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Sample records for antagonistic regulatory effects

  1. Intronic microRNAs support their host genes by mediating synergistic and antagonistic regulatory effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krumsiek Jan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNA-mediated control of gene expression via translational inhibition has substantial impact on cellular regulatory mechanisms. About 37% of mammalian microRNAs appear to be located within introns of protein coding genes, linking their expression to the promoter-driven regulation of the host gene. In our study we investigate this linkage towards a relationship beyond transcriptional co-regulation. Results Using measures based on both annotation and experimental data, we show that intronic microRNAs tend to support their host genes by regulation of target gene expression with significantly correlated expression patterns. We used expression data of three differentiating cell types and compared gene expression profiles of host and target genes. Many microRNA target genes show expression patterns significantly correlated with the expressions of the microRNA host genes. By calculating functional similarities between host and predicted microRNA target genes based on GO annotations, we confirm that many microRNAs link host and target gene activity in an either synergistic or antagonistic manner. Conclusions These two regulatory effects may result from fine tuning of target gene expression functionally related to the host or knock-down of remaining opponent target gene expression. This finding allows to extend the common practice of mapping large scale gene expression data to protein associated genes with functionality of co-expressed intronic microRNAs.

  2. Regulatory effects of interleukin (IL)-1, interferon-beta, and IL-4 on the production of IL-1 receptor antagonist by human adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juge-Aubry, Cristiana E; Somm, Emmanuel; Chicheportiche, Rachel; Burger, Danielle; Pernin, Agnès; Cuénod-Pittet, Brigitte; Quinodoz, Pierre; Giusti, Vittorio; Dayer, Jean-Michel; Meier, Christoph A

    2004-06-01

    Adipose tissue is the source of production and site of action of several pro- and antiinflammatory cytokines. We have recently shown that white adipose tissue (WAT) is a major producer of the antiinflammatory IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra). Because IL-1Ra serum levels are elevated 7-fold in human obesity and an excess of this protein has been implicated in the acquired resistance to leptin and insulin, we investigated the regulation of IL-1Ra in human WAT. We demonstrate that IL-1Ra is mainly produced by adipocytes, rather than the stromal fraction of WAT, and that IL-1alpha and beta, as well as interferon-beta (IFN-beta), strongly up-regulate the expression and secretion of IL-1Ra in WAT. Moreover, human WAT expresses the receptors and proteins known to be required for the action of IL-1 (IL-1 receptor type I, IL-1 receptor accessory protein) and IFN-beta (IFN-alpha/beta receptor subunits 1 and 2). Finally, human WAT actively secretes these regulatory cytokines, suggesting that they up-regulate IL-1Ra through a local autocrine/paracrine action, which is hypothesized to play a regulatory role in adipogenesis and metabolism. PMID:15181037

  3. Effective use of TNF antagonists

    OpenAIRE

    Yocum, David

    2004-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antagonists are biologic response modifiers that have significantly improved functional outcomes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). RA is a progressive disease in which structural joint damage can continue to develop even in the face of symptomatic relief. Before the introduction of biologic agents, the management of RA involved the use of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) early in the course of disease. This focus on early treatment, combined...

  4. Reduced Frequencies and Activation of Regulatory T Cells After the Treatment of HIV-1-Infected Individuals with the CCR5 Antagonist Maraviroc Are Associated with a Reduction in Viral Loads Rather Than a Direct Effect of the Drug on Regulatory T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joedicke, Jara J; Dirks, Miriam; Esser, Stefan; Verheyen, Jens; Dittmer, Ulf

    2016-04-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play an important role in the pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection and they frequently express the chemokine receptor CCR5. We therefore investigated whether antiretroviral treatment with the CCR5 antagonist Maraviroc affected Tregs in chronically HIV-1-infected individuals. HIV-1-infected patients with high viral loads had elevated frequencies of activated Tregs in the peripheral blood compared with healthy controls. In patients successfully treated with antiretroviral drugs (undetectable viral loads), the frequency and the activation status of Tregs were comparable with healthy controls without any specific effect related to the treatment with Maraviroc. These results indicate that the control of viral replication in general rather than a direct binding of Maraviroc to CCR5-positive Tregs influences Treg responses in successfully treated chronically HIV-1-infected individuals. PMID:27035639

  5. DREAM (Downstream Regulatory Element Antagonist Modulator) contributes to synaptic depression and contextual fear memory

    OpenAIRE

    Wu Long-Jun; Mellström Britt; Wang Hansen; Ren Ming; Domingo Sofia; Kim Susan S; Li Xiang-Yao; Chen Tao; Naranjo Jose R; Zhuo Min

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM), a multifunctional Ca2+-binding protein, binds specifically to DNA and several nucleoproteins regulating gene expression and with proteins outside the nucleus to regulate membrane excitability or calcium homeostasis. DREAM is highly expressed in the central nervous system including the hippocampus and cortex; however, the roles of DREAM in hippocampal synaptic transmission and plasticity have not been investigated. Taking...

  6. DREAM (downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator) contributes to synaptic depression and contextual fear memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Long-Jun; Mellström, Britt; Wang, Hansen; Ren, Ming; Domingo, Sofia; Kim, Susan S; Li, Xiang-Yao; Chen, Tao; Naranjo, Jose R; Zhuo, Min

    2010-01-01

    The downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM), a multifunctional Ca2+-binding protein, binds specifically to DNA and several nucleoproteins regulating gene expression and with proteins outside the nucleus to regulate membrane excitability or calcium homeostasis. DREAM is highly expressed in the central nervous system including the hippocampus and cortex; however, the roles of DREAM in hippocampal synaptic transmission and plasticity have not been investigated. Taking advantage of transgenic mice overexpressing a Ca2+-insensitive DREAM mutant (TgDREAM), we used integrative methods including electrophysiology, biochemistry, immunostaining, and behavior tests to study the function of DREAM in synaptic transmission, long-term plasticity and fear memory in hippocampal CA1 region. We found that NMDA receptor but not AMPA receptor-mediated current was decreased in TgDREAM mice. Moreover, synaptic plasticity, such as long-term depression (LTD) but not long-term potentiation (LTP), was impaired in TgDREAM mice. Biochemical experiments found that DREAM interacts with PSD-95 and may inhibit NMDA receptor function through this interaction. Contextual fear memory was significantly impaired in TgDREAM mice. By contrast, sensory responses to noxious stimuli were not affected. Our results demonstrate that DREAM plays a novel role in postsynaptic modulation of the NMDA receptor, and contributes to synaptic plasticity and behavioral memory. PMID:20205763

  7. DREAM (Downstream Regulatory Element Antagonist Modulator contributes to synaptic depression and contextual fear memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Long-Jun

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM, a multifunctional Ca2+-binding protein, binds specifically to DNA and several nucleoproteins regulating gene expression and with proteins outside the nucleus to regulate membrane excitability or calcium homeostasis. DREAM is highly expressed in the central nervous system including the hippocampus and cortex; however, the roles of DREAM in hippocampal synaptic transmission and plasticity have not been investigated. Taking advantage of transgenic mice overexpressing a Ca2+-insensitive DREAM mutant (TgDREAM, we used integrative methods including electrophysiology, biochemistry, immunostaining, and behavior tests to study the function of DREAM in synaptic transmission, long-term plasticity and fear memory in hippocampal CA1 region. We found that NMDA receptor but not AMPA receptor-mediated current was decreased in TgDREAM mice. Moreover, synaptic plasticity, such as long-term depression (LTD but not long-term potentiation (LTP, was impaired in TgDREAM mice. Biochemical experiments found that DREAM interacts with PSD-95 and may inhibit NMDA receptor function through this interaction. Contextual fear memory was significantly impaired in TgDREAM mice. By contrast, sensory responses to noxious stimuli were not affected. Our results demonstrate that DREAM plays a novel role in postsynaptic modulation of the NMDA receptor, and contributes to synaptic plasticity and behavioral memory.

  8. Are peripheral opioid antagonists the solution to opioid side effects?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bates, John J

    2012-02-03

    Opioid medication is the mainstay of therapy for severe acute and chronic pain. Unfortunately, the side effects of these medications can affect patient comfort and safety, thus limiting their proven therapeutic potential. Whereas the main analgesic effects of opioids are centrally mediated, many of the common side effects are mediated via peripheral receptors. Novel peripheral opioid antagonists have been recently introduced that can block the peripheral actions of opioids without affecting centrally mediated analgesia. We review the clinical and experimental evidence of their efficacy in ameliorating opioid side effects and consider what further information might be useful in defining their role. IMPLICATIONS: The major analgesic effects of opioid medication are mediated within the brain and spinal cord. Many of the side effects of opioids are caused by activation of receptors outside these areas. Recently developed peripherally restricted opioid antagonists have the ability to block many opioid side effects without affecting analgesia.

  9. Assessment of regulatory effectiveness. Peer discussions on regulatory practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report arises from the seventh series of peer discussions on regulatory practices entitled 'Assessment of Regulatory Effectiveness'. The term 'regulatory effectiveness' covers the quality of the work and level of performance of a regulatory body. In this sense, regulatory effectiveness applies to regulatory body activities aimed at preventing safety degradation and ensuring that an acceptable level of safety is being maintained by the regulated operating organizations. In addition, regulatory effectiveness encompasses the promotion of safety improvements, the timely and cost effective performance of regulatory functions in a manner which ensures the confidence of the operating organizations, the general public and the government, and striving for continuous improvements to performance. Senior regulators from 22 Member States participated in two peer group discussions during March and May 1999. The discussions were focused on the elements of an effective regulatory body, possible indicators of regulatory effectiveness and its assessment. This report presents the outcome of these meetings and recommendations of good practices identified by senior regulators, which do not necessarily reflect those of the governments of the nominating Member States, the organizations they belong to, or the International Atomic Energy Agency. In order to protect people and the environment from hazards associated with nuclear facilities, the main objective of a nuclear regulatory body is to ensure that a high level of safety in the nuclear activities under its jurisdiction is achieved, maintained and within the control of operating organizations. Even if it is possible to directly judge objective safety levels at nuclear facilities, such safety levels would not provide an exclusive indicator of regulatory effectiveness. The way the regulatory body ensures the safety of workers and the public and the way it discharges its responsibilities also determine its effectiveness. Hence the

  10. 白三烯受体拮抗剂对哮喘气道重塑及Th17细胞/CD4+CD25+调节性T细胞表达的影响%Effects of leukotriene receptor antagonists on airway remodeling and Th17 cells/CD4+CD25+regulatory T cells expresson in asthma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李丽(综述); 李敏(审校)

    2014-01-01

    支气管哮喘的气道重塑是气道炎症反复作用的结果,白三烯是气道重塑中的重要炎症介质之一。影响气道重塑的因素较多,近年来Th17细胞和CD4+CD25+调节性T细胞(CD4+CD25+treg细胞)在气道重塑中的作用日益受到重视。白三烯受体拮抗剂是治疗哮喘的有效药物,能在一定程度上抑制气道重塑,但其作用机制及对Th17细胞/CD4+CD25+treg细胞表达的影响机制尚不十分清楚。因此,阐明Th17细胞/CD4+CD25+treg细胞平衡在气道重塑中的表达变化、白三烯受体拮抗剂干预气道重塑的具体作用途径和生物效应及对Th17细胞/CD4+CD25+treg细胞表达的影响,将为以后哮喘患儿的预防和治疗提供新的靶点。%The airway remodeling of bronchial asthma is the result of repeated airway inlfammation. Its occurrence is a complex process involving many cytokines, inlfammatory mediators and associated cellular components, of which leukotrienes are important mediators of inlfammation in the airway remodeling. Many factors inlfuence Airway remodeling. In recent years, effects of Th17 cells and CD4+CD25+regulatory T cells (CD4+CD25+treg cells) on airway remodeling is growing in importance. Leukotriene receptor antagonist is an effective drug in the treatment of asthma and can suppress airway remodeling. But the exact mechanisms and its impact on the proportion of Th17 cells/CD4+CD25+treg cells is not yet clear. Therefore, the clariifcation of the changes of Th17 cells/CD4+CD25+treg cells expression in airway remodeling and the speciifc pathways, biological effects, inlfuence of the proportion of Th17 cells/CD4+CD25+treg cells expression after leukotriene receptor antagonist intervene can provide a new target for prevention and the treatment of asthma in the future.

  11. Effects of VLA-4 antagonists in rat whole embryo culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence S; Vetter C; Hagmann WK; Van Riper G; Williams H; Mumford RA; Lanza TJ; Lin LS; Schmidt JA

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pharmacological antagonism of VLA-4 (Very Late Antigen 4, alpha(4)beta(1) integrin) has become an attractive target for the treatment of predominantly eosinophil mediated disease states such as asthma, allergic rhinitis, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, and inflammatory bowel disease. Gene knockouts of the alpha(4)-integrin subunit of VLA-4 or its cell surface ligand, VCAM-1, however, have been shown to result in embryo-lethality in homozygous null mice due to defects in chorio-allantoic or epi-myocardial fusion. Although gene knockout phenotypes are not always manifested by pharmacological antagonism, those studies suggested that VLA-4 antagonists might cause embryo-lethality or drug-induced malformations.METHODS: To test these concepts, early neurulating rat embryos were cultured by the methods of New ('78) after intra-coelomic microinjection of a VLA-4 blocking antibody or in the presence of small molecule VLA-4 antagonists.RESULTS: Defects in chorio-allantoic fusion were induced after microinjection of VLA4 blocking antibody and after continuous exposure to small molecule antagonists. In a minority of affected embryos chorio-allantoic fusion was completely blocked whereas the majority of affected embryos had only superficial chorio-allantoic fusion and the allantois was enlarged and edematous. Although the allantoic mesoderm covered the trophoblasts of the chorionic plate and contained blood vessels there was only minimal invasion of the trophoblasts by the allantoic mesoderm. The lowest observed effect level generally correlated with the IC(approximately 95), as determined in 90% plasma.DISCUSSION: Based on these data, VLA-4 antagonism might represent a significant risk to the developing embryo/fetus. In vitro exposure, however, is "constant" and does not take into account the elimination phase of these xenobiotics in vivo. Given the high concentrations required to elicit an effect, therapeutic blood levels in vivo may be several

  12. Effect of diseases on response to vitamin K antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Self, Timothy H; Owens, Ryan E; Sakaan, Sami A; Wallace, Jessica L; Sands, Christopher W; Howard-Thompson, Amanda

    2016-04-01

    Introduction The purpose of this review article is to summarize the literature on diseases that are documented to have an effect on response to warfarin and other VKAs. Methods We searched the English literature from 1946 to September 2015 via PubMed, EMBASE, and Scopus for the effect of diseases on response vitamin K antagonists including warfarin, acenocoumarol, phenprocoumon, and fluindione. Discussion Among many factors modifying response to VKAs, several disease states are clinically relevant. Liver disease, hyperthyroidism, and CKD are well documented to increase response to VKAs. Decompensated heart failure, fever, and diarrhea may also elevate response to VKAs, but more study is needed. Hypothyroidism is associated with decreased effect of VKAs, and obese patients will likely require higher initial doses of VKAs. Conclusion In order to minimize risks with VKAs while ensuring efficacy, clinicians must be aware of the effect of disease states when prescribing these oral anticoagulants. PMID:26695107

  13. Effects of TNF antagonists on immune and neuroendocrine system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cutolo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In the article, the literature on the effects of TNFa-antagonists (etanercept, infliximab and adalimumab on the immune system is reviewed. These biologic agents are employed in chronic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, seronegative spondyloarthritides, as well as psoriasis and Crohn’s disease. The differences of these drugs, testified by the different effects on the immune response, are discussed. These molecules exert their effect through cytokine inhibition, but they present striking differences since they can modulate macrophage activity, T cells apoptosis, leukocyte migration, and angiogenesis to a different degree. Some studies showed that these agents also affect the hypothalamo- pituitary-adrenal axis. The potential immunogenicity of these biologic agents is also discussed.

  14. [Cloning and function identification of gene 'admA' and up-stream regulatory sequence related to antagonistic activity of Enterobacter cloacae B8].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jun-Li; Li, De-Bao; Yu, Xu-Ping

    2012-04-01

    To reveal the antagonistic mechanism of B8 strain to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, transposon tagging method and chromosome walking were deployed to clone antagonistic related fragments around Tn5 insertion site in the mutant strain B8B. The function of up-stream regulatory sequence of gene 'admA' involved in the antagonistic activity was further identified by gene knocking out technique. An antagonistic related left fragment of Tn5 insertion site, 2 608 bp in length, was obtained by tagging with Kan resistance gene of Tn5. A 2 354 bp right fragment of Tn5 insertion site was amplified with 2 rounds of chromosome walking. The length of the B contig around the Tn5 insertion site was 4 611 bp, containing 7 open reading frames (ORFs). Bioinformatic analysis revealed that these ORFs corresponded to the partial coding regions of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, two LysR family transcriptional regulators, hypothetical protein VSWAT3-20465 of Vibrionales and admA, admB, and partial sequence of admC gene of Pantoea agglomerans biosynthetic gene cluster, respectively. Tn5 was inserted in the up-stream of 200 bp or 894 bp of the sequence corresponding to anrP ORF or admA gene on B8B, respectively. The B-1 and B-2 mutants that lost antagonistic activity were selected by homeologuous recombination technology in association with knocking out plasmid pMB-BG. These results suggested that the transcription and expression of anrP gene might be disrupted as a result of the knocking out of up-stream regulatory sequence by Tn5 in B8B strain, further causing biosythesis regulation of the antagonistic related gene cluster. Thus, the antagonistic related genes in B8 strain is a gene family similar as andrimid biosynthetic gene cluster, and the upstream regulatory region appears to be critical for the antibiotics biosynthesis. PMID:22522167

  15. Antagonistic Coevolution Drives Whack-a-Mole Sensitivity in Gene Regulatory Networks.

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    Jeewoen Shin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Robustness, defined as tolerance to perturbations such as mutations and environmental fluctuations, is pervasive in biological systems. However, robustness often coexists with its counterpart, evolvability--the ability of perturbations to generate new phenotypes. Previous models of gene regulatory network evolution have shown that robustness evolves under stabilizing selection, but it is unclear how robustness and evolvability will emerge in common coevolutionary scenarios. We consider a two-species model of coevolution involving one host and one parasite population. By using two interacting species, key model parameters that determine the fitness landscapes become emergent properties of the model, avoiding the need to impose these parameters externally. In our study, parasites are modeled on species such as cuckoos where mimicry of the host phenotype confers high fitness to the parasite but lower fitness to the host. Here, frequent phenotype changes are favored as each population continually adapts to the other population. Sensitivity evolves at the network level such that point mutations can induce large phenotype changes. Crucially, the sensitive points of the network are broadly distributed throughout the network and continually relocate. Each time sensitive points in the network are mutated, new ones appear to take their place. We have therefore named this phenomenon "whack-a-mole" sensitivity, after a popular fun park game. We predict that this type of sensitivity will evolve under conditions of strong directional selection, an observation that helps interpret existing experimental evidence, for example, during the emergence of bacterial antibiotic resistance.

  16. Impact of Trichoderma spp. on Soybean Seed Germination and Potential Antagonistic Effect on Sclerotinia sclerotiorum

    OpenAIRE

    Sonja Tančić; Jelica Skrobonja; Mirjana Lalošević; Radivoje Jevtić; Miloš Vidić

    2013-01-01

    Trichoderma species have been registered as species with important plant growth promoting potential and antagonistic effect against various phytopathogens. Trichoderma isolates originating from different soil types from the Vojvodina region (Serbia) were screened using dual culture test for their antagonistic effect against the pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. All tested isolates had high radial growth inhibition (RGI) factors of the pathogen and high col...

  17. Antagonist effects of calcium on borosilicate glass alteration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercado-Depierre, S. [CEA Marcoule, DTCD SPDE LCLT, 30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Angeli, F., E-mail: frederic.angeli@cea.fr [CEA Marcoule, DTCD SPDE LCLT, 30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Frizon, F. [CEA Marcoule, DTCD SECM LP2C, 30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Gin, S. [CEA Marcoule, DTCD SPDE LCLT, 30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France)

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted -- Highlights: •Kinetic study of glass alteration is investigated in calcium-enriched solutions. •New insights into silicon–calcium interactions in glass/cement systems are proposed. •Glass alteration is controlled by pH, Ca concentration and reaction progress. •Evidence of antagonist effects according to the importance of these parameters. -- Abstract: Numerous studies have been conducted on glass and cement durability in contact with water, but very little work to date has focused directly on interactions between the two materials. These interactions are mostly controlled by silicon–calcium reactivity. However, the physical and chemical processes involved remain insufficiently understood to predict the evolution of coupled glass–cement systems used in several industrial applications. Results are reported from borosilicate glass alteration in calcium-rich solutions. Our data show that four distinct behaviors can be expected according to the relative importance of three key parameters: the pH, the reaction progress (short- or long-term alteration) and the calcium concentration. Glass alteration is thus controlled by specific mechanisms depending on the solution chemistry: calcium complexation at the glass surface, precipitation of calcium silicate hydrates (C–S–H) or calcium incorporation in the altered layer. These findings highlight the impact of silicon–calcium interactions on glass durability and open the way for a better understanding of glass–cement mixing in civil engineering applications as well as in nuclear waste storage.

  18. Effects of combining opioids and clinically available NMDA receptor antagonists in the treatment of pain

    OpenAIRE

    Snijdelaar, D.G.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis concerns the effects of combining opioids with clinically available NMDA receptor antagonists in the treatment of acute and chronic pain. There are a number of problems with the use of opioids, such as, the development of tolerance/hyperalgesia, the reduced effectiveness in (central) neuropathic pain, and troublesome adverse effects. These problems might be resolved by the combined use of opioids and clinically available drugs with N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist p...

  19. Effect of calmodulin antagonists on the growth and graviresponsiveness of primary roots of maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinemetz, C. L.; Hasenstein, K. H.; Young, L. M.; Evans, M. L.

    1992-01-01

    We examined the effect of calmodulin (CaM) antagonists applied at the root tip on root growth, gravity-induced root curvature, and the movement of calcium across the root tip and auxin (IAA) across the elongation zone of gravistimulated roots. All of the CaM antagonists used in these studies delayed gravity-induced curvature at a concentration (1 micromole) that did not affect root growth. Calmodulin antagonists (> or = 1 micromole) inhibited downward transport of label from 45Ca2+ across the caps of gravistimulated roots relative to the downward transport of 45Ca2+ in gravistimulated roots which were not treated with CaM antagonists. Application of CaM antagonists at the root tip (> or = 1 micromole) also decreased the relative downward movement of label from 3H-IAA applied to the upper side of the elongation zone of gravistimulated roots. In general, tip application of antagonists inhibited neither the upward transport of 45Ca2+ in the root tip nor the upward movement of label from 3H-IAA in the elongation zone of gravistimulated roots. Thus, roots treated with CaM antagonists > or = 1 micromole become less graviresponsive and exhibit reduced or even a reversal of downward polarity of calcium transport across the root tip and IAA transport across the elongation zone. The results indicate that calmodulin-regulated events play a role in root gravitropism.

  20. Effects of certain muscarinic antagonists on the actions of anticholinesterases on cat skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brimblecombe, R W; French, M C; Webb, S N

    1979-04-01

    1. The effects of some muscarinic antagonists, namely, N-ethyl-2-pyrrolidylmethyl-cyclopentylphenyl glycollate (PMCG), N-methyl-4-piperidyl-phenylcyclohexyl glycollate (PPCG, racemate and R and S enantiomers) and 4'-N-methyl-piperidyl-1-phenyl-cyclopentane carboxylate (G3063) on organophosphate (sarin, soman)- and carbamate (neostigmine)-induced twitch augmentation have been studied in cat soleus muscle. 2. The results of a preliminary study comparing the potency of sarin and soman in inhibiting the acetylcholinesterase activity of muscle in relation to the effect on the maximal twitch response indicated that there is not a simple relationship between degree of enzyme inhibition by these drugs and alteration of muscle function. 3. The muscarinic antagonists studied were capable of preventing or reversing sarin-, soman- or neostigmine-induced twitch augmentation. Doses sufficient to give complete protection from the effects of the anticholinesterase agents had little or no effect on the twitch response of normal muscle. 4. The protective action of these muscarinic antagonists is dose-dependent but independent of known antagonist actions at muscarinic receptors. 5. The effects of some local anaesthetics (lignocaine, prilocaine, cinchocaine, procaine) and other membrane stabilizers (quinine, ketamine, chlorpromazine, triflupromazine) were compared with those of the muscarinic antagonists in an attempt to elucidate the mode of action of these acetylcholine antagonists. The evidence is insufficient to exclude the involvement of a membrane stabilizing action. PMID:435681

  1. The Effect of Sympathetic Antagonists on the Antidepressant Action of Alprazolam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorash ZM

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Alprazolam is an anti-anxiety drug shown to be effective in the treatment of depression. In this study, the effect of sympathetic receptor antagonists on alprazolam–induced antidepressant action was studied using a mouse model of forced swimming behavioral despair. The interaction of three sympathetic receptor antagonists with benzodiazepines, which may impact the clinical use of alprazolam, was also studied. Behavioral despair was examined in six groups of albino mice. Drugs were administered intraperitoneally. The control group received only a single dose of 1% Tween 80. The second group received a single dose of alprazolam, and the third group received an antagonist followed by alprazolam. The fourth group was treated with imipramine, and the fifth group received an antagonist followed by imipramine. The sixth group was treated with a single dose of an antagonist alone (atenolol, a β1-selective adrenoceptor antagonist; propranolol, a non selective β-adrenoceptor antagonist; and prazocin, an α1-adrenoceptor antagonist. Results confirmed the antidepressant action of alprazolam and imipramine. Prazocin treatment alone produced depression, but it significantly potentiated the antidepressant actions of imipramine and alprazolam. Atenolol alone produced an antidepressant effect and potentiated the antidepressant action of alprazolam. Propranolol treatment alone produced depression, and antagonized the effects of alprazolam and imipramine, even producing depression in combined treatments. In conclusion, our results reveal that alprazolam may produce antidepressant effects through the release of noradrenaline, which stimulates β2 receptors to produce an antidepressant action. Imipramine may act by activating β2 receptors by blocking or down-regulating β1 receptors.

  2. The effect of H 1 and H 2 receptor antagonists on melanogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tag S Anbar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Histamine was found to stimulate melanogenesis in cultured human melanocytes specifically mediated by histamine H 2 receptors via protein kinase A activation. Based on this finding, the effect of topically applied H 2 antagonist on UVB-irradiated Guinea pigs′ skin was examined and found to be suppressive on the post-irradiation melanogenesis. Aims: In this study, we tried to explore the role of topically applied H 1 and H 2 receptor antagonists, in inhibition of UVB-induced melanization. Methods: The effect of topically applied H 1 and H 2 receptor antagonists in inhibition of melanization was done clinically and histochemically using Fontana Masson and DOPA reactions compared with placebo. Results: The post-irradiation pigmentation was found to be brownish/black instead of the original light brown color. This color change occurred below the shaved orange-red fur suggesting a switch of melanogenesis from pheomelanin to eumelanin. The induced pigmentation was suppressed by topically applied H 2 antagonist while both H 1 antagonist and vehicle had no effect. The microscopic examination showed that the keratinocytes in the H 2 antagonist-treated areas contained few melanosomes while the nearby dendrites are full of them. Conclusion: H 2 antagonists′ inhibition of UVB-induced pigmentation is not only due to suppression of melanization but also due to a specific action on melanosomes′ transfer.

  3. Regulatory effects of terahertz waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyacheslav F. Kirichuk

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available There are modern data about biological effects of terahertz (THz waves in this article. Items of interaction of THz waves with bio objects of different organization level. A complex of the data indicates that the realization of a THz wave effect in biosystems is possible at molecular, cellular, tissular, organ and system levels of regulation. There are data about changes in nervous and humoral regulation of an organism and metabolic effects of THz waves.

  4. Pre-commercial procurement : regulatory effectiveness?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Apostol, Anca Ramona

    2014-01-01

    Is public procurement of research and development (‘R&D’) services the key to European Union (‘EU’)’s sustainable welfare? Is it being regulated in accordance with economic prescripts for effectiveness? Is the regulatory and policy setting clear and comprehensive in order to stimulate a widespread u

  5. Study on Ca2+ antagonistic effect and mechanism of Chinese herbal drugs using 45Ca

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Ca2+ antagonistic effect and mechanism of Chinese herbal drugs are studied by using 45Ca. The results indicate that potential-dependent Ca2+ channel (PDC) and receptor-operated Ca2+ channel (ROC) in cell membranes of smooth muscle can be blocked by several Chinese herbal drugs, including as Crocus sativus L., Carthamus L., Di-ao-xin-xue-kang (DAXXG) and Ginkgo biloba L. leaves. Among them Crocus sativus L. has the strongest antagonistic effect on Ca2+ channel, while Ginkgo biloba L. leaves has no obvious effect. The whole prescription and the other functional drugs have significant effect on ROC and PDC. The compositions extracted by hexane have the strongest antagonistic. The wrinkled giant hyssop have five active compositions and Pei-lan have two active compositions

  6. Independence and regulatory effectiveness: The Chilean experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    International binding documents state that Member States should provide an effectively independent Regulatory Body. There are no recommendations on how independent a Regulatory Body must be. As a result, many different regulatory structures are found worldwide. Economical development status of Member States can be easily correlated to their regulatory organizations; nuclear power programs are also decisory. Along the last fifty years, regulatory activities in Chile have gone through several changes: before 1974 radioactive facilities were controlled by the Ministry of Health. A Supreme Decree issued on June 1974, approved the 'Regulations on Licensing (of radioactive facilities)', conferring this faculty to the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission. The CNEC had, de facto, the same faculties regarding nuclear facilities. The Nuclear Safety Law, published in 1984 stated that the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEC) was the competent authority regarding nuclear facilities, while Regional Health Services belonging to the Ministry of Health, were competent over all radioactive facilities. In 1987 the Law No. 18.730 amended the Nuclear Safety Law, transferring the competence over 1st category radioactive facilities and associated matters to the CNEC. In 2004 the Ministry of Health went under a great reorganization: the Law No. 19.937 defined new competent authorities, providing an effective independence of the regulatory functions. In 2001, the Board of Directors of the CNEC delegated the faculty of granting authorizations to the Head of the Nuclear and Radiological Safety Department. In 2005, the Board also delegated the faculties of proposing regulations and standards and prosecuting regulation violators on the person of the Head of the Nuclear and Radiological Safety Department. Both, the Ministry of Health and the CNEC, have given decisory steps towards fulfilling the principle of regulatory independence: the first one by separating functions at the level of

  7. Regulatory effectiveness from an operator's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents the operator's perspective on regulatory effectiveness. The nuclear power plant operator, the regulator and various nuclear industry groups such as the World Association of Nuclear Operators are each responsible for ensuring nuclear safety but have different roles to play with different areas of emphasis. The roles of these organizations, how they can assist each other in achieving the common objective and how to facilitate effective communication between them are discussed. (author)

  8. Comparison of the antagonistic effects of different angiotensin II receptor blockers in human coronary arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pantev, Emil; Stenman, Emelie; Wackenfors, Angelica;

    2002-01-01

    undertaken to evaluate the inhibitory effects of ARBs on vasoconstriction in humans. METHODS: Vasomotor tone was analyzed in endothelium denuded, human coronary artery (HCA) segments. Ang II type 1 (AT(1)) and type 2 (AT(2)) receptor mRNA expression was examined by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain...... presence of 100 nM losartan elicited a depression of the Ang II response to 32%. Its active metabolite, EXP 3174 (1 nM),abolished the Ang II contraction. The AT(1) receptor antagonists had the following order of blocking effect; EXP 3174 > candesartan = valsartan > losartan. The AT(2) receptor antagonist...

  9. Pre-commercial procurement: regulatory effectiveness?

    OpenAIRE

    Apostol, Anca Ramona

    2014-01-01

    Is public procurement of research and development (‘R&D’) services the key to European Union (‘EU’)’s sustainable welfare? Is it being regulated in accordance with economic prescripts for effectiveness? Is the regulatory and policy setting clear and comprehensive in order to stimulate a widespread use of this instrument by EU public authorities? In 2007, the EU released an Interpretative Communication, explaining how to purchase R&D services in compliance with the EU public procurement and St...

  10. Improvement of the effectiveness of regulatory management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The project ARCAL LXVI has as its objective strengthening the national capabilities of the regulatory authorities to achieve an adequate level of radiation safety by training their staff in the implementation of the safety guidelines developed by a prior TC regional project under the framework of the ARCAL Programme and to measure its effectiveness. Detailed program of activities for the years 2001/2002 is presented at this meeting

  11. Effects of MCH and a MCH1-receptor antagonist on (palatable) food and water intake

    OpenAIRE

    Morens, C.; Norregaard, P; Receveur, JM; van Dijk, G.; SCHEURINK, AJW; Nørregaard, Pia; Receveur, Jean-Marie

    2005-01-01

    Melanin concentrating hormone (MCH) is a regulator of ingestive behavior, but several issues regarding its effects on specific components of ingestive behavior remain to be elucidated. Therefore, we injected, in the 3rd ventricle of male Wistar rats, saline, MCH (5 mu g), MCH (5 mu g) together with a MCH1-R antagonist (A, 10 mu g) and the antagonist alone (A, 10 mu g). Our results show that (1) central administration of MCH stimulates food intake (lab chow and medium high fat diet) and this c...

  12. Antagonistic and Inhibitory Effect of Bacillus subtilis Against Certain Plant Pathogenic Fungi, I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Matar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The antagonistic and inhibitory activity of fourteen Bacillus subtilis isolates (B1 to B14 obtained from different Egyptian sites, were tested against six fungal isolates belonging to four different genera, Rhizoctonia solani, Helminthosporium spp., Alternaria spp. and Fusarium oxysporum. Cultural, morphological and physiological characteristics of these isolates were found to be identical to Bacillus subtilis. When the fourteen B. subtilis isolates were tested as biological control agents for their antagonistic effect on the in vitro growth of the fungal isolates, four B. subtilis isolates B1, B4, B7, B8 had more antagonistic effect on all fungal isolates. Supernatant of B. subtilis isolate B7 had antagonistic effect on 6 fungal isolates but it was more effective on Helminthosporium spp., Alternaria spp. and F. oxysporum. B. subtilis as well as, isolate B7 showed effectiveness in reducing disease incidence and severity levels of tomato plants when added to the F. oxysporum and R. solani-infested soil. Also, it stimulated the growth of tomato plants compared to the other. HPLC analysis of the HCl precipitate of B. subtilis isolate B7 culture supernatant revealed that an identical pattern of five peaks to that of a purified preparation of iturin A was obtained.

  13. Effect of calmodulin antagonists on contraction and45Ca movements in rat aorta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wermelskirchen, D.; Koch, P.; Wilhelm, D.; Nebel, U.; Leidig, A.; Wilffert, B.; Peters, Thies

    1989-01-01

    To study the selectivity of calmodulin antagonists it was assumed that they should inhibit noradrenaline (NA)- and K+-induced contractions similarly without an accompanying inhibition of45Ca uptake. Therefore, in isolated rat aorta the effects of W-7, calmidazolium and trifluoperazine on contraction

  14. Effective management of venous thromboembolism in the community: non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants

    OpenAIRE

    Patel R

    2016-01-01

    Raj Patel Department of Haematological Medicine, King's Thrombosis Centre, King's College Hospital, London, UK Abstract: Anticoagulation therapy is essential for the effective treatment and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE). For many years, anticoagulation for acute VTE was limited to the use of initial parenteral heparin, overlapping with and followed by a vitamin K antagonist. Although highly effective, this regimen has several limitations and is particularly cha...

  15. Effective management of venous thromboembolism in the community: non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Raj

    2016-01-01

    Raj Patel Department of Haematological Medicine, King's Thrombosis Centre, King's College Hospital, London, UK Abstract: Anticoagulation therapy is essential for the effective treatment and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE). For many years, anticoagulation for acute VTE was limited to the use of initial parenteral heparin, overlapping with and followed by a vitamin K antagonist. Although highly effective, this regimen has several limitations and is particul...

  16. The effect of purging on sexually selected traits through antagonistic pleiotropy with survival

    OpenAIRE

    Bolstad, Geir H.; Pélabon, Christophe; Larsen, Line-K; Fleming, Ian A; Viken, Åslaug; Rosenqvist, Gunilla

    2012-01-01

    Sexually selected traits are expected to evolve to a point where their positive effect on reproductive success is counterbalanced by their negative effect on survival. At the genetic level, such a trade-off implies antagonistic pleiotropy between survival and the expression of sexually selected traits. Yet, the consequences of such a genetic architecture have been largely overlooked in studies examining how inbreeding influences sexually selected traits. These studies have solely interpreted ...

  17. ANTAGONISTIC EFFECT OF EDIBLE MUSHROOM EXTRACT ON CANDIDA ALBICANS GROWTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paccola Edneia A. de Souza

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Five species of edible mushrooms, Lentinula edodes, Pleurotus ostreatus, Pholiota nameko, Macrolepiota bonaerensis and Agaricus blazei, were tested for their potential to inhibit the in vitro growth of the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans. Only L. edodes had a fungistatic effect on this human pathogen. The inhibitory compound was produced intra and extracellularly in submersed L. edodes culture, and was also present in fresh and dehydrated mushroom basidiocarps. The fungistatic compound was heat sensitive and lost activity after 72 hours.

  18. PROTECTIVE EFFECTS OF CALCIUM ANTAGONIST ON VASCULAR SYSTEM AGAINST TOXICITY INDUCED BY MERCURIC CHLORIDE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马欣; 厉英倩; 白宇飞; 刘明

    2004-01-01

    Objective To explore the toxic effects of mercuric chloride (HgCl2) on vascular smooth muscle as well as its relationship to calcium antagonist. Methods By using isolated vascular tension methods, we studied the effect of HgCl2 on isolated rabbit aortic rings. Results HgCl2 (1-100μmol*L-1) caused a concentration-dependent contraction of rabbit aortic rings, which did not change with phentolamin or without endothelium. In KH solution with Ca2+ , the maximum contraction amplitude reduced by(61.2±3.3)%. Nifedipine produced a concentration-dependent decrease of the maximum contraction amplitude. Conclusion Calcium antagonist has protective effects on vascular smooth muscle against damage induced by HgCl2.

  19. Antagonistic effects of soybean viruses on soybean aphid performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Jack R; Gratton, Claudio

    2007-08-01

    Although there is long-standing recognition that pest complexes require different management approaches than individual pests, relatively little research has explored how pests interact. In particular, little is known of how herbivorous insects and plant pathogens interact when sharing the same host plant. The soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Mastumura, a recently introduced pest of soybean in the upper midwestern United States, and a complex of plant viruses vectored to soybean by insects have become a major concern for growers in the region. Given the abundance of soybean aphid and the increase in virus incidence in recent years, soybean aphids often use soybean infected by plant viral pathogens. We tested the hypothesis that soybean aphid performance is affected by virus infection of soybean plants. We conducted a series of field and laboratory experiments that examined how infection of soybeans with the common plant viruses, alfalfa mosaic, soybean mosaic, and bean pod mottle viruses, influenced soybean aphid performance. Soybean plants (in the field and laboratory) were hand inoculated with individual viruses, and aphids were allowed to colonize plants naturally in field experiments or added to the plants in clip-cages or within mesh bags in laboratory assays. In the field, aphid density on uninfected control soybean plants was nearly double that on infected plants. In laboratory assays, aphid population growth rates were on average 20% lower for aphids on virus infected compared with uninfected plants. Life table analyses showed that increased mortality on virus-infected plants likely explain differences in aphid population growth. Although there was some heterogeneity in the significance of treatment effects among different experiments, when independent experiments are taken together, there is on average an overall negative effect of these viruses on soybean aphids. PMID:17716484

  20. The necessity and effectiveness of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist in the treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Atsuhisa

    2015-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD), and diabetic nephropathy is the most common primary disease necessitating dialysis treatment in the world including Japan. Major guidelines for treatment of hypertension in Japan, the United States and Europe recommend the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin-receptor blockers, which suppress the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), as the antihypertensive drugs of first choice in patients with coexisting diabetes. However, even with the administration of RAS inhibitors, failure to achieve adequate anti-albuminuric, renoprotective effects and a reduction in cardiovascular events has also been reported. Inadequate blockade of aldosterone may be one of the reasons why long-term administration of RAS inhibitors may not be sufficiently effective in patients with diabetic nephropathy. This review focuses on treatment in diabetic nephropathy and discusses the significance of aldosterone blockade. In pre-nephropathy without overt nephropathy, a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist can be used to enhance the blood pressure-lowering effects of RAS inhibitors, improve insulin resistance and prevent clinical progression of nephropathy. In CKD categories A2 and A3, the addition of a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist to an RAS inhibitor can help to maintain 'long-term' antiproteinuric and anti-albuminuric effects. However, in category G3a and higher, sufficient attention must be paid to hyperkalemia. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists are not currently recommended as standard treatment in diabetic nephropathy. However, many studies have shown promise of better renoprotective effects if mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists are appropriately used. PMID:25762415

  1. Effect of the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist telcagepant in human cranial arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edvinsson, Lars; Chan, Kayi Y; Eftekhari, Sajedeh;

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a neuronal messenger in intracranial sensory nerves and is considered to play a significant role in migraine pathophysiology. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We investigated the effect of the CGRP receptor antagonist, telcagepant, on CGRP-induced cra......INTRODUCTION: Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a neuronal messenger in intracranial sensory nerves and is considered to play a significant role in migraine pathophysiology. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We investigated the effect of the CGRP receptor antagonist, telcagepant, on CGRP......-induced cranial vasodilatation in human isolated cerebral and middle meningeal arteries. We also studied the expression of the CGRP receptor components in cranial arteries with immunocytochemistry. Concentration response curves to αCGRP were performed in human isolated cerebral and middle meningeal arteries in...

  2. Safety culture as a matter of regulatory control and regulatory effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More than 15 years have passed since the term 'safety culture' was introduced by the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group (INSAG), and although the concept now is widely accepted, practical applications and characteristics have been disseminated mainly for nuclear power plant operating organizations. There is still a lack of international guidance on the use of safety culture as a regulatory matter and on the application of the concept within regulatory organizations. This work explores the meaning of safety culture in two different fields: as an element of safety management systems it shall be a matter of regulatory control; as a complementary tool for quality management it should be used to enhance regulatory effectiveness. Brazilian recent experience on regulating nuclear power reactors provide some examples on how the concept of safety culture may influence regulatory strategies and regulatory management. (author)

  3. Differential sleep-promoting effects of dual orexin receptor antagonists and GABAA receptor modulators

    OpenAIRE

    Gotter, Anthony L.; Garson, Susan L.; Stevens, Joanne; Munden, Regina L; Fox, Steven V.; Tannenbaum, Pamela L.; Yao, Lihang; Kuduk, Scott D.; McDonald, Terrence; Uslaner, Jason M.; Tye, Spencer J.; Coleman, Paul J.; Winrow, Christopher J; Renger, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Background The current standard of care for insomnia includes gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor A (GABAA) activators, which promote sleep as well as general central nervous system depression. Dual orexin receptor antagonists (DORAs) represent an alternative mechanism for insomnia treatment that induces somnolence by blocking the wake-promoting effects of orexin neuropeptides. The current study compares the role and interdependence of these two mechanisms on their ability to influence sleep arc...

  4. Effect of Leukotriene Receptor Antagonist Montelukast Along with Curcumin against Gastric Ulceration

    OpenAIRE

    UM Viradia; Shenoy AM; Rajan MS; AR Shabaraya; Kothadia AD; Patel NH

    2011-01-01

    Curcumin, a yellow pigment in the spice turmeric, has been used for centuries as a treatment for inflammatory diseases. This yellow pigment has anti-secretary property in different experimental ulcer models. Montelukast, a leukotriene receptor antagonist has been used for the treatment of inflammatory disease. This substance has antioxidant property in different experimental models. This data supports to evaluate the synergistic effect of Montelukast along with Curcumin against gastric ulcera...

  5. Effect of gonadal hormones on hypophagic property of opioid antagonist Naloxone

    OpenAIRE

    Gargate Ashwini R, Kulkarni Dushant V

    2014-01-01

    Background: Studies have shown that hormonal fluctuations that occur over the estrous cycle in rats affect food intake. It is possible that estrogen affects food intake via Opioid system and other brain areas which are involved in regulation of food intake. Therefore it may affect the sensitivity of female rats to hypophagic effect of Opioid antagonist Naloxone. Testosterone in male rats also changes food intake. However, little is known about hoe these Gonadal hormones interact with Opioid ...

  6. Effect of vibration frequency on agonist and antagonist arm muscle activity

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez Jiménez, Sergio; Benítez Herrera, Adolfo; García González, Miguel Ángel; Moras-Feliu, Gerard; Maffiuletti, Nicola A

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to assess the effect of vibration frequency (fout) on the electromyographic (EMG) activity of the biceps brachii (BB) and triceps brachii (TB) muscles when acting as agonist and antagonist during static exercises with different loads. Methods Fourteen healthy men were asked to hold a vibratory bar as steadily as possible for 10 s during lying row (pulling) and bench press (pushing) exercise at fout of 0 (non-vibration condition), 18, 31 and 42 Hz with loads of 20, ...

  7. Inhibitory effect of the CA2+ antagonist nifedipine on histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanizaki,Yoshiro

    1983-06-01

    Full Text Available 45Ca uptake and histamine release was examined in mast cells from rats sensitized with ovalbumin and Bordetella Bertussis as an adjuvant. The uptake of 45Ca by the mast cells was significantly increased by stimulation with ovalbumin as was the release of histamine from the mast cells. Nifedipine, a calcium antagonist, inhibited the increase in both 45Ca uptake and histamine release stimulated by ovalbumin, though the effect on 45Ca uptake was stronger than that on histamine release.

  8. Inhibitory effect of the CA2+ antagonist nifedipine on histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Tanizaki,Yoshiro; Komagoe,Haruki; Sudo,Michiyasu; Ohtani,Jun; Kimura,Ikuro; Akagi,Katsumi; Townley, Robert G.

    1983-01-01

    45Ca uptake and histamine release was examined in mast cells from rats sensitized with ovalbumin and Bordetella Bertussis as an adjuvant. The uptake of 45Ca by the mast cells was significantly increased by stimulation with ovalbumin as was the release of histamine from the mast cells. Nifedipine, a calcium antagonist, inhibited the increase in both 45Ca uptake and histamine release stimulated by ovalbumin, though the effect on 45Ca uptake was stronger than that on histamine release.

  9. Calcium antagonistic effects of Chinese crude drugs: Preliminary investigation and evaluation by 45Ca

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coronary and other diseases in cardiac or brain blood vessels are considered to be due to the excessive influx of Ca2+ into cytoplasm. If Ca2+ channels in cell membrane are blocked by medicines or other substances with considerable calcium antagonistic effects, these diseases might be cured or controlled. The influence of some Chinese crude drugs, including Crocus sativus, Carthamus tinctorius, Ginkgo biloba and Bulbus allii macrostemi on Ca2+ influx in isolated rat aortas was investigated by using 45Ca as a radioactive tracer, and their calcium antagonistic effects were evaluated. It can be noted that Ca2+ uptake in isolated rat aorta rings in normal physiological status was not markedly altered by these drugs, whereas the Ca2+ influxes induced by norepinephrine of 1.2 μmol/L and KCl of 100 mmol/L were significantly inhibited by Crocus, Carthamus and Bulbus in a concentration-dependent manner, but not by Ginkgo. The results show that extracellular Ca2+ influx through receptor-operated Ca2+channels and potential-dependent Ca2+channels can be blocked by Crocus, Carthamus and Bulbus. This implies that these Chinese crude drugs have obvious calcium antagonistic effects

  10. Effects of N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonists on different measures of motion sickness in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucot, J B

    1998-11-15

    Because N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonists prevent cisplatin-induced emesis and NMDA receptors are in both emetic pathways and structures associated with the final common pathway for vomiting, they have the potential to be broad-spectrum antiemetics. This was evaluated by determining their effects on motion sickness in cats. The measures included the number vomiting, the number of symptom points, which reflect activity early in the final common path and the duration of the retch/vomit sequence, which reflects activity late in the path. Dextrorphan, ketamine and dextromethorphan decreased the number vomiting with the same rank order of potency as at NMDA receptors. Additional studies with 1,3-dio-tolylguaninidine (DTG) and haloperidol ruled out a role for sigma receptors. The NMDA antagonists produced a nonsignificant dose-dependent decrease in symptoms and had no effects on the duration of vomiting. They also produced motor abnormalities at the highest doses. The competitive antagonist LY 233053 also decreased the number vomiting without altering the duration. It produced a nonsignificant non-dose-dependent decrease in symptoms and had no effects on gross motor output. The results are consistent with a broad spectrum of antiemetic efficacy with at least a part of its action in the early to middle portions of the final common pathway for vomiting. Additional actions on the vestibular nuclei are possible. PMID:10052568

  11. Antagonistic and synergistic effects of light irradiation on the effects of copper on Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheloni, Giulia; Cosio, Claudia; Slaveykova, Vera I., E-mail: vera.slaveykova@unige.ch

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Light intensity and spectral composition affect Cu uptake and effects to C. reinhardtii. • High light (HL) reduced Cu effect on growth inhibition, oxidative stress and damage. • HL in combination with Cu up-regulated genes involved in the antioxidant responses. • HL with increased UVB radiation exacerbated Cu uptake and Cu-induced toxic effects. - Abstract: The present study showed the important role of light intensity and spectral composition on Cu uptake and effects on green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. High-intenisty light (HL) increased cellular Cu concentrations, but mitigated the Cu-induced decrease in chlorophyll fluorescence, oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation at high Cu concentrations, indicating that Cu and HL interact in an antagonistic manner. HL up-regulated the transcription of genes involved in the antioxidant response in C. reinhardtii and thus reduced the oxidative stress upon exposure to Cu and HL. Combined exposure to Cu and UVBR resulted in an increase of cellular Cu contents and caused severe oxidative damage to the cells. The observed effects were higher than the sum of the effects corresponding to exposure to UVBR or Cu alone suggesting a synergistic interaction.

  12. Antagonistic and synergistic effects of light irradiation on the effects of copper on Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Light intensity and spectral composition affect Cu uptake and effects to C. reinhardtii. • High light (HL) reduced Cu effect on growth inhibition, oxidative stress and damage. • HL in combination with Cu up-regulated genes involved in the antioxidant responses. • HL with increased UVB radiation exacerbated Cu uptake and Cu-induced toxic effects. - Abstract: The present study showed the important role of light intensity and spectral composition on Cu uptake and effects on green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. High-intenisty light (HL) increased cellular Cu concentrations, but mitigated the Cu-induced decrease in chlorophyll fluorescence, oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation at high Cu concentrations, indicating that Cu and HL interact in an antagonistic manner. HL up-regulated the transcription of genes involved in the antioxidant response in C. reinhardtii and thus reduced the oxidative stress upon exposure to Cu and HL. Combined exposure to Cu and UVBR resulted in an increase of cellular Cu contents and caused severe oxidative damage to the cells. The observed effects were higher than the sum of the effects corresponding to exposure to UVBR or Cu alone suggesting a synergistic interaction

  13. Platelet deposition in rat heart allografts and the effect of a thromboxane receptor antagonist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foegh, M.L.; Khirabadi, B.S.; Ramwell, P.W.

    1986-07-01

    The effect of a thromboxane antagonist, L640,035 on platelet deposition in heart allografts was studied. Twenty Lewis rats received heterotopic allografts from Lewis x Brown-Norway F1 hybrid. All recipients received azathioprine (5 mg/kg/day). The rats were divided into three groups. Groups II and III were also treated daily with either the vehicle for L640,035 or L640,035 respectively. Syngeneic indium-111-labeled platelet deposition was determined in the allograft and the native heart at 6, 9, and 13 days after transplantation; group III was studied on the sixth and ninth day only. A rapidly increasing platelet deposition was seen in allografts from rats given azathioprine; whereas the thromboxane antagonist prevented the increase in platelet deposition on the ninth day.

  14. Platelet deposition in rat heart allografts and the effect of a thromboxane receptor antagonist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of a thromboxane antagonist, L640,035 on platelet deposition in heart allografts was studied. Twenty Lewis rats received heterotopic allografts from Lewis x Brown-Norway F1 hybrid. All recipients received azathioprine (5 mg/kg/day). The rats were divided into three groups. Groups II and III were also treated daily with either the vehicle for L640,035 or L640,035 respectively. Syngeneic indium-111-labeled platelet deposition was determined in the allograft and the native heart at 6, 9, and 13 days after transplantation; group III was studied on the sixth and ninth day only. A rapidly increasing platelet deposition was seen in allografts from rats given azathioprine; whereas the thromboxane antagonist prevented the increase in platelet deposition on the ninth day

  15. Effects of autacoid inhibitors and of an antagonist on malaria infection in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwalewa E.O.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of p-chlorophenylalanine, an inhibitor of serotonin synthesis, indomethacin, an inhibitor of prostaglandin synthesis, cyproheptadine, a serotonin, bradykinin and histamine antagonist, were assessed separately and in combination with chloroquine (CQ in Vom strains of Swiss albino mice (18-22 g of either sex infected intraperitoneally with 1 x 10(7 Plasmodium yoelii nigeriensis-induced malaria. As prophylactic, these agents reduced from 31.9 ± 4.5 to 16.1 ± 8.1% the level of parasitemia relative to control but had no appreciable activity as curative agents when administered subcutaneously once daily for 4 days after 72 h of parasites innoculum in vivo. However, CQ alone and the combination of these agents with CQ in curative and prophylactic treatments significantly reduced (from 50.3 ± 5.8 to 4.9 ± 0.75% the level of parasitemia (P < 0.05, which was taken only once 72 h after the parasites innoculum. The prophylactic result was shown to produce better results than the curative treatment. The data indicate that inhibitors and an antagonist can reduce the parasitemia load (the extent of damage and the severity of infection as well as enhance the effects of CQ when combined with it for malaria therapy. The study reveals that the production of autacoids in established infection renders autacoid inhibitors and an antagonist ineffective for radical cure in malarial mice; however, selective inhibition of local hormones implicated in the pathological manifestations of malaria infection by autacoid inhibitors and an antagonist may be a possible pathway to reduce the severity of infection and the associated tissue damage and to enhance the efficacy of available anti-malarials.

  16. Differential effects of GABAA receptor antagonists in the control of respiratory neuronal discharge patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogas, Z; Krolo, M; Stuth, E A; Tonkovic-Capin, M; Hopp, F A; McCrimmon, D R; Zuperku, E J

    1998-11-01

    To ascertain the role of the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in shaping and controlling the phasic discharge patterns of medullary respiratory premotor neurons, localized pressure applications of the competitive GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline (BIC) and the noncompetitive GABAA receptor antagonist picrotoxin (PIC) were studied. Multibarrel micropipettes were used in halothane anesthetized, paralyzed, ventilated, vagotomized dogs to record single unit activity from inspiratory and expiratory neurons in the caudal ventral respiratory group and to picoeject GABAA receptor antagonists. The moving time average of phrenic nerve activity was used to determine respiratory phase durations and to synchronize cycle-triggered histograms of discharge patterns. Picoejection of BIC and PIC had qualitatively different effects on the discharge patterns of respiratory neurons. BIC caused an increase in the discharge rate during the neuron's active phase without inducing activity during the neuron's normally silent phase. The resulting discharge patterns were amplified replicas (x2-3) of the underlying preejection phasic patterns. In contrast, picoejection of PIC did not increase the peak discharge rate during the neuron's active phase but induced a tonic level of activity during the neuron's normally silent phase. The maximum effective BIC dose (15 +/- 1.8 pmol/min) was considerably smaller than that for PIC (280 +/- 53 pmol/min). These findings suggest that GABAA receptors with differential pharmacology mediate distinct functions within the same neuron, 1) gain modulation that is BIC sensitive but PIC insensitive and 2) silent-phase inhibition blocked by PIC. These studies also suggest that the choice of an antagonist is an important consideration in the determination of GABA receptor function within the respiratory motor control system. PMID:9819249

  17. Molecular changes induced by repeated restraint stress in the heart: the effect of oxytocin receptor antagonist atosiban.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartekova, Monika; Barancik, Miroslav; Pokusa, Michal; Prokopova, Barbora; Radosinska, Jana; Rusnak, Andrej; Breier, Albert; Jezova, Daniela

    2015-09-01

    Even though stress belongs to the most common lifestyle risk factors of cardiovascular diseases, there are only limited data on direct influence of stressors on the heart. The aim of the present study was to explore selected protein signaling pathways in response to repeated immobilization stress in the heart tissue. Effects of simultaneous treatment with atosiban, an oxytocin receptor antagonist, on stress-induced changes in the heart were also investigated. Male Wistar rats were exposed to repeated immobilization (2 h daily, lasting 2 weeks). The results showed increased phosphorylation of Akt kinase, enhanced levels of Bcl-2, and decreased levels of cleaved caspase-3 in the left ventricle in response to chronic stress independently of the treatment. Exposure to restraint led to the rise of HSP-90 and p53 in vehicle-treated rats only. Stress failed to modify MMP-2 activity and ultrastructure of the heart tissue. Treatment with the oxytocin/vasopressin receptor antagonist atosiban reversed stress-induced rise in HSP-90 and p53 proteins. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that repeated restraint stress induces Akt kinase activation and this is associated with elevation of anti-apoptotic proteins (Bcl-2) and down-regulation of pro-apoptotic proteins (cleaved caspase-3). These findings suggest that activation of pro-survival anti-apoptotic Akt kinase pathway plays an important role in molecular mechanisms underlying responses and adaptation of the rat heart to repeated stress exposure. The results further indicate a regulatory role of oxytocin/vasopressin in the control of stress-induced activation in HSP-90 and related proteins. PMID:26323039

  18. Effects of treatment with β-blocker and aldosterone antagonist on central and peripheral haemodynamics and oxygenation in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler, Christine; Hobolth, Lise; Krag, Aleksander;

    2011-01-01

    Patients with cirrhosis often exhibit abnormalities in cardiovascular regulation and oxygenation. Many of these patients are treated with β-blockers and aldosterone antagonists that may influence the regulation of systemic haemodynamics, but the specific effects on systemic haemodynamics and...

  19. The Central Reinforcing Properties of Ethanol Are Mediated by Endogenous Opioid Systems: Effects of Mu and Kappa Opioid Antagonists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman E. Spear

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Endogenous opioid systems are implicated in the reinforcing effects of ethanol and may play a substantial role in modulating the central reinforcing effects of ethanol early in ontogeny. This possibility was explored in the present study through the use of an olfactory conditioning paradigm with centrally administered ethanol serving as an unconditioned stimulus (US. In Experiment 1, newborn rat pups were treated with either a selective mu antagonist CTOP or kappa selective antagonist nor-BNI prior to olfactory conditioning. Experiment 2 tested the effectiveness of an alternative, shorter-duration kappa opioid antagonist GNTI in altering ethanol reinforcement. Experiment 3 investigated whether the effectiveness of pharmacological blockade of opioid receptors was due to the disruption of learning per se using an olfactory aversive conditioning paradigm with intraoral quinine serving as a US. Central administration of either mu or kappa opioid antagonists prior to conditioning disrupted the reinforcing effects of ethanol in newborn rats. The kappa opioid antagonist GNTI was as effective as nor-BNI. These effects of opioid antagonists on ethanol reinforcement are unlikely to be due to a disruption of all types of conditioning, since CTOP did not affect aversive reinforcement to intraoral infusions of quinine. The present results support the hypothesis that in newborn rats, the reinforcing properties of ethanol are mediated by the endogenous activity at mu and kappa opioid receptors.

  20. The Central Reinforcing Properties of Ethanol Are Mediated by Endogenous Opioid Systems: Effects of Mu and Kappa Opioid Antagonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizhnikov, Michael E.; Varlinskaya, Elena I.; Spear, Norman E.

    2010-01-01

    Endogenous opioid systems are implicated in the reinforcing effects of ethanol and may play a substantial role in modulating the central reinforcing effects of ethanol early in ontogeny. This possibility was explored in the present study through the use of an olfactory conditioning paradigm with centrally administered ethanol serving as an unconditioned stimulus (US). In Experiment 1, newborn rat pups were treated with either a selective mu antagonist CTOP or kappa selective antagonist nor-BNI prior to olfactory conditioning. Experiment 2 tested the effectiveness of an alternative, shorter-duration kappa opioid antagonist GNTI in altering ethanol reinforcement. Experiment 3 investigated whether the effectiveness of pharmacological blockade of opioid receptors was due to the disruption of learning per se using an olfactory aversive conditioning paradigm with intraoral quinine serving as a US. Central administration of either mu or kappa opioid antagonists prior to conditioning disrupted the reinforcing effects of ethanol in newborn rats. The kappa opioid antagonist GNTI was as effective as nor-BNI. These effects of opioid antagonists on ethanol reinforcement are unlikely to be due to a disruption of all types of conditioning, since CTOP did not affect aversive reinforcement to intraoral infusions of quinine. The present results support the hypothesis that in newborn rats, the reinforcing properties of ethanol are mediated by the endogenous activity at mu and kappa opioid receptors. PMID:22267966

  1. Effects of tiflucarbine as a dual protein kinase C/calmodulin antagonist on proliferation of human keratinocytes and release of reactive oxygen species from human leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegemann, L; Fruchtmann, R; Bonnekoh, B; Schmidt, B H; Traber, J; Mahrle, G; Müller-Peddinghaus, R; van Rooijen, L A

    1991-01-01

    Various studies have suggested that calmodulin (CaM) is involved in the pathophysiology of psoriasis. Protein kinase C (PKC) is also accepted as playing a regulatory role in cell proliferation as well as in inflammatory processes. Therefore, we investigated the effects of the known CaM antagonist tiflucarbine (BAY/TVX P 4495) on two cellular systems related to the major clinical symptoms of psoriasis: proliferation of cultured human keratinocytes (HaCa T cell line) and release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL). Tiflucarbine inhibited both cellular responses in a dose dependent manner. Furthermore, tiflucarbine directly affected PKC, and may thus be considered to be a dual PKC/CaM antagonist with putative antipsoriatic activity. The effects of tiflucarbine on the different parameters were compared with those of the structurally unrelated dual PKC/CaM inhibitor W-7 and those of the potent PKC inhibitor staurosporine. The potencies of all three compounds were found to be in the same range as their PKC-inhibiting potency. Our data indicate that PKC, rather than CaM, may play a regulatory role in the release of ROS as well as in keratinocyte proliferation. Therefore, inhibition of PKC in general might have a therapeutic benefit in psoriasis. PMID:1801655

  2. NMDA antagonists exert distinct effects in experimental organophosphate or carbamate poisoning in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organophosphate (OP) and carbamate acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors produce seizures and lethality in mammals. Anticonvulsant and neuroprotective properties of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonists encourage the investigation of their effects in AChE inhibitor-induced poisonings. In the present study, the effects of dizocilpine (MK-801, 1 mg/kg) or 3-((RS)-2-carboxypiperazin-4-yl)-propyl-1-phosphonic acid (CPP, 10 mg/kg), alone or combined with muscarinic antagonist atropine (1.8 mg/kg), on convulsant and lethal properties of an OP pesticide dichlorvos or a carbamate drug physostigmine, were studied in mice. Both dichlorvos and physostigmine induced dose-dependent seizure activity and lethality. Atropine did not prevent the occurrence of convulsions but decreased the lethal effects of both dichlorvos and physostigmine. MK-801 or CPP blocked or attenuated, respectively, dichlorvos-induced convulsions. Contrariwise, NMDA antagonists had no effect in physostigmine-induced seizures or lethality produced by dichlorvos or physostigmine. Concurrent pretreatment with atropine and either MK-801 or CPP blocked or alleviated seizures produced by dichlorvos, but not by physostigmine. Both MK-801 and CPP co-administered with atropine enhanced its antilethal effects in both dichlorvos and physostigmine poisoning. In both saline- and AChE inhibitor-treated mice, no interaction of the investigated antidotes with brain cholinesterase was found. The data indicate that both muscarinic ACh and NMDA receptor-mediated mechanisms contribute to the acute toxicity of AChE inhibitors, and NMDA receptors seem critical to OP-induced seizures

  3. Dietary hyodeoxycholic acid exerts hypolipidemic effects by reducing farnesoid X receptor antagonist bile acids in mouse enterohepatic tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Shiro; Fujita, Kyosuke

    2014-10-01

    Mice were fed a control diet or a diet supplemented with hyodeoxycholic acid, the most abundant bile acid contained in pig bile, for 4 weeks, after which their serum and livers were collected. The contents of total fatty acids of serum and liver cholesteryl esters, and of liver triglycerides, were reduced following the administration of the hyodeoxycholic acid-supplemented diet, which was mainly due to the reductions in the contents of monounsaturated fatty acids. Free cholesterol contents in the serum and liver were not changed by hyodeoxycholic acid administration. Hyodeoxycholic acid administration reduced the gene expression levels of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c, acetyl-CoA carboxylase, fatty acid synthase, and stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1. Hyodeoxycholic acid administration markedly changes the ratio of FXR-antagonist/FXR-agonist bile acids in the enterohepatic tissues of the mice (1.13 and 7.60 in hyodeoxycholic acid and control diet groups, respectively). Our findings demonstrate that hyodeoxycholic acid administration exerts the hypolipidemic effect in mice, in which downregulations of de novo lipogenesis and desaturation of saturated fatty acids are suggested to play important roles. In addition, regulation of FXR activation through the selective modification of the enterohepatic bile acid pool may be involved in the hypolipidemic effect of hyodeoxycholic acid administration. PMID:25189147

  4. Antagonistic Effects of Sodium Butyrate and N-(4-Hydroxyphenyl-retinamide on Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainer Kuefer

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Butyrates and retinoids are promising antineoplastic agents. Here we analyzed effects of sodium butyrate and N-(4-hydroxyphenyl-retinamide (4-HPR on prostate cancer cells as monotherapy or in combination in vitro and in vivo. Sodium butyrate and 4-HPR induced concentration-dependent growth inhibition in prostate cancer cells in vitro. The isobologram analysis revealed that sodium butyrate and 4-HPR administered together antagonize effects of each other. For the in vivo studies, a water-soluble complex (4-HPR with a cyclodextrin was created. A single dose of sodium butyrate and 4-HPR showed a peak level in chicken plasma within 30 minutes. Both compounds induced inhibition of proliferation and apoptosis in xenografts of the chicken chorioallantoic membrane. Analysis of the cytotoxic effects of the drugs used in combination demonstrated an antagonistic effect on inhibition of proliferation and on induction of apoptosis. Prolonged jun N-terminal kinase phosphorylation induced by sodium butyrate and 4-HPR was strongly attenuated when both compounds were used in combination. Both compounds induced inhibition of NF-κ,B. This effect was strongly antagonized in LNCaP cells when the compounds were used in combination. These results indicate that combinational therapies have to be carefully investigated due to potential antagonistic effects in the clinical setting despite promising results of a monotherapy.

  5. Differential effect of glucocorticoid receptor antagonists on glucocorticoid receptor nuclear translocation and DNA binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiga, Francesca; Knight, David M; Droste, Susanne K; Conway-Campbell, Becky; Kershaw, Yvonne; MacSweeney, Cliona P; Thomson, Fiona J; Craighead, Mark; Peeters, Bernard WMM; Lightman, Stafford L

    2016-01-01

    The effects of RU486 and S-P, a more selective glucocorticoid receptor antagonist from Schering-Plough, were investigated on glucocorticoid receptor nuclear translocation and DNA binding. In the in vitro study, AtT20 cells were treated with vehicle or with RU486, S-P or corticosterone (3–300 nM) or co-treated with vehicle or glucocorticoid receptor antagonists (3–300 nM) and 30 nM corticosterone. Both glucocorticoid receptor antagonists induced glucocorticoid receptor nuclear translocation but only RU486 induced DNA binding. RU486 potentiated the effect of corticosterone on glucocorticoid receptor nuclear translocation and DNA binding, S-P inhibited corticosterone-induced glucocorticoid receptor nuclear translocation, but not glucocorticoid receptor-DNA binding. In the in vivo study, adrenalectomized rats were treated with vehicle, RU486 (20 mg/kg) and S-P (50 mg/kg) alone or in combination with corticosterone (3 mg/kg). RU486 induced glucocorticoid receptor nuclear translocation in the pituitary, hippocampus and prefrontal cortex and glucocorticoid receptor-DNA binding in the hippocampus, whereas no effect of S-P on glucocorticoid receptor nuclear translocation or DNA binding was observed in any of the areas analysed. These findings reveal differential effects of RU486 and S-P on areas involved in regulation of hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis activity in vivo and they are important in light of the potential use of this class of compounds in the treatment of disorders associated with hyperactivity of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis. PMID:20093322

  6. Comparison of anticonvulsant effect of competitive non-NMDA and noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonists in adult rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lojková, Denisa; Živanovič, Dragana; Mareš, Pavel

    -, - (2005), s. 160-160. [Conference of the Czech Neuroscience Society /5./, The Annual Meeting of the Network of European Neuroscience Institutes. 19.11.2005-21.11.2005, Prague] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : anticonvulsant effect * non-NMDA- receptor antagonist * NMDA receptor antagonist * rats Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  7. The α1 Antagonist Doxazosin Alters the Behavioral Effects of Cocaine in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin N. Haile

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Medications that target norepinephrine (NE neurotransmission alter the behavioral effects of cocaine and may be beneficial for stimulant-use disorders. We showed previously that the short-acting, α1-adrenergic antagonist, prazosin, blocked drug-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking in rats and doxazosin (DOX, a longer-acting α1 antagonist blocked cocaine’s subjective effects in cocaine-dependent volunteers. To further characterize DOX as a possible pharmacotherapy for cocaine dependence, we assessed its impact on the development and expression of cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization in rats. Rats (n = 6–8 were administered saline, cocaine (COC, 10 mg/kg or DOX (0.3 or 1.0 mg/kg alone or in combination for 5 consecutive days (development. Following 10-days of drug withdrawal, all rats were administered COC and locomotor activity was again assessed (expression. COC increased locomotor activity across days indicative of sensitization. The high dose (1.0 mg/kg, but not the low dose (0.3 mg/kg of DOX significantly decreased the development and expression of COC sensitization. DOX alone did not differ from saline. These results are consistent with studies showing that α1 receptors are essential for the development and expression of cocaine’s behavioral effects. Results also suggest that blockade of both the development and expression of locomotor sensitization may be important characteristics of possible pharmacotherapies for cocaine dependence in humans.

  8. G-receptor antagonists increased the activating effect of mastoparan on low Km GTPase of mouse PAG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Peña, Y; Sánchez-Blázquez, P; Garzón, J

    1995-02-01

    Mastoparan activated in a concentration-dependent manner the low Km GTPase activity in P2 fractions from mouse periaquedultal grey matter (PAG). This peptide at 1-10 mM produced increases of 30-70% over the basal value of 90-120 pmol Pi/mg/min. A series of substances displaying antagonist activity at cellular receptors and not modifying the GTPase function, when used at nanomolar and micromolar concentrations enhanced the effect of mastoparan upon this enzyme. These included antagonists of receptors coupling G proteins: naloxone (non selective opioid antagonist), CTOP (m opioid receptors), ICI 174,864 (d opioid receptors), nor-BNI (k opioid receptors), sulpiride (D2 dopaminergic antagonist), idazoxan (a2 adrenergic antagonist). Bicuculline, antagonist of a receptor not linked to G proteins, GABAA, did not alter the effect of mastoparan on the GTPase. The m opioid agonist, DAMGO, prevented naloxone from increasing the function of the mastoparan-activated enzyme. Thus, mastoparan appears to act on Gi/Go proteins at a site not directly related to the receptor binding domain. PMID:7794687

  9. Effect of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists and antagonists on motor function in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are ligand-gated cation channels found throughout the body, and serve to mediate diverse physiological functions. Muscle-type nAChRs located in the motor endplate region of muscle fibers play an integral role in muscle contraction and thus motor function. The toxicity and teratogenicity of many plants (which results in millions of dollars in losses annually to the livestock industry) are due to various toxins that bind to nAChRs including deltaline and methyllycaconitine (MLA) from larkspur (Delphinium) species, and nicotine and anabasine from tobacco (Nicotiana) species. The primary result of the actions of these alkaloids at nAChRs is neuromuscular paralysis and respiratory failure. The objective of this study was to further characterize the motor coordination deficiencies that occur upon exposure to a non-lethal dose of nAChR antagonists MLA and deltaline as well as nAChR agonists nicotine and anabasine. We evaluated the effect of nAChR agonists and antagonists on the motor function and coordination in mice using a balance beam, grip strength meter, rotarod, open field analysis and tremor monitor. These analyses demonstrated that within seconds after treatment the mice had significant loss of motor function and coordination that lasted up to 1 min, followed by a short period of quiescence. Recovery to normal muscle coordination was rapid, typically within approximately 10 min post-dosing. However, mice treated with the nAChR agonist nicotine and anabasine required a slightly longer time to recover some aspects of normal muscle function in comparison to mice treated with the nAChR antagonist MLA or deltaline. -- Highlights: ► Mice treated with nAChR agonists and antagonists have a loss in motor function. ► These deficits are temporary as near normal motor function returns within 10 min. ► There are compound-specific differences in the effects on motor function.

  10. Antagonistic effect of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from various ecological niches on Vibrio species pathogenic to crustaceans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Prabhakaran Priyaja; Puthumana Jayesh; Neil Scolastin Correya; Balachandran Sreelakshmi; Naduthalmuriparambil S Sudheer; Rosamma Philip; Isaac Sarogeni Bright Singh

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To abrogate pathogenic vibrios in aquaculture by testing the potential of Pseudomonas isolates from fresh water, brackish and marine environments as probiotics.Methods:Antagonistic activity of the compound against 7 Vibrio spp. was performed. Influence of salinity on the production of pyocyanin and the toxicity was done through the compound using brine shrimp lethality assay. Molecular characterization was performed to confirm that the isolates werePseudomonas aeruginosa. Results: Salinity was found to regulate the levels of pyocyanin production, with 5-10 g/L as the optimum. All Pseudomonas isolates grew at salinities ranging from 5 to 70 g/L. Isolates of marine origin produced detectable levels of pyocyanin up to 45 g/L salinity. Brackish and freshwater isolates ceased to produce pyocyanin at salinities above 30 g/L and 20 g/L, respectively. Culture supernatants of all 5 Pseudomonas isolates possessed the ability to restrict the growth of Vibrio spp. and maximum antagonistic effect on Vibrio harveyi was obtained when they were grown at salinities of 5 to 10 g/L. The marine isolate MCCB117, even when grown at a salinity of 45 g/L possessed the ability to inhibit Vibrio spp.Conclusions:Purification and structural elucidation of antagonistic compound were carried out. ideal for application in freshwater, MCCB102 and MCCB103 in brackish water and MCCB117 and The present investigation showed that Pseudomonas aeruginosa MCCB119 would be MCCB118 in marine aquaculture systems as putative probiotics in the management of vibrios.

  11. Overall Effects of China's Recent Macroeconomic Regulatory Policies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiJianwei,; ZhuShida; DavidKelly

    2004-01-01

    China's economic regulatory policies in the last few years have played an important role in curbing the slide of its consistent growth drive. In terms of overall effects, the macroeconomic regulatory policies of each fiscal year have attained their targets. In some years, however,

  12. Effect of GnRH antagonist on follicular development and uterine biophysical profile in controlled ovarian stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhawana Tiwary

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Objective of current study was to assess the effect of GnRH antagonist on follicular development, premature luteinization, uterine biophysical profile and pregnancy rate in controlled ovarian stimulation with clomiphene and gonadotropins for intrauterine insemination in women with unexplained infertility. Methods: Randomised controlled trial. Minimal stimulation protocol with or without GnRH antagonist was compared. Setting: Infertility clinic, PGIMER, Chandigarh. Patients: Couples with unexplained infertility, age of female partner between 20-39 years. Intervention: GnRH antagonist 0.25 mg since follicle size 14 mm till hCG administration. Main outcome measures: Follicle characteristics, premature luteinisation, uterine biophysical profile and pregnancy rate. Results: The mean number of follicles recruited in group A was 2.32 +/- 1.01 while that in group B (receiving GnRH antagonist it was 4.10 +/- 1.69. Statistically significant increase in total biophysical profile score was observed in periovulatory phase in the antagonist group. 40% women in group A had premature luteinization whereas only 4% women in group B suffered from premature luteinization. 20% women who received GnRH antagonist conceived against only 6% in group A, this difference however was not statistically significant Conclusions: GnRH antagonist has a role in increasing the number of follicles recruited. Furthermore, GnRH antagonist can improve the total uterine biophysical profile score by improving the endometrial thickness, endometrial pattern, blood flow and decreasing the impedance to the blood flow in uterine artery. The drug can potentially help in improving pregnancy rates by decreasing the rate of premature luteinisation. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2015; 4(1.000: 157-163

  13. Sulforaphane is not an effective antagonist of the human pregnane X-receptor in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulforaphane (SFN), is an effective in vitro antagonist of ligand activation of the human pregnane and xenobiotic receptor (PXR). PXR mediated CYP3A4 up-regulation is implicated in adverse drug-drug interactions making identification of small molecule antagonists a desirable therapeutic goal. SFN is not an antagonist to mouse or rat PXR in vitro; thus, normal rodent species are not suitable as in vivo models for human response. To evaluate whether SFN can effectively antagonize ligand activation of human PXR in vivo, a three-armed, randomized, crossover trial was conducted with 24 healthy adults. The potent PXR ligand — rifampicin (300 mg/d) was given alone for 7 days in arm 1, or in daily combination with 450 μmol SFN (Broccoli Sprout extract) in arm 2; SFN was given alone in arm 3. Midazolam as an in vivo phenotype marker of CYP3A was administered before and after each treatment arm. Rifampicin alone decreased midazolam AUC by 70%, indicative of the expected increase in CYP3A4 activity. Co-treatment with SFN did not reduce CYP3A4 induction. Treatment with SFN alone also did not affect CYP3A4 activity in the cohort as a whole, although in the subset with the highest basal CYP3A4 activity there was a statistically significant increase in midazolam AUC (i.e., decrease in CYP3A4 activity). A parallel study in humanized PXR mice yielded similar results. The parallel effects of SFN between humanized PXR mice and human subjects demonstrate the predictive value of humanized mouse models in situations where species differences in ligand-receptor interactions preclude the use of a native mouse model for studying human ligand-receptor pharmacology. -- Highlights: ► The effects of SFN on PXR mediated CYP3A4 induction in humanized PXR mice and humans were examined. ► SFN had no effect on rifampicin mediated CYP3A4 induction in humans or humanized mice. ► SFN had a modest effect on basal CYP3A4 activity among subjects with higher baseline activity. ► Humanized PXR

  14. Sulforaphane is not an effective antagonist of the human pregnane X-receptor in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poulton, Emma Jane [Center for Ecogenetics and Environmental Health, University of Washington (United States); Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington (United States); Levy, Lisa [Public Health Sciences Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center (United States); Lampe, Johanna W. [Center for Ecogenetics and Environmental Health, University of Washington (United States); Public Health Sciences Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center (United States); Shen, Danny D. [Center for Ecogenetics and Environmental Health, University of Washington (United States); Department of Pharmaceutics, University of Washington (United States); Tracy, Julia [Center for Ecogenetics and Environmental Health, University of Washington (United States); Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington (United States); Shuhart, Margaret C. [Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine (United States); Thummel, Kenneth E. [Center for Ecogenetics and Environmental Health, University of Washington (United States); Department of Pharmaceutics, University of Washington (United States); Eaton, David L., E-mail: deaton@uw.edu [Center for Ecogenetics and Environmental Health, University of Washington (United States); Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington (United States); Department of Pharmaceutics, University of Washington (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN), is an effective in vitro antagonist of ligand activation of the human pregnane and xenobiotic receptor (PXR). PXR mediated CYP3A4 up-regulation is implicated in adverse drug-drug interactions making identification of small molecule antagonists a desirable therapeutic goal. SFN is not an antagonist to mouse or rat PXR in vitro; thus, normal rodent species are not suitable as in vivo models for human response. To evaluate whether SFN can effectively antagonize ligand activation of human PXR in vivo, a three-armed, randomized, crossover trial was conducted with 24 healthy adults. The potent PXR ligand — rifampicin (300 mg/d) was given alone for 7 days in arm 1, or in daily combination with 450 μmol SFN (Broccoli Sprout extract) in arm 2; SFN was given alone in arm 3. Midazolam as an in vivo phenotype marker of CYP3A was administered before and after each treatment arm. Rifampicin alone decreased midazolam AUC by 70%, indicative of the expected increase in CYP3A4 activity. Co-treatment with SFN did not reduce CYP3A4 induction. Treatment with SFN alone also did not affect CYP3A4 activity in the cohort as a whole, although in the subset with the highest basal CYP3A4 activity there was a statistically significant increase in midazolam AUC (i.e., decrease in CYP3A4 activity). A parallel study in humanized PXR mice yielded similar results. The parallel effects of SFN between humanized PXR mice and human subjects demonstrate the predictive value of humanized mouse models in situations where species differences in ligand-receptor interactions preclude the use of a native mouse model for studying human ligand-receptor pharmacology. -- Highlights: ► The effects of SFN on PXR mediated CYP3A4 induction in humanized PXR mice and humans were examined. ► SFN had no effect on rifampicin mediated CYP3A4 induction in humans or humanized mice. ► SFN had a modest effect on basal CYP3A4 activity among subjects with higher baseline activity. ► Humanized PXR

  15. The Effects of NMDA Antagonists on Neuronal Activity in Cat Spinal Cord Evoked by Acute Inflammation in the Knee Joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaible, Hans-Georg; Grubb, Blair D.; Neugebauer, Volker; Oppmann, Maria

    1991-01-01

    In alpha-chloralose-anaesthetized, spinalized cats we examined the effects of NMDA antagonists on the discharges of 71 spinal neurons which had afferent input from the knee joint. These neurons were rendered hyperexcitable by acute arthritis in the knee induced by kaolin and carrageenan. They were located in the deep dorsal and ventral horn and some of them had ascending axons. The N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) antagonists ketamine and d-2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (AP5), were administered ionophoretically, and ketamine was also administered intravenously. In some of the experiments the antagonists were tested against the agonists NMDA and quisqualate. The effects of the NMDA antagonists consisted of a significant reduction in the resting activity of neurons and/or the responses of the same neurons to mechanical stimulation of the inflamed knee. Intravenous ketamine was most effective in suppressing the resting and mechanically evoked activity in 25 of 26 neurons tested. Ionophoretically applied ketamine had a suppressive effect in 11 of 21 neurons, and AP5 decreased activity in 17 of 24 cells. The reduction in the resting and/or the mechanically evoked discharges was achieved with doses of the antagonists which suppressed the responses to NMDA but not those to quisqualate. These results suggest that NMDA receptors are involved in the enhanced responses and basal activity of spinal neurons induced by inflammation in the periphery. PMID:12106256

  16. Developing effective consultation programs for regulatory development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulson, K.F. [National Energy Board, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    Canada's National Energy Board promotes safety, environmental protection and economic efficiency in the regulation of pipelines, energy development and trade. The Board regulates the design, construction, operation and abandonment of interprovincial and international pipelines within Canada. It also holds regulatory control over tolls and tariffs of interprovincial and international pipelines as well as the export, exploration and development of natural gas and oil resources. Regulatory authorities are required to consult with stakeholders whenever new regulations or amendments to existing regulations are proposed. The Board has launched new initiatives for compliance with Damage Prevention Regulations. Stakeholders were advised through consultative processes such as plain language drafts, open houses, focus meetings and newsletters. The proposed Damage Prevention Regulation will govern activities that have the potential to damage a pipeline. The regulations will apply to pipeline operators, excavators, landowners, municipal planners, emergency responders, and utility companies dealing with federally regulated pipelines. 7 refs., 1 tab.

  17. Effects of cysteinyl leukotrienes and leukotriene receptor antagonists on markers of inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sampson, Anthony P; Pizzichini, Emilio; Bisgaard, Hans

    2003-01-01

    The understanding that asthma pathophysiology includes an inflammatory component has spurred the more aggressive use of anti-inflammatory therapies and created a need for effective tools to measure inflammation. Biomarkers of airway inflammation proposed are obtained by methods that are direct but...... mediators in a wide range of diseases, implying that their biological activities reach far beyond acute bronchoconstriction, the activity traditionally ascribed to them. The validity of examining sputum for "biomarkers" has improved the understanding of asthma pathophysiology, optimization of asthma...... treatment and management, and investigation of the relation between CysLTs and airway inflammation in asthma. Nitric oxide is also a surrogate marker of asthma and reflects airway inflammation. The anti-inflammatory effects of the leukotriene receptor antagonists and the markers of their activity continue...

  18. The rhizosphere effect on bacteria antagonistic towards the pathogenic fungus Verticillium differs depending on plant species and site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Gabriele; Opelt, Katja; Zachow, Christin; Lottmann, Jana; Götz, Monika; Costa, Rodrigo; Smalla, Kornelia

    2006-05-01

    Rhizobacteria with antagonistic activity towards plant pathogens play an essential role in root growth and plant health and are influenced by plant species in their abundance and composition. To determine the extent of the effect of the plant species and of the site on the abundance and composition of bacteria with antagonistic activity towards Verticillium dahliae, bacteria isolated from the rhizosphere of two Verticillium host plants, oilseed rape and strawberry, and from bulk soil were analysed at three different locations in Germany over two growing seasons. A total of 6732 bacterial isolates screened for in vitro antagonism towards Verticillium resulted in 560 active isolates, among which Pseudomonas (77%) and Serratia (6%) were the most dominant genera. The rhizosphere effect on the antagonistic bacterial community was shown by an enhanced proportion of antagonistic isolates, by enrichment of specific amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis types, species and genotypes, and by a reduced diversity in the rhizosphere in comparison to bulk soil. Such an effect was influenced by the plant species and by the site of its cultivation. Altogether, 16S rRNA gene sequencing of 66 isolates resulted in the identification of 22 different species. Antagonists of the genus Serratia were preferentially isolated from oilseed rape rhizosphere, with the exception of one site. For isolates of Pseudomonas and Serratia, plant-specific and site-specific genotypes were found. PMID:16629754

  19. Effects of α-adrenoreceptor antagonists on apoptosis and proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su-Gang Shen; Dong Zhang; Heng-Tong Hu; Jun-Hui Li; Zheng Wang; Qing-Yong Ma

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To discuss the expression of α-adrenoreceptors in pancreatic cancer cell lines PC-2 and PC-3 and the effects of α1- and α2-adrenoreceptor antagonists, yohimbine and urapidil hydrochloride, on the cell lines in vitro.METHODS: We cultured the human ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines PC-2 and PC-3 and analyzed the mRNA expression of α1- and α2-adrenergic receptors by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).The effects of yohimbine and urapidil hydrochloride on cell proliferation were assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiasol-2-yl)2,4,-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Apoptosis was detected using the terminal deoxyribonucleoticlyl transferase (TdT)-mediated biotin-16-dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay and flow cytometry (FCM).RESULTS: PC-2 expressed rnRNA in α1- and α2-adrenoreceptors. MTT assays showed that urapidil hydrochloride had no effect on PC-3 cell lines. However,exposure to urapidil hydrochloride increased DNA synthesis in PC-2 cell lines as compared to the control group. PC-2 cell lines were sensitive to both drugs. The proliferation of the 2 cell lines was inhibited by yohimbine.Cell proliferation was inhibited by yohimbine via apoptosis induction.CONCLUSION: The expression of α1-and α2-adrenoreceptors is different in PC-2 and PC-3 cell lines,which might be indicative of their different functions. Theα2-adrenoceptor antagonist, yohimbine, can inhibit the proliferation of both cell lines and induce their apoptosis,suggesting that yohimbine can be used as an anticancer drug for apoptosis of PC-2 and PC-3 cells.

  20. Effects of dopamine D1-like and D2-like antagonists on cocaine discrimination in muscarinic receptor knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Morgane; Caine, Simon Barak

    2016-04-01

    Muscarinic and dopamine brain systems interact intimately, and muscarinic receptor ligands, like dopamine ligands, can modulate the reinforcing and discriminative stimulus (S(D)) effects of cocaine. To enlighten the dopamine/muscarinic interactions as they pertain to the S(D) effects of cocaine, we evaluated whether muscarinic M1, M2 or M4 receptors are necessary for dopamine D1 and/or D2 antagonist mediated modulation of the S(D) effects of cocaine. Knockout mice lacking M1, M2, or M4 receptors, as well as control wild-type mice and outbred Swiss-Webster mice, were trained to discriminate 10mg/kg cocaine from saline in a food-reinforced drug discrimination procedure. Effects of pretreatments with the dopamine D1 antagonist SCH 23390 and the dopamine D2 antagonist eticlopride were evaluated. In intact mice, both SCH 23390 and eticlopride attenuated the cocaine discriminative stimulus effect, as expected. SCH 23390 similarly attenuated the cocaine discriminative stimulus effect in M1 knockout mice, but not in mice lacking M2 or M4 receptors. The effects of eticlopride were comparable in each knockout strain. These findings demonstrate differences in the way that D1 and D2 antagonists modulate the S(D) effects of cocaine, D1 modulation being at least partially dependent upon activity at the inhibitory M2/M4 muscarinic subtypes, while D2 modulation appeared independent of these systems. PMID:26874213

  1. Effect of Leukotriene Receptor Antagonist Montelukast Along with Curcumin against Gastric Ulceration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    UM Viradia

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin, a yellow pigment in the spice turmeric, has been used for centuries as a treatment for inflammatory diseases. This yellow pigment has anti-secretary property in different experimental ulcer models. Montelukast, a leukotriene receptor antagonist has been used for the treatment of inflammatory disease. This substance has antioxidant property in different experimental models. This data supports to evaluate the synergistic effect of Montelukast along with Curcumin against gastric ulceration. Gastric ulcers were induced by administering Aspirin (200 mg/kg plus pylorus ligation and Indomethacin (20 mg/kg. Evaluation of Montelukast along with Curcumin was carried out in above experimental models. All the Montelukast (10 mg/kg along with Curcumin (60 mg/kg treated animals showed more significant reduction of ulcer index in both above experimental models compared to individual treatment with both, Curcumin and Montelukast.

  2. Antagonist effect of interferon-γ aerosol inhalation on pulmonary remodeling after γ-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To observe the antagonistic effect of interferon-y aerosol inhalation on pulmonary remodeling after γ-ray irradiation, and explore its mechanisms. Methods: The Wistar rats were randomly divided into irradiation control group and irradiation + Interferon-γ antagonist group, which proceeded IFN-γ aerosol inhalation 3 days before 20 Gy 60Co γ-ray irradiation, then were sacrificed at 10, 20, 30 days after irradiation. Conventional histopathological sections of lung tissue were prepared, which were stained immunohistochemically for α-SMA and Sirius red. The contents of collagen IV were determined by Western blot. The expression of MMP-2, MMP-9 and TIMP-1 in lung homogenate was detected by ELISA. Results: The widen degrees of interalveolar septum, the deposition of collagen I, III, and the expression of α-SMA decreased significantly in IFN-γ treatment group as compared with those in the irradiation control group. The expression of collagen IV appeared an elevation trend, but this phenomenon attenuated after IFN-γ was used. The levels of MMP-2 and TIMP-1 decreased 10 days after administration with IFN-γ but the opposite trend appeared for MMP- 9. The expression of MMP-2, MMP-9 and TIMP-1 decreased 30 days after administration with IFN-γ. Conclusion: IFN-γ is effective in alleviating pulmonary injuries induced by irradiation in rats, possibly by decreasing the expression of TIMP-1 to relieve the inhibition to MMP-9, then degrading collagen IV to antagonize remodeling after lung injury. (authors)

  3. No effect of nutritional adenosine receptor antagonists on exercise performance in the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheuvront, Samuel N; Ely, Brett R; Kenefick, Robert W; Michniak-Kohn, Bozena B; Rood, Jennifer C; Sawka, Michael N

    2009-02-01

    Nutritional adenosine receptor antagonists can enhance endurance exercise performance in temperate environments, but their efficacy during heat stress is not well understood. This double-blinded, placebo-controlled study compared the effects of an acute dose of caffeine or quercetin on endurance exercise performance during compensable heat stress (40 degrees C, 20-30% rh). On each of three occasions, 10 healthy men each performed 30-min of cycle ergometry at 50% Vo2peak followed by a 15-min performance time trial after receiving either placebo (Group P), caffeine (Group C; 9 mg/kg), or quercetin (Group Q; 2,000 mg). Serial blood samples, physiological (heart rate, rectal, and mean skin body temperatures), perceptual (ratings of perceived exertion, pain, thermal comfort, motivation), and exercise performance measures (total work and pacing strategy) were made. Supplementation with caffeine and quercetin increased preexercise blood concentrations of caffeine (55.62 +/- 4.77 microM) and quercetin (4.76 +/- 2.56 microM) above their in vitro inhibition constants for adenosine receptors. No treatment effects were observed for any physiological or perceptual measures, with the exception of elevated rectal body temperatures (0.20-0.30 degrees C; P affect total work performed (Groups P: 153.5 +/- 28.3, C: 157.3 +/- 28.9, and Q: 151.1 +/- 31.6 kJ; P > 0.05) or the self-selected pacing strategy employed. These findings indicate that the nutritional adenosine receptor antagonists caffeine and quercetin do not enhance endurance exercise performance during compensable heat stress. PMID:19020291

  4. Effective management of venous thromboembolism in the community: non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel R

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Raj Patel Department of Haematological Medicine, King's Thrombosis Centre, King's College Hospital, London, UK Abstract: Anticoagulation therapy is essential for the effective treatment and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE. For many years, anticoagulation for acute VTE was limited to the use of initial parenteral heparin, overlapping with and followed by a vitamin K antagonist. Although highly effective, this regimen has several limitations and is particularly challenging when given in an ambulatory setting. Current treatment pathways for most patients with deep-vein thrombosis typically involve initial hospital or community-based ambulatory care with subsequent follow-up in a secondary care setting. With the introduction of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs into routine clinical practice, it is now possible for the initial acute management of patients with deep-vein thrombosis to be undertaken by primary care. As hospital admissions associated with VTE become shorter, primary care will play an increasingly important role in the long-term management of these patients. Although the NOACs can potentially simplify patient management and improve clinical outcomes, primary care physicians may be less familiar with these new treatments compared with traditional therapy. To assist primary care physicians in further understanding the role of the NOACs, this article outlines the main differences between NOACs and traditional anticoagulation therapy and discusses the benefit–risk profile of the different NOACs in the treatment and secondary prevention of recurrent VTE. Key considerations for the use of NOACs in the primary care setting are highlighted, including dose transition, risk assessment and follow-up, duration of anticoagulant therapy, how to minimize bleeding risks, and the importance of patient education and counseling. Keywords: venous thromboembolism, oral anticoagulant, prevention, treatment, primary

  5. Effective management of venous thromboembolism in the community: non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Raj

    2016-01-01

    Anticoagulation therapy is essential for the effective treatment and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE). For many years, anticoagulation for acute VTE was limited to the use of initial parenteral heparin, overlapping with and followed by a vitamin K antagonist. Although highly effective, this regimen has several limitations and is particularly challenging when given in an ambulatory setting. Current treatment pathways for most patients with deep-vein thrombosis typically involve initial hospital or community-based ambulatory care with subsequent follow-up in a secondary care setting. With the introduction of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) into routine clinical practice, it is now possible for the initial acute management of patients with deep-vein thrombosis to be undertaken by primary care. As hospital admissions associated with VTE become shorter, primary care will play an increasingly important role in the long-term management of these patients. Although the NOACs can potentially simplify patient management and improve clinical outcomes, primary care physicians may be less familiar with these new treatments compared with traditional therapy. To assist primary care physicians in further understanding the role of the NOACs, this article outlines the main differences between NOACs and traditional anticoagulation therapy and discusses the benefit–risk profile of the different NOACs in the treatment and secondary prevention of recurrent VTE. Key considerations for the use of NOACs in the primary care setting are highlighted, including dose transition, risk assessment and follow-up, duration of anticoagulant therapy, how to minimize bleeding risks, and the importance of patient education and counseling. PMID:27217793

  6. Differential effects of ghrelin antagonists on alcohol drinking and reinforcement in mouse and rat models of alcohol dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Juan L; Cunningham, Christopher L; Finn, Deborah A; Young, Emily A; Helpenstell, Lily K; Schuette, Lindsey M; Fidler, Tara L; Kosten, Therese A; Ryabinin, Andrey E

    2015-10-01

    An effort has been mounted to understand the mechanisms of alcohol dependence in a way that may allow for greater efficacy in treatment. It has long been suggested that drugs of abuse seize fundamental reward pathways and disrupt homeostasis to produce compulsive drug seeking behaviors. Ghrelin, an endogenous hormone that affects hunger state and release of growth hormone, has been shown to increase alcohol intake following administration, while antagonists decrease intake. Using rodent models of dependence, the current study examined the effects of two ghrelin receptor antagonists, [DLys3]-GHRP-6 (DLys) and JMV2959, on dependence-induced alcohol self-administration. In two experiments adult male C57BL/6J mice and Wistar rats were made dependent via intermittent ethanol vapor exposure. In another experiment, adult male C57BL/6J mice were made dependent using the intragastric alcohol consumption (IGAC) procedure. Ghrelin receptor antagonists were given prior to voluntary ethanol drinking. Ghrelin antagonists reduced ethanol intake, preference, and operant self-administration of ethanol and sucrose across these models, but did not decrease food consumption in mice. In experiments 1 and 2, voluntary drinking was reduced by ghrelin receptor antagonists, however this reduction did not persist across days. Despite the transient effects of ghrelin antagonists, the drugs had renewed effectiveness following a break in administration as seen in experiment 1. The results show the ghrelin system as a potential target for studies of alcohol abuse. Further research is needed to determine the central mechanisms of these drugs and their influence on addiction in order to design effective pharmacotherapies. PMID:26051399

  7. Classification of suppressor additives based on synergistic and antagonistic ensemble effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Three fundamental types of suppressor additives for copper electroplating could be identified by means of potential transient measurements. → These suppressor additives differ in their synergistic and antagonistic interplay with anions that are chemisorbed on the metallic copper surface during electrodeposition. → In addition these suppressor chemistries reveal different barrier properties with respect to cupric ions and plating additives (Cl, SPS). - Abstract: Three fundamental types of suppressor additives for copper electroplating could be identified by means of potential transient measurements. These suppressor additives differ in their synergistic and antagonistic interplay with anions that are chemisorbed on the metallic copper surface during electrodeposition. In addition these suppressor chemistries reveal different barrier properties with respect to cupric ions and plating additives (Cl, SPS). While the type-I suppressor selectively forms efficient barriers for copper inter-diffusion on chloride-terminated electrode surfaces we identified a type-II suppressor that interacts non-selectively with any kind of anions chemisorbed on copper (chloride, sulfate, sulfonate). Type-I suppressors are vital for the superconformal copper growth mode in Damascene processing and show an antagonistic interaction with SPS (Bis-Sodium-Sulfopropyl-Disulfide) which involves the deactivation of this suppressor chemistry. This suppressor deactivation is rationalized in terms of compositional changes in the layer of the chemisorbed anions due to the competition of chloride and MPS (Mercaptopropane Sulfonic Acid) for adsorption sites on the metallic copper surface. MPS is the product of the dissociative SPS adsorption within the preexisting chloride matrix on the copper surface. The non-selectivity in the adsorption behavior of the type-II suppressor is rationalized in terms of anion/cation pairing effects of the poly-cationic suppressor and the anion

  8. Effect of TNF antagonists on the productivity of daily work of patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furuya H

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hidekazu Furuya,1 Tsuyoshi Kasama,1 Takeo Isozaki,1,2 Masayu Umemura,1 Kumiko Otsuka,1 Sakiko Isojima,1 Hiroyuki Tsukamoto,1 TakehiroTokunaga,1 Ryo Yanai,1 Ryo Takahashi11Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Showa University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; 2Department of Rheumatology,University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, USAAbstract: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a significant cause of work disability and job loss. The resulting economic burden experienced by patients has received considerable research attention. This research assesses the effect of tumor necrosis factor (TNF antagonists (infliximab, etanercept on the ability of RA patients living in Japan to work and participate in society. A total of 42 patients with active RA were enrolled and given biological therapy for 12 months (mo. Of these patients, 14 were employed full-time, 6 were employed part-time, and 22 were not employed. Twenty-six patients were given infliximab, and sixteen were given etanercept. The amount of domestic labor performed before the biologics served as a baseline and was assigned a value of 0%. After treatment with biologics, the productivity was evaluated using the visual analog scale (VAS; −100 to +100 mm. The administration of TNF antagonists to RA patients who exhibited an insufficient response to medical treatment significantly improved the Disease Activity Score 28 (DAS 28 after both 6 mo and 12 mo (P < 0.0001. A significant correlation was found between the improvement in their DAS 28 and improvements in their work situation (Productivity VAS (P < 0.05. Of particular interest is the significant correlation between the values of baseline mHAQ and the percent changes of Productivity VAS that was observed after 6 mo and 12 mo (P < 0.05. Our findings indicate that medical treatment of RA with TNF antagonists improves the patients' ability to perform their jobs and housekeeping. Because loss of productivity is an important

  9. Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction: The effects of montelukast, a leukotriene receptor antagonist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P Kemp

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available James P KempClinical Professor of Pediatrics, Division of Immunology and Allergy, University of California School of Medicine, San Diego, CA, USAAbstract: Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB is very common in both patients with asthma and those who are otherwise thought to be normal. The intensity of exercise as well as the type of exercise is important in producing symptoms. This may make some types of exercise such as swimming more suitable and extended running more difficult for patients with this condition. A better understanding of EIB will allow the physician to direct the patient towards a type of exercise and medications that can result in a more active lifestyle without the same concern for resulting symptoms. This is especially important for schoolchildren who are usually enrolled in physical education classes and elite athletes who may desire to participate in competitive sports. Fortunately several medications (short- and long-acting β2-agonists, cromolyn, nedocromil, inhaled corticosteroids, and more recently leukotriene modifiers have been shown to be effective in preventing or attenuating the effects of exercise in many patients. In addition, inhaled β2-agonists have been shown to quickly reverse the airway obstruction that develops in patients and continue to be the reliever medications of choice. Inhaled corticosteroids are increasingly being recommended as regular therapy now that the role of inflammation and airway injury has been identified in EIB. With the discovery that there is a release of mediators such as histamine and leukotrienes from cells in the airway following exercise with resulting airway obstruction in susceptible individuals, interest has turned to attenuating their effects with mediator antagonists especially those that block the effects of leukotrienes. Studies with an oral leukotriene antagonist, montelukast, have shown beneficial effects in adults and children aged as young as 6 years with EIB

  10. Effects of the bradykinin antagonist B4310 on smooth muscles and blood pressure in the rat, and its enzymatic degradation.

    OpenAIRE

    Griesbacher, T; Lembeck, F.; Saria, A.

    1989-01-01

    1. Six competitive bradykinin (Bk) antagonists were tested for their agonistic properties on the rat uterus. Five of these peptides showed agonistic effects only at concentrations at least two orders of magnitude higher than those of bradykinin. 2. The antagonistic potency of Lys-Lys-3-Hyp-5,8-Thi-7-DPhe-Bk (B4310) in the rat uterus (pA2 = 7.24) and in the rat duodenum (pA2 = 7.31) was very similar to that determined in an earlier study for the antagonism of the bradykinin-induced stimulation...

  11. Effects of the H(2)-receptor antagonist ranitidine on gastric motor function after a liquid meal in healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jan Lysgård; Graff, J

    2008-01-01

    Objective. Studies on animals have shown that histamine may be involved in the regulation of gastrointestinal smooth muscle tone. However, the role of histamine in the regulation of human gastric motor function is not clear. This study examined the effect of ranitidine, an H(2)-receptor antagonist...

  12. Effects of the H2-receptor antagonist ranitidine on gastric motor function after a liquid meal in healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, J.L.; Graff, J.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Studies on animals have shown that histamine may be involved in the regulation of gastrointestinal smooth muscle tone. However, the role of histamine in the regulation of human gastric motor function is not clear. This study examined the effect of ranitidine, an H(2)-receptor antagonist...

  13. How synergistic or antagonistic effects may influence the mutual hazard ranking of chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Carlsen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The presence of various agents, including humic materials, nanomaterials, microplastics, or simply specific chemical compounds, may cause changes in the apparent persistence, bioaccumulation, and/or toxicity (PBT of a chemical compound leading to an either increased or decreased PBT characteristics and thus an increased or decreased hazard evaluation. In the present paper, a series chloro-containing obsolete pesticides is studied as an illustrative example. Partial order methodology is used to quantify how changed P, B, or T characteristics of methoxychlor (MEC influences the measure of the hazard of MEC, relative to the other 11 compounds in the series investigated. Not surprisingly, an increase in one of the three indicators (P, B, or T lead to an increased average order and thus an increased relative hazard as a result of a synergistic effect. A decrease in one of the indicator values analogously causes a decreased average order/relative hazard through an antagonistic effect; the effect, however, being less pronounced. It is further seen that the effect of changing the apparent value of the three indicators is different. Thus, persistence apparently is more important that bioaccumulation which again appears more important than toxicity, which is in agreement with previous work. The results are discussed with reference to the European chemicals framework on registration, evaluation and authorization of chemicals (REACH framework.

  14. Comparison of regulatory framework among bench marking countries for improving regulatory effectiveness in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowadays some of developing countries in Asian region are announcing their planning to embark the nuclear power program. This progression are rising due to four factor: increasing political instabilities in fossil-fuel exporting countries; declining domestic natural energy resources; growing concerns about greenhouse gas emissions; and increasing demand for electricity. This paper gives a study on the comparison between Canada, Republic of South Korea and Malaysia regarding to their regulatory framework as well as the licensing procedures in controlling the nuclear power plants establishment. Canada and Korea were selected to study because of both of the countries have different system in controlling the nuclear power plants in terms of its regulatory framework as well as the licensing process. The idea is to compare these countries along with the guidelines by the IAEA and to find out what Malaysia could be learn to start the nuclear power program and find out the best practice in nuclear licensing. Factors taken into consideration are the regulatory framework, especially the nature of the licensing authority, the licensing process and enforcement actions. Together, these give a way to evaluate the effectiveness of the regulatory body due to the licensing authorization of nuclear power plant

  15. The effect of calcium antagonists on atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) release from the rat heart during rapid cardiac pacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doubell, A F

    1989-05-01

    The diuresis associated with rapid atrial rhythms is a well recognized clinical entity (Wood, 1963). Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) levels are elevated during rapid atrial rhythms (Hirata et al., 1987), including during rapid atrial pacing (Rankin et al., 1986; Schiebinger and Linden 1986; Walsh et al., 1987), and may contribute to the associated diuresis. Calcium channel antagonists are often used to treat atrial tachycardias but the effect this may have on ANP secretion and subsequent compensatory responses, such as a diuresis, is unknown. Reported here are experiments demonstrating that the increase in ANP secretion that accompanies rapid atrial pacing of the isolated perfused rat heart is abolished by calcium channel antagonists. This effect is not limited to a single class of calcium channel antagonists and could be demonstrated with Verapamil and Nifedipine. Although extrapolation to the in vivo situation should always be done with care, the results reported here contribute towards clarifying the effect of the calcium channel antagonists on the ANP response to rapid heart rates. PMID:2528639

  16. Effects of β2-Adrenergic Antagonist on Cytosolic Ca2+ in Ventricular Myocytes from Infarcted Rat Heart

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Hui; Wu Wei; Zeng Chong; Deng Chunyu; Fang Chang; Chen Shanming

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the effects of β2-adrenergic antagonist on cytosolic Ca2 +([Ca2+]i) in ventricular myocytes from infarcted rat heart. Methods A ligature was placed around left anterior descending coronary artery of rat hearts. Rats in the control group were sham-operated.Cardiomyocytes were dissociated at two, four, eight weeks after myocardial infarction (MI) and [Ca2+]i was measured via fura-2 fluorescence. The response of cardiomyocytes to isoproterenol in presence or absenceof beta1-adrenergic antagonist atenolol, beta2-adrenergic antagonist ICI118, 551 or non-selective β1,2- adrenergic antagonists propranolol was examined.Results The followings were found that ICI11 8, 551 had no significant effects on the rise of [Ca2+]i induced by isoproterenol in normal ventricular myocytes (P >0.05), ICI118, 551 only significantly attenuated the rise of [Ca2+]i induced by isoproterenol at four weeks and eight weeks after MI (24.5% ±5.7% vs 57.8% ±13.2%, P< 0.01; 12.2%±7.9% vs 44.6%±11.3%, P<0.01). Atenolol had suppressive effects only in the control group and the post-MI group of two weeks (P<0.05), and propranolol had suppressive effects in the control and all the three post-MI groups (P<0.01).Conclusions Beta2-adrenergic antagonist ICI118,551 may exert negative effects on Ca2+ overload initiated by sympathetic stimulation after MI.

  17. Antagonistic effect of Lactobacillus strains against gas-producing coliforms isolated from colicky infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oggero Roberto

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infantile colic is a common disturb within the first 3 months of life, nevertheless the pathogenesis is incompletely understood and treatment remains an open issue. Intestinal gas production is thought to be one of the causes of abdominal discomfort in infants suffering from colic. However, data about the role of the amount of gas produced by infants' colonic microbiota and the correlation with the onset of colic symptoms are scanty. The benefit of supplementation with lactobacilli been recently reported but the mechanisms by which they exert their effects have not yet been fully defined. This study was performed to evaluate the interaction between Lactobacillus spp. strains and gas-forming coliforms isolated from stools of colicky infants. Results Strains of coliforms were isolated from stools of 45 colicky and 42 control breastfed infants in McConkey Agar and identified using PCR with species-specific primers, and the BBL™ Enterotube™ II system for Enterobacteriaceae. Gas-forming capability of coliforms was assessed in liquid cultures containing lactose as sole carbon source. The average count of total coliforms in colicky infants was significantly higher than controls: 5.98 (2.00-8.76 log10 vs 3.90 (2.50-7.10 CFU/g of faeces (p = 0.015. The following strains were identified: Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Klebsiella oxytoca, Enterobacter aerogenes, Enterobacter cloacae and Enterococcus faecalis. Then, 27 Lactobacillus strains were tested for their antagonistic effect against coliforms both by halo-forming method and in liquid co-cultures. Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp.delbrueckii DSM 20074 and L. plantarum MB 456 were able to inhibit all coliforms strains (halo-forming method, also in liquid co-cultures, thus demonstrating an antagonistic activity. Conclusions This study shows that two out of 27 strains of Lactobacillus examined possess an antimicrobial effect against six species of gas-forming coliforms

  18. Rigidified 2-aminopyrimidines as histamine H4 receptor antagonists: effects of substitution about the rigidifying ring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, John R; Liu, Huaqing; Drizin, Irene; Witte, David G; Carr, Tracy L; Manelli, Arlene M; Milicic, Ivan; Strakhova, Marina I; Miller, Thomas R; Esbenshade, Timothy A; Brioni, Jorge D; Cowart, Marlon

    2010-03-15

    Three novel series of histamine H(4) receptor (H(4)R) antagonists containing the 2-aminopyrimidine motif are reported. The best of these compounds display good in vitro potency in both functional and binding assays. In addition, representative compounds are able to completely block itch responses when dosed ip in a mouse model of H(4)-agonist induced scratching, thus demonstrating their activities as H(4)R antagonists. PMID:20171098

  19. Regulatory fit effects on perceived fiscal exchange and tax compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leder, Susanne; Mannetti, Lucia; Hölzl, Erik; Kirchler, Erich

    2010-04-01

    Paying taxes can be considered a contribution to the welfare of a society. But even though tax payments are redistributed to citizens in the form of public goods and services, taxpayers often do not perceive many benefits from paying taxes. Information campaigns about the use of taxes for financing public goods and services could increase taxpayers' understanding of the importance of taxes, strengthen their perception of fiscal exchange and consequently also increase tax compliance. Two studies examined how fit between framing of information and taxpayers' regulatory focus affects perceived fiscal exchange and tax compliance. Taxpayers should perceive the exchange between tax payments and provision of public goods and services as higher if information framing suits their regulatory focus. Study 1 supported this hypothesis for induced regulatory focus. Study 2 replicated the findings for chronic regulatory focus and further demonstrated that regulatory fit also affects tax compliance. The results provide further evidence for findings from previous studies concerning regulatory fit effects on tax attitudes and extend these findings to a context with low tax morale. PMID:20890461

  20. Bidirectional effect of Wnt signaling antagonist DKK1 on the modulation of anthrax toxin uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, LiLi; Cai, ChangZu; Yuan, PengFei; Jeong, Sun-Young; Yang, XiaoZhou; Dealmeida, Venita; Ernst, James; Costa, Michael; Cohen, Stanley N; Wei, WenSheng

    2014-05-01

    LRP6, a co-receptor for the morphogen Wnt, aids endocytosis of anthrax complexes. Here we report that Dickkopf1 (DKK1) protein, a secreted LRP6 ligand and antagonist, is also a modulator of anthrax toxin sensitivity. shRNA-mediated gene silencing or TALEN-mediated gene knockout of DKK1 reduced sensitivity of cells to PA-dependent hybrid toxins. However, unlike the solely inhibitory effect on Wnt signaling, the effects of DKK1 overexpression on anthrax toxicity were bidirectional, depending on its endogenous expression and cell context. Fluorescence microscopy and biochemical analyses showed that DKK1 facilitates internalization of anthrax toxins and their receptors, an event mediated by DKK1-LRP6-Kremen2 complex. Monoclonal antibodies against DKK1 provided dose-dependent protection to macrophages from killing by anthrax lethal toxin (LT). Our discovery that DKK1 forms ternary structure with LRP6 and Kremen2 in promoting PA-mediated toxin internalization provides a paradigm for bacterial exploitation of mechanisms that host cells use to internalize signaling proteins. PMID:24671437

  1. Effect of GABAB Receptor Antagonist (CGP35348 on Learning and Memory in Albino Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quratulane Gillani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to demonstrate the potential effect of CGP 35348 (GABAB receptor antagonist on the learning, memory formation, and neuromuscular coordination in albino mouse. Mice were intrapertoneally injected with 1 mg CGP 35348/mL of distilled water/Kg body weight, while the control animals were injected with equal volume of saline solution. A battery of neurological tests was applied following the intrapertoneal injections. Results of rota rod indicated that CGP 35348 had no effect on neuromuscular coordination in both male (P=0.528 and female (P=0.125 albino mice. CGP 35348 treated females demonstrated poor exploratory behavior during open filed for several parameters (time mobile (P=0.04, time immobile (P=0.04, rotations (P=0.04, and anticlockwise rotations (P=0.038. The results for Morris water maze (MWM retention phase indicated that CGP 35348 treated male mice took shorter latency to reach the hidden platform (P=0.04 than control indicating improved memory. This observation was complemented by the swim strategies used by mice during training days in MWM as CGP 35348 treated males used more direct and focal approach to reach the platform as the training proceeded.

  2. The Safety Culture of an Effective Nuclear Regulatory Body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fundamental objective of all nuclear safety regulatory bodies is to ensure that activities related to the peaceful use of nuclear energy are carried out in a safe manner within their respective countries. In order to effectively achieve this objective, the nuclear regulatory body requires specific characteristics, one of which is a healthy safety culture. This regulatory guidance report describes five principles that support the safety culture of an effective nuclear regulatory body. These principles concern leadership for safety, individual responsibility and accountability, co-operation and open communication, a holistic approach, and continuous improvement, learning and self-assessment. The report also addresses some of the challenges to a regulatory body's safety culture that must be recognised, understood and overcome. It provides a unique resource to countries with existing, mature regulators and can be used for benchmarking as well as for training and developing staff. It will also be useful for new entrant countries in the process of developing and maintaining an effective nuclear safety regulator. (authors)

  3. Effects of different doses of four antagonists on their dopamine D2 receptor occupancy in rat striatum in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: This study was to evaluate the effect of different doses of Haloperidol, Spiperone, (s)-IBZM and (s)-Sulpiride on their dopamine D2 receptor occupancy in rat striatum in vivo. Methods: One hundred rats were divided into four groups, which were subdivided into five subgroups. Using different doses of the four antagonists respectively performed in vivo competitive inhibition experiment of 125I-IBZM, and the receptor occupancy was estimated. Results: The specific binding of 125I-IBZM can be inhibited competitively by dopamine D2 receptor antagonist respectively. The OC50 values of Haloperidol, spiperone, (s)-IBZM and (s)-Sulpiride are 21.0, 9.4, 22.0 and 1605 nmol/rat respectively. For the four antagonists, a dose-dependent relationship with their striatum D2 receptor occupancy has been demonstrated in some range. Conclusion: The results of this study suggested that radio-iodinated IBZM can be used for SPECT imaging of dopamine D2 receptors in human brain. For the four antagonists, the dose-dependent occupation of striatal D2 binding sites can be benefit for optimizing the therapeutic dose of typical neuroleptic agents

  4. INTRACEREBROVENTRICULAR APPLICATION OF COMPETITIVE AND NONCOMPETITIVE NMDA ANTAGONISTS INDUCE SIMILAR EFFECTS UPON RAT HIPPOCAMPAL ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAM AND LOCAL CEREBRAL GLUCOSE-UTILIZATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BODDEKE, HWGM; WIEDERHOLD, KH; PALACIOS, JM

    1992-01-01

    In this study we have used electrophysiological and metabolic markers to investigate the effects of competitive and non-competitive NMDA antagonists in rats after central or peripheral administration. The non-competitive antagonist, MK-801, induced dose-dependent suppression of rat hippocampal EEG e

  5. Effects of dopamine D4 receptor antagonist on spontaneous alternation in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lind Nanna M

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present study was a component of a series of studies scrutinising the neuroreceptor substrate of behavioural flexibility in a rat model. Spontaneous alternation paradigms model the natural tendency of rodents to spontaneously and flexibly shift between alternative spatial responses. In the study it was tested for the first time if the neurochemical substrate mediating spontaneous alternation behaviour includes the dopamine D4 receptor. Methods The acute effects of the highly selective dopamine D4 receptor antagonist L-745,870 on rats' performance in a spontaneous alternation paradigm in a T-maze were examined. The paradigm was a food-rewarded continuous trial procedure performed for 20 trials. Results The spontaneous alternation rate was not affected by the doses of the drug administered (0.02 mg/kg; 0.2 mg/kg; 2 mg/kg, but the position bias of the group receiving the highest L-745,870 dose (2 mg/kg was significantly increased compared to the group that received the lowest dose (0.02 mg/kg. No significant effects on position bias were found compared to saline. The drug did not increase response perseveration. Conclusion The results show that the neural substrate mediating the spatial distribution of responses in the spontaneous alternation paradigm includes the D4 receptor. However, the statistically significant effect of L-745,870 on position bias was found comparing a high drug dose with a low drug dose, and not comparing the drug doses with saline. For the tested doses of L-745,870 the effect on position bias was not large enough to affect the alternation rate.

  6. Effect of gonadal hormones on hypophagic property of opioid antagonist Naloxone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gargate Ashwini R, Kulkarni Dushant V

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Studies have shown that hormonal fluctuations that occur over the estrous cycle in rats affect food intake. It is possible that estrogen affects food intake via Opioid system and other brain areas which are involved in regulation of food intake. Therefore it may affect the sensitivity of female rats to hypophagic effect of Opioid antagonist Naloxone. Testosterone in male rats also changes food intake. However, little is known about hoe these Gonadal hormones interact with Opioid receptors to modulate food intake. Objective: The aim of the study was to find out how Gonadal hormones affect hypophagic property of Naloxone. Methods: Basal food intake of 40 healthy adult females and 20 healthy adult male rats was recorded. Then they were injected intraperitoneally with Naloxone after fasting for 24 hrs. In female rats food intake was measured during different phases of the estrous cycle. All the rats were then subjected to gonadectomy. The food intake was measured after gonadectomy. The effect of Naloxone was also measured in deprivation paradigm after gonadectomy. Results: Female rats showed decreased food intake during proestrous and estrous phases. In female rats there was no hypophagia after Naloxone injection during these phases. Male rats showed hypophagia on Naloxone injection. Male rats showed increased food intake after gonadectomy. In female rats the increase in food intake was not significant when gonadectomy was done during metestrous and diestrous. However, Naloxone could induce hypophagia in all female rats after gonadectomy. Conclusion: Estrogen decreases food intake, it decreases sensitivity of female rats to hypophasic effects of Naloxone. Testosterone decreases food intake. Testosterone does not interfere with hypophagic effect of Naloxone.

  7. VIP and endothelin receptor antagonist: An effective combination against experimental pulmonary arterial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szema Anthony M

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH remains a therapeutic challenge, and the search continues for more effective drugs and drug combinations. We recently reported that deletion of the vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP gene caused the spontaneous expression of a PH phenotype that was fully corrected by VIP. The objectives of this investigation were to answer the questions: 1 Can VIP protect against PH in other experimental models? and 2 Does combining VIP with an endothelin (ET receptor antagonist bosentan enhance its efficacy? Methods Within 3 weeks of a single injection of monocrotaline (MCT, s.c. in Sprague Dawley rats, PAH developed, manifested by pulmonary vascular remodeling, lung inflammation, RV hypertrophy, and death within the next 2 weeks. MCT-injected animals were either untreated, treated with bosentan (p.o. alone, with VIP (i.p. alone, or with both together. We selected this particular combination upon finding that VIP down-regulates endothelin receptor expression which is further suppressed by bosentan. Therapeutic outcomes were compared as to hemodynamics, pulmonary vascular pathology, and survival. Results Treatment with VIP, every other day for 3 weeks, begun on the same day as MCT, almost totally prevented PAH pathology, and eliminated mortality for 45 days. Begun 3 weeks after MCT, however, VIP only partially reversed PAH pathology, though more effectively than bosentan. Combined therapy with both drugs fully reversed the pathology, while preventing mortality for at least 45 days. Conclusions 1 VIP completely prevented and significantly reversed MCT-induced PAH; 2 VIP was more effective than bosentan, probably because it targets a wider range of pro-remodeling pathways; and 3 combination therapy with VIP plus bosentan was more effective than either drug alone, probably because both drugs synergistically suppressed ET-ET receptor pathway.

  8. Conessine, an H3 receptor antagonist, alters behavioral and neurochemical effects of ethanol in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais-Silva, Gessynger; Ferreira-Santos, Mariane; Marin, Marcelo T

    2016-05-15

    Ethanol abuse potential is mainly due to its reinforcing properties, crucial in the transition from the recreational to pathological use. These properties are mediated by mesocorticolimbic and nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathways and neuroadaptations in these pathways seem to be responsible for addiction. Both pathways are modulated by other neurotransmitters systems, including neuronal histaminergic system. Among the histamine receptors, H3 receptor stands out due to its role in modulation of histamine and other neurotransmitters release. Thus, histaminergic system, through H3 receptors, may have an important role in ethanol addiction development. Aiming to understand these interactions, conessine, an H3 receptor antagonist, was given to mice subjected to the evaluation of ethanol-induced psychostimulation, ethanol CPP and quantification of norepinephrine, dopamine, serotonin and their metabolites in mesocorticolimbic and nigrostriatal pathways following acute ethanol treatment. Systemic conessine administration exacerbated ethanol effects on locomotor activity. Despite of conessine reinforcing effect on CPP, this drug did not alter acquisition of ethanol CPP. Ethanol treatment affects the serotoninergic neurotransmission in the ventral tegmental area, the dopaminergic neurotransmission in the pre-frontal cortex (PFC) and caudate-putamen nucleus (CPu) and the noradrenergic neurotransmission in the CPu. In the PFC, conessine blocked ethanol effects on dopaminergic and noradrenergic neurotransmission. The blockade of H3 receptors and ethanol seem to interact in the modulation of dopaminergic neurotransmission of nigrostriatal pathway, decreasing dopamine metabolites in substantia nigra. In conclusion, conessine was able to change psychostimulant effect of ethanol, without altering its reinforcing properties. This exacerbation of ethanol-induced psychostimulation would be related to alterations in dopaminergic neurotransmission in the nigrostriatal pathway. PMID

  9. Pathophysiology of the cysteinyl leukotrienes and effects of leukotriene receptor antagonists in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisgaard, H

    2001-01-01

    Cysteinyl leukotrienes, synthesized de novo from cell membrane phospholipids, are proinflammatory mediators that play an important role in the pathophysiology of asthma. These mediators are among the most potent of bronchoconstrictors and cause vasodilation, increased microvascular permeability, exudation of macromolecules and edema. The cysteinyl leukotrienes also have potent chemoattractant properties for eosinophils, causing an influx of eosinophils into the airway mucosa, which further fuels the inflammatory process. In addition, the cysteinyl leukotrienes are potent secretagogues and reduce ciliary motility, which may hinder mucociliary clearance. Asthmatic patients demonstrate increased production of cysteinyl leukotrienes during naturally occurring asthma and acute asthma attacks as well as after allergen and exercise challenge. The leukotriene receptor antagonists montelukast, zafirlukast and pranlukast inhibit bronchoconstriction in asthmatic patients undergoing allergen, exercise, cold air or aspirin challenge. They attenuate the hallmarks of asthmatic inflammation, including eosinophilia in the airway mucosa and peripheral blood. Moreover, exhaled nitric oxide concentrations, another correlate of airway inflammation, are decreased during montelukast treatment in children. Cysteinyl leukotriene synthesis is not blocked by corticosteroid therapy. This important observation suggests that the leukotriene receptor antagonists represent a novel therapeutic approach, one that may provide benefits that are additive with corticosteroid therapy. This supposition is supported by clinical observations that treatment with leukotriene receptor antagonists significantly improve asthma control when added to inhaled corticosteroid therapy. Moreover, the bronchodilator properties of the leukotriene receptor antagonists are additive with those of beta agonists. These data provide strong support for the use of leukotriene receptor antagonists for treating asthma. PMID

  10. Effects of the estrogen receptor antagonist fulvestrant on F344 rat prolactinoma models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Lei; Gao, Hua; Gui, Songbai; Bai, Giwei; Lu, Runchun; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Yazhuo

    2014-02-01

    The relationship between estrogen and prolactinoma is well documented. But the anti-tumor effects of a pure estrogen receptor antagonist fulvestrant on prolactinomas, especially in vivo, and the possible mechanisms are still unclear. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of fulvestrant and the involvement of the Wnt signaling pathway on rat prolactinoma models. Forty female F344 rat prolactinoma models were established by subcutaneous administration of 10 mg 17β-estradiol for 6 weeks. Rats were intramuscularly injected with fulvestrant (0, 0.5, 3, 20, 40 mg/kg), and tumor size, weight and serum prolactin (PRL) levels were evaluated before and after fulvestrant treatment at 3, 7 and 14 days. Expression of estrogen receptor α (ERα), β-catenin and Wnt inhibitory factor-1 (WIF-1) in prolactinomas was measured using quantitative PCR and western blotting, and methylation of the WIF-1 promoter was investigated using pyrosequencing. Tumor size, weight and serum PRL levels were inhibited in dose-dependent and time-dependent manners after fulvestrant treatments. β-catenin expression was downregulated but WIF-1 expression was upregulated following fulvestrant treatment. The methylation of the CpG site of the WIF-1 promoter was negatively correlated to the expression of WIF-1. In addition, the anti-cell proliferation of fulvestrant on GH3 cells was partly disrupted by Wnt signaling pathway agonist SB 216763. In conclusion, fulvestrant inhibited tumor proliferation and PRL secretion of prolactinomas via ERα, and the Wnt signaling pathway was involved in this anti-tumor effect. Therefore, fulvestrant may be a potential new drug for prolactinomas. PMID:24407733

  11. Effects of a farnesoid X receptor antagonist on hepatic lipid metabolism in primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Yuichiro; Shimada, Mitsuyuki; Miura, Shotaro; Adachi, Ryutaro; Tozawa, Ryuichi

    2014-01-15

    We aimed to elucidate the mechanism underlying the anti-dyslipidemic effect of compound-T3, a farnesoid X receptor antagonist, by investigating its effects on hepatic lipid metabolism in non-human primates. We administered lipid-lowering drugs for 7 days to cynomolgus monkeys receiving a high-fat diet, and subsequently measured the levels of lipid parameters in plasma, feces, and hepatic tissue fluids. Compound-T3 (0.3 and 3mg/kg p.o.) significantly decreased the plasma levels of non-high-density lipoprotein (non-HDL) cholesterol and apolipoprotein B in a dose-dependent manner. It also decreased the mRNA levels of hepatic small heterodimer partner-1, induced the mRNA expression of hepatic cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase, reduced hepatic cholesterol and triglyceride levels, increased fecal bile acid excretion, and upregulated the expression of hepatic low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor. Furthermore, compound-T3 significantly increased plasma HDL cholesterol and apolipoprotein A-I levels. The mRNA expression levels of hepatic apolipoprotein A-I tended to increase after compound-T3 treatment. Compound-T3 also induced accumulation of hepatic bile acids and decreased the mRNA expression levels of the hepatic bile acid export pump. The effects of cholestyramine (300mg/kg p.o.) on the plasma and hepatic lipid parameters were similar to those of compound-T3, and it increased fecal bile acid levels without causing accumulation of hepatic bile acids. These findings suggest that LDL receptor-mediated hepatic LDL incorporation due to cholesterol catabolism catalyzed by cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase decreases plasma non-HDL cholesterol levels. Upregulation of hepatic apolipoprotein A-I mRNA expression may partially contribute to the increase in HDL cholesterol levels mediated by compound-T3. PMID:24361308

  12. Effect of a D3 receptor antagonist on context-induced reinstatement of nicotine seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabioni, Pamela; Di Ciano, Patricia; Le Foll, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Despite the existence of several treatment options for smoking cessation, the rate of relapse after treatment is very high. We and others have proposed that targeting the dopamine D3 receptor (DRD3) may be a good strategy for treatment of nicotine dependence. In human participants, reintroduction to an environment previously associated with drug-taking may induce relapse. In animals, such phenomenon can be studied using the context-induced reinstatement paradigm. As the role of DRD3 in context-induced reinstatement of nicotine-seeking has not yet been explored, we investigated the effects of different doses of the selective DRD3 antagonist SB-277011-A on this reinstatement. Sprague-Dawley adult rats were first trained to self-administer nicotine and subsequently underwent extinction in a second context for 5-7 days. We evaluated the effect of 1, 3 or 10mg/kg of SB-277011-A administered prior to the reintroduction to the training context. We used two different designs: 1) a between-subjects design with a unique reinstatement test; and 2) a counterbalanced within-subjects design, with 4 reinstatement tests. Our findings indicate that, in the within-subjects design, the magnitude of responding induced by the context-induced reinstatement of nicotine seeking was robust during the first reinstatement test, but significantly decreased with repeated testing. SB-277011-A (10mg/kg) blocked context-induced reinstatement of nicotine-seeking at first exposure to the context (between-subjects design), but not after repeated context exposure which produced weaker reinstatement over days. Our results support a role for DRD3 mediating context-induced reinstatement of nicotine seeking, but these effects may not be sustained over time. Further studies should explore this in human participants for validation. PMID:26279138

  13. Cardiorespiratory effects of a 5HT2 antagonist (R51703) in awake and anesthetized dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, T J; McDonell, W N; Dyson, D H; Black, W D

    1996-01-01

    To investigate cardiorespiratory effects of an experimental 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor antagonist (R51703) with sedative properties, intramuscular doses of the drug were studied in 6 awake dogs of mixed breed, and in 6 anesthetized beagles. Two doses (0.2 and 0.4 mg/kg) of R51703 and a saline control were studied in the awake dogs using a randomized crossover trial. Subsequently, the higher dose of R51703 was included as a component of halothane anesthesia to determine whether the halothane sparing effect of R51703 produced a beneficial alteration of hemodynamic function. Data were obtained at equipotent halothane/R51703 (H/R) and halothane/saline (H/S) doses equivalent to 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 MAC. In awake dogs, heart rates tended to be lower in dogs sedated with R51703, significantly so at 30 min for both doses, and at 90 and 120 min for the 0.2 and 0.4 mg/kg doses, respectively (P conscious dogs and there was no evidence of respiratory depression. In the anesthetized dogs, at equipotent MAC, CI tended to be lower with H/R than with H/S, though the difference was not significant. Heart rate and stroke volume index also tended to be lower in the dogs treated with R51703, while systemic vascular resistance tended to be higher: these changes were not significant. Mean and SBP were higher at each MAC multiple in the H/R group. It was concluded that the halothane sparing effect of R51703 did not substantially improve hemodynamic function compared to the use of halothane alone at equipotent doses. PMID:8809379

  14. Physical exercise versus fluoxetine: antagonistic effects on cortical spreading depression in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirelle Costa Monteiro, Heloísa; Lima Barreto-Silva, Nathália; Elizabete Dos Santos, Gracyelle; de Santana Santos, Amanda; Séfora Bezerra Sousa, Mariana; Amâncio-Dos-Santos, Ângela

    2015-09-01

    The antidepressant fluoxetine and physical exercise exert similar effects on the serotoninergic system by increasing brain serotonin availability, and both show antagonistic action on cortical excitability. Here we provide the first assessment of the interaction of the two together on cortical spreading depression (CSD) in young adult rats. Wistar rats (40-60 days of life) received fluoxetine (10mg/kg/d, orogastrically) or an equivalent volume of water. Half of the animals from each condition were assigned to perform physical exercise in a treadmill, and the other half formed the sedentary (non-treadmill) control groups. Body parameters (Lee index and thoracic and abdominal circumferences) and the velocity of CSD propagation were investigated. Fluoxetine+exercise animals had less weight gain (78.68±3.19g) than either the fluoxetine-only (93.34±4.77g) or exercise-only group (97.04±3.48g), but body parameters did not differ among them. The velocity of CSD propagation was reduced in the fluoxetine-only and exercise-only groups compared to sedentary water controls (3.24±0.39mm/min). For the fluoxetine+exercise group, CSD velocity values were significantly lower (2.92±0.22mm/min) than for fluoxetine only (3.03±0.35mm/min); however, they were similar to values for the exercise-only group (2.96±0.23mm/min). These findings confirm the similar effects of fluoxetine and exercise and suggest a greater effect of physical exercise in reducing brain excitability. PMID:26004534

  15. Effective regulatory control of radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides an overview of the situation in the USA regarding government control over use of radiation sources, the challenges it faces and the potential paths to their resolution. In the light of the large number of radiation sources in use worldwide, the safety record on balance is remarkably good. But there is still considerable room for improvement. The IAEA has an important role to play, and it is playing it effectively

  16. Calcium antagonistic effects of Bambusa Rigida investigated by 45Ca and its protection on myocardial ischemia of rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Rushan; YE Ling; YANG Yuanyou; LIAO Jiali; MO Shangwu; LIU Ning

    2008-01-01

    An investigation was conducted using 45Ca as a radioactive tracer to evaluate calcium antagonistic effects of several extracts from Bambusa Rigida in living rats. The relationship between the flavonoid and saccharide contents of Bambusa Rigida and calcium antagonistic effects were also analyzed. The protective effects of the alkali extracts ofBambusa Rigida on myocardial ischemia were investigated in living rats. The results indicated that the alkali extracts of Bambusa Rigida had a prominent influence on Ca2+ influx and efflux in the isolated rat aorta and heart, as they could obviously block 45Ca entering into cells and stimulate efflux of intracellular Ca2+. Moreover, the alkali extracts of Bambusa Rigida had favorable protective effects on myocardial ischemia induced either by isoproterenol injection (ISO) or by the ligation of coronary artery. These results implied that the Bambusa Rigida had attractive potential for the treatment of heart, cerebrovascular and other diseases. However, the conclusion that whether the flavonoid or saccharide in Bambusa Rigida affected the calcium antagonistic effects and Ca2+ channels or not was hard to make within the results of the investigation.

  17. Direct indicators of nuclear regulatory efficiency and effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The desired outcome of nuclear regulatory activities is the safe operation of nuclear facilities in a manner that protects public health and safety, and the environment. The operator has prime responsibility for safe operation; however, the actions of the regulator contribute to this objective. A task group was established by the NEA Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA) to develop a set of direct performance indicators of regulatory efficiency and effectiveness. This report describes the pilot project carried out by the task group to test the indicators developed, and makes some general observations about the usefulness of individual indicators as well as recommendations for future activities. While primarily directed at nuclear safety regulators, the report may also be of interest to government authorities, nuclear power plant operators and the general public. (author)

  18. Effects of H1-receptor antagonists on 14C-aminopyrine accumulated in histamine-stimulated rabbit gastric glands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After stimulation of gastric acid production there is a considerable delay before the acid starts to appear in the gastric lumen. The present study was carried out on isolated gastric glands to test the hypothesis that there may be a mechanisms in the parietal cell that contributes to this delay by preventing emptying of the secretory canaliculi. Glands were incubated with 14C-aminopyrine and stimulated with histamine. After accumulation of 14C-aminopyrine, various concentration of H1-receptor antagonists were added. Clemastine, promethazine, and hydroxyzine effectively and cetirizine and tripelennamine less effectively decreased the accumulated 14C-aminopyrine content in a dose-dependent manner without significantly reducing the oxygen consumption. The H1-receptor antagonists influenced the 14C-aminopyrine content in another manner than H2-receptor antagonists. No effects were obtained by atropine or lidocaine, indicating that the elimination of 14C-amionopyrine is not an inticholinergic effect or due to membrane effects as exerted by local anesthetics. Stimulation of glands by further addition of histamine did not significantly stimulate the uptake of 14C-aminopyrine in the glands, whereas stimulation with db-cAMP produced an increase that was most pronounced when low concentrations of hydroxyzine had been used. It is suggested that H1-receptor antagonists do not inhibit stimulation of acid production in the secretory canaliculi. They may, however, interfere with a mechanism preventing acid from leaving the parietal cell. Such a mechanism may contribute to the delay in appearance of acid in the gastric lumen after stimulation of gastric acid production. 37 refs., 7 figs

  19. Dehydration effects of a V2 antagonist on endolymphatic hydrops in guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egami, Naoya; Kakigi, Akinobu; Takeda, Taizo; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the influence of vasopressin type 2 receptor antagonist (OPC-41061; Tolvaptan) on experimentally induced endolymphatic hydrops (EH) in guinea pigs. In the first series, the endolymphatic sac (ES) of the left ear of all animals was electrocauterized. Four weeks after surgery, the animals were allocated to four groups: three systemic applications groups (saline, OPC 10 and 100 mg/kg) and a local round window (RW) OPC 1 mg/body application group. We examined the histopathology of the temporal bones and assessed volumetric changes of the endolymphatic space in the cochlea and saccule. In the second series, we investigated the effects of systemic and topical applications of OPC on plasma vasopressin (p-VP) concentrations and plasma osmolality (p-OSM). In the first series, we found that EH was reduced in the OPC 10 mg/kg systemic and OPC RW application groups. In contrast, EH increased in the OPC 100 mg/kg systemic application group. In the second series, neither p-VP levels nor p-OSM were significantly different among the non-OPC, OPC 10 mg/kg systemic, and OPC RW application groups. However, in the OPC 100 mg/kg systemic application group, the p-VP level was significantly higher than that in other groups, and p-OSM was higher than that in the non-OPC group. The systemic application of a low dose of OPC and topical application of OPC resulted in reduced EH in the face of minimal systemic effects (p-VP and p-OSM). These findings suggest that OPC-41061 may be one useful treatment option for EH. PMID:26719142

  20. Pathophysiology of the cysteinyl leukotrienes and effects of leukotriene receptor antagonists in asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, H

    2001-01-01

    ciliary motility, which may hinder mucociliary clearance. Asthmatic patients demonstrate increased production of cysteinyl leukotrienes during naturally occurring asthma and acute asthma attacks as well as after allergen and exercise challenge. The leukotriene receptor antagonists montelukast, zafirlukast...... provide benefits that are additive with corticosteroid therapy. This supposition is supported by clinical observations that treatment with leukotriene receptor antagonists significantly improve asthma control when added to inhaled corticosteroid therapy. Moreover, the bronchodilator properties of the......Cysteinyl leukotrienes, synthesized de novo from cell membrane phospholipids, are proinflammatory mediators that play an important role in the pathophysiology of asthma. These mediators are among the most potent of bronchoconstrictors and cause vasodilation, increased microvascular permeability...

  1. Effects of Pranlukast, a Cysteinyl Leukotriene Antagonist, on Bronchial Responsiveness to Methacholine in Aspirin-Intolerant Asthmatics Treated with Corticosteroids

    OpenAIRE

    ISHIOKA Shinichi; Hozawa, Soichiro; Haruta, Yoshinori; Maeda, Akihiro; Tamagawa, Kotaro; Watanabe, Tetsuya; Hiyama, Keiko; Yamakido, Michio

    2000-01-01

    Cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLTs) are considered to be the most important mediator involved in the pathogenesis of aspirin-intolerant asthma (AIA). However, the role of cysLTs in the baseline condition of the pathophysiology of AIA when not exposed to non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) as well as that in the pathophysiology of aspirin-tolerant asthma remains to be elucidated. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of pranlukast, a potent, selective cysLT receptor antagonist, on bronchial...

  2. Therapeutic effects of TNF-α antagonist etanercept and methotrexate on antigen-induced arthritis of the temporomandibular joint

    OpenAIRE

    Rafayelyan, Smbat

    2015-01-01

    Background: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) can cause severe growth disturbances of the craniomandibular system. Antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) of the rabbit TMJ is simulating the inflammatory process of the TMJ in JIA. In the first two studies of the present thesis the effect of a systemic administration of the tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) antagonist etanercept and methotrexate (MTX) on AIA in young rabbits should be investigate...

  3. Antagonist effect of Interleukin 1 receptor on normal thymopoiesis and thymus toxicity of 5-azacytidine in mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Hongjing; Wu, Mingyuan; Wen, Bin; Sun, Ningyun; Xiang, Di; Zhang, Jing; Zhu, Shunying; Weng, Shunyan; Yu, Yan; HAN, WEI

    2016-01-01

    Thymopoiesis is essential and significant for development and maintenance of the robust and healthy immune system. The acute suppression of thymopoiesis induced by 5-Azacytidine (5-Aza) is an intractable clinical problem complicating chemotherapy. Interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) is a cytokine that competitively blocks binding of interleukin 1 (IL-1) to its receptor. This study aims to investigate the effects of the IL-1Ra on the thymus toxicity of 5-Aza in mouse. In this study, we ...

  4. The Effect of Antagonistic Pleiotropy on the Estimation of the Average Coefficient of Dominance of Deleterious Mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández, B.; García-Dorado, A; Caballero, A.

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the impact of antagonistic pleiotropy on the most widely used methods of estimation of the average coefficient of dominance of deleterious mutations from segregating populations. A proportion of the deleterious mutations affecting a given studied fitness component are assumed to have an advantageous effect on another one, generating overdominance on global fitness. Using diffusion approximations and transition matrix methods, we obtain the distribution of gene frequencies for n...

  5. The effect of antagonistic pleiotropy on the estimation of the average coefficient of dominance of deleterious mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, B; García-Dorado, A; Caballero, A

    2005-12-01

    We investigate the impact of antagonistic pleiotropy on the most widely used methods of estimation of the average coefficient of dominance of deleterious mutations from segregating populations. A proportion of the deleterious mutations affecting a given studied fitness component are assumed to have an advantageous effect on another one, generating overdominance on global fitness. Using diffusion approximations and transition matrix methods, we obtain the distribution of gene frequencies for nonpleiotropic and pleiotropic mutations in populations at the mutation-selection-drift balance. From these distributions we build homozygous and heterozygous chromosomes and assess the behavior of the estimators of dominance. A very small number of deleterious mutations with antagonistic pleiotropy produces substantial increases on the estimate of the average degree of dominance of mutations affecting the fitness component under study. For example, estimates are increased three- to fivefold when 2% of segregating loci are over-dominant for fitness. In contrast, strengthening pleiotropy, where pleiotropic effects are assumed to be also deleterious, has little effect on the estimates of the average degree of dominance, supporting previous results. The antagonistic pleiotropy model considered, applied under mutational parameters described in the literature, produces patterns for the distribution of chromosomal viabilities, levels of genetic variance, and homozygous mutation load generally consistent with those observed empirically for viability in Drosophila melanogaster. PMID:16118193

  6. The effects of angiotensin II receptor antagonist (candesartan on rat renal vascular resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supatraviwat, J

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to investigate the action of angiotensin II (AII on renal perfusion pressure and renal vascular resistance using noncompetitive AT1-receptor antagonist (candesartan or CV 11974. Experiments were performed in isolated kidney of adult male Wistar rats. Kreb's Henseleit solution was perfused into the renal artery at the rate of 3.5 ml/min. This flow rate was designed in order to maintain renal perfusion pressure between 80-120 mm Hg. Dose-response relationship between perfusion flow rate and AII concentration were studied. Renal perfusion pressure in response to 1, 10 and 100 nM AII were increased from basal perfusion pressure of 94±8 mm Hg to 127±6, 157±12 and 190±16 mm Hg, respectively. Administration of perfusate containing 11.4 μM candesartan for 30 min had no effect on the basal perfusion pressure. However, this significantly reduced renal perfusion pressure in the presence of AII (1, 10 and 100 nM by 39%, 47% and 61%, (n=7, P<0.05 respectively. At the basal perfusion pressure, calculated renal vascular resistance was 27±2 mm Hg · min · ml-1. However, the vascular resistance were found to be 41±1, 45±2 and 47±2 mm Hg · min · ml-1 when 1, 10 and 100 nM AII were added. Moreover, this dose of candesartan also showed a significant decrease in renal vascular resistance at the corresponding doses of AII by 38%, 48% and 43%, (n=7, P<0.05 respectively. The higher dose of candesartan (22.7 μM completely inhibited the action of 1, 10 and 100 nM AII on renal vasoconstriction. These results may indicate that the action of AII on renal vascular resistance is via AT1-receptor, at least in rat isolated perfusion kidney.

  7. I. Effects of a Dopamine Receptor Antagonist on Fathead Minnow, Pimephales promelas ,Reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study used a 21 d fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) reproduction assay to test the hypothesis that exposure to the dopamine 2 receptor (D2R) antagonist, haloperidol, would impair fish reproduction. Additionally, a 96 h experiment with fathead minnows and zebrafish (Danio ...

  8. The effects of the CXCR2 antagonist, MK-7123, on bone marrow functions in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hastrup, Nina; Khalilieh, Sauzanne; Dale, David C.;

    2015-01-01

    cells; or bone marrow fat to cell balance as assessed by MRI. MK-7123 was generally well tolerated with neutropenia being the most common adverse event; however, there were no clinical symptoms associated with decreased ANCs. These findings indicate that the CXCR2 antagonist MK-7123 causes rapidly...

  9. A cross-laboratory preclinical study on the effectiveness of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist in stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maysami, Samaneh; Wong, Raymond; Pradillo, Jesus M; Denes, Adam; Dhungana, Hiramani; Malm, Tarja; Koistinaho, Jari; Orset, Cyrille; Rahman, Mahbubur; Rubio, Marina; Schwaninger, Markus; Vivien, Denis; Bath, Philip M; Rothwell, Nancy J; Allan, Stuart M

    2016-03-01

    Stroke represents a global challenge and is a leading cause of permanent disability worldwide. Despite much effort, translation of research findings to clinical benefit has not yet been successful. Failure of neuroprotection trials is considered, in part, due to the low quality of preclinical studies, low level of reproducibility across different laboratories and that stroke co-morbidities have not been fully considered in experimental models. More rigorous testing of new drug candidates in different experimental models of stroke and initiation of preclinical cross-laboratory studies have been suggested as ways to improve translation. However, to our knowledge, no drugs currently in clinical stroke trials have been investigated in preclinical cross-laboratory studies. The cytokine interleukin 1 is a key mediator of neuronal injury, and the naturally occurring interleukin 1 receptor antagonist has been reported as beneficial in experimental studies of stroke. In the present paper, we report on a preclinical cross-laboratory stroke trial designed to investigate the efficacy of interleukin 1 receptor antagonist in different research laboratories across Europe. Our results strongly support the therapeutic potential of interleukin 1 receptor antagonist in experimental stroke and provide further evidence that interleukin 1 receptor antagonist should be evaluated in more extensive clinical stroke trials. PMID:26661169

  10. No effect of angiotensin II AT(2)-receptor antagonist PD 123319 on cerebral blood flow autoregulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Estrup, T M; Paulson, O B; Strandgaard, S

    2001-01-01

    Blockade of the renin-angiotensin system with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I) or angiotensin AT1-receptor antagonists shift the limits of autoregulation of cerebral blood flow (CBF) towards lower blood pressure (BP). The role of AT2-receptors in the regulation of the cerebral cir...

  11. "Synthesis and smooth muscle Calcium channel antagonist effects of new derivatives of 1,4-Dihydropyridine containing Nitroimidazol substituent "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miri R

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available A group of racemic 3-[(2-hydroxyethyl, (2-Methoxyethyl, (2-acetylethyl or (2-cyanoethyl], 5- methyl, ethyl or isopropyl-1, 4-dihydro-2, 6-dimethyl-4-(1-methyl-5-nitro-2-imidazolyl-3, 5-pyridinedicarboxylates [XIV-XXV] were prepared by the reaction of 1-methyl-5-nitroimidazol-2-carboxaldehyde [X] with acetoacetic esters [VI-IX] and alkys 3-aminocrotonate [XI-XIII]. In vitro calcium channel antagonist activities of the tested compounds were determined by their effects on contraction of Guinea Pig Ileal Longitudinal Smooth Muscle (GPILSM which was induced by carbacol (1.67 χ 10^-7 M. All compounds exhibited calcium channel antagonist activity (IC50=10^-12 to 10^-13 M range comparable to nifedipine as reference drug (IC50=1.07±0.12x 10^-11 M.

  12. The effects of dopamine D3 agonists and antagonists in a nonhuman primate model of tardive dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Peter; Andersen, Maibritt B; Peacock, Linda

    2004-08-01

    Tardive dyskinesia (TD), a serious complication of antipsychotic dopamine (DA) antagonist treatment, has been hypothesised to develop due to a dominant DA D1 relative to DA D2 receptor function. Recent genetic and pharmacological studies implicate the DA D3 receptor in TD. The present study examined the role of the DA D3 receptor in relation to the DA D1/D2 imbalance hypothesis of TD in nonhuman primates. Eight Cebus monkeys displaying mild to severe TD due to previous chronic exposure to DA D2 antagonists were acutely injected with SKF 81297 (DA D1 agonist) 0.3 and 0.6 mg/kg, pramipexole (DA D3>D2 agonist) 0.025-0.1 mg/kg, CIS-8-OH-PBZI (DA D3 agonist) 5-10 mg/kg and SB-27701-A (DA D3 antagonist) 1-5 mg/kg and rated for oral dyskinesia. SKF 81297, 0.3 and 0.6 mg/kg, exacerbated TD. Pramipexole and CIS-8-OH-PBZI reduced SKF 81297-induced TD, while SB-27701-A had no effect. When administered alone, SB-27701-A increased TD relative to placebo, while pramipexole and CIS-8-OH-PBZI had no significant effect. Pramipexole did, however, ameliorate TD in those monkeys with severe TD. These results point towards a role of the DA D3 receptor in TD, but indicate that the DA D2 receptor may also play an essential role. PMID:15301939

  13. Differential effects of m1 and m2 receptor antagonists in perirhinal cortex on visual recognition memory in monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei; Saunders, Richard C; Mishkin, Mortimer; Turchi, Janita

    2012-07-01

    Microinfusions of the nonselective muscarinic antagonist scopolamine into perirhinal cortex impairs performance on visual recognition tasks, indicating that muscarinic receptors in this region play a pivotal role in recognition memory. To assess the mnemonic effects of selective blockade in perirhinal cortex of muscarinic receptor subtypes, we locally infused either the m1-selective antagonist pirenzepine or the m2-selective antagonist methoctramine in animals performing one-trial visual recognition, and compared these scores with those following infusions of equivalent volumes of saline. Compared to these control infusions, injections of pirenzepine, but not of methoctramine, significantly impaired recognition accuracy. Further, similar doses of scopolamine and pirenzepine yielded similar deficits, suggesting that the deficits obtained earlier with scopolamine were due mainly, if not exclusively, to blockade of m1 receptors. The present findings indicate that m1 and m2 receptors have functionally dissociable roles, and that the formation of new visual memories is critically dependent on the cholinergic activation of m1 receptors located on perirhinal cells. PMID:22561485

  14. Antagonist properties of Conus parius peptides on N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and their effects on CREB signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailaja Kunda

    Full Text Available Three members of a family of small neurotoxic peptides from the venom of Conus parius, conantokins (Con Pr1, Pr2, and Pr3, function as antagonists of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR. We report structural characterizations of these synthetic peptides, and also demonstrate their antagonistic properties toward ion flow through NMDAR ion channels in primary neurons. ConPr1 and ConPr2 displayed moderate increases in α-helicity after addition of Mg(2+. Native apo-ConPr3 possessed an α-helical conformation, and the helicity increased only slightly on addition of Mg(2+. Additionally, these peptides diminished NMDA/Gly-mediated currents and intracellular Ca(2+ (iCa(2+ influx in mature rat primary hippocampal neurons. Electrophysiological data showed that these peptides displayed slower antagonistic properties toward the NMDAR than conantokins from other species of cone snails, e.g., ConT and ConG. Furthermore, to demonstrate selectivity of the C. parius-derived conantokins towards specific NMDAR subunits, cortical neurons from GluN2A(-/- and GluN2B(-/- mice were utilized. Robust inhibition of NMDAR-mediated stimulation in GluN2A(-/--derived mouse neurons, as compared to those isolated from GluN2B(-/--mouse brains, was observed, suggesting a greater selectivity of these antagonists towards the GluN2B subunit. These C. parius conantokins mildly inhibited NMDAR-induced phosphorylation of CREB at Ser(133, suggesting that the peptides modulated iCa(2+ entry and, thereby, activation of CREB, a transcription factor that is required for maintaining long-term synaptic activity. Our data mechanistically show that while these peptides effectively antagonize NMDAR-directed current and iCa(2+ influx, receptor-coupled CREB signaling is maintained. The consequence of sustained CREB signaling is improved neuronal plasticity and survival during neuropathologies.

  15. Selective adenosine A2A receptor agonists and antagonists protect against spinal cord injury through peripheral and central effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esposito Emanuela

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Permanent functional deficits following spinal cord injury (SCI arise both from mechanical injury and from secondary tissue reactions involving inflammation. Enhanced release of adenosine and glutamate soon after SCI represents a component in the sequelae that may be responsible for resulting functional deficits. The role of adenosine A2A receptor in central ischemia/trauma is still to be elucidated. In our previous studies we have demonstrated that the adenosine A2A receptor-selective agonist CGS21680, systemically administered after SCI, protects from tissue damage, locomotor dysfunction and different inflammatory readouts. In this work we studied the effect of the adenosine A2A receptor antagonist SCH58261, systemically administered after SCI, on the same parameters. We investigated the hypothesis that the main action mechanism of agonists and antagonists is at peripheral or central sites. Methods Spinal trauma was induced by extradural compression of SC exposed via a four-level T5-T8 laminectomy in mouse. Three drug-dosing protocols were utilized: a short-term systemic administration by intraperitoneal injection, a chronic administration via osmotic minipump, and direct injection into the spinal cord. Results SCH58261, systemically administered (0.01 mg/kg intraperitoneal. 1, 6 and 10 hours after SCI, reduced demyelination and levels of TNF-α, Fas-L, PAR, Bax expression and activation of JNK mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK 24 hours after SCI. Chronic SCH58261 administration, by mini-osmotic pump delivery for 10 days, improved the neurological deficit up to 10 days after SCI. Adenosine A2A receptors are physiologically expressed in the spinal cord by astrocytes, microglia and oligodendrocytes. Soon after SCI (24 hours, these receptors showed enhanced expression in neurons. Both the A2A agonist and antagonist, administered intraperitoneally, reduced expression of the A2A receptor, ruling out the possibility that the

  16. Effects of a newly developed potent orexin-2 receptor-selective antagonist, compound 1 m, on sleep/wakefulness states in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Keishi eEtori; Yuki eSaito; Natsuko eTsujino; Takeshi eSakurai

    2014-01-01

    Orexins (also known as hypocretins), which are hypothalamic neuropeptides, play critical roles in the regulation of sleep/wakefulness states by activating two G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), orexin 1 (OX1R) and orexin 2 receptors (OX2R). In order to know the difference between effects of OX2R-selective antagonists (2-SORA) and dual orexin receptor antagonists (DORA), and to understand the mechanisms underlying orexin-mediated regulation of sleep/wakefulness states, we examined the effect...

  17. Effect of glutamate antagonists on nitric oxide production in rat brain following intrahippocampal injection

    OpenAIRE

    Radenović Lidija; Selaković Vesna; Janać Branka; Todorović Dajana

    2007-01-01

    Stimulation of glutamate receptors induces neuronal nitric oxide (NO) release, which in turn modulates glutamate transmission. The involvement of ionotropic glutamate NMDA and AMPA/kainate receptors in induction of NO production in the rat brain was examined after injection of kainate, a non-NMDA receptor agonist; kainate plus 6-cyano- 7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX), a selective AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist; or kainate plus 2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (APV), a selective NMDA re...

  18. Transcriptomic insights into antagonistic effects of gibberellin and abscisic acid on petal growth in Gerbera hybrida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lingfei; Zhang, Wenbin; Zhang, Lili; Li, Na; Peng, Jianzong; Wang, Yaqin; Zhong, Chunmei; Yang, Yuping; Sun, Shulan; Liang, Shan; Wang, Xiaojing

    2015-01-01

    Petal growth is central to floral morphogenesis, but the underlying genetic basis of petal growth regulation is yet to be elucidated. In this study, we found that the basal region of the ray floret petals of Gerbera hybrida was the most sensitive to treatment with the phytohormones gibberellin (GA) and abscisic acid (ABA), which regulate cell expansion during petal growth in an antagonistic manner. To screen for differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and key regulators with potentially important roles in petal growth regulation by GA or/and ABA, the RNA-seq technique was employed. Differences in global transcription in petals were observed in response to GA and ABA and target genes antagonistically regulated by the two hormones were identified. Moreover, we also identified the pathways associated with the regulation of petal growth after application of either GA or ABA. Genes relating to the antagonistic GA and ABA regulation of petal growth showed distinct patterns, with genes encoding transcription factors (TFs) being active during the early stage (2 h) of treatment, while genes from the "apoptosis" and "cell wall organization" categories were expressed at later stages (12 h). In summary, we present the first study of global expression patterns of hormone-regulated transcripts in G. hybrida petals; this dataset will be instrumental in revealing the genetic networks that govern petal morphogenesis and provides a new theoretical basis and novel gene resources for ornamental plant breeding. PMID:25852718

  19. Antiproliferative effect of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH antagonist on ovarian cancer cells through the EGFR-Akt pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varga Jozsef

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antagonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH are being developed for the treatment of various human cancers. Methods MTT assay was used to test the proliferation of SKOV3 and CaOV3. The splice variant expression of GHRH receptors was examined by RT-PCR. The expression of protein in signal pathway was examined by Western blotting. siRNA was used to block the effect of EGFR. Results In this study, we investigated the effects of a new GHRH antagonist JMR-132, in ovarian cancer cell lines SKOV3 and CaOV3 expressing splice variant (SV1 of GHRH receptors. MTT assay showed that JMR-132 had strong antiproliferative effects on SKOV3 and CaOV3 cells in both a time-dependent and dose-dependent fashion. JMR-132 also induced the activation and increased cleaved caspase3 in a time- and dose-dependent manner in both cell lines. In addition, JMR-132 treatments decreased significantly the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR level and the phosphorylation of Akt (p-Akt, suggesting that JMR-132 inhibits the EGFR-Akt pathway in ovarian cancer cells. More importantly, treatment of SKOV3 and CaOV3 cells with 100 nM JMR-132 attenuated proliferation and the antiapoptotic effect induced by EGF in both cell lines. After the knockdown of the expression of EGFR by siRNA, the antiproliferative effect of JMR-132 was abolished in SKOV3 and CaOV3 cells. Conclusions The present study demonstrates that the inhibitory effect of the GHRH antagonist JMR-132 on proliferation is due, in part, to an interference with the EGFR-Akt pathway in ovarian cancer cells.

  20. Antagonistic effects of a covalently dimerized insulin derivative on insulin receptors in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Weiland, M; Brandenburg, C; Brandenburg, D.; Joost, H. G.

    1990-01-01

    In the present study we describe the antagonistic effects of the covalently dimerized insulin derivative B29,B29'-suberoyl-insulin on insulin receptors in 3T3-L1 mouse cells. In differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes, the derivative fully inhibits binding of 125I-labeled insulin to its receptor with about the same affinity as unlabeled insulin. In contrast, the dimerized derivative only partially (approximately 20%) mimics insulin's effects on glucose transport and DNA synthesis in the absence of i...

  1. In vitro radioprotective effects of histamine H2 receptor antagonists against gamma-rays induced chromosomal aberrations in human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Radioprotective capability of histamine H2 receptor antagonists have been shown in several in vivo studies mainly using animal models. However, to verify the effectiveness of these agents in clinical applications, studies should be performed on human lymphocytes using metaphase analysis. Materials and Methods: In vitro metaphase analysis technique was used to test the effects of cimetidine, ranitidine and famotidine on radiation induced clastogenic effects. Lymphocytes in whole peripheral blood were exposed to 3 Gy gamma-rays at a dose rate of 73.7 c Gy/min in the presence or absence of various doses of the drugs used in this study. The frequency of chromosomal aberrations were determined after standard metaphase preparations and staining slides in 5% Giemsa. Results: Results show that radiation produced a high number of chromosomal aberrations in lymphocytes compared to controls (p2-receptor antagonists used in this study effectively reduced the clastogenic effects of radiation with a dose reduction factor of 1.5-2 in human lymphocytes in vitro. The way in which these drugs reduce the clastogenic effects of radiation might be via radical scavenging mechanism

  2. Electrophysiological effects of Ca antagonists, tetrodotoxin, [Ca]o and [Na]o on myocardium of hibernating chipmunks: possible involvement of Na-Ca exchange mechanism.

    OpenAIRE

    Kondo, N

    1987-01-01

    The electrophysiological performance of myocardium of hibernating chipmunks was investigated in the presence of Ca antagonists and tetrodotoxin, and the effects of high [Ca]o and low [Na]o were examined. The action potential of the preparations was characterized by the low amplitude of the plateau phase (APp). Ca antagonists, nifedipine (10(-6) M) and nitrendipine (2 X 10(-6) M), did not significantly inhibit this APp or the contraction. These nifedipine-insensitive electromechanical response...

  3. Dopamine D3 Receptor Antagonist (GSK598809) Potentiates the Hypertensive Effects of Cocaine in Conscious, Freely-Moving Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel, Nathan M; Li, Shou-Hua; Holmes, Tyson H; Acri, Jane B

    2015-09-01

    The chronic and relapsing nature of addiction presents unique challenges for ensuring the safety of a potential medication. A patient may use cocaine, for example, while taking the medication or take more medication than prescribed. Thus, a potential medication must be safe and not exacerbate the effects of cocaine. Multiple published studies support antagonism of brain dopamine D3 receptor function as a potential mechanism of action for an anti-addiction medication. Dopamine D3 receptors are widely distributed outside the central nervous system, however; for example, dopamine D3 receptors in the kidneys are implicated in regulating blood pressure. The selective dopamine D3 receptor antagonist GSK598809 [1-(2-fluoro-4-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-3-{3-[4-methyl-5-(4-methyl-oxazol-5-yl)-4H-[1,2,4]triazol-3-ylsulfanyl]-propyl}-3-aza-bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane] has been proposed as a medication to treat cocaine and other substance use disorders. The US Food and Drug Administration has established guidelines recommending safety studies to investigate potential undesirable pharmacodynamic effects of a substance in relation to exposure in the therapeutic range and above. Hence, we assessed the interaction between this selective dopamine D3 receptor antagonist and cocaine on hemodynamics and cardiac function in freely-moving, telemetered dogs before conducting a clinical trial. GSK598809 increased the hemodynamic effect of cocaine in this model. Thus, the increase in blood pressure after intravenous cocaine was greater in animals that had been pretreated with GSK598809 compared with vehicle. This finding suggests that GSK598809 in particular, and perhaps dopamine D3 receptor antagonists as a class, may produce unacceptable cardiovascular risks as medications to treat cocaine use disorder. PMID:26177654

  4. 3-Methoxynaltrexone is not a selective antagonist for the acute psychomotor stimulating effects of heroin and 6-monoacetylmorphine in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksen, Guro Søe; Andersen, Jannike Mørch; Boix, Fernando; Mørland, Jørg

    2014-07-01

    The opioid receptor antagonist 3-methoxynaltrexone (3-MeONtx) has previously been shown in rodents to selectively reverse the analgesic actions of heroin and its metabolites 6-monoacetylmorphine (6-MAM), and morphine-6-glucuronide (M6G), but not that of morphine. Based on these and other results, a heroin/6-MAM/M6G μ-opioid receptor binding site or subreceptor mediating their analgesic activity has been proposed. It is however unknown whether this also accounts for the acute psychomotor stimulating properties of these opioids. The aim of the present study was therefore to explore if the acute psychomotor stimulating effects of heroin, 6-MAM, and morphine are mediated by distinct μ-opioid receptor binding sites or subreceptors. To address this aim, we examined how pretreatment with 3-MeONtx or naltrexone (NTX) affected the acute increase in locomotor activity induced by heroin, 6-MAM, or morphine in mice. The pharmacokinetic profiles of 3-MeONtx and NTX were also assessed in mouse brain. We found that 3-MeONtx similarly antagonized the acute increase in locomotor activity induced by equipotent doses of heroin, 6-MAM, or morphine. This antagonistic effect was comparable to the one observed following administration of NTX, and both antagonists gave similar pharmacokinetic profiles in mouse brain. Our findings do not support that different μ-opioid receptor subtypes or a distinct binding site at the μ-opioid receptor is involved in morphine-induced versus heroin/6-MAM-induced psychomotor activation. This might suggest that the opioid-induced psychomotor stimulation is mediated by different μ-opioid subreceptors than those responsible for their analgesic effects. PMID:24699386

  5. GABAB antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydenvang, Karla Andrea; Hansen, J J; Krogsgaard-Larsen, P;

    1994-01-01

    Phaclofen, which is the phosphonic acid analogue of the GABAB agonist (RS)-3-(4-chlorophenyl)-4-aminobutyric acid (baclofen), is a GABAB antagonist. As part of our studies on the structural requirements for activation and blockade of GABAB receptors, we have resolved phaclofen using chiral...... chromatographic techniques. The absolute stereochemistry of (-)-(R)-phaclofen was established by X-ray crystallographic analysis. (-)-(R)-Phaclofen was shown to inhibit the binding of [3H]-(R)-baclofen to GABAB receptor sites on rat cerebellar membranes (IC50 = 76 +/- 13 microM), whereas (+)-(S)-phaclofen was...... inactive in this binding assay (IC50 > 1000 microM). (-)-(R)-Phaclofen (200 microM) was equipotent with (RS)-phaclofen (400 microM) in antagonizing the action of baclofen in rat cerebral cortical slices, while (+)-(S)-phaclofen (200 microM) was inactive. The structural similarity of the agonist (R)-baclofen...

  6. Extended studies on the effect of glutamate antagonists on ischemic CA-1 damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diemer, Nils Henrik; Balchen, T; Bruhn, T;

    1996-01-01

    Glutamate receptors are numerous on the ischemia vulnerable CA-1 pyramidal cells. Postischemic use of the AMPA antagonist NBQX has shown up to 80% protection against cell death. Three aspects of this were studied: In the first study, male Wistar rats were given NBQX (30 mg/kg x 3) either 20 hours...... protection. In the third study referred here, two groups of ischemic rats were given NBQX (30 mg/kg x 3) immediately after ischemia. The groups survive for six and 21 days, respectively. Counting of CA-1 pyramidal cells showed an equal, significant protection in both groups (approx 20% cell loss)....

  7. CGP 35348, a new GABAB antagonist, prevents antinociception and muscle-relaxant effect induced by baclofen.

    OpenAIRE

    Malcangio, M.; Ghelardini, C.; Giotti, A.; Malmberg-Aiello, P.; Bartolini, A.

    1991-01-01

    1. CGP 35348, a new GABAB antagonist, was examined on antinociception induced by (+/-)-baclofen by use of the hot plate and writhing tests in mice and the paw pressure test in rats. CGP 35348 was also studied in mice on (+/-)-baclofen-induced impairment of rota-rod performance. 2. CGP 35348, injected either i.p. (60-100 mg kg-1 in mouse) or intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) (0.5-2.5 micrograms per mouse; 25 micrograms per rat) prevented (+/-)-baclofen-induced antinociception. 3. CGP 35348 di...

  8. A Selective Orexin-1 Receptor Antagonist Attenuates Stress-Induced Hyperarousal without Hypnotic Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Bonaventure, Pascal; Yun, Sujin; Johnson, Philip L.; Shekhar, Anantha; Fitz, Stephanie D.; Shireman, Brock T.; Lebold, Terry P.; Nepomuceno, Diane; Lord, Brian; Wennerholm, Michelle; Shelton, Jonathan; Carruthers, Nicholas; Lovenberg, Timothy; Dugovic, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Orexins (OXs) are peptides produced by perifornical (PeF) and lateral hypothalamic neurons that exert a prominent role in arousal-related processes, including stress. A critical role for the orexin-1 receptor (OX1R) in complex emotional behavior is emerging, such as overactivation of the OX1R pathway being associated with panic or anxiety states. Here we characterize a brain-penetrant, selective, and high-affinity OX1R antagonist, compound 56 [N-({3-[(3-ethoxy-6-methylpyridin-2-yl)carbonyl]-3...

  9. Effects of isradipine and other calcium antagonists on arteriovenous-shunt flow in anesthetized rabbits and cats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hof, R.P.

    1989-04-17

    The effects of vasodilators on arteriovenous (AV)-shunt flow was investigated in anesthetized cats and rabbits, using the tracer microsphere method. In cats, the calcium antagonist isradipine reduced AV-shunt flow; verapamil showed a similar tendency and nicardipine was without effect. Dihydralazine strongly increased, but nitroglycerin and dipyridamole decreased AV-shunt flow. In rabbits, the effects of isradipine and verapamil were similar to those seen in cats. Sodium nitroprusside had no effect, whereas prazosin, minoxidil, and the potassium-channel activator cromakalim increased AV-shunt flow. The contrasting effects of drugs sharing the same mechanism of action suggest that target-tissue selectivity is more important than the mechanism of action. An increase of AV-shunt flow is unlikely to be beneficial but could be associated with a number of undesirable side effects. It might negatively affect migraine sufferers and, if AV-shunt dilatation shows no tolerance development, it represents an unnecessary hemodynamic burden for the heart.

  10. Effects of thrombin, PAR-1 activating peptide and a PAR-1 antagonist on umbilical artery resistance in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elliott John T

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The non-thrombotic effects of thrombin in cardiovascular tissues, as mediated via the protease activated receptors (PARs, and particularly PAR-1, have been the focus of much recent research. The aims of this study were to evaluate the effects of thrombin, a specific PAR-1 activating peptide (PAR1-AP, and a PAR-1 antagonist on human umbilical artery tone in vitro. Methods Human umbilical artery samples were obtained from 17 women at term. Arterial rings were suspended under physiologic conditions for isometric recording. The in vitro effects of thrombin (0.5 units/mL to 3 units/mL, PAR1-AP TFLLR-NH2 [10(-9 to 10(-6 M], and PAR-1 antagonist (N-trans cinnamoyl- p-fluoroPhe-p-guanidinoPhe-Leu-Arg-Orn-NH2 [10(-9 M to 10(-5 M] on umbilical artery tone were measured. Results Both thrombin and TFLLR-NH2 exerted a potent cumulative vasodilatory effect on human umbilical artery resistance (P 0.05. Conclusion These findings highlight a potential role for thrombin and PAR-1 receptors in vascular regulation of feto-placental blood flow in normal pregnancy, and in association with the vascular lesions associated with IUGR and pre-eclampsia.

  11. Renoprotective Effects of a Highly Selective A3 Adenosine Receptor Antagonist in a Mouse Model of Adriamycin-induced Nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Hye Sook; Cha, Jin Joo; Kim, Kitae; Kim, Jung Eun; Ghee, Jung Yeon; Kim, Hyunwook; Lee, Ji Eun; Han, Jee Young; Jeong, Lak Shin; Cha, Dae Ryong; Kang, Young Sun

    2016-09-01

    The concentration of adenosine in the normal kidney increases markedly during renal hypoxia, ischemia, and inflammation. A recent study reported that an A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR) antagonist attenuated the progression of renal fibrosis. The adriamycin (ADX)-induced nephropathy model induces podocyte injury, which results in severe proteinuria and progressive glomerulosclerosis. In this study, we investigated the preventive effect of a highly selective A3AR antagonist (LJ1888) in ADX-induced nephropathy. Three groups of six-week-old Balb/c mice were treated with ADX (11 mg/kg) for four weeks and LJ1888 (10 mg/kg) for two weeks as following: 1) control; 2) ADX; and 3) ADX + LJ1888. ADX treatment decreased body weight without a change in water and food intake, but this was ameliorated by LJ1888 treatment. Interestingly, LJ1888 lowered plasma creatinine level, proteinuria, and albuminuria, which had increased during ADX treatment. Furthermore, LJ1888 inhibited urinary nephrin excretion as a podocyte injury marker, and urine 8-isoprostane and kidney lipid peroxide concentration, which are markers of oxidative stress, increased after injection of ADX. ADX also induced the activation of proinflammatory and profibrotic molecules such as TGF-β1, MCP-1, PAI-1, type IV collagen, NF-κB, NOX4, TLR4, TNFα, IL-1β, and IFN-γ, but they were remarkably suppressed after LJ1888 treatment. In conclusion, our results suggest that LJ1888 has a renoprotective effect in ADX-induced nephropathy, which might be associated with podocyte injury through oxidative stress. Therefore, LJ1888, a selective A3AR antagonist, could be considered as a potential therapeutic agent in renal glomerular diseases which include podocyte injury and proteinuria. PMID:27510383

  12. CysLT1 leukotriene receptor antagonists inhibit the effects of nucleotides acting at P2Y receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamedova, Liaman; Capra, Valérie; Accomazzo, Maria Rosa; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Ferrario, Silvia; Fumagalli, Marta; Abbracchio, Maria P.; Rovati, G. Enrico; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2016-01-01

    Montelukast and pranlukast are orally active leukotriene receptor antagonists selective for the CysLT1 receptor. Conversely, the hP2Y1,2,4,6,11,12,13,14 receptors represent a large family of GPCRs responding to either adenine or uracil nucleotides, or to sugar-nucleotides. Montelukast and pranlukast were found to inhibit nucleotide-induced calcium mobilization in a human monocyte-macrophage like cell line, DMSO-differentiated U937 (dU937). Montelukast and pranlukast inhibited the effects of UTP with IC50 values of 7.7 and 4.3 μM, respectively, and inhibited the effects of UDP with IC50 values of 4.5 and 1.6 μM, respectively, in an insurmountable manner. Furthermore, ligand binding studies using [3H]LTD4 excluded the possibility of orthosteric nucleotide binding to the CysLT1 receptor. dU937 cells were shown to express P2Y2, P2Y4, P2Y6, P2Y11, P2Y13 and P2Y14 receptors. Therefore, these antagonists were studied functionally in a heterologous expression system for the human P2Y receptors. In 1321N1 astrocytoma cells stably expressing human P2Y1,2,4,6 receptors, CysLT1 antagonists inhibited both the P2Y agonist-induced activation of phospholipase C and intracellular Ca2+ mobilization. IC50 values at P2Y1 and P2Y6 receptors were astrocytoma cells expressing an endogenous M3 muscarinic receptor, 10 μM montelukast had no effect on the carbachol-induced rise in intracellular Ca2+. These data demonstrated that CysLT1 receptor antagonists interact functionally with signaling pathways of P2Y receptors, and this should foster the study of possible implications for the clinical use of these compounds in asthma or in other inflammatory conditions. PMID:16280122

  13. Synergistic, additive and antagonistic effects of fruit mixtures on total antioxidant capacities and bioactive compounds in tropical fruit juices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Ana Carolina da Silva; Wurlitzer, Nedio Jair; Dionisio, Ana Paula; Lacerda Soares, Marcia Valéria; Rocha Bastos, Maria do Socorro; Elesbão Alves, Ricardo; Montenegro Brasil, Isabella

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this work was investigate the synergistic, additive and antagonistic effects of fruit mixtures on total antioxidant capacities and bioactive compounds in tropical fruit juices, and optimize its formulation by the response surface methodology based on the responses: total polyphenols (TP), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), ascorbic acid content and sensorial acceptance. Camu-camu, acerola and acai were the major factors that influenced the antioxidant potential of the juice; and the yellow mombin showed a positive effect on the acceptance of the tropical juice. It was observed an/antagonistic effect between acerola and camu-camu for the TAC response. The optimum formulation obtained was 20% acerola, 10% camu-camu, 10% yellow mombin, 10% cashew apple and 10% acai, which was responsible for a response of 155.46 mg.100 g(-1) of ascorbic acid, 103.01 mg of GAE.100 g-1 of TP, 10.27 µM Trolox g(-1) of TAC and approximately 6.1 of acceptance. PMID:26817384

  14. Food safety regulatory systems in Europe and China:A study of how co-regulation can improve regulatory effectiveness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kevin Chen; WANG Xin-xin; SONG Hai-ying

    2015-01-01

    Food safety has received a great deal of attention in both developed and developing countries in recent years. In China, the numerous food scandals and scares that have struck over the past decade have spurred signiifcant food safety regulatory reform, which has been increasingly oriented towards the public-private partnership model adopted by the Europe Union’s (EU) food safety regulatory system. This paper analyzes the development of both the EU’s and China’s food safety regu-latory systems, identiifes the current chalenges for China and additionaly considers the role of public-private partnership. The success of co-regulation in the food regulatory system would bring signiifcant beneifts and opportunities for China. Finaly, this paper recommends additional measures like training and grants to improve the private’s sector effectiveness in co-regulating China’s food safety issues.

  15. Effect of α{sub 7} nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists and antagonists on motor function in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, Kevin D., E-mail: kevin.welch@ars.usda.gov [USDA/ARS Poisonous Plant Research Laboratory, 1150 E. 1400N., Logan, UT 84341 (United States); Pfister, James A. [USDA/ARS Poisonous Plant Research Laboratory, 1150 E. 1400N., Logan, UT 84341 (United States); Lima, Flavia G. [Federal University of Goías, School of Veterinary Medicine, Goiânia, Goías (Brazil); Green, Benedict T.; Gardner, Dale R. [USDA/ARS Poisonous Plant Research Laboratory, 1150 E. 1400N., Logan, UT 84341 (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are ligand-gated cation channels found throughout the body, and serve to mediate diverse physiological functions. Muscle-type nAChRs located in the motor endplate region of muscle fibers play an integral role in muscle contraction and thus motor function. The toxicity and teratogenicity of many plants (which results in millions of dollars in losses annually to the livestock industry) are due to various toxins that bind to nAChRs including deltaline and methyllycaconitine (MLA) from larkspur (Delphinium) species, and nicotine and anabasine from tobacco (Nicotiana) species. The primary result of the actions of these alkaloids at nAChRs is neuromuscular paralysis and respiratory failure. The objective of this study was to further characterize the motor coordination deficiencies that occur upon exposure to a non-lethal dose of nAChR antagonists MLA and deltaline as well as nAChR agonists nicotine and anabasine. We evaluated the effect of nAChR agonists and antagonists on the motor function and coordination in mice using a balance beam, grip strength meter, rotarod, open field analysis and tremor monitor. These analyses demonstrated that within seconds after treatment the mice had significant loss of motor function and coordination that lasted up to 1 min, followed by a short period of quiescence. Recovery to normal muscle coordination was rapid, typically within approximately 10 min post-dosing. However, mice treated with the nAChR agonist nicotine and anabasine required a slightly longer time to recover some aspects of normal muscle function in comparison to mice treated with the nAChR antagonist MLA or deltaline. -- Highlights: ► Mice treated with nAChR agonists and antagonists have a loss in motor function. ► These deficits are temporary as near normal motor function returns within 10 min. ► There are compound-specific differences in the effects on motor function.

  16. Effects of histamine and its antagonists on murine T-cells and bone marrow-derived dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu XF

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Xiufen Hu,1,* Mohammad Ishraq Zafar,2,* Feng Gao2 1Department of Paediatrics, Tongji Hospital, 2Department of Endocrinology, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: We determined the effects of histamine and its antagonists on the surface marker expression of dendritic cells (DCs and the influence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, histamine, and histamine receptor antagonists on DCs and T-cells. The bone marrow was extracted from the femurs and tibiae of 6- to 8-week-old female Balb/c mice and cultured in medium containing penicillin, streptomycin, L-glutamine, fetal calf serum, or granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF alone or with interleukin (IL-4. The cells received three different doses of LPS and histamine, plus three different doses of descarboethoxyloratadine (DCL. We assayed the supernatant for various cytokines. The spleen cells of DO11.10 mice were examined by flow cytometry, which included labeling and sorting CD4+ T-cells, as well as coculture of DCs and T-cells with ovalbumin (OVA323–339 peptide. Histamine or histamine plus DCL did not affect the expression of major histocompatibility complex class II, CD11c, CD11b, CD86, and CD80. However, GM-CSF increased the expression of all markers except CD80. Histamine increased interferon-γ production in GM-CSF + IL-4-cultured cells; it also enhanced IL-10 production, but suppressed IL-12 production in LPS-stimulated DCs with no DCL. Cimetidine inhibited IL-10 production and restored IL-12 secretion in LPS-treated DCs. LPS increased IL-10 and decreased IL-12 levels. GM-CSF + IL-4-generated DCs had a stronger stimulatory effect on DO11.10 T-cell proliferation than GM-CSF-generated DCs. Inducible costimulator ligand expression was higher in GM-CSF + IL-4- than in GM-CSF-generated DC groups after 2 days of coculture, but decreased 4 days

  17. Effect of histamine H1 and H2 receptor antagonists, microinjected into cerebellar vermis, on emotional memory consolidation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigated the effects of histamine H1 or H2 receptor antagonists on emotional memory consolidation in mice submitted to the elevated plus maze (EPM). The cerebellar vermis of male mice (Swiss albino) was implanted using a cannula guide. Three days after recovery, behavioral tests were performed in the EPM on 2 consecutive days (T1 and T2). Immediately after exposure to the EPM (T1), animals received a microinjection of saline (SAL) or the H1 antagonist chlorpheniramine (CPA; 0.016, 0.052, or 0.16 nmol/0.1 µL) in Experiment 1, and SAL or the H2 antagonist ranitidine (RA; 0.57, 2.85, or 5.7 nmol/0.1 µL) in Experiment 2. Twenty-four hours later, mice were reexposed to the EPM (T2) under the same experimental conditions but they did not receive any injection. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and the Duncan test. In Experiment 1, mice microinjected with SAL and with CPA entered the open arms less often (%OAE) and spent less time in the open arms (%OAT) in T2, and there was no difference among groups. The results of Experiment 2 demonstrated that the values of %OAE and %OAT in T2 were lower compared to T1 for the groups that were microinjected with SAL and 2.85 nmol/0.1 µL RA. However, when animals were microinjected with 5.7 nmol/0.1 µL RA, they did not show a reduction in %OAE and %OAT. These results demonstrate that CPA did not affect behavior at the doses used in this study, while 5.7 nmol/0.1 µL RA induced impairment of memory consolidation in the EPM

  18. Effect of histamine H1 and H2 receptor antagonists, microinjected into cerebellar vermis, on emotional memory consolidation in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gianlorenço, A.C.L.; Serafim, K.R. [Laboratório de Neurociências, Departamento de Fisioterapia, Centro de Ciências Biológicas e da Saúde, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos, SP, Brasil, Laboratório de Neurociências, Departamento de Fisioterapia, Centro de Ciências Biológicas e da Saúde, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Canto-de-Souza, A. [Laboratório de Psicologia da Aprendizagem, Departamento de Psicologia, Centro de Educação e Ciências Humanas, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos, SP, Brasil, Laboratório de Psicologia da Aprendizagem, Departamento de Psicologia, Centro de Educação e Ciências Humanas, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Fisiológicas, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos, SP, Brasil, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Fisiológicas, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Instituto de Neurociências e Comportamento, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brasil, Instituto de Neurociências e Comportamento, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Mattioli, R. [Laboratório de Neurociências, Departamento de Fisioterapia, Centro de Ciências Biológicas e da Saúde, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos, SP, Brasil, Laboratório de Neurociências, Departamento de Fisioterapia, Centro de Ciências Biológicas e da Saúde, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2014-02-17

    This study investigated the effects of histamine H1 or H2 receptor antagonists on emotional memory consolidation in mice submitted to the elevated plus maze (EPM). The cerebellar vermis of male mice (Swiss albino) was implanted using a cannula guide. Three days after recovery, behavioral tests were performed in the EPM on 2 consecutive days (T1 and T2). Immediately after exposure to the EPM (T1), animals received a microinjection of saline (SAL) or the H1 antagonist chlorpheniramine (CPA; 0.016, 0.052, or 0.16 nmol/0.1 µL) in Experiment 1, and SAL or the H2 antagonist ranitidine (RA; 0.57, 2.85, or 5.7 nmol/0.1 µL) in Experiment 2. Twenty-four hours later, mice were reexposed to the EPM (T2) under the same experimental conditions but they did not receive any injection. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and the Duncan test. In Experiment 1, mice microinjected with SAL and with CPA entered the open arms less often (%OAE) and spent less time in the open arms (%OAT) in T2, and there was no difference among groups. The results of Experiment 2 demonstrated that the values of %OAE and %OAT in T2 were lower compared to T1 for the groups that were microinjected with SAL and 2.85 nmol/0.1 µL RA. However, when animals were microinjected with 5.7 nmol/0.1 µL RA, they did not show a reduction in %OAE and %OAT. These results demonstrate that CPA did not affect behavior at the doses used in this study, while 5.7 nmol/0.1 µL RA induced impairment of memory consolidation in the EPM.

  19. Effect of histamine H1 and H2 receptor antagonists, microinjected into cerebellar vermis, on emotional memory consolidation in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.C.L. Gianlorenco

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effects of histamine H1 or H2 receptor antagonists on emotional memory consolidation in mice submitted to the elevated plus maze (EPM. The cerebellar vermis of male mice (Swiss albino was implanted using a cannula guide. Three days after recovery, behavioral tests were performed in the EPM on 2 consecutive days (T1 and T2. Immediately after exposure to the EPM (T1, animals received a microinjection of saline (SAL or the H1 antagonist chlorpheniramine (CPA; 0.016, 0.052, or 0.16 nmol/0.1 µL in Experiment 1, and SAL or the H2 antagonist ranitidine (RA; 0.57, 2.85, or 5.7 nmol/0.1 µL in Experiment 2. Twenty-four hours later, mice were reexposed to the EPM (T2 under the same experimental conditions but they did not receive any injection. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and the Duncan test. In Experiment 1, mice microinjected with SAL and with CPA entered the open arms less often (%OAE and spent less time in the open arms (%OAT in T2, and there was no difference among groups. The results of Experiment 2 demonstrated that the values of %OAE and %OAT in T2 were lower compared to T1 for the groups that were microinjected with SAL and 2.85 nmol/0.1 µL RA. However, when animals were microinjected with 5.7 nmol/0.1 µL RA, they did not show a reduction in %OAE and %OAT. These results demonstrate that CPA did not affect behavior at the doses used in this study, while 5.7 nmol/0.1 µL RA induced impairment of memory consolidation in the EPM.

  20. A selective orexin-1 receptor antagonist attenuates stress-induced hyperarousal without hypnotic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaventure, Pascal; Yun, Sujin; Johnson, Philip L; Shekhar, Anantha; Fitz, Stephanie D; Shireman, Brock T; Lebold, Terry P; Nepomuceno, Diane; Lord, Brian; Wennerholm, Michelle; Shelton, Jonathan; Carruthers, Nicholas; Lovenberg, Timothy; Dugovic, Christine

    2015-03-01

    Orexins (OXs) are peptides produced by perifornical (PeF) and lateral hypothalamic neurons that exert a prominent role in arousal-related processes, including stress. A critical role for the orexin-1 receptor (OX1R) in complex emotional behavior is emerging, such as overactivation of the OX1R pathway being associated with panic or anxiety states. Here we characterize a brain-penetrant, selective, and high-affinity OX1R antagonist, compound 56 [N-({3-[(3-ethoxy-6-methylpyridin-2-yl)carbonyl]-3-azabicyclo[4.1.0]hept-4-yl}methyl)-5-(trifluoromethyl)pyrimidin-2-amine]. Ex vivo receptor binding studies demonstrated that, after subcutaneous administration, compound 56 crossed the blood-brain barrier and occupied OX1Rs in the rat brain at lower doses than standard OX1R antagonists GSK-1059865 [5-bromo-N-({1-[(3-fluoro-2-methoxyphenyl)carbonyl]-5-methylpiperidin-2-yl}methyl)pyridin-2-amine], SB-334867 [1-(2-methyl-1,3-benzoxazol-6-yl)-3-(1,5-naphthyridin-4-yl)urea], and SB-408124 [1-(6,8-difluoro-2-methylquinolin-4-yl)-3-[4-(dimethylamino)phenyl]urea]. Although compound 56 did not alter spontaneous sleep in rats and in wild-type mice, its administration in orexin-2 receptor knockout mice selectively promoted rapid eye movement sleep, demonstrating target engagement and specific OX1R blockade. In a rat model of psychological stress induced by cage exchange, the OX1R antagonist prevented the prolongation of sleep onset without affecting sleep duration. In a rat model of panic vulnerability (involving disinhibition of the PeF OX region) to threatening internal state changes (i.e., intravenous sodium lactate infusion), compound 56 attenuated sodium lactate-induced panic-like behaviors and cardiovascular responses without altering baseline locomotor or autonomic activity. In conclusion, OX1R antagonism represents a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of various psychiatric disorders associated with stress or hyperarousal states. PMID:25583879

  1. 5-HT2 Receptor Regulation of Mitochondrial Genes: Unexpected Pharmacological Effects of Agonists and Antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Jennifer L; Wills, Lauren P; McOmish, Caitlin E; Demireva, Elena Y; Gingrich, Jay A; Beeson, Craig C; Schnellmann, Rick G

    2016-04-01

    In acute organ injuries, mitochondria are often dysfunctional, and recent research has revealed that recovery of mitochondrial and renal functions is accelerated by induction of mitochondrial biogenesis (MB). We previously reported that the nonselective 5-HT2 receptor agonist DOI [1-(4-iodo-2,5-dimethoxyphenyl)propan-2-amine] induced MB in renal proximal tubular cells (RPTCs). The goal of this study was to determine the role of 5-HT2 receptors in the regulation of mitochondrial genes and oxidative metabolism in the kidney. The 5-HT2C receptor agonist CP-809,101 [2-[(3-chlorophenyl)methoxy]-6-(1-piperazinyl)pyrazine] and antagonist SB-242,084 [6-chloro-2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-N-[6-[(2-methyl-3-pyridinyl)oxy]-3-pyridinyl]-1H-indole-1-carboxyamide dihydrochloride] were used to examine the induction of renal mitochondrial genes and oxidative metabolism in RPTCs and in mouse kidneys in the presence and absence of the 5-HT2C receptor. Unexpectedly, both CP-809,101 and SB-242,084 increased RPTC respiration and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) mRNA expression in RPTCs at 1-10 nM. In addition, CP-809,101 and SB-242,084 increased mRNA expression of PGC-1α and the mitochondrial proteins NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 and NADH dehydrogenase (ubiquinone) β subcomplex 8 in mice. These compounds increased mitochondrial genes in RPTCs in which the 5-HT2C receptor was downregulated with small interfering RNA and in the renal cortex of mice lacking the 5-HT2C receptor. By contrast, the ability of these compounds to increase PGC-1α mRNA and respiration was blocked in RPTCs treated with 5-HT2A receptor small interfering RNA or the 5-HT2A receptor antagonist eplivanserin. In addition, the 5-HT2A receptor agonist NBOH-2C-CN [4-[2-[[(2-hydroxyphenyl)methyl]amino]ethyl]-2,5-dimethoxybenzonitrile] increased RPTC respiration at 1-100 nM. These results suggest that agonism of the 5-HT2A receptor induces MB and that the classic 5-HT2C receptor agonist CP

  2. Antiproliferative effects of the serotonin type 2 receptor antagonist, ketanserin, on smooth muscle cell growth in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors defined the role of a serotonin type 2 receptor antagonist, ketanserin, in the growth of aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from Wistar rats, using cell culture and cell synchrony methods. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) replication in the G0/G1- or G1/S-synchronized VSMCs was assessed by [3H]thymidine uptake into DNA. Ketanserin at 2 x 10(-5) M significantly decreased the thymidine uptake by 48% in the proliferating VSMCs, whereas methysergide, a nonspecific serotonin inhibitor, unaffected the thymidine uptake. Ketanserin at 10(-5) M did not influence the duration of the G1 resting period. However, this dose of ketanserin significantly lowered DNA replication in the DNA synthetic (S) period in a dose-dependent manner. Neither methysergide nor the alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonist, prazosin, affected DNA synthesis in the S period. Ketanserin exhibits antiproliferative effects on rat VSMC growth probably through the suppression of DNA replication in the S phase. This property would also contribute to the vascular protective effects of ketanserin with its well-documented antihypertensive action

  3. ACTH Antagonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Adrian John; Forfar, Rachel; Hussain, Mashal; Jerman, Jeff; McIver, Ed; Taylor, Debra; Chan, Li

    2016-01-01

    Adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) acts via a highly selective receptor that is a member of the melanocortin receptor subfamily of type 1 G protein-coupled receptors. The ACTH receptor, also known as the melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R), is unusual in that it is absolutely dependent on a small accessory protein, melanocortin receptor accessory protein (MRAP) for cell surface expression and function. ACTH is the only known naturally occurring agonist for this receptor. This lack of redundancy and high degree of ligand specificity suggests that antagonism of this receptor could provide a useful therapeutic aid and a potential investigational tool. Clinical situations in which this could be useful include (1) Cushing’s disease and ectopic ACTH syndrome – especially while preparing for definitive treatment of a causative tumor, or in refractory cases, or (2) congenital adrenal hyperplasia – as an adjunct to glucocorticoid replacement. A case for antagonism in other clinical situations in which there is ACTH excess can also be made. In this article, we will explore the scientific and clinical case for an ACTH antagonist, and will review the evidence for existing and recently described peptides and modified peptides in this role. PMID:27547198

  4. Sustained effects of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist treatment in type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Claus M; Faulenbach, Mirjam; Vaag, Allan;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Interleukin (IL)-1 impairs insulin secretion and induces beta-cell apoptosis. Pancreatic beta-cell IL-1 expression is increased and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) expression reduced in patients with type 2 diabetes. Treatment with recombinant IL-1Ra improves glycemia and beta......-cell function and reduces inflammatory markers in patients with type 2 diabetes. Here we investigated the durability of these responses. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Among 70 ambulatory patients who had type 2 diabetes, A1C >7.5%, and BMI >27 kg/m(2) and were randomly assigned to receive 13 weeks of anakinra, a...... recombinant human IL-1Ra, or placebo, 67 completed treatment and were included in this double-blind 39-week follow-up study. Primary outcome was change in beta-cell function after anakinra withdrawal. Analysis was done by intention to treat. RESULTS: Thirty-nine weeks after anakinra withdrawal, the proinsulin...

  5. The adrenergic α2 antagonist atipamezole alters the behavioural effects of pramipexole and increases pramipexole concentration in blood plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, P N; Fletcher, P J; Wilson, V S; Remington, G J

    2016-04-15

    Pramipexole is a dopaminergic agonist used in Parkinson's disease treatment. It is thought to exert its therapeutic and side effects through actions on dopamine D3 receptors. In a recent study, we found that at doses occupying D3 but not D2 receptors pramipexole reduced locomotion and operant responding for primary and conditioned reinforcement. These effects, however, were not blocked by a D3 receptor antagonist and were present in D3 knockout mice, suggesting non-D3 receptor mechanisms. Among the next highest affinity binding sites of pramipexole are adrenergic α2 receptors. Here we explored α2 receptor involvement in the behavioural effects of pramipexole. We found that the α2 antagonist atipamezole, which was itself behaviourally silent, counteracted pramipexole's reduction of locomotion, but not operant responding for water or a conditioned reinforcer. The resulting behavioural profile was similar to that of a higher dose of pramipexole, leading to the hypothesize that atipamezole mediates its behavioural effects by increasing pramipexole effective dose. In support of this hypothesis, we found that atipamezole increased pramipexole concentration in blood plasma. This is not likely due to an effect on drug metabolism since pramipexole is not known to undergo metabolic transformation. Future work should examine two alternative hypotheses; that pramipexole plasma concentration is elevated as the result of 1) competition with atipamezole for renal excretion, or 2) atipamezole blockade of peripheral α2 binding sites, thereby preventing pramipexole distribution to α2-rich tissues. The suggestion of adrenergic effects of pramipexole is important in light of recent interest in adrenergic pathophysiology in Parkinson's disease. PMID:26976325

  6. Radioprotective effects of histamine H2 receptor antagonists famotidine and ranitidine on gamma ray induced chromosome damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Histamine H2 receptor antagonist such as Cimetidine, Famotidine and Ranitidine are used in the clinical treatment of peptic ulcer. In vitro metaphase analysis and micronucleus assay were used to test the effects of famotidine and ranitidine on Cobalt 60 γ-ray induced clastogenic effects. Heparinised whole blood was obtained from healthy non-smoker volunteers. Blood samples were irradiated at a dose of 3Gy and incubated at 37 deg C for 1h. Lymphocyte cultures were initiated for metaphase chromosomes and cytochalasin B blocked micronucleus analysis. Aqueous solution of Famotidine (150 g/ml) and Ranitidine (500 g/ml) was added to the whole blood cultures at 0h and 24h. Cultures were harvested and processed at 48h and 72h for chromosome aberrations and micronucleus analysis respectively. Cultures treated with Famotidine at 0h and 24h after 3Gy γ-ray irradiation induce 60.90% and 56.52% inhibition in dicentrics, 48.70% and 43.61% inhibition in total aberrations. Ranitidine at 0h and 24h after 3Gy γ-ray irradiation induce 52.17% and 43.47% inhibition in dicentrics, 33.60% and 46.15% inhibition in total aberrations, when compared with 3Gy γ-ray irradiation alone. 43-54% inhibition in Binucleated cells with micronuclei and 47.72% inhibition in micronuclei at 0h treatment respectively. In conclusion radioprotective effects of Histamine H2 receptor antagonists famotidine and ranitidine on γ-ray induced chromosome damage is observed and the drugs effectively reduced the frequency of radiation induced chromosome aberrations and micronucleus. Famotidine was found to be more effective. The mechanism in which these drugs reduce clastogenic effect of γ-radiation is not fully understood. It might be due to their antioxidant and free radical-scavenging properties. (author)

  7. Effects of oral cetirizine, a selective H1 antagonist, on allergen- and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in subjects with asthma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gong, H

    1990-03-01

    The protective efficacy of oral cetirizine, a selective and potent H1-receptor antagonist, against the immediate bronchoconstrictive response to allergen inhalation and exercise challenge was evaluated in 16 subjects with stable, predominantly mild asthma. The subjects underwent double-blind, crossover pretreatments in randomized order in two separate protocols with (1) three daily oral doses of 20 mg of cetirizine and placebo, followed by allergen inhalation, and (2) single oral doses of cetirizine (5, 10, and 20 mg), albuterol (4 mg), and placebo, followed by exercise with cold-air inhalation. Cetirizine failed to decrease bronchial sensitivity to inhaled allergen in eight of 10 subjects. Neither cetirizine nor albuterol uniformly inhibited exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Serum concentrations of cetirizine were consistent with systemic H1-blocking activity. Modest bronchodilation occurred after administration of cetirizine and albuterol before exercise but not after the third dose of cetirizine in the allergen protocol. One subject developed moderate drowsiness during multiple dosing with cetirizine. Thus, cetirizine, in the doses studied, is not uniformly effective in preventing allergen- or exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Histamine is one of many mediators participating in immediate asthmatic responses, and selective H1 antagonists do not completely block these airway events. However, cetirizine may still clinically benefit some patients with asthma, such as patients with allergic rhinitis or urticaria.

  8. Effects of GABA receptor antagonists on thresholds of P23H rat retinal ganglion cells to electrical stimulation of the retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Ralph J.; Rizzo, Joseph F., III

    2011-06-01

    An electronic retinal prosthesis may provide useful vision for patients suffering from retinitis pigmentosa (RP). In animal models of RP, the amount of current needed to activate retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) is higher than in normal, healthy retinas. In this study, we sought to reduce the stimulation thresholds of RGCs in a degenerate rat model (P23H-line 1) by blocking GABA receptor mediated inhibition in the retina. We examined the effects of TPMPA, a GABAC receptor antagonist, and SR95531, a GABAA receptor antagonist, on the electrically evoked responses of RGCs to biphasic current pulses delivered to the subretinal surface through a 400 µm diameter electrode. Both TPMPA and SR95531 reduced the stimulation thresholds of ON-center RGCs on average by 15% and 20% respectively. Co-application of the two GABA receptor antagonists had the greatest effect, on average reducing stimulation thresholds by 32%. In addition, co-application of the two GABA receptor antagonists increased the magnitude of the electrically evoked responses on average three-fold. Neither TPMPA nor SR95531, applied alone or in combination, had consistent effects on the stimulation thresholds of OFF-center RGCs. We suggest that the effects of the GABA receptor antagonists on ON-center RGCs may be attributable to blockage of GABA receptors on the axon terminals of ON bipolar cells.

  9. Potential effects of environmental regulatory procedures on geothermal development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beeland, G.V.; Boies, D.B.

    1981-01-01

    The potential effects of several types of applicable environmental regulatory procedures on geothermal development were assessed, and particular problem areas were identified. The possible impact of procedures adopted pursuant to the following Federal statutes were analyzed: Clean Air Act; Clean Water Act; Safe Drinking Water Act; and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. State regulations applicable, or potentially applicable, to geothermal facilities were also reviewed to determine: permit information requirements; pre-permit air or water quality monitoring requirements; effect of mandated time frames for permit approval; and potential for exemption of small facilities. The regulations of the following states were covered in the review: Alaska; Arizona; California; Colorado; Hawaii; Idaho; Montana; Nevada; New Mexico; Oregon; Utah; Washington; and Wyoming. (MHR)

  10. In vitro effects of both dopaminergic and enkephalinergic antagonists on the ovarian growth of Cherax quadricarinatus (Decapoda, Parastacidae), at different periods of the reproductive cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahansky, Alejandra Valeria; Medesani, Daniel Alberto; Chaulet, Anouk; Rodríguez, Enrique Marcelo

    2011-01-01

    The in vitro effect of both spiperone (dopaminergic antagonist) and naloxone (enkephalinergic antagonist), was assayed on small pieces of ovary dissected from C. quadricarinatus females, with the eventual addition of some neuroendocrine organs, such as thoracic ganglion or eyestalk tissue. The incorporation of tritiated leucine by the ovary was measured in order to estimate the ovarian growth. During the post-reproductive period, both mentioned antagonists were able to significantly stimulate the ovary in the presence of thoracic ganglion, but did not produce any significant effect in the preparation containing ovary and eyestalk tissue, or only ovary. No significant effects of the assayed antagonists were noted during the pre-reproductive period. These results were in accordance with previous models describing the neuroendocrine control of crustacean reproduction, and represent new findings about the hormonal context in different periods of the reproductive cycle of crayfish. Besides, by means of the experimental combination of the tested antagonists with dopamine or met-enkephalin, a new model dealing with the interaction of these two neurotransmitters on the hormonal secretion of thoracic ganglion has been proposed. PMID:20883810

  11. Antidepressant/anxiolytic potential and adverse effect liabilities of melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 antagonists in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaki, Shigeyuki; Shimazaki, Toshiharu; Nishiguchi, Mariko; Funakoshi, Takeo; Iijima, Michihiko; Ito, Akie; Kanuma, Kosuke; Sekiguchi, Yoshinori

    2015-08-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 (MCH1 receptor) is known to be involved in the control of mood and stress, in addition to the regulation of feeding. Here, we report further evidence that the blockade of the MCH1 receptor exhibits antidepressant and anxiolytic-like effects in a variety of animal models using TASP0382650 and TASP0489838, newly synthesized MCH1 receptor antagonists, with different scaffolds. Both TASP0382650 and TASP0489838 exhibited high affinities for human MCH1 receptor with IC50 values of 7.13 and 3.80nM, respectively. Both compounds showed potent antagonist activities at the MCH1 receptor, as assessed using MCH-increased [(35)S]GTPγS binding to human MCH1 receptor and an MCH-induced [Ca(2+)]i assay in rat MCH1 receptor expressing cells. In contrast, neither TASP0382650 nor TASP0489838 showed an affinity for the MCH2 receptor, another MCH receptor subtype. The oral administration of TASP0382650 or TASP0489838 significantly reduced the immobility time during the forced swimming test in rats, and reduced hyperemotionality induced by an olfactory bulbectomy, both of which are indicative of an antidepressant-like potential. In the olfactory bulbectomy model, the antidepressant effect of TASP0382650 appeared following a single administration, suggesting a faster onset of action, compared with current medications. Moreover, both TASP0382650 and TASP0489838 exhibited anxiolytic effects in several animal models of anxiety. In contrast, both TASP0382650 and TASP0489838 did not affect spontaneous locomotor activity, motor function, spatial memory during the Morris water maze task, or the convulsion threshold to pentylenetetrazole. These findings provide additional evidence that the blockade of the MCH1 receptor exhibits antidepressant- and anxiolytic activities with no adverse effects in experimental animal models. PMID:26044968

  12. Effect of two human growth hormone receptor antagonists on glomerulosclerosis in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei LI; Shui-xian SHEN; Li-hua ZHU; En-bi WANG; Zeng-can YE; Jun LIN; Li-he GUO; Fei-hong LUO; Xi-hong LIU; Xin FANG

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To explore the feasibility of human growth hormone (hGH) receptor antagonist in the treatment of end-stage diabetic renal complications. METHODS: Two hGH mutants, hGHA1 (Cys-hGH-dell-4, G120R, K168A, E174A,C182S, de1186-191) and hGHA2 (hGH-H21A, G120R, E174A) were expressed in E coli. The IC50 (Mean±SD)values for the mutants for inhibiting 125I-hGH binding to rabbit growth hormone receptor were (65±10) ng for hGHA1, (27±5.6) ng for hGHA2, and (10±0.6) ng for wild type hGH, respectively. RESULTS: After treatment for 12 weeks, the renal histology analysis showed that treatment with hGHA2 at 4 mg/kg body weight daily markedly suppressed glomerulosclerosis in streptozotocin-induced diabetic Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats; hGHA1 at the same dosage slightly increased the renal damage compared with saline; while wild type hGH at 1 U/kg body weight daily severely worsened the glomerulo-sclerosis in diabetic SD rats. CONCLUSION: The data indicated that hGHA2 inhibited the end-stage glomerulosclerosis in diabetic rats, but hGHA1 mildly increased the glomerulosclerosis.

  13. Antagonistic effects between magnetite nanoparticles and a hydrophobic surfactant in highly concentrated Pickering emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vílchez, Alejandro; Rodríguez-Abreu, Carlos; Menner, Angelika; Bismarck, Alexander; Esquena, Jordi

    2014-05-13

    Herein we present a systematic study of the antagonistic interaction between magnetite nanoparticles (Fe3O4) and nonionic hydrophobic surfactant in Pickering highly concentrated emulsions. Interfacial tension measurements, phase behavior, and emulsion stability studies, combined with electron microscopy observations in polymerized systems and magnetometry, are used to support the discussion. First, stable W/O highly concentrated emulsions were obtained using partially hydrophobized magnetite nanoparticles. These emulsions experienced phase separation when surfactant is added at concentrations as low as 0.05 wt %. Such phase separation arises from the preferential affinity of the surfactant for the nanoparticle surfaces, which remarkably enhances their hydrophobicity, leading to a gradual desorption of nanoparticles from the interface. W/O emulsions were obtained at higher surfactant concentrations, but in this case, these emulsions were mainly stabilized by surfactant molecules. Therefore, stable emulsions could be prepared in two separate ranges of surfactant concentrations. After polymerization, low-density macroporous polymers were obtained, and the adsorption and aggregation of nanoparticles was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. The progressive displacement of the nanoparticles was revealed: from the oil-water interface, in which aggregated nanoparticles were adsorbed, forming dense layers, to the continuous phase of the emulsions, where small nanoparticle aggregates were randomly dispersed. Interestingly, the results also show that the blocking temperature of the iron oxide superparamagnetic nanoparticles embedded in the macroporous polymers could be modulated by appropriate control of the concentrations of both surfactant and nanoparticles. PMID:24738961

  14. Galanin antagonist increases insulin resistance by reducing glucose transporter 4 effect in adipocytes of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lili; Shi, Mingyi; Zhang, Ling; Li, Guangzhi; Zhang, Lingxiang; Shao, Hu; Fang, Penghua; Ma, Yingping; Li, Jian; Shi, Qiaojia; Sui, Yumei

    2011-08-01

    Seeing that galanin increases animal body weight on the conditions of inhibiting insulin secretion and animals with metabolic disorder of galanin easily suffer from diabetes, we postulate that endogenous galanin is necessary to reduce insulin resistance in adipocytes. To test this hypothesis, we compared four groups of rats to examine whether an increase in galanin secretion stimulated by swimming may reduce insulin resistance. The rats from sedentary and trained drug groups were injected by M35, a galanin antagonist. The rats from trained control and trained drug groups swam after each injection for four weeks. We found that exercise significantly elevated plasma galanin contents and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) mRNA levels in adipocytes. Meanwhile, M35 treatment reduced GLUT4 and GLUT4 mRNA levels, and glucose infusing rates in euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp tests. The ratios of GLUT4 concentrations at plasma membranes to total cell membranes in both drug groups were lower compared with each control group, respectively. These observations suggest that endogenous galanin reduces insulin resistance by increasing GLUT4 contents and promoting GLUT4 transportation from intracellular membranes to plasma membranes in adipocytes. Galanin is an important hormone to reduce insulin resistance in rats. PMID:21664358

  15. D1 Antagonists and D2 Agonists Have Opposite Effects on the Metabolism of Dopamine in the Rat Striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila-Luna, Alberto; Prieto-Leyva, Jacqueline; Gálvez-Rosas, Arturo; Alfaro-Rodriguez, Alfonso; Gonzalez-Pina, Rigoberto; Bueno-Nava, Antonio

    2015-07-01

    The striatum is known to possess high levels of D1-like and D2-like receptors (D1Rs and D2Rs, respectively). We have previously shown that selective inhibition of D1Rs increases the dopaminergic metabolic response and proposed that this effect is associated with the concomitant activation of postsynaptic D2Rs by endogenous dopamine (DA). Here, we examined whether activation of D2Rs modulates the metabolism and synthesis of DA in the striatum. We used male Wistar rats to evaluate the effects of the systemic administration of a D2R agonist (bromocriptine), a D1R antagonist (SCH-23390), and the co-administration of these compounds with pargyline on the inhibition of monoamine oxidase. DA and L-3,4-dihidroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) levels and 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (L-DOPA) content were measured using high performance liquid chromatography. The systemic administration of SCH-23390 alone, at 0.25, 0.5, 1 or 2 mg/kg, significantly (P DOPAC levels and the DOPAC/DA ratio. At 2, 4 and 8 mg/kg, the administration of bromocriptine alone significantly (P DOPAC levels, L-DOPA content and the DOPAC/DA ratio, whereas at 2 mg/kg, it decreased DA levels. In both groups, co-administration of either SCH-23390 or bromocriptine with pargyline decreased DOPAC levels and the DOPAC/DA ratio by approximately 70 % compared to the levels observed in the control groups. In conclusion, administration of the D2R agonist bromocriptine decreased dopaminergic synthesis and metabolism in the striatum; in contrast, administration of the D1R antagonist SCH-23390 induced the opposite effects. PMID:25981954

  16. Effect of yeast antagonist in combination with heat treatment on postharvest blue mold decay and Rhizopus decay of peaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongyin; Wang, Lei; Zheng, Xiaodong; Dong, Ying

    2007-04-01

    The potential of using heat treatment alone or in combination with an antagonistic yeast for the control of blue mold decay and Rhizopus decay of peaches caused by Penicillium expansum and Rhizopus stolonifer respectively, and in reducing natural decay development of peach fruits, as well as its effects on postharvest quality of fruit was investigated. In vitro tests, spore germination of pathogens in PDB was greatly controlled by the heat treatment of 37 degrees C for 2 d. In vivo test to control blue mold decay of peaches, heat treatment and antagonist yeast, as stand-alone treatments, were capable of reducing the percentage of infected wounds from 92.5% to 52.5% and 62.5%, respectively, when peach fruits stored at 25 degrees C for 6 d. However, in fruit treated with combination of heat treatment and Cryptococcus laurentii, the percentage of infected wounds of blue mold decay was only 22.5%. The test of using heat treatment alone or in combination with C. laurentii to control Rhizopus decay of peaches gave a similar result. The application of heat treatment and C. laurentii resulted in low average natural decay incidences on peaches after storage at 4 degrees C for 30 days and 20 degrees C for 7 days ranging from 40% to 30%, compared with 20% in the control fruit. The combination of heat treatment and C. laurentii was the most effective treatment, and the percentage of decayed fruits was 20%. Heat treatment in combination with C. laurentii had no significant effect on firmness, TSS, ascorbic acid or titratable acidity compared to control fruit. Thus, the combination of heat treatment and C. laurentii could be an alternative to chemicals for the control of postharvest decay on peach fruits. PMID:17140691

  17. Regulatory effectiveness from the operator's viewpoint. Fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sustainable development is a keystone of AREVA's industrial strategy for achieving growth that is profitable, socially responsible and environmentally respectful. As an operator AREVA is committed to establishing and maintaining the highest level of nuclear and occupational safety in all of the group's operations to preserve public and worker health, and to protect the environment. The same is true when acting as vendors of nuclear facilities, whether nuclear power reactors or other facilities. Achieving a high safety record is also a necessary condition for ensuring the economic performance of these facilities and for strengthening the acceptance of nuclear energy by the local population as well as the decision makers. The existence of a solid international framework and strong and independent national authorities is an important element to support those goals. From an operator's point of view, regulatory effectiveness is resulting from clear and stable rules, designed and applied in a rigorous yet pragmatic way to cater to the specificities of each type of facilities. Clear rules avoid the uncertainty related to the potential for diverging interpretations. Stability of rules ensures that solutions developed to meet the regulations and the investments made are useful and derive real value for both safety objectives and the objectives of the industry. Regulatory effectiveness is also achieved when actual experience and the input of operators can be taken into account to achieve stringent safety objectives in a most efficient way. Finally, it must be recognized that the nuclear industry is now mature and international. To further support the expected development of nuclear energy in the world, it is important to move towards harmonization of the safety regime and increased cooperation between licensing authorities. (author)

  18. Effect of piboserod, a 5-HT4 serotonin receptor antagonist, on left ventricular function in patients with symptomatic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Inge C; Kjekshus, John K; Torp-Pedersen, Christian;

    2009-01-01

    AIMS: Myocardial 5-HT(4) serotonin (5-HT) receptors are increased and activated in heart failure (HF). Blockade of 5-HT(4) receptors reduced left ventricular (LV) remodelling in HF rats. We evaluated the effect of piboserod, a potent, selective, 5-HT(4) serotonin receptor antagonist, on LV function...... weeks up titration. The primary endpoint was LVEF measured by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Secondary endpoints were LV volumes, N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide, norepinephrine, quality of life, and 6 min walk test. Piboserod significantly increased LVEF by 1.7% vs. placebo (CI 0...... of life, or exercise tolerance. Patients on piboserod reported more adverse events, but numbers were too small to identify specific safety issues. CONCLUSION: Although patients with chronic HF had a small but significant improvement in LVEF when treated with piboserod for 24 weeks, the result...

  19. Effects of the NMDA receptor antagonists on deltamethrin-induced striatal dopamine release in conscious unrestrained rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikawa, Takuya; Furuhama, Kazuhisa

    2009-08-01

    To better understand the neurotoxicity caused by the pyrethroid pesticide, we examined the effects of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists MK-801, a non-competitive cation channel blocker, and 2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (APV), a competitive Na(+) channel blocker, on extracellular dopamine levels in male Sprague-Dawley rats receiving the type II pyrethroid deltamethrin using an in vivo microdialysis system. Deltamethrin (60 mg/kg, i.p.) evidently increased striatal dopamine levels with a peak time of 120 min, and the local infusion (i.c.) of either MK-801(650 muM) or APV (500 muM) completely blocked these actions. The fluctuation in the dopamine metabolite 3-MT also resembled that in dopamine. Our results suggest that dopamine-releasing neurons would be modulated via the NMDA receptor by the excitatory glutamatergic neurons after deltamethrin treatment. PMID:19721373

  20. Pharmacological modulation of the short-lasting effects of antagonistic direct current-stimulation over the human motor cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila eChaieb

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Combined administration of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS with either pergolide (PGL or D-cycloserine (D-CYC can prolong the excitability-diminishing effects of cathodal, or the excitability enhancing effect of anodal stimulation for up to 24hrs poststimulation. However, it remains unclear whether the potentiation of the observed aftereffects is dominated by the polarity and duration of the stimulation, or the dual application of combined stimulation and drug administration. The present study looks at whether the aftereffects of oral administration of PGL (a D1/D2 agonist or D-CYC (a partial NMDA receptor agonist, in conjunction with the short duration antagonistic application of tDCS (either 5 min cathodal followed immediately by 5 min anodal or vice versa, that alone only induces short lasting aftereffects, can modulate cortical excitability in healthy human subjects, as revealed by a single-pulse MEP (motor-evoked-potential paradigm. Results indicate that the antagonistic application of DC currents induces short-term neuroplastic aftereffects that are dependent upon the polarity of the second application of short-duration tDCS. The application of D-cycloserine resulted in a reversal of this trend and so consequently a marked inhibition of cortical excitability with the cathodal-anodal stimulation order was observed. The administration of pergolide showed no significant aftereffects in either case. These results emphasise that the aftereffects of tDCS are dependent upon the stimulation orientation, and mirror the findings of other studies reporting the neuroplasticity inducing aftereffects of tDCS, and their prolongation when combined with the administration of CNS active drugs.

  1. Interleukin expression after injury and the effects of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Connie S Chamberlain

    Full Text Available Ligament healing follows a series of complex coordinated events involving various cell types, cytokines, as well as other factors, producing a mechanically inferior tissue more scar-like than native tissue. Macrophages provide an ongoing source of cytokines to modulate inflammatory cell adhesion and migration as well as fibroblast proliferation. Studying interleukins inherent to ligament healing during peak macrophage activation and angiogenesis may elucidate inflammatory mediators involved in subsequent scar formation. Herein, we used a rat healing model assayed after surgical transection of their medial collateral ligaments (MCLs. On days 3 and 7 post-injury, ligaments were collected and used for microarray analysis. Of the 12 significantly modified interleukins, components of the interleukin-1 family were significantly up-regulated. We therefore examined the influence of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra on MCL healing. Transected rat MCLs received PBS or IL-1Ra at the time of surgery. Inhibition of IL-1 activation decreased pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-12, IL-2, and IFN-γ, myofibroblasts, and proliferating cells, as well as increased anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10, endothelial cells/blood vessel lumen, M2 macrophages, and granulation tissue size without compromising the mechanical properties. These results support the concept that IL-1Ra modulates MCL-localized granulation tissue components and cytokine production to create a transient environment that is less inflammatory. Overall, IL-1Ra may have therapeutic potential early in the healing cascade by stimulating the M2 macrophages and altering the granulation tissue components. However, the single dose of IL-1Ra used in this study was insufficient to maintain the more regenerative early response. Due to the transient influence on most of the healing components tested, IL-1Ra may have greater therapeutic potential with sustained delivery.

  2. Antagonistic effects of atipamezole, flumazenil and 4-aminopyridine against anaesthesia with medetomidine, midazolam and ketamine combination in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueoka, Naotami; Hikasa, Yoshiaki

    2008-02-01

    Antagonistic effects of atipamezole (ATI), flumazenil (FLU) and 4-aminopyridine (4AP) alone and in various combinations after administration of medetomidine-midazolam-ketamine (MED-MID-KET) were evaluated in cats. Animals were anaesthetised with MED (50 microg/kg), MID (0.5 mg/kg) and KET (10 mg/kg) given intramuscularly. Twenty minutes later, physiological saline, ATI (200 microg/kg), FLU (0.1 mg/kg), 4AP (0.5 mg/kg), ATI-FLU, FLU-4AP, ATI-4AP or ATI-FLU-4AP was administered intravenously. FLU, 4AP alone, or FLU-4AP did not effectively antagonise the anaesthesia, hypothermia, bradycardia, and bradypnoea induced by MED-MID-KET. ATI alone was effective. ATI-FLU, ATI-4AP and ATI-FLU-4AP combinations produced an immediate and effective recovery from anaesthesia. The combination of ATI-FLU-4AP was the most effective in antagonising the anaesthetic effects, but was associated with tachycardia, tachypnoea, excitement, and muscle tremors. Combinations with ATI are more effective for antagonising anaesthesia, but ATI-FLU-4AP is not suitable. PMID:17766159

  3. "Synthesis and smooth muscle Calcium channel antagonist effect of Alkyl, Aminoalkyl 1,4-Dihydro-2,6-Dimethyl-4-Nitroimidazole-3,5 Pyridine Dicarboxylates "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miri R

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available The discovery that 1,4-dihydropyridine (DHP class of calcium channel antagonist inhibits the Ca+² influx represented a major therapeutic advance in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension, angina pectoris and other spastic smooth muscle disorders. A novel class of calcium channel antagonist of flunarizine containing arylpiperazinyl moiety has recently been reported. It was therefore of interest to determine the effect that selected C-3 substituents contained amino alkyl and arylpiperazine, in conjunction with a C-4 1-methyl-5-nitro-2-imidazolyl substituents on calcium channel antagonist activity. The unsymmetrical analogues were prepared by a procedure reported by Meyer in which 1-methyl-5-nitro-imidazol-2-carboxaldehyde was reacted with acetoacetic esters and alkyl 3-aminocrotonate. In vitro calcium channel antagonist activities were determined by the use of high K+ contraction of guinea pig ileal longitudinal smooth muscle. All compounds exhibited comparable calcium channel antagonist activity (IC50=10^-9 to 10^-11 M against reference drug nifedipine (IC50=2.75±0.36 x 10^-10 M.

  4. Dual Effects of IL-1 Overactivity on the Immune System in a Mouse Model of Arthritis due to Deficiency of IL-1 Receptor Antagonist

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Yan; Yan Jiao; Hong Chen; Feng Jiao; Karen A.Hasty; John M.Stuart; Weikuan Gu

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have revealed the significance of cytokine interleukin 1 (IL-1) in the onset and progression of meumatoid arthritis (RA).The precise molecular mechanisms related to IL-1 underlying RA is still elusive.We conducted a whole genome-wide transcriptomal comparison of wild-type (WT) and arthritis-prone IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-Irn) deficient BALB/c mice to address this issue.To refine our search efforts,gene expression profiling was also performed on paired wild-type and arthritis-resis nt IL-1m deficient DBA/1 mice as internal controls when identifying causative arthritis candidate genes.Two hundred and fifteen trans dpts were found to be dysregulated greater than or equal to 2-fold in the diseased mice.The altered transcriptome in BALB/c mice revealed increased myeloid cell activities and impaired lymphocyte functionality,suggesting dual regulatory effects of IL-1 hyperactivil on immunological changes associated with arthritis development.Phase-specific gene expression changes were identified,such as early increase and late decrease of heat shock protein coding genes.Moreover,common gene expression changes were also observed,especially the upregulation of paired Ig-like receptor A (Pira) in both early and late phases of arthritis.Real-time PCR was performed to validate the expression of Pira and an intervention experiment with a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I inhibitor (brefeldin A) was carried out to investigate the role of suppressing Pira activity.We conclude that global pattern changes of common and distinct gene expressions may represent novel opportunities for better control of RA through early diagnosis and development of alternative therapeutic strategies.

  5. Antagonist effect of Interleukin 1 receptor on normal thymopoiesis and thymus toxicity of 5-azacytidine in mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hongjing; Wu, Mingyuan; Wen, Bin; Sun, Ningyun; Xiang, Di; Zhang, Jing; Zhu, Shunying; Weng, Shunyan; Yu, Yan; Han, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Thymopoiesis is essential and significant for development and maintenance of the robust and healthy immune system. The acute suppression of thymopoiesis induced by 5-Azacytidine (5-Aza) is an intractable clinical problem complicating chemotherapy. Interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) is a cytokine that competitively blocks binding of interleukin 1 (IL-1) to its receptor. This study aims to investigate the effects of the IL-1Ra on the thymus toxicity of 5-Aza in mouse. In this study, we treated the mice with the 5-Aza (100 mg/kg per mouse). The GeneChip methodology developed by Affymetrix was used to monitor global gene expression during mouse thymus regeneration induced by a single injection of 5-Aza. The total thymocytes were counted using a hemocytometer. Cell cycle of samples were analyzed on a Becton Dickinson FACScan. Cells surfaces were labeled with anti-CD4, anti-CD8 and anti-CD45RA antibodies, and detected by flow cytometry. BrdU incorporation was detected by flow cytometry. The results indicated that administering exogenous IL-1Ra to normal mice inhibited cell cycle progress of thymocytes in a dosage-dependent manner. Proliferation of immature CD4-CD8- double negative (DN) and CD4+CD8+ double positive (DP) thymocytes were both inhibited. The pretreatment of normal mice with exogenous IL-1Ra reduced acute toxicity on thymus and immune suppression induced by 5-Aza. Furthermore, thymus reconstitution after 5-Aza treatment was accelerated by IL-1Ra. In conclusion, interleukin 1 receptor antagonist could inhibit normal thymopoiesis and reduce thymus toxicity of 5-azacytidine in mouse. Pretreatment with IL-1Ra would offer a new and promising strategy to alleviate immunotoxicity of chemotherapy in clinical. PMID:27158410

  6. Antagonist effect of Interleukin 1 receptor on normal thymopoiesis and thymus toxicity of 5-azacytidine in mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hongjing; Wu, Mingyuan; Wen, Bin; Sun, Ningyun; Xiang, Di; Zhang, Jing; Zhu, Shunying; Weng, Shunyan; Yu, Yan; Han, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Thymopoiesis is essential and significant for development and maintenance of the robust and healthy immune system. The acute suppression of thymopoiesis induced by 5-Azacytidine (5-Aza) is an intractable clinical problem complicating chemotherapy. Interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) is a cytokine that competitively blocks binding of interleukin 1 (IL-1) to its receptor. This study aims to investigate the effects of the IL-1Ra on the thymus toxicity of 5-Aza in mouse. In this study, we treated the mice with the 5-Aza (100 mg/kg per mouse). The GeneChip methodology developed by Affymetrix was used to monitor global gene expression during mouse thymus regeneration induced by a single injection of 5-Aza. The total thymocytes were counted using a hemocytometer. Cell cycle of samples were analyzed on a Becton Dickinson FACScan. Cells surfaces were labeled with anti-CD4, anti-CD8 and anti-CD45RA antibodies, and detected by flow cytometry. BrdU incorporation was detected by flow cytometry. The results indicated that administering exogenous IL-1Ra to normal mice inhibited cell cycle progress of thymocytes in a dosage-dependent manner. Proliferation of immature CD4(-)CD8(-) double negative (DN) and CD4(+)CD8(+) double positive (DP) thymocytes were both inhibited. The pretreatment of normal mice with exogenous IL-1Ra reduced acute toxicity on thymus and immune suppression induced by 5-Aza. Furthermore, thymus reconstitution after 5-Aza treatment was accelerated by IL-1Ra. In conclusion, interleukin 1 receptor antagonist could inhibit normal thymopoiesis and reduce thymus toxicity of 5-azacytidine in mouse. Pretreatment with IL-1Ra would offer a new and promising strategy to alleviate immunotoxicity of chemotherapy in clinical. PMID:27158410

  7. [Effect of excitant amino acid antagonists on glutamate receptors in the locust and on convulsions induced by glutamate, aspartate, kynurenine and quinolinic acid in mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryzhov, I V; Slepokurov, M V; Lapin, I P; Mandel'shtam, Iu E; Aleksandrov, V G

    1986-03-01

    All excitatory amino acid antagonists studied: diethyl esters of aspartic (DEEA) and glutamic (DEEG) acids, 2-amino-3-phosphono-propionic acid (APPA) and 2-amino-4-phosphono-butanoic acid (APBA), diminished the amplitude of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPP) of the locust (Locusta migratoria migratorioides) muscle fibers and arbitrary blocked glutamate (GLU) and aspartate (ASP) responses. Kynurenine (KYN) and quinolinic (QUI) acid had no effect on EPP even at a concentration of 2 X 10(-2) M. The antagonists were not strictly selective against intracerebroventricularly administered endogenous convulsants: GLU, ASP, KYN and QUI and in simulation of experimental seizures in mice. The antagonists structurally similar to ASP prevented ASP- and KYN-induced seizures in lower doses than GLU derivatives. Anti-KYN, but not anti-QUI DEEA, DEEG, APPA and APBA efficacy suggests that KYN and QUI act on different structures or binding sites. PMID:2869799

  8. Assessment of the Effectiveness of Operational and Regulatory Systems in Nuclear and Radiation Practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upon choosing a nuclear option and during the implementation or operation of the project, frequently two main questions are asked are relevant to the effectiveness of both the project management or the operating system of the project and the regulatory authority or system that is responsible of performing the regulatory functions relevant to assuring the state about the safety and securing of the whole project and the security of the nuclear material involved as well as the safety and security of the environment. In the present work the main issues that can be adopted as indicators of the effectiveness of both the operational system as well as the regulatory system are discussed. Moreover, some issues concerning the role of the workers in the project as well as on site dosimetry and their relation to the effectiveness of the project management or the regulatory body are also discussed. Key words: Assessment/ Regulatory body/ Regulatory authority/ Operational system/ effectiveness

  9. Psychomotor effects, pharmacokinetics and safety of the orexin receptor antagonist suvorexant administered in combination with alcohol in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hong; Yee, Ka Lai; Gill, Sean; Liu, Wen; Li, Xiaodong; Panebianco, Deborah; Mangin, Eric; Morrison, Dennis; McCrea, Jacqueline; Wagner, John A; Troyer, Matthew D

    2015-11-01

    A double-blind crossover study investigated psychomotor effects, pharmacokinetics, and safety of the orexin receptor antagonist suvorexant with and without alcohol. Healthy adults (n=31) were randomized to receive placebo or suvorexant (40 mg) plus placebo solution or alcohol (0.7 g/kg) in each of four treatments (single doses; morning administration). The US Food and Drug Administration approved suvorexant dose is 10 mg (up to 20 mg) daily. Pharmacodynamic effects were assessed using tests of digit vigilance (DVT; primary endpoint), choice reaction time, digit symbol substitution, numeric working memory, immediate/delayed word recall, body sway and subjective alertness. Suvorexant alone did not significantly affect DVT reaction time, but did impact some pharmacodynamic tests. Suvorexant with alcohol increased reaction time versus either alone (mean difference at 2 h: 44 ms versus suvorexant, p<0.001; 24 ms, versus alcohol, p<0.05) and had additive negative effects on tests of vigilance, working/episodic memory, postural stability and alertness. No effects of suvorexant alone or with alcohol were observed by 9 h. No important changes in pharmacokinetic parameters were observed upon co-administration. All treatments were generally well tolerated without serious adverse events. In conclusion, co-administration of 40 mg suvorexant and 0.7 g/kg alcohol had additive negative psychomotor effects. Patients are advised not to consume alcohol with suvorexant. PMID:26464455

  10. The interactive effects of ammonia and microcystin on life-history traits of the cladoceran Daphnia magna: synergistic or antagonistic?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Yang

    Full Text Available The occurrence of Microcystis blooms is a worldwide concern that has caused numerous adverse effects on water quality and lake ecology. Elevated ammonia and microcystin concentrations co-occur during the degradation of Microcystis blooms and are toxic to aquatic organisms; we studied the relative and combined effects of these on the life history of the model organism Daphnia magna. Ammonia and microcystin-LR treatments were: 0, 0.366, 0.581 mg L(-1 and 0, 10, 30, 100 µg L(-1, respectively. Experiments followed a fully factorial design. Incubations were 14 d and recorded the following life-history traits: number of moults, time to first batch of eggs, time to first clutch, size at first batch of eggs, size at first clutch, number of clutches per female, number of offspring per clutch, and total offspring per female. Both ammonia and microcystin were detrimental to most life-history traits. Interactive effects of the toxins occurred for five traits: the time to first batch of eggs appearing in the brood pouch, time to first clutch, size at first clutch, number of clutches, and total offspring per female. The interactive effects of ammonia and microcystin appeared to be synergistic on some parameters (e.g., time to first eggs and antagonistic on others (e.g., total offspring per female. In conclusion, the released toxins during the degradation of Microcystis blooms would result, according to our data, in substantially negative effect on D. magna.

  11. Epigenetically Mediated Pathogenic Effects of Phenanthrene on Regulatory T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Phenanthrene (Phe, a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH, is a major constituent of urban air pollution. There have been conflicting results regarding the role of other AhR ligands 2,3,7,8- tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD and 6-formylindolo [3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ in modifying regulatory T cell populations (Treg or T helper (Th17 differentiation, and the effects of Phe have been understudied. We hypothesized that different chemical entities of PAH induce Treg to become either Th2 or Th17 effector T cells through epigenetic modification of FOXP3. To determine specific effects on T cell populations by phenanthrene, primary human Treg were treated with Phe, TCDD, or FICZ and assessed for function, gene expression, and phenotype. Methylation of CpG sites within the FOXP3 locus reduced FOXP3 expression, leading to impaired Treg function and conversion of Treg into a CD4+CD25lo Th2 phenotype in Phe-treated cells. Conversely, TCDD treatment led to epigenetic modification of IL-17A and conversion of Treg to Th17 T cells. These findings present a mechanism by which exposure to AhR-ligands mediates human T cell responses and begins to elucidate the relationship between environmental exposures, immune modulation, and initiation of human disease.

  12. The Comparison of Antagonistic Effects of Normal Vaginal Lactobacilli and Some Commonly used Antibiotics on Isolated Bacteria of Uterine Infections in Dairy Cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pouya Dini

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Uterine infections are one of the major reproductive complications during postpartum. The antibiotics and antiseptic agents used in the treatment of postpartum infections have residues in food, induce bacterial resistance, increase the financial costs and cause failure in defense mechanism of host. On the other hand, nowadays the administration of probiotics is considered as an alternative method for the prevention and treatment of infections. Therefore, preventive treatment with probiotic product could decrease the usage of antibiotic and bring advantages in dairy farm systems. The objective of this study was screening of the antagonistic properties of isolated vaginal Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB against the most prevalent bacteria in uterine infections in order to investigate their probiotic potentials as an alternative approach for prevention of uterine infections. LAB were isolated from sampling of cranial part of vagina during estrus phase and luteal phase of Holstein dairy cattle and pathogens bacteria were isolated from merits and endometritis specimens which referred to our veterinary laboratory. The antagonistic activity of isolated LAB against uterine pathogens was tested by Agar spot test. Antibiotic susceptibilities of pathogenic strains to commonly used antibiotics were investigated by using disc diffusion method. Inhibition zones around both the probiotic spots and the antibiotic discs were classified to weak, moderate and strong categories and their antagonistic efficacies were compared. Isolated LAB had antagonistic effects against all the pathogenic strains including both gram negative and gram positive, Arcanobacterium pyogenes and Pseudomonas aeroginosa were the most sensitive bacteria (with 12.60 and 14 mm an average inhibition zone, respectively. LAB had the least antagonistic effects on Clostridium perfringens (3.6 mm of an average inhibition zone. Comparing the antagonistic efficacies, the percentages of overall

  13. Differences between negative inotropic and vasodilator effects of calcium antagonists acting on extra- and intracellular calcium movements in rat and guinea-pig cardiac preparations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hugtenburg, J.G.; Mathy, M.-J.; Boddeke, H.W.G.M.; Beckeringh, J.J.; Van Zwieten, P.A.

    1989-01-01

    In order to get more insight into the utilization of calcium in the mammalian heart and the influence of calcium antagonists on this process we have evaluated the negative inotropic and vasodilator effect of nifedipine, diltiazem, verapamil, bepridil and lidoflazine as well as of the intracellularly

  14. Co-administration of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) and TRPV1 antagonists potentiate the effect of each drug in a rat model of cystitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Charrua, A.; Cruz, C.D.; Jansen, D.; Rozenberg, B.; Heesakkers, J.P.; Cruz, F.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) expression in bladder afferents and study the effect of TRPV4 and TRPV1 antagonists, alone and in combination, in bladder hyperactivity and pain induced by cystitis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: TRPV4 expression in bladder afferents

  15. Comparison of the vasoconstrictor effects of the calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor antagonist telcagepant (MK-0974) and zolmitriptan in human isolated coronary arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynch, Joseph J; Regan, Christopher P; Edvinsson, Lars; Hargreaves, Richard J; Kane, Stefanie A

    2010-01-01

    Studies were conducted in human isolated coronary arteries to explore the vascular effects of the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist telcagepant and to compare its coronary vasoconstrictive potential to that of zolmitriptan. KCl precontracted coronary vessels were shown to...

  16. An antagonist of lipid A action in mammals has complex effects on lipid A induction of defence responses in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erbs, Gitte; Jensen, Tina Tandrup; Silipo, Alba;

    2008-01-01

    perception that underpin these effects in plants are, however, unknown. Here, lipid A from Halomonas magadiensis, which is an antagonist of lipid A action in human cells, was used to investigate lipid A action in plants. Our findings offer an insight into the different structural requirements for direct...

  17. Chronic psychosocial stress in tree shrews : effect of the substance P (NK1 receptor) antagonist L-760735 and clomipramine on endocrine and behavioral parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Hart, MGC; de Biurrun, G; Czeh, B; Rupniak, NMJ; den Boer, JA; Fuchs, E

    2005-01-01

    Rationale: Substance P and its preferred receptor, the neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R), have been proposed as possible targets for new antidepressant therapies, although results of a recently completed phase III trial failed to demonstrate that the NK1R antagonist MK-869 is more effective than placebo

  18. Effects of dopamine D1 and D2 receptor agonists and antagonists on bombesin-induced behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merali, Z; Piggins, H

    1990-12-01

    Central administration of bombesin elicits excessive grooming and locomotor activity in rats. This grooming activity is one characterised by vigorous scratching of the face, nape and body flanks. Pretreatment with the D1 receptor antagonist SCH 23390 inhibited the expression of bombesin-induced activity with grooming being more inhibited than locomotion. Blockade of D2 receptors with eticlopride significantly attenuated the behavioral responses to bombesin. When SCH 23390 and eticlopride were administered concurrently, it was apparent that D1 blockade had a greater effect on grooming and D2 blockade a larger effect on locomotion. Stimulation of D1 receptors by SKF 38393 elicited non-stereotyped locomotor activity and a form of grooming behavior characterised by vigorous washing of the face and ventral body surfaces. Co-administration of bombesin and SKF 38393 resulted in a form of grooming which resembled that elicited by SKF 38393 alone. The specific D2 agonist PPHT elicited a form of locomotion characterised by a downward oriented head posture and slow ambulatory activity around the cage perimeter. Co-administration of PPHT and bombesin resulted in a complete suppression of bombesin-induced behaviors and was largely indistinguishable from activity observed under PPHT alone conditions. These data implicate both D1 and D2 receptor based mechanisms in the modulation/mediation of the behavioral effects of bombesin. Part of the bombesin-induced behavioral effects may be explained by (indirect) activation of (a) dopamine system(s). PMID:2086245

  19. Effective Separation between Regulatory Function and Promotional Function in the Government of Uganda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increasing demand for clean and sustainable energy has resulted in many countries considering nuclear energy as one of the options. In 2009, the IAEA noted a wide use of radioactive sources and ionizing radiation and clearly indicated that many countries expressed the need to introduce nuclear power into their national energy mix. However, the plans for developing nuclear power programme in some countries were faster than the establishment of the necessary infrastructure and capabilities. Uganda is one of the countries that are considering introducing nuclear power into their energy mix, and thus, in 2009, established the Atomic Energy Council to regulate the peaceful application of ionizing radiation. Although the government of Uganda has done much to establish an independent regulatory body, the regulatory personnel should guard against pressure from government institutions and stake holders that can unduly influence regulatory decision making. In addition, they need to be fully aware of their authority. The purpose of this paper was to assess the perceived regulatory independence of regulatory staff as one of the basic personal attributes for effective and efficient execution of regulatory activities. Furthermore, effective separation between regulatory function and promotional function in Uganda was noted as one of the fundamental requisites for effective regulatory performance especially during the early infancy period of a regulatory body. The study assessed the perceived regulatory independence in comparison with the theoretical independence. The results showed a good sense of independence by the staff and thus, the approach can be used for regulatory body self-assessment. However, more appropriate forums such as the Integrated Regulatory Review Services or the Convention on Nuclear Safety are suggested as the best ways of assessing regulatory independence

  20. Dopamine antagonist-induced reproductive function in anoestrous mares: gonadotrophin secretion and the effects of environmental cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daels, P F; Fatone, S; Hansen, B S; Concannon, P W

    2000-01-01

    The effect of the dopamine antagonist sulpiride on FSH secretion and onset of reproductive activity in anoestrous mares under different environmental conditions was investigated. In Expt 1, sulpiride (0.5 mg (-)-sulpiride kg(-1) twice a day) had no affect on FSH pulse frequency, mean FSH concentration, basal FSH concentration or FSH pulse amplitude in anoestrous mares. These data do not support the hypothesis that dopamine inhibits reproductive activity by suppressing GnRH secretion, as it does in other species. In Expt 2, the interval to first ovulation (14.8 +/- 1.9 days; range 12-22 days) in five mares treated with sulpiride (0.5 mg (-)-sulpiride kg(-1) twice a day) housed indoors under extended daylength (16 h light: 8 h dark) was significantly shorter (P mares housed indoors under extended daylength (34.3 +/- 5.5; range 16-52 days and seven untreated mares housed outside under natural photoperiod (73 +/- 10; range 37-107 days). However, if the FSH secretion parameters at the start of treatment are treated as covariants, each has a significant effect (P mares maintained outside under natural photoperiod. These results indicate that sulpiride treatment combined with increased temperature (indoor housing) and stimulatory photoperiod (extended daylength) results in a shorter interval to first ovulation and that a nonstimulatory environment decreases the effect of treatment on the interval to first ovulation. The role of FSH secretion at the time of treatment remains to be determined. PMID:20681129

  1. The Antagonistic Effect of Selenium on Lead Toxicity Is Related to the Ion Profile in Chicken Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tong; Gao, Xuejiao; Liu, Guowen

    2016-02-01

    The interactions between the essential element selenium (Se) and the toxic element lead (Pb) have been reported extensively; however, limited data are available regarding the effects of Se on Pb and the ion profile in chicken liver. Whether the change in the ion profile was involved in the protective process of Se and the toxic effect of Pb is unknown. In the present study, we detected 26 ion profiles (including those of Na, Mg, K, Ca, B, Si, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Se, Mo, Sb, Ba, Tl, Li, Al, As, Cd, Sn, Hg, and Pb) in chicken liver following treatment with Se or Pb and with the compound treatment of Se and Pb. The results showed that Se supplementation decreased the content of B and Cr and increased that of Zn and Ba (P Cu, Se, Mo, and Hg and increased V, Fe, Cd, and Sn (P Cu and Mn. The results also indicated that there existed both synergistic and antagonistic interactions between different ions, further verifying the principal component analysis. Thus, the results showed that prolonged exposure to Se and Pb influences the ion profiles in chicken liver. The protective role of Se and toxic effect of Pb may be related to these changing ion profiles in chicken liver. PMID:26123166

  2. Transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 antagonists block the noxious effects of toxic industrial isocyanates and tear gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessac, Bret F; Sivula, Michael; von Hehn, Christian A; Caceres, Ana I; Escalera, Jasmine; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2009-04-01

    The release of methyl isocyanate in Bhopal, India, caused the worst industrial accident in history. Exposures to industrial isocyanates induce lacrimation, pain, airway irritation, and edema. Similar responses are elicited by chemicals used as tear gases. Despite frequent exposures, the biological targets of isocyanates and tear gases in vivo have not been identified, precluding the development of effective countermeasures. We use Ca(2+) imaging and electrophysiology to show that the noxious effects of isocyanates and those of all major tear gas agents are caused by activation of Ca(2+) influx and membrane currents in mustard oil-sensitive sensory neurons. These responses are mediated by transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), an ion channel serving as a detector for reactive chemicals. In mice, genetic ablation or pharmacological inhibition of TRPA1 dramatically reduces isocyanate- and tear gas-induced nocifensive behavior after both ocular and cutaneous exposures. We conclude that isocyanates and tear gas agents target the same neuronal receptor, TRPA1. Treatment with TRPA1 antagonists may prevent and alleviate chemical irritation of the eyes, skin, and airways and reduce the adverse health effects of exposures to a wide range of toxic noxious chemicals. PMID:19036859

  3. Novel selective cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist MJ08 with potent in vivo bioactivity and inverse agonistic effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei CHEN; Cheng XU; Hong-ying LIU; Long LONG; Wei ZHANG; Zhi-bing ZHENG; Yun-de XIE; Li-li WANG; Song LI

    2011-01-01

    To characterize the biological profiles of M J08,a novel selective CB1 receptor antagonist.Methods:Radioligand binding assays were performed using rat brain and spleen membrane preparations.CB1 and CB2 receptor redistribution and intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]1) assays were performed with IN CELL Analyzer.Inverse agonism was studied using intracellular cAMP assays,and in guinea-pig ileum and mouse vas deferens smooth muscle preparations.In vivo pharmacologic profile was assessed in diet-induced obesity (DIO) mice.Results:In radioligand binding assay,M J08 selectively antagonized CB1 receptor (IC50=99.9 nmol/L).In EGFP-CB1_U20S cells,its IC50 value against CB1 receptor activation was 30.23 nmol/L (SR141716A:32.16 nmol/L).WIN 55,212-2 (1 μmol/L) increased [Ca2+]1 in the primary cultured hippocampal neuronal cells and decreased cAMP accumulation in CHO-hCB1 cells.M J08 (10 nmol/L-1O μmol/L)blocked both the WIN 55,212-2-induced effects.Furthermore,M J08 reversed the inhibition of electrically evoked twitches of mouse vas deferens by WIN 55,212-2 (pA2=10.29±1.05).M J08 and SR141716A both showed an inverse agonism activity by markedly promoting the contraction force and frequency of guinea pig ileum muscle.M J08 significantly increased the cAMP level in CHO-hCB1 cells with an EC50 value of 78.6 nmol/L,which was lower than the EC50 value for SR141716A (159.2 nmol/L).Besides the more potent pharmacological effects of cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonism in DIO mice,such as reducing food intake,decreasing body weight,and ameliorating dyslipidemia,M J08 (10 mg/kg) unexpectedly raised the fasted blood glucose in vivo.Conclusion:M J08 is a novel,potent and selective CB1 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist with potent bioactive responses in vitro and in vivo that may be useful for disclosure the versatile nature of CB1 receptors.

  4. Isolation and molecular identification chitinase-producing Streptomyces strains and examination of their in-vitro antagonistic effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Dehnad

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The chemical fungicides are used widely in the world. To reduce the application of synthetic fungicides in treating plant diseases, biological methods are considered as an alternative way to control plant diseases. Many actinomycetes, particularly Streptomyces species are biological agents against a broad spectrum of fungal plant pathogens. The purpose of this study was using the kitinolitik actinomycetes isolated from soil of Eastern Azerbaijan province In order to produce biological pesticides. Materials and methods: Soil samples were taken from different areas of Eastern Azerbaijan province. According to Streptomyces morphological features, single colonies were isolated. To identify the bacteria by molecular characteristic, the genomic DNA was extracted and then the sequences of 16S rDNA were replicated. By using specific primers the bacterial isolates containing chitinase gene were screened. The isolates consisted Chitinase enzyme and were antagonistically cultured with Alternaria genus which is a fungal plant pathogen. Results: Out of 60 soil collected samples, 31 Streptomyces bacterial isolates were separated. Four isolates showed positive results to selectivity action of the chitinase enzyme. Treatment of 3 bacterial isolates with 2 pathogenic fungi showed that AE09 is the most effective anti-fungal isolates. Discussion and conclusion: Soils in Eastern Azerbaijan province are rich of Streptomyces bacteria which generate antifungal compounds. Obtaining the Streptomyces bacteria which have chitinase gene, can lead to identification of very effective strains as anti-fungal.

  5. Synergistic growth inhibitory effects of the dual endothelin-1 receptor antagonist bosentan on pancreatic stellate and cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzner, Brit; Brock, Peter; Holzhüter, Stephanie-Anna; Nizze, Horst; Sparmann, Gisela; Emmrich, Jörg; Liebe, Stefan; Jaster, Robert

    2009-02-01

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSC) play a key role in pancreatic fibrosis. Activation of PSC occurs in response to pro-fibrogenic stimuli and is maintained by autocrine loops of mediators, such as endothelin (ET)-1. Here, we have evaluated effects of the dual ET receptor antagonist bosentan in models of pancreatic fibrogenesis and cancer. Cell culture studies revealed that PSC and DSL6A pancreatic cancer cells expressed both ET-1 and ET receptors. Bosentan efficiently inhibited proliferation of both cell types and collagen synthesis in PSC. Expression of the myofibroblastic marker alpha-smooth muscle actin, connective tissue growth factor, and ET-1 itself in PSC was reduced, while expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 was enhanced. Like PSC, DSL6A cells secrete less ET-1 when cultured with bosentan. In a rat model of pancreatic fibrosis, chronic pancreatitis induced by dibutyltin dichloride, a tendency towards a diminished disease progression was observed in a subgroup of rats with less severe disease. Together, our results indicate that bosentan exerts antifibrotic and antitumor effects in vitro. Its efficiency in vivo warrants further investigation. PMID:18612819

  6. Effect of intravenously-administered putative and potential antagonists of ethanol on sleep time in ethanol-narcotized mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatch, R.C.; Jernigan, A.D.

    1988-01-01

    Groups of male CD-1 mice (n = 12/group) were injected intraperitoneally (IP) with 5 g ethanol/kg of body weight. After loss of righting reflex, they were given vehicle or one of 2-3 doses of reputed or potential antagonists of ethanol intravenously (IV). Sleep time was measured from loss to return of righting reflex. Mean sleep time (MST) was increased significantly by a large dose of dl-amphetamine and by 4-aminopyridine. Significant increases were also produced by small and large doses of aminophylline and by yohimbine. MST was not altered significantly by small and medium doses of dl-amphetamine, a medium dose of aminophylline, or by any doses of naloxone, thyrotropin-releasing hormone, propranolol, physostigmine, doxapram, or Ro 15-4513. When Ro 15-4513 was given IP 15 minutes before ethanol (n = 6/group), onset and duration of narcosis were not altered. None of the compounds tested was an effective IV antidote for deep ethanol narcosis because of drug side effects, toxicity, prolongation of MST, or insufficient shortening of MST. 36 references, 1 table.

  7. Neuroprotective effects of the AMPA antagonist PNQX in oxygen-glucose deprivation in mouse hippocampal slice cultures and global cerebral ischemia in gerbils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montero, Maria; Nielsen, Marianne; Rønn, Lars Christian B;

    2007-01-01

    PNQX (9-methyl-amino-6-nitro-hexahydro-benzo(F)quinoxalinedione) is a selective AMPA antagonist with demonstrated neuroprotective effects in focal ischemia in rats. Here we report corresponding effects in mouse hippocampal slice cultures subjected to oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) and in....... For comparison, other cultures were exposed to the NMDA antagonist MK-801 using the same protocol. Both PNQX and MK-801 displayed significant neuroprotective effects in all hippocampal subfields when present during and after OGD. When added just after OGD, only PNQX retained some neuroprotective...... effect. When added 2 h after OGD neither PNQX nor MK-801 had an effect. Transient global cerebral ischemia was induced in Mongolian gerbils by occlusion of both common carotid arteries for 4.5 min, with PNQX (10 mg/kg) being injected i.p. 30, 60 and 90 min after the insult. Subsequent analysis of brain...

  8. Effect of the Cannabinoid Receptor-1 antagonist SR141716A on human adipocyte inflammatory profile and differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murumalla Ravi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity is characterized by inflammation, caused by increase in proinflammatory cytokines, a key factor for the development of insulin resistance. SR141716A, a cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1 antagonist, shows significant improvement in clinical status of obese/diabetic patients. Therefore, we studied the effect of SR141716A on human adipocyte inflammatory profile and differentiation. Methods Adipocytes were obtained from liposuction. Stromal vascular cells were extracted and differentiated into adipocytes. Media and cells were collected for secretory (ELISA and expression analysis (qPCR. Triglyceride accumulation was observed using oil red-O staining. Cholesterol was assayed by a fluorometric method. 2-AG and anandamide were quantified using isotope dilution LC-MS. TLR-binding experiments have been conducted in HEK-Blue cells. Results In LPS-treated mature adipocytes, SR141716A was able to decrease the expression and secretion of TNF-a. This molecule has the same effect in LPS-induced IL-6 secretion, while IL-6 expression is not changed. Concerning MCP-1, the basal level is down-regulated by SR141716A, but not the LPS-induced level. This effect is not caused by a binding of the molecule to TLR4 (LPS receptor. Moreover, SR141716A restored adiponectin secretion to normal levels after LPS treatment. Lastly, no effect of SR141716A was detected on human pre-adipocyte differentiation, although the compound enhanced adiponectin gene expression, but not secretion, in differentiated pre-adipocytes. Conclusion We show for the first time that some clinical effects of SR141716A are probably directly related to its anti-inflammatory effect on mature adipocytes. This fact reinforces that adipose tissue is an important target in the development of tools to treat the metabolic syndrome.

  9. Cardiometabolic effects of genetic upregulation of the interleukin 1 receptor antagonist : A Mendelian randomisation analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freitag, Daniel; Butterworth, Adam S.; Willeit, Peter; Howson, Joanna M M; Burgess, Stephen; Kaptoge, Stephen; Young, Robin; Ho, Weang Kee; Wood, Angela M.; Sweeting, Michael; Spackman, Sarah; Staley, James R.; Ramond, Anna; Harshfield, Eric; Nielsen, Sune F.; Grande, Peer; Lange, Leslie A.; Bown, Matthew J.; Jones, Gregory T.; Scott, Robert A.; Bevan, Steve; Porcu, Eleonora; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Zeng, Lingyao; Kessler, Thorsten; Nikpay, Majid; Do, Ron; Zhang, Weihua; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Kleber, Marcus; Delgado, Graciela E.; Nelson, Christopher P.; Goel, Anuj; Bis, Joshua C.; Dehghan, Abbas; Ligthart, Symen; Smith, Albert V.; Qu, Liming; van 't Hof, Femke N G; de Bakker, Paul I W; Baas, Annette F.; van Rij, Andre; Tromp, Gerard; Kuivaniemi, Helena; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Verma, Shefali S.; Crawford, Dana C.; Malinowski, Jennifer; de Andrade, Mariza; Kullo, Iftikhar J.; Peissig, Peggy L.; McCarty, Catherine A.; Böttinger, Erwin P.; Gottesman, Omri; Crosslin, David R.; Carrell, David S.; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J.; Pacheco, Jennifer A.; Huang, Jie; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Kettunen, Johannes; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Mitchell, Gary F.; Parsa, Afshin; Wilkinson, Ian B.; Gorski, Mathias; Li, Yong; Franceschini, Nora; Keller, Margaux F.; Ganesh, Santhi K.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Bruijn, Lucie; Brown, Matthew A.; Evans, David M.; Baltic, Svetlana; Ferreira, Manuel A.; Baurecht, Hansjörg; Weidinger, Stephan; Franke, Andre; Lubitz, Steven A.; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Felix, Janine F.; Smith, Nicholas L.; Sudman, Marc; Thompson, Susan D.; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Panoutsopoulou, Kalliope; Nalls, Mike A.; Singleton, Andrew; Polychronakos, Constantin; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Easton, Douglas F.; Thompson, Deborah; Tomlinson, Ian P.; Dunlop, Malcolm; Hemminki, Kari; Morgan, Gareth; Eisen, Timothy; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Allan, James M.; Henrion, Marc; Whiffin, Nicola; Wang, Yufei; Chubb, Daniel; Iles, Mark M.; Bishop, D. Timothy; Law, Matthew H.; Hayward, Nicholas K.; Luo, Yang; Nejentsev, Sergey; Barbalic, Maja; Crossman, David; Sanna, Serena; Soranzo, Nicole; Markus, Hugh S.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Rader, Daniel J.; Reilly, Muredach; Assimes, Themistocles; Harris, Tamara B.; Hofman, Albert; Franco, Oscar H.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Tracy, Russell; Psaty, Bruce M.; Farrall, Martin; Watkins, Hugh; Hall, Alistair S.; Samani, Nilesh J.; März, Winfried; Clarke, Robert; Collins, Rory; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Chambers, John C.; Kathiresan, Sekar; McPherson, Ruth; Erdmann, Jeanette; Kastrati, Adnan; Schunkert, Heribert; Stefánsson, Kári; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Walston, Jeremy D.; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Alam, Dewan S.; Al Shafi Majumder, Abdullah; Angelantonio, Emanuele Di; Chowdhury, Rajiv; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Saleheen, Danish; Thompson, Simon G.; Danesh, John; Houlston, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    To investigate potential cardiovascular and other effects of long-term pharmacological interleukin 1 (IL-1) inhibition, we studied genetic variants that produce inhibition of IL-1, a master regulator of inflammation. Methods: We created a genetic score combining the effects of alleles of two common

  10. Cardiometabolic effects of genetic upregulation of the interleukin 1 receptor antagonist: A Mendelian randomisation analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. Freitag (Christine); A.S. Butterworth (Adam); J. Willeit (Johann); J.M.M. Howson (Joanna M.M.); S. Burgess (Stephen); S. Kaptoge (Stephen); R. Young (Robin); W.K. Ho (Weang Kee); A.M. Wood (Angela); M. Sweeting (Michael); S. Spackman (Sarah); J.R. Staley (James R.); A. Ramond (Anna); E. Harshfield (Eric); S.F. Nielsen (Sune); P. Grande (Peer); L.A. Lange (Leslie); M.J. Bown (Matthew J.); G.T. Jones (Gregory); R.A. Scott (Robert); S. Bevan (Steve); E. Porcu (Eleonora); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); L. Zeng (Lingyao); T. Kessler (Thorsten); M. Nikpay (Majid); R. Do (Ron); W. Zhang (Weihua); J. Hopewell; M.E. Kleber (Marcus); G. Delgado; C.P. Nelson (Christopher P.); A. Goel (Anuj); J.C. Bis (Joshua); A. Dehghan (Abbas); S. Ligthart (Symen); G.D. Smith; L. Qu (Liming); F.N.G. Van 'T Hof (Femke); P.I.W. de Bakker (Paul); A.F. Baas (Annette); A.M. van Rij (Andre); G. Tromp (Gerard); H. Kuivaniemi (Helena); M.D. Ritchie (Marylyn D.); S.S. Verma (Shefali S.); D.C. Crawford (Dana); J. Malinowski (Jennifer); M. de Andrade (Mariza); I. Kullo (Iftikhar); P.L. Peissig (Peggy L.); C.A. McCarty (Catherine A.); E.P. Bottinger (Erwin); R.F. Gottesman (Rebecca); D.R. Crosslin (David); D.S. Carrell (David); L.J. Rasmussen-Torvik (Laura J.); J.A. Pacheco (Jennifer A.); J. Huang (Jie); N. Timpson (Nicholas); J. Kettunen (Johannes); M. Ala-Korpela (Mika); G.F. Mitchell (Gary); A. Parsa (Afshin); I.B. Wilkinson (Ian B.); M. Gorski (Mathias); Y. Li (Yong); N. Franceschini (Nora); M.F. Keller (Margaux); S.K. Ganesh (Santhi); C.D. Langefeld (Carl); L. Bruijn (Lucie); M.A. Brown (Matthew); D.M. Evans (David M.); S. Baltic (Svetlana); M.A. Ferreira (Manuel); H. Baurecht (Hansjörg); S. Weidinger (Stephan); A. Franke (Andre); S.A. Lubitz (Steven); M. Müller-Nurasyid (Martina); J.F. Felix (Janine); N.L. Smith (Nicholas); M. Sudman (Marc); S.D. Thompson (Susan D.); E. Zeggini (Eleftheria); K. Panoutsopoulou (Kalliope); M.A. Nalls (Michael); A. Singleton (Andrew); C. Polychronakos (Constantin); J.P. Bradfield (Jonathan); H. Hakonarson (Hakon); D.F. Easton (Douglas); D. Thompson (Deborah); I.P. Tomlinson (Ian); M. Dunlop (Malcolm); K. Hemminki (Kari); G. Morgan (Gareth); T. Eisen (Timothy); H. Goldschmidt (Hartmut); J.M. Allan (James); M. Henrion (Marc); N. Whiffin (Nicola); Y. Wang (Yufei); D. Chubb (Daniel); M.M. Iles (Mark M.); D.T. Bishop (David Timothy); M.H. Law (Matthew H.); N. Hayward (Nick); Y. Luo (Yang); S. Nejentsev (Sergey); M. Barbalic (maja); D. Crossman (David); S. Sanna (Serena); N. Soranzo (Nicole); H.S. Markus (Hugh); N.J. Wareham (Nick); D.J. Rader (Daniel); M.P. Reilly (Muredach); T.L. Assimes (Themistocles); T.B. Harris (Tamara B.); A. Hofman (Albert); O.H. Franco (Oscar); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); R.P. Tracy (Russell); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); M. Farrall (Martin); H. Watkins (Hugh); A.S. Hall (Alistair); N.J. Samani (Nilesh); W. März (Winfried); R. Clarke (Robert); F.S. Collins (Francis); J.S. Kooner (Jaspal S.); J.C. Chambers (John C.); S. Kathiresan (Sekar); R. McPherson (Ruth); J. Erdmann (Jeanette); A. Kastrati (Adnan); H. Schunkert (Heribert); J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); J. Walston (Jeremy); A. Tybjaerg-Hansen; D.S. Alam (Dewan S.); A. Al Shafi Majumder (Abdullah); E.D. Angelantonio (Emanuele Di); R. Chowdhury (Rajiv); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); D. Saleheen; S.G. Thompson (Simon); J. Danesh (John); R. Houlston (Richard)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractTo investigate potential cardiovascular and other effects of long-term pharmacological interleukin 1 (IL-1) inhibition, we studied genetic variants that produce inhibition of IL-1, a master regulator of inflammation. Methods: We created a genetic score combining the effects of alleles of

  11. Biphasic effects of direct, but not indirect, GABA mimetics and antagonists on haloperidol-induced catalepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worms, P; Lloyd, K G

    1980-03-01

    At very low doses the GABA agonists SL 76002 and muscimol diminish haloperidol-induced catalepsy. At somewhat higher doses these compounds potentiate catalepsy. Biphasic effects on DA-receptor mediated functions have previously been noted with bicuculline and picrotoxinin. In contrast, manipulation of GABA levels by enzyme inhibition induced only a monophasic effect on dopamine-mediated behaviour. The potentiation of GABA levels by enzyme inhibition induced only a monophasic effect on dopamine-mediated behaviour. The potentiation of haloperidol-induced catalepsy by GABA mimetics is also observed with dipropylacetate, delta-aminovaleric acid and gamma-acetylenic GABA. This GABA-mimetic potentiation of catakepsy was blocked by the coadministration of bicuculline. These results confirm and extend the hypothesis that GABA-neurons influence DA neuron function. Furthermore they suggest that more than one group of GABA receptors influence directly and/or indirectly DA neuronal function, with different resultant effects. PMID:7189827

  12. Effects of a 5-HT3 agonist and antagonist on inter-male aggression in Mus musculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Kerchner

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Research has revealed an inverse relationship between serotonin (5-HT levels in the brain and aggressive behavior. However, effects on aggression at the level of the receptor have yet to be elucidated for many 5-HT receptor subtypes. This study examined the effects of the 5-HT3 receptor agonist m-chlorophenylbiguanide (mCPBG and antagonist ondansetron on inter-male aggression in mice. Using a resident-intruder paradigm designed to assess both offensive and defensive aggression, male C57BL/6J mice received 1 mg/kg i.p. injections of either mCPBG, ondansetron, or an inactive vehicle and were subsequently exposed to male AKR/J mice for a period of 10 minutes. Attack latency and the proportion of time engaged in a range of defensive behaviors were recorded. Subject C57BL/6J mice were then immediately run in an open field test for an additional 10 minutes to examine any anxiolytic or sedative effects of the drugs. Results show no significant differences between drug groups in either offensive or defensive behavior. No significant differences were observed between drug groups and open field activity; however, significant differences were seen between the offensive and defensive condition in the open field. In conclusion, this study fails to reveal any significant effects of the 5-HT3 agents on inter-male aggression, which may reflect a functional difference between the 5-HT3 receptor and the remaining G-protein coupled 5-HT receptor. However, this conclusion is limited by the large variance in behavior combined with small sample sizes, or the possibility of a drug dose insufficient for behavioral effects.

  13. Effects of histamine and the histamine antagonists mepyramine and cimetidine on human coronary arteries in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    Godfraind, Theophile; Miller, R C

    1983-01-01

    The effects of histamine have been studied on human isolated coronary artery preparations taken from hearts ranging in age from 9 to 73 years. Histamine in large concentrations (100 microM) contracted arteries which were without tone or spontaneous activity and sometimes induced rhythmic contractile activity. If spontaneous rhythmic activity was present it was enhanced by histamine. The contractile effects of histamine were inhibited by mepyramine but not by cimetidine. Arteries which were co...

  14. Antidiabetic effects of glucokinase regulatory protein small-molecule disruptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, David J.; St Jean, David J.; Kurzeja, Robert J. M.; Wahl, Robert C.; Michelsen, Klaus; Cupples, Rod; Chen, Michelle; Wu, John; Sivits, Glenn; Helmering, Joan; Komorowski, Renée; Ashton, Kate S.; Pennington, Lewis D.; Fotsch, Christopher; Vazir, Mukta; Chen, Kui; Chmait, Samer; Zhang, Jiandong; Liu, Longbin; Norman, Mark H.; Andrews, Kristin L.; Bartberger, Michael D.; van, Gwyneth; Galbreath, Elizabeth J.; Vonderfecht, Steven L.; Wang, Minghan; Jordan, Steven R.; Véniant, Murielle M.; Hale, Clarence

    2013-12-01

    Glucose homeostasis is a vital and complex process, and its disruption can cause hyperglycaemia and type II diabetes mellitus. Glucokinase (GK), a key enzyme that regulates glucose homeostasis, converts glucose to glucose-6-phosphate in pancreatic β-cells, liver hepatocytes, specific hypothalamic neurons, and gut enterocytes. In hepatocytes, GK regulates glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis, suppresses glucose production, and is subject to the endogenous inhibitor GK regulatory protein (GKRP). During fasting, GKRP binds, inactivates and sequesters GK in the nucleus, which removes GK from the gluconeogenic process and prevents a futile cycle of glucose phosphorylation. Compounds that directly hyperactivate GK (GK activators) lower blood glucose levels and are being evaluated clinically as potential therapeutics for the treatment of type II diabetes mellitus. However, initial reports indicate that an increased risk of hypoglycaemia is associated with some GK activators. To mitigate the risk of hypoglycaemia, we sought to increase GK activity by blocking GKRP. Here we describe the identification of two potent small-molecule GK-GKRP disruptors (AMG-1694 and AMG-3969) that normalized blood glucose levels in several rodent models of diabetes. These compounds potently reversed the inhibitory effect of GKRP on GK activity and promoted GK translocation both in vitro (isolated hepatocytes) and in vivo (liver). A co-crystal structure of full-length human GKRP in complex with AMG-1694 revealed a previously unknown binding pocket in GKRP distinct from that of the phosphofructose-binding site. Furthermore, with AMG-1694 and AMG-3969 (but not GK activators), blood glucose lowering was restricted to diabetic and not normoglycaemic animals. These findings exploit a new cellular mechanism for lowering blood glucose levels with reduced potential for hypoglycaemic risk in patients with type II diabetes mellitus.

  15. In vivo occupancy of dopamine D3 receptors by antagonists produces neurochemical and behavioral effects of potential relevance to attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, V; Need, A B; Tzavara, E T; Giros, B; Overshiner, C; Gleason, S D; Wade, M; Johansson, A M; Perry, K; Nomikos, G G; Witkin, J M

    2013-02-01

    Dopamine D(3) receptors have eluded definitive linkage to neurologic and psychiatric disorders since their cloning over 20 years ago. We report a new method that does not employ a radiolabel for simultaneously defining in vivo receptor occupancy of D(3) and D(2) receptors in rat brain after systemic dosing using the tracer epidepride (N-[[(2S)-1-ethylpyrrolidin-2-yl]methyl]-5-iodo-2,3-dimethoxybenzamide). Decreases in epidepride binding in lobule 9 of cerebellum (rich in D(3) receptors) were compared with nonspecific binding in the lateral cerebellum. The in vivo occupancy of the dopamine D(3) receptors was dose dependently increased by SB-277011A (trans-N-[4-[2-(6-cyano-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinolin-2-yl)ethyl]cyclohexyl]-4-quinolinecarboxamide) and U99194 (2,3-dihydro-5,6-dimethoxy- N,N-dipropyl-1H-inden-2-amine). Both antagonists increased extracellular levels of acetylcholine (ACh) in the medial prefrontal cortex of rats and modified brain-tissue levels of ACh and choline. Consistent with these findings, the D(3) receptor antagonists enhanced the acquisition of learning of rats either alone or in the presence of the norepinephrine uptake blocker reboxetine as with the attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) drug methylphenidate. Like reboxetine, the D(3) receptor antagonists also prevented deficits induced by scopolamine in object recognition memory of rats. Mice in which the dopamine transporter (DAT) has been deleted exhibit hyperactivity that is normalized by compounds that are effective in the treatment of ADHD. Both D(3) receptor antagonists decreased the hyperactivity of DAT(-/-) mice without affecting the activity of wild type controls. The present findings indicate that dopamine D(3) receptor antagonists engender cognition-enhancing and hyperactivity-dampening effects. Thus, D(3) receptor blockade could be considered as a novel treatment approach for cognitive deficits and hyperactivity syndromes, including those observed in ADHD. PMID:23197772

  16. Antagonistic effect of disulfide-rich peptide aptamers selected by cDNA display on interleukin-6-dependent cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemoto, Naoto, E-mail: nemoto@fms.saitama-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Innovation Center for Startups, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 2-2-2 Marunouchi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-0005 (Japan); Janusys Corporation, 508, Saitama Industrial Technology Center, Skip City, 3-12-18 Kami-Aoki, Kawaguchi, Saitama 333-0844 (Japan); Tsutsui, Chihiro [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Yamaguchi, Junichi [Innovation Center for Startups, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 2-2-2 Marunouchi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-0005 (Japan); Applied Gene Technology, Institute for Biological Resources and Functions, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Central 6, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8566 (Japan); Ueno, Shingo [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Machida, Masayuki [Applied Gene Technology, Institute for Biological Resources and Functions, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Central 6, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8566 (Japan); Kobayashi, Toshikatsu [Innovation Center for Startups, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 2-2-2 Marunouchi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-0005 (Japan); Janusys Corporation, 508, Saitama Industrial Technology Center, Skip City, 3-12-18 Kami-Aoki, Kawaguchi, Saitama 333-0844 (Japan); Sakai, Takafumi [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan)

    2012-04-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Disulfide-rich peptide aptamer inhibits IL-6-dependent cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Disulfide bond of peptide aptamer is essential for its affinity to IL-6R. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibitory effect of peptide depends on number and pattern of its disulfide bonds. -- Abstract: Several engineered protein scaffolds have been developed recently to circumvent particular disadvantages of antibodies such as their large size and complex composition, low stability, and high production costs. We previously identified peptide aptamers containing one or two disulfide-bonds as an alternative ligand to the interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R). Peptide aptamers (32 amino acids in length) were screened from a random peptide library by in vitro peptide selection using the evolutionary molecular engineering method 'cDNA display'. In this report, the antagonistic activity of the peptide aptamers were examined by an in vitro competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and an IL-6-dependent cell proliferation assay. The results revealed that a disulfide-rich peptide aptamer inhibited IL-6-dependent cell proliferation with similar efficacy to an anti-IL-6R monoclonal antibody.

  17. Synergistic and antagonistic effects on fatty acid composition in the liver mitochondria of rats by thyroidectomy and streptozotocin-administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, M; Sasaki, T; Terada, H; Kawada, J

    1991-12-01

    The content of individual fatty acid component in mitochondria of livers from thyroidectomized (Tx) and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats was measured to investigate how different hormones are interrelated to control the amount of a particular fatty acid in mitochondria. The results showed (1) diabetes, in general, affected fatty acid contents more severely than hypothyroidism, regardless of the direction of the changes; (2) Hypothyroidism and diabetes affected antagonistically the contents of C16 species and C18:1, which belong to a de novo synthesis (oleate series). However, the two pathological conditions affected synergistically those of higher unsaturated species, eg. C18:2, C20:3 and C20:4, which belong to a dietary-dependent synthesis (linoleate series). These results strongly indicated that each desaturation site and elongation site is affected in a preferential order by either thyroid hormone or insulin, and that hypothyroidism and diabetes have their effects differently on the process of de novo synthesis and the pathways initiated from an essential fatty acid in mitochondria. PMID:1837932

  18. Effects of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists in patients with hypertension and diabetes mellitus: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, S; Katada, J; Daida, H; Kitamura, F; Yokoyama, K

    2016-09-01

    Blood pressure (BP) control is important to ameliorate cardiovascular events in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). However, achieving the target BP with a single drug is often difficult. The objective of this study was to evaluate the antihypertensive effects of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRAs) as add-on therapy to renin-angiotensin system (RAS) inhibitor(s) in patients with hypertension and DM. Studies were searched through October 2014 in MEDLINE, Embase and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Randomized, controlled trials or prospective, observational studies regarding concomitant administration of MRA and RAS inhibitor(s) in patients with DM were included. Articles were excluded if the mean systolic BP (SBP) was mEq l(-1); 95% CI, 0.3-0.5 mEq l(-1)). A consistent reduction of albuminuria across these studies was also demonstrated. MRA further reduced SBP and DBP in patients with hypertension and DM already taking RAS inhibitors. Serum potassium levels should be monitored to prevent hyperkalemia. PMID:26674759

  19. Effects of the neuropeptide Y (NPY)-receptor antagonist BIBP3226 on vascular NPY-receptors with different ligand requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundemar, L; Ekelund, M

    1996-11-01

    The aim was to examine effects of a newly developed neuropeptide Y (NPY)-receptor antagonist, BIBP3226 and to characterize NPY-receptors in the isolated guinea pig caval vein and human subcutaneous artery, respectively. BIBP3226 shift of the concentration-response curve to the Y1-receptor selective agonist [Pro34]NPY in the guinea pig caval vein. Regression analysis of the Schild plot gave a pA2-value of 7.58 (7.20-8.33, 95% confidence interval), slope of regression line 0.96 (0.52-1.39, 95% confidence interval) and a correlation coefficient of 0.78. NPY and the C-terminal NPY 2-36 evoked equipotent concentration-dependent contractions, both of which were sensitive to BIBP3226. Although less potent than NPY 2-36, also the contraction induced by NPY 5-36 was antagonized by BIBP3226. In the human subcutaneous artery [Pro34]NPY but not NPY 2-36 (shift of the concentration-response curve to [Pro34]NPY (from 7.38 +/- 0.10 to 6.95 +/- 0.16 (P demand on the N-terminal part of NPY than that of human Y1-receptors. PMID:8936561

  20. Effects of excitatory amino acid antagonists on the activity of inferior colliculus neurons during sleep and wakefulness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein-Daruech, Natalia; Pedemonte, Marisa; Inderkum, Alejandra; Velluti, Ricardo A

    2002-06-01

    The contribution of N-methyl-D-aspartate to the response to sound of guinea pig inferior colliculus neurons was analyzed by recording single-unit activity before and after iontophoretic injection of a receptor specific antagonist, 2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (AP5), during the sleep-waking cycle. The AP5 produced a significant firing decrease in most of the units recorded, while some neurons exhibited a particular decrease in the later part of the response. A latency reduction in one out of three units in paradoxical sleep was observed. A low proportion of them exhibited a significant firing increase. These actions were observed in wakefulness (W) as well as during sleep phases. We compared the action of kynurenic acid (Kyn) and the electrical stimulation of the auditory cortex on the same inferior colliculus neuron in anesthetized animals and during W. Both Kyn iontophoresis and cortical stimulation evoked similar changes, decreased firing rate in most inferior colliculus units, whereas a low proportion of them increased their discharge, in anesthetized guinea pigs and in W. Ascending as well as descending - efferent - glutamatergic fibers impinging on inferior colliculus neurons contribute to sound-evoked responses. The enhanced unitary activity observed in some neurons with after glutamatergic receptor blocking may indicate that polysynaptic pathways involving inhibitory neurons decreased their activity. These effects were observed in anesthetized and in behaving animals. PMID:12117519

  1. Synergistic and antagonistic effects of combined subzero temperature and high pressure on inactivation of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussa, Marwen; Perrier-Cornet, Jean-Marie; Gervais, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    The combined effects of subzero temperature and high pressure on the inactivation of Escherichia coli K12TG1 were investigated. Cells of this bacterial strain were exposed to high pressure (50 to 450 MPa, 10-min holding time) at two temperatures (-20 degrees C without freezing and 25 degrees C) and three water activity levels (a(w)) (0.850, 0.992, and ca. 1.000) achieved with the addition of glycerol. There was a synergistic interaction between subzero temperature and high pressure in their effects on microbial inactivation. Indeed, to achieve the same inactivation rate, the pressures required at -20 degrees C (in the liquid state) were more than 100 MPa less than those required at 25 degrees C, at pressures in the range of 100 to 300 MPa with an a(w) of 0.992. However, at pressures greater than 300 MPa, this trend was reversed, and subzero temperature counteracted the inactivation effect of pressure. When the amount of water in the bacterial suspension was increased, the synergistic effect was enhanced. Conversely, when the a(w) was decreased by the addition of solute to the bacterial suspension, the baroprotective effect of subzero temperature increased sharply. These results support the argument that water compression is involved in the antimicrobial effect of high pressure. From a thermodynamic point of view, the mechanical energy transferred to the cell during the pressure treatment can be characterized by the change in volume of the system. The amount of mechanical energy transferred to the cell system is strongly related to cell compressibility, which depends on the water quantity in the cytoplasm. PMID:16391037

  2. Radioprotective effect of calcium channel antagonist nifedipine on rat lungs following thoracic X-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nifedipine was administered to rats following 18 Gy thoracic irradiation. Compared with the rats subjected to irradiation alone, in rats administered nifedipine after irradiation, although there was no difference in the phospholipid contents in lung lavage fluid and in the number of type 2 pneumocytes, the survival rate within 30 days and body weight increased, lung weight decreased, in lung lavage fluid the macrophages increased and the neutrophils decreased in number, and pathological changes in lung abated. These results indicated that nifedipine had marked radioprotective effect on rat lungs following thoracic X-ray irradiation. The possible mechanism of the effect is discussed

  3. Is self-monitoring an effective option for people receiving long-term vitamin K antagonist therapy? A systematic review and economic evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Pawana; Scotland, Graham; Cruickshank, Moira; Tassie, Emma; Fraser, Cynthia; Burton, Christopher; Croal, Bernard; Ramsay, Craig R.; Brazzelli, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the clinical and cost-effectiveness of self-monitoring of coagulation status in people receiving long-term vitamin K antagonist therapy compared with standard clinic care. Design Systematic review of current evidence and economic modelling. Data sources Major electronic databases were searched up to May 2013. The economic model parameters were derived from the clinical effectiveness review, routine sources of cost data and advice from clinical experts. Study eligibil...

  4. Effects due to rhizospheric soil application of an antagonistic bacterial endophyte on native bacterial community and its survival in soil: A case study with Pseudomonas aeruginosa from banana

    OpenAIRE

    Pious eThomas; Aparna Chandra Sekhar

    2016-01-01

    Effective translation of research findings from laboratory to agricultural fields is essential for the success of biocontrol or growth promotion trials employing beneficial microorganisms. The rhizosphere is to be viewed holistically as a dynamic ecological niche comprising of diverse microorganisms including competitors and noxious antagonists to the bio-inoculant. This study was undertaken to assess the effects due to the soil application of an endophytic bacterium with multiple pathogen an...

  5. Effects of 5-HT uptake inhibitors, agonists and antagonists on the burying of harmless objects by mice; a putative test for anxiolytic agents.

    OpenAIRE

    Njung'e, K.; Handley, S. L.

    1991-01-01

    1. The effects of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) uptake inhibitors, agonists and antagonists have been evaluated on mouse marble-burying behaviour, a putative test for anxiolytic agents. The high levels of locomotor activity occurring on first exposure to a circular runway (runway were used as a separate test of non-specific drug effects. 2. Fluvoxamine, zimeldine, indalpine and citalopram dose-dependently inhibited burying without affecting runway activity. 5-Hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP, with carbi...

  6. Lack of systematic effects of the 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 receptor antagonist ICS 205-930 on gastric emptying and antral motor activity in patients with primary anorexia nervosa.

    OpenAIRE

    Stacher, G; Bergmann, H; Granser-Vacariu, G V; Wiesnagrotzki, S; Wenzelabatzi, T A; Gaupmann, G; Kugi, A; Steinringer, H; Schneider, C; Höbart, J

    1991-01-01

    1. The 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 receptor antagonist, ICS 205-930, has been reported to have potent effects on gastric smooth muscle and to enhance gastric emptying in animals, but findings in man have been inconsistent. 2. This study investigated the effects of ICS 205-930 on gastric emptying of an isotopically labelled semisolid 1168 kJ meal and on antral contractility in patients with primary anorexia nervosa, a condition frequently associated with impaired gastric motor function. 3. Thirteen ...

  7. Interaction between a selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist and an SSRI in vivo: effects on 5-HT cell firing and extracellular 5-HT.

    OpenAIRE

    Gartside, S E; Umbers, V; Hajós, M.; Sharp, T.

    1995-01-01

    1. The acute inhibitory effect of selective 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) on 5-HT neuronal activity may offset their ability to increase synaptic 5-HT in the forebrain. 2. Here, we determined the effects of the SSRI, paroxetine, and a novel selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist, WAY 100635, on 5-HT cell firing in the dorsal raphé nucleus (DRN), and on extracellular 5-HT in both the DRN and the frontal cortex (FCx). Extracellular electrophysiological recording and ...

  8. Effects of the neuropeptide S receptor antagonist RTI-118 on abuse-related facilitation of intracranial self-stimulation produced by cocaine and methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Bonano, Julie S; Runyon, Scott P.; Hassler, Carla; Glennon, Richard A.; Negus, S. Stevens

    2014-01-01

    Neuropeptide S (NPS) is a neurotransmitter that activates the NPS receptor to modulate biological functions including anxiety-like behaviors, feeding, and drug reinforcement. RTI-118 is a novel NPS receptor antagonist that decreased cocaine self-administration in rats at doses that had little or no effect on food-maintained responding. To build on these previous findings, this study examined effects of RTI-118 on cocaine-induced facilitation of intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) in rats. To...

  9. Effects and mechanism of different adrenergic receptor antagonists on left ventricular hypertrophy subsequent to coarctation of abdominal aorta in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Qin; LI Long-gui; ZHANG Yun

    2004-01-01

    To study the changes of a collagen-binding protein (Colligin) and myosin heavy chain isoform (α/β-MHC) gene and protein in left ventricular hypertrophy subsequent to coarctation of abdominal aorta in rats and the ef-fects of three kinds of adrenergic receptor blockers: Carvedilol (CAR), Metoprolol (MET) and Terazosin (TER) on these changes, and to elucidate the effects and new mechanism of CAR on left ventricular hypearophy regression. Methods: A model of hypertrophy induced by coarctation of abdominal aorta(CAA) was used in this study. Thirty two male istar rats were divided randomly into four groups 4 weeks after CAA operation: CAA, CAR, MET and TER.emodynamics, ventric-ular remodeling parameters, expressions of Colligin and α/β-MHC mRNA, protein expressions of Collagen Ⅰ /Ⅲ and Colligin were investigated in the four groups and sham operation group. Results: Left ventricle hypertrophy was observed clearly 16 weeks after operation. The ratio of α/β-MHC mRNA decreased, while expressions of Collagen Ⅰ/Ⅲ proteins and Colligin mRNA/protein increased( P < 0.05). CAR could ameliorate left ventricle hypertrophy prior to MET and TER. CAR could also change the expressions of α/β-MHC, Collagen Ⅰ/Ⅲ and Colligin in both gene and protein levels ( P < 0.05), while MET and TER have no effect on them ( P > 0.05). Conclusion: The effects of CAR on extracellular matrix proteins and MHC isoform shift regression of left ventricle may be due to antiproliferative or antioxidative mechanism, which was indepen-dent of beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist.

  10. Functional magnetic resonance imaging reveals different neural substrates for the effects of orexin-1 and orexin-2 receptor antagonists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Gozzi

    Full Text Available Orexins are neuro-modulatory peptides involved in the control of diverse physiological functions through interaction with two receptors, orexin-1 (OX1R and orexin-2 (OX2R. Recent evidence in pre-clinical models points toward a putative dichotomic role of the two receptors, with OX2R predominantly involved in the regulation of the sleep/wake cycle and arousal, and the OX1R being more specifically involved in reward processing and motivated behaviour. However, the specific neural substrates underlying these distinct processes in the rat brain remain to be elucidated. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI in the rat to map the modulatory effect of selective OXR blockade on the functional response produced by D-amphetamine, a psychostimulant and arousing drug that stimulates orexigenic activity. OXR blockade was produced by GSK1059865 and JNJ1037049, two novel OX1R and OX2R antagonists with unprecedented selectivity at the counter receptor type. Both drugs inhibited the functional response to D-amphetamine albeit with distinct neuroanatomical patterns: GSK1059865 focally modulated functional responses in striatal terminals, whereas JNJ1037049 induced a widespread pattern of attenuation characterised by a prominent cortical involvement. At the same doses tested in the fMRI study, JNJ1037049 exhibited robust hypnotic properties, while GSK1059865 failed to display significant sleep-promoting effects, but significantly reduced drug-seeking behaviour in cocaine-induced conditioned place preference. Collectively, these findings highlight an essential contribution of the OX2R in modulating cortical activity and arousal, an effect that is consistent with the robust hypnotic effect exhibited by JNJ1037049. The subcortical and striatal pattern observed with GSK1059865 represent a possible neurofunctional correlate for the modulatory role of OX1R in controlling reward-processing and goal-oriented behaviours in the rat.

  11. The effect of selective oestrogen receptor antagonists in an in vitro model of growth plate chondrogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simm, Peter J; Russo, Vincenzo C; Werther, George A

    2011-08-01

    While oestrogen is recognized to play a key role in regulating growth, particularly in relation to epiphyseal fusion, the mechanisms that mediate its effects are still unclear. We utilized an in vitro model of chondrogenesis, the RCJ3.1C5.18 cell line, to explore the effect of oestrogen on this process. We demonstrated the presence of oestrogen receptors (ER) α and β in these cells, with increased abundance of both receptor sub-types evident as the cells differentiated. ERα localized to the nucleus, suggesting it was signalling by genomic pathways, while ERβ was seen predominantly in the cytoplasm, suggesting it may be utilizing non-genomic signalling. While exogenous oestrogen had no effect on proliferation or differentiation, we found some evidence for the endogenous production of oestrogen (intracrinology), as suggested by the expression of aromatase in these cells. Selective ERα blockade with methyl piperidinopyrazole (MPP) led to a significant reduction in both proliferation and differentiation, while ERβ blockade with R,R tetrahydrochrysene (THC) led to an increase in these parameters. This is in keeping with results from mouse knockout models suggesting that unopposed ERβ signalling leads to an inhibition of skeletal growth. Our results are further evidence for the importance of differential ER signalling in regulating chondrogenesis. Future studies examining in vivo effects of these agents are required to extrapolate these findings to a mammalian model. PMID:21541653

  12. Differential effects of organic compounds on cucumber damping-off and biocontrol activity of antagonistic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Bin; Ravnskov, Sabine; Guanlin, X.;

    2011-01-01

    The influence of the organic compounds tryptic soy broth, cellulose, glucose and chitosan on cucumber damping-off caused by Pythium aphanidermatum and biocontrol efficacy of the biocontrol agents (BCAs) Paenibacillus macerans and P. polymyxa were examined in a seedling emergence bioassay. Results...... showed that the organic compounds differentially affected both pathogen and BCAs. Tryptic soy broth, glucose and chitosan increased Pythium damping-off of cucumber, compared to the control treatment without organic compounds, whereas cellulose had no effect. Both Paenibacillus species had biocontrol...... effects against Pythium damping-off compared with the corresponding treatments with P. aphanidermatum alone, but the biocontrol efficacy depended on the type of organic compounds added. Both BCAs counteracted damping-off in treatments with TSB and chitosan. However, P. polymyxa counteracted damping-off in...

  13. Are elder siblings helpers or competitors? Antagonistic fitness effects of sibling interactions in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Nitsch, A.; Faurie, C.; Lummaa, V.

    2013-01-01

    Determining the fitness consequences of sibling interactions is pivotal for understanding the evolution of family living, but studies investigating them across lifetime are lacking. We used a large demographic dataset on preindustrial humans from Finland to study the effect of elder siblings on key life-history traits. The presence of elder siblings improved the chances of younger siblings surviving to sexual maturity, suggesting that despite a competition for parental resources, they may hel...

  14. Effect of histamine and histamine antagonists on portal blood pressure in patients with hepatosplenic schistosomiasis.

    OpenAIRE

    el-Gendi, M A; Nassar, S H

    1980-01-01

    1 Histamine injection via the cannulated portal vein significantly raised the portal pressure in normal volunteers. This elevation was reversed by an H1-receptor blocker but not an H2-receptor blocker. When an H1-receptor blocker was injected first followed by histamine, no significant change in portal pressure was obtained. On the other hand, an H2-receptor blocker failed to antagonize the effect of histamine. 2 Histamine injection induced a non-significant increase in the portal pressure in...

  15. Effects of antagonistic ecosystem engineers on macrofauna communities in a patchy, intertidal mudflat landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklöf, J. S.; Donadi, S.; van der Heide, T.; van der Zee, E. M.; Eriksson, B. K.

    2015-03-01

    Ecosystem engineers are organisms that strongly modify abiotic conditions and in the process alter associated communities. Different types of benthic ecosystem engineers have been suggested to facilitate different communities in otherwise similar marine environments, partly because they alter sediment conditions in contrasting ways. However, most studies testing this hypothesis have either not manipulated the presence of engineers, or have transplanted engineers into areas already dominated by other engineers, which limits the ability to assess the relative engineering effects. Here we combined a field survey and a field experiment to investigate if two contrasting ecosystem engineers - the sediment-stabilizing seagrass Zostera noltei and the bioturbating lugworm Arenicola marina - facilitate different macrofauna communities. The study was performed in a sheltered mudflat area of the eastern Dutch Wadden Sea, where seagrasses and lugworms form a mosaic of spatially alternating seagrass-dominated elevations (hummocks) and lugworm-dominated depressions (hollows). Results showed that seagrasses facilitated some organisms (mainly attached epifauna) while lugworms facilitated others (primarily burrowing infauna), generating distinctly different macrofauna communities in hummocks and hollows. However, seagrasses had a much stronger effect on the macrofauna communities than lugworms, and competitively excluded lugworms. This contrasts with results from similar studies in hydrodynamically more exposed sand flats, where lugworms instead dominate communities and exclude seagrass. We therefore propose that effects of ecosystem engineering (acting primarily on a local scale) and variation in abiotic conditions (acting on larger scales, e.g., hydrodynamic gradients along the Dutch coastline) strongly interact to dictate the distribution and fitness of engineering species, and indirectly, the diversity and structure of associated benthic communities.

  16. Cardiometabolic effects of genetic upregulation of the interleukin 1 receptor antagonist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To investigate potential cardiovascular and other effects of long-term pharmacological interleukin 1 (IL-1) inhibition, we studied genetic variants that produce inhibition of IL-1, a master regulator of inflammation. METHODS: We created a genetic score combining the effects of alleles...... this genetic score with those of anakinra, the recombinant form of IL-1Ra, which has previously been studied in randomised trials of rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory disorders. In primary analyses, we investigated the score in relation to rheumatoid arthritis and four cardiometabolic......). FINDINGS: For each IL1RN minor allele inherited, serum concentrations of IL-1Ra increased by 0.22 SD (95% CI 0.18-0.25; 12.5%; p = 9.3 × 10(-33)), concentrations of interleukin 6 decreased by 0.02 SD (-0.04 to -0.01; -1.7%; p = 3.5 × 10(-3)), and concentrations of C-reactive protein decreased by 0.03 SD...

  17. Antagonistic effects of cadmium on lead accumulation in pregnant and non-pregnant mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We investigate the exposure of pregnant and non-pregnant mice to cadmium (Cd) on lead (Pb) contaminated soil. ► We examine the changes in lead accumulation in mice due to the presence of cadmium in soil. ► Lead accumulation is higher in pregnant compared to non-pregnant mice. ► Cadmium decreases lead accumulation in all mice irrespective of status. - Abstract: People are frequently exposed to combinations of contaminants but there is a paucity of data on the effects of mixed contaminants at low doses. This study investigated the influence of cadmium (Cd) on lead (Pb) accumulation in pregnant and non-pregnant mice following exposure to contaminated soil. Exposure to Pb from contaminated soils increased Pb accumulation in both pregnant and non-pregnant mice compared to unexposed control animals (pregnant and non-pregnant). Lead accumulation in the liver and kidneys of exposure pregnant mice (40 ± 15 mg Pb kg−1) was significantly higher (P −1). The presence of Cd in contaminated soil had a major effect on the Pb and Fe accumulation in the kidneys and liver, respectively. This study shows that Pb uptake is mediated by the presence of Cd in the co-contaminated soil and demonstrates that further research is required to investigate the influence of co-contaminants on human exposure at sub-chronic concentrations.

  18. Antagonist effect of triptolide on AKT activation by truncated retinoid X receptor-alpha.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Lu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Retinoid X receptor-alpha (RXRα is a key member of the nuclear receptor superfamily. We recently demonstrated that proteolytic cleavage of RXRα resulted in production of a truncated product, tRXRα, which promotes cancer cell survival by activating phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase (PI3K/AKT pathway. However, how the tRXRα-mediated signaling pathway in cancer cells is regulated remains elusive. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We screened a natural product library for tRXRα targeting leads and identified that triptolide, an active component isolated from traditional Chinese herb Trypterygium wilfordii Hook F, could modulate tRXRα-mediated cancer cell survival pathway in vitro and in animals. Our results reveal that triptolide strongly induces cancer cell apoptosis dependent on intracellular tRXRα expression levels, demonstrating that tRXRα serves as an important intracellular target of triptolide. We show that triptolide selectively induces tRXRα degradation and inhibits tRXRα-dependent AKT activity without affecting the full-length RXRα. Interestingly, such effects of triptolide are due to its activation of p38. Although triptolide also activates Erk1/2 and MAPK pathways, the effects of triptolide on tRXRα degradation and AKT activity are only reversed by p38 siRNA and p38 inhibitor. In addition, the p38 inhibitor potently inhibits tRXRα interaction with p85α leading to AKT inactivation. Our results demonstrate an interesting novel signaling interplay between p38 and AKT through tRXRα mediation. We finally show that targeting tRXRα by triptolide strongly activates TNFα death signaling and enhances the anticancer activity of other chemotherapies. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results identify triptolide as a new xenobiotic regulator of the tRXRα-dependent survival pathway and provide new insight into the mechanism by which triptolide acts to induce apoptosis of cancer cells. Triptolide represents one of the most

  19. Beyond situational ambiguity in peer conflict: unique and combined effects of cues from an antagonist and a best friend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Schrandt, Heather L; Ojanen, Tiina; Gesten, Ellis; Feldman, Marissa A; Calhoun, Casey D

    2011-01-01

    In accord with increasing recognition of the situation specificity of childhood social behaviors, individual and contextual differences in children's responses to potential peer conflict were examined (hostile attribution, behavioral strategies, and affective reactions; N = 367, 9-12 years, 197 girls). Situational cues from 2 sources, the antagonist and a witnessing best friend, were designed to suggest the antagonist's intentions. Multilevel modeling indicated that children's responses generally varied more according to cues from the antagonist than friend, but the latter also affected responses, especially when conflicting with other situational information. Cognitive and affective responses were also influenced by gender, social goals, friendship quality, and self-efficacy for peer interaction. Findings provide theoretical insight on the context of peer conflict. PMID:22023144

  20. Effects Due to Rhizospheric Soil Application of an Antagonistic Bacterial Endophyte on Native Bacterial Community and Its Survival in Soil: A Case Study with Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Banana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Pious; Sekhar, Aparna C

    2016-01-01

    Effective translation of research findings from laboratory to agricultural fields is essential for the success of biocontrol or growth promotion trials employing beneficial microorganisms. The rhizosphere is to be viewed holistically as a dynamic ecological niche comprising of diverse microorganisms including competitors and noxious antagonists to the bio-inoculant. This study was undertaken to assess the effects due to the soil application of an endophytic bacterium with multiple pathogen antagonistic potential on native bacterial community and its sustenance in agricultural soil. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was employed as a model system considering its frequent isolation as an endophyte, wide antagonistic effects reported against different phytopathogens and soil pests, and that the species is a known human pathogen which makes its usage in agriculture precarious. Employing the strain 'GNS.13.2a' from banana, its survival in field soil and the effects upon soil inoculation were investigated by monitoring total culturable bacterial fraction as the representative indicator of soil microbial community. Serial dilution plating of uninoculated control versus P. aeruginosa inoculated soil from banana rhizosphere indicated a significant reduction in native bacterial cfu soon after inoculation compared with control soil as assessed on cetrimide- nalidixic acid selective medium against nutrient agar. Sampling on day-4 showed a significant reduction in P. aeruginosa cfu in inoculated soil and a continuous dip thereafter registering >99% reduction within 1 week while the native bacterial population resurged with cfu restoration on par with control. This was validated in contained trials with banana plants. Conversely, P. aeruginosa showed static cfu or proliferation in axenic-soil. Lateral introduction of soil microbiome in P. aeruginosa established soil under axenic conditions or its co-incubation with soil microbiota in suspension indicated significant adverse effects by

  1. The CXCR4 antagonist POL5551 is equally effective as sirolimus in reducing neointima formation without impairing re-endothelialisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamesch, Karim; Subramanian, Pallavi; Li, Xiaofeng; Dembowsky, Klaus; Chevalier, Eric; Weber, Christian; Schober, Andreas

    2012-02-01

    Impaired endothelial recovery after the implantation of drug-eluting stents is a major concern because of the increased risk for late stent thrombosis. The disruption of the chemokine axis CXCL12/CXCR4 inhibits neointima formation by blocking the recruitment of smooth muscle progenitor cells. To directly compare a CXCR4-targeting treatment strategy with drugs that are currently used for stent coating, we studied the effects of the CXCR4 antagonist POL5551 and the drug sirolimus on neointima formation. Apolipoprotein E-deficient mice were treated with POL5551 or sirolimus continuously for 28 days after a carotid wire injury. POL5551 inhibited neointima formation by 63% (for a dosage of 2 mg/kg/day) and by 70% (for a dosage of 20 mg/kg/day). In comparison, sirolimus reduced the neointimal area by 69%. In contrast to treatment with POL5551 during the first three days after injury, injection of POL5551 (20 mg/kg) once per day for 28 days diminished neointimal hyperplasia by 53%. An analysis of the cellular composition of the neointima showed a reduction in the relative smooth muscle cell (SMC) and macrophage content in mice that had been treated with a high dose of POL5551. In contrast, the diminished SMC content after sirolimus treatment was associated with a neointimal enrichment of macrophages. Furthermore, endothelial recovery was impaired by sirolimus, but not by POL5551. Therefore, the inhibition of CXCR4 by POL5551 is equally effective in preventing neointima formation as sirolimus, but POL5551 might be more beneficial because treatment with it results in a more stable lesion phenotype and because it does not impair re-endothelialisation. PMID:22234341

  2. Beneficial effects montelukast, cysteinyl-leukotriene receptor antagonist, on renal damage after unilateral ureteral obstruction in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alper Otunctemur

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introductıon Ureteral obstruction is a common pathology and caused kidney fibrosis and dysfunction at late period. In this present, we investigated the antifibrotic and antiinflammatory effects of montelukast which is cysteinyl leukotriene receptor antagonist, on kidney damage after unilateral ureteral obstruction(UUO in rats. Mateirıals and Methods 32 rats divided four groups. Group 1 was control, group 2 was sham, group 3 was rats with UUO and group 4 was rats with UUO which were given montelukast sodium (oral 10 mg/kg/day. After 14 days, rats were killed and their kidneys were taken and blood analysis was performed. Tubular necrosis, mononuclear cell infiltration and interstitial fibrosis scoring were determined histopathologically in a part of kidneys; nitric oxide(NO, malondialdehyde(MDA and reduced glutathione(GSH levels were determined in the other part of kidneys. Urea-creatinine levels were investigated at blood analysis. Statistical analyses were made by the Chi-square test and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA. Results There was no difference significantly for urea-creatinine levels between groups. Pathologically, there was serious tubular necrosis and fibrosis in group 3 and there was significantly decreasing for tubular necrosis and fibrosis in group 4(p<0.005. Also, there was significantly increasing for NO and MDA levels; decreasing for GSH levels in group 3 compared the other groups(p<0.005. Conclusıon We can say that montelukast prevent kidney damage with antioxidant effect, independently of NO.

  3. Antagonistic effects of humic acid and iron oxyhydroxide grain-coating on biochar nanoparticle transport in saturated sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dengjun; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Dongmei

    2013-05-21

    Biochar land application may result in multiple agronomic and environmental benefits (e.g., carbon sequestration, improving soil quality, and immobilizing environmental contaminants). However, our understanding of biochar particle transport is largely unknown in natural environments with significant heterogeneity in solid (e.g., patches of iron oxyhydroxide coating) and solution chemistry (e.g., the presence of natural organic matter), which represents a critical knowledge gap in assessing the environmental impact of biochar land application. Transport and retention kinetics of nanoparticles (NPs) from wheat straw biochars produced at two pyrolysis temperatures (i.e., 350 and 550 °C) were investigated in water-saturated sand columns at environmentally relevant concentrations of dissolved humic acid (HA, 0, 1, 5, and 10 mg L(-1)) and fractional surface coverage of iron oxyhydroxide coatings on sand grains (ω, 0.16, 0.28, and 0.40). Transport of biochar NPs increased with increasing HA concentration, largely because of enhanced repulsive interaction energy between biochar NPs and sand grains. Conversely, transport of biochar NPs decreased significantly with increasing ω due to enhanced electrostatic attraction between negatively charged biochar NPs and positively charged iron oxyhydroxides. At a given ω of 0.28, biochar NPs were less retained with increasing HA concentration due to increased electrosteric repulsion between biochar NPs and sand grains. Experimental breakthrough curves and retention profiles were well described using a two-site kinetic retention model that accounted for Langmuirian blocking or random sequential adsorption at one site. Consistent with the blocking effect, the often observed flat retention profiles stemmed from decreased retention rate and/or maximum retention capacity at a higher HA concentration or smaller ω. The antagonistic effects of HA and iron oxyhydroxide grain-coating imparted on the mobility of biochar NPs suggest that

  4. Moving and academic learning are not antagonists: acute effects on executive function and enjoyment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazou, Spyridoula; Smiley-Oyen, Ann

    2014-10-01

    Classroom-based physical activity is a new approach aiming to improve both physical activity levels and academic achievement. This study investigated the acute effect of a 10-min bout of aerobic physical activity integrated with math practice, compared with a seated math practice, on executive function and enjoyment among normal-weight (n = 24) and overweight children (n = 11). Thirty-five typically developing prepubescent children (10.55 ± 0.74 years) completed a session of physical activity integrated with math practice and a seated math practice session in counterbalanced order. Results showed that following integrated physical activity, the response time in the Standard Flanker improved more than after seated practice. Among the overweight children, physical activity benefitted performance in the Standard Flanker by preventing the decline associated with seated practice. Children enjoyed the physical activity practice more than the seated practice. These findings suggest that integrating physical activity with academic instruction may be a realistic strategy for promoting physical activity because it may facilitate, not antagonize, executive function. PMID:25356611

  5. Effects of leukotriene receptor antagonist on chronic obstractive pulmonary disease induced pulmonary hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卜小宁; 王辰; 庞宝森

    2003-01-01

    Objectives To assess the hemodynamic, oxygen-dynamic and ventilative effects of Zafirlukast in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) induced chronic cor pulmonale at acute exacerbation stage and the mechanisms of Zafirlukast efficacy.Methods Eleven cases of chronic cor pulmonale at acute exacerbation were examinted using Swan-Ganz catheter and peripheral intra-artery catheter. The hemodynamic, oxygen-dynamic parameters and respiratory rate, plasma endothelium-1 (ET-1) level, and urea leukotriene E4 (LTE4) level were measured before and at the 1st, 3rd, 5th, 7th, 9th, 12th hour after taking 40 mg Zafirlukast orally. Artarial and mixed venous blood gas analyses were done correspondingly.Results The average pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) and pulmonary vascular resistance index (PVRI) were lowered at the 3rd hour after taking Zafirlukast by 23% and 36.5%, respectively. They returned to the baseline around 12th hour. Respiratory rate decreased significantly within the 3rd-7th hour after taking Zafirlukast. LTE4 and ET-1 levels lowered at the 3rd hour and showed a positive correlation with change of mPAP. Conclusions Zafirlukast can reduce mPAP, pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and does not affect the ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) and oxygenation in cases of chronic cor pulmonale at acute exacerbation stage. Zafirlukast may play a role as an alternative to decrease PAP in COPD patients.

  6. ANTAGONISTIC EFFECT OF FOUR FUNGAL ISOLATES TO GANODERMA BONINENSE, THE CAUSAL AGENT OF BASAL STEM ROT OF OIL PALM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OKKY SETYAWATI DHARMAPUTRA

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available Four fungal isolates from soils obtained from three sites of the oil palm plantations in North Sumatra were found antagonistic to Ganoderma boninense, the causal agent of basal stem rot of oil palm. Penicillium citrinum inhibited the growth of the pathogen and formed a zone of inhibition on the agar media. Trichoderma harzianum BIO - 1 as well as BIO - 2 and T. viride not only repressed the growth of the pathogen but also caused lysis of the hyphae, and the colony was totally overgrown by the antagonists.

  7. Effect of the selective vasopressin V2 receptor antagonists in hepatic cirrhosis patients with ascites: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-hui TANG

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of selective vasopressin V2 receptor antagonists in the treatment of hepatic cirrhosis patients with ascites. Methods PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Database for Chinese Technical Periodical (VIP, Chinese Journal Full-Text Database (CNKI, and Wan Fang Digital Journal Full-text Database were retrieved to collect clinical randomized controlled trials of hepatic cirrhosis with ascites treated by selective vasopressin V2 receptor antagonists. Meta analysis was performed by using Review Manager 5.0. Results Nine randomized controlled trials including 1884 patients met the inclusion criteria. Meta-analysis showed that: 1 The selective vasopressin V2 receptor antagonists were associated with a significant reduction in body weight compared with placebo (WMD=–1.98kg, 95%CI:–3.24-–0.72kg, P=0.002. Treatment with selective vasopressin V2 receptor antagonists was associated with an improvement of low serum sodium concentration compared to placebo (WMD=3.74mmol/L, 95%CI: 0.91-6.58mmol/L, P=0.01. The percentage of patients with worsening ascites was higher in the group of patients treated with placebo (RR=0.51, 95%CI: 0.34-0.77, P=0.001. 2 The amplitude of increased urine volume was obviously higher in selective vasopressin V2 receptor antagonists group than in placebo group (WMD=1437.65ml, 95%CI: 649.01-2226.30ml, P=0.0004. The difference of serum creatinine in the selective vasopressin V2 receptor antagonists group was not statistically significant compared with the control group (WMD=–3.49μmol/L, 95%CI: –12.54¬5.56μmol/L, P=0.45. 3 There was no statistical significance between the two groups in the heart rate, systolic pressure, diastolic pressure and mortality (P>0.05. The rate of other adverse reactions was higher in the selective vasopressin V2 receptor antagonists group compared with that of placebo group (P=0.003. Conclusion

  8. Effects of glucocorticoid and cysteinyl leukotriene 1 receptor antagonist on CD34 + hematopoietic cells in bone marrow of asthmatic mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛辉; 殷凯生; 王曾礼; 李富宇; 张希龙; 刘春涛; 雷松

    2004-01-01

    Background Corticosteroids remain the most effective therapy available for asthma. They have widespread effects on asthmatic airway inflammation. However, little is known about the effects of corticosteroids on the production of bone marrow inflammatory cells in asthma. This study observed the effects of glucocorticoid and cysteinyl leukotriene 1 receptor antagonist on CD34 + hematopoietic cells, so as to explore the possible effectiveness of a bone marrow-targeted anti-inflammatory strategy.Methods Balb/c mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA) to establish an asthmatic model. For two consecutive weeks, asthmatic mice were challenged with OVA while being given either prednisone, montelukast, prednisone plus montelukast, or sterile saline solution. The mice were killed 24 hours after the last challenge with OVA, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF),peripheral blood, and bone marrow were collected. Eosinophils in peripheral blood and BALF, and nucleated cells in BALF, peripheral blood, and bone marrow were counted. The percentages of CD34+cells, CD4 + T lymphocytes and CD8 + T lymphocytes among nucleated cells in peripheral blood and bone marrow were counted by flow cytometry. Immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridization were employed to detect expression of CD34 and interleukin (IL)-5Rαx mRNA (CD34 + IL-5Rα mRNA+ cells)among bone marrow hematopoietic cells.Results Compared with the sterile saline solution group, the number of eosinophils in BALF and peripheral blood, CD34 + cells in peripheral blood and bone marrow, and CD34 + IL-5Rc mRNA+ cells in bone marrow of mice from the prednisone and prednisone plus montelukast groups were significantly lower (P<0.01). The number of eosinophils in BALF from the montelukast group was also significantly lower (P<0.05).Conclusions The results suggest that, in this asthmatic mouse model, prednisone probably inhibits proliferation, differentiation, and migration of CD34 + cells in bone marrow, blocks

  9. An antagonistic activity of etizolam on platelet-activating factor (PAF). In vitro effects on platelet aggregation and PAF receptor binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikashima, H; Takehara, S; Muramoto, Y; Khomaru, T; Terasawa, M; Tahara, T; Maruyama, Y

    1987-08-01

    The antagonistic effect of etizolam, an anti-anxiety drug, on platelet-activating factor (PAF) was investigated in rabbit platelets in vitro. Etizolam inhibited PAF-induced aggregation in a dose-dependent manner, with an IC50 of 3.8 microM, about one tenth that of triazolam (IC50 = 30 microM). At 300 microM, it inhibited both ADP and arachidonic acid-induced aggregation only slightly, while the other anti-anxiety drugs tested had no effect on PAF-induced aggregation even at this concentration. Etizolam and triazolam inhibited the specific binding of 3H-PAF to PAF receptor sites on washed rabbit platelets with IC50 values of 22 nM and 320 nM, respectively. Diazepam and estazolam were inactive even at 1 microM. These results indicate that etizolam is a specific antagonist of PAF. PMID:2890779

  10. Effect of stress hormone antagonists on ovarian follicular development in pre-pubertal rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalid Hamood Abdullah

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Effect of stress on pre-pubertal ovarian follicular development was studied. Fifteen day old female rats were administered under stress (exposed to maternal separation; 6 hours/day from post-natal day 15 to 21 for 7 days, and appropriate controls were maintained. The time of exposure was randomly changed every day during light phase (7AM to 7 PM of the day to avoid habituation. There was a significant decrease in serum estrogen levels on post-natal day 21 in stress group rats compared to controls indicating stress response in these rats. However, mean number of healthy follicles in all categories of follicles were significantly lower in stressed rats compared to controls. Concomitant with these changes, mean number of atreitic follicles showed an increase over control values in stressed rats. In contrast administration of Naltrexone (5μg NTX/rat/day, Mifepristone (1 μg MP/rat/day, FSH (10 IU FSH/rat/day with stressed the significant increases in the relative weight of ovary, uterus, fallopian tube, body weight and the mean number of healthy follicles in the ovary compared to the controls. In the ovary treatment of stressed did not affect primordial follicles. Primordial follicles were reduced in number significantly in the ovary of controls and treated groups when compared with the initial controls whereas there was no significant variation among the controls and the treated groups. The results indicate that stress dose not interfere with the progress of pre-pubertal follicular development. However, it causes increased loss of follicles by atretia.

  11. Topological effects of data incompleteness of gene regulatory networks

    CERN Document Server

    Sanz, J; Borge-Holthoefer, J; Moreno, Y

    2012-01-01

    The topological analysis of biological networks has been a prolific topic in network science during the last decade. A persistent problem with this approach is the inherent uncertainty and noisy nature of the data. One of the cases in which this situation is more marked is that of transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs) in bacteria. The datasets are incomplete because regulatory pathways associated to a relevant fraction of bacterial genes remain unknown. Furthermore, direction, strengths and signs of the links are sometimes unknown or simply overlooked. Finally, the experimental approaches to infer the regulations are highly heterogeneous, in a way that induces the appearance of systematic experimental-topological correlations. And yet, the quality of the available data increases constantly. In this work we capitalize on these advances to point out the influence of data (in)completeness and quality on some classical results on topological analysis of TRNs, specially regarding modularity at different level...

  12. Constructive effects of fluctuations in genetic and biochemical regulatory systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steuer, Ralf; Zhou, Changsong; Kurths, Jürgen

    2003-12-01

    Biochemical and genetic regulatory systems that involve low concentrations of molecules are inherently noisy. This intrinsic stochasticity has received considerable interest recently, leading to new insights about the sources and consequences of noise in complex systems of genetic regulation. However, most prior work was devoted to the reduction of fluctuation and the robustness of cellular function with respect to intrinsic noise. Here, we focus on several scenarios in which the inherent molecular fluctuations are not merely a nuisance, but act constructively and bring about qualitative changes in the dynamics of the system. It will be demonstrated that in many typical situations biochemical and genetic regulatory systems may utilize intrinsic noise to their advantage. PMID:14643492

  13. Effects of montelukast (MK-0476); a potent cysteinyl leukotriene receptor antagonist, on bronchodilation in asthmatic subjects treated with and without inhaled corticosteroids

    OpenAIRE

    Reiss, T. F.; Sorkness, C. A.; Stricker, W.; Botto, A.; Busse, W W; Kundu, S.; J. Zhang

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cysteinyl leukotriene release in association with airway inflammation is a feature of clinical asthma. The acute effects of montelukast (MK-0476), a potent, orally administered, specific cysteinyl leukotriene receptor antagonist, on airways obstruction was assessed in patients with mild to moderately severe asthma. METHODS: Twenty two asthmatic subjects were randomised to receive montelukast, 100 mg or 250 mg, or placebo in a double blind, three period, crossover trial. Ten ...

  14. Effects of the angiotensin type I receptor antagonist, losartan, on systemic and regional vascular responses to lower body negative pressure in healthy volunteers.

    OpenAIRE

    Duranteau, J; Pussard, E; Berdeaux, A; Giudicelli, J. F.

    1995-01-01

    1. The effects of a single oral dose (50 mg) of the angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonist, losartan, on the systemic and regional vascular responses to simulated orthostatic stress by the lower body negative pressure (LBNP) technique were investigated in nine healthy volunteers, in a double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study. 2. Arterial blood pressure remained unchanged throughout the study. Three hours after its administration and before LBNP, losartan selectively increased renal bl...

  15. Antagonistic Pleiotropy at the Human IL6 Promoter Confers Genetic Resilience to the Pro-Inflammatory Effects of Adverse Social Conditions in Adolescence

    OpenAIRE

    Cole, Steven W.; Arevalo, Jesusa M. G.; Manu, Kavya; Telzer, Eva H; Kiang, Lisa; Bower, Julienne E.; Irwin, Michael R.; Fuligni, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    The authors tested the evolutionary genetic hypothesis that the functional form of an asymmetrically risky Gene × Environment interaction will differ as a function of age-related antagonistic pleiotropy (i.e., show opposite effects in young vs. old individuals). Previous studies have identified a polymorphism in the human IL6 promoter (rs1800795; IL6 –174 G/C) that interacts with adverse socioenvironmental conditions to promote chronic inflammation in older adults (elevated C-reactive protein...

  16. Effective and independent regulatory national infrastructure: Uruguay case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since inception in 1986 the National Direction of Nuclear Technology has fulfilled with the assignment known as 'Control of the ionizing radioactivity in its medical and industrial applications'. This strategic task as far as safety, was performed with significant and crucial deficiencies which they even motivated the users to question the reliability of the institution. The deficiencies were mainly as follows: 1) absence of a regulatory frame; 2) insufficient qualification of technical human resources and 3) lack of suitable equipment. From the use for Uruguay of the Model Project and the beginning of a new management of Dinaten (October 2000), a sensible and well-known increase in the quality and efficiency of the regulating function in the country, which we can summarize in the following landmarks: regulatory frame with the use of a basic norm and eight regulating norms according to the main practices that are developed in the country; intensive training of the regulatory body staff; permanent accomplished update of the inventory of sources; beginning of licensing activities; equipment of last generation; regulation of the personal dosimetry services and management of radioactive waste and establishment of a National Program of Radiological Emergencies. (author)

  17. Effects of ONO-6950, a novel dual cysteinyl leukotriene 1 and 2 receptors antagonist, in a guinea pig model of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonetomi, Yasuo; Sekioka, Tomohiko; Kadode, Michiaki; Kitamine, Tetsuya; Kamiya, Akihiro; inoue, Atsuto; Nakao, Takafumi; Nomura, Hiroaki; Murata, Masayuki; Nakao, Shintaro; Nambu, Fumio; Fujita, Manabu; Nakade, Shinji; Kawabata, Kazuhito

    2015-10-15

    We assessed in this study the anti-asthmatic effects of ONO-6950, a novel cysteinyl leukotriene 1 (CysLT1) and 2 (CysLT2) receptors dual antagonist, in normal and S-hexyl glutathione (S-hexyl GSH)-treated guinea pigs, and compared these effects to those of montelukast, a CysLT1 selective receptor antagonist. Treatment with S-hexyl GSH reduced animals LTC4 metabolism, allowing practical evaluation of CysLT2 receptor-mediated airway response. ONO-6950 antagonized intracellular calcium signaling via human and guinea pig CysLT1 and CysLT2 receptors with IC50 values of 1.7 and 25 nM, respectively (human receptors) and 6.3 and 8.2 nM, respectively (guinea pig receptors). In normal guinea pigs, both ONO-6950 (1 or 0.3 mg/kg, p.o.) and the CysLT1 receptor antagonist montelukast (0.3 or 0.1 mg/kg, p.o.) fully attenuated CysLT1-mediated bronchoconstriction and airway vascular hyperpermeability induced by LTD4. On the other hand, in S-hexyl GSH-treated guinea pigs ONO-6950 at 3 mg/kg, p.o. or more almost completely inhibited bronchoconstriction and airway vascular hyperpermeability elicited by LTC4, while montelukast showed only partial or negligible inhibition of these airway responses. In ovalbumin sensitized guinea pigs, treatment with S-hexyl GSH on top of pyrilamine and indomethacin rendered antigen-induced bronchoconstriction sensitive to both CysLT1 and CysLT2 receptor antagonists. ONO-6950 strongly inhibited this asthmatic response to the level attained by combination therapy with montelukast and BayCysLT2RA, a selective CysLT2 receptor antagonist. These results clearly demonstrate that ONO-6950 is an orally active dual CysLT1/LT2 receptor antagonist that may provide a novel therapeutic option for patients with asthma. PMID:26318198

  18. Co-culture of Yeast Antagonists of Fusarium Head Blight and their Effect on Disease Development in Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.J. Boehm

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Multistrain mixtures of biocontrol agents which can reduce plant disease to a greater extent than the individual strains of the mixture, commonly, are prepared by blending separately produced fermentation products. Co-cultivation of strains to equivalent biomass yields would provide mixture advantages without incurring the cost disadvantages of multiple fermentation and processing protocols. Fusarium Head Blight (FHB antagonists Cryptococcus flavescens OH 182.9 (NRRL Y-30216, C. aureus OH 71.4 (NRRL Y-30213 and C. aureus OH 181.1 (NRRL Y-30215, were grown in two- and three-strain co-cultures to assess the quality and efficacy of the fermentation end products produced. Final cell counts of component strains of all co-cultures produced were equivalent when plated on a medium that contained the trisaccharide melezitose as a sole carbon source and produced colonies of strain-distinguishable sizes. Co-cultures of C. flavescens OH 182.9 and C. aureus OH 71.4 significantly reduced FHB disease severity (32%, p = 0.05, Dunnetts t-test when averaged across four greenhouse studies. In wheat field trials, biomass from co-cultures of these two strains reduced FHB incidence in some cases but rarely other FHB disease parameters (p = 0.05, Bonferoni mean separation. Relative Performance Index (RPI analysis of the overall effect of treatments at both field sites revealed that treatment with the OH 71.4 and OH 182.9 co-culture significantly reduced FHB, as evidence by a higher RPI value than for the control, while the individual strains did not. The potential for obtaining superior efficacy and cost benefits with multi-strain cultures of biocontrol agents justifies additional research effort.

  19. Antifibrotic effects of ambrisentan, an endothelin-A receptor antagonist, in a non-alcoholic steatohepatitis mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Toshiaki; Koda, Masahiko; Miyoshi, Kennichi; Onoyama, Takumi; Kishina, Manabu; Matono, Tomomitsu; Sugihara, Takaaki; Hosho, Keiko; Okano, Junichi; Isomoto, Hajime; Murawaki, Yoshikazu

    2016-01-01

    AIM To examine the effects of the endothelin type A receptor antagonist ambrisentan on hepatic steatosis and fibrosis in a steatohepatitis mouse model. METHODS Fatty liver shionogi (FLS) FLS-ob/ob mice (male, 12 wk old) received ambrisentan (2.5 mg/kg orally per day; n = 8) or water as a control (n = 5) for 4 wk. Factors were compared between the two groups, including steatosis, fibrosis, inflammation, and endothelin-related gene expression in the liver. RESULTS In the ambrisentan group, hepatic hydroxyproline content was significantly lower than in the control group (18.0 μg/g ± 6.1 μg/g vs 33.9 μg/g ± 13.5 μg/g liver, respectively, P = 0.014). Hepatic fibrosis estimated by Sirius red staining and areas positive for α-smooth muscle actin, indicative of activated hepatic stellate cells, were also significantly lower in the ambrisentan group (0.46% ± 0.18% vs 1.11% ± 0.28%, respectively, P = 0.0003; and 0.12% ± 0.08% vs 0.25% ± 0.11%, respectively, P = 0.047). Moreover, hepatic RNA expression levels of procollagen-1 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) were significantly lower by 60% and 45%, respectively, in the ambrisentan group. Inflammation, steatosis, and endothelin-related mRNA expression in the liver were not significantly different between the groups. CONCLUSION Ambrisentan attenuated the progression of hepatic fibrosis by inhibiting hepatic stellate cell activation and reducing procollagen-1 and TIMP-1 gene expression. Ambrisentan did not affect inflammation or steatosis.

  20. A polysaccharide virulence factor from Aspergillus fumigatus elicits anti-inflammatory effects through induction of Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark S Gresnigt

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The galactosaminogalactan (GAG is a cell wall component of Aspergillus fumigatus that has potent anti-inflammatory effects in mice. However, the mechanisms responsible for the anti-inflammatory property of GAG remain to be elucidated. In the present study we used in vitro PBMC stimulation assays to demonstrate, that GAG inhibits proinflammatory T-helper (Th1 and Th17 cytokine production in human PBMCs by inducing Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra, a potent anti-inflammatory cytokine that blocks IL-1 signalling. GAG cannot suppress human T-helper cytokine production in the presence of neutralizing antibodies against IL-1Ra. In a mouse model of invasive aspergillosis, GAG induces IL-1Ra in vivo, and the increased susceptibility to invasive aspergillosis in the presence of GAG in wild type mice is not observed in mice deficient for IL-1Ra. Additionally, we demonstrate that the capacity of GAG to induce IL-1Ra could also be used for treatment of inflammatory diseases, as GAG was able to reduce severity of an experimental model of allergic aspergillosis, and in a murine DSS-induced colitis model. In the setting of invasive aspergillosis, GAG has a significant immunomodulatory function by inducing IL-1Ra and notably IL-1Ra knockout mice are completely protected to invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. This opens new treatment strategies that target IL-1Ra in the setting of acute invasive fungal infection. However, the observation that GAG can also protect mice from allergy and colitis makes GAG or a derivative structure of GAG a potential treatment compound for IL-1 driven inflammatory diseases.

  1. South African plants used in traditional medicine to treat epilepsy have an antagonistic effect on NMDA receptor currents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marchetti, Carla; Gavazzo, Paola; Stafford, Gary Ivan;

    2011-01-01

    Several Searsia species (Anacardiaceae), including Searsia dentata and Searsia pyroides, are used in South Africa traditional medicine to treat epilepsy. Ethanol leaf extracts of these plants have been shown to act as possible antagonists of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-type glutamate receptors....

  2. The effect of ondansetron, a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, in chronic fatigue syndrome: a randomized controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    The, G.K.H.; Bleijenberg, G.; Buitelaar, J.K.; Meer, J.W.M. van der

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Accumulating data support the involvement of the serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]) system in the pathophysiology of chronic fatigue syndrome. Neuropharmacologic studies point to a hyperactive 5-HT system, and open-label treatment studies with 5-HT(3) receptor antagonists have shown

  3. The antagonistic effect of antipsychotic drugs on a HEK293 cell line stably expressing human alpha(1A1)-adrenoceptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nourian, Zahra; Mulvany, Michael J; Nielsen, Karsten Bork;

    2008-01-01

    Antipsychotic drugs often cause orthostatic hypotension, probably through antagonist action on resistance vessel alpha(1A)-adrenoceptors. Here we have tested this possibility directly using cells transfected with a relevant human alpha(1A)-adrenoceptor splice variant. To determine a splice varian...

  4. The Antagonistic Effect of Selenium on Lead-Induced Inflammatory Factors and Heat Shock Protein mRNA Level in Chicken Cartilage Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shufang; Song, Huanyu; Gao, Han; Liu, Chunpeng; Zhang, Ziwei; Fu, Jing

    2016-09-01

    Selenium (Se) is recognized as a necessary trace mineral in animal diets, including those of birds. Lead (Pb) is a toxic heavy metal and can damage organs in humans and animals. Complex antagonistic interactions between Se and heavy metals have been reported in previous studies. However, little is known regarding the effects of Se on Pb-induced toxicity and the expression of inflammatory factors and heat shock proteins (HSPs) in the cartilage of chickens. In this present study, we fed chickens either with Se or Pb or both Se and Pb supplement and later analyzed the mRNA expressions of inflammatory factors (inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)) and HSPs (Hsp27, Hsp40, Hsp60, Hsp70, and Hsp90). The results showed that Se and Pb influenced the expression of inflammatory factors and HSP genes in the chicken cartilage tissues. Additionally, we also found that antagonistic interaction existed between Se and Pb supplementation. Our findings suggested that Se could exert a antagonistic effect on Pb in chicken cartilage tissues. PMID:26831653

  5. Selective orexin receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebold, Terry P; Bonaventure, Pascal; Shireman, Brock T

    2013-09-01

    The orexin, or hypocretin, neuropeptides (orexin-A and orexin-B) are produced on neurons in the hypothalamus which project to key areas of the brain that control sleep-wake states, modulation of food intake, panic, anxiety, emotion, reward and addictive behaviors. These neuropeptides exert their effects on a pair of G-protein coupled receptors termed the orexin-1 (OX1) and orexin-2 (OX2) receptors. Emerging biology suggests the involvement of these receptors in psychiatric disorders as they are thought to play a key role in the regulation of multiple systems. This review is intended to highlight key selective OX1 or OX2 small-molecule antagonists. PMID:23891187

  6. Effects of intracerebroventricular NMDA and non-NMDA receptor agonists or antagonists on general anesthesia of propofol in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Aijun; DUAN Shiming; TIAN Yuke

    2007-01-01

    The efiects of intracerebroventricular(icv)agonists and antagonists of N-methyl-D-aspartate(NMDA)and alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid (AMPA) receptors on the general anesthesia of propofol were studied.A tohal of 144 Kunming mice,male and female with body mass of(22±3)g,were used.Part One of the Experiment:a total of 104 Kunming mice,male and female,were randomly divided into 13 groups.Intracerebroventricular artificial cerebral fluid (aCSF)or different doses of NMDA,AMPA,MK-801 or NBOX was iniected immediately after intravenously administered propofol 25 mg/kg and the recovery time following the loss of righting reflex (LORR)was recorded.Part Two of the Experiment:a total of 40 Kunming female mice were divided randomly into 5 groups and iniected with icv aCSF or NMDA.AMPA.MK-801 or NBQX after intraperitoneally administered propofol 50 mg/kg.The pain threshold of the mice was then investigated by hot-plate test(HPPT).NMDA(0.05 or 0.075μg,icv)or AMPA(0.05 μg,icv)exhibited no effects on the LORR,but NMDA(0.1 μg,icv)or AMPA(0.075 or 0.1 μg,icv)prolonged the LORR significantly compared with the aCSF group(P<0.05,P<0.01).The LORR of the 2 μg MK-801 group had no changes,while those of the 4 or 8 μg MK-801 groups were prolonged significantly.The LORR of the 0.5,2 or 4 μg NBQX groups were all prolonged significantly.NMDA 0.05 μg or AMPA 0.05 μg decreased the pain threshold slightly but did not differ in effect compared with the aCSF group;2 μg MK-801 or 0.5 μg NBQX both increased the pain threshold significantly.Our results indicate that propofol produces general anesthesia partly through an interaction with brain NMDA and AMPA receptors in mice.

  7. Auxin-Oxylipin Crosstalk: Relationship of Antagonists

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maik Hoffmann; Mathias Hentrich; Stephan Pollmann

    2011-01-01

    Phytohormones regulate a wide array of developmental processes throughout the life cycle of plants. Herein, the various plant hormones may interact additively, synergistically, or antagonistically. By their cooperation they create a delicate regulatory network whose net output largely depends on the action of specific phytohormone combinations rather than on the independent activities of separate hormones. While most classical studies of plant hormonal control have focused mainly on the action of single hormones or on the synergistic interaction of hormones in regulating various developmental processes, recent work is beginning to shed light on the crosstalk of nominally antagonistic plant hormones, such as gibberellins and auxins with oxylipins or abscisic acid. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of how two of the first sight antagonistic plant hormones, i.e. auxins and oxylipins,interact in controlling plant responses and development.

  8. Approach for assessing the effectiveness of regulatory control in Peru using performance indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper is intended to make an approach for assessing the effectiveness of regulatory activities in Peru by using of performance indicators for each of the activities developed pursuant their responsibilities. So inspections, authorizations, enforcement and regulation activities are qualified by levels of attainments and then assessed independently to rise specific issues. The general conclusion is that regulatory activities seems to be acceptable but some improvements are needed in order to reach a good level of performance. (author)

  9. Effects of D2 receptor antagonist haloperidol on hippocampal neuronal apoptosis in a rat model of temporal epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Songqing Wang; Aihua Zhang; Haitang Chen; Qianghua He; Peizeng Xie; Yiquan Ke; Xiaodan Jiang

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dopamine receptors are divided into D1 and D2 subgroups. It has been reported that D2 receptors resist neural toxicity induced by excitatory amino acids and muscarine, and also alleviate epilepsy attacks following pilocarpine treatment. However, it has not yet been established whether D2 receptors regulate temporal epilepsy.OBJECTIVE: To observe the effects of the D2 antagonist halopefidol on hippocampal neuronal apoptosis and electrical brain activity in a rat model of kainic acid-induced temporal epilepsy.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: Randomized grouping and histopathological study were performed at the Neurology Medicine Institute of Zhujiang Hospital, Southern Medical University from August to December 2004.MATERIALS: Twenty-five adult, male, Sprague Dawley rats were selected for the present study. Kainic acid (Sigma, USA) was injected into the right lateral ventricle to establish models of temporal epilepsy. A PowerLab multiplying channel electrophysiolograph was provided by AD Instruments, Australia.METHODS: The rats were randomly divided into 5 groups (n = 5): control, model, haloperidol hippocampus, haloperidol striatum, and haloperidol substantia nigra. Temporal epilepsy was established in all rats except the control group. Haloperidol was slowly injected into the hippocampus, striatum and substantia nigra, respectively, in three different injection groups. Normal saline was injected into the fight lateral ventricle of the control rats.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Hippocampal apoptosis was observed on the day 3 of treatment using TUNEL staining. Changes in electroencephalogram at 0, 0.5, 2, 6, and 12 hours following treatment onset were observed using a PowerLab multiplying channel electrophysiolograph. Animal behaviors were classified according to the Racine criteria.RESULTS: Twenty-five rats were included in the final analysis. Seizures did not occur in the control group. In the model group, 10 minutes alter kainic acid injection to the lateral

  10. Effects due to rhizospheric soil application of an antagonistic bacterial endophyte on native bacterial community and its survival in soil: A case study with Pseudomonas aeruginosa from banana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pious eThomas

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Effective translation of research findings from laboratory to agricultural fields is essential for the success of biocontrol or growth promotion trials employing beneficial microorganisms. The rhizosphere is to be viewed holistically as a dynamic ecological niche comprising of diverse microorganisms including competitors and noxious antagonists to the bio-inoculant. This study was undertaken to assess the effects due to the soil application of an endophytic bacterium with multiple pathogen antagonistic potential on native bacterial community and its sustenance in agricultural soil. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was employed as a model system considering its frequent isolation as an endophyte, wide antagonistic effects reported against different phytopathogens and soil pests, and that the species is a known human pathogen which makes its usage in agriculture precarious. Employing the strain ‘GNS.13.2a’ from banana, its survival in field soil and the effects upon soil inoculation were investigated by monitoring total culturable bacterial fraction as the representative indicator of soil microbial community. Serial dilution plating of uninoculated control versus P. aeruginosa inoculated soil from banana rhizosphere indicated a significant reduction in native bacterial cfu soon after inoculation compared with control soil as assessed on cetrimide- nalidixic acid selective medium against nutrient agar. Sampling on day-4 showed a significant reduction in P. aeruginosa cfu in inoculated soil and a continuous dip thereafter registering >99% reduction within one week while the native bacterial population resurged with cfu restoration on par with control. This was validated in contained trials with banana plants. Conversely, P. aeruginosa showed static cfu or proliferation in axenic-soil. Lateral introduction of soil microbiome in P. aeruginosa established soil under axenic conditions or its co-incubation with soil microbiota in suspension indicated

  11. Regulatory effects of cotranscriptional RNA structure formation and transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sheng-Rui; Hu, Chun-Gen; Zhang, Jin-Zhi

    2016-09-01

    RNAs, which play significant roles in many fundamental biological processes of life, fold into sophisticated and precise structures. RNA folding is a dynamic and intricate process, which conformation transition of coding and noncoding RNAs form the primary elements of genetic regulation. The cellular environment contains various intrinsic and extrinsic factors that potentially affect RNA folding in vivo, and experimental and theoretical evidence increasingly indicates that the highly flexible features of the RNA structure are affected by these factors, which include the flanking sequence context, physiochemical conditions, cis RNA-RNA interactions, and RNA interactions with other molecules. Furthermore, distinct RNA structures have been identified that govern almost all steps of biological processes in cells, including transcriptional activation and termination, transcriptional mutagenesis, 5'-capping, splicing, 3'-polyadenylation, mRNA export and localization, and translation. Here, we briefly summarize the dynamic and complex features of RNA folding along with a wide variety of intrinsic and extrinsic factors that affect RNA folding. We then provide several examples to elaborate RNA structure-mediated regulation at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Finally, we illustrate the regulatory roles of RNA structure and discuss advances pertaining to RNA structure in plants. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:562-574. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1350 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27028291

  12. Differential inhibitory effects of CysLT(1 receptor antagonists on P2Y(6 receptor-mediated signaling and ion transport in human bronchial epithelia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Ka-hoi Lau

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cysteinyl leukotriene (CysLT is one of the proinflammatory mediators released by the bronchi during inflammation. CysLTs exert their biological effects via specific G-protein-coupled receptors. CysLT(1 receptor antagonists are available for clinical use for the treatment of asthma. Recently, crosstalk between CysLT(1 and P2Y(6 receptors has been delineated. P2Y receptors are expressed in apical and/or basolateral membranes of virtually all polarized epithelia to control the transport of fluid and electrolytes. Previous research suggests that CysLT(1 receptor antagonists inhibit the effects of nucleotides acting at P2Y receptors. However, the detailed molecular mechanism underlying the inhibition remains unresolved. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, western blot analysis confirmed that both CysLT(1 and P2Y(6 receptors were expressed in the human bronchial epithelial cell line 16HBE14o-. All three CysLT(1 antagonists inhibited the uridine diphosphate (UDP-evoked I(SC, but only montelukast inhibited the UDP-evoked [Ca(2+](i increase. In the presence of forskolin or 8-bromoadenosine 3'5' cyclic monophosphate (8-Br-cAMP, the UDP-induced I(SC was potentiated but was reduced by pranlukast and zafirlukast but not montelukast. Pranlukast inhibited the UDP-evoked I(SC potentiated by an Epac activator, 8-(4-Chlorophenylthio-2'-O-methyladenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-CPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP, while montelukast and zafirlukast had no such effect. Pranlukast inhibited the real-time increase in cAMP changes activated by 8-CPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP as monitored by fluorescence resonance energy transfer imaging. Zafirlukast inhibited the UDP-induced I(SC potentiated by N(6-Phenyladenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate, Sp-isomer (Sp-6-Phe-cAMP; a PKA activator and UDP-activated PKA activity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In summary, our data strongly suggest for the first time that in human airway epithelia, the three specific CysLT(1 receptor

  13. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists for hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, B; Gluud, L L; Gluud, C

    2004-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy may be associated with accumulation of substances that bind to a receptor-complex in the brain resulting in neural inhibition. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists may have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy.......Hepatic encephalopathy may be associated with accumulation of substances that bind to a receptor-complex in the brain resulting in neural inhibition. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists may have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy....

  14. A Foldable Antagonistic Actuator

    OpenAIRE

    Shintake, Jun; Rosset, Samuel; Schubert, Bryan Edward; Floreano, Dario; Shea, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    We report on an actuator based on dielectric elastomers that is capable of antagonistic actuation and passive folding. This actuator enables foldability in robots with simple structures. Unlike other antagonistic dielectric elastomer devices, our concept uses elastic hinges to allow the folding of the structure, which also provides an additional design parameter. To validate the actuator concept through a specific application test, a foldable elevon actuator with outline size of 70 mm × 130 m...

  15. The CXCR4 antagonist plerixafor enhances the effect of rituximab in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinholdt, Linn; Laursen, Maria Bach; Schmitz, Alexander;

    2016-01-01

    strategies are needed. Antagonizing the CXCR4 receptor might be promising since the CXCR4-CXCL12 axis is implicated in several aspects of tumor pathogenesis as well as in protection from chemotherapeutic response. In Burkitt lymphoma, the CXCR4 antagonist plerixafor has already been shown to enhance the......BACKGROUND: Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is an aggressive disease with variable clinical outcome, accounting for at least 25-30 % of adult non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Approximately one third of DLBCL patients are not cured by the currently used treatment regimen, R-CHOP. Hence, new treatment...

  16. PROGESTERONE REDUCES THE EFFECT OF THE SEROTONIN 1B/1D RECEPTOR ANTAGONIST, GR 127935, ON LORDOSIS BEHAVIOR

    OpenAIRE

    Uphouse, Lynda; Hiegel, Cindy; Guptarak, Jutatip; Maswood, Navin

    2008-01-01

    Ovariectomized rats were hormonally primed with 10 μg estradiol benzoate or with estradiol benzoate plus 500 μg progesterone. Rats received a bilateral infusion with 200 ng of the 5-HT1B/1D receptor antagonist, N-[4-methoxy-3-(4-methyl-1-piperazinyl)phenyl]-2′-methyl-4′-(5-methyl-1,2,4-oxadiazol-3-yl)-1-1′-biphenyl-4-carboxamide hydrochloride (GR 127935), into the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMN), followed by a 5 min restraint or home cage experience. In estrogen-primed females ...

  17. Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Modelling of GnRH Antagonist Degarelix: A Comparison of the Non-linear Mixed-Effects Programs NONMEM and NLME

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornøe, Christoffer Wenzel; Agersø, Henrik; Nielsen, Henrik Aalborg;

    2004-01-01

    proposed by Lindstrom and Bates. The two programs were tested using clinical PK/PD data of a new gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist degarelix currently being developed for prostate cancer treatment. The pharmacokinetics of intravenous administered degarelix was analysed using a three......In this paper, the two non-linear mixed-effects programs NONMEM and NLME were compared for their use in population pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modelling. We have described the first-order conditional estimation (FOCE) method as implemented in NONMEM and the alternating algorithm in NLME...

  18. The effect of acute Lithium and AMI-193, a new 5HT2 antagonist, on Apomorphine-induced pecking in pigeon

    OpenAIRE

    Bagheri T; Ejtemaei Mehr Sh; Shamshirgaran Sh

    2002-01-01

    Intramascular (IM) administration of apomorphine (a mixed D1/D2 dopamine receptors agonist 0.2-1.6 mg/kg) induced pecking, a stereotype behavior in pigeons in a dose- dependent manner. In this study the effect of lithium (Li+, 240 mg/kg, IM) and AMI-193 (a new 5-HT2 antagonist, 0.003 mg/pigeon) on apomorphine-induced peking (AIP) were investigated. This study showed that Li+ and AMI-193 did not induce pecking by itself but administration of each of these agents before apomorphine increased an...

  19. Anti-atherosclerotic effects of an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor and an angiotensin II antagonist in Cynomolgus monkeys fed a high-cholesterol diet

    OpenAIRE

    Miyazaki, Mizuo; Sakonjo, Hiroshi; Takai, Shinji

    1999-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between angiotensin II formation and the development of atherosclerotic lesions in the aorta of monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) fed a high-cholesterol (4% cholesterol and 6% corn oil) diet for 6 months, and studied the effects of an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, trandolapril (10 mg kg−1 per day, p.o.), and an angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist, 2-butyl-4-(methylthio)-1-[[2′[[[(propylamino)carbonyl]amino]sulfonyl](1,1′-biphenyl)-4-yl]methy...

  20. Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Modelling of GnRH Antagonist Degarelix: A Comparison of the Non-linear Mixed-Effects Programs NONMEM and NLME

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornøe, Christoffer Wenzel; Agersø, Henrik; Nielsen, Henrik Aalborg; Madsen, Henrik; Jonsson, E. Niclas

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the two non-linear mixed-effects programs NONMEM and NLME were compared for their use in population pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modelling. We have described the first-order conditional estimation (FOCE) method as implemented in NONMEM and the alternating algorithm in NLME...... proposed by Lindstrom and Bates. The two programs were tested using clinical PK/PD data of a new gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist degarelix currently being developed for prostate cancer treatment. The pharmacokinetics of intravenous administered degarelix was analysed using a three...

  1. Enhancement of Glutamate Release by l-Fucose Changes Effects of Glutamate Receptor Antagonists on Long-Term Potentiation in the Rat Hippocampus

    OpenAIRE

    Matthies, Henry; Schroeder, Helmut; Smalla, Karl-Heinz; Krug, Manfred

    2000-01-01

    In previous studies l-fucose has been shown to facilitate long-term memory formation and to enhance and prolong long-term potentiation (LTP). To search for possible presynaptic or postsynaptic mechanisms that are affected by l-fucose, we examined the effect of l-fucose on (1) inhibition of LTP induction via glutamate receptors by antagonists, (2) paired-pulse facilitation, and (3) presynaptic transmitter release. Coapplication of 0.2 mm l-fucose with the competitive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA...

  2. The effect of acute Lithium and AMI-193, a new 5HT2 antagonist, on Apomorphine-induced pecking in pigeon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagheri T

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Intramascular (IM administration of apomorphine (a mixed D1/D2 dopamine receptors agonist 0.2-1.6 mg/kg induced pecking, a stereotype behavior in pigeons in a dose- dependent manner. In this study the effect of lithium (Li+, 240 mg/kg, IM and AMI-193 (a new 5-HT2 antagonist, 0.003 mg/pigeon on apomorphine-induced peking (AIP were investigated. This study showed that Li+ and AMI-193 did not induce pecking by itself but administration of each of these agents before apomorphine increased and decreased the AIP (apomor-phine 0.8 mg/kg respectively whereas concomitant use of Li+ (240 mg/kg IM and AMI-193 decreased AIP significantly. These results suggested that 5-HT2 antagonists inhibit the inhibitory effect of serotonin on the dopamine release in the raphe-striatal pathway but Li+ can modulate dopamine and serotonin function by different mechanisms and decrease this effect. As a result, it is mechanisms and decrease this effect. As a result, it is concluded serotonin can decrease the AIP through 5-HT2 receptors indirectly by decrease the dopamine release.

  3. Adenosine AA Receptor Antagonists Do Not Disrupt Rodent Prepulse Inhibition: An Improved Side Effect Profile in the Treatment of Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina J. Bleickardt

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is characterized by loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Current treatments for PD focus on dopaminergic therapies, including L-dopa and dopamine receptor agonists. However, these treatments induce neuropsychiatric side effects. Psychosis, characterized by delusions and hallucinations, is one of the most serious such side effects. Adenosine A2A receptor antagonism is a nondopaminergic treatment for PD with clinical and preclinical efficacy. The present studies assessed A2A antagonists SCH 412348 and istradefylline in rodent prepulse inhibition (PPI, a model of psychosis. Dopamine receptor agonists pramipexole (0.3–3 mg/kg, pergolide (0.3–3 mg/kg, and apomorphine (0.3–3 mg/kg significantly disrupted PPI; ropinirole (1–30 mg/kg had no effect; L-dopa (100–300 mg/kg disrupted rat but not mouse PPI. SCH 412348 (0.3–3 mg/kg did not disrupt rodent PPI; istradefylline (0.1–1 mg/kg marginally disrupted mouse but not rat PPI. These results suggest that A2A antagonists, unlike dopamine agonists, have an improved neuropsychiatric side effect profile.

  4. Evaluation of the antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like activity of α-spinasterol, a plant derivative with TRPV1 antagonistic effects, in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socała, Katarzyna; Wlaź, Piotr

    2016-04-15

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptor has recently gained attention as a new molecular target in the treatment of mental disorders such as depression and anxiety. α-Spinasterol is a plant steroid that acts as a TRPV1 antagonist. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like properties of α-spinasterol in mice. The obtained results showed that α-spinasterol (at doses of 1 and 2mg/kg) exerted anti-immobility effect in mice subjected to the forced swim test. Furthermore, co-administration of an ineffective dose of α-spinasterol (0.5mg/kg) with an ineffective dose of another TRPV1 antagonist - capsazepine (50 μg/mouse) produced a synergistic effect in the forced swim test. This compound was, however, devoid of anxiolytic-like effects in the elevated plus maze (at doses of 0.5-2mg/kg) and the light/dark box test (at a dose of 2mg/kg) in mice. Of note, α-spinasterol did not produce significant changes in body temperature and did not alter spontaneous locomotor activity in mice. The present study adds further support to the thesis that antagonism of the TRPV1 receptors may produce antidepressant effects. α-Spinasterol may represent a new therapeutic approach towards the development of novel antidepressant therapy. However, further detailed studies on the antidepressant potential of α-spinasterol are warranted. PMID:26808607

  5. 78 FR 78447 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Topaz Exchange, LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-26

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; Topaz Exchange, LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness... Equipment and Co- location Fees. Session Fees The Exchange believes that its proposed API/FIX session fees... written comments from members or other interested parties. III. Date of Effectiveness of the Proposed...

  6. Low doses of ionizing radiation: Biological effects and regulatory control. Contributed papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Atomic Energy Agency and the World Health Organization, in cooperation with the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, organized an international conference on Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation: Biological Effects and Regulatory Control, held in seville, Spain, from 17 to 21 November 1997. This technical document contains concise papers submitted to the conference

  7. 75 FR 55386 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; EDGA Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-10

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; EDGA Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness... written comments from members or other interested parties. III. Date of Effectiveness of the Proposed Rule... public in accordance with the provisions of 5 U.S.C. 552, will be available for website viewing...

  8. 76 FR 18274 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule..., 2011. The text of the proposed rule change is available on the Exchange's Website at http..., Participants, or Others No written comments were either solicited or received. III. Date of Effectiveness...

  9. 75 FR 67791 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-03

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule... either solicited or received. III. Date of Effectiveness of the Proposed Rule Change and Timing for... public in accordance with the provisions of 5 U.S.C. 552, will be available for website viewing...

  10. 76 FR 22158 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-20

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule... of Effectiveness of the Proposed Rule Change and Timing for Commission Action The foregoing rule... for website viewing and printing in the Commission's Public Reference Room, 100 F Street,...

  11. 76 FR 28106 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule... solicited or received. III. Date of Effectiveness of the Proposed Rule Change and Timing for Commission....C. 552, will be available for website viewing and printing in the Commission's Public Reference...

  12. 75 FR 78286 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-15

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule... either solicited or received. III. Date of Effectiveness of the Proposed Rule Change and Timing for... Commission's Internet website ( http://www.sec.gov/rules/sro.shtml ). Copies of the submission,...

  13. 76 FR 2172 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; EDGA Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-12

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; EDGA Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness... Effectiveness of the Proposed Rule Change and Timing for Commission Action The foregoing rule change has become... one method. The Commission will post all comments on the Commission's Internet website (...

  14. 75 FR 66405 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; EDGA Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-28

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; EDGA Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness... written comments from members or other interested parties. III. Date of Effectiveness of the Proposed Rule... comments on the Commission's Internet website ( http://www.sec.gov/rules/sro.shtml ). Copies of...

  15. 76 FR 2163 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-12

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule... comments were solicited or received with respect to the proposed rule change. III. Date of Effectiveness of... for website viewing and printing in the Commission's Public Reference Room, 100 F Street,...

  16. 75 FR 43214 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; EDGX Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-23

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; EDGX Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness... change is available on the Exchange's Internet website at http://www.directedge.com , at the principal... interested parties. III. Date of Effectiveness of the Proposed Rule Change and Timing for Commission...

  17. 75 FR 63235 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-14

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule...) Closing Cross * * * * * The text of the proposed rule change is available on the Exchange's website at..., Participants, or Others No written comments were either solicited or received. III. Date of Effectiveness...

  18. 76 FR 50803 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-16

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness... comments were solicited or received. III. Date of Effectiveness of the Proposed Rule Change and Timing for... for website viewing and printing in the Commission's Public Reference Room, 100 F Street,...

  19. Cis-by-Trans regulatory divergence causes the asymmetric lethal effects of an ancestral hybrid incompatibility gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamoni Maheshwari

    Full Text Available The Dobzhansky and Muller (D-M model explains the evolution of hybrid incompatibility (HI through the interaction between lineage-specific derived alleles at two or more loci. In agreement with the expectation that HI results from functional divergence, many protein-coding genes that contribute to incompatibilities between species show signatures of adaptive evolution, including Lhr, which encodes a heterochromatin protein whose amino acid sequence has diverged extensively between Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans by natural selection. The lethality of D. melanogaster/D. simulans F1 hybrid sons is rescued by removing D. simulans Lhr, but not D. melanogaster Lhr, suggesting that the lethal effect results from adaptive evolution in the D. simulans lineage. It has been proposed that adaptive protein divergence in Lhr reflects antagonistic coevolution with species-specific heterochromatin sequences and that defects in LHR protein localization cause hybrid lethality. Here we present surprising results that are inconsistent with this coding-sequence-based model. Using Lhr transgenes expressed under native conditions, we find no evidence that LHR localization differs between D. melanogaster and D. simulans, nor do we find evidence that it mislocalizes in their interspecific hybrids. Rather, we demonstrate that Lhr orthologs are differentially expressed in the hybrid background, with the levels of D. simulans Lhr double that of D. melanogaster Lhr. We further show that this asymmetric expression is caused by cis-by-trans regulatory divergence of Lhr. Therefore, the non-equivalent hybrid lethal effects of Lhr orthologs can be explained by asymmetric expression of a molecular function that is shared by both orthologs and thus was presumably inherited from the ancestral allele of Lhr. We present a model whereby hybrid lethality occurs by the interaction between evolutionarily ancestral and derived alleles.

  20. Effect of ruthenium red, a ryanodine receptor antagonist in experimental diabetes induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and associated dementia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Swati; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2016-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus is considered as a main risk factor for vascular dementia. In the past, we have reported the induction of vascular dementia by experimental diabetes. This study investigates the efficacy of a ruthenium red, a ryanodine receptor antagonist and pioglitazone in the pharmacological interdiction of pancreatectomy diabetes (PaD) induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and subsequent vascular dementia in rats. Attentional set shifting and Morris water-maze test were used for assessment of learning and memory. Vascular endothelial function, blood brain barrier permeability, serum glucose, serum nitrite/nitrate, oxidative stress (viz. aortic superoxide anion, brain thiobarbituric acid reactive species and brain glutathione), brain calcium and inflammation (myeloperoxidase) were also estimated. PaD rats have shown impairment of endothelial function, blood brain barrier permeability, learning and memory along with an increase in brain inflammation, oxidative stress and calcium. Administration of ruthenium red and pioglitazone has significantly attenuated PaD induced impairment of learning, memory, blood brain barrier permeability, endothelial function and biochemical parameters. It may be concluded that ruthenium red, a ryanodine receptor antagonist and pioglitazone, a PPAR-γ agonist may be considered as potent pharmacological agent for the management of PaD induced endothelial dysfunction and subsequent vascular dementia. Ryanodine receptor may be explored further for their possible benefits in vascular dementia. PMID:27262216

  1. Effect of the dual endothelin receptor antagonist bosentan on untreatable skin ulcers in a patient with diabetes: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brito Suárez Manuel

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Refractory skin ulcers are a major burden in patients with diabetes. Their pathogenesis is multifactorial, and data increasingly implicate endothelin as a mediator of diabetic macro- and microvasculopathy. Here we describe the first reported case of an endothelin receptor antagonist being used to successfully treat refractory skin ulcers in a patient with diabetes. Case presentation An 85-year-old Caucasian man with a 30-year history of type 2 diabetes developed multiple skin ulcerations, including a right heel ulcer. Despite appropriate treatment, the ulcer showed little improvement and the risk of amputation was high. The patient was treated with the dual endothelin receptor antagonist bosentan. After three weeks of treatment, major improvements were observed, and after 21 weeks, all ulcers had healed. No abnormalities were observed during monitoring of blood pressure, erythrocyte sedimentation rate or serum aminotransferase levels. Conclusion In patients with refractory ulceration associated with diabetes, bosentan may be of real benefit, especially in terms of amputation prevention. This case supports the proposed role for endothelin in the pathogenesis of skin ulceration in diabetes and is suggestive of a potential benefit of bosentan in this patient type. This case report is of interest to diabetologists and dermatologists.

  2. From the Cover: Glutamate antagonists limit tumor growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzeski, Wojciech; Turski, Lechoslaw; Ikonomidou, Chrysanthy

    2001-05-01

    Neuronal progenitors and tumor cells possess propensity to proliferate and to migrate. Glutamate regulates proliferation and migration of neurons during development, but it is not known whether it influences proliferation and migration of tumor cells. We demonstrate that glutamate antagonists inhibit proliferation of human tumor cells. Colon adenocarcinoma, astrocytoma, and breast and lung carcinoma cells were most sensitive to the antiproliferative effect of the N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist dizocilpine, whereas breast and lung carcinoma, colon adenocarcinoma, and neuroblastoma cells responded most favorably to the -amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate antagonist GYKI52466. The antiproliferative effect of glutamate antagonists was Ca2+ dependent and resulted from decreased cell division and increased cell death. Morphological alterations induced by glutamate antagonists in tumor cells consisted of reduced membrane ruffling and pseudopodial protrusions. Furthermore, glutamate antagonists decreased motility and invasive growth of tumor cells. These findings suggest anticancer potential of glutamate antagonists.

  3. Binary PAH mixtures cause additive or antagonistic effects on gene expression but synergistic effects on DNA adduct formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staal, Y.C.M.; Hebels, D.G.A.J.; Herwijnen, M.H.M. van; Gottschalk, R.W.H.; Schooten, F.J. van; Delft, J.H.M. van

    2007-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) cover a wide range of structurally related compounds which differ greatly in their carcinogenic potency. PAH exposure usually occurs through mixtures rather than individual compounds. Therefore, we assessed whether the effects of binary PAH mixtures on gene ex

  4. Maternal aggression in Wistar rats: effect of 5-HT2A/2C receptor agonist and antagonist microinjected into the dorsal periaqueductal gray matter and medial septum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida R.M.M. de

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to assess the role of the 5-HT2A/2C receptor at two specific brain sites, i.e., the dorsal periaqueductal gray matter (DPAG and the medial septal (MS area, in maternal aggressive behavior after the microinjection of either a 5-HT2A/2C receptor agonist or antagonist. Female Wistar rats were microinjected on the 7th postpartum day with the selective agonist alpha-methyl-5-hydroxytryptamine maleate (5-HT2A/2C or the antagonist 5-HT2A/2C, ketanserin. The agonist was injected into the DPAG at 0.2 (N = 9, 0.5 (N = 10, and 1.0 µg/0.2 µl (N = 9, and the antagonist was injected at 1.0 µg/0.2 µl (N = 9. The agonist was injected into the medial septal area (MS at 0.2 (N = 9, 0.5 (N = 7, and 1.0 µg/0.2 µl (N = 6 and the antagonist was injected at 1.0 µg/0.2 µl (N = 5. For the control, saline was injected into the DPAG (N = 7 and the MS (N = 12. Both areas are related to aggressive behavior and contain a high density of 5-HT receptors. Non-aggressive behaviors such as horizontal locomotion (walking and social investigation and aggressive behaviors such as lateral threat (aggressive posture, attacks (frontal and lateral, and biting the intruder were analyzed when a male intruder was placed into the female resident's cage. For each brain area studied, the frequency of the behaviors was compared among the various treatments by analysis of variance. The results showed a decrease in maternal aggressive behavior (number of bites directed at the intruder after microinjection of the agonist at 0.2 and 1.0 µg/0.2 µl (1.6 ± 0.7 and 0.9 ± 0.3 into the DPAG compared to the saline group (5.5 ± 1.1. There was no dose-response relationship with the agonist. The present findings suggest that the 5-HT2A/2C receptor agonist has an inhibitory effect on maternal aggressive behavior when microinjected into the DPAG and no effect when microinjected into the MS. Ketanserin (1.0 µg/0.2 µl decreased locomotion when microinjected

  5. Regulatory management system for licensing, inspection and enforcement. Regulatory approach, planning, quality manual, feedback, and measurement and improvement of effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Licensing of nuclear facilities in Finland is based on a detailed review and assessment of the design against deterministic safety requirements and on additional verification of the design solutions and operating procedures with comprehensive probabilistic risk analysis. Design documents of important structures and components are reviewed before the start of manufacturing and the structures and components are inspected at various stages of implementation. The regulatory management system of STUK is documented in a QA manual that provides guidance on all work processes. It involves systematic planning and evaluation of activities, multiple means of getting feedback on the work processes, and continuous efforts to improve its effectiveness. Necessary factors for success are adequate human resources with professional competence in all the relevant areas for radiation and nuclear safety, a comprehensive and integrated assessment of safety issues, and an attention to detail. Personal responsibility and initiative of the staff is encouraged and emphasized in all decision making and everyone is advised to respond promptly to new safety concerns and to indications of deteriorating performance. Work schedule is responsive to licensee needs and a service oriented attitude is expected from the staff, also outside the office hours. Communication with the licensees and industry is open and functions at two levels: whenever different views or confusion exists, issues can easily be discussed among the experts and at the management level. (author)

  6. Regulatory focus and burnout in nurses: The mediating effect of perception of transformational leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Rui; Zhang, Shilei; Xu, Hang; Liu, Xufeng; Miao, Danmin

    2015-12-01

    This correlation study investigated the relationship between nurses' regulatory focus and burnout, as mediated by their perceptions of transformational leadership, using a cross-sectional research design with anonymous questionnaires. In July-August 2012, data were collected from 378 nurses from three hospitals in Shaanxi Province, China, using self-report questionnaires for measuring the nurses' regulatory focus, their level of burnout and their perception of whether the leadership of their supervisor was transformational. Structural equation modelling and bootstrapping procedures were used to identify the mediating effect of their perceptions of transformational leadership. The results supported our hypothesized model. The type of regulatory focus emerged as a significant predictor of burnout. Having a perception of transformational leadership partially mediated the relationship between regulatory focus and burnout. Having a promotion focus reduced burnout when the participants perceived transformational leadership, whereas having a prevention focus exhibited the opposite pattern. The mediating effect of the perception of transformational leadership suggests that a promotion focus may help diminish burnout, directly and indirectly. Nurse managers must be aware of the role of a regulatory focus and cultivate promotion focus in their followers. PMID:24724736

  7. Paradoxical stimulatory effects of the "standard" histamine H4-receptor antagonist JNJ7777120: the H4 receptor joins the club of 7 transmembrane domain receptors exhibiting functional selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Roland; Schneider, Erich H; Dove, Stefan; Brunskole, Irena; Neumann, Detlef; Strasser, Andrea; Buschauer, Armin

    2011-04-01

    The histamine H(4) receptor (H(4)R) is expressed in several cell types of the immune system and is assumed to play an important pro-inflammatory role in various diseases, including bronchial asthma, atopic dermatitis, and pruritus. Accordingly, H(4)R antagonists have been suggested to provide valuable drugs for the treatment of these diseases. Over the past decade, the indole derivative 1-[(5-chloro-1H-indol-2-yl)carbonyl]-4-methylpiperazine (JNJ7777120) has become the "standard" H(4)R antagonist and has been extensively used to assess the pathophysiological role of the H(4)R. However, the situation has now become more complicated by recent data (p. 749 and Naunyn Schmiedebergs Arch Pharmacol doi: 10.1007/s00210-011-0612-3) showing that JNJ7777120 can also activate β-arrestin in a supposedly G(i)-protein-independent (pertussis toxin-insensitive) manner and that at certain H(4)R species orthologs, JNJ7777120 exhibits partial agonist efficacy with respect to G(i)-protein activation (steady-state high-affinity GTPase activity). These novel findings can be explained within the concept of functional selectivity or biased signaling, assuming unique ligand-specific receptor conformations with distinct signal transduction capabilities. Thus, great caution must be exerted when interpreting in vivo effects of JNJ7777120 as H(4)R antagonism. We discuss future directions to get out of the current dilemma in which there is no "standard" H(4)R antagonist available to the scientific community. PMID:21266488

  8. TRADE EFFECTS: REGULATORY, ACCOUNTING PRACTICES AND REPORTING OF INFORMATION RELATED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ARISTIŢA ROTILĂ

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available It is known that within trade relations providers often credit customers for the value of goods or services which are the subject of conducted commercial transactions, this aspect being materialized in the issuance and acceptance of a trade effect. From the time of acceptance until maturity / settlement, trade effects should be reflected separately in the accounts and, to the extent that were not settled until the end of exercise, their value must be presented in the financial statements. Based on analysis of the Romanian accounting regulations, also taking into consideration the opinions expressed in specific literature concerning accounting reflection of trade effects, in this article we try to point out some aspects which, in our opinion, require clarification. We also want to point out some contradictions / inconsistencies regarding the reporting of information on the trade effects, specifically between the text of accounting regulations concerning the definition of accounting structures „cash and bank accounts” and “short term investments” and their contents when presented as positions in the balance sheet structure. In relation to the issues raised we try to prove the effects on the indicators concerning financial position and to make some suggestions that would have effects on Romanian accounting regulations, namely the improvement of financial reporting performed by the economic operators.

  9. Effects of the α-adrenoceptor antagonists phentolamine, phenoxybenzamine, and Idazoxan on sympathetic blood flow control in the periodontal ligament of the cat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blood flow changes in the periodontal ligament (PDL) were measured indirectly by monitoring the local clearance of 125I- during electric sympathetic nerve stimulation or close intra-arterial infusions of either noradrenaline (NA) or adrenaline (ADR) before and after administration of phentolamine (PA), phenoxybenzamine (PBZ) or Idazoxan (RX). At the doses used in the present study, PA was the only antagonist that significantly reduced the blood flow decrease seen on activation of sympathetic fibers, although PBZ also reduced this response. Idazoxan, however, did not induce the consistent effect on blood flow decreases seen on sympathetic activation. All three α-adrenoceptor antagonists almost abolished the effects of exogenously administered NA and ADR. The results suggest the presence of functional post-junctional adrenoceptors of both the α 1 and α 2 subtypes in the sympathetic regulation of the blood flow in the PDL of the cat. A component of the response elicited by electrical sympathetic stimulation appeared to be resistant to α-adrenoceptor blockade. Administration of guanethidine (which inhibits further release of NA and neuropeptide Y) after PA abolished this residual sympathetic response

  10. Enhancing regulatory effectiveness by improving the process for identifying and resolving generic issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Generic Issues Program first began formally in response to a Commission directive in October of 1976. In 1983, it became one of the first programs to make successful use of probabilistic risk information to aid in regulatory decision-making. In the 16 years since the program became quantitative, 836 issues have been processed. Of these, 106 reactor safety issues were prioritized as requiring further evaluation to determine the final resolution. Approximately a dozen generic issues remain unresolved. Although there is far less reactor licensing activity than in the 1970s, new issues continue to be identified from research and operational experience. These issues often involve complex and controversial questions of safety and regulation, and an efficient and effective means of addressing these issues is essential for regulatory effectiveness. Issues that involve a significant safety question require swift, effective, enforceable, and cost-effective regulatory actions. Issues that are of little safety significance must be quickly shown to be so and dismissed in an expeditious manner so as to avoid unnecessary expenditure of limited resources and to reduce regulatory uncertainty. Additionally, in the time since the generic issue program began, probabilistic risk assessment techniques have advanced significantly while agency resources have continued to diminish. Accordingly, the paper discusses the steps that have been taken to enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of the generic issue resolution process. Additionally, four resolved issues are discussed, along with key elements of a proposed new procedure for resolving potential generic issues

  11. Effect of acute androgen withdrawal by GnRH antagonist on epididymal sperm motility and morphology in the cynomolgus monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, C H; Weinbauer, G F; Cooper, T G

    1999-01-01

    Hormonal male contraception requires an induction phase before azoospermia and contraceptive safety are achieved. The nature of spermatozoa that may be ejaculated during this induction phase was studied in a nonhuman primate. The GnRH antagonist Cetrorelix was administered daily to five cynomolgus monkeys to induce testicular regression, and the vehicle was given to five control animals. Within 16 days, the antagonist reduced androgens by 80% in the serum and by 50% in the epididymis. Sperm were obtained by mincing different epididymal regions and were examined for morphology (subjectively) and motility (objectively) after removal of the organs 16 and 25 days after continuous treatment. Spermatozoa entering the epididymis of monkeys undergoing regression differed from those of vehicle-treated controls in their greater susceptibility to disruption during preparation for morphological staining. The acquisition of motility by sperm in the epididymides attached to regressing testes occurred in the same epididymal region as controls but did not achieve the median velocities attained by sperm in controls during epididymal passage. Values for most sperm motion parameters developed as in the controls, and, during epididymal passage, sperm developed resistance to stresses encountered during preparation for morphological analysis. These observations suggest that spermatozoa ejaculated before spermatogenesis ceases may be potentially fertilizing because epididymal maturation continues in an androgen-deprived organ. From these preclinical studies, it can be concluded that in men, applying hormonal contraception precautions against pregnancy must be recommended before azoospermia is induced, since the epididymis can partially compensate for poor-quality sperm produced by a regressing testis even when levels of circulating androgens and tissue androgens are low. PMID:10100476

  12. Biofilms of Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus fermentum: Effect on stress responses, antagonistic effects on pathogen growth and immunomodulatory properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoudia, Nabil; Rieu, Aurélie; Briandet, Romain; Deschamps, Julien; Chluba, Johanna; Jego, Gaëtan; Garrido, Carmen; Guzzo, Jean

    2016-02-01

    Few studies have extensively investigated probiotic functions associated with biofilms. Here, we show that strains of Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus fermentum are able to grow as biofilm on abiotic surfaces, but the biomass density differs between strains. We performed microtiter plate biofilm assays under growth conditions mimicking to the gastrointestinal environment. Osmolarity and low concentrations of bile significantly enhanced Lactobacillus spatial organization. Two L. plantarum strains were able to form biofilms under high concentrations of bile and mucus. We used the agar well-diffusion method to show that supernatants from all Lactobacillus except the NA4 isolate produced food pathogen inhibitory molecules in biofilm. Moreover, TNF-α production by LPS-activated human monocytoid cells was suppressed by supernatants from Lactobacillus cultivated as biofilms but not by planktonic culture supernatants. However, only L. fermentum NA4 showed anti-inflammatory effects in zebrafish embryos fed with probiotic bacteria, as assessed by cytokine transcript level (TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-10). We conclude that the biofilm mode of life is associated with beneficial probiotic properties of lactobacilli, in a strain dependent manner. Those results suggest that characterization of isolate phenotype in the biofilm state could be additional valuable information for the selection of probiotic strains. PMID:26611169

  13. X-ray analysis of the effect of the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist granisetron on gastrointestinal motility in rats repeatedly treated with the antitumoral drug cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, Gema; López-Pérez, Ana Esther; Martínez-Villaluenga, María; Cabezos, Pablo Antonio; Abalo, Raquel

    2014-08-01

    Cancer chemotherapy is associated with the development of numerous adverse effects, including nausea, emesis and other alterations in gastrointestinal (GI) motility. The administration of 5-HT3 receptor antagonists has provided a clinical advance in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced vomiting but these drugs lose efficacy throughout chronic treatment. The effects of these drugs in experimental animals under chronic administration are not well known. Our aim was to study, using radiographic methods, the effect of the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist granisetron on GI dysmotility induced in the rat by repeated cisplatin administration. First, invasive methods were used to select a dose of granisetron capable of reducing increased stomach weight due to acute cisplatin administration (6 mg/kg, ip). Second, rats received two intraperitoneal (ip) injections once a week for 4 weeks: granisetron (1 mg/kg, ip) or saline and, thirty min later, saline or cisplatin (2 mg/kg, ip). Body weight gain was measured throughout treatment. Radiological techniques were used to determine the acute (after first dose) and chronic (after last dose) effects of cisplatin and/or granisetron on GI motility. Repeated cisplatin-induced weight loss which granisetron did not prevent. Gastric emptying was delayed after the first cisplatin administration. Granisetron completely prevented this effect. After weekly administration, cisplatin-induced gastric dysmotility was enhanced and granisetron was not capable of completely preventing this effect. Granisetron prevents gastric emptying alterations, but its efficacy decreases throughout antineoplastic treatment. This might be due to the enhanced effect of cisplatin. PMID:24798399

  14. Regulatory fit effects for injunctive versus descriptive social norms: Evidence from the promotion of sustainable products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melnyk, V.; Herpen, van E.; Fischer, A.R.H.; Trijp, van J.C.M.

    2013-01-01

    Consumers face marketing messages using social norms in many situations where different goals are dominant. This research examines moderating effects of regulatory focus for descriptive and injunctive norms in the promotion of sustainable products. More specifically, it shows that descriptive norms

  15. 78 FR 41453 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-10

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. July 3, 2013. Pursuant to...\\ notice is hereby given that on June 28, 2013, BATS Exchange, Inc. (the ``Exchange'' or ``BATS'')...

  16. 75 FR 20418 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-19

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. April 9, 2010. Pursuant to...\\ notice is hereby given that on March 31, 2010, BATS Exchange, Inc. (the ``Exchange'' or ``BATS'')...

  17. 78 FR 16750 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-18

    ...'').\\5\\ \\5\\ See Securities Exchange Act Release No. 67091 (May 31, 2012), 77 FR 33498 (June 6, 2012) (the... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change To Modify the Operation of Market Orders for BATS Options March 12,...

  18. 78 FR 8617 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-06

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change To Amend BATS Rules Related to Price Sliding Functionality January 31, 2013... thereunder,\\2\\ notice is hereby given that on January 25, 2013, BATS Exchange, Inc. (the ``Exchange''...

  19. 78 FR 62804 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-22

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. October 11, 2013. Pursuant to...\\ notice is hereby given that on October 1, 2013, BATS Exchange, Inc. (the ``Exchange'' or ``BATS'')...

  20. 78 FR 62921 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-22

    ... Exchange Act Release No. 70264 (August 27, 2013), 78 FR 54338 (September 3, 2013) (SR-BATS-2013-045... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of a Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. October 15, 2013....

  1. 76 FR 7891 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-11

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. February 7, 2011. Pursuant to... is hereby given that, on January 31, 2011, BATS Exchange, Inc. (the ``Exchange'' or ``BATS'')...

  2. 75 FR 27847 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-18

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. May 11, 2010. Pursuant to...\\ notice is hereby given that on May 4, 2010, BATS Exchange, Inc. (the ``Exchange'' or ``BATS'') filed...

  3. 78 FR 29805 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-21

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of a Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. May 15, 2013. Pursuant to...\\ notice is hereby given that on May 7, 2013, BATS Exchange, Inc. (the ``Exchange'' or ``BATS'') filed...

  4. 77 FR 23307 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-18

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. April 12, 2012. Pursuant to... is hereby given that on April 2, 2012, BATS Exchange, Inc. (the ``Exchange'' or ``BATS'') filed...

  5. 77 FR 35719 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-14

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change To Adopt Rules Related to Risk Management Functionality for BATS Options June... Rule 19b-4 thereunder,\\2\\ notice is hereby given that on June 1, 2012, BATS Exchange, Inc....

  6. 76 FR 77576 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-13

    ... and executed at C2. \\6\\ See Securities Exchange Act Release No. 65668 (November 2, 2011), 76 FR 69313... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of a Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. December 7, 2011....

  7. 78 FR 37644 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-21

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. June 17, 2013. Pursuant to...\\ notice is hereby given that on June 4, 2013, BATS Exchange, Inc. (the ``Exchange'' or ``BATS'')...

  8. 77 FR 31059 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-24

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. May 18, 2012. Pursuant to...\\ notice is hereby given that on May 11, 2012, BATS Exchange, Inc. (the ``Exchange'' or ``BATS'')...

  9. 78 FR 7826 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-04

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change To Amend BATS Rules in Connection With the Elimination of Discretionary Orders for BATS Options January 29, 2013. Pursuant to Section 19(b)(1) of the Securities Exchange Act...

  10. 76 FR 9841 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-22

    ... FR 51295 (August 19, 2010) (order approving application of BATS Y-Exchange, Inc. for registration as... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change To Amend BATS Rule 11.13, Entitled ``Order Execution'' February 15,...

  11. 76 FR 62884 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-11

    ... available to all Members. \\14\\ See Securities Exchange Act Release No. 61869 (April 7, 2010), 75 FR 19449... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. October 3, 2011 . Pursuant...

  12. 78 FR 61422 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-03

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of a Proposed Rule Change To Modify the Trading Halt Rule of BATS Options September 27, 2013... thereunder,\\2\\ notice is hereby given that, on September 20, 2013, BATS Exchange, Inc. (the ``Exchange''...

  13. 78 FR 16306 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-14

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. March 8, 2013. Pursuant to...\\ notice is hereby given that on March 1, 2013, BATS Exchange, Inc. (the ``Exchange'' or ``BATS'')...

  14. 75 FR 11951 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-12

    ... equity options on the Exchange. See Securities Exchange Act Release No. 61419 (January 26, 2010), 75 FR... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. March 4, 2010. Pursuant...

  15. 76 FR 2734 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-14

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. January 6, 2011. Pursuant to... is hereby given that on January 4, 2011, BATS Exchange, Inc. (the ``Exchange'' or ``BATS'')...

  16. 77 FR 58195 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-19

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. September 13, 2012. Pursuant... thereunder,\\2\\ notice is hereby given that on August 31, 2012, BATS Exchange, Inc. (the ``Exchange''...

  17. 78 FR 51261 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-20

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. August 14, 2013. Pursuant to...\\ notice is hereby given that on August 1, 2013, BATS Exchange, Inc. (the ``Exchange'' or ``BATS'')...

  18. 78 FR 56955 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-16

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. September 10, 2013. Pursuant... thereunder,\\2\\ notice is hereby given that on August 30, 2013, BATS Exchange, Inc. (the ``Exchange''...

  19. 78 FR 77736 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-24

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of a Proposed Rule Change To Modify BATS Options Market Maker Continuous Quoting Obligation Rules... Rule 19b-4 thereunder,\\2\\ notice is hereby given that on December 5, 2013, BATS Exchange, Inc....

  20. 76 FR 57092 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-15

    ... Act Release No. 65133 (August 15, 2011), 76 FR 52032 (August 19, 2011) (SR-BATS-2011-029). The... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change To Offer a Bulk-Quoting Interface To All Users of BATS Options September...

  1. 77 FR 5588 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-03

    ... forth below. \\6\\ See Securities Exchange Act Release No. 65619 (October 25, 2011), 76 FR 67238 (October... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. January 30, 2012. Pursuant...

  2. 75 FR 66183 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-27

    ...), 75 FR 51295 (August 19, 2010) (order approving application of BATS Y-Exchange, Inc. for registration... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change by BATS Exchange, Inc. To Amend BATS Rule 11.13, Entitled ``Order...

  3. 77 FR 35735 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-14

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. June 8, 2012. Pursuant to... is hereby given that on May 31, 2012, BATS Exchange, Inc. (the ``Exchange'' or ``BATS'') filed...

  4. 75 FR 57097 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-17

    ... 13, 2010), 75 FR 51295 (August 19, 2010) (order approving application of BATS Y-Exchange, Inc. for... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change To Adopt BATS Rule 2.12, Entitled ``BATS Trading, Inc. as Inbound...

  5. 76 FR 20414 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-12

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. April 6, 2011. Pursuant to...\\ notice is hereby given that, on April 1, 2011, BATS Exchange, Inc. (the ``Exchange'' or ``BATS'')...

  6. 77 FR 8310 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-14

    ... 4, 2012), 77 FR 1532 (January 10, 2012) (SR-Phlx-2011-185) (notice of filing and immediate..., 2011), 76 FR 78322 (December 16, 2011) (SR-Phlx-2011-162) (notice of filing and immediate effectiveness... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate...

  7. 77 FR 39783 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; EDGA Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-05

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; EDGA Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness..., without the addition of Flag DM, such Non-Displayed or Discretionary Orders would yield Flags HA or HR and... the order book. \\10\\ The Exchange notes that the rate of $0.0010 per share for Flags HA and HR...

  8. 77 FR 7216 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-10

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Exchange, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of a Proposed Rule Change Related to Fees for Use of BATS Exchange, Inc. February 6, 2012. Pursuant... thereunder,\\2\\ notice is hereby given that on February 1, 2012, BATS Exchange, Inc. (the ``Exchange''...

  9. The Effect of Blog Use on Self-Regulatory Learning of Prospective German Language Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyhan Yucel, Mukadder

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the effect of blog use on self-regulatory learning of prospective German language teachers. The study is semi-experimental. Pretest-posttest, experiment control model was used. Blog activities were conducted as extensive beyond classroom activities only for the experiment group. As the data collection tool…

  10. 75 FR 80090 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change by NYSE Amex LLC To Establish Royalty Fees for Non-Customer Executions in Options Based on the KBW Bank Index December 15, 2010. Pursuant...

  11. Effect of recent spinal cord injury on wnt signaling antagonists (sclerostin and dkk-1) and their relationship with bone loss. A 12-month prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifre, Laia; Vidal, Joan; Carrasco, Josep L; Filella, Xavier; Ruiz-Gaspà, Silvia; Muxi, Africa; Portell, Enric; Monegal, Ana; Guañabens, Nuria; Peris, Pilar

    2015-06-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) has been associated with a marked increase in bone loss and bone remodeling, especially short-term after injury. The absence of mechanical load, mediated by osteocyte mechanosensory function, seems to be a causative factor related to bone loss in this condition. However, the pathogenesis and clinical management of this process remain unclear. Therefore, the aim of the study was to analyze the effect of recent SCI on the Wnt pathway antagonists, sclerostin and Dickkopf (Dkk-1), and their relationship with bone turnover and bone mineral density (BMD) evolution. Forty-two patients (aged 35 ± 14yrs) with a recent (58 pmol/L) at baseline showed higher sublesional BMD loss. In conclusion, this study shows that short-term after SCI there is a marked increase in bone turnover and bone loss, the latter associated with an increase in Dkk-1 serum levels. The persistence of increased levels of this Wnt antagonist throughout the study and their relationship with the magnitude of bone loss suggests a contributory role of this mediator in this process. PMID:25484108

  12. Synergistic effects of probiotic Leuconostoc mesenteroides and Bacillus subtilis in malted ragi (Eleucine corocana) food for antagonistic activity against V. cholerae and other beneficial properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VidyaLaxme, B; Rovetto, A; Grau, R; Agrawal, Renu

    2014-11-01

    Finger millet (Elucine corocana), locally known as ragi, and probiotics have been recognized for their health benefits. In the present work we describe novel probiotic ragi malt (functional food) that has been prepared using ragi and probiotic Leuconostoc mesenteroides (Lm) and Bacillus subtilis natto (Bs), alone and in combination, for antagonistic activity against Vibrio cholerae (Vc). In vitro studies using pure cultures showed that each probiotic strain (Lm or Bs) was able to inhibit the planktonic growth of Vc as well as its ability to make biofilms and adhere to extracellular matrix proteins (fibronectin, Fn) that may function in vivo as initial ports of entrance of the pathogen. Interestingly, the combination of both probiotic strains (Lm plus Bs) produced the strongest activity against the Vc. When both cultures were used together in the ragi malt the antimicrobial activity against Vc was enhanced due to synergistic effect of both probiotic strains. The inclusion of both probiotic strains in the functional food produced higher amounts of beneficial fatty acids like linoleic and linolenic acid and increased the mineral content (iron and zinc). The viability and activity of Lm and Bs against Vc was further enhanced with the use of adjuvants like ascorbic acid, tryptone, cysteine hydrochloride and casein hydrolysate in the ragi malt. In sum, the intake of probiotic ragi malt supplemented with Lm and Bs may provide nutrition, energy, compounds of therapeutic importance and antagonistic activity against Vc to a large extent to the consumer. PMID:26396299

  13. U.S. regulatory requirements for blast effects from accidental explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is limited to accidental explosions external to nuclear power plants. Procedures for deciding if the risk of damage due to an accidental explosion is sufficiently high to warrant detailed study and methods for assessing structural capability when detailed study is needed are described. The dynamic blast load effect may be estimated by a simplified static procedure. The regulatory staff permits use of a dynamic load factor of 2 applied to the overpressure or reflected pressure, as appropriate, and the assumption that structures and structural elements will deform dynamically as though the loads were applied statically. This assumption allows the designer to compute stresses, moments and shears without reference to the distribution of inertial forces within the structure. Blast pressure should be considered to act both inward and outward to account for dynamic stress reversal. Overturning and sliding stability as well as the ability of supporting structures to carry loads transmitted from the directly loaded exterior surfaces must be assessed. A detailed dynamic analysis in which force-time histories and the stiffness and mass properties of the structures are employed is also acceptable. Damping is not important for air blast effects. The regulatory staff requires that blast effects be resisted elastically. This is consistent with regulatory philosophy that global loading situations should not be permitted to cause global damage. Appendix C to ACI-349, 'Code Requirements for Nuclear Safety Related Concrete Structures', in conflict with regulatory requirements, permits a ductility of 3 for blast loadings

  14. Chronic treatment with a selective 5-HT6 receptor antagonist alters the behavioral and neurochemical effects of ethanol in young adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayarajan, Pradeep; Nirogi, Ramakrishna; Shinde, Anil; Benade, Vijay; Muddana, Nageswara Rao

    2016-04-01

    Experimental evidence indicates a potential role of 5-HT6 receptors in the regulation of addictive behavior. We studied the effects of a potent and selective 5-HT6 receptor antagonist (compound A) on voluntary ethanol intake and behavioral/neurochemical changes induced by ethanol. The pharmacokinetic interaction of compound A and ethanol was assessed. The effect of compound A on schedule-induced ethanol polydipsia was studied to determine its effect on voluntary ethanol intake. Open-field and ethanol-induced loss of righting reflex assays were carried out to determine the effect of compound A on the ataxic and sedative effects of ethanol. The effect on motor learning was evaluated using rotarod and brain microdialysis was carried out to study the effect on monoaminergic neurotransmission. No significant changes were observed in the pharmacokinetic parameters of compound A when cotreated with ethanol. Compound A significantly decreased voluntary ethanol consumption and attenuated the effects of ethanol on motor learning. Compound A also antagonized the sedative and ataxic effects of ethanol. The effect of ethanol on the dopaminergic and noradrenergic neurotransmission was blocked by compound A. The effects of compound A were evident only after chronic treatment. Compound A may have attenuated the behavioral effects of ethanol by blocking the ethanol-induced efflux of dopamine and norepinephrine in the motor cortex. PMID:25932717

  15. The epigenetically regulated effects of Wnt antagonists on the expression of genes in the apoptosis pathway in human bladder cancer cell line (T24).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varol, Nuray; Konac, Ece; Onen, Ilke Hacer; Gurocak, Serhat; Alp, Ebru; Yilmaz, Akin; Menevse, Sevda; Sozen, Sinan

    2014-07-01

    The epigenetic suppression of Wnt antagonists (sFRPs, DKKs, and WIF-1) causes the activation of both β-catenin and target genes, which play an important role in cell proliferation, metastasis, and angiogenesis. This study is aimed to investigate, on transcriptional and protein levels, the synergic effects of unaccompanied and/or combined use of 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (DAC, 5-aza-dC), trichostatin A (TSA), and gemcitabine+cisplatin chemotherapeutic agents on the apoptotic pathway of human bladder cancer cell line T24. The anti-tumor effects of gemcitabine (0-500 nM), cisplatin (0-10 μM), DAC (10 μM), and TSA (300 nM) alone and/or together on T24 cells were determined by WST-1. ELISA method was used to analyze the effects of unaccompanied and combined use of gemcitabine+cisplatin, DAC, and TSA on cell proliferation and determine the cytotoxic and apoptotic dosages at the level of H3 histone acetylation. Methylation-specific PCR was used to evaluate methylation profiles of Wnt antagonist gene (WIF-1). In the case of unaccompanied and/or combined use of specified drugs, the variations in the expression levels of CTNNB1, GSK3β, c-MYC, CCND1, CASP-3, CASP-8, CASP-9, BCL2L1, and WIF-1 genes were determined by quantitative real-time PCR. Our results indicate that through inhibition of DNA methylation, expression of β-catenin and Wnt antagonist re-activation and expressions of canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway target genes, c-myc and cyclin D1 (CCND1), have decreased. In addition, DAC, TSA, and gemcitabine+cisplatin combination caused an increase in GSK3β mRNA levels, which in turn significantly decreased CCND1 mRNA levels. Moreover, BCL2L1, an anti-apoptotic gene, was downregulated significantly. Meanwhile, both CASP-3 mRNA and active caspase-3 protein levels increased with respect to control (p<0.01). The results revealed that use of quadruplicate gemcitabine+cisplatin+DAC+TSA combination led to a reduced inhibition of canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway and reduced

  16. A randomised trial evaluating the effects of the TRPV1 antagonist SB705498 on pruritus induced by histamine, and cowhage challenge in healthy volunteers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel A Gibson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1 is a non-selective cation channel widely expressed in skin tissues, and peripheral sensory nerve fibres. Activation of TRPV1 releases neuropeptides; the resulting neurogenic inflammation is believed to contribute to the development of pruritus. A TRPV1 antagonist has the potential to perform as an anti-pruritic agent. SB705498 is a TRPV1 antagonist that has demonstrated in vitro activity against cloned TRPV1 human receptors and when orally administered has demonstrated pharmacodynamic activity in animal models and clinical studies. OBJECTIVES: To select a topical dose of SB705498 using the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin; to confirm engagement of the TRPV1 antagonistic action of SB705498 and assess whether the dose selected has an effect on itch induced by two challenge agents. METHODS: A clinical study was conducted in 16 healthy volunteers to assess the effects of 3 doses of SB705498 on skin flare induced by capsaicin. Subjects with a robust capsaicin response were chosen to determine if the selected topical formulation of SB705498 had an effect on challenge agent induced itch. RESULTS: Following capsaicin challenge the greatest average reduction in area of flare was seen for the 3% formulation. This dose was selected for further investigation. Itch intensity induced by two challenge agents (cowhage and histamine was assessed on the Computerised Visual Analogue Scale. The difference in average itch intensity (Weighted Mean Over 15 Mins between the 3% dose of SB705498 and placebo for the cowhage challenge was -0.64, whilst the histamine challenge showed on average a -4.65 point change. CONCLUSIONS: The 3% topical formulation of SB705498 cream was clinically well tolerated and had target specific pharmacodynamic activity. However there were no clinically significant differences on pruritus induced by either challenge agent in comparison to placebo. SB705498 is unlikely to be of symptomatic

  17. Histamine-2 Receptor Antagonists and Semen Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banihani, Saleem A

    2016-01-01

    Histamine-2 receptor antagonists are a class of drugs used to treat the acid-related gastrointestinal diseases such as ulcer and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. Although such drugs, especially ranitidine and famotidine, are still widely used, their effects on semen quality, and hence on male infertility, is still unclear. This MiniReview systematically addresses and summarizes the effect of histamine-2 receptor antagonists (cimetidine, ranitidine, nizatidine and famotidine) on semen quality, particularly, on sperm function. Cimetidine appears to have adverse effects on semen quality. While the effects of ranitidine and nizatidine on semen quality are still controversial, famotidine does not appear to change semen quality. Therefore, additional studies will be required to clarify whether histamine-2 receptor-independent effects of these drugs play a role in semen quality as well as further clinical studies including direct comparison of the histamine-2 receptor antagonists. PMID:26176290

  18. Effects of antagonist of retinoid X receptor (UVI3003) on morphology and gene profile of Xenopus tropicalis embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jingmin; Shi, Huahong; Zhu, Pan; Hu, Lingling; Wu, Lijiao; Yang, Yi; Rotchell, Jeanette M

    2014-07-01

    We exposed Xenopus tropicalis embryos to a selective antagonist of retinoid X receptor (UVI3003). UVI3003 induced multiple malformations at the concentrations of 200-1000 μg/L after 48 h exposure. The most prominent malformations affected brains, eyes, cement gland and fins. UVI3003 also induced variable and divergent malformations at 250-1500 μg/L after 0-24 and 24-48 h exposure. Microarray analysis showed that seven genes (rps15, serp2, fmr1, cyp2e1, lrrc9, ugtla6 and LOC100490188) were differentially regulated in all three treatment groups after 0-24h exposure. The most significantly affected pathway was galactose metabolism. In 24-48 h exposure groups, 18 genes were differentially regulated, mainly comprising components of the PPAR signaling pathway. These results suggested that UVI3003 is teratogenic in amphibian embryos. Differential gene expression suggests that galactose metabolism and PPAR signaling pathways may provide underlying mechanistic detail accounting for the observed malformations. PMID:24950139

  19. Investigating the effect of autoinduction in cynomolgus monkeys of a novel anticancer MDM2 antagonist, idasanutlin, and relevance to humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Kelli J; Yu, Li J; Reddy, Micaela B; Fretland, Adrian J; Parrott, Neil; Hussain, Sazzad; Palacios, Mary; Vazvaei, Faye; Zhi, Jianguo; Tuerck, Dietrich

    2016-08-01

    1. Idasanutlin (RG7388) is a potent p53-MDM2 antagonist currently in clinical development for treatment of cancer. The purpose of the present studies was to investigate the cause of marked decrease in plasma exposure after repeated oral administration of RG7388 in monkeys and whether the autoinduction observed in monkeys is relevant to humans. 2. In monkey liver and intestinal microsomes collected after repeated oral administration of RG7388 to monkeys, significantly increased activities of homologue CYP3A8 were observed (ex vivo). Investigation using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model suggested that the loss of exposure was primarily due to induction of metabolism in the gut of monkeys. 3. Studies in monkey and human primary hepatocytes showed that CYP3A induction by RG7388 only occurred in monkey hepatocytes but not in human hepatocytes, which suggests the observed CYP3A induction is monkey specific. 4. The human PK data obtained from the first cohorts confirmed the lack of relevant induction as predicted by the human hepatocytes and the PBPK modelling based on no induction in humans. PMID:26586447

  20. The haemodynamic effects of the thromboxane A2 receptor antagonist GR32191B during cardiopulmonary bypass in the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathie, R T; Fleming, J S; Barrow, S E; Arnold, J V; Brannan, J J; Becket, J M; Ritter, J M; Taylor, K M

    1995-11-01

    This study examined whether treatment with the specific thromboxane (TX) A2 receptor antagonist GR32191B would result in an improvement in peripheral haemodynamics during and after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) in anaesthetized dogs compared with animals given either saline (control) or aspirin. Following thoracotomy, heparinization and aortic cannulation, and 35 minutes before CPB, dogs received intravenously either GR32191B (15 micrograms/kg/min), saline (50 ml bolus) or aspirin (225 mg bolus) (n = 6 per group). Cardiac output (dye dilution), femoral artery blood flow (electromagnetic flowmeter), gastrocnemius muscle tissue perfusion (133Xe clearance), retinal blood flow (fluorescein angiography), and thromboxane biosynthesis (urinary excretion rates of TXB2 and the metabolite 2,3-dinor-TXB2) were measured before, during and after a standard 90 minute period of CPB at 2.4 l/min/m2 and 28 degrees C. The aspirin-treated group manifested an eightfold reduction in TXB2 excretion compared with controls, indicating a decrease in TXA2 biosynthesis. There were few haemodynamic differences between the groups, though the aspirin-treated group had better maintained muscle tissue perfusion post-CPB and significantly fewer retinal microcirculatory occlusions than GR32191B-treated animals. We conclude that specific TXA2 receptor antagonism provides no significant improvement in peripheral haemodynamics; rather aspirin provides a modest haemodynamic benefit. PMID:8747897

  1. Strategic teaching in ESL writing: effects of self-regulatory instruction on writing performance and self-efficacy beliefs

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Yang

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of an instructional approach, strategy plus self-regulatory instruction, that was designed to promote writing proficiency and self-efficacy perception. A randomized pre-test-post-test intervention-comparison investigation was applied to 40 students attending a local high school in central China. I established a self-regulatory routine and combined this routine with instruction in writing strategies for the intervention group. No such self-regulatory routi...

  2. The evolving regulation of uranium recovery operations in the United States: Inovative approaches are necessary for cost effective regulatory oversight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US domestic uranium industry is at a crossroads. Historic low prices for uranium, combined with stringent and often irrational regulatory requirements, pose a very real threat to the industry's continued viability. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has taken a number of innovative steps to reform and rationalize its regulatory program. However, if the domestic uranium recovery industry is to remain viable, additional steps toward innovation and reform are needed, and effective implementation of reforms adopted by the Commission is essential. (author)

  3. A novel P2X4 receptor-selective antagonist produces anti-allodynic effect in a mouse model of herpetic pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Yuta; Yamashita, Tomohiro; Sasaki, Atsushi; Nakata, Eriko; Kohno, Keita; Masuda, Takahiro; Tozaki-Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Imai, Toshiyasu; Kuraishi, Yasushi; Tsuda, Makoto; Inoue, Kazuhide

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that purinergic P2X4 receptors (P2X4R: cation channels activated by extracellular ATP) expressed in spinal microglia are crucial for pathological chronic pain caused by nerve damage, suggesting a potential target for drug discovery. We identified NP-1815-PX (5-[3-(5-thioxo-4H-[1,2,4]oxadiazol-3-yl)phenyl]-1H-naphtho[1, 2-b][1,4]diazepine-2,4(3H,5H)-dione) as a novel antagonist selective for P2X4R with high potency and selectivity compared with other P2XR subtypes. In in vivo assay for acute and chronic pain, intrathecal administration of NP-1815-PX produced an anti-allodynic effect in mice with traumatic nerve damage without affecting acute nociceptive pain and motor function (although its oral administration did not produce the effect). Furthermore, in a mouse model of herpetic pain, P2X4R upregulation in the spinal cord exclusively occurred in microglia, and intrathecal NP-1815-PX suppressed induction of mechanical allodynia. This model also showed K+/Cl− cotransporter 2 (KCC2) downregulation, which is implicated in dorsal horn neuron hyperexcitability; this downregulation was restored by intrathecal treatment with NP-1815-PX or by interfering with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling, a P2X4R-activated microglial factor implicated in KCC2 downregulation. Taken together, the newly developed P2X4R antagonist NP-1815-PX produces anti-allodynic effects in chronic pain models without altering acute pain sensitivity, suggesting that microglial P2X4R could be an attractive target for treating chronic pain. PMID:27576299

  4. Effects of the kappa opioid receptor antagonist nor-binaltorphimine (nor-BNI) on cocaine versus food choice and extended-access cocaine intake in rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutsell, Blake A; Cheng, Kejun; Rice, Kenner C; Negus, Sidney Stevens; Banks, Matthew L

    2016-03-01

    The dynorphin/kappa opioid receptor (KOR) system has been implicated as one potential neurobiological modulator of the abuse-related effects of cocaine and as a potential target for medications development. This study determined effects of the KOR antagonist nor-binaltorphimine (nor-BNI) on cocaine self-administration under a novel procedure that featured two daily components: (1) a 2-hour 'choice' component (9:00-11:00 am) when monkeys could choose between food pellets and cocaine injections (0-0.1 mg/kg per injection, intravenous) and (2) a 20-hour 'extended-access' component (noon to 8:00 am) when cocaine (0.1 mg/kg per injection) was available under a fixed-ratio schedule to promote high daily cocaine intakes. Rhesus monkeys (n = 4) were given 14 days of exposure to the choice + extended-access procedure then treated with nor-BNI (3.2 or 10.0 mg/kg, intramuscular), and cocaine choice and extended-access cocaine intake were evaluated for an additional 14 days. Consistent with previous studies, cocaine maintained both a dose-dependent increase in cocaine choice during choice components and a high level of cocaine intake during extended-access components. Neither 3.2 nor 10 mg/kg nor-BNI significantly altered cocaine choice or extended-access cocaine intake. In two additional monkeys, nor-BNI also had no effect on cocaine choice or extended-access cocaine intake when it was administered at the beginning of exposure to the extended-access components. Overall, these results do not support a major role for the dynorphin/KOR system in modulating cocaine self-administration under these conditions in non-human primates nor do they support the clinical utility of KOR antagonists as a pharmacotherapeutic strategy for cocaine addiction. PMID:25581305

  5. Effects of adenosine A2a receptor agonist and antagonist on cerebellar nuclear factor-kB expression preceded by MDMA toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kermanian, Fatemeh; Soleimani, Mansoureh; Pourheydar, Bagher; Samzadeh-Kermani, Alireza; Mohammadzadeh, Farzaneh; Mehdizadeh, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Adenosine is an endogenous purine nucleoside that has a neuromodulatory role in the central nervous system. The amphetamine derivative (±)-3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA or ecstasy) is a synthetic amphetamine analogue used recreationally to obtain an enhanced affiliated emotional response. MDMA is a potent monoaminergic neurotoxin with the potential of damage to brain neurons. The NF-kB family of proteins are ubiquitously expressed and are inducible transcription factors that regulate the expression of genes involved in disparate processes such as immunity and ingrowth, development and cell-death regulation. In this study we investigated the effects of the A2a adenosine receptor (A2a-R) agonist (CGS) and antagonist (SCH) on NF-kB expression after MDMA administration. Methods: Sixty three male Sprague–Dawley rats were injected to MDMA (10 and 20mg/kg) followed by intraperitoneal CGS (0.03 mg/kg) or SCH (0.03mg/kg) injection. The cerebellum were then removed forcresylviolet staining, western blot and RT- PCR analyses. MDMA significantly elevated NF-kB expression. Our results showed that MDMA increased the number of cerebellar dark neurons. Results: We observed that administration of CGS following MDMA, significantly elevated the NF-kB expression both at mRNA and protein levels. By contrast, administration of the A2a-R antagonist SCH resulted in a decrease in the NF-kB levels. Conclusion: These results indicated that, co-administration of A2a agonist (CGS) can protect against MDMA neurotoxic effects by increasing NF-kB expression levels; suggesting a potential application for protection against the neurotoxic effects observed in MDMA users. PMID:25678999

  6. Neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of the adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonist ST1535 in a MPTP mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frau, Lucia; Borsini, Franco; Wardas, Jadwiga; Khairnar, Amit S; Schintu, Nicoletta; Morelli, Micaela

    2011-03-01

    Adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonists are one of the most attractive classes of drug for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD) as they are effective in counteracting motor dysfunctions and display neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects in animal models of PD. In this study, we evaluated the neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory properties of the adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonist ST1535 in a subchronic 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model of PD. C57BL/6J mice were repeatedly administered with vehicle, MPTP (20 mg/kg), or MPTP + ST1535 (2 mg/kg). Mice were sacrificed three days after the last administration of MPTP. Immunohistochemistry for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and cresyl violet staining were employed to evaluate dopaminergic neuron degeneration in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) and caudate-putamen (CPu). CD11b and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunoreactivity were, respectively, evaluated as markers of microglial and astroglial response in the SNc and CPu. Stereological analysis for TH revealed a 32% loss of dopaminergic neurons in the SNc after repeated MPTP administration, which was completely prevented by ST1535 coadministration. Similarly, CPu decrease in TH (25%) was prevented by ST1535. MPTP treatment induced an intense gliosis in both the SNc and CPu. ST1535 totally prevented CD11b immunoreactivity in both analyzed areas, but only partially blocked GFAP increase in the SNc and CPu. A(2A) receptor antagonism is a new opportunity for improving symptomatic PD treatment. With its neuroprotective effect on dopaminergic neuron toxicity induced by MPTP and its antagonism on glial activation, ST1535 represents a new prospect for a disease-modifying drug. PMID:20665698

  7. Drug Insight: endothelin-receptor antagonists for pulmonary arterial hypertension in systemic rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humbert, Marc; Simonneau, Gérald

    2005-12-01

    Rapid advances in the understanding of endothelin as a naturally occurring peptide with developmental and regulatory roles in normal physiology, along with a number of deleterious effects under pathologic conditions (including vasoconstriction, fibrosis, vascular hypertrophy, and inflammation) have led to the development of endothelin-receptor antagonists (ERAs). Bosentan, an antagonist with dual specificity for the endothelin-receptor subtypes A and B, has been shown to be efficacious and well tolerated in placebo-controlled clinical trials and is now approved in many countries, including the US, Canada, and Europe, for treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), including PAH associated with rheumatic diseases. ERAs with specificity for the endothelin-receptor subtype A, including sitaxsentan and ambrisentan, are currently undergoing investigation. This article reviews PAH associated with systemic rheumatic diseases and describes the role of ERAs in this setting. PMID:16932638

  8. Evaluation of the effect of the specific CCR1 antagonist CP-481715 on the clinical and cellular responses observed following epicutaneous nickel challenge in human subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borregaard, Jeanett; Skov, Lone; Wang, Lisy;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The CC-chemokine receptor-1 (CCR1) is thought to be involved in recruitment of inflammatory cells in allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). CP-481715 is a specific antagonist of CCR1. OBJECTIVES: To determine the inhibitory effects of CP-418 715 in ACD by evaluating the clinical signs and...... 3000 mg CP-418 715 QD). Twenty-four hours after the first drug administration, nickel sulfate patches were applied on subjects' backs and removed 48 hours later. RESULTS: Pretreatment with 1000 mg CP-481715 TID resulted in significant reductions in visual scores of the nickel reactions (P = 0.......01). Instrumentally measured erythema tended to decrease in the CP-481715 mg TID group (P = 0.06). No differences were noted between the 3000 mg CP-481715 mg QD group and pooled placebo. No significant differences were found for immunohistological cell counts. CP-418 715 was generally safe and well tolerated...

  9. Effect of a somatostatin analogue (SMS 201-995) on antral gastrin cell hyperplasia and hypergastrinemia induced by a histamine H2-receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, K

    1993-05-01

    The effect of a somatostatin analogue, SMS 201-995 (SMS), on antral gastrin cell hyperplasia (AGH) and hypergastrinemia associated with 14-day administration of the histamine H2-receptor antagonist (H2-RA) famotidine was studied in rats. When the famotidine group was compared with the control group, the antral gastrin cell (G-cell) number was significantly increased (P SMS group was compared with the famotidine group, the G-cell number was significantly decreased (P < 0.01) by approximately 30%, and the serum gastrin level was significantly decreased (P < 0.01) by approximately 40%. These findings suggest that SMS may be useful for inhibiting AGH and hypergastrinemia induced by long-term H2-RA administration. PMID:8511502

  10. Effects of environmental protection and public safety regulatory practices upon light water reactor economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While there is a consensus regarding the need for extensive regulation of the nuclear power industry, the regulatory process has been the subject of almost constant controversy during recent years. Those subject to regulation complain that regulation is inefficient, that it causes unnecessary licensing and construction delays, and costs; the opponents of nuclear power charge that regulation is inadequate. This study is an effort to evaluate the performance of the regulatory process to which nuclear power plants are subject. The study is subdivided into three parts. Part One presents an analysis of the effects of regulation upon the leadtime and costs of nuclear power plants in the United States. Licensing and construction delays and power plant cost increases caused by regulatory decisions during the past decade are evaluated. Part Two is a brief review of the evolving differences between nuclear power plants and its main rival for base load generation, coal-fired plants, from the viewpoint of the electric utility planners. Finally, in Part Three, the fundamental problems of the current regulatory process are assessed, and suggestions regarding how to address these problems are presented

  11. Effects of a newly developed potent orexin-2 receptor-selective antagonist Compound1m on sleep/wake states in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keishi eEtori

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Orexins (also known as hypocretins, which are hypothalamic neuropeptides, play critical roles in the regulation of sleep/wakefulness states by activating two G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs, orexin 1 (OX1R and orexin 2 receptors (OX2R. In order to know the difference between effects of OX2R-selective antagonists (2-SORA and dual orexin receptor antagonists (DORA, and to understand the mechanisms underlying orexin-mediated regulation of sleep/wakefulness states, we examined the effects of a newly developed 2-SORA, Compound 1m (C1m, and a DORA, suvorexant, on sleep/wakefulness states in C57BL/6J mice. After oral administration in the dark period, both C1m and suvorexant exhibited potent sleep-promoting properties with similar efficacy in a dose-dependent manner. While C1m did not increase NREM and REM sleep episode durations, suvorexant induced longer episode durations of NREM and REM sleep as compared with both the vehicle- and C1m-administered groups. When compounds were injected during light period, C1m did not show a significant change in sleep/wakefulness states in the light period, whereas suvorexant slightly but significantly increased the sleep time. We also found that C1m did not affect the time of REM sleep, while suvorexant markedly increased it. This suggests that although OX1R-mediated pathway plays a pivotal role in promoting wakefulness, OX1R-mediated pathway also plays an additional role. OX1R-mediated pathway also plays a role in suppression of REM sleep. Fos-immunostaining showed that both compounds affected the activity of arousal-related neurons with different patterns. These results suggest partly overlapping and partly distinct roles of orexin receptors in the regulation of sleep/wakefulness states.

  12. Effects of an H3R antagonist on the animal model of autism induced by prenatal exposure to valproic acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Baronio

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorders (ASD are a group of neurodevelopmental disorders primarily characterized by impaired social interaction and communication, and by restricted repetitive behaviors and interests. Ligands of histamine receptor 3 (H3R are considered potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of different brain disorders and cognitive impairments. Considering this, the aim of the present study is to evaluate the actions of ciproxifan (CPX, an H3R antagonist, on the animal model of autism induced by prenatal exposure to valproic acid (VPA. Swiss mice were prenatally exposed to VPA on embryonic day 11 and assessed for social behavior, nociceptive threshold and repetitive behavior at 50 days of life. The treatment with CPX (3 mg/kg or saline was administered 30 minutes before each behavioral test. The VPA group presented lower sociability index compared to VPA animals that were treated with CPX. Compared to the Control group, VPA animals presented a significantly higher nociceptive threshold, and treatment with CPX was not able to modify this parameter. In the marble burying test, the number of marbles buried by VPA animals was consistent with markedly repetitive behavior. VPA animals that received CPX buried a reduced amount of marbles. In summary, we report that an acute dose of CPX is able to attenuate sociability deficits and stereotypies present in the VPA model of autism. Our findings have the potential to help the investigations of both the molecular underpinnings of ASD and of possible treatments to ameliorate the ASD symptomatology, although more research is still necessary to corroborate and expand this initial data.

  13. Antidepressant- and Anxiolytic-Like Effects of New Dual 5-HT₁A and 5-HT₇ Antagonists in Animal Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Pytka

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to further characterize pharmacological properties of two phenylpiperazine derivatives: 1-{2-[2-(2,6-dimethlphenoxyethoxy]ethyl}-4-(2-methoxyphenylpiperazynine hydrochloride (HBK-14 and 2-[2-(2-chloro-6-methylphenoxyethoxy]ethyl-4-(2- methoxyphenylpiperazynine dihydrochloride (HBK-15 in radioligand binding and functional in vitro assays as well as in vivo models. Antidepressant-like properties were investigated in the forced swim test (FST in mice and rats. Anxiolytic-like activity was evaluated in the four-plate test in mice and elevated plus maze test (EPM in rats. Imipramine and escitalopram were used as reference drugs in the FST, and diazepam was used as a standard anxiolytic drug in animal models of anxiety. Our results indicate that HBK-14 and HBK-15 possess high or moderate affinity for serotonergic 5-HT2, adrenergic α1, and dopaminergic D2 receptors as well as being full 5-HT1A and 5-HT7 receptor antagonists. We also present their potent antidepressant-like activity (HBK-14-FST mice: 2.5 and 5 mg/kg; FST rats: 5 mg/kg and (HBK-15-FST mice: 1.25, 2.5 and 5 mg/kg; FST rats: 1.25 and 2.5 mg/kg. We show that HBK-14 (four-plate test: 2.5 and 5 mg/kg; EPM: 2.5 mg/kg and HBK-15 (four-plate test: 2.5 and 5 mg/kg; EPM: 5 mg/kg possess anxiolytic-like properties. Among the two, HBK-15 has stronger antidepressant-like properties, and HBK-14 displays greater anxiolytic-like activity. Lastly, we demonstrate the involvement of serotonergic system, particularly 5-HT1A receptor, in the antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like actions of investigated compounds.

  14. Dual orexin receptor antagonists show distinct effects on locomotor performance, ethanol interaction and sleep architecture relative to gamma-aminobutyric acid-A receptor modulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres D. Ramirez

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Dual orexin receptor antagonists (DORAs are a potential treatment for insomnia that function by blocking both the orexin 1 and orexin 2 receptors. The objective of the current study was to further confirm the impact of therapeutic mechanisms targeting insomnia on locomotor coordination and ethanol interaction using DORAs and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA-A receptor modulators of distinct chemical structure and pharmacologic properties in the context of sleep-promoting potential. The current study compared rat motor co-ordination after administration of DORAs, DORA-12 and almorexant, and GABA-A receptor modulators, zolpidem, eszopiclone and diazepam, alone or each in combination with ethanol. Motor performance was assessed by measuring time spent walking on a rotarod apparatus. Zolpidem, eszopiclone and diazepam (0.3–30 mg/kg administered orally [PO] impaired rotarod performance in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, all three GABA-A receptor modulators potentiated ethanol- (0.25–1.25 g/kg induced impairment on the rotarod. By contrast, neither DORA-12 (10–100 mg/kg, PO nor almorexant (30–300 mg/kg, PO impaired motor performance alone or in combination with ethanol. In addition, distinct differences in sleep architecture were observed between ethanol, GABA-A receptor modulators (zolpidem, eszopiclone and diazepam and DORA-12 in electroencephalogram studies in rats. These findings provide further evidence that orexin receptor antagonists have an improved motor side-effect profile compared with currently available sleep-promoting agents based on preclinical data and strengthen the rationale for further evaluation of these agents in clinical development.

  15. D1 and D2 antagonists reverse the effects of appetite suppressants on weight loss, food intake, locomotion, and rebalance spiking inhibition in the rat NAc shell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyanasundar, B; Perez, Claudia I; Luna, Alvaro; Solorio, Jessica; Moreno, Mario G; Elias, David; Simon, Sidney A; Gutierrez, Ranier

    2015-07-01

    Obesity is a worldwide health problem that has reached epidemic proportions. To ameliorate this problem, one approach is the use of appetite suppressants. These compounds are frequently amphetamine congeners such as diethylpropion (DEP), phentermine (PHEN), and bupropion (BUP), whose effects are mediated through serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopaminergic pathways. The nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell receives dopaminergic inputs and is involved in feeding and motor activity. However, little is known about how appetite suppressants modulate its activity. Therefore, we characterized behavioral and neuronal NAc shell responses to short-term treatments of DEP, PHEN, and BUP. These compounds caused a transient decrease in weight and food intake while increasing locomotion, stereotypy, and insomnia. They evoked a large inhibitory imbalance in NAc shell spiking activity that correlated with the onset of locomotion and stereotypy. Analysis of the local field potentials (LFPs) showed that all three drugs modulated beta, theta, and delta oscillations. These oscillations do not reflect an aversive-malaise brain state, as ascertained from taste aversion experiments, but tracked both the initial decrease in weight and food intake and the subsequent tolerance to these drugs. Importantly, the appetite suppressant-induced weight loss and locomotion were markedly reduced by intragastric (and intra-NAc shell) infusions of dopamine antagonists SCH-23390 (D1 receptor) or raclopride (D2 receptor). Furthermore, both antagonists attenuated appetite suppressant-induced LFP oscillations and partially restored the imbalance in NAc shell activity. These data reveal that appetite suppressant-induced behavioral and neuronal activity recorded in the NAc shell depend, to various extents, on dopaminergic activation and thus point to an important role for D1/D2-like receptors (in the NAc shell) in the mechanism of action for these anorexic compounds. PMID:25972577

  16. Endophytic cultivable bacterial community obtained from the Paullinia cupana seed in Amazonas and Bahia regions and its antagonistic effects against Colletotrichum gloeosporioides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Maria Carolina Santos E; Polonio, Julio Cesar; Quecine, Maria Carolina; Almeida, Tiago Tognolli de; Bogas, Andréa Cristina; Pamphile, João Alencar; Pereira, José Odair; Astolfi-Filho, Spartaco; Azevedo, João Lucio

    2016-09-01

    Guarana (Paullinia cupana var. sorbilis) is a plant from the Amazonas region with socio-economic importance. However, guarana production has been increasingly affected by unfavorable conditions resulting from anthracnose, caused by the Colletotrichum fungal genus, which primarily affects mainly the Amazonas region. The aim of the present study was to isolate bacterial endophytes from the seeds of guarana plants obtained from Amazonas region and the Northeast state of Bahia, a region where this disease is not a problem for guarana plantations. The number of bacterial Colony Forming Units (CFU/g seeds) was 2.4 × 10(4) from the Bahia and 2.9 × 10(4) from the Amazonas region. One hundred and two isolated bacteria were evaluated in vitro against the phytopathogenic strain Colletotrichum gloeosporioides L1. These isolates were also analyzed for the enzymatic production of amylase, cellulase, protease, pectinase, lipase and esterase. Approximately 15% of isolates, showing high antagonistic activity, and the production of at least one enzyme were identified through the partial sequencing of 16S rDNA. The genus Bacillus was the most frequently observed, followed by Paenibacillus, Ochrobactrum, Microbacterium and Stenotrophomonas. Proteolytic activity was observed in 24 isolates followed by amylolytic, pectinolytic and cellulolytic activities. No esterase and lipase production was detected. Most of the isolates, showing antagonistic effects against C. gloeosporioides and high enzymatic activities, were isolated from the anthracnose-affected region. A biocontrol method using the endophytes from guarana seeds could be applied in the future, as these bacteria are vertically transferred to guarana seedlings. PMID:27343372

  17. Regulatory approach of the monitoring the effectiveness of maintenance at nuclear power plants program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electrical power generation using nuclear power plants requires this installation being safety, reliable and available for the working periods. For this purpose, an adequate, effective and well conducted maintenance program makes an essential and useful tool to the owner of the plant. However, it is necessary to follow the regulatory requirements for this program implementation which monitories this maintenance effectiveness. There are Brazilian norms requirements which must be followed. The international regulatory guides establish these requirements in good details but it is necessary to verify if this methodology for implementing can be totally applied here in Brazil. Then, the american guide NUMARC 93-01 which details how can be implemented a program for this monitoring, shows some methods for using. In this thesis, the Delphi and Probabilistic Safety Analysis were briefly included because they were preferred for implementing this monitoring.in a Brazilian plant. The results which are being obtained show that, looking the regulatory aspects, the NUMARC 93-01 follows our regulations and gives good results for the plant management. (author)

  18. Different effects of calcium antagonist and beta-blocker therapy on left-ventricular diastolic function in ischemic heart disease. A direct comparison of the impact of mibefradil and atenolol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassager, C; Thygesen, K; Grande, P;

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the effect of a calcium antagonist and a beta-blocker on left-ventricular diastolic function in patients with ischemic heart disease. METHODS: 138 patients with chronic stable angina pectoris were randomized in a multicenter, double-blind trial to treatment with either...

  19. Packaging requirements under the new regulatory changes and their effects on the shippers quality control program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has published proposed changes to their current radioactive material transportation regulations (10 CFR Part 71) for comment in the Federal Register. The Department of Transportation (DOT) has also developed changes to their Hazardous Material Regulations dealing with radioactive material. These proposed regulations should soon be published for comment, also in the Federal Register. These regulatory changes are designed to bring the US in line with the international regulations published by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Assuming that DOT adopts essentially IAEA regulations, a significant impact of these changes falls in the area of packaging used for the shipment of Low Specific Activity (LSA) material and the new proper shipping category of Surface Contaminated Objects. Since the majority of the shipments made by nuclear power facilities fall into this category, these changes will directly effect the operations of these facilities

  20. Regulatory T cell effects in antitumor laser immunotherapy: a mathematical model and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawkins, Bryan A.; Laverty, Sean M.

    2016-03-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have tremendous influence on treatment outcomes in patients receiving immunotherapy for cancerous tumors. We present a mathematical model incorporating the primary cellular and molecular components of antitumor laser immunotherapy. We explicitly model developmental classes of dendritic cells (DCs), cytotoxic T cells (CTLs), primary and metastatic tumor cells, and tumor antigen. Regulatory T cells have been shown to kill antigen presenting cells, to influence dendritic cell maturation and migration, to kill activated killer CTLs in the tumor microenvironment, and to influence CTL proliferation. Since Tregs affect explicitly modeled cells, but we do not explicitly model dynamics of Treg themselves, we use model parameters to analyze effects of Treg immunosuppressive activity. We will outline a systematic method for assigning clinical outcomes to model simulations and use this condition to associate simulated patient treatment outcome with Treg activity.

  1. Role of cysteinyl leukotriene receptor-1 antagonists in treatment of experimentally induced mammary tumor: does montelukast modulate antitumor and immunosuppressant effects of doxorubicin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sisi, Alaa El-Din E; Sokar, Samia S; Salem, Tarek A; Abu Risha, Sally E

    2015-11-01

    It has been reported that a leukotriene (LT)-D4 receptor (i.e. cysteinyl LT1 receptor; CysLT1R) has an important role in carcinogenesis. The current study was carried out to assess the possible antitumor effects of montelukast (MON), a CysLT1R antagonist, in a mouse mammary carcinoma model, that is, a solid Ehrlich carcinoma (SEC). Effects of MON on tumor-induced immune dysfunction and the possibility that MON may modulate the antitumor and immunomodulatory effects of doxorubicin (DOX) were also studied. The effects in tumor-bearing hosts of several dosings with MON (10 mg/kg, per os), with and without the added presence of DOX (2 mg/kg, intraperitoneal), were investigated in vivo; end points evaluated included assessment of tumor volume, splenic lymphocyte profiles/functionality, tumor necrosis factor-α content, as well as apoptosis and expression of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) among the tumor cells. The data indicate that MON induced significant antitumor activity against the SEC. MON treatments also significantly mitigated both tumor- and DOX-induced declines in immune parameters assessed here. Moreover, MON led to decreased NF-κB nuclear expression and, in doing so, appeared to chemosensitize these tumor cells to DOX-induced apoptosis. PMID:26499992

  2. Increased training prevents the impairing effect of intra-amygdala infusion of the non-NMDA receptor antagonist CNQX on inhibitory avoidance expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roesler R.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Intra-amygdala infusion of the non-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX prior to testing impairs inhibitory avoidance retention test performance. Increased training attenuates the impairing effects of amygdala lesions and intra-amygdala infusions of CNQX. The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of additional training on the impairing effects of intra-amygdala CNQX on expression of the inhibitory avoidance task. Adult female Wistar rats bilaterally implanted with cannulae into the border between the central and the basolateral nuclei of the amygdala were submitted to a single session or to three training sessions (0.2 mA, 24-h interval between sessions in a step-down inhibitory avoidance task. A retention test session was held 48 h after the last training. Ten minutes prior to the retention test session, the animals received a 0.5-µl infusion of CNQX (0.5 µg or its vehicle (25% dimethylsulfoxide in saline. The CNQX infusion impaired, but did not block, retention test performance in animals submitted to a single training session. Additional training prevented the impairing effect of CNQX. The results suggest that amygdaloid non-NMDA receptors may not be critical for memory expression in animals given increased training.

  3. Antagonistic effects of probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 on EHEC strains of serotype O104:H4 and O157:H7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rund, Stefan A; Rohde, Holger; Sonnenborn, Ulrich; Oelschlaeger, Tobias A

    2013-01-01

    The largest EHEC outbreak up to now in Germany occurred in 2011. It was caused by the non-O157:H7 Shiga-toxinogenic enterohemorrhagic E. coli strain O104:H4. This strain encodes in addition to the Shiga toxin 2 (Stx2), responsible for the hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), several adhesins such as aggregative adherence fimbriae. Currently, there is no effective prophylaxis and treatment available for EHEC infections in humans. Especially antibiotics are not indicated for treatment as they may induce Stx production, thus worsening the symptoms. Alternative therapeutics are therefore desperately needed. We tested the probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 (EcN) for antagonistic effects on two O104:H4 EHEC isolates from the 2011 outbreak and on the classical O157:H7 EHEC strain EDL933. These tests included effects on adherence, growth, and Stx production in monoculture and co-culture together with EcN. The inoculum of each co-culture contained EcN and the respective EHEC strain either at a ratio of 1:1 or 10:1 (EcN:EHEC). Adhesion of EHEC strains to Caco-2 cells and to the mucin-producing LS-174T cells was reduced significantly in co-culture with EcN at the 1:1 ratio and very dramatically at the 10:1 ratio. This inhibitory effect of EcN on EHEC adherence was most likely not due to occupation of adhesion sites on the epithelial cells, because in monocultures EcN adhered with much lower bacterial numbers than the EHEC strains. Both EHEC strains of serotype O104:H4 showed reduced growth in the presence of EcN (10:1 ratio). EHEC strain EDL933 grew in co-culture with EcN only during the first 2h of incubation. Thereafter, EHEC counts declined. At 24h, the numbers of viable EDL933 was at or slightly below the numbers at the time of inoculation. The amount of Stx2 after 24h co-incubation with EcN (EcN:EHEC ratio 10:1) was for all 3 EHEC strains tested significantly reduced in comparison to EHEC monocultures. Obviously, EcN shows very efficient antagonistic activity on

  4. 阴沟肠杆菌B8拮抗活性基因'admA'及上游调控序列的克隆与功能鉴定%Cloning and function identification of gene 'admA' and up-stream regulatory sequence related to antagonistic activity of Enterobacter cloacae B8

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱军莉; 李德葆; 余旭平

    2012-01-01

    为了阐明水稻白叶枯病拮抗菌阴沟肠杆菌B8 的作用机理,文章采用转座子标签法和染色体步移技术克隆到突变株B8B 中Tn5 插入位点周边拮抗活性相关片段,并通过基因敲除验证了获得的拮抗相关片段-admA'上游调控序列的功能.以转座子中Kan 抗性基因为标签,克隆了B8B菌株中Tn5 插入位点左侧2 608 bp 序列,经两次染色体步移得到Tn5 插入位点右侧的2 354 bp 序列.序列拼接后获得B8 菌株拮抗相关序列4 611 bp 的Bcontig.生物信息学分析显示该序列含有7 个ORF,分别对应于3-磷酸甘油醛脱氢酶(GADPH)基因的部分编码区、2 个LysR 家族转录调控因子、弧菌假设蛋白VSWAT3-20465 及成团泛菌(Pantoea agglomerans) andrimid 生物合成基因簇的admA、admB 和部分admC 基因序列.B8B 菌株Tn5 插入分别位于同源于弧菌假设蛋白的anrPORF 及‘admA'基因上游200 bp 和894 bp 处.通过同源重组技术,借助敲除质粒pMB-BG,获得拮抗活性消失的突变株B-1 和B-3.结果表明B8B 突变株中Tn5 的插入可能影响了anrP 蛋白的转录和表达,进而调控拮抗物质编码基因簇的生物合成.B8 菌株中拮抗物质相关基因是类似于andrimid 生物合成基因簇的基因家族,其上游调控区对该抗生素的生物合成具有重要的作用.%To reveal the antagonistic mechanism of B8 strain to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. Oryzae, transposon tagging method and chromosome walking were deployed to clone antagonistic related fragments around Tn5 insertion site in the mutant strain B8B. The function of up-stream regulatory sequence of gene 'admA' involved in the antagonistic activity was further identified by gene knocking out technique. An antagonistic related left fragment of Tn5 insertion site, 2 608 bp in length, was obtained by tagging with Kan resistance gene of Tn5. A 2 354 bp right fragment of Tn5 insertion site was amplified with 2 rounds of chromosome walking. The length of the B

  5. Environmentally Relevant Dose of Bisphenol A Does Not Affect Lipid Metabolism and Has No Synergetic or Antagonistic Effects on Genistein’s Beneficial Roles on Lipid Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ying; Li, Hongyu; Zhao, Nana; Yang, Huiqin; Ye, Xiaolei; He, Dongliang; Yang, Hui; Jin, Xin; Tian, Chong; Ying, Chenjiang

    2016-01-01

    Both bisphenol A (BPA, an endocrine disrupting chemicals) and genistein (a phytoestrogen mainly derived from leguminosae) are able to bind to estrogen receptors, but they are considered to have different effects on metabolic syndrome, surprisingly. We here investigate the effects of an environmentally relevant dose of BPA alone and the combined effects with genistein on lipid metabolism in rats. Eight groups of adult male Wistar rats, fed with either standard chow diet or high-fat diet, were treated with BPA (50μg/kg/day), genistein (10mg/kg/day), and BPA plus genistein for 35 weeks, respectively. Metabolic parameters in serum and liver were determined; the hematoxylin/eosin and oil Red O staining were used to observe liver histologically; gene expressions related to hepatic lipid metabolism were analyzed by Real-time PCR; protein expressions of PPARγ, PPARα and LC3 in liver were analyzed by western blotting. No difference of body weight gain, total energy intake, liver weight/body weight or body fat percentage in both STD- and HFD-fed sub-groups was observed after treatment with BPA, genistein, or BPA plus genistein (P>0.05). Genistein alleviated lipid metabolism disorder and decreased the mRNA and protein expression of PPARγ (P0.05) or combined with genistein. Our findings suggest that long-term environmentally relevant dose of BPA did not affect lipid metabolism, and had no synergetic or antagonistic roles on genistein’s beneficial function on hepatic lipid metabolism. PMID:27171397

  6. Peripheral Opioid Antagonist Enhances the Effect of Anti-Tumor Drug by Blocking a Cell Growth-Suppressive Pathway In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Yumi; Ashikawa, Maho; Aoyagi, Kazuhiko; Fujita, Takeshi; Yanagihara, Kazuyoshi; Komatsu, Masayuki; Narita, Minoru; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Nagase, Hiroshi; Kushima, Ryoji; Sakamoto, Hiromi; Fukagawa, Takeo; Katai, Hitoshi; Nakagama, Hitoshi; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Uezono, Yasuhito; Sasaki, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    The dormancy of tumor cells is a major problem in chemotherapy, since it limits the therapeutic efficacy of anti-tumor drugs that only target dividing cells. One potential way to overcome chemo-resistance is to “wake up” these dormant cells. Here we show that the opioid antagonist methylnaltrexone (MNTX) enhances the effect of docetaxel (Doc) by blocking a cell growth-suppressive pathway. We found that PENK, which encodes opioid growth factor (OGF) and suppresses cell growth, is predominantly expressed in diffuse-type gastric cancers (GCs). The blockade of OGF signaling by MNTX releases cells from their arrest and boosts the effect of Doc. In comparison with the use of Doc alone, the combined use of Doc and MNTX significantly prolongs survival, alleviates abdominal pain, and diminishes Doc-resistant spheroids on the peritoneal membrane in model mice. These results suggest that blockade of the pathways that suppress cell growth may enhance the effects of anti-tumor drugs. PMID:25853862

  7. Bleomycin-induced lung injury in the rat: Effects of the platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor antagonist BN 52021 and platelet depletion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, T.W.; McAnulty, R.J.; Rogers, D.F.; Chung, K.F.; Barnes, P.J.; Laurent, G.J. (Brompton Hospital, London (England))

    1990-04-01

    Bleomycin is a highly effective antitumor agent, but pulmonary toxicity, characterized by an acute inflammatory reaction and associated pulmonary edema, limits clinical use of the drug. Platelets and platelet-activating factor (PAF), a membrane-derived phospholipid, have been implicated in the mechanisms that can mediate pulmonary microvascular injury. The authors sought to investigate the role of PAF in bleomycin-induce lung injury in the rat, using the PAF receptor antagonist BN 52021; and the role of platelets though the use of an anti-platelet antibody. Lung injury was induced by intratracheal bleomycin (1.5 mg) and assessed by measurements of lung wet weight and total pulmonary extravascular albumin space (TPEAS). Bleomycin caused a significant increase in both indices after 48 hr, compared with control animals. A single dose of BN 52021 significantly reduced the bleomycin-induced increase in lung weight, but not the rise in TPEAS. Increasing the dose of BN 52021 had no additional effect. Reducing circulating platelet numbers by approximately 75% had no effect on either the increase in lung weight or TPEAS, observed 48 hr after bleomycin. PAF may partially contribute to the acute inflammatory reaction seen after intratracheal bleomycin in rats.

  8. The effect of the excitatory amino acid receptor antagonist dizocilipine maleate (MK-801) on hemispheric cerebral blood flow and metabolism in dogs: modification by prior complete cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, W J; Lanier, W L; Karlsson, B R; Milde, J H; Michenfelder, J D

    1989-09-25

    The effect of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist dizociplipine maleate (MK-801) on cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen (CMRO2), intracranial pressure and systemic variables was examined in 6 normal dogs (Group I). In 6 additional dogs (Group II), the effects of a prior 11 min episode of complete cerebral ischemia on the response to dizocilipine was studied. CBF was measured with a sagittal sinus outflow technique and CMRO2 was calculated as the product of CBF and the arterial to sagittal sinus O2 content difference. Dizocilipine was administered as a 150 micrograms/kg i.v. bolus followed by a 75 micrograms.kg-1.h-1 infusion for 90 min. Plasma dizocilipine levels were greater than 25 ng/ml for the duration of the infusion. The CSF levels were approximately half the plasma levels. Five minutes after initiation of dizocilipine treatment, Group I dogs experienced a 63% increase in heart rate (P less than 0.01) and an 8% decrease in the mean arterial blood pressure (P less than 0.05). Over the same time interval. CBF increased by 85% (P less than 0.01) and intracranial pressure nearly doubled (P less than 0.05). In addition, dizocilipine treatment in all Group I animals resulted in EEG quasiperiodic bursts of delta-waves and polyspikes on a background of beta-activity. With the exception of the intracranial pressure, the above changes in systemic and cerebral variables persisted for the duration of the drug infusion. Intracranial pressure was no longer significantly elevated after 80 min of drug infusion. Hemispheric CMRO2 was unchanged by dizocilipine in Group I dogs. There was a decrease in the cortical glucose level at the end of the study, but no significant change in phosphocreatine, ATP, lactate, or energy charge when compared with 6 laboratory normals. An identical dose of dizocilipine administered after an 11 min episode of complete cerebral ischemia resulted in no significant changes in either cerebral or systemic

  9. Effect of angiotensin Ⅱ and angiotensin Ⅱ type 1 receptor antagonist on the proliferation,contraction and collagen synthesis in rat hepatic stellate cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jun; GONG Hao; ZHANG Zhong-tao; WANG Yu

    2008-01-01

    Background Angiotensin Ⅱ(Ang Ⅱ)is a very important vasoactive peptide that acts upon hepatic stellate cells(HSCs),which are major effector cells in hepatic cirrhosis and portal hypertension.The present study was aimed to investigate the effects of Ang Ⅱ and angiotensin Ⅱ type 1 receptor antagonist(AT1RA)on the proliferation,contraction and collagen synthesis in HSCs.Methods HSC-T6 rat hepatic stellate cell Iine was studied.The proliferation of the HSC cells was evaluated by MTT colorimetric assay while HSC DNA synthesis was measured by3 H-thymidine incorporation.The effects of angiotensin Ⅱ and AT1 RA on HSCs contraction were studied by analVSIs of the contraction of the collagen Iattice.CelI culture media were analyzed by RT-PCR to detect secretion of collagen Ⅰ(Col Ⅰ),collagen Ⅲ(Col Ⅲ)and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1)by enzyme Iinked Immunosorbent assay.HSC was harvested to measure collagen Ⅰ,collagen Ⅲ and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1(TIMP-1)mRNA expression.Results Ang Ⅱ((1 x10-10-1×10-4)mol/L)stimulated DNA synthesis and proliferation in HSCs compared with untreated control cells.AT1 RA inhibited angiotensin Ⅱ induced proliferation of HSCs.A Iinear increase in the contractive area of collagen lattice correlated with the concentration of angiotensin Ⅱ(1×10-9-1×10-5mol/L)and with time over 48 hours.ATlRA blocks angiotensin Ⅱ induced contraction of collagen Iattice.Coll,Col Ⅲ and TGF-β1 levels of the Ang Ⅱ group were higher than those of control group and this increase was downregulated by AT1RA.The mRNA expressions of ColⅠ,CoI Ⅲ and TIMP-1 were higher in HSCs from the Ang Ⅱ group than the control group and downregulated by AT1RA.Conclusions Angiotensin Ⅱ increased DNA synthesis and proliferation of HSCs in a dose-dependent manner,stimulated the contraction of HSCs dose-and time-dependently.Angiotensin also promoted excretion of Col Ⅰ,ColⅢand TGF-β1 Ievels and stimulated Col Ⅰ,Col Ⅲ and

  10. Governing effect of regulatory proteins for Cl(-)/HCO3(-) exchanger 2 activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Yon Soo; Hong, Jeong Hee

    2016-05-01

    Anion exchanger 2 (AE2) has a critical role in epithelial cells and is involved in the ionic homeostasis such as Cl(-) uptake and HCO3(-) secretion. However, little is known about the regulatory mechanism of AE2. The main goal of the present study was to investigate potential regulators, such as spinophilin (SPL), inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate [IP3] receptors binding protein released with IP3 (IRBIT), STE20/SPS1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) kinase, and carbonic anhydrase XII (CA XII). We found that SPL binds to AE2 and markedly increased the Cl(-)/HCO3(-) exchange activity of AE2. Especially SPL 1-480 domain is required for enhancing AE2 activity. For other regulatory components that affect the fidelity of fluid and HCO3(-) secretion, IRBIT and SPAK had no effect on the activity of AE2 and no protein-protein interaction with AE2. It has been proposed that CA activity is closely associated with AE activity. In this study, we provide evidence that the basolateral membrane-associated CA isoform CA XII significantly increased the activity of AE2 and co-localized with AE2 to the plasma membrane. Collectively, SPL and CA XII enhanced the Cl(-)/HCO3(-) exchange activity of AE2. The modulating action of these regulatory proteins could serve as potential therapeutic targets for secretory diseases mediated by AE2. PMID:26716707

  11. Antagonistic effects of species on C respiration and net N mineralization in soils from mixed coniferous plantations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mixtures of litter from different plant species often show non-additive effects on decomposition and net N release (i.e., observed effects in mixtures differ from predictions based on litter of the component species), yet mechanisms behind these effects remain unclear, with positive non-additive (i....

  12. A Randomised Trial Evaluating the Effects of the TRPV1 Antagonist SB705498 on Pruritus Induced by Histamine, and Cowhage Challenge in Healthy Volunteers

    OpenAIRE

    Gibson, Rachel A.; Jon Robertson; Harshna Mistry; Stewart McCallum; Disala Fernando; Melody Wyres; Gil Yosipovitch

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) is a non-selective cation channel widely expressed in skin tissues, and peripheral sensory nerve fibres. Activation of TRPV1 releases neuropeptides; the resulting neurogenic inflammation is believed to contribute to the development of pruritus. A TRPV1 antagonist has the potential to perform as an anti-pruritic agent. SB705498 is a TRPV1 antagonist that has demonstrated in vitro activity against cloned TRPV1 human receptors and...

  13. A Randomised Trial Evaluating the Effects of the TRPV1 Antagonist SB705498 on Pruritus Induced by Histamine, and Cowhage Challenge in Healthy Volunteers

    OpenAIRE

    Gibson, Rachel A.; Robertson, Jon; Mistry, Harshna; McCallum, Stewart; Fernando, Disala; Wyres, Melody; Yosipovitch, Gil

    2014-01-01

    Background Transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) is a non-selective cation channel widely expressed in skin tissues, and peripheral sensory nerve fibres. Activation of TRPV1 releases neuropeptides; the resulting neurogenic inflammation is believed to contribute to the development of pruritus. A TRPV1 antagonist has the potential to perform as an anti-pruritic agent. SB705498 is a TRPV1 antagonist that has demonstrated in vitro activity against cloned TRPV1 human receptors and ...

  14. Effects of opioid antagonists naloxone and naltrexone on neuropeptide Y-induced feeding and brown fat thermogenesis in the rat. Neural site of action.

    OpenAIRE

    Kotz, C.M.; Grace, M.K.; Briggs, J.; Levine, A S; Billington, C.J.

    1995-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y administered intracerebroventricularly and into the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus stimulates feeding and decreases brown adipose tissue thermogenesis. Although specific neuropeptide Y antagonists are not yet available, previous studies had shown that the opioid antagonist naloxone blocked neuropeptide Y-induced feeding when both drugs were injected intracerebroventricularly. We wanted to find out if naloxone injected into specific brain sites would block neuropept...

  15. A comparison of immunotoxic effects of nanomedicinal products with regulatory immunotoxicity testing requirements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giannakou C

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Christina Giannakou,1,2 Margriet VDZ Park,1 Wim H de Jong,1 Henk van Loveren,1,2 Rob J Vandebriel,1 Robert E Geertsma1 1Centre for Health Protection, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM, Bilthoven, 2Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands Abstract: Nanomaterials (NMs are attractive for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications because of their unique physicochemical and biological properties. A major application area of NMs is drug delivery. Many nanomedicinal products (NMPs currently on the market or in clinical trials are most often based on liposomal products or polymer conjugates. NMPs can be designed to target specific tissues, eg, tumors. In virtually all cases, NMPs will eventually reach the immune system. It has been shown that most NMs end up in organs of the mononuclear phagocytic system, notably liver and spleen. Adverse immune effects, including allergy, hypersensitivity, and immunosuppression, have been reported after NMP administration. Interactions of NMPs with the immune system may therefore constitute important side effects. Currently, no regulatory documents are specifically dedicated to evaluate the immunotoxicity of NMs or NMPs. Their immunotoxicity assessment is performed based on existing guidelines for conventional substances or medicinal products. Due to the unique properties of NMPs when compared with conventional medicinal products, it is uncertain whether the currently prescribed set of tests provides sufficient information for an adequate evaluation of potential immunotoxicity of NMPs. The aim of this study was therefore, to compare the current regulatory immunotoxicity testing requirements with the accumulating knowledge on immunotoxic effects of NMPs in order to identify potential gaps in the safety assessment. This comparison showed that immunotoxic effects, such as complement activation-related pseudoallergy, myelosuppression, inflammasome

  16. Consigned regulatory control and effect of the owner's welding quality under the EPC mode in Fangjiashan nuclear power project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under EPC management mode, how to optimize resources allocation and realize effective management and control over key control points is a big difficulty facing the owner. From the owner's point of view, and through summary of practices, the paper introduces and analyses the mode and effect of consigned regulatory control over the weld quality of Fangjiashan nuclear power project. And some recognitions and point of views on popularization of specialized and consigned regulatory control are put forward. (authors)

  17. The Influence of the Self-Regulatory Focus on the Effectiveness of Stop-Smoking Campaigns for Young Smokers

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Leen; Faseur, Tineke; Geuens, Maggie

    2010-01-01

    People’s self-regulatory focus may determine the effectiveness of stop-smoking campaigns. An experiment with 226 young smokers investigated the persuasiveness of different emotional appeals (fear-relief versus sadness-joy) for different self-regulatory foci (prevention versus promotion). A congruency effect emerges for attitude toward the advertisement and behavioral intentions: Young smokers with a promotion focus are more persuaded by sadness-joy than fear-relief campaigns, and the opposite...

  18. Effect of adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonists and L-DOPA on hydroxyl radical, glutamate and dopamine in the striatum of 6-OHDA-treated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gołembiowska, Krystyna; Dziubina, Anna

    2012-02-01

    A(2A) adenosine receptor antagonists have been proposed as a new therapy of PD. Since oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of PD, we studied the effect of the selective A(2A) adenosine receptor antagonists 8-(-3-chlorostyryl)caffeine (CSC) and 4-(2-[7-amino-2-(2-furyl)[1,2,4]triazolo[2,3-a][1,3,5]triazin-5-ylamino]ethyl)phenol (ZM 241385) on hydroxyl radical generation, and glutamate (GLU) and dopamine (DA) extracellular level using a microdialysis in the striatum of 6-OHDA-treated rats. CSC (1 mg/kg) and ZM 241385 (3 mg/kg) given repeatedly for 14 days decreased the production of hydroxyl radical and extracellular GLU level, both enhanced by prior 6-OHDA treatment in dialysates from the rat striatum. CSC and ZM 241385 did not affect DA and its metabolites, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanilic acid (HVA) extracellular levels in the striatum of 6-OHDA-treated rats. L-DOPA (6 mg/kg) given twice daily for two weeks in the presence of benserazide (3 mg/kg) decreased striatal hydroxyl radical and glutamate extracellular level in 6-OHDA-treated rats. At the same time, L-DOPA slightly but significantly increased the extracellular levels of DOPAC and HVA. A combined repeated administration of L-DOPA and CSC or ZM 241385 did not change the effect of L-DOPA on hydroxyl radical production and glutamate extracellular level in spite of an enhancement of extracellular DA level by CSC and elevation of extracellular level of DOPAC and HVA by ZM 241385. The data suggest that the 6-OHDA-induced damage of nigrostriatal DA-terminals is related to oxidative stress and excessive release of glutamate. Administration of L-DOPA in combination with CSC or ZM 241385, by restoring striatal DA-glutamate balance, suppressed 6-OHDA-induced overproduction of hydroxyl radical. PMID:21830163

  19. Effects of the dual TP receptor antagonist and thromboxane synthase inhibitor EV-077 on human endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •EV-077 reduced TNF-α induced inflammation in endothelial cells. •The thromboxane mimetic U69915 enhanced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. •EV-077 inhibited smooth muscle cell proliferation. -- Abstract: The prothrombotic mediator thromboxane A2 is derived from arachidonic acid metabolism through the cyclooxygenase and thromboxane synthase pathways, and transduces its effect through the thromboxane prostanoid (TP) receptor. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the TP receptor antagonist and thromboxane synthase inhibitor EV-077 on inflammatory markers in human umbilical vein endothelial cells and on human coronary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation. To this end, mRNA levels of different proinflammatory mediators were studied by real time quantitative PCR, supernatants were analyzed by enzyme immune assay, and cell proliferation was assessed using WST-1. EV-077 significantly decreased mRNA levels of ICAM-1 and PTX3 after TNFα incubation, whereas concentrations of 6-keto PGF1α in supernatants of endothelial cells incubated with TNFα were significantly increased after EV-077 treatment. Although U46619 did not alter coronary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation, this thromboxane mimetic enhanced the proliferation induced by serum, insulin and growth factors, which was significantly inhibited by EV-077. In conclusion, EV-077 inhibited TNFα-induced endothelial inflammation and reduced the enhancement of smooth muscle cell proliferation induced by a thromboxane mimetic, supporting that the thromboxane pathway may be associated with early atherosclerosis in terms of endothelial dysfunction and vascular hypertrophy

  20. Effects of the dual TP receptor antagonist and thromboxane synthase inhibitor EV-077 on human endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petri, Marcelo H. [Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet and Center for Molecular Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Tellier, Céline; Michiels, Carine [NARILIS, URBC, University of Namur, Namur (Belgium); Ellertsen, Ingvill [Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet and Center for Molecular Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Dogné, Jean-Michel [Department of Pharmacy, Namur Thrombosis and Hemostasis Center, University of Namur, Namur (Belgium); Bäck, Magnus, E-mail: Magnus.Back@ki.se [Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet and Center for Molecular Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •EV-077 reduced TNF-α induced inflammation in endothelial cells. •The thromboxane mimetic U69915 enhanced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. •EV-077 inhibited smooth muscle cell proliferation. -- Abstract: The prothrombotic mediator thromboxane A{sub 2} is derived from arachidonic acid metabolism through the cyclooxygenase and thromboxane synthase pathways, and transduces its effect through the thromboxane prostanoid (TP) receptor. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the TP receptor antagonist and thromboxane synthase inhibitor EV-077 on inflammatory markers in human umbilical vein endothelial cells and on human coronary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation. To this end, mRNA levels of different proinflammatory mediators were studied by real time quantitative PCR, supernatants were analyzed by enzyme immune assay, and cell proliferation was assessed using WST-1. EV-077 significantly decreased mRNA levels of ICAM-1 and PTX3 after TNFα incubation, whereas concentrations of 6-keto PGF1α in supernatants of endothelial cells incubated with TNFα were significantly increased after EV-077 treatment. Although U46619 did not alter coronary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation, this thromboxane mimetic enhanced the proliferation induced by serum, insulin and growth factors, which was significantly inhibited by EV-077. In conclusion, EV-077 inhibited TNFα-induced endothelial inflammation and reduced the enhancement of smooth muscle cell proliferation induced by a thromboxane mimetic, supporting that the thromboxane pathway may be associated with early atherosclerosis in terms of endothelial dysfunction and vascular hypertrophy.

  1. Antagonistics against pathogenic Bacillus cereus in milk fermentation by Lactobacillus plantarum ZDY2013 and its anti-adhesion effect on Caco-2 cells against pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhihong; Tao, Xueying; Shah, Nagendra P; Wei, Hua

    2016-04-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum ZDY2013 is a potential probiotic isolated from fermented bean acid. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the in vitro antimicrobial activity of this organism against Bacillus cereus in milk fermentation, the antiadhesion ability on intestinal epithelial cells, as well as its ability to abrogate the cytotoxic effect and expression levels of genes. We found no antimicrobial activity produced by L. plantarum once the pH was adjusted to 6.0 and 7.0. The pH decreased continuously when L. plantarum and B. cereus were co-incubated during milk fermentation, which caused a decrease in the B. cereus counts. Antiadhesion assays showed that L. plantarum can significantly inhibit the adhesion of enterotoxin-producing B. cereus ATCC14579 and pathogenic B. cereus HN001 by inhibition, competition, and displacement. The supernatants of B. cereus, either alone or in conjunction with L. plantarum, caused damage to the membrane integrity of Caco-2 cells to release lactate dehydrogenase. In addition, L. plantarum tended to attenuate proinflammatory cytokine and oxidative stress gene expression on Caco-2 cells, inducing with B. cereus HN001 supernatants. This study provided systematic insights into the antagonistic effect of L. plantarum ZDY2013, and the information may be helpful to explore potential control measures for preventing food poisoning by lactic acid bacteria. PMID:26830743

  2. Regulatory and Environmental Effects on Public Transit Efficiency. A Mixed DEA-SFA Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Beniamina Buzzo Margari; Fabrizio Erbetta; Carmelo Petraglia; Massimiliano Piacenza

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to account for the impact of statistical noise and exogenous regulatory and environmental factors on the efficiency of public transit systems in a DEA-based framework. To this end, we implement a three-stage DEA-SFA mixed approach based on Fried et al. (2002) using a 1993-1999 panel of 42 Italian public transit companies. This allows us to decompose input-specific DEA inefficiency measures into three components: exogenous effects, pure managerial inefficiency, and sta...

  3. Differential effects of LY235959, a competitive antagonist of the NMDA receptor on kappa-opioid receptor agonist induced responses in mice and rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, H N; Thorat, S N

    1997-02-01

    The effects of the competitive antagonist of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, LY235959, were determined on the analgesic and hypothermic effects as well as on the development of tolerance to these effects of U-50,488H, a kappa-opioid receptor agonist in mice and rats. In the mouse, a single injection of LY235959 given 10 min prior to U-50,488H did not modify the analgesic action of the latter. Similarly, chronic administration of LY235959 twice a day for 4 days did not modify U-50,488H-induced analgesia in mice. Repeated pretreatment of mice with LY235959 dose-dependently attenuated the development of tolerance to the analgesic actions of U-50,488H. In the rat, LY235959 by itself produced a significant analgesia and prior treatment of rats with LY235959 enhanced the analgesic action of U-50,488H. Similar effects were seen with the hypothermic action. Pretreatment of rats with LY235959 attenuated the development of tolerance to the analgesic but not to the hypothermic action of U-50,488H. These results provide evidence that LY235959 produces differential actions on nociception and thermic responses by itself and when given acutely with U-50,488H in mice and rats. However, when the animals are pretreated with LY235959, similar inhibitory effects are observed on the development of tolerance to the analgesic action of U-50,488H in both the species. These studies demonstrate an involvement of the NMDA receptor in the development of kappa-opioid tolerance and suggest that the biochemical consequences of an opioid's interaction with the opioid receptor are not the only factors that contribute to the acute and chronic actions of opioid analgesic drugs. PMID:9045999

  4. Synthesis and Effects of Novel Dihydropyridines as Dual Calcium Channel Blocker and Angiotensin Antagonist on Isolated Rat Aorta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzin Hadizadeh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Four novel losartan analogues 5a-d were synthesized by connecting a dihydropyridine nucleus to imidazole ring. The effects of 5a and 5b on angiotensin receptors (AT1 and L-type calcium channels were investigated on isolated rat aorta. Materials and MethodsAortic rings were pre-contracted with 1 µM Angiotensin II or 80 mM KCl and relaxant effects of losartan, nifedipine, 5a and 5b were evaluated by cumulative addition of these drugs to the bath solution.ResultsThe results showed that compounds 5a and 5b have both L-type calcium channel and AT1 receptor blocking activity. Their effects on AT1 receptors are 1000 and 100,000 times more than losartan respectively. The activity of compound 5b on L-type calcium channel is significantly less than nifedipine but compound 5a has comparable effect with nifedipine. ConclusionFinally we concluded that these two new Compounds can be potential candidates to be used as effective antihypertensive agents.

  5. Effect of the Toll-Like Receptor 4 Antagonist Eritoran on Retinochoroidal Inflammatory Damage in a Rat Model of Endotoxin-Induced Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feyzahan Ekici

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We investigated the effect of eritoran, a Toll-like receptor 4 antagonist, on retinochoroidal inflammatory damage in an endotoxin-induced inflammatory rat model. Methods. Endotoxin-induced inflammatory model was obtained by intraperitoneal injection of 1.5 mg/kg lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Group 1 had control rats; in groups 2-3 LPS and 0.5 mg/kg sterile saline were injected; and in groups 4-5 LPS and 0.5 mg/kg eritoran were injected. Blood samples were taken and eyes were enucleated after 12 hours (h (groups 2 and 4 or 24 hours (Groups 3 and 5. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and malondialdehyde (MDA levels in the serum and retinochoroidal tissue and nuclear factor kappa-B (NFκB levels in retinochoroidal tissue were determined. Histopathological examination was performed and retinochoroidal changes were scored. Results. Eritoran treatment resulted in lower levels of TNF-α, MDA, and NFκB after 12 h which became significant after 24 h. Serum TNF-α and retinochoroidal tissue NFκB levels were similar to control animals at the 24th h of the study. Eritoran significantly reversed histopathological damage after 24 h. Conclusions. Eritoran treatment resulted in less inflammatory damage in terms of serum and retinochoroidal tissue parameters.

  6. The effect of selective antagonist of H4 receptor JNJ7777120 on nasal symptoms, cough, airway reactivity and inflammation in guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacova-Hanuskova, E; Gavliakova, S; Buday, T; Kosutova, P; Mokra, D; Urbanova-Fulmekova, A; Mokry, J; Plevkova, J

    2015-09-15

    The efficacy of H4R antagonist JNJ7777120 on nasal symptoms, cough, airway resistance (Raw), inflammatory cell count in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and blood in ovalbumin (OVA) induced allergic rhinitis (AR) was studied in guinea pigs. Animals (n=8) were sensitized by i.p. OVA and were repeatedly challenged with nasal OVA to induce rhinitis, seven animals were not sensitized. Animals were pre-treated with JNJ7777120 2.5 and 5mg/kg i.p. 30 min prior OVA. Cough was induced by inhalation of citric acid, Raw was measured in vivo by Pennock's method as baseline, during AR and after JNJ7777120 treatment. Leucocyte count in BAL and blood was analyzed. JNJ7777120 (5mg/kg) significantly suppressed nasal symptoms and the number of coughs. This compound significantly inhibited airway reactivity to histamine, but not methacholine. Pre-treatment with JNJ7777120 5mg/kg did not influence significantly the leucocyte count in BAL and blood except for a significant decrease in monocyte count in blood compared to the control group (p<0.05). We conclude that the antitussive action of JNJ7777120 is peripheral. The primary effect of the compound is anti-inflammatory, and the suppression of cough is a consequence of reduced airway inflammation. PMID:26003849

  7. Graphene oxide as an anaerobic membrane scaffold for the enhancement of B. adolescentis proliferation and antagonistic effects against pathogens E. coli and S. aureus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The impact of the gut microbiota on human health is widely perceived as the most exciting advancement in biomedicine. The gut microbiota has been known to play a crucial role in defining states of human health and diseases, and thus becomes a potential new territory for drug targeting. Herein, graphene oxide (GO) interaction with five common human gut bacteria, B. adolescentis, L. acidophilus, E. coli, E. faecalis, and S. aureus, was studied. It was shown that, in bacterial media, GO sheets were able to form effective, anaerobic membrane scaffolds that enhanced the antagonistic activity of B. adolescentis against the pathogens E. coli andS. aureus. Data obtained using bacterial growth measurements, colony counting and 16S rRNA gene sequencing consistently indicated that GO sheets promoted proliferation of gut bacteria, particularly for B. adolescentis. Scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy images, and membrane potential measurements showed that cell membranes maintained their integrity and that no observable variations in cell morphology were induced after interaction with GO sheets, indicating good biocompatibility of GO. These results suggest the possibility of using GO sheets as efficient drug carriers in therapeutic applications to treat diseases related to the gut microbiota. (paper)

  8. Kindling-induced potentiation of excitatory and inhibitory inputs to hippocampal dentate granule cells. II. Effects of the NMDA antagonist MK-801.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Robinson, G B

    1991-10-18

    The effect of the non-competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist MK-801 on the early development of kindling-induced potentiation was examined in the rabbit hippocampal dentate gyrus. MK-801 (0.5 mg\\/kg) was administered 2 h before each daily kindling stimulation was applied to the perforant path. This treatment continued for the first 10 days of kindling. MK-801 depressed the growth of the afterdischarge duration and suppressed development of behavioral seizures. MK-801 did not block kindling-induced potentiation of either the perforant path-dentate granule cell population spike or excitatory postsynaptic potential. Random impulse train stimulation and non-linear systems analytic techniques were used to examine kindling-induced potentiation of presumed GABAergic recurrent inhibitory circuits. Both the magnitude and duration of kindling-induced response inhibition, to the second of each pair of impulses within the train, were reduced in rabbits pretreated with MK-801. These results suggest that MK-801 differentially affects kindling-induced potentiation of excitatory and inhibitory circuits within the rabbit hippocampal dentate gyrus.

  9. Graphene oxide as an anaerobic membrane scaffold for the enhancement of B. adolescentis proliferation and antagonistic effects against pathogens E. coli and S. aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Han-qing; Gao, Di; Wang, Bing; Zhao, Rui-fang; Guan, Ming; Zheng, Ling-na; Zhou, Xiao-yan; Chai, Zhi-fang; Feng, Wei-yue

    2014-04-01

    The impact of the gut microbiota on human health is widely perceived as the most exciting advancement in biomedicine. The gut microbiota has been known to play a crucial role in defining states of human health and diseases, and thus becomes a potential new territory for drug targeting. Herein, graphene oxide (GO) interaction with five common human gut bacteria, B. adolescentis, L. acidophilus, E. coli, E. faecalis, and S. aureus, was studied. It was shown that, in bacterial media, GO sheets were able to form effective, anaerobic membrane scaffolds that enhanced the antagonistic activity of B. adolescentis against the pathogens E. coli andS. aureus. Data obtained using bacterial growth measurements, colony counting and 16S rRNA gene sequencing consistently indicated that GO sheets promoted proliferation of gut bacteria, particularly for B. adolescentis. Scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy images, and membrane potential measurements showed that cell membranes maintained their integrity and that no observable variations in cell morphology were induced after interaction with GO sheets, indicating good biocompatibility of GO. These results suggest the possibility of using GO sheets as efficient drug carriers in therapeutic applications to treat diseases related to the gut microbiota.

  10. Comparison of the effect of alpha1- and alpha2-adrenoceptor agonists and antagonists on muscle contractility of the rabbit abdominal aorta in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnus, Jan; Rusiecka, Agnieszka; Czerski, Albert; Zawadzki, Wojciech; Witkiewicz, Wojciech; Hauzer, Willy

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to demonstrate the effect of selected agonists and antagonists of alpha-adrenergic receptors on muscle contractility of the rabbit abdominal aorta in vitro with particular emphasis on alpha2-adrenergic receptor subtypes. The study was conducted on 30 New Zealand breed rabbits from which specimens of the abdominal aorta were collected. The sections were set up in an automatic water bath in a Krebs-Henseleit buffer at 37 degrees C. The experiments showed that alpha1-adrenergic receptors played the main role in the contractile response ofthe rabbit abdominal aorta. Stimulation of alpha1-adrenergic receptor by administration ofphenylephrine resulted in an increase in smooth muscle tonus ofthe rabbit abdominal aorta by an average of 4.75 mN. The reaction after stimulation of alpha2-adrenergic receptors by similar doses of their agonists was much weaker. Prolonged tissue response time and time needed to reach maximum tonus for alpha2-adrenergic receptor agonists were observed. The obtained results confirm the thesis that the alpha1-adrenergic receptor is the most important factor controlling the contractility of the rabbit abdominal aorta, but the alpha2-adrenergic receptor is also involved in maintaining muscle tissue tonus. PMID:23767297

  11. Anti-Parkinson effects of a selective alpha2C-adrenoceptor antagonist in the MPTP marmoset model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Philippens, I.H.C.H.M.; Joosen, M.J.A.; Ahnaou, A.; Andres, I.; Drinkenburg, W.H.I.M.

    2014-01-01

    Current dopamine replacement therapies, in Parkinson's disease (PD), result in aversive side effects and rapid drug dose escalation over time. Therefore, a non-dopaminergic treatment would be an advantageous supplement to lower the dose of dopamine replacement treatment postponing the occurrence of

  12. Interleukin 1 receptor antagonist mediates the beneficial effects of systemic interferon beta in mice: implications for rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Corr; D.L. Boyle; L.M. Ronacher; B.R. Lew; L.G. van Baarsen; P.P. Tak; G.S. Firestein

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Interferon beta (IFN beta) therapy is effective in multiple sclerosis and murine models of arthritis. Surprisingly, systemic IFN beta treatment induces only minimal improvement in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). To explain this paradox, the authors evaluated the mechanism of IFN beta benefit i

  13. The Effect of the [mu]-Opioid Receptor Antagonist Naloxone on Extinction of Conditioned Fear in the Developing Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jee Hyun; Richardson, Rick

    2009-01-01

    Several recent studies report that neurotransmitters that are critically involved in extinction in adult rats are not important for extinction in young rats. Specifically, pretest injection of the [gamma]-aminobutryic acid (GABA) receptor inverse agonist FG7142 has no effect on extinction in postnatal day (P)17 rats, although it reverses…

  14. The Role of Effective Regulatory Systems in Sustaining Nuclear Security Upgrades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and donor States, such as the United States through the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI), assist States in improving physical protection of facilities and locations with nuclear and other radioactive material by installing physical security upgrades to protect against theft and sabotage. If they are to remain effective, these security upgrades must be sustainable: that is, there must be a sufficient commitment of resources to ensure that security systems are effectively operated and maintained now and in the long term. Even though sustainability is in the first instance the responsibility of the facilities involved, effective regulatory systems can play a key role in sustaining security upgrades by increasing the motivation and capacity of facilities to take the necessary decisions and actions. (author)

  15. Effect of selective angiotensin antagonists on the antidiuresis produced by angiotensin-(1-7 in water-loaded rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baracho N.C.V.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study we evaluated the nature of angiotensin receptors involved in the antidiuretic effect of angiotensin-(1-7 (Ang-(1-7 in water-loaded rats. Water diuresis was induced in male Wistar rats weighing 280 to 320 g by water load (5 ml/100 g body weight by gavage. Immediately after water load the rats were treated subcutaneously with (doses are per 100 g body weight: 1 vehicle (0.05 ml 0.9% NaCl; 2 graded doses of 20, 40 or 80 pmol Ang-(1-7; 3 200 nmol Losartan; 4 200 nmol Losartan combined with 40 pmol Ang-(1-7; 5 1.1 or 4.4 nmol A-779; 6 1.1 nmol A-779 combined with graded doses of 20, 40 or 80 pmol Ang-(1-7; 7 4.4 nmol A-779 combined with graded doses of 20, 40 or 80 pmol Ang-(1-7; 8 95 nmol CGP 42112A, or 9 95 nmol CGP 42112A combined with 40 pmol Ang-(1-7. The antidiuretic effect of Ang-(1-7 was associated with an increase in urinary Na+ concentration, an increase in urinary osmolality and a reduction in creatinine clearance (CCr: 0.65 ± 0.04 ml/min vs 1.45 ± 0.18 ml/min in vehicle-treated rats, P<0.05. A-779 and Losartan completely blocked the effect of Ang-(1-7 on water diuresis (2.93 ± 0.34 ml/60 min and 3.39 ± 0.58 ml/60 min, respectively. CGP 42112A, at the dose used, did not modify the antidiuretic effect of Ang-(1-7. The blockade produced by Losartan was associated with an increase in CCr and with an increase in sodium and water excretion as compared with Ang-(1-7-treated rats. When Ang-(1-7 was combined with A-779 there was an increase in CCr and natriuresis and a reduction in urine osmolality compared with rats treated with Ang-(1-7 alone. The observation that both A-779, which does not bind to AT1 receptors, and Losartan blocked the effect of Ang-(1-7 suggests that the kidney effects of Ang-(1-7 are mediated by a non-AT1 angiotensin receptor that is recognized by Losartan.

  16. The anorexigenic and hypertensive effects of nesfatin-1 are reversed by pretreatment with an oxytocin receptor antagonist

    OpenAIRE

    Yosten, Gina L. C.; Samson, Willis K.

    2010-01-01

    Nesfatin-1 is an 82-amino acid protein encoded by the nucleobindin2 gene. When injected intracerebroventricularly, nesfatin-1, via a melanocortin ¾ receptor-dependent mechanism, potently decreased both food and water intakes and elevated mean arterial pressure in a dose-related manner. Because nesfatin-1 colocalized with oxytocin in hypothalamus and because nesfatin-1 had direct depolarizing effects on oxytocin-producing neurons in hypothalamic slice preparations, we hypothesized that the act...

  17. Neural and Behavioral Effects of a Novel Mu Opioid Receptor Antagonist in Binge-Eating Obese People

    OpenAIRE

    Cambridge, Victoria C; Ziauddeen, Hisham; Nathan, Pradeep J.; Subramaniam, Naresh; Dodds, Chris; Chamberlain, Samuel R.; Koch, Annelize; Maltby, Kay; Skeggs, Andrew L.; Napolitano, Antonella; Farooqi, I. Sadaf; Bullmore, Edward T; Paul C Fletcher

    2013-01-01

    Background Binge eating is associated with obesity and has been conceptualized as “food addiction.” However, this view has received only inconsistent support in humans, and limited evidence relates key neurocircuitry to the disorder. Moreover, relatively few studies have used pharmacologic functional magnetic resonance imaging to probe the underlying basis of altered eating behaviors. Methods In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group study, we explored the effects of a potent mu-o...

  18. Decomposition of Phragmites australis litter retarded by invasive Solidago canadensis in mixtures: an antagonistic non-additive effect

    OpenAIRE

    Ling Zhang; Yaojun Zhang; Jianwen Zou; Evan Siemann

    2014-01-01

    Solidago canadensis is an aggressive invader in China. Solidago invasion success is partially attributed to allelopathic compounds release and more benefits from AM fungi, which potentially makes the properties of Solidago litter different from co-occurring natives. These properties may comprehensively affect litter decomposition of co-occurring natives. We conducted a field experiment to examine litter mixing effects in a Phragmites australis dominated community invaded by Solidago in southe...

  19. Statin effects on regulatory and proinflammatory factors in chronic idiopathic urticaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azor, M H; dos Santos, J C; Futata, E A; de Brito, C A; Maruta, C W; Rivitti, E A; da Silva Duarte, A J; Sato, M N

    2011-11-01

    Immunological dysfunction has been described to occur in chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU), most notably in association with an inflammatory process. Some pharmacological agents as statins--drugs used in hypercholesterolaemia--display a broad effect on the immune response and thus should be tested in vitro in CIU. Our main objectives were to evaluate the effects of statins on the innate and adaptive immune response in CIU. Simvastatin or lovastatin have markedly inhibited the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) proliferative response induced by T and B cell mitogens, superantigen or recall antigen. Simvastatin arrested phytohaemaglutinin (PHA)-induced T cells at the G0/G1 phase, inhibiting T helper type 1 (Th1), Th2, interleukin (IL)-10 and IL-17A cytokine secretion in both patients and healthy control groups. Up-regulation of suppressor of cytokine signalling 3 (SOCS3) mRNA expression in PHA-stimulated PBMCs from CIU patients was not modified by simvastatin, in contrast to the enhancing effect in the control group. Statin exhibited a less efficient inhibition effect on cytokine production [IL-6 and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α] induced by Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4, to which a statin preincubation step was required. Furthermore, statin did not affect the tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α secretion by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated PBMC or CD14+ cells in CIU patients. In addition, LPS-activated PBMC from CIU patients showed impaired indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) mRNA expression compared to healthy control, which remained at decreased levels with statin treatment. Statins exhibited a marked down-regulatory effect in T cell functions, but were not able to control TLR-4 activation in CIU patients. The unbalanced regulatory SOCS3 and IDO expressions in CIU may contribute to the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:21985375

  20. Effect of endothelin-1 receptor antagonists on histological and ultrastructural changes in the pancreas and trypsinogen activation in the early course of caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anna Andrzejewska; Jan W. Dlugosz; Albert Augustynowicz

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To assess the effect of non-selective ETA/B (LU 302872)and selective ETA (LU 302146) antagonist on pancreatic histology and ultrastructure of acinar cells in connection with trypsinogen activation in early caerulein-induced AP.METHODS: Male Wistar rats with caerulein-induced AP,lasting 4 h, were treated i.p. with 10 and 20 mg/kg b.w.of each antagonist. Edema, inflammatory infiltration,necrosis and vacuolization of acinar cells in the pancreas were scored at 0-3 scale. Free active trypsin (FAT), total potential trypsin (TPT) after activation with enterokinase,and index of trypsinogen activation (%FAT/TPT) were assayed in pancreatic homogenates.RESULTS: In untreated AP, the edema, inflammatory infiltration, necrosis and vacuolization increased as compared to control healthy rats (P<0.01). None of the treatment exerted any meaningful effect on the edema and inflammatory infiltration. The selective antagonist increased slightly the necrosis score to 0.82±0.06 at higher dose (P<0.05) vs 0.58±0.06 in untreated AP. The nonselective antagonist increased slightly the vacuolization score to 2.41±0.07 at higher dose (P<0.01) vs 1.88±0.08in untreated AP. The decrease in the number of zymogen granules, disorganization of endoplasmic reticulum,autophagosomes and cytoplasmic vacuoles were more prominent in treated AP than in untreated AP groups.%FAT/TPT in untreated AP increased about four times (18.4±3.8 vs4.8±1.3 in control group without AP, P<0.001).Treatment of AP with both antagonists did not affect significantly augmented trypsinogen activation.CONCLUSION: The treatment with endothelin-1 receptors (non-selective ETA/B and selective ETA) antagonists has essential effect neither on the edema and inflammatory infiltration nor on trypsinogen activation observed in the early course of caerulein-induced AP. Nevertheless a slight increase of the necrosis and vacuolization score and some of the ultrastructural data could suggest the possibility of their undesired

  1. Effects of self-regulatory strength depletion on muscular performance and EMG activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Steven R; Martin Ginis, Kathleen A; Hicks, Audrey L; Woodgate, Jennifer

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of a self-regulatory strength depletion manipulation on performance of a physical endurance (isometric handgrip) task. In addition, the effect of depletion on EMG activity in the working forearm muscles during the endurance task was explored. Sedentary undergraduates (N=49) were randomly assigned to either a cognitive depletion condition (modified Stroop task) or a control (color word) group and completed two maximal isometric exercise endurance trials separated by the cognitive task. Participants in the depletion group showed significant (p<.05) degradations in performance and exhibited higher EMG activation on the second endurance trial (p<.05) compared to controls. Results are consistent with the limited strength model of self-regulation and are interpreted in light of the central fatigue hypothesis. PMID:17995906

  2. Effects of gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonists on the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptors in a rat model of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TONG Xiao-mei; ZHANG Song-ying; SONG Tao; XU Wei-hai; LIN Xiao-na; SHU Jing; LIU Liu

    2008-01-01

    Background Ovadan hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) is one of the most life-threatening complications of assisted reproduction treatments.Gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonists (GnRHanta) are thought to be effective in preventing this complication,and some clinical tdals have found lower incidences of OHSS in patients treated with GnRHanta.Our aim was to investigate the effects of GnRHanta on vascular permeability and the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptors in a rat model of OHSS.Methods An immature early OHSS rat model was established.Three ovarian stimulation protocols were used:pregnant mare serum gonadotropin/human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) alone,with a GnRHanta,or with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists (GnRHa).Blood and tissue samples were collected at 48 hours after hCG administration.Vascular permeability was evaluated by measuring the Evans-Blue content of extravasated peritoneal fluids.The expression of VEGF and its receptors,including fit-1 and KDR,were detected by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting.Results Treatment with both a GnRHanta and a GnRHa resulted in significant reductions in serum estradiol and peritoneal vascular permeability,as well as decreased ovarian expression of VEGF and its two receptors.However,GnRHanta treatment caused a greater reduction in serum estradiol concentrations,and in VEGF receptor mRNA expression than GnRHa.There were no significant reductions in the expression of VEGF or its receptors in extra-ovarian tissues,including the liver,lungs and peritoneum.Conclusion Our results reveal that GnRHanta are more potent than GnRHa in preventing early OHSS through down-regulation of the expression of VEGF and its receptors in hyperstimulated ovaries.

  3. The histamine H₄ receptor antagonist, JNJ 39758979, is effective in reducing histamine-induced pruritus in a randomized clinical study in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollmeier, Alexa; Francke, Klaus; Chen, Bin; Dunford, Paul J; Greenspan, Andrew J; Xia, Yichuan; Xu, Xie L; Zhou, Bei; Thurmond, Robin L

    2014-07-01

    The histamine H4 receptor (H4R) is a promising target for the treatment of pruritus. A clinical study was conducted to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the H4R antagonist, JNJ 39758979 [(R)-4-(3-amino-pyrrolidin-1-yl)-6-isopropyl-pyrimidin-2-ylamine], on histamine-induced pruritus in healthy subjects. A single oral dose of 600 mg JNJ 39758979, 10 mg cetirizine, or placebo was administered in a randomized, three-period, double-blind, crossover study. Treatment periods were separated by 22-day washout periods. A histamine challenge was administered on day -1 and at 2 and 6 hours postdose on day 1 of each treatment period. The primary efficacy endpoint was the area under the curve (AUC) of pruritus score 0-10 minutes after the histamine challenge. Secondary efficacy endpoints included wheal and flare areas assessed 10 minutes after the histamine challenge. Safety was assessed for all subjects. Of the 24 enrolled subjects, 23 individuals completed the study. One subject withdrew after completing two treatment periods. Due to a carryover effect of JNJ 39758979, only treatment period 1 was used for pruritus-related evaluations. Compared with placebo, the reduction of the AUC of pruritus score was significant for JNJ 39758979 at 2 hours (P = 0.0248) and 6 hours (P = 0.0060), and for cetirizine at 6 hours (P = 0.0417). In all treatment periods, JNJ 39758979 did not demonstrate a significant decrease in wheal or flare at either time point, although a significant reduction was achieved with cetirizine at 2 and 6 hours (P 1 patient with JNJ 39758979 were headache (9%) and nausea (13%). In conclusion, JNJ 39758979 was effective in inhibiting histamine-induced pruritus in healthy subjects. PMID:24817035

  4. The Antagonistic Effect of Selenium on Lead-Induced Inflammatory Factors and Heat Shock Proteins mRNA Expression in Chicken Livers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Li, Shu; Teng, Xiaohua

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of lead (Pb) poisoning on nitric oxide (NO) content, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activity, the messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of inflammatory factors (nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), prostaglandin E synthases (PTGEs), and iNOS), heat shock proteins (HSPs) (HSP27, HSP40, HSP60, HSP70, and HSP90), and the antagonistic effect of selenium (Se) on Pb in chicken livers. One hundred eighty 7-day-old male chickens were randomly divided into four groups and were fed commercial diet and drinking water, Na2SeO3-added commercial diet and drinking water, commercial diet and (CH3OO)2Pb-added drinking water, and Na2SeO3-added commercial diet and (CH3OO)2Pb-added drinking water, respectively, for 30, 60, and 90 days. Then, NO content, iNOS activity, and the mRNA levels of NF-κB, TNF-α, COX-2, PTGEs, iNOS, HSP27, HSP40, HSP60, HSP70, and HSP90 were examined in chicken livers. The results showed that Pb poisoning induced NO content, iNOS activity, and mRNA expression of inflammation factors and HSPs in chicken livers. In addition, Se alleviated Pb-induced increase of inflammation factor and HSP expression in chicken livers. PMID:26470710

  5. Mitigation of antagonistic effects on plant growth due to root co-colonization by dark septate endophytes and ectomycorrhiza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reininger, Vanessa; Sieber, Thomas N

    2013-12-01

    Dark septate endophytes (DSE) are very common root colonizers of woody plant species. Ascomycetes of the Phialocephala fortinii s.l.-Acephala applanata species complex (PAC) are the main representatives of DSE fungi in forest ecosystems. PAC and mycorrhizal fungi share the same habitat, but interactions among PAC, mycorrhizal fungi and plants are poorly understood. We compared the effects of single and dual inoculation of Norway spruce seedlings with PAC and the ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungus Hebeloma crustuliniforme on host growth, degree of mycorrhization and density of endophytic PAC biomass. Single colonization by H. crustuliniforme or PAC significantly reduced plant biomass. Dual colonization reduced or neutralized plant growth depression caused by single fungal colonization. The degree of mycorrhization was independent on PAC colonization, and mycorrhization significantly reduced endophytic PAC biomass. Plant biomass of dually colonized plants positively correlated with PAC biomass. These results demonstrate the ability of dual inoculation of PAC and H. crustuliniforme to neutralize plant growth depression caused by single fungal inoculation. Our explanations of enhanced plant growth in dually inoculated plants are the inhibition of PAC during root colonization by the ECM mantle and ECM-mediated access to plant growth-promoting nutrients resulting from the mineralization of the potting medium by PAC. PMID:24249297

  6. Influence of the CB1 receptor antagonist, AM 251, on the regional haemodynamic effects of WIN-55212-2 or HU 210 in conscious rats

    OpenAIRE

    Gardiner, S. M.; March, J. E.; Kemp, P. A.; Bennett, T.

    2002-01-01

    In conscious, freely-moving, male, Sprague-Dawley rats, the regional haemodynamic responses to the synthetic cannabinoids, WIN-55212-2 and HU 210, were compared. The possible involvement of cannabinoid, CB1-receptors, or β2-adrenoceptors in the responses to WIN-55212-2 and HU 210 were investigated using the CB1-receptor antagonist, AM 251, or the β2-adrenoceptor antagonist, ICI 118551, respectively.Both WIN-55212-2 (150 μg kg−1) and HU 210 (100 μg kg−1) had pressor, renal, and mesenteric vaso...

  7. Assessment by peer review of the effectiveness of a regulatory programme for radiation safety. Interim report for comment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document covers assessment of those aspects of a radiation protection and safety infrastructure that are implemented by the Regulatory Authority for radiation sources and practices using such sources and necessarily includes those ancillary technical services, such as dosimetry services, which directly affect the ability of the Regulatory Authority to discharge its responsibilities. The focus of the guidance in this TECDOC is on assessment of a regulatory programme intended to implement the BSS. The BSS address transportation and waste safety mainly by reference to other IAEA documents. When conducting an assessment, the Review Team members should be aware of the latest IAEA documents (or similar national documents) concerning transportation and waste safety and, if appropriate, nuclear safety, and take them into account to the extent applicable when assessing the effectiveness of the regulatory programme governing radiation protection and safety of radiation source practices in a particular State

  8. The regulatory effect of miRNAs is a heritable genetic trait in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geeleher Paul

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background microRNAs (miRNAs have been shown to regulate the expression of a large number of genes and play key roles in many biological processes. Several previous studies have quantified the inhibitory effect of a miRNA indirectly by considering the expression levels of genes that are predicted to be targeted by the miRNA and this approach has been shown to be robust to the choice of prediction algorithm. Given a gene expression dataset, Cheng et al. defined the regulatory effect score (RE-score of a miRNA as the difference in the gene expression rank of targets of the miRNA compared to non-targeted genes. Results Using microarray data from parent-offspring trios from the International HapMap project, we show that the RE-score of most miRNAs is correlated between parents and offspring and, thus, inter-individual variation in RE-score has a genetic component in humans. Indeed, the mean RE-score across miRNAs is correlated between parents and offspring, suggesting genetic differences in the overall efficiency of the miRNA biogenesis pathway between individuals. To explore the genetics of this quantitative trait further, we carried out a genome-wide association study of the mean RE-score separately in two HapMap populations (CEU and YRI. No genome-wide significant associations were discovered; however, a SNP rs17409624, in an intron of DROSHA, was significantly associated with mean RE-score in the CEU population following permutation-based control for multiple testing based on all SNPs mapped to the canonical miRNA biogenesis pathway; of 244 individual miRNA RE-scores assessed in the CEU, 214 were associated (p p = 0.04 with mean RE-score in the YRI population. Interestingly, the same SNP was associated with 17 (8.5% of all expressed miRNA expression levels in the CEU. We also show here that the expression of the targets of most miRNAs is more highly correlated with global changes in miRNA regulatory effect than with the expression of

  9. A comparison of immunotoxic effects of nanomedicinal products with regulatory immunotoxicity testing requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannakou, Christina; Park, Margriet VDZ; de Jong, Wim H; van Loveren, Henk; Vandebriel, Rob J; Geertsma, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials (NMs) are attractive for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications because of their unique physicochemical and biological properties. A major application area of NMs is drug delivery. Many nanomedicinal products (NMPs) currently on the market or in clinical trials are most often based on liposomal products or polymer conjugates. NMPs can be designed to target specific tissues, eg, tumors. In virtually all cases, NMPs will eventually reach the immune system. It has been shown that most NMs end up in organs of the mononuclear phagocytic system, notably liver and spleen. Adverse immune effects, including allergy, hypersensitivity, and immunosuppression, have been reported after NMP administration. Interactions of NMPs with the immune system may therefore constitute important side effects. Currently, no regulatory documents are specifically dedicated to evaluate the immunotoxicity of NMs or NMPs. Their immunotoxicity assessment is performed based on existing guidelines for conventional substances or medicinal products. Due to the unique properties of NMPs when compared with conventional medicinal products, it is uncertain whether the currently prescribed set of tests provides sufficient information for an adequate evaluation of potential immunotoxicity of NMPs. The aim of this study was therefore, to compare the current regulatory immunotoxicity testing requirements with the accumulating knowledge on immunotoxic effects of NMPs in order to identify potential gaps in the safety assessment. This comparison showed that immunotoxic effects, such as complement activation-related pseudoallergy, myelosuppression, inflammasome activation, and hypersensitivity, are not readily detected by using current testing guidelines. Immunotoxicity of NMPs would be more accurately evaluated by an expanded testing strategy that is equipped to stratify applicable testing for the various types of NMPs. PMID:27382281

  10. Assessment of the effectiveness of the Hungarian nuclear safety regulatory authority by international expert teams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the basis of the role nuclear regulatory authorities (NRA) have to fulfil and the new challenges affecting them, in the paper an overview is made on how the Hungarian NRA has evaluated and utilised the results of different international efforts in the enhancement of its effectiveness and efficiency. The reviews have been conducted by different groups of experts organised by highly recognised international organisations (e.g. IAEA, EC) and highly competent foreign regulatory bodies. The different reviews of activities and working conditions of the HAEA NSD have resulted in a generally positive picture, however, it also revealed weaknesses as well. They recognised the developments made in recent years and also appreciated the overall favourable level of nuclear safety in Hungary, identified 'good practices' and made recommendations and suggestions for the most important and most efficient ways for future improvements. These are cited or referenced in the paper. At the end, some recommendations have been formed based on the experiences gained from the review missions and from our self-assessment. (author)

  11. Ethics and Regulatory Challenges and Opportunities in Patient-Centered Comparative Effectiveness Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugarman, Jeremy

    2016-04-01

    The Affordable Care Act includes provisions for the conduct of large-scale, patient-centered comparative effectiveness research. Such efforts aim toward the laudable moral goal of having evidence to improve health care decision making. Nevertheless, these pragmatic clinical research efforts that typically pose minimal incremental risk and are enmeshed in routine care settings perhaps surprisingly encounter an array of ethics and regulatory challenges and opportunities for academic health centers. An emphasis on patient-centeredness forces an examination of the appropriateness of traditional methods used to protect the rights, interests, and welfare of participants. At the same time, meaningful collaboration with patients throughout the research process also necessitates ensuring that novel approaches to research (including recruitment and consent) entail necessary protections regarding such issues as privacy. As the scientific and logistical aspects of this research are being developed, substantial attention is being focused on the accompanying ethics and regulatory issues that have emerged, which should help to facilitate ethically appropriate research in a variety of contexts. PMID:26826074

  12. Assessment of the effectiveness of the Hungarian nuclear safety regulatory authority by international expert teams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the bases of the role nuclear regulatory authorities (NRA) have to fulfil and the new challenges affecting them, in the paper an overview is made on how the Hungarian NRA has evaluated and utilised the results of different international efforts in the enhancement of its effectiveness and efficiency. The reviews have been conducted by different groups of experts organised by highly recognised international organisations (e.g. IAEA, EC) and highly competent foreign regulatory bodies. The different reviews of activities and working conditions of the HAEA NSD have resulted in a generally positive picture however, revealed also weaknesses as well. They recognised the developments made in the recent years and also appreciated the overall favourable level of nuclear safety in Hungary, identified 'good practices' and made recommendations and suggestions for the most important and most efficient ways of the future improvements. These are cited or referenced in the paper. At the end, some recommendations have been formed based on the experiences gained from the review missions and from our self-assessment. (author)

  13. The role of regulatory B cells (Bregs) in the Tregs-amplifying effect of Sirolimus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jiyong; Xiao, Li; Du, Guosheng; Gao, Yu; Chen, Wen; Yang, Shaozhen; Fan, Wenmei; Shi, Bingyi

    2016-09-01

    Sirolimus can significantly amplify regulatory T cells (Tregs) in vivo and in vitro, but the specific mechanism of this has not been well documented. The role of regulatory B cells (Bregs) in the Tregs-amplifying effect of Sirolimus was investigated in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in vitro in this study. The results showed that the percentages of both CD19+CD24+CD38+TGF-β1+ Bregs and CD19+CD24+CD38+IL-10+ Bregs to B cells were elevated by Sirolimus in PBMCs including B cells. Sirolimus significantly enhances the cytokine production of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) in PBMCs with B cells, and the enhancement significantly decreased in PBMCs without B cells. The percentage of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Tregs to T cells was also elevated by Sirolimus in PBMCs including B cells. The elevation of Tregs percentage decreased in PBMCs without B cells and recovered when additional TGF-β1 and IL-10 were added. The amplification of Tregs by Sirolimus was partially inhibited when either TGF-β1 or IL-10 was neutralized, and it even disappeared when these two cytokines were both neutralized. These results indicate that Sirolimus can amplify Bregs and Tregs in PBMCs in vitro, and Bregs may be the why Sirolimus amplifies Tregs. PMID:27258186

  14. The Effectiveness of Self-regulatory Speech Training for Planning and Problem Solving in Children with Specific Language Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Aziz, Safiyyah; Fletcher, Janet; Bayliss, Donna M

    2016-08-01

    Self-regulatory speech has been shown to be important for the planning and problem solving of children. Our intervention study, including comparisons to both wait-list and typically developing controls, examined the effectiveness of a training programme designed to improve self-regulatory speech, and consequently, the planning and problem solving performance of 87 (60 males, 27 females) children aged 4-7 years with Specific Language Impairment (SLI) who were delayed in their self-regulatory speech development. The self-regulatory speech and Tower of London (TOL) performance of children with SLI who received the intervention initially or after a waiting period was compared with that of 80 (48 male, 32 female) typically developing children who did not receive any intervention. Children were tested at three time points: Time 1- prior to intervention; Time 2 - after the first SLI group had received training and the second SLI group provided a wait-list control; and Time 3 - when the second SLI group had received training. At Time 1 children with SLI produced less self-regulatory speech and were impaired on the TOL relative to the typically developing children. At Time 2, the TOL performance of children with SLI in the first training group improved significantly, whereas there was no improvement for the second training group (the wait-list group). At Time 3, the second training group improved their TOL performance and the first group maintained their performance. No significant differences in TOL performance were evident between typically developing children and those with SLI at Time 3. Moreover, decreases in social speech and increases in inaudible muttering following self-regulatory speech training were associated with improvements in TOL performance. Together, the results show that self-regulatory speech training was effective in increasing self-regulatory speech and in improving planning and problem solving performance in children with SLI. PMID:26678398

  15. Multiple Targeting Approaches on Histamine H3 Receptor Antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad eKhanfar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available With the very recent market approval of pitolisant (Wakix®, the interest in clinical applications of novel multifunctional histamine H3 receptor antagonists has clearly increased. Since histamine H3 receptor antagonists in clinical development have been tested for a variety of different indications, the combination of pharmacological properties in one molecule for improved pharmacological effects and reduced unwanted side-effects is rationally based on the increasing knowledge on the complex neurotransmitter regulations. The polypharmacological approaches on histamine H3 receptor antagonists on different G-protein coupled receptors, transporters, enzymes as well as on NO-signaling mechanism are described, supported with some lead structures.

  16. Effects of low dose radiation on regulatory function between lymphocyte subsets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four kinds of McAbs (anti CD4, CD8, CD19 and CD57) were used to separate CD4, CD8, CD19 (B) and CD57 (NK) lymphocyte subsets from human peripheral blood by 'Panning-direct' method. First the natural killing activity of each subsets and the regulatory functions between CD57 and other subsets were studied. Then the effects of low dose radiation on the function of CD57 cells and the regulatory functions between CD57 and other subsets were studied. The results showed that the NK activity was found in all of the four subsets, with CD57 cell having the strongest activity. When CD4 and CD57 cells were co-cultured, the total NK activity was higher than that of the sum of these two single subsets, i.e. there was synergistic effect between CD4 and CD57 cells. When CD8 or CD19 cells were co-cultured separately with CD57 cells, no synergistic effect was found. Irradiation by gamma rays at doses of 50 cGy and 80 cGy was able to stimulate the function of CD57 cells. After Cd4 or CD57 cells were irradiated, the total NK activity of their co-culture increased significantly. This phenomenon was not found in other subsets. This suggested that low dose radiation can enhance the synergistic action between CD4 and CD57 cells. So at least four subsets (CD4, CD8, CD19, CD57) contribute to the total NK activity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. (15 refs., 4 tabs.)

  17. Enantiomers of HA-966 (3-amino-1-hydroxypyrrolid-2-one) exhibit distinct central nervous system effects: (+)-HA-966 is a selective glycine/N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, but (-)-HA-966 is a potent gamma-butyrolactone-like sedative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The antagonist effect of ±-3-amino-1-hydroxypyrrolid-2-one (HA-966) at the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor occurs through a selective interaction with the glycine modulatory site within the receptor complex. When the enantiomers of ±-HA-966 were resolved, the (R)-(+)-enantiomer was found to be a selective glycine/NMDA receptor antagonist, a property that accounts for its anticonvulsant activity in vivo. In contrast, the (S)-(-)-enantiomer was only weakly active as an NMDA-receptor antagonist, but nevertheless it possessed a marked sedative and muscle relaxant action in vivo. In radioligand binding experiments, (+)-HA-966 inhibited strychnine-insensitive [3H]glycine binding to rat cerebral cortex synaptic membranes with an IC50 of 12.5 μM, whereas (-)-HA-966 had an IC50 value of 339 μM. In mice, (+)-HA-966 antagonized sound and N-methyl-DL-aspartic acid (NMDLA)-induced seizures. The coadministration of D-serine dose-dependently antagonized the anticonvulsant effect of a submaximal dose of (+)-HA-966 against NMDLA-induced seizures. The sedative/ataxic effect of racemic HA-966 was mainly attributable to the (-)-enantiomer. It is suggested that, as in the case of the sedative γ-butyrolactone, disruption of striatal dopaminergic mechanisms may be responsible for this action

  18. Enantiomers of HA-966 (3-amino-1-hydroxypyrrolid-2-one) exhibit distinct central nervous system effects: (+)-HA-966 is a selective glycine/N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, but (-)-HA-966 is a potent gamma-butyrolactone-like sedative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, L.; Donald, A.E.; Foster, A.C.; Hutson, P.H.; Iversen, L.L.; Iversen, S.D.; Kemp, J.A.; Leeson, P.D.; Marshall, G.R.; Oles, R.J.; Priestley, T.; Thorn, L.; Tricklebank, M.D.; Vass, C.A.; Williams, B.J. (Merck Sharp and Dohme Research Labs., Essex (England))

    1990-01-01

    The antagonist effect of {+-}-3-amino-1-hydroxypyrrolid-2-one (HA-966) at the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor occurs through a selective interaction with the glycine modulatory site within the receptor complex. When the enantiomers of {+-}-HA-966 were resolved, the (R)-(+)-enantiomer was found to be a selective glycine/NMDA receptor antagonist, a property that accounts for its anticonvulsant activity in vivo. In contrast, the (S)-(-)-enantiomer was only weakly active as an NMDA-receptor antagonist, but nevertheless it possessed a marked sedative and muscle relaxant action in vivo. In radioligand binding experiments, (+)-HA-966 inhibited strychnine-insensitive ({sup 3}H)glycine binding to rat cerebral cortex synaptic membranes with an IC{sub 50} of 12.5 {mu}M, whereas (-)-HA-966 had an IC{sub 50} value of 339 {mu}M. In mice, (+)-HA-966 antagonized sound and N-methyl-DL-aspartic acid (NMDLA)-induced seizures. The coadministration of D-serine dose-dependently antagonized the anticonvulsant effect of a submaximal dose of (+)-HA-966 against NMDLA-induced seizures. The sedative/ataxic effect of racemic HA-966 was mainly attributable to the (-)-enantiomer. It is suggested that, as in the case of the sedative {gamma}-butyrolactone, disruption of striatal dopaminergic mechanisms may be responsible for this action.

  19. Effects of the GABA(B) antagonist CGP 35348 on sleep-wake states, behaviour, and spike-wave discharges in old rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puigcerver, A.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van; Drinkenburg, W.H.I.M.; Coenen, A.L.M.

    1996-01-01

    The GABA(B) antagonist CGP 35348 was intraperitoneally given in doses of 100, 300, and 900 mg/kg to old rats. These rats were earlier chronically provided with EEG and EMG electrodes. Sleep recordings based on visual inspection of EEG and EMG recordings were made for 3 h post injection, and spontane

  20. The pharmacological effect of BGC20-1531, a novel prostanoid EP4 receptor antagonist, in the prostaglandin E2 human model of headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antonova, Maria; Wienecke, Troels; Maubach, Karen; Thomas, Emma; Olesen, Jes; Ashina, Messoud

    2011-01-01

    Using a human Prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) model of headache, we examined whether a novel potent and selective EP(4) receptor antagonist, BGC20-1531, may prevent headache and dilatation of the middle cerebral (MCA) and superficial temporal artery (STA). In a three-way cross-over trial, eight healthy...

  1. Effect of the selective 5-HT3 receptor antagonists ICS 205-930 and MDL 72222 on 5-HTP-induced head shaking and behavioral symptoms induced by 5-methoxy-N,N,dimethyltryptamine in rats: comparison with some other 5-HT receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearman, G T; Tolcsvai, L

    1987-01-01

    The effect of the selective 5-HT3 receptor antagonists ICS 205-930 and MDL 72222 on head shaking behavior induced by L-5-HTP and behavioral symptoms induced with 5-methoxy-N,N,-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeODMT) in rats was evaluated. Both drugs dose-dependently reduced L-5-HTP-induced head shaking but were at least 600 times less potent than pirenperone and ketanserin and at least 50 times less potent than methysergide. ICS 205-930 and MDL 72222 were more than 1000 times less potent than pirenperone or methysergide and 100 times less potent than ketanserin in blocking 5-MeODMT-induced forepaw treading and tremor. Since it appears that head shakes induced by L-5-HTP are mediated by 5-HT2 receptors, these data suggest that ICS 205-930 and MDL 72222 do not significantly interact with 5-HT2 receptors in the brain. Furthermore, the data suggest that ICS 205-930 and MDL 72222 lack appreciable antagonistic activity at the 5-HT receptor(s) mediating those behavioral effects induced by 5-MeODMT. PMID:3114804

  2. The dual effects of leading for safety: The mediating role of employee regulatory focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kark, Ronit; Katz-Navon, Tal; Delegach, Marianna

    2015-09-01

    This study examined the underlying mechanisms through which transformational and transactional leadership influence employee safety behaviors. Linking leadership theory with self-regulatory focus (SRF) theory, we examined a model of dual effects of leadership on safety initiative and safety compliance behaviors as mediated by promotion and prevention self-regulations. We conducted an experimental study (N = 107), an online study (N = 99) and a field study (N = 798 employees and 49 managers). Results demonstrated that followers' situational promotion focus mediated the positive relationship between transformational leadership and safety initiative behaviors. Through all 3 studies, transactional active leadership was positively associated with followers' situational prevention focus, however, the association between followers' prevention focus and safety compliance behaviors was inconsistent, showing the expected mediation relationships in the experimental setting, but not in the online and field studies. We discuss theoretical and practical implications of the findings. PMID:25664472

  3. Regulatory effect of heat shock protein 70 in stress-induced rat intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-Chang Yang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Psychological stress is one of the factors associated with many human diseases; the mechanisms need to be further understood. Methods : Rats were subjected to chronic water avoid stress. Intestinal epithelial heat shock protein (HSP 70 was evaluated. The intestinal epithelial permeability was examined with Ussing chamber technique. Results : HSP70 was detected in normal intestinal epithelial cells. Psychological stress decreased HSP70 in the intestinal epithelial cells that correlated with the stress-induced intestinal epithelial hyperpermeability. Pretreatment with HSP70 abrogated stress-induced intestinal barrier dysfunction. Conclusions : Chronic stress inhibits HSP70 activity in rat intestinal epithelial layer that is associated with intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction, which can be prevented by pretreatment with HSP70 protein. (Yang PC, Tu YH, Perdue MH, Oluwole C, Struiksma S. Regulatory effect of heat shock protein 70 in stress-induced rat intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction.

  4. Regulatory odour model development: Survey of modelling tools and datasets with focus on building effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, H. R.; Løfstrøm, P.; Berkowicz, R.;

    relation to odour problems due to animal farming. However, the model needs certain improvements and validation in order to be fully suited for that purpose. The report represents a survey of existing literature, models and data sets. It includes a brief overview of the state-of-the-art of atmospheric...... dispersion models for estimating local concentration levels in general. However, the report focuses on some particular issues, which are relevant for subsequent work on odour due to animal production. An issue of primary concern is the effect that buildings (stables) have on flow and dispersion. The handling......A project within the framework of a larger research programme, Action Plan for the Aquatic Environment III (VMP III) aims towards improving an atmospheric dispersion model (OML). The OML model is used for regulatory applications in Denmark, and it is the candidate model to be used also in future in...

  5. Regulatory assessment of effectiveness of ACR-1000 emergency core cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents the regulatory approach for assessment of the Advanced CANDU Reactor (ACR)-1000 Large Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) Emergency Core Cooling (ECC) effectiveness, describes the rationale for the selection of sensitivity cases and discusses the results of the simulations for 50% Pump Suction Break (PSB). The separate in-house simulations strengthened the CNSC staff knowledge about the ACR-1000 design and the modeling methodology. The review of representation of plant systems and plant behavior indicated no major issues. The selected accident scenarios and the limited scope sensitivity cases conducted by the CNSC staff, indicated that, overall, the ECC performance showed small sensitivity to the parameters and assumptions considered for investigation. (author)

  6. Secondary prevention with calcium antagonists after acute myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J F

    1992-01-01

    Experimental studies have demonstrated that the 3 calcium antagonists nifedipine, diltiazem, and verapamil have a comparable effect in the prevention of myocardial damage during ischaemia. Secondary prevention trials after acute myocardial infarction, which aimed at improving survival and...

  7. Effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid A-receptor antagonist on sleep-wakefulness cycles following lesion to the ventrolateral preoptic area in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Zhang; Yina Sun; Peng Xie; Xuguang Yang; Yiping Hou

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neurons expressing gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) play an important role in the regulation of wakefulness to sleep, as well as the maintenance of sleep. However, the role of GABAergic neurons in the tuberomammillary nucleus (TMn), with regard to the sleep-wakefulness cycle, is poorly understood.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of GABAergic neurons in the TMn on the sleep-wakefulness cycle.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: Randomized controlled study, performed at the Laboratory of Neurobiology, Department of Anatomy, Histology and Embryology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Lanzhou University from July 2007 to February 2008.MATERIALS: Fifteen healthy, adult, male, Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups(n = 5): control, ventrolateral preoptic area (VLPO) lesion, and VLPO lesion plus GABAA receptor antagonist-treated. Ibotenic acid and bicuculline were provided by Sigma (St. Louis, USA). METHODS: Four electroencephalogram screw electrodes were implanted into the skull at a frontal region (two) and parietal bones (two) on each side. Three flexible electromyogram wire electrodes were placed into the nuchal muscles. On day 8, a fine glass micropipette (10-20 mm tip diameter) containing ibotenic acid solution (10 nmol/L) was injected into the VLPO in both hemispheres following bone wax removal under anesthesia. One week after the second surgery, sleep-wakefulness states were recorded in rats from the VLPO lesion group. On day 10 after VLPO lesion, bicuculline (10 nmol/L), a GABAA-receptor antagonist, was microinjected into the TMn and sleep-wakefulness states were recorded for 24 hours.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Duration of the sleep-wakefulness cycle in each group using a Data acquisition unit (Micro1 401 mk2) and Data collection software (Spike Ⅱ). RESULTS: VLPO lesion induced an increased duration of wakefulness (W, 13.17%) and light slow-wave sleep (SWS1, 28.9%), respectively. Deep slow-wave sleep (SWS2, 43.74%) and paradoxical sleep (PS

  8. Effects of angiotensin Ⅱ receptor antagonist on expression of collagen Ⅲ, collagen Ⅴ, and transforming growth factor β1 in the airway walls of sensitized rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜永成; 许建英; 张韶君

    2004-01-01

    Background Repeated attacks of bronchial asthma lead to different degrees of airway remodeling, the mechanism of which is not yet clear. Some evidences indicate that it is related to the excessive expression of some growth promotion factors. Angiotensin Ⅱ is a polypeptide that may be involved in airway remodeling. To evaluate its role in airway remodeling in asthma, we observed the effects of an angiotensin Ⅱ type 1 receptor antagonist (valsartan) on the expression of collagen Ⅲ, collagen Ⅴ, and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) mRNA and protein in the airway walls of sensitized rats.Methods Forty Wistar rats were randomly divided into 5 groups: control group, sensitized group, and valsartan groups 1, 2, and 3. The rats in the sensitized group and in valsartan groups 1, 2, and 3 were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin. Rats in control group were sensitized and challenged with 0.9% NaCl. Rats from valsartan groups 1, 2, and 3 were drenched with valsartan (10 μg, 20 μg, or 30 μg, respectively) at the time of the ovalbumin challenges. The expression of collagen Ⅲ, collagen Ⅴ, and TGF-β1 protein were detected using immunohistochemical method in combination with image analysis methods. The expression of TGF-β1 mRNA was detected by in situ hybridization. Results The expression in the airways of collagen Ⅲ and collagen Ⅴ was significantly higher in rats from the sensitized group (7.73±0.81, 1.34±0.28) and from valsartan groups 1, 2, and 3 (5.73±0.64, 1.13±0.15; 4.96±0.51, 0.98±0.08; 4.43±0.35, 0.93±0.06, respectively) than those in the control group (2.65±0.38, 0.67±0.08, P<0.05). In addition, collagen levels were significantly lower in valsartan groups 1, 2, and 3 than those from the sensitized group (P<0.05). The expression of TGF-β1 mRNA and protein in the airways was significantly higher in rats from the sensitized group (20.49%±3.46%, 29.73%±3.25%) and from valsartan groups 1, 2, and 3 (16.47%±1.94%, 19.41%±1.87%; 14

  9. 77 FR 27106 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NYSE Arca, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-08

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; NYSE Arca, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of... Holder of the equipment, installation, and maintenance provided by the Exchange, and (2) the cost to the.... III. Date of Effectiveness of the Proposed Rule Change and Timing for Commission Action The...

  10. 77 FR 4068 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NASDAQ OMX PHLX LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-26

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; NASDAQ OMX PHLX LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness... Facility Fees, Computer Equipment Services, Repairs and Replacements, Computer Relocation Requests and... either solicited or received. III. Date of Effectiveness of the Proposed Rule Change and Timing...

  11. 77 FR 33257 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NASDAQ OMX BX, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-05

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; NASDAQ OMX BX, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness... Rules. BX Members are subject to various charges for membership, services and equipment as noted in the... either solicited or received. III. Date of Effectiveness of the Proposed Rule Change and Timing...

  12. 76 FR 13684 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NASDAQ OMX PHLX LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-14

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; NASDAQ OMX PHLX LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness... equipment. It should be noted, however, that the costs associated with operating a co-location facility... Effectiveness of the Proposed Rule Change and Timing for Commission Action The foregoing rule change has...

  13. 76 FR 13676 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NASDAQ OMX BX, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-14

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; NASDAQ OMX BX, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness... particular product, service, or piece of equipment. It should be noted, however, that the costs associated... nor received. III. Date of Effectiveness of the Proposed Rule Change and Timing for Commission...

  14. 78 FR 21452 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NYSE Arca, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-10

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; NYSE Arca, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of... and have market maker obligations which require them to pay for equipment and connectivity. Customers... Effectiveness of the Proposed Rule Change and Timing for Commission Action The foregoing rule change...

  15. 76 FR 1656 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NYSE Amex LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-11

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; NYSE Amex LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of... received with respect to the proposed rule change. III. Date of Effectiveness of the Proposed Rule Change... Internet website ( http://www.sec.gov/rules/sro.shtml ). Copies of the submission, all...

  16. 75 FR 63240 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NASDAQ OMX PHLX LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-14

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; NASDAQ OMX PHLX LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness.... Date of Effectiveness of the Proposed Rule Change and Timing for Commission Action Because the... comments on the Commission's Internet website ( http://www.sec.gov/rules/sro.shtml ). Copies of...

  17. 76 FR 19511 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NASDAQ OMX PHLX LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-07

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; NASDAQ OMX PHLX LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness... website at http://nasdaqtrader.com/micro.aspx?id=PHLXfilings , at the principal office of the Exchange.... Date of Effectiveness of the Proposed Rule Change and Timing for Commission Action Pursuant to...

  18. 75 FR 20030 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NYSE Arca, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-16

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; NYSE Arca, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of... Schedule is available on the Commission's Website at http://www.sec.gov . A copy of this filing is... comments were solicited or received with respect to the proposed rule change. III. Date of Effectiveness...

  19. 76 FR 64416 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NASDAQ OMX BX, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-18

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; NASDAQ OMX BX, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness... neither solicited nor received. III. Date of Effectiveness of the Proposed Rule Change and Timing for... Commission will post all comments on the Commission's Internet website (...

  20. 76 FR 57090 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NASDAQ OMX PHLX LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-15

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; NASDAQ OMX PHLX LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness... change is available on the Exchange's website at http://nasdaqtrader.com/micro.aspx?id=PHLXfilings , at... either solicited or received. III. Date of Effectiveness of the Proposed Rule Change and Timing...

  1. 75 FR 63233 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NYSE Arca, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-14

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; NYSE Arca, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of... Effectiveness of the Proposed Rule Change and Timing for Commission Action The foregoing rule change is... for website viewing and printing in the Commission's Public Reference Room, 100 F Street,...

  2. 75 FR 81687 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NASDAQ OMX BX, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-28

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; NASDAQ OMX BX, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness... date of effectiveness of the Directed Order \\3\\ process (``Pilot Program'') from December 31, 2010, to... available on the Exchange's website at http://nasdaqomxbx.cchwallstreet.com/NASDAQOMXBX/Filings/ , on...

  3. Cumulative effects of the regulatory action. Exercise of analysis of the CER consideration of the cumulative effects of regulation in the Rulemaking process in a Spanish NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NRC, through interaction with the American industry, is aware for several years the concern of the impact of the cumulative effect of regulatory actions. In response to this concern, put clear by the industry, the NRC Staff has carried out several initiatives review of some regulatory requirements, to ensure that regulation and the practices of the NRC does not result in an unnecessary regulatory burden. The above answers to what is coming commonly called the CER: consideration of the cumulative effects of regulation in the Rulemaking process.

  4. An integrative computational approach to effectively guide experimental identification of regulatory elements in promoters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deyneko Igor V

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcriptional activity of genes depends on many factors like DNA motifs, conformational characteristics of DNA, melting etc. and there are computational approaches for their identification. However, in real applications, the number of predicted, for example, DNA motifs may be considerably large. In cases when various computational programs are applied, systematic experimental knock out of each of the potential elements obviously becomes nonproductive. Hence, one needs an approach that is able to integrate many heterogeneous computational methods and upon that suggest selected regulatory elements for experimental verification. Results Here, we present an integrative bioinformatic approach aimed at the discovery of regulatory modules that can be effectively verified experimentally. It is based on combinatorial analysis of known and novel binding motifs, as well as of any other known features of promoters. The goal of this method is the identification of a collection of modules that are specific for an established dataset and at the same time are optimal for experimental verification. The method is particularly effective on small datasets, where most statistical approaches fail. We apply it to promoters that drive tumor-specific gene expression in tumor-colonizing Gram-negative bacteria. The method successfully identified a number of potential modules, which required only a few experiments to be verified. The resulting minimal functional bacterial promoter exhibited high specificity of expression in cancerous tissue. Conclusions Experimental analysis of promoter structures guided by bioinformatics has proved to be efficient. The developed computational method is able to include heterogeneous features of promoters and suggest combinatorial modules for experimental testing. Expansibility and robustness of the methodology implemented in the approach ensures good results for a wide range of problems.

  5. X-ray diffraction analysis of the effects of myosin regulatory light chain phosphorylation and butanedione monoxime on skinned skeletal muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Maki; Kimura, Masako; Li, Zhao-Bo; Ohno, Tetsuo; Takemori, Shigeru; Hoh, Joseph F Y; Yagi, Naoto

    2016-04-15

    The phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) is an important modulator of skeletal muscle performance and plays a key role in posttetanic potentiation and staircase potentiation of twitch contractions. The structural basis for these phenomena within the filament lattice has not been thoroughly investigated. Using a synchrotron radiation source at SPring8, we obtained X-ray diffraction patterns from skinned rabbit psoas muscle fibers before and after phosphorylation of myosin RLC in the presence of myosin light chain kinase, calmodulin, and calcium at a concentration below the threshold for tension development ([Ca(2+)] = 10(-6.8)M). After phosphorylation, the first myosin layer line slightly decreased in intensity at ∼0.05 nm(-1)along the equatorial axis, indicating a partial loss of the helical order of myosin heads along the thick filament. Concomitantly, the (1,1/1,0) intensity ratio of the equatorial reflections increased. These results provide a firm structural basis for the hypothesis that phosphorylation of myosin RLC caused the myosin heads to move away from the thick filaments towards the thin filaments, thereby enhancing the probability of interaction with actin. In contrast, 2,3-butanedione monoxime (BDM), known to inhibit contraction by impeding phosphate release from myosin, had exactly the opposite effects on meridional and equatorial reflections to those of phosphorylation. We hypothesize that these antagonistic effects are due to the acceleration of phosphate release from myosin by phosphorylation and its inhibition by BDM, the consequent shifts in crossbridge equilibria leading to opposite changes in abundance of the myosin-ADP-inorganic phosphate complex state associated with helical order of thick filaments. PMID:26911280

  6. Understanding the Effects of Users' Behaviors on Effectiveness of Different Exogenous Regulatory Common Pool Resource Management Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madani, K.; Dinar, A.

    2013-12-01

    Tragedy of the commons is generally recognized as one of the possible destinies for common pool resources (CPRs). To avoid the tragedy of the commons and prolonging the life of CPRs, users may show different behavioral characteristics and use different rationales for CPR planning and management. Furthermore, regulators may adopt different strategies for sustainable management of CPRs. The effectiveness of different regulatory exogenous management institutions cannot be evaluated through conventional CPR models since they assume that either users base their behavior on individual rationality and adopt a selfish behavior (Nash behavior), or that the users seek the system's optimal solution without giving priority to their own interests. Therefore, conventional models fail to reliably predict the outcome of CPR problems in which parties may have a range of behavioral characteristics, putting them somewhere in between the two types of behaviors traditionally considered. This work examines the effectiveness of different regulatory exogenous CPR management institutions through a user-based model (as opposed to a system-based model). The new modeling framework allows for consideration of sensitivity of the results to different behavioral characteristics of interacting CPR users. The suggested modeling approach is applied to a benchmark groundwater management problem. Results indicate that some well-known exogenous management institutions (e.g. taxing) are ineffective in sustainable management of CPRs in most cases. Bankruptcy-based management can be helpful, but determination of the fair level of cutbacks remains challenging under this type of institution. Furthermore, some bankruptcy rules such as the Constrained Equal Award (CEA) method are more beneficial to wealthier users, failing to establish social justice. Quota-based and CPR status-based management perform as the most promising and robust regulatory exogenous institutions in prolonging the CPR's life and

  7. Comparative effectiveness and safety of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants and warfarin in patients with atrial fibrillation: propensity weighted nationwide cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skjøth, Flemming; Nielsen, Peter Brønnum; Kjældgaard, Jette Nordstrøm; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2016-01-01

    Objective To study the effectiveness and safety of the non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (novel oral anticoagulants, NOACs) dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apixaban compared with warfarin in anticoagulant naïve patients with atrial fibrillation. Design Observational nationwide cohort study. Setting Three Danish nationwide databases, August 2011 to October 2015. Participants 61 678 patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation who were naïve to oral anticoagulants and had no previous indication for valvular atrial fibrillation or venous thromboembolism. The study population was distributed according to treatment type: warfarin (n=35 436, 57%), dabigatran 150 mg (n=12 701, 21%), rivaroxaban 20 mg (n=7192, 12%), and apixaban 5 mg (n=6349, 10%). Main outcome measures Effectiveness outcomes defined a priori were ischaemic stroke; a composite of ischaemic stroke or systemic embolism; death; and a composite of ischaemic stroke, systemic embolism, or death. Safety outcomes were any bleeding, intracranial bleeding, and major bleeding. Results When the analysis was restricted to ischaemic stroke, NOACs were not significantly different from warfarin. During one year follow-up, rivaroxaban was associated with lower annual rates of ischaemic stroke or systemic embolism (3.0% v 3.3%, respectively) compared with warfarin: hazard ratio 0.83 (95% confidence interval 0.69 to 0.99). The hazard ratios for dabigatran and apixaban (2.8% and 4.9% annually, respectively) were non-significant compared with warfarin. The annual risk of death was significantly lower with apixaban (5.2%) and dabigatran (2.7%) (0.65, 0.56 to 0.75 and 0.63, 0.48 to 0.82, respectively) compared with warfarin (8.5%), but not with rivaroxaban (7.7%). For the combined endpoint of any bleeding, annual rates for apixaban (3.3%) and dabigatran (2.4%) were significantly lower than for warfarin (5.0%) (0.62, 0.51 to 0.74). Warfarin and rivaroxaban had comparable annual bleeding rates (5

  8. In vitro effects of a small-molecule antagonist of the Tcf/ß-catenin complex on endometrial and endometriotic cells of patients with endometriosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachiko Matsuzaki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Our previous studies suggested that aberrant activation of Wnt/ß-catenin signaling might be involved in the pathophysiology of endometriosis. We hypothesized that inhibition of Wnt/ß-catenin signaling might result in inhibition of cell proliferation, migration, and/or invasion of endometrial and endometriotic epithelial and stromal cells of patients with endometriosis. OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of a small-molecule antagonist of the Tcf/ß-catenin complex (PKF 115-584 on cell proliferation, migration, and invasion of endometrial and endometriotic epithelial and stromal cells. METHODS: One hundred twenty-six patients (78 with and 48 without endometriosis with normal menstrual cycles were recruited. In vitro effects of PKF 115-584 on cell proliferation, migration, and invasion and on the Tcf/ß-catenin target genes were evaluated in endometrial epithelial and stromal cells of patients with and without endometriosis, and in endometrial and endometriotic epithelial and stromal cells of the same patients. RESULTS: The inhibitory effects of PKF 115-584 on cell migration and invasion in endometrial epithelial and stromal cells of patients with endometriosis prepared from the menstrual phase were significantly higher than those of patients without endometriosis. Levels of total and active forms of MMP-9 were significantly higher in epithelial and stromal cells prepared from menstrual endometrium in patients with endometriosis compared to patients without endometriosis. Treatment with PKF 115-584 inhibited MMP-9 activity to undetectable levels in both menstrual endometrial epithelial and stromal cells of patients with endometriosis. The number of invasive cells was significantly higher in epithelial and stromal cells of endometriotic tissue compared with matched eutopic endometrium of the same patients. Treatment with PKF 115-584 decreased the number of invasive endometriotic epithelial cells by 73

  9. An investigation into the receptor-regulating effects of the acute administration of opioid agonists and an antagonist on beta adrenergic receptors in the rat cerebral cortex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Past and current research indicated that biochemical deviations which might be involved in the etiology and pathophysiology of depression, included abnormalities or imbalances in the noradrenergic, serotonergic, hormonal and possibly in the endogenous opioid, dopaminergic, histaminergic, cholinergic and trace amine systems. In order to investigate a possible link between the noradrenergic system and opioids, it was decided to test the acute effects of opioid administration on cortical beta adrenoceptor numbers and affinity. As these receptors have been most consistently downregulated by antidepressant treatment, they may be involved in the mechanism of antidepressant action of these agents. It was decided to investigate beta adrenoceptor-regulatory effects of opioid treatment. Naloxone was tested alone, with a view to suppressing any possible endogenous opioid influences upon beta receptor status and revealing an effect which would possibly be the opposite of that brought about by the administration of opioid agonists. Naloxone was administered together with morphine to demonstrate that any beta receptor up- or downregulation which might be measured, had indeed been opioid-receptor mediated. It was found that the acute administration of four different mu opioid agonists, naloxone and naloxone plus morphine, did not cause any statistically significant alterations in cortical beta adrenergic receptor numbers or affinity in the rat. A radioactive ligand, the beta adrenoceptor-labelling compound referred to as DHA (L-dihydroalprenolol HCI) was used in this study

  10. Regulatory volume decrease in Leishmania mexicana: effect of anti-microtubule drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francehuli Dagger

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The trypanosomatid cytoskeleton is responsible for the parasite's shape and it is modulated throughout the different stages of the parasite's life cycle. When parasites are exposed to media with reduced osmolarity, they initially swell, but subsequently undergo compensatory shrinking referred to as regulatory volume decrease (RVD. We studied the effects of anti-microtubule (Mt drugs on the proliferation of Leishmania mexicana promastigotes and their capacity to undergo RVD. All of the drugs tested exerted antiproliferative effects of varying magnitudes [ansamitocin P3 (AP3> trifluoperazine > taxol > rhizoxin > chlorpromazine]. No direct relationship was found between antiproliferative drug treatment and RVD. Similarly, Mt stability was not affected by drug treatment. Ansamitocin P3, which is effective at nanomolar concentrations, blocked amastigote-promastigote differentiation and was the only drug that impeded RVD, as measured by light dispersion. AP3 induced 2 kinetoplasts (Kt 1 nucleus cells that had numerous flagella-associated Kts throughout the cell. These results suggest that the dramatic morphological changes induced by AP3 alter the spatial organisation and directionality of the Mts that are necessary for the parasite's hypotonic stress-induced shape change, as well as its recovery.

  11. FORECAST: Regulatory effects cost analysis software manual -- Version 4.1. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The FORECAST program was developed to facilitate the preparation of the value-impact portion of NRC regulatory analyses. This PC program integrates the major cost and benefit considerations that may result from a proposed regulatory change. FORECAST automates much of the calculations typically needed in a regulatory analysis and thus reduces the time and labor required to perform these analyses. More importantly, its integrated and consistent treatment of the different value-impact considerations should help assure comprehensiveness, uniformity, and accuracy in the preparation of NRC regulatory analyses. The Current FORECAST Version 4.1 has been upgraded from the previous version and now includes an uncertainty package, an automatic cost escalation package, and other improvements. In addition, it now explicitly addresses public health impacts, occupational health impacts, onsite property damage, and government costs. Thus, FORECAST Version 4.1 can treat all attributes normally quantified in a regulatory analysis

  12. Astressin B, a Nonselective Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone Receptor Antagonist, Prevents the Inhibitory Effect of Ghrelin on Luteinizing Hormone Pulse Frequency in the Ovariectomized Rhesus Monkey

    OpenAIRE

    Vulliémoz, Nicolas R; Xiao, Ennian; Xia-Zhang, Linna; Rivier, Jean; Ferin, Michel

    2007-01-01

    Administration of ghrelin, a key peptide in the regulation of energy homeostasis, has been shown to decrease LH pulse frequency while concomitantly elevating cortisol levels. Because increased endogenous CRH release in stress is associated with an inhibition of reproductive function, we have tested here whether the pulsatile LH decrease after ghrelin may reflect an activated hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and be prevented by a CRH antagonist. After a 3-h baseline LH pulse frequency monit...

  13. Effects of proton pump inhibitors and histamine-2 receptor antagonists on response to fidaxomicin or vancomycin in patients with Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea

    OpenAIRE

    WEISS, Karl; Louie, Thomas; Miller, Mark A; Mullane, Kathleen; Crook, Derrick W.; Gorbach, Sherwood L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective It has been established that use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) is associated with an increased risk of acquiring Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea (CDAD). However, it is not known whether the use of PPIs or histamine-2 receptor antagonists (H2RAs) concurrently with CDAD-targeted antibiotic treatment affects clinical response or recurrence rates. Design In two phase 3 trials, patients with toxin-positive CDAD were randomised to receive fidaxomicin 200 mg twice daily or va...

  14. The antinociceptive effect of combined systemic administration of morphine and the glycine/NMDA receptor antagonist, (+)-HA966 in a rat model of peripheral neuropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Christensen, Dennis; Idänpään-Heikkilä, Juhana J; Guilbaud, Gisèle; Kayser, Valérie

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated the ability of the functional antagonist at the glycine site of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor complex, (+)-(1-Hydroxy-3-aminopyrrolodine-2-one) ((+)-HA966), to modulate the antinociceptive action of systemic morphine in a rat model of neuropathic pain produced by chronic constriction injury to the sciatic nerve. Mechanical (vocalization threshold to hindpaw pressure) and thermal (struggle latency to hindpaw immersion into a water bath) stimuli were used.In the mechanic...

  15. Different effects of two N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonists on seizures, spontaneous behavior, and motor performance in immature rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mareš, Pavel; Mikulecká, Anna

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 1 (2009), s. 32-39. ISSN 1525-5050 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA ČR(CZ) GA305/06/1188; GA MŠk(CZ) LN00B122 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : NMDA receptors * antagonists * developing rat Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.610, year: 2009

  16. Influence of β-adrenoceptor antagonists on the pharmacokinetics of rizatriptan, a 5-HT1B/1D agonist: differential effects of propranolol, nadolol and metoprolol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Michael R; Sciberras, David; De Smet, Marina; Lowry, Richard; Tomasko, Lisa; Lee, Yih; Olah, Timothy V; Zhao, Jamie; Vyas, Kamlesh P; Halpin, Rita; Kari, Prasad H; James (deceased), Ian

    2001-01-01

    Aims Patients with migraine may receive the 5-HT1B/1D agonist, rizatriptan (5 or 10 mg), to control acute attacks. Patients with frequent attacks may also receive propranolol or other β-adrenoceptor antagonists for migraine prophylaxis. The present studies investigated the potential for pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic interaction between β-adrenoceptor blockers and rizatriptan. Methods Four double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized crossover investigations were performed in a total of 51 healthy subjects. A single 10 mg dose of rizatriptan was administered after 7 days' administration of propranolol (60 and 120 mg twice daily), nadolol (80 mg twice daily), metoprolol (100 mg twice daily) or placebo. Rizatriptan pharmacokinetics were assessed. In vitro incubations of rizatriptan and sumatriptan with various β-adrenoceptor blockers were performed in human S9 fraction. Production of the indole-acetic acid-MAO-A metabolite of each triptan was measured. Results Administration of rizatriptan during propranolol treatment (120 mg twice daily for 7.5 days) increased the AUC(0,∞) for rizatriptan by approximately 67% and the Cmax by approximately 75%. A reduction in the dose of propranolol (60 mg twice daily) and/or the incorporation of a delay (1 or 2 h) between propranolol and rizatriptan administration did not produce a statistically significant change in the effect of propranolol on rizatriptan pharmacokinetics. Administration of rizatriptan together with nadolol (80 mg twice daily) or metoprolol (100 mg twice daily) for 7 days did not significantly alter the pharmacokinetics of rizatriptan. No untoward adverse experiences attributable to the pharmacokinetic interaction between propranolol and rizatriptan were observed, and no subjects developed serious clinical, laboratory, or other significant adverse experiences during coadministration of rizatriptan with any of the β-adrenoceptor blockers. In vitro incubations showed that propranolol, but not other

  17. The suitability of concentration addition for predicting the effects of multi-component mixtures of up to 17 anti-androgens with varied structural features in an in vitro AR antagonist assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ermler, Sibylle; Scholze, Martin; Kortenkamp, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.kortenkamp@brunel.ac.uk

    2011-12-15

    The risks associated with human exposures to chemicals capable of antagonising the effects of endogenous androgens have attracted considerable recent interest. Exposure is typically to large numbers of chemicals with androgen receptor (AR) antagonist activity, yet there is limited evidence of the combined effects of multi-component mixtures of these chemicals. A few in vitro studies with mixtures of up to six AR antagonists suggest that the concept of concentration addition (CA) provides good approximations of experimentally observed mixture effects, but studies with larger numbers of anti-androgens, and with more varied structural features, are missing. Here we show that the mixture effects of up to 17 AR antagonists, comprising compounds as diverse as UV-filter substances, parabens, perfluorinated compounds, bisphenol-A, benzo({alpha})pyrene, synthetic musks, antioxidants and polybrominated biphenyls, can be predicted well on the basis of the anti-androgenicity of the single components using the concept of CA. We tested these mixtures in an in vitro AR-dependent luciferase reporter gene assay, based on MDA-kb2 cells. The effects of further mixtures, composed of four and six anti-androgens, could be predicted accurately by CA. However, there was a shortfall from expected additivity with a ten-component mixture at two different mixture ratios, but attempts to attribute these deviations to differential expression of hormone-metabolising CYP isoforms did not produce conclusive results. CA provides good approximations of in vitro mixture effects of anti-androgens with varying structural features. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Humans are exposed to a large number of androgen receptor antagonists. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There is limited evidence of the combined effects of anti-androgenic chemicals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We modelled the predictability of combined effects of up to 17 anti-androgens. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We tested the

  18. Vasopressin receptor antagonists: Characteristics and clinical role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondon-Berrios, Helbert; Berl, Tomas

    2016-03-01

    Hyponatremia, the most common electrolyte disorder in hospitalized patients is associated with increased risk of mortality even when mild and apparently asymptomatic. Likewise morbidity manifested as attention deficits, gait disturbances, falls, fractures, and osteoporosis is more prevalent in hyponatremic subjects. Hyponatremia also generates a significant financial burden. Therefore, it is important to explore approaches that effectively and safely treat hyponatremia. Currently available strategies are physiologically sound and affordable but lack evidence from clinical trials and are limited by variable efficacy, slow response, and/or poor compliance. The recent emergence of vasopressin receptor antagonists provides a class of drugs that target the primary pathophysiological mechanism, namely vasopressin mediated impairment of free water excretion. This review summarizes the historical development, pharmacology, clinical trials supporting efficacy and safety, shortcomings, as well as practical suggestions for the use of vasopressin receptor antagonists. PMID:27156765

  19. 77 FR 68163 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NYSE Arca, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; NYSE Arca, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change To Amend the NYSE Arca Options Fee Schedule Relating to Pricing Applicable to Electronic Transactions in Non-Penny...

  20. The additive effect of regulatory activities on top of intelligence in relation to academic performance in higher education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minnaert, A; Janssen, PJ

    1999-01-01

    This study investigated the additive, beneficial effect of regulatory activities on top of verbal, numerical, and diagrammatic intelligence in the prediction of academic performance. About 500 freshmen of different study domains participated in this research. The findings supported both the mixed an

  1. 78 FR 22353 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NASDAQ OMX PHLX LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-15

    ... NOS, membership fees at away markets, Options Regulatory Fees (``ORFs'') and technical costs... NOS, membership fees at away markets, ORFs and technical costs associated with routing options, the...), 77 FR 66904 (November 7, 2012) (Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule...

  2. 78 FR 16731 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NYSE Arca, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-18

    ... execution. \\4\\ See Securities Exchange Act Release No. 65730 (November 10, 2011), 76 FR 71410 (November 17... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; NYSE Arca, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of... Reduce the Floor Broker Rebate for Qualified Contingent Cross Transactions March 8, 2013. Pursuant...

  3. 78 FR 4184 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NASDAQ OMX PHLX LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-18

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; NASDAQ OMX PHLX LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change To Reduce the Fees Assessed for Certain Co-location Services January 14, 2013. Pursuant to Section 19(b)(1) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (``Act''),\\1\\ and Rule 19b-4...

  4. 78 FR 3924 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NASDAQ OMX BX, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-17

    ... COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; NASDAQ OMX BX, Inc.; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change To Reduce Fees Assessed for Certain Co-Location Services January 11, 2013. Pursuant to Section 19(b)(1) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (``Act''),\\1\\ and Rule 19b-4...

  5. Regulatory effect of miR-149 on interleukin-6 expression in silica-induced pulmonary fibrosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范晶晶

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the regulatory effect of miR-149 on interleukin-6(IL-6)expression in silica-induced pulmonary fibrosis.Methods A mouse model of pulmonary fibrosis was established using silica dust;the level of miR-149 in the lung tissues of mice with silicainduced pulmonary fibrosis was measured by quantitative

  6. 76 FR 44061 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NYSE Amex LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Self-Regulatory Organizations; NYSE Amex LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule Change Implementing Proposal To Amend the Fee Schedule by Adding Definitions for the Strategy Executions That Qualify for...

  7. [The effect of extremely low doses of the novel regulatory plant proteins ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnov, M S; Margasiuk, D V; Iamskov, I A; Iamskova, V P

    2003-01-01

    Searching and study on regulatory proteins, which can keep under control the scope of important processes as like as cell adhesion, proliferation, differentiation and morphogenesis, is an actual aim of the current biochemistry. Recently we have identified S-100 proteins in plants of following species: plantain (Plantago major L.), aloe (Aloe arborescens L.), and bilberry (Vaccinum myrtillus L.). Extraction and purification of S-100 proteins gotten from these plants were performed by the method we developed earlier for adhesion proteins of animal tissues. Homogeneity of the studied plant proteins was evaluated and confirmed by HPLC and SDS-electrophoresis in PAAG. Both, plant and animal proteins have appeared to be biologically active at extremely low doses. The tests were performed by adhesiometrical method in short-term tissue culture of mouse's liver in vitro. As a result it was established that the plant proteins insert a membranotropic effect being added in extremely low doses, corresponding to 10(-10)-10(-13) mg/ml. Keeping in mind that the plantain is well known remedy for wound protection and healing, in several experiments we studied the biological effect of plant S-100 proteins on animal cells. It was found that S-100 proteins obtained from plantain influences proliferation of human fibroblasts in vitro. It was found that after the treatment with this protein in low doses the cell growth rate increases essentially. PMID:12881977

  8. 5-Azacytidine modulates interferon regulatory factor 1 in macrophages to exert a cardioprotective effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hye-yun; Kang, Wan Seok; Hong, Moon Hwa; Jeong, Hae Chang; Shin, Myun-Geun; Jeong, Myung Ho; Kim, Yong Sook; Ahn, Youngkeun

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are actively involved in inflammatory responses during the progression of cardiac injury, including myocardial infarction (MI). A previous study showed that 5-azacytidine (5AZ), a DNA methylation inhibitor, can ameliorate cardiac injury by shifting macrophages toward an anti-inflammatory phenotype via iNOS inhibition. Here, we show that the beneficial effect of 5AZ is associated with sumoylation of interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF1) in macrophages. IRF1 is a critical transcription factor for iNOS induction and is antagonized by IRF2. In the stimulated macrophages, IRF1 accumulated in the nucleus without degradation by 5AZ treatment. In animal study, 5AZ administration resulted in significant improvements in cardiac function and fibrosis. IRF1-expressing macrophages were more abundant in the 5AZ-treated MI group than in the PBS-treated MI group. Because sumoylated IRF1 is known to mimic IRF2, we examined the IRF1 sumoylation. Sumoylated IRF1 was resistant to degradation and significantly increased in the 5AZ-treated MI group. Collectively, 5AZ had a protective effect after MI by potentiation of IRF1 sumoylation and is suggested as a novel therapeutic intervention for cardiac repair. PMID:26510961

  9. 5-Azacytidine modulates interferon regulatory factor 1 in macrophages to exert a cardioprotective effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hye-yun; Kang, Wan Seok; Hong, Moon Hwa; Jeong, Hae Chang; Shin, Myun-Geun; Jeong, Myung Ho; Kim, Yong Sook; Ahn, Youngkeun

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are actively involved in inflammatory responses during the progression of cardiac injury, including myocardial infarction (MI). A previous study showed that 5-azacytidine (5AZ), a DNA methylation inhibitor, can ameliorate cardiac injury by shifting macrophages toward an anti-inflammatory phenotype via iNOS inhibition. Here, we show that the beneficial effect of 5AZ is associated with sumoylation of interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF1) in macrophages. IRF1 is a critical transcription factor for iNOS induction and is antagonized by IRF2. In the stimulated macrophages, IRF1 accumulated in the nucleus without degradation by 5AZ treatment. In animal study, 5AZ administration resulted in significant improvements in cardiac function and fibrosis. IRF1-expressing macrophages were more abundant in the 5AZ-treated MI group than in the PBS-treated MI group. Because sumoylated IRF1 is known to mimic IRF2, we examined the IRF1 sumoylation. Sumoylated IRF1 was resistant to degradation and significantly increased in the 5AZ-treated MI group. Collectively, 5AZ had a protective effect after MI by potentiation of IRF1 sumoylation and is suggested as a novel therapeutic intervention for cardiac repair. PMID:26510961

  10. The effect of the calcium antagonist, isradipine, on working capacity, pulmonary function, morbidity and survival rate in patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galløe, Anders Michael; Graudal, Niels Albert; Petersen, J.R.;

    1991-01-01

    Beneficial effects of calcium antagonists on the pulmonary haemodynamics of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have been observed in several studies. Such effects include a decrease in pulmonary vascular resistance, an increase in cardiac output, and an increase in oxygen......, isradipine, could increase working capacity and lung function, and decrease morbidity and mortality. Fifty-two patients with COPD were investigated. During a 22-month observation period no statistically significant differences between the isradipine group and the placebo group were found with regard to these...

  11. Effect of ionizing radiation on expressions of regulatory T cells and related molecules in mice spleen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To observe the changes in expressions of spleen regulatory T cells (Tregs) and the related factor forkhead box protein-3 (Foxp3) after irradiation with different doses of X-ray in mice at different times, and to elaborate the effects of X-rays on regulatory T cells and Foxp3. Methods: 112 male ICR mice were randomly divided into 2 groups and irradiated by X-rays at the doses of 0.075 and 2 Gy, respectively. The mice were killed at 0, 4, 8, 16, 24, 48, and 72 h post-irradiation and the spleens removed. Flow cytometry was used to detect the percentage of CD4 + CD25 + Treg and protein expression of (Foxp3), and RT-PCR was used to exmiamine the mRNA expression of Fox3. Results: Compared with those before irradiation, the CD4 + CD25 + Treg positive rates began to increase and peaked at 8 h post-irradiation with 0.075 Gy at 8, 16, 24, 72 h (t=8.73, 10.55, 4.21, 4.65, P<0.05) and 2 Gy at 8, 16, 48, 72 h (t=4.65, 4.28, 3.71, 2.88, P<0.05), and then slightly decreased, but still remained at high levels. The mRNA protein levels of Fox3 did not change significantly after exposure to the dose of 0.075 Gy, but began to significantly increase at 8 h after exposure to the dose of 2 Gy. However, the Fox3 protein level began to increase 4 h post-irradiation, peaked at 16 h, and then slightly decreased, but still remained at high levels (t=2.59, 3.37, 3.70, 3.20, P<0.05). Conclusions: The changes in expressions of Tregs and Foxp3 after high- and low-dose X-ray irradiation may be used to explain the differences in immune effects induced ionizing radiation at different doses. (authors)

  12. Effects of the Brazilian Regulatory Inspection Programme on Nuclear Medicine Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work aims to demonstrate the importance of the regulatory inspections carried out by Brazilian regulatory body in the area of nuclear medicine field. The main aspects observed during the inspections are presented as well as the time evolution of the non-compliances, according to their occurrence by type. The results point out the importance of continuous coercion actions to improve the radiological protection level in nuclear medicine facilities in compliance with the standards established by the national regulatory authority and international recommendations. (author)

  13. XAF1 expression and regulatory effects of somatostatin on XAF1 in prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Chunde

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Somatostatin prevents cell proliferation by inducing apoptosis. Downregulation of the XAF1 transcript may occur during the development of prostate cancer. It is interesting to evaluate the potential regulatory effects of somatostatin on XAF1 expression during the development of prostate cancer cells. Methods XAF1 mRNA and protein expression in human prostate epithelial cells RWPE-1, androgen dependent prostate cancer LNCaP, and androgen independent DU145 and PC3 cells were evaluated using RT-PCR and Western blot. The regulation of XAF1 mRNA and protein expression by somatostatin and its analogue Octreotide was evaluated. Results Substantial levels of XAF1 mRNA and proteins were detected in RWPE-1 cells, whereas prostate cancer cells LNCaP, DU145 and PC3 exhibited lower XAF1 expression. Somatostatin and Octreotide up-regulated XAF1 mRNA and protein expression in all prostate cancer cell lines. Conclusions XAF1 down-regulation may contribute to the prostate cancer development. The enhanced XAF1 expression by somatostatin indicates a promising strategy for prostate cancer therapy.

  14. Effect of cysteine on methionine production by a regulatory mutant of Corynebacterium lilium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Dharmendra; Subramanian, Kartik; Bisaria, Virendra S.; Sreekrishnan, T.R.; Gomes, James [Indian Inst. of Technology, Dept. of Biochemical Engineering and Biotechnology, New Delhi (India)

    2005-02-01

    The production of methionine by submerged fermentation using a mutant strain of Corynebacterium lilium was studied to determine suitable conditions for obtaining high productivity. The mutant strain resistant to the methionine analogues ethionine, norleucine, methionine sulfoxide and methionine methylsulfonium chloride produced 2.34 g l{sup -1} of methionine in minimal medium containing glucose as carbon source. The effect of cysteine on methionine production in a 15 l bioreactor was studied by supplementing cysteine intermittently during the course of fermentation. The addition of cysteine (0.75 g l{sup -1} h{sup -1}) every 2 h to the production medium increased the production of methionine to 3.39 g l{sup -1}. A metabolic flux analysis showed that during cysteine supplementation the ATP consumption reduced by 20%. It also showed that the increase in flux from phosphoenol pyruvate to oxaloacetate leads to higher methionine production. Results indicate that controlling the respiratory quotient close to 0.75 will produce the highest amount of methionine and that regulatory mutants also resistant to analogues of cysteine would be better methionine over producers. (Author)

  15. Improving regulatory effectiveness in federal/state siting actions. Preliminary staff report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the past few years, there has been a growing belief on the part of States, other Federal agencies, the utilities, regional groupings, and the environmental community that the present regulatory system for siting nuclear facilities is far from effective. Many people suggest that too much time, talent, and money is wasted in coming to decisions on environmental matters, and all segments of society do not feel well served. It is argued that the time sequencing on environment decisionmaking is wrong, and that there are many areas of duplication and overlap. The States are not satisfied that their role in siting decisions is sufficiently understood or recognized. Many statements by public interest groups and individuals indicate that in some way public confidence and understanding must be improved. There is much concern expressed that the public does not have timely opportunity to see or understand the long term system plans of utilities and that the identification of specific sites takes place too late to avoid a clash of commitments. All parties with a stake in the outcome appear to believe that the delays built into the present system of environmental decisionmaking can and should be remedied so that timely decisions, whether negative or affirmative, can be made. The report presents a discussion of these matters

  16. Effects of gene regulatory reprogramming on gene expression in human and mouse developing hearts

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, Chih-Hao; Ovcharenko, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Lineage-specific regulatory elements underlie adaptation of species and play a role in disease susceptibility. We compared functionally conserved and lineage-specific enhancers by cross-mapping 5042 human and 6564 mouse heart enhancers. Of these, 79 per cent are lineage-specific, lacking a functional orthologue. Heart enhancers tend to cluster and, commonly, there are multiple heart enhancers in a heart locus providing a regulatory stability to the locus. We observed little cross-clustering, ...

  17. The Effect of Regulatory Harmonization on Cross-border Labor Migration: Evidence from the Accounting Profession

    OpenAIRE

    Brüggemann, Ulf; Matthew J. Bloomfield; Christensen, Hans B.; Leuz, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The paper examines whether international regulatory harmonization increases cross-border labor migration. To study this question, we analyze European Union (EU) initiatives that harmonized accounting and auditing standards. Regulatory harmonization should reduce economic mobility barriers, essentially making it easier for accounting professionals to move across countries. Our research design compares the cross-border migration of accounting professionals relative to tightly-matched other prof...

  18. Innate Immune Activity Conditions the Effect of Regulatory Variants upon Monocyte Gene Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Fairfax, B. P.; Humburg, P.; Makino, S.; Naranbhai, V; Wong, D.; Lau, E; Jostins, L; Plant, K.; Andrews, R; McGee, C.; Knight, J.C.

    2014-01-01

    To systematically investigate the impact of immune stimulation upon regulatory variant activity, we exposed primary monocytes from 432 healthy Europeans to interferon-γ (IFN-γ) or differing durations of lipopolysaccharide and mapped expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs). More than half of cis-eQTLs identified, involving hundreds of genes and associated pathways, are detected specifically in stimulated monocytes. Induced innate immune activity reveals multiple master regulatory trans-eQTL...

  19. Bicycloorthocarboxylate convulsants. Potent GABAA receptor antagonists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    4-t-Butyl-1-(4-bromophenyl)-bicycloorthocarboxylate antagonizes gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mediated relaxation at a functional insect nerve-muscle synapse, mimicking the action of picrotoxinin, suggesting that it causes GABA antagonism through blockade of the chloride ionophore. It is also a potent GABAA receptor antagonist, inhibiting the binding of [35S]t-butyl-bicyclophosphorothionate ([35S]TBPS) to EDTA/water-dialyzed human brain P2 membranes. Structure-activity relationships of 74 1,4-bis-substituted bicycloorthocarboxylates, mostly new compounds, reveal that for high potency as a GABAA receptor antagonist the optimal 4-substituent is a C4 to C6 branched chain alkyl or cycloalkyl group (e.g., t-butyl, s-butyl, or cyclohexyl) and the optimal 1-substituent is a phenyl moiety with one or more electron-withdrawing groups (e.g., 4-cyano, 4-bromo, 4-chloro, 3,4-dichloro, or pentafluoro). Bicycloorthocarboxylate inhibitors of [35S]TBPS binding with IC50 values of 5-10 nM exceed by several-fold the potency of any GABAA receptor antagonist previously reported. The 4-t-butyl-1-(4-azidophenyl) analog, synthesized as a candidate photoaffinity label, gives an IC50 of 315 nM. The potency of bicycloorthocarboxylates for decreasing [35S]TBPS binding generally correlates with their toxicity, i.e., compounds without inhibitory activity in this brain receptor assay are of low toxicity on intraperitoneal administration to mice, and the analogs most potent as inhibitors are generally those most toxic to mice (e.g., IC50 of 5 nM and LD50 of 0.06 mg/kg for 4-t-butyl-1-(4-cyanophenyl)-bicycloorthocarboxylate). The effects of phenyl substituents on the potency of the orthobenzoates as GABAA receptor antagonists are similar to those on toxicity

  20. Antagonistic parent-offspring co-adaptation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Kölliker

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In species across taxa, offspring have means to influence parental investment (PI. PI thus evolves as an interacting phenotype and indirect genetic effects may strongly affect the co-evolutionary dynamics of offspring and parental behaviors. Evolutionary theory focused on explaining how exaggerated offspring solicitation can be understood as resolution of parent-offspring conflict, but the evolutionary origin and diversification of different forms of family interactions remains unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In contrast to previous theory that largely uses a static approach to predict how "offspring individuals" and "parental individuals" should interact given conflict over PI, we present a dynamic theoretical framework of antagonistic selection on the PI individuals obtain/take as offspring and the PI they provide as parents to maximize individual lifetime reproductive success; we analyze a deterministic and a stochastic version of this dynamic framework. We show that a zone for equivalent co-adaptation outcomes exists in which stable levels of PI can evolve and be maintained despite fast strategy transitions and ongoing co-evolutionary dynamics. Under antagonistic co-adaptation, cost-free solicitation can evolve as an adaptation to emerging preferences in parents. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We show that antagonistic selection across the offspring and parental life-stage of individuals favors co-adapted offspring and parental behavior within a zone of equivalent outcomes. This antagonistic parent-offspring co-adaptation does not require solicitation to be costly, allows for rapid divergence and evolutionary novelty and potentially explains the origin and diversification of the observed provisioning forms in family life.