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Sample records for anterior cranial base

  1. Use of a Galeopericranial Flap for the Reconstruction of Anterior Cranial Base Defects

    OpenAIRE

    Chia-Hsiang Fu; Sheng-Po Hao; Yung-Shin Hsu

    2005-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the efficacy of using a galeopericranial flap for reconstruction ofanterior cranial base defects.Methods: In Linkou Chang Gung Memorial Hospital from February 1994 to November2003, 25 patients who had tumors of the skull base underwent craniofacialresection, and a galeopericranial flap was used to reconstruct the anterior cranialbase defect. The galeopericranial flap was developed and based on atleast 1 side of the supraorbital or supratrochlear arteries and veins; it ...

  2. Lengths of the maxillary central incisor, the nasal bone, and the anterior cranial base in different skeletal malocclusions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arntsen, Torill; Kjær, Inger; Sonnesen, Liselotte

    malocclusions. Material and methods . Incisor, nasal, and cranial base lengths were measured on lateral radiographs of adult patients with skeletal malocclusions, including open bite (n=35), mandibular overjet (n=56), maxillary overjet (n=31), deep bite (n=19), and compared with those of a control group with...... skeletal malocclusions. The present findings, especially the deviation of the upper incisor length in different skeletal malocclusions, are considered relevant for orthodontic diagnostics and treatment....

  3. Comparative analysis of the anterior and posterior length and deflection angle of the cranial base, in individuals with facial Pattern I, II and III

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    Guilherme Thiesen

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the variations in the anterior cranial base (S-N, posterior cranial base (S-Ba and deflection of the cranial base (SNBa among three different facial patterns (Pattern I, II and III. METHOD: A sample of 60 lateral cephalometric radiographs of Brazilian Caucasian patients, both genders, between 8 and 17 years of age was selected. The sample was divided into 3 groups (Pattern I, II and III of 20 individuals each. The inclusion criteria for each group were the ANB angle, Wits appraisal and the facial profile angle (G'.Sn.Pg'. To compare the mean values obtained from (SNBa, S-N, S-Ba each group measures, the ANOVA test and Scheffé's Post-Hoc test were applied. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: There was no statistically significant difference for the deflection angle of the cranial base among the different facial patterns (Patterns I, II and III. There was no significant difference for the measures of the anterior and posterior cranial base between the facial Patterns I and II. The mean values for S-Ba were lower in facial Pattern III with statistically significant difference. The mean values of S-N in the facial Pattern III were also reduced, but without showing statistically significant difference. This trend of lower values in the cranial base measurements would explain the maxillary deficiency and/or mandibular prognathism features that characterize the facial Pattern III.OBJETIVO: o presente estudo avaliou as variações da base craniana anterior (S-N, base craniana posterior (S-Ba, e ângulo de deflexão da base do crânio (SNBa entre três diferentes padrões faciais (Padrão I, II e III. MÉTODOS: selecionou-se uma amostra de 60 telerradiografias em norma lateral de pacientes brasileiros leucodermas, de ambos os sexos, com idades entre 8 anos e 17 anos. A amostra foi dividida em três grupos (Padrão I, II e III, sendo cada grupo constituído de 20 indivíduos. Os critérios de seleção dos indivíduos para cada grupo

  4. Neurosurgical considerations of cranial base surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenelle, A G; Shaffrey, M E; Delashaw, J B; Jane, J A

    1995-07-01

    Several craniotomies have been described that allow extensive resection of skull base and low-lying cranial tumors that involve little disfigurement to the patient. These techniques should be of interest to plastic surgeons as they may be called to aid their neurosurgical colleagues in exposing the anterior skull base or may be involved in combined procedures to resect tumors that involve the face, sinuses, orbit, and cranial vault. PMID:7554716

  5. Endovascular treatment of anterior cranial fossa dural arteriovenous fistula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv, Xianli; Li, Youxiang; Wu, Zhongxue [Beijing Neurosurgical Institute, Beijing (China); Capital Medical University, Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Beijing (China)

    2008-05-15

    We describe the technique and results of the endovascular treatment of anterior cranial fossa dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVF) in four symptomatic patients. Catheterization was via the superior sagittal sinus in two patients and via the ophthalmic artery in two patients. Embolization was performed using detachable platinum coils in the former two patients and a liquid embolic system (Onyx-18, MTI) in the latter. We were able to reach the fistula site and to embolize the arteriovenous shunting zone in all of the patients. The final angiogram showed complete occlusion of the DAVFs, and all patients recovered completely. No complications related to either approach were observed. Endovascular treatment of anterior cranial fossa DAVFs is feasible by either transvenous or transarterial access. (orig.)

  6. Endovascular treatment of anterior cranial fossa dural arteriovenous fistula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the technique and results of the endovascular treatment of anterior cranial fossa dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVF) in four symptomatic patients. Catheterization was via the superior sagittal sinus in two patients and via the ophthalmic artery in two patients. Embolization was performed using detachable platinum coils in the former two patients and a liquid embolic system (Onyx-18, MTI) in the latter. We were able to reach the fistula site and to embolize the arteriovenous shunting zone in all of the patients. The final angiogram showed complete occlusion of the DAVFs, and all patients recovered completely. No complications related to either approach were observed. Endovascular treatment of anterior cranial fossa DAVFs is feasible by either transvenous or transarterial access. (orig.)

  7. Minimally Invasive Supraorbital Key-hole Approach for the Treatment of Anterior Cranial Fossa Meningiomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    IACOANGELI, Maurizio; NOCCHI, Niccolò; NASI, Davide; DI RIENZO, Alessandro; DOBRAN, Mauro; GLADI, Maurizio; COLASANTI, Roberto; ALVARO, Lorenzo; POLONARA, Gabriele; SCERRATI, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    The most important target of minimally invasive surgery is to obtain the best therapeutic effect with the least iatrogenic injury. In this background, a pivotal role in contemporary neurosurgery is played by the supraorbital key-hole approach proposed by Perneczky for anterior cranial base surgery. In this article, it is presented as a possible valid alternative to the traditional craniotomies in anterior cranial fossa meningiomas removal. From January 2008 to January 2012 at our department 56 patients underwent anterior cranial base meningiomas removal. Thirty-three patients were submitted to traditional approaches while 23 to supraorbital key-hole technique. A clinical and neuroradiological pre- and postoperative evaluation were performed, with attention to eventual complications, length of surgical procedure, and hospitalization. Compared to traditional approaches the supraorbital key-hole approach was associated neither to a greater range of postoperative complications nor to a longer surgical procedure and hospitalization while permitting the same lesion control. With this technique, minimization of brain exposition and manipulation with reduction of unwanted iatrogenic injuries, neurovascular structures preservation, and a better aesthetic result are possible. The supraorbital key-hole approach according to Perneckzy could represent a valid alternative to traditional approaches in anterior cranial base meningiomas surgery. PMID:26804334

  8. Surgical technique for repair of complex anterior skull base defects

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    Kevin Reinard

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The layered reconstruction of large anterior cranial fossa defects resulted in postoperative CSF leak in only 5% of the patients and represents a simple and effective closure option for skull base surgeons.

  9. The extended pterional approach allows excellent results for removal of anterior cranial fossa meningiomas

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    Jose Carlos Lynch

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To describe a unique operative strategy, instead the classical pterional approach, and to analyses it safety and effectiveness for removal of anterior cranial fossa meningiomas. Method We identify 38 patients with tuberculum sellae and olphactory groove meningiomas operated between 1986 and 2013. Medical charts, operative reports, imaging studies and clinical follow-up evaluations were reviewed and analyzed retrospectively. The pterional craniotomy is extended toward the frontal bone providing access through the subfrontal route, besides the usual anterolateral view provided by the classical pterional approach. Results Surgical mortality occurred in one patient (2.6%. Gross total resection was achieved in 27 patients (86.8%. Median time of follow-up was 69.4 months. Conclusion The extended pterional approach allows excellent results. Total removal of meningiomas of the anterior cranial fossa was obtained in 86.8 % of patients, with low morbidity and mortality.

  10. Lateral angle and cranial base sexual dimorphism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duquesnel Mana, Mathilde; Adalian, Pascal; Lynnerup, Niels

    2016-01-01

    , to examine sexual dimorphism in the relationship between the lateral angle and cranial base shape. The lateral angle method was tested using a forensic sample of 102 CT scans of the head with known sex. We measured the angle using two methods: measurements directly on the CT slide, the method usually...... major overlap between the female and male shapes. In the light of the observed results, we confirm the lack of accuracy reported when using the lateral angle method to determine sex and we hypothesise that it may be explained by a lack of sexual dimorphism of the cranial base in terms of shape....

  11. Intraoperative Monitoring of Motor Cranial Nerves in Skull Base Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Maurer, Jan; Pelster, H.; Amedee, Ronald G.; Mann, Wolf J.

    1995-01-01

    Intraoperative monitoring of cranial nerves is performed to minimize postoperative cranial nerve dysfunction. We performed electrophysiologic monitoring of motor cranial nerves with a NIM 2 unit from Xomed Treace and a patient multiplexer developed in our clinic. This multiplexer allows simultaneous monitoring of four cranial nerves and is additionally equipped with a bipolar stimulation mode. This intraoperative monitoring was used during 102 skull base operations. Of these, 44 operations we...

  12. Extranodal Rosai-Dorfman Disease involving paranasal sinuses, orbits and anterior cranial fossa

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    Sudhansu Sekhar Mishra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rosai-Dorfman disease (RDD is a rare, benign pseudolymphatous condition, predominantly involving lymph nodes. Although several cases of extra-nodal involvement have been reported previously, central nervous system involvement, particularly in the absence of nodal disease is extremely rare. Extranodal large RDD presenting as a single lesion involving sino-orbital and anterior cranial fossa has rarely been described previously. We report a case of incisional biopsy proved RDD in a young lady who presented with nasal obstruction and subsequent proptosis with visual diminution. Radiography of head and paranasal sinus demonstrated a strongly enhanced, diffuse polypoid lesion filling the bilateral sinonasal cavity and orbit with extension to the anterior cranial fossa by way of splaying the bony foramina. Pre-operative low dose steroid therapy had resulted in decreased size of the mass which facilitate gross-total surgical resection. RDD was confirmed by histopathology (emperipolesis and immuno-histochemistry (S-100 positivity. The follow-up computed tomography 3 months later showed minimal tumor residue in left parasellar region with complete sinonasal decompression.

  13. Spontaneous resolution of a flow-related ophthalmic-segment aneurysm after treatment of anterior cranial fossa dural arteriovenous fistula

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    Kevin Reinard

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The natural history of proximal, feeding-artery aneurysms after successful obliteration of high-grade, anterior cranial fossa dural arteriovenous fistulas (dAVFs has not been well documented. Case Description: A 52-year-old Caucasian male presented with an unruptured anterior cranial fossa (dAVF and an associated aneurysm. Cerebral angiography revealed a large, contralateral, carotid-ophthalmic segment aneurysm, enlarged feeding ophthalmic arteries, as well as cortical venous drainage. Successful surgical obliteration of the dAVF was undertaken to eliminate the risk of hemorrhage. Conclusion: The carotid-ophthalmic aneurysm regressed significantly after surgical obliteration of the dAVF and a follow-up, planned coiling procedure to address the carotid-ophthalmic aneurysm was abandoned. This represents the first reported case of a near complete, spontaneous resolution of an unruptured carotid-ophthalmic aneurysm associated with a high-grade anterior cranial fossa dAVF.

  14. Analysis on the diagnosis and treatment of the fractures of the anterior cranial fossa in the 26 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the diagnosis and treatment of anterior cranial fossa fracture. Methods: The medical records of 26 patients treated were reviewed retrospectively. All cases were examined by CT imaging scans preoperatively. The total cases were divided into three types. The types of operation such as acute decompress, skull base reconstruction, dural repairement, optical canaldompress were performed. Results: Only one case developed postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leakage in the chronic period. After using repair operation, the patient recovered. Three cases visual impairement did not recover postoperativaly. Two patients died. Conclusion: Verification of the fracture types and initial necerological systemic impairments by means of CT scanning is important preoperatively. It is very effective to prevent cerebrospinal fluid leakage if the dura is repaired and the skull base recons-tructed in primury operation

  15. Retrospective analysis of the use of amniotic membranes and xenografts in spinal surgery and anterior cranial fossa operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the suitability of amniotic membrane an bovine bone xenografts for the use in spinal surgery and anterior cranial for a generations. Fifteen patients with anterior cranial fossa defects and spinal bone fractures received bovine bone xenografts and 10 patients with meningomyeloceles received amniotic membranes (produced by the Malaysian National Tissue Bank) were analysed retrospectively. Clinical criterias like fever, signs of inflammation, breakdown of graft implant, non specific reaction to the nervous tissue were analysed haematological and radiologically. All patients who received the bovine grafts and amniotic membranes did not show any evidence of inflammation or fever. There were no graft implant breakdowns. There was no radiological or clinical evidence of specific or non specific reaction to the nervous tissue after 12-36 months followup Amniotic membranes and bovine xenografts may be used in the healing and reconstruction of spinal and cranial defects. Despite no evidence of rejection and infection after 36 months, a long term followup is still needed

  16. The cranial base of Australopithecus afarensis: new insights from the female skull

    OpenAIRE

    Kimbel, William H.; Rak, Yoel

    2010-01-01

    Cranial base morphology differs among hominoids in ways that are usually attributed to some combination of an enlarged brain, retracted face and upright locomotion in humans. The human foramen magnum is anteriorly inclined and, with the occipital condyles, is forwardly located on a broad, short and flexed basicranium; the petrous elements are coronally rotated; the glenoid region is topographically complex; the nuchal lines are low; and the nuchal plane is horizontal. Australopithecus afarens...

  17. The cranial base of Australopithecus afarensis: new insights from the female skull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimbel, William H; Rak, Yoel

    2010-10-27

    Cranial base morphology differs among hominoids in ways that are usually attributed to some combination of an enlarged brain, retracted face and upright locomotion in humans. The human foramen magnum is anteriorly inclined and, with the occipital condyles, is forwardly located on a broad, short and flexed basicranium; the petrous elements are coronally rotated; the glenoid region is topographically complex; the nuchal lines are low; and the nuchal plane is horizontal. Australopithecus afarensis (3.7-3.0 Ma) is the earliest known species of the australopith grade in which the adult cranial base can be assessed comprehensively. This region of the adult skull was known from fragments in the 1970s, but renewed fieldwork beginning in the 1990s at the Hadar site, Ethiopia (3.4-3.0 Ma), recovered two nearly complete crania and major portions of a third, each associated with a mandible. These new specimens confirm that in small-brained, bipedal Australopithecus the foramen magnum and occipital condyles were anteriorly sited, as in humans, but without the foramen's forward inclination. In the large male A.L. 444-2 this is associated with a short basal axis, a bilateral expansion of the base, and an inferiorly rotated, flexed occipital squama--all derived characters shared by later australopiths and humans. However, in A.L. 822-1 (a female) a more primitive morphology is present: although the foramen and condyles reside anteriorly on a short base, the nuchal lines are very high, the nuchal plane is very steep, and the base is as relatively narrow centrally. A.L. 822-1 illuminates fragmentary specimens in the 1970s Hadar collection that hint at aspects of this primitive suite, suggesting that it is a common pattern in the A. afarensis hypodigm. We explore the implications of these specimens for sexual dimorphism and evolutionary scenarios of functional integration in the hominin cranial base. PMID:20855310

  18. Evaluation of the relation between adenoids hypertrophy and cranial base angles

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    Dalili Z

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Adenoids are normally large in children and their size starts to reduce during adolescence. Hypertrophic adenoids could be associated with allergic reactions. Enlarged adenoids result in nasal breathing difficulties and the child is forced to switch to mouth breathing. Airway obstruction causes postural alterations of jaw, tongue and head, and due to persistent obstruction, patient’s appearance changes to adenoid face. Evaluation of nasopharyngeal space in lateral cephalometic view is a simple and repeatable method for determination of the size and shape of adenoids and nasopharyngeal space which can provide a simple measurement of nasopharyngeal obstruction. The roof of nasopharyngeal space is covered by the sphenoid bone. Thus changes of nasorespiratory resistance by hypertrophic adenoids may affect the cranial base angles. In this study, the relationship between adenoid hypertrophy and cranial base angles was investigated. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive-analytic study, lateral cephalometric views of 7 to 14 y/o patients from the files of orthodontic centers in Rasht city were selected. The radiographs with proper resolution were separated for this research. Adenoid to nasorespiratory ratio (A/N Ratio was determined by Fujioka method and categorized in three groups: A (A/N 0.8, B (0.5cranial base angle (NSAr on lat cephalometric view was measured and categorized to normal, wide and narrow. Gonial angle, sum of articular, gonial & saddle angle, posterior to anterior facial height ratio and facial skeleton classification were also determined. Data were analyzed using Chi-Square and Pearson tests with p<0.05 as the limit of significance. Resuts: After evaluation of 206 lateral cephalometric views, adenoid hypertrophy (A and B groups was observed in 66% of cases whereas 34% were normal. The frequency of narrow, normal and wide cranial base angles

  19. Orbito-Rhino-Antro Access Osteotomy For Anterior Skull Base Lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Sreeramaneni, Sumanth K; Kattimani, Vivekanand. S

    2014-01-01

    Even with advent of endoscopic assisted surgeries the access osteotomy plays an important role for accessing the pathological lesions of anterior skull base since beginning of the era of surgery. This report introduces the orbito–rhino–antral access osteotomy for the removal of juvenile nasio angio fiboma extending in to the cranial base. This osteotomy provides good access to the lesion with lesser morbidity and without hampering the occlusion as in lefort osteotomies. It is safe, easy and f...

  20. Recurring fibrous dysplasia of anthro maxillary with cranial base invasion

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    Sousa, Kátia Maria Marabuco de

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Fibrous dysplasia is an osseous lesion with an unknown etiology. It is characterized by the osseous maturation insufficiency. It may affect any bone, but the affection of craniofacial bones is the most critical for otorhinolaryngology. Maxilla is the most affected facial bone and the orbitary invasion is an uncommon event. The symptoms are unspecific and for its low suspicion and uncommonness, the diagnosis is generally late. The monostotic form presents a slow growth and asymptomatic course and needs to be followed up. The polyostotic type has a progressive behavior and is associated to recurrence and complications. Objective: To present two cases of patients with fibrous dysplasia diagnosis and describe the clinical presentation, radiological findings and the treatment of this pathology. Cases Report: Two cases of fibrous dysplasia are reported, which initially presented unspecific symptomatology, but with characteristic radiologic signs. They were submitted to surgical treatment for resection of the lesions and evolved with frequent recurrences with extensive affection of the facial sinuses, one patient had cranial base invasion and frontal craniotomy was needed for tumoral excision. Final Comments: Fibrous dysplasia is an uncommon osteopathy. The tomography is the choice method for characterization of the tumoral expansion, and helps in the surgical planning. The surgical strategy is indicated for symptomatic lesions, functions alterations or anatomic disorders. This article describes two uncommon manifestations of recurrent fibrous dysplasia with an extensive affection of anthro maxillary, ethmoidal and sphenoid sinuses, in addition to orbitary and cranial base invasion.

  1. A checklist for endonasal transsphenoidal anterior skull base surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laws, Edward R; Wong, Judith M; Smith, Timothy R; de Los Reyes, Kenneth; Aglio, Linda S; Thorne, Alison J; Cote, David J; Esposito, Felice; Cappabianca, Paolo; Gawande, Atul

    2016-06-01

    OBJECT Approximately 250 million surgical procedures are performed annually worldwide, and data suggest that major complications occur in 3%-17% of them. Many of these complications can be classified as avoidable, and previous studies have demonstrated that preoperative checklists improve operating room teamwork and decrease complication rates. Although the authors' institution has instituted a general preoperative "time-out" designed to streamline communication, flatten vertical authority gradients, and decrease procedural errors, there is no specific checklist for transnasal transsphenoidal anterior skull base surgery, with or without endoscopy. Such minimally invasive cranial surgery uses a completely different conceptual approach, set-up, instrumentation, and operative procedure. Therefore, it can be associated with different types of complications as compared with open cranial surgery. The authors hypothesized that a detailed, procedure-specific, preoperative checklist would be useful to reduce errors, improve outcomes, decrease delays, and maximize both teambuilding and operational efficiency. Thus, the object of this study was to develop such a checklist for endonasal transsphenoidal anterior skull base surgery. METHODS An expert panel was convened that consisted of all members of the typical surgical team for transsphenoidal endoscopic cases: neurosurgeons, anesthesiologists, circulating nurses, scrub technicians, surgical operations managers, and technical assistants. Beginning with a general checklist, procedure-specific items were added and categorized into 4 pauses: Anesthesia Pause, Surgical Pause, Equipment Pause, and Closure Pause. RESULTS The final endonasal transsphenoidal anterior skull base surgery checklist is composed of the following 4 pauses. The Anesthesia Pause consists of patient identification, diagnosis, pertinent laboratory studies, medications, surgical preparation, patient positioning, intravenous/arterial access, fluid management

  2. Cervical vertebrae, cranial base, and mandibular retrognathia in human triploid fetuses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnesen, Liselotte; Nolting, Dorrit; Engel, Ulla;

    2009-01-01

    On profile radiographs of adults, an association between fusions of cervical vertebrae, deviations in the cranial base and mandibular retrognathia has been documented radiographically. An elaboration of this association on a histological level is needed. In human triploid fetuses severe mandibular...... retrognathia and deviations in the cranial base have previously been described radiographically (without cephalometry) and cervical column fusions radiographically as well as histologically. Therefore, triploid fetuses were chosen to elucidate the cranial base cephalomterically and histologically. In the...... uppermost vertebra in the body axis. As the notochord connects the cervical column and the cranial base in early prenatal life, molecular signaling from the notochord may in future studies support the notochord as the developmental link between abnormal development in the spine and the cranial base....

  3. CT and MRI of the skull base, including the cranial nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some considerations about nuclear magnetic resonance and computerized tomography, essential for examining skull base lesions are treated here, including the cranial nerves. Neoplasms such as meningiomas, adenomas, chordomas, chondrosarcomas and others tumors are also cited, mentioning some commentaries. (author)

  4. Changes in Cranial Base Morphology in Class I and Class II Division 1 Malocclusions

    OpenAIRE

    Agarwal, Anirudh; Pandey, Harsh; Bajaj, Kamal; Pandey, Lavesh

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The cranial base plays a key role in craniofacial growth; it helps to integrate spatially and functionally different patterns of growth in various adjoining regions of the skull such as components of the brain, the nasal and oral cavity and the pharynx. The aim of this study was to evaluate the difference in cranial base flexure between skeletal and dental Class I and Class II division 1.

  5. Virtual temporal bone: an interactive 3-dimensional learning aid for cranial base surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Kockro, R A; Hwang, P Y

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We have developed an interactive virtual model of the temporal bone for the training and teaching of cranial base surgery. METHODS: The virtual model was based on the tomographic data of the Visible Human Project. The male Visible Human's computed tomographic data were volumetrically reconstructed as virtual bone tissue, and the individual photographic slices provided the basis for segmentation of the middle and inner ear structures, cranial nerves, vessels, and brainstem. These st...

  6. Preoperative surgical planning and simulation of complex cranial base tumors in virtual reality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YI Zhi-qiang; LI Liang; MO Da-peng; ZHANG Jia-yong; ZHANG Yang; BAO Sheng-de

    2008-01-01

    @@ The extremely complex anatomic relationships among bone,tumor,blood vessels and cranial nerves remains a big challenge for cranial base tumor surgery.Therefore.a good understanding of the patient specific anatomy and a preoperative planning are helpful and crocial for the neurosurgeons.Three dimensional (3-D) visualization of various imaging techniques have been widely explored to enhance the comprehension of volumetric data for surgical planning.1 We used the Destroscope Virtual Reality (VR) System (Singapore,Volume Interaction Pte Ltd,software:RadioDexterTM 1.0) to optimize preoperative plan in the complex cranial base tumors.This system uses patient-specific,coregistered,fused radiology data sets that may be viewed stereoscopically and can be manipulated in a virtual reality environment.This article describes our experience with the Destroscope VR system in preoperative surgical planning and simulation for 5 patients with complex cranial base tumors and evaluates the clinical usefulness of this system.

  7. Anatomy of the skull base and the cranial nerves in slice imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are suitable methods for examination of the skull base. Whereas CT is used to evaluate mainly bone destruction e.g. for planning surgical therapy, MRI is used to show pathologies in the soft tissue and bone invasion. High resolution and thin slice thickness are indispensible for both modalities of skull base imaging. Detailed anatomical knowledge is necessary even for correct planning of the examination procedures. This knowledge is a requirement to be able to recognize and interpret pathologies. MRI is the method of choice for examining the cranial nerves. The total path of a cranial nerve can be visualized by choosing different sequences taking into account the tissue surrounding this cranial nerve. This article summarizes examination methods of the skull base in CT and MRI, gives a detailed description of the anatomy and illustrates it with image examples. (orig.)

  8. Direct fabrication through electron beam melting technology of custom cranial implants designed in a PHANToM-based haptic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Repairing critical human skull injuries requires the production and use of customized cranial implants and involves the integration of computer aided design and manufacturing (CAD and CAM). The main causes for large cranial defects are trauma, cranial tumors, infected craniotomy bone flaps and external neurosurgical decompression. The success of reconstructive cranial surgery depends upon: the preoperative evaluation of the defect, the design and manufacturing of the implant, and the skill of the operating surgeon. Cranial implant design is usually carried out manually using CAD although this process is very time-consuming and the quality of the end product depends wholly upon the skill of the operator. This paper presents an alternative automated method for the design of custom-made cranial plates in a PHANToM®-based haptic environment, and their direct fabrication in biocompatible metal using electron beam melting (EBM) technology.

  9. Skull Base Meningiomas and Cranial Nerves Contrast Using Sodium Fluorescein: A New Application of an Old Tool

    OpenAIRE

    da Silva, Carlos Eduardo; da Silva, Vinicius Duval; da Silva, Jefferson Luis Braga

    2014-01-01

    Objective The identification of cranial nerves is one of the most challenging goals in the dissection of skull base meningiomas. The authors present an application of sodium fluorescein (SF) in skull base meningiomas with the purpose of improving the identification of cranial nerves.

  10. Cranial nerve palsies in metastatic prostate cancer--results of base of skull radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied the rate of response to palliative external beam radiation therapy (20 Gy/5 or 30 Gy/10 fractions) to the base of skull in 32 prostate cancer patients with cranial nerve dysfunction. Sixteen patients (50%; 95% CI, 34-66%) had a useful response to therapy. The median survival post-therapy was 3 months

  11. The cranial base and calvaria index methods applied to Australian aborigine skulls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göthlin, J H; Gadeholt, G

    1988-11-01

    Cranial base and calvaria indices were calculated on lateral skull radiographs of Australian aborigines, and compared with the values of one mummy, 4 prehistoric (fossil), and modern Scandinavian skulls. The aborigines had thicker calvarian bone and a lower forehead profile than the mummy and the modern skulls, but a higher frontal calvarium than the fossils. The aborigines may developmentally represent a link between prehistoric and modern man (including the mummy). PMID:3234401

  12. Minimally invasive surgery of the anterior skull base: transorbital approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassner, Holger G.; Schwan, Franziska; Schebesch, Karl-Michael

    2016-01-01

    Minimally invasive approaches are becoming increasingly popular to access the anterior skull base. With interdisciplinary cooperation, in particular endonasal endoscopic approaches have seen an impressive expansion of indications over the past decades. The more recently described transorbital approaches represent minimally invasive alternatives with a differing spectrum of access corridors. The purpose of the present paper is to discuss transorbital approaches to the anterior skull base in the light of the current literature. The transorbital approaches allow excellent exposure of areas that are difficult to reach like the anterior and posterior wall of the frontal sinus; working angles may be more favorable and the paranasal sinus system can be preserved while exposing the skull base. Because of their minimal morbidity and the cosmetically excellent results, the transorbital approaches represent an important addition to established endonasal endoscopic and open approaches to the anterior skull base. Their execution requires an interdisciplinary team approach. PMID:27453759

  13. Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis of the Cranial Base: Is Low-Dose Radiotherapy Effective?

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    Andreas Meyer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH is a rare disease of unknown etiology with different clinical features. A standardised treatment has not been established so far. Case Report. We report a case of a 28-year-old patient who initially presented with hypesthesia of the fifth cranial nerve and pain of the left ear. Diagnosis showed a tumour localised in the cranial base with a maximum diameter of 4.1 cm. The diagnosis of LCH was confirmed histologically by biopsy. Diagnostic workup verified the cranial lesion as the sole manifestation of LCH. A total dose of 9 Gy (single dose 1.8 Gy was delivered. The symptoms dissolved completely within 6 months after radiation; repeated CT and MRI scans revealed a reduction in size of the lesion and a remineralisation of the bone. After a followup of 13 years the patient remains free of symptoms without relapse or any side effects from therapy. Discussion. Due to the indolent course of the disease with a high rate of spontaneous remissions the choice of treatment strongly depends on the individual clinical situation. In the presented case low-dose radiotherapy was sufficient to obtain long-term local control in a region with critical structures and tissues.

  14. Radiographic cephalometry assessment of the linear and angular parameters on cranial base in children with skeletal class III

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    Stojanović Zdenka M.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. In malocclusion of skeletal class III, mandible is located in front of maxilla in sagital plain, which is manifested by a lower value of the sagital inter-jaw angle than in skeletal class I, where the jaw sagital relation is normal. Apart from the deformities on mandible and/or maxilla, in skeletal class III deformities are also frequent on the cranial base. The aim of this research was to find the differences in the parameter values on the cranial base among the children with skeletal class III and the children with skeletal class I in the period of mixed dentition. Methods. After clinical examination and orthopan-tomography, profile radiography of the head was analyzed in 60 examinees, aged from 6−12 years. The examinees were divided into two groups: group 1 - the children with skeletal class III; group 2 - the children with skeletal class I. Both linear and angular parameters on the cranial base were measured, as well as the angles of maxillary and mandible prognatism and the angle of sagital inter-jaw relation. The level of difference in the parameter values between the groups was estimated and the degree of correlation of the main angle of the cranial base with the angles of sagital position of the jaws in each of the two groups was established. Results. A significant difference between the groups was found only in the average values of the angles of maxillary prognatism and sagital interjaw relation. In the group 1, the main angle of the cranial base was in a significant correlation with the angles of sagital positions of the jaws, while in the group 2, such significance was not found. Conclusion. There were no significant differences in the parameter values on the cranial base between the groups. There was a significant correlation of the main angle of the cranial base with the angles of sagital position of the jaws in the group 1 only. .

  15. Imaging of cranial nerves with three-dimensional high resolution diffusion-weighted MR sequence based on SSFP technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To depict the normal anatomy of cranial nerves in detail and define the exact relationships between cranial nerves and adjacent structures with three-dimensional high resolution diffusion-weighted MR sequence based on SSFP technique (3D DW-SSFP). Methods: 3D DW- SSFP sequence was performed and axial images were obtained in 12 healthy volunteers Post-processing techniques were used to generate images of cranial nerves, and the images acquired were compared with anatomical sections and diagrams of textbook. Results: In all subjects, 3D DW-SSFP sequence could produce homogeneous images and high contrast between the cranial nerves and other solid structures. The intracranial portions of all cranial nerves except olfactory nerve were identified; the extracranial portions of nerve Ⅱ-Ⅻ were identified in all subjects bilaterally. Conclusion: The 3D DW-SSFP sequence can characterize the normal MR appearance of cranial nerves and its branches and the ability to define the nerves may provide greater sensitivity and specificity in detecting abnormalities of craniofacial structure. (authors)

  16. A unified model for the speed of sound in cranial bone based on genetic algorithm optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The density and structure of bone is highly heterogeneous, causing wide variations in the reported speed of sound for ultrasound propagation. Current research on the propagation of high intensity focused ultrasound through an intact human skull for non-invasive therapeutic action on brain tissue requires a detailed model for the acoustic velocity in cranial bone. Such models have been difficult to derive empirically due to the aforementioned heterogeneity of bone itself. We propose a single unified model for the speed of sound in cranial bone based upon the apparent density of bone by CT scan. This model is based upon the coupling of empirical measurement, theoretical acoustic simulation and genetic algorithm optimization. The phase distortion caused by the presence of skull in an acoustic path is empirically measured. The ability of a theoretical acoustic simulation coupled with a particular speed-of-sound model to predict this phase distortion is compared against the empirical data, thus providing the fitness function needed to perform genetic algorithm optimization. By performing genetic algorithm optimization over an initial population of candidate speed-of-sound models, an ultimate single unified model for the speed of sound in both the cortical and trabecular regions of cranial bone is produced. The final model produced by genetic algorithm optimization has a nonlinear dependency of speed of sound upon local bone density. This model is shown by statistical significance to be a suitable model of the speed of sound in bone. Furthermore, using a skull that was not part of the optimization process, this model is also tested against a published homogeneous speed-of-sound model and shown to return an improved prediction of transcranial ultrasound propagation

  17. Fractionated external beam radiotherapy of skull base metastases with cranial nerve involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skull base metastases frequently appear in a late stage of various tumor entities and cause pain and neurological disorders which strongly impair patient quality of life. This study retrospectively analyzed fractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) as a palliative treatment approach with special respect to neurological outcome, feasibility and acute toxicity. A total of 30 patients with skull base metastases and cranial nerve disorders underwent EBRT with a mean total dose of 31.6 Gy. Neurological status was assessed before radiotherapy, during radiotherapy and 2 weeks afterwards categorizing orbital, parasellar, middle fossa, jugular foramen and occipital condyle involvement and associated clinical syndromes. Neurological outcome was scored as persistence of symptoms, partial response, good response and complete remission. Treatment-related toxicity and overall survival were assessed. Before EBRT 37 skull base involvement syndromes were determined with 4 patients showing more than 1 syndrome. Of the patients 81.1 % responded to radiotherapy with 10.8 % in complete remission, 48.6 % with good response and 21.6 % with partial response. Grade 1 toxicity of the skin occurred in two patients and grade 1 hematological toxicity in 1 patient under concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Median overall survival was 3.9 months with a median follow-up of 45 months. The use of EBRT for skull base metastases with symptomatic involvement of cranial nerves is marked by good therapeutic success in terms of neurological outcome, high feasibility and low toxicity rates. These findings underline EBRT as the standard therapeutic approach in the palliative setting. (orig.)

  18. Fractionated external beam radiotherapy of skull base metastases with cranial nerve involvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Droege, L.H.; Hinsche, T.; Hess, C.F.; Wolff, H.A. [University Hospital of Goettingen, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Goettingen (Germany); Canis, M. [University of Goettingen, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Goettingen (Germany); Alt-Epping, B. [University of Goettingen, Department of Palliative Medicine, Goettingen (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    Skull base metastases frequently appear in a late stage of various tumor entities and cause pain and neurological disorders which strongly impair patient quality of life. This study retrospectively analyzed fractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) as a palliative treatment approach with special respect to neurological outcome, feasibility and acute toxicity. A total of 30 patients with skull base metastases and cranial nerve disorders underwent EBRT with a mean total dose of 31.6 Gy. Neurological status was assessed before radiotherapy, during radiotherapy and 2 weeks afterwards categorizing orbital, parasellar, middle fossa, jugular foramen and occipital condyle involvement and associated clinical syndromes. Neurological outcome was scored as persistence of symptoms, partial response, good response and complete remission. Treatment-related toxicity and overall survival were assessed. Before EBRT 37 skull base involvement syndromes were determined with 4 patients showing more than 1 syndrome. Of the patients 81.1 % responded to radiotherapy with 10.8 % in complete remission, 48.6 % with good response and 21.6 % with partial response. Grade 1 toxicity of the skin occurred in two patients and grade 1 hematological toxicity in 1 patient under concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Median overall survival was 3.9 months with a median follow-up of 45 months. The use of EBRT for skull base metastases with symptomatic involvement of cranial nerves is marked by good therapeutic success in terms of neurological outcome, high feasibility and low toxicity rates. These findings underline EBRT as the standard therapeutic approach in the palliative setting. (orig.)

  19. MEMO1 drives cranial endochondral ossification and palatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Otterloo, Eric; Feng, Weiguo; Jones, Kenneth L; Hynes, Nancy E; Clouthier, David E; Niswander, Lee; Williams, Trevor

    2016-07-15

    The cranial base is a component of the neurocranium and has a central role in the structural integration of the face, brain and vertebral column. Consequently, alteration in the shape of the human cranial base has been intimately linked with primate evolution and defective development is associated with numerous human facial abnormalities. Here we describe a novel recessive mutant mouse strain that presented with a domed head and fully penetrant cleft secondary palate coupled with defects in the formation of the underlying cranial base. Mapping and non-complementation studies revealed a specific mutation in Memo1 - a gene originally associated with cell migration. Expression analysis of Memo1 identified robust expression in the perichondrium and periosteum of the developing cranial base, but only modest expression in the palatal shelves. Fittingly, although the palatal shelves failed to elevate in Memo1 mutants, expression changes were modest within the shelves themselves. In contrast, the cranial base, which forms via endochondral ossification had major reductions in the expression of genes responsible for bone formation, notably matrix metalloproteinases and markers of the osteoblast lineage, mirrored by an increase in markers of cartilage and extracellular matrix development. Concomitant with these changes, mutant cranial bases showed an increased zone of hypertrophic chondrocytes accompanied by a reduction in both vascular invasion and mineralization. Finally, neural crest cell-specific deletion of Memo1 caused a failure of anterior cranial base ossification indicating a cell autonomous role for MEMO1 in the development of these neural crest cell derived structures. However, palate formation was largely normal in these conditional mutants, suggesting a non-autonomous role for MEMO1 in palatal closure. Overall, these findings assign a new function to MEMO1 in driving endochondral ossification in the cranium, and also link abnormal development of the cranial base

  20. Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy Sections What Is Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy? ... Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy Treatment What Is Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy? Aug. 02, 2012 Microvascular cranial nerve palsy ( ...

  1. Normal cranial CT anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The human brain consists of well-known anatomical components. Some parts of these components have been shown to be concerned with certain functions. A complete cranial CT examination consists of a series of several slices obtained in a sequence usually from the base to the vertex of the cranial vault, in the axial mode. The ultimate goal of this chapter is to pinpoint those slices that depict a given anatomical structure or several structures that deal with a given function. To achieve this goal, the discussion of CT cranial anatomy is presented in three sections

  2. Value of Free-Run Electromyographic Monitoring of Lower Cranial Nerves in Endoscopic Endonasal Approach to Skull Base Surgeries

    OpenAIRE

    Thirumala, Parthasarathy D.; Mohanraj, Santhosh Kumar; Habeych, Miguel; Wichman, Kelley; Chang, Yue-Fang; Gardner, Paul; Snyderman, Carl; Crammond, Donald J.; Balzer, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Objective The main objective of this study was to evaluate the value of free-run electromyography (f-EMG) monitoring of cranial nerves (CNs) VII, IX, X, XI, and XII in skull base surgeries performed using endoscopic endonasal approach (EEA) to reduce iatrogenic CN deficits.

  3. Association between joint hypermobility, scoliosis, and cranial base anomalies in paediatric Osteogenesis imperfecta patients: a retrospective cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Arponen, Heidi; MÀkitie, Outi; Waltimo-Sirén, Janna

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Joint hypermobility is a common clinical characteristic of patients with Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), a disorder with serious comorbidities of scoliosis and cranial base anomalies. This study aimed at evaluating how prevalent joint hypermobility is in paediatric OI patients, and to find out whether it serves as a potential predictive marker of the different spinal complications; scoliosis and craniovertebral anomalie...

  4. Fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy improves cranial neuropathies in patients with skull base meningiomas: a retrospective cohort study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skull base meningiomas commonly present with cranial neuropathies. Fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (FSRT) has been used to treat these tumors with excellent local control, but rates of improvement in cranial neuropathies have not been well defined. We review the experience at Thomas Jefferson University using FSRT in the management of these patients with a focus on symptom outcomes. We identified 225 cases of skull base meningiomas treated with FSRT at Thomas Jefferson University from 1994 through 2009. The target volume was the enhancing tumor, treated to a standard prescription dose of 54 Gy. Symptoms at the time of RT were classified based on the cranial nerve affected. Logistic regression was performed to determine predictors of symptom improvement after FSRT. The median follow-up time was 4.4 years. In 92% of cases, patients were symptomatic at the time of RT; the most common were impaired visual field/acuity (58%) or extraocular movements (34%). After FSRT, durable improvement of at least one symptom occurred in 57% of cases, including 40% of visual acuity/visual field deficits, and 40% of diplopia/ptosis deficits. Of all symptomatic patients, 27% experienced improvement of at least one symptom within 2 months of the end of RT. FSRT is very effective in achieving improvement of cranial neuropathies from skull base meningiomas, particularly visual symptoms. Over half of treated patients experience a durable improvement of at least one symptom, frequently within 2 months from the end of RT

  5. Comparison of closure times for cranial base synchondroses in mesaticephalic, brachycephalic, and Cavalier King Charles Spaniel dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Martin J; Volk, Holger; Klingler, Melanie; Failing, Klaus; Kramer, Martin; Ondreka, Nele

    2013-01-01

    Premature closure of cranial base synchondroses has been proposed as the mechanism for brachycephaly in dogs and caudal occipital malformation syndrome (COMS) in Cavalier King Charles Spaniels. The purpose of this retrospective study was to compare times of closure for cranial base synchondroses in mesaticephalic, brachycephalic, and Cavalier King Charles Spaniel dogs. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging studies were retrieved for client-owned dogs less than 18 months of age. Breed, age, skull conformation, and the open or closed state of cranial base synchondroses were independently recorded by two observers. For dogs with a unanimous observer agreement, regression analysis was used to test effects of age and gender on the open or closed status of synchondroses and differences between groups. A total of 174 dogs were included in MRI interpretations and 165 dogs were included in the regression analysis. Statistically significant differences in closure time of the spheno-occipital synchondrosis were identified between brachycephalic and mesaticephalic dogs (P = 0.016), Cavalier King Charles Spaniels and mesaticephalic dogs (P brachycephalic dogs (P = 0.014). Findings from the current study supported the theory that morphological changes leading to the skull phenotype of the Cavalier King Charles Spaniels could be due to an earlier closure of the spheno-occipital synchondrosis. PMID:23782353

  6. Cranial chordomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Survey radiographs of the skull as well as spot-film radiography and tomography of sella and clivus reveal destructions of bone structures of the base, necrotic tumor calcifications and soft-tissue-dense clouding of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. Angiography reveals reduced vascularization and sometimes a stretched or constricted carotid artery. Cranial CT or NMR are best suited for imaging the tumour's extent and destructive growth. Clinical symptoms and signs are determined by the location and growth direction of the chordomas. The prognosis continues to be determined by their poor treatability. Chordomas hardly respond to chemotherapy; hence, surgery is the method of choice. Palliative radiotherapy may also be chosen as an alternative or additional therapy subsequent to tumour reduction. Modern methods involving megavolt, helium, ion or proton radiation should be preferred both to lower CNS radiation load and to achieve a possibly curative treatment. However, optimistic reports should be taken with some caveat since chordoma recurrences have been described to occur after as much as 25 years. (orig./MG)

  7. Carotid-anterior cerebral artery anastomosis on MR angiography: a university hospital-based study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchino, Akira; Saito, Naoko; Okada, Yoshitaka; Inoue, Kaiji [Saitama Medical University International Medical Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Hidaka, Saitama (Japan)

    2012-01-15

    Rarely in the anterior circulation, an anastomosis of the carotid and anterior cerebral arteries occurs when an anomalous branch arises from the ophthalmic segment of the internal carotid artery and anastomoses with the A1-A2 junction of the anterior communicating artery. Right-side predominance is known. To our knowledge, the incidence of carotid-anterior cerebral artery anastomosis has not been reported, so we researched cases in our institution records to determine incidence and investigated characteristic features of the condition on magnetic resonance (MR) angiography. To isolate such cases, we retrospectively reviewed cranial MR angiographic images of 3,491 consecutive patients in our institution. We found three cases with carotid-anterior cerebral artery anastomosis (two men, one woman), representing an incidence of 0.086%. The anastomosis was on the right in all three cases. A normal A1 segment of the anterior cerebral artery (ACA) was present in two cases but could not be identified in the remaining case on MR angiographic images that included source images. Two of the three patients demonstrated associated arterial variations in their carotid systems. On MR angiography, we observed a 0.086% incidence of carotid-anterior cerebral artery anastomosis in our institution and reaffirmed the right-side predominance of this anomaly. We found a high frequency of other associated arterial variations in the carotid system. (orig.)

  8. Cranial mononeuropathy III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Third cranial nerve palsy; Oculomotor palsy; Pupil-involving third cranial nerve palsy; Mononeuropathy - compression type ... cranial (oculomotor) nerve. This is one of the cranial nerves that control eye movement. Local tumors or swelling ...

  9. Fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery for patients with skull base metastases from systemic cancer involving the anterior visual pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To analyze the tumor control, survival outcomes, and toxicity after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for skull base metastases from systemic cancer involving the anterior visual pathway. We have analyzed 34 patients (23 females and 11 males, median age 59 years) who underwent multi-fraction SRS for a skull base metastasis compressing or in close proximity of optic nerves and chiasm. All metastases were treated with frameless LINAC-based multi-fraction SRS in 5 daily fractions of 5 Gy each. Local control, distant failure, and overall survival were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method calculated from the time of SRS. Prognostic variables were assessed using log-rank and Cox regression analyses. At a median follow-up of 13 months (range, 2–36.5 months), twenty-five patients had died and 9 were alive. The 1-year and 2-year local control rates were 89% and 72%, and respective actuarial survival rates were 63% and 30%. Four patients recurred with a median time to progression of 12 months (range, 6–27 months), and 17 patients had new brain metastases at distant brain sites. The 1-year and 2-year distant failure rates were 50% and 77%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, a Karnofsky performance status (KPS) >70 and the absence of extracranial metastases were prognostic factors associated with lower distant failure rates and longer survival. After multi-fraction SRS, 15 (51%) out of 29 patients had a clinical improvement of their preexisting cranial deficits. No patients developed radiation-induced optic neuropathy during the follow-up. Multi-fraction SRS (5 x 5 Gy) is a safe treatment option associated with good local control and improved cranial nerve symptoms for patients with a skull base metastasis involving the anterior visual pathway

  10. Methods to quantify soft tissue-based cranial growth and treatment outcomes in children: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sander Brons

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Longitudinal assessment of cranial dimensions of growing children provides healthcare professionals with information about normal and deviating growth as well as treatment outcome. OBJECTIVE: To give an overview of soft tissue-based methods for quantitative longitudinal assessment of cranial dimensions in children until age 6 years and to assess the reliability of these methods in studies with good methodological quality. DATA SOURCE: PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, Scopus, and CINAHL were searched. A manual search was performed to check for additional relevant studies. STUDY SELECTION: Primary publications on facial growth and treatment outcomes in children younger than age 6 years were included. DATA EXTRACTION: Independent data extraction was performed by two observers. A quality assessment instrument was used to determine methodological quality. Methods used in studies with good methodological quality were assessed for reliability expressed as the magnitude of the measurement error and the correlation coefficient between repeated measurements. RESULTS: In total, 165 studies were included, forming three groups of methods: head circumference anthropometry, direct anthropometry, and 2D photography and 3D imaging techniques (surface laser scanning and stereophotogrammetry. In general, the measurement error was below 2 mm, and correlation coefficients were very good. CONCLUSION: Various methods for measuring cranial dimensions have shown to be reliable. Stereophotogrammetry is the most versatile method for quantitative longitudinal assessment of cranial dimensions and shapes in children. However, direct anthropometry continues to be the best method for routine clinical assessments of linear cranial dimensions in growing children until age 6 years.

  11. Anterior and middle skull base reconstruction after tumor resection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Bo; WU Sheng-tian; LI Zhi; LIU Pi-nan

    2010-01-01

    Background Surgical management of skull base tumors is still challenging today due to its sophisticated operation procedure. Surgeons who specialize in skull base surgery are making endeavor to promote the outcome of patients with skull base tumor. A reliable skull base reconstruction after tumor resection is of paramount importance in avoiding life-threatening complications, such as cerebrospinal fluid leakage and intracranial infection. This study aimed at investigating the indication, operation approach and operation technique of anterior and middle skull base reconstruction.Methods A retrospective analysis was carried out on 44 patients who underwent anterior and middle skull base reconstruction in the Department of Neurosurgery at Beijing Tiantan Hospital between March 2005 and March 2008. Different surgical approaches were selected according to the different regions involved by the tumor. Microsurgery was carried out for tumor resection and combined endoscopic surgery was performed in some cases. According to the different locations and sizes of various defects after tumor resection, an individualized skull base soft tissue reconstruction was carried out for each case with artificial materials, pedicled flaps, free autologous tissue, and free vascularized muscle flaps, separately. A skull base bone reconstruction was carried out in some cases simultaneously.Results Soft tissue reconstruction was performed in all 44 cases with a fascia lata repair in 9 cases, a free vascularized muscle flap in 1 case, a pedicled muscle flap in 14 cases, and a pedicled periosteal flap in 20 cases. Skull base bone reconstruction was performed on 10 cases simultaneously. The materials for bone reconstruction included titanium mesh, free autogenous bone, and a Medpor implant. The result of skull base reconstruction was satisfactory in all patients. Postoperative early-stage complications occurred in 10 cases with full recovery after conventional treatment.Conclusions The specific

  12. A comparative study of the width of the anterior interhemispheric fissure in schizophrenia and senile dementia by cranial computed tomography (CCT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CCT pictures were used to obtain comparative measurements of morphologic changes in the prefrontal lobes in schizophrenics and senile dementia patients as well as in an age-matched control group. A Statistically significant widening of the distance between the inner surfaces of both superior frontal gyri and between anterior surfaces of both cingulate gyri were noted in the diseased group. As to the schizophrenic group, a greater distance between the inner surfaces of both frontal gyri was noted, while a generalized atrophic change of frontal lobes was rather common in the senile dementia group. (author)

  13. Imaging the cranial nerves in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Chong, Vincent

    2004-01-01

    The cranial nerves are often involved in head and neck malignancies. Some malignancies have a strong propensity to show perineural spread. Cranial nerve palsy may be the presenting sign of metastatic disease to the skull base. Like metastatic disease to the lungs or liver, the cranial nerves themselves may be the site of metastatic disease. In addition, cranial nerves can be injured by radiation therapy or sacrificed during surgical treatment. This paper focuses on the imaging features of per...

  14. Cranial computed tomography associated with development of functional dependence in a community-based elderly population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether changes at computed tomography (CT) imaging in the ageing brain are associated with future risks for functional dependence. One hundred sixty residents aged 69 years and older at the cranial CT and were independently living in a rural community in Hokkaido, Japan. Cranial CT was performed between 1991 and 1993, graded for ventricular enlargement, sulcal enlargement, white matter change, and small infarction. Functional status was reassessed in 1998 in each participant. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to estimate the association of CT changes in the ageing brain with development of functional dependence over six years. Functional dependence was found in 19 residents at the second survey. After adjusting for age, sex, medical conditions, and cognitive functioning, small infarction and ventricular enlargement were significantly associated with development of functional dependence (adjusted odds ratio=9.27 and 4.62). After controlling for age, the age-related changes on cranial CT have significant association on development of functional dependence. (author)

  15. Anatomy of the skull base and the cranial nerves in slice imaging; Anatomie der Schaedelbasis und Hirnnerven in der Schnittbildgebung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bink, A.; Berkefeld, J.; Zanella, F. [Klinikum der Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt, Institut fuer Neuroradiologie, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2009-07-15

    Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are suitable methods for examination of the skull base. Whereas CT is used to evaluate mainly bone destruction e.g. for planning surgical therapy, MRI is used to show pathologies in the soft tissue and bone invasion. High resolution and thin slice thickness are indispensible for both modalities of skull base imaging. Detailed anatomical knowledge is necessary even for correct planning of the examination procedures. This knowledge is a requirement to be able to recognize and interpret pathologies. MRI is the method of choice for examining the cranial nerves. The total path of a cranial nerve can be visualized by choosing different sequences taking into account the tissue surrounding this cranial nerve. This article summarizes examination methods of the skull base in CT and MRI, gives a detailed description of the anatomy and illustrates it with image examples. (orig.) [German] Zur Untersuchung der Schaedelbasis sind sowohl die Computertomographie (CT) als auch Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) geeignet. Waehrend mittels CT vorzugsweise die exakte knoecherne Ausbreitung von Pathologien z. B. zur operativen Therapieplanung erfasst werden, dient die MRT sowohl der Darstellung von Pathologien bzgl. ihrer Ausbreitung im Weichteilgewebe als auch dem Nachweis knoecherner Infiltration. Bei der Untersuchung der Schaedelbasis wird eine hochaufloesende Darstellung mit geringer Schichtdicke fuer beide Modalitaeten angestrebt. Die genaue Kenntnis der Anatomie ist bereits bei der Untersuchungsplanung notwendig. Sie ist zudem Voraussetzung fuer das Erkennen und die korrekte Interpretation von Pathologien. Die MRT ist die bildgebende Methode der Wahl zur Abklaerung von Pathologien der Hirnnerven. Dabei ist es durch gezielte Sequenzauswahl, die sich nach den die Hirnnerven umgebenen Strukturen richtet, moeglich, den gesamten Verlauf der Hirnnerven zu beurteilen. Dieser Artikel beschreibt die Untersuchung der Schaedelbasis

  16. THIRTY YEARS IN SKULL BASE SURGERY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG; Deliang; LIU; Liangfa

    2012-01-01

    <正>The skull base generally refers to the anterior, middle and posterior cranial fossa and structures on the outside side of these skull areas. The cranial roof and skull base are separated by a line connecting the external occipital protuberance, parietal notch and supraorbital ridge[1].The skull base supports the brain above, is connected to

  17. Cranial mononeuropathy VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may reduce the risk by controlling their blood sugar. Alternative Names Abducens paralysis; Abducens palsy; Lateral rectus palsy; Vith nerve palsy; Cranial nerve VI palsy Images Central nervous system and peripheral nervous system References Rucker JC. Cranial ...

  18. Clinical validity of MR based program for analysis of fluid/brain index of posterior cranial fossa structures in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) and type 2 (SCA2) belong to the group of neurodegenerative disorders of autosomal dominant inheritance, genetically and clinically heterogeneous, caused by CAG trinucleotide repeat expansion, which leads to productions of protein carrying the abnormal polyglutamine chain (polyQ). Molecular abnormalities cause degenerative changes - atrophy of posterior cranial fossa structures. The clinical symptoms typical of this disorder include progressive gait and limb ataxia, dysarthria, occulomotor disturbances, pyramidal tract and peripheral nerves involvement. The aim of the study is to evaluate the usefulness of a computer program prepared in our department for volumetric measurements of posterior cranial fossa structures (the pons, vermis and cerebellar hemispheres) in a group of SCA patients. MR examinations of 22 patients suffering from SCA were used to calculate the value of fluid/brain index of posterior cranial fossa structures and compared with the results of group of 10 healthy volunteers. The degree of atrophy of posterior cranial fossa structures can be objectively evaluated by special volumetric measurements. We found fluid/brain index (FBI) of posterior cranial fossa structures in group of SCA patients to vary from 0.1411 to 0.3929 (mean 0.2456 SD±0.601). 1. MR-based calculation of fluid/brain index of posterior fossa structures is a valuable tool for morphological assessment of SCA-related changes in brain structures. 2. The presented software enables objective evaluation of the course and stage of posterior fossa structures atrophy. 3. Our self-made computer program to calculate the fluid/brain index of posterior cranial fossa structures is easy to use on a personal computer- it is a good tool in everyday radiological practice. (author)

  19. Developmental Changes in Morphology of the Middle and Posterior External Cranial Base in Modern Homo sapiens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepal H. Dalal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The basicranium has been described as phylogenetically informative, developmentally stable, and minimally affected by external factors and consequently plays an important role in cranial size and shape in subadult humans. Here basicranial variation of subadults from several modern human populations was investigated and the impact of genetic relatedness on basicranial morphological similarities was investigated. Three-dimensional landmark data were digitized from subadult basicrania from seven populations. Published molecular data on short tandem repeats were statistically compared to morphological data from three ontogenetic stages. Basicranial and temporal bone morphology both reflect genetic distances in childhood and adolescence (5–18 years, but not in infancy (<5 years. The occipital bone reflects genetic distances only in adolescence (13–18 years. The sphenoid bone does not reflect genetic distances at any ontogenetic stage but was the most diagnostic region evaluated, resulting in high rates of correct classification among populations. These results suggest that the ontogenetic processes driving basicranial development are complex and cannot be succinctly summarized across populations or basicranial regions. However, the fact that certain regions reflect genetic distances suggests that the morphology of these regions may be useful in reconstructing population history in specimens for which direct DNA evidence is unavailable, such as archaeological sites.

  20. Chondroblastoma with secondary aneurysmal bone cyst in the anterior skull base

    OpenAIRE

    Ming Jie Wang, MD, PhD; Bing Zhou, MD

    2016-01-01

    Chondroblastoma with secondary aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC), especially in the anterior skull base, is an extremely rare condition. A 5-year-old boy presented with a large space-occupying lesion in the anterior skull base along with a left sided-epistaxis, proptosis and decreased vision. Radical excision of the lesion was performed by an endoscopic transnasal and transethmoidal approach. The patient recovered without any recurrence during a follow-up period of up to 28 months. Here, we review t...

  1. Neonatal cranial ultrasound: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco A

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Arie Franco, Kristopher Neal Lewis Department of Radiology, Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University, Augusta, GA, USA Abstract: Ultrasound is the most common imaging tool used in the neonatal intensive care unit. It is portable, readily available, and can be used at bedside. It is the least expensive cross sectional imaging modality and the safest imaging device used in the pediatric population due to its lack of ionizing radiation. There are well established indications for cranial ultrasound in many neonatal patient groups including preterm infants and term infants with birth asphyxia, seizures, congenital infections, etc. Cranial ultrasound is performed with basic grayscale imaging, using a linear array or sector transducer via the anterior fontanel in the coronal and sagittal planes. Additional images can be obtained through the posterior fontanel in preterm newborns. The mastoid fontanel can be used for assessment of the posterior fossa. Doppler images may be obtained for screening of the vascular structures. The normal sonographic neonatal cranial anatomy and normal variants are discussed. The most common pathological findings in preterm newborns, such as germinal matrix-intraventricular hemorrhage and periventricular leukomalacia, are described as well as congenital abnormalities such as holoprosencephaly and agenesis of the corpus callosum. New advances in sonographic equipment enable high-resolution and three-dimensional images, which facilitate obtaining very accurate measurements of various anatomic structures such as the ventricles, the corpus callosum, and the cerebellar vermis. Limited studies have been performed to predict that longitudinal measurements of these anatomic structures might predict the clinical outcome of high-risk preterm newborns. Hemodynamic Doppler studies may offer the potential for early intervention and treatment to counter the hazards of developmental delay and a moribund clinical outcome

  2. Multimodality imaging in cranial blastomycosis, a great mimicker: Case-based illustration with review of clinical and imaging findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puneet S Kochar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the clinical, laboratory, and imaging data of three patients who are proven cases of blastomycosis with cranial involvement. In this review, we discuss the imaging features of cranial blastomycosis with relevant clinical case examples including computed tomography (CT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and advanced MR imaging techniques like magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS and MR perfusion. Literature is reviewed for modern-day diagnosis and treatment of this fatal intracranial infection, if not diagnosed promptly and managed effectively.

  3. Postnatal development of the anterior skull base and nasal septum: CT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To know the normal CT appearance of the anterior skull base and nasal septum after birth. Coronal CT scans with a helical mode were performed from the nasal bone to the sphenoid sinus in 99 children whose ages ranged from 27 days to 14 years. We investigated the CT appearance of the developing anterior skull base and nasal septum with particular attention to the anteroposterior length of the anterior skull base and the ossification patterns of the cribriform plate, perpendicular plate, crista galli, and vomer. The anteroposterior length of the anterior skull base statistically significantly increased with age. The cribriform plate showed partial or complete ossification in at least one segment at more than 3 months of age and in all three segments at more than 6 months of age. Ossification of the cribriform plate occurred earlier in the middle segment than in the anterior and posterior segments. It began exclusively in the region of the lateral mass of the ethmoid and proceeded medially toward the crista galli. Partial ossification of the perpendicular plate was noted as early as 9 months of age, and complete ossification as early as 13 months of age. All children at 18 months and older showed at least partial ossification of the perpendicular plate. Partial ossification of the crista galli was noted as early as 27 days of age, and complete ossification as early as 3 months of age. CT showed complete ossification of the crista galli in all but two children at 6 months and older. The superior aspect of the vomer exhibited a V- or Y-shape on all CT scans in 66%(65/99) of children at any age. It appeared as an undivided single lump anteriorly and a V or Y posteriorly in 34%(34/99). Knowledge of the normal developing patterns of ossification of the anterior skull base and nasal septum could help prevent errors in interpreting CT scans in this region, especially in infants and young children

  4. Automated Extraction of Cranial Landmarks from Computed Tomography Data using a Combined Method of Knowledge and Pattern Based Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshan N. RAJAPAKSE

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Accurate identification of anatomical structures from medical imaging data is a significant and critical function in the medical domain. Past studies in this context have mainly utilized two main approaches, the knowledge and learning methodologies based methods. Further, most of previous reported studies have focused on identification of landmarks from lateral X-ray Computed Tomography (CT data, particularly in the field of orthodontics. However, this study focused on extracting cranial landmarks from large sets of cross sectional CT slices using a combined method of the two aforementioned approaches. The proposed method of this study is centered mainly on template data sets, which were created using the actual contour patterns extracted from CT cases for each of the landmarks in consideration. Firstly, these templates were used to devise rules which are a characteristic of the knowledge based method. Secondly, the same template sets were employed to perform template matching related to the learning methodologies approach. The proposed method was tested on two landmarks, the Dorsum sellae and the Pterygoid plate, using CT cases of 5 subjects. The results indicate that, out of the 10 tests, the output images were within the expected range (desired accuracy in 7 instances and acceptable range (near accuracy for 2 instances, thus verifying the effectiveness of the combined template sets centric approach proposed in this study.

  5. Evaluation of Three Cases Using a Novel Titanium Mesh System-Skull-Fit with Orbital Wall (Skull-Fit WOW)-For Cranial Base Reconstructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Noriko; Nakajima, Hideo; Tamada, Ikkei; Sakamoto, Yoshiaki; Ohira, Takayuki; Yoshida, Kazunari; Kawase, Takeshi; Kishi, Kazuo

    2011-09-01

    Cranial base reconstructions associated with tumor resections around the orbital wall often require that both the upper and lateral orbital walls be reconstructed during a single procedure. Previously, we used titanium mesh plates that were preoperatively fabricated based on three-dimensional models. Although these plates are precise and do not increase the probability of infection, we still had to use autologous bones to reconstruct the orbital walls. Recently, we developed a new titanium mesh plate-called Skull-Fit(®)-with orbital wall (Skull-Fit WOW(®)), enabling us to reconstruct the cranial base and orbital walls without bone grafts. Here, we report on three reconstruction cases in which the novel titanium mesh-orbital wall system was used. In all three cases, the customized titanium mesh system performed satisfactorily with little, if any, complications. PMID:22451827

  6. Quality-of-Life after Anterior Skull Base Surgery: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkman, Matthew A; Borg, Anouk; Al-Mousa, Alaa; Haliasos, Nikolaos; Choi, David

    2014-04-01

    Background Improved treatment and survival of patients with skull base tumors has made the assessment of quality-of-life (QoL) in this population increasingly important. This article provides a comprehensive systematic review pertaining to QoL assessment in adults undergoing anterior skull base surgery. Methods We performed a literature search using the electronic databases of Ovid Medline and Embase. Additional articles were identified through a search using the phrase anterior skull base. Further articles were sought through hand-searching relevant journals and reference lists of identified articles. Results Our search strategy identified 29 articles for inclusion in our systematic review, with considerable variation between studies in population characteristics, methodological design and quality, follow-up length, and outcome assessment. The most commonly used QoL tools were the Karnofsky Performance Status and the Anterior Skull Base Questionnaire. QoL following anterior skull base surgery appears to improve beyond preoperative levels in the months after surgery. For patients undergoing endoscopic skull base surgery, the gain in QoL appears to be greater and may manifest earlier, with no clear long-term deleterious effect on sinonasal outcomes compared with open surgery. Conclusions QoL after anterior skull base surgery in adults appears to improve within several months of surgery, but earlier and to a larger extent if the endoscopic approach is used. Given the relative paucity and heterogeneity of anterior skull base tumors, large-scale prospective multicentre studies utilizing valid and reliable multidimensional QoL tools are required. This may result in improved patient care, by understanding patients' needs better and facilitating the provision of reliable outcome data for clinical trials. PMID:24719794

  7. Evaluation of X ray radiation doses in pediatric examinations of cranial computerized tomography based on optimization studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper identifies the technical conditions for CT examination which offers lowest absorbed dose and to attend the manufacturer recommendations as far the spatial resolution is concerned. The paper evaluates the absorbed dose during cranial CT in up to 6 years children satisfying the technical condition recommended by the manufacturer and routine clinical conditions. The paper also established a quantitative relationship among the absorbed dose and its distribution in the cranial regions of pediatric patients up to 6 years old in a way to estimate the doses subject to optimized conditions

  8. Analysis of translational errors in frame-based and frameless cranial radiosurgery using an anthropomorphic phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Taynna Vernalha Rocha [Faculdades Pequeno Principe (FPP), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Cordova Junior, Arno Lotar; Almeida, Cristiane Maria; Piedade, Pedro Argolo; Silva, Cintia Mara da, E-mail: taynnavra@gmail.com [Centro de Radioterapia Sao Sebastiao, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Brincas, Gabriela R. Baseggio [Centro de Diagnostico Medico Imagem, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Marins, Priscila; Soboll, Danyel Scheidegger [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2016-03-15

    Objective: To evaluate three-dimensional translational setup errors and residual errors in image-guided radiosurgery, comparing frameless and frame-based techniques, using an anthropomorphic phantom. Materials and Methods: We initially used specific phantoms for the calibration and quality control of the image-guided system. For the hidden target test, we used an Alderson Radiation Therapy (ART)-210 anthropomorphic head phantom, into which we inserted four 5- mm metal balls to simulate target treatment volumes. Computed tomography images were the taken with the head phantom properly positioned for frameless and frame-based radiosurgery. Results: For the frameless technique, the mean error magnitude was 0.22 ± 0.04 mm for setup errors and 0.14 ± 0.02 mm for residual errors, the combined uncertainty being 0.28 mm and 0.16 mm, respectively. For the frame-based technique, the mean error magnitude was 0.73 ± 0.14 mm for setup errors and 0.31 ± 0.04 mm for residual errors, the combined uncertainty being 1.15 mm and 0.63 mm, respectively. Conclusion: The mean values, standard deviations, and combined uncertainties showed no evidence of a significant differences between the two techniques when the head phantom ART-210 was used. (author)

  9. Analysis of translational errors in frame-based and frameless cranial radiosurgery using an anthropomorphic phantom*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Taynná Vernalha Rocha; Cordova Junior, Arno Lotar; Piedade, Pedro Argolo; da Silva, Cintia Mara; Marins, Priscila; Almeida, Cristiane Maria; Brincas, Gabriela R. Baseggio; Soboll, Danyel Scheidegger

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate three-dimensional translational setup errors and residual errors in image-guided radiosurgery, comparing frameless and frame-based techniques, using an anthropomorphic phantom. Materials and Methods We initially used specific phantoms for the calibration and quality control of the image-guided system. For the hidden target test, we used an Alderson Radiation Therapy (ART)-210 anthropomorphic head phantom, into which we inserted four 5mm metal balls to simulate target treatment volumes. Computed tomography images were the taken with the head phantom properly positioned for frameless and frame-based radiosurgery. Results For the frameless technique, the mean error magnitude was 0.22 ± 0.04 mm for setup errors and 0.14 ± 0.02 mm for residual errors, the combined uncertainty being 0.28 mm and 0.16 mm, respectively. For the frame-based technique, the mean error magnitude was 0.73 ± 0.14 mm for setup errors and 0.31 ± 0.04 mm for residual errors, the combined uncertainty being 1.15 mm and 0.63 mm, respectively. Conclusion The mean values, standard deviations, and combined uncertainties showed no evidence of a significant differences between the two techniques when the head phantom ART-210 was used. PMID:27141132

  10. Analysis of translational errors in frame-based and frameless cranial radiosurgery using an anthropomorphic phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate three-dimensional translational setup errors and residual errors in image-guided radiosurgery, comparing frameless and frame-based techniques, using an anthropomorphic phantom. Materials and Methods: We initially used specific phantoms for the calibration and quality control of the image-guided system. For the hidden target test, we used an Alderson Radiation Therapy (ART)-210 anthropomorphic head phantom, into which we inserted four 5- mm metal balls to simulate target treatment volumes. Computed tomography images were the taken with the head phantom properly positioned for frameless and frame-based radiosurgery. Results: For the frameless technique, the mean error magnitude was 0.22 ± 0.04 mm for setup errors and 0.14 ± 0.02 mm for residual errors, the combined uncertainty being 0.28 mm and 0.16 mm, respectively. For the frame-based technique, the mean error magnitude was 0.73 ± 0.14 mm for setup errors and 0.31 ± 0.04 mm for residual errors, the combined uncertainty being 1.15 mm and 0.63 mm, respectively. Conclusion: The mean values, standard deviations, and combined uncertainties showed no evidence of a significant differences between the two techniques when the head phantom ART-210 was used. (author)

  11. A Case of Multiple Primary Tumors of the Anterior Skull Base

    OpenAIRE

    Lenarz, Minoo; Durisin, Martin; Becker, Hartmut; Brandis, Almuth; Lenarz, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    We report a case of synchronous olfactory bulb meningioma and undifferentiated carcinoma of the nose and paranasal sinuses that involved and destroyed the anterior skull base and mimicked intracranial invasion by a carcinoma. The heterogeneity of tissue types in the skull base gives rise to a diverse variety of benign and malignant neoplasms which have totally different prognoses. Synchronous development of benign and malignant primary tumors both originating from and involving the skull base...

  12. Treating dose of target volume of nasopharyngeal carcinoma and contiguous organ at risk influenced by MRI and CT image difference in cranial base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the treating dose of target volume of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and contiguous organ at risk influenced by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) Image difference in cranial base. Methods: 26 cases were performed from 101 patients of NPC with MRI and CT image difference in cranial base. We applied ARTP-TOP3D-TPS system to delineate target volume of NPC and contiguous organ at risk and develop the three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3-DCRT) plan, and compared the target volume of NPC by MRI (GTVMR) with the target volume of NPC by CT (GTVCT). Results: There was statistic difference between GTVMR (47.0±16.3) cm3 and GTVCT (31.6±10.0) cm3 (Z=4.462, P5 mean dose of brainstem, spinal cord, pituitary, temporal lobe and both eyes in MRI based plan were larger. There was no statistic difference in the mean dose of spinal cord between two plans. Conclusions: The dose of target volume in 3D-CRT plan based GTVMR is superior to GTVCT, but the dose of contiguous organ at risk in 3D-CRT plan based GTVMR is higher. (authors)

  13. Superficial peroneal neurocutaneous flap based on an anterior tibial artery perforator for forefoot reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun-Yang; Chai, Yi-Min; Wen, Gen; Han, Pei; Cheng, Liang

    2015-06-01

    The distally based superficial peroneal neurocutaneous (SPNC) island flap has been widely used for foot reconstruction. It is based on the descending branch of the peroneal artery perforator. However, damage to the perimalleolar vascularization or anatomic variations of the descending branch often causes flap necrosis. Because septocutaneous perforators from the anterior tibial artery participate in the vascular network of superficial peroneal nerve in the distal lower leg, a modified SPNC flap is designed based on the anterior tibial artery perforator. Seven patients with soft tissue defect over the forefoot were treated by this modified technique. Six patients had accompanied injuries at the lateral perimalleolar region, and 1 patient had an anatomic variation of the descending branch of the peroneal artery perforator. The size of defect ranged from 12 × 5 to 15 × 9 cm. All 7 flaps survived completely without complications. The size of the flaps ranged from 13 × 6 to 16 × 10 cm. No severe venous congestion occurred. The mean follow-up was 9.4 months (range, 6-14 months). All patients were satisfied with the texture and color of the flaps. Two patients complained about the thickness of the flaps, but did not want further operation. The donor sites healed uneventfully and no painful neuroma occurred. In conclusion, the modified SPNC flap based on an anterior tibial artery perforator is a feasible salvage procedure when the traditional design is unreliable. It can provide sufficient and superior coverage for large forefoot defect. PMID:25969973

  14. Visual outcome after fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy of benign anterior skull base tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astradsson, Arnar; Wiencke, Anne Katrine; Munck af Rosenschold, Per; Engelholm, Svend-Aage; Ohlhues, Lars; Roed, Henrik; Juhler, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    meningiomas and 100, 98.2 and 94.9% for pituitary adenomas, respectively. Patients with an impaired visual field function pre-FSRT were more likely to experience worsened function (p = 0.016). We found that RION, was a relatively uncommon event, in a large prospective cohort of patients that were......To determine visual outcome including the occurrence of radiation induced optic neuropathy (RION) as well as tumor control after fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (FSRT) of benign anterior skull base meningiomas or pituitary adenomas. Thirty-nine patients treated with FSRT for anterior...... skull base meningiomas and 55 patients treated with FSRT for pituitary adenomas between January 1999 and December 2009 with at least 2 years follow-up were included. Patients were followed up prospectively with magnetic resonance imaging scans, visual acuity and visual field examinations. RION was found...

  15. Image quality of iterative reconstruction in cranial CT imaging: comparison of model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to compare cranial CT (CCT) image quality (IQ) of the MBIR algorithm with standard iterative reconstruction (ASiR). In this institutional review board (IRB)-approved study, raw data sets of 100 unenhanced CCT examinations (120 kV, 50-260 mAs, 20 mm collimation, 0.984 pitch) were reconstructed with both ASiR and MBIR. Signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR) were calculated from attenuation values measured in caudate nucleus, frontal white matter, anterior ventricle horn, fourth ventricle, and pons. Two radiologists, who were blinded to the reconstruction algorithms, evaluated anonymized multiplanar reformations of 2.5 mm with respect to depiction of different parenchymal structures and impact of artefacts on IQ with a five-point scale (0: unacceptable, 1: less than average, 2: average, 3: above average, 4: excellent). MBIR decreased artefacts more effectively than ASiR (p < 0.01). The median depiction score for MBIR was 3, whereas the median value for ASiR was 2 (p < 0.01). SNR and CNR were significantly higher in MBIR than ASiR (p < 0.01). MBIR showed significant improvement of IQ parameters compared to ASiR. As CCT is an examination that is frequently required, the use of MBIR may allow for substantial reduction of radiation exposure caused by medical diagnostics. (orig.)

  16. Organ and effective dose coefficients for cranial and caudal irradiation geometries: photons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veinot, K G; Eckerman, K F; Hertel, N E

    2016-02-01

    With the introduction of new recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in Publication 103, the methodology for determining the protection quantity, effective dose, has been modified. The modifications include changes to the defined organs and tissues, the associated tissue weighting factors, radiation weighting factors and the introduction of reference sex-specific computational phantoms. Computations of equivalent doses in organs and tissues are now performed in both the male and female phantoms and the sex-averaged values used to determine the effective dose. Dose coefficients based on the ICRP 103 recommendations were reported in ICRP Publication 116, the revision of ICRP Publication 74 and ICRU Publication 57. The coefficients were determined for the following irradiation geometries: anterior-posterior (AP), posterior-anterior (PA), right and left lateral (RLAT and LLAT), rotational (ROT) and isotropic (ISO). In this work, the methodology of ICRP Publication 116 was used to compute dose coefficients for photon irradiation of the body with parallel beams directed upward from below the feet (caudal) and directed downward from above the head (cranial). These geometries may be encountered in the workplace from personnel standing on contaminated surfaces or volumes and from overhead sources. Calculations of organ and tissue kerma and absorbed doses for caudal and cranial exposures to photons ranging in energy from 10 keV to 10 GeV have been performed using the MCNP6.1 radiation transport code and the adult reference phantoms of ICRP Publication 110. As with calculations reported in ICRP 116, the effects of charged-particle transport are evident when compared with values obtained by using the kerma approximation. At lower energies the effective dose per particle fluence for cranial and caudal exposures is less than AP orientations while above ∼30 MeV the cranial and caudal values are greater. PMID:25935016

  17. Organ and effective dose coefficients for cranial and caudal irradiation geometries: photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the introduction of new recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in Publication 103, the methodology for determining the protection quantity, effective dose, has been modified. The modifications include changes to the defined organs and tissues, the associated tissue weighting factors, radiation weighting factors and the introduction of reference sex-specific computational phantoms. Computations of equivalent doses in organs and tissues are now performed in both the male and female phantoms and the sex-averaged values used to determine the effective dose. Dose coefficients based on the ICRP 103 recommendations were reported in ICRP Publication 116, the revision of ICRP Publication 74 and ICRU Publication 57. The coefficients were determined for the following irradiation geometries: anterior-posterior (AP), posterior-anterior (PA), right and left lateral (RLAT and LLAT), rotational (ROT) and isotropic (ISO). In this work, the methodology of ICRP Publication 116 was used to compute dose coefficients for photon irradiation of the body with parallel beams directed upward from below the feet (caudal) and directed downward from above the head (cranial). These geometries may be encountered in the workplace from personnel standing on contaminated surfaces or volumes and from overhead sources. Calculations of organ and tissue kerma and absorbed doses for caudal and cranial exposures to photons ranging in energy from 10 keV to 10 GeV have been performed using the MCNP6.1 radiation transport code and the adult reference phantoms of ICRP Publication 110. As with calculations reported in ICRP 116, the effects of charged-particle transport are evident when compared with values obtained by using the kerma approximation. At lower energies the effective dose per particle fluence for cranial and caudal exposures is less than AP orientations while above ∼30 MeV the cranial and caudal values are greater. (authors)

  18. Cranial nerve palsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper evaluates the utility of multiplanar reconstructions (MPRs) of three-dimensional (3D) MR angiography data sets in the examination of patients with cranial nerve palsies. The authors hypothesis was that 3D data could be reformatted to highlight the intricate spatial relationships of vessels to adjacent neural tissues by taking advantage of the high vessel-parenchyma contrast in high-resolution 3D time-of-flight sequences. Twenty patients with cranial nerve palsies and 10 asymptomatic patients were examined with coronal T1-weighted and axial T2-weighted imaging plus a gadolinium-enhanced 3D MRA sequence (40/7/15 degrees, axial 60-mm volume, 0.9-mm isotropic resolution). Cranial nerves II-VIII were subsequently evaluated on axial and reformatted coronal and/or sagittal images

  19. Terminal nerve: cranial nerve zero

    OpenAIRE

    Jorge Eduardo Duque Parra; Carlos Alberto Duque Parra

    2006-01-01

    It has been stated, in different types of texts, that there are only twelve pairs of cranial nerves. Such texts exclude the existence of another cranial pair, the terminal nerve or even cranial zero. This paper considers the mentioned nerve like a cranial pair, specifying both its connections and its functional role in the migration of liberating neurons of the gonadotropic hormone (Gn RH). In this paper is also stated the hypothesis of the phylogenetic existence of a cerebral sector and a co...

  20. Cranial Neuropathy in Multiple Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Mine Hayriye Sorgun; Bilge Koçer; Funda Kaplan; Nesrin Yılmaz; Nezih Yücemen; Canan Yücesan

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: It has been reported that cranial neuropathy findings could be seen in the neurologic examination of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, although brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may not reveal any lesion responsible for the cranial nerve involvement. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of brainstem and cranial nerve involvement, except for olfactory and optic nerves, during MS attacks, and to investigate the rate of an available explanation for the cranial neu...

  1. Multimodal navigated skull base tumor resection using image-based vascular and cranial nerve segmentation: A prospective pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parviz Dolati

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Image-based preoperative vascular and neural element segmentation with 3D reconstruction is highly informative preoperatively and could increase the vigilance of neurosurgeons for preventing neurovascular injury during skull base surgeries. Additionally, the accuracy found in this study is superior to previously reported measurements. This novel preliminary study is encouraging for future validation with larger numbers of patients.

  2. Uso de concentrados autólogos de plaquetas intraarticulares como coadyuvantes en el tratamiento quirúrgico de la rotura del ligamento cruzado anterior en una perra Use of intra-articular autologous platelet concentrates as coadjutants in the surgical treatment of a cranial cruciate ligament rupture in a bitch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RF Silva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available La ruptura del ligamento cruzado anterior (RLCA es uno de los principales problemas ortopédicos que producen cojera de los miembros posteriores en perros. A pesar de que este problema sea tratado quirúrgicamente el desarrollo y progresión de la osteoartritis son típicamente característicos. Se describe un caso de un perro que recibió inyecciones intraarticulares de concentrados autólogos de plaquetas (APCs durante el posoperatorio después de la reparación quirúrgica de una RLCA. Los resultados clínicos y radiográficos y el análisis de la marcha mediante plataforma de fuerza podrían potencialmente soportar la utilización posoperatoria de inyecciones intraarticulares de APCs como terapia coadyuvante en el tratamiento quirúrgico de la RLCA en perros.Cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CCLR is one of the main orthopedic problems that could produce hind limb lameness in dogs. Even though this problem can be surgically treated the development and progression of osteoarthritis are typical features. A case of a dog that received postoperative intra-articular injections of autologous platelet concentrates (APCs after the surgical reparation of a CCLR is described. The clinical, radiographic, and gait analysis results could potentially support the postoperative use of intra-articular injections of APCs as an adjunctive therapy in the CCLR surgical reparation.

  3. Cervicoplastia anterior Anterior cervicoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Gomes Patrocínio

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Muitos pacientes buscam correção estética da frouxidão da pele do pescoço, depósito de gordura na região submentoneana ou bandas de platisma. Em grande parte dos casos a ação medial, via cervicoplastia anterior é necessária. OBJETIVO: Demonstrar a casuística e avaliar os resultados e complicações com a técnica de cervicoplastia anterior no Serviço de Otorrinolaringologia da Universidade Federal de Uberlândia. FORMA DE ESTUDO: Relato de série. PACIENTES E MÉTODOS: Quarenta e dois pacientes, entre 39 e 65 anos de idade, sendo 40 (95,2% do sexo feminino e 2 (4,8% do masculino, foram submetidos a cervicoplastia anterior. Retrospectivamente foram avaliados resultados e complicações. RESULTADOS: Destes, 34 apresentaram resultados satisfatórios, 4 apresentaram déficit estético notado somente pelo cirurgião, 3 apresentaram déficit estético notado somente pelo paciente e 1 apresentou déficit estético necessitando cirurgia revisional. Ao estudo fotográfico, todos os pacientes apresentaram melhora do perfil cervical, redução das bandas de platisma e da frouxidão da pele, estabilização da musculatura cervical e acentuação do ângulo cervicomental, em graus variados. Houve complicação em 2 casos (discreto serohematoma e cicatriz um pouco alargada. CONCLUSÃO: A cervicoplastia, associada ou não à tração lateral pela ritidoplastia, é uma técnica que produz resultados satisfatórios na grande maioria dos casos.Many patients look for aesthetic correction of the laxity of neck skin, submandibular fat deposit or platisma bands. In a large part of the cases, medial action, through anterior cervicoplasty is necessary. AIM: To demonstrate the casuistic and to evaluate the results and complications with anterior cervicoplasty technique in the Otorhinolaryngology Service of the Federal University of Uberlândia. STUDY DESIGN: Serie report. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Forty-two patients, between 39 and 65 years of age, being 40 (95

  4. Association of Anterior and Lateral Extraprostatic Extensions with Base-Positive Resection Margins in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abalajon, Mark Joseph; Jang, Won Sik; Kwon, Jong Kyou; Yoon, Cheol Yong; Lee, Joo Yong; Cho, Kang Su; Ham, Won Sik

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Positive surgical margins (PSM) detected in the radical prostatectomy specimen increase the risk of biochemical recurrence (BCR). Still, with formidable number of patients never experiencing BCR in their life, the reason for this inconsistency has been attributed to the artifacts and to the spontaneous regression of micrometastatic site. To investigate the origin of margin positive cancers, we have looked into the influence of extraprostatic extension location on the resection margin positive site and its implications on BCR risk. Materials & Methods The clinical information and follow-up data of 612 patients who had extraprostatic extension and positive surgical margin at the time of robot assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) in the single center between 2005 and 2014 were modeled using Fine and Gray’s competing risk regression analysis for BCR. Extraprostatic extensions were divided into categories according to location as apex, base, anterior, posterior, lateral, and posterolateral. Extraprostatic extensions were defined as presence of tumor beyond the borders of the gland in the posterior and posterolateral regions. Tumor admixed with periprostatic fat was additionally considered as having extraprostatic extension if capsule was vague in the anterior, apex, and base regions. Positive surgical margins were defined as the presence of tumor cells at the inked margin on the inspection under microscopy. Association of these classifications with the site of PSM was evaluated by Cohen’s Kappa analysis for concordance and logistic regression for the odds of apical and base PSMs. Results Median follow-up duration was 36.5 months (interquartile range[IQR] 20.1–36.5). Apex involvement was found in 158 (25.8%) patients and base in 110 (18.0%) patients. PSMs generally were found to be associated with increased risk of BCR regardless of location, with BCR risk highest for base PSM (HR 1.94, 95% CI 1.40–2.68, p<0.001) after adjusting for age, initial

  5. Neuromuscular Ultrasound of Cranial Nerves

    OpenAIRE

    Tawfik, Eman A.; Walker, Francis O.; Cartwright, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound of cranial nerves is a novel subdomain of neuromuscular ultrasound (NMUS) which may provide additional value in the assessment of cranial nerves in different neuromuscular disorders. Whilst NMUS of peripheral nerves has been studied, NMUS of cranial nerves is considered in its initial stage of research, thus, there is a need to summarize the research results achieved to date. Detailed scanning protocols, which assist in mastery of the techniques, are briefly mentioned in the few re...

  6. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cranial Magnetic Resonance Imaging is comprehensive, well structured, and well written. The material is current and well referenced. The illustrations are good and complement the text well. The overall quality of publication is above average. The greatest attribute of the book is its readability. The author demonstrates ample skill in making complex subjects, such as MR physics and imaging of cerebral hemorrhage, easy to understand. The book closes with a detailed atlas on the anatomic appearance of the brain on MR images in the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes

  7. Facial nerve neurinoma presenting as middle cranial fossa and cerebellopontine angle mass : a case report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devi B

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Facial nerve neurinomas are rare. The tumours arising from the geniculate ganglion may grow anteriorly and superiorly and present as a mass in the middle cranial fossa. Only a few cases of facial nerve neurinomas presenting as middle cranial fossa mass have so far been reported. These tumours present with either long standing or intermittent facial palsy along with cerebellopontine angle syndrome.

  8. Neurovascular compression syndrome of the eighth cranial nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neurovascular compression syndrome (NVCS) involves neuropathy due to intracranial blood vessels compressing the cranial nerves. NVCS of the eighth cranial nerve is less reportedly established as a clinical entity than that of the fifth and seventh cranial nerves. We report 17 cases of NVCS of the eighth cranial nerve and their clinical features. Clinical symptoms and test findings among our subjects indicated that most were aged more than 65 years, were unilateral, had intermittent tinnitus, suffered attacks lasting a few seconds dozens of times a day, experienced dizziness concomitantly with tinnitus, aggravated tinnitus and dizziness when tilting the head toward the affected side and looking downward (positional tinnitus, positional dizziness), heard specific tinnitus sounds such as crackling differing from those in cochlear tinnitus, had mild or no hearing loss, were diagnosed with retrocochlear hearing disturbance due to an interpeak latency delay between waves I and III of the auditory brainstem response (ABR), often had no nystagmus or canal paresis (CP), were found in constructive interference steady state magnetic resonance imaging (CISS MRI) to have compression of the eighth cranial nerve by the vertebral artery (VA) or the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA), rarely had concomitant facial spasms, and had tinnitus and dizziness markedly suppressed by carbamazepine. With the number of elderly individuals continuing to increase, cases of NVCS due to arteriosclerotic changes in cerebral blood vessels are expected to increase, making it necessary to consider NVCS in elderly subjects with dizziness, tinnitus, and hearing loss. (author)

  9. Pediatric cranial computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The introduction of CT in the investigation of intercranial pathology has revolutionized the approach to clinical neurological and neurosurgical practice. This book applies the advances of cranial CT to the pediatric patient. The test is divided into two sections. The first portion describes the practical methodology, anatomy and normal and abnormal CT scan appearance, including high or low density lesions, cystic lesions and ventricular or subarachnoid space dilation. The characteristic scans for various neurological diseases are presented and discussed. The author has given special attention to the CT diagnosis of congenital malformations and cerebral neoplasms. Partial Contents: Normal Computed Tomographic Anatomy/ High Density Lesions/Low Density Lesions/Cystic Lesions; Supratentorial/Cystic Lesions; Infratentorial/Increased Head Circumference/Increased Ventricular Size/Small Ventricular Size/Cranial Lesions/Spinal Lesions/CT Cisternography/Part II CT in Neonates/Congenital Craniocerebral Malformations/Hydrocephalus/Craniosynostosis/Head Trauma/Cerebrovascular Lesions/Intracranial Lesions/Seizure Disorders/Intracranial and Other Chronic Neurological Disorders

  10. Cranial mononeuropathy III - diabetic type

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... also have eyelid drooping. Prevention Controlling your blood sugar level may reduce the risk of developing this disorder. Alternative Names Diabetic third nerve palsy; Pupil-sparing third cranial nerve palsy Images Central nervous system and peripheral nervous system References Rucker JC. Cranial ...

  11. Contribution of 18F-Fluoro-ethyl-tyrosine Positron Emission Tomography to Target Volume Delineation in Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Malignant Cranial Base Tumours: First Clinical Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhold Graf

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased amino acid uptake has been demonstrated in intracerebral tumours and head and neck carcinomas of squamous cell origin. We investigated the potential impact of using 18F-fluoro-ethyl-tyrosine (18F-FET-PET/CT in addition to conventional imaging for gross tumour volume (GTV delineation in stereotactic radiotherapy of skull base tumours. The study population consisted of 14 consecutive patients with cranial base tumours (10 with squamous cell histology, 4 others. All patients underwent a FET-PET/CT examination in addition to contrast-enhanced CT and 11 patients underwent MRI. All tumours and histologic types showed increased FET uptake. The GTV was defined by all voxels showing hyperintensity in MRI or CT (GTVMRI/CT or enhancement in PET (GTVPET, forming a GTVcomposite that was used for the initial treatment fields. An additional volume of infiltrative growth outside the GTVMRI/CT of about 1.0 ± 2 cm3 (5% of the conventional volume was demonstrated by FET-PET only (GTVPETplus with significant enlargement (>10% of GTVMRI/CT in three patients. From existing data, we found correlation between cellular density and the standardized uptake value (SUV of FET. We were able to substantially reduce the volume of escalated radiation dose (GTVboost by 11 ± 2 cm3 (24% of the conventional volume.

  12. [Babies with cranial deformity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feijen, Michelle M W; Claessens, Edith A W M Habets; Dovens, Anke J Leenders; Vles, Johannes S; van der Hulst, Rene R W J

    2009-01-01

    Plagiocephaly was diagnosed in a baby aged 4 months and brachycephaly in a baby aged 5 months. Positional or deformational plagio- or brachycephaly is characterized by changes in shape and symmetry of the cranial vault. Treatment options are conservative and may include physiotherapy and helmet therapy. During the last two decades the incidence of positional plagiocephaly has increased in the Netherlands. This increase is due to the recommendation that babies be laid on their backs in order to reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome. We suggest the following: in cases of positional preference of the infant, referral to a physiotherapist is indicated. In cases of unacceptable deformity of the cranium at the age 5 months, moulding helmet therapy is a possible treatment option. PMID:19857299

  13. Cranial suture biology of the Aleutian Island inhabitants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cray, James; Mooney, Mark P; Siegel, Michael I

    2011-04-01

    Research on cranial suture biology suggests there is biological and taxonomic information to be garnered from the heritable pattern of suture synostosis. Suture synostosis along with brain growth patterns, diet, and biomechanical forces influence phenotypic variability in cranial vault morphology. This study was designed to determine the pattern of ectocranial suture synostosis in skeletal populations from the Aleutian Islands. We address the hypothesis that ectocranial suture synostosis pattern will differ according to cranial vault shape. Ales Hrdlicka identified two phenotypes in remains excavated from the Aleutian Island. The Paleo-Aleutians, exhibiting a dolichocranic phenotype with little prognathism linked to artifacts distinguished from later inhabitants, Aleutians, who exhibited a brachycranic phenotype with a greater amount of prognathism. A total of 212 crania representing Paleo-Aleuts and Aleutian as defined by Hrdlicka were investigated for suture synostosis pattern following standard methodologies. Comparisons were performed using Guttmann analyses. Results revealed similar suture fusion patterns for the Paleo-Aleut and Aleutian, a strong anterior to posterior pattern of suture fusion for the lateral-anterior suture sites, and a pattern of early termination at the sagittal suture sites for the vault. These patterns were found to differ from that reported in the literature. Because these two populations with distinct cranial shapes exhibit similar patterns of suture synostosis it appears pattern is independent of cranial shape in these populations of Homo sapiens. These findings suggest that suture fusion patterns may be population dependent and that a standardized methodology, using suture fusion to determine age-at-death, may not be applicable to all populations. PMID:21328563

  14. Evaluation of paracavernous cranial nerves (3rd to 6th) with CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have now used CT to evaluate the cavernous sinuses, especially the 3rd, 4th, 5th, and 6th cranial nerves. adjacent to them. Twenty cases, presumably all having sellar or parasellar lesions, were examined by means of thin-slice (2-4 mm) axial and coronal (including both direct and reconstructed methods) CT studies. Moreover, three blocks of the sellar region obtained from adult cadavers were examined beforehand by CT scan, and the courses of the respective paracavernous cranial nerves were confirmed by microsurgical dissection. As a result, the following conclusions were obtained. 1. It was valuable to perform a post-enhanced direct coronal study for the definite identification of the paracavernous cranial nerves (3rd to 6th cranial nerves). 2. Also valuable was a magnified CT film of the parasellar regions, which made the identification of the parasellar cranial nerves clearer. 3. In the clinical cases showing a normal shape of the cavernous sinuses on CT, each cranial nerve was evaluated. In the axial studies (almost 10 to 15 degrees anterior to Reid's basal line), the frequencies of the identification of the 3rd, 5th, and 6th cranial nerves were 76%, 97% (as to the Gasserian ganglion), and 21% respectively. None of the 4th cranial nerve was visualized in the cases examined. On the other hand, the frequencies of the identification of the 3rd, 5th, and 6th cranial nerves were 83%, 86%, and 21% respectively in the direct coronal studies and 62%, 57%, and 4% in those of the reconstructed films. The visualization of each cranial nerve in the direct coronal study was better than when the reconstructed method was used. Finally, a schematic presentation of the cranial nerves adjacent to the cavernous sinuses was made in the axial and coronal projections. (J.P.N.)

  15. Direct Cranial Nerve Involvement by Gliomas: Case Series and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabray, M C; Glastonbury, C M; Mamlouk, M D; Punch, G E; Solomon, D A; Cha, S

    2015-07-01

    Malignant gliomas are characterized by infiltrative growth of tumor cells, including along white matter tracts. This may result in clinical cranial neuropathy due to direct involvement of a cranial nerve rather than by leptomeningeal spread along cranial nerves. Gliomas directly involving cranial nerves III-XII are rare, with only 11 cases reported in the literature before 2014, including 8 with imaging. We present 8 additional cases demonstrating direct infiltration of a cranial nerve by a glioma. Asymmetric cisternal nerve expansion compared with the contralateral nerve was noted with a mean length of involvement of 9.4 mm. Based on our case series, the key imaging feature for recognizing direct cranial nerve involvement by a glioma is the detection of an intra-axial mass in the pons or midbrain that is directly associated with expansion, signal abnormality, and/or enhancement of the adjacent cranial nerves. PMID:25857757

  16. Primary step for endoscopic sinonasal tract and anterior skull base robotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crampette Louis

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Surgeons have evolved a lot their surgical procedures in sinus surgery and are now able to resect malignant tumors. These progresses are now leading new difficulties like impairing vision (bleeding and LCR flow and necessity of multiple simultaneous tasks. With the aim of designing a new endoscope-holder, primary step was to characterize the surgeon gesture, the kinematics, and the type of man-machine interface acceptable by the surgeon. Methods: We worked on thirteen sinonasal tracts of cadaver heads. Surgical procedures were: opening all the sinuses, the carotid, the sella turcica, the lamina papyracea and the anterior skull base. We used conventional instruments which were instrumented with a force-torque sensor and a navigation system. Then we have experimentally evaluated robots with three different kinematics and two types of man-machine interfaces. Results: We collected enough position and force data as well as kinematics constraints and interface requirements to specify a robot for endoscopic sinus surgery.

  17. Terminal nerve: cranial nerve zero

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Eduardo Duque Parra

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been stated, in different types of texts, that there are only twelve pairs of cranial nerves. Such texts exclude the existence of another cranial pair, the terminal nerve or even cranial zero. This paper considers the mentioned nerve like a cranial pair, specifying both its connections and its functional role in the migration of liberating neurons of the gonadotropic hormone (Gn RH. In this paper is also stated the hypothesis of the phylogenetic existence of a cerebral sector and a common nerve that integrates the terminal nerve with the olfactory nerves and the vomeronasals nerves which seem to carry out the odors detection function as well as in the food search, pheromone detection and nasal vascular regulation.

  18. Cranial nerve palsies in childhood

    OpenAIRE

    Lyons, C J; Godoy, F; ALQahtani, E

    2015-01-01

    We review ocular motor cranial nerve palsies in childhood and highlight many of the features that differentiate these from their occurrence in adulthood. The clinical characteristics of cranial nerve palsies in childhood are affected by the child's impressive ability to repair and regenerate after injury. Thus, aberrant regeneration is very common after congenital III palsy; Duane syndrome, the result of early repair after congenital VI palsy, is invariably associated with retraction of the g...

  19. A prospective evaluation of short-term health-related quality of life in patients undergoing anterior skull base surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abergel, Abraham; Fliss, Dan M; Margalit, Nevo; Gil, Ziv

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the health-related quality of life (QOL) of patients undergoing anterior skull base tumor resection. The Anterior Skull Base Surgery QOL questionnaire, a disease-specific multidimensional instrument dedicated to this population, was used to collect and prospectively analyze demographic, medical, and QOL data on 48 patients. Thirty-nine patients completed the questionnaire preoperatively and at 6 and 12 months postoperatively. Seventeen patients (44%) had malignant histology and 22 (56%) had benign tumors. The overall QOL score decreased significantly at 6 months postoperatively (p base tumor resection returns to baseline by 1 year after surgery. Histology and radiotherapy are significant predictors of health-related QOL in this population. PMID:20592855

  20. Osteopathia striata with cranial sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osteopathia striata with cranial sclerosis (OS-CS) is a specific bone dysplasia manifested by hypertelorism, flat nasal bridge, frontal bossing, large head, hypoplastic maxilla, palate anomalies, chronic otitis media, hearing deficits, nasal obstruction, and neurological changes of deafness, facial palsy, ophthalmoplegia, and mental retardation. We will review the clinical and radiologic findings in a new patient from birth to 20 years; this is believed to be the thirty-fifth patient reported. OS-CS is 2.5 times more common in females and occurs as an autosomal dominant condition or a sporadic dominant mutation with patients presenting for evaluation from the newborn period to the fifth decade. Skeletal abnormalities are distinctive including sclerosis of the skull base and calvarium, linear striated densities in the long bones and pelvis, and poor development of the mastoid and sinus air cells. Radionuclide bone scans with SPECT indicated in our patient increased bone turnover which was supported by biochemical findings of increased pyridinoline excretion. The major complications are due to constriction of essential foramina at the skull base. The condition is not life-threatening but can produce disability. (orig.)

  1. Early surgery of ruptured anterior circulation aneurysm based on multislice helical computerised tomography angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Ma; Dong, Wang Xiao; Ciceri, E; Marras, C; Tao, Sun; Chun, Xia He; Zheng, Li Zong; Fang, Li Guo

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the utility of three-dimensional computed tomographic angiography (3D-CTA) as the primary diagnostic investigation in patients with spontaneous subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) from anterior circulation aneurysms, and to correlate the results with digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and intraoperative findings. From May 2005 to May 2007 a total of 38 consecutive patients admitted for SAH, suspicious for ruptured anterior circulation cerebral aneurysm, underwent 3D-CTA. Inclusion criteria were a SAH confirmed by a non-contrast head computed tomographic scan or by lumbar puncture. Exclusion criteria were: previous DSA, severe contrast medium allergy and severe renal failure. All patients underwent early surgical clipping of the aneurysm. The mean time between SAH onset and surgery was 43.6 h (range, 14-74 h). The 3D-CTA was performed in all cases; and in 13 out of 38 patients (34%) represented the only preoperative exam. In all patients that underwent surgery with the sole 3D-CTA, the images collected allowed a good visualisation of the morphology of aneurysms and of the anatomical relationship with the vascular structures. 3D-CTA allows accurate diagnosis with an excellent visualisation of ruptured aneurysms of the anterior circulation. Our results suggest that, in selected cases, ruptured anterior circulation aneurysms could be successfully treated on the basis of 3D-CTA alone. PMID:18175079

  2. Arachnoid cyst of the middle cranial fossa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The middle cranial fossa is the most common site for intracranial arachnoid cysts. Galassi and his associates have provided a useful classification of middle fossa arachnoid cysts based on their computed tomographic appearances. The Type I cyst is a small lenticular lesion. The Type II cyst is quadrangular in shape, reflecting a completely open insula. The Type III cyst appears as a large area of smoothly rounded lucency, with a significant compression of the brain. We report a 2-year-old boy with a middle fossa arachnoid cyst. This cyst differed from the type of Galassi's classification in its extension. Computerized tomograms showed low-density lesions of the bilateral middle cranial fossa and suprasellar area, which was not enhanced with contrast medium. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) showed a CSF-like pattern (Kjos) and revealed delicate anatomical structures in the surrounding brain. Arachnoid cysts are usually single lesions. However, not infrequently these cystic cavities may be divided by membranous septa into two or more compartments. Bilateral, more or less symmetrical arachnoid cysts in the middle cranial fossa as seen in this patient, however, seem to be very rare. Only a few such cases have been reported previously. MRI was superior to X-ray CT in characterizing intracranial cystic lesions because of its ability to categorize cysts into Kjos's three groups on the basis of the intensity pattern of the cyst contents, thereby improving diagnostic specificity and patient management. (author)

  3. Sci—Sat AM: Stereo — 05: The Development of Quality Assurance Methods for Trajectory based Cranial SRS Treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, B; Duzenli, C; Gete, E [BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver Cancer Centre (Canada); Teke, T [BC Cancer Agency, Centre for the Southern Interior (Canada)

    2014-08-15

    The goal of this work was to develop and validate non-planar linac beam trajectories defined by the dynamic motion of the gantry, couch, jaws, collimator and MLCs. This was conducted on the Varian TrueBeam linac by taking advantage of the linac's advanced control features in a non-clinical mode (termed developers mode). In this work, we present quality assurance methods that we have developed to test for the positional and temporal accuracy of the linac's moving components. The first QA method focuses on the coordination of couch and gantry. For this test, we developed a cylindrical phantom which has a film insert. Using this phantom we delivered a plan with dynamic motion of the couch and gantry. We found the mean absolute deviation of the entrance position from its expected value to be 0.5mm, with a standard deviation of 0.5mm. This was within the tolerances set by the machine's mechanical accuracy and the setup accuracy of the phantom. We also present an altered picket fence test which has added dynamic and simultaneous rotations of the couch and the collimator. While the test was shown to be sensitive enough to discern errors 1° and greater, we were unable to identify any errors in the coordination of the linacs collimator and couch. When operating under normal conditions, the Varian TrueBeam linac was able to pass both tests and is within tolerances acceptable for complex trajectory based treatments.

  4. Sci—Sat AM: Stereo — 05: The Development of Quality Assurance Methods for Trajectory based Cranial SRS Treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this work was to develop and validate non-planar linac beam trajectories defined by the dynamic motion of the gantry, couch, jaws, collimator and MLCs. This was conducted on the Varian TrueBeam linac by taking advantage of the linac's advanced control features in a non-clinical mode (termed developers mode). In this work, we present quality assurance methods that we have developed to test for the positional and temporal accuracy of the linac's moving components. The first QA method focuses on the coordination of couch and gantry. For this test, we developed a cylindrical phantom which has a film insert. Using this phantom we delivered a plan with dynamic motion of the couch and gantry. We found the mean absolute deviation of the entrance position from its expected value to be 0.5mm, with a standard deviation of 0.5mm. This was within the tolerances set by the machine's mechanical accuracy and the setup accuracy of the phantom. We also present an altered picket fence test which has added dynamic and simultaneous rotations of the couch and the collimator. While the test was shown to be sensitive enough to discern errors 1° and greater, we were unable to identify any errors in the coordination of the linacs collimator and couch. When operating under normal conditions, the Varian TrueBeam linac was able to pass both tests and is within tolerances acceptable for complex trajectory based treatments

  5. What do cranial bones of LB1 tell us about Homo floresiensis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balzeau, Antoine; Charlier, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    Cranial vault thickness (CVT) of Liang Bua 1, the specimen that is proposed to be the holotype of Homo floresiensis, has not yet been described in detail and compared with samples of fossil hominins, anatomically modern humans or microcephalic skulls. In addition, a complete description from a forensic and pathological point of view has not yet been carried out. It is important to evaluate scientifically if features related to CVT bring new information concerning the possible pathological status of LB1, and if it helps to recognize affinities with any hominin species and particularly if the specimen could belong to the species Homo sapiens. Medical examination of the skull based on a micro-CT examination clearly brings to light the presence of a sincipital T (a non-metrical variant of normal anatomy), a scar from an old frontal trauma without any evident functional consequence, and a severe bilateral hyperostosis frontalis interna that may have modified the anterior morphology of the endocranium of LB1. We also show that LB1 displays characteristics, related to the distribution of bone thickness and arrangements of cranial structures, that are plesiomorphic traits for hominins, at least for Homo erectus s.l. relative to Homo neanderthalensis and H. sapiens. All the microcephalic skulls analyzed here share the derived condition of anatomically modern H. sapiens. Cranial vault thickness does not help to clarify the definition of the species H. floresiensis but it also does not support an attribution of LB1 to H. sapiens. We conclude that there is no support for the attribution of LB1 to H. sapiens as there is no evidence of systemic pathology and because it does not have any of the apomorphic traits of our species. PMID:27086053

  6. Ulnar nerve stability-based surgery for cubital tunnel syndrome via a small incision: a comparison with classic anterior nerve transposition

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Ho-Jung; Koh, Il-Hyun; Chun, Yong-Min; Oh, Won-Taek; Chung, Kwang-Ho; Choi, Yun-Rak

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical outcomes of ulnar nerve stability-based surgery via a small incision with those of classic anterior transposition of the ulnar nerve for cubital tunnel syndrome. Methods From March 2008 to December 2013, 107 patients with cubital tunnel syndrome underwent simple decompression or anterior transposition via a small incision, according to an ulnar nerve stability-based decision based on an assessment of intraoperative ulnar nerve st...

  7. Cranial functional (psychogenic) movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaski, Diego; Bronstein, Adolfo M; Edwards, Mark J; Stone, Jon

    2015-12-01

    Functional (psychogenic) neurological symptoms are frequently encountered in neurological practice. Cranial movement disorders--affecting the eyes, face, jaw, tongue, or palate--are an under-recognised feature of patients with functional symptoms. They can present in isolation or in the context of other functional symptoms; in particular, for functional eye movements, positive clinical signs such as convergence spasms can be triggered by the clinical examination. Although the specialty of functional neurological disorders has expanded, appreciation of cranial functional movement disorders is still insufficient. Identification of the positive features of cranial functional movement disorders such as convergence and unilateral platysmal spasm might lend diagnostic weight to a suspected functional neurological disorder. Understanding of the differential diagnosis, which is broad and includes many organic causes (eg, stroke), is essential to make an early and accurate diagnosis to prevent complications and initiate appropriate management. Increased understanding of these disorders is also crucial to drive clinical trials and studies of individually tailored therapies. PMID:26581970

  8. Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medical News Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement By Michael Rubin, MDCM NOTE: This is the ... Gaze Palsies Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement Third Cranial Nerve (Oculomotor Nerve) Palsy Fourth Cranial ...

  9. Vincristine-Induced Cranial Neuropathy

    OpenAIRE

    TALEBIAN, Ahmad; Razeieh GOUDARZI; Mohammadzadeh, Mahdi; Mirzadeh, Azadeh Sadat

    2014-01-01

    How to Cite This Article: Talebian A, Goudarzi RM, Mohammadzadeh M , Mirzadeh AS. Vincristine-Induced Cranial Neuropathy. Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Winter; 8(1):66-68. AbstractVincristine (VCR) is a vinca alkaloid that is used for treatment of many malignancies.The vinca alkaloids are neurotoxic, usually causing a peripheral neuropathy, but cranial neuropathies are rare as side effects. Described here is the case of a 2.5-year-old boy, a known case of Wilms’ tumor, treated by vincristine (0/0...

  10. Anterior tarsaltunnelsyndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miliam, Palle B; Basse, Peter N

    2009-01-01

    Anterior tarsal tunnel syndrome is a rare entrapment neuropathy of the deep peroneal nerve beneath the extensor retinaculum of the ankle. It may be rare because it is underrecognized clinically.We present a case regarding a 29-year-old man, drummer, who for one and a half year experienced clinical...

  11. Overview of the Cranial Nerves

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... speech Because both the 9th and 10th cranial nerves control swallowing and the gag reflex, they are tested together. The person is asked ... of palate movement). 10th Vagus Swallowing, the gag reflex, and speech ... 11th Accessory Neck turning and shoulder shrugging ...

  12. Cranial nerve palsies in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, C J; Godoy, F; ALQahtani, E

    2015-02-01

    We review ocular motor cranial nerve palsies in childhood and highlight many of the features that differentiate these from their occurrence in adulthood. The clinical characteristics of cranial nerve palsies in childhood are affected by the child's impressive ability to repair and regenerate after injury. Thus, aberrant regeneration is very common after congenital III palsy; Duane syndrome, the result of early repair after congenital VI palsy, is invariably associated with retraction of the globe in adduction related to the innervation of the lateral rectus by the III nerve causing co-contraction in adduction. Clinical features that may be of concern in adulthood may not be relevant in childhood; whereas the presence of mydriasis in III palsy suggests a compressive aetiology in adults, this is not the case in children. However, the frequency of associated CNS abnormalities in III palsy and the risk of tumour in VI palsy can be indications for early neuroimaging depending on presenting features elicited through a careful history and clinical examination. The latter should include the neighbouring cranial nerves. We discuss the impact of our evolving knowledge of congenital cranial dysinnervation syndromes on this field. PMID:25572578

  13. Invasive cranial mycosis our experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapas Kumbhkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungi can cause serious cranial infections in immunocompromised and diabetic patients. Common pathogens mainly include Aspergillus and Mucor. These organisms cause tissue invasion and destruction of adjacent structures (e.g. orbit, ethmoid, sphenoid, maxillary & cavernous sinuses. Mortality and morbidity rate is high despite combined surgical, antifungal and antidiabetic treatment. We present our experience of six cases with such infection.

  14. Morphometric Analysis of Bone Resection in Anterior Petrosectomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Osama; Walther, Jonathan; Theriot, Krystle; Manuel, Morganne; Guthikonda, Bharat

    2016-06-01

    Introduction The anterior petrosectomy is a well-defined skull base approach to lesions such as petroclival meningiomas, posterior circulation aneurysms, petrous apex lesions (chondrosarcomas, cholesteatomas), ventrolateral brainstem lesions, clival chordomas, trigeminal neurinomas, and access to cranial nerves III, IV, V, and VII. Methods and Materials Fourteen anterior petrosectomies on eight cadaveric heads were performed in a skull base dissection laboratory. Predissection and postdissection thin-cut computed tomography scans were obtained to compare the bone resection. A computer program was used (InVivo5, Anatomage, San Jose, California, United States) to measure the bone resection and the improved viewing angle. Results The average bone removed in each plane was as follows: anterior to posterior plane was 10.57 mm ± 2.00 mm, superior to inferior was 9.39 mm ± 1.67 mm, and lateral to medial was 17.46 mm ± 4.64 mm. The average increased angle of view was 13.01 ± 2.35 degrees (Table 1). The average volume was 1786.94 ± 827.40 mm(3). Conclusions Anterior petrosectomy is a useful approach to access the ventrolateral brainstem region. We present a cadaveric study quantitating the volume of bone resection and improvement in the viewing angle. These data provide useful preoperative information on the utility of this skull base approach and the gain in the viewing angle after bony removal. PMID:27175319

  15. Preoperative MR imaging-based volume measurements of the hippocampal formation and anterior temporal lobe in epileptic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MR-based volume measurements of the anterior temporal lobe and hippocampal formation were performed in 36 patients who subsequently underwent surgery for medically refractory temporal lobe epilepsy. Seizure lateralization was based on standard clinical and electroencephalographic criteria. No surgical pathologic specimens contained structural lesions; epilepsy in these patients was therefore presumably due to mesial sclerosis. The right-minus-left hippocampal formation volume difference was greater than 0 in all 20 patients operated on the left side and less than 0 in all 16 patients operated on the right side. This difference completely separated the two surgical groups, while the same measurement in a group of 35 normal controls fell between the two surgical groups. Measurements of the anterior temporal to be showed a similar trend but incompletely separated controls, right- and left-sided epileptics. These results suggest that in a significant percentage of cases, MR-based volume measurements correctly identify the unilateral hippocampal atrophy that is known to occur in cases of mesial temporal sclerosis

  16. Surgical Simulation of Extradural Anterior Clinoidectomy through the Trans-superior Orbital Fissure Approach Using a Dissectable Three-dimensional Skull Base Model with Artificial Cavernous Sinus

    OpenAIRE

    Mori, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Takuji; NAKAO, Yasuaki; Esaki, Takanori

    2010-01-01

    Extradural anterior clinoidectomy via the trans-superior orbital fissure (SOF) approach can provide extensive exposure of the anterior clinoid process and safe drilling under direct view. This technique requires peeling of the dura propria of the temporal lobe from the lateral wall of the SOF. Therefore, cadaveric dissection is mandatory to acquire surgical technique. However, chances for cadaveric dissection are limited. We propose modification of our three-dimensional (3-D) skull base model...

  17. Asymmetric activation of the anterior cerebral cortex in recipients of IRECA: preliminary evidence for the energetic effects of an intention-based treatment modality on human neurophysiology.

    OpenAIRE

    Pike, C.; Vernon, D.; Hald, L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Neurophysiologic studies of mindfulness link the health benefits of meditation to activation of the left-anterior cerebral cortex. The similarity and functional importance of intention and attentional stance in meditative and biofield therapeutic practices suggest that modulation of recipient anterior asymmetric activation may mediate the energetic effects of intention-based biofield treatments as well. The aim of the current study was to test this hypothesis by using a treatment ...

  18. High-resolution sonography of the abnormal cranial suture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective. The purpose of this investigation is to elucidate the sonographic features of abnormal major cranial sutures. Materials and methods. Eight excised synostosed suture specimens were evaluated. The high-resolution sonographic appearance was correlated with the histological section, plain radiographs, CT and MRI. Diastatic and molded sutures were also evaluated with sonography and compared with the normal cranial suture appearance. Results. Synostosed sutures demonstrated one or more of the following features: (a) loss of echo-poor fibrous gap between bony plates (five sagittal and coronal synostoses); (b) irregular thickened inner sutural margin (three lambdoid synostoses); (c) loss of bevelled edge (one lambdoid synostosis); (d) asymmetric anterior fontanelle (one coronal synostosis). Cranial molding results in an overlap of echogenic bony plates. Sutural width (the distance between bony plates) is increased in cases of elevated intracranial pressure. Conclusion. Sonography is an inexpensive, radiation-free modality which can confirm synostosis versus molding versus an underlying intracranial lesion as a cause of plagiocephaly. The high-resolution sonographic images also provide a relatively easy means to assess sutural width and may provide information in regard to increased intracranial pressure. (orig.)

  19. The controversy of cranial bone motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, J S; Witt, P L

    1997-08-01

    Cranial bone motion continues to stimulate controversy. This controversy affects the general acceptance of some intervention methods used by physical therapists, namely, cranial osteopathic and craniosacral therapy techniques. Core to these intervention techniques is the belief that cranial bone mobility provides a compliant system where somatic dysfunction can occur and therapeutic techniques can be applied. Diversity of opinion over the truth of this concept characterizes differing viewpoints on the anatomy and physiology of the cranial complex. Literature on cranial bone motion was reviewed for the purpose of better understanding this topic. Published research overall was scant and inconclusive. Animal and human studies demonstrate a potential for small magnitude motion. Physical therapists should carefully scrutinize the literature presented as evidence for cranial bone motion. Further research is needed to resolve this controversy. Outcomes research, however, is needed to validate cranial bone mobilization as an effective treatment. PMID:9243408

  20. Does lumbar spinal degeneration begin with the anterior structures? A study of the observed epidemiology in a community-based population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarvik Jeffrey G

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background- Prior studies that have concluded that disk degeneration uniformly precedes facet degeneration have been based on convenience samples of individuals with low back pain. We conducted a study to examine whether the view that spinal degeneration begins with the anterior spinal structures is supported by epidemiologic observations of degeneration in a community-based population. Methods- 361 participants from the Framingham Heart Study were included in this study. The prevalences of anterior vertebral structure degeneration (disk height loss and posterior vertebral structure degeneration (facet joint osteoarthritis were characterized by CT imaging. The cohort was divided into the structural subgroups of participants with 1 no degeneration, 2 isolated anterior degeneration (without posterior degeneration, 3 combined anterior and posterior degeneration, and 4 isolated posterior degeneration (without anterior structure degeneration. We determined the prevalence of each degeneration pattern by age group Results- As the prevalence of the no degeneration and isolated anterior degeneration patterns decreased with increasing age group, the prevalence of the combined anterior/posterior degeneration pattern increased. 22% of individuals demonstrated isolated posterior degeneration, without an increase in prevalence by age group. Isolated posterior degeneration was most common at the L5-S1 and L4-L5 spinal levels. In multivariate analyses, disk height loss was independently associated with facet joint osteoarthritis, as were increased age (years, female sex, and increased BMI (kg/m2, but not smoking. Conclusions- The observed epidemiology of lumbar spinal degeneration in the community-based population is consistent with an ordered progression beginning in the anterior structures, for the majority of individuals. However, some individuals demonstrate atypical patterns of degeneration, beginning in the posterior joints. Increased age and BMI

  1. Epidemiological approach to emergent cranial surgery of cranial traumas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hülagü Kaptan

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available

    Objective: In this study, we aim to define the emergent cranial surgery of cranial trauma cases in terms of the reason of occurance, diagnosis, prognostic factors and results. Methods: 153 cases hospitalized in our clinic during a four year period were statistically analysed in accordance with trauma etiology, age, gender, application GCS (Glascow Coma Score mortality rate, location and established patology.

    Results: 76% (116 of the 153 cases were male. The most frequent etiological reasons were, in descending order, traffic accident 52% (n = 80, fall 34% (n = 53, direct trauma to the head 14(n =20. 45% (n = 69 were diagnosed epidural haematomas, 26% (n = 40 were diagnosed depression fractures and 3% (n = 5 were diagnosed intracerebral haematomas. A meaningful statistical difference was found in the comparison of the diagnosis regarding gender (p=0,012 age group (p=0,0282 and GCS (p=0,0001.

    Conclusions: In order to prevent cranial traumas, studies aimed at minimizing traffic accidents should be undertaken. The most essential action after the accident has occured is triage, and this is of great importance in order to establish communication among the health institutions.

  2. Posttraumatic Cranial Cystic Fibrous Dysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arata Tomiyama

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 14-year-old was girl admitted to our hospital with a subcutaneous mass of the occipital head. The mass had grown for 6 years, after she had sustained a head injury at the age of 6, and was located directly under a previous wound. Skull X-ray Photograph (xp, computed tomography (CT, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed a bony defect and cystic changes in the skull corresponding to a subcutaneous mass. Bone scintigraphy revealed partial accumulation. The patient underwent total removal of the skull mass, and the diagnosis from the pathological findings of the cyst wall was fibrous dysplasia (FD. The radiographic findings for cystic cranial FD can be various. Progressive skull disease has been reported to be associated with head trauma, but the relationship between cranial FD and head trauma has not been previously reported. Previous studies have suggested that c-fos gene expression is a key mechanism in injury-induced FD.

  3. Cranial computerized tomography in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of cranial ultrasound (A-scan) and computerized tomography (CT) in 81 children were corresponding in 90%, when ventricular diameter was determined, in 85% of intracerebral dysplasias, and in 12,5% of neonatal intracranial hemorrhagia. Comparison of EEG and CT findings in 70 of these children were corresponding in 54% of the cases with respect to 'normal' and 'abnormal'. On the basis of these results routine one-dimensional ultrasound scanning still seems to be a useful procedure. (orig.)

  4. Cranial computed tomography in paediatrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper deals mainly with methodical aspects (such as sedation, intravenous and intrathecal application of contrast media) and with common difficulties in interpretation of computed tomography images. The indications for cranial CT are discussed in respect probable therapeutic consequences and expected diagnostic yield. In view of the author CT is, as a rule, not required in assessing chronic headache, generalised epileptic convulsions, non-specific mental retardation and cerebral palsy. (Author)

  5. Cranial imaging in child abuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serious head injury in children less than 2 years old is often the result of child abuse. The role of the different neuroimaging modalities in child abuse is reviewed. Skull X-ray and cranial CT are mandatory. Repeat or serial imaging may be necessary and brain MR imaging may contribute to the diagnostic work-up, particularly in the absence of characteristic CT findings. The radiologist plays an important role in accurately identifying non-accidental cranial trauma. The clinical presentation can be non-specific or misleading. The possibility should be considered of a combined mechanism, i.e., an underlying condition with superimposed trauma. In this context, the radiologist is in the front line to suggest the possibility of child abuse. It is therefore important to know the spectrum of, sometimes subtle, imaging findings one may encounter. Opthalmological examination is of the greatest importance and is discussed here, because the combination of retinal hemorrhages and subdural hematoma is very suggestive of non-accidental cranial trauma. (orig.)

  6. Relationship between the anterior forebrain mesocircuit and the default mode network in the structural bases of disorders of consciousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas D. Lant

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The specific neural bases of disorders of consciousness (DOC are still not well understood. Some studies have suggested that functional and structural impairments in the default mode network may play a role in explaining these disorders. In contrast, others have proposed that dysfunctions in the anterior forebrain mesocircuit involving striatum, globus pallidus, and thalamus may be the main underlying mechanism. Here, we provide the first report of structural integrity of fiber tracts connecting the nodes of the mesocircuit and the default mode network in 8 patients with DOC. We found evidence of significant damage to subcortico-cortical and cortico-cortical fibers, which were more severe in vegetative state patients and correlated with clinical severity as determined by Coma Recovery Scale—Revised (CRS-R scores. In contrast, fiber tracts interconnecting subcortical nodes were not significantly impaired. Lastly, we found significant damage in all fiber tracts connecting the precuneus with cortical and subcortical areas. Our results suggest a strong relationship between the default mode network – and most importantly the precuneus – and the anterior forebrain mesocircuit in the neural basis of the DOC.

  7. Tract-based Spatial Statistics and fMRI Analysis in Patients with Small Cell Lung Cancer before Prophylactic Cranial Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benezi, S.; Bromis, K.; Karavasilis, E.; Karanasiou, I. S.; Koutsoupidou, M.; Matsopoulos, G.; Ventouras, E.; Uzunoglu, N.; Kouloulias, V.; Papathanasiou, M.; Foteineas, A.; Efstathopoulos, E.; Kelekis, N.; Kelekis, D.

    2015-09-01

    Prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) is known to increase life expectancy to a significant degree in Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC) patients. The overall scope of this research is to investigate changes in structural and functional connectivity between SCLC patients and controls before and after PCI treatment. In the current study specifically we use diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and functional Magnetic Resonance (fMRI) to identify potential alterations in white matter structure and brain function respectively, in SCLC patients before PCI compared to healthy participants. The results in DTI analysis have showed lower fractional anisotropy (FA) and higher eigenvalues in white matter regions in the patient group. Similarly, in fMRI analysis a lower level of activation in the primary somatosensory cortex was reported. The results presented herein are subject to further investigation with larger patient and control groups.

  8. Roentgen stereophotogrammetry for analysis of cranial growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A system of roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis (RSA) has been developed and its value in studies of cranial growth in both man and the experimental animal (rabbit) has been delineated. This method is based on measurements from metal bone marker images on roentgenograms. Two roentgen tubes simultaneously expose the object, which is placed in one of two types of calibration cages. The object position does not need to be identical from one examination to the next. The cage, holding indicators of predetermined internal positions (in two or four planes), defines a laboratory coordinate system. Two-dimensional image coordinates are obtained by means of a highly accurate cartographic instrument. By computer reconstruction of the x-ray beams through the markers, 3-D object coordinates are calculated. For subsequent analysis of growth processes, extensive software is necessary. To control intrasegmental stability (routinely performed at each examination), a minimum of two markers is required, whereas three markers are needed in each skeletal segment for kinematic analysis using the rigid-body concept. Careful planning of marker placement before implantation minimizes implant loss and instability that otherwise might be a problem. Complications other than bone marker loosening have been nonexistent. The technical accuracy is high. Consequently, roentgen stereophotogrammetry, with the aid of metallic implants, is a superior means to obtain biometric information on cranial growth with relative ease

  9. Multiple Cranial Nerve Involvement In Cryptococcal Meningitis

    OpenAIRE

    Mahadevan A; Kumar A; Santosh V; Satishchandra P; Shankar S K

    2000-01-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis is an uncommon cause of multiple cranial nerve palsies. This case report illustrates one such case of cryptococcal meningitis clinically manifesting with extensive cranial nerve involvement in an HIV seronegative individual. Histology revealed infiltration of the cranial nerves by cryptococci causing axonal disruption with secondary demyelination in the absence of any evidence of inflammation or vasculitis. We believe that axonal damage underlies the pathogenesis of...

  10. Cranial radiotherapy predisposes to abdominal adiposity in survivors of childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advances in treatment of acute lymphocytic leukemia increased the likelihood of developing late treatment-associated effects, such as abdominal adiposity, increasing the risk of cardiovascular disease in this population. Cranial radiotherapy is one of the factors that might be involved in this process. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of cranial radiotherapy on adiposity indexes in survivors of acute lymphocytic leukemia. A comparative cross-sectional study of 56 acute lymphocytic leukemia survivors, chronological age between 15 and 24 years, assigned into two groups according to the exposure to cranial radiotherapy (25 irradiated and 31 non-irradiated), assessed according to body fat (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry), computed tomography scan-derived abdominal adipose tissue, lipid profile, and insulin resistance. Cranial radiotherapy increased body fat and abdominal adipose tissue and altered lipid panel. Yet, lipids showed no clinical relevance so far. There were significantly more obese patients among those who received cranial radiotherapy (52% irradiated versus 22.6% non-irradiated), based on dual energy X-ray absorptiometry body fat measurements. Nonetheless, no association was observed between cranial radiotherapy and body mass index, waist circumference, waist-to-height ratio or insulin resistance. Adolescent and young adult survivors of childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia showed an increase in body fat and an alteration of fat distribution, which were related to cranial radiotherapy. Fat compartment modifications possibly indicate a disease of adipose tissue, and cranial radiotherapy imports in this process

  11. The Cranial Nerve Skywalk: A 3D Tutorial of Cranial Nerves in a Virtual Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson-Hatcher, April; Hazzard, Matthew; Ramirez-Yanez, German

    2014-01-01

    Visualization of the complex courses of the cranial nerves by students in the health-related professions is challenging through either diagrams in books or plastic models in the gross laboratory. Furthermore, dissection of the cranial nerves in the gross laboratory is an extremely meticulous task. Teaching and learning the cranial nerve pathways…

  12. Significcance of cranial nerve involvement shown by the prognosis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To analyze the cranial nerve involvement in nasophryngeal carcinoma and its relationship with the prognosis with the optimal treatment for such patients studied also. Methods: 935 untreated nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients, admitted into our hospital from January 1990 to June 1999, were analyzed retrospectively. These patients were divided into cranial nerve involved group and cranial nerve un- involved group by patients symptoms signs and/or images before the treatment. SPSS10.0 soft package was used to analyze the effect of cranial nerve involvement on the prognosis. Results: The overall percentage of cranial nerve involvement was 20.0%, of which the trigeminal nerve was most common . The 5-year local recurrence rate was 20.1% and 16.8% (P=0.465) in cranial nerve involved group and un-involved group, respectively. In the patients with cranial nerve involved, the 5-year local recurrence rates of patients who received boost skull base irradiation dose <70, 70-79 and ≥80 Gy was 38.1%, 24.5% and 16.0% (P =0.082), respectively. The 5-year distant metastasis rate was 31.6% and 19.5% (P=0.020) in cranial nerve involved group and un-involved group. The corresponding overall survival rates and disease-free survival rate was 62.2% and 78.1% (P=O.000) and 43.2%, 62.4% (P=0.000), respectively. By multivariate analysis, cranial nerve involvement was an independent factor both in overall survival (RR 1.62, P=0.001 ) and disease-free survival (RR=1.40, P=0.020). Conclusions: There are more distant metastasis, worse overall survival and disease-free survival in patients with cranial nerve involved. Boost irradiation to the involved skull base may improve the local control. Radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy for these patients may also have brighter future. (authors)

  13. Disruption of the MacMARCKS gene prevents cranial neural tube closure and results in anencephaly.

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, J; Chang, S.; Duncan, S A; Okano, H J; Fishell, G.; Aderem, A

    1996-01-01

    MacMARCKS is a member of the MARCKS family of protein kinase C (PKC) substrates. Biochemical evidence demonstrates that these proteins integrate calcium and PKC-dependent signals to regulate actin structure at the membrane. We report here that deletion of the MacMARCKS gene prevents cranial neural tube closure in the developing brain, resulting in anencephaly. This suggests a central role for MacMARCKS and the PKC signal transduction pathway in the folding of the anterior neural plate during ...

  14. Intracranial Carotid Calcification on Cranial Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subedi, Deepak; Zishan, Umme Sara; Chappell, Francesca; Gregoriades, Maria-Lena; Sudlow, Cathie; Sellar, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Intracranial internal carotid artery calcification is associated with cerebrovascular risk factors and stroke, but few quantification methods are available. We tested the reliability of visual scoring, semiautomated Agatston score, and calcium volume measurement in patients with recent stroke. Methods— We used scans from a prospective hospital stroke registry and included patients with anterior circulation ischemic stroke or transient ischemic stroke whose noncontrast cranial computed tomographic scans were available electronically. Two raters measured semiautomatic quantitative Agatston score, and calcium volume, and performed qualitative visual scoring using the original 4-point Woodcock score and a modified Woodcock score, where each image on which the internal carotid arteries appeared was scored and the slice scores summed. Results— Intra- and interobserver coefficient of variations were 8.8% and 16.5% for Agatston, 8.8% and 15.5% for calcium volume, and 5.7% and 5.4% for the modified Woodcock visual score, respectively. The modified Woodcock visual score correlated strongly with both Agatston and calcium volume quantitative measures (both R2=0.84; P<0.0001); calcium volume increased by 0.47-mm/point increase in modified Woodcock visual score. Intracranial internal carotid artery calcification increased with age by all measures (eg, visual score, Spearman ρ=0.4; P=0.005). Conclusions— Visual scores correlate highly with quantitative intracranial internal carotid artery calcification measures, with excellent observer agreements. Visual intracranial internal carotid artery scores could be a rapid and practical method for epidemiological studies. PMID:26251250

  15. Cranial morphometry of early hominids: facial region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilsborough, A; Wood, B A

    1988-05-01

    We report here on early hominid facial diversity, as part of a more extensive morphometric survey of cranial variability in Pliocene and early Pleistocene Hominidae. Univariate and multivariate techniques are used to summarise variation in facial proportions in South and East African hominids, and later Quaternary groups are included as comparators in order to scale the variation displayed. The results indicate that "robust" australopithecines have longer, broader faces than the "gracile" form, but that all australopithecine species show comparable degrees of facial projection. "Robust" crania are characterised by anteriorly situated, deep malar processes that slope forwards and downwards. Smaller hominid specimens, formally or informally assigned to Homo (H. habilis, KNM-ER 1813, etc.), have individual facial dimensions that usually fall within the range of Australopithecus africanus, but which in combination reveal a significantly different morphological pattern; SK 847 shows similarly hominine facial proportions, which differ significantly from those of A. robustus specimens from Swartkrans. KNM-ER 1470 possesses a facial pattern that is basically hominine, but which in some respects mimics that of "robust" australopithecines. Early specimens referred to H. erectus possess facial proportions that contrast markedly with those of other Villafranchian hominids and which suggest differing masticatory forces, possibly reflecting a shift in dietary niche. Overall the results indicate two broad patterns of facial proportions in Hominidae: one is characteristic of Pliocene/basal Pleistocene forms with opposite polarities represented by A. boisei and H. habilis; the other pattern, which typifies hominids from the later Lower Pleistocene onwards, is first found in specimens widely regarded as early representatives of H. erectus, but which differ in which certain respects from the face of later members of that species. PMID:3136656

  16. Vincristine-Induced Cranial Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad TALEBIAN*

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Talebian A, Goudarzi RM, Mohammadzadeh M , Mirzadeh AS. Vincristine-Induced Cranial Neuropathy. Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Winter; 8(1:66-68. Abstract Vincristine (VCR is a vinca alkaloid that is used for treatment of many malignancies. The vinca alkaloids are neurotoxic, usually causing a peripheral neuropathy, but cranial neuropathies are rare as side effects. Described here is the case of a 2.5-year-old boy, a known case of Wilms’ tumor, treated by vincristine (0/067 mg/kg/day and dactinomycin (0/045 mg/kg/day after surgery. Three weeks after treatment, he presented with bilateral ptosis. Neurological examination revealed bilateral ptosis with normal pupillary reflex and eye movement. He received 3.015 mg cumulative dose of vincristine before development of ptosis. Treatment with pyridoxine (150 mg/m2 p.o. BID and pyridostigmine (3 mg/kg p.o. BID started as neuroprotective agents, and after 7 days the problem disappeared. The treatment continued for 6 weeks and there were no signs of ptosis or a recurrence in follow up 2 months later.

  17. Evaluation of X ray radiation doses in pediatric examinations of cranial computerized tomography based on optimization studies; Avaliacao das doses de radiacao X em exames pediatricos de tomografia computadorizada de cranio com base em estudos de otimizacao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daros, Kellen Adriana Curci

    2005-07-01

    This paper identifies the technical conditions for CT examination which offers lowest absorbed dose and to attend the manufacturer recommendations as far the spatial resolution is concerned. The paper evaluates the absorbed dose during cranial CT in up to 6 years children satisfying the technical condition recommended by the manufacturer and routine clinical conditions. The paper also established a quantitative relationship among the absorbed dose and its distribution in the cranial regions of pediatric patients up to 6 years old in a way to estimate the doses subject to optimized conditions

  18. Classification of neurons by dendritic branching pattern. A categorisation based on Golgi impregnation of spinal and cranial somatic and visceral afferent and efferent cells in the adult human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Maguid, T E; Bowsher, D

    1984-06-01

    Neurons from adult human brainstem and spinal cord, fixed by immersion in formalin, were impregnated by a Golgi method and examined in sections 100 micron thick. Objective numerical criteria were used to classify completely impregnated neurons. Only the parameters mentioned below were found to be valid. Neurons in 100 micron sections were classified on the basis of (i) the primary dendrite number, indicated by a Roman numeral and called group; (ii) the dendritic branching pattern, comprising the highest branching order seen, indicated by an Arabic numeral and called category; the lowest dendritic branching order observed in complete neurons, indicated by an upper case letter and called class; and the number of branching orders seen between the two preceding, indicated by a lower case letter and called subclass. On the basis of the above characteristics, all neurons seen in the grey matter of the spinal cord and cranial nerve nuclei could be classified into thirteen 'families'. The results of other investigations (Abdel-Maguid & Bowsher, 1979, 1984) showed that this classification has functional value. PMID:6204961

  19. Vincristine-Induced Cranial Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad TALEBIAN*

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Talebian A, Goudarzi RM, Mohammadzadeh M , Mirzadeh AS. Vincristine-Induced Cranial Neuropathy. Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Winter; 8(1:66-68. AbstractVincristine (VCR is a vinca alkaloid that is used for treatment of many malignancies.The vinca alkaloids are neurotoxic, usually causing a peripheral neuropathy, but cranial neuropathies are rare as side effects. Described here is the case of a 2.5-year-old boy, a known case of Wilms’ tumor, treated by vincristine (0/067 mg/kg/day and dactinomycin (0/045 mg/kg/day after surgery. Three weeks after treatment, he presented with bilateral ptosis.Neurological examination revealed bilateral ptosis with normal pupillary reflex and eye movement. He received 3.015 mg cumulative dose of vincristine before development of ptosis.Treatment with pyridoxine (150 mg/m2 p.o. BID and pyridostigmine (3 mg/kg p.o. BID started as neuroprotective agents, and after 7 days the problem disappeared.The treatment continued for 6 weeks and there were no signs of ptosis or a recurrence in follow up 2 months later. References:Toopchizade V, Hosseini M, et al. Electrophysiological signs of neuropathy caused by vincristine. Medical Journal of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. 2010 Autumn;31(3; 19-25.Gursel E.S. Vincristine-Induced Unilateral Ptosis in a Child. Pediatr Neurol 2009; 41:461-463.Ngamphaiboon N, Sweeney R, Wetzler M, Wang ES. Pyridoxine treatment of vincristine-induced cranial polyneuropathy in an adult patient with acute lymphocytic leukemia: Case report and review of the literature. Leuk Res. 2010 Aug;34(8:e194-6.Lash SC, Williams CP, Marsh CS, Crithchley C, Hodgkins PR, Mackie EJ. Acute Sixth-Nerve Palsy After Vincristine Therapy. Journal of AAPOS 2004 Feb;8(1: 67-8.Bay A, Yilmaz C, Yilmaz N, Oner AF. Vincristine induced cranial polyneuropathy. Indian J Pediatr. 2006 Jun;73(6:531-3.Tuxen M K, Hansen SW. Complication of treatment, Neurotoxicity secondary to antineoplastic

  20. Unconstrained cranial evolution in Neandertals and modern humans compared to common chimpanzees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Timothy D; Stringer, Chris B

    2015-10-22

    A variety of lines of evidence support the idea that neutral evolutionary processes (genetic drift, mutation) have been important in generating cranial differences between Neandertals and modern humans. But how do Neandertals and modern humans compare with other species? And how do these comparisons illuminate the evolutionary processes underlying cranial diversification? To address these questions, we used 27 standard cranial measurements collected on 2524 recent modern humans, 20 Neandertals and 237 common chimpanzees to estimate split times between Neandertals and modern humans, and between Pan troglodytes verus and two other subspecies of common chimpanzee. Consistent with a neutral divergence, the Neandertal versus modern human split-time estimates based on cranial measurements are similar to those based on DNA sequences. By contrast, the common chimpanzee cranial estimates are much lower than DNA-sequence estimates. Apparently, cranial evolution has been unconstrained in Neandertals and modern humans compared with common chimpanzees. Based on these and additional analyses, it appears that cranial differentiation in common chimpanzees has been restricted by stabilizing natural selection. Alternatively, this restriction could be due to genetic and/or developmental constraints on the amount of within-group variance (relative to effective population size) available for genetic drift to act on. PMID:26468243

  1. Increased cranial capacity in hominid evolution and preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaline, Jean

    2003-08-01

    One of the major trends in primate evolution generally and hominid evolution in particular, is cranio-facial contraction accompanied by an increase in cranial capacity. Landmark-based morphometric methods are applied to adult skulls of great apes (Gorilla, Pan), australopithecines (Australopithecus and Paranthropus), and humans (Homo eragster, erectus, neanderthalensis, and sapiens). Morphological changes quantified by vector fields (Procrustes methods) indicate that these skull plans are characterized by distinctive degrees of cranio-facial contraction. These suggest the existence of three discrete skull organization plans: "great ape", "australopithecine" and "Homo". This paper focuses on the "Homo" skull bauplan and discusses the possible relationships between greatly increased cranial capacity and preeclampsia. The earliest species of the human lineage exhibit less cranio-facial contraction and smaller cranial capacity than Homo neanderthalensis and modern Homo sapiens. Neandertalization introduces a posterior elongation of the skull and leads to a large increase in cranial capacity in the last Neandertals, with values as large as in present-day H. sapiens. Consequently, a new biological hypothesis is proposed to account for the unexplained disappearance of H. neanderthalensis some 30000 years ago related to the possible appearance of preeclampsia as a factor affecting the survival of the species. PMID:12896818

  2. Examining the feasibility of a Microsoft Kinect ™ based game intervention for individuals with anterior cruciate ligament injury risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhiyu Huo; Griffin, Joseph; Babiuch, Ryan; Gray, Aaron; Willis, Bradley; Marjorie, Skubic; Shining Sun

    2015-08-01

    We describe a feasibility study in which the Microsoft Kinect is used for a game-based exercise to strengthen posterior chain muscles which are often weak in those at high risk of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. In the game, subjects perform a single posterior chain strengthening exercise. The game uses a side-scrolling video display driven by a hip abduction exercise while a player lies down on the floor. Leg lifts beyond a predetermined angle trigger the jumping action of an animated tiger. We describe the scene and game control, which uses depth images from the Kinect. Although Kinect-based skeletal data are used for many games, the skeletal model does not yield good estimates for positions on the floor. Our proposed system uses multiple leg angle estimators for different angle regions to recognize the player lying down and capture the angle between two legs. We conducted an experiment that validates our system with marker-based Vicon ground truth data. We also present results of an end-to-end test using the game, showing feasibility. PMID:26737918

  3. Cranial nerves III, IV and VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of advances in CT and MR imaging, accurate identification and evaluation of cranial nerve lesions is now possible. Cranial nerves III, IV, and VI, providing motor and sensory control of the eye, can be evaluated as a unit. In this paper, the authors present an overview of the anatomy and pathology of these cranial nerves. We first illustrate their normal anatomic pathways from the brain stem to the orbit. This is followed by clinical examples of patients with a variety of isolated and complex palsies of these three cranial nerves. This is accomplished by inclusion of ocular photographs, correlative imaging studies, and the use of diagrams. Knowledge of the gross and imaging anatomy and the ophthalmologic manifestations of pathology affecting these three cranial nerves permits a tailored approach to their evaluation

  4. Acesso transmaxilar à base do crânio: avaliação de 11 casos Transmaxillary approach to the cranial base: an evaluation of 11 cases

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio Figueiredo Caubi; Carlos Augusto Pereira Lago; Belmiro Cavalcanti do Egito Vasconcelos; Emanuel Dias e Oliveira Silva; Nelson Studart Rocha; Hécio Henrique Araújo de Morais

    2008-01-01

    O acesso cirúrgico à região de base do crânio é sempre difícil principalmente pelas estruturas anatômicas nobres associadas. A osteotomia maxilar proporciona visão direta à região de clivus e coluna cervical, além de apresentar uma menor morbidade em relação aos diversos acessos descritos na literatura. OBJETIVO: Avaliar 11 casos submetidos à osteotomia transmaxilar, descrevendo técnica cirúrgica, resultados e complicações pós-operatórias. PACIENTES E MÉTODOS: O estudo retrospectivo de onze p...

  5. Psychophysiological Working Mechanisms of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy: Functional Anterior Brain Asymmetry and Affective Style

    OpenAIRE

    Keune, Philipp

    2011-01-01

    Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) is one of the most frequent psychiatric disorders and is often not limited to a single depressive episode, but involves repeated relapses. Due to the frequent phenomenon of relapse, in recent years, research efforts in clinical psychology have focused on the development and refinement of maintenance psychotherapy, i.e. therapeutic interventions specifically designed to prevent depressive relapse. Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) is a meditation-based ...

  6. Efficacy of a lutein-based dye (PhacodyneTM for visualizing anterior capsulorhexis during cataract surgery by phacoemulsification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Monferrari Monteiro Vianna

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Avaliar a eficácia e eficiência de um novo corante à base de luteína para coloração da cápsula anterior durante cirurgia de facoemulsificação em humanos. Métodos: Vinte e cinco olhos de 25 pacientes foram operados por 25 cirurgiões diferentes que realizaram capsulorrexis circular contínua e facoemulsificação após coloração da cápsula anterior com corante à base de luteína. Um questionário avaliou a opinião dos cirurgiões sobre a eficácia do corante. Exames pós-operatórios foram realizados nos dias 1, 7 e 30 por meio de exame oftalmológico completo, topografia/ paquimetria e contagem de células endoteliais. Resultados: De acordo com o questionário aplicado, o corante facilitou a cirurgia em todos os olhos. A classificação da catarata de acordo com o LOCS III foi de 3,24 ± 1,12. A acuidade visual pré-operatória com melhor correção foi de 0,89 ± 0,59 (logMAR, passando a 0,23 ± 0,22 no pós-operatório. A pressão intraocular (PIO permaneceu estável e houve reação de câmara leve que desapareceu em todos os casos durante os primeiros 7 dias de pós-operatório. Não houve significância estatística comparando a paquimetria e PIO pré e pós-operatórios. Conclusão: O novo corante se mostrou eficiente e sem sinais de toxicidade ou efeitos adversos, após 30 dias, quando usado para auxiliar a cirurgia de facoemulsificação.

  7. Acesso transmaxilar à base do crânio: avaliação de 11 casos Transmaxillary approach to the cranial base: an evaluation of 11 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Figueiredo Caubi

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available O acesso cirúrgico à região de base do crânio é sempre difícil principalmente pelas estruturas anatômicas nobres associadas. A osteotomia maxilar proporciona visão direta à região de clivus e coluna cervical, além de apresentar uma menor morbidade em relação aos diversos acessos descritos na literatura. OBJETIVO: Avaliar 11 casos submetidos à osteotomia transmaxilar, descrevendo técnica cirúrgica, resultados e complicações pós-operatórias. PACIENTES E MÉTODOS: O estudo retrospectivo de onze pacientes foi submetido à cirurgia transmaxilar para acesso à região do tronco encefálico. Registros quanto à oclusão dentária, hemorragia trans e pós-operatória, necrose óssea e alterações de tecido mole foram estudados. Todos seguiram o mesmo protocolo cirúrgico e acompanhamento médio de dois anos. RESULTADOS: Após o tratamento todos os pacientes apresentaram melhora do quadro clínico e nenhum dano neurológico, hemorragia trans e pós-operatória ou intercorrências maiores foram identificadas. Dentre as complicações, em dois pacientes ocorreu fratura incompleta da maxila, dois apresentaram laceração da mucosa nasal e um apresentou como complicação tardia uma fístula bucossinusal. CONCLUSÃO: A osteotomia transmaxilar possibilitou adequado acesso a região de clivus para descompressão do tronco encefálico com baixo índice de complicações nesta série de casos.Surgical access to the skull base is always difficult, especially because of the noble anatomic structures present there. Maxillary osteotomy provides direct view to the clivus region and the neck spine, and it also bears less morbidity when compared to the many other accesses described in the literature. AIM: to assess 11 patients submitted to transmaxillary osteotomy, describing the surgical technique and postoperative results and complications. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective study involving eleven patients submitted to transmaxillary approach

  8. Alopecia after prophylactic cranial irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) is currently widely used in treatment of patients with lung cancer despite that the data on alopecia after PCI are limited. The aim of the study was to identify factors influencing the duration of alopecia after prophylactic cranial irradiation. Two groups of patients were analyzed: group I - 34 patients radically treated for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and group II - 18 patients undergoing concurrent chemo-radiotherapy for small cell lung cancer (SCLC). In group I 12 patients were treated with radiotherapy only, the remaining patients were treated with neo- or adjuvant chemotherapy (cisplatin + vinorelbine: PN or cisplatin + gemcitabin: PG) in 2 to 6 cycles. PCI was administered during the last tree weeks of thoracic irradiation or . 2 weeks after the last cycle of chemotherapy and consisted of 15 fractions of 2 Gy per day (30 Gy), 5 days per week. Patients from group II received 25 Gy in 10 fractions starting from the second week of thoracic irradiation; chemotherapy (cisplatin + vepesid: PE every 21 days) started concurrently with thoracic irradiation. Alopecia occurred in all patients treated with PCI; hair loss began 2-3 weeks after the initiation of therapy. In group I full re-growth of hair occurred in 33 patients, one patient died during treatment, before hair re-growth had chance to appear. Time to re-growths (TRG) was 1.5-6 months, median 2.5 months. In this group a trend towards longer re-growths in patients who had received more than 3 cycles of chemotherapy (p=0.07). In group II hair re-growths occurred between 5 and 12 months after the completion of treatment, with median time of 10 months, and was significantly longer than in group I. The results suggest that the most important factor for TRG is the type and the number of chemotherapy cycles. (author)

  9. Factors associated with the prevalence of anterior open bite among preschool children: A population-based study in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniella Borges Machado

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with the prevalence of anterior open bite among five-year-old Brazilian children. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was undertaken using data from the National Survey of Oral Health (SB Brazil 2010. The outcome variable was anterior open bite classified as present or absent. The independent variables were classified by individual, sociodemographic and clinical factors. Data were analyzed through bivariate and multivariate analysis using SPSS statistical software (version 18.0 with a 95% level of significance. RESULTS: The prevalence of anterior open bite was 12.1%. Multivariate analysis showed that preschool children living in Southern Brazil had an increased chance of 1.8 more times of having anterior open bite (CI 95%: 1.16 - 3.02. Children identified with alterations in overjet had 14.6 times greater chances of having anterior open bite (CI 95%: 8.98 - 24.03. CONCLUSION: There was a significant association between anterior open bite and the region of Brazil where the children lived, the presence of altered overjet and the prevalence of posterior crossbite.

  10. Network Profiles of the Dorsal Anterior Cingulate and Dorsal Prefrontal Cortex in Schizophrenia During Hippocampal-Based Associative Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodcock, Eric A; Wadehra, Sunali; Diwadkar, Vaibhav A

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a disorder characterized by brain network dysfunction, particularly during behavioral tasks that depend on frontal and hippocampal mechanisms. Here, we investigated network profiles of the regions of the frontal cortex during memory encoding and retrieval, phases of processing essential to associative memory. Schizophrenia patients (n = 12) and healthy control (HC) subjects (n = 10) participated in an established object-location associative memory paradigm that drives frontal-hippocampal interactions. Network profiles were modeled of both the dorsal prefrontal (dPFC) and the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) as seeds using psychophysiological interaction analyses, a robust framework for investigating seed-based connectivity in specific task contexts. The choice of seeds was motivated by previous evidence of involvement of these regions during associative memory. Differences between patients and controls were evaluated using second-level analyses of variance (ANOVA) with seed (dPFC vs. dACC), group (patients vs. controls), and memory process (encoding and retrieval) as factors. Patients showed a pattern of exaggerated modulation by each of the dACC and the dPFC during memory encoding and retrieval. Furthermore, group by memory process interactions were observed within regions of the hippocampus. In schizophrenia patients, relatively diminished modulation during encoding was associated with increased modulation during retrieval. These results suggest a pattern of complex dysfunctional network signatures of critical forebrain regions in schizophrenia. Evidence of dysfunctional frontal-medial temporal lobe network signatures in schizophrenia is consistent with the illness' characterization as a disconnection syndrome. PMID:27092063

  11. Phacoemulsification in anterior megalophthalmos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Graham A; Hann, Joshua V; Braga-Mele, Rosa

    2006-07-01

    This case outlines the phacoemulsification technique used to overcome the challenge of the hyperdeep anterior chamber, weak zonules, abnormal anterior capsule, and large capsular bag. Key steps included trypan blue staining of the anterior capsule, a large capsulorhexis, prolapse of the nucleus into the anterior chamber with phacoemulsification anterior to the capsulorhexis, and a posterior chamber-placed iris-clip intraocular lens. Successful visual rehabilitation is achievable in these anatomically challenging eyes. PMID:16857490

  12. Cranial nerve involvement in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Between 1975 and 1989, 23 nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients presenting with cranial nerve involvement (CNI) of one or more nerves at the time of diagnosis were treated and followed-up in our department. All patients were irradiated with curative intent, and total doses of 50 to 70 Gy (median 65 Gy) were delivered to the nasopharynx. Cranial nerves VI, III, V, IV, IX, and XII were the most commonly involved nerves. The total response rate of cranial nerves was 74% in a median follow-up time of 2 years, with the highest rate observed in the third and sixth cranial nerves. All complete responses except two were observed in the first month after radiotherapy. (author)

  13. Cranial MR finding of reversible eclampsia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate clinical usefulness of cranial magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) in diagnosis and for follow-up of reversible eclampsia. Cranial MRI was performed on four consecutive pregnant patients(ante-partum 3 cases, postpartum 1 cases), who had generalized tonic-clonic seizure caused by eclampsia. One of the four patients underwent follow-up MRI. Cranial MRI typically demonstrated bilateral hyperintense lesions on T2-weighted images and iso-to hypointense lesions on T1-weighted images. MRI abnormalities were most commonly located in the distribution of the posterior cerebral artery circulation and were associated with symptoms of visual disturbance. Most cranial lesions of eclampsia demonstrated in MRI were reversible. MRI with its capability to detect even subtle abnormalities in the brain that are not visible on CT, and may be the technique of choice for evaluating the cerebral the pathology of pregnant women with eclampsia

  14. Normal computed tomographic anatomy of the cisterns and cranial nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study, based on the normal CT anatomy of the cisterns investigated with Metrizamide, aims at attempting to find out with accuracy which plane of section is the most suitable for the investigation of each group of cisterns (posterior fossa, mesencephalon, suprasellar). Moreover we felt it necessary to include our study the normal appearance of the cranial nerves as their normal CT anatymy - optic nerves expected - is not well known yet. (orig./AJ)

  15. Disorders of the lower cranial nerves

    OpenAIRE

    Josef Finsterer; Wolfgang Grisold

    2015-01-01

    Lesions of the lower cranial nerves (LCN) are due to numerous causes, which need to be differentiated to optimize management and outcome. This review aims at summarizing and discussing diseases affecting LCN. Review of publications dealing with disorders of the LCN in humans. Affection of multiple LCN is much more frequent than the affection of a single LCN. LCN may be affected solely or together with more proximal cranial nerves, with central nervous system disease, or with nonneurological d...

  16. Isolated cranial nerve palsies in multiple sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Zadro, Ivana; Barun, Barbara; Habek, Mario; Brinar, Vesna V.

    1997-01-01

    During a 10 year period 24 patients with definite multiple sclerosis with isolated cranial nerve palsies were studied (third and fourth nerve: one patient each, sixth nerve: 12 patients, seventh nerve: three patients, eighth nerve: seven patients), in whom cranial nerve palsies were the presenting sign in 14 and the only clinical sign of an exacerbation in 10 patients. MRI was carried out in 20 patients and substantiated corresponding brainstem lesions in seven patients (...

  17. Multiple cranial nerve dysfunction caused by neurosarcoidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loor, Rivkah G J; van Tongeren, Joost; Derks, Wynia

    2012-01-01

    Neurosarcoidosis is a rare identity and occurs in only 5% to 15% of patients with sarcoidosis. It can manifest in many different ways, and therefore, diagnosis may be complicated. We report a case presented in a very unusual manner with involvement of 3 cranial nerves; anosmia (NI), facial palsy (NVII), and hearing loss (NVIII). When cranial nerve dysfunction occurs, it is very important to take neurosarcoidosis into consideration. PMID:22154016

  18. Computer tomography of posterior cranial fossa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobota, J.; Dutka, J. (Ustredni Vojenska Nemocnice, Prague (Czechoslovakia))

    1982-11-01

    The problems and possibilities are presented of computer tomography examinations of the posterior cranial fossa. The apparatus used was Somatom 2 by Siemens. Such examinations make it possible to introduce specific measurements and evaluations of pathological processes. Computer tomography in itself, however, may not always be successful in this respect and in the examination of the posterior cranial fossa invasive methods, suitably used, will make the diagnosis more accurate and adequate therapy possible.

  19. Computer tomography of posterior cranial fossa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problems and possibilities are presented of computer tomography examinations of the posterior cranial fossa. The apparatus used was Somatom 2 by Siemens. Such examinations make it possible to introduce specific measurements and evaluations of pathological processes. Computer tomography in itself, however, may not always be successful in this respect and in the examination of the posterior cranial fossa invasive methods, suitably used, will make the diagnosis more accurate and adequate therapy possible. (J.O.)

  20. Cranial osteopathy: its fate seems clear

    OpenAIRE

    Hartman Steve E

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background According to the original model of cranial osteopathy, intrinsic rhythmic movements of the human brain cause rhythmic fluctuations of cerebrospinal fluid and specific relational changes among dural membranes, cranial bones, and the sacrum. Practitioners believe they can palpably modify parameters of this mechanism to a patient's health advantage. Discussion This treatment regime lacks a biologically plausible mechanism, shows no diagnostic reliability, and offers little ho...

  1. Multiple cranial neuropathies following etanercept administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Jacob B; Rivas, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    There have been recent reports of sarcoid-like granulomatosis development following the administration of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors. To date, only four cases of neurosarcoidosis have been reported in association with TNF inhibitors, two of which were attributed to etanercept. We present the first case of etanercept-induced neurosarcoidosis involving multiple cranial neuropathies, including the trigeminal, facial, and vestibulocochlear nerves, while also highlighting the differential diagnoses of multiple cranial neuropathies and the association of TNF inhibitors and neurosarcoidosis. PMID:27178520

  2. Brain atrophy and neuropsychological outcome after treatment of ruptured anterior cerebral artery aneurysms: a voxel-based morphometric study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bendel, Paula; Koskenkorva, Paeivi; Vanninen, Ritva [Kuopio University Hospital and University of Kuopio, Department of Clinical Radiology, Kuopio (Finland); Koivisto, Timo; Aeikiae, Marja [Kuopio University Hospital and University of Kuopio, Department of Neurosurgery, Kuopio (Finland); Niskanen, Eini [Kuopio University Hospital and University of Kuopio, Department of Neurology, Kuopio (Finland); Kuopio University Hospital and University of Kuopio, Department of Physics, Kuopio (Finland); Koenoenen, Mervi [Kuopio University Hospital and University of Kuopio, Department of Clinical Radiology, Kuopio (Finland); Kuopio University Hospital and University of Kuopio, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Kuopio (Finland); Haenninen, Tuomo [Kuopio University Hospital and University of Kuopio, Department of Neurology, Kuopio (Finland)

    2009-11-15

    Cognitive impairment after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) is frequently detected. Here, we describe the pattern of cerebral (gray matter) atrophy and its clinical relevance after treatment of aSAH caused by a ruptured anterior cerebral artery (ACA) aneurysm. Thirty-seven aSAH patients with ACA aneurysm (17 surgical, 20 endovascular treatment) and a good or moderate clinical outcome (Glasgow Outcome Scale V or IV) and 30 controls underwent brain MRI. Voxel-based morphometric analysis was applied to compare the patients and controls. Patients also underwent a detailed neuropsychological assessment. The comparisons between controls and either all patients (n=37) or the subgroup of surgically treated patients (n=17) revealed bilateral cortical atrophy in the frontal lobes, mainly in the basal areas. The brainstem, bilateral thalamic and hypothalamic areas, and ipsilateral caudate nucleus were also involved. Small areas of atrophy were detected in temporal lobes. The hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus showed atrophy ipsilateral to the surgical approach. In the subgroup of endovascularly treated patients (n = 15), small areas of atrophy were detected in the bilateral orbitofrontal cortex and in the thalamic region. Twenty patients (54%) showed cognitive deficits in neuropsychological assessment. Group analysis after aSAH and treatment of the ruptured ACA aneurysm revealed gray matter atrophy, principally involving the frontobasal cortical areas and hippocampus ipsilateral to the surgical approach. Areas of reduced gray matter were more pronounced after surgical than endovascular treatment. Together with possible focal cortical infarctions and brain retraction deficits in individual patients, this finding may explain the neuropsychological disturbances commonly detected after treatment of ruptured ACA aneurysms. (orig.)

  3. Brain atrophy and neuropsychological outcome after treatment of ruptured anterior cerebral artery aneurysms: a voxel-based morphometric study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cognitive impairment after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) is frequently detected. Here, we describe the pattern of cerebral (gray matter) atrophy and its clinical relevance after treatment of aSAH caused by a ruptured anterior cerebral artery (ACA) aneurysm. Thirty-seven aSAH patients with ACA aneurysm (17 surgical, 20 endovascular treatment) and a good or moderate clinical outcome (Glasgow Outcome Scale V or IV) and 30 controls underwent brain MRI. Voxel-based morphometric analysis was applied to compare the patients and controls. Patients also underwent a detailed neuropsychological assessment. The comparisons between controls and either all patients (n=37) or the subgroup of surgically treated patients (n=17) revealed bilateral cortical atrophy in the frontal lobes, mainly in the basal areas. The brainstem, bilateral thalamic and hypothalamic areas, and ipsilateral caudate nucleus were also involved. Small areas of atrophy were detected in temporal lobes. The hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus showed atrophy ipsilateral to the surgical approach. In the subgroup of endovascularly treated patients (n = 15), small areas of atrophy were detected in the bilateral orbitofrontal cortex and in the thalamic region. Twenty patients (54%) showed cognitive deficits in neuropsychological assessment. Group analysis after aSAH and treatment of the ruptured ACA aneurysm revealed gray matter atrophy, principally involving the frontobasal cortical areas and hippocampus ipsilateral to the surgical approach. Areas of reduced gray matter were more pronounced after surgical than endovascular treatment. Together with possible focal cortical infarctions and brain retraction deficits in individual patients, this finding may explain the neuropsychological disturbances commonly detected after treatment of ruptured ACA aneurysms. (orig.)

  4. Pituitary apoplexy presenting as isolated third cranial nerve palsy with ptosis : two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Won-Jin; Joo, Sung-Pil; Kim, Tae-Sun; Seo, Bo-Ra

    2009-02-01

    Pituitary apoplexy is a clinical syndrome caused by an acute ischemic or hemorrhagic vascular accident involving a pituitary adenoma or an adjacent pituitary gland. Pituitary apoplexy may be associated with a variety of neurological and endocrinological signs and symptoms. However, isolated third cranial nerve palsy with ptosis as the presenting sign of pituitary apoplexy is very rare. We describe two cases of pituitary apoplexy presenting as sudden-onset unilateral ptosis and diplopia. In one case, brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a mass in the pituitary fossa with signs of hemorrhage, upward displacement of the optic chiasm, erosion of the sellar floor and invasion of the right cavernous sinus. In the other case, MRI showed a large area of insufficient enhancement in the anterior pituitary consistent with pituitary infarction or Sheehan's syndrome. We performed neurosurgical decompression via a transsphenoidal approach. Both patients showed an uneventful recovery. Both cases of isolated third cranial nerve palsy with ptosis completely resolved during the early postoperative period. We suggest that pituitary apoplexy should be included in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with isolated third cranial nerve palsy with ptosis and that prompt neurosurgical decompression should be considered for the preservation of third cranial nerve function. PMID:19274125

  5. Uso de concentrados autólogos de plaquetas intraarticulares como coadyuvantes en el tratamiento quirúrgico de la rotura del ligamento cruzado anterior en una perra Use of intra-articular autologous platelet concentrates as coadjutants in the surgical treatment of a cranial cruciate ligament rupture in a bitch

    OpenAIRE

    RF Silva; CMF Rezende; JU Carmona

    2011-01-01

    La ruptura del ligamento cruzado anterior (RLCA) es uno de los principales problemas ortopédicos que producen cojera de los miembros posteriores en perros. A pesar de que este problema sea tratado quirúrgicamente el desarrollo y progresión de la osteoartritis son típicamente característicos. Se describe un caso de un perro que recibió inyecciones intraarticulares de concentrados autólogos de plaquetas (APCs) durante el posoperatorio después de la reparación quirúrgica de una RLCA. Los resulta...

  6. Anatomic Illustrations of Cranial Ultrasound Images Through the Posterior Fontanelle in Neonates: Objective Analysis of Oblique Sonographic Scans using MRI and a Reconstruction Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Sang Young; Lee, Young Seok; Yoo, Dong Soo; Chang, Young Pyo [Dankook University Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-09-15

    Neonatal cranial sonography through the posterior fontanelle is more useful than through the anterior approach for the evaluation of posterior brain structures. The aims of this study were to determine the appropriate neonatal cranial sonography scan planes through the posterior fontanelle, and to objectively evaluate the anatomy of neonatal cranial sonographic images. Neonates who underwent cranial sonography and MRI including 3D-SPGR axial scans and showed normal features on both modalities were enrolled. We reconstructed MR images corresponding to sonographic planes, then constructed anatomic models of the neonatal cranial sonographic images using axial MRI as the standard reference on the same screen. We successfully created anatomic atlas that represents 8 oblique coronal and 4 oblique sagittal scans and planes that corresponded to the neonatal cranial sonographic images through the posterior fontanelle. The objective manner of this anatomic research provided standardized sonographic scan planes and created anatomic model through the posterior fontanelle. Cranial sonographic models through the posterior fontanelle using MRI and multi-planar reconstruction program will be helpful in the evaluation of sonographic anatomy and detection of abnormalities in the basal ganglia, thalamus and posterior part of the brain

  7. Estimating cranial musculoskeletal constraints in theropod dinosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lautenschlager, Stephan

    2015-11-01

    Many inferences on the biology, behaviour and ecology of extinct vertebrates are based on the reconstruction of the musculature and rely considerably on its accuracy. Although the advent of digital reconstruction techniques has facilitated the creation and testing of musculoskeletal hypotheses in recent years, muscle strain capabilities have rarely been considered. Here, a digital modelling approach using the freely available visualization and animation software Blender is applied to estimate cranial muscle length changes and optimal and maximal possible gape in different theropod dinosaurs. Models of living archosaur taxa (Alligator mississippiensis, Buteo buteo) were used in an extant phylogenetically bracketed framework to validate the method. Results of this study demonstrate that Tyrannosaurus rex, Allosaurus fragilis and Erlikosaurus andrewsi show distinct differences in the recruitment of the jaw adductor musculature and resulting gape, confirming previous dietary and ecological assumptions. While the carnivorous taxa T. rex and Allo. fragilis were capable of a wide gape and sustained muscle force, the herbivorous therizinosaurian E. andrewsi was constrained to small gape angles. PMID:26716007

  8. Cranial osteopathy: its fate seems clear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartman Steve E

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background According to the original model of cranial osteopathy, intrinsic rhythmic movements of the human brain cause rhythmic fluctuations of cerebrospinal fluid and specific relational changes among dural membranes, cranial bones, and the sacrum. Practitioners believe they can palpably modify parameters of this mechanism to a patient's health advantage. Discussion This treatment regime lacks a biologically plausible mechanism, shows no diagnostic reliability, and offers little hope that any direct clinical effect will ever be shown. In spite of almost uniformly negative research findings, "cranial" methods remain popular with many practitioners and patients. Summary Until outcome studies show that these techniques produce a direct and positive clinical effect, they should be dropped from all academic curricula; insurance companies should stop paying for them; and patients should invest their time, money, and health elsewhere.

  9. The cranial nerve skywalk: A 3D tutorial of cranial nerves in a virtual platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson-Hatcher, April; Hazzard, Matthew; Ramirez-Yanez, German

    2014-01-01

    Visualization of the complex courses of the cranial nerves by students in the health-related professions is challenging through either diagrams in books or plastic models in the gross laboratory. Furthermore, dissection of the cranial nerves in the gross laboratory is an extremely meticulous task. Teaching and learning the cranial nerve pathways is difficult using two-dimensional (2D) illustrations alone. Three-dimensional (3D) models aid the teacher in describing intricate and complex anatomical structures and help students visualize them. The study of the cranial nerves can be supplemented with 3D, which permits the students to fully visualize their distribution within the craniofacial complex. This article describes the construction and usage of a virtual anatomy platform in Second Life™, which contains 3D models of the cranial nerves III, V, VII, and IX. The Cranial Nerve Skywalk features select cranial nerves and the associated autonomic pathways in an immersive online environment. This teaching supplement was introduced to groups of pre-healthcare professional students in gross anatomy courses at both institutions and student feedback is included. PMID:24678025

  10. Cranial symmetry in baleen whales (Cetacea, Mysticeti) and the occurrence of cranial asymmetry throughout cetacean evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahlke, Julia M.; Hampe, Oliver

    2015-10-01

    Odontoceti and Mysticeti (toothed and baleen whales) originated from Eocene archaeocetes that had evolved from terrestrial artiodactyls. Cranial asymmetry is known in odontocetes that can hear ultrasound (>20,000 Hz) and has been linked to the split function of the nasal passage in breathing and vocalization. Recent results indicate that archaeocetes also had asymmetric crania. Their asymmetry has been linked to directional hearing in water, although hearing frequencies are still under debate. Mysticetes capable of low-frequency and infrasonic hearing (<20 Hz) are assumed to have symmetric crania. This study aims to resolve whether mysticete crania are indeed symmetric and whether mysticete cranial symmetry is plesiomorphic or secondary. Cranial shape was analyzed applying geometric morphometrics to three-dimensional (3D) cranial models of fossil and modern mysticetes, Eocene archaeocetes, modern artiodactyls, and modern odontocetes. Statistical tests include analysis of variance, principal components analysis, and discriminant function analysis. Results suggest that symmetric shape difference reflects general trends in cetacean evolution. Asymmetry includes significant fluctuating and directional asymmetry, the latter being very small. Mysticete crania are as symmetric as those of terrestrial artiodactyls and archaeocetes, without significant differences within Mysticeti. Odontocete crania are more asymmetric. These results indicate that (1) all mysticetes have symmetric crania, (2) archaeocete cranial asymmetry is not conspicuous in most of the skull but may yet be conspicuous in the rostrum, (3) directional cranial asymmetry is an odontocete specialization, and (4) directional cranial asymmetry is more likely related to echolocation than hearing.

  11. IN VIVO KINEMATICS OF THE ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT DEFICIENT KNEE DURING WIDE-BASED SQUAT USING A 2D/3D REGISTRATION TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Miyaji

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL deficiency increases the risk of early osteoarthritis (OA. Studies of ACL deficient knee kinematics would be important to reveal the disease process and therefore to find mechanisms which would potentially slow OA progression. The purpose of this study was to determine if in vivo kinematics of the anterior cruciate ligament deficient (ACLD knee during a wide-based squat activity differ from kinematics of the contralateral intact knee. Thirty-three patients with a unilateral ACLD knee consented to participate in this institutional review board approved study with the contralateral intact knee serving as the control. In vivo knee kinematics during the wide-based squat were analyzed using a 2D/3D registration technique utilizing CT-based bone models and lateral fluoroscopy. Comparisons were performed using values between 0 and 100° flexion both in flexion and extension phases of the squat activity. Both the ACLD and intact knees demonstrated increasing tibial internal rotation with knee flexion, and no difference was observed in tibial rotation between the groups. The tibia in the ACLD knee was more anterior than that of the contralateral knees at 0 and 5° flexion in both phases (p < 0.05. Tibiofemoral medial contact points of the ACLD knees were more posterior than that of the contralateral knees at 5, 10 and 15° of knee flexion in the extension phase of the squat activity (p < 0.05. Tibiofemoral lateral contact points of the ACLD knees were more posterior than that of the contralateral knees at 0° flexion in the both phases (p < 0.05. The kinematics of the ACLD and contralateral intact knees were similar during the wide-based squat except at the low flexion angles. Therefore, we conclude the wide-based squat may be recommended for the ACLD knee by avoiding terminal extension

  12. Isovaleric acidaemia: cranial CT and MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sogut, Ayhan; Acun, Ceyda; Tomsac, Nazan; Demirel, Fatma [Department of Paediatrics, Karaelmas University, Zonguldak (Turkey); Aydin, Kubilay [Department of Radiology, Istanbul Medical School, Istanbul University, Camlikyolu, B. mehmetpasa sokak yavuz apt. No:10/10, Etiler, Istanbul (Turkey); Aktuglu, Cigdem [Department of Paediatrics, Cerrahpasa Medical School, Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2004-02-01

    Isovaleric acidaemia is an inborn error of leucine metabolism due to deficiency of isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase, which results in accumulation of isovaleric acid in body fluids. There are acute and chronic-intermittent forms of the disease. We present the cranial CT and MRI findings of a 19-month-old girl with the chronic-intermittent form of isovaleric acidaemia. She presented with severe metabolic acidosis, hyperglycaemia, glycosuria, ketonuria and acute encephalopathy. Cranial CT revealed bilateral hypodensity of the globi pallidi. MRI showed signal changes in the globi pallidi and corticospinal tracts of the mesencephalon, which were hypointense on T1-weighted and hyperintense on T2-weighted images. (orig.)

  13. Neurosyphilis Involving Cranial Nerves in Brain Stem: 2 Case Reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neurosyphilis uncommonly presents with cranial neuropathies in acute syphilitic meningitis and meningovascular neurosyphilis. We now report two cases in which the meningeal form of neurosyphilis involved cranial nerves in the brain stem: the oculomotor and trigeminal nerve.

  14. Neurosyphilis Involving Cranial Nerves in Brain Stem: 2 Case Reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Ji Hye [Dept. of Radiology, Kyung Hee University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Woo Suk; Kim, Eui Jong [Dept. of Radiology, Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Sung Sang; Heo, Sung Hyuk [Dept. of Neurology, Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    Neurosyphilis uncommonly presents with cranial neuropathies in acute syphilitic meningitis and meningovascular neurosyphilis. We now report two cases in which the meningeal form of neurosyphilis involved cranial nerves in the brain stem: the oculomotor and trigeminal nerve.

  15. Localized cranial hyperostosis of meningiomas: a result of neoplastic enzymatic activity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heick, A.; Mosdal, C.; Klinken, Leif

    1993-01-01

    Neuropathology, alkaline phosphatase, cranial hyperostosis, meningioma, ossifying enzymatic activity......Neuropathology, alkaline phosphatase, cranial hyperostosis, meningioma, ossifying enzymatic activity...

  16. Variability of Cranial Nerve Assignment to Speech and Swallow Muscles

    OpenAIRE

    Morrey, Kristina

    2011-01-01

    The object of this study was to examine and document anatomical variability of cranial nerve assignment for muscles of the speech and swallow mechanism. Through means of textbook review, the study’s first purpose was to identify which cranial nerves were attributed to the innervation for muscles associated with the speech and swallow mechanism. The second purpose was to examine if cranial nerve assignment, field of study, or geographic region explained differences in cranial nerve assignment ...

  17. 38 CFR 4.124 - Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Neuralgia, cranial or....124 Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral. Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral, characterized usually by a dull and intermittent pain, of typical distribution so as to identify the nerve, is to be rated on...

  18. 38 CFR 4.123 - Neuritis, cranial or peripheral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Neuritis, cranial or....123 Neuritis, cranial or peripheral. Neuritis, cranial or peripheral, characterized by loss of... the scale provided for injury of the nerve involved, with a maximum equal to severe,...

  19. 21 CFR 882.4360 - Electric cranial drill motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electric cranial drill motor. 882.4360 Section 882...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4360 Electric cranial drill motor. (a) Identification. An electric cranial drill motor is an electrically operated power source...

  20. Late cranial MRI after cranial irradiation in survivors of childhood cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paeaekkoe, E. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Univ. of Oulu (Finland); Talvensaari, K. [Dept. of Pediatrics, Univ. of Oulu (Finland); Pyhtinen, J. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Univ. of Oulu (Finland); Lanning, M. [Dept. of Pediatrics, Univ. of Oulu (Finland)

    1994-11-01

    We carried out MRI on 43 survivors of childhood cancer after different treatment protocols with or without cranial radiotherapy. They were free of disease, therapy having been discontinued 2-20 years earlier. Treatment had been for various malignancies, excluding brain tumours; 27 had received cranial irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) or lymphoma. Two asymptomatic young women treated for ALL had falx meningiomas. White matter changes, low intensity foci (representing calcification or old haemorrhage) and (heterogeneous intensity focic old haemorrhages) were seen only in patients who had undergone radiotherapy. Because of the possibility of benign, potentially curable brain tumours occurring after cranial irradiation, it may be wise to carry out occasional cranial imaging in the follow-up of these patients. No routine imaging follow-up is needed after chemotherapy alone. (orig.)

  1. Entrainment and the cranial rhythmic impulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPartland, J M; Mein, E A

    1997-01-01

    Entrainment is the integration or harmonization of oscillators. All organisms pulsate with myriad electrical and mechanical rhythms. Many of these rhythms emanate from synchronized pulsating cells (eg, pacemaker cells, cortical neurons). The cranial rhythmic impulse is an oscillation recognized by many bodywork practitioners, but the functional origin of this impulse remains uncertain. We propose that the cranial rhythmic impulse is the palpable perception of entrainment, a harmonic frequency that incorporates the rhythms of multiple biological oscillators. It is derived primarily from signals between the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems. Entrainment also arises between organisms. The harmonizing of coupled oscillators into a single, dominant frequency is called frequency-selective entrainment. We propose that this phenomenon is the modus operandi of practitioners who use the cranial rhythmic impulse in craniosacral treatment. Dominant entrainment is enhanced by "centering," a technique practiced by many healers, for example, practitioners of Chinese, Tibetan, and Ayurvedic medicine. We explore the connections between centering, the cranial rhythmic impulse, and craniosacral treatment. PMID:8997803

  2. Disorders of Cranial Nerves IX and X

    OpenAIRE

    Erman, Audrey B.; Kejner, Alexandra E.; Hogikyan, Norman D.; Eva L Feldman

    2009-01-01

    The glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves mediate the complex interplay between the many functions of the upper aerodigestive tract. Defects may occur anywhere from the brainstem to the peripheral nerve and can result in significant impairment in speech, swallowing, and breathing. Multiple etiologies can produce symptoms. This review will broadly examine the normal functions, clinical examination, and various pathologies of cranial nerves IX and X.

  3. Bilateral anterior shoulder dislocation

    OpenAIRE

    Meena, Sanjay; Saini, Pramod; Singh, Vivek; Kumar, Ramakant; Trikha, Vivek

    2013-01-01

    Shoulder dislocations are the most common major joint dislocations encountered in the emergency departments. Bilateral shoulder dislocations are rare and of these, bilateral posterior shoulder dislocations are more prevalent than bilateral anterior shoulder dislocations. Bilateral anterior shoulder dislocation is very rare. We present a case of 24-year-old male who sustained bilateral anterior shoulder dislocation following minor trauma, with associated greater tuberosity fracture on one side...

  4. Autologous cranial particulate bone grafting reduces the frequency of osseous defects after cranial expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lin Lin; Rogers, Gary F; Clune, James E; Proctor, Mark R; Meara, John G; Mulliken, John B; Greene, Arin K

    2010-03-01

    Primary autologous particulate bone grafting has been demonstrated to heal osseous defects after fronto-orbital advancement. We sought to determine if this technique was equally effective for larger defects resulting from major cranial expansion procedures. We studied children who underwent cranial expansion (other than fronto-orbital advancement) between 1989 and 2008. Defects either were left to heal spontaneously (group 1) or had autologous cranial particulate bone graft placed over dura at the time of cranial expansion (group 2). Particulate bone graft was harvested from the endocortical or ectocortical surface using a hand-driven brace and bit. Outcome variables were ossification and need for revision cranioplasty. The study included 53 children. Mean (SD) age at procedure was 12.2 (8.1) months (range, 1.0-36.0 months) for group 1 (n = 15) and 20.2 (15.1) months (range, 3.3-78.6 months) for group 2 (n = 38) (P = 0.06). There were palpable bony defects in 33.0% (n = 5) of group 1 patients versus 7.9% (n = 3) of group 2 patients (P = 0.03). Corrective cranioplasty was needed in 26.7% of group 1 patients and only 5.3% of those in group 2 (P = 0.04). Primary cranial particulate bone grafting significantly reduced the frequency of osseous defects and secondary cranioplasty following cranial remodeling. PMID:20186093

  5. Cranial shape transformation in the evolution of the giant panda ( Ailuropoda melanoleuca)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueirido, Borja; Palmqvist, Paul; Pérez-Claros, Juan A.; Dong, Wei

    2011-02-01

    In this study, landmark-based methods of geometric morphometrics are used for investigating the main aspects of cranial shape transformation in the evolution of the giant panda, Ailuropoda melanoleuca. Specifically, we explore if the highly derived cranial adaptations for bamboo feeding of the living panda were developed early in the panda's lineage. Results obtained show that the overall cranial morphologies of the oldest known panda, the "pygmy" Ailuropoda microta, and the late Pleistocene Ailuropoda baconi are both very similar to that of their closest living relative, A. melanoleuca, which agrees with a previous proposal based on qualitative criteria. However, we also describe several differences between the crania of A. microta, A. baconi, and A. melanoleuca, including the development of the postorbital process, the orientation of the occipital region, and the expansion of the braincase. As a result, the cranial morphology of A. microta shows a less specialized morphology toward a fibrous and durophagous diet compared to the giant panda. These results are confirmed by a comparative analysis of the dimensions of the upper teeth in bears, which has revealed differences in relative tooth size between A. microta and A. melanoleuca, most probably as a result of mosaic evolution. Therefore, we conclude that cranial shape did not remain essentially uniform in the Ailuropoda lineage, as previously thought, but underwent a number of changes during more than 2 Myr.

  6. Automatic Detection of Wild-type Mouse Cranial Sutures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ólafsdóttir, Hildur; Darvann, Tron Andre; Hermann, Nuno V.;

    , automatic detection of the cranial sutures becomes important. We have previously built a craniofacial, wild-type mouse atlas from a set of 10 Micro CT scans using a B-spline-based nonrigid registration method by Rueckert et al. Subsequently, all volumes were registered nonrigidly to the atlas. Using these...... observer traced the sutures on each of the mouse volumes as well. The observer outperforms the automatic approach by approximately 0.1 mm. All mice have similar errors while the suture error plots reveal that suture 1 and 2 are cumbersome, both for the observer and the automatic approach. These sutures can...

  7. Effect of Connector Design on Fracture Resistance in Zirconia-based Fixed Partial Dentures for Upper Anterior Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogino, Yasushi; Nomoto, Syuntaro; Sato, Toru

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of the cross-sectional form and area of the connector on fracture resistance in three-unit zirconia fixed partial denture (FPD) frameworks for the upper anterior region. Sixty FPD framework specimens were fabricated using the CAD/CAM system. The cross-sectional form (Type I, II, or III) and area (9.0, 7.0, 5.0, or 3.0 mm(2)) of the connectors differed. The specimens were fixed to a jig capable of applying a load axially to the abutment teeth at an angle of 135 degrees. Each specimen was subjected to fracture load measurements using a universal testing machine and cross-sectional microscopic examination. Fracture load fell significantly with a decrease in cross-sectional area (p 5.0 mm(2). PMID:27320295

  8. Neurinomas of the facial nerve extending to the middle cranial fossa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three cases with neurinomas of the facial nerve are reported, especially with regard to the computerized tomographic (CT) findings. All of them had a long history of facial-nerve dysfunction, associated with hearing loss over periods from several to twenty-five years. Intraoperative findings demonstrated that these tumors arose from the intrapetrous portion, the horizontal portion, or the geniculate portion of the facial nerve and that they were located in the middle cranial fossa. The histological diagnoses were neurinomas. CT scans of three cases demonstrated round and low-density masses with marginal high-density areas in the middle cranial fossa, in one associated with diffuse low-density areas in the left temporal and parietal lobes. The low-density areas on CT were thought to be cysts; this was confirmed by surgery. Enhanced CT scans showed irregular enhancement in one case and ring-like enhancement in two cases. High-resolution CT scans of the temporal bone in two cases revealed a soft tissue mass in the middle ear, a well-circumscribed irregular destruction of the anterior aspect of the petrous bone, and calcifications. These findings seemed to be significant features of the neurinomas of the facial nerve extending to the middle cranial fossa. We emphasize that bone-window CT of the temporal bone is most useful in detecting a neurinoma of the facial nerve in its early stage in order to preserve the facial- and acoustic-nerve functions. (author)

  9. MR imaging of the cranial nerves and the intracranial vessels using 3D-SPGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MR angiography (MRA) has developed rapidly, but it is still insufficient to demonstrate the detail of the intracranial vascular anatomy. We found that original images of MRA render more information than MRA images about not only intracranial vessels but also cranial nerves. We have tried to demonstrate cranial nerves and intracranial vessels on 26 patients and evaluated using real time reformation of original images of MRA. MR images were obtained by SPGR (3DFT) after injection of Gd-DTPA. The optic nerve, the oculomotor nerve, the trigeminal nerve, the facial nerve and the vestibulocochlear nerve were visualized clearly on almost patients and detectabilities of these nerves were 100%, 98%, 100%, 94% and 100%, respectively. The abducent nerve was also detectable in 76%. The trochlear nerve, which could not be observed by any modality, was detected at prepontine cistern in 10%. Arteries around brain stem such as the superior cerebellar artery (SCA), the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA), the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) and the posterior communicating artery (PcomA) were clearly visible, and branching of these arteries and anatomical detail were completely coincide with angiogram on 12 patients. The basal vein of Rosenthal and the petrosal vein were confirmed in 100% and their anastomose were demonstrated obviously. We concluded that this method was extremely useful to observe cranial nerves and intracranial small vessels. (author)

  10. Dilated coronary sinus in a dog with persistent left cranial vena cava

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the electrocardiographic, echocardiographic (two-dimensional, M-mode, contrast and Doppler) and non-selective angiocardiographic features in a 3 year old female Beagle with dilated coronary sinus due to persistent left cranial vena cava. Negative P waves in leads III and aVR and a positive P wave in lead aVL were seen, Echocardiographically, a hipoechoic circular structure was seen between the left atrium and the pericardium in the area where the coronary sinus islocated, A velocity pattern with two peaks was obtained, one systolicwith velocity = 0.44 +/- 0.05 m/sec and the other diastolic with velocity = 0.27 +/- 0.01 m/sec, By M-mode echocardiography, at level of the aorta and the left atrium, a linear structure was identified betweenthe left atrium and the pericardium; this structure was characterizedby phasic movements of the anterior wall during the cardiac cycle, Following a left cephalic vein injection of saline, bubbles were seen within the coronary sinus; when saline was injected into the right cephalic vein, bubbles were also seen within the coronary sinus and right atrium and ventricle, Non-selective angiocardiography confirmed a dilated coronary sinus with persistent left cranial vena cava, The right cranial vena cava was absent, The dog was clinically normal and the unusual vessel was an incidental finding

  11. Macrostructure of the Cranial Cervical Ganglion in the River Buffalo (Bubalus Bubalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Dehghani

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe autonomic nervous system consists of a vast range of nerves and ganglions. Anatomical studies have demonstrated that the sympathetic innervations of the head and neck are affected by the neurons that ramify from the cranial cervical ganglion (CCG. The CCG is the end of the sympathetic cervical trunk, which runs with the vagal nerve during its cervical course. In this study sixteen adult (2 - 5 year river buffalo of both sexes (eight male, eight female weighing around 250 - 450 kg were dissected to investigate the weight, situation and arrangement of nerve branches of the cranial cervical ganglion bilaterally. The ganglions showed a fusiform shape and reddish in color. The cranial cervical ganglion covered by the digastricus muscle. It lies in dorsal region of the base of epiglottic cartilage, ventromedial to tympanic bulla and ventrally to atlantic fossa, and medial of the occipital artery. This study showed that the cranial cervical ganglions in river buffalo were well-developed structure. The main branches of cranial cervical ganglion included the internal carotid, external carotid and jugular nerves.

  12. Imaging characteristics of primary cranial Ewing sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewing sarcoma accounts for 10-15% of all childhood malignant bone tumours and is second in prevalence to osteosarcoma. The skull bones are an unusual site of origin of primary Ewing sarcoma in children. Previous reports concentrate on the neurosurgical aspects and relatively good outcome compared to other bone tumours of the calvarium. Reported cases mainly describe the imaging characteristics on CT. To describe the MRI and CT features of primary cranial Ewing sarcoma. The neuroimaging of three cases of primary cranial Ewing sarcoma are reviewed. Our three cases show an extra-axial mass that is high attenuation on CT and low signal on T2-weighted MRI. Haemorrhagic components, dural extension and contrast enhancement are also characteristic features. CT attenuation and magnetic resonance signal characteristics reflect sheets of densely packed cells seen in Ewing sarcoma. (orig.)

  13. Review of cranial radiotherapy-induced vasculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Erin S; Xie, Hao; Merchant, Thomas E; Yu, Jennifer S; Chao, Samuel T; Suh, John H

    2015-05-01

    Cranial radiation can impact the cerebral vasculature in many ways, with a wide range of clinical manifestations. The incidence of these late effects including cerebrovascular accidents (CVAs), lacunar lesions, vascular occlusive disease including moyamoya syndrome, vascular malformations, and hemorrhage is not well known. This article reviews the preclinical findings regarding the pathophysiology of late radiation-induced vascular damage, and discusses the clinical incidence and risk factors for each type of vasculopathy. The pathophysiology is complex and dependent on the targeted blood vessels, and upregulation of pro-inflammatory and hypoxia-related genes. The risk factors for adult CVAs are similar to those for patients not exposed to cranial radiotherapy. For children, risks for late vascular complications include young age at radiotherapy, radiotherapy dose, NF1, tumor location, chemotherapy, and endocrine abnormalities. The incidence of late vascular complications of radiotherapy may be impacted by improved technology, therapeutic interventions, and appropriate follow up. PMID:25670390

  14. Anatomic Illustrations of Cranial Ultrasound Images Obtained Through the Mastoid Fontanelle in Neonates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bong Man; Lee, Young Seok [Dankook University Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    Neonatal cranial sonography performed through the mastoid fontanelle is more useful to evaluate the peripheral structures at the convexity of the cerebral hemispheres and brainstem rather than that performed through the anterior fontanelle. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the anatomy of the extracerebral CSF space and brainstem and to suggest appropriate scan planes for performing neonatal cranial sonography through the mastoid fontanelle using MRI and multiplanar reconstruction programs. A neonate with normal features on ultrasonography and good image quality on MRI, including the 3D-SPGR axial scans, was selected. We made the reconstructed MR images corresponding to the sonongraphic planes and the anatomic models of the neonatal cranial sonographic images by using axial MRI as the standard reference on the same screen. We demonstrated the sonographic images at the levels of the body of the caudate nucleus and lentiform nucleus, the head of the caudate nucleus and thalamus, the third ventricle and midbrain, and the midbrain and cerebellar vermis on the oblique axial scans. Four oblique coronal images at the levels of the periventricular white matter, basal ganglia, thalamus and tentorium were also obtained. We illustrated the anatomic atlas with including four oblique axial scans and four oblique coronal scans that corresponded to the neonatal cranial sonographic images through the mastoid fontanelle. We objectively analyzed the anatomy of the extracerebral CSF space and brainstem by using MRI and multiplanar reconstruction programs and we provided the standardized sonographic scan planes through the mastoid fontanelle. This study will be very helpful for evaluating the abnormalities of the peripheral structures at the convexity of the cerebral hemispheres and brainstem

  15. [Chondroma adjacent to Meckel's cave mimicking a fifth cranial nerve neurinoma. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narro-Donate, Jose María; Huete-Allut, Antonio; Velasco-Albendea, Francisco J; Escribano-Mesa, Jose A; Mendez-Román, Paddy; Masegosa-González, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Cranial chondromas are tumours arising from chondrocyte embryonic remnants cells that usually appear in the skull base synchondrosis. In contrast to the rest of the organism, where chondroid tumours are the most common primary bone tumour just behind the haematopoietic lineage ones, they are a rarity at cranial level, with an incidence of less than 1% of intracranial tumours. The case is reported on a 42 year-old male referred to our clinic due to the finding of an extra-axial lesion located close to the Meckel's cave region, with extension to the posterior fossa and brainstem compression after progressive paraparesis of 6 months onset. With the diagnosis of trigeminal schwannoma, a subtotal tumour resection was performed using a combined supra-infratentorial pre-sigmoidal approach. The postoperative histopathology report confirmed the diagnosis of cranial chondroma. PMID:26944382

  16. Cranial Mesenteric Arterial Obstruction Due To Strongylus vulgaris Larvae in a Donkey (Equus asinus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Borji

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Arteritis due to Strongylus vulgaris is a well-known cause of colic in horses and donkeys. The current report describes a fatal incidence of arterial obstruction in cranial mesenteric artery caused by S. vulgaris infection in an adult donkey in which anthelmintic treatment was not regularly administered. Necropsy findings of the abdominal cavity revealed a complete cranial mesenteric arterial obstruction due to larvae of S. vulgaris, causing severe colic. To the authors' knowledge, a complete cranial mesenteric arterial obstruction due to verminous arteritis has rarely been described in horses and donkeys. Based on recent reports of fatal arterial obstruction due to S. vulgaris infection in donkeys, it may be evident to consider acute colic caused by this pathogenic parasite a re-emerging disease in donkeys and horses.

  17. Cranial Nerves IX, X, XI, and XII

    OpenAIRE

    Gillig, Paulette Marie; Sanders, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    This article concludes the series on cranial nerves, with review of the final four (IX–XII). To summarize briefly, the most important and common syndrome caused by a disorder of the glossopharyngeal nerve (craniel nerve IX) is glossopharyngeal neuralgia. Also, swallowing function occasionally is compromised in a rare but disabling form of tardive dyskinesia called tardive dystonia, because the upper motor portion of the glossopharyngel nerve projects to the basal ganglia and can be affected b...

  18. Vasopressin function in familial cranial diabetes insipidus.

    OpenAIRE

    Baylis, P. H.; Robertson, G. L.

    1981-01-01

    A family suffering from cranial diabetes insipidus, that extends over 4 generations, is described. Inheritance of polyuria was autosomal dominant. Vasopressin function was studied in members of the last 2 generations, 4 of whom had polyuria. Osmoregulation of vasopressin secretion was assessed by infusion of hypertonic saline. Plasma vasopressin remained undetectable in one patient, while 2 others had very blunted vasopressin responses to osmotic stimulation. Three non-osmotic stimuli were ap...

  19. Role of cranial imaging in epileptic status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: There is paucity of studies evaluating the role of cranial imaging in the management of status epilepticus (SE); therefore this study evaluates the role of imaging in predicting the outcome of SE. Methods: Consecutive patients with SE were prospectively evaluated. Clinical evaluation, blood counts, serum chemistry and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were carried out. Cranial CT scan was performed on a spiral CT and MRI on a 1.5 T scanner. Patients were treated with IV sodium valproate, phenytoin and benzodiazepines as per fixed protocol. Outcome was defined as seizure control at 1 h and mortality. Various clinical and radiological parameters were correlated. Results: There were 99 patients with SE whose mean age was 35 (1-78) years, 40 females and 17 were below 12 years of age. Fifty six patients had central nervous system (CNS) infections, 15 strokes, 13 metabolic encephalopathy, 5 drug default and in the remaining 10 patients various acute symptomatic causes were present. Cranial imaging was abnormal in 59% patients. CT was abnormal in 21 (47.7%) out of 44 patients whereas MRI was abnormal in 26 (63.4%) out of 41 patients. Both MRI and CT were carried out in 14 patients and 12 revealed abnormalities; 2 had abnormality only on MRI. Imaging revealed cortical lesions in 10, subcortical in 19 and both cortical as well as subcortical in 30 patients. One hour seizure control was achieved in 60, seizures recurred within 24 h in 38 and 27 patients died during hospital stay. Seizure type, duration of SE, seizure control at 1 h and mortality did not correlate with radiological abnormalities. Conclusion: Cranial imaging reveals structural abnormality in 59% patients with SE and was not related to SE control and mortality.

  20. Gallium scanning in cerebral and cranial infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eighteen patients with cranial or intracranial infections were studied with technetium and gallium brain scans. Seven of 18 lesions were noted with gallium and not with pertechnetate, while the reverse pattern was not seen. Brain abscesses were visualized with gallium but not with pertechnetate in two of five cases. Osteomyelitis of the skull and mastoiditis showed intense gallium uptake in all cases, while meningitis or cerebritis gave inconsistent results

  1. Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Help a Friend Who Cuts? Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries KidsHealth > For Teens > Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) ... and Recovery Coping With an ACL Injury About ACL Injuries A torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is ...

  2. Cranial Ultrasound/Head Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is the procedure performed? Head Ultrasound A head ultrasound is performed in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) at the infant's bedside. The infant is positioned lying face-up. A clear, water-based gel is applied ...

  3. MR imaging of cranial nerve schwannomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the major advantages of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging over other imaging modalities is direct visualization of the cranial nerves. This is best accomplished with thin-section, contiguous T1-weighted images. They report a series of 75 cranial nerve neuromas, including 47 of the eighth nerve and a mixture of schwannomas involving all other cranial nerves (excluding the fourth). All tumors demonstrated at least some area of increased signal (equal to or greater than that of cerebrospinal fluid) on T2-weighted images. This fact enabled them to differentiate schwannomas from neoplasms (lymphoma, meningioma, sarcoma) that may be isointense on T2-weighted pulse sequences. Many of the lesions had areas of low signal intermixed with predominantly high signal (on T2-weighted images). The pathologic evaluation of these areas of decreased signal revealed predominant fibrosis. In addition, some of the neuromas had a cystic component. Gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging may permit detection when the nerve is still normal in size

  4. Cranial involvement in sickle cell disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate cranial findings in patients with neurologically symptomatic sickle cell disease (SCD). Materials and methods: We studied 50 consecutive patients with SCD and neurologic symptoms. All patients underwent brain MR examinations: all 50 underwent classic MR imaging; 42, diffusion-weighted MR imaging; 10, MR angiography; four, MR venography; and three patients, digital subtraction angiography. Results: Of the 50 SCD patients, 19 (38%) had normal MR findings, and 31 (62%) showed abnormalities on brain MR images. Of the 50 patients, 16 (32%) had ischemic lesions; two (4%), subarachnoid hemorrhage; one (2%), moya-moya pattern; one (2%), posterior reversible encephalopathy; one (2%), dural venous sinus thrombosis; 12 (24%), low marrow signal intensity and thickness of the diploic space; 12 (24%), cerebral atrophy; and two (4%), osteomyelitis. Twenty-seven patients (54%) presented with headache, which was the most common clinical finding. Conclusions: The cranial involvement is one of the most devastating complications of SCD. Early and accurate diagnosis is important in the management of cranial complications of SCD.

  5. Cranial involvement in sickle cell disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alkan, Ozlem, E-mail: yalinozlem@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Baskent University, Ankara (Turkey); Kizilkilic, Ebru, E-mail: ebru90@yahoo.com [Department of Hematology, Faculty of Medicine, Baskent University, Ankara (Turkey); Kizilkilic, Osman, E-mail: ebos90@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Baskent University, Ankara (Turkey); Yildirim, Tulin, E-mail: ytulin@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Baskent University, Ankara (Turkey); Karaca, Sibel, E-mail: sibelkaraca@hotmail.com [Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Baskent University, Ankara (Turkey); Yeral, Mahmut, E-mail: mahmutyeral@hotmail.com [Department of Hematology, Faculty of Medicine, Baskent University, Ankara (Turkey); Kasar, Mutlu, E-mail: mutlukasar@hotmail.com [Department of Hematology, Faculty of Medicine, Baskent University, Ankara (Turkey); Ozdogu, Hakan, E-mail: hakanozdogu@hotmail.com [Department of Hematology, Faculty of Medicine, Baskent University, Ankara (Turkey)

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate cranial findings in patients with neurologically symptomatic sickle cell disease (SCD). Materials and methods: We studied 50 consecutive patients with SCD and neurologic symptoms. All patients underwent brain MR examinations: all 50 underwent classic MR imaging; 42, diffusion-weighted MR imaging; 10, MR angiography; four, MR venography; and three patients, digital subtraction angiography. Results: Of the 50 SCD patients, 19 (38%) had normal MR findings, and 31 (62%) showed abnormalities on brain MR images. Of the 50 patients, 16 (32%) had ischemic lesions; two (4%), subarachnoid hemorrhage; one (2%), moya-moya pattern; one (2%), posterior reversible encephalopathy; one (2%), dural venous sinus thrombosis; 12 (24%), low marrow signal intensity and thickness of the diploic space; 12 (24%), cerebral atrophy; and two (4%), osteomyelitis. Twenty-seven patients (54%) presented with headache, which was the most common clinical finding. Conclusions: The cranial involvement is one of the most devastating complications of SCD. Early and accurate diagnosis is important in the management of cranial complications of SCD.

  6. Cranial Osteology of Meiglyptini (Aves: Piciformes: Picidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reginaldo José Donatelli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Meiglyptini comprise eight species grouped into three genera: Meiglyptes and Mulleripicus, with three species each, and Hemicircus, with two species. The aim of the present study was to describe the cranial osteology of six species and three genera of Meiglyptini and to compare them to each other, as well as with other species of woodpeckers and other bird groups. The cranial osteology varied among the investigated species, but the most markedly distinct characteristics were: (1 a frontal overhang is only observed in the middle portion of the frontale of H. concretus; (2 the Proc. zygomaticus and suprameaticus are thick and long in species of the genus Mulleripicus, but short in other species; (3 the Pes pterygoidei is relatively larger in species of the genus Mulleripicus, while it is narrow, thin and relatively smaller in species of the genus Meiglyptes and indistinct in H. concretus; (4 the bony projection of the ectethmoidale is relatively short and thin in species of Mulleripicus and more developed in H. concretus. It appears that the greatest structural complexity of the cranial osteology is associated with the birds’ diet, with the frugivorous H. concretus being markedly different from the insectivorous species.

  7. Cranial nerve palsy in Wegener's granulomatosis--lessons from clinical cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nowack, Rainer; Wachtler, Paul; Kunz, Jürgen;

    2009-01-01

    The problem of diagnosing vasculitic neuropathy is discussed based on case reports of two patients with Wegener's granulomatosis. One patient developed de novo 6(th) nerve palsy as an isolated relapse manifestation and the second patient a sequence of multiple cranial nerve palsies. Brain imaging...... overall clinical presentations. Cranial neuropathy may be the first obvious vasculitic manifestation preceding other organ disease, and since single reliable tests for its diagnosis are lacking, a multidisciplinary approach is advocated here to detect vasculitic manifestations in other organs....

  8. Perioperative Complications Prognosis Based on Local Neurocirculatory and Trophic Changes in the Anterior Eye Segment in Pseudoexfoliation Syndrome (Report II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Petrayevsky

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose To develop clinical method of prognosis of cataract surgery possible complications in pseudoexfoliation syndrome (PES patients convenient for routine practice of the ophthalmosurgeon. Material and methods We examined 111 patients (111 eyes between the ages of 58 and 76, who were operated for cataract. Of those, 66 patients (66 eyes had cataract combined with PES and 45 patients (45 eyes had cataract without PES signs. We used the following examination methods: visometry, eye anterior segment biomicroscopy with estimation of severity of iris trophic changes and pseudoexfoliation signs according to special classification schemes, computer tonography, ultrasonic biometry, ophthalmometry, vasotonometry in anterior ciliary arteries (ACA, and pupil cycle time (PCT calculation. The patients with cataract were operated by extracapsular extraction using corneal access in 60% of cases, and by mechanical phacofragmentation using scleral access in 40% of cases. All patients were implanted posterior chamber intraocular lenses (IOL. In the patients with cataract and PES we additionally used intracapsular extraction with implantation IOL RSP3 in 15% of cases. Results In operated patients, we recorded such complications of cataract sur gery as lens posterior capsule rupture, zonula fibers rupture, fibrinoidtype reactions, and postoperative ocular hypertension. The rate of complications was higher in PES patients (37,9% and lower in patients without PES (17,8%. An average PCT was 1840±82 ms in PES against 1186±35 ms without PES. ACA blood pressure in the PES-patients was 44,1±1,0 mm Hg against 53,1±0,98 mm Hg in the patients without PES. The rate of iris trophic changes was significantly higher in PES-patients than in the patients without PES. The rate of complications depended on frequency and severity of iris trophic changes and intensity of PES. Most of complicated cases were observed in the PES-patients with III–IV grade of PES

  9. Neuroanatomy of cranial computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the fundamental structures visualized by means of computed tomography, the authors present the functional systems which are relevant in neurology by means of axial cross-sections. All drawings were prepared from original preparations by means of a new technique which is similar to the grey values of X-ray CT and nuclear magnetic resonance tomography. A detailed description is given of the topics of neurofunctional lesions

  10. Anterior cervical plating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonugunta V

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Although anterior cervical instrumentation was initially used in cervical trauma, because of obvious benefits, indications for its use have been expanded over time to degenerative cases as well as tumor and infection of the cervical spine. Along with a threefold increase in incidence of cervical fusion surgery, implant designs have evolved over the last three decades. Observation of graft subsidence and phenomenon of stress shielding led to the development of the new generation dynamic anterior cervical plating systems. Anterior cervical plating does not conclusively improve clinical outcome of the patients, but certainly enhances the efficacy of autograft and allograft fusion and lessens the rate of pseudoarthrosis and kyphosis after multilevel discectomy and fusions. A review of biomechanics, surgical technique, indications, complications and results of various anterior cervical plating systems is presented here to enable clinicians to select the appropriate construct design.

  11. Anterior knee pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patellofemoral syndrome; Chondromalacia patella; Runner's knee; Patellar tendinitis; Jumper's knee ... or playing soccer). You have flat feet. Anterior knee pain is more ... skiers, bicyclists, and soccer players who exercise often ...

  12. Anterior knee pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or playing soccer). You have flat feet. Anterior knee pain is more common in: People who are overweight People who have had a dislocation, fracture, or other injury to the kneecap Runners, jumpers, ...

  13. Cranial CT revisited: do we really need contrast enhancement?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to define guidelines for intravenous contrast administration in cranial CT, as currently there are no recent guidelines based on a large series of patients. In 1900 consecutive patients (1480 adults and 420 children) pre- and post-contrast scan was analysed in order to assess the contribution of contrast enhancement to the diagnosis. The findings were grouped according to whether abnormalities were seen on the pre- and/or post-contrast scan, or whether no abnormalities were seen at all. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accurracy of a pre-contrast scan were used to determine validity. Intravenous contrast enhancement only contributes to the diagnosis if a suspicious abnormality is seen on the unenhanced scan or in the appropriate clinical setting (33.6 %). In the remaining patients (65.6 %) there is no diagnostic contribution, except for a small number of abnormalities (0.8 %). These are often anatomical variants and have no therapeutic impact. The number of contrast-enhanced cranial CT examinations can significantly be reduced by using four general guidelines for contrast administration resulting in considerable cost savings without affecting the quality of service to the patient. These guidelines are defined by the clinical findings/presentation or by the findings on the unenhanced scan. The number of contrast-related complications will be reduced, which may have medicolegal implications. These guidelines can be applied in any radiology department. (orig.) (orig.)

  14. Should patients with extrapulmonary small-cell carcinoma receive prophylactic cranial irradiation?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Naidoo, Jarushka

    2013-09-01

    Extrapulmonary small-cell carcinoma (EPSCC) is a rare disease. Management is based on small-cell lung carcinoma. Prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) is not routinely administered in EPSCC. This study investigates the role of PCI in EPSCC, by analyzing the incidence, treatment, and survival of patients with brain metastases in a national cohort. Disease biology and epidemiology are also investigated.

  15. Sagittal synostosis: II. Cranial morphology and growth after the modified pi-plasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guimaraes-Ferreira, J.; Gewalli, F.; David, L.; Darvann, Tron Andre; Hermann, N.V.; Kreiborg, S.; Friede, H.; Lauritzen, C.G.K.

    2006-01-01

    developed by Kreiborg, which included the digitisation of 89 landmarks of the calvaria, cranial base, and orbit ( 43 in the lateral and 46 in the frontal projections), the production of mean shape plots for each group, and the intergroup comparison of a series of 78 variables ( linear distance between...

  16. Dosimetric comparison of intensity modulated radiosurgery with dynamic conformal arc radiosurgery for small cranial lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan F Calvo-Ortega

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: We have shown that IMRS provides the dosimetric advantages compared with DCARS. Based on the dosimetric findings in this study, fixed gantry IMRS technique can be adopted as a standard procedure for cranial SRS when micro-MLC technology is not available on the linear accelerator.

  17. Technical Aspects of Intraoperative Monitoring of Lower Cranial Nerve Function

    OpenAIRE

    Mishler, E. Tracy; Smith, Peter G.

    1995-01-01

    The efficacy of monitoring facial nerve activity in decreasing long-term morbidity has promoted an interest in monitoring other at-risk cranial nerves during procedures that involve manipulation of the basal cranial nerves. This presentation details practical techniques for monitoring the lower cranial nerves, which have been experientially developed over the past 9 years. Emphasis is placed on the selection of electrodes and procedural changes required for reliable and safe stimulation of th...

  18. [Modern surgery of meningiomas affecting anterior visual pathways].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, F; Ebner, F H; Honegger, J

    2013-05-01

    Meningiomas are the most common form of primary intracranial tumors. If the anterior visual pathways are affected clinical visual compromise, visual field defects, oculomotor nerve disturbances or propotosis are predominant. Meningiomas of the anterior visual pathway remain therapeutically challenging due to the direct anatomical relationship to the circulus arteriosus cerebri, the cavernous sinus and cranial nerves. The therapy of choice is microsurgical resection. In many cases a curative approach can be achieved with modern surgical techniques and simultaneously maintaining patient quality of life. Problematic are cases in which resection would be associated with the risk of clinical impairment and in these cases radiotherapy is an important therapeutic option. In cases involving complex invasiveness an interdisciplinary treatment to control local clinical symptoms is favored. PMID:23604251

  19. Ontogenetic allometry constrains cranial shape of the head-first burrowing worm lizard Cynisca leucura (Squamata: Amphisbaenidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipsley, Christy A; Rentinck, Marc-Nicolas; Rödel, Mark-Oliver; Müller, Johannes

    2016-09-01

    Amphisbaenians are fossorial, predominantly limbless squamate reptiles with distinct cranial shapes corresponding to specific burrowing behaviors. Due to their cryptic lifestyles and the scarcity of museum specimens, little is known of their intraspecific variation, particularly regarding cranial osteology. This represents a critical lack of information, because the majority of morphological investigations of squamate relationships are based on cranial characters. We investigated cranial variation in the West African Coast Worm Lizard Cynisca leucura, a round-headed member of the Amphisbaenidae. Using geometric morphometric analyses of three-dimensional computed tomographic scans, we found that cranial osteology of C. leucura is highly conserved, with the majority of shape changes occurring during growth as the cranium becomes more slender and elongate, accompanied by increasing interdigitation among the dermal roofing bones. Elements of the ventral portion of the cranium remain loosely connected in adults, possibly as a protective mechanism against repeated compression and torsion during burrow excavation. Intraspecific variation was strongly correlated with size change from juveniles to adults, indicating a dominant role of ontogenetic allometry in determining cranial shape. We found no evidence of sexual dimorphism, either during growth or among adults. Given the fossorial habits of C. leucura, we hypothesize that cranial allometry is under strong stabilizing selection to maintain adequate proportions for head-first digging, thereby constraining the ability of individuals to respond to differing selection pressures, including sexual selection and variation in diet or microhabitat. For species in which digging imposes less mechanical stress (e.g., in softer sand), allometric associations during growth may be weakened, allowing changes to the ontogenetic trajectory and subsequent morphological traits. Such developmental dissociation between size and shape, known

  20. Imaging of muscular denervation secondary to motor cranial nerve dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connor, S.E.J. [Neuroradiology Department, Kings College Hospital, Denmark Hill, London SE5 9RS (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: sejconnor@tiscali.co.uk; Chaudhary, N. [Neuroradiology Department, Kings College Hospital, Denmark Hill, London SE5 9RS (United Kingdom); Fareedi, S. [Neuroradiology Department, Kings College Hospital, Denmark Hill, London SE5 9RS (United Kingdom); Woo, E.K. [Neuroradiology Department, Kings College Hospital, Denmark Hill, London SE5 9RS (United Kingdom)

    2006-08-15

    The effects of motor cranial nerve dysfunction on the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances of head and neck muscles are reviewed. Patterns of denervation changes are described and illustrated for V, VII, X, XI and XII cranial nerves. Recognition of the range of imaging manifestations, including the temporal changes in muscular appearances and associated muscular grafting or compensatory hypertrophy, will avoid misinterpretation as local disease. It will also prompt the radiologist to search for underlying cranial nerve pathology, which may be clinically occult. The relevant cranial nerve motor division anatomy will be described to enable a focussed search for such a structural abnormality.

  1. Imaging of muscular denervation secondary to motor cranial nerve dysfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of motor cranial nerve dysfunction on the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances of head and neck muscles are reviewed. Patterns of denervation changes are described and illustrated for V, VII, X, XI and XII cranial nerves. Recognition of the range of imaging manifestations, including the temporal changes in muscular appearances and associated muscular grafting or compensatory hypertrophy, will avoid misinterpretation as local disease. It will also prompt the radiologist to search for underlying cranial nerve pathology, which may be clinically occult. The relevant cranial nerve motor division anatomy will be described to enable a focussed search for such a structural abnormality

  2. Twelfth cranial nerve involvement in Guillian Barre syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subrat Kumar Nanda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Guillian Barre Syndrome (GBS is associated with cranial nerve involvement. Commonest cranial nerves involved were the facial and bulbar (IXth and Xth. Involvement of twelfth cranial nerve is rare in GBS. We present a case of GBS in a thirteen years old boy who developed severe tongue weakness and wasting at two weeks after the onset of GBS. The wasting and weakness of tongue improved at three months of follow up. Brief review of the literature about XIIth cranial nerve involvement in GBS is discussed.

  3. Twelfth cranial nerve involvement in Guillian Barre syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Subrat Kumar Nanda; Sita Jayalakshmi; Devashish Ruikar; Mohandas Surath

    2013-01-01

    Guillian Barre Syndrome (GBS) is associated with cranial nerve involvement. Commonest cranial nerves involved were the facial and bulbar (IXth and Xth). Involvement of twelfth cranial nerve is rare in GBS. We present a case of GBS in a thirteen years old boy who developed severe tongue weakness and wasting at two weeks after the onset of GBS. The wasting and weakness of tongue improved at three months of follow up. Brief review of the literature about XIIth cranial nerve involvement in GBS is...

  4. Cranial nerves - spectrum of inflammatory and tumorous changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inflammatory processes as well as primary and secondary tumorous changes may involve cranial nerves causing neurological deficits. In addition to neurologists, ENT physicians, ophthalmologists and maxillofacial surgeons, radiologists play an important role in the investigation of patients with cranial nerve symptoms. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and particularly magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allow the depiction of the cranial nerve anatomy and pathological neural changes. This article briefly describes the imaging techniques in MDCT and MRI and is dedicated to the radiological presentation of inflammatory and tumorous cranial nerve pathologies. (orig.)

  5. A comparative study of cranial, blunt trauma fractures as seen at medicolegal autopsy and by Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed Tomography (CT) has become a widely used supplement to medico legal autopsies at several forensic institutes. Amongst other things, it has proven to be very valuable in visualising fractures of the cranium. Also CT scan data are being used to create head models for biomechanical trauma analysis by Finite Element Analysis. If CT scan data are to be used for creating individual head models for retrograde trauma analysis in the future we need to ascertain how well cranial fractures are captured by CT scan. The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic agreement between CT and autopsy regarding cranial fractures and especially the precision with which cranial fractures are recorded. The autopsy fracture diagnosis was compared to the diagnosis of two CT readings (reconstructed with Multiplanar and Maximum Intensity Projection reconstructions) by registering the fractures on schematic drawings. The extent of the fractures was quantified by merging 3-dimensional datasets from both the autopsy as input by 3D digitizer tracing and CT scan. The results showed a good diagnostic agreement regarding fractures localised in the posterior fossa, while the fracture diagnosis in the medial and anterior fossa was difficult at the first CT scan reading. The fracture diagnosis improved during the second CT scan reading. Thus using two different CT reconstructions improved diagnosis in the medial fossa and at the impact points in the cranial vault. However, fracture diagnosis in the anterior and medial fossa and of hairline fractures in general still remained difficult. The study showed that the forensically important fracture systems to a large extent were diagnosed on CT images using Multiplanar and Maximum Intensity Projection reconstructions. Difficulties remained in the minute diagnosis of hairline fractures. These inconsistencies need to be resolved in order to use CT scan data of victims for individual head modelling and trauma analysis

  6. Cranial computed tomographic abnormalities in leptomeningeal metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sixty-four (57.6%) of 111 cancer patients with cerebrospinal fluid cytology positive for malignant cells had cranial computed tomographic (CT) scans within 2 weeks before or after a lumbar puncture. Twenty-two (34.3%) of the 64 had abnormal CT findings indicative of leptomeningeal metastasis. Thirteen (59.6%) of these 22 patients had associated parenchymal metastases. Recognition of leptomeningeal disease may alter the management of patients with parenchymal metastases. Communicating hydrocephalus in cancer patients should be considered to be related to leptomeningeal metastasis until proven otherwise

  7. Approaches to anterior and anterolateral foramen magnum lesions: A critical review

    OpenAIRE

    Komotar, Ricardo J.; Zacharia, Brad E.; McGovern, Robert A.; Sisti, Michael B.; Bruce, Jeffrey N.; Anthony L D′Ambrosio

    2010-01-01

    Foramen magnum (FM) lesions represent some of the most complex cases for the modern neurosurgeon because of their location near vital brainstem structures, the vertebral arteries, and lower cranial nerves. In particular, anterior or anterolaterally located FM tumors have traditionally been most difficult to resect with high morbidity and mortality resulting from approaches through the posterior midline or transorally. For many neurosurgeons, the far lateral, extreme lateral approach, and more...

  8. Disorders of the lower cranial nerves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Finsterer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lesions of the lower cranial nerves (LCN are due to numerous causes, which need to be differentiated to optimize management and outcome. This review aims at summarizing and discussing diseases affecting LCN. Review of publications dealing with disorders of the LCN in humans. Affection of multiple LCN is much more frequent than the affection of a single LCN. LCN may be affected solely or together with more proximal cranial nerves, with central nervous system disease, or with nonneurological disorders. LCN lesions have to be suspected if there are typical symptoms or signs attributable to a LCN. Causes of LCN lesions can be classified as genetic, vascular, traumatic, iatrogenic, infectious, immunologic, metabolic, nutritional, degenerative, or neoplastic. Treatment of LCN lesions depends on the underlying cause. An effective treatment is available in the majority of the cases, but a prerequisite for complete recovery is the prompt and correct diagnosis. LCN lesions need to be considered in case of disturbed speech, swallowing, coughing, deglutition, sensory functions, taste, or autonomic functions, neuralgic pain, dysphagia, head, pharyngeal, or neck pain, cardiac or gastrointestinal compromise, or weakness of the trapezius, sternocleidomastoid, or the tongue muscles. To correctly assess manifestations of LCN lesions, precise knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the area is required.

  9. Congenital anterior urethral diverticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sanjeet Kumar; Ansari, Ms

    2014-09-01

    Congenital anterior urethral diverticulum (CAUD) may be found all along the anterior urethra and may present itself at any age, from infant to adult. Most children with this condition present with difficulty in initiating micturition, dribbling of urine, poor urinary stream, or urinary tract infection. A careful history will reveal that these children never had a good urinary stream since birth, and the telltale sign is a cystic swelling of the penile urethra. In this paper, we present two cases of CAUD that were managed by excision of the diverticulum with primary repair. PMID:26328174

  10. Asymmetric Type F Botulism with Cranial Nerve Demyelination

    OpenAIRE

    Filozov, Alina; Kattan, Jessica A.; Jitendranath, Lavanya; Smith, C. Gregory; Lúquez, Carolina; Phan, Quyen N.; Fagan, Ryan P.

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of type F botulism in a patient with bilateral but asymmetric neurologic deficits. Cranial nerve demyelination was found during autopsy. Bilateral, asymmetric clinical signs, although rare, do not rule out botulism. Demyelination of cranial nerves might be underrecognized during autopsy of botulism patients.

  11. 21 CFR 882.4370 - Pneumatic cranial drill motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pneumatic cranial drill motor. 882.4370 Section 882.4370 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... drill motor. (a) Identification. A pneumatic cranial drill motor is a pneumatically operated...

  12. Idiopathic hypertrophic cranial pachymeningitis associated with Sweet's Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A case of hypertrophic cranial pachymeningitis associated with Sweet's Syndrome is presented. Both entities have been described in association with several other chronic systemic inflammatory diseases and autoimmune conditions. To our knowledge the coexistence between Sweet's Syndrome and hypertrophic cranial pachymeningitis has not been reported up to date. We suggest a possible autoimmune or dysimmune mechanism in the pathogenesis of these two entities

  13. Vasculopathic cranial ocular motor neuropathy following sudden emotional stress

    OpenAIRE

    ValeriePurvin

    2010-01-01

    We describe 3 patients who experienced onset of a microvascular ocular motor nerve palsy in the setting of sudden emotional stress. Such emotional states are accompanied by a marked increase in sympathetic tone in some individuals. Mechanisms by which these autonomic changes might produce an ischemic cranial nerve palsy include intra-cranial vasoconstriction and transient systemic hypotension due to alterations in cardiac function.

  14. Vasculopathic Cranial Ocular Motor Neuropathy Following Sudden Emotional Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Purvin, Valerie

    2010-01-01

    We describe three patients who experienced onset of a microvascular ocular motor nerve palsy in the setting of sudden emotional stress. Such emotional states are accompanied by a marked increase in sympathetic tone in some individuals. Mechanisms by which these autonomic changes might produce an ischemic cranial nerve palsy include intra-cranial vasoconstriction and transient systemic hypotension due to alterations in cardiac function.

  15. Transient neonatal hypoglycemia: cranial US and MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cakmakci, H.; Usal, C.; Karabay, N.; Kovanlikaya, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Dokuz Eyluel Univ., Izmir (Turkey)

    2001-12-01

    A case of transient neonatal hypoglycemia with patchy hyperechogenic white matter abnormalities in the frontal and parietooccipital lobes on cranial US is presented. An MRI examination revealed T1 and T2 shortening of the lesions in the occipital and frontal white matter. Follow-up cranial US demonstrated recovery of white matter changes in the patient with normal neurological outcome. (orig.)

  16. Transient neonatal hypoglycemia: cranial US and MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A case of transient neonatal hypoglycemia with patchy hyperechogenic white matter abnormalities in the frontal and parietooccipital lobes on cranial US is presented. An MRI examination revealed T1 and T2 shortening of the lesions in the occipital and frontal white matter. Follow-up cranial US demonstrated recovery of white matter changes in the patient with normal neurological outcome. (orig.)

  17. The anterior process of the malleus in Cetartiodactyla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Wolfgang; Ruf, Irina

    2016-02-01

    The anterior fixation of the anterior process of the malleus has been studied in a number of Cetartiodactyla. This anterior process, also known as processus gracilis, is provided by the prearticular (gonial), a dermal bone, whereas the cartilage of Meckel becomes resorbed in perinatal ontogenetic stages. Posteriorly, the prearticular fuses with the cartilaginous caput of the malleus; rostrally, the prearticular (= processus gracilis) is always fixed to the anterior crus of the ectotympanic by an extremely thin splint (thickness fused to the adjacent bones already in juveniles. However, in ruminants, the tegmen tympani tends to disappear and the processus internus praearticularis appears as relatively small bony knob at the floor of the medial cranial cavity, and it seems not to be fused to the surrounding bones; in later age stages, it may become secondarily overgrown by the petrosal. This dorsally exposed processus internus praearticularis seems to be a synapomorphy of the Ruminantia. The functional meaning of this internal process of the prearticular, which is also developed to a minor degree in Carnivora, remains unclear at the moment - but we present some speculations about this. PMID:26510377

  18. Effect of cranial window type on monitoring neurovasculature using laser speckle contrast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hang; Senarathna, Janaka; Tyler, Betty M.; Hossain, Syed; Thakor, Nitish V.; Pathak, Arvind P.

    2016-03-01

    The cranial window preparation provides optical access to the rodent brain for high-resolution in vivo optical imaging. Two types of cranial windows are commonly employed, namely the open-skull window and thinned-skull window. Chronic in vivo laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) through the cranial window permits characterization of neurovascular morphology and blood flow changes over days or weeks. However, the effects of window type and their long-term stability for in vivo LSCI have not been studied. Here we systematically characterize the effect of each cranial window type on in vivo neurovascular monitoring with LSCI over two weeks. Imaging outcomes for each window were assessed in terms of contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), microvessel density (MVD) and total vessel length (TVL). We found that the thinned-skull window required a shorter recovery period (~ 4 days), provided a larger field of view and was a good choice for short-term (i.e. type for LSCI-based neurovascular imaging.

  19. Single fraction prophylactic cranial irradiation for small cell carcinoma of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effectiveness of a single 8-Gy fraction prophylactic cranial irradiation regime was assessed in 106 patients with small-cell carcinoma of the lung. All patients had limited stage disease and received combination chemotherapy consisting of either cisplatin or carboplatin with ifosfamide, etoposide, and vincristine (VICE). Cranial irradiation was administered 48 h after the first cycle of chemotherapy and was well tolerated. Actual 2-year survival was 35% and cranial relapse occurred in 22% of those patients who achieved complete remission. This compares favourably with a cranial relapse rate of 45% incomplete remitters previously reported with the same chemotherapy regime after a minimum follow-up of 2 years where PCI was not used. Formal psychometric testing was performed retrospectively on a series of 25 long-term survivors of whom 14 were taken from this reported series. Whilst 75% of patients were impaired on at least one test with 68% performing badly in the most complex task, this was not associated with clinically detectable neurological damage and the patients did not complain of memory or concentration difficulties. In conclusion, single fraction PCI, when used with platinum based combination chemotherapy, appears to be equally effective but may be less neurotoxic than the more standard fractionated regimes

  20. Clinical and radiographic outcome of cranial cruciate ligament reconstruction in dogs using frozen pattelar ligament allograft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the clinical and radiographic outcome of cranial cruciate ligament reconstruction using frozen pattelar ligament allograft at –20 ºC, fixed with interference screw and blount clamp. Ten crossbred dogs, between one and three years old, weightening 18 to 25 Kg, were submitted to left cranial cruciate desmotomy, based on the Pond & Nuki model. After 30 days, they were divided in two groups. In the group B, it was performed ligament reconstruction, and the group A received no treatment (control). The follow-up period was 90 days. Group B showed better limb function, less muscle hipotrophy and lower severity of the radiographic lesions in the knee when compared to control group (p value<0,05). Although the allografts were feasible macroscopically, it was observed slight cranial drawer moviment. It can be concluded that cranial cruciate ligament reconstruction using frozen pattelar tendon allograft improve limb function and decrease knee osteoarthritis progression at radiographic evaluation, but the joint was not completely stabilized. The interference screw and blount clamp were effective in graft fixation

  1. Normal cranial bone marrow MR imaging pattern with age-related ADC value distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Qi [Department of Radiology, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Sanhao Street No. 36, Heping District, Shenyang 110004 (China); Pan Shinong, E-mail: cjr.panshinong@vip.163.com [Department of Radiology, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Sanhao Street No. 36, Heping District, Shenyang 110004 (China); Yin Yuming [Radiology Associates, LLP, Corpus Christi, TX 78411 (United States); Li Wei; Chen Zhian [Department of Radiology, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Sanhao Street No. 36, Heping District, Shenyang 110004 (China); Liu Yunhui [Department of Neurosurgery, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Wu Zhenhua; Guo Qiyong [Department of Radiology, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Sanhao Street No. 36, Heping District, Shenyang 110004 (China)

    2011-11-15

    Objective: To determine MRI appearances of normal age-related cranial bone marrow and the relationship between MRI patterns and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values. Methods: Five hundred subjects were divided into seven groups based on ages. Cranial bone marrow MRI patterns were performed based on different thickness of the diploe and signal intensity distribution characteristics. ADC values of the frontal, parietal, occipital and temporal bones on DWI were measured and calculated. Correlations between ages and ADC values, between patterns and ADC values, as well as the distribution of ADC values were analyzed. Results: Normal cranial bone marrow was divided into four types and six subtypes, Type I, II, III and IV, which had positive correlation with age increasing ({chi}{sup 2} = 266.36, P < 0.01). The ADC values of normal parietal and occipital bone marrow showed significant negative correlation with age growing (r = -0.561 and -0.622, P < 0.01), while there were no significant differences of that with age increasing in frontal and temporal bone marrow (P > 0.05). In addition, there was significant negative correlation between the ADC values and MRI patterns in the normal parietal and occipital bones (r = -0.691 and -0.750, P < 0.01). Conclusion: The combination of MRI features and ADC values changes in different cranial bones showed significant correlation with age increasing. Familiar with the MRI appearance of the normal bone marrow conversion pattern in different age group and their ADC value will aid the diagnosis and differential of the cranial bone pathology.

  2. Anterior vaginal wall repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... symptoms will go away. This improvement will often last for years. Alternative Names A/P repair; Vaginal wall repair; Anterior and/ ... writing by ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact ... Institutes of Health Page last updated: 23 August 2016

  3. [Toxic anterior segment syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornut, P-L; Chiquet, C

    2011-01-01

    Toxic anterior segment syndrome (TASS) is a general term used to describe acute, sterile postoperative inflammation due to a non-infectious substance that accidentally enters the anterior segment at the time of surgery and mimics infectious endophthalmitis. TASS most commonly occurs acutely following anterior segment surgery, typically 12-72h after cataract extraction. Anterior segment inflammation is usually quite severe with hypopyon. Endothelial cell damage is common, resulting in diffuse corneal edema. No bacterium is isolated from ocular samples. The causes of TASS are numerous and difficult to isolate. Any device or substance used during the surgery or in the immediate postoperative period may be implicated. The major known causes include: preservatives in ophthalmic solutions, denatured ophthalmic viscosurgical devices, bacterial endotoxin, and intraocular lens-induced inflammation. Clinical features of infectious and non-infectious inflammation are initially indistinguishable and TASS is usually diagnosed and treated as acute endophthalmitis. It usually improves with local steroid treatment but may result in chronic elevation of intraocular pressure or irreversible corneal edema due to permanent damage of trabecular meshwork or endothelial cells. PMID:21176994

  4. Meta-analysis of defunctioning stoma in low anterior resection with total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer: evidence based on thirteen studies

    OpenAIRE

    Gu, Wen-long; Wu, Sheng-wen

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent studies have shown that a protective stoma can reduce morbidity in low anterior resection for rectal cancer; however, the necessity of it is still controversially discussed. Methods We performed this meta-analysis to provide a comprehensive evaluation of the role of defunctioning stoma in low anterior resection for rectal cancer on the rates of anastomotic leakage and reoperation related to leakage with or without defunctioning stoma by calculating the pooled risk ratio. Res...

  5. CT-based study of internal structure of the anterior pillar in extinct hominins and its implications for the phylogeny of robust Australopithecus

    OpenAIRE

    Villmoare, Brian A.; Kimbel, William H.

    2011-01-01

    The phylogeny of the early African hominins has long been confounded by contrasting interpretations of midfacial structure. In particular, the anterior pillar, an externally prominent bony column running vertically alongside the nasal aperture, has been identified as a homology of South African species Australopithecus africanus and Australopithecus robustus. If the anterior pillar is a true synapomorphy of these two species, the evidence for a southern African clade of Australopithecus would...

  6. Deep Learning Guided Partitioned Shape Model for Anterior Visual Pathway Segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansoor, Awais; Cerrolaza, Juan J; Idrees, Rabia; Biggs, Elijah; Alsharid, Mohammad A; Avery, Robert A; Linguraru, Marius George

    2016-08-01

    Analysis of cranial nerve systems, such as the anterior visual pathway (AVP), from MRI sequences is challenging due to their thin long architecture, structural variations along the path, and low contrast with adjacent anatomic structures. Segmentation of a pathologic AVP (e.g., with low-grade gliomas) poses additional challenges. In this work, we propose a fully automated partitioned shape model segmentation mechanism for AVP steered by multiple MRI sequences and deep learning features. Employing deep learning feature representation, this framework presents a joint partitioned statistical shape model able to deal with healthy and pathological AVP. The deep learning assistance is particularly useful in the poor contrast regions, such as optic tracts and pathological areas. Our main contributions are: 1) a fast and robust shape localization method using conditional space deep learning, 2) a volumetric multiscale curvelet transform-based intensity normalization method for robust statistical model, and 3) optimally partitioned statistical shape and appearance models based on regional shape variations for greater local flexibility. Our method was evaluated on MRI sequences obtained from 165 pediatric subjects. A mean Dice similarity coefficient of 0.779 was obtained for the segmentation of the entire AVP (optic nerve only =0.791 ) using the leave-one-out validation. Results demonstrated that the proposed localized shape and sparse appearance-based learning approach significantly outperforms current state-of-the-art segmentation approaches and is as robust as the manual segmentation. PMID:26930677

  7. Dose estimation for paediatric cranial computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curci Daros, K.A.; Bitelli Medeiros, R. [Sao Paulo Univ. Federal (Brazil); Curci Daros, K.A.; Oliveira Echeimberg, J. de [Centro Univ. Sao Camilo, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2006-07-01

    In the last ten years, the number of paediatric computed tomography (CT) scans have increased worldwide, contributing to higher population radiation dose. Technique diversification in paediatrics and different CT equipment technologies have led to various exposure levels complicating precise evaluation of doses and operational conditions necessary for good quality images. The objective of this study was to establish a quantitative relationship between absorbed dose and cranial region in children up to 6 years old undergoing CT exams. Methods: X-ray was measured on the cranial surface of 64 patients undergoing CT using thermoluminescent (T.L.) dosimeters. Forty T.L.D.100 thermoluminescent dosimeters (T.L.D.) were evenly distributed on each patients skin surface along the sagittal axis. Measurements were performed in facial regions exposed to scatter radiation and in the supratentorial and posterior fossa regions, submitted to primary radiation. T.L.D. were calibrated for 120 kV X-ray over the acrylic phantom. T.L. measurements were made with a Harshaw 4000 system. Patient mean T.L. readings were determined for position, pi, of T.L.D. and normalized to the maximum supratentorial reading. From integrating the linear T.L. density function (?) resulting from radiation distribution in each of the three exposed regions, dose fraction was determined in the region of interest, along with total dose under the technical conditions used in that specific exam protocol. For each T.L.D. position along the patient cranium, there were n T.L. measurements with 2% uncertainty due to T.L. reader, and 5% due to thermal treatment of dosimeters. Also, mean T.L. readings and their uncertainties were calculated for each patient at each position, p. Results: Mean linear T.L. density for the region exposed to secondary radiation defined by position, 0.3{<=}p{<=}6 cm, was {rho}((p)=7.9(4)x10{sup -2}+7(5)x10{sup -5}p{sup 4.5(4)} cm{sup -1}; exposed to primary X-ray for the posterior fossa

  8. Hemiplegic peripheral neuropathy accompanied with multiple cranial nerve palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirohisa Okuma

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A 32-year-old man experienced double vision around January, 2010, followed by weakness of his left upper and lower extremities. Articulation disorders and loss of hearing in his left ear developed, and he was admitted to our hospital on February 14, 2010. Physical examination was normal, and neurological examination showed clear consciousness with no impairment of cognitive function, but with articulation disorders. Olfactory sensation was reduced. Left ptosis and left gaze palsy, complete left facial palsy, perceptive deafness of the left ear, and muscle weakness of the left trapezius muscle were observed. Paresis in the left upper and lower extremities was graded 4/5 through manual muscle testing. Sensory system evaluation revealed complete left-side palsy, including the face. Deep tendon reflexes were slightly diminished equally on both sides; no pathologic reflex was seen. No abnormality of the brain parenchyma, cerebral nerves or cervicothoracolumbar region was found on brain magnetic resonance imaging. On electroencephalogram, alpha waves in the main frequency band of 8 to 9 Hz were recorded, indicating normal findings. Brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT scan showed reduced blood flow in the right inner frontal lobe and both occipital lobes. Nerve biopsy (left sural nerve showed reduction of nerve density by 30%, with demyelination. The patient also showed manifestations of multiple cranial nerve disorder, i.e., of the trigeminal nerve, glossopharyngeal nerve, vagus nerve, and hypoglossal nerve. Whole-body examination was negative. Finally, based on ischemic brain SPECT images, spinal fluid findings and nerve biopsy results, peripheral neuropathy accompanied with multiple cranial nerve palsy was diagnosed.

  9. α-Synuclein pathology in the cranial and spinal nerves in Lewy body disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Keiko; Mori, Fumiaki; Tanji, Kunikazu; Miki, Yasuo; Toyoshima, Yasuko; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Yamada, Masahito; Wakabayashi, Koichi

    2016-06-01

    Accumulation of phosphorylated α-synuclein in neurons and glial cells is a histological hallmark of Lewy body disease (LBD) and multiple system atrophy (MSA). Recently, filamentous aggregations of phosphorylated α-synuclein have been reported in the cytoplasm of Schwann cells, but not in axons, in the peripheral nervous system in MSA, mainly in the cranial and spinal nerve roots. Here we conducted an immunohistochemical investigation of the cranial and spinal nerves and dorsal root ganglia of patients with LBD. Lewy axons were found in the oculomotor, trigeminal and glossopharyngeal-vagus nerves, but not in the hypoglossal nerve. The glossopharyngeal-vagus nerves were most frequently affected, with involvement in all of 20 subjects. In the spinal nerve roots, Lewy axons were found in all of the cases examined. Lewy axons in the anterior nerves were more frequent and numerous in the thoracic and sacral segments than in the cervical and lumbar segments. On the other hand, axonal lesions in the posterior spinal nerve roots appeared to increase along a cervical-to-sacral gradient. Although Schwann cell cytoplasmic inclusions were found in the spinal nerves, they were only minimal. In the dorsal root ganglia, axonal lesions were seldom evident. These findings indicate that α-synuclein pathology in the peripheral nerves is axonal-predominant in LBD, whereas it is restricted to glial cells in MSA. PMID:26563477

  10. Ontogeny of the Early Triassic Cynodont Thrinaxodon liorhinus (Therapsida): Cranial Morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasinoski, Sandra C; Abdala, Fernando; Fernandez, Vincent

    2015-08-01

    The cranial morphology of 68 Thrinaxodon liorhinus specimens, ranging in size from 30 to 96 mm in basal skull length, is investigated using both qualitative and quantitative analyses. From this comprehensive survey, we determined that nine cranial features, including five in the temporal region, separated the sample into four ontogenetic stages. A bivariate analysis of 60 specimens indicated that the skull generally increased in size isometrically, with the exception of four regions. The orbit had negative allometry, a result consistent with other ontogenetic studies of tetrapods, whereas the length of the snout, palate, and temporal region showed positive allometry. The last trend had strong positive allometry indicating that during ontogeny the length of the sagittal crest increased at a much faster rate than the rest of the skull. The large number of changes in the temporal region of the skull of Thrinaxodon may indicate a greater development of the posterior fibres of the temporalis musculature from an early ontogenetic stage. For example, the posterior sagittal crest developed much earlier in ontogeny than the anterior crest that formed in adults, and bone was deposited dorsally creating a unified posterior sagittal crest rather than having a suture that spanned the entire depth of the skull roof. In combination with the isometric height of the zygomatic arch and the almost complete absence of the zygomatic arch angulation, these ontogenetic changes suggest that there was greater development of the temporalis relative to the masseter muscles, indicating a strong posterodorsal movement of the mandible in Thrinaxodon. PMID:25620050

  11. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruciate ligament injury - anterior; ACL injury; Knee injury - anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ... confirm the diagnosis. It may also show other knee injuries. First aid for an ACL injury may include: ...

  12. Middle Cranial Fossa Transtemporal Approach to the Intrapetrous Internal Carotid Artery

    OpenAIRE

    Andrews, James C.; Martin, Neil A.; Black, Keith; Honrubia, Vincent F.; Becker, Donald P.

    1991-01-01

    Diseases involving the proximity of the internal carotid artery at the skull base require identification of this vessel in the temporal bone to gain vascular control for any maneuver in its vicinity. This article details the technique of surgical dissection and exposure of the internal carotid artery within the skull base through a transtemporal middle cranial fossa approach. The anatomic landmarks important in utilizing this procedure include the greater superficial petrosal nerve, the mandi...

  13. Primary cranial mediastinal hemangiosarcoma in a young dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hun-Young; Kang, Hye-Mi; Lee, Mi-Young

    2014-01-01

    Primary cranial mediastinal hemangiosarcomas are uncommon tumors. A 30-kg, 2-year-old, intact female German shepherd was presented for evaluation of cachexia and respiratory distress of a few days' duration. Lateral radiographic projection of the thorax revealed significant pleural effusion. Computed tomography revealed a cranial mediastinal mass effect adjacent to the heart. On surgical exploration, a pedunculated mass attached to the esophagus, trachea, brachiocephalic trunk, left subclavian artery and cranial vena cava without attachment to the right atrium and auricular appendage was removed and debrided by use of blunt dissection and dry gauzes, respectively. Histopathology results described the cranial mediastinal mass as hemangiosarcoma. At 8 months and 5 days post-operatively, the patient died. Primary cranial mediastinal hemangiosarcomas, although a seemingly rare cause of thoracic pathology in young dogs, should be considered in the differential diagnosis for pleural effusion and soft tissue mass effect in the cranial mediastinum. This is the first case report in a dog to describe primary cranial mediastinal hemangiosarcoma. PMID:25089185

  14. Vídeo-artroscopia da articulação fêmoro-tíbio-patelar em cães após secção do ligamento cruzado cranial guiada por artroscopia Videoarthroscopy of the stifle joint in dogs after cranial cruciate ligament rupture guided by arthroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.F. Borges

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Avaliaram-se e classificaram-se por meio da vídeo-artroscopia as alterações da articulação fêmoro-tíbio-patelar (FTP, 21 dias após secção experimental do ligamento cruzado cranial (LCCr em cães, tendo como referência os parâmetros encontrados no exame artroscópico imediatamente anterior à secção. Ao exame artroscópico, foi possível visibilizar os cotos remanescentes do LCCr e as alterações articulares, como aumento da vascularização, aumento das vilosidades na membrana sinovial, bem como fibrilação e osteófitos, principalmente nas bordas trocleares do fêmur. Os resultados sugerem que a artroscopia é um método preciso de avaliação macroscópica dos tecidos articulares moles e duros.By the use of videoarthroscopy, the changes of the stifle joint after experimental rupture of cranial cruciate ligament (CCL in dogs were evaluated and classified, based on the parameters found at the arthroscopic examination right before the rupture. By the arthroscopic examination, it was possible to visualize the remainings of the CCL and joint changes such as increase of the vascularity and synovial proliferation increase in the synovial membranes, as well as fibrillation and irregularities on the joint surfaces and osteophyte formation, mainly on the trochlear ridges. The results suggest that arthroscopy is a precise method for macroscopic evaluation of the smooth and bone joint tissues

  15. Recent refinements to cranial implants for rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Jessica M; Cohen, Yale E; Shirley, Harry; Tsunada, Joji; Bennur, Sharath; Christison-Lagay, Kate; Veeder, Christin L

    2016-04-20

    The advent of cranial implants revolutionized primate neurophysiological research because they allow researchers to stably record neural activity from monkeys during active behavior. Cranial implants have improved over the years since their introduction, but chronic implants still increase the risk for medical complications including bacterial contamination and resultant infection, chronic inflammation, bone and tissue loss and complications related to the use of dental acrylic. These complications can lead to implant failure and early termination of study protocols. In an effort to reduce complications, we describe several refinements that have helped us improve cranial implants and the wellbeing of implanted primates. PMID:27096188

  16. Radiodiagnosis of cranial and verterbral injuries of children at birth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Description of roentgenological methods of the examination for most common cranial and vertebral injuries of children at birth is given. Roentgenological signs of such cranial injuries as cracks, linear skull fractures, impression and the likes are presented. Diagnostics difficulties concerning cranial injuries due to anatomical immaturity of osteal elements are pointed out. Specific features of the method of X-ray examination of vertebral column of newborns and infants are considered in detail. Shiftings, fractures of spine and indirect signs of spine injury represent roentgenological signs of spine injury. Their description is given in detail

  17. Intra-cranial Toxoplasmosis in an Immunocompetent Female.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoti, Yaser Ud Din; Aziz, Amir; Ishaque, Khurram; Abbas, Sadia; Ud Din, Tariq Salah

    2016-06-01

    Intra-cranial toxoplasmosis is a rare entity occurring mostly in immunosuppressed individuals. It is extremely rare in an immune competent patient. Toxoplasmosis is the third leading cause of food borne illness. Depending upon the site, degree of inflammation and local damage, toxoplasmosis encephalitis and cranial abscess can cause long lasting neurologic sequel. With modern imaging techniques, toxoplasmosis antibody titers, slit lamp examination and brain biopsy, there is improvement in diagnosis along with reduction in the mortality rate. We present a case illustrating the radiological manifestations, complications, potential pitfalls in diagnosis and treatment of intra-cranial toxoplasmosis in immunocompetent patient. PMID:27376217

  18. Familial idiopathic hypertrophic osteoarthropathy and cranial suture defects in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three children with idiopathic hypertrophic osteoarthropathy and cranial suture defects are reported. The syndrome was recognized after birth and in the two oldest siblings, the cranial defects and subperiosteal bone formation resolved almost completely by age 4 and 6 years. The joint swelling and clubbing persisted and mild bone reabsorption of the distal phalanges became apparent at an older age. Two siblings and both parents had normal bone X-rays and no clubbing. This study confirms the association of cranial sutural defects and familial idopathic hypertrophic osteoarthropathy. (orig.)

  19. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Vilaseca, Tomas; Chahla, Jorge; Rodriguez, Gustavo Gomez; Arroquy, Damián; Herrera, Gonzalo Perez; Orlowski, Belen; Carboni, Martín

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to analyze whether it is more frequent the presence of a decreased range of motion in the hips of recreational athletes with primary injury of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) than in a control group of volunteers without knee pathology. Methods: We included prospectively recreational athletes between 18 and 40 years with an acute ACL injury between January 2011 and January 2013. They were compared with a control group of volunteers recreational...

  20. Current approach in diagnosis and management of anterior uveitis

    OpenAIRE

    Agrawal Rupesh; Murthy Somasheila; Sangwan Virender; Biswas Jyotirmay

    2010-01-01

    Uveitis is composed of a diverse group of disease entities, which in total has been estimated to cause approximately 10% of blindness. Uveitis is broadly classified into anterior, intermediate, posterior and panuveitis based on the anatomical involvement of the eye. Anterior uveitis is, however, the commonest form of uveitis with varying incidences reported in worldwide literature. Anterior uveitis can be very benign to present with but often can lead to severe morbidity if not treated...

  1. Simulated activity but real trauma: a systematic review on Nintendo Wii injuries based on a case report of an acute anterior cruciate ligament rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Sebastian A; Vavken, Patrick; Pagenstert, Geert

    2015-03-01

    Video gaming injuries are classically regarded as eccentric accidents and novelty diagnoses. A case of an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear sustained during Wii boxing spurned us to review the literature for other Wii-related injuries and Wii-based posttraumatic rehabilitation. The English literature listed in PubMed was systematically reviewed by searching for "Wii (trauma or injury or fracture)." Full-text articles were included after duplicate, blinded review. The type and treatment of injury as well as the Wii-based rehabilitation programs found were analyzed. Additionally, a new case of an acute ACL tear-sustained playing, Wii boxing, is additionally presented. After exclusion of irrelevant articles, 13 articles describing Wii-related injuries were included reporting on 3 fractures, 6 nonosseous, 2 overuse injuries, and 2 rehabilitation programs using Wii for posttraumatic rehabilitation. Among the presented Wii-related injuries, only 12.5% were treated conservatively, whereas 87.5% underwent either surgical or interventional treatment. Because of the reported case, the literature search was limited to Wii-related injuries excluding other video games. Another limitation of this article lies in the fact that mainly case reports but no controlled trials exist on the topic. Assumingly, primarily the more severe injuries are reported in the literature with an unknown number of possibly minor injuries. Motion-controlled video games, such as Wii, are becoming increasingly popular as a recreational entertainment. Because of their wide acceptance and entertaining nature, they are also increasingly recognized as a tool in rehabilitation. However, although the activity is simulated, injuries are real. Our systematic review shows that Wii gaming can lead to severe injuries, sometimes with lasting limitations. PMID:25816033

  2. Androgen action during male sex differentiation includes suppression of cranial suspensory ligament development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M.A. Emmen (Judith); A. McLuskey; J.A. Grootegoed (Anton); A.O. Brinkmann (Albert)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractThe cranial suspensory ligament is located on the border of the cranial (mesonephric) mesentery in adult female mammals, which runs between the cranial pole of the internal genitalia and the dorsal abdominal wall. Absence of the cranial suspensory ligament i

  3. Anterior ethmoidal artery emerging anterior to bulla ethmoidalis: An abnormal anatomical variation in Waardenburg's syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Danny K. C.; Shao, Angus; Campbell, Raewyn; Douglas, Richard

    2014-01-01

    In endoscopic sinus surgery, the anterior ethmoidal artery (AEA) is usually identified as it traverses obliquely across the fovea ethmoidalis, posterior to the bulla ethmoidalis and anterior to or within the ground lamella's attachment to the skull base. Injury to the AEA may result in hemorrhage, retraction of the AEA into the orbit, and a retrobulbar hematoma. The resulting increase in intraorbital pressure may threaten vision. Waardenburg's syndrome (WS) is a rare congenital, autosomal dom...

  4. [Somatotopic Representation of the Anterior Horn within Cervical Enlargement: Reappraisal of Known Doctrine Based on Clinicopathological Findings Seen in Hirayama Disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, Keizo

    2016-05-01

    Clinical features (weakness and amyotrophy of intrinsic hand muscles and obliquely distributed amyotrophy of forearm muscles, figure 1), needle electromyographic findings (distribution of neurogenic activities, figure 2), and pathological findings (ischemic necroses of the anterior horns between C6 and T1, figure 3) of Hirayama disease suggest that understanding of somatotopic representation of the anterior horn innervating arm muscles in the cervical enlargement of spinal cord differs from the known doctrine. Anterior horn cells of the intrinsic hand muscles are located between C7 and T1, those of forearm muscles and triceps brachii muscle as elbow extensor are, contrary to the known doctrine, located in C5 and C6, and those of elbow flexors such as biceps brachii and brachioradialis are located in C4 and above (figure 5). Development of dexterity in human hand may reflect development of cervical enlargement in accord with larger areas representing the hand and fingers on cerebral motor cortex. PMID:27156506

  5. Side effect of cranial radiation in childhood acute leukemia, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examined the somnolence syndrome, which is one of the side effects of cranial irradiation. Out of 53 patients in acute leukemia who had received cranial irradiation, nine patients (17%) developed the somnolence syndrome. Patients with the somnolence syndrome showed slow waves on EEG. Some patients had ventricular dilatation and widening of sulci before cranial irradiation on CT findings, but these findings improved after cranial irradiation. Out of nine cases with the somnolence syndrome, 6 patients survived and did not experience difficulties in school. But one patient showed calcification on CT brain scan. It is considered that the cause of the somnolence syndrome is a trasient inhibition of myelin synthesis and most patients improved without serious sequelae. It is necessary to follow up many cases of somnolence syndrome. (author)

  6. Cranial computerized tomography in children suffering from acute leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cranial computerized (axial) tomography permits a more complete neurologic supervision of children with acute leukemia and a better knowledge of the frequency and varieties of cerebral complications in leukemia. Endocranial complications in acute leukemia are essentially infiltrative, hemorrhagic, infectious or iatrogenic. Cranial computerized tomography can demonstrate cerebral changes in meningeal leukemia, hemorrhages, calcifications, brain atrophy or leukencephalopathy. The preliminary results of cranial computerized tomography in childhood leukemia suggest that the iatrogenic main lesion of the brain due to combined radiation-chemotherapy is atrophy whereas that of the intrathecal cytostatic therapy is demyelination. Accurate diagnostics and control of possible cerebral complications in therapy of leukemia is essentially for appropriate therapeutic management. For that cranial computerized tomography is the best method to a effective supervision of the brain. (author)

  7. The Affect of the Cranial Elektrotherapy on the Dynamic Parameters of Movements

    OpenAIRE

    Čupriks, Leonīds; Rudzītis, Andris; Čuprika, Aleksandra; Žilinskis, Leonīds

    2015-01-01

    It is considered that in sport athletes use the cranial electrotherapy stimulation (CES) to improve the performance and to increase the ability to concentrate before the competition. Based on the previous researches we can conclude that CES is absolutely safe. Therefore, the aim of the current study is to determine the CES affect on the dynamic parameters of movements (power, strength, velocity). Subjects of our study were twenty healthy athletes of luge, bobsled and skeleton. The evaluation ...

  8. Agreement between cranial and facial classification through clinical observation and anthropometric measurement among envigado school children

    OpenAIRE

    Torres-Restrepo, Adriana M; Quintero-Monsalve, Ana M; Giraldo-Mira, Juan F; Rueda, Zulma Vanessa; Vélez-Trujillo, Natalia; Botero-Mariaca, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Background To evaluate the agreement between cranial and facial classification obtained by clinical observation and anthropometric measurements among school children from the municipality of Envigado, Colombia. Methods This cross-sectional study was carried out among 8-15-year-old children. Initially, an indirect clinical observation was made to determine the skull pattern (dolichocephalic, mesocephalic or brachycephalic), based on visual equivalence of right eurion- left eurion and glabella-...

  9. TISSUE-MOTION ANALYSIS OF ARTERY PULSATION IN CRANIAL ULTRASONOGRAM OF NEWBORN BABY

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad, Mohiuddin; Chowdhury, Mostafa Zaman; Alam, Md. Jahangir

    2012-01-01

    Tissue-motion is an important physical parameter that can be considered in discussing the strength of artery pulsation of newborn baby for pediatrics diagnosis. In this paper, we have used optical flow technique to determine the tissue-motion velocity quantitatively in cranial ultrasonogram of newborn baby. We have estimated the tissue-motion by using gradient-based optical flow method and then the time variant tissue motion velocities are analyzed by using Fourier transform. Strong pulsation...

  10. Genetically induced abnormal cranial development in human trisomy 18 with holoprosencephaly: comparisons with the normal tempo of osteogenic-neural development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Shaina N; Ziermann, Janine M; Gondré-Lewis, Marjorie C

    2015-07-01

    Craniofacial malformations are common congenital defects caused by failed midline inductive signals. These midline defects are associated with exposure of the fetus to exogenous teratogens and with inborn genetic errors such as those found in Down, Patau, Edwards' and Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndromes. Yet, there are no studies that analyze contributions of synchronous neurocranial and neural development in these disorders. Here we present the first in-depth analysis of malformations of the basicranium of a holoprosencephalic (HPE) trisomy 18 (T18; Edwards' syndrome) fetus with synophthalmic cyclopia and alobar HPE. With a combination of traditional gross dissection and state-of-the-art computed tomography, we demonstrate the deleterious effects of T18 caused by a translocation at 18p11.31. Bony features included a single developmentally unseparated frontal bone, and complete dual absence of the anterior cranial fossa and ethmoid bone. From a superior view with the calvarium plates removed, there was direct visual access to the orbital foramen and hard palate. Both the eyes and the pituitary gland, normally protected by bony structures, were exposed in the cranial cavity and in direct contact with the brain. The middle cranial fossa was shifted anteriorly, and foramina were either missing or displaced to an abnormal location due to the absence or misplacement of its respective cranial nerve (CN). When CN development was conserved in its induction and placement, the respective foramen developed in its normal location albeit with abnormal gross anatomical features, as seen in the facial nerve (CNVII) and the internal acoustic meatus. More anteriorly localized CNs and their foramina were absent or heavily disrupted compared with posterior ones. The severe malformations exhibited in the cranial fossae, orbital region, pituitary gland and sella turcica highlight the crucial involvement of transcription factors such as TGIF, which is located on chromosome 18 and contributes

  11. A study of cranial computed tomography scan in acute lymphocytic leukemia and non-Hodgkin lymphoma in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A serial follow-up of cranial computed tomography (CT) scan was performed in total of 55 children with acute lymphocytic leukemia and non-Hodgkin lymphoma in order to elucidate the early and late influences of the chemoradiotherapy to the cerebrum. Scoring system was applied in evaluation of the cerebral surface changes, namely atropy, counting 0 to 2 points for the widening of extracerebral space, surface sulici, Sylvian fissure, and rounding of the gyri respectively. Lateral vetricular measurement was also performed at the level of basal ganglia, calculating the anterior horn width/maximum cerebral width (C/B), and bicaudate width/maximum cerebral width (D/B). All the patients except for 3 in the remission (CR) group, and for 1 in the relapsed group (REL) had been treated with cranial irradiation and intrathecal methotrexate as a prophylaxis of central nervous system leukemia. Analysis of CR patients showed mild to moderate degree of cerebral atropy early at the preprophylactic stage, with mean surface score of 3, C/B of 26.5 %, and D/B of 12.7 %. The main factor for this change may well be corticosteroid used at the time of initial remission induction. Serial follow-up of CT revealed that these changes improved even after the cranial irradiation phase in most cases. In the period from 12 to 36 months after diagnosis, 28 % of CR patient showed atrophic changes, and 13.3 % from 36 to 60 months, and 16.6 % from 60 months or later. No remarkable alterations were observed after the first 12 months in individual cases, indicating that the major changes in CT findings in these patient occur in quite early phase of the therapy, and persist with various degree of improvements during the long course of chemotherapy. In the relapsed group of patients, the atrophic changes of the cranial CT progressed as they repeated the relapse, either of marrow or CNS, including 5 cases of leukoencephalopathy. (author)

  12. Macroanatomical Studies on the Cranial Cervical Ganglion in Sheep

    OpenAIRE

    Türkmenoğlu, İsmail

    2003-01-01

    In this study, the location and relations of the cranial cervical ganglion were investigated. A total of six sheep of different ages and both sexes were used. The cranial cervical ganlion lies medial to the occipitohyoid muscle, ventral to the jugular foramen, lateral to the longissimus capitis muscle and craniomedial to a common mass constituted by the glossopharyngeal, vagal, accessory and hypoglossal nerves and the condyloid artery. The colour and shape of the ganglion are light brown and ...

  13. Imaging assessment of isolated lesions affecting cranial nerve III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to review the anatomy and main pathologic conditions affecting cranial nerve III using imaging studies, particularly magnetic resonance imaging. Imaging methods are essential in the evaluation of patients with suspected lesions of the oculomotor nerve once signs and symptoms are unspecific and a large number of diseases can affect cranial nerve III. A brief review of the literature is also presented. (author)

  14. Cranial nerve involvement in patients with leprous neuropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar Sudhir; Alexander Mathew; Gnanamuthu Chandran

    2006-01-01

    Background: Leprosy is one of the most common causes of peripheral neuropathy, perhaps closely matched by diabetic neuropathy. Patterns of peripheral neuropathy in leprosy can be varied, which may include mononeuropathy, mononeuritis multiplex and symmetric polyneuropathy. Cranial nerves, especially facial and trigeminal nerves, are also commonly involved in leprosy. Aims: To find out the pattern and spectrum of cranial nerve involvement in a consecutive series of patients with leprous neu...

  15. MALIGNANT TRANSFORMATION OF CRANIAL NERVE SCHWANNOMA AFTER RADIOSURGERY - CASE REPORT

    OpenAIRE

    Bah, AB; N’dri, OD; Herbrecht, A; Parker, F

    2014-01-01

    We describe an unusual case of malignant transformation of benign cranial nerves schwannoma eleven months after surgery and five months post radiotherapy. There has been no evidence of recurrence after 5 years follow-up. This early malignant transformation of a schwannoma involved cranial nerves IX, X, XI. Due to the uncommon presentation and the uncertainty of the actual role of the radiation on the tumor behavior, the report of this case was considered clinically important.

  16. Cranial irradiation in the management of childhood leukemic hyperleukocytosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acute leukemia with hyperleukocytosis (more than 105/mm3) is at high risk of early sudden death, usually from intracerebral hemorrhage. Emergency cranial irradiation is a relatively simple approach to solve this the problem. We summarized our experience of cranial irradiation in 24 leukemic children who presented with hyperleukocytosis. Between 1990 and 1998, 40 children with acute leukemia presenting with hyper leukocytosis were referred for emergency cranial irradiation. Among these patients, 24 children were evaluable. There were 16 boys and eight girls, their ages ranged from 2 to 13 years (median 9.5 years). The initial leukocyte counts ranged 109,910/mm3 to 501,000/mm3. Peripheral blood smear was performed in all patients and noted the morphology of the blast. Introduction of emergency cranial irradiation was determined by the leukocyte counts (more than 100,000/mm) and the existence of the blast in peripheral blood smear. All patients were treated with intravenous hydration with alkaline fluid and oral allopurinol. Cranial irradiation started on the day of diagnosis. With 2 Gy in one fraction in 4 patients, 4 Gy in two fractions in 20 patients. The WBC count had fallen in 19 patients (83%) and no intracerebral hemorrhage occurred after irradiation. There were five cases of early deaths. Four patients died of metabolic complications, and one patient with intracerebral hemorrhage. He died 5 hours after cranial irradiation. No patient had any immediate side effect from cranial irradiation. Our data suggest, that emergency cranial irradiation can be safely chosen and effective in childhood leukemic patients presenting with high leukocyte counts

  17. Cranial irradiation in the management of childhood leukemic hyperleukocytosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Semie; Kim, Il Han [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-06-01

    Acute leukemia with hyperleukocytosis (more than 10{sup 5}/mm{sup 3}) is at high risk of early sudden death, usually from intracerebral hemorrhage. Emergency cranial irradiation is a relatively simple approach to solve this the problem. We summarized our experience of cranial irradiation in 24 leukemic children who presented with hyperleukocytosis. Between 1990 and 1998, 40 children with acute leukemia presenting with hyper leukocytosis were referred for emergency cranial irradiation. Among these patients, 24 children were evaluable. There were 16 boys and eight girls, their ages ranged from 2 to 13 years (median 9.5 years). The initial leukocyte counts ranged 109,910/mm{sup 3} to 501,000/mm{sup 3}. Peripheral blood smear was performed in all patients and noted the morphology of the blast. Introduction of emergency cranial irradiation was determined by the leukocyte counts (more than 100,000/mm) and the existence of the blast in peripheral blood smear. All patients were treated with intravenous hydration with alkaline fluid and oral allopurinol. Cranial irradiation started on the day of diagnosis. With 2 Gy in one fraction in 4 patients, 4 Gy in two fractions in 20 patients. The WBC count had fallen in 19 patients (83%) and no intracerebral hemorrhage occurred after irradiation. There were five cases of early deaths. Four patients died of metabolic complications, and one patient with intracerebral hemorrhage. He died 5 hours after cranial irradiation. No patient had any immediate side effect from cranial irradiation. Our data suggest, that emergency cranial irradiation can be safely chosen and effective in childhood leukemic patients presenting with high leukocyte counts.

  18. Primary cranial mediastinal hemangiosarcoma in a young dog

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon, Hun-Young; Kang, Hye-Mi; Lee, Mi-Young

    2014-01-01

    Primary cranial mediastinal hemangiosarcomas are uncommon tumors. A 30-kg, 2-year-old, intact female German shepherd was presented for evaluation of cachexia and respiratory distress of a few days’ duration. Lateral radiographic projection of the thorax revealed significant pleural effusion. Computed tomography revealed a cranial mediastinal mass effect adjacent to the heart. On surgical exploration, a pedunculated mass attached to the esophagus, trachea, brachiocephalic trunk, left subclavia...

  19. Positive pressure ventilation and cranial volume in newborn infants.

    OpenAIRE

    Milligan, D W

    1981-01-01

    The relationship between changes in airways pressure, pleural pressure, and cranial volume was studied in a group of sick newborn infants requiring ventilatory assistance. Cranial volume increased appreciably only when lung compliance was such that more than 20% of the applied airways pressure was transmitted to the pleural space, or if the absolute pleural pressure was greater than 4 cmH2O above atmospheric pressure. The findings stress the need for more-critical monitoring during periods of...

  20. Botulinum Toxin Physiology in Focal Hand and Cranial Dystonia

    OpenAIRE

    Barbara Illowsky Karp

    2012-01-01

    The safety and efficacy of botulinum toxin for the treatment of focal hand and cranial dystonias are well-established. Studies of these adult-onset focal dystonias reveal both shared features, such as the dystonic phenotype of muscle hyperactivity and overflow muscle contraction and divergent features, such as task specificity in focal hand dystonia which is not a common feature of cranial dystonia. The physiologic effects of botulinum toxin in these 2 disorders also show both similarities an...

  1. Cranial Nerve Development Requires Co-Ordinated Shh and Canonical Wnt Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Kurosaka, Hiroshi; Paul A Trainor; Leroux-Berger, Margot; Iulianella, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    Cranial nerves govern sensory and motor information exchange between the brain and tissues of the head and neck. The cranial nerves are derived from two specialized populations of cells, cranial neural crest cells and ectodermal placode cells. Defects in either cell type can result in cranial nerve developmental defects. Although several signaling pathways are known to regulate cranial nerve formation our understanding of how intercellular signaling between neural crest cells and placode cell...

  2. DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT OF ANTERIOR CSF LEAKS : OUR EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Probal

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available CSF leaks through the nose (CSF rhinorrhea may occur due to defects in the anterior, middle or posterior cranial fossa. Among them, anterior CSF leaks are most commonly encountered in clinical practice and may be traumatic or spontaneous in origin. A pro mpt diagnosis is essential as the main risk of a persistent leak is the chance of developing life threatening meningitis. Radiological imaging by non - contrast high - resolution CT scan is the initial investigation of choice and shows the site of leak in most cases. In case of recent onset leaks, a period of conservative management is indicated. If conservative management fails, then the traditional neurosurgical procedures like craniotomy and other open approaches were the most preferred line of management of such leaks till a few years back. But now endoscopic repair of these leaks has provided a better alternative because of reduced surgical morbidity, hospital stay and costs. We present our initial experience with seven cases of anterior CSF rhinorrhea whic h were encountered in a two year period in our institute. Two out of three cases with recent onset leaks healed spontaneously with medical management while five cases required endoscopic repair with two surgical failures.

  3. Craniosynostosis : correlation with cranial vault shape and osseous defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damianidis, Ch; Kyriakou, V; Vachtsevanos, N; Tzikos, F; Konstantinou, D; Tsitouridis, I

    2009-08-29

    This study assessed the value of three-dimensional CT (3D CT) in the diagnosis of craniosynostosis, and correlated the cranial deformity with the presence of osseous defects in cranial vault's bones. One hundred and two children (55♀ and 47♂) with a clinical suspicion of craniosynostosis, underwent spiral computed tomography with 3D reconstruction using the shaded surface display (SSD) and volume rendering (VR) algorithms. We evaluated the presence of osseous defects in cranial bones in correlation with the type of craniosynostosis and the shape of the cranial vault. 3D CT allowed the evaluation of craniosynostosis in all patients. All patients had combined forms of craniosynostosis. Osseous defects in the bones of cranial vault were found in 56 patients of whom nine had scaphocephaly, eight plagiocephaly and one trigonocephaly. CT of the skull with three-dimensional reconstruction can safely and reliably identify craniosynostoses in children and could be used for the identification of osseous defects in the cranial vault. PMID:24207149

  4. Cranial Electrical Stimulation Potential Use in Reducing Sleep and Mood Disturbances in Persons With Dementia and Their Family Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Karen M.; Taylor, Ann Gill; Bourguignon, Cheryl; Utz, Sharon W.; Goehler, Lisa E.

    2009-01-01

    Family caregivers of persons with dementia and their care recipients frequently experience sleep and mood disturbances throughout their caregiving and disease trajectories. Because conventional pharmacologic treatments of sleep and mood disturbances pose numerous risks and adverse effects to elderly persons, the investigation of other interventions is warranted. As older adults use complementary and alternative medicine interventions for the relief of sleep and mood disturbances, cranial electrical stimulation, an energy-based complementary and alternative medicine, may be a viable intervention. The proposed mechanism of action and studies that support cranial electrical stimulation as a modality to reduce distressing symptoms are reviewed. Directions for research are proposed. PMID:18552605

  5. Radiation-induced cranial nerve palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty-five patients with 35 cranial nerve palsies were seen at the Fondation Curie during follow-up after radical radiotherapy for head and neck tumors. The twelfth nerve was involved in 19 cases, the tenth in nine, and the eleventh in five; the fifth and second nerves were involved once each and in the same patient. The twelfth nerve was involved alone in 16 patients and the tenth nerve alone in three, with multiple nerves involved in the remaining six patients. The palsy was noted from 12 to 145 months after diagnosis of the tumor. The latency period could be correlated with dose so that the least square fit equation representing NSD vs delay is NSD = 2598--Delay (in months) x 4.6, with a correlation coefficient of -0.58. The distinction between tumor recurrence and radiation-induced nerve palsy is critical. It can often be inferred from the latency period but must be confirmed by observation over a period of time

  6. Cranial computed tomography in infantile spasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Out of 109 children with infantile spasms (IS), prospectively tested during the years 1976 to 1979 in Denmark, 52 children were examined by cranial computed tomography (CT). The classification of IS into cryptogenic (CR), symptomatic (SY) and doubtful (DO) was done clinically without considering the CT-finding. Sixty per cent of the scannings were abnormal. Only 6/30 (20%) of the children in ACTH treatment were found to develop cerebral atrophy which means that this finding is not an obligatory side-effect of ACTH treatment of children with IS. Normal CT-findings were found in 50% of the CR and 50% of the SY + DO-groups, and could not be used as a prognostic tool for estimating the mental development. This was also the case for children with cerebral atrophy. Abnormal CT-findings (minus atrophy) were highly correlated to the group with clinical symptoms and indicate an extremely unsatisfying long-term mental prognosis. CT-scanning is a valuable tool for the examination of clearing children with infantile spasms. (authors)

  7. Anatomic variation of cranial parasympathetic ganglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Siéssere

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Having broad knowledge of anatomy is essential for practicing dentistry. Certain anatomical structures call for detailed studies due to their anatomical and functional importance. Nevertheless, some structures are difficult to visualize and identify due to their small volume and complicated access. Such is the case of the parasympathetic ganglia located in the cranial part of the autonomic nervous system, which include: the ciliary ganglion (located deeply in the orbit, laterally to the optic nerve, the pterygopalatine ganglion (located in the pterygopalatine fossa, the submandibular ganglion (located laterally to the hyoglossus muscle, below the lingual nerve, and the otic ganglion (located medially to the mandibular nerve, right beneath the oval foramen. The aim of this study was to present these structures in dissected anatomic specimens and perform a comparative analysis regarding location and morphology. The proximity of the ganglia and associated nerves were also analyzed, as well as the number and volume of fibers connected to them. Human heads were dissected by planes, partially removing the adjacent structures to the point we could reach the parasympathetic ganglia. With this study, we concluded that there was no significant variation regarding the location of the studied ganglia. Morphologically, our observations concur with previous classical descriptions of the parasympathetic ganglia, but we observed variations regarding the proximity of the otic ganglion to the mandibular nerve. We also observed that there were variations regarding the number and volume of fiber bundles connected to the submandibular, otic, and pterygopalatine ganglia.

  8. Anterior knee pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anterior knee pain is a common complain in all ages athletes. It may be caused by a large variety of injuries. There is a continuum of diagnoses and most of the disorders are closely related. Repeated minor trauma and overuse play an important role for the development of lesions in Hoffa's pad, extensor mechanism, lateral and medial restrain structures or cartilage surface, however usually an increase or change of activity is referred. Although the direct relation of cartilage lesions, especially chondral, and pain is a subject of debate these lesions may be responsible of early osteoarthrosis and can determine athlete's prognosis. The anatomy and biomechanics of patellofemoral joint is complex and symptoms are often unspecific. Transient patellar dislocation has MR distinct features that provide evidence of prior dislocation and rules our complication. However, anterior knee pain more often is related to overuse and repeated minor trauma. Patella and quadriceps tendon have been also implicated in anterior knee pain, as well as lateral or medial restraint structures and Hoffa's pad. US and MR are excellent tools for the diagnosis of superficial tendons, the advantage of MR is that permits to rule out other sources of intraarticular derangements. Due to the complex anatomy and biomechanic of patellofemoral joint maltracking is not fully understood; plain films and CT allow the study of malalignment, new CT and MR kinematic studies have promising results but further studies are needed. Our purpose here is to describe how imaging techniques can be helpful in precisely defining the origin of the patient's complaint and thus improve understanding and management of these injuries

  9. Asymmetric activation of the anterior cerebral cortex in recipients of IRECA: Preliminary evidence for the energetic effects of an intention-based biofield treatment modality on human neurophysiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pike, C.; Vernon, D.; Hald, L.A.

    2014-01-01

    Neurophysiologic studies of mindfulness link the health benefits of meditation to activation of the left-anterior cerebral cortex. The similarity and functional importance of intention and attentional stance in meditative and biofield therapeutic practices suggest that modulation of recipient anteri

  10. The anterior cingulate cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlović D.M.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC has a role in attention, analysis of sensory information, error recognition, problem solving, detection of novelty, behavior, emotions, social relations, cognitive control, and regulation of visceral functions. This area is active whenever the individual feels some emotions, solves a problem, or analyzes the pros and cons of an action (if it is a right decision. Analogous areas are also found in higher mammals, especially whales, and they contain spindle neurons that enable complex social interactions. Disturbance of ACC activity is found in dementias, schizophrenia, depression, the obsessive-compulsive syndrome, and other neuropsychiatric diseases.

  11. ANTERIOR OSTEOPHYTE IDENTIFICATION IN CERVICAL VERTEBRAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. T. Chougale

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Radiologist always examines X-ray to determine abnormal changes in cervical, lumbar & thoracic vertebrae. Osteophyte (bony growth may appear at the corners of vertebrae so that vertebral shape becomes abnormal. This paper presents the idea from Image processing techniques such as customised Hough transform which will be used for segmentation which should be independent of rotation, scale, noise & shape. This segmented image will be then used for computing size invariant, convex hull based features to differentiate normal cervical vertebrae from cervical vertebrae containing anterior osteophyte. This approach effectively finds anterior osteophytes in cervical vertebrae.

  12. Sutherland's legacy in the new millennium: the osteopathic cranial model and modern osteopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordoni, Bruno; Zanier, Emiliano

    2015-01-01

    The concept of cranial osteopathy was introduced by W. G. Sutherland, DO, and became the foundation for setting the rules for use of skull palpation and many other techniques in the many types of dysfunctional patterns that craniosacral therapy treats. Sutherland's theories enabled modern osteopathy to develop and improve. The mechanism of primary respiration as well as the motion of neurocranial and viscerocranial sutures are phenomena intrinsic to the field and can be found in every living organism, independent of thoracic breathing and cardiac impulse. The sphenobasilar synchondrosis (ie, the joint between the base of the occiput and the body of the sphenoid bone) is the pillar supporting the concepts of craniosacral therapy. This article compares the cranial model devised by Sutherland with the present, relevant scientific research, aiming at clarifying the possibility of applying the craniosacral model in the new millennium. PMID:25831430

  13. Multidisciplinary management of anterior diastemata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furuse, Adilson Yoshio; Herkrath, Fernando José; Franco, Eduardo Jacomino;

    2007-01-01

    Anterior diastemata may compromise the harmony of a patient's smile. Consideration of etiologic factors, previous gingival conditioning, and individual treatment planning are essential in the proper management of anterior diastemata. An integrated orthodontic-restorative approach may enhance the...... aesthetic results when orthodontic therapy itself is not feasible. This article presents integrated orthodonticrestorative solutions of anterior diastemata, associated with the conditioning of the gingival tissue with composite resin, and discusses the most relevant aspects related to their etiology and...

  14. Anatomy and radiology of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study describes the variations of the Anterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery (AICA) and identifies its types of appearance in normal angiograms as well as in angiograms of patients suffering from posterior fossa tumours or from ischemic lesions in the vertebro-basilar territory. For this purpose a study of 20 normal specimens was undertaken. Four main types of the AICA are distinguished. One hundred normal vertebral angiograms, made between 1976 and 1982 in the Valeriuskliniek and the Academisch Ziekenhuis der Vrije Univesiteit are reviewed. The AICA's are classified in the same way as in the anatomical study. The same classification was used in the analysis of 41 vertebral angiograms of patients with posterior fossa tumours and nine angiograms of patients with ischemic disturbances in the posterior cranial fossa. (Auth.)

  15. The cranial MRI in severe cerebral palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The magnetic resonance examination was performed in 38 patients with severe cerebral palsy (CP; 15 males and 23 females) who had both motor delay (unable to move anywhere) and mental retardation (I.Q. or D.Q. below 30). Neuroimaging findings were compared with the CP type, etiology, and grade of understanding of language. Cranial magnetic resonance imagings (MRI) in CP were divided into five types. In type 1, nine predominantly showed cyst-liked ventricles and periventricular hyperintensity on T2-weighted imaging (PVH) and only scarred basal ganglia and thalamus were visible. All suffered from neonatal asphyxia and the clinical type was rigospastic tetraplegia (RST). In type 2, eleven predominantly showed PVH and hyperintensity on T2-weighted (HT2) in basal ganglia and thalamus. All suffered from neonatal asphyxia and the clinical type was RST or rigospastic diplegia. In type 3, five showed PVH and three had cortical atrophy. All suffered from neonatal asphyxia and the clinical type was spastic diplegia. In type 4, four predominantly showed HT2 in putamen and thalamus. Three had cortical atrophy. All suffered from neonatal asphyxia. The clinical type was athetotic CP (ATH). In type 5, nine predominantly showed HT2 in globus pallidus. Four had cortical atrophy and two had hippocampal atrophy. All suffered from neonatal jaundice and the clinical type was ATH. All patients who suffered from neonatal asphyxia and spastic CP had MRI in PVH. All patients who suffered from neonatal asphyxia and ATH showed HT2 in putamen and thalamus. Almost patients who suffered from neonatal jaundice and ATH showed HT2 in globus pallidus. With athetotic CP, cases with atrophy of the cerebral cortex and/or hippocampus were lower grade of understanding of language than no atrophy of both. The results of studies of MRI are in agreement with neuropathological findings. (author)

  16. A soft, transparent, freely accessible cranial window for chronic imaging and electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Chaejeong; Park, Hyejin; Kim, Yong-Tae; Baeg, Eunha; Kim, Yong Ho; Kim, Seong-Gi; Suh, Minah

    2016-01-01

    Chronic in vivo imaging and electrophysiology are important for better understanding of neural functions and circuits. We introduce the new cranial window using soft, penetrable, elastic, and transparent, silicone-based polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) as a substitute for the skull and dura in both rats and mice. The PDMS can be readily tailored to any size and shape to cover large brain area. Clear and healthy cortical vasculatures were observed up to 15 weeks post-implantation. Real-time hemodynamic responses were successfully monitored during sensory stimulation. Furthermore, the PDMS window allowed for easy insertion of microelectrodes and micropipettes into the cortical tissue for electrophysiological recording and chemical injection at any location without causing any fluid leakage. Longitudinal two-photon microscopic imaging of Cx3Cr1(+/- GFP) transgenic mice was comparable with imaging via a conventional glass-type cranial window, even immediately following direct intracortical injection. This cranial window will facilitate direct probing and mapping for long-term brain studies. PMID:27283875

  17. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper determines the efficacy of MR imaging in evaluation of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) following reconstructive surgery. Forty-three MR examinations were performed in 33 patients who had undergone previous arthroscopic ACL reconstruction with patellar bone-tendon- bone autografts (postoperative period, 1-24 months; mean, 5.2 months). Of the 40 studies performed in clinically stable knees (30 patients), MR demonstrated a well-defined, signal void ACL graft in 36. Of the three studies performed in three patients with clinical ACL laxity or suspected tear, the neoligament was of intermediate definition in one and nondiscernible in the other two. As in the native knee, buckling of the PCL was suggestive of ACL insufficiency. Bone tunnel placement, patellar tendon changes, and joint effusions were also evaluated

  18. Anterior hip pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Kane, J W

    1999-10-15

    Anterior hip pain is a common complaint with many possible causes. Apophyseal avulsion and slipped capital femoral epiphysis should not be overlooked in adolescents. Muscle and tendon strains are common in adults. Subsequent to accurate diagnosis, strains should improve with rest and directed conservative treatment. Osteoarthritis, which is diagnosed radiographically, generally occurs in middle-aged and older adults. Arthritis in younger adults should prompt consideration of an inflammatory cause. A possible femoral neck stress fracture should be evaluated urgently to prevent the potentially significant complications associated with displacement. Patients with osteitis pubis should be educated about the natural history of the condition and should undergo physical therapy to correct abnormal pelvic mechanics. "Sports hernias," nerve entrapments and labral pathologic conditions should be considered in athletic adults with characteristic presentations and chronic symptoms. Surgical intervention may allow resumption of pain-free athletic activity. PMID:10537384

  19. CT-based study of internal structure of the anterior pillar in extinct hominins and its implications for the phylogeny of robust Australopithecus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villmoare, Brian A; Kimbel, William H

    2011-09-27

    The phylogeny of the early African hominins has long been confounded by contrasting interpretations of midfacial structure. In particular, the anterior pillar, an externally prominent bony column running vertically alongside the nasal aperture, has been identified as a homology of South African species Australopithecus africanus and Australopithecus robustus. If the anterior pillar is a true synapomorphy of these two species, the evidence for a southern African clade of Australopithecus would be strengthened, and support would be given to the phylogenetic hypothesis of an independent origin for eastern and southern African "robust" australopith clades. Analyses of CT data, however, show that the internal structure of the circumnasal region is strikingly different in the two South African australopith species. In A. africanus the anterior pillar is a hollow column of cortical bone, whereas in A. robustus it is a column of dense trabecular bone. Although Australopithecus boisei usually lacks an external pillar, it has internal morphology identical to that seen in A. robustus. This result supports the monophyly of the "robust" australopiths and suggests that the external similarities seen in the South African species are the result of parallel evolution. PMID:21930932

  20. Ets-1 confers cranial features on neural crest delamination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Théveneau

    Full Text Available Neural crest cells (NCC have the particularity to invade the environment where they differentiate after separation from the neuroepithelium. This process, called delamination, is strikingly different between cranial and trunk NCCs. If signalings controlling slow trunk delamination start being deciphered, mechanisms leading to massive and rapid cranial outflow are poorly documented. Here, we show that the chick cranial NCCs delamination is the result of two events: a substantial cell mobilization and an epithelium to mesenchyme transition (EMT. We demonstrate that ets-1, a transcription factor specifically expressed in cranial NCCs, is responsible for the former event by recruiting massively cranial premigratory NCCs independently of the S-phase of the cell cycle and by leading the gathered cells to straddle the basal lamina. However, it does not promote the EMT process alone but can cooperate with snail-2 (previously called slug to this event. Altogether, these data lead us to propose that ets-1 plays a pivotal role in conferring specific cephalic characteristics on NCC delamination.

  1. Anterior Approach Total Hip Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and E-poly antioxidant-infused technology during a hip replacement through the anterior supine intramuscular approach. “OR- ... Dr. Keith Berend perform an anterior approach total hip replacement with the patient on a regular OR ...

  2. Psychological Aspects of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries

    OpenAIRE

    Ardern, Clare; Kvist, Joanna; Webster, Kate E.

    2016-01-01

    Impairment-based evaluation has, until recently, been the mainstay of orthopaedic research in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. However, participation-based outcomes, in particular returning to sport, have lately garnered increased research attention. This is important because returning to sport is typically a main concern of injured athletes. Recent metaanalyses have demonstrated that the return to sport rate after ACL reconstruction is disappointingly low, and that a range of...

  3. Mass stranding of Odontoceti caused by parasitogenic eighth cranial neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimitsu, T; Nagai, T; Ide, M; Kawano, H; Naichuu, A; Koono, M; Ishii, A

    1987-10-01

    Hearing organs of the Odontoceti from two mass strandings in 1983 and 1986 were examined histopathologically. In the 1983 stranding, two of three pilot whales (Globicephala macrorhynchus) were necropsied and numerous Nasitrema sp. were found close to the eighth cranial nerve (nervus vistibulo cochlearis) in both animals. Patchy degeneration of the eighth cranial nerve in and out of the modiolus of the cochlea was observed. In the 1986 stranding, five of 125 false killer whales (Pseudorca crassiclens) were examined and numerous trematodes (Nasitrema gondo) were found in the tympanic cavities. Severe degeneration of the eighth cranial nerve was discovered and there were many trematode eggs in the nervous and surrounding tissues. Parasitogenic eighth neuropathy is proposed again as the cause of mass stranding of the Odontoceti. PMID:3682083

  4. 3D Printed, Customized Cranial Implant for Surgical Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogu, Venkata Phanindra; Ravi Kumar, Yennam; Asit Kumar, Khanra

    2016-06-01

    The main objective of the present work is to model cranial implant and printed in FDM machine (printer model used: mojo). Actually this is peculiar case and the skull has been damaged in frontal, parietal and temporal regions and a small portion of frontal region damaged away from saggital plane, complexity is to fill this frontal region with proper curvature. The Patient CT-data (Number of slices was 381 and thickness of each slice is 0.488 mm) was processed in mimics14.1 software, mimics file was sent to 3-matic software and calculated thickness of skull at different sections where cranial implant is needed then corrected the edges of cranial implant to overcome CSF (cerebrospinal fluid) leakage and proper fitting. Finally the implant average thickness is decided as 2.5 mm and printed in FDM machine with ABS plastic.

  5. Brain damage following prophylactic cranial irradiation in lung cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simó, Marta; Vaquero, Lucía; Ripollés, Pablo; Jové, Josep; Fuentes, Rafael; Cardenal, Felipe; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni; Bruna, Jordi

    2016-03-01

    Long-term toxic effects of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) on cognition in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) patients have not yet been well-established. The aim of our study was to examine the cognitive toxic effects together with brain structural changes in a group of long-term SCLC survivors treated with PCI. Eleven SCLC patients, who underwent PCI ≥ 2 years before, were compared with an age and education matched healthy control group. Both groups were evaluated using a neuropsychological battery and multimodal structural magnetic resonance imaging. Voxel-based morphometry and Tract-based Spatial Statistics were used to study gray matter density (GMD) and white matter (WM) microstructural changes. Cognitive deterioration was correlated with GMD and Fractional Anisotropy (FA). Finally, we carried out a single-subject analysis in order to evaluate individual structural brain changes. Nearly half of the SCLC met criteria for cognitive impairment, all exhibiting a global worsening of cognitive functioning. Patients showed significant decreases of GMD in basal ganglia bilaterally (putamen and caudate), bilateral thalamus and right insula, together with WM microstructural changes of the entire corpus callosum. Cognitive deterioration scores correlated positively with mean FA values in the corpus callosum. Single-subject analysis revealed that GMD and WM changes were consistently observed in nearly all patients. This study showed neuropsychological deficits together with brain-specific structural differences in long-term SCLC survivors. Our results suggest that PCI therapy, possibly together with platinum-based chemotherapy, was associated to permanent long-term cognitive and structural brain effects in a SCLC population. PMID:26015269

  6. Trigeminal neuropathic pain as a complication of anterior temporal lobectomy: report of 2 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Impreet; Parrent, Andrew G; Steven, David A

    2016-04-01

    Cranial nerve (CN) deficits following anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) are an uncommon but well-recognized complication. The usual CNs implicated in post-ATL complications include the oculomotor, trochlear, and facial nerves. To the authors' knowledge, injury to the trigeminal nerve leading to neuropathic pain has not been previously described in the literature. This paper presents 2 cases of trigeminal neuropathic pain following temporal lobe resections for pharmacoresistant epilepsy. The possible pathophysiological mechanisms are discussed and the microsurgical anatomy of surgically relevant structures is reviewed. PMID:26517768

  7. Androgen action during male sex differentiation includes suppression of cranial suspensory ligament development

    OpenAIRE

    Emmen, Judith; McLuskey, A.; Grootegoed, Anton; Brinkmann, Albert

    1998-01-01

    textabstractThe cranial suspensory ligament is located on the border of the cranial (mesonephric) mesentery in adult female mammals, which runs between the cranial pole of the internal genitalia and the dorsal abdominal wall. Absence of the cranial suspensory ligament in male mammals depends upon exposure of its primordium to fetal testicular androgens and is a prerequisite for testis descent. Female rats were exposed to 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone propionate at different stages of genital dev...

  8. Anterior Decompression and Anterior Instrumentation of Tuberculosis of Cervicothoracic Spine by Cervicomanubrial Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anant Kumar Garg

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Evaluation of result of anterior cervical approach with manubriotomy and anterior instrumentation in tuberculosis of cervicothoracic spine in terms of the neurological recovery, reconstruction of spine and prevention of deformity along with relief of pain. Materials and Methods: All five patients with cervicothoracic caries spine had surgery through anterior cervical approach with manubriotomy in our hospital and underwent excision of the involved vertebrae and intervertebral discs followed by anterior spinal reconstruction with titanium spacer cage filled with cancellous iliac crest bone graft and Orion plate with locking screw. Antitubercular drugs were administered for 12 months. The follow-up period ranged from 12 to 36 months. Results: Analysis of result was done on the basis of clinical and radiological criteria. Clinical assessment based on Frankel grade and modified JOA score showed significant improvement from preoperative findings. Radiological assessment showed osteointegration, no spinal instability and no progression of the deformity. The pain control, based on visual analog scale changed from a pre-operative average of 7.5 to 2 at the last follow-up thereby indicating significant improvement and all patients returned to preoperative functional status. One patient had transient hoarseness of voice. No other complication had been encountered in the immediate post operative and during the follow-up period. Conclusions: Our study showed that anterior cervical approach with manubriotomy and anterior insertion of titanium cage, filled with autogenous bone graft, secured with locking plate instrumentation has a successful role in the eradication of infection, neurological recovery, segmental spinal reconstruction and it also reduces surgical time, blood loss, and surgical complications and approach related comorbidity in follow up period. Level of Evidence- Level 4, Case series

  9. Teaching Parents How to Prevent Acquired Cranial Asymmetry in Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennartsson, Freda; Nordin, Per; Wennergren, Göran

    2016-01-01

    Acquired cranial asymmetry is prevalent in infants today. This is largely attributed to the supine sleep position recommended for infant safety. The condition can become permanent, so prevention and early detection are important. A prevention project was initiated where guidelines for Swedish child health nurses were developed, tested in a pilot study, revised, and then incorporated into a short cranial asymmetry prevention program for nurses. The program included detailed information on what to teach parents of newborns. An intervention study was initiated where one group of nurses was taught according to the program and the other group followed the standard recommendations. The aim of this survey was to compare intervention and control group parents' responses regarding the cranial asymmetry prevention information that they had received from their nurses during their infant's first four months. Participants included 272 parents (180 intervention group, 92 control group) at 26 child health centers. A checklist was distributed to parents in conjunction with infants' four month health checkup. A significantly higher percentage of intervention group parents were aware of regular recommendations - alternate direction of the infant's head when putting the child to bed (82%: 64%, p=0.001), which pillow to use (92%: 80%, p=0.01), and when to remove the pillow (48%: 31%, p=0.006) - and five newly introduced recommendations compared to controls. Results indicate that educating child health nurses on prevention of cranial asymmetry works to increase parental awareness of what to do and how to do it safely. PMID:26825249

  10. Bony exostosis of the atlas with resultant cranial nerve palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A case of tenth and twelfth nerve compression secondary to a bony exostosis of the first cervical vertebra is described. This uncommon phenomenon serves to outline the importance of imaging the course of a cranial nerve when no intracranial abnormality is demonstrable on CT or MRI. The radiologic features of spinal osteochondromas are reviewed. (orig.)

  11. The Forgotten Cranial Nereve - clinical importance of olfaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjældstad, Alexander; Clausen, Christian H; Kjærgaard, Thomas;

    2014-01-01

    Hyposmia is often undiagnosed despite the known negative effect on taste, appetite and life quality. However, a new focus on the first cranial nerve has emerged as a consequence of a discovered connection between neurodegenerative disorders and hyposmia. In Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer...

  12. Cranial Radiation Therapy and Damage to Hippocampal Neurogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monje, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    Cranial radiation therapy is associated with a progressive decline in cognitive function, prominently memory function. Impairment of hippocampal neurogenesis is thought to be an important mechanism underlying this cognitive decline. Recent work has elucidated the mechanisms of radiation-induced failure of neurogenesis. Potential therapeutic…

  13. Expression of serotonin receptor genes in cranial ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Naohiro; Ohmoto, Makoto; Yamamoto, Kurumi; Kurokawa, Azusa; Narukawa, Masataka; Ishimaru, Yoshiro; Misaka, Takumi; Matsumoto, Ichiro; Abe, Keiko

    2016-03-23

    Taste cells release neurotransmitters to gustatory neurons to transmit chemical information they received. Sweet, umami, and bitter taste cells use ATP as a neurotransmitter. However, ATP release from sour taste cells has not been observed so far. Instead, they release serotonin when they are activated by sour/acid stimuli. Thus it is still controversial whether sour taste cells use ATP, serotonin, or both. By reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and subsequent in situ hybridization (ISH) analyses, we revealed that of 14 serotonin receptor genes only 5-HT3A and 5-HT3B showed significant/clear signals in a subset of neurons of cranial sensory ganglia in which gustatory neurons reside. Double-fluorescent labeling analyses of ISH for serotonin receptor genes with wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) in cranial sensory ganglia of pkd1l3-WGA mice whose sour neural pathway is visualized by the distribution of WGA originating from sour taste cells in the posterior region of the tongue revealed that WGA-positive cranial sensory neurons rarely express either of serotonin receptor gene. These results suggest that serotonin receptors expressed in cranial sensory neurons do not play any role as neurotransmitter receptor from sour taste cells. PMID:26854841

  14. Association of fetal cranial shape with shoulder dystocia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belfort, M. A.; White, G. L.; Vermeulen, F. M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether fetal cranial shape is related to shoulder dystocia. Methods We compared shoulder dystocia cases (n = 18) with controls (normal vaginal deliveries, n = 18) in a retrospective matched- pairs observational study. Subjects were matched for known maternal and fetal risk fac

  15. Is phenytoin contraindicated in patients receiving cranial irradiation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three recent publications have reported the development of erythema multiforme and Stevens-Johnson syndrome in patients receiving cranial irradiation and sodium phenytoin. Some authors have recommended that patients receiving whole brain radiation therapy and who have had seizures should not be prescribed phenytoin but an alternative anticonvulsant. This article reviews the current literature pertaining to the development of this potentially lethal complication in patients receiving whole brain radiation and phenytoin, with reference to the single recorded case of Stevens-Johnson syndrome in a patient receiving cranial irradiation and phenytoin in Auckland, New Zealand. While the clinical picture in the 16 patients reported in the literature and the current case report differed from the classical form of erythema multiforme, a similar pattern of presentation and outcome appeared in all patients reviewed, suggesting that the combination of phenytoin, cranial irradiation and the gradual reduction of concomitant steroids seem to lead to the development of erythema multiforme and/or Stevens-Johnson syndrome. The data presented, although sparse, suggest that phenytoin should not be prescribed in patients receiving cranial irradiation. 21 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs

  16. Primary Burkitt's lymphoma of the cranial vault in a child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in the cranial vault is rare, particularly in children. This report describes a 12-year-old boy who had a palpable and painless occipital skull mass and left hypoglossal nerve paralysis as the initial manifestations of Burkitt's lymphoma. Plain radiography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings are presented. (orig.)

  17. Anterior Approach Total Hip Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Taperloc Microplasty stem and E-poly antioxidant-infused technology during a hip replacement through the anterior supine ... renewed interest at this time due to several advantages that it brings. The approach that is performed ...

  18. Anterior Approach Total Hip Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... an anterior approach total hip replacement with the patient on a regular OR table supine. My name ... less invasive without being small incision surgery. Obese patients can be easier due to less distribution of ...

  19. Anterior Approach Total Hip Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... it to have any real negative or deleterious effect by removing the anterior capsule. Now I would ... is what happens with one of the competitive designs. Like I told you, I just take a ...

  20. Anterior approach for knee arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective. To develop a new method of magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) of the knee using an anterior approach analogous to the portals used for knee arthroscopy.Design. An anterior approach to the knee joint was devised mimicking anterior portals used for knee arthroscopy. Seven patients scheduled for routine knee MRA were placed in a decubitus position and under fluoroscopic guidance a needle was advanced from a position adjacent to the patellar tendon into the knee joint. After confirmation of the needle tip location, a dilute gadolinium solution was injected.Results and conclusion. All the arthrograms were technically successful. The anterior approach to knee MRA has greater technical ease than the traditional approach with little patient discomfort. (orig.)

  1. Travoprost Induced Granulomatous Anterior Uveitis

    OpenAIRE

    Patrick Chiam

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To report a case of granulomatous anterior uveitis caused by travoprost. Methods. Single observational case report. Results. A 71-year-old who was fit and healthy presented with bilateral granulomatous anterior uveitis 2 months after he was started on travoprost in both eyes. There was no past history of uveitis. Blood test and radiological investigation were unremarkable. Travoprost was stopped. The uveitis resolved on topical steroid treatment. A rechallenge with travoprost was att...

  2. Update on anterior ankle impingement

    OpenAIRE

    Vaseenon, Tanawat; Amendola, Annunziato

    2012-01-01

    Anterior ankle impingement results from an impingement of the ankle joint by a soft tissue or osteophyte formation at the anterior aspect of the distal tibia and talar neck. It often occurs secondary to direct trauma (impaction force) or repetitive ankle dorsiflexion (repetitive impaction and traction force). Chronic ankle pain, swelling, and limitation of ankle dorsiflexion are common complaints. Imaging is valuable for diagnosis of the bony impingement but not for the soft tissue impingemen...

  3. Radiographic study on the anterior portion of the neck of the condylar process. Aged-related developmental changes based on Hellman's dental stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The condylar process is directly and indirectly influenced by the masticatory muscles and the temporomandibular joint, which functions to regulate jaw movement. Age-related changes in the condylar process were found in both external and internal structures. Observation of X-ray profiles afforded identification of areas of interest in the anterior portion of the neck of condylar process. This portion anatomically includes the pterygoid fovea; moreover, the process serves as a terminal for the lateral pterygoid muscle. Rather than directly analyzing bone structure, we made distinct measurements in regions of interest by X-ray image analysis. Subsequently, changes in occlusion during each developmental stage were evaluated. In addition, bone mineral density measurements were performed. Greater growth was recognized in the long axis of the condylar process in comparison to the short axis. The long axis indicated a 2.7-fold increase in ODL (length along the major axis) from the IA period to the VA period; additionally, the total absolute length increased by 3.1-fold. The short axis demonstrated a 2.3-fold increase in ODS (length along the minor axis) from the IA period to the VA period; furthermore, the total average length revealed a 1.9-fold increase. Bone mineral density was highest in the anterior portion (region of interest) and was higher in the posterior portion (cortical bone); than in the middle portion (central bone). Among these 3 areas, density differences became larger as the developmental stage of occlusion progressed. Detailed measurements in the region of interest demonstrated significant increases from the IIC period to the IIIA (B) period, and distinct peak times of increases were observed in bone mineral density: the center bone structure, as well as the posterior cortical bone, showed significant increases between the IIIC period and the IVA period. The anterior border displayed to constant increase with an exception for the period between stages

  4. Skeletogenic fate of zebrafish cranial and trunk neural crest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Kague

    Full Text Available The neural crest (NC is a major contributor to the vertebrate craniofacial skeleton, detailed in model organisms through embryological and genetic approaches, most notably in chick and mouse. Despite many similarities between these rather distant species, there are also distinct differences in the contribution of the NC, particularly to the calvariae of the skull. Lack of information about other vertebrate groups precludes an understanding of the evolutionary significance of these differences. Study of zebrafish craniofacial development has contributed substantially to understanding of cartilage and bone formation in teleosts, but there is currently little information on NC contribution to the zebrafish skeleton. Here, we employ a two-transgene system based on Cre recombinase to genetically label NC in the zebrafish. We demonstrate NC contribution to cells in the cranial ganglia and peripheral nervous system known to be NC-derived, as well as to a subset of myocardial cells. The indelible labeling also enables us to determine NC contribution to late-forming bones, including the calvariae. We confirm suspected NC origin of cartilage and bones of the viscerocranium, including cartilages such as the hyosymplectic and its replacement bones (hymandibula and symplectic and membranous bones such as the opercle. The cleithrum develops at the border of NC and mesoderm, and as an ancestral component of the pectoral girdle was predicted to be a hybrid bone composed of both NC and mesoderm tissues. However, we find no evidence of a NC contribution to the cleithrum. Similarly, in the vault of the skull, the parietal bones and the caudal portion of the frontal bones show no evidence of NC contribution. We also determine a NC origin for caudal fin lepidotrichia; the presumption is that these are derived from trunk NC, demonstrating that these cells have the ability to form bone during normal vertebrate development.

  5. Anterior chamber depth during hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gracitelli CPB

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Carolina Pelegrini Barbosa Gracitelli,1 Francisco Rosa Stefanini,1 Fernando Penha,1 Miguel Ângelo Góes,2 Sérgio Antonio Draibe,2 Maria Eugênia Canziani,2 Augusto Paranhos Junior1 1Ophthalmology Department, 2Division of Nephrology, Federal University of São Paulo – UNIFESP, São Paulo, Brazil Background: Exacerbation of chronic glaucoma or acute glaucoma is occasionally observed in patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD because of anterior chamber depth changes during this therapy. Purpose: To evaluate anterior chamber depth and axial length in patients during HD sessions. Methods: A total of 67 eyes of 35 patients were prospectively enrolled. Axial length and anterior chamber depth were measured using ultrasonic biometry, and these measures were evaluated at three different times during HD sessions. Body weight and blood pressure pre- and post-HD were also measured. Results: There was no difference in the axial length between the three measurements (P = 0.241. We observed a significantly decreased anterior chamber depth (P = 0.002 during HD sessions. Conclusion: Our results support the idea that there is a change in anterior chamber depth in HD sessions. Keywords: anterior chamber, hemodialysis, axial length, acute angle-closure glaucoma

  6. Tolerance of cranial nerves of the cavernous sinus to radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is becoming a more accepted treatment option for benign, deep seated intracranial lesions. However, little is known about the effects of large single fractions of radiation on cranial nerves. This study was undertaken to assess the effect of radiosurgery on the cranial nerves of the cavernous sinus. The authors examined the tolerance of cranial nerves (II-VI) following radiosurgery for 62 patients (42/62 with meningiomas) treated for lesions within or near the cavernous sinus. Twenty-nine patients were treated with a modified 6 MV linear accelerator (Joint Center for Radiation Therapy) and 33 were treated with the Gamma Knife (University of Pittsburgh). Three-dimensional treatment plans were retrospectively reviewed and maximum doses were calculated for the cavernous sinus and the optic nerve and chiasm. Median follow-up was 19 months (range 3-49). New cranial neuropathies developed in 12 patients from 3-41 months following radiosurgery. Four of these complications involved injury to the optic system and 8 (3/8 transient) were the result of injury to the sensory or motor nerves of the cavernous sinus. There was no clear relationship between the maximum dose to the cavernous sinus and the development of complications for cranial nerves III-VI over the dose range used (1000-4000 cGy). For the optic apparatus, there was a significantly increased incidence of complications with dose. Four of 17 patients (24%) receiving greater than 800 cGy to any part of the optic apparatus developed visual complications compared with 0/35 who received less than 800 cGy (p = 0.009). Radiosurgery using tumor-controlling doses of up to 4000 cGy appears to be a relatively safe technique in treating lesions within or near the sensory and motor nerves (III-VI) of the cavernous sinus. The dose to the optic apparatus should be limited to under 800 cGy. 21 refs., 4 tabs

  7. Myological variability in a decoupled skeletal system: batoid cranial anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolmann, Matthew A; Huber, Daniel R; Dean, Mason N; Grubbs, R Dean

    2014-08-01

    Chondrichthyans (sharks, batoids, and chimaeras) have simple feeding mechanisms owing to their relatively few cranial skeletal elements. However, the indirect association of the jaws to the cranium (euhyostylic jaw suspension) has resulted in myriad cranial muscle rearrangements of both the hyoid and mandibular elements. We examined the cranial musculature of an abbreviated phylogenetic representation of batoid fishes, including skates, guitarfishes and with a particular focus on stingrays. We identified homologous muscle groups across these taxa and describe changes in gross morphology across developmental and functional muscle groups, with the goal of exploring how decoupling of the jaws from the skull has effected muscular arrangement. In particular, we focus on the cranial anatomy of durophagous and nondurophagous batoids, as the former display marked differences in morphology compared to the latter. Durophagous stingrays are characterized by hypertrophied jaw adductors, reliance on pennate versus fusiform muscle fiber architecture, tendinous rather than aponeurotic muscle insertions, and an overall reduction in mandibular kinesis. Nondurophagous stingrays have muscles that rely on aponeurotic insertions onto the skeletal structure, and display musculoskeletal specialization for jaw protrusion and independent lower jaw kinesis, relative to durophagous stingrays. We find that among extant chondrichthyans, considerable variation exists in the hyoid and mandibular muscles, slightly less so in hypaxial muscles, whereas branchial muscles are overwhelmingly conserved. As chondrichthyans occupy a position sister to all other living gnathostomes, our understanding of the structure and function of early vertebrate feeding systems rests heavily on understanding chondrichthyan cranial anatomy. Our findings highlight the incredible variation in muscular complexity across chondrichthyans in general and batoids in particular. PMID:24652648

  8. Approaches to anterior and anterolateral foramen magnum lesions: A critical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo J Komotar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Foramen magnum (FM lesions represent some of the most complex cases for the modern neurosurgeon because of their location near vital brainstem structures, the vertebral arteries, and lower cranial nerves. In particular, anterior or anterolaterally located FM tumors have traditionally been most difficult to resect with high morbidity and mortality resulting from approaches through the posterior midline or transorally. For many neurosurgeons, the far lateral, extreme lateral approach, and more recently, endoscopic endonasal approaches have become the preferred modern methods for the resection of anterior or anterolateral FM tumors. In this review, we examine both operative and non-operative approaches to FM tumors, including surgical anatomy, surgical technique, and indications for operative intervention in these complex cases. In addition, we compared outcomes from prior series.

  9. Anterior segment parameters and eyelids in systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin Atik, Sevinc; Koc, Feray; Akin Sari, Sirin; Sefi Yurdakul, Nazife; Ozmen, Mustafa; Akar, Servet

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate main numerical parameters of anterior segment and the effects of eyelid skin changes on these parameters in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc). Thirty-four patients with SSc and 34 healthy individuals were enrolled. Besides full eye examination, anterior segment measurements including anterior chamber depth (ACD), anterior chamber volume, anterior chamber angle width, central corneal thickness, pupil size, corneal volume and keratometry were obtained using a Sirius Scheimpflug/Placido photography-based topography system. Eyelid thickness was evaluated using the scala of the modified Rodnan skin score and the patients were subgrouped with respect to these scores to evaluate the effect of eyelid thickening on the anterior segment parameters. Age and sex distributions of the groups were similar (p > 0.05). SSc patients had steeper and thinner corneas, smaller corneal volumes, narrower, shallower and smaller anterior segments but only the mean ACD value of right eyes was found significantly less than those of the controls (p = 0.047). The mean ACD values of SSc subgroup patients with moderate to severe eyelid thickening (50 %) had lower ACD measurements compared to those of control group. (p = 0.043 for the right eyes, p = 0.070 for the left eyes). However, SSc subgroup patients with none to mild eyelid thickening (50 %) had similar anterior segment parameters with control subjects (p > 0.05). Anterior chamber parameters of the SSc patients could show significant differences. These differences occur parallel to the eyelid changes but not secondary to it. PMID:26694912

  10. Practice guideline on prophylactic cranial irradiation in small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To develop an evidence-based clinical practice guideline that would address the following questions: (a) What is the role of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) in patients with limited or extensive stage small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) who have achieved complete remission in response to induction therapy (chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy)? (b) What dose and fractionation schedules of PCI are optimal? (c) Does the use of PCI in patients with SCLC in complete remission affect quality of life? Survival, disease-free survival, quality of life, and adverse effects were the outcomes of interest. Methods and Materials: A systematic review of the published literature was undertaken to provide the data for an evidence-based practice guideline. Results: Six randomized controlled trials and one fully published individual patient data meta-analysis were included in the systematic review of the evidence. For patients who have achieved complete response after induction therapy, there is evidence of a disease-free survival benefit (4 of 6 trials) and an overall survival benefit (meta-analysis). There is insufficient evidence to make a definitive recommendation with respect to dose. There is some indication that 30-36 Gy in 2-3 Gy per fraction, or a biologically equivalent dose, may produce a better outcome than a lower dose or less aggressive fractionation regimen. The schedule commonly used in Canada is 25 Gy in 10 fractions over 2 weeks. Data from further research, including a trial currently ongoing that compares 25 Gy in 10 fractions with 36 Gy in 18 fractions, will be required to determine optimal dose of PCI. There is insufficient evidence to make recommendations concerning the optimal timing of PCI in relation to the administration of chemotherapy. Lung DSG members generally felt that it should be given as soon as possible after completion of chemotherapy. There is evidence from trials with data for up to 2 years of follow-up that prophylactic cranial

  11. Iatrogenic traumatic brain injury: penetration of Kirschner's knitting needle into the middle cranial cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Lee Wei; Molchanov, Victor Ivanovich; Volkodav, Oleg Vladimirovich

    2007-05-01

    Traumatic penetrations of foreign objects into the craniocerebral cavity are often encountered in the department of emergency and traumatology. A 5-year-old child was brought to the department of pediatric neurosurgery with a severe headache and fatigue. On admission, the patient had initial neurologic examinations and radiologic scans. The consciousness assessment by Glasgow Coma Scale was 13. Neuroradiologic studies revealed a long hyperdense object extending from the extracranial cavity into the middle cranial fossa. A thorough history was obtained with attention to how and when the injury was sustained. Two weeks before the incident, the child had a blunt trauma of mandibular fractures with dislocation of the temporomandibular joint. Maxillomandibular surgery was performed with a Kirschner's knitting needle to fixate the temporomandibular articulation and simple interdental ligatures for mandibular fracture stabilization. The present radiologic film suggested that the mandibular fracture was not properly fixated allowing the mobilization of Kirschner's needle moving either externally or internally. A standard pterional access with frontotemporosphenoidal approach was performed according to the method of Yasargil and Oikawa-Miyazawa followed by an extradural approach method of Dolenc to the middle cranial structure at the skull base. Several stages of hemostasis were carried out with electrohemocoagulation on the penetrated Kirschner's needle during the needle extracting process at the extradural space of the middle cranial fossa. Two weeks postoperatively, computed tomography scan revealed the supratentorial and middle craniocerebral structures were in symmetric localization. The patient was free of neurologic deficits with no signs of excessive cerebrospinal fluid volume formation. In conclusion, the method of fixation requires appropriate application techniques to ensure adequate fracture fixation during the healing cascade. The neurosurgical approach also

  12. Nell1-deficient mice have reduced expression of extracellular matrix proteins causing cranial and vertebral defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, Jayashree [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Shannon, Mark E. [Applied Biosystems; Johnson, Mahlon D. [University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine; Ruff, David W. [Applied Biosystems; Hughes, Lori A [ORNL; Kerley, Marilyn K [ORNL; Carpenter, D A [ORNL; Johnson, Dabney K [ORNL; Rinchik, Eugene M. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Culiat, Cymbeline T [ORNL

    2006-01-01

    The mammalian Nell1 gene encodes a protein kinase C-b1 (PKC-b1) binding protein that belongs to a new class of cell-signaling molecules controlling cell growth and differentiation. Over-expression of Nell1 in the developing cranial sutures in both human and mouse induces craniosynostosis, the premature fusion of the growing cranial bone fronts. Here, we report the generation, positional cloning and characterization of Nell16R, a recessive, neonatal-lethal point mutation in the mouse Nell1 gene, induced by N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea. Nell16R has a T!A base change that converts a codon for cysteine into a premature stop codon [Cys(502)Ter], resulting in severe truncation of the predicted protein product and marked reduction in steady-state levels of the transcript. In addition to the expected alteration of cranial morphology, Nell16R mutants manifest skeletal defects in the vertebral column and ribcage, revealing a hitherto undefined role for Nell1 in signal transduction in endochondral ossification. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR assays of 219 genes showed an association between the loss of Nell1 function and reduced expression of genes for extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins critical for chondrogenesis and osteogenesis. Several affected genes are involved in the human cartilage disorder Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome and other disorders associated with spinal curvature anomalies. Nell16R mutant mice are a new tool for elucidating basic mechanisms in osteoblast and chrondrocyte differentiation in the developing skull and vertebral column and understanding how perturbations in the production of ECM proteins can lead to anomalies in these structures.

  13. Hoffa's fat pad injuries and their relationship with anterior cruciate ligament tears: new observations based on MR imaging in patients and MR imaging and anatomic correlation in cadavers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the normal anatomic relationships of Hoffa's fat pad with the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and with the frequency of Hoffa's fat pad abnormalities in ACL-deficient knees. Retrospective clinical study on patients and observational anatomic study on cadavers. The study was approved by the Institutional Review Board. MR imaging studies of the knees of 100 patients (21-48 years old) with or without arthroscopically proven tears of the ACL, performed at a single institution, were reviewed by two readers for abnormalities of Hoffa's fat pad. Ten cadaveric knee specimens were studied with MR imaging and Faxitron radiographs, and by inspection of sections and histology. Alterations in Hoffa's fat pad on MR imaging were present in 64% (32/50) of patients with torn ACLs, and in 24% (12/50) of patients without a tear of the ACL (P < 0.05). Hoffa's fat pad inserted into the intercondylar notch in 50% (5/10) of cadaveric specimens, four in conjunction with the ligamentum mucosum and in one in an isolated fashion. Histological study demonstrated the composition of the ligamentum mucosum and Hoffa's fat pad and their course and insertion sites in the intercondylar notch. Abnormalities of Hoffa's fat pad, such as focal and diffuse edema, tears, scars and synovial proliferation, are more common in knees with torn ACLs than in knees with intact ACLs. (orig.)

  14. Ukuran kranial dan indeks sefalik pada anak retardasi mental (Cranial size and cephalic index of mentally retarded children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi Elianora

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mental retardation is imperfect condition of mental development which resulted in delay of motoric development, speech and in adaption with the environment. The common symptoms is brain growth disorder, which affects the cranial size and the intelectual function lower than average (<70. Purpose: This study was aimed to determine the difference of cranial size and cephalic index of mentally retarded children compared with normal chilren based on antropometry and cephalometric measurement. Methods: This research was epidemiology analytic observational with case control design. The cranial size and cephalic index measurements were carried out on 168 children in range of age 7-12 years old (84 were moderate mental retarded children and 84 were normal children. Data was statistically analyzed with t-test. Results: The size of cranial and cephalic on index on mentally retarded children were smaller than normal children. S-N and G-Op size were shorter than normal children, the results of S-N differences (-4.4, S-Ar (-2.38 and G-Op (-5.5, Eu-Eu (-8.24. The results analysis of linear and angle component cranial base (S-N, S-Ar and Based on age and genders, and the normal child was normocephalic. Odds ratio value of the head profile based on age groups 2.10 times (CI 0.290-3.390 compared to normal children 0.99 (CI 0.025-0.375. Based on gender the odds ratio value 1.469 times (CI 0.429-5.035 compared normal child 0.562 (CI 0.19-1.65. The head length and cranial base had related with gender. Cranial size on boys were bigger than girls. Conclusion: It is concluded that the cephalic index and the size of cranial base of mentally retarded children were smaller than normal children.Latar belakang: Retardasi mental merupakan ketidaksempurnaan perkembangan mental yang mengakibatkan keterlambatan perkembangan motorik, bicara dan penyesuaian diri dengan lingkungan. Gejala umum adalah gangguan

  15. Travoprost Induced Granulomatous Anterior Uveitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiam, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To report a case of granulomatous anterior uveitis caused by travoprost. Methods. Single observational case report. Results. A 71-year-old who was fit and healthy presented with bilateral granulomatous anterior uveitis 2 months after he was started on travoprost in both eyes. There was no past history of uveitis. Blood test and radiological investigation were unremarkable. Travoprost was stopped. The uveitis resolved on topical steroid treatment. A rechallenge with travoprost was attempted in one eye. The inflammation recurred in this eye only. This subsided with the cessation of travoprost alone without topical steroid. Conclusion. This is the first case report of travoprost causing granulomatous anterior uveitis. The uveitis recurred with a rechallenge. Changing the prostaglandin analogue to another topical treatment may be adequate to cease the inflammation. PMID:22606464

  16. Cranial radiation in childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia. Neuropsychologic sequelae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A battery of neuropsychologic tests was administered ''blindly'' to 18 children with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) who had been randomly assigned to treatment regimens with or without cranial radiation. These children were all in complete continuous remission for more than 3 1/2 years and were no longer receiving therapy. The results indicated no substantial differences between groups as a function of radiation therapy. However, decreased neuropsychologic performance was found when the entire sample was compared with population norms. These data do not support the hypothesis that cranial radiation therapy is responsible for the neuropsychologic sequelae seen in these survivors of ALL. Post hoc multiple regression analysis indicated that parental education levels accounted for more of the neuropsychologic variability seen in these children than other factors such as age at diagnosis, type of therapy, or sex of child

  17. Cerebral venous thrombosis presenting as multiple lower cranial nerve palsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byju, N; Jose, James; Saifudheen, K; Gafoor, V Abdul; Jithendranath, P

    2012-10-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a well-recognized entity, but its clinical presentation is varied and often mimics many neurological disorders, making it a diagnostic challenge. Cerebral venous thrombosis has a wide spectrum of signs and symptoms, which may evolve suddenly or over weeks. It mimics many neurological conditions such as meningitis, encephalopathy, idiopathic intracranial hypertension, and stroke. Cerebral venous thrombosis presenting as multiple lower cranial nerve palsies, are rarely reported. We describe a pregnant lady who presented with sensorineural deafness of the right ear and paralysis of the 9(th), 10(th), and 12(th) cranial nerves on the right side. She was diagnosed to have thrombosis of the right transverse sinus and sigmoid sinus with extension to the jugular vein and confluence of sinuses. She improved with anticoagulant treatment. PMID:23559730

  18. Cerebral venous thrombosis presenting as multiple lower cranial nerve palsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Byju

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT is a well-recognized entity, but its clinical presentation is varied and often mimics many neurological disorders, making it a diagnostic challenge. Cerebral venous thrombosis has a wide spectrum of signs and symptoms, which may evolve suddenly or over weeks. It mimics many neurological conditions such as meningitis, encephalopathy, idiopathic intracranial hypertension, and stroke. Cerebral venous thrombosis presenting as multiple lower cranial nerve palsies, are rarely reported. We describe a pregnant lady who presented with sensorineural deafness of the right ear and paralysis of the 9 th , 10 th , and 12 th cranial nerves on the right side. She was diagnosed to have thrombosis of the right transverse sinus and sigmoid sinus with extension to the jugular vein and confluence of sinuses. She improved with anticoagulant treatment.

  19. Ioversol 350: clinical experience in cranial computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A single, open trial was conducted in 40 patients to evaluate the diagnostic efficacy and safety, in cranial computed tomography, of ioversol (350 mgl/ml), a new nonionic, monomeric, low-osmolality contrast medium. Ioversol is characterized by a hydrophilicity which is not only the highest of all nonionic agents available to date, but also evenly distributed among the various sides of the benzene ring. Diagnosis was possible in 100 % of cases with a mean degree of certainty of 90.8 %. Six minor adverse reactions requiring no treatment we recorded, of which two were observed by the investigator and four reported by the patients. No pain sensation was found and heat sensations were of minor intensity. Ioversol 350, which showed good diagnostic efficacy and proved to be well tolerated, is therefore suitable for cranial computed tomography at a mean dose of 1 ml/kg

  20. Distraction Osteogenesis Update: Introduction of Multidirectional Cranial Distraction Osteogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunaga, Ataru; Kamochi, Hideaki; Oguma, Hirofumi; Sugawara, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we discuss in detail our current procedure for treating craniosynostosis using multidirectional cranial distraction osteogenesis (MCDO). The MCDO method allows all phenotypes of skull deformity to be reshaped by distraction osteogenesis, except in patients who are 5 months of age or younger and patients with posterior cranial vault problems. We report the results of clinical data of 36 children with craniosynostosis who underwent MCDO between 2005 and 2014 in our institute. This method has the following benefits, such as a high flexibility of reshaping, shorter treatment period and less invasive secondary intervention. We also discuss the other distraction osteogenesis techniques that are used to treat craniosynostosis and compare them with MCDO. The preferred procedure for correction of craniosynostosis may depend on the patient's age, the extent of deformity, and the extent of correction achievable by surgery. We can arrange the combinations of various methods according to the advantage and disadvantage of each technique. PMID:27226854

  1. MR of acoustic neuromas; Relationship to cranial nerves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Masayuki; Takashima, Tsutomu; Kadoya, Masumi; Takahashi, Shiroh; Miyayama, Shiroh; Taira, Sakae; Kashihara, Kengo; Yamashima, Tetsumori; Itoh, Haruhide (Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1989-08-01

    In this report, the relationship of acoustic neuromas to the adjacent cranial nerves is discussed. On T{sub 1}-weighted images, the trigeminal nerve was detected in all 13 cases. Mild to marked compression of these nerves by the tumors was observed in eight cases. The extent of compression did not always correspond to the clinical symptoms. In four cases with a maximum tumor diameter of 2 cm or less, the 7th and 8th cranial nerves were identified. There was no facial palsy in these patients. Two patients with a tumor diameter of more than 2 cm also had no facial palsy. All patients, including those with small tumors, complained of hearing loss and/or tinnitus. While MR imaging has some limitations, it is an effective imaging modality for showing the relationship between tumors and nerves. (author).

  2. Effective treatment of advanced-stage childhood lymphoblastic lymphoma without prophylactic cranial irradiation: Results of St Jude NHL13 study

    OpenAIRE

    Sandlund, John T.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Zhou, Yinmei; Behm, Frederick G.; Onciu, Mihaela; Razzouk, Bassem I.; Hijiya, Nobuko; Campana, Dario; Hudson, Mlissa M.; Ribeiro, Raul C.

    2009-01-01

    There has been a steady improvement in cure rates for children with advanced-stage lymphoblastic non-Hodgkin lymphoma. To further improve cure rates while minimizing long-term toxicity, we designed a protocol (NHL13) based on a regimen for childhood T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, which features intensive intrathecal chemotherapy for central-nervous-system-directed therapy and excludes prophylactic cranial irradiation. From 1992 to 2002, 41 patients with advanced-stage lymphoblastic lymp...

  3. GLOBAL OPTIMIZATION OF OPTICAL FLOW TECHNIQUE ON THE COMPUTATION OF TISSUE-MOTION IN NEONATAL CRANIAL ULTRASONOGRAM

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad, Mohiuddin; YUSUF, M. S.; CHOWDHURY, M. Z.; Yamada, M.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a global optimization method of optical flow technique is presented for estimating tissue-motion velocity from a time series of neonatal cranial ultrasonogram images. The global optimization method is used here was proposed by Horn and Schunck. In this method, the tissue- motion velocity field is determined by minimizing an error function based on the gradient constraint and a global smoothing term over the whole image. An iterative implementation is shown which successfully co...

  4. [Kawasaki disease and cranial nerve involvement: two cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delafay, M-C; Matoussi, Z; Remy-Piccolo, V; Gay, C; Veyrier, M; Stéphan, J-L

    2015-08-01

    CNS involvement, except classical lymphocytic meningitis, is exceptionally rare in Kawasaki disease. Herein, we report on two atypical cases of KD with cranial nerve inflammation. The first case presented supranuclear vertical palsy and the second case Bell palsy. Outcome was promptly favorable with IV immunoglobulins, with no long-term complications. No specific KD biomarkers are available and diagnosis of atypical forms is difficult. KD can mimic a systemic illness and appropriate therapy may be delayed. PMID:26141803

  5. Imaging Features of Extra Cranial Parapharyngeal Space Meningioma: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishor Taori

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Parapharyngeal tumors are less common in clinical practice and are often difficult to diagnose upon clinical examination due to the anatomic complexity of the region. We report a rare case of extracranial parapharyngeal space meningioma presenting as a cervical mass with encasement of cranial nerves giving tram track appearance and features on various imaging modalities [Radiographs, Ultrasound, Computed tomography (CT scan and Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI].

  6. Cranial nerves XIII and XIV: nerves in the shadows

    OpenAIRE

    Bordoni, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Bruno Bordoni,1 Emiliano Zanier21Don Carlo Gnocchi IRCCS, Department of Cardiology, Milan, 2Xamar Institute, Rosà, Vicenza, ItalyAbstract: It has been known for over a century that these cranial nerves exist, and that they are not typographical errors nor a sensational event reported in the medical literature. A number of scientific articles on anatomy highlight how textbooks on descriptive anatomy do not always consider variables such as differences related to the geographical are...

  7. SCHWANNOMA ORIGINATING FROM LOWER CRANIAL NERVES: REPORT OF 4 CASES

    OpenAIRE

    OYAMA, HIROFUMI; KITO, AKIRA; MAKI, HIDEKI; HATTORI, KENICHI; Noda,Tomoyuki; WADA, KENTARO

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Four cases of schwannoma originating from the lower cranial nerves are presented. Case 1 is a schwannoma of the vagus nerve in the parapharyngeal space. The operation was performed by the transcervical approach. Although the tumor capsule was not dissected from the vagus nerve, hoarseness and dysphagia happened transiently after the operation. Case 2 is a schwannoma in the jugular foramen. The operation was performed by the infralabyrinthine approach. Although only the intracapsular ...

  8. Central mechanisms of cranial nerve stimulation for epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Fanselow, Erika E

    2012-01-01

    Stimulation of peripheral cranial nerves has been shown to exert anticonvulsant effects in animal models as well as in human patients. Specifically, stimulation of both the trigeminal and vagus nerves has been shown in multiple clinical trials to be anticonvulsant, and stimulation of these nerves at therapeutic levels does not cause pain or negatively affect brain function. However, the neuronal mechanisms by which such stimulation exerts therapeutic effects are not well understood. In this r...

  9. Imaging Features of Extra Cranial Parapharyngeal Space Meningioma: Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Kishor Taori; Kundaragi, Nischal G; Amit Disawal; Chetan Jathar; Prajwalit P. Gaur; Jawahar Rathod; Virendra Patil

    2011-01-01

    Parapharyngeal tumors are less common in clinical practice and are often difficult to diagnose upon clinical examination due to the anatomic complexity of the region. We report a rare case of extracranial parapharyngeal space meningioma presenting as a cervical mass with encasement of cranial nerves giving tram track appearance and features on various imaging modalities [Radiographs, Ultrasound, Computed tomography (CT) scan and Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)].

  10. Filament proteins in central, cranial, and peripheral mammalian nerves

    OpenAIRE

    1981-01-01

    Several classes of 10-nm filaments have been reported in mammalian cells and they can be distinguished by the size of their protein subunit. We have studied the distribution of these filaments in nerves from calves and other mammals. From the display on polyacrylamide electrophoretic gels of proteins in extracts from fibroblast and central, cranial and peripheral nerves, we cut the appropriate stained bands and prepared iodinated peptide maps. The similarities between the respective maps prov...

  11. Brain Mass and Cranial Nerve Size in Shrews and Moles

    OpenAIRE

    Leitch, Duncan B.; Sarko, Diana K.; Catania, Kenneth C.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between body size, brain size, and fibers in selected cranial nerves in shrews and moles. Species include tiny masked shrews (S. cinereus) weighing only a few grams and much larger mole species weighing up to 90 grams. It also includes closely related species with very different sensory specializations – such as the star-nosed mole and the common, eastern mole. We found that moles and shrews have tiny optic nerves with fiber counts not correlated with body or ...

  12. Cerebral venous thrombosis presenting as multiple lower cranial nerve palsies

    OpenAIRE

    Byju, N.; James Jose; Saifudheen, K; V Abdul Gafoor; P Jithendranath

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a well-recognized entity, but its clinical presentation is varied and often mimics many neurological disorders, making it a diagnostic challenge. Cerebral venous thrombosis has a wide spectrum of signs and symptoms, which may evolve suddenly or over weeks. It mimics many neurological conditions such as meningitis, encephalopathy, idiopathic intracranial hypertension, and stroke. Cerebral venous thrombosis presenting as multiple lower cranial nerve palsies, ...

  13. Morphological specialisations of rat cranial nerve transitional zones.

    OpenAIRE

    Fraher, J P; O'Leary, D

    1994-01-01

    Near their CNS-PNS transitional zones (TZs), many rat cranial nerve rootlets are subdivided to a marked degree by a reticulum of fine cytoplasmic processes. Some of the resulting compartments contain only a single myelinated fibre or a bundle of collagen fibrils. The compartments are aligned with the astrocytic tunnels in which the fibres lie as they traverse the CNS-PNS transitional zone. This marked subdivision may help to insulate individual fibres from one another, preventing functional i...

  14. Morphometric Analysis of Cranial Shape in Fossil and Recent Euprimates

    OpenAIRE

    C. Verity Bennett; Anjali Goswami

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of morphology allows for identification of subtle evolutionary patterns or convergences in anatomy that can aid ecological reconstructions of extinct taxa. This study explores diversity and convergence in cranial morphology across living and fossil primates using geometric morphometrics. 33 3D landmarks were gathered from 34 genera of euprimates (382 specimens), including the Eocene adapiforms Adapis and Leptadapis and Quaternary lemurs Archaeolemur, Palaeopropithecus, ...

  15. Recurrent malignant otitis externa with multiple cranial nerve involvement: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đerić Dragoslava

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Necrotizing otitis externa is a rare but conditionally fatal infection of external auditory canal with extension to deep soft tissue and bones, resulting in necrosis and osteomyelitis of the temporal bone and scull base. This condition is also known as malignant otitis due to an aggressive behavior and poor treatment response. Early diagnosis of malignant otitis is a difficult challenge. We present an illustrative case of necrotizing otitis externa and suggest some strategies to avoid diagnostic and treatment pitfalls. Case Outline. A 70-year-old patient presented with signs of malignant otitis externa, complicated by peripheral facial palsy. Adequate diagnostic and treatment procedures were performed with clinical signs of resolution. The recurrence of malignant infection had presented three months after previous infection with multiple cranial nerve neuropathies and signs of jugular vein and lateral sinus thrombosis. An aggressive antibiotic treatment and surgery were carried out, followed by substantial recovery of the patient and complete restoration of cranial nerves’ functions. Conclusion. Necrotizing otitis externa is a serious condition with uncertain prognosis. The suspicion of malignant external otitis should be raised in cases of resistance to topical treatment, especially in patient with predisposing factors. Evidence-based guideline for necrotizing otitis externa still doesn’t exist and treatment protocol should be adjusted to individual presentation of each patient.

  16. Phylogeny, diet, and cranial integration in australodelphian marsupials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjali Goswami

    Full Text Available Studies of morphological integration provide valuable information on the correlated evolution of traits and its relationship to long-term patterns of morphological evolution. Thus far, studies of morphological integration in mammals have focused on placentals and have demonstrated that similarity in integration is broadly correlated with phylogenetic distance and dietary similarity. Detailed studies have also demonstrated a significant correlation between developmental relationships among structures and adult morphological integration. However, these studies have not yet been applied to marsupial taxa, which differ greatly from placentals in reproductive strategy and cranial development and could provide the diversity necessary to assess the relationships among phylogeny, ecology, development, and cranial integration. This study presents analyses of morphological integration in 20 species of australodelphian marsupials, and shows that phylogeny is significantly correlated with similarity of morphological integration in most clades. Size-related correlations have a significant affect on results, particularly in Peramelia, which shows a striking decrease in similarity of integration among species when size is removed. Diet is not significantly correlated with similarity of integration in any marsupial clade. These results show that marsupials differ markedly from placental mammals in the relationships of cranial integration, phylogeny, and diet, which may be related to the accelerated development of the masticatory apparatus in marsupials.

  17. Morphometric Analysis of Cranial Shape in Fossil and Recent Euprimates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Verity Bennett

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative analysis of morphology allows for identification of subtle evolutionary patterns or convergences in anatomy that can aid ecological reconstructions of extinct taxa. This study explores diversity and convergence in cranial morphology across living and fossil primates using geometric morphometrics. 33 3D landmarks were gathered from 34 genera of euprimates (382 specimens, including the Eocene adapiforms Adapis and Leptadapis and Quaternary lemurs Archaeolemur, Palaeopropithecus, and Megaladapis. Landmark data was treated with Procrustes superimposition to remove all nonshape differences and then subjected to principal components analysis and linear discriminant function analysis. Haplorhines and strepsirrhines were well separated in morphospace along the major components of variation, largely reflecting differences in relative skull length and width and facial depth. Most adapiforms fell within or close to strepsirrhine space, while Quaternary lemurs deviated from extant strepsirrhines, either exploring new regions of morphospace or converging on haplorhines. Fossil taxa significantly increased the area of morphospace occupied by strepsirrhines. However, recent haplorhines showed significantly greater cranial disparity than strepsirrhines, even with the inclusion of the unusual Quaternary lemurs, demonstrating that differences in primate cranial disparity are likely real and not simply an artefact of recent megafaunal extinctions.

  18. Surgical pitfalls with custom-made porous hydroxyapatite cranial implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Zanotti

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Cranioplasty implants are used primarily in cases of surgical cranial decompression following pathological elevations of intracranial pressure. Available bone substitutes include porous hydroxyapatite (HA and polymethylmethacrylate. Whichever material is used, however, prosthetic cranial implants are susceptible to intra- and postsurgical complications and even failure. The aim of this study was to investigate such occurrences in HA cranioplasty implants, seeking not only to determine the likely causes (whether correlated or not with the device itself but also, where possible, to suggest countermeasures. Methods: We analyzed information regarding failures or complications reported in postmarketing surveillance and clinical studies of patients treated worldwide with custom-made HA cranial implants (Custom Bone Service Fin-Ceramica Faenza, Italy in the period 1997-2013. Results: The two most common complications were implant fractures (84 cases, 2.9% of the total fitted and infections (51 cases, 1.77%. Conclusion: Although cranioplasties are superficial and not difficult types of surgery, and use of custom-made implants are often considered the "easy" option from a surgical perspective, these procedures are nonetheless plagued by potential pitfalls. If performed well they yield more than satisfactory results from the points of view of both the patient and surgeon, but lack of appropriate care can open the door to numerous potential sources of failure, which can compromise-even irreparably-the ability to heal.

  19. Surgical experience of minipterional craniotomy with 102 ruptured and unruptured anterior circulation aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Eberval Gadelha; Welling, Leonardo C; Preul, Mark C; Sakaya, Gabriel Reis; Neville, Iuri; Spetzler, Robert F; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen

    2016-05-01

    The pterional approach was described in the 1970s and has become the most utilized cranial approach with many variations described, including the minipterional technique. Although described recently as an alternative to the pterional approach for anterior circulation aneurysms, to our knowledge a large series of cases using the minipterional approach in both ruptured and unruptured aneurysms has not been described. We present our clinical experience with the minipterional craniotomy in more than 100 ruptured and unruptured anterior circulation aneurysms. The results of 86 consecutive patients with 102 ruptured non-giant, anterior circulation aneurysms treated with early surgery utilizing the minipterional craniotomy were analyzed. Postoperative angiography was carried out in all cases. Outcome results were classified as excellent in 67 (77.9%), and good in seven (8.1%), while 16 (13.9%) patients died. The minipterional technique provides adequate surgical exposure and excellent outcomes for both ruptured and unruptured anterior circulation aneurysm clipping. It constitutes a safe and effective alternative to the pterional approach, with equivalent or potentially better aesthetic and functional outcomes. PMID:26924181

  20. The Flap Sandwich Technique for a Safe and Aesthetic Skull Base Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Tomoyuki; Okazaki, Mutsumi; Tanaka, Kentarou; Iida, Hideo

    2016-02-01

    For safe and reliable skull base reconstruction combined with repair of cranial bone defects, we introduce the flap sandwich technique in this study. A titanium mesh is often used to repair structural cranial bone defects because it has less donor site morbidity and is easy to handle. However, titanium mesh has disadvantages of exposure and infection postoperatively. To improve surgical outcomes, we applied the flap sandwich technique to 3 cases of skull base reconstruction combined with cranial bone defect repair. Two anterior skull base defects and 1 middle skull base defect were included in this study. The subjects were all women, aged 30, 58, and 62 years. One patient had former multiple craniotomies and another patient had preoperative radiotherapy. The flap sandwich technique involves structural cranial bone reconstruction with a titanium mesh and soft tissue reconstruction with a chimeric anterolateral thigh free flap. First, the dead space between the repaired dura and the titanium mesh is filled with vastus lateralis muscle, and then structural reconstruction is performed with a titanium mesh. Finally, the titanium mesh is totally covered with the adiposal flap of the anterolateral thigh free flap. The muscle flap protects the dead space from infection, and the adiposal flap covers the titanium mesh to reduce mechanical stress on the covered skin and thus prevent the exposure of the titanium mesh through the scalp. By applying this technique, there was no intracranial infection or titanium mesh exposure in these 3 cases postoperatively, even though 2 patients had postoperative radiotherapy. Additionally, the adiposal flap could provide a soft and natural contour to the scalp and forehead region, and this gives patients a better facial appearance even though they have had skull base surgery. PMID:25954846

  1. [Successful treatment with total cranial irradiation for central nervous system involvement of Langerhans cell sarcoma during chemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Noriharu; Yamazaki, Hirohito; Yamashita, Takeshi; Kondo, Yukio; Nakao, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Langerhans cell sarcoma (LCS) is an extremely rare neoplasm of Langerhans cell origin characterized by systemic involvement and a poor prognosis. There are, however, few reports of LCS with central nervous system involvement. We experienced a patient with LCS recurrence in the brain that appeared during systemic chemotherapy. The brains lesions eventually responded to total cranial irradiation. A 60-year-old female presented with systemic lymphadenopathy. LCS was diagnosed based on neck lymph node biopsy findings. Two cycles of ESHAP induced marked regression of her lymphadenopathy, but FDG-PET/CT scan revealed new lesions in the central nervous system and her disorientation gradually worsened. We administered 37.5 Gy of total cranial irradiation which improved her consciousness and shrank the brain tumors as demonstrated by MRI. The patient's clinical course indicates that radiation therapy may be effective for central nervous system involvement of LCS even if the lesion is resistant to systemic chemotherapy. PMID:26861100

  2. Anterior Approach Total Hip Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... during a hip replacement through the anterior supine intramuscular approach. “OR-Live,” the vision of improving health. ... the approach are operating through an internervous and intramuscular anatomic interval. It’s not necessary to detach any ...

  3. Anterior Approach Total Hip Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... got coming out in “JBJS,” the early six-week recovery is dramatically different between a direct lateral abductor splitting approach and this anterior supine approach. Let me get this head on. My experience, these patients have full leg control in about 24 hours. Yeah. They can get out of bed and ...

  4. Anterior Approach Total Hip Replacement

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the anterior supine intramuscular approach. “OR-Live,” the vision of improving health. Good evening and welcome to ... should know that this is done under direct vision. Yeah. You are seeing everything you’re doing. ...

  5. Estimating cranial musculoskeletal constraints in theropod dinosaurs

    OpenAIRE

    Lautenschlager, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Many inferences on the biology, behaviour and ecology of extinct vertebrates are based on the reconstruction of the musculature and rely considerably on its accuracy. Although the advent of digital reconstruction techniques has facilitated the creation and testing of musculoskeletal hypotheses in recent years, muscle strain capabilities have rarely been considered. Here, a digital modelling approach using the freely available visualization and animation software Blender is applied to estimate...

  6. Anterior process calcaneal fractures: a systematic evaluation of associated conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective was to evaluate the association, by MRI, of anterior calcaneal process fractures with tarsal coalitions, ankle sprains, and bifurcate ligament abnormalities. A retrospective review of 1,479 foot and ankle MR images was performed, over a period of 5 years, for isolated anterior process fractures of the calcaneus. Fifteen 1.5-T MR examinations were systematically evaluated by two radiologists in consensus. Marrow edema patterns, presence of a calcaneonavicular coalition, as well as bifurcate and anterior talofibular ligaments, were evaluated. There were 15 fractures of the anterior calcaneal process with an incidence of 1%. The average patient age was 51 years (range 25-82). Twelve patients were women and 3 were men. The majority of the fractures (14 out of 15) presented as an edema pattern on T2-weighted images, either diffuse (9 out of 15), or vertical (5 out of 15). One case did not show marrow edema, but rather a hypointense line. Nine patients (60%) demonstrated calcaneonavicular coalition and anterior calcaneal process fracture. In 6 patients (50%) the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) was thickened. Three patients did not have axial images, and were classified as non-conclusive for the ATFL evaluation. The bifurcate ligament was thickened with hyperintense signal demonstrating a sprain in 9 out of 13 (69%). Only 2 patients (16.5%) had an anterior calcaneal process fracture without any associated abnormality. We believe that there is a probable association of anterior process fractures and calcaneonavicular coalitions. We also feel, based on our results and the prior literature that there is likely also an association with both ATFL injuries and bifurcate ligament injuries. (orig.)

  7. Anterior process calcaneal fractures: a systematic evaluation of associated conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrover, David [NYU Hospital for Joint Disease, Radiology Department, New York, NY (United States); Hopital Beaujon, Service de Radiologie, Paris (France); Schweitzer, Mark E. [NYU Hospital for Joint Disease, Radiology Department, New York, NY (United States); Laredo, J.D. [Hopital Lariboisiere, Service de Radiologie, Paris (France)

    2007-07-15

    The objective was to evaluate the association, by MRI, of anterior calcaneal process fractures with tarsal coalitions, ankle sprains, and bifurcate ligament abnormalities. A retrospective review of 1,479 foot and ankle MR images was performed, over a period of 5 years, for isolated anterior process fractures of the calcaneus. Fifteen 1.5-T MR examinations were systematically evaluated by two radiologists in consensus. Marrow edema patterns, presence of a calcaneonavicular coalition, as well as bifurcate and anterior talofibular ligaments, were evaluated. There were 15 fractures of the anterior calcaneal process with an incidence of 1%. The average patient age was 51 years (range 25-82). Twelve patients were women and 3 were men. The majority of the fractures (14 out of 15) presented as an edema pattern on T2-weighted images, either diffuse (9 out of 15), or vertical (5 out of 15). One case did not show marrow edema, but rather a hypointense line. Nine patients (60%) demonstrated calcaneonavicular coalition and anterior calcaneal process fracture. In 6 patients (50%) the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) was thickened. Three patients did not have axial images, and were classified as non-conclusive for the ATFL evaluation. The bifurcate ligament was thickened with hyperintense signal demonstrating a sprain in 9 out of 13 (69%). Only 2 patients (16.5%) had an anterior calcaneal process fracture without any associated abnormality. We believe that there is a probable association of anterior process fractures and calcaneonavicular coalitions. We also feel, based on our results and the prior literature that there is likely also an association with both ATFL injuries and bifurcate ligament injuries. (orig.)

  8. New approach to neurorehabilitation: cranial nerve noninvasive neuromodulation (CN-NINM) technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilov, Yuri P.; Tyler, Mitchel E.; Kaczmarek, Kurt A.; Skinner, Kimberley L.

    2014-06-01

    Cranial Nerve NonInvasive NeuroModulation (CN-NINM) is a primary and complementary multi-targeted rehabilitation therapy that appears to initiate the recovery of multiple damaged or suppressed brain functions affected by neurological disorders. It is deployable as a simple, home-based device (portable neuromodulation stimulator, or PoNSTM) and training regimen following initial patient training in an outpatient clinic. It may be easily combined with many existing rehabilitation therapies, and may reduce or eliminate the need for more aggressive invasive procedures or possibly decrease total medication intake. CN-NINM uses sequenced patterns of electrical stimulation on the tongue. Our hypothesis is that CN-NINM induces neuroplasticity by noninvasive stimulation of two major cranial nerves: trigeminal (CN-V), and facial (CN-VII). This stimulation excites a natural flow of neural impulses to the brainstem (pons varolli and medulla), and cerebellum, to effect changes in the function of these targeted brain structures, extending to corresponding nuclei of the brainstem. CN-NINM represents a synthesis of a new noninvasive brain stimulation technique with applications in physical medicine, cognitive, and affective neurosciences. Our new stimulation method appears promising for treatment of a full spectrum of movement disorders, and for both attention and memory dysfunction associated with traumatic brain injury.

  9. Anticoagulation after anterior myocardial infarction and the risk of stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob A Udell

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Survivors of anterior MI are at increased risk for stroke with predilection to form ventricular thrombus. Commonly patients are discharged on dual antiplatelet therapy. Given the frequency of early coronary reperfusion and risk of bleeding, it remains uncertain whether anticoagulation offers additional utility. We examined the effectiveness of anticoagulation therapy for the prevention of stroke after anterior MI. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We performed a population-based cohort analysis of 10,383 patients who survived hospitalization for an acute MI in Ontario, Canada from April 1, 1999 to March 31, 2001. The primary outcome was four-year ischemic stroke rates compared between anterior and non-anterior MI patients. Risk factors for stroke were assessed by multivariate Cox proportional-hazards analysis. Warfarin use was determined at discharge and followed for 90 days among a subset of patients aged 66 and older (n = 1483. Among the 10,383 patients studied, 2,942 patients survived hospitalization for an anterior MI and 20% were discharged on anticoagulation therapy. Within 4 years, 169 patients (5.7% were admitted with an ischemic stroke, half of which occurred within 1-year post-MI. There was no significant difference in stroke rate between anterior and non-anterior MI patients. The use of warfarin up to 90 days was not associated with stroke protection after anterior MI (hazard ratio [HR], 0.68; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.37-1.26. The use of angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors (HR, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.44-0.95 and beta-blockers (HR, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.41-0.87 were associated with a significant decrease in stroke risk. There was no significant difference in bleeding-related hospitalizations in patients who used warfarin for up to 90 days post-MI. CONCLUSION: Many practitioners still consider a large anterior-wall MI as high risk for potential LV thrombus formation and stroke. Among a cohort of elderly patients who survived an anterior

  10. CELL ADHESION MOLECULE CADHERIN-6 FUNCTION IN ZEBRAFISH CRANIAL AND LATERAL LINE GANGLIA DEVELOPMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Q.; Dalman, M. R.; Sarmah, S.; Chen, S.; Chen, Y.; Hurlbut, A. K.; Spencer, M. A.; Pancoe, L.; Marrs, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    Cadherins regulate the vertebrate nervous system development. We previously showed that cadherin-6 message (cdh6) was strongly expressed in the majority of the embryonic zebrafish cranial and lateral line ganglia during their development. Here, we present evidence that cdh6 has specific functions during cranial and lateral line ganglia and nerve development. We analyzed the consequences of cdh6 loss-of-function on cranial ganglion and nerve differentiation in zebrafish embryos. Embryos inject...

  11. A STUDY OF TUMOURS OF THE CRANIAL NERVE AND PARASPINAL NERVE

    OpenAIRE

    Sudesh Shetty; Shreesha

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION One of the frequent sites of tumour formation is the cranial nerves and paraspinal nerves. The cranial nerves perform a plethora of functions and so the signs and symptoms caused may be different. They are mainly classified into four different types. The aim of the study is: 1. To study the tumours arising from the cranial nerves in an epidemiological point of view. 2. To study the tumours histopathologically. 3. To classify the tumours according to WHO cl...

  12. Morphometric characteristics of caudal cranial nerves at petroclival region in fetuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdogmus, Omer; Saban, Enis; Ozkan, Mazhar; Yildiz, Sercan Dogukan; Verimli, Ural; Cakmak, Ozgur; Arifoglu, Yasin; Sehirli, Umit

    2016-06-01

    Morphometric measurements of cranial nerves in posterior cranial fossa of fetus cadavers were carried out in an attempt to identify any asymmetry in their openings into the cranium. Twenty-two fetus cadavers (8 females, 14 males) with gestational age ranging between 22 and 38 weeks (mean 30 weeks) were included in this study. The calvaria were removed, the brains were lifted, and the cranial nerves were identified. The distance of each cranial nerve opening to midline and the distances between different cranial nerve openings were measured on the left and right side and compared. The mean clivus length and width were 21.2 ± 4.4 and 13.2 ± 1.5 mm, respectively. The distance of the twelfth cranial nerve opening from midline was shorter on the right side when compared with the left side (6.6 ± 1.1 versus 7.1 ± 0.8 mm, p = 0.038). Openings of other cranial nerves did not show such asymmetry with regard to their distance from midline, and the distances between different cranial nerves were similar on the left and right side. Cranial nerves at petroclival region seem to show minimal asymmetry in fetuses. PMID:26205322

  13. Diagnosis of cranial cruciate ligament injury in dogs by tibial compression radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stress radiographs were taken of 42 sound stifle joints, of five stifles with injuries other than cruciate disease, and of 72 stifles with surgically confirmed cranial cruciate damage. The stifles were also examined by the cranial drawer test. No false positive compression radiographs were obtained. In the 72 stifles with cranial cruciate damage, instability was diagnosed on the stressed view in all but two cases. The sensitivity of the radiographic tibial compression test was 97 per cent, compared with 86 per cent for the cranial drawer test; the specificities of the tests were 100 per cent and nearly 98 per cent, respectively

  14. Cranial grafting of stem cell-derived microvesicles improves cognition and reduces neuropathology in the irradiated brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baulch, Janet E; Acharya, Munjal M; Allen, Barrett D; Ru, Ning; Chmielewski, Nicole N; Martirosian, Vahan; Giedzinski, Erich; Syage, Amber; Park, Audrey L; Benke, Sarah N; Parihar, Vipan K; Limoli, Charles L

    2016-04-26

    Cancer survivors face a variety of challenges as they cope with disease recurrence and a myriad of normal tissue complications brought on by radio- and chemotherapeutic treatment regimens. For patients subjected to cranial irradiation for the control of CNS malignancy, progressive and debilitating cognitive dysfunction remains a pressing unmet medical need. Although this problem has been recognized for decades, few if any satisfactory long-term solutions exist to resolve this serious unintended side effect of radiotherapy. Past work from our laboratory has demonstrated the neurocognitive benefits of human neural stem cell (hNSC) grafting in the irradiated brain, where intrahippocampal transplantation of hNSC ameliorated radiation-induced cognitive deficits. Using a similar strategy, we now provide, to our knowledge, the first evidence that cranial grafting of microvesicles secreted from hNSC affords similar neuroprotective phenotypes after head-only irradiation. Cortical- and hippocampal-based deficits found 1 mo after irradiation were completely resolved in animals cranially grafted with microvesicles. Microvesicle treatment was found to attenuate neuroinflammation and preserve host neuronal morphology in distinct regions of the brain. These data suggest that the neuroprotective properties of microvesicles act through a trophic support mechanism that reduces inflammation and preserves the structural integrity of the irradiated microenvironment. PMID:27044087

  15. 38 CFR 3.379 - Anterior poliomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Anterior poliomyelitis. 3... Specific Diseases § 3.379 Anterior poliomyelitis. If the first manifestations of acute anterior poliomyelitis present themselves in a veteran within 35 days of termination of active military service, it...

  16. Ardipithecus ramidus and the evolution of the human cranial base

    OpenAIRE

    Kimbel, William H.; Suwa, Gen; Asfaw, Berhane; Rak, Yoel; White, Tim D.

    2014-01-01

    The Pliocene (4.4 Ma) hominoid species Ardipithecus ramidus has been linked phylogenetically to the Australopithecus + Homo clade by nonhoning canines, a short basicranium, and postcranial features related to bipedality. However, aspects of the foot and pelvis indicative of arboreal locomotion have raised arguments that this taxon may instead exemplify parallel evolution of human-like traits among apes around the time of the chimpanzee-human split. Our investigation of the basicranium shows t...

  17. Assessment of the α-angle of femoral neck and morphological classification of the anterior femoral head-neck junction on CT-based images in normal Chinese adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the normal range of the femoral neck α-angle in normal Chinese adults and classify the morphology of the anterior femoral head-neck junction on CT-based images. Methods: Six hundred and fifty-two adult patients (Bilateral: 459 patients, unilateral: 193 patients) with the total of 1111 hips (552 left; 559 right, and 654 male, 457 female) without known diseases affecting the proximal femur or symptoms of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) underwent 64- slice CT scanning for medical purpose with the hip included in the scan range. The volume CT data was used for further analysis in this study. Oblique sagittal plane images paralleling to the axis of the femoral neck were reconstructed with the volume CT data, the image through the middle of the femoral neck was chosen to measure α-angle with AutoCAD2006 software. The morphology of the anterior femoral head-neck junction was classified. Analysis of variance and t-test were performed with SPSS 15.0. Results: The mean value of a-angle of all 1111 hips was 38.2°±5.3°. The normal range of α-angle in Chinese adults was 28° to 49°. The mean value of left and right α-angles were 38.0°±5.3° and 38.4°±5.3°,respectively, and there was no statistically significant difference between both sides (t=-1.231, P>0.05 ). Males have greater α- angles than females 39.2°±5.8 vs 36.8°±4.1°, with t=-8.180, P0.05). In all 1111 proximal femora, 168 were classified as concave type, accounting for 15.1%, with a mean a-angle of 31.2°±2.0°, 726 were smooth type, accounting for 65.4%, with a mean α-angle of 37.4°±2.4°, and 217 were flat type, accounting for 19.5%, with a mean a-angle of 46.4°±3.8°. The differences of the α-angles of the three groups reached statistical significance (F=1636.107, P<0.01). Conclusions: The morphology of anterior femoral head-neck junction can be classified into three types: concave type (type Ⅰ), smooth type (type Ⅱ) and fiat type (type Ⅲ). This

  18. The taxonomic implications of cranial shape variation in Homo erectus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baab, Karen L

    2008-06-01

    The taxonomic status of Homo erectus sensu lato has been a source of debate since the early 1980s, when a series of publications suggested that the early African fossils may represent a separate species, H. ergaster. To gain further resolution regarding this debate, 3D geometric morphometric data were used to quantify overall shape variation in the cranial vault within H. erectus using a new metric, the sum of squared pairwise Procrustes distances (SSD). Bootstrapping methods were used to compare the H. erectus SSD to a broad range of human and nonhuman primate samples in order to ascertain whether variation in H. erectus most clearly resembles that seen in one or more species. The reference taxa included relevant phylogenetic, ecological, and temporal analogs including humans, apes, and both extant and extinct papionin monkeys. The mean cranial shapes of different temporogeographic subsets of H. erectus fossils were then tested for significance using exact randomization tests and compared to the distances between regional groups of modern humans and subspecies/species of the ape and papionin monkey taxa. To gauge the influence of sexual dimorphism on levels of variation, comparisons were also made between the mean cranial shapes of single-sex samples for the reference taxa. Results indicate that variation in H. erectus is most comparable to single species of papionin monkeys and the genus Pan, which included two species. However, H. erectus encompasses a limited range of variation given its extensive geographic and temporal range, leading to the conclusion that only one species should be recognized. In addition, there are significant differences between the African/Georgian and Asian H. erectus samples, but not between H. ergaster (Georgia+Africa, excluding OH 9 and Daka) and H. erectus sensu stricto. This finding is in line with expectations for intraspecific variation in a long-lived species with a wide, but probably discontinuous, geographic distribution. PMID

  19. Morphology and variation in porpoise (Cetacea: Phocoenidae) cranial endocasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racicot, Rachel A; Colbert, Matthew W

    2013-06-01

    Evolution of endocranial anatomy in cetaceans is important from the perspective of echolocation ability, intelligence, social structure, and alternate pathways for circulation to the brain. Apart from the importance of studying brain shape and asymmetries as they relate to aspects of behavior and intelligence, cranial endocasts can show a close correspondence to the hydrostatic shape of the brain in life, and canals and grooves can preserve features of the circulatory system. Multiple samples are rarely available for studies of individual variation, especially in fossils, thus a first step in quantifying variation and making comparisons with fossils is made possible with CT scans of osteological specimens. This study presents a series of high-resolution X-ray CT-derived cranial endocasts of six extant species of Phocoenidae, a clade including some of the smallest and one of the rarest cetaceans. Degree of gyrification varies interspecifically and intraspecifically, possibly resulting from variation in preservation of the ossified meninges. Computed tomographic data show that visually assessed asymmetry in the cranial endocasts is not correlated with volumetric measurements, but nonetheless may reflect torsion in the skull's shape such that the right cerebral and cerebellar hemispheres extend rostrally and laterally more than the left. Vasculature and canals are similar to other described cetacean species, but the hypophyseal casts are unusual. Similarities between brain shape and volume measurements in the different species can be attributed to paedomorphism and concomitant variation in ecological preferences. This may explain similarities Neophocaena phocaenoides and Phocoena sinus share with the juvenile Phocoena phocoena specimen studied. PMID:23613315

  20. Cranial radiation necessary for CNS prophylaxis in pediatric NHL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The records of 95 consecutive children less than or equal to 21 years of age with previously untreated diffuse histology NHL registered in our protocols from 1978 to 1983 were reviewed. Seventy-nine patients were considered eligible for analysis. The histologic subtypes represented included lymphoblastic (LB) 37%; histiocytic (DHL) 29%; undifferentiated (DU) 19%; poorly differentiated (DPDL) 9%; and unclassified (UNHL) 6%. Distribution of the patients according to stage showed Stage I, 0%; Stage II, 11%; Stage III, 53%; Stage IV, 36%. Four different Memorial Hospital protocols for systemic chemotherapy were used (LSA2L2 73%; L10 9%; L17 10%; L17M 8%); however, the IT (intrathecal) chemotherapy was uniform (Methotrexate: 6.0-6.25 mg/M2 per treatment course) and was included in the induction, consolidation, and maintenance phases of all treatment protocols. Cranial radiation was included in the induction, consolidation, and maintenance phases of all treatment protocols. Cranial radiation was not included in the CNS prophylaxis program. The overall median time of follow-up was 43 months. The overall CNS relapse rate was 6.3%; however, the incidence of CNS lymphoma presenting as the first isolated site of relapse in patients in otherwise complete remission (minimum follow-up of 19 months with 97% of patients off treatment) was only 1/58 (1.7%). Our data suggest that IT chemotherapy when given in combination with modern aggressive systemic combination chemotherapy, and without cranial radiation appears to be a highly effective modality for CNS prophylaxis regardless of stage, histology, or bone marrow or mediastinal involvement. (Abstract Truncated)

  1. Pediatric anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    McConkey, Mark O.; Bonasia, Davide Edoardo; Amendola, Annunziato

    2011-01-01

    An increasing number of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are seen in children now than in the past due to increased sports participation. The natural history of ACL deficient knees in active individuals, particularly in children is poor. Surgical management of ACL deficiency in children is complex due to the potential risk of injury to the physis and growth disturbance. Delaying ACL reconstruction until maturity is possible but risks instability episodes and intra-articular damage. S...

  2. Anterior impingement syndrome in dancers

    OpenAIRE

    O’Kane, John William; Kadel, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    Anterior impingement is a common problem in dancers occurring primarily secondary to the repetitive forced ankle dorsiflexion inherent in ballet. Symptoms generally occur progressively and may respond to conservative treatment including addressing biomechanical faults that contribute to the problem. As impingement progresses, movements essential to ballet may become impossible and arthroscopic ankle surgery is often effective for both diagnosis and treatment, allowing athletes to return to da...

  3. Calculation of cranial nerve complication probability for acoustic neuroma radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Estimations of complications from stereotactic radiosurgery usually rely simply on dose-volume or dose-diameter isoeffect curves. Due to the sparse clinical data available, these curves have typically not considered the target location in the brain, target histology, or treatment plan conformality as parameters in the calculation. In this study, a predictive model was generated to estimate the probability of cranial neuropathies as a result of acoustic schwannoma radiosurgery. Methods and Materials: The dose-volume histogram reduction scheme was used to calculate the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) from brainstem dose-volume histograms. The model's fitting parameters were optimized to provide the best fit to the observed complication data for acoustic neuroma patients treated with stereotactic radiosurgery at the University of Florida. The calculation was then applied to the remainder of the patients in the database. Results: The best fit to our clinical data was obtained using n = 0.04, m = 0.15, and no. alphano. /no. betano. = 2.1 Gy-1. Although the fitting parameter m is relatively consistent with ranges found in the literature, both the volume parameter, n, and no. alphano. /no. betano. are much smaller than the values quoted in the literature. The fit to our clinical data indicates that brainstem, or possibly a specific portion of the brainstem, is more radiosensitive than the parameters in the literature indicate, and that there is very little volume effect; in other words, irradiation of a small fraction of the brainstem yields NTCPs that are nearly as high as those calculated for entire volume irradiation. These new fitting parameters are specific to acoustic neuroma radiosurgery, and the small volume effect that we observe may be an artifact of the fixed relationship of acoustic tumors to specific regions of the brainstem. Applying the model to our patient database, we calculate an average NTCP of 7.2% for patients who had no cranial

  4. Cranial growth of captive bred bank voles (Clethrionomys glareolus)

    OpenAIRE

    Balčiauskienė, Laima

    2007-01-01

    The cranial growth of C. glareolus was investigated using 444 captive bred individuals, aged from 5 to 680 days. Three growth patterns of skull characters were found: (1) rapid growth in the first decade of age, followed by a very slow change or stabilisation (width of molar M1 and length of maxillary tooth row), (2) long period of flat growth (length of mandibular tooth row and length of mandibular diastema), and (3) long period of initial growth followed by the plateau phase (length of nasa...

  5. Cranial irradiation of young rats impairs later learning and growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young rats (26 days) were exposed to ionizing radiation of the head of 0, 1200, 2400 or 3000 rads total in 200 rads/day doses. The subsequent growth of irradiated rats was permanently impaired: such impairment was positively related to amount of irradiation. Beginning in adolescence, rats were trained on a horizontal/vertical visual discrimination in a runway task and although all four groups mastered the discrimination, they differed in their patterns of acquisition. These results indicated long term effects and are associated with a cranial irradiation regimen similar to that given to children suffering acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). (author)

  6. Posterior cranial fossa arteriovenous fistula with presenting as caroticocavernous fistula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report cases of posterior cranial fossa arteriovenous fistula (AVF) with presenting with exophthalmos, chemosis and tinnitus in 26- and 66-year-old men. The final diagnoses was vertebral artery AVF and AVF of the marginal sinus, respectively. The dominant venous drainage was the cause of the unusual presentation: both drained from the jugular bulb or marginal sinus, via the inferior petrosal and cavernous sinuses and superior ophthalmic vein. We used endovascular techniques, with coils and liquid adhesives to occlude the fistulae, with resolution of the symptoms and signs. (orig.)

  7. CRANIAL INDEX IN NORTH INDIAN CRANIA (PREDOMINANTLY HARYANAVI)

    OpenAIRE

    S. K. Rathee; Sanjay Gupta; Shelja; Usha Dhall; P Raghavan

    2014-01-01

    Shape of crania is seen by measuring cranial index in 150 (115 male and 35 female) crania. Crania were obtained from the department of Anatomy, Pt. B.D. Sharma PGIMS Rohtak. In males, 91.07 % crania were found dolichocephalic while in females 97.14% crania were dolichocephalic. Few crania were found mesocephalic (6.25% in males and 2.85% in females) in both sexes. None of female crania was seen as brachycephalic. Percentage obtained in present study is quite different from any oth...

  8. Nonlinear dynamical model and response of avian cranial kinesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meekangvan, Preeda; A Barhorst, Alan; Burton, Thomas D; Chatterjee, Sankar; Schovanec, Lawrence

    2006-05-01

    All modern birds have kinetic skulls in which the upper bill can move relative to the braincase, but the biomechanics and motion dynamics of cranial kinesis in birds are poorly understood. In this paper, we model the dynamics of avian cranial kinesis, such as prokinesis and proximal rhynchokinesis in which the upper jaw pivots around the nasal-frontal (N-F) hinge. The purpose of this paper is to present to the biological community an approach that demonstrates the application of sophisticated predictive mathematical modeling tools to avian kinesis. The generality of the method, however, is applicable to the advanced study of the biomechanics of other skeletal systems. The paper begins with a review of the relevant biological literature as well as the essential morphology of avian kinesis, especially the mechanical coupling of the upper and lower jaw by the postorbital ligament. A planar model of the described bird jaw morphology is then developed that maintains the closed kinematic topology of the avian jaw mechanism. We then develop the full nonlinear equations of motion with the assumption that the M. protractor pterygoideus and M. depressor mandibulae act on the quadrate as a pure torque, and the nasal frontal hinge is elastic with damping. The mechanism is shown to be a single degree of freedom device due to the holonomic constraints present in the quadrate-jugal bar-upper jaw-braincase-quadrate kinematic chain as well as the quadrate-lower jaw-postorbital ligament-braincase-quadrate kinematic chain. The full equations are verified via simulation and animation using the parameters of a Grey Heron (Ardea cinerea). Next we develop a simplified analytical model of the equations by power series expansion. We demonstrate that this model reproduces the dynamics of the full model to a high degree of fidelity. We proceed to use the harmonic balance technique to develop the frequency response characteristics of the jaw mechanism. It is shown that this avian cranial

  9. Posterior cranial fossa arteriovenous fistula with presenting as caroticocavernous fistula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, H.M.; Shih, H.C.; Huang, Y.C.; Wang, Y.H. [Dept. of Medical Imaging, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei (Taiwan)

    2001-05-01

    We report cases of posterior cranial fossa arteriovenous fistula (AVF) with presenting with exophthalmos, chemosis and tinnitus in 26- and 66-year-old men. The final diagnoses was vertebral artery AVF and AVF of the marginal sinus, respectively. The dominant venous drainage was the cause of the unusual presentation: both drained from the jugular bulb or marginal sinus, via the inferior petrosal and cavernous sinuses and superior ophthalmic vein. We used endovascular techniques, with coils and liquid adhesives to occlude the fistulae, with resolution of the symptoms and signs. (orig.)

  10. Thyroid dose in children undergoing prophylactic cranial irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the radiation dose received by the thyroid gland as a result of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) in childhood leukemia and the factors influencing that dose. Methods and Materials: The dose to the thyroid resulting from simulated cranial irradiation with parallel opposed lateral fields of an adult anthropomorphic (ART) phantom with both 6 MV X-rays and Cobalt-60 γ-rays was measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). The dependence of thyroid dose on the distance of the field from the thyroid and the proportions of thyroid dose from stray radiation (leakage, scatter from jaws, etc.) and tissue scattered radiation were measured. The effects of a shadow tray and shielding blocks were also determined. Calculation of thyroid dose using the Clarkson scatter integration method was performed for 6 MV X-rays to compare with the measured doses. In vivo thyroid dose estimates were made using TLD measurements for three children receiving PCI with 6 MV X-rays. Results: Using open, unshielded fields, the thyroid region of the phantom received 1.2-1.4% of the prescribed cranial dose for 6 MV X-rays and 1.5-1.7% for Cobalt-60. For both treatment units, stray radiation accounted for approximately two thirds of the thyroid dose and tissue scatter accounted for the remaining one third. The thyroid dose increased as the field moved closer to the thyroid, with an increasing proportion of the dose due to tissue scatter. Placement of a thyroid shielding block on a shadow tray reduced the thyroid dose by only 20% compared with the open, unshielded setup. Thyroid dose from 6 MV using open fields was affected by the orientation of the collimator. When the inferior field edge was defined by the lower jaw, the dose was reduced by 27% compared with the upper jaw. Good correlation of dose to the thyroid region was obtained between phantom measured doses, in vivo measured doses and calculation of dose using the Clarkson method. Conclusion: For PCI doses of

  11. Misdiagnosed Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma Secondary to Cranial Astrocytoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Wei; Xian-sheng Liu; Yong-jian Xu

    2009-01-01

    A case of angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL) which was misdiagnosed as adult Still's disease was presented. The clinical and laboratory characteristics of this case and related literatures were analyzed and reviewed. The patient was finally diagnosed as AITL (Ann Arbor classification: Stage IIIB) secondary to cranial astrocytoma (WHO classification: Stage III), complicated with severe pulmonary infection because of long time treatment of corticosteroid and misdiagnosis (about one and a half year). It is concluded that AITL is a rare disease which was easily misdiagnosed. The diagnosis of AITL should combine the clinical manifestation with pathological biopsy as well as corresponding immunohistochemical tests.

  12. Selection of operative procedures for anterior plagiocephaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate long-term results after surgical treatment for anterior plagiocephaly and to identify factors that might influence these results. And according to these results selection of operative procedures for plagiocephaly was discussed. From April 1, 1985 to December 31, 2002, 12 children with anterior plagiocephaly were treated by craniofacial surgery (frontoorbital advancement) or distraction osteogenesis in Saitama Children's Medical Center. Distraction osteogenesis was applied in 3 patients with mild deformities. Preoperative severity of the craniofacial deformities, the time of operations, operative methods and long-term results were analyzed in these cases. Preoperative deformities were classified by the classification system developed by Di Rocco C et al (1988) and surgical results were graded according to the grading system reported by Wagner JD et al (1995) at the end of follow-up period. Follow-up ranged from 1 to 12 years (mean 6.2±4.9). Morphological long-term surgical results in 12 cases with plagiocephaly as follows; excellent in 8 cases, good in 3 cases and poor in 1 case. At the end of follow-up, excellent craniofacial configurations were obtained in 8 cases operated on in less than 1 year after birth or with mild craniofacial deformities (grade II) preoperatively. And also complete normalization of endocranial base asymmetries on 3D-CTs were recognized in cases operated on in less than 1 year after birth regardless of surgical procedures. These results suggest that early craniofacial surgery is necessary for an infant to attain complete normalization of the craniofacial dysmorphology of anterior plagiocephaly in spite of operative methods. (author)

  13. Posterior cranial fossa single-hole arteriovenous fistulae in children: 14 consecutive cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Y.; Weon, Y.C.; Sachet, M.; Mahadevan, J.; Alvarez, H.; Rodesch, G.; Lasjaunias, P. [Service de Neuroradiologie Diagnostique et Therapeutique, CHU de Bicetre, 78 rue du General Leclerc, 94275, Le Kremlin Bicetre (France)

    2004-06-01

    We report 14 consecutive children with 23 posterior cranial fossa arteriovenous fistula (AVF); six had multifocal lesions, involving the supratentorial brain in three and the spinal cord in one. There were two boys and four girls with a family history compatible with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia. The diagnosis was made in infancy in eight cases and in a further six before the age of 12 years; mean age at diagnosis was 3.5 years. The male-to-female ratio was 1.8:1. Presenting features were macrocrania in four cases, haemorrhage or headache in three and nonhaemorrhagic neurological deficits or and cardiac overload in two. Dominant supply to the symptomatic fistula arose from the posterior inferior cerebellar artery in five cases, anterior inferior cerebellar artery in two and the upper basilar artery system in seven. All children were primarily treated by transarterial embolisation. We treated thirteen children (93%) by transarterial embolisation alone; one older child with a history of haemorrhage also underwent radiosurgery. We obtained 100% exclusion of the fistula(e) in six children, 95-80% in five, 80-50% in one and <50% in one. Of the incompletely treated cases, three had conservative management, and two with 80% and one with 60% reduction of their lesion are scheduled for elective treatment; two partially treated case died. There was no morbidity due to the endovascular procedures. Follow-up since referral is 6 months-10 years (mean 4.5 years). Ten children are neurologically normal, two have persistent (pre-existing) neurological deficits and two are dead. (orig.)

  14. Performance-based functional outcome for children 12 years or younger following anterior cruciate ligament injury : a two to nine-year follow-up study.

    OpenAIRE

    Moksnes, Håvard; Engebretsen, Lars; Risberg, May Arna

    2007-01-01

    There is limited scientific knowledge on ACL injuries in children 12 years or younger. Substantial controversy exists on treatment algorithms and there are no published data on performance based functional outcome. Classification of adult ACL injured subjects as copers and non-copers is common, but no study has classified knee function in children using performance based functional test after ACL injury. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the long term functional outcome among...

  15. MRI anatomy of anteriorly displaced anus: what obstructs defecation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AbouZeid, Amr Abdelhamid [Ain-Shams University, Department of Pediatric Surgery, Cairo (Egypt); Mohammad, Shaimaa Abdelsattar; Khairy, Khaled Talaat [Ain-Shams University, Department of Radiodiagnosis, Cairo (Egypt)

    2014-07-15

    Anteriorly displaced anus is an anomaly that is debated with regard to its nomenclature, diagnosis and management. To describe MRI anatomy of the anal canal in children with anteriorly displaced anus and its impact on the process of defecation. We prospectively examined ten children (7 girls, 3 boys; age range 7 months to 8 years, mean 3 years) with anteriorly displaced anus between August 2009 and April 2012. Noncontrast MRI examinations were performed on a 1.5-T magnet. T1- and T2-weighted turbo spin-echo images were acquired in axial, sagittal and coronal planes of the pelvis. The anorectal angle and the relative hiatal distance were measured in mid-sagittal images, and compared with those of a control group using the Mann-Whitney test. In children with anteriorly displaced anus, no anatomical abnormality was depicted at the level of the proximal anal canal. However, the distal anal canal was displaced anteriorly, running out its external muscle cuff, which remained un-displaced at the usual site of the anus. This changes the orientation of the central axis of the anal canal by passing across instead of along the fibers of the longitudinal muscle coat. Children with anteriorly displaced anus had a more obtuse anorectal angle (mean 112.1 ), which was significantly greater than that of the control group (mean 86.2 ). MRI is a valuable tool in studying the anatomy of the anal canal in children with anteriorly displaced anus. The abnormal orientation of the longitudinal muscle across the anal canal can explain the obstructed defecation in these children. Based on this study, it might be of interest to use MRI in studying equivocal cases and children with unexplained constipation. (orig.)

  16. A Rare Case of Cranial Osteomyelitis Caused by Proteus Vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Uslu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Osteomyelitis of the calvarial bones can cause serious complications such as brain abscess, due to the close proximity to adjacent brain structures. Development of the purulent secretion in surgery and traumatic scalp injuries must be considered as a possibility of osteomyelitis possibility. Generally gram positive, rarely gram negative bacteria and mix agents, can be isolated in infection. Especially chronic pyogenic osteomyelitis agents can be isolated from chronic infections such as tuberculosis. In cranial osteomyelitis diagnosis, radiological diagnosis has a very important place together with the clinical diagnosis. However, infection can usually show late findings radiologically. In treatment, antibiotic treatment is absolutely essential as well as removal of the infected part of the bone. Due to antibiotic treatment lasting between 6-12 weeks, organizing the antibiotic protocols according to the results of culture-antibiograms, which were provided from purulent secretions, has the most important role in the success of surgical treatment. In Proteus sp. infections, for choice of suitable treatment, determination of the type of bacteria is important. For exact diagnosis, histopathological examination of the bone tissue must be carried out. In this report, a case with cranial osteomyelitis caused by Proteus vulgaris which is a gram negative bacteria causing anaerobic infections and classified in the Enterobacteriaceae family is presented. The patient was treated with surgery and appropriate antibiotics. Early recognition of this condition, planning the best treatment strategy and taking precautions to prevent complications, is mandatory for a better outcome.

  17. Biomechanical Dynamics of Cranial Sutures during Simulated Impulsive Loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z Q; Yang, J L

    2015-01-01

    Background. Cranial sutures are deformable joints between the bones of the skull, bridged by collagen fibres. They function to hold the bones of the skull together while allowing for mechanical stress transmission and deformation. Objective. The aim of this study is to investigate how cranial suture morphology, suture material property, and the arrangement of sutural collagen fibres influence the dynamic responses of the suture and surrounding bone under impulsive loads. Methods. An idealized bone-suture-bone complex was analyzed using a two-dimensional finite element model. A uniform impulsive loading was applied to the complex. Outcome variables of von Mises stress and strain energy were evaluated to characterize the sutures' biomechanical behavior. Results. Parametric studies revealed that the suture strain energy and the patterns of Mises stress in both the suture and surrounding bone were strongly dependent on the suture morphologies. Conclusions. It was concluded that the higher order hierarchical suture morphology, lower suture elastic modulus, and the better collagen fiber orientation must benefit the stress attenuation and energy absorption. PMID:27019589

  18. Cranial implant design using augmented reality immersive system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Zhuming; Evenhouse, Ray; Leigh, Jason; Charbel, Fady; Rasmussen, Mary

    2007-01-01

    Software tools that utilize haptics for sculpting precise fitting cranial implants are utilized in an augmented reality immersive system to create a virtual working environment for the modelers. The virtual environment is designed to mimic the traditional working environment as closely as possible, providing more functionality for the users. The implant design process uses patient CT data of a defective area. This volumetric data is displayed in an implant modeling tele-immersive augmented reality system where the modeler can build a patient specific implant that precisely fits the defect. To mimic the traditional sculpting workspace, the implant modeling augmented reality system includes stereo vision, viewer centered perspective, sense of touch, and collaboration. To achieve optimized performance, this system includes a dual-processor PC, fast volume rendering with three-dimensional texture mapping, the fast haptic rendering algorithm, and a multi-threading architecture. The system replaces the expensive and time consuming traditional sculpting steps such as physical sculpting, mold making, and defect stereolithography. This augmented reality system is part of a comprehensive tele-immersive system that includes a conference-room-sized system for tele-immersive small group consultation and an inexpensive, easily deployable networked desktop virtual reality system for surgical consultation, evaluation and collaboration. This system has been used to design patient-specific cranial implants with precise fit. PMID:17377223

  19. Early effects of cranial irradiation on hypothalamic-pituitary function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, K.S.; Tse, V.K.; Wang, C.; Yeung, R.T.; Ma, J.T.; Ho, J.H.

    1987-03-01

    Hypothalamic-pituitary function was studied in 31 patients before and after cranial irradiation for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. The estimated radiotherapy (RT) doses to the hypothalamus and pituitary were 3979 +/- 78 (+/- SD) and 6167 +/- 122 centiGrays, respectively. All patients had normal pituitary function before RT. One year after RT, there was a significant decrease in the integrated serum GH response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia. In the male patients, basal serum FSH significantly increased, while basal serum LH and testosterone did not change. Moreover, in response to LHRH, the integrated FSH response was increased while that of LH was decreased. Such discordant changes in FSH and LH may be explained by a defect in LHRH pulsatile release involving predominantly a decrease in pulse frequency. The peak serum TSH response to TRH became delayed in 28 patients, suggesting a defect in TRH release. Twenty-one patients were reassessed 2 yr after RT. Their mean basal serum T4 and plasma cortisol levels had significantly decreased. Hyperprolactinemia associated with oligomenorrhoea was found in 3 women. Further impairment in the secretion of GH, FSH, LH, TSH, and ACTH had occurred, and 4 patients had hypopituitarism. Thus, progressive impairment in hypothalamic-pituitary function occurs after cranial irradiation and can be demonstrated as early as 1 yr after RT.

  20. Early effects of cranial irradiation on hypothalamic-pituitary function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hypothalamic-pituitary function was studied in 31 patients before and after cranial irradiation for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. The estimated radiotherapy (RT) doses to the hypothalamus and pituitary were 3979 +/- 78 (+/- SD) and 6167 +/- 122 centiGrays, respectively. All patients had normal pituitary function before RT. One year after RT, there was a significant decrease in the integrated serum GH response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia. In the male patients, basal serum FSH significantly increased, while basal serum LH and testosterone did not change. Moreover, in response to LHRH, the integrated FSH response was increased while that of LH was decreased. Such discordant changes in FSH and LH may be explained by a defect in LHRH pulsatile release involving predominantly a decrease in pulse frequency. The peak serum TSH response to TRH became delayed in 28 patients, suggesting a defect in TRH release. Twenty-one patients were reassessed 2 yr after RT. Their mean basal serum T4 and plasma cortisol levels had significantly decreased. Hyperprolactinemia associated with oligomenorrhoea was found in 3 women. Further impairment in the secretion of GH, FSH, LH, TSH, and ACTH had occurred, and 4 patients had hypopituitarism. Thus, progressive impairment in hypothalamic-pituitary function occurs after cranial irradiation and can be demonstrated as early as 1 yr after RT

  1. Idiopathic Hypertrophic Cranial Pachymeningitis Misdiagnosed as Acute Subtentorial Hematoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ik-Seong; Kim, Hoon; Chung, Eun Yong

    2010-01-01

    A case of idiopathic hypertrophic cranial pachymeningitis (IHCP) misdiagnosed as an acute subdural hematoma is reported. A 37-year-old male patient presented with headache following head trauma 2 weeks earlier. Computerized tomography showed a diffuse high-density lesion along the left tentorium and falx cerebri. Initial chest X-rays revealed a small mass in the right upper lobe with right lower pleural thickening, which suggested lung cancer, such as an adenoma or mediastinal metastasis. During conservative treatment under the diagnosis of a subdural hematoma, left cranial nerve palsies were developed (3rd and 6th), followed by scleritis and uveitis involving both eyes. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed an unusual tentorium-falx enhancement on gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted images. Non-specific chronic inflammation of the pachymeninges was noticed on histopathologic examination following an open biopsy. Systemic steroid treatment was initiated, resulting in dramatic improvement of symptoms. A follow-up brain MRI showed total resolution of the lesion 2 months after steroid treatment. IHCP should be included in the differential diagnosis of subtentorial-enhancing lesions. PMID:20856672

  2. Phenytoin Induced Erythema Multiforme after Cranial Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazanci, Atilla; Tekkök, İsmail Hakkı

    2015-08-01

    The prophylactic use of phenytoin during and after brain surgery and cranial irradiation is a common measure in brain tumor therapy. Phenytoin has been associated with variety of adverse skin reactions including urticaria, erythroderma, erythema multiforme (EM), Stevens-Johnson syndrome, and toxic epidermal necrolysis. EM associated with phenytoin and cranial radiation therapy (EMPACT) is a rare specific entity among patients with brain tumors receiving radiation therapy while on prophylactic anti-convulsive therapy. Herein we report a 41-year-old female patient with left temporal glial tumor who underwent surgery and then received whole brain radiation therapy and chemotherapy. After 24 days of continous prophylactic phenytoin therapy the patient developed minor skin reactions and 2 days later the patient returned with generalized erythamatous and itchy maculopapuler rash involving neck, chest, face, trunk, extremities. There was significant periorbital and perioral edema. Painful mucosal lesions consisting of oral and platal erosions also occurred and prevented oral intake significantly. Phenytoin was discontinued gradually. Systemic admistration of corticosteroids combined with topical usage of steroids for oral lesions resulted in complete resolution of eruptions in 3 weeks. All cutaneous lesions in patients with phenytoin usage with the radiotherapy must be evoluated with suspicion for EM. PMID:26361537

  3. The evolution of cranial form in mid-Pleistocene Homo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Philip Rightmire

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Interactions of the brain and cranium in archaic populations remain poorly understood. Hominin fossils from Middle Pleistocene localities in Africa and Europe have been allocated to one or more species distinct from Homo erectus, the Neanderthals and modern humans, based on the assumption that characters of the vault and face are developmentally independent. However, it is possible that increased frontal width, parietal lengthening, midvault expansion and occipital rounding all reflect encephalisation occurring within the H. erectus lineage. If specimens from Broken Hill and Elandsfontein (in southern Africa and Sima de los Huesos and Petralona (in Europe differ from H. erectus only in brain volume, then it will be difficult to distinguish and diagnose Homo rhodesiensis or Homo heidelbergensis adequately. In this study, correlation analysis showed that the brain fails to influence vault breadth within either H. erectus or the mid-Pleistocene sample. Instead, the (large cranial base has a major effect on width. Variation in brain volume is not associated with frontal flattening. In H. erectus and in individuals such as Bodo and Petralona, the massive face seems to override the brain as a determinant of frontal curvature. Small H. erectus crania have rounded occipitals, whilst larger individuals show greater flexion. Later hominins do not follow this trend, and encephalisation cannot explain the occipital rounding that is present. Few of the vault characters considered diagnostic for the mid-Pleistocene fossils can be attributed to increasing brain volume. The situation is complex, as of course the brain must influence some traits indirectly. The cranial base is also an instrument of change. Discriminant analysis identified basicranial breadth as critical to distinguishing individuals such as Broken Hill, Sima de los Huesos and Petralona from H. erectus.

  4. MULTIPLE MYELOMA PRESENTING AS THIRD CRANIAL NERVE PALSY: A RARE CASE REPORT

    OpenAIRE

    Lohit Kumar; Chayanika; Pabitra Kumar; Umesh

    2015-01-01

    Compression of cranial nerves (CNs) by an intracranial plasmacytoma is considered to be an unusual presentation of multiple myeloma (MM). Here, we report a case of right 3 rd cranial nerve involvement as an initial presentation, which emphasizes the fact that third CN palsy can be the first presenting feature of Multiple Myeloma (MM).

  5. Multi cranial nerve palsies as the presenting features of prostate carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Cranial nerve palsies have previously been reported in metastatic prostate carcinoma, usually occurring late in the course of the disease. We describe the case of a 55-year-old man whose diagnosis of prostate cancer was made following investigation of multiple cranial nerve palsies.

  6. Thickness of the human cranial diploe in relation to age, sex and general body build

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynnerup, Niels; Astrup, Jacob G; Sejrsen, Birgitte

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Earlier studies have addressed the human total cranial vault thickness and generally found no correlation with sex, age or body weight. However, the thickness of the diploe has not been investigated. Our study has determined the diploeic thickness of the human cranial vault using modern...

  7. Cranial thickness in relation to age, sex and general body build in a Danish forensic sample

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynnerup, N

    2001-01-01

    thickness and these parameters. This study, thus, adds to other studies showing that cranial thickness cannot be used in aging or sexing human remains. Likewise, in a forensic pathological setting, cranial thickness cannot be inferred from the individuals stature and build, which may be an issue in cases of...

  8. The name cranial ovarian suspensory ligaments in mammalian anatomy should be used only to indicate the structures derived from the foetal cranial mesonephric and gonadal ligaments

    OpenAIRE

    Van Der Schoot, P.

    1993-01-01

    textabstractThe term ovarian suspensory ligament appears ambiguous when human adult anatomy textbooks are compared with human embryology or with general mammalian anatomy textbooks. The term ovarian suspensory ligament in laboratory rodents and domestic animals indicates homologous structures during foetal (the cranial mesonephric and gonadal ligaments) and later life (the cranial mesonephric ligament derivatives). In human foetal anatomy textbooks ovarian suspensory ligament is generally app...

  9. Positional changes of the lower and upper anterior teeth after surgical correction of mandibular prognathism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukadinović Miroslav

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. To establish the influence of surgical corrections of mandibular prognathism upon the position of the lower and upper anterior teeth (incisors. Methods. The changes in position of the lower and upper anterior teeth (incisors after the surgical correction of mandibular prognathism were analyzed by means of x-ray craniometry in 183 patients (female: n = 110, male: n = 73 in which the correction had been made in accordance with the principles of sagital osteotomy of the mandibular ramus. There were 4 angular and 2 linear parameters determined in the pre- and postoperative tele-xray-pictures. The changes of these parameters were tested by means of the parametric statistic tests. Results. The performed surgical procedures did not cause statistically significant changes in the angular parameters. The changes of both linear parameters were thought highly statistically significant. Conclusion. Under the influence of the performed surgical procedures no changes were found in the position of anterior teeth (incisors in relation to SN and the mandibular plane. They were actually moved along with the medium fragment of the lower jaw and that fragment was moved linearly backwards along the occlusal plane with a practically insignificant rotation in the cranial direction.

  10. Effect of Control-released Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor Incorporated in β-Tricalcium Phosphate for Murine Cranial Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azusa Shimizu, MD

    2014-03-01

    Conclusions: These findings suggest that control-released bFGF incorporated in β-TCP can accelerate bone regeneration in the murine cranial defect model and may be promising for the clinical treatment of cranial defects.

  11. Endovascular Management of Extra-cranial Supra-aortic Vascular Injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almazedi, Bahir, E-mail: b.almazedi@doctors.org.uk; Lyall, Harpreet; Bhatnagar, Priya [Leeds and West Yorkshire Radiology Academy, Leeds General Infirmary (United Kingdom); Kessel, David; McPherson, Simon; Patel, Jai V.; Puppala, Sapna [The Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds General Infirmary, Department of Vascular and Interventional Radiology (United Kingdom)

    2013-02-08

    Supra-aortic vessel injuries are uncommon but can be life-threatening and surgically challenging. Trauma to these vessels may be blunt or penetrating, including iatrogenic trauma following the insertion of central venous lines, which may be preventable. Recent advances in technology have resulted in endovascular therapy becoming a common first-line treatment, and interventional radiologists now play a major role in the management of these vascular injuries. We review the literature on the endovascular management of these types of injuries and describe a spectrum of case-based extra-cranial supra-aortic vascular injuries managed at our institution and the range of imaging appearances, including active contrast extravasation, traumatic vessel occlusion, true aneurysms, pseudoaneurysms, and arteriovenous fistulae.

  12. Acute necrosis after Gamma Knife surgery in vestibular schwannoma leading to multiple cranial nerve palsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapitza, Sandra; Pangalu, Athina; Horstmann, Gerhard A; van Eck, Albert T; Regli, Luca; Tarnutzer, Alexander A

    2016-08-01

    We discuss a rare acute complication after Gamma Knife therapy (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) in a single patient. A 52-year-old woman presented with vertigo, facial weakness and hearing loss emerging 48hours following Gamma Knife radiosurgery for a right-sided vestibular schwannoma. Neurological examination 6days after symptom onset showed right-sided facial palsy, spontaneous left-beating nystagmus and pathologic head-impulse testing to the right. Pure-tone audiogram revealed right-sided sensorineural hearing loss. A diagnosis of acute vestibulocochlear and facial neuropathy was made. Brain MRI demonstrated focal contrast sparing within the schwannoma, likely related to acute radiation necrosis. Acute multiple cranial neuropathies of the cerebellopontine angle after Gamma Knife treatment should raise suspicion of acute tissue damage within the schwannoma and should result in urgent MRI. Treatment with steroids may be considered based on accompanying swelling and edema. PMID:26947104

  13. A STUDY OF TUMOURS OF THE CRANIAL NERVE AND PARASPINAL NERVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudesh Shetty

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION One of the frequent sites of tumour formation is the cranial nerves and paraspinal nerves. The cranial nerves perform a plethora of functions and so the signs and symptoms caused may be different. They are mainly classified into four different types. The aim of the study is: 1. To study the tumours arising from the cranial nerves in an epidemiological point of view. 2. To study the tumours histopathologically. 3. To classify the tumours according to WHO classification. Thirty-eight brain tumor cases were studied in the Department of Medicine, A. J. Shetty Institute of Medical Sciences, Mangalore. Cranial nerve tumours accounts for 4(10% among the intracranial tumours. Schwannomas makes up 3(7.39% among the Intracranial tumours. and constituted 3(75% among cranial nerve tumours. All the 3 schwannomas were located in CP angle. The geographic distribution of cases was found to be 28 cases from Mangalore and 10 cases from Kerala.

  14. Anatomic and pathologic features of third cranial nerve disorders according to magnetic resonance studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this report is to demonstrate the utility of magnetic resonance (MR) in the diagnosis of disorders involving the third cranial nerves. We have selected MR studies corresponding to patients with an anomaly affecting the third cranial nerves, whether alone or in combination with other cranial nerves. In order to better study the pathology of these cranial nerves, we considered four different segments of the nerves: mesencephalic, cisternal, cavernous and orbital. We present the MR features of the anatomy of the third cranial nerves and the most representative lesions affecting the different intracranial segments: infraction, multiple sclerosis, glioma and cavernoma in the mesencephalon; posterior communicating artery aneurysm, neuritis, neurinomas and meningioma in the cisternal segment; aneurysm of the internal carotid artery, cavernous carotid fistula, metastasis and meningioma in the cavernous sinus and Tolosa-Hunt syndrome in the orbital apex. (Author) 11 refs

  15. Physiologic properties of contraction of the canine cremaster and cranial preputial muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurgeon, T L; Kitchell, R L; Lohse, C L

    1978-12-01

    Contraction properties of the cremaster and the cranial preputial muscles of 11 mature intact male dogs were investigated. Isometric recordings of muscle contractile tension were performed in situ. Muscle contractions were elicited by stimulating the severed motor nerves. Contraction times of 73.8 ms and 103.2 ms were obtained for the cremaster and the cranial preputial muslces, respectively. Application of repetitive stiumuli produced summation of contractions at low stimulus frequencies. Apparent tetanic fusion and maximum tetanic tension were also observed at relatively low stimulus frequencies, 30 Hz for the cremaster muscle and 28 Hz for the cranial preputial muscle. Optimum length for the cremaster muscle was coincident with its observed in situ resting length (+/- 5 mm), but the optimum length for the cranial preputial muslce deviated by some 20 to 25 mm above the resting length. Possible artifactual errors regarding the cranial preputial muslce's length-tension relationship are discussed. PMID:749569

  16. Significance of high-intensity signals on cranial MRI T2 weighted image in diagnosis of age-associated dementia. From a viewpoint of reversibility of brain function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was undertaken to determine whether changes of EEG band profile in patients showing high-intensity signal (HIS) on cranial magnetic resonance images (MRI), who had however no vascular lesions on cranial CT, were similar to those in multi-infarct dementia (MID) or senile dementia of Alzheimer type (SDAT) patients and to determine the significance of HIS in the diagnosis of SDAT. Forty-two patients with dementia diagnosed according to DSM-III-R were divided into HIS (n=21), MID (n=13), and SDAT (n=8) based on CT and MRI findings. Multi-infarcted lesions were seen on cranial CT and HIS was seen on cranial MRI in MID patients. There were no abnormal lesions except brain atrophy on cranial CT and MRI in SDAT patients. Appearance rates (%) of the 2-18 c/s frequency bands using computerized quantitative EEG before and after administration of protirelin tartrate (TRH-T) were analyzed in the frontal, central, parietal and occipital areas of the brain. There were no significant differences in appearance rates of EEG frequency bands before administration of TRH-T in HIS, MID, and SDAT patients. A significant decrease in appearance rates of slow waves and a significant increase in appearance rates of α waves were observed after administration of TRH-T in the four areas in MID patients compared with those before administration. No significant differences in appearance rates of EEG frequency bands were observed after administration of TRH-T in the four areas in HIS and SDAT patients compared with those before administration. Changes of the EEG band profile in HIS patients were similar to those in SDAT patients. In the presence of appearance of HSI on cranial MRI T2 weighted images, the possibility of SDAT patients cannot be excluded. Therefore, SDAT should be diagnosed based on both clinical data and the absence of brain vascular lesions on cranial CT. Also, HIS on MRI T2-weighted images is considered to reflect non-vascular lesions. (J.N.P.)

  17. Absence of scalenus anterior muscle.

    OpenAIRE

    Murakami S; Horiuchi K; Yamamoto C; Ohtsuka A; Murakami T.

    2003-01-01

    A rare anomaly of the scalenus muscles is described. In this case, the right scalenus anterior muscle was absent. As a substitute for this muscle, some aberrant muscle slips arose from the lower vertebrae and descended in front of the ventral rami of the lower cervical nerves. These aberrant slips then ran between the ventral rami of the the eighth cervical and first thoracic nerves, and were fused with the right scalenus medius muscle. Thus, the subclavian artery and vein ran in front of the...

  18. Lesiones del ligamento cruzado anterior

    OpenAIRE

    Alejandro Álvarez López; Yenima García Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Fundamento: el ligamento cruzado anterior desempeña un papel muy importante en la estabili-dad de la rodilla. La incidencia de esta afección es alta en pacientes que practican deportes de contacto y de no ser tratados de forma adecuada, los resultados son desfavorables. Objetivo: profundizar en los factores necesarios para el tratamiento adecuado de enfermos con esta lesión y evitar las complicaciones. Método: se realizó una revisión bibliográfica de un total de 300 artículos publicados en Pu...

  19. Descriptive epidemiology of primary tumors of the brain, cranial nerves and cranial meninges in Los Angeles County.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston-Martin, S

    1989-01-01

    This report presents data on the distribution of 8,612 cases of primary tumors of the brain, cranial nerves and cranial meninges (both benign and malignant) diagnosed among residents of Los Angeles County from 1972 to 1985. Incidence rates of gliomas, meningiomas, nerve sheath tumors and all histologic types combined are presented for specific age, sex and ethnic groups. At all ages, the highest incidence is seen for gliomas among men. Meningioma rates are higher among women than men in every ethnic group. In both sexes, glioma rates are highest among whites, and meningioma rates are highest among blacks. Asians have the lowest rates of both types of tumors. Proportional incidence ratios are elevated among those born in Eastern Europe, Southern Europe and the Middle East and among Jewish residents of Los Angeles County. A clear trend of increasing glioma incidence with increasing social class is seen among males. An analysis among white men aged 25-64 by occupation and industry at the time of diagnosis supports several previously published findings. A glioma excess is evident among workers in the aircraft industry. Workers in the petroleum industry and the rubber and plastics industry have an excess of meningiomas. Occupational groups at excess risk include dentists who have an increased risk of all types of brain tumors and electricians whose excess risk is limited to gliomas. PMID:2586698

  20. Potential Involvement of Draxin in the Axonal Projection of Cranial Nerves, Especially Cranial Nerve X, in the Chick Hindbrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sanbing; Cui, Huixian; Wang, Lei; Kang, Lin; Huang, Guannan; Du, Juan; Li, Sha; Tanaka, Hideaki; Su, Yuhong

    2016-07-01

    The appropriate projection of axons within the nervous system is a crucial component of the establishment of neural circuitry. Draxin is a repulsive axon guidance protein. Draxin has important functions in the guidance of three commissures in the central nervous system and in the migration of neural crest cells and dI3 interneurons in the chick spinal cord. Here, we report that the distribution of the draxin protein and the location of 23C10-positive areas have a strong temporal and spatial correlation. The overexpression of draxin, especially transmembrane draxin, caused 23C10-positive axon bundles to misproject in the dorsal hindbrain. In addition, the overexpression of transmembrane draxin caused abnormal formation of the ganglion crest of the IX and X cranial nerves, misprojection of some anti-human natural killer-1 (HNK-1)-stained structures in the dorsal roof of the hindbrain, and a simultaneous reduction in the efferent nerves of some motoneuron axons inside the hindbrain. Our data reveal that draxin might be involved in the fascicular projection of cranial nerves in the hindbrain. PMID:27199282

  1. Anterior celiac plexus block for interventional biliary procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports temporary celiac ganglion block for pain relief during biliary procedures performed without complication in 65 patients. The block was given from an anterior approach, with 30 mL of bupivacaine injected over the right T-12 pedicle. Fluoroscopy was used to guide the needle 2 cm anterior to the spine. Patients were assigned to one of three groups based on degree of anesthesia. In group 1, there was no benefit (20%); in group 2, moderate regional anesthesia (22%); and in group 3, excellent anesthesia (58%). The procedure may be performed at the start of or any time during the examination and provides satisfactory regional anesthesia in 80% of patients

  2. Palpation for muscular tenderness in the anterior chest wall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik Wulff; Vach, Werner; Manniche, Claus; Haghfelt, Torben; Hartvigsen, Lisbeth; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To asses the interobserver and intraobserver reliability (in terms of day-to-day and hour-to-hour reliability) of palpation for muscular tenderness in the anterior chest wall. DESIGN: A repeated measures designs was used. SETTING: Department of Nuclear Medicine, Odense University...... Hospital, Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: Two experienced chiropractors examined 29 patients and 27 subjects in the interobserver part, and 1 of the 2 chiropractors examined 14 patients and 15 subjects in the intraobserver studies. INTERVENTION: Palpation for muscular tenderness was done in 14 predetermined areas...... of the anterior chest wall with all subjects sitting. Each dimension was rated as absent or present for tenderness or pain for each location. All examinations were carried out according to a standard written procedure. RESULTS: Based on a pooled analysis of data from palpation of the anterior chest...

  3. A 3-year review of cranial nerve palsies from the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital Eye Clinic, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinyere Nnenne Pedro-Egbe

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: This is the first study in the literature on ocular cranial nerve palsies in Southern Nigeria. Third and sixth cranial nerve palsies were the most common cases to present to the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital Eye Clinic. There was a statistically significant association to systemic disorders such as hypertension and DM and majority of cases with 6 th cranial nerve palsy.

  4. A dosimetric evaluation of the Eclipse AAA algorithm and Millennium 120 MLC for cranial intensity-modulated radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvo Ortega, Juan Francisco, E-mail: jfcdrr@yahoo.es; Moragues, Sandra; Pozo, Miquel; José, Sol San; Puertas, Enrique; Fernández, Jaime; Casals, Joan

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the accuracy of a convolution-based algorithm (anisotropic analytical algorithm [AAA]) implemented in the Eclipse planning system for intensity-modulated radiosurgery (IMRS) planning of small cranial targets by using a 5-mm leaf-width multileaf collimator (MLC). Overall, 24 patient-based IMRS plans for cranial lesions of variable size (0.3 to 15.1 cc) were planned (Eclipse, AAA, version 10.0.28) using fixed field-based IMRS produced by a Varian linear accelerator equipped with a 120 MLC (5-mm width on central leaves). Plan accuracy was evaluated according to phantom-based measurements performed with radiochromic film (EBT2, ISP, Wayne, NJ). Film 2D dose distributions were performed with the FilmQA Pro software (version 2011, Ashland, OH) by using the triple-channel dosimetry method. Comparison between computed and measured 2D dose distributions was performed using the gamma method (3%/1 mm). Performance of the MLC was checked by inspection of the DynaLog files created by the linear accelerator during the delivery of each dynamic field. The absolute difference between the calculated and measured isocenter doses for all the IMRS plans was 2.5% ± 2.1%. The gamma evaluation method resulted in high average passing rates of 98.9% ± 1.4% (red channel) and 98.9% ± 1.5% (blue and green channels). DynaLog file analysis revealed a maximum root mean square error of 0.46 mm. According to our results, we conclude that the Eclipse/AAA algorithm provides accurate cranial IMRS dose distributions that may be accurately delivered by a Varian linac equipped with a Millennium 120 MLC.

  5. A dosimetric evaluation of the Eclipse AAA algorithm and Millennium 120 MLC for cranial intensity-modulated radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to assess the accuracy of a convolution-based algorithm (anisotropic analytical algorithm [AAA]) implemented in the Eclipse planning system for intensity-modulated radiosurgery (IMRS) planning of small cranial targets by using a 5-mm leaf-width multileaf collimator (MLC). Overall, 24 patient-based IMRS plans for cranial lesions of variable size (0.3 to 15.1 cc) were planned (Eclipse, AAA, version 10.0.28) using fixed field-based IMRS produced by a Varian linear accelerator equipped with a 120 MLC (5-mm width on central leaves). Plan accuracy was evaluated according to phantom-based measurements performed with radiochromic film (EBT2, ISP, Wayne, NJ). Film 2D dose distributions were performed with the FilmQA Pro software (version 2011, Ashland, OH) by using the triple-channel dosimetry method. Comparison between computed and measured 2D dose distributions was performed using the gamma method (3%/1 mm). Performance of the MLC was checked by inspection of the DynaLog files created by the linear accelerator during the delivery of each dynamic field. The absolute difference between the calculated and measured isocenter doses for all the IMRS plans was 2.5% ± 2.1%. The gamma evaluation method resulted in high average passing rates of 98.9% ± 1.4% (red channel) and 98.9% ± 1.5% (blue and green channels). DynaLog file analysis revealed a maximum root mean square error of 0.46 mm. According to our results, we conclude that the Eclipse/AAA algorithm provides accurate cranial IMRS dose distributions that may be accurately delivered by a Varian linac equipped with a Millennium 120 MLC

  6. Anterior chest wall examination reviewed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Trotta

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Anterior chest wall involvement is not infrequently observed within inflammatory arthropaties, particularly if one considers seronegative spondiloarthritides and SAPHO syndrome. Physical examination is unreliable and conventional X-rays analysis is an unsatisfactory tool during diagnostic work-up of this region. Scintigraphic techniques yield informations both on the activity and on the anatomical extent of the disease while computerized tomography visualize the elementary lesions, such as erosions, which characterize the process. Moreover, when available, magnetic resonance imaging couple the ability to finely visualize such lesions with the possibility to show early alterations and to characterize the “activity” of the disease, presenting itself as a powerful tool both for diagnosis and follow-up. This review briefly shows the applications of imaging techniques for the evaluation of the anterior chest wall focusing on what has been done in the SAPHO syndrome which can be considered prototypical for this regional involvement since it is the osteo-articular target mainly affected by the disease.

  7. Dolor anterior de la rodilla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Álvarez López

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introducción:el dolor anterior de la rodilla constituye una importante causa de consulta en la especialidad de Ortopedia y Traumatología. La incidencia de otras enfermedades relacionadas con este síntoma es cada vez mayor, ejemplo de ello es la condromalacia de rótula, tendinitis patelar, osteoartritis patelofemoral entre otras, el diagnóstico de estas enfermedades se debe al cúmulo de experiencia y a la introducción de técnicas y equipos imagenológicos de avanzada. Desarrollo: se realizó una revisión bibliográfica sobre el dolor anterior de la rodilla, con especial énfasis en las teorías involucradas en su fisiopatología, entre las que se encuentran la mala-alineación patelo-femoral, equilibrio de la homeostasis tisular y aumento de la presión intra-ósea, además de brindar brevemente el cuadro clínico de la enfermedad. Para finalizar se expone el enfoque terapéutico que se basa fundamentalmente en el tratamiento conservador, se mencionan además las modalidades de tratamiento quirúrgico.

  8. Mechanisms of anterior cruciate ligament injury in basketball - Video analysis of 39 cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krosshaug, Tron; Nakamae, Atsuo; Boden, Barry P.; Engebretsen, Lars; Smith, Gerald; Slauterbeck, James R.; Hewett, Timothy E.; Bahr, Roald

    2007-01-01

    Background: The mechanisms of anterior cruciate ligament injury in basketball are not well defined. Purpose: To describe the mechanisms of anterior cruciate ligament injury in basketball based on videos of injury situations. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Six international

  9. Positioning of anterior teeth in removable dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strajnić Ljiljana

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The aim of this paper was to present methods of placement of artificial anterior teeth in edentulous individuals. The following review takes account of the majority of papers published during the last 100 years. The review has been divided into sections regarding the method used to determine the position of artificial anterior teeth. Geometric aspect Gysi (1895-1920 produced the first scientific theory about the position of artificial anterior teeth. Physiognomic theory The aim of this theory is to find the most natural position for artificial anterior teeth for each individual. Camper's "face angle" as a physiognomic criterion, has been introduced in papers of Wehrli (1961, Marxhors (1966, Tanzer (1968, Lombardi (1973. Esthetic aspect Important names in the field of dental esthetics are: Schön and Singer (1961, Arnheim (1965, Krajiček (1969, Tanzer (1968, Lombardi (1973, Goldstein (1976. They have introduced principles of visual aspects for selection of contours, dimension and position of artificial anterior teeth. Constitution aspect Flagg (1880, Williams (1913 and Hrauf (1957, 1958, have considered body constitution and individual characteristics regarding position of artificial anterior teeth. Physiological theory In 1971, Marxhors pointed to the fact that the position of artificial teeth corresponds with the function of the surrounding soft tissue and from the aspect of physiognomy as well. Phonetic aspect According to Silverman (1962 artificial anterior teeth are nearest when we pronounce the sound "S". Cephalometrical research Rayson (1970, Watson (1989, Strajnić Lj. (1999, Bassi F. (2001 have presented cephalometric radiographic analyses of natural anterior teeth compared with cephalometric radiographic analyses of artificial anterior teeth. A review of dental literature shows several factors suggesting modalities which should determine the position of artificial anterior teeth. Numerous methods have been designed for

  10. Pharyngocutaneous fistula after anterior cervical spine surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Sansur, Charles A.; Early, Stephen; Reibel, James; Arlet, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Pharyngocutaneous fistulae are rare complications of anterior spine surgery occurring in less than 0.1% of all anterior surgery cases. We report a case of a 19 year old female who sustained a C6 burst fracture with complete quadriplegia. She was treated urgently with a C6 corpectomy with anterior cage and plating followed by posterior cervical stabilization at another institution. Post operatively she developed a pharyngocutaneous fistula that failed to heal despite several attempts of closu...

  11. Far-lateral transcondylar approach for microsurgical trapping of an anterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Justin M; Jusue-Torres, Ignacio; Kim, Jennifer E; Luksik, Andrew; Liauw, Jason; Gottschalk, Allan; Tamargo, Rafael J

    2015-07-01

    Aneurysms of the posterior circulation remain challenging lesions given their proximity to the brainstem and cranial nerves. Many of these aneurysms may best be approached through a retrosigmoid-suboccipital craniectomy with a far-lateral transcondylar extension. In this narrated video illustration, we present the case of a 37-year-old man with an incidentally discovered right-sided anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) aneurysm. Diagnostic studies included CT angiography and cerebral angiography. A suboccipital craniectomy and far-lateral transcondylar extension were performed for microsurgical trapping and excision of the AICA aneurysm. The techniques of the retrosigmoid craniectomy, C-1 laminectomy, condylectomy and microsurgical trapping of the aneurysm are reviewed. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/JiM3CXVwXnk. PMID:26132623

  12. An Isolated Bee Sting Involving Multiple Cranial Nerves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Motamed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hymenoptera stings are self-limiting events or due to allergic reactions. Sometimes envenomation with Hymenoptera can cause rare complications such as acute encephalopathy, peripheral neuritis, acute renal failure, nephrotic syndrome, silent myocardial infarction, rhabdomyolysis, conjunctivitis, corneal infiltration, lens subluxation, and optic neuropathy. The mechanism of peripheral nervous system damage is not clearly known. In our studied case after bee sting on face between the eyebrows with little erythema and  cm in size, bilateral blindness developed and gradually improved. Lateral movement of eyes was restricted with no pain. Involvement of cranial nerves including II, V, and VI was found. With conservative therapy after a year significant improvement has been achieved.

  13. Meningitis tuberculosa: Clinical findings and results of cranial computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guided by 9 own observations between 1977 and 1981, new diagnostic facilities in tuberculous meningitis are discussed. For differentiation from viral meningitis, measurement of CSF lactic acid concentration in addition to that of CSF glucose has proved to be of value in recent years. In accordance with the literature, two cases of this series which were examined for CSF lactic acid concentration showed markedly elevated levels of 8,4 rsp. 10,4 mmol/l. In contrast to this, in viral meningitis usually values of less than 3.5 mmol/l are found. Additionally, the presence of hypochlor- and hyponatremia, which could be demonstrated in 6 of our 9 patients, may raise the suspicion of tuberculous etiology. In the series presented, cranial computed tomography was of greatest diagnostic value, enabling the diagnosis of hydrocephalus internus in 5, and basal arachnoiditis in 2 cases. (orig.)

  14. Wilson's disease clinical correlation with cranial computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cranial computed tomograms of 12 patients with proven Wilson's disease were correlated with clinical disturbances. CT abnormalities occurred only in the eight patients with neurological manifestations. The presence of atrophy and low density lesions of the basal ganglia shown on CT correlated well with clinical signs of extrapyramidal dysfunction. Cerebral atrophy and cerebellar cortical atrophy were only moderately related to the degree of intellectual dysfunction and ataxia, respectively; there were no specific clinical signs in cases with brainstem involvement. Abnormalities may be marked in scans taken within a year of neuropsychiatric symptoms, but the most severly abnormal CT scans occurred in patients with a relatively longer duration of untreated disease. Computed tomography provides the opportunity to follow the response of the abnormalities of the brain to cupruresis and can give some assistance in management. (orig.)

  15. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging of wolfram (DIDMOAD) syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfram syndrome is a rare neurodegenerative disorder characterized by diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy and deafness (DIDMOAD). A wide spectrum of abnormalities of the central nervous system, urinary tract and endocrine glands is also observed. We report cranial MRI findings in a 32-year-old female patient with Wolfram syndrome. In addition to the classical features, including absence of the normal high signal of the neurohypophysis, atrophy of visual pathways, the brainstem, cerebellum and cerebral cortex, we observed bilateral hyperintensity on proton density- and T2- weighted images related to the optic radiations in the periventricular white matter of the temporal and parieto-occipital lobes, which may reflect gliosis pathologically Copyright (2005) Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd

  16. CRANIAL INDEX IN NORTH INDIAN CRANIA (PREDOMINANTLY HARYANAVI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Rathee

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Shape of crania is seen by measuring cranial index in 150 (115 male and 35 female crania. Crania were obtained from the department of Anatomy, Pt. B.D. Sharma PGIMS Rohtak. In males, 91.07 % crania were found dolichocephalic while in females 97.14% crania were dolichocephalic. Few crania were found mesocephalic (6.25% in males and 2.85% in females in both sexes. None of female crania was seen as brachycephalic. Percentage obtained in present study is quite different from any other population studied as most of the crania were dolichocephalic. So it can be used as a tool to identify crania of this region.

  17. Cranial Paget's disease - clinical case of symptomatic secondary basilar impression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A clinical case of 52 years old woman with history of periodic headaches for many years. The headache became more intensive and constant during the last 4-6 months. Instability by walking and stagger occurred as well as weakness in all 4 extremities, difficult swallowing and speech changes. Bulbar, quadripyramidal and archicerebellar symptoms were in hand. Pagets disease was ascertained engaging the skull with secondary basilar impression and compression of the cerebellum and the brain-stem leading to the above described clinical signs. Decompressive median suboccipital craniectomy was performed with laminectomy of C1. Occipital squama was thickened and highly vascularized.. Secondary basilar impression could occur in cranial Pagets disease with clinical symptoms resulting from the compression of the cerebellum and the brain-stem

  18. Motion analysis of artery pulsation in neonatal cranial ultrasonogram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzawa, Masayuki; Kubo, Hiroki; Kitsunezuka, Yoshiki; Yamada, Masayoshi

    1999-05-01

    Using an optical-flow technique, we have quantitatively analyzed tissue motion due to artery pulsation accompanied with blood flow in a neonatal cranial ultrasonogram. The tissue motion vector was successfully calculated at each pixel in a series of echo images (32 frames, 640 X 480 pixels/frame, 8 bits/pixel, 33 ms/frame) taken in the brightness mode by using an ultrasound probe of 5.0 MHz. The optical-flow technique used was a gradient method combined with local optimization for 3 X 3 neighbors. From 2D mappings of tissue motion vectors and their time-sequence variations, it was found that the tissue motion due to artery pulsation revealed periodic to-and-fro motion synchronized with heartbeat (300 - 500 ms), clearly distinguishing from unwanted non-periodic motion due to the sway of neonatal head during diagnosis.

  19. Peripheral doses of cranial pediatric IMRT performed with attenuator blocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents values of peripheral doses measured at six vital points of simulator objects which represent the ages of 2, 5 and 10 years old, submitted to a cranial IMRT procedure that applied compensator blocks interposed to 6 MV beams. The found values indicate that there is independence of dose with position of measurements and age of the patient, as the peripheral dose at the points nearest and the 2 year old simulator object where larger. The doses in thyroid reached the range of 1.4 to 2.9% of the dose prescribed in the isocenter, indicating that the peripheral doses for IMRT that employ compensator blocks can be greater than for the IMRT produced with sliding window technique

  20. Is Gadolinium-DTPA required for routine cranial MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gd-DTPA was administered prospectively to 500 consecutive children and adults referred for routine cranial MR imaging. Blinded readings were performed by two observers, and the results were analyzed in terms of specific criteria to define radio-graphic helpfulness. Gadolinium enhancement of lesions was noted in 99 of 500 cases (19.8%) and was helpful in 74 (15%). In only 15 of 500 cases (3%) did Gd-DTPA permit detection of lesions not also apparent on precontrast images. Lack of contrast enhancement was considered helpful in 112 of 500 cases (22%). Overall, Gd-DTPA administration provided radiographically helpful information in 171 of 500 cases (34%). The cost-effectiveness of administering Gd-DTPA to a nonselected patient population where clinical history is available is analyzed and discussed

  1. Early South Americans Cranial Morphological Variation and the Origin of American Biological Diversity.

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    Mark Hubbe

    Full Text Available Recent South Americans have been described as presenting high regional cranial morphological diversity when compared to other regions of the world. This high diversity is in accordance with linguistic and some of the molecular data currently available for the continent, but the origin of this diversity has not been satisfactorily explained yet. Here we explore if this high morphological variation was already present among early groups in South America, in order to refine our knowledge about the timing and origins of the modern morphological diversity. Between-group (Fst estimates and within-group variances (trace of within-group covariance matrix of the only two early American population samples available to date (Lagoa Santa and Sabana de Bogotá were estimated based on linear craniometric measurements and compared to modern human cranial series representing six regions of the world, including the Americas. The results show that early Americans present moderate within-group diversity, falling well within the range of modern human groups, despite representing almost three thousand years of human occupation. The between-group variance apportionment is very low between early Americans, but is high among recent South American groups, who show values similar to the ones observed on a global scale. Although limited to only two early South American series, these results suggest that the high morphological diversity of native South Americans was not present among the first human groups arriving in the continent and must have originated during the Middle Holocene, possibly due to the arrival of new morphological diversity coming from Asia during the Holocene.

  2. Cost analysis of contrast-enhanced cranial MRI at a German university hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Detailed evaluation and cost analysis of a cranial contrast-enhanced MRI (c-ceMRI) in outpatients, inpatients, patients in an intensive care unit and children under anesthesia. Materials and Methods: Based on a detailed process-oriented model, we calculated the cost of a cranial MRI for the four situations mentioned above. A comprehensive evaluation of the overhead and personnel costs was performed. Results: We performed 5108 MRI examinations on 2 scanners in the year 2008. 2150 examinations (42 %) were identified as c-ceMRI. For inpatients we calculated a total cost of Euro 242.46 per examination with a personnel cost of Euro 81.71 for the radiological department. In outpatients we calculated total costs of Euro 181.97 with radiological personnel costs of Euro 68.67. Patients coming from an intensive care unit were treated by an intensive care team, which resulted in total costs of Euro 416.58 with Euro 283 in costs for radiological personnel (32.8 %). MRI examinations of children under anesthesia resulted in costs of Euro 616.79 for the hospital, of which Euro 285.78 were radiological personnel costs (34.5 %). Conclusion: In this study we evaluated for the first time different radiological scenarios of a c-ceMRI at a university hospital. Considering the present reimbursement situation, all outpatients covered by statutory health insurance resulted in a deficit for the hospital. Particularly high costs for patients in intensive care units as well as for children under anesthesia have to be taken into account and are currently not adequately covered by care providers. (orig.)

  3. Aneurysm of the cranial mesenteric artery as a site of carriage of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Abortusequi in the horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Hidekazu; Hobo, Seiji; Kinoshita, Yuta; Muranaka, Masanori; Ochi, Akihiro; Ueno, Takanori; Oku, Kazuomi; Hariu, Kazuhisa; Katayama, Yoshinari

    2016-07-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Abortusequi is a pathogen restricted to horses. Our investigation targeted 4 draft horses (9-10 months old) kept on a Japanese farm that had suffered an outbreak of S. Abortusequi abortion. The 4 horses were suspected to be carriers of the bacterium owing to their high agglutination titers (≥1:2,560) in tube agglutination testing. The owners' on-farm observations confirmed that the horses had no apparent abnormalities, and S. Abortusequi was not isolated from their blood, rectal swabs, or sternal bone marrow fluid at antemortem investigation. However, at autopsy, all horses displayed the following: suppurative aneurysm of the cranial mesenteric artery with heavy infection with Strongylus vulgaris larvae; heavy intestinal parasitic infection with Gasterophilus intestinalis, Parascaris equorum, Anoplocephala perfoliata, and S. vulgaris; and enlargement of the systemic lymph nodes. In each case, large numbers of S. Abortusequi were isolated from the anterior mesenteric artery thrombus. The thrombus isolates harbored a single virulence plasmid, and the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profiles of the isolates were identical not only to each other but also to those of Japanese enzootic strains of S. Abortusequi. These results reveal that parasitic aneurysms of the cranial mesenteric artery should be considered an important possible site of carriage of S. Abortusequi in horses. The results also suggest high clonality of the isolated serovar in the horse population in Japan. PMID:27271985

  4. Herniation of the anterior lens capsule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira Nolette

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Herniation of the anterior lens capsule is a rare abnormality in which the capsule bulges forward in the pupillary area. This herniation can be mistaken for an anterior lenticonus where both the capsule and the cortex bulge forward. The exact pathology behind this finding is still unclear. We report the clinical, ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM and histopathological findings of a case of herniation of the anterior lens capsule. UBM helped to differentiate this entity from anterior lenticonus. Light microscopy revealed capsular splitting suggestive of capsular delamination and collection of fluid (aqueous in the area of herniation giving it a characteristic appearance.

  5. Neurochemical Evidence of Potential Neurotoxicity After Prophylactic Cranial Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalm, Marie, E-mail: marie.kalm@neuro.gu.se [Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Rehabilitation, Insitute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Abel, Edvard [Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Wasling, Pontus [Department of Physiology, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Nyman, Jan [Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Hietala, Max Albert [Department of Neurology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Bremell, Daniel; Hagberg, Lars [Department of Infectious Diseases, Institute of Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Elam, Mikael [Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Rehabilitation, Insitute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Blennow, Kaj [Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Mölndal (Sweden); Björk-Eriksson, Thomas [Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Zetterberg, Henrik [Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Mölndal (Sweden); UCL Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To examine whether cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for neuroaxonal damage, neuroglial activation, and amyloid β–related processes could characterize the neurochemical response to cranial radiation. Methods and Materials: Before prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) of patients with small cell lung cancer, each patient underwent magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, lumbar puncture, and Mini-Mental State Examination of cognitive function. These examinations were repeated at approximately 3 and 12 months after radiation. Results: The major findings were as follows. (1) Cerebrospinal fluid markers for neuronal and neuroglial injury were elevated during the subacute phase after PCI. Neurofilament and T-tau increased 120% and 50%, respectively, after PCI (P<.05). The same was seen for the neuroglial markers YKL-40 and glial fibrillary acidic protein, which increased 144% and 106%, respectively, after PCI (P<.05). (2) The levels of secreted amyloid precursor protein-α and -β were reduced 44% and 46%, respectively, 3 months after PCI, and the levels continued to decrease as long as 1 year after treatment (P<.05). (3) Mini-Mental State Examination did not reveal any cognitive decline, indicating that a more sensitive test should be used in future studies. Conclusion: In conclusion, we were able to detect radiation therapy–induced changes in several markers reflecting neuronal injury, inflammatory/astroglial activation, and altered amyloid precursor protein/amyloid β metabolism, despite the low number of patients and quite moderate radiation doses (20-30 Gy). These changes are hypothesis generating and could potentially be used to assess the individual risk of developing long-term symptoms of chronic encephalopathy after PCI. This has to be evaluated in large studies with extended clinical follow-up and more detailed neurocognitive assessments.

  6. Neurochemical Evidence of Potential Neurotoxicity After Prophylactic Cranial Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To examine whether cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for neuroaxonal damage, neuroglial activation, and amyloid β–related processes could characterize the neurochemical response to cranial radiation. Methods and Materials: Before prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) of patients with small cell lung cancer, each patient underwent magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, lumbar puncture, and Mini-Mental State Examination of cognitive function. These examinations were repeated at approximately 3 and 12 months after radiation. Results: The major findings were as follows. (1) Cerebrospinal fluid markers for neuronal and neuroglial injury were elevated during the subacute phase after PCI. Neurofilament and T-tau increased 120% and 50%, respectively, after PCI (P<.05). The same was seen for the neuroglial markers YKL-40 and glial fibrillary acidic protein, which increased 144% and 106%, respectively, after PCI (P<.05). (2) The levels of secreted amyloid precursor protein-α and -β were reduced 44% and 46%, respectively, 3 months after PCI, and the levels continued to decrease as long as 1 year after treatment (P<.05). (3) Mini-Mental State Examination did not reveal any cognitive decline, indicating that a more sensitive test should be used in future studies. Conclusion: In conclusion, we were able to detect radiation therapy–induced changes in several markers reflecting neuronal injury, inflammatory/astroglial activation, and altered amyloid precursor protein/amyloid β metabolism, despite the low number of patients and quite moderate radiation doses (20-30 Gy). These changes are hypothesis generating and could potentially be used to assess the individual risk of developing long-term symptoms of chronic encephalopathy after PCI. This has to be evaluated in large studies with extended clinical follow-up and more detailed neurocognitive assessments

  7. Hyperfractionated Low-Dose (21 Gy) Radiotherapy for Cranial Skeletal Metastases in Patients With High-Risk Neuroblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To present a large experience (73 patients) using a standard radiotherapy (RT) protocol to prevent relapse in cranial sites where measurable metastatic neuroblastoma (NB), an adverse prognostic marker, is common. Methods and Materials: High-risk NB patients with measurable cranial disease at diagnosis or residual cranial disease after induction therapy had those sites irradiated with hyperfractionated 21 Gy; a brain-sparing technique was used for an extensive field. The patients were grouped according to the response to systemic therapy. Thus, when irradiated, Group 1 patients were in complete remission and Group 2 patients had primary refractory disease. Follow-up was from the start of cranial RT. Results: At 3 years, the 39 Group 1 patients had a progression-free survival rate of 51%; control of cranial disease was 79%. Two relapses involved irradiated cranial sites. Two other patients relapsed in the irradiated cranial sites 6 and 12 months after a systemic relapse. At 3 years, the 34 Group 2 patients had a progression-free survival rate of 33%; control of cranial disease was 52%. Group 2 included 19 patients who had residual cranial (with or without extracranial) disease. The cranial sites showed major (n = 13), minor (n = 2), or no response (n = 4) to RT. Five patients had progression in the cranial RT field at 10-27 months. Group 2 also included 15 patients who had persistent NB in extracranial, but not cranial, sites. Of these 15 patients, 2 relapsed in the irradiated cranial sites and elsewhere at 8 and 14 months. Cranial RT was well tolerated, with no Grade 2 or greater toxicity. Conclusion: Hyperfractionated 21-Gy cranial RT might help control NB and is feasible without significant toxicity in children.

  8. Access related complications during anterior exposure of the lumbar spine

    OpenAIRE

    Fantini, Gary A; Pawar, Abhijit Y.

    2013-01-01

    The new millennium has witnessed the emergence of minimally invasive, non-posterior based surgery of the lumbar spine, in particular via lateral based methodologies to discectomy and fusion. In contrast, and perhaps for a variety of reasons, anterior motion preservation (non-fusion) technologies are playing a comparatively lesser, though incompletely defined, role at present. Lateral based motion preservation technologies await definition of their eventual role in the armamentarium of minimal...

  9. Perawatan Gigitan Terbalik Anterior Dengan Menggunakan Inclined Plane

    OpenAIRE

    Siregar, Wilda A.

    2008-01-01

    Gigitan terbalik anterior adalah suatu anomali posisi gigi anterior atas yang lebih ke lingual dibandingkan gigi anterior bawah. Anomali gigitan terbalik anterior dapat ditemui pada periode gigi sulung, gigi bercampur, dan gigi permanen. Faktor etiologi gigitan terbalik anterior dibedakan atas dental, fungsional atau skeletal. Untuk menentukan etiologi dari anomali gigitan terbalik anterior perlu dilakukan diagnosa yang tepat. Perawatan gigitan terbalik anterior ini dapat dilakukan de...

  10. Preliminary studies of radiation port in children receiving cranial irradiation for preventing central nervous system (CNS) disease of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For preventing CNS leukemia in children with ALL, simple whole skull irradiation that included only retro-orbital spaces and not anterior part of the cribriform plate and first two cervical vertebrae had been given until March 1982 to patients who had remission after drug therapy. Since March 1982, however, such patients have received new modified cranial irradiation of Pinkel's method of preventive CNS therapy to include the cribriform plate. Pinkel's method usually includes first two cervical vertebrae in radiation port, but sometimes his method of radiation fails to reach the brain and the meninges on the anterior parts of the lamina cribrosa. In this study, a comparison of CNS-relapes ratio between these two methods of preventive CNS therapy was carried out. The frequency of CNS leukemia was remarkably high in patients given the simple whole skull irradiation. Of 18 patients, 7 developed CNS leukemia. Among these 7, 5 patients (71 %) had occurence of CNS-relapse within 1 year 7 months with the other one patient, making a total of 86 %, having CNS-relapse within 1 year 11 months. On the other hand, 17 of 39 patients who received new modified cranial irradiation were followed up for more than 1 year 9 months, and all patient had no CNS-relapse to date. This result showed that the irradiation of whole circulation areas of cerebrospinal fluid of the brain and the spine at first two cervical vertebra levels had great importance in preventing CNS-relapse after achievement of drug-induced remission. (author)

  11. Dysphagia and disrupted cranial nerve development in a mouse model of DiGeorge (22q11 deletion syndrome

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    Beverly A. Karpinski

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We assessed feeding-related developmental anomalies in the LgDel mouse model of chromosome 22q11 deletion syndrome (22q11DS, a common developmental disorder that frequently includes perinatal dysphagia – debilitating feeding, swallowing and nutrition difficulties from birth onward – within its phenotypic spectrum. LgDel pups gain significantly less weight during the first postnatal weeks, and have several signs of respiratory infections due to food aspiration. Most 22q11 genes are expressed in anlagen of craniofacial and brainstem regions critical for feeding and swallowing, and diminished expression in LgDel embryos apparently compromises development of these regions. Palate and jaw anomalies indicate divergent oro-facial morphogenesis. Altered expression and patterning of hindbrain transcriptional regulators, especially those related to retinoic acid (RA signaling, prefigures these disruptions. Subsequently, gene expression, axon growth and sensory ganglion formation in the trigeminal (V, glossopharyngeal (IX or vagus (X cranial nerves (CNs that innervate targets essential for feeding, swallowing and digestion are disrupted. Posterior CN IX and X ganglia anomalies primarily reflect diminished dosage of the 22q11DS candidate gene Tbx1. Genetic modification of RA signaling in LgDel embryos rescues the anterior CN V phenotype and returns expression levels or pattern of RA-sensitive genes to those in wild-type embryos. Thus, diminished 22q11 gene dosage, including but not limited to Tbx1, disrupts oro-facial and CN development by modifying RA-modulated anterior-posterior hindbrain differentiation. These disruptions likely contribute to dysphagia in infants and young children with 22q11DS.

  12. The role of prophylactic cranial irradiation in small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To analyse if prophylactic cranial irradiation is small cell lung cancer for improved survival is indicated; if adjuvant irradiation could cure the microscopic disease; if and how late effects could be minimized. Data from randomized trials and retrospective studies are critically analysed related to the incidence of central nervous system (CNS) metastases in limited disease patients in complete remission with or without prophylactic cranial irradiation. The mechanisms of late effects on CNS of prophylactic cranial irradiation and combined treatment are presented. Prophylactic cranial irradiation could decrease the incidence of CNS metastases but could not improve survival. A subgroup of patients (9 to 14%) most likely to benefit from prophylactic cranial irradiation includes patients who are likely to have an isolated CNS failure. The actual used total dose in the range 30 to 40 Gy could only conditionally decrease the CNS failure. Higher total and/or daily doses and combined treatment are related with potentially devastating neurologic and intellectual disabilities. No prospective randomized trial has demonstrated a significant survival advantage for patients treated with prophylactic cranial irradiation. Prophylactic cranial irradiation is capable of reducing the incidence of cerebral metastases and delays CNS failure. A subgroup of patients most likely to benefit from prophylactic cranial irradiation (9 to 14%) includes patients who are likely to have an isolated CNS failure, but this had yet to be demonstrated. The toxicity of treatment is difficult to be influenced. Prophylactic cranial irradiation should not be given concurrently with chemotherapy, a larger interval after chemotherapy is indicated. The total dose should be in the range 30 to 36 Gy and the daily fraction size not larger than 2 Gy. (orig.)

  13. Absence of scalenus anterior muscle.

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    Murakami S

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available A rare anomaly of the scalenus muscles is described. In this case, the right scalenus anterior muscle was absent. As a substitute for this muscle, some aberrant muscle slips arose from the lower vertebrae and descended in front of the ventral rami of the lower cervical nerves. These aberrant slips then ran between the ventral rami of the the eighth cervical and first thoracic nerves, and were fused with the right scalenus medius muscle. Thus, the subclavian artery and vein ran in front of the aberrant slips, together with the ventral ramus of the first thoracic nerve. The aberrant muscle slips issued 2 accessory bundles. One bundle ran between the ventral rami of the fourth and fifth cervical nerves and was fused with the scalenus medius muscle; the other bundle ran between the ventral rami of the fifth and sixth cervical nerves and was fused with the scalenus medius muscle.

  14. Toxic Anterior Segment Syndrome (TASS

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    Özlem Öner

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Toxic anterior segment syndrome (TASS is a sterile intraocular inflammation caused by noninfectious substances, resulting in extensive toxic damage to the intraocular tissues. Possible etiologic factors of TASS include surgical trauma, bacterial endotoxin, intraocular solutions with inappropriate pH and osmolality, preservatives, denatured ophthalmic viscosurgical devices (OVD, inadequate sterilization, cleaning and rinsing of surgical devices, intraocular lenses, polishing and sterilizing compounds which are related to intraocular lenses. The characteristic signs and symptoms such as blurred vision, corneal edema, hypopyon and nonreactive pupil usually occur 24 hours after the cataract surgery. The differential diagnosis of TASS from infectious endophthalmitis is important. The main treatment for TASS formation is prevention. TASS is a cataract surgery complication that is more commonly seen nowadays. In this article, the possible underlying causes as well as treatment and prevention methods of TASS are summarized. (Turk J Oph thal mol 2011; 41: 407-13

  15. Peripheral doses of cranial pediatric IMRT performed with attenuator blocks; Doses perifericas de IMRT cranial pediatrica realizada com blocos atenuadores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soboll, Danyel Scheidegger; Schitz, Ivette; Schelin, Hugo Reuters, E-mail: soboll@utfpr.edu.b, E-mail: iveteschitz@yahoo.com.b, E-mail: schelin@utfpr.edu.b [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Silva, Ricardo Goulart da, E-mail: ricardo.goulart@ymail.co [Hospital Angelina Caron, Campina Grande do Sul, PR (Brazil); Viamonte, Alfredo, E-mail: aviamonte@inca.gov.b [Instituto Nacional do Cancer (INCa), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-10-26

    This paper presents values of peripheral doses measured at six vital points of simulator objects which represent the ages of 2, 5 and 10 years old, submitted to a cranial IMRT procedure that applied compensator blocks interposed to 6 MV beams. The found values indicate that there is independence of dose with position of measurements and age of the patient, as the peripheral dose at the points nearest and the 2 year old simulator object where larger. The doses in thyroid reached the range of 1.4 to 2.9% of the dose prescribed in the isocenter, indicating that the peripheral doses for IMRT that employ compensator blocks can be greater than for the IMRT produced with sliding window technique

  16. Mild toxic anterior segment syndrome mimicking delayed onset toxic anterior segment syndrome after cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Na Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Toxic anterior segment syndrome (TASS is an acute sterile postoperative anterior segment inflammation that may occur after anterior segment surgery. I report herein a case that developed mild TASS in one eye after bilateral uneventful cataract surgery, which was masked during early postoperative period under steroid eye drop and mimicking delayed onset TASS after switching to weaker steroid eye drop.

  17. Cranial chordomas in infancy and childhood. A report of two cases and review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cranial chordomas are uncommon, accounting for less than 1% of all intracranial neoplasms. Although they are presumed to arise from congenital notochordal remnants, it is rare for these tumors to present in childhood. Only 35 cases of cranial chordomas have been reported in children 16 years of age or younger. We report 2 additional cases of pediatric cranial chordomas. One occurred in a 4 month old infant and to our knowledge represents the earliest age of presentation yet reported. The second case documents the value of MR imaging in delineating the extent of the tumor and defining its relationship to adjacent structures. (orig.)

  18. Development and Growth of the Normal Cranial Vault : An Embryologic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Sung-Won; Kim, Sang-Dae

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the development of a skull deformity requires an understanding of the normal morphogenesis of the cranium. Craniosynostosis is the premature, pathologic ossification of one or more cranial sutures leading to skull deformities. A review of the English medical literature using textbooks and standard search engines was performed to gather information about the prenatal development and growth of the cranial vault of the neurocranium. A process of morphogenic sequencing begins during prenatal development and growth, continues postnatally, and contributes to the basis for the differential manner of growth of cranial vault bones. This improved knowledge might facilitate comprehension of the pathophysiology of craniosynostosis.

  19. Development and Growth of the Normal Cranial Vault : An Embryologic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Sung-Won; Sim, Ki-Bum; Kim, Sang-Dae

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the development of a skull deformity requires an understanding of the normal morphogenesis of the cranium. Craniosynostosis is the premature, pathologic ossification of one or more cranial sutures leading to skull deformities. A review of the English medical literature using textbooks and standard search engines was performed to gather information about the prenatal development and growth of the cranial vault of the neurocranium. A process of morphogenic sequencing begins during prenatal development and growth, continues postnatally, and contributes to the basis for the differential manner of growth of cranial vault bones. This improved knowledge might facilitate comprehension of the pathophysiology of craniosynostosis. PMID:27226848

  20. Vertical tears of the cranial horn of the meniscus and its cranial ligament in the equine femorotibial joint: 7 cases and their treatment by arthroscopic surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Five horses with a vertical tear in the cranial horn and cranial ligament of the medial meniscus and 2 horses with a similar injury in the lateral meniscus were diagnosed from a series of 126 horses which were examined arthroscopically for stifle lameness. All the lesions had similar characteristics. The tear was about 1 cm from the axial border of the meniscus and its ligament and, in all but one case in which it was incomplete, much of the torn tissue was loosely attached in the axial part of the joint from where it was removed. The remaining meniscus, abaxial to the tear, was displaced cranially and abaxially and its torn edges were debrided. Radiographically, 6 cases had proliferative new bone on the cranial aspect of the intercondylar eminence of the tibia and 3 had calcified soft tissue densities in the cranial, medial or lateral femorotibial joint. Following surgery and a 6 month period of rest and controlled exercise, 3 horses returned to full competition work, one was usable for hacking, 2 are convalescing and one is lame after one year. It is postulated that this could be a characteristic meniscal injury in horses which can benefit from arthroscopic surgery. Better techniques for accessing the body and caudal pole of the menisci are needed if a more complete diagnosis and treatment of meniscal injuries are to be achieved

  1. New cranial characters in the tribe Hydropsini (Serpentes: Dipsadidae: Xenodontinae)

    OpenAIRE

    Diego O. Di Pietro; Leandro Alcalde; Williams, Jorge D.

    2014-01-01

    We here describe the skull in four species of the three genera of the tribe Hydropsini (Serpentes: Dipsadidae: Xenodontinae): Helicops infrataeniatus, H. leopardinus, Hydrops caesurus and Pseudoeryx plicatilis. We compare them with several genera of Dipsadidae. We found that the unpaired foramen on the parabasisphenoid with anterior position is the only skull feature shared by all Hydropsini genera. This feature also occurs in semi-aquatic (Erythrolamphrus semiaureus) and fully-aquatic (Faran...

  2. Totally thrombosed giant anterior communicating artery aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V R Roopesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant anterior communicating artery aneurysmsarerare. Apatient presented with visual dysfunction, gait ataxia and urinary incontinence. MRI showed a giant suprasellar mass.At surgery, the lesion was identified as being an aneurysm arising from the anterior communicating artery.The difficulty in preoperative diagnosis and relevant literature are reviewed.

  3. Anterior capsular rupture following blunt ocular injury

    OpenAIRE

    Gremida, Anas; Kassem, Iris; Traish, Aisha

    2011-01-01

    A 10-year-old boy suffered a large, oblique anterior capsular tear following blunt injury to his right eye. The boy was followed daily for hyphema resolution and progressive traumatic cataract formation. After the hyphema had resolved, the lens was removed using an anterior approach and an intraocular lens was placed with excellent visual outcome.

  4. Dentulous Appliance for Upper Anterior Edentulous Span

    OpenAIRE

    Chalakkal, Paul; Devi, Ramisetty Sabitha; Srinivas, G Vijay; Venkataramana, Pammi

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses about a fixed dentulous appliance that was constructed to replace the primary upper anterior edentulous span in a four year old girl. It constituted a design, whereby the maxillary primary second molars were used to support the appliance through bands and a wire that contained an acrylic flange bearing trimmed acrylic teeth, anteriorly. The appliance was functionally and aesthetically compliant.

  5. Anterior cervical hypertrichosis: a sporadic case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostan, Sezen; Yaşar, Şirin; Serdar, Zehra Aşiran; Gizlenti, Sevda

    2016-03-01

    Anterior cervical hypertrichosis is a very rare form of primary localized hypertrichosis. It consists of a tuft of terminal hair on the anterior neck just above the laryngeal prominence. The etiology is still unknown. In this article, we reported a 15-year-old female patient who presented to our clinic with a complaint of hypertrichosis on the anterior aspect of the neck for the last five years. Her past medical history revealed no pathology except for vesicoureteral reflux. On the basis of clinical presentation, our patient was diagnosed with anterior cervical hypertrichosis and she was considered to be a sporadic case due to lack of other similar cases in familial history. To date, 33 patients with anterior cervical hypertrichosis have been reported. Anterior cervical hypertrichosis can be associated with other abnormalities, but it frequently presents as an isolated defect (70%). The association of vesicoureteral reflux and anterior cervical hypertrichosis which was observed in our patient might be coincidental. So far, no case of anterior cervical hypertrichosis associated with vesicoureteral reflux has been reported in the literature. PMID:27103865

  6. New cranial characters in the tribe Hydropsini (Serpentes: Dipsadidae: Xenodontinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego O. Di Pietro

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We here describe the skull in four species of the three genera of the tribe Hydropsini (Serpentes: Dipsadidae: Xenodontinae: Helicops infrataeniatus, H. leopardinus, Hydrops caesurus and Pseudoeryx plicatilis. We compare them with several genera of Dipsadidae. We found that the unpaired foramen on the parabasisphenoid with anterior position is the only skull feature shared by all Hydropsini genera. This feature also occurs in semi-aquatic (Erythrolamphrus semiaureus and fully-aquatic (Farancia abacura dipsadids. All species of Hydrops with available skull descriptions and Pseudoeryx plicatilis share four features: (1 The anterior border of the angular is higher than the posterior border of the splenial, (2 the vomerine processes of the premaxilla are long, (3 the ascending process of the premaxilla overlaps the horizontal lamina of the nasals, and (4 an anterior projection of the prefrontal is present. All species of Helicops with available skull descriptions and Pseudoeryx plicatilis share three features: (1 A vertical lamina of the nasal with a notch, (2 a single foramen rotundum, and (3 the presence of a ventral projection of the transverse crista of the basioccipital. Finally, we found small, paired parietal foramina in most of the dipsadids studied here, which are filled with a Sudan-Black-positive tissue of possible nervous origin.

  7. CT false-profile view of the hip: a reproducible method of measuring anterior acetabular coverage using volume CT data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Needell, Steven D.; Borzykowski, Ross M. [Boca Radiology Group, Boca Raton, FL (United States); Carreira, Dominic S.; Kozy, John [Broward Health Orthopedics and Sports Medicine, Fort Lauderdale, FL (United States)

    2014-11-15

    To devise a simple, reproducible method of using CT data to measure anterior acetabular coverage that results in values analogous to metrics derived from false-profile radiographs. Volume CT images were used to generate simulated false-profile radiographs and cross-sectional false-profile views by angling a multiplanar reformat 115 through the affected acetabulum relative to a line tangential to the posterior margin of the ischial tuberosities. The anterolateral margin of the acetabulum was localized on the CT false-profile view corresponding with the cranial opening of the acetabular roof. Anterior center edge angle (CEA) was measured between a vertical line passing through the center of the femoral head and a line connecting the center of the femoral head with the anterior edge of the condensed line of the acetabulum (sourcil). Anterior CEA values measured on CT false-profile views of 38 symptomatic hips were compared with values obtained on simulated and projection false-profile radiographs. The CT false-profile view produces a cross-sectional image in the same obliquity as false-profile radiographs. Anterior CEA measured on CT false-profile views were statistically similar to values obtained with false-profile radiographs. CT technologists quickly mastered the technique of generating this view. Inter-rater reliability indicated this method to be highly reproducible. The CT false-profile view is simple to generate and anterior CEA measurements derived from it are similar to those obtained using well-positioned false-profile radiographs. Utilization of CT to assess hip geometry enables precise control of pelvic inclination, eliminates projectional errors, and minimizes limitations of image quality inherent to radiography. (orig.)

  8. CT false-profile view of the hip: a reproducible method of measuring anterior acetabular coverage using volume CT data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To devise a simple, reproducible method of using CT data to measure anterior acetabular coverage that results in values analogous to metrics derived from false-profile radiographs. Volume CT images were used to generate simulated false-profile radiographs and cross-sectional false-profile views by angling a multiplanar reformat 115 through the affected acetabulum relative to a line tangential to the posterior margin of the ischial tuberosities. The anterolateral margin of the acetabulum was localized on the CT false-profile view corresponding with the cranial opening of the acetabular roof. Anterior center edge angle (CEA) was measured between a vertical line passing through the center of the femoral head and a line connecting the center of the femoral head with the anterior edge of the condensed line of the acetabulum (sourcil). Anterior CEA values measured on CT false-profile views of 38 symptomatic hips were compared with values obtained on simulated and projection false-profile radiographs. The CT false-profile view produces a cross-sectional image in the same obliquity as false-profile radiographs. Anterior CEA measured on CT false-profile views were statistically similar to values obtained with false-profile radiographs. CT technologists quickly mastered the technique of generating this view. Inter-rater reliability indicated this method to be highly reproducible. The CT false-profile view is simple to generate and anterior CEA measurements derived from it are similar to those obtained using well-positioned false-profile radiographs. Utilization of CT to assess hip geometry enables precise control of pelvic inclination, eliminates projectional errors, and minimizes limitations of image quality inherent to radiography. (orig.)

  9. CT-clinical approach to patients with symptoms related to the V, VII, IX-XII cranial nerves and cervical sympathetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forty-three patients who had signs and symptoms possibly related to the extracranial course of cranial nerves V, VII, IX, X-XII, and the cervical sympathetics were examined prospectively using high resolution CT to obtain images of thin sections during rapid drip infusion of contrast material. Anatomic areas in the scan protocols included the posterior fossa, cavernous and paranasal sinuses, skull base, temporal bone, nasopharynx, parotid gland, tongue base, and neck. Nine of the 23 patients with possible fifth nerve deficits had extracranial structural lesions that explained the symptoms; none of these nine, however, had typical trigeminal neuralgia. Of eight patients with peripheral seventh nerve abnormalities, two had positive findings on scans. Of five patients presenting with referred ear pain, three had carcinoma of the upper aerodigestive tract. The authors' experience suggests that patients at high risk for structural lesions responsible for cranial nerve deficits can be selected by clinical criteria. Protocols for each clinical setting are presented

  10. CT-clinical approach to patients with symptoms related to the V, VII, IX-XII cranial nerves and cervical sympathetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalovidouris, A.; Mancuso, A.A.; Dillon, W.

    1984-06-01

    Forty-three patients who had signs and symptoms possibly related to the extracranial course of cranial nerves V, VII, IX, X-XII, and the cervical sympathetics were examined prospectively using high resolution CT to obtain images of thin sections during rapid drip infusion of contrast material. Anatomic areas in the scan protocols included the posterior fossa, cavernous and paranasal sinuses, skull base, temporal bone, nasopharynx, parotid gland, tongue base, and neck. Nine of the 23 patients with possible fifth nerve deficits had extracranial structural lesions that explained the symptoms; none of these nine, however, had typical trigeminal neuralgia. Of eight patients with peripheral seventh nerve abnormalities, two had positive findings on scans. Of five patients presenting with referred ear pain, three had carcinoma of the upper aerodigestive tract. The authors' experience suggests that patients at high risk for structural lesions responsible for cranial nerve deficits can be selected by clinical criteria. Protocols for each clinical setting are presented.

  11. Follow-up neurological evaluation in patients with small cell lung carcinoma treated with prophylactic cranial irradiation and chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The safety of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) has recently been questioned, based on reports of computerized tomographic abnormalities mainly seen in children, who received PCI and chemotherapy, primarily for acute lymphocytic leukemia. In order to clarify the significance of these findings, we examined a series of adult patients who were long term survivors (18 to 48 months, median 26 months, after all treatment). These patients were treated with combination radiotherapy and chemotherapy for small cell lung carcinoma and received cranial irradiation in the absence of known brain involvement by tumor. Patients were divided into three groups: three patients who received PCI + intrathecal methotrexate (MTX) (Group 1), and ten who received only PCI (Group 2). An additional three patients (Group 3) were identified as long term survivors (41 to 70 months after all treatments) of a similar treatment program without any central nervous system (CNS) prophylaxis. All patients received an extensive evaluation of a variety of clinical parameters, EEG, and computer tomography (CT). Although CT abnormalities were detectable (mild cerebral atrophy in eight patients, encephalomalacia in one of the 13 patients with CNS prophylaxis, and mild atrophy in two of the three patients without CNS prophylaxis), no significant clinical abnormalities or EEG changes were detectable. While this group of patients is small, it is a unique cohort: adults who have received cranial irradiation in the absence of known brain tumor with long term follow-up. The precise role of CNS prophylaxis in the etiology of CT abnormalities is unclear, and the lack of clinically significant changes would suggest no contraindication to PCI when indicated

  12. Anterior Shoulder Instability with Concomitant Superior Labrum from Anterior to Posterior (SLAP) Lesion Compared to Anterior Instability without SLAP Lesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durban, Claire Marie C.; Kim, Je Kyun; Kim, Sae Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Background The aims of this study were to investigate the clinical characteristics of patients with combined anterior instability and superior labrum from anterior to posterior (SLAP) lesions, and to analyze the effect of concomitant SLAP repair on surgical outcomes. Methods We retrospectively reviewed patients who underwent arthroscopic stabilization for anterior shoulder instability between January 2004 and March 2013. A total of 120 patients were available for at least 1-year follow-up. Forty-four patients with reparable concomitant detached SLAP lesions (group I) underwent combined SLAP and anterior stabilization, and 76 patients without SLAP lesions (group II) underwent anterior stabilization alone. Patient characteristics, preoperative and postoperative pain scores, Rowe scores, and shoulder ranges of motion were compared between the 2 groups. Results Patients in group I had higher incidences of high-energy trauma (p = 0.03), worse preoperative pain visual analogue scale (VAS) (p = 0.02), and Rowe scores (p = 0.04). The postoperative pain VAS and Rowe scores improved equally in both groups without significant differences. Limitation in postoperative range of motion was similar between the groups (all p-value > 0.05). Conclusions Anterior instability with SLAP lesion may not be related to frequent episodes of dislocation but rather to a high-energy trauma. SLAP fixation with anterior stabilization procedures did not lead to poor functional outcomes if appropriate surgical techniques were followed. PMID:27247742

  13. Operation for recurrent cystocele with anterior colporrhaphy or non-absorbable mesh: patient reported outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nüssler, Emil Karl; Greisen, Susanne; Kesmodel, Ulrik Schiøler;

    2013-01-01

    Abstract INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: The aim of this study was to compare patient reported outcomes and complications after repair of recurrent anterior vaginal wall prolapse in routine health care settings using standard anterior colporrhaphy or non-absorbable mesh. METHODS: The study is based on...... prospective data from the Swedish National Register for Gynaecological Surgery. 286 women were operated on for recurrent anterior vaginal wall prolapse in 2008-2010; 157 women had an anterior colporrhaphy and 129 were operated on with a non-absorbable mesh. Pre-, and perioperative data were collected from...... were found more often in the mesh group. However, no differences in serious complications were found. Thus, an organ lesion was found in 2.3 % after mesh implant compared with 2.5 % after anterior colporrhaphy (p = 0.58). Two patients in the mesh group (1.2 %) were re-operated compared with 1 patient...

  14. Cranial Reconstruction following the Removal of an Infected Synthetic Dura Mater Substitute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobutaka Yoshioka, MD

    2014-04-01

    Conclusions: Staged cranial reconstruction after the removal of an infected synthetic dura mater substitute using an algorithmic approach is feasible and safe, produces satisfactory cosmetic results, and is not associated with any complications.

  15. Morbidity of cranial relapse in small cell lung cancer and the impact of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirty-nine of 225 patients with small cell lung cancer developed brain metastases after the initiation of chemotherapy. Treatment with high-dose dexamethasone in all 39 patients and cranial irradiation in 32 patients resulted in a complete neurological recovery in only eight of 39 patients (20%). Twenty-one of 39 patients (53%) failed to derive lasting benefit from their palliative treatment. Thirteen of 24 patients with limited disease with cranial relapse had no clinical evidence of other distant metastases prior to death and in these patients the CNS disease was an important cause of morbidity. On the basis of this study, it appears that palliative treatment of overt cranial metastases is relatively unsuccessful and that patients with limited disease represent a group with much to gain from effective prophylactic cranial irradiation

  16. Intracranial volume changes following cranial vault expansion using distraction techniques in craniosynostosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From October 2000 through December 2004, 12 children with craniosynostosis were treated by cranial vault expansion using distraction techniques. Intracranial volumes were calculated from mathematical data of three-dimensional surface reconstruction computed tomographic scans obtained before and after cranial expansion. The intracranial volumes measured before surgery were compared with those after surgery to confirm quantitatively the effect of cranial expansion. These results were compared with those of 27 cases treated previously with conventional craniofacial surgery. Intracranial volumes increased by more than 20% with distraction techniques but increased by less than 10% with conventional craniofacial techniques. This result suggests that cranial vault expansion with distraction techniques is more useful than conventional craniofacial surgery in children with craniosynostosis. (author)

  17. Differential effects of cranial radiation on growth hormone response to arginine and insulin infusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The growth hormone responses to arginine infusion and to insulin-induced hypoglycemia were studied in 13 patients with neoplastic disease after treatment with radiation and chemotherapy. Patients who received intensive cranial radiation (greater than 2,400 rads) had no response to either arginine or insulin; those who received moderate cranial radiation (greater than or equal to 2,400 rads) had GH response to arginine but not to insulin; patients receiving no cranial radiation responded to both arginine and insulin. These data support the hypothesis that GH secretion in response to arginine infusion has a different mechanism in contrast to the response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia and that the latter is more vulnerable to cranial radiation

  18. Malignant otitis externa with bilateral cranial nerve involvement: Report of a unique case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somnath Saha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant otitis externa is an inflammatory condition caused by pseudomonas infection usually in the elderly diabetics, or an immunosuppressive condition that presents with diffuse otitis externa along with excruciating pain and granulations tissue in the external auditory meatus. Facial paralysis is common along with occasional involvement of other cranial nerves. Case report describing a patient of malignant otitis externa who presented to a tertiary referral hospital of eastern India. This patient had ipsilateral facial and tenth cranial nerve paralysis along with delayed-onset contralateral sixth and twelfth cranial nerve palsy. The patient was treated initially with intravenous anti-pseudomonal antibody followed by tympanic platectomy, facial nerve decompression and medialisation thyroplasty. The contralateral cranial nerve palsy was managed conservatively with partial recovery of function. Malignant otitis externa, though a common disease, may occasionally present with uncommon or unexplained presentations. The management of these cases should be prompt and aggressive and specifically address each of the debilitating complications.

  19. Management of brain metastasis with magnetic resonance imaging and stereotactic irradiation attenuated benefits of prophylactic cranial irradiation in patients with limited-stage small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ozawa, Yuichi; Omae, Minako; Fujii, Masato; Matsui, Takashi; KATO, Masato; Sagisaka, Shinya; Asada, Kazuhiro; Karayama, Masato; Shirai, Toshihiro; Yasuda, Kazumasa; Nakamura, Yutaro; Inui, Naoki; Yamada, Kazunari; Yokomura, Koshi; Suda, Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    Background Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enables a more sensitive detection of brain metastasis and stereotactic irradiation (SRI) efficiently controls brain metastasis. In limited-stage small cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC), prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) in patients with good responses to initial treatment is recommended based on the survival benefit shown in previous clinical trials. However, none of these trials evaluated PCI effects using the management of brain metastasis with MRI...

  20. Prognosis of psychomotor and mental development in premature infants by early cranial ultrasound

    OpenAIRE

    Duan, Yang; Sun, Fu-qiang; Li, Yue-Qin; Que, Sheng-shun; Yang, Su-yan; Xu, Wen-jing; Yu, Wen-hong; Chen, Jun-hua; Lu, Ya-jie; Li, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Background It is of high incidence of brain injuries in premature infants, so it is necessary to diagnose and treat the brain injury early for neonatal clinical practice. We are aimed to investigate the relationship between early postnatal cranial ultrasonography and psychomotor and mental development in prematrue infants at the age of 12 months. Methods Two-hundred and eight premature infants were selected and underwent follow-up from January, 2007 to November, 2012. Cranial ultrasonography ...

  1. Pontine extension of a tentorial schwannoma without cranial nerve involvement: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    D'Urso Pietro; Marino Michele; Di Blasi Arturo; Muccio Carmine; De Cillis Pompilio; Catapano Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Intracranial schwannomas unrelated to the cranial nerves are uncommon. We report a new case of tentorial schwannoma unrelated to the cranial nerves, with extension into the pons. A literature review with discussion of the most relevant pathogenetic aspects is also performed. Case presentation A 42-year-old Caucasian man was admitted with right-sided paresthesias and weakness of his upper and lower extremities. The neurological examination revealed right hemiparesis and h...

  2. The Trigeminal (V) and Facial (VII) Cranial Nerves: Head and Face Sensation and Movement

    OpenAIRE

    Sanders, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    There are close functional and anatomical relationships between cranial nerves V and VII in both their sensory and motor divisions. Sensation on the face is innervated by the trigeminal nerves (V) as are the muscles of mastication, but the muscles of facial expression are innervated mainly by the facial nerve (VII) as is the sensation of taste. This article briefly reviews the anatomy of these cranial nerves, disorders of these nerves that are of particular importance to psychiatry, and some ...

  3. Radiation-induced cranial nerve palsy: hypoglossal nerve and vocal cord palsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cranial nerve palsies are an unexpected complication of radiotherapy for head and neck tumours. We present a case of this radiation-induced cranial palsy. An 18-year-old female with nasopharyngeal carcinoma developed a right hypoglossal nerve palsy 42 months after cancericidal doses of radiotherapy. In addition, she developed a bilateral vocal cord palsy 62 months after the therapy. Follow-up over four years has demonstrated no evidence of tumour recurrence and no sign of neurological improvement. (author)

  4. Progressive multiple cranial neuropathies presenting as a delayed complication of radiotherapy in infancy.

    OpenAIRE

    Pall, H S; Nightingale, S; Clough, C G; Spooner, D.

    1988-01-01

    A 38 year old woman who had undergone irradiation during infancy for a left facial cutaneous arteriovenous malformation sequentially developed complete palsies of the ipsilateral VII, V, XI, IX, X, XII and VI cranial nerves. Apart from optic and olfactory nerve damage there are few reports of radiotherapy causing cranial nerve injury. We link the unusually extensive and progressive neural damage and the prolonged latency to the patient's age at time of irradiation.

  5. Traumatic Acute Subdural Hematoma Extending from the Posterior Cranial Fossa to the Cerebellopontine Angle

    OpenAIRE

    Gulsen, Salih; Sonmez, Erkin; Yilmaz, Cem; Altinors, Nur

    2009-01-01

    Posterior cranial fossa subdural hematomas and extension of the subdural hematoma to the cerebellopontine angle is rarely seen and the concurrent development of acute peripheral facial palsy and the management strategy have not previously been reported in this pathology because of its rarity. We present this case to emphasize that minor head trauma may lead to a posterior cranial fossa hematoma extending to the cerebellopontine angle and cause peripheral facial palsy in patients using aspirin...

  6. Multiple Cranial Neuropathies Without Limb Involvements: Guillain-Barre Syndrome Variant?

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Ju Young; Jung, Han Young; Kim, Chang Hwan; Kim, Hyo Sang; Kim, Myeong Ok

    2013-01-01

    Acute multiple cranial neuropathies are considered as variant of Guillain-Barre syndrome, which are immune-mediated diseases triggered by various cases. It is a rare disease which is related to infectious, inflammatory or systemic diseases. According to previous case reports, those affected can exhibit almost bilateral facial nerve palsy, then followed by bulbar dysfunctions (cranial nerves IX and X) accompanied by limb weakness and walking difficulties due to motor and/or sensory dysfunction...

  7. Idiopathic hypertrophic cranial pachymeningitis associated with Sweet's Syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cano, Antonio E-mail: acano@hrs.sas.junta-andalucia.es; Ribes, Ramon; Riva, Andres de la; Rubio, Fernando Lopez; Sanchez, Carmen; Sancho, Jose L

    2002-11-01

    A case of hypertrophic cranial pachymeningitis associated with Sweet's Syndrome is presented. Both entities have been described in association with several other chronic systemic inflammatory diseases and autoimmune conditions. To our knowledge the coexistence between Sweet's Syndrome and hypertrophic cranial pachymeningitis has not been reported up to date. We suggest a possible autoimmune or dysimmune mechanism in the pathogenesis of these two entities.

  8. Ultrasound-guided biopsy as a diagnostic aid in three horses with a cranial mediastinal lymphosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Clercq, D; van Loon, G; Lefère, L; Deprez, P

    2004-06-01

    An ultrasound examination of the thorax of three horses which were performing poorly or had mild signs of colic showed that they had a cranial mediastinal mass and a pleural effusion. A cytological examination of the pleural fluid showed that it did not contain neoplastic cells. A histological examination of an ultrasound-guided core biopsy of the cranial mediastinal mass showed that in each of the three horses it was a lymphosarcoma. PMID:15214516

  9. Functional Deficits of Cranial Nerves in Patients with Jugular Foramen Lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Raquet, F.; Mann, W.; Amedee, R.; Maruer, J.; Gilsbach, J

    1991-01-01

    Lower cranial neuropathies are a leading presenting symptom in patients with tumors involving the jugular foramen. The purpose of this study is to assess acute and chronic functional deficits along with neurologic findings in 31 patients who underwent resection of a tumor involving the jugular foramen. Preoperative nerve dysfunction made intraoperative preservation unlikely, while postoperative lower cranial nerve dysfunction was found to be transient in many patients. Compensation of permane...

  10. A Development of a Human Cranial Bone Surrogate for Impact Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JackCRoberts

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to replicate the fracture behavior of the intact human skull under impact it becomes necessary to develop a material having the mechanical properties of cranial bone. The most important properties to replicate in a surrogate human skull were found to be the fracture toughness and tensile strength of the cranial tables as well as the bending strength of the 3-layer (inner table-diplöe-outer table architecture of the human skull. The materials selected to represent the surrogate cranial tables consisted of two different epoxy resins systems with random milled glass fiber to enhance the strength and stiffness and the materials to represent the surrogate diplöe consisted of three low density foams. Forty-one three-point bending fracture toughness tests were performed on nine material combinations. The materials that best represented the fracture toughness of cranial tables were then selected and formed into tensile samples and tested. These materials were then used with the two surrogate diplöe foam materials to create the three layer surrogate cranial bone samples for three point bending tests. Drop tower tests were performed on flat samples created from these materials and the fracture patterns were very similar to the linear fractures seen in pendulum impacts of intact human skulls. The surrogate cranial tables had the quasi-static fracture toughness and tensile strength of 2.5 MPa√m and 53 ± 4.9 MPa, respectively, while the same properties of human compact bone were 3.1 ± 1.8 MPa√m and 68 ± 18 MPa, respectively. The cranial surrogate had a quasi-static bending strength of 68 ± 5.7 MPa, while that of cranial bone was 82 ± 26 MPa. This material/design is currently being used to construct spherical shell samples for drop tower and ballistic tests.

  11. Imaging the cranial nerves: Part I: Methodology, infectious and inflammatory, traumatic and congenital lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many disease processes manifest either primarily or secondarily by cranial nerve deficits. Neurologists, ENT surgeons, ophthalmologists and maxillo-facial surgeons are often confronted with patients with symptoms and signs of cranial nerve dysfunction. Seeking the cause of this dysfunction is a common indication for imaging. In recent decades we have witnessed an unprecedented improvement in imaging techniques, allowing direct visualization of increasingly small anatomic structures. The emergence of volumetric CT scanners, higher field MR scanners in clinical practice and higher resolution MR sequences has made a tremendous contribution to the development of cranial nerve imaging. The use of surface coils and parallel imaging allows sub-millimetric visualization of nerve branches and volumetric 3D imaging. Both with CT and MR, multiplanar and curved reconstructions can follow the entire course of a cranial nerve or branch, improving tremendously our diagnostic yield of neural pathology. This review article will focus on the contribution of current imaging techniques in the depiction of normal anatomy and on infectious and inflammatory, traumatic and congenital pathology affecting the cranial nerves. A detailed discussion of individual cranial nerves lesions is beyond the scope of this article. (orig.)

  12. Roentgenological investigation of cavernous sinus structure with special reference to paracavernous cranial nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have evaluated the anatomical structure of cavernous sinuses in parasellar blocks obtained from adult cadavers to gain clinically useful information. Ten microdissectional studies of parasellar blocks (20 sides of cavernous sinus) were carried out with special emphasis on the course of paracavernous cranial nerves (3rd to 6th). These were also examined on plain radiographs. Secondly, CT investigations of the cavernous sinuses (notably as to paracavernous cranial nerves) were undertaken in twenty clinical cases having presumed parasellar lesions and in three parasellar blocks from cadavers. The results from microdisectional studies and plain radiographs were as follows. It was found that the 3rd cranial nerve entered the lateral wall of the cavernous sinus close to the antero-inferior part of the posterior clinoid on lateral projection. The 4th cranial nerve, on the other hand, entered near the postero-inferior portion of the posterior clinoid on the same view. Variations in Parkinson's triangle were fairly often noted, although marked asymmetry was not seen in individual cases. From CT findings, it was found that a postenhanced, magnified direct coronal study was essential for identifying paracavernous cranial nerves more clearly. The 3rd and 5th cranial nerves were fairly well identified on axial and coronal projections. Careful radiological investigation including plain skull radiographs and CT seems to be of value for those who diagnose or treat parasellar lesions. (orig.)

  13. Imaging the cranial nerves: part II: primary and secondary neoplastic conditions and neurovascular conflicts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There have been unprecedented improvements in cross-sectional imaging in the last decades. The emergence of volumetric CT, higher field MR scanners and higher resolution MR sequences is largely responsible for the increasing diagnostic yield of imaging in patients presenting with cranial nerve deficits. The introduction of parallel MR imaging in combination with small surface coils allows the depiction of submillimetric nerves and nerve branches, and volumetric CT and MR imaging is able to provide high quality multiplanar and curved reconstructions that can follow the often complex course of cranial nerves. Seeking the cause of a cranial nerve deficit is a common indication for imaging, and it is not uncommon that radiologists are the first specialists to see a patient with a cranial neuropathy. To increase the diagnostic yield of imaging, high-resolution studies with smaller fields of view are required. To keep imaging studies within a reasonable time frame, it is mandatory to tailor the study according to neuro-topographic testing. This review article focuses on the contribution of current imaging techniques in the depiction of primary and secondary neoplastic conditions affecting the cranial nerves as well as on neurovascular conflicts, an increasingly recognized cause of cranial neuralgias. (orig.)

  14. Imaging the cranial nerves: part II: primary and secondary neoplastic conditions and neurovascular conflicts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Alexandra [Instituto Portugues de Oncologia Francisco Gentil- Centro de Lisboa, Radiology Department, Lisboa Codex (Portugal); Casselman, Jan [A. Z. St Jan Brugge and A. Z. St Augustinus Antwerpen Hospitals, Department of Radiology, Antwerp (Belgium)

    2007-09-15

    There have been unprecedented improvements in cross-sectional imaging in the last decades. The emergence of volumetric CT, higher field MR scanners and higher resolution MR sequences is largely responsible for the increasing diagnostic yield of imaging in patients presenting with cranial nerve deficits. The introduction of parallel MR imaging in combination with small surface coils allows the depiction of submillimetric nerves and nerve branches, and volumetric CT and MR imaging is able to provide high quality multiplanar and curved reconstructions that can follow the often complex course of cranial nerves. Seeking the cause of a cranial nerve deficit is a common indication for imaging, and it is not uncommon that radiologists are the first specialists to see a patient with a cranial neuropathy. To increase the diagnostic yield of imaging, high-resolution studies with smaller fields of view are required. To keep imaging studies within a reasonable time frame, it is mandatory to tailor the study according to neuro-topographic testing. This review article focuses on the contribution of current imaging techniques in the depiction of primary and secondary neoplastic conditions affecting the cranial nerves as well as on neurovascular conflicts, an increasingly recognized cause of cranial neuralgias. (orig.)

  15. Imaging the cranial nerves: Part I: Methodology, infectious and inflammatory, traumatic and congenital lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Alexandra [Instituto Portugues de Oncologia Francisco Gentil- Centro de Lisboa, Department of Radiology, Lisboa Codex (Portugal); Casselman, Jan [A.Z. St. Jan Brugge Hospital, Department of Radiology, Brugge (Belgium); A.Z. St. Augustinus Antwerpen Hospitals, Department of Radiology, Antwerpen (Belgium)

    2007-08-15

    Many disease processes manifest either primarily or secondarily by cranial nerve deficits. Neurologists, ENT surgeons, ophthalmologists and maxillo-facial surgeons are often confronted with patients with symptoms and signs of cranial nerve dysfunction. Seeking the cause of this dysfunction is a common indication for imaging. In recent decades we have witnessed an unprecedented improvement in imaging techniques, allowing direct visualization of increasingly small anatomic structures. The emergence of volumetric CT scanners, higher field MR scanners in clinical practice and higher resolution MR sequences has made a tremendous contribution to the development of cranial nerve imaging. The use of surface coils and parallel imaging allows sub-millimetric visualization of nerve branches and volumetric 3D imaging. Both with CT and MR, multiplanar and curved reconstructions can follow the entire course of a cranial nerve or branch, improving tremendously our diagnostic yield of neural pathology. This review article will focus on the contribution of current imaging techniques in the depiction of normal anatomy and on infectious and inflammatory, traumatic and congenital pathology affecting the cranial nerves. A detailed discussion of individual cranial nerves lesions is beyond the scope of this article. (orig.)

  16. Neurovascular compression of cranial nerves: CT and MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The compression of a nervous structure by an aberrant vessel may be asymptomatic or produce an important symptoms, in these cases CT and MRI show relevant information. Materials and Methods: Between January 1998 and March 2001, we studied 27 patients: 8 with trigeminal neuralgia, 7 with hemi facial spasm, 4 vertigo and tinnitus, 2 hemianopsia, 1 with neuralgia of the amygdalin fossa, 1 with bitonal voice, 1 with tongue deviation with fascicular movements, 2 essential hypertension and 1 with severe headache. All of them had a neurologic evaluation from 2 specialists and 2 neuro radiologists interpreted the results. Results: The CT and RMI images with special sequences allowed to prove the compression of the entry segments of the V, VII, IX, X and XII cranial nerves, of the optic chiasma and the ventrolateral aspect of the medulla oblongata in close relation with the vasopressor centre. Also they demonstrate a rare vessel in the Silvio aqueduct avoiding the normal flow of the CSF. Of the total of patients that were studied, 37% had surgical confirmation. Conclusion: CT and RMI are sensitive and specific methods for the detection of vascular compressions of nervous structures. (author)

  17. Serial cranial computed tomography in acute infantile hemiplegia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serial cranial computed tomography (CCT) was studied in 20 children with acute infantile hemiplegia. These children were devided into two groups: hemiplegia following fever, hemiconvulsion and unconsiousness (the convulsive group) and hemiplegia without convulsion (the non-convulsive group). There were 15 cases in the convulsive group and 5 cases in the non-convulsive group. We could investigate the CCT immediately after the onset in 6 convulsive cases and 3 non-convulsive cases, but the immediate CCT revealed no abnormalities in both groups. Within several days after the onset the abnormally low density area appeared on the CCT in both groups. In three cases there were abnormally high density areas complicationing these abnormalities. Over more than a month, the hemispheric low density area changed into the hemispheric atrophy and the lobar low density area changed into the focal wedge-shaped atrophy or diminished. The small or lacunar low density area changed into the low density spot and the hemorrhagic infarction into the porencephaly. The occlusion of the internal carotid artery were found in two non-convulsive cases and the stenosis of the internal carotid artery in a convulsive case with purulent meningitis. (J.P.N.)

  18. Non-uniform dose distributions in cranial radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Edward T.

    Radiation treatments are often delivered to patients with brain metastases. For those patients who receive radiation to the entire brain, there is a risk of long-term neuro-cognitive side effects, which may be due to damage to the hippocampus. In clinical MRI and CT scans it can be difficult to identify the hippocampus, but once identified it can be partially spared from radiation dose. Using deformable image registration we demonstrate a semi-automatic technique for obtaining an estimated location of this structure in a clinical MRI or CT scan. Deformable image registration is a useful tool in other areas such as adaptive radiotherapy, where the radiation oncology team monitors patients during the course of treatment and adjusts the radiation treatments if necessary when the patient anatomy changes. Deformable image registration is used in this setting, but there is a considerable level of uncertainty. This work represents one of many possible approaches at investigating the nature of these uncertainties utilizing consistency metrics. We will show that metrics such as the inverse consistency error correlate with actual registration uncertainties. Specifically relating to brain metastases, this work investigates where in the brain metastases are likely to form, and how the primary cancer site is related. We will show that the cerebellum is at high risk for metastases and that non-uniform dose distributions may be advantageous when delivering prophylactic cranial irradiation for patients with small cell lung cancer in complete remission.

  19. Middle cranial fossa anatomy and the origin of modern humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastir, Markus; Rosas, Antonio; Lieberman, Daniel E; O'Higgins, Paul

    2008-02-01

    Anatomically, modern humans differ from archaic forms in possessing a globular neurocranium and a retracted face and in cognitive functions, many of which are associated with the temporal lobes. The middle cranial fossa (MCF) interacts during growth and development with the temporal lobes, the midface, and the mandible. It has been proposed that evolutionary transformations of the MCF (perhaps from modification of the temporal lobes) can have substantial influences on craniofacial morphology. Here, we use three-dimensional (3D) geometric morphometrics and computer reconstructions of computed tomography-scanned fossil hominids, fossil and recent modern humans and chimpanzees to address this issue further. Mean comparisons and permutation analyses of scaled 3D basicranial landmarks confirm that the MCF of Homo sapiens is highly significantly different (P heidelbergensis, and Pan troglodytes. Modern humans have a unique configuration with relatively more anterolateral projection of the MCF pole relative to the optic chiasm and the foramen rotundum. These findings are discussed in the context of evolutionary changes in craniofacial morphology and the origins of modern human autapomorphies. In particular, the findings of this study point to variations in the temporal lobe, which, through effects on the MCF and face, are central to the evolution of modern human facial form. PMID:18213701

  20. Using mouse cranial muscles to investigate neuromuscular pathology in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, L M; Gillingwater, T H; Parson, S H

    2010-11-01

    Neuromuscular pathology is a classic hallmark of many diseases such as muscular dystrophy, myasthenia gravis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal muscular atrophy. It is also a feature of many congenital and acquired myopathies and neuropathies such as diabetic neuropathy and toxin-exposure. The availability of experimentally accessible nerve-muscle preparations from rodent models in which pathological events can be studied in nerve and muscle, as well as at the neuromuscular junction, is therefore of fundamental importance for investigating neuromuscular disease. The group of small cranial muscles, which move the ear in the mouse provide ideal experimental preparations for the study of neuromuscular disease in vivo, but information regarding their anatomical and functional characteristics is currently lacking. Here, we provide a detailed description of the levator auris longus, auricularis superior, abductor auris longus and interscutularis muscles. In addition, we briefly review their differential fibre type and developmental characteristics, which can be exploited to aid our understanding of neuromuscular vulnerability and to provide preferable alternatives to more traditional muscle preparations such as gastrocnemius, soleus and diaphragm. PMID:20637618