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Sample records for antarctic arthrobacter sp

  1. A new cold-adapted β-D-galactosidase from the Antarctic Arthrobacter sp. 32c – gene cloning, overexpression, purification and properties

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    Kur Józef

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of a new cold-active β-D-galactosidases and microorganisms that efficiently ferment lactose is of high biotechnological interest, particularly for lactose removal in milk and dairy products at low temperatures and for cheese whey bioremediation processes with simultaneous bio-ethanol production. Results In this article, we present a new β-D-galactosidase as a candidate to be applied in the above mentioned biotechnological processes. The gene encoding this β-D-galactosidase has been isolated from the genomic DNA library of Antarctic bacterium Arthrobacter sp. 32c, sequenced, cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli and Pichia pastoris, purified and characterized. 27 mg of β-D-galactosidase was purified from 1 L of culture with the use of an intracellular E. coli expression system. The protein was also produced extracellularly by P. pastoris in high amounts giving approximately 137 mg and 97 mg of purified enzyme from 1 L of P. pastoris culture for the AOX1 and a constitutive system, respectively. The enzyme was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity by using either one step- or a fast two step- procedure including protein precipitation and affinity chromatography. The enzyme was found to be active as a homotrimeric protein consisting of 695 amino acid residues in each monomer. Although, the maximum activity of the enzyme was determined at pH 6.5 and 50°C, 60% of the maximum activity of the enzyme was determined at 25°C and 15% of the maximum activity was detected at 0°C. Conclusion The properties of Arthrobacter sp. 32cβ-D-galactosidase suggest that this enzyme could be useful for low-cost, industrial conversion of lactose into galactose and glucose in milk products and could be an interesting alternative for the production of ethanol from lactose-based feedstock.

  2. Arthrobacter equi sp. nov., isolated from veterinary clinical material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassin, A F; Spröer, C; Siering, C; Hupfer, H; Schumann, P

    2011-09-01

    A Gram-positive-staining, catalase-positive, non-spore-forming, rod-shaped bacterium, strain IMMIB L-1606(T), isolated from genital swabs of a horse, was characterized using a polyphasic approach. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that the organism was related to members of the genus Arthrobacter, displaying sequence similarities of 93.5-99.1 % with the type strains of recognized species of the genus. Cell-wall analysis revealed peptidoglycan type A3α L-Lys-L-Ser-L-Thr-L-Ala. DNA-DNA hybridization data and biochemical characterization of strain IMMIB L-1606(T) enabled the isolate to be differentiated genotypically and phenotypically from phylogenetically closely related species of the genus Arthrobacter. Therefore, it is concluded that strain IMMIB L-1606(T) represents a novel species of the genus Arthrobacter, for which the name Arthrobacter equi sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Arthrobacter equi sp. nov. is IMMIB L-1606(T) ( = DSM 23395(T) = CCUG 59597(T)).

  3. Arthrobacter pityocampae sp. nov., isolated from Thaumetopoea pityocampa (Lep., Thaumetopoeidae).

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    İnce, İkbal Agah; Demirbağ, Zihni; Katı, Hatice

    2014-10-01

    A bacterium (strain Tp2(T)) was isolated from a caterpillar of the pine processionary moth, Thaumetopoea pityocampa (Den. & Schiff.) (Lepidoptera: Thaumetopoeidae), a destructive pine forest pest. The bacterium is a Gram-stain-positive, red-pigmented coccus, oxidase-negative, nitrate-reducing, non-motile and non-spore-forming. Strain Tp2(T) was subjected to a taxonomic study using polyphasic approach that included morphological and biochemical characterizations, 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, DNA-DNA hybridization, DNA G+C content analysis, comparative fatty acid profiles, and analyses of quinones and polar lipids. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain Tp2(T) revealed that Arthrobacter agilis DSM 20550(T) was the closest known strain (98% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). DNA-DNA hybridization of A. agilis DSM 20550(T) and strain Tp2(T) resulted in a DNA-DNA relatedness value of 11.9% (20.2% reciprocal). The DNA base composition of strain Tp2(T) was 69.5 mol%, which is consistent with the other recognized members of Actinobacteria that have a high G+C content in their genome. The polar lipid pattern of strain Tp2(T) consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol (major), phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylinositol and unknown glycolipids. The cellular fatty acids were anteiso C15:0 and anteiso C17:0 and the major menaquinone was MK-9(II-H2). The peptidoglycan type was A3α with an L-Lys-L-Thr-L-Ala3 interpeptide bridge. The above-mentioned characterization qualifies strain Tp2(T) as genotypically and phenotypically distinct from closely related species of the genus Arthrobacter with validly published names. Strain Tp2(T) is therefore proposed to represent a novel species of the genus Arthrobacter, described as Arthrobacter pityocampae sp. nov. The type strain is Tp2(T) ( = DSM 21719(T) = NCCB 100254(T)).

  4. Adhesion of an Amylolytic Arthrobacter sp. to Starch-Containing Plastic Films

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    Cells of the amylolytic bacterium KB-1 (thought to be an Arthrobacter sp.) adhered (∼70%) to the surface of plastic films composed of starch-poly (methylacrylate) graft copolymer (starch-PMA), but did not adhere (

  5. Degradation of 4-chlorobenzoic acid by Arthrobacter sp

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    Marks, T.S.; Smith, A.R.W.; Quirk, A.V.

    1984-11-01

    A mixed population, enriched and established in a defined medium, from a sewage sludge inoculum was capable of complete mineralization of 4-chlorobenzoate. An organism, identified as Arthrobacter sp., was isolated from the consortium and shown to be capable of utilizing 4-chlorobenzoate as the sole carbon and energy source in pure culture. This organism (strain TM-1), dehalogenated 4-chlorobenzoate as the initial step in the degradative pathway. The production, 4-hydroxybenzoate, was further metabolized via protocatechuate. The ability of strain TM-1 to degrade 4-chlorobenzoate in liquid medium at 25/sup 0/C was improved by the use of continuous culture and repeated sequential subculturing. Other chlorinated benzoates and the parent compound benzoate did not support growth of strain TM-1. An active cell extract was prepared and shown to dehalogenate 4-chloro-, 4-fluoro-, and 4-bromobenzoate. Dehalogenase activity had an optimum pH of 6.8 and an optimum temperature of 20/sup 0/C and was inhibited by dissolved oxygen and stimulated by manganese (Mn/sup 2 +/). Strain improvement resulted in an increase in the specific activity of the cell extract from 0.09 to 0.85 nmol of 4-hydroxybenzoate per min per mg of protein and a decrease in the doubling time of the organism from 50 to 1.6 h. 18 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  6. Potential Degradation of Swainsonine by Intracellular Enzymes of Arthrobacter sp. HW08

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    Haili Li

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Swainsonine (SW is a toxin produced by locoweeds and harmful to the livestock industry. Degrading SW by Arthrobacter sp. HW08 was demonstrated as a promising way to deal with SW poisoning. However, it is unknown which part of the subcellular enzymes in Arthrobacter sp. HW08 is responsible for biodegrading SW and whether the metabolites are atoxic. In this study, intracellular and extracellular enzymes of Arthrobacter sp. HW08 were isolated and their enzyme activity was evaluated. The metabolites were fed to mice, and physiological and histological properties of the treated mice were investigated. The results showed that only intracellular enzyme of Arthrobacter sp. HW08 (IEHW08 could degrade SW efficiently. Compared with mice in SW treatment group, mice in SW + IEHW08 treatment group (1 increased their body weights; (2 showed higher number of platelets and lower number of white blood cells; (3 decreased the levels of creatinine, urea nitrogen, alanine transaminase and aspartate aminotransferase in serum; (4 reduced the number of vacuolated cells in cerebellum, liver and kidney. All these data demonstrate that IEHW08 was potentially safe for mice, while keeping the capacity of degrading SW. This study indicates a possible application of IEHW08 as an additive in the livestock industry to protect animals from SW poisoning.

  7. Arthrobacter enclensis sp. nov., isolated from sediment sample

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Dastager, S.G.; Qin, L.; Tang, S.K.; Krishnamurthi, S.; Lee, J.C.; Li, W.J.

    , genomic DNA was extracted and purified according to the method of Mar- mur (1961) with additional RNAse treatment. DNA–DNA hybridization was carried out based on principles and equa- tions described by De Ley et al. (1970) under the consid- eration.... Chin J Oceanol Lim- nol 26:166–177 De Ley J, Cattoir H, Reynaerts A (1970) The quantitative measure- ment of DNA hybridization from renaturation rates. Eur J Bio- chem 12:133–142 Ding L, Hirose T, Yokota A (2009) Four novel Arthrobacter spe- cies...

  8. A method for the production of D-tagatose using a recombinant Pichia pastoris strain secreting β-D-galactosidase from Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus and a recombinant L-arabinose isomerase from Arthrobacter sp. 22c

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    Wanarska Marta

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background D-Tagatose is a natural monosaccharide which can be used as a low-calorie sugar substitute in food, beverages and pharmaceutical products. It is also currently being tested as an anti-diabetic and obesity control drug. D-Tagatose is a rare sugar, but it can be manufactured by the chemical or enzymatic isomerization of D-galactose obtained by a β-D-galactosidase-catalyzed hydrolysis of milk sugar lactose and the separation of D-glucose and D-galactose. L-Arabinose isomerases catalyze in vitro the conversion of D-galactose to D-tagatose and are the most promising enzymes for the large-scale production of D-tagatose. Results In this study, the araA gene from psychrotolerant Antarctic bacterium Arthrobacter sp. 22c was isolated, cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The active form of recombinant Arthrobacter sp. 22c L-arabinose isomerase consists of six subunits with a combined molecular weight of approximately 335 kDa. The maximum activity of this enzyme towards D-galactose was determined as occurring at 52°C; however, it exhibited over 60% of maximum activity at 30°C. The recombinant Arthrobacter sp. 22c L-arabinose isomerase was optimally active at a broad pH range of 5 to 9. This enzyme is not dependent on divalent metal ions, since it was only marginally activated by Mg2+, Mn2+ or Ca2+ and slightly inhibited by Co2+ or Ni2+. The bioconversion yield of D-galactose to D-tagatose by the purified L-arabinose isomerase reached 30% after 36 h at 50°C. In this study, a recombinant Pichia pastoris yeast strain secreting β-D-galactosidase Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus was also constructed. During cultivation of this strain in a whey permeate, lactose was hydrolyzed and D-glucose was metabolized, whereas D-galactose was accumulated in the medium. Moreover, cultivation of the P. pastoris strain secreting β-D-galactosidase in a whey permeate supplemented with Arthrobacter sp. 22c L-arabinose isomerase resulted in a 90% yield

  9. Isolation, purification and characterization of xylanase produced by Arthrobacter sp. MTCC 5214 when grown in solid-state fermentation

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khandeparker, R.; Bhosle, N.B.

    Thermoalkalophilic Arthrobacter sp. produced extracellular xylanase, when wheat bran, rice husk, rice bran and bagassae were used as carbon source under solid-state fermentation (SSF). The xylanase enzyme was isolated by ammonium sulfate (80...

  10. Improving the Survival of Arthrobacter sp., CW9 during Spray Drying Monitored by Scan Electric Microscope

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    Zhenqiang Xia

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The culture of an aquaculture probiotic, i.e., Arthrobacter sp., CW9, was spray dried with different carriers/protectants, in which Scan Electric Microscope (SEM was used to analyze the surface of micro-paticles produced by spray-drying. Matrix of protectants, inlet temperature and feed rate were optimized according to the survival rate after spray drying. Scanning electron micrographs showed that cracks formed on the particle surface were a key factor in enhancing bacteria survival during spray-drying. Span-60 had synergism with Skim Milk Powder (SMP: trehalose (7.5%: 7.5%, w/v in protecting Arthrobacter sp., CW9 bacteria from heat injury, unlike SMP with trehalose. Particle size is an important factor influencing bacteria survival during spray drying and particle size itself was influenced by certain additives.

  11. Improving the Survival of Arthrobacter sp., CW9 during Spray Drying Monitored by Scan Electric Microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Zhenqiang Xia; Ming Zhu; Yanqiu Zhang

    2014-01-01

    The culture of an aquaculture probiotic, i.e., Arthrobacter sp., CW9, was spray dried with different carriers/protectants, in which Scan Electric Microscope (SEM) was used to analyze the surface of micro-paticles produced by spray-drying. Matrix of protectants, inlet temperature and feed rate were optimized according to the survival rate after spray drying. Scanning electron micrographs showed that cracks formed on the particle surface were a key factor in enhancing bacteria survival during s...

  12. Biosorption of Lead(II) by Arthrobacter sp. 25: Process Optimization and Mechanism.

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    Jin, Yu; Wang, Xin; Zang, Tingting; Hu, Yang; Hu, Xiaojing; Ren, Guangming; Xu, Xiuhong; Qu, Juanjuan

    2016-08-28

    In the present work, Arthrobacter sp. 25, a lead-tolerant bacterium, was assayed to remove lead(II) from aqueous solution. The biosorption process was optimized by response surface methodology (RSM) based on the Box-Behnken design. The relationships between dependent and independent variables were quantitatively determined by second-order polynomial equation and 3D response surface plots. The biosorption mechanism was explored by characterization of the biosorbent before and after biosorption using atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The results showed that the maximum adsorption capacity of 9.6 mg/g was obtained at the initial lead ion concentration of 108.79 mg/l, pH value of 5.75, and biosorbent dosage of 9.9 g/l (fresh weight), which was close to the theoretically expected value of 9.88 mg/g. Arthrobacter sp. 25 is an ellipsoidalshaped bacterium covered with extracellular polymeric substances. The biosorption mechanism involved physical adsorption and microprecipitation as well as ion exchange, and functional groups such as phosphoryl, hydroxyl, amino, amide, carbonyl, and phosphate groups played vital roles in adsorption. The results indicate that Arthrobacter sp. 25 may be potentially used as a biosorbent for low-concentration lead(II) removal from wastewater.

  13. New metabolic pathway for degradation of 2-nitrobenzoate by Arthrobacter sp. SPG

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    Pankaj Kumar Arora

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Arthrobacter sp. SPG utilized 2-nitrobenzoate as its sole source of carbon and energy and degraded it with accumulation of stoichiometric amounts of nitrite ions. Salicylate and catechol were detected as metabolites of the 2-nitrobenzoate degradation using high performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Enzyme activities for 2-nitrobenzoate-2-monooxygenase, salicylate hydroxylase, and catechol-1,2-dioxygenase were detected in the crude extracts of the 2-nitrobenzoate-induced cells of strain SPG. The 2-nitrobenzoate-monooxygenase activity resulted in formation of salicylate and nitrite from 2-nitrobenzoate whereas salicylate hydroxylase catalyzed the conversion of salicylate to catechol. The ring-cleaving enzyme, catechol-1,2-dioxygenase cleaved catechol to cis, cis-muconic acid. Cells of strain SPG were able to degrade 2-nitrobenzoate in sterile as well as non-sterile soil microcosms. The results of microcosm studies showed that strain SPG degraded more than 90% of 2-nitrobenzoate within 10-12 days. This study clearly shows that Arthrobacter sp. SPG degraded 2-nitrobenzoate via a new pathway with formation of salicylate and catechol as metabolites. Arthrobacter sp. SPG may be used for bioremediation of 2-nitrobenzoate-contaminated sites due to its ability to degrade 2-nitrobenzoate in soil.

  14. New metabolic pathway for degradation of 2-nitrobenzoate by Arthrobacter sp. SPG

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    Arora, Pankaj K.; Sharma, Ashutosh

    2015-01-01

    Arthrobacter sp. SPG utilized 2-nitrobenzoate as its sole source of carbon and energy and degraded it with accumulation of stoichiometric amounts of nitrite ions. Salicylate and catechol were detected as metabolites of the 2-nitrobenzoate degradation using high performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Enzyme activities for 2-nitrobenzoate-2-monooxygenase, salicylate hydroxylase, and catechol-1,2-dioxygenase were detected in the crude extracts of the 2-nitrobenzoate-induced cells of strain SPG. The 2-nitrobenzoate-monooxygenase activity resulted in formation of salicylate and nitrite from 2-nitrobenzoate, whereas salicylate hydroxylase catalyzed the conversion of salicylate to catechol. The ring-cleaving enzyme, catechol-1,2-dioxygenase cleaved catechol to cis,cis-muconic acid. Cells of strain SPG were able to degrade 2-nitrobenzoate in sterile as well as non-sterile soil microcosms. The results of microcosm studies showed that strain SPG degraded more than 90% of 2-nitrobenzoate within 10–12 days. This study clearly shows that Arthrobacter sp. SPG degraded 2-nitrobenzoate via a new pathway with formation of salicylate and catechol as metabolites. Arthrobacter sp. SPG may be used for bioremediation of 2-nitrobenzoate-contaminated sites due to its ability to degrade 2-nitrobenzoate in soil. PMID:26082768

  15. 2,3-Dihydroxybiphenyl dioxygenase gene was first discovered in Arthrobacter sp. strain P J3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG MeiYing; MA PengDa; LI WenMing; LIU JinYing; LI Liang; ZHU XiaoJuan; WANG XingZhi

    2007-01-01

    Bacterium strain PJ3, isolated from wastewater and identified as Arthrobacter sp. bacterium based on its 16S rDNA gene, could use carbazole as the sole carbon, nitrogen and energy source. The genomic libraryof strain PJ3 was constructed and a positive clone JM109 (pUCW402) was screened out for the expression of dioxygenase by the ability to form yellow ring-fission product. A 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl dioxygenase (23DHBD) gene of 933 bp was found in the 3360 bp exogenous fragment of pUCW402 by GenSCAN software and BLAST analysis. The phylogenetic analysis showed that 23DHBD from strain PJ3 formed a deep branch separate from a cluster containing most known 23DHBD in GenBank.Southern hybridization confirmed for the first time that the 23DHBD gene was from the genomic DNA of Arthrobacter sp. PJ3. In order to test the gene function, recombinant bacterium BL21 (pETW-8) was constructed to express 23DHBD. The expression level in BL21 (pETW-8) was highest compared with the recombinant bacteria JM109 (pUCW402) and strain PJ3. We observed that 23DHBD was not absolute specific. The enzyme activity was higher with 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl as a substrate than with catechol.The substrate specificity assay suggested that 23DHBD was essential for cleavage of bi-cyclic aromatic compounds during the course of aromatic compound biodegradation in Arthrobacter sp. strain PJ3.

  16. Biofiltration of trimethylamine, dimethylamine, and methylamine by immobilized Paracoccus sp. CP2 and Arthrobacter sp. CP1.

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    Ho, Kuo-Ling; Chung, Ying-Chien; Lin, Yueh-Hsien; Tseng, Ching-Ping

    2008-05-01

    A biofilter using granular activated carbon with immobilized Paracoccus sp. CP2 was applied to the elimination of 10-250 ppm of trimethylamine (TMA), dimethylamine (DMA), and methylamine (MA). The results indicated that the system effectively treated MA (>93%), DMA (>90%), and TMA (>85%) under high loading conditions, and the maximum degradation rates were 1.4, 1.2, and 0.9g-Nkg(-1) GAC d(-1). Among the three different amines treated, TMA was the most difficult to degrade and resulted in ammonia accumulation. Further study on TMA removal showed that the optimal pH was near neutral (6.0-8.0). The supply of high glucose (>0.1%) inhibited TMA removal, maybe due to substrate competition. However, complete TMA degradation was achieved under the co-immobilization of Paracoccus sp. CP2 and Arthrobacter sp. CP1 ( approximately 96%). Metabolite analysis results demonstrated that the metabolite NH(4)(+) concentrations decreased by a relatively small 27% while the metabolite NO(2)(-) apparently increased by heterotrophic nitrification of Arthrobacter sp. CP1 in the co-immobilization biofilter.

  17. Complete genome sequence and metabolic potential of the quinaldine-degrading bacterium Arthrobacter sp. Rue61a

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    Niewerth Heiko

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacteria of the genus Arthrobacter are ubiquitous in soil environments and can be considered as true survivalists. Arthrobacter sp. strain Rue61a is an isolate from sewage sludge able to utilize quinaldine (2-methylquinoline as sole carbon and energy source. The genome provides insight into the molecular basis of the versatility and robustness of this environmental Arthrobacter strain. Results The genome of Arthrobacter sp. Rue61a consists of a single circular chromosome of 4,736,495 bp with an average G + C content of 62.32%, the circular 231,551-bp plasmid pARUE232, and the linear 112,992-bp plasmid pARUE113 that was already published. Plasmid pARUE232 is proposed to contribute to the resistance of Arthrobacter sp. Rue61a to arsenate and Pb2+, whereas the linear plasmid confers the ability to convert quinaldine to anthranilate. Remarkably, degradation of anthranilate exclusively proceeds via a CoA-thioester pathway. Apart from quinaldine utilization, strain Rue61a has a limited set of aromatic degradation pathways, enabling the utilization of 4-hydroxy-substituted aromatic carboxylic acids, which are characteristic products of lignin depolymerization, via ortho cleavage of protocatechuate. However, 4-hydroxyphenylacetate degradation likely proceeds via meta cleavage of homoprotocatechuate. The genome of strain Rue61a contains numerous genes associated with osmoprotection, and a high number of genes coding for transporters. It encodes a broad spectrum of enzymes for the uptake and utilization of various sugars and organic nitrogen compounds. A. aurescens TC-1 is the closest sequenced relative of strain Rue61a. Conclusions The genome of Arthrobacter sp. Rue61a reflects the saprophytic lifestyle and nutritional versatility of the organism and a strong adaptive potential to environmental stress. The circular plasmid pARUE232 and the linear plasmid pARUE113 contribute to heavy metal resistance and to the ability to degrade

  18. Growth of Arthrobacter sp. strain JBH1 on nitroglycerin as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen.

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    Husserl, Johana; Spain, Jim C; Hughes, Joseph B

    2010-03-01

    Arthrobacter sp. strain JBH1 was isolated from nitroglycerin-contaminated soil by selective enrichment. Detection of transient intermediates and simultaneous adaptation studies with potential intermediates indicated that the degradation pathway involves the conversion of nitroglycerin to glycerol via 1,2-dinitroglycerin and 1-mononitroglycerin, with concomitant release of nitrite. Glycerol then serves as the source of carbon and energy.

  19. Analysis of Two Gene Clusters Involved in the Degradation of 4-Fluorophenol by Arthrobacter sp Strain IF1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferreira, Maria Isabel M.; Iida, Toshiya; Hasan, Syed A.; Nakamura, Kaoru; Fraaije, Marco W.; Janssen, Dick B.; Kudo, Toshiaki

    2009-01-01

    Arthrobacter sp. strain IF1 is able to grow on 4-fluorophenol (4-FP) as a sole source of carbon and energy. To clone the 4-FP degradation genes, DNA libraries were constructed and screened with a probe obtained by PCR using primers designed on the basis of conserved regions of aromatic two-component

  20. Arthrobacter cupressi sp. nov., an actinomycete isolated from the rhizosphere soil of Cupressus sempervirens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Ma, Yuchao; Yu, Huimin

    2012-11-01

    An actinobacterial strain, designated D48(T), was isolated from the rhizosphere soil of a cypress tree collected from Mianyang in Sichuan province, China. The strain was Gram-stain-positive, catalase-positive, oxidase-negative and non-motile, with lysine as the peptidoglycan diagnostic diamino acid and acetyl as the peptidoglycan acyl type. The predominant menaquinone was MK-9(H(2)); small amounts of MK-7(H(2)), MK-10(H(2)) and MK-6 were also present. The major fatty acids were anteiso-C(15:0), anteiso-C(17:0) and iso-C(16:0). The isolate underwent a rod-coccus morphological cycle, had a high DNA G+C content, was aerobic and grew between 12 and 37 °C (optimum, 28 °C). On the basis of the phenotypic and chemotaxonomic analyses, 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons and DNA-DNA hybridization data, the isolate represents a novel species of the genus Arthrobacter, for which the name Arthrobacter cupressi sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is D48(T) (=DSM 24664(T)=CGMCC 1.10783(T)).

  1. Biodegradation of p-nitrophenol via 1,2,4-benzenetriol by an Arthrobacter sp.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, R.K.; Spain, J.C. [Armstrong Lab., Tyndall Air Force Base, FL (United States); Dreisbach, J.H. [Univ. of Scranton, PA (United States)

    1994-08-01

    The degradation of p-nitrophenol (PNP) by Moraxella and Pseudomonas spp. involves an initial monooxygenase-catalyzed removal of the nitro group. The resultant hydroquinone is subject to ring fission catalyzed by a dioxygenase enzyme. A strain of an Arthrobacter sp. JS443, capable of degrading PNP with stoichiometric release of nitrite has been isolated. During induction of the enzymes required for growth on PNP, 1,2,4-benzenetriol was identified as an intermediate by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy and radiotracer studies. 1,2,4-Benzenetriol was converted to maleylacetic acid, which was further degraded by the beta-ketoadipate pathway. Conversion of PNP to 1,2,4-benzenetriol is catalyzed by a monooxygenase system in strain JS443 through the formation of 4-nitrocatechol, 4-nitroresorcinol, or both. Results clearly indicate the existence of an alternative pathway for the biodegradation of PNP. 15 refs, 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Combined bioremediation of atrazine-contaminated soil by Pennisetum and Arthrobacter sp. strain DNS10.

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    Zhang, Ying; Ge, Shijie; Jiang, Mingyue; Jiang, Zhao; Wang, Zhigang; Ma, Bingbing

    2014-05-01

    Strain DNS10 was isolated from the black soil collected from the northeast of China which had been cultivated with atrazine as the sole nitrogen source. Pennisetum is a common plant in Heilongjiang Province of China. The main objective of this paper was to evaluate the efficiency of plant-microbe joint interactions (Arthrobacter sp. DNS10 + Pennisetum) in atrazine degradation compared with single-strain and single-plant effects. Plant-microbe joint interactions degraded 98.10 % of the atrazine, while single strain and single plant only degraded 87.38 and 66.71 % after a 30-day experimental period, respectively. The results indicated that plant-microbe joint interactions had a better degradation effect. Meanwhile, we found that plant-microbe joint interactions showed a higher microbial diversity. The results of microbial diversity illustrated that the positive effects of cropping could improve soil microbial growth and activity. In addition, we planted atrazine-sensitive plants (soybean) in the soil after repair. The results showed that soybean growth in soil previously treated with the plant-microbe joint interactions treatment was better compared with other treatments after 20 days of growth. This was further proved that the soil is more conducive for crop cultivation. Hence, plant-microbe joint interactions are considered to be a potential tool in the remediation of atrazine-contaminated soil.

  3. Characterization and flocculation mechanism of an alkali-activated polysaccharide flocculant from Arthrobacter sp. B4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yumei; Li, Qiang; Hao, Dakui; Hu, Zhiheng; Song, Dongxue; Yang, Min

    2014-10-01

    The characterization and flocculation mechanism of a bioflocculant produced by Arthrobacter sp. B4 were investigated. The bioflocculant's active ingredient was a polysaccharide (B4-PS) that consisted of three main fractions corresponding to the molecular weights of approximately 3.97×10(4)Da, 6.84×10(3)Da and 5.9×10(6)Da, respectively. These fractions were composed of galactose, glucose, mannose and glucuronic acid. Flocculation experiments showed that B4-PS could spontaneously flocculate in the presence of Ca(2+) ions at a high pH (>12.0), followed by the pH reduction to ∼6.0. The self-flocculation of B4-PS may be mediated by ionization and charge neutralization mechanism. Furthermore, B4-PS exhibited excellent capabilities for pollutant removal and pH reduction in alkaline wastewater. These data suggest B4-PS may be a promising tool for use in industrial alkaline wastewater pretreatment.

  4. Isolation and characteristics of Arthrobacter sp. strain CW-1 for biodegradation of PAEs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Isolation of new bacterial strains and recognition of their metabolic activities are highly desirable for sustainability of natural ecosystems. Biodegradation of dimethyl phthalate (DMP) under anoxic conditions has been shown to occur as a series of sequential steps using strain CW-1 isolated from digested sludge of Sibao Wastewater Treatment Plant in Hangzhou, China. The microbial colony on LB medium was yellowish, 3~5 mm in diameter, convex in the center, and embedded in mucous externally.The individual cells of strain CW-1 are irregular rods, measuring (0.6~0.7)×(0.9~1.0) μm, V-shaped, with clubbed ends, Gram positive and without any filaments. 16S rDNA (1438 bp) sequence analysis showed that the strain was related to Arthrobacter sp.CW-1 and can degrade PAEs utilizing nitrate as electron acceptor, but cannot mineralize DMP completely. The degradation pathway was recommended as: dimethyl phthalate (DMP)→monomethyl phthalate (MMP)→phthalic acid (PA). DMP biodegradation was a first order reaction with degradation rate constant of 0.3033 d-1 and half-life 2.25 d. The DMP conversion to PA by CW-1 could be described by using sequential kinetic model.

  5. Biodegradation of nitroglycerin in porous media and potential for bioaugmentation with Arthrobacter sp. strain JBH1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husserl, Johana; Hughes, Joseph B

    2013-07-01

    Nitroglycerin (NG) is a toxic explosive found as a contaminant of soil and groundwater. Several microbial strains are capable of partially reducing the NG molecule to dinitro or mononitroesters. Recently, a strain capable of growing on NG as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen (Arthrobacter sp. strain JBH1) was isolated from contaminated soil. Despite the widespread presence of microbial strains capable of transforming NG in contaminated soils and sediments, the extent of NG biodegradation at contaminated sites is still unknown. In this study column experiments were conducted to investigate the extent of microbial degradation of NG in saturated porous media, specifically after bioaugmentation with JBH1. Initial experiments using sterile, low sorptivity sand, showed mineralization of NG after bioaugmentation with JBH1 in the absence of sources of carbon and nitrogen other than NG. Results could be modeled using a first order degradation rate of 0.14d(-1). Further experiments conducted using contaminated soil with high organic carbon content (highly sorptive) resulted in column effluents that did not contain NG although high dinitroester concentrations were observed. Bioaugmentation with JBH1 in sediments containing strains capable of partial transformation of NG resulted in complete mineralization of NG and faster degradation rates.

  6. Crystal structure of a lactosucrose-producing enzyme, Arthrobacter sp. K-1 β-fructofuranosidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonozuka, Takashi; Tamaki, Akiko; Yokoi, Gaku; Miyazaki, Takatsugu; Ichikawa, Megumi; Nishikawa, Atsushi; Ohta, Yukari; Hidaka, Yuko; Katayama, Kinya; Hatada, Yuji; Ito, Tetsuya; Fujita, Koki

    2012-12-10

    Arthrobacter sp. K-1 β-fructofuranosidase (ArFFase), a glycoside hydrolase family 68 enzyme, catalyzes the hydrolysis and transfructosylation of sucrose. ArFFase is useful for producing a sweetener, lactosucrose (4(G)-β-D-galactosylsucrose). The primary structure of ArFFase is homologous to those of levansucrases, although ArFFase catalyzes mostly hydrolysis when incubated with sucrose alone, even at high concentration. Here, we determined the crystal structure of ArFFase in unliganded form and complexed with fructose. ArFFase consisted of a five-bladed β-propeller fold as observed in levansucrases. The structure of ArFFase was most similar to that of Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus levansucrase (GdLev). The structure of the catalytic cleft of ArFFase was also highly homologous to that of GdLev. However, two amino acid residues, Tyr232 and Pro442 in ArFFase, were not conserved between them. A tunnel observed at the bottom of the catalytic cleft of ArFFase may serve as a water drain or its reservoir.

  7. s-triazine degrading bacterial isolate Arthrobacter sp. AK-YN10, a candidate for bioaugmentation of atrazine contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagarkar, Sneha; Bhardwaj, Pooja; Storck, Veronika; Devers-Lamrani, Marion; Martin-Laurent, Fabrice; Kapley, Atya

    2016-01-01

    The Arthrobacter sp. strain AK-YN10 is an s-triazine pesticide degrading bacterium isolated from a sugarcane field in Central India with history of repeated atrazine use. AK-YN10 was shown to degrade 99 % of atrazine in 30 h from media supplemented with 1000 mg L(-1) of the herbicide. Draft genome sequencing revealed similarity to pAO1, TC1, and TC2 catabolic plasmids of the Arthrobacter taxon. Plasmid profiling analyses revealed the presence of four catabolic plasmids. The trzN, atzB, and atzC atrazine-degrading genes were located on a plasmid of approximately 113 kb.The flagellar operon found in the AK-YN10 draft genome suggests motility, an interesting trait for a bioremediation agent, and was homologous to that of Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus. The multiple s-triazines degradation property of this isolate makes it a good candidate for bioremediation of soils contaminated by s-triazine pesticides.

  8. Optimization of Endoglucanase Production from a Novel Bacterial Isolate, Arthrobacter sp. HPG166 and Characterization of Its Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengwei Huang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTIn this study, a potential novel cellulolytic bacteriumArthrobacter sp. HPG166 was isolated from the hindgut of root-feeding larvaeHolotrichia parallela. Optimization of fermentation factors for endoglucanase production byArthrobacter sp. HPG166 was carried out via response surface methodology. Sodium carboxymethylcellulose 1.19% (w/v and beef extract 0.35% (w/v were the ideal combination of carbon and nitrogen sources for enzyme production; the optimum temperature and pH for cellulase production were 34°C and pH 8.0 respectively. Under the optimized fermentation conditions, the maximum endoglucanase activity of 1.411 U mL-1 was obtained. The crude endoglucanase was thermotolerant as it retained 50.31% of its activity after incubation at 70°C for an hour. Metal profile of the enzyme indicated that Mg2+ and Na+ were strong stimulators while Mn2+ and Co+ drastically inhibited its activity. Due to its particular characteristics, this enzyme could have potential for industrial applications.

  9. Biodegradation of 2-methyl, 2-ethyl, and 2-hydroxypyridine by an Arthrobacter sp. isolated from subsurface sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Loughlin, E J; Sims, G K; Traina, S J

    1999-04-01

    A bacterium capable of degrading 2-methylpyridine was isolated by enrichment techniques from subsurface sediments collected from an aquifer located at an industrial site that had been contaminated with pyridine and pyridine derivatives. The isolate, identified as an Arthrobacter sp., was capable of utilizing 2-methylpyridine, 2-ethylpyridine, and 2-hydroxypyridine as primary C, N, and energy sources. The isolate was also able to utilize 2-, 3-, and 4-hydroxybenzoate, gentisic acid, protocatechuic acid and catechol, suggesting that it possesses a number of enzymatic pathways for the degradation of aromatic compounds. Degradation of 2-methylpyridine, 2-ethylpyridine, and 2-hydroxypyridine was accompanied by growth of the isolate and release of ammonium into the medium. Degradation of 2-methylpyridine was accompanied by overproduction of riboflavin. A soluble blue pigment was produced by the isolate during the degradation of 2-hydroxypyridine, and may be related to the diazadiphenoquinones reportedly produced by other Arthrobacter spp. when grown on 2-hydroxypyridine. When provided with 2-methylpyridine, 2-ethylpyridine, and 2-hydroxypyridine simultaneously, 2-hydroxypyridine was rapidly and preferentially degraded; however there was no apparent biodegradation of either 2-methylpyridine or 2-ethylpyridine until after a seven day lag. The data suggest that there are differences between the pathway for 2-hydroxypyridine degradation and the pathways(s) for 2-methylpyridine and 2-ethylpyridine.

  10. Characterization of a novel phenol hydroxylase in indoles biotransformation from a strain Arthrobacter sp. W1 [corrected].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Qu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Indigoids, as popular dyes, can be produced by microbial strains or enzymes catalysis. However, the new valuable products with their transformation mechanisms, especially inter-conversion among the intermediates and products have not been clearly identified yet. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate novel microbial catalytic processes for indigoids production systematically. FINDINGS: A phenol hydroxylase gene cluster (4,606 bp from Arthrobacter sp. W1 (PH(w1 was obtained. This cluster contains six components in the order of KLMNOP, which exhibit relatively low sequence identities (37-72% with known genes. It was suggested that indole and all the tested indole derivatives except for 3-methylindole were transformed to various substituted indigoid pigments, and the predominant color products derived from indoles were identified by spectrum analysis. One new purple product from indole, 2-(7-oxo-1H-indol-6(7H-ylidene indolin-3-one, should be proposed as the dimerization of isatin and 7-hydroxylindole at the C-2 and C-6 positions. Tunnel entrance and docking studies were used to predict the important amino acids for indoles biotransformation, which were further proved by site-directed mutagenesis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We showed that the phenol hydroxylase from genus Arthrobacter could transform indoles to indigoids with new chemical compounds being produced. Our work should show high insights into understanding the mechanism of indigoids bio-production.

  11. Taxonomic identification, phenanthrene uptake activity, and membrane lipid alterations of the PAH degrading Arthrobacter sp. strain Sphe3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kallimanis, A.; Drainas, C.; Koukkou, A.I. [Ioannina Univ. (Greece). Sector of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry; Frillingos, S. [Ioannina Univ. (Greece). Lab. of Biological Chemistry

    2007-09-15

    This report describes phenanthrene uptake as well as the effect of phenanthrene on the membrane phospholipid and fatty acid composition in a newly isolated bacterial strain, Sphe3, that we taxonomically identified as Arthrobacter sp. Strain Sphe3 is able to utilize phenanthrene as a carbon source at high rates and appears to internalize phenanthrene with two mechanisms: a passive diffusion when cells are grown on glucose, and an inducible active transport system when cells are grown on phenanthrene as a sole carbon source. Active transport followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics, and it was amenable to inhibition by 2,4-dinitrophenol and sodium azide. Evidence provided here indicates that apart from inducing an active PAH uptake, the presence of phenanthrene elicits significant changes in membrane fluidity.

  12. Complete genome sequence of Arthrobacter sp. ERGS1:01, a putative novel bacterium with prospective cold active industrial enzymes, isolated from East Rathong glacier in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rakshak; Singh, Dharam; Swarnkar, Mohit Kumar; Singh, Anil Kumar; Kumar, Sanjay

    2015-11-20

    We report the complete genome sequence of Arthrobacter sp. ERGS1:01, a novel bacterium which produces industrial enzymes at low temperature. East Rathong glacier in Sikkim Himalayas is untouched and unexplored for microbial diversity though it has a rich source of glaciers, alpine and meadows. Genome sequence has provided the basis for understanding its adaptation under harsh condition of Himalayan glacier, its ability to produce cold active industrial enzymes and has unlocked opportunities for microbial bioprospection from East Rathong glacier.

  13. Degradation of Swainsonine by the NADP-Dependent Alcohol Dehydrogenase A1R6C3 in Arthrobacter sp. HW08

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Swainsonine is an indolizidine alkaloid that has been found in locoweeds and some fungi. Our previous study demonstrated that Arthrobacter sp. HW08 or its crude enzyme extract could degrade swainsonie efficiently. However, the mechanism of swainsonine degradation in bacteria remains unclear. In this study, we used label-free quantitative proteomics method based on liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry to dissect the mechanism of swainsonine biodegradation by Arthrobacter sp. HW08. The results showed that 129 differentially expressed proteins were relevant to swainsonine degradation. These differentially expressed proteins were mostly related to the biological process of metabolism and the molecular function of catalytic activity. Among the 129 differentially expressed proteins, putative sugar phosphate isomerase/epimerase A1R5X7, Acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase A0JZ95, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase A1R6C3 were found to contribute to the swainsonine degradation. Notably, NADP-dependent alcohol dehyrodgenase A1R6C3 appeared to play a major role in degrading swainsonine, but not as much as Arthrobacter sp. HW08 did. Collectively, our findings here provide insights to understand the mechanism of swainsonine degradation in bacteria.

  14. Production of Xylanase from Arthrobacter sp. MTCC 6915 Using Saw Dust As Substrate under Solid State Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevanan Murugan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Saw dust was used as substrate for xylanase production from Arthrobacter sp. MTCC 6915. The study of period of incubation, temperature, pH, carbon, and nitrogen sources for xylanase production was optimized. Xylanase production was found to be optimum at an incubation period of 96 hrs (117.0 U/mL, temperature 30°C (105.0 U/mL, and pH 9.0 (102.9 U/mL. The results showed that the xylanase production was found to be higher in the presence of carboxymethylcellulose (176.4 U/mL and dextrose (126.0 U/mL. It was also observed that peptone (170.1 U/mL and beef extract (161.7 U/mL supported maximum xylanase production.The enzyme was characterized and found to be fairly active at pH 9 (764.4 U/mL and temperature 60°C (819 U/mL. Even in the present study, a major difference in the production temperature (30°C and optimal temperature (60°C of the enzyme activity was observed. However, the pH of the production media and the enzyme activity were found to be the same (pH 9.

  15. First record of Babesia sp. in Antarctic penguins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero, Estrella; González, Luis Miguel; Chaparro, Alberto; Benzal, Jesús; Bertellotti, Marcelo; Masero, José A; Colominas-Ciuró, Roger; Vidal, Virginia; Barbosa, Andrés

    2016-04-01

    This is the first reported case of Babesia sp. in Antarctic penguins, specifically a population of Chinstrap penguins (Pygoscelis antarctica) in the Vapour Col penguin rookery in Deception Island, South Shetlands, Antarctica. We collected peripheral blood from 50 adult and 30 chick Chinstrap penguins. Examination of the samples by microscopy showed intraerythrocytic forms morphologically similar to other avian Babesia species in 12 Chinstrap penguin adults and seven chicks. The estimated parasitaemias ranged from 0.25×10(-2)% to 0.75×10(-2)%. Despite the low number of parasites found in blood smears, semi-nested PCR assays yielded a 274 bp fragment in 12 of the 19 positive blood samples found by microscopy. Sequencing revealed that the fragment was 97% similar to Babesia sp. 18S rRNA from Australian Little Penguins (Eudyptula minor) confirming presence of the parasite. Parasite prevalence estimated by microscopy in adults and chicks was higher (24% vs. 23.3%, respectively) than found by semi-nested PCR (16% vs. 13.3% respectively). Although sampled penguins were apparently healthy, the effect of Babesia infection in these penguins is unknown. The identification of Babesia sp. in Antarctic penguins is an important finding. Ixodes uriae, as the only tick species present in the Antarctic Peninsula, is the key to understanding the natural history of this parasite. Future work should address the transmission dynamics and pathogenicity of Babesia sp. in Chinstrap penguin as well as in other penguin species, such as Gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua) and Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae), present within the tick distribution range in the Antarctic Peninsula.

  16. Isolation and characterization of atrazine-degrading Arthrobacter sp. AD26 and use of this strain in bioremediation of contaminated soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Qingyan; LI Ying; ZHU Xikun; CAI Baoli

    2008-01-01

    A bacterial strain (AD26) capable of utilizing atrazine as a sole nitrogen source for growth was isolated from an industrial wastewatersample by enrichment culture. The 16S rRNA gene sequencing identified AD26 as anArthrobacter sp. PCR assays indicated that AD26contained atrazine-degrading genes trzN and atzBC. The trzN gene of AD26 only differs from the trzN ofArthrobacter aurescens TC1by one base (A→T at 907) and one amino acid (Met→Leu at 303). The specific activity of trzN of AD26 in crude cell extract was0.28 U/mg, which was 1.2 times that of TC 1. This strain has shown faster growth and atrazine-degradation rates in atrazine-containingminimal media than two well characterized atrazine-degrading bacteria, Pseudomonas sp. ADP and Arthrobacter aurescens TC 1. Afterincubating for 48 h at 30℃, the OD600 of AD26 reached 2.6 compared with 1.33 of ADP. AD26 was capable of degrading 500 mg/Lof atrazine in minimal medium at 95% in 72 h, while the degradative rates by TC1 and ADP were only 90% and 86%, respectively. Abioremediation trial of contaminated soil has indicated that AD26 can degrade as high as 98% of atrazine contained in soil (300 mg/kg)after incubating for 20 d at 26℃, nominating this strain as a good candidate for use in bioremediation programs.

  17. Identification of a recombinant inulin fructotransferase (difructose dianhydride III forming) from Arthrobacter sp. 161MFSha2.1 with high specific activity and remarkable thermostability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Yu, Shuhuai; Zhang, Tao; Jiang, Bo; Mu, Wanmeng

    2015-04-08

    Difructose dianhydride III (DFA III) is a functional carbohydrate produced from inulin by inulin fructotransferase (IFTase, EC 4.2.2.18). In this work, an IFTase gene from Arthrobacter sp. 161MFSha2.1 was cloned and expressed in Escherachia coli. The recombinant enzyme was purified by metal affinity chromatography. It showed significant inulin hydrolysis activity, and the produced main product from inulin was determined as DFA III by nuclear magnetic resonance analysis. The molecular mass of the purified protein was calculated to be 43 and 125 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and gel filtration, respectively, suggesting the native enzyme might be a homotrimer. The recombinant enzyme showed maximal activity as 2391 units/mg at pH 6.5 and 55 °C. It displayed the highest thermostability among previously reported IFTases (DFA III forming) and was stable up to 80 °C for 4 h of incubation. The smallest substrate was determined as nystose. The conversion ratio of inulin to DFA III reached 81% when 100 g/L inulin was catalyzed by 80 nM recombinant enzyme for 20 min at pH 6.5 and 55 °C. All of these data indicated that the IFTase (DFA III forming) from Arthrobacter sp. 161MFSha2.1 had great potential for industrial DFA III production.

  18. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis of nylon hydrolase (NylC) from Arthrobacter sp. KI72.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Keisuke; Yasuhira, Kengo; Tanaka, Yusuke; Kato, Dai-ichiro; Takeo, Masahiro; Higuchi, Yoshiki; Negoro, Seiji; Shibata, Naoki

    2013-10-01

    Nylon hydrolase (NylC) encoded by Arthrobacter plasmid pOAD2 (NylCp2) was expressed in Escherichia coli JM109 and purified by ammonium sulfate fractionation, anion-exchange column chromatography and gel-filtration chromatography. NylCp2 was crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method with ammonium sulfate as a precipitant in 0.1 M HEPES buffer pH 7.5 containing 0.2 M NaCl and 25% glycerol. Diffraction data were collected from the native crystal to a resolution of 1.60 Å. The obtained crystal was spindle shaped and belonged to the C-centred orthorhombic space group C2221, with unit-cell parameters a=70.84, b=144.90, c=129.05 Å. A rotation and translation search gave one clear solution containing two molecules per asymmetric unit.

  19. Kordia antarctica sp. nov., isolated from Antarctic seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Kiwoon; Choi, Ahyoung; Kang, Ilnam; Lee, Kiyoung; Cho, Jang-Cheon

    2013-10-01

    A Gram-staining-negative, chemoheterotrophic, yellow-pigmented, non-motile, flexirubin-negative, facultatively anaerobic bacterium, designated strain IMCC3317(T), was isolated from a coastal seawater sample from the Antarctic Penninsula. Optimal growth of strain IMCC3317(T) was observed at 20 °C, pH 8.0 and in the presence of 2-3 % NaCl. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain IMCC3317(T) belonged to the genus Kordia and was closely related to Kordia algicida OT-1(T) (96.7 % sequence similarity) and Kordia periserrulae IMCC1412(T) (96.1 % sequence similarity). The major fatty acids were 10-methyl C16 : 0 and/or iso-C16 : 1ω9c, iso-C17 : 0 3-OH, iso-C15 : 0 and anteiso-C15 : 0. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 35.1 mol%. The strain contained menaquinone-6 (MK-6) as the respiratory quinone. The polar lipids detected in the strain were phosphatidylethanolamine and unknown aminophospholipids, aminolipids and polar lipids. On the basis of phylogenetic distinction and differential phenotypic characteristics, it is suggested that strain IMCC3317(T) ( = KCTC 32292(T) = NBRC 109401(T)) be assigned to the genus Kordia as the type strain of a novel species, for which the name Kordia antarctica sp. nov. is proposed.

  20. Draft Genome Sequences of the Antimicrobial Producers Pseudomonas sp. TAA207 and Pseudomonas sp. TAD18 Isolated from Antarctic Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presta, Luana; Inzucchi, Ilaria; Bosi, Emanuele; Fondi, Marco; Perrin, Elena; Maida, Isabel; Miceli, Elisangela; Tutino, Maria Luisa; Lo Giudice, Angelina; de Pascale, Donatella

    2016-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of the Pseudomonas sp. TAA207 and Pseudomonas sp. TAD18 strains, isolated from Antarctic sediments during a summer campaign near coastal areas of Terra Nova Bay (Antarctica). Genome sequence knowledge allowed the identification of genes associated with the production of bioactive compounds and antibiotic resistance. Furthermore, it will be instrumental for comparative genomics and the fulfillment of both basic and application-oriented investigations. PMID:27469957

  1. Enhanced U(VI) release from autunite mineral by aerobic Arthrobacter sp. in the presence of aqueous bicarbonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsenovich, Yelena; Carvajal, Denny A.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Lagos, Leonel

    2012-04-20

    The bacterial effect on U(VI) leaching from the autunite mineral (Ca[(UO{sub 2})(PO{sub 4})]{sub 2} {center_dot} 3H{sub 2}O) was investigated to provide a more comprehensive understanding into important microbiological processes affecting autunite stability within subsurface bicarbonate-bearing environments. Experiments were performed in a culture of G975 Arthrobacter oxydans strain, herein referred to as G975, a soil bacterium previously isolated from Hanford Site soil. 91 mg of autunite powder and 50 mL of phosphorus-limiting sterile media were amended with bicarbonate ranging between 1-10 mM in glass reactor bottles and inoculated with G975 strain after the dissolution of autunite was at steady state. SEM observations indicated G975 formed a biofilm on the autunite surface and penetrated the mineral cleavages. The mineral surface colonization by bacteria tended to increase concomitantly with bicarbonate concentrations. Additionally, a sterile cultureware with inserts was used in non-contact bioleaching experiments where autunite and bacteria cells were kept separately. The data suggest the G975 bacteria is able to enhance U(VI) leaching from autunite without the direct contact with the mineral. In the presence of bicarbonate, the damage to bacterial cells caused by U(VI) toxicity was reduced, yielding similar values for total organic carbon (TOC) degradation and cell density compared to U(VI)-free controls. The presence of active bacterial cells greatly enhanced the U(VI) bioleaching from autunite in bicarbonate-amended media.

  2. Enhanced U(VI) release from autunite mineral by aerobic Arthrobacter sp. in the presence of aqueous bicarbonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsenovich, Yelena P.; Carvajal, Denny A.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Lagos, Leonel E.

    2012-05-01

    The bacterial effect on U(VI) release from the autunite mineral (Ca[(UO2)(PO4)]2•3H2O) was investigated to provide a more comprehensive understanding of the important microbiological processes affecting autunite stability within subsurface bicarbonate-bearing environments. Experiments were performed in a culture of the Arthrobacter oxydans G975 strain, herein referred to as G975, a soil bacterium previously isolated from Hanford Site soil. 91 mg of autunite powder and 50 mL of phosphorous-limiting sterile media were amended with bicarbonate (ranging between 1 and 10 mM) in glass reactor bottles and inoculated with the G975 strain after the dissolution of autunite was at steady state. SEM observations indicated that G975 formed a biofilm on the autunite surface and penetrated the mineral cleavages. The mineral surface colonization by bacteria tended to increase concomitantly with bicarbonate concentrations. Additionally, a sterile culture-ware with inserts was used in non-contact dissolution experiments where autunite and bacteria cells were kept separately. The data suggest that G975 bacteria is able to enhance the release of U(VI) from autunite without direct contact with the mineral. In the presence of bicarbonate, the damage to bacterial cells caused by U(VI) toxicity was reduced, yielding similar values for total organic carbon (TOC) degradation and cell density compared to U(VI)-free controls. The presence of active bacterial cells greatly enhanced the release of U(VI) from autunite in bicarbonate-amended media.

  3. Probing the Role of Two Critical Residues in Inulin Fructotransferase (DFA III-Producing) Thermostability from Arthrobacter sp. 161MFSha2.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shuhuai; Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Tao; Jiang, Bo; Mu, Wanmeng

    2016-08-10

    Inulin fructotransferase (IFTase) is an important enzyme that produces di-d-fructofuranose 1,2':2,3' dianhydride (DAF III), which is beneficial for human health. Present investigations mainly focus on screening and characterizing IFTase, including catalytic efficiency and thermostability, which are two important factors for enzymatic industrial applications. However, few reports aimed to improve these two characteristics based on the structure of IFTase. In this work, a structural model of IFTase (DFA III-producing) from Arthrobacter sp. 161MFSha2.1 was constructed through homology modeling. Analysis of this model reveals that two residues, Ser-309 and Ser-333, may play key roles in the structural stability. Therefore, the functions of the two residues were probed by site-directed mutagenesis combined with the Nano-DSC method and assays for residual activity. In contrast to other mutations, single mutation of serine 309 (or serine 333) to threonine did not decrease the enzymatic stability, whereas double mutation (serine 309 and serine 333 to threonine) can enhance thermostability (by approximately 5 °C). The probable mechanisms for this enhancement were investigated.

  4. In Silico Approach to Support that p-Nitrophenol Monooxygenase from Arthrobacter sp. Strain JS443 Catalyzes the Initial Two Sequential Monooxygenations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallubai, Monika; Amineni, Umamaheswari; Mallavarapu, Megharaj; Kadiyala, Venkateswarlu

    2015-06-01

    p-Nitrophenol (PNP), used primarily for manufacturing pesticides and dyes, has been recognized as a priority environmental pollutant. It is therefore important to reduce the input of this toxicant into the environment and to establish approaches for its removal from the contaminated sites. PNP monooxygenase, a novel enzyme from Gram-positive bacteria like Arthrobacter sp. and Bacillus sp., that comprises two components, a flavoprotein reductase and an oxygenase, catalyzes the initial two sequential monooxygenations to convert PNP to trihydroxybenzene. Accurate and reliable prediction of this enzyme-substrate interactions and binding affinity are of vital importance in understanding these catalytic mechanisms of the two sequential reactions. As crystal structure of the enzyme has not yet been published, we built a homology model for PNP monooxygenase using crystallized chlorophenol 4-monooxygenase from Burkholderia cepacia AC1100 (3HWC) as the template. The model was assessed for its reliability using PROCHECK, ERRAT and ProSA. Molecular docking of the physiological substrates, PNP and 4-nitrocatechol (4-NC), was carried out using Glide v5.7 implemented in Maestro v9.2, and the binding energies were calculated to substantiate the prediction. Docking complexes formed by molecular level interactions of PNP monooxygenase-PNP/4-NC without or with the cofactors, FAD and NADH, showed good correlation with the established experimental evidence that the two-component PNP monooxygenase catalyzes both the hydroxylation of PNP and the oxidative release of nitrite from 4-NC in B. sphaericus JS905. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulations performed for docking complexes using Desmond v3.0 showed stable nature of the interactions as well.

  5. Influence of pH and inorganic phosphate on toxicity of zinc to Arthrobacter sp. isolated from heavy-metal-contaminated sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moberly, James G; Staven, Ari; Sani, Rajesh K; Peyton, Brent M

    2010-10-01

    Because of its high solubility over a wide range of pH conditions, zinc is found in many natural and human-impacted systems. Zinc speciation is critical in assessing zinc toxicity to microorganisms because it varies considerably with pH and is dependent on other aqueous constituents. Combined results of thermodynamic modeling, statistical analysis, and batch culture studies using Arthrobacter sp. JM018 suggest that the toxic species may not be solely limited to the free ion, but also includes ZnHPO(4)(0)(aq). Cellular uptake of ZnHPO(4)(0)(aq) through the inorganic phosphate transporter (Pit family), which requires a neutral metal phosphate complex for phosphate transport, may explain the observed toxicity. Based on visual MINTEQ (v3.0) modeling, at 50 μM total zinc, ZnHPO(4)(0)(aq) constitutes 33, 70, and 76% of the neutral metal phosphate pool at pH 6, 7, and 8, respectively. At 50 μM total zinc, cultures supplied with organic phosphate (glycerol-3-phosphate) show no significant response to pH (p = 0.13) while inhibition of inorganic phosphate-supplemented cultures, whose neutral metal phosphates are increasingly dominated by ZnHPO(4)(0)(aq), show significant pH dependence (p = 9.45 × 10(-7)). Using sodium to decrease the distribution of ZnHPO(4)(0)(aq) in the neutral metal phosphate pool also decreased the pH dependent toxicity, further supporting this mechanism. These findings show the important role of minor zinc species in organism toxicity and have wider implications because the Pit inorganic phosphate transport system is widely distributed in Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukarya.

  6. Purification and characterization of alpha-L-arabinofuranosidase from Arthrobacter sp. MTCC 5214 in solid-state fermentation

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khandeparker, R.; Numan, M.T.H.; Mukherjee, B.; Satwekar, A.; Bhosle, N.B.

    acetobutylicum [6] and Bacillus pumilus PS213 [16], which were 92, 94 and 60 kDa, respectively. High molecular mass a-L-AFases with multiple subunits isolated from Streptomyces purpurascens [32], Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens GS113 [33] and Thermotoga maritime [39... was not observed with pNPAF tested up to 6.8 mmol l C01 concentration. The efficiency of a-L-AFase (V max /K m ) from Arthro- bacter sp. was less than that shown by the a-L-AFase produced by Bacillus stearothermophilus[9] andB. pumilus PS213[16].However...

  7. 阿特拉津降解茵FM326(Arthrobacter sp.)的分离筛选、鉴定和生物学特性%Isolation, Screening and Identification of Atrazine-degrading Bacterium FM326(Arthrobacter sp.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李明锐; 祖艳群; 陈建军; 湛方栋; 何永美; 李元

    2011-01-01

    采集除草剂阿特拉津污染的土壤,通过直接涂布法和富集驯化培养分离法,分别获得6株和5株能够降解阿特拉津的细菌.通过降解效率和降解动态试验,筛选到1株高效降解阿特拉津的菌株FM326,该菌株能以阿特拉津为唯一的碳源和氮源生长,培养96 h后对1000 mg· L-1阿特拉津降解效率达到97%.通过生理生化鉴定和16S rDNA序列分析,菌株FM326鉴定为节杆菌属(Arthrobacter sp.)细菌.该菌株表现出最适生长温度30~35℃,最适生长pH值5~9,好氧生长的生长特性.%The Iriazine herbicide atrazine(2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropyl-amino-s-triazine) is one of the most used pesticides. Atrazine is principally used for control of certain annual broadleaf and grass weeds, primarily in com but also in sorghum, sugarcane, and other crops. Although atrazine has relatively low persistency in soil, its remanets have been found in many higher concentrations even years after application due to widespread use. Microbial remediation is an effective and economic method to control the environment that has been polluted by atrazine. From herbicide contaminated soil, 5 atrazine degrading bacterial strains were isolated by enrichment culture, and 6 a- trazine-degrading bacterial strains were isolated by direct coating method. In the 11 strains, FM326 was screened out as the most highly efficient degradation bacteria by degradation test and could use atrazine as the sole carbon and nitrogen sources for growth. The degradation efficiency of strain FM326 was up to 97% within 96 hours while atrazine concentration was 1 000 mg-L"'. Strain FM326 was identified as Arthrobacter sp. According to physiological and biochemical tests and the phylogenic tree established by means of 16S rDNA sequencing. Moreover, strain FM326 was aerobic bacteria, its optimum temperature and pH value for growth was 30-35 t and 5~9, respectively. Strain of highly efficient degrading atrazine was found from soils

  8. Proteomic Alterations of Antarctic Ice Microalga Chlamydomonas sp. Under Low-Temperature Stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang-Feng Kan; Jin-Lai Miao; Cui-Juan Shi; Guang-You Li

    2006-01-01

    Antarctic ice microalga can survive and thrive in cold channels or pores in the Antarctic ice layer. In order to understand the adaptive mechanisms to low temperature, in the present study we compared two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-DE) profiles of normal and low temperature-stressed Antarctic ice microalga Chlamydomonas sp. cells. In addition, new protein spots induced by low temperature were identified with peptide mass fingerprinting based on matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) and database searching. Well-resolved and reproducible 2-DE patterns of both normal and low temperature-stressed cells were acquired. A total of 626 spots was detected in control cells and 652 spots were detected in the corresponding low temperature-stressed cells. A total of 598 spots was matched between normal and stressed cells. Two newly synthesized proteins (a and b) in low temperature-stressed cells were characterized. Protein spot A (53 kDa, pI 6.0) was similar to isopropylmalate/homocitrate/citramalate synthases, which act in the transport and metabolism of amino acids. Protein spot b (25 kDa, pI 8.0) was related to glutathione S-transferase, which functions as a scavenger of active oxygen, free radicals, and noxious metabolites. The present study is valuable for the application of ice microalgae, establishing an ice microalga Chlamydomonas sp. proteome database, and screening molecular biomarkers for further studies.

  9. Key enzymes enabling the growth of Arthrobacter sp. strain JBH1 with nitroglycerin as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husserl, Johana; Hughes, Joseph B; Spain, Jim C

    2012-05-01

    Flavoprotein reductases that catalyze the transformation of nitroglycerin (NG) to dinitro- or mononitroglycerols enable bacteria containing such enzymes to use NG as the nitrogen source. The inability to use the resulting mononitroglycerols limits most strains to incomplete denitration of NG. Recently, Arthrobacter strain JBH1 was isolated for the ability to grow on NG as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen, but the enzymes and mechanisms involved were not established. Here, the enzymes that enable the Arthrobacter strain to incorporate NG into a productive pathway were identified. Enzyme assays indicated that the transformation of nitroglycerin to mononitroglycerol is NADPH dependent and that the subsequent transformation of mononitroglycerol is ATP dependent. Cloning and heterologous expression revealed that a flavoprotein catalyzes selective denitration of NG to 1-mononitroglycerol (1-MNG) and that 1-MNG is transformed to 1-nitro-3-phosphoglycerol by a glycerol kinase homolog. Phosphorylation of the nitroester intermediate enables the subsequent denitration of 1-MNG in a productive pathway that supports the growth of the isolate and mineralization of NG.

  10. Complete genome sequence of Hymenobacter sp. strain PAMC26554, an ionizing radiation-resistant bacterium isolated from an Antarctic lichen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Tae-Jin; Han, So-Ra; Ahn, Do-Hwan; Park, Hyun; Kim, Augustine Yonghwi

    2016-06-10

    A Gram-negative, rod-shaped, red-pink in color, and UV radiation-resistant bacterium Hymenobacter sp. strain PAMC26554 was isolated from Usnea sp., an Antarctic lichen, and belongs to the class of Cytophagia and the phylum of Bacteroidetes. The complete genome of Hymenobacter sp. PAMC26554 consists of one chromosome (5,244,843bp) with two plasmids (199,990bp and 6421bp). The genomic sequence indicates that Hymenobacter sp. strain PAMC26554 possesses several genes involved in the nucleotide excision repair pathway that protects damaged DNA. This complete genome information will help us to understand its adaptation and novel survival strategy in the Antarctic extreme cold environment.

  11. Bioavailability of Ag(I) with Arthrobacter oxidas and Arthrobacter globiformis

    CERN Document Server

    Gelagutashvili, E; Ginturi, E; Bagdavadze, N; Kuchava, N; Tsakadze, K; Janjalia, M

    2012-01-01

    The biosorption of Ag(I)_ Arthrobacter species (Arthrobacter globiformis 151B and Arthrobacter oxidas 61B) was studied at simultaneous application of dialysis and atomic absorption analysis. The biosorption constants and nature of interaction for Ag(I) -Arthrobacter oxidas and Ag(I) -Arthrobacter globiformis were determined. The biosorption constants for Ag(I)- -Arthrobacter globiformis and for Ag(I) -Arthrobacter oxidas equal to 65.0 x10-4 and 35.0 x10-4 respectively.

  12. Cryptococcus socialis sp. nov. and Cryptococcus consortionis sp. nov., Antarctic basidioblastomycetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishniac, H. S.

    1985-01-01

    New yeasts from the Ross Desert (dry valley area) of Antarctica include Cryptococcus socialis sp. nov. and Cryptococcus consortionis sp. nov. Cryptococcus socialis MYSW A801-3aY1 (= ATCC 56685) requires no vitamins, assimilates L-arabinose, cellobiose, D-glucuronate, maltose, melezitose, raffinose, soluble starch, sucrose, and trehalose, and may be distinguished from all other basidioblastomycetes by the combination of amylose production, cellobiose assimilation, and failure to utilize nitrate, D-galactose, myo-inositol, and mannitol. Its guanine-plus-cytosine content is 56 mol%. Cryptococcus consortionis MYSW A801-3aY92 (= ATCC 56686) requires thiamine, assimilates L-arabinose, D-glucuronate, 2-ketogluconate, salicin, succinate, sucrose, trehalose, and D-xylose, and may be distinguished from all other basidioblastomycetes by the combination of amylose production and failure to utilize nitrate, cellobiose, D-galactose, myo-inositol, and mannitol. Its guanine-plus-cytosine content is 56 mol%.

  13. UV and cold tolerance of a pigment-producing Antarctic Janthinobacterium sp. Ant5-2

    KAUST Repository

    Mojib, Nazia

    2013-03-20

    In this paper, we describe the UV and cold tolerance of a purple violet pigment (PVP)-producing Antarctic bacterium, Janthinobacterium sp. Ant5-2 (PVP+) and compared its physiological adaptations with a pigmentless mutant strain (PVP-). A spontaneous deletion of vioA that codes for tryptophan monooxygenase, the first gene involved in the biosynthesis of PVP was found in PVP- strain. The PVP- culture exhibited significantly reduced survival during exponential and stationary growth phase following exposure to UVB (320 nm) and UVC (254 nm) (dose range: 0-300 J/m2) when compared to wild-type (PVP+) cultures. In addition, upon biochemical inhibition of pigment synthesis by 2(5H)-furanone, wild-type PVP+ cultures exhibited approximately 50-fold growth reduction at a higher dose (300 J/m2) of UV. Increased resistance to UV was observed upon inducing starvation state in both PVP+ and PVP- cultures. There was 80 % (SD = ±8) reduction in extrapolymeric substance (EPS) production in the PVP- cultures along with a compromised survival to freeze-thaw cycles when compared to the PVP+ cultures. Perhaps synthesis of PVP and EPS are among the key adaptive features that define the survival of this bacterium in Antarctic extreme conditions, especially during austral summer months. © 2013 Springer Japan.

  14. Activation of macrophages by an exopolysaccharide isolated from Antarctic Psychrobacter sp. B-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Leiye; Sun, Guojie; Wei, Jingfang; Wang, Yingze; Du, Chao; Li, Jiang

    2016-09-01

    An exopolysaccharide (EPS) was isolated and purified from an Antarctic psychrophilic bacterium B-3, identified as Psychrobacter sp., and the activation of RAW264.7 cells by B-3 EPS was investigated. The results show that B-3 EPS, over a certain concentration range, promoted cell viability, nitric oxide production, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α secretion, and phagocytic ability. Furthermore, TAK-242, an inhibitor of the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) significantly reduced nitric oxide production by these cells after stimulation with B-3 EPS. Moreover, B-3 EPS induced p65 phosphorylation and IκBα degradation in these cells. In conclusion, B-3 EPS might have activated RAW264.7 cells by combining with TLR4 on cell surface and triggering activation of NF-κB signaling pathways, implying that this EPS could activate macrophages and regulate initial immune response.

  15. Isolation and optimization of production of Astaxanthin from Antarctic yeast Rhodotorula sp.NJ298

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Junling; Miao Jinlai; Sun Xiuqin; Wang Quanfu; Li Guangyou

    2007-01-01

    Rhodotorula sp. NJ298 which could produce carotenoids was isolated from Antarctic sea ice. The major carotenoid was identified as astaxanthin by Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry(LC/MS), and its content accounted for 87.62% of total carotenoids (1,786 μg/g). High Performance Liquid Chromatogrephy(HPLC)analysis showed that the purity of the astaxanthin reached about 96.16% through a simple purification. Maximum astaxanthin production(1,908/μg/g)was obtained when the yeast was grown at 10℃ in seawater medium containing 5g/L sodium acetate, 5g/L peptone, 0.5g/L NaCl, 0.01g/L KH2P04;0.01g/L MgS04·7H2O and 0.001 g/L FeS04·7H20 at pH 7.5.

  16. Cloning and sequencing of the trpE gene from Arthrobacter globiformis ATCC 8010 and several related subsurface Arthrobacter isolates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chernova, T.; Viswanathan, V.K.; Austria, N.; Nichols, B.P.

    1998-09-01

    Tryptophan dependent mutants of Arthrobacter globiformis ATCC 8010 were isolated and trp genes were cloned by complementation and marker rescue of the auxotrophic strains. Rescue studies and preliminary sequence analysis reveal that at least the genes trpE, trpC, and trpB are clustered together in this organism. In addition, sequence analysis of the entire trpE gene, which encodes component I of anthranilate synthase, is described. Segments of the trpE gene from 17 subsurface isolates of Arthrobacter sp. were amplified by PCR and sequenced. The partial trpE sequences from the various strains were aligned and subjected to phylogenetic analysis. The data suggest that in addition to single base changes, recombination and genetic exchange play a major role in the evolution of the Arthrobacter genome.

  17. New Cysteine-Rich Ice-Binding Protein Secreted from Antarctic Microalga, Chloromonas sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Woongsic; Campbell, Robert L; Gwak, Yunho; Kim, Jong Im; Davies, Peter L; Jin, EonSeon

    2016-01-01

    Many microorganisms in Antarctica survive in the cold environment there by producing ice-binding proteins (IBPs) to control the growth of ice around them. An IBP from the Antarctic freshwater microalga, Chloromonas sp., was identified and characterized. The length of the Chloromonas sp. IBP (ChloroIBP) gene was 3.2 kb with 12 exons, and the molecular weight of the protein deduced from the ChloroIBP cDNA was 34.0 kDa. Expression of the ChloroIBP gene was up- and down-regulated by freezing and warming conditions, respectively. Western blot analysis revealed that native ChloroIBP was secreted into the culture medium. This protein has fifteen cysteines and is extensively disulfide bonded as shown by in-gel mobility shifts between oxidizing and reducing conditions. The open-reading frame of ChloroIBP was cloned and over-expressed in Escherichia coli to investigate the IBP's biochemical characteristics. Recombinant ChloroIBP produced as a fusion protein with thioredoxin was purified by affinity chromatography and formed single ice crystals of a dendritic shape with a thermal hysteresis activity of 0.4±0.02°C at a concentration of 5 mg/ml. In silico structural modeling indicated that the three-dimensional structure of ChloroIBP was that of a right-handed β-helix. Site-directed mutagenesis of ChloroIBP showed that a conserved region of six parallel T-X-T motifs on the β-2 face was the ice-binding region, as predicted from the model. In addition to disulfide bonding, hydrophobic interactions between inward-pointing residues on the β-1 and β-2 faces, in the region of ice-binding motifs, were crucial to maintaining the structural conformation of ice-binding site and the ice-binding activity of ChloroIBP.

  18. Characterization of a sodium dodecyl sulphate-degrading Pseudomonas sp. strain DRY15 from Antarctic soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halmi, M I E; Hussin, W S W; Aqlima, A; Syed, M A; Ruberto, L; MacCormack, W P; Shukor, M Y

    2013-11-01

    A bacterium capable of biodegrading surfactant sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) was isolated from Antarctic soil. The isolate was tentatively identified as Pseudomonas sp. strain DRY15 based on carbon utilization profiles using Biolog GN plates and partial 16S rDNA molecular phylogeny. Growth characteristic studies showed that the bacterium grew optimally at 10 degrees C, 7.25 pH, 1 g l(-1) SDS as a sole carbon source and 2 g l(-1) ammonium sulphate as nitrogen source. Growth was completely inhibited at 5 g l(-1) SDS. At a tolerable initial concentration of 2 g l(-1), approximately 90% of SDS was degraded after an incubation period of eight days. The best growth kinetic model to fit experimental data was the Haldane model of substrate inhibition with a correlation coefficient value of 0.97. The maximum growth rate was 0.372 hr(-1) while the saturation constant or half velocity constant (Ks) and inhibition constant (Ki), were 0.094% and 11.212 % SDS, respectively. Other detergent tested as carbon sources at 1 g l(-1) was Tergitol NP9, Tergitol 15S9, Witconol 2301 (methyl oleate), sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS), benzethonium chloride, and benzalkonium chloride showed Tergitol NP9, Tergitol 15S9, Witconol 2301 and the anionic SDBS supported growth with the highest growth exhibited by SDBS.

  19. The genome of the Antarctic polyextremophile Nesterenkonia sp. AN1 reveals adaptive strategies for survival under multiple stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliyu, Habibu; De Maayer, Pieter; Cowan, Don

    2016-04-01

    Nesterenkonia sp. AN1 is a polyextremophile isolated from Antarctic desert soil. Genomic analyses and genome comparisons with three mesophilic Nesterenkonia strains indicated that the unique genome fraction of Nesterenkonia sp. AN1 contains adaptive features implicated in the response to cold stress including modulation of membrane fluidity as well as response to cold-associated osmotic and oxidative stress. The core genome also encodes a number of putative cold stress response proteins. RNA-Seq-based transcriptome analyses of Nesterenkonia sp. AN1 grown at 5ºC and 21°C showed that there was significant induction of transcripts that code for antioxidants at 5ºC, demonstrated by the upregulation of sodA, bcp and bpoA2. There was also overexpression of universal stress protein genes related to uspA, along with genes encoding other characterized cold stress features. Genes encoding the two key enzymes of the glyoxylate cycle, isocitrate lyase (ICL) and malate synthase (AceB) were induced at 5ºC, suggesting possible adaptation strategies for energy metabolism in cold habitats. These genomic features may contribute to the survival of Nesterenkonia sp. AN1 in arid Antarctic soils.

  20. Degradation of the Phosphonate Herbicide Glyphosate by Arthrobacter atrocyaneus ATCC 13752

    OpenAIRE

    Pipke, Rüdiger; Amrhein, Nikolaus

    1988-01-01

    Of nine authentic Arthrobacter strains tested, only A. atrocyaneus ATCC 13752 was capable of using the herbicide glyphosate [N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine] as its sole source of phosphorus. Contrary to the previously isolated Arthrobacter sp. strain GLP-1, which degrades glyphosate via sarcosine, A. atrocyaneus metabolized glyphosate to aminomethylphosphonic acid. The carbon of aminomethylphosphonic acid was entirely converted to CO2. This is the first report on glyphosate degradation by a bacte...

  1. Expression and enzymatic characterization of a cold-adapted β-agarase from Antarctic bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. NJ21

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiang; Sha, Yujie

    2015-03-01

    An agar-degrading bacterium, designated as Pseudoalteromonas sp. NJ21, was isolated from an Antarctic sediment sample. The agarase gene aga1161 from Pseudoalteromonas sp. NJ21 consisting of a 2 382-bp coding region was cloned. The gene encodes a 793-amino acids protein and was found to possess characteristic features of the Glyco_hydro_42 family. The recombinant agarase (rAga1161) was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified as a fusion protein. Enzyme activity analysis revealed that the optimum temperature and pH for the purified recombinant agarase were 30-40°C and 8.0, respectively. rAga1161 was found to maintain as much as 80% of its maximum activity at 10°C, which is typical of a coldadapted enzyme. The pattern of agar hydrolysis demonstrated that the enzyme is an β-agarase, producing neoagarobiose (NA2) as the final main product. Furthermore, this work is the first proof of an agarolytic activity in Antarctic bacteria and these results indicate the potential for the Antarctic agarase as a catalyst in medicine, food and cosmetic industries.

  2. Effect of Cd on GSH and GSH-related enzymes of Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L existing in Antarctic ice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Yu; MIAO Jin-lai; LI Guang-you; WANG Quan-fu; KAN Guang-feng; WANG Guo-dong

    2005-01-01

    Glutathione(GSH) and GSH-related enzymes play a great role in protecting organisms from oxidative damage. The GSH level and GSH-related enzymes activities were investigated as well as the growth yield and malonyldialdehyde(MDA) content in the Antarctic ice microalga Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L exposure to the different cadmium concentration in this paper. The results showed that the higher concentration Cd inhibited the growth of ICE-L significantly and Cd would induce formation of MDA. At the same time, it is clear that GSH level, glutathione peroxidases(GPx) activity and glutathione S-transferases(GST), activity were higher in ICE-L exposed to Cd than the control. But GR activity dropped notably when ICE-L were cultured in the medium containing Cd. Increase of GSH level, GPx and GST activities acclimate to oxidative stress induced by Cd and protect Antarctic ice microalga Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L from toxicity caused by Cd exposure. These parameters may be used to assess the biological impact of Cd in the Antarctic pole region environment.

  3. Changes of proteins in the Antarctic ice microalga Chlamydomonas sp. cultured under UV-B radiation stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KAN Guangfeng; MIAO Jinlai; SHI Cuijuan; LI Guangyou

    2006-01-01

    Antarctic ice microalga Chlamydomonas sp. can thrive undisturbed under high UV radiation in the Antarctic ice layer. However, it is unknown that the initial adaptation mechanisms in protein level occurring in response to high UV radiation. Global-expression profiling of proteins in response to stress was analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and image analysis. In the 2-DE analysis,protein preparation is the key step. Three different protein extract methods were compared, and the results showed that the trichloroacetic acid (TCA)-acetone fractional precipitation method was the fittest one. At the same time, the proteins in Chlamydomonas sp. were compared in 2-DE way, and the synthesis of seven protein spots was found disappeared and 18 decreased after exposed to UV-B radiation. In addition, 14 protein spots were enhanced or induced, among which two new peptides (20 and 21 kDa) appeared whose isoelectric point (pI) was 7.05 and 4.60 respectively. These changed proteins might act as key role in the acclimation of Antarctic ice microalga to UV-B radiation

  4. Pb2 + Tolerance and Adsorption of Arthrobacter sp. 12-1 Isolated from Lead-zinc Mine Tailing Dam%铅锌矿尾矿坝分离节杆菌12-1对Pb2+的耐受和吸附性能研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈志; 邹情雅; 潘晓鸿; 林璋; 关雄

    2014-01-01

    The extensive exploitation and usage of lead resources have caused serious environmental pollution problems currently. Bioremediation of Pb2 + contaminated water and soil environments using microbes is regarded as a promising technology due to the advantages of its cost-effective, easy operation and environmental-friendly properties. In order to understand Pb2+ biosorption characterization of microbes, an indigenous lead-resistant bacterium-Arthrobacter sp. 12-1(GenBank No. KM362724) was isolated from lead-zinc mine tailing dam, and the process and mechanism of Pb2+ biosorption by Arthrobacter sp. 12-1 were furtherly investigated in this study. Study on the growth of Arthrobacter sp. 12-1 in LB medium containing different concentration of Pb2+suggested that the highest Pb2+tolerant concentration of Arthrobacter sp. 12-1 was 800 mg/L. In water solution, 105 mg/L of Pb2+could be reduced to 2.17 mg/L by Arthrobacter sp. 12-1 within 24 h with biosorption rate of 97.93%. Microscopic investigation (atomic force microscopy and scanning electronic microscopy) combined with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis showed that lead containing mineral was formed on the surface of cell after Pb2+sorption by Arthrobacter sp. 12-1. Further fourier transform infrared (FT- IR) analysis revealed that carboxyl, amide and phosphate groups of Arthrobacter sp. 12-1 might be involved in Pb2 + biosorption process. The results demonstrated that the Arthrobacter sp. 12-1 isolated from lead-zinc mine tailing dam had strong ability of Pb2 + resistance and biosorption, indicating an attractive prospect of practical applications in bioremediation Pb2+ contaminated water and soil environments. The present work provides much fundamental information for help in constructing feasible strategies for Pb2+bioremediation in the environment.%当前铅资源的粗放式开采和使用对环境造成了严重的污染。利用微生物修复铅污染具有费用低、易操作、环境友好等优

  5. Marisediminicola antarctica gen. nov., sp. nov., an actinobacterium isolated from the Antarctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui-Rong; Yu, Yong; Luo, Wei; Zeng, Yin-Xin

    2010-11-01

    Strain ZS314(T) was isolated from a sandy intertidal sediment sample collected from the coastal area off the Chinese Antarctic Zhongshan Station, east Antarctica (6 9° 22' 13″ S 76 ° 21' 41″ E). The cells were Gram-positive, motile, short rods. The temperature range for growth was 0-26 °C and the pH for growth ranged from 5 to 10, with optimum growth occurring within the temperature range 18-23 °C and pH range 6.0-8.0. Growth occurred in the presence of 0-6 % (w/v) NaCl, with optimum growth occurring in the presence of 2-4 % (w/v) NaCl. Strain ZS314(T) had MK-10 as the major menaquinone and anteiso-C(15 : 0), iso-C(16 : 0) and anteiso-C(17 : 0) as major fatty acids. The cell-wall peptidoglycan type was B2β with ornithine as the diagnostic diamino acid. The major polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylglycerol. The genomic DNA G+C content was approximately 67 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity showed that strain ZS314(T) represents a new lineage in the family Microbacteriaceae. On the basis of the phylogenetic analyses and phenotypic characteristics, a new genus, namely Marisediminicola gen. nov., is proposed, harbouring the novel species Marisediminicola antarctica sp. nov. with the type strain ZS314(T) (=DSM 22350(T) =CCTCC AB 209077(T)).

  6. Flavobacterium faecale sp. nov., an agarase-producing species isolated from stools of Antarctic penguins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Ho; Choi, Bo Hyun; Jo, Minho; Kim, Sun Chang; Lee, Pyung Cheon

    2014-08-01

    Taxonomic studies were performed on an agarase-producing strain, designated WV33(T), isolated from faeces of Antarctic penguins. Cells of strain WV33(T) were Gram-staining-negative, strictly aerobic, orange and rod-shaped. Strain WV33(T) displayed agarase activity and was able to utilize galactose as a sole carbon source. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that strain WV33(T) was closely related to Flavobacterium algicola TC2(T) (98.0% similarity), F. frigidarium ATCC 700810(T) (96.9%) and F. frigoris LMG 21922(T) (96.1%). The predominant cellular fatty acids were iso-C(15 : 1) G, iso-C(15 : 0), C(15 : 0), C(16 : 0) and summed feature 3 (comprising iso-C(15 : 0) 2-OH and/or C(16 : 1)ω7c). Menaquinone 6 (MK-6) was the sole quinone identified, and the major pigment was zeaxanthin. The major polar lipid was phosphatidylethanolamine. DNA-DNA relatedness of strain WV33(T) with respect to its closest phylogenetic neighbours was 25% for F. algicola NBRC 102673(T), 23% for F. frigidarium DSM 17623(T) and 21% for F. frigoris DSM 15719(T). The DNA G+C content of strain WV33(T) was 37±0.6 mol%. Based on the phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic data, strain WV33(T) is concluded to represent a novel species of the genus Flavobacterium, for which the name Flavobacterium faecale sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is WV33(T) ( = KCTC 32457(T) = CECT 8384(T)).

  7. Purification and characterization of β-galactosidase from Arthrobacter sp%节杆菌β-半乳糖苷酶的分离纯化及酶学性质研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李珍爱; 唐蕾; 毛忠贵; 张建华; 杨瑞金

    2011-01-01

    分离纯化了由节杆菌所产的fI-半乳糖苷酶(EC 3.2.1.23)并研究了其酶学性质.以乳糖发酵培养基培养,离心收集茵体,超声破碎细胞得到粗酶液;采用硫酸铵沉淀、Phenyl-Sepharose疏水、DEAE-Sepharose离子交换和p-aminobelazyl-1-thio-β-galactopyranoside(PABTG)亲和层析方法进行酶的分离纯化,纯化倍数达到31.4;经SDS-PAGE检测分子量为30 kD.酶学性质的研究表明:该酶最适pH值为6.6,最适反应温度为37℃,pH在5.5~8.0,温度低于30℃时,相对酶活在1 h内保持在50%以上,较为稳定.以邻硝基苯-β-吡喃半乳糖苷(ONPG)为底物,米氏常数为4.64 mmol/L.%The purification and characterization of β-galactosidase (EC 3.2.1.23) produced by Arthrobacter sp. Were investigated. The bacterial cells cultured were gathered by centrifugation and disrupted by ultrasonication. The crude enzyme solution was precipitated by ammonium sulphate. Further enzyme purification was carried out by Phenyl- Sepharose, DEAE-Sepharose and p-amino-benzyl-l-thio-β-Dgalactopyranoside (PABTG) affinity chromatography. The purified β-galactosiclase was illustrated as a single band in SDS-PAGE with a purification fold of 31.4 and an apparent molecular weight of 30 kD. The maximum activity of the enzyme was determined at pH 6.6 and 37 ℃. Above 50% of the maximum activity of the enzyme was detected at pH 5.5~8.0 and 30 ℃. The Km for ONPG was 4.64 mmol/L.

  8. Planococcus faecalis sp. nov., a carotenoid-producing species isolated from stools of Antarctic penguins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Ho; Kang, Hyung Jun; Yu, Byung Jo; Kim, Sun Chang; Lee, Pyung Cheon

    2015-10-01

    Taxonomic studies were performed on a novel carotenoid-producing strain, designated AJ003T, isolated from faeces of Antarctic penguins. Cells of strain AJ003T were aerobic, Gram-stain-positive, cocci-shaped and orange. Strain AJ003T was capable of growing in a broad temperature range, including sub-zero growth (below − 20 to 30 °C). 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that strain AJ003T was closely related to Planococcus halocryophilus Or1T (97.4 % similarity), Planococcus antarcticus DSM 14505T (97.3 %), Planococcus kocurii NCIMB 629T (97.3 %), and Planococcus donghaensis JH1T (97.1 %). The predominant cellular fatty acids were anteiso-C15 : 0, and iso-C16 : 0.MK-7 and MK-8 were the quinones identified, and the major pigment was glycosyl-4,4′-diaponeurosporen-4′-ol-4-oic acid. The major polar lipid was phosphatidylglycerol. DNA–DNA relatedness of strain AJ003T with respect to its closest phylogenetic neighbours was 38.2 ± 0.5 % for Planococcus halocryophilus DSM 24743T, 32.2 ± 0.2 % for Planococcus antarcticus DSM 14505T, 21.0 ± 0.3 % for Planococcus kocurii DSM 20747T and 18.6 ± 1.4 % for Planococcus donghaensis KCTC 13050T. The DNA G+C content of strain AJ003T was 40.0 ± 0.6 mol%. Based on the phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic data, strain AJ003T is concluded to represent a novel species of the genus Planococcus, for which the name Planococcus faecalis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is AJ003T ( = KCTC 33580T = CECT 8759T).

  9. Production and characterization of an extracellular polysaccharide of antarctic marine bacteria Pseudoalteromonas sp. S-15-13

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jiang; CHEN Kaoshan; LIN Xuezheng; HE Peiqing; LI Guangyou

    2006-01-01

    Twenty-seven antarctic bacteria producing extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) were selected from 57 strains by staining technology. The effects of major environmental factors on the growth and EPS production of Pseudoalteromonas sp. S-15-13 were investigated, and the EPS was separated and purified for characterization analysis. The results showed that the optimal conditions for the EPS production were culture period, 56 h; growth temperature, 8 ℃; carbon source, 1.0% glucose; NaCl concentration, 3.0%; pH 6.0~7.0. The EPS was purified by cold ethanol precipitation, proteins removal, ion exchange chromatography and gel chromatography technology. The molecular mass of EPS-II was 62 kDa as determined by the high performance gel permeation chromatography. Its sugar composition was a homopolymer of mannose analyzed by gas chromatograph spectroscopy. After repeated freezing and thawing of the bacteria biomass in the presence of EPS, the bacterial growth was much higher than that observed after freezing in the absence of EPS and the difference augmented with the increase of freeze-thaw cycles. It is hypothesized that the adaptation of Pseudoalteromonas sp. S-15-13 to the antarctic marine conditions, characterized by low temperature, high NaCl concentration and repeated freeze-thaw cycles, might be related to the EPS production ability.

  10. Pricia antarctica gen. nov., sp. nov., a member of the family Flavobacteriaceae, isolated from Antarctic intertidal sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yong; Li, Hui-Rong; Zeng, Yin-Xin; Sun, Kun; Chen, Bo

    2012-09-01

    A yellow-coloured, rod-shaped, Gram-reaction- and Gram-staining-negative, non-motile and aerobic bacterium, designated strain ZS1-8(T), was isolated from a sample of sandy intertidal sediment collected from the Antarctic coast. Flexirubin-type pigments were absent. In phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, strain ZS1-8(T) formed a distinct phyletic line and the results indicated that the novel strain should be placed in a new genus within the family Flavobacteriaceae. In pairwise comparisons between strain ZS1-8(T) and recognized species, the levels of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity were all antarctica gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of the type species is ZS1-8(T) (= JCM 17291(T) = DSM 23421(T)).

  11. Biodegradation kinetics of 4-fluorocinnamic acid by a consortium of Arthrobacter and Ralstonia strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hasan, Syed A.; Wietzes, Piet; Janssen, Dick B.

    2012-01-01

    Arthrobacter sp. strain G1 is able to grow on 4-fluorocinnamic acid (4-FCA) as sole carbon source. The organism converts 4-FCA into 4-fluorobenzoic acid (4-FBA) and utilizes the two-carbon side-chain for growth with some formation of 4-fluoroacetophenone as a dead-end side product. We also have isol

  12. Screening and optimization of EPA-producing antarctic psychrophilic bacterium Shewanella sp.NJ136

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Botao; Miao Jinlai; Ma Jinhai; Zheng Zhou; Wang Guodong; Wang Quanfu; Li Guangyou; Liu Wanshun

    2007-01-01

    Two hundred strains of bacteria from Antarctic sea ice were collected and screened for their ability of producing eicosapentaenoic acid(EPA, 20:5ω3)by means of Gas Chromatography/Mass Spetrometry (GC/MS). Eight strains of bacteria containing EPA were investigated, among which the outstanding one was recorded as NJl36. This bacterium was identified as Shewanella by the biochemical characteristics and 16S rRNA sequence. Response surface methodology(RSM)was applied to optimize the medium ingredients. A 24full factorial central composite design(FFCCD)was employed to determine the maximum EPA production at optimum levels of pH, NaCl, glucose and yeast extract. The predicted optimal combination of media constituents for maximum 14.02 mg/g(about 1.7-fold increase)EPA production were determined as 30.15‰(m/v)NaCl, 9.98g/L glucose, 4.42g/L yeast extract and pH 6.08. The actual experimental results were in agreement with the prediction.

  13. Extracellular cold active lipase from the psychrotrophic Halomonas sp. BRI 8 isolated from the Antarctic sea water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipra Vijay Jadhav

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available An extracellular cold active lipase-producing psychrotrophic bacterium (BRI 8 was isolated from the Antarctic sea water sample. The 16s rRNA sequence study revealed that the isolate belongs to the genus Halomonas (929 bp. The present paper reports optimization of fermentation conditions for production of lipase (EC 3.1.1.3 from Halomonas sp. BRI 8. Highest lipase production was observed in the medium containing olive oil and peptone. The optimum pH and temperature for enzyme catalysis were 7.0 and 10°C respectively. The enzyme was relatively more stable in acidic pH range and retained 50% activity when incubated at 30°C for 1 h. The enzyme was stable in various organic solvents and showed more than 100% activity in presence of isoamyl alcohol. Significant enzyme activity was also observed in the presence of metal ions and detergents. The molecular mass of partially purified lipase was found to be around 66 kD.

  14. Cloning, Expression, Purification, and Characterization of Glutaredoxin from Antarctic Sea-Ice Bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. AN178

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quanfu Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glutaredoxins (Grxs are small ubiquitous redox enzymes that catalyze glutathione-dependent reactions to reduce protein disulfide. In this study, a full-length Grx gene (PsGrx with 270 nucleotides was isolated from Antarctic sea-ice bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. AN178. It encoded deduced 89 amino acid residues with the molecular weight 9.8 kDa. Sequence analysis of the amino acid sequence revealed the catalytic motif CPYC. Recombinant PsGrx (rPsGrx stably expressed in E. coli BL21 was purified to apparent homogeneity by Ni-affinity chromatography. rPsGrx exhibited optimal activity at 30°C and pH 8.0 and showed 25.5% of the activity at 0°C. It retained 65.0% of activity after incubation at 40°C for 20 min and still exhibited 37.0% activity in 1.0 M NaCl. These results indicated that rPsGrx was a typical cold active protein with low thermostability.

  15. Some remarks on the taxonomy of Antarctic Leuconidae (Cumacea: Crustacea) with a description of a new species Leucon intermedius n. sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlenhardt-Siegel, U.

    1996-09-01

    The newly described species Leucon intermedius n. sp. differs from other known Leucon species by an inconspicuous antennal notch and the presence of only a few teeth at the dorsomedian crest. The species most similar to Leucon intermedius are L. septemdentatus and L. inexcavatus from the Antarctic/Subantarctic Ocean. A Table is given to allow direct comparison of the characteristics of all Leucon species known from the Antarctic/Subantarctic, Ocean. Forty-one specimens of Leucon intermedius n. sp. were collected at depths ranging from 109 to 791 m in the vicinity of the Amery Depression (Indian Sector) and near King George Island (South Shetland Islands). Problems in distinguishing the Antarctic/Subantarctic species of the genus Eudorella are discussed. The shape of the antennal notch is suggested as a better characteristic to distinguish the Eudorella species than the proportions of the articles of extremities. On the basis of this criterion, samples at the Zoological Museum, Hamburg are made up of two species of Eudorella: gracilior and cf. fallax.

  16. Mrakia psychrophila sp. nov., a new species isolated from Antarctic soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIN Ming-xiu; ZHOU Pei-jin

    2007-01-01

    The yeast strain (Y18) was isolated from a soil sample collected from Fildes Peninsula, Antarctica. The strain is a psychrophilic yeast with optimum and maximum growth temperatures of 10 ℃ and 18 ℃, respectively. Teliospores were formed after 7 d on malt agar, when the germination of teliospores was observed. Both inositol and D-glucuronate were assimilated.Positive results of the DBB (diazonium blue B) color reaction, urease test, and starch formation were observed. The major CoQ is Q8. All results indicated that Y18 belongs to the genes of Mrakia. The 18S rDNA sequence analyses showed that Y18 is closely related to Mrakia frigida. DNA-DNA relatedness study, and some biochemistry characteristics indicated that Y18 represents a new species for which Mrakia psychrophila sp. nov. is proposed.

  17. Zhongshania antarctica gen. nov., sp. nov. and Zhongshania guokunii sp. nov., gammaproteobacteria respectively isolated from coastal attached (fast) ice and surface seawater of the Antarctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui-Juan; Zhang, Xi-Ying; Chen, Chun-Xiao; Zhang, Yan-Jiao; Gao, Zhao-Ming; Yu, Yong; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Chen, Bo; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2011-09-01

    Two Gram-negative, motile, aerobic, catalase- and oxidase-positive, rod-shaped strains, designated ZS5-23(T) and ZS6-22(T), were respectively isolated from Antarctic coastal attached (fast) ice and surface seawater samples. Both strains could grow at 4-35 °C (optimum 30 °C) and in the absence of NaCl. Analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strains ZS5-23(T) and ZS6-22(T) were closely related to each other (99.0 % sequence similarity) and belonged to the class Gammaproteobacteria, with their closest relatives being Spongiibacter and Melitea species (93.1-94.3 % sequence similarity). The predominant cellular fatty acids in both strains were C₁₇:₁ω8c, C₁₇:₀ and summed feature 3 (C₁₆:₁ω7c and/or iso-C₁₅:₀ 2-OH). Genomic DNA G+C contents of strains ZS5-23(T) and ZS6-22(T) were 51.5 and 51.8 mol%, respectively. The DNA-DNA relatedness between strains ZS5-23(T) and ZS6-22(T) was 50.9 %. Strains ZS5-23(T) and ZS6-22(T) could be differentiated from each other and from Spongiibacter and Melitea species by differences in a number of phenotypic properties. Based on the data presented, strains ZS5-23(T) and ZS6-22(T) represent two novel species in a new genus in the class Gammaproteobacteria, for which the names Zhongshania antarctica gen. nov., sp. nov. (the type species) and Zhongshania guokunii sp. nov. are proposed. The type strain of Zhongshania antarctica is ZS5-23(T) ( = KACC 14066(T)  = CCTCC AB 209246(T)) and that of Zhongshania guokunii is ZS6-22(T) ( = KACC 14532(T)  = CCTCC AB 209247(T)).

  18. Bacillus piscis sp. nov., a novel bacterium isolated from the muscle of the antarctic fish Dissostichus mawsoni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Bong; Jeon, Seon Hwa; Choi, Seok-Gwan; Jung, Hee-Young; Kim, Myung Kyum; Srinivasan, Sathiyaraj

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, a new bacterial strain designated as 16MFT21(T) is isolated from the muscle of a fish caught in the Antarctic Ocean. Strain 16MFT21(T) is a Gram-staining-positive, catalase-oxidase-positive, rod-shaped facultative-aerobic bacterium. The phylogenetic analysis that is based on the 16S-rRNA gene sequence of strain 16MFT21(T) revealed that it belongs to the genus Bacillus in the family Bacillaceae in the class Bacilli. The highest degrees of the sequence similarity of the strain 16MFT21(T) is with Bacillus licheniformis ATCC 14580(T) (96.6%) and Bacillus sonorensis NBRC 101234(T) (96.6%). The isolate formed a pale-yellow pigment, and it grew in the presence of 0% to 10% (w/v) NaCl (optimum at 2% NaCl), a pH of 6.0 to 10.0 (optimum pH from 7.0 to 8.0), and from 4°C to 30°C (optimum at 30°C). The major polar lipids consist of diphosphatidylglycerol (DPG) and phosphatidylglycerol (PG). The predominant fatty acids are iso-C15:0, anteiso-C15:0, iso-C17:0, and anteiso-C17:0. The main respiratory quinone is menaquinone-7 (MK-7), and based on the use of the meso-diaminopimelic acid as the diagnostic diamino acid, the peptidoglycan cell-wall type is A1γ. Based on the phylogenetic, phenotypic, and chemotaxonomic data, strain 16MFT21(T) (=KCTC 18866(T) =JCM 31664(T)) for which the name Bacillus piscis sp. nov. is proposed should be classified as a new species.

  19. Characterizing proteases in an Antarctic Janthinobacterium sp. isolate:Evidence of a protease horizontal gene transfer event

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cecilia Martinez-Rosales; Juan Jos Marizcurrena; Andrs Iriarte; Natalia Fullana; Hctor Musto; Susana Castro-Sowinski

    2015-01-01

    We report the isolation of a cold-adapted bacterium belonging to the genus Janthinobacterium (named AU11), from a water sample collected in Lake Uruguay (King George Island, South Shetlands). AU11 (growth between 4°C and 30°C) produces a single cold-active extracellular protease (ExPAU11), differentially expressed at low temperature. ExPAU11 was identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-ToF MS) as an alkaline metallo-protease (70% coverage with an extracellular protease of Janthinobacterium sp. PI12), and by protease-inhibitor screening identified as a serine-protease. To the best of our knowledge this is the first experimental evidence of a cold-active extracellular protease produced by Janthinobacterium. Furthermore, we identified a serine-protease gene (named JSP8A) showing 60% identity (98%query coverage) to subtilisin peptidases belonging to the S8 family (S8A subfamily) of many cyanobacteria. A phylogenetic analysis of the JSP8A protease, along with related bacterial protein sequences, confirms that JSP8A clusters with S8A subtilisin sequences from different cyanobacteria, and is clearly separated from S8A bacterial sequences of other phyla (including its own). An analysis of the genomic organization around JSP8A suggests that this protease gene was acquired in an event that duplicated a racemase gene involved in transforming L- to D-amino acids. Our results suggest that AU11 probably acquired this subtilisin-like protease gene by horizontal gene transfer (HGT) from a cyanobacterium. We discuss the relevance of a bacterial protease-HGT in the Antarctic environment in light of this hypothesis.

  20. Pseudomonas extremaustralis sp. nov., a Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) producer isolated from an antarctic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Nancy I; Pettinari, M Julia; Stackebrandt, Erko; Tribelli, Paula M; Põtter, Markus; Steinbüchel, Alexander; Méndez, Beatriz S

    2009-11-01

    A Gram-negative, mobile, rod-shaped, non-spore-forming bacterium (strain 14-3(T)) was isolated from a temporary pond in Antarctica. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, strain 14-3(T) was shown to belong to the genus Pseudomonas sensu stricto. Physiological and biochemical tests supported the phylogenetic affiliation. Strain 14-3(T) is closely related to Pseudomonas veronii DSM 11331(T), sharing 99.7% sequence similarity. DNA-DNA hybridization experiments between the two strains showed only moderate reassociation similarity (35.1%). Tests for arginine dihydrolase and nitrate reduction were positive, while those for denitrification, indol production, glucose acidification, urease, ss-galactosidase, esculin, caseine and gelatin hydrolysis were negative. Growth of this bacterium occurred in a range from 4 to 37 degrees C but not at 42 degrees C. It accumulated poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) when grown on sodium octanoate medium. Strain 14-3(T) therefore represents the type strain of a new species, for which the name Pseudomonas extremaustralis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain 14-3(T) has been deposited as DSM 17835(T) and as CIP 109839(T).

  1. Muricauda antarctica sp. nov., a marine member of the Flavobacteriaceae isolated from Antarctic seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yue-Hong; Yu, Pei-Song; Zhou, Ya-Dong; Xu, Lin; Wang, Chun-Sheng; Wu, Min; Oren, Aharon; Xu, Xue-Wei

    2013-09-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped bacterium with appendages, designated Ar-22(T), was isolated from a seawater sample collected from the western part of Prydz Bay, near Cape Darnley, Antarctica. Strain Ar-22(T) grew optimally at 35 °C, at pH 7.5 and in the presence of 1-3% (w/v) NaCl. The isolate was positive for casein, gelatin and Tween 20 decomposition and negative for H2S production and indole formation. Chemotaxonomic analysis showed that MK-6 was the major isoprenoid quinone and phosphatidylethanolamine was the major polar lipid. The major fatty acids were iso-C(17:0) 3-OH, iso-C(15:1) G, iso-C(15:0) and C(16:1)ω7c/iso-C(15:0) 2OH. The genomic DNA G+C content was 44.8 mol%. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that strain Ar-22(T) is closely related to members of the genus Muricauda, sharing 94.2-97.3% sequence similarity with the type strains of species of the genus Muricauda and being most closely related to the Muricauda aquimarina. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence comparison confirmed that strain Ar-22(T) formed a deep lineage with Muricauda flavescens. Sequence similarity between strain Ar-22(T) and Muricauda ruestringensis DSM 13258(T), the type species of the genus Muricauda, was 96.9%. Strain Ar-22(T) exhibited mean DNA-DNA relatedness values of 40.1%, 49.4% and 25.7% to M. aquimarina JCM 11811(T), M. flavescens JCM 11812(T) and Muricauda lutimaris KCTC 22173(T), respectively. On the basis of phenotypic and genotypic data, strain Ar-22(T) represents a novel species of the genus Muricauda, for which the name Muricauda antarctica sp. nov. (type strain Ar-22(T) =CGMCC 1.12174(T) = JCM 18450(T)) is proposed.

  2. Lysobacter oligotrophicus sp. nov., isolated from an Antarctic freshwater lake in Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Wakao; Kimura, Tomomi; Araki, Shigeo; Miyoshi, Yuki; Atomi, Haruyuki; Imanaka, Tadayuki

    2013-09-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, non-spore-forming, rod-shaped, aerobic bacterium (strain 107-E2(T)) was isolated from freshwater samples containing microbial mats collected at a lake in Skarvsnes, Antarctica (temporary lake name, Lake Tanago Ike). Strain 107-E2(T) grew between 5 and 25 °C, with an optimum of 23 °C. Moreover, colony formation was observed on agar media even at -5 °C. The pH range for growth was between 6.0 and 9.0, with an optimum of pH 7.0-8.0. The range of NaCl concentration for growth was between 0.0 and 0.5% (w/v), with an optimum of 0.0%. No growth was observed in media containing organic compounds at high concentrations, which indicated that strain 107-E2(T) was an oligotroph. In the late stationary phase, strain 107-E2(T) produced a dark brown water-soluble pigment. Esterase, amylase and protease production was observed. Antimicrobial-lytic activities for Gram-negative bacteria and yeast were observed. Ubiquinone-8 was the major respiratory quinone. The major fatty acids were iso-C15:0, iso-C(17:1)ω9c and iso-C(15:1) at 5. The G+C content of genomic DNA was 66.1 mol%. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain 107-E2(T) belonged to the genus Lysobacter, and low DNA-DNA relatedness values with closely related species distinguished strain 107-E2(T) from recognized species of the genus Lysobacter. The phylogenetic situation and physiological characteristics indicated that strain 107-E2(T) should be classified as a representative of a novel species of the genus Lysobacter, for which the name Lysobacter oligotrophicus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is 107-E2(T) ( =JCM 18257(T) =ATCC BAA-2438(T)).

  3. Isolation, chemical characteristics and immunity activity of an extracellular polysaccharide EPSⅠ isolated from Antarctic bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. S-15-13

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Jiang; Chen Kaoshan; Sun Xiuqin; Song Jinping; Li Guangyou

    2007-01-01

    A new extracelluar polysaccharide (EPS) was isolated and purified from Antarctic bacterium S-15-13, identified as Pseudoalteromonas sp. After being separated and purified by DEAE-Sephadex A-50 ionexchange and Sephadex G-100 gel chromatography, two mains fractions (EPSⅠ and EPSⅡ ) were obtained. EPSⅠ was composed of mannose, glucose and galactose with a molecular weight of 23kDa and EPSⅡ was composed of mannose only with a molecular weight of 62kDa. The effect of the polysaccharide EPSⅠ on the cellular immune response of mice was investigated. Results demonstrated that EPSⅠ could markedly facilitate lymphocyte proliferation, and might be a strong immunomodulator.

  4. Influence of temperature on glutathione level and glutathione-related enzyme activities of Antarctic ice microalgae Chlamydomonas sp.ICE-L

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    GSH system plays a role in the control of the redox balance state, anti-oxidation and protecting life from injury of ROS (reactive oxygen species).In present paper, the possible GSH system of Chlamydomonas sp.ICE-L has been investigated by evaluating GSH and GSH-related enzymatic responses at different temperatures using speetrophotometer methods.The results showed that the GSH system is correlated positively to low temperature, and other factors but GR are correlated negatively to high temperature.So GSH and GSH-related enzymes play an important role in the adaptation of Antarctic ice microulgae to low temperature.

  5. Mineralization of melamine and cyanuric acid as sole nitrogen source by newly isolated Arthrobacter spp. using a soil-charcoal perfusion method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakeyama, Takashi; Takagi, Kazuhiro; Yamazaki, Kenichi; Sakakibara, Futa; Ito, Koji; Takasu, Eiichi; Naokawa, Takuji; Fujii, Kunihiko

    2015-05-01

    Melamine belongs to the s-triazine family, and industrially used as raw product in many ways all over the world. Melamine has been reported for human harmful effects and detected from some crops, soil and water. To remove melamine from the polluted environment, the efficient melamine-mineralizing microorganisms have been needed. We newly isolated three melamine-degrading bacteria from the same upland soil sample using soil-charcoal perfusion method. These bacteria were classified as Arthrobacter sp. MCO, Arthrobacter sp. CSP and Microbacterium sp. ZEL by 16S rRNA genes sequencing analysis. Both Arthrobacter species completely degraded melamine within 2 days, and consumed melamine as a sole nitrogen source. Both strains also grew in cyanuric acid as sole nitrogen source, and released small quantities of ammonium ions. These strains are the first identified bacteria that can mineralize both melamine and cyanuric acid as sole initial nitrogen source in Arthrobacter sp. Although ammeline and ammelide intermediates were detected, these strains possess none of the known genes encoding melamine degrading enzymes. Since the Arthrobacter strains also degraded melamine in a high pH liquid medium, they present as potential bioremediation agents in melamine-polluted environments.

  6. The arthrobacter arilaitensis Re117 genome sequence reveals its genetic adaptation to the surface of cheese.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Monnet

    Full Text Available Arthrobacter arilaitensis is one of the major bacterial species found at the surface of cheeses, especially in smear-ripened cheeses, where it contributes to the typical colour, flavour and texture properties of the final product. The A. arilaitensis Re117 genome is composed of a 3,859,257 bp chromosome and two plasmids of 50,407 and 8,528 bp. The chromosome shares large regions of synteny with the chromosomes of three environmental Arthrobacter strains for which genome sequences are available: A. aurescens TC1, A. chlorophenolicus A6 and Arthrobacter sp. FB24. In contrast however, 4.92% of the A. arilaitensis chromosome is composed of ISs elements, a portion that is at least 15 fold higher than for the other Arthrobacter strains. Comparative genomic analyses reveal an extensive loss of genes associated with catabolic activities, presumably as a result of adaptation to the properties of the cheese surface habitat. Like the environmental Arthrobacter strains, A. arilaitensis Re117 is well-equipped with enzymes required for the catabolism of major carbon substrates present at cheese surfaces such as fatty acids, amino acids and lactic acid. However, A. arilaitensis has several specificities which seem to be linked to its adaptation to its particular niche. These include the ability to catabolize D-galactonate, a high number of glycine betaine and related osmolyte transporters, two siderophore biosynthesis gene clusters and a high number of Fe(3+/siderophore transport systems. In model cheese experiments, addition of small amounts of iron strongly stimulated the growth of A. arilaitensis, indicating that cheese is a highly iron-restricted medium. We suggest that there is a strong selective pressure at the surface of cheese for strains with efficient iron acquisition and salt-tolerance systems together with abilities to catabolize substrates such as lactic acid, lipids and amino acids.

  7. Responses of seabirds, in particular prions (Pachyptila sp.), to small-scale processes in the Antarctic Polar Front

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franeker, van J.A.; Brink, van den N.W.; Bathmann, U.V.; Pollard, R.T.; Baar, de H.J.W.; Wolff, W.J.

    2002-01-01

    Small-scale distribution patterns of seabirds in the Antarctic Polar Front (APF) were investigated in relation to other biological, physical, and chemical features during the ANT-XIII/2 research cruise of R.V. Polarstern from December 1995 to January 1996. The APF is characterized by steep gradients

  8. Study on changes of plasmalemma permeability and some primary inorganic ions of Antarctic ice microalgae (Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L) in the low-temperature stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Zhou; Miao Jinlai; Chen Hao; Zhang Botao; Li Guangyou

    2006-01-01

    The changes of plasrnalemma permeability and some primary inorganic ions of Antarctic ice microalgae (Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L) in the low-temperature stress were examined. The plasmalemma of ICE-L could maintain the stability at the freezing condition of -6℃. That signifies that it could maintain the proper function of plasmalemma and stability of the intracellular environment during sea ice formation. The function of inorganic ions on low-temperature adaptation of ICE-L was investigated by using the X-ray microanalysis method. Low temperature (0~-6℃) induces Ca2 + concentration increment of cytoplasm, but after 24 h the content decrease quickly to normal value. As a matter of fact, Ca2 + plays an important role as the second messenger in the low temperature adaptation of ICE-L. In addition, low temperature also influences on the other primary inorganic ions transfer and the cell maintains activity by keeping ratio balance among different ions. Above all, it is necessary for Antarctic ice microalgae to survive and breed by maintaining the stability of K + content and the balance of Na +/Cl-.

  9. Long-term experiment on physiological responses to synergetic effects of ocean acidification and photoperiod in the Antarctic sea ice algae Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dong; Wang, Yitao; Fan, Xiao; Wang, Dongsheng; Ye, Naihao; Zhang, Xiaowen; Mou, Shanli; Guan, Zheng; Zhuang, Zhimeng

    2014-07-15

    Studies on ocean acidification have mostly been based on short-term experiments of low latitude with few investigations of the long-term influence on sea ice communities. Here, the combined effects of ocean acidification and photoperiod on the physiological response of the Antarctic sea ice microalgae Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L were examined. There was a general increase in growth, PSII photosynthetic parameters, and N and P uptake in continuous light, compared to those exposed to regular dark and light cycles. Elevated pCO2 showed no consistent effect on growth rate (p=0.8) and N uptake (p=0.38) during exponential phrase, depending on the photoperiod but had a positive effect on PSII photosynthetic capacity and P uptake. Continuous dark reduced growth, photosynthesis, and nutrient uptake. Moreover, intracellular lipid, mainly in the form of PUFA, was consumed at 80% and 63% in low and high pCO2 in darkness. However, long-term culture under high pCO2 gave a more significant inhibition of growth and Fv/Fm to high light stress. In summary, ocean acidification may have significant effects on Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L survival in polar winter. The current study contributes to an understanding of how a sea ice algae-based community may respond to global climate change at high latitudes.

  10. Effects of iron and light stress on the biochemical composition of Antarctic Phaeocystis sp. (Prymnesiophyceae). II. Pigment composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwe, MA; Stefels, J

    1998-01-01

    A strain of Phaeocystis sp., isolated in the Southern Ocean, was cultured under iron- and light-limited conditions. The cellular content of chlorophyll a and accessory light-harvesting (LH) pigments increased under low light intensities. Iron limitation resulted in a decrease of all light-harvesting

  11. Responses of seabirds, in particular prions ( Pachyptila sp.), to small-scale processes in the Antarctic Polar Front

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Franeker, Jan A.; van den Brink, Nico W.; Bathmann, Ulrich V.; Pollard, Raymond T.; de Baar, Hein J. W.; Wolff, Wim J.

    Small-scale distribution patterns of seabirds in the Antarctic Polar Front (APF) were investigated in relation to other biological, physical, and chemical features during the ANT-XIII/2 research cruise of R.V. Polarstern from December 1995 to January 1996. The APF is characterized by steep gradients in sea-surface temperature and salinity. Within the APF, gradient zones were closely associated with elevated levels of primary production, chlorophyll- a (chl- a) concentrations, and zooplankton densities. Even broad-billed prions (' Pachyptila vittata-group'), which dominated the seabird community by 83% in carbon requirements, showed small-scale distributional patterns that were positively related to primary production, chl- a, and total zooplankton densities. The findings demonstrate a close, direct link between fine-scale physical processes in the APF and biological activity through several food web levels up to that of zooplankton-eating seabirds. Broad-billed prions appeared to forage on very small copepods ( Oithona spp.) in close association with the front. Fish- and squid-eating predators showed poor correlations with small-scale spatial structures of the APF. However, in a wider band around the APF, most top predators did occur in elevated densities, showing gradual spatio-temporal diffusion of the impact of the APF on higher trophic levels.

  12. Antimicrobial activity of PVP from an Antarctic bacterium, Janthinobacterium sp. Ant5-2, on multi-drug and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Jonathan P.

    2012-04-11

    Multiple drug resistant (MDR) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) have become increasingly prevalent as a community acquired infection. As a result limited treatment options are available with conventional synthetic antibiotics. Bioprospecting natural products with potent antimicrobial activity show promise for developing new drugs against this pathogen. In this study, we have investigated the antimicrobial activity of a purple violet pigment (PVP) from an Antarctic bacterium, Janthinobacterium sp. Ant5-2 on 15 clinical MDR and MRSA strains. The colorimetric resazurin assay was employed to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC90) of PVP against MDR and MRSA. The MIC90 ranged between 1.57 µg/mL and 3.13 µg/mL, which are significantly lower than many antimicrobials tested from natural sources against this pathogen. The spectrophotometrically determined growth analysis and total microscopic counts using Live/dead® BacLight™ fluorescent stain exhibited a steady decrease in viability of both MDR and MRSA cultures following treatment with PVP at the MIC levels. In silico predictive molecular docking study revealed that PVP could be a DNA-targeting minor groove binding antimicrobial compound. The continued development of novel antimicrobials derived from natural sources with the combination of a suite of conventional antibiotics could stem the rising pandemic of MDR and MRSA along with other deadly microbial pathogens.

  13. Degradation of 4-fluorophenol by Arthrobacter sp strain IF1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferreira, Maria Isabel M.; Marchesi, Julian R.; Janssen, Dick B.

    2008-01-01

    A Gram-positive bacterial strain capable of aerobic biodegradation of 4-fluorophenol (4-FP) as the sole source of carbon and energy was isolated by selective enrichment from soil samples collected near an industrial site. The organism, designated strain IF1, was identified as a member of the genus A

  14. Glaciambulata neumayeri gen. et sp. nov., a new Antarctic trachymedusa (Cnidaria: Hydrozoa, with a revision of the family Ptychogastriidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horia R. Galea

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A new genus and species of sympagic trachymedusa, Glaciambulata neumayeri gen. et sp. nov., are described based on material from Antarctica. Its generic features are compared to those of its relatives, Ptychogastria Allman, 1878 and Tesserogastria Beyer, 1959, and a review of the family Ptychogastriidae Mayer, 1910, based on literature data, is provided. From this, it results that the poorly-known Pectis antarctica Haeckel, 1879, formerly assigned to Ptychogastria by a number of authors, displays all characters of the contemporary rhopalonematid genus Voragonema Naumov, 1971. It is additionally demonstrated that V. laciniata Bouillon et al., 2001 is coterminous with P. antarctica, a finding that clarifies, 137 years later, the morphology and the taxonomic status of Haeckel’s medusa. In accordance with the Principle of Priority, Pectis is recognized as the valid name of the genus, and Voragonema is assigned to its synonymy. Similarly so, the specific name introduced by Haeckel has priority over laciniata.

  15. Cloning, expression and biochemical characterization of recombinant superoxide dismutase from Antarctic psychrophilic bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. ANT506.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Quan-Fu; Wang, Yi-Fan; Hou, Yan-Hua; Shi, Yong-Lei; Han, Han; Miao, Miao; Wu, Ying-Ying; Liu, Yuan-Ping; Yue, Xiao-Na; Li, Yu-Jin

    2016-07-01

    In this study, a superoxide dismutase gene (PsSOD) from Pseudoalteromonas sp. ANT506 was cloned and over expressed in Escherichia coli. The PsSOD has an open reading frame of 582 bp with a putative product of 193 amino acid residue and an estimated molecular size of 21.4 kDa. His-tagged PsSOD was subsequently purified 12.6-fold by Ni-affinity chromatography and the yield of 22.9%. The characterization of the purified rPsSOD exhibited maximum activity at 30 °C and pH 8.0. The enzyme exhibited 13.9% activity at 0 °C and had high-thermo lability at higher than 50 °C. rPsSOD exhibited well capability to 2.5 M NaCl (62.4%). These results indicated that rPsSOD exhibited special catalytic properties.

  16. Antarctic clouds

    OpenAIRE

    Lachlan-Cope, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Sensitivity studies with global climate models show that, by their influence on the radiation balance, Antarctic clouds play a major role in the climate system, both directly at high southern latitudes and indirectly globally, as the local circulation changes lead to global teleconnections. Unfortunately, observations of cloud distribution in the Antarctic are limited and often of low quality because of the practical difficulty in observing clouds in the harsh Antarctic environment. The best ...

  17. Antarctic Entomology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chown, Steven L; Convey, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The Antarctic region comprises the continent, the Maritime Antarctic, the sub-Antarctic islands, and the southern cold temperate islands. Continental Antarctica is devoid of insects, but elsewhere diversity varies from 2 to more than 200 species, of which flies and beetles constitute the majority. Much is known about the drivers of this diversity at local and regional scales; current climate and glacial history play important roles. Investigations of responses to low temperatures, dry conditions, and varying salinity have spanned the ecological to the genomic, revealing new insights into how insects respond to stressful conditions. Biological invasions are common across much of the region and are expected to increase as climates become warmer. The drivers of invasion are reasonably well understood, although less is known about the impacts of invasion. Antarctic entomology has advanced considerably over the past 50 years, but key areas, such as interspecific interactions, remain underexplored.

  18. Antarctic Fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastman, Joseph T.; DeVries, Arthur L.

    1986-01-01

    Explains the adaptations to Antarctic waters that Notothenioidei, a group of advanced bony fishes, have exhibited. Discusses the fishes' mechanisms of production of antifreeze properties and their capacities for neutral buoyancy in water. (ML)

  19. Molecular identification, morphological characterization and new insights into the ecology of larval Pseudoterranova cattani in fishes from the Argentine coast with its differentiation from the Antarctic species, P. decipiens sp. E (Nematoda: Anisakidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timi, Juan T; Paoletti, Michela; Cimmaruta, Roberta; Lanfranchi, Ana L; Alarcos, Ana J; Garbin, Lucas; George-Nascimento, Mario; Rodríguez, Diego H; Giardino, Gisela V; Mattiucci, Simonetta

    2014-01-17

    Larvae of the genus Pseudoterranova constitute a risk for human health when ingested through raw or undercooked fish. They can provoke pseudoterranovosis in humans, a fish-borne zoonotic disease whose pathogenicity varies with the species involved, making their correct specific identification a necessary step in the knowledge of this zoonosis. Larvae of Pseudoterranova decipiens s.l. have been reported in several fish species from off the Argentine coasts; however, there are no studies dealing with their specific identification in this region. Here, a genetic identification and morphological characterization of larval Pseudoterranova spp. from three fish species sampled from Argentine waters and from Notothenia coriiceps from Antarctic waters was carried out. Larvae were sequenced for their genetic/molecular identification, including the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (mtDNA cox2), the first (ITS-1) and the second (ITS-2) internal transcribed spacers of the nuclear ribosomal DNA, and compared with all species of the P. decipiens (sensu lato) species complex (sequences available in GenBank). Further, adults of Pseudoterranova spp. from the definitive host, the southern sea lion, Otaria flavescens, from Argentine and Chilean coasts were sequenced at the same genes. The sequences obtained at the ITS-1 and ITS-2 genes from all the larvae examined from fish of Argentine waters, as well as the adult worms, matched 100% the sequences for the species P. cattani. The sequences obtained at mtDNA cox2 gene for Antarctic larvae matched 99% those available in GenBank for the sibling P. decipiens sp. E. Both MP and BI phylogenetic trees strongly supported P. cattani and P. decipiens sp. E as two distinct phylogenetic lineages and depicted the species P. decipiens sp. E as sister taxon to the remaining taxa of the P. decipiens complex. Larval morphometry was similar between specimens of P. cattani from Argentina, but significantly different from those of P

  20. Biodegradation kinetics of 4-fluorocinnamic acid by a consortium of Arthrobacter and Ralstonia strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Syed A; Wietzes, Piet; Janssen, Dick B

    2012-02-01

    Arthrobacter sp. strain G1 is able to grow on 4-fluorocinnamic acid (4-FCA) as sole carbon source. The organism converts 4-FCA into 4-fluorobenzoic acid (4-FBA) and utilizes the two-carbon side-chain for growth with some formation of 4-fluoroacetophenone as a dead-end side product. We also have isolated Ralstonia sp. strain H1, an organism that degrades 4-FBA. A consortium of strains G1 and H1 degraded 4-FCA with Monod kinetics during growth in batch and continuous cultures. Specific growth rates of strain G1 and specific degradation rates of 4-FCA were observed to follow substrate inhibition kinetics, which could be modeled using the kinetic models of Haldane-Andrew and Luong-Levenspiel. The mixed culture showed complete mineralization of 4-FCA with quantitative release of fluoride, both in batch and continuous cultures. Steady-state chemostat cultures that were exposed to shock loadings of substrate responded with rapid degradation and returned to steady-state in 10-15 h, indicating that the mixed culture provided a robust system for continuous 4-FCA degradation.

  1. Expression and characterization of thermotolerant lipase with broad pH profiles isolated from an Antarctic Pseudomonas sp strain AMS3

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    A gene encoding a thermotolerant lipase with broad pH was isolated from an Antarctic Pseudomonas strain AMS3. The recombinant lipase AMS3 was purified by single-step purification using affinity chromatography, yielding a purification fold of approximately 1.52 and a recovery of 50%. The molecular weight was approximately ∼60 kDa including the strep and affinity tags. Interestingly, the purified Antarctic AMS3 lipase exhibited broad temperature profile from 10–70 °C and stable over a broad pH range from 5.0 to pH 10.0. Various mono and divalent metal ions increased the activity of the AMS3 lipase, but Ni2+ decreased its activity. The purified lipase exhibited the highest activity in the presence of sunflower oil. In addition, the enzyme activity in 25% v/v solvents at 50 °C particularly to n-hexane, DMSO and methanol could be useful for catalysis reaction in organic solvent and at broad temperature. PMID:27781152

  2. Wide Distribution of Closely Related, Antibiotic-Producing Arthrobacter Strains throughout the Arctic Ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wietz, Matthias; Månsson, Maria; Bowman, Jeff S.

    2012-01-01

    We isolated 16 antibiotic-producing bacterial strains throughout the central Arctic Ocean, including seven Arthrobacter spp. with almost identical 16S rRNA gene sequences. These strains were numerically rare, as revealed using 454 pyrosequencing libraries. Arthrobacter spp. produced arthrobacilins...

  3. Isolation of Arthrobacter species from the phyllosphere and demonstration of their epiphytic fitness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheublin, T.R.; Leveau, J.H.J.

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Arthrobacter are common inhabitants of the soil environment, but can also be recovered from leaf surfaces (the phyllosphere). Using enrichment cultures on 4-chlorophenol, we succeeded in specifically isolating Arthrobacter bacteria from ground cover vegetation in an apple orcha

  4. Biosorption of Cr(VI)_ and Cr(III)_Arthrobacter species

    CERN Document Server

    Gelagutashvili, E; Gurielidze, M

    2011-01-01

    The biosorption of Cr(VI)_ and Cr(III)_ Arthrobacter species (Arthrobacter globiformis and Arthrobacter oxidas) was studied simultaneous application dialysis and atomic absorption analysis. Also biosorption of Cr(VI) in the presence of Zn(II) during growth of Arthrobacter species and Cr(III) in the presence of Mn(II) were discussed. Comparative Cr(VI)_ and Cr(III)_ Arthrobacter species shown, that Cr(III) was more effectively adsorbed by both bacterium than Cr(VI). The adsorption capacity is the same for both the Chromium-Arthrobacter systems. The biosorption constants for Cr(III) is higher than for Cr(VI) 5.7-5.9- fold for both species. Comparative Freundlich biosorption characteristics Cr(VI) Arthrobacter species of living and dry cells shown, that capacity(n) is in both cases the same(1.25,1.35). Dry cells have larger biosorption constant for both species, than living cells. Biosorption characteristics (K) and (n) for A. oxidas are without Mn(II) and in the presence of Mn(II) 2.6 x 10-4 (K), 1.37 (n) and 2...

  5. Ability of Cyanobacteria and Arthrobacter Species to Remove Gold Ions from Solution

    CERN Document Server

    Gelagutashvili, E; Rcheulichvili, A; Tsakadze, K; Bagdavadze, N; Kuchava, N; Djandjalia, M

    2012-01-01

    The biosorption of Au(III) - Spirulina platensis and Au(III) - Arthrobacter species (Arthrobacter globiformis and Arthrobacter oxidas) were studied at simultaneous application of dialysis and atomic absorption analysis. Also biosorption of Au(III) - Spirulina platensis at various pH were discussed. Biosorption constants for Au-cyanobacteris Spirulina platensis at different pH, and for Arthrobacter oxidas and Arthrobacter globiformis at pH=7.1 are : 1. K=3.91 x 10-4 (Au- Arthrobacter oxidas 61B, pH=7.1) 2. K=14.17 x 10-4 . (Au- Arthrobacter globiformis 151B, pH=7.1). 3. K=2.07x10-4 (Au- Spirulina platensis, pH=7.1) 4. K= 4.87x10-4 (Au- Spirulina platensis, pH=6.2) 5. K=8.7x10-4 (Au- Spirulina platensis, pH=8.4)

  6. Erythema caused by a localised skin infection with Arthrobacter mysorens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakraborty Trinad

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Skin erythemas of unknown origin are a frequent reason for consulting the general practitioner or dermatologist. Case presentation Here we report a case of an erythema resembling the erythema migrans manifestation of Lyme disease, but with atypical symptoms like persistent pruritus. The patient had no history of a recent tick-bite but displayed a positive serology for an advanced stage of Lyme borreliosis, which stood in contrast to the clinical manifestation of erythema migrans as a symptom of early Lyme disease. Three skin swabs and soil samples, collected in the area where the patient possibly acquired the infection, were examined by bacterial and fungal culture methods. Microorganisms were identified by using 16 S rRNA gene sequencing and bioinformatics. The patient and soil isolates were compared by employing RAPD analysis. The serum samples of the patient were examined by immunoblotting. Arthrobacter mysorens, a soil bacterium, was isolated from the collected skin and soil samples. The identity of both isolates was determined by molecular fingerprinting methods. A. mysorens was proven to be causative for the erythema by direct isolation from the affected skin and a positive serology, thus explaining the atypical appearance of the erythema compared to erythema migrans caused by Borrelia infection. Conclusions Infections with A.mysorens might be underreported and microbiological diagnostic techniques should be applied in cases of patients with unclear erythemas, resembling erythema migrans, without a history of tick bites.

  7. Review of the taxonomy of the genus Arthrobacter, emendation of the genus Arthrobacter sensu lato, proposal to reclassify selected species of the genus Arthrobacter in the novel genera Glutamicibacter gen. nov., Paeniglutamicibacter gen. nov., Pseudoglutamicibacter gen. nov., Paenarthrobacter gen. nov. and Pseudarthrobacter gen. nov., and emended description of Arthrobacter roseus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busse, Hans-Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the taxonomy of the genus Arthrobacter is discussed, from its first description in 1947 to the present state. Emphasis is given to intrageneric phylogeny and chemotaxonomic characteristics, concentrating on quinone systems, peptidoglycan compositions and polar lipid profiles. Internal groups within the genus Arthrobacter indicated from homogeneous chemotaxonomic traits and corresponding to phylogenetic grouping and/or high 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities are highlighted. Furthermore, polar lipid profiles and quinone systems of selected species are shown, filling some gaps concerning these chemotaxonomic traits. Based on phylogenetic groupings, 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities and homogeneity in peptidoglycan types, quinone systems and polar lipid profiles, a description of the genus Arthrobacter sensu lato and an emended description of Arthrobacter roseus are provided. Furthermore, reclassifications of selected species of the genus Arthrobacter into novel genera are proposed, namely Glutamicibacter gen. nov. (nine species), Paeniglutamicibacter gen. nov. (six species), Pseudoglutamicibacter gen. nov. (two species), Paenarthrobacter gen. nov. (six species) and Pseudarthrobacter gen. nov. (ten species).

  8. Reclassification of Arthrobacter sanguinis (Mages et al. 2009) as Haematomicrobium sanguinis gen. nov., comb. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Peter; Busse, Hans-Jürgen

    2016-12-29

    Due to its separate position within the genus Arthrobacter in many published phylogenetic trees and its incomplete chemotaxonomic characterization the type strain of Arthrobacter sanguinis was subjected to analysis of its chemotaxonomic traits including quinone system, polar lipid profile, peptidoglycan structure and fatty acid profile. The fatty acid profile consisted of the major compounds (>10 %) iso-C15:0, anteiso-C15:0 and anteiso-C17:0. It showed a quinone system with the predominating menaquinone MK-9(H2). Both, fatty acid profile and quinone system are in line with the description of the genus Arthrobacter. The peptidoglycan type was L-Lys - L-Ala - Gly (A11.50) which is unique within the genus Arthrobacter sensu lato and also among Arthrobacter species recently reclassified in the genera Sinomonas, Paenarthrobacter and Pseudarthrobacter. The polar lipid profile was very complex and unique among the group of taxa in containing relatively high proportions of several unidentified lipids. In conclusion from its phylogenetic position and its chemotaxonomic distinguishability from related taxa here the reclassification of A. sanguinis in a new genus and species, Haematomicrobium sanguinis gen. nov., comb. nov, is proposed. The type strain is 741T (=CCUG 46407T=DSM 21259T).

  9. Application of NAA Method to Study Chromium Uptake by Arthrobacter oxydans

    CERN Document Server

    Tsibakhashvili, N Ya; Kalabegishvili, T L; Kirkesali, E I; Frontasyeva, M V; Pomyakushina, E V; Pavlov, S S

    2002-01-01

    To study chromium uptake by Arthrobacter oxydans (Cr(VI)-reducer bacteria isolated from Columbia basalt rocks, USA) instrumental neutron activation analysis method was applied. It was established that chromate accumulation is dose-dependent and it is more intesive in the interval of concentrations of Cr(VI) (10-50 mg/l). At low concentrations of Cr(VI) (up to 50 mg/l) the most intensive formation of Cr(V) was also found (using ESR method). Besides, it was estimated that reduction from Cr(VI) to Cr(V) is faster process than the uptake of Cr(VI). According to ENAA measurements Cr(III), in constant to Cr(VI), is not accumulated in Arthrobacter oxydans cells up to concentration of 200 mg/l. Using epithermal neutron activation analysis the background levels of 17 major, minor and trace elements were determined in Arthrobacter oxydans.

  10. Application of thermoalkalophilic xylanase from Arthrobacter sp. MTCC 5214 in biobleaching of kraft pulp

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khandeparker, R.; Bhosle, N.B.

    released by enzyme treatment showed a characteristic peak at 280 nm indicating the presence of lignin in the released coloring matter. Enzymatic prebleaching of kraft pulp showed 20 % reduction in kappa number of the pulp without much change in viscosity...

  11. Arthrobacter luteus restriction endonuclease cleavage map of X174 RF DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vereijken, J.M.; Mansfeld, A.D.M. van; Baas, P.D.; Jansz, H.S.

    1975-01-01

    Cleavage of X174 RF DNA with the restriction endonuclease from Arthrobacter luteus (Alu I) produces 23 fragments of approximately 24–1100 base pairs in length. The order of most of these fragments has been established by digestion of Haemophilus influenzae Rd (Hind II) and Haemophilus aegyptius (Hae

  12. CLONING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF THE PHTHALATE CATABOLISM REGION OF PRE1 OF ARTHROBACTER KEYSERI 12B

    Science.gov (United States)

    o-Phthalate (benzene-1,2-dicarboxylate) is a central intermediate in the bacterial degradation of phthalate ester plasticizers as well as of a number of fused-ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons found in fossil fuels. In Arthrobacter keyseri 12B, the genes encoding catabolism o...

  13. Genome sequence of Arthrobacter antarcticus strain W2, isolated from a slaughterhouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herschend, Jakob; Raghupathi, Prem Krishnan; Røder, Henriette Lyng;

    2016-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence ofArthrobacter antarcticusstrain W2, which was isolated from a wall of a small slaughterhouse in Denmark. The 4.43-Mb genome sequence was assembled into 170 contigs....

  14. Two new species of calcareous sponges (Porifera: Calcarea) from the deep Antarctic Eckstrom Shelf and a revised list of species found in Antarctic waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapp, Hans Tore; Göcke, Christian; Tendal, Ole Secher;

    2013-01-01

    The paper reports on two new species of calcareous sponges (Porifera, Calcarea) from the Antarctic Weddell Sea, Clathrina brandtae sp. nov. and Leucetta delicata sp. nov., collected at 600 m depth during the ANT XXIV/2-SYSTCO expedition in January 2008. The new species are described based...

  15. 南极低温降解菌Shewanella sp. NJ49羟化酶分离纯化及最适产酶条件研究%Separation and purification of hydroxylase from Antarctic psychrophilic bacteriumShewanella sp. NJ49 and optimum conditions for its enzyme production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘芳明; 王以斌; 曲长凤; 梁强; 郑洲; 缪锦来; 肖天

    2016-01-01

    Hydroxylase is a key enzyme with respect to bacteria during hydrocarbon degradation. In this paper, we investigate the Antarctic psychrophilic bacteriumShewanella sp. NJ49. To obtain a single component of hydroxy-lase, we separated and purified hydroxylase from NJ49 in a series of steps, i.e., ammonium sulfate precipitation, ultrafiltration concentration, and column chromatography with Sephadex G-75 as the column media. In addition, we studied the relationships between the activity of NJ49 hydroxylase and environmental factors such as temperature, pH, surfactant, and salinity. We found that purified hydroxylase comprised subunitsα,β, andγ, with estimated molecular masses of 56, 45, and 36 kD, respectively. The optimum conditions for producing NJ49 hydroxylase were a temperature of 15℃, a pH of 7.2, and a salinity of 55‰. Different types of surfactants had different effects on enzyme activity. Although individual amphoteric, cationic, and nonionic surfactants did not inhibit enzyme activity, a mixture of anionic and nonionic surfactants, as well as a mixture of cationic and nonionic surfactants, improved the activity of the hydroxylase.%羟化酶是细菌降解烷烃的关键酶,本文以南极低温降解菌Shewanella sp. NJ49为研究对象,通过硫酸铵沉淀、超滤浓缩及葡聚糖凝胶Sephadex G-75柱层析方法,分离纯化NJ49的羟化酶,获得了单一羟化酶组分,研究了温度、pH、表面活性剂和盐度等环境因素对 NJ49羟化酶酶活活性影响。结果表明,羟化酶组分由α、β、γ三个亚基组成,分子质量分别为56,45和36 kD。NJ49最适产酶条件为:温度15℃、pH7.2、盐度55;不同类型表面活性剂对酶的活性影响效应不一,两性离子表面活性剂、阳离子表面活性剂、非离子表面活性剂对酶活没有作用,阴离子表面活性剂+非离子表面活性剂混和剂和阳离子表面活性剂+非离子表面活性剂混和剂能提高羟化酶的活性。

  16. Bacteremia Due to Arthrobacter creatinolyticus in an Elderly Diabetic Man with Acute Cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kei; Hayakawa, Kayoko; Nagamatsu, Maki; Fujiya, Yoshihiro; Mawatari, Momoko; Kutsuna, Satoshi; Takeshita, Nozomi; Tamura, Saeko; Mezaki, Kazuhisa; Ohmagari, Norio

    2017-03-24

    An 87-year-old man with poorly controlled diabetic mellitus presented with fever, bedsores, and elevated hepatobiliary enzyme levels. He was diagnosed with bacteremia with acute cholangitis due to Arthrobacter species, which are Gram-positive, aerobic, catalase-positive, coryneform bacteria belonging to the family Microbacteriaceae. Doripenem and subsequencial sulbactam/ampicillin treatment were used for the acute cholangitis, and the bacteremia was treated with a 2-week course of vancomycin. The bacteremia was misidentified by the phenotyping assay (API Coryne test), but was identified as Arthrobacter creatinolyticus by 16S rRNA and matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a human case of A. creatinolyticus bacteremia.

  17. An Arthrobacter spp. bacteremia leading to fetal death and maternal disseminated intravascular coagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigeta, Naoya; Ozaki, Kimiaki; Hori, Kensuke; Ito, Kimihiko; Nakayama, Masahiro; Nakahira, Kumiko; Yanagihara, Itaru

    2013-02-01

    A 34-year-old parous woman developed high fever and threatened preterm labor after a 1-day trip, for which she was receiving prenatal care at a hospital. Three days after onset, at 24 4/7 weeks of gestation, she was transferred to our hospital in an emergency. Soon after the woman's arrival at our hospital, the infant was spontaneously stillborn via a transvaginal delivery. Laboratory tests revealed severe maternal disseminated intravascular coagulation with renal and liver insufficiency. Histopathologic examination of the placenta revealed vast fibrin deposition and remarkable neutrophilic infiltration in the intervillous space, suggesting a rare bacterial infection caused by Arthrobacter spp. The bacteria were predominantly detected in the placenta and maternal blood serum by common bacterial 16S rRNA sequencing after polymerase chain reaction amplification. We report the first case, to our knowledge, of bacteremia with Arthrobacter spp., which may lead to maternal disseminated intravascular coagulation and intrauterine fetal death.

  18. Molecular cloning and bioinformatics analysis of the S-adenosyl homocysteine hydrolase(SAHH)gene in the Antarctic ice alga Chlamydomonas sp.ICE-L(Chlamydomonadales, Chlamydomonas)%南极冰藻Chlamydomonas sp.ICE-L S-腺苷同型半胱氨酸水解酶基因的克隆及其生物信息学分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王金慧; 丁燏; 简纪常; 吴灶和

    2011-01-01

    S-Adenosyl-L-methionine(SAM)is the most common methyl donor in a multitude of cellular methyla-tion reactions. Numerous methyltransferases transfer the methyl group from SAM to their respective biological acceptors, forming S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine(SAH). SAH is hydrolyzed to adenosine and L-homocysteine by S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase(SAHH, EC 3.3.1.1). SAHH is an essential enzyme in all living cells, and has been explored as a potential drug target for many bacteria and parasites. The inhibition of SAHH activity can result in the accumulation of SAH and reduce the S-adenosylmethionine(SAM):SAH ratio in cells. In that case, SAHH can act as a potent feedback inhibitor, blocking the SAM-dependent methylation that is required for the metabolism of a wide variety of biological compounds such as nucleic acids, proteins, phospholipids, and other small molecules. SAHH is found in animals, plants, fungi, and other microorganisms. Antarctic ice microalgae with special characteristics to withstand the extreme environment characterized by low temperatures and ice, high levels of dissolved oxygen, and strong seasonal changes in light intensity have been investigated in recent years. To further understand the intrinsic mechanisms by which the Antarctic sea ice alga Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L responds to ecological and environmental factors, we cloned and analyzed its SAHH. A cDNA encoding S-adenosyl homocysteine hydrolase(designated as ICE-LSAHH)was cloned from this alga by RT-PCR and RACE-PCR methods. The ICE-LSAHH full-length cDNA sequence was 1844 bp, including a 5'-terminal untranslated region(UTR)of 36 bp, a 3'-terminal UTR of 344 bp with a poly(A)tail, and an open reading frame(ORF)of 1461 bp encoding a polypeptide of 487 amino acids. The predicted molecular weight(MW)of ICE-LSAHH was 53 kD with an estimated pi of 5.16. Using SignalP 3.0 and TMHMM Server v. 2.0 software, it was predicted that the ICE-LSAHH protein did not contain a signal peptide or a transmembranous

  19. Regulation and function of transaldolase isoenzymes involved in sugar and one-carbon metabolism in the ribulose monophosphate cycle methylotroph Arthrobacter P1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levering, P.R.; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    1986-01-01

    In the facultative methylotroph Arthrobacter P1 the enzyme transaldolase plays an important role in both the pentose phosphate pathway and in the ribulose monophosphate cycle of formaldehyde fixation. Among gluconate-negative mutants of Arthrobacter P1 strains occurred which also were unable to grow

  20. Screening of microorganisms from Antarctic surface water and cytotoxicity metabolites from Antarctic microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lanhong; Yang, Kangli; Liu, Jia; Sun, Mi; Zhu, Jiancheng; Lv, Mei; Kang, Daole; Wang, Wei; Xing, Mengxin; Li, Zhao

    2016-03-01

    The Antarctic is a potentially important library of microbial resources and new bioactive substances. In this study, microorganisms were isolated from surface water samples collected from different sites of the Antarctic. 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay-based cytotoxicity-tracking method was used to identify Antarctic marine microorganism resources for antitumor lead compounds. The results showed that a total of 129 Antarctic microorganism strains were isolated. Twelve strains showed potent cytotoxic activities, among which a Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium, designated as N11-8 was further studied. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence showed that N11-8 belongs to the genus Bacillus. Fermented active products of N11-8 with molecular weights of 1-30 kDa had higher inhibitory effects on different cancaer cells, such as BEL-7402 human hepatocellular carcinoma cells, U251 human glioma cells, RKO human colon carcinoma cells, A549 human lung carcinoma cells, and MCF-7 human breast carcinoma cells. However, they displayed lower cytotoxicity against HFL1 human normal fibroblast lung cells. However, they displayed lower cytotoxicity against HFL1 human normal fibroblast lung cells. Microscopic observations showed that the fermented active products have inhibitory activity on BEL-7402 cells similar to that of mitomycin C. Further studies indicated that the fermented active products have high pH and high thermal stability. In conclusion, most strains isolated in this study may be developed as promising sources for the discovery of antitumor bioactive substances. The fermented active products of Antarctic marine Bacillus sp. N11- 8 are expected to be applied in the prevention and treatment of cancer.

  1. Impact of phenolic substrate and growth temperature on the arthrobacter chlorophenolicus proteome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unell, Maria; Abraham, Paul E.; Shah, Manesh; Zhang, Bing; Ruckert, Christian; VerBerkmoes, Nathan C.; Jansson, Janet K.

    2009-02-15

    We compared the Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus proteome during growth on 4-chlorophenol, 4-nitrophenol or phenol at 5 C and 28 C; both for the wild type and a mutant strain with mass spectrometry based proteomics. A label free workflow employing spectral counting identified 3749 proteins across all growth conditions, representing over 70% of the predicted genome and 739 of these proteins form the core proteome. Statistically significant differences were found in the proteomes of cells grown under different conditions including differentiation of hundreds of unknown proteins. The 4-chlorophenol-degradation pathway was confirmed, but not that for phenol.

  2. 6-hydroxy-L-nicotine from Arthrobacter nicotinovorans facilitate spatial memory formation in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Lucian Hritcu; Marius Stefan; Marius Mihasan; Roderich Brandsch

    2010-01-01

    Effects of 6-hydroxy-L-nicotine derived from nicotine catabolism in Arthrobacter nicotinovorans on learning and memory processes were examined in adult male Wistar rats. 6-hydroxy-L-nicotine (0.3 mg/kg, i.p., 7 consecutive days chronic administration) significantly increased spontaneous alternation in Y-maze task and working memory in radial arm-maze task, suggesting effects on short-term memory, without affecting long-term memory, explored by reference memory in radial arm-maze t...

  3. Accumulation of rare earth elements by siderophore-forming Arthrobacter luteolus isolated from rare earth environment of Chavara, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E S Challaraj Emmanuel; T Ananthi; B Anandkumar; S Maruthamuthu

    2012-03-01

    In this study, Arthrobacter luteolus, isolated from rare earth environment of Chavara (Quilon district, Kerala, India), were found to produce catechol-type siderophores. The bacterial strain accumulated rare earth elements such as samarium and scandium. The siderophores may play a role in the accumulation of rare earth elements. Catecholate siderophore and low-molecular-weight organic acids were found to be present in experiments with Arthrobacter luteolus. The influence of siderophore on the accumulation of rare earth elements by bacteria has been extensively discussed.

  4. Modelling the Antarctic Ice Sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke; Holm, A.

    2015-01-01

    The Antarctic ice sheet is a major player in the Earth’s climate system and is by far the largest depository of fresh water on the planet. Ice stored in the Antarctic ice sheet (AIS) contains enough water to raise sea level by about 58 m, and ice loss from Antarctica contributed significantly...... Science) Antarctic Ice Sheet (DAIS) model (Shaffer 2014) is forced by reconstructed time series of Antarctic temperature, global sea level and ocean subsurface temperature over the last two glacial cycles. In this talk a modelling work of the Antarctic ice sheet over most of the Cenozoic era using...... the DAIS model will be presented. G. Shaffer (2014) Formulation, calibration and validation of the DAIS model (version 1), a simple Antarctic ice sheet model sensitive to variations of sea level and ocean subsurface temperature, Geosci. Model Dev., 7, 1803‐1818...

  5. Genetic differentiation of Arthrobacter population from heavy metal-contaminated environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hanbo; REN Weimin; SHAO Qiyong; DUAN Changqun

    2007-01-01

    Six samples containing extremely high concentration of Pb,Zn,and Cd were obtained from the layers of 5-10 cm and 25-30 cm three tailing piles,with ages of about 10,20 and more than 80 years,respectively.Then,48 bacterial strains were obtained from these samples,and subsequently their phylogenetic positions were determined by analysis on the partial sequence of 16S rRNA gene (fragment length ranging from 474 to 708 bp).These isolates were members of the Arthrobacter genus,phylogenetically close to A.keyseri and A.ureafaciens,with sequence ranging from 99.1%to 100%.Furthermore,genetic variation between subpopulations from different samples was revealed by analysis on their randomly amplified polymorphic DNA profile.Nei genetic distance showed that the greatest differentiation occurred between subpopulation A and C.Notably,either genetic distance between subpopulations from the layers of 5-10 cm and 25-30 cm of each tailing pile or between same layers of different tailing pile increased with the history of tailings.Moreover,correlation analysis showed that soluble Pb has a significantly negative relationship with Nei'gene diversity of subpopulation.It was assumed that soluble Pb may be responsible for the reduced genetic diversity of the Arthrobacter population.Our data provided evidence that genetic differentiation of microbial populations was consistent with the changes of environmental factors,particularly heavy metals.

  6. Temperature-dependent enthalpy of oxygenation in Antarctic fish hemoglobins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fago, A.; Wells, R.M.G.; Weber, Roy E.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of temperature on the oxygen-binding properties of the hemoglobins of three cold-adapted Antarctic fish species, Dissostichus mawsoni, Pagothenia borchgrevinki and Trematomus, sp., has been investigated under different pH values and buffer conditions. A clear non linear van't Hoff plot...... an adaptation to the low-temperature habitat needs to be revised. (C) 1997 Elsevier Science Inc Udgivelsesdato: 1997/10...

  7. Antarctic science preserve polluted

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simarski, Lynn Teo

    Geophysicists are alarmed at the electromagnetic pollution of a research site in the Antarctic specifically set aside to study the ionosphere and magnetosphere. A private New Zealand communications company called Telecom recently constructed a satellite ground station within the boundaries of this Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI), protected since the mid-1970s. The placement of a commercial facility within this site sets an ominous precedent not only for the sanctity of other SSSIs, but also for Specially Protected Areas—preserves not even open to scientific research, such as certain penguin rookeries.The roughly rectangular, one-by-one-half mile site, located at Arrival Heights not far from McMurdo Station, is one of a number of areas protected under the Antarctic treaty for designated scientific activities. Many sites are set aside for geological or biological research, but this is the only one specifically for physical science.

  8. Viruses in Antarctic lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepner, R. L. Jr; Wharton, R. A. Jr; Suttle, C. A.; Wharton RA, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Water samples collected from four perennially ice-covered Antarctic lakes during the austral summer of 1996-1997 contained high densities of extracellular viruses. Many of these viruses were found to be morphologically similar to double-stranded DNA viruses that are known to infect algae and protozoa. These constitute the first observations of viruses in perennially ice-covered polar lakes. The abundance of planktonic viruses and data suggesting substantial production potential (relative to bacteria] secondary and photosynthetic primary production) indicate that viral lysis may be a major factor in the regulation of microbial populations in these extreme environments. Furthermore, we suggest that Antarctic lakes may be a reservoir of previously undescribed viruses that possess novel biological and biochemical characteristics.

  9. Biodiversity and phylogenetic analysis of the gut microbiome ofEuphausia superba Dana from the Rose Sea of the Antarctic Ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Lidong; LI Lingzhi; TIAN Xiaoqing; TANG Yingying; FAN Chengqi; HUANG Hongliang; YANG Qiao

    2016-01-01

    Metabolites derived from marine symbiotic microorganisms have great potential as lead compounds for the discovery of novel marine drugs.Euphausia superba Dana, which lives in the Antarctic Ocean, is regarded as a new source of marine microbial natural products. However, no studies have examined the biodiversity of the symbiotic intestinal microbiome ofE. superba. To address this issue, the species diversity and abundance of the gut microbiome ofE. superba Dana from the Rose Sea of the Antarctic Ocean were analyzed by culture-independent high-throughput sequencing and pure culture methods. A comparison with gene databases revealed that the microbiome contained 61 known microbial species and a plethora of uncultivable microorganisms. Additionally, 7% of the species in the microbiome were currently unknown. The microbes belonged to 56 genera, eight of which, includingArthrobacter,Bacillus,Candidatus,Lactococcus,Lysinibacillus,Leuconostoc,Solibacillus, andVibrio, were dominant, as wereVibrionaceae spp. Moreover, 81 microbial strains were isolated by the pure culture method, and they belonged to 36 genera, includingMobilicoccus,Rhodococcus,Arthrobacter, andMicrobacterium. The results obtained by two different methods demonstrate the richness of the microbial biodiversity of the gut microbiome ofE. superba, and it also suggests that they have good potential for the discovery of novel marine microbial species.

  10. Transcriptional profiling of Gram-positive Arthrobacter in the phyllosphere: induction of pollutant degradation genes by natural plant phenolic compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheublin, T.R.; Deusch, S.; Moreno-Forero, S.K.; Müller, J.A.; van der Meer, J.R.; Leveau, J.H.J.

    2014-01-01

    Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus A6 is a Gram-positive, 4-chlorophenol degrading soil bacterium that was recently shown to be an effective colonizer of plant leaf surfaces. The genetic basis for this phyllosphere competency is unknown. In this paper, we describe the genome-wide expression profile of A.

  11. Nitrogen metabolism in the facultative methylotroph Arthrobacter P1 grown with various amines or ammonia as nitrogen sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, L.; Brouwer, J.W.; Hassel, C.W. van; Levering, Pieter; Dijkhuizen, L.

    1989-01-01

    The metabolism of trimethylamine (TMA) and dimethylamine (DMA) in Arthrobacter P1 involved the enzymes TMA monooxygenase and trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMA-NO) demethylase, and DMA monooxygenase, respectively. The methylamine and formaldehyde produced were further metabolized via a primary amine oxidas

  12. Class 1 integrons and tetracycline resistance genes in Alcaligenes, Arthrobacter, and Pseudomonas spp. isolated from pigsties and manured soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agersø, Yvonne; Sandvang, Dorthe

    2005-01-01

    Escherichia coli, Enterobacter spp., Arthrobacter spp., Alcaligenes spp., Pseudomonas spp., and Corynebacterium glutamicum. The 257 isolates were screened for in-1. Eighty-one of the gram-negative isolates were also screened for the Tc-r genes tet(A), tet(B), and tet(C), and all (n = 72) gram...

  13. Antarctic, Sub-Antarctic and cold temperate echinoid database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Pierrat

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This database includes spatial data of Antarctic, Sub-Antarctic and cold temperate echinoid distribution (Echinodermata: Echinoidea collected during many oceanographic campaigns led in the Southern Hemisphere from 1872 to 2010. The dataset lists occurrence data of echinoid distribution south of 35°S latitude, together with information on taxonomy (from species to genus level, sampling sources (cruise ID, sampling dates, ship names and sampling sites (geographic coordinates and depth. Echinoid occurrence data were compiled from the Antarctic Echinoid Database (David et al., 2005a, which integrates records from oceanographic cruises led in the Southern Ocean until 2003. This database has been upgraded to take into account data from oceanographic cruises led after 2003. The dataset now reaches a total of 6160 occurrence data that have been checked for systematics reliability and consistency. It constitutes today the most complete database on Antarctic and Sub-Antarctic echinoids.

  14. Shackleton: His Antarctic Writings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalrymple, Paul C.

    Two books entitled “Shackleton” were published in the United Kingdom in recent years. The one entitled Shackleton: His Antarctic Writings, Selected and Introduced by Christopher Ralling was published by the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) in 1983; the other, by Roland Huntford and simply entitled Shackleton, was published by Hodder and Stoughton (London) in November 1985. The only two things that these books have in common are their title and home publication base: The BBC book is essentially excerpts from two well-known books written by Shackleton, with a strong assist from a New Zealand reporter, Edward Saunders (who served as Shackleton's amanuensis), whereas Huntford's book is an outstanding polar biography.

  15. Effects of nutritional input and diesel contamination on soil enzyme activities and microbial communities in Antarctic soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jiwon; Jung, Jaejoon; Hyun, Seunghun; Park, Hyun; Park, Woojun

    2012-12-01

    Pollution of Antarctic soils may be attributable to increased nutritional input and diesel contamination via anthropogenic activities. To investigate the effect of these environmental changes on the Antarctic terrestrial ecosystem, soil enzyme activities and microbial communities in 3 types of Antarctic soils were evaluated. The activities of alkaline phosphomonoesterase and dehydrogenase were dramatically increased, whereas the activities of β-glucosidase, urease, arylsulfatase, and fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis were negligible. Alkaline phosphomonoesterase and dehydrogenase activities in the 3 types of soils increased 3- to 10-fold in response to nutritional input, but did not increase in the presence of diesel contamination. Consistent with the enzymatic activity data, increased copy numbers of the phoA gene, encoding an alkaline phosphomonoesterase, and the 16S rRNA gene were verified using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Interestingly, dehydrogenase activity and 16S rRNA gene copy number increased slightly after 30 days, even under diesel contamination, probably because of adaptation of the bacterial population. Intact Antarctic soils showed a predominance of Actinobacteria phylum (mostly Pseudonorcarida species) and other phyla such as Proteobacteria, Chloroflexi, Planctomycetes, Firmicutes, and Verrucomicrobia were present in successively lower proportions. Nutrient addition might act as a selective pressure on the bacterial community, resulting in the prevalence of Actinobacteria phylum (mostly Arthrobacter species). Soils contaminated by diesel showed a predominance of Proteobacteria phylum (mostly Phyllobacterium species), and other phyla such as Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Planctomycetes, and Gemmatimonadetes were present in successively lower proportions. Our data reveal that nutritional input has a dramatic impact on bacterial communities in Antarctic soils and that diesel contamination is likely toxic to enzymes in this

  16. Chlorine Monoxide in the Antarctic Spring Stratosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo-Ayerbe, Mauricio

    1988-06-01

    A series of observations of stratospheric chlorine monoxide (ClO) were carried out during the austral springs of 1986 and 1987 in McMurdo Station, Antarctica, as part of two experimental campaigns sent to investigate the seasonal decrease in ozone over the antarctic continent (the ozone "hole"). Measurements of the vertical distribution of ClO were obtained by high resolution ground-based emission spectroscopy at 278 GHz, using the Stony Brook mm-wave receiver. They show the presence of an anomalous layer of lower stratospheric ClO which is not observed at other latitudes. This anomalous layer is centered at ~20 km altitude and exhibits a pronounced diurnal variation, reaching a maximum at midday and disappearing at night. During the period of Sep. 20-24, 1987, the lower-stratospheric ClO had a maximum volume mixing ratio of 1.8_sp{+0cdot5}{ -0cdot9} ppbv. A normal ClO layer centered at ~36 km was also observed, with concentrations and diurnal behavior similar to those seen in tropical latitudes. These findings are evidence of anomalous chlorine chemistry taking place in the lower stratosphere during the antarctic spring, and indicate that increasing anthropogenic chlorine is a prime causative agent in the formation of the ozone hole.

  17. Biodiversity and biogeography of Antarctic and sub-Antarctic mollusca

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linse, Katrin; Griffiths, Huw J.; Barnes, David K. A.; Clarke, Andrew

    2006-04-01

    For many decades molluscan data have been critical to the establishment of the concept of a global-scale increase in species richness from the poles to the equator. Low polar diversity is key to this latitudinal cline in diversity. Here we investigate richness patterns in the two largest classes of molluscs at both local and regional scales throughout the Southern Ocean. We show that biodiversity is very patchy in the Southern Ocean (at the 1000-km scale) and test the validity of historical biogeographic sub-regions and provinces. We used multivariate analysis of biodiversity patterns at species, genus and family levels to define richness hotspots within the Southern Ocean and transition areas. This process identified the following distinct sub-regions in the Southern Ocean: Antarctic Peninsula, Weddell Sea, East Antarctic—Dronning Maud Land, East Antarctic—Enderby Land, East Antarctic—Wilkes Land, Ross Sea, and the independent Scotia arc and sub Antarctic islands. Patterns of endemism were very different between the bivalves and gastropods. On the basis of distributional ranges and radiation centres of evolutionarily successful families and genera we define three biogeographic provinces in the Southern Ocean: (1) the continental high Antarctic province excluding the Antarctic Peninsula, (2) the Scotia Sea province including the Antarctic Peninsula, and (3) the sub Antarctic province comprising the islands in the vicinity of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current.

  18. Description of Taphrina antarctica f.a. sp. nov., a new anamorphic ascomycetous yeast species associated with Antarctic endolithic microbial communities and transfer of four Lalaria species in the genus Taphrina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selbmann, Laura; Turchetti, Benedetta; Yurkov, Andrey; Cecchini, Clarissa; Zucconi, Laura; Isola, Daniela; Buzzini, Pietro; Onofri, Silvano

    2014-07-01

    In the framework of a large-scale rock sampling in Continental Antarctica, a number of yeasts have been isolated. Two strains that are unable to grow above 20 °C and that have low ITS sequence similarities with available data in the public domain were found. The D1/D2 LSU molecular phylogeny placed them in an isolated position in the genus Taphrina, supporting their affiliation to a not yet described species. Because the new species is able to grow in its anamorphic state only, the species Taphrina antarctica f.a. (forma asexualis) sp. nov. has been proposed to accommodate both strains (type strain DBVPG 5268(T), DSM 27485(T) and CBS 13532(T)). Lalaria and Taphrina species are dimorphic ascomycetes, where the anamorphic yeast represents the saprotrophic state and the teleomorph is the parasitic counterpart on plants. This is the first record for this genus in Antarctica; since plants are absent on the continent, we hypothesize that the fungus may have focused on the saprotrophic part of its life cycle to overcome the absence of its natural host and adapt environmental constrains. Following the new International Code of Nomenclature for Algae, Fungi and Plants (Melbourne Code 2011) the reorganization of Taphrina-Lalaria species in the teleomorphic genus Taphrina is proposed. We emend the diagnosis of the genus Taphrina to accommodate asexual saprobic states of these fungi. Taphrina antarctica was registered in MycoBank under MB 808028.

  19. Metazoan Parasites of Antarctic Fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oğuz, Mehmet Cemal; Tepe, Yahya; Belk, Mark C; Heckmann, Richard A; Aslan, Burçak; Gürgen, Meryem; Bray, Rodney A; Akgül, Ülker

    2015-06-01

    To date, there have been nearly 100 papers published on metazoan parasites of Antarctic fishes, but there has not yet been any compilation of a species list of fish parasites for this large geographic area. Herein, we provide a list of all documented occurrences of monogenean, cestode, digenean, acanthocephalan, nematode, and hirudinean parasites of Antarctic fishes. The list includes nearly 250 parasite species found in 142 species of host fishes. It is likely that there are more species of fish parasites, which are yet to be documented from Antarctic waters.

  20. Massalongia olechiana (Massalongiaceae, Peltigerales), a new lichen spcies from the Antarctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrup, Vagn; Søchting, Ulrik

    2011-01-01

    A new species of lichenized ascomycete, Massalongia olechiana Alstrup et Søchting, sp. nov. (Massalongiaceae) is described from the South Shetland Islands and the Antarctic Peninsula. The species is distinguished by laminal isidia and 5-7-septate ascospores. The relationships with the other species...

  1. Effects of two kinds of imidazolium-based ionic liquids on the characteristics of steroid-transformation Arthrobacter simplex

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Yanbing; Wang, Lifang; Liang, Jingting; Rui TANG; WANG, Min

    2016-01-01

    Background Ionic liquids (ILs) are a promising alternative for organic solvents because these liquids exhibit unique properties and enhanced steroid 1-dehydrogenation biotransformation caused by Arthrobacter simplex CPCC 140451 (ASP). However, the effect of ILs on the whole cell itself remains poorly understood and must be further investigated. Results A comparative investigation was performed to determine the effect of imidazolium-based ILs, namely, hydrophobic [PrMIm]PF6, and hydrophilic [P...

  2. Antarctic crabs: invasion or endurance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Huw J; Whittle, Rowan J; Roberts, Stephen J; Belchier, Mark; Linse, Katrin

    2013-01-01

    Recent scientific interest following the "discovery" of lithodid crabs around Antarctica has centred on a hypothesis that these crabs might be poised to invade the Antarctic shelf if the recent warming trend continues, potentially decimating its native fauna. This "invasion hypothesis" suggests that decapod crabs were driven out of Antarctica 40-15 million years ago and are only now returning as "warm" enough habitats become available. The hypothesis is based on a geographically and spatially poor fossil record of a different group of crabs (Brachyura), and examination of relatively few Recent lithodid samples from the Antarctic slope. In this paper, we examine the existing lithodid fossil record and present the distribution and biogeographic patterns derived from over 16,000 records of Recent Southern Hemisphere crabs and lobsters. Globally, the lithodid fossil record consists of only two known specimens, neither of which comes from the Antarctic. Recent records show that 22 species of crabs and lobsters have been reported from the Southern Ocean, with 12 species found south of 60 °S. All are restricted to waters warmer than 0 °C, with their Antarctic distribution limited to the areas of seafloor dominated by Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW). Currently, CDW extends further and shallower onto the West Antarctic shelf than the known distribution ranges of most lithodid species examined. Geological evidence suggests that West Antarctic shelf could have been available for colonisation during the last 9,000 years. Distribution patterns, species richness, and levels of endemism all suggest that, rather than becoming extinct and recently re-invading from outside Antarctica, the lithodid crabs have likely persisted, and even radiated, on or near to Antarctic slope. We conclude there is no evidence for a modern-day "crab invasion". We recommend a repeated targeted lithodid sampling program along the West Antarctic shelf to fully test the validity of the "invasion hypothesis".

  3. Environmental contamination in Antarctic ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargagli, R

    2008-08-01

    Although the remote continent of Antarctica is perceived as the symbol of the last great wilderness, the human presence in the Southern Ocean and the continent began in the early 1900s for hunting, fishing and exploration, and many invasive plant and animal species have been deliberately introduced in several sub-Antarctic islands. Over the last 50 years, the development of research and tourism have locally affected terrestrial and marine coastal ecosystems through fuel combustion (for transportation and energy production), accidental oil spills, waste incineration and sewage. Although natural "barriers" such as oceanic and atmospheric circulation protect Antarctica from lower latitude water and air masses, available data on concentrations of metals, pesticides and other persistent pollutants in air, snow, mosses, lichens and marine organisms show that most persistent contaminants in the Antarctic environment are transported from other continents in the Southern Hemisphere. At present, levels of most contaminants in Antarctic organisms are lower than those in related species from other remote regions, except for the natural accumulation of Cd and Hg in several marine organisms and especially in albatrosses and petrels. The concentrations of organic pollutants in the eggs of an opportunistic top predator such as the south polar skua are close to those that may cause adverse health effects. Population growth and industrial development in several countries of the Southern Hemisphere are changing the global pattern of persistent anthropogenic contaminants and new classes of chemicals have already been detected in the Antarctic environment. Although the Protocol on Environmental Protection to the Antarctic Treaty provides strict guidelines for the protection of the Antarctic environment and establishes obligations for all human activity in the continent and the Southern Ocean, global warming, population growth and industrial development in countries of the Southern

  4. Adenylate nucleotide levels and energy charge in Arthrobacter crystallopoietes during growth and starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leps, W T; Ensign, J C

    1979-07-01

    The adenylate nucleotide concentrations, based on internal water space, were determined in cells of Arthrobacter crystallopoietes during growth and starvation and the energy charge of the cells was calculated. The energy charge of spherical cells rose during the first 10 h of growth, then remained nearly constant for as long as 20 h into the stationary phase. The energy charge of rod-shaped cells rose during the first 4 h of growth, then remained constant during subsequent growth and decreased in the stationary growth phase. Both spherical and rod-shaped cells excreted adenosine monophosphate but not adenosine triphosphate or adenosine diphosphate during starvation. The intracellular energy charge of spherical cells declined during the initial 10 h and then remained constant for 1 week of starvation at a value of 0.78. The intracellular energy charge of rod-shaped cells declined during the first 24 h of starvation, remained constant for the next 80 h, then decreased to a value of 0.73 after a total of 168 h starvation. Both cell forms remained more than 90% viable during this time. Addition of a carbon and energy source to starving cells resulted in an increase in the ATP concentration and as a result the energy charge increased to the smae levels as found during growth.

  5. Biodegradation of Benzo[a]pyrene by Arthrobacter oxydans B4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Hui; YIN Hua; DENG Jun; YE Jin-Shao; CHEN Shuo-Na; HE Bao-Yan; ZHANG Na

    2012-01-01

    A bacterial strain,Arthrobacter oxydans (B4),capable of degrading benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) in water body,was isolated from a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons-contaminated site.Effects of different factors,such as reaction time,pH value,temperature and organic nutrients,on BaP biodegradation by the strain B4 were studied.After 5 d treatment,the concentration of BaP in mineral salts medium was reduced to 0.318 mg L-1,compared to the initial concentration of 1.000 mg L-1.There was a process of acid formation during the degradation with pH failing from initial 7.01 to 4.61 at 5 d,so keeping the water body under slightly alkaline condition was propitious to BaP degradation.Strain B4 efficiently degraded BaP at 20 to 37 ℃ with addition of organic nutrients.The biodegradation and transformation of BaP mainly occurred on cell surfaces,and extracellular secretions played an important role in these processes.Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer analyses of metabolites showed that ring cleavage occurred in the BaP degradation process and the resulting metabolically utilizable substrates were generated as sole carbon sources for B4 growth.Furthermore,mineralization extent of metabolites was verified by determining the total organic carbon and inorganic carbon in the degradation system.

  6. Plasmid-encoded degradation of p-nitrophenol and 4-nitrocatechol by Arthrobacter protophormiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, A; Chakraborti, A K; Jain, R K

    2000-04-21

    Arthrobacter protophormiae strain RKJ100 is capable of utilizing p-nitrophenol (PNP) as well as 4-nitrocatechol (NC) as the sole source of carbon, nitrogen and energy. The degradation of PNP and NC by this microorganism takes place through an oxidative route, as stoichiometry of nitrite molecules was observed when the strain was grown on PNP or NC as sole carbon and energy sources. The degradative pathways of PNP and NC were elucidated on the basis of enzyme assays and chemical characterization of the intermediates by TLC, GC, (1)H NMR, GC-MS, UV spectroscopy, and HPLC analyses. Our studies clearly indicate that the degradation of PNP proceeds with the formation of p-benzoquinone (BQ) and hydroquinone (HQ) and is further degraded via the beta-ketoadipate pathway. Degradation of NC involved initial oxidation to generate 1,2,4-benzenetriol (BT) and 2-hydroxy-1,4-benzoquinone; the latter intermediate is then reductively dehydroxylated, forming BQ and HQ, and is further cleaved via beta-ketoadipate to TCA intermediates. It is likely, therefore, that the same set of genes encode the further metabolism of HQ in PNP and NC degradation. A plasmid of approximately 65 kb was found to be responsible for harboring genes for PNP and NC degradation in this strain. This was based on the fact that PNP(-) NC(-) derivatives were devoid of the plasmid and had simultaneously lost their capability to grow at the expense of these nitroaromatic compounds.

  7. The Arthrobacter species FB24 Arth_1007 (DnaB intein is a pseudogene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuo Tori

    Full Text Available An Arthrobacter species FB24 gene (locus tag Arth_1007 was previously annotated as a putative intein-containing DnaB helicase of phage origin (Arsp-FB24 DnaB intein. However, it is not a helicase gene because the sequence similarity is limited to inteins. In fact, the flanking exteins total only 66 amino acids. Therefore, the intein should be referred to as the Arsp-FB24 Arth_1007 intein. The Arsp-FB24 Arth_1007 intein failed to splice in its native precursor and in a model precursor. We previously noted that the Arsp-FB24 Arth_1007 intein is the only putative Class 3 intein that is missing the catalytically essential Cys at position 4 of intein Motif F, which is one of the three defining signature residues of this class. Additionally, a catalytically essential His in position 10 of intein Motif B is also absent; this His is the most conserved residue amongst all inteins. Splicing activity was not rescued when these two catalytically important positions were 'reverted' back to their consensus residues. This study restores the unity of the Class 3 intein signature sequence in active inteins by demonstrating that the Arsp-FB24 Arth_1007 intein is an inactive pseudogene.

  8. Moessbauer study of thermal metamorphosed Antarctic meteorites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scorzelli, R.B. (Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)); Galvao da Silva, E. (Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil) Dept. de Fisica, Univ. Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte (Brazil)); Souza Azevedo, I. (Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil))

    1994-02-01

    In this paper we report on variable temperature Moessbauer spectroscopy measurements on Yamato-82162 and Yamato-86720. These Antarctic carbonaceous chondrites contrast with other non-Antarctic carbonaceous chondrites in which no evidences of thermal metamorphism have been found. (orig.)

  9. Cryptococcus friedmannii, a new species of yeast from the Antarctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishniac, H. S.

    1985-01-01

    Cryptococcus friedmannii Vishniac sp. nov. from an Antarctic cryptoendolithic community is a psychrophilic basidioblastomycete characterized by cream-colored colonies of cells with smooth, layered walls, budding monopolarly, producing amylose and extracellular proteinase, utilizing nitrate and D-alanine (inter alia) as nitrogen sources and L-arabinose, arbutin, cellobiose, D-glucuronate, maltose, melezitose, salicin, soluble starch, trehalose, and D-xylose as carbon sources. This species differs from all other basidiomycetous yeasts in possessing the following combination of characters: amylose production (positive), assimilation of cellobiose (positive), D-galactose (negative), myo-inositol (negative), D-mannitol (negative), and sucrose (negative).

  10. Regulating Antarctic Tourism and the Precautionary Principle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastmeijer, C.J.; Roura, R.

    2004-01-01

    On the basis of an overview of the developments in Antarctic tourism since 1956, this current development note examines the issue of international regulation of Antarctic tourism. After discussing one of the main management issues in respect of Antarctic tourism ¿ the assessment and prevention of cu

  11. Degradation of o-methoxybenzoate by a two-member consortium made up of a gram-positive Arthrobacter strain and a gram-negative Pantotea strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, M; Haïdour, A; Ramos, J L

    2000-01-01

    Aromatic carboxylic acids substituted with methoxylated groups are among the most abundant products in "alpechin", the wastes resulting from pressing olives to obtain olive oil. Degradation of o-methoxybenzoate by an stable consortium made of a gram positive bacterium, Arthrobacter oxydans, and gram negative one, Pantotea agglomerans, was shown to mineralize this compound efficiently. The concerted action of both microorganisms was needed for the two first steps in the process, namely, the conversion of o-methoxybenzoate into salycilate, and the hydroxylation of the latter to gentisate. Gentisate was further degraded by the Arthrobacter strain.

  12. Special Stamps:Antarctic Scenery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In July 2002, the State Postal Bureau issued a set of three stamps, whose theme is Antarctic scenery.The first stamp depicts an iceberg. Antarctica is where 90 percent of the world’s ice exists. Each year countless icebergs float majestically through the sea, and are a magnificent scenic feature of Antarctica.

  13. Principles of the Antarctic Treaty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candidi, M.

    The operation of any base or expedition to Antarctica is regulated by the mutual agreement among nations in the “Antarctic Treaty”. This treaty deals with the major aspects of life in Antarctica and its main principles and provisions are described in what follows.

  14. Fotoprotección antioxidante no-enzimática contra el potencial daño inducido por UVBR en una diatomea antártica (Thalassiosira sp. Non-enzymatic antioxidant photoprotection against potential UVBR-induced damage in an Antarctic diatom (Thalassiosira sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Hernando

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In January 1999, unialgal cultures of the diatom Thalassiosira sp., solate from natural phyto-plankton assemblages from Potter Cove, Antarctica, were exposed to solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR, 280400 nm in order to study the long-term acclimation of this species. Ultraviolet radiation B (UVBR, 280-315 nm inhibited the growth rate during the first and second days of exposure. No UVBR inhibition was observed on the third day. The initial content of α-tocopherol (13 pmol (10(4 cell-1 showed a marked decrease during the exponential growth phase (4 pmol (10(4 cell-1 by day 3. The initial content of β-carotene (3 pmol (10(4 cell-1 did not show significant differences over time in cells exposed to UVBR. Two mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs were identified: porphyra-334 and shinorine. Cellular concentrations of MAAs increased significantly on days 2 and 3, and exposure of the algae to UVBR significantly enhanced this value. The relative importance of MAAs concentration was significant (P Durante enero 1999, cultivos unialgales de una diatomea Thalassiosira sp., aislada de poblaciones fitoplanctónicas naturales de Caleta Carlos Potter, Antártida, fueron expuestos a radiación solar ultravioleta (UVR, 280-400 nm con el objetivo de estudiar su aclimatación a largo plazo. La radiación ultravioleta B (UVBR, 280-315 nm inhibió la tasa de crecimiento durante el primer y segundo día de exposición. No se observó inhibición por UVBR durante el tercer día. El contenido inicial de α-tocopherol (13 pmol (10(4 cel-1 mostró una marcada disminución durante la fase de crecimiento exponencial (4 pmol (10(4 cel-1 al día 3. El contenido inicial de β-caroteno (3 pmol (10(4 cel-1 no mostró diferencias significativas entre días en células expuestas a UVBR. Se identificaron dos aminoácidos parecidos a micosporina (MAAs, porfira-334 y shinorina. Las concentraciones celulares de MAAs mostraron aumentos significativos en los días 2 y 3, que resultaron

  15. Optimization of four types of antimicrobial agents to increase the inhibitory ability of marine Arthrobacter oxydans KQ11 dextranase mouthwash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Wei; Wang, Shujun; Lü, Mingsheng; Wang, Xiaobei; Fang, Yaowei; Jiao, Yuliang; Hu, Jianen

    2016-03-01

    We adopted the response surface methodology using single factor and orthogonal experiments to optimize four types of antimicrobial agents that could inhibit biofilm formation by Streptococcus mutans, which is commonly found in the human oral cavity and causes tooth decay. The objective was to improve the function of marine Arthrobacter oxydans KQ11 dextranase mouthwash (designed and developed by our laboratory). The experiment was conducted in a three-level, four-variable central composite design to determine the best combination of ZnSO4, lysozyme, citric acid and chitosan. The optimized antibacterial agents were 2.16 g/L ZnSO4, 14 g/L lysozyme, 4.5 g/L citric acid and 5 g/L chitosan. The biofilm formation inhibition reached 84.49%. In addition, microscopic observation of the biofilm was performed using scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy. The optimized formula was tested in marine dextranase Arthrobacter oxydans KQ11 mouthwash and enhanced the inhibition of S. mutans. This work may be promoted for the design and development of future marine dextranase oral care products.

  16. Arthrobacter P 1, a Fast Growing Versatile Methylotroph with Amine Oxidase as a Key Enzyme in the Metabolism of Methylated Amines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijken, J.P. van; Veenhuis, M.; Harder, W.

    1981-01-01

    A facultative methylotrophic bacterium was isolated from enrichment cultures containing methylamine as the sole carbon source. It was tentatively identified as an Arthrobacter species. Extracts of cells grown on methylamine or ethylamine contained high levels of amine oxidase (E.C. 1.4.3) activity.

  17. Multibranch Antarctic Seismic Data Library facilitates research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Alan K.

    In 1991, investigators from 11 nations involved in Antarctic multichannel seismic (MCS) reflection research sought a way to keep the Antarctic Treaty's promise of open access to data, and in the process to encourage Earth-science research using seismic data. The Antarctic Seismic Data Library System for Cooperative Research (SDLS) was the solution, and is now a recommendation of the Antarctic Treaty Consultative Parties (ATCP). Today—at 12 branches spanning the world—researchers can access over 68,000 km of marine MCS data to use for cooperative research.More than 150,000 km of MCS data have been accumulated since 1976 by 13 countries on nearly 70 cruises. The majority of data now in the library cover the Ross Sea, Wilkes Land, and Prydz Bay sectors of the Antarctic margin, with smaller amounts from the Weddell Sea and the Antarctic Peninsula.

  18. Snow on Antarctic sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massom, Robert A.; Eicken, Hajo; Hass, Christian; Jeffries, Martin O.; Drinkwater, Mark R.; Sturm, Matthew; Worby, Anthony P.; Wu, Xingren; Lytle, Victoria I.; Ushio, Shuki; Morris, Kim; Reid, Phillip A.; Warren, Stephen G.; Allison, Ian

    2001-08-01

    Snow on Antarctic sea ice plays a complex and highly variable role in air-sea-ice interaction processes and the Earth's climate system. Using data collected mostly during the past 10 years, this paper reviews the following topics: snow thickness and snow type and their geographical and seasonal variations; snow grain size, density, and salinity; frequency of occurrence of slush; thermal conductivity, snow surface temperature, and temperature gradients within snow; and the effect of snow thickness on albedo. Major findings include large regional and seasonal differences in snow properties and thicknesses; the consequences of thicker snow and thinner ice in the Antarctic relative to the Arctic (e.g., the importance of flooding and snow-ice formation); the potential impact of increasing snowfall resulting from global climate change; lower observed values of snow thermal conductivity than those typically used in models; periodic large-scale melt in winter; and the contrast in summer melt processes between the Arctic and the Antarctic. Both climate modeling and remote sensing would benefit by taking account of the differences between the two polar regions.

  19. Geographic names of the Antarctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,; ,; ,; ,; Alberts, Fred G.

    1995-01-01

    This gazetteer contains 12,710 names approved by the United States Board on Geographic Names and the Secretary of the Interior for features in Antarctica and the area extending northward to the Antarctic Convergence. Included in this geographic area, the Antarctic region, are the off-lying South Shetland Islands, the South Orkney Islands, the South Sandwich Islands, South Georgia, Bouvetøya, Heard Island, and the Balleny Islands. These names have been approved for use by U.S. Government agencies. Their use by the Antarctic specialist and the public is highly recommended for the sake of accuracy and uniformity. This publication, which supersedes previous Board gazetteers or lists for the area, contains names approved as recently as December 1994. The basic name coverage of this gazetteer corresponds to that of maps at the scale of 1:250,000 or larger for coastal Antarctica, the off-lying islands, and isolated mountains and ranges of the continent. Much of the interior of Antarctica is a featureless ice plateau. That area has been mapped at a smaller scale and is nearly devoid of toponyms. All of the names are for natural features, such as mountains, glaciers, peninsulas, capes, bays, islands, and subglacial entities. The names of scientific stations have not been listed alphabetically, but they may appear in the texts of some decisions. For the names of submarine features, reference should be made to the Gazetteer of Undersea Features, 4th edition, U.S. Board on Geographic Names, 1990.

  20. Antarctic skuas recognize individual humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Won Young; Han, Yeong-Deok; Lee, Sang-Im; Jablonski, Piotr G; Jung, Jin-Woo; Kim, Jeong-Hoon

    2016-07-01

    Recent findings report that wild animals can recognize individual humans. To explain how the animals distinguish humans, two hypotheses are proposed. The high cognitive abilities hypothesis implies that pre-existing high intelligence enabled animals to acquire such abilities. The pre-exposure to stimuli hypothesis suggests that frequent encounters with humans promote the acquisition of discriminatory abilities in these species. Here, we examine individual human recognition abilities in a wild Antarctic species, the brown skua (Stercorarius antarcticus), which lives away from typical human settlements and was only recently exposed to humans due to activities at Antarctic stations. We found that, as nest visits were repeated, the skua parents responded at further distances and were more likely to attack the nest intruder. Also, we demonstrated that seven out of seven breeding pairs of skuas selectively responded to a human nest intruder with aggression and ignored a neutral human who had not previously approached the nest. The results indicate that Antarctic skuas, a species that typically inhabited in human-free areas, are able to recognize individual humans who disturbed their nests. Our findings generally support the high cognitive abilities hypothesis, but this ability can be acquired during a relatively short period in the life of an individual as a result of interactions between individual birds and humans.

  1. Physicochemical factors for affecting the efficiency of Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus MN1409 on manganese oxidation%理化因素对锰细菌Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus MN1409氧化Mn2+的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯福鑫; 王芳; 许旭萍

    2012-01-01

    Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus MN1409是1株分离自锰矿样品的高效锰氧化细菌.为了建立该菌株氧化Mn2+的适宜条件,研究了接种量、装液量、摇床转速、温度、pH值、Fe2+初始质量浓度和Mn2+初始质量浓度等理化因素对其锰氧化效率的影响.结果表明,接种量、装液量、转速和Mn2+初始质量浓度在一定范围内变化对锰氧化率影响不大;而温度、pH值和Fe2+初始质量浓度变化对锰氧化率有较大影响.当接种量为4%,装液量为60mL,温度为25℃,摇床转速为100r/min,pH值为7,且有一定的Fe2+存在时,Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus MN1409对锰的氧化效率最高.%The physicochemical factors for affecting the manganese oxidation efficiency of an manganese oxidizing bacteria named Arthrobacter chlorophennlicus MN1409 which was isolated from manganese ore sample were studied. The identified factors include inoculum volume, liquid volume, temperature, shaking speed, pH as well as the concentration of Fe2+ and Mn2+ . The results showed that there was no significant effect on the biological manganese oxidation rate and chemical manganese oxidation rate during 2% - 10% inoculum volumes. 4% inoculum volume was the optimum condition according to its highest total manganese oxidation rate. Similarly, biological and chemical manganese oxidation rale have no significant difference for the liquid volume ranging from 50 mL to 100 mL in 250 mL triangular flask , the highest total manganese oxidation rate occurred in 60 mL liquid volume. Nevertheless, temperature showed an positive effect on manganese oxidation rate. By increasing the temperature from 15 ℃ to 35 ℃, highest biological and chemical manganese oxidation rate could be reached at 25 ℃ and 35 ℃ , respectively, plus the total oxidation rate could achieved 81.52% as well in 35 ℃ . In addition, the effect of shaker speed on manganese oxidation efficiency (MOE) showed that the oxidation rates were similar for

  2. Four new monoraphid diatom species (Bacillariophyta, Achnanthaceae from the Maritime Antarctic Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateřina Kopalová

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Four monoraphid taxa belonging to the genera Achnanthes, Psammothidium and Planothidium were found during the ongoing taxonomic revision of the freshwater and limno-terrestrial diatoms of the Maritime Antarctic region. The present paper describes these four taxa as new based on detailed light and scanning electron microscopy observations: Achnanthes kohleriana Kopalová, Zidarova & Van de Vijver sp. nov., Planothidium wetzelectorianum Kopalová, Zidarova & Van de Vijver sp. nov., Psammothidium confusoneglectum Kopalová, Zidarova & Van de Vijver sp. nov. and Psammothidium superpapilio Kopalová, Zidarova & Van de Vijver sp. nov. The morphology and ecology of all four taxa are discussed and the species are compared with morphologically similar taxa.

  3. Screening micro-organisms for cadmium absorption from aqueous solution and cadmium absorption properties of Arthrobacter nicotianae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuruta, Takehiko; Umenai, Daishi; Hatano, Tomonobu; Hirajima, Tsuyoshi; Sasaki, Keiko

    2014-01-01

    To obtain basic information on how microbial cells absorb cadmium from aqueous solution, we examined cadmium absorption in various micro-organisms. Of 51 micro-organism strains tested, we found that some Gram-positive bacteria, such as, Arthrobacter nicotianae and Bacillus subtilis, and some actinomycetes, such as, Streptomyces flavoviridis and S. levoris were highly capable of absorbing cadmium from an aqueous solution. A. nicotianae absorbed the largest amount of cadmium, over 800 μmol cadmium per gram of dry wt. cells. However, cadmium absorption by A. nicotianae was affected by the solution pH, cadmium concentration, and cell density. The absorption of cadmium was very rapid. Some factors that affected cadmium absorption by A. nicotianae cells were also discussed.

  4. JCADM, new directions in Antarctic data management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, H.; de Bruin, T. F.

    2008-12-01

    The Joint Committee on Antarctic Data Management (JCADM) was established by the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR) and the Council of Managers of National Antarctic Programs (COMNAP), to assist in the fulfilment of the data management obligations imposed by the Antarctic Treaty (section III.1.c): "Scientific observations and results from Antarctica shall be exchanged and made freely available." JCADM comprises representatives of the National Antarctic Data Centres or national points of contact. Currently 31 nations around the world are represented in JCADM. So far, JCADM has been focussing on the coordination of the Antarctic Master Directory (AMD), the internationally accessible, web-based, searchable record of Antarctic and Southern Ocean data set descriptions. The AMD is directly integrated into the international Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) to help further merge Antarctic science into global science. The AMD is a resource for scientists to advertise the data they have collected and to search for data they may need. Currently, JCADM is in a transition phase, moving forward to provide data access. Existing systems and web services technology will be used as much as possible, to increase efficiency and prevent 're-inventing the wheel' This poster will give an overview of this process, the current status and the expected results.

  5. Impact of climate change on Antarctic krill

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Florentino De Souza Silva, A.P.; Atkinson, A.; Kawaguchi, S.; Bravo Rebolledo, E.; Franeker, van J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Antarctic krill Euphausia superba (hereafter ‘krill’) occur in regions undergoing rapid environmental change, particularly loss of winter sea ice. During recent years, harvesting of krill has increased, possibly enhancing stress on krill and Antarctic ecosystems. Here we review the overall impact of

  6. Anti-inflammatory activity in selected Antarctic benthic organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan eMoles

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Antarctic benthos was prospected in search for anti-inflammatory activity in polar benthic invertebrates, in two different geographical areas: deep-bottoms of the Eastern Weddell Sea and shallow-waters of the South Shetland Islands. A total of 36 benthic algae and invertebrate species were selected to perform solubility tests in order to test them for anti-inflammatory activity. From these, ethanol extracts of ten species from five different phyla resulted suitable to be studied in cell macrophage cultures (RAW 264.7. Cytotoxicity (MTT method and production of inflammatory mediators (prostaglandin E2, leukotriene B4, interleukin-1 were determined at three extract concentrations (50, 125, 250 g/mL. Bioassays resulted in four different species showing anti-inflammatory activity corresponding to three sponges: Mycale (Oxymycale acerata, Isodictya erinacea, and I. toxophila; and one hemichordate: Cephalodiscus sp. These results show that Antarctic sessile invertebrates may have great value as a source of lead compounds with potential pharmaceutical applications.

  7. 铅胁迫对节杆菌(Arthrobacter sp.)和芽孢杆菌(Bacillus sp.)生理生化特性的影响%Impacts of Pb (Ⅱ) on the physio-biochemical features of Arthrobacter sp.and Bacillus sp.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜瑞英; 黄文芳; 赵沛华; 赵迪; 文典

    2016-01-01

    将节杆菌和芽孢杆菌分别暴露于不同浓度的铅溶液中,并进行不同暴露时间的急性毒性试验.结果表明,500 mg/kg的Pb(Ⅱ)处理会使节杆菌中的细胞膜脂质过氧化产物——硫代巴比妥酸活性物质(TBARS)浓度显著降低(p<0.05),而Pb(Ⅱ)质量比变化对其他指标无显著影响(p<0.05);铅处理会使芽孢杆菌中可溶性蛋白质量浓度、GSH质量浓度和超氧化物歧化酶(SOD)活性显著升高,而过氧化氢酶(CAT)活性显著降低(p<0.05).节杆菌的可溶性糖质量浓度、GSH质量浓度、SOD活性和TBARS浓度随暴露时间延长而显著增加;芽孢杆菌的可溶性糖质量浓度、GSH质量浓度和SOD活性随暴露时间延长而显著增加,TBARS浓度随暴露时间延长呈先增后减的变化趋势,CAT活性也表现出先增后降的变化趋势.铅处理对节杆菌和芽孢杆菌具有一定的胁迫作用,两种菌通过启动不同的抗性系统来抵抗外界胁迫.

  8. Imported anthropogenic bacteria may survive the Antarctic winter and introduce new genes into local bacterial communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brat Kristian

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We studied dynamic changes in anthropogenic bacterial communities at a summer-operated Czech research base (the Mendel Research Station in the Antarctic during 2012 and 2013. We observed an increase in total numbers of detected bacteria between the beginning and the end of each stay in the Antarctic. In the first series of samples, bacteria of Bacillus sp. predominated. Surprisingly, high numbers of Gram-positive cocci and coliforms were found (including opportunistic human pathogens, although the conditions for bacterial life were unfavourable (Antarctic winter. In the second series of samples, coliforms and Gram-positive cocci predominated. Dangerous human pathogens were also detected. Yersinia enterocolitica was identified as serotype O:9. Antibiotic susceptibility testing showed medium-to-high resistance rates to ampicillin, cefalotin, cefuroxime, amoxicillin-clavulanate and gentamicin in Enterobacteriaceae. 16S rRNA sequencing showed high rates of accordance between nucleotide sequences among the tested strains. Three conclusions were drawn: (1 Number of anthropogenic bacteria were able to survive the harsh conditions of the Antarctic winter (inside and outside the polar station. Under certain circumstances (e.g. impaired immunity, the surviving bacteria might pose a health risk to the participants of future expeditions or to other visitors to the base. (2 The bacteria released into the outer environment might have impacts on local ecosystems. (3 New characteristics (e.g. resistance to antibiotics may be introduced into local bacterial communities.

  9. Hydrocarbon degradation by antarctic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavanagh, J.A.E.; Nichols, P.D.; McMeekin, T.A.; Franzmann, P.D. [Univ. of Tasmania (Australia)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Bacterial cultures obtained from sediment samples collected during a trial oil spill experiment conducted at Airport beach, Eastern Antarctica were selectively enriched for n-alkane-degrading and phenanthrenedegrading bacteria. Samples were collected from a control site and sites treated with different hydrocarbon mixtures - Special Antarctic blend (SAB), BP-Visco and orange roughy oils. One set of replicate sites was also treated with water from Organic Lake which had previously been shown to contain hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria. No viable bacteria were obtained from samples collected from sites treated with orange roughy oil. Extensive degradation of n-alkanes by enrichment cultures obtained from sites treated with SAB and BP-Visco occurred at both 25{degrees}C and 10{degrees}C. Extensive degradation of phenanthrene also occurred in enrichment cultures from these sites grown at 25{degrees}C. Concurrent increases of polar lipid in these cultures were also observed. The presence of 1,4-naphthaquinone and 1-naphthol during the growth of the cultures on phenanthrene is unusual and warrants further investigation of the mechanism of phenanthrene-degradation by these Antarctic bacteria.

  10. Underwater Optics in Sub-Antarctic and Antarctic Coastal Ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huovinen, Pirjo; Ramírez, Jaime; Gómez, Iván

    2016-01-01

    Understanding underwater optics in natural waters is essential in evaluating aquatic primary production and risk of UV exposure in aquatic habitats. Changing environmental conditions related with global climate change, which imply potential contrasting changes in underwater light climate further emphasize the need to gain insights into patterns related with underwater optics for more accurate future predictions. The present study evaluated penetration of solar radiation in six sub-Antarctic estuaries and fjords in Chilean North Patagonian region (39-44°S) and in an Antarctic bay (62°S). Based on vertical diffuse attenuation coefficients (Kd), derived from measurements with a submersible multichannel radiometer, average summer UV penetration depth (z1%) in these water bodies ranged 2-11 m for UV-B (313 nm), 4-27 m for UV-A (395 nm), and 7-30 m for PAR (euphotic zone). UV attenuation was strongest in the shallow Quempillén estuary, while Fildes Bay (Antarctica) exhibited the highest transparency. Optically non-homogeneous water layers and seasonal variation in transparency (lower in winter) characterized Comau Fjord and Puyuhuapi Channel. In general, multivariate analysis based on Kd values of UV and PAR wavelengths discriminated strongly Quempillén estuary and Puyuhuapi Channel from other study sites. Spatial (horizontal) variation within the estuary of Valdivia river reflected stronger attenuation in zones receiving river impact, while within Fildes Bay a lower spatial variation in water transparency could in general be related to closeness of glaciers, likely due to increased turbidity through ice-driven processes. Higher transparency and deeper UV-B penetration in proportion to UV-A/visible wavelengths observed in Fildes Bay suggests a higher risk for Antarctic ecosystems reflected by e.g. altered UV-B damage vs. photorepair under UV-A/PAR. Considering that damage repair processes often slow down under cool temperatures, adverse UV impact could be further

  11. Microbial ecology of Antarctic aquatic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavicchioli, Ricardo

    2015-11-01

    The Earth's biosphere is dominated by cold environments, and the cold biosphere is dominated by microorganisms. Microorganisms in cold Southern Ocean waters are recognized for having crucial roles in global biogeochemical cycles, including carbon sequestration, whereas microorganisms in other Antarctic aquatic biomes are not as well understood. In this Review, I consider what has been learned about Antarctic aquatic microbial ecology from 'omic' studies. I assess the factors that shape the biogeography of Antarctic microorganisms, reflect on some of the unusual biogeochemical cycles that they are associated with and discuss the important roles that viruses have in controlling ecosystem function.

  12. Abundance, viability and culturability of Antarctic bacteria

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    LokaBharathi, P.A.; DeSouza, M.J.B.D.; Nair, S.; Chandramohan, D.

    The viability of total number of bacteria decide the mineralisation rate in any ecosystem and ultimately the fertility of the region. This study aims at establishing the extent of viability in the standing stock of the Antarctic bacterial population...

  13. Unveiling the Antarctic subglacial landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Roland; Roberts, Jason

    2010-05-01

    Better knowledge of the subglacial landscape of Antarctica is vital to reducing uncertainties regarding prediction of the evolution of the ice sheet. These uncertainties are associated with bedrock geometry for ice sheet dynamics, including possible marine ice sheet instabilities and subglacial hydrological pathways (e.g. Wright et al., 2008). Major collaborative aerogeophysics surveys motivated by the International Polar Year (e.g. ICECAP and AGAP), and continuing large scale radar echo sounding campaigns (ICECAP and NASA Ice Bridge) are significantly improving the coverage. However, the vast size of Antarctica and logistic difficulties mean that data gaps persist, and ice thickness data remains spatially inhomogeneous. The physics governing large scale ice sheet flow enables ice thickness, and hence bedrock topography, to be inferred from knowledge of ice sheet surface topography and considerations of ice sheet mass balance, even in areas with sparse ice thickness measurements (Warner and Budd, 2000). We have developed a robust physically motivated interpolation scheme, based on these methods, and used it to generate a comprehensive map of Antarctic bedrock topography, using along-track ice thickness data assembled for the BEDMAP project (Lythe et al., 2001). This approach reduces ice thickness biases, compared to traditional inverse distance interpolation schemes which ignore the information available from considerations of ice sheet flow. In addition, the use of improved balance fluxes, calculated using a Lagrangian scheme, eliminates the grid orientation biases in ice fluxes associated with finite difference methods (Budd and Warner, 1996, Le Brocq et al., 2006). The present map was generated using a recent surface DEM (Bamber et al., 2009, Griggs and Bamber, 2009) and accumulation distribution (van de Berg et al., 2006). Comparing our results with recent high resolution regional surveys gives confidence that all major subglacial topographic features are

  14. Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctic Ice and Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    In this view of Antarctic ice and clouds, (56.5S, 152.0W), the Ross Ice Shelf of Antarctica is almost totally clear, showing stress cracks in the ice surface caused by wind and tidal drift. Clouds on the eastern edge of the picture are associated with an Antarctic cyclone. Winds stirred up these storms have been known to reach hurricane force.

  15. The SCAR Standing Committee on Antarctic Data Management - new directions in access to Antarctic research data

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruin, T.

    2009-04-01

    The SCAR Standing Committee on Antarctic Data Management (SC-ADM) was established by the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR) and the Council of Managers of National Antarctic Programs (COMNAP), to assist in the fulfillment of the data management obligations imposed by the Antarctic Treaty (section III.1.c): "Scientific observations and results from Antarctica shall be exchanged and made freely available." SC-ADM comprises representatives of the National Antarctic Data Centres or national points of contact. Currently 31 nations around the world are represented in SC-ADM. So far, SC-ADM has been focussing on the coordination of the Antarctic Master Directory (AMD), the internationally accessible, web-based, searchable record of Antarctic and Southern Ocean data set descriptions. The AMD is directly integrated into the international Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) to help further merge Antarctic science into global science. The AMD is a resource for scientists to advertise the data they have collected and to search for data they may need. Currently, SC-ADM is in a transition phase, moving forward to provide data access. Existing systems and web services technology will be used as much as possible, to increase efficiency and prevent 're-inventing the wheel' This poster will give an overview of this process, the current status and the expected results.

  16. Evaluation of Arthrobacter aurescens Strain TC1 as Bioaugmentation Bacterium in Soils Contaminated with the Herbicidal Substance Terbuthylazine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera P Silva

    Full Text Available In the last years the chloro-s-triazine active substance terbuthylazine has been increasingly used as an herbicide and may leave residues in the environment which can be of concern. The present study aimed at developing a bioaugmentation tool based on the soil bacterium Arthrobacter aurescens strain TC1 for the remediation of terbuthylazine contaminated soils and at examining its efficacy for both soil and aquatic compartments. First, the feasibility of growing the bioaugmentation bacterium inocula on simple sole nitrogen sources (ammonium and nitrate instead of atrazine, while still maintaining its efficiency to biodegrade terbuthylazine was shown. In sequence, the successful and quick (3 days bioremediation efficacy of ammonium-grown A. aurescens TC1 cells was proven in a natural soil freshly spiked or four-months aged with commercial terbuthylazine at a dose 10× higher than the recommended in corn cultivation, to mimic spill situations. Ecotoxicity assessment of the soil eluates towards a freshwater microalga supported the effectiveness of the bioaugmentation tool. Obtained results highlight the potential to decontaminate soil while minimizing terbuthylazine from reaching aquatic compartments via the soil-water pathway. The usefulness of this bioaugmentation tool to provide rapid environment decontamination is particularly relevant in the event of accidental high herbicide contamination. Its limitations and advantages are discussed.

  17. SP. Pescado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Gendre

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Nell'occhiello di un articolo dal titolo Il Peru dei de[Jini rosa e de/la grande pioggia si legge: "da una partenza  in aereo al «pescado»  che ti  sfamera."1 Questa parola spagnola, giustamente chiusa tra caporali, a noi pare molto interes­ sante, perche, nonostante l'apparenza, non ha nulla da spartire sotto i1 profilo se­ mantico con l'it. pescato. lnfatti, tutti i piu importanti dizionari della lingua italiana, di ieri e di oggi, etimologici e non 2, registrano  accanto a pescata,  ii lemma pescato, 3 ma lo spiegano come "quantita di pesce catturato nel corso di una battuta o di una stagione di pesca",4 mentre lo sp. pescado  indica i1 "pesce (solo nel senso di: pesGe pescato da mangiare [...]".s

  18. Controls and variability of solute and sedimentary fluxes in Antarctic and sub-Antarctic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwolinski, Zbigniew

    2015-04-01

    The currently prepared SEDIBUD Book on "Source-to-Sink Fluxes in Undisturbed Cold Environments" (edited by Achim A. Beylich, John C. Dixon and Zbigniew Zwolinski and published by Cambridge University Press) is summarizing and synthesizing the achievements of the International Association of Geomorphologists` (I.A.G./A.I.G.) Working Group SEDIBUD (Sediment Budgets in Cold Environments), which has been active since 2005 (http://www.geomorph.org/wg/wgsb.html). The book comprises five parts. One of them is part about sub-Antarctic and Antarctic Environments. This part "Sub-Antarctic and Antarctic Environments" describes two different environments, namely oceanic and continental ones. Each part contains results of research on environmental drivers and rates of contemporary solute and sedimentary fluxes in selected sites. Apart from describing the environmental conditions of the whole continent of Antarctica and sub-Antarctic islands (Zb.Zwolinski, M.Kejna, A.N.Lastochkin, A.Zhirov, S.Boltramovich) this part of the book characterizes terrestrial polar oases free from multi-year ice and snow covers (Zb.Zwolinski). The detailed results of geoecological and sedimentological research come from different parts of Antarctica. Antarctic continental shelf (E.Isla) is an example of sub-Antarctic oceanic environment. South Shetlands, especially King George Island (Zb.Zwolinski, M.Kejna, G.Rachlewicz, I.Sobota, J.Szpikowski), is an example of sub-Antarctic terrestrial environment. Antarctic Peninsula (G.Vieira, M.Francelino, J.C.Fernandes) and surroundings of McMurdo Dry Valleys (W.B.Lyons, K.A.Welch, J.Levy, A.Fountain, D.McKnight) are examples of Antarctic continental environments. The key goals of the Antarctic and sub-Antarctic book chapters are following: (i) identify the main environmental drivers and rates of contemporary solute and sedimentary fluxes, and (ii) model possible effects of projected climate change on solute and sedimentary fluxes in cold climate environments

  19. Antarctic teleost immunoglobulins: more extreme, more interesting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coscia, Maria Rosaria; Varriale, Sonia; Giacomelli, Stefano; Oreste, Umberto

    2011-11-01

    We have investigated the immunoglobulin molecule and the genes encoding it in teleosts living in the Antarctic seas at the constant temperature of -1.86 °C. The majority of Antarctic teleosts belong to the suborder Notothenioidei (Perciformes), which includes only a few non-Antarctic species. Twenty-one Antarctic and two non-Antarctic Notothenioid species were included in our studies. We sequenced immunoglobulin light chains in two species and μ heavy chains, partially or totally, in twenty species. In the case of heavy chain, genomic DNA and the cDNA encoding the secreted and the membrane form were analyzed. From one species, Trematomus bernacchii, a spleen cDNA library was constructed to evaluate the diversity of VH gene segments. T. bernacchii IgM, purified from the serum and bile, was characterized. Homology Modelling and Molecular Dynamics were used to determine the molecular structure of T. bernacchii and Chionodraco hamatus immunoglobulin domains. This paper sums up the previous results and broadens them with the addition of unpublished data.

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Flavobacterium sp. Strain TAB 87, Able To Inhibit the Growth of Cystic Fibrosis Bacterial Pathogens Belonging to the Burkholderia cepacia Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presta, Luana; Inzucchi, Ilaria; Bosi, Emanuele; Fondi, Marco; Perrin, Elena; Miceli, Elisangela; Tutino, Maria Luisa; Lo Giudice, Angelina

    2016-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of the Flavobacterium sp. TAB 87 strain, isolated from Antarctic seawater during a summer campaign near the French Antarctic station Dumont d’Urville (60°40′S, 40°01′E). It will allow for comparative genomics and the fulfillment of both fundamental and application-oriented investigations. It allowed the recognition of genes associated with the production of bioactive compounds and antibiotic resistance. PMID:27198032

  1. Antarctic station life: The first 15 years of mixed expeditions to the Antarctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarris, Aspa

    2017-02-01

    This study examined the experiences of women who lived and worked on remote and isolated Antarctic stations for up to 15 months at a time. The study employed purposeful sampling and a longitudinal - processual approach to study women's experiences over the first 15 years of mixed gender Antarctic expeditions. The retrospective analysis was based on a semi-structured interview administered to 14 women upon their return to Australia. The results showed that women referred to the natural physical Antarctic environment as one of the best aspects of their experience and the reason they would recommend the Antarctic to their friends as a good place to work. In describing the worst aspect of their experience, women referred to aspects of Antarctic station life, including: (i) the male dominated nature of station culture; (ii) the impact of interpersonal conflict, including gender based conflict and friction between scientists and trades workers; and (iii) the lack of anonymity associated with living and working with the same group of individuals, mainly men, for up to 12 months or more. The results are discussed within the context of the evolution of Antarctic station culture and recommendations are made in terms of the demography of expeditions, expeditioner selection and recruitment and the ongoing monitoring of Antarctic station culture. The study presents a framework that can be applied to groups and teams living and working in analogous isolated, confined and extreme work environments, including outer space missions.

  2. 76 FR 9849 - Comprehensive Environmental Evaluations for Antarctic Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-22

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Article 3 of Annex I to the Protocol on Environmental Protection to the Antarctic Treaty requires the preparation of a CEE for any proposed Antarctic activity likely to have more than a... Comprehensive Environmental Evaluations for Antarctic Activities SUMMARY: The Department of State gives...

  3. Antarctic “quiet” site stirs debate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simarski, Lynn Teo

    Geophysicists from the United States and New Zealand plan to meet in the coming months to assess the electromagnetic pollution of an Antarctic site especially designated for research. U.S. scientists charge that a satellite Earth station erected apparently inside the preserve by New Zealand's Telecom company could interfere with experiments on the ionosphere and magnetosphere (Eos, April 28, 1992). The Site of Special Scientific Interest at Arrival Heights, the only Antarctic preserve specifically for physical science, is located near the U.S. McMurdo and New Zealand Scott bases.Debate over the Telecom facility inter-twines diplomatic and scientific issues. One question is whether the station violates the Antarctic treaty. Secondly, does it actually impair research at the site—or could it harm future experiments? To deepen the imbroglio, those involved from both nations say that transmissions from sources off-site also interfere with research—raising doubts about how pristine the site really is.

  4. NSF's role in Antarctic environment scrutinized

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Susan

    In the last few years, the National Science Foundation has come under criticism by environmental groups for inadequate stewardship in the U.S. Antarctic Program's environmental issues. Since 1978, NSF was given full responsibility, by Executive Order, for budgeting and managing the entire U.S. national program in Antarctica, including logistics support. NSF has also been responsible for the compliance of the U.S. Antarctic Program with environmental protection measures agreed to by the Antarctic Treaty nations. Specifically under fire by environmentalists have been NSF's maintenance of a land-fill, open-air burning of solid waste, and the removal of toxic substances. According to Peter E. Wilkniss, director of the Division of Polar Programs at NSF, open burning is no longer taking place and will not be allowed in the future.

  5. Purification and characterization of cold-adapted beta-agarase from an Antarctic psychrophilic strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Li

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available An extracellular β-agarase was purified from Pseudoalteromonas sp. NJ21, a Psychrophilic agar-degrading bacterium isolated from Antarctic Prydz Bay sediments. The purified agarase (Aga21 revealed a single band on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, with an apparent molecular weight of 80 kDa. The optimum pH and temperature of the agarase were 8.0 and 30 °C, respectively. However, it maintained as much as 85% of the maximum activities at 10 °C. Significant activation of the agarase was observed in the presence of Mg2+, Mn2+, K+; Ca2+, Na+, Ba2+, Zn2+, Cu2+, Co2+, Fe2+, Sr2+ and EDTA inhibited the enzyme activity. The enzymatic hydrolyzed product of agar was characterized as neoagarobiose. Furthermore, this work is the first evidence of cold-adapted agarase in Antarctic psychrophilic bacteria and these results indicate the potential for the Antarctic agarase as a catalyst in medicine, food and cosmetic industries.

  6. Mysterious iodine-overabundance in Antarctic meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreibus, G.; Waenke, H.; Schultz, L.

    1986-01-01

    Halogen as well as other trace element concentrations in meteorite finds can be influenced by alteration processes on the Earth's surface. The discovery of Antarctic meteorites offered the opportunity to study meteorites which were kept in one of the most sterile environment of the Earth. Halogen determination in Antartic meteorites was compared with non-Antarctic meteorites. No correlation was found between iodine concentration and the weathering index, or terrestrial age. The halogen measurements indicate a contaminating phase rich in iodine and also containing chlorine. Possible sources for this contamination are discussed.

  7. Antarctic Data Management as Part of the IPY Legacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruin, T.

    2006-12-01

    The Antarctic Treaty states that "scientific observations and results from Antarctica shall be exchanged and made freely available". Antarctica includes the Southern Ocean. In support of this, National Antarctic Data Centres (NADC) are being established to catalogue data sets and to provide information on data sets to scientists and others with interest in Antarctic science. The Joint Committee on Antarctic Data Management (JCADM) was established by the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR) and the Council of Managers of National Antarctic Programs (COMNAP). JCADM comprises representatives of the National Antarctic Data Centres. Currently 30 nations around the world are represented in JCADM. JCADM is responsible for the Antarctic Master Directory (AMD), the internationally accessible, web-based, searchable record of Antarctic and Southern Ocean data set descriptions. The AMD is directly integrated into the international Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) to help further merge Antarctic science into global science. The AMD is a resource for scientists to advertise the data they have collected and to search for data they may need. JCADM is the Antarctic component of the IPY Data Infrastructure, which is presently being developed. This presentation will give an overview of the organization of Antarctic and Southern Ocean data management with sections on the organizational structure of JCADM, contents of the Antarctic Master Directory, relationships to the SCAR Scientific Research Programmes (SRP) and IPY, international embedding and connections with discipline-based peer organizations like the International Oceanographic Data and Information Exchange Committee (IODE). It will focus primarily on the role that an existing infrastructure as JCADM, may play in the development of the IPY Data Infrastructure and will provide considerations for IPY data management, based on the experiences in Antarctic and oceanographic data management.

  8. Taxonomic assessment and enzymes production by yeasts isolated from marine and terrestrial Antarctic samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, A W F; Dayo-Owoyemi, I; Nobre, F S; Pagnocca, F C; Chaud, L C S; Pessoa, A; Felipe, M G A; Sette, L D

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the taxonomic identity of yeasts isolated from the Antarctic continent and to evaluate their ability to produce enzymes (lipase, protease and xylanase) at low and moderate temperatures. A total of 97 yeast strains were recovered from marine and terrestrial samples collected in the Antarctica. The highest amount of yeast strains was obtained from marine sediments, followed by lichens, ornithogenic soils, sea stars, Salpa sp., algae, sea urchin, sea squirt, stone with lichens, Nacella concinna, sea sponge, sea isopod and sea snail. Data from polyphasic taxonomy revealed the presence of 21 yeast species, distributed in the phylum Ascomycota (n = 8) and Basidiomycota (n = 13). Representatives of encapsulated yeasts, belonging to genera Rhodotorula and Cryptococcus were recovered from 7 different Antarctic samples. Moreover, Candida glaebosa, Cryptococcus victoriae, Meyerozyma (Pichia) guilliermondii, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa and R. laryngis were the most abundant yeast species recovered. This is the first report of the occurrence of some species of yeasts recovered from Antarctic marine invertebrates. Additionally, results from enzymes production at low/moderate temperatures revealed that the Antarctic environment contains metabolically diverse cultivable yeasts, which could be considered as a target for biotechnological applications. Among the evaluated yeasts in the present study 46.39, 37.11 and 14.43 % were able to produce lipase (at 15 °C), xylanase (at 15 °C) and protease (at 25 °C), respectively. The majority of lipolytic, proteolytic and xylanolytic strains were distributed in the phylum Basidiomycota and were mainly recovered from sea stars, lichens, sea urchin and marine sediments.

  9. Global dynamics of the Antarctic ice sheet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, J.

    2002-01-01

    The total mass budget of the Antarctic ice sheet is studied with a simple axi-symmetrical model. The ice-sheet has a parabolic profile resting on a bed that slopes linearly downwards from the centre of the ice sheet into the ocean. The mean ice velocity at the grounding line is assumed to be proport

  10. Contrasts between Antarctic and Arctic ozone depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Susan; Portmann, Robert W; Thompson, David W J

    2007-01-09

    This work surveys the depth and character of ozone depletion in the Antarctic and Arctic using available long balloon-borne and ground-based records that cover multiple decades from ground-based sites. Such data reveal changes in the range of ozone values including the extremes observed as polar air passes over the stations. Antarctic ozone observations reveal widespread and massive local depletion in the heart of the ozone "hole" region near 18 km, frequently exceeding 90%. Although some ozone losses are apparent in the Arctic during particular years, the depth of the ozone losses in the Arctic are considerably smaller, and their occurrence is far less frequent. Many Antarctic total integrated column ozone observations in spring since approximately the 1980s show values considerably below those ever observed in earlier decades. For the Arctic, there is evidence of some spring season depletion of total ozone at particular stations, but the changes are much less pronounced compared with the range of past data. Thus, the observations demonstrate that the widespread and deep ozone depletion that characterizes the Antarctic ozone hole is a unique feature on the planet.

  11. Neogene kinematic history of Nazca-Antarctic-Phoenix slab windows beneath Patagonia and the Antarctic Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitsprecher, Katrin; Thorkelson, Derek J.

    2009-01-01

    The Patagonian slab window is a subsurface tectonic feature resulting from subduction of the Nazca-Antarctic spreading-ridge system (Chile Rise) beneath southern South America. The geometry of the slab window had not been rigorously defined, in part because of the complex nature of the history of ridge subduction in the southeast Pacific region, which includes four interrelated spreading-ridge systems since 20 Ma: first, the Nazca-Phoenix ridge beneath South America, then simultaneous subduction of the Nazca-Antarctic and the northern Phoenix-Antarctic spreading-ridge systems beneath South America, and the southern Phoenix-Antarctic spreading-ridge system beneath Antarctica. Spreading-ridge paleo-geographies and rotation poles for all relevant plate pairs (Nazca, Phoenix, Antarctic, South America) are available from 20 Ma onward, and form the mathematical basis of our kinematic reconstruction of the geometry of the Patagonia and Antarctic slab windows through Neogene time. At approximately 18 Ma, the Nazca-Phoenix-Antarctic oceanic (ridge-ridge-ridge) triple junction enters the South American trench; we recognize this condition as an unstable quadruple junction. Heat flow at this junction and for some distance beneath the forearc would be considerably higher than is generally recognized in cases of ridge subduction. From 16 Ma onward, the geometry of the Patagonia slab window developed from the subduction of the trailing arms of the former oceanic triple junction. The majority of the slab window's areal extent and geometry is controlled by the highly oblique (near-parallel) subduction angle of the Nazca-Antarctic ridge system, and by the high contrast in relative convergence rates between these two plates relative to South America. The very slow convergence rate of the Antarctic slab is manifested by the shallow levels achieved by the slab edge (< 45 km); thus no point on the Antarctic slab is sufficiently deep to generate "normal" mantle-derived arc-type magmas

  12. Low temperature reduction of hexavalent chromium by a microbial enrichment consortium and a novel strain of Arthrobacter aurescens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson Vicki S

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromium is a transition metal most commonly found in the environment in its trivalent [Cr(III] and hexavalent [Cr(VI] forms. The EPA maximum total chromium contaminant level for drinking water is 0.1 mg/l (0.1 ppm. Many water sources, especially underground sources, are at low temperatures (less than or equal to 15 Centigrade year round. It is important to evaluate the possibility of microbial remediation of Cr(VI contamination using microorganisms adapted to these low temperatures (psychrophiles. Results Core samples obtained from a Cr(VI contaminated aquifer at the Hanford facility in Washington were enriched in Vogel Bonner medium at 10 Centigrade with 0, 25, 50, 100, 200, 400 and 1000 mg/l Cr(VI. The extent of Cr(VI reduction was evaluated using the diphenyl carbazide assay. Resistance to Cr(VI up to and including 1000 mg/l Cr(VI was observed in the consortium experiments. Reduction was slow or not observed at and above 100 mg/l Cr(VI using the enrichment consortium. Average time to complete reduction of Cr(VI in the 30 and 60 mg/l Cr(VI cultures of the consortium was 8 and 17 days, respectively at 10 Centigrade. Lyophilized consortium cells did not demonstrate adsorption of Cr(VI over a 24 hour period. Successful isolation of a Cr(VI reducing organism (designated P4 from the consortium was confirmed by 16S rDNA amplification and sequencing. Average time to complete reduction of Cr(VI at 10 Centigrade in the 25 and 50 mg/l Cr(VI cultures of the isolate P4 was 3 and 5 days, respectively. The 16S rDNA sequence from isolate P4 identified this organism as a strain of Arthrobacter aurescens, a species that has not previously been shown to be capable of low temperature Cr(VI reduction. Conclusion A. aurescens, indigenous to the subsurface, has the potential to be a predominant metal reducer in enhanced, in situ subsurface bioremediation efforts involving Cr(VI and possibly other heavy metals and radionuclides.

  13. Increased iron-stress resilience of maize through inoculation of siderophore-producing Arthrobacter globiformis from mine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Meenakshi; Mishra, Vandana; Rau, Nupur; Sharma, Radhey Shyam

    2016-07-01

    Iron deficiency is common among graminaceous crops. Ecologically successful wild grasses from iron-limiting habitats are likely to harbour bacteria which secrete efficient high-affinity iron-chelating molecules (siderophores) to solubilize and mobilize iron. Such siderophore-producing rhizobacteria may increase the iron-stress resilience of graminaceous crops. Considering this, 51 rhizobacterial isolates of Dichanthium annulatum from iron-limiting abandoned mine (∼84% biologically unavailable iron) were purified and tested for siderophore production; and efficacy of Arthrobacter globiformis inoculation to increase iron-stress resilience of maize and wheat was also evaluated. 16S rRNA sequence analyses demonstrated that siderophore-producing bacteria were taxonomically diverse (seven genera, nineteen species). Among these, Gram-positive Bacillus (eleven species) was prevalent (76.92%). A. globiformis, a commonly found rhizobacterium of graminaceous crops was investigated in detail. Its siderophore has high iron-chelation capacity (ICC: 13.0 ± 2.4 μM) and effectively dissolutes diverse iron-complexes (FeCl3 : 256.13 ± 26.56 μM/ml; Fe2 O3 red: 84.3 ± 4.74 μM/ml; mine spoil: 123.84 ± 4.38 μM/ml). Siderophore production (ICC) of A. globiformis BGDa404 also varied with supplementation of different iron complexes. In plant bioassay with iron-deficiency sensitive species maize, A. globiformis inoculation triggered stress-associated traits (peroxidase and proline) in roots, enhanced plant biomass, uptake of iron and phosphate, and protein and chlorophyll contents. However, in iron deficiency tolerant species wheat, growth improvement was marginal. The present study illustrates: (i) rhizosphere of D. annulatum colonizing abandoned mine as a "hotspot" of siderophore-producing bacteria; and (ii) potential of A. globiformis BGDa404 inoculation to increase iron-stress resilience in maize. A. globiformis BGDa404 has the potential to develop as

  14. PLASMID-ENCODED PHTHALATE CATABOLIC PATHWAY IN ARTHROBACTER KEYSERI 12B: BIOTRANSFORMATIONS OF 2-SUBSTITUTED BENZOATES AND THEIR USE IN CLONING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF PHTHALATE CATABOLISM GENES AND GENE PRODUCTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Several 2-substituted benzoates (including 2-trifluoromethyl-, 2-chloro-, 2-bromo-, 2-iodo-, 2-nitro-, 2-methoxy-, and 2-acetyl-benzoates) were converted by phthalate-grown Arthrobacter keyseri 12B to the corresponding 2-substituted 3,4-dihydroxybenzoates (protocatechuates)...

  15. Characterization of 15 selected coccal bacteria isolated from Antarctic rock and soil samples from the McMurdo-Dry Valleys (South-Victoria Land)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebert, J.; Hirsch, P.; Friedmann, E. I. (Principal Investigator)

    1988-01-01

    Approximately 1500 cultures of microorganisms were isolated from rocks and soils of the Ross Desert (McMurdo-Dry Valleys). From these, 15 coccoid strains were chosen for more detailed investigation. They were characterized by morphological, physiological and chemotaxonomical properties. All isolates were Gram-positive, catalase-positive and nonmotile. Six strains showed red pigmentation and could be identified as members of the genera Micrococcus (M. roseus, M. agilis) or Deinococcus. In spite of their coccoid morphology, the remaining nine strains had to be associated with coryneform bacteria (Arthrobacter, Brevibacterium), because of their cell wall composition and G+C ratios. Most of the strains were psychrotrophic, but one strain was even obligately psychrophilic, with a temperature maximum below 20 degrees C. Red cocci had in vitro pH optima above 9.0 although they generally originated from acid samples. Most isolates showed a preference for sugar alcohols and organic acids, compounds which are commonly known to be released by lichens, molds and algae, the other components of the cryptoendolithic ecosystem. These properties indicate that our strains are autochthonous members of the natural Antarctic microbial population.

  16. Screening, Molecular Identification and Adaptability Exploration of Antarctic Microbial Flocculant-Producing Bacteria%南极微生物絮凝剂产生菌的筛选、分子鉴定及适应性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜宁

    2012-01-01

    Seven microbial flocculant-producing bacteria were separated from antarctic seawater,sea ice and marine sediment. The molecular identification of these bacteria was by the way of 16S rRNA gene sequence amplification. Phylogenetic analysis showed that they belonged to Acinetobacter,Arthrobacter,Psychrobacter,Ser-ratia,Pseudomonas and Pseudoalteromonas, respectively. Different carbon sources and nitrogen sources were used to culture the bacteria in order to observe the change of flocculation activity. The bacteria, 1-2 and P2-13-1, were of universal adaptability to different carbon sources and nitrogen sources and had higher flocculation activity in economic culture medium.%从南极海水、海冰、底泥中分离得到7株产絮凝剂的菌株,通过16S rRNA基因序列扩增方法进行分子鉴定,分别隶属于不动杆菌属(Acinetobacter)、节杆菌属(Arthrobacter)、嗜冷杆菌属(Psychrobacter)、沙雷菌属(Serratia)、假单胞菌属(Pseudomonas)和假交替单胞菌属(Pseudoa lteromonas).改变培养基中碳源和氮源的组成并观察絮凝率的变化,筛选出在经济培养基条件下具有较高絮凝活性、同时对碳源和氮源具有普适性的菌株I-2和P2-13-1.

  17. The Effects of Heterologous Expression of groEL from Arthrobacter simplex on the Resistance Performance of Escherichia coli%简单节杆菌groEL基因表达对大肠杆菌抗逆性能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王艳霞; 王红玲; 王敏; 骆健美

    2016-01-01

    Arthrobacter simplex,a strain with steroid C1,2 dehydrogenation ability,has been widely used in the steroid industry, usually adding ethanol in the transforming system may catalyze the dissolution of hydrophobic substrates. Our prior work by LC-MS/MS and bioinformatics analysis found that heat shock protein(HSP)GroEL was closely correlated to the cell adaptive behavior under ethanol stress condition. Based on this concept,groEL gene was cloned by PCR while usingA. simplexTCCC 11037 genome as a template. The results showed that the homologies of nucleotide and amino acid sequence of GroEL in the strain were the highest with that fromNocardioides sp. JS614 by the ratio of 89% and 95%,respectively. Then its heterologous expression was conducted in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3)with the vector pET-22b (+),and the results showed that the recombinant strain presented the significant increase on the survival performance under the shock condition with high-concentration of methanol,hypertonicity and superacid,as well as the growth performance under the proper stresses of them. The study was the first report on the cloning and expression of genegroEL fromA. simplex,and also provided fundamental data for exploring the biological function of HSP protein GroEL from A. simplex.%以简单节杆菌(Arthrobacter simplex)TCCC 11037基因组为模板,通过PCR方法进行groEL基因克隆,结果表明,该菌株中GroEL的核苷酸和氨基酸序列与Nocardioidessp. JS614来源的GroEL同源性最高,分别为89%和95%。通过pET-22b(+)将其在大肠杆菌BL21(DE3)中进行异源表达,结果表明,重组菌株在甲醇、高渗和强酸这3种压力高浓度冲击条件下的存活能力和适当压力条件下的生长性能均明显提高。

  18. Bacterial diversity of autotrophic enriched cultures from remote, glacial Antarctic, Alpine and Andean aerosol, snow and soil samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. González-Toril

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Four different communities and one culture of autotrophic microbial assemblages were obtained by incubation of samples collected from high elevation snow in the Alps (Mt. Blanc area and the Andes (Nevado Illimani summit, Bolivia, from Antarctic aerosol (French station Dumont d'Urville and a maritime Antarctic soil (King George Island, South Shetlands, Uruguay Station Artigas, in a minimal mineral (oligotrophic media. Molecular analysis of more than 200 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that all cultured cells belong to the Bacteria domain. Phylogenetic comparison with the currently available rDNA database allowed sequences belonging to Proteobacteria Alpha-, Beta- and Gamma-proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes phyla to be identified. The Andes snow culture was the richest in bacterial diversity (eight microorganisms identified and the marine Antarctic soil the poorest (only one. Snow samples from Col du Midi (Alps and the Andes shared the highest number of identified microorganisms (Agrobacterium, Limnobacter, Aquiflexus and two uncultured Alphaproteobacteria clones. These two sampling sites also shared four sequences with the Antarctic aerosol sample (Limnobacter, Pseudonocardia and an uncultured Alphaproteobacteriaclone. The only microorganism identified in the Antarctica soil (Brevundimonas sp. was also detected in the Antarctic aerosol. Most of the identified microorganisms had been detected previously in cold environments, marine sediments soils and rocks. Air current dispersal is the best model to explain the presence of very specific microorganisms, like those identified in this work, in environments very distant and very different from each other.

  19. Encouraging Advances Made by Chinese Scientists in Antarctic Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Qingsong

    2003-01-01

    @@ Chinese scientists began involving in the Antarctic research in 1980. As the first step, some 40 Chinese scientists were sent to Antarctic stations of Australia and other countries during the period from 1980 to 1984. Then,China established two Antarctic stations of its own, and purchased an icebreaker, enabling China to carry on its own independent research program both on land and at sea.

  20. Antarctic microfungi as models for exobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onofri, S.; Selbmann, L.; Zucconi, L.; Pagano, S.

    2004-01-01

    Microfungi living in different Antarctic environments are generally well adapted to high stress conditions such as low temperatures, wide thermal fluctuations, high UV irradiance, and low water and nutrients availability; for this reason they could be investigated in order to explore limits of microbial life. Microfungi living in simple cryptoendolithic microbial communities inside the porosity of rocks in the Antarctic Dry Valleys, the closest terrestrial analogue of Mars, are particularly suitable for exobiological studies. Until now studies on exobiology focused mainly on prokaryotes; since cryptoendolithic black meristematic fungi are able to tolerate hard desiccation, high UV exposure, extremely low temperatures and wide thermal fluctuations, they are proposed as the best eukaryotic models for the biological exploration of Mars. Indeed, their adaptive strategies could be crucial as predictive tools in investigating the limits of life.

  1. A simulated Antarctic fast ice ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrigo, Kevin R.; Kremer, James N.; Sullivan, Cornelius W.

    1993-01-01

    A 2D numerical ecosystem model of Antarctic land fast ice is developed to elucidate the primary production with the Antarctic sea ice zone. The physical component employs atmospheric data to simulate congelation ice growth, initial brine entrapment, desalination, and nutrient flux. The biological component is based on the concept of a maximum temperature-dependent algal growth rate which is reduced by limitations imposed from insufficient light or nutrients, as well as suboptimal salinity. Preliminary simulations indicate that, during a bloom, microalgae are able to maintain their vertical position relative to the lower congelation ice margin and are not incorporated into the crystal matrix as the ice sheet thickens. It is inferred that land fast sea ice contains numerous microhabitats that are functionally distinct based upon the unique set of processes that control microalgal growth and accumulation within each.

  2. Total Mercury in Six Antarctic Notothenioid Fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintle, Nathan J P; Sleadd, Isaac M; Gundersen, Deke T; Kohl, Kristina; Buckley, Bradley A

    2015-11-01

    We analyzed white muscle samples from six species of Antarctic fish (suborder Notothenioidei) collected in 2011 from McMurdo Sound, Ross Sea, Antarctica, to assess levels of total mercury (THg). Gymnodraco acuticeps and Trematomus bernacchii exhibited the highest concentrations of THg followed by Trematomus pennellii, Trematomus nicolai, Trematomus newnesi and Pagothenia borchgrevinki, (71.3, 53.9±32.1, 45.8±27.3, 37.2±18.6, 35.7±23.6, and 21.9±2.8 ng/g wet weight, respectively). The results from this study suggest that THg has the potential to bioaccumulate from various marine Antarctic ecosystems into biota.

  3. Antarctic Meteorite Classification and Petrographic Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Nancy S.; Satterwhite, C. E.; Righter, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    The Antarctic Meteorite collection, which is comprised of over 18,700 meteorites, is one of the largest collections of meteorites in the world. These meteorites have been collected since the late 1970's as part of a three-agency agreement between NASA, the National Science Foundation, and the Smithsonian Institution [1]. Samples collected each season are analyzed at NASA s Meteorite Lab and the Smithsonian Institution and results are published twice a year in the Antarctic Meteorite Newsletter, which has been in publication since 1978. Each newsletter lists the samples collected and processed and provides more in-depth details on selected samples of importance to the scientific community. Data about these meteorites is also published on the NASA Curation website [2] and made available through the Meteorite Classification Database allowing scientists to search by a variety of parameters

  4. Optical Turbulence above the Internal Antarctic Plateau

    CERN Document Server

    Masciadri, E; Hagelin, S; Moigne, P Le; Noilhan, J

    2010-01-01

    The internal antarctic plateau revealed in the last years to be a site with interesting potentialities for the astronomical applications due to the extreme dryness and low temperatures, the typical high altitude of the plateau, the weak level of turbulence in the free atmosphere down to a just few tens of meters from the ground and the thin optical turbulence layer developed at the ground. The main goal of a site testing assessment above the internal antarctic plateau is to characterize the site (optical turbulence and classical meteorological parameters) and to quantify which is the gain we might obtain with respect to equivalent astronomical observations done above mid-latitude sites to support plans for future astronomical facilities. Our group is involved, since a few years, in studies related to the assessment of this site for astronomical applications that include the characterization of the meteorological parameters and optical turbulence provided by general circulation models as well as mesoscale atmo...

  5. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of fatty acid profiles of Antarctic and non-Antarctic yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuiyan, Mohammad; Tucker, David; Watson, Kenneth

    2014-08-01

    The fatty acid profiles of Antarctic (n = 7) and non-Antarctic yeasts (n = 7) grown at different temperatures were analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The Antarctic yeasts were enriched in oleic 18:1 (20-60 %), linoleic 18:2 (20-50 %) and linolenic 18:3 (5-40 %) acids with lesser amounts of palmitic 16:0 (Antarctic yeasts (n = 4) were enriched in 18:1 (20-55 %, with R. mucilaginosa at 75-80 %) and 18:2 (10-40 %) with lesser amounts of 16:0 (Antarctic yeasts (enriched in 18:1 and 18:2) and the third to the Antarctic yeasts (enriched in 18:2 and 18:3).

  6. Magnetic anisotropy and porosity of Antarctic chondrites

    OpenAIRE

    Hamano,Yozo/Yomogida,Kiyoshi

    1982-01-01

    Magnetic susceptibility anisotropy and porosity were measured in eleven Antarctic meteorites. These meteorites are ordinary chondrites (H and L type) in various metamorphic stages. Large magnetic anisotropy has been observed in most of the chondrites. The foliation type of the anisotropy, inferred from the shape of the susceptibility ellipsoid indicates that a uniaxial compressional type deformation is responsible for the anisotropy. The degree of the anisotropy and the porosity do not correl...

  7. An Antarctic hot spot for fungi at Shackleton's historic hut on Cape Royds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchette, Robert A; Held, Benjamin W; Arenz, Brett E; Jurgens, Joel A; Baltes, Nicolas J; Duncan, Shona M; Farrell, Roberta L

    2010-07-01

    The historic expedition huts located in the Ross Sea Region of the Antarctic and the thousands of artifacts left behind by the early explorers represent important cultural heritage from the "Heroic Era" of Polar exploration. The hut at Cape Royds built by Ernest Shackleton and members of the 1907-1908 British Antarctic Expedition has survived the extreme Antarctic environment for over 100 years, but recent studies have shown many forms of deterioration are causing serious problems, and microbial degradation is evident in the historic wood. Conservation work to reduce moisture at the hut required removal of fodder, wood, and many different types of organic materials from the stables area on the north side of the structure allowing large numbers of samples to be obtained for these investigations. In addition, wood from historic food storage boxes exposed in a ravine adjacent to the hut were also sampled. Fungi were cultured on several different media, and pure cultures were obtained and identified by sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer region of rDNA. From the 69 cultures of filamentous fungi obtained, the most predominant genera were Cadophora (44%) followed by Thielavia (17%) and Geomyces (15%). Other fungi found included Cladosporium, Chaetomium, and isolates identified as being in Pezizomycotina, Onygenales, Nectriaceae, and others. No filamentous basidiomycetes were found. Phylogenetic analyses of the Cadophora species showed great species diversity present revealing Cadophora malorum, Cadophora luteo-olivacea, Cadophora fastigiata, as well as Cadophora sp. 4E71-1, a C. malorum-like species, and Cadophora sp. 7R16-1, a C. fastigiata-like species. Scanning electron microscopy showed extensive decay was present in the wood samples with type 1 and type 2 forms of soft rot evident in pine and birch wood, respectively. Fungi causing decay in the historic wooden structures and artifacts are of great concern, and this investigation provides insight into the

  8. A paleomagnetic study of the Antarctic Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poblete, F.; Arriagada, C.; Roperch, P.

    2009-05-01

    In the Paleozoic, South America, South Africa and Antarctica were part of Gondwana. The Weddell Sea began to form at about 146 Ma, after rifting between the Antarctic Peninsula and southernmost South America. Much uncertainty still exists about the geometrical fit and subsequent drift history between Patagonia and Antarctica. Geophysical and geological data which describe the tectonic history are sparsely distributed and often of poor quality. During the last two years we have collected more than 1000 paleomagnetic samples from 70 sites at several localities (King George Island, Robert Island, Yankee Bay, Half Moon Island, Byers Peninsula and Snow Island) from the South Shetland Islands and Anderson Island in the northern tip of Antarctic Peninsula. Our main objective was to provide first-order constraints on latitudinal displacements and the amount of tectonic rotations as an essential test of published tectonic models. Paleomagnetic results were obtained from 50 sites. All samples from sites in volcanic and intrusive rocks have well-defined univectorial magnetizations. Unfortunately, all sites in late Paleozoic sediments have been remagnetized and the magnetizations are often unstable upon thermal demagnetization. Cretaceous and Cenozoic units display very little apparent polar wander. Results from intrusive rocks of expected Jurassic age do not confirm the expected relative rotation betwen the Antarctic Peninsula and East Antarctica. Further radiometric dating are needed to confirm the age of these units.

  9. Antarctic Treaty Summit: Washington, DC (2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkman, P. A.; Young, O. R.

    2005-12-01

    Advancement in Earth system science and international cooperation have been intertwined with the International Polar Years since 1882. In particular, the 3rd International Polar Year (which was convened as the International Geophysical Year from 1 July 1957 through 31 December 1958) specifically demonstrates the role of science in international policy: Acknowledging the substantial contributions to scientific knowledge resulting from international cooperation in scientific investigation in Antarctica; Convinced that the establishment of a firm foundation for the continuation and development of such cooperation on the basis of freedom of scientific investigation in Antarctica as applied during the International Geophysical Year accords with the interests of science and the progress of all mankind; Preamble, 1959 Antarctic Treaty To commemorate the 50th anniversary of the 1959 Antarctic Treaty and to explore the complexities of the science-policy relationship through the lens of a well-constrained case study, an international and interdisciplinary Antarctic Treaty Summit is being planned for 2009 in Washington, DC in conjunction with the International Polar Year 2007-08 (http://www.ipy.org).

  10. Antarctic Meteorite Classification and Petrographic Database Enhancements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, N. S.; Satterwhite, C. E.; Righter, K.

    2012-01-01

    The Antarctic Meteorite collection, which is comprised of over 18,700 meteorites, is one of the largest collections of meteorites in the world. These meteorites have been collected since the late 1970 s as part of a three-agency agreement between NASA, the National Science Foundation, and the Smithsonian Institution [1]. Samples collected each season are analyzed at NASA s Meteorite Lab and the Smithsonian Institution and results are published twice a year in the Antarctic Meteorite Newsletter, which has been in publication since 1978. Each newsletter lists the samples collected and processed and provides more in-depth details on selected samples of importance to the scientific community. Data about these meteorites is also published on the NASA Curation website [2] and made available through the Meteorite Classification Database allowing scientists to search by a variety of parameters. This paper describes enhancements that have been made to the database and to the data and photo acquisition process to provide the meteorite community with faster access to meteorite data concurrent with the publication of the Antarctic Meteorite Newsletter twice a year.

  11. Antarctic isolation: immune and viral studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tingate, T. R.; Lugg, D. J.; Muller, H. K.; Stowe, R. P.; Pierson, D. L.

    1997-01-01

    Stressful environmental conditions are a major determinant of immune reactivity. This effect is pronounced in Australian National Antarctic Research Expedition populations exposed to prolonged periods of isolation in the Antarctic. Alterations of T cell function, including depression of cutaneous delayed-type hypersensitivity responses and a peak 48.9% reduction of T cell proliferation to the mitogen phytohaemagglutinin, were documented during a 9-month period of isolation. T cell dysfunction was mediated by changes within the peripheral blood mononuclear cell compartment, including a paradoxical atypical monocytosis associated with altered production of inflammatory cytokines. There was a striking reduction in the production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells of the predominant pro-inflammatory monokine TNF-alpha and changes were also detected in the production of IL-1, IL-2, IL-6, IL-1ra and IL-10. Prolonged Antarctic isolation is also associated with altered latent herpesvirus homeostasis, including increased herpesvirus shedding and expansion of the polyclonal latent Epstein-Barr virus-infected B cell population. These findings have important long-term health implications.

  12. Mirror seeing of the Antarctic survey telescope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Kaiyuan; LI Zhengyang; YUAN Xiangyan; PEI Chong

    2014-01-01

    Site testing results indicate that Antarctic Dome A is an excellent ground-based astronomical site suitable for observations ranging from visible to infrared wavelengths. However, the harsh environment in Antarctica, especially the very low temperature and atmospheric pressure, always produces frost on the telescopes’ mirrors, which are exposed to the air. Since the Dome A site is still unattended, the Antarctic telescope tubes are always designed to be filled with dry nitrogen, and the outer surfaces of the optical system are heated by an indium-tin oxide thin film. These precautions can prevent the optical surfaces from frosting over, but they degrade the image quality by introducing additional mirror seeing. Based on testing observations of the second Antarctic Survey Telescope (AST3-2) in the Mohe site in China, mirror seeing resulting from the heated aspheric plate has been measured using micro-thermal sensors. Results comparing the real-time atmospheric seeing monitored by the Differential Image Motion Monitor and real-time examinations of image quality agree well.

  13. Update on terrestrial ages of Antarctic meteorites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welten, K C; Nishiizumi, K; Caffee, M W

    2000-01-14

    Terrestrial ages of Antarctic meteorites are one of the few parameters that will help us to understand the meteorite concentration mechanism on blue-ice fields. Traditionally, terrestrial ages were determined on the basis of {sup 36}Cl in the metal phase, which has an uncertainty of about 70 ky. For young meteorites (< 40 ky), the terrestrial age is usually and most accurately determined using {sup 14}C in the stone phase. In recent years two methods have been developed which are independent of shielding effects, the {sup 10}Be-{sup 36}Cl/{sup 10}Be method and the {sup 41}Ca/{sup 36}Cl method. These methods have reduced the typical uncertainties in terrestrial ages by a factor of 2, to about 30 ky. The {sup 10}Be-{sup 36}Cl/{sup 10}Be method is quite dependent on the exposure age, which is unknown for most Antarctic meteorites. The authors therefore also attempt to use the relation between {sup 26}Al and {sup 36}Cl/{sup 26}Al to derive a terrestrial age less dependent on the exposure age. The authors have measured the concentrations of cosmogenic {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al and {sup 36}Cl in the metal phase of {approximately} 70 Antarctic meteorites, from more than 10 different ice-fields, including many new ones. They then discuss the trends in terrestrial ages of meteorites from different ice-fields.

  14. The ARM West Antarctic Radiation Experiment (AWARE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubin, Dan; Bromwich, David; Vogelmann, Andrew; Verlinde, Johannes; Russell, Lynn

    2016-04-01

    West Antarctica is one of the most rapidly warming regions on Earth, and its changing climate in both atmosphere and ocean is linked to loss of Antarctic ice mass and global sea level rise. The specific mechanisms for West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) warming are not fully understood, but are hypothesized to involve linkage between moisture from Southern Ocean storm tracks and the surface energy balance over the WAIS, and related teleconnections with subtropical and tropical meteorology. This present lack of understanding has motivated a climate science and cloud physics campaign jointly supported by the US National Science Foundation (NSF) and Department of Energy (DOE), called the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) West Antarctic Radiation Experiment (AWARE). The DOE's second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) was deployed to McMurdo Station on Ross Island in November 2015 and will operate through December 2016. The AMF2 includes (1) cloud research radars, both scanning and zenith, operating in the Ka- and X-bands, (2) high spectral resolution and polarized micropulse lidars, and (3) a suite of shortwave and longwave broadband and spectral radiometers. A second suite of instruments is deployed at the WAIS Divide Ice Camp on the West Antarctic plateau during December 2015 and January 2016. The WAIS instrument suite provides (1) measurement of all surface energy balance components, (2) a polarized micropulse lidar and shortwave spectroradiometer, (3) microwave total water column measurement, and (4) four times daily rawinsonde launches which are the first from West Antarctica since 1967. There is a direct linkage between the WAIS instrument suite and the AMF2 at McMurdo, in that air masses originating in Southern Ocean storm tracks that are driven up over the WAIS often subsequently descend over the Ross Ice Shelf and arrive at Ross Island. Preliminary data are already illustrating the prevalence of mixed-phase clouds and their role in the surface energy balance

  15. Geoethical Approach to Antarctic Subglacial Lakes Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talalay, Pavel; Markov, Alexey; Sysoev, Mikhail

    2014-05-01

    Antarctic subglacial aquatic environment have become of great interest to the science community because they may provide unique information about microbial evolution, the past climate of the Earth, and the formation of the Antarctic ice sheet. Nowadays it is generally recognized that a vast network of lakes, rivers, and streams exists thousands of meters beneath Antarctic Ice Sheets. Up to date only four boreholes accessed subglacial aquatic system but three of them were filled with high-toxic drilling fluid, and the subglacial water was contaminated. Two recent exploration programs proposed by UK and USA science communities anticipated direct access down to the lakes Ellsworth and Whillans, respectively, in the 2012/2013 Antarctic season. A team of British scientists and engineers engaged in the first attempt to drill into Lake Ellsworth but failed. US research team has successfully drilled through 800 m of Antarctic ice to reach a subglacial lake Whillans and retrieve water and sediment samples. Both activities used hot-water drilling technology to access lakes. Hot water is considered by the world science community as the most clean drilling fluid medium from the present point of view but it cannot solve environmental problems in total because hot-water even when heated to 90 °C, filtered to 0.2 μm, and UV treated at the surface could pick up microorganisms from near-surface snow and circulate them in great volume through the borehole. Another negative impact of hot-water circulation medium is thermal pollution of subglacial water. The new approach to Antarctic subglacial lakes exploration is presented by sampling technology with recoverable autonomous sonde which is equipped by two hot-points with heating elements located on the bottom and top sides of the sonde. All down-hole sonde components will be sterilized by combination of chemical wash, HPV and UV sterilization prior using. At the beginning of the summer season sonde is installed on the surface of the

  16. Reaching for the Horizon: Enabling 21st Century Antarctic Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogan-Finnemore, M.; Kennicutt, M. C., II; Kim, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The Council of Managers of National Antarctic Programs' (COMNAP) Antarctic Roadmap Challenges(ARC) project translated the 80 highest priority Antarctic and Southern Ocean scientific questionsidentified by the community via the SCAR Antarctic Science Horizon Scan into the highest prioritytechnological, access, infrastructure and logistics needs to enable the necessary research to answer thequestions. A workshop assembled expert and experienced Antarctic scientists and National AntarcticProgram operators from around the globe to discern the highest priority technological needs includingthe current status of development and availability, where the technologies will be utilized in the Antarctic area, at what temporal scales and frequencies the technologies will be employed,and how broadly applicable the technologies are for answering the highest priority scientific questions.Secondly the logistics, access, and infrastructure requirements were defined that are necessary todeliver the science in terms of feasibility including cost and benefit as determined by expected scientific return on investment. Finally, based on consideration of the science objectives and the mix oftechnologies implications for configuring National Antarctic Program logistics capabilities andinfrastructure architecture over the next 20 years were determined. In particular those elements thatwere either of a complexity, requiring long term investments to achieve and/or having an associated cost that realistically can only (or best) be achieved by international coordination, planning and partnerships were identified. Major trends (changes) in logistics, access, and infrastructure requirements were identified that allow for long-term strategic alignment of international capabilities, resources and capacity. The outcomes of this project will be reported.

  17. Antarctic bacteria inhibit growth of foodborne microorganisms at low temperatures.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C. O'Brien; R. Sharp; N.J. Russell; S. Roller

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify Antarctic microorganisms with the ability to produce cold-active antimicrobial compounds with potential for use in chilled food preservation. Colonies (4496) were isolated from 12 Antarctic soil samples and tested against Listeria innocua, Pseudomonas fragi and

  18. The distribution of Fe in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Löscher, B.M.; Baar, H.J.W. de; Jong, J.T.M. de; Veth, C.; Dehairs, F.

    1997-01-01

    The large-scale distributions of dissolved and total Fe in surface and deep waters of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current exhibit strong relationships with hydrography and biological processes. The mean dissolved Fe concentrations are low in surface waters of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (0.31–0.

  19. Biological studies in the Antarctic waters: A review

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Dhargalkar, V.K.

    stream_size 12 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Proc_Workshop_Antarct_Stud_1990_407.pdf.txt stream_source_info Proc_Workshop_Antarct_Stud_1990_407.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset...

  20. Ice core reconstruction of Antarctic climate change and implications

    OpenAIRE

    Mayewski,Paul Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Antarctica is the Earth’s largest environmental library for ice cores. Examples of the scientific fin-dings of the 21-nation consortium called the International Trans Antarctic Scientific Expedition (ITASE) under the auspices of the Scientific Committee for Antarctic Research (SCAR) are presented with special emphasis on the value of these records in reconstructing atmospheric circulation over Antarctica and the Southern Ocean.

  1. Challenges to the Future - Conservation of the Antarctic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chown, S.L.; Lee, J.E.; Hughes, K.A.; Barnes, J.; Bergstrom, D.M.; Convey, P.; Cowan, D.A.; Crosbie, K.; Dyer, G.; Frenot, Y.; Grant, S.M.; Herr, D.; Kennicutt, M.C.; Lamers, M.A.J.; Murray, A.; Possingham, H.P.; Reid, K.; Riddle, M.J.; Ryan, P.G.; Sanson, L.; Shaw, J.D.; Sparrow, M.D.; Summerhayes, C.; Terauds, A.; Wall, D.H.

    2012-01-01

    The Antarctic Treaty System, acknowledged as a successful model of cooperative regulation of one of the globe's largest commons (1), is under substantial pressure. Concerns have been raised about increased stress on Antarctic systems from global environmental change and growing interest in the regio

  2. 77 FR 31044 - Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-24

    ... No: 2012-12616] NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of permits issued under the Antarctic Conservation of 1978, Public Law 95-541. SUMMARY: The National Science Foundation (NSF) is required to publish...

  3. Transcriptome of the Antarctic brooding gastropod mollusc Margarella antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Melody S; Thorne, Michael A S

    2015-12-01

    454 RNA-Seq transcriptome data were generated from foot tissue of the Antarctic brooding gastropod mollusc Margarella antarctica. A total of 6195 contigs were assembled de novo, providing a useful resource for researchers with an interest in Antarctic marine species, phylogenetics and mollusc biology, especially shell production.

  4. Emerging spatial patterns in Antarctic prokaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Wie eChong

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in knowledge of patterns of biogeography in terrestrial eukaryotic organisms have led to a fundamental paradigm shift in understanding of the controls and history of life on land in Antarctica, and its interactions over the long term with the glaciological and geological processes that have shaped the continent. However, while it has long been recognized that the terrestrial ecosystems of Antarctica are dominated by microbes and their processes, knowledge of microbial diversity and distributions has lagged far behind that of the macroscopic eukaryote organisms. Increasing human contact with and activity in the continent is leading to risks of biological contamination and change in a region whose isolation has protected it for millions of years at least; these risks may be particularly acute for microbial communities which have, as yet, received scant recognition and attention. Even a matter apparently as straightforward as Protected Area designation in Antarctica requires robust biodiversity data which, in most parts of the continent, remain almost completely unavailable. A range of important contributing factors mean that it is now timely to reconsider the state of knowledge of Antarctic terrestrial prokaryotes. Rapid advances in molecular biological approaches are increasingly demonstrating that bacterial diversity in Antarctica may be far greater than previously thought, and that there is overlap in the environmental controls affecting both Antarctic prokaryotic and eukaryotic communities. Bacterial dispersal mechanisms and colonization patterns remain largely unaddressed, although evidence for regional evolutionary differentiation is rapidly accruing and, with this, there is increasing appreciation of patterns in regional bacterial biogeography in this large part of the globe. In this review, we set out to describe the state of knowledge of Antarctic prokaryote diversity patterns, drawing analogy with those of eukaryote

  5. Ocean processes at the Antarctic continental slope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heywood, Karen J; Schmidtko, Sunke; Heuzé, Céline; Kaiser, Jan; Jickells, Timothy D; Queste, Bastien Y; Stevens, David P; Wadley, Martin; Thompson, Andrew F; Fielding, Sophie; Guihen, Damien; Creed, Elizabeth; Ridley, Jeff K; Smith, Walker

    2014-07-13

    The Antarctic continental shelves and slopes occupy relatively small areas, but, nevertheless, are important for global climate, biogeochemical cycling and ecosystem functioning. Processes of water mass transformation through sea ice formation/melting and ocean-atmosphere interaction are key to the formation of deep and bottom waters as well as determining the heat flux beneath ice shelves. Climate models, however, struggle to capture these physical processes and are unable to reproduce water mass properties of the region. Dynamics at the continental slope are key for correctly modelling climate, yet their small spatial scale presents challenges both for ocean modelling and for observational studies. Cross-slope exchange processes are also vital for the flux of nutrients such as iron from the continental shelf into the mixed layer of the Southern Ocean. An iron-cycling model embedded in an eddy-permitting ocean model reveals the importance of sedimentary iron in fertilizing parts of the Southern Ocean. Ocean gliders play a key role in improving our ability to observe and understand these small-scale processes at the continental shelf break. The Gliders: Excellent New Tools for Observing the Ocean (GENTOO) project deployed three Seagliders for up to two months in early 2012 to sample the water to the east of the Antarctic Peninsula in unprecedented temporal and spatial detail. The glider data resolve small-scale exchange processes across the shelf-break front (the Antarctic Slope Front) and the front's biogeochemical signature. GENTOO demonstrated the capability of ocean gliders to play a key role in a future multi-disciplinary Southern Ocean observing system.

  6. Terrestrial and exposure histories of Antarctic meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiizumi, K.

    1986-01-01

    Records of cosmogenic effects were studied in a large suite of Antarctic meteorites. The cosmogenic nuclide measurements together with cosmic ray track measurements on Antartic meteorites provide information such as exposure age, terrestrial age, size and depth in meteoroid or parent body, influx rate in the past, and pairing. The terrestrail age is the time period between the fall of the meteorite on the Earth and the present. To define terrestrial age, two or more nuclides with different half-lives and possibly noble gases are required. The cosmogenic radionuclides used are C-14, Kr-81, Cl-36, Al-26, Be-10, Mn-53, and K-40.

  7. Ultraviolet radiation levels during the Antarctic spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, John E.; Snell, Hilary E.

    1988-01-01

    The decrease in atmospheric ozone over Antarctica during spring implies enhanced levels of ultraviolet (UV) radiation received at the earth's surface. Model calculations show that UV irradiances encountered during the occurrence of an Antarctic 'ozone hole' remain less than those typical of a summer solstice at low to middle latitudes. However, the low ozone amounts observed in October 1987 imply biologically effective irradiances for McMurdo Station, Antarctica, that are comparable to or greater than those for the same location at December solstice. Life indigenous to Antarctica thereby experiences a greatly extended period of summerlike UV radiation levels.

  8. Automatic focusing system of BSST in Antarctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Peng-Yi; Liu, Jia-Jing; Zhang, Guang-yu; Wang, Jian

    2015-10-01

    Automatic focusing (AF) technology plays an important role in modern astronomical telescopes. Based on the focusing requirement of BSST (Bright Star Survey Telescope) in Antarctic, an AF system is set up. In this design, functions in OpenCV is used to find stars, the algorithm of area, HFD or FWHM are used to degree the focus metric by choosing. Curve fitting method is used to find focus position as the method of camera moving. All these design are suitable for unattended small telescope.

  9. The Antarctic Ozone Hole: An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, Anne R.; Newman, Paul A.; Solomon, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The stratospheric ozone hole, an annual occurrence during austral spring, is caused by heterogeneous conversion of hydrogen chloride and chlorine nitrate to chlorine radicals. These reactions take place of polar stratospheric cloud particles in the cold, isolate Antarctic winter vortex. The chlorine radicals participate in chemical reactions that rapidly deplete ozone when sunlight returns at the end of polar night. International agreements eliminated production of the culprit anthropogenic chlorofluorocarbons in the late 1990s, but due to their long stratospheric lifetime (50-100 years), the ozone hole will continue its annual appearance for years to come.

  10. Sp(2) Renormalization

    CERN Document Server

    Lavrov, Peter M

    2010-01-01

    The renormalization of general gauge theories on flat and curved space-time backgrounds is considered within the Sp(2)-covariant quantization method. We assume the existence of a gauge-invariant and diffeomorphism invariant regularization. Using the Sp(2)-covariant formalism one can show that the theory possesses gauge invariant and diffeomorphism invariant renormalizability to all orders in the loop expansion and the extended BRST symmetry after renormalization is preserved. The advantage of the Sp(2)-method compared to the standard Batalin-Vilkovisky approach is that, in reducible theories, the structure of ghosts and ghosts for ghosts and auxiliary fields is described in terms of irreducible representations of the Sp(2) group. This makes the presentation of solutions to the master equations in more simple and systematic way because they are Sp(2)- scalars.

  11. Sp(2) renormalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavrov, Peter M., E-mail: lavrov@tspu.edu.r [Department of Mathematical Analysis, Tomsk State Pedagogical University, Kievskaya St. 60, Tomsk 634061 (Russian Federation)

    2011-08-11

    The renormalization of general gauge theories on flat and curved space-time backgrounds is considered within the Sp(2)-covariant quantization method. We assume the existence of a gauge-invariant and diffeomorphism invariant regularization. Using the Sp(2)-covariant formalism one can show that the theory possesses gauge-invariant and diffeomorphism invariant renormalizability to all orders in the loop expansion and the extended BRST-symmetry after renormalization is preserved. The advantage of the Sp(2) method compared to the standard Batalin-Vilkovisky approach is that, in reducible theories, the structure of ghosts and ghosts for ghosts and auxiliary fields is described in terms of irreducible representations of the Sp(2) group. This makes the presentation of solutions to the master equations in more simple and systematic way because they are Sp(2)-scalars.

  12. When will the Antarctic Ozone Hole Recover?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Paul A.; Nash, Eric R.; Kawa, S. Randolph; Montzka, Steve

    2006-01-01

    The Antarctic ozone hole develops each year and culminates by early Spring. Antarctic ozone values have been monitored since 1979 using satellite observations from the .TOMS instrument. The severity of the hole has been assessed from TOMS using the minimum total ozone value from the October monthly mean (depth of the hole) and by calculating the average size during the September-October period. Ozone is mainly destroyed by halogen catalytic cycles, and these losses are modulated by temperature variations in the collar of the polar lower stratospheric vortex. In this presentation, we show the relationships of halogens and temperature to, both the size and depth of the hole. Because atmospheric halogen levels are responding to international agreements that limit or phase out production, the amount of halogens in the stratosphere should decrease over the next few decades. Using projections of halogen levels combined with age-of-air estimates, we find that the ozone hole is recovering at an extremely slow rate and that large ozone holes will regularly recur over the next 2 decades. The ozone hole will begin to show first signs of recovery in about 2023, and the hole will fully recover to pre-1980 levels in approximately 2070. This 2070 recovery is 20 years later than recent projections.

  13. Recovery of the Antarctic Ozone Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Paul A.; Nash, Eric R.; Kawa, S. Randolph; Montzka, Steve; Schauffler, Sue; Stolarski, Richard S.; Douglass, Anne R.; Pawson, Steven; Nielsen, J. Eric

    2006-01-01

    The Antarctic ozone hole develops each year and culminates by early Spring. Antarctic ozone values have been monitored since 1979 using satellite observations from the TOMS and OMI instruments. The severity of the hole has been assessed using the minimum total ozone value from the October monthly mean (depth of the hole), the average size during the September-October period, and the ozone mass deficit. Ozone is mainly destroyed by halogen catalytic cycles, and these losses are modulated by temperature variations in the collar of the polar lower stratospheric vortex. In this presentation, we show the relationships of halogens and temperature to both the size and depth of the hole. Because atmospheric halogen levels are responding to international agreements that limit or phase out production, the amount of halogens in the stratosphere should decrease over the next few decades. We use two methods to estimate ozone hole recovery. First, we use projections of halogen levels combined with age-of-air estimates in a parametric model. Second, we use a coupled chemistry climate model to assess recovery. We find that the ozone hole is recovering at an extremely slow rate and that large ozone holes will regularly recur over the next 2 decades. Furthermore, full recovery to 1980 levels will not occur until approximately 2068. We will also show some error estimates of these dates and the impact of climate change on the recovery.

  14. Longitudinal surface structures (flowstripes on Antarctic glaciers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. F. Glasser

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Longitudinal surface structures (''flowstripes'' are common on many glaciers but their origin and significance are poorly understood. In this paper we present observations of the development of these longitudinal structures from four different Antarctic glacier systems (the Lambert Glacier/Amery Ice Shelf area, outlet glaciers in the Ross Sea sector, ice-shelf tributary glaciers on the Antarctic Peninsula, and the onset zone of a tributary to the Recovery Glacier Ice Stream in the Filchner Ice Shelf area. Mapping from optical satellite images demonstrates that longitudinal surface structures develop in two main situations: (1 as relatively wide flow stripes within glacier flow units and (2 as relatively narrow flow stripes where there is convergent flow around nunataks or at glacier confluence zones. Our observations indicate that the confluence features are narrower, sharper, and more clearly defined features. They are characterised by linear troughs or depressions on the ice surface and are much more common than the former type. Longitudinal surface structures within glacier flow units have previously been explained as the surface expression of localised bed perturbations but a universal explanation for those forming at glacier confluences is lacking. Here we propose that these features are formed at zones of ice acceleration and extensional flow at glacier confluences. We provide a schematic model for the development of longitudinal surface structures based on extensional flow that can explain their ridge and trough morphology as well as their down-ice persistence.

  15. Hydrocarbon degradation by Antarctic coastal bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavanagh, J.E. [University of Tasmania, Hobart (Australia). Antarctic Cooperative Research Centre; CSIRO Div of Marine Research, Hobart (Australia); University of Tasmania, Hobart (Australia). Dept. of Agricultural Science; Nichols, P.D. [University of Tasmania, Hobart (Australia). Antarctic Cooperative Research Centre; CSIRO Div. of Marine Research, Hobart (Australia); Franzmann, P.D. [CSIRO Land and Water, Wembley (Australia); McMeekin, T.A. [University of Tasmania, Hobart (Australia). Antarctic Cooperative Research Centre

    1999-07-01

    Bacterial cultures obtained through selective enrichment of beach sand collected 60 days and one year after treatment of sites in a pilot oil spill trial conducted at Airport Beach, Vestfold Hills, East Antarctica, were examined for the ability to degrade n-alkanes and phenanthrene. The effects of different hydrocarbon mixtures (Special Antarctic Blend [SAB] and BP-Visco), (fish oil [orange roughy]) and inoculation of replicate sites with water from Organic Lake, (previously shown to contain hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria) on the indigenous microbial population, were examined. Of the cultures obtained, those from sites treated with SAB and BP-Visco degraded n-alkanes most consistently and typically to the greatest extent. Two mixed cultures obtained from samples collected at 60 days and two isolates obtained from these cultures extensively degraded phenanthrene. 1-Hydroxy-naphthoic acid formed the major phenanthrene metabolite. Lower levels of salicyclic acid, 1-naphthol, 1,4-naphthaquinone and phenanthrene 9-10 dihydrodiol were detected in extracts of phenanthrene grown cultures. This study shows that under laboratory conditions indigenous Antarctica bacteria can degrade n-alkanes and the more recalcitrant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, phenanthrene. The enrichment of hydrocarbon degrading microorganisms in Antarctic ecosystems exposed to hydrocarbons, is relevant for the long term fate of hydrocarbon spills in this environment. (author)

  16. Interhemispheric coupling and warm Antarctic interglacials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. B. Holden

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Ice core evidence indicates that even though atmospheric CO2 concentrations did not exceed ~300 ppm at any point during the last 800 000 years, East Antarctica was at least ~3–4 °C warmer than pre-industrial (CO2 ~280 ppm in each of the last four interglacials. During the previous three interglacials, this anomalous warming was short lived (~3 000 years and apparently occurred before the completion of Northern Hemisphere deglaciation. Hereafter, we refer to these periods as "Warmer than Present Transients" (WPTs. We here present transient 800 kyr simulations using the intermediate complexity model GENIE-1 which suggest that WPTs could be explained as a consequence of the meltwater-forced slowdown of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC during glacial terminations. It is well known that a slowed AMOC would increase southern Sea Surface Temperature (SST through the bipolar seesaw. Observational data supports this hypothesis, suggesting that the AMOC remained weak throughout the terminations preceding WPTs, strengthening rapidly at a time which coincides closely with peak Antarctic temperature. In order to investigate model and boundary condition uncertainty, we additionally present three ensembles of transient GENIE-1 simulations across Termination II (135 000 to 124 000 BP and three snapshot HadCM3 simulations at 130 000 Before Present (BP. These simulations together reproduce both the timing and magnitude of WPTs, and point to the potential importance of an albedo feedback associated with West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS retreat.

  17. Widespread Antarctic glaciation during the Late Eocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Andrew; Riley, Teal R.; Hillenbrand, Claus-Dieter; Rittner, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Marine sedimentary rocks drilled on the southeastern margin of the South Orkney microcontinent in Antarctica (Ocean Drilling Program Leg 113 Site 696) were deposited between ∼36.5 Ma to 33.6 Ma, across the Eocene-Oligocene climate transition. The recovered rocks contain abundant grains exhibiting mechanical features diagnostic of iceberg-rafted debris. Sand provenance based on a multi-proxy approach that included petrographic analysis of over 275,000 grains, detrital zircon geochronology and apatite thermochronometry rule out local sources (Antarctic Peninsula or the South Orkney Islands) for the material. Instead the ice-transported grains show a clear provenance from the southern Weddell Sea region, extending from the Ellsworth-Whitmore Mountains of West Antarctica to the coastal region of Dronning Maud Land in East Antarctica. This study provides the first evidence for a continuity of widespread glacier calving along the coastline of the southern Weddell Sea embayment at least 2.5 million yrs before the prominent oxygen isotope event at 34-33.5 Ma that is considered to mark the onset of widespread glaciation of the Antarctic continent.

  18. Acclimation of Antarctic Chlamydomonas to the sea-ice environment: a transcriptomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chenlin; Wang, Xiuliang; Wang, Xingna; Sun, Chengjun

    2016-07-01

    The Antarctic green alga Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L was isolated from sea ice. As a psychrophilic microalga, it can tolerate the environmental stress in the sea-ice brine, such as freezing temperature and high salinity. We performed a transcriptome analysis to identify freezing stress responding genes and explore the extreme environmental acclimation-related strategies. Here, we show that many genes in ICE-L transcriptome that encoding PUFA synthesis enzymes, molecular chaperon proteins, and cell membrane transport proteins have high similarity to the gens from Antarctic bacteria. These ICE-L genes are supposed to be acquired through horizontal gene transfer from its symbiotic microbes in the sea-ice brine. The presence of these genes in both sea-ice microalgae and bacteria indicated the biological processes they involved in are possibly contributing to ICE-L success in sea ice. In addition, the biological pathways were compared between ICE-L and its closely related sister species, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Volvox carteri. In ICE-L transcripome, many sequences homologous to the plant or bacteria proteins in the post-transcriptional, post-translational modification, and signal-transduction KEGG pathways, are absent in the nonpsychrophilic green algae. These complex structural components might imply enhanced stress adaptation capacity. At last, differential gene expression analysis at the transcriptome level of ICE-L indicated that genes that associated with post-translational modification, lipid metabolism, and nitrogen metabolism are responding to the freezing treatment. In conclusion, the transcriptome of Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L is very useful for exploring the mutualistic interaction between microalgae and bacteria in sea ice; and discovering the specific genes and metabolism pathways responding to the freezing acclimation in psychrophilic microalgae.

  19. Biodiversity and adaptive evolution of Antarctic notothenioid fishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianghua Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The sea surrounding the Antarctic continent is one of the coldest regions in the world. It provides an environmentally unique and isolated “hotbed” for evolution to take place. In the past 30 million years, species of Perciform suborder Notothenioidei evolved and diversified from a benthic and temperate-water ancestor, and now dominate the fish fauna of the coldest ocean. Because of their distribution across temperature zones both inside and outside the Antarctic Polar Front, notothenioid fishes are regarded as excellent model organisms for exploring mechanisms of adaptive evolution, particularly cold adaptation. We first summarize research progress on the biodiversity of Antarctic fish and then review current findings on the peculiar biological characteristics of Antarctic notothenioids that evolved in response to a freezing environment. Research has revealed that extensive gene duplication and transcriptomic changes occurred during the adaptive radiation of notothenioid fish. Examples of highly duplicated genes in the Antarctic lineages include genes encoding hepcidin, and zona pellucida proteins, in addition to various retrotransposable elements. A few genes from Antarctic notothenioid fishes have been used as transgenes and demonstrated to be effective in making transgenic plants cold-hardy. In the coming years, the genomes of some Antarctic notothenioid species will be fully sequenced and the adaptive functions of duplicated genes will be further elucidated. Such studies will deepen our understanding of how genomes evolve in freezing environments, and provide an improved knowledge of molecular mechanisms of cold adaptation.

  20. Antarctic Crustal Thickness from Gravity Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, A. P.; Kusznir, N. J.; Ferraccioli, F.; Jordan, T. A.

    2013-12-01

    Using gravity anomaly inversion, we have produced the first comprehensive regional maps of crustal thickness and oceanic lithosphere distribution for Antarctica and the Southern Ocean. We determine Moho depth, crustal basement thickness, continental lithosphere thinning (1-1/β) and ocean-continent transition location using a 3D spectral domain gravity inversion method, which incorporates a lithosphere thermal gravity anomaly correction. The continental lithosphere thinning distribution, used to define the initial thermal model temperature perturbation is derived from the gravity inversion and uses no a priori isochron information; as a consequence the gravity inversion method provides a prediction of ocean-continent transition location, which is independent of ocean isochron information. The gravity anomaly contribution from ice thickness is included in the gravity inversion, as is the contribution from sediments which assumes a compaction controlled sediment density increase with depth. Data used in the gravity inversion are elevation and bathymetry, free-air gravity anomaly, the most recent Bedmap2 ice thickness and bedrock topography compilation south of 60 degrees south (Fretwell et al., 2013) and relatively sparse constraints on sediment thickness. Our gravity inversion study predicts thick crust (> 45 km) under interior East Antarctica penetrated by narrow continental rifts that feature relatively thinner crust. The East Antarctic Rift System (EARS) is a major Permian to Cretaceous age rift system that appears to extend from the continental margin at the Lambert Rift to the South Pole region, a distance of 2500 km. This is comparable in scale to the well-studied East African rift system. Intermediate crustal thickness with an inferred linear rift fabric is predicted under Coates Land. An extensive region of either thick oceanic crust or highly thinned continental crust is predicted offshore Oates Land and north Victoria Land, and also off West Antarctica

  1. Microbial biomass and basal respiration in Sub-Antarctic and Antarctic soils in the areas of some Russian polar stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Abakumov

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Antarctica is the unique place for pedological investigations. Soils of Antarctica have been studied intensively during the last century. Antarctic logistic provides the possibility to scientists access the terrestrial landscapes mainly in the places of polar stations. That is why the main and most detailed pedological investigations were conducted in Mc Murdo Valleys, Transantarctic Mountains, South Shetland Islands, Larsemann hills and Schirmacher Oasis. Investigations were conducted during the 53rd and 55th Russian Antarctic expeditions on the base of soil pits and samples collected in Sub-Antarctic and Antarctic regions. Soils of diverse Antarctic landscapes were studied with aim to assess the microbial biomass level, basal respiration rates and metabolic activity of microbial communities. The investigation conducted shows that soils of Antarctic are quite different in profile organization and carbon content. In general, Sub-Antarctic soils are characterized by more developed humus (sod organo-mineral horizons as well as the upper organic layer. The most developed organic layers were revealed in peat soils of King-George Island, where its thickness reach even 80 cm. These soils as well as soils under guano are characterized by the highest amount of total organic carbon (TOC 7.22–33.70%. Coastal and continental soils of Antarctic are presented by less developed Leptosols, Gleysols, Regolith and rare Ornhitosol with TOC levels about 0.37–4.67%. The metabolic ratios and basal respiration were higher in Sub-Antarctic soils than in Antarctic ones which can be interpreted as result of higher amounts of fresh organic remnants in organic and organo-mineral horizons. Also the soils of King-George island have higher portion of microbial biomass (max 1.54 mg g−1 than coastal (max 0.26 mg g−1 and continental (max 0.22 mg g−1 Antarctic soils. Sub-Antarctic soils mainly differ from Antarctic ones in increased organic layers thickness and total

  2. The impacts of local human activities on the Antarctic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tin, T.; Fleming, Z. L.; Hughes, K. A.; Ainley, D. G.; Convey, P.; Moreno, C. A.; Pfeiffer, S.; Scott, J.; Snape, I.

    2009-04-01

    An overview of a recently published review of the scientific literature from the past decade on the impacts of human activities on the Antarctic environment is presented. An assessment of the cumulative effects of scientists and accompanying base construction, tourists and fishery activities in Antarctica is timely given a decade since the Protocol on Environmental Protection to the Antarctic Treaty came into force in 1998 and the increasing attention given to and human presence in Antarctica during this 2007-2009 IPY. A range of impacts has been identified at a variety of spatial and temporal scales. Chemical contamination and sewage disposal on the continent have been found to be long-lived, with contemporary sewage management practices at many coastal stations insufficient to prevent local contamination. Human activities, particularly construction and transport, have affected Antarctic flora and fauna and a small number of non-indigenous plant and animal species has become established on some of the Antarctic Peninsula and sub Antarctic islands. There is little indication of recovery of overexploited fish stocks, and ramifications of fishing activity on bycatch species and the ecosystem could also be far-reaching. The Antarctic Treaty System and its instruments, in particular the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR) and the Environmental Protocol, provide a framework within which management of human activities take place. In order to ensure comprehensive protection of the Antarctic environment, including its intrinsic, wilderness and scientific values in the face of the continuing expansion of human activities in Antarctica, a more effective implementation of a wide range of measures is essential. These include effective environmental impact assessments, long-term monitoring, mitigation measures for non-indigenous species, ecosystem-based management of living resources, and increased regulation of National Antarctic

  3. 78 FR 48201 - Notice of Permit Applications Received Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 (Pub. L. 95-541)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-07

    ... sites at various sub-Antarctic (within geographic coverage area of the Antarctic Treaty) and Antarctic... Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 (Pub. L. 95-541) AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of Permit Applications Received under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978, Public Law 95-541....

  4. Antarctic Treaty Summit to Focus on Global Science Policy Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkman, Paul Arthur; Walton, David W. H.; Weiler, C. Susan

    2008-10-01

    The Antarctic Treaty Summit, which will coincide with the fiftieth anniversary of the treaty's signing, will be held at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History, in Washington, D. C., from 30 November to 3 December 2009. The summit will provide an open international forum for scientists, legislators, lawyers, administrators, educators, students, corporate executives, historians, and other members of global civil society to explore science policy achievements from the first 50 years of the Antarctic Treaty. In addition, the summit will complement official government celebrations of the Antarctic Treaty anniversary that do not include public participation.

  5. Adjustment of pigment composition in Desmarestia (Desmarestiaceae species along a sub-Antarctic to Antarctic latitudinal gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Mansilla

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Photosynthesis at high latitudes demands efficient strategies of light utilization to maintain algal fitness and performance. The fitness, and physiological adaptation, of a plant or algae species depends in part on the abundance and efficiency of the pigments it can produce to utilize the light resource from its environment. We quantified pigment composition and concentration in six species of the brown macroalgal genus Desmarestia, collected from sub-Antarctic sites (Strait of Magellan, Beagle Channel–Cape Horn Province and sites on the Antarctic Peninsula and adjacent islands. Sub-Antarctic Desmarestia species exhibited lower concentrations of chlorophyll a, chlorophyll c and fucoxanthin than endemic Antarctic species. Antarctic samples of D. menziesii and D. antarctica collected along a decreasing latitudinal gradient showed spatial and interspecific differences in light-harvesting pigment composition. Our results suggest distinct physiological adjustments in Desmarestia species in response to heterogeneous abiotic environmental conditions. The marine sub-Antarctic and Antarctic ecosystems are characterized by harsh environments (e.g., extreme irradiance, photoperiod, temperature, salinity to which the physiology of macroalgal species must adapt.

  6. Different adaptations of Chinese winter-over expeditioners during prolonged Antarctic and sub-Antarctic residence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nan; Wu, Quan; Li, Hao; Zhang, Tao; Xu, Chengli

    2016-05-01

    Prolonged residence in Antarctica is characterized by exposure to isolated, confined, and extreme (ICE) environment. Winter-over expeditioners at research stations often exhibit a complex of psychophysiological symptoms, which varied by stations and sociocultural backgrounds. To understand the different patterns of psychophysiological responses provoked by environmental stress, we conducted a longitudinal assessment of mood and endocrine function in two groups of Chinese expeditioners who were deployed to sub-Antarctic (Great Wall Station, 62°S, N = 12) and Antarctic (Zhongshan Station, 66°S, N = 16) from December 2003 to 2005. Measures of mood, thyroid function, the levels of plasma catecholamine, and circulating interleukins were obtained at departure from China, mid-winter (Antarctica), end of winter (Antarctica), and return to China, respectively. The Zhongshan Station crew experienced significant increases in fatigue, anger, tension, confusion, and decrease in free thyroxine (FT4), norepinephrine (NE), and epinephrine (E) during the winter, increase in thyrotropin (TSH) and total triiodothyronine (TT3) when returning, whereas their counterparts at Great Wall Station only experienced increased TT3 after deployment. Moreover, compared with the Great Wall Station crew, the Zhongshan Station crew exhibited greater increase in anger, greater decrease in FT4, total thyroxine (TT4), NE and E over the winter, and greater increase in TSH when returning. Chinese expeditioners who lived and worked at the Antarctic station and the sub-Antarctic station for over a year showed different change patterns in mood and endocrine hormones. Negative mood and endocrine dysfunction were positively associated with the severity of environment. The study is a supplement to scientific knowledge on psychophysiological variation under ICE environment, which has certain applied value for the development of preventive countermeasures or interventions.

  7. Different adaptations of Chinese winter-over expeditioners during prolonged Antarctic and sub-Antarctic residence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nan; Wu, Quan; Li, Hao; Zhang, Tao; Xu, Chengli

    2016-05-01

    Prolonged residence in Antarctica is characterized by exposure to isolated, confined, and extreme (ICE) environment. Winter-over expeditioners at research stations often exhibit a complex of psychophysiological symptoms, which varied by stations and sociocultural backgrounds. To understand the different patterns of psychophysiological responses provoked by environmental stress, we conducted a longitudinal assessment of mood and endocrine function in two groups of Chinese expeditioners who were deployed to sub-Antarctic (Great Wall Station, 62°S, N = 12) and Antarctic (Zhongshan Station, 66°S, N = 16) from December 2003 to 2005. Measures of mood, thyroid function, the levels of plasma catecholamine, and circulating interleukins were obtained at departure from China, mid-winter (Antarctica), end of winter (Antarctica), and return to China, respectively. The Zhongshan Station crew experienced significant increases in fatigue, anger, tension, confusion, and decrease in free thyroxine (FT4), norepinephrine (NE), and epinephrine (E) during the winter, increase in thyrotropin (TSH) and total triiodothyronine (TT3) when returning, whereas their counterparts at Great Wall Station only experienced increased TT3 after deployment. Moreover, compared with the Great Wall Station crew, the Zhongshan Station crew exhibited greater increase in anger, greater decrease in FT4, total thyroxine (TT4), NE and E over the winter, and greater increase in TSH when returning. Chinese expeditioners who lived and worked at the Antarctic station and the sub-Antarctic station for over a year showed different change patterns in mood and endocrine hormones. Negative mood and endocrine dysfunction were positively associated with the severity of environment. The study is a supplement to scientific knowledge on psychophysiological variation under ICE environment, which has certain applied value for the development of preventive countermeasures or interventions.

  8. Photosynthesis in a sub-Antarctic shore-zone lichen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, V.; Gremmen, N.J.M.

    2001-01-01

    Photosynthetic responses to moisture, light, temperature, salinity and inorganic nitrogen fertilization are reported for a shore-zone lichen Turgidiusculum complicatulum (formerly Mastodia tesselata), a possible recent introduction to sub-Antarctic Marion Island. Optimum moisture contents for net ph

  9. A Comparative Study of Antarctic Arctic and Himalayan Ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Pathak

    1989-07-01

    Full Text Available Arctic, Antarctic and inaccessible lofty regions of Himalayas,which are geographically diverse areas and have been a constant source of inspiration, envisages a challenging field of study 'by early adventurers and scientists of the world. Characteristics of ice obtained at Arctic and Antarctic do not possess similar properties. Even thesalient properties of snow and ice of western and central Himalayas vary due to its differing free water content. A study has been carriedout based on recent Antarctic Expedition by Indian scientists and the data gathered along litha-tectonic regions of Himalayas and their characteristics have been compared, wkich brings out stratigraphic and metamorphic characteristics of the ice and snow. In the present paper,an analysis of the ice and snow properties of Arctic, Antarctic and Himalayan regions has been presented.

  10. German Antarctic Receiving Station (GARS) O'Higgins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neidhardt, Alexander; Ploetz, Christian; Kluegel, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    In 2012, the German Antarctic Receiving Station (GARS) O'Higgins contributed to the IVS observing program with four observation sessions. Maintenance and upgrades were made, and a new replacement dewar is under construction in the observatory at Yebes, Spain.

  11. Climate Prediction Center (CPC) Daily Antarctic Oscillation Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Antarctic Oscillation (AAO) is a leading teleconnection pattern in the Southern Hemisphere circulation. It is calculated as the first Empirical Orthogonal...

  12. Climate Prediction Center(CPC)Monthly Antarctic Oscillation Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Antarctic Oscillation (AAO) is a leading teleconnection pattern in the Southern Hemisphere circulation. It is calculated as the first Empirical Orthogonal...

  13. Organic analysis of the Antarctic carbonaceous chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotra, R. K.; Shimoyama, A.; Ponnamperuma, C.; Hare, P. E.; Yanai, K.

    1981-01-01

    Thus far, organic analysis of carbonaceous chondrites has proven the only fruitful means of examining complex organic matter of extraterrestrial origin. The present paper presents the results of organic analysis of two Antarctic meteorites, Allan Hills (77306) and Yamato (74662), which may be considered free from terrestrial contamination. Ion-exchange chromatography, gas chromatography and mass spectrometery of meteorite samples reveal the presence in Yamato of 15 and in Allan Hills of 20 protein and nonprotein amino acids, the most abundant of which are glycine and alanine. Abundances of the D and L enantiomers of each amino acid are also found to be nearly equal. Data thus indicate an abiotic extraterrestrial origin for the matter, and confirm a lack of terrestrial contamination.

  14. An Antarctic molluscan biomineralisation tool-kit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleight, Victoria A.; Marie, Benjamin; Jackson, Daniel J.; Dyrynda, Elisabeth A.; Marie, Arul; Clark, Melody S.

    2016-11-01

    The Antarctic clam Laternula elliptica lives almost permanently below 0 °C and therefore is a valuable and tractable model to study the mechanisms of biomineralisation in cold water. The present study employed a multidisciplinary approach using histology, immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy, proteomics and gene expression to investigate this process. Thirty seven proteins were identified via proteomic extraction of the nacreous shell layer, including two not previously found in nacre; a novel T-rich Mucin-like protein and a Zinc-dependent metalloprotease. In situ hybridisation of seven candidate biomineralisation genes revealed discrete spatial expression patterns within the mantle tissue, hinting at modular organisation, which is also observed in the mantle tissues of other molluscs. All seven of these biomineralisation candidates displayed evidence of multifunctionality and strong association with vesicles, which are potentially involved in shell secretion in this species.

  15. Joint Antarctic School Expedition - An International Collaboration for High School Students and Teachers on Antarctic Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botella, J.; Warburton, J.; Bartholow, S.; Reed, L. F.

    2014-12-01

    The Joint Antarctic School Expedition (JASE) is an international collaboration program between high school students and teachers from the United States and Chile aimed at providing the skills required for establishing the scientific international collaborations that our globalized world demands, and to develop a new approach for science education. The National Antarctic Programs of Chile and the United States worked together on a pilot program that brought high school students and teachers from both countries to Punta Arenas, Chile, in February 2014. The goals of this project included strengthening the partnership between the two countries, and building relationships between future generations of scientists, while developing the students' awareness of global scientific issues and expanding their knowledge and interest in Antarctica and polar science. A big component of the project involved the sharing by students of the acquired knowledge and experiences with the general public. JASE is based on the successful Chilean Antarctic Science Fair developed by Chile´s Antarctic Research Institute. For 10 years, small groups of Chilean students, each mentored by a teacher, perform experimental or bibliographical Antarctic research. Winning teams are awarded an expedition to the Chilean research station on King George Island. In 2014, the Chileans invited US participation in this program in order to strengthen science ties for upcoming generations. On King George Island, students have hands-on experiences conducting experiments and learning about field research. While the total number of students directly involved in the program is relatively small, the sharing of the experience by students with the general public is a novel approach to science education. Research experiences for students, like JASE, are important as they influence new direction for students in science learning, science interest, and help increase science knowledge. We will share experiences with the

  16. Interaction mechanism between Arthrobacter oxydans and BaP-Cd%氧化节杆菌与苯并[a]芘-镉交互作用机理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓军; 尹华; 叶锦韶; 彭辉; 秦华明; 龙焰; 何宝燕; 张娜

    2010-01-01

    利用HPLC、FTIR分析技术,研究了氧化节杆菌(Arthrobacter oxydans)对水体中苯并[a]芘(BaP)-镉(Cd)复合污染物交互作用机理.结果表明,BaP、Cd及BaP-Cd复合污染均对菌株的正常生长产生影响,其影响程度为:BaP-Cd>Cd>BaP;使用该菌投加到BaP、Cd浓度均为1 mg·L~(-1)的BaP-Cd复合污染无机盐溶液中,30 ℃、130 r·min~(-1),培养5 d后,体系BaP、Cd的残留量分别为0.39、0.65 mg·L~(-1);添加一定浓度的H_2O_2并保持体系呈偏碱性更适于该复合污染的处理.红外扫描分析显示,在微生物作用下,BaP的结构发生改变,菌株降解BaP和吸附Cd的过程主要与羟基、CC键、酰胺基团和C-H键有关.

  17. capA, a cspA-like gene that encodes a cold acclimation protein in the psychrotrophic bacterium Arthrobacter globiformis SI55.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, F; Normand, P; Potier, P

    1997-09-01

    By use of Arthrobacter globiformis SI55, a psychrotrophic bacterium capable of growth between -5 and +32 degrees C, we cloned and sequenced capA, a gene homologous to cspA encoding the major cold shock protein in Escherichia coli. The deduced protein sequence has a high level of identity with the sequences of other CspA-related proteins from various sources, and no particular residue or domain that could be specific to cold-adapted microorganisms emerged. We show that CapA was produced very rapidly following cold shock, but unlike its mesophilic counterparts, it was still expressed during prolonged growth at low temperature. Its synthesis is regulated at the translational level, and we showed that growth resumption following a temperature downshift correlated with CapA expression. Transient inhibitions in protein synthesis during the first stages of the cold shock response severely impaired the subsequent acclimation of A. globiformis SI55 to low temperature and delayed CapA expression. The cold shock response in A. globiformis SI55 is an adaptative process in which CapA may play a crucial role. We suggest that low-temperature acclimation is conditioned mainly by the ability of cells to restore an active translational machinery after cold shock in a process that may be different from that present in mesophiles.

  18. Toxicity screening of soils from different mine areas—A contribution to track the sensitivity and variability of Arthrobacter globiformis assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, Catarina R., E-mail: crmarques@ua.pt [Departamento de Biologia and CESAM (Centro de Estudos do Ambiente e do Mar), Universidade de Aveiro, Campus Universitário de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Caetano, Ana L. [Departamento de Biologia and CESAM (Centro de Estudos do Ambiente e do Mar), Universidade de Aveiro, Campus Universitário de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Haller, Andreas [ECT Oekotoxikologie GmbH, Böttgerstraße 2–14, D-65439 Flörsheim a. M. (Germany); Gonçalves, Fernando [Departamento de Biologia and CESAM (Centro de Estudos do Ambiente e do Mar), Universidade de Aveiro, Campus Universitário de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Pereira, Ruth [Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, s/n, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Interdisciplinary Centre of Marine and Environmental Research (CIIMAR/CIMAR), Universidade do Porto, Rua dos Bragas 289, P 4050-123 Porto (Portugal); Römbke, Jörg [ECT Oekotoxikologie GmbH, Böttgerstraße 2–14, D-65439 Flörsheim a. M. (Germany)

    2014-06-01

    Highlights: • The assay gave rapid and feasible discrimination of toxic soils to A. globiformis. • Sensitive and low variability response to soils from different regions. • Soil properties may interfere with metal toxicity and fluorescence measurements. • Proposal of a toxicity threshold for the contact assay regarding soils. • A. globiformis assay should be included in the Tier I of risk assessment frameworks. - Abstract: This study used the Arthrobacter globiformis solid-contact test for assessing the quality of soils collected in areas subjected to past and present mine activities in Europe (uranium mine, Portugal) and North Africa (phosphogypsum pile, Tunisia; iron mine, Morocco). As to discriminate the influence of soils natural variability from the effect of contaminants, toxicity thresholds were derived for this test, based on the dataset of each study area. Furthermore, the test sensitivity and variability was also evaluated. As a result, soils that inhibited A. globiformis dehydrogenase activity above 45% or 50% relatively to the control, were considered to be toxic. Despite the soil metal content determined, the properties of soils seemed to influence dehydrogenase activity. Overall, the contact test provided a coherent outcome comparing to other more time-consuming and effort-demanding ecotoxicological assays. Our results strengthened the feasibility and ecological relevance of this assay, which variability was quite reduced hence suggesting its potential integration within the test battery of tier 1 of soil risk assessment schemes.

  19. Arctic and Antarctic sea ice and climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreira, S.

    2014-12-01

    Principal Components Analysis in T-Mode Varimax rotated was performed on Antarctic and Arctic monthly sea ice concentration anomalies (SICA) fields for the period 1979-2014, in order to investigate which are the main spatial characteristics of sea ice and its relationship with atmospheric circulation. This analysis provides 5 patterns of sea ice for inter-spring period and 3 patterns for summer-autumn for Antarctica (69,2% of the total variance) and 3 different patterns for summer-autumn and 3 for winter-spring season for the Arctic Ocean (67,8% of the total variance).Each of these patterns has a positive and negative phase. We used the Monthly Polar Gridded Sea Ice Concentrations database derived from satellite information generated by NASA Team algorithm. To understand the links between the SICA and climate trends, we extracted the mean pressure and, temperature field patterns for the months with high loadings (positive or negative) of the sea ice patterns that gave distinct atmospheric structures associated with each one. For Antarctica, the first SICA spatial winter-spring pattern in positive phase shows a negative SICA centre over the Drake Passage and north region of Bellingshausen and Weddell Seas together with another negative SICA centre over the East Indian Ocean. Strong positive centres over the rest of the Atlantic and Indian Oceans basins and the Amundsen Sea are also presented. A strong negative pressure anomaly covers most of the Antarctic Continent centered over the Bellingshausen Sea accompanied by three positive pressure anomalies in middle-latitudes. During recent years, the Arctic showed persistent associations of sea-ice and climate patterns principally during summer. Our strongest summer-autumn pattern in negative phase showed a marked reduction on SICA over western Arctic, primarily linked to an overall increase in Arctic atmospheric temperature most pronounced over the Beaufort, Chukchi and East Siberian Seas, and a positive anomaly of

  20. Morphogenesis of Antarctic Paleosols: Martian Analogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaney, W. C.; Dohm, J. M.; Baker, V. R.; Newsom, Horton E.; Malloch, D.; Hancock, R. G. V.; Campbell, Iain; Sheppard, D.; Milner, M. W.

    2001-11-01

    Samples of horizons in paleosols from the Quartermain Mountains of the Antarctic Dry Valleys (Aztec and New Mountain areas) were analyzed for their physical characteristics, mineralogy, chemical composition, and microbiology to determine the accumulation and movement of salts and other soluble constituents and the presence/absence of microbial populations. Salt concentrations are of special interest because they are considered to be a function of age, derived over time, in part from nearby oceanic and high-altitude atmospheric sources. The chemical composition of ancient Miocene-age paleosols in these areas is the direct result of the deposition and weathering of airborne-influxed salts and other materials, as well as the weathering of till derived principally from local dolerite and sandstone outcrops. Paleosols nearer the coast have greater contents of Cl, whereas near the inland ice sheet, nitrogen tends to increase on a relative basis. The accumulation and vertical distribution of salts and other soluble chemical elements indicate relative amounts of movement in the profile over long periods of time, in the order of several million years. Four of the six selected subsamples from paleosol horizons in two ancient soil profiles contained nil concentrations of bacteria and fungi. However, two horizons at depths of between 3 and 8 cm, in two profiles, yielded several colonies of the fungi Beauveria bassiana and Penicillium brevicompactum, indicating very minor input of organic carbon. Beauveria bassiana is often reported in association with insects and is used commercially for the biological control of some insect pests. Penicillium species are commonly isolated from Arctic, temperate, and tropical soils and are known to utilize a wide variety of organic carbon and nitrogen compounds. The cold, dry soils of the Antarctic bear a close resemblance to various present and past martian environments where similar weathering could occur and possible microbial populations

  1. Depth and density of the Antarctic firn layer

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    The depth and density of the Antarctic firn layer is modeled, using a combination of regional climate model output and a steady-state firn densification model. The modeled near-surface climate (temperature, wind speed, and accumulation) and the depth of two critical density levels (550 kg m−3 and 830 kg m−3) agree well with climate and firn density observations selected from >50 Antarctic coring sites (r = 0.90–0.99, p

  2. The present and future state of the Antarctic firn layer

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Firn is the transitional product between fresh snow and glacier ice and acts as a boundary between the atmosphere and the glacier ice of the Antarctic Ice Sheet (AIS). Spatiotemporal variations in firn layer characteristics are therefore important to consider when assessing the mass balance of the AIS. In this thesis, a firn densification model, forced with a realistic climate, is used to examine contemporary (1979-2012) and future (2000-2200) variations in the Antarctic firn layer. Currently...

  3. Antarctic marine biodiversity and deep-sea hydrothermal vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chown, Steven L

    2012-01-01

    The diversity of many marine benthic groups is unlike that of most other taxa. Rather than declining from the tropics to the poles, much of the benthos shows high diversity in the Southern Ocean. Moreover, many species are unique to the Antarctic region. Recent work has shown that this is also true of the communities of Antarctic deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Vent ecosystems have been documented from many sites across the globe, associated with the thermally and chemically variable habitats found around these, typically high temperature, streams that are rich in reduced compounds and polymetallic sulphides. The animal communities of the East Scotia Ridge vent ecosystems are very different to those elsewhere, though the microbiota, which form the basis of vent food webs, show less differentiation. Much of the biological significance of deep-sea hydrothermal vents lies in their biodiversity, the diverse biochemistry of their bacteria, the remarkable symbioses among many of the marine animals and these bacteria, and the prospects that investigations of these systems hold for understanding the conditions that may have led to the first appearance of life. The discovery of diverse and unusual Antarctic hydrothermal vent ecosystems provides opportunities for new understanding in these fields. Moreover, the Antarctic vents south of 60°S benefit from automatic conservation under the Convention on the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources and the Antarctic Treaty. Other deep-sea hydrothermal vents located in international waters are not protected and may be threatened by growing interests in deep-sea mining.

  4. Transcriptomics and comparative analysis of three antarctic notothenioid fishes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Chul Shin

    Full Text Available For the past 10 to 13 million years, Antarctic notothenioid fish have undergone extraordinary periods of evolution and have adapted to a cold and highly oxygenated Antarctic marine environment. While these species are considered an attractive model with which to study physiology and evolutionary adaptation, they are poorly characterized at the molecular level, and sequence information is lacking. The transcriptomes of the Antarctic fishes Notothenia coriiceps, Chaenocephalus aceratus, and Pleuragramma antarcticum were obtained by 454 FLX Titanium sequencing of a normalized cDNA library. More than 1,900,000 reads were assembled in a total of 71,539 contigs. Overall, 40% of the contigs were annotated based on similarity to known protein or nucleotide sequences, and more than 50% of the predicted transcripts were validated as full-length or putative full-length cDNAs. These three Antarctic fishes shared 663 genes expressed in the brain and 1,557 genes expressed in the liver. In addition, these cold-adapted fish expressed more Ub-conjugated proteins compared to temperate fish; Ub-conjugated proteins are involved in maintaining proteins in their native state in the cold and thermally stable Antarctic environments. Our transcriptome analysis of Antarctic notothenioid fish provides an archive for future studies in molecular mechanisms of fundamental genetic questions, and can be used in evolution studies comparing other fish.

  5. Parasites of the Antarctic toothfish (Dissostichus mawsoni Norman, 1937 (Perciformes, Nototheniidae in the Pacific sector of the Antarctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilya I. Gordeev

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Antarctic toothfish (Dissostichus mawsoni Norman, 1937 is one of the main target species of commercial fisheries in the Antarctic. It is an endemic and is found along the shelf of Antarctica, as well as on the slopes of seamounts, underwater elevations and islands in the sub-Antarctic. It feeds on a variety of fish and cephalopods and can be an intermediate/paratenic host of some helminthes, whose final hosts are whales, seals, large rays and sharks. This article presents new data on toothfish infection in the Pacific sector of the Antarctic. Specimens were examined during commercial longline fishing in the Ross Sea and the Amundsen Sea in January–February 2013. Fourteen species of parasites were found using standard parasitological methods and genetic analysis.

  6. An unusual giant pycnogonid (Pycnogonida-Colossendeidae) Decolopoda qasimi sp. nov. from Antarctic waters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jayasree, V.; Sreepada, R.A.; Parulekar, A.H.

    Five specimens of benthic pycnogonids collected from the Southern Ocean are described. Of these, two are identified as Nymphon australis (Hodgson) and two as Ecleipsotherma spinosa (Hodgson). One specimen under the class Colossendeidae, is described...

  7. Survival, DNA Integrity, and Ultrastructural Damage in Antarctic Cryptoendolithic Eukaryotic Microorganisms Exposed to Ionizing Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacelli, Claudia; Selbmann, Laura; Zucconi, Laura; Raguse, Marina; Moeller, Ralf; Shuryak, Igor; Onofri, Silvano

    2017-02-01

    Life dispersal between planets, planetary protection, and the search for biosignatures are main topics in astrobiology. Under the umbrella of the STARLIFE project, three Antarctic endolithic microorganisms, the melanized fungus Cryomyces antarcticus CCFEE 515, a hyaline strain of Umbilicaria sp. (CCFEE 6113, lichenized fungus), and a Stichococcus sp. strain (C45A, green alga), were exposed to high doses of space-relevant gamma radiation (60Co), up to 117.07 kGy. After irradiation survival, DNA integrity and ultrastructural damage were tested. The first was assessed by clonogenic test; viability and dose responses were reasonably described by the linear-quadratic formalism. DNA integrity was evaluated by PCR, and ultrastructural damage was observed by transmission electron microscopy. The most resistant among the tested organisms was C. antarcticus both in terms of colony formation and DNA preservation. Besides, results clearly demonstrate that DNA was well detectable in all the tested organisms even when microorganisms were dead. This high resistance provides support for the use of DNA as a possible biosignature during the next exploration campaigns. Implication in planetary protection and contamination during long-term space travel are put forward.

  8. Pigments from UV-resistant Antarctic bacteria as photosensitizers in Dye Sensitized Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Órdenes-Aenishanslins, N; Anziani-Ostuni, G; Vargas-Reyes, M; Alarcón, J; Tello, A; Pérez-Donoso, J M

    2016-09-01

    Here we report the use of pigments produced by UV-resistant Antarctic bacteria as photosensitizers in Dye Sensitized Solar Cells (DSSCs). Pigments were obtained from red and yellow colored psychrotolerant bacteria isolated from soils of King George Island, Antarctica. Based on metabolic characteristics and 16s DNA sequence, pigmented bacteria were identified as Hymenobacter sp. (red) and Chryseobacterium sp. (yellow). Pigments produced by these microorganisms were extracted and classified as carotenoids based on their spectroscopic and structural characteristics, determined by UV-Vis spectrophotometry and infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), respectively. With the purpose of develop green solar cells based on bacterial pigments, the photostability and capacity of these molecules as light harvesters in DSSCs were determined. Absorbance decay assays determined that bacterial carotenoids present high photostability. In addition, solar cells based on these photosensitizers exhibit an open circuit voltage (VOC) of 435.0 [mV] and a short circuit current density (ISC) of 0.2 [mA·cm(-2)] for the red pigment, and a VOC of 548.8 [mV] and a ISC of 0.13 [mA·cm(-2)] for the yellow pigment. This work constitutes the first approximation of the use of pigments produced by non-photosynthetic bacteria as photosensitizers in DSSCs. Determined photochemical characteristics of bacterial pigments, summed to their easy obtention and low costs, validates its application as photosensitizers in next-generation biological solar cells.

  9. The circum-Antarctic sedimentary record; a dowsing rod for Antarctic ice in the Eocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scher, H.

    2012-12-01

    Arguments for short-lived Antarctic glacial events during the Eocene (55-34 Ma) are compelling, however the paleoceanographic proxy records upon which these arguments are based (e.g., benthic δ18O, eustatic sea level, deep sea carbonate deposition) are global signals in which the role of Antarctic ice volume variability is ambiguous. That is to say, the proxy response to ice volume may be masked other processes. As a result broad correlations between proxies for ice volume are lacking during suspected Eocene glacial events. I will present a more direct approach for detecting Antarctic ice sheets in the Eocene; utilizing provenance information derived from the radiogenic isotopic composition of the terrigenous component of marine sediments near Antarctica. The method relies on knowledge that marine sediments represent a mixture derived from different basement terrains with different isotopic fingerprints. A key issue when using sedimentary deposits to characterize continental sediment sources is to deconvolve different sources from the mixed signal of the bulk sample. The pioneering work of Roy et al. (2007) and van de Flierdt et al. (2007) represents a major advance in Antarctic provenance studies. It is now known that the isotopic composition of neodymium (Nd) and hafnium (Hf) in modern circum-Antarctic sediments are distributed in a pattern that mimics the basement age of sediment sources around Antarctica. For this study I selected two Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) sites on southern Kerguelen Plateau (ODP Sites 738 and 748) because of their proximity to Prydz Bay, where Precambrian sediment sources contribute to extremely nonradiogenic isotopic signatures in modern sediments in the Prydz Bay region. New detrital Nd isotope records from these sediment cores reveal an Nd isotope excursion at the Bartonian/Priabonian boundary (ca. 37 Ma) that coincides with a 0.5 ‰ increase in benthic foram δ18O values. Detrital sediment ɛNd values are around -12 in intervals

  10. Interhemispheric coupling, the West Antarctic Ice Sheet and warm Antarctic interglacials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. B. Holden

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Ice core evidence indicates that even though atmospheric CO2 concentrations did not exceed ~300 ppm at any point during the last 800 000 years, East Antarctica was at least ~3–4 °C warmer than preindustrial (CO2~280 ppm in each of the last four interglacials. During the previous three interglacials, this anomalous warming was short lived (~3000 years and apparently occurred before the completion of Northern Hemisphere deglaciation. Hereafter, we refer to these periods as "Warmer than Present Transients" (WPTs. We present a series of experiments to investigate the impact of deglacial meltwater on the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC and Antarctic temperature. It is well known that a slowed AMOC would increase southern sea surface temperature (SST through the bipolar seesaw and observational data suggests that the AMOC remained weak throughout the terminations preceding WPTs, strengthening rapidly at a time which coincides closely with peak Antarctic temperature. We present two 800 kyr transient simulations using the Intermediate Complexity model GENIE-1 which demonstrate that meltwater forcing generates transient southern warming that is consistent with the timing of WPTs, but is not sufficient (in this single parameterisation to reproduce the magnitude of observed warmth. In order to investigate model and boundary condition uncertainty, we present three ensembles of transient GENIE-1 simulations across Termination II (135 000 to 124 000 BP and three snapshot HadCM3 simulations at 130 000 BP. Only with consideration of the possible feedback of West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS retreat does it become possible to simulate the magnitude of observed warming.

  11. Main: SP8BFIBSP8AIB [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SP8BFIBSP8AIB S000183 16-Feb-2001 (last modified) seki One of SPBF binding site (SP...o (I.b.); SP8BF recognizes both SP8a and SP8b sequences; See also SP8BFIBSP8BIB (S000184); SP8BF activity is

  12. Main: SP8BFIBSP8BIB [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SP8BFIBSP8BIB S000184 16-Feb-2001 (last modified) seki One of SPBF binding site (SP...; SP8BF recognizes both SP8a and SP8b sequences; See also SP8BFIBSP8AIB (S000183); SP8BF activity is also fo

  13. Pteropods and climate off the Antarctic Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeb, Valerie J.; Santora, Jarrod A.

    2013-09-01

    Shelled (thecosome) and naked (gymnosome) pteropods are regular, at times abundant, members of Southern Ocean zooplankton assemblages. Regionally, shelled species can play a major role in food webs and carbon cycling. Because of their aragonite shells thecosome pteropods may be vulnerable to the impacts of ocean acidification; without shells they cannot survive and their demise would have major implications for food webs and carbon cycling in the Southern Ocean. Additionally, pteropod species in the southwest Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean inhabit a region of rapid warming and climate change, the impacts of which are predicted to be observed as poleward distribution shifts. Here we provide baseline information on intraseasonal, interannual and longer scale variability of pteropod populations off the Antarctic Peninsula between 1994 and 2009. Concentrations of the 4 dominant taxa, Limacina helicina antarctica f. antarctica, Clio pyramidata f. sulcata, Spongiobranchaea australis and Clione limacina antarctica, are similar to those monitored during the 1928-1935 Discovery Investigations and reflect generally low values but with episodic interannual abundance peaks that, except for C. pyr. sulcata, are related to basin-scale climate forcing associated with the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) climate mode. Significant abundance increases of L. helicina and S. australis after 1998 were associated with a climate regime shift that initiated a period dominated by cool La Niña conditions and increased nearshore influence of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). This background information is essential to assess potential future changes in pteropod species distribution and abundance associated with ocean warming and acidification. construct maps of pteropod spatial frequency and mean abundance to assess their oceanographic associations; quantify pteropod abundance anomalies for comparing intraseasonal and interannual variability relative to m-3 environmental

  14. Antarctic Single Frames = Frame Level Records of Antarctica Photos: 1946 - 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Aerial photographs of Antarctica from the United States Antarctic Resource Center (USARC) and the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) are maintained in this collection....

  15. Inoculation of PAH-degrading strains of Fusarium solani and Arthrobacter oxydans in rhizospheric sand and soil microcosms: microbial interactions and PAH dissipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thion, Cécile; Cébron, Aurélie; Beguiristain, Thierry; Leyval, Corinne

    2013-07-01

    Very little is known about the influence of bacterial-fungal ecological interactions on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) dissipation in soils. Fusarium solani MM1 and Arthrobacter oxydans MsHM11 can dissipate PAHs in vitro. We investigated their interactions and their effect on the dissipation of three PAHs-phenanthrene (PHE), pyrene (PYR) and dibenz(a,h)anthracene (DBA)-in planted microcosms, in sterile sand or non-sterile soil. In sterile sand microcosms planted with alfalfa, the two microbes survived and grew, without any significant effect of co-inoculation. Co-inoculation led to the dissipation of 46 % of PHE after 21 days. In soil microcosms, whether planted with alfalfa or not, both strains persisted throughout the 46 days of the experiment, without any effect of co-inoculation or of alfalfa, as assessed by real-time PCR targeting taxon-level indicators, i.e. Actinobacteria 16S rDNA and the intergenic transcribed spacer specific to the genus Fusarium. The microbial community was analyzed by temporal temperature gradient electrophoresis and real-time PCR targeting bacterial and fungal rDNA and PAH-ring hydroxylating dioxygenase genes. These communities were modified by PAH pollution, which selected PAH-degrading bacteria, by the presence of alfalfa and, concerning the bacterial community, by inoculation. PHE and PYR concentrations significantly decreased (91 and 46 %, respectively) whatever the treatment, but DBA concentration significantly decreased (30 %) in planted and co-inoculated microcosms only.

  16. Arthrobacter aurescens TC1 Atrazine Catabolism Genes trzN, atzB, and atzC Are Linked on a 160-Kilobase Region and Are Functional in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Sajjaphan, Kannika; Shapir, Nir; Wackett, Lawrence P; Palmer, Michael; Blackmon, Barbara; Tomkins, Jeff; Sadowsky, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    Arthrobacter aurescens strain TC1 metabolizes atrazine to cyanuric acid via TrzN, AtzB, and AtzC. The complete sequence of a 160-kb bacterial artificial chromosome clone indicated that trzN, atzB, and atzC are linked on the A. aurescens genome. TrzN, AtzB, and AtzC were shown to be functional in Escherichia coli. Hybridization studies localized trzN, atzB, and atzC to a 380-kb plasmid in A. aurescens strain TC1.

  17. Complex Geodetic Research in Ukrainian Antarctic Station "Academician Vernadsky" (Years 2002 - 2005, 2013-2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretyak, Kornyliy; Hlotov, Volodymyr; Holubinka, Yuriy; Marusazh, Khrystyna

    2016-06-01

    In this paper is given an information about complex geodetic research in Ukrainian Antarctic station "Academician Vernadsky". Research were carried by Lviv polytechnic scientists, during Antarctic expeditions in years 2002 - 2005, 2013, 2014. Main objectives of the studies were: (a) study of the islands glaciers surface volumes changes in Antarctic archipelago and Antarctic Peninsula using terestrial laser scaning and digital terrestrial stereophotogrammetry survey; (b) investigation of Penola strain tectonic fault, using the results of precise GNSS observations.

  18. Choanoflagellates in the Antarctic Ocean, with special reference to Parvicorbicula socialis (Meunier) Deflandre

    OpenAIRE

    Hara,Shigemitsu/Tanoue,Eiichiro/Zenimoto,Michio/Komaki,Yuzo/Takahashi,Eiji

    1984-01-01

    Distribution and morphology of choanoflagellates, collared heterotrophic flagellates bearing an extracellular siliceous lorica, were reviewed. Eleven species were reported from the Antarctic Ocean. Three of the eleven species were originally described from the Antarctic and are known to be endemic to the Antarctic. The other eight were found in various oceanic areas. Choanoflagellates had been found in both ice and water, which suggested their wide and abundant distribution in the Antarctic. ...

  19. Skip spawning as a reproductive strategy in Antarctic fish species: the Antarctic silverfish (Pleuragramma antarctica case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Pisano

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The Antarctic silverfish Pleuragramma antarctica (Notothenioidei, Nototheniidae is the most abundant pelagic fish inhabiting the frigid Antarctic coastal waters. It plays relevant roles in the local ecosystems, where it is often considered a keystone species connecting lower and upper trophic levels within the coastal marine food web. Despite its ecological relevance, and although many aspects of the Antarctic silverfish biology have already been elucidated, knowledge on important components of its life cycle, including the reproductive features, is still poor. The available data on the reproduction of the Antarctic silverfish remains fragmentary and, in particular, information on the silverfish from the Ross Sea is lacking, in spite of the intensive ecological studies on this unique region and the fact that the only known nursery ground for this species is located in Terra Nova Bay (Ross Sea where hatching occurs under the sea-ice. We present the here first description of the reproductive features of Antarctic silverfish from fish sampled in late Summer (mid February 2008 in the Ross Sea. The gross reproductive traits are consistent with those reported from other Antarctic sectors but, interestingly, widespread follicular atresia has been detected in the fish examined. The intensity and prevalence of such a follicular degenerative process suggest that skip spawning (not all adults spawn every year could be a reproductive strategy of this Antarctic species. Such an hypothesis is discussed both on the short-term and on the evolutionary time-scale. Overall, the data presented also contribute to support the acknowledgment that skip-spawning is a diffuse phenomenon in fishes.

  20. Antarctic Yeasts: Biodiversity and Potential Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivaji, S.; Prasad, G. S.

    This review is an attempt in cataloguing the diversity of yeasts in Antarctica, highlight their biotechnological potential and understand the basis of adaptation to low temperature. As of now several psychrophilic and psychrotolerant yeasts from Antarctic soils and marine waters have been characterized with respect to their growth characteristics, ecological distribution and taxonomic significance. Interestingly most of these species belonged to basidiomycetous yeasts which as a group are known for their ability to circumvent and survive under stress conditions. Simultaneously their possible role as work horses in the biotechnological industry was recognized due to their ability to produce novel enzymes and biomolecules such as agents for the breakdown of xenobiotics, and novel pharmaceutical chemi cals. The high activity of psychrophilic enzymes at low and moderate temperatures offers potential economic benefits. As of now lipases from Pseudozyma antarctica have been extensively studied to understand their unique thermal stability at 90°C and also because of its use in the pharmaceutical, agriculture, food, cosmetics and chemical industry. A few of the other enzymes which have been studied include extracellular alpha-amylase and glucoamylase from the yeast Pseudozyma antarctica (Candida antarctica), an extra-cellular protease from Cryptococcus humicola, an aspartyl proteinase from Cryptococcus humicola, a novel extracellular subtilase from Leucosporidium antarcticum, and a xylanase from Cryptococcus adeliensis

  1. Biogeography of circum-Antarctic springtails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGaughran, Angela; Stevens, Mark I; Holland, Barbara R

    2010-10-01

    We examine the effects of isolation over both ancient and contemporary timescales on evolutionary diversification and speciation patterns of springtail species in circum-Antarctica, with special focus on members of the genus Cryptopygus (Collembola, Isotomidae). We employ phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial DNA (cox1), and ribosomal DNA (18S and 28S) genes in the programmes MrBayes and RAxML. Our aims are twofold: (1) we evaluate existing taxonomy in light of previous work which found dubious taxonomic classification in several taxa based on cox1 analysis; (2) we evaluate the biogeographic origin of our chosen suite of springtail species based on dispersal/vicariance scenarios, the magnitude of genetic divergence among lineages and the age and accessibility of potential habitat. The dubious taxonomic characterisation of Cryptopygus species highlighted previously is confirmed by our multi-gene phylogenetic analyses. Specifically, according to the current taxonomy, Cryptopygus antarcticus subspecies are not completely monophyletic and neither are Cryptopygus species in general. We show that distribution patterns among species/lineages are both dispersal- and vicariance-driven. Episodes of colonisation appear to have occurred frequently, the routes of which may have followed currents in the Southern Ocean. In several cases, the estimated divergence dates among species correspond well with the timing of terrestrial habitat availability. We conclude that these isotomid springtails have a varied and diverse evolutionary history in the circum-Antarctic that consists of both ancient and recent elements and is reflected in a dynamic contemporary fauna.

  2. Quantification of ikaite in Antarctic sea ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Fischer

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Calcium carbonate precipitation in sea ice can increase pCO2 during precipitation in winter and decrease pCO2 during dissolution in spring. CaCO3 precipitation in sea ice is thought to potentially drive significant CO2 uptake by the ocean. However, little is known about the quantitative spatial and temporal distribution of CaCO3 within sea ice. This is the first quantitative study of hydrous calcium carbonate, as ikaite, in sea ice and discusses its potential significance for the carbon cycle in polar oceans. Ice cores and brine samples were collected from pack and land fast sea ice between September and December 2007 during an expedition in the East Antarctic and another off Terre Adélie, Antarctica. Samples were analysed for CaCO3, Salinity, DOC, DON, Phosphate, and total alkalinity. A relationship between the measured parameters and CaCO3 precipitation could not be observed. We found calcium carbonate, as ikaite, mostly in the top layer of sea ice with values up to 126 mg ikaite per liter melted sea ice. This potentially represents a contribution between 0.12 and 9 Tg C to the annual carbon flux in polar oceans. The horizontal distribution of ikaite in sea ice was heterogenous. We also found the precipitate in the snow on top of the sea ice.

  3. Ionospheric irregularities at Antarctic using GPS measurements

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sunita Tiwari; Amit Jain; Shivalika Sarkar; Sudhir Jain; A K Gwal

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this work is to study the behaviour of the ionospheric scintillation at high latitude during geomagnetically quiet and disturbed conditions which is one of the most relevant themes in the space weather studies. Scintillation is a major problem in navigation application using GPS and in satellite communication at high latitudes. Severe amplitude fading and strong scintillation affect the reliability of GPS navigational system and satellite communication. To study the effects of the ionospheric scintillations, GPS receiver installed at Antarctic station Maitri (Geog. 70.76°S; 11.74°E) was used. The data is collected by using GISTM 4004A, NOVATEL’S GPS receiver during March 2008. Studies show that percentage occurrence of phase scintillation is well correlated with geomagnetic activity during the observation period. The result also shows that very intense scintillations can degrade GPS based location determination due to loss of lock of satellites. These findings indicate that the dependence of scintillations and irregularity occurrence on geomagnetic activity is associated with the magnetic local time (MLT). Large number of patches are reported and their activity depends on the magnetic activity index.

  4. Evidence for warmer interglacials in East Antarctic ice cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sime, L C; Wolff, E W; Oliver, K I C; Tindall, J C

    2009-11-19

    Stable isotope ratios of oxygen and hydrogen in the Antarctic ice core record have revolutionized our understanding of Pleistocene climate variations and have allowed reconstructions of Antarctic temperature over the past 800,000 years (800 kyr; refs 1, 2). The relationship between the D/H ratio of mean annual precipitation and mean annual surface air temperature is said to be uniform +/-10% over East Antarctica and constant with time +/-20% (refs 3-5). In the absence of strong independent temperature proxy evidence allowing us to calibrate individual ice cores, prior general circulation model (GCM) studies have supported the assumption of constant uniform conversion for climates cooler than that of the present day. Here we analyse the three available 340 kyr East Antarctic ice core records alongside input from GCM modelling. We show that for warmer interglacial periods the relationship between temperature and the isotopic signature varies among ice core sites, and that therefore the conversions must be nonlinear for at least some sites. Model results indicate that the isotopic composition of East Antarctic ice is less sensitive to temperature changes during warmer climates. We conclude that previous temperature estimates from interglacial climates are likely to be too low. The available evidence is consistent with a peak Antarctic interglacial temperature that was at least 6 K higher than that of the present day -approximately double the widely quoted 3 +/- 1.5 K (refs 5, 6).

  5. Levoglucosan and phenols in Antarctic marine, coastal and plateau aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zangrando, Roberta; Barbaro, Elena; Vecchiato, Marco; Kehrwald, Natalie M; Barbante, Carlo; Gambaro, Andrea

    2016-02-15

    Due to its isolated location, Antarctica is a natural laboratory for studying atmospheric aerosols and pollution in remote areas. Here, we determined levoglucosan and phenolic compounds (PCs) at diverse Antarctic sites: on the plateau, a coastal station and during an oceanographic cruise. Levoglucosan and PCs reached the Antarctic plateau where they were observed in accumulation mode aerosols (with median levoglucosan concentrations of 6.4 pg m(-3) and 4.1 pg m(-3), and median PC concentrations of 15.0 pg m(-3) and 7.3 pg m(-3)). Aged aerosols arrived at the coastal site through katabatic circulation with the majority of the levoglucosan mass distributed on larger particulates (24.8 pg m(-3)), while PCs were present in fine particles (34.0 pg m(-3)). The low levoglucosan/PC ratios in Antarctic aerosols suggest that biomass burning aerosols only had regional, rather than local, sources. General acid/aldehyde ratios were lower at the coastal site than on the plateau. Levoglucosan and PCs determined during the oceanographic cruise were 37.6 pg m(-3) and 58.5 pg m(-3) respectively. Unlike levoglucosan, which can only be produced by biomass burning, PCs have both biomass burning and other sources. Our comparisons of these two types of compounds across a range of Antarctic marine, coastal, and plateau sites demonstrate that local marine sources dominate Antarctic PC concentrations.

  6. Divergent trajectories of Antarctic surface melt under two 21st century climate scenarios

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trusel, L.D.; Frey, Karen; Das, Sarah; Karnauskas, Kristopher; Kuipers Munneke, P.; van Meijgaard, E.; van den Broeke, M.R.

    2015-01-01

    Ice shelves modulate Antarctic contributions to sea-level rise and thereby represent a critical, climate-sensitive interface between the Antarctic ice sheet and the global ocean. Following rapid atmospheric warming over the past decades, Antarctic Peninsula ice shelves have progressively retreated,

  7. Isolation and characterization of Campylobacter spp. from Antarctic fur seals (Arctocephalus gazella) at Deception Island, Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Peña, F J; Pérez-Boto, D; Jiménez, C; San Miguel, E; Echeita, A; Rengifo-Herrera, C; García-Párraga, D; Ortega-Mora, L M; Pedraza-Díaz, S

    2010-09-01

    The presence of Campylobacter spp. was investigated in 41 Antarctic fur seals (Arctocephalus gazella) and 9 Weddell seals (Leptonychotes weddellii) at Deception Island, Antarctica. Infections were encountered in six Antarctic fur seals. The isolates, the first reported from marine mammals in the Antarctic region, were identified as Campylobacter insulaenigrae and Campylobacter lari.

  8. 78 FR 41960 - Notice of Permit Applications Received Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-12

    ... Environmental Protocol to the Antarctic Treaty. All other wastes would be packaged and removed to the yacht for... Notice of Permit Applications Received Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of Permit Applications Received under the Antarctic Conservation Act...

  9. 77 FR 9707 - U.S. Antarctic Program Blue Ribbon Panel Review; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-17

    ..., innovative, affordable, sustainable, and consistent with the Antarctic Treaty. Agenda: Present the Panel with... U.S. Antarctic Program Blue Ribbon Panel Review; Notice of Meeting In accordance with Federal... following meeting: Name: U.S. Antarctic Program Blue Ribbon Panel Review, 76826. Date/Time: March 5, 2012,...

  10. 78 FR 41959 - Notice of Permit Modification Received Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-12

    ... Modification Requested: The Foundation must report to the Antarctic Treaty annually, no later than June 1 on... Notice of Permit Modification Received Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of permit modification under the Antarctic Conservation Act of...

  11. 76 FR 63329 - U.S. Antarctic Program Blue Ribbon Panel Review; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-12

    ..., affordable, sustainable, and consistent with the Antarctic Treaty. Agenda: First meeting of the Panel to... Doc No: 2011-26281] NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION U.S. Antarctic Program Blue Ribbon Panel Review... National Science Foundation announces the following meeting: Name: U.S. Antarctic Program Blue Ribbon...

  12. 77 FR 1743 - U.S. Antarctic Program Blue Ribbon Panel; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-11

    ... sound, safe, innovative, affordable, sustainable, and consistent with the Antarctic Treaty. Agenda... U.S. Antarctic Program Blue Ribbon Panel; Notice of Meeting In accordance with Federal Advisory...: Name: U.S. Antarctic Program Blue Ribbon Panel Review, 76826. Date/Time: January 24, 2012, 8 a.m. to...

  13. 78 FR 51213 - Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-20

    ... Protocol on Environmental Protection to the Antarctic Treaty done at Madrid on October 4, 1991. The NSF is... Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of document availability under the Antarctic Conservation of 1978, as amended by...

  14. 77 FR 20852 - U.S. Antarctic Program Blue Ribbon Panel Review; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-06

    ... the Antarctic Treaty. Agenda: Present the Panel with additional programmatic information related to... U.S. Antarctic Program Blue Ribbon Panel Review; Notice of Meeting In accordance with Federal... following meeting: Name: U.S. Antarctic Program Blue Ribbon Panel Review, 76826. Date/Time: April 20,...

  15. 77 FR 38834 - Notice of Permit Applications Received Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ... Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of permit applications received under the Antarctic Conservation Act of.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The National Science Foundation, as directed by the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 (Pub. L. 95-541), as amended by the Antarctic Science, Tourism and Conservation Act of 1996,...

  16. 78 FR 28000 - Notice of Permit Applications Received Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-13

    ... Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of Permit Applications Received under the Antarctic Conservation Act of... National Science Foundation, as directed by the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 (Pub. L. 95-541), as amended by the Antarctic Science, Tourism and Conservation Act of 1996, has developed regulations for...

  17. 77 FR 67407 - Notice of Permit Applications Received Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-09

    ... Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of Permit Applications Received under the Antarctic Conservation Act of... National Science Foundation, as directed by the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 (Pub. L. 95-541), as amended by the Antarctic Science, Tourism and Conservation Act of 1996, has developed regulations for...

  18. 78 FR 59728 - Notice of Permit Applications Received Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-27

    ... the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 (Pub. L. 95-541), as amended by the Antarctic Science, Tourism... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Notice of Permit Applications Received Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 AGENCY:...

  19. ABOUT THE INTERNATIONAL GIS WORKSHOPON ANTARCTIC KING GEORGE ISLAND

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@With rapid scientific development and further exploration towards the nature, the human kind hopes to serve themselves by mastering the natural law. Countries all over the world set much value on the study of Antarctica and have obtained plenty and substantial achievements. So as to strengthen mutual understanding among the countries in Antarctic surveying and mapping and share the achievements, the "International GIS Workshop on Antarctic King George Island", Wuhan, July 6th~7th, 2000 was successfully held in the Lecture Hall of the National Laboratory for Information Engineering in Surveying, Mapping and Remote Sensing (LIESMARS). It was jointly held by the National Research Center on Antarctic Surveying and Mapping and LIESMARS, and sponsored by the National Polar Region Inspection Office, National Natural Scientific Foundation Committee, the State Bureau of Surveying and Mapping, the former Wuhan Technical University of Surveying and Mapping.

  20. Genetics differentiation between Arctic and Antarctic monothalamous foraminiferans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pawlowski, Jan; Majewski, Wojciech; Longet, David;

    2008-01-01

    Monothalamous (single-chambered) foraminifers are a major component of the benthic meiofauna in high latitude regions. Several morphologically similar species are common in the Arctic and Antarctic. However, it is uncertain whether these morphospecies are genetically identical, or whether...... their accurate identification is compromised by a lack of distinctive morphological features. To determine the relationship between Arctic and Antarctic species, we have compared SSU rDNA sequences of specimens belonging to four morphotaxa: Micrometula, Psammophaga, Gloiogullmia, and one morphospecies...... Hippocrepinella hirudinea from western Svalbard (Arctic) and McMurdo Sound (Antarctic). Wherever possible, we include in our analyses representatives of these taxa from the deep Arctic and Southern Oceans, as well as from Northern European fjords. We found that in all cases, the bipolar populations were clearly...

  1. (Environmental impact statement on the US Antarctic program)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, R.M.; Railsback, S.F.; McLean, R.B.

    1989-12-22

    Three staff members from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) participated in a site visit to US Antarctic Program (USAP) facilities at McMurdo Station, Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station, and remote field and support sites. Interviews were conducted with National Science Foundation, Navy, and ITT/Antarctic Services staff responsible for environmental management functions. The ORNL team visited all facilities at McMurdo Station, three remote field camps, a Navy refueling facility, South Pole Station, and Scott Base (a New Zealand installation). In general, the team found that environmental impacts of the USAP are minor for the Antarctic continent as a whole. Improvements for the handling and disposal of solid wastes and the discharge of wastewaters that have been initiated should help minimize environmental impacts of USAP activities. The information collected during the site visit will be used in a draft supplemental environmental impact statement on the USAP to be published for public review in June 1990.

  2. Mitochondrial function in Antarctic nototheniids with ND6 translocation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix C Mark

    Full Text Available Fish of the suborder Notothenioidei have successfully radiated into the Southern Ocean and today comprise the dominant fish sub-order in Antarctic waters in terms of biomass and species abundance. During evolution in the cold and stable Antarctic climate, the Antarctic lineage of notothenioids developed several unique physiological adaptations, which make them extremely vulnerable to the rapid warming of Antarctic waters currently observed. Only recently, a further phenomenon exclusive to notothenioid fish was reported: the translocation of the mitochondrial gene encoding the NADH Dehydrogenase subunit 6 (ND6, an indispensable part of complex I in the mitochondrial electron transport system.This study investigated the potential physiological consequences of ND6 translocation for the function and thermal sensitivity of the electron transport system in isolated liver mitochondria of the two nototheniid species Notothenia coriiceps and Notothenia rossii, with special attention to the contributions of complex I (NADH DH and complex II (Succinate DH to oxidative phosphorylation. Furthermore, enzymatic activities of NADH:Cytochrome c Oxidoreductase and Cytochrome C Oxidase were measured in membrane-enriched tissue extracts.During acute thermal challenge (0-15°C, capacities of mitochondrial respiration and enzymatic function in the liver could only be increased until 9°C. Mitochondrial complex I (NADH Dehydrogenase was fully functional but displayed a higher thermal sensitivity than the other complexes of the electron transport system, which may specifically result from its unique amino acid composition, revealing a lower degree of stability in notothenioids in general. We interpret the translocation of ND6 as functionally neutral but the change in amino acid sequence as adaptive and supportive of cold stenothermy in Antarctic nototheniids. From these findings, an enhanced sensitivity to ocean warming can be deduced for Antarctic notothenioid fish.

  3. Mitochondrial function in Antarctic nototheniids with ND6 translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Felix C; Lucassen, Magnus; Strobel, Anneli; Barrera-Oro, Esteban; Koschnick, Nils; Zane, Lorenzo; Patarnello, Tomaso; Pörtner, Hans O; Papetti, Chiara

    2012-01-01

    Fish of the suborder Notothenioidei have successfully radiated into the Southern Ocean and today comprise the dominant fish sub-order in Antarctic waters in terms of biomass and species abundance. During evolution in the cold and stable Antarctic climate, the Antarctic lineage of notothenioids developed several unique physiological adaptations, which make them extremely vulnerable to the rapid warming of Antarctic waters currently observed. Only recently, a further phenomenon exclusive to notothenioid fish was reported: the translocation of the mitochondrial gene encoding the NADH Dehydrogenase subunit 6 (ND6), an indispensable part of complex I in the mitochondrial electron transport system.This study investigated the potential physiological consequences of ND6 translocation for the function and thermal sensitivity of the electron transport system in isolated liver mitochondria of the two nototheniid species Notothenia coriiceps and Notothenia rossii, with special attention to the contributions of complex I (NADH DH) and complex II (Succinate DH) to oxidative phosphorylation. Furthermore, enzymatic activities of NADH:Cytochrome c Oxidoreductase and Cytochrome C Oxidase were measured in membrane-enriched tissue extracts.During acute thermal challenge (0-15°C), capacities of mitochondrial respiration and enzymatic function in the liver could only be increased until 9°C. Mitochondrial complex I (NADH Dehydrogenase) was fully functional but displayed a higher thermal sensitivity than the other complexes of the electron transport system, which may specifically result from its unique amino acid composition, revealing a lower degree of stability in notothenioids in general. We interpret the translocation of ND6 as functionally neutral but the change in amino acid sequence as adaptive and supportive of cold stenothermy in Antarctic nototheniids. From these findings, an enhanced sensitivity to ocean warming can be deduced for Antarctic notothenioid fish.

  4. Antarctic marine biodiversity and deep-sea hydrothermal vents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven L Chown

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The diversity of many marine benthic groups is unlike that of most other taxa. Rather than declining from the tropics to the poles, much of the benthos shows high diversity in the Southern Ocean. Moreover, many species are unique to the Antarctic region. Recent work has shown that this is also true of the communities of Antarctic deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Vent ecosystems have been documented from many sites across the globe, associated with the thermally and chemically variable habitats found around these, typically high temperature, streams that are rich in reduced compounds and polymetallic sulphides. The animal communities of the East Scotia Ridge vent ecosystems are very different to those elsewhere, though the microbiota, which form the basis of vent food webs, show less differentiation. Much of the biological significance of deep-sea hydrothermal vents lies in their biodiversity, the diverse biochemistry of their bacteria, the remarkable symbioses among many of the marine animals and these bacteria, and the prospects that investigations of these systems hold for understanding the conditions that may have led to the first appearance of life. The discovery of diverse and unusual Antarctic hydrothermal vent ecosystems provides opportunities for new understanding in these fields. Moreover, the Antarctic vents south of 60°S benefit from automatic conservation under the Convention on the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources and the Antarctic Treaty. Other deep-sea hydrothermal vents located in international waters are not protected and may be threatened by growing interests in deep-sea mining.

  5. Antarctic Porifera database from the Spanish benthic expeditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Rios

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The information about the sponges in this dataset is derived from the samples collected during five Spanish Antarctic expeditions: Bentart 94, Bentart 95, Gebrap 96, Ciemar 99/00 and Bentart 2003. Samples were collected in the Antarctic Peninsula and Bellingshausen Sea at depths ranging from 4 to 2044 m using va­rious sampling gears.The Antarctic Porifera database from the Spanish benthic expeditions is unique as it provides in­formation for an under-explored region of the Southern Ocean (Bellingshausen Sea. It fills an information gap on Antarctic deep-sea sponges, for which there were previously very few data.This phylum is an important part of the Antarctic biota and plays a key role in the structure of the Antarctic marine benthic community due to its considerable diversity and predominance in different areas. It is often a dominant component of Southern Ocean benthic communities.The quality of the data was controlled very thoroughly with GPS systems onboard the R/V Hesperides and by checking the data against the World Porifera Database (which is part of the World Register of Marine Species, WoRMS. The data are therefore fit for completing checklists, inclusion in biodivers­ity pattern analysis and niche modelling. The authors can be contacted if any additional information is needed before carrying out detailed biodiversity or biogeographic studies.The dataset currently contains 767 occurrence data items that have been checked for systematic reliability. This database is not yet complete and the collection is growing. Specimens are stored in the author’s collection at the Spanish Institute of Oceanography (IEO in the city of Gijón (Spain. The data are available in GBIF.

  6. 45 CFR 670.29 - Designation of Antarctic Specially Protected Areas, Specially Managed Areas and Historic Sites...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... the Antarctic Treaty Parties for special protection and are hereby designated as Antarctic Specially... Elizabeth Land, East Antarctica (b) The following areas have been designated by the Antarctic Treaty Parties... Antarctica (c) The following areas have been designated by the Antarctic Treaty Parties as historic sites...

  7. DECADAL VARIABILITY OF THE ANTARCTIC OSCILLATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龚道溢; 王绍武

    2001-01-01

    This paper summarizes the long-term and decadal time-scale fluctuations of atmospheric circulation in the Southern (Hemisphere) middle and high latitudes. The long time series of Antarctic Oscillation Indices (AOIs) were established for January, April, July and October based on the historical sea level pressure maps and NCEP/NCAR reanalysis surface pressure data set. It was found that the AOI of January had upward trend at a rate of 1.17 hPa/100 a, and July had downward trend at a rate of -1.49 hPa/100 a since 1871. The method of wavelet analysis was applied to detect the low frequency characteristics of AOIs, and it is clear that there are decadal variations in the time scale of about 20-30 years in all 4 indices. Since the averaged value of 4 months could explain most variance of annual AOI thus it is reasonable using the mean AOI of January, April, July and October to represent the annual AOI. The value of annual AOI was much lower in periods of about 1894-1901. 1910-1935, and was much higher in periods of about 1880 -1893, 1936-1945. The positive anomalies were remarkable since 1980s. Power spectra of modeled AOIs from Hadley Center Control Integration (HCCI) were compared with the observations, it is found that the interannual time scale frequencies were more significant than decadal frequencies. But, there also had the possibility for generating weak decadal fluctuations in some special months and years by Hasselmann mechanism.

  8. Microbiology and Geochemistry of Antarctic Paleosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaney, W. C.; Malloch, D.; Hancock, R. G. V.; Campbell, I. B.; Sheppard, D.

    2000-08-01

    Samples of ancient soils from horizons in paleosols from the Quartermain Mountains (Aztec and New Mountain areas of the Antarctic Dry Valleys) were analyzed for their chemical composition and microbiology to determine the accumulation and movement of salts and other soluble constituents. The salt concentrations are of special interest because they are considered to be a function of age, derived in part from nearby oceanic and high altitude atmospheric sources. The geochemistry of ancient Miocene-age paleosols in these areas is the direct result of the deposition and weathering of till, derived principally from dolerite and sandstone source rock, in association with airborne-influxed salts. Paleosols nearer the coast have greater contents of chlorine, and farther inland near the Inland Ice Sheet, nitrogen tends to increase on a relative basis. The accumulation and vertical distribution of salts and other soluble chemical elements indicate relative amounts of movement in the profile over long periods of time, to the order of several million years. Iron, both in total concentration and in the form of various extracts, indicates it can be used as a geochronometer to assess the buildup of goethite plus hematite over time in the paleosols. Trends for ferrihydrite, a partially soluble Fe-hydroxide, shows limited profile translocation that might be related to the movement of salt. Six of the eight selected subsamples from paleosol horizons in three soil profiles contained nil concentrations of bacteria and fungi. However, two horizons at depths of between three to eight centimeters yielded several colonies of the fungi Beauveria bassiana and Penicillium spp., indicating some input of organic carbon. Beauveria bassiana is often reported in association with insects and is used commercially for the biological control of some insect pests. Penicillium species are commonly isolated from Arctic, temperate and tropical soils and are known to utilize a wide variety of organic

  9. Running PILOT: operational challenges and plans for an Antarctic Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Andrew; Saunders, Will; Gillingham, Peter; Ward, David; Storey, John; Lawrence, Jon; Haynes, Roger

    2008-07-01

    We highlight the operational challenges and planned solutions faced by an optical observatory taking advantage of the superior astronomical observing potential of the Antarctic plateau. Unique operational aspects of an Antarctic optical observatory arise from its remoteness, the polar environment and the unusual observing cycle afforded by long continuous periods of darkness and daylight. PILOT is planned to be run with remote observing via satellite communications, and must overcome both limited physical access and data transfer. Commissioning and lifetime operations must deal with extended logistics chains, continual wintertime darkness, extremely low temperatures and frost accumulation amidst other challenging issues considered in the PILOT operational plan, and discussed in this presentation.

  10. Antarctic marine gravity field from high-density satellite altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandwell, David T.

    1992-01-01

    High-density (about 2-km profile spacing) Geosat/GM altimetry profiles were obtained for Antarctic waters (6-deg S to 72 deg S) and converted to vertical gravity gradient, using Laplace's equation to directly calculate gravity gradient from vertical deflection grids and Fourier analysis to construct gravity anomalies from two vertical deflection grids. The resultant gravity grids have resolution and accuracy comparable to shipboard gravity profiles. The obtained gravity maps display many interesting and previously uncharted features, such as a propagating rift wake and a large 'leaky transform' along the Pacific-Antarctic Rise.

  11. Pogonophryne neyelovi, a new species of Antarctic short-barbeled plunderfish (Perciformes, Notothenioidei, Artedidraconidae from the deep Ross Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennadiy Shandikov

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper continues descriptions of new deep-water Antarctic barbeled plunderfishes of the poorly known and the most speciose notothenioid genus Pogonophryne. It is based on a comprehensive collection obtained by the authors in 2009–2010 during an Antarctic toothfish (Dissostichus mawsoni fishing trip. A new species, the hopbeard plunderfish P. neyelovi, the twenty-second species of the genus, is described. The new species belongs to dorsally-spotted short-barbeled species forming the “P. mentella” group. Pogonophryne neyelovi sp.n. is characterized by the following combination of characters: a very short and small mental barbel with an ovaloid and short terminal expansion covered by flattened scale-like processes that are mostly bluntly palmate; a moderately protruding lower jaw; a high second dorsal fin almost uniformly black and lacking a sharply elevated anterior lobe; pectoral fins striped anteriorly and uniformly light posteriorly; the anal and pelvic fins light; the dorsal surface of the head and the area anterior to the first dorsal fin covered with large, irregular dark brown blotches and spots; the ventral surface of the head, breast and belly without sharp dark markings. The new species is compared to the closest species P. brevibarbata, P. tronio, and P. ventrimaculata. English vernacular names are proposed for all species of the genus.

  12. Contrasting time trends of organic contaminants in Antarctic pelagic and benthic food webs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brink, Nico W; Riddle, Martin J; van den Heuvel-Greve, Martine; van Franeker, Jan Andries

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate that pelagic Antarctic seabirds show significant decreases in concentrations of some persistent organic pollutants. Trends in Adélie penguins and Southern fulmars fit in a general pattern revealed by a broad literature review. Downward trends are also visible in pelagic fish, contrasting sharply with steady or increasing concentrations in Antarctic benthic organisms. Transfer of contaminants between Antarctic pelagic and benthic food webs is associated with seasonal sea-ice dynamics which may influence the balance between the final receptors of contaminants under different climatic conditions. This complicates the predictability of future trends of emerging compounds in the Antarctic ecosystem, such as of the brominated compounds that we detected in Antarctic petrels. The discrepancy in trends between pelagic and benthic organisms shows that Antarctic biota are still final receptors of globally released organic contaminants and it remains questionable whether the total environmental burden of contaminants in the Antarctic ecosystem is declining.

  13. Antarctomyces pellizariae sp. nov., a new, endemic, blue, snow resident psychrophilic ascomycete fungus from Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Menezes, Graciéle C A; Godinho, Valéria M; Porto, Bárbara A; Gonçalves, Vívian N; Rosa, Luiz H

    2017-03-01

    In the present study, we have identified and characterised a new snow resident ascomycete blue stain fungus from Antarctica named Antarctomyces pellizariae sp. nov. Menezes, Godinho, Porto, Gonçalves and Rosa, using polyphasic taxonomy techniques. This fungal species was recovered from the seasonal snow of the Antarctic Peninsula. Antarctomyces pellizariae displayed different macro- and micromorphology when compared with A. psychrotrophicus Stchigel and Guarro, the only other Antarctomyces species reported until date. Antarctomyces pellizariae showed psychrophilic behavior and very low growth rate at 22-25 °C, quite different from A. psychrotrophicus that has a higher growth rate at mesophilic temperatures. In addition, micromorphological characteristics and the analysis of the nuclear rDNA internal transcribed spacer, β-tubulin, and RNA polymerase II regions revealed that A. pellizariae is a new species that is related to A. psychrotrophicus and Thelebolus species. Since the Antarctic Peninsula is reported to be one of the main regions of the earth experiencing the effects of global change in climate, species, such as A. pellizariae, might provide information about these effects on the endemic Antarctic biota. In addition, A. pellizariae displayed psychrophilic behavior and might be a source of interesting anti-freeze compounds that might prove useful in biotechnological processes.

  14. Emplacement of Antarctic ice sheet mass affects circumpolar ocean flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rugenstein, M.; Stocchi, P.; van der Heydt, A.; Brinkhuis, H.

    2014-01-01

    During the Cenozoic the Antarctic continent experienced large fluctuations in ice-sheet volume. We investigate the effects of Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) on Southern Ocean circulation for the first continental scale glaciation of Antarctica (~ 34 Myr) by combining solid Earth and ocean dynami

  15. Pioneering work of CAS researchers in Antarctic expedition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ The first observatory at Dome A On 12 January, China scientific expedition to Antarctica succeeded for a second time in climbing up to Dome A, the highest Antarctic icecap peak. A similar feat was made by Chinese scientists about three years ago in January 2005, leaving first human footprints there.

  16. Spatial-temporal characters of Antarctic sea ice variation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Lijuan; Lu Longhua; Bian Lingen

    2004-01-01

    Using sea ice concentration dataset covering the period of 1968-2002 obtained from the Hadley Center of UK, this paper investigates characters of Antarctic sea ice variations .The finding demonstrates that the change of mean sea-ice extent is almost consistent with that of sea-ice area, so sea-ice extent can be chosen to go on this research. The maximum and the minimum of Antarctic sea ice appear in September and February respectively. The maximum and the maximal variation of sea ice appear in Weddell Sea and Ross Sea, while the minimum and the minimal variation of sea-ice appear in Antarctic Peninsula. In recent 35 years, as a whole, Antarctic sea ice decreased distinctly. Moreover, there are 5 subdivision characteristic regions considering their different variations. Hereinto, the sea-ice extent of Weddell Sea and Ross Sea regions extends and area increases, while the sea-ice extent of the other three regions contracts and area decreases. They are all of obvious 2-4 years and 5-7 years significant oscillation periods. It is of significance for further understanding the sea-ice-air interaction in Antarctica region and discussing the relationship between sea-ice variation and atmospheric circulation.

  17. Occurrence of a taurine derivative in an antarctic glass sponge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Marianna; Núñez-Pons, Laura; Ciavatta, M Letizia; Castelluccio, Francesco; Avila, Conxita; Gavagnin, Margherita

    2014-04-01

    The n-butanol extract of an Antarctic hexactinellid sponge, Anoxycalyx (Scolymastra) joubini, was found to contain a taurine-conjugated anthranilic acid, never reported so far either as a natural product or by synthesis. The compound was inactive against human cancer cells in an in vitro growth inhibitory test, and also showed no antibacterial activity.

  18. Mass Gains of the Antarctic Ice Sheet Exceed Losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwally, H. Jay; Li, Jun; Robbins, John; Saba, Jack L.; Yi, Donghui; Brenner, Anita; Bromwich, David

    2012-01-01

    During 2003 to 2008, the mass gain of the Antarctic ice sheet from snow accumulation exceeded the mass loss from ice discharge by 49 Gt/yr (2.5% of input), as derived from ICESat laser measurements of elevation change. The net gain (86 Gt/yr) over the West Antarctic (WA) and East Antarctic ice sheets (WA and EA) is essentially unchanged from revised results for 1992 to 2001 from ERS radar altimetry. Imbalances in individual drainage systems (DS) are large (-68% to +103% of input), as are temporal changes (-39% to +44%). The recent 90 Gt/yr loss from three DS (Pine Island, Thwaites-Smith, and Marie-Bryd Coast) of WA exceeds the earlier 61 Gt/yr loss, consistent with reports of accelerating ice flow and dynamic thinning. Similarly, the recent 24 Gt/yr loss from three DS in the Antarctic Peninsula (AP) is consistent with glacier accelerations following breakup of the Larsen B and other ice shelves. In contrast, net increases in the five other DS of WA and AP and three of the 16 DS in East Antarctica (EA) exceed the increased losses. Alternate interpretations of the mass changes driven by accumulation variations are given using results from atmospheric-model re-analysis and a parameterization based on 5% change in accumulation per degree of observed surface temperature change. A slow increase in snowfall with climate waRMing, consistent with model predictions, may be offsetting increased dynamic losses.

  19. Conclusions: Multiple dimensions of human engagement with the Antarctic environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liggett, D.; Lamers, M.A.J.; Tin, T.; Maher, P.T.

    2014-01-01

    The future scenarios developed by the contributors to this volume communicate a strong message. They concur that existing environmental management practices and the current system of governance are insufficient to meet the obligations set out under the Madrid Protocol to protect the Antarctic enviro

  20. TEMPERATURE REQUIREMENTS AND BIOGEOGRAPHY OF ANTARCTIC, ARCTIC AND AMPHIEQUATORIAL SEAWEEDS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WIENCKE, C; BARTSCH, [No Value; BISCHOFF, B; PETERS, AF; BREEMAN, AM

    1994-01-01

    The temperature requirements for growth and survival of cold water seaweeds from both Hemispheres are compared and discussed in relation to the climatic history of the various regions and in relation to the origin of amphiequatorial distribution patterns. Endemic Antarctic species are most strongly

  1. Local scaling characteristics of Antarctic surface layer turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Basu

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the past years, several studies have validated Nieuwstadt's local scaling hypothesis by utilizing turbulence observations from the mid-latitude, nocturnal stable boundary layers. In this work, we probe into the local scaling characteristics of polar, long-lived stable boundary layers by analyzing turbulence data from the South Pole region of the Antarctic Plateau.

  2. A multivariate analysis of Antarctic sea ice since 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magalhaes Neto, Newton de; Evangelista, Heitor [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (Uerj), LARAMG - Laboratorio de Radioecologia e Mudancas Globais, Maracana, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Tanizaki-Fonseca, Kenny [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (Uerj), LARAMG - Laboratorio de Radioecologia e Mudancas Globais, Maracana, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Dept. Analise Geoambiental, Inst. de Geociencias, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Penello Meirelles, Margareth Simoes [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ)/Geomatica, Maracana, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Garcia, Carlos Eiras [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande (FURG), Laboratorio de Oceanografia Fisica, Rio Grande, RS (Brazil)

    2012-03-15

    Recent satellite observations have shown an increase in the total extent of Antarctic sea ice, during periods when the atmosphere and oceans tend to be warmer surrounding a significant part of the continent. Despite an increase in total sea ice, regional analyses depict negative trends in the Bellingshausen-Amundsen Sea and positive trends in the Ross Sea. Although several climate parameters are believed to drive the formation of Antarctic sea ice and the local atmosphere, a descriptive mechanism that could trigger such differences in trends are still unknown. In this study we employed a multivariate analysis in order to identify the response of the Antarctic sea ice with respect to commonly utilized climate forcings/parameters, as follows: (1) The global air surface temperature, (2) The global sea surface temperature, (3) The atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration, (4) The South Annular Mode, (5) The Nino 3, (6) The Nino (3 + 4, 7) The Nino 4, (8) The Southern Oscillation Index, (9) The Multivariate ENSO Index, (10) the Total Solar Irradiance, (11) The maximum O{sub 3} depletion area, and (12) The minimum O{sub 3} concentration over Antarctica. Our results indicate that western Antarctic sea ice is simultaneously impacted by several parameters; and that the minimum, mean, and maximum sea ice extent may respond to a separate set of climatic/geochemical parameters. (orig.)

  3. Metagenomic analysis of a Southern Maritime Antarctic soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Anthony Pearce

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Our current understanding of Antarctic soils is derived from direct culture on selective media, biodiversity studies based on clone library construction and analysis, quantitative PCR amplification of specific gene sequences and the application of generic microarrays for microbial community analysis. Here, we investigated the biodiversity and functional potential of a soil community at Mars Oasis on Alexander Island in the southern Maritime Antarctic, by applying 454 pyrosequencing technology to a metagenomic library constructed from soil genomic DNA. The results suggest that the commonly cited range of phylotypes used in clone library construction and analysis of 78-730 OTUs (de-replicated to 30-140 provides low coverage of the major groups present (~5%. The vast majority of functional genes (>77% were for structure, carbohydrate metabolism and DNA/RNA processing and modification. This study suggests that prokaryotic diversity in Antarctic terrestrial environments appears to be limited at the generic level, with Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria being common. Cyanobacteria were surprisingly under-represented at 2.6% of sequences, although ~1% of the genes identified were involved in CO2 fixation. At the sequence level there appeared to be much greater heterogeneity, and this might be due to high divergence within the relatively restricted lineages which have successfully colonized Antarctic terrestrial environments.

  4. Present and future variations in Antarctic firn air content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ligtenberg, S. R M; Kuipers Munneke, P.; Van Den Broeke, M. R.

    2014-01-01

    A firn densification model (FDM) is used to assess spatial and temporal (1979-2200) variations in the depth, density and temperature of the firn layer covering the Antarctic ice sheet (AIS). A time-dependent version of the FDM is compared to more commonly used steady-state FDM results. Although the

  5. Depth and density of the Antarctic firn layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broeke, M.R.

    2008-01-01

    The depth and density of the Antarctic firn layer is modeled, using a combination of regional climate model output and a steady-state firn densification model. The modeled near-surface climate (temperature, wind speed, and accumulation) and the depth of two critical density levels (550 kg m−3 and 83

  6. The present and future state of the Antarctic firn layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ligtenberg, S.R.M.

    2014-01-01

    Firn is the transitional product between fresh snow and glacier ice and acts as a boundary between the atmosphere and the glacier ice of the Antarctic Ice Sheet (AIS). Spatiotemporal variations in firn layer characteristics are therefore important to consider when assessing the mass balance of the A

  7. Oxygen Isotopes and Origin of Opal in an Antarctic Ureilite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downes, H.; Beard, A. D.; Franchi, I. A.; Greenwood, R. C.

    2016-08-01

    Fragments of opal (SiO2.nH2O) in several internal chips of a single Antarctic polymict ureilite meteorite Elephant Moraine (EET) 83309 have been studied by NanoSIMS to determine their oxygen isotope compositions and hence constrain their origin.

  8. Antarctic Cenozoic climate history from sedimentary records: ANDRILL and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, R M; Barrett, P J; Levy, R S; Naish, T R; Golledge, N R; Pyne, A

    2016-01-28

    Mounting evidence from models and geological data implies that the Antarctic Ice Sheet may behave in an unstable manner and retreat rapidly in response to a warming climate, which is a key factor motivating efforts to improve estimates of Antarctic ice volume contributions to future sea-level rise. Here, we review Antarctic cooling history since peak temperatures of the Middle Eocene Climatic Optimum (approx. 50 Ma) to provide a framework for future initiatives to recover sediment cores from subglacial lakes and sedimentary basins in Antarctica's continental interior. While the existing inventory of cores has yielded important insights into the biotic and climatic evolution of Antarctica, strata have numerous and often lengthy time breaks, providing a framework of 'snapshots' through time. Further cores, and more work on existing cores, are needed to reconcile Antarctic records with the more continuous 'far-field' records documenting the evolution of global ice volume and deep-sea temperature. To achieve this, we argue for an integrated portfolio of drilling and coring missions that encompasses existing methodologies using ship- and sea-ice-/ice-shelf-based drilling platforms as well as recently developed seafloor-based drilling and subglacial access systems. We conclude by reviewing key technological issues that will need to be overcome.

  9. Maneuver simulation model of an experimental hovercraft for the Antarctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murao, Rinichi

    Results of an investigation of a hovercraft model designed for Antarctic conditions are presented. The buoyancy characteristics, the propellant control system, and simulation model control are examined. An ACV (air cushion vehicle) model of the hovercraft is used to examine the flexibility and friction of the skirt. Simulation results are presented which show the performance of the hovercraft.

  10. Thermoluminescence study of the terrestrial ages of antarctic meteorites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakanishi, Akio [Shiga Univ., Otsu (Japan)

    1994-04-01

    The terrestrial ages of Antarctic meteorites were estimated from the thermoluminescence (TL) intensity of the fusion crust. It was found that there is a good correlation between the TL intensities and terrestrial ages which had been previously determined by cosmogenic radionuclide abundance. (Author).

  11. Terrestrial Ages of Antarctic Meteorites: Up Date 1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiizumi, K.; Caffee, M. W.; Welten, K. C.

    2000-01-01

    We are continuing our ongoing study of cosmogenic nuclides in Antarctic meteorites. In addition to the studies of exposure histories of meteorites, we study terrestrial ages and pairing of Antarctic meteorites and desert meteorites. Terrestrial ages of Antarctic meteorites provide information on meteorite accumulation mechanisms, mean weathering lifetimes, and influx rates. The determination of Cl-36 (half-life=3.01 x 10(exp 5) y) terrestrial ages is one of our long-term on-going projects, however, in many instances neither Cl-36 or C-14 (5,730 y) yields an accurate terrestrial age. Using Ca-41 (1.04 x 10(exp 5) y) for terrestrial age determinations solves this problem by filling the gap in half-life between C-14 and Cl-36 ages. We are now applying the new Ca-41 - Cl-36 terrestrial age method as well as the Cl-36 - Be-10 method to Antarctic meteorites. Our measurements and C-14 terrestrial age determinations by the University of Arizona group are always complementary.

  12. Molecular evolution of hemoglobins of Antarctic fishes (Notothenioidei)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stam, W.T.; Beintema, J.J; D Avino, R.; Tamburrini, M.; di Prisco, G.

    1997-01-01

    Amino acid sequences of alpha- and beta-chains of human hemoglobin and of hemoglobins of coelacanth and 24 teleost fish species, including 11 antarctic and two temperate Notothenioidei, were analyzed using maximum parsimony. Trees were derived for the alpha- and beta-chains separately and for tandem

  13. Biochemical composition of Antarctic zooplankton from the Indian Ocean sector

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ingole, B.S.; Parulekar, A.H.

    variations and ranged between 8.02 and 29.9% (x = 19.57 + or - 6.25). Values for carbohydrate content varied from 11.01 to 27.65% (x = 19.62 + or - 4.80). Higher accumulation of lipids in Antarctic zooplankton during phytoplankton blooms (austral summer...

  14. Microbial ecology and biogeochemistry of continental Antarctic soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Don A Cowan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The Antarctica Dry Valleys are regarded as the coldest hyperarid desert system on Earth. While a wide variety of environmental stressors including very low minimum temperatures, frequent freeze-thaw cycles and low water availability impose severe limitations to life, suitable niches for abundant microbial colonization exist. Antarctic desert soils contain much higher levels of microbial diversity than previously thought. Edaphic niches, including cryptic and refuge habitats, microbial mats and permafrost soils all harbour microbial communities which drive key biogeochemical cycling processes. For example, lithobionts (hypoliths and endoliths possess a genetic capacity for nitrogen and carbon cycling, polymer degradation and other system processes. Nitrogen fixation rates of hypoliths, as assessed through acetylene reduction assays, suggest that these communities are a significant input source for nitrogen into these oligotrophic soils. Here we review aspects of microbial diversity in Antarctic soils with an emphasis on functionality and capacity. We assess current knowledge regarding adaptations to Antarctic soil environments and highlight the current threats to Antarctic desert soil communities.

  15. On the interpretation of stable isotopes in Antarctic precipitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helsen, M.M.

    2006-01-01

    Polar ice caps contain valuable information about the earth's climate. This thesis investigates the extent to which meteorological data are stored in the composition of snow in order to improve the interpretation of deep ice cores from the Antarctic ice cap. It is demonstrated that annual temperatur

  16. Control of Branchionus sp. and Amoeba sp. in cultures of Arthrospira sp. Control de Branchionus sp. y Amoeba sp. en cultivos de Arthrospira sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Méndez

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Cultivation of cyanobacterium Arthrospira sp. has been developed in many countries for the production of proteins, pigments and other compounds. Outdoor mass cultures are often affected by biological contamination, drastically reducing productivity as far as bringing death. This study evaluates the control of Branchionus sp. and Amoeba sp. with two chemical compounds: urea (U and ammonium bicarbonate (AB, in laboratory conditions and outdoor mass culture of Arthrospira sp. The lethal concentration 100 (LC100 at 24 h for Branchionus sp. and Amoeba sp. determined was of 60-80 mg L-1 (U and 100-150 mg L-1 (AB. The average effective inhibition concentration for 50% of the population (IC50 in Arthrospira sp., after 72 h, was 80 mg L-1 (U and 150 mg L-1 (AB. The application of doses of 60 mg L-1 (U or 100 mg L-1 (AB in the outdoor mass culture of this contaminated microalga, completely inhibited grazing and did not affect the growth of Arthrospira sp. but rather promoted rapid recovery of algal density at levels prior to infestation. These compounds provided an economical and effective control of predators in cultures of Arthrospira sp.El cultivo de la cianobacteria Arthrospira sp. ha sido desarrollado en muchos países para la obtención de proteínas, pigmentos y otros compuestos. Cultivo que a nivel industrial se ve afectado frecuentemente por contaminación biológica, reduciendo drásticamente la productividad hasta causar la muerte. Este estudio evalúa el control de Branchionus sp. y de Amoeba sp. con dos compuestos químicos, la urea (U y bicarbonato de amonio (AB en cultivos de Arthrospira sp. La concentración letal 100 (LC100 determinada a las 24 h para Branchionus sp. y Amoeba sp. fue de 60-80 mg L-1 (U y 100-150 mg L-1 (AB. La concentración media de inhibición efectiva, después de 72 h, para el 50% de la población (IC50 en Arthrospira fue de 80 mg L-1 (U y 150 mg L-1 (AB. La aplicación de dosis de 60 mg L-1 (U ó 100 mg L-1 (AB en

  17. Microbial biomass and basal respiration of selected Sub-Antarctic and Antarctic soils in the areas of some Russian polar stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abakumov, E.; Mukhametova, N.

    2014-07-01

    Antarctica is a unique place for soil, biological, and ecological investigations. Soils of Antarctica have been studied intensively during the last century, when different national Antarctic expeditions visited the sixth continent with the aim of investigating nature and the environment. Antarctic investigations are comprised of field surveys mainly in the terrestrial landscapes, where the polar stations of different countries are situated. That is why the main and most detailed soil surveys were conducted in the McMurdo Valleys, Transantarctic Mountains, South Shetland Islands, Larsemann Hills and the Schirmacher Oasis. Our investigations were conducted during the 53rd and 55th Russian Antarctic expeditions in the base of soil pits, and samples were collected in Sub-Antarctic and Antarctic regions. Sub-Antarctic or maritime landscapes are considered to be very different from Antarctic landscapes due to differing climatic and geogenic conditions. Soils of diverse zonal landscapes were studied with the aim of assessing the microbial biomass level, basal respiration rates and metabolic activity of microbial communities. This investigation shows that Antarctic soils are quite diverse in profile organization and carbon content. In general, Sub-Antarctic soils are characterized by more developed humus (sod) organo-mineral horizons as well as by an upper organic layer. The most developed organic layers were revealed in peat soils of King George Island, where its thickness reach, in some cases, was 80 cm. These soils as well as soils formed under guano are characterized by the highest amount of total organic carbon (TOC), between 7.22 and 33.70%. Coastal and continental Antarctic soils exhibit less developed Leptosols, Gleysols, Regolith and rare Ornhitosol, with TOC levels between 0.37 and 4.67%. The metabolic ratios and basal respiration were higher in Sub-Antarctic soils than in Antarctic ones, which can be interpreted as a result of higher amounts of fresh organic

  18. Fundamental differences between Arctic and Antarctic ozone depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Susan; Haskins, Jessica; Ivy, Diane J; Min, Flora

    2014-04-29

    Antarctic ozone depletion is associated with enhanced chlorine from anthropogenic chlorofluorocarbons and heterogeneous chemistry under cold conditions. The deep Antarctic "hole" contrasts with the generally weaker depletions observed in the warmer Arctic. An unusually cold Arctic stratospheric season occurred in 2011, raising the question of how the Arctic ozone chemistry in that year compares with others. We show that the averaged depletions near 20 km across the cold part of each pole are deeper in Antarctica than in the Arctic for all years, although 2011 Arctic values do rival those seen in less-depleted years in Antarctica. We focus not only on averages but also on extremes, to address whether or not Arctic ozone depletion can be as extreme as that observed in the Antarctic. This information provides unique insights into the contrasts between Arctic and Antarctic ozone chemistry. We show that extreme Antarctic ozone minima fall to or below 0.1 parts per million by volume (ppmv) at 18 and 20 km (about 70 and 50 mbar) whereas the lowest Arctic ozone values are about 0.5 ppmv at these altitudes. At a higher altitude of 24 km (30-mbar level), no Arctic data below about 2 ppmv have been observed, including in 2011, in contrast to values more than an order of magnitude lower in Antarctica. The data show that the lowest ozone values are associated with temperatures below -80 °C to -85 °C depending upon altitude, and are closely associated with reduced gaseous nitric acid concentrations due to uptake and/or sedimentation in polar stratospheric cloud particles.

  19. Evidence for widespread endemism among Antarctic micro-organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyverman, Wim; Verleyen, Elie; Wilmotte, Annick; Hodgson, Dominic A.; Willems, Anne; Peeters, Karolien; Van de Vijver, Bart; De Wever, Aaike; Leliaert, Frederik; Sabbe, Koen

    2010-08-01

    Understanding the enormous diversity of microbes, their multiple roles in the functioning of ecosystems, and their response to large-scale environmental and climatic changes, are at the forefront of the international research agenda. In Antarctica, where terrestrial and lacustrine environments are predominantly microbial realms, an active and growing community of microbial ecologists is probing this diversity and its role in ecosystem processes. In a broader context, this work has the potential to make a significant contribution to the long-standing debate as to whether microbes are fundamentally different from macroorganisms in their biogeography. According to the ubiquity hypothesis, microbial community composition is not constrained by dispersal limitation and is solely the result of species sorting along environmental gradients. However, recent work on several groups of microalgae is challenging this view. Global analyses using morphology-based diatom inventories have demonstrated that, in addition to environmental harshness, geographical isolation underlies the strong latitudinal gradients in local and regional diversity in the Southern hemisphere. Increasing evidence points to a strong regionalization of diatom floras in the Antarctic and sub-Antarctic regions, mirroring the biogeographical regions that have been recognized for macroorganisms. Likewise, the application of molecular-phylogenetic techniques to cultured and uncultured diversity revealed a high number of Antarctic endemics among cyanobacteria and green algae. Calibration of these phylogenies suggests that several clades have an ancient evolutionary history within the Antarctic continent, possibly dating back to 330 Ma. These findings are in line with the current view on the origin of Antarctic terrestrial metazoa, including springtails, chironomids and mites, with most evidence suggesting a long history of geographic isolation on a multi-million year, even pre-Gondwana break-up timescale.

  20. Evaluation of the biological toxicity of lfuorine in Antarctic krill

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ling; LU Xiaoqi; WANG Zhangmin; QIN Liqiang; LIN Zhiqin; YUAN Linxi; ZHANG Wen; YIN Xuebin

    2014-01-01

    Antarctic krill is a potentially nutritious food source for humans, but lfuorine (F) toxicity is a matter of concern. To evaluate the toxicity of F in Antarctic krill, 30 Wistar rats were divided into three groups with different dietary regimens:a control group, a krill treatment group (150 mg·kg-1 F), and a sodium lfuoride (NaF) treatment group (150 mg·kg-1 F). After three months, F concentrations in feces, plasma, and bone were determined, and the degree of dental and skeletal lfuorosis was assessed. The F concentrations in plasma and bone from the krill treatment group were 0.167 0±0.020 4 mg.L-1 and 2 709.8±301.9 mg·kg-1, respectively, compared with 0.043 8±0.005 5 mg·L-1 and 442.4±60.7 mg·kg-1, respectively, in samples from the control group. Concentrations of F in plasma and bone in the krill treatment group were higher than in the control group, but lower than in the NaF treatment group. The degree of dental lfuorosis in the krill treatment group was moderate, compared with severe in the NaF treatment group and normal in the control group. The degree of skeletal lfuorosis did not change signiifcantly in any group. These results showed that the toxicity of F in Antarctic krill was lower than for an equivalent concentration of F in NaF, but it was toxic for rats consuming krill in large quantities. To conclude, we discuss possible reasons for the reduced toxicity of F in Antarctic krill. The present study provides a direct toxicological reference for the consideration of Antarctic krill for human consumption.

  1. Energy density of sub-Antarctic fishes from the Beagle Channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, D A; Lattuca, M E; Boy, C C; Pérez, A F; Ceballos, S G; Vanella, F A; Morriconi, E R; Malanga, G F; Aureliano, D R; Rimbau, S; Calvo, J

    2009-03-01

    The energy density (ED) of nine species of sub-Antarctic fishes was estimated by calorimetry. The fish, seven notothenioids, one atherinopsid and one galaxiid, represents some of the more abundant species in the ichthyofauna of the Beagle Channel. Principal-components analysis (PCA) of the ED of the different organs/tissues indicated that PC(1) and PC(2) accounted for 87% of the variability. Separation along PC(1) corresponded to differences in muscle and liver energy densities whereas separation along PC(2) corresponded to differences in the ED of the gonads. Differences between species were significant except for P. sima. Inclusion of the gonadosomatic index (GSI) as an explanatory variable enabled us to establish the existence of energy transfer from muscle and liver to the gonads in ripe P. tessellata females. Total ED values varied between 4.21 and 6.26 kJ g(-1), the pelagic Odontesthes sp. being the species with the highest ED. A significant relationship between ED and muscle dry weight (DW(M)) was found for all the species except P. tessellata. These data are the first direct estimates of ED of fishes from the Beagle Channel.

  2. At-Sea Distribution and Prey Selection of Antarctic Petrels and Commercial Krill Fisheries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descamps, Sébastien; Tarroux, Arnaud; Cherel, Yves; Delord, Karine; Godø, Olaf Rune; Kato, Akiko; Krafft, Bjørn A; Lorentsen, Svein-Håkon; Ropert-Coudert, Yan; Skaret, Georg; Varpe, Øystein

    2016-01-01

    Commercial fisheries may impact marine ecosystems and affect populations of predators like seabirds. In the Southern Ocean, there is an extensive fishery for Antarctic krill Euphausia superba that is projected to increase further. Comparing distribution and prey selection of fishing operations versus predators is needed to predict fishery-related impacts on krill-dependent predators. In this context, it is important to consider not only predators breeding near the fishing grounds but also the ones breeding far away and that disperse during the non-breeding season where they may interact with fisheries. In this study, we first quantified the overlap between the distribution of the Antarctic krill fisheries and the distribution of a krill dependent seabird, the Antarctic petrel Thalassoica antarctica, during both the breeding and non-breeding season. We tracked birds from the world biggest Antarctic petrel colony (Svarthamaren, Dronning Maud Land), located >1000 km from the main fishing areas, during three consecutive seasons. The overall spatial overlap between krill fisheries and Antarctic petrels was limited but varied greatly among and within years, and was high in some periods during the non-breeding season. In a second step, we described the length frequency distribution of Antarctic krill consumed by Antarctic petrels, and compared this with results from fisheries, as well as from diet studies in other krill predators. Krill taken by Antarctic petrels did not differ in size from that taken by trawls or from krill taken by most Antarctic krill predators. Selectivity for specific Antarctic krill stages seems generally low in Antarctic predators. Overall, our results show that competition between Antarctic petrels and krill fisheries is currently likely negligible. However, if krill fisheries are to increase in the future, competition with the Antarctic petrel may occur, even with birds breeding thousands of kilometers away.

  3. Cold adaptive traits revealed by comparative genomic analysis of the eurypsychrophile Rhodococcus sp. JG3 isolated from high elevation McMurdo Dry Valley permafrost, Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goordial, Jacqueline; Raymond-Bouchard, Isabelle; Zolotarov, Yevgen; de Bethencourt, Luis; Ronholm, Jennifer; Shapiro, Nicole; Woyke, Tanja; Stromvik, Martina; Greer, Charles W; Bakermans, Corien; Whyte, Lyle

    2016-02-01

    The permafrost soils of the high elevation McMurdo Dry Valleys are the most cold, desiccating and oligotrophic on Earth. Rhodococcus sp. JG3 is one of very few bacterial isolates from Antarctic Dry Valley permafrost, and displays subzero growth down to -5°C. To understand how Rhodococcus sp. JG3 is able to survive extreme permafrost conditions and be metabolically active at subzero temperatures, we sequenced its genome and compared it to the genomes of 14 mesophilic rhodococci. Rhodococcus sp. JG3 possessed a higher copy number of genes for general stress response, UV protection and protection from cold shock, osmotic stress and oxidative stress. We characterized genome wide molecular adaptations to cold, and identified genes that had amino acid compositions favourable for increased flexibility and functionality at low temperatures. Rhodococcus sp. JG3 possesses multiple complimentary strategies which may enable its survival in some of the harshest permafrost on Earth.

  4. Methane isotope records from Antarctic firn air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowers, T. A.; Battle, M.

    2007-12-01

    The earth's climate is directly influenced by changes in the atmospheric loading of trace "greenhouse" gases. Methane is an important greenhouse gas whose atmospheric concentration has doubled over the last century as a result of various anthropogenic activities. Understanding the methane cycle in the recent past is a compelling scientific problem because increasing methane levels in the modern atmosphere will contribute to predicted future warming. The only source of air that allows us to study the long-term cycles of these gases is found in the trapped gases in ice cores and the interstitial pore spaces in firn from the central portions of Greenland and Antarctica. Firn air samples, retrieved from the South Pole in 1995 and 2001, were analyzed for δ13CH4. In December of 2005, another suite of firn air samples was recovered from the new US deep coring site located along the west Antarctic divide (WAIS D) which were analyzed for both δ13C and δ D of CH4. In general, replicate flasks were sampled from each depth from two separate drillings each year. The precision of the δ13C and δ D analyses is generally better than ± 0.2‰ and 2‰, respectively, with surface values in good agreement with NOAA (INSTAAR) biweekly flask measurements from South Pole. In all cases, δ13C and δD values decrease gradually with depth below the convective zone. However, these isotopes and CH4 mixing ratios decline sharply below the "lock-in" depth. The measured firn air profiles are primarily the result of three factors. First, tropospheric changes drive compositional changes in the near-surface convective layer that are subsequently mixed downward due to bulk air-movement within the shallow firn. Secondly, gases are mixed below the convective zone solely by molecular diffusion, leading to the gradual downward propagation of the compositional changes in the convective layer. Finally, differential gravitational settling causes the heavier atmospheric constituents (both elemental

  5. Arctic and Antarctic Sea Ice Changes and Impacts (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghiem, S. V.

    2013-12-01

    The extent of springtime Arctic perennial sea ice, important to preconditioning summer melt and to polar sunrise photochemistry, continues its precipitous reduction in the last decade marked by a record low in 2012, as the Bromine, Ozone, and Mercury Experiment (BROMEX) was conducted around Barrow, Alaska, to investigate impacts of sea ice reduction on photochemical processes, transport, and distribution in the polar environment. In spring 2013, there was further loss of perennial sea ice, as it was not observed in the ocean region adjacent to the Alaskan north coast, where there was a stretch of perennial sea ice in 2012 in the Beaufort Sea and Chukchi Sea. In contrast to the rapid and extensive loss of sea ice in the Arctic, Antarctic sea ice has a trend of a slight increase in the past three decades. Given the significant variability in time and in space together with uncertainties in satellite observations, the increasing trend of Antarctic sea ice may arguably be considered as having a low confidence level; however, there was no overall reduction of Antarctic sea ice extent anywhere close to the decreasing rate of Arctic sea ice. There exist publications presenting various factors driving changes in Arctic and Antarctic sea ice. After a short review of these published factors, new observations and atmospheric, oceanic, hydrological, and geological mechanisms contributed to different behaviors of sea ice changes in the Arctic and Antarctic are presented. The contribution from of hydrologic factors may provide a linkage to and enhance thermal impacts from lower latitudes. While geological factors may affect the sensitivity of sea ice response to climate change, these factors can serve as the long-term memory in the system that should be exploited to improve future projections or predictions of sea ice changes. Furthermore, similarities and differences in chemical impacts of Arctic and Antarctic sea ice changes are discussed. Understanding sea ice changes and

  6. Effects of Environmental Factors on Atrazine Degradation by Arthrobacter sp.Ha1%环境因素对节杆菌株Ha1降解阿特拉津效果的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏晓爱; 赵清泉; 周博如

    2014-01-01

    [目的]明确菌株Ha1降解阿特拉津(AT)的最适环境因素.[方法]采用液相色谱法测定降解体系中阿特拉津的残留量.[结果]K+和Mg2+对菌株Ha1降解阿特拉津有促进作用,Cu2、cd2+等离子则抑制其降解功能的发挥;溶液的缓冲性、pH、温度、供氧方式、反应体系、菌株的浓度和氰尿酸(CA)对菌株Ha1降解阿特拉津有影响.[结论]该研究结果为生物修复被阿特拉津污染的水环境奠定了理论基础.

  7. Acetobacter intermedius, sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesch, C; Trcek, J; Sievers, M; Teuber, M

    1998-03-01

    Strains of a new species in the genus Acetobacter, for which we propose the name A. intermedius sp. nov., were isolated and characterized in pure culture from different sources (Kombucha beverage, cider vinegar, spirit vinegar) and different countries (Switzerland, Slovenia). The isolated strains grow in media with 3% acetic acid and 3% ethanol as does A. europaeus, do, however, not require acetic acid for growth. These characteristics phenotypically position A. intermedius between A. europaeus and A. xylinus, DNA-DNA hybridizations of A. intermedius-DNA with DNA of the type strains of Acetobacter europaeus, A. xylinus, A. aceti, A. hansenii, A. liquefaciens, A. methanolicus, A. pasteurianus, A. diazotrophicus, Gluconobacter oxydans and Escherichia coli HB 101 indicated less than 60% DNA similarity. The important features of the new species are described. Acetobacter intermedius strain TF2 (DSM11804) isolated from the liquid phase of a tea fungus beverage (Kombucha) is the type strain.

  8. Structures of a γ-aminobutyrate (GABA) transaminase from the s-triazine-degrading organism Arthrobacter aurescens TC1 in complex with PLP and with its external aldimine PLP–GABA adduct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Heather; Nguyen Tuan, Anh; Mangas Sánchez, Juan; Leese, Charlotte; Hopwood, Jennifer; Hyde, Ralph; Hart, Sam; Turkenburg, Johan P.; Grogan, Gideon

    2012-01-01

    Two complex structures of the γ-aminobutyrate (GABA) transaminase A1R958 from Arthrobacter aurescens TC1 are presented. The first, determined to a resolution of 2.80 Å, features the internal aldimine formed by reaction between the ∊-amino group of Lys295 and the cofactor pyridoxal phosphate (PLP); the second, determined to a resolution of 2.75 Å, features the external aldimine adduct formed between PLP and GABA in the first half-reaction. This is the first structure of a microbial GABA transaminase in complex with its natural external aldimine and reveals the molecular determinants of GABA binding in this enzyme. PMID:23027742

  9. Stable isotopes and Antarctic moss banks: Plants and soil microbes respond to recent warming on the Antarctic Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royles, Jessica; Amesbury, Matthew; Ogée, Jérôme; Wingate, Lisa; Convey, Peter; Hodgson, Dominic; Griffiths, Howard; Leng, Melanie; Charman, Dan

    2014-05-01

    The Antarctic Peninsula is one of the most rapidly warming regions on Earth, with air temperature increases of as much as 3°C recorded since the 1950s. However, the longer-term context of this change is limited and existing records, largely relying on ice core data, are not suitably located to be able to trace the spatial signature of change over time. We are working on a project exploiting stable isotope records preserved in moss peat banks spanning 10 degrees of latitude along the Antarctic Peninsula as an archive of late Holocene climate variability. Here we present a unique time series of past moss growth and soil microbial activity that has been produced from a 150 year old moss bank at Lazarev Bay, Alexander Island (69°S), a site at the southern limit of significant plant growth in the Antarctic Peninsula region. These moss banks are ideal archives for palaeoclimate research as they are well-preserved by freezing, generally monospecific, easily dated by radiocarbon techniques, and have sufficiently high accumulation rates to permit decadal resolution. We use accumulation rates, cellulose δ13C and fossil testate amoebae to show that growth rates, assimilation and microbial productivity rose rapidly in the 1960s, consistent with temperature change, although recently may have stalled, concurrent with other evidence. The increase in biological activity is unprecedented in the last 150 years. Along with work completed on Signy Island (60°S), in the South Orkney Islands, in which we used carbon isotope evidence to show recent climate-related enhancement of CO2 assimilation and peat accumulation rates in Antarctica, the observed relationships between moss growth, microbial activity and climate suggests that moss bank records have the potential to test the regional expression of temperature variability shown by instrumental data on the Antarctic Peninsula over centennial to millennial timescales, by providing long-term records of summer growth conditions

  10. Definition of Arctic and Antarctic Sea Ice Variation Index

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Hongxia; Liu Na; Pan Zengdi; Zhang Qinghua

    2004-01-01

    It is well known that varying of the sea ice not only in the Antarctic but also in the Arctic has an active influence on the globe atmosphere and ocean. In order to understand the sea ice variation in detail, for the first time, an objective index of the Arctic and Antarctic sea ice variation is defined by projecting the monthly sea ice concentration anomalies poleward of 20°N or 20°S onto the EOF (empirical orthogonal function)-1 spatial pattern. Comparing with some work in former studies of polar sea ice, the index has the potential for clarifying the variability of sea ice in northern and southern high latitudes.

  11. Ozone depletion - Ultraviolet radiation and phytoplankton biology in Antarctic waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. C.; Prezelin, B. B.; Baker, K. S.; Bidigare, R. R.; Boucher, N. P.; Coley, T.; Karentz, D.; Macintyre, S.; Matlick, H. A.; Menzies, D.

    1992-01-01

    The near-50-percent thinning of the stratospheric ozone layer over the Antarctic, with increased passage of mid-UV radiation to the surface of the Southern Ocean, has prompted concern over possible radiation damage to the near-surface phytoplankton communities that are the bases of Antarctic marine ecosystems. As the ozone layer thinned, a 6-week study of the marginal ice zone of the Bellingshousen Sea in the austral spring of 1990 noted sea-surface and depth-dependent ratios of mid-UV irradiance to total irradiance increased, and mid-UV inhibition of photosynthesis increased. A 6-12 percent reduction in primary production associated with ozone depletion was estimated to have occurred over the course of the present study.

  12. Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berhanu, Tesfaye A.; Meusinger, Carl; Erbland, Joseph;

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric nitrate is preserved in Antarctic snow firn and ice. However, at low snow accumulation sites, post-depositional processes induced by sunlight obscure its interpretation. The goal of these studies (see also Paper I by Meusinger et al. [" Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis...... in Antarctic snow. I. Observed quantum yield, domain of photolysis, and secondary chemistry," J. Chem. Phys. 140, 244305 (2014)]) is to characterize nitrate photochemistry and improve the interpretation of the nitrate ice core record. Naturally occurring stable isotopes in nitrate (15N, 17O, and 18O) provide...... additional information concerning post-depositional processes. Here, we present results from studies of the wavelength-dependent isotope effects from photolysis of nitrate in a matrix of natural snow. Snow from Dome C, Antarctica was irradiated in selected wavelength regions using a Xe UV lamp and filters...

  13. Development of the Australian-Antarctic depth anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, Joanne M.; Müller, R. Dietmar; Gurnis, Michael

    2010-11-01

    The oceanic Australian-Antarctic Discordance (AAD) contains two unusual features: (1) N-S trending anomalously deep bathymetries and (2) rough basement morphologies in young (geological observations. We find that the interaction of negative dynamic topography and crustal thickness variations results in the observed complex patterns of residual basement depths. Downwelling, caused by a sinking Mesozoic slab, is the most likely cause of the broad N-S trending residual depth anomalies, while overprinting by westward flowing, buoyant Pacific mantle resulted in the distinctive V-shaped eastern boundary of the AAD. The particularly large residual depths proximal to the Australian and Antarctic margins may be due to negative dynamic topography combined with thinned oceanic crust caused by ultraslow (45° spreading obliquities.

  14. The South Atlantic in the Fine-Resolution Antarctic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. P. Stevens

    Full Text Available The geographical area covered by the Fine-Resolution Antarctic Model (FRAM includes that part of the South Atlantic south of 24°S. A description of the dynamics and thermodynamics of this region of the model is presented. Both the mean and eddy fields in the model are in good agreement with reality, although the magnitude of the transients is somewhat reduced. The heat flux is northward and in broad agreement with many other estimates. Agulhas eddies are formed by the model and propagate westward into the Atlantic providing a mechanism for fluxing heat from the Indian Ocean. The confluence of the Brazil and Falkland currents produces a strong front and a large amount of mesoscale activity. In the less stratified regions to the south, topographic steering of the Antarctic circumpolar current is important.

  15. DINSAR measurement of glacier motion in Antarctic Grove Mountain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Xiao; LI XiaoWen; SHAO Yun; LI Zhen

    2007-01-01

    Grove Mountain is an important nunatak region on East Antarctic Glacier that blocks the ice flow toward Lambert Glacier. The existence of nunataks and subglacial mountains leads to complex ice flow patterns, which are difficult to be measured by conventional ground-based methods. In this study, several JERS-1 and ERS-1/2 SAR images covering this area are used for 3-pass and 4-pass differential interferometric processing. The ice flow field of Grove Mountain and the eastern zone are derived and validated with related knowledge. The research shows that DINSAR is an effective method for measuring complex ice flow in Antarctic inland glacier. L-band DINSAR is more suitable for mid or fast ice flow than C-band over this region.

  16. Windblown Pliocene diatoms and East Antarctic Ice Sheet retreat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Reed P; DeConto, Robert M; Pollard, David; Alley, Richard B

    2016-09-20

    Marine diatoms in tillites along the Transantarctic Mountains (TAMs) have been used to suggest a diminished East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) during Pliocene warm periods. Updated ice-sheet modelling shows significant Pliocene EAIS retreat, creating marine embayments into the Wilkes and Aurora basins that were conducive to high diatom productivity and rapid accumulation of diatomaceous sediments. Here we show that subsequent isostatic uplift exposed accumulated unconsolidated marine deposits to wind erosion. We report new atmospheric modelling utilizing Pliocene climate and derived Antarctic landscapes indicating that prevailing mid-altitude winds transported diatoms towards the TAMs, dominantly from extensive emerged coastal deposits of the Aurora Basin. This result unifies leading ideas from competing sides of a contentious debate about the origin of the diatoms in the TAMs and their link to EAIS history, supporting the view that parts of the EAIS are vulnerable to relatively modest warming, with possible implications for future sea-level rise.

  17. Results and perspectives of tectonomagnetic investigations in the Western Antarctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ihor O. Chobotok

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The results of long-term (1998-2005 yrs. tectonomagnetic investigations in the Western Antarctic near the location
    of Ukrainian Antarctic Station «Academic Vernadsky» are reviewed. The peculiarities of the Earth’s
    anomalous magnetic field and its dynamic temporal variations (tectonomagnetic anomalies were studied using
    the newly founded tectonomagnetic polygon. Near the Argentine Archipelago intensive tectonomagnetic effects
    up to -2.8 nT/year were determined. Their spatial-temporal structure agrees with tectonic structure elements. We
    suggest that the nature of such effects is caused by a piezomagnetic effect under the influence of stretching tectonic
    forces (few bars per year in sub-latitudinal direction. Perspectives of tectonomagnetic investigations in the
    region are discussed.

  18. Windblown Pliocene diatoms and East Antarctic Ice Sheet retreat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Reed P.; DeConto, Robert M.; Pollard, David; Alley, Richard B.

    2016-01-01

    Marine diatoms in tillites along the Transantarctic Mountains (TAMs) have been used to suggest a diminished East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) during Pliocene warm periods. Updated ice-sheet modelling shows significant Pliocene EAIS retreat, creating marine embayments into the Wilkes and Aurora basins that were conducive to high diatom productivity and rapid accumulation of diatomaceous sediments. Here we show that subsequent isostatic uplift exposed accumulated unconsolidated marine deposits to wind erosion. We report new atmospheric modelling utilizing Pliocene climate and derived Antarctic landscapes indicating that prevailing mid-altitude winds transported diatoms towards the TAMs, dominantly from extensive emerged coastal deposits of the Aurora Basin. This result unifies leading ideas from competing sides of a contentious debate about the origin of the diatoms in the TAMs and their link to EAIS history, supporting the view that parts of the EAIS are vulnerable to relatively modest warming, with possible implications for future sea-level rise. PMID:27649516

  19. UAV Observations of an Antarctic Polynya During Winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassano, J.; Maslanik, J. A.; Knuth, S.

    2009-12-01

    Aerosonde unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) will be used during September 2009 to observe the atmosphere and ocean / sea ice surface state in the vicinity of the Terra Nova Bay polynya, Antarctica. The flights will take place at the end of the Antarctic winter, in an environment characterized by strong katabatic winds and strong air-sea fluxes. Flights of up to 20 hours duration are planned. This mission will be the second deployment of UAVs in the Antarctic, and the first deployment funded by the United States National Science Foundation. Results from this UAV deployment and lessons learned during the deployment will be presented. Visible satellite image of Terra Nova Bay polynya (6 Oct 2007).

  20. On the manoeuvering simulation of an Antarctic hovercraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murao, R.; Nojiri, T.

    Since 1981 an experimental hovercraft for the Antarctic has been tested in Japan's Antarctic station Syowa. During tests on the ice field near Syowa station, it was experienced that the yaw response of this craft is very sensitive to certain ice conditions. In this report, we deal with course keeping of the craft in relative crosswinds and with the maneuvering simulation while turning. Maneuvering at large yaw angle is required to generate the effective centripetal force in turning. The trajectories based on pulse steering are obtained. The course stability is very dependent upon the friction between skirts and ground, and generally not good on smooth flat ice. It is shown, however, that the rudder automatic control provides good course stability independent of ice conditions. The trajectories obtained from the simulation show that the use of a combination of rudder control and puff ports produces quick turning.

  1. Medical supplies for the expeditions of the heroic age of Antarctic exploration: introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guly, H R

    2012-06-01

    During the heroic age of Antarctic exploration (1895-1922) there were at least 18 expeditions to the Antarctic lasting between 18 and 30 months. This is an introduction to a series of articles about the drugs taken and used in the Antarctic at this time. Most of the information relates to the expeditions of Robert Scott and Ernest Shackleton and the main supplier of medical equipment was Burroughs Wellcome and Co. This article also describes the medical cases that were taken to the Antarctic.

  2. Cyclone formation and development in the Antarctic Prydz Bay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    解思梅; 梅山; 刘克威; 魏立新

    2002-01-01

    Using meteorological data of field observation in 1990~ 2000 , especially polar orbit highresolution NOAA satellite cloud maps received from the Antarctic expedition vessel since 1997, the formation and development of the Prydz Bay cyclone are studied in this paper. Some new viewpoints are suggested such as: when surround-polar cyclone enters the Prydz Bay, it can also intensify and develop in summer; cyclone can also develop in the easterlies in this bay. These view points revise old uncomplete view point that the Prydz Bay is a burial ground of cyclone, and also further consummate formation-development theory of surround-cyclone in the Antarctic westerlies and cyclone in the Antarctic easterlies. In this paper, the mechanism of ice-air-sea interaction in the Prydz Bay is studied, and the physical process of cyclone formation-development is explained. By use of wholly dynamic transportation method, an energy exchange case of a cyclone, which explosively developed after entering the Prydz Bay, is calculated. In the open water area, momentum flux is - 2.205 N/m2, sensible heat flux is 486.69 W/m2, and latent heat flux is 261.84 W/m2. It is larger than values of westerlies burst over the Pacific. The heat transferred from ocean to atmosphere in form of sensible and latent heat promotes cyclone development rapidly. In this case wind force was as strong as 12 grade, with 10 minutes average wind speed of 38 m/s, and instantaneous wind speed of 100 m/s which broke the wind speed record of 96 m/s in the Antarctic (Wendler and Kodama).

  3. Emergence of healing in the Antarctic ozone layer

    OpenAIRE

    Solomon, S.; Ivy, DJ; Kinnison, D.; Mills, MJ; Neely III, RR; Schmidt, A.

    2016-01-01

    Industrial chlorofluorocarbons that cause ozone depletion have been phased out under the Montreal Protocol. A chemically driven increase in polar ozone (or “healing”) is expected in response to this historic agreement. Observations and model calculations together indicate that healing of the Antarctic ozone layer has now begun to occur during the month of September. Fingerprints of September healing since 2000 include (i) increases in ozone column amounts, (ii) changes in the vertical profile...

  4. Obliquity-paced Pliocene West Antarctic ice sheet oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naish, T.; Powell, R.; Levy, R.; Wilson, G.; Scherer, R.; Talarico, F.; Krissek, L.; Niessen, F.; Pompilio, M.; Wilson, T.; Carter, L.; DeConto, R.; Huybers, P.; McKay, R.; Pollard, D.; Ross, J.; Winter, D.; Barrett, P.; Browne, G.; Cody, R.; Cowan, E.; Crampton, J.; Dunbar, G.; Dunbar, N.; Florindo, F.; Gebhardt, C.; Graham, I.; Hannah, M.; Hansaraj, D.; Harwood, D.; Helling, D.; Henrys, S.; Hinnov, L.; Kuhn, G.; Kyle, P.; Laufer, A.; Maffioli, P.; Magens, D.; Mandernack, K.; McIntosh, W.; Millan, C.; Morin, R.; Ohneiser, C.; Paulsen, T.; Persico, D.; Raine, I.; Reed, J.; Riesselman, C.; Sagnotti, L.; Schmitt, D.; Sjunneskog, C.; Strong, P.; Taviani, M.; Vogel, S.; Wilch, T.; Williams, T.

    2009-01-01

    Thirty years after oxygen isotope records from microfossils deposited in ocean sediments confirmed the hypothesis that variations in the Earth's orbital geometry control the ice ages, fundamental questions remain over the response of the Antarctic ice sheets to orbital cycles. Furthermore, an understanding of the behaviour of the marine-based West Antarctic ice sheet (WAIS) during the 'warmer-than-present' early-Pliocene epoch (???5-3 Myr ago) is needed to better constrain the possible range of ice-sheet behaviour in the context of future global warming. Here we present a marine glacial record from the upper 600 m of the AND-1B sediment core recovered from beneath the northwest part of the Ross ice shelf by the ANDRILL programme and demonstrate well-dated, ???40-kyr cyclic variations in ice-sheet extent linked to cycles in insolation influenced by changes in the Earth's axial tilt (obliquity) during the Pliocene. Our data provide direct evidence for orbitally induced oscillations in the WAIS, which periodically collapsed, resulting in a switch from grounded ice, or ice shelves, to open waters in the Ross embayment when planetary temperatures were up to ???3??C warmer than today and atmospheric CO 2 concentration was as high as ???400 p.p.m.v. (refs 5, 6). The evidence is consistent with a new ice-sheet/ice-shelf model that simulates fluctuations in Antarctic ice volume of up to +7 m in equivalent sea level associated with the loss of the WAIS and up to +3 m in equivalent sea level from the East Antarctic ice sheet, in response to ocean-induced melting paced by obliquity. During interglacial times, diatomaceous sediments indicate high surface-water productivity, minimal summer sea ice and air temperatures above freezing, suggesting an additional influence of surface melt under conditions of elevated CO2. ??2009 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  5. In situ primary production in young Antarctic sea ice

    OpenAIRE

    Mock, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    An in situ incubation technique used successfully to measure the photosynthetic carbon assimilation of internal algal assemblages within thick multiyear Arctic sea ice was developed and improved to measure the photosynthetic carbon assimilation within young sea ice only 50 cm thick (Eastern Weddell Sea, Antarctica). The new device enabled some of the first precise measurements of in situ photosynthetic carbon assimilation in newly formed Antarctic sea ice.

  6. Antarctic krill 454 pyrosequencing reveals chaperone and stress transcriptome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melody S Clark

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Antarctic krill Euphausia superba is a keystone species in the Antarctic food chain. Not only is it a significant grazer of phytoplankton, but it is also a major food item for charismatic megafauna such as whales and seals and an important Southern Ocean fisheries crop. Ecological data suggest that this species is being affected by climate change and this will have considerable consequences for the balance of the Southern Ocean ecosystem. Hence, understanding how this organism functions is a priority area and will provide fundamental data for life history studies, energy budget calculations and food web models. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The assembly of the 454 transcriptome of E. superba resulted in 22,177 contigs with an average size of 492bp (ranging between 137 and 8515bp. In depth analysis of the data revealed an extensive catalogue of the cellular chaperone systems and the major antioxidant proteins. Full length sequences were characterised for the chaperones HSP70, HSP90 and the super-oxide dismutase antioxidants, with the discovery of potentially novel duplications of these genes. The sequence data contained 41,470 microsatellites and 17,776 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs/INDELS, providing a resource for population and also gene function studies. CONCLUSIONS: This paper details the first 454 generated data for a pelagic Antarctic species or any pelagic crustacean globally. The classical "stress proteins", such as HSP70, HSP90, ferritin and GST were all highly expressed. These genes were shown to be over expressed in the transcriptomes of Antarctic notothenioid fish and hypothesized as adaptations to living in the cold, with the associated problems of decreased protein folding efficiency and increased vulnerability to damage by reactive oxygen species. Hence, these data will provide a major resource for future physiological work on krill, but in particular a suite of "stress" genes for studies understanding

  7. Ecological and Pharmacological Activities of Antarctic Marine Natural Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, Conxita

    2016-06-01

    Antarctic benthic communities are regulated by abundant interactions of different types among organisms, such as predation, competition, etc. Predators are usually sea stars, with omnivorous habits, as well as other invertebrates. Against this strong predation pressure, many organisms have developed all sorts of defensive strategies, including chemical defenses. Natural products are thus quite common in Antarctic organisms with an important ecological and pharmacological potential. In this paper, the chemical defenses of the Antarctic organisms studied during the ECOQUIM and ACTIQUIM projects, as well as their pharmacological potential, are reviewed. For the ecological defenses, predation against the sea star Odontaster validus is analyzed and evaluated along depth gradients as well as considering the lifestyle of the organisms. For the pharmacological activity, the anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and antibacterial activities tested are evaluated here. Very often, only crude extracts or fractions have been tested so far, and therefore, the natural products responsible for such activities remain yet to be identified. Even if the sampling efforts are not uniform along depth, most ecologically active organisms are found between 200 and 500 m depth. Also, from the samples studied, about four times more sessile organisms possess chemical defenses against the sea star than the vagile ones; these represent 50 % of sessile organisms and 35 % of the vagile ones, out of the total tested, being active. Pharmacological activity has not been tested uniformly in all groups, but the results show that relevant activity is found in different phyla, especially in Porifera, Cnidaria, Bryozoa, and Tunicata, but also in others. No relationship between depth and pharmacological activity can be established with the samples tested so far. More studies are needed in order to better understand the ecological relationships among Antarctic invertebrates mediated by natural products and

  8. Evolution of the Australian-Antarctic discordance since Miocene time

    OpenAIRE

    Marks, Karen M.; Stock, Joann M.; Quinn, Katherine J.

    1999-01-01

    In this study we chronicle the development of the Australian-Antarctic discordance (AAD), the crenelated portion of the Southeast Indian Ridge between ∼120° and 128°E, since anomaly 6y time (19 Ma). We reconstruct satellite-derived marine gravity fields and depth anomalies at selected times by first removing anomalies overlying seafloor younger than the selected age, and then rotating the remaining anomalies through improved finite rotations based on a very detailed set of magnetic anomaly id...

  9. Blue and fin whale acoustics and ecology off Antarctic Peninsula

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Blue (Balaenoptera musculus) and fin whales (B. physalus) in the Southern Ocean were subjects of extensive whaling industry during the twentieth century. Their current population numbers remain low, making population monitoring using traditional visual surveys difficult. Both blue and fin whales produce low frequency, regularly repeated calls and are suitable for acoustic monitoring. Eight, continuously recording acoustic recorders were deployed off the Western Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) betwe...

  10. Study of the Microbial Diversity of a Newly Discovered East Antarctic Freshwater Lake, L27C, and of a Perennially Ice-Covered Lake Untersee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jonathan P.; Hoover, Richard B.; Andersen, Dale; Bej, Asim K.

    2010-01-01

    The microbial communities that reside within freshwater lakes of Schirmacher and Untersee Oases in East Antarctica must cope with extreme conditions that may include cold temperature, annual freeze-thaw cycles, exposure to UV radiation, especially during the austral summer months, low light beneath thick ice-cover, followed by seasonal darkness. The objective of this study was to assess the microbial biodiversity and distribution from samples taken from two freshwater lakes (L27C and Lake Untersee) that were collected during the Tawani 2008 International Antarctic Expedition that conducted research in this region of Antarctica. L27C is a small, previously unreported lake residing 2 km WNW of Maitri Station at Schirmacher Oasis. Biodiversity and distribution of microorganisms within the lake were studied using both culture-independent and culture-dependent methodologies based upon the analysis of eubacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences. Lake Untersee, a perennially ice-covered, ultra-oligotrophic, lake in the Otto-von-Gruber-Gebirge (Gruber Mountains) of central Dronning Maud Land was also sampled and the microbial diversity was analyzed by eubacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences derived from pure cultures. Direct culturing of water samples from each lake on separate R2A growth medium exhibited a variety of microorganisms including: Janthinobacterium, Hymenobacter, Sphingamonas, Subtercola, Deinococcus, Arthrobacter, Flavobacterium, Polaromonas, Rhodoferax and Duganella. The evaluation of samples from L27C through culture-independent methodology identified a rich microbial diversity consisting of six different phyla of bacteria. The culture-independent analysis also displayed the majority of bacteria (56%) belonged to the Class gamma-proteobacteria within the phylum Proteobacteria. Within the Class gamma-proteobacteria, Acinetobacter dominated (48%) the total microbial load. Overall, L27C exhibited 7 different phyla of bacteria and 20 different genera. Statistical analysis

  11. Antarctic birds (Neornithes during the Cretaceous-Eocene times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Tambussi

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Antarctic fossil birds can be confidently assigned to modern orders and families, such as a goose-like anseriform, two loon-like and a seriema-like, all recorded before the K/T boundary at the López de Bertodano Fomation. Also, the discovery of a ratite and a phororhacids from the uppermost levels of the Submeseta Allomember (Late Eocene, suggests that West Antarctica was functional to dispersal routes obligate terrestrial birds. Representatives of Falconiformes Polyborinae, Ciconiiformes, Phoenicoteriformes, Charadriiformes, Pelagornitidae and Diomedeidae constitute the non-penguin avian assemblages of the Eocene of La Meseta Formation. Fifthteen Antarctic species of penguins have been described including the oldest penguin of West Antarctica, Croswallia unienwillia. The Anthropornis nordenskjoeldi Biozone (36.13 and 34.2 Ma, Late Eocene is characterized by bearing one of the highest frequencies of penguin bones and the phospatic brachiopod Lingula., together with remains of Gadiforms, sharks and primitive mysticete whales. Anthropornis nordenskjoeldi, Delphinornis gracilis, D. arctowski, Archaeospheniscus lopdelli, and Palaeeudyptes antarcticus are exclusively of the La Meseta Formation. Anthropornis nordenskjoeldi was evidently the largest penguin recorded at the James Ross Basin, whereas Delphinornis arctowski is the smallest, and include one of the worldwide highest morphological and taxonomic penguin diversity living sympatrically. The progressive climate cooling of the Eocene could have affected the penguin populations, because of climatic changes linked with habitat availability and food web processes. However, there is not available evidence about Antarctic penguins' evolution after the end of the Eocene.

  12. Metagenomic Analysis of Bacterial Communities of Antarctic Surface Snow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopatina, Anna; Medvedeva, Sofia; Shmakov, Sergey; Logacheva, Maria D; Krylenkov, Vjacheslav; Severinov, Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    The diversity of bacteria present in surface snow around four Russian stations in Eastern Antarctica was studied by high throughput sequencing of amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments and shotgun metagenomic sequencing. Considerable class- and genus-level variation between the samples was revealed indicating a presence of inter-site diversity of bacteria in Antarctic snow. Flavobacterium was a major genus in one sampling site and was also detected in other sites. The diversity of flavobacterial type II-C CRISPR spacers in the samples was investigated by metagenome sequencing. Thousands of unique spacers were revealed with less than 35% overlap between the sampling sites, indicating an enormous natural variety of flavobacterial CRISPR spacers and, by extension, high level of adaptive activity of the corresponding CRISPR-Cas system. None of the spacers matched known spacers of flavobacterial isolates from the Northern hemisphere. Moreover, the percentage of spacers with matches with Antarctic metagenomic sequences obtained in this work was significantly higher than with sequences from much larger publically available environmental metagenomic database. The results indicate that despite the overall very high level of diversity, Antarctic Flavobacteria comprise a separate pool that experiences pressures from mobile genetic elements different from those present in other parts of the world. The results also establish analysis of metagenomic CRISPR spacer content as a powerful tool to study bacterial populations diversity.

  13. On the Atmospheric Correction of Antarctic Airborne Hyperspectral Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Black

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The first airborne hyperspectral campaign in the Antarctic Peninsula region was carried out by the British Antarctic Survey and partners in February 2011. This paper presents an insight into the applicability of currently available radiative transfer modelling and atmospheric correction techniques for processing airborne hyperspectral data in this unique coastal Antarctic environment. Results from the Atmospheric and Topographic Correction version 4 (ATCOR-4 package reveal absolute reflectance values somewhat in line with laboratory measured spectra, with Root Mean Square Error (RMSE values of 5% in the visible near infrared (0.4–1 µm and 8% in the shortwave infrared (1–2.5 µm. Residual noise remains present due to the absorption by atmospheric gases and aerosols, but certain parts of the spectrum match laboratory measured features very well. This study demonstrates that commercially available packages for carrying out atmospheric correction are capable of correcting airborne hyperspectral data in the challenging environment present in Antarctica. However, it is anticipated that future results from atmospheric correction could be improved by measuring in situ atmospheric data to generate atmospheric profiles and aerosol models, or with the use of multiple ground targets for calibration and validation.

  14. A transcriptome resource for the Antarctic pteropod Limacina helicina antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kevin M; Hofmann, Gretchen E

    2016-08-01

    The pteropod Limacina helicina antarctica is a dominant member of the zooplankton assemblage in the Antarctic marine ecosystem, and is part of a relatively simple food web in nearshore marine Antarctic waters. As a shelled pteropod, Limacina has been suggested as a candidate sentinel organism for the impacts of ocean acidification, due to the potential for shell dissolution in undersaturated waters. In this study, our goal was to develop a transcriptomic resource for Limacina that would support mechanistic studies to explore the physiological response of Limacina to abiotic stressors such as ocean acidification and ocean warming. To this end, RNA sequencing libraries were prepared from Limacina that had been exposed to a range of pH levels and an elevated temperature to maximize the diversity of expressed genes. RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) was conducted on an Illumina NextSeq500 which produced 339,000,000 150bp paired-end reads. The de novo transcriptome was produced using Trinity and annotation of the assembled transcriptome resulted in the identification of 81,229 transcripts in 137 KEGG pathways. This RNA-seq effort resulted in a transcriptome for the Antarctic pteropod, Limacina helicina antarctica, that is a major resource for an international marine science research community studying these pelagic molluscs in a global change context.

  15. Extreme phenotypic plasticity in metabolic physiology of Antarctic Demosponges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Anthony Morley

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Seasonal measurements of the metabolic physiology of four Antarctic demosponges and their associated assemblages, maintained in a flow through aquarium facility, demonstrated one of the largest differences in seasonal strategies between species and their associated sponge communities. The sponge oxygen consumption measured here exhibited both the lowest and highest seasonal changes for any Antarctic species; metabolic rates varied from a 25% decrease to a 5.8 fold increase from winter to summer, a range which was greater than all 17 Antarctic marine species (encompassing 8 phyla previously investigated and amongst the highest recorded for any marine environment. The differences in nitrogen excretion, metabolic substrate utilisation and tissue composition between species were, overall, greater than seasonal changes. The largest seasonal difference in tissue composition was an increase in CHN (Carbon, Hydrogen and Nitrogen content in Homaxinella balfourensis, a pioneer species in ice-scour regions, which changed growth form to a twig-like morph in winter. The considerable flexibility in seasonal and metabolic physiology across the Demospongiae likely enables these species to respond to rapid environmental change such as ice-scour, reductions in sea ice cover and ice-shelf collapse in the Polar Regions, shifting the paradigm that polar sponges always live life in the slow lane. Great phenotypic plasticity in physiology has been linked to differences in symbiotic community composition, and this is likely to be a key factor in the global success of sponges in all marine environments and their dominant role in many climax communities.

  16. Metagenomic Analysis of Bacterial Communities of Antarctic Surface Snow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eLopatina

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The diversity of bacteria present in surface snow around four Russian stations in Eastern Antarctica was studied by high throughput sequencing of amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments and shotgun metagenomic sequencing. Considerable class- and genus-level variation between the samples was revealed indicating a presence of inter-site diversity of bacteria in Antarctic snow. Flavobacterium was a major genus in one sampling site and was also detected in other sites. The diversity of flavobacterial type II-C CRISPR spacers in the samples was investigated by metagenome sequencing. Thousands of unique spacers were revealed with less than 35% overlap between the sampling sites, indicating an enormous natural variety of flavobacterial CRISPR spacers and, by extension, high level of adaptive activity of the corresponding CRISPR-Cas system. None of the spacers matched known spacers of flavobacterial isolates from the Northern hemisphere. Moreover, the percentage of spacers with matches with Antarctic metagenomic sequences obtained in this work was significantly higher than with sequences from much larger publically available environmental metagenomic database. The results indicate that despite the overall very high level of diversity, Antarctic Flavobacteria comprise a separate pool that experiences pressures from mobile genetic elements different from those present in other parts of the world. The results also establish analysis of metagenomic CRISPR spacer content as a powerful tool to study bacterial populations diversity.

  17. Role of Indian remote sensing imaging satellites for the Antarctic monitoring and mapping: a case study around Indian Antarctic research stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaprasad, P.; Mehra, Raghav; Chawla, Saket; Rajak, D. Ram; Oza, Sandip R.

    2016-05-01

    Antarctic research station's existence largely depend on the supply of fuel, food and other commodities through Antarctic Scientific Expedition using ship voyage. Safer Ship Navigation demands high resolution satellite monitoring of the ice conditions which varies from 30 km to 200 km from the Antarctic coast of Research stations. During the last couple of years Indian Satellites play a major role in safer ship navigation in sea ice regions of the Arctic and the Antarctic. Specifically Indian Scientific Expedition to the Antarctica (ISEA) through National Centre for Antarctic and Oceanic Research (NCAOR) is one of the beneficiaries for safer ship navigation using information derived from Indian Satellite data. Space Applications Centre, Indian Space Research Organisation (SAC-ISRO) is providing Sea Ice Advisories for the safer optimum entry and exit for the expedition ship at two of the Research stations Bharati and Maitri. Two of the Indian Satellites namely Radar Imaging Satellite-1 (RISAT-1) and ResourceSAT-2 (RS-2) are the two major workhorses of ISRO for monitoring and mapping of the Antarctic terrain. The present study demonstrate the utilisation potential of these satellite images for various Polar Science Applications. Mosaic of the Antarctic Terrain was generated from RISAT-1 CRS data. The preliminary results of the mosaic from CRS- circular polarisation data is presented. Demonstration of the study is extended for other applications such as change detection studies, safer ship navigation and extreme events of Antarctica. The use of multi resolution multi sensor data is also shown in the study.

  18. Major advance of South Georgia glaciers during the Antarctic Cold Reversal following extensive sub-Antarctic glaciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Alastair G. C.; Kuhn, Gerhard; Meisel, Ove; Hillenbrand, Claus-Dieter; Hodgson, Dominic A.; Ehrmann, Werner; Wacker, Lukas; Wintersteller, Paul; Dos Santos Ferreira, Christian; Römer, Miriam; White, Duanne; Bohrmann, Gerhard

    2017-03-01

    The history of glaciations on Southern Hemisphere sub-polar islands is unclear. Debate surrounds the extent and timing of the last glacial advance and termination on sub-Antarctic South Georgia in particular. Here, using sea-floor geophysical data and marine sediment cores, we resolve the record of glaciation offshore of South Georgia through the transition from the Last Glacial Maximum to Holocene. We show a sea-bed landform imprint of a shelf-wide last glacial advance and progressive deglaciation. Renewed glacier resurgence in the fjords between c. 15,170 and 13,340 yr ago coincided with a period of cooler, wetter climate known as the Antarctic Cold Reversal, revealing a cryospheric response to an Antarctic climate pattern extending into the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean. We conclude that the last glaciation of South Georgia was extensive, and the sensitivity of its glaciers to climate variability during the last termination more significant than implied by previous studies.

  19. Roseomonas terrae sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jung-Hoon; Kang, So-Jung; Oh, Hyun Woo; Oh, Tae-Kwang

    2007-11-01

    A Gram-negative, non-motile, coccobacilli-shaped bacterium, DS-48T, was isolated from soil from Dokdo, Korea, and its taxonomic position was investigated by means of a polyphasic study. Strain DS-48T grew optimally at 25 degrees C and pH 7.0-8.0 in the presence of 0.5% (w/v) NaCl. It contained Q-10 as the predominant ubiquinone and C18:1omega7c and C18:1 2-OH as the major fatty acids. The DNA G+C content was 69.3 mol%. A phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain DS-48T fell within the genus Roseomonas, clustering with Roseomonas lacus TH-G33T (at a bootstrap confidence level of 100%). The levels of similarity between the 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain DS-48T and those of the type strains of recognized Roseomonas species were in the range 93.2-98.0%. DNA-DNA relatedness data and differential phenotypic properties, together with the phylogenetic distinctiveness of DS-48T, revealed that this strain differs from recognized Roseomonas species. On the basis of phenotypic, phylogenetic and genetic data, therefore, strain DS-48T represents a novel species within the genus Roseomonas, for which the name Roseomonas terrae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is DS-48T (=KCTC 12874T=JCM 14592T).

  20. Latest tendency in the Antarctic ozone longitudinal distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milinevsky, Gennadi; Grytsai, Asen; Klekociuk, Andrew; Evtushevsky, Olexander

    2014-05-01

    Significant ozone depletion was observed within the southern polar vortex during spring in the 1980s - early 1990s. Later, a stabilization in total ozone levels and ozone hole area has been observed. Atmosphere models predict a consequent recovery of the Antarctic ozone. Nevertheless, identification of the long-term processes is complicated by high interannual variability hiding their general regularities. In particular, a large stratosphere warming in 2002 resulted in significant increase in total ozone levels. The Antarctic ozone hole is formed inside polar stratospheric vortex, which is under influence of large-scale planetary waves. The components of the quasi-stationary wave (QSW) in the spring Southern Hemisphere (SH) stratosphere is mainly contributed by zonal wave number 1 which in turn determines the location of the total ozone extremes in spring: QSW minimum (maximum) is located in the South Atlantic (Australian) sector. In our work the satellite data of TOMS/Nimbus-7, TOMS/Earth Probe and OMI/Aura (http://ozoneaq.gsfc.nasa.gov/) have been used to investigate longitudinal distribution of the total ozone in Antarctic region. The gap in these satellite observations (1993-1995) was filled by the Multi-Sensor Reanalysis data (http://www.temis.nl/). Ozone distribution in the SH high and mid latitudes 80-50S were analyzed for southern spring season including months from September to November. The zonal distribution is considered along seven latitude circles from 80S to 50S with step of five degrees. To distinguish long-term processes and to obtain a quasi-stationary pattern, daily September - November ozone was averaged. Our previous study demonstrated a systematic eastward shift of the QSW minimum region. In this study, we extended the analysis to 2013 and obtained new results that exhibited a probable cessation in that eastward shift. Polynomial fit for all chosen latitudes is even evidence of a change in the tendency to opposite. It more time needs to

  1. Bradysia sp. em morangueiro Bradysia sp. in strawberry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernadete Radin

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available No trabalho, relatam-se os primeiros registros de Bradysia sp. (Insecta: Diptera: Sciaridae em morangueiro (Fragaria x ananassa Duch., cultivado no Município de Eldorado do Sul, RS. O cultivo foi realizado em sacolas com três metros de comprimento, preenchidas com substrato composto de casca de arroz e turfa, dispostas horizontalmente sobre bancadas de madeira, em ambiente protegido. A presença de Bradysia sp. foi observada na segunda quinzena de agosto de 2005. Neste trabalho, estão descritos os sintomas apresentados no morangueiro pela praga, prováveis conseqüências sobre o aparecimento de doenças e uma breve descrição morfológica da Bradysia sp., adulto e fase larval.This paper describes the first record of Bradysia sp. (Insecta; Diptera; Sciaridae in strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa, cultivated in the city of Eldorado do Sul, RS, Brazil. Strawberry was planted in plastic bags filled with a mixture of burnt rice hulls and peat and cultivated in a greenhouse. The presence of Bradysia sp was noticed in the second fortnight of August, 2005. The symptoms in strawberry and the probable consequences in terms of disease arising were described in the present study, as well as the morphological characterization of Bradysia sp. and its illustrations.

  2. Complex Geodetic Research in Ukrainian Antarctic Station “Academician Vernadsky” (Years 2002 - 2005, 2013-2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tretyak Kornyliy

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper is given an information about complex geodetic research in Ukrainian Antarctic station “Academician Vernadsky”. Research were carried by Lviv polytechnic scientists, during Antarctic expeditions in years 2002 - 2005, 2013, 2014. Main objectives of the studies were: (a study of the islands glaciers surface volumes changes in Antarctic archipelago and Antarctic Peninsula using terestrial laser scaning and digital terrestrial stereophotogrammetry survey; (b investigation of Penola strain tectonic fault, using the results of precise GNSS observations.

  3. Complex Geodetic Research in Ukrainian Antarctic Station “Academician Vernadsky” (Years 2002 - 2005, 2013-2014)

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    In this paper is given an information about complex geodetic research in Ukrainian Antarctic station “Academician Vernadsky”. Research were carried by Lviv polytechnic scientists, during Antarctic expeditions in years 2002 - 2005, 2013, 2014. Main objectives of the studies were: (a) study of the islands glaciers surface volumes changes in Antarctic archipelago and Antarctic Peninsula using terestrial laser scaning and digital terrestrial stereophotogrammetry survey; (b) investigation of Penol...

  4. Psychromicrobium silvestre gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel actinobacterium isolated from alpine forest soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Peter; Zhang, De-Chao; Franca, Luís; Albuquerque, Luciana; da Costa, Milton S; Margesin, Rosa

    2016-11-21

    Two Gram-stain-variable, non-motile, catalase-positive and cytochrome c oxidase-negative bacteria, designated AK20-18T and AM20-54, were isolated from forest soil samples collected in the Italian Alps. Growth occurred at a temperature range of 5-30 °C, at pH 6-9 and in the presence of 0-5 % (w/v) NaCl. The 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity between strains AK20-18T and AM20-54 was 100 %. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence showed that AK20-18T had highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with the type strain of Arthrobacter psychrochitiniphilus (96.9 %). The cell-wall peptidoglycan structure of strain AK20-18T was of the type A3alpha L-Lys - L-Thr - L-Ala2 (A11.27). The whole-cell sugars were galactose, ribose and lower amounts of mannose. The major respiratory quinone of the two strains was menaquinone 9(H2) (MK-9 [H2]), whereas MK-10(H2) was a minor component. The polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylinositol and unknown glycolipids. The major cellular fatty acids were anteiso-C15:0, iso-C15:0, iso-C16:0 and anteiso-C17:0. The genomic DNA G+C content was 59.9 mol%. Combined data of phylogenetic, phenotypic and chemotaxonomic analysis demonstrated that strains AK20-18T and AM20-54 represent a novel genus and species, for which the name Psychromicrobium silvestre gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Psychromicrobium silvestre is AK20-18T (DSM 102047T = LMG 29369 T).

  5. 75 FR 53723 - Notice of Permit Applications Received Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 (Pub. L. 95-541)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    ... requiring special protection. The regulations establish such a permit system to designate Antarctic... Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 (Pub. L. 95-541) AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of Permit Applications Received under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978, Public Law 95-541....

  6. 76 FR 30397 - Notice of Permit Applications Received Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 (Pub. L. 95-541)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-25

    ... requiring special protection. The regulations establish such a permit system to designate Antarctic... Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 (Pub. L. 95-541) AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of Permit Modification Received under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978, Public Law 95-541....

  7. 77 FR 31044 - Notice of Permit Applications Received Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 (Pub. L. 95-541)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-24

    ... requiring special protection. The regulations establish such a permit system to designate Antarctic... Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 (Pub. L. 95-541) AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of Permit Applications Received Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978, Public Law 95-541....

  8. 78 FR 73893 - Notice of Permit Modification Received Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 (Pub. L. 95-541)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-09

    ... requiring special protection. The regulations establish such a permit system to designate Antarctic... Notice of Permit Modification Received Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 (Pub. L. 95-541... Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978, Public Law 95-541. SUMMARY: The National Science Foundation (NSF)...

  9. 78 FR 69709 - Notice of Permit Modification Received Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 (Pub. L. 95-541)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-20

    ... Protection to the Antarctic Treaty and would be disposed of properly Now the applicant proposes a... Notice of Permit Modification Received Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 (Pub. L. 95-541... Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978, Public Law 95-541. SUMMARY: The National Science Foundation (NSF)...

  10. Actinoplanes couchii sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kämpfer, Peter; Huber, Birgit; Thummes, Kathrin; Grün-Wollny, Iris; Busse, Hans-Jürgen

    2007-04-01

    A Gram-positive bacterium, strain GW8-1761(T), was isolated from soil close to the Marmore waterfalls, Terni, Italy. 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity studies showed that strain GW8-1761(T) belonged to the genus Actinoplanes, being most closely related to Actinoplanes italicus JCM 3165(T) (98.9 %), A. rectilineatus IFO 13941(T) (98.5 %), A. palleronii JCM 7626(T) (97.8 %), A. utahensis IFO 13244(T) (97.6 %) and A. cyaneus DSM 46137(T) (97.6 %). Strain GW8-1761(T) could be distinguished from any other Actinoplanes species with validly published names by 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity values of less than 97.5 %. Chemotaxonomic data [major menaquinone MK-9(H(4)); major polar lipids diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylinositol, with phosphatidylcholine and aminoglycolipids absent; major fatty acids C(15 : 0), C(16 : 0), C(16 : 0) iso, C(17 : 1)omega8c and summed feature 3 (C(16 : 1)omega7c and/or C(15 : 0) iso 2-OH)] supported the affiliation of strain GW8-1761(T) to the genus Actinoplanes. The results of DNA-DNA hybridizations and physiological and biochemical tests allowed genotypic and phenotypic differentiation of strain GW8-1761(T) from the most closely related species. Strain GW8-1761(T) therefore merits species status, and we propose the name Actinoplanes couchii sp. nov., with the type strain GW8-1761(T) (=DSM 45050(T)=CIP 109316(T)).

  11. Arcobacter marinus sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye Min; Hwang, Chung Yeon; Cho, Byung Cheol

    2010-03-01

    A slightly curved, rod-shaped marine bacterium, designated strain CL-S1(T), was isolated from near Dokdo, an island in the East Sea, Korea. Cells were Gram-negative and grew well under either aerobic or microaerobic conditions. Analyses of the 16S rRNA and gyrA gene sequences of strain CL-S1(T) revealed an affiliation with the genus Arcobacter within the class Epsilonproteobacteria. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA and gyrA gene sequences showed that strain CL-S1(T) formed a robust clade with Arcobacter halophilus LA31B(T), with sequence similarities of 96.1 and 88.2 %, respectively. DNA-DNA relatedness between strain CL-S1(T) and A. halophilus DSM 18005(T) was 44 %, indicating that they represent genomically distinct species. Strain CL-S1(T) grew optimally at 30-37 degrees C, at pH 7 and in the presence of 3-5 % NaCl. The dominant cellular fatty acids were iso-C(15 : 0) 2-OH and/or C(16 : 1)omega7c (28.4 %), C(16 : 0) (26.2 %) and C(18 : 1)omega7c (22.3 %). The DNA G+C content of strain CL-S1(T) was 28 mol%. Strain CL-S1(T) differed phenotypically from A. halophilus LA31B(T) based on its ability to grow aerobically at 10 degrees C and inability to grow under anaerobic conditions. Based on the data presented, strain CL-S1(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Arcobacter, for which the name Arcobacter marinus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CL-S1(T) (=KCCM 90072(T) =JCM 15502(T)).

  12. Antarctic ice volume for the last 740 ka calculated with a simple ice sheet model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, J.

    2005-01-01

    Fluctuations in the volume of the Antarctic ice sheet for the last 740 ka are calculated by forcing a simple ice sheet model with a sea-level history (from a composite deep sea δ18O record) and a temperature history (from the Dome C deuterium record). Antarctic ice volume reaches maximum values of a

  13. Escherichia coli out in the cold: Dissemination of human-derived bacteria into the Antarctic microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Michelle L; Samuel, Angelingifta; Smith, James J; Stark, Jonathon S; Gillings, Michael R; Gordon, David M

    2016-08-01

    Discharge of untreated sewage into Antarctic environments presents a risk of introducing non-native microorganisms, but until now, adverse consequences have not been conclusively identified. Here we show that sewage disposal introduces human derived Escherichia coli carrying mobile genetic elements and virulence traits with the potential to affect the diversity and evolution of native Antarctic microbial communities. We compared E. coli recovered from environmental and animal sources in Antarctica to a reference collection of E. coli from humans and non-Antarctic animals. The distribution of phylogenetic groups and frequency of 11 virulence factors amongst the Antarctic isolates were characteristic of E. coli strains more commonly associated with humans. The rapidly emerging E. coli ST131 and ST95 clones were found amongst the Antarctic isolates, and ST95 was the predominant E. coli recovered from Weddell seals. Class 1 integrons were found in 15% of the Antarctic E. coli with 4 of 5 identified gene cassette arrays containing antibiotic resistance genes matching those common in clinical contexts. Disposing untreated sewage into the Antarctic environment does disseminate non-native microorganisms, but the extent of this impact and implications for Antarctic ecosystem health are, as yet, poorly understood.

  14. Living resources of Antarctic India's contribution to exploration and future plans for exploration

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Parulekar, A.H.

    stream_size 7 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Proc_Workshop_Antarct_Stud_1990_459.pdf.txt stream_source_info Proc_Workshop_Antarct_Stud_1990_459.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset...

  15. Standing crop and growth rates of net phytoplankton and nanoplankton in Antarctic waters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Goes, J.I.; Fondekar, S.P.; Parulekar, A.H.

    stream_size 16 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Proc_Workshop_Antarct_Stud_1990_419.pdf.txt stream_source_info Proc_Workshop_Antarct_Stud_1990_419.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset...

  16. 75 FR 53351 - Notice of Permit Application Received Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-31

    ... Notice of Permit Application Received Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of permit applications received under the Antarctic Conservation Act... permit application for operation of a camp at Patriot Hills, Heritage Range, southern Ellsworth...

  17. Spatial pattern in Antarctica: what can we learn from Antarctic bacterial isolates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Chun Wie; Goh, Yuh Shan; Convey, Peter; Pearce, David; Tan, Irene Kit Ping

    2013-09-01

    A range of small- to moderate-scale studies of patterns in bacterial biodiversity have been conducted in Antarctica over the last two decades, most suggesting strong correlations between the described bacterial communities and elements of local environmental heterogeneity. However, very few of these studies have advanced interpretations in terms of spatially associated patterns, despite increasing evidence of patterns in bacterial biogeography globally. This is likely to be a consequence of restricted sampling coverage, with most studies to date focusing only on a few localities within a specific Antarctic region. Clearly, there is now a need for synthesis over a much larger spatial to consolidate the available data. In this study, we collated Antarctic bacterial culture identities based on the 16S rRNA gene information available in the literature and the GenBank database (n > 2,000 sequences). In contrast to some recent evidence for a distinct Antarctic microbiome, our phylogenetic comparisons show that a majority (~75 %) of Antarctic bacterial isolates were highly similar (≥99 % sequence similarity) to those retrieved from tropical and temperate regions, suggesting widespread distribution of eurythermal mesophiles in Antarctic environments. However, across different Antarctic regions, the dominant bacterial genera exhibit some spatially distinct diversity patterns analogous to those recently proposed for Antarctic terrestrial macroorganisms. Taken together, our results highlight the threat of cross-regional homogenisation in Antarctic biodiversity, and the imperative to include microbiota within the framework of biosecurity measures for Antarctica.

  18. JCADM, new Directions in Antarctic Data Management in Support of IPY

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruin, T.

    2007-12-01

    The Joint Committee on Antarctic Data Management (JCADM) was established by the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR) and the Council of Managers of National Antarctic Programs (COMNAP), to assist in the fulfilment of the data management obligations imposed by the Antarctic Treaty (section III.1.c): "Scientific observations and results from Antarctica shall be exchanged and made freely available." JCADM comprises representatives of the National Antarctic Data Centres or national points of contact. Currently 31 nations around the world are represented in JCADM. So far, JCADM has been focussing on the coordination of the Antarctic Master Directory (AMD), the internationally accessible, web-based, searchable record of Antarctic and Southern Ocean data set descriptions. The AMD is directly integrated into the international Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) to help further merge Antarctic science into global science. The AMD is a resource for scientists to advertise the data they have collected and to search for data they may need. Currently, JCADM is in a transition phase, moving forward to provide data access. Existing systems and web services technology will be used as much as possible, to increase efficiency and prevent 're-inventing the wheel' This presentation will give an overview of this process, the current status and the expected results.

  19. 77 FR 67407 - Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of permits issued under the Antarctic Conservation of 1978, Public Law 95-541....

  20. 78 FR 44165 - Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of permits issued under the Antarctic Conservation of 1978, Public Law 95-541....

  1. 77 FR 47121 - Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of permits issued under the Antarctic Conservation of 1978, Public Law 95-541....

  2. 75 FR 35508 - Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of permits issued under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978, Public Law 95-541....

  3. 78 FR 41961 - Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of permits cancelled under the Antarctic Conservation of 1978, Public Law...

  4. 77 FR 37446 - Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of permits issued under the Antarctic Conservation of 1978, Public Law 95-541....

  5. 77 FR 36581 - Notice of Permit Applications Received Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-19

    ... Conservation Act of 1978. SUMMARY: The National Science Foundation (NSF) is required to publish a notice of... INFORMATION: The National Science Foundation, as directed by the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 (Pub. L. 95-541), as amended by the Antarctic Science, Tourism and Conservation Act of 1996, has...

  6. 78 FR 69710 - Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of permits issued under the Antarctic Conservation of 1978, Public Law 95-541....

  7. 77 FR 38834 - Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of permits issued under the Antarctic Conservation of 1978, Public Law 95-541....

  8. 77 FR 64831 - Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of permits issued under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978, Public Law 95-541....

  9. 75 FR 56147 - Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of permits issued under the Antarctic Conservation of 1978, Public Law...

  10. 77 FR 69660 - Notice of Permit Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Notice of Permit Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of permit issued under the Antarctic Conservation of 1978, Public Law...

  11. 77 FR 46528 - Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of permits issued under the Antarctic Conservation of 1978, Public Law 95-541....

  12. 77 FR 21112 - Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ] ACTION: Notice of permit issued under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978, Public Law 95-541....

  13. 75 FR 12311 - Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of permits issued under the Antarctic Conservation of 1978, Public Law 95-541....

  14. 75 FR 68831 - Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-09

    ... Doc No: 2010-28209] NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of permits issued under the Antarctic Conservation of 1978, Public Law 95-541. SUMMARY: The National Science Foundation (NSF)...

  15. 77 FR 67408 - Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of permits issued under the Antarctic Conservation of 1978, Public Law 95-541....

  16. 76 FR 39905 - Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of permits issued under the Antarctic Conservation of 1978, Public Law 95-541....

  17. 77 FR 68851 - Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of permits issued under the Antarctic Conservation of 1978, Public Law 95-541....

  18. 78 FR 66075 - Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of permits issued under the Antarctic Conservation of 1978, Public Law 95-541....

  19. 77 FR 50533 - Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of permits issued under the Antarctic Conservation of 1978, Public Law 95-541....

  20. 76 FR 36938 - Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of permits issued under the Antarctic Conservation of 1978, Public Law 95-541....

  1. 78 FR 58568 - Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of permits issued under the Antarctic Conservation of 1978, Public Law 95-541....

  2. 78 FR 6142 - Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of permits issued under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978, Public Law 95-541....

  3. 77 FR 16567 - Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of permit issued under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978, Public Law 95-541....

  4. 78 FR 18374 - Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of permits issued under the Antarctic Conservation of 1978, Public Law 95-541....

  5. 78 FR 66074 - Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of permits issued under the Antarctic Conservation of 1978, Public Law 95-541....

  6. 78 FR 12799 - Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of permits issued under the Antarctic Conservation of 1978, Public Law 95-541....

  7. 78 FR 33115 - Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of permits issued under the Antarctic Conservation of 1978, Public Law 95-541....

  8. 77 FR 42515 - Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of permits issued under the Antarctic Conservation of 1978, Public Law 95-541....

  9. 77 FR 68154 - Notice of Permit Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Notice of Permit Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of permit issued under the Antarctic Conservation of 1978, Public Law 95-541. SUMMARY:...

  10. 78 FR 66076 - Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of permits issued under the Antarctic Conservation of 1978, Public Law 95-541....

  11. 78 FR 59979 - Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of permits issued under the Antarctic Conservation of 1978, Public Law 95-541....

  12. 77 FR 61033 - Notice of Permit Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Notice of Permit Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of permit issued under the Antarctic Conservation of 1978, Public Law 95-541. SUMMARY:...

  13. 78 FR 36604 - Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of permits issued under the Antarctic Conservation of 1978, Public Law 95-541....

  14. 77 FR 35068 - Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of permits issued under the Antarctic Conservation of 1978, Public Law 95-541....

  15. 77 FR 50174 - Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of permits issued under the Antarctic Conservation of 1978, Public Law 95-541....

  16. 78 FR 75376 - Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of permits issued under the Antarctic Conservation of 1978, Public Law 95-541....

  17. 75 FR 31819 - Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of permits issued under the Antarctic Conservation of 1978, Public Law...

  18. 76 FR 40754 - Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of permits issued under the Antarctic Conservation of 1978, Public Law 95-541....

  19. 75 FR 67143 - Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Notice of Permits Issued Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of permits issued under the Antarctic Conservation of 1978, Public Law...

  20. Concentration and environmental significance of lead in surface snow of Antarctic ice sheet (III)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦大河; 任贾文; 孙俊英; 陈瓞延; 文克玲; 李良权

    1995-01-01

    Lead as an ultra-trace heavy metal becomes one of popular topics in glaciochemistry of the Antarctic ice sheet, because of its very low concertration (pg·g-1) and background and its sensitivity to the quality of the environment. The lead concentration of surface snow of the Antarctic ice sheet (corresponding to modern precipitation) applying LEAF technique by Chinese scholars has systematically been studied for the first time in the world. The distribution principle of lead concentration of surface snow of the Antarctic ice sheet is "low in the west and high in the east" along the route of 1990 International Trans-Antarctic Expedition (ITAE). The concentration of lead in East Antarctica is 2 - 3 fold higher than that in Larsen ice shelf and Antarctic Peninsula, which majorly results from the activity of pre-Soviet Antarctic Expedition The concentration of lead in Larsen ice shelf and Antarctic Peninsula can be regarded as the background value of modern precipitation of the Antarctic ice sheet in the en

  1. Penicillium araracuarense sp. nov., Penicillium elleniae sp. nov., Penicillium penarojense sp. nov., Penicillium vanderhammenii sp. nov. and Penicillium wotroi sp. nov., isolated from leaf litter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houbraken, Jos; López-Quintero, Carlos A.; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2011-01-01

    Several species of the genus Penicillium were isolated during a survey of the mycobiota of leaf litter and soil in Colombian Amazon forest. Five species, Penicillium penarojense sp. nov. (type strain CBS 113178T = IBT 23262T), Penicillium wotroi sp. nov. (type strain CBS 118171T = IBT 23253T...

  2. Surfactant protein (SP)-A and SP-D as antimicrobial and immunotherapeutic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Shanjana

    2010-06-01

    Surfactant protein (SP)-A and SP-D belong to the "Soluble C-type Lectin" family of proteins and are collectively known as "Collectins". Based on their ability to recognize pathogens and to regulate the host defense, SP-A and SP-D have been recently categorized as "Secretory Pathogen Recognition Receptors". SP-A and SP-D were first identified in the lung; the expression of SP-A and SP-D has also been observed at other mucosal surfaces, such as lacrimal glands, gastrointestinal mucosa, genitourinary epithelium and periodontal surfaces. Since the role of these proteins is not fully elucidated at other mucosal surfaces, the focus of this article is on lung-SP-A and SP-D. It has become clear from research studies performed over a number of years that SP-A and SP-D are critical for the maintenance of lung homeostasis and the regulation of host defense and inflammation. However, none of the surfactant preparations available for clinical use have SP-A or SP-D. A review is presented here on SP-A- and SP-D-deficiencies in lung diseases, the importance of the administration of SP-A and SP-D, and recent patents and research directions that may lead to the design of novel SP-A- or SP-D-based therapeutics and surfactants.

  3. Iron biogeochemistry in Antarctic pack ice during SIPEX-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lannuzel, Delphine; Chever, Fanny; van der Merwe, Pier C.; Janssens, Julie; Roukaerts, Arnout; Cavagna, Anne-Julie; Townsend, Ashley T.; Bowie, Andrew R.; Meiners, Klaus M.

    2016-09-01

    Our study quantified the spatial and temporal distribution of Fe and ancillary biogeochemical parameters at six stations visited during an interdisciplinary Australian Antarctic marine science voyage (SIPEX-2) within the East Antarctic first-year pack ice zone during September-October 2012. Unlike previous studies in the area, the sea ice Chlorophyll a, Particulate Organic Carbon and Nitrogen (POC and PON) maxima did not occur at the ice/water interface because of the snow loading and dynamic processes under which the sea ice formed. Iron in sea ice ranged from 0.9 to 17.4 nM for the dissolved (0.2 μm) fraction. Our results highlight that the concentration of particulate Fe in sea ice was highest when approaching the continent. The high POC concentration and high particulate iron to aluminium ratio in sea ice samples demonstrate that 71% of the particulate Fe was biogenic in composition. Our estimated Fe flux from melting pack ice to East Antarctic surface waters over a 30 day melting period was 0.2 μmol/m2/d of DFe, 2.7 μmol/m2/d of biogenic PFe and 1.3 μmol/m2/d of lithogenic PFe. These estimates suggest that the fertilization potential of the particulate fraction of Fe may have been previously underestimated due to the assumption that it is primarily lithogenic in composition. Our new measurements and calculated fluxes indicate that a large fraction of the total Fe pool within sea ice may be bioavailable and therefore, effective in promoting primary productivity in the marginal ice zone.

  4. [Microbiological analysis of terrestrial biotopes of the Antarctic region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashirev, A B; Romanovskaia, V A; Rokitko, P V; Shilin, S O; Chernaia, N A; Tashireva, A A

    2010-01-01

    Microbiological analysis has been made of 120 samples from biotopes of the western coast of the Antarctic peninsula (Rasmussen cope, Tuxen cope, Waugh mountain), Argentine archipelago islands (Galindez, Skua, Corner, Barchans, Irizar, Uruguay, Cluls, Three Little Pigs, King-George), as well as neighbouring islands (Petermann--on the north, a group of Jalour islands--on the east, Berthelot--on the south-east); and more remote islands (Darboux, Lippmann, Booth). It was found out that the total number of chemoorganotrophic aerobic microorganisms was 10(6) - 10(8) cells/g of soil, that was by 2-3 orders lower than in the regions with temperate climate. One can observe a tendency of decreasing the quantity of chemoorganotrophic microorganisms in the Antartic biotopes (cells/g of a sample) in the following order: soil (1 x 10(7) - 8 x 10(8)), underground part of moss (1 x 10(6) - 5 x 10(7)), grass Deschampsia antarctica (10(6) - 10(8), slit of fresh-water reservoir (10(5) - 10(7)), ground part of moss (10(3) - 10(6)), lichens (10(3) - 10(6)). Representatives of several phylogenetic lines: Proteobacteria (genera Pseudomonas, Methylobacterium, Enterobacter), Firmicutes (genera Bacillus, Staphylococcus), Actinobacteria (genera Brevibacterium, Actinomyces, Streptomyces) have been found in the Antarctic samples. As a rule, genera of bacteria found in the Antarctic Region are widely distributed in different regions of the Earth with temperate climate. Microorganisms similar to the species Exophiala nigra (Issatsch.) Haats et de Hoog 1999, which was first detected 100 years ago by Academician B.L. Isachenko in the Arctic region water, were also isolated from biofilms on vertical rocks of the Galindez Island as well as from the soil of the Irizar Island.

  5. Terrestrial Kr-81-Kr ages of Antarctic meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freundel, M.; Schultz, L.; Reedy, R. C.

    1986-01-01

    The production rate of Ar-38 in meteorites P(38), has been determined, as a function of the sample's chemical composition, from Kr-81-Kr exposure ages of four eucrite falls. The cosmogenic Kr-78/Kr-83 ratio is used to estimate the shielding dependence of P(38). From the 'true' Ar-38 exposure ages and the apparent Kr-81-Kr exposure ages of nine Antarctic eucrite finds, terrestrial ages are calculated. They range from about 300,000 ages (Pecora Escarpment 82502) to very recent falls (Thiel Mountains 82502). Polymict eucrites from the Allan Hills (A78132, A79017, and A81009) have within the limits of error the same exposure age (15.2 x 10 to the 6th ages) and the same terrestrial age (110,000 ages). This is taken as strong evidence that these meteorites are fragments of the same fall. A similar case is the Elephant Moraine polymict eucrites A79005, A79006, and 82600 with an exposure age of 26 x 10 to the 6th ages and a terrestrial age of 180,000 ages. EETA 79004 may be different from this group because its exposure age and terrestrial age are 21 x 10 to the 6th ages and 250,000 ages, respectively. The distribution of terrestrial ages of Allan Hills meteorites is discussed. Meteorites from this blue ice field have two sources: directly deposited falls and meteorites transported to the Allen Hills inside the moving Antarctic ice sheet. During the surface residence time meteorites decompose due to weathering processes. The weathering 'half-life' is about 160,000 ages. From the different age distributions of Allan Hills and Yamato meteorites, it is concluded that meteorite concentrations of different Antarctic ice fields need different explanations.

  6. The Future of the United States Antarctic Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, J. E.; Weidner, G. A.; Lazzara, M. A.; Knuth, S. L.; Cassano, J. J.

    2009-04-01

    The last three decades have seen Antarctic surface meteorological observations augmented by an increasing number of automated weather stations (AWS). Since 1980, the University of Wisconsin-Madison has managed an expanding array of AWS in Antarctica that are funded through the United States' National Science Foundation. The AWS network began with six stations and has grown to approximately 60 stations. The majority of the AWS use a custom electronics package designed in the 1970s and modified over approximately 20 years. However, dramatic changes in the electronics industry have led the UW-Madison to transition its AWS to commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) components capable of integrating on-station storage, varied sensors, multiple data telemetry options, and a flexible operating system. Among the important technical issues arising from adopting a COTS-based AWS system are limited temperature certification for Antarctic conditions; non-standard integration of the varied telecommunications equipment; potentially inflexible data acquisition schemes; and frequent product upgrades, changes, and obsolescence. The UW-Madison presents the current status of its AWS system; its recent experience with new data loggers, sensors, and communication options; and its attempts to obtain a standardized AWS. The intent is to encourage the development of a forum where groups can document their experiences with varied AWS systems in the extreme polar climate. Recent events have added another challenge within the United States Antarctic Program, as it has become clear that budgetary and logistic limitations will drastically impact the AWS program. With logistical costs playing a bigger factor in funding AWS operations, international coordination and cooperation will be important in deploying and maintaining the AWS networks (such as GCOS) that are critical to monitoring the world's climate.

  7. Spatiotemporal variations in the surface velocities of Antarctic Peninsula glaciers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Chen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Velocity is an important parameter for the estimation of glacier mass balance, which directly signals the response of glaciers to climate change. Antarctic ice sheet movement and the associated spatiotemporal velocity variations are of great significance to global sea level rise. In this study, we estimate Antarctic Peninsula glacier velocities using the co-registration of optically sensed images and correlation (hereafter referred to as COSI-Corr based on moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer Level 1B data (hereafter referred to as MODIS L1B. The results show that the glaciers of Graham Land and the Larsen Ice Shelf have substantially different velocity features. The Graham Land glaciers primarily flow from the peninsula ridge towards the Weddell Sea and Bellingshausen Sea on the east and west sides, respectively. There are very large velocity variations among the different ice streams, with a minimum of −1 and a maximum of 1500 m a−1 (with an average of 100–150 m a−1. Over the period 2000–2012, the glaciers of Graham Land accelerated in the south but slowed down in the north. In contrast, the Larsen Ice Shelf flows in a relatively uniform direction, mainly towards the northeast into the Weddell Sea. Its average velocity is 750–800 m a−1 and the maximum is > 1500 m a−1. During the period 2000–2012, the Larsen Ice Shelf experienced significant acceleration. The use of COSI-Corr based on MODIS L1B data is suitable for glacier velocity monitoring on the Antarctic Peninsula over long time series and large spatial scales. This method is clearly advantageous for analysing macro-scale spatiotemporal variations in glacier movement.

  8. Pliocene retreat of Greenland and Antarctic Ice Sheet margins (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deconto, R. M.; Pollard, D.

    2013-12-01

    The middle Pliocene epoch (~3 million years ago) is often considered an analogue for future global climatic conditions, because global mean temperatures were comparable to projections of future climate at the end of this century. Importantly, some estimates of mid-Pliocene sea level are >20 m higher than today, implying the potential for significant retreat of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS), in addition to the loss of the Greenland and West Antarctic Ice Sheets (WAIS). Here, we use a hybrid ice sheet-shelf model with freely migrating grounding lines coupled to a high-resolution regional climate model to test the potential for both West and East Antarctic Ice Sheet retreat during the warm Pliocene and in long-term future scenarios with elevated CO2. In these simulations we apply new treatments of i) ice shelf calving (accounting for the effects of divergent ice flow and surface melt water on crevassing), ii) ice-cliff mechanics at the grounding line, iii) improved sub-glacial bathymetry using BEDMAP2, and iv) a range of plausible ocean warming scenarios based on offline ocean modeling. In warm Pliocene simulations, the combination of improved bathymetric detail and more physically based model treatments of floating and grounded calving fronts substantially increases the rates and magnitudes of ice sheet retreat into over-deepened subglacial basins in both in West and East Antarctica. These new results imply the EAIS margin did indeed contribute to elevated (and orbitally paced) Pliocene sea levels, with Antarctica contributing up to ~20m equivalent sea level during the warmest intervals. In long-term (10^3-4-yr) future simulations using the same model physics, we find these new mechanisms produce a much more sensitive and vulnerable ice sheet than previously considered, with the potential for substantial future retreat of both WAIS and parts of the East Antarctic margin in response to the combined effects of increased surface melt on ice shelf surfaces and

  9. Dr Reginald Koettlitz (1860-1916): Arctic and Antarctic explorer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guly, Henry

    2012-11-01

    Reginald Koettlitz was born in Ostend but moved to England as a child and qualified at Guy's Hospital. He was a general practitioner in County Durham for eight years before serving as doctor and geologist to the Jackson-Harmsworth Expedition to Franz-Josef Land in 1894-97. Thereafter he made further expeditions to Somaliland, Abyssinia and the Amazon before joining Captain Scott's Discovery Expedition to the Antarctic in 1901-04 as surgeon and botanist. After the expedition he emigrated to South Africa, where he worked as a general practitioner, dying in 1916.

  10. Response of the Antarctic ice sheet to future greenhouse warming

    OpenAIRE

    Oerlemans, J.; Huybrechts, P.

    1990-01-01

    Possible future changes in land ice volume are mentioned frequently as an important aspect of the greenhouse problem. This paper deals with the response ofthe Antarctic ice sheet and presents a tentative projection of changes in global sea level for the next few hundred years, due to changes in its surface massbalance. We imposed a temperature scenario, in which surface air temperature rises to 4.2¡C in the year 2100 AD and is kept constant afterwards. As GCMstudies seem to indicate a higher ...

  11. ARM West Antarctic Radiation Experiment (AWARE) Science Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lubin, D [National Science Foundation; Bromwich, DH [Ohio State University; Russell, LM [Scripps Institution of Oceanography; Verlinde, J [The Pennsylvania State University; Vogelmann, AM [Brookhaven National Laboratory

    2015-10-01

    West Antarctica is one of the most rapidly warming regions on Earth, and this warming is closely connected with global sea level rise. The discovery of rapid climate change on the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) has challenged previous explanations of Antarctic climate change that focused on strengthening of circumpolar westerlies in response to the positive polarity trend in the Southern Annular Mode. West Antarctic warming does not yet have a comprehensive explanation: dynamical mechanisms may vary from one season to the next, and these mechanisms very likely involve complex teleconnections with subtropical and tropical latitudes. The prime motivation for this proposal is that there has been no substantial atmospheric science or climatological field work on West Antarctica since the 1957 International Geophysical Year and that research continued for only a few years. Direct meteorological information on the WAIS has been limited to a few automatic weather stations for several decades, yet satellite imagery and meteorological reanalyses indicate that West Antarctica is highly susceptible to advection of warm and moist maritime air with related cloud cover, depending on the location and strength of low pressure cells in the Amundsen, Ross, and Bellingshausen Seas. There is a need to quantify the role of these changing air masses on the surface energy balance, including all surface energy components and cloud-radiative forcing. More generally, global climate model simulations are known to perform poorly over the Antarctic and Southern Oceans, and the marked scarcity of cloud information at southern high latitudes has so far inhibited significant progress. Fortunately, McMurdo Station, where the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Facility’s (ARM’s) most advanced cloud and aerosol instrumentation is situated, has a meteorological relationship with the WAIS via circulation patterns in the Ross and Amundsen Seas. We can therefore gather sophisticated data with cloud

  12. The Last Interglacial History of the Antarctic Ice sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Sarah; Siddall, Mark; Milne, Glenn A.; Masson-Delmotte, Valerie; Wolff, Eric; Hindmarsh, Richard C. A.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper we present a summary of the work which was conducted as part of the 'PAST4FUTURE -WP4.1: Sea Level and Ice sheets' project. The overall aim of this study was to understand the response of the Antarctic Ice sheet (AIS) to climate forcing during the Last interglacial (LIG) and its contribution to the observed higher than present sea level during this period. The study involved the application and development of a novel technique which combined East Antarctic stable isotope ice core data with the output from a Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) model [Bradley et al., 2012]. We investigated if the stable isotope ice core data are sensitive to detecting isostatically driven changes in the surface elevation driven by changes in the ice-loading history of the AIS and if so, could we address some key questions relating to the LIG history of the AIS. Although it is believed that the West Antarctic Ice sheet (WAIS) reduced in size during the LIG compared to the Holocene, major uncertainties and unknowns remain unresolved: Did the WAIS collapse? What would the contribution of such a collapse be the higher than present LIG eustatic sea level (ESL)? We will show that a simulated collapse of the WAIS does not generate a significant elevation driven signal at the EAIS LIG ice core sites, and as such, these ice core records cannot be used to assess WAIS stability over this period. However, we will present 'treasure maps' [Bradley et al., 2012] to identify regions of the AIS where results from geological studies and/or new paleoclimate data may be sensitive to detecting a WAIS collapse. These maps can act as a useful tool for the wider science community/field scientists as a guide to highlight sites suitable to constrain the evolution of the WAIS during the LIG. Studies have proposed that the surface temperature across the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) was significantly warmer, 2-5°C during the LIG compared to present [Lang and Wolff, 2011]. These higher

  13. Generalized λ-deformations of AdSp × Sp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chervonyi, Yuri; Lunin, Oleg

    2016-12-01

    We study analytical properties of the generalized λ-deformation, which modifies string theories while preserving integrability, and construct the explicit backgrounds corresponding to AdSp ×Sp, including the Ramond-Ramond fluxes. For an arbitrary coset, we find the general form of the R-matrix underlying the deformation, and prove that the dilaton is not modified by the deformation, while the frames are multiplied by a constant matrix. Our explicit solutions describe families of integrable string theories depending on several continuous parameters.

  14. Towards Resolving the Paradox of Antarctic Sea Ice: A New Integrated Framework for Observing the Antarctic Marginal Ice Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, G. D.

    2014-12-01

    Antarctic sea ice distribution, a canary in the coal mine for climate change in the Southern Hemisphere, is controlled by the marginal ice zone (MIZ). The MIZ is the dynamic outer part of the sea-ice zone, where it interacts with the high-energy open ocean and is strongly affected by waves and storms. As an interface between ocean and atmosphere with extreme vertical and horizontal temperature gradients and large variations in mechanical properties, the MIZ is a complex system that evolves with, and impacts upon, the advancing/receding ice edge. More than a zone, it is a migratory transition in 'phase space' that biannually passes across the entire Antarctic SIZ. During the advance phase of sea-ice seasonality, and under freezing conditions, wave-induced pancake-ice formation can lead to rapid ice-edge advance. During the retreat phase, the dynamic break-up and modification of sea ice by passing storms, winds and waves greatly modifies the floe-size distribution within the MIZ, to create smaller floes that melt more rapidly and accelerate sea-ice retreat as spring progresses. Inspired by the current Arctic MIZ efforts, new fieldwork is proposed to resolve the key characteristics of the Antarctic MIZ and the processes controlling its extent. Combining new autonomous observation technology with ship-based techniques, integrated experiments are being designed to advance our understanding of the MIZ and its role in driving seasonal sea ice advance and retreat around Antarctica. The proposed project provides a unique opportunity to develop an observational, analytical, and science-policy framework for coordinated monitoring of sea ice in both the northern and southern hemispheres, with implications for forecasting, monitoring, and prediction that are essential with increasingly dynamic and variable polar climate systems.

  15. Arctic and Antarctic Analogs for Planetary Surface Traverses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Stephen J.; Cameron, A. O.

    2009-01-01

    The proposed paper summarizes the workshop presentations and discusses several of the key findings or lessons including: (1) A recognition that NASA s current approach for long duration planetary surface operations has fundamental differences from any of the operational approaches described by the invited speakers. These approaches drive the crew size and skill mix to accomplish basic objectives and, in turn, drive the logistical pyramid needed to support these operations. NASA will review the operational approaches of the organizations represented to understand the differentiating factors. NASA will then decide if it should alter its current approach to surface exploration. (2) There are potential parallels between key characteristics of the systems used for exploration in these environments, such as heated volume as an analog for pressurized volume or energy usage for various activities. NASA will look at these characteristics to identify which could help with preliminary planning and gather raw data from the presenters to model these characteristics. (3) New technologies are being applied and design approaches are being tailored to take advantage of these technologies on both side. Interactions between these two communities has begun or is expanding to understand how these new technologies are being leveraged: NASA habitation designers are exchanging ideas and approaches with the Antarctic station designers; Antarctic support

  16. What Controls the Size of the Antarctic Ozone Hole?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor); Newman, Paul A.; Kawa, S. Randolph; Nash, Eric R.

    2002-01-01

    The Antarctic ozone hole is a region of extremely large ozone depletion that is roughly centered over the South Pole. Since 1979, the area coverage of the ozone hole has grown from near zero size to over 24 Million square kilometers. In the 8-year period from 1981 to 1989, the area expanded by 18 Million square kilometers. During the last 5 years, the hole has been observed to exceed 25 Million square kilometers over brief periods. We will review these size observations, the size trends, and the interannual variability of the size. The area is derived from the area enclosed by the 220 DU total ozone contour. We will discuss the rationale for the choice of 220 DU: 1) it is located near the steep gradient between southern mid-latitudes and the polar region, and 2) 220 DU is a value that is lower than the pre- 1979 ozone observations over Antarctica during the spring period. The phenomenal growth of the ozone hole was directly caused by the increases of chlorine and bromine compounds in the stratosphere. In this talk, we will show the relationship of the ozone hole's size to the interannual variability of Antarctic spring temperatures. In addition, we will show the relationship of these same temperatures to planetary-scale wave forcings.

  17. Detecting the Recovery of the Antarctic Ozone Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Paul A.; Nash, Eric R.; Kawa, S. Randolph; Montzka, Steve

    2004-01-01

    The Antarctic ozone hole develops each year and culminates by early Spring. Antarctic ozone values have been monitored since 1979 using satellite observations from the TOMS instrument. The severity of the hole has been assessed from TOMS using the minimum total ozone value from the October monthly mean (depth of the hole) and by calculating the average size during the September-October period. Ozone is mainly destroyed by halogen catalytic cycles, and these losses are modulated by temperature variations in the collar of the polar lower stratospheric vortex. In this presentation, we show the relationships of halogens and temperature to both the size and depth of the hole. Because atmospheric halogen levels are responding to international agreements that limit or phase out production, the amount of halogens in the stratosphere should decrease over the next few decades. Using projections of halogen levels combined with age-of-air estimates, we find that the ozone hole is recovering at an extremely slow rate and that large ozone holes will regularly recur over the next 2 decades. We will show estimates of both when the ozone hole will begin to show first signs of recovery, and when the hole will fully recover to pre-1980 levels.

  18. On the Size of the Antarctic Ozone Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Paul A.; Nash, Eric R.; Kawa, S. Randolph

    2002-01-01

    The Antarctic ozone hole is a region of extremely large ozone depletion that is roughly centered over the South Pole. Since 1979, the area coverage of the ozone hole has grown from near zero size to over 24 Million sq km. In the 8-year period from 1981 to 1989, the area expanded by 18 Million sq km. During the last 5 years, the hole has been observed to exceed 25 Million sq km over brief periods. In the spring of 2002, the size of the ozone hole barely reached 20 Million sq km for only a couple of days. We will review these size observations, the size trends, and the interannual variability of the size. The area is derived from the area enclosed by the 220 DU total ozone contour. We will discuss the rationale for the choice of 220 DU: 1) it is located near the steep gradient between southern mid-latitudes and the polar region, and 2) 220 DU is a value that is lower than the pre-1979 ozone observations over Antarctica during the spring period. The phenomenal growth of the ozone hole was directly caused by the increases of chlorine and bromine compounds in the stratosphere. In this talk, we will show the relationship of the ozone hole's size to the interannual variability of Antarctic spring temperatures. In addition, we will show the relationship of these same temperatures to planetary-scale wave forcings.

  19. East Antarctic rifting triggers uplift of the Gamburtsev Mountains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraccioli, Fausto; Finn, Carol A; Jordan, Tom A; Bell, Robin E; Anderson, Lester M; Damaske, Detlef

    2011-11-16

    The Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains are the least understood tectonic feature on Earth, because they are completely hidden beneath the East Antarctic Ice Sheet. Their high elevation and youthful Alpine topography, combined with their location on the East Antarctic craton, creates a paradox that has puzzled researchers since the mountains were discovered in 1958. The preservation of Alpine topography in the Gamburtsevs may reflect extremely low long-term erosion rates beneath the ice sheet, but the mountains' origin remains problematic. Here we present the first comprehensive view of the crustal architecture and uplift mechanisms for the Gamburtsevs, derived from radar, gravity and magnetic data. The geophysical data define a 2,500-km-long rift system in East Antarctica surrounding the Gamburtsevs, and a thick crustal root beneath the range. We propose that the root formed during the Proterozoic assembly of interior East Antarctica (possibly about 1 Gyr ago), was preserved as in some old orogens and was rejuvenated during much later Permian (roughly 250 Myr ago) and Cretaceous (roughly 100 Myr ago) rifting. Much like East Africa, the interior of East Antarctica is a mosaic of Precambrian provinces affected by rifting processes. Our models show that the combination of rift-flank uplift, root buoyancy and the isostatic response to fluvial and glacial erosion explains the high elevation and relief of the Gamburtsevs. The evolution of the Gamburtsevs demonstrates that rifting and preserved orogenic roots can produce broad regions of high topography in continental interiors without significantly modifying the underlying Precambrian lithosphere.

  20. Leadership in politics and science within the Antarctic Treaty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R. Dudeney

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available For over 50 years the Antarctic has been governed through the Antarctic Treaty, an international agreement now between 49 nations of whom 28 Consultative Parties (CPs undertake the management role. Ostensibly, these Parties have qualified for their position on scientific grounds, though diplomacy also plays a major role. This paper uses counts of policy papers and science publications to assess the political and scientific outputs of all CPs over the last 18 years. We show that a subset of the original 12 Treaty signatories, consisting of the seven claimant nations, the USA and Russia, not only set the political agenda for the continent but also provide most of the science, with those CPs producing the most science generally having the greatest political influence. None of the later signatories to the Treaty appear to play a major role in managing Antarctica compared with this group, with half of all CPs collectively producing only 7% of the policy papers. Although acceptance as a CP requires demonstration of a substantial scientific programme, the Treaty has no formal mechanism to review whether a CP continues to meet this criterion. As a first step to addressing this deficiency, we encourage the CPs collectively to resolve to hold regular international peer reviews of their individual science programmes and to make the results available to the other CPs.

  1. Study on ecological structures of coastal lakes in Antarctic continent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Coastal region on the Antarctic continent, where it is under the influences both of ocean and ice sheet, as well as frequent human activities, could be considered as a fragile zone in Antarctic ecological environment. There are many lakes in coastal region, showing much differences from each other in physical-chemical features because of individual evolutionary history in their geographical environments, and suffering from different outside factors, such as climate changes and precipitation. Thus, it results in respective biological distribution and ecological structure in lakes. The present paper reports the results from the studies of chemical components, species distributions and community structures, which mainly consisted of planktons in lakes in the Vestfold Hills (68°38'S, 78°06'E), and the Larsemann Hills (69°30'S, 76°20'E), East Antarctica. It also treats the biological diversities and nutrient relationships of these different types of lakes. So as to provide more scientific basis for monitoring of climate changes and environmental protection in Antarctica.

  2. Reversible Photoinhibition in Antarctic Moss during Freezing and Thawing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelock, C. E.; Jackson, A. E.; Melick, D. R.; Seppelt, R. D.

    1995-01-01

    Tolerance of antarctic moss to freezing and thawing stress was investigated using chlorophyll a fluorescence. Freezing in darkness caused reductions in Fv/Fm (ratio of variable to maximum fluorescence) and Fo (initial fluorescence) that were reversible upon thawing. Reductions in Fv/Fm and Fo during freezing in darkness indicate a reduction in the potential efficiency of photosystem II that may be due to conformational changes in pigment-protein complexes due to desiccation associated with freezing. The absorption of light during freezing further reduced Fv/Fm and Fo but was also reversible. Using dithiothreitol (DTT), which inhibits the formation of the carotenoid zeaxanthin, we found reduced flurorescence quenching during freezing and reduced concentrations of zeaxanthin and antheraxanthin after freezing in DTT-treated moss. Reduced concentrations of zeaxanthin and antheraxanthin in DTT-treated moss were partially associated with reductions in nonphotochemical fluorescence quenching. The reversible photoinhibition observed in antarctic moss during freezing indicates the existence of processes that protect from photoinhibitory damage in environments where freezing temperatures occur in conjunction with high solar radiation levels. These processes may limit the need for repair cycles that require temperatures favorable for enzyme activity. PMID:12228644

  3. Practical experience of telehealth between an Antarctic station and Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Giichiro; Watanabe, Kentaro; Okada, Yutaka; Higuchi, Kazuo

    2012-12-01

    The Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition (JARE) has had a presence in Antarctica since 1956. The Syowa station is 15,000 km from Japan and evacuation of patients is impossible during the winter months. From 1956 to 2003, a total of 4932 telemedical consultations were undertaken, i.e. every member of the station needed an average of 4 medical consultations each winter. Forty five percent of the consultations were surgical or orthopaedic cases, 23% were for internal medicine and 12% were for dental problems. In the early 1980s, satellite radio-telephony was found to be useful for consultations, but did not have the ability to transmit medical pictures. Email was transmitted by the International Mobile Satellite Organization (INMARSAT) but the connection was only available every 2 hours and the maximum message size was 100 kByte. In 2004, the International Telecommunications Satellite (INTELSAT) system made a connection constantly available, and increased the maximum message size to 10 MByte. Transmission of still and moving pictures became possible. Scheduled consultations are performed monthly. A doctor in Japan can ask the patient questions and perform a proxy examination with the assistance of the Antarctic doctor. Real-time telemedicine is very effective in orthopaedic and surgical cases, skin, eye and dental troubles. Still pictures are more effective for understanding in detail skin and eye problems. Emergency consultations are effective if adequate consulting staff are available.

  4. Antarctic and Southern Ocean influences on Late Pliocene global cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Robert; Naish, Tim; Carter, Lionel; Riesselman, Christina; Dunbar, Robert; Sjunneskog, Charlotte; Winter, Diane; Sangiorgi, Francesca; Warren, Courtney; Pagani, Mark; Schouten, Stefan; Willmott, Veronica; Levy, Richard; DeConto, Robert; Powell, Ross D.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of Antarctica and the Southern Ocean on Late Pliocene global climate reconstructions has remained ambiguous due to a lack of well-dated Antarctic-proximal, paleoenvironmental records. Here we present ice sheet, sea-surface temperature, and sea ice reconstructions from the ANDRILL AND-1B sediment core recovered from beneath the Ross Ice Shelf. We provide evidence for a major expansion of an ice sheet in the Ross Sea that began at ~3.3 Ma, followed by a coastal sea surface temperature cooling of ~2.5 °C, a stepwise expansion of sea ice, and polynya-style deep mixing in the Ross Sea between 3.3 and 2.5 Ma. The intensification of Antarctic cooling resulted in strengthened westerly winds and invigorated ocean circulation. The associated northward migration of Southern Ocean fronts has been linked with reduced Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation by restricting surface water connectivity between the ocean basins, with implications for heat transport to the high latitudes of the North Atlantic. While our results do not exclude low-latitude mechanisms as drivers for Pliocene cooling, they indicate an additional role played by southern high-latitude cooling during development of the bipolar world.

  5. Antarctic subglacial lake exploration: first results and future plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegert, Martin J; Priscu, John C; Alekhina, Irina A; Wadham, Jemma L; Lyons, W Berry

    2016-01-28

    After more than a decade of planning, three attempts were made in 2012-2013 to access, measure in situ properties and directly sample subglacial Antarctic lake environments. First, Russian scientists drilled into the top of Lake Vostok, allowing lake water to infiltrate, and freeze within, the lower part of the ice-core borehole, from which further coring would recover a frozen sample of surface lake water. Second, UK engineers tried unsuccessfully to deploy a clean-access hot-water drill, to sample the water column and sediments of subglacial Lake Ellsworth. Third, a US mission successfully drilled cleanly into subglacial Lake Whillans, a shallow hydraulically active lake at the coastal margin of West Antarctica, obtaining samples that would later be used to prove the existence of microbial life and active biogeochemical cycling beneath the ice sheet. This article summarizes the results of these programmes in terms of the scientific results obtained, the operational knowledge gained and the engineering challenges revealed, to collate what is known about Antarctic subglacial environments and how to explore them in future. While results from Lake Whillans testify to subglacial lakes as being viable biological habitats, the engineering challenges to explore deeper more isolated lakes where unique microorganisms and climate records may be found, as exemplified in the Lake Ellsworth and Vostok missions, are considerable. Through international cooperation, and by using equipment and knowledge of the existing subglacial lake exploration programmes, it is possible that such environments could be explored thoroughly, and at numerous sites, in the near future.

  6. Allelopathy-mediated Competition in Microbial Mats from Antarctic Lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, Marc; Lesser, Michael P

    2017-02-18

    Microbial mats are vertically stratified communities that host a complex consortium of microorganisms, dominated by cyanobacteria, that compete for available nutrients and environmental niches, within these extreme habitats. The Antarctic Dry Valleys near McMurdo Sound include a series of lakes within the drainage basin that are bisected by glacial traverses. These lakes are traditionally independent, but recent increases in glacial melting have allowed two lakes (Chad and Hoare) to become connected by a meltwater stream. Microbial mats were collected from these lakes, and cultured under identical conditions at the McMurdo Station laboratory. Replicate pairings of the microbial mats exhibited consistent patterns of growth inhibition indicative of competitive dominance. Natural products were extracted from the microbial mats, and a disc diffusion assay was utilized to show that allelochemical compounds mediate competitive interactions. Both microscopy and 16S rRNA sequencing show that these mats contain significant populations of cyanobacteria known to produce allelochemicals. Two compounds were isolated from these microbial mats that might be important in the chemical ecology of these psychrophiles. In other disc:mat pairings, including extract versus mat of origin, the allelochemicals exhibited no effect. Taken together, these results indicate that Antarctic lake microbial mats can compete via allelopathy.

  7. Antarctic Radio Frequency Albedo and Implications for Cosmic Ray Reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Besson, D Z; Sullivan, M; Allison, P; Barwick, S W; Baughman, B M; Beatty, J J; Belov, K; Bevan, S; Binns, W R; Chen, C; Chen, P; Clem, J M; Connolly, A; De Marco, D; Dowkontt, P F; DuVernois, M; Goldstein, D; Gorham, P W; Grashorn, E W; Hill, B; Hoover, S; Huang, M; Israel, M H; Javaid, A; Kowalski, J; Learned, J; Liewer, K M; Matsuno, S; Mercurio, B C; Miki, C; Mottram, M; Nam, J; Naudet, C J; Nichol, R J; Palladino, K; Romero-Wolf, A; Ruckman, L; Saltzberg, D; Seckel, D; Shang, R Y; Stockham, M; Varner, G S; Vieregg, A G; Wang, Y

    2013-01-01

    From an elevation of ~38 km, the balloon-borne ANtarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) is designed to detect the up-coming radio frequency (RF) signal resulting from a sub-surface neutrino-nucleon collision. Although no neutrinos have been discovered thus far, ANITA is nevertheless the only experiment to self-trigger on radio frequency emissions from cosmic-ray induced atmospheric air showers. In the majority of those cases, down-coming RF signals are observed via their reflection from the Antarctic ice sheet and back up to the ANITA interferometer. Estimating the energy scale of the incident cosmic rays therefore requires an estimate of the fractional power reflected at the air-ice interface. Similarly, inferring the energy of neutrinos interacting in-ice from observations of the upwards-directed signal refracting out to ANITA also requires consideration of signal coherence across the interface. By comparing the direct Solar RF signal intensity measured with ANITA to the surface-reflected Solar signal ...

  8. Antarctic environmental specimen bank. A tool for chemical monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soggia, F.; Dalla Riva, S.; Abelmoschi, M.L.; Frache, R. [Genoa Univ., Genoa (Italy). Dipt. di Chimica e Chimica Industriale

    2000-02-01

    The work illustrates the project on Antarctic Environmental Specimen Bank (BCAA), which is an integral part of the Italian project on the micropollutants chemistry (sector on chemical contamination of the Italian Antarctic Research program, PNRA), begun in 1994 when the BCAA was installed in the department of chemistry and industrial chemistry (Genoa University, Italy). Its objective underlines an emphasis on environmental chemistry and the establishment of baselines similar to the approaches followed by the other environmental specimen banks, begun at the end of Sixties with the aim of long-term storage of representative environmental specimens in order to study the presence and the evolution of dangerous substances, but focus on the chemical characterization of samples. [Italian] Il lavoro illustra le finalita' del Progetto su una Banca Campioni Ambientali Antartici (BCAA), che e' parte integrante del progetto Chmica dei microinquinannti del Settore Contaminazione chimica del Programma Nazionale di ricerche in Antartide (ONRA), nata nel 1994 presso il dipartimento di chimicia e chimica industriale dell'universita' di Genova. A differenza di altri progetti internazionali che enfatizzano gli aspetti biologici, ecologici e medici, il progetto BCAA enfatizza la chimica ambientale.

  9. A Palaeohydrological Shift during Neogene East Antarctic Ice Sheet Retreat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees-Owen, R. L.; Newton, R.; Ivanovic, R. F.; Francis, J.; Tindall, J. C.; Riding, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    The East Antarctic Ice Sheet is an important driver of global climate, playing a particular role in governing albedo and atmospheric circulation (eg. Singh et al., 2013). Recent evidence from marine sediment and terrestrial glaciovolcanic sequences suggests that the EAIS underwent periodic retreat and collapse in response to warmer climates during the late Neogene (14 to 3 million years ago). Mummified prostrate trees recovered from palaeosols at Oliver Bluffs in the Beardmore Glacier region, Transantarctic Mountains (85° S), represent a rare insight into the terrestrial palaeoclimate during one of these periods of retreat. Prostrate trees are an understudied but useful tool for interrogating endmember (e.g. periglacial) environments at high altitudes and latitudes. We present exciting new palaeoclimate data from the sequence at Oliver Bluffs. δ18O analysis of tree ring cellulose suggests that Antarctic summer palaeoprecipitation was enriched relative to today (-25 to -5‰ for ancient, -35 to -20‰ for modern); consistent with our isotope-enabled general circulation model simulations. The MBT/CBT palaeothermometer gives a summer temperature of 3-6ºC, consistent with other palaeobotanical climate indices. These geological and model data have wide-ranging implications for our understanding of the hydrological cycle during this time period. We present data suggesting that changes in moisture recycling and source region indicate a markedly different hydrological cycle.

  10. Antarctic glaciation caused ocean circulation changes at the Eocene-Oligocene transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldner, A; Herold, N; Huber, M

    2014-07-31

    Two main hypotheses compete to explain global cooling and the abrupt growth of the Antarctic ice sheet across the Eocene-Oligocene transition about 34 million years ago: thermal isolation of Antarctica due to southern ocean gateway opening, and declining atmospheric CO2 (refs 5, 6). Increases in ocean thermal stratification and circulation in proxies across the Eocene-Oligocene transition have been interpreted as a unique signature of gateway opening, but at present both mechanisms remain possible. Here, using a coupled ocean-atmosphere model, we show that the rise of Antarctic glaciation, rather than altered palaeogeography, is best able to explain the observed oceanographic changes. We find that growth of the Antarctic ice sheet caused enhanced northward transport of Antarctic intermediate water and invigorated the formation of Antarctic bottom water, fundamentally reorganizing ocean circulation. Conversely, gateway openings had much less impact on ocean thermal stratification and circulation. Our results support available evidence that CO2 drawdown--not gateway opening--caused Antarctic ice sheet growth, and further show that these feedbacks in turn altered ocean circulation. The precise timing and rate of glaciation, and thus its impacts on ocean circulation, reflect the balance between potentially positive feedbacks (increases in sea ice extent and enhanced primary productivity) and negative feedbacks (stronger southward heat transport and localized high-latitude warming). The Antarctic ice sheet had a complex, dynamic role in ocean circulation and heat fluxes during its initiation, and these processes are likely to operate in the future.

  11. Exploration of Antarctic Subglacial environments: a challenge for analytical chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traversi, R.; Becagli, S.; Castellano, E.; Ghedini, C.; Marino, F.; Rugi, F.; Severi, M.; Udisti, R.

    2009-12-01

    The large number of subglacial lakes detected in the Dome C area in East Antarctica suggests that this region may be a valuable source of paleo-records essential for understanding the evolution of the Antarctic ice cap and climate changes in the last several millions years. In the framework of the Project on “Exploration and characterization of Concordia Lake, Antarctica”, supported by Italian Program for Antarctic Research (PNRA), a glaciological investigation of the Dome C “Lake District” are planned. Indeed, the glacio-chemical characterisation of the ice column over subglacial lakes will allow to evaluate the fluxes of major and trace chemical species along the ice column and in the accreted ice and, consequently, the availability of nutrients and oligo-elements for possible biological activity in the lake water and sediments. Melting and freezing at the base of the ice sheet should be able to deliver carbon and salts to the lake, as observed for the Vostok subglacial lake, which are thought to be able to support a low concentration of micro-organisms for extended periods of time. Thus, this investigation represents the first step for exploring the subglacial environments including sampling and analysis of accreted ice, lake water and sediments. In order to perform reliable analytical measurements, especially of trace chemical species, clean sub-sampling and analytical techniques are required. For this purpose, the techniques already used by the CHIMPAC laboratory (Florence University) in the framework of international Antarctic drilling Projects (EPICA - European Project for Ice Coring in Antarctica, TALDICE - TALos Dome ICE core, ANDRILL MIS - ANTarctic DRILLing McMurdo Ice Shelf) were optimised and new techniques were developed to ensure a safe sample handling. CHIMPAC laboratory has been involved since several years in the study of Antarctic continent, primarily focused on understanding the bio-geo-chemical cycles of chemical markers and the

  12. Lactobacillus apinorum sp. nov., Lactobacillus mellifer sp. nov., Lactobacillus mellis sp. nov., Lactobacillus melliventris sp. nov., Lactobacillus kimbladii sp. nov., Lactobacillus helsingborgensis sp. nov. and Lactobacillus kullabergensis sp. nov., isolated from the honey stomach of the honeybee Apis mellifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olofsson, Tobias C; Alsterfjord, Magnus; Nilson, Bo; Butler, Eile; Vásquez, Alejandra

    2014-09-01

    We previously discovered a symbiotic lactic acid bacterial (LAB) microbiota in the honey stomach of the honeybee Apis mellifera. The microbiota was composed of several phylotypes of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus. 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses and phenotypic and genetic characteristics revealed that the phylotypes isolated represent seven novel species. One grouped with Lactobacillus kunkeei and the others belong to the Lactobacillus buchneri and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subgroups of Lactobacillus. We propose the names Lactobacillus apinorum sp. nov., Lactobacillus mellifer sp. nov., Lactobacillus mellis sp. nov., Lactobacillus melliventris sp. nov., Lactobacillus kimbladii sp. nov., Lactobacillus helsingborgensis sp. nov. and Lactobacillus kullabergensis sp. nov. for these novel species, with the respective type strains being Fhon13N(T) ( = DSM 26257(T) = CCUG 63287(T)), Bin4N(T) ( = DSM 26254(T) = CCUG 63291(T)), Hon2N(T) ( = DSM 26255(T) = CCUG 63289(T)), Hma8N(T) ( = DSM 26256(T) = CCUG 63629(T)), Hma2N(T) ( = DSM 26263(T) = CCUG 63633(T)), Bma5N(T) ( = DSM 26265(T) = CCUG 63301(T)) and Biut2N(T) ( = DSM 26262(T) = CCUG 63631(T)).

  13. [Toxocara sp. eggs and Ancylostoma sp. larva in public parks, Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Antônio Marcos; Alves, Endrigo Gabellini Leonel; de Rezende, Glycia Ferreira; Rodrigues, Marcelo Costa

    2005-04-01

    Visceral and cutaneous larva migrans are parasitic zoonoses caused by the infection of larval nematodes Toxocara sp. and Ancylostoma sp. respectively. The objective of this study was to investigate the contamination by Toxocara sp. eggs and Ancylostoma sp. eggs and larva of soil samples collected from public parks and children's playground areas in state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, using both Baermann's method and centrifugal flotation technique. Toxocara sp. and Ancylostoma sp. eggs were observed in soil samples collected from public squares in 17.4% (4/23) and 69.6 (16/23) respectively. In schools and child day care settings the contamination by Ancylostoma sp. larva in sand samples was 11.1% (2/18). Public parks are settings of more potential risk of Toxocara sp. eggs and Ancylostoma sp. infection. Stool parasitology testing of 174 stool samples showed 58% and 23% of Ancylostoma sp and Toxocara sp eggs infection respectively.

  14. Deep UV Native Fluorescence Imaging of Antarctic Cryptoendolithic Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storrie-Lombardi, M. C.; Douglas, S.; Sun, H.; McDonald, G. D.; Bhartia, R.; Nealson, K. H.; Hug, W. F.

    2001-01-01

    An interdisciplinary team at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Center for Life Detection has embarked on a project to provide in situ chemical and morphological characterization of Antarctic cryptoendolithic microbial communities. We present here in situ deep ultraviolet (UV) native fluorescence and environmental scanning electron microscopy images transiting 8.5 mm into a sandstone sample from the Antarctic Dry Valleys. The deep ultraviolet imaging system employs 224.3, 248.6, and 325 nm lasers to elicit differential fluorescence and resonance Raman responses from biomolecules and minerals. The 224.3 and 248.6 nm lasers elicit a fluorescence response from the aromatic amino and nucleic acids. Excitation at 325 nm may elicit activity from a variety of biomolecules, but is more likely to elicit mineral fluorescence. The resultant fluorescence images provide in situ chemical and morphological maps of microorganisms and the associated organic matrix. Visible broadband reflectance images provide orientation against the mineral background. Environmental scanning electron micrographs provided detailed morphological information. The technique has made possible the construction of detailed fluorescent maps extending from the surface of an Antarctic sandstone sample to a depth of 8.5 mm. The images detect no evidence of microbial life in the superficial 0.2 mm crustal layer. The black lichen component between 0.3 and 0.5 mm deep absorbs all wavelengths of both laser and broadband illumination. Filamentous deep ultraviolet native fluorescent activity dominates in the white layer between 0.6 mm and 5.0 mm from the surface. These filamentous forms are fungi that continue into the red (iron-rich) region of the sample extending from 5.0 to 8.5 mm. Using differential image subtraction techniques it is possible to identify fungal nuclei. The ultraviolet response is markedly attenuated in this region, apparently from the absorption of ultraviolet light by iron-rich particles coating

  15. Potential genesis and implications of calcium nitrate in Antarctic snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalinganathan, Kanthanathan; Thamban, Meloth

    2016-04-01

    Among the large variety of particulates in the atmosphere, calcic mineral dust particles have highly reactive surfaces that undergo heterogeneous reactions with atmospheric acids contiguously. The association between nssCa2+, an important proxy indicator of mineral dust, and NO3-, a dominant anion in the Antarctic snowpack, was analysed. A total of 41 snow cores ( ˜ 1 m each) that represent snow deposited during 2008-2009 were studied along coastal-inland transects from two different regions in East Antarctica - the Princess Elizabeth Land (PEL) and central Dronning Maud Land (cDML). Correlation statistics showed a strong association (at 99 % significance level) between NO3- and nssCa2+ at the near-coastal sections of both PEL (r = 0.74) and cDML (r = 0.82) transects. Similarly, a strong association between these ions was also observed in snow deposits at the inland sections of PEL (r = 0.73) and cDML (r = 0.84). Such systematic associations between nssCa2+ and NO3- are attributed to the interaction between calcic mineral dust and nitric acid in the atmosphere, leading to the formation of calcium nitrate (Ca(NO3)2) aerosol. Principal component analysis revealed common transport and depositional processes for nssCa2+ and NO3- both in PEL and cDML. Forward- and back-trajectory analyses using HYSPLIT model v. 4 revealed that southern South America (SSA) was an important dust-emitting source to the study region, aided by the westerlies. Particle size distribution showed that over 90 % of the dust was in the range dust particles reached the Antarctic region via long-range transport from the SSA region. We propose that the association between nssCa2+ and NO3- occurs during the long-range transport due to the formation of Ca(NO3)2 rather than to local neutralisation processes. However, the influence of local dust sources from the nunataks in cDML and the contribution of high sea salt in coastal PEL evidently mask such association in the mountainous and coastal regions

  16. Present and future variations in Antarctic firn air content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. M. Ligtenberg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A firn densification model (FDM is used to assess spatial and temporal (1979–2200 variations in the depth, density and temperature of the firn layer covering the Antarctic ice sheet (AIS. Results from a time-dependent version of the FDM are compared to more commonly used steady-state FDM results. Although the average AIS firn air content (FAC between both models is similar (22.5 m, large spatial differences are found: in the ice-sheet interior, the steady-state model underestimates the FAC by up to 2 m, while the FAC is overestimated by 5–15 m along the ice-sheet margins, due to significant surface melt. Applying the steady-state FAC values to convert surface elevation to ice thickness (i.e. assuming flotation at the grounding line potentially results in an underestimation of ice discharge at the grounding line, and hence an underestimation of current AIS mass loss by 23.5%, or 16.7 Gt yr−1 (with regard to the reconciled estimate over 1992–2011, Shepherd et al., 2012. The timing of the measurement is also important as temporal FAC variations of 1–2 m are simulated within the 33 yr period. Until 2200, the Antarctic FAC is projected to change due to a combination of increasing accumulation, temperature and surface melt. The latter two result in a decrease of FAC, due to (i more refrozen meltwater, (ii a higher densification rate and (iii a faster firn-to-ice transition at the bottom of the firn layer. These effects are however more than compensated by increasing snowfall, leading to a 4–14% increase in FAC. Only in melt-affected regions, future FAC is simulated to decrease, with the largest changes (−50 to −80% on the ice shelves in the Antarctic Peninsula and Dronning Maud Land. Integrated over the AIS, increased precipitation results in a combined ice and air volume increase of ∼300 km3 yr−1 until 2100, equivalent to an elevation change of +2.1 cm yr−1. This shows that variations in firn depth remain important to consider

  17. Present and future variations in Antarctic firn air content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligtenberg, S. R. M.; Kuipers Munneke, P.; van den Broeke, M. R.

    2014-09-01

    A firn densification model (FDM) is used to assess spatial and temporal (1979-2200) variations in the depth, density and temperature of the firn layer covering the Antarctic ice sheet (AIS). A time-dependent version of the FDM is compared to more commonly used steady-state FDM results. Although the average AIS firn air content (FAC) of both models is similar (22.5 m), large spatial differences are found: in the ice-sheet interior, the steady-state model underestimates the FAC by up to 2 m, while the FAC is overestimated by 5-15 m along the ice-sheet margins, due to significant surface melt. Applying the steady-state FAC values to convert surface elevation to ice thickness (i.e., assuming flotation at the grounding line) potentially results in an underestimation of ice discharge at the grounding line, and hence an underestimation of current AIS mass loss by 23.5% (or 16.7 Gt yr-1) with regard to the reconciled estimate over the period 1992-2011. The timing of the measurement is also important, as temporal FAC variations of 1-2 m are simulated within the 33 yr period (1979-2012). Until 2200, the Antarctic FAC is projected to change due to a combination of increasing accumulation, temperature, and surface melt. The latter two result in a decrease of FAC, due to (i) more refrozen meltwater, (ii) a higher densification rate, and (iii) a faster firn-to-ice transition at the bottom of the firn layer. These effects are, however, more than compensated for by increasing snowfall, leading to a 4-14% increase in FAC. Only in melt-affected regions, future FAC is simulated to decrease, with the largest changes (-50 to -80%) on the ice shelves in the Antarctic Peninsula and Dronning Maud Land. Integrated over the AIS, the increase in precipitation results in a similar volume increase due to ice and air (both ~150 km3 yr-1 until 2100). Combined, this volume increase is equivalent to a surface elevation change of +2.1 cm yr-1, which shows that variations in firn depth remain

  18. Annotated checklist and fisheries interactions of cetaceans in Togo, with evidence of Antarctic minke whale in the Gulf of Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segniagbeto, Gabriel H; VAN Waerebeek, Koen; Bowessidjaou, Joseph E; Ketoh, Koffivi; Kpatcha, Takouda K; Okoumassou, Kotchikpa; Ahoedo, Kossi

    2014-01-01

    Based on strandings and captures, 9 cetacean species, including 6 odontocetes and 3 mysticetes, are documented (photos and specimens) in Togo's coastal waters (newly-recorded species marked with an asterisk): Antarctic minke whale (Balaenoptera bonaerensis*), Bryde's whale (Balaenoptera brydei or B. edeni), humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae), sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus), pygmy sperm whale (Kogia breviceps*), short-finned pilot whale (Globicephala macrorhynchus*), pantropical spotted dolphin (Stenella attenuata*), common bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) and common dolphin Delphinus sp. An anecdotal sighting record for killer whale (Orcinus orca) is considered reliable. The lack of Sousa teuszii records in Togo is consistent with its apparent contemporaneous absence in Ghana. The B. bonaerensis specimen, entangled in a purse seine set on small pelagics, is a first record for the Gulf of Guinea. The occurrence of this Southern Ocean species north of the equator underscores the severe gaps in our understanding of cetacean distribution off western Africa. The majority of artisanal fishermen operating in Togolese coastal waters are of Ghanaian origin and are thought to promote trade and consumption of cetacean bushmeat. Because captures are illegal, enforced with some success in the main fishing centers, covert landings of cetaceans are exceedingly difficult to monitor, quantify or sample. Concern is expressed about pollution of Togo's coastal waters with heavy metals due to phosphorite mining and export from the coastal basin near Hahotoé and Kpogamé.

  19. Abundance and diversity of functional genes involved in the degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons in Antarctic soils and sediments around Syowa Station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muangchinda, C; Chavanich, S; Viyakarn, V; Watanabe, K; Imura, S; Vangnai, A S; Pinyakong, O

    2015-03-01

    Hydrocarbon catabolic genes were investigated in soils and sediments in nine different locations around Syowa Station, Antarctica, using conventional PCR, real-time PCR, cloning, and sequencing analysis. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon ring-hydroxylating dioxygenase (PAH-RHD)-coding genes from both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria were observed. Clone libraries of Gram-positive RHD genes were related to (i) nidA3 of Mycobacterium sp. py146, (ii) pdoA of Terrabacter sp. HH4, (iii) nidA of Diaphorobacter sp. KOTLB, and (iv) pdoA2 of Mycobacterium sp. CH-2, with 95-99% similarity. Clone libraries of Gram-negative RHD genes were related to the following: (i) naphthalene dioxygenase of Burkholderia glathei, (ii) phnAc of Burkholderia sartisoli, and (iii) RHD alpha subunit of uncultured bacterium, with 41-46% similarity. Interestingly, the diversity of the Gram-positive RHD genes found around this area was higher than those of the Gram-negative RHD genes. Real-time PCR showed different abundance of dioxygenase genes between locations. Moreover, the PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profile demonstrated diverse bacterial populations, according to their location. Forty dominant fragments in the DGGE profiles were excised and sequenced. All of the sequences belonged to ten bacterial phyla: Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Chloroflexi, Gemmatimonadetes, Cyanobacteria, Chlorobium, and Acidobacteria. In addition, the bacterial genus Sphingomonas, which has been suggested to be one of the major PAH degraders in the environment, was observed in some locations. The results demonstrated that indigenous bacteria have the potential ability to degrade PAHs and provided information to support the conclusion that bioremediation processes can occur in the Antarctic soils and sediments studied here.

  20. 77 FR 60677 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Antarctic Marine Living Resources Conservation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-04

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Antarctic Marine Living Resources Conservation and Management Measures AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric... to take this opportunity to comment on continuing information collections, as required by...

  1. Multichannel Seismic Reflection Data - SCAR - Antarctic Peninsula - 1985, SDLS CD-ROM vol 16

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are stacked multichannel marine seismic reflection data recorded during 1985 field season along the north side of the Antarctic-Peninsula by the British...

  2. Projected changes of Antarctic krill habitat by the end of the 21st century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñones, Andrea; Fedorov, Alexey V.

    2016-08-01

    Climate change is rapidly shaping the living environment of the most abundant keystone species of the Antarctic marine food web, Antarctic krill. Projected future changes for the krill habitat include a sustained increase in ocean temperature and changes in sea ice and chlorophyll a. Here we investigate how these factors affect the early life history of krill and identify the regions around Antarctica where the impact will be greatest. Our tool is a temperature-dependent krill growth model forced by data from comprehensive greenhouse warming simulations. We find that by the year 2100 localized regions along the western Weddell Sea, isolated areas of the Indian Antarctic , and the Amundsen/Bellingshausen Sea will support successful spawning habitats for krill. The failure of potentially successful spawning will have a strong impact on the already declining adult populations with consequences for the Antarctic marine food web, having both ecological and commercial ramifications.

  3. Microbial populations in Antarctic permafrost: biodiversity, state, age, and implication for astrobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilichinsky, D A; Wilson, G S; Friedmann, E I; McKay, C P; Sletten, R S; Rivkina, E M; Vishnivetskaya, T A; Erokhina, L G; Ivanushkina, N E; Kochkina, G A; Shcherbakova, V A; Soina, V S; Spirina, E V; Vorobyova, E A; Fyodorov-Davydov, D G; Hallet, B; Ozerskaya, S M; Sorokovikov, V A; Laurinavichyus, K S; Shatilovich, A V; Chanton, J P; Ostroumov, V E; Tiedje, J M

    2007-04-01

    Antarctic permafrost soils have not received as much geocryological and biological study as has been devoted to the ice sheet, though the permafrost is more stable and older and inhabited by more microbes. This makes these soils potentially more informative and a more significant microbial repository than ice sheets. Due to the stability of the subsurface physicochemical regime, Antarctic permafrost is not an extreme environment but a balanced natural one. Up to 10(4) viable cells/g, whose age presumably corresponds to the longevity of the permanently frozen state of the sediments, have been isolated from Antarctic permafrost. Along with the microbes, metabolic by-products are preserved. This presumed natural cryopreservation makes it possible to observe what may be the oldest microbial communities on Earth. Here, we describe the Antarctic permafrost habitat and biodiversity and provide a model for martian ecosystems.

  4. Multichannel Seismic Reflection Data - SCAR - Antarctic Peninsula - 1988-1989, SDLS CD-ROM vol 25

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are stacked multichannel marine seismic reflection data recorded during 1988-89 in the Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica, by the Japan National Oil...

  5. 'Trade-off' in Antarctic bacteria: limnetic psychrotrophs concede multiple enzyme expressions for multiple metal resistance

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DeSouza, M.J.B.D.; LokaBharathi, P.A.; Nair, S.; Chandramohan, D.

    . On the eastern side multiple metal resistance was encountered in bacterial isolates associated with fewer enzyme expressions suggesting a 'tradeoff'. Thus these Antarctic isolates from the east trade their ability to express multiple enzymes for developing...

  6. Multichannel Seismic Reflection Data - SCAR - Antarctic Peninsula 1987-88, SDLS CD-ROM vol 24

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are stacked multichannel marine seismic reflection data recorded during 1987-88 in the Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica, by the Japan National Oil...

  7. Antarctic Flight Line Maps = Map-Line Indexes of Antarctica Aerial Photos: Pre 1950

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Antarctic Fight Line Maps collection is comprised of 1:250,000 scale topographic maps over Antarctica with original hand-drawn flight lines for aerial...

  8. Sublimation: A Mechanism for the Enrichment of Organics in Antarctic Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Luann; McDonald, Gene D.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Bada, Jeffrey L.; Bunch, Theodore E.; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Recent analyses of the carbonate globules present in the Martian meteorite ALH84001 have detected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at the ppm level. The distribution of PAHs observed in ALH84001 was interpreted as being inconsistent with a terrestrial origin and were claimed to be indigenous to the meteorite, perhaps derived from an ancient Martian biota. However, Becker et al., have examined PAHs in the Martian meteorite EETA79001, in several Antarctic carbonaceous chondrites and Antarctic Allan Hills Ice and detected many of the same PAHs found in ALH84001. The reported presence of L-amino acids of apparent terrestrial origin in the EETA79001 druse material, suggests that this meteorite is contaminated with terrestrial/extraterrestrial organics probably derived from Antarctic ice meltwater that had percolated through the meteorite. The detection of PAHs and L-amino acids in these Martian meteorites suggests that despite storage in the Antarctic ice, selective changes of certain chemical and mineralogical phases has occurred.

  9. Genetic population structure in the Antarctic benthos: insights from the widespread amphipod, Orchomenella franklini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Helena Phoenix; Miller, Karen Joy; Stark, Jonathan Sean

    2012-01-01

    Currently there is very limited understanding of genetic population structure in the Antarctic benthos. We conducted one of the first studies of microsatellite variation in an Antarctic benthic invertebrate, using the ubiquitous amphipod Orchomenella franklini (Walker, 1903). Seven microsatellite loci were used to assess genetic structure on three spatial scales: sites (100 s of metres), locations (1-10 kilometres) and regions (1000 s of kilometres) sampled in East Antarctica at Casey and Davis stations. Considerable genetic diversity was revealed, which varied between the two regions and also between polluted and unpolluted sites. Genetic differentiation among all populations was highly significant (F(ST) = 0.086, R(ST) = 0.139, pbenthos. These results provide insights into processes of speciation in Antarctic brooders, and will help inform the design of spatial management initiatives recently endorsed for the Antarctic benthos.

  10. Age, growth and distribution of the Antarctic fish Chaenocephalus aceratus based on otoliths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryszard Jacek Traczyk

    2015-10-01

    Żabrowski, M. 2000. The osteology and ossification variability of the skull of antarctic white-blooded fish Chaenodraco wilsoni Regan, 1914 (Channichthyidae, Notothenioidei. W-wa : Acta Icht. Piscat. 30 (2: 111-126.

  11. 77 FR 50720 - Notice of Permit Modification Received Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-22

    ... 1978 (Pub. L. 95-541), as amended by the Antarctic Science, Tourism and Conservation Act of 1996, has... whales in the penguin's foraging area within the leads of the McMurdo Sound fast ice as it breaks up....

  12. 77 FR 60477 - Notice of Permit Applications Received Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-03

    ... amended by the Antarctic Science, Tourism and Conservation Act of 1996, has developed regulations for the... the nature of their geology, climatic influences, and topography. Two sites will be sampled...

  13. Transcriptome of the Antarctic amphipod Gondogeneia antarctica and its response to pollutant exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seunghyun; Kim, Sanghee; Park, Hyun

    2015-12-01

    Gondogeneia antarctica is widely distributed off the western Antarctic Peninsula and is a key species in the Antarctic food web. In this study, we performed Illumina sequencing to produce a total of 4,599,079,601 (4.6Gb) nucleotides and a comprehensive transcript dataset for G. antarctica. Over 46 million total reads were assembled into 20,749 contigs, and 12,461 annotated genes were predicted by Blastx. The RNA-seq results after exposure to three pollutants showed that 658, 169 and 367 genes that were potential biomarkers of responses to pollutants for this species were specifically upregulated after exposure to PCBs (Polychlorinated biphenyls), PFOS (Perfluorooctanesulfonic acid) and PFOA (Perfluorooctanoic acid), respectively. These data represent the first transcriptome resource for the Antarctic amphipod G. antarctica and provide a useful resource for studying Antarctic marine species.

  14. Determination of Antarctic geoid by using global gravity field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    With Chinese latest global gravity field model WDM94, the authors providethe geoid height and mean free-air gravity anomaly of Antarctica (The range of latitude is from—60° to—90°). In order to conclude and analyze the characters of Antarctic geoid roundly, the authors collect the latest oversea global gravity field model OSU91 (to degree and order 360) and JGMOSU (to degree and order 360), get the corresponding geoid height and mean free-air gravity anomaly. The results arecompared with the results got from WDM94, thus we get the difference. The standard deviation of geoid height between WDM94 and OSU91 is ± 1.90 re;the deviation of geoid between WDM9 and JGMOSU is ± 2.09 m. The standard deviation of mean gravity anomaly are±8.97 mGal and ± 9.32 mGal respectively.

  15. Quality changes of Antarctic krill powder during long term storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Nina Skall; Lu, Henna Fung Sieng; Bruheim, Inge

    2017-01-01

    , it is important, that the quality and stability is sufficiently high to retain the nutritional value during storage. This study contributes with information about the stability during storage up to 12 months at room temperature and the effect of packaging the powder in vacuum. Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba...... of packaging in vacuum was observed. The stability was assessed by changes in concentrations of lipid classes, antioxidants, pyrroles and lipid, and Strecker-derived volatiles. Some degradation occurred during storage at room temperature. Thus, a minor increase in volatiles, an increase in free fatty acids...... and a concomitant decrease in antioxidants, tocopherol, and astaxanthin was observed. In addition, there was a minor decrease in phospholipids and n-3 fatty acids; however, storage at vacuum improved the oxidative stability of krill powder. Practical applications: For the use of krill powder in human nutrition...

  16. The 2014 high record of Antarctic sea ice extent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massonnet, Francois; Guemas, Virginie; Fuckar, Neven; Doblas-Reyes, Francisco

    2016-04-01

    In September 2014, Antarctic sea ice extent exceeded the symbolic level of 20 million km²for the first time since 1978, when reliable satellite measurements became available. After the successive records of 2012 and 2013, sea ice extent in 2014 once again reinforced the positive trend observed since the late 1970s. We conduct here a dedicated study to elucidate the origins of a major, and perhaps the most intriguing, event that happened at our Poles recently. Observations, reanalyses and model results all point towards the important role of winds in modifying near-surface heat advection patterns around Antarctica. The role of pre-conditioning (summer conditions) is found to be of lesser importance. Finally, we find no evidence that anomalous freshwater forcing (from atmospheric or continental origin) could have explained the record extent of 2014.

  17. The near-surface wind field over the Antarctic continent

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lipzig, N. P. M.; Turner, J.; Colwell, S. R.; van den Broeke, M. R.

    2004-12-01

    A 14 year integration with a regional atmospheric model has been used to determine the near-surface climatological wind field over the Antarctic ice sheet at a horizontal grid spacing of 55 km. Previous maps of the near-surface wind field were generally based on models ignoring the large-scale pressure-gradient forcing term in the momentum equation. Presently, state-of-the-art atmospheric models include all pressure-gradient forcing terms. Evaluation of our model output against in situ data shows that the model is able to represent realistically the observed increase in wind speed going from the interior to the coast, as well as the observed wind direction at South Pole and Dumont d'Urville and the bimodal wind distribution at Halley.

  18. Updates on Pairing Issues with the US Antarctic Meteorite Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righter, K.; Satterwhite, C.; Schutt, J.

    2015-01-01

    The US Antarctic meteorite program has re-covered >21,000 meteorites since 1976, with thousands of those recovered from several icefields over multiple seasons, some-times spanning over a decade [1]. Pairing is assigned as best as possible at the time of classification, based on information from the field team, macro-scale hand sample features in the lab, and petrography, but later focused studies can reveal details that suggest re-evaluation of pairing groups. As a result, pairing groups are revealed over time, and must be continuously updated. Here we examine a few groups with known issues and give an update on some of the larger or more significant pairing groups.

  19. Antarctic epilithic lichens as niches for black meristematic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selbmann, Laura; Grube, Martin; Onofri, Silvano; Isola, Daniela; Zucconi, Laura

    2013-05-17

    Sixteen epilithic lichen samples (13 species), collected from seven locations in Northern and Southern Victoria Land in Antarctica, were investigated for the presence of black fungi. Thirteen fungal strains isolated were studied by both morphological and molecular methods. Nuclear ribosomal 18S gene sequences were used together with the most similar published and unpublished sequences of fungi from other sources, to reconstruct an ML tree. Most of the studied fungi could be grouped together with described or still unnamed rock-inhabiting species in lichen dominated Antarctic cryptoendolithic communities. At the edge of life, epilithic lichens withdraw inside the airspaces of rocks to find conditions still compatible with life; this study provides evidence, for the first time, that the same microbes associated to epilithic thalli also have the same fate and chose endolithic life. These results support the concept of lichens being complex symbiotic systems, which offer attractive and sheltered habitats for other microbes.

  20. Antarctic Epilithic Lichens as Niches for Black Meristematic Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Zucconi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Sixteen epilithic lichen samples (13 species, collected from seven locations in Northern and Southern Victoria Land in Antarctica, were investigated for the presence of black fungi. Thirteen fungal strains isolated were studied by both morphological and molecular methods. Nuclear ribosomal 18S gene sequences were used together with the most similar published and unpublished sequences of fungi from other sources, to reconstruct an ML tree. Most of the studied fungi could be grouped together with described or still unnamed rock-inhabiting species in lichen dominated Antarctic cryptoendolithic communities. At the edge of life, epilithic lichens withdraw inside the airspaces of rocks to find conditions still compatible with life; this study provides evidence, for the first time, that the same microbes associated to epilithic thalli also have the same fate and chose endolithic life. These results support the concept of lichens being complex symbiotic systems, which offer attractive and sheltered habitats for other microbes.