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Sample records for antagonistic regulatory effects

  1. [Cutaneous adverse effects of TNFalpha antagonists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Failla, V; Sabatiello, M; Lebas, E; de Schaetzen, V; Dezfoulian, B; Nikkels, A F

    2012-01-01

    The TNFalpha antagonists, including adalimumab, etanercept and infliximab, represent a class of anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive drugs. Although cutaneous adverse effects are uncommon, they are varied. There is no particular risk profile to develop cutaneous adverse effects. The principal acute side effects are injection site reactions and pruritus. The major long term cutaneous side effects are infectious and inflammatory conditions. Neoplastic skin diseases are exceptional. The association with other immunosuppressive agents can increase the risk of developing cutaneous adverse effects. Some adverse effects, such as lupus erythematosus, require immediate withdrawal of the biological treatment, while in other cases temporary withdrawal is sufficient. The majority of the other cutaneous adverse effects can be dealt without interrupting biologic treatment. Preclinical and clinical investigations revealed that the new biologics, aiming IL12/23, IL23 and IL17, present a similar profile of cutaneous adverse effects, although inflammatory skin reactions may be less often encountered compared to TNFalpha antagonists.

  2. Downstream Regulatory Element Antagonist Modulator (DREAM), a target for anti-thrombotic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jaehyung

    2017-03-01

    Circulating platelets participate in the process of numerous diseases including thrombosis, inflammation, and cancer. Thus, it is of great importance to understand the underlying mechanisms mediating platelet activation under disease conditions. Emerging evidence indicates that despite the lack of a nucleus, platelets possess molecules that are involved in gene transcription in nucleated cells. This review will summarize downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM), a transcriptional repressor, and highlight recent findings suggesting its novel non-transcriptional role in hemostasis and thrombosis.

  3. Antioxidant effects of calcium antagonists in rat brain homogenates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, K; Ina, Y; Nagashima, K; Ohmori, K; Ohno, T

    2000-06-01

    We studied the antioxidant activities of calcium antagonists against autoxidation in rat brain homogenates. The homogenates were incubated for 30 min at 37 degrees C with or without a calcium antagonist and subsequently assayed for lipid peroxide content. Percent inhibition of the lipid peroxidation was used as an index of the antioxidant effect. Dihydropyridine calcium antagonists exhibited concentration-dependent (3-300 micromol/l) inhibitory effects against lipid peroxidation. The relative order of antioxidant potency and associated IC50 values (micromol/l) of the calcium antagonists for inhibition of the lipid peroxidation were as follows: nifedipine (51.5)>barnidipine (58.6)>benidipine (71.2)>nicardipine (129.3)>amlodipine (135.5)>nilvadipine (167.3)>nitrendipine (252.1)> diltiazem (>300)=verapamil (>300). These results suggest that some dihydropyridine calcium antagonists show antioxidant properties. The antioxidant effects of the calcium antagonists may contribute to their pharmacological actions.

  4. EFFECT OF ANGIOTENSIN II RECEPTOR ANTAGONIST AND ENDOTHELIN RECEPTOR ANTAGONIST ON NITROGLYCERIN TOLERANCE IN RATS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To investigate whether angiotensin II receptor antagonist and endothelin receptor antagonist can improve the nitroglycerin (Nit) tolerance in vivo. Methods. Twenty-four rats were divided into 4 groups (n=6,each): Control group, Nitroglycerin (Nit) group, Nit+ bosentan group and Nit+ losartan group. Nitroglycerin tolerance was induced by 2-day treatment of nitroglycerin patch (0.05 mg/h). AngiotensinⅡ receptor antagonist losartan ( 10 mg· kg- 1· d- 1 ) and endothelin receptor antagonist bosentan ( 100 mg· kg- 1· d- 1 ) were given by gavage for 2 days respectively. Results. The least hypotensive response to sodium nitroprusside (SNP) was observed in Nit group . The effective percentages of hypotensive response to SNP were increased in both Nit+ losartan group and Nit+ bosentan group compared with Nit group [(31.95± 4.45 ) % vs (21.00± 3.69 ) % , P Conclusion. Endothelin receptor antagonist and angiotensin Ⅱ receptor antagonist could prevent against the Nit tolerance .

  5. DREAM (Downstream Regulatory Element Antagonist Modulator contributes to synaptic depression and contextual fear memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Long-Jun

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM, a multifunctional Ca2+-binding protein, binds specifically to DNA and several nucleoproteins regulating gene expression and with proteins outside the nucleus to regulate membrane excitability or calcium homeostasis. DREAM is highly expressed in the central nervous system including the hippocampus and cortex; however, the roles of DREAM in hippocampal synaptic transmission and plasticity have not been investigated. Taking advantage of transgenic mice overexpressing a Ca2+-insensitive DREAM mutant (TgDREAM, we used integrative methods including electrophysiology, biochemistry, immunostaining, and behavior tests to study the function of DREAM in synaptic transmission, long-term plasticity and fear memory in hippocampal CA1 region. We found that NMDA receptor but not AMPA receptor-mediated current was decreased in TgDREAM mice. Moreover, synaptic plasticity, such as long-term depression (LTD but not long-term potentiation (LTP, was impaired in TgDREAM mice. Biochemical experiments found that DREAM interacts with PSD-95 and may inhibit NMDA receptor function through this interaction. Contextual fear memory was significantly impaired in TgDREAM mice. By contrast, sensory responses to noxious stimuli were not affected. Our results demonstrate that DREAM plays a novel role in postsynaptic modulation of the NMDA receptor, and contributes to synaptic plasticity and behavioral memory.

  6. EFFECT OF ANGIOTENSIN II RECEPTOR ANTAGONIST AND ENDOTHELIN RECEPTOR ANTAGONIST ON NITROGLYCERIN TOLERANCE IN RATS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张建梅; 陈永红; 王晓红; 唐朝枢

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To investigate whether angiotensin II receptor antagonist and endothelin receptor antagonist can improve the nitroglycerin (Nit) tolerance in vivo. Methods. Twenty-four rats were divided into 4 groups (n =6, each): Control group, Nitroglycerin (Nit) group, Nit + bosentan group and Nit + losartan group. Nitroglycerin tolerance was induced by 2-day treatment ofnitroglycerin patch (0. 05mg/h). Angiotensin I1 receptor antagonist losartan (10mg ·kg-1·d-1) and endothe-lin receptor antagonist bosentan ( 100 mg·kg-1· d-1 ) were given by gavage for 2 days respectively. Results. The least hypotensive response to sodium nitroprusside (SNP) was observed in Nit group. The effec-tive percentages of hypotensive response to SNP were increased in both Nit + losartan group and Nit + bosentangroup compared with Nit group [(31.95±4.45) % vs (21.00±3.69) %, P <0.01and (33. 18±6. 16)% vs (21.00±3.69 ) %, P < 0. 01 , respectivelyl. The maximal vessel relaxation induced by SNP was thesame in 4 different groups but the highest EC50 (concentration which produces 50% of the maximal response toSNP) was found in tolerant group[ (34 ±10) nmol/L, P < 0. 01 ]. The ET-1 amounts in plasma and vasculartissue were markedly increased by 54% and 60% in Nit group compared with those in control group( P<0. 01). The ET-1 amounts in plasma and vascular tissue were decreased by 30% and 37% in Nit + losartangroup compared with those in Nit group ( P < 0.01 ). Conclusion. Endothelin receptor antagonist and angiotensin Ⅱ receptor antagonist could prevent against the Nit tolerance.

  7. Determinants of effective, safe and convenient vitamin K antagonist use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooistra, Hilde Afra Margaretha

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin K antagonists (VKA) are frequently used anticoagulants. They are very effective in preventing atrial fibrillation related strokes and recurrent venous thrombosis. However, it can be difficult to achieve an optimal balance between the efficacy and side effects (bleeding), as the dose response

  8. Neuroprotective Effects of Glutamate Antagonists and Extracellular Acidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaku, David A.; Giffard, Rona G.; Choi, Dennis W.

    1993-06-01

    Glutamate antagonists protect neurons from hypoxic injury both in vivo and in vitro, but in vitro studies have not been done under the acidic conditions typical of hypoxia-ischemia in vivo. Consistent with glutamate receptor antagonism, extracellular acidity reduced neuronal death in murine cortical cultures that were deprived of oxygen and glucose. Under these acid conditions, N-methyl-D-aspartate and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isox-azolepropionate-kainate antagonists further reduced neuronal death, such that some neurons tolerated prolonged oxygen and glucose deprivation almost as well as did astrocytes. Neuroprotection induced by this combination exceeded that induced by glutamate antagonists alone, suggesting that extracellular acidity has beneficial effects beyond the attenuation of ionotropic glutamate receptor activation.

  9. Are peripheral opioid antagonists the solution to opioid side effects?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bates, John J

    2012-02-03

    Opioid medication is the mainstay of therapy for severe acute and chronic pain. Unfortunately, the side effects of these medications can affect patient comfort and safety, thus limiting their proven therapeutic potential. Whereas the main analgesic effects of opioids are centrally mediated, many of the common side effects are mediated via peripheral receptors. Novel peripheral opioid antagonists have been recently introduced that can block the peripheral actions of opioids without affecting centrally mediated analgesia. We review the clinical and experimental evidence of their efficacy in ameliorating opioid side effects and consider what further information might be useful in defining their role. IMPLICATIONS: The major analgesic effects of opioid medication are mediated within the brain and spinal cord. Many of the side effects of opioids are caused by activation of receptors outside these areas. Recently developed peripherally restricted opioid antagonists have the ability to block many opioid side effects without affecting analgesia.

  10. Sex-linkage of sexually antagonistic genes is predicted by female, but not male, effects in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mank, Judith E; Ellegren, Hans

    2009-06-01

    Evolutionary theory predicts that sexually antagonistic loci will be preferentially sex-linked, and this association can be empirically testes with data on sex-biased gene expression with the assumption that sex-biased gene expression represents the resolution of past sexual antagonism. However, incomplete dosage compensating mechanisms and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation have hampered efforts to connect expression data to theoretical predictions regarding the genomic distribution of sexually antagonistic loci in a variety of animals. Here we use data on the underlying regulatory mechanism that produce expression sex-bias to test the genomic distribution of sexually antagonistic genes in chicken. Using this approach, which is free from problems associated with the lack of dosage compensation in birds, we show that female-detriment genes are significantly overrepresented on the Z chromosome, and female-benefit genes underrepresented. By contrast, male-effect genes show no over- or underrepresentation on the Z chromosome. These data are consistent with a dominant mode of inheritance for sexually antagonistic genes, in which male-benefit coding mutations are more likely to be fixed on the Z due to stronger male-specific selective pressures. After fixation of male-benefit alleles, regulatory changes in females evolve to minimize antagonism by reducing female expression.

  11. Anticonvulsive effect of nonimidazole histamine H3 receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadek, Bassem; Kuder, Kamil; Subramanian, Dhanasekaran; Shafiullah, Mohamed; Stark, Holger; Lażewska, Dorota; Adem, Abdu; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna

    2014-06-01

    To determine the potential of histamine H3 receptor (H3R) ligands as new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), aromatic ether, and diether derivatives (1-12) belonging to the nonimidazole class of ligands, with high in-vitro binding affinity at human H3R, were tested for their in-vivo anticonvulsive activity in the maximal electroshock (MES)-induced and pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-kindled seizure models in rats. The anticonvulsive effects of a systemic injection of 1-12 on MES-induced and PTZ-kindled seizures were evaluated against the reference AED phenytoin (PHT) and the structurally related H3R antagonist/inverse agonist pitolisant (PIT). Among the most promising ligands 2, 4, 5, and 11, there was a significant and dose-dependent reduction in the duration of tonic hind limb extension (THLE) in MES-induced seizure subsequent to administration of 4 and 5 [(5, 10, and 15 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.)]. The protective effects observed for the 1-(3-(3-(4-chlorophenyl)propoxy)propyl)-3-methylpiperidine derivative 11 at 10 mg/kg, i.p. were significantly greater than those of PIT, and were reversed by pretreatment with the central nervous system penetrant H1R antagonist pyrilamine (PYR) (10 mg/kg). Moreover, the protective action of the reference AED PHT, at a dose of 5 mg/kg (without considerable protection in the MES model), was significantly augmented when coadministered with derivative 11 (5 mg/kg, i.p.). Surprisingly, pretreatment with derivative 7 (10 mg/kg, i.p.), an ethylphenoxyhexyl-piperidine derivative without considerable protection in the MES model, potently altered PTZ-kindled seizure, significantly prolonged myoclonic latency time, and clearly shortened the total seizure time when compared with control, PHT, and PIT. These interesting results highlight the potential of H3R ligands as new AEDs or as adjuvants to available AED therapeutics.

  12. Anticonvulsant effects of isomeric nonimidazole histamine H3 receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadek, Bassem; Saad, Ali; Schwed, Johannes Stephan; Weizel, Lilia; Walter, Miriam; Stark, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Phenytoin (PHT), valproic acid, and modern antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), eg, remacemide, loreclezole, and safinamide, are only effective within a maximum of 70%-80% of epileptic patients, and in many cases the clinical use of AEDs is restricted by their side effects. Therefore, a continuous need remains to discover innovative chemical entities for the development of active and safer AEDs. Ligands targeting central histamine H3 receptors (H3Rs) for epilepsy might be a promising therapeutic approach. To determine the potential of H3Rs ligands as new AEDs, we recently reported that no anticonvulsant effects were observed for the (S)-2-(4-(3-(piperidin-1-yl)propoxy)benzylamino)propanamide (1). In continuation of our research, we asked whether anticonvulsant differences in activities will be observed for its R-enantiomer, namely, (R)-2-(4-(3-(piperidin-1-yl)propoxy)benzylamino)propaneamide (2) and analogs thereof, in maximum electroshock (MES)-, pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-, and strychnine (STR)-induced convulsion models in rats having PHT and valproic acid (VPA) as reference AEDs. Unlike the S-enantiomer (1), the results show that animals pretreated intraperitoneally (ip) with the R-enantiomer 2 (10 mg/kg) were moderately protected in MES and STR induced models, whereas proconvulsant effect was observed for the same ligand in PTZ-induced convulsion models. However, animals pretreated with intraperitoneal doses of 5, 10, or 15 mg/kg of structurally bulkier (R)-enantiomer (3), in which 3-piperidinopropan-1-ol in ligand 2 was replaced by (4-(3-(piperidin-1-yl)propoxy)phenyl)methanol, and its (S)-enantiomer (4) significantly and in a dose-dependent manner reduced convulsions or exhibited full protection in MES and PTZ convulsions model, respectively. Interestingly, the protective effects observed for the (R)-enantiomer (3) in MES model were significantly greater than those of the standard H3R inverse agonist/antagonist pitolisant, comparable with those observed for PHT, and

  13. Does protein binding modulate the effect of angiotensin II receptor antagonists?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc P Maillard

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionAngiotensin II AT 1-receptor antagonists are highly bound to plasma proteins (≥ 99%. With some antagonists, such as DuP-532, the protein binding was such that no efficacy of the drug could be demonstrated clinically. Whether protein binding interferes with the efficacy of other antagonists is not known. We have therefore investigated in vitro how plasma proteins may affect the antagonistic effect of different AT1-receptor antagonists.MethodsA radio-receptor binding assay was used to analyse the interaction between proteins and the ability of various angiotensin II (Ang II antagonists to block AT1-receptors. In addition, the Biacore technology, a new technique which enables the real-time monitoring of binding events between two molecules, was used to evaluate the dissociation rate constants of five AT1-receptor antagonists from human serum albumin.ResultsThe in vitro AT 1-antagonistic effects of different Ang II receptor antagonists were differentially affected by the presence of human plasma, with rightward shifts of the IC50 ranging from one to several orders of magnitude. The importance of the shift correlates with the dissociation rate constants of these drugs from albumin. Our experiments also show that the way that AT1-receptor antagonists bind to proteins differs from one compound to another. These results suggest that the interaction with plasma proteins appears to modulate the efficacy of some Ang II antagonists.ConclusionAlthough the high binding level of Ang II receptor antagonist to plasma proteins appears to be a feature common to this class of compounds, the kinetics and characteristics of this binding is of great importance. With some antagonists, protein binding interferes markedly with their efficacy to block AT1-receptors.

  14. Anticonvulsant effects of isomeric nonimidazole histamine H3 receptor antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadek B

    2016-11-01

    , in which 3-piperidinopropan-1-ol in ligand 2 was replaced by (4-(3-(piperidin-1-ylpropoxyphenylmethanol, and its (S-enantiomer (4 significantly and in a dose-dependent manner reduced convulsions or exhibited full protection in MES and PTZ convulsions model, respectively. Interestingly, the protective effects observed for the (R-enantiomer (3 in MES model were significantly greater than those of the standard H3R inverse agonist/antagonist pitolisant, comparable with those observed for PHT, and reversed when rats were pretreated with the selective H3R agonist R-(α-methyl-histamine. Comparisons of the observed antagonistic in vitro affinities among the ligands 1–6 revealed profound stereoselectivity at human H3Rs with varying preferences for this receptor subtype. Moreover, the in vivo anticonvulsant effects observed in this study for ligands 1–6 showed stereoselectivity in different convulsion models in male adult rats. Keywords: histamine, H3 receptor, isomeric antagonists, anticonvulsant activity, stereo­selectivity

  15. REM sleep deprivation induces changes of down regulatory antagonist modulator (DREAM) expression in the ventrobasal thalamic nuclei of sprague-dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siran, Rosfaiizah; Ahmad, Asma Hayati; Abdul Aziz, Che Badariah; Ismail, Zalina

    2014-12-01

    REM sleep is a crucial component of sleep. Animal studies indicate that rapid eye movement (REM) sleep deprivation elicits changes in gene expression. Down regulatory antagonist modulator (DREAM) is a protein which downregulates other gene transcriptions by binding to the downstream response element site. The aim of this study is to examine the effect of REM sleep deprivation on DREAM expression in ventrobasal thalamic nuclei (VB) of rats. Seventy-two male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four major groups consisting of free-moving control rats (FMC) (n = 18), 72-h REM sleep-deprived rats (REMsd) (n = 18), 72-h REM sleep-deprived rats with 72-h sleep recovery (RG) (n = 18), and tank control rats (TC) (n = 18). REM sleep deprivation was elicited using the inverted flower pot technique. DREAM expression was examined in VB by immunohistochemical, Western blot, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) studies. The DREAM-positive neuronal cells (DPN) were decreased bilaterally in the VB of rats deprived of REM sleep as well as after sleep recovery. The nuclear DREAM extractions were increased bilaterally in animals deprived of REM sleep. The DREAM messenger RNA (mRNA) levels were decreased after sleep recovery. The results demonstrated a link between DREAM expression and REM sleep deprivation as well as sleep recovery which may indicate potential involvement of DREAM in REM sleep-induced changes in gene expression, specifically in nociceptive processing.

  16. [Vascular calcifications, the hidden side effects of vitamin K antagonists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennis, Youssef; Vengadessane, Subashini; Bodeau, Sandra; Gras, Valérie; Bricca, Giampiero; Kamel, Saïd; Liabeuf, Sophie

    2016-09-01

    Despite the availability of new oral anticoagulants, vitamin K antagonists (VKA, such as fluindione, acenocoumarol or warfarin) remain currently the goal standard medicines for oral prevention or treatment of thromboembolic disorders. They inhibit the cycle of the vitamin K and its participation in the enzymatic gamma-carboxylation of many proteins. The VKA prevent the activation of the vitamin K-dependent blood clotting factors limiting thus the initiation of the coagulation cascade. But other proteins are vitamin K-dependent and also remain inactive in the presence of VKA. This is the case of matrix Gla-protein (MGP), a protein that plays a major inhibitory role in the development of vascular calcifications. Several experimental and epidemiological results suggest that the use of the VKA could promote the development of vascular calcifications increasing thus the cardiovascular risk. This risk seems to be higher in patients with chronic kidney disease or mellitus diabetes who are more likely to develop vascular calcifications, and may be due to a decrease of the MGP activity. This review aims at summarizing the data currently available making vascular calcifications the probably underestimated side effects of VKA.

  17. Effect of antagonist muscle fatigue on knee extension torque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltman, J G M; Sargeant, A J; Ball, D; Maganaris, C N; de Haan, A

    2003-09-01

    The effect of hamstring fatigue on knee extension torque was examined at different knee angles for seven male subjects. Before and after a dynamic flexion fatigue protocol (180 degrees s(-1), until dynamic torque had declined by 50%), maximal voluntary contraction extension torque was measured at four knee flexion angles (90 degrees, 70 degrees, 50 degrees and 30 degrees ). Maximal torque generating capacity and voluntary activation of the quadriceps muscle were determined using electrical stimulation. Average rectified EMG of the biceps femoris was determined. Mean dynamic flexion torque declined by 48+/-11%. Extensor maximal voluntary contraction torque, maximal torque generating capacity, voluntary activation and average rectified EMG at the four knee angles were unaffected by the hamstring fatigue protocol. Only at 50 degrees knee angle was voluntary activation significantly lower (15.7%) after fatigue ( P<0.05). In addition, average rectified EMG before fatigue was not significantly influenced by knee angle. It was concluded that a fatigued hamstring muscle did not increase the maximal voluntary contraction extension torque and knee angle did not change coactivation. Three possible mechanisms may explain the results: a potential difference in recruited fibre populations in antagonist activity compared with the fibres which were fatigued in the protocol, a smaller loss in isometric torque generating capacity of the hamstring muscle than was expected from the dynamic measurements and/or a reduction in voluntary activation.

  18. Effect of platelet activating factor antagonist treatment on gentamicin nephrotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rodriguez-Barbero

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available To assess whether PAF could be involved in the gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity, we have studied the effect of PAF antagonist BN-52021 on renal function in rats after gentamicin (GENTA treatment. Experiments were completed in 21 Wistar rats divided into three groups: group GENTA was injected with gentamicin 100 mg kg−1 body wt/day s.c. for 6 days. Group GENTA + BN received gentamicin and BN-52021 i.p. 5 mg kg−1 body wt/day. A third group served as control. Rats were placed in meta-bolic cages and plasma creatinine and creatinine clearance were measured daily. GENTA group showed a progressive increase in plasma creatinine, a drop in creatinine clearance and an increase in urinary excretion of N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase and alkaline phosphatase. GENTA + BN group showed a lesser change in plasma creatinine and a creatinine clearance, but no difference with GENTA group in urinary excretion of NAG and AP were observed. Histological examination revealed a massive cortical tubular necrosis in rats treated with gentamicin, whereas in BN-52021 injected animals tubular damage was markedly attenuated. The present results suggest a role for PAF in the gentamicininduced nephro-toxicity.

  19. Pre-commercial procurement : regulatory effectiveness?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Apostol, Anca Ramona

    2014-01-01

    Is public procurement of research and development (‘R&D’) services the key to European Union (‘EU’)’s sustainable welfare? Is it being regulated in accordance with economic prescripts for effectiveness? Is the regulatory and policy setting clear and comprehensive in order to stimulate a widespread u

  20. 5-Hydroxytryptamine3 receptor antagonists and cardiac side effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brygger, Louise; Herrstedt, Jørn

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: 5-Hydroxytryptamine3-receptor antagonists (5-HT3-RA) are the most widely used antiemetics in oncology, and although tolerability is high, QTC prolongation has been observed in some patients. AREAS COVERED: The purpose of this article is to outline the risk of cardiac adverse events...

  1. The Effect of Antagonist Muscle Sensory Input on Force Regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya Onushko

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to understand how stretch-related sensory feedback from an antagonist muscle affects agonist muscle output at different contraction levels in healthy adults. Ten young (25.3 ± 2.4 years, healthy subjects performed constant isometric knee flexion contractions (agonist at 6 torque levels: 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 30%, and 40% of their maximal voluntary contraction. For half of the trials, subjects received patellar tendon taps (antagonist sensory feedback during the contraction. We compared error in targeted knee flexion torque and hamstring muscle activity, with and without patellar tendon tapping, across the 6 torque levels. At lower torque levels (5%, 10%, and 15%, subjects produced greater knee torque error following tendon tapping compared with the same torque levels without tendon tapping. In contrast, we did not find any difference in torque output at higher target levels (20%, 30%, and 40% between trials with and without tendon tapping. We also observed a load-dependent increase in the magnitude of agonist muscle activity after tendon taps, with no associated load-dependent increase in agonist and antagonist co-activation, or reflex inhibition from the antagonist tapping. The findings suggest that at relatively low muscle activity there is a deficiency in the ability to correct motor output after sensory disturbances, and cortical centers (versus sub-cortical are likely involved.

  2. The Effect of Sympathetic Antagonists on the Antidepressant Action of Alprazolam

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    Gorash ZM

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Alprazolam is an anti-anxiety drug shown to be effective in the treatment of depression. In this study, the effect of sympathetic receptor antagonists on alprazolam–induced antidepressant action was studied using a mouse model of forced swimming behavioral despair. The interaction of three sympathetic receptor antagonists with benzodiazepines, which may impact the clinical use of alprazolam, was also studied. Behavioral despair was examined in six groups of albino mice. Drugs were administered intraperitoneally. The control group received only a single dose of 1% Tween 80. The second group received a single dose of alprazolam, and the third group received an antagonist followed by alprazolam. The fourth group was treated with imipramine, and the fifth group received an antagonist followed by imipramine. The sixth group was treated with a single dose of an antagonist alone (atenolol, a β1-selective adrenoceptor antagonist; propranolol, a non selective β-adrenoceptor antagonist; and prazocin, an α1-adrenoceptor antagonist. Results confirmed the antidepressant action of alprazolam and imipramine. Prazocin treatment alone produced depression, but it significantly potentiated the antidepressant actions of imipramine and alprazolam. Atenolol alone produced an antidepressant effect and potentiated the antidepressant action of alprazolam. Propranolol treatment alone produced depression, and antagonized the effects of alprazolam and imipramine, even producing depression in combined treatments. In conclusion, our results reveal that alprazolam may produce antidepressant effects through the release of noradrenaline, which stimulates β2 receptors to produce an antidepressant action. Imipramine may act by activating β2 receptors by blocking or down-regulating β1 receptors.

  3. Sexual differentiation of oxytocin stress responsiveness: effect of neonatal androgenization, castration and a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, D A; Saridaki, E; Lightman, S L

    1988-04-01

    The plasma OT increment following stress in rats is sexually dimorphic, females exhibiting greater responses than males. We have investigated the role of neonatal androgen secretion in determining the sex-typical level of response. Castration of male pups either surgically or functionally (GnRH antagonist treatment) within either 2 h or 5 days of birth did not elevate the OT responses of adult males. In contrast, androgenization of female pups (testosterone, 1.25 mg/pup) within 5 days of birth markedly reduced the OT stress responses of adults to a level insignificantly different to males. The results show that neonatal androgens can exert organizational effects on OT regulatory mechanisms. Since neonatal castration was ineffective it would appear that a prenatal defeminization or masculinization event determines OT stress responsiveness in males.

  4. Spatial working memory in rats: effects of monoaminergic antagonists.

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    Beatty, W W; Rush, J R

    1983-01-01

    To assess the possible involvement of the monoaminergic neurotransmitters norepinephrine, dopamine and serotonin in the maintenance of spatial working memory rats were treated with antagonists 0 or 2 hr after completing the first 4 choices in an 8 arm maze. Haloperidol (0.25-1 mg/kg), when administered 2 hr after Choice 4, produced a small but consistent impairment in performance on retention tests given 5 hr after the first 4 choices. This deficit closely resembled natural forgetting in terms of the type of errors committed. By contrast, haloperidol in the same doses given 0 hr after Choice 4 or 3 hr before the first 4 choices did not affect retention. Likewise treatment with propranolol (10-20 mg/kg), phentolamine (5-20 mg/kg) or methysergide (5-15 mg/kg) did not impair spatial memory, regardless of when these drugs were injected within the session. Evidently dopaminergic neuronal systems are important in the maintenance of normal spatial working memory.

  5. Adenosine A2A receptor antagonists exert motor and neuroprotective effects by distinct cellular mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Liqun; Shen, Hai-Ying; Coelho, Joana E.; Araújo, Inês M.; HUANG, QING-YUAN; Day, Yuan-Ji; Rebola, Nelson; Canas, Paula M.; Rapp, Erica Kirsten; Ferrara, Jarrod; Taylor, Darcie; Müller, Christa E.; Linden, Joel; Cunha, Rodrigo A.; Chen, Jiang-Fan

    2008-01-01

    To investigate whether the motor and neuroprotective effects of adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) antagonists are mediated by distinct cell types in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) model of Parkinson's disease.We used the forebrain A2AR knock-out mice coupled with flow cytometric analyses and intracerebroventricular injection to determine the contribution of A2ARs in forebrain neurons and glial cells to A2AR antagonist-mediated motor and neuroprotective effects.The selecti...

  6. Genetic determinants of response and adverse effects following vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parameshwar S.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vitamin K antagonist anticoagulants (warfarin/acenocoumarol are commonly used anticoagulants that require careful clinical management to balance the risks of over anticoagulation and bleeding with those of under anticoagulation and clotting. Genetic variants of the enzyme that metabolizes vitamin K antagonist anticoagulant, cytochrome P-450 2C9 (CYP2C9, and of a key pharmacologic target of vitamin K antagonists anticoagulant, vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKORC1, contribute to differences in patients responses to various anticoagulant doses. Methods: In thirty patients on oral vitamin K antagonist anticoagulant therapy, presented with either clotting manifestations (valve thrombosis, pulmonary embolism and DVT or prolonged INR/bleeding manifestations, we assessed CYP2C9 genotypes, VKORC1 haplotypes, clinical characteristics, response to therapy (as determined by the international normalized ratio [INR], and bleeding events. Results: Of the thirty patients, thirteen patients INR was high and four patients presented with major bleeding and four with minor bleeding manifestations. Out of thirteen patients with high INR, ten patients showed CYP2C9 polymorphism ( 1/ 3 and 2/ 3 of poor metabolizer genotype. Most of the high INR patients were recently started on oral vitamin K antagonist anticoagulant. Most patients presented with clotting manifestations with below therapeutic INR are noncompliant with anticoagulants. Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that the CYP2C9 polymorphisms are associated with an increased risk of over anticoagulation and of bleeding events among patients on vitamin K antagonists' anticoagulant setting. Screening for CYP2C9 variants may allow clinicians to develop dosing protocols and surveillance techniques to reduce the risk of adverse drug reactions in patients receiving vitamin K antagonist anticoagulants. However the cost-effectiveness of genotyping of patients must be considered. [Int J Res Med Sci

  7. The 5-HT2A receptor antagonist M100907 produces antiparkinsonian effects and decreases striatal glutamate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Twum eAnsah

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available 5-HT plays a regulatory role in voluntary movements of the basal ganglia and have a major impact on disorders of the basal ganglia such as Parkinson’s disease (PD. Clinical studies have suggested that 5-HT2 receptor antagonists may be useful in the treatment of the motor symptoms of PD. We hypothesized that 5-HT2A receptor antagonists may restore motor function by regulating glutamatergic activity in the striatum. Mice treated with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP exhibited decreased performance on the beam-walking apparatus. Peripheral administration of the 5-HT2A receptor antagonist M100907 improved performance of MPTP-treated mice on the beam-walking apparatus. In vivo microdialysis revealed an increase in striatal extracellular glutamate in MPTP-treated mice and local perfusion of M100907 into the dorsal striatum significantly decreased extracellular glutamate levels in saline and MPTP-treated mice. Our studies suggest that blockade of 5-HT2A receptors may represent a novel therapeutic target for the motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease.

  8. Effect of the cannabinoid receptor-1 antagonist rimonabant on lipolysis in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølhøj, Signe; Hansen, Harald S; Schweiger, Martina

    2010-01-01

    The cannabinoid receptor 1 antagonist, rimonabant, reduces food intake and body weight, but contradictory findings have been reported as to whether the weight-reducing effect is fully accounted for by the reduced food intake or if rimonabant also mediates a lipolytic effect. In the present study...

  9. Effects of calmodulin antagonists on radiation-induced lipid peroxidation in microsomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varshney, R.; Kale, R.K. (Jawaharlal Nehru Univ., New Delhi (India). School of Life Sciences)

    1990-11-01

    Rat liver microsomes were irradiated with {gamma}-rays at a dose of 1.31 Gy s{sup -1}. The extent of lipid peroxidation, measured in terms of malondialdehyde (MDA) formed, increased with radiation dose. The presence of calmodulin antagonists during irradiation decreased lipid peroxidation. The order of their protective efficiency was: chlorpromazine (CPZ)>promethazine (PMZ)>trimeprazine (TMZ). Their protective effect was diminished in the presence of ferrous (Fe{sup 2+}) ions and was restored on addition of EDTA. However, calmodulin antagonists considerably inhibited radiation-induced lipid peroxidation in the presence of ferric (Fe{sup 3+}) ions. Calmodulin antagonists also decreased the cytochrome P-450 content of microsomes. These results are discussed with respect to their applicability to radiotherapy. A possible mechanism for the inhibition of radiation-induced lipid peroxidation is suggested. (author).

  10. The necessity and effectiveness of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist in the treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Atsuhisa

    2015-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD), and diabetic nephropathy is the most common primary disease necessitating dialysis treatment in the world including Japan. Major guidelines for treatment of hypertension in Japan, the United States and Europe recommend the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin-receptor blockers, which suppress the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), as the antihypertensive drugs of first choice in patients with coexisting diabetes. However, even with the administration of RAS inhibitors, failure to achieve adequate anti-albuminuric, renoprotective effects and a reduction in cardiovascular events has also been reported. Inadequate blockade of aldosterone may be one of the reasons why long-term administration of RAS inhibitors may not be sufficiently effective in patients with diabetic nephropathy. This review focuses on treatment in diabetic nephropathy and discusses the significance of aldosterone blockade. In pre-nephropathy without overt nephropathy, a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist can be used to enhance the blood pressure-lowering effects of RAS inhibitors, improve insulin resistance and prevent clinical progression of nephropathy. In CKD categories A2 and A3, the addition of a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist to an RAS inhibitor can help to maintain 'long-term' antiproteinuric and anti-albuminuric effects. However, in category G3a and higher, sufficient attention must be paid to hyperkalemia. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists are not currently recommended as standard treatment in diabetic nephropathy. However, many studies have shown promise of better renoprotective effects if mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists are appropriately used.

  11. Regulatory Effects of Fisetin on Microglial Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Yuan Chuang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence suggests that inflammatory processes in the central nervous system that are mediated by microglial activation play a key role in neurodegeneration. Fisetin, a plant flavonol commonly found in fruits and vegetables, is frequently added to nutritional supplements due to its antioxidant properties. In the present study, treatment with fisetin inhibited microglial cell migration and ROS (reactive oxygen species production. Treatment with fisetin also effectively inhibited LPS plus IFN-γ-induced nitric oxide (NO production, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS expression in microglial cells. Furthermore, fisetin also reduced expressions of iNOS and NO by stimulation of peptidoglycan, the major component of the Gram-positive bacterium cell wall. Fisetin also inhibited the enhancement of LPS/IFN-γ- or peptidoglycan-induced inflammatory mediator IL (interlukin-1 β expression. Besides the antioxidative and anti-inflammatory effects of fisetin, our study also elucidates the manner in fisetin-induced an endogenous anti-oxidative enzyme HO (heme oxygenase-1 expression. Moreover, the regulatory molecular mechanism of fisetin-induced HO-1 expression operates through the PI-3 kinase/AKT and p38 signaling pathways in microglia. Notably, fisetin also significantly attenuated inflammation-related microglial activation and coordination deficit in mice in vivo. These findings suggest that fisetin may be a candidate agent for the development of therapies for inflammation-related neurodegenerative diseases.

  12. Regulatory effects of fisetin on microglial activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Jing-Yuan; Chang, Pei-Chun; Shen, Yi-Chun; Lin, Chingju; Tsai, Cheng-Fang; Chen, Jia-Hong; Yeh, Wei-Lan; Wu, Ling-Hsuan; Lin, Hsiao-Yun; Liu, Yu-Shu; Lu, Dah-Yuu

    2014-06-26

    Increasing evidence suggests that inflammatory processes in the central nervous system that are mediated by microglial activation play a key role in neurodegeneration. Fisetin, a plant flavonol commonly found in fruits and vegetables, is frequently added to nutritional supplements due to its antioxidant properties. In the present study, treatment with fisetin inhibited microglial cell migration and ROS (reactive oxygen species) production. Treatment with fisetin also effectively inhibited LPS plus IFN-γ-induced nitric oxide (NO) production, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression in microglial cells. Furthermore, fisetin also reduced expressions of iNOS and NO by stimulation of peptidoglycan, the major component of the Gram-positive bacterium cell wall. Fisetin also inhibited the enhancement of LPS/IFN-γ- or peptidoglycan-induced inflammatory mediator IL (interlukin)-1 β expression. Besides the antioxidative and anti-inflammatory effects of fisetin, our study also elucidates the manner in fisetin-induced an endogenous anti-oxidative enzyme HO (heme oxygenase)-1 expression. Moreover, the regulatory molecular mechanism of fisetin-induced HO-1 expression operates through the PI-3 kinase/AKT and p38 signaling pathways in microglia. Notably, fisetin also significantly attenuated inflammation-related microglial activation and coordination deficit in mice in vivo. These findings suggest that fisetin may be a candidate agent for the development of therapies for inflammation-related neurodegenerative diseases.

  13. Effect of the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist telcagepant in human cranial arteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Edvinsson (Lars); K.Y. Chan (Kayi); S. Eftekhari; E. Nilsson (Elisabeth); R. de Vries (René); H. Säveland (Hans); C.M.F. Dirven (Clemens); A.H.J. Danser (Jan)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a neuronal messenger in intracranial sensory nerves and is considered to play a significant role in migraine pathophysiology. Materials and methods: We investigated the effect of the CGRP receptor antagonist, telcagepant, on CGRP-in

  14. Acute Effects of Different Agonist and Antagonist Stretching Arrangements on Static and Dynamic Range of Motion

    OpenAIRE

    Amiri-Khorasani; Kellis

    2015-01-01

    Background Traditionally, stretching exercises are considered as basic components of warm up aiming to prepare the musculoskeletal system for performance and to prevent injuries. Objectives The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of different agonist and antagonist stretching arrangements within a pre-exercise warm-up on hip static (SROM) and dynamic range of motion (DROM). Materia...

  15. Effect of the Urotensin Receptor Antagonist Palosuran in Hypertensive Patients With Type 2 Diabetic Nephropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Vogt; C. Chiurchiu; H. Chadha-Boreham; P. Danaietash; J. Dingemanse; S. Hadjadj; H. Krum; G. Navis; E. Neuhart; A.I. Parvanova; P. Ruggenenti; A.J. Woittiez; R. Zimlichman; G. Remuzzi; D. de Zeeuw

    2010-01-01

    The urotensin system has been hypothesized to play an important role in the pathophysiology of diabetic nephropathy. In this multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2-period crossover study, the effects of the urotensin receptor antagonist palosuran on urinary albumin excretion an

  16. Infusions of alpha-2 noradrenergic agonists and antagonists into the amygdala: effects on kindling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, M R; Corcoran, M E

    1993-12-31

    We reported previously that activation of alpha-2 adrenoceptors with infusions of clonidine into the amygdala/pyriform region is sufficient to retard kindling. To characterize further the involvement in kindling of alpha-2 receptors in the amygdala/pyriform, we exposed rats to unilateral intraamygdaloid infusions of a variety of noradrenergic drugs followed by either low-frequency stimulation of the amygdala, to induce rapid kindling, or conventional high-frequency stimulation. Infusions and electrical stimulation were administered once every 48 h. The prophylactic effects of clonidine were blocked by simultaneous infusion of idazoxan, an alpha-2 adrenergic antagonist, which suggests strongly that these effects were produced at an alpha-2 receptor. Intraamygdaloid infusions of xylazine, another alpha-2 agonist, also significantly retarded low-frequency kindling. Unexpectedly, intraamygdaloid infusions of the alpha-2 antagonists idazoxan, yohimbine, and SK&F 104856 failed to accelerate kindling. Infusion of the alpha-1 antagonist corynanthine also failed to affect kindling. We propose that the alpha-2 adrenoceptors in the amygdala/pyriform region contribute to the prophylactic effects of systemically administered clonidine and that the facilitation of kindling observed after systemic administration of alpha-2 antagonists may be due to blockade of alpha-2 adrenoceptors outside of the amygdala/pyriform region.

  17. Dynamics of Antagonistic Potency of Rhodobacter capsulatus PG Lipopolysaccharide against Endotoxin-Induced Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabanov, D S; Serov, D A; Zubova, S V; Grachev, S V; Prokhorenko, I R

    2016-03-01

    The dynamics of antagonistic potency of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) isolated from Rhodobacter capsulatus PG on the synthesis of proinflammatory (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-8, IL-6, IFN-γ) and antiinflammatory (IL-10, IL-1Ra) cytokines induced by highly stimulatory endotoxins from Escherichia coli or Salmonella enterica have been studied. Using human whole blood, we have shown that R. capsulatus PG LPS inhibited most pronouncedly the endotoxin-induced synthesis of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-8, and IL-6 during the first 6 h after endotoxin challenge. Similarly, the endotoxin-induced release of IFN-γ was abolished by R. capsulatus PG LPS as well (24 h). In contrast to the above-mentioned cytokines, the relatively weak antagonistic activity of R. capsulatus PG LPS against endotoxin-triggered production of IL-6 and IL-8 was revealed. Since R. capsulatus PG LPS displays more potent antagonistic activity against deleterious effects of S. enterica LPS than those of E. coli LPS in the cases of such cytokines as IL-1β (6 and 24 h), IL-6 and IL-8 (4 h), we conclude that the effectiveness of protective action of antagonist is mostly determined by the primary lipid A structure of the employed agonist.

  18. Species differences in the effects of the κ-opioid receptor antagonist zyklophin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirohi, Sunil; Aldrich, Jane V; Walker, Brendan M

    2016-03-01

    We have shown that dysregulation of the dynorphin/kappa-opioid receptor (DYN/KOR) system contributes to escalated alcohol self-administration in alcohol dependence and that KOR antagonists with extended durations of action selectively reduce escalated alcohol consumption in alcohol-dependent animals. As KOR antagonism has gained widespread attention as a potential therapeutic target to treat alcoholism and multiple neuropsychiatric disorders, we tested the effect of zyklophin (a short-acting KOR antagonist) on escalated alcohol self-administration in rats made alcohol-dependent using intermittent alcohol vapor exposure. Following dependence induction, zyklophin was infused centrally prior to alcohol self-administration sessions and locomotor activity tests during acute withdrawal. Zyklophin did not impact alcohol self-administration or locomotor activity in either exposure condition. To investigate the neurobiological basis of this atypical effect for a KOR antagonist, we utilized a κ-, μ-, and δ-opioid receptor agonist-stimulated GTPyS coupling assay to examine the opioid receptor specificity of zyklophin in the rat brain and mouse brain. In rats, zyklophin did not affect U50488-, DAMGO-, or DADLE-stimulated GTPyS coupling, whereas the prototypical KOR antagonist nor-binaltorphimine (norBNI) attenuated U50488-induced stimulation in the rat brain tissue at concentrations that did not impact μ- and δ-receptor function. To reconcile the discrepancy between the present rat data and published mouse data, comparable GTPyS assays were conducted using mouse brain tissue; zyklophin effects were consistent with KOR antagonism in mice. Moreover, at higher concentrations, zyklophin exhibited agonist properties in rat and mouse brains. These results identify species differences in zyklophin efficacy that, given the rising interest in the development of short-duration KOR antagonists, should provide valuable information for therapeutic development efforts.

  19. Agonist and antagonist effects of cytisine in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radchenko, Elena V; Dravolina, Olga A; Bespalov, Anton Y

    2015-08-01

    Varenicline, the most successful smoking cessation aid, is a selective partial agonists at α4β2* nicotinic receptors. Its efficacy is likely to be shared by other drugs with similar receptor action, including cytisine. The present study aimed to characterize behavioral effects of cytisine compared with nicotine using locomotor activity tests, intracranial self-stimulation of ventral tegmental area (discrete-trial threshold current intensity titration procedure), drug discrimination (0.6 mg/kg nicotine from vehicle), physical dependence (osmotic minipumps delivering 6 mg/kg/day of nicotine) and intravenous nicotine self-administration (0.01 mg/kg per infusion) in adult Wistar rats. Cytisine (1-3 mg/kg) partially substituted for nicotine and at the highest dose tended to antagonize nicotine's discriminative stimulus effects. Nicotine (0.05-0.4 mg/kg), but not cytisine (0.3-3 mg/kg), lowered ICSS thresholds and cytisine dose-dependently reversed effects of nicotine. Nicotine (0.15-0.6 mg/kg), but not cytisine (0.3-3 mg/kg), stimulated locomotor activity and cytisine (3 mg/kg) fully reversed these effects of nicotine. Acute pretreatment with nicotine (0.15-0.6 mg/kg), but not cytisine (0.3-3 mg/kg), reinstated extinguished nicotine self-administration. Continuous infusion of nicotine induced physical dependence, as indicated by reduced rates of food-reinforced responding induced by a challenge dose of mecamylamine. At the highest tested dose (3 mg/kg), cytisine tended to reduce response rates irrespective of whether the rats were continuously exposed to nicotine or saline. Cytisine behaves like a weak partial agonist, mimicking effects of nicotine to a limited degree. Although cytisine reversed several effects of nicotine, it seemed to have a reduced potential to produce withdrawal signs in nicotine-dependent subjects.

  20. Overall Effects of China's Recent Macroeconomic Regulatory Policies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiJianwei,; ZhuShida; DavidKelly

    2004-01-01

    China's economic regulatory policies in the last few years have played an important role in curbing the slide of its consistent growth drive. In terms of overall effects, the macroeconomic regulatory policies of each fiscal year have attained their targets. In some years, however,

  1. Effect of a Hypocretin/Orexin Antagonist on Neurocognitive Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    infantile febrile seizures), epilepsy, or brain infection caused by meningitis, encephalitis, or any other infectious agent. 7.) Systemic illness...not including infantile febrile seizures), epilepsy, or brain infection caused by meningitis, encephalitis, or any other infectious agent. 7...hyperalgesic effects of intrathecally- administered orexins in diabetic neuropathic pain model rats. Brain Res 1044: 76–86. 17. Mobarakeh JI, Takahashi K

  2. Effect of a Hypocretin/Orexin Antagonist on Neurocognitive Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    balance, and gastrointestinal control [14], nociception and hyperalgesia [15,16,17], stress and stress-induced analgesia [18,19], reward and addiction...an hypothalamic peptide with analgesic properties. Pain 92: 81–90. 16. Kajiyama S, Kawamoto M, Shiraishi S, Gaus S, Matsunaga A, et al. (2005) Spinal...orexin-1 receptors mediate anti-hyperalgesic effects of intrathecally- administered orexins in diabetic neuropathic pain model rats. Brain Res 1044

  3. Effect of a Hypocretin/Orexin Antagonist on Neurocognitive Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Army Medical Research and Materiel Command Fort Detrick, Maryland 21702-5012 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT...results are consistent with the hypothesis that, although both ALM and ZOL are effective hypnotic medications , rats would show less functional impairment...Tech. RS421 1 Implantable)rodent)headstage Tucker2Davis)Tech. 322Channel)ZIF2Clip 2 External)battery Tucker2Davis)Tech. PZ2BAT 1 Microwire )array

  4. ANTAGONISTIC EFFECT OF EDIBLE MUSHROOM EXTRACT ON CANDIDA ALBICANS GROWTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paccola Edneia A. de Souza

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Five species of edible mushrooms, Lentinula edodes, Pleurotus ostreatus, Pholiota nameko, Macrolepiota bonaerensis and Agaricus blazei, were tested for their potential to inhibit the in vitro growth of the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans. Only L. edodes had a fungistatic effect on this human pathogen. The inhibitory compound was produced intra and extracellularly in submersed L. edodes culture, and was also present in fresh and dehydrated mushroom basidiocarps. The fungistatic compound was heat sensitive and lost activity after 72 hours.

  5. Relaxant effect of the H2-receptor antagonist oxmetidine on guinea-pig and human airways.

    OpenAIRE

    Advenier, C; Gnassounou, J. P.; Scarpignato, C.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of three different H2-receptor antagonists (cimetidine, ranitidine and oxmetidine) were tested on isolated preparations of guinea-pig trachea and human bronchus against contractions induced by acetylcholine, histamine and potassium chloride (KCl). In addition, their influence on calcium concentration-response curves in guinea-pig tracheal spirals was examined in a potassium-rich solution (30 mM). Finally, their effects were studied in vivo against acetylcholine and histamine-induc...

  6. Effects of Proton Pump Inhibitors and H2 Receptor Antagonists on the Ileum Motility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atilla Kurt

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To investigate the effects of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs and H2 receptor antagonists on ileum motility in rats with peritonitis and compare changes with control group rats. Methods. Peritonitis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture in 8 rats. Another of 8 rats underwent a sham operation and were accepted as controls. Twenty-four hours later after the operation, the rats were killed, and their ileum smooth muscle was excised and placed in circular muscle direction in a 10 mL organ bath. Changes in amplitude and frequency of contractions were analyzed before and after PPIs and H2 receptor blockers. Results. PPI agents decreased the motility in a dose-dependent manner in ileum in both control and intraabdominal sepsis groups. While famotidine had no significant effect on ileum motility, ranitidine and nizatidine enhanced motility in ileum in both control and intraabdominal sepsis groups. This excitatory effect of H2 receptor antagonists and inhibitor effects of PPIs were significantly high in control group when compared to the peritonitis group. The inhibitor effect of pantoprazole on ileum motility was significantly higher than the other two PPI agents. Conclusions. It was concluded that H2 receptor antagonists may be more effective than PPIs for recovering the bowel motility in the intraabdominal sepsis situation.

  7. PROTECTIVE EFFECTS OF CALCIUM ANTAGONIST ON VASCULAR SYSTEM AGAINST TOXICITY INDUCED BY MERCURIC CHLORIDE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马欣; 厉英倩; 白宇飞; 刘明

    2004-01-01

    Objective To explore the toxic effects of mercuric chloride (HgCl2) on vascular smooth muscle as well as its relationship to calcium antagonist. Methods By using isolated vascular tension methods, we studied the effect of HgCl2 on isolated rabbit aortic rings. Results HgCl2 (1-100μmol*L-1) caused a concentration-dependent contraction of rabbit aortic rings, which did not change with phentolamin or without endothelium. In KH solution with Ca2+ , the maximum contraction amplitude reduced by(61.2±3.3)%. Nifedipine produced a concentration-dependent decrease of the maximum contraction amplitude. Conclusion Calcium antagonist has protective effects on vascular smooth muscle against damage induced by HgCl2.

  8. Immunoactive effects of cannabinoids: considerations for the therapeutic use of cannabinoid receptor agonists and antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greineisen, William E; Turner, Helen

    2010-05-01

    The active constituents of Cannabis sativa have been used for centuries as recreational drugs and medicinal agents. Today, marijuana is the most prevalent drug of abuse in the United States and, conversely, therapeutic use of marijuana constituents are gaining mainstream clinical and political acceptance. Given the documented contributions of endocannabinoid signaling to a range of physiological systems, including cognitive function, and the control of eating behaviors, it is unsurprising that cannabinoid receptor agonists and antagonists are showing significant clinical potential. In addition to the neuroactive effects of cannabinoids, an emerging body of data suggests that both endogenous and exogenous cannabinoids are potently immunoactive. The central premise of this review article is that the immunological effects of cannabinoids should be considered in the context of each prescribing decision. We present evidence that the immunological effects of cannabinoid receptor agonists and antagonists are highly relevant to the spectrum of disorders for which cannabinoid therapeutics are currently offered.

  9. The Effect of Coasting on Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection Outcome in Antagonist and Agonist Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İltemir Duvan Z.Candan,

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Coasting can reduce the ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS risk in ovulation induction cycles before intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI. This study aimed to investigate the effect of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH agonist and GnRH antagonist protocols to controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH cycles with coasting on the parameters of ICSI cycles and the outcome. Materials and Methods In a retrospective cohort study, 117 ICSI cycles were per- formed and coasting was applied due to hyperresponse, between 2006 and 2011. The ICSI outcomes after coasting were then compared between the GnRH agonist group (n=91 and the GnRH antagonist group (n=26. Results The duration of induction and the total consumption of gonadotropins were found to be similar. Estradiol (E2 levels on human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG day were found higher in the agonist group. Coasting days were similar when the two groups were compared. The number of mature oocytes and the fertilization rates were similar in both groups; however, the number of grade 1 (G1 embryos and the number of transferred embryos were higher in the agonist group. Implantation rates were significantly higher in the antagonist group compared to the agonist group. Pregnancy rates/embryo transfer rates were higher in the antagonist group; however, this difference was not statistically significant (32.8% for agonist group vs. 39.1% for antagonist group, P>0.05. Conclusion The present study showed that applying GnRH-agonist and GnRH-antago- nist protocols to coasted cycles did not result in any differences in cycle parameters and clinical pregnancy rates.

  10. Magnesium: Effect on ocular health as a calcium channel antagonist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şafak Korkmaz

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium is the physiologic calcium channel blocker,involving in many different metabolic processes by maintainingcell membrane function, modulating smooth musclecontraction and influencing enzymatic activities. Magnesiumhas been shown to increase blood flow to tissuesby modifying endothelial function via endothelin-1 (ET-1and nitric Oxide (NO pathways. Magnesium also exhibitsneuroprotective role by blocking N-methyl-D-aspartate(NMDA receptor related calcium influx and by inhibitingthe release of glutamate, hence protects the cell againstoxidative stress and apoptosis. Both increase in bloodflow and its neuroprotective effect make magnesium agood candidate for glaucoma studies. Magnesium hasbeen shown to decrease oxidative stress and apoptosisin retinal tissue and to have retinal ganglion cell sparingeffect. A series of studies has been conducted aboutmagnesium could decrease insulin resistance in diabeticpatients, ease glycemia control and prevent diabetic retinopathy.Magnesium is found to be critically important inmaintaining normal ionic homeostasis of lens. Magnesiumdeficiency has been shown to cause increased lenticularoxidative stress and ionic imbalance in the lens so triggercataractogenesis. J Clin Exp Invest 2013; 4 (2: 244-251Key words: Magnesium, calcium channel blockage,glaucoma, neuroprotection, diabetic retinopathy, cataract

  11. No Effect of Nutritional Adenosine Receptor Antagonists on Exercise Performance in the Heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-01

    not temperate, conditions after administration of a dopamine reuptake inhib- itor in humans (52) and improved thermoregulation in rats after...acute nutritional adenosine antagonist (caffeine and quercetin) administration on endurance exercise performance in the heat. An underlying assumption...both achieved with a small (0.6 mg/kg) intracerebroventricular dose of caffeine, while the same intraperitoneal dose had no effects. It remains

  12. Antagonistic and synergistic effects of light irradiation on the effects of copper on Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheloni, Giulia; Cosio, Claudia; Slaveykova, Vera I., E-mail: vera.slaveykova@unige.ch

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Light intensity and spectral composition affect Cu uptake and effects to C. reinhardtii. • High light (HL) reduced Cu effect on growth inhibition, oxidative stress and damage. • HL in combination with Cu up-regulated genes involved in the antioxidant responses. • HL with increased UVB radiation exacerbated Cu uptake and Cu-induced toxic effects. - Abstract: The present study showed the important role of light intensity and spectral composition on Cu uptake and effects on green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. High-intenisty light (HL) increased cellular Cu concentrations, but mitigated the Cu-induced decrease in chlorophyll fluorescence, oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation at high Cu concentrations, indicating that Cu and HL interact in an antagonistic manner. HL up-regulated the transcription of genes involved in the antioxidant response in C. reinhardtii and thus reduced the oxidative stress upon exposure to Cu and HL. Combined exposure to Cu and UVBR resulted in an increase of cellular Cu contents and caused severe oxidative damage to the cells. The observed effects were higher than the sum of the effects corresponding to exposure to UVBR or Cu alone suggesting a synergistic interaction.

  13. Sisters' curse: sexually antagonistic effects constrain the spread of a mitochondrial haplogroup superior in sperm competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padua, Michael V; Zeh, David W; Bonilla, Melvin M; Zeh, Jeanne A

    2014-12-22

    Maternal inheritance of mitochondria creates a sex-specific selective sieve with implications for male longevity, disease susceptibility and infertility. Because males are an evolutionary dead end for mitochondria, mitochondrial mutations that are harmful or beneficial to males but not females cannot respond directly to selection. Although the importance of this male/female asymmetry in evolutionary response depends on the extent to which mitochondrial mutations exert antagonistic effects on male and female fitness, few studies have documented sex-specific selection acting on mitochondria. Here, we exploited the discovery of two highly divergent mitochondrial haplogroups (A and B2) in central Panamanian populations of the pseudoscorpion Cordylochernes scorpioides. Next-generation sequencing and phylogenetic analyses suggest that selection on the ND4 and ND4L mitochondrial genes may partially explain sexually antagonistic mitochondrial effects on reproduction. Males carrying the rare B2 mitochondrial haplogroup enjoy a marked advantage in sperm competition, but B2 females are significantly less sexually receptive at second mating than A females. This reduced propensity for polyandry is likely to significantly reduce female lifetime reproductive success, thereby limiting the spread of the male beneficial B2 haplogroup. Our findings suggest that maternal inheritance of mitochondria and sexually antagonistic selection can constrain male adaptation and sexual selection in nature.

  14. Effects of different rest intervals between antagonist paired sets on repetition performance and muscle activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Marianna F; Willardson, Jeffrey M; Paz, Gabriel A; Miranda, Humberto

    2014-09-01

    Recent evidence suggests that exercising the antagonist musculature acutely enhances subsequent performance for the agonist musculature. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of different rest intervals between sets for exercises that involve antagonistic muscle groups, a technique referred to as antagonist paired sets (APS). Fifteen recreationally trained men were tested for knee extension (KE) exercise performance, with or without previous knee flexion (KF) exercise for the antagonist musculature. The following protocols were performed in random order with 10 repetition maximum loads for the KF and KE exercises: (a) traditional protocol (TP)-1 set of KE only to repetition failure; (b) paired sets with minimal allowable rest (PMR)-1 set of KF followed immediately by a set of KE; (c) P30-30-second rest between paired sets of KF and KE; (d) P1-1-minute rest between paired sets; (e) P3-3-minute rest between paired sets; and (f) P5-5-minute rest between paired sets. The number of repetitions performed and electromyographic (EMG) activity of vastus lateralis, vastus medialis (VM), and rectus femoris (RF) muscles were recorded during the KE set in each protocol. It was demonstrated that significantly greater KE repetitions were completed during the PMR, P30, and P1 protocols vs. the TP protocol. Significantly greater EMG activity was demonstrated for the RF muscle during the KE exercise in the PMR and P30 vs. the TP, P3, and P5, respectively. In addition, significantly greater EMG activity was demonstrated for the VM muscle during the PMR vs. all other protocols. The results of this study indicate that no rest or relatively shorter rest intervals (30 seconds and 1 minute) between APS might be more effective to elicit greater agonist repetition enhancement and muscle activation.

  15. Differential antiepileptic effects of the organic calcium antagonists verapamil and flunarizine in neurons of organotypic neocortical explants from newborn rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bingmann, D; Speckmann, E J; Baker, R E; Ruijter, J; de Jong, B. M.

    1988-01-01

    Effects of the organic calcium antagonists verapamil and flunarizine on pentylenetetrazol induced paroxysmal depolarizations were tested in organotypic neocortical explants taken from neonatal rats. In these in vitro experiments the papaverin derivative verapamil depressed, and finally abolished, ep

  16. The Central Reinforcing Properties of Ethanol Are Mediated by Endogenous Opioid Systems: Effects of Mu and Kappa Opioid Antagonists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman E. Spear

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Endogenous opioid systems are implicated in the reinforcing effects of ethanol and may play a substantial role in modulating the central reinforcing effects of ethanol early in ontogeny. This possibility was explored in the present study through the use of an olfactory conditioning paradigm with centrally administered ethanol serving as an unconditioned stimulus (US. In Experiment 1, newborn rat pups were treated with either a selective mu antagonist CTOP or kappa selective antagonist nor-BNI prior to olfactory conditioning. Experiment 2 tested the effectiveness of an alternative, shorter-duration kappa opioid antagonist GNTI in altering ethanol reinforcement. Experiment 3 investigated whether the effectiveness of pharmacological blockade of opioid receptors was due to the disruption of learning per se using an olfactory aversive conditioning paradigm with intraoral quinine serving as a US. Central administration of either mu or kappa opioid antagonists prior to conditioning disrupted the reinforcing effects of ethanol in newborn rats. The kappa opioid antagonist GNTI was as effective as nor-BNI. These effects of opioid antagonists on ethanol reinforcement are unlikely to be due to a disruption of all types of conditioning, since CTOP did not affect aversive reinforcement to intraoral infusions of quinine. The present results support the hypothesis that in newborn rats, the reinforcing properties of ethanol are mediated by the endogenous activity at mu and kappa opioid receptors.

  17. Effects of treatment with β-blocker and aldosterone antagonist on central and peripheral haemodynamics and oxygenation in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler, Christine; Hobolth, Lise; Krag, Aleksander

    2011-01-01

    Patients with cirrhosis often exhibit abnormalities in cardiovascular regulation and oxygenation. Many of these patients are treated with β-blockers and aldosterone antagonists that may influence the regulation of systemic haemodynamics, but the specific effects on systemic haemodynamics and oxyg......Patients with cirrhosis often exhibit abnormalities in cardiovascular regulation and oxygenation. Many of these patients are treated with β-blockers and aldosterone antagonists that may influence the regulation of systemic haemodynamics, but the specific effects on systemic haemodynamics...

  18. Effects of treatment with β-blocker and aldosterone antagonist on central and peripheral haemodynamics and oxygenation in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler, Christine; Hobolth, Lise; Krag, Aleksander;

    2011-01-01

    Patients with cirrhosis often exhibit abnormalities in cardiovascular regulation and oxygenation. Many of these patients are treated with ß-blockers and aldosterone antagonists that may influence the regulation of systemic haemodynamics, but the specific effects on systemic haemodynamics and oxyg......Patients with cirrhosis often exhibit abnormalities in cardiovascular regulation and oxygenation. Many of these patients are treated with ß-blockers and aldosterone antagonists that may influence the regulation of systemic haemodynamics, but the specific effects on systemic haemodynamics...

  19. Cardiovascular effects of selective agonists and antagonists of histamine H3 receptors in the anaesthetized rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coruzzi, G; Gambarelli, E; Bertaccini, G; Timmerman, H

    1995-06-01

    The cardiovascular responses to a series of selective histamine H3 receptor agonists, (R) alpha-methylhistamine, imetit and immepip and selective antagonists, thioperamide, clobenpropit and clophenpropit, were studied in anaesthetized rats. At 0.003-1 mumol/kg i.v. doses, H3 agonists failed to produce any significant change in the basal blood pressure and heart rate. Larger doses of (R) alpha-methylhistamine increased the blood pressure and heart rate and higher doses of imetit caused vasodepressor responses and reduced heart rate, whereas immepip proved virtually inactive. While (R) alpha-methylhistamine-induced effects were not blocked by histamine H1-, H2- and H3-receptor antagonists, they were however reduced by idazoxan and propranolol, which indicates that the mechanisms involved are adrenergic. The effects induced by imetit are not related to histamine H3 receptors but are mediated by indirect (via 5HT3 receptors) cholinergic mechanisms, since these effects were prevented by 1 mg/kg i.v. atropine and by 0.1 mg/kg i.v. ondansetron. Similarly, the H3 antagonists per se failed to change basal cardiovascular function up to 10 mumol/kg i.v. and only at 30 mumol/kg i.v. were marked decreases observed in the blood pressure and heart rate with a significant reduction in the effects of noradrenaline. These data indicate that in anaesthetized rats, histamine H3 receptor activation or blockade has no effect on basal cardiovascular function. The effects recorded after the administration of large doses of (R) alpha-methylhistamine and imetit are clearly unrelated to histamine H3 receptors and should be taken into account when using these compounds as H3 ligands for "in vivo" experiments.

  20. Effect of dopamine and serotonin receptor antagonists on fencamfamine-induced abolition of latent inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Aguiar, Cilene Rejane Ramos Alves; de Aguiar, Marlison José Lima; DeLucia, Roberto; Silva, Maria Teresa Araujo

    2013-01-05

    The purpose of this investigation was to verify the role of dopamine and serotonin receptors in the effect of fencamfamine (FCF) on latent inhibition. FCF is a psychomotor stimulant with an indirect dopaminergic action. Latent inhibition is a model of attention. Latent inhibition is blocked by dopaminergic agents and facilitated by dopamine receptor agonists. FCF has been shown to abolish latent inhibition. The serotonergic system may also participate in the neurochemical mediation of latent inhibition. The selective dopamine D(1) receptor antagonist SCH 23390 (7-chloro-3-methyl-1-phenyl-1,2,4,5-tetrahydro-3-benzazepin-8-ol), D(2) receptor antagonists pimozide (PIM) and methoclopramide (METH), and serotonin 5-HT(2A/C) receptor antagonist ritanserin (RIT) were used in the present study. Latent inhibition was evaluated using a conditioned emotional response procedure. Male Wistar rats that were water-restricted were subjected to a three-phase procedure: preexposure to a tone, tone-shock conditioning, and a test of the effect of the tone on licking frequency. All of the drugs were administered before the preexposure and conditioning phases. The results showed that FCF abolished latent inhibition, and this effect was clearly antagonized by PIM and METH and moderately attenuated by SCH 23390. At the doses used in the present study, RIT pretreatment did not affect latent inhibition and did not eliminate the effect of FCF, suggesting that the FCF-induced abolition of latent inhibition is not mediated by serotonin 5-HT(2A/C) receptors. These results suggest that the effect of FCF on latent inhibition is predominantly related to dopamine D(2) receptors and that dopamine D(2) receptors participate in attention processes.

  1. Antagonistic Effects of Sodium Butyrate and N-(4-Hydroxyphenyl-retinamide on Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainer Kuefer

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Butyrates and retinoids are promising antineoplastic agents. Here we analyzed effects of sodium butyrate and N-(4-hydroxyphenyl-retinamide (4-HPR on prostate cancer cells as monotherapy or in combination in vitro and in vivo. Sodium butyrate and 4-HPR induced concentration-dependent growth inhibition in prostate cancer cells in vitro. The isobologram analysis revealed that sodium butyrate and 4-HPR administered together antagonize effects of each other. For the in vivo studies, a water-soluble complex (4-HPR with a cyclodextrin was created. A single dose of sodium butyrate and 4-HPR showed a peak level in chicken plasma within 30 minutes. Both compounds induced inhibition of proliferation and apoptosis in xenografts of the chicken chorioallantoic membrane. Analysis of the cytotoxic effects of the drugs used in combination demonstrated an antagonistic effect on inhibition of proliferation and on induction of apoptosis. Prolonged jun N-terminal kinase phosphorylation induced by sodium butyrate and 4-HPR was strongly attenuated when both compounds were used in combination. Both compounds induced inhibition of NF-κ,B. This effect was strongly antagonized in LNCaP cells when the compounds were used in combination. These results indicate that combinational therapies have to be carefully investigated due to potential antagonistic effects in the clinical setting despite promising results of a monotherapy.

  2. Symbiotic interaction of endophytic bacteria with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and its antagonistic effect on Ganoderma boninense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundram, Shamala; Meon, Sariah; Seman, Idris Abu; Othman, Radziah

    2011-08-01

    Endophytic bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa UPMP3 and Burkholderia cepacia UMPB3), isolated from within roots of oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) were tested for their presymbiotic effects on two arbuscular mcorrhizal fungi, Glomus intraradices UT126 and Glomus clarum BR152B). These endophytic bacteria were also tested for antagonistic effects on Ganoderma boninense PER 71, a white wood rot fungal pathogen that causes a serious disease in oil palm. Spore germination and hyphal length of each arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) pairing with endophytic bacteria was found to be significantly higher than spores plated in the absence of bacteria. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that the endophytic bacteria were scattered, resting or embedded on the surface hyaline layer or on the degraded walls of AMF spores, possibly feeding on the outer hyaline spore wall. The antagonistic effect of the endophytic bacteria was expressed as severe morphological abnormalities in the hyphal structures of G. boninense PER 71. The effects of the endophytic bacteria on G. boninense PER 71 hyphal structures were observed clearly under SEM. Severe inter-twisting, distortion, lysis and shriveling of the hyphal structures were observed. This study found that the effect of endophytic bacteria on G. intraradices UT126 and G. clarum BR152B resembled that of a mycorrhiza helper bacteria (MHB) association because the association significantly promoted AMF spore germination and hyphal length. However, the endophytic bacteria were extremely damaging to G. boninense PER 71.

  3. Antagonistic effects of atipamezole, yohimbine and prazosin on medetomidine-induced diuresis in healthy cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murahata, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Asami; Miki, Yuya; Hikasa, Yoshiaki

    2014-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate and compare the antagonistic effects of atipamezole, yohimbine and prazosin on medetomidine-induced diuresis in healthy cats. Five cats were repeatedly used in each of the 9 groups. One group was not medicated. Cats in the other groups received 40 µg/kg medetomidine intramuscularly and saline (as the control), 160 µg/kg prazosin, or 40, 160 or 480 µg/kg atipamezole or yohimbine intravenously 0.5 hr later. Volume, pH and specific gravity of urine; plasma arginine vasopressin (AVP) level; and creatinine, osmolality and electrolyte levels in both urine and plasma were measured. Both atipamezole and yohimbine, but not prazosin, antagonized medetomidine-induced diuresis. The antidiuretic effect of atipamezole was more potent than that of yohimbine, but was not dose dependent, in contrast to the effect of yohimbine at the tested doses. Both atipamezole and yohimbine reversed medetomidine-induced decreases in both urine specific gravity and osmolality and increases in plasma osmolality and free-water clearance. Antidiuresis of either atipamezole or yohimbine was not related to the area under the curve for AVP level, although the highest dose of both atipamezole and yohimbine initially and temporarily increased plasma AVP levels, suggesting that this may partly influence the antidiuretic effects of both agents. The diuretic effect of medetomidine in cats may be mediated by α2-adrenoceptors, but not α1-adrenoceptors. Atipamezole and yohimbine can be used as antagonistic agents against medetomidine-induced diuresis in healthy cats.

  4. Radiosensitizing Effect of P2X7 Receptor Antagonist on Melanoma in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanamachi, Keisuke; Nishino, Keisuke; Mori, Natsuki; Suzuki, Toshihiro; Tanuma, Sei-Ichi; Abe, Ryo; Tsukimoto, Mitsutoshi

    2017-03-24

    Melanoma is highly malignant, and generally exhibits radioresistance, responding poorly to radiation therapy. We previously reported that activation of P2X7, P2Y6, and P2Y12 receptors is involved in the DNA damage response after γ-irradiation of human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells. However, it is not clear whether these receptors are also involved in the case of melanoma cells, although P2X7 receptor is highly expressed in various cancers, including melanoma. Here, we show that P2X7 receptor antagonist enhances radiation-induced cytotoxicity in B16 melanoma cells in vitro and in vivo. We confirmed that these cells express P2X7 receptor mRNA and exhibit P2X7 receptor-mediated activities, such as ATP-induced pore formation and cytotoxicity. We further examined the radiosensitizing effect of P2X7 receptor antagonist Brilliant Blue G (BBG) in vitro by colony formation assay of B16 cells. γ-Irradiation dose-dependently reduced cell survival, and pretreatment with BBG enhanced the radiation-induced cytotoxicity. BBG pretreatment also decreased the number of DNA repair foci in nuclei, supporting involvement of P2X7 receptor in the DNA damage response. Finally, we investigated the radiosensitizing effect of BBG on B16 melanoma cells inoculated into the hind footpad of C57BL/6 mice. Neither 1 Gy γ-irradiation alone nor BBG alone suppressed the increase of tumor volume, but the combination of irradiation and BBG significantly suppressed tumor growth. Our results suggest that P2X7 receptor antagonist BBG has a radiosensitizing effect in melanoma in vitro and in vivo. BBG, which is used as a food coloring agent, appears to be a promising candidate as a radiosensitizer.

  5. Modifier effects between regulatory and protein-coding variation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antigone S Dimas

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide associations have shown a lot of promise in dissecting the genetics of complex traits in humans with single variants, yet a large fraction of the genetic effects is still unaccounted for. Analyzing genetic interactions between variants (epistasis is one of the potential ways forward. We investigated the abundance and functional impact of a specific type of epistasis, namely the interaction between regulatory and protein-coding variants. Using genotype and gene expression data from the 210 unrelated individuals of the original four HapMap populations, we have explored the combined effects of regulatory and protein-coding single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. We predict that about 18% (1,502 out of 8,233 nsSNPs of protein-coding variants are differentially expressed among individuals and demonstrate that regulatory variants can modify the functional effect of a coding variant in cis. Furthermore, we show that such interactions in cis can affect the expression of downstream targets of the gene containing the protein-coding SNP. In this way, a cis interaction between regulatory and protein-coding variants has a trans impact on gene expression. Given the abundance of both types of variants in human populations, we propose that joint consideration of regulatory and protein-coding variants may reveal additional genetic effects underlying complex traits and disease and may shed light on causes of differential penetrance of known disease variants.

  6. Modifier effects between regulatory and protein-coding variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimas, Antigone S; Stranger, Barbara E; Beazley, Claude; Finn, Robert D; Ingle, Catherine E; Forrest, Matthew S; Ritchie, Matthew E; Deloukas, Panos; Tavaré, Simon; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T

    2008-10-01

    Genome-wide associations have shown a lot of promise in dissecting the genetics of complex traits in humans with single variants, yet a large fraction of the genetic effects is still unaccounted for. Analyzing genetic interactions between variants (epistasis) is one of the potential ways forward. We investigated the abundance and functional impact of a specific type of epistasis, namely the interaction between regulatory and protein-coding variants. Using genotype and gene expression data from the 210 unrelated individuals of the original four HapMap populations, we have explored the combined effects of regulatory and protein-coding single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We predict that about 18% (1,502 out of 8,233 nsSNPs) of protein-coding variants are differentially expressed among individuals and demonstrate that regulatory variants can modify the functional effect of a coding variant in cis. Furthermore, we show that such interactions in cis can affect the expression of downstream targets of the gene containing the protein-coding SNP. In this way, a cis interaction between regulatory and protein-coding variants has a trans impact on gene expression. Given the abundance of both types of variants in human populations, we propose that joint consideration of regulatory and protein-coding variants may reveal additional genetic effects underlying complex traits and disease and may shed light on causes of differential penetrance of known disease variants.

  7. Regulatory fit effects on perceived fiscal exchange and tax compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leder, Susanne; Mannetti, Lucia; Hölzl, Erik; Kirchler, Erich

    2010-04-01

    Paying taxes can be considered a contribution to the welfare of a society. But even though tax payments are redistributed to citizens in the form of public goods and services, taxpayers often do not perceive many benefits from paying taxes. Information campaigns about the use of taxes for financing public goods and services could increase taxpayers' understanding of the importance of taxes, strengthen their perception of fiscal exchange and consequently also increase tax compliance. Two studies examined how fit between framing of information and taxpayers' regulatory focus affects perceived fiscal exchange and tax compliance. Taxpayers should perceive the exchange between tax payments and provision of public goods and services as higher if information framing suits their regulatory focus. Study 1 supported this hypothesis for induced regulatory focus. Study 2 replicated the findings for chronic regulatory focus and further demonstrated that regulatory fit also affects tax compliance. The results provide further evidence for findings from previous studies concerning regulatory fit effects on tax attitudes and extend these findings to a context with low tax morale.

  8. Intrathecal neurosteroids and a neurosteroid antagonist: effects on inflammation-evoked thermal hyperalgesia and tactile allodynia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Elin; Persson, Josefin; Fitzsimmons, Bethany; Yaksh, Tony L

    2013-08-26

    Neurosteroids regulate neuronal excitability though binding sites associated with the ionotropic γ-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) receptor. We sought to characterize the spinal analgesic actions in rats of two 5α-reduced neurosteroids, allopregnanolone and alphaxalone, on nociceptive processing and to determine whether a putative neurosteroid antagonist attenuates this effect: (3α,5α)-17-phenylandrost-16-en-3-ol (17PA). Intrathecal (IT) injection of allopregnanolone (1-30 μg/10 μL in 20% cyclodextrin) delivered through lumbar catheters produced a dose-dependent analgesia in rats as measured by thermal thresholds in the ipsilateral (inflamed by intraplantar carrageenan) and in the contralateral (un-inflamed paws). Similar observations were made with alphaxalone (30-60 μg in 20% cyclodextrin). Effective doses were not associated with suppressive effects on pinnae, blink or placing and stepping reflex. Effects of allopregnanolone (30 μg) on the normal and hyperalgesic paw were completely prevented by IT 17PA (30 μg). Reversal by IT 17PA of an equi-analgesic dose of alphaxalone occurred only at higher antagonist dosing. These results suggest that a spinal neurosteroid-binding site with which 17PA interacts may regulate spinal nociceptive processing in normal and inflamed tissue.

  9. Cooperation goals, regulatory focus, and their combined effects on creativity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bittner, Jenny V.; Bruena, Mareen; Rietzschel, Eric F.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the co-activation of cooperation versus competition goals with regulatory focus, and tested whether the combined effects on creativity are interactive or additive. An experiment with 192 adults showed two main effects, such that participants with a cooperation goal and a promotio

  10. Effects of dopamine D1 and D2 receptor antagonists on laryngeal neurophysiology in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xin; Henriquez, Victor M; Walters, Judith R; Ludlow, Christy L

    2009-08-01

    Hypophonia is an early symptom in Parkinson's disease (PD) that involves an increase in laryngeal muscle activity, interfering with voice production. Our aim was to use an animal model to better understand the role of different dopamine receptor subtypes in the control of laryngeal neurophysiology. First, we evaluated the combined effects of SCH23390-a D(1) receptor antagonist with a D(2) receptor antagonist (eticlopride) on laryngeal neurophysiology, and then tested the separate effects of selective receptor antagonists. Thyroarytenoid (TA) and gastrocnemius (GN) muscle activity was measured at rest and while stimulating the internal branch of superior laryngeal nerve to elicit the laryngeal adductor response (LAR) in alpha-chloralose-anesthetized rats. Paired stimuli at different interstimulus intervals between 250 and 5,000 ms measured central conditioning of the LAR. Changes in resting muscle activity, response latency, amplitude, and LAR conditioning after each drug were compared with the saline control. SCH23390 alone increased the resting TA muscle activity (P < 0.05). With the combined SCH23390 + eticlopride or SCH23390 alone, response latency decreased (P < 0.01), amplitude increased (P < 0.01), and the test LAR was reduced at 2,000-ms ISI (P < 0.01). No LAR changes occurred when eticlopride was administered alone at a low dose and only a tendency to suppress responses was found at a high dose. No changes in GN muscle activity occurred in any of the groups. The results suggest that a loss of stimulation of D(1) receptors plays a significant role in laryngeal pathophysiology in PD.

  11. Nitroester drug's effects and their antagonistic effects against morphine on human sphincter of Oddi motility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuo-Dong Wu; Zhen-Hai Zhang; Dong-Yan Li; Jun-Zhe Jin; Jing Kong; Zhong Tian; Wei Wang; Min-Fei Wang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effects of nitroester drugs on human sphincter of Oddi (SO) motility and their antagonistic effects against morphine which shows excitatory effect on Oddi's sphincter motility.METHODS: The effects of these drugs on SO were evaluated by means of choledochofiberoscopy manometry.A total of 67 patients having T-tubes after cholecystectomy and choledochotomy were involved in the study, they were randomly divided into glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) group,isosorbide dinitrate (ISDN) group, pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PTN) group, morphine associated with GTN group, morphine associated with ISDN group and morphine associated with PTN group. Basal pressure of Oddi's sphincter (BPOS), amplitude of phasic contractions (SOCA), frequency of phasic contractions (SOF), duration of phasic contractions (SOD), duodenal pressure (DP) and common bile duct pressure (CBDP) were scored and analyzed. Morphine was given intramuscularly while nitroester drugs were applied sublingually.RESULTS: BPOS and SOCA decreased significantly after administration of ISDN and GTN, BPOS reduced from 10.95±7.49 mmHg to 5.92±4.04 mmHg (P<0.05) evidently after application of PTN. BPOS increased from 7.37±5.58mmHg to 16.60±13.87 mmHg, SOCA increased from 54.09±38.37 mmHg to 100.70±43.51 mmHg, SOF increased from 7.15±3.20 mmHg to 10.38±2.93 mmHg and CBDP increased 3.75±1.95 mmHg to 10.49±8.21 mmHg (P<0.01)evidently after injection of morphine. After associated application of ISDN and GTN, the four indications above decreased obviously. As for application associated with PTN,SOCA and SOF decreased separately from 100.64±44.99mmHg to 66.17±35.88 mmHg and from 10.70±2.76 mmHg to 9.04±1.71 mmHg (P<0.05) markedly.CONCLUSION: The regular dose of GTN, ISDN and PTN showed inhibitory effect on SO motility, morphine showed excitatory effect on SO while GTN, ISDN and PTN could antagonize the effect of morphine. Among the three nitroester drugs, the effect of ISDN on SO was most

  12. Two short-acting kappa opioid receptor antagonists (zyklophin and LY2444296) exhibited different behavioral effects from the long-acting antagonist norbinaltorphimine in mouse anxiety tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Peng; Yakovleva, Tatyana; Aldrich, Jane V; Tunis, Julia; Parry, Christopher; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan

    2016-02-26

    Prototypical long-acting kappa opioid receptor (KOPR) antagonists [e.g., norbinaltorphimine (norBNI)] have been reported to exert anxiolytic-like effects in several commonly used anxiety tests in rodents including the novelty-induced hypophagia (NIH) and elevated plus maze (EPM) tests. It remains unknown if the short-acting KOPR antagonists (e.g., zyklophin and LY2444296) have similar effects. In this study effects of zyklophin and LY2444296 (s.c.) were investigated in the NIH and EPM tests in mice 1h post-injection and compared with norBNI (i.p.) 48h post-administration. In the NIH test, zyklophin at 3 and 1mg/kg, but not 0.3mg/kg, or LY2444296 at 30mg/kg decreased the latency of palatable food consumption in novel cages, but had no effect in training cages, similar to norBNI (10mg/kg). Zyklophin at 3 or 1mg/kg increased or had a trend of increasing the amount of palatable food consumption in novel cages, with no effects in training cages, further indicating its anxiolytic-like effect, but norBNI (10mg/kg) and LY2444296 (30mg/kg) did not. In the EPM test, norBNI (10mg/kg) increased open arm time and % open arm entries or time, but zyklophin at all three doses and LY2444296 (30mg/kg) had no effects. In addition, zyklophin at 3mg/kg increased numbers of close and total arm entries on EPM, suggesting increased activity; however, norBNI and LY2444296 had no effects on close and total arm entries. Thus, all three KOPR antagonists had anxiolytic-like effects in the NIH test. However, only the long-acting one (norBNI), but not the short-acting ones (zyklophin and LY2444296), demonstrated anti-anxiety like effects in the EPM test. It remains to be investigated if the differences are due to the differences in their durations of action and/or pharmacodynamic properties.

  13. Structural and energetic effects of A2A adenosine receptor mutations on agonist and antagonist binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Keränen

    Full Text Available To predict structural and energetic effects of point mutations on ligand binding is of considerable interest in biochemistry and pharmacology. This is not only useful in connection with site-directed mutagenesis experiments, but could also allow interpretation and prediction of individual responses to drug treatment. For G-protein coupled receptors systematic mutagenesis has provided the major part of functional data as structural information until recently has been very limited. For the pharmacologically important A(2A adenosine receptor, extensive site-directed mutagenesis data on agonist and antagonist binding is available and crystal structures of both types of complexes have been determined. Here, we employ a computational strategy, based on molecular dynamics free energy simulations, to rationalize and interpret available alanine-scanning experiments for both agonist and antagonist binding to this receptor. These computer simulations show excellent agreement with the experimental data and, most importantly, reveal the molecular details behind the observed effects which are often not immediately evident from the crystal structures. The work further provides a distinct validation of the computational strategy used to assess effects of point-mutations on ligand binding. It also highlights the importance of considering not only protein-ligand interactions but also those mediated by solvent water molecules, in ligand design projects.

  14. The α1 Antagonist Doxazosin Alters the Behavioral Effects of Cocaine in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin N. Haile

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Medications that target norepinephrine (NE neurotransmission alter the behavioral effects of cocaine and may be beneficial for stimulant-use disorders. We showed previously that the short-acting, α1-adrenergic antagonist, prazosin, blocked drug-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking in rats and doxazosin (DOX, a longer-acting α1 antagonist blocked cocaine’s subjective effects in cocaine-dependent volunteers. To further characterize DOX as a possible pharmacotherapy for cocaine dependence, we assessed its impact on the development and expression of cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization in rats. Rats (n = 6–8 were administered saline, cocaine (COC, 10 mg/kg or DOX (0.3 or 1.0 mg/kg alone or in combination for 5 consecutive days (development. Following 10-days of drug withdrawal, all rats were administered COC and locomotor activity was again assessed (expression. COC increased locomotor activity across days indicative of sensitization. The high dose (1.0 mg/kg, but not the low dose (0.3 mg/kg of DOX significantly decreased the development and expression of COC sensitization. DOX alone did not differ from saline. These results are consistent with studies showing that α1 receptors are essential for the development and expression of cocaine’s behavioral effects. Results also suggest that blockade of both the development and expression of locomotor sensitization may be important characteristics of possible pharmacotherapies for cocaine dependence in humans.

  15. Effect of α₇ nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists and antagonists on motor function in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Kevin D; Pfister, James A; Lima, Flavia G; Green, Benedict T; Gardner, Dale R

    2013-02-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are ligand-gated cation channels found throughout the body, and serve to mediate diverse physiological functions. Muscle-type nAChRs located in the motor endplate region of muscle fibers play an integral role in muscle contraction and thus motor function. The toxicity and teratogenicity of many plants (which results in millions of dollars in losses annually to the livestock industry) are due to various toxins that bind to nAChRs including deltaline and methyllycaconitine (MLA) from larkspur (Delphinium) species, and nicotine and anabasine from tobacco (Nicotiana) species. The primary result of the actions of these alkaloids at nAChRs is neuromuscular paralysis and respiratory failure. The objective of this study was to further characterize the motor coordination deficiencies that occur upon exposure to a non-lethal dose of nAChR antagonists MLA and deltaline as well as nAChR agonists nicotine and anabasine. We evaluated the effect of nAChR agonists and antagonists on the motor function and coordination in mice using a balance beam, grip strength meter, rotarod, open field analysis and tremor monitor. These analyses demonstrated that within seconds after treatment the mice had significant loss of motor function and coordination that lasted up to 1 min, followed by a short period of quiescence. Recovery to normal muscle coordination was rapid, typically within approximately 10 min post-dosing. However, mice treated with the nAChR agonist nicotine and anabasine required a slightly longer time to recover some aspects of normal muscle function in comparison to mice treated with the nAChR antagonist MLA or deltaline.

  16. Antagonistic effect of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from various ecological niches on Vibrio species pathogenic to crustaceans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Prabhakaran Priyaja; Puthumana Jayesh; Neil Scolastin Correya; Balachandran Sreelakshmi; Naduthalmuriparambil S Sudheer; Rosamma Philip; Isaac Sarogeni Bright Singh

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To abrogate pathogenic vibrios in aquaculture by testing the potential of Pseudomonas isolates from fresh water, brackish and marine environments as probiotics.Methods:Antagonistic activity of the compound against 7 Vibrio spp. was performed. Influence of salinity on the production of pyocyanin and the toxicity was done through the compound using brine shrimp lethality assay. Molecular characterization was performed to confirm that the isolates werePseudomonas aeruginosa. Results: Salinity was found to regulate the levels of pyocyanin production, with 5-10 g/L as the optimum. All Pseudomonas isolates grew at salinities ranging from 5 to 70 g/L. Isolates of marine origin produced detectable levels of pyocyanin up to 45 g/L salinity. Brackish and freshwater isolates ceased to produce pyocyanin at salinities above 30 g/L and 20 g/L, respectively. Culture supernatants of all 5 Pseudomonas isolates possessed the ability to restrict the growth of Vibrio spp. and maximum antagonistic effect on Vibrio harveyi was obtained when they were grown at salinities of 5 to 10 g/L. The marine isolate MCCB117, even when grown at a salinity of 45 g/L possessed the ability to inhibit Vibrio spp.Conclusions:Purification and structural elucidation of antagonistic compound were carried out. ideal for application in freshwater, MCCB102 and MCCB103 in brackish water and MCCB117 and The present investigation showed that Pseudomonas aeruginosa MCCB119 would be MCCB118 in marine aquaculture systems as putative probiotics in the management of vibrios.

  17. Suppressant effects of selective 5-HT2 antagonists on rapid eye movement sleep in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortella, F C; Echevarria, E; Pastel, R H; Cox, B; Blackburn, T P

    1989-04-24

    The effects of the novel, highly selective serotonin-2 (5-HT2) antagonists, ICI 169,369 and ICI 170,809, on 24 h EEG sleep-wake activity were studied in the rat. Both compounds caused a dose-related increase in the latency to rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) and significantly suppressed cumulative REMS time up to 12 h postinjection. In contrast, neither drug disrupted slow-wave sleep continuity in as much as the latency to non-REMS (NREMS) and cumulative NREMS time were unchanged. However, at the highest dose tested (20 mg/kg) ICI 170,809 did produce a significant increase in total NREMS time during the second half of the sleep-awake cycle. These results demonstrate effects of selective 5-HT2 antagonists on sleep in rats which appear to be specific for REMS behavior, suggesting that the priming influence of serotonin on REMS may involve 5-HT2 receptor subtypes. The relationship between the REMS suppressant actions of these compounds and their consideration as therapeutic agents in depression is discussed.

  18. Effect of GnRH antagonist on follicular development and uterine biophysical profile in controlled ovarian stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhawana Tiwary

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Objective of current study was to assess the effect of GnRH antagonist on follicular development, premature luteinization, uterine biophysical profile and pregnancy rate in controlled ovarian stimulation with clomiphene and gonadotropins for intrauterine insemination in women with unexplained infertility. Methods: Randomised controlled trial. Minimal stimulation protocol with or without GnRH antagonist was compared. Setting: Infertility clinic, PGIMER, Chandigarh. Patients: Couples with unexplained infertility, age of female partner between 20-39 years. Intervention: GnRH antagonist 0.25 mg since follicle size 14 mm till hCG administration. Main outcome measures: Follicle characteristics, premature luteinisation, uterine biophysical profile and pregnancy rate. Results: The mean number of follicles recruited in group A was 2.32 +/- 1.01 while that in group B (receiving GnRH antagonist it was 4.10 +/- 1.69. Statistically significant increase in total biophysical profile score was observed in periovulatory phase in the antagonist group. 40% women in group A had premature luteinization whereas only 4% women in group B suffered from premature luteinization. 20% women who received GnRH antagonist conceived against only 6% in group A, this difference however was not statistically significant Conclusions: GnRH antagonist has a role in increasing the number of follicles recruited. Furthermore, GnRH antagonist can improve the total uterine biophysical profile score by improving the endometrial thickness, endometrial pattern, blood flow and decreasing the impedance to the blood flow in uterine artery. The drug can potentially help in improving pregnancy rates by decreasing the rate of premature luteinisation. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2015; 4(1.000: 157-163

  19. Characterization of mechanisms involved in presynaptic inhibition of sympathetic pressor effects induced by some 5-HT1 receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, M M; Calama, E; Morán, A; Martín, M L; San Román, L

    2000-01-01

    1. In a previous study, we showed that the presynaptic inhibitory action of 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor agonists on sympathetic pressor effects obtained in the pithed rats were mainly mediated by activation of 5-HT1A and 5-HT1D receptor subtypes. At the time, we observed that some 5-HT1 receptors antagonists - WAY 100,635 and NAN-190 (both 5-HT1A receptor antagonists), methiothepin (a 5-HT1,2,5,6,7 receptor antagonist) and spiperone (a 5-HT1,2 receptor antagonist) - reduced per se the pressor effects obtained by electrical stimulation. The aim of the present work was to investigate the mechanism participating in this inhibitory effect. 2. The inhibition induced by WAY 100,635 (1000 microg kg-1, i.v.) was blocked after i.v. treatment with idazoxan, an alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonist (300 and 1000 microg kg-1) and was not modified after i.v. treatment with propranolol, a beta-adrenoceptor antagonist (1000 microg kg-1) and sulpiride, a D2 receptor antagonist (1000 microg kg-1). The inhibition induced by spiperone (500 microg kg-1 i.v.) was significantly blocked by sulpiride (1000 microg kg-1) and was not modified by idazoxan or propranolol. 3. Sulpiride (1000 microg kg-1) partially blocked the inhibition induced by methiothepin (50 microg kg-1 i.v.). Only pretreatment with idazoxan (300 microg kg-1) modified the inhibition induced by NAN-190 (100 microg kg-1 i.v.), such inhibition increasing after intravenous administration of idazoxan. 4. All the antagonists used in our experiments failed to inhibit the pressor responses elicited by i.v. noradrenaline administration. 5. The above results suggest that the inhibitory effects of these 5-HT1 receptor antagonists are presynaptic in nature, but not related to the blockade of 5-HT1 receptors subtypes. The simultaneous activation or inhibition of other receptor systems could explain the inhibition produced by each 5-HT1 receptor antagonist studied.

  20. Sulforaphane is not an effective antagonist of the human pregnane X-receptor in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poulton, Emma Jane [Center for Ecogenetics and Environmental Health, University of Washington (United States); Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington (United States); Levy, Lisa [Public Health Sciences Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center (United States); Lampe, Johanna W. [Center for Ecogenetics and Environmental Health, University of Washington (United States); Public Health Sciences Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center (United States); Shen, Danny D. [Center for Ecogenetics and Environmental Health, University of Washington (United States); Department of Pharmaceutics, University of Washington (United States); Tracy, Julia [Center for Ecogenetics and Environmental Health, University of Washington (United States); Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington (United States); Shuhart, Margaret C. [Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine (United States); Thummel, Kenneth E. [Center for Ecogenetics and Environmental Health, University of Washington (United States); Department of Pharmaceutics, University of Washington (United States); Eaton, David L., E-mail: deaton@uw.edu [Center for Ecogenetics and Environmental Health, University of Washington (United States); Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington (United States); Department of Pharmaceutics, University of Washington (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN), is an effective in vitro antagonist of ligand activation of the human pregnane and xenobiotic receptor (PXR). PXR mediated CYP3A4 up-regulation is implicated in adverse drug-drug interactions making identification of small molecule antagonists a desirable therapeutic goal. SFN is not an antagonist to mouse or rat PXR in vitro; thus, normal rodent species are not suitable as in vivo models for human response. To evaluate whether SFN can effectively antagonize ligand activation of human PXR in vivo, a three-armed, randomized, crossover trial was conducted with 24 healthy adults. The potent PXR ligand — rifampicin (300 mg/d) was given alone for 7 days in arm 1, or in daily combination with 450 μmol SFN (Broccoli Sprout extract) in arm 2; SFN was given alone in arm 3. Midazolam as an in vivo phenotype marker of CYP3A was administered before and after each treatment arm. Rifampicin alone decreased midazolam AUC by 70%, indicative of the expected increase in CYP3A4 activity. Co-treatment with SFN did not reduce CYP3A4 induction. Treatment with SFN alone also did not affect CYP3A4 activity in the cohort as a whole, although in the subset with the highest basal CYP3A4 activity there was a statistically significant increase in midazolam AUC (i.e., decrease in CYP3A4 activity). A parallel study in humanized PXR mice yielded similar results. The parallel effects of SFN between humanized PXR mice and human subjects demonstrate the predictive value of humanized mouse models in situations where species differences in ligand-receptor interactions preclude the use of a native mouse model for studying human ligand-receptor pharmacology. -- Highlights: ► The effects of SFN on PXR mediated CYP3A4 induction in humanized PXR mice and humans were examined. ► SFN had no effect on rifampicin mediated CYP3A4 induction in humans or humanized mice. ► SFN had a modest effect on basal CYP3A4 activity among subjects with higher baseline activity. ► Humanized PXR

  1. Effects of a gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist on gonadotropin levels in Masu salmon and Sockeye salmon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Masafumi; Ikuta, Kazumasa; Kitamura, Shoji

    2007-09-01

    The salmon gonadotropin-releasing hormone (sGnRH) is considered to be involved in gonadal maturation via gonadotropin (GTH) secretion in salmonid fishes. However, there is no direct evidence for endogenous sGnRH-stimulated GTH secretion in salmonids. In this study, to clarify whether endogenous sGnRH stimulates GTH secretion, we examined the effects of the mammalian GnRH (mGnRH) antagonist [Ac-Delta(3)-Pro(1), 4FD-Phe(2), D-Trp(3,6)]-mGnRH on luteinizing hormone (LH) levels in 0-year-old masu salmon Oncorhynchus masou and sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka. First, the effects of the GnRH antagonist on LH release were examined in 0-year-old precocious male masu salmon. GnRH antagonist treatment for 3 hr significantly inhibited an increase in plasma LH levels that was artificially induced by exogenous sGnRH administration, indicating that the GnRH antagonist is effective in inhibiting LH release from the pituitary. Subsequently, we examined the effect of the GnRH antagonist on LH synthesis in 0-year-old immature sockeye salmon that were pretreated with exogenous testosterone for 42 days to increase the pituitary LH contents; the testosterone treatment did not affect the plasma LH levels. GnRH antagonist treatment slightly but significantly inhibited an increase in the testosterone-stimulated pituitary LH content levels. However, no significant differences in the plasma LH levels were observed between the GnRH antagonist-treated and control groups. These results suggest that endogenous sGnRH is involved in LH secretion in salmonid fishes.

  2. Possible Mechanisms for Functional Antagonistic Effect of Ferula assafoetida on Muscarinic Receptors in Tracheal Smooth Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyanmehr, Majid; Boskabady, Mohammad Hossein; Khazdair, Mohammad Reza; Hashemzehi, Milad

    2016-01-01

    Background The contribution of histamine (H1) receptors inhibitory and/or β-adrenoceptors stimulatory mechanisms in the relaxant property of Ferula assa-foetida. (F. asafoetida) was examined in the present study. Methods We evaluated the effect of three concentrations of F. asafoetida extract (2.5, 5, and 10 mg/mL), a muscarinic receptors antagonist, and saline on methacholine concentration-response curve in tracheal smooth muscles incubated with β-adrenergic and histamine (H1) (group 1), and only β-adrenergic (group 2) receptors antagonists. Results EC50 values in the presence of atropine, extract (5 and 10 mg/mL) and maximum responses to methacholine due to the 10 mg/mL extract in both groups and 5 mg/mL extract in group 1 were higher than saline (P < 0.0001, P = 0.0477, and P = 0.0008 in group 1 and P < 0.0001, P = 0.0438, and P = 0.0107 in group 2 for atropine, 5 and 10 mg/mL extract, respectively). Values of concentration ratio minus one (CR-1), in the presence of extracts were lower than atropine in both groups (P = 0.0339 for high extract concentration in group 1 and P < 0.0001 for other extract concentrations in both groups). Conclusion Histamine (H1) receptor blockade affects muscarinic receptors inhibitory property of F. asafoetida in tracheal smooth muscle PMID:27540324

  3. Acute Effects of Different Agonist and Antagonist Stretching Arrangements on Static and Dynamic Range of Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri-Khorasani, Mohammadtaghi; Kellis, Eleftherios

    2015-01-01

    Background: Traditionally, stretching exercises are considered as basic components of warm up aiming to prepare the musculoskeletal system for performance and to prevent injuries. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of different agonist and antagonist stretching arrangements within a pre-exercise warm-up on hip static (SROM) and dynamic range of motion (DROM). Materials and Methods: Sixty trained male subjects (Mean ± SD: height, 177.38 ± 6.92 cm; body mass, 68.4 ± 10.22 kg; age, 21.52 ± 1.17 years) volunteered to participate in this study. SROM was measured by V-sit test and DROM captured by a motion analysis system before and after (i) static stretching for both hip flexor and extensor muscles (SFSE), (ii) dynamic stretching for both hip flexor and extensor muscles (DFDE), (iii) static stretching for the hip flexors and dynamic stretching for hip extensors (SFDE), and (iv) dynamic stretching for the hip flexors and static stretching for hip extensors (DFSE). Results: DFSE showed a significantly higher increase in DROM and SROM than the remainder of the stretching protocols (P < 0.05). There were significant differences between DFDE with SFSE and SFDE (P < 0.05) and SFSE showed significant increase as compared to SFDE (P < 0.05). Conclusions: In conclusion, DFSE is probably the best stretching arrangement due to producing more post activation potentiation on agonist muscles and less muscle stiffness in antagonist muscles. PMID:26715975

  4. Antagonistic effects of atipamezole, yohimbine, and prazosin on xylazine-induced diuresis in clinically normal cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murahata, Yusuke; Miki, Yuya; Hikasa, Yoshiaki

    2014-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate and compare the antagonistic effects of atipamezole, yohimbine, and prazosin on xylazine-induced diuresis in clinically normal cats. Five cats were repeatedly used in each of the 9 groups. One group was not medicated. Cats in the other groups received 2 mg/kg BW xylazine intramuscularly, and saline (as the control); 160 μg/kg BW prazosin; or 40, 160, or 480 μg/kg BW atipamezole or yohimbine intravenously 0.5 h later. Urine and blood samples were collected 10 times over 8 h. Urine volume, pH, and specific gravity; plasma arginine vasopressin (AVP) concentration; and creatinine, osmolality, and electrolyte values in both urine and plasma were measured. Both atipamezole and yohimbine antagonized xylazine-induced diuresis, but prazosin did not. The antidiuretic effect of atipamezole was more potent than that of yohimbine but not dose-dependent, in contrast to the effect of yohimbine at the tested doses. Both atipamezole and yohimbine reversed xylazine-induced decreases in both urine specific gravity and osmolality, and the increase in free water clearance. Glomerular filtration rate, osmolar clearance, and plasma electrolyte concentrations were not significantly altered. Antidiuresis of either atipamezole or yohimbine was not related to the area under the curve for AVP concentration, although the highest dose of both atipamezole and yohimbine increased plasma AVP concentration initially and temporarily, suggesting that this may in part influence antidiuretic effects of both agents. The diuretic effect of xylazine in cats may be mediated by α2-adrenoceptors but not α1-adrenoceptors. Atipamezole and yohimbine can be used as antagonistic agents against xylazine-induced diuresis in clinically normal cats.

  5. Regulatory Effects of Fisetin on Microglial Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Jing-Yuan Chuang; Pei-Chun Chang; Yi-Chun Shen; Chingju Lin; Cheng-Fang Tsai; Jia-Hong Chen; Wei-Lan Yeh; Ling-Hsuan Wu; Hsiao-Yun Lin; Yu-Shu Liu; Dah-Yuu Lu

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that inflammatory processes in the central nervous system that are mediated by microglial activation play a key role in neurodegeneration. Fisetin, a plant flavonol commonly found in fruits and vegetables, is frequently added to nutritional supplements due to its antioxidant properties. In the present study, treatment with fisetin inhibited microglial cell migration and ROS (reactive oxygen species) production. Treatment with fisetin also effectively inhibited LPS...

  6. Retinal Neuroprotective Effects of Flibanserin, an FDA-Approved Dual Serotonin Receptor Agonist-Antagonist.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron S Coyner

    Full Text Available To assess the neuroprotective effects of flibanserin (formerly BIMT-17, a dual 5-HT1A agonist and 5-HT2A antagonist, in a light-induced retinopathy model.Albino BALB/c mice were injected intraperitoneally with either vehicle or increasing doses of flibanserin ranging from 0.75 to 15 mg/kg flibanserin. To assess 5-HT1A-mediated effects, BALB/c mice were injected with 10 mg/kg WAY 100635, a 5-HT1A antagonist, prior to 6 mg/kg flibanserin and 5-HT1A knockout mice were injected with 6 mg/kg flibanserin. Injections were administered once immediately prior to light exposure or over the course of five days. Light exposure lasted for one hour at an intensity of 10,000 lux. Retinal structure was assessed using spectral domain optical coherence tomography and retinal function was assessed using electroretinography. To investigate the mechanisms of flibanserin-mediated neuroprotection, gene expression, measured by RT-qPCR, was assessed following five days of daily 15 mg/kg flibanserin injections.A five-day treatment regimen of 3 to 15 mg/kg of flibanserin significantly preserved outer retinal structure and function in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, a single-day treatment regimen of 6 to 15 mg/kg of flibanserin still provided significant protection. The action of flibanserin was hindered by the 5-HT1A antagonist, WAY 100635, and was not effective in 5-HT1A knockout mice. Creb, c-Jun, c-Fos, Bcl-2, Cast1, Nqo1, Sod1, and Cat were significantly increased in flibanserin-injected mice versus vehicle-injected mice.Intraperitoneal delivery of flibanserin in a light-induced retinopathy mouse model provides retinal neuroprotection. Mechanistic data suggests that this effect is mediated through 5-HT1A receptors and that flibanserin augments the expression of genes capable of reducing mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. Since flibanserin is already FDA-approved for other indications, the potential to repurpose this drug for treating retinal

  7. Presenilin 2 Modulates Endoplasmic Reticulum-Mitochondria Coupling by Tuning the Antagonistic Effect of Mitofusin 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Filadi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Communication between organelles plays key roles in cell biology. In particular, physical and functional coupling of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and mitochondria is crucial for regulation of various physiological and pathophysiological processes. Here, we demonstrate that Presenilin 2 (PS2, mutations in which underlie familial Alzheimer’s disease (FAD, promotes ER-mitochondria coupling only in the presence of mitofusin 2 (Mfn2. PS2 is not necessary for the antagonistic effect of Mfn2 on organelle coupling, although its abundance can tune it. The two proteins physically interact, whereas their homologues Mfn1 and PS1 are dispensable for this interplay. Moreover, PS2 mutants associated with FAD are more effective than the wild-type form in modulating ER-mitochondria tethering because their binding to Mfn2 in mitochondria-associated membranes is favored. We propose a revised model for ER-mitochondria interaction to account for these findings and discuss possible implications for FAD pathogenesis.

  8. Effects of the nonpeptide V(1) vasopressin receptor antagonist SR49059 in hypertensive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibonnier, M; Kilani, A; Rahman, M; DiBlasi, T P; Warner, K; Smith, M C; Leenhardt, A F; Brouard, R

    1999-12-01

    We assessed the clinical and pharmacological profile of the orally active V(1) vascular vasopressin (AVP) receptor nonpeptide antagonist SR49059 (SR) during the osmotic stimulation of AVP release in hypertensive patients. In a double-blind crossover-versus-placebo study, 24 untreated stage I or II essential hypertensive patients (12 whites and 12 blacks) received a single 300 mg oral dose of SR 2 hours before the stimulation of AVP secretion with a 5% hypertonic saline infusion. Hemodynamic, humoral, and hormonal parameters were monitored for up to 28 hours after drug administration. SR did not alter blood pressure or heart rate before the saline infusion and did not reduce the blood pressure increment induced by the hypertonic saline infusion. However, the blood pressure peak at the end of the hypertonic saline infusion was slightly lower in the presence of SR (P=0.04). Heart rate was significantly faster between 4 and 6 hours after SR administration (P=0.02). The rise in plasma sodium and osmolality triggered by the saline infusion was not modified by SR, but AVP release was slightly greater in the presence of SR (P<0.0003). AVP-induced aggregation of blood platelets in vitro was significantly reduced by SR, with a peak effect 2 hours after drug administration that coincided with the SR peak plasma concentration. Plasma renin activity and aldosterone before and after the saline infusion were not modified by SR. Urine volume and osmolality were not altered by SR administration. SR effects were similar in the 2 ethnic groups as well as in salt-sensitive versus salt-resistant patients. In a situation of AVP osmotic release and volume expansion in hypertensive patients, a single oral dose of the V(1) vascular AVP receptor nonpeptide antagonist SR49059, which is able to block AVP-induced platelet aggregation, exerts a transient vasodilation effect that is not associated with a sustained blood pressure reduction. SR49059 is a pure V(1) vascular receptor antagonist that

  9. Effects of α-adrenoreceptor antagonists on apoptosis and proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su-Gang Shen; Dong Zhang; Heng-Tong Hu; Jun-Hui Li; Zheng Wang; Qing-Yong Ma

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To discuss the expression of α-adrenoreceptors in pancreatic cancer cell lines PC-2 and PC-3 and the effects of α1- and α2-adrenoreceptor antagonists, yohimbine and urapidil hydrochloride, on the cell lines in vitro.METHODS: We cultured the human ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines PC-2 and PC-3 and analyzed the mRNA expression of α1- and α2-adrenergic receptors by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).The effects of yohimbine and urapidil hydrochloride on cell proliferation were assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiasol-2-yl)2,4,-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Apoptosis was detected using the terminal deoxyribonucleoticlyl transferase (TdT)-mediated biotin-16-dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay and flow cytometry (FCM).RESULTS: PC-2 expressed rnRNA in α1- and α2-adrenoreceptors. MTT assays showed that urapidil hydrochloride had no effect on PC-3 cell lines. However,exposure to urapidil hydrochloride increased DNA synthesis in PC-2 cell lines as compared to the control group. PC-2 cell lines were sensitive to both drugs. The proliferation of the 2 cell lines was inhibited by yohimbine.Cell proliferation was inhibited by yohimbine via apoptosis induction.CONCLUSION: The expression of α1-and α2-adrenoreceptors is different in PC-2 and PC-3 cell lines,which might be indicative of their different functions. Theα2-adrenoceptor antagonist, yohimbine, can inhibit the proliferation of both cell lines and induce their apoptosis,suggesting that yohimbine can be used as an anticancer drug for apoptosis of PC-2 and PC-3 cells.

  10. Effects of dopamine D1-like and D2-like antagonists on cocaine discrimination in muscarinic receptor knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Morgane; Caine, Simon Barak

    2016-04-05

    Muscarinic and dopamine brain systems interact intimately, and muscarinic receptor ligands, like dopamine ligands, can modulate the reinforcing and discriminative stimulus (S(D)) effects of cocaine. To enlighten the dopamine/muscarinic interactions as they pertain to the S(D) effects of cocaine, we evaluated whether muscarinic M1, M2 or M4 receptors are necessary for dopamine D1 and/or D2 antagonist mediated modulation of the S(D) effects of cocaine. Knockout mice lacking M1, M2, or M4 receptors, as well as control wild-type mice and outbred Swiss-Webster mice, were trained to discriminate 10mg/kg cocaine from saline in a food-reinforced drug discrimination procedure. Effects of pretreatments with the dopamine D1 antagonist SCH 23390 and the dopamine D2 antagonist eticlopride were evaluated. In intact mice, both SCH 23390 and eticlopride attenuated the cocaine discriminative stimulus effect, as expected. SCH 23390 similarly attenuated the cocaine discriminative stimulus effect in M1 knockout mice, but not in mice lacking M2 or M4 receptors. The effects of eticlopride were comparable in each knockout strain. These findings demonstrate differences in the way that D1 and D2 antagonists modulate the S(D) effects of cocaine, D1 modulation being at least partially dependent upon activity at the inhibitory M2/M4 muscarinic subtypes, while D2 modulation appeared independent of these systems.

  11. In vitro antagonistic growth effects of Lactobacillus fermentum and Lactobacillus salivarius and their fermentative broth on periodontal pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-Ju Chen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available As lactobacilli possess an antagonistic growth property, these bacteria may be beneficial as bioprotective agents for infection control. However, whether the antagonistic growth effects are attributed to the lactobacilli themselves or their fermentative broth remains unclear. The antagonistic growth effects of Lactobacillus salivarius and Lactobacillus fermentum as well as their fermentative broth were thus tested using both disc agar diffusion test and broth dilution method, and their effects on periodontal pathogens, including Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguis, and Porphyromonas gingivalisin vitro at different concentrations and for different time periods were also compared. Both Lactobacillus salivarius and Lactobacillus fermentum and their concentrated fermentative broth were shown to inhibit significantly the growth of Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguis, and Porphyromonas gingivalis, althoughdifferent inhibitory effects were observed for different pathogens. The higher the counts of lactobacilli and the higher the folds of concentrated fermentative broth, the stronger the inhibitory effects are observed. The inhibitory effect is demonstrated to be dose-dependent. Moreover, for the lactobacilli themselves, Lactobacillus fermentum showed stronger inhibitory effects than Lactobacillus salivarius. However, the fermentative broth of Lactobacillus fermentum showed weaker inhibitory effects than that of Lactobacillus salivarius. These data suggested that lactobacilli and their fermentative broth exhibit antagonistic growth activity, and consumption of probiotics or their broth containing lactobacilli may benefit oral health.

  12. Effect of a cysteinyl leukotriene receptor antagonist on experimental emphysema and asthma combined with emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Genyo; Miyahara, Nobuaki; Koga, Hikari; Fuchimoto, Yasuko; Waseda, Koichi; Kurimoto, Etsuko; Taniguchi, Akihiko; Tanimoto, Yasushi; Kataoka, Mikio; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Kanehiro, Arihiko

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of overlapping bronchial asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease has increased in recent years. Cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLTs) play an important role in asthma, and the type 1 CysLT receptor (CysLT1R) is expressed by many inflammatory cells. We evaluated the effect of montelukast, a CysLT1R antagonist, on mouse models of asthma, porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE)-induced emphysema, and asthma combined with emphysema. Mice were sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA) on Days 0 and 14 and subsequently challenged with OVA on Days 28, 29, and 30. Pulmonary emphysema was induced by intratracheal instillation of PPE on Day 25. Mice were treated subcutaneously with montelukast or vehicle from Day 25 to Day 31. Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), static compliance; the number of inflammatory cells, the levels of cytokines, chemokines, LTs, and perforin in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and the quantitative morphometry of lung sections were analyzed on Day 32. Treatment with montelukast significantly attenuated the AHR and eosinophilic airway inflammation in OVA-sensitized and OVA-challenged mice. Administration of montelukast significantly reduced the AHR, static compliance, and neutrophilic airway inflammation, while attenuating emphysematous lung changes, in PPE-treated mice. In PPE-treated mice subjected to allergen sensitization and challenges, montelukast significantly suppressed the AHR, static compliance, and eosinophilic and neutrophilic airway inflammation in addition to the development of experimentally induced emphysema in the lungs. Our data suggest that CysLT1R antagonists may be effective in ameliorating the consequences of PPE-induced lung damage and the changes that follow allergen sensitization and challenges.

  13. Antagonistic effects of atipamezole and yohimbine on xylazine-induced diuresis in healthy dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukder, Hasanuzzaman; Hikasa, Yoshiaki; Matsuu, Aya; Kawamura, Hiroe

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the antagonistic effects of atipamezole and yohimbine on xylazine-induced diuresis in healthy dogs. Five healthy male beagles were assigned to each of the 8 treatment groups in a randomized design at 1-week intervals in the same dog. One group was not medicated. The dogs in the other groups received 2 mg/kg xylazine intramuscularly (IM) and a treatment of saline (control), 50, 100 or 300 microg/kg of each atipamezole or yohimbine IM 0.5 hr later. Urine and blood samples were collected 11 times over the course of 24 hr. Urine volume, pH, specific gravity and creatinine values; osmolality, electrolyte and arginine vasopressin (AVP) values in both urine and plasma; and plasma atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) concentration were measured. Both atipamezole and yohimbine antagonized xylazine-induced diuresis. The reversal effect of yohimbine was more potent, but not dose-dependent at the tested doses, in contrast with atipamezole. Both atipamezole and yohimbine exhibited similar potency in reversing the decreases in urine specific gravity, osmolality, creatinine, sodium and chloride concentrations and the increase in the plasma potassium concentration induced by xylazine. Both also inhibited xylazine-induced diuresis without significantly altering the hormonal profile in the dogs. A higher dose of atipamezole tended to increase the plasma ANP concentration. This may not be due only to actions mediated by alpha(2)-adrenoceptors. Both drugs can be used as antagonistic agents against xylazine-induced diuresis in healthy dogs.

  14. Effective management of venous thromboembolism in the community: non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel R

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Raj Patel Department of Haematological Medicine, King's Thrombosis Centre, King's College Hospital, London, UK Abstract: Anticoagulation therapy is essential for the effective treatment and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE. For many years, anticoagulation for acute VTE was limited to the use of initial parenteral heparin, overlapping with and followed by a vitamin K antagonist. Although highly effective, this regimen has several limitations and is particularly challenging when given in an ambulatory setting. Current treatment pathways for most patients with deep-vein thrombosis typically involve initial hospital or community-based ambulatory care with subsequent follow-up in a secondary care setting. With the introduction of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs into routine clinical practice, it is now possible for the initial acute management of patients with deep-vein thrombosis to be undertaken by primary care. As hospital admissions associated with VTE become shorter, primary care will play an increasingly important role in the long-term management of these patients. Although the NOACs can potentially simplify patient management and improve clinical outcomes, primary care physicians may be less familiar with these new treatments compared with traditional therapy. To assist primary care physicians in further understanding the role of the NOACs, this article outlines the main differences between NOACs and traditional anticoagulation therapy and discusses the benefit–risk profile of the different NOACs in the treatment and secondary prevention of recurrent VTE. Key considerations for the use of NOACs in the primary care setting are highlighted, including dose transition, risk assessment and follow-up, duration of anticoagulant therapy, how to minimize bleeding risks, and the importance of patient education and counseling. Keywords: venous thromboembolism, oral anticoagulant, prevention, treatment, primary

  15. Effects of the 5-HT(6) receptor antagonist Ro 04-6790 on learning consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses, A

    2001-01-08

    The 5-HT(6) receptor antagonist Ro-04-6790 or 8-OH-DPAT injection improved learning consolidation on an autoshaping task, while mCPP, scopolamine and dizocilpine decreased the performance. The effect induced by scopolamine, but not that induced by mCPP, was reversed completely by Ro-04-6790, while dizocilpine effect was antagonized partially. Nevertheless, ritanserin or WAY 100635, but not Ro 04-6790, antagonized the 8-OH-DPAT facilitatory effects on learning consolidation. As WAY 100635 did not modify the Ro 04-6790 facilitatory effect, hence 5-HT(1A), and/or 5-HT(7), but not 5-HT(6), receptors might mediate the 8-OH-DPAT facilitatory effect on learning consolidation. Since, the Ro 04-6790 facilitatory effect was unaffected by 5-HT(1A), 5-HT(2A)/(2B)/(2C), 5-HT(3) or 5-HT(4) receptor blockade, thereby, the facilitatory effect induced by Ro 04-6790 involved specifically 5-HT(6) receptors. Indeed, the present data provide further support to the notion that, 5-HT(6) receptors play a significant part in the learning consolidation under normal and dysfunctional memory conditions.

  16. Effect of TNF antagonists on the productivity of daily work of patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furuya H

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hidekazu Furuya,1 Tsuyoshi Kasama,1 Takeo Isozaki,1,2 Masayu Umemura,1 Kumiko Otsuka,1 Sakiko Isojima,1 Hiroyuki Tsukamoto,1 TakehiroTokunaga,1 Ryo Yanai,1 Ryo Takahashi11Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Showa University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; 2Department of Rheumatology,University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, USAAbstract: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a significant cause of work disability and job loss. The resulting economic burden experienced by patients has received considerable research attention. This research assesses the effect of tumor necrosis factor (TNF antagonists (infliximab, etanercept on the ability of RA patients living in Japan to work and participate in society. A total of 42 patients with active RA were enrolled and given biological therapy for 12 months (mo. Of these patients, 14 were employed full-time, 6 were employed part-time, and 22 were not employed. Twenty-six patients were given infliximab, and sixteen were given etanercept. The amount of domestic labor performed before the biologics served as a baseline and was assigned a value of 0%. After treatment with biologics, the productivity was evaluated using the visual analog scale (VAS; −100 to +100 mm. The administration of TNF antagonists to RA patients who exhibited an insufficient response to medical treatment significantly improved the Disease Activity Score 28 (DAS 28 after both 6 mo and 12 mo (P < 0.0001. A significant correlation was found between the improvement in their DAS 28 and improvements in their work situation (Productivity VAS (P < 0.05. Of particular interest is the significant correlation between the values of baseline mHAQ and the percent changes of Productivity VAS that was observed after 6 mo and 12 mo (P < 0.05. Our findings indicate that medical treatment of RA with TNF antagonists improves the patients' ability to perform their jobs and housekeeping. Because loss of productivity is an important

  17. Classification of suppressor additives based on synergistic and antagonistic ensemble effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broekmann, P., E-mail: peter.broekmann@iac.unibe.ch [BASF SE, Global Business Unit Electronic Materials, 67056 Ludwigshafen (Germany); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Fluegel, A.; Emnet, C.; Arnold, M.; Roeger-Goepfert, C.; Wagner, A. [BASF SE, Global Business Unit Electronic Materials, 67056 Ludwigshafen (Germany); Hai, N.T.M. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Mayer, D. [BASF SE, Global Business Unit Electronic Materials, 67056 Ludwigshafen (Germany)

    2011-05-01

    Highlights: > Three fundamental types of suppressor additives for copper electroplating could be identified by means of potential transient measurements. > These suppressor additives differ in their synergistic and antagonistic interplay with anions that are chemisorbed on the metallic copper surface during electrodeposition. > In addition these suppressor chemistries reveal different barrier properties with respect to cupric ions and plating additives (Cl, SPS). - Abstract: Three fundamental types of suppressor additives for copper electroplating could be identified by means of potential transient measurements. These suppressor additives differ in their synergistic and antagonistic interplay with anions that are chemisorbed on the metallic copper surface during electrodeposition. In addition these suppressor chemistries reveal different barrier properties with respect to cupric ions and plating additives (Cl, SPS). While the type-I suppressor selectively forms efficient barriers for copper inter-diffusion on chloride-terminated electrode surfaces we identified a type-II suppressor that interacts non-selectively with any kind of anions chemisorbed on copper (chloride, sulfate, sulfonate). Type-I suppressors are vital for the superconformal copper growth mode in Damascene processing and show an antagonistic interaction with SPS (Bis-Sodium-Sulfopropyl-Disulfide) which involves the deactivation of this suppressor chemistry. This suppressor deactivation is rationalized in terms of compositional changes in the layer of the chemisorbed anions due to the competition of chloride and MPS (Mercaptopropane Sulfonic Acid) for adsorption sites on the metallic copper surface. MPS is the product of the dissociative SPS adsorption within the preexisting chloride matrix on the copper surface. The non-selectivity in the adsorption behavior of the type-II suppressor is rationalized in terms of anion/cation pairing effects of the poly-cationic suppressor and the anion-modified copper

  18. Differential effects of ghrelin antagonists on alcohol drinking and reinforcement in mouse and rat models of alcohol dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Juan L; Cunningham, Christopher L; Finn, Deborah A; Young, Emily A; Helpenstell, Lily K; Schuette, Lindsey M; Fidler, Tara L; Kosten, Therese A; Ryabinin, Andrey E

    2015-10-01

    An effort has been mounted to understand the mechanisms of alcohol dependence in a way that may allow for greater efficacy in treatment. It has long been suggested that drugs of abuse seize fundamental reward pathways and disrupt homeostasis to produce compulsive drug seeking behaviors. Ghrelin, an endogenous hormone that affects hunger state and release of growth hormone, has been shown to increase alcohol intake following administration, while antagonists decrease intake. Using rodent models of dependence, the current study examined the effects of two ghrelin receptor antagonists, [DLys3]-GHRP-6 (DLys) and JMV2959, on dependence-induced alcohol self-administration. In two experiments adult male C57BL/6J mice and Wistar rats were made dependent via intermittent ethanol vapor exposure. In another experiment, adult male C57BL/6J mice were made dependent using the intragastric alcohol consumption (IGAC) procedure. Ghrelin receptor antagonists were given prior to voluntary ethanol drinking. Ghrelin antagonists reduced ethanol intake, preference, and operant self-administration of ethanol and sucrose across these models, but did not decrease food consumption in mice. In experiments 1 and 2, voluntary drinking was reduced by ghrelin receptor antagonists, however this reduction did not persist across days. Despite the transient effects of ghrelin antagonists, the drugs had renewed effectiveness following a break in administration as seen in experiment 1. The results show the ghrelin system as a potential target for studies of alcohol abuse. Further research is needed to determine the central mechanisms of these drugs and their influence on addiction in order to design effective pharmacotherapies.

  19. [Effect of barnidipine hydrochloride on the autonomic nervous system: difference between short- and long-acting components of calcium antagonist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soejima, K; Akaishi, M; Oyamada, K; Mitamura, H; Ogawa, S

    1997-07-01

    Short-acting calcium antagonists have a deleterious effect on the prognosis for patients with myocardial ischemia, possibly caused by overactivation of sympathetic nerves due to vasodilatation, negative inotropism, or coronary steal. However, there is considerable debate about whether long-acting calcium antagonists as well as the short-acting calcium antagonists have the same effect. Barnidipine-HCl is a newly-developed calcium antagonist with 1:2 short- and long-acting particles. This study evaluated the changes of autonomic tone due to barnidipine. Both the short- and long-acting effect of the calcium antagonist was evaluated. Eleven patients with primary hypertension underwent 24-hour ambulatory electrocardiogram and blood pressure monitoring before and after the treatment with barnidipine. Heart rate and blood pressure were compared before and after the medication. Heart rate variability was analyzed with a Marquette 8000/T. High frequency power (HF), as a parameter of vagal tone, and the ratio to low frequency power (LF), as a parameter of sympathetic tone, were obtained. Twenty-four-hour average blood pressure decreased significantly during the day, but nocturnal hypotension was not observed. Heart rate did not increase. HF decreased at the peak of the short- and long-acting components. LF/HF increased at the peak of the short-acting component. Short-acting particles of barnidipine had a deleterious effect on the autonomic tone, that is overactivation of sympathetic tone and suppression of vagal tone. Long-acting particles of barnidipine suppressed the vagal tone. These findings suggest that short-acting calcium antagonists may cause arrhythmia or deterioration of coronary ischemia.

  20. Anesthetic effects of a three-drugs mixture--comparison of administrative routes and antagonistic effects of atipamezole in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirihara, Yumiko; Takechi, Mayumi; Kurosaki, Kaoru; Kobayashi, Yuta; Saito, Yoji; Takeuchi, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The anesthetic mixture of medetomidine (MED), midazolam (MID) and butorphanol (BUT) produced anesthetic duration of around 40 minutes (min) in ICR mice. We reported that this anesthetic mixture produced almost the same anesthetic effects in both male and female BALB/c and C57BL/6J strains. Intraperitoneal (IP) administration of drugs has been widely used in mice. However, various injectable routes of the anesthetic mixture may cause different anesthetic effects. First, we examined effects of the anesthetic mixture by subcutaneous (SC) and intravenous (IV) injection compared to IP injection. After injection of the anesthetic mixture, administration of atipamezole (ATI) induced mice recovery from anesthesia. Secondly, we examined how different dosage and optimum injection timing of ATI affected mice recovery from anesthesia. We used an anesthetic score to measure anesthetic duration and a pulse oximeter to monitor vital signs under anesthesia. Usually, drugs from SC injection work more weakly than IP or IV injection. However, we found no significant differences of anesthetic duration among the three different injection routes. Antagonistic effects of ATI (0.3 mg/kg and 1.5 mg/kg) worked equally when administered at 30 min after injection of the anesthetic mixture. Antagonistic effects of ATI (1.5 mg/kg) were stronger than ATI (0.3 mg/kg) at 10 min after injection of the anesthetic mixture. The anesthetic mixture is a useful drug to induce nearly the same anesthetic effects by different injection routes and has an antagonist of ATI which helps mice quickly recover from anesthesia. These results may contribute to the welfare of laboratory animals.

  1. Effects of chronic treatment with two selective 5-HT2 antagonists on sleep in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastel, R H; Echevarria, E; Cox, B; Blackburn, T P; Tortella, F C

    1993-04-01

    The effect of chronic administration of 2(2-dimethylaminoethylthio)-3-phenylquinoline (ICI-169,369) and 2(2-dimethylamino-2-methylpropylthio)-3-phenylquinoline (ICI-170,809), two selective 5-HT2 antagonists, on sleep was studied in rats. As previously shown, the acute effect of ICI-170,809 was to increase latency to rapid eye movement sleep (REMS), decrease the number of REM periods (REMPs), suppress the cumulative amount of REMS over 12 h, and increase the duration of REMPs in the first 6 h, while having no effect on non-REM sleep (NREMS). Administration of ICI-169,369 had similar effects except no change was seen in the duration of REMPs and cumulative REMS was suppressed for 24 h. When given 2 x daily for 5 days, tolerance to the REMS suppressant effects developed in both drugs. After discontinuation of treatment, a REMS rebound occurred after ICI-170,809, but not ICI-169,369. No significant effect on NREMS was seen after administration of ICI-170,809, whereas ICI-169,369 lowered 24-h cumulative NREMS on the fifth day of administration.

  2. Dissociable effects of histamine H1 antagonists on reaction-time performance in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blokland, A; Scholtissen, B; Vermeeren, A; Ramaekers, J

    2001-01-01

    The most pronounced side effect of antiallergic histaminergic drugs (H1 antagonists) is sedation. These effects have been linked with the effects of histaminergic drugs on central H1 receptors. In the present study, we investigated the dose-response relationship of different antihistamines on the performance in a reaction-time task that has been developed for rats. The dose-response relationship of diphenhydramine, cetirizine and terfenadine were examined for the various behavioural measures in this task (i.e., reaction time, motor time, premature responses and number of trials completed). In addition, the effects of scopolamine were assessed to evaluate the cholinergic profile in this task. Diphenhydramine did not reliably affect the reaction time, but increased the motor time and the proportion of premature responses, and decreased the number of trials completed in a session. A low dose of cetirizine decreased the reaction time, whereas an increase in reaction time was found for the high dose. The motor time was increased after both doses of cetirizine. Terfenadine did not affect the responding of rats in the reaction-time task at the doses tested. The effects of scopolamine were very similar to those of diphenhydramine. The reaction-time task used in this study was able to dissociate different types of antihistamines on aspects of psychomotor function, which were likely to be related to central muscarinic or H1 antagonism. These findings suggest that the reaction-time task may be a sensitive tool for assessing effects of drugs on psychomotor function.

  3. Effect of the NMDA antagonist MK-801 on latent inhibition of fear conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverso, Luis M; Ruiz, Gabriel; De la Casa, Luis G

    2012-10-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors seem to play a central role in learning and memory processes involved in Latent Inhibition (LI). In fact, MK-801, a non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, has proved its effectiveness as a drug for attenuating LI when administered before or after stimulus preexposure and conditioning stages. This paper presents three experiments designed to analyze the effect of MK-801 on LI when the drug is administered before (Experiment 1A) or after (Experiment 1B) preexposure and conditioning stages with a conditioned emotional response procedure. Additionally, we analyze the effect of the drug when it was administered before preexposure, before conditioning or before both phases (Experiment 2). The results show that the effect of the drug varied as a function of the dose (with only the highest dose being effective), the moment of administration (with only the drug administered before the experimental treatments being effective), and the phase of procedure (reducing LI when the drug was administered only at preexposure, and disrupting fear conditioning when administered at conditioning). These differences may be due to several factors ranging from the role played by NMDA receptors in the processing of stimuli of different sensorial modalities to the molecular processes triggered by drug administration.

  4. Anxiolytic-like effects of mGlu1 and mGlu5 receptor antagonists in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietraszek, Małgorzata; Sukhanov, Ilia; Maciejak, Piotr; Szyndler, Janusz; Gravius, Andreas; Wisłowska, Aleksandra; Płaźnik, Adam; Bespalov, Anton Y; Danysz, Wojciech

    2005-05-02

    The purpose of the present study was to compare anxiolytic activity of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGlu) antagonist, EMQMCM ((3-ethyl-2-methyl-quinolin-6-yl)-(4-methoxy-cyclohexyl)-methanone methanesulfonate) and the mGlu5 receptor antagonist MTEP ([(2-methyl-1,3-thiazol-4-yl)ethynyl]pyridine) and MPEP (2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine) in animal models of anxiety. In the elevated plus maze, diazepam (1 mg/kg), but not the mGlu1 or mGlu5 receptor antagonists induced anxiolytic-like effects. Meanwhile, MTEP (2.5 and 5 mg/kg), EMQMCM (5 mg/kg), and diazepam (2 mg/kg) all significantly inhibited fear potentiated startle. In the contextual fear conditioning test, MTEP (1.25 and 2.5 but not 5 mg/kg) and EMQMCM (0.6 to 5 mg/kg) attenuated freezing responding. In the Geller-Seifter conflict test, MPEP (1 and 3 mg/kg), MTEP (3 mg/kg), chlordiazepoxide (10 and 20 mg/kg) and midazolam (1 mg/kg) all facilitated punished responding, while ECMQCM failed to produce any significant effects up to 3 mg/kg dose. To summarise, the present data further support a significant anxiolytic potential of group I mGlu receptor antagonists, while suggesting the effects of mGlu1 receptor antagonists may depend on the experimental procedure and may be qualitatively different from those of mGlu5 receptor antagonists.

  5. Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction: The effects of montelukast, a leukotriene receptor antagonist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P Kemp

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available James P KempClinical Professor of Pediatrics, Division of Immunology and Allergy, University of California School of Medicine, San Diego, CA, USAAbstract: Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB is very common in both patients with asthma and those who are otherwise thought to be normal. The intensity of exercise as well as the type of exercise is important in producing symptoms. This may make some types of exercise such as swimming more suitable and extended running more difficult for patients with this condition. A better understanding of EIB will allow the physician to direct the patient towards a type of exercise and medications that can result in a more active lifestyle without the same concern for resulting symptoms. This is especially important for schoolchildren who are usually enrolled in physical education classes and elite athletes who may desire to participate in competitive sports. Fortunately several medications (short- and long-acting β2-agonists, cromolyn, nedocromil, inhaled corticosteroids, and more recently leukotriene modifiers have been shown to be effective in preventing or attenuating the effects of exercise in many patients. In addition, inhaled β2-agonists have been shown to quickly reverse the airway obstruction that develops in patients and continue to be the reliever medications of choice. Inhaled corticosteroids are increasingly being recommended as regular therapy now that the role of inflammation and airway injury has been identified in EIB. With the discovery that there is a release of mediators such as histamine and leukotrienes from cells in the airway following exercise with resulting airway obstruction in susceptible individuals, interest has turned to attenuating their effects with mediator antagonists especially those that block the effects of leukotrienes. Studies with an oral leukotriene antagonist, montelukast, have shown beneficial effects in adults and children aged as young as 6 years with EIB

  6. Immune regulatory effects of simvastatin on regulatory T cell-mediated tumour immune tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K J; Moon, J Y; Choi, H K; Kim, H O; Hur, G Y; Jung, K H; Lee, S Y; Kim, J H; Shin, C; Shim, J J; In, K H; Yoo, S H; Kang, K H; Lee, S Y

    2010-08-01

    Statins are potent inhibitors of hydroxyl-3-methylglutaryl co-enzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, and have emerged as potential anti-cancer agents based on preclinical evidence. In particular, compelling evidence suggests that statins have a wide range of immunomodulatory properties. However, little is known about the role of statins in tumour immune tolerance. Tumour immune tolerance involves the production of immunosuppressive molecules, such as interleukin (IL)-10, transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta and indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) by tumours, which induce a regulatory T cell (T(reg)) response. In this study, we investigated the effect of simvastatin on the production of IL-10, TGF-beta and IDO production and the proliferation of T(regs) using several cancer cell lines, and Lewis lung cancer (3LL) cells-inoculated mouse tumour model. Simvastatin treatment resulted in a decrease in the number of cancer cells (3LL, A549 and NCI-H292). The production of the immune regulatory markers IL-10, TGF-beta in 3LL and NCI-H292 cells increased after treatment with simvastatin. The expression of IDO and forkhead box P3 (FoxP3) transcription factor was also increased in the presence of simvastatin. In a murine 3LL model, there were no significant differences in tumour growth rate between untreated and simvastatin-treated mice groups. Therefore, while simvastatin had an anti-proliferative effect, it also exhibited immune tolerance-promoting properties during tumour development. Thus, due to these opposing actions, simvastatin had no net effect on tumour growth.

  7. The effect of luteal phase gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist administration on IVF outcomes in women at risk of OHSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eftekhar, Maryam; Miraj, Sepideh; Mortazavifar, Zahrasadat

    2016-01-01

    Background: Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) plays essential roles in embryo implantation, invasion of trophoblastic tissue, and steroid synthesis in the placenta. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of GnRH antagonist administration on pregnancy outcomes in early implantation period. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, 94 infertile women undergoing GnRH antagonist protocol who were at risk of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) were included. Sixty-seven patients (group I) received Cetrorelix 0.25 mg/daily in the luteal phase for 3 days while in 27 participants (group II), it was not administered. Pregnancy outcomes were assessed based on chemical and clinical pregnancy rates. Results: The pregnancy outcomes were not significantly different between two groups (p=0.224). Conclusion: The present study proposed that luteal phase GnRH antagonist administration does not influence the chance of successful pregnancy outcomes. PMID:27679825

  8. Antagonistic effects of Satureja hortensis essential oil against AFB1 on human lymphocytes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceker, S; Agar, G; Alpsoy, L; Nardemir, G; Kizil, H E

    2014-01-01

    Satureja hortensis L. (Lamiaceae) has been used as a folk remedy to treat various such as cramps, muscle pains, nausea, indigestion, diarrhea, and infectious diseases. In this study, the antagonistic effects of essential oil of S. hortensis (SHE) were studied against aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) in human lymphocytes in vitro. The analysis of the essential oil was performed by using Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Anti-genotoxic effects of the SHEs was evaluated using sister chromatid exchange (SCE), micronuclei (MN) tests against AFB1. Also level of malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities used to determine the anti-oxidative effects of the SHEs. This result showed AFB1 (5 microM) increased the frequencies of SCE, MN and the level of MDA. AFB1 at the same concentration decreased the activities of SOD and GPx. However, different concentrations of SHE with AFB1 decreased the frequency of SCE and MN and level of MDA and also increased the activities of SOD and GPx significantly. Especially, the 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 microL dose of SHE are more effective than other doses. The results of this experiment have clearly shown that SHE has strong antioxidative and antigenotoxic effects, these biological activities of SHEs can be due to its component.

  9. The inability of CCK to block (or CCK antagonists to substitute for) the stimulus effects of chlordiazepoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, M A; Levine, E S; Riley, A L

    2001-01-01

    To further examine the relationship between cholecystokinin (CCK) and GABA, the present study assessed the ability of the CCK-A antagonist devazepide and the CCK-B antagonist L-365,260 to substitute for the stimulus effects of chlordiazepoxide (CDP), as well as the ability of CCK-8s to block these effects, in female Long-Evans rats within the conditioned taste aversion baseline of drug discrimination learning. Both devazepide and L-365,260 failed to substitute for the discriminative stimulus properties of CDP, and CCK-8s failed to block its stimulus effects. The benzodiazepine diazepam did substitute for, and the benzodiazepine antagonist flumazenil did block, the stimulus effects of CDP. This suggests that the lack of substitution for, or antagonism of, CDP by the CCK antagonists and CCK-8s, respectively, was not due to the inability of the present design to assess such effects. Possible bases for the current findings, e.g., necessity of an anxiogenic baseline, drug and receptor specificity, as well as the dose-response nature of the interaction, were discussed. Given that a relationship between CCK and GABA has been reported in other designs, the present results suggest that such a relationship may be preparation specific.

  10. Effects of Static and Dynamic Stretching on the Isokinetic Peak Torques and Electromyographic Activities of the Antagonist Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serefoglu, Abdullah; Sekir, Ufuk; Gür, Hakan; Akova, Bedrettin

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if static and dynamic stretching exercises of the knee muscles (quadriceps and hamstring muscles) have any effects on concentric and eccentric isokinetic peak torques and electromyographic amplitudes (EMG) of the antagonist muscles. Twenty healthy male athletes (age between 18-30 years) voluntarily participated in this study. All of the subjects visited the laboratory to complete the following intervention in a randomized order on 5 separate days; (a) non-stretching (control), (b) static stretching of the quadriceps muscles, (c) static stretching of the hamstring muscles, (d) dynamic stretching of the quadriceps muscles, and (e) dynamic stretching of the hamstring muscles. Static stretching exercises either for the quadriceps or the hamstring muscles were carried out at the standing and sitting positions. Subjects performed four successive repetitions of each stretching exercises for 30 seconds in both stretching positions. Similar to static stretching exercises two different stretching modes were designed for dynamic stretching exercises. Concentric and eccentric isokinetic peak torque for the non-stretched antagonist quadriceps or hamstring muscles at angular velocities of 60°/sec and 240°/sec and their concurrent electromyographic (EMG) activities were measured before and immediately after the intervention. Isokinetic peak torques of the non-stretched agonist hamstring and quadriceps muscles did not represent any significant (p > 0.05) differences following static and dynamic stretching of the antagonist quadriceps and hamstring muscles, respectively. Similarly, the EMG activities of the agonist muscles exhibited no significant alterations (p > 0.05) following both stretching exercises of the antagonist muscles. According to the results of the present study it is possible to state that antagonist stretching exercises either in the static or dynamic modes do not affect the isokinetic peak torques and the EMG activities

  11. Saccharide-mediated antagonistic effects of bark beetle fungal associates on larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Lu, Min; Cheng, Chihang; Salcedo, Christian; Sun, Jianghua

    2013-02-23

    Bark beetles are among the most destructive of pine forest pests and they form close symbiotic relationships with ophiostomatoid fungi. Although some fungi are considered to be mutualistic symbionts of bark beetles with respect to the supply of nutrients, detrimental effects of fungal symbionts on larval growth have also been frequently reported. The mechanisms of such antagonistic effects are hypothesized to be a decrease in nutritional resources caused by competition for saccharides by the fungi. Here, we provide experimental evidence that three beetle-associated fungi modify the nutritional content of an artificial phloem diet, leading to a detrimental effect on the growth of Dendroctonus valens larvae. When larvae were fed a diet of pine phloem in agar medium colonized with any of these fungi, feeding activity was not affected but weight significantly decreased. Additional analysis showed that fungi depleted the fructose and glucose concentrations in the phloem media. Furthermore, these detrimental effects were neutralized by supplementing the media with fructose or glucose, suggesting that fungi may affect larval growth by modifying diet saccharide contents. These data indicate that fungus-induced nutritional changes in bark beetle diet can affect larval growth, and that the mechanism involves fungus-induced saccharide depletion from the larval diet.

  12. How synergistic or antagonistic effects may influence the mutual hazard ranking of chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Carlsen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The presence of various agents, including humic materials, nanomaterials, microplastics, or simply specific chemical compounds, may cause changes in the apparent persistence, bioaccumulation, and/or toxicity (PBT of a chemical compound leading to an either increased or decreased PBT characteristics and thus an increased or decreased hazard evaluation. In the present paper, a series chloro-containing obsolete pesticides is studied as an illustrative example. Partial order methodology is used to quantify how changed P, B, or T characteristics of methoxychlor (MEC influences the measure of the hazard of MEC, relative to the other 11 compounds in the series investigated. Not surprisingly, an increase in one of the three indicators (P, B, or T lead to an increased average order and thus an increased relative hazard as a result of a synergistic effect. A decrease in one of the indicator values analogously causes a decreased average order/relative hazard through an antagonistic effect; the effect, however, being less pronounced. It is further seen that the effect of changing the apparent value of the three indicators is different. Thus, persistence apparently is more important that bioaccumulation which again appears more important than toxicity, which is in agreement with previous work. The results are discussed with reference to the European chemicals framework on registration, evaluation and authorization of chemicals (REACH framework.

  13. Effect of piboserod, a 5-HT4 serotonin receptor antagonist, on left ventricular function in patients with symptomatic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Inge C; Kjekshus, John K; Torp-Pedersen, Christian;

    2009-01-01

    AIMS: Myocardial 5-HT(4) serotonin (5-HT) receptors are increased and activated in heart failure (HF). Blockade of 5-HT(4) receptors reduced left ventricular (LV) remodelling in HF rats. We evaluated the effect of piboserod, a potent, selective, 5-HT(4) serotonin receptor antagonist, on LV function...

  14. THE AUTOCRINE REGULATORY EFFECT OF VASOACTIVE INTESTINAL PEPTIDE ON THE GROWTH OF HUMAN PANCREATIC CARCINOMA CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈元方; 陈潜; 陆国钧; 范振符; 钟守先

    1994-01-01

    In the present study, the effets of VIP on the growth of two human pancreatic carcinoma cell lines PU-PAH-1 and PANC-1 were determined using tritiated thymidine incorporation, VIP receptors, intracellular cAMP and polyamings were investlsa.ted, The results indicated that VIP at a concentcation of 10-8mol/L to 10-7 mol/L can significantly Stimulate the growth of PU-PAN-1 cells but not PANC-1 cells, This effect is dose-dependent and abolished by VIP receptor antagonist, [4-CI-Phe6 , Leu7] VIP, suggesting VIP receptors in PU-PAN-1 cells maymediate this effect. VIP can markedly elevate the levels of intracellular cAMP and polyammes in PU-PAN-1 cells,indicating that the growth-promoting effect stimulated by VIP may be via a rapid increase in the biosynth~es of cAMP and polyamines. In addition, the VIP-antibody ir2Libited the growth of PU-PAN-1 cells in serum-free culture medium. The results above suggested that VIP has an autoctine regulatory effect on this pancreatic carcinoma cell line(PU-PAN-1).

  15. The incentive amplifying effects of nicotine are reduced by selective and non-selective dopamine antagonists in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmatier, Matthew I; Kellicut, Marissa R; Brianna Sheppard, A; Brown, Russell W; Robinson, Donita L

    2014-11-01

    Nicotine is a psychomotor stimulant with 'reinforcement enhancing' effects--the actions of nicotine in the brain increase responding for non-nicotine rewards. We hypothesized that this latter effect of nicotine depends on increased incentive properties of anticipatory cues; consistent with this hypothesis, multiple laboratories have reported that nicotine increases sign tracking, i.e. approach to a conditioned stimulus (CS), in Pavlovian conditioned-approach tasks. Incentive motivation and sign tracking are mediated by mesolimbic dopamine (DA) transmission and nicotine facilitates mesolimbic DA release. Therefore, we hypothesized that the incentive-promoting effects of nicotine would be impaired by DA antagonists. To test this hypothesis, separate groups of rats were injected with nicotine (0.4mg/kg base) or saline prior to Pavlovian conditioning sessions in which a CS (30s illumination of a light or presentation of a lever) was immediately followed by a sweet reward delivered in an adjacent location. Both saline and nicotine pretreated rats exhibited similar levels of conditioned approach to the reward location (goal tracking), but nicotine pretreatment significantly increased approach to the CS (sign tracking), regardless of type (lever or light). The DAD1 antagonist SCH-23390 and the DAD2/3 antagonist eticlopride reduced conditioned approach in all rats, but specifically reduced goal tracking in the saline pretreated rats and sign tracking in the nicotine pretreated rats. The non-selective DA antagonist flupenthixol reduced sign-tracking in nicotine rats at all doses tested; however, only the highest dose of flupenthixol reduced goal tracking in both nicotine and saline groups. The reductions in conditioned approach behavior, especially those by SCH-23390, were dissociated from simple motor suppressant effects of the antagonists. These experiments are the first to investigate the effects of dopaminergic drugs on the facilitation of sign-tracking engendered by

  16. Anti-arrhythmic and electrophysiological effects of the endothelin receptor antagonists, BQ-123 and PD161721.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crockett, T R; Scott, G A; McGowan, N W; Kane, K A; Wainwright, C L

    2001-11-30

    The effects of the endothelin ET(A), (BQ-123) and endothelin ET(A/B) (PD161721) receptor antagonists were investigated on ischaemia-induced arrhythmias and on the maximum following frequency. The study was carried out in Langendorff perfused rat hearts subjected to coronary artery occlusion in which the severity of arrhythmias, coronary perfusion pressure and heart rate were measured. The % incidence of ischaemia-induced irreversible ventricular fibrillation (ventricular fibrillation) was reduced significantly from 58%, in control rat hearts, to 0% (at 10(-7) and 10(-6) M PD161721 and 10(-6) M BQ-123 PHz, respectively (PHz) than in normal [K(+)] (from 9.0+/-0.3 to 4.9+/-0.5 Hz). In conclusion, both BQ-123 and PD161721 had an anti-fibrillatory effect in isolated rat hearts that may be due, at least in part, to an ability to reduce the maximum following frequency. This latter effect is unlikely to be due to Na(+) channel blockade since it was not markedly potentiated by elevation of extracellular [K(+)].

  17. Effects of 2,3-benzodiazepine AMPA receptor antagonists on dopamine turnover in the striatum of rats with experimental parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megyeri, Katalin; Marko, Bernadett; Sziray, Nora; Gacsalyi, Istvan; Juranyi, Zsolt; Levay, Gyorgy; Harsing, Laszlo G

    2007-03-15

    Although levodopa is the current "gold standard" for treatment of Parkinson's disease, there has been disputation on whether AMPA receptor antagonists can be used as adjuvant therapy to improve the effects of levodopa. Systemic administration of levodopa, the precursor of dopamine, increases brain dopamine turnover rate and this elevated turnover is believed to be essential for successful treatment of Parkinson's disease. However, long-term treatment of patients with levodopa often leads to development of dyskinesia. Therefore, drugs that feature potentiation of dopamine turnover rate and are able to reduce daily levodopa dosages might be used as adjuvant in the treatment of patients suffering from Parkinson's disease. To investigate such combined treatment, we have examined the effects of two non-competitive AMPA receptor antagonists, GYKI-52466 and GYKI-53405, alone or in combination with levodopa on dopamine turnover rate in 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned striatum of the rat. We found here that repeated administration of levodopa, added with the peripheral DOPA decarboxylase inhibitor carbidopa, increased dopamine turnover rate after lesioning the striatum with 6-hydroxydopamine. Moreover, combination of levodopa with GYKI-52466 or GYKI-53405 further increased dopamine turnover enhanced by levodopa administration while the AMPA receptor antagonists by themselves failed to influence striatal dopamine turnover. We concluded from the present data that potentiation observed between levodopa and AMPA receptor antagonists may reflect levodopa-sparing effects in clinical treatment indicating the therapeutic potential of such combination in the management of Parkinson's disease.

  18. Antagonistic effect of Lactobacillus strains against gas-producing coliforms isolated from colicky infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oggero Roberto

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infantile colic is a common disturb within the first 3 months of life, nevertheless the pathogenesis is incompletely understood and treatment remains an open issue. Intestinal gas production is thought to be one of the causes of abdominal discomfort in infants suffering from colic. However, data about the role of the amount of gas produced by infants' colonic microbiota and the correlation with the onset of colic symptoms are scanty. The benefit of supplementation with lactobacilli been recently reported but the mechanisms by which they exert their effects have not yet been fully defined. This study was performed to evaluate the interaction between Lactobacillus spp. strains and gas-forming coliforms isolated from stools of colicky infants. Results Strains of coliforms were isolated from stools of 45 colicky and 42 control breastfed infants in McConkey Agar and identified using PCR with species-specific primers, and the BBL™ Enterotube™ II system for Enterobacteriaceae. Gas-forming capability of coliforms was assessed in liquid cultures containing lactose as sole carbon source. The average count of total coliforms in colicky infants was significantly higher than controls: 5.98 (2.00-8.76 log10 vs 3.90 (2.50-7.10 CFU/g of faeces (p = 0.015. The following strains were identified: Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Klebsiella oxytoca, Enterobacter aerogenes, Enterobacter cloacae and Enterococcus faecalis. Then, 27 Lactobacillus strains were tested for their antagonistic effect against coliforms both by halo-forming method and in liquid co-cultures. Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp.delbrueckii DSM 20074 and L. plantarum MB 456 were able to inhibit all coliforms strains (halo-forming method, also in liquid co-cultures, thus demonstrating an antagonistic activity. Conclusions This study shows that two out of 27 strains of Lactobacillus examined possess an antimicrobial effect against six species of gas-forming coliforms

  19. Effects of β2-Adrenergic Antagonist on Cytosolic Ca2+ in Ventricular Myocytes from Infarcted Rat Heart

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Hui; Wu Wei; Zeng Chong; Deng Chunyu; Fang Chang; Chen Shanming

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the effects of β2-adrenergic antagonist on cytosolic Ca2 +([Ca2+]i) in ventricular myocytes from infarcted rat heart. Methods A ligature was placed around left anterior descending coronary artery of rat hearts. Rats in the control group were sham-operated.Cardiomyocytes were dissociated at two, four, eight weeks after myocardial infarction (MI) and [Ca2+]i was measured via fura-2 fluorescence. The response of cardiomyocytes to isoproterenol in presence or absenceof beta1-adrenergic antagonist atenolol, beta2-adrenergic antagonist ICI118, 551 or non-selective β1,2- adrenergic antagonists propranolol was examined.Results The followings were found that ICI11 8, 551 had no significant effects on the rise of [Ca2+]i induced by isoproterenol in normal ventricular myocytes (P >0.05), ICI118, 551 only significantly attenuated the rise of [Ca2+]i induced by isoproterenol at four weeks and eight weeks after MI (24.5% ±5.7% vs 57.8% ±13.2%, P< 0.01; 12.2%±7.9% vs 44.6%±11.3%, P<0.01). Atenolol had suppressive effects only in the control group and the post-MI group of two weeks (P<0.05), and propranolol had suppressive effects in the control and all the three post-MI groups (P<0.01).Conclusions Beta2-adrenergic antagonist ICI118,551 may exert negative effects on Ca2+ overload initiated by sympathetic stimulation after MI.

  20. Darpp-32 and its truncated variant t-Darpp have antagonistic effects on breast cancer cell growth and herceptin resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Gu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Herceptin (trastuzumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that is approved for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer patients whose tumors overexpress Her2 (erbB2/neu. Up to 70% of Her2-positive breast cancers demonstrate a response to Herceptin-based therapies, but resistance almost inevitably arises within a year of the initial response. To help understand the mechanism of Herceptin resistance, we isolated clonal variants of Her2-positive BT474 human breast cancer cells (BT/Her(R that are highly resistant to Herceptin. These cell lines exhibit sustained PI3K/Akt signaling as an essential component of Herceptin-resistant proliferation. Several genes in the protein kinase A (PKA signaling network have altered expression in BT/Her(R cells, including PPP1R1B, which encodes a 32 kDa protein known as Darpp-32 and its amino-terminal truncated variant, t-Darpp. The purpose of the current work was to determine the role of Darpp-32 and t-Darpp in Herceptin resistance. METHODOLOGY AND RESULTS: We determined expression of Darpp-32 and t-Darpp in BT/Her(R cells selected for resistance to Herceptin. Subsequently, cDNAs encoding the two isoforms of Darpp-32 were transfected, separately and together, into Her2-positive SK-Br-3 breast cancer cells. Transfected cells were tested for resistance to Herceptin and Herceptin-mediated dephosphorylation of Akt. DNA binding activity by the cAMP response element binding protein (CREB was also measured. We found that BT/Her(R cells overexpressed t-Darpp but not Darpp-32. Moreover, t-Darpp overexpression in SK-Br-3 cells was sufficient for conferring resistance to Herceptin and Herceptin-mediated dephosphorylation of Akt. Darpp-32 co-expression reversed t-Darpp's effects on Herceptin resistance and Akt phosphorylation. t-Darpp overexpression led to increased CREB binding activity, which was also reversible by Darpp-32. CONCLUSIONS: t-Darpp and Darpp-32 appear to have antagonistic effects on Herceptin

  1. Effects of ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists on rat dural artery diameter in an intravital microscopy model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, K Y; Gupta, S; de Vries, R;

    2010-01-01

    studies have shown that glutamate receptor antagonists affect the pathophysiology of migraine. This study investigated whether antagonists of NMDA (ketamine and MK801), AMPA (GYKI52466) and kainate (LY466195) glutamate receptors affected dural vasodilatation induced by alpha-CGRP, capsaicin......During migraine, trigeminal nerves may release calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), inducing cranial vasodilatation and central nociception; hence, trigeminal inhibition or blockade of craniovascular CGRP receptors may prevent this vasodilatation and abort migraine headache. Several preclinical...

  2. Effects of H1–receptor antagonists in antidepressant tests in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Chitra C. Khanwelkar

    2008-01-01

    : Considering the vast data suggesting the role of brain histamine(HA) in behaviour,emotions,anxiety and depression;four H1-receptor antagonists; promethazine, diphenhydramine, cyclizine and pheniramine were subjected to antidepressant tests in rats. All H1 – antagonists behaved like antidepressants in animal tests. They antagonized reserpine induced catalepsy, potentiated methamphetamine induced stereotypy and reduced the period of immobility in Porsolt’s behavioural despair test. It is sug...

  3. Antidepressant-like effects of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists, but not agonists, in the mouse forced swim and mouse tail suspension tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen T., Jesper; Olsen, G M; Wiborg, O;

    2009-01-01

    AChR subtype/s involved remains unknown. In this study, we systematically compared the effects of non-selective and selective nicotinic agonists and antagonists in two different tests for antidepressant effects in mice: the tail suspension test and the forced swim test. Compounds: nicotine, RJR-2403 (alpha4......beta2-selective agonist), PNU-282987 (alpha7-selective agonist), mecamylamine (non-selective antagonist), dihydro-beta-erythroidine (DHbetaE; alpha4beta2-selective antagonist), methyllycaconitine (MLA; alpha7-selective antagonist) and hexamethonium (non-brain-penetrant non-selective antagonist). All...... compounds were tested in a locomotor activity paradigm to rule out non-specific stimulant effects. The data show that blockade of nAChRs with mecamylamine, or selective antagonism of alpha4beta2 or alpha7 nAChRs with DHbetaE or MLA, respectively, has antidepressant-like effects. These effects were...

  4. Effect of GABAB Receptor Antagonist (CGP35348 on Learning and Memory in Albino Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quratulane Gillani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to demonstrate the potential effect of CGP 35348 (GABAB receptor antagonist on the learning, memory formation, and neuromuscular coordination in albino mouse. Mice were intrapertoneally injected with 1 mg CGP 35348/mL of distilled water/Kg body weight, while the control animals were injected with equal volume of saline solution. A battery of neurological tests was applied following the intrapertoneal injections. Results of rota rod indicated that CGP 35348 had no effect on neuromuscular coordination in both male (P=0.528 and female (P=0.125 albino mice. CGP 35348 treated females demonstrated poor exploratory behavior during open filed for several parameters (time mobile (P=0.04, time immobile (P=0.04, rotations (P=0.04, and anticlockwise rotations (P=0.038. The results for Morris water maze (MWM retention phase indicated that CGP 35348 treated male mice took shorter latency to reach the hidden platform (P=0.04 than control indicating improved memory. This observation was complemented by the swim strategies used by mice during training days in MWM as CGP 35348 treated males used more direct and focal approach to reach the platform as the training proceeded.

  5. STUDY ON THE ANTAGONISTIC EFFECT OF ACUPUNCTURE OF SHUIGOU (GV 26) UPON VENOUS ANESTHESIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To observe the antagonistic effect of acupuncture of Shuigou (水沟 GV 26) on intravenous anesthesia for surgical operation. Methods: Forty patients received intravenous anesthesia were randomly and evenly divided into treatment group and control group. At the termination of anesthesia, Shuigou (GV 26) was needled for patients in treatment group, in control group patients aroused spontaneously. Recovery degrees of every patient were assessed by using modified Robertzon Scoring Scale. Results: Results showed that from the 6th min on, the scores of treatment group were significantly bigger than those of control group (6 min: 5.3±0.42 vs 3.2±0.33, P<0.05; 15 min: 13.7±0.32 vs 8.23±0.77, P<0.01), suggesting that the recovery of the patient's consciousness of treatment group was markedly quicker than that of control group. Conclusion: Puncturing Shuigou (GV 26) can hasten the patient's arousal from postoperative anesthesia and thus may be used as an effective remedy for resisting the aftereffects of intravenous anesthetics.

  6. Food safety regulatory systems in Europe and China:A study of how co-regulation can improve regulatory effectiveness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kevin Chen; WANG Xin-xin; SONG Hai-ying

    2015-01-01

    Food safety has received a great deal of attention in both developed and developing countries in recent years. In China, the numerous food scandals and scares that have struck over the past decade have spurred signiifcant food safety regulatory reform, which has been increasingly oriented towards the public-private partnership model adopted by the Europe Union’s (EU) food safety regulatory system. This paper analyzes the development of both the EU’s and China’s food safety regu-latory systems, identiifes the current chalenges for China and additionaly considers the role of public-private partnership. The success of co-regulation in the food regulatory system would bring signiifcant beneifts and opportunities for China. Finaly, this paper recommends additional measures like training and grants to improve the private’s sector effectiveness in co-regulating China’s food safety issues.

  7. Effect of leukotriene receptor antagonists on vascular permeability during endotoxic shock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, J.A.; Li, E.J.; Spicer, K.M.; Wise, W.C.; Halushka, P.V. (Medical Univ. of South Carolina, Charleston (USA))

    1990-11-01

    Evidence has accumulated that sulfidopeptide leukotrienes are significant pathogenic mediators of certain hematologic and hemodynamic sequelae of endotoxic shock. In the present study, the effects of a selective LTD4/E4 receptor antagonist, LY171883 (LY), or a selective LTD4 receptor antagonist, SKF-104353 (SKF), were assessed on splanchnic and pulmonary localization of 99mTechnetium-labeled human serum albumin (99mTc-HSA) in acute endotoxic shock in the rat. Dynamic gamma camera imaging of heart (H), midabdominal (GI), and lung regions of interest generated time activity curves for baseline and at 5-35 min after Salmonella enteritidis endotoxin (10 mg/kg, i.v.). Slopes of GI/H and lung/H activity (permeability index, GI/H or lung/H X 10(-3)/min) provided indices of intestinal and lung localization. Rats received LY (30 mg/kg, i.v.), LY vehicle (LY Veh), SKF (10 mg/kg), or SKF vehicle (SK Veh) 10 min prior to endotoxin or endotoxin vehicle. In rats receiving the LY Veh and endotoxin (n = 8) or SKF Veh and endotoxin (n = 12), the splanchnic permeability indices to 99mTc-HSA were increased 11.2-fold and 5.1-fold, respectively (P less than 0.05) compared to vehicle control groups not given endotoxin (n = 5). Pulmonary permeability index for 99mTc-HSA was increased (P less than 0.05) to a lesser extent (3.2-fold) by endotoxin compared to vehicle controls. Pretreatment with SKF reduced the mesenteric permeability index to control levels (P less than 0.05) during the 5-35 min time interval post-endotoxin. LY reduced the mesenteric permeability index by 70%. Pulmonary relative permeability to 99mTc-HSA was not affected by LY pretreatment. Both splanchnic and lung relative permeability to the isotope was transient; at 135-225 min post-endotoxin, splanchnic localization of 99mTc-HSA (n = 4) was not significantly different from vehicle controls in these vascular beds.

  8. Effects of caerulein and CCK antagonists on tolerance induced to morphine antinociception in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrindast, M R; Zabihi, A; Rezayat, M; Rakhshandeh, H; Ghazi-Khansari, M; Hosseini, R

    1997-09-01

    Different groups of mice received one daily dose (50 mg/kg) of morphine subcutaneously (SC) for 3, 4 or 5 days to develop tolerance to the opioid. The antinociceptive response of morphine (9 mg/kg) was tested in the hot-plate test 24 h after the last dose of the drug. Tolerance to morphine was obtained in all groups. The group of mice that received morphine for 4 days was employed for the rest of the experiments. Pretreatment of animals with a single dose of caerulein (0.025, 0.05, and 0.1 mg/kg, SC) 30 min prior to receiving morphine (50 mg/kg; during the development of tolerance to the opioid) on day 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5 of morphine administration potentiate antinociception induced by morphine (test dose of 9 mg/kg). The dose of 0.05 mg/kg of caerulein, used 30 min before morphine administration on day 3, was also used to evaluate the effects of antagonists on caerulein-induced decrease in tolerance. The selective cholecystokinin (CCK) receptor antagonists, MK-329 [1-methyl-3-(2 indoloyl)amino-5-phenyl-3H-1,4-benzodiazepin-2-one; 0.25 and 0.5 mg/kg] or L-365,260 [3R(+)-N-(2,3-dihydro-1-methyl-2-oxo-5-phenyl-1H- 1,4-benzodiazepin-3-yl)-N-(3-methyl-phenyl)urea: 0.25 and 0.5 mg/kg] decreased potentiation of morphine response induced by caerulein. MK-329 or L-365,260, when were injected 35 min before morphine injection during the development of tolerance and on day 3, decreased the tolerance to morphine. A single administration of MK-329 or L-365,260 (in the absence of caerulein) 35 min and 48 h before the test dose of morphine (9 mg/kg) potentiated the antinociception of morphine in nontolerant animals. In conclusion, CCK mechanism(s) may interact with morphine tolerance.

  9. Protective effects of calmodulin antagonists (trifluoperazine and W-7 on hypothermic ischemic rat hearts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugawara,Eiji

    1991-06-01

    Full Text Available The cardioprotective effect of calmodulin antagonists, trifluoperazine (TFP and N-(6-aminohexyl-5-chloro-1-naphthalene sulfonamide (W-7 was examined on the isolated rat heart exposed to hypothermic and ischemic conditions by measuring distribution of lysosomal enzymes in myocardial cells, and leakage of creatine kinase (CK during reperfusion and postischemic recovery in myocardial systolic function. Experimental hearts were infused with 20 degrees C Krebs-Henseleit bicarbonate buffer (KHB or KHB containing TFP or W-7 for 2min every 30min during hypothermic ischemia. After ischemia for 120min at 20 degrees C, rat hearts were reperfused at 37 degrees C for 30min. TFP and W-7 improved functional recovery and prevented CK release. In TFP treated hearts, leakage of lysosomal enzymes was reduced significantly, whereas stabilization of lysosomes by W-7 did not occur. These results suggest that calcium-calmodulin dependent enzymes may play an important role in the development of cellular damage of the myocardium during hypothermic ischemia, although levels of leakage of lysosomal enzymes may be unreliable predictors of functional recovery after hypothermic ischemia.

  10. Conessine, an H3 receptor antagonist, alters behavioral and neurochemical effects of ethanol in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais-Silva, Gessynger; Ferreira-Santos, Mariane; Marin, Marcelo T

    2016-05-15

    Ethanol abuse potential is mainly due to its reinforcing properties, crucial in the transition from the recreational to pathological use. These properties are mediated by mesocorticolimbic and nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathways and neuroadaptations in these pathways seem to be responsible for addiction. Both pathways are modulated by other neurotransmitters systems, including neuronal histaminergic system. Among the histamine receptors, H3 receptor stands out due to its role in modulation of histamine and other neurotransmitters release. Thus, histaminergic system, through H3 receptors, may have an important role in ethanol addiction development. Aiming to understand these interactions, conessine, an H3 receptor antagonist, was given to mice subjected to the evaluation of ethanol-induced psychostimulation, ethanol CPP and quantification of norepinephrine, dopamine, serotonin and their metabolites in mesocorticolimbic and nigrostriatal pathways following acute ethanol treatment. Systemic conessine administration exacerbated ethanol effects on locomotor activity. Despite of conessine reinforcing effect on CPP, this drug did not alter acquisition of ethanol CPP. Ethanol treatment affects the serotoninergic neurotransmission in the ventral tegmental area, the dopaminergic neurotransmission in the pre-frontal cortex (PFC) and caudate-putamen nucleus (CPu) and the noradrenergic neurotransmission in the CPu. In the PFC, conessine blocked ethanol effects on dopaminergic and noradrenergic neurotransmission. The blockade of H3 receptors and ethanol seem to interact in the modulation of dopaminergic neurotransmission of nigrostriatal pathway, decreasing dopamine metabolites in substantia nigra. In conclusion, conessine was able to change psychostimulant effect of ethanol, without altering its reinforcing properties. This exacerbation of ethanol-induced psychostimulation would be related to alterations in dopaminergic neurotransmission in the nigrostriatal pathway.

  11. Effect of gonadal hormones on hypophagic property of opioid antagonist Naloxone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gargate Ashwini R, Kulkarni Dushant V

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Studies have shown that hormonal fluctuations that occur over the estrous cycle in rats affect food intake. It is possible that estrogen affects food intake via Opioid system and other brain areas which are involved in regulation of food intake. Therefore it may affect the sensitivity of female rats to hypophagic effect of Opioid antagonist Naloxone. Testosterone in male rats also changes food intake. However, little is known about hoe these Gonadal hormones interact with Opioid receptors to modulate food intake. Objective: The aim of the study was to find out how Gonadal hormones affect hypophagic property of Naloxone. Methods: Basal food intake of 40 healthy adult females and 20 healthy adult male rats was recorded. Then they were injected intraperitoneally with Naloxone after fasting for 24 hrs. In female rats food intake was measured during different phases of the estrous cycle. All the rats were then subjected to gonadectomy. The food intake was measured after gonadectomy. The effect of Naloxone was also measured in deprivation paradigm after gonadectomy. Results: Female rats showed decreased food intake during proestrous and estrous phases. In female rats there was no hypophagia after Naloxone injection during these phases. Male rats showed hypophagia on Naloxone injection. Male rats showed increased food intake after gonadectomy. In female rats the increase in food intake was not significant when gonadectomy was done during metestrous and diestrous. However, Naloxone could induce hypophagia in all female rats after gonadectomy. Conclusion: Estrogen decreases food intake, it decreases sensitivity of female rats to hypophasic effects of Naloxone. Testosterone decreases food intake. Testosterone does not interfere with hypophagic effect of Naloxone.

  12. Effects of 5-HT4 receptor agonists and antagonists in learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses, A; Hong, E

    1997-03-01

    In the present work, the effects of pre- or post-training (ip) injection of BIMU1 and BIMU8 (5-HT4 agonists) were figured out in the autoshaping learning task. Furthermore, the post-training effects of these agonists after treatment with SDZ 205-557 and GR 125487D (5-HT4 antagonists) or p-Chloroamphetamine (PCA) were also explored. Animals were individually trained in a lever-press response on the autoshaping task and 24 hours later were tested. The results showed that pre-training injection of BIMU1 (5 20 mg/Kg) or BIMU8 (20 mg/Kg) increased the CR; in contrast, the post-training administration of BIMU1 (10-20 mg/Kg) or BIMU8 (5 and 20 mg/Kg) decreased it. Further experiments revealed that the post-training injections of SDZ 205-557 (1.0-10.0 mg/Kg) or GR 125487D (0.39-1.56 mg/Kg) by themselves did not alter the CR. When BIMU1 or BIMU8 was administered to rats pretreated with SDZ 205-557 (10 mg/Kg) or GR 125487D (0.78 mg/Kg), the decrement induced by 5-HT4 the agonists was reversed; in contrast, the administration of PCA failed to modify the CR or the agonist-induced responses. The findings showed that the pre-training stimulation of 5-HT4 receptors enhanced the acquisition of CR, while, post-training activation of 5-HT4 receptors, impaired the consolidation of learning. The latter effect was not altered by PCA pretreatment. The data show that 5-HT4 receptors are involved in the acquisition and consolidation of learning. It seems that postsynaptic 5-HT4 receptors are involved in the latter effect.

  13. VIP and endothelin receptor antagonist: An effective combination against experimental pulmonary arterial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szema Anthony M

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH remains a therapeutic challenge, and the search continues for more effective drugs and drug combinations. We recently reported that deletion of the vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP gene caused the spontaneous expression of a PH phenotype that was fully corrected by VIP. The objectives of this investigation were to answer the questions: 1 Can VIP protect against PH in other experimental models? and 2 Does combining VIP with an endothelin (ET receptor antagonist bosentan enhance its efficacy? Methods Within 3 weeks of a single injection of monocrotaline (MCT, s.c. in Sprague Dawley rats, PAH developed, manifested by pulmonary vascular remodeling, lung inflammation, RV hypertrophy, and death within the next 2 weeks. MCT-injected animals were either untreated, treated with bosentan (p.o. alone, with VIP (i.p. alone, or with both together. We selected this particular combination upon finding that VIP down-regulates endothelin receptor expression which is further suppressed by bosentan. Therapeutic outcomes were compared as to hemodynamics, pulmonary vascular pathology, and survival. Results Treatment with VIP, every other day for 3 weeks, begun on the same day as MCT, almost totally prevented PAH pathology, and eliminated mortality for 45 days. Begun 3 weeks after MCT, however, VIP only partially reversed PAH pathology, though more effectively than bosentan. Combined therapy with both drugs fully reversed the pathology, while preventing mortality for at least 45 days. Conclusions 1 VIP completely prevented and significantly reversed MCT-induced PAH; 2 VIP was more effective than bosentan, probably because it targets a wider range of pro-remodeling pathways; and 3 combination therapy with VIP plus bosentan was more effective than either drug alone, probably because both drugs synergistically suppressed ET-ET receptor pathway.

  14. GABAB antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydenvang, Karla Andrea; Hansen, J J; Krogsgaard-Larsen, P

    1994-01-01

    Phaclofen, which is the phosphonic acid analogue of the GABAB agonist (RS)-3-(4-chlorophenyl)-4-aminobutyric acid (baclofen), is a GABAB antagonist. As part of our studies on the structural requirements for activation and blockade of GABAB receptors, we have resolved phaclofen using chiral chroma...

  15. Intracerebroventricular application of competitive and non-competitive NMDA antagonists induce similar effects upon rat hippocampal electroencephalogram and local cerebral glucose utilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boddeke, H.W.G.M.; Wiederhold, K.H.; Palacios, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    In this study we have used electrophysiological and metabolic markers to investigate the effects of competitive and non-competitive NMDA antagonists in rats after central or peripheral administration. The non-competitive antagonist, MK-801, induced dose-dependent suppression of rat hippocampal EEG e

  16. INTRACEREBROVENTRICULAR APPLICATION OF COMPETITIVE AND NONCOMPETITIVE NMDA ANTAGONISTS INDUCE SIMILAR EFFECTS UPON RAT HIPPOCAMPAL ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAM AND LOCAL CEREBRAL GLUCOSE-UTILIZATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BODDEKE, HWGM; WIEDERHOLD, KH; PALACIOS, JM

    1992-01-01

    In this study we have used electrophysiological and metabolic markers to investigate the effects of competitive and non-competitive NMDA antagonists in rats after central or peripheral administration. The non-competitive antagonist, MK-801, induced dose-dependent suppression of rat hippocampal EEG e

  17. Tyrosol exhibits negative regulatory effects on LPS response and endotoxemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jing; Huang, Guoren; Wang, Zhenning; Zhuang, Shuang; Xu, Linli; Song, Bocui; Xiong, Ying; Guan, Shuang

    2013-12-01

    Tyrosol, a phenolic compound, was isolated from wine, olive oil and other plant-derived products. In the present study, we first investigated the negative regulatory effects of tyrosol on cytokine production by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages in vitro, and the results showed that tyrosol reduced tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) secretion. This inspired us to further study the effects of tyrosol in vivo. Tyrosol significantly attenuated TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 production in serum from mice challenged with LPS, and consistent with the results in vitro. In the murine model of endotoxemia, mice were treated with tyrosol prior to or after LPS challenge. The results showed that tyrosol significantly increased mice survival. We further investigated signal transduction ways to determine how tyrosol works. The data revealed that tyrosol shocked LPS-induced mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and nuclear transcription factor-κB (NF-κB) signal transduction pathways in RAW 264.7 macrophages. These observations indicated that tyrosol exerted negative regulatory effects on LPS response in vitro and in vivo through suppressing NF-κB and p38/ERK MAPK signaling pathways.

  18. Effects of the estrogen receptor antagonist fulvestrant on F344 rat prolactinoma models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Lei; Gao, Hua; Gui, Songbai; Bai, Giwei; Lu, Runchun; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Yazhuo

    2014-02-01

    The relationship between estrogen and prolactinoma is well documented. But the anti-tumor effects of a pure estrogen receptor antagonist fulvestrant on prolactinomas, especially in vivo, and the possible mechanisms are still unclear. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of fulvestrant and the involvement of the Wnt signaling pathway on rat prolactinoma models. Forty female F344 rat prolactinoma models were established by subcutaneous administration of 10 mg 17β-estradiol for 6 weeks. Rats were intramuscularly injected with fulvestrant (0, 0.5, 3, 20, 40 mg/kg), and tumor size, weight and serum prolactin (PRL) levels were evaluated before and after fulvestrant treatment at 3, 7 and 14 days. Expression of estrogen receptor α (ERα), β-catenin and Wnt inhibitory factor-1 (WIF-1) in prolactinomas was measured using quantitative PCR and western blotting, and methylation of the WIF-1 promoter was investigated using pyrosequencing. Tumor size, weight and serum PRL levels were inhibited in dose-dependent and time-dependent manners after fulvestrant treatments. β-catenin expression was downregulated but WIF-1 expression was upregulated following fulvestrant treatment. The methylation of the CpG site of the WIF-1 promoter was negatively correlated to the expression of WIF-1. In addition, the anti-cell proliferation of fulvestrant on GH3 cells was partly disrupted by Wnt signaling pathway agonist SB 216763. In conclusion, fulvestrant inhibited tumor proliferation and PRL secretion of prolactinomas via ERα, and the Wnt signaling pathway was involved in this anti-tumor effect. Therefore, fulvestrant may be a potential new drug for prolactinomas.

  19. Physical exercise versus fluoxetine: antagonistic effects on cortical spreading depression in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirelle Costa Monteiro, Heloísa; Lima Barreto-Silva, Nathália; Elizabete Dos Santos, Gracyelle; de Santana Santos, Amanda; Séfora Bezerra Sousa, Mariana; Amâncio-Dos-Santos, Ângela

    2015-09-05

    The antidepressant fluoxetine and physical exercise exert similar effects on the serotoninergic system by increasing brain serotonin availability, and both show antagonistic action on cortical excitability. Here we provide the first assessment of the interaction of the two together on cortical spreading depression (CSD) in young adult rats. Wistar rats (40-60 days of life) received fluoxetine (10mg/kg/d, orogastrically) or an equivalent volume of water. Half of the animals from each condition were assigned to perform physical exercise in a treadmill, and the other half formed the sedentary (non-treadmill) control groups. Body parameters (Lee index and thoracic and abdominal circumferences) and the velocity of CSD propagation were investigated. Fluoxetine+exercise animals had less weight gain (78.68±3.19g) than either the fluoxetine-only (93.34±4.77g) or exercise-only group (97.04±3.48g), but body parameters did not differ among them. The velocity of CSD propagation was reduced in the fluoxetine-only and exercise-only groups compared to sedentary water controls (3.24±0.39mm/min). For the fluoxetine+exercise group, CSD velocity values were significantly lower (2.92±0.22mm/min) than for fluoxetine only (3.03±0.35mm/min); however, they were similar to values for the exercise-only group (2.96±0.23mm/min). These findings confirm the similar effects of fluoxetine and exercise and suggest a greater effect of physical exercise in reducing brain excitability.

  20. Antagonistic effects of biological invasion and environmental warming on detritus processing in freshwater ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenna, Daniel; Fincham, William N W; Dunn, Alison M; Brown, Lee E; Hassall, Christopher

    2017-03-01

    Global biodiversity is threatened by multiple anthropogenic stressors but little is known about the combined effects of environmental warming and invasive species on ecosystem functioning. We quantified thermal preferences and then compared leaf-litter processing rates at eight different temperatures (5.0-22.5 °C) by the invasive freshwater crustacean Dikerogammarus villosus and the Great Britain native Gammarus pulex at a range of body sizes. D. villosus preferred warmer temperatures but there was considerable overlap in the range of temperatures that the two species occupied during preference trials. When matched for size, G. pulex had a greater leaf shredding efficiency than D. villosus, suggesting that invasion and subsequent displacement of the native amphipod will result in reduced ecosystem functioning. However, D. villosus is an inherently larger species and interspecific variation in shredding was reduced when animals of a representative size range were compared. D. villosus shredding rates increased at a faster rate than G. pulex with increasing temperature suggesting that climate change may offset some of the reduction in function. D. villosus, but not G. pulex, showed evidence of an ability to select those temperatures at which its shredding rate was maximised, and the activation energy for shredding in D. villosus was more similar to predictions from metabolic theory. While per capita and mass-corrected shredding rates were lower in the invasive D. villosus than the native G. pulex, our study provides novel insights in to how the interactive effects of metabolic function, body size, behavioural thermoregulation, and density produce antagonistic effects between anthropogenic stressors.

  1. Estrogenic effects of the new opioid antagonist naltrexone-estrone azine on pituitary luteinizing hormone secretion in ovariectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armeanu, M C; van Dieten, J A; Kolb, V M; Schoemaker, J; de Koning, J

    1992-01-01

    The effect of the new opioid antagonist naltrexone-estrone azine (EH-NX) on pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion in the ovariectomized rat was studied. EH-NX is a hybrid between the steroid component estrone and the opioid antagonist naltrexone (NX). It is a potent and long-acting opioid antagonist in vitro and in vivo, but its effect upon in vivo LH secretion has not been tested before. The aims of the study were to investigate whether, unlike naltrexone, EH-NX can stimulate LH secretion without the need of additional estrogen pretreatment and whether EH-NX has peripheral estrogenic effects upon the uterine weight, when administered chronically to long-term ovariectomized rats. Female rats were injected subcutaneously with EH-NX 21 days after ovariectomy. The effects of EH-NX injections on LH secretion were compared to the effects of NX and estrone hydrazone (EH) alone, or in combination, with or without estradiol-benzoate (EB) pretreatment. Inhibition of LH secretion and uterine proliferation were observed in rats treated chronically with EH-NX in dosages of 0.250 mg/kg bw and higher. These effects were similar to those caused by EH and EB. In short-term OVX rats EH-NX appeared to act faster than EH. In contrast to NX, no stimulatory effect on LH secretion was seen with EH-NX in EB primed OVX rats. These results surprisingly demonstrate that EH-NX behaves like an estrogen and not like an opioid antagonist. The unexpected pharmacological profile of this new drug may open up doors for several medical applications.

  2. Effects of Static and Dynamic Stretching on the Isokinetic Peak Torques and Electromyographic Activities of the Antagonist Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serefoglu, Abdullah; Sekir, Ufuk; Gür, Hakan; Akova, Bedrettin

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if static and dynamic stretching exercises of the knee muscles (quadriceps and hamstring muscles) have any effects on concentric and eccentric isokinetic peak torques and electromyographic amplitudes (EMG) of the antagonist muscles. Twenty healthy male athletes (age between 18-30 years) voluntarily participated in this study. All of the subjects visited the laboratory to complete the following intervention in a randomized order on 5 separate days; (a) non-stretching (control), (b) static stretching of the quadriceps muscles, (c) static stretching of the hamstring muscles, (d) dynamic stretching of the quadriceps muscles, and (e) dynamic stretching of the hamstring muscles. Static stretching exercises either for the quadriceps or the hamstring muscles were carried out at the standing and sitting positions. Subjects performed four successive repetitions of each stretching exercises for 30 seconds in both stretching positions. Similar to static stretching exercises two different stretching modes were designed for dynamic stretching exercises. Concentric and eccentric isokinetic peak torque for the non-stretched antagonist quadriceps or hamstring muscles at angular velocities of 60°/sec and 240°/sec and their concurrent electromyographic (EMG) activities were measured before and immediately after the intervention. Isokinetic peak torques of the non-stretched agonist hamstring and quadriceps muscles did not represent any significant (p > 0.05) differences following static and dynamic stretching of the antagonist quadriceps and hamstring muscles, respectively. Similarly, the EMG activities of the agonist muscles exhibited no significant alterations (p > 0.05) following both stretching exercises of the antagonist muscles. According to the results of the present study it is possible to state that antagonist stretching exercises either in the static or dynamic modes do not affect the isokinetic peak torques and the EMG activities

  3. Pathophysiology of the cysteinyl leukotrienes and effects of leukotriene receptor antagonists in asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, H

    2001-01-01

    Cysteinyl leukotrienes, synthesized de novo from cell membrane phospholipids, are proinflammatory mediators that play an important role in the pathophysiology of asthma. These mediators are among the most potent of bronchoconstrictors and cause vasodilation, increased microvascular permeability, ...... antagonists are additive with those of beta agonists. These data provide strong support for the use of leukotriene receptor antagonists for treating asthma.......Cysteinyl leukotrienes, synthesized de novo from cell membrane phospholipids, are proinflammatory mediators that play an important role in the pathophysiology of asthma. These mediators are among the most potent of bronchoconstrictors and cause vasodilation, increased microvascular permeability...... ciliary motility, which may hinder mucociliary clearance. Asthmatic patients demonstrate increased production of cysteinyl leukotrienes during naturally occurring asthma and acute asthma attacks as well as after allergen and exercise challenge. The leukotriene receptor antagonists montelukast, zafirlukast...

  4. Calcium antagonistic effects of Bambusa Rigida investigated by 45Ca and its protection on myocardial ischemia of rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Rushan; YE Ling; YANG Yuanyou; LIAO Jiali; MO Shangwu; LIU Ning

    2008-01-01

    An investigation was conducted using 45Ca as a radioactive tracer to evaluate calcium antagonistic effects of several extracts from Bambusa Rigida in living rats. The relationship between the flavonoid and saccharide contents of Bambusa Rigida and calcium antagonistic effects were also analyzed. The protective effects of the alkali extracts ofBambusa Rigida on myocardial ischemia were investigated in living rats. The results indicated that the alkali extracts of Bambusa Rigida had a prominent influence on Ca2+ influx and efflux in the isolated rat aorta and heart, as they could obviously block 45Ca entering into cells and stimulate efflux of intracellular Ca2+. Moreover, the alkali extracts of Bambusa Rigida had favorable protective effects on myocardial ischemia induced either by isoproterenol injection (ISO) or by the ligation of coronary artery. These results implied that the Bambusa Rigida had attractive potential for the treatment of heart, cerebrovascular and other diseases. However, the conclusion that whether the flavonoid or saccharide in Bambusa Rigida affected the calcium antagonistic effects and Ca2+ channels or not was hard to make within the results of the investigation.

  5. Effects of an NMDA antagonist on the auditory mismatch negativity response to transcranial direct current stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Impey, Danielle; de la Salle, Sara; Baddeley, Ashley; Knott, Verner

    2016-09-13

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive form of brain stimulation which uses a weak constant current to alter cortical excitability and activity temporarily. tDCS-induced increases in neuronal excitability and performance improvements have been observed following anodal stimulation of brain regions associated with visual and motor functions, but relatively little research has been conducted with respect to auditory processing. Recently, pilot study results indicate that anodal tDCS can increase auditory deviance detection, whereas cathodal tDCS decreases auditory processing, as measured by a brain-based event-related potential (ERP), mismatch negativity (MMN). As evidence has shown that tDCS lasting effects may be dependent on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activity, the current study investigated the use of dextromethorphan (DMO), an NMDA antagonist, to assess possible modulation of tDCS's effects on both MMN and working memory performance. The study, conducted in 12 healthy volunteers, involved four laboratory test sessions within a randomised, placebo and sham-controlled crossover design that compared pre- and post-anodal tDCS over the auditory cortex (2 mA for 20 minutes to excite cortical activity temporarily and locally) and sham stimulation (i.e. device is turned off) during both DMO (50 mL) and placebo administration. Anodal tDCS increased MMN amplitudes with placebo administration. Significant increases were not seen with sham stimulation or with anodal stimulation during DMO administration. With sham stimulation (i.e. no stimulation), DMO decreased MMN amplitudes. Findings from this study contribute to the understanding of underlying neurobiological mechanisms mediating tDCS sensory and memory improvements.

  6. Long-lasting effect of NMDA receptor antagonist memantine on ethanol-cue association and relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vengeliene, Valentina; Olevska, Anastasia; Spanagel, Rainer

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that the glutamatergic system plays a crucial role in alcohol addiction and especially in relapse-like behaviour. However, results of clinical studies on compounds that influence the activity of the glutamatergic system have been disappointing so far. The aim of our study was to establish treatment conditions under which the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist memantine may produce more reliable treatment effect with respect to alcohol relapse-like behaviour. For this purpose, male Wistar rats were trained to associate several discrete stimuli with ethanol delivery. Thereafter, half of the animals received a brief memory reactivation session followed by two administrations of 20 mg/kg of memantine, while the other half received the same treatment without memory reactivation. Afterwards, a cue-induced ethanol-seeking behaviour test was performed followed by repeated extinction sessions and a reacquisition test. Our data show that administration of memantine reduced responding on the ethanol-associated lever in a cue-induced ethanol-seeking test. This reduction did not depend on whether or not a memory reactivation session was introduced prior to memantine administration. Following extinction, however, reacquisition of ethanol self-administration was only impaired in the group where memantine was given after a short memory reactivation session, showing that this schedule of drug administration produced a long-lasting disruption of the association between the conditioned stimuli and the delivery of ethanol. In conclusion, we show that memantine disrupted the drug-cue association, which consequently interfered with relapse-like behaviour supporting the possibility that memantine is a treatment option for alcoholism. Our data supports the possibility that memantine is a treatment option for alcoholism. However, the effectiveness of this drug seems to lie in its ability to disrupt conditioned behaviours and should be given in conjunction

  7. Effects of the N-methyl-D-Aspartate receptor antagonist dextromethorphan on vibrotactile adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Folger Stephen E

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous reports have demonstrated that short durations of vibrotactile stimuli (less than or equal to 2 sec effectively and consistently modify both the perceptual response in humans as well as the neurophysiological response in somatosensory cortex. The change in cortical response with adaptation has been well established by a number of studies, and other reports have extended those findings in determining that both GABA- and NMDAR-mediated neurotransmission play a significant role in the dynamic response of somatosensory cortical neurons. In this study, we evaluated the impact that dextromethorphan (DXM, an NMDAR antagonist, had on two distinct vibrotactile adaptation tasks. Results All subjects, both those that ingested 60 mg DXM and those that ingested placebo, were evaluated for their amplitude discriminative capacity between two simultaneously delivered vibrotactile stimuli both with and without 3 conditions of pre-exposure to adapting stimulation. The results demonstrated that the perceptual metrics of subjects who ingested 60 mg DXM were significantly altered from that of controls when the amplitude discrimination task followed one of the conditions of adapting stimulation. Without the condition of pre-exposure to an adapting stimulus (or stimuli, there was little difference between the observations obtained from the subjects that ingested DXM and controls. Peak impact on subject response occurred at 60 min post-ingestion, whereas the scores of controls who ingested placebo were not impacted. Conclusion The results – that DXM blocks vibrotactile adaptation – is consistent with the suggestion that NMDAR-mediated neurotransmission plays a significant role in the perceptual adaptive response. This finding is also consistent with neurophysiological findings that report observations of the effects of NMDAR block on the SI cortical response to repetitive vibrotactile stimulation.

  8. Effects of the N-methyl-D-Aspartate receptor antagonist dextromethorphan on vibrotactile adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folger, Stephen E; Tannan, Vinay; Zhang, Zheng; Holden, Jameson K; Tommerdahl, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Background Previous reports have demonstrated that short durations of vibrotactile stimuli (less than or equal to 2 sec) effectively and consistently modify both the perceptual response in humans as well as the neurophysiological response in somatosensory cortex. The change in cortical response with adaptation has been well established by a number of studies, and other reports have extended those findings in determining that both GABA- and NMDAR-mediated neurotransmission play a significant role in the dynamic response of somatosensory cortical neurons. In this study, we evaluated the impact that dextromethorphan (DXM), an NMDAR antagonist, had on two distinct vibrotactile adaptation tasks. Results All subjects, both those that ingested 60 mg DXM and those that ingested placebo, were evaluated for their amplitude discriminative capacity between two simultaneously delivered vibrotactile stimuli both with and without 3 conditions of pre-exposure to adapting stimulation. The results demonstrated that the perceptual metrics of subjects who ingested 60 mg DXM were significantly altered from that of controls when the amplitude discrimination task followed one of the conditions of adapting stimulation. Without the condition of pre-exposure to an adapting stimulus (or stimuli), there was little difference between the observations obtained from the subjects that ingested DXM and controls. Peak impact on subject response occurred at 60 min post-ingestion, whereas the scores of controls who ingested placebo were not impacted. Conclusion The results – that DXM blocks vibrotactile adaptation – is consistent with the suggestion that NMDAR-mediated neurotransmission plays a significant role in the perceptual adaptive response. This finding is also consistent with neurophysiological findings that report observations of the effects of NMDAR block on the SI cortical response to repetitive vibrotactile stimulation. PMID:18796147

  9. Synergetic and Antagonistic Effects of Cadmium on Adsorption of Atrazine on Surficial Sediments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yu; GAO Qian; WANG Xiao-li; DONG De-ming; WANG Ao

    2009-01-01

    Co-contamination of atrazine(AT) and cadmium(Cd) on the surficial sediments(SSs) and natural suface coating samples(NSCSs) was investigated via thermodynamic adsorption experiments.The results show that surface coatings have a stronger ability to adsorb AT owing to their higher active components compared with surficial sediments.Synergetic and antagonistic effects of Cd on the adsorption of AT were observed.Cd at a lower concentration(≤4.0 mg/L) in the solid/liquid phase enhanced AT adsorption onto the surficiai sediments(surface coatings),while the adsorption of AT would be inhibited at a Cd concentration of more than 8.0 mg/L:AT coordinates strongly to Cd,and AT-Cd complexes seem to be more strongly adsorbed on sediments than AT alone,and at the adsorption of AT can take place on the sites where Cd has been previously adsorbed and Cd acts as a bridge for the interaction between sediments and AT.With the increase of Cd concentration,the superfluous Cd may hold much more adsorption sites and thus inhibits the adsorption of AT.Meanwhile,the effects of co-existed AT on Cd adsorption on SSs(NSCSs)were insignificant since Cd has a stronger competitive ability to be absorbed on SSs(NSCSs).The present study could be useful in predicting interactions of the metal ions with herbicides and potentially aid the design of remediation strategies for contaminated sediments and groundwater.

  10. Therapeutic effect of the NMDA antagonist MK-801 on low-level laser induced retinal injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, W.-H.; Wu, J.; Chen, P.; Dou, J.-T.; Pan, C.-Y.; Mu, Y.-M.; Lu, J.-M.

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this article was to explore the mechanism of injury in rat retina after constant low-level helium-neon (He-Ne) laser exposure and therapeutic effects of MK-801, an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, on laser-induced retinal injury. He-Ne laser lesions were created in the central retina of adult Wistar Kyoto rats and were followed immediately by intraperitoneal injection of MK-801 (2 mg/kg) or saline, macroscopical and microscopical lesion were observed by funduscope and light microscope. Ultrastructural changes of the degenerating cells were examined by electron microscopy. Photoreceptor apoptosis was evaluated by TdT-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL). mRNA levels were measured by in situ hybridization and NMDA receptor expression was determined by immunohistochemistry. Laser induced damage was histologically quantified by image-analysis morphometry. Electroretinograms (ERGs) were recorded at different time point after the cessation of exposure to constant irradiation. There was no visible bleeding, exudation or necrosis under funduscope. TUNEL and electron microscopy showed photoreceptor apoptosis after irradiation. MK-801-treated animals had significantly fewer TUNEL-positive cells in the photoreceptors than saline-treated animals after exposure to laser. In situ hybridization (ISH) showed that the NMDAR mRNA level of MK-801-treated rats decreased in the inner plexiform layer 6 h after the cessation of exposure to constant irradiation when compared with that of saline-treated rats. So did Immunohistochemistry (IHC). Electroretinogram showed that b-wave amplitudes of MK-801-treated group were higher than that of saline-treated group after laser exposure. These findings suggest that Low level laser may cause the retinal pathological changes under given conditions. High expression of NMDAR is one of the possible mechanisms causing experimental retinal laser injury of rats. MK-801 exhibits the therapeutic effect due to promote the

  11. Discovery of Isoquinolinoquinazolinones as a Novel Class of Potent PPARγ Antagonists with Anti-adipogenic Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yifeng; Han, Younho; Khadka, Daulat Bikram; Zhao, Chao; Lee, Kwang Youl; Cho, Won-Jea

    2016-01-01

    Conformational change in helix 12 can alter ligand-induced PPARγ activity; based on this reason, isoquinolinoquinazolinones, structural homologs of berberine, were designed and synthesized as PPARγ antagonists. Computational docking and mutational study indicated that isoquinolinoquinazolinones form hydrogen bonds with the Cys285 and Arg288 residues of PPARγ. Furthermore, SPR results demonstrated strong binding affinity of isoquinolinoquinazolinones towards PPARγ. Additionally, biological assays showed that this new series of PPARγ antagonists more strongly inhibit adipocyte differentiation and PPARγ2-induced transcriptional activity than GW9662. PMID:27695006

  12. The cardiovascular effects of PFRFamide and PFR(Tic)amide, a possible agonist and antagonist of neuropeptide FF (NPFF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, E Y; Li, J Y; Tan, P P; Wong, C H; Chen, J C

    2000-02-01

    Neuropeptide FF (NPFF), an endogenous opioid-related neuromodulater, has been reported to show significant effects on the cardiovascular system, namely elevation of arterial blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) in rats. In the present study, we synthesized two novel NPFF analogs, PFRFamide (putative NPFF agonist) and PFR(Tic)amide (putative NPFF antagonist), and examined their cardiovascular effect on BP and HR in anesthetized rats. The arterial mean BP and HR were measured by way of direct femoral artery catheterization. The data showed that PFRFamide increased BP in a dose-dependent manner, while PFR(Tic)amide decreased BP dose-dependently. These results revealed the possibility of PFRFamide and PFR(Tic)amide to be NPFF agonist and antagonist (or inverse agonist), respectively. These two NPFF analogs may possess potential in new drug design, and the NPFF system could be very important in mammalian cardiovascular function.

  13. The effects of angiotensin II receptor antagonist (candesartan on rat renal vascular resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supatraviwat, J

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to investigate the action of angiotensin II (AII on renal perfusion pressure and renal vascular resistance using noncompetitive AT1-receptor antagonist (candesartan or CV 11974. Experiments were performed in isolated kidney of adult male Wistar rats. Kreb's Henseleit solution was perfused into the renal artery at the rate of 3.5 ml/min. This flow rate was designed in order to maintain renal perfusion pressure between 80-120 mm Hg. Dose-response relationship between perfusion flow rate and AII concentration were studied. Renal perfusion pressure in response to 1, 10 and 100 nM AII were increased from basal perfusion pressure of 94±8 mm Hg to 127±6, 157±12 and 190±16 mm Hg, respectively. Administration of perfusate containing 11.4 μM candesartan for 30 min had no effect on the basal perfusion pressure. However, this significantly reduced renal perfusion pressure in the presence of AII (1, 10 and 100 nM by 39%, 47% and 61%, (n=7, P<0.05 respectively. At the basal perfusion pressure, calculated renal vascular resistance was 27±2 mm Hg · min · ml-1. However, the vascular resistance were found to be 41±1, 45±2 and 47±2 mm Hg · min · ml-1 when 1, 10 and 100 nM AII were added. Moreover, this dose of candesartan also showed a significant decrease in renal vascular resistance at the corresponding doses of AII by 38%, 48% and 43%, (n=7, P<0.05 respectively. The higher dose of candesartan (22.7 μM completely inhibited the action of 1, 10 and 100 nM AII on renal vasoconstriction. These results may indicate that the action of AII on renal vascular resistance is via AT1-receptor, at least in rat isolated perfusion kidney.

  14. [Effects of the histamine H2 receptor antagonist roxatidine acetate on stomach and liver alcohol dehydrogenase and serum alcohol level].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beil, W; Sewing, K F

    1993-11-01

    Some histamine-H2-receptor antagonists block gastric first-pass metabolism of ethanol and lead to increased blood alcohol concentrations after ingestion of a low dose (0.15 and 0.3 g/kg) of alcohol. To investigate whether the histamine-H2-receptor antagonist roxatidine acetate has a similar effect, we administered a low dose (0.3 g/kg) of ethanol to eleven volunteers before and after seven days treatment with roxatidine acetate (150 mg once daily). No effect of the drug on mean peak serum alcohol concentrations or on areas under the serum alcohol curves was found. In vitro, roxatidine acetate and its active metabolite roxatidine had almost no effect on guinea-pig gastric alcohol dehydrogenase activity. We conclude that roxatidine acetate does not block gastric first-pass metabolism of ethanol and can be considered as a safe histamine-H2-receptor antagonist in individuals who do not refrain from alcohol consumption under treatment for gastric or duodenal ulcer disease.

  15. Extended studies on the effect of glutamate antagonists on ischemic CA-1 damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diemer, Nils Henrik; Balchen, T; Bruhn, T;

    1996-01-01

    Glutamate receptors are numerous on the ischemia vulnerable CA-1 pyramidal cells. Postischemic use of the AMPA antagonist NBQX has shown up to 80% protection against cell death. Three aspects of this were studied: In the first study, male Wistar rats were given NBQX (30 mg/kg x 3) either 20 hours...

  16. I. Effects of a Dopamine Receptor Antagonist on Fathead Minnow, Pimephales promelas ,Reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study used a 21 d fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) reproduction assay to test the hypothesis that exposure to the dopamine 2 receptor (D2R) antagonist, haloperidol, would impair fish reproduction. Additionally, a 96 h experiment with fathead minnows and zebrafish (Danio ...

  17. The effect of the benzodiazepine antagonist flumazenil on regional cerebral blood flow in human volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolf, J; Friberg, L; Jensen, J

    1990-01-01

    The influence of the benzodiazepine antagonist flumazenil on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was investigated in ten healthy, alert volunteers. The design was a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, cross-over study. rCBF was measured by 133-Xe inhalation and single photon emission...

  18. A cross-laboratory preclinical study on the effectiveness of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist in stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maysami, Samaneh; Wong, Raymond; Pradillo, Jesus M; Denes, Adam; Dhungana, Hiramani; Malm, Tarja; Koistinaho, Jari; Orset, Cyrille; Rahman, Mahbubur; Rubio, Marina; Schwaninger, Markus; Vivien, Denis; Bath, Philip M; Rothwell, Nancy J; Allan, Stuart M

    2016-03-01

    Stroke represents a global challenge and is a leading cause of permanent disability worldwide. Despite much effort, translation of research findings to clinical benefit has not yet been successful. Failure of neuroprotection trials is considered, in part, due to the low quality of preclinical studies, low level of reproducibility across different laboratories and that stroke co-morbidities have not been fully considered in experimental models. More rigorous testing of new drug candidates in different experimental models of stroke and initiation of preclinical cross-laboratory studies have been suggested as ways to improve translation. However, to our knowledge, no drugs currently in clinical stroke trials have been investigated in preclinical cross-laboratory studies. The cytokine interleukin 1 is a key mediator of neuronal injury, and the naturally occurring interleukin 1 receptor antagonist has been reported as beneficial in experimental studies of stroke. In the present paper, we report on a preclinical cross-laboratory stroke trial designed to investigate the efficacy of interleukin 1 receptor antagonist in different research laboratories across Europe. Our results strongly support the therapeutic potential of interleukin 1 receptor antagonist in experimental stroke and provide further evidence that interleukin 1 receptor antagonist should be evaluated in more extensive clinical stroke trials.

  19. The effects of agonist and antagonist muscle activation on the knee extension moment-angle relationship in adults and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Thomas D; Reeves, Neil D; Baltzopoulos, Vasilios; Jones, David A; Maganaris, Constantinos N

    2009-08-01

    The present study examined the effect of agonist activation and antagonist co-activation on the shape of the knee extension moment-angle relationship in adults and children. Isometric knee extension maximum voluntary contractions (MVCs) were performed at every 5 degrees of knee flexion between 55 degrees and 90 degrees (full extension = 0 degrees) by ten men, ten women, ten boys and ten girls. For each trial, the knee extensors' voluntary activation level was quantified using magnetic stimulation and the level of antagonist co-activation was quantified from their electromyographical activity. Peak MVC moment was greater for men (264 +/- 63 N m) than women (177 +/- 60 N m), and greater for adults than children (boys 78 +/- 17 N m, girls 91 +/- 28 N m) (p architecture, and the pattern of the moment arm-angle relationship may in combination occur so that as children develop and mature into adults the shape of the moment-angle relationship is not altered.

  20. Effects of the AMPA antagonist ZK 200775 on visual function: a randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Bergholz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: ZK 200775 is an antagonist at the alpha-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA receptor and had earned attention as a possible neuroprotective agent in cerebral ischemia. Probands receiving the agent within phase I trials reported on an alteration of visual perception. In this trial, the effects of ZK 200775 on the visual system were analyzed in detail. METHODOLOGY: In a randomised controlled trial we examined eyes and vision before and after the intravenous administration of two different doses of ZK 200775 and placebo. There were 3 groups of 6 probands each: Group 1 recieved 0.03 mg/kg/h, group 2 0.75 mg/kg/h of ZK 200775, the control group received 0.9% sodium chloride solution. Probands were healthy males aged between 57 and 69 years. The following methods were applied: clinical examination, visual acuity, ophthalmoscopy, colour vision, rod absolute threshold, central visual field, pattern-reversal visual evoked potentials (pVEP, ON-OFF and full-field electroretinogram (ERG. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: No effect of ZK 200775 was seen on eye position or motility, stereopsis, pupillary function or central visual field testing. Visual acuity and dark vision deteriorated significantly in both treated groups. Color vision was most remarkably impaired. The dark-adapted ERG revealed a reduction of oscillatory potentials (OP and partly of the a- and b-wave, furthermore an alteration of b-wave morphology and an insignificantly elevated b/a-ratio. Cone-ERG modalities showed decreased amplitudes and delayed implicit times. In the ON-OFF ERG the ON-answer amplitudes increased whereas the peak times of the OFF-answer were reduced. The pattern VEP exhibited lower amplitudes and prolonged peak times. CONCLUSIONS: The AMPA receptor blockade led to a strong impairment of typical OFF-pathway functions like color vision and the cone ERG. On the other hand the ON-pathway as measured by dark vision and the scotopic ERG was affected as well

  1. Differential effects of selective adenosine antagonists on the effort-related impairments induced by dopamine D1 and D2 antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, E J; Randall, P A; Santerre, J L; Given, A B; Sager, T N; Correa, M; Salamone, J D

    2010-09-29

    Mesolimbic dopamine (DA) is a critical component of the brain circuitry regulating behavioral activation and effort-related processes. Rats with impaired DA transmission reallocate their instrumental behavior away from food-reinforced tasks with high response requirements, and instead select less effortful food-seeking behaviors. Previous work showed that adenosine A(2A) antagonists can reverse the effects of DA D(2) antagonists on effort-related choice. However, less is known about the effects of adenosine A(1) antagonists. Despite anatomical data showing that A(1) and D(1) receptors are co-localized on the same striatal neurons, it is uncertain if A(1) antagonists can reverse the effects DA D(1) antagonists. The present work systematically compared the ability of adenosine A(1) and A(2A) receptor antagonists to reverse the effects of DA D(1) and D(2) antagonists on a concurrent lever pressing/feeding choice task. With this procedure, rats can choose between responding on a fixed ratio 5 lever-pressing schedule for a highly preferred food (i.e. high carbohydrate pellets) vs. approaching and consuming a less preferred rodent chow. The D(1) antagonist ecopipam (0.2 mg/kg i.p.) and the D(2) antagonist eticlopride (0.08 mg/kg i.p.) altered choice behavior, reducing lever pressing and increasing lab chow intake. Co-administration of the adenosine A(1) receptor antagonists 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX; 0.375, 0.75, and 1.5 mg/kg i.p.), and 8-cyclopentyltheophylline (CPT; 3.0, 6.0, 12.0 mg/kg i.p.) failed to reverse the effects of either the D(1) or D(2) antagonist. In contrast, the adenosine A(2A) antagonist KW-6002 (0.125, 0.25 and 0.5 mg/kg i.p.) was able to produce a robust reversal of the effects of eticlopride, as well as a mild partial reversal of the effects of ecopipam. Adenosine A(2A) and DA D(2) receptors interact to regulate effort-related choice behavior, which may have implications for the treatment of psychiatric symptoms such as psychomotor

  2. Inhibitory effect of angiotensin TT receptor antagonist on hepatic stellate cell activation in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shiro Yokohama; Naoyuki Miyokawa; Masakazu Haneda; Masashi Yoneda; Yoshihiko Tokusashi; Kimihide Nakamura; Yosui Tamaki; Satoshi Okamoto; Mituyoshi Okada; Kazunobu Aso; Takenao Hasegawa; Masaru Aoshima

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the efficacy of angiotensin Ⅱ receptor antagonist on hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) activation in the patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH).METHODS: Seven patients with NASH were prescribed losartan, a selective angiotensin Ⅱ type 1 receptor antagonist (50 mg/d) for 48 wk. Liver biopsies were performed both at the entry and end of the study in all patients. Quiescent and activated HSCs were identified by double immunostaining using anti-p75 and α-smooth muscle actin antibodies, and the number of each phenotype was counted. Similarly, the liver specimens obtained from the eight patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) were also examined as controls.RESULTS: In NASH hepatic tissues, activated HSCs were dominantly distributed as compared with those in NAFL.The 48-wk losartan treatment induced a remarkable decrease in activated HSCs and a mild increase in quiescent phenotypes.CONCLUSION: Our data suggest the crucial involvement of HSCs in anti-fibrotic effect of angiotensin Ⅱ receptor antagonist on patients with NASH.

  3. Effects of calcium channel antagonists on the induction of nitric oxide synthase in cultured cells by immunostimulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Y; Kasai, K; So, S; Hattori, S; Banba, N; Shimoda, S

    1995-01-01

    We investigated whether calcium channel antagonists would alter the induction of nitric oxide (NO) synthesis by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) alone or in combination with interferon-gamma (IFN gamma) in cultured J774 macrophages, rat vascular smooth muscle cells, rat renal mesangial cells, and rat cardiac myocytes. The induction of NO synthesis was determined by measuring nitrite, the stable end-product. The dihydropyridine calcium channel antagonists, nifedipine, manidipine, nitrendipine, benidipine, barnidipine, perdipine, and nilvadipine all reduced the LPS-induced nitrite production in a dose-dependent manner, each with a differing half-maximal inhibitory concentration, in cultured J774 macrophages. Nifedipine also inhibited nitrite production in vascular smooth muscle cells, mesangial cells, and cardiac myocytes. The half-maximal inhibitory concentrations of nifedipine were ranked as follows: smooth muscle cells < mesangial cells < cardiac myocytes. Diltiazem, at nontoxic concentrations, had no effect on the nitrite formation in the three cell types. Verapamil markedly increased the formation of nitrite in cardiac myocytes in response to LPS and IFN gamma, but not in vascular smooth muscle or mesangial cells. Exposure of cardiac myocytes to LPS and IFN gamma caused the expression of NO synthase mRNA that was significantly increased by verapamil. Thus, certain calcium channel antagonists modulate NO synthesis by altering the induction of NO synthase.

  4. Antagonist properties of Conus parius peptides on N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and their effects on CREB signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailaja Kunda

    Full Text Available Three members of a family of small neurotoxic peptides from the venom of Conus parius, conantokins (Con Pr1, Pr2, and Pr3, function as antagonists of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR. We report structural characterizations of these synthetic peptides, and also demonstrate their antagonistic properties toward ion flow through NMDAR ion channels in primary neurons. ConPr1 and ConPr2 displayed moderate increases in α-helicity after addition of Mg(2+. Native apo-ConPr3 possessed an α-helical conformation, and the helicity increased only slightly on addition of Mg(2+. Additionally, these peptides diminished NMDA/Gly-mediated currents and intracellular Ca(2+ (iCa(2+ influx in mature rat primary hippocampal neurons. Electrophysiological data showed that these peptides displayed slower antagonistic properties toward the NMDAR than conantokins from other species of cone snails, e.g., ConT and ConG. Furthermore, to demonstrate selectivity of the C. parius-derived conantokins towards specific NMDAR subunits, cortical neurons from GluN2A(-/- and GluN2B(-/- mice were utilized. Robust inhibition of NMDAR-mediated stimulation in GluN2A(-/--derived mouse neurons, as compared to those isolated from GluN2B(-/--mouse brains, was observed, suggesting a greater selectivity of these antagonists towards the GluN2B subunit. These C. parius conantokins mildly inhibited NMDAR-induced phosphorylation of CREB at Ser(133, suggesting that the peptides modulated iCa(2+ entry and, thereby, activation of CREB, a transcription factor that is required for maintaining long-term synaptic activity. Our data mechanistically show that while these peptides effectively antagonize NMDAR-directed current and iCa(2+ influx, receptor-coupled CREB signaling is maintained. The consequence of sustained CREB signaling is improved neuronal plasticity and survival during neuropathologies.

  5. Antagonist properties of Conus parius peptides on N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and their effects on CREB signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunda, Shailaja; Cheriyan, John; Hur, Michael; Balsara, Rashna D; Castellino, Francis J

    2013-01-01

    Three members of a family of small neurotoxic peptides from the venom of Conus parius, conantokins (Con) Pr1, Pr2, and Pr3, function as antagonists of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR). We report structural characterizations of these synthetic peptides, and also demonstrate their antagonistic properties toward ion flow through NMDAR ion channels in primary neurons. ConPr1 and ConPr2 displayed moderate increases in α-helicity after addition of Mg(2+). Native apo-ConPr3 possessed an α-helical conformation, and the helicity increased only slightly on addition of Mg(2+). Additionally, these peptides diminished NMDA/Gly-mediated currents and intracellular Ca(2+) (iCa(2+)) influx in mature rat primary hippocampal neurons. Electrophysiological data showed that these peptides displayed slower antagonistic properties toward the NMDAR than conantokins from other species of cone snails, e.g., ConT and ConG. Furthermore, to demonstrate selectivity of the C. parius-derived conantokins towards specific NMDAR subunits, cortical neurons from GluN2A(-/-) and GluN2B(-/-) mice were utilized. Robust inhibition of NMDAR-mediated stimulation in GluN2A(-/-)-derived mouse neurons, as compared to those isolated from GluN2B(-/-)-mouse brains, was observed, suggesting a greater selectivity of these antagonists towards the GluN2B subunit. These C. parius conantokins mildly inhibited NMDAR-induced phosphorylation of CREB at Ser(133), suggesting that the peptides modulated iCa(2+) entry and, thereby, activation of CREB, a transcription factor that is required for maintaining long-term synaptic activity. Our data mechanistically show that while these peptides effectively antagonize NMDAR-directed current and iCa(2+) influx, receptor-coupled CREB signaling is maintained. The consequence of sustained CREB signaling is improved neuronal plasticity and survival during neuropathologies.

  6. Selective adenosine A2A receptor agonists and antagonists protect against spinal cord injury through peripheral and central effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esposito Emanuela

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Permanent functional deficits following spinal cord injury (SCI arise both from mechanical injury and from secondary tissue reactions involving inflammation. Enhanced release of adenosine and glutamate soon after SCI represents a component in the sequelae that may be responsible for resulting functional deficits. The role of adenosine A2A receptor in central ischemia/trauma is still to be elucidated. In our previous studies we have demonstrated that the adenosine A2A receptor-selective agonist CGS21680, systemically administered after SCI, protects from tissue damage, locomotor dysfunction and different inflammatory readouts. In this work we studied the effect of the adenosine A2A receptor antagonist SCH58261, systemically administered after SCI, on the same parameters. We investigated the hypothesis that the main action mechanism of agonists and antagonists is at peripheral or central sites. Methods Spinal trauma was induced by extradural compression of SC exposed via a four-level T5-T8 laminectomy in mouse. Three drug-dosing protocols were utilized: a short-term systemic administration by intraperitoneal injection, a chronic administration via osmotic minipump, and direct injection into the spinal cord. Results SCH58261, systemically administered (0.01 mg/kg intraperitoneal. 1, 6 and 10 hours after SCI, reduced demyelination and levels of TNF-α, Fas-L, PAR, Bax expression and activation of JNK mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK 24 hours after SCI. Chronic SCH58261 administration, by mini-osmotic pump delivery for 10 days, improved the neurological deficit up to 10 days after SCI. Adenosine A2A receptors are physiologically expressed in the spinal cord by astrocytes, microglia and oligodendrocytes. Soon after SCI (24 hours, these receptors showed enhanced expression in neurons. Both the A2A agonist and antagonist, administered intraperitoneally, reduced expression of the A2A receptor, ruling out the possibility that the

  7. Effects of histamine H(1) receptor antagonists on depressive-like behavior in diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Shoko; Miyata, Shigeo; Onodera, Kenji; Kamei, Junzo

    2006-02-01

    We previously reported that streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice showed depressive-like behavior in the tail suspension test. It is well known that the central histaminergic system regulates many physiological functions including emotional behaviors. In this study, we examined the role of the central histaminergic system in the diabetes-induced depressive-like behavior in the mouse tail suspension test. The histamine contents in the hypothalamus were significantly higher in diabetic mice than in non-diabetic mice. The histamine H(1) receptor antagonist chlorpheniramine (1-10 mg/kg, s.c.) dose-dependently and significantly reduced the duration of immobility in both non-diabetic and diabetic mice. In contrast, the selective histamine H(1) receptor antagonists epinastine (0.03-0.3 microg/mouse, i.c.v.) and cetirizine (0.01-0.1 microg/mouse, i.c.v.) dose-dependently and significantly suppressed the duration of immobility in diabetic mice, but not in non-diabetic mice. Spontaneous locomotor activity was not affected by histamine H(1) receptor antagonists in either non-diabetic or diabetic mice. In addition, the number and affinity of histamine H(1) receptors in the frontal cortex were not affected by diabetes. In conclusion, we suggest that the altered neuronal system mediated by the activation of histamine H(1) receptors is involved, at least in part, in the depressive-like behavior seen in diabetic mice.

  8. Low-dose prazosin in combination with 5-HT6 antagonist PRX-07034 has antipsychotic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Renny; Nirogi, Ramakrishna; Shinde, Anil; Irupannanavar, Shantaveer

    2015-01-01

    An extensive amount of research has focused on the development of new pharmacological agents to treat schizophrenia. Varying from person to person, schizophrenia is a heterogeneous disease with symptoms of positive, negative, and cognitive deficits. PRX-07034, a 5-hydroxytryptamine6 (5-HT6) receptor antagonist has been evaluated for its potential in treating obesity and cognitive deficits. This study evaluated PRX-07034 (0.1, 0.3, and 1.0 mg/kg body mass, by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection), in combination with a low dose of prazosin (0.3 mg/kg, i.p.), for its antipsychotic potential. The research utilized a stereotypy assay, an open field test, an object recognition task, and prepulse inhibition. Dizocilpine, a non-competitive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist, was also administered in the above-mentioned assays as a psychomimetic. The combination of PRX-07034 and prazosin alleviated stereotypy and hyperlocomotor activity while enhancing memory in an object recognition task, and reversed sensory-gating deficits induced by dizocilpine. Examination of the medial prefrontal cortex revealed that a combination of PRX-07034 and prazosin reduced the dizocilpine-mediated increase of 5-HT. These results suggest that the combination of a 5-HT6 antagonist with low doses of prazosin could have therapeutic potential in the treatment of schizophrenia.

  9. Antiproliferative effect of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH antagonist on ovarian cancer cells through the EGFR-Akt pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varga Jozsef

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antagonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH are being developed for the treatment of various human cancers. Methods MTT assay was used to test the proliferation of SKOV3 and CaOV3. The splice variant expression of GHRH receptors was examined by RT-PCR. The expression of protein in signal pathway was examined by Western blotting. siRNA was used to block the effect of EGFR. Results In this study, we investigated the effects of a new GHRH antagonist JMR-132, in ovarian cancer cell lines SKOV3 and CaOV3 expressing splice variant (SV1 of GHRH receptors. MTT assay showed that JMR-132 had strong antiproliferative effects on SKOV3 and CaOV3 cells in both a time-dependent and dose-dependent fashion. JMR-132 also induced the activation and increased cleaved caspase3 in a time- and dose-dependent manner in both cell lines. In addition, JMR-132 treatments decreased significantly the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR level and the phosphorylation of Akt (p-Akt, suggesting that JMR-132 inhibits the EGFR-Akt pathway in ovarian cancer cells. More importantly, treatment of SKOV3 and CaOV3 cells with 100 nM JMR-132 attenuated proliferation and the antiapoptotic effect induced by EGF in both cell lines. After the knockdown of the expression of EGFR by siRNA, the antiproliferative effect of JMR-132 was abolished in SKOV3 and CaOV3 cells. Conclusions The present study demonstrates that the inhibitory effect of the GHRH antagonist JMR-132 on proliferation is due, in part, to an interference with the EGFR-Akt pathway in ovarian cancer cells.

  10. Regulatory framework for access to safe, effective quality medicines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rägo, Lembit; Sillo, Hiiti; 't Hoen, Ellen; Zweygarth, Monika

    2014-01-01

    Medicines of uncertain quality, safety and efficacy can be worse than no treatment at all. It is the responsibility of national medicines regulatory authorities to protect patients from harm. Yet, there are great disparities in regulatory capacity globally, preventing large populations from accessin

  11. Moderating effect of regulatory focus on burnout and exercise behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Huai-Liang; Kao, Yueh-Tzu; Lin, Cheng-Chen

    2013-12-01

    Applying Higgins' regulatory focus, which assumes that people pursue goals using means that match their self-regulatory motivation, the authors examined whether individual's promotion- or prevention-focused motivations in work would decrease participation in physical activity. Participants were 197 employees (163 men, 34 women, M age = 39 yr.) in five different Taiwanese manufacturing firms. They responded to Copenhagen Burnout Inventory, the Regulatory Focus Questionnaire, and Exercise Behavior at two different times, 8-10 weeks apart. Promotion-oriented regulatory focus significantly moderated the relationship between burnout and exercise, but prevention-oriented focus did not. BMI, blood pressure, cholesterol, and work hours contributed small but significant amounts of variance. A prevention focus was associated with more time for physical activity, even when participants were tired, supporting regulatory focus theory.

  12. Opioid Antagonist Impedes Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merluzzi, Thomas V.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Thirty spider-phobic adults underwent exposure to 17 phobic-related, graded performance tests. Fifteen subjects were assigned to naltrexone, an opioid antagonist, and 15 were assigned to placebo. Naltrexone had a significant effect on exposure, with naltrexone subjects taking significantly longer to complete first 10 steps of exposure and with…

  13. Epigenetically Mediated Pathogenic Effects of Phenanthrene on Regulatory T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Phenanthrene (Phe, a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH, is a major constituent of urban air pollution. There have been conflicting results regarding the role of other AhR ligands 2,3,7,8- tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD and 6-formylindolo [3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ in modifying regulatory T cell populations (Treg or T helper (Th17 differentiation, and the effects of Phe have been understudied. We hypothesized that different chemical entities of PAH induce Treg to become either Th2 or Th17 effector T cells through epigenetic modification of FOXP3. To determine specific effects on T cell populations by phenanthrene, primary human Treg were treated with Phe, TCDD, or FICZ and assessed for function, gene expression, and phenotype. Methylation of CpG sites within the FOXP3 locus reduced FOXP3 expression, leading to impaired Treg function and conversion of Treg into a CD4+CD25lo Th2 phenotype in Phe-treated cells. Conversely, TCDD treatment led to epigenetic modification of IL-17A and conversion of Treg to Th17 T cells. These findings present a mechanism by which exposure to AhR-ligands mediates human T cell responses and begins to elucidate the relationship between environmental exposures, immune modulation, and initiation of human disease.

  14. DNA protective effect of ginseng and the antagonistic effect of Chinese turnip: A supplementation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeto, Yim Tong; Wong, Kam Shing; Han, Andrea; Pak, Sok Cheon; Kalle, Wouter

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this clinical study is to provide scientific evidence for supporting traditional Chinese application and usage to the patients. For this purpose, we tested the ability if Panax ginseng extract to lower oxidative damage to nuclear DNA in human lymphocytes by comparing the effect of cooked Chinese turnip on this effect. Materials and Methods: Seven healthy subjects (4 males and 3 females from 37 to 60 years) participated two occasions which were at least 2 weeks apart. About 2 mL of fasting blood sample for baseline measurement was taken on arrival. They were requested to ingest the content of 5 ginseng capsules in 200 mL water. The subject remained fasting for 2 h until the second blood sample taken. In the other occasion, the experiment was repeated except a piece of cooked turnip (10 g) was taken with the ginseng extract. The two occasions could be interchanged. Comet assay was performed on two specimens on the same day for the evaluation of lymphocytic DNA damage with or without oxidative stress. Results: For the group with ginseng supplementation, there was a significant decrease in comet score for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) treatment over the 2-h period while no change in DNA damage for unstressed sample. For the group with ginseng together with turnip supplementation, there was no significant difference in comet score for both H2O2 treatment and phosphate-buffered saline treatment. Ginseng extract could reduce DNA damage mediated by H2O2 effectively, but this protection effect was antagonized by the ingestion of cooked turnip at the same time. Conclusion: In the current study, commercial ginseng extract was used for supplementing volunteers. Ginseng extract could protect DNA from oxidative stress in vivo while turnip diminished the protection.

  15. Effect of ghrelin receptor antagonist on meal patterns in cholecystokinin type 1 receptor null mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jennifer; Martin, Elizabeth; Paulino, Gabriel; de Lartigue, Guillaume; Raybould, Helen E

    2011-05-03

    Vagal afferent neurons (VAN) express the cholecystokinin (CCK) type 1 receptor (CCK₁R) and, as predicted by the role of CCK in inducing satiation, CCK₁R⁻/⁻ mice ingest larger and longer meals. However, after a short fast, CCK₁R⁻/⁻ mice ingesting high fat (HF) diets initiate feeding earlier than wild-type mice. We hypothesized that the increased drive to eat in CCK₁R⁻/⁻ mice eating HF diet is mediated by ghrelin, a gut peptide that stimulates food intake. The decrease in time to first meal, and the increase in meal size and duration in CCK₁R⁻/⁻ compared to wild-type mice ingesting high fat (HF) diet were reversed by administration of GHSR1a antagonist D-(Lys3)-GHRP-6 (p<0.05). Administration of the GHSR1a antagonist significantly increased expression of the neuropeptide cocaine and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) in VAN of HF-fed CCK₁R⁻/⁻ but not wild-type mice. Administration of the GHSR1a antagonist decreased neuronal activity measured by immunoreactivity for fos protein in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and the arcuate nucleus of both HF-fed wild-type and CCK₁R⁻/⁻ mice. The data show that hyperphagia in CCK₁R⁻/⁻ mice ingesting HF diet is reversed by blockade of the ghrelin receptor, suggesting that in the absence of the CCK₁R, there is an increased ghrelin-dependent drive to feed. The site of action of ghrelin receptors is unclear, but may involve an increase in expression of CART peptide in VAN in HF-fed CCK₁R⁻/⁻ mice.

  16. Sustained effects of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist treatment in type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Claus M; Faulenbach, Mirjam; Vaag, Allan

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Interleukin (IL)-1 impairs insulin secretion and induces beta-cell apoptosis. Pancreatic beta-cell IL-1 expression is increased and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) expression reduced in patients with type 2 diabetes. Treatment with recombinant IL-1Ra improves glycemia and beta......-cell function and reduces inflammatory markers in patients with type 2 diabetes. Here we investigated the durability of these responses. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Among 70 ambulatory patients who had type 2 diabetes, A1C >7.5%, and BMI >27 kg/m(2) and were randomly assigned to receive 13 weeks of anakinra...

  17. Dopamine D3 Receptor Antagonist (GSK598809) Potentiates the Hypertensive Effects of Cocaine in Conscious, Freely-Moving Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel, Nathan M; Li, Shou-Hua; Holmes, Tyson H; Acri, Jane B

    2015-09-01

    The chronic and relapsing nature of addiction presents unique challenges for ensuring the safety of a potential medication. A patient may use cocaine, for example, while taking the medication or take more medication than prescribed. Thus, a potential medication must be safe and not exacerbate the effects of cocaine. Multiple published studies support antagonism of brain dopamine D3 receptor function as a potential mechanism of action for an anti-addiction medication. Dopamine D3 receptors are widely distributed outside the central nervous system, however; for example, dopamine D3 receptors in the kidneys are implicated in regulating blood pressure. The selective dopamine D3 receptor antagonist GSK598809 [1-(2-fluoro-4-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-3-{3-[4-methyl-5-(4-methyl-oxazol-5-yl)-4H-[1,2,4]triazol-3-ylsulfanyl]-propyl}-3-aza-bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane] has been proposed as a medication to treat cocaine and other substance use disorders. The US Food and Drug Administration has established guidelines recommending safety studies to investigate potential undesirable pharmacodynamic effects of a substance in relation to exposure in the therapeutic range and above. Hence, we assessed the interaction between this selective dopamine D3 receptor antagonist and cocaine on hemodynamics and cardiac function in freely-moving, telemetered dogs before conducting a clinical trial. GSK598809 increased the hemodynamic effect of cocaine in this model. Thus, the increase in blood pressure after intravenous cocaine was greater in animals that had been pretreated with GSK598809 compared with vehicle. This finding suggests that GSK598809 in particular, and perhaps dopamine D3 receptor antagonists as a class, may produce unacceptable cardiovascular risks as medications to treat cocaine use disorder.

  18. Anxiogenic and Stressor Effects of the Hypothalamic Neuropeptide RFRP-3 Are Overcome by the NPFFR Antagonist GJ14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joon S; Brownjohn, Phil W; Dyer, Blake S; Beltramo, Massimiliano; Walker, Christopher S; Hay, Debbie L; Painter, Gavin F; Tyndall, Joel D A; Anderson, Greg M

    2015-11-01

    RFamide-related peptide-3 (RFRP-3) is a recently discovered neuropeptide that has been proposed to play a role in the stress response. We aimed to elucidate the role of RFRP-3 and its receptor, neuropeptide FF (NPFF1R), in modulation of stress and anxiety responses. To achieve this, we characterized a new NPFF1R antagonist because our results showed that the only commercially available putative antagonist, RF9, is in fact an agonist at both NPFF1R and the kisspeptin receptor (KISS1R). We report here the identification and pharmacological characterization of GJ14, a true NPFFR antagonist. In in vivo tests of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function, GJ14 completely blocked RFRP-3-induced corticosterone release and neuronal activation in CRH neurons. Furthermore, chronic infusion of GJ14 led to anxiolytic-like behavior, whereas RFRP-3 infusion had anxiogenic effects. Mice receiving chronic RFRP-3 infusion also had higher basal circulating corticosterone levels. These results indicate a stimulatory action of RFRP-3 on the HPA axis, consistent with the dense expression of NPFF1R in the vicinity of CRH neurons. Importantly, coinfusion of RFRP-3 and GJ14 completely reversed the anxiogenic and HPA axis-stimulatory effects of RFRP-3. Here we have established the role of RFRP-3 as a regulator of stress and anxiety. We also show that GJ14 can reverse the effects of RFRP-3 both in vitro and in vivo. Infusion of GJ14 causes anxiolysis, revealing a novel potential target for treating anxiety disorders.

  19. Does regulatory fit lead to more effective health communication? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludolph, Ramona; Schulz, Peter J

    2015-03-01

    Many of today's threats to public health arise from people's lifestyle. Hence, the public's compliance with advice given for health promotion and disease prevention has to be enhanced. Much research traces back the efficacy of health promotion messages to message qualities, while other work focuses on recipient qualities. Regulatory focus theory posits inter-individual differences in motivational orientation, namely a promotion or prevention focus, and offers a unique chance to look at message and recipient variables at the same time (Higgins, 1997). Whereas a promotion-focused individual tries to achieve desired end-states, someone with a prevention focus is rather vigilant. If individuals' goal pursuit strategies match their regulatory orientation, they experience regulatory fit, which increases the perceived persuasiveness of health messages (Higgins, 2000). Such a match can be evoked by particularly framed messages that highlight a person's regulatory orientation. Thus, the assumption of regulatory fit goes beyond the concept of gain- and loss-framing. To assess whether regulatory fit contributes to the effectiveness of health communication, a systematic review was conducted. An extensive systematic search led to the inclusion of 30 studies, for which data were extracted and quality appraised. Findings were summarized using narrative synthesis. Most studies (n = 23) were conducted in the USA and assessed the effects of regulatory fit on behavioral intention (n = 21). Nineteen experiments used samples of university students, and the health context chosen most often was a healthy diet (n = 7). Sixteen experiments manipulated regulatory orientation whereas chronic regulatory focus was measured ten times. The majority of studies confirmed that regulatory fit enhanced the effectiveness of health messages, which did not vary much across different health domains or outcomes. Regulatory fit is a promising approach for tailoring health messages as the synergy effects of

  20. Effects of exogenous neuropeptide Y and neuropeptide Y-Y1 receptor antagonist on focal cerebral ischemia in the rat

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, SH; Cheung, RTF

    2000-01-01

    We studied the effects of exogenous neuropeptide Y (NPY) and BIBP3226, an NPY-Y1 antagonist, on the infarct volume. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing between 280 and 380 g were anaesthetised with sodium pentobarbital (60 mg/kg, I.P.) to undergo reversible right-sided endovascular middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) for 2 hours. Arterial blood pressure, heart rate and cerebral blood flow (CBF) were monitored, and rectal temperature was kept between 36.5 and 37.5 ºC throughout anesthe...

  1. Effects of PAF Antagonist BN52021 on Systemic and Renal Oxidative Stress in Experimentally Induced Obstructive Jaundice

    OpenAIRE

    Akyürek, Nusret

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of PAF antagonist BN52021 on systemic and renal oxidative stress in experimentally induced obstructive jaundice. A total of 30 Wistar-Albino type rats used in the study were divided into sham, control and study groups, each consisting of ten subjects. A laparotomy was performed on the study and control groups, and the choledochus was ligated and dissected. In the sham group, the choledochus was dissected by laparotomy and not ligated. The s...

  2. Effects of thrombin, PAR-1 activating peptide and a PAR-1 antagonist on umbilical artery resistance in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elliott John T

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The non-thrombotic effects of thrombin in cardiovascular tissues, as mediated via the protease activated receptors (PARs, and particularly PAR-1, have been the focus of much recent research. The aims of this study were to evaluate the effects of thrombin, a specific PAR-1 activating peptide (PAR1-AP, and a PAR-1 antagonist on human umbilical artery tone in vitro. Methods Human umbilical artery samples were obtained from 17 women at term. Arterial rings were suspended under physiologic conditions for isometric recording. The in vitro effects of thrombin (0.5 units/mL to 3 units/mL, PAR1-AP TFLLR-NH2 [10(-9 to 10(-6 M], and PAR-1 antagonist (N-trans cinnamoyl- p-fluoroPhe-p-guanidinoPhe-Leu-Arg-Orn-NH2 [10(-9 M to 10(-5 M] on umbilical artery tone were measured. Results Both thrombin and TFLLR-NH2 exerted a potent cumulative vasodilatory effect on human umbilical artery resistance (P 0.05. Conclusion These findings highlight a potential role for thrombin and PAR-1 receptors in vascular regulation of feto-placental blood flow in normal pregnancy, and in association with the vascular lesions associated with IUGR and pre-eclampsia.

  3. Effect of the selective 5-HT7 receptor antagonist SB 269970 in animal models of anxiety and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesołowska, Anna; Nikiforuk, Agnieszka; Stachowicz, Katarzyna; Tatarczyńska, Ewa

    2006-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of the selective 5-HT7 receptor antagonist SB 269970 (0.25-20 mg/kg) in the behavioral tests commonly used for predicting anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like activity. Diazepam and imipramine were used as standard drugs. SB 269970 (in one medium dose of 0.5 or 1 mg/kg) exerted a specific antianxiety-like effect in the Vogel drinking test in rats, in the elevated plus-maze test in rats and in the four-plate test in mice. Moreover, SB 269970 (in one medium dose of 5 or 10 mg/kg) showed antidepressant-like activity in the forced swimming and the tail suspension tests in mice. At the same time, the tested compound at doses of 1-20 mg/kg did not change the spontaneous locomotor activity of mice. The potential anxiolytic and antidepressant effects produced by SB 269970 were weaker than those of the reference drugs employed. It is noteworthy that the active doses of SB 269970 were devoid of any visible motor side-effects. In conclusion, the results of our studies indicate that 5-HT7 receptor antagonists may play a role in the therapy of both anxiety and depression.

  4. Effect of SDF-1/Cxcr4 Signaling Antagonist AMD3100 on Bone Mineralization in Distraction Osteogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jia; Chen, Yuanfeng; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Jinfang; Kang, Qinglin; Ho, Kiwai; Chai, Yimin; Li, Gang

    2017-03-16

    Distraction osteogenesis (DO) is a widely applied technique in orthopedics surgery, which involves rapid stem cell migration, homing, and differentiation. Interactions between the chemokine receptor Cxcr4 and its ligand, stromal derived factor-1 (SDF-1), regulate hematopoietic stem cell trafficking to the ischemic area and induce their subsequent differentiation. Here, we examined SDF-1 expression and further investigated the role of SDF-1/Cxcr4 signaling antagonist AMD3100 during bone regeneration in rat DO model. The results showed that expression levels of SDF-1 and osteogenic genes were higher in DO zones than in the fracture zones, and SDF-1 expression level was the highest at the termination of the distraction phase. Radiological, mechanical, and histological analyses demonstrated that the local administration of AMD3100 (400 μM) to DO rats significantly inhibited new bone formation. In the rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells culture, comparing to the group treated with osteogenic induction medium, AMD3100 supplement led to a considerable decrease in the expression of alkaline phosphatase and early osteogenic marker genes. However, the amount of calcium deposits in rat MSCs did not differ between the groups. Therefore, our study demonstrated that the DO process induced higher expression of SDF-1, which collated to rapid induction of callus formation. Local application of SDF-1/Cxcr4 signaling antagonist AMD3100 significantly inhibited bone mineralization and osteogenesis in DO, which may represent a potential therapeutic approach to the enhancement of bone consolidation in patients undergoing DO.

  5. Salvianolic Acid A, as a Novel ETA Receptor Antagonist, Shows Inhibitory Effects on Tumor in Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiao; Wang, Shifeng; Yu, Yangyang; Sun, Shengnan; Zhang, Yuxin; Zhang, Yanling; Yang, Wei; Li, Shiyou; Qiao, Yanjiang

    2016-08-02

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) autocrine and paracrine signaling modulate cell proliferation of tumor cells by activating its receptors, endothelin A receptor (ETAR) and endothelin B receptor (ETBR). Dysregulation of ETAR activation promotes tumor development and progression. The potential of ETAR antagonists and the dual-ETAR and ETBR antagonists as therapeutic approaches are under preclinical and clinical studies. Salvianolic acid A (Sal A) is a hydrophilic polyphenolic derivative isolated from Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge (Danshen), which has been reported as an anti-cancer and cardio-protective herbal medicine. In this study, we demonstrate that Sal A inhibits ETAR activation induced by ET-1 in both recombinant and endogenous ETAR expression cell lines. The IC50 values were determined as 5.7 µM in the HEK293/ETAR cell line and 3.14 µM in HeLa cells, respectively. Furthermore, our results showed that Sal A suppressed cell proliferation and extended the doubling times of multiple cancer cells, including HeLa, DU145, H1975, and A549 cell lines. In addition, Sal A inhibited proliferation of DU145 cell lines stimulated by exogenous ET-1 treatment. Moreover, the cytotoxicity and cardio-toxicity of Sal A were assessed in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and Human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPS-CMs), which proved that Sal A demonstrates no cytotoxicity or cardiotoxicity. Collectively, our findings indicate that Sal A is a novel anti-cancer candidate through targeting ETAR.

  6. Effect of 5-HT(7) antagonist SB-269970 in the modulation of working and reference memory in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasbarri, Antonella; Cifariello, Agata; Pompili, Assunta; Meneses, Alfredo

    2008-12-16

    It has been established that serotonergic pathways project to cerebral areas involved in learning and memory and that serotonin (5-HT) receptor agonists and antagonists modify these processes. Indeed, most of the 5-HT receptors characterized so far, i.e., 5-HT(1) through 5-HT(7), show a regional distribution in brain areas involved in learning and memory, such as hippocampal formation (HF), amygdala and cortex. Although 5-HT(7) receptor biological functions are still to be clarified, it was recently suggested that it may play a role in the control of learning and memory processes. The aim of our study was to assess the role of 5-HT(7) receptors antagonist SB-269970 on working and reference memory in a radial arm maze task, utilizing a two-phase procedure, comprising an acquisition and test phase, conducted to evaluate working and reference memory, respectively. Our results showed that 5-HT(7) receptors antagonist SB-269970 improved memory, decreasing the number of errors in test phase and, thus, affecting reference memory, while no effects were observed in working memory. These results could be explained taking into consideration the specific localization of 5-HT(7) receptors in the CNS. In fact, high concentrations of 5-HT(7) receptors were found in the HF, which exerts an important role on reference memory, while relatively low concentrations were present in the prefrontal cortex, involved in working memory. Thus, 5-HT(7) receptor blockade had procognitive effect, when the learning task implicated a high degree of difficulty. This conclusion has a major implication in the context that 5-HT receptors play an important role under amnesia states (e.g., Alzheimer's disease) or when the learning is complex.

  7. Inhibitory effects of antagonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone on growth and invasiveness of PC3 human prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Moreno, Laura; Arenas, M Isabel; Schally, Andrew V; Fernández-Martínez, Ana B; Zarka, Elías; González-Santander, Marta; Carmena, María J; Vacas, Eva; Prieto, Juan C; Bajo, Ana M

    2013-02-15

    New approaches are needed to the therapy of advanced prostate cancer. This study determined the effect of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) antagonists, JMR-132 and JV-1-38 on growth of PC3 tumors as well as on angiogenesis and metastasis through the evaluation of various factors that contribute largely to the progression of prostate cancer. Human PC3 androgen-independent prostate cancer cells were injected subcutaneously into nude mice. The treatment with JMR-132 (10 μg/day) or JV-1-38 (20 μg/day) lasted 41 days. We also evaluated the effects of JMR-132 and JV-1-38 on proliferation, cell adhesion and migration in PC-3 cells in vitro. Several techniques (Western blot, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry, ELISA and zymography) were used to evaluate the expression levels of GHRH receptors and its splice variants, GHRH, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α, metalloproteinases (MMPs) -2 and -9, β-catenin and E-cadherin. GHRH antagonists suppressed the proliferation of PC-3 cells in vitro and significantly inhibited growth of PC3 tumors. After treatment with these analogues, we found an increase in expression of GHRH receptor accompanied by a decrease of GHRH levels, a reduction in both VEGF and HIF-1α expression and in active forms of MMP-2 and MMP-9, a significant increase in levels of membrane-associated β-catenin and a significant decline in E-cadherin. These results support that the blockade of GHRH receptors can modulate elements involved in angiogenesis and metastasis. Consequently, GHRH antagonists could be considered as suitable candidates for therapeutic trials in the management of androgen-independent prostate cancer.

  8. Effect of α{sub 7} nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists and antagonists on motor function in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, Kevin D., E-mail: kevin.welch@ars.usda.gov [USDA/ARS Poisonous Plant Research Laboratory, 1150 E. 1400N., Logan, UT 84341 (United States); Pfister, James A. [USDA/ARS Poisonous Plant Research Laboratory, 1150 E. 1400N., Logan, UT 84341 (United States); Lima, Flavia G. [Federal University of Goías, School of Veterinary Medicine, Goiânia, Goías (Brazil); Green, Benedict T.; Gardner, Dale R. [USDA/ARS Poisonous Plant Research Laboratory, 1150 E. 1400N., Logan, UT 84341 (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are ligand-gated cation channels found throughout the body, and serve to mediate diverse physiological functions. Muscle-type nAChRs located in the motor endplate region of muscle fibers play an integral role in muscle contraction and thus motor function. The toxicity and teratogenicity of many plants (which results in millions of dollars in losses annually to the livestock industry) are due to various toxins that bind to nAChRs including deltaline and methyllycaconitine (MLA) from larkspur (Delphinium) species, and nicotine and anabasine from tobacco (Nicotiana) species. The primary result of the actions of these alkaloids at nAChRs is neuromuscular paralysis and respiratory failure. The objective of this study was to further characterize the motor coordination deficiencies that occur upon exposure to a non-lethal dose of nAChR antagonists MLA and deltaline as well as nAChR agonists nicotine and anabasine. We evaluated the effect of nAChR agonists and antagonists on the motor function and coordination in mice using a balance beam, grip strength meter, rotarod, open field analysis and tremor monitor. These analyses demonstrated that within seconds after treatment the mice had significant loss of motor function and coordination that lasted up to 1 min, followed by a short period of quiescence. Recovery to normal muscle coordination was rapid, typically within approximately 10 min post-dosing. However, mice treated with the nAChR agonist nicotine and anabasine required a slightly longer time to recover some aspects of normal muscle function in comparison to mice treated with the nAChR antagonist MLA or deltaline. -- Highlights: ► Mice treated with nAChR agonists and antagonists have a loss in motor function. ► These deficits are temporary as near normal motor function returns within 10 min. ► There are compound-specific differences in the effects on motor function.

  9. Effect of histamine H1 and H2 receptor antagonists, microinjected into cerebellar vermis, on emotional memory consolidation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianlorenço, A C L; Serafim, K R; Canto-de-Souza, A; Mattioli, R

    2014-02-01

    This study investigated the effects of histamine H1 or H2 receptor antagonists on emotional memory consolidation in mice submitted to the elevated plus maze (EPM). The cerebellar vermis of male mice (Swiss albino) was implanted using a cannula guide. Three days after recovery, behavioral tests were performed in the EPM on 2 consecutive days (T1 and T2). Immediately after exposure to the EPM (T1), animals received a microinjection of saline (SAL) or the H1 antagonist chlorpheniramine (CPA; 0.016, 0.052, or 0.16 nmol/0.1 µL) in Experiment 1, and SAL or the H2 antagonist ranitidine (RA; 0.57, 2.85, or 5.7 nmol/0.1 µL) in Experiment 2. Twenty-four hours later, mice were reexposed to the EPM (T2) under the same experimental conditions but they did not receive any injection. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and the Duncan test. In Experiment 1, mice microinjected with SAL and with CPA entered the open arms less often (%OAE) and spent less time in the open arms (%OAT) in T2, and there was no difference among groups. The results of Experiment 2 demonstrated that the values of %OAE and %OAT in T2 were lower compared to T1 for the groups that were microinjected with SAL and 2.85 nmol/0.1 µL RA. However, when animals were microinjected with 5.7 nmol/0.1 µL RA, they did not show a reduction in %OAE and %OAT. These results demonstrate that CPA did not affect behavior at the doses used in this study, while 5.7 nmol/0.1 µL RA induced impairment of memory consolidation in the EPM.

  10. Effect of histamine H1 and H2 receptor antagonists, microinjected into cerebellar vermis, on emotional memory consolidation in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.C.L. Gianlorenco

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effects of histamine H1 or H2 receptor antagonists on emotional memory consolidation in mice submitted to the elevated plus maze (EPM. The cerebellar vermis of male mice (Swiss albino was implanted using a cannula guide. Three days after recovery, behavioral tests were performed in the EPM on 2 consecutive days (T1 and T2. Immediately after exposure to the EPM (T1, animals received a microinjection of saline (SAL or the H1 antagonist chlorpheniramine (CPA; 0.016, 0.052, or 0.16 nmol/0.1 µL in Experiment 1, and SAL or the H2 antagonist ranitidine (RA; 0.57, 2.85, or 5.7 nmol/0.1 µL in Experiment 2. Twenty-four hours later, mice were reexposed to the EPM (T2 under the same experimental conditions but they did not receive any injection. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and the Duncan test. In Experiment 1, mice microinjected with SAL and with CPA entered the open arms less often (%OAE and spent less time in the open arms (%OAT in T2, and there was no difference among groups. The results of Experiment 2 demonstrated that the values of %OAE and %OAT in T2 were lower compared to T1 for the groups that were microinjected with SAL and 2.85 nmol/0.1 µL RA. However, when animals were microinjected with 5.7 nmol/0.1 µL RA, they did not show a reduction in %OAE and %OAT. These results demonstrate that CPA did not affect behavior at the doses used in this study, while 5.7 nmol/0.1 µL RA induced impairment of memory consolidation in the EPM.

  11. Effect of histamine H1 and H2 receptor antagonists, microinjected into cerebellar vermis, on emotional memory consolidation in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gianlorenço, A.C.L.; Serafim, K.R. [Laboratório de Neurociências, Departamento de Fisioterapia, Centro de Ciências Biológicas e da Saúde, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos, SP, Brasil, Laboratório de Neurociências, Departamento de Fisioterapia, Centro de Ciências Biológicas e da Saúde, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Canto-de-Souza, A. [Laboratório de Psicologia da Aprendizagem, Departamento de Psicologia, Centro de Educação e Ciências Humanas, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos, SP, Brasil, Laboratório de Psicologia da Aprendizagem, Departamento de Psicologia, Centro de Educação e Ciências Humanas, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Fisiológicas, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos, SP, Brasil, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Fisiológicas, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Instituto de Neurociências e Comportamento, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brasil, Instituto de Neurociências e Comportamento, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Mattioli, R. [Laboratório de Neurociências, Departamento de Fisioterapia, Centro de Ciências Biológicas e da Saúde, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos, SP, Brasil, Laboratório de Neurociências, Departamento de Fisioterapia, Centro de Ciências Biológicas e da Saúde, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2014-02-17

    This study investigated the effects of histamine H1 or H2 receptor antagonists on emotional memory consolidation in mice submitted to the elevated plus maze (EPM). The cerebellar vermis of male mice (Swiss albino) was implanted using a cannula guide. Three days after recovery, behavioral tests were performed in the EPM on 2 consecutive days (T1 and T2). Immediately after exposure to the EPM (T1), animals received a microinjection of saline (SAL) or the H1 antagonist chlorpheniramine (CPA; 0.016, 0.052, or 0.16 nmol/0.1 µL) in Experiment 1, and SAL or the H2 antagonist ranitidine (RA; 0.57, 2.85, or 5.7 nmol/0.1 µL) in Experiment 2. Twenty-four hours later, mice were reexposed to the EPM (T2) under the same experimental conditions but they did not receive any injection. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and the Duncan test. In Experiment 1, mice microinjected with SAL and with CPA entered the open arms less often (%OAE) and spent less time in the open arms (%OAT) in T2, and there was no difference among groups. The results of Experiment 2 demonstrated that the values of %OAE and %OAT in T2 were lower compared to T1 for the groups that were microinjected with SAL and 2.85 nmol/0.1 µL RA. However, when animals were microinjected with 5.7 nmol/0.1 µL RA, they did not show a reduction in %OAE and %OAT. These results demonstrate that CPA did not affect behavior at the doses used in this study, while 5.7 nmol/0.1 µL RA induced impairment of memory consolidation in the EPM.

  12. Effects of dopamine antagonists on methamphetamine-induced dopamine release in high and low alcohol preference rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiguchi, Minori; Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Kasuda, Shogo; Takahashi, Montonori; Yamamura, Takehiko; Matsui, Kiyoshi; Ouchi, Harumi; Minami, Takako; Hishida, Shigeru; Nishio, Hajime

    2010-03-01

    The authors have previously shown that high alcohol preference rats (HAP) have a significantly higher sensitivity than low alcohol preference rats (LAP) for methamphetamine (MAP). In this study, changes in dopamine and serotonin release induced by MAP (1 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) after pre-treatment with D1 and D2 receptor antagonists were examined in the striatum of rats with different alcohol preferences to elucidate differences in receptor levels between the two rat strains. D1 receptor antagonist SCH23390 or D2 receptor antagonist haloperidol were administrated intracerebroventricularly 10 min before MAP stimulation. This study investigated the effect of methamphetamine-induced dopamine and serotonin release in striatum using microdialysis of freely moving rats coupled to ECD-HPLC. With haloperidol treatment both strains of rats showed a significantly greater maximum increase on MAP-induced dopamine release compared with respective control rats. However, after SCH23390 treatment only HAP rats showed a significantly greater increase in dopamine release compared with controls. SCH23390 blocks mainly D1 receptors only in the post-synaptic membrane, whereas haloperidol blocks D2 receptors in both the pre-synaptic and post-synaptic membranes. The MAP-induced increase in dopamine release following haloperidol pre-treatment was greater than SCH23390 pre-treatment in both strains. This result indicates that D2 receptors (autoreceptors) in the pre-synaptic membrane were blocked, leading to the elimination of the feedback function that regulates dopamine release. These data suggested that alcohol preference is associated with the action of MAP, and the dopaminergic mechanism, specifically the D1 system in the striatum, might have a different pathway dependent on alcohol preference.

  13. Mechanisms underlying the inhibitory effects of tachykinin receptor antagonists on eosinophil recruitment in an allergic pleurisy model in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessandri, Ana Letícia; Pinho, Vanessa; Souza, Danielle G; Castro, Maria Salete de A; Klein, André; Teixeira, Mauro M

    2003-01-01

    The activation of tachykinin NK receptors by neuropeptides may induce the recruitment of eosinophils in vivo. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects and underlying mechanism(s) of the action of tachykinin receptor antagonists on eosinophil recruitment in a model of allergic pleurisy in mice. Pretreatment of immunized mice with capsaicin partially prevented the recruitment of eosinophils after antigen challenge, suggesting the potential contribution of sensory nerves for the recruitment of eosinophils Local (10–50 nmol per pleural cavity) or systemic (100–300 nmol per animal) pretreatment with the tachykinin NK1 receptor antagonist SR140333 prevented the recruitment of eosinophils induced by antigen challenge of immunized mice. Neither tachykinin NK2 nor NK3 receptor antagonists suppressed eosinophil recruitment. Pretreatment with SR140333 failed to prevent the antigen-induced increase of interleukin-5 concentrations in the pleural cavity. Similarly, SR140333 failed to affect the bone marrow eosinophilia observed at 48 h after antigen challenge of immunized mice. SR140333 induced a significant increase in the concentrations of antigen-induced eotaxin at 6 h after challenge. Antigen challenge of immunized mice induced a significant increase of Leucotriene B4 (LTB4) concentrations at 6 h after challenge. Pretreatment with SR140333 prevented the antigen-induced increase of LTB4 concentrations. Our data suggest an important role for NK1 receptor activation with consequent LTB4 release and eosinophil recruitment in a model of allergic pleurisy in the mouse. Tachykinins appear to be released mainly from peripheral endings of capsaicin-sensitive sensory neurons and may act on mast cells to facilitate antigen-driven release of LTB4. PMID:14585802

  14. Trunk response to sudden forward perturbations - effects of preload and sudden load magnitudes, posture and abdominal antagonistic activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahvarpour, Ali; Shirazi-Adl, Aboulfazl; Mecheri, Hakim; Larivière, Christian

    2014-06-01

    Unexpected loading of the spine is a risk factor for low back pain. The trunk neuromuscular and kinematics responses are likely influenced by the perturbation itself as well as initial trunk conditions. The effect of four parameters (preload, sudden load, initial trunk flexed posture, initial abdominal antagonistic activity) on trunk kinematics and back muscles reflex response were evaluated. Twelve asymptomatic subjects participated in sudden forward perturbation tests under six distinct conditions. Preload did not change the reflexive response of back muscles and the trunk displacement; while peak trunk velocity and acceleration as well as the relative load peak decreased. Sudden load increased reflex response of muscles, trunk kinematics and loading variables. When the trunk was initially flexed, back muscles latency was delayed, trunk velocity and acceleration increased; however, reflex amplitude and relative trunk displacement remained unchanged. Abdominal antagonistic preactivation increased reflexive response of muscles but kinematics variables were not affected. Preload, initial flexed posture and abdominal muscles preactivation increased back muscles preactivity. Both velocity and acceleration peaks of the trunk movement decreased with preload despite greater total load. In contrast, they increased in the initial flexed posture and to some extent when abdominal muscles were preactivated demonstrating the distinct effects of pre-perturbation variables on trunk kinematics and risk of injury.

  15. Effect Of α2-Adrenergic Agonists And Antagonists On Cytokine Release From Human Lung Macrophages Cultured In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, O.; Staiano, R.I.; De Robertis, E.; Conti, G.; Di Crescenzo, V.; Loffredo, S.; Marone, G.; Marinosci, G. Zito; Cataldi, M. M.

    2016-01-01

    The most trusted hypothesis to explain how α2-adrenergic agonists may preserve pulmonary functions in critically ill patients is that they directly act on macrophages by interfering with an autocrine/paracrine adrenergic system that controls cytokine release through locally synthetized noradrenaline and α1- and α2-adrenoreceptors. We tested this hypothesis in primary cultures of resident macrophages from human lung (HLMs). HLMs were isolated by centrifugation on percoll gradients from macroscopically healthy human lung tissue obtained from four different patients at the time of lung resection for cancer. HLMs from these patients showed a significant expression of α2A, α2B and α2C adrenoreceptors both at the mRNA and at the protein level. To evaluate whether α2 adrenoreceptors controlled cytokine release from HMLs, we measured IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α concentrations in the culture medium in basal conditions and after preincubation with several α2-adrenergic agonists or antagonists. Neither the pretreatment with the α2-adrenergic agonists clonidine, medetomidine or dexdemetomidine or with the α2-adrenergic antagonist yohimbine caused significant changes in the response of any of these cytokines to LPS. These results show that, different from what reported in rodents, clonidine and dexdemetomidine do not directly suppress cytokine release from human pulmonary macrophages. This suggests that alternative mechanisms such as effects on immune cells activation or the modulation of autonomic neurotransmission could be responsible for the beneficial effects of these drugs on lung function in critical patients. PMID:27896229

  16. Effect of serotonergic and catecholaminergic antagonists on mild-stress-induced excessive grooming in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Echandía, E L; Broitman, S T; Fóscolo, M R

    1983-12-01

    Excessive grooming was induced in male rats by two ip injections of physiological saline. This mild stressful procedure did not modify open-field locomotion in 5-min trials. Methysergide (15 mg/kg) and pizotifene (5 mg/kg), serotonergic blockers, selectively prevented the grooming response to saline without affecting locomotion. Haloperidol (.4 mg/kg) also prevented the excessive grooming. However, this dopaminergic blocker impaired locomotion. The alpha- or beta-adrenoceptor antagonists phentolamine (20 mg/kg) and l-propranolol (20 mg/kg) did not prevent the excessive grooming in response to saline and did not affect locomotion. The results suggest that some serotonergic pathways in the brain are involved in the grooming response to a mild stress and support previous findings on the role of dopaminergic systems on this activity.

  17. Salvianolic Acid A, as a Novel ETA Receptor Antagonist, Shows Inhibitory Effects on Tumor in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiao Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Endothelin-1 (ET-1 autocrine and paracrine signaling modulate cell proliferation of tumor cells by activating its receptors, endothelin A receptor (ETAR and endothelin B receptor (ETBR. Dysregulation of ETAR activation promotes tumor development and progression. The potential of ETAR antagonists and the dual-ETAR and ETBR antagonists as therapeutic approaches are under preclinical and clinical studies. Salvianolic acid A (Sal A is a hydrophilic polyphenolic derivative isolated from Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge (Danshen, which has been reported as an anti-cancer and cardio-protective herbal medicine. In this study, we demonstrate that Sal A inhibits ETAR activation induced by ET-1 in both recombinant and endogenous ETAR expression cell lines. The IC50 values were determined as 5.7 µM in the HEK293/ETAR cell line and 3.14 µM in HeLa cells, respectively. Furthermore, our results showed that Sal A suppressed cell proliferation and extended the doubling times of multiple cancer cells, including HeLa, DU145, H1975, and A549 cell lines. In addition, Sal A inhibited proliferation of DU145 cell lines stimulated by exogenous ET-1 treatment. Moreover, the cytotoxicity and cardio-toxicity of Sal A were assessed in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC and Human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPS-CMs, which proved that Sal A demonstrates no cytotoxicity or cardiotoxicity. Collectively, our findings indicate that Sal A is a novel anti-cancer candidate through targeting ETAR.

  18. Effects of Regulatory Self-Questioning on Secondary-Level Students' Problem-Solving Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pate, Michael L.; Miller, Greg

    2011-01-01

    A randomized posttest-only control group experimental design was used to determine the effects of regulatory self-questioning on secondary-level career and technical education students' electrical circuit theory test scores. Students who participated in the self-questioning group were asked to answer a list of regulatory questions as they solved…

  19. Effects of clonidine and alpha-adrenoceptor antagonists on motor activity in DSP4-treated mice II: interactions with apomorphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredriksson, A; Archer, T

    2000-04-01

    Adult mice were administered either the noradrenaline (NA) neurotoxin, N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP4) or distilled water (control), 10-12 days before motor activity testing, and 6 h before testing all the mice were administered reserpine (10 mg/kg), the monoamine-depleting agent. The interactive effects of (I) clonidine, the alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonist, with the dopamine (DA) agonist, apomorphine, and the alpha(2)-antagonist, yohimbine, and (II) with either yohimbine or the alpha(1)-antagonist, prazosin, upon motor behaviour in activity test chambers were studied in reserpinized DSP4-treated and control mice. It was shown that apomorphine (3 mg/kg) increased locomotor and total activity in both reserpinized DSP4-treated and control mice but the effect was attenuated in the DSP4 mice. Co-administration of clonidine (3 mg/kg) with apomorphine potentiated the effects of apomorphine on motor activity and this effect was enhanced markedly by DSP4 pretreatment. Yohimbine (10 mg/kg) antagonized the motor activity-stimulating effects of apomorphine in both DSP4-treated and control mice. Co-administration of clonidine with apomorphine, following yohimbine, restored motor activity levels to those obtained in the absence of yohimbine and this effect upon locomotor activity was enhanced by DSP4 pretreatment. The effects of clonidine on motor activity were enhanced by NA-denervation. Prazzosin (3 mg/kg) enhanced the locomotor activity of both reserpinized DSP4-treated and control mice after the initial 30-min period but was not affected by DSP4 treatment. Analysis of post-decapitation convulsions (PDCs) indicated loss of the reflex by DSP4 pretreatment. Reserpine pretreatment abolished the initial, exploratory phase (30 min) of motor activity. These results demonstrate interactions between NA and DA systems that may bear eventual relevance to neurologic disorders such as parkinsonism.

  20. Effects of 12 Ca2+ antagonists on multidrug resistance, MDR1-mediated transport and MDR1 mRNA expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takara, Kohji; Sakaeda, Toshiyuki; Tanigawara, Yusuke; Nishiguchi, Kohshi; Ohmoto, Nobuko; Horinouchi, Masanori; Komada, Fusao; Ohnishi, Noriaki; Yokoyama, Teruyoshi; Okumura, Katsuhiko

    2002-08-01

    The effects of 12 Ca(2+) antagonists on MDR1 were examined by two independent models: the inhibitory effect on MDR1-mediated transport of [(3)H]digoxin using MDR1-overexpressing LLC-GA5-COL150 cell monolayers and the reversal effect on cytotoxicity of vinblastine or paclitaxel using MDR1-overexpressing Hvr100-6 cells. The inhibitory effects on [(3)H]digoxin transport were assessed as the 50% inhibitory concentration during 4 h exposure, and the values were the lowest for nicardipine (4.54 microM), manidipine (4.65 microM) and benidipine (4.96 microM), followed by bepridil (10.6 microM), barnidipine (12.6 microM), efonidipine (13.0 microM), verapamil (13.2 microM) and nilvadipine (18.0 microM). The reversal effect on cytotoxicity was assessed by the 50% growth inhibitory concentration after 3 days exposure, and the resistance to vinblastine or paclitaxel in Hvr100-6 cells was reversed by manidipine, verapamil, benidipine, barnidipine, and nicardipine, in that order. Bepridil, barnidipine, efonidipine, verapamil and nilvadipine showed similar inhibitory effects on [(3)H]digoxin transport, but barnidipine and verapamil showed a stronger effect in reversal of cytotoxicity. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR assay indicated a decrease in MDR1 mRNA expression by barnidipine and verapamil. It is concluded that Ca(2+) antagonists cannot only be direct inhibitors of MDR1 but that some may at the same time act as inhibitors of expression of MDR1 via down-regulation of MDR1 mRNA.

  1. Antidiabetic effects of glucokinase regulatory protein small-molecule disruptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, David J.; St Jean, David J.; Kurzeja, Robert J. M.; Wahl, Robert C.; Michelsen, Klaus; Cupples, Rod; Chen, Michelle; Wu, John; Sivits, Glenn; Helmering, Joan; Komorowski, Renée; Ashton, Kate S.; Pennington, Lewis D.; Fotsch, Christopher; Vazir, Mukta; Chen, Kui; Chmait, Samer; Zhang, Jiandong; Liu, Longbin; Norman, Mark H.; Andrews, Kristin L.; Bartberger, Michael D.; van, Gwyneth; Galbreath, Elizabeth J.; Vonderfecht, Steven L.; Wang, Minghan; Jordan, Steven R.; Véniant, Murielle M.; Hale, Clarence

    2013-12-01

    Glucose homeostasis is a vital and complex process, and its disruption can cause hyperglycaemia and type II diabetes mellitus. Glucokinase (GK), a key enzyme that regulates glucose homeostasis, converts glucose to glucose-6-phosphate in pancreatic β-cells, liver hepatocytes, specific hypothalamic neurons, and gut enterocytes. In hepatocytes, GK regulates glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis, suppresses glucose production, and is subject to the endogenous inhibitor GK regulatory protein (GKRP). During fasting, GKRP binds, inactivates and sequesters GK in the nucleus, which removes GK from the gluconeogenic process and prevents a futile cycle of glucose phosphorylation. Compounds that directly hyperactivate GK (GK activators) lower blood glucose levels and are being evaluated clinically as potential therapeutics for the treatment of type II diabetes mellitus. However, initial reports indicate that an increased risk of hypoglycaemia is associated with some GK activators. To mitigate the risk of hypoglycaemia, we sought to increase GK activity by blocking GKRP. Here we describe the identification of two potent small-molecule GK-GKRP disruptors (AMG-1694 and AMG-3969) that normalized blood glucose levels in several rodent models of diabetes. These compounds potently reversed the inhibitory effect of GKRP on GK activity and promoted GK translocation both in vitro (isolated hepatocytes) and in vivo (liver). A co-crystal structure of full-length human GKRP in complex with AMG-1694 revealed a previously unknown binding pocket in GKRP distinct from that of the phosphofructose-binding site. Furthermore, with AMG-1694 and AMG-3969 (but not GK activators), blood glucose lowering was restricted to diabetic and not normoglycaemic animals. These findings exploit a new cellular mechanism for lowering blood glucose levels with reduced potential for hypoglycaemic risk in patients with type II diabetes mellitus.

  2. Effects of oxytocin and an oxytocin receptor antagonist on retention of a nose-poke habituation response in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccia, M M; Baratti, C M

    1999-01-01

    The present study describes the use of nose-poke habituation as a memory task in mice and demonstrates that it is sensitive to oxytocin (OT) and an oxytocin receptor antagonist (AOT) administered after the learning trial. Habituation of nose-poke behavior of mice was defined as a reduction in number of nose-pokes compared to baseline, and was measured in a hole-board apparatus to which male Swiss mice were exposed on two consecutive days for 5 min, respectively. Immediate post-training subcutaneous administration of OT (2.00 micrograms/kg) impaired retention performance, whereas AOT (0.20 microgram/kg) enhanced it. Neither the impairing effects of OT (2.00 micrograms/kg) nor the enhancing effects of AOT (0.20 microgram/kg) were seen when the training treatment interval was 180 min, suggesting that both treatments influenced the storage of recently acquired information. The effects of OT (2.00 micrograms/kg) on retention were prevented by AOT (0.02 microgram/kg) administered immediately after training but 10 min prior OT treatment. This dose of antagonist did not affect retention by itself which suggest that impairing effects of OT on retention are probably due to an interaction of the neuropeptide with specific receptors. The actions of OT and AOT on retention were not due to enduring proactive effects of the compounds on performance during the retention test, since when given to untrained mice did not modify their spontaneous activities in the hole-board when recorded 24 h later. We suggest that nose-poke habituation learning can be a suitable method to investigate the mnestic effects of drugs, and that oxytocin negatively modulates memory storage of this form of learning elicited by stimuli repeatedly presented without reinforcement.

  3. The effects of dopamine receptor 1 and 2 agonists and antagonists on sexual and aggressive behaviors in male green anoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alexandra N.

    2017-01-01

    The propensity to exhibit social behaviors during interactions with same-sex and opposite-sex conspecifics is modulated by various neurotransmitters, including dopamine. Dopamine is a conserved neurotransmitter among vertebrates and dopaminergic receptors are also highly conserved among taxa. Activation of D1 and D2 dopamine receptor subtypes has been shown to modulate social behaviors, especially in mammalian and avian studies. However, the specific behavioral functions of these receptors vary across taxa. In reptiles there have been few studies examining the relationship between dopaminergic receptors and social behaviors. We therefore examined the effects of D1 and D2 agonists and antagonists on sexual and aggressive behaviors in the male green anole lizard (Anolis carolinensis). Treatment with high doses of both D1 and D2 agonists was found to impair both sexual and aggressive behaviors. However, the D1 agonist treatment was also found to impair motor function, suggesting that those effects were likely nonspecific. Lower doses of both agonists and antagonists failed to affect social behaviors. These findings provide some evidence for D2 receptor regulation of social behaviors, but in contrast with previous research, these effects are all inhibitory and no effects were found for manipulations of D1 receptors. A potential reason for the lack of more widespread effects on social behaviors using moderate or low drug doses is that systemic injection of drugs resulted in effects throughout the whole brain, thus affecting counteracting circuits which negated one another, making measurable changes in behavioral output difficult to detect. Future studies should administer drugs directly into brain regions known to regulate sexual and aggressive behaviors. PMID:28187160

  4. The Antagonistic Effect of Mycotoxins Deoxynivalenol and Zearalenone on Metabolic Profiling in Serum and Liver of Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Ji

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic profiling in liver and serum of mice was studied for the combined toxic effects of deoxynivalenol (DON and zearalenone (ZEN, through gas chromatography mass spectrum. The spectrum of serum and liver sample of mice, treated with individual 2 mg/kg DON, 20 mg/kg ZEN, and the combined DON + ZEN with final concentration 2 mg/kg DON and 20 mg/kg ZEN for 21 days, were deconvoluted, aligned and identified with MS DIAL. The data matrix was processed with univariate analysis and multivariate analysis for selection of metabolites with variable importance for the projection (VIP > 1, t-test p value < 0.05. The metabolic pathway analysis was performed with MetaMapp and drawn by CytoScape. Results show that the combined DON and ZEN treatment has an obvious “antagonistic effect” in serum and liver tissue metabolic profiling of mice. The blood biochemical indexes, like alkaline phosphatase, alanine transaminase, and albumin (ALB/globulin (GLO, reveal a moderated trend in the combined DON + ZEN treatment group, which is consistent with histopathological examination. The metabolic pathway analysis demonstrated that the combined DON and ZEN treatment could down-regulate the valine, leucine and isoleucine biosynthesis, glycine, serine and threonine metabolism, and O-glycosyl compounds related glucose metabolism in liver tissue. The metabolic profiling in serum confirmed the finding that the combined DON and ZEN treatment has an “antagonistic effect” on liver metabolism of mice.

  5. Effects of oral cetirizine, a selective H1 antagonist, on allergen- and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in subjects with asthma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gong, H

    1990-03-01

    The protective efficacy of oral cetirizine, a selective and potent H1-receptor antagonist, against the immediate bronchoconstrictive response to allergen inhalation and exercise challenge was evaluated in 16 subjects with stable, predominantly mild asthma. The subjects underwent double-blind, crossover pretreatments in randomized order in two separate protocols with (1) three daily oral doses of 20 mg of cetirizine and placebo, followed by allergen inhalation, and (2) single oral doses of cetirizine (5, 10, and 20 mg), albuterol (4 mg), and placebo, followed by exercise with cold-air inhalation. Cetirizine failed to decrease bronchial sensitivity to inhaled allergen in eight of 10 subjects. Neither cetirizine nor albuterol uniformly inhibited exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Serum concentrations of cetirizine were consistent with systemic H1-blocking activity. Modest bronchodilation occurred after administration of cetirizine and albuterol before exercise but not after the third dose of cetirizine in the allergen protocol. One subject developed moderate drowsiness during multiple dosing with cetirizine. Thus, cetirizine, in the doses studied, is not uniformly effective in preventing allergen- or exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Histamine is one of many mediators participating in immediate asthmatic responses, and selective H1 antagonists do not completely block these airway events. However, cetirizine may still clinically benefit some patients with asthma, such as patients with allergic rhinitis or urticaria.

  6. Effects of the 5-HT7 receptor antagonists SB-269970 and DR 4004 in autoshaping Pavlovian/instrumental learning task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses, Alfredo

    2004-12-06

    There is an important debate regarding the functional role of the 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(7) receptor in memory systems. Hence, the objective of this paper is to investigate the function of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) in memory consolidation, utilising an autoshaping Pavlovian/instrumental learning test. Specific antagonists at 5-HT(1A) (WAY 100635) and 5-HT(7) (SB-269970 or DR 4004) receptors administered i.p. or s.c.) after training, significantly decreased the improvement of performance produced by the 5-HT(1A/7) agonist 8-OH-DPAT to levels lower than controls'. These same antagonists attenuated the decreased level of performance produced by mCPP, although they decrease the performance levels after p-chloroamphetamine (PCA) lesion of the 5-HT system, which has no effect on its own on the conditioned response. Moreover, SB-269970 or DR 4004 reversed amnesia induced by scopolamine and dizocilpine. These data confirm a role for 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(7) receptors in memory formation and support the hypothesis that serotonergic, cholinergic, and glutamatergic systems interact in cognitively impaired animals. These findings support a potential role for both 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(7) receptors in the pathophysiology and/or treatment of schizophrenia, cognitive deficits and the mechanism of action of atypical antipsychotic drugs.

  7. Effects of excitatory amino acid antagonists on evoked and spontaneous excitatory potentials in guinea-pig hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotman, C W; Flatman, J A; Ganong, A H; Perkins, M N

    1986-09-01

    Evoked and spontaneous excitatory post-synaptic potentials (e.p.s.p.s) at the mossy fibre input to CA3 pyramidal neurones were recorded intracellularly in slices from the guinea-pig hippocampus. The effects of several amino acid antagonists on these responses were examined. L-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyrate (L-AP4), L-serine-O-phosphate (L-SOP), kynurenate, and N-(p-bromobenzoyl)piperazine-2,3-dicarboxylate (pBB-PzDA) reduced the amplitude of evoked mossy fibre e.p.s.p.s without affecting membrane potential or input resistance. Antagonism of mossy fibre spontaneous miniature e.p.s.p.s (m.e.p.s.p.s) by these compounds fell into two groups. L-AP4 and L-SOP applied at concentrations that blocked evoked e.p.s.p.s did not affect amplitude distributions of spontaneous m.e.p.s.p.s. Kynurenate and pBB-PzDA significantly affected the amplitude distributions and reduced the mean amplitude of spontaneous m.e.p.s.p.s. These results are consistent with a presynaptic site of action for L-AP4 and L-SOP and a post-synaptic site of action for kynurenate and pBB-PzDA as antagonists of e.p.s.p.s at the guinea-pig mossy fibre-CA3 pyramidal neurone synapse.

  8. Effects of iodoproxyfan, a potent and selective histamine H3 receptor antagonist, on alpha 2 and 5-HT3 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlicker, E; Pertz, H; Bitschnau, H; Purand, K; Kathmann, M; Elz, S; Schunack, W

    1995-07-01

    We determined the affinity and/or potency of the novel H3 receptor antagonist iodoproxyfan at alpha 2 and 5-HT3 receptors. Iodoproxyfan and rauwolscine (a reference alpha 2 ligand) (i) monophasically displaced 3H-rauwolscine binding to rat brain cortex membranes (pKi 6.79 and 8.59); (ii) facilitated the electrically evoked tritium overflow from superfused mouse brain cortex slices preincubated with 3H-noradrenaline (pEC50 6.46 and 7.91) and (iii) produced rightward shifts of the concentration-response curve (CRC) of (unlabelled) noradrenaline for its inhibitory effect on the evoked overflow (pA2 6.65 and 7.88). In the guinea-pig ileum, iodoproxyfan 6.3 mumol/l failed to evoke a contraction by itself but depressed the maximum of the CRC of 5-hydroxytryptamine (pD'2 5.24). Tropisetron (a reference 5-HT3 antagonist) produced rightward shifts of the CRC of 5-hydroxytryptamine (pA2 7.84). In conclusion, the affinity/potency of iodoproxyfan at H3 receptors (range 8.3-9.7 [1]) exceeds that at alpha 2 receptors by at least 1.5 log units and that at 5-HT3 receptors by at least 3 log units.

  9. The Antagonistic Effect of Mycotoxins Deoxynivalenol and Zearalenone on Metabolic Profiling in Serum and Liver of Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jian; Zhu, Pei; Cui, Fangchao; Pi, Fuwei; Zhang, Yinzhi; Li, Yun; Wang, Jiasheng; Sun, Xiulan

    2017-01-01

    Metabolic profiling in liver and serum of mice was studied for the combined toxic effects of deoxynivalenol (DON) and zearalenone (ZEN), through gas chromatography mass spectrum. The spectrum of serum and liver sample of mice, treated with individual 2 mg/kg DON, 20 mg/kg ZEN, and the combined DON + ZEN with final concentration 2 mg/kg DON and 20 mg/kg ZEN for 21 days, were deconvoluted, aligned and identified with MS DIAL. The data matrix was processed with univariate analysis and multivariate analysis for selection of metabolites with variable importance for the projection (VIP) > 1, t-test p value < 0.05. The metabolic pathway analysis was performed with MetaMapp and drawn by CytoScape. Results show that the combined DON and ZEN treatment has an obvious “antagonistic effect” in serum and liver tissue metabolic profiling of mice. The blood biochemical indexes, like alkaline phosphatase, alanine transaminase, and albumin (ALB)/globulin (GLO), reveal a moderated trend in the combined DON + ZEN treatment group, which is consistent with histopathological examination. The metabolic pathway analysis demonstrated that the combined DON and ZEN treatment could down-regulate the valine, leucine and isoleucine biosynthesis, glycine, serine and threonine metabolism, and O-glycosyl compounds related glucose metabolism in liver tissue. The metabolic profiling in serum confirmed the finding that the combined DON and ZEN treatment has an “antagonistic effect” on liver metabolism of mice. PMID:28075412

  10. Determinants of Effective Information Transfer in International Regulatory Standards Adoption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Denisa

    2010-01-01

    The role of international regulatory standards within the current global environment has become of the most importance. The age of the global system and free market capitalism carried us into the unprecedented age of regulations, and standard setting. Regulations are now becoming the emerging mode of global governance. This study focuses on…

  11. Effects of 5-HT1A receptor agonists and NMDA receptor antagonists in the social interaction test and the elevated plus maze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, R W; Corbett, R; Fielding, S

    1989-10-01

    The effects of several 5-HT1A agonists and excitatory amino acid antagonists were compared to the standard benzodiazepines, diazepam and chlordiazepoxide (CDP) in two assays predictive of anxiolytic activity, the social interaction and elevated plus maze procedures. Indicative of anxiolytic effects the 5-HT1A agonists, buspirone, gepirone and 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino) tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) all significantly increased social interaction time and open arm exploration time in the social interaction and elevated plus maze procedures, respectively. Likewise, anxiolytic activity in these assays were also produced by the competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonists, 2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (AP-5), 2-amino-7-phosphonoheptanoic acid (AP-7), 3-(2-carboxypiperazin-4-yl)-propyl-1-phosphonic acid (CPP) and the non-competitive NMDA antagonist, (+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine (MK-801) while NMDA produced anxiogenic effects. Furthermore, the anxiolytic effects of these agents were of equal magnitude to the benzodiazepines. These two classes of compounds were differentiated in the yohimbine-induced seizure assay, with the NMDA antagonists dose dependently antagonizing seizures similar to the benzodiazepines while the 5-HT1A agonists were inactive. These results suggest that the 5-HT1A agonists and the NMDA antagonists may be potential non-classical anxiolytic agents with different mechanisms of action.

  12. Effects of GABA receptor antagonists on thresholds of P23H rat retinal ganglion cells to electrical stimulation of the retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Ralph J.; Rizzo, Joseph F., III

    2011-06-01

    An electronic retinal prosthesis may provide useful vision for patients suffering from retinitis pigmentosa (RP). In animal models of RP, the amount of current needed to activate retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) is higher than in normal, healthy retinas. In this study, we sought to reduce the stimulation thresholds of RGCs in a degenerate rat model (P23H-line 1) by blocking GABA receptor mediated inhibition in the retina. We examined the effects of TPMPA, a GABAC receptor antagonist, and SR95531, a GABAA receptor antagonist, on the electrically evoked responses of RGCs to biphasic current pulses delivered to the subretinal surface through a 400 µm diameter electrode. Both TPMPA and SR95531 reduced the stimulation thresholds of ON-center RGCs on average by 15% and 20% respectively. Co-application of the two GABA receptor antagonists had the greatest effect, on average reducing stimulation thresholds by 32%. In addition, co-application of the two GABA receptor antagonists increased the magnitude of the electrically evoked responses on average three-fold. Neither TPMPA nor SR95531, applied alone or in combination, had consistent effects on the stimulation thresholds of OFF-center RGCs. We suggest that the effects of the GABA receptor antagonists on ON-center RGCs may be attributable to blockage of GABA receptors on the axon terminals of ON bipolar cells.

  13. Combined drug therapy in porcine endotoxemia. Hemodynamic and proteolytic effects of antagonists against histamine, serotonin and endorphin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naess, F; Roeise, O; Stadaas, J O; Aasen, A O

    1990-01-01

    In order to investigate the importance of potential mediators of pathophysiologic derangements in endotoxemia, we have examined the effects of the combined administration of antagonists against histamine, serotonin and endorphins in a porcine model of endotoxemia. The treatment regimen significantly reduced the increase in pulmonary artery pressure, pulmonary vascular resistance and systemic arterial pressure seen in the early stages of endotoxemia. Also, cardiac output was better maintained. However, the hemodynamic performance after an observation period of 5 h was not statistically different from untreated animals. The treatment regimen did not hinder the activation of the kallikreinkinin and fibrinolytic systems of plasma, which was evident in both treated and untreated animals, and could not counteract the increase in hematocrit or leukopenia seen in this model. This study shows that the combined blocking of histamine, serotonin and endorphines is not enough to abrogate the detrimental effects of endotoxin in a porcine model.

  14. Effect of two human growth hormone receptor antagonists on glomerulosclerosis in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei LI; Shui-xian SHEN; Li-hua ZHU; En-bi WANG; Zeng-can YE; Jun LIN; Li-he GUO; Fei-hong LUO; Xi-hong LIU; Xin FANG

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To explore the feasibility of human growth hormone (hGH) receptor antagonist in the treatment of end-stage diabetic renal complications. METHODS: Two hGH mutants, hGHA1 (Cys-hGH-dell-4, G120R, K168A, E174A,C182S, de1186-191) and hGHA2 (hGH-H21A, G120R, E174A) were expressed in E coli. The IC50 (Mean±SD)values for the mutants for inhibiting 125I-hGH binding to rabbit growth hormone receptor were (65±10) ng for hGHA1, (27±5.6) ng for hGHA2, and (10±0.6) ng for wild type hGH, respectively. RESULTS: After treatment for 12 weeks, the renal histology analysis showed that treatment with hGHA2 at 4 mg/kg body weight daily markedly suppressed glomerulosclerosis in streptozotocin-induced diabetic Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats; hGHA1 at the same dosage slightly increased the renal damage compared with saline; while wild type hGH at 1 U/kg body weight daily severely worsened the glomerulo-sclerosis in diabetic SD rats. CONCLUSION: The data indicated that hGHA2 inhibited the end-stage glomerulosclerosis in diabetic rats, but hGHA1 mildly increased the glomerulosclerosis.

  15. ABI4 mediates antagonistic effects of abscisic acid and gibberellins at transcript and protein levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Kai; Chen, Qian; Wu, Yaorong; Liu, Ruijun; Zhang, Huawei; Wang, Pengfei; Li, Yanli; Wang, Shengfu; Tang, Sanyuan; Liu, Chunyan; Yang, Wenyu; Cao, Xiaofeng; Serino, Giovanna; Xie, Qi

    2016-02-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) and gibberellins (GAs) are plant hormones which antagonistically mediate numerous physiological processes, and their optimal balance is essential for normal plant development. However, the molecular mechanism underlying ABA and GA antagonism still needs to be determined. Here, we report that ABA-INSENSITIVE 4 (ABI4) is a central factor in GA/ABA homeostasis and antagonism in post-germination stages. ABI4 overexpression in Arabidopsis (OE-ABI4) leads to developmental defects including a decrease in plant height and poor seed production. The transcription of a key ABA biosynthetic gene, NCED6, and of a key GA catabolic gene, GA2ox7, is significantly enhanced by ABI4 overexpression. ABI4 activates NCED6 and GA2ox7 transcription by directly binding to the promoters, and genetic analysis revealed that mutation in these two genes partially rescues the dwarf phenotype of ABI4 overexpressing plants. Consistently, ABI4 overexpressing seedlings have a lower GA/ABA ratio than the wild type. We further show that ABA induces GA2ox7 transcription while GA represses NCED6 expression in an ABI4-dependent manner; and that ABA stabilizes the ABI4 protein whereas GA promotes its degradation. Taken together, these results suggest that ABA and GA antagonize each other by oppositely acting on ABI4 transcript and protein levels.

  16. The effects of cannabinoid CB1, CB2 and vanilloid TRPV1 receptor antagonists on cocaine addictive behavior in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, Przemysław; Miszkiel, Joanna; McCreary, Andrew C; Filip, Małgorzata; Papp, Mariusz; Przegaliński, Edmund

    2012-03-20

    There is evidence that indicates that tonic activation of cannabinoid CB1 receptors plays a role in extinction/reinstatement of cocaine seeking-behavior but is not involved in the maintenance of cocaine self-administration. To further explore the importance of other endocannabinoid-related receptors in an animal model of cocaine addiction, the present paper examines cannabinoid CB2 receptor antagonist N-((1S)-endo-1,3,3-trimethylbicyclo(2.2.1)heptan-2-yl)-5-(4-chloro-3-methylphenyl)-1-(4-methylbenzyl)-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (SR144528) and the transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) receptor antagonist N-(3-methoxyphenyl)-4-chlorocinnamide (SB366791) on intravenous (i.v.) cocaine self-administration and extinction/reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior in rats. For comparison and reference purposes, the effect of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM251) was also examined. Moreover, for comparison effects of those drugs on operant lever responding for artificial (cocaine) vs. natural (food) reward, food self-administration was also evaluated. Our findings show that AM251 (1-3mg/kg), SR144528 (0.1-1mg/kg) and SB366791 (0.3-1mg/kg) did not affect cocaine self-administration. However, AM251 (0.1-1mg/kg), SR144528 (0.1-1mg/kg) and SB366791 (0.1-1mg/kg) decreased cocaine-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior, and AM251 (0.3-1mg/kg) decreased cue-induced reinstatement. Moreover, AM251 (3mg/kg), SR144528 (0.1-1mg/kg) and SB366791 (0.1-1mg/kg) slightly decreased food self-administration behavior, but only AM251 (3mg/kg) reduced food reward. In conclusion, our results indicate for the first time, that tonic activation of CB2 or TRPV1 receptors is involved in cocaine-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior, but their activity is not necessary for the rewarding effect of this psychostimulant. In contrast to CB1 receptors, neither CB2 nor

  17. Detailed analysis of food-reinforced operant lever pressing distinguishes effects of a cannabinoid CB1 inverse agonist and dopamine D1 and D2 antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, P J; Winston, K M; Swezey, L A; Vemuri, V K; Makriyannis, A; Salamone, J D

    2010-07-01

    Overt similarities exist between the effects of systemic cannabinoid CB1 inverse agonists and dopamine (DA) antagonists on appetitive behavior. The present set of studies was undertaken to apply a fine-grained analysis of food-reinforced operant lever pressing in rats in order to compare the pattern of effects produced by administration of the CB1 inverse agonist AM 251 and those induced by the DA D1 antagonist SKF 83566, and the D2 antagonist raclopride. Three groups of rats were trained on a fixed-ratio 5 (FR5) schedule and administered these compounds over a range of doses expected to suppress responding. All three drugs produced a dose-related suppression of total lever pressing. In addition to main effects of dose, regression analyses were performed to determine which of several response timing- and rate-related variables correlated most strongly with overall responding in each group. It was found that total session time spent pausing from responding was significantly better at predicting responding in the AM 251 group, while both DA antagonists produced significantly stronger regression coefficients (versus AM 251) from fast responding measures. These results suggest that, while several similarities exist, CB1, D1, and D2 antagonists are not identical in their pattern of suppression of food-maintained lever pressing.

  18. Effects of dopamine receptor agonist and antagonists on cholestasis-induced anxiolytic-like behaviors in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reza Zarrindast, Mohammad; Eslimi Esfahani, Delaram; Oryan, Shahrbano; Nasehi, Mohammad; Torabi Nami, Mohammad

    2013-02-28

    Dysfunctions in the dopamine transmission system have been suggested to contribute to the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. In an experimental animal model, cholestasis induction through bile duct ligation may present several main pathological features of hepatic encephalopathy. Dopaminergic systems are shown to play pivotal roles in regulation of anxiety-like behaviors. The main bile duct in male Wistar rats, weighing 220-240 g, was ligated using two ligatures plus duct transection in between. Anxiety-like behaviors were measured using the elevated plus maze task. Cholestasis increased the open arm time percentage (%OAT), 13 but not 10 days after bile duct ligation, indicating an anxiolytic-like effect. Sole intraperitoneal injection of apomorphine (dopamine D1/D2 receptor agonist, 0.25 mg/kg), SCH23390 (dopamine D1 receptor antagonist, 0.005, 0.01 and 0.02 mg/kg) or sulpiride (dopamine D2 receptor antagonist, 0.125, 0.25 and 0.5 mg/kg) did not alter %OAT, open arm entries percentage (%OAE) and locomotor activity in the sham-operated rats. Meanwhile, the higher dose apomorphine (0.5 mg/kg) induced anxiolytic-like behaviors in this group. The subthreshold dose injection of SCH23390 or sulpiride, partially reversed the anxiolytic-like behaviors induced by cholestasis (13 days after bile duct ligation). On the other hand, subthreshold dose of apomorphine in cholestatic rats (10 days post bile duct ligation) induced anxiolytic-like effects which could be blocked by SCH23390 or sulpiride. The effective doses of above drugs did not alter locomotor activity, number of rearings, groomings and defections. These findings suggested that the dopaminergic system may potentially be involved in the modulation of cholestasis-induced anxiolytic-like behaviors in rats.

  19. Effects of SB-269970, a 5-HT7 receptor antagonist, in mouse models predictive of antipsychotic-like activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galici, Ruggero; Boggs, Jamin D; Miller, Kirsten L; Bonaventure, Pascal; Atack, John R

    2008-03-01

    5-HT7 receptors have been linked to a number of psychiatric disorders including anxiety and depression. The localization of 5-HT7 receptors in the thalamus, a key sensory processing center, and the high affinity of many atypical antipsychotic compounds for these receptors have led to the speculation of the utility of 5-HT7 antagonists in schizophrenia. The goal of these studies was to examine the effects of pharmacologic blockade and genetic ablation of 5-HT7 receptors in animal models predictive of antipsychotic-like activity. We evaluated the effects of SB-269970, a selective 5-HT7 receptor antagonist, on amphetamine and ketamine-induced hyperactivity and prepulse inhibition (PPI) deficits. In addition, sensorimotor gating function and locomotor activity were evaluated in 5-HT7 knockout mice. Locomotor activity was measured for up to 180 min using an automated infrared photobeam system, and PPI was evaluated in startle chambers. SB-269970 (3, 10 and 30 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) significantly blocked amphetamine [3 mg/kg, subcutaneously (s.c.)] and ketamine (30 mg/kg, s.c.)-induced hyperactivity and reversed amphetamine (10 mg/kg, s.c.)-induced but not ketamine (30 mg/kg, s.c.)-induced PPI deficits, without changing spontaneous locomotor activity and startle amplitude. The largest dose of SB-269970 did not block the effects of amphetamine in 5-HT7 knockout mice. Collectively, these results indicate that blockade of 5-HT7 receptors partially modulates glutamatergic and dopaminergic function and could be clinically useful for the treatment of positive symptoms of schizophrenia.

  20. Endothelin receptor antagonists: effects on extracellular matrix synthesis in primary cultures of skin fibroblasts from systemic sclerosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Villaggio

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Endothelin-1 (ET-1 seems to enhance the pro-fibrotic protein synthesis by skin fibroblasts and its effects are mediated by endothelin-A and B (ETA and ETB receptors. This study aimed to investigate the effects of ETA and ETB receptor antagonists (ETARA-sitaxentan and ETA/BRA-bosentan on type I collagen (COL-1, fibronectin (FN and fibrillin-1 (FBL-1 synthesis in primary cultures of skin fibroblasts from systemic sclerosis patients. Primary cultures of fibroblasts were obtained from skin biopsies of 6 female systemic sclerosis patients and were treated with ET-1 (100 nM for 24 and 48 hrs with or without pre-treatment (1 hr with ETARA (2 μM or ETA/BRA (10 μM. Primary culture of human scleroderma skin fibroblasts not treated with ET-1 or ET receptor antagonists (ETARA and ETA/BRA were used as controls. COL-1, FN and FBL-1 synthesis was evaluated by immunocytochemistry and Western blot analysis. Immunocytochemistry and Western blot analysis showed that ET-1 significantly increased COL-1 and FN synthesis at 24 and 48 hrs and FBL-1 synthesis at 48 hrs vs untreated cells. ETARA significantly contrasted the ET-1-mediated increase in COL-1 and FN at 24 hrs as well as COL-1 and FBL-1 at 48 hrs, but not FN synthesis vs ET-1-treated fibroblasts. Conversely, ETA/BRA significantly antagonized the ET-1-mediated overproduction of COL-1 and FN both at 24 and 48 hrs and the FBL-1 synthesis at 48 hrs vs ET-1-treated cells. The single ETARA treatment seems to contrast significantly the increase in COL-1 synthesis, whereas the dual ETA/BRA treatment seems active in significantly antagonizing both COL-1 and FN overproduction induced by ET-1. In conclusion, ET-1 antagonism might have positive effects in contrasting the profibrotic activity of systemic sclerosis skin fibroblasts.

  1. Topological effects of data incompleteness of gene regulatory networks

    CERN Document Server

    Sanz, J; Borge-Holthoefer, J; Moreno, Y

    2012-01-01

    The topological analysis of biological networks has been a prolific topic in network science during the last decade. A persistent problem with this approach is the inherent uncertainty and noisy nature of the data. One of the cases in which this situation is more marked is that of transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs) in bacteria. The datasets are incomplete because regulatory pathways associated to a relevant fraction of bacterial genes remain unknown. Furthermore, direction, strengths and signs of the links are sometimes unknown or simply overlooked. Finally, the experimental approaches to infer the regulations are highly heterogeneous, in a way that induces the appearance of systematic experimental-topological correlations. And yet, the quality of the available data increases constantly. In this work we capitalize on these advances to point out the influence of data (in)completeness and quality on some classical results on topological analysis of TRNs, specially regarding modularity at different level...

  2. Effects of histamine and its antagonists on murine T-cells and bone marrow-derived dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiufen; Zafar, Mohammad Ishraq; Gao, Feng

    2015-01-01

    We determined the effects of histamine and its antagonists on the surface marker expression of dendritic cells (DCs) and the influence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), histamine, and histamine receptor antagonists on DCs and T-cells. The bone marrow was extracted from the femurs and tibiae of 6- to 8-week-old female Balb/c mice and cultured in medium containing penicillin, streptomycin, L-glutamine, fetal calf serum, or granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) alone or with interleukin (IL)-4. The cells received three different doses of LPS and histamine, plus three different doses of descarboethoxyloratadine (DCL). We assayed the supernatant for various cytokines. The spleen cells of DO11.10 mice were examined by flow cytometry, which included labeling and sorting CD4+ T-cells, as well as coculture of DCs and T-cells with ovalbumin (OVA)323-339 peptide. Histamine or histamine plus DCL did not affect the expression of major histocompatibility complex class II, CD11c, CD11b, CD86, and CD80. However, GM-CSF increased the expression of all markers except CD80. Histamine increased interferon-γ production in GM-CSF + IL-4-cultured cells; it also enhanced IL-10 production, but suppressed IL-12 production in LPS-stimulated DCs with no DCL. Cimetidine inhibited IL-10 production and restored IL-12 secretion in LPS-treated DCs. LPS increased IL-10 and decreased IL-12 levels. GM-CSF + IL-4-generated DCs had a stronger stimulatory effect on DO11.10 T-cell proliferation than GM-CSF-generated DCs. Inducible costimulator ligand expression was higher in GM-CSF + IL-4- than in GM-CSF-generated DC groups after 2 days of coculture, but decreased 4 days later. IL-13 production was higher in bone marrow DCs generated with GM-CSF than in those generated with GM-CSF + IL-4. OVA-pulsed DCs and OVA-plus-DCL DCs showed increased IL-12 levels. OVA plus LPS increased both IL-10 and interferon-α. Although histamine or histamine receptor-1 antagonists did not influence DC LPS

  3. Dual Effects of IL-1 Overactivity on the Immune System in a Mouse Model of Arthritis due to Deficiency of IL-1 Receptor Antagonist

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Yan; Yan Jiao; Hong Chen; Feng Jiao; Karen A.Hasty; John M.Stuart; Weikuan Gu

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have revealed the significance of cytokine interleukin 1 (IL-1) in the onset and progression of meumatoid arthritis (RA).The precise molecular mechanisms related to IL-1 underlying RA is still elusive.We conducted a whole genome-wide transcriptomal comparison of wild-type (WT) and arthritis-prone IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-Irn) deficient BALB/c mice to address this issue.To refine our search efforts,gene expression profiling was also performed on paired wild-type and arthritis-resis nt IL-1m deficient DBA/1 mice as internal controls when identifying causative arthritis candidate genes.Two hundred and fifteen trans dpts were found to be dysregulated greater than or equal to 2-fold in the diseased mice.The altered transcriptome in BALB/c mice revealed increased myeloid cell activities and impaired lymphocyte functionality,suggesting dual regulatory effects of IL-1 hyperactivil on immunological changes associated with arthritis development.Phase-specific gene expression changes were identified,such as early increase and late decrease of heat shock protein coding genes.Moreover,common gene expression changes were also observed,especially the upregulation of paired Ig-like receptor A (Pira) in both early and late phases of arthritis.Real-time PCR was performed to validate the expression of Pira and an intervention experiment with a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I inhibitor (brefeldin A) was carried out to investigate the role of suppressing Pira activity.We conclude that global pattern changes of common and distinct gene expressions may represent novel opportunities for better control of RA through early diagnosis and development of alternative therapeutic strategies.

  4. Effects of the NMDA receptor antagonists on deltamethrin-induced striatal dopamine release in conscious unrestrained rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikawa, Takuya; Furuhama, Kazuhisa

    2009-08-01

    To better understand the neurotoxicity caused by the pyrethroid pesticide, we examined the effects of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists MK-801, a non-competitive cation channel blocker, and 2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (APV), a competitive Na(+) channel blocker, on extracellular dopamine levels in male Sprague-Dawley rats receiving the type II pyrethroid deltamethrin using an in vivo microdialysis system. Deltamethrin (60 mg/kg, i.p.) evidently increased striatal dopamine levels with a peak time of 120 min, and the local infusion (i.c.) of either MK-801(650 muM) or APV (500 muM) completely blocked these actions. The fluctuation in the dopamine metabolite 3-MT also resembled that in dopamine. Our results suggest that dopamine-releasing neurons would be modulated via the NMDA receptor by the excitatory glutamatergic neurons after deltamethrin treatment.

  5. The CXCR4 antagonist plerixafor enhances the effect of rituximab in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinholdt, Linn; Laursen, Maria Bach; Schmitz, Alexander;

    2016-01-01

    . Accordingly, the fraction of apoptotic/dead cells significantly increased following addition of plerixafor to rituximab treatment. Furthermore, exposure of DLBCL cells to plerixafor resulted in a significant decrease in CXCR4 fluorescence intensity. CONCLUSIONS: Based on our results, implying that the anti......BACKGROUND: Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is an aggressive disease with variable clinical outcome, accounting for at least 25-30 % of adult non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Approximately one third of DLBCL patients are not cured by the currently used treatment regimen, R-CHOP. Hence, new treatment......-proliferative/pro-apoptotic effect of rituximab on DLBCL cells can be synergistically enhanced by the CXCR4 antagonist plerixafor, addition of plerixafor to the R-CHOP regimen can be suggested to improve treatment outcome for DLBCL patients....

  6. Interleukin expression after injury and the effects of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Connie S Chamberlain

    Full Text Available Ligament healing follows a series of complex coordinated events involving various cell types, cytokines, as well as other factors, producing a mechanically inferior tissue more scar-like than native tissue. Macrophages provide an ongoing source of cytokines to modulate inflammatory cell adhesion and migration as well as fibroblast proliferation. Studying interleukins inherent to ligament healing during peak macrophage activation and angiogenesis may elucidate inflammatory mediators involved in subsequent scar formation. Herein, we used a rat healing model assayed after surgical transection of their medial collateral ligaments (MCLs. On days 3 and 7 post-injury, ligaments were collected and used for microarray analysis. Of the 12 significantly modified interleukins, components of the interleukin-1 family were significantly up-regulated. We therefore examined the influence of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra on MCL healing. Transected rat MCLs received PBS or IL-1Ra at the time of surgery. Inhibition of IL-1 activation decreased pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-12, IL-2, and IFN-γ, myofibroblasts, and proliferating cells, as well as increased anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10, endothelial cells/blood vessel lumen, M2 macrophages, and granulation tissue size without compromising the mechanical properties. These results support the concept that IL-1Ra modulates MCL-localized granulation tissue components and cytokine production to create a transient environment that is less inflammatory. Overall, IL-1Ra may have therapeutic potential early in the healing cascade by stimulating the M2 macrophages and altering the granulation tissue components. However, the single dose of IL-1Ra used in this study was insufficient to maintain the more regenerative early response. Due to the transient influence on most of the healing components tested, IL-1Ra may have greater therapeutic potential with sustained delivery.

  7. Investigation of antidepressant-like and anxiolytic-like actions and cognitive and motor side effects of four N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Refsgaard, Louise Konradsen; Pickering, Darryl S; Andreasen T., Jesper

    2017-01-01

    Evidence suggests that N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonists could be efficacious in treating depression and anxiety, but side effects constitute a challenge. This study evaluated the antidepressant-like and anxiolytic-like actions, and cognitive and motor side effects of four NMDAR...

  8. Pharmacological modulation of the short-lasting effects of antagonistic direct current-stimulation over the human motor cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila eChaieb

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Combined administration of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS with either pergolide (PGL or D-cycloserine (D-CYC can prolong the excitability-diminishing effects of cathodal, or the excitability enhancing effect of anodal stimulation for up to 24hrs poststimulation. However, it remains unclear whether the potentiation of the observed aftereffects is dominated by the polarity and duration of the stimulation, or the dual application of combined stimulation and drug administration. The present study looks at whether the aftereffects of oral administration of PGL (a D1/D2 agonist or D-CYC (a partial NMDA receptor agonist, in conjunction with the short duration antagonistic application of tDCS (either 5 min cathodal followed immediately by 5 min anodal or vice versa, that alone only induces short lasting aftereffects, can modulate cortical excitability in healthy human subjects, as revealed by a single-pulse MEP (motor-evoked-potential paradigm. Results indicate that the antagonistic application of DC currents induces short-term neuroplastic aftereffects that are dependent upon the polarity of the second application of short-duration tDCS. The application of D-cycloserine resulted in a reversal of this trend and so consequently a marked inhibition of cortical excitability with the cathodal-anodal stimulation order was observed. The administration of pergolide showed no significant aftereffects in either case. These results emphasise that the aftereffects of tDCS are dependent upon the stimulation orientation, and mirror the findings of other studies reporting the neuroplasticity inducing aftereffects of tDCS, and their prolongation when combined with the administration of CNS active drugs.

  9. An electrophysiological analysis of the effects of noradrenaline and alpha-receptor antagonists on neuromuscular transmission in mammalian muscular arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, M E; Surprenant, A

    1980-01-01

    1 The effects of exogenously applied noradrenaline (NA) and alpha-adrenoceptor antagonists on the mechanical and intracellularly recorded responses to perivascular nerve stimulation were examined in the rabbit ear artery, rabbit saphenous artery and rat tail artery. 2 Excitatory junction potentials (e.j.ps) and action potentials recorded from these smooth muscles were not blocked or depressed by phentolamine, phenoxybenzamine, prazosin, or labetolol in concentrations as high as 10 microgram/ml. Phentolamine (1 to 10 microgram/ml) depressed neurally-evoked contractions of the ear and saphenous, but not the tail artery, and also depressed the contractions produced by direct muscle stimulation in the ear and saphenous arteries. Prazosin and labetolol (0.1 to 10 microgram/ml) had no effect on the neurally evoked contractile response in any of the arteries examined. 3 The amplitude of the steady-state e.j.p. during repetitive stimulation at 0.45 to 2 Hz was increased by phentolamine or phenoxybenzamine but not by prazosin or labetolol. Phentolamine and phenoxybenzamine also increased the amplitude of the e.j.p. evoked by a single stimulus in the majority of the preparations. 4 Concentrations of NA greater than or equal to 1 microgram/ml depolarized the smooth muscle while concentrations greater than or equal to 0.5 microgram/ml depressed the amplitude of the e.j.ps recorded from these arteries. alpha-Antagonists did not suppress either the NA-induced membrane depolarization or depression of e.j.ps. 5 These observations call into question the physiological relevance of both pre- and postsynaptic alpha-receptors in regard to adrenergic neuromuscular transmission in muscular arteries.

  10. Effects of the novel 5-HT(6) receptor antagonist RO4368554 in rat models for cognition and sensorimotor gating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Rudy; Vivian, Jef; Hedley, Linda; Szczepanski, Krystine; Secchi, Rob L; Zuzow, Marcus; van Laarhoven, Susanne; Moreau, Jean-Luc; Martin, James R; Sik, Ayhan; Blokland, Arjan

    2007-03-01

    Serotonin(6) (5-HT(6)) receptors are almost exclusively located in the central nervous system. High expression in the hippocampus, nucleus accumbens and striatum is consistent with a potential role in cognition and psychosis. The availability of potent, selective and brain-penetrating 5-HT(6) antagonists such as RO4368554 allows further characterization of the role of the 5-HT(6) receptor in these processes. Herein, we tested RO4368554 in several cognition tasks, as well as sensorimotor gating tests. Using scopolamine-impaired and unimpaired adult male rats, RO4368554 was given in novel object discrimination, social recognition, social discrimination, Morris water maze, passive avoidance and autoshaping procedures. RO4368554 reversed the effects of scopolamine in novel object discrimination (active doses in mg/kg, i.p., 3, 10), social recognition (3, 10), social discrimination (1, 3, 10) and passive avoidance (10, 30 i.p. and 100 p.o.) tasks. In unimpaired rats, RO4368554 enhanced object discrimination (3, 10; 4-h forgetting interval) and autoshaping learning (3), but was inactive in a water maze task (doses tested: 1-10 mg/kg, i.p.). In tests sensitive to antipsychotics, RO4368554 did not reverse sensorimotor gating deficits induced by the psychostimulants dizocilpine and amphetamine (doses tested: 1-30 mg/kg, i.p.) or neonatal lesion of the ventral hippocampus (1-10 mg/kg, i.p.). In conclusion, RO4368554 enhanced learning and memory processes in unimpaired and scopolamine-impaired rats, supporting the notion that the cognitive enhancing effects of 5-HT(6) receptor antagonists involve modulation of cholinergic neurotransmission.

  11. The effect of antagonistic micro-organisms on the brood of honeybees (Apis mellifera) and bumblebees (Bombus terrestris) 2003

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steen, van der J.J.M.; Dik, A.J.

    2002-01-01

    Several plant pathogenic fungi enter the plant trough open flowers. Spores of antagonistic micro-organisms present on the flowers can successfully compete with the possible pathogens. Honeybees and bumblebees can be used for transporting these antagonistic micro-organisms from the hive into flowers

  12. Estimation of the cost-effectiveness of apixaban versus vitamin K antagonists in the management of atrial fibrillation in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgi, Mariano Anibal; Caroli, Christian; Giglio, Norberto Damian; Micone, Paula; Aiello, Eleonora; Vulcano, Cristina; Blanco, Julia; Donato, Bonnie; Quevedo, Joaquin Mould

    2015-12-01

    Apixaban, a novel oral anticoagulant which has been approved for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in non-valvular atrial fibrillation, reduces both ischemic and haemorrhagic stroke and produces fewer bleedings than vitamin K antagonist warfarin. These clinical results lead to a decrease in health care resource utilization and, therefore, have a positive impact on health economics of atrial fibrillation. The cost-effectiveness of apixaban has been assessed in a variety of clinical settings and countries. However, data from emergent markets, as is the case of Argentina, are still scarce.We performed a cost-effectiveness analysis of apixaban versus warfarin in non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) in patients suitable for oral anticoagulation in Argentina. A Markov-based model including both costs and effects were used to simulate a cohort of patients with NVAF. Local epidemiological, resource utilization and cost data were used and all inputs were validated by a Delphi Panel of local experts. We adopted the payer's perspective with costs expressed in 2012 US Dollars.The study revealed that apixaban is cost-effective compared with warfarin using a willingness to pay threshold ranging from 1 to 3 per capita Gross Domestic Product (11558 - 34664 USD) with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of 786.08 USD per QALY gained. The benefit is primarily a result of the reduction in stroke and bleeding events.The study demonstrates that apixaban is a cost-effective alternative to warfarin in Argentina.

  13. Effects of the selective dopamine D(1) antagonists NNC 01-0112 and SCH 39166 on latent inhibition in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimble, Karen M; Bell, Robert; King, David J

    2002-09-01

    Dopamine D(1) receptor blockade does not appear to be a prerequisite for antipsychotic activity since many clinically effective antipsychotics have little or no affinity for this receptor subtype. Clozapine, however, which has minimal liability for extrapyramidal symptoms, possesses affinities of similar order for D(1) and D(2) receptors. In earlier animal models used to predict antipsychotic effect, selective D(1) antagonists have shown effects similar to standard antipsychotics with preferential D(2) or mixed D(1)/D(2) antagonism. We investigated the effects of haloperidol (0.1 mg/kg) and two selective D(1) antagonists, NNC 01-0112 (0.05, 0.1 and 0.2 mg/kg) and SCH 39166 (0.02, 0.2 and 2.0 mg/kg), on latent inhibition (LI) in rats. LI is a behavioural paradigm in which repeated nonreinforced preexposure to a stimulus retards subsequent associations to that stimulus. Disrupted LI has been suggested as a model for the attentional deficits in schizophrenia. Using preexposure to a flashing light stimulus, which subsequently served as a conditioned stimulus for suppression of water licking, we demonstrated a clear LI effect with haloperidol but with neither of the two D(1) antagonists. Since selective D(1) antagonists are not clinically effective, these results add further credibility for the relevance of LI as an animal model of psychosis.

  14. SAR110894, a potent histamine H₃-receptor antagonist, displays procognitive effects in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griebel, Guy; Pichat, Philippe; Pruniaux, Marie-Pierre; Beeské, Sandra; Lopez-Grancha, Mati; Genet, Elisabeth; Terranova, Jean-Paul; Castro, Antonio; Sánchez, Juan Antonio; Black, Mark; Varty, Geoffrey B; Weiner, Ina; Arad, Michal; Barak, Segev; De Levie, Amaya; Guillot, Etienne

    2012-08-01

    SAR110894 is a novel histamine H₃-R ligand, displaying high and selective affinity for human, rat or mouse H₃-Rs. SAR110894 is a potent H₃-R antagonist at native receptors, reversing R-α-methylhistamine-induced inhibition of electrical field stimulation contraction in the guinea-pig ileum. Additionally, SAR110894 inhibited constitutive GTPγS binding at human H₃-Rs demonstrating inverse agonist properties. In behavioral models addressing certain aspects of cognitive impairment associated with schizophrenia (CIAS) and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), SAR110894 improved memory performances in several variants of the object recognition task in mice (0.3-3 mg/kg, p.o.) or rats (0.3-1 mg/kg, p.o.). Moreover, SAR110894 (1 mg/kg, p.o.) reversed a deficit in working memory in the Y-maze test, following an acute low dose of phencyclidine (PCP) (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) in mice sensitized by repeated treatment with a high dose of PCP (10 mg/kg, i.p.). In the latent inhibition (LI) model, SAR110894 potentiated LI in saline-treated rats (1 and 3 mg/kg, i.p.) and reversed abnormally persistent LI induced by neonatal nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition in rodents (0.3-3 mg/kg, i.p.). In a social novelty discrimination task in rats, SAR110894 attenuated selective attention deficit induced by neonatal PCP treatment (3 and 10 mg/kg, p.o.) or a parametric modification of the procedure (3 and 10 mg/kg, p.o.). SAR110894 showed efficacy in several animal models related to the cognitive deficits in Alzheimer's disease (AD). It prevented the occurrence of episodic memory deficit induced by scopolamine in rats (0.01-10 mg/kg, p.o.) or by the central infusion of the toxic amyloid fragment β₂₅₋₃₅ in the object recognition test in mice (1 and 3 mg/kg, p.o.). Altogether, these findings suggest that SAR110894 may be of therapeutic interest for the treatment of the cognitive symptoms of AD, schizophrenia and certain aspects of ADHD.

  15. Designer Leptin Receptor Antagonist Allo-aca Inhibits VEGF Effects in Ophthalmic Neoangiogenesis Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coroniti, Roberta; Fario, Rafal; Nuno, Didier J.; Otvos, Laszlo; Scolaro, Laura; Surmacz, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Experimental and clinical data suggest that pro-angiogenic, pro-inflammatory and mitogenic cytokine leptin can be implicated in ocular neovascularization and other eye pathologies. At least in part, leptin action appears to be mediated through functional interplay with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). VEGF is a potent regulator of neoangiogenesis and vascular leakage with a proven role in conditions such as proliferative diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration and diabetic macular edema. Accordingly, drugs targeting VEGF are becoming mainstream treatments for these diseases. The crosstalk between leptin and VEGF has been noted in different tissues, but its involvement in the development of eye pathologies is unclear. Leptin is coexpressed with VEGF during ocular neovascularization and can potentiate VEGF synthesis and angiogenic function. However, whether or not VEGF regulates leptin expression or signaling has never been studied. Consequently, we addressed this aspect of leptin/VEGF crosstalk in ocular models, focusing on therapeutic exploration of underlying mechanisms. Here we show, for the first time, that in retinal (RF/6A) and corneal (BCE) endothelial cells, VEGF (100 ng/mL, 24 h) stimulated leptin mRNA synthesis by 70 and 30%, respectively, and protein expression by 56 and 28%, respectively. In parallel, VEGF induced RF/6A and BCE cell growth by 33 and 20%, respectively. In addition, VEGF upregulated chemotaxis and chemokinesis in retinal cells by ~40%. VEGF-dependent proliferation and migration were significantly reduced in the presence of the leptin receptor antagonist, Allo-aca, at 100–250 nmol/L concentrations. Furthermore, Allo-aca suppressed VEGF-dependent long-term (24 h), but not acute (15 min) stimulation of the Akt and ERK1/2 signaling pathways. The efficacy of Allo-aca was validated in the rat laser-induced choroidal neovascularization model where the compound (5 μg/eye) significantly reduced pathological

  16. Native soil bacteria isolates in Mexico exhibit a promising antagonistic effect against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis-lycopersici.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero-Ramírez, Jesús Damián; López-Rivera, Raquel; Figueroa-Lopez, Alejandro Miguel; Mancera-López, María Elena; Martínez-Álvarez, Juan Carlos; Apodaca-Sánchez, Miguel Ángel; Maldonado-Mendoza, Ignacio Eduardo

    2013-10-01

    Sinaloa state accounts for 23% of Mexico's tomato production. One constraint on this important crop is the Fusarium crown and root rot, caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis-lycopersici, which has been reported to reduce crop yield by up to 50%. In this study, we set out to identify bacterial populations which could be used to control this disease through natural antagonism. Five tomato rhizospheric soil samples were collected, dried for 1-week, and homogenized. Sub-samples were used to prepare an aqueous solution used to isolate microorganisms in pure cultures. Organisms were purified and grown separately, and used to generate a collection of 705 bacterial isolates. Thirty-four percent from this bank (254 strains) was screened against Forl, finding 27 bacteria displaying in vitro Forl growth inhibition levels from 5% to 60%. These isolates belonged to the genus Bacillus and their 16Sr DNA sequences showed that they are closely related to seven species and they were putatively designated as: B. subtilis, B. cereus, B. amyloliquefaciens, B. licheniformis, B. thuringiensis, B. megaterium, and B. pumilus. One isolate belonged to the genus Acinetobacter. Two B. subtilis isolates (144 and 151) and one B. cereus isolate (171) showed the best antagonistic potential against FCRRT when evaluated on seedlings. Plate and activity assays indicate that these isolates include a diverse repertoire of functional antagonistic traits that might explain their ability to control FCRRT. Moreover, bacteria showed partial hemolytic activity, and future research will be directed at ensuring that their application will be not harmful for humans and effective against Forl in greenhouse or field conditions.

  17. HPLC method development, validation and its application to investigate in vitro effect of pioglitazone on the availability of H1 receptor antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agha Zeeshan Mirza

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The method has been developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of pioglitazone and H1-receptor antagonists (fexofenadine, cetirizine and levocetirizine in formulations and human serum. Utilizing HPLC techniques, an assay was designed to determine the in vitro effects of pioglitazone on H1-receptor antagonists. Obtained results were verified using the UV spectrophotometric technique. First-derivative values versus concentrations were used to plot calibration curves of these drugs and were found to similar with the HPLC data. The availability of pioglitazone remained unchanged in absence or presence of fexofenadine, cetirizine and levocetirizine. This in vitro analysis confirms the harmless co-administration of pioglitazone and H1-receptor antagonists, and can serve as the foundation for designing further in vivo studies.

  18. The interactive effects of ammonia and microcystin on life-history traits of the cladoceran Daphnia magna: synergistic or antagonistic?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Yang

    Full Text Available The occurrence of Microcystis blooms is a worldwide concern that has caused numerous adverse effects on water quality and lake ecology. Elevated ammonia and microcystin concentrations co-occur during the degradation of Microcystis blooms and are toxic to aquatic organisms; we studied the relative and combined effects of these on the life history of the model organism Daphnia magna. Ammonia and microcystin-LR treatments were: 0, 0.366, 0.581 mg L(-1 and 0, 10, 30, 100 µg L(-1, respectively. Experiments followed a fully factorial design. Incubations were 14 d and recorded the following life-history traits: number of moults, time to first batch of eggs, time to first clutch, size at first batch of eggs, size at first clutch, number of clutches per female, number of offspring per clutch, and total offspring per female. Both ammonia and microcystin were detrimental to most life-history traits. Interactive effects of the toxins occurred for five traits: the time to first batch of eggs appearing in the brood pouch, time to first clutch, size at first clutch, number of clutches, and total offspring per female. The interactive effects of ammonia and microcystin appeared to be synergistic on some parameters (e.g., time to first eggs and antagonistic on others (e.g., total offspring per female. In conclusion, the released toxins during the degradation of Microcystis blooms would result, according to our data, in substantially negative effect on D. magna.

  19. The effect of melanocortin (Mc3 and Mc4) antagonists on serotonin-induced food and water intake of broiler cockerels

    OpenAIRE

    Zendehdel, Morteza; Hamidi, Farshid; Babapour, Vahab; Mokhtarpouriani, Kasra; Fard, Ramin Mazaheri Nezhad

    2012-01-01

    The current study was designed to examine the effects of intracerebroventricular injections of SHU9119 [a nonselective melanocortin receptor (McR) antagonist] and MCL0020 (a selective McR antagonist) on the serotonin-induced eating and drinking responses of broiler cockerels deprived of food for 24 h (FD24). For Experiment 1, the chickens were intracerebroventricularly injected with 2.5, 5, and 10 µg serotonin. In Experiment 2, the chickens received 2 nmol SHU9119 before being injected with 1...

  20. The effect of the non-NMDA receptor antagonist GYKI 52466 and NBQX and the competitive NMDA receptor antagonist D-CPPene on the development of amygdala kindling and on amygdala-kindled seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dürmüller, N; Craggs, M; Meldrum, B S

    1994-02-01

    A competitive (NBQX) and a non-competitive (GYKI 52466) AMPA antagonist, and a competitive NMDA antagonist (D-CPPene) were tested against the development of kindling and against fully kindled seizures in amygdala-kindled rats. GYKI 52466, 10 mg/kg given i.p. 5 min prior to electrical stimulation in fully kindled animals, reduces both the cortical after-discharge duration and the behavioural seizure score. GYKI 52466, 20 mg/kg, reduces seizure score and after-discharge duration significantly (after 5-30 min) but the animals show severe motor side effects and an irregular cortical and hippocampal EEG. Administration of GYKI 52466, 10 mg/kg, prior to kindling stimulation on days 3-8, does not slow the development of kindling. NBQX, 20 mg/kg or 40 mg/kg i.p., 30 min prior to stimulation, significantly reduces the seizure score in fully kindled animals. NBQX 20 mg/kg i.p. has no effect on the development of kindling. D-CPPene, 8 mg/kg or 12 mg/kg, 120 min prior to stimulation reduces the behavioural seizure score in fully kindled animals. D-CPPene, 8 mg/kg on days 3-8, delays the development of kindling. NMDA receptors play a key role in the kindling process. Expression of kindled seizures involves non-NMDA and NMDA receptors.

  1. The Comparison of Antagonistic Effects of Normal Vaginal Lactobacilli and Some Commonly used Antibiotics on Isolated Bacteria of Uterine Infections in Dairy Cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pouya Dini

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Uterine infections are one of the major reproductive complications during postpartum. The antibiotics and antiseptic agents used in the treatment of postpartum infections have residues in food, induce bacterial resistance, increase the financial costs and cause failure in defense mechanism of host. On the other hand, nowadays the administration of probiotics is considered as an alternative method for the prevention and treatment of infections. Therefore, preventive treatment with probiotic product could decrease the usage of antibiotic and bring advantages in dairy farm systems. The objective of this study was screening of the antagonistic properties of isolated vaginal Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB against the most prevalent bacteria in uterine infections in order to investigate their probiotic potentials as an alternative approach for prevention of uterine infections. LAB were isolated from sampling of cranial part of vagina during estrus phase and luteal phase of Holstein dairy cattle and pathogens bacteria were isolated from merits and endometritis specimens which referred to our veterinary laboratory. The antagonistic activity of isolated LAB against uterine pathogens was tested by Agar spot test. Antibiotic susceptibilities of pathogenic strains to commonly used antibiotics were investigated by using disc diffusion method. Inhibition zones around both the probiotic spots and the antibiotic discs were classified to weak, moderate and strong categories and their antagonistic efficacies were compared. Isolated LAB had antagonistic effects against all the pathogenic strains including both gram negative and gram positive, Arcanobacterium pyogenes and Pseudomonas aeroginosa were the most sensitive bacteria (with 12.60 and 14 mm an average inhibition zone, respectively. LAB had the least antagonistic effects on Clostridium perfringens (3.6 mm of an average inhibition zone. Comparing the antagonistic efficacies, the percentages of overall

  2. Psychomotor effects, pharmacokinetics and safety of the orexin receptor antagonist suvorexant administered in combination with alcohol in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hong; Yee, Ka Lai; Gill, Sean; Liu, Wen; Li, Xiaodong; Panebianco, Deborah; Mangin, Eric; Morrison, Dennis; McCrea, Jacqueline; Wagner, John A; Troyer, Matthew D

    2015-11-01

    A double-blind crossover study investigated psychomotor effects, pharmacokinetics, and safety of the orexin receptor antagonist suvorexant with and without alcohol. Healthy adults (n=31) were randomized to receive placebo or suvorexant (40 mg) plus placebo solution or alcohol (0.7 g/kg) in each of four treatments (single doses; morning administration). The US Food and Drug Administration approved suvorexant dose is 10 mg (up to 20 mg) daily. Pharmacodynamic effects were assessed using tests of digit vigilance (DVT; primary endpoint), choice reaction time, digit symbol substitution, numeric working memory, immediate/delayed word recall, body sway and subjective alertness. Suvorexant alone did not significantly affect DVT reaction time, but did impact some pharmacodynamic tests. Suvorexant with alcohol increased reaction time versus either alone (mean difference at 2 h: 44 ms versus suvorexant, palcohol, peffects on tests of vigilance, working/episodic memory, postural stability and alertness. No effects of suvorexant alone or with alcohol were observed by 9 h. No important changes in pharmacokinetic parameters were observed upon co-administration. All treatments were generally well tolerated without serious adverse events. In conclusion, co-administration of 40 mg suvorexant and 0.7 g/kg alcohol had additive negative psychomotor effects. Patients are advised not to consume alcohol with suvorexant.

  3. Pharmacokinetic/pharmaco-dynamic modelling and simulation of the effects of different cannabinoid receptor type 1 antagonists on (9)-tetrahydrocannabinol challenge tests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guan, Zheng; Klumpers, Linda E.; Oyetayo, Olubukayo-Opeyemi; Heuberger, Jules; van Gerven, Joop M. A.; Stevens, Jasper

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The severe psychiatric side effects of cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) antagonists hampered their wide development but this might be overcome by careful management of drug development with pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) analyses. PK/PD models suitable for direct comparison of differe

  4. The pituitary mediates the anxiolytic-like effects of the vasopressin V1B receptor antagonist, SSR149415, in a social interaction test in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazaki, Toshiharu; Iijima, Michihiko; Chaki, Shigeyuki

    2006-08-14

    A vasopressin V(1B) receptor antagonist has been shown to exhibit anxiolytic effects in a variety of animal models of anxiety. In the present study, we examined the involvement of the pituitary in the anxiolytic effects of a vasopressin V(1B) receptor antagonist by conducting a social interaction test in rats. In the sham-operated rats, both the vasopressin V(1B) receptor antagonist SSR149415 and the benzodiazepine chlordiazepoxide significantly increased the social behavior of a pair of unfamiliar rats, and the blood adrenocorticotropic hormone levels were markedly increased during the social interaction test. Hypophysectomy also increased the length of time that the animals engaged in social behavior to the same extent as that observed after treatment of the sham-operated rats with anxiolytics. However, while chlordiazepoxide further increased the duration of social interaction in the hypophysectomized rats, the anxiolytic effects of SSR149415 was no longer observed in these animals. These results suggest that the anxiolytic effects of the vasopressin V(1B) receptor antagonist in the social interaction test are mediated through blockade of the vasopressin V(1B) receptor in the pituitary.

  5. Pharmacokinetic/pharmaco-dynamic modelling and simulation of the effects of different cannabinoid receptor type 1 antagonists on (9)-tetrahydrocannabinol challenge tests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guan, Zheng; Klumpers, Linda E.; Oyetayo, Olubukayo-Opeyemi; Heuberger, Jules; van Gerven, Joop M. A.; Stevens, Jasper

    2016-01-01

    AimThe severe psychiatric side effects of cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) antagonists hampered their wide development but this might be overcome by careful management of drug development with pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) analyses. PK/PD models suitable for direct comparison of different

  6. Cost-Effectiveness of Dabigatran Compared to Vitamin-K Antagonists for the Treatment of Deep Venous Thrombosis in the Netherlands Using Real-World Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leent, Merlijn W. J.; Stevanovic, Jelena; Jansman, Frank G.; Beinema, Maarten J.; Brouwers, Jacobus R. B. J.; Postma, Maarten J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Vitamin-K antagonists (VKAs) present an effective anticoagulant treatment in deep venous thrombosis (DVT). However, the use of VKAs is limited because of the risk of bleeding and the necessity of frequent and long-term laboratory monitoring. Therefore, new oral anticoagulant drugs (NOACs)

  7. Antagonistic Pleiotropy at the Human "IL6" Promoter Confers Genetic Resilience to the Pro-Inflammatory Effects of Adverse Social Conditions in Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Steven W.; Arevalo, Jesusa M. G.; Manu, Kavya; Telzer, Eva H.; Kiang, Lisa; Bower, Julienne E.; Irwin, Michael R.; Fuligni, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    The authors tested the evolutionary genetic hypothesis that the functional form of an asymmetrically risky Gene x Environment interaction will differ as a function of age-related antagonistic pleiotropy (i.e., show opposite effects in young vs. old individuals). Previous studies have identified a polymorphism in the human "IL6" promoter…

  8. Chronic psychosocial stress in tree shrews : effect of the substance P (NK1 receptor) antagonist L-760735 and clomipramine on endocrine and behavioral parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Hart, MGC; de Biurrun, G; Czeh, B; Rupniak, NMJ; den Boer, JA; Fuchs, E

    2005-01-01

    Rationale: Substance P and its preferred receptor, the neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R), have been proposed as possible targets for new antidepressant therapies, although results of a recently completed phase III trial failed to demonstrate that the NK1R antagonist MK-869 is more effective than placebo

  9. Effects of calcium channel antagonists on the motivational effects of nicotine and morphine in conditioned place aversion paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budzynska, Barbara; Polak, Piotr; Biala, Grazyna

    2012-03-01

    The motivational component of drug withdrawal may contribute to drug seeking and relapse through the negative reinforcement-related process; thus, it is important to understand the mechanisms that mediate affective withdrawal behaviors. The present study was undertaken to examine the calcium-dependent mechanism of negative motivational symptoms of nicotine and morphine withdrawal using the conditioned place aversion (CPA) paradigm. Rats were chronically treated with nicotine (1.168 mg/kg, free base, s.c., 11 days, three times daily) or morphine (10 mg/kg,s.c., 11 days, twice daily). Then, during conditioning, rats pre-treated with nicotine or morphine received a nicotinic receptor antagonist mecamylamine (3.5 mg/kg) or an opioid receptor antagonist naloxone (1 mg/kg) to precipitate withdrawal in their initially preferred compartment, or saline in their non-preferred compartment. Our results demonstrated that after three conditioning sessions, mecamylamine induced a clear place aversion in rats that had previously received nicotine injections, and naloxone induced a significant place aversion in rats that had previously received morphine injections. Further, the major findings showed that calcium channel antagonists, i.e., nimodipine, verapamil and flunarizine (5 and 10 mg/kg, i.p.), injected before the administration of mecamylamine or naloxone, attenuated nicotine or morphine place aversion. As an outcome, these findings support the hypothesis that similar calcium-dependent mechanisms are involved in aversive motivational component associated with nicotine a morphine withdrawal. We can suggest that calcium channel blockers have potential for alleviating nicotine and morphine addiction by selectively decreasing the incentive motivational properties of both drugs, and may be beneficial as smoking cessation or opioid dependence pharmacotherapies.

  10. 77 FR 1545 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NYSE Arca, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-10

    ....15c3-5. Because these are NYSE Arca proprietary firms, the regulatory risk of extending the time to... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; NYSE Arca, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of... Regulatory Authority Members to March 31, 2012 January 4, 2012. Pursuant to Section 19(b)(1) \\1\\ of...

  11. 77 FR 52090 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NYSE MKT LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-28

    ... Regulatory Bulletin any applicable minimum, maximum and/or default settings for the Risk Limitation... Regulatory Bulletin the applicable time period(s) for the Risk Limitation Mechanisms proposed under Rule... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; NYSE MKT LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

  12. Effect of Vitamin K Intake on the Stability of Treatment with Vitamin K Antagonists: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dentali, Francesco; Crowther, Mark; Galli, Matteo; Pomero, Fulvio; Garcia, David; Clark, Nathan; Spadafora, Laura; Witt, Daniel M; Ageno, Walter

    2016-09-01

    Vitamin K antagonists (VKA) are highly effective for the primary and secondary prevention of arterial and venous thromboembolic events. However, patients treated with VKA have on average only 60% of their international normalized ratio (INR) values within the therapeutic range and INR instability is associated with an increased risk of thrombosis and bleeding events. Recent evidence suggests that poor dietary vitamin K intake may affect anticoagulation control, but the role of vitamin K in INR stability remains to be established. We performed a systematic review of the literature to assess the role of vitamin K dietary intake on the stability of VKA and the potential effect of daily vitamin K supplementation on VKA therapy. After a search in Medline and EMBASE databases, 15 studies for a total of 1,838 patients were included in our systematic review. Observational studies suggest an increased risk of unstable anticoagulation control in patients with lower daily vitamin K intake. On the other hand, the role of daily vitamin K supplementation or a diet with controlled vitamin K content in patients on VKA treatment remains to be established. Use of daily vitamin K supplementation may be associated with a clinically relevant increase in the time in therapeutic range in patients with unstable anticoagulation control. Conversely, this effect appears small and not clinically relevant when vitamin K was administered to an unselected population receiving VKA. Other large prospective studies are necessary to confirm our preliminary findings.

  13. Effects of an interleukin-1 receptor antagonist on human sleep, sleep-associated memory consolidation, and blood monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Eva-Maria; Linz, Barbara; Diekelmann, Susanne; Besedovsky, Luciana; Lange, Tanja; Born, Jan

    2015-07-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines like interleukin-1 beta (IL-1) are major players in the interaction between the immune system and the central nervous system. Various animal studies report a sleep-promoting effect of IL-1 leading to enhanced slow wave sleep (SWS). Moreover, this cytokine was shown to affect hippocampus-dependent memory. However, the role of IL-1 in human sleep and memory is not yet understood. We administered the synthetic IL-1 receptor antagonist anakinra (IL-1ra) in healthy humans (100mg, subcutaneously, before sleep; n=16) to investigate the role of IL-1 signaling in sleep regulation and sleep-dependent declarative memory consolidation. Inasmuch monocytes have been considered a model for central nervous microglia, we monitored cytokine production in classical and non-classical blood monocytes to gain clues about how central nervous effects of IL-1ra are conveyed. Contrary to our expectation, IL-1ra increased EEG slow wave activity during SWS and non-rapid eye movement (NonREM) sleep, indicating a deepening of sleep, while sleep-associated memory consolidation remained unchanged. Moreover, IL-1ra slightly increased prolactin and reduced cortisol levels during sleep. Production of IL-1 by classical monocytes was diminished after IL-1ra. The discrepancy to findings in animal studies might reflect species differences and underlines the importance of studying cytokine effects in humans.

  14. Combined effect of antagonistic yeast and modified atmosphere to control Penicillium expansum infection in sweet cherries cv. Ambrunés.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paiva, E; Serradilla, M J; Ruiz-Moyano, S; Córdoba, M G; Villalobos, M C; Casquete, R; Hernández, A

    2017-01-16

    Fruit decay caused by pathogenic moulds is a major concern in the postharvest quality and shelf life of fruit. Blue mould decay is caused by Penicillium expansum (P. expansum) and is one of the most important postharvest diseases in cherries (Prunus avium L.). Synthetic fungicides are the main medium used to control pathogenic moulds. However, alternative approaches are available for developing safer technologies to control postharvest disease. An integrated approach that combines biological control, using antagonistic yeasts and modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) with cold storage is a promising alternative to synthetic fungicide treatment. In this work, two microperforated films (M10 and M50) and two antagonistic yeast strains (Hanseniaspora opuntiae L479 and Metschnikowia pulcherrima L672) were evaluated for their effectiveness to control the development of P. expansum in wounded cherries stored at 1°C. Results showed that the microperforated films had fungistatic effects, particularly M50, due to the level of CO2 achieved (mean CO2 of 11.2kPa at 35days), and the decrease in disease severity. Antagonistic yeasts, particularly Metschnikowia pulcherrima L672, delayed the development of P. expansum and decreased disease incidence and severity. The combination of MAP and antagonistic yeasts was the most effective approach to control P. expansum, during cold storage.

  15. Assessment of Effect of Angiotensin Ⅱ Receptor Antagonist Losartan on Aortic Distensibility in Patients With Essential Hypertension by Echocardiography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨好意; 邓又斌; 黎春蕾; 毕小军; 潘敏; 常青

    2002-01-01

    Summary: The effects of angiotensin Ⅱ receptor antagonist losartan on elastic properties of aorta in patients with mild to moderate essential hypertension were assessed. The ascending aortic distensibili-ty in 26 patients (48± 3 years) with mild to moderate essential hypertension before and after 12 weeks of treatment with losartan (50 mg/day) was evaluated by using two-dimensional echocardio graphy. M-mode measurements of aortic systolic (Ds) and diastolic diameter (Dd) were taken at a level approximately 3 cm above the aortic valve. Simultaneously, cuff brachial artery systolic (SBP)and diastolic(DBP) pressures were measured. Aortic pressure-strain elastic modulus (Ep) was calcu lated as Dd × (SBP-DBP)/(Ds-Dd) × 1333 and stiffness index beta (β) was defined as Dd × Ln (SBP/DBP)/(Ds-Dd). Blood pressure significantly decreased from 148±13/95±9 mmHg to 138± 12/88±8 mmHg (systolic blood pressure, P=0. 001; diastolic blood pressure, P=0. 003). Therewas no significant difference in pulse pressure before and after treatment with losartan (53±10 mmHg vs 50± 7 mmHg). The distensibility of ascending aorta increased significantly as showed by the significant decrease in pressure-strain elastic modulus from 4.42± 5.79 × 106 dynes/cm2 to 1.99 ± 1.49 × 106 dynes/cm2 (P=0. 02) and stiffness index beta from 27.4 ± 32.9 to 13.3 ± 9.9 (P = 0. 02). Although there was a weak correlation between the percent changes in pressure-strain elastic modulus and stiffness index beta and that in diastolic blood pressure after losartan treatment (r= 0. 40, P = 0. 04 and r = 0.55, P = 0. 004, respectively), no correlation was found between the percent changes in pressure-strain elastic modulus and stiffness index beta and that in systolic blood pressure (r = 0. 04, P = 0. 8 and r = 0. 24, P = 0. 2, respectively). Our study demonstrated that angiotensin Ⅱ receptor antagonist losartan has a beneficial effect on aortic distensibility in patients with mild to moderate essential

  16. SMCis: An Effective Algorithm for Discovery of Cis-Regulatory Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Haitao; Huo, Hongwei; Yu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) is a challenging problem in computational biology. Limited by the difficulty of using an HMM to model dependent features in transcriptional regulatory sequences (TRSs), the probabilistic modeling methods based on HMMs cannot accurately represent the distance between regulatory elements in TRSs and are cumbersome to model the prevailing dependencies between motifs within CRMs. We propose a probabilistic modeling algorithm called SMCis, which builds a more powerful CRM discovery model based on a hidden semi-Markov model. Our model characterizes the regulatory structure of CRMs and effectively models dependencies between motifs at a higher level of abstraction based on segments rather than nucleotides. Experimental results on three benchmark datasets indicate that our method performs better than the compared algorithms. PMID:27637070

  17. High doses of dextromethorphan, an NMDA antagonist, produce effects similar to classic hallucinogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Lawrence P.; Johnson, Matthew W.; Mintzer, Miriam Z.; Klinedinst, Margaret A.; Griffiths, Roland R.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Although reports of dextromethorphan (DXM) abuse have increased recently, few studies have examined the effects of high doses of DXM. Objective This study in humans evaluated the effects of supratherapeutic doses of DXM and triazolam. Methods Single, acute, oral doses of DXM (100, 200, 300, 400, 500, 600, 700, 800 mg/70 kg), triazolam (0.25, 0.5 mg/70kg), and placebo were administered to twelve healthy volunteers with histories of hallucinogen use, under double-blind conditions, using an ascending dose run-up design. Subjective, behavioral, and physiological effects were assessed repeatedly after drug administration for 6 hours. Results Triazolam produced dose-related increases in subject-rated sedation, observer-rated sedation, and behavioral impairment. DXM produced a profile of dose-related physiological and subjective effects differing from triazolam. DXM effects included increases in blood pressure, heart rate, and emesis, increases in observer-rated effects typical of classic hallucinogens (e.g. distance from reality, visual effects with eyes open and closed, joy, anxiety), and participant ratings of stimulation (e.g. jittery, nervous), somatic effects (e.g. tingling, headache), perceptual changes, end-of-session drug liking, and mystical-type experience. After 400 mg/70kg DXM, 11 of 12 participants indicated on a pharmacological class questionnaire that they thought they had received a classic hallucinogen (e.g. psilocybin). Drug effects resolved without significant adverse effects by the end of the session. In a 1-month follow up volunteers attributed increased spirituality and positive changes in attitudes, moods, and behavior to the session experiences. Conclusions High doses of DXM produced effects distinct from triazolam and had characteristics that were similar to the classic hallucinogen psilocybin. PMID:22526529

  18. Cardiometabolic effects of genetic upregulation of the interleukin 1 receptor antagonist: A Mendelian randomisation analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. Freitag (Christine); A.S. Butterworth (Adam); J. Willeit (Johann); J.M.M. Howson (Joanna M.M.); S. Burgess (Stephen); S. Kaptoge (Stephen); R. Young (Robin); W.K. Ho (Weang Kee); A.M. Wood (Angela); M. Sweeting (Michael); S. Spackman (Sarah); J.R. Staley (James R.); A. Ramond (Anna); E. Harshfield (Eric); S.F. Nielsen (Sune); P. Grande (Peer); L.A. Lange (Leslie); M.J. Bown (Matthew J.); G.T. Jones (Gregory); R.A. Scott (Robert); S. Bevan (Steve); E. Porcu (Eleonora); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); L. Zeng (Lingyao); T. Kessler (Thorsten); M. Nikpay (Majid); R. Do (Ron); W. Zhang (Weihua); J. Hopewell; M.E. Kleber (Marcus); G. Delgado; C.P. Nelson (Christopher P.); A. Goel (Anuj); J.C. Bis (Joshua); A. Dehghan (Abbas); S. Ligthart (Symen); G.D. Smith; L. Qu (Liming); F.N.G. Van 'T Hof (Femke); P.I.W. de Bakker (Paul); A.F. Baas (Annette); A.M. van Rij (Andre); G. Tromp (Gerard); H. Kuivaniemi (Helena); M.D. Ritchie (Marylyn D.); S.S. Verma (Shefali S.); D.C. Crawford (Dana); J. Malinowski (Jennifer); M. de Andrade (Mariza); I. Kullo (Iftikhar); P.L. Peissig (Peggy L.); C.A. McCarty (Catherine A.); E.P. Bottinger (Erwin); R.F. Gottesman (Rebecca); D.R. Crosslin (David); D.S. Carrell (David); L.J. Rasmussen-Torvik (Laura); J.A. Pacheco (Jennifer A.); J. Huang (Jie); N. Timpson (Nicholas); J. Kettunen (Johannes); M. Ala-Korpela (Mika); G.F. Mitchell (Gary); A. Parsa (Afshin); I.B. Wilkinson (Ian B.); M. Gorski (Mathias); Y. Li (Yong); N. Franceschini (Nora); M.F. Keller (Margaux); S.K. Ganesh (Santhi); C.D. Langefeld (Carl); L. Bruijn (Lucie); M.A. Brown (Matthew); D.M. Evans (David M.); S. Baltic (Svetlana); M.A. Ferreira (Manuel); H. Baurecht (Hansjörg); S. Weidinger (Stephan); A. Franke (Andre); S.A. Lubitz (Steven); M. Müller-Nurasyid (Martina); J.F. Felix (Janine); N.L. Smith (Nicholas); M. Sudman (Marc); S.D. Thompson (Susan D.); E. Zeggini (Eleftheria); K. Panoutsopoulou (Kalliope); M.A. Nalls (Michael); A. Singleton (Andrew); C. Polychronakos (Constantin); J.P. Bradfield (Jonathan); H. Hakonarson (Hakon); D.F. Easton (Douglas); D. Thompson (Deborah); I.P. Tomlinson (Ian); M. Dunlop (Malcolm); K. Hemminki (Kari); G. Morgan (Gareth); T. Eisen (Timothy); H. Goldschmidt (Hartmut); J.M. Allan (James); M. Henrion (Marc); N. Whiffin (Nicola); Y. Wang (Yufei); D. Chubb (Daniel); M.M. Iles (Mark M.); D.T. Bishop (David Timothy); M.H. Law (Matthew H.); N. Hayward (Nick); Y. Luo (Yang); S. Nejentsev (Sergey); M. Barbalic (maja); D. Crossman (David); S. Sanna (Serena); N. Soranzo (Nicole); H.S. Markus (Hugh); N.J. Wareham (Nick); D.J. Rader (Daniel); M.P. Reilly (Muredach); T.L. Assimes (Themistocles); T.B. Harris (Tamara B.); A. Hofman (Albert); O.H. Franco (Oscar); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); R.P. Tracy (Russell); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); M. Farrall (Martin); H. Watkins (Hugh); A.S. Hall (Alistair); N.J. Samani (Nilesh); W. März (Winfried); R. Clarke (Robert); F.S. Collins (Francis); J.S. Kooner (Jaspal S.); J.C. Chambers (John C.); S. Kathiresan (Sekar); R. McPherson (Ruth); J. Erdmann (Jeanette); A. Kastrati (Adnan); H. Schunkert (Heribert); J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); J. Walston (Jeremy); A. Tybjaerg-Hansen; D.S. Alam (Dewan S.); A. Al Shafi Majumder (Abdullah); E.D. Angelantonio (Emanuele Di); R. Chowdhury (Rajiv); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); D. Saleheen; S.G. Thompson (Simon); J. Danesh (John); R. Houlston (Richard)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractTo investigate potential cardiovascular and other effects of long-term pharmacological interleukin 1 (IL-1) inhibition, we studied genetic variants that produce inhibition of IL-1, a master regulator of inflammation. Methods: We created a genetic score combining the effects of alleles of

  19. Cardiometabolic effects of genetic upregulation of the interleukin 1 receptor antagonist : A Mendelian randomisation analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freitag, Daniel; Butterworth, Adam S.; Willeit, Peter; Howson, Joanna M M; Burgess, Stephen; Kaptoge, Stephen; Young, Robin; Ho, Weang Kee; Wood, Angela M.; Sweeting, Michael; Spackman, Sarah; Staley, James R.; Ramond, Anna; Harshfield, Eric; Nielsen, Sune F.; Grande, Peer; Lange, Leslie A.; Bown, Matthew J.; Jones, Gregory T.; Scott, Robert A.; Bevan, Steve; Porcu, Eleonora; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Zeng, Lingyao; Kessler, Thorsten; Nikpay, Majid; Do, Ron; Zhang, Weihua; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Kleber, Marcus; Delgado, Graciela E.; Nelson, Christopher P.; Goel, Anuj; Bis, Joshua C.; Dehghan, Abbas; Ligthart, Symen; Smith, Albert V.; Qu, Liming; van 't Hof, Femke N G; de Bakker, Paul I W; Baas, Annette F.; van Rij, Andre; Tromp, Gerard; Kuivaniemi, Helena; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Verma, Shefali S.; Crawford, Dana C.; Malinowski, Jennifer; de Andrade, Mariza; Kullo, Iftikhar J.; Peissig, Peggy L.; McCarty, Catherine A.; Böttinger, Erwin P.; Gottesman, Omri; Crosslin, David R.; Carrell, David S.; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J.; Pacheco, Jennifer A.; Huang, Jie; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Kettunen, Johannes; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Mitchell, Gary F.; Parsa, Afshin; Wilkinson, Ian B.; Gorski, Mathias; Li, Yong; Franceschini, Nora; Keller, Margaux F.; Ganesh, Santhi K.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Bruijn, Lucie; Brown, Matthew A.; Evans, David M.; Baltic, Svetlana; Ferreira, Manuel A.; Baurecht, Hansjörg; Weidinger, Stephan; Franke, Andre; Lubitz, Steven A.; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Felix, Janine F.; Smith, Nicholas L.; Sudman, Marc; Thompson, Susan D.; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Panoutsopoulou, Kalliope; Nalls, Mike A.; Singleton, Andrew; Polychronakos, Constantin; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Easton, Douglas F.; Thompson, Deborah; Tomlinson, Ian P.; Dunlop, Malcolm; Hemminki, Kari; Morgan, Gareth; Eisen, Timothy; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Allan, James M.; Henrion, Marc; Whiffin, Nicola; Wang, Yufei; Chubb, Daniel; Iles, Mark M.; Bishop, D. Timothy; Law, Matthew H.; Hayward, Nicholas K.; Luo, Yang; Nejentsev, Sergey; Barbalic, Maja; Crossman, David; Sanna, Serena; Soranzo, Nicole; Markus, Hugh S.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Rader, Daniel J.; Reilly, Muredach; Assimes, Themistocles; Harris, Tamara B.; Hofman, Albert; Franco, Oscar H.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Tracy, Russell; Psaty, Bruce M.; Farrall, Martin; Watkins, Hugh; Hall, Alistair S.; Samani, Nilesh J.; März, Winfried; Clarke, Robert; Collins, Rory; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Chambers, John C.; Kathiresan, Sekar; McPherson, Ruth; Erdmann, Jeanette; Kastrati, Adnan; Schunkert, Heribert; Stefánsson, Kári; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Walston, Jeremy D.; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Alam, Dewan S.; Al Shafi Majumder, Abdullah; Angelantonio, Emanuele Di; Chowdhury, Rajiv; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Saleheen, Danish; Thompson, Simon G.; Danesh, John; Houlston, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    To investigate potential cardiovascular and other effects of long-term pharmacological interleukin 1 (IL-1) inhibition, we studied genetic variants that produce inhibition of IL-1, a master regulator of inflammation. Methods: We created a genetic score combining the effects of alleles of two common

  20. Novel selective cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist MJ08 with potent in vivo bioactivity and inverse agonistic effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei CHEN; Cheng XU; Hong-ying LIU; Long LONG; Wei ZHANG; Zhi-bing ZHENG; Yun-de XIE; Li-li WANG; Song LI

    2011-01-01

    To characterize the biological profiles of M J08,a novel selective CB1 receptor antagonist.Methods:Radioligand binding assays were performed using rat brain and spleen membrane preparations.CB1 and CB2 receptor redistribution and intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]1) assays were performed with IN CELL Analyzer.Inverse agonism was studied using intracellular cAMP assays,and in guinea-pig ileum and mouse vas deferens smooth muscle preparations.In vivo pharmacologic profile was assessed in diet-induced obesity (DIO) mice.Results:In radioligand binding assay,M J08 selectively antagonized CB1 receptor (IC50=99.9 nmol/L).In EGFP-CB1_U20S cells,its IC50 value against CB1 receptor activation was 30.23 nmol/L (SR141716A:32.16 nmol/L).WIN 55,212-2 (1 μmol/L) increased [Ca2+]1 in the primary cultured hippocampal neuronal cells and decreased cAMP accumulation in CHO-hCB1 cells.M J08 (10 nmol/L-1O μmol/L)blocked both the WIN 55,212-2-induced effects.Furthermore,M J08 reversed the inhibition of electrically evoked twitches of mouse vas deferens by WIN 55,212-2 (pA2=10.29±1.05).M J08 and SR141716A both showed an inverse agonism activity by markedly promoting the contraction force and frequency of guinea pig ileum muscle.M J08 significantly increased the cAMP level in CHO-hCB1 cells with an EC50 value of 78.6 nmol/L,which was lower than the EC50 value for SR141716A (159.2 nmol/L).Besides the more potent pharmacological effects of cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonism in DIO mice,such as reducing food intake,decreasing body weight,and ameliorating dyslipidemia,M J08 (10 mg/kg) unexpectedly raised the fasted blood glucose in vivo.Conclusion:M J08 is a novel,potent and selective CB1 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist with potent bioactive responses in vitro and in vivo that may be useful for disclosure the versatile nature of CB1 receptors.

  1. The Effect of an Angiotensin II Antagonist on Hormones of Pituitary-Gonad Axis in Adult Male Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ebrahim Hosseini

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of valsartan, an angiotensin II antagonist, on the function of the pituitary- gonad axis. Materials and Methods: Adult male Wistar rats (200 to 220 g were used as experimental and control groups. The 3 experimental groups received either 100, 200, or 400 mg/kg/day valsartan in 1 ml water orally for 28 days, while a set of control group received 1 ml distilled water for the same period of time and another set received no treatment. At the end of the experimental period, blood was collected and serum was analyzed for FSH, LH, testosterone and dihydrotestosterone levels by RIA methods. Results: There were no significant differences among FSH levels at all doses of valsartan used, while the serum LH level was decreased significantly at the maximum dose of the drug used. Serum testosterone level decreased at both the 200 and 400 mg/kg dose compared to the control, while the dihydrotestosterone level was reduced significantly at all the three dosages used. Conclusion: According to our founding, suggested that the effects of valsartan on serum LH, testosterone and dihydrotestosterone may be mediated through angiotensin II receptor.

  2. Effect of the Cannabinoid Receptor-1 antagonist SR141716A on human adipocyte inflammatory profile and differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murumalla Ravi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity is characterized by inflammation, caused by increase in proinflammatory cytokines, a key factor for the development of insulin resistance. SR141716A, a cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1 antagonist, shows significant improvement in clinical status of obese/diabetic patients. Therefore, we studied the effect of SR141716A on human adipocyte inflammatory profile and differentiation. Methods Adipocytes were obtained from liposuction. Stromal vascular cells were extracted and differentiated into adipocytes. Media and cells were collected for secretory (ELISA and expression analysis (qPCR. Triglyceride accumulation was observed using oil red-O staining. Cholesterol was assayed by a fluorometric method. 2-AG and anandamide were quantified using isotope dilution LC-MS. TLR-binding experiments have been conducted in HEK-Blue cells. Results In LPS-treated mature adipocytes, SR141716A was able to decrease the expression and secretion of TNF-a. This molecule has the same effect in LPS-induced IL-6 secretion, while IL-6 expression is not changed. Concerning MCP-1, the basal level is down-regulated by SR141716A, but not the LPS-induced level. This effect is not caused by a binding of the molecule to TLR4 (LPS receptor. Moreover, SR141716A restored adiponectin secretion to normal levels after LPS treatment. Lastly, no effect of SR141716A was detected on human pre-adipocyte differentiation, although the compound enhanced adiponectin gene expression, but not secretion, in differentiated pre-adipocytes. Conclusion We show for the first time that some clinical effects of SR141716A are probably directly related to its anti-inflammatory effect on mature adipocytes. This fact reinforces that adipose tissue is an important target in the development of tools to treat the metabolic syndrome.

  3. Synergistic and antagonistic effects of thermal shock, air exposure, and fishing capture on the physiological stress of Squilla mantis (Stomatopoda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saša Raicevich

    Full Text Available This study is aimed at assessing the effects of multiple stressors (thermal shock, fishing capture, and exposure to air on the benthic stomatopod Squilla mantis, a burrowing crustacean quite widespread in the Mediterranean Sea. Laboratory analyses were carried out to explore the physiological impairment onset over time, based on emersion and thermal shocks, on farmed individuals. Parallel field-based studies were carried out to also investigate the role of fishing (i.e., otter trawling in inducing physiological imbalance in different seasonal conditions. The dynamics of physiological recovery from physiological disruption were also studied. Physiological stress was assessed by analysing hemolymph metabolites (L-Lactate, D-glucose, ammonia, and H+, as well as glycogen concentration in muscle tissues. The experiments were carried out according to a factorial scheme considering the three factors (thermal shock, fishing capture, and exposure to air at two fixed levels in order to explore possible synergistic, additive, or antagonistic effects among factors. Additive effects on physiological parameters were mainly detected when the three factors interacted together while synergistic effects were found as effect of the combination of two factors. This finding highlights that the physiological adaptive and maladaptive processes induced by the stressors result in a dynamic response that may encounter physiological limits when high stress levels are sustained. Thus, a further increase in the physiological parameters due to synergies cannot be reached. Moreover, when critical limits are encountered, mortality occurs and physiological parameters reflect the response of the last survivors. In the light of our mortality studies, thermal shock and exposure to air have the main effect on the survival of S. mantis only on trawled individuals, while lab-farmed individuals did not show any mortality during exposure to air until after 2 hours.

  4. [The antagonistic effect of physostigmine on sedation by lormetazepam (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grote, B; Doenicke, A; Kugler, J; Laub, M; Ott, H; Fichte, K; Suttmann, H; Zwisler, P

    1981-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the arousal effect of physostigmine after lormetazepam sedation on the human EEG. 12 male volunteers received 2 mg/kg bm lormetazepam and 30 minutes later physostigmine 2 mg preceded by atropine 1 mg. Generally an arousal effect of physostigmine could be clinically observed and more objectively demonstrated by reduced sleep stages in the vigilosomnogram (p less than 0.05). 2 volunteers did not fall asleep. 9 volunteers were awake 5-12 minutes after termination of physostigmine injection. 1 volunteer did not show any effect. Resedation and parasympathetic side effects did not occur. In earlier studies deep sleep stages after lormetazepam 1 or 2 mg/70 kg bm lasted 70 to 120 minutes. Physostigmine is recommended to counteract undesirable benzodiazepine induced sedation.

  5. Effects of the selective 5-HT7 receptor antagonist SB-269970 on premature responding in the five-choice serial reaction time test in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiforuk, Agnieszka; Hołuj, Małgorzata; Potasiewicz, Agnieszka; Popik, Piotr

    2015-08-01

    The antagonists of serotonin 5-HT7 receptors have been demonstrated to ameliorate cognitive impairments in pharmacological animal models of schizophrenia that involve blockade of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs). The administration of NMDAR antagonists evokes a broad range of cognitive deficits, including a loss of impulse control. The involvement of 5-HT7 receptors in the modulation of impulsivity has been recently suggested but has not been studied in great detail. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of a selective 5-HT7 receptor antagonist SB-269970 on a measure of impulsive action, i.e., premature responding on the five-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRTT) in rats. The antagonist of 5-HT2A receptor M100,907 was used as a positive control. The efficacies of both compounds were assessed in conditions of increased impulsivity that were produced by the administration of the NMDAR antagonist MK-801 or/and non-drug stimuli, i.e., using variable inter-trial intervals (vITIs). To examine the general ability of SB-269970 to counteract the MK-801-induced impairments, a discrete paired-trial delayed alternation task in a T-maze was employed. MK-801 significantly increased the number of premature responses in 5-CSRTT, and this effect was abolished by the administration of M100,907 (0.5 mg/kg) and SB-269970 (1 mg/kg). In addition, M100,907, but not SB-269970, reduced premature responding in the prolonged ITI trials. Both M100,907 and SB-269970 attenuated MK-801-induced working memory impairment in a T-maze. The present study demonstrated the efficacy of SB-269970 against MK-801-induced premature responding in the 5-CSRTT. This anti-impulsive action may offer additional benefits to the cognitive-enhancing effects of pharmacological blockade of 5-HT7 receptors.

  6. Regional Fos-expression induced by γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB): comparison with γ-butyrolactone (GBL) and effects of co-administration of the GABAB antagonist SCH 50911 and putative GHB antagonist NCS-382.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Nieuwenhuijzen, P S; McGregor, I S; Chebib, M; Hunt, G E

    2014-09-26

    γ-Hydroxybutyrate (GHB) has a complex array of neural actions that include effects on its own high-affinity GHB receptor, the release of neuroactive steroids, and agonist actions at GABAA and GABAB receptors. We previously reported partial overlap in the c-Fos expression patterns produced by GHB and the GABAB agonist, baclofen in rats. The present study extends these earlier findings by examining the extent to which GHB Fos expression and behavioral sedation are prevented by (2S)-(+)-5,5-dimethyl-2-morpholineacetic acid (SCH 50911), a GABAB antagonist, and NCS-382, a putative antagonist at the high-affinity GHB receptor. We also compare Fos expression caused by GHB and its precursor γ-butyrolactone (GBL), which is a pro-drug for GHB but lacks the high sodium content of the parent GHB molecule. Both GHB (1,000 mg/kg) and GBL (600 mg/kg) induced rapid sedation in rats that lasted over 90 min and caused similar Fos expression patterns, albeit with GBL causing greater activation of the nucleus accumbens (core and shell) and dentate gyrus (granular layer). Pretreatment with SCH 50911 (100mg/kg) partly reversed the sedative effects of GHB and significantly reduced GHB-induced Fos expression in only four regions: the tenia tecta, lateral habenula, dorsal raphe and laterodorsal tegmental nucleus. NCS-382 (50mg/kg) had no effect on GHB-induced sedation or Fos expression. When given alone, both NCS-382 and SCH 50911 increased Fos expression in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, central amygdala, parasubthalamic nucleus and nucleus of the solitary tract. SCH 50911 alone affected the Islands of Calleja and the medial, central and paraventricular thalamic nuclei. Overall, this study shows a surprising lack of reversal of GHB-induced Fos expression by two relevant antagonists, both of which have marked intrinsic actions. This may reflect the limited doses tested but also suggests that GHB Fos expression reflects mechanisms independent of GHB and GABAB receptors.

  7. Effects of angiotensin Ⅱ receptor antagonist, Losartan on the apoptosis, proliferation and migration of the human pancreatic stellate cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Bin Liu; Xing-Peng Wang; Kai Wu; Ru-Ling Zhang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of AT1 (Type 1 angiotensin Ⅱ receptor) antagonist (Losartan) on the apoptosis,proliferation and migration of the human pancreaticstellate cells (hPSCs).METHODS: hPSCs were isolated from pancreatic sample of patients with pancreatic carcinoma using radioimmunoassay (RIA) technique to detect the concentration of AngⅡ in culture media and cell homogenate. Immunocytochemistry (ICC) and in situ hybridization (ISH) methods were utilized to test AT1 expression in hPSCs. Effects of Losartan on hPSCs proliferation, apoptosis and migration were investigated using BrdU incorporation, TUNEL, flow cytometry (FCM),and phase-contrast microscope separately when cells treated with Losartan. Immunofluorescence and Western blot were applied to quantify the expression of type Ⅰ collagen in hPSCs.RESULTS: There exists AT1 expression in hPSCs, while no AngⅡ was detected in culture media and cell homogenate. Losartan induces cell apoptosis in a doseand time-dependent manner (apparently at 10-5 mol/L),no pro-proliferative effect was observed in the same condition.Corresponding dosage of Losartan can also alleviate the motion capability and type Ⅰ collagen content of hPSCs compared with AngⅡ treatment and non-treatment control groups.CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that paracrine not autocrine functions of AngⅡ may have effects on hPSCs,which was mediated by AT1 expressed on cells, while Losartan may exert anti-fibrotic effects by inhibiting hPSCs motion and partly by inducing apoptosis.

  8. Human studies on the benzodiazepine receptor antagonist beta-carboline ZK 93 426: antagonism of lormetazepam's psychotropic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duka, T; Goerke, D; Dorow, R; Höller, L; Fichte, K

    1988-01-01

    The effects of lormetazepam (0.03 mg/kg IV) a benzodiazepine (BZ) derivative in combination with ZK 93 426 (0.04 mg/kg IV) a beta-carboline, benzodiazepine receptor antagonist were evaluated in humans. Independently, the effects of ZK 93 426 on its own were investigated. A psychometric test battery to evaluate sedation (visual analog scales (VAS), anxiolysis (state-trait-anxiety inventory scale (STAIG X1) and cognitive functions [logical reasoning test (LR), letter detection test (LD)] was applied before and several hours after initiation of treatment. Multiple sleep latency test (MSLT), which measures day time sleepiness, was also applied. Vigilosomnograms analysed from standard EEG recordings were evaluated shortly before and for 1 h after treatment. Treatment started with an intravenous injection of either lormetazepam (LMZ) or placebo (PLA), which was followed 30 min later by administration of either ZK 93 426 or placebo; thus four treatment groups were created (PLA + PLA, LMZ + PLA, LMZ + ZK 93 426 and PLA + ZK 93 426). ZK 93 426 antagonized the sedative and hypnotic effect of LMZ as estimated by MSLT and vigilosomnograms, respectively. Impairment of cognitive functions (LR and LD) induced by LMZ was also antagonized by ZK 93 426. ZK 93 426 had no effect on the changes in the time estimation seen in the LMZ group. Furthermore, ZK 93 426 on its own increased vigilance (alertness) as measured by the vigilosomnogram. A competitive antagonism at the benzodiazepine binding site between ZK 93 426 and LMZ is suggested by their combination effects; the intrinsic activity of ZK 93 426 seems to be due to its weak partial inverse agonist component.

  9. Effects of a 5-HT3 agonist and antagonist on inter-male aggression in Mus musculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Kerchner

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Research has revealed an inverse relationship between serotonin (5-HT levels in the brain and aggressive behavior. However, effects on aggression at the level of the receptor have yet to be elucidated for many 5-HT receptor subtypes. This study examined the effects of the 5-HT3 receptor agonist m-chlorophenylbiguanide (mCPBG and antagonist ondansetron on inter-male aggression in mice. Using a resident-intruder paradigm designed to assess both offensive and defensive aggression, male C57BL/6J mice received 1 mg/kg i.p. injections of either mCPBG, ondansetron, or an inactive vehicle and were subsequently exposed to male AKR/J mice for a period of 10 minutes. Attack latency and the proportion of time engaged in a range of defensive behaviors were recorded. Subject C57BL/6J mice were then immediately run in an open field test for an additional 10 minutes to examine any anxiolytic or sedative effects of the drugs. Results show no significant differences between drug groups in either offensive or defensive behavior. No significant differences were observed between drug groups and open field activity; however, significant differences were seen between the offensive and defensive condition in the open field. In conclusion, this study fails to reveal any significant effects of the 5-HT3 agents on inter-male aggression, which may reflect a functional difference between the 5-HT3 receptor and the remaining G-protein coupled 5-HT receptor. However, this conclusion is limited by the large variance in behavior combined with small sample sizes, or the possibility of a drug dose insufficient for behavioral effects.

  10. Time perspective and social preference in older and younger adults: Effects of self-regulatory fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segerstrom, Suzanne C; Geiger, Paul J; Combs, Hannah L; Boggero, Ian A

    2016-09-01

    Socioemotional selectivity theory predicts that when perceived time in life is limited, people will prefer emotionally close social partners over less emotionally rewarding partners. Regulating social choices with regard to time perspective can make the best use of time with regard to well-being. However, doing so may depend on the self-regulatory capacity of the individual. Two studies, 1 with younger adults (N = 101) and 1 with younger (N = 42) and older (N = 39) adults, experimentally tested the effects of time perspective and self-regulatory fatigue on preferences for emotionally close partners and knowledgeable partners. In both studies and across younger and older adults, when self-regulatory fatigue was low, the perception of limited time resulted in a greater preference for close social partners relative to knowledgeable social partners. However, this shift was eliminated by self-regulatory fatigue. In Study 2, when fatigued, younger adults preferred close social partners to knowledgeable partners across time perspectives; older adults preferred close and knowledgeable partners more equally across time perspectives. These findings have implications for social decision-making and satisfaction among people who experience chronic self-regulatory fatigue. They also contradict previous suggestions that only younger adults are susceptible to self-regulatory fatigue. (PsycINFO Database Record

  11. The Regulatory Effect of Natural Killer Cells: Do "NK-reg Cells" Exist?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cai Zhang; Jian Zhang; Zhigang Tian

    2006-01-01

    The most important progress in immunology in the last decade is the description of regulatory lymphocytes, among which Treg cells and regulatory NKT cells are much attractive to not only immunologists but also almost all biomedical researchers. Meanwhile, it is noted that NK cells are not only "Killers" but also regulate innate and adaptive immunity, especially in early stage, by secreting cytokines and cell-cell contact. In this review, we are going to briefly summarize the progresses in regulatory lymphocytes including T cells (Treg, Tr1, Th3), NKT cells and NK cells, and then extensively introduce the positive regulatory function of NK cells in both normal immune response and in disease condition (tumor, infection and autoimmunity), and finally, to focus on the most latest progression in the negative regulatory effects of NK cells on normal and pathogenic immune response. In conclusion, we speculate that a "regulatory NK (NK-reg)" cell subset exist and need to explore. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2006;3(4):241-254.

  12. Effect of CP-96,345, a nonpeptide substance P receptor antagonist, on salivation in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snider, R.M.; Longo, K.P.; Drozda, S.E.; Lowe, J.A. III (Pfizer, Inc., Groton, CT (United States)); Leeman, S.E. (Univ. of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA (United States))

    1991-11-15

    CP-96,345 ((2S, 3S)-cis-2-(diphenylmethyl)-N-((2-methoxyphenyl)methyl)-1-azabicyclo(2.2.2)octan-3-amine) antagonism of substance P-stimulated salivation was investigated in pentobarbital-anesthetized rats. Administered either intraperitoneally or orally, CP-96,345 produced dose-dependent inhibition of the sialogogic response elicited by substance P but had no effect on acetylcholine-stimulated salivation. CP-96,345 produced concentration-dependent inhibition of ({sup 3}H)substance P binding to rat submaxillary gland membranes, with a median effective concentration of 34{plus minus}3.6 nM. These biological activities were confined to CP-96,345 in that the 2R, 3R enantiomer (CP-96,344) was without effect.

  13. Antagonistic effects of aldosterone on corticosterone-mediated changes in exploratory behavior of adrenalectomized rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuis, H D; De Kloet, E R

    1983-01-01

    The effect of aldosterone administration on exploratory activity of chronic adrenalectomized (10 days) male rats was investigated. Aldosterone (30 micrograms/100 g body wt sc) administered 1 hr or 30 min prior to the behavioral test failed to normalize disturbed exploratory activity of adrenalectomi

  14. Effects of cysteinyl leukotrienes and leukotriene receptor antagonists on markers of inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sampson, Anthony P; Pizzichini, Emilio; Bisgaard, Hans

    2003-01-01

    The understanding that asthma pathophysiology includes an inflammatory component has spurred the more aggressive use of anti-inflammatory therapies and created a need for effective tools to measure inflammation. Biomarkers of airway inflammation proposed are obtained by methods that are direct bu...

  15. Pulsed light and antimicrobial combination treatments for surface decontamination of cheese: Favorable and antagonistic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proulx, J; Sullivan, G; Marostegan, L F; VanWees, S; Hsu, L C; Moraru, C I

    2017-03-01

    Postprocessing cross-contamination of cheese can lead to both food safety issues and significant losses due to spoilage. Pulsed light (PL) treatment, consisting of short, high-energy, broad-spectrum light pulses, has been proven effective in reducing the microbial load on cheese surface. As PL treatment effectiveness is limited by light-cheese interactions, the possibility to improve its effectiveness by combining it with the antimicrobial nisin was explored. The effect of natamycin, which is added to cheeses as an antifungal agent, on PL effectiveness was also investigated. Pseudomonas fluorescens, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, and Listeria innocua were used as challenge microorganisms. Bacterial cultures in stationary growth phase were diluted to initial inoculum levels of 5 or 7 log cfu per cheese slice. Slices of sharp white Cheddar cheese and white American singles were cut in rectangles of 2.5 × 5 cm. For cheese slices receiving antimicrobial treatment before PL, slices were dipped in natamycin or nisin, spot inoculated with 100 μL of bacterial suspension, and then treated with PL. Cheese slices receiving PL treatment before antimicrobials were spot inoculated, treated with PL, and then treated with antimicrobials. The PL fluence levels from 1.02 to 12.29 J/cm(2) were used. Survivors were enumerated by standard plate counting or the most probable number technique, as appropriate. All treatments were performed in triplicate, and the data were analyzed using a general linear model. Treatment with nisin or natamycin before PL decreased the effectiveness of PL for all bacteria tested. For instance, PL reduced P. fluorescens on Cheddar cheese by 2.19 ± 0.27 log after 6.14 J/cm(2), whereas combination treatments at the same PL fluence yielded barely 1 log reduction. Inactivation of L. innocua on Cheddar was only 0.78 ± 0.01 log when using PL after nisin, compared with a 1.30 ± 0.76 log reduction by nisin alone. This was attributed to the absorption of UV light

  16. Antagonist effects of Bacillus spp. strains against Fusarium graminearum for protection of durum wheat (Triticum turgidum L. subsp. durum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalila-Kolsi, Imen; Ben Mahmoud, Afif; Ali, Hacina; Sellami, Sameh; Nasfi, Zina; Tounsi, Slim; Jamoussi, Kaïs

    2016-11-01

    Bacillus species are attractive due to their potential use in the biological control of fungal diseases. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain BLB369, Bacillus subtilis strain BLB277, and Paenibacillus polymyxa strain BLB267 were isolated and identified using biochemical and molecular (16S rDNA, gyrA, and rpoB) approaches. They could produce, respectively, (iturin and surfactin), (surfactin and fengycin), and (fusaricidin and polymyxin) exhibiting broad spectrum against several phytopathogenic fungi. In vivo examination of wheat seed germination, plant height, phenolic compounds, chlorophyll, and carotenoid contents proved the efficiency of the bacterial cells and the secreted antagonist activities to protect Tunisian durum wheat (Triticum turgidum L. subsp. durum) cultivar Om Rabiia against F. graminearum fungus. Application of single bacterial culture medium, particularly that of B. amyloliquefaciens, showed better protection than combinations of various culture media. The tertiary combination of B. amyloliquefaciens, B. subtilis, and P. polymyxa bacterial cells led to the highest protection rate which could be due to strains synergistic or complementary effects. Hence, combination of compatible biocontrol agents could be a strategic approach to control plant diseases.

  17. [Reaction of population of pulmonary mast cells in rat bronchial asthma under the effect of β-adrenoreceptor antagonists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erokhina, I L; Voronchikhin, P A; Okovityĭ, S V; Emel'ianova, O I

    2013-01-01

    Multifunctional granular mast cells (MCs) are among targets in bronchial asthma (BA) therapy. We studied pulmonary MC population in a rat model of BA under the effect of β-adrenoreceptor antagonists and of the latter combined with the standard therapy (glucocorticoid budesonide + β2-adrenergic agonist salbutamol). MCs of different degrees of maturity were identified on paraffin section of lung stained with Alcian blue and Safranin. MC density in the lung of rats with BA increased 1.9 times. Alcian blue-positive immature cells predominated in the lungs of both intact rats and rats with BA. In response to pharmacological agents, the mean MC densities were reduced in 2-2.7 times in all the variants of experiments and were close to the norm. It allows us to suppose that MCs migration from the outside was suppressed and, in consequence of the decline of MC densities, the release of the mediators involved in the progression of BA may be diminished.

  18. Effect of N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor Antagonist Dextromethorphan on Opioid Analgesia in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Naeem

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Pain control is an essential goal in the management of critical children. Narcotics are the mainstay for pain control. Patients frequently need escalating doses of narcotics. In such cases an adjunctive therapy may be beneficial. Dextromethorphan (DM is NMDA receptor antagonist and may prevent tolerance to narcotics; however, its definitive role is still unclear. We sought whether dextromethorphan addition could decrease the requirements of fentanyl to control pain in critical children. Design. Double-blind, randomized control trial (RCT. Setting. Pediatric multidisciplinary ICU in tertiary care center. Patients. Thirty-six pediatric patients 2–14 years of age in a multidisciplinary PICU requiring analgesia were randomized into dextromethorphan and placebo. The subjects in both groups showed similarity in most of the characteristics. Interventions. Subjects while receiving fentanyl for pain control received dextromethorphan or placebo through nasogastric/orogastric tubes for 96 hours. Pain was assessed using FLACC and faces scales. Measurements and Main Results. This study found no statistical significant difference in fentanyl requirements between subjects receiving dextromethorphan and those receiving placebo (p=0.127. Conclusions. Dextromethorphan has no effect on opioid requirement for control of acute pain in children admitted with acute critical care illness in PICU. The registration number for this trial is NCT01553435.

  19. The role of adenosine receptor agonist and antagonist on Hippocampal MDMA detrimental effects; a structural and behavioral study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kermanian, Fatemeh; Mehdizadeh, Mehdi; Soleimani, Mansureh; Ebrahimzadeh Bideskan, Ali Reza; Asadi-Shekaari, Majid; Kheradmand, Hamed; Haghir, Hossein

    2012-12-01

    There is abundant evidence showing that repeated use of MDMA (3, 4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine, ecstasy) has been associated with depression, anxiety and deficits in learning and memory, suggesting detrimental effects on hippocampus. Adenosine is an endogenous purine nucleoside that has a neuromodulatory role in the central nervous system. In the present study, we investigated the role of A2a adenosine receptors agonist (CGS) and antagonist (SCH) on the body temperature, learning deficits, and hippocampal cell death induced by MDMA administration. In this study, 63 adult, male, Sprague - Dawley rats were subjected to MDMA (10 and 20 mg/kg) followed by intraperitoneal CGS (0.03 mg/kg) or SCH (0.03 mg/kg) injection. The animals were tested for spatial learning in the Morris water maze (MWM) task performance, accompanied by a recording of body temperature, electron microscopy and stereological study. Our results showed that MDMA treatment increased body temperature significantly, and impaired the ability of rats to locate the hidden platform(P mechanism of these interactions requires further studies.

  20. Acute effects of antagonist static stretching in the inter-set rest period on repetition performance and muscle activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Humberto; Maia, Marianna de Freitas; Paz, Gabriel Andrade; Costa, Pablo B

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of antagonist passive static stretching (AS) during the inter-set rest period on repetition performance and muscle activation. Ten trained men (22.4 ± 0.9 years) participated in this study. Two protocols were adopted: Passive recovery (PR)--three sets to repetition failure were performed for the seated row (SR) with two-minute rest interval between sets without pre-exercise stretching; AS--forty seconds of stretching was applied to pectoralis major prior to each set of SR. Significant increases in the number of repetitions were noted under AS compared with PR (p < 0.05). Significant increases on latissimus dorsi (p = 0.002) and biceps brachii (p = 0.001) muscle activity were noted inter-sets under the AS compared with the PR condition. Therefore, the AS adopted during the inter-set rest period may enhance repetition performance and activation of agonist muscles in an acute manner.

  1. Effect of GNTI,a kappa opioid receptor antagonist, on MK-801-induced hyperlocomotion and stereotypy in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-ting QI; Hong ZOU; Chen-hao ZHANG; Qing-lian XIE; Mei-lei JIN; Lei YU

    2006-01-01

    Aim:To examine the effect of GNTI[5'-guanidinyl-17-(cyclopropylmethyl)-6,7-dehydro-4,-5α-epoxy-3-14-dihydroxy-6,7-2',3'-indolomorphinan],a selective antagonist for the kappa opioid receptor,in the MK-801 (dizocilpine maleate)-induced behavioral model of psychosis in schizophrenia as a way to explore the involvement of the kappa opioid receptor in modulating psychotic symptoms of schizophrenia.Methods:Two doses 0f MK-801 (0.3 mg/kg and 0.6 mg/kg) were administered by systemic injection in mice to induce psychosis-like behavior as a rodent schizophrenia model, preceded by an injection of different doses of GNTI. Both locomotion and stereotypy were measured as the behavioral endpoints for quantitative analysis.Results:GNTI inhibited MK-801-induced hyperlocomotion and stereotypy.In particular,GNTI showed differential modulation of stereotypy induced by 0.3 mg/kg VS 0.6 mg/kg MK-801.Conclusion:Antagonism of kappa opioid receptors attenuates MK-801-induced behavior,suggesting a potential involvement of the kappa opioid receptor in psychosis-like symptoms of schizophrenia.GNTI aDpears to be a useful pharmacological tool to explore the kappa opioid receptor function in vivo.

  2. Effects and mechanism of different adrenergic receptor antagonists on left ventricular hypertrophy subsequent to coarctation of abdominal aorta in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Qin; LI Long-gui; ZHANG Yun

    2004-01-01

    To study the changes of a collagen-binding protein (Colligin) and myosin heavy chain isoform (α/β-MHC) gene and protein in left ventricular hypertrophy subsequent to coarctation of abdominal aorta in rats and the ef-fects of three kinds of adrenergic receptor blockers: Carvedilol (CAR), Metoprolol (MET) and Terazosin (TER) on these changes, and to elucidate the effects and new mechanism of CAR on left ventricular hypearophy regression. Methods: A model of hypertrophy induced by coarctation of abdominal aorta(CAA) was used in this study. Thirty two male istar rats were divided randomly into four groups 4 weeks after CAA operation: CAA, CAR, MET and TER.emodynamics, ventric-ular remodeling parameters, expressions of Colligin and α/β-MHC mRNA, protein expressions of Collagen Ⅰ /Ⅲ and Colligin were investigated in the four groups and sham operation group. Results: Left ventricle hypertrophy was observed clearly 16 weeks after operation. The ratio of α/β-MHC mRNA decreased, while expressions of Collagen Ⅰ/Ⅲ proteins and Colligin mRNA/protein increased( P < 0.05). CAR could ameliorate left ventricle hypertrophy prior to MET and TER. CAR could also change the expressions of α/β-MHC, Collagen Ⅰ/Ⅲ and Colligin in both gene and protein levels ( P < 0.05), while MET and TER have no effect on them ( P > 0.05). Conclusion: The effects of CAR on extracellular matrix proteins and MHC isoform shift regression of left ventricle may be due to antiproliferative or antioxidative mechanism, which was indepen-dent of beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist.

  3. Functional magnetic resonance imaging reveals different neural substrates for the effects of orexin-1 and orexin-2 receptor antagonists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Gozzi

    Full Text Available Orexins are neuro-modulatory peptides involved in the control of diverse physiological functions through interaction with two receptors, orexin-1 (OX1R and orexin-2 (OX2R. Recent evidence in pre-clinical models points toward a putative dichotomic role of the two receptors, with OX2R predominantly involved in the regulation of the sleep/wake cycle and arousal, and the OX1R being more specifically involved in reward processing and motivated behaviour. However, the specific neural substrates underlying these distinct processes in the rat brain remain to be elucidated. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI in the rat to map the modulatory effect of selective OXR blockade on the functional response produced by D-amphetamine, a psychostimulant and arousing drug that stimulates orexigenic activity. OXR blockade was produced by GSK1059865 and JNJ1037049, two novel OX1R and OX2R antagonists with unprecedented selectivity at the counter receptor type. Both drugs inhibited the functional response to D-amphetamine albeit with distinct neuroanatomical patterns: GSK1059865 focally modulated functional responses in striatal terminals, whereas JNJ1037049 induced a widespread pattern of attenuation characterised by a prominent cortical involvement. At the same doses tested in the fMRI study, JNJ1037049 exhibited robust hypnotic properties, while GSK1059865 failed to display significant sleep-promoting effects, but significantly reduced drug-seeking behaviour in cocaine-induced conditioned place preference. Collectively, these findings highlight an essential contribution of the OX2R in modulating cortical activity and arousal, an effect that is consistent with the robust hypnotic effect exhibited by JNJ1037049. The subcortical and striatal pattern observed with GSK1059865 represent a possible neurofunctional correlate for the modulatory role of OX1R in controlling reward-processing and goal-oriented behaviours in the rat.

  4. The effects of dopamine synthesis inhibitors and dopamine antagonists on regeneration in the hydra Hydra attenuata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostroumova, T V; Markova, L N

    2002-01-01

    The effects of catecholamine synthesis inhibitors (alpha-methyltyrosine, 3-iodotyrosine, and alpha-methyl-DOPA) and dopamine receptor blockers (haloperidol and spiperone) on the regeneration of apical, gastral, and basal fragments of the hydra Hydra attenuata were studied. These experiments showed that alpha-methyltyrosine and 3-iodotyrosine significantly inhibited regeneration but did not produce morphological anomalies. Alpha-Methyl-DOPA produce less inhibition of regeneration, but induced ectopic tentacles and outgrowths in gastral regenerates. Haloperidol and spiperone had no significant effect on the rate of regeneration but induced significant numbers of morphogenetic anomalies in gastral regenerates. Apical and basal regenerates, which retained their natural organizers (the head and base respectively) never yielded morphogenetic anomalies in the presence of either dopamine receptor blockers or dopamine synthesis inhibitors. The possible role of neurotransmitters. particularly dopamine, in morphogenesis in hydras is discussed.

  5. Therapeutic effect of ifenprodil,a NMDA receptor antagonist,on drug dependence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SuzukT; NaritM

    2002-01-01

    Although drug dependence has been treated by the adonist-therapy,the specific drug therapy for drug dependence has not been established.Ifenprodil is consibdred to specifically block the NMDA receptor consisted of NR1/NR2B subunits without undesirable adverse reactions,such as psychotomimetic action and psychological dependence,while ketamine and MK-801 can block both NMDA receptors consisted of NR1/NR2A and NR1/NR2B subunits with the undesirable adverse reactions.In the present study,we designed to examine the effect of ifenprodil on drug dependence in rodents.Pretreatment with ifenprodil suppressed the expression of withdrawal signs in morphine-, diazepam-and alcohol-dependent rats and mics.Rewarding effects of morphine,methamphetamine and cocaine as well as physical dependence,were suppressed by pretreatment with ifenprodil in rats and mice.These results suggest that ifenprodil be useful in treating drug dependence.

  6. Effects of the uncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist memantine on spatial memory in medial septal lesioned rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashniani, M; Burjanadze, M; Beselia, G; Chkhikvishvili, N; Kruashvili, L

    2011-12-01

    These experiments examined the effects of acute administration of memantine (2.5 or 5 mg/kg) or saline on spatial memory and learning process within single sessions, on place versions of food-rewarded maze in MS electrolytic lesioned and sham-lesioned rats. Sham-lesioned rats trained in the place task learned more rapidly than did MS electrolytic lesioned rats. This fact certifies for obvious deficit of the place learning performance strategy in the MS-lesioned rats. The results indicate that the drug-treated (5 mg/kg memantine) sham-lesioned rats exhibited significantly impaired performance relative to the saline controls in terms of trials-to-criterion (Pimprove performance in place learning task in MS electrolytic lesioned rats. Our experimental data support the interpretation that memantine does not produce intolerable side effects in human AD patients because it is being used at doses that are below the threshold for interacting with NMDA receptors.

  7. Differential effects of organic compounds on cucumber damping-off and biocontrol activity of antagonistic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Bin; Ravnskov, Sabine; Guanlin, X.;

    2011-01-01

    The influence of the organic compounds tryptic soy broth, cellulose, glucose and chitosan on cucumber damping-off caused by Pythium aphanidermatum and biocontrol efficacy of the biocontrol agents (BCAs) Paenibacillus macerans and P. polymyxa were examined in a seedling emergence bioassay. Results...... showed that the organic compounds differentially affected both pathogen and BCAs. Tryptic soy broth, glucose and chitosan increased Pythium damping-off of cucumber, compared to the control treatment without organic compounds, whereas cellulose had no effect. Both Paenibacillus species had biocontrol...... effects against Pythium damping-off compared with the corresponding treatments with P. aphanidermatum alone, but the biocontrol efficacy depended on the type of organic compounds added. Both BCAs counteracted damping-off in treatments with TSB and chitosan. However, P. polymyxa counteracted damping...

  8. In vivo occupancy of dopamine D3 receptors by antagonists produces neurochemical and behavioral effects of potential relevance to attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, V; Need, A B; Tzavara, E T; Giros, B; Overshiner, C; Gleason, S D; Wade, M; Johansson, A M; Perry, K; Nomikos, G G; Witkin, J M

    2013-02-01

    Dopamine D(3) receptors have eluded definitive linkage to neurologic and psychiatric disorders since their cloning over 20 years ago. We report a new method that does not employ a radiolabel for simultaneously defining in vivo receptor occupancy of D(3) and D(2) receptors in rat brain after systemic dosing using the tracer epidepride (N-[[(2S)-1-ethylpyrrolidin-2-yl]methyl]-5-iodo-2,3-dimethoxybenzamide). Decreases in epidepride binding in lobule 9 of cerebellum (rich in D(3) receptors) were compared with nonspecific binding in the lateral cerebellum. The in vivo occupancy of the dopamine D(3) receptors was dose dependently increased by SB-277011A (trans-N-[4-[2-(6-cyano-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinolin-2-yl)ethyl]cyclohexyl]-4-quinolinecarboxamide) and U99194 (2,3-dihydro-5,6-dimethoxy- N,N-dipropyl-1H-inden-2-amine). Both antagonists increased extracellular levels of acetylcholine (ACh) in the medial prefrontal cortex of rats and modified brain-tissue levels of ACh and choline. Consistent with these findings, the D(3) receptor antagonists enhanced the acquisition of learning of rats either alone or in the presence of the norepinephrine uptake blocker reboxetine as with the attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) drug methylphenidate. Like reboxetine, the D(3) receptor antagonists also prevented deficits induced by scopolamine in object recognition memory of rats. Mice in which the dopamine transporter (DAT) has been deleted exhibit hyperactivity that is normalized by compounds that are effective in the treatment of ADHD. Both D(3) receptor antagonists decreased the hyperactivity of DAT(-/-) mice without affecting the activity of wild type controls. The present findings indicate that dopamine D(3) receptor antagonists engender cognition-enhancing and hyperactivity-dampening effects. Thus, D(3) receptor blockade could be considered as a novel treatment approach for cognitive deficits and hyperactivity syndromes, including those observed in ADHD.

  9. 特质性与情境性调节定向匹配效应的一致性%The Coincidence between the Regulatory Fit Effects Based on Chronic Regulatory Focus and Situational Regulatory Focus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪玲; 林晖芸; 逄晓鸣

    2011-01-01

    Regulatory fit theory proposes that the fit between regulatory focus and information frame will strengthen the individual's evaluation on the information, as well as the affect and motivation. However, the regulatory focus involves two different types: situational focus and chronic focus, the former is induced by environmental factors, while the latter reflects stable personality. Thus, an interesting question is, whether the regulatory fits based on different types of regulatory focus have the same effect? And this is the purpose of the present study.Experiment 1 adopted 2 (chronic regulatory focus: promotion vs. prevention) ×2 (information frame:positive vs. negative) between-subjects design to explore the influence of regulatory fit between chronic focus and information frame upon the effect of persuasion. Experiment 2 also adopted 2 (situational regulatory focus:promotion vs. prevention) ×2 (information frame: positive vs. negative) between-subjects design to explore the effect of regulatory fit between situational focus and information frame upon the effect of persuasion. Data were collected from 166 college students (113 in Experiment 1 and 53 in Experiment 2).In experiment 1, MANOVA revealed significant interactions between regulatory focus and information frame on the information value and mood intensity, while in experiment 2, in addition to information value and mood intensity, MANOVA revealed significant interaction on behavior intention. Taken together, results showed the regulatory fit based on chronic regulatory focus and the regulatory fit based on situational regulatory focus have the same influence on information value and mood intensity (they both improve the value of information and increase the intensity of mood); however, they have different influence on behavior intention (the former has no impact on behavior intention while the latter can improve behavior intention).This conclusion is beneficial to understand the difference between chronic

  10. 78 FR 62921 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-22

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness... marketed by the Exchange by featuring and advertising them on the Exchange's Web site. Market-Q will be... comments on the proposed rule change. III. Date of Effectiveness of the Proposed Rule Change and Timing...

  11. Antagonistic effect of polyamines on ABA-induced suppression of mitosis in Allium cepa L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Arpana; Sharma, Shashi

    2009-02-01

    Effect of abscisic acid (ABA) and polyamines (PAs) [putrescine (Put), spermidine (Spd) and spermine (Spm)] on mitosis in root tips of A. cepa was studied. Treatment with ABA (0.1 to 100 microM) for 24 hr suppressed the mitosis, measured as mitotic index (MI), in a concentration-dependent manner with approx. 50% suppression at 10 microM of ABA. Treatment with different PAs (1 to 100 microM) had differential mitosis suppression effect. Spm was most inhibitory followed by Spd and Put, respectively. The higher concentrations of PAs (1 mM Put; 0.1 and 1 mM Spd or Spm) caused cell distortion. Remarkably, a 24 hr pretreatment of root tips with PAs prior to ABA (100 microM) treatment resulted in a general concentration-dependent reversal of ABA-induced suppression of MI. Catalase (CAT) activity in the root tips, an indicator of redox metabolism, increased due to ABA treatment in a concentration-dependent manner, remained unaltered in response to Put and declined due to Spd and Spm (> or = 0.1 mM). However, all PAs, irrespective of their individual effects, generally antagonized the ABA-dependent increase in CAT activity. Data indicate the possibility of ABA-PA interaction in the regulation of mitosis.

  12. Renal hemodynamics in hypertensive renal allograft recipients: effects of calcium antagonists and ACE inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grekas, D; Dioudis, C; Kalevrosoglou, I; Alivanis, P; Derveniotis, V; Tourkantonis, A

    1996-06-01

    Hypertension present in more than 50% of successfully renal transplanted patients and its prevalence has slightly increased since the introduction of cyclosporine A. Twenty patients, 9 women and 11 men aged from 30 to 58 years, with stable cadaveric renal allograft function and moderate to severe hypertension, were included in the study. Renal artery graft stenosis causing hypertension were excluded. All patients were given triple drug immunosuppressive treatment with methylprednisolone, azathioprine and cyclosporine A (CsA) and their hypertension was treated with a nifedipine dose of 20 mg twice daily. To evaluate the effect of ACE inhibitors on renal hemodynamics and hypertension, a 4 mg/daily dose of perindopril was added to the above regimen for two months. Effective renal plasma flow (ERPF) decreased from 208 +/- 54 to 168 +/- 61 ml/min and renal vascular resistance (RVR) increased from 75 +/- 12 to 88 +/- 17 mm Hg/ml/min (P nifedipine. It is suggested that the combination of both antihypertensive agents was more effective than monotherapy with nifedipine in controlling blood pressure, but less favorable on the renal hemodynamic response in hypertensive renal transplant patients who were maintained on CsA.

  13. Does Self-Regulatory Efficacy Matter? Effects of Punishment Certainty and Punishment Severity on Organizational Deviance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabiru Maitama Kura

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Extant empirical research has reported conflicting findings with respect to the effects of punishment certainty and punishment severity on organizational deviance, suggesting the need to introduce a moderator. The present study tested whether self-regulatory efficacy matters on the relationships among punishment certainty, punishment severity, and organizational deviance. Drawing on deterrence and self-efficacy theories, this study examined the effects of punishment certainty, punishment severity, and self-regulatory efficacy on organizational deviance among 197 employed postgraduate students who enrolled in the Master of Business Administration program at two large universities located in the north-west geopolitical zone of Nigeria. We used self-administered questionnaires to collect data. Using Partial Least Squares Structural Equation Modeling (PLS-SEM, we found a significant negative relationship between punishment certainty and organizational deviance. Similarly, the results indicated that punishment severity had a significant negative relationship with organizational deviance. The study also found a significant negative relationship between self-regulatory efficacy and organizational deviance. As expected, self-regulatory efficacy was found to moderate the relationship between punishment certainty and organizational deviance. On the contrary, no significant interaction effect was found between self-regulatory efficacy and punishment severity. Implications of the study in the Nigerian context have been discussed.

  14. Effect of different thisamine receptor agonists and antagonists on the pain threshold caused by hot plate and abdominal writhing in mice

    OpenAIRE

    D. Farzin; L.Asghari; M.Norousi

    2000-01-01

    SummaryBackground and purpose: Histamine is a neurotransmitter present in the brain of mammals which produces its physiological effects on target cells by stimulation of three types of receptors H1, H2 and H3.Various reports nowadays indicate the role of histamine in reduction of pain transmission. This study was designed to determine the role of histamine receptors in reduction of pain.Materials and Methods: In this study, effects of different histamine receptor agonists and antagonists on t...

  15. Effects of a 5-HT3 antagonist, ondansetron, on fasting and postprandial small bowel water content assessed by magnetic resonance imaging

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background 5-HT3 antagonists have been shown to be effective in relieving symptoms of IBS-D. Using a recently validated MRI method we have demonstrated reduced fasting small bowel water content (SBWC) in IBS-D associated with accelerated small bowel transit. We hypothesized that slowing of transit with ondansetron would lead to an increase in SBWC by inhibiting fasting motility. Aim To assess the effects of ondansetron compared with placebo in healthy volunteers o...

  16. Effects of Propranolol, a β-noradrenergic Antagonist, on Memory Consolidation and Reconsolidation in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villain, Hélène; Benkahoul, Aïcha; Drougard, Anne; Lafragette, Marie; Muzotte, Elodie; Pech, Stéphane; Bui, Eric; Brunet, Alain; Birmes, Philippe; Roullet, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Memory reconsolidation impairment using the β-noradrenergic receptor blocker propranolol is a promising novel treatment avenue for patients suffering from pathogenic memories, such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, in order to better inform targeted treatment development, the effects of this compound on memory need to be better characterized via translational research. We examined the effects of systemic propranolol administration in mice undergoing a wide range of behavioral tests to determine more specifically which aspects of the memory consolidation and reconsolidation are impaired by propranolol. We found that propranolol (10 mg/kg) affected memory consolidation in non-aversive tasks (object recognition and object location) but not in moderately (Morris water maze (MWM) to highly (passive avoidance, conditioned taste aversion) aversive tasks. Further, propranolol impaired memory reconsolidation in the most and in the least aversive tasks, but not in the moderately aversive task, suggesting its amnesic effect was not related to task aversion. Moreover, in aquatic object recognition and location tasks in which animals were forced to behave (contrary to the classic versions of the tasks); propranolol did not impair memory reconsolidation. Taken together our results suggest that the memory impairment observed after propranolol administration may result from a modification of the emotional valence of the memory rather than a disruption of the contextual component of the memory trace. This is relevant to the use of propranolol to block memory reconsolidation in individuals with PTSD, as such a treatment would not erase the traumatic memory but only reduce the emotional valence associated with this event.

  17. Effects of propranolol, a β-noradrenergic antagonist, on memory consolidation and reconsolidation in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélène eVillain

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Memory reconsolidation impairment using the β-noradrenergic receptor blocker propranolol is a promising novel treatment avenue for patients suffering from pathogenic memories, such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD. However, in order to better inform targeted treatment development, the effects of this compound on memory need to be better characterized via translational research. We examined the effects of systemic propranolol administration in mice undergoing a wide range of behavioral tests to determine more specifically which aspects of the memory consolidation and reconsolidation are impaired by propranolol. We found that propranolol (10mg/kg affected memory consolidation in non-aversive tasks (object recognition and object location but not in moderately (Morris water maze to highly (passive avoidance, conditioned taste aversion aversive tasks. Further, propranolol impaired memory reconsolidation in the most and in the least aversive tasks, but not in the moderately aversive task, suggesting its amnesic effect was not related to task aversion. Moreover, in aquatic object recognition and location tasks in which animals were forced to behave (contrary to the classic versions of the tasks; propranolol did not impair memory reconsolidation. Taken together our results suggest that the memory impairment observed after propranolol administration may result from a modification of the emotional valence of the memory rather than a disruption of the contextual component of the memory trace. This is relevant to the use of propranolol to block memory reconsolidation in individuals with PTSD, as such a treatment would not erase the traumatic memory but only reduce the emotional valence associated with this event.

  18. The Effects of the Adenosine Receptor Antagonists on the Reverse of Cardiovascular Toxic Effects Induced by Citalopram In-Vivo Rat Model of Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büyükdeligöz, Müjgan; Hocaoğlu, Nil; Oransay, Kubilay; Tunçok, Yeşim; Kalkan, Şule

    2015-01-01

    Background: Citalopram is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor that requires routine cardiac monitoring to prevent a toxic dose. Prolongation of the QT interval has been observed in acute citalopram poisoning. Our previous experimental study showed that citalopram may be lead to QT prolongation by stimulating adenosine A1 receptors without affecting the release of adenosine. Aims: We examined the effects of adenosine receptor antagonists in reversing the cardiovascular toxic effects induced by citalopram in rats. Study Design: Animal experimentation. Methods: Rats were divided into three groups randomly (n=7 for each group). Sodium cromoglycate (20 mg/kg) was administered to all rats to inhibit adenosine A3 receptor mast cell activation. Citalopram toxicity was achieved by citalopram infusion (4 mg/kg/min) for 20 minutes. After citalopram infusion, in the control group (Group 1), rats were given an infusion of dextrose solution for 60 minutes. In treatment groups, the selective adenosine A1 antagonist DPCPX (Group 2, 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine, 20 μg/kg/min) or the selective A2a antagonist CSC (Group 3, 8-(3-chlorostyryl)caffeine, 24 μg/kg/min) was infused for 60 minutes. Mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), QRS duration and QT interval measurements were followed during the experiment period. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA followed by Tukey’s multiple comparison tests. Results: Citalopram infusion reduced MAP and HR and prolonged the QT interval. It did not cause any significant difference in QRS duration in any group. When compared to the control group, DPCPX after citalopram infusion shortened the prolongation of the QT interval after 40, 50 and 60 minutes (p<0.01). DPCPX infusion shortened the prolongation of the QT interval at 60 minutes compared with the CSC group (p<0.05). CSC infusion shortened the prolongation of the QT at 60 minutes compared with the control group (p<0.05). Conclusion: DPCPX improved QT interval

  19. The effects of the CXCR2 antagonist, MK-7123, on bone marrow functions in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hastrup, Nina; Khalilieh, Sauzanne; Dale, David C.;

    2015-01-01

    of either MK-7123 (30 mg, po, daily for 28 days) or placebo on peripheral blood counts and bone marrow myeloid cell populations. MK-7123 caused a reversible decrease (approximately 50%) in the ANC as demonstrated on days 1 and 28, the first and last days of the treatment period. Bone marrow aspirate smears...... and biopsy imprints did not differ in the proportion of mature neutrophils in pretreatment, day 28, day 56 or placebo samples. There were no treatment effects on biopsy or aspirate clot cellularity, myeloid to erythroid or myeloid post-mitotic to mitotic ratios; flow-cytometric analyses of aspirate cells...

  20. The antithrombotic versus calcium antagonistic effects of polyethylene glycol grafted bovine pericardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudev, S C; Chandy, T; Sharma, C P

    1999-07-01

    Cardiovascular calcification, the formation of calcium phosphate deposits in cardiovascular tissue, is a common end stage phenomenon affecting a wide variety of bioprosthesis. This study proposes a novel approach of reducing pericardial calcification and thrombosis via coupling polyethylene glycols (PEG) to glutaraldehyde treated bovine pericardium via acetal linkages. The calcification of the PEG modified tissue and the control pericardium (extracted and glutaraldehyde treated) was investigated by in vivo rat subcutaneous implantation models and by in vitro meta stable calcium phosphate solutions. Scanning electron microscopy showed that calcification primarily involved the surface of collagen fibrils and the intrafibrillar spaces. However, the grafting of pericardium with PEG-20,000 had dramatically modified the surface and subsequently inhibited the deposits of calcium. Further, the modified tissue had also reduced the platelet surface attachment. Such a reduced calcification of PEG modified tissues can be explained by decrease of free aldehyde groups, a space filling effect and therefore improved biostability and synergistic blood compatible effects of PEG after coupling to the tissues. This simple method can be a useful anticalcification treatment for implantable tissue valves.

  1. Cardiometabolic effects of genetic upregulation of the interleukin 1 receptor antagonist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    ). FINDINGS: For each IL1RN minor allele inherited, serum concentrations of IL-1Ra increased by 0.22 SD (95% CI 0.18-0.25; 12.5%; p = 9.3 × 10(-33)), concentrations of interleukin 6 decreased by 0.02 SD (-0.04 to -0.01; -1.7%; p = 3.5 × 10(-3)), and concentrations of C-reactive protein decreased by 0.03 SD......BACKGROUND: To investigate potential cardiovascular and other effects of long-term pharmacological interleukin 1 (IL-1) inhibition, we studied genetic variants that produce inhibition of IL-1, a master regulator of inflammation. METHODS: We created a genetic score combining the effects of alleles...... = 3.9 × 10(-10)). Per-allele odds ratios were 0.97 (0.95-0.99; p = 9.9 × 10(-4)) for rheumatoid arthritis, 0.99 (0.97-1.01; p = 0.47) for type 2 diabetes, 1.00 (0.98-1.02; p = 0.92) for ischaemic stroke, and 1.08 (1.04-1.12; p = 1.8 × 10(-5)) for abdominal aortic aneurysm. In exploratory analyses, we...

  2. Potential toxic effects of glyphosate and its commercial formulations below regulatory limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesnage, R; Defarge, N; Spiroux de Vendômois, J; Séralini, G E

    2015-10-01

    Glyphosate-based herbicides (GlyBH), including Roundup, are the most widely used pesticides worldwide. Their uses have increased exponentially since their introduction on the market. Residue levels in food or water, as well as human exposures, are escalating. We have reviewed the toxic effects of GlyBH measured below regulatory limits by evaluating the published literature and regulatory reports. We reveal a coherent body of evidence indicating that GlyBH could be toxic below the regulatory lowest observed adverse effect level for chronic toxic effects. It includes teratogenic, tumorigenic and hepatorenal effects. They could be explained by endocrine disruption and oxidative stress, causing metabolic alterations, depending on dose and exposure time. Some effects were detected in the range of the recommended acceptable daily intake. Toxic effects of commercial formulations can also be explained by GlyBH adjuvants, which have their own toxicity, but also enhance glyphosate toxicity. These challenge the assumption of safety of GlyBH at the levels at which they contaminate food and the environment, albeit these levels may fall below regulatory thresholds. Neurodevelopmental, reproductive, and transgenerational effects of GlyBH must be revisited, since a growing body of knowledge suggests the predominance of endocrine disrupting mechanisms caused by environmentally relevant levels of exposure.

  3. The effects of the β1 antagonist, metoprolol, on methamphetamine-induced changes in core temperature in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrell, Ricki; Speaker, H Anton; Mitchell, Scott L; Sabol, Karen E

    2015-11-16

    Methamphetamine (METH) results in hyperthermia or hypothermia depending on environmental conditions. Here we studied the role of the β1 adrenergic receptor in mediating METH's temperature effects. Core temperature measurements were made telemetrically over a 7.5h session, two days/week, in test chambers regulated at either 18°C, 24°C, or 30°C ambient temperature. Rats were treated with the β1 antagonist metoprolol (5.0, 10.0, and 15.0mg/kg) alone (Experiment 1), or in combination with 5.0mg/kg METH (Experiment 2). In experiment 3, we combined a lower dose range of metoprolol (0.75, 1.5, and 3.0mg/kg) with 5.0mg/kg METH at 18°C and 30°C. Confirming prior findings, METH alone resulted in hyperthermia in warm (30°) and hypothermia in cool environments (18°C). Metoprolol alone induced small but significant increases in core temperature. In combination, however, metoprolol reduced METH-induced changes in core temperature. Specifically, at 30°C, 3.0, 5.0, 10.0, and 15.0mg/kg metoprolol decreased METH-induced hyperthermia; at 18°C, all six doses of metoprolol enhanced METH-induced hypothermia. Our metoprolol findings suggest that one component of METH's temperature effects involves increasing core temperature at all ambient conditions via β1 receptors. Since β receptors are involved in brown adipose tissue (BAT)-mediated thermogenesis, skeletal muscle-mediated thermogenesis, heart rate, and the metabolism of glucose and lipids, we discuss each of these as possible mechanisms for metoprolol's effects on METH-induced changes in core temperature.

  4. Antagonistic Effects of Fertilizer on Photochemical Efficiency of Hibiscus cannabinus L. (Kenaf Planted on Beach Ridges Interspersed with Swales Soil

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    Mohd-Hazimy Yusoff

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Hibiscus cannabinus L. or Kenaf is a highly productive, warmseasonal C3 annual crop and is one of the potential candidates to substitute kenaf fiber as raw product for pulp and paper production. It survives well on less fertile soils including those of Beach Ridges Interspersed with Swales (BRIS soil. Approach: The objective of this study was to determine the effect of fertilizer on photochemical efficiency of H. cannabinus L. planted on BRIS soil using chlorophyll fluorescence technique. NPK with the ratio of 12:12:36 + 2MgO + TE (Trace-elements are mineral substances that act as an essential nutrients at a very low concentration and the micronutrient of the trace elements compositions are Boron, Copper, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum and Zinc were used for fertilizer treatment. Three levels of fertilizer treatments were applied in three plots; high (1960 kg plot-1, medium (1260 kg plot-1 and low (700 kg plot-1 respectively each plot comprising 106, 000 plants and were planted in 20 lines. Photochemical efficiency in terms of Fv/Fm ratio was determined under water deficit condition, fertilizer toxicity and interaction of both factors. Results: Contrasting trends for photochemical parameters were observed between different fertilizer levels where antagonistic effects were found between the three fertilizer treatments. The mean values ranged for minimal fluorescence (Fo were from 256.27-273.06, maximal fluorescence (Fm were from 970-1110.5, variable fluorescence (Fv were from 705-854.23 and the ratio of Fv/Fm (photochemical efficiency were from 0.72-0.77, respectively. Hitherto, for stress level, percentage for the low fertilizer level was 23.5% as compared to medium with 26.8 and 27.6% for high fertilizer level. Conclusion: The present study revealed that an appropriate amount of fertilizer is required to maximize the yield production cost effectively.

  5. [The antagonistic effect of aspirin on the expression of prostaglandin participation in the antihypertensive activity of ACE inhibitors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimento, M; Campodonico, J; Santambrogio, G; Rossi, M; Trabattoni, D; Celeste, F; Guazzi, M

    1997-06-01

    ACE-inhibitors antagonize both angiotensin production and bradykinin breakdown, resulting in enhancement of vasodilating prostaglandin release. This provides an explanation for the experimental observation that cycloxygenase blockers (such as aspirin or indomethacin) may counteract the antihypertensive efficacy of the ACE-inhibitors; it may be also possible that hypertensive patients taking aspirin as an antiplatelet agent may fail to benefit from ACE-inhibition. This study was aimed at: evaluating the magnitude and incidence of the inhibitory phenomenon; defining the minimal aspirin dosage that produces an antagonistic effect, as well as the possible reasons for a different individual susceptibility. We have studied untreated patients with mild (10 cases, Group 1), moderate (16 cases, Group 2) or severe (26 cases, Group 3) hypertension. The ACE-inhibitor enalapril was used at doses of 10 mg bid (groups 1 and 2) or 20 mg bid (Group 3). Active drug treatment periods had a 5-day duration. A daily dose of aspirin of 100 mg had no effect on the antihypertensive efficacy of enalapril. On the contrary, when a dose of 300 mg was used, 60, 57 and 50% of patients in Group 1, 2 and 3, respectively, showed a > 20% restraint of the mean arterial pressure fall with enalapril (20% was the lower arbitrary limit for defining antagonism). Inhibition was independent of the sequence of drug administration. In these patients counteraction averaged 60, 70 and 90%, respectively. In them, and not in the remaining patients in each group, aspirin substantially attenuated the renin rise elicited by ACE-inhibition. These data suggest that: a dosage of 100 mg aspirin is devoid of any inhibitory effect; more that 50% of ACE inhibited patients are, at least in the short term, susceptible to the action of 300 mg aspirin, regardless of the severity of hypertension; counteraction is seemingly mediated through a prostaglandin inhibition and depends on the individual predominance of prostaglandin

  6. Imetelstat (a telomerase antagonist) exerts off‑target effects on the cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mender, Ilgen; Senturk, Serif; Ozgunes, Nuriman; Akcali, K Can; Kletsas, Dimitris; Gryaznov, Sergei; Can, Alp; Shay, Jerry W; Dikmen, Z Gunnur

    2013-05-01

    Telomerase is a cellular ribonucleoprotein reverse transcriptase that plays a crucial role in telomere maintenance. This enzyme is expressed in approximately 90% of human tumors, but not in the majority of normal somatic cells. imetelstat sodium (GRN163L), is a 13-mer oligonucleotide N3'→P5' thio-phosphoramidate lipid conjugate, which represents the latest generation of telomerase inhibitors targeting the template region of the human functional telomerase RNA (hTR) subunit. In preclinical trials, this compound has been found to inhibit telomerase activity in multiple cancer cell lines, as well as in vivo xenograft mouse models. Currently, GRN163L is being investigated in several clinical trials, including a phase II human non‑small cell lung cancer clinical trial, in a maintenance setting following standard doublet chemotherapy. In addition to the inhibition of telomerase activity in cancer cell lines, GRN163L causes morphological cell rounding changes, independent of hTR expression or telomere length. This leads to the loss of cell adhesion properties; however, the mechanism underlying this effect is not yet fully understood. In the present study, we observed that GRN163L treatment leads to the loss of adhesion in A549 lung cancer cells, due to decreased E-cadherin expression, leading to the disruption of the cytoskeleton through the alteration of actin, tubulin and intermediate filament organization. Consequently, the less adherent cancer cells initially cease to proliferate and are arrested in the G1 phase of the cell cycle, accompanied by decreased matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) expression. These effects of GRN163L are independent of its telomerase catalytic activity and may increase the therapeutic efficacy of GRN163L by decreasing the adhesion, proliferation and metastatic potential of cancer cells in vivo.

  7. Regulatory focus and burnout in nurses: The mediating effect of perception of transformational leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Rui; Zhang, Shilei; Xu, Hang; Liu, Xufeng; Miao, Danmin

    2015-12-01

    This correlation study investigated the relationship between nurses' regulatory focus and burnout, as mediated by their perceptions of transformational leadership, using a cross-sectional research design with anonymous questionnaires. In July-August 2012, data were collected from 378 nurses from three hospitals in Shaanxi Province, China, using self-report questionnaires for measuring the nurses' regulatory focus, their level of burnout and their perception of whether the leadership of their supervisor was transformational. Structural equation modelling and bootstrapping procedures were used to identify the mediating effect of their perceptions of transformational leadership. The results supported our hypothesized model. The type of regulatory focus emerged as a significant predictor of burnout. Having a perception of transformational leadership partially mediated the relationship between regulatory focus and burnout. Having a promotion focus reduced burnout when the participants perceived transformational leadership, whereas having a prevention focus exhibited the opposite pattern. The mediating effect of the perception of transformational leadership suggests that a promotion focus may help diminish burnout, directly and indirectly. Nurse managers must be aware of the role of a regulatory focus and cultivate promotion focus in their followers.

  8. Glyphosate suppresses the antagonistic effect of Enterococcus spp. on Clostridium botulinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Monika; Shehata, Awad Ali; Schrödl, Wieland; Rodloff, Arne

    2013-04-01

    During the last 10-15 years, an increase of Clostridium botulinum associated diseases in cattle has been observed in Germany. The reason for this development is currently unknown. The normal intestinal microflora is a critical factor in preventing intestinal colonisation by C. botulinum as shown in the mouse model of infant botulism. Numerous bacteria in the gastro-intestinal tract (GIT) produce bacteriocines directed against C. botulinum and other pathogens: Lactic acid producing bacteria (LAB) such as lactobacilli, lactococci and enterococci, generate bacteriocines that are effective against Clostridium spp. A reduction of LAB in the GIT microbiota by ingestion of strong biocides like glyphosate could be an explanation for the observed increase in levels of C. botulinum associated diseases. In the present paper, we report on the toxicity of glyphosate to the most prevalent Enterococcus spp. in the GIT. Ingestion of this herbicide could be a significant predisposing factor that is associated with the increase in C. botulinum mediated diseases in cattle.

  9. Effects of leukotriene receptor antagonist on chronic obstractive pulmonary disease induced pulmonary hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卜小宁; 王辰; 庞宝森

    2003-01-01

    Objectives To assess the hemodynamic, oxygen-dynamic and ventilative effects of Zafirlukast in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) induced chronic cor pulmonale at acute exacerbation stage and the mechanisms of Zafirlukast efficacy.Methods Eleven cases of chronic cor pulmonale at acute exacerbation were examinted using Swan-Ganz catheter and peripheral intra-artery catheter. The hemodynamic, oxygen-dynamic parameters and respiratory rate, plasma endothelium-1 (ET-1) level, and urea leukotriene E4 (LTE4) level were measured before and at the 1st, 3rd, 5th, 7th, 9th, 12th hour after taking 40 mg Zafirlukast orally. Artarial and mixed venous blood gas analyses were done correspondingly.Results The average pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) and pulmonary vascular resistance index (PVRI) were lowered at the 3rd hour after taking Zafirlukast by 23% and 36.5%, respectively. They returned to the baseline around 12th hour. Respiratory rate decreased significantly within the 3rd-7th hour after taking Zafirlukast. LTE4 and ET-1 levels lowered at the 3rd hour and showed a positive correlation with change of mPAP. Conclusions Zafirlukast can reduce mPAP, pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and does not affect the ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) and oxygenation in cases of chronic cor pulmonale at acute exacerbation stage. Zafirlukast may play a role as an alternative to decrease PAP in COPD patients.

  10. Effects of dopamine agonists and antagonists on PCP-induced stereotyped behaviour and social isolation in the rat social interaction test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sams-Dodd, F

    1998-01-01

    Phencyclidine (PCP) can induce a model psychosis in humans that resembles an acute schizophrenic psychosis. In animal models of schizophrenia, PCP induces locomotor hyperactivity, stereotyped behaviour and social isolation, and the purpose of the present study was to describe the ability of dopamine agonists and antagonists to mimic or interact with these PCP-induced behaviours in rats. The compounds were administered daily for 3 days in combination with vehicle or 2.0 mg/kg PCP and the rats were tested in the social interaction test on the last day of drug administration. The study showed that D1-agonists with relative differences in efficacy at the DA-stimulated adenylate cyclase had limited effects on the PCP-induced behaviours, whereas the D1-antagonist SCH 23391 could alleviate the PCP-induce social isolation following daily treatment for 3 days. However, following long-term treatment for 21 days, the rats develop tolerance to this effect. These data thus suggested that the D1-receptor system only had a modulatory effect on PCP. In contrast, the D2-receptor family may be more directly involved, because the D2/D3/D4-agonist quinpirole could mimic and potentiate the PCP-induced deficits in social behaviour, and the D2/D3-antagonist (-)sulpiride could alleviate the PCP-induced stereotyped behaviour and social isolation. However, a D4-antagonist did not affect the behaviour of vehicle- and PCP-treated rats, suggesting that this system plays a less direct role in the behavioural effects of PCP. In general, however, the effects of SCH 23391, quinpirole and (-)sulpiride on the PCP-induced behaviours were mirrored in the vehicle-treated control groups and it is therefore possible that non-specific effects may have been important.

  11. Effect of stress hormone antagonists on ovarian follicular development in pre-pubertal rat

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    Kalid Hamood Abdullah

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Effect of stress on pre-pubertal ovarian follicular development was studied. Fifteen day old female rats were administered under stress (exposed to maternal separation; 6 hours/day from post-natal day 15 to 21 for 7 days, and appropriate controls were maintained. The time of exposure was randomly changed every day during light phase (7AM to 7 PM of the day to avoid habituation. There was a significant decrease in serum estrogen levels on post-natal day 21 in stress group rats compared to controls indicating stress response in these rats. However, mean number of healthy follicles in all categories of follicles were significantly lower in stressed rats compared to controls. Concomitant with these changes, mean number of atreitic follicles showed an increase over control values in stressed rats. In contrast administration of Naltrexone (5μg NTX/rat/day, Mifepristone (1 μg MP/rat/day, FSH (10 IU FSH/rat/day with stressed the significant increases in the relative weight of ovary, uterus, fallopian tube, body weight and the mean number of healthy follicles in the ovary compared to the controls. In the ovary treatment of stressed did not affect primordial follicles. Primordial follicles were reduced in number significantly in the ovary of controls and treated groups when compared with the initial controls whereas there was no significant variation among the controls and the treated groups. The results indicate that stress dose not interfere with the progress of pre-pubertal follicular development. However, it causes increased loss of follicles by atretia.

  12. Toxicity of lithium to three freshwater organisms and the antagonistic effect of sodium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kszos, Lynn Adams; Beauchamp, John J; Stewart, Arthur J

    2003-10-01

    Lithium (Li) is the lightest metal and occurs primarily in stable minerals and salts. Concentrations of Li in surface water are typically toxicity of Li to common toxicity test organisms, we evaluated the toxicity of Li to Pimephales promelas (fathead minnow), Ceriodaphnia dubia, and a freshwater snail (Elimia clavaeformis). In the laboratory, the concentration of Li that inhibited P. promelas growth or C. dubia reproduction by 25% (IC25) was dependant upon the dilution water. In laboratory control water containing little sodium (approximately 2.8 mg l(-1)), the IC25s were 0.38 and 0.32 mg Li l(-1) and in ambient stream water containing approximately 17 mg Na l(-1), the IC25s were 1.99 and 3.33, respectively. A Li concentration of 0.15 mg l(-1) inhibited the feeding of E. clavaeformis in laboratory tests. Toxicity tests conducted to evaluate the effect of sodium on the toxicity of Li were conducted with fathead minnows and C. dubia. The presence of sodium greatly affected the toxicity of Li. Fathead minnows and Ceriodaphnia, for example, tolerated concentrations of Li as great as 6 mg l(-1) when sufficient Na was present. The interaction of Li and Na on the reproduction of Ceriodaphnia was investigated in depth and can be described using an exponential model. The model predicts that C. dubia reproduction would not be affected when animals are exposed to combinations of lithium and sodium with a log ratio of mmol Na to mmol Li equal to at least 1.63. The results of this study indicate that for most natural waters, the presence of sodium is sufficient to prevent Li toxicity. However, in areas of historical disposal or heavy processing or use, an evaluation of Li from a water quality perspective would be warranted.

  13. The Effects of Serotonin Receptor Antagonists on Contraction and Relaxation Responses Induced by Electrical Stimulation in the Rat Small Intestine

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    Farajian Mashhadi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background The main source of 5-HT in body is in enterchromafin cells of intestine, different studies mentioned different roles for endogenous 5-HT and receptors involved and it is not clearified the mechanism of action of endogenous 5-HT. Objectives To study the role of endogenous 5-HT on modulation of contraction and relaxation responses induced by electrical field stimulation (EFS in different regions of the rat intestine. Materials and Methods Segments taken from the rat duodenum, jejunum, mid and terminal ileum were vertically mounted, connected to a transducer and exposed to EFS with different frequencies in the absence and presence of various inhibitors of enteric mediators i. e. specific 5-HT receptor antagonists. Results EFS-induced responses were sensitive to TTX and partly to atropine, indicating a major neuronal involvement and a cholinergic system. Pre-treatment with WAY100635 (a 5-HT1A receptor antagonist and granisetron up to 10.0 µM, GR113808 (a 5-HT4 receptor antagonist, methysergide and ritanserin up to 1.0 µM, failed to modify responses to EFS inall examined tissues. In the presence of SB258585 1.0 µM (a 5-HT6 receptor antagonist there was a trend to enhance contraction in the proximal part of the intestine and reduce contraction in the distal part. Pre-treatment with SB269970A 1.0 µM (5-HT7 receptor antagonist induced a greater contractile response to EFS at 0.4 Hz only in the duodenum. Conclusions The application of 5-HT1A, 5-HT2, 5-HT3, 5-HT4, 5-HT6 and 5-HT7 receptor antagonists, applied at concentrations lower than 1.0 µM did not modify the EFS-induced contraction and relaxation responses, whichsuggests the unlikely involvement of endogenous 5-HT in mediating responses to EFS in the described test conditions.

  14. Effects of estrogen receptor antagonist on biological behavior and expression of growth factors in the prolactinoma MMQ cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Hongtao; Li, Chuzhong; Gui, Songbai; Sun, Meizhen; Li, Dan; Zhang, Yazhuo

    2011-04-01

    The relationship between estrogen and pituitary prolactinoma is well documented. The biological effects of estrogen are mainly mediated by estrogen receptor α (ERα). Several lines of evidence demonstrate that growth factors such as pituitary tumor transforming gene (PTTG), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1), transforming growth factor β3 (TGFβ3), and transforming growth factor β receptor type II (TGFβRII) play an important role in prolactinoma pathogenesis induced by estrogen, but the relationship between ERα and such growth factors is still unclear. The aims of this study are to investigate the functional role of ERα in proliferation, prolactin (PRL) secretion, and expression of the above-mentioned growth factors in MMQ cells in the absence of estrogen and to discuss the feasibility of using an estrogen receptor antagonist to treat prolactinoma. Fulvestrant, a "pure" antiestrogen without any estrogen-like activity, was used to block expression of ERα in the MMQ cell line. Proliferation and PRL secretion of MMQ cells were measured using CellTiter 96(®) AQueous One Solution Cell Proliferation Assay (MTS) and the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. Levels of ERα, PTTG, bFGF, TGFβ1, TGFβ3, and TGFβRII were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blot. Fulvestrant significantly inhibited cell proliferation (up to 60.80%) and PRL secretion (up to 77.95%), and changed expression of TGFβ3 and TGFβRII in the absence of estrogen. In conclusion, ERα plays an important functional role in proliferation and PRL secretion of pituitary prolactinomas and also can change expression of some growth factors even under the condition of no estrogen. Fulvestrant could potentially be an effective therapy for treating such tumors.

  15. Effects Due to Rhizospheric Soil Application of an Antagonistic Bacterial Endophyte on Native Bacterial Community and Its Survival in Soil: A Case Study with Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Banana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Pious; Sekhar, Aparna C.

    2016-01-01

    Effective translation of research findings from laboratory to agricultural fields is essential for the success of biocontrol or growth promotion trials employing beneficial microorganisms. The rhizosphere is to be viewed holistically as a dynamic ecological niche comprising of diverse microorganisms including competitors and noxious antagonists to the bio-inoculant. This study was undertaken to assess the effects due to the soil application of an endophytic bacterium with multiple pathogen antagonistic potential on native bacterial community and its sustenance in agricultural soil. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was employed as a model system considering its frequent isolation as an endophyte, wide antagonistic effects reported against different phytopathogens and soil pests, and that the species is a known human pathogen which makes its usage in agriculture precarious. Employing the strain ‘GNS.13.2a’ from banana, its survival in field soil and the effects upon soil inoculation were investigated by monitoring total culturable bacterial fraction as the representative indicator of soil microbial community. Serial dilution plating of uninoculated control versus P. aeruginosa inoculated soil from banana rhizosphere indicated a significant reduction in native bacterial cfu soon after inoculation compared with control soil as assessed on cetrimide- nalidixic acid selective medium against nutrient agar. Sampling on day-4 showed a significant reduction in P. aeruginosa cfu in inoculated soil and a continuous dip thereafter registering >99% reduction within 1 week while the native bacterial population resurged with cfu restoration on par with control. This was validated in contained trials with banana plants. Conversely, P. aeruginosa showed static cfu or proliferation in axenic-soil. Lateral introduction of soil microbiome in P. aeruginosa established soil under axenic conditions or its co-incubation with soil microbiota in suspension indicated significant adverse effects by

  16. Effects of glucocorticoid and cysteinyl leukotriene 1 receptor antagonist on CD34 + hematopoietic cells in bone marrow of asthmatic mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛辉; 殷凯生; 王曾礼; 李富宇; 张希龙; 刘春涛; 雷松

    2004-01-01

    Background Corticosteroids remain the most effective therapy available for asthma. They have widespread effects on asthmatic airway inflammation. However, little is known about the effects of corticosteroids on the production of bone marrow inflammatory cells in asthma. This study observed the effects of glucocorticoid and cysteinyl leukotriene 1 receptor antagonist on CD34 + hematopoietic cells, so as to explore the possible effectiveness of a bone marrow-targeted anti-inflammatory strategy.Methods Balb/c mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA) to establish an asthmatic model. For two consecutive weeks, asthmatic mice were challenged with OVA while being given either prednisone, montelukast, prednisone plus montelukast, or sterile saline solution. The mice were killed 24 hours after the last challenge with OVA, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF),peripheral blood, and bone marrow were collected. Eosinophils in peripheral blood and BALF, and nucleated cells in BALF, peripheral blood, and bone marrow were counted. The percentages of CD34+cells, CD4 + T lymphocytes and CD8 + T lymphocytes among nucleated cells in peripheral blood and bone marrow were counted by flow cytometry. Immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridization were employed to detect expression of CD34 and interleukin (IL)-5Rαx mRNA (CD34 + IL-5Rα mRNA+ cells)among bone marrow hematopoietic cells.Results Compared with the sterile saline solution group, the number of eosinophils in BALF and peripheral blood, CD34 + cells in peripheral blood and bone marrow, and CD34 + IL-5Rc mRNA+ cells in bone marrow of mice from the prednisone and prednisone plus montelukast groups were significantly lower (P<0.01). The number of eosinophils in BALF from the montelukast group was also significantly lower (P<0.05).Conclusions The results suggest that, in this asthmatic mouse model, prednisone probably inhibits proliferation, differentiation, and migration of CD34 + cells in bone marrow, blocks

  17. [Comparative study of effects of Escherichia coli M-17 exometabolites and fructooligosaccharides on the growth and antagonistic activity of Lactobacilli].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakkhitov, T Ia; Dobrolezh, O V; Petrov, L N; Verbitskaia, N B; Zadaura, E Iu

    2001-01-01

    Facts concerning the evaluation of the influence of E. coli M17 exometabolites and fructooligosaccharides (FOS) on the growth and antagonistic activity of lactobacilli are presented. As revealed by these facts, preparation "Aktoflor" accelerates the growth of lactobacillary cultures, increases the final yield of biomass and antagonistic activity. E. coli M17 exometabolites contained in "Aktoflor" have been shown to be more active in comparison with FOS. The character of their influence on lactobacilli is discussed and the conclusion is made that the restoration and maintenance of eubiosis is greatly determined by the pool of metabolites excreted by the bacteria.

  18. ANTAGONISTIC EFFECT OF FOUR FUNGAL ISOLATES TO GANODERMA BONINENSE, THE CAUSAL AGENT OF BASAL STEM ROT OF OIL PALM

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    OKKY SETYAWATI DHARMAPUTRA

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available Four fungal isolates from soils obtained from three sites of the oil palm plantations in North Sumatra were found antagonistic to Ganoderma boninense, the causal agent of basal stem rot of oil palm. Penicillium citrinum inhibited the growth of the pathogen and formed a zone of inhibition on the agar media. Trichoderma harzianum BIO - 1 as well as BIO - 2 and T. viride not only repressed the growth of the pathogen but also caused lysis of the hyphae, and the colony was totally overgrown by the antagonists.

  19. Effect of the selective vasopressin V2 receptor antagonists in hepatic cirrhosis patients with ascites: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-hui TANG

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of selective vasopressin V2 receptor antagonists in the treatment of hepatic cirrhosis patients with ascites. Methods PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Database for Chinese Technical Periodical (VIP, Chinese Journal Full-Text Database (CNKI, and Wan Fang Digital Journal Full-text Database were retrieved to collect clinical randomized controlled trials of hepatic cirrhosis with ascites treated by selective vasopressin V2 receptor antagonists. Meta analysis was performed by using Review Manager 5.0. Results Nine randomized controlled trials including 1884 patients met the inclusion criteria. Meta-analysis showed that: 1 The selective vasopressin V2 receptor antagonists were associated with a significant reduction in body weight compared with placebo (WMD=–1.98kg, 95%CI:–3.24-–0.72kg, P=0.002. Treatment with selective vasopressin V2 receptor antagonists was associated with an improvement of low serum sodium concentration compared to placebo (WMD=3.74mmol/L, 95%CI: 0.91-6.58mmol/L, P=0.01. The percentage of patients with worsening ascites was higher in the group of patients treated with placebo (RR=0.51, 95%CI: 0.34-0.77, P=0.001. 2 The amplitude of increased urine volume was obviously higher in selective vasopressin V2 receptor antagonists group than in placebo group (WMD=1437.65ml, 95%CI: 649.01-2226.30ml, P=0.0004. The difference of serum creatinine in the selective vasopressin V2 receptor antagonists group was not statistically significant compared with the control group (WMD=–3.49μmol/L, 95%CI: –12.54¬5.56μmol/L, P=0.45. 3 There was no statistical significance between the two groups in the heart rate, systolic pressure, diastolic pressure and mortality (P>0.05. The rate of other adverse reactions was higher in the selective vasopressin V2 receptor antagonists group compared with that of placebo group (P=0.003. Conclusion

  20. [Bipolar affective disorders and role of intraneuronal calcium. Therapeutic effects of the treatment with lithium salts and/or calcium antagonist in patients with rapid polar inversion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manna, V

    1991-11-01

    Treatment with lithium salts produces improvements in bipolar affective disorders. Up to date, the relationship between neurochemical and behavioural effects of lithium and its actions on intraneuronal free calcium ions is not well known. Some calcium antagonist drugs resulted active in the treatment of bipolar affective syndromes, with therapeutic effects similar to lithium salts. Some studies suggest that also lithium salts act as calcium antagonist at intraneuronal level. In this preliminary open study the activity of nimodipine, a selective neuronal calcium antagonist drug, was evaluated alone and in association with lithium salts in the treatment of rapid cycling bipolar manic-depressive illness. During three periods of 6 months 12 rapid cycling patients were treated with lithium salts, lithium salts plus nimodipine 30 mg x 3/day, nimodipine 30 mg x 3/day. The association of lithium with nimodipine resulted more effective than lithium alone or nimodipine alone in the reduction of episodes of affective disorder. These results suggest a probable sinergic activity of both treatments. Further studies will be necessary to confirm the mechanism of action, perhaps calcium antagonism, at the basis of therapeutic effects of both treatments. The results seem to confirm the hypothesis that a calcium-ionic disorders play a role in the pathogenesis of bipolar affective disorders.

  1. Microinjection of the 5-HT7 receptor antagonist SB-269970 into the rat brainstem and basal forebrain: site-dependent effects on REM sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, Jaime M; Leopoldo, Marcello; Jantos, Héctor; Lagos, Patricia

    2012-08-01

    The effects of SB-269970, a selective 5-HT7 receptor antagonist, on spontaneous sleep were studied in adult rats implanted for chronic sleep recordings. The 5-HT7 receptor ligand was microinjected into the horizontal limb of the diagonal band of Broca (HDB) and the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT) during the light period of the 12-h light/12-h dark cycle. For comparative purposes the compound was administered systemically and, in addition, injected directly into the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN). Microinjection of SB-269970 into the HDB and the DRN induced a significant reduction of rapid-eye-movement sleep (REMS). Similar effects were observed after systemic administration of the 5-HT7 receptor antagonist. On the other hand, local infusion of the compound into the LDT provoked the opposite effect. It is proposed that the deactivation of GABAergic cells located in the HDB, DRN and LDT is responsible for the changes induced by SB-269970 on REM sleep values. It is suggested that the antidepressant effect of the 5-HT7 receptor antagonist could partly depend on the involvement of neuronal systems located in the DRN and the HDB.

  2. Simultaneous Determination of Gallic Acid, Ellagic Acid, and Eugenol in Syzygium aromaticum and Verification of Chemical Antagonistic Effect by the Combination with Curcuma aromatica Using Regression Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Hoon Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to perform simultaneous determination of three reference compounds in Syzygium aromaticum (SA, gallic acid, ellagic acid, and eugenol, and to investigate the chemical antagonistic effect when combining Curcuma aromatica (CA with SA, based on chromatographic analysis. The values of LODs and LOQs were 0.01–0.11 μg/mL and 0.03–0.36 μg/mL, respectively. The intraday and interday precisions were 0.87, indicating a linear relationship between SA and SAC. These results demonstrate that the components contained in CA could affect the extraction of components of SA mainly in a decreasing manner. The antagonistic effect of CA on SA was verified by chemical analysis.

  3. Impaired effect of activation of rat hippocampal 5-HT7 receptors, induced by treatment with the 5-HT7 receptor antagonist SB 269970.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusek, M; Sowa, J; Tokarski, K; Hess, G

    2015-04-01

    Effects of the 5-HT(7) receptor antagonist SB 269970, administered for 14 days (1.25 mg/kg), were studied in ex vivo slices of rat hippocampus. To activate the 5-HT(7) receptor, 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT, 200 nM) was applied in the presence of WAY 100635 (2 μM), a 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist. In contrast to control preparations, no 5-HT(7) receptor-mediated increase in excitability nor depolarization and an increase in the input resistance of CA1 and CA3 pyramidal neurons were present in slices prepared from rats treated with SB 269970. The treatment also abolished the stimulatory effect of 5-HT(7) receptor activation on spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents recorded from CA1 stratum radiatum/lacunosum-moleculare interneurons. These data demonstrate that repeated administration of SB 269970 impairs the reactivity of the CA1 hippocampal neuronal network to 5-HT(7) receptor activation.

  4. TRADE EFFECTS: REGULATORY, ACCOUNTING PRACTICES AND REPORTING OF INFORMATION RELATED

    OpenAIRE

    ARISTIŢA ROTILĂ

    2014-01-01

    It is known that within trade relations providers often credit customers for the value of goods or services which are the subject of conducted commercial transactions, this aspect being materialized in the issuance and acceptance of a trade effect. From the time of acceptance until maturity / settlement, trade effects should be reflected separately in the accounts and, to the extent that were not settled until the end of exercise, their value must be presented in the financial ...

  5. Dopamine D3 and D2 receptor mechanisms in the abuse-related behavioral effects of cocaine: studies with preferential antagonists in squirrel monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achat-Mendes, Cindy; Grundt, Peter; Cao, Jianjing; Platt, Donna M; Newman, Amy Hauck; Spealman, Roger D

    2010-08-01

    Dopamine (DA) D3 and D2 receptor mechanisms are implicated in cocaine's abuse-related behavioral effects, but the relative contribution of the two receptor subtypes is only partially characterized. This study investigated the role of D3 and D2 subtype mechanisms by determining the degree to which the D3-preferring antagonist PG01037 [N-{4-[4-(2,3-dichlorophenyl)-piperazin- 1-yl]-trans-but-2-enyl}-4-pyridine-2-yl-benzamide HCl] and the D2-preferring antagonist L-741626 [3-[4-(4-chlorophenyl)-4- hydroxypiperidin-1-yl]methyl-1H-indole] attenuated several behavioral effects of cocaine in squirrel monkeys. Quantitative observational studies established doses of each antagonist that did not produce untoward effects, which were used in subsequent comparisons. In addition, the ability of the D3-preferring agonist PD128907 [(R-(+)-trans-3,4a,10b-tetrahydro-4-propyl-2H,5H-[1]benzopyrano[4,3-b]-1,4-oxazin-9-ol)] and the D2-preferring agonist sumanirole [(R)-5,6-dihydro-5-(methylamino)-4H- imidazo[4,5,1-ij]quinolin-2(1H)-one(Z)-2-butenedioate] to reproduce cocaine's discriminative stimulus (DS) and priming effects were compared. In monkeys trained to discriminate cocaine from vehicle, both DA antagonists attenuated and both DA agonists partially reproduced cocaine's DS effects. PG01037 also selectively attenuated the cocaine-like DS effects of PD128907, whereas L-741626 attenuated the cocaine-like DS effects of both agonists. In self-administration studies, L-741626 nonselectively reduced cocaine- and food-maintained responding, whereas PG01037 was ineffective against either reinforcer. In studies involving reinstatement of extinguished cocaine seeking, both antagonists attenuated cocaine-induced reinstatement of responding, and both agonists induced at least partial reinstatement of cocaine seeking. L-741626 also attenuated sumanirole-induced, but not PD128907-induced, reinstatement of responding, whereas PG01037 was ineffective against either DA agonist. The results are

  6. TRADE EFFECTS: REGULATORY, ACCOUNTING PRACTICES AND REPORTING OF INFORMATION RELATED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ARISTIŢA ROTILĂ

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available It is known that within trade relations providers often credit customers for the value of goods or services which are the subject of conducted commercial transactions, this aspect being materialized in the issuance and acceptance of a trade effect. From the time of acceptance until maturity / settlement, trade effects should be reflected separately in the accounts and, to the extent that were not settled until the end of exercise, their value must be presented in the financial statements. Based on analysis of the Romanian accounting regulations, also taking into consideration the opinions expressed in specific literature concerning accounting reflection of trade effects, in this article we try to point out some aspects which, in our opinion, require clarification. We also want to point out some contradictions / inconsistencies regarding the reporting of information on the trade effects, specifically between the text of accounting regulations concerning the definition of accounting structures „cash and bank accounts” and “short term investments” and their contents when presented as positions in the balance sheet structure. In relation to the issues raised we try to prove the effects on the indicators concerning financial position and to make some suggestions that would have effects on Romanian accounting regulations, namely the improvement of financial reporting performed by the economic operators.

  7. Differences in the effects of four TRPV1 channel antagonists on lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokine production and COX-2 expression in murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninomiya, Yuki; Tanuma, Sei-Ichi; Tsukimoto, Mitsutoshi

    2017-03-11

    Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response syndrome triggered by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an outer membrane component of gram-negative bacteria, and cytokine production via LPS-induced macrophage activation is deeply involved in its pathogenesis. Effective therapy of sepsis has not yet been established. However, it was reported that transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel antagonist capsazepine (CPZ; a capsaicin analogue) attenuates sepsis in a murine model [Ang et al., PLoS ONE 6(9) (2011) e24535; J. Immunol. 187 (2011) 4778-4787]. Here, we profiled the effects of four TRPV1 channel antagonists, AMG9810, SB366791, BCTC and CPZ, on the release of IL-6, IL-1β and IL-18, and on expression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) in LPS-activated macrophages. Treatment of murine macrophage J774.1 cells or BALB/c mouse-derived intraperitoneal immune cells with LPS induced pro-inflammatory cytokines production and COX-2 expression. Pretreatment with AMG9810 or CPZ significantly suppressed the release of IL-6, IL-1β and IL-18, and COX-2 expression, whereas SB366791 and BCTC were less effective. These results support a role of TRPV1 channel in macrophage activation, but also indicate that only a subset of TRPV1 channel antagonists may be effective in suppressing inflammatory responses. These results suggest that at least some TRPV1 channel antagonists, such as AMG9810 and CPZ, may be candidate anti-inflammatory agents for treatment of sepsis.

  8. Antifibrotic effects of ambrisentan,an endothelin-A receptor antagonist,in a non-alcoholic steatohepatitis mouse model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Toshiaki; Okamoto; Masahiko; Koda; Kennichi; Miyoshi; Takumi; Onoyama; Manabu; Kishina; Tomomitsu; Matono; Takaaki; Sugihara; Keiko; Hosho; Junichi; Okano; Hajime; Isomoto; Yoshikazu; Murawaki

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To examine the effects of the endothelin type A receptor antagonist ambrisentan on hepatic steatosis and fibrosis in a steatohepatitis mouse model.METHODS: Fatty liver shionogi(FLS) FLS-ob/ob mice(male, 12 wk old) received ambrisentan(2.5 mg/kg orally per day; n = 8) or water as a control(n = 5) for 4 wk. Factors were compared between the two groups, including steatosis, fibrosis, inflammation, and endothelin-related gene expression in the liver.RESULTS: In the ambrisentan group, hepatic hydroxyproline content was significantly lower than in the control group(18.0 μg/g ± 6.1 μg/g vs 33.9 μg/g ± 13.5 μg/g liver, respectively, P = 0.014). Hepatic fibrosis estimated by Sirius red staining and areas positive for α-smooth muscle actin, indicative of activated hepatic stellate cells, were also significantly lower in the ambrisentan group(0.46% ± 0.18% vs 1.11% ± 0.28%, respectively, P = 0.0003; and 0.12% ± 0.08% vs 0.25% ± 0.11%, respectively, P = 0.047). Moreover, hepatic RNA expression levels of procollagen-1 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1(TIMP-1) were significantly lower by 60% and 45%, respectively, in the ambrisentan group. Inflammation, steatosis, and endothelin-related m RNA expression in the liver were not significantly different between the groups.CONCLUSION: Ambrisentan attenuated the progression of hepatic fibrosis by inhibiting hepatic stellate cell activation and reducing procollagen-1 and TIMP-1 gene expression. Ambrisentan did not affect inflammation or steatosis.

  9. Effects of structural modifications of N-CPM-normorphine derivatives on agonist and antagonist activities in isolated organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riba, P; Tóth, Z; Hosztafi, S; Friedmann, T; Fürst, S

    2003-01-01

    The agonistic and antagonistic properties of N-cyclopropylmethyl (N-CPM) morphine derivatives were observed in mouse vas deferens (MVD), longitudinal muscle of guinea pig ileum (GPI) and rabbit vas deferens (LVD). In MVD the K(e) values of the titled compounds (N-CPM-morphine, N-CPM-isomorphine, N-CPM-dihydromorphine, N-CPM-dihydroisomorpPhine, N-CPM-dihydromorphone and naltrexone) were measured for mu-, kappa- and delta-receptors using normorphine, ethylketocyclazocine (EKC) and D-Pen2-D-Pen5-enkephaline (DPDPE) as selective agonists on the receptors, respectively. For mu-receptors of MVD the tested compounds showed similar affinity. For kappa-receptors the non-iso-6-OH derivatives possessed much less affinity than the iso-derivatives. Similar difference could be observed for delta-receptors. The agonistic activities of these compounds in MVD were observed to be between 0-20% of the inhibition of muscle contractions. In GPI the compounds except naltrexone possessed strong agonistic activities effectively antagonized by nor-binaltorphimine (nor-BNI) (K(e) of nor-BNI was 0.23 nM) suggesting that they were strong kappa-receptor agonists. We investigated these agents in LVD too, which contains kappa-receptors, but they did not produce any agonist potencies. It raises the possibility that the kappa-receptor subtypes of LVD and MVD are different from the kappa-receptor subtype of GPI or the vasa deferentia contain much fewer kappa-receptors than GPI and the intrinsic activities of these compounds are too small to reach the 50% inhibition of the contractions.

  10. PGE2 receptor EP2 mediates the antagonistic effect of COX-2 on TGF-beta signaling during mammary tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Maozhen; Schiemann, William P

    2010-04-01

    The molecular mechanisms that enable cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and its mediator prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) to inhibit transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) signaling during mammary tumorigenesis remain unknown. We show here that TGF-beta selectively stimulated the expression of the PGE2 receptor EP2, which increased normal and malignant mammary epithelial cell (MEC) invasion, anchorage-independent growth, and resistance to TGF-beta-induced cytostasis. Mechanistically, elevated EP2 expression in normal MECs inhibited the coupling of TGF-beta to Smad2/3 activation and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI1) expression, while EP2 deficiency in these same MECs augmented Smad2/3 activation and PAI expression stimulated by TGF-beta. Along these lines, engineering malignant MECs to lack EP2 expression prevented their growth in soft agar, restored their cytostatic response to TGF-beta, decreased their invasiveness in response to TGF-beta, and potentiated their activation of Smad2/3 and expression of PAI stimulated by TGF-beta. More important, we show that COX-2 or EP2 deficiency both significantly decreased the growth, angiogenesis, and pulmonary metastasis of mammary tumors produced in mice. Collectively, this investigation establishes EP2 as a potent mediator of the anti-TGF-beta activities elicited by COX-2/PGE2 in normal and malignant MECs. Our findings also suggest that pharmacological targeting of EP2 receptors may provide new inroads to antagonize the oncogenic activities of TGF-beta during mammary tumorigenesis.-Tian, M., Schiemann, W. P. PGE2 receptor EP2 mediates the antagonistic effect of COX-2 on TGF-beta signaling during mammary tumorigenesis.

  11. PGE2 receptor EP2 mediates the antagonistic effect of COX-2 on TGF-β signaling during mammary tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Maozhen; Schiemann, William P.

    2010-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms that enable cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and its mediator prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) to inhibit transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling during mammary tumorigenesis remain unknown. We show here that TGF-β selectively stimulated the expression of the PGE2 receptor EP2, which increased normal and malignant mammary epithelial cell (MEC) invasion, anchorage-independent growth, and resistance to TGF-β-induced cytostasis. Mechanistically, elevated EP2 expression in normal MECs inhibited the coupling of TGF-β to Smad2/3 activation and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI1) expression, while EP2 deficiency in these same MECs augmented Smad2/3 activation and PAI expression stimulated by TGF-β. Along these lines, engineering malignant MECs to lack EP2 expression prevented their growth in soft agar, restored their cytostatic response to TGF-β, decreased their invasiveness in response to TGF-β, and potentiated their activation of Smad2/3 and expression of PAI stimulated by TGF-β. More important, we show that COX-2 or EP2 deficiency both significantly decreased the growth, angiogenesis, and pulmonary metastasis of mammary tumors produced in mice. Collectively, this investigation establishes EP2 as a potent mediator of the anti-TGF-β activities elicited by COX-2/PGE2 in normal and malignant MECs. Our findings also suggest that pharmacological targeting of EP2 receptors may provide new inroads to antagonize the oncogenic activities of TGF-β during mammary tumorigenesis.—Tian, M., Schiemann, W. P. PGE2 receptor EP2 mediates the antagonistic effect of COX-2 on TGF-β signaling during mammary tumorigenesis. PMID:19897661

  12. A polysaccharide virulence factor from Aspergillus fumigatus elicits anti-inflammatory effects through induction of Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark S Gresnigt

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The galactosaminogalactan (GAG is a cell wall component of Aspergillus fumigatus that has potent anti-inflammatory effects in mice. However, the mechanisms responsible for the anti-inflammatory property of GAG remain to be elucidated. In the present study we used in vitro PBMC stimulation assays to demonstrate, that GAG inhibits proinflammatory T-helper (Th1 and Th17 cytokine production in human PBMCs by inducing Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra, a potent anti-inflammatory cytokine that blocks IL-1 signalling. GAG cannot suppress human T-helper cytokine production in the presence of neutralizing antibodies against IL-1Ra. In a mouse model of invasive aspergillosis, GAG induces IL-1Ra in vivo, and the increased susceptibility to invasive aspergillosis in the presence of GAG in wild type mice is not observed in mice deficient for IL-1Ra. Additionally, we demonstrate that the capacity of GAG to induce IL-1Ra could also be used for treatment of inflammatory diseases, as GAG was able to reduce severity of an experimental model of allergic aspergillosis, and in a murine DSS-induced colitis model. In the setting of invasive aspergillosis, GAG has a significant immunomodulatory function by inducing IL-1Ra and notably IL-1Ra knockout mice are completely protected to invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. This opens new treatment strategies that target IL-1Ra in the setting of acute invasive fungal infection. However, the observation that GAG can also protect mice from allergy and colitis makes GAG or a derivative structure of GAG a potential treatment compound for IL-1 driven inflammatory diseases.

  13. 77 FR 4600 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; EDGA Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-30

    ... equitable principles of trade, to remove impediments to and perfect the mechanism of a free and open market... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; EDGA Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change To Amend EDGA Rule 11.13 To Extend the Operation of a Pilot Program...

  14. 77 FR 4595 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; EDGX Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-30

    ... equitable principles of trade, to remove impediments to and perfect the mechanism of a free and open market... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; EDGX Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change To Amend EDGX Rule 11.13 To Extend the Operation of a Pilot Program...

  15. 75 FR 78783 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; EDGA Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    ... and open market and a national market system and, in general, to protect investors and the public... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; EDGA Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change To Amend EDGA Rule 11.14 To Extend the Operation of a Pilot Pursuant to...

  16. 75 FR 78787 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; EDGX Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    ... and open market and a national market system and, in general, to protect investors and the public... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; EDGX Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change To Amend EDGX Rule 11.14 To Extend the Operation of a Pilot Pursuant to...

  17. 77 FR 4608 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; EDGA Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-30

    ... of a free and open market and a national market system and, in general, to protect investors and the... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; EDGA Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change To Amend EDGA Rule 11.14 To Extend the Operation of the Single Stock...

  18. 77 FR 4606 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; EDGX Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-30

    ... of a free and open market and a national market system and, in general, to protect investors and the... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; EDGX Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change To Amend EDGX Rule 11.14 To Extend the Operation of the Single Stock...

  19. 78 FR 68889 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; EDGA Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; EDGA Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change To Amend EDGA Rule 3.5 (Advertising Practices) and To Repeal Rule 3.20... Change The Exchange proposes to amend EDGA Rule 3.5 (Advertising Practices) and repeal EDGA Rule...

  20. 78 FR 68897 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; EDGX Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; EDGX Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change To Amend EDGX Rule 3.5 (Advertising Practices) and To Repeal Rule 3.20... Change The Exchange proposes to amend EDGX Rule 3.5 (Advertising Practices) and repeal EDGX Rule...

  1. Regulatory fit effects for injunctive versus descriptive social norms: Evidence from the promotion of sustainable products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melnyk, V.; Herpen, van E.; Fischer, A.R.H.; Trijp, van J.C.M.

    2013-01-01

    Consumers face marketing messages using social norms in many situations where different goals are dominant. This research examines moderating effects of regulatory focus for descriptive and injunctive norms in the promotion of sustainable products. More specifically, it shows that descriptive norms

  2. The persuasive effects of framing messages on fruit and vegetable consumption according to regulatory focus theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Arie; Rothman, Alexander; Pietersma, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    According to Regulatory Focus theory (RFT), outcomes in persuasive messages can be framed in four different ways, as gains, non-gains, losses or non-losses. In study 1, the persuasiveness of all four frames was compared and the presence/absence effect that was expected on the basis of the feature-po

  3. 75 FR 80097 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-21

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change by NYSE Amex LLC Establishing Strike Price Intervals of $1 and Increasing Position and Exercise Limits With Respect to Options on the KBW Bank Index December 15, 2010. Pursuant to Section 19(b)(1)...

  4. The Effect of Blog Use on Self-Regulatory Learning of Prospective German Language Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyhan Yucel, Mukadder

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the effect of blog use on self-regulatory learning of prospective German language teachers. The study is semi-experimental. Pretest-posttest, experiment control model was used. Blog activities were conducted as extensive beyond classroom activities only for the experiment group. As the data collection tool…

  5. 78 FR 37644 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-21

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. June 17, 2013. Pursuant to...\\ notice is hereby given that on June 4, 2013, BATS Exchange, Inc. (the ``Exchange'' or ``BATS'')...

  6. 77 FR 58195 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-19

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. September 13, 2012. Pursuant... thereunder,\\2\\ notice is hereby given that on August 31, 2012, BATS Exchange, Inc. (the ``Exchange''...

  7. 78 FR 77736 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-24

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of a Proposed Rule Change To Modify BATS Options Market Maker Continuous Quoting Obligation Rules... Rule 19b-4 thereunder,\\2\\ notice is hereby given that on December 5, 2013, BATS Exchange, Inc....

  8. 78 FR 8617 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-06

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change To Amend BATS Rules Related to Price Sliding Functionality January 31, 2013... thereunder,\\2\\ notice is hereby given that on January 25, 2013, BATS Exchange, Inc. (the ``Exchange''...

  9. 76 FR 26331 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-06

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of a Proposed Rule Change To Extend the Trading Hours of BATS Options for Certain Products May 2... 19b-4 thereunder,\\2\\ notice is hereby given that, on April 26, 2011, BATS Exchange, Inc....

  10. 76 FR 77576 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-13

    ... and executed at C2. \\6\\ See Securities Exchange Act Release No. 65668 (November 2, 2011), 76 FR 69313... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of a Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. December 7, 2011....

  11. 78 FR 51235 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-20

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. August 14, 2013. Pursuant to...\\ notice is hereby given that on August 7, 2013, BATS Exchange, Inc. (the ``Exchange'' or ``BATS'')...

  12. 78 FR 62804 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-22

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. October 11, 2013. Pursuant to...\\ notice is hereby given that on October 1, 2013, BATS Exchange, Inc. (the ``Exchange'' or ``BATS'')...

  13. 78 FR 7826 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-04

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change To Amend BATS Rules in Connection With the Elimination of Discretionary Orders for BATS Options January 29, 2013. Pursuant to Section 19(b)(1) of the Securities Exchange Act...

  14. 75 FR 66170 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-27

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. October 21, 2010. Pursuant to...\\ notice is hereby given that on October 14, 2010, BATS Exchange, Inc. (``BATS'' or the ``Exchange'')...

  15. 77 FR 35735 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-14

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. June 8, 2012. Pursuant to... is hereby given that on May 31, 2012, BATS Exchange, Inc. (the ``Exchange'' or ``BATS'') filed...

  16. 76 FR 9841 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-22

    ... FR 51295 (August 19, 2010) (order approving application of BATS Y-Exchange, Inc. for registration as... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change To Amend BATS Rule 11.13, Entitled ``Order Execution'' February 15,...

  17. 78 FR 16306 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-14

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. March 8, 2013. Pursuant to...\\ notice is hereby given that on March 1, 2013, BATS Exchange, Inc. (the ``Exchange'' or ``BATS'')...

  18. 76 FR 57092 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-15

    ... Act Release No. 65133 (August 15, 2011), 76 FR 52032 (August 19, 2011) (SR-BATS-2011-029). The... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change To Offer a Bulk-Quoting Interface To All Users of BATS Options September...

  19. 78 FR 51261 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-20

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. August 14, 2013. Pursuant to...\\ notice is hereby given that on August 1, 2013, BATS Exchange, Inc. (the ``Exchange'' or ``BATS'')...

  20. 78 FR 61422 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-03

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of a Proposed Rule Change To Modify the Trading Halt Rule of BATS Options September 27, 2013... thereunder,\\2\\ notice is hereby given that, on September 20, 2013, BATS Exchange, Inc. (the ``Exchange''...

  1. 77 FR 23307 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-18

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. April 12, 2012. Pursuant to... is hereby given that on April 2, 2012, BATS Exchange, Inc. (the ``Exchange'' or ``BATS'') filed...

  2. 77 FR 35719 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-14

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change To Adopt Rules Related to Risk Management Functionality for BATS Options June... Rule 19b-4 thereunder,\\2\\ notice is hereby given that on June 1, 2012, BATS Exchange, Inc....

  3. 75 FR 66183 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-27

    ...), 75 FR 51295 (August 19, 2010) (order approving application of BATS Y-Exchange, Inc. for registration... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change by BATS Exchange, Inc. To Amend BATS Rule 11.13, Entitled ``Order...

  4. 76 FR 50803 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-16

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. August 10, 2011. Pursuant to...\\ notice is hereby given that on July 29, 2011, BATS Exchange, Inc. (the ``Exchange'' or ``BATS'')...

  5. 77 FR 5588 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-03

    ... forth below. \\6\\ See Securities Exchange Act Release No. 65619 (October 25, 2011), 76 FR 67238 (October... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. January 30, 2012. Pursuant...

  6. 78 FR 76355 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-17

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of a Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. December 11, 2013. Pursuant... thereunder,\\2\\ notice is hereby given that on December 2, 2013, BATS Exchange, Inc. (the ``Exchange''...

  7. 75 FR 20418 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-19

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. April 9, 2010. Pursuant to...\\ notice is hereby given that on March 31, 2010, BATS Exchange, Inc. (the ``Exchange'' or ``BATS'')...

  8. 75 FR 27847 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-18

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. May 11, 2010. Pursuant to...\\ notice is hereby given that on May 4, 2010, BATS Exchange, Inc. (the ``Exchange'' or ``BATS'') filed...

  9. 78 FR 56955 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-16

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. September 10, 2013. Pursuant... thereunder,\\2\\ notice is hereby given that on August 30, 2013, BATS Exchange, Inc. (the ``Exchange''...

  10. 77 FR 31059 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-24

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. May 18, 2012. Pursuant to...\\ notice is hereby given that on May 11, 2012, BATS Exchange, Inc. (the ``Exchange'' or ``BATS'')...

  11. 75 FR 11951 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-12

    ... equity options on the Exchange. See Securities Exchange Act Release No. 61419 (January 26, 2010), 75 FR... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. March 4, 2010. Pursuant...

  12. 77 FR 8310 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-14

    ... 4, 2012), 77 FR 1532 (January 10, 2012) (SR-Phlx-2011-185) (notice of filing and immediate..., 2011), 76 FR 78322 (December 16, 2011) (SR-Phlx-2011-162) (notice of filing and immediate effectiveness... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate...

  13. 78 FR 16750 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-18

    ...'').\\5\\ \\5\\ See Securities Exchange Act Release No. 67091 (May 31, 2012), 77 FR 33498 (June 6, 2012) (the... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change To Modify the Operation of Market Orders for BATS Options March 12,...

  14. 78 FR 51257 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-20

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. August 14, 2013. Pursuant to...\\ notice is hereby given that on August 2, 2013, BATS Exchange, Inc. (the ``Exchange'' or ``BATS'')...

  15. 76 FR 20414 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-12

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. April 6, 2011. Pursuant to...\\ notice is hereby given that, on April 1, 2011, BATS Exchange, Inc. (the ``Exchange'' or ``BATS'')...

  16. 78 FR 53814 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-30

    ... (July 30, 2013), 78 FR 47469 (Aug. 5, 2013) (SR-CBOE-2013-078); Securities Exchange Act Release No... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of a Proposed Rule Change Related to Registration and Continuing Education Fees for BATS...

  17. 76 FR 12155 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-04

    ..., 2009), 74 FR 11386 (March 17, 2009). In order to allow Members sufficient time to review and complete... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change by BATS Exchange, Inc. to Adopt BATS Rule 11.21, entitled ``Input of...

  18. Reducing the Effect of Stereotype Threat: The Role of Coaction Contexts and Regulatory Fit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Fangfang; Zuo, Bin; Wu, Yang; Dong, Xuanhao; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Two experiments examined the effects of competition and cooperation contexts, as well as regulatory fit, on reducing the negative influence of stereotype threat. Experiment 1 demonstrated that in high stereotype threat conditions, participants in the cooperation context scored significantly higher on a math test than those in the competition…

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF NEW LHRH ANTAGONISTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENGDun-Ren; XIAOShao-Bo

    1989-01-01

    An ideal antagonist of LHRH is one which can act on the pitutary to inhibit LHRH-stimulatod LH / FSH secretion by competitive occupying the LHRH receptor in the pitutary gland. Its action should be very specific, fast and highly effective, the durations

  20. South African plants used in traditional medicine to treat epilepsy have an antagonistic effect on NMDA receptor currents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marchetti, Carla; Gavazzo, Paola; Stafford, Gary Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Several Searsia species (Anacardiaceae), including Searsia dentata and Searsia pyroides, are used in South Africa traditional medicine to treat epilepsy. Ethanol leaf extracts of these plants have been shown to act as possible antagonists of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-type glutamate receptors....

  1. The effect of ondansetron, a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, in chronic fatigue syndrome: a randomized controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    The, G.K.H.; Bleijenberg, G.; Buitelaar, J.K.; Meer, J.W.M. van der

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Accumulating data support the involvement of the serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]) system in the pathophysiology of chronic fatigue syndrome. Neuropharmacologic studies point to a hyperactive 5-HT system, and open-label treatment studies with 5-HT(3) receptor antagonists have shown

  2. Effects of the CGRP receptor antagonist BIBN4096BS on capsaicin-induced carotid haemodynamic changes in anaesthetised pigs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Kapoor (Kapil); U. Arulmani (Udayasankar); J.P. Heiligers (Jan); I.M. Garrelds (Ingrid); E.W. Willems (Edwin); H. Doods (Henri); C.M. Villalón (Carlos); P.R. Saxena (Pramod Ranjan)

    2003-01-01

    textabstract1. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), a potent vasodilator released from capsaicin-sensitive trigeminal sensory nerves, seems to be involved in the pathogenesis of migraine. Hence, CGRP receptor antagonists may serve as a novel treatment for migraine. This study wa

  3. Neutrophils accentuate renal cold ischemia-reperfusion injury. Dose-dependent protective effect of a platelet-activating factor receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riera, M; Torras, J; Herrero, I; Valles, J; Paubert-Braquet, M; Cruzado, J M; Alsina, J; Grinyo, J M

    1997-02-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate whether the renal damage induced by cold ischemia-reperfusion was worsened by neutrophils (PMN), and if blockade of platelet-activating factor (PAF) could effectively decrease this injury. After flushing with EuroCollins, 85 kidneys from Sprague-Dawley rats underwent either no cold ischemia or a 4-h cold ischemia, and then were reperfused for 75 min at 37 degrees C and 100 mm Hg in an isolated perfusion circuit. Reperfusion was performed with a Krebs-Henseleit solution containing 4.5% albumin, with and without human PMN (7.5 x 10(5) cells/ml) and with and without addition of a PAF receptor antagonist (BN 52021). Hemodynamic and functional parameters were continuously assessed during reperfusion. At end of the study, PAF production was evaluated. Presence of PMN during reperfusion of nonischemic kidneys produced no alteration of functional parameters or PAF production. After 4-h cold ischemia, the presence of PMN during reperfusion produced a significant worsening of plasma flow rate, glomerular filtration rate and sodium reabsorption in comparison with kidneys reperfused without PMN. Also, higher production of PAF was observed in the kidneys reperfused with PMN than in the kidneys reperfused without PMN. After 4-h cold ischemia, addition of BN 52021 during reperfusion in the presence of PMN significantly increased the plasma flow rate, glomerular filtration rate and sodium reabsorption in comparison with kidneys reperfused without this PAF antagonist. This effect was dose dependent. After 4-h cold ischemia, addition of BN 52021 during reperfusion in the absence of PMN produced no significant effect on functional parameters in comparison with kidneys reperfused without this PAF antagonist. These results indicate that PMN contribute to renal cold ischemia-reperfusion injury evaluated in the isolated perfused kidney. Treatment with a PAF receptor antagonist attenuated this injury in a dose-dependent manner, which suggests that it

  4. Effects of the Adenosine A(1) Receptor Antagonist Rolofylline on Renal Function in Patients With Acute Heart Failure and Renal Dysfunction Results From PROTECT (Placebo-Controlled Randomized Study of the Selective A(1) Adenosine Receptor Antagonist Rolofylline for Patients Hospitalized With Acute Decompensated Heart Failure and Volume Overload to Assess Treatment Effect on Congestion and Renal Function)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voors, Adriaan A.; Dittrich, Howard C.; Massie, Barry M.; DeLucca, Paul; Mansoor, George A.; Metra, Marco; Cotter, Gad; Weatherley, Beth D.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Teerlink, John R.; Cleland, John G. F.; O'Connor, Christopher M.; Givertz, Michael M.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to assess the effects of rolofylline on renal function in patients with acute heart failure (AHF) and renal dysfunction randomized in PROTECT (Placebo-Controlled Randomized Study of the Selective A(1) Adenosine Receptor Antagonist Rolofylline for Patients Hospitalized Wi

  5. Different effects of two types of H2-receptor antagonists, famotidine and roxatidine, on the mucus barrier of rat gastric mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikama, Nobuaki; Ichikawa, Takafumi; Iwai, Tomohisa; Yamamoto, Hajime; Kida, Mitsuhiro; Koizumi, Wasaburo; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2012-02-01

    Compared with the aggressive factors, little attention has been paid to the mucosal defensive factors in ulcer therapy, and the role of the H2-receptor antagonists in gastric mucosal protection has not been well characterized. In the present study, the effects of different types of H2-receptor antagonists (famotidine and roxatidine) on rat gastric mucus cells were investigated using both biochemical and histological methods. Each drug (famotidine, 3 mg/kg; roxatidine, 100 mg/kg) was orally administered to rats by gavage once daily for 7 days. The biosynthesis and tissue content of mucin were compared in the gastric mucosa treated with each drug. Using anti-mucin monoclonal antibodies, the mucin content and immunohistochemical localization were also compared. Both the biosynthesis and the accumulation of gastric mucin were significantly decreased in the famotidine-treated rats, but not in the roxatidine. Both the content and the immunoreactivity of surface mucus cell-derived mucin were reduced by famotidine, while they were maintained in roxatidine-treated rat stomachs. There was no difference between the groups in the content and immunoreactivity of mucous neck cell-derived mucin. H2-receptor antagonists should be classified in relation to gastric surface mucus cell function, raising the possibility of more effective ulcer therapy.

  6. Chronic escitalopram treatment caused dissociative adaptation in serotonin (5-HT) 2C receptor antagonist-induced effects in REM sleep, wake and theta wave activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostyalik, Diána; Kátai, Zita; Vas, Szilvia; Pap, Dorottya; Petschner, Péter; Molnár, Eszter; Gyertyán, István; Kalmár, Lajos; Tóthfalusi, László; Bagdy, Gyorgy

    2014-03-01

    Several multi-target drugs used in treating psychiatric disorders, such as antidepressants (e.g. agomelatine, trazodone, nefazodone, amitriptyline, mirtazapine, mianserin, fluoxetine) or most atypical antipsychotics, have 5-hydroxytryptamine 2C (5-HT2C) receptor-blocking property. Adaptive changes in 5-HT2C receptor-mediated functions are suggested to contribute to therapeutic effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants after weeks of treatment, at least in part. Beyond the mediation of anxiety and other functions, 5-HT2C receptors are involved in sleep regulation. Anxiety-related adaptive changes caused by antidepressants have been studied extensively, although sleep- and electroencephalography (EEG)-related functional studies are still lacking. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of chronic SSRI treatment on 5-HT2C receptor antagonist-induced functions in different vigilance stages and on quantitative EEG (Q-EEG) spectra. Rats were treated with a single dose of the selective 5-HT2C receptor antagonist SB-242084 (1 mg/kg, i.p.) or vehicle at the beginning of passive phase following a 20-day-long SSRI (escitalopram; 10 mg/kg/day, osmotic minipump) or VEHICLE pretreatment. Fronto-parietal electroencephalogram, electromyogram and motility were recorded during the first 3 h of passive phase. We found that the chronic escitalopram pretreatment attenuated the SB-242084-caused suppression in rapid eye movement sleep (REMS). On the contrary, the 5-HT2C receptor antagonist-induced elevations in passive wake and theta (5-9 Hz) power density during active wake and REMS were not affected by the SSRI. In conclusion, attenuation in certain, but not all vigilance- and Q-EEG-related functions induced by the 5-HT2C receptor antagonist, suggests dissociation in 5-HT2C receptor adaptation.

  7. Auxin-Oxylipin Crosstalk: Relationship of Antagonists

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maik Hoffmann; Mathias Hentrich; Stephan Pollmann

    2011-01-01

    Phytohormones regulate a wide array of developmental processes throughout the life cycle of plants. Herein, the various plant hormones may interact additively, synergistically, or antagonistically. By their cooperation they create a delicate regulatory network whose net output largely depends on the action of specific phytohormone combinations rather than on the independent activities of separate hormones. While most classical studies of plant hormonal control have focused mainly on the action of single hormones or on the synergistic interaction of hormones in regulating various developmental processes, recent work is beginning to shed light on the crosstalk of nominally antagonistic plant hormones, such as gibberellins and auxins with oxylipins or abscisic acid. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of how two of the first sight antagonistic plant hormones, i.e. auxins and oxylipins,interact in controlling plant responses and development.

  8. Effect of Silodosin, an Alpha1A-Adrenoceptor Antagonist, on Ventral Prostatic Hyperplasia in the Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shogo Shimizu

    Full Text Available A decreased prostatic blood flow could be one of the risk factors for benign prostatic hyperplasia/benign prostatic enlargement. The spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR shows a chronic prostatic ischemia and hyperplastic morphological abnormalities in the ventral prostate. The effect of silodosin, a selective alpha1A-adrenoceptor antagonist, was investigated in the SHR prostate as a prostatic hyperplasia model focusing on prostatic blood flow.Twelve-week-old male SHRs were administered perorally with silodosin (100 μg/kg/day or vehicle once daily for 6 weeks. Wistar Kyoto (WKY rats were used as normotensive controls and were treated with the vehicle. The effect of silodosin on blood pressure and prostatic blood flow were estimated and then the prostates were removed and weighed. The tissue levels of malondialdehyde (MDA, interleukin-6 (IL-6, chemokine (C-X-C motif ligand 1/cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant 1 (CXCL1/CINC1, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α, transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF and alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA were measured. The histological evaluation was also performed by hematoxylin and eosin staining.There was a significant increase in blood pressure, prostate weight, prostate body weight ratio (PBR, tissue levels of MDA, IL-6, CXCL1/CINC1, TNF-α, TGF-β1, bFGF and α-SMA in the SHR compared to the WKY rat. The ventral prostate in the SHR showed the morphological abnormalities compared to the WKY rat. Prostatic blood flow was decreased in the SHR. However, treatment with silodosin significantly restored the decreased prostatic blood flow in the SHR. Moreover, silodosin normalized tissue levels of MDA, IL-6, CXCL1/CINC1, TNF-α, TGF-β1, bFGF and α-SMA, and it ameliorated ventral prostatic hyperplasia in the SHR excluding blood pressure. Silodosin decreased PBR but not prostate weight in the SHR.Silodosin can inhibit the progression of prostatic hyperplasia through

  9. Effects of intracerebroventricular NMDA and non-NMDA receptor agonists or antagonists on general anesthesia of propofol in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Aijun; DUAN Shiming; TIAN Yuke

    2007-01-01

    The efiects of intracerebroventricular(icv)agonists and antagonists of N-methyl-D-aspartate(NMDA)and alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid (AMPA) receptors on the general anesthesia of propofol were studied.A tohal of 144 Kunming mice,male and female with body mass of(22±3)g,were used.Part One of the Experiment:a total of 104 Kunming mice,male and female,were randomly divided into 13 groups.Intracerebroventricular artificial cerebral fluid (aCSF)or different doses of NMDA,AMPA,MK-801 or NBOX was iniected immediately after intravenously administered propofol 25 mg/kg and the recovery time following the loss of righting reflex (LORR)was recorded.Part Two of the Experiment:a total of 40 Kunming female mice were divided randomly into 5 groups and iniected with icv aCSF or NMDA.AMPA.MK-801 or NBQX after intraperitoneally administered propofol 50 mg/kg.The pain threshold of the mice was then investigated by hot-plate test(HPPT).NMDA(0.05 or 0.075μg,icv)or AMPA(0.05 μg,icv)exhibited no effects on the LORR,but NMDA(0.1 μg,icv)or AMPA(0.075 or 0.1 μg,icv)prolonged the LORR significantly compared with the aCSF group(P<0.05,P<0.01).The LORR of the 2 μg MK-801 group had no changes,while those of the 4 or 8 μg MK-801 groups were prolonged significantly.The LORR of the 0.5,2 or 4 μg NBQX groups were all prolonged significantly.NMDA 0.05 μg or AMPA 0.05 μg decreased the pain threshold slightly but did not differ in effect compared with the aCSF group;2 μg MK-801 or 0.5 μg NBQX both increased the pain threshold significantly.Our results indicate that propofol produces general anesthesia partly through an interaction with brain NMDA and AMPA receptors in mice.

  10. Excitatory amino acid receptor antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, T N; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea; Ebert, B

    1997-01-01

    We have previously shown that (RS)-2-amino-2-(5-tert-butyl-3-hydroxyisoxazol-4-yl)acetic acid (ATAA) is an antagonist at N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) and (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazol-4-yl)propionic acid (AMPA) receptors. We have now resolved ATAA via diastereomeric salt formation......)-phenylethylamine salt of N-BOC-(R)-ATAA. Like ATAA, neither (R)- nor (S)-ATAA significantly affected (IC50 > 100 microM) the receptor binding of tritiated AMPA, kainic acid, or (RS)-3-(2-carboxypiperazin-4-yl)propyl-1-phosphonic acid, the latter being a competitive NMDA antagonist. Electrophysiological experiments......, using the rat cortical wedge preparation, showed the NMDA antagonist effect as well as the AMPA antagonist effect of ATAA to reside exclusively in the (R)-enantiomer (Ki = 75 +/- 5 microM and 57 +/- 1 microM, respectively). Neither (R)- nor (S)-ATAA significantly reduced kainic acid-induced excitation...

  11. Effects of the non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist memantine on the volitional consumption of ethanol by alcohol-preferring rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malpass, Gloria E; Williams, Helen L; McMillen, Brian A

    2010-05-01

    Potent N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists decrease volitional consumption of ethanol by rats. This study examined the effects of memantine, a low-affinity, open channel NMDA antagonist, on volitional consumption of ethanol by alcohol-preferring rats and potential locomotor, sedative and hypothermic effects. Volitional consumption of ethanol in a 24-hr two-choice paradigm was determined for male Myers' high-ethanol-preferring (mHEP) rats. Effects of memantine (0.3, 1.0, 3.0 and 10.0 mg/kg, i.p., b.i.d. [twice daily] for 3 days) or vehicle on volitional consumption of ethanol, proportion of ethanol to total fluids consumed, total fluid intake and consumption of food were observed. Potential sedating and locomotor effects of memantine (10.0 mg/kg, i.p., b.i.d.) were determined using an elevated plus maze and an Auto-Track Opto-Varimex activity monitoring system. Rectal temperature was measured to determine if memantine (10.0 mg/kg, i.p.) produces a hypothermic effect. The results indicate that memantine dose-dependently decreased the amount of ethanol and proportion of ethanol to total fluids consumed daily, reaching 48% and 24%, respectively, at the highest dose. These effects did not appear to be anti-caloric. Memantine (10.0 mg/kg) partially reversed both the sedation and the reductions in locomotor activity induced by ethanol. This dose did, however, produce a small, partially reversible hypothermic effect. In conclusion, memantine may decrease ethanol consumption with fewer side effects than other NMDA receptor antagonists, such as phencyclidine (PCP), MK 801 and ketamine.

  12. Dopamine D3/D2 Receptor Antagonist PF-4363467 Attenuates Opioid Drug-Seeking Behavior without Concomitant D2 Side Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wager, Travis T; Chappie, Thomas; Horton, David; Chandrasekaran, Ramalakshmi Y; Samas, Brian; Dunn-Sims, Elizabeth R; Hsu, Cathleen; Nawreen, Nawshaba; Vanase-Frawley, Michelle A; O'Connor, Rebecca E; Schmidt, Christopher J; Dlugolenski, Keith; Stratman, Nancy C; Majchrzak, Mark J; Kormos, Bethany L; Nguyen, David P; Sawant-Basak, Aarti; Mead, Andy N

    2017-01-18

    Dopamine receptor antagonism is a compelling molecular target for the treatment of a range of psychiatric disorders, including substance use disorders. From our corporate compound file, we identified a structurally unique D3 receptor (D3R) antagonist scaffold, 1. Through a hybrid approach, we merged key pharmacophore elements from 1 and D3 agonist 2 to yield the novel D3R/D2R antagonist PF-4363467 (3). Compound 3 was designed to possess CNS drug-like properties as defined by its CNS MPO desirability score (≥4/6). In addition to good physicochemical properties, 3 exhibited low nanomolar affinity for the D3R (D3 Ki = 3.1 nM), good subtype selectivity over D2R (D2 Ki = 692 nM), and high selectivity for D3R versus other biogenic amine receptors. In vivo, 3 dose-dependently attenuated opioid self-administration and opioid drug-seeking behavior in a rat operant reinstatement model using animals trained to self-administer fentanyl. Further, traditional extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS), adverse side effects arising from D2R antagonism, were not observed despite high D2 receptor occupancy (RO) in rodents, suggesting that compound 3 has a unique in vivo profile. Collectively, our data support further investigation of dual D3R and D2R antagonists for the treatment of drug addiction.

  13. 四川瓜蒌具钙拮抗作用化学成分的 光谱研究(Ⅱ)%SHECTRUM STUDY ON CHEMICAL COMPONENTS HAVING CALCIUM ANTAGONIST EFFECT IN SICHUAN TRICHOSANTHES(Ⅱ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴玉蓉; 翟成尘; 莫尚武

    2001-01-01

    The Components having calcium antagonist effect were isolated from richosanthes with 70% C2H5OH.The analytical data showed that the mixture was composed of saturated aliphatic acids,spinasterol and 24-dihydro-10α-cucurbitadienol.

  14. Effects of Dopamine D2-Like Receptor Antagonists on Light Responses of Ganglion Cells in Wild-Type and P23H Rat Retinas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph Jensen

    Full Text Available In animal models of retinitis pigmentosa the dopaminergic system in the retina appears to be dysfunctional, which may contribute to the debilitated sight experienced by retinitis pigmentosa patients. Since dopamine D2-like receptors are known to modulate the activity of dopaminergic neurons, I examined the effects of dopamine D2-like receptor antagonists on the light responses of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs in the P23H rat model of retinitis pigmentosa. Extracellular electrical recordings were made from RGCs in isolated transgenic P23H rat retinas and wild-type Sprague-Dawley rat retinas. Intensity-response curves to flashes of light were evaluated prior to and during bath application of a dopamine D2-like receptor antagonist. The dopamine D2/D3 receptor antagonists sulpiride and eticlopride and the D4 receptor antagonist L-745,870 increased light sensitivity of P23H rat RGCs but decreased light sensitivity in Sprague-Dawley rat RGCs. In addition, L-745,870, but not sulpiride or eticlopride, reduced the maximum peak responses of Sprague-Dawley rat RGCs. I describe for the first time ON-center RGCs in P23H rats that exhibit an abnormally long-latency (>200 ms response to the onset of a small spot of light. Both sulpiride and eticlopride, but not L-745,870, reduced this ON response and brought out a short-latency OFF response, suggesting that these cells are in actuality OFF-center cells. Overall, the results show that the altered dopaminergic system in degenerate retinas contributes to the deteriorated light responses of RGCs.

  15. Effect of a corticotropin releasing hormone receptor antagonist on colonic sensory and motor function in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Background and aims: Corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) is a major mediator of the stress response in the brain-gut axis. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is presumed to be a disorder of the brain-gut link associated with an exaggerated response to stress. We hypothesised that peripheral administration of α-helical CRH (αhCRH), a non-selective CRH receptor antagonist, would improve gastrointestinal motility, visceral perception, and negative mood in response to gut stimulation in IBS patient...

  16. Effects of D2 receptor antagonist haloperidol on hippocampal neuronal apoptosis in a rat model of temporal epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Songqing Wang; Aihua Zhang; Haitang Chen; Qianghua He; Peizeng Xie; Yiquan Ke; Xiaodan Jiang

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dopamine receptors are divided into D1 and D2 subgroups. It has been reported that D2 receptors resist neural toxicity induced by excitatory amino acids and muscarine, and also alleviate epilepsy attacks following pilocarpine treatment. However, it has not yet been established whether D2 receptors regulate temporal epilepsy.OBJECTIVE: To observe the effects of the D2 antagonist halopefidol on hippocampal neuronal apoptosis and electrical brain activity in a rat model of kainic acid-induced temporal epilepsy.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: Randomized grouping and histopathological study were performed at the Neurology Medicine Institute of Zhujiang Hospital, Southern Medical University from August to December 2004.MATERIALS: Twenty-five adult, male, Sprague Dawley rats were selected for the present study. Kainic acid (Sigma, USA) was injected into the right lateral ventricle to establish models of temporal epilepsy. A PowerLab multiplying channel electrophysiolograph was provided by AD Instruments, Australia.METHODS: The rats were randomly divided into 5 groups (n = 5): control, model, haloperidol hippocampus, haloperidol striatum, and haloperidol substantia nigra. Temporal epilepsy was established in all rats except the control group. Haloperidol was slowly injected into the hippocampus, striatum and substantia nigra, respectively, in three different injection groups. Normal saline was injected into the fight lateral ventricle of the control rats.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Hippocampal apoptosis was observed on the day 3 of treatment using TUNEL staining. Changes in electroencephalogram at 0, 0.5, 2, 6, and 12 hours following treatment onset were observed using a PowerLab multiplying channel electrophysiolograph. Animal behaviors were classified according to the Racine criteria.RESULTS: Twenty-five rats were included in the final analysis. Seizures did not occur in the control group. In the model group, 10 minutes alter kainic acid injection to the lateral

  17. Comparison of efficacy and side effects of combination therapy of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (benazepril) with calcium antagonist (either nifedipine or amlodipine) versus high-dose calcium antagonist monotherapy for systemic hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messerli, F H; Oparil, S; Feng, Z

    2000-12-01

    The present 2 multicenter studies were designed to evaluate whether patients with essential hypertension derived equal benefits from use of combination therapy with a calcium antagonist and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor as from doubling the dose of the calcium antagonist. After a 2-week washout and a 2-week single-blind placebo run-in period, a total of 1,390 patients were treated with either nifedipine 30 mg (study 1) or amlodipine 5 mg (study 2) once daily for 4 weeks. The 1,079 patients whose diastolic blood pressure remained between 95 and 115 mm Hg were randomized to 8 weeks of double-blind therapy with amlodipine 5 mg/benazepril 10 mg, amlodipine 5 mg/ benazepril 20 mg, nifedipine 30 mg or nifedipine 60 mg (study 1), and amlodipine 5 mg/benazepril 10 mg, amlodipine 5 mg/benazepril 20 mg, amlodipine 5 mg or amlodipine 10 mg (study 2). Both doses of the calcium antagonist/ACE inhibitor combination therapy lowered diastolic pressure as much as the high dose and significantly better than the lower dose of calcium antagonist monotherapy (with either nifedipine or amlodipine). However, 15% of patients in the nifedipine high-dose monotherapy group and 24% in the amlodipine high-dose monotherapy group presented with some form of edema. In contrast, the incidence of edema was similar for patients treated with both combination therapy and low-dose calcium antagonists. Thus, combination therapy with a calcium antagonist and an ACE inhibitor provides blood pressure control equal to that of high-dose calcium antagonist monotherapy but with significantly fewer dose-dependent adverse experiences such as vasodilatory edema. Inc.

  18. Mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid receptor antagonists in animal models of anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korte, SM; KorteBouws, GAH; Koob, GF; DeKloet, ER; Bohus, B

    1996-01-01

    The behavioral effects of intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of a specific mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist [RU28318 (10-50 ng/2 mu l)], a glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist [RU38486 (1-50 ng/2 mu l)], or both antagonists (50 ng/2 mu l), were studied in two different animal

  19. Novel benzimidazole-based MCH R1 antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Andrew J; Al-Barazanji, Kamal A; Barvian, Kevin K; Bishop, Michael J; Britt, Christy S; Cooper, Joel P; Goetz, Aaron S; Grizzle, Mary K; Hertzog, Donald L; Ignar, Diane M; Morgan, Ronda O; Peckham, Gregory E; Speake, Jason D; Swain, Will R

    2006-10-01

    The identification of an MCH R1 antagonist screening hit led to the optimization of a class of benzimidazole-based MCH R1 antagonists. Structure-activity relationships and efforts to optimize pharmacokinetic properties are detailed along with the demonstration of the effectiveness of an MCH R1 antagonist in an animal model of obesity.

  20. Effects due to rhizospheric soil application of an antagonistic bacterial endophyte on native bacterial community and its survival in soil: A case study with Pseudomonas aeruginosa from banana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pious eThomas

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Effective translation of research findings from laboratory to agricultural fields is essential for the success of biocontrol or growth promotion trials employing beneficial microorganisms. The rhizosphere is to be viewed holistically as a dynamic ecological niche comprising of diverse microorganisms including competitors and noxious antagonists to the bio-inoculant. This study was undertaken to assess the effects due to the soil application of an endophytic bacterium with multiple pathogen antagonistic potential on native bacterial community and its sustenance in agricultural soil. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was employed as a model system considering its frequent isolation as an endophyte, wide antagonistic effects reported against different phytopathogens and soil pests, and that the species is a known human pathogen which makes its usage in agriculture precarious. Employing the strain ‘GNS.13.2a’ from banana, its survival in field soil and the effects upon soil inoculation were investigated by monitoring total culturable bacterial fraction as the representative indicator of soil microbial community. Serial dilution plating of uninoculated control versus P. aeruginosa inoculated soil from banana rhizosphere indicated a significant reduction in native bacterial cfu soon after inoculation compared with control soil as assessed on cetrimide- nalidixic acid selective medium against nutrient agar. Sampling on day-4 showed a significant reduction in P. aeruginosa cfu in inoculated soil and a continuous dip thereafter registering >99% reduction within one week while the native bacterial population resurged with cfu restoration on par with control. This was validated in contained trials with banana plants. Conversely, P. aeruginosa showed static cfu or proliferation in axenic-soil. Lateral introduction of soil microbiome in P. aeruginosa established soil under axenic conditions or its co-incubation with soil microbiota in suspension indicated

  1. Differential effects of acute and repeat dosing with the H3 antagonist GSK189254 on the sleep–wake cycle and narcoleptic episodes in Ox−/− mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, RX; Anaclet, C; Roberts, JC; Parmentier, R; Zhang, M; Guidon, G; Buda, C; Sastre, JP; Feng, JQ; Franco, P; Brown, SH; Upton, N; Medhurst, AD; Lin, JS

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Histamine H3 receptor antagonists are currently being evaluated in clinical trials for a number of central nervous system disorders including narcolepsy. These agents can increase wakefulness (W) in cats and rodents following acute administration, but their effects after repeat dosing have not been reported previously. Experimental approach: EEG and EMG recordings were used to investigate the effects of acute and repeat administration of the novel H3 antagonist GSK189254 on the sleep–wake cycle in wild-type (Ox+/+) and orexin knockout (Ox−/−) mice, the latter being genetically susceptible to narcoleptic episodes. In addition, we investigated H3 and H1 receptor expression in this model using radioligand binding and autoradiography. Key results: In Ox+/+ and Ox−/− mice, acute administration of GSK189254 (3 and 10 mg·kg−1 p.o.) increased W and decreased slow wave and paradoxical sleep to a similar degree to modafinil (64 mg·kg−1), while it reduced narcoleptic episodes in Ox−/− mice. After twice daily dosing for 8 days, the effect of GSK189254 (10 mg·kg−1) on W in both Ox+/+ and Ox−/− mice was significantly reduced, while the effect on narcoleptic episodes in Ox−/− mice was significantly increased. Binding studies revealed no significant differences in H3 or H1 receptor expression between Ox+/+ and Ox−/− mice. Conclusions and implications: These studies provide further evidence to support the potential use of H3 antagonists in the treatment of narcolepsy and excessive daytime sleepiness. Moreover, the differential effects observed on W and narcoleptic episodes following repeat dosing could have important implications in clinical studies. PMID:19413575

  2. Physiological and regulatory effects of controlled overproduction of five cold shock proteins of Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, J.A.; Mailhes, M.; Rombouts, F.M.; Vos, de W.M.; Kuipers, O.P.; Abee, T.

    2000-01-01

    The physiological and regulatory effects of overproduction of five cold shock proteins (CSPs) of Lactococcus lactis were studied. CspB, CspD, and CspE could be overproduced at high levels (up to 19␘f the total protein), whereas for CspA and CspC limited overproduction (0.3 to 0.5␘f the total protein

  3. Antinociceptive effects of a new sigma-1 receptor antagonist (N-(2-morpholin-4-yl-ethyl)-2-(1-naphthyloxy)acetamide) in two types of nociception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Martínez, Betzabeth Anali; Jaramillo-Morales, Osmar Antonio; Espinosa-Juárez, Josué Vidal; Navarrete-Vázquez, Gabriel; Melo-Hernández, Luis Alberto; Medina-López, José Raúl; Domínguez-Ramírez, Adriana Miriam; Schepmann, Dirk; Wünsch, Bernhard; López-Muñoz, Francisco Javier

    2016-01-15

    Pain has become an active clinical challenge due its etiological heterogeneity, symptoms and mechanisms of action. In the search for new pharmacological therapeutic alternatives, sigma receptors have been proposed as drug targets. This family consists of sigma-1 and sigma-2 receptors. The sigma-1 system is involved in nociception through its chaperone activity. Additionally, it has been shown that agonist to these receptors promote related sensitisation and pain hypersensitisation, suggesting the possible use of antagonists for sigma-1 receptors as an alternative therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antinociceptive effect of a new sigma-1 receptor antagonist N-(2-morpholin-4-yl-ethyl)-2-(1-naphthyloxy)acetamida (NMIN) in two types of pain (arthritic and neuropathic) and to compare its efficacy and potency with reference drugs. The antinociceptive effects of NMIN were quantitatively evaluated using the pain-induced functional impairment model in the rat and the acetone test in a rat model of neuropathic pain. NMIN (sigma-1 receptor affinity of 324nM) did not show any antinociceptive activity in the arthritic pain model but showed a dose-dependent anti-allodynic effect in neuropathic pain. NMIN showed a similar efficacy compared to the effects obtained with morphine and the sigma-1 antagonist BD-1063. However, these reference drugs showed increased potency compared with NMIN. Our results suggest that sigma-1 receptors may play an important direct role in neuropathic pain but not in arthritic pain, supporting the hypothesis that NMIN may be useful for the treatment of neuropathic pain.

  4. Contribution of the central dopaminergic system in the anti-hypertensive effect of kinin B1 receptor antagonists in two rat models of hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Brito Gariepy, H; Carayon, P; Ferrari, B; Couture, R

    2010-04-01

    Kinins are neuroactive peptides that could play a role in central autonomic control of blood pressure. Whereas kinin B1R binding sites were increased in specific brain areas of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and Angiotensin II (AngII)-hypertensive rats, the contribution of kinin B1R in hypertension remains controversial. The aims of the study were to determine: (a) the effects on mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) of centrally and peripherally administered B1R antagonists in SHR (16weeks) and AngII-hypertensive rats (200ng/kg/minx2weeks, s.c.); (b) the contribution of central dopamine in the effects of SSR240612. The rationale is based on the overactivity of the dopaminergic system in hypertension. In both models, SSR240612 (1, 5 and 10mg/kg, gavage) reduced dose-dependently MAP (-75mm Hg at least up to 6-8h) and this therapeutic effect was resolved after 24h. At the dose of 5mg/kg, SSR240612-induced anti-hypertension was prevented by two dopamine receptor blockers, namely raclopride (0.16mg/kg, i.v.) and haloperidol (10mg/kg, s.c.). I.c.v. SSR240612 (1mug) decreased rapidly MAP in both models (1-6h) via a raclopride sensitive mechanism. In comparison, peripherally acting B1R antagonists (R-715 and R-954, 2mg/kg, s.c.) caused shorter and very modest decreases of MAP (from -20 to -30mm Hg). Centrally or peripherally administered B1R antagonists had no effect on MAP in control Wistar-Kyoto rats. Data provide the first pharmacological evidence that the up-regulated brain kinin B1R contributes through a central dopaminergic mechanism (DA-D2R) to the maintenance of arterial hypertension in genetic and experimental animal models of hypertension.

  5. Effects of Different Regulatory Methods on Improvement of Greenhouse Saline Soils, Tomato Quality, and Yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou Maomao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To identify effective regulatory methods scheduling with the compromise between the soil desalination and the improvement of tomato quality and yield, a 3-year field experiment was conducted to evaluate and compare the effect of straw mulching and soil structure conditioner and water-retaining agent on greenhouse saline soils, tomato quality, and yield. A higher salt removing rate of 80.72% in plough layer with straw mulching was obtained based on the observation of salt mass fraction in 0~20 cm soil layer before and after the experiment. Salts were also found to move gradually to the deeper soil layer with time. Straw mulching enhanced the content of soil organic matter significantly and was conductive to reserve soil available N, P, and K, while available P and K in soils of plough layer with soil structure conditioner decreased obviously; thus a greater usage of P fertilizer and K fertilizer was needed when applying soil structure conditioner. Considering the evaluation indexes including tomato quality, yield, and desalination effects of different regulatory methods, straw mulching was recommended as the main regulatory method to improve greenhouse saline soils in south China. Soil structure conditioner was the suboptimal method, which could be applied in concert with straw mulching.

  6. A strategy for regulatory action when new adverse effects of a licensed product emerge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson, Jeffrey K; Price, Deirdre; Ferner, Robin E

    2009-01-01

    Regulatory agencies grant product licences (marketing authorizations) for medicinal products in the light of evidence that the balance between benefit and harm in the population is favourable. Here we consider a framework for allowing regulatory agencies to make rational decisions when reviewing product licences in the light of new information about harms that change that balance. The regulator can revoke the product licence, restrict the product's availability or change the 'label' in different ways. We examine the features of the adverse effect that may be relevant in making the decision: namely, individual differences in susceptibility; the possibility of monitoring; and the availability of protective strategies. The balance of benefit and harm, and the time-course and dose relation of the adverse effect play important roles in the decision-making process. We set out how these factors can help determine the logical response to new information on the balance between benefit and harm, and provide a series of relevant examples. We believe that when regulatory agencies have to decide how to amend the product licence of a drug when new serious adverse effects cause concern, they would find it useful to adopt a framework of this kind, using different strategies for different cases. Our proposed framework could also be useful in risk management planning during drug development.

  7. Effects of AR Antagonist on Myocardial α1-AR Density and VERP-D after Myocardial Infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Jingmin; Wu Wei; Fang Chang; Zhang Yan; Wang Jingfeng

    2004-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the effects of adrenergic receptor antagonist ( metoprolol or prazosin) on myocardial α1-AR density and the changes of ventricular effective refractory period dispersion (VERP-D) in rabbits after myocardial infarction.Methods twenty-four adult male New Zealand rabbits were divided into four groups at random: control group ( n = 6 ); MI with placebo group ( n = 6 ); MI with metoprolol group (n = 6 ) ; MI with prazosin group (n = 6 ). The rabbits received corresponding drugs for seven days, beginning at the first day after MI and myocardial α1-AR density were measured and meanwhile, myocardial β-AR was also measured.Results In the placebo group, the density of ventricular α1-AR was increased in comparison with control group ( α1 -AR in normal region 36.9 ± 0.2 vs 27.3 ±0.9 fmol mg-1 Pro-1 ,p <0.01; α1-AR in ischemic region 33.0±0.9 vs 26.6 ±0.4 fmol mg-1 pro-1 P <0.01). In the metoprolol group, it was also increased in comparison with control group( α1-AR in normal region 44.7 ±1.5 vs 27.3 ±0.9 fmol mg-1 pro-1 ,P <0.01; α1-AR in ischemic region 33.6 ± 0.5 vs 26.6 ± 0.4 fmol mg-1pro-1 , P < 0.01 ). Meanwhile the density of ventricular α1-AR in normal region in the metoprolol group was increased in comparison with placebo group (44.7 ±1.5 vs 36.9 ±0.2 fmol mg-1 pro-1,P<0.01). While it decreased in the prazosin group in comparison with control group ( α1-AR in normal region 22.5 ± 0.6 vs27.3 ±0.9 fmol mg-1pro-1 ,P <0.01; α1-AR in ischemic region 20.9 ±0.4 vs 26.6 ±0.4 fmol mg-1 pro-1,P <0.01 ). VERP-D was increased after MI(P <0.01 ).After treatment with metoprolol or prazosin, VERP-D was decreased ( P < 0.01 ). Conclusions After acute MI, α1-AR of ventricular myocardium was upregulated, which may be accompanied by its activitation.The density of myocardial α1-AR became upregulated more dramatically treated with metoprolol and downregulated with prazosin. When treated with metoprolol or prazosin

  8. Cannabinoid receptor 1 antagonist treatment induces glucagon release and shows an additive therapeutic effect with GLP-1 agonist in diet-induced obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Kartikkumar Navinchandra; Joharapurkar, Amit Arvind; Patel, Vishal; Kshirsagar, Samadhan Govind; Bahekar, Rajesh; Srivastava, Brijesh Kumar; Jain, Mukul R

    2014-12-01

    Cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptor antagonists reduce body weight and improve insulin sensitivity. Preclinical data indicates that an acute dose of CB1 antagonist rimonabant causes an increase in blood glucose. A stable analog of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), exendin-4 improves glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreas, and reduces appetite through activation of GLP-1 receptors in the central nervous system and liver. We hypothesized that the insulin secretagogue effect of GLP-1 agonist exendin-4 may synergize with the insulin-sensitizing action of rimonabant. Intraperitoneal as well as intracerebroventricular administration of rimonabant increased serum glucose upon glucose challenge in overnight fasted, diet-induced obese C57 mice, with concomitant rise in serum glucagon levels. Exendin-4 reversed the acute hyperglycemia induced by rimonabant. The combination of exendin-4 and rimonabant showed an additive effect in the food intake, and sustained body weight reduction upon repeated dosing. The acute efficacy of both the compounds was additive for inducing nausea-like symptoms in conditioned aversion test in mice, whereas exendin-4 treatment antagonized the effect of rimonabant on forced swim test upon chronic dosing. Thus, the addition of exendin-4 to rimonabant produces greater reduction in food intake owing to increased aversion, but reduces the other central nervous system side effects of rimonabant. The hyperglucagonemia induced by rimonabant is partially responsible for enhancing the antiobesity effect of exendin-4.

  9. Clarification of the Antagonistic Effect of the Lipopeptides Produced by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens BPD1 against Pyricularia oryzae via In Situ MALDI-TOF IMS Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Hung Liao

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study tried to clarify the antagonistic effect of the lipopeptides secreted by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain BPD1 (Ba-BPD1 against Pyricularia oryzae Cavara (PO. To determine the major antifungal lipopeptides effective against PO, single and dual cultures were carried out in solid-state media. The matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization–time of flight imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF IMS was used to identify the most effective lipopeptide in situ. Meanwhile, the morphology of pathogen fungi treated with lipopeptides was observed via the SEM. Of the three lipopeptide families, surfactin, iturin, and fengycin, the last was identified as the most effective for inhibiting mycelium growth and conidial germination of PO. The conidia and hyphae of fengycin-treated PO were shown to become deformed and tumorous under exposure. This study provides insights into the antagonistic effect of Ba-BPD1 against fungal phytopathogens. Such insights are helpful in the development of reagents for biological control applications.

  10. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists for hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, B; Gluud, L L; Gluud, C

    2004-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy may be associated with accumulation of substances that bind to a receptor-complex in the brain resulting in neural inhibition. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists may have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy.......Hepatic encephalopathy may be associated with accumulation of substances that bind to a receptor-complex in the brain resulting in neural inhibition. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists may have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy....

  11. An antagonist of lipid A action in mammals has complex effects on lipid A induction of defence responses in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erbs, Gitte; Jensen, Tina Tandrup; Silipo, Alba;

    2008-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides, the ubiquitous part of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, and their derivatives are recognised by plants to trigger or potentiate particular defence responses such as induction of genes encoding pathogenesis-related proteins. The molecular mechanisms of LPS...... perception that underpin these effects in plants are, however, unknown. Here, lipid A from Halomonas magadiensis, which is an antagonist of lipid A action in human cells, was used to investigate lipid A action in plants. Our findings offer an insight into the different structural requirements for direct...

  12. [The effect of calcium antagonists on the rate of gastric emptying in patients with duodenal peptic ulcer and the dumping syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saakian, A G

    1990-10-01

    Comparative evaluation of single-dose finoptin, corinfar and falicor by effect on gastric evacuation was conducted in 33 peptic ulcer and 48 postgastrectomy dumping syndrome patients. Finoptin was found to prolong the evacuation in contrast to corinfar which stimulated it. Nonsignificant delay in gastric evacuation occurred in falicor administration. When designing therapy of cardiovascular diseases associated with gastric evacuation, due consideration should be given to pharmacokinetic action of calcium antagonists and functional status of gastric evacuation. Finoptin is preferable in dumping syndrome, corinfar in slow gastric evacuation. In view of the above corinfar treatment is undesirable in postgastrectomy patients, otherwise they could develop rapid gastric stump evacuation and dumping syndrome.

  13. The effect of adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonists on hydroxyl radical, dopamine, and glutamate in the striatum of rats with altered function of VMAT2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gołembiowska, Krystyna; Dziubina, Anna

    2012-08-01

    It has been shown that a decreased vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT2) function and the disruption of dopamine (DA) storage is an early contributor to oxidative damage of dopamine neurons in Parkinson's disease (PD). In our previous study, we demonstrated that adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonists suppressed oxidative stress in 6-hydroxydopamine-treated rats suggesting that this effect may account for neuroprotective properties of drugs. In the present study, rats were injected with reserpine (10 mg/kg sc) and 18 h later the effect of the adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonists 8-(3-chlorostyryl)caffeine (CSC) and 4-(2-[7-amino-2-(2-furyl)[1,2,4]triazolo[2,3-a][1,3,5]triazin-5-ylamino]ethyl)phenol (ZM 241385) on extracellular DA, glutamate and hydroxyl radical formation was studied in the rat striatum using in vivo microdialysis. By disrupting VMAT2 function, reserpine depleted DA stores, and increased glutamate and hydroxyl radical levels in the rat striatum. CSC (1 mg/kg) but not ZM 241385 (3 mg/kg) increased extracellular DA level and production of hydroxyl radical in reserpinised rats. Both antagonists decreased the reserpine-induced increase in extracellular glutamate. L-3,4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) (25 mg/kg) significantly enhanced extracellular DA, had no effect on reserpine-induced hydroxyl radical production and decreased extracellular glutamate concentration. CSC but not ZM 241385 given jointly with L-DOPA increased the effect of L-DOPA on extracellular DA and augmented the reserpine-induced hydroxyl radical production. CSC and ZM 241385 did not influence extracellular glutamate level, which was decreased by L-DOPA. It seems that by decreasing the MAO-dependent DA metabolism rate, CSC raised cytosolic DA and by DA autoxidation, it induced hydroxyl radical overproduction. Thus, the methylxanthine A(2A) receptor antagonists bearing properties of MAO-B inhibitor, like CSC, may cause a risk of oxidative stress resulting from dysfunctional DA storage

  14. Discrimination of direct and indirect interactions in a network of regulatory effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tresch, Achim; Beissbarth, T; Sültmann, H; Kuner, R; Poustka, A; Buness, A

    2007-11-01

    The matter of concern are algorithms for the discrimination of direct from indirect regulatory effects from an interaction graph built up by error-prone measurements. Many of these algorithms can be cast as a rule for the removal of a single edge of the graph, such that the remaining graph is still consistent with the data. A set of mild conditions is given under which iterated application of such a rule leads to a unique minimal consistent graph. We show that three of the common methods for direct interactions search fulfill these conditions, thus providing a justification of their use. The main issues a reconstruction algorithm has to deal with, are the noise in the data, the presence of regulatory cycles, and the direction of the regulatory effects. We introduce a novel rule that, in contrast to the previously mentioned methods, simultaneously takes into account all these aspects. An efficient algorithm for the computation of the minimal graph is given, whose time complexity is cubic in the number of vertices of the graph. Finally, we demonstrate the utility of our method in a simulation study.

  15. Effect of YM218, a nonpeptide vasopressin V(1A) receptor-selective antagonist, on rat mesangial cell hyperplasia and hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahara, Atsuo; Tsukada, Junko; Tomura, Yuichi; Suzuki, Takeshi; Yatsu, Takeyuki; Shibasaki, Masayuki

    2007-06-01

    Mesangial cell growth constitutes a key feature of progressive glomerular injury. Vasopressin (AVP), a potent peptide vasoconstrictor, acts on mesangial cells through the V(1A) receptors, inducing contraction and cell proliferation. This study examined the effects of YM218, a nonpeptide AVP V(1A) receptor-selective antagonist, on the mitogenic and hypertrophic effects of AVP in rat mesangial cells. When added to mesangial cells whose growth was arrested, AVP concentration-dependently induced hyperplasia and hypertrophy. YM218 potently prevented AVP-induced hyperplasia and hypertrophy of these cells. Furthermore, AVP stimulated endothelin (ET)-1 secretion from mesangial cells in a concentration-dependent manner and this effect was potently inhibited by YM218. ET-1 also induced hyperplasia and hypertrophy in mesangial cells and this effect was completely abolished by ET(A) receptor-selective antagonist YM598. In addition, AVP-induced hyperplasia and hypertrophy were partly inhibited by YM598. These results suggest that AVP may modulate mesangial cell growth not only by its direct action but also through the stimulation of ET-1 secretion. YM218 displays high potency in inhibiting the AVP-induced physiologic responses of mesangial cells via the V(1A) receptors and is a potent pharmacologic probe for investigating the physiologic and pathophysiologic roles of AVP in several renal diseases.

  16. Adenosine AA Receptor Antagonists Do Not Disrupt Rodent Prepulse Inhibition: An Improved Side Effect Profile in the Treatment of Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina J. Bleickardt

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is characterized by loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Current treatments for PD focus on dopaminergic therapies, including L-dopa and dopamine receptor agonists. However, these treatments induce neuropsychiatric side effects. Psychosis, characterized by delusions and hallucinations, is one of the most serious such side effects. Adenosine A2A receptor antagonism is a nondopaminergic treatment for PD with clinical and preclinical efficacy. The present studies assessed A2A antagonists SCH 412348 and istradefylline in rodent prepulse inhibition (PPI, a model of psychosis. Dopamine receptor agonists pramipexole (0.3–3 mg/kg, pergolide (0.3–3 mg/kg, and apomorphine (0.3–3 mg/kg significantly disrupted PPI; ropinirole (1–30 mg/kg had no effect; L-dopa (100–300 mg/kg disrupted rat but not mouse PPI. SCH 412348 (0.3–3 mg/kg did not disrupt rodent PPI; istradefylline (0.1–1 mg/kg marginally disrupted mouse but not rat PPI. These results suggest that A2A antagonists, unlike dopamine agonists, have an improved neuropsychiatric side effect profile.

  17. The effect of acute Lithium and AMI-193, a new 5HT2 antagonist, on Apomorphine-induced pecking in pigeon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagheri T

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Intramascular (IM administration of apomorphine (a mixed D1/D2 dopamine receptors agonist 0.2-1.6 mg/kg induced pecking, a stereotype behavior in pigeons in a dose- dependent manner. In this study the effect of lithium (Li+, 240 mg/kg, IM and AMI-193 (a new 5-HT2 antagonist, 0.003 mg/pigeon on apomorphine-induced peking (AIP were investigated. This study showed that Li+ and AMI-193 did not induce pecking by itself but administration of each of these agents before apomorphine increased and decreased the AIP (apomor-phine 0.8 mg/kg respectively whereas concomitant use of Li+ (240 mg/kg IM and AMI-193 decreased AIP significantly. These results suggested that 5-HT2 antagonists inhibit the inhibitory effect of serotonin on the dopamine release in the raphe-striatal pathway but Li+ can modulate dopamine and serotonin function by different mechanisms and decrease this effect. As a result, it is mechanisms and decrease this effect. As a result, it is concluded serotonin can decrease the AIP through 5-HT2 receptors indirectly by decrease the dopamine release.

  18. The effect of melanocortin (Mc3 and Mc4) antagonists on serotonin-induced food and water intake of broiler cockerels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zendehdel, Morteza; Hamidi, Farshid; Babapour, Vahab; Mokhtarpouriani, Kasra; Fard, Ramin Mazaheri Nezhad

    2012-09-01

    The current study was designed to examine the effects of intracerebroventricular injections of SHU9119 [a nonselective melanocortin receptor (McR) antagonist] and MCL0020 (a selective McR antagonist) on the serotonin-induced eating and drinking responses of broiler cockerels deprived of food for 24 h (FD24). For Experiment 1, the chickens were intracerebroventricularly injected with 2.5, 5, and 10 µg serotonin. In Experiment 2, the chickens received 2 nmol SHU9119 before being injected with 10 µg serotonin. For Experiment 3, the chickens were given 10 µg serotonin after receiving 2 nmol MCL0020, and the level of food and water intake was determined 3 h post-injection. Results of this study showed that serotonin decreased food intake but increased water intake among the FD24 broiler cockerels and that these effects occurred in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory effect of serotonin on food intake was significantly attenuated by pretreatment with SHU9119 and MCL0020. However, the stimulatory effect of serotonin on water intake was not altered by this pretreatment. These results suggest that serotonin hypophagia and hyperdipsia were mediated by different mechanisms in the central nervous system, and that serotonin required downstream activation of McRs to promote hypophagia but not hyperdipsia in the FD24 chickens.

  19. The effects of alcohol on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the selective mu-opioid receptor antagonist GSK1521498 in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziauddeen, Hisham; Nathan, Pradeep J; Dodds, Chris; Maltby, Kay; Miller, Sam R; Waterworth, Dawn; Song, Kijoung; Warren, Liling; Hosking, Louise; Zucchetto, Mauro; Bush, Mark; Johnson, Lakshmi Vasist; Sarai, Bhopinder; Mogg, Karin; Bradley, Brendan P; Richards, Duncan B; Fletcher, Paul C; Bullmore, Edward T

    2013-10-01

    The mu-opioid system has a key role in hedonic and motivational processes critical to substance addiction. However, existing mu-opioid antagonists have had limited success as anti-addiction treatments. GSK1521498 is a selective and potent mu-opioid antagonist being developed for the treatment of overeating and substance addictions. In this study, 28 healthy participants were administered single doses of GSK1521498 20 mg, ethanol 0.5 g/kg body weight, or both in combination, in a double blind placebo controlled four-way crossover design. The primary objective was to determine the risk of significant adverse pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic (PK) interactions. The effects of GSK1521498 on hedonic and consummatory responses to alcohol and the attentional processing of alcohol-related stimuli, and their modulation by the OPRM1 A118G polymorphism were also explored. GSK1521498 20 mg was well tolerated alone and in combination with ethanol. There were mild transient effects of GSK1521498 on alertness and mood that were greater when it was combined with ethanol. These effects were not of clinical significance. There were no effects of GSK1521498 on reaction time, hedonic or consummatory responses. These findings provide encouraging safety and PK data to support continued development of GSK1521498 for the treatment of alcohol addiction.

  20. Effect of glycine site/NMDA receptor antagonist MRZ2/576 on the conditioned place preference and locomotor activity induced by morphine in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Yong-ping; LONG Zai-hao; ZHENG Ming-lan; BINSACK Ralf

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of glycine site/NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptor antagonist MRZ2/576 on the conditioned place preference (CPP) and locomotor activity induced by morphine in mice. Methods: Different doses (1.25, 2.5 and 5 mg/kg, i.p.) of MRZ2/576 were used to evaluate the effect of MRZ2/576 on the acquisition and expression of CPP induced by morphine (5 mg/kg) in mice. In addition, we examined the locomotor activity of mice in conditioning and testing phase of CPP paradigm. Results: MRZ2/576 alone could not establish place preference, but a 5 mg/kg dose of MRZ2/576 could block both acquisition and expression of morphine-induced CPP. In testing phase of CPP, there was no statistical difference for locomotor activity between the groups; injection of MRZ2/576 showed a dose-dependent decrease of locomotor activity on both control and morphine-treated mice, especially 5 mg/kg of MRZ2/576 significantly suppressed the locomotor activity of mice. Conclusion:Based on the present results, we assume that MRZ2/576 can antagonize the rewarding effect of morphine, suggesting that this glycine site/NMDA receptor antagonist could be used to treat addictions due to its light side effect profile.

  1. Glutamate antagonists limit tumor growth

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    Neuronal progenitors and tumor cells possess propensity to proliferate and to migrate. Glutamate regulates proliferation and migration of neurons during development, but it is not known whether it influences proliferation and migration of tumor cells. We demonstrate that glutamate antagonists inhibit proliferation of human tumor cells. Colon adenocarcinoma, astrocytoma, and breast and lung carcinoma cells were most sensitive to the antiproliferative effect of the N...

  2. Effect of ruthenium red, a ryanodine receptor antagonist in experimental diabetes induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and associated dementia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Swati; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2016-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus is considered as a main risk factor for vascular dementia. In the past, we have reported the induction of vascular dementia by experimental diabetes. This study investigates the efficacy of a ruthenium red, a ryanodine receptor antagonist and pioglitazone in the pharmacological interdiction of pancreatectomy diabetes (PaD) induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and subsequent vascular dementia in rats. Attentional set shifting and Morris water-maze test were used for assessment of learning and memory. Vascular endothelial function, blood brain barrier permeability, serum glucose, serum nitrite/nitrate, oxidative stress (viz. aortic superoxide anion, brain thiobarbituric acid reactive species and brain glutathione), brain calcium and inflammation (myeloperoxidase) were also estimated. PaD rats have shown impairment of endothelial function, blood brain barrier permeability, learning and memory along with an increase in brain inflammation, oxidative stress and calcium. Administration of ruthenium red and pioglitazone has significantly attenuated PaD induced impairment of learning, memory, blood brain barrier permeability, endothelial function and biochemical parameters. It may be concluded that ruthenium red, a ryanodine receptor antagonist and pioglitazone, a PPAR-γ agonist may be considered as potent pharmacological agent for the management of PaD induced endothelial dysfunction and subsequent vascular dementia. Ryanodine receptor may be explored further for their possible benefits in vascular dementia.

  3. Effects of oral rehydration therapy on gastric volume and pH in patients with preanesthetic H2 antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, Kishiko; Niwa, Hidetomo; Kitayama, Masatou; Satoh, Yutaka; Hirota, Kazuyoshi

    2012-12-01

    Recent preanesthetic fasting practice allows patients to take clear fluids up to 2 h before surgery without taking any antacid for the prophylaxis of aspiration pneumonia; this practice is defined as oral rehydration therapy (ORT). It has been reported that with ORT the gastric volume may be significantly lower than that with a standard fasting regimen, although in a standard fasting regimen without preanesthetic antacid, gastric pH and volume values could be critical for causing aspiration pneumonia. In this study we compared gastric fluid status in patients with ORT and those with a standard fasting regimen; patients in both groups received a preanesthetic H(2) antagonist. One hundred and four patients were randomly assigned to either the ORT or standard fasting group, and all were given roxatidine 75 mg 2 h before surgery. After the induction of anesthesia, the gastric contents were collected via a gastric tube to measure gastric volume and pH. Neither gastric volume nor pH differed between the groups (ORT 9.6 ± 8.2 ml and 5.6 ± 1.7, respectively, vs. standard fasting 8.5 ± 6.8 ml and 5.5 ± 1.7, respectively). These data suggest that ORT may not reduce gastric volume in patients receiving a preanesthetic H(2) antagonist.

  4. Effect of the dual endothelin receptor antagonist bosentan on untreatable skin ulcers in a patient with diabetes: a case report

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    Brito Suárez Manuel

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Refractory skin ulcers are a major burden in patients with diabetes. Their pathogenesis is multifactorial, and data increasingly implicate endothelin as a mediator of diabetic macro- and microvasculopathy. Here we describe the first reported case of an endothelin receptor antagonist being used to successfully treat refractory skin ulcers in a patient with diabetes. Case presentation An 85-year-old Caucasian man with a 30-year history of type 2 diabetes developed multiple skin ulcerations, including a right heel ulcer. Despite appropriate treatment, the ulcer showed little improvement and the risk of amputation was high. The patient was treated with the dual endothelin receptor antagonist bosentan. After three weeks of treatment, major improvements were observed, and after 21 weeks, all ulcers had healed. No abnormalities were observed during monitoring of blood pressure, erythrocyte sedimentation rate or serum aminotransferase levels. Conclusion In patients with refractory ulceration associated with diabetes, bosentan may be of real benefit, especially in terms of amputation prevention. This case supports the proposed role for endothelin in the pathogenesis of skin ulceration in diabetes and is suggestive of a potential benefit of bosentan in this patient type. This case report is of interest to diabetologists and dermatologists.

  5. Gender-specific effects of CGP 55845, GABAB receptor antagonist, on neuromuscular coordination, learning and memory formation in albino mouse following neonatal hypoxia-ischemia insult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillani, Quratul Ane; Akbar, Atif; Ali, Muhammad; Iqbal, Furhan

    2015-06-01

    GABAB receptor antagonists are experimentally proved as spatial memory enhancers in mouse models but their role has not been described following hypoxic-ischemic insult. 10-day-old albino mice were subjected to Murine model of hypoxia and ischemia. Following brain damage, mice were fed on normal rodent diet till they were 13 weeks old. At this time point, mice were divided into two groups. Group 1 received saline and group 2 received intraperitoneally CGP 55845 (1 mg/ml solvent/Kg body weight) for 12 days. Behavioural observations were made during rota rod, open field and Morris water maze test along with brain infarct measurement in both CGP 55845 treated and untreated groups. It was observed that application of GABAB receptor antagonist improved the over all motor function in male and female albino mice but effects were more pronounced in males. In open field, CGP 55845-treated female mice showed poor performance. CGP 55845 had no significant effect on learning and memory formation during Morris water maze test and also on brain infract size in both genders following hypoxia ischemia encephalopathy. Effects of CGP 55845 can be further explored in a dose and duration dependent manner to improve the learning and memory in albino mice following neonatal brain damage.

  6. Anxiolytic-like effect of a selective and non-peptidergic melanocortin 4 receptor antagonist, MCL0129, in a social interaction test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazaki, Toshiharu; Chaki, Shigeyuki

    2005-03-01

    The social interaction test is an animal behavioral test of anxiety. Brain melanocortins such as alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) have anxiogenic effects in this test. Melanocortins have five receptor subtypes (MC1-MC5). Among them, MC3 and MC4 receptor are mainly expressed in the brain. We investigated the involvement of MC4 receptor in a social interaction test, using Ac-[Nle(4),Asp(5),D-Phe(7),Lys(10)]alpha-MSH-(4-10)-NH2 (MT II), an MC4 receptor agonist, and 1-[(S)-2-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-(4-isopropylpiperadin-1-yl)ethyl]-4-[4-(2-methoxynaphthalen-1-yl)butyl]piperazine (MCL0129), a selective and nonpeptide MC4 receptor antagonist. MT II dose-dependently and significantly reduced the time spent in social interaction. Acute administration of MCL0129 had no effect on the results of this test. In contrast, when given repeatedly for 1 week, MCL0129 significantly and dose-dependently increased the time spent in social interaction without affecting locomotor activity. These results suggest that MC4 receptor is involved in social interaction, and that MCL0129, an MC4 receptor antagonist, has an anxiolytic-like effect in this model.

  7. Effects of L-type Ca2+ channel antagonists on in vitro excystment of Paragonimus ohirai metacercariae induced by sodium cholate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Teruaki

    2006-09-01

    The inhibitory effects of L-type Ca2+ channel antagonists on Na cholate-induced in vitro excystment (CIIE) of Paragonimus ohirai metacercariae were studied. At concentrations of 10 microM, nicardipine and nimodipine inhibited CIIE completely and by approximately 92%, respectively. Nitrendipine and (+/-)-verapamil inhibited CIIE by about one half and one third, respectively. Nifedipine and diltiazem did not inhibit CIIE significantly. At higher concentrations, nitrendipine at 20 microM completely inhibited CIIE, and (+/-)-verapamil at 40 microM inhibited CIIE by 93%. Nifedipine and diltiazem inhibited CIIE only slightly and little, respectively, even at 40 microM. Complete inhibition by nicardipine at 10 microM required preincubation of metacercariae with the antagonist for 15 min. The inhibitory effects of nicardipine and nimodipine were reversible, and most of the nimodipine-treated metacercariae could excyst within 1 h after being washed, but the nicardipine-treated ones started to excyst 1 h after washing. Nicardipine suppressed the active movement of encysted juveniles evoked by Na cholate, whereas nimodipine did not suppress this significantly. These results suggested that L-type Ca2+ channels appeared to be involved in CIIE of P. ohirai metacercariae and that the inhibitory effect of the channels was due primarily to factors other than the inhibition of muscular activity, probably involving the secretion and release of enzymes lytic against the metacercarial cyst wall.

  8. Effect of aldosterone breakthrough on albuminuria during treatment with a direct renin inhibitor and combined effect with a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Atsuhisa; Fukuda, Seiichi

    2013-10-01

    We have reported observing aldosterone breakthrough in the course of relatively long-term treatment with renin-angiotensin (RA) system inhibitors, where the plasma aldosterone concentration (PAC) increased following an initial decrease. Aldosterone breakthrough has the potential to eliminate the organ-protective effects of RA system inhibitors. We therefore conducted a study in essential hypertensive patients to determine whether aldosterone breakthrough occurred during treatment with the direct renin inhibitor (DRI) aliskiren and to ascertain its clinical significance. The study included 40 essential hypertensive patients (18 men and 22 women) who had been treated for 12 months with aliskiren. Aliskiren significantly decreased blood pressure and plasma renin activity (PRA). The PAC was also decreased significantly at 3 and 6 months; however, the significant difference disappeared after 12 months. Aldosterone breakthrough was observed in 22 of the subjects (55%). Urinary albumin excretion differed depending on whether breakthrough occurred. For the subjects in whom aldosterone breakthrough was observed, eplerenone was added. A significant decrease in urinary albumin excretion was observed after 1 month, independent of changes in blood pressure. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that aldosterone breakthrough occurs in some patients undergoing DRI therapy. Aldosterone breakthrough affects the drug's ability to improve urinary albumin excretion, and combining a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist with the DRI may be useful for decreasing urinary albumin excretion. When the objective is organ protection in hypertensive patients, a two-pronged approach using combination therapy to inhibit both the RA system and aldosterone may be highly effective.

  9. Maternal aggression in Wistar rats: effect of 5-HT2A/2C receptor agonist and antagonist microinjected into the dorsal periaqueductal gray matter and medial septum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida R.M.M. de

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to assess the role of the 5-HT2A/2C receptor at two specific brain sites, i.e., the dorsal periaqueductal gray matter (DPAG and the medial septal (MS area, in maternal aggressive behavior after the microinjection of either a 5-HT2A/2C receptor agonist or antagonist. Female Wistar rats were microinjected on the 7th postpartum day with the selective agonist alpha-methyl-5-hydroxytryptamine maleate (5-HT2A/2C or the antagonist 5-HT2A/2C, ketanserin. The agonist was injected into the DPAG at 0.2 (N = 9, 0.5 (N = 10, and 1.0 µg/0.2 µl (N = 9, and the antagonist was injected at 1.0 µg/0.2 µl (N = 9. The agonist was injected into the medial septal area (MS at 0.2 (N = 9, 0.5 (N = 7, and 1.0 µg/0.2 µl (N = 6 and the antagonist was injected at 1.0 µg/0.2 µl (N = 5. For the control, saline was injected into the DPAG (N = 7 and the MS (N = 12. Both areas are related to aggressive behavior and contain a high density of 5-HT receptors. Non-aggressive behaviors such as horizontal locomotion (walking and social investigation and aggressive behaviors such as lateral threat (aggressive posture, attacks (frontal and lateral, and biting the intruder were analyzed when a male intruder was placed into the female resident's cage. For each brain area studied, the frequency of the behaviors was compared among the various treatments by analysis of variance. The results showed a decrease in maternal aggressive behavior (number of bites directed at the intruder after microinjection of the agonist at 0.2 and 1.0 µg/0.2 µl (1.6 ± 0.7 and 0.9 ± 0.3 into the DPAG compared to the saline group (5.5 ± 1.1. There was no dose-response relationship with the agonist. The present findings suggest that the 5-HT2A/2C receptor agonist has an inhibitory effect on maternal aggressive behavior when microinjected into the DPAG and no effect when microinjected into the MS. Ketanserin (1.0 µg/0.2 µl decreased locomotion when microinjected

  10. Integrated effect of microbial antagonist, organic amendment and fungicide in controlling seedling mortality (Rhizoctonia solani) and improving yield in pea (Pisum sativum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhter, Wasira; Bhuiyan, Mohamed Khurshed Alam; Sultana, Farjana; Hossain, Mohamed Motaher

    2015-01-01

    The study evaluated the comparative performance of a few microbial antagonists, organic amendments and fungicides and their integration for the management of seedling mortality (Rhizoctonia solani Kühn) and yield improvement in pea (Pisum sativum L.). Before setting the experiment in field microplots, a series of in vitro and in vivo experiments were conducted to select a virulent isolate of R. solani, an effective antagonistic isolate of Trichoderma harzianum, a fungitoxic organic amendment and an appropriate fungicide. A greenhouse pathogenicity test compared differences in seedling mortality in pea inoculated by four isolates of R. solani and identified the isolate RS10 as the most virulent one. Among the 20 isolates screened in dual culture assay on PDA, T. harzianum isolate T-3 was found to show the highest (77.22%) inhibition of the radial growth of R. solani. A complete inhibition (100.00%) of colony growth of R. solani was observed when fungicide Bavistin 50 WP and Provax-200 at the rate of 100 and 250 ppm, respectively, were used, while Provax-200 was found to be highly compatible with T. harzianum. Mustard oilcake gave maximum inhibition (60.28%) of the radial growth of R. solani at all ratios, followed by sesame oilcake and tea waste. Integration of soil treatment with T. harzianum isolate T-3 and mustard oilcake and seed treatment with Provax-200 appeared to be significantly superior in reducing seedling mortality and improving seed yield in pea in comparison to any single or dual application of them in the experimental field. The research results will help growers develop integrated disease management strategies for the control of Rhizoctonia disease in pea. The research results show the need for an integrating selective microbial antagonist, organic amendment and fungicide to achieve appropriate management of seedling mortality (R. solani) and increase of seed yield in pea.

  11. Effects of acute and chronic administration of MK-801 on c-Fos protein expression in mice brain regions implicated in schizophrenia and antagonistic action of clozapine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZUO Dai-ying; CAO Yue; ZHANG Lan; WANG Hai-feng; WU Ying-liang

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of acute and chronic administration of the non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonists MK-801 on c-Fos protein expression in different brain regions of mice and antagonistic action of clozapine. Methods Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression of c-Fos protein. Results MK-801 (0.6 mg·kg-1) acute administration produced a significant increase in the expression of c-Fos protein in the layers Ⅲ-Ⅳ of posterior cingulate and retrosplenial (PC/RS) cortex, which was consistent with the previous reports. Moreover, we presented a new finding that MK-801 (0.6 mg·kg-1) chronic administration for 8 days produced a significant increase of c-Fos protein expression in the PC/RS cortex, prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hypothalamus of mice. Among that, c-Fos protein expression in the PC/ RS cortex of mice was most significant. Compared acute administration with chronic administration, we found that MK-801 chronic administration significantly increased the expression of c-Fos protein in the PC/ RS cortex, PFC and hypothalamus. Furthermore, pretreatment of mice with clozapine significantly decreased the expression of c-Fos protein induced by MK-801 acute and chronic administration. Conclusions Marked expression of c-Fos protein induced by MK-801 is associated with neurotransmitters' change noted in our previous studies, and c-Fos protein, the marker of neuronal activation, might play an important role in the chronic pathophysiological process of schizophrenic model induced by NMDA receptor antagonist.

  12. Effect of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptor antagonist compounds SB705498, BCTC and AMG9810 in rat models of thermal hyperalgesia measured with an increasing-temperature water bath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tékus, Valéria; Bölcskei, Kata; Kis-Varga, Agnes; Dézsi, László; Szentirmay, Eva; Visegrády, András; Horváth, Csilla; Szolcsányi, János; Petho, Gábor

    2010-09-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptor is activated by noxious heat, various endogenous mediators and exogenous irritants. The aim of the present study was to compare three TRPV1 receptor antagonists (SB705498, BCTC and AMG9810) in rat models of heat hyperalgesia. The behavioural noxious heat threshold, defined as the lowest temperature evoking nocifensive reaction, was measured with an increasing-temperature water bath. The effects of TRPV1 receptor antagonists were assessed in thermal hyperalgesia induced by the TRPV1 agonist resiniferatoxin (RTX), mild heat injury (51 degrees C, 20s) or plantar incision in rats. The control heat threshold was 43.2+/-0.4 degrees C. RTX induced an 8-10 degrees C decrease in heat threshold which was dose-dependently inhibited by oral pre-treatment with any of the TRPV1 receptor antagonists with a minimum effective dose of 1mg/kg. The mild heat injury-evoked 7-8 degrees C heat threshold drop was significantly reversed by all three antagonists injected i.p. as post-treatment. The minimum effective doses were as follows: SB705498 10, BCTC 3 and AMG9810 1mg/kg. Plantar incision-induced heat threshold drop (7-8 degrees C) was dose-dependently diminished by an oral post-treatment with any of the antagonists with minimum effective doses of 10, 3 and 3mg/kg, respectively. Assessment of RTX hyperalgesia by measurement of the paw withdrawal latency with a plantar test apparatus yielded 30 mg/kg minimum effective dose for each antagonist. In conclusion, measurement of the noxious heat threshold with the increasing-temperature water bath is suitable to sensitively detect the effects of TRPV1 receptor antagonists in thermal hyperalgesia models.

  13. From the Cover: Glutamate antagonists limit tumor growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzeski, Wojciech; Turski, Lechoslaw; Ikonomidou, Chrysanthy

    2001-05-01

    Neuronal progenitors and tumor cells possess propensity to proliferate and to migrate. Glutamate regulates proliferation and migration of neurons during development, but it is not known whether it influences proliferation and migration of tumor cells. We demonstrate that glutamate antagonists inhibit proliferation of human tumor cells. Colon adenocarcinoma, astrocytoma, and breast and lung carcinoma cells were most sensitive to the antiproliferative effect of the N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist dizocilpine, whereas breast and lung carcinoma, colon adenocarcinoma, and neuroblastoma cells responded most favorably to the -amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate antagonist GYKI52466. The antiproliferative effect of glutamate antagonists was Ca2+ dependent and resulted from decreased cell division and increased cell death. Morphological alterations induced by glutamate antagonists in tumor cells consisted of reduced membrane ruffling and pseudopodial protrusions. Furthermore, glutamate antagonists decreased motility and invasive growth of tumor cells. These findings suggest anticancer potential of glutamate antagonists.

  14. Effects of alpha-adrenoceptor agonists and antagonists on histamine-induced impairment of memory retention of passive avoidance learning in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza; Ahmadi, Ramesh; Oryan, Shahrbanoo; Parivar, Kazem; Haeri-Rohani, Ali

    2002-11-15

    The effect of alpha-adrenoceptor agents on the impairment induced by histamine was measured for memory retention of passive avoidance learning in rats. Post-training intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection was carried out in all the experiments. Histamine (5, 10 and 20 microg/rat) reduced, while a histamine H(1) receptor antagonist, chlorpheniramine (0.1, 1 and 10 microg/rat), increased memory retention. The histamine H(2) receptor antagonist, ranitidine (0.1, 1, 10 and 20 microg/rat), did not elicit any response in this respect. Different doses of chlorpheniramine but not ranitidine reversed the histamine-induced impairment of memory. Clonidine and prazosin decreased, but yohimbine and phenylephrine increased, memory retention. Yohimbine decreased the inhibitory response to histamine. Phenylephrine, clonidine and prazosin did not alter the histamine effect. It is concluded that a histamine-induced impairment of memory retention through histamine H(1) receptors and an alpha(2)-adrenoceptor mechanism may be involved in the histamine response.

  15. Effects of the. cap alpha. -adrenoceptor antagonists phentolamine, phenoxybenzamine, and Idazoxan on sympathetic blood flow control in the periodontal ligament of the cat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwall, B.; Gazelius, B.

    1988-01-01

    Blood flow changes in the periodontal ligament (PDL) were measured indirectly by monitoring the local clearance of /sup 125/I/sup -/ during electric sympathetic nerve stimulation or close intra-arterial infusions of either noradrenaline (NA) or adrenaline (ADR) before and after administration of phentolamine (PA), phenoxybenzamine (PBZ) or Idazoxan (RX). At the doses used in the present study, PA was the only antagonist that significantly reduced the blood flow decrease seen on activation of sympathetic fibers, although PBZ also reduced this response. Idazoxan, however, did not induce the consistent effect on blood flow decreases seen on sympathetic activation. All three ..cap alpha..-adrenoceptor antagonists almost abolished the effects of exogenously administered NA and ADR. The results suggest the presence of functional post-junctional adrenoceptors of both the ..cap alpha.. 1 and ..cap alpha.. 2 subtypes in the sympathetic regulation of the blood flow in the PDL of the cat. A component of the response elicited by electrical sympathetic stimulation appeared to be resistant to ..cap alpha..-adrenoceptor blockade. Administration of guanethidine (which inhibits further release of NA and neuropeptide Y) after PA abolished this residual sympathetic response. 32 refs.

  16. Simultaneous Determination of Gallic Acid, Ellagic Acid, and Eugenol in Syzygium aromaticum and Verification of Chemical Antagonistic Effect by the Combination with Curcuma aromatica Using Regression Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung-Hoon; Seo, Chang-Seob; Kim, Seong-Sil; Ha, Hyekyung

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to perform simultaneous determination of three reference compounds in Syzygium aromaticum (SA), gallic acid, ellagic acid, and eugenol, and to investigate the chemical antagonistic effect when combining Curcuma aromatica (CA) with SA, based on chromatographic analysis. The values of LODs and LOQs were 0.01-0.11  μ g/mL and 0.03-0.36  μ g/mL, respectively. The intraday and interday precisions were values, and the recovery was in the range of 92.19-103.24%, with RSD values reference and relative peaks in SA and SA combined with CA (SAC), the amounts of gallic acid and eugenol were increased, while that of ellagic acid was decreased in SAC (compared with SA), and most of peak areas in SA were reduced in SAC. Regression analysis of the relative peak areas between SA and SAC showed r (2) values >0.87, indicating a linear relationship between SA and SAC. These results demonstrate that the components contained in CA could affect the extraction of components of SA mainly in a decreasing manner. The antagonistic effect of CA on SA was verified by chemical analysis.

  17. NMDA and non-NMDA receptor gene expression following global brain ischemia in rats: effect of NMDA and non-NMDA receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini-Giampietro, D E; Pulsinelli, W A; Zukin, R S

    1994-03-01

    Transient forebrain or global ischemia in rats induces selective and delayed damage of hippocampal CA1 neurons. In a previous study, we have shown that expression of GluR2, the kainate/alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor subunit that governs Ca2+ permeability, is preferentially reduced in CA1 at a time point preceding neuronal degeneration. Postischemic administration of the selective AMPA receptor antagonist, 2,3-dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulfamoyl-benzo(f)quinoxaline (NBQX), protects CA1 neurons against delayed death. In this study we examined the effects of NBQX (at a neuroprotective dose) and of MK-801 (a selective NMDA receptor antagonist, not protective in this model) on kainate/AMPA receptor gene expression changes after global ischemia. We also examined the effects of transient forebrain ischemia on expression of the NMDA receptor subunit NMDAR1. In ischemic rats treated with saline, GluR2 and GluR3 mRNAs were markedly reduced in CA1 but were unchanged in CA3 or dentate gyrus. GluR1 and NMDAR1 mRNAs were not significantly changed in any region examined. Administration of NBQX or MK-801 did not alter the ischemia-induced changes in kainate/AMPA receptor gene expression. These findings suggest that NBQX affords neuroprotection by a direct blockade of kainate/AMPA receptors, rather than by a modification of GluR2 expression changes.

  18. [Effect of orexin-A and orexin-1 receptor antagonist injected into the fourth ventricle of rats on food-intake and spontaneous physical activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xiao-Yan; Guo, Fei-Fei; Sun, Xiang-Rong; Gong, Yan-Ling; Xu, Luo

    2015-08-25

    The present study was aimed to investigate the effects of orexin-A and orexin-1 receptor (OX1R) antagonist injected into the fourth ventricle of rats on food-intake and spontaneous physical activity (SPA). Obese rat model was induced by high fat diet. Different doses of orexin-A or SB334867, an OX1R antagonist, were injected into the fourth ventricle of obese and normal rats respectively. SPA and food intake were monitored for 4 h after injection in both light and dark environment. In the light measurement cycle, different doses of orexin-A significantly stimulated feeding and SPA in all injected rats, and the animals' responses showed a dose-dependent manner (P orexin-A induced food intake and SPA were more pronounced in obese rats. In the dark measurement cycle, different doses of orexin-A had no obvious effect on food intake and SPA in both normal and obese rats (P > 0.05). In the light cycle, different doses of SB334867 significantly decreased food intake and SPA in all rats during 0-2 h and 2-4 h after injection (P 0.05). These results suggest that fourth cerebral ventricle nuclei may be one target for orexin-A and light condition may play an important role in orexin-A and OX1R physiological functional processes.

  19. Optimal Control of Gene Regulatory Networks with Effectiveness of Multiple Drugs: A Boolean Network Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Koichi; Hiraishi, Kunihiko

    2013-01-01

    Developing control theory of gene regulatory networks is one of the significant topics in the field of systems biology, and it is expected to apply the obtained results to gene therapy technologies in the future. In this paper, a control method using a Boolean network (BN) is studied. A BN is widely used as a model of gene regulatory networks, and gene expression is expressed by a binary value (0 or 1). In the control problem, we assume that the concentration level of a part of genes is arbitrarily determined as the control input. However, there are cases that no gene satisfying this assumption exists, and it is important to consider structural control via external stimuli. Furthermore, these controls are realized by multiple drugs, and it is also important to consider multiple effects such as duration of effect and side effects. In this paper, we propose a BN model with two types of the control inputs and an optimal control method with duration of drug effectiveness. First, a BN model and duration of drug effectiveness are discussed. Next, the optimal control problem is formulated and is reduced to an integer linear programming problem. Finally, numerical simulations are shown. PMID:24058904

  20. Synergistic antidepressant-like effects between a kappa opioid antagonist (LY2444296) and a delta opioid agonist (ADL5859) in the mouse forced swim test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Peng; Tunis, Julia; Parry, Christopher; Tallarida, Ronald; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan

    2016-06-15

    Kappa opioid (KOP) receptor antagonists and delta opioid (DOP) receptor agonists have antidepressant-like effects in animal tests and may be useful for treatment-resistant depression in humans. In this study, we examined whether the combination of a KOP receptor antagonist and a DOP receptor agonist would produce a better than additive effect (i.e. synergy). LY2444296 is a short-acting selective nonpeptide KOP receptor antagonist. ADL5859 is a selective nonpeptide DOP receptor agonist which does not produce seizures and EEG disturbances. Each compound and combinations of the two were examined in the forced swim test (FST) one h post injection, a screening test for antidepressant-like effect, in male adult C57BL/6J mice (Jackson Lab). LY2444296 [subcutaneous (s.c.) injection] at 10 and 30mg/kg, but not 3mg/kg, significantly decreased immobility time in a dose-dependent manner. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of ADL5859 also reduced immobility time dose-dependently at doses of 3 and 10mg/kg, but not at 1mg/kg. An analysis was conducted using the method of Tallarida and Raffa (2010), which employed dose equivalence. The relative potency of the drugs was determined to be LY2444296: ADL5859=1:0.28, which was the dose ratio for combination studies. Six combinations of the two compounds were tested in mice at a fixed dose ratio. We found that LY2444296 and ADL5859 yielded significant synergistic effects for the antidepressant-like effect at the combined dose ranging from 3.84mg/kg to 9.0mg/kg. ADL5859 (10mg/kg), LY2444296 (30mg/kg) and their combined dose (3.84mg/kg) had no effects on locomotor activities. Since the two drugs have distinct pharmacological profiles, such a synergism will allow use of lower doses of both drugs to achieve desired antidepressant effects with fewer side effects.

  1. A comparison of immunotoxic effects of nanomedicinal products with regulatory immunotoxicity testing requirements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giannakou C

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Christina Giannakou,1,2 Margriet VDZ Park,1 Wim H de Jong,1 Henk van Loveren,1,2 Rob J Vandebriel,1 Robert E Geertsma1 1Centre for Health Protection, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM, Bilthoven, 2Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands Abstract: Nanomaterials (NMs are attractive for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications because of their unique physicochemical and biological properties. A major application area of NMs is drug delivery. Many nanomedicinal products (NMPs currently on the market or in clinical trials are most often based on liposomal products or polymer conjugates. NMPs can be designed to target specific tissues, eg, tumors. In virtually all cases, NMPs will eventually reach the immune system. It has been shown that most NMs end up in organs of the mononuclear phagocytic system, notably liver and spleen. Adverse immune effects, including allergy, hypersensitivity, and immunosuppression, have been reported after NMP administration. Interactions of NMPs with the immune system may therefore constitute important side effects. Currently, no regulatory documents are specifically dedicated to evaluate the immunotoxicity of NMs or NMPs. Their immunotoxicity assessment is performed based on existing guidelines for conventional substances or medicinal products. Due to the unique properties of NMPs when compared with conventional medicinal products, it is uncertain whether the currently prescribed set of tests provides sufficient information for an adequate evaluation of potential immunotoxicity of NMPs. The aim of this study was therefore, to compare the current regulatory immunotoxicity testing requirements with the accumulating knowledge on immunotoxic effects of NMPs in order to identify potential gaps in the safety assessment. This comparison showed that immunotoxic effects, such as complement activation-related pseudoallergy, myelosuppression, inflammasome

  2. Effects of antalarmin, a CRF receptor 1 antagonist, on fright reaction and endocrine stress response in crucian carp (Carassius carassius)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lastein, Stine; Höglund, Erik; Overli, Oyvind

    2008-01-01

    and stress reactions in non-mammalian vertebrates are largely unknown. Crucian carp displays the olfactory-mediated fright reaction, a stereotypic behavioral response to waterborne cues from damaged skin of conspecifics. This reaction shows several similarities to basic components of avoidance behavior......The corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) receptors show striking homogeneity throughout the vertebrate subphylum. In mammals, the CRF1 receptor (CRFR1) plays an important role in mediating behavioral and endocrine responses to fear and stress. The specific roles of this receptor subtype in fear...... in mammals. In the present study, we applied the non-peptide CRFR1 antagonist, antalarmin, to crucian carp 1 h before exposure to conspecific skin extract. This treatment resulted in a suppression of the fright reaction. After skin extract exposure, antalarmin treatment also lead to lower plasma cortisol...

  3. The antagonistic effect of antipsychotic drugs on a HEK293 cell line stably expressing human alpha(1A1)-adrenoceptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nourian, Zahra; Mulvany, Michael J; Nielsen, Karsten Bork

    2008-01-01

    challenged with phenylephrine (EC(50)=1.61x10(-8) M). From Schild analysis, prazosin, sertindole, risperidone, and haloperidol caused a concentration-dependent, rightward shift of the cumulative concentration-response curves for phenylephrine in cells expressing human recombinant alpha(1A1)-adrenoceptors...... human alpha(1A1)-adrenoceptors in competition binding studies confirmed much higher antagonist affinity of sertindole and risperidone than haloperidol for these receptors. In summary, it can be concluded that there is an approximately 10-fold higher adrenoceptor affinity of risperidone and sertindole...... for human alpha(1A1)-adrenoceptors compared to haloperidol. These findings are consistent with the observation that risperidone and sertindole have a higher incidence of orthostatic hypotension than haloperidol....

  4. Biofilms of Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus fermentum: Effect on stress responses, antagonistic effects on pathogen growth and immunomodulatory properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoudia, Nabil; Rieu, Aurélie; Briandet, Romain; Deschamps, Julien; Chluba, Johanna; Jego, Gaëtan; Garrido, Carmen; Guzzo, Jean

    2016-02-01

    Few studies have extensively investigated probiotic functions associated with biofilms. Here, we show that strains of Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus fermentum are able to grow as biofilm on abiotic surfaces, but the biomass density differs between strains. We performed microtiter plate biofilm assays under growth conditions mimicking to the gastrointestinal environment. Osmolarity and low concentrations of bile significantly enhanced Lactobacillus spatial organization. Two L. plantarum strains were able to form biofilms under high concentrations of bile and mucus. We used the agar well-diffusion method to show that supernatants from all Lactobacillus except the NA4 isolate produced food pathogen inhibitory molecules in biofilm. Moreover, TNF-α production by LPS-activated human monocytoid cells was suppressed by supernatants from Lactobacillus cultivated as biofilms but not by planktonic culture supernatants. However, only L. fermentum NA4 showed anti-inflammatory effects in zebrafish embryos fed with probiotic bacteria, as assessed by cytokine transcript level (TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-10). We conclude that the biofilm mode of life is associated with beneficial probiotic properties of lactobacilli, in a strain dependent manner. Those results suggest that characterization of isolate phenotype in the biofilm state could be additional valuable information for the selection of probiotic strains.

  5. Anxiolytic-like effect of the selective neuropeptide Y Y2 receptor antagonist BIIE0246 in the elevated plus-maze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchi, Fabrizio; Mathé, Aleksander A; Jiménez, Patricia; Stasi, Luigi; Arban, Roberto; Gerrard, Philip; Caberlotto, Laura

    2006-12-01

    The involvement of Neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the pathophysiology of mood disorders has been suggested by clinical and preclinical evidence. NPY Y1 and Y2 receptors have been proposed to mediate the NPY modulation of stress responses and anxiety related behaviors. To further investigate the role of Y2 receptors in anxiety we studied the effect of BIIE0246, a selective Y2 receptor antagonist, in the elevated plus-maze test. Rats treated with 1.0 nmol BIIE0246 showed an increase in the time spent on the open arm of the maze. In addition, to study the effects of the Y2 antagonism on NPY protein level, NPY-like immunoreactivity was measured in different brain regions following treatment with BIIE0246, but no statistically significant effects were observed. These results suggest that BIIE0246 has an anxiolytic-like profile in the elevated plus-maze.

  6. Antidepressant-like effects of mGluR1 and mGluR5 antagonists in the rat forced swim and the mouse tail suspension tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belozertseva, I V; Kos, T; Popik, P; Danysz, W; Bespalov, A Y

    2007-02-01

    Drugs that act to reduce glutamatergic neurotransmission such as NMDA receptor antagonists exert antidepressant-like effects in a variety of experimental paradigms, but their therapeutic application is limited by undesired side effects. In contrast, agents that reduce glutamatergic tone by blocking type I metabotropic glutamate receptors have been suggested to have more a favorable side-effect profile. The present study aimed to compare the effects of mGluR1 antagonist (EMQMCM; JNJ16567083, 3-ethyl-2-methyl-quinolin-6-yl)-(4-methoxy-cyclohexyl)-methanone methanesulfonate, 0.156-10 mg/kg) and mGluR5 antagonist (MTEP, [(2-methyl-1,3-thiazol-4-yl)ethynyl]pyridine, 1.25-10 mg/kg) in two behavioral screening assays commonly used to assess antidepressant-like activity. In the modified forced swim test in rats, imipramine (used as a positive control) decreased immobility (MED 40 mg/kg) and increased the duration of escape-oriented (climbing and diving; MED 20 mg/kg) behaviors. Both EMQMCM and MTEP decreased the floating duration (MED 1.25 and 2.5 mg/kg) and increased the duration of mobile behaviors (paddling and swimming; MED 2.5 and 5 mg/kg). EMQMCM but not MTEP increased the duration of escape behaviors (climbing and diving; MED 1.25 mg/kg). In the mouse tail suspension test, EMQMCM (5 but not 2.5, 10 and 25 mg/kg), 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)-pyridine (MPEP, 10 but not 1 mg/kg) and MTEP (MED 25 mg/kg) decreased immobility scores. For EMQMCM, the dose-effect relationship was biphasic. With the exception of EMQMCM (10 mg/kg), locomotor activity in mice was not affected by treatments. The present study therefore suggests that acute blockade of mGluR5 and also of mGluR1 exerts antidepressant-like effects in behavioral despair tests in rats and mice.

  7. Effects of the 5-HT receptor antagonists GR127935 (5-HT1B/1D) and MDL100907 (5-HT2A) in the consolidation of learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses, A; Terrón, J A; Hong, E

    1997-12-01

    We have previously reported that 5-HT1B/1D and 5-HT2A/2B/2C receptors play a role in learning and memory. The present investigation was devoted to analyze further in the autoshaping learning task: (1) the effects of the 5-HT1A/1B/1D receptor agonist, GR46611, the 5-HT1B/1D receptor antagonist, GR127935, and the selective 5-HT2A receptor antagonist, MDL100907. Consistent with a role of 5-HT1B/1D receptors in learning, the post-training injection of GR46611 (1-10 mg/kg) decreased the consolidation of learning whereas GR127935 (10 mg/kg) increased it; the effects of both drugs were reversed by PCA pretreatment. GR127935 abolished the decrease induced by GR46611, TFMPP and mCPP, whereas MDL100907 (0.1-3.0 mg/kg) had no effect by itself but abolished the effects of DOI, ketanserin and TFMPP and moderately inhibited the effects elicited by mCPP, 1-NP and mesulergine. Neither did GR127935 nor MDL100907 significantly modify the increase in the consolidation of learning induced by 8-OH-DPAT. Thus, the present findings suggest that stimulation of presynaptic 5-HT1B/1D receptors impairs the consolidation of learning whilst stimulation of 5-HT2A/2C receptors enhances it; the blockade of 5-HT2A receptors has no effects. In addition, 5-HT2 receptors seem to modulate this cognitive stage.

  8. Prophylactic and therapeutic effects of acute systemic injections of EMD 281014, a selective serotonin 2A receptor antagonist on anxiety induced by predator stress in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamec, Robert; Creamer, Katherine; Bartoszyk, Gerd D; Burton, Paul

    2004-11-03

    We examined the effect of the selective serotonin 2A (5-HT(2A)) receptor antagonist 7-[4-[2-(4-fluoro-phenyl)-ethyl]-piperazine-1-carbonyl]-1H-indole-3-carbon itrile HCl (EMD 281014) [Bartoszyk, G.D., van Amsterdam, C., Bottcher, H., Seyfried, C.A., 2003. EMD 281014, a new selective serotonin 5-HT2A receptor antagonist. Eur. J. Pharmacol. 473, 229-230.] on change in affect following predator stress. Predator stress involved a 5 min unprotected exposure of rats to a domestic cat. Behavioral effects of stress were evaluated with hole board, plus maze, light/dark box and acoustic startle tests 1 week after stress. Predator stress increased anxiety-like behavior in the plus maze, light/dark box, and elevated response to acoustic startle. EMD 281014 (0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1 or 10 mg/kg) and vehicle injection (ip) occurred either 10 min after predator stress (prophylactic testing), or 90 min prior to behavioral testing for the effects of predator stress (therapeutic testing 1 week after predator stress). In prophylactic testing, EMD 281014 prevented stress potentiation of startle in a dose dependent manner, though the most effective doses were midrange (0.01 and 0.1 mg/kg). Prophylactic administration of EMD 281014 also prevented stress-induced increase of open arm avoidance in the plus maze in a clear dose dependent manner (from 0.01 mg/kg onward). In therapeutic testing, EMD 281014 had no clear drug dependent effects on stress elevation of startle or on behavior of stressed rats in the elevated plus maze. Finally, EMD 281014 did not block the effects of stress on behavior in the light/dark box when given prophylactically or therapeutically. Findings implicate 5-HT(2A) receptors in initiation of some but not all lasting changes in anxiety-like behavior following predator stress. Potential clinical significance of findings are discussed.

  9. Selective antinociceptive effects of a combination of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor peptide antagonist [Ser1]histogranin and morphine in rat models of pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hama, Aldric; Sagen, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    Numerous rather than a few analgesic endogenous neuropeptides are likely to work in concert in vivo in ameliorating pain. Identification of effective neuropeptide combinations would also facilitate the development of gene or cell-based analgesics. In this study, opioid peptides endomorphin-1 (EM-1) and endomorphin-2 (EM-2) and the peptide histogranin analogue [Ser1]histogranin (SHG), which possess activity as an N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, were intrathecally (i.t.) injected alone and in combination in rat models of acute and persistent pain. None of the peptides when injected alone altered hind paw responses of uninjured rats to acute noxious stimulation. EM-1 and EM-2 showed divergent efficacies in the persistent pain models. For example, EM-1 injected alone was antinociceptive in rats with neuropathic pain, whereas EM-2 demonstrated no efficacy. Demonstration of synergism was also divergent across the models. For example, while SHG combined with EM-1 did not alter the efficacy of EM-1 in rats with neuropathic pain, SHG significantly increased the efficacy of EM-1 in the formalin test. By contrast, the potency and efficacy of the peptides alone and combinations were much less than those of the reference analgesic morphine. Furthermore, morphine combined with the clinically used NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine showed synergism across a broad range of pain states. While the current set of neuropeptides could serve as a basis for analgesic therapeutics, there could be other neuropeptides with greater efficacy and potency and broader therapeutic application. PMID:25505581

  10. Adapting to an initial self-regulatory task cancels the ego depletion effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Junhua; Dewitte, Siegfried; Mao, Lihua; Xiao, Shanshan; Shi, Yucai

    2013-09-01

    The resource-based model of self-regulation provides a pessimistic view of self-regulation that people are destined to lose their self-control after having engaged in any act of self-regulation because these acts deplete the limited resource that people need for successful self-regulation. The cognitive control theory, however, offers an alternative explanation and suggests that the depletion effect reflects switch costs between different cognitive control processes recruited to deal with demanding tasks. This account implies that the depletion effect will not occur once people have had the opportunity to adapt to the self-regulatory task initially engaged in. Consistent with this idea, the present study showed that engaging in a demanding task led to performance deficits on a subsequent self-regulatory task (i.e. the depletion effect) only when the initial demanding task was relatively short but not when it was long enough for participants to adapt. Our results were unrelated to self-efficacy, mood, and motivation.

  11. The effect of the calcium antagonist, isradipine, on working capacity, pulmonary function, morbidity and survival rate in patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galløe, Anders Michael; Graudal, Niels Albert; Petersen, J.R.;

    1991-01-01

    Beneficial effects of calcium antagonists on the pulmonary haemodynamics of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have been observed in several studies. Such effects include a decrease in pulmonary vascular resistance, an increase in cardiac output, and an increase in oxygen...... delivery. The clinical implications of these effects are uncertain. The randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, long-term study described here is the first to investigate the clinical effects of a calcium antagonist on patients with COPD. The aim was to test the hypothesis that the calcium antagonist......, isradipine, could increase working capacity and lung function, and decrease morbidity and mortality. Fifty-two patients with COPD were investigated. During a 22-month observation period no statistically significant differences between the isradipine group and the placebo group were found with regard...

  12. [Antagonistic effects of selenium on the expression of c-fos in central nerval system of rat included by mercury contaminated rice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jin-ping; Wang, Wen-hua; Jia, Jin-ping; Qu, Li-ya; Zheng, Min; Shen, Zhe-ming; Shi, Wei

    2005-03-01

    The objective of this paper is to study the antagonisms between selenium and mercury and the effect of different species mercury on the brain injury. The expression of c-fos mRNA and c-FOS protein in rat brain induced by Hg-contaminated rice was observed by using reverse transcriptions polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunocytochemical methods. The results show the Hg-contaminated rice induced significantly the expression of c-fos mRNA and c-FOS protein; selenium could antagonize mercury accumulative level in brain. Antagonistic effects of selenium on the expression of c-fos included by mercury and the molecule mechanism of the antagonisms between selenium and mercury was probed, too.

  13. Neuroprotective effects of the AMPA antagonist PNQX in oxygen-glucose deprivation in mouse hippocampal slice cultures and global cerebral ischemia in gerbils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montero, Maria; Nielsen, Marianne; Rønn, Lars Christian B;

    2007-01-01

    PNQX (9-methyl-amino-6-nitro-hexahydro-benzo(F)quinoxalinedione) is a selective AMPA antagonist with demonstrated neuroprotective effects in focal ischemia in rats. Here we report corresponding effects in mouse hippocampal slice cultures subjected to oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD......) and in transient global cerebral ischemia in gerbils. For in vitro studies, hippocampal slice cultures derived from 7-day-old mice and grown for 14 days, were submersed in oxygen-glucose deprived medium for 30 min and exposed to PNQX for 24 h, starting together with OGD, immediately after OGD, or 2 h after OGD...... ischemia in gerbils in vivo and oxygen-glucose deprivation in mouse hippocampal slice cultures....

  14. The effects of the alpha2-adrenergic receptor agonists clonidine and rilmenidine, and antagonists yohimbine and efaroxan, on the spinal cholinergic receptor system in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abelson, Klas S P; Höglund, A Urban

    2004-01-01

    Cholinergic agonists produce spinal antinociception via mechanisms involving an increased release of intraspinal acetylcholine. The cholinergic receptor system interacts with several other receptor types, such as alpha2-adrenergic receptors. To fully understand these interactions, the effects...... of various receptor ligands on the cholinergic system must be investigated in detail. This study was initiated to investigate the effects of the alpha2-adrenergic receptor agonists clonidine and rilmenidine and the alpha2-adrenergic receptor antagonists yohimbine and efaroxan on spinal cholinergic receptors...... in the rat. Spinal microdialysis was used to measure in vivo changes of acetylcholine after administration of the ligands, with or without nicotinic receptor blockade. In addition, in vitro binding properties of the ligands on muscarinic and nicotinic receptors were investigated. It was found that clonidine...

  15. 77 FR 39302 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; EDGA Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-02

    ... designed to manage the financial, regulatory and other risks of this business activity. These controls... certain regulatory risk management controls that, among other things, prevent the entry of orders unless... have been pre- approved and authorized by the broker-dealer. These regulatory risk management...

  16. 77 FR 61449 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; EDGX Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-09

    ..., regulatory and other risks of this business activity. These controls include financial risk management... entry of erroneous orders. In addition, the Market Access Rule requires certain regulatory risk... authorized by the broker-dealer. These regulatory risk management controls also include measures designed...

  17. 77 FR 39300 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; EDGX Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-02

    ... designed to manage the financial, regulatory and other risks of this business activity. These controls... certain regulatory risk management controls that, among other things, prevent the entry of orders unless... have been pre- approved and authorized by the broker-dealer. These regulatory risk management...

  18. 77 FR 61463 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; EDGA Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-09

    ..., regulatory and other risks of this ] business activity. These controls include financial risk management... entry of erroneous orders. In addition, the Market Access Rule requires certain regulatory risk... authorized by the broker-dealer. These regulatory risk management controls also include measures designed...

  19. Modulatory effects by CB1 receptors on rat spinal locomotor networks after sustained application of agonists or antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeraraghavan, P; Nistri, A

    2015-09-10

    Sustained administration of cannabinoid agonists acting on neuronal CB1 receptors (CB1Rs) are proposed for treating spasticity and chronic pain. The impact of CB1Rs on mammalian locomotor networks remains, however, incompletely understood. To clarify how CB1Rs may control synaptic activity and locomotor network function, we used the rat spinal cord in vitro which is an advantageous model to investigate locomotor circuit mechanisms produced by the local central pattern generator. Neither the CB1 agonist anandamide (AEA) nor the CB1R antagonist AM-251 evoked early (3-24h largely impaired locomotor network activity induced by DR stimuli or neurochemicals, and depressed disinhibited bursting without changing reflex amplitude or inducing neurotoxicity even if CB1R immunoreactivity was lowered in the central region. Since CB1R activation usually inhibits cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) synthesis, we investigated how a 24-h application of AEA or AM-251 affected basal or forskolin-stimulated cAMP levels. While AEA decreased them in an AM-251-sensitive manner, AM-251 per se did not change resting or stimulated cAMP. Our data suggest that CB1Rs may control the circuit gateway regulating the inflow of sensory afferent inputs into the locomotor circuits, indicating a potential site of action for restricting peripheral signals disruptive for locomotor activity.

  20. In vitro and in vivo protein phosphorylation in Avena sativa L. coleoptiles: effects of Ca2+, calmodulin antagonists, and auxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veluthambi, K.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1986-01-01

    In vitro and in vivo protein phosphorylations in oat (Avena sativa L.) coleoptile segments were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. In vitro phosphorylation of several polypeptides was distinctly promoted at 1 to 15 micromolar free Ca2+ concentrations. Ca2(+)-stimulated phosphorylation was markedly reduced by trifluoperazine, chlorpromazine, and naphthalene sulfonamide (W7). Two polypeptides were phosphorylated both under in vitro and in vivo conditions, but the patterns of phosphorylation of several other polypeptides were different under the two conditions indicating that the in vivo phosphorylation pattern of proteins is not truly reflected by in vitro phosphorylation studies. Trifluoperazine, W7, or ethylene glycol-bis-(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) + calcium ionophore A23187 treatments resulted in reduced levels of in vivo protein phosphorylation of both control and auxin-treated coleoptile segments. Analysis by two-dimensional electrophoresis following in vivo phosphorylation revealed auxin-dependent changes of certain polypeptides. A general inhibition of phosphorylation by calmodulin antagonists suggested that both control and auxin-treated coleoptiles exhibited Ca2+, and calmodulin-dependent protein phosphorylation in vivo.

  1. Effect of Zinc on Appetite Regulatory Peptides in the Hypothalamus of Salmonella-Challenged Broiler Chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiyi; Sheikhahmadi, Ardashir; Li, Xianlei; Wang, Yufeng; Jiao, Hongchao; Lin, Hai; Zhang, Bingkun; Song, Zhigang

    2016-07-01

    The effects of dietary Zinc (Zn) supplementation on the gene expression of appetite regulatory peptides were investigated in Salmonella-infected broiler chickens. Broiler chickens (Arbor Acres, 1 day old) were allocated randomly into 24 pens of 10 birds. The chickens from 12 pens were fed with basal diet and the other with basal diet supplemented with Zn (ZnSO4·H2O, 120 mg/kg). At 5 days of age, the chickens were divided into 4 treatments with 6 pens: basal diet; basal diet and Salmonella challenge; Zn-supplemented diet; Zn-supplemented diet and Salmonella challenge. At 42 days of age, the hypothalamus from 6 chickens per treatment (1 chicken per pen) was individually collected for gene expression determination. Results showed that dietary supplementation of Zn reduced the gene expression of hypothalamic ghrelin and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) (P Salmonella infection upregulated the messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of hypothalamic neuropeptide Y (NPY) and TNF-α. Zn supplementation and Salmonella inoculation were significantly correlated with the mRNA levels of toll-like receptor 2-1 (P Salmonella inoculation had significant effect on hypothalamic agouti-related protein, cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript, and pro-opiomelanocortin. This study shows that dietary Zn supplementation promoted orexigenic appetite regulatory peptides and reduced the expression of the inflammatory cytokine TNF-α in the hypothalamus of Salmonella-challenged broilers.

  2. A randomised trial evaluating the effects of the TRPV1 antagonist SB705498 on pruritus induced by histamine, and cowhage challenge in healthy volunteers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel A Gibson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1 is a non-selective cation channel widely expressed in skin tissues, and peripheral sensory nerve fibres. Activation of TRPV1 releases neuropeptides; the resulting neurogenic inflammation is believed to contribute to the development of pruritus. A TRPV1 antagonist has the potential to perform as an anti-pruritic agent. SB705498 is a TRPV1 antagonist that has demonstrated in vitro activity against cloned TRPV1 human receptors and when orally administered has demonstrated pharmacodynamic activity in animal models and clinical studies. OBJECTIVES: To select a topical dose of SB705498 using the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin; to confirm engagement of the TRPV1 antagonistic action of SB705498 and assess whether the dose selected has an effect on itch induced by two challenge agents. METHODS: A clinical study was conducted in 16 healthy volunteers to assess the effects of 3 doses of SB705498 on skin flare induced by capsaicin. Subjects with a robust capsaicin response were chosen to determine if the selected topical formulation of SB705498 had an effect on challenge agent induced itch. RESULTS: Following capsaicin challenge the greatest average reduction in area of flare was seen for the 3% formulation. This dose was selected for further investigation. Itch intensity induced by two challenge agents (cowhage and histamine was assessed on the Computerised Visual Analogue Scale. The difference in average itch intensity (Weighted Mean Over 15 Mins between the 3% dose of SB705498 and placebo for the cowhage challenge was -0.64, whilst the histamine challenge showed on average a -4.65 point change. CONCLUSIONS: The 3% topical formulation of SB705498 cream was clinically well tolerated and had target specific pharmacodynamic activity. However there were no clinically significant differences on pruritus induced by either challenge agent in comparison to placebo. SB705498 is unlikely to be of symptomatic

  3. The composite regulatory basis of the large X-effect in mouse speciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Erica L; Keeble, Sara; Vanderpool, Dan; Dean, Matthew D; Good, Jeffrey M

    2016-12-20

    The disruption of meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) has been proposed to be a major developmental mechanism underlying the rapid evolution of hybrid male sterility. We tested this idea by analyzing cell-specific gene expression across spermatogenesis in two lineages of house mice and their sterile and fertile reciprocal hybrids. We found pervasive disruption of sex chromosome gene expression in sterile hybrids at every stage of spermatogenesis. Failure of MSCI was developmentally preceded by increased silencing of autosomal genes, supporting the hypothesis that divergence at the hybrid incompatibility gene, Prdm9, results in increased rates of autosomal asynapsis which in turn triggers widespread silencing of unsynapsed chromatin. We also detected opposite patterns of postmeiotic overexpression or hyper-repression of the sex chromosomes in reciprocal hybrids, supporting the hypothesis that genomic conflict has driven functional divergence that leads to deleterious X-Y dosage imbalances in hybrids. Our developmental timeline also exposed more subtle patterns of mitotic misregulation on the X chromosome, a previously undocumented stage of spermatogenic disruption in this cross. These results indicate that multiple hybrid incompatibilities have converged on a common regulatory phenotype, the disrupted expression of the sex chromosomes during spermatogenesis. Collectively, these data reveal a composite regulatory basis to hybrid male sterility in mice that helps resolve the mechanistic underpinnings of the well-documented large X-effect in mice speciation. We propose that the inherent sensitivity of spermatogenesis to X-linked regulatory disruption has the potential to be a major driver of reproductive isolation in species with chromosomal sex determination.

  4. Calcium channel antagonists suppress cross-tolerance to the anxiogenic effects of D-amphetamine and nicotine in the mouse elevated plus maze test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biala, Grazyna; Kruk, Marta

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the current experiments was to examine the anxiety-related effects of repeated amphetamine and nicotine administration using the mouse elevated plus maze (EPM). d-amphetamine was administered daily for 8 days (2 mg/kg, i.p.). On the 9th day, mice were challenged with amphetamine (2 mg/kg, i.p.) or nicotine (0.1 mg/kg, s.c.), and were tested 30 min after this last injection. Additionally, a distinct group of mice was pretreated with nicotine (0.1 mg/kg, s.c., 6 days). These mice were subjected to nicotine (0.1 mg/kg, s.c.) or amphetamine (2 mg/kg, i.p.) challenge on the seventh day to see if full crossover effects developed after the pretreatment of both psychostimulant drugs. Moreover, the L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel antagonists nimodipine (5 and 10 mg/kg, i.p.), flunarizine (5 and 10 mg/kg, i.p.), verapamil (5 and 10 mg/kg, i.p.) and diltiazem (5 and 10 mg/kg, i.p.) were injected prior to each injection of chronic d-amphetamine or nicotine. We observed cross-tolerance to the anxiogenic effects of d-amphetamine and nicotine that was blunted by a pretreatment with calcium channel blockers. Overall our findings imply that similar neural calcium-dependent mechanisms are involved in the anxiety-related responses to chronic amphetamine and nicotine injections. As anxiety seems to be an important factor for the development of psychostimulant dependence, the L-type VDCC antagonists can offer an interesting approach for the pharmacotherapy of addiction, including amphetamine and/or nicotine dependence.

  5. Protection from inorganic mercury effects on the in vivo dopamine release by ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists and nitric oxide synthase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Lucía; Durán, Rafael; Faro, Lilian F; Campos, Francisco; Cervantes, Rosa C; Alfonso, Miguel

    2007-09-05

    The possible role of ionotropics glutamate receptors on the HgCl(2)-induced dopamine (DA) release from rat striatum was investigated by using in vivo brain microdialysis technique after administration of selective NMDA and AMPA/Kainate receptors antagonists dizocilpine (MK-801), D (-)-2-amino-5-phoshonopentanoic acid (AP5), and 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX). Moreover, we have also studied the effects of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors L-nitro-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) and 7-nitro-indazol (7-NI) on HgCl(2)-induced DA release. Intraestriatal infusion of 1mM HgCl(2) increased striatal DA to 1717.2+/-375.4% respect to basal levels. Infusion of 1mM HgCl(2) in 400 microM MK-801 pre-treated animals produced an increase on striatal DA levels 61% smaller than that induced in non-pre-treated animals. In the case of AP5, this treatment reduced 92% the increase produced by HgCl(2) as compared to non-pre-treated rats. Nevertheless, the administration of CNQX did not produce any effect on HgCl(2)-induced dopamine release. Intrastriatal infusion of 1mM HgCl(2) in 100 microM L-NAME pre-treated animals produced an increase on extracellular DA levels 82% smaller than produced by HgCl(2) alone. In addition, the pre-treatment with 7-NI reduced 90% the increase produced by infusion of HgCl(2) alone in rats. Thus, HgCl(2)-induced DA release could be produced at last in part, by overstimulation of NMDA receptors with NO production, since administration of NMDA receptor antagonists and NOS inhibitors protected against HgCl(2) effects on DA release.

  6. Effects of ZK 93,426, a beta-carboline benzodiazepine receptor antagonist on night sleep pattern in healthy male volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duka, T; Goerke, D; Fichte, K

    1995-01-01

    The beta-carboline ZK 93,426, a benzodiazepine-antagonist with weak inverse agonist activity, was administered intravenously to human volunteers at a dose of 0.04 mg/kg when they initially reached slow-wave sleep during their night's sleep. Eight subjects, subjected to half a night of sleep withdrawal, took part in the study, which was performed according to a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over design. Sleep parameters as determined by electroencephalography, actometry (wrist actometer) and temperature (rectal thermometer) were monitored for the whole night. Vital functions (blood pressure and heart rate) as well as subjectively experienced effects via visual analogue scales were evaluated and blood samples for hormone plasma level estimation were taken before and after sleep. ZK 93,426 was well tolerated. Sleep parameters were reduced under the influence of the drug indicating a stimulant effect. Slow wave sleep (sleep stages 3 and 4) was significantly reduced in favour of light sleep stages 1 and 2 during the first 30 min after the administration of ZK 93,426 (P = 0.02). In keeping with these findings subjects exhibited a significantly (P < 0.02) elevated number and intensity of movements during the first 90 min after the beta-carboline injection. Effects on self-ratings, in body temperature and on hormonal changes were not found. It is assumed that the benzodiazepine-antagonist ZK 93,426 is able to induce activation and disturb sleep via modulation of GABAergic transmission mainly by benzodiazepine receptor blocking properties.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. When do chronic differences in self-regulation count? Regulatory focus effects in easy and difficult soccer tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Tobias; Genschow, Oliver

    2013-04-01

    Research on regulatory focus theory (Higgins, 1997) suggests that performance increases if instructions fit with sportspersons' dispositions. Sportspersons who chronically focus on wins (i.e., promotion-oriented individuals) perform best if instructions frame the objective as a promotion goal (e.g., "Try to hit!"). By contrast, sportspersons who chronically focus on losses (i.e., prevention-oriented individuals) perform best if instructions frame the objective as a prevention goal (e.g., "Try not to miss!"). Recent theorizing also suggests that regulatory focus interacts with task difficulty. In an experiment, we assessed soccer performance as a function of chronic focus, instructional focus, and task difficulty. Results support that task difficulty moderates the effects of fit on performance; fitting instructions to match the sportsperson's chronic regulatory focus improved performance in the easy rather than the difficult task. Findings are discussed regarding the role of regulatory fit in altering subjective pressure during sports performance.

  8. Regulatory effects on the population dynamics and wave propagation in a cell lineage model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mao-Xiang; Ma, Yu-Qiang; Lai, Pik-Yin

    2016-03-21

    We consider the interplay of cell proliferation, cell differentiation (and de-differentiation), cell movement, and the effect of feedback regulations on the population and propagation dynamics of different cell types in a cell lineage model. Cells are assumed to secrete and respond to negative feedback molecules which act as a control on the cell lineage. The cell densities are described by coupled reaction-diffusion partial differential equations, and the propagating wave front solutions in one dimension are investigated analytically and by numerical solutions. In particular, wavefront propagation speeds are obtained analytically and verified by numerical solutions of the equations. The emphasis is on the effects of the feedback regulations on different stages in the cell lineage. It is found that when the progenitor cell is negatively regulated, the populations of the cell lineage are strongly down-regulated with the steady growth rate of the progenitor cell being driven to zero beyond a critical regulatory strength. An analytic expression for the critical regulation strength in terms of the model parameters is derived and verified by numerical solutions. On the other hand, if the inhibition is acting on the differentiated cells, the change in the population dynamics and wave propagation speed is small. In addition, it is found that only the propagating speed of the progenitor cells is affected by the regulation when the diffusion of the differentiated cells is large. In the presence of de-differentiation, the effect on down-regulating the progenitor population is weakened and there is no effect on the propagation speed due to regulation, suggesting that the effect of regulatory control is diminished by de-differentiation pathways.

  9. The Effectiveness of Self-regulatory Speech Training for Planning and Problem Solving in Children with Specific Language Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Aziz, Safiyyah; Fletcher, Janet; Bayliss, Donna M

    2016-08-01

    Self-regulatory speech has been shown to be important for the planning and problem solving of children. Our intervention study, including comparisons to both wait-list and typically developing controls, examined the effectiveness of a training programme designed to improve self-regulatory speech, and consequently, the planning and problem solving performance of 87 (60 males, 27 females) children aged 4-7 years with Specific Language Impairment (SLI) who were delayed in their self-regulatory speech development. The self-regulatory speech and Tower of London (TOL) performance of children with SLI who received the intervention initially or after a waiting period was compared with that of 80 (48 male, 32 female) typically developing children who did not receive any intervention. Children were tested at three time points: Time 1- prior to intervention; Time 2 - after the first SLI group had received training and the second SLI group provided a wait-list control; and Time 3 - when the second SLI group had received training. At Time 1 children with SLI produced less self-regulatory speech and were impaired on the TOL relative to the typically developing children. At Time 2, the TOL performance of children with SLI in the first training group improved significantly, whereas there was no improvement for the second training group (the wait-list group). At Time 3, the second training group improved their TOL performance and the first group maintained their performance. No significant differences in TOL performance were evident between typically developing children and those with SLI at Time 3. Moreover, decreases in social speech and increases in inaudible muttering following self-regulatory speech training were associated with improvements in TOL performance. Together, the results show that self-regulatory speech training was effective in increasing self-regulatory speech and in improving planning and problem solving performance in children with SLI.

  10. Regulatory agencies and regulatory risk

    OpenAIRE

    Knieps, Günter; Weiß, Hans-Jörg

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show that regulatory risk is due to the discretionary behaviour of regulatory agencies, caused by a too extensive regulatory mandate provided by the legislator. The normative point of reference and a behavioural model of regulatory agencies based on the positive theory of regulation are presented. Regulatory risk with regard to the future behaviour of regulatory agencies is modelled as the consequence of the ex ante uncertainty about the relative influence of inter...

  11. Synergistic effects of dopamine D2-like receptor antagonist sulpiride and β-blocker propranolol on learning in the carousel maze, a dry-land spatial navigation task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokopova, Iva; Bahnik, Stepan; Doulames, Vanessa; Vales, Karel; Petrasek, Tomas; Svoboda, Jan; Stuchlik, Ales

    2012-07-01

    Spatial navigation attracts the attention of neuroscientists as an animal analogue of human declarative memory. The Carousel maze is a dry-land navigational paradigm, which proved to be useful in studying neurobiological substrates of learning. The task involves avoidance of a stable sector on a rotating arena and is highly dependent upon the hippocampus. The present study aims at testing hypothesis that sulpiride (a centrally-active dopamine D2-like receptor antagonist) and propranolol (a beta-blocker) impair spatial learning in the Carousel maze after combined systemic administration. These doses were previously shown to be subthreshold in this task. Results showed that both substances affected behavior and significantly potentiated their negative effects on spatial learning. This suggests central interaction of both types of receptors in influencing acquisition of this dynamic-environment task.

  12. Effects of an H3R antagonist on the animal model of autism induced by prenatal exposure to valproic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baronio, Diego; Castro, Kamila; Gonchoroski, Taylor; de Melo, Gabriela Mueller; Nunes, Gustavo Della Flora; Bambini-Junior, Victorio; Gottfried, Carmem; Riesgo, Rudimar

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are a group of neurodevelopmental disorders primarily characterized by impaired social interaction and communication, and by restricted repetitive behaviors and interests. Ligands of histamine receptor 3 (H3R) are considered potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of different brain disorders and cognitive impairments. Considering this, the aim of the present study is to evaluate the actions of ciproxifan (CPX), an H3R antagonist, on the animal model of autism induced by prenatal exposure to valproic acid (VPA). Swiss mice were prenatally exposed to VPA on embryonic day 11 and assessed for social behavior, nociceptive threshold and repetitive behavior at 50 days of life. The treatment with CPX (3 mg/kg) or saline was administered 30 minutes before each behavioral test. The VPA group presented lower sociability index compared to VPA animals that were treated with CPX. Compared to the Control group, VPA animals presented a significantly higher nociceptive threshold, and treatment with CPX was not able to modify this parameter. In the marble burying test, the number of marbles buried by VPA animals was consistent with markedly repetitive behavior. VPA animals that received CPX buried a reduced amount of marbles. In summary, we report that an acute dose of CPX is able to attenuate sociability deficits and stereotypies present in the VPA model of autism. Our findings have the potential to help the investigations of both the molecular underpinnings of ASD and of possible treatments to ameliorate the ASD symptomatology, although more research is still necessary to corroborate and expand this initial data.

  13. Sexual conflict over the maintenance of sex: effects of sexually antagonistic coevolution for reproductive isolation of parthenogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazutaka Kawatsu

    Full Text Available Sexual reproduction involves many costs. Therefore, females acquiring a capacity for parthenogenetic (or asexual reproduction will gain a reproductive advantage over obligately sexual females. In contrast, for males, any trait coercing parthenogens into sexual reproduction (male coercion increases their fitness and should be under positive selection because parthenogenesis deprives them of their genetic contribution to future generations. Surprisingly, although such sexual conflict is a possible outcome whenever reproductive isolation is incomplete between parthenogens and the sexual ancestors, it has not been given much attention in the studies of the maintenance of sex. Using two mathematical models, I show here that the evolution of male coercion substantially favours the maintenance of sex even though a female barrier against the coercion can evolve. First, the model based on adaptive-dynamics theory demonstrates that the resultant antagonistic coevolution between male coercion and a female barrier fundamentally ends in either the prevalence of sex or the co-occurrence of two reproductive modes. This is because the coevolution between the two traits additionally involves sex-ratio selection, that is, an increase in parthenogenetic reproduction leads to a female-biased population sex ratio, which will enhance reproductive success of more coercive males and directly promotes the evolution of the coercion among males. Therefore, as shown by the individual-based model, the establishment of obligate parthenogenesis in the population requires the simultaneous evolution of strong reproductive isolation between males and parthenogens. These findings should shed light on the interspecific diversity of reproductive modes as well as help to explain the prevalence of sexual reproduction.

  14. The effects of a 5-HT7 receptor agonist and antagonist on morphine withdrawal syndrome in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahidi, Siamak; Hashemi-Firouzi, Nasrin

    2014-08-22

    Withdrawal from opioids leads to the expression of aversion behaviors. Previous studies have shown that the serotonergic system has an important role in morphine withdrawal syndrome. The 5-HT7 receptor is a recently discovered member of the 5-HT receptor family that has been shown to be involved in these behaviors. The aim of the present study was to test the role of the 5-HT7 receptor in withdrawal syndrome in morphine-dependent mice with AS19 and SB269970, a selective agonist and antagonist of this receptor, respectively. Dependence was induced by the repeated administration of morphine for five consecutive days. The morphine-dependent mice received AS19 (3, 5, or 10mg/kg, intraperitoneal) or SB269970 (1, 3, or 10mg/kg, intraperitoneal) 15 min prior to the precipitation of morphine withdrawal syndromes by naloxone (3mg/kg, subcutaneous). Withdrawal symptoms, including percent weight loss, jumping, teeth chattering, writhing, body and face grooming, sniffing, standing, and head and limb shaking, were recorded for 30 min after the naloxone injection. The morphine-dependent mice had significantly more withdrawal symptoms than naive control mice. The administration of AS19 reduced most of the morphine withdrawal symptoms. However, SB2699 increased some of the withdrawal symptoms, including teeth chattering, face grooming, jumping, and head and limb shaking. These findings suggest that the 5-HT7 receptor is involved in morphine withdrawal. Its activation decreased and its inactivation increased the morphine withdrawal syndrome. Further studies are recommended to better understand the role of the 5-HT7 receptor in morphine dependence and withdrawal.

  15. Antidepressant- and Anxiolytic-Like Effects of New Dual 5-HT₁A and 5-HT₇ Antagonists in Animal Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Pytka

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to further characterize pharmacological properties of two phenylpiperazine derivatives: 1-{2-[2-(2,6-dimethlphenoxyethoxy]ethyl}-4-(2-methoxyphenylpiperazynine hydrochloride (HBK-14 and 2-[2-(2-chloro-6-methylphenoxyethoxy]ethyl-4-(2- methoxyphenylpiperazynine dihydrochloride (HBK-15 in radioligand binding and functional in vitro assays as well as in vivo models. Antidepressant-like properties were investigated in the forced swim test (FST in mice and rats. Anxiolytic-like activity was evaluated in the four-plate test in mice and elevated plus maze test (EPM in rats. Imipramine and escitalopram were used as reference drugs in the FST, and diazepam was used as a standard anxiolytic drug in animal models of anxiety. Our results indicate that HBK-14 and HBK-15 possess high or moderate affinity for serotonergic 5-HT2, adrenergic α1, and dopaminergic D2 receptors as well as being full 5-HT1A and 5-HT7 receptor antagonists. We also present their potent antidepressant-like activity (HBK-14-FST mice: 2.5 and 5 mg/kg; FST rats: 5 mg/kg and (HBK-15-FST mice: 1.25, 2.5 and 5 mg/kg; FST rats: 1.25 and 2.5 mg/kg. We show that HBK-14 (four-plate test: 2.5 and 5 mg/kg; EPM: 2.5 mg/kg and HBK-15 (four-plate test: 2.5 and 5 mg/kg; EPM: 5 mg/kg possess anxiolytic-like properties. Among the two, HBK-15 has stronger antidepressant-like properties, and HBK-14 displays greater anxiolytic-like activity. Lastly, we demonstrate the involvement of serotonergic system, particularly 5-HT1A receptor, in the antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like actions of investigated compounds.

  16. Effect of estrogen agonists and antagonists on induction of progesterone receptor in a rat hypothalamic cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, S L; Berrodin, T J; Jenkins, S F; Sindoni, D M; Deecher, D C; Frail, D E

    1999-09-01

    Estrogen is essential in the hypothalamus for the central regulation of reproduction. To understand the molecular mechanism(s) of estrogen action in the hypothalamus, immortalized rat embryonic hypothalamic cell lines were characterized for steroid receptors and subcloned. Scatchard analysis of the D12 subclone demonstrated one high affinity estrogen receptor-binding site (Kd = 31.3+/-1.9 pM) with a Bmax of 30.8+/-0.8 fmol/mg. Estrogen receptor-alpha protein was identified by Western blot and gel shift analyses. Treatment with estradiol (48 h) stimulated progesterone receptor (PR) messenger RNA expression and binding to [3H]R5020, a synthetic progestin. Because the agonist or antagonist activity of estrogen mimetics can be cell type dependent, the activities of various estrogen mimetics were determined in D12 cells. ICI 182,780 (IC50 = 0.63 nM), raloxifene (IC50 = 1 nM), enclomiphene (IC50 = 77 nM), and tamoxifen (IC50 = 174 nM) inhibited the induction of PR by estradiol, and none of these compounds significantly stimulated PR when given alone. In contrast, 17alpha-ethynyl estradiol (EC50 = 0.014 nM), zuclomiphene (EC50 = 100 nM), and genistein (EC50 = 17.5 nM) functioned as estrogen agonists in these cells. In addition, the estrogen-induced progesterone receptor activated a progesterone response element reporter construct in response to progestins. Thus, the D12 rat hypothalamic cell line provides a useful model for characterizing tissue-selective estrogenic compounds, identifying estrogen- and progesterone-regulated hypothalamic genes, and understanding the molecular mechanisms of steroid action in various physiological processes mediated by the hypothalamus.

  17. Consumption of probiotics increases the effect of regulatory T cells in transfer colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Emil Rathsach; Claesson, Mogens Helweg; Schmidt, Esben Gjerløff Wedebye

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Probiotics may alter immune regulation. Recently, we showed that the probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM™ influenced the activity of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in vitro. The aim of the present work was to demonstrate if L. acidophilus NCFM™ also affects the function...... of Tregs in vivo. METHODS: Development of colitis after transfer of CD4+CD25- T cells and protection from colitis by Tregs was studied in immunodeficient SCID mice which were simultaneously tube-fed with L. acidophilus NCFM™ or L. salivarius Ls-33 for 5 weeks. RESULTS: Probiotic-fed SCID mice transplanted...... by inducing a Treg-favorable environment rather than a direct effect on the Tregs. CONCLUSIONS: L. acidophilus NCFM™ and L. salivarius Ls-33 feeding of SCID mice increases the in vivo effect of Tregs, resulting in a gene expression pattern in the rectum resembling that of the naïve SCID mouse. (Inflamm Bowel...

  18. Ethics and Regulatory Challenges and Opportunities in Patient-Centered Comparative Effectiveness Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugarman, Jeremy

    2016-04-01

    The Affordable Care Act includes provisions for the conduct of large-scale, patient-centered comparative effectiveness research. Such efforts aim toward the laudable moral goal of having evidence to improve health care decision making. Nevertheless, these pragmatic clinical research efforts that typically pose minimal incremental risk and are enmeshed in routine care settings perhaps surprisingly encounter an array of ethics and regulatory challenges and opportunities for academic health centers. An emphasis on patient-centeredness forces an examination of the appropriateness of traditional methods used to protect the rights, interests, and welfare of participants. At the same time, meaningful collaboration with patients throughout the research process also necessitates ensuring that novel approaches to research (including recruitment and consent) entail necessary protections regarding such issues as privacy. As the scientific and logistical aspects of this research are being developed, substantial attention is being focused on the accompanying ethics and regulatory issues that have emerged, which should help to facilitate ethically appropriate research in a variety of contexts.

  19. The regulatory effect of miRNAs is a heritable genetic trait in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geeleher Paul

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background microRNAs (miRNAs have been shown to regulate the expression of a large number of genes and play key roles in many biological processes. Several previous studies have quantified the inhibitory effect of a miRNA indirectly by considering the expression levels of genes that are predicted to be targeted by the miRNA and this approach has been shown to be robust to the choice of prediction algorithm. Given a gene expression dataset, Cheng et al. defined the regulatory effect score (RE-score of a miRNA as the difference in the gene expression rank of targets of the miRNA compared to non-targeted genes. Results Using microarray data from parent-offspring trios from the International HapMap project, we show that the RE-score of most miRNAs is correlated between parents and offspring and, thus, inter-individual variation in RE-score has a genetic component in humans. Indeed, the mean RE-score across miRNAs is correlated between parents and offspring, suggesting genetic differences in the overall efficiency of the miRNA biogenesis pathway between individuals. To explore the genetics of this quantitative trait further, we carried out a genome-wide association study of the mean RE-score separately in two HapMap populations (CEU and YRI. No genome-wide significant associations were discovered; however, a SNP rs17409624, in an intron of DROSHA, was significantly associated with mean RE-score in the CEU population following permutation-based control for multiple testing based on all SNPs mapped to the canonical miRNA biogenesis pathway; of 244 individual miRNA RE-scores assessed in the CEU, 214 were associated (p p = 0.04 with mean RE-score in the YRI population. Interestingly, the same SNP was associated with 17 (8.5% of all expressed miRNA expression levels in the CEU. We also show here that the expression of the targets of most miRNAs is more highly correlated with global changes in miRNA regulatory effect than with the expression of

  20. Behavioral effects of saredutant, a tachykinin NK2 receptor antagonist, in experimental models of mood disorders under basal and stress-related conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micale, Vincenzo; Tamburella, Alessandra; Leggio, Gian Marco; Mazzola, Carmen; Li Volsi, Valentina; Drago, Filippo

    2008-09-01

    The present study was made to investigate the role of tachykinin NK2 receptors in the expression of stress-related behaviors in animals. Under basal conditions, intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of the selective tachykinin NK2 receptor antagonist, saredutant (1 and 3 mg/kg) or diazepam (1 mg/kg) exerted anxiolytic-like effects in rodents, as they reduced grooming score of Wistar male rats tested in the novelty-induced grooming sampling test (NGT) and increased percentage of time and entries in open arms of Swiss male mice tested in the elevated plus maze (EPM) test. After previous exposure to stress-related conditions, as induced by a 2-min forced swim made 5 min prior to the EPM test, saredutant but not diazepam, exhibited anxiolytic-like effects in mice. To study the antidepressant-like activity of tachykinin NK2 receptor antagonist under basal conditions, different groups of rats were injected i.p. with saredutant (2.5, 5 and 10 mg/kg) or the tricyclic antidepressant, clomipramine (50 mg/kg) and tested in the forced swim test (FST), a widely used antidepressant-responsive test. The influence of stress-related conditions was studied in rats subjected to electric foot-shocks (1 mA, 1 s) 24, 5 and 1 h prior to FST, after drugs injection. In the FST, clomipramine decreased the immobility time only under basal conditions, but not after application of acute foot-shocks. To the contrary, saredutant-treated rats also exhibited more active behavior in FST after previous exposure to stressors. These results give further support to the hypothesis that tachykinin NK2 receptors may be a therapeutic target for pharmacological treatment of stress-related diseases, such as anxiety and depression.

  1. Effects of a newly developed potent orexin-2 receptor-selective antagonist Compound1m on sleep/wake states in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keishi eEtori

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Orexins (also known as hypocretins, which are hypothalamic neuropeptides, play critical roles in the regulation of sleep/wakefulness states by activating two G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs, orexin 1 (OX1R and orexin 2 receptors (OX2R. In order to know the difference between effects of OX2R-selective antagonists (2-SORA and dual orexin receptor antagonists (DORA, and to understand the mechanisms underlying orexin-mediated regulation of sleep/wakefulness states, we examined the effects of a newly developed 2-SORA, Compound 1m (C1m, and a DORA, suvorexant, on sleep/wakefulness states in C57BL/6J mice. After oral administration in the dark period, both C1m and suvorexant exhibited potent sleep-promoting properties with similar efficacy in a dose-dependent manner. While C1m did not increase NREM and REM sleep episode durations, suvorexant induced longer episode durations of NREM and REM sleep as compared with both the vehicle- and C1m-administered groups. When compounds were injected during light period, C1m did not show a significant change in sleep/wakefulness states in the light period, whereas suvorexant slightly but significantly increased the sleep time. We also found that C1m did not affect the time of REM sleep, while suvorexant markedly increased it. This suggests that although OX1R-mediated pathway plays a pivotal role in promoting wakefulness, OX1R-mediated pathway also plays an additional role. OX1R-mediated pathway also plays a role in suppression of REM sleep. Fos-immunostaining showed that both compounds affected the activity of arousal-related neurons with different patterns. These results suggest partly overlapping and partly distinct roles of orexin receptors in the regulation of sleep/wakefulness states.

  2. [Antagonistic effect of gingerols against TNF-α release, ROS overproduction and RIP3 expression increase induced by lectin from Pinellia ternata].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hong-li; Mao, Shan-hu; Zhao, Teng-fei; Wu, Hao; Pan, Yao-zong; Shu, Chen-yan

    2015-09-01

    To explore the antagonistic effect of gingerols against the inflammation induced by lectin from Pinellia ternata. In this study, ELISA method was used to determine the effect of different extracts from gingerols on the release of inflammatory factor TNF-α from macrophages induced by lectin from P. ternata. The fluorescence probe was used to determine the effect of gingerols on the changes in ROS of macrophages induced by lectin from P. ternata. The western-blot method was applied to study the effect of gingerols on the increase in expression of cell receptor interacting protein RIP3 in macrophages induced by lectin from P. ternata. The scanning ele