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Sample records for anterior ankle arthroscopy

  1. Anterior ankle arthroscopy, distraction or dorsiflexion?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Leeuw, P.A.J.; Golanó, P.; Clavero, J.A.; van Dijk, C.N.

    2010-01-01

    Anterior ankle arthroscopy can basically be performed by two different methods; the dorsiflexion- or distraction method. The objective of this study was to determine the size of the anterior working area for both the dorsiflexion and distraction method. The anterior working area is anteriorly

  2. Advancements in ankle arthroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, C. Niek; van Bergen, Christiaan J. A.

    2008-01-01

    Important progress has been made during the past 30 years in arthroscopic ankle surgery. Ankle arthroscopy has gradually changed from a diagnostic to a therapeutic tool. Most arthroscopic procedures can be performed by using the anterior working area with the ankle in dorsiflexion or plantar

  3. Ankle arthroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Failure of repair to heal Weakness of the ankle Injury to tendon, blood vessel, or nerve Before the ... and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Ankle Injuries and Disorders Read more Endoscopy Read more NIH ...

  4. Delayed rupture of the extensor hallucis longus and extensor digitorum communis tendons after breaching the anterior capsule with a radiofrequency probe during ankle arthroscopy: a case report.

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    Tuncer, Serdar; Aksu, Neslihan; Isiklar, Ugur

    2010-01-01

    A 40-year-old man with early arthritis, loose bodies, and anterolateral joint impingement symptoms in his left ankle, which was refractory to noninvasive therapeutic modalities for 1 year, underwent ankle arthroscopy and radiofrequency thermal ablation. The anterior capsule of the ankle joint was breached by the radiofrequency probe while the loose bodies were removed from the anterior recess, exposing the extensor tendons and resulting in a delayed spontaneous rupture of the extensor hallucis longus tendon and extensor tendons to the second and third toes. The extensor hallucis longus tendon was repaired with a semitendinosus tendon graft, and extensor digitorum tendons underwent primary repair. The patient regained full function and was symptom free 1 year after surgery. Copyright 2010 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Value of stress ultrasound for the diagnosis of chronic ankle instability compared to manual anterior drawer test, stress radiography, magnetic resonance imaging, and arthroscopy.

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    Cho, Jae Ho; Lee, Doo Hyung; Song, Hyung Keun; Bang, Joon Young; Lee, Kyung Tai; Park, Young Uk

    2016-04-01

    Clinicians frequently diagnose chronic ankle instability using the manual anterior drawer test and stress radiography. However, both examinations can yield incorrect results and do not reveal the extent of ankle instability. Stress ultrasound has been reported to be a new diagnostic tool for the diagnosis of chronic ankle instability. The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic value of stress ultrasound for chronic ankle instability compared to the manual anterior drawer test, stress radiography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and arthroscopy. Twenty-eight consecutive patients who underwent ankle arthroscopy and subsequent modified Broström repair for treatment of chronic ankle instability were included. The arthroscopic findings were used as the reference standard. A standardized physical examination (manual anterior drawer test), stress radiography, MRI, and stress ultrasound were performed to assess the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) prior to operation. Ultrasound images were taken in the resting position and the maximal anterior drawer position. Grade 3 lateral instability was verified arthroscopically in all 28 cases with a clinical diagnosis (100%). Twenty-two cases showed grade III instability on the manual anterior drawer test (78.6%). Twenty-four cases displayed anterior translation exceeding 5 mm on stress radiography (86%), and talar tilt angle exceeded 15° in three cases (11 %). Nineteen cases displayed a partial chronic tear (change in thickness or signal intensity), and nine cases displayed complete tear on MRI (100%). Lax and wavy ATFL was evident on stress ultrasound in all cases (100 %). The mean value of the ATFL length was 2.8 ± 0.3 cm for the stressed condition and 2.1 ± 0.2 cm for the resting condition (p radiography. III.

  6. Anterior Impingement Syndrome of the Ankle Caused by Osteoid Osteoma in the Talar Neck Treated with Arthroscopy and 3D C-Arm-Based Imaging

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    Masachika Ikegami

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoid osteoma in periarticular lesions tends to have an unusual presentation that likely leads to a delayed or missed diagnosis compared with a typical osteoid osteoma in the metaphysis or diaphysis of the long bone. In cases that are unresponsive to conservative treatment, surgical interventions including en bloc resection, computed tomography-guided percutaneous treatment, and arthroscopic resection have been performed; however, these methods frequently result in inadequate tumor resection and recurrence. Here we present a case of a 16-year-old girl with osteoid osteoma in the talar neck presenting as anterior impingement syndrome due to marked synovitis in the ankle joint which was successfully treated without complications by arthroscopic synovectomy and tumor resection followed by intraoperative 3D C-arm-based imaging confirming complete tumor lesion removal. Her pain was relieved immediately after the surgery, and there was no recurrence at 12 months of follow-up. This is the first case report of the surgical treatment of the osteoid osteoma in the talar neck with the combination methods of arthroscopy and 3D C-arm-based imaging.

  7. Anterior ankle impingement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tol, Johannes L.; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2006-01-01

    The anterior ankle impingement syndrome is a clinical pain syndrome that is characterized by anterior ankle pain on (hyper) dorsiflexion. The plain radiographs often are negative in patients who have anteromedial impingement. An oblique view is recommended in these patients. Arthroscopic excision of

  8. Anterior cruciate ligament tears: MRI versus arthroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosch, U.; Felix, R.; Schauwecker, W.; Dreithaler, B.

    1992-01-01

    Because of suspected rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament sixteen acute traumatised patients were investigated by MR and arthroscopy. The MR diagnosis of a lesion of the anterior cruciate ligament proved to be correct by arthroscopy in fifteen of sixteen cases. Diagnostic criteria for lesions of the anterior cruciate ligament were: increased signal intensity in T 1 - and T 2 weighted images, increased volume and discontinuity of ligamentous structures. Additional MR findings of meniscal tears were correct in three of four cases laterally and in four of four cases medially. Femoral cartilage lesions were correctly identified by MR in three cases. MR normal findings proved to be correct by arthroscopy in another five cases. (orig.) [de

  9. Anterior ankle arthrodesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Gordon L; Sayres, Stephanie C; O’Malley, Martin J

    2014-01-01

    Ankle arthrodesis is a common procedure that resolves many conditions of the foot and ankle; however, complications following this procedure are often reported and vary depending on the fixation technique. Various techniques have been described in the attempt to achieve ankle arthrodesis and there is much debate as to the efficiency of each one. This study aims to evaluate the efficiency of anterior plating in ankle arthrodesis using customised and Synthes TomoFix plates. We present the outcomes of 28 ankle arthrodeses between 2005 and 2012, specifically examining rate of union, patient-reported outcomes scores, and complications. All 28 patients achieved radiographic union at an average of 36 wk; the majority of patients (92.86%) at or before 16 wk, the exceptions being two patients with Charcot joints who were noted to have bony union at a three year review. Patient-reported outcomes scores significantly increased (P plate offers added compression and provides a rigid fixation for arthrodesis stabilization. PMID:24649408

  10. Cadaver study of anatomic landmark identification for placing ankle arthroscopy portals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheibling, B; Koch, G; Clavert, P

    2017-05-01

    Arthroscopy-assisted surgery is now widely used at the ankle for osteochondral lesions of the talus, anterior and posterior impingement syndromes, talocrural or subtalar fusion, foreign body removal, and ankle instability. Injuries to the vessels and nerves may occur during these procedures. To determine whether ultrasound topographic identification of vulnerable structures decreased the risk of iatrogenic injuries to vessels, nerves, and tendons and influenced the distance separating vulnerable structures from the arthroscope introduced through four different portals. Ultrasonography to identify vulnerable structures before or during arthroscopic surgery on the ankle may be useful. Twenty fresh cadaver ankles from body donations to the anatomy institute in Strasbourg, France, were divided into two equal groups. Preoperative ultrasonography to mark the trajectories of vessels, nerves, and tendons was performed in one group but not in the other. The portals were created using a 4-mm trocar. Each portal was then dissected. The primary evaluation criterion was the presence or absence of injuries to vessels, nerves, and tendons. The secondary evaluation criterion was the distance between these structures and the arthroscope. No tendon injuries occurred with ultrasonography. Without ultrasonography, there were two full-thickness tendon lesions, one to the extensor hallucis longus and the other to the Achilles tendon. Furthermore, with the anterolateral, anteromedial, and posteromedial portals, the distance separating the vessels and nerves from the arthroscope was greater with than without ultrasonography (P=0.041, P=0.005, and P=0.002), respectively; no significant difference was found with the anterior portal. Preoperative ultrasound topographic identification decreases the risk of iatrogenic injury to the vessels, nerves, and tendons during ankle arthroscopy and places these structures at a safer distance from the arthroscope. Our hypothesis was confirmed. IV

  11. The efficacy of intra-articular bupivacaine for relief of pain following arthroscopy of the ankle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, F; Coakes, J; Umarji, S; Palmer, S; Venn, R; Panayiotou, S

    2006-12-01

    The intra-articular injection of local anaesthetic is frequently used for pain relief after arthroscopy. There is, however, no published evidence of the analgesic effect of bupivacaine in the ankle. In a randomised, double-blind study, 35 patients undergoing arthroscopy of the ankle were allocated to receive intra-articular saline or bupivacaine. Pain was assessed using pain scores and additional analgesic requirements. Intra-articular bupivacaine had a significant analgesic effect in the immediate post-operative period, reducing pain scores and the need for additional analgesics. We recommend the use of intra-articular bupivacaine for post-operative analgesia in ankle surgery.

  12. Arthroscopy Up to Date: Anterior Cruciate Ligament Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillhammer, Carl K; Reid, John B; Rister, Jamie; Jani, Sunil S; Marvil, Sean C; Chen, Austin W; Anderson, Chris G; D'Agostino, Sophia; Lubowitz, James H

    2016-01-01

    To categorize and summarize up-to-date anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) research published in Arthroscopy and The American Journal of Sports Medicine and systematically review each subcategory, beginning with ACL anatomy. After searching for "anterior cruciate ligament" OR "ACL" in Arthroscopy and The American Journal of Sports Medicine from January 2012 through December 2014, we excluded articles more pertinent to ACL augmentation; open growth plates; and meniscal, chondral, or multiligamentous pathology. Studies were subcategorized for data extraction. We included 212 studies that were classified into 8 categories: anatomy; basic science and biomechanics; tunnel position; graft selection; graft fixation; injury risk and rehabilitation; practice patterns and outcomes; and complications. Anatomic risk factors for ACL injury and post-reconstruction graft failure include a narrow intercondylar notch, low native ACL volume, and increased posterior slope. Regarding anatomic footprints, the femoral attachment is 43% of the proximal-to-distal lateral femoral condylar length whereas the posterior border of the tendon is 2.5 mm from the articular margin. The tibial attachment of the ACL is two-fifths of the medial-to-lateral interspinous distance and 15 mm anterior to the posterior cruciate ligament. Anatomic research using radiology and computed tomography to evaluate ACL graft placement shows poor interobserver and intraobserver reliability. With a mind to improving outcomes, surgeons should be aware of anatomic risk factors (stenotic femoral notch, low ligament volume, and increased posterior slope) for ACL graft failure, have a precise understanding of arthroscopic landmarks identifying femoral and tibial footprint locations, and understand that imaging to evaluate graft placement is unreliable. Level III, systematic review of Level III evidence. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Tenosynovial (Extra-articular) Chondromatosis of the Extensor Digitorum Longus Tendon and Synovial Chondromatosis of the Ankle: Treated by Extensor Digitorum Longus Tendoscopy and Ankle Arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-10-01

    Synovial chondromatosis is a rare pathology in the foot and ankle region. We present a case of concomitant tenosynovial chondromatosis of the extensor digitorum longus tendon and synovial chondromatosis of the ankle, which was successfully treated by extensor digitorum tendon tendoscopy and ankle arthroscopy. Therapeutic, Level IV: Case study. © 2014 The Author(s).

  14. Arthroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Learn more about this top honor Arthroscopy About Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  15. Anterior cruciate ligament injury and ankle dorsiflexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlstedt, Charlotta; Rasmussen-Barr, Eva

    2015-11-01

    The aim was to study whether the degree of ankle dorsiflexion differs between subjects with an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and uninjured controls. Another aim was to study ankle dorsiflexion between the injured and the uninjured leg and in addition between women and men with an ACL injury. Sixty subjects (ACL injury, n = 30 and controls, n = 30) were enroled consecutively at two physical therapy settings. Ankle dorsiflexion was measured with a goniometer in a standardized way in a weight-bearing lunge position. Repeated-measures ANOVA revealed a significant difference (p < 0.001) in ankle dorsiflexion between subjects with an ACL injury (mean 41.1° SD 5.7) and those without (mean 46.6° SD 5.3). No difference in ankle dorsiflexion was found between the injured leg and the uninjured or between women and men with ACL injury. The present findings suggest lower degree of ankle dorsiflexion in subjects with an ACL injury than in uninjured controls. A functional test measuring ankle dorsiflexion with a goniometer may be one way of identifying individuals at increased risk of ACL injury. Comparative study, Level II.

  16. [Arthroscopy-guided fracture management. Ankle joint and calcaneus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoepp, C; Rixen, D

    2013-04-01

    Arthroscopic fracture management of the ankle and calcaneus requires a differentiated approach. The aim is to minimize surgical soft tissue damage and to visualize anatomical fracture reduction arthroscopically. Moreover, additional cartilage damage can be detected and treated. The arthroscopic approach is limited by deep impressions of the joint surface needing cancellous bone grafting, by multiple fracture lines on the articular side and by high-grade soft tissue damage. An alternative to the minimally invasive arthroscopic approach is open arthroscopic reduction in conventional osteosynthesis. This facilitates correct assessment of surgical reduction of complex calcaneal fractures, otherwise remaining non-anatomical reduction might not be fluoroscopically detected during surgery.

  17. Chronic instability of the anterior tibiofibular syndesmosis of the ankle. Arthroscopic findings and results of anatomical reconstruction

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    Swierstra Bart A

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The arthroscopic findings in patients with chronic anterior syndesmotic instability that need reconstructive surgery have never been described extensively. Methods In 12 patients the clinical suspicion of chronic instability of the syndesmosis was confirmed during arthroscopy of the ankle. All findings during the arthroscopy were scored. Anatomical reconstruction of the anterior tibiofibular syndesmosis was performed in all patients. The AOFAS score was assessed to evaluate the result of the reconstruction. At an average of 43 months after the reconstruction all patients were seen for follow-up. Results The syndesmosis being easily accessible for the 3 mm transverse end of probe which could be rotated around its longitudinal axis in all cases during arthroscopy of the ankle joint, confirmed the diagnosis. Cartilage damage was seen in 8 ankles, of which in 7 patients the damage was situated at the medial side of the ankle joint. The intraarticular part of anterior tibiofibular ligament was visibly damaged in 5 patients. Synovitis was seen in all but one ankle joint. After surgical reconstruction the AOFAS score improved from an average of 72 pre-operatively to 92 post-operatively. Conclusions To confirm the clinical suspicion, the final diagnosis of chronic instability of the anterior syndesmosis can be made during arthroscopy of the ankle. Cartilage damage to the medial side of the tibiotalar joint is often seen and might be the result of syndesmotic instability. Good results are achieved by anatomic reconstruction of the anterior syndesmosis, and all patients in this study would undergo the surgery again if necessary.

  18. Anterior cruciate ligament tears: MRI versus arthroscopy. Vordere Kreuzbandruptur: MRT versus Arthroskopie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tosch, U.; Felix, R. (Strahlenklinik und Poliklinik, Universitaetsklinik Rudolf Virchow, Berlin (Germany)); Schauwecker, W.; Dreithaler, B. (Chirurgische Klinik und Poliklinik, Universitaetsklinik Rudolf Virchow, Berlin (Germany))

    1992-05-01

    Because of suspected rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament sixteen acute traumatised patients were investigated by MR and arthroscopy. The MR diagnosis of a lesion of the anterior cruciate ligament proved to be correct by arthroscopy in fifteen of sixteen cases. Diagnostic criteria for lesions of the anterior cruciate ligament were: increased signal intensity in T[sub 1]- and T[sub 2] weighted images, increased volume and discontinuity of ligamentous structures. Additional MR findings of meniscal tears were correct in three of four cases laterally and in four of four cases medially. Femoral cartilage lesions were correctly identified by MR in three cases. MR normal findings proved to be correct by arthroscopy in another five cases. (orig.).

  19. Anterior cruciate ligament: 3-D fiber anatomy, fluorescence arthroscopy & healing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, D.T.

    2015-01-01

    One of the current emphases in optimizing anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions is closer mimicking the anatomy of the ACL. The aim of Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 is to develop and validate a methodology to quantify the 3-D collagen fiber orientation of ligaments, accurately and at a high

  20. Anterior Interosseous Nerve Neuropraxia Secondary to Shoulder Arthroscopy and Open Subpectoral Long Head Biceps Tenodesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremiah T. Steed

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Arthroscopic rotator cuff tendon repair is a common elective procedure performed by trained orthopaedic surgeons with a relatively low complication rate. Specifically, isolated neuropraxia of the anterior interosseous nerve (AIN is a very rare complication of shoulder arthroscopy. An analysis of peer-reviewed published literature revealed only three articles reporting a total of seven cases that describe this specific complication following standard shoulder arthroscopic procedures. This article reports on three patients diagnosed with AIN neuropraxia following routine shoulder arthroscopy done by a single surgeon within a three-year period. All three patients also underwent open biceps tenodesis immediately following completion of the arthroscopic procedures. The exact causal mechanism of AIN neuropraxia following shoulder arthroscopy with biceps tenodesis is not known. This case report reviews possible mechanisms with emphasis on specific factors that make a traction injury the most likely etiology in these cases. We critically analyze our operating room setup and patient positioning practices in light of the existing biomechanical and cadaveric research to propose changes to our standard practices that may help to reduce the incidence of this specific postoperative complication in patients undergoing elective shoulder arthroscopy with biceps tenodesis.

  1. Synovialisation of the torn anterior cruciate ligament of the knee: comparison between magnetic resonance and arthroscopy

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    Higueras Guerrero, V.; Torregrosa Andres, A.; Marti-Bonmati, L.; Casillas, C. [Dept. of Radiology, Doctor Peset University Hospital, Valencia (Spain); Sanfeliu, M. [Dept. of Orthopedics, Doctor Peset University Hospital, Valencia (Spain)

    1999-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of MR in the diagnosis of synovialisation of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) compared with arthroscopy. One hundred and forty-nine patients were examined with MR imaging and arthroscopy of the knee. The MR sign used to consider a synovialised ACL consisted of hypointense fibrillar tracts, disrupted and wavily, in its expected course. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV), comparison of proportions (McNemar test) and Kappa values for agreement between MR imaging and arthroscopy were calculated. Of the 133 (89.3 %) ligaments without synovialisation at arthroscopy, 130 accorded with the MR results. Of the 16 (10.7 %) synovialised ligaments, 13 accorded with the MR results. Three false-positive and three false-negative MR diagnoses were identified. The agreement between both techniques was excellent (Kappa = 0.79; p = 0.000), without differences (McNemar test; p = 1). Sensitivity was 0.81, specificity 0.98, PPV 0.98 and NPV 0.81. Magnetic resonance imaging is highly reliability for synovialisation diagnosis. The imaging sign used to diagnose synovialised ACL (hypointense comma-like tracts in its expected course) is reliable. As this reparative process can simulate an intact ligament, knowledge of this sign is important in diagnosing synovialisation of ACL tears so as not to confuse it with normal ACL. (orig.)

  2. ARTHROSCOPIC TREATMENT OF ANTERIOR IMPINGEMENT IN THE ANKLE

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    Martin Mikek

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Anterior soft tissue impingement is a common cause of chronic pain in the ankle. The preferred method of operative treatment is an arthroscopic excision of hypertrophic fibrous and synovial tissue in the anterior part of the ankle joint.Methods. We present the results of arthroscopic treatment of anterior ankle impingement in group of 14 patients.Results. Subjective improvement after the procedure was observed in all patients and 13 of them (93% were without any symptoms after the operation. One patient reported of intermittent pain, especially when walking on uneven grounds.Conclusions. We conclude that arthroscopic excision of hypertrophic synovial tissue in the anterior part of the ankle which causes the symptoms of impingement is a minimally invasive procedure that is both safe and reliable. When used for appropriate indications, an improvement can be expected in over 90% of patients.

  3. The effects of tibiofibularis anterior ligaments on ankle joint biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakaşlı, Ahmet; Erduran, Mehmet; Baktıroğlu, Lütfü; Büdeyri, Aydın; Yıldız, Didem Venüs; Havıtçıoğlu, Hasan

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical behavior of anterior inferior tibiofibularis ligament (AITFL) deficient human ankle under axial loading of ankle at stance phase of gait. In order to investigate the contribution of AITFL to ankle stability, an in vitro sequential experimental setup was simulated. The measurement of posterior displacement of distal tibia and anterior displacement of the foot, in neutral position, secondary to axial compression, was performed by two non-contact video extensometers. Eight freshly frozen, anatomically intact, cadaveric human ankle specimens were included and tested. An axial compression test machine was utilized from 0 to 800 Newtonswith a loading speed of 5 mm/min in order to simulate the axial weight-bearing sequence of the ankle at stance phase of human gait. There was a statistically significant difference between anteroposterior displacement values for AITFL-Intact and AITFL-Dissected specimens (p≤0.05). Mean AITFL-Intact and mean AITFL-Dissected ankle anteroposterior displacement was 1.28±0.47 mm and 2.06±0.7 mm, respectively. This study determined some numerical and quantitative data about the biomechanical properties of AITFL in neutral foot position. In the emergency department, diagnosis and treatment of AITFL injury, due to ankle distortion, is important. In AITFL injuries, ankle biomechanics is affected, and ankle instability occurs.

  4. Deltoid ligament and tibiofibular syndesmosis injury in chronic lateral ankle instability: Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation at 3T and comparison with arthroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Ka Young; Choi, Yun Sun; Lee, Seok Hoon; Kim, Jin Su; Young, Ki Won; Jeong, Min Sun; Kim, Dae Jung

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of deltoid ligament and distal tibiofibular syndesmosis injury on 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with chronic lateral ankle instability (CLAI). Fifty patients (mean age, 35 years) who had undergone preoperative 3T MRI and surgical treatment for CLAI were enrolled. The prevalence of deltoid ligament and syndesmosis injury were assessed. The complexity of lateral collateral ligament complex (LCLC) injury was correlated with prevalence of deltoid or syndesmosis injuries. The diagnostic accuracy of ankle ligament imaging at 3T MRI was analyzed using arthroscopy as a reference standard. On MRI, deltoid ligament injury was identified in 18 (36%) patients as follows: superficial ligament alone, 9 (50%); deep ligament alone 2 (11%); and both ligaments 7 (39%). Syndesmosis abnormality was found in 21 (42%) patients as follows: anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament (AITFL) alone, 19 (90%); and AITFL and interosseous ligament, 2 (10%). There was no correlation between LCLC injury complexity and the prevalence of an accompanying deltoid or syndesmosis injury on both MRI and arthroscopic findings. MRI sensitivity and specificity for detection of deltoid ligament injury were 84% and 93.5%, and those for detection of syndesmosis injury were 91% and 100%, respectively. Deltoid ligament or syndesmosis injuries were common in patients undergoing surgery for CLAI, regardless of the LCLC injury complexity. 3T MRI is helpful for the detection of all types of ankle ligament injury. Therefore, careful interpretation of pre-operative MRI is essential

  5. Deltoid ligament and tibiofibular syndesmosis injury in chronic lateral ankle instability: Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation at 3T and comparison with arthroscopy

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    Chun, Ka Young; Choi, Yun Sun; Lee, Seok Hoon; Kim, Jin Su; Young, Ki Won; Jeong, Min Sun; Kim, Dae Jung [Eulji Hospital, Eulji University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    To evaluate the prevalence of deltoid ligament and distal tibiofibular syndesmosis injury on 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with chronic lateral ankle instability (CLAI). Fifty patients (mean age, 35 years) who had undergone preoperative 3T MRI and surgical treatment for CLAI were enrolled. The prevalence of deltoid ligament and syndesmosis injury were assessed. The complexity of lateral collateral ligament complex (LCLC) injury was correlated with prevalence of deltoid or syndesmosis injuries. The diagnostic accuracy of ankle ligament imaging at 3T MRI was analyzed using arthroscopy as a reference standard. On MRI, deltoid ligament injury was identified in 18 (36%) patients as follows: superficial ligament alone, 9 (50%); deep ligament alone 2 (11%); and both ligaments 7 (39%). Syndesmosis abnormality was found in 21 (42%) patients as follows: anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament (AITFL) alone, 19 (90%); and AITFL and interosseous ligament, 2 (10%). There was no correlation between LCLC injury complexity and the prevalence of an accompanying deltoid or syndesmosis injury on both MRI and arthroscopic findings. MRI sensitivity and specificity for detection of deltoid ligament injury were 84% and 93.5%, and those for detection of syndesmosis injury were 91% and 100%, respectively. Deltoid ligament or syndesmosis injuries were common in patients undergoing surgery for CLAI, regardless of the LCLC injury complexity. 3T MRI is helpful for the detection of all types of ankle ligament injury. Therefore, careful interpretation of pre-operative MRI is essential.

  6. Deltoid Ligament and Tibiofibular Syndesmosis Injury in Chronic Lateral Ankle Instability: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Evaluation at 3T and Comparison with Arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Ka-Young; Choi, Yun Sun; Lee, Seok Hoon; Kim, Jin Su; Young, Ki Won; Jeong, Min-Sun; Kim, Dae-Jung

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of deltoid ligament and distal tibiofibular syndesmosis injury on 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with chronic lateral ankle instability (CLAI). Fifty patients (mean age, 35 years) who had undergone preoperative 3T MRI and surgical treatment for CLAI were enrolled. The prevalence of deltoid ligament and syndesmosis injury were assessed. The complexity of lateral collateral ligament complex (LCLC) injury was correlated with prevalence of deltoid or syndesmosis injuries. The diagnostic accuracy of ankle ligament imaging at 3T MRI was analyzed using arthroscopy as a reference standard. On MRI, deltoid ligament injury was identified in 18 (36%) patients as follows: superficial ligament alone, 9 (50%); deep ligament alone 2 (11%); and both ligaments 7 (39%). Syndesmosis abnormality was found in 21 (42%) patients as follows: anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament (AITFL) alone, 19 (90%); and AITFL and interosseous ligament, 2 (10%). There was no correlation between LCLC injury complexity and the prevalence of an accompanying deltoid or syndesmosis injury on both MRI and arthroscopic findings. MRI sensitivity and specificity for detection of deltoid ligament injury were 84% and 93.5%, and those for detection of syndesmosis injury were 91% and 100%, respectively. Deltoid ligament or syndesmosis injuries were common in patients undergoing surgery for CLAI, regardless of the LCLC injury complexity. 3T MRI is helpful for the detection of all types of ankle ligament injury. Therefore, careful interpretation of pre-operative MRI is essential.

  7. Examination of the sprained ankle: Anterior drawer test or arthrography

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    Laehde, S.; Putkonen, M.; Puranen, J.; Raatikainen, T.

    1988-11-01

    The accuracy of the anterior drawer test for the diagnosis of recent lateral ligament tears in the ankle was evaluated in a series of 192 patients using surgical or arthrographic findings for reference. Considerable overlapping of results was obtained in ankles with and without ligament tear. Twenty-eight per cent of the anterior talofibular ligament tears, and 38% of the combined anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular tears were not detected, and single and combined tears could not be differentiated. It is concluded that the anterior drawer test is too unreliable as a basis for any decision regarding surgical treatment of a recent sprain. Therefore, arthrography is recommended as the method of choice in such cases of recent ankle sprain, where the need of surgery has to be supported by X-ray analysis.

  8. Examination of the sprained ankle: Anterior drawer test or arthrography?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laehde, S.; Putkonen, M.; Puranen, J.; Raatikainen, T.

    1988-01-01

    The accuracy of the anterior drawer test for the diagnosis of recent lateral ligament tears in the ankle was evaluated in a series of 192 patients using surgical or arthrographic findings for reference. Considerable overlapping of results was obtained in ankles with and without ligament tear. Twenty-eight per cent of the anterior talofibular ligament tears, and 38% of the combined anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular tears were not detected, and single and combined tears could not be differentiated. It is concluded that the anterior drawer test is too unreliable as a basis for any decision regarding surgical treatment of a recent sprain. Therefore, arthrography is recommended as the method of choice in such cases of recent ankle sprain, where the need of surgery has to be supported by X-ray analysis. (orig.)

  9. CT arthrography and virtual arthroscopy in the diagnosis of the anterior cruciate ligament and meniscal abnormalities of the knee joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Whal; Chung, Jin-Wook; Kang, Heung-Sik; Hong, Sung-Hwan; Choi, Ja-Young; Kim, Ho-Sung; Kim, Seok-Jung; Kim, Hyung-Ho

    2004-01-01

    To determine the diagnostic accuracy of CT arthrography and virtual arthroscopy in the diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament and meniscus pathology. Thirty-eight consecutive patients sho underwent CT arthrography and arthroscopy of the knee were included in this study. The ages of the patients ranged from 19 to 52 years and all of the patients were male. Sagittal, coronal, transverse and oblique coronal multiplanar reconstruction images were reformatted from CT arthrography. Virtual arthroscopy was performed from 6 standard views using a volume rendering technique. Three radiologists analyzed the MPR images and two orthopedic surgeons analyzed the virtual arthroscopic images. The sensitivity and specificity of CT arthrography for the diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament abnormalities were 87.5%-100% and 93.3%-96.7%, respectively and those for meniscus abnormalities were 91.7%-100% and 98.1%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of virtual arthroscopy for the diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament abnormalities were 87.5% and 83.3%-90%, respectively, and those for meniscus abnormalities were 83.3%-87.5% and 96.1-98.1%, respectively. CT arthrography and virtual arthroscopy showed good diagnostic accuracy for anterior cruciate ligament and meniscal abnormalities

  10. Ankle Arthrodesis Using an Anterior Titanium Dual Locked Plating Construct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, Wesley W; Hirose, Christopher B; Coughlin, Michael J

    Ankle arthrodesis is currently the reference standard treatment for end-stage tibiotalar arthrosis. The fusion rates have varied in the published data from 59% to 100%. We reviewed 60 cases of consecutive anterior ankle arthrodesis using an anterior dual locked plating construct with respect to the fusion rate, time to fusion, pain relief, and complications. The patients were followed up for a mean of 1.1 years (range 16 weeks to 4 years). We found that our fusion rate was 97% for ankles not requiring structural allograft. The mean interval to fusion was 11.7 weeks, excluding those with a structural allograft. The mean visual analog scale pain scores decreased from 7 preoperatively to 2 at the final follow-up visit. Anterior ankle arthrodesis with dual locked plating provides excellent results with respect to the fusion rate with a low complication rate. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Anterior Ankle Arthrodesis with Molded Plate: Technique and Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Gharehdaghi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background:  There is still controversy regarding the best technique for ankle arthrodesis to acheive stable rigid fixation along with reconstructing a functional plantigrade foot. Moreover, existing techniques have complictions related to stability, soft tissue covering, fusion rate, and exposure. Methods: With the anterior approach exactly on the tibialis anterior sheath, the joint was exposed and previous hardware, if any, was removed and with the safe direct approach, the ankle, hindfoot, and indirectly the subtalar joints were accessed. Then fresh cancellous bone was obtained and complete denudation was preformed. Lastly, a narrow 4.5 millimeter plate was carefully placed on what was determined to be the best final position.In this prospective study, 12 patients with severe ankle pain and arthritis enrolled from February 2010 to January 2012. Eight of them had posttraumatic arthritis and deformity with hardware, two had rheumatoid arthritis, one had poliomyelitis with severe deformity of the foot and knee, and another had chronic ulcerative ynovitis of the ankle joint. The patients were assessed clinically and radiographically for an average of two years (range: 13 months to 4 years for functional recovery, range of motion, stability of the ankle, and imaging evidence of union.  Results:  Ankle deformities and pain in all 12 cases were corrected. With a short healing time and rapid recovery period, after six weeks all of the patients could walk independently. Also, scores of the Manchester–Oxford Foot Questionnaire (MOXFQ improved significantly from 69 preoperatively to 33 postoperatively. Conclusions:  Anterior ankle arthrodesis with molded plating can be an easy and safe way to manage deformities and it has excellent fusion rate and sufficient rigid fixation.

  12. Anterior ankle arthrodesis with molded plate: technique and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharehdaghi, Mohammad; Rahimi, Hasan; Mousavian, Alireza

    2014-09-01

    There is still controversy regarding the best technique for ankle arthrodesis to acheive stable rigid fixation along with reconstructing a functional plantigrade foot. Moreover, existing techniques have complictions related to stability, soft tissue covering, fusion rate, and exposure. With the anterior approach exactly on the tibialis anterior sheath, the joint was exposed and previous hardware, if any, was removed and with the safe direct approach, the ankle, hindfoot, and indirectly the subtalar joints were accessed. Then fresh cancellous bone was obtained and complete denudation was preformed. Lastly, a narrow 4.5 millimeter plate was carefully placed on what was determined to be the best final position.In this prospective study, 12 patients with severe ankle pain and arthritis enrolled from February 2010 to January 2012. Eight of them had posttraumatic arthritis and deformity with hardware, two had rheumatoid arthritis, one had poliomyelitis with severe deformity of the foot and knee, and another had chronic ulcerative synovitis of the ankle joint. The patients were assessed clinically and radiographically for an average of two years (range: 13 months to 4 years) for functional recovery, range of motion, stability of the ankle, and imaging evidence of union. Ankle deformities and pain in all 12 cases were corrected. With a short healing time and rapid recovery period, after six weeks all of the patients could walk independently. Also, scores of the Manchester-Oxford Foot Questionnaire (MOXFQ) improved significantly from 69 preoperatively to 33 postoperatively). Anterior ankle arthrodesis with molded plating can be an easy and safe way to manage deformities and it has excellent fusion rate and sufficient rigid fixation.

  13. Oblique radiograph for the detection of bone spurs in anterior ankle impingement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dijk, Niek C. van; Wessel, Ronald N.; Tol, Johannes L.; Maas, M.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to develop a radiographic view to detect anteromedial talotibial osteophytes that remain undetected on standard radiographs. Design and patients: In 10 cadaver specimens the maximal size was measured of anteromedial tibial osteophytes that remain undetected on a standard lateral radiograph projection, due to the presence of the anteromedial tibial rim. The average projection of the most prominent anterolateral tibial rim over the anteromedial rim was found to be 7.3 mm. A 7 mm barium-clay osteophyte was attached to this anteromedial rim of the distal tibia. Anteromedial osteophytes become most prominent on an oblique view, in which the radiographic beam is tilted into a 45 craniocaudal direction with the leg in 30 external rotation. This oblique view was compared with the findings of arthroscopic surgery in 25 consecutive patients with anterior ankle impingement syndrome. Results: Medially located tibial and talar osteophytes remained undetected on a standard lateral projection and became visible on the oblique anteromedial impingement (AMI) radiograph. Anterolateral tibial and talar osteophytes were well detected on a standard lateral radiograph projection but were invisible on the AMI view. There was a high correlation between the location of the osteophyte and the location of symptoms and the findings at arthroscopy. Conclusion: A combination of lateral and oblique radiographs can be used to differentiate between anteromedial and anterolateral bony ankle impingement. (orig.)

  14. Ankle arthrodesis in tubercular arthritis using anterior bridge plating: a report of 2 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Mantu; Singh, Roop

    2014-06-01

    Ankle arthrodesis is a common procedure for tubercular arthritis in India. However, attaining fusion in osteoporotic bones is difficult to achieve by both external and internal fixation methods described in the literature. We report two cases for ankle arthrodesis using an anterior approach to the ankle and internal fixation with a bridging anteriorly placed AO L/AO T plate. Both ankles were fused. The surgical technique is simple, easily reproducible and gives excellent results. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. An anterior ankle arthroscopic technique for retrograde osteochondral autograft transplantation of posteromedial and central talar dome cartilage defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wajsfisz, Anthony; Makridis, Konstantinos G; Naji, Omar; Hirsh, Caroline; Boisrenoult, Philippe; Beaufils, Philippe

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to present an arthroscopic technique for the treatment for posteromedial and central cartilage defects of the talus using anterior arthroscopic portals and without performing a medial malleolar osteotomy. Nine fresh cadavers were dissected. Autografts were implanted under arthroscopy using a retrograde osteochondral transplantation system, and their position was estimated using specific angular calibrators and later confirmed by software analysis of two photographs of the disarticulated ankle joint. In eight cases, the congruence between the surrounding articular cartilage and the cartilage of the graft was high, with differences measuring <1 mm. There were no iatrogenic cartilage lesions of the tibial plafond and no fractures of the talus. All the autografts remained stable during full range of motion cycles of the ankle joint. One failure was reported. This cadaveric study showed that the retrograde osteochondral autograft transplantation technique in the talus is feasible. It can be used to restore the posteromedial and central talar articular surfaces using conventional ankle arthroscopic instrumentation and anterior arthroscopic portals without resorting to a medial malleolar osteotomy. Further clinical and biomechanical studies are required to prove the efficacy of this technique and its reproducibility in routine clinical practice.

  16. Ultrasonography in the Assessment of Lateral Ankle Ligament Injury, Instability, and Anterior Ankle Impingement: A Diagnostic Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Patrick J; Craig, Kate; Kettner, Norman W

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this case report is to describe the diagnostic value of ultrasonography (US) in a patient with injury to the lateral ligaments of the ankle with concomitant ankle joint osteoarthritis and anterior impingement. A 28-year-old male had a history of an inversion injury of the left ankle. Diagnostic US of the left ankle using an 8- to 15-MHz linear array transducer demonstrated a full thickness tear of the anterior talofibular ligament, partial thickness tearing of the calcaneofibular ligament, and laxity of the ankle with varus stress testing. In addition, US was able to demonstrate degeneration of the ankle and talonavicular joints and anterior impingement with dorsiflexion. Osteoarthritic changes were confirmed with radiography. Other US findings included remote deltoid ligamentous complex injury, multiple sites of tenosynovitis, and a large ankle joint effusion with synovial hypertrophy and synovitis. Using US, an accurate diagnosis was established with respect to the pathology and functional impairments of the patient's ankle. This case report exemplifies the value and utility of US in diagnosing derangement in ligamentous, tendinous, articular, and osseous injuries of the ankle.

  17. The course of the superficial peroneal nerve in relation to the ankle position: anatomical study with ankle arthroscopic implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Leeuw, Peter A. J.; Golanó, Pau; Sierevelt, Inger N.; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2010-01-01

    Despite the fact that the superficial peroneal nerve is the only nerve in the human body that can be made visible; iatrogenic damage to this nerve is the most frequently reported complication in anterior ankle arthroscopy. One of the methods to visualize the nerve is combined ankle plantar flexion

  18. Three-dimensional bone kinematics in an anterior laxity test of the ankle joint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhoffs, G.; Blankevoort, L.; Kingma, I.; van Dijk, C.N.

    2007-01-01

    Questions addressed in this in-vitro study are (1) what are the actual three-dimensional kinematics of talus and calcaneus during an anterior drawer test as performed with the quasi-static anterior ankle tester (QAAT) (2) does laxity measurement with the QAAT represent the true anterior translation

  19. Primary stability and stiffness in ankle arthrodes-crossed screws versus anterior plating

    OpenAIRE

    Betz, Michael M; Benninger, Emanuel E; Favre, Philipp P; Wieser, Karl K; Vich, Magdalena M; Espinosa, Norman

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ankle arthrodesis is commonly used for the treatment of osteoarthritis or failed arthroplasty. Screw fixation is the predominant technique to perform ankle arthrodesis. Due to a considerable frequency of failures research suggests the use of an anatomically shaped anterior double plate system as a reliable method for isolated tibiotalar arthrodesis. The purpose of the present biomechanical study was to compare two groups of ankle fusion constructs - three screw fixation and an ant...

  20. Chronic instability of the anterior syndesmosis of the ankle: Biomechanical, kinematical, radiological and clinical aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Beumer (Annechien)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis is concerned with chronic anterior instability of the tibiofibular syndesmosis of the ankle. The ankle plays a fundamental role in locomotion. It consists of the talocrural and distal tibiofibular joint. The latter is a syndesmosis, a fibrous joint with ample intervening

  1. Anterolateral Drawer Versus Anterior Drawer Test for Ankle Instability: A Biomechanical Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Adam G; Myers, Stuart H; Parks, Brent G; Guyton, Gregory P

    2016-04-01

    The addition of unconstrained internal rotation to the physical examination could allow for detection of more subtle degrees of ankle instability. We hypothesized that a simulated anterolateral drawer test allowing unconstrained internal rotation of the ankle would provoke greater displacement of the lateral talus in the mortise versus the anterior drawer test. Ten cadaveric lower extremities were tested in a custom apparatus designed to reproduce the anterior drawer test and the anterolateral drawer test, in which the ankle was allowed to internally rotate about the intact deep deltoid ligament while being subluxed anteriorly. Specimens were tested intact and with anterior tibiofibular ligament sectioned. A differential variable reluctance transducer was used to measure lateral talar displacement with anterior forces of 25 and 50 N. No significant differences in talar displacement or ankle rotation were noted in intact specimens between the groups. Among sectioned specimens, significantly more talar displacement (25 N [6.5 ± 1.7 mm vs 3.8 ± 2.4 mm] and 50 N [8.7 ± 0.9 mm vs 4.5 ± 2.5 mm], P < .001) and ankle rotation (25 N [13.9 ± 8.0 degrees vs 0.0 ± 0.0 degrees] and 50 N [23.7 ± 5.8 degrees vs 0.0 ± 0.0 degrees], P < .001) were found in the anterolateral drawer versus anterior drawer group. In an ankle instability model, the anterolateral drawer test provoked almost twice the lateral talus displacement found with the anterior drawer test. Allowing internal rotation of the ankle while testing for ankle instability may allow the examiner to detect more subtle degrees of ankle instability. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Relation of the radial nerve to the anterior capsule of the elbow: anatomy with correlation to arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omid, Reza; Hamid, Nady; Keener, Jay D; Galatz, Leesa M; Yamaguchi, Ken

    2012-12-01

    To determine the location and proximity of the radial nerve to the anterior capsule and to delineate and describe the anatomy of the brachialis as it relates to the radial nerve and anterior capsule. Arthroscopy was performed on 24 cadavers using only a standard anteromedial portal. A Beath pin was placed laterally, entering the joint at the most lateral edge of the radiocapitellar joint space, and a suture was placed through the pin and into the joint for reference during the dissection. The second phase was to perform open anatomic dissections. We found that in all specimens the radial nerve coursed longitudinally medial to the capitellum. The brachialis muscle was found to lie between the radial nerve and the joint capsule at the joint line and all proximal levels. Only at the most distal aspect of the joint line (corresponding to the level of the radial neck) did the nerve run in direct contact with the capsule in 11 specimens (55%). The brachialis muscle thickness was 4 mm or greater at the joint line and at all proximal measurement points. We found that the radial nerve is more medially located than previously thought. At the level of the radiocapitellar joint line, the radial nerve runs medial to the capitellum. The brachialis muscle lies between the radial nerve and the joint capsule at the level of the joint line and proximally. Arthroscopic capsular release laterally should be performed at the level of the joint line or above. The most dangerous area for capsular resection is distally over the radial head/neck, where 50% of our specimens had no brachialis protecting the nerve. Copyright © 2012 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Quantitative evaluation of the viscoelastic properties of the ankle joint complex in patients suffering from ankle sprain by the anterior drawer test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Che-Yu; Shau, Yio-Wha; Wang, Chung-Li; Chai, Huei-Ming; Kang, Jiunn-Horng

    2013-06-01

    Biological tissues such as ligaments exhibit viscoelastic behaviours. Injury to the ligament may induce changes of these viscoelastic properties, and these changes could serve as biomarkers to detect the injury. In the present study, a novel instrument was developed to non-invasive quantify the viscoelastic properties of the ankle in vivo by the anterior drawer test. The purpose of the study was to investigate the reliability of the instrument and to compare the viscoelastic properties of the ankle between patients suffering from ankle sprain and controls. Eight patients and eight controls participated in the present study. The reliability test was performed on three randomly chosen subjects. In patient and control test, both ankles of each subject were tested to evaluate the viscoelastic properties of the ankle. The viscosity index was defined for quantitatively evaluating the viscosity of the ankle. Greater viscosity index was associated with lower viscosity. Injured and uninjured ankles of patient and both ankles of controls were compared. The instrument exhibited excellent test-retest reliability (r > 0.9). Injured ankles exhibited significantly less viscosity than uninjured ankles, since injured ankles of patients had significantly higher viscosity index (8,148 ± 5,266) compared with uninjured ankles of patients (948 ± 617; p = 0.008) and controls (1,326 ± 613; p ankle can serve as sensitive and useful clinical biomarkers to differentiate between injured and uninjured ankles. The method may provide a clinical examination for objectively evaluating lateral ankle ligament injuries.

  4. The importance of early arthroscopy in athletes with painful cartilage lesions of the ankle: a prospective study of 61 consecutive cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riyami Masoud

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ankle sprains are common in sports and can sometimes result in a persistent pain condition. Purpose Primarily to evaluate clinical symptoms, signs, diagnostics and outcomes of surgery for symptomatic chondral injuries of the talo crural joint in athletes. Secondly, in applicable cases, to evaluate the accuracy of MRI in detecting these injuries. Type of study: Prospective consecutive series. Methods Over around 4 years we studied 61 consecutive athletes with symptomatic chondral lesions to the talocrural joint causing persistent exertion ankle pain. Results 43% were professional full time athletes and 67% were semi-professional, elite or amateur athletes, main sports being soccer (49% and rugby (14%. The main subjective complaint was exertion ankle pain (93%. Effusion (75% and joint line tenderness on palpation (92% were the most common clinical findings. The duration from injury to arthroscopy for 58/61 cases was 7 months (5.7–7.9. 3/61 cases were referred within 3 weeks from injury. There were in total 75 cartilage lesions. Of these, 52 were located on the Talus dome, 17 on the medial malleolus and 6 on the Tibia plafond. Of the Talus dome injuries 18 were anteromedial, 14 anterolateral, 9 posteromedial, 3 posterolateral and 8 affecting mid talus. 50% were grade 4 lesions, 13.3% grade 3, 16.7% grade 2 and 20% grade 1. MRI had been performed pre operatively in 26/61 (39% and 59% of these had been interpreted as normal. Detection rate of cartilage lesions was only 19%, but subchondral oedema was present in 55%. At clinical follow up average 24 months after surgery (10–48 months, 73% were playing at pre-injury level. The average return to that level of sports after surgery was 16 weeks (3–32 weeks. However 43% still suffered minor symptoms. Conclusion Arthroscopy should be considered early when an athlete presents with exertion ankle pain, effusion and joint line tenderness on palpation after a previous sprain

  5. Ankle Arthrodesis: A Retrospective Analysis Comparing Single Column, Locked Anterior Plating to Crossed Lag Screw Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prissel, Mark A; Simpson, G Alex; Sutphen, Sean A; Hyer, Christopher F; Berlet, Gregory C

    Ankle arthrodesis is performed to eliminate pain due to end-stage osteoarthritis, regardless of etiology. This procedure remains the reference standard treatment for end-stage ankle arthritis, despite recent advancements in total ankle replacement. The objective of the present study was to retrospectively evaluate the radiographic and clinical fusion rates and time to bony fusion for patients who underwent ankle arthrodesis using an anterior approach with a single column locked plate construct versus crossed lag screws. We identified 358 patients who had undergone ankle arthrodesis from January 2003 to June 2013. Of the 358 patients, 83 (23.2%) met the inclusion criteria for the present study. Of the 83 included patients, 47 received locked anterior (or anterolateral) plate fixation, and 36 received crossed lag screw constructs. The overall nonunion rate was 6.0% (n = 5), with 1 nonunion in the anterior plate group (2.1%) and 4 nonunions in the crossed lag screw group (11.1%; p = .217). No differences were identified between the 2 groups for normal talocrural angle [χ 2 (1) = 0.527; p = .468], normal tibial axis/talar ratio [χ 2 (1) = 0.004; p = .952], and lateral dorsiflexion angle (p = .565). Based on our findings in similar demographic groups, ankle arthrodesis using locked anterior plate fixation is a safe technique with similar complication rates and radiographic outcomes to those of crossed lag screws. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Anterior Inferior Iliac Spine Morphology and Outcomes of Hip Arthroscopy in Soccer Athletes: A Comparison to Nonkicking Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawabi, Danyal H; Degen, Ryan M; Fields, Kara G; Wentzel, Catherine S; Adeoye, Olusanjo; Kelly, Bryan T

    2017-04-01

    To describe the anterior inferior iliac spine (AIIS) morphology and clinical outcomes following arthroscopic surgical decompression in a group of high-level soccer athletes presenting with symptomatic hip impingement when compared with a control group of nonkicking athletes. From 2009 to 2012, we retrospectively reviewed our prospective hip registry for soccer athletes who underwent arthroscopic treatment for femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) with 2-year follow-up, comparing with a control group of nonkicking athletes. Demographics were collected and radiographic studies (plain radiograph and computed tomographic scan) reviewed for several parameters, including AIIS morphology. Patient-reported outcome scores, including modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS), Hip Outcome Score-Activities of Daily Living (HOS-ADL) and Sport-Specific Subscale (HOS-SSS), and International Hip Outcome Tool-33 (iHOT-33), were administered preoperatively, at 6 months, and at 1, 2, and 3 years postoperatively. Twenty-six soccer players (34 hips) and 87 nonkicking athletes (115) hips were identified. Demographics, including age (19.2 ± 4.1 vs 20.1 ± 3.8 years) and gender distribution (53.8% vs 51.7% male), were similar between the soccer and nonkicking athletes (P = .288, .849). Eighty-four percent of soccer players demonstrated some abnormality of the AIIS extending to (type II, 52%) or below the anterior acetabular rim (type III, 32%), compared with 52% nonkicking athletes (P soccer players have a significantly higher rate of subspine impingement compared with nonkicking athletes. There should be a high index of suspicion when treating soccer players for FAI, where appropriate recognition and treatment of subspine impingement can yield excellent clinical results. Level III, retrospective case-control study. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Concordance between preoperatory diagnosis and arthroscopy findings of meniscal lesions associated to anterior cruciate ligament injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel-Jarquín, A; Barragán-Hervella, R; López-Cázares, G; Lima-Ramírez, P; Lázaro-Michaca, G; Vallecillo-Velázquez, H; Sánchez-Durán, M; Medina-Escobedo, C; Villatoro-Martínez, A

    2015-01-01

    Ligament injuries of the knee joint are common during the second and third decades of life, clinical and radiological diagnosis presents difficulties since the surgical findings may differ significantly. The objective is to determine correlation between clinical-radiologic and arthroscopic diagnosis in patients with injury of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and meniscal lesions. Cross-sectional study held in 29 patients with ACL injury associated to meniscal lesions treated arthroscopically. Variables were age, gender, affected side, preoperative and postoperative diagnosis, type and location of meniscal injury; descriptive statistics and Cohen Kappa for concordance were used. There were 29 patients, 23 (79.3%) men and 6 (20.7%) women, mean age 39.04 (15-50) ± 13.19 years; right side was affected in 69% and left in 31%; 19% had not meniscal lesion, 17.2% had injury in anterior horn, 10.3% in posterior horn and 6.9% in the body. The concordance between preoperative and artroscopic diagnosis was: Kappa 0.2; intraboservador was Kappa 1.0; between suspected meniscal injury and arthroscopic findings was: Kappa 0.2. The concordance between the clinical-radiological and arthroscopic diagnosis in patients with ACL injuries and meniscal injury associated is low, which has to be considered in the initial review and the arthroscopic treatment of patients.

  8. Arthroscopic treatment of impingement of the ankle reduces pain and enhances function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, S; Hjorth Jensen, C

    2002-01-01

    A consecutive series of 105 patients with a median age of 35 (16-62) years who were operated on with arthroscopic resection for impingement of the ankle using standardized technique without distraction is presented. All patients complained of painful dorsiflexion and had failed to respond...... synovectomy and intravenous antibiotics. In one patient persistent symptoms were recorded. Ankle arthroscopy yielded good results in the treatment of anterior impingement of the ankle as it effectively reduced pain and enhanced function....

  9. Value of fat-suppressed PD-weighted TSE-sequences for detection of anterior and posterior cruciate ligament lesions-Comparison to arthroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, Fritz K.W.; Schaefer, Philipp J.; Brossmann, Joachim; Frahm, Christian; Muhle, Claus; Hilgert, Ralf Erik; Heller, Martin; Jahnke, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate fat-suppressed (FS) proton-density-weighted (PDw) turbo spin-echo (TSE) magnetic resonance imaging for the detection of anterior and posterior cruciate ligament lesions in comparison to arthroscopy. Materials and methods: In a prospective study 31 knee joints were imaged on a 1.5 T MR scanner (Vision[reg], Siemens, Erlangen) prior to arthroscopy using following sequences: (a) sagittal FS-PDw/T2w TSE (TR/TE: 4009/15/105 ms); (b) sagittal PDw/T2w TSE (TR/TE:3800/15/105 ms). Further imaging parameters: slice thickness 3 mm, FOV 160 mm, matrix 256 x 256. A total of 62 anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments (ACL/PCL) were evaluated, standard of reference was arthroscopy. Sensitivity, specificity, positive (ppv) and negative predictive value (npv) and accuracy were calculated. Results: Twenty-one cruciate ligament ruptures were detected in arthroscopy, 19 ACL- and 2 PCL-ruptures (on MRI 34/124, 25/62 ACL, 9/62 PCL lesions). For all four sequences in the 31 patients with arthroscopic correlation sensitivity, specificity, ppv, npv and accuracy were 86%, 98%, 95%, 93% and 94% for detection of tears, and 84%, 100%, 100%, 80% and 90% for ACL-ruptures respectively. The two PCL-ruptures were true positive in all sequences, one intact PCL was diagnosed as torn (false positive). Conclusions: Fat-suppressed PDw/T2w TSE-MR sequences are comparable to PDw TSE sequences for the detection of ACL/PCL-lesions

  10. Value of fat-suppressed PD-weighted TSE-sequences for detection of anterior and posterior cruciate ligament lesions-Comparison to arthroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, Fritz K.W. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital of Schleswig-Holstein Campus Kiel, Arnold-Heller-Strasse 9, 24105 Kiel (Germany)]. E-mail: f.schaefer@rad.uni-kiel.de; Schaefer, Philipp J. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital of Schleswig-Holstein Campus Kiel, Arnold-Heller-Strasse 9, 24105 Kiel (Germany); Brossmann, Joachim [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital of Schleswig-Holstein Campus Kiel, Arnold-Heller-Strasse 9, 24105 Kiel (Germany); Frahm, Christian [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital of Schleswig-Holstein Campus Kiel, Arnold-Heller-Strasse 9, 24105 Kiel (Germany); Muhle, Claus [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital of Schleswig-Holstein Campus Kiel, Arnold-Heller-Strasse 9, 24105 Kiel (Germany); Hilgert, Ralf Erik [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital of Schleswig-Holstein Campus Kiel, Arnold-Heller-Strasse 9, 24105 Kiel (Germany); Heller, Martin [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital of Schleswig-Holstein Campus Kiel, Arnold-Heller-Strasse 9, 24105 Kiel (Germany); Jahnke, Thomas [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital of Schleswig-Holstein Campus Kiel, Arnold-Heller-Strasse 9, 24105 Kiel (Germany)

    2006-06-15

    Objective: To evaluate fat-suppressed (FS) proton-density-weighted (PDw) turbo spin-echo (TSE) magnetic resonance imaging for the detection of anterior and posterior cruciate ligament lesions in comparison to arthroscopy. Materials and methods: In a prospective study 31 knee joints were imaged on a 1.5 T MR scanner (Vision[reg], Siemens, Erlangen) prior to arthroscopy using following sequences: (a) sagittal FS-PDw/T2w TSE (TR/TE: 4009/15/105 ms); (b) sagittal PDw/T2w TSE (TR/TE:3800/15/105 ms). Further imaging parameters: slice thickness 3 mm, FOV 160 mm, matrix 256 x 256. A total of 62 anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments (ACL/PCL) were evaluated, standard of reference was arthroscopy. Sensitivity, specificity, positive (ppv) and negative predictive value (npv) and accuracy were calculated. Results: Twenty-one cruciate ligament ruptures were detected in arthroscopy, 19 ACL- and 2 PCL-ruptures (on MRI 34/124, 25/62 ACL, 9/62 PCL lesions). For all four sequences in the 31 patients with arthroscopic correlation sensitivity, specificity, ppv, npv and accuracy were 86%, 98%, 95%, 93% and 94% for detection of tears, and 84%, 100%, 100%, 80% and 90% for ACL-ruptures respectively. The two PCL-ruptures were true positive in all sequences, one intact PCL was diagnosed as torn (false positive). Conclusions: Fat-suppressed PDw/T2w TSE-MR sequences are comparable to PDw TSE sequences for the detection of ACL/PCL-lesions.

  11. Tendinopatia do compartimento anterior do tornozelo Tendinopathy of the anterior compartment of the ankle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Egydio de Carvalho Junior

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Análise retrospectiva da etiopatogenia, diagnóstico e opções de tratamento nos casos de tendinopatias do compartimento anterior do tornozelo (TCAT. MÉTODO: No período de setembro de 1998 a fevereiro de 2009, 13 pacientes foram operados por tendinopatia do compartimento anterior do tornozelo. A casuística constou de 10 pacientes do sexo masculino e três do feminino. O lado direito foi acometido em 12 pés e um do esquerdo. A média de idade foi de 35 anos (15-67. A etiologia foi traumática em oito pacientes e em cinco, degenerativa (atraumática. O tempo médio do diagnóstico ao tratamento foi de 19 meses (1-60 e o seguimento foi de 34 meses (4-127. O diagnóstico foi feito através da história e exame clínico. A ressonância magnética foi realizada em nove pacientes para estadiamento e planejamento. O tratamento cirúrgico foi personalizado para cada caso (sinovectomia, ressecção de ventre muscular, solidarização com o tendão adjacente e enxerto livre de tendão semitendíneo. Para a avaliação dos resultados foram utilizadas as escalas: 1 graduação subjetiva de satisfação, 2 AOFAS e 3 Maryland. RESULTADO: Em relação à escala de graduação subjetiva de satisfação, 12 pacientes satisfeitos e um paciente insatisfeito. A média da escala AOFAS foi de 80 pontos, a média da escala Maryland foi de 86 pontos. CONCLUSÃO: O tratamento cirúrgico é eficaz para recuperação funcional. As técnicas cirúrgicas devem ser personalizadas. A opção do enxerto livre de tendão semitendíneo é eficiente nas falhas maiores que cinco centímetros.OBJECTIVE: To carry out a retrospective analysis of the etiopathogeny, diagnosis and therapeutic options in cases of tendinopathies of the anterior compartment of the ankle. METHOD: 13 patients underwent surgery between September 1998 and February 2009; ten men and three women. The right side was involved in twelve patients and the left in one. The averaging age was 35 years of

  12. Comparison of Ankle Fusion Rates With and Without Anterior Plate Augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Phillip M; Douleh, Diana G; Thomson, A Brian

    2017-04-01

    The optimal fixation construct for tibiotalar arthrodesis continues to be debated. While biomechanical data and clinical series support anterior plate augmentation, comparative studies assessing its use are sparse. The purpose of this study was to compare the rates of successful tibiotalar arthrodesis with and without anterior plate augmentation of a compression screw construct. We studied 64 patients (65 ankles) undergoing tibiotalar arthrodesis done by a single surgeon over a 10-year period (2006-2016) with anterior plate augmentation beginning in 2010. Twenty-six ankles had a construct using compression screws only and 39 ankles had anterior plate augmentation of a compression screw construct. We reviewed clinical notes, operative reports, and postoperative radiographs to evaluate for union, incidence of revision, and postoperative complications. The nonunion rate in the compression screw (CS) cohort was 15.4% and 7.7% in the anterior plate augmentation (AP) cohort ( P = .33). The revision rate was 7.7% in the CS group and 2.6% in the AP cohort ( P = .34). The use of autograft harvested through a separate incision was 19.2% and 17.9% in the CS and AP cohorts, respectively. There were 2 deep postoperative infections in the AP group and none in the patients with CS only ( P = .24). There were no superficial wound complications in either group. Anterior plate augmentation was a viable fixation strategy in tibiotalar arthrodesis. In a trend toward an improved rate of fusion and decreased revision rate in the anterior plate augmentation cohort. Level III, retrospective comparative series.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in anterolateral impingement of the ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, L.K. III.; Cooperman, A.E.; Helms, C.A.; Speer, K.P.

    2000-01-01

    Objective. To demonstrate the MR imaging findings of anterolateral impingement (ALI) of the ankle.Design and patients. Nine patients with a history of ankle inversion injury and chronic lateral ankle pain were imaged with MR imaging, and the findings correlated with the results of arthroscopy. Three additional patients with clinically suspected ALI of the ankle were also included. Ankle MR imaging studies from 20 control patients in whom ALI was not suspected clinically were examined for similar findings to the patient group.Results. MR imaging findings in the patients with ALI included a soft tissue signal mass in the anterolateral gutter of the ankle in 12 of 12 (100%) cases, corresponding to the synovial hypertrophy and soft tissue mass found at arthroscopy in the nine patients who underwent arthroscopy. Disruption, attenuation, or marked thickening of the anterior talofibular ligament was seen in all cases. Additional findings included signs of synovial hypertrophy elsewhere in the tibiotalar joint in seven of 12 patients (58%) and bony and cartilaginous injuries to the tibiotalar joint in five of 12 (42%). None of the control patients demonstrated MR imaging evidence of a soft tissue mass in the anterolateral gutter.Conclusions. ALI of the ankle is a common cause for chronic lateral ankle pain. It has been well described in the orthopedic literature but its imaging findings have not been clearly elucidated. The MR imaging findings, along with the appropriate clinical history, can be used to direct arthroscopic examination and subsequent debridement. (orig.)

  14. Anterior ankle impingement after tendo-Achilles lengthening for long-standing equinus deformity in residual poliomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Ki Hyuk; Chung, Chin Youb; Lee, Kyoung Min; Lee, Seung Yeol; Park, Moon Seok

    2013-09-01

    This study was performed to investigate anterior ankle impingement after tendo-Achilles lengthening for long-standing equinus deformity in patients with residual poliomyelitis and to investigate whether the severity of preoperative equinus deformity affected the occurrence of symptomatic anterior impingement. Twenty-seven consecutive patients (mean age, 43.8 ± 9.4 years) with residual poliomyelitis who underwent tendo-Achilles lengthening for equinus foot deformity were included. On lateral foot-ankle weight-bearing radiographs, the tibiocalcaneal angle, plantigrade angle, and McDermott grade were measured and the presence of anterior blocking spur was evaluated. Eleven patients (40.7%) had anterior ankle impingement on radiographic findings preoperatively and 24 patients (88.9%) at latest follow-up. There was a significant difference in McDermott grade between preoperative and latest follow-up (P poliomyelitis had anterior ankle impingement after tendo-Achilles lengthening for long-standing equinus deformity, and the presence of symptomatic anterior ankle impingement was significantly associated with the severity of the equinus deformity. Therefore, for residual poliomyelitis patients with severe long-standing equinus deformity, surgeons should consider the possibility of a subsequent anterior procedure for anterior impingement after tendo-Achilles lengthening. Level IV, retrospective case series.

  15. Safe zone for placement of talar screws when fusing the ankle with an anterior plating system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskell, Andrew; Dedini, Russell; Dini, Monara

    2015-06-01

    Ankle fusions fixed with anterior plates use fluoroscopic guidance to direct screws toward the subtalar joint. Special imaging views that visualize the subtalar joint are difficult to use and can be unreliable. This study evaluated whether a single lateral ankle view would provide adequate information to judge whether a screw penetrated the subtalar joint and identified strategies that would improve this technique. In 5 cadaveric ankles fixed with anterior plates, talar screws were placed up to the subtalar joint without penetration using lateral fluoroscopy to guide screw length. After dissection, the true distance from the screw tip to subchondral surface was measured. In addition, 4 readers measured the perceived distance from screw tip to subchondral surface using direct lateral, 10 degrees cephalad tilt lateral, and 10 degrees caudal tilt lateral fluoroscopic images on 2 separate occasions. Nineteen (63%) of 30 screws penetrated the subchondral bone, and screw length determined using fluoroscopy was significantly longer than screw length measured directly (29.4 ± 5.5 mm vs 27.3 ± 8.5 mm, P = .014). Measurement of screw tip to bone distance demonstrated a high level of within-reader (kappa = .871, P plates may minimize screw penetration into the subtalar joint and diminish development of subtalar arthropathy. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Primary stability and stiffness in ankle arthrodes-crossed screws versus anterior plating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betz, Michael M; Benninger, Emanuel E; Favre, Philipp P; Wieser, Karl K; Vich, Magdalena M; Espinosa, Norman

    2013-09-01

    Ankle arthrodesis is commonly used for the treatment of osteoarthritis or failed arthroplasty. Screw fixation is the predominant technique to perform ankle arthrodesis. Due to a considerable frequency of failures research suggests the use of an anatomically shaped anterior double plate system as a reliable method for isolated tibiotalar arthrodesis. The purpose of the present biomechanical study was to compare two groups of ankle fusion constructs - three screw fixation and an anterior double plate system - in terms of primary stability and stiffness. Six matched-pairs human cadaveric lower legs (Thiel fixated) were used in this study. One specimen from each pair was randomly assigned to be stabilized with the anterior double plate system and the other with the three-screw technique. The different arthrodesis methods were tested by dorsiflexing the foot until failure of the system, defined as rotation of the talus relative to the tibia in the sagittal plane. Experiments were performed on a universal materials testing machine. The force required to make arthrodesis fail was documented. For calculation of the stiffness, a linear regression was fitted to the force-displacement curve in the linear portion of the curve and its slope taken as the stiffness. For the anatomically shaped double-plate system a mean load of 967N was needed (range from 570N to 1400N) to make arthrodesis fail. The three-screw fixation method resisted a mean load of 190N (range from 100N to 280N) (p=0.005). In terms of stiffness a mean of 56N/mm (range from 35N/mm to 79N/mm) was achieved for the anatomically shaped double-plate system whereas a mean of 10N/mm (range from 6N/mm to 18N/mm) was achieved for the three-screw fixation method (p=0.004). Our biomechanical data demonstrates that the anterior double-plate system is significantly superior to the three-screw fixation technique for ankle arthrodesis in terms of primary stability and stiffness. Copyright © 2013 European Foot and Ankle

  17. Six Sessions of Anterior-to-Posterior Ankle Joint Mobilizations Improve Patient-Reported Outcomes in Chronic Ankle Instability Patients: A Critically Appraised Topic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikstrom, Erik A; Bagherian, Sajad; Cordero, Nicole B; Song, Kyeongtak

    2018-01-24

    Clinical Scenario: Chronic ankle instability (CAI) is a complex musculoskeletal condition that results in sensorimotor and mechanical alterations. Manual therapies, such as ankle joint mobilizations are known to improve clinician-oriented outcomes like dorsiflexion range of motion but their impact of patient-reported outcomes remains less clear. Focused Clinical Question: Do anterior-to-posterior ankle joint mobilizations improve patient reported outcomes in patients with CAI? Summary of Key Findings: Three studies (2 RCT, 1 Prospective cohort) quantified the effect of at least 2-weeks of anterior-to-posterior ankle joint mobilizations on improving patient reported outcomes immediately after the intervention and at a follow-up assessment. All three studies demonstrated significant improvements in at least one patient-reported outcome immediately after the intervention and at the follow-up assessment. Clinical Bottom Line: At least 2-weeks of ankle joint mobilization improves patient-reported outcomes in patients with CAI and these benefits are retained for at least a week following the termination of the intervention. Strength of Recommendation: Strength of recommendation is an A due to consistent good-quality patient-oriented evidence.

  18. Weber B Fracture of the Lateral Malleolus with Concomitant Anterior Talofibular Ligament Injury following an Ankle Supination Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Khalid Faqi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Lauge-Hansen (LH classification attempts to predict patterns of ankle injuries based upon the preceding mechanism of injury. Although it is widely used in clinical practice, it has been criticized mainly due to numerous reports of cases conflicting the prediction system. Here, we report a case of a 32-year-old male who sustained a Weber B fracture of the lateral malleolus following a supination ankle injury, which was treated conservatively, following which the patient presented with ankle instability and was found to have concurrent anterior talofibular ligament tear. Critical review of the LH classification along with its shortcomings is discussed.

  19. Weber B Fracture of the Lateral Malleolus with Concomitant Anterior Talofibular Ligament Injury following an Ankle Supination Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faqi, Mohammed Khalid; AlJawder, Abdulla; Alkhalifa, Fahad; Almajed, Ali H

    2016-01-01

    The Lauge-Hansen (LH) classification attempts to predict patterns of ankle injuries based upon the preceding mechanism of injury. Although it is widely used in clinical practice, it has been criticized mainly due to numerous reports of cases conflicting the prediction system. Here, we report a case of a 32-year-old male who sustained a Weber B fracture of the lateral malleolus following a supination ankle injury, which was treated conservatively, following which the patient presented with ankle instability and was found to have concurrent anterior talofibular ligament tear. Critical review of the LH classification along with its shortcomings is discussed.

  20. Comparison of Ankle Joint Visualization Between the 70° and 30° Arthroscopes: A Cadaveric Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonogai, Ichiro; Hayashi, Fumio; Tsuruo, Yoshihiro; Sairyo, Koichi

    2018-02-01

    Ankle arthroscopy is an important diagnostic and therapeutic tool. Arthroscopic ankle surgery for anterior ankle impingement or osteochondral lesions (OCLs) is mostly performed with a 30° arthroscope; however, visualization of lesions is sometimes difficult. This study sought to compare ankle joint visualization between 70° and 30° arthroscopes and clarify the effectiveness of 70° arthroscopy. Standard anterolateral and anteromedial portals were placed with 4-mm 70° or 30° angled arthroscopes in a fresh 77-year-old male cadaveric ankle. The medial ligament and surrounding tissue were dissected via a medial malleolar skin incision. Kirschner wires were inserted into the distal tibia anterior edge; 5-mm diameter OCLs were created on the medial talar gutter anteriorly, midway, and posteriorly. The talar dome and distal tibia anterior edge were visualized using both arthroscopes. The 70° arthroscope displayed the anterior edge of the distal tibia immediately in front of the arthroscope, allowing full visualization of the posterior OCL of the medial talar gutter more clearly than the 30° arthroscope. This study revealed better ankle joint visualization with the 70° arthroscope, and may enable accurate, safe, and complete debridement, especially in treatment of medial talar gutter posterior OCLs and removal of anterior distal tibial edge bony impediments. Level IV, Anatomic study.

  1. [Case-control study on therapeutic effects of Rigidfix cross pins combined with Intrafix pins for the reconstruction of anterior or posterior cruciate ligament under arthroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jian-hua; Yang, Chang-sheng; Xu, Jing; Bao, Chang-kun; Li, Hong-bin

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate therapeutic effects of Rigidfix cross pins combined with Intrafix pins for the reconstruction of anterior or posterior cruciate ligament under arthroscopy. From January 2009 to June 2010,34 patients with anterior or posterior cruciate ligament injuries were divided into two groups : group A and group B. There were 24 patients in group A, including 19 males and 5 females,with an average age of (31.83±9.57) years old. The patients in group A were treated with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction under arthroscopy; Rigidfix cross pins and Intrafix pins were used to fix femoral and tibial side respectively. Among the 10 patients in group B, 8 patients were male and 2 patients were female, with an average age of (27.20+7.59) years old. The patients in group B were treated with posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction under arthroscope; Intrafix pins and Rigidifix cross pins were used to fix femoral and tibial side sepectively. The drawer test and Lachaman test were used to evaluate postoperative knee stability. All the patients were followed up at least 18 months. Lysholm and Tegner knee scores were used to evaluate the clinical therapeutic effects. All the 34 patients were followed up, and the duration ranged from 18 to 26 months,with an average of (20.79±2.39) months. All the patients obtained good pain relief and knee stability. In group A,Lysholm scores significantly increased from 43.04±7.57 preoperatively to 85.41±4.68, 92.50±3.05, and 93.45±2.57 at 6,12, and 18 months postoperatively; Tegner scores significantly increased from 2.62±0.92 preoperatively to 7.45±1.14, 8.58±0.77, and 8.95±0.55 at 6, 12, and 18 months postoperatively. In group B,Lysholm scores significantly increased from 46.20±8.27 preoperatively to 86.40±5.14,90.40±2.67,and 92.00±3.85 at 6,12,and 18 months postoperatively ;Tegner scores significantly increased from 2.00±0.66 preoperatively to 7.10±0.99, 8.60±0.84, and 8.80±0.42 at 6,12, and 18 months

  2. An anterior ankle-foot orthosis improves walking economy in Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menotti, Federica; Laudani, Luca; Damiani, Antonello; Mignogna, Teresa; Macaluso, Andrea

    2014-10-01

    Ankle-foot orthoses are commonly prescribed in Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A disease to improve quality of walking and reduce the risk of falling due to the foot drop. This study aimed at assessing the effect of an anterior ankle-foot orthosis on walking economy in a group of Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A patients. Within-group comparisons. 7 Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A patients (four women and three men; 37 ± 11 years; age range = 22-53 years) were asked to walk on a circuit at their self-selected speeds ('slow', 'comfortable' and 'fast') in two walking conditions: (1) with shoes only and (2) with Taloelast(®) anterior elastic ankle-foot orthoses. Speed of walking and metabolic cost of walking energy cost per unit of distance were assessed at the three self-selected speeds of walking for both walking conditions. Speed of walking at the three self-selected speeds did not differ between shoes only and anterior elastic ankle-foot orthoses, whereas walking energy cost per unit of distance at comfortable speed was lower in patients using anterior elastic ankle-foot orthoses with respect to shoes only (2.39 ± 0.22 vs 2.70 ± 0.19 J kg(-1) m(-1); P Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A patients, the use of anterior elastic ankle-foot orthoses improved walking economy by reducing the energy cost of walking per unit of distance, thus reflecting a lower level of metabolic effort and improved mechanical efficiency in comparison with shoes only. From a practical perspective, Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A patients with anterior elastic ankle-foot orthoses can walk for a longer duration with a lower level of physical effort. Improvements in walking economy due to ankle-foot orthoses are likely a consequence of the reduction in steppage gait. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2013.

  3. Traction-related problems after hip arthroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Lone; Lund, Bent; Grønbech Nielsen, Torsten

    2017-01-01

    . The questionnaire included questions on patients' perceptions of traction-related problems in the groin area, at the knee and ankle and how patients had coped with these problems. A total of 100 consecutive patients undergoing hip arthroscopy filled out the questionnaire. Primary findings of this study were that 74......% of patients reported some sort of traction-related problems after hip arthroscopy. About 32% of the patients had problems in the groin area and 49% of the patients complained of symptoms in the knee joint. A total of 37% of the patients had experienced problems from the traction boot in the ankle area....... The complications were found to be temporary and disappeared after 2-4 weeks. Five patients still had complaints after 3 months. All five patients had a pre-existing knee injury prior to undergoing hip arthroscopy. Traction-related problems after hip arthroscopy are a challenge and our study showed that 74...

  4. Combined Anterolateral, Anterior, and Anteromedial Ankle Impingement in an Adolescent Soccer Player-A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosma, Dan I; Vasilescu, Dana E; Corbu, Andrei; Todor, Adrian; Valeanu, Madalina; Ulici, Alexandru

    2018-01-24

    A unique case of combined anterolateral, anterior, and anteromedial ankle impingement in an adolescent soccer player is presented in this article. To the best of our knowledge, this is the only report of circumferential, massive, anterior ankle impingement in children described in the literature. The importance of proper diagnosis and treatment of such a lesion is illustrated in this case report. We also emphasize that clinical examination combined with 3D computed tomography scan reconstruction is an excellent and cost-effective imaging modality that can help with the diagnosis of anterior ankle impingement. Finally, open surgical treatment showed excellent results in an elite athlete.

  5. MR-imaging of anterior tibiotalar impingement syndrome: Agreement, sensitivity and specificity of MR-imaging and indirect MR-arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haller, Joerg; Bernt, Reinhard; Seeger, Thomas; Weissenbaeck, Alexander; Tuechler, Heinrich; Resnick, Donald

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To clarify the role of MR-imaging in the diagnosis of anterior ankle impingement syndromes. Materials and methods: We prospectively examined 51 consecutive patients with chronic ankle pain by MR-imaging. Arthroscopy was performed in 29 patients who previously underwent non-enhanced MR-imaging; in 11 patients, indirect MR-arthrography additionally was performed. MR-examinations were correlated with clinical findings; MR and arthroscopy scores were statistically compared, agreement was measured. Results: Arthroscopy demonstrated granulation tissue in the lateral gutter (38%) and anterior recess (31%), lesions of the anterior tibiofibular (31%) and the anterior talofibular ligament (21%) as well as intraarticular bodies (10%). Stenosing tenosynovitis and a ganglionic cyst were revealed as extraarticular causes for chronic ankle pain by MR-examination (17%). Agreement of MR-imaging and arthroscopy was fair for the anterior talofibular ligament and the anterior joint cavity (kappa 0.40). Major discrepancy was found for non-enhanced MR scans (kappa 0.49) when compared with indirect MR-arthrography (kappa 0.03) in the anterior cavity. The sensitivity for lesions of the anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligament and the anterior cavity (0.91-0.87) detected by MR-imaging was superior in comparison to lesions of the anterior tibiofibular ligament and anteromedial cavity (0.50-0.24). Conclusion: MR-imaging provides additional information about the mechanics of chronic ankle impingement rather than an accurate diagnosis of this clinical entity. The method is helpful in differentiating extra- from intra-articular causes of ankle impingement. Indirect MR-arthrography has little or no additional value in patients with ankle impingement syndrome

  6. MR-imaging of anterior tibiotalar impingement syndrome: Agreement, sensitivity and specificity of MR-imaging and indirect MR-arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haller, Joerg [Department of Radiology, Hanusch Hospital, Heinrich Collin-Strasse 30, A-1140 Vienna (Austria); Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Osteology, Hanusch Hospital, Heinrich Collin-Strasse 30, A-1140 Vienna (Austria); Bernt, Reinhard [Department of Radiology, Hanusch Hospital, Heinrich Collin-Strasse 30, A-1140 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: reinhard.bernt@wgkk.sozvers.at; Seeger, Thomas [Department of Trauma Surgery, Hanusch Hospital, Heinrich Collin-Strasse 30, A-1140 Vienna (Austria); Weissenbaeck, Alexander [Department of Trauma Surgery, Hanusch Hospital, Heinrich Collin-Strasse 30, A-1140 Vienna (Austria); Tuechler, Heinrich [Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Hematology, Hanusch Hospital, Heinrich Collin-Strasse 30, A-1140 Vienna (Austria); Resnick, Donald [Department of Radiology, VA Medical Center, UCSD, 3350 La Jolla Village Dr, San Diego, CA 92161 (United States)

    2006-06-15

    Objective: To clarify the role of MR-imaging in the diagnosis of anterior ankle impingement syndromes. Materials and methods: We prospectively examined 51 consecutive patients with chronic ankle pain by MR-imaging. Arthroscopy was performed in 29 patients who previously underwent non-enhanced MR-imaging; in 11 patients, indirect MR-arthrography additionally was performed. MR-examinations were correlated with clinical findings; MR and arthroscopy scores were statistically compared, agreement was measured. Results: Arthroscopy demonstrated granulation tissue in the lateral gutter (38%) and anterior recess (31%), lesions of the anterior tibiofibular (31%) and the anterior talofibular ligament (21%) as well as intraarticular bodies (10%). Stenosing tenosynovitis and a ganglionic cyst were revealed as extraarticular causes for chronic ankle pain by MR-examination (17%). Agreement of MR-imaging and arthroscopy was fair for the anterior talofibular ligament and the anterior joint cavity (kappa 0.40). Major discrepancy was found for non-enhanced MR scans (kappa 0.49) when compared with indirect MR-arthrography (kappa 0.03) in the anterior cavity. The sensitivity for lesions of the anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligament and the anterior cavity (0.91-0.87) detected by MR-imaging was superior in comparison to lesions of the anterior tibiofibular ligament and anteromedial cavity (0.50-0.24). Conclusion: MR-imaging provides additional information about the mechanics of chronic ankle impingement rather than an accurate diagnosis of this clinical entity. The method is helpful in differentiating extra- from intra-articular causes of ankle impingement. Indirect MR-arthrography has little or no additional value in patients with ankle impingement syndrome.

  7. Intramuscular Pressure of Tibialis Anterior Reflects Ankle Torque but Does Not Follow Joint Angle-Torque Relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filiz Ateş

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Intramuscular pressure (IMP is the hydrostatic fluid pressure that is directly related to muscle force production. Electromechanical delay (EMD provides a link between mechanical and electrophysiological quantities and IMP has potential to detect local electromechanical changes. The goal of this study was to assess the relationship of IMP with the mechanical and electrical characteristics of the tibialis anterior muscle (TA activity at different ankle positions. We hypothesized that (1 the TA IMP and the surface EMG (sEMG and fine-wire EMG (fwEMG correlate to ankle joint torque, (2 the isometric force of TA increases at increased muscle lengths, which were imposed by a change in ankle angle and IMP follows the length-tension relationship characteristics, and (3 the electromechanical delay (EMD is greater than the EMD of IMP during isometric contractions. Fourteen healthy adults [7 female; mean (SD age = 26.9 (4.2 years old with 25.9 (5.5 kg/m2 body mass index] performed (i three isometric dorsiflexion (DF maximum voluntary contraction (MVC and (ii three isometric DF ramp contractions from 0 to 80% MVC at rate of 15% MVC/second at DF, Neutral, and plantarflexion (PF positions. Ankle torque, IMP, TA fwEMG, and TA sEMG were measured simultaneously. The IMP, fwEMG, and sEMG were significantly correlated to the ankle torque during ramp contractions at each ankle position tested. This suggests that IMP captures in vivo mechanical properties of active muscles. The ankle torque changed significantly at different ankle positions however, the IMP did not reflect the change. This is explained with the opposing effects of higher compartmental pressure at DF in contrast to the increased force at PF position. Additionally, the onset of IMP activity is found to be significantly earlier than the onset of force which indicates that IMP can be designed to detect muscular changes in the course of neuromuscular diseases impairing electromechanical transmission.

  8. [Ultrabraid SUTURE WITH FOOTPRINT RIVET FOR ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT TIBIAL EMINENCE AVULSION FRACTURE IN ADOLESCENTS UNDER ARTHROSCOPY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jinying; Zheng, Jiapeng; Ll, Qiang; Zhong, Shuyu; Chen, Minzhen

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the clinical effects of the Ultrabraid suture with FOOTPRINT rivet by arthroscopic technique for the treatment of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tibial eminence avulsion fracture. Between May 2011 and December 2013, 19 adolescent patients with ACL tibial eminence avulsion fracture were treated with arthroscopic reduction and fixation by Ultrabraid sutures with FOOTPRINT rivet. There were 13 males and 6 females with an average age of 15.8 years (range, 8-18 years). The left knees were involved in 10 cases and the right knees in 9 cases. The injury causes included traffic accident injury in 8 cases, sport injury in 6 cases, and sprain injury in 5 cases. Three patients had old fractures, and the others had fresh fractures. The results of Lachman test and anterior drawer test were both positive. The International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) subject score was 54.2 ± 4.0. Based on Meyers-McKeever classification, there were 3 cases of type II, 10 cases of type III, and 6 cases of type IV. The operation time was 50-60 minutes (mean, 55.2 minutes). X-ray film showed satisfactory fracture reduction at 1 day after operation. Primary healing of incision was obtained with no infection. Eighteen patients were followed up for 1-3 years (mean, 1.7 years). All fractures healed with smooth joint surface on the X-ray film at 3 months after operation. The results of Lachman test and anterior drawer test were both negative in 17 cases, and the results was negative for anterior drawer test and was weakly positive for Lachman test in 1 case. The IKDC subject score was significantly improved to 96.1 ± 2.1 at last follow-up (t = 34.600, P = 0.000). It could achieve early restoration of knee joint function to treat the ACL tibial eminence avulsion fracture by arthroscopic technique of the Ultrabraid suture with FOOTPRINT rivet because of satisfactory reduction, reliable fixation, small wound, and early rehabilitation.

  9. T2 mapping of the articular cartilage in the ankle: Correlation to the status of anterior talofibular ligament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.; Yoon, Y.C.; Kim, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate differences in T2 relaxation time of ankle cartilage using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) according to the status of the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL). Materials and methods: The talar trochlear cartilage (TTC) was evaluated in 52 patients with ankle pain that were categorized according to the status of ATFL; normal (NL; n = 23, mean age 40 years); partial tear (PT; n = 21, mean age 39 years); or complete tear (CT; n = 8, mean age 33 years). The TTC was divided into six compartments (medial anterior, medial centre, medial posterior, lateral anterior, lateral centre, and lateral posterior). The mean T2 value of each compartment was obtained using the multi-echo sequence. Data were analysed with parametric and non-parametric statistical tests. Results: The mean T2 values of the TTC showed significant differences between the three groups; NL, PT, and CT (p < 0.001). The T2 value between the three ligamentous groups were significantly different in the medial anterior, lateral anterior, and lateral centre compartments (p = 0.003, 0.002, 0.002, respectively). T2 values of the PT and CT groups were significantly higher than those of the NL group in the medial anterior compartment (p = 0.015, 0.002) and lateral anterior compartment (p = 0.026, <0.001). The T2 value of the CT group was significantly higher than that of NL and PT groups in the lateral centre compartment (p < 0.001, 0.031). Conclusion: The T2 value of the TTC in patients with ATFL injury increased at the medial anterior, lateral anterior, and lateral centre compartments

  10. Pseudo-aneurysm of the anterior tibial artery, a rare cause of ankle swelling following a sports injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McAteer Eamon

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ankle pain and swelling following sports injuries are common presenting complaints to the accident and emergency department. Frequently these are diagnosed as musculoskeletal injuries, even when no definitive cause is found. Vascular injuries following trauma are uncommon and are an extremely rare cause of ankle swelling and pain. These injuries may however be limb threatening and are important to diagnose early, in order that appropriate treatment can be delivered. We highlight the steps to diagnosis of these injuries, and methods of managing these injuries. It is important for clinicians to be aware of the potential for this injury in patients with seemingly innocuous trauma from sports injuries, who have significant ankle pain and swelling. Case presentation A young, professional sportsman presented with a swollen, painful ankle after an innocuous hyper-plantar flexion injury whilst playing football, which was initially diagnosed as a ligamentous injury after no bony injury was revealed on X-Ray. He returned 2 days later with a large ulcer at the lateral malleolus and further investigation by duplex ultrasound and transfemoral arteriogram revealed a Pseudo-Aneurysm of the Anterior Tibial Artery. This was initially managed with percutaneous injection of thrombin, and later open surgery to ligate the feeding vessel. The patient recovered fully and was able to return to recreational sport. Conclusion Vascular injuries remain a rare cause of ankle pain and swelling following sports injuries, however it is important to consider these injuries when no definite musculo-skeletal cause is found. Ultrasound duplex and Transfemoral arteriogram are appropriate, sensitive modalities for investigation, and may allow novel treatment to be directed percutaneously. Early diagnosis and intervention are essential for the successful outcome in these patients.

  11. Pseudo-aneurysm of the anterior tibial artery, a rare cause of ankle swelling following a sports injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marron, Conor D; McKay, Damian; Johnston, Ruth; McAteer, Eamon; Stirling, WJ Ivan

    2005-01-01

    Background Ankle pain and swelling following sports injuries are common presenting complaints to the accident and emergency department. Frequently these are diagnosed as musculoskeletal injuries, even when no definitive cause is found. Vascular injuries following trauma are uncommon and are an extremely rare cause of ankle swelling and pain. These injuries may however be limb threatening and are important to diagnose early, in order that appropriate treatment can be delivered. We highlight the steps to diagnosis of these injuries, and methods of managing these injuries. It is important for clinicians to be aware of the potential for this injury in patients with seemingly innocuous trauma from sports injuries, who have significant ankle pain and swelling. Case presentation A young, professional sportsman presented with a swollen, painful ankle after an innocuous hyper-plantar flexion injury whilst playing football, which was initially diagnosed as a ligamentous injury after no bony injury was revealed on X-Ray. He returned 2 days later with a large ulcer at the lateral malleolus and further investigation by duplex ultrasound and transfemoral arteriogram revealed a Pseudo-Aneurysm of the Anterior Tibial Artery. This was initially managed with percutaneous injection of thrombin, and later open surgery to ligate the feeding vessel. The patient recovered fully and was able to return to recreational sport. Conclusion Vascular injuries remain a rare cause of ankle pain and swelling following sports injuries, however it is important to consider these injuries when no definite musculo-skeletal cause is found. Ultrasound duplex and Transfemoral arteriogram are appropriate, sensitive modalities for investigation, and may allow novel treatment to be directed percutaneously. Early diagnosis and intervention are essential for the successful outcome in these patients. PMID:16225679

  12. Sagittal Plane Hip, Knee, and Ankle Biomechanics and the Risk of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury: A Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppänen, Mari; Pasanen, Kati; Krosshaug, Tron; Kannus, Pekka; Vasankari, Tommi; Kujala, Urho M; Bahr, Roald; Perttunen, Jarmo; Parkkari, Jari

    2017-12-01

    Stiff landings with less knee flexion and high vertical ground-reaction forces have been shown to be associated with an increased risk of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. The literature on the association between other sagittal plane measures and the risk of ACL injuries with a prospective study design is lacking. To investigate the relationship between selected sagittal plane hip, knee, and ankle biomechanics and the risk of ACL injury in young female team-sport athletes. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 171 female basketball and floorball athletes (age range, 12-21 years) participated in a vertical drop jump test using 3-dimensional motion analysis. All new ACL injuries, as well as match and training exposure data, were recorded for 1 to 3 years. Biomechanical variables, including hip and ankle flexion at initial contact (IC), hip and ankle ranges of motion (ROMs), and peak external knee and hip flexion moments, were selected for analysis. Cox regression models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% CIs. The combined sensitivity and specificity of significant test variables were assessed using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. A total of 15 noncontact ACL injuries were recorded during follow-up (0.2 injuries/1000 player-hours). Of the variables investigated, landing with less hip flexion ROM (HR for each 10° increase in hip ROM, 0.61 [95% CI, 0.38-0.99]; P < .05) and a greater knee flexion moment (HR for each 10-N·m increase in knee moment, 1.21 [95% CI, 1.04-1.40]; P = .01) was significantly associated with an increased risk of ACL injury. Hip flexion at IC, ankle flexion at IC, ankle flexion ROM, and peak external hip flexion moment were not significantly associated with the risk of ACL injury. ROC curve analysis for significant variables showed an area under the curve of 0.6, indicating a poor combined sensitivity and specificity of the test. Landing with less hip flexion ROM and a greater peak

  13. Hip and Ankle Kinematics in Noncontact Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Situations: Video Analysis Using Model-Based Image Matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Hideyuki; Nakamae, Atsuo; Shima, Yosuke; Bahr, Roald; Krosshaug, Tron

    2018-02-01

    Detailed kinematic descriptions of real anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury situations are limited to the knee only. To describe hip and ankle kinematics as well as foot position relative to the center of mass (COM) in ACL injury situations through use of a model-based image-matching (MBIM) technique. The distance between the projection of the COM on the ground and the base of support (BOS) (COM_BOS) normalized to the femur length was also evaluated. Descriptive laboratory study. Ten ACL injury video sequences from women's handball and basketball were analyzed. Hip and ankle joint kinematic values were obtained by use of MBIM. The mean hip flexion angle was 51° (95% CI, 41° to 63°) at initial contact and remained constant over the next 40 milliseconds. The hip was internally rotated 29° (95% CI, 18° to 39°) at initial contact and remained unchanged for the next 40 milliseconds. All of the injured patients landed with a heel strike with a mean dorsiflexion angle of 2° (95% CI, -9° to 14°), before reaching a flatfooted position 20 milliseconds later. The foot position was anterior and lateral to the COM in all cases. However, none of the results showed larger COM_BOS than 1.2, which has been suggested as a criterion for ACL injury risk. Hip kinematic values were consistent among the 10 ACL injury situations analyzed; the hip joint remained unchanged in a flexed and internally rotated position in the phase leading up to injury, suggesting that limited energy absorption took place at the hip. In all cases, the foot contacted the ground with the heel strike. However, relatively small COM_BOS distances were found, indicating that the anterior and lateral foot placement in ACL injury situations was not different from what can be expected in noninjury game situations.

  14. Impingement syndrome of the ankle following supination external rotation trauma: MR imaging findings with arthroscopic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaffler, Gottfried J. [Department of Radiology, University of California San Francisco, 350 Parnassus Avenue, Suite 150, San Francisco, CA 94117 (United States); Department of Radiology, University Hospital Graz, Auenbruggerplatz 9, 8036 Graz (Austria); Tirman, Phillip F.J.; Stoller, David W. [San Francisco Magnetic Resonance Center, 3333 California Street, Suite 105, San Francisco, CA 94118 (United States); Genant, Harry K. [Department of Radiology, University of California San Francisco, 350 Parnassus Avenue, Suite 150, San Francisco, CA 94117 (United States); Ceballos, Cecar; Dillingham, Michael F. [Sports Orthopedics and Rehabilitation, 2884 Sand Hill Rd., Suite 110, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2003-06-01

    Our objective was to identify MR imaging findings in patients with syndesmotic soft tissue impingement of the ankle and to investigate the reliability of these imaging characteristics to predict syndesmotic soft tissue impingement syndromes of the ankle. Twenty-one ankles with chronic pain ultimately proven to have anterior soft tissue impingement syndrome were examined by MR imaging during January 1996 to June 2001. The MR imaging protocol included sagittal and coronal short tau inversion recovery (STIR), sagittal T1-weighted spin echo, axial and coronal proton-density, and T2-weighted spin-echo sequences. Nineteen ankles that underwent MR imaging during the same period of time and that had arthroscopically proven diagnosis different than impingement syndrome served as a control group. Fibrovascular scar formations distinct from the syndesmotic ligaments possibly related to syndesmotic soft tissue impingement were recorded. Arthroscopy was performed subsequently in all patients and was considered the gold standard. The statistical analysis revealed an overall frequency of scarred syndesmotic ligaments of 70% in the group with ankle impingement. Fibrovascular scar formations distinct from the syndesmotic ligaments presented with low signal intensity on T1-weighted images and remained low to intermediate in signal intensity on T2-weighted MR imaging. Compared with arthroscopy, MR imaging revealed a sensitivity of 89%, a specificity of 100%, and a diagnostic accuracy of 93% for scarred syndesmotic ligaments. The frequency of scar formation distinct from the syndesmotic ligaments in patients with impingement syndrome of the ankle was not statistically significantly higher than in the control group. In contrast to that, anterior tibial osteophytes and talar osteophytes were statistically significantly higher in the group with anterior impingement than in the control group. Conventional MR imaging was found to be insensitive for the diagnosis of syndesmotic soft tissue

  15. Computational model to investigate the relative contributions of different neuromuscular properties of tibialis anterior on force generated during ankle dorsiflexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqi, Ariba; Poosapadi Arjunan, Sridhar; Kumar, Dinesh Kant

    2018-01-16

    This study describes a new model of the force generated by tibialis anterior muscle with three new features: single-fiber action potential, twitch force, and pennation angle. This model was used to investigate the relative effects and interaction of ten age-associated neuromuscular parameters. Regression analysis (significance level of 0.05) between the neuromuscular properties and corresponding simulated force produced at the footplate was performed. Standardized slope coefficients were computed to rank the effect of the parameters. The results show that reduction in the average firing rate is the reason for the sharp decline in the force and other factors, such as number of muscle fibers, specific force, pennation angle, and innervation ratio. The fast fiber ratio affects the simulated force through two significant interactions. This study has ranked the individual contributions of the neuromuscular factors to muscle strength decline of the TA and identified firing rate decline as the biggest cause followed by decrease in muscle fiber number and specific force. The strategy for strength preservation for the elderly should focus on improving firing rate. Graphical abstract Neuromuscular properties of Tibialis Anterior on force generated during ankle dorsiflexion.

  16. Traction-related problems after hip arthroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Bent; Grønbech Nielsen, Torsten; Lind, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Traction-related problems are poorly described in the existing literature. The purpose of this prospective study was to describe traction-related problems and how patients perceive these problems. The study was a descriptive cohort study and data were collected from questionnaires and patient files. The questionnaire included questions on patients’ perceptions of traction-related problems in the groin area, at the knee and ankle and how patients had coped with these problems. A total of 100 consecutive patients undergoing hip arthroscopy filled out the questionnaire. Primary findings of this study were that 74% of patients reported some sort of traction-related problems after hip arthroscopy. About 32% of the patients had problems in the groin area and 49% of the patients complained of symptoms in the knee joint. A total of 37% of the patients had experienced problems from the traction boot in the ankle area. The complications were found to be temporary and disappeared after 2–4 weeks. Five patients still had complaints after 3 months. All five patients had a pre-existing knee injury prior to undergoing hip arthroscopy. Traction-related problems after hip arthroscopy are a challenge and our study showed that 74% of the patients reported traction-related problems. This is significantly higher than previously reported. The present study found a high rate of complaints from the knee and ankle joints that have not previously been reported. The presented data suggest the need for more pre-surgery patient information about possible traction-related problems. PMID:28630721

  17. Anatomical Footprint of the Tibialis Anterior Tendon: Surgical Implications for Foot and Ankle Reconstructions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeleine Willegger

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to analyze precisely the dimensions, shapes, and variations of the insertional footprints of the tibialis anterior tendon (TAT at the medial cuneiform (MC and first metatarsal (MT1 base. Forty-one formalin-fixed human cadaveric specimens were dissected. After preparation of the TAT footprint, standardized photographs were made and the following parameters were evaluated: the footprint length, width, area of insertion, dorsoplantar location, shape, and additional tendon slips. Twenty feet (48.8% showed an equal insertion at the MC and MT1, another 20 feet (48.8% had a wide insertion at the MC and a narrow insertion at the MT1, and 1 foot (2.4% demonstrated a narrow insertion at the MC and a wide insertion at the MT1. Additional tendon slips inserting at the metatarsal shaft were found in two feet (4.8%. Regarding the dorsoplantar orientation, the footprints were located medial in 29 feet (70.7% and medioplantar in 12 feet (29.3%. The most common shape at the MT1 base was the crescent type (75.6% and the oval type at the MC (58.5%. The present study provided more detailed data on the dimensions and morphologic types of the tibialis anterior tendon footprint. The established anatomical data may allow for a safer surgical preparation and a more anatomical reconstruction.

  18. Incidence and MR imaging features of fractures of the anterior process of calcaneus in a consecutive patient population with ankle and foot symptoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouellette, H.; Salamipour, H.; Thomas, B.J.; Kassarjian, A.; Torriani, M. [Division of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2006-11-15

    To determine the incidence, appearances and associated injuries of fractures affecting the anterior process of calcaneus from a general population with foot and ankle symptoms. A retrospective review of foot and ankle MR imaging procedures was performed for detection of cases with a fracture affecting the anterior process of calcaneus over a four year period. Radiographs, MR imaging studies, radiology reports, medical records, and operative notes were reviewed. Imaging analysis included fracture pattern, displacement, associated fractures, and presence of tendon and ligamentous injuries. The incidence of anterior process of calcaneus fracture on MR imaging was 0.5% (14/2577). Fractures were more common in female subjects (71%, 10/14). Fracture orientation was predominantly vertical (93%, 13/14). No comminuted fractures were seen and only three fractures were displaced. Three of the eight MR imaging evident fractures of anterior process of calcaneus were seen on radiographs. Associated fractures of the talus (n=5), navicular bone (n=3), cuboid (n=2), and calcaneal body (n=1) were noted. Associated injuries to the anterior talofibular ligament (n=3) and tears of the peroneus brevis (n=3) and peroneus longus (n=1) tendons were present. All fractures were treated non-operatively. Two patients had subtalar joint steroid injection for symptomatic relief.

  19. Incidence and MR imaging features of fractures of the anterior process of calcaneus in a consecutive patient population with ankle and foot symptoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouellette, H.; Salamipour, H.; Thomas, B.J.; Kassarjian, A.; Torriani, M.

    2006-01-01

    To determine the incidence, appearances and associated injuries of fractures affecting the anterior process of calcaneus from a general population with foot and ankle symptoms. A retrospective review of foot and ankle MR imaging procedures was performed for detection of cases with a fracture affecting the anterior process of calcaneus over a four year period. Radiographs, MR imaging studies, radiology reports, medical records, and operative notes were reviewed. Imaging analysis included fracture pattern, displacement, associated fractures, and presence of tendon and ligamentous injuries. The incidence of anterior process of calcaneus fracture on MR imaging was 0.5% (14/2577). Fractures were more common in female subjects (71%, 10/14). Fracture orientation was predominantly vertical (93%, 13/14). No comminuted fractures were seen and only three fractures were displaced. Three of the eight MR imaging evident fractures of anterior process of calcaneus were seen on radiographs. Associated fractures of the talus (n=5), navicular bone (n=3), cuboid (n=2), and calcaneal body (n=1) were noted. Associated injuries to the anterior talofibular ligament (n=3) and tears of the peroneus brevis (n=3) and peroneus longus (n=1) tendons were present. All fractures were treated non-operatively. Two patients had subtalar joint steroid injection for symptomatic relief

  20. Minor or occult ankle instability as a cause of anterolateral pain after ankle sprain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Jordi; Peña, Fernando; Golanó, Pau

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine which intra-articular injuries are associated with chronic anterolateral pain and functional instability after an ankle sprain. From 2008 to 2010, records of all patients who underwent ankle joint arthroscopy with anterolateral pain and functional instability after an ankle sprain were reviewed. A systematic arthroscopic examination of the intra-articular structures of the ankle joint was performed. Location and characteristics of the injuries were identified and recorded. A total of 36 ankle arthroscopic procedures were reviewed. A soft-tissue occupying mass over the lateral recess was present in 18 patients (50%). A partial injury of the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) was observed in 24 patients (66.6%). Cartilage abrasion due to the distal fascicle of the anteroinferior tibiofibular ligament coming into contact with the talus was seen in 21 patients (58.3%), but no thickening of the ligament was observed. Injury to the intra-articular posterior structures, including the transverse ligament in 19 patients (52.7%) and the posterior surface of the distal tibia in 21 patients (58.3%), was observed. Intra-articular pathological findings have been observed in patients affected by anterolateral pain after an ankle sprain. Despite no demonstrable abnormal lateral laxity, morphologic ATFL abnormality has been observed on arthroscopic evaluation. An injury of the ATFL is present in patients with chronic anterolateral pain and functional instability after an ankle sprain. A degree of microinstability due to a deficiency of the ATFL could explain the intra-articular pathological findings and the patients' complaints. IV.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of capsulolabral tears after traumatic primary anterior shoulder dislocation. A prospective comparison with arthroscopy of 25 cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suder, P.A.; Frich, Lars Henrik; Hougaard, K.

    1995-01-01

    . Subacute MRI evaluation identified 15 labral tears, 12 Hill-Sachs lesions, 1 total rotator cuff lesion, 1 partial joint side rotator cuff lesion, and 1 partial rupture of the biceps tendon. Arthroscopic examination revealed 22 labral tears, 15 Hill-Sachs lesions, 1 total rotator cuff lesion, 1 partial...... joint side rotator cuff tear, 1 partial rupture of the biceps tendon, and 1 osseous Bankart lesion. Anterior capsulolabral tears and Hill-Sachs lesions appeared with a high incidence after acute anterior primary shoulder dislocation. Conventional MRI was only moderately reliable in the preoperative...

  2. Comparative X-ray investigation of lateral and anterior-posterior ankle-joint images - comparison with pathological and anatomical findings concerning lateral ankle-joint lesions and their clinical importance, studied in a special type of holding device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, F.

    1982-01-01

    The study reports on a possibility to interpret the relation of the different bone structures of the upper ankle-joint to one another in the X-ray picture without using contrast media. Modern funtional diagnostic methods increasingly make use of X-ray pictures taken in fixed position. It seems useful to standardize such X-ray images of the ankle-joint in order to make them reproducible. The author developed a device that would suit these purposes. A diagnosis required the reproduction of the accidental mechanism. The clinical symptoms do not permit to clearly state the extent of the lesion of the ligaments. The results of the post-operative follow-up examinations confirm the urgent necessity of the standardized diagnostic method presented and the success of the therapy applied. The presented X-ray method permits safe diagnosis of ruptures of the ligaments. Location of a certain rupture is not possible with the fixed-position X-ray screening. For a clear assessment of lesions of the ligaments at the lateral ankle-joint, X-ray pictures must be taken both in the anterior-posterior path of rays and in the lateral one. A normal result in the lateral path of rays does not exclude a pathologic result in the anterior-posterior path of rays, and vice versa. (orig./MG) [de

  3. Prospectively identified deficits in sagittal plane hip-ankle coordination in female athletes who sustain a second anterior cruciate ligament injury after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and return to sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterno, Mark V; Kiefer, Adam W; Bonnette, Scott; Riley, Michael A; Schmitt, Laura C; Ford, Kevin R; Myer, Gregory D; Shockley, Kevin; Hewett, Timothy E

    2015-12-01

    Athletes who return to sport after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction are at increased risk of future ACL injury. Altered coordination of lower extremity motion may increase this risk. The purpose of this study was to prospectively determine if altered lower extremity coordination patterns exist in athletes who go on to sustain a 2nd anterior cruciate ligament injury. Sixty-one female athletes who were cleared to return to sport after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction were included. Hip-ankle coordination was assessed prior to return to sport with a dynamic postural coordination task. Within 12 months, 14 patients sustained a 2nd ACL injury. Fourteen matched subjects were selected for comparative analysis. Cross-recurrence quantification analysis characterized hip-ankle coordination patterns. A group × target speed (slow vs. fast) × leg (involved vs. uninvolved) analysis of variance was used to identify differences. A main effect of group (P = 0.02) indicated that the single injury group exhibited more stable hip-ankle coordination [166.2 (18.9)] compared to the 2nd injury group [108.4 (10.1)]. A leg × group interaction was also observed (P = .04). The affected leg of the single injury group exhibited more stable coordination [M = 187.1 (23.3)] compared to the affected leg of the 2nd injury group [M = 110.13 (9.8)], P = 0.03. Hip-ankle coordination was altered in female athletes who sustained a 2nd anterior cruciate ligament injury after return to sport. Failure to coordinate lower extremity movement in the absence of normal knee proprioception may place the knee at risk. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Ankle replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankle arthroplasty - total; Total ankle arthroplasty; Endoprosthetic ankle replacement; Ankle surgery ... Ankle replacement surgery is most often done while you are under general anesthesia. This means you will ...

  5. Relationship between viscosity of the ankle joint complex and functional ankle instability for inversion ankle sprain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Che-Yu; Kang, Jiunn-Horng; Wang, Chung-Li; Shau, Yio-Wha

    2015-03-01

    Measurement of viscosity of the ankle joint complex is a novel method to assess mechanical ankle instability. In order to further investigate the clinical significance of the method, this study intended to investigate the relationship between ankle viscosity and severity of functional ankle instability. Cross-sectional study. 15 participants with unilateral inversion ankle sprain and 15 controls were recruited. Their ankles were further classified into stable and unstable ankles. Ankle viscosity was measured by an instrumental anterior drawer test. Severity of functional ankle instability was measured by the Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool. Unstable ankles were compared with stable ankles. Injured ankles were compared with uninjured ankles of both groups. The spearman's rank correlation coefficient was applied to determine the relationship between ankle viscosity and severity of functional ankle instability in unstable ankles. There was a moderate relationship between ankle viscosity and severity of functional ankle instability (r=-0.64, pankles exhibited significantly lower viscosity (pankle instability (pankles. Injured ankles exhibited significantly lower viscosity and more severe functional ankle instability than uninjured ankles (pankle viscosity and severity of functional ankle instability. This finding suggested that, severity of functional ankle instability may be partially attributed to mechanical insufficiencies such as the degenerative changes in ankle viscosity following the inversion ankle sprain. In clinical application, measurement of ankle viscosity could be a useful tool to evaluate severity of chronic ankle instability. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of capsulolabral tears after traumatic primary anterior shoulder dislocation. A prospective comparison with arthroscopy of 25 cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suder, P.A.; Frich, Lars Henrik; Hougaard, K.

    1995-01-01

    . Subacute MRI evaluation identified 15 labral tears, 12 Hill-Sachs lesions, 1 total rotator cuff lesion, 1 partial joint side rotator cuff lesion, and 1 partial rupture of the biceps tendon. Arthroscopic examination revealed 22 labral tears, 15 Hill-Sachs lesions, 1 total rotator cuff lesion, 1 partial...... joint side rotator cuff tear, 1 partial rupture of the biceps tendon, and 1 osseous Bankart lesion. Anterior capsulolabral tears and Hill-Sachs lesions appeared with a high incidence after acute anterior primary shoulder dislocation. Conventional MRI was only moderately reliable in the preoperative...... evaluation of labral tears and Hill-Sachs lesions, and it failed to give an accurate, differentiated preoperative diagnosis of the capsulolabral lesions....

  7. Kinematic features of rear-foot motion using anterior and posterior ankle-foot orthoses in stroke patients with hemiplegic gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Chi; Hong, Wei-Hsien; Wang, Chin-Man; Chen, Chih-Kuang; Wu, Katie Pei-Hsuan; Kang, Chao-Fu; Tang, Simon F

    2010-12-01

    To evaluate the kinematic features of rear-foot motion during gait in hemiplegic stroke patients, using anterior ankle-foot orthoses (AFOs), posterior AFOs, and no orthotic assistance. Crossover design with randomization for the interventions. A rehabilitation center for adults with neurologic disorders. Patients with hemiplegia due to stroke (n=14) and able-bodied subjects (n=11). Subjects with hemiplegia were measured walking under 3 conditions with randomized sequences: (1) with an anterior AFO, (2) with a posterior AFO, and (3) without an AFO. Control subjects were measured walking without an AFO to provide a normative reference. Rear-foot kinematic change in the sagittal, coronal, and transverse planes. In the sagittal plane, compared with walking with an anterior AFO or without an AFO, the posterior AFO significantly decreased plantar flexion to neutral at initial heel contact (P=.001) and the swing phase (PRehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Meniscal and cruciate ligaments tears diagnosed with MR imaging versus arthroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziemianski, A.; Kruczynski, J.; Bruszewski, J.

    1993-01-01

    MR studies of knee joints in 37 patients were performed. The clinical diagnostics was traumatic lesions of menisci or cruciate ligaments. Arthroscopy of the knee joint was performed in 21 patients. MR showed meniscal lesion in 25 patients and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) lesions in 18 patients. Arthroscopy showed meniscal lesions in 16 of 21 patients and ACL lesions in 11 of 21 patients. MR correlated with arthroscopy in 16 of examined menisci and 15 of 21 examined ACL. (author)

  9. Ankle pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain - ankle ... Ankle pain is often due to an ankle sprain. An ankle sprain is an injury to the ligaments, which ... the joint. In addition to ankle sprains, ankle pain can be caused by: Damage or swelling of ...

  10. Hip Arthroscopy: A Brief History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandil, Abdurrahman; Safran, Marc R

    2016-07-01

    Hip arthroscopy is a fast-growing and evolving field. Like knee and shoulder arthroscopy, hip arthroscopy began as a diagnostic procedure and then progressed to biopsy and resection of abnormalities. Subsequently, it has evolved to repair of various tissues and treatment of underlying causes. As the understanding of the hip joint and its associated pathophysiology grows, indications will continue to expand for this diagnostic and therapeutic modality. This article outlines the historic developments of hip arthroscopy, including advancements in instrumentation and techniques from the days of the first hip arthroscopies to the present day. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. High lateral plantar pressure is related to an increased tibialis anterior/fibularis longus activity ratio in patients with recurrent lateral ankle sprain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mineta S

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Shinshiro Mineta,1 Takayuki Inami,2 Raldy Mariano,3 Norikazu Hirose4 1Graduate School of Sport Sciences, 2Institute of Physical Education, Keio University, Hiyoshi, Yokohama, 3Graduate School of Asia-Pacific Studies, Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo, 4Faculty of Sport Sciences, Waseda University, Higashifushimi, Nishitokyo, Japan Introduction: Center of pressure (COP is a sudden displacement at the time of a lateral ankle sprain (LAS. It has been suggested that the distribution of plantar pressure and the quantity of COP displacement are important for assessing the risk of LAS. Therefore, we evaluated the plantar pressure during a single-leg balance test with eyes closed (SLB-C to identify the factors and characteristics of plantar pressure in people with repeated cases of LAS.Methods: We recruited 22 collegiate athletes and divided them into an instability group (IG; n=11 and a control group (CG; n=11. We measured the distribution of plantar pressure and lower extremity muscle activity during a SLB-C along with static alignment and isometric ankle strength.Results: The fibularis longus (FL activity was significantly lower in the IG than in the CG. The lateral plantar pressure (LPP/medial plantar pressure (MPP ratio was also higher in the IG than in the CG. In addition, the LPP/MPP ratio was correlated with the tibialis anterior (TA/FL ratio.Conclusion: These results suggest that increased lateral plantar pressure is related to decreased FL activity and increased TA/FL ratio. Keywords: chronic ankle instability, ankle sprain, postural stability, soccer, prevention

  12. Complications in Hip Arthroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Naoki; Khanduja, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Recent developments in hip arthroscopic techniques and technology have made it possible in many cases to avoid open surgical dislocation for treating a variety of pathology in the hip. Although early reports suggest favourable results’ using hip arthroscopy and it has been shown to be a relatively safe procedure, complications do exist and can sometimes lead to significant morbidity. Methods This is a review article. The aim of this manuscript is to present the most frequent and/or serious complications that could occur at or following hip arthroscopy and some guidelines to avoid these complications. Conclusion Most complications of hip arthroscopy are minor or transient but serious complications can occur as well. A lot of complication e.g. acetabular labral puncture go unreported. Appropriate education and training, precise and meticulous surgical technique with correct instrumentation, the right indication in the right patient and adherence to advice from mentors and experienced colleagues are all essential factors for a successful outcome. Level of evidence: V. PMID:28066747

  13. A reusable suture anchor for arthroscopy psychomotor skills training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillett, Edward D; Rogers, Rainie; Nyland, John

    2003-03-01

    For residents to adequately develop the early arthroscopy psychomotor skills required to better learn how to manage the improvisational situations they will encounter during actual patient cases, they need to experience sufficient practice repetitions within a contextually relevant environment. Unfortunately, the cost of suture anchors can be a practice repetition-limiting factor in learning arthroscopic knot-tying techniques. We describe a technique for creating inexpensive reusable suture anchors and provide an example of their application to repair the anterior glenoid labrum during an arthroscopy psychomotor skills laboratory training session.

  14. Evaluation of anterior talofibular ligament injury with stress radiography, ultrasonography and MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oae, Kazunori; Uchio, Yuji; Takao, Masato; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the efficacy of stress radiography (stress X-P), ultrasonography (US), and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the detection of the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) injury. Thirty-four patients with ankle sprain were involved. In all patients, Stress X-P, US, MR imaging, and arthroscopy were performed. The arthroscopic results were considered to be the gold standard. The imaging results were compared with the arthroscopic results, and the accuracy calculated. Arthroscopic findings showed ATFL injury in 30 out of 34 cases. The diagnosis of ATFL injury with stress X-P, US, MR imaging were made with an accuracy of 67, 91 and 97%. US and MR imaging demonstrated the same location of the injury as arthroscopy in 63 and 93%. We have clarified the diagnostic value of stress X-P, US, and MR imaging in diagnosis of ATFL injury. We obtained satisfactory results with US and MR imaging. (orig.)

  15. Evaluation of anterior talofibular ligament injury with stress radiography, ultrasonography and MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oae, Kazunori; Uchio, Yuji [Shimane University School of Medicine, Department of Orthopaedics, Shimane, Izumo (Japan); Takao, Masato [Teikyo University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Tokyo, Itabashi-ku (Japan); Ochi, Mitsuo [Hiroshima University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Hiroshima, Minami-ku (Japan)

    2010-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the efficacy of stress radiography (stress X-P), ultrasonography (US), and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the detection of the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) injury. Thirty-four patients with ankle sprain were involved. In all patients, Stress X-P, US, MR imaging, and arthroscopy were performed. The arthroscopic results were considered to be the gold standard. The imaging results were compared with the arthroscopic results, and the accuracy calculated. Arthroscopic findings showed ATFL injury in 30 out of 34 cases. The diagnosis of ATFL injury with stress X-P, US, MR imaging were made with an accuracy of 67, 91 and 97%. US and MR imaging demonstrated the same location of the injury as arthroscopy in 63 and 93%. We have clarified the diagnostic value of stress X-P, US, and MR imaging in diagnosis of ATFL injury. We obtained satisfactory results with US and MR imaging. (orig.)

  16. Individuals with chronic ankle instability exhibit altered landing knee kinematics: potential link with the mechanism of loading for the anterior cruciate ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Masafumi; Pietrosimone, Brian; Gribble, Phillip A

    2014-12-01

    Alterations in sagittal plane landing biomechanics in the lower extremity have been observed within the chronic ankle instability (CAI) population. Interestingly, a potential link between the risk of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and ankle sprain history has been proposed. However, it is not known if the observed biomechanical changes associated with CAI could mimic factors related to the mechanism of ACL injury. We investigated the influence of CAI on anterior tibial shear force (ATSF), lower extremity sagittal plane kinematics, and posterior ground reaction force (GRF) in a jump landing task. Nineteen participants with CAI and 19 healthy control participants performed a vertical stop jump. Peak ATSF was calculated during the first landing of the stop jump, with sagittal-plane kinematics and posterior GRF measured at peak ATSF. Independent t-tests, multiple linear regression, and Pearson bivariate correlation were used for statistical analysis. Participants with CAI demonstrated less knee flexion at peak ATSF compared to the controls (P=.026). No group-differences were found for peak ATSF or the other biomechanical variables. Knee flexion was moderately correlated with peak ATSF (r=-0.544, P=.008); however, the contributing factor that most explained the variance in ATSF was posterior GRF (R2=0.449; P=.002) in the CAI group. Our findings indicate that the CAI group may be exhibiting altered knee function during functional movement. Screening knee movement patterns in individuals with CAI may help develop preventative measures for future joint injury throughout the kinetic chain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Ankle Sprains

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Ankle Sprains KidsHealth / For Teens / Ankle Sprains What's in ... she could play again. What Is a Sprained Ankle? A sprained ankle is a very common injury ...

  18. A New Snowboard Injury Caused by "FLOW" Bindings A Complete Deltoid Ligament and Anterior Talofibular Ankle Ligament Rupture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haverkamp, Daniel; Hoornenborg, Daniel; Maas, Mario; Kerkhoffs, Gino

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of a snowboard injury that caused a combination of a complete deltoid and anterior talofibular ligament rupture, without bony or syndesmotic injury. Initial surgical repair for both ligaments was performed. We describe the etiology of this injury to demonstrate the cause and

  19. Medial ankle pain after lateral ligament rupture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, C. N.; Bossuyt, P. M.; Marti, R. K.

    1996-01-01

    After a severe ankle sprain the incidence of residual complaints, particularly on the medial side of the joint, is high. We studied a consecutive series of 30 patients who had operative repair of acute ruptures of lateral ligaments. During operation, arthroscopy revealed a fresh injury to the

  20. Value of ultrasonography for detecting chronic injury of the lateral ligaments of the ankle joint compared with ultrasonography findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Y; Cai, Y; Wang, Y

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of ultrasonography in the diagnosis of chronic lateral ankle ligament injury. A total of 120 ankles in 120 patients with a clinical suspicion of chronic ankle ligament injury were examined by ultrasonography by using a 5- to 17-MHz linear array transducer before surgery. The results of ultrasonography were compared with the operative findings. There were 18 sprains and 24 partial and 52 complete tears of the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL); 26 sprains, 27 partial and 12 complete tears of the calcaneofibular ligament (CFL); and 1 complete tear of the posterior talofibular ligament (PTFL) at arthroscopy and operation. Compared with operative findings, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of ultrasonography were 98.9%, 96.2% and 84.2%, respectively, for injury of the ATFL and 93.8%, 90.9% and 83.3%, respectively, for injury of the CFL. The PTFL tear was identified by ultrasonography. The accuracy of identification between acute-on-chronic and subacute-chronic patients did not differ. The accuracies of diagnosing three grades of ATFL injuries were almost the same as those of diagnosing CFL injuries. Ultrasonography provides useful information for the evaluation of patients presenting with chronic pain after ankle sprain. Intraoperative findings are the reference standard. We demonstrated that ultrasonography was highly sensitive and specific in detecting chronic lateral ligments injury of the ankle joint.

  1. Influence of ankle joint plantarflexion and dorsiflexion on lateral ankle sprain: A computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purevsuren, Tserenchimed; Kim, Kyungsoo; Batbaatar, Myagmarbayar; Lee, SuKyoung; Kim, Yoon Hyuk

    2018-03-01

    Understanding the mechanism of injury involved in lateral ankle sprain is essential to prevent injury, to establish surgical repair and reconstruction, and to plan reliable rehabilitation protocols. Most studies for lateral ankle sprain posit that ankle inversion, internal rotation, and plantarflexion are involved in the mechanism of injury. However, recent studies indicated that ankle dorsiflexion also plays an important role in the lateral ankle sprain mechanism. In this study, the contributions of ankle plantarflexion and dorsiflexion on the ankle joint were evaluated under complex combinations of internal and inversion moments. A multibody ankle joint model including 24 ligaments was developed and validated against two experimental cadaveric studies. The effects of ankle plantarflexion (up to 60°) and dorsiflexion (up to 30°) on the lateral ankle sprain mechanism under ankle inversion moment coupled with internal rotational moment were investigated using the validated model. Lateral ankle sprain injuries can occur during ankle dorsiflexion, in which the calcaneofibular ligament and anterior talofibular ligament tears may occur associated with excessive inversion and internal rotational moment, respectively. Various combinations of inversion and internal moment may lead to anterior talofibular ligament injuries at early ankle plantarflexion, while the inversion moment acts as a primary factor to tear the anterior talofibular ligament in early plantarflexion. It is better to consider inversion and internal rotation as primary factors of the lateral ankle sprain mechanism, while plantarflexion or dorsiflexion can be secondary factor. This information will help to clarify the lateral ankle sprain mechanism of injury.

  2. Diagnostic shoulder arthroscopy: incidence of physiologic variants of joint structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Mikek

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Shoulder arthroscopy first described by Burman already in 1930, has evolved only in last 15 years to become a common accepted diagnostic and therapeutic procedure in treatment of different shoulder conditions. Parallely to the advances in arthroscopic operative techniques also our knowledge about arthroscopic shoulder anatomy expanded and many physiologic variants in anatomical structures have been identified in glenohumeral joint. It is very important to be familiar with those when performing shoulder arthroscopy, since in some cases they can easily be mistaken for pathologic lesions which can lead to unnecessary and potentially harmful operative procedures.Methods: We prospectively evaluated arthroscopic shoulder anatomy in 54 consecutive shoulder arthroscopies performed for different shoulder conditions in our practice. In all patients diagnostic arthroscopy was performed following the SCOI protocol described by Snyder. With regard to the anatomy variants described in literature and its importance in shoulder arthroscopy, special attention was focused on three regions of glenohumeral joint: long head of biceps tendon with its anchor and adjacent superior labrum, anterior joint capsule with glenohumeral ligaments and subscapularis tendon and on anterior labrum. The incidence of the observed anatomical variants was calculated. The most common combinations of anatomy variants were described and schematically presented.Results: The most significant anatomical variant observed in the region of long head of biceps tendon, biceps anchor and superior labrum was sublabral sulcus that was observed in 17% of shoulders. The region of anterior capsule with glenohumeral ligaments and subscapularis tendon showed greatest anatomical variability, especially the MGHL and the IGHL were very variably expressed and in some cases also absent. In the region of anterior labrum two significant anatomical variants were observed, one of them sublabral hole

  3. Shoulder Arthroscopy in the Beach Chair Position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, John D; Frank, Rachel M; Hamamoto, Jason T; Provencher, Matthew T; Romeo, Anthony A; Verma, Nikhil N

    2017-08-01

    Arthroscopic shoulder surgery can be performed in both the beach chair and lateral decubitus positions. The beach chair position is a reliable, safe, and effective position to perform nearly all types of shoulder arthroscopic procedures. The advantages of the beach chair position include the ease of setup, limited brachial plexus stress, increased glenohumeral and subacromial visualization, anesthesia flexibility, and the ability to easily convert to an open procedure. This position is most commonly used for rotator cuff repair, subacromial decompression, and superior labrum anterior-to-posterior repair procedures. To perform arthroscopy surgery in the beach chair position successfully, meticulous care during patient positioning and setup must be taken. In this Technical Note, we describe the necessary steps to safely and efficiently prepare patients in the beach chair position for arthroscopic shoulder surgery.

  4. Knee arthroscopy - series (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... between the femur and the tibia in the knee joint. The anterior cruciate ligament, the posterior cruciate ligament, and the ... Several small punctures are made into the knee joint while the patient ... and pain-free (regional anesthesia or spinal anesthesia).

  5. Meniscal and cruciate ligaments tears diagnosed with MR imaging versus arthroscopy; Uszkodzenie lakotek i wiazadel krzyzowych w stawie kolanowym w badaniu MR i artroskopii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziemianski, A.; Kruczynski, J.; Bruszewski, J. [Akademia Medyczna, Poznan (Poland)

    1993-12-31

    MR studies of knee joints in 37 patients were performed. The clinical diagnostics was traumatic lesions of menisci or cruciate ligaments. Arthroscopy of the knee joint was performed in 21 patients. MR showed meniscal lesion in 25 patients and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) lesions in 18 patients. Arthroscopy showed meniscal lesions in 16 of 21 patients and ACL lesions in 11 of 21 patients. MR correlated with arthroscopy in 16 of examined menisci and 15 of 21 examined ACL. (author).

  6. Ankle instability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krips, Rover; de Vries, Jasper; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2006-01-01

    The ankle joint is the most congruent joint of the human body. Stability is provided by the bony configuration of the ankle mortise and the talar dome and by the ankle ligaments. During ankle motions, rotation and translation around and along the movement axes occur. Soft tissue stability is

  7. Gross Instability After Hip Arthroscopy: An Analysis of Case Reports Evaluating Surgical and Patient Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Marco; Memon, Muzammil; Simunovic, Nicole; Belzile, Etienne; Philippon, Marc J; Ayeni, Olufemi R

    2016-06-01

    Gross hip instability is a rare complication after hip arthroscopy, and there is limited literature surrounding this topic. This systematic review investigates cases of gross hip instability after arthroscopy and discusses the risk factors associated with this complication. A systematic search was performed in duplicate for studies investigating gross hip instability after hip arthroscopy up to October 2015. Study parameters including sample size, mechanism and type of dislocation, surgical procedure details, patient characteristics, postoperative rehabilitation protocol, and level of evidence were analyzed. The systematic review identified 9 case reports investigating gross hip instability after hip arthroscopy (10 patients). Anterior dislocation occurred in 66.7% of patients, and most injuries occurred with a low-energy mechanism. Common surgical factors cited included unrepaired capsulotomy (77.8%) and iliopsoas release (33.3%), whereas patient factors included female gender (77.8%), acetabular dysplasia (22.2%), and general ligamentous laxity (11.1%). Postoperative restrictions and protocols were variable and inconsistently reported, and their relation to post-arthroscopy instability was difficult to ascertain. This systematic review discussed various patient, surgical, and postoperative risk factors of gross hip instability after arthroscopy. Patient characteristics such as female gender, hip dysplasia, and ligamentous laxity may be risk factors for post-arthroscopy dislocation. Similarly, surgical risk factors for iatrogenic hip instability may include unrepaired capsulotomies and iliopsoas debridement, although the role of capsular closure in iatrogenic instability is not clear. The influences of postoperative restrictions and protocols on dislocation are also unclear in the current literature. Surgeons should be cognizant of these risk factors when performing hip arthroscopy and be mindful that these factors appear to occur in combination. Level IV

  8. Arthrography of the ankle sprains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Moon Hee

    1985-01-01

    Ankle arthrography, by direct puncture of joint cavity, is considered to be a simple and accurate diagnostic method for a precise evaluation of ligamentous injury. Forty-seven cases of ankle arthrography were successively performed in the patients of acute ankle sprains. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate how ankle arthrography can delineate the pathologic anatomy in such cases. The results are as follows: 1. Thirty cases among forty seven revealed the findings of ligament tears. 2. For better diagnostic accuracy, the arthrography should be performed within 72 hrs. after injury. 3. The anterior talofibular ligament tears were the most common (twenty-nine cases) of all and seventeen of them revealed tears without association of any other ligament tears. 4. There were ten cases of calcaneofibular ligament tears and nine of them were associated with anterior talofibular ligament tears. 5. Three cases of anterior tibiofibular and one deltoid ligament tears were demonstrated

  9. Hip Arthroscopy in The Athlete

    OpenAIRE

    Byrd, J.W. Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Sports related injuries to the hip have received relatively little attention, in the part because the clinical assessment, imaging studies, and surgical techniques are less sophisticated. The evolution of hip arthroscopy has offered a less invasive technique that allows for recognition and treatment of hip pathologies that previously went unrecognized. The success of hip arthoscopy is dependent on proper patient selection based on the patient's history and diagnosis. The purpose of this clini...

  10. Ankle Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it follows an injury. Even a relatively benign ankle injury can be quite painful, at least at first. ... improve after several weeks Self-care For many ankle injuries, self-care measures ease the pain. Examples include: ...

  11. Ankle Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Read MoreDepression in Children and TeensRead MoreBMI Calculator Ankle ProblemsFollow this chart for more information about problems that can cause ankle pain. Our trusted Symptom Checker is written and ...

  12. Ankle arthrodesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boc, Steven F; Norem, Nathan D

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an overview of current ankle arthrodesis techniques. Surgical indications, pathophysiology of the ankle joint, preoperative assessment of the patient, surgical techniques for ankle fusion, and complications/sequelae are discussed. The surgical techniques section focuses on crossed screws arthrodesis and intramedullary nailing for tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis. Other techniques, including arthroscopic fusion, are also discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Ankle sprain - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lateral ankle sprain - aftercare; Medial ankle sprain - aftercare; Medial ankle injury - aftercare; Ankle syndesmosis sprain - aftercare; Syndesmosis injury - aftercare; ATFL injury - aftercare; CFL injury - ...

  14. Nerve injuries do occur in elbow arthroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilgersom, Nick F. J.; van Deurzen, Derek F. P.; Gerritsma, Carina L. E.; van der Heide, Huub J. L.; Malessy, Martijn J. A.; Eygendaal, Denise; van den Bekerom, Michel P. J.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose is to create more awareness as well as emphasize the risk of permanent nerve injury as a complication of elbow arthroscopy. Patients who underwent elbow arthroscopy complicated by permanent nerve injury were retrospectively collected. Patients were collected using two strategies: (1) by

  15. The Benefits of an In-Office Arthroscopy in the Diagnosis of Unresolved Knee Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garrett L. Chapman

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a patient who developed persistent knee pain with mechanical symptoms after an uncomplicated patellofemoral arthroplasty. The etiology of his knee pain remained inconclusive following magnetic resonance imaging due to metallic artifact image distortion. With the use of an in-office needle arthroscopy, an immediate and definitive diagnosis was obtained, preventing an unnecessary surgery for a diagnostic arthroscopy. We discovered a lateral meniscus tear, an anterior cruciate ligament tear, and a medial femoral condyle chondral defect for which the patient underwent arthroscopic partial meniscectomy, ligament reconstruction, and osteochondral allograft transplantation, with resolution of his knee pain.

  16. Ankle sprain (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    An ankle sprain is a common injury to the ankle. The most common way the ankle is injured is when ... swelling, inflammation, and bruising around the ankle. An ankle sprain injury may take a few weeks to many ...

  17. Ankle replacement - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... total - discharge; Total ankle arthroplasty - discharge; Endoprosthetic ankle replacement - discharge; Osteoarthritis - ankle ... You had an ankle replacement. Your surgeon removed and reshaped ... an artificial ankle joint. You received pain medicine and were ...

  18. Anterior approach for knee arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zurlo, J.V.; Towers, J.D.; Golla, S.

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To develop a new method of magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) of the knee using an anterior approach analogous to the portals used for knee arthroscopy.Design. An anterior approach to the knee joint was devised mimicking anterior portals used for knee arthroscopy. Seven patients scheduled for routine knee MRA were placed in a decubitus position and under fluoroscopic guidance a needle was advanced from a position adjacent to the patellar tendon into the knee joint. After confirmation of the needle tip location, a dilute gadolinium solution was injected.Results and conclusion. All the arthrograms were technically successful. The anterior approach to knee MRA has greater technical ease than the traditional approach with little patient discomfort. (orig.)

  19. Ankle sprain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struijs, Peter; Kerkhoffs, Gino

    2007-01-01

    Injury of the lateral ligament complex of the ankle joint occurs in about one per 10,000 people a day, accounting for a quarter of all sports injuries. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatment strategies for acute ankle

  20. Ankle sprain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struijs, Peter Aa; Kerkhoffs, Gino Mmj

    2010-01-01

    Injury of the lateral ligament complex of the ankle joint occurs in about one in 10,000 people a day, accounting for a quarter of all sports injuries. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatment strategies for acute ankle

  1. Sprained Ankles

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... away before the ligament is injured. Types of Sprains In young children, the ankle is the most commonly sprained joint, followed by ... A walking cast may be necessary if the ankle or foot injury has been severe. Most grade 1 sprains will heal within two weeks without subsequent complications. ...

  2. Knee, Shoulder, and Fundamentals of Arthroscopic Surgery Training: Validation of a Virtual Arthroscopy Simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofte, Josef N; Westerlind, Brian O; Martin, Kevin D; Guetschow, Brian L; Uribe-Echevarria, Bastián; Rungprai, Chamnanni; Phisitkul, Phinit

    2017-03-01

    To validate the knee, shoulder, and virtual Fundamentals of Arthroscopic Training (FAST) modules on a virtual arthroscopy simulator via correlations with arthroscopy case experience and postgraduate year. Orthopaedic residents and faculty from one institution performed a standardized sequence of knee, shoulder, and FAST modules to evaluate baseline arthroscopy skills. Total operation time, camera path length, and composite total score (metric derived from multiple simulator measurements) were compared with case experience and postgraduate level. Values reported are Pearson r; alpha = 0.05. 35 orthopaedic residents (6 per postgraduate year), 2 fellows, and 3 faculty members (2 sports, 1 foot and ankle), including 30 male and 5 female residents, were voluntarily enrolled March to June 2015. Knee: training year correlated significantly with year-averaged knee composite score, r = 0.92, P = .004, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.84, 0.96; operation time, r = -0.92, P = .004, 95% CI = -0.96, -0.84; and camera path length, r = -0.97, P = .0004, 95% CI = -0.98, -0.93. Knee arthroscopy case experience correlated significantly with composite score, r = 0.58, P = .0008, 95% CI = 0.27, 0.77; operation time, r = -0.54, P = .002, 95% CI = -0.75, -0.22; and camera path length, r = -0.62, P = .0003, 95% CI = -0.8, -0.33. Shoulder: training year correlated strongly with average shoulder composite score, r = 0.90, P = .006, 95% CI = 0.81, 0.95; operation time, r = -0.94, P = .001, 95% CI = -0.97, -0.89; and camera path length, r = -0.89, P = .007, 95% CI = -0.95, -0.80. Shoulder arthroscopy case experience correlated significantly with average composite score, r = 0.52, P = .003, 95% CI = 0.2, 0.74; strongly with operation time, r = -0.62, P = .0002, 95% CI = -0.8, -0.33; and camera path length, r = -0.37, P = .044, 95% CI = -0.64, -0.01, by training year. FAST: training year correlated significantly with 3 combined FAST

  3. Ankle and subtalar synovitis in a ball-and-socket ankle joint causing posterolateral painful coarse crepitus: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ka Yuk; Lui, Tun Hing

    2014-01-01

    A 17-year-old girl with bilateral ball-and-socket ankles reported left medial heel pain. Her left heel had gone into a varus position on tiptoeing, and a painful clunk had occurred when returning to normal standing. The clunk persisted after physiotherapy and treatment with an orthosis. Subtalar arthroscopy and peroneal tendoscopy showed mild diffuse synovitis of the ankle joint, especially over the posterior capsule, and a patch of inflamed and fibrotic synovium at the posterolateral corner of the subtalar joint. The clunk subsided immediately after arthroscopic synovectomy and had not recurred during 5 years of follow-up. We found no other reported cases of ankle and subtalar synovitis occurring in patients with a ball-and-socket ankle joint. Copyright © 2014 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Joint stability characteristics of the ankle complex in female athletes with histories of lateral ankle sprain, part II: clinical experience using arthrometric measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovaleski, John E; Heitman, Robert J; Gurchiek, Larry R; Hollis, J M; Liu, Wei; Pearsall, Albert W

    2014-01-01

    This is part II of a 2-part series discussing stability characteristics of the ankle complex. In part I, we used a cadaver model to examine the effects of sectioning the lateral ankle ligaments on anterior and inversion motion and stiffness of the ankle complex. In part II, we wanted to build on and apply these findings to the clinical assessment of ankle-complex motion and stiffness in a group of athletes with a history of unilateral ankle sprain. To examine ankle-complex motion and stiffness in a group of athletes with reported history of lateral ankle sprain. Cross-sectional study. University research laboratory. Twenty-five female college athletes (age = 19.4 ± 1.4 years, height = 170.2 ± 7.4 cm, mass = 67.3 ± 10.0 kg) with histories of unilateral ankle sprain. All ankles underwent loading with an ankle arthrometer. Ankles were tested bilaterally. The dependent variables were anterior displacement, anterior end-range stiffness, inversion rotation, and inversion end-range stiffness. Anterior displacement of the ankle complex did not differ between the uninjured and sprained ankles (P = .37), whereas ankle-complex rotation was greater for the sprained ankles (P = .03). The sprained ankles had less anterior and inversion end-range stiffness than the uninjured ankles (P ankle-complex laxity and end-range stiffness were detected in ankles with histories of sprain. These results indicate the presence of altered mechanical characteristics in the soft tissues of the sprained ankles.

  5. Postoperative MR study of the ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosch, U.; Sander, B.; Schubeus, P.; Tepe, H.; Goudarzi, Y.M.

    1991-01-01

    20 patients with acute traumatic rupture of the anterior talofibular ligament and ligamental suture were studied postoperatively by MRI. MR results were correlated with stress X-ray studies. We found a normal anterior talofibular ligament in eight cases. However, stress X-ray images showed normal stability of the ankle joint in eighteen cases. In six patients the anterior talofibular ligament was thickened, in another six cases it could not be separated from scar tissue. Therefore MR imaging of ankle ligaments did not allow a diagnosis of their function. Nevertheless, sequelae of the ankle trauma such as osteochondrosis, exsudation into the ankle joint and tendovaginitis of the flexor muscles were sensitively visualised by MR. (orig.) [de

  6. Instability of the hindfoot after lesion of the lateral ankle ligaments: investigations of the anterior drawer and adduction maneuvers in autopsy specimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaersgaard-Andersen, P.; Frich, Lars Henrik; Madsen, F.

    1991-01-01

    The mobility patterns in the tibiotalocalcaneal joint complex with a solitary lesion of the anterior talofibular ligament (ATL) and a combined lesion of the ATL and calcaneofibular ligament (CFL) were studied in 22 human lower-extremity autopsy specimens mounted in a kinesiologic testing device...

  7. A Qualitative Assessment of Return to Sport After Hip Arthroscopy for Femoroacetabular Impingement

    OpenAIRE

    Tjong, Vehniah K.; Cogan, Charles J.; Riederman, Brett D.; Terry, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is known to produce excellent outcomes, yet some patients do not return to their preinjury level of sport participation. Much literature on return to sport has revolved around anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and even shoulder instability, but none to date have used qualitative, semistructured patient interviews on patients with hip labral tears. Purpose: To understand the factors influencing the decision to return to...

  8. Ultrasonography of ankle ligaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peetrons, P.A.; Silvestre, A.; Cohen, M.; Creteur, V.

    2002-01-01

    The lateral collateral ligament of the ankle is a complex of 3 ligaments: The anterior and posterior talofibular ligaments and the calcaneofibular ligament; these ligaments work together to support the lateral aspect of the ankle. The anterior talofibular (ATF) ligament (Fig. 1) runs from the anterior of the talus. The probe is placed in a slightly oblique position from the malleolus toward the forefoot. The ligament is hyperechoic when its fibres are perpendicular to the ultrasound beam (anisotropy artifact is present in ligaments as well as in tendons). It is approximately 2 mm thick and, during examination, must be straight and tight from one insertion point to the other, as seen in Fig. 2. The posterior talofibular (PTF) ligament, which runs from the posterior part of the malleolus to the posterior part of the talus, is difficult to see on US, being partially or sometimes completely hidden by the malleolus. The calcaneofibular ligament forms the middle portion of the lateral collateral ligament. It is tight between the inferior part of the lateral malleolus and the calcaneus, and runs in a slightly posterior oblique direction toward the heel (Fig. 3). The ligament lies on the deep surface of the fibular tendons, forming a hammock to fall deep on the calcaneus surface (Fig. 4). The calcaneofibular ligament is approximately 2-3 nun thick and is hyperechoic in the distal two-thirds only because of the obliquity of the proximal part. When examining this ligament, it is mandatory that the ankle be flexed dorsally; this stretches the ligament so that it can be seen clearly. (author)

  9. Syndesmotic ankle sprain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Sharon G

    2012-01-01

    Ankle sprain injuries are the most common type of joint sprain. The prevalence of ankle joint sprains accounts for 21% of joint injuries in the body. Although somewhat rare, high-ankle or syndesmotic ankle sprains occur in up to 15% of ankle trauma. This article will present the pathomechanics of the high-ankle or syndesmotic sprain.

  10. Rehabilitation following hip arthroscopy - A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey S Grzybowski

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Rehabilitation following hip arthroscopy is an integral component of the clinical outcome of the procedure. Given the increase in quantity, complexity, and diversity of procedures performed, a need exists to define the role of rehabilitation following hip arthroscopy.OBJECTIVES: 1 To determine the current rehabilitation protocols utilized following hip arthroscopy in the current literature, 2 to determine if clinical outcomes are significantly different based on different post-operative rehabilitation protocols; and 3 to propose the best-available evidence-based rehabilitation program following hip arthroscopy.DATA SOURCES: Per PRISMA guidelines and checklist, Medline, SciVerse Scopus, SportDiscus, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched.STUDY SELECTION: Level I-IV evidence clinical studies with minimum two-year follow-up reporting outcomes of hip arthroscopy with post-operative rehabilitation protocols described were included. DATA EXTRACTION: All study, subject, and surgery parameters were collected. All elements of rehabilitation were extracted and analyzed. Descriptive statistics were calculated. Study methodological quality was analyzed using the Modified Coleman Methodology Score (MCMS.RESULTS: 18 studies were included (2,092 subjects; 52% male, mean age 35.1 +/- 10.6 years, mean follow-up 3.2 +/- 1.0 years. Labral tear and femoroacetabular impingement were the most common diagnoses treated and labral debridement and femoral/acetabular osteochondroplasty the most common surgical techniques performed. Rehabilitation protocol parameters (weight-bearing, motion, strengthening, and return-to-sport were poorly reported. Differences in clinical outcomes were unable to be assessed given heterogeneity in study reporting. Time-, phase-, goal-, and precaution-based guidelines were extracted and reported.CONCLUSIONS: The current literature of hip arthroscopy rehabilitation lacks high-quality evidence to support a

  11. Arthroscopy Journal Prizes Are Major Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubowitz, James H; Brand, Jefferson C; Provencher, Matthew T; Rossi, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    According to the Harvard Business Review, the optimal number of people in a decision-making group is no more than 8. Thus, it is no surprise that 18 Arthroscopy journal associate editors had difficulty making a major decision. In the end, 18 editors did successfully select the 2015 winner of the Best Comparative Study Prize. All studies have limitations, but from a statistical standpoint, the editors believe that the conclusions of the winning study are likely correct. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Relationship between stress ankle radiographs and injured ligaments on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyoung Min; Chung, Chin Youb; Chung, Myung Ki; Won, Sung Hun; Lee, Seung Yeol; Park, Moon Seok [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kyungki (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Soon-Sun [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Biomedical Research Institute, Kyungki (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    This study was performed to investigate the relationship between the injured lateral ankle ligaments on MRI and stress ankle radiographs. Two hundred and twenty-nine consecutive patients (mean age 35.5 years, SD 14.6 years; 136 males and 93 females) that underwent ankle stress radiographs and MRI for lateral ankle instability were included. Tibiotalar tilt angle and anterior translation of talus were measured on stress ankle radiographs. Degree of lateral ligaments (anterior talofibular, calcaneofibular, and posterior talofibular) and deltoid ligament injuries were evaluated and scored as intact (0), partial injury (1), and complete injury (2) on MR images. Effusion of ankle joint was also recorded. The effects of gender, age, injuries of ligaments, and ankle joint effusion on stress radiographs were statistically analyzed. Gender (p = 0.010), age (p = 0.020), and anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) injury (p < 0.001) were the factors significantly affecting tibiotalar tilt angle. Posterior talofibular ligament (PTFL) injury (p = 0.014) was found to be the only significant factor affecting the anterior translation on the anterior drawer radiographs. ATFL injury and PTFL injury on MRI significantly affected tibiotalar tilt angle and anterior drawer on stress radiographs. Other factors, such as age and gender, need to be considered in evaluating radiographic lateral ankle instability. (orig.)

  13. Relationship between stress ankle radiographs and injured ligaments on MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyoung Min; Chung, Chin Youb; Chung, Myung Ki; Won, Sung Hun; Lee, Seung Yeol; Park, Moon Seok; Kwon, Soon-Sun

    2013-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the relationship between the injured lateral ankle ligaments on MRI and stress ankle radiographs. Two hundred and twenty-nine consecutive patients (mean age 35.5 years, SD 14.6 years; 136 males and 93 females) that underwent ankle stress radiographs and MRI for lateral ankle instability were included. Tibiotalar tilt angle and anterior translation of talus were measured on stress ankle radiographs. Degree of lateral ligaments (anterior talofibular, calcaneofibular, and posterior talofibular) and deltoid ligament injuries were evaluated and scored as intact (0), partial injury (1), and complete injury (2) on MR images. Effusion of ankle joint was also recorded. The effects of gender, age, injuries of ligaments, and ankle joint effusion on stress radiographs were statistically analyzed. Gender (p = 0.010), age (p = 0.020), and anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) injury (p < 0.001) were the factors significantly affecting tibiotalar tilt angle. Posterior talofibular ligament (PTFL) injury (p = 0.014) was found to be the only significant factor affecting the anterior translation on the anterior drawer radiographs. ATFL injury and PTFL injury on MRI significantly affected tibiotalar tilt angle and anterior drawer on stress radiographs. Other factors, such as age and gender, need to be considered in evaluating radiographic lateral ankle instability. (orig.)

  14. Diagnostic imaging of ankle syndesmosis injuries: A general review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellett, John J; Lovell, Gregory A; Eriksen, David A; Sampson, Matthew J

    2018-02-05

    Literature on the various techniques for imaging injuries to the ankle syndesmosis to determine the most appropriate imaging modality for diagnosing syndesmosis ligament disruption and instability was reviewed using the following data sources: Pubmed, Google scholar, SportsDiscus, E-journals and PLOSone. Search terms used were: syndesmosis paired with injury, imaging, radiology, X-ray, stress X-ray, arthrography, ultrasound, nuclear medicine scan, CT scan, MRI and arthroscopy. Articles were selected by reading abstracts and the full article if indicated. Further articles were derived from the references of the primary articles. Plain x-rays of the ankle will detect approximately half on AP view to two-thirds on mortise view of syndesmosis injuries. Syndesmosis injuries frequently occur in association with tibial or fibular fractures. Intra-operative stress radiography failed to detect approximately half of instabilities confirmed at arthroscopy. The current benchmark imaging techniques to diagnose syndesmosis injury and diastasis are arthroscopy and high-power (3T) MRI. Ultrasound is a promising, developing, cost-effective imaging technique which is yet to reach its full diagnostic potential. CT and nuclear medicine scans have limited roles. MRI (3T) scanning in the plane of the syndesmotic ligaments is the investigation of choice to detect ankle syndesmosis injuries. In the presence of associated injuries requiring surgery, arthroscopic viewing with stress examination is the diagnostic benchmark when available. © 2018 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  15. History of hip arthroscopy: challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Joseph C; Lee, Jo-Ann

    2011-04-01

    Hip arthroscopy began with resection of pathologies and later progressed to repair of different tissues. There is an increasing impetus for reconstruction of biologic joints; although this has occurred with other joints, hip arthroscopic procedures are now headed in this direction. Thus, despite considerable initial challenges, multiple opportunities are now available in this fertile field. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Anterolateral ankle impingement: findings and diagnostic accuracy with ultrasound imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, C.L.; Wilson, D.J. [Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Radiology, Oxford (United Kingdom); Coltman, T.P. [Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2008-03-15

    The objective was to evaluate the findings and diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound in antero-lateral ankle impingement (ALI) with clinical and arthroscopic correlation. Seventeen elite footballers with chronic ankle pain were referred for ultrasound with a clinical diagnosis of ALI (n = 8) or a control condition (n = 9; lateral mechanical instability, osteochondral defect, intra-articular bodies and osteoarthritis). Ultrasound examination included the antero-lateral gutter for abnormal synovial tissue (synovitic lesion), lateral ligament integrity, tibiotalar joint and osseous spurs of the distal tibia and talus. Ultrasound findings were correlated with subsequent arthroscopic appearance. Ultrasound examination detected a synovitic mass in the antero-lateral gutter in all 8 footballers with clinical ALI (100%) and in 2 patients with a control diagnosis (22%). Arthroscopic correlation of antero-lateral synovitis and fibrosis was present in all 10 cases (100%). The synovitic lesion was seen at ultrasound as a nodular soft tissue mass of mixed echogenicity within the antero-lateral gutter, which extruded anteriorly with manual compression of the distal fibula against the tibia. Increased blood supply was detected using power Doppler imaging in only 1 patient. The synovitic lesion measured >10 mm in its maximum dimension in 7 footballers with clinical ALI and <10 mm in the control group. Additional ultrasound findings in patients with abnormal antero-lateral synovial tissue included an anterior talofibular ligament injury in all patients (n = 10), a tibiotalar joint effusion (n = 6) and osseous spurs (n = 4). Antero-lateral synovitic tissue was accurately identified at ultrasound in the absence of an effusion (n = 4). No synovitic lesion was detected at ultrasound or arthroscopy in the remaining 7 patients with a control diagnosis. Ultrasound is accurate in detecting synovitic lesions within the antero-lateral gutter, demonstrating associated ligamentous injuries and in

  17. Anterolateral ankle impingement: findings and diagnostic accuracy with ultrasound imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, C.L.; Wilson, D.J.; Coltman, T.P.

    2008-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate the findings and diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound in antero-lateral ankle impingement (ALI) with clinical and arthroscopic correlation. Seventeen elite footballers with chronic ankle pain were referred for ultrasound with a clinical diagnosis of ALI (n = 8) or a control condition (n = 9; lateral mechanical instability, osteochondral defect, intra-articular bodies and osteoarthritis). Ultrasound examination included the antero-lateral gutter for abnormal synovial tissue (synovitic lesion), lateral ligament integrity, tibiotalar joint and osseous spurs of the distal tibia and talus. Ultrasound findings were correlated with subsequent arthroscopic appearance. Ultrasound examination detected a synovitic mass in the antero-lateral gutter in all 8 footballers with clinical ALI (100%) and in 2 patients with a control diagnosis (22%). Arthroscopic correlation of antero-lateral synovitis and fibrosis was present in all 10 cases (100%). The synovitic lesion was seen at ultrasound as a nodular soft tissue mass of mixed echogenicity within the antero-lateral gutter, which extruded anteriorly with manual compression of the distal fibula against the tibia. Increased blood supply was detected using power Doppler imaging in only 1 patient. The synovitic lesion measured >10 mm in its maximum dimension in 7 footballers with clinical ALI and <10 mm in the control group. Additional ultrasound findings in patients with abnormal antero-lateral synovial tissue included an anterior talofibular ligament injury in all patients (n = 10), a tibiotalar joint effusion (n = 6) and osseous spurs (n = 4). Antero-lateral synovitic tissue was accurately identified at ultrasound in the absence of an effusion (n = 4). No synovitic lesion was detected at ultrasound or arthroscopy in the remaining 7 patients with a control diagnosis. Ultrasound is accurate in detecting synovitic lesions within the antero-lateral gutter, demonstrating associated ligamentous injuries and in

  18. Three-dimensional isotropic T2-weighted fast spin-echo (VISTA) ankle MRI versus two-dimensional fast spin-echo T2-weighted sequences for the evaluation of anterior talofibular ligament injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H J; Lee, S Y; Park, N H; Rho, M H; Chung, E C; Park, J H; Park, S J

    2016-04-01

    To compare the performance of axial images of the ankle joint on three-dimensional (3D) volume isotropic turbo spin echo acquisition (VISTA) with that of two-dimensional (2D) fast spin echo (FSE) T2-weighted images for the diagnosis of anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) injury. This retrospective study included 101 patients who underwent both 2D FSE T2-weighted and 3D VISTA magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the ankle. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of both sequences were measured. The anatomical identification score and diagnostic performances of both sequences were evaluated by two radiologists. The diagnostic performances of 3D VISTA and 2D FSE images were analysed in terms of sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for diagnosing ATFL injury. Surgically or clinically confirmed diagnoses were used as reference standards. The margin sharpness scores on 3D VISTA were significantly inferior to those of 2D FSE (p<0.001). Other scores (entire length, entire width) were not significantly different between the two imaging methods. The SNRs and CNRs of 3D VISTA were significantly higher than those of 2D FSE (p<0.001). When diagnoses were classified as normal and abnormal, the specificity of the 3D VISTA images for the diagnosis of ATFL injury was 95.7%, significantly superior to 2D FSE (84.3-85.7%). There were no significant differences between 3D VISTA and 2D FSE images in sensitivity or accuracy for diagnosis (p=0.227-1.000), with the exception of accuracy by reader 1 (p=0.039). 3D VISTA imaging has a diagnostic performance comparable to that of 2D FSE for the diagnosis of ATFL injury, although 3D VISTA is inferior to 2D FSE for the evaluation of margin sharpness. Replacing axial and coronal images with 3D VISTA can save imaging time without negatively impacting the diagnostic ability for ATFL injury. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Hip Dislocation or Subluxation After Hip Arthroscopy: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duplantier, Neil L; McCulloch, Patrick C; Nho, Shane J; Mather, Richard C; Lewis, Brian D; Harris, Joshua D

    2016-07-01

    To determine patient- and surgery-specific characteristics of patients sustaining postarthroscopic hip dislocation or subluxation. A systematic review of multiple medical databases was registered with PROSPERO and performed using Preferred Reporting Items for Systemic Reviews and Meta-Analysis guidelines. Level I to IV clinical outcome studies reporting the presence of hip dislocation or subluxation after hip arthroscopy were eligible. Length of follow-up was not an exclusion criterion. All patient- and surgery-specific variables were extracted from each, specifically evaluating osseous morphology and resection details; labral, iliopsoas, ligamentum teres, and capsular management; generalized ligamentous laxity; instability direction and mechanism; management; and outcome. Study authors were individually contacted to assess most recent outcome. Ten articles with 11 patients were analyzed (mean patient age: 36.6 ± 12.3 years). There were 9 hip dislocations and 2 subluxations. Mean time between surgery and dislocation was 3.2 ± 4.0 months (range: recovery room to 14 months). Anterior was the most frequent dislocation direction (8 cases). Acetabular undercoverage (preoperative dysplasia or iatrogenic rim over-resection) was observed in 5 cases. Labral debridement was performed in 5 cases, iliopsoas tenotomy in 3 cases, and ligamentum teres debridement in 1 case. A "T" capsulotomy was created in 1 case (isolated interportal in other 10 cases). Capsular closure was performed in 2 cases (both interportal). Generalized ligamentous laxity was diagnosed in 1 case. A combination of external rotation and extension was observed in 5 of the 6 cases reporting the mechanism of anterior dislocation. Four cases were successfully treated with closed reduction; 4 required total hip arthroplasty; and 3 required revision capsulorrhaphy. Postarthroscopic hip instability was observed in patients with acetabular undercoverage (including iatrogenic resection), labral debridement

  20. Patient Compliance With Electronic Patient Reported Outcomes Following Shoulder Arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhni, Eric C; Higgins, John D; Hamamoto, Jason T; Cole, Brian J; Romeo, Anthony A; Verma, Nikhil N

    2017-11-01

    To determine the patient compliance in completing electronically administered patient-reported outcome (PRO) scores following shoulder arthroscopy, and to determine if dedicated research assistants improve patient compliance. Patients undergoing arthroscopic shoulder surgery from January 1, 2014, to December 31, 2014, were prospectively enrolled into an electronic data collection system with retrospective review of compliance data. A total of 143 patients were included in this study; 406 patients were excluded (for any or all of the following reasons, such as incomplete follow-up, inaccessibility to the order sets, and inability to complete the order sets). All patients were assigned an order set of PROs through an electronic reporting system, with order sets to be completed prior to surgery, as well as 6 and 12 months postoperatively. Compliance rates of form completion were documented. Patients who underwent arthroscopic anterior and/or posterior stabilization were excluded. The average age of the patients was 53.1 years, ranging from 20 to 83. Compliance of form completion was highest preoperatively (76%), and then dropped subsequently at 6 months postoperatively (57%) and 12 months postoperatively (45%). Use of research assistants improved compliance by approximately 20% at each time point. No differences were found according to patient gender and age group. Of those completing forms, a majority completed forms at home or elsewhere prior to returning to the office for the clinic visit. Electronic administration of PRO may decrease the amount of time required in the office setting for PRO completion by patients. This may be mutually beneficial to providers and patients. It is unclear if an electronic system improves patient compliance in voluntary completion PRO. Compliance rates at final follow-up remain a concern if data are to be used for establishing quality or outcome metrics. Level IV, case series. Copyright © 2017 Arthroscopy Association of North

  1. Analysis of the Effects of Normal Walking on Ankle Joint Contact Characteristics After Acute Inversion Ankle Sprain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Ji Yong; Park, Kyung Soon; Seon, Jong Keun; Jeon, Insu

    2015-12-01

    To show the causal relationship between normal walking after various lateral ankle ligament (LAL) injuries caused by acute inversion ankle sprains and alterations in ankle joint contact characteristics, finite element simulations of normal walking were carried out using an intact ankle joint model and LAL injury models. A walking experiment using a volunteer with a normal ankle joint was performed to obtain the boundary conditions for the simulations and to support the appropriateness of the simulation results. Contact pressure and strain on the talus articular cartilage and anteroposterior and mediolateral translations of the talus were calculated. Ankles with ruptured anterior talofibular ligaments (ATFLs) had a higher likelihood of experiencing increased ankle joint contact pressures, strains and translations than ATFL-deficient ankles. In particular, ankles with ruptured ATFL + calcaneofibular ligaments and all ruptured ankles had a similar likelihood as the ATFL-ruptured ankles. The push off stance phase was the most likely situation for increased ankle joint contact pressures, strains and translations in LAL-injured ankles.

  2. Understanding acute ankle ligamentous sprain injury in sports

    OpenAIRE

    Fong, Daniel TP; Chan, Yue-Yan; Mok, Kam-Ming; Yung, Patrick SH; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2009-01-01

    Abstract This paper summarizes the current understanding on acute ankle sprain injury, which is the most common acute sport trauma, accounting for about 14% of all sport-related injuries. Among, 80% are ligamentous sprains caused by explosive inversion or supination. The injury motion often happens at the subtalar joint and tears the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) which possesses the lowest ultimate load among the lateral ligaments at the ankle. For extrinsic risk factors to ankle sprai...

  3. Surgical documentation form for TMJ arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosby, E L; Cline, M P

    1995-02-01

    The use of a form to document the findings observed during arthroscopy of the temporomandibular joint will allow oral and maxillofacial surgeons not only to consistently record the abnormal observations but also to compare their findings with the findings of other surgeons and possibly even establish a national database. The form presented has been used by the author for 6 years with periodic modification and has provided a means to review and evaluate surgical findings in patients who had arthroscopic procedures.

  4. MRI of ankle sprain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Gen [Dokkyo Univ., Mibu, Tochigi (Japan). School of Medicine

    1995-06-01

    We reviewed MR (magnetic resonance) studies in 54 patients with a sprained ankle. MR examination was able to depict the following injuries: lateral collateral ligamentous injuries, fluid collection in the peroneal tendon sheath, injury to the peroneal tendon, deltoid ligamentous injuries, the extent of subcutaneous soft tissue swelling, and various kinds of osseous injuries. A total of 21 patients underwent repair or reconstructive surgery to the lateral collateral ligaments, the findings of which were correlated with those on MR examination. MR diagnosis of anterior talofibular ligamentous injury was confirmed in 16/21; the discrepancy could be attributed to remodeling and/or reorganization which progressed during the time lapse between the MR examination and surgery in three, while the misdiagnosis resulted from the difficulty in distinguishing the acute tear from the injured scar in two. The calcaneofibular ligamentous injury was confirmed in 10/12; two false negatives were responsible for the difficulty in delineating its entire length on a single image and/or in differentiating between the attenuated star and the normal calcaneofibular ligament. MR imaging is a useful tool to use in deciding the surgical indication and predicting the prognosis of the patients with ankle sprain. (author)

  5. MRI of ankle sprain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Gen

    1995-01-01

    We reviewed MR (magnetic resonance) studies in 54 patients with a sprained ankle. MR examination was able to depict the following injuries: lateral collateral ligamentous injuries, fluid collection in the peroneal tendon sheath, injury to the peroneal tendon, deltoid ligamentous injuries, the extent of subcutaneous soft tissue swelling, and various kinds of osseous injuries. A total of 21 patients underwent repair or reconstructive surgery to the lateral collateral ligaments, the findings of which were correlated with those on MR examination. MR diagnosis of anterior talofibular ligamentous injury was confirmed in 16/21; the discrepancy could be attributed to remodeling and/or reorganization which progressed during the time lapse between the MR examination and surgery in three, while the misdiagnosis resulted from the difficulty in distinguishing the acute tear from the injured scar in two. The calcaneofibular ligamentous injury was confirmed in 10/12; two false negatives were responsible for the difficulty in delineating its entire length on a single image and/or in differentiating between the attenuated star and the normal calcaneofibular ligament. MR imaging is a useful tool to use in deciding the surgical indication and predicting the prognosis of the patients with ankle sprain. (author)

  6. Hip joint pathology: relationship between patient history, physical tests, and arthroscopy findings in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tijssen, M; van Cingel, R E H; de Visser, E; Hölmich, P; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, M W G

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this retrospective cohort study was to (a) describe the clinical presentation of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and hip labral pathology; (b) describe the accuracy of patient history and physical tests for FAI and labral pathology as confirmed by hip arthroscopy. Patients (18-65 years) were included if they were referred to a physical therapist to gather pre-operative data and were then diagnosed during arthroscopy. Results of pre-operative patient history and physical tests were collected and compared to arthroscopy. Data of 77 active patients (mean age: 37 years) were included. Groin as main location of pain, the Anterior Impingement test (AIT), Flexion-Abduction-External Rotation (FABER) test, and Fitzgerald test had a high sensitivity (range 0.72-0.91). Sensitivity increased when combining these tests (0.97) as either groin as main location of pain and a positive FABER test or a positive AIT and a positive FABER test were the shortest most sensitive combinations. The results of this study point out that in clinical practice absence of groin as main location of pain combined with a negative FABER test or the combination of a negative AIT and a negative FABER test are suggested to rule out the diagnosis of symptomatic FAI and/or labral pathology. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Biomechanical Study about Lateral Ankle Laxity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Voicu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to study the contribution of the anterior talofibular ligament to ankle laxity at 18 cadaver ankles. For this, there was made an original, bipolar transoseus system, in a monitorized test stand Mx-500N Schmidt with a digital force gauge Imada. It was measured the motion response for applied antero-posterior force, inversion-eversion moment and internal-external rotary torque, in three positions of flexion of the ankle, with an intact anterior talofibular ligament and after it’s sectioning. The results showed a significant increases in laxity in plantar flexion for the inversion and internal rotary torque, this mechanism coresponding with common modes of injury.

  8. Return to Driving After Hip Arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momaya, Amit M; Stavrinos, Despina; McManus, Benjamin; Wittig, Shannon M; Emblom, Benton; Estes, Reed

    2017-07-11

    The objective of this study was to evaluate patients' braking performance using a modern driving simulator after undergoing a right hip arthroscopy. This prospective study included 5 total driving sessions at which measurements were taken. The study was conducted at an academic medical center. A total of 14 patients scheduled to undergo a right hip arthroscopy were enrolled and compared with a control group of 17 participants to account for a potential learning phenomenon. Patients drove in the simulator preoperatively to establish a baseline, and then drove again at 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks postoperatively. The control group did not undergo any type of surgical procedure. The main independent variable was time from surgery. A modern driving simulator was used to measure initial reaction time (IRT), throttle release time (TRT), foot movement time (FMT), and brake travel time (BTT). The braking reaction time (BRT) was calculated as the sum of IRT + TRT + FMT, and the total braking time (TBT) was calculated as the sum of BRT + BTT. The experimental group showed no significant changes in BTT (P = 0.11, ηG = 0.04) nor TBT (P = 0.20, ηG = 0.03) over the duration of 8 weeks. Although the experimental group did exhibit significant improvements in IRT (P = 0.002), TRT (P < 0.0001), FMT (P < 0.0001), and BRT (P = 0.0002) between preoperative and 2 weeks postoperative driving sessions, there were no significant changes thereafter. The mean preoperative TBT and 2 weeks postoperative TBT for the experimental group were 3.07 seconds (SD = 0.50) and 2.97 seconds (SD = 0.57), respectively. No learning phenomenon was observed in the control group. This study's findings suggest that patients may return to driving 2 weeks postoperatively from a right-sided hip arthroscopy procedure.

  9. Tips to avoid nerve injury in elbow arthroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilgersom, Nick F. J.; Oh, Luke S.; Flipsen, Mark; Eygendaal, Denise; van den Bekerom, Michel P. J.

    2017-01-01

    Elbow arthroscopy is a technical challenging surgical procedure because of close proximity of neurovascular structures and the limited articular working space. With the rising number of elbow arthroscopies being performed nowadays due to an increasing number of surgeons performing this procedure and

  10. Clinical examination results in individuals with functional ankle instability and ankle-sprain copers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Cynthia J; Arnold, Brent L; Ross, Scott E; Ketchum, Jessica; Ericksen, Jeffrey; Pidcoe, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Why some individuals with ankle sprains develop functional ankle instability and others do not (ie, copers) is unknown. Current understanding of the clinical profile of copers is limited. To contrast individuals with functional ankle instability (FAI), copers, and uninjured individuals on both self-reported variables and clinical examination findings. Cross-sectional study. Sports medicine research laboratory. Participants consisted of 23 individuals with a history of 1 or more ankle sprains and at least 2 episodes of giving way in the past year (FAI: Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool [CAIT] score = 20.52 ± 2.94, episodes of giving way = 5.8 ± 8.4 per month), 23 individuals with a history of a single ankle sprain and no subsequent episodes of instability (copers: CAIT score = 27.74 ± 1.69), and 23 individuals with no history of ankle sprain and no instability (uninjured: CAIT score = 28.78 ± 1.78). Self-reported disability was recorded using the CAIT and Foot and Ankle Ability Measure for Activities of Daily Living and for Sports. On clinical examination, ligamentous laxity and tenderness, range of motion (ROM), and pain at end ROM were recorded. Questionnaire scores for the CAIT, Foot and Ankle Ability Measure for Activities of Daily Living and for Sports, ankle inversion and anterior drawer laxity scores, pain with palpation of the lateral ligaments, ankle ROM, and pain at end ROM. Individuals with FAI had greater self-reported disability for all measures (P < .05). On clinical examination, individuals with FAI were more likely to have greater talar tilt laxity, pain with inversion, and limited sagittal-plane ROM than copers (P < .05). Differences in both self-reported disability and clinical examination variables distinguished individuals with FAI from copers at least 1 year after injury. Whether the deficits could be detected immediately postinjury to prospectively identify potential copers is unknown.

  11. Comparison between ankle proprioception measurements and postural sway test for evaluating ankle instability in subjects with functional ankle instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang-Yong; Choi, Jong-Duk

    2016-01-01

    It is important to establish the effective evaluation approaches that are appropriate for measuring ankle proprioception. But, only a few studies used more than one test procedure simultaneously to identify proprioceptive deficits. Further, no data are available on the correlations between the measures of ankle proprioception and postural sway (PS) test in subjects with functional ankle instability (FAI). The aim of this study was to identify the relationship between ankle proprioception measurements and PS test in subjects with FAI. Of the 79 subjects enrolled in the case-control study, 40 had FAI and 39 were control subjects. Ankle proprioception was evaluated by the angle reproduction (AR), force matching (FM), and the muscle reaction (MR) to sudden ankle inversion tests. For the AR and FM tests, absolute errors (AE) of ankle plantarflexion, dorsiflexion, inversion, and eversion directions were calculated. For the MR test, reaction times and activation of tibialis anterior (TA), peroneus longus (PL), and peroneus brevis (PB) muscles were measured during sudden ankle inversion with a 30° tilting angle. The PS test was investigated by using a force platform during single-limb standing test. Three trials were performed and averaged in each test. Reaction time of the PL (p = 0.006), a variable of MR test, and plantarflexion (p = 0.001, p = 0.009) and eversion (p = 0.016, p = 0.039) error variables of the AR and FM tests differed significantly between the control and FAI groups. Moreover, these variables (r = -0.381 ∼ 0.788, p proprioception measurements were more sensitive and discriminative than others, and could be useful to assess ankle instability, particularly if the method is to be applied in clinical studies and laboratory settings.

  12. Talofibular interval changes after acute ankle sprain: a stress ultrasonography study of ankle laxity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croy, Theodore; Saliba, Susan; Saliba, Ethan; Anderson, Mark W; Hertel, Jay

    2013-11-01

    Quantifying talocrural joint laxity after ankle sprain is problematic. Stress ultrasonography (US) can image the lateral talocrural joint and allow the measurement of the talofibular interval, which may suggest injury to the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL). The acute talofibular interval changes after lateral ankle sprain are unknown. Twenty-five participants (9 male, 16 female; age 21.8 ± 3.2 y, height 167.8 ± 34.1 cm, mass 72.7 ± 13.8 kg) with 27 acute, lateral ankle injuries underwent bilateral stress US imaging at baseline (ankle at 3 wk and 6 wk from injury in 3 ankle conditions: neutral, anterior drawer, and inversion. Talofibular interval (mm) was measured using imaging software and self-reported function (activities of daily living [ADL] and sports) by the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM). The talofibular interval increased with anterior-drawer stress in the involved ankle (22.65 ± 3.75 mm; P = .017) over the uninvolved ankle (19.45 ± 2.35 mm; limb × position F1,26 = 4.9, P = .035) at baseline. Inversion stress also resulted in greater interval changes (23.41 ± 2.81 mm) than in the uninvolved ankles (21.13 ± 2.08 mm). A main effect for time was observed for inversion (F2,52 = 4.3, P = .019, 21.93 ± 2.24 mm) but not for anterior drawer (F2,52 = 3.1, P = .055, 21.18 ± 2.34 mm). A significant reduction in the talofibular interval took place between baseline and week 3 inversion measurements only (F1,26 = 5.6, P = .026). FAAM-ADL and sports results increased significantly from baseline to wk 3 (21.9 ± 16.2, P ankle sprain. Stress US provides a safe, repeatable, and quantifiable method of measuring the talofibular interval and may augment manual stress examinations in acute ankle injuries.

  13. Isolated Pulmonary Embolism following Shoulder Arthroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole H. Goldhaber

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary embolism (PE following shoulder arthroscopy is a rare complication. We present a unique case report of a 43-year-old right-hand dominant female who developed a PE 41 days postoperatively with no associated upper or lower extremity DVT. The patient had minimal preoperative and intraoperative risk factors. Additionally, she had no thromboembolic symptoms postoperatively until 41 days following surgery when she developed sudden right-hand swelling, labored breathing, and abdominal pain. A stat pulmonary computed tomography (CT angiogram of the chest revealed an acute PE in the right lower lobe, and subsequent extremity ultrasounds showed no upper or lower extremity deep vein thrombosis. After a thorough review of the literature, we present the first documented isolated PE following shoulder arthroscopy. Although rare, sudden development of an isolated PE is possible, and symptoms such as sudden hand swelling, trouble breathing, and systemic symptoms should be evaluated aggressively with a pulmonary CT angiogram given the fact that an extremity ultrasound may be negative for deep vein thrombosis.

  14. Diagnosis of ligament injuries in the superior ankle joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebing, R.; Fiedler, V.

    1991-01-01

    Nearly 40 years after ankle arthrography was first introduced, the anterior and inversion stress views of the ankle are still widely preferred as a noninvasive method of evaluating ligament injuries in the upper ankle. We consider the stress test, bilaterally performed using a standardized stress apparatus, as a basic examination by which to differentiate between slight and severe sprain. Intensive muscel splinting due to painful swelling can sometimes be treated by injection of local anesthetic. Like many authors, we perform ankle arthrography in cases where there is a significant difference between the clinical findings and the stress test. The technique of ankle arthrography can be readily learned and is extremely accurate in delineating the extent of ligamentous injury produced by moderate or severe ankle sprains. It can be performed in any X-ray department. (orig.) [de

  15. Ankle Fractures Often Not Diagnosed

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... especially in the cold-weather months when most ankle injuries occur. An ankle fracture involves a crack or ... Weak ankles may be a result of previous ankle injuries, but in some cases, they are a congenital ( ...

  16. Dynamic balance deficits in individuals with chronic ankle instability compared to ankle sprain copers 1 year after a first-time lateral ankle sprain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Cailbhe; Bleakley, Chris; Hertel, Jay; Caulfield, Brian; Ryan, John; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2016-04-01

    To quantify the dynamic balance deficits that characterise a group with chronic ankle instability compared to lateral ankle sprain copers and non-injured controls using kinematic and kinetic outcomes. Forty-two participants with chronic ankle instability and twenty-eight lateral ankle sprain copers were initially recruited within 2 weeks of sustaining a first-time, acute lateral ankle sprain and required to attend our laboratory 1 year later to complete the current study protocol. An additional group of non-injured individuals were also recruited to act as a control group. All participants completed the anterior, posterior-lateral and posterior-medial reach directions of the star excursion balance test. Sagittal plane kinematics of the lower extremity and associated fractal dimension of the centre of pressure path were also acquired. Participants with chronic ankle instability displayed poorer performance in the anterior, posterior-medial and posterior-lateral reach directions compared with controls bilaterally, and in the posterior-lateral direction compared with lateral ankle sprain copers on their 'involved' limb only. These performance deficits in the posterior-lateral and posterior-medial directions were associated with reduced flexion and dorsiflexion displacements at the hip, knee and ankle at the point of maximum reach, and coincided with reduced complexity of the centre of pressure path. In comparison with lateral ankle sprain copers and controls, participants with chronic ankle instability were characterised by dynamic balance deficits as measured using the SEBT. This was attested to reduced sagittal plane motions at the hip, knee and ankle joints, and reduced capacity of the stance limb to avail of its supporting base. III.

  17. Foot and Ankle Surgery: Common Problems and Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejarano-Pineda, Lorena; Amendola, Annunziato

    2018-04-01

    Participation in sports activity has increased significantly during the last several decades. This phenomenon has exposed orthopedic sports medicine surgeons to new challenges regarding the diagnosis and management of common sport-related injuries. Arthroscopy is becoming more commonly used in many of the surgical procedures for these injuries and carries the risk of complications. Wound and nerve complications make up the bulk of complications in most procedures. This article describes these complications associated with the common surgical procedures related to foot and ankle sport-related injuries and how to address and prevent them. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Ankle-Dorsiflexion Range of Motion After Ankle Self-Stretching Using a Strap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, In-cheol; Kwon, Oh-yun; Yi, Chung-Hwi; Cynn, Heon-Seock; Hwang, Ui-jae

    2015-01-01

    Context  A variety of ankle self-stretching exercises have been recommended to improve ankle-dorsiflexion range of motion (DFROM) in individuals with limited ankle dorsiflexion. A strap can be applied to stabilize the talus and facilitate anterior glide of the distal tibia at the talocrural joint during ankle self-stretching exercises. Novel ankle self-stretching using a strap (SSS) may be a useful method of improving ankle DFROM. Objective  To compare the effects of 2 ankle-stretching techniques (static stretching versus SSS) on ankle DFROM. Design  Randomized controlled clinical trial. Setting  University research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants  Thirty-two participants with limited active dorsiflexion (<20°) while sitting (14 women and 18 men) were recruited. Main Outcome Measure(s)  The participants performed 2 ankle self-stretching techniques (static stretching and SSS) for 3 weeks. Active DFROM (ADFROM), passive DFROM (PDFROM), and the lunge angle were measured. An independent t test was used to compare the improvements in these values before and after the 2 stretching interventions. The level of statistical significance was set at α = .05. Results  Active DFROM and PDFROM were greater in both stretching groups after the 3-week interventions. However, ADFROM, PDFROM, and the lunge angle were greater in the SSS group than in the static-stretching group (P < .05). Conclusions  Ankle SSS is recommended to improve ADFROM, PDFROM, and the lunge angle in individuals with limited DFROM. PMID:26633750

  19. Modified Blair ankle fusion for ankle arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Shuangli

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective:To investigate the clinical outcome of modified Blair ankle fusion for ankle arthritis. Methods:Between November 2009 and June 2012, 28 patients with ankle arthritis were treated, among whom 11 had obvious foot varus deformity, and 17 were almost normal in appearance. There were 13 males and 15 females with an average age of 49.4 years (range, 23-67 years. The main symptoms included swelling, pain, and a limited range of motion of the ankles. The ankle joints functions were assessed by American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS ankle and hindfoot score and visual analog scale (VAS preoperatively and at 1 year follow-up. Results:Twenty-eight patients were followed up for 19.8 months on average (range, 1-2 years. Superficial wound infection occurred in 3 cases, and was cured after debridement; the other incisions healed by first intention without complications. All ankles were fused at 1 year follow-up after operation. The symptom was relieved completely in all patients at last follow-up without complication of implant failure, or nonunion. The postoperative AOFAS ankle and hindfoot score was 83.13±3.76, showing significant difference when compared with the preoperative score (45.38±3.21, P<0.01. VAS was significantly decreased from 8.01±0.63 to 2.31±1.05 at 1 year follow-up (P<0.05. Conclusion:Modified Blair ankle fusion has the advantages of high feasiblity, less cost and rigid fixation. It shows high reliability in pain relief and may obtain a good clinical effectiveness. Key words: Ankle; Arthritis; Arthrodesis; Fracture fixation, intramedullary

  20. Ankle fracture - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000548.htm Ankle fracture - aftercare To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. An ankle fracture is a break in 1 or more ...

  1. Ankle sprain - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100209.htm Ankle sprain - Series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... to slide 4 out of 4 Overview The ankle joint connects the foot with the leg. The ...

  2. LATERAL ANKLE INJURY

    OpenAIRE

    Pollard, Henry; Sim, Patrick; McHardy, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    Background: Injury to the ankle joint is the most common peripheral joint injury. The sports that most commonly produce high ankle injury rates in their participating athletes include: basketball, netball, and the various codes of football. Objective: To provide an up to date understanding of manual therapy relevant to lateral ligament injury of the ankle. A discussion of the types of ligament injury and common complicating factors that present with lateral ankle pain is presented along with ...

  3. Recalcitrant Lateral Premalleolar Bursitis of the Ankle Associated with Lateral Ankle Instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masashi Naito

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lateral premalleolar bursitis of the ankle is a rarely reported disorder in the English literature although it is not uncommon in Asian countries where people commonly sit on their feet. Here, we present the case of a 66-year-old woman with recalcitrant lateral premalleolar bursitis associated with lateral ankle instability which was successfully treated with surgical resection of the bursa and repair of the anterior talofibular ligament. Operative findings revealed a communication between the bursa and articular cavity of the ankle joint via the sheath of the extensor digitorum longus tendon, which was considered to act as a check valve leading to a large and recalcitrant bursitis. This report provides a novel concept about the etiology of recalcitrant lateral premalleolar bursitis of the ankle.

  4. THE EFFECTS OF KINESIO TAPING ON PROPRIOCEPTION AT THE ANKLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark DeBeliso

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was designed to determine if KinesioTM taping the anterior and lateral portion of the ankle would enhance ankle proprioception compared to the untaped ankle. 30 subjects, 15 men, 15 women, ages 18-30 participated in this study. Exclusion criteria: Ankle injury < 6 months prior to testing, significant ligament laxity as determined through clinical evaluation by an ATC, or any severe foot abnormality. Experiment utilized a single group, pretest and posttest. Plantar flexion and inversion with 20° of plantar flexion reproduction of joint position sense (RJPS was determined using an ankle RJPS apparatus. Subjects were barefooted, blindfolded, and equipped with headphones playing white noise to eliminate auditory cues. Subjects had five trials in both plantar flexion and inversion with 20° plantar flexion before and after application of the KinesioTM tape to the anterior/lateral portion of the ankle. Constant error and absolute error were determined from the difference between the target angle and the trial angle produced by the subject. The treatment group (KinesioTM taped subjects showed no change in constant and absolute error for ankle RJPS in plantar flexion and 20º of plantar flexion with inversion when compared to the untaped results using the same motions. The application of KinesioTM tape does not appear to enhance proprioception (in terms of RJPS in healthy individuals as determined by our measures of RJPS at the ankle in the motions of plantar flexion and 20º of plantar flexion with inversion.

  5. Ankle Sprain Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ankle Sprain Treatment Page Content Article Body Acute ankle and foot injuries are common in athletes and other active young ... Phase I treatment involves resting and protecting the ankle to permit healing, to prevent further injury, and to control pain and swelling. Rest, protection ( ...

  6. Assessment of Ankle Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Nicholas; Cooper, Leslie

    2009-01-01

    School nurses are faced with the challenge of identifying and treating ankle injuries in the school setting. There is little information guiding the assessment and treatment of these children when an injury occurs. It is essential for school nurses to understand ankle anatomy, pathophysiology of the acute ankle injury, general and orthopedic…

  7. Ankle Injuries and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your ankle bone and the ends of your two lower leg bones make up the ankle joint. Your ligaments, which connect bones to one ... muscles and tendons move it. The most common ankle problems are sprains and fractures. A sprain is ...

  8. Refractory pain following hip arthroscopy: evaluation and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    de SA, Darren L; Burnham, Jeremy M; Mauro, Craig S

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT With increased knowledge and understanding of hip pathology, hip arthroscopy is rapidly becoming a popular treatment option for young patients with hip pain. Despite improved clinical and radiographic outcomes with arthroscopic treatment, some patients may have ongoing pain and less than satisfactory outcomes. While the reasons leading to failed hip arthroscopy are multifactorial, patient selection, surgical technique and rehabilitation all play a role. Patients with failed hip arthroscopy should undergo a thorough history and physical examination, as well as indicated imaging. A treatment plan should then be developed based on pertinent findings from the workup and in conjunction with the patient. Depending on the etiology of failed hip arthroscopy, management may be nonsurgical or surgical, which may include revision arthroscopic or open surgery, periacetabular osteotomy or joint arthroplasty. Revision surgery may be appropriate in settings including, but not limited to, incompletely treated femoroacetabular impingement, postoperative adhesions, heterotopic ossification, instability, hip dysplasia or advanced degeneration. PMID:29423245

  9. Education in wrist arthroscopy: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obdeijn, M C; Bavinck, N; Mathoulin, C; van der Horst, C M A M; Schijven, M P; Tuijthof, G J M

    2015-05-01

    Arthroscopy has assumed an important place in wrist surgery. It requires specific operative skills that are now mainly acquired in the operating room. In other fields of endoscopic surgery, e-learning and virtual reality (VR) have introduced new perspectives in teaching skills. This leads to the following research question: Could the current way of teaching wrist arthroscopy skills be supported using new educational media, such as e-learning and simulator training? The literature was searched for available methods of teaching endoscopic skills. Articles were assessed on the evidence of validity. In addition, a survey was sent to all members of the European Wrist Arthroscopy Society (EWAS) to find out whether hand surgeons express a need to embrace modern educational tools such as e-learning or simulators for training of wrist arthroscopy skills. This study shows that the current way of teaching wrist arthroscopy skills can be supported using new educational media, such as e-learning and simulator training. Literature indicates that e-learning can be a valuable tool for teaching basic knowledge of arthroscopy and supports the hypothesis that the use of virtual reality and simulators in training enhances operative skills in surgical trainees. This survey indicates that 55 out of 65 respondents feel that an e-learning program would be a valuable asset and 62 out of the 65 respondents are positive on the additional value of wrist arthroscopy simulator in training. Study results support the need and relevance to strengthen current training of wrist arthroscopy using e-learning and simulator training. V.

  10. Total ankle joint replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Ankle arthritis results in a stiff and painful ankle and can be a major cause of disability. For people with end-stage ankle arthritis, arthrodesis (ankle fusion) is effective at reducing pain in the shorter term, but results in a fixed joint, and over time the loss of mobility places stress on other joints in the foot that may lead to arthritis, pain and dysfunction. Another option is to perform a total ankle joint replacement, with the aim of giving the patient a mobile and pain-free ankle. In this article we review the efficacy of this procedure, including how it compares to ankle arthrodesis, and consider the indications and complications. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  11. Radiographic predictability of cartilage damage in medial ankle osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jeong-Seok; Shim, Jae-Chan; Suh, Jin-Soo; Lee, Woo-Chun

    2010-08-01

    Radiographic grading has been used to assess and select between treatment options for ankle osteoarthritis. To use radiographic grading systems in clinical practice and scientific studies one must have reliable systems that predict the fate of the cartilage. We therefore asked whether (1) radiographic grading of ankle osteoarthritis is reliable and (2) grading reflects cartilage damage observed during arthroscopy. We then (3) determined the sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values of the radiographic findings. We examined 74 ankles with medial osteoarthritis and 24 with normal articular cartilage based on arthroscopy. Arthroscopic findings were graded according to the modified Outerbridge grades and all radiographs were graded using the modified Kellgren-Lawrence, Takakura et al., and van Dijk et al. grading systems. The reliability of each radiographic grading system was evaluated. We correlated the radiographic grades and severity of cartilage damage for each radiographic grading system. Sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values of spurs and joint space narrowing with or without talar tilting then were determined. The interobserver weighted kappa ranged from 0.58 to 0.89 and the intraobserver weighted kappa from 0.51 to 0.85. The correlation coefficients for the Kellgren-Lawrence, Takakura et al., and van Dijk et al. grades were 0.53, 0.42, and 0.42, respectively. Ankles with medial joint space narrowing (Stage 2 of Takakura et al. and van Dijk et al. grades) showed varying severity of cartilage damage. The positive predictive value of cartilage damage increased from 77% for medial joint space narrowing regardless of the presence of talar tilting to 98% for medial joint space narrowing with talar tilting. Our observations suggest the inclusion of talar tilting in grading schemes enhances the assessment of cartilage damage. Level II, diagnostic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of level of evidence.

  12. The effect of ankle joint adjustment on the path of the centre of pressure and rotation during gait

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    M.Tech. (Chiropractic) Problem Statement: Ankle sprains are one of the most common acute injuries treated by physicians (Pellow & Brantingham, 2001). Most ankle sprains involve the lateral ankle ligaments, with the anterior tibiotalar ligament being the most commonly affected in injuries involving plantarflexion and inversion. These injuries often result in restriction of movements that will limit gait (Crosbie, Green, Refshauge, 1999). Even in the event of injury to one ankle, the sensori...

  13. Proceedings of the SRBR-KBVR osteoarticular section meeting of October 18, 2003 in Antwerp--Part one. Imaging of chronic ankle pain, with a focus on soccer injuries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, M.; de Jonge, M. C.

    2004-01-01

    Chronic ankle pain is a very common problem encountered in soccer injuries. It can be divided into three regional entities, including anterior ankle pain, deep ankle pain and posterior ankle pain. The purpose of this presentation is to present the value of each imaging technique (standard

  14. Dynamic ankle control in athletes with ankle instability during sports maneuvers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Cheng-Feng; Chen, Chin-Yang; Lin, Chia-Wei

    2011-09-01

    Ankle sprain is a common sports injury. While the effects of static constraints in stabilizing the ankle joint are relatively well understood, those of dynamic constraints are less clear and require further investigation. This study was undertaken to evaluate the dynamic stability of the ankle joint during the landing phase of running and stop-jump maneuvers in athletes with and without chronic ankle instability (CAI). Controlled laboratory study. Fifteen athletes with CAI and 15 age-matched athletes without CAI performed running and stop-jump landing tasks. The dynamic ankle joint stiffness, tibialis anterior (TA)/peroneus longus (PL) and TA/gastrocnemius lateralis (GL) co-contraction indices, ankle joint angle, and root-mean-square (RMS) of the TA, PL, and GL electromyographic signals were measured during each task. During running, the CAI group exhibited a greater ankle inversion angle than the control group in the pre-landing phase (P = .012-.042) and a lower dynamic ankle joint stiffness in the post-landing phase (CAI: 0.109 ± 0.039 N·m/deg; control: 0.150 ± 0.068 N·m/deg; P = .048). In the stop-jump landing task, athletes with CAI had a significantly lower TA/PL co-contraction index during the pre-landing phase (CAI: 49.1 ± 19; control: 64.8 ± 16; P = .009). In addition, the CAI group exhibited a greater ankle inversion (P = .049), a lower peak eversion (P = .04), and a smaller RMS of the PL electromyographic signal in the post-landing phase (CAI: 0.73 ± 0.32; control: 0.51 ± 0.22; P = .04). Athletes with CAI had a relatively inverted ankle, reduced muscle co-contraction, and a lower dynamic stiffness in the ankle joint during the landing phase of sports maneuvers and this may jeopardize the stability of the ankle. Sports training or rehabilitation programs should differentiate between the pre-landing and post-landing phases of sports maneuvers, and should educate athletes to land with an appropriate ankle position and muscle recruitment.

  15. The sprained ankle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puffer, J C

    2001-01-01

    The sprained ankle is the most common musculoskeletal injury seen by physicians caring for active youngsters and adults. It accounts for approximately one fourth of all sports-related injuries and is commonly seen in athletes participating in basketball, soccer, or football. It has been shown that one third of West Point cadets suffer an ankle sprain during their 4 years at the military academy. While diagnosis and management of the sprained ankle is usually straightforward, several serious injuries can masquerade as an ankle sprain, and it is important for the clinician to recognize these to prevent long-term morbidity. In this article the basic anatomy of the ankle, mechanisms by which the ankle is injured, and the differential diagnosis of the acutely injured ankle are reviewed. Appropriate evaluation of the injured ankle and the criteria that should be utilized for determining the necessity of radiographs are discussed as well as management of the acutely sprained ankle and the role of prevention in reducing the risk of ankle injury.

  16. A three-dimensional model to assess the effect of ankle joint axis misalignments in ankle-foot orthoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatone, Stefania; Johnson, William Brett; Tucker, Kerice

    2016-04-01

    Misalignment of an articulated ankle-foot orthosis joint axis with the anatomic joint axis may lead to discomfort, alterations in gait, and tissue damage. Theoretical, two-dimensional models describe the consequences of misalignments, but cannot capture the three-dimensional behavior of ankle-foot orthosis use. The purpose of this project was to develop a model to describe the effects of ankle-foot orthosis ankle joint misalignment in three dimensions. Computational simulation. Three-dimensional scans of a leg and ankle-foot orthosis were incorporated into a link segment model where the ankle-foot orthosis joint axis could be misaligned with the anatomic ankle joint axis. The leg/ankle-foot orthosis interface was modeled as a network of nodes connected by springs to estimate interface pressure. Motion between the leg and ankle-foot orthosis was calculated as the ankle joint moved through a gait cycle. While the three-dimensional model corroborated predictions of the previously published two-dimensional model that misalignments in the anterior -posterior direction would result in greater relative motion compared to misalignments in the proximal -distal direction, it provided greater insight showing that misalignments have asymmetrical effects. The three-dimensional model has been incorporated into a freely available computer program to assist others in understanding the consequences of joint misalignments. Models and simulations can be used to gain insight into functioning of systems of interest. We have developed a three-dimensional model to assess the effect of ankle joint axis misalignments in ankle-foot orthoses. The model has been incorporated into a freely available computer program to assist understanding of trainees and others interested in orthotics. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2014.

  17. Ulnar impaction syndrome: Managed by wrist arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Jiajie; Xu, Zhijie; Zhao, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    The development of handicraft industry and increase of various such works that need a large amount of repeated wrist ulnar deviation strength, the incidence of ulnar impaction syndrome (UIS) is increasing, but the traditional simple ulnar shortening osteotomy has more complications. This study aimed to explore the early diagnostic criteria of UIS and its wrist arthroscopic treatment experience. 9 UIS patients were enrolled in this study. According to magnetic resonance imaging, X-ray and endoscopic features, the diagnostic criteria of UIS were summarized and the individualized treatment schedule was made. If the ulnar positive variance was less than 4 mm, the arthroscopic wafer resection was performed. If the ulnar positive variance was more than 4 mm, the arthroscopic resection of injury and degenerative triangular fibrocartilage complex and ulnar osteotomy were conducted. In all patients, the wound healed without any complications. All patients returned to normal life and work, with no ulnar wrist pain again. One patient had wrist weakness. There was a significant difference of the wrist activity between the last followup and before operation (P < 0.05). According to the modified wrist function scoring system of Green and O'Brien, there were 6 cases of excellent, 2 cases of good and 1 case of appropriate and the overall excellent and good rate was 92.3%. In the treatment of UIS, the arthroscopy can improve the diagnosis rate, optimize the treatment plan, shorten the treatment cycle, with good treatment results.

  18. Biochemical Characterization of Early Osteoarthritis in the Ankle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagen Schmal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Reliable data about in vivo regulation of cytokines in early ankle osteoarthritis (OA are still missing. Methods. 49 patients with a mean age of 33±14 years undergoing an arthroscopy of the ankle with different stages of chronic OA were prospectively included in a clinical trial. Lavage fluids were analyzed by ELISA. Additionally, clinical parameters and scores (FFI, CFSS, and AOFAS were evaluated and supplemented by the Kellgren Lawrence Score (KLS and the ankle osteoarthritis scoring system (AOSS. Results. ICRS grading of cartilage damage, previous operations, and duration of complains were strong indicators for OA progress and showed correlations to age, clinical scores, validated KLS, and AOSS (P<0.04. Systemic and intraarticular inflammatory parameters were low in all patients. Biochemically, aggrecan and BMP-7 positively indicated OA with statistically significant associations with duration of symptoms, FFI, AOFAS, and KLS (P<0.04. In contrast, BMP-2 levels showed statistically significant negative correlations to aggrecan or BMP-7 concentrations, which is in line with the negative association with ICRS score and KLS and the positive correlation with FFI (P<0.03. Conclusions. We were able to identify different key markers of OA in the ankle as aggrecan, BMP-7, and BMP-2, offering starting points for new ways in diagnostics and interventional strategies.

  19. Flexor Digitorum Accessorius Longus: Importance of Posterior Ankle Endoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Jorge Pablo; del Vecchio, Jorge Javier; Golanó, Pau; Vega, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopy for the posterior region of the ankle through two portals is becoming more widespread for the treatment of a large number of conditions which used to be treated with open surgery years ago. The tendon of the flexor hallucis longus (FHL) travels along an osteofibrous tunnel between the posterolateral and posteromedial tubercles of the talus. Chronic inflammation of this tendon may lead to painful stenosing tenosynovitis. The aim of this report is to describe two cases depicting an accessory tendon which is an anatomical variation of the flexor hallucis longus in patients with posterior friction syndrome due to posterior ankle impingement and associated with a posteromedial osteochondral lesion of the talus. The anatomical variation (FDAL) described was a finding during an endoscopy of the posterior region of the ankle, and we have spared it by sectioning the superior flexor retinaculum only. The accessory flexor digitorum longus is an anatomical variation and should be taken into account when performing an arthroscopy of the posterior region of the ankle. We recommend this treatment on this type of injury although we admit this does not make a definite conclusion. PMID:26060592

  20. Flexor Digitorum Accessorius Longus: Importance of Posterior Ankle Endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Pablo Batista

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Endoscopy for the posterior region of the ankle through two portals is becoming more widespread for the treatment of a large number of conditions which used to be treated with open surgery years ago. The tendon of the flexor hallucis longus (FHL travels along an osteofibrous tunnel between the posterolateral and posteromedial tubercles of the talus. Chronic inflammation of this tendon may lead to painful stenosing tenosynovitis. The aim of this report is to describe two cases depicting an accessory tendon which is an anatomical variation of the flexor hallucis longus in patients with posterior friction syndrome due to posterior ankle impingement and associated with a posteromedial osteochondral lesion of the talus. The anatomical variation (FDAL described was a finding during an endoscopy of the posterior region of the ankle, and we have spared it by sectioning the superior flexor retinaculum only. The accessory flexor digitorum longus is an anatomical variation and should be taken into account when performing an arthroscopy of the posterior region of the ankle. We recommend this treatment on this type of injury although we admit this does not make a definite conclusion.

  1. Altered Knee and Ankle Kinematics During Squatting in Those With Limited Weight-Bearing–Lunge Ankle-Dorsiflexion Range of Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dill, Karli E.; Begalle, Rebecca L.; Frank, Barnett S.; Zinder, Steven M.; Padua, Darin A.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Ankle-dorsiflexion (DF) range of motion (ROM) may influence movement variables that are known to affect anterior cruciate ligament loading, such as knee valgus and knee flexion. To our knowledge, researchers have not studied individuals with limited or normal ankle DF-ROM to investigate the relationship between those factors and the lower extremity movement patterns associated with anterior cruciate ligament injury. Objective: To determine, using 2 different measurement techniques, whether knee- and ankle-joint kinematics differ between participants with limited and normal ankle DF-ROM. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Sports medicine research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Forty physically active adults (20 with limited ankle DF-ROM, 20 with normal ankle DF-ROM). Main Outcome Measure(s): Ankle DF-ROM was assessed using 2 techniques: (1) nonweight-bearing ankle DF-ROM with the knee straight, and (2) weight-bearing lunge (WBL). Knee flexion, knee valgus-varus, knee internal-external rotation, and ankle DF displacements were assessed during the overhead-squat, single-legged squat, and jump-landing tasks. Separate 1-way analyses of variance were performed to determine whether differences in knee- and ankle-joint kinematics existed between the normal and limited groups for each assessment. Results: We observed no differences between the normal and limited groups when classifying groups based on nonweight-bearing passive-ankle DF-ROM. However, individuals with greater ankle DF-ROM during the WBL displayed greater knee-flexion and ankle-DF displacement and peak knee flexion during the overhead-squat and single-legged squat tasks. In addition, those individuals also demonstrated greater knee-varus displacement during the single-legged squat. Conclusions: Greater ankle DF-ROM assessed during the WBL was associated with greater knee-flexion and ankle-DF displacement during both squatting tasks as well as greater knee-varus displacement during

  2. Distraction arthroplasty with arthroscopic microfracture in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis of the ankle joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakasa, Tomoyuki; Adachi, Nobuo; Kato, Tomohiro; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2015-01-01

    We treated a 39-year-old female who had experienced destruction of her ankle joint owing to rheumatoid arthritis. This relatively young patient wished to avoid ankle fusion and joint replacement. Therefore, distraction arthroplasty with arthroscopic microfracture was performed to improve her symptoms and preserve motion. A microfracture procedure specifically for cartilage defects of the tibial plafond and talar dome was performed with the arthroscope, after which a hinged external fixator was applied to distract the ankle joint. The ankle joint space was enlarged by the external device and joint movement allowed. After 3 months, removal of the external device and repeat arthroscopy revealed newly formed fibrocartilage on the surfaces of both the tibia and the talus. At 2 years after the surgery, a radiograph showed that the joint space enlargement of the ankle had been maintained. The American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score improved from 37 points preoperatively to 82 points at 2 years postoperatively. Our findings suggest that good clinical results can be achieved with distraction arthroplasty and arthroscopic microfracture in a relatively young patient with rheumatoid arthritis. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Ankle Sprains. A Round Table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physician and Sportsmedicine, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Types of ankle sprains, surgical versus nonsurgical treatment, tape versus brace for support, rehabilitation, exercise, and prevention of ankle sprains are discussed by a panel of experts. An acute ankle taping technique is illustrated. (MT)

  4. Foot, leg, and ankle swelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swelling of the ankles - feet - legs; Ankle swelling; Foot swelling; Leg swelling; Edema - peripheral; Peripheral edema ... Foot, leg, and ankle swelling is common when the person also: Is overweight Has a blood clot in the leg Is older Has ...

  5. LATERAL ANKLE INJURY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Henry; Sim, Patrick; McHardy, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    Background: Injury to the ankle joint is the most common peripheral joint injury. The sports that most commonly produce high ankle injury rates in their participating athletes include: basketball, netball, and the various codes of football. Objective: To provide an up to date understanding of manual therapy relevant to lateral ligament injury of the ankle. A discussion of the types of ligament injury and common complicating factors that present with lateral ankle pain is presented along with a review of relevant anatomy, assessment and treatment. Also included is a discussion of the efficacy of manual therapy in the treatment of ankle sprain. Discussion: A detailed knowledge of the anatomy of the ankle as well as the early recognition of factors that may delay the rate of healing are important considerations when developing a management plan for inversion sprains of the ankle. This area appears to be under-researched however it was found that movement therapy and its various forms appear to be the most efficient and most effective method of treating uncomplicated ankle injury. Future investigations should involve a study to determine the effect chiropractic treatment (manipulation) may have on the injured ankle. PMID:17987171

  6. Stable Versus Unstable Grade II High Ankle Sprains: A Prospective Study Predicting the Need for Surgical Stabilization and Time to Return to Sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calder, James D; Bamford, Richard; Petrie, Aviva; McCollum, Graham A

    2016-04-01

    To investigate grade II syndesmosis injuries in athletes and identify factors important in differentiating stable from dynamically unstable ankle sprains and those associated with a longer time to return to sports. Sixty-four athletes with an isolated syndesmosis injury (without fracture) were prospectively assessed, with a mean follow-up period of 37 months (range, 24 to 66 months). Those with an associated deltoid ligament injury or osteochondral lesion were included. Those whose injuries were considered stable (grade IIa) were treated conservatively with a boot and rehabilitation. Those whose injuries were clinically unstable underwent arthroscopy, and if instability was confirmed (grade IIb), the syndesmosis was stabilized. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging assessments of injury to individual ligaments were recorded, along with time to return to play. A power analysis estimated that each group would need 28 patients. All athletes returned to the same level of professional sport. The 28 patients with grade IIa injuries returned at a mean of 45 days (range, 23 to 63 days) compared with 64 days (range, 27 to 104 days) for those with grade IIb injuries (P < .0001). There was a highly significant relationship between clinical and magnetic resonance imaging assessments of ligament injury (anterior tibiofibular ligament [ATFL], anterior-inferior tibiofibular ligament [AITFL], and deltoid ligament, P < .0001). Instability was 9.5 times as likely with a positive squeeze test and 11 times as likely with a deltoid injury. Combined injury to the anterior-inferior tibiofibular ligament and deltoid ligament was associated with a delay in return to sports. Concomitant injury to the ATFL indicated a different mechanism of injury-the syndesmosis is less likely to be unstable and is associated with an earlier return to sports. A positive squeeze test and injury to the ATFL and deltoid ligament are important factors in differentiating stable from dynamically unstable grade

  7. How to Care for a Sprained Ankle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sprained Ankle How to Care for a Sprained Ankle Page Content Ankle sprains are very common injuries. ... Grade I, II or III. Treating your Sprained Ankle Treating your sprained ankle properly may prevent chronic ...

  8. RESULTS OF SHOULDER STABILIZATION BY A MODIFIED BRISTOW - LATARJET PROCEDURE WITH ARTHROSCOPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. V. Gladkov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors describe the minimally invasive technique for Bristow-Latarjet bone unfree autoplasty with arthroscopy in patients with bone loss more than 25% of anterior-posterior diameter of the glenoid, the poor quality of the capsule or deep defects of Hill-Sachs. The analysis of the early results of treatment in 19 patients and midterm results - in 13 soldiers operated in 2011-2014. Features of the proposed technique are the shortening of surgical approach and the reduction of subscapularis muscle damage. In addition, arthroscopic support allows to attain the precision location of the graft relative to the articular surface of scapula, at the same time restoring the damaged anatomy SLAP, rotator cuff tendons and posterior labrum and restore shoulder ligaments tension and isolate bone graft from the joint cavity, contributing to a better articulation of the humeral head and reducing the risk of nonunion and resorption.

  9. Ligamentous Injuries and the Risk of Associated Tissue Damage in Acute Ankle Sprains in Athletes: A Cross-sectional MRI Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roemer, Frank W.; Jomaah, Nabil; Niu, Jingbo; Almusa, Emad; Roger, Bernard; D'Hooghe, Pieter; Geertsema, Celeste; Tol, Johannes L.; Khan, Karim; Guermazi, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Ankle joint injuries are extremely common sports injuries, with the anterior talofibular ligament involved in the majority of ankle sprains. There have been only a few large magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies on associated structural injuries after ankle sprains. To describe the injury pattern

  10. Chronic ankle instability: Arthroscopic anatomical repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo-Hernández, M; Mellado-Romero, M; Páramo-Díaz, P; García-Lamas, L; Vilà-Rico, J

    Ankle sprains are one of the most common injuries. Despite appropriate conservative treatment, approximately 20-40% of patients continue to have chronic ankle instability and pain. In 75-80% of cases there is an isolated rupture of the anterior talofibular ligament. A retrospective observational study was conducted on 21 patients surgically treated for chronic ankle instability by means of an arthroscopic anatomical repair, between May 2012 and January 2013. There were 15 men and 6 women, with a mean age of 30.43 years (range 18-48). The mean follow-up was 29 months (range 25-33). All patients were treated by arthroscopic anatomical repair of anterior talofibular ligament. Four (19%) patients were found to have varus hindfoot deformity. Associated injuries were present in 13 (62%) patients. There were 6 cases of osteochondral lesions, 3 cases of posterior ankle impingement syndrome, and 6 cases of peroneal pathology. All these injuries were surgically treated in the same surgical time. A clinical-functional study was performed using the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score. The mean score before surgery was 66.12 (range 60-71), and after surgery it increased up to a mean of 96.95 (range 90-100). All patients were able to return to their previous sport activity within a mean of 21.5 weeks (range 17-28). Complications were found in 3 (14%) patients. Arthroscopic anatomical ligament repair technique has excellent clinical-functional results with a low percentage of complications, and enables patients to return to their previous sport activity within a short period of time. Copyright © 2016 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Chronic Ankle Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... treatments and exercises to strengthen the ankle, improve balance and range of motion and retrain your muscles. As you progress through rehabilitation, you may also receive training that relates specifically to your activities or sport. Bracing. Some patients wear an ankle brace to ...

  12. Ankle-Brachial Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... measured at your arm. A low ankle-brachial index number can indicate narrowing or blockage of the arteries in ... tell your doctor so that he or she can continue to monitor your risk. Blockage (0.9 or less). An ankle-brachial index number less than 1.0 indicates narrowing of ...

  13. The foot and ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berquist, T.H.

    1985-01-01

    Imaging of the foot and ankle can be difficult because of the complex anatomy. Familiarity with the bony and ligamentous anatomy is essential for proper evaluation of radiographic findings. Therefore, pertinent anatomy is discussed as it applies to specific injuries. Special views, tomography, arthrography, and other techniques may be indicated for complete evaluation of foot and ankle trauma

  14. Arthroscopy in diagnosis and treatment of hip disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frich, Lars Henrik; Lauritzen, J.; Juhl, M.

    1989-01-01

    Fourteen hip arthroscopies between January 1985 and May 1988 were reviewed. Included were ten women and four men with an age ranging from 12 to 76 years. Indications were avascular necrosis; loose bodies; osteoarthrosis, arthritis, or pain; and snapping hip. The diagnosis was verified in five cases......, including arthroscopic removal of a loose body in one and resection of a plica bridging the space between the femoral head and acetabular roof in two patients. The diagnosis was rejected in three cases. In five cases, no pathologic changes were found. One arthroscopy was inconclusive because of a narrow...

  15. Third-degree burn from a grounding pad during arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Samuel M; Krowka, Stephanie; Giacobbe, Andrew; Bisson, Leslie J

    2009-10-01

    We describe a healthy 59-year-old woman who sustained a third-degree burn from a grounding pad during shoulder arthroscopy. We wish to make surgeons aware of a rare complication associated with any arthroscopic procedure in which an electrocautery/grounding pad system is used. We detail the presentation, evaluation, treatment, and definitive care and review the possible causes of this complication and the mechanism by which an electrocautery/grounding pad system functions. Although this complication is not uncommon, we believe that this is the first case report describing a burn at the grounding pad site occurring during arthroscopy.

  16. Ankle sprains and instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czajka, Cory M; Tran, Elaine; Cai, Andrew N; DiPreta, John A

    2014-03-01

    Ankle injuries are among the most common injuries presenting to primary care providers and emergency departments and may cause considerable time lost to injury and long-term disability. Inversion injuries about the ankle involve about 25% of all injuries of the musculoskeletal system and 50% of all sports-related injuries. Medial-sided ankle sprains occur less frequently than those on the lateral side. High ankle sprains occur less frequently in the general population, but do occur commonly in collision sports. Providers should apply the Ottawa ankle rules when radiography is indicated and refer fractures and more severe injuries to orthopedic surgery as needed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [Diagnostic value of Blumensaat angle for anterior cruciate ligament injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiang-Yun; Feng, Jiang-Feng; Lu, Yan-Hui; Zhao, Yong-Liang; Yang, Zi-Quan

    2017-08-25

    The receiver operator characteristic(ROC) curve was used to determine the best Blumensaat angle for the diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament injury, so as to objectively evaluate the diagnostic value of Blumensaat angle for anterior cruciate ligament injury. Total 167 patients who had knee arthroscopic treatment in a hospital from January 2015 to January 2016 were retrospectively studied, and the patients' age, gender, left and right limb condition were recorded. The patients were divided into two groups according to Blumensaat angle measured on the MRI: group A(Blumensaat angle0°). The ROC curve was drawn from the statistical data of the group B to get the best critical value of the anterior cruciate ligament injury when the Blumensaat angle was more than 0°. According to the best critical value obtained by ROC curve, the coincidence rate of the total sample was obtained. There were no significant differences in patients' age, gender, and affected limbs. There were 51 patients in group A, in which 49 patients were diagnosed as anterior cruciate injury under arthroscopy(gold standard for diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament injury), and 2 patients were diagnosed as no anterior cruciate injury under arthroscopy. When the Blumensaat angle was=15°, the probability of anterior cruciate ligament injury was greater. When the Blumensaat angle was 0° to 15°, the anterior cruciate ligament was more likely to be not injured. The Blumensaat angle=15° were used to diagnose the injury of anterior cruciate ligament. Compared with the results of arthroscopy, the coincidence rate of the total sample was 92.8%. Blumensaat angle is helpful to diagnose the ACL injuries. When the Blumensaat angle was =15°, the probability of ACL injury is greater.

  18. The Effect of Ankle Kinesio Tape on Ankle Muscle Activity During a Drop Landing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayson, Shirleeah D; Needle, Alan R; Kaminski, Thomas W

    2015-11-01

    The use of Kinesio Tape among health care professional has grown recently in efforts to efficiently prevent and treat joint injuries. However, limited evidence exists regarding the efficacy of this technique in enhancing joint stability and neuromuscular control. To determine how Kinesio Tape application to the ankle joint alters forces and muscle activity during a drop-jump maneuver. Single-group pretest- posttest. University laboratory. 22 healthy adults with no previous history of ankle injury. Participants were instrumented with electromyography on the lower-leg muscles as they jumped from a 35-cm platform onto force plates. Test trials were performed without tape (BL), immediately after application of Kinesio Tape to the ankle (KT-I), and after 24 h of continued use (KT-24). Peak ground-reaction forces (GRFs) and time to peak GRF were compared across taping conditions, and the timing and amplitude of muscle activity from the tibialis anterior, peroneus longus, and lateral gastrocnemius were compared across taping conditions. No significant differences in amplitude or timing of GRFs were observed (P > .05). However, muscle activity was observed to decrease from BL to KT-I in the tibialis anterior (P = .027) and from BL to KT-24 in the PL (P = .022). The data suggest that Kinesio Tape decreases muscle activity in the ankle during a drop-jump maneuver, although no changes in GRFs were observed. This is contrary to the proposed mechanisms of Kinesio Tape. Further research might investigate how this affects participants with a history of injury.

  19. Injury of the ankle joint ligaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breitenseher, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    The diagnosis of lateral collateral ankle ligament trauma is based on patient history, clinical examination and clinical stress tests. If the clinical stress test is positive, stress radiography can be performed. There is, however, no consensus about the usefulness of stress radiography in acute ankle sprain, and in particular about the cut-off talar tilt angle beyond which a two-ligament rupture would be certain, ranging from 5 to 30 . Today, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is not used in this area, although it does allow controlled positioning of the foot and defined section visualization of injured lateral collateral ankle ligaments. In acute and chronic sinus tarsi injuries, MRI forms the established basis for diagnostic imaging, and can provide a definitive answer in most cases. MRI is also the method of choice for chronic posttraumatic pain with anterolateral impingement after rupture of the anterior talofibular ligament. Generally, for the evaluation of acute ankle injuries, MRI has developed to be the most important second-step procedure when projection radiology is non-diagnostic. (orig.) [de

  20. Augmented reality-based navigation system for wrist arthroscopy: feasibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zemirline, Ahmed; Agnus, Vincent; Soler, Luc; Mathoulin, Christophe L.; Liverneaux, Philippe A.; Obdeijn, Miryam

    2013-01-01

    Purpose In video surgery, and more specifically in arthroscopy, one of the major problems is positioning the camera and instruments within the anatomic environment. The concept of computer-guided video surgery has already been used in ear, nose, and throat (ENT), gynecology, and even in hip

  1. correlation of magnetic resonance imaging findings with arthroscopy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cuff tear and subacromial bursitis. However, after arthroscopy, significant majority of the respondents are diagnosed with osteophytosis, partial thickness rotator cuff tear and biceps tendinitis (rather than subacromial bursitis). The least common diagnosis is acromion. Type 3 and synovitis in both MRI radiological and.

  2. A Comparision of Clinical Diagnosis and Knee Arthroscopy Findings ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: The commonest clinical diagnosis was medial meniscal tear (21%), while the most frequent finding at arthroscopy was osteochondral lesions (27%). The highest correlations between clinical impressions and arthroscopic findings were in ACL tears and osteoarthritis. The overall accuracy of clinical examination was ...

  3. Education in wrist arthroscopy: past, present and future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Obdeijn, M. C.; Bavinck, N.; Mathoulin, C.; van der Horst, C. M. A. M.; Schijven, M. P.; Tuijthof, G. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Arthroscopy has assumed an important place in wrist surgery. It requires specific operative skills that are now mainly acquired in the operating room. In other fields of endoscopic surgery, e-learning and virtual reality (VR) have introduced new perspectives in teaching skills. This leads to the

  4. The Benefit of Arthroscopy for Symptomatic Total Knee Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiu-Peng Teng

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Thirty-one knees with symptomatic total knee arthroplasty were diagnosed and treated arthroscopically. There were 18 knees with soft tissue impingement and 13 knees without. There were 16 knees with painful arthroplasty and range of motion (ROM greater than 90°. Hypertrophied synovitis with or without impingement was more easily found by arthroscopy in this group than in the other 15 knees with the chief complaint of limited ROM, where more remarkable fibrotic tissue with intra-articular adhesion was found. Overall, the average improvement in ROM was 43.1° immediately after arthroscopy, and 20° at the final follow-up. Symptoms improved in 90.3% of patients, and 58.1% were satisfied with the outcome of their surgery. Arthroscopy is helpful for intra-articular diagnosis, obtaining a specimen for histopathologic analysis, culture for subclinical infection, and better improvement in ROM. In our experience, arthros-copy for symptomatic knee arthroplasty is reliable, safe and effective.

  5. Cervical epidural anaesthesia for shoulder arthroscopy and effective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Shoulder arthroscopy is used to treat various diseases of the shoulder, including refractory adhesive capsulitis. Effective postoperative pain relief is critical for these patients, as the success of surgery largely depends on early and regular physiotherapy. Although traditionally, various methods of postoperative analgesia have ...

  6. Variation in joint stressing magnitudes during knee arthroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stunt, J. J.; Wulms, P. H. L. M.; Kerkhoffs, G. M. M. J.; Sierevelt, I. N.; Schafroth, M. U.; Tuijthof, G. J. M.

    2014-01-01

    When performing knee arthroscopy, joint stressing is essential to increase the operative joint space. Adequate training of joint stressing is important, since high stressing forces can damage knee ligaments, and low stressing might not give sufficient operative space. As forces are difficult to

  7. Review of knee arthroscopy performed under local anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Law Billy

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Local anesthesia for knee arthroscopy is a well documented procedure with diagnostic and therapeutic role. Numerous therapeutic procedures including partial menisectomy, meniscus repair, abrasion chondroplasy, synovectomy, loose body removal can be performed safely and comfortably. Appropriate case selection, anesthetic strategy and technical expertise are the key to smooth and successful surgery.

  8. Arthrography of the ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindholmer, E.; Andersen, A.; Andersen, S.B.; Funder, V.; Joergensen, J.P.; Niedermann, B.; Vuust, M.

    1983-01-01

    As part of a clinical prospective investigation 102 patients with fresh ankle injuries underwent ankle arthrography and surgery for rupture of the lateral ligaments of the ankle. Three hypotheses concerning the improvement of the arthrographic diagnosis of rupture of the calcaneofibular ligament were tested. Two were rejected. Improvement in the diagnostic specificity was possible by combining arthrography with a stress inversion test, but the sensitivity of this combination was low. It was demonstrated that absence of peroneus sheath filling was a better diagnostic sign with good rather than with poor recess filling. (Auth.)

  9. Understanding acute ankle ligamentous sprain injury in sports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fong Daniel TP

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper summarizes the current understanding on acute ankle sprain injury, which is the most common acute sport trauma, accounting for about 14% of all sport-related injuries. Among, 80% are ligamentous sprains caused by explosive inversion or supination. The injury motion often happens at the subtalar joint and tears the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL which possesses the lowest ultimate load among the lateral ligaments at the ankle. For extrinsic risk factors to ankle sprain injury, prescribing orthosis decreases the risk while increased exercise intensity in soccer raises the risk. For intrinsic factors, a foot size with increased width, an increased ankle eversion to inversion strength, plantarflexion strength and ratio between dorsiflexion and plantarflexion strength, and limb dominance could increase the ankle sprain injury risk. Players with a previous sprain history, players wearing shoes with air cells, players who do not stretch before exercising, players with inferior single leg balance, and overweight players are 4.9, 4.3, 2.6, 2.4 and 3.9 times more likely to sustain an ankle sprain injury. The aetiology of most ankle sprain injuries is incorrect foot positioning at landing – a medially-deviated vertical ground reaction force causes an explosive supination or inversion moment at the subtalar joint in a short time (about 50 ms. Another aetiology is the delayed reaction time of the peroneal muscles at the lateral aspect of the ankle (60–90 ms. The failure supination or inversion torque is about 41–45 Nm to cause ligamentous rupture in simulated spraining tests on cadaver. A previous case report revealed that the ankle joint reached 48 degrees inversion and 10 degrees internal rotation during an accidental grade I ankle ligamentous sprain injury during a dynamic cutting trial in laboratory. Diagnosis techniques and grading systems vary, but the management of ankle ligamentous sprain injury is mainly conservative

  10. Multivariable Dynamic Ankle Mechanical Impedance With Active Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunglae; Krebs, Hermano Igo; Hogan, Neville

    2015-01-01

    Multivariable dynamic ankle mechanical impedance in two coupled degrees-of-freedom (DOFs) was quantified when muscles were active. Measurements were performed at five different target activation levels of tibialis anterior and soleus, from 10% to 30% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) with increments of 5% MVC. Interestingly, several ankle behaviors characterized in our previous study of the relaxed ankle were observed with muscles active: ankle mechanical impedance in joint coordinates showed responses largely consistent with a second-order system consisting of inertia, viscosity, and stiffness; stiffness was greater in the sagittal plane than in the frontal plane at all activation conditions for all subjects; and the coupling between dorsiflexion–plantarflexion and inversion–eversion was small—the two DOF measurements were well explained by a strictly diagonal impedance matrix. In general, ankle stiffness increased linearly with muscle activation in all directions in the 2-D space formed by the sagittal and frontal planes, but more in the sagittal than in the frontal plane, resulting in an accentuated “peanut shape.” This characterization of young healthy subjects’ ankle mechanical impedance with active muscles will serve as a baseline to investigate pathophysiological ankle behaviors of biomechanically and/or neurologically impaired patients. PMID:25203497

  11. Only MR can safely exclude patients from arthroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vincken, Patrice W.J.; Braak, Bert P.M. ter; Erkel, Arian R. van; Bloem, Johan L. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 9600, Leiden (Netherlands); Bloem, Rolf M. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Leiden (Netherlands); Reinier de Graaf Gasthuis, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Delft (Netherlands); Luijt, Peter A. van [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Traumatology, Leiden (Netherlands); Coene, L.N.J.E.M. [HAGA Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, The Hague (Netherlands); Lange, Sam de [Medical Center Haaglanden, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, The Hague (Netherlands)

    2009-10-15

    The aim of this study was to determine in patients with subacute knee complaints and normal standardized physical examination the fraction of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies showing arthroscopically treatable intra-articular pathology. There were 290 consecutive patients (between 16 and 45 years) with at least 4 weeks of knee complaints and low clinical suspicion of intra-articular pathology based on physical exam. Two hundred seventy-four patients were included. Sixteen patients with prior knee surgery, rheumatic arthritis, or severe osteoarthritis were excluded. MRI was used to assign patients to group 1 (treatable abnormalities) or group 2 (normal or no treatable findings), depending on whether MR demonstrated treatable pathology. Arthroscopy was performed in group 1 patients. If symptoms persisted for 3 months in group 2 patients, cross over to arthroscopy was allowed. MR showed treatable pathology in 73 patients (26.6%). Arthroscopy was performed in 64 patients of 73 patients (group 1). In 52 patients (81.3%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 71.4-91.1%), arthroscopy was therapeutic. Of the 13 arthroscopies (6.5%) in group 2, four were therapeutic (30.8%, 95% CI 1.7-59.8). The highest fraction of MR studies showing treatable pathology was found in males, aged over 30 years, with a history of effusion (54.5%, six of 11 patients). Authors believe that the negative predictive value of clinical assessment in patients with subacute knee complaints is too low to exclude these patients from MR. MR should at least be considered in male patients aged 30 years and over with a history of effusion. (orig.)

  12. Sprained ankle (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A sprain is caused by the twisting or bending of a joint into a position it was not designed to move. The ankle is the most commonly sprained joint. Some common symptoms of a sprain are pain around the joint, ...

  13. Knee Arthroscopy Simulation: A Randomized Controlled Trial Evaluating the Effectiveness of the Imperial Knee Arthroscopy Cognitive Task Analysis (IKACTA) Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Rahul; Davidson, Donald J; Sugand, Kapil; Bartlett, Matthew J; Bhattacharya, Rajarshi; Gupte, Chinmay M

    2017-10-04

    Virtual-reality and cadaveric simulations are expensive and not readily accessible. Innovative and accessible training adjuncts are required to help to meet training needs. Cognitive task analysis has been used extensively to train pilots and in other surgical specialties. However, the use of cognitive task analyses within orthopaedics is in its infancy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a novel cognitive task analysis tool to train novice surgeons in diagnostic knee arthroscopy in high-fidelity, phantom-limb simulation. Three expert knee surgeons were interviewed independently to generate a list of technical steps, decision points, and errors for diagnostic knee arthroscopy. A modified Delphi technique was used to generate the final cognitive task analysis. A video and a voiceover were recorded for each phase of this procedure. These were combined to produce the Imperial Knee Arthroscopy Cognitive Task Analysis (IKACTA) tool that utilizes written and audiovisual stimuli to describe each phase of a diagnostic knee arthroscopy. In this double-blinded, randomized controlled trial, a power calculation was performed prior to recruitment. Sixteen novice orthopaedic trainees who performed ≤10 diagnostic knee arthroscopies were randomized into 2 equal groups. The intervention group (IKACTA group) was given the IKACTA tool and the control group had no additional learning material. They were assessed objectively (validated Arthroscopic Surgical Skill Evaluation Tool [ASSET] global rating scale) on a high-fidelity, phantom-knee simulator. All participants, using the Likert rating scale, subjectively rated the tool. The mean ASSET score (and standard deviation) was 19.5 ± 3.7 points in the IKACTA group and 10.6 ± 2.3 points in the control group, resulting in an improvement of 8.9 points (95% confidence interval, 7.6 to 10.1 points; p = 0.002); the score was determined as 51.3% (19.5 of 38) for the IKACTA group, 27.9% (10.6 of 38) for the

  14. Análise radiológica do posicionamento dos túneis ósseos na cirurgia de reconstrução do ligamento cruzado anterior: comparação entre as técnicas aberta e artroscópica via portal anteromedial Radiological analysis of bone tunnel position in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction surgery: comparison between the open technique and arthroscopy via an anteromedial portal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Marcel Dambrós

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar e comparar o posicionamento dos túneis ósseos na cirurgia de reconstrução do ligamento cruzado anterior (LCA pela técnica artroscópica e pela técnica aberta através da artrotomia. MÉTODO: Foi realizado um estudo retrospectivo comparativo de 70 pacientes acometidos por lesão do LCA. Trinta e cinco pacientes foram submetidos à reconstrução do LCA por via aberta e 35 por via artroscópica utilizando a técnica via portal anteromedial. Todos os pacientes foram submetidos à reconstrução do LCA usando enxerto autólogo do terço central do tendão patelar fixado com parafusos de interferência. As radiografias pós-operatórias foram revisadas e o posicionamento do túnel femoral foi avaliado pelos métodos propostos por Harner e Aglietti, enquanto o túnel tibial foi avaliado pelo método proposto por Staubli e Rauschning. RESULTADOS: Foram observados 54 pacientes do sexo masculino e 16 do sexo feminino. A média de idade na ocasião do procedimento foi de 34 anos e três meses, variando de 17 a 58 anos. A técnica artroscópica mostrou-se mais precisa que a técnica aberta quanto ao posicionamento dos túneis ósseos, tanto femoral quanto tibial. CONCLUSÃO: Através da análise radiológica dos joelhos submetidos à reconstrução do LCA, observou-se que o posicionamento dos túneis ósseos, tanto femoral quanto tibial, apresenta menor variação quando a cirurgia é feita pela via artroscópica.OBJECTIVES: To evaluate and compare bone tunnel positioning in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction surgery using the arthroscopic technique and the open technique consisting of arthrotomy. METHOD: A comparative retrospective study on 70 patients with ACL lesions was conducted. Thirty-five patients underwent ACL reconstruction by means of the open technique and 35 by means of the arthroscopic technique using an anteromedial portal. All the patients underwent ACL reconstruction using an autologous graft from the

  15. Anterior process fractures of the calcaneus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renfrew, D.L.; El-Khoury, G.Y.

    1985-01-01

    Fractures of the anterior process of the calcaneus are often missed. This error follows from the tendency to focus exclusively on the mortise and malleoli when a history of ankle trauma is supplied. Seven patients with this fracture are presented. The anatomy, mechanism of injury, clinical presentation, and the radiographic features of this injury are discussed. (orig.)

  16. Anterior process fractures of the calcaneus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renfrew, D.L.; El-Khoury, G.Y.

    1985-07-01

    Fractures of the anterior process of the calcaneus are often missed. This error follows from the tendency to focus exclusively on the mortise and malleoli when a history of ankle trauma is supplied. Seven patients with this fracture are presented. The anatomy, mechanism of injury, clinical presentation, and the radiographic features of this injury are discussed.

  17. Ankle injuries in basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leanderson, J; Nemeth, G; Eriksson, E

    1993-01-01

    We carried out a retrospective study of the frequency of ankle sprains in basketball players. A questionnaire about previous ankle injuries, time off after such injuries, current ankle problems, personal data, number of practice hours and the use of prophylactic measures was sent out to 102 basketball players in a second division league in Sweden. Ninety-six players answered. 92% of them had suffered an ankle sprain while playing basketball, and of these 83% reported repeated sprains of one ankle. In the last two seasons, 78% of the players had injured at least one ankle. The injury frequency in the investigation was 5.5 ankle injuries per 1000 activity hours. 22% of the players used some kind of prophylactic support of their ankle joints. Because of the great number of ankle sprains and the disability in terms of time away from sports that they cause, prevention of these injuries is essential.

  18. Diagnosis of ligament injuries in the superior ankle joint. Roentgendiagnostik der Bandlaesionen des oberen Sprunggelenks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gebing, R.; Fiedler, V. (Staedtische Krankenanstalten Krefeld (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik)

    1991-12-01

    Nearly 40 years after ankle arthrography was first introduced, the anterior and inversion stress views of the ankle are still widely preferred as a noninvasive method of evaluating ligament injuries in the upper ankle. We consider the stress test, bilaterally performed using a standardized stress apparatus, as a basic examination by which to differentiate between slight and severe sprain. Intensive muscel splinting due to painful swelling can sometimes be treated by injection of local anesthetic. Like many authors, we perform ankle arthrography in cases where there is a significant difference between the clinical findings and the stress test. The technique of ankle arthrography can be readily learned and is extremely accurate in delineating the extent of ligamentous injury produced by moderate or severe ankle sprains. It can be performed in any X-ray department. (orig.).

  19. Arthroscopic Anatomy of the Ankle Joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Ronald G

    2016-10-01

    There are a number of variations in the intra-articular anatomy of the ankle which should not be considered pathological under all circumstances. The anteromedial corner of the tibial plafond (between the anterior edge of the tibial plafond and the medial malleolus) can have a notch, void of cartilage and bone. This area can appear degenerative arthroscopically; it is actually a normal variant of the articular surface. The anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament (AITF) can possess a lower, accessory band which can impinge on the anterolateral edge of the talar dome. In some cases it can cause irritation along this area of the talus laterally. If it is creating local irritation it can be removed since it does not provide any additional stabilization to the syndesmosis. There is a beveled region at the anterior leading edge of the lateral and dorsal surfaces of the talus laterally. This triangular region is void of cartilage and subchondral bone. The lack of talar structure in this region allows the lower portion of the AITF ligament to move over the talus during end range dorsiflexion of the ankle, preventing impingement. The variation in talar anatomy for this area should not be considered pathological. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Anterior cruciate ligament ganglion: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Pedrinelli

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: A ganglion is a cystic formation close to joints or tendinous sheaths, frequently found in the wrist, foot or knee. Intra-articular ganglia of the knee are rare, and most of them are located in the anterior cruciate ligament. The clinical picture for these ganglia comprises pain and movement restrictions in the knee, causing significant impairment to the patient. Symptoms are non-specific, and anterior cruciate ligament ganglia are usually diagnosed through magnetic resonance imaging or arthroscopy. Not all ganglia diagnosed through magnetic resonance imaging need to undergo surgical treatment: only those that cause clinical signs and symptoms do. Surgical results are considered good or excellent in the vast majority of cases. CASE REPORT: A 29-year-old male presented with pain in the left knee during a marathon race. Physical examination revealed limitation in the maximum range of knee extension and pain in the posterior aspect of the left knee. Radiographs of the left knee were normal, but magnetic resonance imaging revealed a multi-lobed cystic structure adjacent to the anterior cruciate ligament, which resembled a ganglion cyst. The mass was removed through arthroscopy, and pathological examination revealed a synovial cyst. Patient recovery was excellent, and he resumed his usual training routine five months later.

  1. Glossary of Foot and Ankle Terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Glossary of Foot & Ankle Terms Glossary of Foot & Ankle Terms Page Content Achilles tendon - The Achilles tendon ... research grants, humanitarian outreach and public education initiatives. Ankle instability - Chronic, repetitive sprains of the ankle. This ...

  2. Ultrasonography of the ankle joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jung Won; Lee, Sun Joo; Choo, Hye Jung; Kim, Sung Kwan; Gwak, Heui Chul [Inje University Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sung Moon [Dept. of Radiology, Dae Kyung Imaging Center, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-10-15

    Ankle disorders are a relatively common pathological condition, and ankle injuries account for approximately 14% of sports-related orthopedic emergency visits. Various imaging modalities can be used to make a diagnosis in cases of ankle pain; however, ultrasound (US) has several benefits for the evaluation of ankle pain, especially in the tendons, ligaments, and nerves of the ankle. The purpose of this article is to review the common causes of ankle pathology, with particular reference to US features. In addition, the importance of a dynamic evaluation and a stress test with US is emphasized.

  3. Ultrasonography of the ankle joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jung Won; Lee, Sun Joo; Choo, Hye Jung; Kim, Sung Kwan; Gwak, Heui Chul; Lee, Sung Moon

    2017-01-01

    Ankle disorders are a relatively common pathological condition, and ankle injuries account for approximately 14% of sports-related orthopedic emergency visits. Various imaging modalities can be used to make a diagnosis in cases of ankle pain; however, ultrasound (US) has several benefits for the evaluation of ankle pain, especially in the tendons, ligaments, and nerves of the ankle. The purpose of this article is to review the common causes of ankle pathology, with particular reference to US features. In addition, the importance of a dynamic evaluation and a stress test with US is emphasized

  4. Muscular reflexes elicited by electrical stimulation of the anterior cruciate ligament in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyhre-Poulsen, P; Krogsgaard, M R

    2000-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-deficient knees have impaired proprioception, and, although mechanoreceptors have been found in the ACL, the existence of a reflex elicited from these receptors has not been directly demonstrated in humans. In eight patients that underwent knee arthroscopy and had...

  5. Ankle ligament injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per A.F.H. Renström

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute ankle ligament sprains are common injuries. The majority of these occur during athletic participation in the 15 to 35 year age range. Despite the frequency of the injury, diagnostic and treatment protocols have varied greatly. Lateral ligament complex injuries are by far the most common of the ankle sprains. Lateral ligament injuries typically occur during plantar flexion and inversion, which is the position of maximum stress on the anterotalofibular liagment (ATFL. For this reason, the ATFL is the most commonly torn ligament during an inversion injury. In more severe inversion injuries the calcaneofibular (CFL, posterotalofibular (PTFL and subtalar ligament can also be injured. Most acute lateral ankle ligament injuries recover quickly with nonoperative management. The treatment program, called "functional treatment," includes application of the RICE principle (rest, ice, compression, and elevation immediately after the injury, a short period of immobilization and protection with an elastic or inelastic tape or bandage, and early motion exercises followed by early weight bearing and neuromuscular ankle training. Proprioceptive training with a tilt board is commenced as soon as possible, usually after 3 to 4 weeks. The purpose is to improve the balance and neuromuscular control of the ankle. Sequelae after ankle ligament injuries are very common. As much as 10% to 30% of patients with a lateral ligament injury may have chronic symptoms. Symptoms usually include persistent synovitis or tendinitis, ankle stiffness, swelling, and pain, muscle weakness, and frequent giving-way. A well designed physical therapy program with peroneal strengthening and proprioceptive training, along with bracing and/or taping can alleviate instability problems in most patients. For cases of chronic instability that are refractory to bracing and external support, surgical treatment can be explored. If the chronic instability is associated with subtalar instability

  6. MRI of the anterior talofibular ligament, talar cartilage and os subfibulare: Comparison of isotropic resolution 3D and conventional 2D T2-weighted fast spin-echo sequences at 3.0 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Jisook; Cha, Jang Gyu [Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Department of Radiology, Wonmi-gu, Bucheon-si (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young Koo [Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Department of Orthopedics, Wonmi-gu, Bucheon-si (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Bo Ra [Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Department of Biomedical Statistics, Wonmi-gu, Bucheon-si (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Chan Hong [Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Wonmi-gu, Bucheon-si (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    To determine the accuracy of a three-dimensional (3D) T2-weighted fast spin-echo (FSE) magnetic resonance (MR) sequence compared with two-dimensional (2D) sequence for diagnosing anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) tears, chondral lesion of the talus (CLT) and os subfibulare/avulsion fracture of the distal fibula (OSF). Thirty-five patients were included, who had undergone ankle MRI with 3D T2-weighted FSE and 2D T2-weighted FSE sequences, as well as subsequent ankle arthroscopy, between November 2013 and July 2014. Each MR imaging sequence was independently scored by two readers retrospectively for the presence of ATFL tears, CLT and OSF. The area under the receiver operating curve (AUC) was compared to determine the discriminatory power of the two image sequences. Interobserver agreement was expressed as unweighted kappa value. Arthroscopic findings confirmed 21 complete tears of the ATFL, 14 partial tears of the ATFL, 17 CLTs and 7 OSFs. There were no significant differences in the diagnoses of ATFL tears (p = 0.074-0.501), CLT (p = 0.090-0.450) and OSF (p = 0.317) obtained from the 2D and 3D sequences by either reader. The interobserver agreement rates between two readers using the 3D T2-weighted FSE sequence versus those obtained with the 2D sequence were substantial (κ = 0.659) versus moderate (κ = 0.553) for ATFL tears, moderate (κ = 0.499) versus substantial (κ = 0.676) for CLT and substantial (κ = 0.621) versus substantial (κ = 0.689) for OSF. Three-dimensional isotropic T2-weighted FSE MRI of the ankle resulted in no statistically significant difference in diagnostic performance compared to two-dimensional T2-weighted FSE MRI in the evaluation of ATFL tears, CLTs and OSFs. (orig.)

  7. MRI of the anterior talofibular ligament, talar cartilage and os subfibulare: Comparison of isotropic resolution 3D and conventional 2D T2-weighted fast spin-echo sequences at 3.0 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, Jisook; Cha, Jang Gyu; Lee, Young Koo; Lee, Bo Ra; Jeon, Chan Hong

    2016-01-01

    To determine the accuracy of a three-dimensional (3D) T2-weighted fast spin-echo (FSE) magnetic resonance (MR) sequence compared with two-dimensional (2D) sequence for diagnosing anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) tears, chondral lesion of the talus (CLT) and os subfibulare/avulsion fracture of the distal fibula (OSF). Thirty-five patients were included, who had undergone ankle MRI with 3D T2-weighted FSE and 2D T2-weighted FSE sequences, as well as subsequent ankle arthroscopy, between November 2013 and July 2014. Each MR imaging sequence was independently scored by two readers retrospectively for the presence of ATFL tears, CLT and OSF. The area under the receiver operating curve (AUC) was compared to determine the discriminatory power of the two image sequences. Interobserver agreement was expressed as unweighted kappa value. Arthroscopic findings confirmed 21 complete tears of the ATFL, 14 partial tears of the ATFL, 17 CLTs and 7 OSFs. There were no significant differences in the diagnoses of ATFL tears (p = 0.074-0.501), CLT (p = 0.090-0.450) and OSF (p = 0.317) obtained from the 2D and 3D sequences by either reader. The interobserver agreement rates between two readers using the 3D T2-weighted FSE sequence versus those obtained with the 2D sequence were substantial (κ = 0.659) versus moderate (κ = 0.553) for ATFL tears, moderate (κ = 0.499) versus substantial (κ = 0.676) for CLT and substantial (κ = 0.621) versus substantial (κ = 0.689) for OSF. Three-dimensional isotropic T2-weighted FSE MRI of the ankle resulted in no statistically significant difference in diagnostic performance compared to two-dimensional T2-weighted FSE MRI in the evaluation of ATFL tears, CLTs and OSFs. (orig.)

  8. The stress-tenogram in the diagnosis of ruptures of the lateral ligament of the ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, G.A.; Frenyo, S.D.

    1979-01-01

    The stress-tenogram is a radiological technique for the investigation of injuries to the lateral ligament of the ankle, and combines the information previously provided by inversion and anterior stress radiographs, and the peroneal tenogram. It is designed to differentiate between stable and unstable ankles, and between isolated ruptures of the anterior talofibular ligament and combined tears of the anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligaments. A high degree of diagnostic accuracy has been confirmed at operative repair in a group of thirty-two patients. (author)

  9. A Survey of Parachute Ankle Brace Breakages

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-10

    ankle stablizers in preventing ankle injuries . American Journal of Sports Medicine. 16: 228–233. 14...Schmidt MD, Sulsky SI, and Amoroso PJ (2005). Effectiveness of an external ankle brace in reducing parachute-related ankle injuries . Injury Prevention ...and Horodyski M (1994). The efficacy of a semirigid ankle stabilizer to reduce acute ankle injury in basketball . American Journal of Sports

  10. Impact of MRI on a knee arthroscopy waiting list.

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, R. L.; Williams, L. A.; Watura, R.; Fairclough, J. A.

    1996-01-01

    As part of a waiting list initiative, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were arranged for 69 patients waiting for knee arthroscopy. All patients had a clinical diagnosis of a meniscal tear. With 11 non-attenders, 58 scans were performed. Of the patients scanned, 35 had demonstrable meniscal tears, and five patients had other pathology on their scans. All patients were reviewed clinically after their scans, and 24 patients were removed from the waiting list. After a further 9 months, only...

  11. [Acute rhabdomyolysis after spinal anesthesia for knee arthroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouché, P M; Chavagnac, B; Cognet, V; Banssillon, V

    2001-08-01

    We report an observation of acute rhabdomyolysis of gluteus maximum muscles occurring in a non-obese patient installed in supine position that underwent knee arthroscopy under spinal anaesthesia. The patient had insulin-dependent diabetes melitus with documented microangiopathy. The interest of this observation resides in the occurrence of the syndrome after a short period of time (one hour) of installation in the supine position in a patient that did not have any of the generally described risk factors of rhabdomyolysis.

  12. Arthrography of the foot and ankle. Ankle and subtalar joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trnka, H J; Ivanic, G; Trattnig, S

    2000-03-01

    Arthrography is the intra-articular injection of contrast media. This article reviews the normal and pathologic findings of standard arthrography and MR imaging arthrography of the ankle and subtalar joint. Standard arthrography is used primarily after acute ankle sprains, whereas MR imaging arthrography is used for staging and detecting osteochondritis dissecans of the talus, anterolateral soft tissue impingement, and chronic lateral ankle instability.

  13. Augmented reality-based navigation system for wrist arthroscopy: feasibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemirline, Ahmed; Agnus, Vincent; Soler, Luc; Mathoulin, Christophe L; Obdeijn, Miryam; Liverneaux, Philippe A

    2013-11-01

    In video surgery, and more specifically in arthroscopy, one of the major problems is positioning the camera and instruments within the anatomic environment. The concept of computer-guided video surgery has already been used in ear, nose, and throat (ENT), gynecology, and even in hip arthroscopy. These systems, however, rely on optical or mechanical sensors, which turn out to be restricting and cumbersome. The aim of our study was to develop and evaluate the accuracy of a navigation system based on electromagnetic sensors in video surgery. We used an electromagnetic localization device (Aurora, Northern Digital Inc., Ontario, Canada) to track the movements in space of both the camera and the instruments. We have developed a dedicated application in the Python language, using the VTK library for the graphic display and the OpenCV library for camera calibration. A prototype has been designed and evaluated for wrist arthroscopy. It allows display of the theoretical position of instruments onto the arthroscopic view with useful accuracy. The augmented reality view represents valuable assistance when surgeons want to position the arthroscope or locate their instruments. It makes the maneuver more intuitive, increases comfort, saves time, and enhances concentration.

  14. Change in neck circumference after shoulder arthroscopy: An observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrividya Chellam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Shoulder arthroscopy requires fluid irrigation, which causes soft-tissue oedema around chest, neck, and arm intraoperatively, leading to postoperative airway complications. We decided to study the incidence of increase in the neck circumference in shoulder arthroscopy and its effects on the airway. Methods: We studied 32 cases of shoulder arthroscopies over a period of 1-year, performed under general anaesthesia with interscalene block. The neck circumference of patients before and after the procedure was measured along with other parameters. The endotracheal tube cuff was deflated at the end of surgery to determine air leak around the tube. The negative leak test suggested airway oedema. Results: Thirty out of 32 patients showed positive air leak test. The average change in neck circumference was 1.17 ± 1.16 cm and all could be extubated uneventfully. Two showed negative leak test with an increase in neck circumference by 4.5 and 6.4 cm and were not extubated. Multiple regression analysis for risk factors showed intraoperative hypertension as a single predictor for an increase in neck circumference. Conclusion: Change in the neck circumference beyond 4 cm may suggest airway compromise and below 4 cm, airway compromise is unlikely even in the presence of extensive soft-tissue oedema around the shoulder, upper arm and chest.

  15. Role of Surgery in Management of Osteo-Articular Tuberculosis of the Foot and Ankle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhillon, Mandeep Singh; Agashe, Vikas; Patil, Sampat Dumbre

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis of the foot and ankle still remains to be a significant problem, especially in the developing countries, and with an increase in incidence in immunosuppressed patients. Treatment is mainly medical using multidrug chemotherapy; surgical interventions range from biopsy, synovectomy and debridement, to joint preserving procedures like distraction in early cases, and arthrodesis of hindfoot joints and the ankle in advanced disease with joint destruction. Surgical Options: All procedures should be done after initiating appropriate medical management. The ankle is the commonest joint needing intervention, followed by the subtalar and talo-navicular joint. Forefoot TB limited to the bone rarely needs surgical intervention except when the infective focus is threatening to invade a joint. Articular disease can spread rapidly, so early diagnosis and treatment can influence the outcome. Surgical interventions may need to be modified in the presence of sinuses and active disease; fusions need compression, and implants have to be chosen wisely. External fixators are the commonest devices used for compression in active disease, but intramedullary nails better stabilize pantalar arthrodesis. Arthroscopy has become a valuable tool for visualizing the ankle and hindfoot joints, and is an excellent adjunct for arthrodesis by minimally invasive methods. Although Osteoarticular Tb involving the foot and ankle is largely managed with chemotherapy, specific indications for surgical intervention exist. Timely done procedures could limit joint destruction, or prevent spread to adjacent joints. Fusions are the commonest procedure for sequelae of disease or for correcting residual deformity.

  16. The Activities of the Muscles around the Ankle Joint during Foot-gripping are Affected by the Angle of the Ankle

    OpenAIRE

    Soma, Masayuki; Murata, Shin; Kai, Yoshihiro; Nakae, Hideyuki; Satou, Yosuke

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the activities of the muscles around the ankle joint during foot gripping. [Subjects] The subjects of this study were 17 healthy females. [Methods] We measured the maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) activities of the soleus muscle, the medial head of the gastrocnemius muscle, and the tibialis anterior muscle, and calculated %IEMG during foot gripping in 3 different ankle joint positions: 10° of plantar flexion, 0°, and 10° of dorsiflexion....

  17. [A rare injury of the ankle in competition skiiers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritschy, D

    1994-01-01

    Ankle ligamentous injuries have become rare since high and rigid boots are used in alpine skiing because tibio-talar and foot movements are almost impossible. However, in extreme competition conditions, external rotation of the ankle is possible in the ski boot. These are slalom accidents where the leg is forced suddenly in external rotation when straddling a gate. This movement leads to a collision between talus and distal fibula opening the tibio-fibular joint. The anterior tibio-fibular ligament is first torn. We report a series of 13 cases collected in a 17 years experience in the FIS-World Cup.

  18. X-Ray Exam: Ankle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Educators Search English Español X-Ray Exam: Ankle KidsHealth / For Parents / X-Ray Exam: Ankle What's in this article? What It Is Why ... You Have Questions Print What It Is An ankle X-ray is a safe and painless test ...

  19. Comparison of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and arthroscopy in the diagnosis of ligamentous and meniscal tears of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyahara, Kenji; Sera, Keisuke; Taniguchi, Tatsuyuki; Komuta, Kaname; Teramoto, Tsukasa.

    1994-01-01

    We prospectively studied 20 patients with suspected ligamentous or meniscal tears of the knee. They were examined by both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and arthroscopy. The accuracy of the diagnoses from MRI compared with arthroscopy was 90% for the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), 100% for the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), 90% for the medial meniscus (MM), and 95% for the lateral meniscus (LM). But there were 2 'false positive' ACL tears, 1 'false positive' MM tear, 1 'false negative' MM tear, and 1 'false negative' LM tear. We thought that we can reduce these 'false positive' and 'false negative' findings by describing the best conditions to take MRI for ligamentous or meniscal tears of the knee, or raising the ability to interpret MRI findings. However it is probable that the MRI findings are different from the arthroscopic findings, because MRI is more sensitive to intermeniscal tears and there is the dead angle of the arthroscope in the knee to be taken into consideration. (author)

  20. Comparison of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and arthroscopy in the diagnosis of ligamentous and meniscal tears of the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyahara, Kenji; Sera, Keisuke; Taniguchi, Tatsuyuki; Komuta, Kaname (Mitsubishi General Hospital, Nagasaki (Japan)); Teramoto, Tsukasa

    1994-09-01

    We prospectively studied 20 patients with suspected ligamentous or meniscal tears of the knee. They were examined by both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and arthroscopy. The accuracy of the diagnoses from MRI compared with arthroscopy was 90% for the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), 100% for the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), 90% for the medial meniscus (MM), and 95% for the lateral meniscus (LM). But there were 2 'false positive' ACL tears, 1 'false positive' MM tear, 1 'false negative' MM tear, and 1 'false negative' LM tear. We thought that we can reduce these 'false positive' and 'false negative' findings by describing the best conditions to take MRI for ligamentous or meniscal tears of the knee, or raising the ability to interpret MRI findings. However it is probable that the MRI findings are different from the arthroscopic findings, because MRI is more sensitive to intermeniscal tears and there is the dead angle of the arthroscope in the knee to be taken into consideration. (author).

  1. Comparison between arthroscopy and 3 dimensional double echo steady state 3D-DESS sequences in magnetic resonance imaging of internal derangements of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dongola, Nagwa A.; Gishen, Philip

    2004-01-01

    This study was performed with the aim of evaluating the usefulness of 3 dimensional double-echo steady state sequences in examining the internal derangements of the knee. Arthroscopy was used as a referral standard. The study was performed in the Radiology and Arthroscopy Departments of Kings College Hospital, London, United Kingdom, during a 6-month period from January 1997 to June 1997. All patients who had knee magnetic resonance imaging within 3 months of arthroscopy were retrospectively studied. Thirty-three patients fulfilled these criteria and were selected. Three dimensional double-echo steady state sequences produced sensitivity for detecting meniscal tears of 87.5% for medial menisci (MM) and 75% for lateral menisci (LM). Specificity was 76% for MM and 96% for LM; positive predictive value (PPV) was 46.1% for MM and 85.7% for LM and negative predictive value (NPV) of 95% for MM and 96% for LM. The sensitivity for the anterior cruciate ligament was 83.3%, specificity was 77.7%, PPV was 45.4% and NPV was 95.4%. Three dimensional double-echo steady state sequences are useful in evaluating internal derangement of the knee, especially in advanced cartilage lesions. (author)

  2. Differences in lateral ankle laxity measured via stress ultrasonography in individuals with chronic ankle instability, ankle sprain copers, and healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croy, Theodore; Saliba, Susan A; Saliba, Ethan; Anderson, Mark W; Hertel, Jay

    2012-07-01

    Cross-sectional. To use stress ultrasonography to measure the change in anterior talofibular ligament length during the simulated anterior drawer and ankle inversion stress tests. In approximately 30% of individuals, ankle sprains may eventually develop into chronic ankle instability (CAI) with recurrent symptoms. Individuals with CAI and those who have a history of ankle sprain (greater than 1 year prior) without chronic instability (copers) may or may not have mechanical laxity. Sixty subjects (n=60 ankles) were divided into 3 groups: 1) Control subjects without ankle injury history (n=20; mean ± SD age; 24.8 ± 4.8 years; height, 173.7 ± 9.4 cm; weight, 77.2 ± 19.5 kg), ankle sprain copers (n=20; 22.3 ± 2.9 years; 172.8 ± 11.3 cm; 72.4 ± 14.3 kg), and subjects with CAI (n=20; 23.5 ± 4.2 years; 174.6 ± 9.6 cm; 74.8 ± 17.3 kg). Ligament length change with the anterior drawer and end range ankle inversion was calculated from ultrasound images. The Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM) was used to quantify self-reported function on activities-of-daily living (ADL) and sports. The anterior drawer test resulted in length changes that were greater (F₂,₅₇=6.2, P=.004) in the CAI (mean ± SD length change, 15.6 ± 15.1%, P=.006) and the coper groups (14.0 ± 15.9%, P=.016) compared to the control group (1.3 ± 10.7%); however the length change for the CAI and coper groups were not different (P=.93). Ankle inversion similarly resulted in greater ligament length change (F₂,₅₇=6.5, P=.003) in the CAI (25.3 ± 15.5%, P=.003) and coper groups (20.2 ± 19.6%, P=.039) compared to the control group (7.4 ± 12.9%); with no difference in length change between the copers and CAI groups (P=.59). The CAI group had a lower score on the FAAM-ADL (87.4 ± 13.4%) and FAAM-Sports (74.2 ± 17.8%) when compared to the control (98.8 ± 2.9% and 98.9 ± 3.1%, P<.0001) and coper groups (99.4 ± 1.8% and 94.6 ± 8.8%, P<.0001). Stress ultrasonography identified greater

  3. Arthrography of the ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aragonez, S.D.B.; Avila, G.A. de; Calieron, P.J.

    1985-01-01

    The contribution of artrography in the diagnosis of acute ligaments injuries of the ankle is discussed. The technique of examination is described. An anatomic review, diagnostic elements and the proceeding are presented emphasizing the lateral ligaments. (M.A.C.) [pt

  4. Reliability and validity of the Dutch version of the Foot and Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Akker-Scheek, Inge; Seldentuis, Arnoud; Reininga, Inge H F; Stevens, Martin

    2013-06-11

    The Foot and Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS) is a patient-reported questionnaire measuring symptoms and functional limitations of the foot and ankle. Aim is to translate and culturally adapt the Dutch version of the FAOS and to investigate internal consistency, validity, repeatability and responsiveness. According to the Cross Cultural Adaptation of Self-Report Measures guideline, the FAOS was translated into Dutch. Eighty-nine patients who had undergone an ankle arthroscopy, ankle arthrodesis, ankle ligament reconstruction or hallux valgus correction completed the FAOS, FFI, WOMAC and SF-36 questionnaires and were included in the validity study. Sixty-five of them completed the FAOS a second time to determine repeatability. Responsiveness was analysed in an additional 15 patients who were being treated for foot or ankle problems. Internal consistency of the FAOS is high (Cronbach's alphas varying between 0.90 and 0.96). Repeatability can be considered good, with ICC's ranging from 0.90 to 0.96. Construct validity can be classified as good with moderate-to-high correlations between the FAOS subscales and subscales of the FFI (0.55 to 0.90), WOMAC (0.57 to 0.92) and SF-36 subscales physical functioning, pain, social functioning and role-physical (0.33 to 0.81). Low standard response means were found for responsiveness (0.0 to 0.4). The results of this study show that the Dutch version of the FAOS is a reliable and valid questionnaire to assess symptoms and functional limitations of the foot and ankle.

  5. Analysis of muscle activity and ankle joint movement during the side-hop test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Masahiro; Taniguchi, Keigo; Katayose, Masaki

    2011-08-01

    Functional performance tests (FPTs) that consist of movements, such as hopping, landing, and cutting, provide useful measurements. Although some tests have been established for kinematic studies of the knee joint, very few tests have been established for the ankle joint. To use the FPT as a test battery for patients with an ankle sprain, it is necessary to document typical patterns of muscle activation and range of motion (ROM) of the ankle joint during FPTs. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the pattern of the ROM of the ankle inversion/eversion and the muscle activity of the peroneus longus muscle (PL) and the tibial anterior muscle (TA) in normal subjects during the side-hop test. To emphasize the characteristics of ROM and electromyography (EMG) at each phase, the side-hop tests were divided into 4 phases: lateral-hop contact phase (LC), lateral-hop flight phase (LF), medial hop contact phase (MC), and medial hop flight phase (MF), and the ROM of ankle inversion/eversion, a peak angle of ankle inversion, and Integral EMG (IEMG) of PL and TA compared among 4 phases. Fifteen male subjects with no symptoms of ankle joint problems participated in this research. The ROM of ankle inversion/eversion during the side-hop test was 27 ± 3.8° (mean ± SD), and there was a significant difference in the ROM of ankle inversion/eversion among 4 phases (p sprain.

  6. A neuromechanics-based powered ankle exoskeleton to assist walking post-stroke: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kota Z; Lewek, Michael D; Sawicki, Gregory S

    2015-02-25

    In persons post-stroke, diminished ankle joint function can contribute to inadequate gait propulsion. To target paretic ankle impairments, we developed a neuromechanics-based powered ankle exoskeleton. Specifically, this exoskeleton supplies plantarflexion assistance that is proportional to the user's paretic soleus electromyography (EMG) amplitude only during a phase of gait when the stance limb is subjected to an anteriorly directed ground reaction force (GRF). The purpose of this feasibility study was to examine the short-term effects of the powered ankle exoskeleton on the mechanics and energetics of gait. Five subjects with stroke walked with a powered ankle exoskeleton on the paretic limb for three 5 minute sessions. We analyzed the peak paretic ankle plantarflexion moment, paretic ankle positive work, symmetry of GRF propulsion impulse, and net metabolic power. The exoskeleton increased the paretic plantarflexion moment by 16% during the powered walking trials relative to unassisted walking condition (p exoskeleton assistance appeared to reduce the net metabolic power gradually with each 5 minute repetition, though no statistical significance was found. In three of the subjects, the paretic soleus activation during the propulsion phase of stance was reduced during the powered assistance compared to unassisted walking (35% reduction in the integrated EMG amplitude during the third powered session). This feasibility study demonstrated that the exoskeleton can enhance paretic ankle moment. Future studies with greater sample size and prolonged sessions are warranted to evaluate the effects of the powered ankle exoskeleton on overall gait outcomes in persons post-stroke.

  7. Arthrography of the ankle joint in chronic instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dory, M.A.

    1986-05-01

    Papers on arthrography of injuries of the lateral ligaments of the ankle relate mainly to recent distortion of the joint. Arthrography performed at a later stage after injury generally is considered useless. In fact, changes in chronic instability are observed; they are subtle and consist either of small recesses adjacent to the lateral malleolus or communication of the joint with the peroneal tendon sheaths. Arthrography was assessed in 61 cases of recurrent lateral sprains of the ankle more than 2 weeks after acute injury; 38 were considered as positive. Twenty-five patients had operative evaluation, with four false negative and one false positive results. Small recesses adjacent to the lateral malleolus or opacification of the peroneal tendon sheaths are sequelae of an acute sprain with tear of the anterior talofibular and/or the calcaneofibular ligaments. Although false negative results occur, arthrography is useful in the preoperative assessment of chronic ankle instability.

  8. Arthrography of the ankle joint in chronic instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dory, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    Papers on arthrography of injuries of the lateral ligaments of the ankle relate mainly to recent distortion of the joint. Arthrography performed at a later stage after injury generally is considered useless. In fact, changes in chronic instability are observed; they are subtle and consist either of small recesses adjacent to the lateral malleolus or communication of the joint with the peroneal tendon sheaths. Arthrography was assessed in 61 cases of recurrent lateral sprains of the ankle more than 2 weeks after acute injury; 38 were considered as positive. Twenty-five patients had operative evaluation, with four false negative and one false positive results. Small recesses adjacent to the lateral malleolus or opacification of the peroneal tendon sheaths are sequelae of an acute sprain with tear of the anterior talofibular and/or the calcaneofibular ligaments. Although false negative results occur, arthrography is useful in the preoperative assessment of chronic ankle instability. (orig.)

  9. Injured lateral ankle ligaments: technique and assessment of MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breitenseher, M.J.; Trattnig, S.; Kukla, C.; Gaebler, C.; Kaider, A.; Haller, J.; Heinz-Peer, G.; Imhof, H.

    1996-01-01

    56 patients with the clinical diagnosis of sprained ankles were investigated. Evaluation of the anterior (AFTL) and posterior fibulotalar ligament (PFTL) was performed with the foot in dorsiflexion (20 ) and of the fibulo calcanear ligament (FCL) in plantarflexion (45 ). Axial T 1 w-SE and T 2 w-TSE images were obtained. Full-length visualisation of ligmaments in one slice and the extent of injury were evaluated. 12 ankle injuries were confirmed by operation. With MRI full-length visualisation of lateral ankle ligaments was possible in 86%. A partial/complete rupture of the AFTL was noticed in 33/64% and of the FCI in 29/39%, and of the PFTL in 27/5%. Sensitivity/specificity of MRI when compared to surgery was 100/100% for injuries of the AFTL, 64/100% for the FCL, and 33/78% for the PFTL. (orig./MG) [de

  10. Value of Fat-Suppressed Proton-Density-Weighted Turbo Spin-Echo Sequences in Detecting Meniscal Lesions: Comparison with Arthroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, F.K.W.; Schaefer, P.J.; Brossmann, J.; Frahm, C.; Hilgert, R.E.; Heller, M.; Jahnke, T.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate fat-suppressed (FS) proton-density-weighted (PDw) turbo spin-echo (TSE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compared to arthroscopy in the detection of meniscal lesions. Material and Methods: In a prospective study, 31 knee joints were imaged on a 1.5T MR scanner before arthroscopy using the following sequences: (a) coronal and sagittal FS-PDw TSE (TR/TE: 4009/15 ms); (b) coronal T1w SE (TR/TE: 722/20 ms), and sagittal PDw TSE (TR/TE: 3800/15 ms). Other imaging parameters were: slice thickness 3 mm, FOV 160 mm, matrix 256x256. A total of 186 meniscal regions (62 menisci; anterior horn, body, posterior horn) were evaluated. Standard of reference was arthroscopy. Sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value (npv), positive predictive value (ppv), and accuracy were calculated. Results: Arthroscopically, meniscal lesions were detected in 55/186 segments (35 medial and 20 lateral meniscal lesions). Sensitivity, specificity, npv, ppv, and accuracy for combination of coronal and sagittal FS PDw TSE were 91.4%, 98.3%, 95%, 97%, and 93.5% for the medial meniscus, and 90%, 98.6%, 97.3%, 94.7%, and 96.8% for the lateral. The results were comparable to the combination of coronal T1w SE and sagittal PDw TSE for the medial (88.6%, 98.3%, 93.4%, 96.9%, 91.4%) and the lateral (90%, 95.9%, 97.2%, 85.7%, 92.5%) meniscus. Conclusion: FS PDw TSE-MR sequences are an excellent alternative for the detection of meniscal lesions in comparison with diagnostic arthroscopy

  11. Septic arthritis caused by Granulicatella adiacens after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena Rosón, A; Valencia García, H; Moreno Coronas, F J

    2018-02-05

    Septic arthritis after knee arthroscopy is an extremely rare condition. A rate of 0.15-0.84% cases of postoperative infection is estimated in several series. The arthroscopy procedure most frequently related with an infectious complication is anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, with a prevalence of 0.3-1.7% cases. Staphylococcus sp. is the pathogen most commonly cultured. We describe a case of septic arthritis after ACL reconstruction. We found no published case of septic arthritis caused by this microorganism after knee arthroscopy. It is probably the first case published in the literature. Copyright © 2017 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Safety and efficacy of hyperosmolar irrigation solution in shoulder arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capito, Nicholas M; Cook, James L; Yahuaca, Bernardo; Capito, Marie D; Sherman, Seth L; Smith, Matthew J

    2017-05-01

    A hyperosmolar irrigation solution has been reported to be safe and have potential benefits for use during shoulder arthroscopy in an animal model study. In this study, the clinical effects of a hyperosmolar solution were compared with a standard isotonic solution when used for shoulder arthroscopy. A prospective, double-blind, randomized controlled trial was performed to compare isotonic (273 mOsm/L) and hyperosmolar (593 mOsm/L) irrigation solutions used for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Primary outcomes focused on the amount of periarticular fluid retention based on net weight gain, change in shoulder girth, and pain. All patients were tracked through standard postsurgical follow-up to ensure no additional complications arose. Patients were contacted at 1 year to assess American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeon score, visual analog scale pain score, and the Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation shoulder scores RESULTS: Fifty patients (n = 25/group) were enrolled and completed the study. No statistically significant differences were noted between cohorts in demographics or surgical variables. The hyperosmolar group experienced significantly less mean weight gain (1.6 ± 0.82 kg vs. 2.25 ± 0.77 kg; P = .005), significantly less change in shoulder girth (P  .2). A hyperosmolar irrigation solution provides a safe and effective way to decrease periarticular fluid retention associated with arthroscopic rotator cuff surgery without any adverse long-term effects. Use of a hyperosmolar irrigation solution for shoulder arthroscopy has potential clinical benefits to surgeons and patients. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Learning the skills needed to perform shoulder arthroscopy by simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcheix, P-S; Vergnenegre, G; Dalmay, F; Mabit, C; Charissoux, J-L

    2017-06-01

    Simulation for arthroscopy helps surgical trainees develop their surgery skills in a safe environment. This teaching technique has become more widespread in recent years because of the need to provide surgeons in training with an alternative to the current methods. We hypothesized that a resident in surgery could acquire the skills needed to perform arthroscopic shoulder surgery by working on a simulator. The study was conducted over a 4-month period from June to September 2016. All the surgeons and residents in our department participated in the study. We recorded each participant's age, sex, dominant hand, and video gaming experience. We used the Arthro Mentor™ simulator from Simbionix (now 3D Systems). Testing was carried out at the start and end of training to evaluate the participant's skills and their progression. The changes were evaluated statistically. Fourteen surgeons were included in the study. They were split into two groups: controls and residents. There was a statistically significant improvement in the intern group between the overall pre-test score and the overall post-test score. There was no significant improvement in the overall score of the control group between the pre-test and post-test. For surgeons in training, shoulder arthroscopy simulation helps them acquire the skills needed to perform arthroscopy such as hand-eye coordination, triangulation and the ability to work in three-dimensions based on two-dimensional visual information. We believe that the benefit of simulation resides in learning the skills needed to perform a surgical procedure, not in learning the procedure itself. III-case-control study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Dynamic Evaluation of the Contact Characteristics and Three-Dimensional Motion for the Ankle Joint with Lateral Ligament Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Kensaku; Omori, Go; Terashima, Shojiro; Sakamoto, Makoto; Hara, Toshiaki

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the dynamic changes in contact pressure distribution and three-dimensional ankle joint motion before and after lateral ligament injuries. Five fresh and frozen intact cadaveric ankles were examined. Each ankle was mounted on a specially designed frame that preserved five degrees of freedom motion. The direct linear transformation technique was used to measure the three-dimensional ankle motion, and a pressure-sensitive conductive rubber sensor was inserted into the talocrural joint space to determine the contact pressure distribution. The contact area on the talus for intact ankle moved anteriorly and laterally with increasing dorsiflexion. An area of high pressure was observed in the medial aspect of the articular surface after the ligament was cut. Supination significantly increased after a combined anterior talofibular ligament (ATF) and calcaneofibular ligament (CF) were cut in comparison with after only an ATF was cut, and no significant differences were observed in motional properties under each experimental condition.

  15. Frequency of bone-bruises in ankle sprains. Magnetic resonance imaging studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uto, Yuji; Morooka, Masaaki [Morooka Orthopaedic Surgery Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2002-09-01

    We retrospectively studied MRI on the frequency of bone-bruises in ankle sprains, especially those of the lateral collateral ligaments of the ankle joint. Bone-bruises occurred in 3.8% (4/106) of ruptures of anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL), and 6.3% (5/79) of ruptures of ATFL and calcaneofibular ligament (CFL). Bone-bruises were more likely to be seen in ATFL and CFL ruptures than in ATFL rupture alone. (author)

  16. Accuracy of double-contrast arthrography and arthroscopy of the knee joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thijn, C.J.P.

    1982-01-01

    Only in the diagnosis of medial meniscal lesions is double contrast arthrography superior to arthroscopy, provided that arthroscopy is carried out only from the anterolateral side (94% against 81% positive correlations). The rates in diagnosing lateral meniscal lesions are respectively 90% and 94.5%, in patellar chondropathy 55% and 99.5% respectively, and in diagnosting cruciate ligament lesions 69% and 97% respectively

  17. Using arthroscopy to observe the effect of liver-softening medicine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Arthroscopy was used to observe the clinical effect of liver-softening medicine for treating knee osteoarthritis (OA). Materials and Methods: Forty knee OA patients with cartilage classifications of Outerbridge grade II, III, or II plus III determined via arthroscopy were randomly assigned to a treatment of ...

  18. The anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligaments: an anatomic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yıldız, Selda; Yalcın, Bulent

    2013-08-01

    Inversion injuries of the ankle are the most common sport injuries. Extreme inversion of the ankle affects frequently lateral ankle ligaments, especially the anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligaments. The aim of this study is to investigate the ligaments in detail to contribute to accurate evaluation of radiological investigations and more precise surgical interventions by clarifying the anatomic structure of the ligaments by considering their functional importance. In the study, length between the attachment points and width at the midpoint of the anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligaments, length and width of the bands of anterior talofibular ligament, and connecting ligaments extending from the talus to calcaneus exchanging from the both ligaments were measured on the 46 ankles. In addition, angles between these ligaments and between longitudinal axis of the fibula and both ligaments were measured. Relationship between determined variables on the right and left sides was statistically analyzed. In diagnosis and treatment methods, the clinical importance of the anatomy of the lateral collateral ligaments of the ankle, especially the anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligaments, was frequently reported in the literature. Angular measurements benefit in determination of the ligament injury. Therefore, knowledge about normal anatomic angles between each other and angles between longitudinal axis of the fibula and both ligaments was certainly important for the correct diagnosis. Nowadays, surgical reconstructions of the ligaments are frequently used. During the surgical invention, length and width of the ligaments are necessary to determine quantity of ligament loss. Nonetheless, knowledge of ligament attachments contributes to more accurate reconstructions.

  19. Ankle impingement syndromes; Impingement-Syndrome am Sprunggelenk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eiber, Matthias; Woertler, Klaus [Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik

    2010-06-15

    Soft-tissue and osseous impingement syndromes can be an important cause of chronic ankle pain, particularly in the professional athlete. The classification of ankle impingement syndromes is based to their anatomical location around the tibiotalar joint. The most important impingement syndromes are anterolateral, anterior and posterior impingement with more recent studies describing posteromedial and anteromedial impingement. Usually conventional radiography is the first imaging technique to be performed as it allows assessment of potential bone abnormalities, particularly in anterior and posterior joint compartments. Computed tomography (CT) only plays a role in the assessment of the posterior impingement. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is regarded as the modality of choice as it is able to demonstrate both osseous and soft tissue changes, such as bone marrow edema, capsular and ligametous thickening, and localized synovitis. (orig.)

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of the ankle in female ballet dancers en pointe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Jeffrey A. (Dept. of Dance, Univ. of California-Irvine, Irvine, CA (United States)), e-mail: jeff.russell@uci.edu; Shave, Ruth M. (Dept. of Radiology, Russells Hall Hospital, Dudley (United Kingdom)); Yoshioka, Hiroshi (Dept. of Radiological Sciences, Univ. of California-Irvine, Irvine, CA (United States)); Kruse, David W. (Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery and Family Medicine, Univ. of California-Irvine, Irvine, CA (United States)); Koutedakis, Yiannis; Wyon, Matthew A. (School of Sport, Performing Arts and Leisure, Univ. of Wolverhampton, Walsall (United Kingdom))

    2010-07-15

    Background: Ballet dancers require extreme range of motion of the ankle, especially weight-bearing maximum plantar flexion (en pointe). In spite of a high prevalence of foot and ankle injuries in ballet dancers, the anatomy and pathoanatomy of this position have not been sufficiently studied in weight-bearing. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a beneficial method for such study. Purpose: To develop an MRI method of evaluating the ankles of female ballet dancers standing en pointe and to assess whether pathological findings from the MR images were associated with ankle pain reported by the subjects. Material and Methods: Nine female ballet dancers (age, 21+-2.9 years; dance experience, 16+-4.1 years; en pointe dance experience, 7+-4.9 years) completed an ankle pain visual analog scale questionnaire and underwent T1- and T2-weighted scans using a 0.25 T open MRI device. The ankle was scanned in three positions: supine with full plantar flexion, standing with the ankle in anatomical position, and standing en pointe. Results: Obtaining MR images of the ballet dancers en pointe was successful in spite of limitations imposed by the difficulty of remaining motionless in the en pointe position during scanning. MRI signs of ankle pathology and anatomical variants were observed. Convergence of the posterior edge of the tibial plafond, posterior talus, and superior calcaneus was noted in 100% of cases. Widened anterior joint congruity and synovitis/joint effusion were present in 71% and 67%, respectively. Anterior tibial and/or talar spurs and Stieda's process were each seen in 44%. However, clinical signs did not always correlate with pain reported by the subjects. Conclusion: This study successfully established an ankle imaging technique for ballet dancers en pointe that can be used in the future to assess the relationship between en pointe positioning and ankle pathoanatomy in ballet dancers

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of the ankle in female ballet dancers en pointe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Jeffrey A; Shave, Ruth M; Yoshioka, Hiroshi; Kruse, David W; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Wyon, Matthew A

    2010-07-01

    Ballet dancers require extreme range of motion of the ankle, especially weight-bearing maximum plantar flexion (en pointe). In spite of a high prevalence of foot and ankle injuries in ballet dancers, the anatomy and pathoanatomy of this position have not been sufficiently studied in weight-bearing. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a beneficial method for such study. To develop an MRI method of evaluating the ankles of female ballet dancers standing en pointe and to assess whether pathological findings from the MR images were associated with ankle pain reported by the subjects. Nine female ballet dancers (age, 21+/-2.9 years; dance experience, 16+/-4.1 years; en pointe dance experience, 7+/-4.9 years) completed an ankle pain visual analog scale questionnaire and underwent T1- and T2-weighted scans using a 0.25 T open MRI device. The ankle was scanned in three positions: supine with full plantar flexion, standing with the ankle in anatomical position, and standing en pointe. Obtaining MR images of the ballet dancers en pointe was successful in spite of limitations imposed by the difficulty of remaining motionless in the en pointe position during scanning. MRI signs of ankle pathology and anatomical variants were observed. Convergence of the posterior edge of the tibial plafond, posterior talus, and superior calcaneus was noted in 100% of cases. Widened anterior joint congruity and synovitis/joint effusion were present in 71% and 67%, respectively. Anterior tibial and/or talar spurs and Stieda's process were each seen in 44%. However, clinical signs did not always correlate with pain reported by the subjects. This study successfully established an ankle imaging technique for ballet dancers en pointe that can be used in the future to assess the relationship between en pointe positioning and ankle pathoanatomy in ballet dancers.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of the ankle in female ballet dancers en pointe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, Jeffrey A.; Shave, Ruth M.; Yoshioka, Hiroshi; Kruse, David W.; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Wyon, Matthew A.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Ballet dancers require extreme range of motion of the ankle, especially weight-bearing maximum plantar flexion (en pointe). In spite of a high prevalence of foot and ankle injuries in ballet dancers, the anatomy and pathoanatomy of this position have not been sufficiently studied in weight-bearing. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a beneficial method for such study. Purpose: To develop an MRI method of evaluating the ankles of female ballet dancers standing en pointe and to assess whether pathological findings from the MR images were associated with ankle pain reported by the subjects. Material and Methods: Nine female ballet dancers (age, 21±2.9 years; dance experience, 16±4.1 years; en pointe dance experience, 7±4.9 years) completed an ankle pain visual analog scale questionnaire and underwent T1- and T2-weighted scans using a 0.25 T open MRI device. The ankle was scanned in three positions: supine with full plantar flexion, standing with the ankle in anatomical position, and standing en pointe. Results: Obtaining MR images of the ballet dancers en pointe was successful in spite of limitations imposed by the difficulty of remaining motionless in the en pointe position during scanning. MRI signs of ankle pathology and anatomical variants were observed. Convergence of the posterior edge of the tibial plafond, posterior talus, and superior calcaneus was noted in 100% of cases. Widened anterior joint congruity and synovitis/joint effusion were present in 71% and 67%, respectively. Anterior tibial and/or talar spurs and Stieda's process were each seen in 44%. However, clinical signs did not always correlate with pain reported by the subjects. Conclusion: This study successfully established an ankle imaging technique for ballet dancers en pointe that can be used in the future to assess the relationship between en pointe positioning and ankle pathoanatomy in ballet dancers

  3. MRI appearances of the anterior fibulocalcaneus muscle: a rare anterior compartment muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhyay, Bhavin [Basildon and Thurrock University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Imaging Department, Essex (United Kingdom); Amiras, Dimitri [Imperial College Health Care NHS Trust, Imaging Department, London (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-01

    MRI of a 62-year-old female presenting with ankle pain demonstrated an accessory muscle within the anterior compartment of the lower leg. The muscle originated from the fibula and anterior crural septum. The tendon passed anterior to the lateral malleolus and inserted at the critical angle of Gissane on the calcaneus. This muscle was initially described in the anatomic literature by Lambert and Atsas in 2010. To our knowledge, this is the first time the MRI appearances of this muscle has been described in the radiological literature. Awareness of the fibulocalcaneal muscle is important as it may represent a cause of ankle pain. In addition, the tendon could potentially be harvested for use in reconstructive procedures. (orig.)

  4. Does Hip Arthroscopy Have a Role in the Treatment of Developmental Hip Dysplasia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Jacob M; Khan, Moin; Bedi, Asheesh

    2017-09-01

    Indications for hip arthroscopy in mildly dysplastic patients with a symptomatic hip remain controversial. This article provides a concise review of the available literature evaluating the role of hip arthroscopy in treating symptomatic dysplasia. Potential indications for hip arthroscopy in isolation are reviewed. Emerging evidence on the role of hip arthroscopy based on patient-specific pathomorphology is highlighted. Hip arthroscopy in isolation may be helpful for select dysplastic patients with dynamic impingement or microinstability. Isolated arthroscopic treatment of intra-articular pathology resulting from static overload is unlikely to be successful in the long term and may be detrimental. Arthroscopic procedures for individuals with mild dysplasia in the absence of frank instability may be effective; however, great caution should be exercised when approaching dysplastic patients with symptomatic hips. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. THE FEATURES OF TIBIOFIBULAR INJURY IN PATENTS WITH ANKLE FRACTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. F. Fomin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of interposition of soft tissues into tibiofibular syndesmosis is analyzed as a cause of unsatisfactory outcomes in the ankle joint pronation fracture treatment. The study is based on clinical (452 patients and experimental material (36 experiments including unfixed anatomic objects. The elevator for minimal invasive operative elimination of interposition of stumps of distal tibiofibular syndesmosis anterior and posterior ligaments is developed and tested.

  6. Acute ankle sprain in dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Jeffrey A

    2010-01-01

    Ankle sprain is a common injury in dancers. Because of the relative frequency of this injury and its wide acceptance as a likely part of an active lifestyle, in many individuals it may not receive the careful attention it deserves. An extreme ankle range of motion and excellent ankle stability are fundamental to success in dance. Hence, following a proper treatment protocol is crucial for allowing a dancer who suffers an ankle sprain to return to dance as soon as possible without impaired function. This article reviews the basic principles of the etiology and management of ankle sprain in dancers. Key concepts are on-site examination and treatment, early restoration, dance-specific rehabilitation, and a carefully administered safe return to dance. Additionally, injuries that may occur in conjunction with ankle sprain are highlighted, and practical, clinically relevant summary concepts for dance healthcare professionals, dance scientists, dance teachers, and dancers are provided.

  7. [Ankle braces prevent ligament injuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Jon

    2002-09-05

    The Cochrane collaboration has performed a meta-analysis of all studies found on the prevention of ankle ligament injuries, frequent in sports like soccer, European handball and basketball. Interventions include the use of modified footwear and associated supports, training programmes and health education. Five randomized trials totalling 3,954 participants were included. With the exception of ankle disc training, all prophylactic interventions entailed the application of an external ankle support in the form of a semi-rigid orthosis, air-cast or high top shoes. The studies showed a significant reduction in the number of ankle sprains in individuals allocated to external ankle support. This reduction was greater for those with a previous history of ankle sprains.

  8. Hydrocortisone reduces postoperative shivering following day care knee arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Manjeet Singh; Suri, Neelam; Kaul, Naresh; Lad, Shobha; Khan, Rashid Manzoor

    2011-10-01

    Postoperative shivering is commonly observed in patients after general anesthesia. A double-blind randomized controlled trial was conducted in patients undergoing day care knee arthroscopy to test the hypothesis that a single intraoperative dose of hydrocortisone would prevent or attenuate postoperative shivering. One hundred and twenty patients were given a nitrous oxide-isoflurane-remifentanil anesthetic. Approximately ten minutes before the end of anesthesia, they were randomized to receive normal saline (Control group; n = 40); hydrocortisone 1 mg·kg(-1) iv (Hydrocortisone-1 group; n = 40), or hydrocortisone 2 mg·kg(-1) iv (Hydrocortisone-2 group; n = 40). Postoperative shivering was graded by a blinded observer using a five-point scale: Grade 0: none; Grade 1: one or more areas of piloerection but without visible muscular activity; Grade 2: visible muscular activity confined to one muscle group; Grade 3: same as Grade 2 but in more than one muscle group; and Grade 4: gross muscular activity involving the entire body. Shivering (Grades 1-4) was observed in 33 patients (82%) in the Control group, 13 patients (32%) in the Hydrocortisone-1 group (P shivering was similar in the Hydrocortisone-1 and Hydrocortisone-2 groups. This study shows that hydrocortisone (1-2 mg·kg(-1) iv) provides effective prophylaxis against postoperative shivering in patients undergoing day care knee arthroscopy under general anesthesia.

  9. Examining Ankle-Joint Laxity Using 2 Knee Positions and With Simulated Muscle Guarding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlon, Shawn; Caccese, Jaclyn; Knight, Christopher A; Swanik, Charles Buz; Kaminski, Thomas W

    2016-02-01

    Several factors affect the reliability of the anterior drawer and talar tilt tests, including the individual clinician's experience and skill, ankle and knee positioning, and muscle guarding. To compare gastrocnemius activity during the measurement of ankle-complex motion at different knee positions, and secondarily, to compare ankle-complex motion during a simulated trial of muscle guarding. Cross-sectional study. Research laboratory. Thirty-three participants aged 20.2 ± 1.7 years were tested. The ankle was loaded under 2 test conditions (relaxed, simulated muscle guarding) at 2 knee positions (0°, 90° of flexion) while gastrocnemius electromyography (EMG) activity was recorded. Anterior displacement (mm), inversion-eversion motion (°), and peak EMG amplitude values of the gastrocnemius (μV). Anterior displacement did not differ between the positions of 0° and 90° of knee flexion (P = .193). Inversion-eversion motion was greater at 0° of knee flexion compared with 90° (P ankle laxity at the 2 most common knee positions for anterior drawer testing; however, talar tilt testing may be best performed with the knee in 0° of knee flexion. Finally, our outcomes from the simulated muscle-guarding condition suggest that clinicians should use caution and be aware of reduced perceived laxity when performing these clinical examination techniques immediately postinjury.

  10. Additional mesenchymal stem cell injection improves the outcomes of marrow stimulation combined with supramalleolar osteotomy in varus ankle osteoarthritis: short-term clinical results with second-look arthroscopic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Sang; Lee, Moses; Koh, Yong Gon

    2016-12-01

    Supramalleolar osteotomy (SMO) is reported to be an effective treatment for varus ankle osteoarthritis by redistributing the load line within the ankle joint. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been proposed as a new treatment option for osteoarthritis on the basis of their cartilage regeneration ability. The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical, radiological, and second-look arthroscopic outcomes between MSC injection with marrow stimulation and marrow stimulation alone in patients with varus ankle osteoarthritis who have undergone SMO. In this retrospective study, 62 patients (64 ankles) with varus ankle osteoarthritis underwent second-look arthroscopy at a mean of 12.8 months after arthroscopic marrow stimulation combined with SMO; 33 ankles were subjected to marrow stimulation alone (group I), and 31 were subjected to marrow stimulation with MSC injection (group II). Clinical outcome measures included a visual analog scale (VAS) for pain and the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score. Radiological outcome variables included the tibial-ankle surface (TAS), talar tilt (TT), and tibial-lateral surface (TLS) angles. In second-look arthroscopy, cartilage regeneration was evaluated using the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) grade. The mean VAS score improved significantly from 7.2 ± 1.0 to 4.7 ± 1.4 in group I and from 7.3 ± 0.8 to 3.7 ± 1.5 in group II at the final follow-up (P varus ankle osteoarthritis who have undergone SMO. Furthermore, the ICRS grade is significantly correlated with clinical outcome.

  11. What Is a Foot and Ankle Surgeon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A A | Print | Share What is a Foot & Ankle Surgeon? Foot and ankle surgeons are the surgical ... every age. What education has a foot and ankle surgeon received? After completing undergraduate education, the foot ...

  12. Sports Injuries to the Foot and Ankle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... School Soccer Season Prime time for foot and ankle injuries. Parents and coaches should think twice before coaxing ... Ankle Tennis involves much foot work. Foot and ankle injuries can occur from the continuous side-to-side ...

  13. Anterior double plating for rigid fixation of isolated tibiotalar arthrodesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaass, Christian; Knupp, Markus; Barg, Alexej; Hintermann, Beat

    2009-07-01

    Arthrodesis is the most common procedure used to treat end-stage osteoarthritis of the ankle, particularly in patients with difficult conditions such as poor bone quality. While many techniques are available to fuse the ankle, current recommendations favor the use of internal fixation with screws and/or plates. Despite of progress, the complication rate remains a major concern. Non-union is one difficult problem especially with difficult bone conditions, particularly the loss of bone stock on the talar side. Therefore, fusion of the tibiotalar joint is often extended to the talocalcaneal joint to provide sufficient stability. To preserve the subtalar joint, an anterior double plate system for rigid fixation of isolated tibiotalar arthrodesis was developed. This is a preliminary report on the clinical and radiological outcome with this technique. Twenty-nine patients (15 men, 14 women; one ankle per patient) were treated from October 2006 to September 2007. We converted 16 ankles with osteoarthritis and difficult bone conditions, four non-united ankle arthrodeses, and nine failed total ankle replacements to an isolated tibiotalar arthrodesis using anterior double plating. If necessary, we used solid allograft to fill bony defects. Outcomes included bone union as assessed by radiographs, pain as indicated by the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society scores, and patient satisfaction. Solid arthrodesis was achieved after an average of 12.3 (eight to 26) weeks in the 16 ankles without bone graft interposed between the tibia and talus, and 14.3 (range, 8 to 26) weeks in the 13 ankles with interpositional bone allograft. Radiographs showed that the position of arthrodesis obtained at the time of surgery did not change in any patient up to one year after surgery. The mean American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) Hindfoot Score increased from 37 (range, 20 to 63) preoperatively to 68 (range, 50 to 92) at the last followup. Twenty-seven patients (93%) were

  14. Functional Instability of the Ankle Joint: Etiopathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aydan ÖRSÇELİK

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ankle sprain is one of the most common sports injuries. Chronic ankle instability is a common complication of ankle sprains. Two causes of chronic ankle instability are mechanical instability and functional instability. It is important to understand functional instability etiopathogenesis of the ankle joint in order to guide diagnosis and treatment. This article aims to understand the etiopathogenesis of functional ankle instability.

  15. Effects of Ankle Arthrodesis on Biomechanical Performance of the Entire Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Li, Zengyong; Wong, Duo Wai-Chi; Zhang, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Background/Methodology Ankle arthrodesis is one popular surgical treatment for ankle arthritis, chronic instability, and degenerative deformity. However, complications such as foot pain, joint arthritis, and bone fracture may cause patients to suffer other problems. Understanding the internal biomechanics of the foot is critical for assessing the effectiveness of ankle arthrodesis and provides a baseline for the surgical plan. This study aimed to understand the biomechanical effects of ankle arthrodesis on the entire foot and ankle using finite element analyses. A three-dimensional finite element model of the foot and ankle, involving 28 bones, 103 ligaments, the plantar fascia, major muscle groups, and encapsulated soft tissue, was developed and validated. The biomechanical performances of a normal foot and a foot with ankle arthrodesis were compared at three gait instants, first-peak, mid-stance, and second-peak. Principal Findings/Conclusions Changes in plantar pressure distribution, joint contact pressure and forces, von Mises stress on bone and foot deformation were predicted. Compared with those in the normal foot, the peak plantar pressure was increased and the center of pressure moved anteriorly in the foot with ankle arthrodesis. The talonavicular joint and joints of the first to third rays in the hind- and mid-foot bore the majority of the loading and sustained substantially increased loading after ankle arthrodesis. An average contact pressure of 2.14 MPa was predicted at the talonavicular joint after surgery and the maximum variation was shown to be 80% in joints of the first ray. The contact force and pressure of the subtalar joint decreased after surgery, indicating that arthritis at this joint was not necessarily a consequence of ankle arthrodesis but rather a progression of pre-existing degenerative changes. Von Mises stress in the second and third metatarsal bones at the second-peak instant increased to 52 MPa and 34 MPa, respectively, after

  16. The Activities of the Muscles around the Ankle Joint during Foot-gripping are Affected by the Angle of the Ankle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soma, Masayuki; Murata, Shin; Kai, Yoshihiro; Nakae, Hideyuki; Satou, Yosuke

    2013-12-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the activities of the muscles around the ankle joint during foot gripping. [Subjects] The subjects of this study were 17 healthy females. [Methods] We measured the maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) activities of the soleus muscle, the medial head of the gastrocnemius muscle, and the tibialis anterior muscle, and calculated %IEMG during foot gripping in 3 different ankle joint positions: 10° of plantar flexion, 0°, and 10° of dorsiflexion. [Results] The maximal force of foot gripping achived by the crural muscles in any ankle position was 30-50% IMEG of the MVC. Repeated analysis of variance showed that the %IEMG was significantly lower in 10°of dorsiflexion than in the other 2 positions for all muscles. [Conclusion] These results suggested that the crural muscles help the ankle joint by co-contracting during foot gripping.

  17. Recurrent anterior glenohumeral instability: the quantification of glenoid bone loss using magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins e Souza, Patricia [Fleury Medicina e Saude and Instituto Nacional de Traumatologia e Ortopedia, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Brandao, Bruno Lobo; Motta, Geraldo; Monteiro, Martim [Instituto Nacional de Traumatologia e Ortopedia, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Brown, Eduardo [Grupo Fleury Medicina Diagnostica, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Marchiori, Edson [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Petropolis, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    To investigate the accuracy of conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in determining the severity of glenoid bone loss in patients with anterior shoulder dislocation by comparing the results with arthroscopic measurements. Institutional review board approval and written consent from all patients were obtained. Thirty-six consecutive patients (29 men, seven women; mean age, 34.5 [range, 18-55] years) with recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation (≥3 dislocations; mean, 37.9; range, 3-200) and suspected glenoid bone loss underwent shoulder MRI before arthroscopy (mean interval, 28.5 [range, 9-73] days). Assessments of glenoid bone loss by MRI (using the best-fit circle area method) and arthroscopy were compared. Inter- and intrareader reproducibility of MRI-derived measurements was evaluated using arthroscopy as a comparative standard. Glenoid bone loss was evident on MRI and during arthroscopy in all patients. Inter- and intrareader correlations of MRI-derived measurements were excellent (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.80-0.82; r = 0.81-0.86). The first and second observers' measurements showed strong (r = 0.76) and moderate (r = 0.69) interreader correlation, respectively, with arthroscopic measurements. Conventional MRI can be used to measure glenoid bone loss, particularly when employed by an experienced musculoskeletal radiologist. (orig.)

  18. MRI of tibialis anterior tendon rupture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallo, Robert A.; DeMeo, Patrick J.; Kolman, Brett H.; Daffner, Richard H.; Sciulli, Robert L.; Roberts, Catherine C.

    2004-01-01

    Ruptures of the tibialis anterior tendon are rare. We present the clinical histories and MRI findings of three recent male patients with tibialis anterior tendon rupture aged 58-67 years, all of whom presented with pain over the dorsum of the ankle. Two of the three patients presented with complete rupture showing discontinuity of the tendon, thickening of the retracted portion of the tendon, and excess fluid in the tendon sheath. One patient demonstrated a partial tear showing an attenuated tendon with increased surrounding fluid. Although rupture of the tibialis anterior tendon is a rarely reported entity, MRI is a useful modality in the definitive detection and characterization of tibialis anterior tendon ruptures. (orig.)

  19. Vulvodynia and Concomitant Femoro-Acetabular Impingement: Long-Term Follow-up After Hip Arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coady, Deborah; Futterman, Stacey; Harris, Dena; Coleman, Struan H

    2015-07-01

    We hypothesized that in patients with vulvodynia and femoro-acetabular impingement (FAI), vulvar pain may be generated by the effect of FAI on pelvic floor structures, and treatment with arthroscopy may improve vulvodynia. We also sought to identify characteristics of patients whose vulvodynia improved after arthroscopy. A case series of patients with vulvodynia and FAI underwent physical therapy, and, if hip symptoms did not improve, arthroscopy. Three to 5 years postoperatively, follow-up of outcomes after arthroscopy on vulvodynia was performed using chart review and patient questionnaire. Clinical characteristics and pain scores describing patients with and without vulvodynia improvement were assessed. Twenty-six patients with generalized unprovoked vulvodynia (GUV) or clitorodynia underwent arthroscopy for FAI. Six patients, all younger than 30 years, experienced lasting improvement in vulvodynia. Twenty patients, with an older mean age, longer mean vulvodynia duration, and mainly severe pain scores, did not experience vulvar pain improvement after arthroscopy. This case series describes improved vulvodynia outcomes after arthroscopy for FAI in women younger than 30 years. Patients with vulvar pain and coexisting FAI had GUV and clitorodynia.

  20. Injection of Mesenchymal Stem Cells as a Supplementary Strategy of Marrow Stimulation Improves Cartilage Regeneration After Lateral Sliding Calcaneal Osteotomy for Varus Ankle Osteoarthritis: Clinical and Second-Look Arthroscopic Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Sang; Koh, Yong Gon

    2016-05-01

    To compare the clinical and second-look arthroscopic outcomes in patients undergoing arthroscopic marrow stimulation combined with lateral sliding calcaneal osteotomy for varus ankle osteoarthritis, with or without adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) injection. In this retrospective comparative study, 49 patients with varus ankle osteoarthritis underwent second-look arthroscopy after arthroscopic marrow stimulation combined with lateral sliding calcaneal osteotomy between January 2010 and November 2012; 23 ankles underwent marrow stimulation alone (group 1), and 26 underwent marrow stimulation with MSC injection (group 2). The decision whether to receive the MSC injection, which was free of charge, was solely up to the patients. Second-look arthroscopies were performed at a mean of 12.5 months and 12.4 months postoperatively in group 1 and group 2, respectively. Clinical outcome measures included a visual analog scale (VAS) score for pain and the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) score. The radiologic outcome variable was the talar tilt angle. On second-look arthroscopy, cartilage regeneration was evaluated using the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) grade. The mean VAS score improved significantly from 7.3 ± 0.9 to 3.9 ± 1.2 in group 1 and from 7.4 ± 0.8 to 3.1 ± 1.5 in group 2 at final follow-up (P osteoarthritis who underwent lateral sliding calcaneal osteotomy, significant improvements in VAS and AOFAS scores, as well as better ICRS grades, were achieved at short-term follow-up after marrow stimulation with additional MSC injection compared with after marrow stimulation alone. Level III, retrospective comparative study. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of ankle eversion taping using kinesiology tape in a patient with ankle inversion sprain

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sun-Min; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to report the effects of ankle eversion taping using kinesiology tape on ankle inversion sprain. [Subject] The subject was a 21-year-old woman with Grade 2 ankle inversion sprain. [Methods] Ankle eversion taping was applied to the sprained left ankle using kinesiology tape for 4 weeks (average, 15?h/day). [Results] Ankle instability and pain were reduced, and functional dynamic balance was improved after ankle eversion taping for 4 weeks. The Cumberland Ank...

  2. Ankle Fractures: The Operative Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Hafiz Z

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Ankle fractures are commonly seen in orthopaedic practice. This retrospective study of patients with ankle fractures who underwent surgical treatment in our institution from January 2000 to December 2003 was undertaken to analyze the common causes and patterns of ankle fractures; and the functional outcome of operative treatment for these fractures. Eighty patients were identified and reviewed. There were 65 male (81.3% and 15 female patients (18.7% with age ranging from 13 to 71 years old (mean, 32.3y. Common causes of ankle fractures were trauma (especially motor vehicle accidents, sports injuries and the osteoporotic bones in the elderly. Weber C (64.0% was the most common pattern of fracture at presentation. The most common operative treatment for ankle fractures was open reduction and internal fixation (73 patients, 91.2%. Excellent and good outcomes were achieved in 93.8% of cases when measured using the Olerud and Molander scoring system for foot and ankle. In conclusion, operative treatment for ankle fractures restores sufficient stability and allowed mobility of the ankle joint.

  3. Long-term prognosis of acute lateral ankle ligamentous sprains: high incidence of recurrences and residual symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemler, Ellen; Thijs, Karin M; Badenbroek, Ilse; van de Port, Ingrid G L; Hoes, Arno W; Backx, Frank J G

    2016-12-01

    Acute lateral ankle ligamentous sprains (ALALS) are common injuries. This injury does not always have a favourable long-term outcome. Studies reporting the prognosis of ALALS after functional treatment are scarce. To determine the prognosis of functionally treated ALALS, in terms of recurrent ALALS and residual symptoms. Retrospective cohort study. Patients were recruited from 20 family practices, nine physical therapy practices, the emergency departments of a regional hospital and a university hospital. Adult patients with an ALALS caused by an inversion trauma were invited to participate in this study 2.5-5 years after their initial injury. Functional treatment of the initial ALALS. Acute lateral ankle ligamentous sprain recurrences and residual symptoms. A total of 44 patients were included, with an average follow-up period after the initial ankle sprain of 204 weeks (range 150-274 weeks). Eight patients (18.1%) had reinjured their ankle. Explicit pain around the ankle joint at physical examination was experienced by 45.5%. Clinical symptoms of anterior ankle impingement were present in 25% (all athletes), with radiologically confirmed tibiotalar osteophyte bone formation in 82% of them. A large proportion of patients with ALALS experience recurrences and persistent symptoms after their initial ankle injury. The high percentage of patients with anterior ankle impingement syndromes illustrates the need for early assessment of this impairment in patients with persistent complaints. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Fast three-dimensional MR imaging of the knee: A comparison with arthroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyrrell, R.; Gluckert, K.; Yulish, B.; Pathria, M.N.; Goodfellow, D.

    1987-01-01

    Fifty patients with suspected knee pathology were evaluated with fast volume imaging and compared to arthroscopy as a gold standard. The knee was imaged with FISP (repetition time 28 msec/echo time, 14 msec/flip angle, 40 degrees) in a sagittal plane generating 64 continguous slices in about 8 minutes. A numerical grading system that could be used for both MR and arthroscopy was devised. Results showed that there was a 95% agreement between MR and arthroscopy in meniscal tears; 100% correlation between MR and severely degenerated menisci; 100% agreement of partial cruciate tears; and high correlation for high-grade cartilage lesions

  5. Patients' experiences of varicose vein and arthroscopy day surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, J M; Selby, T T; While, A E

    A small-scale telephone survey of day surgery patients' (n = 30) experience of pain, nausea and vomiting, wound healing and fatigue during the 7 days following discharge and their views of the service is described. Respondents who had undergone either varicose vein stripping (n = 15) or arthroscopy (n = 15) were interviewed using a semi-structured interview schedule. The findings indicated that most respondents expressed satisfaction with their recovery despite some evidence of postoperative morbidity. The majority of the sample indicated that they had received adequate information to enable them to cope at home and qualified nurses on the day unit were identified as a primary source of information. Following discharge, GPs or the day unit were key points of contact. The findings of this study, together with previous research, highlight important areas for further action by health professionals if this service is to be delivered effectively and efficiently.

  6. Intraoperative Evaluation of Acetabular Morphology in Hip Arthroscopy Comparing Standard Radiography Versus Fluoroscopy: A Cadaver Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büchler, Lorenz; Schwab, Joseph M; Whitlock, Patrick W; Beck, Martin; Tannast, Moritz

    2016-06-01

    To compare quantitative measurements of acetabular morphology obtained using intraoperative fluoroscopy, to standardized anteroposterior (AP) pelvis radiographs. Ten dried human pelvis specimens (20 hips) were imaged using hip-centered fluoroscopy and standardized AP pelvis radiographs. Each hip was evaluated for acetabular version and coverage, including lateral center edge (LCE) angle, acetabular index (AI), total anterior and posterior coverage, and crossover sign. No statistically significant differences existed between the mean LCE angle (fluoroscopy 36.5° ± 8.3° v plain films 36.1° ± 7.9°, P = .59), acetabular index (0.6° ± 8.6° v 0.2° ± 7.1°, P = .61), ACM angle (44.0° ± 2.6° v 44.1° ± 3.8°, P = .89), Sharp's angle (31.8° ± 5.7° v 32.4° ± 3.9°, P = .44), and the total femoral coverage (80.9% ± 6.4% v 80.7% ± 7.5%, P = .83). Conversely, total anterior coverage (30.7% ± 8.5% v 33.3% ± 8.2%, P fluoroscopy compared with plain film radiographs. Fluoroscopy also failed to identify the presence of a crossover sign in 30% and underestimated the retroversion index (9% ± 16%, v 13% ± 16%, P = .016). The values for the LCE angle and AI determined by hip-centered fluoroscopy did not differ from those obtained by standardized AP plain film radiography. However, fluoroscopy leads to a more anteverted projection of the acetabulum with significantly decreased total anterior coverage, significantly increased total posterior coverage, and underestimated signs of retroversion compared with standardized AP pelvis radiography. This study shows reliable LCE and AI angles but significant differences in the projected anteversion of the acetabulum between standardized AP pelvis radiography and hip-centered fluoroscopy. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Deltoid ligament in acute ankle injury: MR imaging analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Min Sun; Choi, Yun Sun; Kim, Yun Jung; Jung, Yoon Young; Kim, Jin Su; Young, Ki Won

    2014-01-01

    To identify the pattern of deltoid ligament injury after acute ankle injury and the relationship between ankle fracture and deltoid ligament tear by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Thirty-six patients (32 male, and 4 female; mean age, 29.8 years) with acute deltoid ligament injury who had undergone MRI participated in this study. The deltoid ligament was classified as having 3 superficial and 2 deep components. An image analysis included the integrity and tear site of the deltoid ligament, and other associated injuries. Association between ankle fracture and deltoid ligament tear was assessed using Fisher's exact test (P < 0.05). Of the 36 patients, 21 (58.3 %) had tears in the superficial and deep deltoid ligaments, 6 (16.7 %) in the superficial ligaments only, and 4 (11.1 %) in the deep ligaments only. The most common tear site of the three components of the superficial deltoid and deep anterior tibiotalar ligaments was their proximal attachments (94 % and 91.7 % respectively), and that of the deep posterior tibiotalar ligament (pTTL) was its distal attachment (82.6 %). The common associated injuries were ankle fracture (63.9 %), syndesmosis tear (55.6 %), and lateral collateral ligament complex tear (44.4 %). All the components of the deltoid ligament were frequently torn in patients with ankle fractures (tibionavicular ligament, P = 0.009). The observed injury pattern of the deltoid ligament was complex and frequently associated with concomitant ankle pathology. The most common tear site of the superficial deltoid ligament was the medial malleolar attachment, whereas that of the deep pTTL was near its medial talar insertion. (orig.)

  8. Deltoid ligament in acute ankle injury: MR imaging analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Min Sun; Choi, Yun Sun; Kim, Yun Jung; Jung, Yoon Young [Eulji University, Department of Radiology, Eulji Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Su; Young, Ki Won [Eulji University, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Eulji Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    To identify the pattern of deltoid ligament injury after acute ankle injury and the relationship between ankle fracture and deltoid ligament tear by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Thirty-six patients (32 male, and 4 female; mean age, 29.8 years) with acute deltoid ligament injury who had undergone MRI participated in this study. The deltoid ligament was classified as having 3 superficial and 2 deep components. An image analysis included the integrity and tear site of the deltoid ligament, and other associated injuries. Association between ankle fracture and deltoid ligament tear was assessed using Fisher's exact test (P < 0.05). Of the 36 patients, 21 (58.3 %) had tears in the superficial and deep deltoid ligaments, 6 (16.7 %) in the superficial ligaments only, and 4 (11.1 %) in the deep ligaments only. The most common tear site of the three components of the superficial deltoid and deep anterior tibiotalar ligaments was their proximal attachments (94 % and 91.7 % respectively), and that of the deep posterior tibiotalar ligament (pTTL) was its distal attachment (82.6 %). The common associated injuries were ankle fracture (63.9 %), syndesmosis tear (55.6 %), and lateral collateral ligament complex tear (44.4 %). All the components of the deltoid ligament were frequently torn in patients with ankle fractures (tibionavicular ligament, P = 0.009). The observed injury pattern of the deltoid ligament was complex and frequently associated with concomitant ankle pathology. The most common tear site of the superficial deltoid ligament was the medial malleolar attachment, whereas that of the deep pTTL was near its medial talar insertion. (orig.)

  9. Acetabular labral tear complicating idiopathic osteonecrosis of the femoral head treated by labral repair with hip arthroscopy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumida, Hiroyuki; Kanaji, Arihiko; Nishiwaki, Toru; Shimizu, Hidenori; Fujie, Atsuhiro; Tando, Toshimi; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Suda, Yasunori

    2014-11-18

    It has been well documented that labral tear is frequently associated with femoroacetabular impingement and dysplasia of the hip; however, there have been few reported cases of labral tear associated with idiopathic osteonecrosis of the hip. Here we report the case of a patient with labral tear associated with idiopathic osteonecrosis of the femoral head who was treated by hip arthroscopy, with a favorable short-term outcome. Under the diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus, a 28-year-old Japanese woman was treated with the oral administration of steroid in 2007. A year after the treatment, she developed right hip joint pain and was diagnosed with idiopathic osteonecrosis of the femoral head at our institution. In November of 2011, she revisited our hospital when her right hip joint pain exacerbated and she became unable to walk. On the visit, the anterior impingement sign and Patrick test were positive. Radiography and magnetic resonance imaging in 2011 demonstrated neither spreading of the osteonecrosis area nor collapse of the femoral head in the right joint; however, magnetic resonance imaging showed a high-intensity area in the articular labrum in a T2-weighted image, leading to a diagnosis of labral tear. She underwent labral repair with hip arthroscopy in August of 2012. Now, 1 year after surgery, she does not feel any pain during walking and her modified Harris hip score has improved from 20 prior to surgery to 85. The case indicated that it is important to be aware of the possibility of labral tear in patients with idiopathic osteonecrosis of the femoral head, when spreading of the osteonecrosis area or collapse of the femoral head has not been seen on magnetic resonance imaging.

  10. The distal fascicle of the anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament as a cause of tibiotalar impingement syndrome: a current concepts review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bekerom, Michel P. J.; Raven, Eric E. J.

    2007-01-01

    Impingement syndromes of the ankle involve either osseous or soft tissue impingement and can be anterior, anterolateral, or posterior. Ankle impingement syndromes are painful conditions caused by the friction of joint tissues, which are both the cause and the effect of altered joint biomechanics.

  11. Can Chronic Ankle Instability be Prevented? Rethinking Management of Lateral Ankle Sprains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denegar, Craig R.; Miller, Sayers J., III

    2002-01-01

    Investigates whether chronic ankle instability can be prevented, discussing: the relationship between mechanical and functional instability; normal ankle mechanics, sequelae to lateral ankle sprains, and abnormal ankle mechanics; and tissue healing, joint dysfunction, and acute lateral ankle sprain management. The paper describes a treatment model…

  12. Effects of focal ankle joint cooling on unipedal static balance in individuals with and without chronic ankle instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung-Min; Hart, Joseph M; Saliba, Susan A; Hertel, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Application of cryotherapy over an injured joint has been shown to improve muscle function, yet it is unknown how ankle cryotherapy affects postural control. Our purpose was to determine the effects of a 20-min focal ankle joint cooling on unipedal static stance in individuals with and without chronic ankle instability (CAI). Fifteen young subjects with CAI (9 males, 6 females) and 15 healthy gender-matched controls participated. All subjects underwent two intervention sessions on different days in which they had a 1.5L plastic bag filled with either crushed ice (active treatment) or candy corn (sham) applied to the ankle. Unipedal stance with eyes closed for 10s were assessed with a forceplate before and after each intervention. Center of pressure (COP) data were used to compute 10 specific dependent measures including velocity, area, standard deviation (SD), and percent range of COP excursions, and mean and SD of time-to-boundary (TTB) minima in the anterior-posterior (AP) and mediolateral directions. For each measure a three-way (Group-Intervention-Time) repeated ANOVAs found no significant interactions and main effects involving intervention (all Ps > 0.05). There were group main effects found for mean velocity (F(1,28) = 6.46, P = .017), area (F(1,28) = 12.83, P = .001), and mean of TTB minima in the AP direction (F(1,28) = 5.19, P = .031) indicating that the CAI group demonstrated greater postural instability compared to the healthy group. Postural control of unipedal stance was not significantly altered following focal ankle joint cooling in groups both with and without CAI. Ankle joint cryotherapy was neither beneficial nor harmful to single leg balance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Graded stress radiography in acute injury to the lateral ligaments of the ankle

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    Rijke, A.M.; Vierhout, P.A. (Virginia Univ., Charlottesville (USA). Dept. of Radiology Rijksuniversiteit Leiden (Netherlands). Dept. of Surgery)

    1990-03-01

    The diagnostic accuracy of graded stress radiography in 26 patients with acute injury to the lateral ankle ligaments has been compared with findings at arthrography and surgery. Measuring talar tilt angles and anterior talar displacement over a range of pressures applied to the distal tibia using a commercially available stress device allows diagnostic distinction between isolated anterior talofibular ligament injury and a combined lesion that involves the calcaneofibular ligament. The results compare well with arthrographic and surgical findings. (orig.).

  14. Graded stress radiography in acute injury to the lateral ligaments of the ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rijke, A.M.; Vierhout, P.A.; Rijksuniversiteit Leiden

    1990-01-01

    The diagnostic accuracy of graded stress radiography in 26 patients with acute injury to the lateral ankle ligaments has been compared with findings at arthrography and surgery. Measuring talar tilt angles and anterior talar displacement over a range of pressures applied to the distal tibia using a commercially available stress device allows diagnostic distinction between isolated anterior talofibular ligament injury and a combined lesion that involves the calcaneofibular ligament. The results compare well with arthrographic and surgical findings. (orig.)

  15. Motor-neuron pool excitability of the lower leg muscles after acute lateral ankle sprain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klykken, Lindsey W; Pietrosimone, Brian G; Kim, Kyung-Min; Ingersoll, Christopher D; Hertel, Jay

    2011-01-01

    Neuromuscular deficits in leg muscles that are associated with arthrogenic muscle inhibition have been reported in people with chronic ankle instability, yet whether these neuromuscular alterations are present in individuals with acute sprains is unknown. To compare the effect of acute lateral ankle sprain on the motor-neuron pool excitability (MNPE) of injured leg muscles with that of uninjured contralateral leg muscles and the leg muscles of healthy controls. Case-control study. Laboratory. Ten individuals with acute ankle sprains (6 females, 4 males; age= 19.2 ± 3.8 years, height= 169.4 ± 8.5 cm, mass= 66.3 ± 11.6 kg) and 10 healthy individuals(6 females,4 males; age= 20.6 ± 4.0 years, height = 169.9 ± 10.6 cm, mass= 66.3 ± 10.2 kg) participated. The independent variables were group (acute ankle sprain, healthy) and limb (injured, uninjured). Separate dependent t tests were used to determine differences in MNPE between legs. The MNPE of the soleus, fibularis longus, and tibialis anterior was measured by the maximal Hoffmann reflex (H(max)) and maximal muscle response (M(max)) and was then normalized using the H(max):M(max) ratio. The soleus MNPE in the ankle-sprain group was higher in the injured limb (H(max):M(max) = 0.63; 95% confidence interval [Cl],0.46, 0.80) than the uninjured limb (H(max):M(max) = 0.47; 95%Cl, 0.08, 0.93)(t(6) = 3.62,P =.01).In the acute ankle-sprain group, tibialis anterior MNPE tended to be lower in the injured ankle (H(max):M(max) =0.06; 95% Cl, 0.01, 0.10) than in the uninjured ankle (H(max):M(max) =0.22; 95%Cl, 0.09, 0.35),but this finding was not different (t(9) =-2.01, P =.07). No differences were detected between injured (0.22; 95% Cl, 0.14, 0.29) and uninjured (0.25; 95%Cl, 0.12, 0.38) ankles for the fibularis longus in the ankle-sprain group (t(9) =-0.739, P =.48). We found no side-to-side differences in any muscle among the healthy group. Facilitated MNPE was present in the involved soleus muscle of patients with acute

  16. Use of infrared thermography for the diagnosis and grading of sprained ankle injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, João; Vardasca, Ricardo; Pimenta, Madalena; Gabriel, Joaquim; Torres, João

    2016-05-01

    Ankle joint sprains are a common medical condition estimated to be responsible for 15-25% of all musculoskeletal injuries worldwide. The pathophysiology of the lesion can represent considerable time lost to injury, as well as long-term disability in up to 60% of patients. A percentage between 10% and 20% may complicate with chronic instability of the ankle joint and disability in walking, contributing to morbidity and poor life quality. Ankle sprains can be classified as grade I, II, or III, based on the extent of damage and number of ligaments affected. The diagnostic grading is important for setting further treatment and rehabilitation, since more severe injuries carries risk of recurrence, added morbidity and decrease in life quality. The aim of this work was to evaluate the adequacy of infrared thermography as a potential complimentary diagnostic tool of the distinct lesions grades. Evaluation of different thermographic values of the ankle region (in both affected and non-affected foot) was conducted for this purpose. The principal results to be highlighted are that some of the regions, namely anterior view for non defined time after injury analysis, and anterior, frontal, posterior and anterior talofibular ligament regions and proximal calcaneofibular ligament regions in acute lesions (herein defined as less than 6 h post-traumatic event) presented consistent profiles of variation. The analyses were performed considering affected and non-affected ankles results on plotted graphics representing termographic evaluation and grading of these lesions performed using ultrasound by experimented medical radiologists. An increase in temperature values was observed when progressing from mild to severe ankle sprain injuries, with these regions presenting lower values for the affected ankle when compared to the non-affected ankle in all the analysis performed. The remaining analysed regions did not present the same variations. Statistical analysis using Kruskal

  17. Acetabular Chondral Lesions in Hip Arthroscopy: Relationships Between Grade, Topography, and Demographics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez-Ahedo, Carlos; Gui, Chengcheng; Rabe, Stephanie M; Chandrasekaran, Sivashankar; Lodhia, Parth; Domb, Benjamin G

    2017-09-01

    Hip pain remains a challenge given the multiple factors that can cause damage to the articular cartilage, such as traumatic injury, metabolic damage, and morphologic variations such as femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and that can contribute to progression of osteoarthritis. However, a direct relationship between patient characteristics, the extent of acetabular chondral damage, and topologic characteristics of chondral lesions has not been established. To compare the grade of acetabular chondral damage, measured in terms of acetabular labrum articular disruption (ALAD) classification, to the size and position of the chondral lesions, matching patients' demographic factors such as age and body mass index (BMI). Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. This study included all hip arthroscopies performed by the corresponding author from August 7, 2008, to November 19, 2014, in which acetabular chondral lesions were intraoperatively identified and measured in terms of ALAD grade, clockface location, and size. Bivariate analyses and multiple logistic regression were used to identify the demographic factors, characteristics of the acetabular chondral lesion, and other anatomic characteristics that were related to the ALAD grade of the acetabular chondral lesion. Acetabular chondral lesions were measured in 1502 patients during the study period. Multivariate analysis showed that higher ALAD grade of acetabular chondral damage was significantly related to male sex, more advanced age, the area of the acetabular chondral lesion, anterior extension of the acetabular chondral lesion within the anterosuperior quadrant, labral detachment from the acetabular cartilage, and posterior extension of the labral tear. Higher grades of acetabular chondral damage were related to male sex, increased age, height, weight, BMI, and the size of the lesion. Chondral lesions were generally found in the anterosuperior region of the acetabulum, consistent with labral lesions and the

  18. A Qualitative Assessment of Return to Sport After Hip Arthroscopy for Femoroacetabular Impingement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjong, Vehniah K; Cogan, Charles J; Riederman, Brett D; Terry, Michael A

    2016-11-01

    Hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is known to produce excellent outcomes, yet some patients do not return to their preinjury level of sport participation. Much literature on return to sport has revolved around anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and even shoulder instability, but none to date have used qualitative, semistructured patient interviews on patients with hip labral tears. To understand the factors influencing the decision to return to sport after arthroscopic hip surgery for FAI. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. An experienced interviewer conducted qualitative, semistructured interviews of patients aged 18 to 60 years who had arthroscopic hip surgery for FAI. All had preinjury participation in sport and a minimum 2-year follow-up with no revision surgery. Qualitative analysis was then performed to derive codes, categories, and themes. An assessment of preinjury and current sports participation by type, level of competition, and frequency along with patient-reported hip function was also obtained. In addition, current modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS), international Hip Outcome Tool (iHOT-12), Hip Outcome Score-sports-specific subscale (HOS-SSS), and a coping mechanism evaluation (Brief COPE) were also recorded. A total of 23 patients were interviewed to reveal the overarching themes of internal motivation, external encouragement, and resetting expectations as the predominant factors influencing a patient's decision to return to preinjury sport. Subjective outcome measurements (mHHS, iHOT-12, patient satisfaction) showed significant differences between patients who did and did not return to sport. Interestingly, the adaptive and maladaptive coping mechanisms matched and supported our themes in those patients who described fear and self-motivation as defining features influencing their cessation of or return to play, respectively. Self-motivation, aging, pain, encouragement from others, and adapting to physical limitations can

  19. Anatomical predisposition of the ankle joint for lateral sprain or lateral malleolar fracture evaluated by radiographic measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyoung Min; Chung, Chin Youb; Sung, Ki Hyuk; Lee, SeungYeol; Kim, Tae Gyun; Choi, Young; Jung, Ki Jin; Kim, Yeon Ho; Koo, Seung Bum; Park, Moon Seok

    2015-01-01

    Injury mechanism and the amount of force are important factors determining whether a fracture or sprain occurs at the time of an ankle inversion injury. However, the anatomical differences between the ankle fracture and sprain have not been investigated sufficiently. This study was performed to investigate whether an anatomical predisposition of the ankle joint results in a lateral malleolar fracture or lateral ankle sprain. Two groups of consecutive patients, one with lateral malleolar fracture (274 patients, mean age 49.0 years) and the other with lateral ankle sprain (400 patients, mean age 38.4 years), were evaluated. Ankle radiographs were examined for 7 measures: distal tibial articular surface (DTAS) angle, bimalleolar tilt (BT), medial malleolar relative length (MMRL), lateral malleolar relative length (LMRL), medial malleolar slip angle (MMSA), anterior inclination of tibia (AI), and fibular position (FP). After an interobserver reliability test, the radiographic measurements were compared between the 2 groups. Linear regression analysis was performed to correct for age and sex effects between the groups. The fracture group and the sprain group showed significant differences in BT (P = .001), MMSA (P sprain groups showed a significant difference in BT (P = .001), MMRL (P ankle sprain group. Further 3-dimensional assessment of the bony structure and subsequent biomechanical studies are needed to elucidate the mechanism of injury according to the various types of ankle fractures and ankle sprain. Level III, retrospective comparative study. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. Measurement of T2 value by using 3.0T MRI for patient with ankle arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jae Ouk

    2013-01-01

    This study intended to evaluate shape of ankle joint cartilage and damage to the ankle joint cartilage by measuring changes in T2 value of cartilage of healthy people without ankle arthritis and patients with ankle arthritis. The multi-echo technique was used for 20 healthy persons who had no ankle arthritis in the past or in the present clinically and 20 patients who were examined to have ankle arthritis in order to obtain T2 map image of knee joint cartilage. We divided the talotibial joint into medial position, middle position and lateral position to calculate the mean values of T2 in 18 spots that included anterior part, middle part and posterior part of cartilage of neck bone and ankle bone. Mean T2 values were measured in the healthy people group and the ankle arthritis patient group. According to the measurement results, the mean T2 value of the ankle arthritis patient group was measured to be higher than that of the healthy people group.

  1. Knee arthroscopy and exercise versus exercise only for chronic patellofemoral pain syndrome: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seitsalo Seppo

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arthroscopy is often used to treat patients with chronic patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS. As there is a lack of evidence, we conducted a randomized controlled trial to study the efficacy of arthroscopy in patients with chronic PFPS. Methods A total of 56 patients with chronic PFPS were randomized into two treatment groups: an arthroscopy group (N = 28, treated with knee arthroscopy and an 8-week home exercise program, and a control group (N = 28, treated with the 8-week home exercise program only. The arthroscopy included finding-specific surgical procedures according to current recommendations. The primary outcome was the Kujala score on patellofemoral pain and function at 9 months following randomization. Secondary outcomes were visual analog scales (VASs to assess activity-related symptoms. We also estimated the direct healthcare costs. Results Both groups showed marked improvement during the follow-up. The mean improvement in the Kujala score was 12.9 (95% confidence interval (CI 8.2–17.6 in the arthroscopy group and 11.4 (95% CI 6.9–15.8 in the control group. However, there was no difference between the groups in mean improvement in the Kujala score (group difference 1.1 (95% CI -7.4 - 5.2 or in any of the VAS scores. Total direct healthcare costs in the arthroscopy group were estimated to exceed on average those of the control group by €901 per patient (p Conclusion In this controlled trial involving patients with chronic PFPS, the outcome when arthroscopy was used in addition to a home exercise program was no better than when the home exercise program was used alone. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN 41800323

  2. Accuracy of double-contrast arthrography and arthroscopy of the knee joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thijn, C.J.P.

    1982-01-01

    Only in the diagnosis of medial meniscal lesions is double contrast arthrography superior to arthroscopy, provided that arthroscopy is carried out only from the anterolateral side (94% against 81% positive correlations). The rates in diagnosing lateral meniscal lesions are respectively 90% and 94.5%, in patellar chondropathy 55% and 99.5% respectively, and in diagnosting cruciate ligament lesions 69% and 97% respectively. (orig.)

  3. Atypical Chronic Ankle Instability in a Pediatric Population Secondary to Distal Fibula Avulsion Fracture Nonunion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ashry, Saad R; El Gamal, Tarek A; Platt, Simon R

    Chronic ankle instability is a disabling condition, often occurring as a result of traumatic ankle injury. A paucity of published data is available documenting chronic ankle instability in the pediatric population. Much of the data has been confined to the adult population. We present 2 cases of chronic ankle instability, 1 in a 12-year-old and 1 in a 9-year-old patient. Unlike the typical adult etiology, the cause of instability was a dysfunctional lateral ligamentous complex as a consequence of bony avulsion of the tip of the fibula. Both patients had sustained a twisting injury to the ankle. The fractures failed to unite. The nonunion resulted in dysfunction of the anterior talofibular ligament with consequent chronic ankle instability. At the initial clinical assessment, magnetic resonance imaging was requested for both patients. In patient 1 (12 years old), the fracture was fixed with 2 headless screws and was immobilized in a plaster cast for 6 weeks. In patient 2 (9 years old), because of the small size of the avulsed fragment, fixation was not possible. A modified Gould-Broström procedure was undertaken, facilitating repair of the avulsed fragment using anchor sutures. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Editorial Commentary: Size Does Matter-Anterior Cruciate Ligament Graft Diameter Affects Biomechanical and Clinical Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Mark

    2017-05-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) graft strength is related to graft diameter and how ACL grafts heal. All grafts appear to lose strength during healing. Clinical studies have documented that hamstring grafts less than 8 mm wide are more vulnerable to failure. Tripling the semitendinosus allows to increase the graft diameter and strength. A recent study documents a semitendinosus tripling technique with excellent clinical results. Copyright © 2017 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Ankle sprains and instability in dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Loughlin, Padhraig F; Hodgkins, Christopher W; Kennedy, John G

    2008-04-01

    Ankle inversion injuries are the most common traumatic injuries in dancers. Ankle stability is integral to normal mobilization and to minimizing the risk for ankle sprain. The ability of the dynamic and static stabilizers of the ankle joint to maintain their structural integrity is a major component of the normal gait cycle. In the world of dance, this quality assumes even greater importance given the range of movement and stresses imposed on the ankle during various dance routines.

  6. Osteoligamentous injuries of the medial ankle joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lötscher, P; Lang, T H; Zwicky, L; Hintermann, B; Knupp, M

    2015-12-01

    Injuries of the ankle joint have a high incidence in daily life and sports, thus, playing an important socioeconomic role. Therefore, proper diagnosis and adequate treatment are mandatory. While most of the ligament injuries around the ankle joint are treated conservatively, great controversy exists on how to treat deltoid ligament injuries in ankle fractures. Missed injuries and inadequate treatment of the medial ankle lead to inferior outcome with instability, progressive deformity, and ankle joint osteoarthritis.

  7. Acute Ankle Sprain in a Mouse Model: Changes in Knee-Joint Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard-Turner, Tricia; Wikstrom, Erik A; Guderian, Sophie; Turner, Michael J

    2017-06-02

    Ankle sprains remain the most common orthopaedic injury. Conducting long-term studies in humans is difficult and costly, so the long-term consequences of an ankle sprain are not entirely known.   To measure knee-joint space after a single surgically induced ankle sprain in mice.   Randomized controlled trial.   University research laboratory.   Thirty male mice (CBA/2J) were randomly placed into 1 of 3 surgical groups: the transected calcaneofibular ligament (CFL) group, the transected anterior talofibular ligament/CFL group, or a sham treatment group. The right ankle was operated on in all mice.   Three days after surgery, all of the mice were individually housed in cages containing a solid-surface running wheel, and daily running-wheel measurements were recorded. Before surgery and every 6 weeks after surgery, a diagnostic ultrasound was used to measure medial and lateral knee-joint space in both hind limbs.   Right medial (P = .003), right lateral (P = .002), left medial (P = .03), and left lateral (P = .002) knee-joint spaces decreased across the life span. The mice in the anterior talofibular ligament/CFL group had decreased right medial (P = .004) joint space compared with the sham and CFL groups starting at 24 weeks of age and continuing throughout the life span. No differences occurred in contralateral knee-joint degeneration among any of the groups.   Based on current data, mice that sustained a surgically induced severe ankle sprain developed greater joint degeneration in the ipsilateral knee. Knee degeneration could result from accommodation to the laxity of the ankle or biomechanical alterations secondary to ankle instability. A single surgically induced ankle sprain could significantly affect knee-joint function.

  8. The effects of total ankle replacement on ankle joint mechanics during walking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Wang

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: Three months after surgeries, the STAA patients experienced improvements in ankle function and gait parameters. The STAA ankle demonstrated improved ankle mechanics during daily activities such as walking.

  9. Combined Innovative Portal Arthroscopy and Fluoroscopy-Assisted Reduction and Fixation in Subtle Injury of the Lisfranc Joint Complex: Analysis of 10 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, Shiu-Bii; Shen, Hsain-Chung; Lin, Leou-Chyr

    Subtle injuries of the Lisfranc joint complex are uncommon and difficult to diagnose clinically and thus are easily missed even by experienced orthopedic doctors. Misdiagnosed injuries can lead to chronic disability until eventual fusion surgery. We describe 10 cases diagnosed with subtle injury of the Lisfranc joint that were treated with combined innovative portal arthroscopy and fluoroscopy-assisted reduction and percutaneous screw fixation in an interfragmentary fashion. The distance between the first and second metatarsals (the Lisfranc distance) and that between the medial cuneiform and fifth metatarsal base (foot arch height) was measured before and after surgery. The American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society function score was evaluated perioperatively. The average preoperative and postoperative Lisfranc distance was 4.38 ± 0.39 mm and 2.68 ± 0.9 mm, the foot arch height was 12.63 ± 2.75 mm and 21.80 ± 3.50 mm, and the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score was 59.1 ± 5.69 and 86.8 ± 10.1, respectively. Of the 10 patients, 3 had excellent outcomes, 6 had good outcomes, and 1 had a fair outcome. In conclusion, we report a useful and minimally invasive surgery for acute, subacute, and even chronic subtle injury of the Lisfranc joint. The Lisfranc distance, foot arch height, and function of the foot were restored clinically, and all measurements showed statistically significant differences. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Treatment of Unstable Ankle Fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Yaniel Truffín Rodríguez; Gerardo Águila Tejeda

    2015-01-01

    Patients with unstable ankle fractures frequently attend the emergency rooms. It is estimated that there are 122 ankle fractures per 100 000 people a year. Surgical treatment of those that are unstable is inevitable since they can not be corrected in a conservative way. Several surgical procedures for repair of such lesions have been described and all of them constitute important tools for the orthopedic surgeon. Therefore, we conducted a literature review to discuss the current management of...

  11. Effects of Arthroscopy for Femoroacetabular Impingement Syndrome on Quality of Life and Economic Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Richard C; Nho, Shane J; Federer, Andrew; Demiralp, Berna; Nguyen, Jennifer; Saavoss, Asha; Salata, Michael J; Philippon, Marc J; Bedi, Asheesh; Larson, Christopher M; Byrd, J W Thomas; Koenig, Lane

    2018-04-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) have increased steadily within the past decade, and research indicates clinically significant improvements after treatment of FAI with hip arthroscopy. This study examined the societal and economic impact of hip arthroscopy by high-volume surgeons for patients with FAI syndrome aged Economic and decision analysis; Level of evidence, 2. The cost-effectiveness of hip arthroscopy versus nonoperative treatment was evaluated by calculating direct and indirect treatment costs. Direct cost was calculated with Current Procedural Terminology medical codes associated with FAI treatment. Indirect cost was measured with the patient-reported data of 102 patients who underwent arthroscopy and from the reimbursement records of 32,143 individuals between the ages of 16 and 79 years who had information in a private insurance claims data set contained within the PearlDiver Patient Records Database. The indirect economic benefits of hip arthroscopy were inferred through regression analysis to estimate the statistical relationship between functional status and productivity. A simulation-based approach was then used to estimate the change in productivity associated with the change in functional status observed in the treatment cohort between baseline and follow-up. To analyze cost-effectiveness, 1-, 2-, and 3-way sensitivity analyses were performed on all variables in the model, and Monte Carlo analysis evaluated the impact of uncertainty in the model assumptions. Analysis of indirect costs identified a statistically significant increase of mean aggregate productivity of $8968 after surgery. Cost-effectiveness analysis showed a mean cumulative total 10-year societal savings of $67,418 per patient from hip arthroscopy versus nonoperative treatment. Hip arthroscopy also conferred a gain of 2.03 quality-adjusted life years over this period. The mean cost for hip arthroscopy was estimated at $23,120 ± $10,279, and the mean

  12. Ankle fusion with a retrograde locked intramedullary nail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Xu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: To assess the value of ankle fusion with a retrograde locked intramedullary nail in the treatment of sequela of lower extremity compartment syndrome. Methods: Thirty-five cases of equinus deformity follow-ing tibiofibular compartment syndrome treated by means of ankle fusion with a retrograde locked intramedullary nail from January 2001 to December 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. The complications, the time needed for bony fu-sion of the ankle joint assessed by anteroposterior and lateral X-ray photographs as well as patients’ subjective evalua-tion were recorded and analysed. Results: Among the 35 patients, 15 had previously undergone surgical treatment twice on the same limb, 13 had thrice and 7 had to be operated on four times before ankle fusion. An anterior midpoint approach to the ankle joint was adopted in 29 cases, while anterior midpoint ap-proach plus a small incision on the posterior ankle joint was made in 17 cases, whereas lateral approach in 6 cases. Tar-sus joint fusion was performed on 4 cases. The follow-up period ranged 6-124 months, averaged 40.6 months. Bone grafting was not performed in this series. Preoperative tibial shaft fracture occurred in one patient and was healed after conservative treatment. Incision dehiscence located at pre-vious Achilles tendon incision was found in two patients. As a result, one received an intramedullary nail emplace-ment at calcaneoplantar part while the wound at anterosuperior part of the other one was healed by dressing change. Two patients failed to bony union 5 months postoperatively, in which one healed 10 weeks after retrieval of proximal tibial nail and another by iliac grafting. Terminal necrosis of the toe due to blood supply dysfunction was not found in this series. All the patients were satisfied with the ankle joint function postoperatively. The time for bony union on X-rays was 9.8 weeks on average. Except for one patient who demanded removal of

  13. Ankle Joint Contact Loads and Displacement With Progressive Syndesmotic Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Kenneth J; Goeb, Yannick; Behn, Anthony W; Criswell, Braden; Chou, Loretta

    2015-09-01

    Ligamentous injuries to the distal tibiofibular syndesmosis are predictive of long-term ankle dysfunction. Mild and moderate syndesmotic injuries are difficult to stratify, and the impact of syndesmosis injury on the magnitude and distribution of forces within the ankle joint during athletic activities is unknown. Eight below-knee cadaveric specimens were tested in the intact state and after sequential sectioning of the following ligaments: anterior-inferior tibiofibular, anterior deltoid (1 cm), interosseous/transverse (IOL/TL), posterior-inferior tibiofibular, and whole deltoid. In each condition, specimens were loaded in axial compression to 700 N and then externally rotated to 20 N·m torque. During axial loading and external rotation, both the fibula and the talus rotated significantly after each ligament sectioning as compared to the intact condition. After IOL/TL release, a significant increase in posterior translation of the fibula was observed, although no syndesmotic widening was observed. Mean tibiotalar contact pressure increased significantly after IOL/TL release, and the center of pressure shifted posterolaterally, relative to more stable conditions, after IOL/TL release. There were significant increases in mean contact pressure and peak pressure along with a reduction in contact area with axial loading and external rotation as compared to axial loading alone for all 5 conditions. Significant increases in tibiotalar contact pressures occur when external rotation stresses are added to axial loading. Moderate and severe injuries are associated with a significant increase in mean contact pressure combined with a shift in the center of pressure and rotation of the fibula and talus. Considerable changes in ankle joint kinematics and contact mechanics may explain why moderate syndesmosis injuries take longer to heal and are more likely to develop long-term dysfunction and, potentially, ankle arthritis. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Accuracy of Lachman and Anterior Drawer Tests for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries

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    Hadi Makhmalbaf

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available   Background: The knee joint is prone to injury because of its complexity and weight-bearing function. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL ruptures happen in young and physically active population and can result in instability, meniscal tears, and articular cartilage damage. The aim of this study is to evaluate the accuracy of Lachman and anterior drawer test in ACL injury in compare with arthroscopy.   Methods: In a descriptive, analytical study from 2009 to 2013, 653 patients who were suspected to ACL rapture were entered the study. Statistical analysis was performed by the usage of SPSS 19.0. Multiple comparison procedure was performed for comparing data between clinical examination and arthroscopic findings and their relation with age and sex. Results: Mean age of patients was 28.3±7.58 years (range from 16 to 68 years. From 428 patients, 41.2% (175 patients were between 26 and 35, 38.8% (165 ones between 15 and 25 and 20% (85 patients over 36 years. 414 patients were male (97.2% and 12 were female (2.8%. Sensitivity of anterior drawer test was 94.4% and sensitivity of Lachman test was 93.5%. Conclusion: The diagnosis and decision to reconstruct ACL injury can be reliably made regard to the anterior drawer and Lachman tests result. The tests did not have privilege to each other. These test accuracy increased considerably under anesthesia especially in women.

  15. Accuracy of Lachman and Anterior Drawer Tests for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Makhmalbaf

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The knee joint is prone to injury because of its complexity and weight-bearing function. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL ruptures happen in young and physically active population and can result in instability, meniscal tears, and articular cartilage damage. The aim of this study is to evaluate the accuracy of Lachman and anterior drawer test in ACL injury in compare with arthroscopy.   Methods: In a descriptive, analytical study from 2009 to 2013, 653 patients who were suspected to ACL rapture were entered the study. Statistical analysis was performed by the usage of SPSS 19.0. Multiple comparison procedure was performed for comparing data between clinical examination and arthroscopic findings and their relation with age and sex. Results: Mean age of patients was 28.3±7.58 years (range from 16 to 68 years. From 428 patients, 41.2% (175 patients were between 26 and 35, 38.8% (165 ones between 15 and 25 and 20% (85 patients over 36 years. 414 patients were male (97.2% and 12 were female (2.8%. Sensitivity of anterior drawer test was 94.4% and sensitivity of Lachman test was 93.5%. Conclusion: The diagnosis and decision to reconstruct ACL injury can be reliably made regard to the anterior drawer and Lachman tests result. The tests did not have privilege to each other. These test accuracy increased considerably under anesthesia especially in women.

  16. Posterior Ankle Structure Injury During Total Ankle Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reb, Christopher W; McAlister, Jeffrey E; Hyer, Christopher F; Berlet, Gregory C

    2016-01-01

    Total ankle replacement studies have focused on reporting complications that are directly observed clinically or radiographically, including wound problems, technical errors, implant loosening, subsidence, infection, bone fractures, and heterotopic ossification. However, patients can still experience unresolved pain even when these problems have been ruled out. We initiated a study to more clearly define the relative risk of injury to the anatomic structures in the posterior ankle during total ankle replacement using a third-generation implant system. Ten fresh-frozen adult cadaveric below-the-knee specimens were positioned in the intraoperative positioning frame of an approved total ankle replacement system and adjusted to achieve proper foot alignment using fluoroscopic imaging. The relationship between the tibial cutting guide pins and the posterior neurovascular and tendon structures was measured using digital calipers. High rates of posterior structural injury were found. Nearly all proximal-medial pins encountered a posteromedial neurovascular structure, most commonly the tibial nerve. The distal-medial pins mainly encountered posteromedial tendinous structures, in particular, the flexor digitorum longus tendon. The proximal lateral pins were highly likely to encounter the Achilles tendon and the sural nerve. Our results support our hypothesis that the tibial neurovascular structures are at the greatest risk when preparing for and completing the bony resection, particularly with the medial and proximal cuts. Posterior ankle soft tissue structure injuries can occur during implantation but currently with unknown frequency and undetermined significance. Further study of posterior structural injuries could result in a more informed approach to post-total ankle replacement complications and management. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A randomised controlled trial for the effectiveness of intra-articular Ropivacaine and Bupivacaine on pain after knee arthroscopy: the DUPRA (DUtch Pain Relief after Arthroscopy)-trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campo, M. M.; Kerkhoffs, G. M. M. J.; Sierevelt, I. N.; Weeseman, R. R.; van der Vis, H. M.; Albers, G. H. R.

    2012-01-01

    In this double-blinded, randomised clinical trial, the aim was to compare the analgesic effects of low doses of intra-articular Bupivacaine and Ropivacaine against placebo after knee arthroscopy performed under general anaesthesia. A total of 282 patients were randomised to 10 cc NaCl 0.9%, 10 cc

  18. MORPHOMETRIC STUDY OF MEDIAL COLLATERAL LIGAMENTS OF ANKLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelu Prasad

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The ankle joint is one of the most frequently injured joint. A sprained ankle results due to tear of anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligaments when the foot is twisted in lateral direction. In forcible eversion of the foot, the deltoid ligament may be torn. At times, the deltoid ligament pulls the medial malleolus thereby causing avulsion fracture of the malleolus. The strong eversion pull on the deltoid ligament causes transverse fracture of medial malleolus. If the tibia is carried anteriorly, the posterior margin of the distal end of the tibia is also broken by the talus producing a trimalleolar fracture. The talocrural joint is a major weight bearing joint of the body. The weight of the body is transmitted from the tibia and fibula to the talus which distributes the weight anteriorly and posteriorly within the foot. One sixth of the static load of the leg is carried by the fibula at the tibiofibular joint. These require a high degree of stability which is determined by the passive and dynamic factors. A sprained ankle results due to tear of anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligaments when the foot is twisted in lateral direction. In forcible eversion of the foot, the deltoid ligament may be torn. At times, the deltoid ligament pulls the medial malleolus thereby causing avulsion fracture of the malleolus. The strong eversion pull on the deltoid ligament causes transverse fracture of medial malleolus. If the tibia is carried anteriorly, the posterior margin of the distal end of the tibia is also broken by the talus producing a trimalleolar fracture. Conventionally, X-ray techniques have been used to diagnose ligament injuries. Magnetic resonance (MR imaging has opened new horizons in the diagnosis and treatment of many musculoskeletal diseases of the ankle and foot. It demonstrates abnormalities in the bones and soft tissues before they become evident at other imaging modalities. The anatomy of the deltoid ligament

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of meniscal and anterior cruciate ligament injuries of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreitner, K.F.; Herrig, A.; Grebe, P.; Runkel, M.; Regentrop, H.J.

    1998-01-01

    To categorise discrepancies in findings of the menisci and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) between arthroscopy and MRI. Materials and methods: The MRIs of 236 patients were retrospectively analysed by an experienced radiologist without knowledge of clinical and/for operative findings. Discrepancies in arthroscopic findings were reevaluated together with the arthroscopist to determine their cause of error. Results: The diagnostic accuracies for injuries of the medial and lateral meniscus and the ACL were 92.4%, 92.4%, and 94.1%. respectively. For the menisci, causes for discrepancies in findings (n=31) were: overinterpretation of central signal intensities with contact to the meniscal surface but without disturbance of the meniscal contour as a tear (n=12), insufficient arthroscopie evaluation of the knee joint (n=11), overlooked tears on MR imaging (n=6), misinterpretation of normal anatomic structures (n=1), ''magic angle'' phenomenon (n=1), and missed tears at MRI (n=1). Causes for discrepancies for the ACL (n=18) were: nearly complete versus complete rupture either at MRI or arthroscopy and vice versa (n=9), insufficient arthroscopic evaluation (n=6), insufficient MRI technique (n=2), and overlooked tear on MR imaging (n=1). Conclusions: Discrepant findings between MRI and arthroscopy may be also due to an insufficient arthroscopic evaluation in clinical routine. The close cooperation between surgeons and radiologists improves the understanding of the methods of each other. (orig.) [de

  20. Predictors of Length of Career After Hip Arthroscopy for Femoroacetabular Impingement in Professional Hockey Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menge, Travis J; Briggs, Karen K; Philippon, Marc J

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that professional hockey players return to sport at a high rate after hip arthroscopy, although it is unknown how long players continue to compete at a professional level after surgery. To determine the prevalence of athletes who continued playing in the National Hockey League (NHL) for a minimum of 5 years after hip arthroscopy for treatment of symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and to determine predictors associated with length of career. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. A total of 60 professional hockey players (69 hips) underwent hip arthroscopy for FAI by a single surgeon between 2005 and 2010. Data were retrieved from NHL.com and Hockey-reference.com regarding information on each player's professional career. Position played, age, surgical procedure, and intraoperative findings were also used in data analysis. There were 12 centers, 15 defensemen, 16 goalies, and 17 wings studied. Of the 60 athletes, 40 (67%) continued to play professionally a minimum of 5 years after hip arthroscopy. As of the 2015 season, the mean length of a player's NHL career was 13.7 years (range, 2-27 years), with an average of 5.9 years played after hip arthroscopy. There was no difference in length of career or years played when goalies were compared with other positions (P = .760). Length of career and years played after arthroscopy correlated with age at surgery (r = 0.799 and -0.408, respectively). Players who played ≥5 years after arthroscopy were significantly younger than those who did not (25 vs 30 years; P = .001). Athletes who played hockey players with symptomatic FAI. © 2016 The Author(s).

  1. Defining the Learning Curve for Hip Arthroscopy: A Threshold Analysis of the Volume-Outcomes Relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Nabil; Chamberlin, Peter; Marx, Robert G; Hidaka, Chisa; Ge, Yile; Nawabi, Danyal H; Lyman, Stephen

    2018-01-01

    Hip arthroscopy has emerged as a successful option for the treatment of femoroacetabular impingement and related hip disorders, but the procedure is technically challenging. To define the learning curve through which surgeons become proficient at hip arthroscopy. Cohort study; level of evidence, 3. The authors identified hip arthroscopy procedures performed by surgeons through a New York State database (Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System) and followed those cases for additional hip surgery (total hip arthroplasty, hip resurfacing, or ipsilateral hip arthroscopy) within 5 years of the original procedure. Career volume for each case was calculated as the number of hip arthroscopy procedures that the surgeon had performed. Volume strata were identified via the stratum-specific likelihood ratio method. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to measure the effect of surgeon career volume on risk of additional hip surgery, adjusting for the following patient characteristics: age, sex, race/ethnicity, insurance type, and concurrent diagnosis of hip osteoarthritis. Among 8041 hip arthroscopies performed by 251 surgeons, 989 (12.3%) cases underwent additional hip surgery within 5 years. Four strata of surgeon career volume associated with distinct frequencies of reoperation were identified: cases in the lowest stratum (0-97) had the highest frequency of additional surgery (15.4%). Frequencies declined for cases in the medium (98-388), high (389-518), and highest (≥519) strata (13.8%, 10.1%, and 2.6%, respectively). There was an increased risk of subsequent surgery in each stratum when compared with the highest stratum (hazard ratio [95% CI]: low volume, 3.22 [2.29-4.54]; medium, 3.40 [2.41-4.82]; high, 2.81 [1.86-4.25]; P learning curve for hip arthroscopy was unexpectedly demanding. Cases performed by surgeons with career volumes ≥519 had significantly lower risk of subsequent hip surgery than those performed by lower-volume surgeons.

  2. Ankle tenosynovitis in rheumatoid arthritis: clinical and ultrasonographic evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Luiza Naves Pereira

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate ankle tenosynovitis in rheumatoid arthritis patients, regarding its presence, the kind of tendon involved and the concordance between clinical and ultrasound findings. Methods: Twenty patients with rheumatoid arthritis and pain or swollen ankle joint were evaluated. Tendon involvement was evaluated with ultrasound imaging. The Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ was performed for disability evaluation. Age, sex, disease duration, and vocational activity levels were also obtained. The statistical analysis included Fisher’s exact test. The significance level was 0.05. Results: Tenosynovitis was found in 13 of 20 (65.0% patients in 19 joints, in which 6 were bilaterally (46.1% and unilateral in 7 (53.8%. Tibialis posterior tenosynovitis was seen in nine (45.0% patients, Achilles tenosynovitis in seven (35.0%, tibialis anterior tenosynovitis in three (15.0%, and peroneal tenosynovitis in three (15.0% patients. We found concordance between symptomatic ankle and ultrasonographic findings in 92.3% of the patients with tenosynovitis. Association between severe HAQ with tendon involvement was not found (p>0.05. Disease duration was not associated with tenosynovitis. Patients were predominantly older, female, with mean age around 50.8 years. The long disease duration of patients presented a mean of 11.4 years and, most of them, with no vocational activity (65.0%. Conclusions: The results indicate that ankle tenosynovitis is very common in rheumatoid arthritis patients, both unilateral and bilateral. Tibialis posterior was the most common tendon involvement found. Finally, we found concordance between the clinical and ultrasound findings in almost all rheumatoid arthritis patients with ankle tenosynovitis.

  3. Diagnostic equivalence of conventional and fast spin echo magnetic resonance imaging of the anterior cruciate ligament of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munk, P.L.; Hilborn, M.D.; Vellet, A.D.; University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta,; Romano, C.C.; University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta,

    1997-01-01

    Many techniques and pulse sequences have been devised for the assessment of the anterior cruciate ligament. The present study compares fast spin echo (FSE) imaging to conventional spin echo imaging at a field strength of 1.5 T in an effort to determine if these sequences are diagnostically equivalent. Where available, arthroscopy was also done. A total of 52 patients were imaged using both FSE and conventional spin echo sequences. Eight volunteers were used as controls. Arthroscopy was performed on 10 patients. The anterior cruciate ligament was assessed in a blinded fashion by three radiologists. The Kappa statistic was then used to determine the percentage agreement between FSE and conventional spin echo imaging. Fast spin echo sequencing demonstrated a sensitivity of 100%, a specificity of 94.8% and an accuracy of 96.3% when compared to arthroscopy. Conventional spin echo imaging and arthroscopy had a sensitivity of 100%, specificity of 84.6% and an accuracy of 88.9%. The remaining 34 patients who did not undergo arthroscopy were followed clinically because clinical and imaging findings were not suggestive of ACL tears. These demonstrated 72% agreement between FSE and conventional spin echo imaging using the Kappa statistic, with regards to calling ACL normal or having only a low-grade partial tear. Fast spin echo imaging produces images of the anterior cruciate ligament that have similar diagnostic accuracy to conventional spin echo images (P<0.05) within a much shorter scan time. These results however, require further validation in a larger group, preferably with arthroscopic correlation. (author)

  4. Diagnostic equivalence of conventional and fast spin echo magnetic resonance imaging of the anterior cruciate ligament of the knee.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munk, P.L. [University of Western Ontario, London, Ontaio, (Canada). Department of Diagnostic Radiology]|[University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, (Canada). British Columbia Cancer Agency]|[Vancouver Hospital and Health Sciences Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia, (Canada); Hilborn, M.D. [University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, (Canada). Department of Diagnostic Radiology; Vellet, A.D. [University of Western Ontario, London, Ontaio, (Canada). Department of Diagnostic Radiology]|[University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, (Canada). Foothills Hospital; Romano, C.C. [University of Western Ontario, London, Ontaio, (Canada). Department of Diagnostic Radiology]|[University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, (Canada). Foothills Hospital

    1997-08-01

    Many techniques and pulse sequences have been devised for the assessment of the anterior cruciate ligament. The present study compares fast spin echo (FSE) imaging to conventional spin echo imaging at a field strength of 1.5 T in an effort to determine if these sequences are diagnostically equivalent. Where available, arthroscopy was also done. A total of 52 patients were imaged using both FSE and conventional spin echo sequences. Eight volunteers were used as controls. Arthroscopy was performed on 10 patients. The anterior cruciate ligament was assessed in a blinded fashion by three radiologists. The Kappa statistic was then used to determine the percentage agreement between FSE and conventional spin echo imaging. Fast spin echo sequencing demonstrated a sensitivity of 100%, a specificity of 94.8% and an accuracy of 96.3% when compared to arthroscopy. Conventional spin echo imaging and arthroscopy had a sensitivity of 100%, specificity of 84.6% and an accuracy of 88.9%. The remaining 34 patients who did not undergo arthroscopy were followed clinically because clinical and imaging findings were not suggestive of ACL tears. These demonstrated 72% agreement between FSE and conventional spin echo imaging using the Kappa statistic, with regards to calling ACL normal or having only a low-grade partial tear. Fast spin echo imaging produces images of the anterior cruciate ligament that have similar diagnostic accuracy to conventional spin echo images (P<0.05) within a much shorter scan time. These results however, require further validation in a larger group, preferably with arthroscopic correlation. (author). 21 refs., 3 tabs., 2 figs.

  5. Anterior shoulder capsular tears in professional baseball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulotta, Lawrence V; Lobatto, Daniel; Delos, Demetris; Coleman, Struan H; Altchek, David W

    2014-08-01

    Tearing of the anterior capsule of the shoulder is a rare but debilitating injury for throwing athletes. However, there is very little in the literature to guide its diagnosis and treatment. In this case series, we outline our experience with anterior capsular tears of the shoulder in professional baseball players. Five professional baseball players were diagnosed with midsubstance tears of their anterior capsule. A trial of rest and rehabilitation failed in all patients, and they eventually underwent surgery. These patients were retrospectively reviewed. The presenting symptoms and findings were documented, and outcomes were assessed by the player's ability to return to play. The mean age was 33.5 years (range, 31-37 years), and all patients presented with anterior shoulder pain and the inability to throw. No patient had an acute traumatic injury. Magnetic resonance imaging provided the correct diagnosis in 4 patients, and the diagnosis was made with diagnostic arthroscopy in the fifth. Three underwent arthroscopic repair, and 2 underwent open repair of the anterior capsule. Of the 5 players, 4 (80%) returned to their preinjury level by a mean of 13.3 months (range, 8-18 months). Anterior capsular tears can occur in older throwing athletes. Surgical repair, whether arthroscopic or open, can yield good results in most patients. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Balance measures for discriminating between functionally unstable and stable ankles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Scott E; Guskiewicz, Kevin M; Gross, Michael T; Yu, Bing

    2009-02-01

    To identify force plate measures that discriminate between ankles with functional instability and stable ankles and to determine the most accurate force plate measure for enabling this distinction. Twenty-two subjects (177 +/- 10 cm, 77 +/- 16 kg, 21 +/- 2 yr) without a history of ankle injury and 22 subjects (177 +/- 10 cm, 77 +/- 16 kg, 20 +/- 2 yr) with functional ankle instability (FAI) performed a single-leg static balance test and a single-leg jump-landing dynamic balance test. Static force plate measures analyzed in both anterior/posterior (A/P) and medial/lateral (M/L) directions included the following: ground reaction force (GRF) SD; center-of-pressure (COP) SD; mean, maximum, and total COP excursion; and mean and maximum COP velocity. COP area was also analyzed for static balance. A/P and M/L time to stabilization quantified dynamic balance. Greater values of force plate measures indicated impaired balance. A stepwise discriminant function analysis examined group differences, group classification, and accuracy of force plate measures for discriminating between ankle groups. The FAI group had greater values than the stable ankle group for A/P GRF SD (P = 0.027), M/L GRF SD (P = 0.006), M/L COP SD (P = 0.046), A/P mean COP velocity (P = 0.015), M/L mean COP velocity (P = 0.016), A/P maximum COP velocity (P = 0.037), M/L mean COP excursion (P = 0.014), M/L total COP excursion (P = 0.016), A/P time to stabilization (P = 0.011), and M/L time to stabilization (P = 0.040). M/L GRF SD and A/P time to stabilization had the greatest accuracy scores of 0.73 and 0.72, respectively. Although 10 measures identified group differences, M/L GRF SD and A/P time to stabilization were the most accurate in discriminating between ankle groups. These results provide evidence for choosing these GRF measures for evaluating static and dynamic balance deficits associated with FAI.

  7. The incidence of total hip arthroplasty after hip arthroscopy in osteoarthritic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haviv Barak

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To assess the incidence of total hip arthroplasty (THA in osteoarthritic patients who were treated by arthroscopic debridement and to evaluate factors that might influence the time interval from the first hip arthroscopy to THA. Design Retrospective clinical series Methods Follow-up data and surgical reports were retrieved from 564 records of osteoarthritic patients that have had hip arthroscopy between the years 2002 to 2009 with a mean follow-up time of 3.2 years (range, 1-6.4 years. The time interval between the first hip arthroscopy to THA was modelled as a function of patient age; level of cartilage damage; procedures performed and repeated arthroscopies with the use of multivariate regression analysis. Results Ninety (16% of all participants eventually required THA. The awaiting time from the first arthroscopy to a hip replacement was found to be longer in patients younger than 55 years and in a milder osteoarthritic stage. Patients that experienced repeated hip scopes had a longer time to THA than those with only a single procedure. Procedures performed concomitant with debridement and lavage did not affect the time interval to THA. Conclusions In our series of arthroscopic treatment of hip osteoarthritis, 16% required THA over a period of 7 years. Factors that influence the time to arthroplasty were age, degree of osteoarthritis and recurrent procedures.

  8. Evaluation of the symptomatic supraspinatus tendon - a comparison of ultrasound and arthroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venu, K.M.; Howlett, D.C.; Garikipati, R.; Anderson, H.J.; Bonnici, A.V

    2002-11-01

    Purpose: A prospective study was undertaken to determine the accuracy of ultrasound compared with arthroscopy in the evaluation of the symptomatic supraspinatus tendon, and to identify whether ultrasound diagnosis was helpful in pre-operative planning. Methods: A total of 276 consecutive patients with shoulder impingement symptoms underwent ultrasound examination of the supraspinatus tendon. Of these patients, 41 proceeded to open or arthroscopic surgical procedure on clinical grounds, and in this group direct comparison with ultrasound findings was made. Results: There was full correlation between ultrasound and arthroscopy in the diagnosis of a normal supraspinatus tendon, full-thickness tear, tendinopathy and tendon rupture. There was some discrepancy between the two techniques. Two patients with partial thickness tear on ultrasound had a full thickness tear at arthroscopy. Ultrasound was able to identify intra-substance partial thickness tears in three patients with supraspinatus tendon said to be normal at arthroscopy. Ultrasound helped plan the surgical approach and operative time needed in cases of supraspinatus tendon rupture and full thickness tear. Conclusion: In this study ultrasound was effective in the evaluation of the symptomatic supraspinatus tendon, and was also able to diagnose intra-tendinous lesions not visible at arthroscopy.

  9. Diagnostic Efficiency of MR Imaging of the Knee. Relationship to time Interval between MR and Arthroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrera, M. C.; Recondo, J. A.; Aperribay, M.; Gervas, C.; Fernandez, E.; Alustiza, J. M.

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the efficiency of magnetic resonance (MR) in the diagnosis of knee lesions and how the results are influenced by the time interval between MR and arthroscopy. 248 knees studied by MR were retrospectively analyzed, as well as those which also underwent arthroscopy. Arthroscopy was considered to be the gold standard, MR diagnostic capacity was evaluated for both meniscal and cruciate ligament lesions. Sensitivity, specificity and Kappa index were calculated for the set of all knees included in the study (248), for those in which the time between MR and arthroscopy was less than or equal to three months (134) and for those in which the time between both procedures was less than or equal to one month. Sensitivity, specificity and Kappa index of the MR had global values of 96.5%, 70% and 71%, respectively. When the interval between MR and arthroscopy was less than or equal to three months, sensitivity, specificity and Kappa index were 95.5%, 75% and 72%, respectively. When it was less than or equal to one month, sensitivity was 100%, specificity was 87.5% and Kappa index was 91%. MR is an excellent tool for the diagnosis of knee lesions. Higher MR values of sensitivity, specificity and Kappa index are obtained when the time interval between both procedures is kept to a minimum. (Author) 11 refs

  10. The origin of the ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Codino, Antonio; Plouin, Francois

    2007-01-01

    The differential intensity of cosmic radiation shows a sequence of depressions referred to as knees in a large energy band above 10 15 eV. The global depression entailed in the complete spectrum with respect to the extrapolated intensity based on low energy data, amounts to a maximum factor of 8, occurring at 5x10 18 eV, where flux measurements exhibit a relative minimum, referred to as the ankle. It is demonstrated by a full simulation of cosmic ray trajectories in the Galaxy that the intensity minimum around the ankle energy is primarily due to the nuclear interactions of the cosmic ions with the interstellar matter and to the galactic magnetic field. Ankles signal the onset energies of the rectilinear propagation in the Milky Way at Earth, being for example, 4x10 18 eV for helium and 6x10 19 eV for iron. The ankle, in spite of its notable importance at Earth, is a local perturbation of the universal spectrum which, between the knee and the ankle, decreases by a round factor 10 9 regaining its unperturbed status above 10 19 eV

  11. Arthroscopic Accessibility of the Talus Quantified by Computed Tomography Simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bergen, Christiaan J. A.; Tuijthof, Gabriëlle J. M.; Maas, Mario; Sierevelt, Inger N.; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2012-01-01

    Background: Anterior ankle arthroscopy is the preferred surgical approach for the treatment of osteochondral defects of the talus (OCDs). However, the ankle is a congruent joint with limited surgical access. Purpose: The dual purpose of this study was (1) to quantify the anterior arthroscopic reach

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of anterior cruciate ligament rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiang Hongsen

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Magnetic resonance (MR imaging is a useful diagnostic tool for the assessment of knee joint injury. Anterior cruciate ligament repair is a commonly performed orthopaedic procedure. This paper examines the concordance between MR imaging and arthroscopic findings. Methods Between February, 1996 and February, 1998, 48 patients who underwent magnetic resonance (MR imaging of the knee were reported to have complete tears of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL. Of the 48 patients, 36 were male, and 12 female. The average age was 27 years (range: 15 to 45. Operative reconstruction using a patellar bone-tendon-bone autograft was arranged for each patient, and an arthroscopic examination was performed to confirm the diagnosis immediately prior to reconstructive surgery. Results In 16 of the 48 patients, reconstructive surgery was cancelled when incomplete lesions were noted during arthroscopy, making reconstructive surgery unnecessary. The remaining 32 patients were found to have complete tears of the ACL, and therefore underwent reconstructive surgery. Using arthroscopy as an independent, reliable reference standard for ACL tear diagnosis, the reliability of MR imaging was evaluated. The true positive rate for complete ACL tear diagnosis with MR imaging was 67%, making the possibility of a false-positive report of "complete ACL tear" inevitable with MR imaging. Conclusions Since conservative treatment is sufficient for incomplete ACL tears, the decision to undertake ACL reconstruction should not be based on MR findings alone.

  13. Radiography in acute ankle injuries: The Ottawa ankle rules versus local diagnostic decision rules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijnenburg, A. C. M.; Glas, Afina S.; de Roos, Marnix A. J.; Bogaard, Kjell; Lijmer, Jeroen G.; Bossuyt, Patrick M. M.; Butzelaar, Rudolf M. J. M.; Keeman, Johannes N.

    2002-01-01

    Study objective: We validate the Ottawa Ankle Rules and 2 Dutch ankle rules in distinguishing clinically significant fractures from insignificant fractures and other injuries in patients with a painful ankle presenting to the emergency department. Methods: This prospective comparison of 3 ankle

  14. Ankle Injuries and Disorders - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Ankle Injuries and Disorders URL of this page: https://medlineplus. ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Ankle Injuries and Disorders - Multiple Languages To use the sharing ...

  15. American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... IFFAS / AOFAS eBook ​The AOFAS and MD Conference Express invite you to enjoy complimentary access to the ... Foundation Exhibit Privacy Statement Legal Disclosure Site Map American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society ® Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Foundation ...

  16. MRI of the lateral ankle ligaments: value of three-dimensional orientation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayerhoefer, M.E.; Breitenseher, M.J.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the three-dimensional orientation of the lateral ankle ligaments with MRI. Materials and Methods: Twenty healthy volunteers without previous injury to the ankle were included in the study. With the right ankle in the normal anatomic position stabilized in a splint, coronal T2-weighted spin-echo sequences (TSE) were obtained. The three-dimensional orientation was determined by placing paths through the ligaments and by measuring the angles between corresponding tangents and the three main imaging planes. Results: Using the calculated angles, full-length visualization of the lateral ligaments of the ankle was achieved. The angles deviating from the axial imaging plane were 18.0 degrees for the anterior talofibular ligament, 52.3 degrees for the calcaneofibular ligament and 28.2 degrees for the posterior talofibular ligament. Conclusion: MRI enables the exact determination of the three-dimensional orientation of the lateral ankle ligaments. Orienting the imaging planes according to the calculated angular deviation allows the full-length visualization of the ligaments and is the basis for optimal imaging of the lateral ankle ligaments. (orig.) [de

  17. Osteoligamentous injuries of the medial ankle joint

    OpenAIRE

    L?tscher, P.; Lang, T. H.; Zwicky, L.; Hintermann, B.; Knupp, M.

    2015-01-01

    Injuries of the ankle joint have a high incidence in daily life and sports, thus, playing an important socioeconomic role. Therefore, proper diagnosis and adequate treatment are mandatory. While most of the ligament injuries around the ankle joint are treated conservatively, great controversy exists on how to treat deltoid ligament injuries in ankle fractures. Missed injuries and inadequate treatment of the medial ankle lead to inferior outcome with instability, progressive deformity, and ank...

  18. Correlation between physical examination and intraoperative findings in shoulder disease treated by arthroscopy. Statistical analysis of 150 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Parra, P; Anaya Rojas, M; Jiménez Bravo, B; González Oria, M O; Lisbona Muñoz, M; Gil Álvarez, J J; Cano Luis, P

    2016-01-01

    Only a few clinical exploratory manoeuvres are truly discriminatory and useful in shoulder disease. The aim of this study is to correlate the physical examination results of the shoulder with the true diagnosis found by arthroscopy. A retrospective case series of 150 patients with the most common surgical conditions of the shoulder. Data were collected on the suspicion of each pathology, the physical examination of the patient, and the actual discovery of the disease during arthroscopic surgery. The Bankart examination manoeuvres of the lesion show the best results, with a 92.1% positive prediction value (PPV), a 99.1% negative predictive value (NPV), followed by the impingement syndrome, with a PPV of 94.4%, and total cuff rupture with a PPV of 92.3%.Exploration of the superior labrum anterior to posterior (SLAP) lesion had an NPV of 99.1%. Physical examination is sufficient to diagnose or rule out Bankart. A positive physical examination provides the complete rupture of the rotator cuff, and requires further studies. The patients suspected of subacromial syndrome only need an NMR if the physical tests are negative. The conclusions drawn from this work can have a significant impact on both cost savings (by reducing forward tests), and saving time in certain cases in which, after appropriate physical examination, surgery may be indicated without losing time in intermediate steps. Copyright © 2016 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Risk factors for the need of hip arthroscopy following periacetabular osteotomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartig-Andreasen, Charlotte; Troelsen, Anders; Thillemann, Theis M

    2015-01-01

    Despite the frequency of labral tears in symptomatic developmental dysplasia of the hip, no consensus exists regarding the treatment of coexisting dysplasia of the hip and tearing of the acetabular labrum. The purpose of this prospective, MR arthrography (MRA) based 2-year follow-up study...... was to identify risk factors predicting the need for a hip arthroscopy (HA) after periacetabular osteotomy (PAO). Ninety-nine patients (104 hips) scheduled for PAO were evaluated preoperatively and at 2-year follow-up. MRA was performed in all patients prior to PAO. At follow-up, patients were divided into a non......-arthroscopy and arthroscopy group. The two groups were compared clinical and radiological, and risk factors for HA after PAO were calculated. Patient reported outcome measures (WOMAC, Oxford Hip and SF36) were filled out before PAO and at follow-up. Ninety-five hips (91.3%) were evaluated. Twenty-six hips (27%) required...

  20. Combined intra-articular glucocorticoid, bupivacaine and morphine reduces pain and convalescence after diagnostic knee arthroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Sten; Lorentzen, Jan S; Larsen, Allan S

    2002-01-01

    We studied the effect of intra-articullar saline vs. bupivacaine + morphine or bupivacaine morphine + methylprednisolone after diagnostic knee arthroscopy. In a double-blind randomized study, 60 patients undergoing diagnostic knee arthroscopy without a therapeutic procedure were allocated to groups...... receiving intra-articular saline, intra-articular bupivacaine 150 mg + morphine 4 mg or the same dose of bupivacaine + morphine + intra-articular methylprednisolone 40 mg at the end of arthroscopy during general anesthesia. All patients were instructed to resume normal activities immediately after...... the procedure. Pain during movement and walking, leg muscle force and joint effusion, use of crutches and duration of sick leave were assessed. A combination of bupivacaine and morphine reduced pain, duration of immobilization and of convalescence. The addition of methylprednisolone further reduced pain, use...

  1. Development and validation of a computer-based learning module for wrist arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obdeijn, M C; Alewijnse, J V; Mathoulin, C; Liverneaux, P; Tuijthof, G J M; Schijven, M P

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study was to develop and validate a computer-based module for wrist arthroscopy to which a group of experts could consent. The need for such a module was assessed with members of the European Wrist Arthroscopy Society (EWAS). The computer-based module was developed through several rounds of consulting experts on the content. The module's learning enhancement was tested in a randomized controlled trial with 28 medical students who were assigned to the computer-based module group or lecture group. The design process led to a useful tool, which is supported by a panel of experts. Although the computer based module did not enhance learning, the participants did find the module more pleasant to use. Developing learning tools such as this computer-based module can improve the teaching of wrist arthroscopy skills. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  2. The Incidence of Ankle Sprains in Orienteering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekstrand, Jan; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Investigates relationship between ankle sprains and participation time in competitive orienteering. Examined 15,474 competitors in races in the Swedish O-ringen 5-day event in 1987. Injuries requiring medical attention were analyzed, showing 137 (23.9 percent) ankle sprains. Injury incidence was 8.4/10,000 hours. Incidence of ankle sprains was…

  3. The conservative treatment of ankle osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witteveen, A.G.H.

    2015-01-01

    In 70% to 78% of patients with ankle osteoarthritis (OA), they present themselves with the sequelae of a traumatic event in the past. Ankle trauma occurs in many patients at a relatively young age. Consequently, the expected life span of many patients with ankle OA is relatively long. Many treatment

  4. Acute Ankle Sprains in Primary Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.M. van Rijn (Rogier)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractOf all injuries of the musculoskeletal system, 25% are acute lateral ankle sprains.1 In the USA and the UK there are about 23,000 and 5000 ankle sprains, respectively, each day. In the Netherlands approximately 600,000 people sustain an ankle injury each year, of those 120,000 occur

  5. Incidence and risk factors of surgical site infection and septic arthritis after elective arthroscopy in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunsting, Julie Y; Pille, Frederik J; Oosterlinck, Maarten; Haspeslagh, Maarten; Wilderjans, Hans C

    2018-01-01

    To determine the incidence of infection and associated risk factors, after elective arthroscopy. Retrospective case study. Horses (n=1079) undergoing elective arthroscopy. Medical records of all horses that underwent elective arthroscopy between 2006 and 2013 were reviewed. Age, gender, breed, surgeon, number of joints operated, total anesthetic time, perioperative antimicrobial administration, and the presence and size of osteochondral fragments/subchondral lesions were recorded. For each operated joint, the development of postoperative infection (surgical site infection [SSI] and/or septic arthritis) and long-term outcome (>6 months) were recorded. Multivariate logistic regression was used to test for association between the independent variables and the dependent outcomes. A total of 1741 joints in 1079 horses underwent arthroscopy. SSI without septic arthritis occurred in 1 fetlock joint (0.14%), 1 tibiotarsal joint (0.19%), and 6 femoropatellar joints (1.67%). Thirteen joints (0.75%) were diagnosed with septic arthritis, including 1 fetlock joint (0.14%), 4 tibiotarsal joints (0.74%), and 8 femoropatellar joints (2.23%). The probability of postoperative SSI was higher when large lesions (>40 mm long) were treated, compared to medium (20-40 mm, P = .005) and small (septic arthritis (P septic arthritis rate (P = .028). Septic arthritis after elective arthroscopy was more likely in the presence of SSI and younger age. Horses with large lesions were at risk for SSI, which translated into a higher incidence of postoperative septic arthritis after femoropatellar arthroscopy. © 2017 The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  6. Comparison of Functional Ankle Motion Measures in Modern Dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Danelle; Hollman-Gage, Kendra; Ojofeitimi, Sheyi; Bronner, Shaw

    2012-09-01

    Ankle injuries are the most common lower extremity injury in dance and sports, often resulting in limitation of dorsiflexion or plantar flexion. Accurate assessment of any limitation in range of motion is an important factor in implementing effective preventative and rehabilitative regimens. Ankle range of motion has traditionally been quantified with goniometers. However, standard goniometry may not be an adequate method of assessing plantar flexion range of motion in dancers. An alternative technique using inclinometers to quantify ankle plantar flexion has been reported, but reliability and inter-instrument correlations for this method are limited. The dorsiflexion lunge distance method has been used to assess ankle dorsiflexion. Although shown to be reliable, this method has not been objectively correlated. The purpose of this study was to determine the most clinically appropriate tool for assessing functional ankle dorsiflexion and plantar flexion in dancers. The aims were to: 1. determine reliability of the weightbearing ankle dorsiflexion lunge method using inclinometer, goniometer, and distance; 2. assess the reliability of inclinometer and goniometer measurements of non-weightbearing active plantar flexion; 3. conduct inter-method and experienced versus novice rater correlations; and 4. determine if a relationship exists between dorsiflexion distance (cm) and dorsiflexion inclinometer angle (degrees) measurements. Twenty-six modern dancers (age: 20.2 ± 1.8 years) participated in the study. Four raters measured weightbearing dorsiflexion in a lunge position using a goniometer, two inclinometer placements, and a distance measurement. They also measured active ankle plantar flexion using an inclinometer placed on the anterior talonavicular joint and a goniometer placed at the lateral ankle. Intra- and inter-rater reliability and inter-method correlations were calculated with Intraclass Correlation Coefficients (ICC) and standard error of measurement (SEM

  7. Combined intra-articular glucocorticoid, bupivacaine and morphine reduces pain and convalescence after diagnostic knee arthroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Sten; Lorentzen, Jan S; Larsen, Allan S

    2002-01-01

    We studied the effect of intra-articullar saline vs. bupivacaine + morphine or bupivacaine morphine + methylprednisolone after diagnostic knee arthroscopy. In a double-blind randomized study, 60 patients undergoing diagnostic knee arthroscopy without a therapeutic procedure were allocated to groups...... the procedure. Pain during movement and walking, leg muscle force and joint effusion, use of crutches and duration of sick leave were assessed. A combination of bupivacaine and morphine reduced pain, duration of immobilization and of convalescence. The addition of methylprednisolone further reduced pain, use...

  8. Interscalene plexus block for arthroscopy of the humero-scapular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandin, R; Stam, H; Sternlo, J E

    1992-07-01

    Interscalene plexus block was performed in nine patients subjected to shoulder arthroscopy. The operating conditions, including muscle relaxation, were fully adequate in all patients (after additional local anaesthesia of the skin in four patients). With the exception of one patient who experienced temporary hoarseness (probably due to a concomitant block of the recurrent laryngeal nerve), no side effects were found and the patients tolerated the surgical procedure well. Interscalene block might be a suitable alternative to general anaesthesia for shoulder arthroscopy. However, additional local anaesthesia at the site where the arthroscope is to be inserted is frequently required.

  9. Medial Clamp Tine Positioning Affects Ankle Syndesmosis Malreduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, Christopher T; Putnam, Sara M; Cherney, Steven M; Ricci, William M; Spraggs-Hughes, Amanda; McAndrew, Christopher M; Gardner, Michael J

    2017-08-01

    To determine whether the position of the medial clamp tine during syndesmotic reduction affected reduction accuracy. Prospective cohort. Urban Level 1 trauma center. Seventy-two patients with operatively treated syndesmotic injuries. Patients underwent operative fixation of their ankle syndesmotic injuries using reduction forceps. The position of the medial clamp tine was then recorded with intraoperative fluoroscopy. Malreduction rates were then assessed with bilateral ankle computerized tomography. Fibular position within the incisura was measured with respect to the uninjured side to determine whether a malreduction had occurred. Malreductions were then analyzed for associations with injury pattern, patient demographics, and the location of the medial clamp tine. A statistically significant association was found between medial clamp position and sagittal plane syndesmosis malreduction. In reference to anterior fibular translation, there was a 0% malreduction rate in the 18 patients where the clamp tine was placed in the anterior third, a 19.4% malreduction rate in the middle third, and 60% malreduction rate in the posterior third (P = 0.006). In reference to posterior fibular translation, there was a 11.1% malreduction when clamp placement was in the anterior third, a 16.1% malreduction rate in the middle third, and 60% malreduction rate in the posterior third (P = 0.062). There were no significant associations between medial clamp position and coronal plane malreductions (overcompression or undercompression) (P = 1). When using reduction forceps for syndesmotic reduction, the position of the medial clamp tine can be highly variable. The angle created with off-axis syndesmotic clamping is likely a major culprit in iatrogenic malreduction. Sagittal plane malreduction appears to be highly sensitive to clamp obliquity, which is directly related to the medial clamp tine placement. Based on these data, we recommend placing the medial clamp tine in the anterior third

  10. Technical note: Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in the presence of an intramedullary femoral nail using anteromedial drilling

    OpenAIRE

    Lacey, Matthew; Lamplot, Joseph; Walley, Kempland C; DeAngelis, Joseph P; Ramappa, Arun J

    2017-01-01

    AIM To describe an approach to anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using autologous hamstring by drilling via the anteromedial portal in the presence of an intramedullary (IM) femoral nail. METHODS Once preoperative imagining has characterized the proposed location of the femoral tunnel preparations are made to remove all of the hardware (locking bolts and IM nail). A diagnostic arthroscopy is performed in the usual fashion addressing all intra-articular pathology. The ACL remnant...

  11. Prospective study of the " Inside-Out" arthroscopic ankle ligament technique: Preliminary result.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nery, Caio; Fonseca, Lucas; Raduan, Fernando; Moreno, Marcus; Baumfeld, Daniel

    2017-03-22

    Lateral ankle ligament injury is among the most common orthopedic injuries. The objective of this study is to present the preliminary prospective results of treatment using the "Inside-Out" variant of the fully arthroscopic Broström-Gould technique. Twenty six patients were included: 20 male and 6 female, aged 19-60 years, mean 41 years. All patients had positive "anterior drawer" and "talar tilt" tests. When necessary, cartilage injuries were treated with microfracture and arthroscopic resection for anterior impingement; three patients had hindfoot varus, on whom Dwyer osteotomy was performed; one patient had peroneal tendinopathy and was treated with tendoscopic debridement and another one had partial injury of the deltoid ligament, which was treated by direct repair. Two arthroscopic surgery portals were used; the anteromedial and anterolateral. After careful inspection of the joint, the anterior surface of the fibula was cleaned to resect the remains of the anterior talo-fibular ligament. An anchor with two sutures was placed on the anterior aspect of the fibula, 1cm from the distal apex of the malleolus. The sutures were passed through the remnant of the anterior talo-fibular ligament as well as the extensor retinaculum using special curved needles. Duncan knots were used to tie the ligament and the inferior extensor retinaculum while the ankle was kept in a neutral position. Patients were kept immobilized non-weight bearing for 2 weeks and were then allowed to start weight bearing in a removable protective boot for 4 weeks. The patients were able to return to sporting activities 6 months after surgery. After a mean follow-up of 27 months (range 21-36 months), patients were functionally evaluated using the American Orthopedics Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle score. The mean preoperative value was 58 points, while the mean postoperative value increased to 90 points. One patient had paresthesia in the superficial fibular nerve area, which resolved

  12. Effects of joint alignment and type on mechanical properties of thermoplastic articulated ankle-foot orthosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fan; Carlton, William; Kapp, Susan

    2011-06-01

    Articulated or hinged ankle-foot orthosis (AFO) allow more range of motion. However, quantitative investigation on articulated AFO is still sparse. The objective of the study was to quantitatively investigate effects of alignment and joint types on mechanical properties of the thermoplastic articulated AFO. Tamarack dorsiflexion assist flexure joints with three durometers (75, 85 and 95) and free motion joint were tested. The AFO joint was aligned with the center of the motor shaft (surrogate ankle joint), 10 mm superior, inferior, anterior and posterior with respect to the motor shaft center. The AFO was passively moved from 20° plantar flexion to 15° dorsiflexion at a speed of 10°/s using a motorized device. Mechanical properties including index of hysteresis, passive resistance torque and quasi-static stiffness (at neutral, 5°, 10° and 15° in plantar flexion) were quantified. Significant effects of joint types and joint alignment on the mechanical properties of an articulated thermoplastic AFO were revealed. Specifically, center alignment showed minimum resistance and stiffness while anterior and posterior alignment showed significantly higher resistance and stiffness. The dorsiflexion assist torques at neutral position ranged from 0.69 ± 0.09 to 1.88 ± 0.10 Nm. Anterior and posterior alignment should be avoided as much as possible. The current study suggested that anterior and posterior alignment be avoided as much as possible in clinical practice due to potential skin irritation and increase in stress around the ankle joint.

  13. Diagnostic validity of alternative manual stress radiographic technique detecting subtalar instability with concomitant ankle instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byung Hoon; Choi, Kyung-Hwa; Seo, Dong Yeon; Choi, Sang Min; Kim, Gab Lae

    2016-04-01

    To incorporate a diagnostic technique for measuring subtalar motion, namely "talar rotation", into the manual supination-anterior drawer stress radiographs for evaluation of the severity of rotational instability, and to determine its clinical relevance. Sixty-six patients with combined injuries of the anterior talofibular (ATFL) and calcaneofibular ligament (CFL) underwent three bilateral manual stress radiographs, and mean increments of anterior talar translation (mm), talar tilt (°), and talar rotation (%) in the injured ankle compared to the normal opposite side were measured with the technique. Intraobserver and interobserver reliability of each measure was assessed, and the difference in the degree of increments was compared according to the presence of additional cervical ligament insufficiency. Ankle stress radiographic intraobserver and interobserver agreement was ICC = 0.91 and 0.82 for talar rotation (%), ICC = 0.64 and 0.51 for anterior talar translation, and ICC = 0.78 and 0.71 for talar tilt angle, respectively. In group 2 including patients with combined injuries of the ATFL and CFL along with additional cervical ligament insufficiency, a significantly higher increment of talar rotation, mean 6.4% (SD 3.4%), was observed compared to that of talar rotation, mean 4.1% (SD 2.7 ), in the other group (group 1) with an intact cervical ligament (p technique for diagnosis of chronic lateral ankle instability presented in this study might be a reliable and representable measurement tool to assess additional injury or instability of the subtalar joint. Prospective cohort study, Level II.

  14. Expecting ankle tilts and wearing an ankle brace influence joint control in an imitated ankle sprain mechanism during walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehring, Dominic; Wissler, Sabrina; Lohrer, Heinz; Nauck, Tanja; Gollhofer, Albert

    2014-03-01

    A thorough understanding of the functional aspects of ankle joint control is essential to developing effective injury prevention. It is of special interest to understand how neuromuscular control mechanisms and mechanical constraints stabilize the ankle joint. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine how expecting ankle tilts and the application of an ankle brace influence ankle joint control when imitating the ankle sprain mechanism during walking. Ankle kinematics and muscle activity were assessed in 17 healthy men. During gait rapid perturbations were applied using a trapdoor (tilting with 24° inversion and 15° plantarflexion). The subjects either knew that a perturbation would definitely occur (expected tilts) or there was only the possibility that a perturbation would occur (potential tilts). Both conditions were conducted with and without a semi-rigid ankle brace. Expecting perturbations led to an increased ankle eversion at foot contact, which was mediated by an altered muscle preactivation pattern. Moreover, the maximal inversion angle (-7%) and velocity (-4%), as well as the reactive muscle response were significantly reduced when the perturbation was expected. While wearing an ankle brace did not influence muscle preactivation nor the ankle kinematics before ground contact, it significantly reduced the maximal ankle inversion angle (-14%) and velocity (-11%) as well as reactive neuromuscular responses. The present findings reveal that expecting ankle inversion modifies neuromuscular joint control prior to landing. Although such motor control strategies are weaker in their magnitude compared with braces, they seem to assist ankle joint stabilization in a close-to-injury situation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Contribution of thin slice (1 mm) oblique coronal proton density-weighted MR images for assessment of anteromedial and posterolateral bundle damage in anterior cruciate ligament injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gokalp, Gokhan, E-mail: drgokhangokalp@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey); Demirag, Burak, E-mail: bdemirag@uludag.edu.tr [Department of Orthopedy, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey); Nas, Omer Fatih, E-mail: omerfatihnas@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey); Aydemir, Mehmet Fatih, E-mail: fatiha@yahoo.com [Department of Orthopedy, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey); Yazici, Zeynep, E-mail: zyazici@uludag.edu.tr [Department of Radiology, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey)

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of using additional oblique coronal 1 mm proton density-weighted (PDW) MR imaging of the knee for detection and grading anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), anteromedial bundle (AMB) and posterolateral bundle (PLB) injuries. Materials and methods: We prospectively assessed preoperative MR images of 50 patients (36 men, 14 women; age range, 18–62 years). First, we compared the diagnostic performance of routine sagittal (3 mm) and additional oblique coronal images (1 mm) for ACL tears. Then, we compared the tear types (AMB or PLB) and grade presumed from oblique coronal MR imaging with arthroscopy. Results: Arthroscopy revealed ACL tear in 24 (48%) patients. There was significant difference between sagittal images and arthroscopy results for ACL tear recognition (p < 0.001). No significant difference was detected for oblique coronal images when compared with arthroscopy results (p = 0.180). Sensitivity and specificity values for ACL tear diagnosis were 37.04% and 95.65% for sagittal images; 74.07% and 91.30% for oblique coronal images. There was no significant difference between arthroscopy and oblique coronal MR images in grading AMB and PLB injuries (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Addition of thin slice oblique coronal images to conventional sequences could better contribute to better verifying the presence of ACL tear and in determining its grade.

  16. Arthrography of the ankle joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crespi Porro, R.; Zellner, A.; Puricelli, G.; Quaglia, R.; Chelazzi, G.

    1984-02-01

    Arthrography of the ankle joint was first carried out by Johnson and Palmer at the Military Hospital in Stockholm in 1940. Arthrography can be used for judging the integrity of the articular cartilage, of osteochondritis dissecans, arthritis or adhesive capsulitis. The literature shows, however, that more than 95% of the patients on whom this examination has been performed has suffered from acute trauma.

  17. Acute ankle sprain: conservative or surgical approach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mohrej, Omar A.; Al-Kenani, Nader S.

    2016-01-01

    Ankle sprains fall into two main categories: acute ankle sprains and chronic ankle instability, which are among the most common recurrent injuries during occupational activities, athletic events, training and army service. Acute ankle sprain is usually managed conservatively and functional rehabilitation failure by conservative treatment leads to development of chronic ankle instability, which most often requires surgical intervention. Enhancing the in-depth knowledge of the ankle anatomy, biomechanics and pathology helps greatly in deciding the management options. Cite this article: Al-Mohrej OA, Al-Kenani NS. Acute ankle sprain: conservative or surgical approach? EFORT Open Rev 2016;1:34-44. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.1.000010. PMID:28461926

  18. A novel tool for measuring ankle dorsiflexion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Peter; B Nielsen, Henrik; Lund, Christoffer

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Assessment of ankle joint movement in a weight bearing position has important clinical implications. The Lunge Ankle Dorsiflexion measurement device (LAD) has been developed with the aim of facilitating ease of and standardisation of the measurement of ankle joint movement....... The literature lacks studies evaluating the reliability of weight bearing measurements of the ankle joint in study groups with ankle disabilities. The objective of this study was to examine the intra- and inter-tester reliability of ankle dorsiflexion measured with the novel LAD in patients following a fracture...... of the ankle. METHOD: This study was a randomized intra- and inter-tester reliability study with blinding of testers and participants. All participants were tested twice by each tester, with the order of testers randomized. The intra- and inter-tester reliability was assessed by the calculation of interclass...

  19. Injury of the ankle joint ligaments; Bandverletzungen des Sprunggelenks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breitenseher, M.J. [Institut fuer Radiologie, Landesklinikum Waldviertel Horn, Horn (Austria); Karl Landsteiner Institut, St. Poelten (Austria)

    2007-03-15

    The diagnosis of lateral collateral ankle ligament trauma is based on patient history, clinical examination and clinical stress tests. If the clinical stress test is positive, stress radiography can be performed. There is, however, no consensus about the usefulness of stress radiography in acute ankle sprain, and in particular about the cut-off talar tilt angle beyond which a two-ligament rupture would be certain, ranging from 5 to 30 . Today, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is not used in this area, although it does allow controlled positioning of the foot and defined section visualization of injured lateral collateral ankle ligaments. In acute and chronic sinus tarsi injuries, MRI forms the established basis for diagnostic imaging, and can provide a definitive answer in most cases. MRI is also the method of choice for chronic posttraumatic pain with anterolateral impingement after rupture of the anterior talofibular ligament. Generally, for the evaluation of acute ankle injuries, MRI has developed to be the most important second-step procedure when projection radiology is non-diagnostic. (orig.) [German] Die Diagnose einer lateralen Bandverletzung nach einem Sprunggelenktrauma basiert auf der Anamnese, der klinischen Untersuchung und klinischen Stresstests. Bei positiven klinischen Stresstests kann eine Stressradiographie durchgefuehrt werden. Es gibt keine Uebereinstimmung hinsichtlich des Stellenwerts der Stressradiographie beim frischen Supinationstrauma des Sprunggelenks, insbesondere fuer den Winkel der Aufklappbarkeit bei einer Zweibandverletzung, der von 5 -30 reicht. Die MRT wird bei dieser Indikation zurzeit nur in Einzelfaellen benutzt, obwohl sie mit definierter Fusspositionierung und Ausrichtung der Untersuchungsebene eine ausgezeichnete Beurteilung der Sprunggelenkbaender erlaubt. Sie ist im besonderen Masse geeignet, akute und chronische Verletzungen des Sinus tarsi zu beurteilen. Bei chronischen Beschwerden nach Bandverletzung ist die MRT zur

  20. Possible factors for ankle fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabaković Dejan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Classification of ankle fractures is commonly used for selecting an appropriate treatment and prognosing an outcome of definite management. One of the most used classifications is the Danis-Weber classification. To the best of our knowledge, in the available literature, there are no parameters affecting specific types of ankle fractures according to the Danis-Weber classification. The aim of this study was to analyze the correlation of the following parameters: age, body weight, body mass index (BMI, height, osteoporosis, osteopenia and physical exercises with specific types of ankle fractures using the Danis-Weber classification. Methods. A total of 85 patients grouped by the Danis-Weber classification fracture types were analyzed and the significance of certain parameters for specific types of ankle fractures was established. Results. The proportion of females was significantly higher (p < 0.001 with a significantly higher age (59.9 years, SD ± 14.2 in relation to males (45.1 years, SD ± 12.8 (p < 0.0001. Type A fracture was most frequent in the younger patients (34.2 years, SD ± 8.6, and those with increased physical exercises (p = 0.020. In type B fracture, the risk factor was osteoporosis (p = 0.0180, while in type C fracture, body weight (p = 0.017 and osteoporosis (p = 0.004 were significant parameters. Conclusion. Statistical analysis using the Danis-Weber classification reveals that there are certain parameters suggesting significant risk factors for specific types of ankle fractures.

  1. The MR imaging features of the posterior intermalleolar ligament in patients with posterior impingement syndrome of the ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorella, D.

    1999-01-01

    Objective. To describe the MR imaging features of the posterior intermalleolar ligament (IML) in patients with posterior impingement syndrome (PIS) of the ankle.Design and patients. Three patients (one male and two females, 13-25 years of age) are presented. Each patient presented clinically with symptoms of PIS of the ankle. Plain film examination was negative for a structural cause of the PIS in all patients. MR images were obtained with a 1.5 T scanner using an extremity coil. Clinical data and, in one patient, findings at ankle arthroscopy, were correlated with the results of MR imaging.Results. Ankle MR images from the three patients with a clinical diagnosis of PIS are presented. Findings in all patients included: (1) absence of another structural cause of the PIS (i.e., an os trigonum, trigonal process, fracture, loose bodies, etc.), (2) identification of the IML as a structure discrete from the posterior talofibular and tibiofibular ligaments, and (3) prominence of the IML as indicated by (a) identification of the IML in three different imaging planes, and (b) a caliber of the IML comparable to that of the conventional posterior ankle ligaments visualized in the same imaging plane. Arthroscopic resection of a meniscoid IML resulted in resolution of the PIS in one of the patients presented.Conclusions. MR imaging is an effective means of investigating the IML as a potential cause of PIS. The identification of a prominent IML in the absence of another structural cause of PIS indicates that impingement of the IML is the most likely cause of PIS. (orig.)

  2. Anatomy of the inferior extensor retinaculum and its role in lateral ankle ligament reconstruction: a pictorial essay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalmau-Pastor, M.; Yasui, Y.; Calder, J. D.; Karlsson, J.; Kerkhoffs, G. M. M. J.; Kennedy, J. G.

    2016-01-01

    The inferior extensor retinaculum (IER) is an aponeurotic structure, which is in continuation with the anterior part of the sural fascia. The IER has often been used to augment the reconstruction of the lateral ankle ligaments, for instance in the Broström-Gould procedure, with good outcomes

  3. Hyperosmolar irrigation compared with a standard solution in a canine shoulder arthroscopy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capito, Nicholas M; Smith, Matthew J; Stoker, Aaron M; Werner, Nikki; Cook, James L

    2015-08-01

    A hyperosmolar irrigation solution may decrease fluid extravasation during arthroscopic procedures. Demonstrating the safety of a hyperosmolar irrigation solution with respect to chondrocyte viability and cartilage water content was deemed necessary before designing a clinical efficacy study. We designed a translational animal model study in which hyperosmolar arthroscopy irrigation fluid (1.8%, 600 mOsm/L) was compared with normal saline (0.9%, 300 mOsm/L). Purpose-bred research dogs (n = 5) underwent bilateral shoulder arthroscopy. Irrigation fluid was delivered to each shoulder joint (n = 10) at 40 mm Hg for 120 minutes using standard ingress and egress portals. The percentage change in shoulder girth was documented at the completion of 120 minutes. Articular cartilage sections from the glenoid and humeral head were harvested from both shoulders. Chondrocyte viability and tissue water content were evaluated. Differences between groups and compared with time 0 controls were determined, with significance set at P irrigation solution used for arthroscopy was not associated with any detrimental effects on chondrocyte viability or tissue water content after 2 hours of arthroscopic irrigation. On the basis of potential benefits in conjunction with the safety demonstrated in these data, clinical evaluation of a hyperosmolar solution for irrigation during shoulder arthroscopy appears warranted. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The effect of intra-articular Tenoxicam on knee effusion after arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawish, Roger; Najdi, Hassan; Abi Safi, Claude; Chameseddine, Ali

    2015-07-01

    NSAIDs and analgesic drugs are used intra-articularly after knee arthroscopy for pain relief. However, synovial effusion is still a common cause of delayed physical therapy. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the beneficial effect of intra-articular injection of Tenoxicam on knee effusion after arthroscopy. This was a prospective non-randomized study on 134 patients with a mean age of 36.7 years. Knee arthroscopy on a day-case basis was performed; normal saline was used for irrigation. At the end of the procedure, fluid was aspirated from the knee joint and 20 ml of Tenoxicam diluted with 20 ml of 0.9% normal saline was injected into the knee five minutes before deflation of limb tourniquet. The same surgeon performed clinical examination for knee effusion 14 days postoperatively. Encountered pathologies included meniscal injury, degenerative arthropathy, synovial plica and ACL rupture. Knee effusion developed in 15.7% of the patients, particularly in those with degenerative arthropathy (p = 0.006) and meniscal lesions (p = 0.06). Intra-articular Tenoxicam is a simple method for the prevention of postoperative knee effusion. Degenerative arthropathy and meniscal lesions are major risk factors for post arthroscopy knee effusion.

  5. Hip joint pathology: relationship between patient history, physical tests, and arthroscopy findings in clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijssen, M.; Cingel, R.E. van; Visser, E de; Holmich, P.; Nijhuis-Van der Sanden, M.W.G.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective cohort study was to (a) describe the clinical presentation of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and hip labral pathology; (b) describe the accuracy of patient history and physical tests for FAI and labral pathology as confirmed by hip arthroscopy. Patients (18-65

  6. Ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape for treating medial ankle sprain in an amateur soccer player

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sun-Min; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to report the effects of ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape in a patient with a medial ankle sprain. [Subject] A 28-year-old amateur soccer player suffered a Grade 2 medial ankle sprain during a match. [Methods] Ankle inversion taping was applied to the sprained ankle every day for 2 months. [Results] His symptoms were reduced after ankle inversion taping application for 2 months. The self-reported function score, the reach distances in the S...

  7. Comparison of Multisegmental Foot and Ankle Motion Between Total Ankle Replacement and Ankle Arthrodesis in Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Sang Gyo; Kim, Eo Jin; Lee, Doo Jae; Bae, Kee Jeong; Lee, Kyoung Min; Lee, Dong Yeon

    2017-09-01

    Total ankle replacement (TAR) and ankle arthrodesis (AA) are usually performed for severe ankle arthritis. We compared postoperative foot segmental motion during gait in patients treated with TAR and AA. Gait analysis was performed in 17 and 7 patients undergoing TAR and AA, respectively. Subjects were evaluated using a 3-dimensional multisegmental foot model with 15 markers. Temporal gait parameters were calculated. The maximum and minimum values and the differences in hallux, forefoot, hindfoot, and arch in 3 planes (sagittal, coronal, transverse) were compared between the 2 groups. One hundred healthy adults were evaluated as a control. Gait speed was faster in the TAR ( P = .028). On analysis of foot and ankle segmental motion, the range of hindfoot sagittal motion was significantly greater in the TAR (15.1 vs 10.2 degrees in AA; P = .004). The main component of motion increase was hindfoot dorsiflexion (12.3 and 8.6 degrees). The range of forefoot sagittal motion was greater in the TAR (9.3 vs 5.8 degrees in AA; P = .004). Maximum ankle power in the TAR (1.16) was significantly higher than 0.32 in AA; P = .008). However, the range of hindfoot and forefoot sagittal motion was decreased in both TAR and AA compared with the control group ( P = .000). Although biomechanical results of TAR and AA were not similar to those in the normal controls, joint motions in the TAR more closely matched normal values. Treatment decision making should involve considerations of the effect of surgery on the adjacent joints. Level III, case-control study.

  8. Anterior Horn Cell Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merve Firinciogullari

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The anterior horn cells control all voluntary movement. Motor activity, respiratory, speech, and swallowing functions are dependent upon signals from the anterior horn cells. Diseases that damage the anterior horn cells, therefore, have a profound impact. Symptoms of anterior horn cell loss (weakness, falling, choking lead patients to seek medical attention. In this article, anterior horn diseases were reviewed, diagnostic criteria and management were discussed in detail. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2016; 25(3.000: 269-303

  9. Compartment Syndrome Following Directly Repair of Hernia of Anterior Tibialis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Ta Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a patient with hernia of anterior tibialis who was treated operatively. Muscle herniation through a fascial defect is rare, which requires repair of fascial defects. We performed a simple closure of fascial defect. A fasciotomy was proceeded to complication of acute compartment syndrome developed after the operation. The sequelae as weakness of dorsiflexion of ankle and big toe were present.

  10. Anatomy of the ankle ligaments: a pictorial essay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golanó, Pau; Vega, Jordi; de Leeuw, Peter A. J.; Malagelada, Francesc; Manzanares, M. Cristina; Götzens, Víctor; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the anatomy of the ankle ligaments is important for correct diagnosis and treatment. Ankle ligament injury is the most frequent cause of acute ankle pain. Chronic ankle pain often finds its cause in laxity of one of the ankle ligaments. In this pictorial essay, the ligaments around the

  11. Anatomy of the ankle ligaments: a pictorial essay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golanó, Pau; Vega, Jordi; de Leeuw, Peter A. J.; Malagelada, Francesc; Manzanares, M. Cristina; Götzens, Víctor; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the anatomy of the ankle ligaments is important for correct diagnosis and treatment. Ankle ligament injury is the most frequent cause of acute ankle pain. Chronic ankle pain often finds its cause in laxity of one of the ankle ligaments. In this pictorial essay, the ligaments around the

  12. Ankle Arthrodesis Following Trauma, a Useful Salvage Procedure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ankle joint which aims to relieve pain, and restores function. Ankle arthrodesis, used as surgical treatment for tuberculosis of the ankle joint, is still used for the treatment of ankle joint destruction. Arthrodesis of the ankle joint is an important operation in the treatment of painful arthrosis, chronic infection, and malalignment ...

  13. Brain control of volitional ankle tasks in people with chronic stroke and in healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, L D; Massé-Alarie, H; Brouwer, B; Schneider, C

    2014-03-15

    This study explored the relationships between motor cortical control of ankle dorsiflexors and clinical impairments of volitional ankle dorsiflexion in people with chronic stroke. Eighteen persons with stroke and 14 controls were evaluated. Clinical tools were used to assess ankle dorsiflexion amplitude and isometric strength. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the primary motor cortex (M1) tested the functional integrity of cortical circuits controlling the tibialis anterior (TA). All clinical scores and most TMS outcomes were impaired in people with chronic stroke. The lower clinical scores were related to the reduction of the strength of corticospinal projections onto spinal motoneurons. Concurrent TMS and clinical testing in chronic stroke provided original data demonstrating relationships between the integrity of cortical and corticospinal components of TA motor control and volitional ankle tasks. Our study proposes that volitional ankle mobilization in chronic stroke may be explained by the residual abnormal M1 circuits which may be responsive for rehabilitation intervention. This should be confirmed in longitudinal studies with larger samples to determine whether TMS outcomes associated with lower limb muscles are predictive of clinical changes or vice versa. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The relationship of foot and ankle mobility to the frontal plane projection angle in asymptomatic adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyndow, Narelle; De Jong, Amy; Rial, Krystal; Tucker, Kylie; Collins, Natalie; Vicenzino, Bill; Russell, Trevor; Crossley, Kay

    2016-01-01

    The frontal plane projection angle (FPPA) is frequently used as a measure of dynamic knee valgus during functional tasks, such as the single leg squat. Increased dynamic knee valgus is observed in people with knee pathologies including patellofemoral pain and anterior cruciate injury. As the foot is the primary interface with the support surface, foot and ankle mobility may affect the FPPA. This study investigated the relationship between foot and ankle mobility and the FPPA in asymptomatic adults. Thirty healthy people (aged 18-50 years) performed 5 single leg squats. Peak FPPA and FPPA excursion were determined from digital video recordings. Foot mobility was quantified as the difference in dorsal midfoot height or midfoot width, between non-weightbearing and bilateral weightbearing positions. Ankle joint dorsiflexion range was measured as the maximum distance in centimetres between the longest toe and the wall during a knee-to-wall lunge. Linear regressions with generalised estimating equations were used to examine relationships between variables. Higher midfoot width mobility was associated with greater peak FPPA (β 0.90, p Foot and ankle mobility was significantly related to the FPPA during the single leg squat in healthy individuals. Specifically, higher midfoot width mobility, or lower ankle joint dorsiflexion range and midfoot height mobility, were associated with a greater FPPA. These foot mobility factors should be considered in the clinical management of knee-related disorders that are associated with a high FPPA.

  15. Effects of immobilization and remobilization on the ankle joint in Wistar rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunz, R.I. [Laboratório de Biologia Estrutural e Funcional, Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Paraná, Cascavel, PR (Brazil); Coradini, J.G.; Silva, L.I.; Bertolini, G.R.F. [Laboratório do Estudo das Lesões e Recursos Fisioterapêuticos, Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Paraná, Cascavel, PR (Brazil); Brancalhão, R.M.C.; Ribeiro, L.F.C. [Laboratório de Biologia Estrutural e Funcional, Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Paraná, Cascavel, PR (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    A sprained ankle is a common musculoskeletal sports injury and it is often treated by immobilization of the joint. Despite the beneficial effects of this therapeutic measure, the high prevalence of residual symptoms affects the quality of life, and remobilization of the joint can reverse this situation. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of immobilization and remobilization on the ankle joint of Wistar rats. Eighteen male rats had their right hindlimb immobilized for 15 days, and were divided into the following groups: G1, immobilized; G2, remobilized freely for 14 days; and G3, remobilized by swimming and jumping in water for 14 days, performed on alternate days, with progression of time and a series of exercises. The contralateral limb was the control. After the experimental period, the ankle joints were processed for microscopic analysis. Histomorphometry did not show any significant differences between the control and immobilized/remobilized groups and members, in terms of number of chondrocytes and thickness of the articular cartilage of the tibia and talus. Morphological analysis of animals from G1 showed significant degenerative lesions in the talus, such as exposure of the subchondral bone, flocculation, and cracks between the anterior and mid-regions of the articular cartilage and the synovial membrane. Remobilization by therapeutic exercise in water led to recovery in the articular cartilage and synovial membrane of the ankle joint when compared with free remobilization, and it was shown to be an effective therapeutic measure in the recovery of the ankle joint.

  16. Terrain stiffness and ankle biomechanics during simulated half-squat parachute landing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Wenxin; Fan, Yubo

    2013-12-01

    A hard surface is potentially one of the risk factors for ankle injuries during parachute landing, but this has never been experimentally validated. This study was designed to evaluate the effects of terrain stiffness on ankle biomechanics during half-squat parachute landing (HSPL). Eight male and eight female healthy participants landed on three surfaces with standard HSPL technique. The three surfaces were cushioned mats with different thicknesses (0 mm, 4 mm, and 8 mm). The effects of terrain hardness and gender and their interaction with ground reaction forces, ankle kinematics, and electromyograms of selected lower-extremity muscles were statistically analyzed with multivariate analysis of variance. The effects of terrain stiffness and the interaction between factors on all variables were not statistically significant. The effects of gender were not statistically significant on most variables. The peak angular velocity of the ankle dorsiflexion was significantly lower in men (mean 1345 degree x s(-1)) than in women (mean 1965 degree x s(-1)). A spongy surface even eliminated the differences between men compared to women in the activity of their tibialis anterior during simulated HSPL. Terrain stiffness, in the ranges tested, did not appear to influence ankle biomechanics among individuals performing HSPL. Additional studies are required to know whether this finding is applicable to realistic parachuting.

  17. Dynamic Postural-Stability Deficits After Cryotherapy to the Ankle Joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullam, Karl; Caulfield, Brian; Coughlan, Garrett F; McGroarty, Mark; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2015-09-01

    Decreased postural stability is a primary risk factor for lower limb musculoskeletal injuries. During athletic competitions, cryotherapy may be applied during short breaks in play or during half-time; however, its effects on postural stability remain unclear. To investigate the acute effects of a 15-minute ankle-joint cryotherapy application on dynamic postural stability. Controlled laboratory study. University biomechanics laboratory. A total of 29 elite-level collegiate male field-sport athletes (age = 20.8 ± 1.12 years, height = 1.80 ± 0.06 m, mass = 81.89 ± 8.59 kg) participated. Participants were tested on the anterior (ANT), posterolateral (PL), and posteromedial (PM) reach directions of the Star Excursion Balance Test before and after a 15-minute ankle-joint cryotherapy application. Normalized reach distances; sagittal-plane kinematics of the hip, knee, and ankle joints; and associated mean velocity of the center-of-pressure path during performance of the ANT, PL, and PM reach directions of the Star Excursion Balance Test. We observed a decrease in reach-distance scores for the ANT, PL, and PM reach directions from precryotherapy to postcryotherapy (P ankle-joint sagittal-plane kinematics (P > .05). We noted a decrease in mean velocity of the center-of-pressure path from precryotherapy to postcryotherapy (P ankle joint.

  18. Effects of immobilization and remobilization on the ankle joint in Wistar rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunz, R.I.; Coradini, J.G.; Silva, L.I.; Bertolini, G.R.F.; Brancalhão, R.M.C.; Ribeiro, L.F.C.

    2014-01-01

    A sprained ankle is a common musculoskeletal sports injury and it is often treated by immobilization of the joint. Despite the beneficial effects of this therapeutic measure, the high prevalence of residual symptoms affects the quality of life, and remobilization of the joint can reverse this situation. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of immobilization and remobilization on the ankle joint of Wistar rats. Eighteen male rats had their right hindlimb immobilized for 15 days, and were divided into the following groups: G1, immobilized; G2, remobilized freely for 14 days; and G3, remobilized by swimming and jumping in water for 14 days, performed on alternate days, with progression of time and a series of exercises. The contralateral limb was the control. After the experimental period, the ankle joints were processed for microscopic analysis. Histomorphometry did not show any significant differences between the control and immobilized/remobilized groups and members, in terms of number of chondrocytes and thickness of the articular cartilage of the tibia and talus. Morphological analysis of animals from G1 showed significant degenerative lesions in the talus, such as exposure of the subchondral bone, flocculation, and cracks between the anterior and mid-regions of the articular cartilage and the synovial membrane. Remobilization by therapeutic exercise in water led to recovery in the articular cartilage and synovial membrane of the ankle joint when compared with free remobilization, and it was shown to be an effective therapeutic measure in the recovery of the ankle joint

  19. [MRI anatomy and injury of the lateral collateral ligaments of ankle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Z H; Liu, Y; Bai, R J; Zhan, H L; Zhang, H; Li, Y X; Wu, B D

    2017-08-01

    Objective: To explore the MRI features of the lateral collateral ligament injuries of the ankle and determine the value MRI in diagnosing the ligament injuries of the ankle. Methods: The study was reviewed and approved by an institutional review board of hospital. Retrospective analysised 10 healthy volunteers and 26 ankle injury cases underwent surgery since January 2013 to September 2016, the MR imaging findings of patients were compared with volunteers' and operative documents, to analysis the MRI feature of the ligament injuries of the ankle. Results: The normal anterior talofibular ligament and posterior talofibular ligament can be manifest in 3-4 layers of MRI, and can be fully displayed in 1 layer. The normal calcaneofibular ligament can be manifest in 3 layers of MRI, but can not be fully displayed in 1 layer. 26 cases of lateral ligament injury (including 1 case of ATFL injury, 1 case of CFL injury, 3 cases of ATFL conjunction with CFL injury, 3 cases of ATFL conjunction with CFL and PTFL injury) manifested the heterogeneous signal of the T(1)-weighted image, the ligament disruption, the increased signal intensity on fat-suppression PD-weighted image , the surrounding soft tissue edema and bone marrow edema. Conclusion: MR imaging is an accurate method for evaluation of the ligament injuries of the ankle, and it is a useful tool for diagnosis and treatment.

  20. Estimation of ligament strains and joint moments in the ankle during a supination sprain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Feng; Fong, Daniel Tik-Pui; Chan, Kai-Ming; Haut, Roger C

    2015-01-01

    This study presents the ankle ligament strains and ankle joint moments during an accidental injury event diagnosed as a grade I anterior talofibular ligament (ATaFL) sprain. A male athlete accidentally sprained his ankle while performing a cutting motion in a laboratory setting. The kinematic data were input to a three-dimensional rigid-body foot model for simulation analyses. Maximum strains in 20 ligaments were evaluated in simulations that investigated various combinations of the reported ankle joint motions. Temporal strains in the ATaFL and the calcaneofibular ligament (CaFL) were then compared and the three-dimensional ankle joint moments were evaluated from the model. The ATaFL and CaFL were highly strained when the inversion motion was simulated (10% for ATaFL and 12% for CaFL). These ligament strains were increased significantly when either or both plantarflexion and internal rotation motions were added in a temporal fashion (up to 20% for ATaFL and 16% for CaFL). Interestingly, at the time strain peaked in the ATaFL, the plantarflexion angle was not large but apparently important. This computational simulation study suggested that an inversion moment of approximately 23 N m plus an internal rotation moment of approximately 11 N m and a small plantarflexion moment may have generated a strain of 15-20% in the ATaFL to produce a grade I ligament injury in the athlete's ankle. This injury simulation study exhibited the potentially important roles of plantarflexion and internal rotation, when combined with a large inversion motion, to produce a grade I ATaFL injury in the ankle of this athlete.

  1. The use of arthroscopic thermal shrinkage to treat chronic lateral ankle instability in young athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiotti, Marco; Massoni, Carlo; Tarantino, Umberto

    2005-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the preliminary results of arthroscopic thermal capsular shrinkage performed for chronic lateral ankle instability in soccer players. Case series. We reviewed 22 male soccer players (average age, 18 years) with chronic lateral ankle instability who underwent arthroscopic thermal shrinkage between 1997 and 1998. The only exclusion criterion for this study was the failure of previous surgery. Before surgery, all patients had participated in a physical rehabilitation program consisting of peroneal strengthening exercises and proprioceptive training for several months, without any relief of their symptoms. All patients were characterized by repeated episodes of giving way, a positive anterior drawer sign, and positive stress radiographs. The stress radiographs consisted of a sagittal stress and talar tilt by the TELOS device (Fallston, MD). The Karlsson and Peterson ankle function scoring scale was used to assess these patients for their current activity level as well as activity before surgery. Patients were reviewed at a mean of 42 months (range, 32 to 56 months); 19 patients (86.3%) reported a good or excellent functional outcome as assessed by the Karlsson and Peterson ankle function scoring scale. Eighteen of the 22 patients presented no evidence of ankle instability on physical examination or on stress radiographs. Only 1 patient was not able to return to his previous level of sports activity and complained of ankle instability when walking on uneven ground. This study suggests that arthroscopic thermal capsular shrinkage is a valid and safe procedure for treatment of chronic lateral ankle instability. Longer follow-up is needed, however, to see how these results may change with time in high-demand athletes. Level IV.

  2. 3D Model Analysis of Ankle Flexion on Anatomic Reduction of a Syndesmotic Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schon, Jason M; Mikula, Jacob D; Backus, Jonathon D; Venderley, Melanie B; Dornan, Grant J; LaPrade, Robert F; Clanton, Thomas O

    2017-04-01

    The effect of ankle positioning during suture-button fixation for syndesmosis repair on range of motion (ROM) and anatomic reduction has yet to be investigated. The purpose of this cadaveric study was to compare the effects of 3 different ankle positions during suture-button repair on volumetric reduction of the syndesmosis, fibular displacement, and ROM of the ankle using 3-dimensional computed tomography (CT) analysis. The null hypothesis was that ankle position during fixation would not affect syndesmotic volume restoration, fibular displacement, or ROM. Twelve matched pair (n = 24) human cadaveric specimens were used for this study. Prior to syndesmotic sectioning, ROM assessment and CT scans were performed. Following sectioning of the syndesmosis, specimens were repaired in plantarflexion, dorsiflexion, or neutral, and simulated postrepair ROM evaluations and CT scans were repeated. Least squares mean differences between repair groups and the preinjury state were compared by analysis of variance and Tukey's method. There were no significant differences between repair groups for volumetric reduction ( P = .917), fibular displacement (anterior-posterior, P = .805; medial-lateral, P = .949), or dorsiflexion capacity ( P = .249). Among all specimens, compared with the preinjury state, there was a significant mean ± SD volume reduction of 337 ± 400 mm 3 and medial displacement of 1.9 ± 1.5 mm. This study failed to reject the null hypothesis and demonstrated that ankle flexion at the time of syndesmotic fixation with a suture-button construct had no significant in vitro effect on volume changes, fibular displacement, or dorsiflexion capacity. However, in comparison to the preinjured state, suture-button repair resulted in significant overcompression with respect to syndesmosis volume and medial displacement of the fibula. Ankle position at the time of syndesmotic fixation did not affect overall ankle ROM when using a suture-button construct; however

  3. Hydrocolonotherapy ankle joints after injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volodymyr Muchin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to improve efficiency of gydrokinesitherapy by means of specially designed devices and monolasts for patients after ankle joint injuries. Material & Methods: there are pedagogical methods, clinical and radiological methods, anthropometric measurements and goniometry were used. Results: the author's technique of hydrokinesitherapy with application hydrokinesimechanotherapy device in the program of physical rehabilitation which provides optimum conditions for the recovery process was developed. Conclusions: the specially designed hydrokinesomechanotherapeutic device and monolasts are allow strictly controlled movement in all planes of the ankle joint, which contributes to the acceleration of the recovery; the conducted anthropometric and goniometric studies were indicate more rapid elimination of edema, increase movement amplitude, carries opposition to the development of contractures and muscle atrophy.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of cyclops lesion as a cause of persistent morbidity after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kharat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Localized anterior arthrofibrosis (cyclops lesion is having around 1-9.8% frequency rate after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction. It has been reported to be a significant cause of loss of knee extension after reconstruction of the ACL of the knee. We present a case report of a patient with prior ACL reconstruction who presented with pain and loss of extension following surgery. MR imaging revealed the typical features of cyclops lesion. Repeat arthroscopy excision of the lesion is the only treatment to reduce the morbidity of the patient.

  5. Difference in balance measures between patients with chronic ankle instability and patients after an acute ankle inversion trauma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, J. S.; Kingma, I.; Blankevoort, L.; van Dijk, C. N.

    2010-01-01

    Neuromuscular control of the ankle is disturbed in patients with chronic ankle instability due to an initial ankle inversion trauma. Static balance is assumed to be a measure for this disturbance. Functional (ankle) scores are another way to evaluate ankle impairment. The hypothesis was that there

  6. Effects of ankle foot orthoses on body functions and activities in people with floppy paretic ankle muscles : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilk, van der Dymphy; Dijkstra, Pieter Ubele; Postema, Klaas; Verkerke, Gijsbertus Jacob; Hijmans, Juha Markus

    2015-01-01

    Background: People with floppy ankle muscles paresis use ankle foot orthoses to improve their walking ability. Ankle foot orthoses also limit ankle range of motion thereby introducing additional problems. Insight in effects of ankle foot orthoses on body functions and activities in people with

  7. Anterior process calcaneal fractures: a systematic evaluation of associated conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrover, David [NYU Hospital for Joint Disease, Radiology Department, New York, NY (United States); Hopital Beaujon, Service de Radiologie, Paris (France); Schweitzer, Mark E. [NYU Hospital for Joint Disease, Radiology Department, New York, NY (United States); Laredo, J.D. [Hopital Lariboisiere, Service de Radiologie, Paris (France)

    2007-07-15

    The objective was to evaluate the association, by MRI, of anterior calcaneal process fractures with tarsal coalitions, ankle sprains, and bifurcate ligament abnormalities. A retrospective review of 1,479 foot and ankle MR images was performed, over a period of 5 years, for isolated anterior process fractures of the calcaneus. Fifteen 1.5-T MR examinations were systematically evaluated by two radiologists in consensus. Marrow edema patterns, presence of a calcaneonavicular coalition, as well as bifurcate and anterior talofibular ligaments, were evaluated. There were 15 fractures of the anterior calcaneal process with an incidence of 1%. The average patient age was 51 years (range 25-82). Twelve patients were women and 3 were men. The majority of the fractures (14 out of 15) presented as an edema pattern on T2-weighted images, either diffuse (9 out of 15), or vertical (5 out of 15). One case did not show marrow edema, but rather a hypointense line. Nine patients (60%) demonstrated calcaneonavicular coalition and anterior calcaneal process fracture. In 6 patients (50%) the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) was thickened. Three patients did not have axial images, and were classified as non-conclusive for the ATFL evaluation. The bifurcate ligament was thickened with hyperintense signal demonstrating a sprain in 9 out of 13 (69%). Only 2 patients (16.5%) had an anterior calcaneal process fracture without any associated abnormality. We believe that there is a probable association of anterior process fractures and calcaneonavicular coalitions. We also feel, based on our results and the prior literature that there is likely also an association with both ATFL injuries and bifurcate ligament injuries. (orig.)

  8. Anterior process calcaneal fractures: a systematic evaluation of associated conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrover, David; Schweitzer, Mark E.; Laredo, J.D.

    2007-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate the association, by MRI, of anterior calcaneal process fractures with tarsal coalitions, ankle sprains, and bifurcate ligament abnormalities. A retrospective review of 1,479 foot and ankle MR images was performed, over a period of 5 years, for isolated anterior process fractures of the calcaneus. Fifteen 1.5-T MR examinations were systematically evaluated by two radiologists in consensus. Marrow edema patterns, presence of a calcaneonavicular coalition, as well as bifurcate and anterior talofibular ligaments, were evaluated. There were 15 fractures of the anterior calcaneal process with an incidence of 1%. The average patient age was 51 years (range 25-82). Twelve patients were women and 3 were men. The majority of the fractures (14 out of 15) presented as an edema pattern on T2-weighted images, either diffuse (9 out of 15), or vertical (5 out of 15). One case did not show marrow edema, but rather a hypointense line. Nine patients (60%) demonstrated calcaneonavicular coalition and anterior calcaneal process fracture. In 6 patients (50%) the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) was thickened. Three patients did not have axial images, and were classified as non-conclusive for the ATFL evaluation. The bifurcate ligament was thickened with hyperintense signal demonstrating a sprain in 9 out of 13 (69%). Only 2 patients (16.5%) had an anterior calcaneal process fracture without any associated abnormality. We believe that there is a probable association of anterior process fractures and calcaneonavicular coalitions. We also feel, based on our results and the prior literature that there is likely also an association with both ATFL injuries and bifurcate ligament injuries. (orig.)

  9. Arthrography of the ankle joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crespi Porro, R.; Zellner, A.; Puricelli, G.; Quaglia, R.; Chelazzi, G.

    1984-01-01

    Arthrography of the ankle joint was first carried out by Johnson and Palmer at the Military Hospital in Stockholm in 1940. Arthrography can be used for judging the integrity of the articular cartilage, of osteochondritis dissecans, arthritis or adhesive capsulitis. The literature shows, however, that more than 95% of the patients on whom this examination has been performed has suffered from acute trauma. (orig.) [de

  10. Qualitative and Quantitative Anatomic Investigation of the Lateral Ankle Ligaments for Surgical Reconstruction Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clanton, Thomas O; Campbell, Kevin J; Wilson, Katharine J; Michalski, Max P; Goldsmith, Mary T; Wijdicks, Coen A; LaPrade, Robert F

    2014-06-18

    Lateral ankle sprains are common sports injuries that may require surgery for chronic lateral ankle instability. Anatomic repair or reconstruction is desired, yet there is a scarcity of quantitative information regarding the origins and insertions of the lateral ligaments related to surgically pertinent osseous landmarks. Fourteen ankle specimens were dissected to isolate the anterior talofibular ligament, calcaneofibular ligament, posterior talofibular ligament, and cervical ligament. A three-dimensional coordinate measurement device was used to determine the origins, insertions, footprint areas, orientations, and distances from osseous landmarks. A single-banded anterior talofibular ligament was identified in seven of the fourteen specimens, and a double-banded anterior talofibular ligament was identified in the remaining seven. The single-banded anterior talofibular ligament originated an average of 13.8 mm (95% confidence interval [CI], 12.3 to 15.3) from the inferior tip of the lateral malleolus at the anterior fibular border and inserted an average of 17.8 mm (95% CI, 16.3 to 19.3) superior to the apex of the lateral talar process along the anterior border of the talar lateral articular facet. The calcaneofibular ligament originated an average of 5.3 mm (95% CI, 4.2 to 6.5) from the inferior tip of the lateral malleolus at the anterior fibular border and inserted an average of 16.3 mm (95% CI, 14.5 to 18.1) from the posterior point of the peroneal tubercle. The posterior talofibular ligament was the largest ligament and originated an average of 4.8 mm (95% CI, 3.7 to 5.9) superior to the inferior tip of the lateral malleolus in the digital fossa to insert an average of 13.2 mm (95% CI, 11.5 to 14.9) from the talar posterolateral tubercle. The cervical ligament originated on the superior part of the calcaneus and inserted at a point that was approximately 50% of the talar neck anteroposterior distance. Consistent distances from the anterior talofibular

  11. Modifications in ankle dorsiflexor activation by applying a torque perturbation during walking in persons post-stroke: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchette, Andreanne K; Noël, Martin; Richards, Carol L; Nadeau, Sylvie; Bouyer, Laurent J

    2014-06-09

    Results obtained in a previous study (Gait Posture 34:358-363, 2011) have shown that, in non-disabled participants, a specific increase in ankle dorsiflexor (Tibialis anterior [TA]) activation can be induced by walking with a torque perturbation that plantarflexes the ankle during the swing phase. After perturbation removal, the increased TA activation persisted temporarily and was associated with a more dorsiflexed ankle during swing. The objective of the present case-series study was to verify if these results can be reproduced in persons post-stroke. Six participants who sustained a stroke walked on a treadmill before, during and after exposure to a torque perturbation applied at the ankle by a robotized ankle-foot orthosis. Spatiotemporal gait parameters, ankle and knee kinematics, and the electromyographic activity of TA and Soleus were recorded. Mean amplitude of the TA burst located around toe off and peak ankle dorsiflexion angle during swing were compared across the 3 walking periods for each participant. At the end of the walking period with the perturbation, TA mean amplitude was significantly increased in 4 of the 6 participants. Among these 4 participants, modifications in TA activation persisted after perturbation removal in 3 of them, and led to a statistically significant increase in peak dorsiflexion during swing. This approach may be helpful to evaluate the residual adaptive capacity in the ankle dorsiflexors after a stroke and guide decision-making for the selection of optimal rehabilitation interventions. Future work will investigate the clinical impact of a multiple-session gait training based on this approach in persons presenting a reduced ankle dorsiflexion during the swing phase of walking.

  12. Evaluating Postural Control and Ankle Laxity Between Taping and High-Top Cleats in High School Football Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizac, Douglas A; Swanik, Charles B; Glutting, Joseph J; Kaminski, Thomas W

    2018-03-01

    Lateral ankle sprains are the most common injuries in high school sports. While ankle taping is a preferred method of external prophylactic support, its restrictive properties decline during exercise. The Under Armour ® Highlight cleat is marketed on the premise that it provides added support without the need for additional ankle taping. To determine if differences in ankle joint laxity and postural control exist between football players wearing the Under Armour ® Highlight cleat (Under Armour Inc, Baltimore, MD) as compared to a low/mid-top cleat with ankle tape. Crossover trial. Athletic training room and football practice field sideline. 32 interscholastic football players (15.8 ± 1.0 y; 178.9 ± 7.4 cm; 87.1 ± 21.4 kg). Ankle laxity was assessed using an instrumented ankle arthrometer (Blue Bay Research Inc, Milton, FL), while postural control testing was performed on the Tekscan MobileMat™ Balanced Error Scoring System (BESS; South Boston, MA). The 2 treatments included Under Armour ® Highlight cleats and a low/mid-top cleat with ankle tape applied to the nondominant ankle only. Measurements were taken before and immediately after practice. The independent variable was treatment (Highlight vs low/mid-top cleat with ankle tape). Dependent variables included ankle arthrometry measures of anterior displacement (mm), inversion/eversion rotation (deg), and the modified BESS error scores. A linear mixed-effects model was used for analysis. The low/mid-top cleat with tape condition had significantly higher inversion range-of-motion (ROM) and inversion/eversion rotation postexercise when compared to the Highlight cleat (P Under Armour ® Highlight cleat restricts ankle ROM following a training session better than the taped low/mid-top cleat. Further study is warranted to determine if this high-top style of football cleat can reduce the incidence of ankle sprains and how it might compare to spat taping.

  13. Posterior ankle impingement in the dancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Brad R

    2011-01-01

    Dancers spend a lot of time in the relevé position in demi-pointe and en pointe in their training and their careers. Pain from both osseous and soft tissue causes may start to occur in the posterior aspect of their ankle. This article reviews the potential causes of posterior ankle impingement in dancers. It will discuss the clinical evaluation of a dancer and the appropriate workup and radiographic studies needed to further evaluate a dancer with suspected posterior ankle impingement.

  14. Two genetic loci associated with ankle injury

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Stuart K.; Kleimeyer, John P.; Ahmed, Marwa A.; Avins, Andrew L.; Fredericson, Michael; Dragoo, Jason L.; Ioannidis, John P. A.

    2017-01-01

    Ankle injuries, including sprains, strains and other joint derangements and instability, are common, especially for athletes involved in indoor court or jumping sports. Identifying genetic loci associated with these ankle injuries could shed light on their etiologies. A genome-wide association screen was performed using publicly available data from the Research Program in Genes, Environment and Health (RPGEH) including 1,694 cases of ankle injury and 97,646 controls. An indel (chr21:47156779:...

  15. Ankle taping can reduce external ankle joint moments during drop landings on a tilted surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Nahoko; Nunome, Hiroyuki; Hopper, Luke S; Ikegami, Yasuo

    2017-09-20

    Ankle taping is commonly used to prevent ankle sprains. However, kinematic assessments investigating the biomechanical effects of ankle taping have provided inconclusive results. This study aimed to determine the effect of ankle taping on the external ankle joint moments during a drop landing on a tilted surface at 25°. Twenty-five participants performed landings on a tilted force platform that caused ankle inversion with and without ankle taping. Landing kinematics were captured using a motion capture system. External ankle inversion moment, the angular impulse due to the medio-lateral and vertical components of ground reaction force (GRF) and their moment arm lengths about the ankle joint were analysed. The foot plantar inclination relative to the ground was assessed. In the taping condition, the foot plantar inclination and ankle inversion angular impulse were reduced significantly compared to that of the control. The only component of the external inversion moment to change significantly in the taped condition was a shortened medio-lateral GRF moment arm length. It can be assumed that the ankle taping altered the foot plantar inclination relative to the ground, thereby shortening the moment arm of medio-lateral GRF that resulted in the reduced ankle inversion angular impulse.

  16. Prospective Computed Tomographic Analysis of Osteochondral Lesions of the Ankle Joint Associated With Ankle Fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nosewicz, Tomasz L.; Beerekamp, M. Suzan H.; de Muinck Keizer, Robert-Jan O.; Schepers, Tim; Maas, Mario; Niek van Dijk, C.; Goslings, J. Carel

    2016-01-01

    Osteochondral lesions (OCLs) associated with ankle fracture correlate with unfavorable outcome. The goals of this study were to detect OCLs following ankle fracture, to associate fracture type to OCLs and to investigate whether OCLs affect clinical outcome. 100 ankle fractures requiring operative

  17. How to Stretch Your Ankle After a Sprain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ankle After A Sprain How to Stretch Your Ankle After A Sprain Page Content You should perform the following stretches ... Consider these home exercises when recuperating from an ankle sprain. Perform them twice per day. While seated, bring ...

  18. Total ankle arthroplasty: An imaging overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Da Rae; Choi, Yun Sun; Chun, Ka Young; Jung, Yoon Young; Kim, Jin Su; Young, Ki Won [Eulji Hospital, Eulji University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Potter, Hollis G.; Li, Angela E. [Dept. of Radiology and Imaging, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York (United States)

    2016-06-15

    With advances in implant technology, total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) has become an increasingly popular alternative to arthrodesis for the management of end-stage ankle arthritis. However, reports in the literature do not focus on the imaging features of TAA. Through a literature review, we demonstrate basic design features of the current ankle arthroplasty system, and the normal and abnormal postoperative imaging features associated with such devices. Pre- and postoperative evaluations of ankle arthroplasty mainly include radiography; in addition, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging provide further characterization of imaging abnormalities. Familiarization with multimodal imaging features of frequent procedural complications at various postoperative intervals is important in radiological practice.

  19. Simulating clamp placement across the trans-syndesmotic angle of the ankle to minimize malreduction: A radiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, Sara M; Linn, Michael S; Spraggs-Hughes, Amanda; McAndrew, Christopher M; Ricci, William M; Gardner, Michael J

    2017-03-01

    Ankle fractures associated with syndesmotic injury have a poorer prognosis than those without such an injury. Anatomic reduction of the distal tibiofibular joint restores joint congruency and minimizes contact pressures, yet operative fixation of syndesmotic ankle injuries is frequently complicated by malreduction of the syndesmosis. Current methods of assessing reduction have been shown to be inadequate. As such, additional methods to judge the accuracy of syndesmotic reduction are required. The purposes of our study were (1) to determine the anatomic axis of the syndesmosis, or the trans-syndesmotic angle (TSA), and (2) to describe the intraoperative fluoroscopic appearance of syndesmotic clamp reduction oriented along the anatomic syndesmotic angle. Computed tomography (CT) scans of 45 uninjured adult ankles were analyzed to measure the TSA, defined as the angle between the plane of a lateral ankle radiograph and a line drawn perpendicular to the fibular incisura. Three-dimensional reconstructions of CT scans were then used to demonstrate clamp placement collinear with the TSA as would be seen on an intraoperative lateral ankle radiograph. The average TSA measured 21±5° anterior to the plane of a lateral radiograph. When a simulated reduction clamp tine was placed on the fibular ridge and the clamp oriented along the TSA, the medial tine, as seen on a lateral radiograph, was within the anterior one-third of the tibia 93% of the time. It was, on average, 23±7% of the distance from the anterior to the posterior tibial cortex, with tine placement occurring in this range in 73% of ankles. The medial tine rested 53±17% of the distance between the anterior cortices of the tibia and fibula, with 71% of tines placed in this range. Reduction clamp placement oriented along the TSA has a predictable appearance on lateral ankle imaging and can guide clamp positioning during syndesmotic reduction. With one tine placed on the fibular ridge, placing the medial clamp tine

  20. Ligamentous Injuries and the Risk of Associated Tissue Damage in Acute Ankle Sprains in Athletes: A Cross-sectional MRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roemer, Frank W; Jomaah, Nabil; Niu, Jingbo; Almusa, Emad; Roger, Bernard; D'Hooghe, Pieter; Geertsema, Celeste; Tol, Johannes L; Khan, Karim; Guermazi, Ali

    2014-07-01

    Ankle joint injuries are extremely common sports injuries, with the anterior talofibular ligament involved in the majority of ankle sprains. There have been only a few large magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies on associated structural injuries after ankle sprains. To describe the injury pattern in athletes who were referred to MRI for the assessment of an acute ankle sprain and to assess the risk of associated traumatic tissue damage including lateral and syndesmotic ligament involvement. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 261 ankle MRI scans of athletes with acute ankle sprains were evaluated for: lateral and syndesmotic ligament injury; concomitant injuries to the deltoid and spring ligaments and sinus tarsi; peroneal, flexor, and extensor retinacula and tendons; traumatic and nontraumatic osteochondral and osseous changes; and joint effusion. Patients were on average 22.5 years old, and the average time from injury to MRI was 5.7 days. Six exclusive injury patterns were defined based on lateral and syndesmotic ligament involvement. The risk for associated injuries was assessed by logistic regression using ankles with no or only low-grade lateral ligament injuries and no syndesmotic ligament damage as the reference. With regard to the injury pattern, there were 103 ankles (39.5%) with complete anterior talofibular ligament disruption and no syndesmotic injury, and 53 ankles (20.3%) had a syndesmotic injury with or without lateral ligament damage. Acute osteochondral lesions of the lateral talar dome were seen in 20 ankles (7.7%). The percentage of chronic lateral osteochondral lesions was 1.1%. The risk for talar bone contusions increased more than 3-fold for ankles with complete lateral ligament ruptures (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 3.43; 95% CI, 1.72-6.85) but not for ankles with syndesmotic involvement. The risk for associated deltoid ligament injuries increased for ankles with complete lateral ligament injuries (aOR, 4.04; 95% CI, 1

  1. High Rate of Return to Cycling After Hip Arthroscopy for Femoroacetabular Impingement Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Rachel M; Ukwuani, Gift; Clapp, Ian; Chahla, Jorge; Nho, Shane J

    2017-12-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement syndrome (FAIS) is most commonly diagnosed in athletes who sustain repetitive flexion and rotational loading to their hip. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a patient's ability to return to cycling after hip arthroscopy for FAIS. There is a high rate of return to cycling after hip arthroscopy. Retrospective analysis. Level 4. Consecutive patients who had identified themselves as cyclists and had undergone hip arthroscopy for the treatment of FAIS were reviewed. Pre- and postoperative physical examinations, imaging, and patient-reported outcomes (PROs) scores, including the modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS), Hip Outcome Score Activities of Daily Living (HOS-ADL) and Sports-Specific (HOS-SS) subscales, and visual analog scale for pain, as well as a cycling-specific questionnaire, were assessed for all patients. A total of 58 patients (62% female; mean age, 30.0 ± 7.1 years; mean body mass index, 23.2 ± 2.7 kg/m 2 ) were included. Prior to surgery, patients averaged 30 ± 42 miles per week (range, 2-300 miles). Fifty-five patients (95%) were forced to discontinue cycling at an average of 7.5 ± 6.2 months prior to surgery due to hip pain. Fifty-six patients (97%) returned to cycling at an average of 4.5 ± 2.5 months after surgery, with 33 (59%) returning to a better level of cycling and 23 (41%) to the same cycling level. Postoperatively, there was no difference in the average number of miles patients completed per week compared with preoperative values ( P = 0.08). At a mean follow-up of 31.14 ± 0.71 months (range, 24-48 months), all patients experienced significant improvements in mHHS, HOS-ADL, and HOS-SS PROs (all P cycling 97% of the time after hip arthroscopy for FAIS, with most of these patients returning at an average of 4.5 months after surgery. This information is helpful in counseling patients on their expectations with regard to returning to cycling after hip arthroscopy for FAIS. Cyclists return to sport 97% of the

  2. Worldwide Research Productivity in the Field of Arthroscopy: A Bibliometric Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhimin; Luo, Xuyao; Gong, Feng; Bao, Hongwei; Qian, Haiping; Jia, Zhiwei; Li, Guo

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the quantity and quality of articles from different countries involving arthroscopy to investigate the characteristics of worldwide research productivity. Web of Science was searched for arthroscopy articles published between 1999 and 2013. The numbers of articles and citations were analyzed to assess the contributions of different countries. Publication activity was adjusted by country population and gross domestic product (GDP). A total of 12,553 articles were published worldwide. The time trend for the number of articles showed an increase of 2.27-fold between 1999 and 2013. North America, Western Europe, and Eastern Asia were the most productive areas. High-income countries published 90.86% of the articles; middle-income countries, 9.11%; and lower-income countries, only 0.02%. The United States published the most articles (35.40%), followed by Germany (9.53%), the United Kingdom (6.80%), the Republic of Korea (5.45%), and Japan (4.76%), and had the highest total citations (78,161). However, Sweden had the highest mean citations (35.56), followed by Switzerland (23.39) and the Netherlands (18.90). There were positive correlations between the number of publications and population/GDP (P GDP, the Republic of Korea ranked first, followed by Finland and Turkey. The number of publications on arthroscopy increased significantly from 1999 to 2013, with a more than 2-fold increase in volume. The United States was the most productive country as measured by total publications, but when adjusted for population, Switzerland published the highest number of articles, followed by Finland and Sweden. When publications were adjusted for GDP, the Republic of Korea ranked first, with Finland second and Turkey third. Bibliometric analysis allows us to understand contributions of different world regions in scientific research in the field of arthroscopy and gives insight into the quantity and quality of articles related to arthroscopy. Copyright © 2015

  3. The relationship between lateral ankle sprain and ankle tendinitis in ballet dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Stephanie; Moore, Marjorie

    2008-01-01

    The lateral ligament complex of the ankle is the most frequently injured structure in the body. Although most simple ankle sprains do not result in long-term disability, a significant number do not completely resolve, leading to residual symptoms that may persist for years. The most commonly reported symptoms, particularly among athletes, include instability, re-injury, and tendinitis. Ballet dancers are a combination of artist and high-performance athlete; consequently, they are subjected to the same types of injuries as other athletes, including lateral ankle sprains and their sequelae. Furthermore, ballet dancers perform in unusual positions such as en pointe, which places the ankle in extreme plantar flexion, requiring stabilization by surrounding muscles. Dancers' extraordinary performance demands place them at risk for other ankle injuries as well, including inflammation ofseveral tendons, especially the peroneals. This report reviews the relevant literature to characterize the scope of lateral ankle sprains and sequelae, discuss the importance of the peroneal muscles in ankle stability, and explore a relationship between lateral ankle sprain and ankle tendinitis in ballet dancers. Informal interviews were conducted with physical therapists who specialize in treating ballet dancers, providing a clinical context for this report. An extensive review of the literature was conducted, including electronic databases, reference lists from papers, and relevant reference texts. Numerous studies have investigated ankle sprains and residual complaints; nearly all report that lateral ankle sprains commonly lead to chronic ankle instability. Studies exploring ankle stability have demonstrated that the peroneal muscles play a crucial role in ankle stabilization; EMG studies confirm they are the first to contract during ankle inversion stress. The dancer's need for exceptional ankle stabilization may lead to peroneal overuse and tendinitis. Studies have linked peroneal

  4. Immediate postoperative anterior knee stability: double- versus triple-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mae, Tatsuo; Shino, Konsei; Matsumoto, Norinao; Yoneda, Kenji; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Nakata, Ken

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the triple-bundle (TB) anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with the double-bundle (DB) ACL reconstruction in immediate postoperative anterior knee stability. This study involved 133 patients who had undergone the anatomic ACL reconstruction with autogenous hamstring tendon unilaterally. Then 83 patients (mean age, 28.8 years) underwent the DB between November 2004 and December 2005, and 50 patients (mean age, 29.6 years) underwent the TB ACL reconstruction between January and December 2006. The 2 femoral tunnels were created in the ideal ACL attachment area, whereas 2 tibial tunnels for the DB and 3 tunnels for the TB were created in the ACL footprint. The 2 doubled tendon grafts were fixed with EndoButton-CL (Smith & Nephew Endoscopy, Andover, MA) on the femur. The grafts were fixed to the tibia using a Double Spike Plate and a screw under the total initial tension of 20 N at 20° of flexion, after meticulous in situ pretensioning using a tensioning boot. Then immediate postoperative anterior knee laxity in response to 89 N of anterior load was measured by one experienced examiner (T.M.) with the KT-2000 Knee Arthrometer (MEDmedtric, San Diego, CA) under general anesthesia at 30° of knee flexion with muscle relaxants. The measured anterior laxity was 3.4 ± 1.2 mm in the DB and 2.5 ± 0.7 mm in the TB ACL reconstruction, a statistically significant difference. The side-to-side difference of the laxity was -3.2 ± 1.6 mm in the DB and -4.2 ± 2.0 mm in the TB, again a significant difference. TB ACL reconstruction resulted in better immediate postoperative anterior knee stability than DB ACL reconstruction under 89 N of anterior tibial load (P = .031). Level III, therapeutic retrospective comparative study. Copyright © 2013 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Anterior dislocation of the fibula resulting from surgical malreduction: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z Y; Wu, X B

    2016-04-18

    Ankle joint fracture is one of the most common types of fracture. There are many researches on the injury mechanism, treatment principles and surgical techniques. A type of injury which combines posterior dislocation of fibula, known as the Bosworth injury, is relatively rare. In 1947, Bosworth first described this type of injury as an unusual ankle fracture dislocation with fixed posterior fracture dislocation of the distal part of the fibula. In this type of fracture, the proximal fibular shaft fragment locks behind the tibialis posterior tubercle. This rare ankle fracture variant is often not recognized in initial radiographs and requires a computed tomographic (CT) scan for verification. But there are already many reports, discussing the injury mechanism, treatment principles and surgical techniques. However, there are few reports of anterior dislocation of the fibula, caused by either injury or surgery. The mechanism of the injury is still not clear. This article reports a case of anterior dislocation of the fibula. We report a patient with left ankle open fracture (Lauge-Hansen pronation-external rotation stage III, Gustilo IIIA). Open reduction and internal fixation was done in the initial surgery, but ended up with poor reduction, resulting in fibula anterior dislocation, anterior dislocation of talus and tibia fibular dislocation. The fibula was dislocated anteriorly of the tibia, which rarely happened. The patient suffered severe ankle joint dysfunction. The second operation took out the original internal fixation, reduced the fracture, and reset the internal fixation. The function of ankle joint was improved obviously after operation. But because of the initial injury and the two operations, the soft tissue around the fracture was greatly damaged. 6 months after the second operation, and the fracture still not healed, so the bone graft was carried out in the third surgery. Two months after the third surgery, the function of the ankle was significantly

  6. Diagnosis of knee injuries: comparison of the physical examination and magnetic resonance imaging with the findings from arthroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilton Orlando Júnior

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVES: To ascertain the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and concordance of the physical examination (PE and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in comparison with arthroscopy, in diagnosing knee injuries. METHODS: Prospective study on 72 patients, with evaluation and comparison of PE, MRI and arthroscopic findings, to determine the concordance, accuracy, sensitivity and specificity. RESULTS: PE showed sensitivity of 75.00%, specificity of 62.50% and accuracy of 69.44% for medial meniscal (MM lesions, while it showed sensitivity of 47.82%, specificity of 93.87% and accuracy of 79.16% for lateral meniscal (LM lesions. For anterior cruciate ligament (ACL injuries, PE showed sensitivity of 88.67%, specificity of 94.73% and accuracy of 90.27%. For MM lesions, MRI showed sensitivity of 92.50%, specificity of 62.50% and accuracy of 69.44%, while for LM injuries, it showed sensitivity of 65.00%, specificity of 88.46% and accuracy of 81.94%. For ACL injuries, MRI showed sensitivity of 86.79%, specificity of 73.68% and accuracy of 83.33%. For ACL injuries, the best concordance was with PE, while for MM and LM lesions, it was with MRI ( p < 0.001. CONCLUSIONS: Meniscal and ligament injuries can be diagnosed through careful physical examination, while requests for MRI are reserved for complex or doubtful cases. PE and MRI used together have high sensitivity for ACL and MM lesions, while for LM lesions the specificity is higher. Level of evidence II - Development of diagnostic criteria on consecutive patients (with universally applied reference "gold" standard.

  7. Clinical Tests Have Limited Predictive Value for Chronic Ankle Instability When Conducted in the Acute Phase of a First-Time Lateral Ankle Sprain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Cailbhe; Bleakley, Chris; Hertel, Jay; Caulfield, Brian; Ryan, John; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2018-04-01

    To evaluate whether a battery of clinical assessments for acute lateral ankle sprain (LAS) can be used to predict long-term recovery. Cohort study. University biomechanics laboratory. Individuals (N=82) were assessed using a clinical test battery within 2 weeks of incurring a first-time LAS. Not applicable. The clinical test battery included scores on the talar glide test (degrees), the anterior drawer, talar tilt, figure of 8 for swelling (millimeters) and knee to wall (millimeters) tests, and handheld goniometric range of motion (inversion, eversion, and plantarflexion [in degrees]). Scores on the Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool taken 12 months after the clinical test battery were used to classify participants as having chronic ankle instability (CAI) or as being LAS copers. Forty percent of participants were designated as having CAI, with 60% being designated as LAS copers. A logistic regression analysis revealed that a combined model using scores from the talar glide, talar tilt, and anterior drawer tests in addition to plantarflexion range of motion was statistically significant (P<.01) and correctly classified cases with moderate accuracy (68.8%). The final model had moderate sensitivity (64%) and good specificity (72%). The clinical tests used in this investigation have limited predictive value for CAI when conducted in the acute phase of a first-time LAS injury. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Selection criteria for patients with chronic ankle instability in controlled research: a position statement of the international ankle consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gribble, P.A.; Delahunt, E.; Bleakley, C.; Caulfield, B.; Docherty, C.L.; Fourchet, F.; Fong, D.; Hertel, J.; Hiller, C.; Kaminski, T.W.; McKeon, P.O.; Refshauge, K.M.; Wees, P.J. van der; Vicenzino, B.; Wikstrom, E.A.

    2013-01-01

    The International Ankle Consortium is an international community of researchers and clinicians whose primary scholastic purpose is to promote scholarship and dissemination of research-informed knowledge related to pathologies of the ankle complex. The constituents of the International Ankle

  9. The direct environmental impact of hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement: a surgical waste audit of five cases

    OpenAIRE

    de SA, Darren; Stephens, Kellee; Kuang, Michelle; Simunovic, Nicole; Karlsson, Jon; Ayeni, Olufemi R.

    2016-01-01

    Health care facilities produce significant waste (2200?kg/bed/year) creating 2% of greenhouse gas emissions and 1% total solid waste nationwide, with 20?70% of waste coming from operating rooms. We performed a waste audit of hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) to understand its environmental impact and identify areas for greening practices. A waste audit of five hip arthroscopy procedures for FAI was performed. All waste was collected and separated into six waste streams in...

  10. Facilitation of soleus but not tibialis anterior motor evoked potentials before onset of antagonist contraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geertsen, Svend Sparre; Zuur, Abraham Theodore; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2008-01-01

    the MEP is evoked. Methods: Seated subjects (n=11) were instructed to react to an auditory cue by contracting either the tibialis anterior (TA) or soleus muscle of the left ankle to 30% of their maximal dorsiflexion voluntary contraction (MVC) or plantar flexion MVC, respectively. Focal TMS at 1.2 x motor...

  11. Morphologic evaluation of remnant anterior cruciate ligament bundles after injury with three-dimensional computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Nobuo; Ochi, Mitsuo; Takazawa, Kobun; Ishifuro, Minoru; Deie, Masataka; Nakamae, Atsuo; Kamei, Goki

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the morphological patterns of remnant anterior cruciate ligament bundles after injury (ACL remnant) on three-dimensional computed tomography (3DCT) and compare them with those on arthroscopy. Sixty-three patients (33 males and 30 females; mean age 25.2 ± 10.1 years) who had undergone primary ACL reconstruction between March 2011 and December 2012 were included in this study. The average durations between traumas and 3DCT and between 3DCT and surgery were 101.7 ± 87.2 and 38.2 ± 38.7 days, respectively. ACL remnants were classified into four morphological patterns on 3DCT. 3DCT findings were compared with arthroscopic findings with and without probing. The morphological patterns of the ACL remnants on 3DCT were well matched with those on arthroscopy without probing (the concordance rate was 77.8%). However, the concordance rate was reduced to 49.2% when arthroscopic probing was used to confirm the femoral attachment of ACL remnants (p ≤ 0.05). This study demonstrates that the morphological patterns of ACL remnants on 3DCT were well matched with those on arthroscopy without probing. Therefore, the technique can be useful for preoperative planning of the ACL reconstruction or informed consent to the patients. However, for definitive diagnosis, arthroscopic probing is required. IV.

  12. Clinical and Arthroscopic Findings of Acute Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tears of the Knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Shirakura

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical, arthrographic, and arthroscopic findings in 53 patients with acutely torn anterior cruciate ligaments (ACLs were documented. Arthroscopy and instability tests under anesthesia were performed on all patients within 2 weeks after the initial injury. Twenty-three patients complained of extension blocks, and localized tenderness on the medial side was revealed in 26 patients at the initial examination. Aspiration from joints exhibited hemarthrosis in 52 patients. Arthroscopy revealed ACL ruptures in all patients. Four Segond's fractures, 26 meniscus tears (8 medial and 18 lateral, 1 osteochondral fracture, and 19 medial collateral ligament ruptures were revealed. Arthroscopy detected only 1 of the 5 ruptures of the posteromedial corner of the medial meniscus, which were noted on arthrography. Three ACL stumps were protruding among the femorotibial joint, which seemed to be restricting full extension. Statistical analysis showed that tenderness on the medial side was not revealed more frequently in knees with medial collateral ligament injuries than in the others. The volume of aspirated fluids in knees with no leakage in arthrography significantly increased over those with leakages (p < 0.05. Diagnosis of ACL injuries should be completed by clinical, arthrographic, and arthroscopic examinations.

  13. Mucoid degeneration of the anterior cruciate ligament mistaken for ligamentous tears

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McIntyre, J. [San Francisco Magnetic Resonance Center, CA (United States); Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, One Medical Center Drive, Lebanon, NH (United States); Moelleken, S.; Tirman, P. [San Francisco Magnetic Resonance Center, CA (United States)

    2001-06-01

    Objective. To describe the MR features of mucoid degeneration of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in a series of patients with MRI findings that were mistaken for tears in the majority of cases but who were found to have an intact ligament at arthroscopy. We will suggest a pathologic entity corresponding to this finding and describe some characteristic features that can be used to identify this entity on MRI.Design. A retrospective analysis of 10 MRI examinations of the knee was performed after arthroscopic evaluation. Prearthroscopic MRI findings had been interpreted as a tear in six patients prospectively and in the remaining four the diagnosis of mucoid degeneration was suggested and ultimately proven. All patients had an intact ACL by preoperative clinical examination, examination under anesthesia, and at arthroscopy.Results. MRI examinations demonstrated an ill-defined ACL, greater in girth than the normal ligament and characterized by increased signal on all sequences. The high-signal ligament was oriented in the normal direction of the ACL. The overall appearance of the ligament was retrospectively described as like a celery stalk. Arthroscopy demonstrated mechanically intact ligaments with a normal to expanded external appearance. Probing of three of the ligaments caused a material to be expressed and pathologic evaluation resulted in the diagnosis of cystic, mucoid degeneration.Conclusion. Mucoid degeneration and an intact ACL can be suspected when an apparently thickened and ill-defined ligament with increased signal intensity on all sequences is identified in a patient with a clinically intact ligament. (orig.)

  14. Prediction of three-dimensional contact stress and ligament tension in the ankle during stance determined from computational modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraguchi, Naoki; Armiger, Robert S; Myerson, Mark S; Campbell, John T; Chao, Edmund Y S

    2009-02-01

    Our goal was to quantify and visualize the three-dimensional loading relationship between the ligaments and articular surfaces of the ankle to identify and determine the stabilizing roles of these anatomical structures during the stance phase of gait. We applied discrete element analysis to computationally model the three-dimensional contact characteristics and ligament loading of the ankle joint. Physiologic loads approximating those at five positions in the stance phase of a normal walk cycle were applied. We analyzed joint contact pressures and periankle ligament tension concurrently. Most ankle joint loading during the stance phase occurred across the articular surfaces of the joint, and the amount of ligament tension was small. The tibiotalar articulation showed full congruency throughout most of the stance phase, with peak pressure developing anteriorly toward the toe-off frame. Of the periankle ligaments, the deep deltoid ligament transferred the most force during the stance phase (57.2%); the superficial deltoid ligament transferred the second-most force (26.1%). The anterior talofibular ligament transferred force between the talus and fibula continuously, whereas the calcaneofibular ligament did not carry force during gait. The distal tibiofibular ligaments and the interosseous membrane were loaded throughout the stance phase. Force transmission through the ankle joint during the stance phase is predominantly through the articular surfaces, and the periankle ligaments do not play a major stabilizing role in constraining ankle motion. The medial ligaments have a more important role than do the lateral ligaments in stabilizing the ankle joint. In addition to ligament insufficiency, other factors, such as varus tilt of the tibial plafond, may be important in the development of recurrent instability. Continuous loading of syndesmosis ligaments provides a theoretical basis for evidence of syndesmosis screw breakage or loosening. The analysis method has

  15. Neuromuscular Alterations After Ankle Sprains: An Animal Model to Establish Causal Links After Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepley, Lindsey K; McKeon, Patrick O; Fitzpatrick, Shane G; Beckemeyer, Catherine L; Uhl, Timothy L; Butterfield, Timothy A

    2016-10-01

    The mechanisms that contribute to the development of chronic ankle instability are not understood. Investigators have developed a hypothetical model in which neuromuscular alterations that stem from damaged ankle ligaments are thought to affect periarticular and proximal muscle activity. However, the retrospective nature of these studies does not allow a causal link to be established. To assess temporal alterations in the activity of 2 periarticular muscles of the rat ankle and 2 proximal muscles of the rat hind limb after an ankle sprain. Controlled laboratory study. Laboratory. Five healthy adult male Long Evans rats (age = 16 weeks, mass = 400.0 ± 13.5 g). Indwelling fine-wire electromyography (EMG) electrodes were implanted surgically into the biceps femoris, medial gastrocnemius, vastus lateralis, and tibialis anterior muscles of the rats. We recorded baseline EMG measurements while the rats walked on a motor-driven treadmill and then induced a closed lateral ankle sprain by overextending the lateral ankle ligaments. After ankle sprain, the rats were placed on the treadmill every 24 hours for 7 days, and we recorded postsprain EMG data. Onset time of muscle activity, phase duration, sample entropy, and minimal detectable change (MDC) were assessed and compared with baseline using 2-tailed dependent t tests. Compared with baseline, delayed onset time of muscle activity was exhibited in the biceps femoris (baseline = -16.7 ± 54.0 milliseconds [ms]) on day 0 (5.2 ± 64.1 ms; t 4 = -4.655, P = .043) and tibialis anterior (baseline = 307.0 ± 64.2 ms) muscles on day 3 (362.5 ± 55.9 ms; t 4 = -5.427, P = .03) and day 6 (357.3 ± 39.6 ms; t 4 = -3.802, P = .02). Longer phase durations were observed for the vastus lateralis (baseline = 321.9 ± 92.6 ms) on day 3 (401.3 ± 101.2 ms; t 3 = -4.001, P = .03), day 4 (404.1 ± 93.0 ms; t 3 = -3.320, P = .048), and day 5 (364.6 ± 105.2 ms; t 3 = -3.963, P = .03) and for the tibialis anterior (baseline = 103.9 ± 16.4 ms

  16. Ulnar nerve injury due to lateral traction device during shoulder arthroscopy: Was it avoidable?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Pandey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of the nerve injuries reported during shoulder arthroscopy in a beach chair, or lateral position is related to inappropriate patient positioning or excess traction. The lateral decubitus position is more vulnerable for traction-related neuropraxia. The present case serves as an important lesson from an avoidable situation of “having a one track mind” of the surgical team during the arthroscopic repair of shoulder instability performed in the lateral decubitus position. The operating surgeon must supervise the appropriate positioning of the patient on operation table and adequate padding of vulnerable bony points before beginning of shoulder arthroscopy to prevent any position-related nerve injuries. This is probably the first case to illustrate an unusual cause of ulnar nerve compression particularly related to the use of an additional traction device in the arthroscopic repair of shoulder instability performed in lateral decubitus position, which has not been previously defined.

  17. Comparison of dynamic postural stability scores between athletes with and without chronic ankle instability during lateral jump landing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiravi, Zeinab; Shadmehr, Azadeh; Moghadam, Saeed Talebian; Moghadam, Behrouz Attarbashi

    2017-01-01

    Many ankle injuries occur while participating in sports that require jumping and landing such as basketball, volleyball and soccer. Most recent studies have investigated dynamic postural stability of patients with chronic ankle instability after landing from a forward jump. The present study aimed to investigate the dynamic postural stability of the athletes who suffer from chronic ankle sprain while landing from a lateral jump. Twelve athletes with self-reported unilateral chronic ankle instability (4 females and 8 males) and 12 matched controls (3 females and 9 males) voluntarily participated in the study. Dynamic postural stability index and its directional indices were measured while performing lateral jump landing test. No differences were found between athletes with and without chronic ankle instability during our landing protocol by means of the dynamic postural stability index and its directional indices. Findings showed that in each group, medial/lateral stability index is significantly higher than anterior/posterior and vertical stability indexes. Findings showed that dynamic postural stability was not significantly different between the two groups. Future studies should examine chronic ankle instability patients with more severe disabilities and expose them to more challenging dynamic balance conditions to further explore postural stability. IIIa.

  18. Diagnostics of degenerative meniscal tears at 3-Tesla MRI compared to arthroscopy as reference standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Engelhardt, L V; Schmitz, A; Pennekamp, P H; Schild, H H; Wirtz, D C; von Falkenhausen, F

    2008-05-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of 3-Tesla MRI for the assessment of degenerative meniscal tears in clinical practice. In patients with chronic knee pain, a negative history of acute trauma and a mean age of 52 years, 3-Tesla MRI were performed a few days prior to arthroscopy. In 86 menisci, diagnostic values of 3-Tesla MRI for the detection of degenerative tears were evaluated using arthroscopy as reference standard. The MRI classification, for meniscus diagnostics, described by Crues was used. At arthroscopy, all tears identified (19 horizontal, 7 complex, 3 radial) were degenerative as confirmed by histological examination. MRI grade II lesions had a prevalence of 24% and a rate of 24% of missed tears, whereas grade I lesions were not associated with a torn meniscus at arthroscopy. For meniscal tears, (grade III) sensitivity and specificity of 3-Telsa MRI was 79 and 95% for both menisci, 86 and 100% for the medial meniscus, and 57 and 92% for the lateral meniscus. The best diagnostic performance was found for complex tears, horizontal tears showed relatively good results, poor results were documented for radial tears. For the medial meniscus, where horizontal and complex tears were more prevalent, 3-Tesla MRI shows a higher accuracy than for the lateral meniscus. Particularly with regard to the medial meniscus, 3-Tesla MRI could be effectively used when a degenerative tear is suspected. Nevertheless, in regard to a remarkable number of false positive and false negative findings the diagnostic value of a 3-Tesla MRI investigation should not be overestimated.

  19. Arthroscopy-Assisted Reduction and Fixation of a Transversal Glenoid Fracture: About a Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Zbili

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An articular glenoid fracture is an uncommon injury. Usually significantly displaced intra-articular glenoid fractures are treated with open reduction surgery. Conventional open surgery techniques involve high morbidity. Here we describe an arthroscopy-assisted reduction and fixation method of an Ideberg type III glenoid fracture. This method provides good articular reduction without extensive exposure or soft tissue dissection and without nerve and/or vascular lesion.

  20. Prevalence of Propionibacterium acnes in the glenohumeral compared with the subacromial space in primary shoulder arthroscopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzer, Thilo; Petersdorf, Sabine; Krauspe, Ruediger; Verde, Pablo Emilio; Henrich, Birgit; Hufeland, Martin

    2018-05-01

    We hypothesized that the prevalence of Propionibacterium acnes in patients undergoing primary shoulder arthroscopy is equal in the glenohumeral space compared with the subacromial space. Patients aged 18 years or older with shoulder arthroscopies were included. The exclusion criteria were prior shoulder operations, complete rotator cuff tears, systemic inflammatory diseases, tumors, shoulder injections within 6 months of surgery, and antibiotic therapy within 14 days preoperatively. After standardized skin disinfection with Kodan Tinktur Forte Gefärbt, a skin swab was taken at the posterior portal. Arthroscopy was performed without cannulas, prospectively randomized to start either in the glenohumeral space or in the subacromial space, with direct harvesting of a soft-tissue biopsy specimen. Sample cultivation was conducted according to standardized criteria for bone and joint aspirate samples and incubated for 14 days. Matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight spectrometry was used for specimen identification in positive culture results. The study prospectively included 115 consecutive patients with normal C-reactive protein levels prior to surgery (54.8% men; mean age, 47.2 ± 14.6 years). P acnes was detected on the skin after disinfection in 36.5% of patients, in the glenohumeral space in 18.9%, and in the subacromial space in 3.5% (P = .016). The prevalence of P acnes is significantly higher in the glenohumeral space compared with the subacromial space in primary shoulder arthroscopies. The results do not confirm the contamination theory but also cannot clarify whether P acnes is a commensal or enters the joint hematologically or even lymphatically or via an unknown pathway. Despite standardized surgical skin disinfection, P acnes can be detected in skin swab samples in more than one-third of patients. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Severe cerebral desaturation during shoulder arthroscopy in the beach-chair position

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dippmann, Christian; Winge, Søren; Nielsen, Henning Bay

    2010-01-01

    During shoulder arthroscopy in the beach-chair position, cerebral ischemia may be a serious complication because prolonged hypotension may affect regional cerebral oxygen supply. We present the cases of 2 patients in whom a reduction in mean arterial pressure after anesthesia provoked a decrease...... cerebral oxygenation. During surgery in the beach-chair position, hypotension must be avoided, and in all patients regional, cerebral oxygenation should be monitored and optimized....

  2. Dynamic balance deficits in individuals with chronic ankle instability compared to ankle sprain copers 1 year after a first-time lateral ankle sprain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Doherty, Cailbhe; Bleakley, Chris J.; Hertel, Jay; Caulfield, Brian; Ryan, John; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the dynamic balance deficits that characterise a group with chronic ankle instability compared to lateral ankle sprain copers and non-injured controls using kinematic and kinetic outcomes. Methods: Forty-two participants with chronic ankle instability and twenty-eight lateral ankle sprain copers were initially recruited within 2 weeks of sustaining a first-time, acute lateral ankle sprain and required to attend our laboratory 1 year later to complete the current study pro...

  3. Ankle ligamints : comparison of MR arthrography with conventional MR imaging in amputated feet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Jae Sung; Lee, Sang Yong; Lee, Jeong Min; Han, Young Min; Chung, Kyung Ho; Kim, CHong Soo

    2001-01-01

    To compare magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography with conventional MR imaging in the evaluation of ankle ligaments. Eight freshly amputated human feet underwent conventional MR imaging and MR arthrography. For the former, 1.5-T magnets in the axial, coronal and sagittal planes were used, and T1-weighted sequences were obtained. Following the injection of 6-10 ml of diluted contrast media (Gd-DTPA 1:250), T1-weighted images were obtained in the same positions as conventional MR images. Paired conventional MR imaging and MR arthrography of each ankle ligament were rated on a five-point scale, and to reflect inter-group differences a Wilcoxon singed-rank test was used to compare the different measurements (p<0.05). In two ankles, MR images of the ligaments were correlated with ankle dissection. Anterior and posterior talofibular ligaments were more clearly revealed by MR arthrography than by conventional MR imaging, while calcaneofibular ligaments showed no difference between these two modalities. With regard to deltoid ligaments, visualization of the anterior and posterior tibiotalar ligament was much improved when contrast material was used to outline the ligament's articular aspect. Visualization of the posterior inferior tibiofibular ligament and inferior transverse ligament were also improved when the use of contrast material provided delineation of the articular side of the ligaments and separated them from adjacent bone. In addition, MR arthography was very useful for indentification of the posterior intermalleolar ligament, though its use did not enhance visualization of the calcaneofibular, tibiocalcaneal, spring or tibiospring ligaments. MR arthrography accurately revealed the anatomic details of ankle ligaments, and may therefore be more useful than conventional Mr imaging for evaluation of these structures

  4. Absence of sensory function in the reconstructed anterior cruciate ligament

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsgaard, Michael R; Fischer-Rasmussen, Torsten; Dyhre-Poulsen, Poul

    2011-01-01

    -constructions were stimulated. The sensory threshold was 3.4 times higher in the ACL than in the PCL. Stimulus amplitudes were increased to 1.5-2.0 times the sensory threshold, and a typical inhibitory reflex could be elicited in 9 patients. The latency was the same as for the reflex from the PCL. The stimulus......Cruciate ligaments provide sensory information that cause excitatory as well as inhibitory effects to the activity of the muscles around the knee. The aim of the study was to determine whether these muscular reflexes are reestablished after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) re-construction. Wire...... electrodes were inserted during arthroscopy into the normal posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) and the reconstructed ACL in 11 patients who had a successful ACL re-construction 8 months to 12 years earlier. After the anesthesia had subsided, the PCL was stimulated electrically through the electrodes...

  5. Therapeutic ultrasound for acute ankle sprains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bekerom, M. P. J.; van der Windt, D. A. W. M.; ter Riet, G.; van der Heijden, G. J.; Bouter, L. M.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Ultrasound is used in the treatment of a wide variety of musculoskeletal disorders, which include acute ankle sprains. Aim. To evaluate the effects of ultrasound therapy in the treatment of acute ankle sprains. Methods. We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group

  6. Osteochondral defects in the ankle: why painful?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, C. Niek; Reilingh, Mikel L.; Zengerink, Maartje; van Bergen, Christiaan J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Osteochondral defects of the ankle can either heal and remain asymptomatic or progress to deep ankle pain on weight bearing and formation of subchondral bone cysts. The development of a symptomatic OD depends on various factors, including the damage and insufficient repair of the subchondral bone

  7. Ankle and Other Signatures in Uhecr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezinsky, Veniamin

    2015-03-01

    The interaction signatures of UHE protons propagating through CMB are discussed. Much attention is given to ankle, which starting from 1963 is usually interpreted as a feature of transition from galactic to extragalactic cosmic rays. We argue here that this interpretation is now excluded. It gives more credit to alternative explanation of the ankle as an intrinsic part of the pair-production dip.

  8. Two genetic loci associated with ankle injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Stuart K; Kleimeyer, John P; Ahmed, Marwa A; Avins, Andrew L; Fredericson, Michael; Dragoo, Jason L; Ioannidis, John P A

    2017-01-01

    Ankle injuries, including sprains, strains and other joint derangements and instability, are common, especially for athletes involved in indoor court or jumping sports. Identifying genetic loci associated with these ankle injuries could shed light on their etiologies. A genome-wide association screen was performed using publicly available data from the Research Program in Genes, Environment and Health (RPGEH) including 1,694 cases of ankle injury and 97,646 controls. An indel (chr21:47156779:D) that lies close to a collagen gene, COL18A1, showed an association with ankle injury at genome-wide significance (p = 3.8x10-8; OR = 1.99; 95% CI = 1.75-2.23). A second DNA variant (rs13286037 on chromosome 9) that lies within an intron of the transcription factor gene NFIB showed an association that was nearly genome-wide significant (p = 5.1x10-8; OR = 1.63; 95% CI = 1.46-1.80). The ACTN3 R577X mutation was previously reported to show an association with acute ankle sprains, but did not show an association in this cohort. This study is the first genome-wide screen for ankle injury that yields insights regarding the genetic etiology of ankle injuries and provides DNA markers with the potential to inform athletes about their genetic risk for ankle injury.

  9. Two genetic loci associated with ankle injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart K Kim

    Full Text Available Ankle injuries, including sprains, strains and other joint derangements and instability, are common, especially for athletes involved in indoor court or jumping sports. Identifying genetic loci associated with these ankle injuries could shed light on their etiologies. A genome-wide association screen was performed using publicly available data from the Research Program in Genes, Environment and Health (RPGEH including 1,694 cases of ankle injury and 97,646 controls. An indel (chr21:47156779:D that lies close to a collagen gene, COL18A1, showed an association with ankle injury at genome-wide significance (p = 3.8x10-8; OR = 1.99; 95% CI = 1.75-2.23. A second DNA variant (rs13286037 on chromosome 9 that lies within an intron of the transcription factor gene NFIB showed an association that was nearly genome-wide significant (p = 5.1x10-8; OR = 1.63; 95% CI = 1.46-1.80. The ACTN3 R577X mutation was previously reported to show an association with acute ankle sprains, but did not show an association in this cohort. This study is the first genome-wide screen for ankle injury that yields insights regarding the genetic etiology of ankle injuries and provides DNA markers with the potential to inform athletes about their genetic risk for ankle injury.

  10. [Hip arthroscopy in males younger than 40 with femoroacetabular impingement: short-term outcomes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Más Martínez, J; Morales-Santías, M; Bustamante Suarez Suarez de Puga, D; Sanz-Reig, J

    2014-01-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement is probably the most common mechanism that leads to the development of early cartilage and labral damage in the non-dysplastic hip. The objective was to evaluate the outcomes of hip arthroscopy as a treatment for femoroacetabular impingement in patients with high level of function. A prospective study was performed on 41 patients younger than 40 years old undergoing hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement. Modified Harris Hip Score and HOS and IHOT questionnaires were used for clinical assessment. Radiological evaluation was made for joint space and alpha angle. The mean age of patients was 32.7 years. Labrum injury was detected in 78%, and acetabular cartilage injury in 56% of cases. The average follow-up was 31.3 months. There was a significantly improvement in the mean score in the clinical questionnaires. Radiologically there was no change in the mean joint space, with significantly reduction to normal values of the alpha angle. All patients returned to sports at their pre-injury level of function. Hip arthroscopy resulted in improvement in hip functional outcomes with correction of the underlying osseous deformity and treatment of the associated labral and cartilage pathology, with the return of patients to their pre-injury sports. Further follow-up is essential to confirm the stability of the clinical and radiological outcomes. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. Rehabilitation activities in patients at the early stages of coxarthrosis after arthroscopy of the hip joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.V. Roy

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. Development of rehabilitation programs for patients after surgical interventions using modern methods of osteosynthesis — one of the most important directions of modern restorative treatment in orthopedic and trauma patients. The purpose of the study: to develop rehabilitation measures in the comprehensive treatment of patients at the early stages of coxarthrosis after arthroscopy of the hip joint. Materials and methods. The analysis of treatment was carried out in 95 patients with stage I–II hip osteoarthritis, who underwent arthroscopic surgical intervention on the basis of the trauma unit of M.I. Pirogov Vinnytsia Regional Clinical Hospital and SI “Institute of Traumatology and Orthopedics of the NAMS of Ukraine” in 2007–2016. Results. Based on comprehensive examination of patients in the early stages of coxarthrosis after arthroscopy of the hip joint, rehabilitation measures were developed in the combination treatment of this cohort of patients. The proposed methods corresponded to the time of the postoperative period, the peculiarities of surgical intervention during arthroscopy of the hip joint and the individual characteristics of patients and made it possible for 100 % of patients to have effective rehabilitation. Conclusions. Implementation of the rehabilitation methods proposed by the authors will allow for full differentiated treatment and will improve the effectiveness of providing medical care to this cohort of patients.

  12. Topographic anatomical study of the sciatic nerve relationship to the posterior portal in hip arthroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berliet Assad Gomes

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the anatomic topographic relation between the sciatic nerve in relation to the piriform muscle and the posterior portal for the establishment of hip arthroscopy.Methods: We dissected 40 hips of 20 corpses of adult Brazilians, 17 male and three female, six black, six brown and eight white. We studied the anatomical relationship between the sciatic nerve and the piriform muscle with their variations and the distance between the lateral edge of the sciatic nerve and the posterior portal used in hip arthroscopy. We then classified the anatomical alterations found in the path of the sciatic nerve on the piriform muscle.Results: Seventeen corpses had bilateral relationship between the sciatic nerve and the piriform muscle, i.e., type A. We found the following anatomical variations: 12.5% of variant type B; and an average distance between the sciatic nerve and the portal for arthroscopy of 2.98cm. One body had type B anatomical variation on the left hip and type A on the right.Conclusion: the making of the posterior arthroscopic portal to the hip joint must be done with careful marking of the trochanter massive; should there be difficult to find it, a small surgical access is recommended. The access point to the portal should not exceed two centimeters towards the posterior superior aspect of the greater trochanter, and must be made with the limb in internal rotation of 15 degrees.

  13. Compression therapy after ankle fracture surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winge, R; Bayer, L; Gottlieb, H

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: The main purpose of this systematic review was to investigate the effect of compression treatment on the perioperative course of ankle fractures and describe its effect on edema, pain, ankle joint mobility, wound healing complication, length of stay (LOS) and time to surgery (TTS). The aim...... was to suggest a recommendation to clinicians considering implementing compression therapy in the standard care of the ankle fracture patient, based on the existing literature. METHODS: We conducted a systematic search of literature including studies concerning adult patients with unstable ankle fractures...... undergoing surgery, testing either intermittent pneumatic compression, compression bandage and/or compression stocking and reporting its effect on edema, pain, ankle joint mobility, wound healing complication, LOS and TTS. To conclude on data a narrative synthesis was performed. RESULTS: The review included...

  14. Y-balance test performance and BMI are associated with ankle sprain injury in collegiate male athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Emily M; Hoch, Matthew C; Boling, Michelle C

    2017-10-25

    To determine if static balance, dynamic balance, ankle range of motion, body mass index (BMI), or history of an ankle sprain were associated with ankle sprain injuries within male and female collegiate athletes. Prospective cohort. Three hundred and eighty-four male (age=19.79±1.80 years, height=178.02±10.39cm, mass=85.71±17.59kg) and one hundred and sixty seven female (age=19.80±1.52 years, height=165.61±7.08cm, mass=66.16±10.53kg) collegiate athletes involved in a variety of sports at a NCAA Division II or NAIA institution participated. Baseline measures of the Y-Balance (YBT), modified Balance Error Scoring System (mBESS), weight-bearing lunge test (WBLT), BMI, and history of ankle sprain were recorded. Participants were followed prospectively for two years and incidence of ankle sprain injury was documented. The average of the WBLT, mBESS, and YBT measures were used for analysis. Male and female participants were analyzed separately. Mann-Whitney U tests were utilized to identify variables which may be significantly associated with ankle sprain injury for logistic regression analysis. A total of 59 (38 males and 21 females) individuals sustained an ankle sprain during the follow up period. The binary logistic regression revealed BMI (Nagelkerke R 2 =0.069; X 2 =12.89; p<0.001; OR=3.85; 95% CI, 1.90-7.79; p<0.001) and anterior reach of the YBT (Nagelkerke R 2 =0.074; X 2 =13.70, p<0.001; OR=3.64; 95% CI=1.83-7.23; p=0.01) were significantly associated with ankle sprain injury in male athletes. No variables were associated with ankle sprain injury within female athletes. Male collegiate athletes with greater BMI and lesser YBT anterior reach were at a greater risk of sustaining an ankle sprain injury. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. An ankle-foot orthosis powered by artificial pneumatic muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, Daniel P; Czerniecki, Joseph M; Hannaford, Blake

    2005-05-01

    We developed a pneumatically powered orthosis for the human ankle joint. The orthosis consisted of a carbon fiber shell, hinge joint, and two artificial pneumatic muscles. One artificial pneumatic muscle provided plantar flexion torque and the second one provided dorsiflexion torque. Computer software adjusted air pressure in each artificial muscle independently so that artificial muscle force was proportional to rectified low-pass-filtered electromyography (EMG) amplitude (i.e., proportional myoelectric control). Tibialis anterior EMG activated the artificial dorsiflexor and soleus EMG activated the artificial plantar flexor. We collected joint kinematic and artificial muscle force data as one healthy participant walked on a treadmill with the orthosis. Peak plantar flexor torque provided by the orthosis was 70 Nm, and peak dorsiflexor torque provided by the orthosis was 38 Nm. The orthosis could be useful for basic science studies on human locomotion or possibly for gait rehabilitation after neurological injury.

  16. Neuromuscular Control Mechanisms During Single-Leg Jump Landing in Subacute Ankle Sprain Patients: A Case Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allet, Lara; Zumstein, Franziska; Eichelberger, Patric; Armand, Stéphane; Punt, Ilona M

    2017-03-01

    Optimal neuromuscular control mechanisms are essential for preparing, maintaining, and restoring functional joint stability during jump landing and to prevent ankle injuries. In subacute ankle sprain patients, neither muscle activity nor kinematics during jump landing has previously been assessed. To compare neuromuscular control mechanisms and kinematics between subacute ankle sprain patients and healthy persons before and during the initial contact phase of a 25-cm single-leg jump. Case-control study. University hospital. Fifteen patients with grade I or II acute ankle sprains were followed up after 4 weeks of conservative management not involving physical therapy. Subjects performed alternately 3 single-leg forward jumps of 25 cm (toe-to-heel distance) barefoot. Their results were compared with the data of 15 healthy subjects. Electromyographic (EMG) activity of the musculus (m.) gastrocnemius lateralis, m. tibialis anterior, and m. peroneus longus as well as kinematics for ankle, knee, and hip joint were recorded for pre-initial contact (IC) phase, post-initial contact phase, and reflex-induced phase. The results showed that EMG activity of the 3 muscles did not differ between ankle sprain patients (n = 15) and healthy persons (n = 15) for any of the analyzed time intervals (all P > .05). However, during the pre-IC phase, ankle sprain patients presented less plantar flexion, as well as during the post-IC phase after jump landing, compared to healthy persons (P ankle joint can lead to neuromuscular control mechanism disturbances through which functional instability might arise. III. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Changes in ground reaction force during jump landing in subjects with functional instability of the ankle joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield, Brian; Garrett, Mary

    2004-07-01

    To identify changes in ground reaction force during jump landing in subjects with functional instability of the ankle joint. Comparison of ground reaction force during jump landing between subjects with functional instability and healthy controls. We have recently demonstrated significantly altered patterns of ankle and knee movement immediately pre- and post-impact in subjects with functional instability compared to healthy controls. We now examine the changes in timing and magnitude of forces sustained by the unstable ankle during jump landing. Fourteen subjects with unstable ankles and 10 age, sex and activity matched controls performed five single leg jumps onto a force platform whilst ground reaction forces were sampled. Timing and magnitudes of forces during the first 150 ms following impact were analysed and compared between groups. Lateral and anterior force peaks occurred significantly earlier in subjects with functional instability. Significant differences were seen between groups' time-averaged vertical, frontal and sagittal components of ground reaction force. These ranged from 5% (frontal force) to 100% (vertical force) of body mass. These changes occur immediately post-impact and too early for reflex correction/modification. The disordered force patterns observed in subjects with functional instability are likely to result in repeated injury due to significant increase in stress on ankle joint structures during jump landing. We suggest that they are most likely to result from deficits in feed-forward motor control. These results identify the potentially injurious nature of the changes in the forces applied to the unstable ankle joint during jump landing. The timing of these changes suggests that they are caused by a motor control deficit. Treatment approaches aimed at retraining feed-forward control of ankle joint movement could succeed in restoring more normal patterns of force absorption and reduce the occurrence of repeated micro-trauma to ankle

  18. [Combined procedure for the treatment of ankle and foot deformities secondary to spina bifida].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Shao-Feng; Qin, Si-He; Ren, Long-Xi; Ge, Jian-Zhong; Wu, Hong-Fei; Wang, Zhen-Jun; Zheng, Xue-Jian

    2012-03-01

    To study surgical strategies for ankle and foot deformities secondary to spina bifida and treatment methods for different types of deformities. From January 1990 and July 2009, 107 patients with ankle and foot deformities secondary to spina bifida were retrospectively analyzed. There were 44 males and 63 females, with an average age of 17.7 years (rangd from 1.3 to 52 years). Among the patients, 58 patients had double ankle deformities, 49 patients had unilateral deformities (22 cases on the left side, 27 cases on the right). Ninety-nine patients with equinus deformities were treated by achilles tendon lengthening and tendon transfering; 25 patients with talipes were treated by release of anterior tendon of ankle and tendon transfer; 17 patients with valgus and varus deformities were treated by tendon transfer and calcaneal osteotomy; 15 patients with flail deformities were managed treated by bone fusion between calcaneus and talus and shortening of achilles tendon; 9 patients with claw toe deformities were treated by bone fusion of interphalangeal joint or Ilizarovs distraction. AOFAS (American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society) comprehensive scoring system was used to evaluate subjective pain and objective functional. Seventy-nine (127 feet) of 107 patients were followed up, and the duration ranged from 48 to 180 months (averaged, 64 months). According to AOFAS scoring system, the results were rated as excellent in 89 feet, good in 26 feet, moderate in 9 feet and poor in 3 feet. Treatment strategies for ankle-foot deformities mainly included four principles, deformity correction, muscular balance, joint stability and reservation of foot elasticity. Different combined procedure was applied for different foot deformities and received good therapeutic effects.

  19. Correlation between Mechanical Properties of the Ankle Muscles and Postural Sway during the Menstrual Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, JongEun; Petrofsky, Jerrold; Lee, Haneul

    2018-03-01

    Ankle and foot injuries are common among athletes and physically active individuals. The most common residual disability, ankle sprain, is characterized by instability along with postural sway. If the supporting structures around a joint become lax, posture stability and balance are also affected. Previous studies have examined muscle stiffness and elasticity and postural sway separately; however, the relationship between these factors is yet unknown. It is well known that the levels of sex hormones, especially estrogen, change in women over the phase of the menstrual cycle. Therefore, this study examined the relationship between the mechanical properties of tissue and balance activity using a non-invasive digital palpation device to determine if they undergo any changes over the menstrual cycle in young women. Sixteen young women with regular menstrual cycles completed the study. Tone, stiffness, and elasticity of the ankle muscles (lateral gastrocnemius, peroneus longus, and tibialis anterior) were measured using a non-invasive digital palpation device. Postural sway was recorded while the participants performed balance tasks during ovulation and menstruation. Significantly greater posture sway characteristics and ankle muscle elasticity were found during ovulation than during menstruation; lower tone and stiffness of the ankle muscles were observed at ovulation (p < 0.05). Additionally, weak-to-strong relationships between ankle muscle mechanical properties and postural sway characteristics were found (p < 0.05). These results suggest the effect of estrogen on human connective tissues. We therefore postulate that estrogen increases joint and muscle laxity and affects posture stability according to the phase of the menstrual cycle.

  20. Isolated syndesmotic injuries in acute ankle sprains: diagnostic significance of clinical examination and MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Großterlinden, Lars Gerhard; Hartel, Maximilian; Yamamura, Jin; Schoennagel, Bjoern; Bürger, Nils; Krause, Mathias; Spiro, Alexander; Hoffmann, Michael; Lehmann, Wolfgang; Rueger, Johannes Maria; Rupprecht, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Acute ankle sprains are frequently accompanied by syndesmotic injuries. These injuries are often overlooked in clinical examinations. The aim of this study was (1) to evaluate the incidence of syndesmotic injuries in acute ankle sprains using MRI, (2) to determine the accuracy of common clinical diagnostic tests, (3) to analyse their inter-rater reliability, and (4) to evaluate the role of clinical symptoms in the diagnosis of syndesmotic injuries. A total of 100 patients with acute ankle sprain injury without associated fractures in plane radiographs were enrolled. The clinical assessment was performed by two independent examiners. Local findings, ankle ligament palpation, squeeze test, external rotation test, Drawer test, Cotton test, and the crossed-leg test (two examiners) were compared with MRI results (read by two blinded radiologists) as a reference standard. Ninety-six participants (57% male) met the inclusion criteria. MRI detected a ruptured anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament (AITFL) in 14 patients (15%); 9 partial tears and 5 complete tears were evident. Evidence of pain at rest was found to predict syndesmotic injuries most accurately (p = 0.039). The palpation test over the proximal fibula produced the highest inter-rater correlation (κ = 0.65), but the lowest sensitivity for syndesmotic injuries of 8%. All other clinical tests demonstrated moderate to fair inter-rater reliabilities (κ = 0.37-0.52). Low sensitivity values were found with all clinical tests (13.9-55.6%). In this study, clinical examination was insufficient to detect syndesmotic injuries in acute ankle sprains. MRI scanning revealed a syndesmotic lesion in 15% of patients. MRI scanning should be recommended in patients with ongoing pain at rest following ankle sprains. I.

  1. Consumer Choice Between Hospital-Based and Freestanding Facilities for Arthroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, James C.; Brown, Timothy T.; Whaley, Christopher; Bozic, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hospital-based outpatient departments traditionally charge higher prices for ambulatory procedures, compared with freestanding surgery centers. Under emerging reference-based benefit designs, insurers establish a contribution limit that they will pay, requiring the patient to pay the difference between that contribution limit and the actual price charged by the facility. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of reference-based benefits on consumer choices, facility prices, employer spending, and surgical outcomes for orthopaedic procedures performed at ambulatory surgery centers. Methods: We obtained data on 3962 patients covered by the California Public Employees’ Retirement System (CalPERS) who underwent arthroscopy of the knee or shoulder in the three years prior to the implementation of reference-based benefits in January 2012 and on 2505 patients covered by CalPERS who underwent arthroscopy in the two years after implementation. Control group data were obtained on 57,791 patients who underwent arthroscopy and were not subject to reference-based benefits. The impact of reference-based benefits on consumer choices between hospital-based and freestanding facilities, facility prices, employer spending, and surgical complications was assessed with use of difference-in-differences multivariable regressions to adjust for patient demographic characteristics, comorbidities, and geographic location. Results: By the second year of the program, the shift to reference-based benefits was associated with an increase in the utilization of freestanding ambulatory surgery centers by 14.3 percentage points (95% confidence interval, 8.1 to 20.5 percentage points) for knee arthroscopy and by 9.9 percentage points (95% confidence interval, 3.2 to 16.7 percentage points) for shoulder arthroscopy and a corresponding decrease in the use of hospital-based facilities. The mean price paid by CalPERS fell by 17.6% (95% confidence interval, −24.9% to −9

  2. Ankle and shoulder joint reconstruction using soft tissue allografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nather, A.; Singh, G.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Lateral Collateral Ligament Insufficiency is a common complication of injury to the ankle joint. This needs reconstruction of the torn ligament as the joint instability gives rise to frequent giving way at the ankle joint. It can be reconstructed using autologous peroneus brevis tendon. The authors prefer to reconstruct using deep frozen (-80 degree C) non-gamma irradiated tibialis anterior or tibialis posterior tendon allograft procured by NUH Tissue Bank. The graft must be at least between 18-22 cm long. The procedure employed is a first stage Brostrom Procedure repairing the anterior talo-fibula ligament using Mitek sutures. In the second stage the Calcaneofibular ligament is reconstructed using a figure of eight tendon reconstruction via drill holes in the fibular above and the calcaneum below. Twelve cases have been reconstructed this way with good results. When injury is sustained to the Acromia-clavicular (AC) Joint, for type 3 to 5 AC Joint Dislocation and in manual labourers, reconstruction is needed. The author's preferred method is a 2 stage procedure using deep frozen (-80 degree C), non gamma-irradiated fascia lata allografts procured by NUH Tissue Bank. In the first stage the dislocated AC Joint is reduced and held in position by transfixation using 2 baby Steinmann Pins and repair of torn corac clavicular ligaments. The second stage consisted of reconstruction with rolled-up fascia lata figure of eight allograft tendon between the clavicle and the coracoid process. The 2 pins are removed after 6 weeks and the shoulder mobilised. 10 cases have been done with good results. Two cases showed mild subluxation of the AC joint due to slight loss of the reduction performed during the operation. (Author)

  3. The role of ankle bracing for prevention of ankle sprain injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Michael T; Liu, Hsin-Yi

    2003-10-01

    Lateral ankle sprains are one of the most common injuries incurred in recreational and competitive athletics. These injuries have a significant impact in terms of cost, athletic participation, and activities of daily living. Prophylactic ankle braces are often used to reduce the risk of injury recurrence when individuals return to athletic participation. The purpose of this clinical commentary is to review the literature and provide our own experience relative to the use of prophylactic ankle bracing. Relatively high incidence rates of ankle sprain injury have been reported for basketball and soccer athletes, military trainees, and individuals with a previous history of ankle sprain injury. Semirigid and laced ankle braces have significantly reduced the incidence of initial and recurrent ankle sprain injuries in athletic and military samples. With few exceptions, these braces do not appear to affect functional performance adversely. The prophylactic use of semirigid ankle braces appears warranted to reduce the incidence of initial and, in particular, recurrent ankle sprain injuries for individuals who participate in activities that have the highest risk for these injuries. Additional research is needed to evaluate the many new braces that are available and in use and their influence on the incidence of ankle sprain injury and functional performance.

  4. -Computed tomography arthrography and tendon imaging of the ankle-.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wybier, M; Hamze, B; Champsaur, P; Parlier, C

    1997-01-01

    Ankle opacification dramatically increases the diagnostic value of CT examination of the foot and ankle. The procedure may be entirely performed on the CT table. The main results and indications of CT-arthrography of the ankle are presented. CT-tenography of the ankle which includes the opacification of a tendon sheath on the CT table, is also described.

  5. Footwear and ankle stability in the basketball player.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, O; Blocher, K; Bradbury, R L; Saxena, A; Toy, M L

    1988-04-01

    Ankle stability in basketball players is affected by footwear. Athletic shoe manufacturers have introduced specialized lacing systems and high-top performance shoes to improve ankle stability. These performance shoes not only aid in preventing ankle injuries, but also protect injured ankles.

  6. [Arthroscopic treatment of chondral lesions of the ankle joint. Evidence-based therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, M; Jordan, M; Hamborg-Petersen, E

    2016-02-01

    Ankle sprains are the most relevant injuries of the lower extremities and can lead to damage to ligaments and osteochondral lesions. Up to 50 % of patients with a sprained ankle later develop a lesion of the cartilage in the ankle joint or an osteochondral lesion of the talus. This can lead to osteoarthritis of the injured ankle joint. Spontaneous healing is possible in all age groups in cases of a bone bruise in the subchondral bone but in isolated chondral injuries is only useful in pediatric patients. In many cases chondral and osteochondral injuries lead to increasing demarcation of the affected area and can result in progressive degeneration of the joint if not recognized in time. There also exist a certain number of osteochondral changes of the articular surface of the talus without any history of relevant trauma, which are collectively grouped under the term osteochondrosis dissecans. Perfusion disorders are discussed as one of many possible causes of these alterations. Nowadays, chondral and osteochondral defects can be treated earlier due to detection using very sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) techniques. The use of conservative treatment only has a chance of healing in pediatric patients. Conservative measures for adults should only be considered as adjuvant treatment to surgery.Based on a comprehensive analysis of the current literature, this article gives an overview and critical analysis of the current concepts for treatment of chondral and osteochondral injuries and lesions of the talus. With arthroscopic therapy curettage and microfracture of talar lesions are the predominant approaches or retrograde drilling of the defect is another option when the chondral coating is retained. Implantation of autologous chondral cells or homologous juvenile cartilage tissue is also possible with arthroscopic techniques. Osteochondral fractures (flake fracture) are usually performed as a mini-open procedure supported by

  7. Effects of ankle fatigue on functional reflex activity during gait perturbations in young and elderly men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granacher, Urs; Gruber, Markus; Förderer, Dominik; Strass, Dieter; Gollhofer, Albert

    2010-05-01

    There is growing evidence that aging and muscle fatigue result in impaired postural reflexes in humans. Therefore, the objective of this study was to examine the effects of ankle fatigue on functional reflex activity (FRA) during gait perturbations in young and elderly men. Twenty-eight young (27.0+/-3.1 years, n=14) and old (67.2+/-3.7 years, n=14) healthy active men participated in this study. Fatigue of the plantarflexors and dorsiflexors was induced by isokinetic contractions. Pre and post-fatigue, subjects were tested for their ability to compensate for decelerating gait perturbations while walking on a treadmill. Latency, FRA of lower extremity muscles and angular velocity of the ankle joint complex were analysed by means of surface electromyography and goniometry. After the fatigue protocol, no significant main and interaction effects were detected for the parameter latency in m. tibialis anterior (TA). For both groups, a significant pre to post-test decrease in FRA in TA (pvelocity of the ankle joint (p=.007). However, no significant groupxtest interactions were found for the three parameters. Ankle fatigue has an impact on the ability to compensate for gait perturbations in young and elderly adults. However, no significant differences in all analysed parameters were detected between young and elderly subjects. These results may imply that age-related deteriorations in the postural control system do not specifically affect the ability to compensate for gait perturbations under fatigued condition. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The effect of ankle bracing on knee kinetics and kinematics during volleyball-specific tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, T; Ng, L; Campbell, A

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of ankle bracing on knee kinetics and kinematics during volleyball tasks. Fifteen healthy, elite, female volleyball players performed a series of straight-line and lateral volleyball tasks with no brace and when wearing an ankle brace. A 14-camera Vicon motion analysis system and AMTI force plate were used to capture the kinetic and kinematic data. Knee range of motion, peak knee anterior-posterior and medial-lateral shear forces, and peak ground reaction forces that occurred between initial contact with the force plate and toe off were compared using paired sample t-tests between the braced and non-braced conditions (P volleyball tasks. However, ankle bracing was demonstrated to reduce knee lateral shear forces during all of the lateral movement volleyball tasks. Wearing the Active Ankle T2 brace will not impact knee joint range of motion and may in fact reduce shear loading to the knee joint in volleyball players. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. CONGENITAL ANTERIOR TIBIOFEMURAL SUBLUXATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Shahla

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Congenital anterior tibiofemoral subluxation is an extremely rare disorder. All reported cases accompanied by other abnormalities and syndromes. A 16-year-old high school girl referred to us with bilateral anterior tibiofemoral subluxation as the knees were extended and reduced at more than 30 degrees flexion. Deformities were due to tightness of the iliotibial band and biceps femuris muscles and corrected by surgical release. Associated disorders included bilateral anterior shoulders dislocation, short metacarpals and metatarsals, and right calcaneuvalgus deformity.

  10. Effects of Preventative Ankle Taping on Planned Change-of-Direction and Reactive Agility Performance and Ankle Muscle Activity in Basketballers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffriess, Matthew D; Schultz, Adrian B; McGann, Tye S; Callaghan, Samuel J; Lockie, Robert G

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the effects of preventative ankle taping on planned change-of-direction and reactive agility performance and peak ankle muscle activity in basketballers. Twenty male basketballers (age = 22.30 ± 3.97 years; height = 1.84 ± 0.09 meters; body mass = 85.96 ± 11.88 kilograms) with no ankle pathologies attended two testing sessions. Within each session, subjects completed six planned and six reactive randomized trials (three to the left and three to the right for each condition) of the Y-shaped agility test, which was recorded by timing lights. In one session, subjects had both ankles un-taped. In the other, both ankles were taped using a modified subtalar sling. Peak tibialis anterior, peroneus longus (PL), peroneus brevis (PB), and soleus muscle activity was recorded for both the inside and outside legs across stance phase during the directional change, which was normalized against 10-meter sprint muscle activity (nEMG). Both the inside and outside cut legs during the change-of-direction step were investigated. Repeated measures ANOVA determined performance time and nEMG differences between un-taped and taped conditions. There were no differences in planned change-of-direction or reactive agility times between the conditions. Inside cut leg PL nEMG decreased when taped for the planned left, reactive left, and reactive right cuts (p = 0.01). Outside leg PB and soleus nEMG increased during the taped planned left cut (p = 0.02). There were no other nEMG changes during the cuts with taping. Taping did not affect change-of-direction or agility performance. Inside leg PL activity was decreased, possibly due to the tape following the line of muscle action. This may reduce the kinetic demand for the PL during cuts. In conclusion, ankle taping did not significantly affect planned change-of-direction or reactive agility performance, and did not demonstrate large changes in activity of the muscle complex in healthy basketballers. Key pointsAnkle taping

  11. Ankle muscle activity modulation during single-leg stance differs between children, young adults and seniors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, Eduard; Faude, Oliver; Roth, Ralf; Zahner, Lukas; Donath, Lars

    2018-02-01

    Incomplete maturation and aging-induced declines of the neuromuscular system affect postural control both in children and older adults and lead to high fall rates. Age-specific comparisons of the modulation of ankle muscle activation and behavioral center of pressure (COP) indices during upright stance have been rarely conducted. The objective of the present study was to quantify aging effects on a neuromuscular level. Thus, surface electromyography (SEMG) modulation and co-activity of ankle muscles during single-leg standing was compared in healthy children, young adults and seniors. Postural steadiness (velocity and mean sway frequency of COP), relative muscle activation (SEMG modulation) and co-activation of two ankle muscles (tibialis anterior, TA; soleus, SO) were examined during single-leg stance in 19 children [age, 9.7 (SD 0.5) years], 30 adults [23.3 (1.5) years] and 29 seniors [62.7 (6.1) years]. Velocity of COP in medio-lateral and anterior-posterior directions, mean sway frequency in anterior-posterior direction, relative muscle activation (TA and SO) and co-activation revealed large age effects (P  0.14). Post-hoc comparisons indicated higher COP velocities, anterior-posterior frequencies, relative SO activation and co-activation in children and seniors when compared with adults. Relative TA activation was higher in children and adults compared with seniors (P modulation. However, TA modulation is higher in children and adults, whereas seniors' TA modulation capacity is diminished. An aging-induced decline of TA motor units might account for deteriorations of TA modulation in seniors.

  12. Basketball Coaches’ Utilization of Ankle Injury Prevention Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    McGuine, Timothy A.; Hetzel, Scott; Pennuto, Anthony; Brooks, Alison

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ankle injuries are the most common high school basketball injury. Little is known regarding the utilization of ankle injury prevention strategies in high school settings. Objective: To determine high school basketball coaches’ utilization of ankle injury prevention strategies, including prophylactic ankle bracing (PAB) or an ankle injury prevention exercise program (AIEPP). Study Design: Cross-sectional survey. Methods: The survey was distributed to all high school basketball coac...

  13. WITHDRAWN: Interventions for preventing ankle ligament injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handoll, Helen Hg; Rowe, Brian H; Quinn, Kathryn M; de Bie, Rob

    2011-05-11

    Some sports, for example basketball and soccer, have a very high incidence of ankle injuries, mainly sprains. Consequently, ankle sprains are one of the most commonly treated injuries in acute care. To assess the effects of interventions used for the prevention of ankle ligament injuries or sprains in physically active individuals from adolescence to middle age. We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauam Group's specialised register, MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, the National Research Register and bibliographies of study reports. We also contacted colleagues and some trialists. The most recent search was conducted in July 2000. Randomised or quasi-randomised trials of interventions for the prevention of ankle sprains in physically active individuals from adolescence to middle age were included provided that ankle sprains were recorded. Interventions included use of modified footwear, external ankle supports, co-ordination training and health education. These could be applied as a supplement to treatment provided that prevention of re-injury was the primary objective. At least two reviewers independently assessed methodological quality and extracted data. Wherever possible, results of outcome measures were pooled and sub-grouped by history of previous sprain. Relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) are reported for individual and pooled data. In this review update, a further nine new trials were included. Overall, 14 randomised trials with data for 8279 participants were included. Twelve trials involved active, predominantly young, adults participating in organised, generally high-risk, activities. The other two trials involved injured patients who had been active in sports before their injury. The prophylactic interventions under test included the application of an external ankle support in the form of a semi-rigid orthosis (three trials), air-cast brace (one trial) or high top shoes (one trial); ankle disk training; taping; muscle

  14. Interventions for preventing ankle ligament injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handoll, H H; Rowe, B H; Quinn, K M; de Bie, R

    2001-01-01

    Some sports, for example basketball and soccer, have a very high incidence of ankle injuries, mainly sprains. Consequently, ankle sprains are one of the most commonly treated injuries in acute care. To assess the effects of interventions used for the prevention of ankle ligament injuries or sprains in physically active individuals from adolescence to middle age. We searched the Cochrane Musculoskeletal Injuries Group's specialised register, MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, the National Research Register and bibliographies of study reports. We also contacted colleagues and some trialists. The most recent search was conducted in July 2000. Randomised or quasi-randomised trials of interventions for the prevention of ankle sprains in physically active individuals from adolescence to middle age were included provided that ankle sprains were recorded. Interventions included use of modified footwear, external ankle supports, co-ordination training and health education. These could be applied as a supplement to treatment provided that prevention of re-injury was the primary objective. At least two reviewers independently assessed methodological quality and extracted data. Wherever possible, results of outcome measures were pooled and sub-grouped by history of previous sprain. Relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) are reported for individual and pooled data. In this review update, a further nine new trials were included. Overall, 14 randomised trials with data for 8279 participants were included. Twelve trials involved active, predominantly young, adults participating in organised, generally high-risk, activities. The other two trials involved injured patients who had been active in sports before their injury. The prophylactic interventions under test included the application of an external ankle support in the form of a semi-rigid orthosis (three trials), air-cast brace (one trial) or high top shoes (one trial); ankle disk training; taping; muscle

  15. Differences in kinematic control of ankle joint motions in people with chronic ankle instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipp, Kristof; Palmieri-Smith, Riann M

    2013-06-01

    People with chronic ankle instability display different ankle joint motions compared to healthy people. The purpose of this study was to investigate the strategies used to control ankle joint motions between a group of people with chronic ankle instability and a group of healthy, matched controls. Kinematic data were collected from 11 people with chronic ankle instability and 11 matched control subjects as they performed a single-leg land-and-cut maneuver. Three-dimensional ankle joint angles were calculated from 100 ms before, to 200 ms after landing. Kinematic control of the three rotational ankle joint degrees of freedom was investigated by simultaneously examining the three-dimensional co-variation of plantarflexion/dorsiflexion, toe-in/toe-out rotation, and inversion/eversion motions with principal component analysis. Group differences in the variance proportions of the first two principal components indicated that the angular co-variation between ankle joint motions was more linear in the control group, but more planar in the chronic ankle instability group. Frontal and transverse plane motions, in particular, contributed to the group differences in the linearity and planarity of angular co-variation. People with chronic ankle instability use a different kinematic control strategy to coordinate ankle joint motions during a single-leg landing task. Compared to the healthy group, the chronic ankle instability group's control strategy appeared to be more complex and involved joint-specific contributions that would tend to predispose this group to recurring episodes of instability. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Simulation-Based Training Platforms for Arthroscopy: A Randomized Comparison of Virtual Reality Learning to Benchtop Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Robert M; Alvand, Abtin; Garfjeld Roberts, Patrick; Hargrove, Caroline; Kirby, Georgina; Rees, Jonathan L

    2017-05-01

    To determine whether a virtual reality (VR) arthroscopy simulator or benchtop (BT) arthroscopy simulator showed superiority as a training tool. Arthroscopic novices were randomized to a training program on a BT or a VR knee arthroscopy simulator. The VR simulator provided user performance feedback. Individuals performed a diagnostic arthroscopy on both simulators before and after the training program. Performance was assessed using wireless objective motion analysis and a global rating scale. The groups (8 in the VR group, 9 in the BT group) were well matched at baseline across all parameters (P > .05). Training on each simulator resulted in significant performance improvements across all parameters (P .05). BT-trained subjects outperformed VR-trained subjects in all parameters during final assessments on the BT simulator (P .05). Both simulators delivered improvements in arthroscopic skills. BT training led to skills that readily transferred to the VR simulator. Skills acquired after VR training did not transfer as readily to the BT simulator. Despite trainees receiving automated metric feedback from the VR simulator, the results suggest a greater gain in psychomotor skills for BT training. Further work is required to determine if this finding persists in the operating room. This study suggests that there are differences in skills acquired on different simulators and skills learnt on some simulators may be more transferable. Further work in identifying user feedback metrics that enhance learning is also required. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. All rights reserved.

  17. Epinephrine-induced pulmonary edema during hip arthroscopy: a report of two cases and a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkin, Nicole S; Degen, Ryan M; Liguori, Gregory A; Kelly, Bryan T

    2017-09-01

    Hip arthroscopy utilization has significantly increased in recent years. While it is a relatively safe procedure, it is not without risk. Life-threatening complications, albeit rare, can potentially occur and must be appropriately recognized and treated. We describe 2 cases in which patients' undergoing hip arthroscopy developed pulmonary edema and their respective courses of treatment. Both patients were being treated for symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement (FAI), with labral tears, requiring operative management after a failed trial of conservative management. The complication occurred during a primary hip arthroscopy procedure and a retrospective review of their clinical records and intra-operative notes was performed. Hip arthroscopy was performed under spinal anesthetic in the supine position in both patients. In both procedures, patients developed severe hypertension and tachycardia, with subsequent oxygen desaturations with noted pulmonary edema. The postulated etiology was systemic effects from intra-articular epinephrine, causing acute pulmonary edema with corresponding cardiovascular changes. With supportive ventilation, selective alpha-adrenergic blocker and furosemide administration, and cessation of epinephrine exposure, vital signs normalized and both patients experienced symptom resolution. During arthroscopy, if acute hypertension, tachycardia and hypoxia develop, epinephrine-induced pulmonary edema should be considered as a cause by the treating orthopedic surgeon and anesthesiologist in order to initiate an appropriate treatment plan.

  18. Primary ankle arthrodesis for neglected open weber B ankle fracture dislocation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Thomason, Katherine

    2014-07-01

    Primary ankle arthrodesis used to treat a neglected open ankle fracture dislocation is a unique decision. A 63-year-old man presented to the emergency department with a 5-day-old open fracture dislocation of his right ankle. After thorough soft tissue debridement, primary arthrodesis of the tibiotalar joint was performed using initial Kirschner wire fixation and an external fixator. Definitive soft tissue coverage was later achieved using a latissimus dorsi free flap. The fusion was consolidated to salvage the limb from amputation. The use of primary arthrodesis to treat a compound ankle fracture dislocation has not been previously described.

  19. The adult ball-and-socket ankle joint: surgical management of late ankle and subtalar arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, John S; DeOrio, James K

    2015-04-01

    We review the surgical management of 4 adult patients with ball-and-socket ankle deformity who developed end-stage subtalar and/or ankle joint arthritis. We retrospectively reviewed a series of 4 adult patients with ball-and-socket ankle configurations who underwent surgical treatment for either end-stage tibiotalar or subtalar arthritis, with either subtalar arthrodesis or total ankle replacement (TAR). Clinical outcome, including subjective pain assessment, limitation of activities, and difficulty with shoe wear, were assessed at follow-up. A total of 5 ankles in 4 patients were identified that met the inclusion criteria. There were 3 subtalar arthrodeses in 2 patients and 2 primary TARs in 2 patients. At an average follow-up of 30.5 (range = 17 to 59) months, there were no failures, although 1 patient who underwent TAR was considered an impending failure with aseptic component loosening. Of the 4 patients, 3 resumed normal activity with minimal pain and were very pleased with their overall outcome. Standard surgical interventions for ankle and subtalar arthritis, such as total ankle arthroplasty and subtalar arthrodesis, can be successfully performed in patients with ball-and-socket ankles; clinical outcome and survivorship, however, may be inferior to that in patients with normal ankle configurations. Therapeutic, Level IV: Case Series. © 2014 The Author(s).

  20. Spontaneous resolution of posterior ankle joint loose bodies after total ankle replacement: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Raymond P; Cheng, Sally H S

    2017-06-01

    Late stage ankle osteoarthritis often presents with debilitating pain. It is common to find osteophytes and loose body formation around the joint. Total ankle arthroplasty can preserve joint mobility and pain relieve for such patient. However, when trying to remove the osteophytes and loose bodies at the posterior ankle joint, there is risk of damaging posterior structures such as the neurovascular bundle during the procedure. We are presenting a case where the posterior loose bodies remained untouched during the operation, and patient showed spontaneous resolution of the lesions with time. Patient enjoyed good function outcome after the surgery. Copyright © 2016 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of Prefabricated Ankle Orthoses on Postural Stability in Basketball Players with Chronic Ankle Instability

    OpenAIRE

    Faraji, Elahe; Daneshmandi, Hassan; Atri, Ahmad Ebrahimi; Onvani, Vahid; Namjoo, Faride Rezaee

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Ankle sprain is one of the most common injuries among athletes and instability and injury to this joint is responsible for long time loss of physical and recreational activity. Also, it can impose high costs to sport teams. Prevention of this injury is an important concern of practice and rehabilitation. One way of reducing the possibility of ankle joint injury is using an ankle orthosis. The present study aimed at inspecting the effects of two ankle orthoses on dynamic and semi-dynam...

  2. Influence of Elastic Bandage and Neoprene Ankle Support on Ankle Position Sense and Pain in Subjects with Ankle Sprain (Grade I & II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basir Majdoleslami

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to investigate whether a neoprene ankle support and elastic bandage around the ankle joint of subjects with ankle sprain (grade I&II would , in short term (a reduce pain (b improve ankle joint position sense and comparison of their effect with each other if they have. Materials & Methods: In a semi-experimental study, 30 subjects (16men, 14 women, age between 16-52 with ankle sprain grade I&II. Subjects had to have at least 2cm from 10cm visual analogue scale (VAS of ankle pain for study entry. All patients were randomly assigned to either an elastic bandage or a neoprene ankle support. One week later they were assigned to the opposite selection. Joint position sense was assessed in the sitting position using an electrogoniometer and pain by VAS where 0cm equals no pain and 10 cm equals worst pain. ankle pain and JPS were assessed for each selection one week apart. During each visit assessment were performed at baseline and after 20 min of bandage/neoprene ankle support application. Results: the mean of scores for ankle variables JPS and VAS was taken and paired-t test and Wilcoxon signed rank test was employed to calculate the different between two trails. Neoprene ankle support had significant effect on ankle JPS (P=0.034. But elastic bandage had no effect (P=0.539. Both of them had significantly reduced ankle pain. (P=0.000  Conclusion: In subjects with both neoprene ankle support and elastic bandage reduced ankle pain with more effect of neoprene ankle support. Only the neoprene ankle support had effect on knee JPS.

  3. Comparison of custom-moulded ankle orthosis with hinged joints and off-the-shelf ankle braces in preventing ankle sprain in lateral cutting movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Winson C C; Kobayashi, Toshiki; Choy, Barton T S; Leung, Aaron K L

    2012-06-01

    A custom moulded ankle orthosis with hinged joints potentially offers a better control over the subtalar joint and the ankle joint during lateral cutting movements, due to total contact design and increase in material strength. To test the above hypothesis by comparing it to three other available orthoses. Repeated measures. Eight subjects with a history of ankle sprains (Grade 2), and 11 subjects without such history performed lateral cutting movements in four test conditions: 1) non-orthotic, 2) custom-moulded ankle orthosis with hinges, 3) Sport-Stirrup, and 4) elastic ankle sleeve with plastic support. A VICON motion analysis system was used to study the motions at the ankle and subtalar joints. The custom-moulded ankle orthosis significantly lowered the inversion angle at initial contact (p = 0.006) and the peak inversion angle (p = 0.000) during lateral cutting movements in comparison to non-orthotic condition, while the other two orthoses did not. The three orthoses did not affect the plantarflexion motions, which had been suggested by previous studies to be important in shock wave attenuation. The custom-moulded ankle orthosis with hinges could better control inversion and thus expected to better prevent ankle sprain in lateral cutting movements. Custom-moulded ankle orthoses are not commonly used in preventing ankle sprains. This study raises the awareness of the use of custom-moulded ankle orthoses which are expected to better prevent ankle sprains.

  4. A Survey of Parachute Ankle Brace Breakages

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Knapik, Joseph J; Spiess, Anita; Darakjy, Salima; Grier, Tyson; Manning, Fred; Livingston, Elaine; Swedler, David; Amoroso, Paul; Jones, Bruce H

    2008-01-01

    ...) of the Defense Safety Oversight Council (DSOC) to evaluate the parachute ankle brace (PAB). Information provided by the questionnaire identified potential injury risk factors and comments on the PAB...

  5. New arthroscopic assisted technique for ankle instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerstner Garces, Juan Ricardo

    2004-01-01

    An assisted arthroscopic technique for chronic ankle instability is presented by the author, together with his results for 27 patients treated between January 2000 and February 2004, with a minimum follow-up of six months. Indications for his technique, according to the rehabilitation protocol of the Medical Centre, included patients with chronic subjective and objective ankle instability, anteroposterior instability, associated anteromedical impingement syndromes, non competitive athletes, patients not displaying defects in the alignment of the axis of foot and ankle, or systemic disorders such as diabetes mellitus, collagenisis or hyperelasticity. Patients were evaluated according to the AOFAS scale for the outcome of ankle procedures, and followed up for a minimum period of six months. Positive results confirm an efficient and effective technique, simple and easy to reproduce, that does not hinder future open anatomical or non-anatomical reconstruction, and in which complications are minimal

  6. Total joint replacement for neglected posterior knee dislocation following septic arthritis after arthroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Öztürkmen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This report presents the first case of a knee dislocation following septic arthritis after arthroscopy. A 65-year-old woman had an arthroscopy with irrigation and debridement (I&D of the joint and microfracture for the chondral lesions. She had complaints of postarthroscopic infection but non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medication and local ice compression was recommended. She revisited her physician twice and at the last visit she had a large purulent effusion in her knee. The gram stain of the joint fluid aspirate demonstrated gram-positive cocci and the cultures grew methicilline-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. She underwent arthroscopic assisted I&D and received intravenous antibiotics. I&D was repeated after two weeks. Intravenous antibiotherapy was continued for one more week and was changed to oral antibiotherapy for six weeks. At the third month visit's physical examination, a deformity at the knee was noticed and was referred to us for further treatment. A posterior knee dislocation with no neurovascular deficit was detected. The patient had a history of knee sprain but did not seek medical advice immediately. The blood samples showed no abnormality. The patient underwent a surgery with a cemented hinged revision total knee prosthesis following the exclusion of the active knee joint infection. Intraoperative frozen sections were also taken to exclude the active infection. The patient's knee is pain-free with full range of motion after 3 years. The objective of this report was to highlight the importance of early diagnosis, prompt appropriate treatment of septic arthritis following arthroscopy and the awareness of the knee dislocation as a rare dreadful complication of postarthroscopic infection particularly in elderly patients.

  7. Total joint replacement for neglected posterior knee dislocation following septic arthritis after arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürkmen, Yusuf; Akman, Yunus Emre; Ünkar, Ethem Ayhan; Şükür, Erhan

    2017-07-01

    This report presents the first case of a knee dislocation following septic arthritis after arthroscopy. A 65-year-old woman had an arthroscopy with irrigation and debridement (I&D) of the joint and microfracture for the chondral lesions. She had complaints of postarthroscopic infection but non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medication and local ice compression was recommended. She revisited her physician twice and at the last visit she had a large purulent effusion in her knee. The gram stain of the joint fluid aspirate demonstrated gram-positive cocci and the cultures grew methicilline-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. She underwent arthroscopic assisted I&D and received intravenous antibiotics. I&D was repeated after two weeks. Intravenous antibiotherapy was continued for one more week and was changed to oral antibiotherapy for six weeks. At the third month visit's physical examination, a deformity at the knee was noticed and was referred to us for further treatment. A posterior knee dislocation with no neurovascular deficit was detected. The patient had a history of knee sprain but did not seek medical advice immediately. The blood samples showed no abnormality. The patient underwent a surgery with a cemented hinged revision total knee prosthesis following the exclusion of the active knee joint infection. Intraoperative frozen sections were also taken to exclude the active infection. The patient's knee is pain-free with full range of motion after 3 years. The objective of this report was to highlight the importance of early diagnosis, prompt appropriate treatment of septic arthritis following arthroscopy and the awareness of the knee dislocation as a rare dreadful complication of postarthroscopic infection particularly in elderly patients. Copyright © 2017 Turkish Association of Orthopaedics and Traumatology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Pain Management After Outpatient Shoulder Arthroscopy: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrender, William J; Syed, Usman Ali M; Hammoud, Sommer; Emper, William; Ciccotti, Michael G; Abboud, Joseph A; Freedman, Kevin B

    2017-06-01

    Effective postoperative pain management after shoulder arthroscopy is a critical component to recovery, rehabilitation, and patient satisfaction. This systematic review provides a comprehensive overview of level 1 and level 2 evidence regarding postoperative pain management for outpatient arthroscopic shoulder surgery. Systematic review. We performed a systematic review of the various modalities reported in the literature for postoperative pain control after outpatient shoulder arthroscopy and analyzed their outcomes. Analgesic regimens reviewed include regional nerve blocks/infusions, subacromial/intra-articular injections or infusions, cryotherapy, and oral medications. Only randomized control trials with level 1 or level 2 evidence that compared 2 or more pain management modalities or placebo were included. We excluded studies without objective measures to quantify postoperative pain within the first postoperative month, subjective pain scale measurements, or narcotic consumption as outcome measures. A combined total of 40 randomized control trials met our inclusion criteria. Of the 40 included studies, 15 examined nerve blocks, 4 studied oral medication regimens, 12 studied subacromial infusion, 8 compared multiple modalities, and 1 evaluated cryotherapy. Interscalene nerve blocks (ISBs) were found to be the most effective method to control postoperative pain after shoulder arthroscopy. Increasing concentrations, continuous infusions, and patient-controlled methods can be effective for more aggressively controlling pain. Dexamethasone, clonidine, intrabursal oxycodone, and magnesium have all been shown to successfully improve the duration and adequacy of ISBs when used as adjuvants. Oral pregabalin and etoricoxib administered preoperatively have evidence supporting decreased postoperative pain and increased patient satisfaction. On the basis of the evidence in this review, we recommend the use of ISBs as the most effective analgesic for outpatient arthroscopic

  9. Pudendal nerve injury is a relatively common but transient complication of hip arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Anthony; Haldane, Chloe E; Ekhtiari, Seper; de Sa, Darren; Simunovic, Nicole; Belzile, Etienne L; Ayeni, Olufemi R

    2018-03-01

    Hip arthroscopy is emerging as the standard of care for conditions involving the hip, and has a unique set of complications. The purpose of this review was to identify (1) the crude rate of pudendal nerve injury following hip arthroscopy and (2) the specific factors leading to pudendal nerve injury. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PubMed were searched from database inception to October 2016. Patient demographics, indications, surgical technique, complication rates, treatment approaches, and rehabilitation strategies were extracted. Twenty-four studies (n = 3405) were included, with the majority (66%) of studies being level IV evidence. The mean age was 33.9 ± 9.7 years (range 12-78) and 48.2% were males. Average follow-up was 30.2 ± 19.1 months. 62 patients were reported to have sustained pudendal nerve injury (1.8%) post-operatively, and all resolved within 6 weeks to 3 months. Of the seven studies that reported using a perineal post, 20 patients were diagnosed with pudendal nerve injury (4.3%), in contrast to two studies (189 patients) reporting only 0.5% pudendal nerve injury without the use of perineal post. Two studies commented on time of traction during surgical intervention with mean times of 98 and 68 min with complication rates of 10% and 6.6%, respectively. Pudendal nerve injury is not uncommon following hip arthroscopy, with a reported rate found in this review of 1.8%. Potential risk factors may include the use of a perineal post and long traction times. All reported cases resolved within 3 months. Patients should be informed of complications related to pudendal nerve injury, which include sexual and urinary dysfunction. Level IV, systematic review of level I-IV studies.

  10. [Fear and preoperative anxiety behaviour and pain intensity perceived after knee arthroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anguita-Palacios, M Carmen; Talayero-San-Miguel, Marta; Herrero-Cereceda, Salomé; Martín-Cadenas, Mar; Pardo-Cuevas, Pilar; Gil-Martínez, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the short-term (24hours) association between postoperative pain and preoperative psychological variables (anxiety, pain catastrophizing and kinesiophobia) in a sample of knee arthroscopy ambulatory surgery. Observational cross-sectional study, conducted with 40 adult subjects who underwent knee arthroscopy in the surgical area of Cantoblanco Hospital (Hospital Universitario La Paz) in Madrid. The fear-avoidance beliefs and anxiety were assessed using validated questionnaires of pain catastrophizing, kinesiophobia and anxiety. Pre and post-surgical pain and perceived disability were evaluated by the Verbal Numeric Scale. Mean age of the sample (22 men and 18 women) was 52.85±14.21 without significant differences between gender. No statistically significant data for the association between variables of kinesiofobia, anxiety and pain catastrophizing and the intensity of perceived pain by the postoperative knee arthroscopy patient were found. Length of surgery in our study has a correlation with the immediate post-surgical pain (r=0.468; P=.002) and there is a relationship between age and pain intensity at 24hours (r=-0.329; P=.038), and between age and perceived disability (r=-0.314; P=.049). An association between catastrophizing and kinesiophobia scales (r=0.337; P=.033) is obtained likewise. In conclusion, preoperative fear-avoidance beliefs like pain anxiety or pain catastrophizing and kinesiophobia were not associated with acute postoperative pain in our study. Analyses of secondary pain related outcomes, however, indicated that reduced time of surgery may contribute to enhance clinical postoperative pain. If confirmed and replicated in larger samples, this may potentially enable clinicians to improve postoperative pain management in future patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Hip Distraction Without a Perineal Post: A Prospective Study of 1000 Hip Arthroscopy Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei-Dan, Omer; Kraeutler, Matthew J; Garabekyan, Tigran; Goodrich, Jesse A; Young, David A

    2018-03-01

    Hip arthroscopy has traditionally been performed with a perineal post, resulting in various groin-related complications, including pudendal nerve neurapraxias, vaginal tears, and scrotal necrosis. To assess the safety of a technique for hip distraction without the use of a perineal post. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. We prospectively analyzed a consecutive cohort of 1000 hips presenting to a dedicated hip preservation clinic; all patients had hip pain and were subsequently treated with hip arthroscopy. Demographic variables, hip pathology, and lateral center edge angle were recorded for each case. In the operating room, the patient's feet were placed in traction boots in a specifically designed distraction setup, and the operative table was placed in varying degrees of Trendelenburg. With this technique, enough resistance is created by gravity and friction between the patient's body and the bed to allow for successful hip distraction without the need for a perineal post. In a subset of 309 hips (n = 281 patients), the degrees of Trendelenburg as well as the distraction force were analyzed. The mean ± SD Trendelenburg angle used among the subset of 309 hips was 11° ± 2°. The mean initial distraction force necessary was 90 ± 28 lb, which decreased to 65 ± 24 lb by 30 minutes after traction initiation ( P edge angle ( P < .01). No groin-related complications occurred among the entire cohort of patients, including soft tissue or nerve-related complications. The rate of deep venous thrombosis was 2 in 1000. The use of the Trendelenburg position and a specially designed distraction setup during hip arthroscopy allows for safe hip distraction without a perineal post, thereby eliminating groin-related soft tissue and nerve complications. Certain patient variables can be used to estimate the required distraction force and inclination angle with this method.

  12. [Treatment of osteochondritis lesion in the knee with reduction and fixation under arthroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao-feng; Wei, Shan-shan; Wang, Shao-shan

    2015-10-01

    To study clinical results of reduction and fixation under arthroscopy for the treatment of osteochondrotical lesion in the knee. From December 2012 to December 2013, 4 patients with the knee joint osteochondritis lesion and free bone fragments were treated with arthroscopy to detect the stripped cartilage, and then the cartilages were reduced with small incision and fixed by cartilage nail. There were 3 males and 1 female, with age of 15, 15, 20 and 27 years old. The durations of the disease were 1 d, 5 d, 1 month and 1 year. All the patients had swelling and effusion in the knee joint, and the floating patellar test was positive. CT examination showed bone defects and loose bodies. The Lysholm, VAS, and Tegner scale were used to evaluate the knee joint functions before and after operation. All the patients underwent successful surgery. Postoperative CT showed good location of the cartilage without loss of reduced bone and cartilage. All the patients were followed up, and the duration ranged from 10 to 13 months, with a mean of 12 months. In one patient, arthroscopy examination was conducted for a second time to examine the connection of the fracture part to the surrounding cartilage, and it showed that the internal fixator was not absorbed. The Lysholm, VAS and Tegner scale of all patients were better than those before operation. Treatment of osteochondritis lesion with the fixation of absorbable cartilage nails may reconstruct the integrity of articular surface and recover the stability of joints, and it is an effective treatment method.

  13. Tibiofibular syndesmosis in acute ankle fractures: additional value of an oblique MR image plane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermans, John J.; Ginai, Abida Z. [Erasmus University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Beumer, Annechien; Moonen, Adrianus F.C.M. [Amphia Hospital, Department of Orthopaedics, Breda (Netherlands); Hop, Wim C.J. [Erasmus University Medical Center, Department of Biostatistics, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-02-15

    To evaluate the additional value of a 45 oblique MRI scan plane for assessing the anterior and posterior distal tibiofibular syndesmotic ligaments in patients with an acute ankle fracture. Prospectively, data were collected for 44 consecutive patients with an acute ankle fracture who underwent a radiograph (AP, lateral, and mortise view) as well as an MRI in both the standard three orthogonal planes and in an additional 45 oblique plane. The fractures on the radiographs were classified according to Lauge-Hansen (LH). The anterior (ATIFL) and posterior (PTIFL) distal tibiofibular ligaments, as well as the presence of a bony avulsion in both the axial and oblique planes was evaluated on MRI. MRI findings regarding syndesmotic injury in the axial and oblique planes were compared to syndesmotic injury predicted by LH. Kappa and the agreement score were calculated to determine the interobserver agreement. The Wilcoxon signed rank test and McNemar's test were used to compare the two scan planes. The interobserver agreement ({kappa}) and agreement score [AS (%)] regarding injury of the ATIFL and PTIFL and the presence of a fibular or tibial avulsion fracture were good to excellent in both the axial and oblique image planes ({kappa} 0.61-0.92, AS 84-95%). For both ligaments the oblique image plane indicated significantly less injury than the axial plane (p < 0.001). There was no significant difference in detection of an avulsion fracture in the axial or oblique plane, neither anteriorly (p=0.50) nor posteriorly (p=1.00). With syndesmotic injury as predicted by LH as comparison, the specificity in the oblique MR plane increased for both anterior (to 86% from 7%) and posterior (to 86% from 48%) syndesmotic injury when compared to the axial plane. Our results show the additional value of an 45 oblique MR image plane for detection of injury of the anterior and posterior distal tibiofibular syndesmoses in acute ankle fractures. Findings of syndesmotic injury in the oblique

  14. Tibiofibular syndesmosis in acute ankle fractures: additional value of an oblique MR image plane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermans, John J.; Ginai, Abida Z.; Beumer, Annechien; Moonen, Adrianus F.C.M.; Hop, Wim C.J.

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the additional value of a 45 oblique MRI scan plane for assessing the anterior and posterior distal tibiofibular syndesmotic ligaments in patients with an acute ankle fracture. Prospectively, data were collected for 44 consecutive patients with an acute ankle fracture who underwent a radiograph (AP, lateral, and mortise view) as well as an MRI in both the standard three orthogonal planes and in an additional 45 oblique plane. The fractures on the radiographs were classified according to Lauge-Hansen (LH). The anterior (ATIFL) and posterior (PTIFL) distal tibiofibular ligaments, as well as the presence of a bony avulsion in both the axial and oblique planes was evaluated on MRI. MRI findings regarding syndesmotic injury in the axial and oblique planes were compared to syndesmotic injury predicted by LH. Kappa and the agreement score were calculated to determine the interobserver agreement. The Wilcoxon signed rank test and McNemar's test were used to compare the two scan planes. The interobserver agreement (κ) and agreement score [AS (%)] regarding injury of the ATIFL and PTIFL and the presence of a fibular or tibial avulsion fracture were good to excellent in both the axial and oblique image planes (κ 0.61-0.92, AS 84-95%). For both ligaments the oblique image plane indicated significantly less injury than the axial plane (p < 0.001). There was no significant difference in detection of an avulsion fracture in the axial or oblique plane, neither anteriorly (p=0.50) nor posteriorly (p=1.00). With syndesmotic injury as predicted by LH as comparison, the specificity in the oblique MR plane increased for both anterior (to 86% from 7%) and posterior (to 86% from 48%) syndesmotic injury when compared to the axial plane. Our results show the additional value of an 45 oblique MR image plane for detection of injury of the anterior and posterior distal tibiofibular syndesmoses in acute ankle fractures. Findings of syndesmotic injury in the oblique MRI plane were

  15. Modulation of recurrent inhibition from knee extensors to ankle motoneurones during human walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamy, Jean-Charles; Iglesias, Caroline; Lackmy, Alexandra

    2008-01-01

    The neural control for muscle coordination during human locomotion involves spinal and supraspinal networks, but little is known about the exact mechanisms implicated. The present study focused on modulation of heteronymous recurrent inhibition from knee extensors to ankle motoneurones at different...... times in the gait cycle, when quadriceps (Quad) muscle activity overlaps that in tibialis anterior (TA) and soleus (Sol). The effects of femoral nerve stimulation on ankle motoneurones were investigated during treadmill walking and during tonic co-contraction of Quad and TA/Sol while standing. Recurrent...... inhibition of TA motoneurones depended on the level of background EMG, and was similar during walking and standing for matched background EMG levels. On the other hand, recurrent inhibition in Sol was reduced in early stance, with respect to standing, and enhanced in late stance. Reduced inhibition in Sol...

  16. Optimization of MR imaging of the most commonly injured structures of the ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneck, C.D.; Mesgarzadeh, M.; Bonakdarpour, A.

    1987-01-01

    MR images of the ankles of seven cadavers, nine healthy volunteers, and seven injured patients were correlated with cadaver dissections and cryosections to determine the optimum imaging plane and foot position for demonstrating each ligament's injury parameters. Axial images of the neutral-positioned foot allowed full-length visualization of the anterior and posterior talofibular ligaments, while the calcaneofibular ligament was paraxially imaged in 40 0 of plantar flexion. Coronal images allowed paraaxial visualization of major parts of the deltoid ligament: the tibionavicular ligament in 40 0 of plantar flexion and the tibospring and posterior tibiotalar ligaments in 15 0 of plantar flexion. Acute ligament rupture was well delineated on T2-weighted images by the high signal intensity of the overlying subcutaneous edema and hemorrhage and the underlying joint effusion. In chronically unstable ankles, ligament rupture, thinning, and lengthening were best demonstrated by placing that ligament in its stress position

  17. The principles of interference screw fixation: application to foot and ankle surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Kent A

    2005-01-01

    Based on the success of the anterior cruciate ligament model, interference screw fixation is now being applied to a wide variety of orthopedic conditions that require the fixation of tendon or ligament to bone. The primary focus of this article is to present the principles of interference screw fixation. By understanding the principles of interference screw fixation, the foot and ankle surgeon will be able to apply this fixation technique to a wide variety of surgical applications for tendon transfers or ligament repairs. The surgical technique, history, principles of fixation, studies of fixation strength, tissue healing, and foot and ankle indications are reviewed. A modified Girdlestone digital flexor tendon transfer procedure description is included to illustrate how interference screw techniques may be applied to foot surgery.

  18. An epidemiological survey on ankle sprain.

    OpenAIRE

    Yeung, M S; Chan, K M; So, C H; Yuan, W Y

    1994-01-01

    Ankle sprain is a common sports injury and is often regarded as trivial by athletes and coaches. This epidemiological study was conducted among three categories of Hong Kong Chinese athletes: national teams, competitive athletes and recreational athletes. This study shows that as much as 73% of all athletes had recurrent ankle sprain and 59% of these athletes had significant disability and residual symptoms which led to impairment of their athletic performance. This study indicates that a pro...

  19. Postoperative infection in the foot and ankle.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chan, Victoria O

    2012-07-01

    Our discussion highlights the commonly performed surgical procedures in the foot and ankle and reviews the various imaging modalities available for the detection of infection with graphic examples to better enable radiologists to approach the radiological evaluation of postoperative infection in the foot and ankle. Discrimination between infectious and noninfectious inflammation remains a diagnostic challenge usually needing a combination of clinical assessment, laboratory investigations, and imaging studies to increase diagnostic accuracy.

  20. Arthroscopy or ultrasound in undergraduate anatomy education: a randomized cross-over controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The exponential growth of image-based diagnostic and minimally invasive interventions requires a detailed three-dimensional anatomical knowledge and increases the demand towards the undergraduate anatomical curriculum. This randomized controlled trial investigates whether musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSUS) or arthroscopic methods can increase the anatomical knowledge uptake. Methods Second-year medical students were randomly allocated to three groups. In addition to the compulsory dissection course, the ultrasound group (MSUS) was taught by eight, didactically and professionally trained, experienced student-teachers and the arthroscopy group (ASK) was taught by eight experienced physicians. The control group (CON) acquired the anatomical knowledge only via the dissection course. Exposure (MSUS and ASK) took place in two separate lessons (75 minutes each, shoulder and knee joint) and introduced standard scan planes using a 10-MHz ultrasound system as well as arthroscopy tutorials at a simulator combined with video tutorials. The theoretical anatomic learning outcomes were tested using a multiple-choice questionnaire (MCQ), and after cross-over an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). Differences in student’s perceptions were evaluated using Likert scale-based items. Results The ASK-group (n = 70, age 23.4 (20–36) yrs.) performed moderately better in the anatomical MC exam in comparison to the MSUS-group (n = 84, age 24.2 (20–53) yrs.) and the CON-group (n = 88, 22.8 (20–33) yrs.; p = 0.019). After an additional arthroscopy teaching 1% of students failed the MC exam, in contrast to 10% in the MSUS- or CON-group, respectively. The benefit of the ASK module was limited to the shoulder area (p training is profitable and attractive to students with respect to complex joint anatomy. Simultaneous teaching of basic-skills in musculoskeletal ultrasound should be performed by medical experts, but seems to be inferior to the arthroscopic 2D-3D

  1. Quality analysis of patient information about knee arthroscopy on the World Wide Web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambandam, Senthil Nathan; Ramasamy, Vijayaraj; Priyanka, Priyanka; Ilango, Balakrishnan

    2007-05-01

    This study was designed to ascertain the quality of patient information available on the World Wide Web on the topic of knee arthroscopy. For the purpose of quality analysis, we used a pool of 232 search results obtained from 7 different search engines. We used a modified assessment questionnaire to assess the quality of these Web sites. This questionnaire was developed based on similar studies evaluating Web site quality and includes items on illustrations, accessibility, availability, accountability, and content of the Web site. We also compared results obtained with different search engines and tried to establish the best possible search strategy to attain the most relevant, authentic, and adequate information with minimum time consumption. For this purpose, we first compared 100 search results from the single most commonly used search engine (AltaVista) with the pooled sample containing 20 search results from each of the 7 different search engines. The search engines used were metasearch (Copernic and Mamma), general search (Google, AltaVista, and Yahoo), and health topic-related search engines (MedHunt and Healthfinder). The phrase "knee arthroscopy" was used as the search terminology. Excluding the repetitions, there were 117 Web sites available for quality analysis. These sites were analyzed for accessibility, relevance, authenticity, adequacy, and accountability by use of a specially designed questionnaire. Our analysis showed that most of the sites providing patient information on knee arthroscopy contained outdated information, were inadequate, and were not accountable. Only 16 sites were found to be providing reasonably good patient information and hence can be recommended to patients. Understandably, most of these sites were from nonprofit organizations and educational institutions. Furthermore, our study revealed that using multiple search engines increases patients' chances of obtaining more relevant information rather than using a single search

  2. Intraligamentous ganglion cysts of the anterior cruciate Ligament: MR findings with clinical and arthroscopic correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Do-Dai, D.D.; Youngberg, R.A.; Lanchbury, F.D.; Pitcher, J.D. Jr.; Garver, T.H. [Madigan Army Medical Center, Tacoma, WA (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Magnetic resonance findings with clinical and arthroscopic correlation of intraligamentous cysts of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are presented. Three cases of intraligamentous cysts of the ACL were identified out of 681 knee MRI examinations over a 2-year period. Arthroscopy and postoperative MRI were performed in all three patients, each of whom experienced knee pain with extreme flexion and extension. In all three cases the intraligamentous cyst was homogeneously hypointense on T1-weighted imaging and hyperintense on T2-weighted imaging relative to the ACL. Two of the three ACL cysts required a 70{degrees} scope for adequate visualization and establishment of posteromedial and posterolateral portals for arthroscopic treatment. One cyst could not be visualized arthroscopically and probing of the ACL from the anterior portal resulted in drainage of the cyst. No patient had presence of ACL cyst on follow-up MRI or recurrence of symptoms at a mean of 24 months. Intraligamentous cyst of ACL is a rare cause of knee pain. It should be suspected in patients having chronic pain with extremes of motion. Magnetic resonance findings are diagnostic and help to guide arthroscopy. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  3. The Effect of Prior Hip Arthroscopy on Patient-Reported Outcomes After Total Hip Arthroplasty: An Institutional Registry-Based, Matched Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopka, Joseph F; Buly, Robert L; Kelly, Bryan T; Su, Edwin P; McLawhorn, Alexander S

    2018-02-02

    A significant number of patients who undergo hip arthroscopy will subsequently undergo total hip arthroplasty (THA) or hip resurfacing arthroplasty (HRA), although limited evidence exists regarding effects of prior hip arthroscopy on the outcomes of these procedures. Of 5091 patients who underwent hip arthroscopy, we identified 69 patients who underwent subsequent THA (46) or HRA (23). Patients were matched to patients with no history of hip arthroscopy. Preoperative and 2-year postoperative Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), Short Form-12, Lower Extremity Activity Scale score, and satisfaction surveys were compared. Patients who underwent THA with history of arthroscopy had lower postoperative Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score Pain (82 ± 16 vs 93 ± 9, P = .003), Stiffness (85 ± 16 vs 93 ± 15, P = .01), Sports and Recreation (71 ± 22 vs 88 ± 18, P = .003), Quality-of-Life (65 ± 22 vs 86 ± 11, P Hip arthroscopy before hip arthroplasty is associated with slightly lower results in several patient-reported outcomes. These results are relevant when assessing patients for hip arthroscopy and when counseling prospective arthroplasty patients with history of arthroscopy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Differentiation of ankle sprain motion and common sporting motion by ankle inversion velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Vikki Wing-Shan; Fong, Daniel Tik-Pui; Chan, Yue-Yan; Yung, Patrick Shu-Hang; Fung, Kwai-Yau; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2010-07-20

    This study investigated the ankle inversion and inversion velocity between various common motions in sports and simulated sprain motion, in order to provide a threshold for ankle sprain risk identification. The experiment was composed of two parts: firstly, ten male subjects wore a pair of sport shoes and performed ten trials of running, cutting, jump-landing and stepping-down motions. Secondly, five subjects performed five trials of simulated sprain motion by a supination sprain simulator. The motions were analyzed by an eight-camera motion capture system at 120 Hz. A force plate was employed to record the vertical ground reaction force and locate the foot strike time for common sporting motions. Ankle inversion and inversion velocity were calculated by a standard lower extremity biomechanics calculation procedure. Profiles of vertical ground reaction force, ankle inversion angle and ankle inversion velocity were obtained. Results suggested that the ankle was kept in an everted position during the stance. The maximum ankle inversion velocity ranged from 22.5 to 85.1 degrees/s and 114.0 to 202.5 degrees/s for the four tested motions and simulated sprain motion respectively. Together with the ankle inversion velocity reported in the injury case (623 degrees/s), a threshold of ankle inversion velocity of 300 degrees/s was suggested for the identification of ankle sprain. The information obtained in this study can serve as a basis for the development of an active protection apparatus for reducing ankle sprain injury. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Preparatory co-activation of the ankle muscles may prevent ankle inversion injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMers, Matthew S.; Hicks, Jennifer L.; Delp, Scott L.

    2018-01-01

    Ankle inversion sprains are the most frequent acute musculoskeletal injuries occurring in physical activity. Interventions that retrain muscle coordination have helped rehabilitate injured ankles, but it is unclear which muscle coordination strategies, if any, can prevent ankle sprains. The purpose of this study was to determine whether coordinated activity of the ankle muscles could prevent excessive ankle inversion during a simulated landing on a 30-degree incline. We used a set of musculoskeletal simulations to evaluate the efficacy of two strategies for coordinating the ankle evertor and invertor muscles during simulated landing scenarios: planned co-activation and stretch reflex activation with physiologic latency (60-millisecond delay). A full-body musculoskeletal model of landing was used to generate simulations of a subject dropping onto an inclined surface with each coordination condition. Within each condition, the intensity of evertor and invertor co-activity or stretch reflexes were varied systematically. The simulations revealed that strong preparatory co-activation of the ankle evertors and invertors prior to ground contact prevented ankle inversion from exceeding injury thresholds by rapidly generating eversion moments after initial contact. Conversely, stretch reflexes were too slow to generate eversion moments before the simulations reached the threshold for inversion injury. These results suggest that training interventions to protect the ankle should focus on stiffening the ankle with muscle co-activation prior to landing. The musculoskeletal models, controllers, software, and simulation results are freely available online at http://simtk.org/home/ankle-sprains, enabling others to reproduce the results and explore new injury scenarios and interventions. PMID:28057351

  6. Injuries of the lateral collateral ligaments of the ankle: assessment with MR imaging

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    Kreitner, K.F.; Ferber, A.; Grebe, P.; Thelen, M. [Department of Radiology, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (Germany); Runkel, M. [Department of Traumatologic and Reconstructive Surgery, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (Germany); Berger, S. [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (Germany)

    1999-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of MRI to display injuries of the lateral collateral ligamentous complex in patients with an acute ankle distorsion trauma. The MR examinations of 36 patients with ankle pain after ankle distorsion were evaluated retrospectively without knowledge of clinical history, outcome and/or operative findings. The examinations were performed on a 1.5-T whole-body imager using a flexible surface coil. The signs for ligamentous abnormality were as follows: complete or partial discontinuity, increased signal within, and irregularity and waviness of the ligament. The results were compared with operative findings in 18 patients with subsequent surgical repair. Eighteen patients with conservative therapy had a follow-up MR examination after 3 months. There was 1 sprain, 3 partial and 32 complete tears of the anterior talofibular ligament, and 5 sprains, 5 partial, and 7 complete tears of the calcaneofibular ligament. There were no lesions of the posterior talofibular ligament. Compared with surgery, MRI demonstrated in 18 of 18 cases the exact extent of anterior talofibular ligament injuries and underestimated the extent in 2 of 8 cases of calcaneofibular ligament injury. In patients with follow-up MRI after conservative therapy, a thickened band-like structure was found along the course of the injured ligament in 17 of 18 cases. The absence of ligament repair after conservative treatment was confirmed during operative revision in one case. The MRI technique allows for grading of the extent of injury of the lateral collateral ligamentous complex after acute ankle strain. It seems to be suitable for monitoring the healing process after conservative-functional treatment of ligament tears. (orig.) With 5 figs., 2 tabs., 26 refs.

  7. Injuries of the lateral collateral ligaments of the ankle: assessment with MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreitner, K.F.; Ferber, A.; Grebe, P.; Thelen, M.; Runkel, M.; Berger, S.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of MRI to display injuries of the lateral collateral ligamentous complex in patients with an acute ankle distorsion trauma. The MR examinations of 36 patients with ankle pain after ankle distorsion were evaluated retrospectively without knowledge of clinical history, outcome and/or operative findings. The examinations were performed on a 1.5-T whole-body imager using a flexible surface coil. The signs for ligamentous abnormality were as follows: complete or partial discontinuity, increased signal within, and irregularity and waviness of the ligament. The results were compared with operative findings in 18 patients with subsequent surgical repair. Eighteen patients with conservative therapy had a follow-up MR examination after 3 months. There was 1 sprain, 3 partial and 32 complete tears of the anterior talofibular ligament, and 5 sprains, 5 partial, and 7 complete tears of the calcaneofibular ligament. There were no lesions of the posterior talofibular ligament. Compared with surgery, MRI demonstrated in 18 of 18 cases the exact extent of anterior talofibular ligament injuries and underestimated the extent in 2 of 8 cases of calcaneofibular ligament injury. In patients with follow-up MRI after conservative therapy, a thickened band-like structure was found along the course of the injured ligament in 17 of 18 cases. The absence of ligament repair after conservative treatment was confirmed during operative revision in one case. The MRI technique allows for grading of the extent of injury of the lateral collateral ligamentous complex after acute ankle strain. It seems to be suitable for monitoring the healing process after conservative-functional treatment of ligament tears. (orig.)

  8. Unlocking the talus by eversion limits medial ankle injury risk during external rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Button, Keith D; Wei, Feng; Haut, Roger C

    2015-10-15

    Eversion prior to excessive external foot rotation has been shown to predispose the anterior tibiofibular ligament (ATiFL) to failure, yet protect the anterior deltoid ligament (ADL) from failure despite high levels of foot rotation. The purpose of the current study was to measure the rotations of both the subtalar and talocrural joints during foot external rotation at sub-failure levels in either a neutral or a pre-everted position as a first step towards understanding the mechanisms of injury in previous studies. Fourteen (seven pairs) cadaver lower extremities were externally rotated 20° in either a pre-everted or neutral configuration, without producing injury. Motion capture was performed to track the tibia, talus, and calcaneus motions, and a joint coordinate system was used to analyze motions of the two joints. While talocrural joint rotation was greater in the neutral ankle (13.3±2.0° versus 10.5±2.7°, p=0.006), subtalar joint rotation was greater in the pre-everted ankle (2.4±1.9° versus 1.1±1.0°, p=0.014). Overall, the talocrural joint rotated more than the subtalar joint (11.9±2.8° versus 1.8±1.6°, p<0.001). It was proposed that the calcaneus and talus 'lock' in a neutral position, but 'unlock' when the ankle is everted prior to rotation. This locking/unlocking mechanism could be responsible for an increased subtalar rotation, but decreased talocrural rotation when the ankle is pre-everted, protecting the ADL from failure. This study may provide information valuable to the study of external rotation kinematics and injury risk. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Editorial Commentary: Renaissance of Primary Anterior Cruciate Ligament Repair: Is History Repeating Itself?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohmann, Erik

    2016-12-01

    In a comparative Level III study, Achtnich et al. compared suture anchor repair of acute proximal anterior cruciate ligament avulsion tears with single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with the quadrupled semitendinosus tendon. Short-term follow-up at a mean of 28 months showed that the between-group differences were not different. These results are encouraging but not different from other published series 25+ years ago. Only time will tell whether the long-term outcomes are identical and whether these techniques will also die a slow death. Hopefully history is not repeating itself. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of the application of ankle functional rehabilitation exercise on the ankle joint functional movement screen and isokinetic muscular function in patients with chronic ankle sprain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Sung-Bum; Park, Gi Duck

    2017-02-01

    [Purpose] This study was conducted to investigate the effects of ankle functional rehabilitation exercise on ankle joint functional movement screen results and isokinetic muscular function in patients with chronic ankle sprain patients. [Subjects and Methods] In this study, 16 patients with chronic ankle sprain were randomized to an ankle functional rehabilitation exercise group (n=8) and a control group (n=8). The ankle functional rehabilitation exercise centered on a proprioceptive sense exercise program, which was applied 12 times for 2 weeks. To verify changes after the application, ankle joint functional movement screen scores and isokinetic muscular function were measured and analyzed. [Results] The ankle functional rehabilitation exercise group showed significant improvements in all items of the ankle joint functional movement screen and in isokinetic muscular function after the exercise, whereas the control group showed no difference after the application. [Conclusion] The ankle functional rehabilitation exercise program can be effectively applied in patients with chronic ankle sprain for the improvement of ankle joint functional movement screen score and isokinetic muscular function.

  11. The American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society Ankle-Hindfoot Scale; Translation and validation of the Dutch language version for ankle fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.S. de Boer (Annette ); Tjioe, R.J.C. (Roderik J.C.); Van Der Sijde, F. (Fleur); D.E. Meuffels (Duncan); P.Th. den Hoed (Pieter); C.H. van der Vlies (Cornelis); W.E. Tuinebreijer (Wim); M.H.J. Verhofstad (Michiel); E.M.M. van Lieshout (Esther)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractObjectives The American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) Ankle-Hindfoot Scale is among the most commonly used instruments for measuring outcome of treatment in patients who sustained a complex ankle or hindfoot injury. It consists of a patient-reported and a physician-reported

  12. Bilateral anterior tarsal tunnel syndrome variant secondary to extensor hallucis brevis muscle hypertrophy in a ballet dancer: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennant, Joshua N; Rungprai, Chamnanni; Phisitkul, Phinit

    2014-12-01

    We present a case of bilateral anterior tarsal tunnel syndrome secondary EHB hypertrophy in a dancer, with successful treatment with bilateral EHB muscle excisions for decompression. The bilateral presentation of this case with the treatment of EHB muscle excision is the first of its type reported in the literature. Copyright © 2014 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Posttraumatic pseudoaneurysms of the anterior tibial artery: a review of the literature and a clinical case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stio, F; Ortensi, A; Battisti, G; Felici, A; Marigliani, M; Gallinacci, E; De Vita, M; Finizio, R; Fabrizio, G; Porcelli, C

    1993-02-01

    The authors after a review of the literature report a case of anterior tibial artery false aneurysm in a seventeen year old male, due to traumatic sprained ankle during a basketball match. Surgical techniques used in repairing the lesion as well as microsurgical technique for the direct suture of the artery, which allowed to resolve the problem, are discussed.

  14. Peroneal tendinosis as a predisposing factor for the acute lateral ankle sprain in runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziai, Pejman; Benca, Emir; Wenzel, Florian; Schuh, Reinhard; Krall, Christoph; Auffahrt, Alexander; Hofstetter, Martin; Windhager, Reinhard; Buchhorn, Tomas

    2016-04-01

    A painful episode in the region of the peroneal tendons, within the retromalleolar groove, is a common precipitating event of an acute lateral ankle sprain. A forefoot striking pattern is suspected to cause peroneal tendinosis. The aim of this study is to analyse the role of peroneal tendinosis as a predisposing factor for ankle sprain trauma in runners. Fifty-eight runners who had experienced acute ankle sprain trauma, with pre-existing pain episodes for up to 4 weeks in the region of the peroneal tendons, were assessed clinically. Fractures were excluded by conventional radiography. An magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan had been performed within 14 days after the traumatic event and was subsequently evaluated by two experienced radiologists. MRI revealed peroneal tendinosis in 55 patients (95% of the total study population). Peroneus brevis (PB) tendinosis was found in 48 patients (87% of all patients with peroneal tendinosis), and peroneus longus (PL) tendinosis was observed in 42 cases (76%). Thirty-five patients (64%) had combined PB and PL tendinosis. A lesion of the anterior talofibular ligament was found to be the most common ligament injury associated with peroneal tendinosis (29 cases; 53%), followed by a lesion of the calcaneofibular ligament (16 cases; 29%) and a lesion of the posterior tibiofibular ligament (13 cases; 24%). The results of this study reflect the correlation between peroneal tendinosis and ankle sprain trauma. Injuries of one or more ligaments are associated with further complications. A period of rest or forbearance of sports as well as adequate treatment of the peroneal tendinosis is essential to prevent subsequent ankle injuries, especially in runners. Modification of the running technique would also be beneficial. IV.

  15. An Acute Lateral Ankle Sprain Significantly Decreases Physical Activity across the Lifespan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tricia Hubbard-Turner, Erik A. Wikstrom, Sophie Guderian, Michael J. Turner

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We do not know the impact an ankle sprain has on physical activity levels across the lifespan. With the negative consequences of physical inactivity well established, understanding the effect of an ankle sprain on this outcome is critical. The objective of this study was to measure physical activity across the lifespan after a single ankle sprain in an animal model. Thirty male mice (CBA/J were randomly placed into one of three groups: the transected calcaneofibular ligament (CFL group, the transected anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL/CFL group, and a SHAM group. Three days after surgery, all of the mice were individually housed in a cage containing a solid surface running wheel. Physical activity levels were recorded and averaged every week across the mouse’s lifespan. The SHAM mice ran significantly more distance each day compared to the remaining two running groups (post hoc p = 0.011. Daily duration was different between the three running groups (p = 0.048. The SHAM mice ran significantly more minutes each day compared to the remaining two running groups (post hoc p=0.046 while the ATFL/CFL mice ran significantly less minutes each day (post hoc p = 0.028 compared to both the SHAM and CFL only group. The SHAM mice ran at a faster daily speed versus the remaining two groups of mice (post hoc p = 0.019 and the ATFL/CFL mice ran significantly slower each day compared to the SHAM and CFL group (post hoc p = 0.005. The results of this study indicate that a single ankle sprain significantly decreases physical activity across the lifespan in mice. This decrease in physical activity can potentially lead to the development of numerous chronic diseases. An ankle sprain thus has the potential to lead to significant long term health risks if not treated appropriately.

  16. How to sprain your ankle - a biomechanical case report of an inversion trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehring, D; Wissler, S; Mornieux, G; Gollhofer, A

    2013-01-04

    In order to develop preventive measures against lateral ankle sprains, it is essential to have a detailed understanding of the injury mechanism. Under laboratory experimental conditions the examination of the joint load has to be restricted with clear margins of safety. However, in the present case one athlete sprained his ankle while performing a run-and-cut movement during a biomechanical research experiment. 3D kinematics, kinetics, and muscle activity of the lower limb were recorded and compared to 16 previously performed trials. Motion patterns of global pelvis orientation, hip flexion, and knee flexion in the sprain trail deviated from the reference trials already early in the preparatory phase before ground contact. During ground contact, the ankle was rapidly plantar flexed (up to 1240°/s), inverted (up to 1290°/s) and internally rotated (up to 580°/s) reaching its maximum displacement within the first 150 ms after heel strike. Rapid neuromuscular activation bursts of the m. tibialis anterior and the m. peroneus longus started 40-45 ms after ground contact and overshot the activation profile of the reference trials with peak activation at 62 ms and 74 ms respectively. Therefore, it may be suggested that neuromuscular reflexes played an important role in joint control during the critical phase of excessive ankle displacement. The results of this case report clearly indicate that (a) upper leg mechanics, (b) pre-landing adjustments, and (c) neuromuscular contribution have to be considered in the mechanism of lateral ankle sprains. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of immobilization and remobilization on the ankle joint in Wistar rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.I. Kunz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A sprained ankle is a common musculoskeletal sports injury and it is often treated by immobilization of the joint. Despite the beneficial effects of this therapeutic measure, the high prevalence of residual symptoms affects the quality of life, and remobilization of the joint can reverse this situation. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of immobilization and remobilization on the ankle joint of Wistar rats. Eighteen male rats had their right hindlimb immobilized for 15 days, and were divided into the following groups: G1, immobilized; G2, remobilized freely for 14 days; and G3, remobilized by swimming and jumping in water for 14 days, performed on alternate days, with progression of time and a series of exercises. The contralateral limb was the control. After the experimental period, the ankle joints were processed for microscopic analysis. Histomorphometry did not show any significant differences between the control and immobilized/remobilized groups and members, in terms of number of chondrocytes and thickness of the articular cartilage of the tibia and talus. Morphological analysis of animals from G1 showed significant degenerative lesions in the talus, such as exposure of the subchondral bone, flocculation, and cracks between the anterior and mid-regions of the articular cartilage and the synovial membrane. Remobilization by therapeutic exercise in water led to recovery in the articular cartilage and synovial membrane of the ankle joint when compared with free remobilization, and it was shown to be an effective therapeutic measure in the recovery of the ankle joint.

  18. Experience with peroneus brevis muscle flaps for reconstruction of distal leg and ankle defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babu Bajantri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Peroneus brevis is a muscle in the leg which is expendable without much functional deficit. The objective of this study was to find out its usefulness in coverage of the defects of the lower leg and ankle. Patients and Methods: A retrospective analysis of the use of 39 pedicled peroneus brevis muscle flaps used for coverage of defects of the lower leg and ankle between November 2010 and December 2012 was carried out. The flaps were proximally based for defects of the lower third of the leg in 12 patients and distally based for reconstruction of defects of the ankle in 26 patients, with one patient having flaps on both ankles. Results: Partial flap loss in critical areas was found in four patients requiring further flap cover and in non-critical areas in two patients, which were managed with a skin graft. Three of the four critical losses occurred when we used it for covering defects over the medial malleolus. There was no complete flap loss in any of the patients. Conclusion: This flap has a unique vascular pattern and fails to fit into the classification of the vasculature of muscles by Mathes and Nahai. The unusual feature is an axial vessel system running down the deep aspect of the muscle and linking the perforat