WorldWideScience

Sample records for antagonistic parent-offspring co-adaptation

  1. Antagonistic parent-offspring co-adaptation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Kölliker

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In species across taxa, offspring have means to influence parental investment (PI. PI thus evolves as an interacting phenotype and indirect genetic effects may strongly affect the co-evolutionary dynamics of offspring and parental behaviors. Evolutionary theory focused on explaining how exaggerated offspring solicitation can be understood as resolution of parent-offspring conflict, but the evolutionary origin and diversification of different forms of family interactions remains unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In contrast to previous theory that largely uses a static approach to predict how "offspring individuals" and "parental individuals" should interact given conflict over PI, we present a dynamic theoretical framework of antagonistic selection on the PI individuals obtain/take as offspring and the PI they provide as parents to maximize individual lifetime reproductive success; we analyze a deterministic and a stochastic version of this dynamic framework. We show that a zone for equivalent co-adaptation outcomes exists in which stable levels of PI can evolve and be maintained despite fast strategy transitions and ongoing co-evolutionary dynamics. Under antagonistic co-adaptation, cost-free solicitation can evolve as an adaptation to emerging preferences in parents. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We show that antagonistic selection across the offspring and parental life-stage of individuals favors co-adapted offspring and parental behavior within a zone of equivalent outcomes. This antagonistic parent-offspring co-adaptation does not require solicitation to be costly, allows for rapid divergence and evolutionary novelty and potentially explains the origin and diversification of the observed provisioning forms in family life.

  2. Parent-offspring conflict and co-adaptation: behavioural ecology meets quantitative genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiseth, Per T; Wright, Jonathan; Kölliker, Mathias

    2008-08-22

    The evolution of the complex and dynamic behavioural interactions between caring parents and their dependent offspring is a major area of research in behavioural ecology and quantitative genetics. While behavioural ecologists examine the evolution of interactions between parents and offspring in the light of parent-offspring conflict and its resolution, quantitative geneticists explore the evolution of such interactions in the light of parent-offspring co-adaptation due to combined effects of parental and offspring behaviours on fitness. To date, there is little interaction or integration between these two fields. Here, we first review the merits and limitations of each of these two approaches and show that they provide important complementary insights into the evolution of strategies for offspring begging and parental resource provisioning. We then outline how central ideas from behavioural ecology and quantitative genetics can be combined within a framework based on the concept of behavioural reaction norms, which provides a common basis for behavioural ecologists and quantitative geneticists to study the evolution of parent-offspring interactions. Finally, we discuss how the behavioural reaction norm approach can be used to advance our understanding of parent-offspring conflict by combining information about the genetic basis of traits from quantitative genetics with key insights regarding the adaptive function and dynamic nature of parental and offspring behaviours from behavioural ecology.

  3. Sex roles in nest keeping - how information asymmetry contributes to parent-offspring co-adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucass, Carsten; Fresneau, Nolwenn; Eens, Marcel; Müller, Wendt

    2016-03-01

    Parental food provisioning and offspring begging influence each other reciprocally. This makes both traits agents and targets of selection, which may ultimately lead to co-adaptation. The latter may reflect co-adapted parent and offspring genotypes or could be due to maternal effects. Maternal effects are in turn likely to facilitate in particular mother-offspring co-adaptation, further emphasized by the possibility that mothers are sometimes found to be more responsive to offspring need. However, parents may not only differ in their sensitivity, but often play different roles in postnatal care. This potentially impinges on the access to information about offspring need. We here manipulated the information on offspring need as perceived by parents by playing back begging calls at a constant frequency in the nest-box of blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus). We measured the parental response in provisioning to our treatment, paying particular attention to sex differences in parental roles and whether such differences alter the perception of the intensity of our manipulation. This enabled us to investigate whether an information asymmetry about offspring need exists between parents and how such an asymmetry relates to co-adaptation between parental provisioning and offspring begging. Our results show that parents indeed differed in the frequency how often they perceived the playback due to the fact that females spent more time with their offspring in the nest box. Correcting for the effective exposure of an adult to the playback, the parental response in provisioning covaried more strongly (positive) with offspring begging intensity, independent of the parental sex, indicating coadaptation on the phenotypic level. Females were not more sensitive to experimentally increased offspring need than males, but they were exposed to more broadcasted begging calls. Therefore, sex differences in access to information about offspring need, due to different parental roles, have the

  4. Games among cannibals: competition to cannibalize and parent-offspring conflict lead to increased sibling cannibalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, J C; Roitberg, B D

    2005-11-01

    Sibling cannibalism occurs in many species, yet understanding of sibling cannibalism as an adaptation currently lags behind understanding of other antagonistic interactions among siblings. Observed sibling cannibalism phenotypes likely reflect the interaction between competitive games among siblings and parent-offspring conflict. Using a game-theoretic approach, we derive optimal offspring cannibalism behaviour and parental modifiers that limit or facilitate cannibalism. The results are compared to contemporary frequency-independent analysis. With the addition of game interactions among siblings or parent-offspring co-evolution, our model predicts increased cannibalism (compared to the frequency-independent prediction), as offspring compete to eat siblings. When infertile eggs are present--strengthening competition--offspring risk eating viable siblings in order to gain access to infertile eggs, intensifying parent-offspring conflict. We use the results to make new predictions about the occurrence of sibling cannibalism. Additionally, we demonstrate the utility of trophic egg laying as a maternal mechanism to promote egg eating.

  5. When ambient noise impairs parent-offspring communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucass, Carsten; Eens, Marcel; Müller, Wendt

    2016-05-01

    Ambient noise has increased in extent, duration and intensity with significant implications for species' lives. Birds especially, because they heavily rely on vocal communication, are highly sensitive towards noise pollution. Noise can impair the quality of a territory or hamper the transmission of vocal signals such as song. The latter has significant fitness consequences as it may erode partner preferences in the context of mate choice. Additional fitness costs may arise if noise masks communication between soliciting offspring and providing parents during the period of parental care. Here, we experimentally manipulated the acoustic environment of blue tit (Cyanistes caeruleus) families within their nest boxes with playbacks of previously recorded highway noise and investigated the consequences on parent-offspring communication. We hypothesized that noise interferes with the acoustic cues of parental arrival and vocal components of offspring begging. As such we expected an increase in the frequency of missed detections, when nestlings fail to respond to the returning parent, and a decrease in parental provisioning rates. Parents significantly reduced their rate of provisioning in noisy conditions compared to a control treatment. This reduction is likely to be the consequence of a parental misinterpretation of the offspring hunger level, as we found that nestlings fail to respond to the returning parent more frequently in the presence of noise. Noise also potentially masks vocal begging components, again contributing to parental underestimation of offspring requirements. Either way, it appears that noise impaired parent-offspring communication is likely to reduce reproductive success.

  6. Parent-Offspring Conflict over Mating: The Case of Beauty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menelaos Apostolou

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available In pre-industrial societies parents exercise a strong influence over the mating decisions of their offspring. As modern pre-industrial societies approximate the way of life in ancestral human societies, human mating behavior should be seen as the outcome of a co-evolutionary process between parental and offspring's mating choice. Both parents and offspring have evolved mating preferences, which enable them to select those mates and in-laws who maximize their inclusive fitness. Following Trivers' (1974 theory of parent-offspring conflict, it is hypothesized that in-law and mating preferences substantially overlap, but also differ with respect to the beauty trait of a mating candidate. This hypothesis is tested on a sample of 292 parents. It is found that the two sets of preferences are strongly correlated, while beauty is preferred significantly more in a mating partner than in an in-law.

  7. Fitness-valley crossing with generalized parent-offspring transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osmond, Matthew M; Otto, Sarah P

    2015-11-01

    Simple and ubiquitous gene interactions create rugged fitness landscapes composed of coadapted gene complexes separated by "valleys" of low fitness. Crossing such fitness valleys allows a population to escape suboptimal local fitness peaks to become better adapted. This is the premise of Sewall Wright's shifting balance process. Here we generalize the theory of fitness-valley crossing in the two-locus, bi-allelic case by allowing bias in parent-offspring transmission. This generalization extends the existing mathematical framework to genetic systems with segregation distortion and uniparental inheritance. Our results are also flexible enough to provide insight into shifts between alternate stable states in cultural systems with "transmission valleys". Using a semi-deterministic analysis and a stochastic diffusion approximation, we focus on the limiting step in valley crossing: the first appearance of the genotype on the new fitness peak whose lineage will eventually fix. We then apply our results to specific cases of segregation distortion, uniparental inheritance, and cultural transmission. Segregation distortion favouring mutant alleles facilitates crossing most when recombination and mutation are rare, i.e., scenarios where crossing is otherwise unlikely. Interactions with more mutable genes (e.g., uniparental inherited cytoplasmic elements) substantially reduce crossing times. Despite component traits being passed on poorly in the previous cultural background, small advantages in the transmission of a new combination of cultural traits can greatly facilitate a cultural transition. While peak shifts are unlikely under many of the common assumptions of population genetic theory, relaxing some of these assumptions can promote fitness-valley crossing.

  8. Habitat structure influences parent-offspring association in a social lizard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Botterill-James

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Parental care emerges as a result of an increase in the extent of interaction between parents and their offspring. These interactions can provide the foundation for the evolution of a range of complex parental behaviors. Therefore, fundamental to understanding the evolution of parental care is an understanding of the factors that promote this initial increase in parent-offspring association. Here, we used large outdoor enclosures to test how the spatial structure of high-quality habitat affects the occurrence of parent-offspring associations in a social lizard (Liopholis whitii. We found that the extent of parent-offspring association was higher when high-quality habitat was aggregated relative to when it was dispersed. This may be the result of greater competitive exclusion of adults and offspring from high quality crevices sites in the aggregated treatment compared to the dispersed treatment. Associating with parents had significant benefits for offspring growth and body condition but there were no concomitant effects on offspring survival. We did not find costs of parent-offspring association for parents in terms of increased harassment and loss of body condition. We discuss a number of potential mechanisms underlying these results. Regardless of mechanisms, our results suggest that habitat structure may shape the extent of parent-offspring association in L. whitti, and that highly aggregated habitats may set the stage for the diversification of more complex forms of care observed across closely related species.

  9. Parent-offspring conflict and the persistence of pregnancy-induced hypertension in modern humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hollegaard, Birgitte; Byars, Sean Geoffrey; Lykke, Jacob;

    2013-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a major cause of perinatal mortality and disease affecting 5-10% of all pregnancies worldwide, but its etiology remains poorly understood despite considerable research effort. Parent-offspring conflict theory suggests that such hypertensive disorders of pregnancy may have evolved ...

  10. Parent-offspring conflict in Japan and parental influence across six cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubbs, Shelli L.; Buunk, Abraham P.; Taniguchi, Hirokazu

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that parents and children often have conflicting mate preferences. The present research was conducted among 443 Japanese university students. Using an existing scale designed to uncover parent-offspring conflict over mate choice, the results revealed that children

  11. Parent-offspring conflict and the persistence of pregnancy-induced hypertension in modern humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartsteen, Birgitte Hollegaard; Byars, Sean Geoffrey; Lykke, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a major cause of perinatal mortality and disease affecting 5-10% of all pregnancies worldwide, but its etiology remains poorly understood despite considerable research effort. Parent-offspring conflict theory suggests that such hypertensive disorders of pregnancy may have evolved...... through the ability of fetal genes to increase maternal blood pressure as this enhances general nutrient supply. However, such mechanisms for inducing hypertension in pregnancy would need to incur sufficient offspring health benefits to compensate for the obvious risks for maternal and fetal health...... that early PIH leading to improved postpartum survival and health represents a balanced compromise between the reproductive interests of parents and offspring, whereas later onset of PIH may reflect an unbalanced parent-offspring conflict at the detriment of maternal and offspring health....

  12. Parent-offspring recognition in thick-billed murres (Aves: Alcidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefevre; Montgomerie; Gaston

    1998-04-01

    Using field experiments, we investigated the development of parent-offspring recognition in the thick-billed murre, Uria lomvia. Cross-fostering experiments (N=73) showed that the likelihood of parents accepting a foreign chick decreased with chick age. Simultaneous-choice playback experiments demonstrated that chicks discriminate between the calls of their parents and both strange and familiar adult conspecifics from as early as 3 days old. In presentation experiments with chicks of fledging age (>/=14 days), adults responded more strongly to the calls of their own chicks than to other familiar chicks from the same breeding ledge. Results are consistent with those of earlier studies of parent-offspring recognition in the congeneric and ecologically similar common murre, U. aalge, which were among the first to suggest that parent birds and their chicks can identify each other's calls. Copyright 1998 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. Copyright 1998 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour.

  13. Sex differences in razorbill Alca torda parent-offspring vocal recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insley, Stephen J; Paredes, Rosana; Jones, Ian L

    2003-01-01

    We investigated differences in parent-offspring vocal recognition between males and females in a natural population of razorbills Alca torda, a long-lived and highly social species of auk (Family: Alcidae). Razorbills provide biparental care to their chicks while at the nest site, after which the male is the sole caregiver for an additional period at sea. Parent-offspring recognition in razorbills is most challenging once the chick becomes mobile, leaves the nest site and goes to sea with the male parent. It is during this period when selection pressure acting on recognition behaviour is expected to be strongest. As a result, we predicted that parent-offspring recognition would be better developed in the male parent, that is, show a paternal bias. To test this prediction we used vocal playback experiments conducted on breeding razorbills at the Gannet Islands, Labrador, Canada. We found (1) most positive responses to playbacks (vocal and phonotactic) occurred close to fledging, (2) males responded more to calls from their chicks than to calls from strange chicks, (3) females responded indifferently to calls from their own or strange chicks and (4) chicks responded more to calls from their male parent than to calls from other adult males. The results provide clear evidence of mutual vocal recognition between the male parent and the chick but not between the female parent and the chick, supporting the prediction that parent-offspring recognition is male biased in this species. Such a bias could have important social implications for a variety of behavioural and basic life history traits such as cooperation and sex-biased dispersal.

  14. Parent-offspring conflict theory: an evolutionary framework for understanding conflict within human families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlomer, Gabriel L; Del Giudice, Marco; Ellis, Bruce J

    2011-07-01

    Decades of research demonstrate that conflict shapes and permeates a broad range of family processes. In the current article, we argue that greater insight, integration of knowledge, and empirical achievement in the study of family conflict can be realized by utilizing a powerful theory from evolutionary biology that is barely known within psychology: parent-offspring conflict theory (POCT). In the current article, we articulate POCT for psychological scientists, extend its scope by connecting it to the broader framework of life history theory, and draw out its implications for understanding conflict within human families. We specifically apply POCT to 2 instances of early mother-offspring interaction (prenatal conflict and weaning conflict); discuss the effects of genetic relatedness on behavioral conflict between parents, children, and their siblings; review the emerging literature on parent-offspring conflict over the choice of mates and spouses; and examine parent-offspring conflict from the perspective of imprinted genes. This review demonstrates the utility of POCT, not only for explaining what is known about conflict within families but also for generating novel hypotheses, suggesting new lines of research, and moving us toward the "big picture" by integrating across biological and psychological domains of knowledge.

  15. Assessing and comparison of different machine learning methods in parent-offspring trios for genotype imputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhchi, Abbas; Honarvar, Mahmood; Kashan, Nasser Emam Jomeh; Aminafshar, Mehdi

    2016-06-21

    Genotype imputation is an important tool for prediction of unknown genotypes for both unrelated individuals and parent-offspring trios. Several imputation methods are available and can either employ universal machine learning methods, or deploy algorithms dedicated to infer missing genotypes. In this research the performance of eight machine learning methods: Support Vector Machine, K-Nearest Neighbors, Extreme Learning Machine, Radial Basis Function, Random Forest, AdaBoost, LogitBoost, and TotalBoost compared in terms of the imputation accuracy, computation time and the factors affecting imputation accuracy. The methods employed using real and simulated datasets to impute the un-typed SNPs in parent-offspring trios. The tested methods show that imputation of parent-offspring trios can be accurate. The Random Forest and Support Vector Machine were more accurate than the other machine learning methods. The TotalBoost performed slightly worse than the other methods.The running times were different between methods. The ELM was always most fast algorithm. In case of increasing the sample size, the RBF requires long imputation time.The tested methods in this research can be an alternative for imputation of un-typed SNPs in low missing rate of data. However, it is recommended that other machine learning methods to be used for imputation.

  16. Parent-offspring conflict and the persistence of pregnancy-induced hypertension in modern humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgitte Hollegaard

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia is a major cause of perinatal mortality and disease affecting 5-10% of all pregnancies worldwide, but its etiology remains poorly understood despite considerable research effort. Parent-offspring conflict theory suggests that such hypertensive disorders of pregnancy may have evolved through the ability of fetal genes to increase maternal blood pressure as this enhances general nutrient supply. However, such mechanisms for inducing hypertension in pregnancy would need to incur sufficient offspring health benefits to compensate for the obvious risks for maternal and fetal health towards the end of pregnancy in order to explain why these disorders have not been removed by natural selection in our hunter-gatherer ancestors. We analyzed >750,000 live births in the Danish National Patient Registry and all registered medical diagnoses for up to 30 years after birth. We show that offspring exposed to pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH in trimester 1 had significantly reduced overall later-life disease risks, but increased risks when PIH exposure started or developed as preeclampsia in later trimesters. Similar patterns were found for first-year mortality. These results suggest that early PIH leading to improved postpartum survival and health represents a balanced compromise between the reproductive interests of parents and offspring, whereas later onset of PIH may reflect an unbalanced parent-offspring conflict at the detriment of maternal and offspring health.

  17. Sex differences in razorbill (Family: Alcidae) parent-offspring vocal recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insley, Stephen J.; Paredes Vela, Rosana; Jones, Ian L.

    2002-05-01

    In this study we examines how a pattern of parental care may result in a sex bias in vocal recognition. In Razorbills (Alca torda), both sexes provide parental care to their chicks while at the nest, after which the male is the sole caregiver for an additional period at sea. Selection pressure acting on recognition behavior is expected to be strongest during the time when males and chicks are together at sea, and as a result, parent-offspring recognition was predicted to be better developed in the male parent, that is, show a paternal bias. In order to test this hypothesis, vocal playback experiments were conducted on breeding Razorbills at the Gannet Islands, Labrador, 2001. The data provide clear evidence of mutual vocal recognition between the male parent and chick but not between the female parent and chick, supporting the hypothesis that parent-offspring recognition is male biased in this species. In addition to acoustic recognition, such a bias could have important social implications for a variety of behavioral and basic life history traits such as cooperation and sex-biased dispersal.

  18. Parent-offspring conflict and the persistence of pregnancy-induced hypertension in modern humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartsteen, Birgitte Hollegaard; Byars, Sean Geoffrey; Lykke, Jacob;

    2013-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a major cause of perinatal mortality and disease affecting 5-10% of all pregnancies worldwide, but its etiology remains poorly understood despite considerable research effort. Parent-offspring conflict theory suggests that such hypertensive disorders of pregnancy may have evolved...... through the ability of fetal genes to increase maternal blood pressure as this enhances general nutrient supply. However, such mechanisms for inducing hypertension in pregnancy would need to incur sufficient offspring health benefits to compensate for the obvious risks for maternal and fetal health...... that offspring exposed to pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) in trimester 1 had significantly reduced overall later-life disease risks, but increased risks when PIH exposure started or developed as preeclampsia in later trimesters. Similar patterns were found for first-year mortality. These results suggest...

  19. Evolution of learning and levels of selection: a lesson from avian parent-offspring communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotem, Arnon; Biran-Yoeli, Inbar

    2014-02-01

    In recent years, it has become increasingly clear that the evolution of behavior may be better understood as the evolution of the learning mechanisms that produce it, and that such mechanisms should be modeled and tested explicitly. However, this approach, which has recently been applied to animal foraging and decision-making, has rarely been applied to the social and communicative behaviors that are likely to operate in complex social environments and be subject to multi-level selection. Here we use genetic, agent-based evolutionary simulations to explore how learning mechanisms may evolve to adjust the level of nestling begging (offspring signaling of need), and to examine the possible consequences of this process for parent-offspring conflict and communication. In doing so, we also provide the first step-by-step dynamic model of parent-offspring communication. The results confirm several previous theoretical predictions and demonstrate three novel phenomena. First, negatively frequency-dependent group-level selection can generate a stable polymorphism of learning strategies and parental responses. Second, while conventional reinforcement learning models fail to cope successfully with family dynamics at the nest, a newly developed learning model (incorporating behaviors that are consistent with recent experimental results on learning in nestling begging) produced effective learning, which evolved successfully. Third, while kin-selection affects the frequency of the different learning genes, its impact on begging slope and intensity was unexpectedly negligible, demonstrating that evolution is a complex process, and showing that the effect of kin-selection on behaviors that are shaped by learning may not be predicted by simple application of Hamilton's rule.

  20. Parent-offspring conflict theory, signaling of need, and weight gain in early life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Jonathan C

    2003-06-01

    Human growth in early life has major implications for fitness. During this period, the mother regulates the growth of her offspring through placental nutrition and lactation. However, parent-offspring conflict theory predicts that offspring are selected to demand more resources than the mother is selected to provide. This general issue has prompted the development of begging theory, which attempts to find the optimal levels of offspring demand and parental provisioning. Several models have been proposed to account for begging behavior, whether by biochemical or behavioral pathways, including: (1) blackmail of parents; (2) scramble competition between multiple offspring; (3) honest signaling of nutritional need; and (4) honest signaling of offspring worth. These models are all supported by data from nonhuman animals, with species varying according to which model is relevant. This paper examines the evidence that human suckling and crying signal nutritional demand, need, and worth to the mother. While suckling provides hormonal stimulation of breast milk production and signals hunger, crying fulfills a different role, with evidence suggesting that it signals both worth and need for resources (nutrition and thermoregulation). The role of signaling in nutritional demand is examined in the context of three common health problems that have traditionally been assumed to have physiological rather than behavioral causes: excess weight gain, failure to thrive, and colic. The value of such an evolutionary approach lies in its potential to enhance behavioral management of these conditions.

  1. The biological evolution of conscience – from parent-offspring conflict to morality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voland Eckart

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, two theories regarding the biological evolution of morality with conscience as its central regulatory agency are compared and contrasted. One theory (“navigator theory” interprets conscience as a strategically operating agency for the optimum balance between selfish and altruistic behavioral tendencies to maximize gains in cooperation in view of social complexity. From this standpoint, conscience serves the evolved self-interest of the person having a conscience. In contrast hereto, the second theory (“helper theory” locates the evolutionary origins of conscience on the battlefield of the parent- offspring conflict through intrafamilial demands for altruism. Functions of conscience, and thus human morality in a narrower sense, evolved during the transition of hominines to cooperative breeding and the novel helper conflict emerging through this evolution. The “helper theory” of the evolution of conscience can resolve some of the theoretical and empirical inconsistencies of the conventional “navigator theory”, in particular, the contradiction between the consequentialistic regulation of altruistic behavior and the non-consequentialistic nature of the judgment of conscience. And in contrast to the “navigator theory”, it is compatible with the observation that behavior guided by a conscience is not infrequently disastrous for one’s own fitness outcome.

  2. Selfish mothers? An empirical test of parent-offspring conflict over extended parental care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Manabi; Sen Majumder, Sreejani; Bhadra, Anindita

    2014-03-01

    Parent-offspring conflict (POC) theory is an interesting conceptual framework for understanding the dynamics of parental care. However, this theory is not easy to test empirically, as exact measures of parental investment in an experimental set-up are difficult to obtain. We have used free-ranging dogs Canis familiaris in India, to study POC in the context of extended parental care. We observed females and their pups in their natural habitat for the mother's tendency to share food given by humans with her pups in the weaning and post-weaning stages. Since these dogs are scavengers, and depend largely on human provided food for their sustenance, voluntary sharing of food by the mother with her pups is a good surrogate for extended parental care. Our behavioural observations convincingly demonstrate an increase of conflict and decrease of cooperation by the mother with her offspring over given food within a span of 4-6 weeks. We also demonstrate that the competition among the pups in a litter scales with litter size, an indicator of sib-sib competition.

  3. Fidelity of parent-offspring transmission and the evolution of social behavior in structured populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Débarre, F

    2017-02-28

    The theoretical investigation of how spatial structure affects the evolution of social behavior has mostly been done under the assumption that parent-offspring strategy transmission is perfect, i.e., for genetically transmitted traits, that mutation is very weak or absent. Here, we investigate the evolution of social behavior in structured populations under arbitrary mutation probabilities. We consider populations of fixed size N, structured such that in the absence of selection, all individuals have the same probability of reproducing or dying (neutral reproductive values are the all same). Two types of individuals, A and B, corresponding to two types of social behavior, are competing; the fidelity of strategy transmission from parent to offspring is tuned by a parameter μ. Social interactions have a direct effect on individual fecundities. Under the assumption of small phenotypic differences (implying weak selection), we provide a formula for the expected frequency of type A individuals in the population, and deduce conditions for the long-term success of one strategy against another. We then illustrate our results with three common life-cycles (Wright-Fisher, Moran Birth-Death and Moran Death-Birth), and specific population structures (graph-structured populations). Qualitatively, we find that some life-cycles (Moran Birth-Death, Wright-Fisher) prevent the evolution of altruistic behavior, confirming previous results obtained with perfect strategy transmission. We also show that computing the expected frequency of altruists on a regular graph may require knowing more than just the graph's size and degree.

  4. Parent-offspring transmission of adipocytokine levels and their associations with metabolic traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasser M Al-Daghri

    Full Text Available Adipose tissue secreted cytokines (adipocytokines have significant effects on the physiology and pathology of human metabolism relevant to diabetes and cardiovascular disease. We determined the relationship of the pattern of these circulating hormones with obesity-related phenotypes and whether such pattern is transmitted from parent to offspring. A combined total of 403 individuals from 156 consenting Saudi families divided into initial (119 families with 123 adults and 131 children and replication (37 families with 58 adults and 91 children cohorts were randomly selected from the RIYADH Cohort study. Anthropometrics were evaluated and metabolic measures such as fasting serum glucose, lipid profiles, insulin, leptin, adiponectin, resistin, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα, activated plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (aPAI1, high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP and angiotensin II were also assessed. Parent-offspring regressions revealed that with the exception of hsCRP, all hormones measured showed evidence for significant inheritance. Principal component (PC analysis of standardized hormone levels demonstrated surprising heritability of the three most common axes of variation. PC1, which explained 21% of the variation, was most strongly loaded on levels of leptin, TNFα, insulin, and aPAI1, and inversely with adiponectin. It was significantly associated with body mass index (BMI and phenotypically stronger in children, and showed a heritability of ∼50%, after adjustment for age, gender and generational effects. We conclude that adipocytokines are highly heritable and their pattern of co-variation significantly influences BMI as early as the pre-teen years. Investigation at the genomic scale is required to determine the variants affecting the regulation of the hormones studied.

  5. Exploring the developmental overnutrition hypothesis using parental-offspring associations and FTO as an instrumental variable.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debbie A Lawlor

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The developmental overnutrition hypothesis suggests that greater maternal obesity during pregnancy results in increased offspring adiposity in later life. If true, this would result in the obesity epidemic progressing across generations irrespective of environmental or genetic changes. It is therefore important to robustly test this hypothesis. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We explored this hypothesis by comparing the associations of maternal and paternal pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI with offspring dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA-determined fat mass measured at 9 to 11 y (4,091 parent-offspring trios and by using maternal FTO genotype, controlling for offspring FTO genotype, as an instrument for maternal adiposity. Both maternal and paternal BMI were positively associated with offspring fat mass, but the maternal association effect size was larger than that in the paternal association in all models: mean difference in offspring sex- and age-standardised fat mass z-score per 1 standard deviation BMI 0.24 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.22 to 0.26 for maternal BMI versus 0.13 (95% CI: 0.11, 0.15 for paternal BMI; p-value for difference in effect < 0.001. The stronger maternal association was robust to sensitivity analyses assuming levels of non-paternity up to 20%. When maternal FTO, controlling for offspring FTO, was used as an instrument for the effect of maternal adiposity, the mean difference in offspring fat mass z-score per 1 standard deviation maternal BMI was -0.08 (95% CI: -0.56 to 0.41, with no strong statistical evidence that this differed from the observational ordinary least squares analyses (p = 0.17. CONCLUSIONS: Neither our parental comparisons nor the use of FTO genotype as an instrumental variable, suggest that greater maternal BMI during offspring development has a marked effect on offspring fat mass at age 9-11 y. Developmental overnutrition related to greater maternal BMI is unlikely to have driven the recent

  6. Should I stay or should I go? Fitness costs and benefits of prolonged parent-offspring and sibling-sibling associations in an Arctic-nesting goose population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weegman, Mitch D; Bearhop, Stuart; Hilton, Geoff M; Walsh, Alyn J; Weegman, Kaitlin M; Hodgson, David J; Fox, Anthony David

    2016-07-01

    Theory predicts persistence of long-term family relationships in vertebrates will occur until perceived fitness costs exceed benefits to either parents or offspring. We examined whether increased breeding probability and survival were associated with prolonged parent-offspring and sibling-sibling relationships in a long-lived Arctic migrant herbivore, the Greenland white-fronted goose (Anser albifrons flavirostris). Although offspring associated with parents for 1-13 years, 79 % of these associations lasted two or less years. Only 65 (9.9 %) of the 656 marked offspring bred once in their lifetime, and just 16 (2.4 %) bred twice or more. The probability of birds with siblings breeding successfully in a subsequent year was credibly greater than that of independent birds at ages 5, 6, and 7. Survival of offspring with parents was credibly greater than that of independent/nonbreeder birds at all possible ages (i.e., ages 2-7+). A cost-benefit matrix model utilizing breeding and survival probabilities showed that staying with family groups was favored over leaving until age 3, after which there were no credible differences between staying and leaving strategies until the oldest ages, when leaving family groups was favored. Thus, most birds in this study either departed family groups early (e.g., at age 2, when the "stay" strategy was favored) or as predicted by our cost-benefit model (i.e., at age 3). Although extended family associations are a feature of this population, we contend that the survival benefits are not sufficient enough to yield clear fitness benefits, and associations only persist because parents and offspring mutually benefit from their persistence.

  7. Co-adaptability solution to conflict events in construction projects by segmented hierarchical algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU XueLiang; LU Mei

    2008-01-01

    In order to seek the co-adaptability solution to conflict events in construction en-gineering projects,a new method referred to as segmented hierarchical algorithm is proposed in this paper by means of comparing co-adaptability evolution process of conflict events to the stackelberg model.By this new algorithm,local solutions to the first-order transformation of co-adaptability for conflict events can be ob-tained,based upon which,a global solution to the second-order transformation of co-adaptability for conflict events can also be decided by judging satisfaction de-gree of local solutions.The research results show that this algorithm can be used not only for obtaining co-adaptability solution to conflict events efficiently,but also for other general decision-making problems with multi-layers and multi-subsidi-aries in project management field.

  8. Co-adaptability solution to conflict events in construction projects by segmented hierarchical algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In order to seek the co-adaptability solution to conflict events in construction engineering projects, a new method referred to as segmented hierarchical algorithm is proposed in this paper by means of comparing co-adaptability evolution process of conflict events to the stackelberg model. By this new algorithm, local solutions to the first-order transformation of co-adaptability for conflict events can be obtained, based upon which, a global solution to the second-order transformation of co-adaptability for conflict events can also be decided by judging satisfaction degree of local solutions. The research results show that this algorithm can be used not only for obtaining co-adaptability solution to conflict events efficiently, but also for other general decision-making problems with multi-layers and multi-subsidi-aries in project management field.

  9. Co-adaptation between modern oasis urbanization and water resources exploitation: A case of Urumqi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Hongru; ZHANG Xiaolei; WANG Bin

    2006-01-01

    Water resources exploitation is always very important during the whole oasis urbanization in arid zone, adapting with urban development in between contradiction and coordination. Taking Urumqi City as a case, co-adaptation of water exploitation and urban growth is imitated by interactions between water supply and oasis city's expands on population,economy and environment. In different urbanization stages, the co-adaptation can be represented differently, which can be summarized by five phases:elementary coordination, expanding coordination,expanding contradiction, adapting contradiction, and adapting coordination. Cost of water consumption,proportion of water use and efficiency are the main influence factors to help the co-adaptation.

  10. GABAB antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydenvang, Karla Andrea; Hansen, J J; Krogsgaard-Larsen, P

    1994-01-01

    Phaclofen, which is the phosphonic acid analogue of the GABAB agonist (RS)-3-(4-chlorophenyl)-4-aminobutyric acid (baclofen), is a GABAB antagonist. As part of our studies on the structural requirements for activation and blockade of GABAB receptors, we have resolved phaclofen using chiral chroma...

  11. A co-adaptive brain-computer interface for end users with severe motor impairment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Faller

    Full Text Available Co-adaptive training paradigms for event-related desynchronization (ERD based brain-computer interfaces (BCI have proven effective for healthy users. As of yet, it is not clear whether co-adaptive training paradigms can also benefit users with severe motor impairment. The primary goal of our paper was to evaluate a novel cue-guided, co-adaptive BCI training paradigm with severely impaired volunteers. The co-adaptive BCI supports a non-control state, which is an important step toward intuitive, self-paced control. A secondary aim was to have the same participants operate a specifically designed self-paced BCI training paradigm based on the auto-calibrated classifier. The co-adaptive BCI analyzed the electroencephalogram from three bipolar derivations (C3, Cz, and C4 online, while the 22 end users alternately performed right hand movement imagery (MI, left hand MI and relax with eyes open (non-control state. After less than five minutes, the BCI auto-calibrated and proceeded to provide visual feedback for the MI task that could be classified better against the non-control state. The BCI continued to regularly recalibrate. In every calibration step, the system performed trial-based outlier rejection and trained a linear discriminant analysis classifier based on one auto-selected logarithmic band-power feature. In 24 minutes of training, the co-adaptive BCI worked significantly (p = 0.01 better than chance for 18 of 22 end users. The self-paced BCI training paradigm worked significantly (p = 0.01 better than chance in 11 of 20 end users. The presented co-adaptive BCI complements existing approaches in that it supports a non-control state, requires very little setup time, requires no BCI expert and works online based on only two electrodes. The preliminary results from the self-paced BCI paradigm compare favorably to previous studies and the collected data will allow to further improve self-paced BCI systems for disabled users.

  12. Interspecific Interactions and the Scope for Parent-Offspring Conflict: High Mite Density Temporarily Changes the Trade-Off between Offspring Size and Number in the Burying Beetle, Nicrophorus vespilloides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ornela De Gasperin

    Full Text Available Parents have a limited amount of resources to invest in reproduction and commonly trade-off how much they invest in offspring size (or quality versus brood size. A negative relationship between offspring size and number has been shown in numerous taxa and it underpins evolutionary conflicts of interest between parents and their young. For example, previous work on vertebrates shows that selection favours mothers that produce more offspring, at the expense of individual offspring size, yet favours offspring that have relatively few siblings and therefore attain a greater size at independence. Here we analyse how this trade-off is temporarily affected by stochastic variation in the intensity of interspecific interactions. We examined the effect of the mite Poecilochirus carabi on the relationship between offspring size and number in the burying beetle, Nicrophorus vespilloides. We manipulated the initial number of mites in the reproductive event (by introducing either no mites, 4 mites, 10 mites, or 16 mites, and assessed the effect on the brood. We found a similar trade-off between offspring size and number in all treatments, except in the '16 mite' treatment where the correlation between offspring number and size flattened considerably. This effect arose because larvae in small broods failed to attain a high mass by dispersal. Our results show that variation in the intensity of interspecific interactions can temporarily change the strength of the trade-off between offspring size and number. In this study, high densities of mites prevented individual offspring from attaining their optimal weight, thus potentially temporarily biasing the outcome of parent-offspring conflict in favour of parents.

  13. Parent-offspring conflict in mate preferences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buunk, Abraham P.; Park, Justin H.; Dubbs, Shelli L.

    2008-01-01

    Prevailing evolutionary approaches to human mating have largely ignored the fact that mating decisions are heavily influenced by parents and other kin. This is significant because parents and children often have conflicting mate preferences. We provide a brief review of how parents have influenced t

  14. Competitiveness and the process of co-adaptation in team sport performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Passos

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available An evolutionary psycho-biological perspective on competitiveness dynamics is presented, focusing on continuous behavioral co-adaptations to constraints that arise in performance environments. We suggest that an athlete's behavioral dynamics are constrained by circumstances of competing for the availability of resources, which once obtained offer possibilities for performance success. This defines the influence of the athlete-environment relationship on competitiveness. Constraining factors in performance include proximity to target areas in team sports and the number of other competitors in a location. By pushing the athlete beyond existing limits, competitiveness enhances opportunities for co-adaptation, innovation and creativity, which can lead individuals towards different performance solutions to achieve the same performance goal. Underpinned by an ecological dynamics framework we examine whether competitiveness is a crucial feature to succeed in team sports. Our focus is on intra-team competitiveness, concerning the capacity of individuals within a team to become perceptually attuned to affordances in a given performance context which can increase their likelihood of success. This conceptualization implies a re-consideration of the concept of competitiveness, not as an inherited trait or entity to be acquired, but rather theorizing it as a functional performer-environment relationship that needs to be explored, developed, enhanced and maintained in team games training programs.

  15. Competitiveness and the Process of Co-adaptation in Team Sport Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passos, Pedro; Araújo, Duarte; Davids, Keith

    2016-01-01

    An evolutionary psycho-biological perspective on competitiveness dynamics is presented, focusing on continuous behavioral co-adaptations to constraints that arise in performance environments. We suggest that an athlete’s behavioral dynamics are constrained by circumstances of competing for the availability of resources, which once obtained offer possibilities for performance success. This defines the influence of the athlete-environment relationship on competitiveness. Constraining factors in performance include proximity to target areas in team sports and the number of other competitors in a location. By pushing the athlete beyond existing limits, competitiveness enhances opportunities for co-adaptation, innovation and creativity, which can lead individuals toward different performance solutions to achieve the same performance goal. Underpinned by an ecological dynamics framework we examine whether competitiveness is a crucial feature to succeed in team sports. Our focus is on intra-team competitiveness, concerning the capacity of individuals within a team to become perceptually attuned to affordances in a given performance context which can increase their likelihood of success. This conceptualization implies a re-consideration of the concept of competitiveness, not as an inherited trait or entity to be acquired, but rather theorizing it as a functional performer-environment relationship that needs to be explored, developed, enhanced and maintained in team games training programs. PMID:27777565

  16. Reduced analysis and confirmatory research on co-adaptability theoretical solution to conflicting events in construction engineering projects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The co-adaptability theoretical solution to conflicting events in construction engineering projects has three problems. First, the transformation of constraint conditions of theoretical solution is very difficult in practical engineering applications; second, some coefficients are difficult to be determined; third, there are overfull circular arithmetic operations involved in it. To resolve these problems, a new method to reduce the theoretical solution complications is proposed. By analyzing the operating mechanism of theoretical solution model, redundancies in the theoretical solution can be eliminated, and the ISM mapping with the co-adaptability solution can be set up. Based on this approach, a procedure to solve practical conflicting events in construction projects is established by replacing characteristic variables with mathematic variables. The research results show that the procedure can replace the co-adaptability theoretical solution effectively and solve practical conflicting events in construction projects.

  17. The co-adaptive neural network approach to the Euclidean Travelling Salesman Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, E M; Beasley, J E

    2003-12-01

    In this paper we consider the Euclidean Travelling Salesman Problem (ETSP). This is the problem of finding the shortest tour around a number of cities where the cities correspond to points in the Euclidean plane and the distances between cities are given by the usual Euclidean distance metric. We present a review of the literature with respect to neural network (NN) approaches for the ETSP, and the computational results that have been reported. Based upon this review we highlight two areas that are, in our judgement, currently neglected/lacking in the literature. These are: failure to make significant use of publicly available ETSP test problems in computational work, failure to address co-operation between neurons. Drawing upon our literature survey this paper presents a new Self-Organising NN approach, called the Co-Adaptive Net, which involves not just unsupervised learning to train neurons, but also allows neurons to co-operate and compete amongst themselves depending on their situation. Our Co-Adaptive Net algorithm also includes a number of algorithmic mechanisms that, based upon our literature review, we consider to have contributed to the computational success of previous algorithms. Results for 91 publicly available standard ETSP's are presented in this paper. The largest of these problems involves 85,900 cities. This paper presents: the most extensive computational evaluation of any NN approach on publicly available ETSP test problems that has been made to date in the literature, a NN approach that performs better, with respect to solution quality and/or computation time, than other NN approaches given previously in the literature. Drawing upon computational results produced as a result of the DIMACS TSP Challenge, we highlight the fact that none of the current NN approaches for the ETSP can compete with state of the art Operations Research heuristics. We discuss why we consider continuing to study and develop NN approaches for the ETSP to be of value.

  18. [Co-adaptation between mites (Arachnida: Klinckowstroemiidae) and Passalidae beetles (Insecta: Coleoptera)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas-Guzmán, Gabriel A; Francke, Oscar F; Pérez, Tila M; Reyes-Castillo, Pedro

    2012-06-01

    Mites of the family Klinckowstroemiidae establish an association with beetles of the family Passalidae known as phoresy. In order to obtain information about this association, we analyzed the relationship between mites of the family Klinckowstroemiidae and beetles of the family Passalidae, as adult mites have been exclusively collected from host beetles. We examined 1 150 beetles collected in seven states of the Mexican Republic, and found 19 species of klinckowstroemiid mites associated with 168 passalids, that belong to 28 different species in 15 genera. Host specificity between species of both groups does not exist, as one species of passalid beetle can have several different symbionts; conversely, a given mite species can associate with passalid beetles of different species and even of different genera. This way, Odontotaenius zodiacus has been found associated with mites of seven species of the genus Klinckowstroemia. Besides, Klinckowstroemia valdezi is associated with five species of passalids. Furthermore, two and even three different species of mites have been found on one host beetle (synhospitality). The lack of congruence between the phylogenies of the mites and that of the beetles indicates that a process of co-adaptation by colonization is going on, because the association is due to the resources that passalid beetles can offer to the mites, like transportation, food and refuge. Since these resources are not host-specific, the klinckowstroemiid mites can climb onto virtually any species of passalid beetles occurring on the same habitat.

  19. 父母-子女人格相似性对教养行为与青少年抑郁关系的调节作用%Moderating Effect of Parent-offspring Similarity in Personality on Relationship Between Parenting Behavior and Adolescent Depression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈韧; 郭菲; 陈祉妍

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the moderating effect of parent-offspring similarity in personality on the relationship between parenting behavior and adolescent depression. Methods: The cross-sectional data of 4474 adolescents aged 11 -22 of the National Survey of Adolescent Mental Health in China (2009) was used. Parents and children reported their own personalities. Parenting behaviors were reported by parents and adolescent depressions were reported by adolescents. Results: For neuroticism, the interaction between father-offspring similarity and three types of parenting behavior was significant respectively; while, for extraversion, the interaction between mother-offspring similarity and inductive reasoning was significant; for neuroticism, the interaction between mother-offspring similarity and three types of parenting behavior was significant respectively; for psychoticism, the interaction between mother-offspring similarity and monitoring was significant Conclusion: Parent-offspring similarity in personality significantly moderated the relationship between parenting behavior and adolescent depression.%目的:考查父母-子女人格相似性对教养行为与青少年抑郁关系的调节作用.方法:采用中国科学院心理研究所全国青少年心理健康数据库中2009年的横断数据,对其中4474名11岁到22岁的在校学生数据进行分析.父母和子女人格均为自评,教养行为采用父母自评,抑郁由青少年自评.结果:父亲-子女在神经质维度上的相似性与父亲各项教养行为的交互作用均显著;母亲-子女在外向性维度上的相似性与母亲说理的交互作用显著,母亲-子女在神经质维度上的相似性与母亲各项教养行为的交互作用均显著,母亲-子女在精神质维度上的相似性与母亲监控交互作用显著.结论:父母-子女人格相似性对教养行为与青少年抑郁的关系具有显著的调节作用.

  20. Opioid Antagonist Impedes Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merluzzi, Thomas V.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Thirty spider-phobic adults underwent exposure to 17 phobic-related, graded performance tests. Fifteen subjects were assigned to naltrexone, an opioid antagonist, and 15 were assigned to placebo. Naltrexone had a significant effect on exposure, with naltrexone subjects taking significantly longer to complete first 10 steps of exposure and with…

  1. Food quality assessment in parent-offspring dyads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech-Larsen, Tino; Jensen, Birger Boutrup

    When the buyer and the consumer of a food product are not identical, the risk of discrepancies between food quality expectations and experiences is even higher. We introduce the concept of dyadic quality assessment and apply it to an exploration of parents' willingness to pay for new and healthier...... in-between meals for their children. Results show poor congruence between parent and child quality assessment due to the two parties emphasising quite different quality aspects. Improved parental knowledge of their children's quality experience however has a significant effect on parents' willingness...... to pay. Accordingly, both parents and children should be involved when developing and testing healthy in-between meals....

  2. The evolution of parent-offspring conflict over mate choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Pieter; Fawcett, Tim W.; Buunk, Abraham P.; Weissing, Franz J.

    2013-01-01

    In human societies, parents often have a strong influence on the mate choice of their offspring. Moreover, empirical studies show that conflict over mate choice between parents and offspring is widespread across human cultures. Here we provide the first theoretical investigation into this conflict,

  3. Sexual conflict between parents: offspring desertion and asymmetrical parental care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Székely, Tamás

    2014-09-25

    Parental care is an immensely variable social behavior, and sexual conflict offers a powerful paradigm to understand this diversity. Conflict over care (usually considered as a type of postzygotic sexual conflict) is common, because the evolutionary interests of male and female parents are rarely identical. I investigate how sexual conflict over care may facilitate the emergence and maintenance of diverse parenting strategies and argue that researchers should combine two fundamental concepts in social behavior to understand care patterns: cooperation and conflict. Behavioral evidence of conflict over care is well established, studies have estimated specific fitness implications of conflict for males or females, and experiments have investigated specific components of conflict. However, studies are long overdue to reveal the full implications of conflict for both males and females. Manipulating (or harming) the opposite sex seems less common in postzygotic conflicts than in prezygotic conflicts because by manipulating, coercing, or harming the opposite sex, the reproductive interest of the actor is also reduced. Parental care is a complex trait, although few studies have yet considered the implications of multidimensionality for parental conflict. Future research in parental conflict will benefit from understanding the behavioral interactions between male and female parents (e.g., negotiation, learning, and coercion), the genetic and neurogenomic bases of parental behavior, and the influence of social environment on parental strategies. Empirical studies are needed to put sexual conflict in a population context and reveal feedback between mate choice, pair bonds and parenting strategies, and their demographic consequences for the population such as mortalities and sex ratios. Taken together, sexual conflict offers a fascinating avenue for understanding the causes and consequences of parenting behavior, sex roles, and breeding system evolution.

  4. Tetrahydroindolizinone NK1 antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Jianming; Lu, Huagang; Morriello, Gregori J; Carlson, Emma J; Wheeldon, Alan; Chicchi, Gary G; Kurtz, Marc M; Tsao, Kwei-Lan C; Zheng, Song; Tong, Xinchun; Mills, Sander G; DeVita, Robert J

    2010-04-01

    A new class of potent NK(1) receptor antagonists with a tetrahydroindolizinone core has been identified. This series of compounds demonstrated improved functional activities as compared to previously identified 5,5-fused pyrrolidine lead structures. SAR at the 7-position of the tetrahydroindolizinone core is discussed in detail. A number of compounds displayed high NK(1) receptor occupancy at both 1 h and 24 h in a gerbil foot tapping model. Compound 40 has high NK(1) binding affinity, good selectivity for other NK receptors and promising in vivo properties. It also has clean P(450) inhibition and hPXR induction profiles.

  5. Synthesis of potential mescaline antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSantis, F; Nieforth, K A

    1976-10-01

    1-[2-(3,4,5-Trimethoxyphenyl)ethyl]-3-pyrroline, 2-(3,4,5-trimethoxybenzyl)-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine, N-n-propylmescaline, N-cyclopropylmethylmescaline, and N-allylmescaline were synthesized as potential mescaline antagonists. The ability of these compounds to antagonize mescaline-induced disruption of swim behavior is also given.

  6. Excitatory amino acid receptor antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, T N; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea; Ebert, B

    1997-01-01

    We have previously shown that (RS)-2-amino-2-(5-tert-butyl-3-hydroxyisoxazol-4-yl)acetic acid (ATAA) is an antagonist at N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) and (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazol-4-yl)propionic acid (AMPA) receptors. We have now resolved ATAA via diastereomeric salt formation......)-phenylethylamine salt of N-BOC-(R)-ATAA. Like ATAA, neither (R)- nor (S)-ATAA significantly affected (IC50 > 100 microM) the receptor binding of tritiated AMPA, kainic acid, or (RS)-3-(2-carboxypiperazin-4-yl)propyl-1-phosphonic acid, the latter being a competitive NMDA antagonist. Electrophysiological experiments......, using the rat cortical wedge preparation, showed the NMDA antagonist effect as well as the AMPA antagonist effect of ATAA to reside exclusively in the (R)-enantiomer (Ki = 75 +/- 5 microM and 57 +/- 1 microM, respectively). Neither (R)- nor (S)-ATAA significantly reduced kainic acid-induced excitation...

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF NEW LHRH ANTAGONISTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENGDun-Ren; XIAOShao-Bo

    1989-01-01

    An ideal antagonist of LHRH is one which can act on the pitutary to inhibit LHRH-stimulatod LH / FSH secretion by competitive occupying the LHRH receptor in the pitutary gland. Its action should be very specific, fast and highly effective, the durations

  8. Glutamate antagonists limit tumor growth

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    Neuronal progenitors and tumor cells possess propensity to proliferate and to migrate. Glutamate regulates proliferation and migration of neurons during development, but it is not known whether it influences proliferation and migration of tumor cells. We demonstrate that glutamate antagonists inhibit proliferation of human tumor cells. Colon adenocarcinoma, astrocytoma, and breast and lung carcinoma cells were most sensitive to the antiproliferative effect of the N...

  9. Muscarinic Receptor Agonists and Antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Kelly

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive review of pharmacological and medical aspects of the muscarinic class of acetylcholine agonists and antagonists is presented. The therapeutic benefits of achieving receptor subtype selectivity are outlined and applications in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease are discussed. A selection of chemical routes are described, which illustrate contemporary methodology for the synthesis of chiral medicinal compounds (asymmetric synthesis, chiral pool, enzymes. Routes to bicyclic intrannular amines and intramolecular Diels-Alder reactions are highlighted.

  10. New antagonist agents of neuropeptide y receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Aldana

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available In the CNS, NPY has been implicated in obesity and feeding, endocrine function and metabolism. Potent and selective rNPY antagonists will be able to probe the merits of this approach for the treatment of obesity. We report the synthesis and preliminary evaluation of some hydrazide derivatives as antagonists of rNPY.

  11. Antagonists of the kappa opioid receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbano, Mariangela; Guerrero, Miguel; Rosen, Hugh; Roberts, Edward

    2014-05-01

    The research community has increasingly focused on the development of OPRK antagonists as pharmacotherapies for the treatment of depression, anxiety, addictive disorders and other psychiatric conditions produced or exacerbated by stress. Short-acting OPRK antagonists have been recently developed as a potential improvement over long-acting prototypic ligands including nor-BNI and JDTic. Remarkably the short-acting LY2456302 is undergoing phase II clinical trials for the augmentation of the antidepressant therapy in treatment-resistant depression. This Letter reviews relevant chemical and pharmacological advances in the identification and development of OPRK antagonists.

  12. Antagonistic formation motion of cooperative agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢婉婷; 代明香; 薛方正

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates a new formation motion problem of a class of first-order multi-agent systems with antagonis-tic interactions. A distributed formation control algorithm is proposed for each agent to realize the antagonistic formation motion. A sufficient condition is derived to ensure that all agents make an antagonistic formation motion in a distributed manner. It is shown that all agents can be spontaneously divided into several groups, and agents in the same group collab-orate while agents in different groups compete. Finally, a numerical simulation is included to demonstrate our theoretical results.

  13. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists for hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, B; Gluud, L L; Gluud, C

    2004-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy may be associated with accumulation of substances that bind to a receptor-complex in the brain resulting in neural inhibition. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists may have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy.......Hepatic encephalopathy may be associated with accumulation of substances that bind to a receptor-complex in the brain resulting in neural inhibition. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists may have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy....

  14. Auxin-Oxylipin Crosstalk: Relationship of Antagonists

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maik Hoffmann; Mathias Hentrich; Stephan Pollmann

    2011-01-01

    Phytohormones regulate a wide array of developmental processes throughout the life cycle of plants. Herein, the various plant hormones may interact additively, synergistically, or antagonistically. By their cooperation they create a delicate regulatory network whose net output largely depends on the action of specific phytohormone combinations rather than on the independent activities of separate hormones. While most classical studies of plant hormonal control have focused mainly on the action of single hormones or on the synergistic interaction of hormones in regulating various developmental processes, recent work is beginning to shed light on the crosstalk of nominally antagonistic plant hormones, such as gibberellins and auxins with oxylipins or abscisic acid. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of how two of the first sight antagonistic plant hormones, i.e. auxins and oxylipins,interact in controlling plant responses and development.

  15. Genetic factors influencing pyrimidine-antagonist chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maring, JG; Groen, HJM; Wachters, FM; Uges, DRA; de Vries, EGE

    2005-01-01

    Pyrimidine antagonists, for example, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), cytarabine (ara-C) and gemcitabine (dFdC), are widely used in chemotherapy regimes for colorectal, breast, head and neck, non-small-cell lung cancer, pancreatic cancer and leukaemias. Extensive metabolism is a prerequisite for conversion of

  16. Why are mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists cardioprotective?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Chai (Wenxia); A.H.J. Danser (Jan)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractTwo clinical trials, the Randomized ALdosterone Evaluation Study (RALES) and the EPlerenone HEart failure and SUrvival Study (EPHESUS), have recently shown that mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists reduce mortality in patients with heart failure on top of ACE inhibition. This effe

  17. EFFECT OF ANGIOTENSIN II RECEPTOR ANTAGONIST AND ENDOTHELIN RECEPTOR ANTAGONIST ON NITROGLYCERIN TOLERANCE IN RATS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To investigate whether angiotensin II receptor antagonist and endothelin receptor antagonist can improve the nitroglycerin (Nit) tolerance in vivo. Methods. Twenty-four rats were divided into 4 groups (n=6,each): Control group, Nitroglycerin (Nit) group, Nit+ bosentan group and Nit+ losartan group. Nitroglycerin tolerance was induced by 2-day treatment of nitroglycerin patch (0.05 mg/h). AngiotensinⅡ receptor antagonist losartan ( 10 mg· kg- 1· d- 1 ) and endothelin receptor antagonist bosentan ( 100 mg· kg- 1· d- 1 ) were given by gavage for 2 days respectively. Results. The least hypotensive response to sodium nitroprusside (SNP) was observed in Nit group . The effective percentages of hypotensive response to SNP were increased in both Nit+ losartan group and Nit+ bosentan group compared with Nit group [(31.95± 4.45 ) % vs (21.00± 3.69 ) % , P Conclusion. Endothelin receptor antagonist and angiotensin Ⅱ receptor antagonist could prevent against the Nit tolerance .

  18. Young Children's Understanding of a Biological Basis for Parent-Offspring Relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Ken

    1996-01-01

    Results of two experiments indicated that preschoolers expected adopted babies to share physical properties, but not preferences with their biological parents; and recognized that a baby who looks like and lives with a woman but who grew inside another woman's body is not the first woman's baby. (BC)

  19. Parents Just Don't Understand : Parent-Offspring Conflict over Mate Choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubbs, Shelli L.; Buunk, Abraham P.

    2010-01-01

    Previous research reveals that children and parents are not in complete agreement over which traits are most important for the mate of the child. Children tend to prefer traits that suggest genetic quality, whereas parents prefer characteristics that suggest high parental investment and cooperation

  20. Mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid receptor antagonists in animal models of anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korte, SM; KorteBouws, GAH; Koob, GF; DeKloet, ER; Bohus, B

    1996-01-01

    The behavioral effects of intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of a specific mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist [RU28318 (10-50 ng/2 mu l)], a glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist [RU38486 (1-50 ng/2 mu l)], or both antagonists (50 ng/2 mu l), were studied in two different animal

  1. High affinity retinoic acid receptor antagonists: analogs of AGN 193109.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, A T; Wang, L; Gillett, S J; Chandraratna, R A

    1999-02-22

    A series of high affinity retinoic acid receptor (RAR) antagonists were prepared based upon the known antagonist AGN 193109 (2). Introduction of various phenyl groups revealed a preference for substitution at the para-position relative to the meta-site. Antagonists with the highest affinities for the RARs possessed hydrophobic groups, however, the presence of polar functionality was also well tolerated.

  2. Novel benzimidazole-based MCH R1 antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Andrew J; Al-Barazanji, Kamal A; Barvian, Kevin K; Bishop, Michael J; Britt, Christy S; Cooper, Joel P; Goetz, Aaron S; Grizzle, Mary K; Hertzog, Donald L; Ignar, Diane M; Morgan, Ronda O; Peckham, Gregory E; Speake, Jason D; Swain, Will R

    2006-10-01

    The identification of an MCH R1 antagonist screening hit led to the optimization of a class of benzimidazole-based MCH R1 antagonists. Structure-activity relationships and efforts to optimize pharmacokinetic properties are detailed along with the demonstration of the effectiveness of an MCH R1 antagonist in an animal model of obesity.

  3. [Cutaneous adverse effects of TNFalpha antagonists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Failla, V; Sabatiello, M; Lebas, E; de Schaetzen, V; Dezfoulian, B; Nikkels, A F

    2012-01-01

    The TNFalpha antagonists, including adalimumab, etanercept and infliximab, represent a class of anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive drugs. Although cutaneous adverse effects are uncommon, they are varied. There is no particular risk profile to develop cutaneous adverse effects. The principal acute side effects are injection site reactions and pruritus. The major long term cutaneous side effects are infectious and inflammatory conditions. Neoplastic skin diseases are exceptional. The association with other immunosuppressive agents can increase the risk of developing cutaneous adverse effects. Some adverse effects, such as lupus erythematosus, require immediate withdrawal of the biological treatment, while in other cases temporary withdrawal is sufficient. The majority of the other cutaneous adverse effects can be dealt without interrupting biologic treatment. Preclinical and clinical investigations revealed that the new biologics, aiming IL12/23, IL23 and IL17, present a similar profile of cutaneous adverse effects, although inflammatory skin reactions may be less often encountered compared to TNFalpha antagonists.

  4. Aminopyrimidine derivatives as adenosine antagonists / Janke Kleynhans

    OpenAIRE

    Kleynhans, Janke

    2013-01-01

    Aims of this project - The aim of this study was to design and synthesise novel 2-aminopyrimidine derivatives as potential adenosine A1 and A2A receptor antagonists. Background and rationale - Parkinson’s disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder (after Alzheimer’s disease) and is characterised by the selective death of the dopaminergic neurons of the nigro-striatal pathway. Distinctive motor symptoms include bradykinesia, muscle rigidity and tremor, while non-m...

  5. The Justification of Antagonistic Response to Wrongdoing

    OpenAIRE

    Goldman, David Michael

    2012-01-01

    There is a strong Western tradition of opposing angry, hostile, or antagonistic reactions to wrongdoing. In the twentieth century, leaders like Mahatma Gandhi and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. counseled responding to wrongdoing with forgiveness and love rather than anger, hate, or vindictiveness.This ideal has taken on an exalted status in Western culture. Gandhi and King are widely regarded as moral saints. And yet sometimes antagonism seems deeply appropriate. Consider a very serious wrong: s...

  6. From the Cover: Glutamate antagonists limit tumor growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzeski, Wojciech; Turski, Lechoslaw; Ikonomidou, Chrysanthy

    2001-05-01

    Neuronal progenitors and tumor cells possess propensity to proliferate and to migrate. Glutamate regulates proliferation and migration of neurons during development, but it is not known whether it influences proliferation and migration of tumor cells. We demonstrate that glutamate antagonists inhibit proliferation of human tumor cells. Colon adenocarcinoma, astrocytoma, and breast and lung carcinoma cells were most sensitive to the antiproliferative effect of the N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist dizocilpine, whereas breast and lung carcinoma, colon adenocarcinoma, and neuroblastoma cells responded most favorably to the -amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate antagonist GYKI52466. The antiproliferative effect of glutamate antagonists was Ca2+ dependent and resulted from decreased cell division and increased cell death. Morphological alterations induced by glutamate antagonists in tumor cells consisted of reduced membrane ruffling and pseudopodial protrusions. Furthermore, glutamate antagonists decreased motility and invasive growth of tumor cells. These findings suggest anticancer potential of glutamate antagonists.

  7. EFFECT OF ANGIOTENSIN II RECEPTOR ANTAGONIST AND ENDOTHELIN RECEPTOR ANTAGONIST ON NITROGLYCERIN TOLERANCE IN RATS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张建梅; 陈永红; 王晓红; 唐朝枢

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To investigate whether angiotensin II receptor antagonist and endothelin receptor antagonist can improve the nitroglycerin (Nit) tolerance in vivo. Methods. Twenty-four rats were divided into 4 groups (n =6, each): Control group, Nitroglycerin (Nit) group, Nit + bosentan group and Nit + losartan group. Nitroglycerin tolerance was induced by 2-day treatment ofnitroglycerin patch (0. 05mg/h). Angiotensin I1 receptor antagonist losartan (10mg ·kg-1·d-1) and endothe-lin receptor antagonist bosentan ( 100 mg·kg-1· d-1 ) were given by gavage for 2 days respectively. Results. The least hypotensive response to sodium nitroprusside (SNP) was observed in Nit group. The effec-tive percentages of hypotensive response to SNP were increased in both Nit + losartan group and Nit + bosentangroup compared with Nit group [(31.95±4.45) % vs (21.00±3.69) %, P <0.01and (33. 18±6. 16)% vs (21.00±3.69 ) %, P < 0. 01 , respectivelyl. The maximal vessel relaxation induced by SNP was thesame in 4 different groups but the highest EC50 (concentration which produces 50% of the maximal response toSNP) was found in tolerant group[ (34 ±10) nmol/L, P < 0. 01 ]. The ET-1 amounts in plasma and vasculartissue were markedly increased by 54% and 60% in Nit group compared with those in control group( P<0. 01). The ET-1 amounts in plasma and vascular tissue were decreased by 30% and 37% in Nit + losartangroup compared with those in Nit group ( P < 0.01 ). Conclusion. Endothelin receptor antagonist and angiotensin Ⅱ receptor antagonist could prevent against the Nit tolerance.

  8. GABAA receptor partial agonists and antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krall, Jacob; Balle, Thomas; Krogsgaard-Larsen, Niels;

    2015-01-01

    A high degree of structural heterogeneity of the GABAA receptors (GABAARs) has been revealed and is reflected in multiple receptor subtypes. The subunit composition of GABAAR subtypes is believed to determine their localization relative to the synapses and adapt their functional properties...... to the local temporal pattern of GABA impact, enabling phasic or tonic inhibition. Specific GABAAR antagonists are essential tools for physiological and pharmacological elucidation of the different type of GABAAR inhibition. However, distinct selectivity among the receptor subtypes (populations) has been shown...

  9. Antioxidant effects of calcium antagonists in rat brain homogenates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, K; Ina, Y; Nagashima, K; Ohmori, K; Ohno, T

    2000-06-01

    We studied the antioxidant activities of calcium antagonists against autoxidation in rat brain homogenates. The homogenates were incubated for 30 min at 37 degrees C with or without a calcium antagonist and subsequently assayed for lipid peroxide content. Percent inhibition of the lipid peroxidation was used as an index of the antioxidant effect. Dihydropyridine calcium antagonists exhibited concentration-dependent (3-300 micromol/l) inhibitory effects against lipid peroxidation. The relative order of antioxidant potency and associated IC50 values (micromol/l) of the calcium antagonists for inhibition of the lipid peroxidation were as follows: nifedipine (51.5)>barnidipine (58.6)>benidipine (71.2)>nicardipine (129.3)>amlodipine (135.5)>nilvadipine (167.3)>nitrendipine (252.1)> diltiazem (>300)=verapamil (>300). These results suggest that some dihydropyridine calcium antagonists show antioxidant properties. The antioxidant effects of the calcium antagonists may contribute to their pharmacological actions.

  10. Sexually antagonistic selection in human male homosexuality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Camperio Ciani

    Full Text Available Several lines of evidence indicate the existence of genetic factors influencing male homosexuality and bisexuality. In spite of its relatively low frequency, the stable permanence in all human populations of this apparently detrimental trait constitutes a puzzling 'Darwinian paradox'. Furthermore, several studies have pointed out relevant asymmetries in the distribution of both male homosexuality and of female fecundity in the parental lines of homosexual vs. heterosexual males. A number of hypotheses have attempted to give an evolutionary explanation for the long-standing persistence of this trait, and for its asymmetric distribution in family lines; however a satisfactory understanding of the population genetics of male homosexuality is lacking at present. We perform a systematic mathematical analysis of the propagation and equilibrium of the putative genetic factors for male homosexuality in the population, based on the selection equation for one or two diallelic loci and Bayesian statistics for pedigree investigation. We show that only the two-locus genetic model with at least one locus on the X chromosome, and in which gene expression is sexually antagonistic (increasing female fitness but decreasing male fitness, accounts for all known empirical data. Our results help clarify the basic evolutionary dynamics of male homosexuality, establishing this as a clearly ascertained sexually antagonistic human trait.

  11. Sexually antagonistic selection in human male homosexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camperio Ciani, Andrea; Cermelli, Paolo; Zanzotto, Giovanni

    2008-06-18

    Several lines of evidence indicate the existence of genetic factors influencing male homosexuality and bisexuality. In spite of its relatively low frequency, the stable permanence in all human populations of this apparently detrimental trait constitutes a puzzling 'Darwinian paradox'. Furthermore, several studies have pointed out relevant asymmetries in the distribution of both male homosexuality and of female fecundity in the parental lines of homosexual vs. heterosexual males. A number of hypotheses have attempted to give an evolutionary explanation for the long-standing persistence of this trait, and for its asymmetric distribution in family lines; however a satisfactory understanding of the population genetics of male homosexuality is lacking at present. We perform a systematic mathematical analysis of the propagation and equilibrium of the putative genetic factors for male homosexuality in the population, based on the selection equation for one or two diallelic loci and Bayesian statistics for pedigree investigation. We show that only the two-locus genetic model with at least one locus on the X chromosome, and in which gene expression is sexually antagonistic (increasing female fitness but decreasing male fitness), accounts for all known empirical data. Our results help clarify the basic evolutionary dynamics of male homosexuality, establishing this as a clearly ascertained sexually antagonistic human trait.

  12. Activins and activin antagonists in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alev Deli; Emanuel Kreidl; Stefan Santifaller; Barbara Trotter; Katja Seir; Walter Berger; Rolf Schulte-Hermann; Chantal Rodgarkia-Dara; Michael Grusch

    2008-01-01

    In many parts of the world hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is among the leading causes of cancer-related mortality but the underlying molecular pathology is still insufficiently understood. There is increasing evidence that activins, which are members of the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) superfamily of growth and differentiation factors, could play important roles in liver carcinogenesis. Activins are disulphide-linked homo-or heterodimers formed from four different β subunits termed βA, βB, βC, and βE, respectively. Activin A, the dimer of two βA subunits, is critically involved in the regulation of cell growth, apoptosis, and tissue architecture in the liver, while the hepatic function of other activins is largely unexplored so far. Negative regulators of activin signals include antagonists in the extracellular space like the binding proteins follistatin and FLRG, and at the cell membrane antagonistic co-receptors like Cripto or BAMBI. Additionally, in the intracellular space inhibitory Smads can modulate and control activin activity. Accumulating data suggest that deregulation of activin signals contributes to pathologic conditions such as chronic inflammation, fibrosis and development of cancer. The current article reviews the alterations in components of the activin signaling pathway that have been observed in HCC and discusses their potential significance for liver tumorigenesis.

  13. ETA-receptor antagonists or allosteric modulators?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Mey, Jo G R; Compeer, Matthijs G; Lemkens, Pieter

    2011-01-01

    The paracrine signaling peptide endothelin-1 (ET1) is involved in cardiovascular diseases, cancer and chronic pain. It acts on class A G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) but displays atypical pharmacology. It binds tightly to ET receptor type A (ET(A)) and causes long-lasting effects. In resista......The paracrine signaling peptide endothelin-1 (ET1) is involved in cardiovascular diseases, cancer and chronic pain. It acts on class A G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) but displays atypical pharmacology. It binds tightly to ET receptor type A (ET(A)) and causes long-lasting effects....... In resistance arteries, the long-lasting contractile effects can only be partly and reversibly relaxed by low-molecular-weight ET(A) antagonists (ERAs). However, the neuropeptide calcitonin-gene-related peptide selectively terminates binding of ET1 to ET(A). We propose that ET1 binds polyvalently to ET(A......) and that ERAs and the physiological antagonist allosterically reduce ET(A) functions. Combining the two-state model and the two-domain model of GPCR function and considering receptor activation beyond agonist binding might lead to better anti-endothelinergic drugs. Future studies could lead to compounds...

  14. Zebrafish phenotypic screen identifies novel Notch antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velaithan, Vithya; Okuda, Kazuhide Shaun; Ng, Mei Fong; Samat, Norazwana; Leong, Sze Wei; Faudzi, Siti Munirah Mohd; Abas, Faridah; Shaari, Khozirah; Cheong, Sok Ching; Tan, Pei Jean; Patel, Vyomesh

    2017-04-01

    Zebrafish represents a powerful in vivo model for phenotype-based drug discovery to identify clinically relevant small molecules. By utilizing this model, we evaluated natural product derived compounds that could potentially modulate Notch signaling that is important in both zebrafish embryogenesis and pathogenic in human cancers. A total of 234 compounds were screened using zebrafish embryos and 3 were identified to be conferring phenotypic alterations similar to embryos treated with known Notch inhibitors. Subsequent secondary screens using HEK293T cells overexpressing truncated Notch1 (HEK293TΔE) identified 2 compounds, EDD3 and 3H4MB, to be potential Notch antagonists. Both compounds reduced protein expression of NOTCH1, Notch intracellular domain (NICD) and hairy and enhancer of split-1 (HES1) in HEK293TΔE and downregulated Notch target genes. Importantly, EDD3 treatment of human oral cancer cell lines demonstrated reduction of Notch target proteins and genes. EDD3 also inhibited proliferation and induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest of ORL-150 cells through inducing p27(KIP1). Our data demonstrates the utility of the zebrafish phenotypic screen and identifying EDD3 as a promising Notch antagonist for further development as a novel therapeutic agent.

  15. Evaluation of H2 receptor antagonists in chronic idiopathic urticaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minocha Y

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available H1-antagonist (hydroxyzine hydrochloride in dosage of 10 mg-25 mg thrice a day failed to elicit satisfactory response in 60 out of 170 patients of chronic idiopathic urticaria. Additional administration of H2-antagonist (cimetidine in dosage of 200 mg four times a day, in patients not responding earlier to H1-antagonist alones exhibited moderate to good improvement of various parameters of urticaria in approximately 85% patients

  16. Causes of metabolic syndrome and obesity-related co-morbidities Part 1: A composite unifying theory review of human-specific co-adaptations to brain energy consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Anne-Thea

    2014-01-01

    The medical, research and general community is unable to effect significantly decreased rates of central obesity and related type II diabetes mellitus (TIIDM), cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cancer. All conditions seem to be linked by the concept of the metabolic syndrome (MetS), but the underlying causes are not known. MetS markers may have been mistaken for causes, thus many treatments are destined to be suboptimal. The current paper aims to critique current paradigms, give explanations for their persistence, and to return to first principles in an attempt to determine and clarify likely causes of MetS and obesity related comorbidities. A wide literature has been mined, study concepts analysed and the basics of human evolution and new biochemistry reviewed. A plausible, multifaceted composite unifying theory is formulated. The basis of the theory is that the proportionately large, energy-demanding human brain may have driven co-adaptive mechanisms to provide, or conserve, energy for the brain. A 'dual system' is proposed. 1) The enlarged, complex cortico-limbic-striatal system increases dietary energy by developing strong neural self-reward/motivation pathways for the acquisition of energy dense food, and (2) the nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) cellular protection system amplifies antioxidant, antitoxicant and repair activity by employing plant chemicals, becoming highly energy efficient in humans. The still-evolving, complex human cortico-limbic-striatal system generates strong behavioural drives for energy dense food procurement, including motivating agricultural technologies and social system development. Addiction to such foods, leading to neglect of nutritious but less appetizing 'common or garden' food, appears to have occurred. Insufficient consumption of food micronutrients prevents optimal human NRF2 function. Inefficient oxidation of excess energy forces central and non-adipose cells to store excess toxic lipid. Oxidative stress and

  17. Past and future corollaries of theories on causes of metabolic syndrome and obesity related co-morbidities part 2: a composite unifying theory review of human-specific co-adaptations to brain energy consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Anne-Thea

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) predicts type II diabetes mellitus (TIIDM), cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cancer, and their rates have escalated over the last few decades. Obesity related co-morbidities also overlap the concept of the metabolic syndrome (MetS). However, understanding of the syndrome's underlying causes may have been misapprehended. The current paper follows on from a theory review by McGill, A-T in Archives of Public Health, 72: 30. This accompanying paper utilises research on human evolution and new biochemistry to theorise on why MetS and obesity arise and how they affect the population. The basis of this composite unifying theory is that the proportionately large, energy-demanding human brain may have driven co-adaptive mechanisms to provide, or conserve, energy for the brain. A 'dual system' is proposed. 1) The enlarged, complex cortico-limbic-striatal system increases dietary energy by developing strong neural self-reward/motivation pathways for the acquisition of energy dense food, and (2) the nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) cellular protection system amplifies antioxidant, antitoxicant and repair activity by employing plant chemicals. In humans who consume a nutritious diet, the NRF2 system has become highly energy efficient. Other relevant human-specific co-adaptations are explored. In order to 'test' this composite unifying theory it is important to show that the hypothesis and sub-theories pertain throughout the whole of human evolution and history up till the current era. Corollaries of the composite unifying theory of MetS are examined with respect to past under-nutrition and malnutrition since agriculture began 10,000 years ago. The effects of man-made pollutants on degenerative change are examined. Projections are then made from current to future patterns on the state of 'insufficient micronutrient and/or unbalanced high energy malnutrition with central obesity and metabolic dysregulation' or 'malnubesity'. Forecasts

  18. Mutually-Antagonistic Interactions in Baseball Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Saavedra, Serguei; McCotter, Trent; Porter, Mason A; Mucha, Peter J

    2009-01-01

    We formulate the head-to-head matchups between Major League Baseball pitchers and batters from 1954 to 2008 as a bipartite network of mutually-antagonistic interactions. We consider both the full network and single-season networks, which exhibit interesting structural changes over time. We also find that these networks exhibit a significant network structure that is sensitive to baseball's rule changes. We then study a biased random walk on the matchup networks as a simple and transparent way to compare the performance of players who competed under different conditions. We find that a player's position in the network does not correlate with his success in the random walker ranking but instead has a substantial effect on its sensitivity to changes in his own aggregate performance.

  19. Mutually-antagonistic interactions in baseball networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra, Serguei; Powers, Scott; McCotter, Trent; Porter, Mason A.; Mucha, Peter J.

    2010-03-01

    We formulate the head-to-head matchups between Major League Baseball pitchers and batters from 1954 to 2008 as a bipartite network of mutually-antagonistic interactions. We consider both the full network and single-season networks, which exhibit structural changes over time. We find interesting structure in the networks and examine their sensitivity to baseball’s rule changes. We then study a biased random walk on the matchup networks as a simple and transparent way to (1) compare the performance of players who competed under different conditions and (2) include information about which particular players a given player has faced. We find that a player’s position in the network does not correlate with his placement in the random walker ranking. However, network position does have a substantial effect on the robustness of ranking placement to changes in head-to-head matchups.

  20. Antagonists of IAP proteins as cancer therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dynek, Jasmin N; Vucic, Domagoj

    2013-05-28

    Inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins play pivotal roles in cellular survival by blocking apoptosis, modulating signal transduction, and affecting cellular proliferation. Through their interactions with inducers and effectors of apoptosis IAP proteins can effectively suppress apoptosis triggered by diverse stimuli including death receptor signaling, irradiation, chemotherapeutic agents, or growth factor withdrawal. Evasion of apoptosis, in part due to the action of IAP proteins, enhances resistance of cancer cells to treatment with chemotherapeutic agents and contributes to tumor progression. Additionally, IAP genes are known to be subject to amplification, mutation, and chromosomal translocation in human malignancies and autoimmune diseases. In this review we will discuss the role of IAP proteins in cancer and the development of antagonists targeting IAP proteins for cancer treatment.

  1. The Attractiveness of Opposites: Agonists and Antagonists.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Brien, Tony

    2015-02-02

    ABSTRACT Opioid-induced bowel dysfunction, of which constipation is the most common aspect, is a major limiting factor in the use of opioids for pain management. The availability of an oral, long-acting formulation of oxycodone and naloxone represents a highly significant development in pain management. The combination of an opioid analgesic with an opioid antagonist offers reliable pain control with a significant reduction in the burden of opioid-induced constipation. This report is adapted from paineurope 2014; Issue 3, ©Haymarket Medical Publications Ltd, and is presented with permission. paineurope is provided as a service to pain management by Mundipharma International, LTD and is distributed free of charge to healthcare professionals in Europe. Archival issues can be accessed via the website: http:\\/\\/www.paineurope.com at which European health professionals can register online to receive copies of the quarterly publication.

  2. Antagonistic activity of marine sponges associated Actinobacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Selvakumar Dharmaraj; Dhevendaran Kandasamy

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To focus on the isolation and preliminary characterization of marine sponges associated Actinobacteria particularly Streptomyces species and also their antagonistic activities against bacterial and fungal pathogens. Methods: The sponges were collected from Kovalam and Vizhinjam port of south-west coast of Kerala, India. Isolation of strains was carried out from sponge extracts using international Streptomyces project media. For preliminary identification of the strains, morphological (mycelial colouration, soluble pigments, melanoid pigmentation, spore morphology), nutritional uptake (carbon utilisation, amonoacids influence, sodium chloride tolerance), physiological (pH, temperature) and chemotaxonomical characterization were done. Antimicrobial studies were also carried out for the selected strains. Results: With the help of the spicule structures, the collected marine sponges were identified as Callyspongia diffusa, Mycale mytilorum, Tedania anhelans and Dysidea fragilis. Nearly 94 strains were primarily isolated from these sponges and further they were sub-cultured using international Streptomyces project media. The strains exhibited different mycelial colouration (aerial and substrate), soluble and melanoid pigmentations. The strains possessed three types of sporophore morphology namely rectus flexibilis, spiral and retinaculiaperti. Among the 94 isolates, seven exhibited antibacterial and antifungal activities with maximal zone of inhibition of 30 mm. The nutritional, physiological and chemotaxonomical characteristic study helped in the conventional identification of the seven strains and they all suggest that the strains to be grouped under the genus Streptomyces. Conclusions: The present study clearly helps in the preliminary identification of the isolates associated with marine sponges. Antagonistic activities prove the production of antimicrobial metabolites against the pathogens. Marine sponges associated Streptomyces are universally well

  3. PARTIAL AGONISTS, FULL AGONISTS, ANTAGONISTS - DILEMMAS OF DEFINITION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HOYER, D; BODDEKE, HWGM

    1993-01-01

    The absence of selective antagonists makes receptor characterization difficult, and largely dependent on the use of agonists. However, there has been considerable debate as to whether certain drugs acting at G protein-coupled receptors are better described as agonists, partial agonists or antagonist

  4. Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone antagonists for assisted reproductive technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Inany, Hesham G.; Youssef, Mohamed A.; Ayeleke, Reuben Olugbenga; Brown, Julie; Lam, Wai Sun; Broekmans, Frank J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonists can be used to prevent a luteinizing hormone (LH) surge during controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) without the hypo-oestrogenic side-effects, flare-up, or long down-regulation period associated with agonists. The antagonists direct

  5. Antagonistic and Bargaining Games in Optimal Marketing Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipovetsky, S.

    2007-01-01

    Game theory approaches to find optimal marketing decisions are considered. Antagonistic games with and without complete information, and non-antagonistic games techniques are applied to paired comparison, ranking, or rating data for a firm and its competitors in the market. Mix strategy, equilibrium in bi-matrix games, bargaining models with…

  6. Optimisation of GnRH antagonist use in ART

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamdine, O.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the optimisation of controlled ovarian stimulation for IVF using exogenous FSH and GnRH antagonist co-treatment, by studying the timing of the initiation of GnRH antagonist co-medication and the role of ovarian reserve markers in optimising ovarian response and reproductive ou

  7. Fine Tuning of a Type 1 Interferon Antagonist.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Urin

    Full Text Available Type I interferons are multi-potent cytokines that serve as first line of defense against viruses and other pathogens, posses immunomudolatory functions and elicit a growth inhibitory response. In recent years it has been shown that interferons are also detrimental, for example in lupus, AIDS, tuberculosis and cognitive decline, highlighted the need to develop interferon antagonists. We have previously developed the antagonist IFN-1ant, with much reduced binding to the IFNAR1 receptor and enhanced binding to IFNAR2. Here, we further tune the IFN-1ant by producing three additional antagonists based on IFN-1ant but with altered activity profiles. We show that in all three cases the antiproliferative activity of interferons is blocked and the induction of gene transcription of immunomudolatory and antiproliferative associated genes are substantially decreased. Conversely, each of the new antagonists elicits a different degree of antiviral response, STAT phosphorylation and related gene induction. Two of the new antagonists promote decreased activity in relation to the original IFN-1ant, while one of them promotes increased activity. As we do not know the exact causes of the detrimental effects of IFNs, the four antagonists that were produced and analyzed provide the opportunity to investigate the extent of antagonistic and agonistic activity optimal for a given condition.

  8. Nalmefene: radioimmunoassay for a new opioid antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, R; Hsiao, J; Taaffe, W; Hahn, E; Tuttle, R

    1984-11-01

    A specific radioimmunoassay (RIA) has been developed for the quantitation of a new opioid antagonist, nalmefene, in human plasma. The method employs a rabbit antiserum to an albumin conjugate of naltrexone-6-(O-carboxymethyl)oxime and [3H]naltrexone as the radioligand. Assay specificity was achieved by extraction of nalmefene from plasma at pH 9 into ether prior to RIA. The procedure has a limit of sensitivity of 0.2 ng/mL of nalmefene using a 0.5-mL sample of plasma for analysis. The intra- and interassay coefficients of variation did not exceed 5.6 and 11%, respectively. The specificity of the RIA was established by demonstrating excellent agreement (r = 0.99) with a less sensitive and more time consuming HPLC procedure in the analysis of clinical plasma samples. The use of the RIA for the pharmacokinetic evaluation of nalmefene is illustrated with plasma concentration profiles of the drug in humans following intravenous and oral administration.

  9. Antagonistic Neural Networks Underlying Differentiated Leadership Roles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Eleftherios Boyatzis

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of two distinct leadership roles, the task leader and the socio-emotional leader, has been documented in the leadership literature since the 1950’s. Recent research in neuroscience suggests that the division between task oriented and socio-emotional oriented roles derives from a fundamental feature of our neurobiology: an antagonistic relationship between two large-scale cortical networks -- the Task Positive Network (TPN and the Default Mode Network (DMN. Neural activity in TPN tends to inhibit activity in the DMN, and vice versa. The TPN is important for problem solving, focusing of attention, making decisions, and control of action. The DMN plays a central role in emotional self-awareness, social cognition, and ethical decision making. It is also strongly linked to creativity and openness to new ideas. Because activation of the TPN tends to suppress activity in the DMN, an over-emphasis on task oriented leadership may prove deleterious to social and emotional aspects of leadership. Similarly, an overemphasis on the DMN would result in difficulty focusing attention, making decisions and solving known problems. In this paper, we will review major streams of theory and research on leadership roles in the context of recent findings from neuroscience and psychology. We conclude by suggesting that emerging research challenges the assumption that role differentiation is both natural and necessary, in particular when openness to new ideas, people, emotions, and ethical concerns are important to success.

  10. Multiple Targeting Approaches on Histamine H3 Receptor Antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanfar, Mohammad A; Affini, Anna; Lutsenko, Kiril; Nikolic, Katarina; Butini, Stefania; Stark, Holger

    2016-01-01

    With the very recent market approval of pitolisant (Wakix®), the interest in clinical applications of novel multifunctional histamine H3 receptor antagonists has clearly increased. Since histamine H3 receptor antagonists in clinical development have been tested for a variety of different indications, the combination of pharmacological properties in one molecule for improved pharmacological effects and reduced unwanted side-effects is rationally based on the increasing knowledge on the complex neurotransmitter regulations. The polypharmacological approaches on histamine H3 receptor antagonists on different G-protein coupled receptors, transporters, enzymes as well as on NO-signaling mechanism are described, supported with some lead structures.

  11. Multiple Targeting Approaches on Histamine H3 Receptor Antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad eKhanfar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available With the very recent market approval of pitolisant (Wakix®, the interest in clinical applications of novel multifunctional histamine H3 receptor antagonists has clearly increased. Since histamine H3 receptor antagonists in clinical development have been tested for a variety of different indications, the combination of pharmacological properties in one molecule for improved pharmacological effects and reduced unwanted side-effects is rationally based on the increasing knowledge on the complex neurotransmitter regulations. The polypharmacological approaches on histamine H3 receptor antagonists on different G-protein coupled receptors, transporters, enzymes as well as on NO-signaling mechanism are described, supported with some lead structures.

  12. Identification of a novel conformationally constrained glucagon receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Esther C Y; Tu, Meihua; Stevens, Benjamin D; Bian, Jianwei; Aspnes, Gary; Perreault, Christian; Sammons, Matthew F; Wright, Stephen W; Litchfield, John; Kalgutkar, Amit S; Sharma, Raman; Didiuk, Mary T; Ebner, David C; Filipski, Kevin J; Brown, Janice; Atkinson, Karen; Pfefferkorn, Jeffrey A; Guzman-Perez, Angel

    2014-02-01

    Identification of orally active, small molecule antagonists of the glucagon receptor represents a novel treatment paradigm for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The present work discloses novel glucagon receptor antagonists, identified via conformational constraint of current existing literature antagonists. Optimization of lipophilic ligand efficiency (LLE or LipE) culminated in enantiomers (+)-trans-26 and (-)-trans-27 which exhibit good physicochemical and in vitro drug metabolism profiles. In vivo, significant pharmacokinetic differences were noted with the two enantiomers, which were primarily driven through differences in clearance rates. Enantioselective oxidation by cytochrome P450 was ruled out as a causative factor for pharmacokinetic differences.

  13. New potential uroselective NO-donor alpha1-antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschi, Donatella; Tron, Gian Cesare; Di Stilo, Antonella; Fruttero, Roberta; Gasco, Alberto; Poggesi, Elena; Motta, Gianni; Leonardi, Amedeo

    2003-08-14

    A recent uroselective alpha(1)-adrenoceptor antagonist, REC15/2739, has been joined with nitrooxy and furoxan NO-donor moieties to give new NO-donor alpha(1)-antagonists. All the compounds studied proved to be potent and selective ligands of human cloned alpha(1a)-receptor subtype. Derivatives 6 and 7 were able to relax the prostatic portion of rat vas deferens contracted by (-)-noradrenaline because of both their alpha(1A)-antagonist and their NO-donor properties.

  14. The pharmacological properties of lipophilic calcium antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zwieten, P A

    1998-01-01

    Several types of calcium antagonists (CA) (verapamil, diltiazem, nifedipine and related drugs) may be used as antihypertensives. In practice, the dihydropyridines (nifedipine and related drugs) are the CA used most frequently as antihypertensives. Apart from the lowering of blood pressure CA may lead to other, theoretically beneficial, effects: regression of left ventricular and vascular hypertrophy, renal protection, weak natriuretic, weak antiplatelet, anti-ischaemic and antiatherogenic activity. Several new dihydropyridine CA have been introduced in recent years. The advantages of the newer compounds, such as amlodipine, felodipine, isradipine, lacidipine and lercanidipine, may include: vasoselectivity, hence little or no cardiodepressant activity; an improved kinetic profile, resulting in a slow onset and long duration of action, fewer side-effects such as reflex tachycardia and headache, owing to the slow onset of the antihypertensive action. For a few newer CA a predominant effect on specialized circulatory beds (renal, coronary and cerebral) has been claimed. The new CA, which are clearly lipophilic, deserve special attention. Owing to the lipophilic character of such compounds considerable concentration occurs in lipid-containing membrane depots. The CA thus concentrated are slowly released from these depots and, subsequently, reach their targets, the L-type calcium channels. This phenomenon explains both the slow onset and the long duration of action of these CA. Owing to the slow onset of action reflex tachycardia is virtually absent. The long duration of action allows satisfactory control of blood pressure in hypertensives by means of a single daily dose. A few lipophilic dihydropyridine CA are vasoselective. This property implies that at therapeutic, vasodilatory dosages no cardiodepressant activity occurs. Lercanidipine is a recently introduced example of a lipophilic and vasoselective dihydropyridine CA. It is an effective vasodilator

  15. A SELECTIVE ANTAGONIST OF MINERALOCORTICOID RECEPTOR EPLERENONE IN CARDIOLOGY PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. B. Gegenava

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The role of aldosterone in pathophysiological processes is considered. The effects of the selective antagonist of mineralocorticoid receptor eplerenone are analyzed. The advantages of eplerenone compared with spironolactone are discussed.

  16. Structure-based drug design identifies novel LPA3 antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fells, James I; Tsukahara, Ryoko; Liu, Jianxiong; Tigyi, Gabor; Parrill, Abby L

    2009-11-01

    Compound 5 ([5-(3-nitrophenoxy)-1,3-dioxo-1,3-dihydro-2-isoindol-2-yl]acetic acid) was identified as a weak selective LPA(3) antagonist (IC(50)=4504 nM) in a virtual screening effort to optimize a dual LPA(2 and 3) antagonist. Structure-based drug design techniques were used to prioritize similarity search matches of compound 5. This strategy rapidly identified 10 novel antagonists. The two most efficacious compounds identified inhibit activation of the LPA(3) receptor by 200 nM LPA with IC(50) values of 752 nM and 2992 nM. These compounds additionally define changes to our previously reported pharmacophore that will improve its ability to identify more potent and selective LPA(3) receptor antagonists. The results of the combined computational and experimental screening are reported.

  17. Secondary prevention with calcium antagonists after acute myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J F

    1992-01-01

    Experimental studies have demonstrated that the 3 calcium antagonists nifedipine, diltiazem, and verapamil have a comparable effect in the prevention of myocardial damage during ischaemia. Secondary prevention trials after acute myocardial infarction, which aimed at improving survival...

  18. Perampanel: A Selective AMPA Antagonist for Treating Seizures

    OpenAIRE

    Krauss, Gregory L.

    2013-01-01

    Perampanel is a selective, noncompetitive AMPA receptor antagonist that has recently been approved for treating localization-related epilepsy. This article reviews the pharmacology, clinical development, efficacy, and safety/tolerability of perampanel.

  19. Complications of TNF-α antagonists and iron homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    TNF-α is a central regulator of inflammation and its blockade downregulates other proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors. Subsequently, TNF-α antagonists are currently used in treatment regimens directed toward several inflammatory diseases. Despite a beneficia...

  20. Histamine-2 receptor antagonists as immunomodulators: new therapeutic views?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen

    1996-01-01

    from such studies are currently accumulating and suggest that the histamine-2 receptor antagonists have potential beneficial effects in the treatment of certain malignant, autoimmune and skin diseases, either alone or in combination with other drugs. The beneficial effect of histamine-2 receptor...... antagonists as adjuvant single drugs to reduce trauma-, blood transfusion- and sepsis-induced immunosuppression has led to research in combined treatment regimens in major surgery, particularly, of patients operated on for malignant diseases....

  1. Structure-activity relationships of benzothiazole GPR35 antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalhameed, Manahil M; Zhao, Pingwei; Hurst, Dow P; Reggio, Patricia H; Abood, Mary E; Croatt, Mitchell P

    2017-02-01

    The first structure-activity relationships for a benzothiazole scaffold acting as an antagonist at GPR35 is presented. Analogues were designed based on a lead compound that was previously determined to have selective activity as a GPR35 antagonist. The synthetic route was modular in nature to independently explore the role of the middle and both ends of the scaffold. The activities of the analogues illustrate the importance of all three segments of the compound.

  2. Deficiency of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist responsive to anakinra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnellbacher, Charlotte; Ciocca, Giovanna; Menendez, Roxanna; Aksentijevich, Ivona; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela; Duarte, Ana M; Rivas-Chacon, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    We describe a 3-month-old infant who presented to our institution with interleukin (IL)-1 receptor antagonist deficiency (DIRA), which consists of neutrophilic pustular dermatosis, periostitis, aseptic multifocal osteomyelitis, and persistently high acute-phase reactants. Skin findings promptly improved upon initiation of treatment with anakinra (recombinant human IL-1 receptor antagonist), and the bony lesions and systemic inflammation resolved with continued therapy.

  3. Multiple Targeting Approaches on Histamine H3 Receptor Antagonists

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad eKhanfar; Anna eAffini; Kiril eLutsenko; Katarina eNikolic; Stefania eButini; Holger eStark

    2016-01-01

    With the very recent market approval of pitolisant (Wakix®), the interest in clinical applications of novel multifunctional histamine H3 receptor antagonists has clearly increased. Since histamine H3 receptor antagonists in clinical development have been tested for a variety of different indications, the combination of pharmacological properties in one molecule for improved pharmacological effects and reduced unwanted side-effects is rationally based on the increasing knowledge on the complex...

  4. Interleukin-2 receptor antagonists as induction therapy after heart transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Christian H; Gustafsson, Finn; Gluud, Christian;

    2008-01-01

    About half of the transplantation centers use induction therapy after heart transplantation. Interleukin-2 receptor antagonists (IL-2Ras) are used increasingly for induction therapy. We conducted a systematic review of randomized trials assessing IL-2Ras.......About half of the transplantation centers use induction therapy after heart transplantation. Interleukin-2 receptor antagonists (IL-2Ras) are used increasingly for induction therapy. We conducted a systematic review of randomized trials assessing IL-2Ras....

  5. A pharmacophore model for dopamine D4 receptor antagonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boström, Jonas; Gundertofte, Klaus; Liljefors, Tommy

    2000-11-01

    A pharmacophore model for dopamine D4 antagonists has been developed on the basis of a previously reported dopamine D2 model. By using exhaustive conformational analyses (MM3* force field and the GB/SA hydration model) and least-squares molecular superimposition studies, a set of eighteen structurally diverse high affinity D4 antagonists have successfully been accommodated in the D4 pharmacophore model. Enantioselectivities may be rationalized by conformational energies required for the enantiomers to adopt their proposed bioactive conformations. The pharmacophore models for antagonists at the D4 and D2 receptor subtypes have been compared in order to get insight into molecular properties of importance for D2/D4 receptor selectivity. It is concluded that the bioactive conformations of antagonists at the two receptor subtypes are essentially identical. Receptor essential volumes previously identified for the D2 receptor are shown to be present also in the D4 receptor. In addition, a novel receptor essential volume in the D4 receptor, not present in the D2 receptor, has been identified. This feature may be exploited for the design of D4 selective antagonists. However, it is concluded that the major determinant for D2/D4 selectivity is the nature of the interactions between the receptor and aromatic ring systems. The effects of the electronic properties of these ring systems on the affinities for the two receptor subtypes differ substantially.

  6. The Apolipoprotein E Antagonistic Pleiotropy Hypothesis: Review and Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth R. Tuminello

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Research on apolipoprotein E (APOE has consistently revealed a relationship between the gene's ε4 allele and risk for development of Alzheimer's disease (AD. However, research with younger populations of ε4 carriers has suggested that the APOE ε4 allele may in fact be beneficial in earlier ages and may only confer risk of cognitive decline later in life. Accordingly, we and others have proposed that APOE may represent an example of antagonistic pleiotropy. Antagonistic pleiotropy is an evolutionary biology concept that proposes certain genes or alleles that may differentially impact fitness during different life stages. We critically review this hypothesis in light of new research of the impact of APOE on cognition and neural integrity across the lifespan. We provide recommendations for the revision of the antagonistic pleiotropy hypothesis of APOE and suggest important avenues for future research in this area.

  7. Discovery of the improved antagonistic prolactin variants by library screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun; Gong, Wei; Breinholt, Jens; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Leif; Zhang, Jinchao; Ma, Qinhong; Chen, Jianhe; Panina, Svetlana; Guo, Wei; Li, Tengkun; Zhang, Jingyuan; Kong, Meng; Liu, Zibing; Mao, Jingjing; Christensen, Leif; Hu, Sean; Wang, Lingyun

    2011-11-01

    Prolactin (PRL), a potent growth stimulator of the mammary epithelium, has been suggested to be a factor contributing to the development and progression of breast and prostate cancer. Several PRL receptor (PRLR) antagonists have been identified in the past decades, but their in vivo growth inhibitory potency was restricted by low receptor affinity, rendering them pharmacologically unattractive for clinical treatment. Thus, higher receptor affinity is essential for the development of improved PRLR antagonistic variants with improved in vivo potency. In this study, we generated Site 1 focused protein libraries of human G129R-PRL mutants and screened for those with increased affinity to the human PRLR. By combining the mutations with enhanced affinities for PRLR, we identified a novel G129R-PRL variant with mutations at Site 1 that render nearly 50-fold increase in the antagonistic potency in vitro.

  8. ANTAGONISTIC BACTERIA AGAINST SCHIZOPHYLLUM COMMUNE FR. IN PENINSULAR MALAYSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANTARJO DIKIN

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Schizophyllum commune Fr., is one of the important fungi, causes brown germ and seed rot of oil palm. Biodiversity of antagonistic bacteria from oil palm plantations in Peninsular Malaysia is expected to support in development of biopesticide. Isolation with liquid assay and screening antagonistic bacteria using dual culture assay were carried out in the bioexploration. A total of 265 bacterial isolates from plant parts of oil palm screened 52 antagonistic bacterial isolates against 5. commune. Bacterial isolates were identified by using Biolog* Identification System i.e. Bacillus macroccanus, B. thermoglucosidasius, Burkholderia cepacia, B. gladioli, B. multivorans, B pyrrocinia, B. spinosa, Corynebacterium agropyri, C. misitidis, Enterobacter aerogenes, Microbacterium testaceum, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, P. citronellolis, Rhodococcus rhodochrous, Serratia ficaria, Serratia sp., S. marcescens, Staphylococcus sciuri, Sternotrophomonas maltophilia.

  9. Neuroprotective Effects of Glutamate Antagonists and Extracellular Acidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaku, David A.; Giffard, Rona G.; Choi, Dennis W.

    1993-06-01

    Glutamate antagonists protect neurons from hypoxic injury both in vivo and in vitro, but in vitro studies have not been done under the acidic conditions typical of hypoxia-ischemia in vivo. Consistent with glutamate receptor antagonism, extracellular acidity reduced neuronal death in murine cortical cultures that were deprived of oxygen and glucose. Under these acid conditions, N-methyl-D-aspartate and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isox-azolepropionate-kainate antagonists further reduced neuronal death, such that some neurons tolerated prolonged oxygen and glucose deprivation almost as well as did astrocytes. Neuroprotection induced by this combination exceeded that induced by glutamate antagonists alone, suggesting that extracellular acidity has beneficial effects beyond the attenuation of ionotropic glutamate receptor activation.

  10. First Irish birth following IVF therapy using antagonist protocol.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mocanu, E V

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: During in vitro fertilization (IVF), the prevention of a premature LH surge was traditionally achieved using a gonadotrophin releasing hormone agonist (GnRH-a), and more recently, a GnRH antagonist. AIMS: We report a case of a 37 year old treated using the GnRH antagonist in a second completed cycle of IVF. METHODS: IVF was performed for primary infertility of 5-year duration due to frozen pelvis secondary to endometriosis. RESULTS: Following controlled ovarian hyperstimulation, oocyte recovery and fertilization, cleavage and transfer of two zygotes, a pregnancy established. A twin gestation was diagnosed at 7-weeks scan and pregnancy ended with the delivery of twin girls by emergency caesarean section. CONCLUSION: This is a first report of a delivery following IVF using the antagonist protocol in Ireland. Such therapy is patient friendly and its use should be introduced on a larger scale in clinical practice.

  11. Development and characterization of high affinity leptins and leptin antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpilman, Michal; Niv-Spector, Leonora; Katz, Meirav; Varol, Chen; Solomon, Gili; Ayalon-Soffer, Michal; Boder, Eric; Halpern, Zamir; Elinav, Eran; Gertler, Arieh

    2011-02-11

    Leptin is a pleiotropic hormone acting both centrally and peripherally. It participates in a variety of biological processes, including energy metabolism, reproduction, and modulation of the immune response. So far, structural elements affecting leptin binding to its receptor remain unknown. We employed random mutagenesis of leptin, followed by selection of high affinity mutants by yeast surface display and discovered that replacing residue Asp-23 with a non-negatively charged amino acid leads to dramatically enhanced affinity of leptin for its soluble receptor. Rational mutagenesis of Asp-23 revealed the D23L substitution to be most effective. Coupling the Asp-23 mutation with alanine mutagenesis of three amino acids (L39A/D40A/F41A) previously reported to convert leptin into antagonist resulted in potent antagonistic activity. These novel superactive mouse and human leptin antagonists (D23L/L39A/D40A/F41A), termed SMLA and SHLA, respectively, exhibited over 60-fold increased binding to leptin receptor and 14-fold higher antagonistic activity in vitro relative to the L39A/D40A/F41A mutants. To prolong and enhance in vivo activity, SMLA and SHLA were monopegylated mainly at the N terminus. Administration of the pegylated SMLA to mice resulted in a remarkably rapid, significant, and reversible 27-fold more potent increase in body weight (as compared with pegylated mouse leptin antagonist), because of increased food consumption. Thus, recognition and mutagenesis of Asp-23 enabled construction of novel compounds that induce potent and reversible central and peripheral leptin deficiency. In addition to enhancing our understanding of leptin interactions with its receptor, these antagonists enable in vivo study of the role of leptin in metabolic and immune processes and hold potential for future therapeutic use in disease pathologies involving leptin.

  12. Development and Characterization of High Affinity Leptins and Leptin Antagonists*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpilman, Michal; Niv-Spector, Leonora; Katz, Meirav; Varol, Chen; Solomon, Gili; Ayalon-Soffer, Michal; Boder, Eric; Halpern, Zamir; Elinav, Eran; Gertler, Arieh

    2011-01-01

    Leptin is a pleiotropic hormone acting both centrally and peripherally. It participates in a variety of biological processes, including energy metabolism, reproduction, and modulation of the immune response. So far, structural elements affecting leptin binding to its receptor remain unknown. We employed random mutagenesis of leptin, followed by selection of high affinity mutants by yeast surface display and discovered that replacing residue Asp-23 with a non-negatively charged amino acid leads to dramatically enhanced affinity of leptin for its soluble receptor. Rational mutagenesis of Asp-23 revealed the D23L substitution to be most effective. Coupling the Asp-23 mutation with alanine mutagenesis of three amino acids (L39A/D40A/F41A) previously reported to convert leptin into antagonist resulted in potent antagonistic activity. These novel superactive mouse and human leptin antagonists (D23L/L39A/D40A/F41A), termed SMLA and SHLA, respectively, exhibited over 60-fold increased binding to leptin receptor and 14-fold higher antagonistic activity in vitro relative to the L39A/D40A/F41A mutants. To prolong and enhance in vivo activity, SMLA and SHLA were monopegylated mainly at the N terminus. Administration of the pegylated SMLA to mice resulted in a remarkably rapid, significant, and reversible 27-fold more potent increase in body weight (as compared with pegylated mouse leptin antagonist), because of increased food consumption. Thus, recognition and mutagenesis of Asp-23 enabled construction of novel compounds that induce potent and reversible central and peripheral leptin deficiency. In addition to enhancing our understanding of leptin interactions with its receptor, these antagonists enable in vivo study of the role of leptin in metabolic and immune processes and hold potential for future therapeutic use in disease pathologies involving leptin. PMID:21119198

  13. Interleukin-1-receptor antagonist in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Claus M; Faulenbach, Mirjam; Vaag, Allan

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The expression of interleukin-1-receptor antagonist is reduced in pancreatic islets of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and high glucose concentrations induce the production of interleukin-1beta in human pancreatic beta cells, leading to impaired insulin secretion, decreased cell...... proliferation, and apoptosis. METHODS: In this double-blind, parallel-group trial involving 70 patients with type 2 diabetes, we randomly assigned 34 patients to receive 100 mg of anakinra (a recombinant human interleukin-1-receptor antagonist) subcutaneously once daily for 13 weeks and 36 patients to receive...

  14. Barnidipine, a long-acting slow onset calcium antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korstanje, C

    2000-11-01

    Barnidipine is a stereochemically pure dihydropyridine calcium antagonist with a high potency. The drug showed a slow onset and long-lasting vasorelaxating effect in vitro, and strong antihypertensive activity in hypertension models. Barnidipine was shown to have a high vasoselectivity and offered protection in cardiac and renal ischaemia models. The in vitro drug:drug interaction profile suggests a low potential for clinically relevant interactions with concomitant medication. It can be anticipated that barnidipine is an attractive calcium antagonist, offering good blood pressure control without compensatory baroreflex activity.

  15. Hyperglycemia of Diabetic Rats Decreased by a Glucagon Receptor Antagonist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, David G.; Ulichny Goebel, Camy; Hruby, Victor J.; Bregman, Marvin D.; Trivedi, Dev

    1982-02-01

    The glucagon analog [l-Nα-trinitrophenylhistidine, 12-homoarginine]-glucagon (THG) was examined for its ability to lower blood glucose concentrations in rats made diabetic with streptozotocin. In vitro, THG is a potent antagonist of glucagon activation of the hepatic adenylate cyclase assay system. Intravenous bolus injections of THG caused rapid decreases (20 to 35 percent) of short duration in blood glucose. Continuous infusion of low concentrations of the inhibitor led to larger sustained decreases in blood glucose (30 to 65 percent). These studies demonstrate that a glucagon receptor antagonist can substantially reduce blood glucose levels in diabetic animals without addition of exogenous insulin.

  16. 5-Hydroxytryptamine3 receptor antagonists and cardiac side effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brygger, Louise; Herrstedt, Jørn

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: 5-Hydroxytryptamine3-receptor antagonists (5-HT3-RA) are the most widely used antiemetics in oncology, and although tolerability is high, QTC prolongation has been observed in some patients. AREAS COVERED: The purpose of this article is to outline the risk of cardiac adverse events...

  17. The Effect of Antagonist Muscle Sensory Input on Force Regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya Onushko

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to understand how stretch-related sensory feedback from an antagonist muscle affects agonist muscle output at different contraction levels in healthy adults. Ten young (25.3 ± 2.4 years, healthy subjects performed constant isometric knee flexion contractions (agonist at 6 torque levels: 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 30%, and 40% of their maximal voluntary contraction. For half of the trials, subjects received patellar tendon taps (antagonist sensory feedback during the contraction. We compared error in targeted knee flexion torque and hamstring muscle activity, with and without patellar tendon tapping, across the 6 torque levels. At lower torque levels (5%, 10%, and 15%, subjects produced greater knee torque error following tendon tapping compared with the same torque levels without tendon tapping. In contrast, we did not find any difference in torque output at higher target levels (20%, 30%, and 40% between trials with and without tendon tapping. We also observed a load-dependent increase in the magnitude of agonist muscle activity after tendon taps, with no associated load-dependent increase in agonist and antagonist co-activation, or reflex inhibition from the antagonist tapping. The findings suggest that at relatively low muscle activity there is a deficiency in the ability to correct motor output after sensory disturbances, and cortical centers (versus sub-cortical are likely involved.

  18. Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel Antagonists and Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Lyeth

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a leading cause of death and disability in the United States. Despite more than 30 years of research, no pharmacological agents have been identified that improve neurological function following TBI. However, several lines of research described in this review provide support for further development of voltage gated calcium channel (VGCC antagonists as potential therapeutic agents. Following TBI, neurons and astrocytes experience a rapid and sometimes enduring increase in intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i. These fluxes in [Ca2+]i drive not only apoptotic and necrotic cell death, but also can lead to long-term cell dysfunction in surviving cells. In a limited number of in vitro experiments, both L-type and N-type VGCC antagonists successfully reduced calcium loads as well as neuronal and astrocytic cell death following mechanical injury. In rodent models of TBI, administration of VGCC antagonists reduced cell death and improved cognitive function. It is clear that there is a critical need to find effective therapeutics and rational drug delivery strategies for the management and treatment of TBI, and we believe that further investigation of VGCC antagonists should be pursued before ruling out the possibility of successful translation to the clinic.

  19. How Hybrid Organizations Turn Antagonistic Assets into Complementarities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hockerts, Kai

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on people excluded from traditional markets as employees, producers, or consumers on the grounds that they lack the appropriate skills. It describes the processes through which these perceived liabilities can be overcome by so-called hybrid organizations. Hybrids pursue expli...... for complementarities, and by creating demands for antagonistic assets, or by using partnerships....

  20. Serotonin 2A receptor antagonists for treatment of schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebdrup, Bjørn Hylsebeck; Rasmussen, Hans; Arnt, Jørn;

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: All approved antipsychotic drugs share an affinity for the dopamine 2 (D2) receptor; however, these drugs only partially ameliorate the symptoms of schizophrenia. It is, therefore, of paramount importance to identify new treatment strategies for schizophrenia. Areas covered: Preclin......Introduction: All approved antipsychotic drugs share an affinity for the dopamine 2 (D2) receptor; however, these drugs only partially ameliorate the symptoms of schizophrenia. It is, therefore, of paramount importance to identify new treatment strategies for schizophrenia. Areas covered...... receptor antagonists is evaluated. Moreover, the investigational pipeline of major pharmaceutical companies is examined and an Internet search conducted to identify other pharmaceutical companies investigating 5-HT2A receptor antagonists for the treatment of schizophrenia. Expert opinion: 5-HT2A receptor...... antagonists appear to assume an intermediate position by being marginally superior to placebo but inferior to conventional antipsychotic drugs. Three previous 5-HT2A receptor antagonists have been discontinued after Phase II or III trials, and available Phase IIa data on the remaining 5-HT2A receptor...

  1. Facilitative and antagonistic interactions between plant viruses in mixed infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syller, Jerzy

    2012-02-01

    Mixed infections of plant viruses are common in nature, and a number of important virus diseases of plants are the outcomes of interactions between causative agents. Multiple infections lead to a variety of intrahost virus-virus interactions, many of which may result in the generation of variants showing novel genetic features, and thus change the genetic structure of the viral population. Hence, virus-virus interactions in plants may be of crucial significance for the understanding of viral pathogenesis and evolution, and consequently for the development of efficient and stable control strategies. The interactions between plant viruses in mixed infections are generally categorized as synergistic or antagonistic. Moreover, mixtures of synergistic and antagonistic interactions, creating usually unpredictable biological and epidemiological consequences, are likely to occur in plants. The mechanisms of some of these are still unknown. This review aims to bring together the current knowledge on the most commonly occurring facilitative and antagonistic interactions between related or unrelated viruses infecting the same host plant. The best characterized implications of these interactions for virus-vector-host relationships are included. The terms 'synergism' and 'helper dependence' for facilitative virus-virus interactions, and 'cross-protection' and 'mutual exclusion' for antagonistic interactions, are applied in this article.

  2. Determinants of effective, safe and convenient vitamin K antagonist use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooistra, Hilde Afra Margaretha

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin K antagonists (VKA) are frequently used anticoagulants. They are very effective in preventing atrial fibrillation related strokes and recurrent venous thrombosis. However, it can be difficult to achieve an optimal balance between the efficacy and side effects (bleeding), as the dose response

  3. Characterization of a novel non-steroidal glucocorticoid receptor antagonist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Qun-Yi; Zhang, Meng [The National Center for Drug Screening, Shanghai (China); State Key Laboratory of Drug Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China); Hallis, Tina M.; DeRosier, Therese A. [Cell Systems Division, Invitrogen, Madison, WI (United States); Yue, Jian-Min; Ye, Yang [State Key Laboratory of Drug Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China); Mais, Dale E. [The National Center for Drug Screening, Shanghai (China); MPI Research, Mattawan, MI (United States); Wang, Ming-Wei, E-mail: wangmw@mail.shcnc.ac.cn [The National Center for Drug Screening, Shanghai (China); State Key Laboratory of Drug Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China)

    2010-01-15

    Selective antagonists of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) are desirable for the treatment of hypercortisolemia associated with Cushing's syndrome, psychic depression, obesity, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases, and glaucoma. NC3327, a non-steroidal small molecule with potent binding affinity to GR (K{sub i} = 13.2 nM), was identified in a high-throughput screening effort. As a full GR antagonist, NC3327 greatly inhibits the dexamethasone (Dex) induction of marker genes involved in hepatic gluconeogenesis, but has a minimal effect on matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), a GR responsive pro-inflammatory gene. Interestingly, the compound recruits neither coactivators nor corepressors to the GR complex but competes with glucocorticoids for the interaction between GR and a coactivator peptide. Moreover, NC3327 does not trigger GR nuclear translocation, but significantly blocks Dex-induced GR transportation to the nucleus, and thus appears to be a 'competitive' GR antagonist. Therefore, the non-steroidal compound, NC3327, may represent a new class of GR antagonists as potential therapeutics for a variety of cortisol-related endocrine disorders.

  4. Reversal strategies for vitamin K antagonists in acute intracerebral hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parry-Jones, A.R.; Napoli, M. Di; Goldstein, J.N.; Schreuder, F.H.; Tetri, S.; Tatlisumak, T.; Yan, B.; Nieuwenhuizen, K.M.; Dequatre-Ponchelle, N.; Lee-Archer, M.; Horstmann, S.; Wilson, D.; Pomero, F.; Masotti, L.; Lerpiniere, C.; Godoy, D.A.; Cohen, A.S.; Houben, R.; Al-Shahi Salman, R.; Pennati, P.; Fenoglio, L.; Werring, D.; Veltkamp, R.; Wood, E.; Dewey, H.M.; Cordonnier, C.; Klijn, C.J.M.; Meligeni, F.; Davis, S.M.; Huhtakangas, J.; Staals, J.; Rosand, J.; Meretoja, A.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: There is little evidence to guide treatment strategies for intracerebral hemorrhage on vitamin K antagonists (VKA-ICH). Treatments utilized in clinical practice include fresh frozen plasma (FFP) and prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC). Our aim was to compare case fatality with different

  5. Reversal strategies for vitamin K antagonists in acute intracerebral hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parry-Jones, Adrian R.; Di Napoli, Mario; Goldstein, Joshua N.; Schreuder, Floris H B M; Tetri, Sami; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Yan, Bernard; Van Nieuwenhuizen, Koen M.; Dequatre-Ponchelle, Nelly; Lee-Archer, Matthew; Horstmann, Solveig; Wilson, Duncan; Pomero, Fulvio; Masotti, Luca; Lerpiniere, Christine; Godoy, Daniel Agustin; Cohen, Abigail S.; Houben, Rik; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam; Pennati, Paolo; Fenoglio, Luigi; Werring, David; Veltkamp, Roland; Wood, Edith; Dewey, Helen M.; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Klijn, Catharina J M; Meligeni, Fabrizio; Davis, Stephen M.; Huhtakangas, Juha; Staals, Julie; Rosand, Jonathan; Meretoja, Atte

    2015-01-01

    Objective There is little evidence to guide treatment strategies for intracerebral hemorrhage on vitamin K antagonists (VKA-ICH). Treatments utilized in clinical practice include fresh frozen plasma (FFP) and prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC). Our aim was to compare case fatality with different

  6. Aryl biphenyl-3-ylmethylpiperazines as 5-HT7 receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeeyeon; Kim, Youngjae; Tae, Jinsung; Yeom, Miyoung; Moon, Bongjin; Huang, Xi-Ping; Roth, Bryan L; Lee, Kangho; Rhim, Hyewhon; Choo, Il Han; Chong, Youhoon; Keum, Gyochang; Nam, Ghilsoo; Choo, Hyunah

    2013-11-01

    The 5-HT7 receptor (5-HT7 R) is a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of depression and neuropathic pain. The 5-HT7 R antagonist SB-269970 exhibited antidepressant-like activity, whereas systemic administration of the 5-HT7 R agonist AS-19 significantly inhibited mechanical hypersensitivity and thermal hyperalgesia. In our efforts to discover selective 5-HT7 R antagonists or agonists, aryl biphenyl-3-ylmethylpiperazines were designed, synthesized, and biologically evaluated against the 5-HT7 R. Among the synthesized compounds, 1-([2'-methoxy-(1,1'-biphenyl)-3-yl]methyl)-4-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazine (28) was the best binder to the 5-HT7 R (pKi =7.83), and its antagonistic property was confirmed by functional assays. The selectivity profile of compound 28 was also recorded for the 5-HT7 R over other serotonin receptor subtypes, such as 5-HT1 R, 5-HT2 R, 5-HT3 R, and 5-HT6 R. In a molecular modeling study, the 2-methoxyphenyl moiety attached to the piperazine ring of compound 28 was proposed to be essential for the antagonistic function.

  7. Bronchoprotection with a leukotriene receptor antagonist in asthmatic preschool children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, H; Nielsen, K G

    2000-01-01

    We hypothesized that a leukotriene receptor antagonist (LTRA) could provide bronchoprotection against the cold, dry air-induced response in asthmatic preschool children. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study, we examined the effect of the specific LTRA montelukast at 5...

  8. Does intergenerational social mobility affect antagonistic attitudes towards ethnic minorities?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolsma, J.; Graaf, N.D. de; Quillian, L.

    2009-01-01

    Up till now, no study satisfactorily addressed the effect of social mobility on antagonistic attitudes toward ethnic minorities. In this contribution, we investigate the effect of educational and class intergenerational mobility on ethnic stereotypes, ethnic threat, and opposition to ethnic intermar

  9. Komplikationer til langtidsbehandling med vitamin K-antagonister

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    May, O; Garne, E; Mickley, H

    1990-01-01

    Long-term treatment with vitamin K antagonists (vKA) frequently involves complications. The commonest complication is haemorrhage and cases of serious haemorrhage are stated in the literature to occur with a frequency per 1,000 treatment years of 12-108, of which 2-17 are fatal. The majority...

  10. Myofascial force transmission via extramuscular pathways occurs between antagonistic muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huijing, Peter A; Baan, Guus C

    2008-01-01

    Most often muscles (as organs) are viewed as independent actuators. To test if this is true for antagonistic muscles, force was measured simultaneously at: (1) the proximal and distal tendons of the extensor digitorum muscle (EDL) to quantify any proximo-distal force differences, as an indicator of myofascial force transmission, (2) at the distal tendons of the whole antagonistic peroneal muscle group (PER) to test if effects of EDL length changes are present and (3) at the proximal end of the tibia to test if myofascially transmitted force is exerted there. EDL length was manipulated either at the proximal or distal tendons. This way equal EDL lengths are attained at two different positions of the muscle with respect to the tibia and antagonistic muscles. Despite its relatively small size, lengthening of the EDL changed forces exerted on the tibia and forces exerted by its antagonistic muscle group. Apart from its extramuscular myofascial connections, EDL has no connections to either the tibia or these antagonistic muscles. Proximal EDL lengthening increased distal muscular forces (active PER DeltaF approximately +1.7%), but decreased tibial forces (passive from 0.3 to 0 N; active DeltaF approximately -5%). Therefore, it is concluded that these antagonistic muscles do not act independently, because of myofascial force transmission between them. Such a decrease in tibial force indicates release of pre-strained connections. Distal EDL lengthening had opposite effects (tripling passive force exerted on tibia; active PER force DeltaF approximately -3.6%). It is concluded that the length and relative position of the EDL is a co-determinant of passive and active force exerted at tendons of nearby antagonistic muscle groups. These results necessitate a new view of the locomotor apparatus, which needs to take into account the high interdependence of muscles and muscle fibres as force generators, as well as proximo-distal force differences and serial and parallel

  11. Accumulation of Deleterious Mutations Near Sexually Antagonistic Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Connallon

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Mutation generates a steady supply of genetic variation that, while occasionally useful for adaptation, is more often deleterious for fitness. Recent research has emphasized that the fitness effects of mutations often differ between the sexes, leading to important evolutionary consequences for the maintenance of genetic variation and long-term population viability. Some forms of sex-specific selection—i.e., stronger purifying selection in males than females—can help purge a population’s load of female-harming mutations and promote population growth. Other scenarios—e.g., sexually antagonistic selection, in which mutations that harm females are beneficial for males—inflate genetic loads and potentially dampen population viability. Evolutionary processes of sexual antagonism and purifying selection are likely to impact the evolutionary dynamics of different loci within a genome, yet theory has mostly ignored the potential for interactions between such loci to jointly shape the evolutionary genetic basis of female and male fitness variation. Here, we show that sexually antagonistic selection at a locus tends to elevate the frequencies of deleterious alleles at tightly linked loci that evolve under purifying selection. Moreover, haplotypes that segregate for different sexually antagonistic alleles accumulate different types of deleterious mutations. Haplotypes that carry female-benefit sexually antagonistic alleles preferentially accumulate mutations that are primarily male harming, whereas male-benefit haplotypes accumulate mutations that are primarily female harming. The theory predicts that sexually antagonistic selection should shape the genomic organization of genetic variation that differentially impacts female and male fitness, and contribute to sexual dimorphism in the genetic basis of fitness variation.

  12. Ubiquitination profiling identifies sensitivity factors for IAP antagonist treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varfolomeev, Eugene; Izrael-Tomasevic, Anita; Yu, Kebing; Bustos, Daisy; Goncharov, Tatiana; Belmont, Lisa D; Masselot, Alexandre; Bakalarski, Corey E; Kirkpatrick, Donald S; Vucic, Domagoj

    2015-02-15

    Evasion of cell death is one crucial capability acquired by tumour cells to ward-off anti-tumour therapies and represents a fundamental challenge to sustaining clinical efficacy for currently available agents. Inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins use their ubiquitin E3 ligase activity to promote cancer cell survival by mediating proliferative signalling and blocking cell death in response to diverse stimuli. Using immunoaffinity enrichment and MS, ubiquitination sites on thousands of proteins were profiled upon initiation of cell death by IAP antagonists in IAP antagonist-sensitive and -resistant breast cancer cell lines. Our analyses identified hundreds of proteins with elevated levels of ubiquitin-remnant [K-GG (Lys-Gly-Gly)] peptides upon activation of cell death by the IAP antagonist BV6. The majority of these were observed in BV6-sensitive, but not-resistant, cells. Among these were known pro-apoptotic regulators, including CYC (cytochrome c), RIP1 (receptor-interacting protein 1) and a selection of proteins known to reside in the mitochondria or regulate NF-κB (nuclear factor κB) signalling. Analysis of early time-points revealed that IAP antagonist treatment stimulated rapid ubiquitination of NF-κB signalling proteins, including TRAF2 [TNF (tumour necrosis factor) receptor-associated factor 2], HOIL-1 (haem-oxidized iron-regulatory protein 2 ubiquitin ligase-1), NEMO (NF-κB essential modifier), as well as c-IAP1 (cellular IAP1) auto-ubiquitination. Knockdown of several NF-κB pathway members reduced BV6-induced cell death and TNF production in sensitive cell lines. Importantly, RIP1 was found to be constitutively ubiquitinated in sensitive breast-cancer cell lines at higher basal level than in resistant cell lines. Together, these data show the diverse and temporally defined roles of protein ubiquitination following IAP-antagonist treatment and provide critical insights into predictive diagnostics that may enhance clinical efficacy.

  13. Design, synthesis, and structure-activity relationship of novel CCR2 antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothandaraman, Shankaran; Donnely, Karla L; Butora, Gabor; Jiao, Richard; Pasternak, Alexander; Morriello, Gregori J; Goble, Stephen D; Zhou, Changyou; Mills, Sander G; Maccoss, Malcolm; Vicario, Pasquale P; Ayala, Julia M; Demartino, Julie A; Struthers, Mary; Cascieri, Margaret A; Yang, Lihu

    2009-03-15

    A series of novel 1-aminocyclopentyl-3-carboxyamides incorporating substituted tetrahydropyran moieties have been synthesized and subsequently evaluated for their antagonistic activity against the human CCR2 receptor. Among them analog 59 was found to posses potent antagonistic activity.

  14. Design and discovery of 1,3-benzodiazepines as novel dopamine antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhaoning; Sun, Zhong-Yue; Ye, Yuanzan; McKittrick, Brian; Greenlee, William; Czarniecki, Michael; Fawzi, Ahmad; Zhang, Hongtao; Lachowicz, Jean E

    2009-09-01

    A series of novel 1,3-benzodiazapine based D1 antagonists was designed according to the understanding of pharmacophore models derived from SCH 23390 (1b), a potent and selective D1 antagonist. The new design features an achiral cyclic-amidine that maintains desired basicity. Solid phase synthesis was developed for SAR development of the novel dopamine antagonists.

  15. Lead optimization studies of cinnamic amide EP2 antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, Thota; Jiang, Jianxiong; Yang, Myung-Soon; Dingledine, Ray

    2014-05-22

    Prostanoid receptor EP2 can play a proinflammatory role, exacerbating disease pathology in a variety of central nervous system and peripheral diseases. A highly selective EP2 antagonist could be useful as a drug to mitigate the inflammatory consequences of EP2 activation. We recently identified a cinnamic amide class of EP2 antagonists. The lead compound in this class (5d) displays anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective actions. However, this compound exhibited moderate selectivity to EP2 over the DP1 prostanoid receptor (∼10-fold) and low aqueous solubility. We now report compounds that display up to 180-fold selectivity against DP1 and up to 9-fold higher aqueous solubility than our previous lead. The newly developed compounds also display higher selectivity against EP4 and IP receptors and a comparable plasma pharmacokinetics. Thus, these compounds are useful for proof of concept studies in a variety of models where EP2 activation is playing a deleterious role.

  16. Anti-antimicrobial peptides: folding-mediated host defense antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Lloyd; Lamarre, Baptiste; Diu, Ting; Ravi, Jascindra; Judge, Peter J; Temple, Adam; Carr, Matthew; Cerasoli, Eleonora; Su, Bo; Jenkinson, Howard F; Martyna, Glenn; Crain, Jason; Watts, Anthony; Ryadnov, Maxim G

    2013-07-12

    Antimicrobial or host defense peptides are innate immune regulators found in all multicellular organisms. Many of them fold into membrane-bound α-helices and function by causing cell wall disruption in microorganisms. Herein we probe the possibility and functional implications of antimicrobial antagonism mediated by complementary coiled-coil interactions between antimicrobial peptides and de novo designed antagonists: anti-antimicrobial peptides. Using sequences from native helical families such as cathelicidins, cecropins, and magainins we demonstrate that designed antagonists can co-fold with antimicrobial peptides into functionally inert helical oligomers. The properties and function of the resulting assemblies were studied in solution, membrane environments, and in bacterial culture by a combination of chiroptical and solid-state NMR spectroscopies, microscopy, bioassays, and molecular dynamics simulations. The findings offer a molecular rationale for anti-antimicrobial responses with potential implications for antimicrobial resistance.

  17. Churg-Strauss syndrome associated with leukotriene receptor antagonists (LTRA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuchacovich, R; Justiniano, M; Espinoza, L R

    2007-10-01

    Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) is a rare vasculitic disorder that generally occurs in patients with bronchial asthma. CSS is being increasingly recognized in asthmatic patients treated with leukotriene receptor antagonists. However, the nature of this relationship remains to be elucidated. The present report describes three asthmatic patients who developed clinical manifestations highly suggestive of CSS, although one patient lacked the presence of eosinophilia. The patient, however, exhibited biopsy-proven cutaneous necrotizing vasculitis, which improved after withdrawal of montelukast. The second patient presented with systemic constitutional signs including fever, malaise, arthralgias, clinical jaundice, peripheral blood eosinophilia, and biopsy-proven eosinophilic hepatitis. The third patient also had circulating eosinophilia, scleritis, and arthritis. All patients improved after discontinuation of the leukotriene receptor antagonist (montelukast).

  18. Potential Clinical Implications of the Urotensin II Receptor Antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Kane

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Urotensin-II (UII, which binds to its receptor UT, plays an important role in the heart, kidneys, pancreas, adrenal gland and CNS. In the vasculature, it acts as a potent endothelium-independent vasoconstrictor and endothelium-dependent vasodilator. In disease states, this constriction-dilation equilibrium is disrupted. There is an upregulation of the UII system in heart disease, metabolic syndrome and kidney failure. The increase in UII release and UT expression suggest that UII system may be implicated in the pathology and pathogenesis of these diseases by causing an increase in ACAT-1 activity leading to SMC proliferation and foam cell infiltration, insulin resistance (DMII, as well as inflammation, high blood pressure and plaque formation. Recently, UT antagonists such as SB-611812, palosuran, and most recently a piperazino-isoindolinone based antagonist have been developed in the hope of better understanding the UII system and treating its associated diseases.

  19. Histamine-2 receptor antagonists as immunomodulators: new therapeutic views?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen

    1996-01-01

    Considerable evidence has emerged to suggest that histamine participates in the regulation of the inflammatory response, immune reaction, coagulation cascade, and cardiovascular function. Furthermore, histamine may play a major role in the growth of normal and malignant tissue as a regulator...... of proliferation and angiogenesis. Specific histamine receptors have been identified on the surface of bone marrow cells, immune competent cells, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and also on malignant cells. This has prompted research in regulation by specific histamine receptor agonists and antagonists. Results...... from such studies are currently accumulating and suggest that the histamine-2 receptor antagonists have potential beneficial effects in the treatment of certain malignant, autoimmune and skin diseases, either alone or in combination with other drugs. The beneficial effect of histamine-2 receptor...

  20. Are peripheral opioid antagonists the solution to opioid side effects?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bates, John J

    2012-02-03

    Opioid medication is the mainstay of therapy for severe acute and chronic pain. Unfortunately, the side effects of these medications can affect patient comfort and safety, thus limiting their proven therapeutic potential. Whereas the main analgesic effects of opioids are centrally mediated, many of the common side effects are mediated via peripheral receptors. Novel peripheral opioid antagonists have been recently introduced that can block the peripheral actions of opioids without affecting centrally mediated analgesia. We review the clinical and experimental evidence of their efficacy in ameliorating opioid side effects and consider what further information might be useful in defining their role. IMPLICATIONS: The major analgesic effects of opioid medication are mediated within the brain and spinal cord. Many of the side effects of opioids are caused by activation of receptors outside these areas. Recently developed peripherally restricted opioid antagonists have the ability to block many opioid side effects without affecting analgesia.

  1. Non-imidazole histamine NO-donor H3-antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosco, Paolo; Bertinaria, Massimo; Di Stilo, Antonella; Cena, Clara; Fruttero, Roberta; Gasco, Alberto

    2005-01-01

    Recently a series of H3-antagonists related to Imoproxifan was realised (I); in these products the oxime substructure of the lead was constrained in NO-donor furoxan systems and in the corresponding furazan derivatives. In this paper, a new series of compounds derived from I by substituting the imidazole ring with the ethoxycarbonylpiperazino moiety present in the non-imidazole H3-ligand A-923 is described. For all the products synthesis and preliminary pharmacological characterisation, as well as their hydrophilic-lipophilic balance, are reported. The imidazole ring replacement generally results in a decreased H3-antagonist activity with respect to the analogues of series I and, in some cases, induces relaxing effects on the electrically contracted guinea-pig ileum, probably due to increased affinity for other receptor systems.

  2. Enhanced Chronic Pain Management Utilizing Chemokine Receptor Antagonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Center for Substance Abuse Research Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University 3500 N, Broad Street Philadelphia, PA 19140 AND ADDRESS(ES) 8...processes), affect the ability of opioid drugs to counteract pain. We predicted that one way of increasing the effectiveness of the pain-relieving... drugs would be to eliminate or reduce the activity of the chemokines by administering chemokine receptor antagonists (CRAs). The blockade of one or

  3. Potent and orally efficacious benzothiazole amides as TRPV1 antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besidski, Yevgeni; Brown, William; Bylund, Johan; Dabrowski, Michael; Dautrey, Sophie; Harter, Magali; Horoszok, Lucy; Hu, Yin; Johnson, Dean; Johnstone, Shawn; Jones, Paul; Leclerc, Sandrine; Kolmodin, Karin; Kers, Inger; Labarre, Maryse; Labrecque, Denis; Laird, Jennifer; Lundström, Therese; Martino, John; Maudet, Mickaël; Munro, Alexander; Nylöf, Martin; Penwell, Andrea; Rotticci, Didier; Slaitas, Andis; Sundgren-Andersson, Anna; Svensson, Mats; Terp, Gitte; Villanueva, Huascar; Walpole, Christopher; Zemribo, Ronald; Griffin, Andrew M

    2012-10-01

    Benzothiazole amides were identified as TRPV1 antagonists from high throughput screening using recombinant human TRPV1 receptor and structure-activity relationships were explored to pinpoint key pharmacophore interactions. By increasing aqueous solubility, through the attachment of polar groups to the benzothiazole core, and enhancing metabolic stability, by blocking metabolic sites, the drug-like properties and pharmokinetic profiles of benzothiazole compounds were sufficiently optimized such that their therapeutic potential could be verified in rat pharmacological models of pain.

  4. Epiminocyclohepta[b]indole analogs as 5-HT6 antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henderson, Alan J; Guzzo, Peter R; Ghosh, Animesh;

    2012-01-01

    A new series of epiminocyclohepta[b]indoles with potent 5-HT(6) antagonist activity were discovered and optimized using in vitro protocols. One compound from this series was progressed to advanced pharmacokinetic (PK) studies followed by 5-HT(6) receptor occupancy studies. The compound was found...... to have excellent oral absorption, a highly favorable PK profile and demonstrated pharmacodynamic interaction with the 5-HT(6) receptor as shown by ex vivo autoradiography....

  5. Exploration of a new series of PAR1 antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planty, Bruno; Pujol, Chantal; Lamothe, Marie; Maraval, Catherine; Horn, Clemens; Le Grand, Bruno; Perez, Michel

    2010-03-01

    Two series of new PAR1 antagonists have been identified. The first incorporates a cinnamoylpiperidine motif and the second a cinnamoylpyridine pattern. The synthesis, biological activity and structure-activity relationship of these compounds are presented. In each series, one analog showed potent in vivo antithrombotic activity in a rat AV shunt model, with up to 53% inhibition at 1.25mpk iv for compound 30.

  6. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists: emerging roles in cardiovascular medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Funder JW

    2013-01-01

    John W FunderPrince Henry's Institute, Clayton, Victoria, AustraliaAbstract: Spironolactone was first developed over 50 years ago as a potent mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist with undesirable side effects; it was followed a decade ago by eplerenone, which is less potent but much more MR-specific. From a marginal role as a potassium-sparing diuretic, spironolactone was shown to be an extraordinarily effective adjunctive agent in the treatment of progressive heart failure, as ...

  7. Approaches to the rational design of selective melanocortin receptor antagonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hruby, Victor J; Cai, Minying; Nyberg, Joel; Muthu, Dhanasekaran

    2015-01-01

    Introduction When establishing the physiological roles of specific receptors in normal and disease states, it is critical to have selective antagonist ligands for each receptor in a receptor system with several subtypes. The melanocortin receptors have five subtypes referred to as the melanocortin 1 receptor, melanocortin 2 receptor, melanocortin 3 receptor, melanocortin 4 receptor and melanocortin 5 receptor, and they are of critical importance for many aspects of human health and disease. Areas covered This article reviews the current efforts to design selective antagonistic ligands for the five human melanocortin receptors summarizing the currently published orthosteric and allosteric antagonists for each of these receptors. Expert opinion Though there has been progress, there are still few drugs available that address the many significant biological activities and diseases that are associated with these receptors, which is possibly due to the lack of receptor selectivity that these designed ligands are currently showing. The authors believe that further studies into the antagonists’ 3D conformational and topographical properties in addition to future mutagenesis studies will provide greater insight into these ligands which could play a role in the treatment of various diseases in the future. PMID:22646078

  8. Synergistic and antagonistic drug combinations depend on network topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ning; Ma, Wenzhe; Pei, Jianfeng; Ouyang, Qi; Tang, Chao; Lai, Luhua

    2014-01-01

    Drug combinations may exhibit synergistic or antagonistic effects. Rational design of synergistic drug combinations remains a challenge despite active experimental and computational efforts. Because drugs manifest their action via their targets, the effects of drug combinations should depend on the interaction of their targets in a network manner. We therefore modeled the effects of drug combinations along with their targets interacting in a network, trying to elucidate the relationships between the network topology involving drug targets and drug combination effects. We used three-node enzymatic networks with various topologies and parameters to study two-drug combinations. These networks can be simplifications of more complex networks involving drug targets, or closely connected target networks themselves. We found that the effects of most of the combinations were not sensitive to parameter variation, indicating that drug combinational effects largely depend on network topology. We then identified and analyzed consistent synergistic or antagonistic drug combination motifs. Synergistic motifs encompass a diverse range of patterns, including both serial and parallel combinations, while antagonistic combinations are relatively less common and homogenous, mostly composed of a positive feedback loop and a downstream link. Overall our study indicated that designing novel synergistic drug combinations based on network topology could be promising, and the motifs we identified could be a useful catalog for rational drug combination design in enzymatic systems.

  9. Twisted gastrulation, a BMP antagonist, exacerbates podocyte injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachiko Yamada

    Full Text Available Podocyte injury is the first step in the progression of glomerulosclerosis. Previous studies have demonstrated the beneficial effect of bone morphogenetic protein 7 (Bmp7 in podocyte injury and the existence of native Bmp signaling in podocytes. Local activity of Bmp7 is controlled by cell-type specific Bmp antagonists, which inhibit the binding of Bmp7 to its receptors. Here we show that the product of Twisted gastrulation (Twsg1, a Bmp antagonist, is the central negative regulator of Bmp function in podocytes and that Twsg1 null mice are resistant to podocyte injury. Twsg1 was the most abundant Bmp antagonist in murine cultured podocytes. The administration of Bmp induced podocyte differentiation through Smad signaling, whereas the simultaneous administration of Twsg1 antagonized the effect. The administration of Bmp also inhibited podocyte proliferation, whereas simultaneous administration of Twsg1 antagonized the effect. Twsg1 was expressed in the glomerular parietal cells (PECs and distal nephron of the healthy kidney, and additionally in damaged glomerular cells in a murine model of podocyte injury. Twsg1 null mice exhibited milder hypoalbuminemia and hyperlipidemia, and milder histological changes while maintaining the expression of podocyte markers during podocyte injury model. Taken together, our results show that Twsg1 plays a critical role in the modulation of protective action of Bmp7 on podocytes, and that inhibition of Twsg1 is a promising means of development of novel treatment for podocyte injury.

  10. IAP antagonists sensitize murine osteosarcoma cells to killing by TNFα

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhar, Tanmay M.; Miles, Mark A.; Gupte, Ankita; Taylor, Scott; Tascone, Brianna; Walkley, Carl R.; Hawkins, Christine J.

    2016-01-01

    Outcomes for patients diagnosed with the bone cancer osteosarcoma have not improved significantly in the last four decades. Only around 60% of patients and about a quarter of those with metastatic disease survive for more than five years. Although DNA-damaging chemotherapy drugs can be effective, they can provoke serious or fatal adverse effects including cardiotoxicity and therapy-related cancers. Better and safer treatments are therefore needed. We investigated the anti-osteosarcoma activity of IAP antagonists (also known as Smac mimetics) using cells from primary and metastatic osteosarcomas that arose spontaneously in mice engineered to lack p53 and Rb expression in osteoblast-derived cells. The IAP antagonists SM-164, GDC-0152 and LCL161, which efficiently target XIAP and cIAPs, sensitized cells from most osteosarcomas to killing by low levels of TNFα but not TRAIL. RIPK1 expression levels and activity correlated with sensitivity. RIPK3 levels varied considerably between tumors and RIPK3 was not required for IAP antagonism to sensitize osteosarcoma cells to TNFα. IAP antagonists, including SM-164, lacked mutagenic activity. These data suggest that drugs targeting XIAP and cIAP1/2 may be effective for osteosarcoma patients whose tumors express abundant RIPK1 and contain high levels of TNFα, and would be unlikely to provoke therapy-induced cancers in osteosarcoma survivors. PMID:27129149

  11. Histamine H1 antagonists and clinical characteristics of febrile seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zolaly MA

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Mohammed A ZolalyDepartment of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, Taibah University, Al-Madinah Al-Munawarah, Kingdom of Saudi ArabiaBackground: The purpose of this study was to determine whether seizure susceptibility due to antihistamines is provoked in patients with febrile seizures.Methods: The current descriptive study was carried out from April 2009 to February 2011 in 250 infants and children who visited the Madinah Maternity and Children's Hospital as a result of febrile convulsions. They were divided into two groups according to administration of antihistamines at the onset of fever.Results: Detailed clinical manifestations were compared between patients with and without administration of antihistamines. The time from fever detection to seizure onset was significantly shorter in the antihistamine group than that in the nonantihistamine group, and the duration of seizures was significantly longer in the antihistamine group than in the nonantihistamine group. No significant difference was found in time from fever detection to seizure onset or seizure duration between patients who received a first-generation antihistamine and those who received a second-generation antihistamine.Conclusion: Due to their central nervous system effects, H1 antagonists should not be administered to patients with febrile seizures and epilepsy. Caution should be exercised regarding the use of histamine H1 antagonists in young infants, because these drugs could potentially disturb the anticonvulsive central histaminergic system.Keywords: antihistamine, nonantihistamine, histamine H1 antagonist, febrile seizures

  12. Receptor discrimination and control of agonist-antagonist binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallarida, R J

    1995-08-01

    The law of mass action is the common model for the interaction of agonist and antagonist compounds with cellular receptors. Parameters of the interaction, obtained from functional and radioligand-binding studies, allow discrimination and subtyping of receptors and aid in understanding specific mechanisms. This article reviews the theory and associated mathematical models and graphical transformations of data that underlie the determination of receptor parameters. The main theory assumes that agonist and antagonist compounds bind to cells that have a fixed number of receptors and provides the framework for obtaining drug-receptor parameters from data and their graphical transformations. Conditions that produce a change in receptor number, a newer concept in pharmacology, can have an important effect on the parameter values derived in the usual way. This review concludes with a discussion of the quantitative study of receptor-mediated feedback control of endogenous ligands, a very new topic with potentially important implications for understanding antagonist effectiveness, loss of control, and chaos in regulated mass action binding.

  13. μ Opioid receptor: novel antagonists and structural modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaserer, Teresa; Lantero, Aquilino; Schmidhammer, Helmut; Spetea, Mariana; Schuster, Daniela

    2016-02-01

    The μ opioid receptor (MOR) is a prominent member of the G protein-coupled receptor family and the molecular target of morphine and other opioid drugs. Despite the long tradition of MOR-targeting drugs, still little is known about the ligand-receptor interactions and structure-function relationships underlying the distinct biological effects upon receptor activation or inhibition. With the resolved crystal structure of the β-funaltrexamine-MOR complex, we aimed at the discovery of novel agonists and antagonists using virtual screening tools, i.e. docking, pharmacophore- and shape-based modeling. We suggest important molecular interactions, which active molecules share and distinguish agonists and antagonists. These results allowed for the generation of theoretically validated in silico workflows that were employed for prospective virtual screening. Out of 18 virtual hits evaluated in in vitro pharmacological assays, three displayed antagonist activity and the most active compound significantly inhibited morphine-induced antinociception. The new identified chemotypes hold promise for further development into neurochemical tools for studying the MOR or as potential therapeutic lead candidates.

  14. Newer calcium channel antagonists and the treatment of hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, D F

    1999-07-01

    Calcium channel antagonists have become popular medications for the management of hypertension. These agents belong to the diphenylalkylamine, benzothiazepine, dihydropyridine, or tetralol chemical classes. Although the medications share a common pharmacological mechanism in reducing peripheral vascular resistance, clinical differences between the sub-classes can be linked to structural profiles. This heterogeneity is manifested by differences in vascular selectivity, effects on cardiac conduction and adverse events. The lack of differentiation between calcium channel antagonists in clinical trials has contributed to uncertainty associated with their impact on morbidity and mortality. Data from more recent studies in specific patient populations underscores the importance of investigating these antihypertensives as individual agents. A proposed therapeutic classification system suggests that newer agents should share the slow onset and long-acting antihypertensive effect of amlodipine. Additionally, a favourable trough-to-peak ratio has been recommended as an objective measurement of efficacy. The newer drugs, barnidipine and lacidipine, have a therapeutic profile similar to amlodipine, but trough-to-peak ratios are not substantially greater than the recommended minimum of 0.50. Aranidipine, cilnidipine and efonidipine have unique pharmacological properties that distinguish them from traditional dihydropyridines. Although clinical significance is unconfirmed, these newer options may be beneficial for patients with co-morbid conditions that preclude use of older antagonists.

  15. Kappa opioid receptor antagonist and N-methyl-D- aspartate receptor antagonist affect dynorphin- induced spinal cord electrophysiologic impairment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Chen; Liangbi Xiang; Jun Liu; Dapeng Zhou; Hailong Yu; Qi Wang; Wenfeng Han; Weijian Ren

    2012-01-01

    The latencies of motor- and somatosensory-evoked potentials were prolonged to different degrees, and wave amplitude was obviously decreased, after injection of dynorphin into the rat subarachnoid cavity.The wave amplitude and latencies of motor- and somatosensory-evoked potentials were significantly recovered at 7 and 14 days after combined injection of dynorphin and either the kappa opioid receptor antagonist nor-binaltorphimine or the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist MK-801.The wave amplitude and latency were similar in rats after combined injection of dynorphin and nor-binaltorphimine or MK-801.These results suggest that intrathecal injection of dynorphin causes damage to spinal cord function.Prevention of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor or kappa receptor activation lessened the injury to spinal cord function induced by dynorphin.

  16. Anti free radical action of calcium antagonists and H1 and H2 receptors antagonists in neoplastic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    della Rovere, F; Broccio, M; Granata, A; Zirilli, A; Brugnano, L; Artemisia, A; Broccio, G

    1996-01-01

    The blood of the subjects suffering from Neoplastic Disease (ND) shows phenomena of membrane peroxidation due to the presence of Free Radicals (FRs), in a quantity much greater than the one observed in the blood of healthy subjects. This can be detected either by calculating the time necessary for the formation of "Heinz bodies" (Hbs), (p < 0.00001) after oxidative stress of the blood in vitro with acetylphenylidrazine (APH), or by calculating the methemoglobin (metHb) quantity that forms after the same treatment (P < 0.00001). The statistical analyses we carried out showed that metHb formation was not affected by age, sex, smoking habits, red blood cell number, Hb, Ht or tumor staging. In this study, by using equal parameters of investigation, we noted that the blood of the subjects with ND who were previously treated with calcium-antagonists drugs and with antagonists of H1 and H2 receptors, gave results completely superimposable on the results obtained from healthy subjects, implying that the treatment had avoided the increase of FRs. Therefore we concluded that calcium-antagonists and the antagonists of the H1 and H2 receptors behave as antioxidant substances, having decreased the FRs damaging activity on the cellular membranes, thus controlling, although to a limited degree, the pejorative evolution of the disease. It is also important to remember that investigations into the ND, even possible screenings, must take into account the above said data, submitting the subjects under investigation to a pharmacological wash out, particularly with those substances which, are considered to be scavengers of FRs. Some of these substances are investigated in this work.

  17. Conformational studies of 3-amino-1-alkyl-cyclopentane carboxamide CCR2 antagonists leading to new spirocyclic antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasternak, Alexander; Goble, Stephen D; Doss, George A; Tsou, Nancy N; Butora, Gabor; Vicario, Pasquale P; Ayala, Julia Marie; Struthers, Mary; Demartino, Julie A; Mills, Sander G; Yang, Lihu

    2008-02-15

    In an effort to shed light on the active binding conformation of our 3-amino-1-alkyl-cyclopentane carboxamide CCR2 antagonists, we prepared several conformationally constrained analogs resulting from backbone cyclization. Evaluation of CCR2 binding affinities for these analogs gave insight into the optimal relative positions of the piperidine and benzylamide moieties while simultaneously leading to the discovery of a new, potent lead type based upon a spirocyclic acetal scaffold.

  18. Predictions of in vivo prolactin levels from in vitro k I values of d 2 receptor antagonists using an agonist-antagonist interaction model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petersson, K.J.; Vermeulen, A.M.J.; Friberg, L.E.

    2013-01-01

    Prolactin elevation is a side effect of all currently available D2 receptor antagonists used in the treatment of schizophrenia. Prolactin elevation is the result of a direct antagonistic D2 effect blocking the tonic inhibition of prolactin release by dopamine. The aims of this work were to assess th

  19. Does protein binding modulate the effect of angiotensin II receptor antagonists?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc P Maillard

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionAngiotensin II AT 1-receptor antagonists are highly bound to plasma proteins (≥ 99%. With some antagonists, such as DuP-532, the protein binding was such that no efficacy of the drug could be demonstrated clinically. Whether protein binding interferes with the efficacy of other antagonists is not known. We have therefore investigated in vitro how plasma proteins may affect the antagonistic effect of different AT1-receptor antagonists.MethodsA radio-receptor binding assay was used to analyse the interaction between proteins and the ability of various angiotensin II (Ang II antagonists to block AT1-receptors. In addition, the Biacore technology, a new technique which enables the real-time monitoring of binding events between two molecules, was used to evaluate the dissociation rate constants of five AT1-receptor antagonists from human serum albumin.ResultsThe in vitro AT 1-antagonistic effects of different Ang II receptor antagonists were differentially affected by the presence of human plasma, with rightward shifts of the IC50 ranging from one to several orders of magnitude. The importance of the shift correlates with the dissociation rate constants of these drugs from albumin. Our experiments also show that the way that AT1-receptor antagonists bind to proteins differs from one compound to another. These results suggest that the interaction with plasma proteins appears to modulate the efficacy of some Ang II antagonists.ConclusionAlthough the high binding level of Ang II receptor antagonist to plasma proteins appears to be a feature common to this class of compounds, the kinetics and characteristics of this binding is of great importance. With some antagonists, protein binding interferes markedly with their efficacy to block AT1-receptors.

  20. Classification and virtual screening of androgen receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiazhong; Gramatica, Paola

    2010-05-24

    Computational tools, such as quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR), are highly useful as screening support for prioritization of substances of very high concern (SVHC). From the practical point of view, QSAR models should be effective to pick out more active rather than inactive compounds, expressed as sensitivity in classification works. This research investigates the classification of a big data set of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs)-androgen receptor (AR) antagonists, mainly aiming to improve the external sensitivity and to screen for potential AR binders. The kNN, lazy IB1, and ADTree methods and the consensus approach were used to build different models, which improve the sensitivity on external chemicals from 57.1% (literature) to 76.4%. Additionally, the models' predictive abilities were further validated on a blind collected data set (sensitivity: 85.7%). Then the proposed classifiers were used: (i) to distinguish a set of AR binders into antagonists and agonists; (ii) to screen a combined estrogen receptor binder database to find out possible chemicals that can bind to both AR and ER; and (iii) to virtually screen our in-house environmental chemical database. The in silico screening results suggest: (i) that some compounds can affect the normal endocrine system through a complex mechanism binding both to ER and AR; (ii) new EDCs, which are nonER binders, but can in silico bind to AR, are recognized; and (iii) about 20% of compounds in a big data set of environmental chemicals are predicted as new AR antagonists. The priority should be given to them to experimentally test the binding activities with AR.

  1. Sexually antagonistic "zygotic drive" of the sex chromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R Rice

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Genomic conflict is perplexing because it causes the fitness of a species to decline rather than improve. Many diverse forms of genomic conflict have been identified, but this extant tally may be incomplete. Here, we show that the unusual characteristics of the sex chromosomes can, in principle, lead to a previously unappreciated form of sexual genomic conflict. The phenomenon occurs because there is selection in the heterogametic sex for sex-linked mutations that harm the sex of offspring that does not carry them, whenever there is competition among siblings. This harmful phenotype can be expressed as an antagonistic green-beard effect that is mediated by epigenetic parental effects, parental investment, and/or interactions among siblings. We call this form of genomic conflict sexually antagonistic "zygotic drive", because it is functionally equivalent to meiotic drive, except that it operates during the zygotic and postzygotic stages of the life cycle rather than the meiotic and gametic stages. A combination of mathematical modeling and a survey of empirical studies is used to show that sexually antagonistic zygotic drive is feasible, likely to be widespread in nature, and that it can promote a genetic "arms race" between the homo- and heteromorphic sex chromosomes. This new category of genomic conflict has the potential to strongly influence other fundamental evolutionary processes, such as speciation and the degeneration of the Y and W sex chromosomes. It also fosters a new genetic hypothesis for the evolution of enigmatic fitness-reducing traits like the high frequency of spontaneous abortion, sterility, and homosexuality observed in humans.

  2. Discovery of dopamine D₄ receptor antagonists with planar chirality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanna, Fabrizio; Ortner, Birgit; Hübner, Harald; Löber, Stefan; Tschammer, Nuska; Gmeiner, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Employing the D4 selective phenylpiperazine 2 as a lead compound, planar chiral analogs with paracyclophane substructure were synthesized and evaluated for their ability to bind and activate dopamine receptors. The study revealed that the introduction of a [2.2]paracyclophane moiety is tolerated by dopamine receptors of the D2 family. Subtype selectivity for D4 and ligand efficacy depend on the absolute configuration of the test compounds. Whereas the achiral single-layered lead 2 and the double-layered paracyclophane (R)-3 showed partial agonist properties, the enantiomer (S)-3 behaved as a neutral antagonist.

  3. Lymphocyte homing antagonists in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saruta, Masayuki; Papadakis, Konstantinos A

    2014-09-01

    Lymphocyte homing antagonists represent promising therapeutic agents for the treatment of idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Several critical molecules involved in the recruitment of inflammatory cells in the intestine, including integrins and chemokine receptors, have been successfully targeted for the treatment of IBD. These agents have shown great promise for the induction and maintenance of remission for both Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis. This article discusses currently approved prototypic agents for the treatment of IBD (natalizumab, anti-α4 integrin; vedolizumab, anti-α4β7 integrin), and several other agents in the same class currently under development.

  4. The opiate antagonist, naltrexone, in the treatment of trichotillomania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grant, Jon E; Odlaug, Brian Lawrence; Schreiber, Liana R N;

    2014-01-01

    Trichotillomania (TTM) is characterized by repetitive hair pulling resulting in hair loss. Data on the pharmacological treatment of TTM are limited. This study examined the opioid antagonist, naltrexone, in adults with TTM who had urges to pull their hair. Fifty-one individuals with TTM were...... improved with naltrexone (P = 0.026). Subjects taking naltrexone with a family history of addiction showed a greater numerical reduction in the urges to pull, although it was not statistically significant. Future studies will have to examine whether pharmacological modulation of the opiate system may...

  5. Estrogen Receptor Agonists and Antagonists in the Yeast Estrogen Bioassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Si; Bovee, Toine F H

    2016-01-01

    Cell-based bioassays can be used to predict the eventual biological activity of a substance on a living organism. In vitro reporter gene bioassays are based on recombinant vertebrate cell lines or yeast strains and especially the latter are easy-to-handle, cheap, and fast. Moreover, yeast cells do not express estrogen, androgen, progesterone or glucocorticoid receptors, and are thus powerful tools in the development of specific reporter gene systems that are devoid of crosstalk from other hormone pathways. This chapter describes our experience with an in-house developed RIKILT yeast estrogen bioassay for testing estrogen receptor agonists and antagonists, focusing on the applicability of the latter.

  6. Antagonistic action of pitrazepin on human and rat GABAA receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demuro, Angelo; Martinez-Torres, Ataulfo; Francesconi, Walter; Miledi, Ricardo

    1999-01-01

    Pitrazepin, 3-(piperazinyl-1)-9H-dibenz(c,f) triazolo(4,5-a)azepin is a piperazine antagonist of GABA in a variety of electrophysiological and in vitro binding studies involving GABA and glycine receptors. In the present study we have investigated the effects of pitrazepin, and the GABAA antagonist bicuculline, on membrane currents elicited by GABA in Xenopus oocytes injected with rat cerebral cortex mRNA or cDNAs encoding α1β2 or α1β2γ2S human GABAA receptor subunits.The three types of GABAA receptors expressed were reversibly antagonized by bicuculline and pitrazepin in a concentration-dependent manner. GABA dose-current response curves for the three types of receptors were shifted to the right, in a parallel manner, by increasing concentrations of pitrazepin.Schild analyses gave pA2 values of 6.42±0.62, n=4, 6.41±1.2, n=5 and 6.21±1.24, n=6, in oocytes expressing rat cerebral cortex, α1β2 or α1β2γ2S human GABAA receptors respectively (values are given as means±s.e.mean), and the Hill coefficients were all close to unity. All this is consistent with the notion that pitrazepin acts as a competitive antagonist of these GABAA receptors; and that their antagonism by pitrazepin is not strongly dependent on the subunit composition of the receptors here studied.Since pitrazepin has been reported to act also at the benzodiazepine binding site, we studied the effect of the benzodiazepine antagonist Ro 15-1788 (flumazenil) on the inhibition of α1β2γ2S receptors by pitrazepin. Co-application of Ro 15-1788 did not alter the inhibiting effect of pitrazepin. Moreover, pitrazepin did not antagonize the potentiation of GABA-currents by flunitrazepam. All this suggests that pitrazepin does not affect the GABA receptor-chloride channel by interacting with the benzodiazepine receptor site. PMID:10369456

  7. The evolution of histamine H₃ antagonists/inverse agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebois, Evan P; Jones, Carrie K; Lindsley, Craig W

    2011-01-01

    This article describes our efforts along with recent advances in the development, biological evaluation and clinical proof of concept of small molecule histamine H₃ antagonists/inverse agonists. The H3 receptor is a presynaptic autoreceptor within the Class A GPCR family, but also functions as a heteroreceptor modulating levels of neurotransmitters such as dopamine, acetylcholine, norepinephrine, serotonin, GABA and glutamate. Thus, H₃R has garnered a great deal of interest from the pharmaceutical industry for the possible treatment of obesity, epilepsy, sleep/wake, schizophrenia, Alzheimer's disease, neuropathic pain and ADHD. Within the two main classes of H₃ ligands, both imidazole and non-imidazole derived, have shown sufficient potency and specificity which culminated with efficacy in preclinical models for various CNS disorders. Importantly, conserved elements have been identified within the small molecule H₃ ligand scaffolds that resulted in a highly predictive pharmacophore model. Understanding of the pharmacophore model has allowed several groups to dial H₃R activity into scaffolds designed for other CNS targets, and engender directed polypharmacology. Moreover, Abbott, GSK, Pfizer and several others have reported positive Phase I and/or Phase II data with structurally diverse H₃R antagonists/inverse agonists.

  8. Evodiamine as a novel antagonist of aryl hydrocarbon receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Hui [State Key Laboratory of Trauma, Burns, and Combined Injury, Department 1, Research Institute of Surgery, Daping Hospital, The Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400042 (China); Department of Laboratory Medicine, The Affiliated Tenth People' s Hospital, Tongji University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Tu, Yongjiu; Zhang, Chun; Fan, Xia; Wang, Xi [State Key Laboratory of Trauma, Burns, and Combined Injury, Department 1, Research Institute of Surgery, Daping Hospital, The Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400042 (China); Wang, Zhanli [College of Pharmaceutical Science, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310014 (China); Liang, Huaping, E-mail: huaping_liang@yahoo.com.cn [State Key Laboratory of Trauma, Burns, and Combined Injury, Department 1, Research Institute of Surgery, Daping Hospital, The Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400042 (China)

    2010-11-05

    Research highlights: {yields} Evodiamine interacted with the AhR. {yields} Evodiamine inhibited the specific binding of [{sup 3}H]-TCDD to the AhR. {yields} Evodiamine acts as an antagonist of the AhR. -- Abstract: Evodiamine, the major bioactive alkaloid isolated from Wu-Chu-Yu, has been shown to interact with a wide variety of proteins and modify their expression and activities. In this study, we investigated the interaction between evodiamine and the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Molecular modeling results revealed that evodiamine directly interacted with the AhR. Cytosolic receptor binding assay also provided the evidence that evodiamine could interact with the AhR with the K{sub i} value of 28.4 {+-} 4.9 nM. In addition, we observed that evodiamine suppressed the 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) induced nuclear translocation of the AhR and the expression of CYP1A1 dose-dependently. These results suggested that evodiamine was able to bind to the AhR as ligand and exhibit antagonistic effects.

  9. CCR9 Antagonists in the Treatment of Ulcerative Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pirow Bekker

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available While it has long been established that the chemokine receptor CCR9 and its ligand CCL25 are essential for the movement of leukocytes into the small intestine and the development of small-intestinal inflammation, the role of this chemokine-receptor pair in colonic inflammation is not clear. Toward this end, we compared colonic CCL25 protein levels in healthy individuals to those in patients with ulcerative colitis. In addition, we determined the effect of CCR9 pharmacological inhibition in the mdr1a−/− mouse model of ulcerative colitis. Colon samples from patients with ulcerative colitis had significantly higher levels of CCL25 protein compared to healthy controls, a finding mirrored in the mdr1a−/− mice. In the mdr1a−/− mice, CCR9 antagonists significantly decreased the extent of wasting and colonic remodeling and reduced the levels of inflammatory cytokines in the colon. These findings indicate that the CCR9:CCL25 pair plays a causative role in ulcerative colitis and suggest that CCR9 antagonists will provide a therapeutic benefit in patients with colonic inflammation.

  10. Suppression of Aldosterone Synthesis and Secretion by Channel Antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiichi Ikeda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aldosterone, a specific mineralocorticoid receptor (MR agonist and a key player in the development of hypertension, is synthesized as a final product of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Hypertension can be generally treated by negating the effects of angiotensin II through the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-Is or angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonists (ARBs. However, the efficacy of angiotensin II blockade by such drugs is sometimes diminished by the so-called “aldosterone breakthrough” effect, by which ACE-Is or ARBs (renin-angiotensin system (RAS inhibitors gradually lose their effectiveness against hypertension due to the overproduction of aldosterone, known as primary aldosteronism. Although MR antagonists are used to antagonize the effects of aldosterone, these drugs may, however, give rise to life-threatening adverse actions, such as hyperkalemia, particularly when used in conjunction with RAS inhibitors. Recently, several groups have reported that some dihydropyridine Ca2+ channel blockers (CCBs have inhibitory actions on aldosterone production in in vitro and in the clinical setting. Therefore, the use of such dihydropyridine CCBs to treat aldosterone-related hypertension may prove beneficial to circumvent such therapeutic problems. In this paper, we discuss the mechanism of action of CCBs on aldosterone production and clinical perspectives for CCB use to inhibit MR activity in hypertensive patients.

  11. CGRP antagonists and antibodies for the treatment of migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vécsei, László; Szok, Délia; Csáti, Anett; Tajti, János

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Migraine is a highly devastating neurovascular disorder that affects up to 16% of the population worldwide. In spite of intensive research, its origin remains enigmatic with no therapeutic option appropriate for all migraine patients. One of the leading hypotheses is related to the function of the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Regardless, the pharmaceutical options currently applied for the acute and prophylactic treatment of migraine are not appropriate for all migraine patients. Areas covered: This article is based on a literature review using the PubMed database and highlights the CGRP theory of the pathomechanism of migraine. Expert opinion: Since migraine is a CGRP-related disorder, it appeared obvious to develop CGRP receptor antagonists that exert high efficacy, both intravenously and orally. Unfortunately, the frequent use of these antagonists results in an elevated liver transaminase level. In an attempt to bypass these harmful side effects, efforts should be made to modify these pharmacons. The use of fully humanized monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that target CGRP and its receptors may also be possible. However, while Phase I and II clinical trials are promising, a long-term follow-up of these therapies is still needed.

  12. Implications of hedgehog signaling antagonists for cancer therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingwu Xie

    2008-01-01

    The hedgehog(Hh)pathway,initially discovered inDrosophila by two Nobel laureates,Dr.Eric Wieschaus and Dr.Christiane Nusslein-Volhard,is a major regulator for cell differentiation,tissue polarity and cell proliferation.Studies from many laboratories,including ours,reveal activation of this pathway in most basal cell carcinomas and in approximately 30% of extracutaneous human cancers,including medulloblastomas,gastrointestinal,lung,breast and prostate cancers.Thus,it is believed that targeted inhibition of Hh signaling may be effective in treating and preventing many types of human cancers.Even more exciting is the discovery and synthesis of specific signaling antagonists for the Hh pathway,which have significant clinical implications in novel cancer therapeutics.This review discusses the major advances in the current understanding of Hh signaling activation in different types of human cancers,the molecular basis of Hh signaling activation,the major antagonists for Hh signaling inhibition and their potential clinical application in human cancer therapy.

  13. Rogue sperm indicate sexually antagonistic coevolution in nematodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald E Ellis

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Intense reproductive competition often continues long after animals finish mating. In many species, sperm from one male compete with those from others to find and fertilize oocytes. Since this competition occurs inside the female reproductive tract, she often influences the outcome through physical or chemical factors, leading to cryptic female choice. Finally, traits that help males compete with each other are sometimes harmful to females, and female countermeasures may thwart the interests of males, which can lead to an arms race between the sexes known as sexually antagonistic coevolution. New studies from Caenorhabditis nematodes suggest that males compete with each other by producing sperm that migrate aggressively and that these sperm may be more likely to win access to oocytes. However, one byproduct of this competition appears to be an increased probability that these sperm will go astray, invading the ovary, prematurely activating oocytes, and sometimes crossing basement membranes and leaving the gonad altogether. These harmful effects are sometimes observed in crosses between animals of the same species but are most easily detected in interspecies crosses, leading to dramatically lowered fitness, presumably because the competitiveness of the sperm and the associated female countermeasures are not precisely matched. This mismatch is most obvious in crosses involving individuals from androdioecious species (which have both hermaphrodites and males, as predicted by the lower levels of sperm competition these species experience. These results suggest a striking example of sexually antagonistic coevolution and dramatically expand the value of nematodes as a laboratory system for studying postcopulatory interactions.

  14. Human homosexuality: a paradigmatic arena for sexually antagonistic selection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camperio Ciani, Andrea; Battaglia, Umberto; Zanzotto, Giovanni

    2015-01-29

    Sexual conflict likely plays a crucial role in the origin and maintenance of homosexuality in our species. Although environmental factors are known to affect human homosexual (HS) preference, sibling concordances and population patterns related to HS indicate that genetic components are also influencing this trait in humans. We argue that multilocus, partially X-linked genetic factors undergoing sexually antagonistic selection that promote maternal female fecundity at the cost of occasional male offspring homosexuality are the best candidates capable of explaining the frequency, familial clustering, and pedigree asymmetries observed in HS male proband families. This establishes male HS as a paradigmatic example of sexual conflict in human biology. HS in females, on the other hand, is currently a more elusive phenomenon from both the empirical and theoretical standpoints because of its fluidity and marked environmental influence. Genetic and epigenetic mechanisms, the latter involving sexually antagonistic components, have been hypothesized for the propagation and maintenance of female HS in the population. However, further data are needed to truly clarify the evolutionary dynamics of this trait.

  15. Comparative proteome analysis of two antagonist Bacillus subtilis strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C X; Zhao, X; Han, F; Yang, M F; Chen, H; Chida, T; Shen, S H

    2009-04-01

    Natural wild-type strains of Bacillus subtilis are extensively used in agriculture as biocontrol agents for plants. This study examined two antagonist B. subtilis strains, KB-1111 and KB-1122, and the results illustrated that KB-1122 was a more potent inhibitor of the indicator pathogen than KB- 1111. Thus, to investigate the intrinsic differences between the two antagonist strains under normal culture conditions, samples of KB-1111 and KB-1122 were analyzed using MALDI-TOF-MS. The main differences were related to 20 abundant intracellular and 17 extracellular proteins. When searching the NCBI database, a number of the differentially expressed proteins were identified, including 11 cellular proteins and 10 secretory proteins. Among these proteins, class III stress-response-related ATPase, aconitate hydratase, alpha-amylase precursor, and a secretory protein, endo-1, 4-beta-glucanase, were differentially expressed by the two strains. These results are useful to comprehend the intrinsic differences between the antagonism of KB-1111 and KB-1122.

  16. Actions of dopamine antagonists on stimulated striatal and limbic dopamine release: an in vivo voltammetric study.

    OpenAIRE

    Stamford, J. A.; Kruk, Z L; Millar, J.

    1988-01-01

    1. Fast cyclic voltammetry at carbon fibre microelectrodes was used to study the effects of several dopamine antagonists upon stimulated dopamine release in the rat striatum and nucleus accumbens. 2. In both nuclei, stimulated dopamine release was increased by D2-receptor-selective and mixed D1/D2-receptor antagonists. The D1-selective antagonist SCH 23390 had no effect. 3. Striatal and limbic dopamine release were elevated by cis- but not trans-flupenthixol. 4. The 'atypical' neuroleptics (c...

  17. Oral Administration of a Retinoic Acid Receptor Antagonist Reversibly Inhibits Spermatogenesis in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Sanny S. W.; Wang, Xiangyuan; Roberts, Shelby S.; Stephen M Griffey; Reczek, Peter R.; Wolgemuth, Debra J.

    2011-01-01

    Meeting men's contraceptive needs, orally administered retinoic acid receptor antagonists represent new lead molecules in developing non-hormonal, reversible male contraceptives without adverse side effects.

  18. Synthesis and Dual Histamine H1 and H2 Receptor Antagonist Activity of Cyanoguanidine Derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Premedication with a combination of histamine H1 receptor (H1R) and H2 receptor (H2R) antagonists has been suggested as a prophylactic principle, for instance, in anaesthesia and surgery. Aiming at pharmacological hybrids combining H1R and H2R antagonistic activity, a series of cyanoguanidines 14–35 was synthesized by linking mepyramine-type H1R antagonist substructures with roxatidine-, tiotidine-, or ranitidine-type H2R antagonist moieties. N-desmethylmepyramine was connected via a poly-met...

  19. Clinical experience in Europe with uroselective alpha1-antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debruyne, F M; Van der Poel, H G

    1999-01-01

    alpha1-Adrenoreceptors are thought to be involved in prostate smooth muscle contractions and could hence play a role in the dynamic component of intravesical obstruction associated with symptomatic BPH. Consequently, since the mid-eighties alpha receptor blocking agents have been used for the treatment of BPH. Non-selective alpha blockers are usually associated with systemic side-effects which resulted in an exclusion or withdrawal of many patients from this form of treatment. With the availability of so-called uroselective alpha blockers the management picture has changed since it was anticipated that these compounds cause lesser side-effects with at least the same, or even better, efficacy. Comparative clinical studies are essential for determining the eventual advantages of the uroselective alpha1-antagonists and a large number of such studies have been performed worldwide studying the various available compounds. European studies with terazosin showed clear superiority of the drug over the placebo while causing only limited side-effects. Various other studies using alpha-blocking agents such as doxazosin, tamsulosin and alfuzosin yielded identical results. Especially with tamsulosin and alfuzosin, the side-effects were comparable with those encountered in the placebo group. About 7% of the patients using tamsulosin experienced retrograde ejaculation in one study which did not occur in the alfuzosin studies. Important studies in Europe have also investigated the value of a combination of an alpha blocker with a 5alpha-reductase inhibitor. Comparable studies in which both alfuzosin and doxazosin were combined with the 5alpha-reductase inhibitor Proscar have shown that a combination is not superior to a blocker monotherapy and especially in the ALFIN study the results show that alfuzosin monotherapy is superior to Proscar in the management of symptomatic BPH. European studies have evaluated Quality of Life, sexuality as well as socio-economical outcome of the

  20. 1/f scaling in heart rate requires antagonistic autonomic control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struzik, Zbigniew R.; Hayano, Junichiro; Sakata, Seiichiro; Kwak, Shin; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2004-11-01

    We present systematic evidence for the origins of 1/f -type temporal scaling in human heart rate. The heart rate is regulated by the activity of two branches of the autonomic nervous system: the parasympathetic (PNS) and the sympathetic (SNS) nervous systems. We examine alterations in the scaling property when the balance between PNS and SNS activity is modified, and find that the relative PNS suppression by congestive heart failure results in a substantial increase in the Hurst exponent H towards random-walk scaling 1/f2 and a similar breakdown is observed with relative SNS suppression by primary autonomic failure. These results suggest that 1/f scaling in heart rate requires the intricate balance between the antagonistic activity of PNS and SNS.

  1. Pathological gambling induced by dopamine antagonists: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grötsch, Philipp; Lange, Claudia; Wiesbeck, Gerhard A; Lang, Undine

    2015-03-01

    Pathological gambling is defined as inappropriate, persistent, and maladaptive gambling behaviour. It is a non-pharmacological addiction classified as an impulse control disorder. However, pathological gambling has been associated with dopamine agonist use. Here we report of a 28-year-old man with a first major depressive episode and a post-traumatic stress disorder who has been treated with a combination of the serotonine/noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor duloxetine and the tricyclic antidepressant maprotiline. The administration of antipsychotic flupentixole (up to 7 mg) turned this slight online poker gambler into an excessive gambler. Only after the discontinuation of the antidopaminergic agents and the switch to bupropion did this gambling behaviour stop which suggests a causal relationship between dopamine antagonists and pathological gambling.

  2. Pharmacoepidemiological assessment of drug interactions with vitamin K antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pottegård, Anton; Christensen, R. D.; Wang, S. V.;

    2014-01-01

    PurposeWe present a database of prescription drugs and international normalized ratio (INR) data and the applied methodology for its use to assess drug-drug interactions with vitamin K antagonists (VKAs). We use the putative interaction between VKAs and tramadol as a case study. MethodsWe used...... a self-controlled case series to estimate the incidence rate ratio (IRR) comparing the rate of INR measurements of 4.0 in concomitant tramadol and VKA-exposed periods to VKA-only-exposed periods. Secondary analyses considered specific subgroups, alternative exposure criteria, alternative outcome...... definitions, and other drugs. ResultsWe identified 513 VKA users with at least 1 INR measurement 4.0 and concomitant tramadol and VKA exposure during the observation period. The overall IRR was 1.80 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.53-2.10), with a stronger association among users of phenprocoumon compared...

  3. Discovery and characterization of carbamothioylacrylamides as EP2 selective antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, Thota; Jiang, Jianxiong; Shashidharamurthy, Rangaiah; Dingledine, Ray

    2013-07-11

    Prostanoid receptor EP2 is emerging as a novel target for development of anti-inflammatory drugs for the treatment of chronic neurodegenerative and peripheral diseases; however, the availability of EP2 antagonist probes for exploration of peripheral disease models is very limited. We now report identification and characterization of a novel chemical class of compounds that show nanomolar potency and competitive antagonism of the EP2 receptor. A compound in this class, TG6-129, showed prolonged plasma half-life and did not cross the blood brain barrier. This compound also suppressed the induction of inflammatory mRNA markers in a macrophage cell line upon activation of EP2. Thus, this compound could be useful as a probe for a variety of peripheral chronic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, in which EP2 appears to play a pathogenic role.

  4. [Antifibrillatory activity of dipeptide antagonist of nerve growth factor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryzhanovskiĭ, S A; Stoliarchuk, V N; Vititnova, M B; Tsorin, I B; Pekel'dina, E S; Gudasheva, T A

    2012-01-01

    In experiments on anesthetized rats were assessed antifibrillatoty action of dipeptide GK-1. This compound is the fragment of fourth loop of nerve growth factor (NGF) and manifests antagonistic activity in respect to TrkA receptor, that specified for NGF. It is shown that this compound is able to significantly increase the threshold of electrical fibrillation of the heart and its effectiveness is not inferior to the reference antiarrhythmics I and III class on Vaughan Williams classification. However, unlike the latter, antifibrillatory action of dipeptide GK-1 was delayed and realized within 40-60 minutes after its administration. It is discussed possible mechanisms underlying antifibrillatory action of dipeptide GK-1, that, to some extent, may be associated with its ability to change the reactivity of beta-adrenergic structures of the heart.

  5. Suvorexant: The first orexin receptor antagonist to treat insomnia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok K Dubey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary insomnia is mainly treated with drugs acting on benzodiazepine receptors and a few other classes of drugs used for different co-morbidities. A novel approach to treat insomnia has been introduced recently, with the approval of suvorexant, the first in a new class of orexin receptor antagonists. Orexin receptors in the brain have been found to play an important role in the regulation of various aspects of arousal and motivation. The drugs commonly used for insomnia therapy to date, have often been associated with adverse effects, such as, day-time somnolence, amnesia, confusion, and gait disturbance, apart from the risk of dependence on chronic use. Suvorexant has not shown these adverse effects because of its unique mechanism of action. It also appears to be suitable as a chronic therapy for insomnia, because of minimal physical dependence. The availability of this new drug as an effective and safe alternative is an important and welcome development in insomnia management.

  6. SP 01-3 ALDOSTERONE ANTAGONISTS IN HEART FAILURE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Colin

    2016-09-01

    Aldosterone's deleterious pathophysiological effects on the cardiovascular system if blocked by mineralcorticord antagonists (MRAs) logically should lead to improvement in heart function and outcomes in heart failure (HF). The first trial to test this hypothesis was tthe RALES trial in 1999 which treated patients with class III-IV HF with spironolactone. It showed significant reduction in mortality and cardiovascular hospitalzation rates. This was confirmed & extended in EMHASIS-HF RCT with classs II-III being treated with ACEIs & BB who received placebo or elperinone (a MRA) with again a statistically significant fall in mortality & hospitalization.The possible cardioprotective effects of MRA post acute myocardial infarct (MI) is less clear. The EPHESUS RCT in 2003 demostrated that elperinone given 3-14 days AMI in patients with early signs of HF reduced mortality & morbidity. However in the ALBTROSS trial using spironolactone 2 days after AMI showed no benfit in patients without HF but in a subgroup with ST elevation there was a 80% reduction in mortality after 6 months. However a recent meta-analysis from 25 RCT with data invovling 19,333 patients with either HF or post MI assigned aldosterone antagonists (AA)or placebo showed a 18% reduction in mortality including a 20% fall in CV mortality and a 19% reduction in SCD.The role of AA in HFPEF is even even more contraversial. The TOPCAT RCT of 3445 patients with symptomatc HFPEF randomised to spironolactone failed to meet the primary composite end point of death, aborted cardiac arrest or hospitalization although there was a reduction in hospitalization for HF (HR 0.83 P = 0.04).The differences between selective or non-selective MRAs, their ADRs & off target effects will also be discussed.

  7. Agonistic and antagonistic estrogens in licorice root (Glycyrrhiza glabra).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Rudy; Vincken, Jean-Paul; Mol, Loes A M; The, Susan A M; Bovee, Toine F H; Luijendijk, Teus J C; Verbruggen, Marian A; Gruppen, Harry

    2011-07-01

    The roots of licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra) are a rich source of flavonoids, in particular, prenylated flavonoids, such as the isoflavan glabridin and the isoflavene glabrene. Fractionation of an ethyl acetate extract from licorice root by centrifugal partitioning chromatography yielded 51 fractions, which were characterized by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and screened for activity in yeast estrogen bioassays. One third of the fractions displayed estrogenic activity towards either one or both estrogen receptors (ERs; ERα and ERβ). Glabrene-rich fractions displayed an estrogenic response, predominantly to the ERα. Surprisingly, glabridin did not exert agonistic activity to both ER subtypes. Several fractions displayed higher responses than the maximum response obtained with the reference compound, the natural hormone 17β-estradiol (E(2)). The estrogenic activities of all fractions, including this so-called superinduction, were clearly ER-mediated, as the estrogenic response was inhibited by 20-60% by known ER antagonists, and no activity was found in yeast cells that did not express the ERα or ERβ subtype. Prolonged exposure of the yeast to the estrogenic fractions that showed superinduction did, contrary to E(2), not result in a decrease of the fluorescent response. Therefore, the superinduction was most likely the result of stabilization of the ER, yeast-enhanced green fluorescent protein, or a combination of both. Most fractions displaying superinduction were rich in flavonoids with single prenylation. Glabridin displayed ERα-selective antagonism, similar to the ERα-selective antagonist RU 58668. Whereas glabridin was able to reduce the estrogenic response of E(2) by approximately 80% at 6 × 10(-6) M, glabrene-rich fractions only exhibited agonistic responses, preferentially on ERα.

  8. Anticonvulsive effect of nonimidazole histamine H3 receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadek, Bassem; Kuder, Kamil; Subramanian, Dhanasekaran; Shafiullah, Mohamed; Stark, Holger; Lażewska, Dorota; Adem, Abdu; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna

    2014-06-01

    To determine the potential of histamine H3 receptor (H3R) ligands as new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), aromatic ether, and diether derivatives (1-12) belonging to the nonimidazole class of ligands, with high in-vitro binding affinity at human H3R, were tested for their in-vivo anticonvulsive activity in the maximal electroshock (MES)-induced and pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-kindled seizure models in rats. The anticonvulsive effects of a systemic injection of 1-12 on MES-induced and PTZ-kindled seizures were evaluated against the reference AED phenytoin (PHT) and the structurally related H3R antagonist/inverse agonist pitolisant (PIT). Among the most promising ligands 2, 4, 5, and 11, there was a significant and dose-dependent reduction in the duration of tonic hind limb extension (THLE) in MES-induced seizure subsequent to administration of 4 and 5 [(5, 10, and 15 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.)]. The protective effects observed for the 1-(3-(3-(4-chlorophenyl)propoxy)propyl)-3-methylpiperidine derivative 11 at 10 mg/kg, i.p. were significantly greater than those of PIT, and were reversed by pretreatment with the central nervous system penetrant H1R antagonist pyrilamine (PYR) (10 mg/kg). Moreover, the protective action of the reference AED PHT, at a dose of 5 mg/kg (without considerable protection in the MES model), was significantly augmented when coadministered with derivative 11 (5 mg/kg, i.p.). Surprisingly, pretreatment with derivative 7 (10 mg/kg, i.p.), an ethylphenoxyhexyl-piperidine derivative without considerable protection in the MES model, potently altered PTZ-kindled seizure, significantly prolonged myoclonic latency time, and clearly shortened the total seizure time when compared with control, PHT, and PIT. These interesting results highlight the potential of H3R ligands as new AEDs or as adjuvants to available AED therapeutics.

  9. Alpha antagonists and intraoperative floppy iris syndrome: A spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharif A Issa

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Sharif A Issa, Omar H Hadid, Oliver Baylis, Margaret DayanDepartment of Ophthalmology, Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle upon Tyne, UKBackground: To determine occurrence of features of intraoperative floppy iris syndrome (IFIS during cataract surgery in patients taking systemic alpha-antagonists (AA.Methods: We prospectively studied patients on AA and who underwent phacoemulsification. The following were recorded: pupil diameter preoperatively, iris flaccidity, iris prolapse and peroperative miosis.Results: We studied 40 eyes of 31 subjects. Mean age was 78 years. Overall, 14 eyes (13 patients showed signs of IFIS: 9/13 (69% eyes of patients on tamsulosin, 1/18 (6% eyes in the doxazosin group, 2/2 prazosin patients, 1/4 eyes in the indoramin group, and 1/2 eyes in two patients on a combination of doxazosin and tamsulosin. Most cases (92% had only one or two signs of IFIS. Bilateral cataract surgery was undertaken in 9 patients but only one patient (on tamsulosin had features of IFIS in both eyes, while 4 patients (2 on tamsulosin and 2 on other AA showed signs of IFIS in one eye only, and 4 patients did not show IFIS in either eye.Conclusion: Most AA were associated with IFIS, but it tends to present as a spectrum of signs rather than full triad originally described. Tamsulosin was most likely to be associated with IFIS; however, its intake does not necessarily mean that IFIS will occur. For patients on AA, the behavior of the iris intraoperatively in one eye is a poor predictor of the other eye. Surgeons should anticipate the occurrence of IFIS in any patient on AA.Keywords: alpha blocker, alpha antagonist, cataract surgery, intraoperative floppy iris syndrome, tamsulosin.

  10. Comparison of GnRH Agonist, GnRH Antagonist, and GnRH Antagonist Mild Protocol of Controlled Ovarian Hyperstimulation in Good Prognosis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Stimpfel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The reports on how to stimulate the ovaries for oocyte retrieval in good prognosis patients are contradictory and often favor one type of controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH. For this reason, we retrospectively analyzed data from IVF/ICSI cycles carried out at our IVF Unit in good prognosis patients (aged <38 years, first and second attempts of IVF/ICSI, more than 3 oocytes retrieved to elucidate which type of COH is optimal at our condition. The included patients were undergoing COH using GnRH agonist, GnRH antagonist or GnRH antagonist mild protocol in combination with gonadotrophins. We found significant differences in the average number of retrieved oocytes, immature oocytes, fertilized oocytes, embryos, transferred embryos, embryos frozen per cycle, and cycles with embryo freezing between studied COH protocols. Although there were no differences in live birth rate (LBR, miscarriages, and ectopic pregnancies between compared protocols, pregnancy rate was significantly higher in GnRH antagonist mild protocol in comparison with both GnRH antagonist and GnRH agonist protocols and cumulative LBR per cycle was significantly higher in GnRH antagonist mild protocol in comparison to GnRH agonist protocol. Our data show that GnRH antagonist mild protocol of COH could be the best method of choice in good prognosis patients.

  11. Agar composition affects in vitro screening of biocontrol activity of antagonistic microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosmans, L; De Bruijn, I; De Mot, R; Rediers, H; Lievens, B

    2016-08-01

    Agar-based screening assays are the method of choice when evaluating antagonistic potential of bacterial biocontrol-candidates against pathogens. We showed that when using the same medium, but different agar compositions, the activity of a bacterial antagonist against Agrobacterium was strongly affected. Consequently, results from in vitro screenings should be interpreted cautiously.

  12. Marketed New Drug Delivery Systems for Opioid Agonists/Antagonists Administration: A Rapid Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Hoda; Pardakhty, Abbas

    2016-04-01

    Novel drug delivery systems for controlled-release of opioid agonists as a long time painkillers or opioid antagonists for opium, heroin, and alcohol addiction are under development or in clinical use today. In this article, the field of "new drug delivery systems" is momentarily reviewed from the viewpoint of the marketed opioid agonists/antagonists dosage forms today.

  13. Marketed New Drug Delivery Systems for Opioid Agonists/Antagonists Administration: A Rapid Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Soltani, Hoda; Pardakhty, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Novel drug delivery systems for controlled-release of opioid agonists as a long time painkillers or opioid antagonists for opium, heroin, and alcohol addiction are under development or in clinical use today. In this article, the field of “new drug delivery systems” is momentarily reviewed from the viewpoint of the marketed opioid agonists/antagonists dosage forms today.

  14. Screening of Fungus Antagonists against Six Main Disease Pathogens in Crops

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    28 soil samples were collected from the rhizosphere of 16 plant species in six different districts in Hunan. As a result of isolation and purification, 122 fungus strains were obtained of which the antagonistic activity was tested against six fungus pathogens in tomato, cotton, cucumber, chilli, rice and rape, and 17 strains were found antagonistic to one or more pathogenic fungi.

  15. Agar composition affects in vitro screening of biocontrol activity of antagonistic microorganisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosmans, Lien; De Bruijn, I.; de Mot, Rene; Readers, Hans; Lievens, Bart

    2016-01-01

    Agar-based screening assays are the method of choice when evaluating antagonistic potential of bacterial biocontrol-candidates against pathogens.Weshowed thatwhen using the samemedium, but different agar compositions, the activity of a bacterial antagonist against Agrobacteriumwas strongly affected.

  16. Anti-inflammatory properties of a novel peptide interleukin 1 receptor antagonist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klementiev, Boris; Li, Shizhong; Korshunova, Irina

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin 1 (IL-1) is implicated in neuroinflammation, an essential component of neurodegeneration. We evaluated the potential anti-inflammatory effect of a novel peptide antagonist of IL-1 signaling, Ilantide.......Interleukin 1 (IL-1) is implicated in neuroinflammation, an essential component of neurodegeneration. We evaluated the potential anti-inflammatory effect of a novel peptide antagonist of IL-1 signaling, Ilantide....

  17. Discovery of the CCR1 antagonist, BMS-817399, for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santella, Joseph B; Gardner, Daniel S; Duncia, John V; Wu, Hong; Dhar, Murali; Cavallaro, Cullen; Tebben, Andrew J; Carter, Percy H; Barrish, Joel C; Yarde, Melissa; Briceno, Stephanie W; Cvijic, Mary Ellen; Grafstrom, R Robert; Liu, Richard; Patel, Sima R; Watson, Andrew J; Yang, Guchen; Rose, Anne V; Vickery, Rodney D; Caceres-Cortes, Janet; Caporuscio, Christian; Camac, Daniel M; Khan, Javed A; An, Yongmi; Foster, William R; Davies, Paul; Hynes, John

    2014-09-25

    High-affinity, functionally potent, urea-based antagonists of CCR1 have been discovered. Modulation of PXR transactivation has revealed the selective and orally bioavailable CCR1 antagonist BMS-817399 (29), which entered clinical trials for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

  18. Inhibition of tryptase release from human colon mast cells by histamine receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shao-Heng; Xie, Hua; Fu, Yi-Ling

    2005-03-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the ability of histamine receptor antagonists to modulate tryptase release from human colon mast cells induced by histamine. Enzymatically dispersed cells from human colon were challenged with histamine in the absence or presence of the histamine receptor antagonists, and the tryptase release was determined. It was found that histamine induced tryptase release from colon mast cells was inhibited by up to approximately 61.5% and 24% by the H1 histamine receptor antagonist terfenadine and the H2 histamine receptor antagonist cimetidine, respectively, when histamine and its antagonists were added to cells at the same time. The H3 histamine receptor antagonist clobenpropit had no effect on histamine induced tryptase release from colon mast cells at all concentrations tested. Preincubation of terfenadine, cimetidine or clobenpropit with cells for 20 minutes before challenging with histamine did not enhance the ability of these antihistamines to inhibit histamine induced tryptase release. Apart from terfenadine at 100 microg/ml, the antagonists themselves did not stimulate tryptase release from colon mast cells following both 15 minutes and 35 minutes incubation periods. It was concluded that H1 and H2 histamine receptor antagonists were able to inhibit histamine induced tryptase release from colon mast cells. This not only added some new data to our hypothesis of self-amplification mechanisms of mast cell degranulation, but also suggested that combining these two types of antihistamine drugs could be useful for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

  19. Survivin mRNA antagonists using locked nucleic acid, potential for molecular cancer therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisker, Niels; Westergaard, Majken; Hansen, Henrik Frydenlund;

    2007-01-01

    synergistic effect when combining the mRNA antagonists against Survivin with the chemotherapeutic Taxol. This effect was demonstrated at concentrations of antagonists far lower than any previously demonstrated, indicating the high potential of locked nucleic acid for therapeutic use. Further characterisations...

  20. Transitions between male and female heterogamety caused by sex-antagonistic selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doorn, G. Sander; Kirkpatrick, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Many animal taxa show frequent and rapid transitions between male heterogamety (XY) and female heterogamety (ZW). We develop a model showing how these transitions can be driven by sex-antagonistic selection. Sex-antagonistic selection acting on loci linked to a new sex-determination mutation can cau

  1. Draft genome sequence of the antagonistic rhizosphere bacterium Serratia plymuthica strain PRI-2C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbeva, P; van Elsas, J D; de Boer, W

    2012-08-01

    Serratia plymuthica strain PRI-2C is a rhizosphere bacterial strain with antagonistic activity against different plant pathogens. Here we present the 5.39-Mb (G+C content, 55.67%) draft genome sequence of S. plymuthica strain PRI-2C with the aim of providing insight into the genomic basis of its antagonistic activity.

  2. Antagonistic activity of autosimbionts А. viridans, B. subtilis and their probiotic association to conditionally microflora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stepansky D.A.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this research the data on examination of antagonist qualities of bioassotiantes A. viridans and strain B. subtilis 3 towards pathogenic and opportunistic pathogenic microflora isolated from oropharynx and nasopharynx of children who were in contact with patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (MBT + are submitted. The expressed antagonist activity of autosimbionts A. viridans towards pathogenic and opportunistic pathogenic microflora was shown. Common antagonist activity of A. viridans (k N 1 and B. subtilis 3 towards diverse strains of test-cultures is 1,5-2 times higher, than separate antagonist activity of A. viridans (k №1 and B. subtilis 3. Received research data showed the possibility of continuing work on development of probiotic associations, that contain representatives of normal microflora - bioassociants A. viridans and probiotic strains B. subtilis 3 with broadspectrum of antagonistic activity in relation to the various groups of bacterium.

  3. Screening of antagonistic bacteria for biological control of nursery wilt of black pepper (Piper nigrum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anith, K N; Radhakrishnan, N V; Manomohandas, T P

    2003-01-01

    Bacterial antagonists of Phytophthora capsici were isolated from underground shoot portions of rooted cuttings of black pepper. Initially isolates were screened by dual culture on potato dextrose agar and carrot agar. Further, a screening was done on black pepper shoots for supression of lesion caused by the pathogen. Most of the antagonists showed varying levels of antagonism in the dual culture and the shoot assay. Isolate PN-026, showing the highest suppression of lesion development in the shoot assay was found to be the most efficient antagonist in reducing Phytophthora capsici induced nursery wilt of black pepper. This screening involving the host, pathogen, and the antagonist, performed on black pepper shoot (the planting material for this vegetatively propagated crop), could be used as a rapid and reliable method for the isolation of efficient bacterial antagonists of P. capsici.

  4. Anticonvulsant effects of isomeric nonimidazole histamine H3 receptor antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadek B

    2016-11-01

    , in which 3-piperidinopropan-1-ol in ligand 2 was replaced by (4-(3-(piperidin-1-ylpropoxyphenylmethanol, and its (S-enantiomer (4 significantly and in a dose-dependent manner reduced convulsions or exhibited full protection in MES and PTZ convulsions model, respectively. Interestingly, the protective effects observed for the (R-enantiomer (3 in MES model were significantly greater than those of the standard H3R inverse agonist/antagonist pitolisant, comparable with those observed for PHT, and reversed when rats were pretreated with the selective H3R agonist R-(α-methyl-histamine. Comparisons of the observed antagonistic in vitro affinities among the ligands 1–6 revealed profound stereoselectivity at human H3Rs with varying preferences for this receptor subtype. Moreover, the in vivo anticonvulsant effects observed in this study for ligands 1–6 showed stereoselectivity in different convulsion models in male adult rats. Keywords: histamine, H3 receptor, isomeric antagonists, anticonvulsant activity, stereo­selectivity

  5. Dopamine D(3) receptor antagonists: The quest for a potentially selective PET ligand. Part two: Lead optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheli, Fabrizio; Holmes, Ian; Arista, Luca; Bonanomi, Giorgio; Braggio, Simone; Cardullo, Francesca; Di Fabio, Romano; Donati, Daniele; Gentile, Gabriella; Hamprecht, Dieter; Terreni, Silvia; Heidbreder, Christian; Savoia, Chiara; Griffante, Cristiana; Worby, Angela

    2009-08-01

    The lead optimization process to identify new selective dopamine D(3) receptor antagonists is reported. DMPK parameters and binding data suggest that selective D(3) receptor antagonists as potential PET ligands might have been identified.

  6. Anticonvulsant effects of isomeric nonimidazole histamine H3 receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadek, Bassem; Saad, Ali; Schwed, Johannes Stephan; Weizel, Lilia; Walter, Miriam; Stark, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Phenytoin (PHT), valproic acid, and modern antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), eg, remacemide, loreclezole, and safinamide, are only effective within a maximum of 70%-80% of epileptic patients, and in many cases the clinical use of AEDs is restricted by their side effects. Therefore, a continuous need remains to discover innovative chemical entities for the development of active and safer AEDs. Ligands targeting central histamine H3 receptors (H3Rs) for epilepsy might be a promising therapeutic approach. To determine the potential of H3Rs ligands as new AEDs, we recently reported that no anticonvulsant effects were observed for the (S)-2-(4-(3-(piperidin-1-yl)propoxy)benzylamino)propanamide (1). In continuation of our research, we asked whether anticonvulsant differences in activities will be observed for its R-enantiomer, namely, (R)-2-(4-(3-(piperidin-1-yl)propoxy)benzylamino)propaneamide (2) and analogs thereof, in maximum electroshock (MES)-, pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-, and strychnine (STR)-induced convulsion models in rats having PHT and valproic acid (VPA) as reference AEDs. Unlike the S-enantiomer (1), the results show that animals pretreated intraperitoneally (ip) with the R-enantiomer 2 (10 mg/kg) were moderately protected in MES and STR induced models, whereas proconvulsant effect was observed for the same ligand in PTZ-induced convulsion models. However, animals pretreated with intraperitoneal doses of 5, 10, or 15 mg/kg of structurally bulkier (R)-enantiomer (3), in which 3-piperidinopropan-1-ol in ligand 2 was replaced by (4-(3-(piperidin-1-yl)propoxy)phenyl)methanol, and its (S)-enantiomer (4) significantly and in a dose-dependent manner reduced convulsions or exhibited full protection in MES and PTZ convulsions model, respectively. Interestingly, the protective effects observed for the (R)-enantiomer (3) in MES model were significantly greater than those of the standard H3R inverse agonist/antagonist pitolisant, comparable with those observed for PHT, and

  7. The NK1 receptor antagonist L822429 reduces heroin reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbier, Estelle; Vendruscolo, Leandro F; Schlosburg, Joel E; Edwards, Scott; Juergens, Nathan; Park, Paula E; Misra, Kaushik K; Cheng, Kejun; Rice, Kenner C; Schank, Jesse; Schulteis, Gery; Koob, George F; Heilig, Markus

    2013-05-01

    Genetic deletion of the neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) has been shown to decrease the reinforcing properties of opioids, but it is unknown whether pharmacological NK1R blockade has the same effect. Here, we examined the effect of L822429, a rat-specific NK1R antagonist, on the reinforcing properties of heroin in rats on short (1 h: ShA) or long (12 h: LgA) access to intravenous heroin self-administration. ShA produces heroin self-administration rates that are stable over time, whereas LgA leads to an escalation of heroin intake thought to model important dependence-related aspects of addiction. L822429 reduced heroin self-administration and the motivation to consume heroin, measured using a progressive-ratio schedule, in both ShA and LgA rats. L822429 also decreased anxiety-like behavior in both groups, measured on the elevated plus maze, but did not affect mechanical hypersensitivity observed in LgA rats. Expression of TacR1 (the gene encoding NK1R) was decreased in reward- and stress-related brain areas both in ShA and LgA rats compared with heroin-naïve rats, but did not differ between the two heroin-experienced groups. In contrast, passive exposure to heroin produced increases in TacR1 expression in the prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens. Taken together, these results show that pharmacological NK1R blockade attenuates heroin reinforcement. The observation that animals with ShA and LgA to heroin were similarly affected by L822429 indicates that the SP/NK1R system is not specifically involved in neuroadaptations that underlie escalation resulting from LgA self-administration. Instead, the NK1R antagonist appears to attenuate acute, positively reinforcing properties of heroin and may be useful as an adjunct to relapse prevention in detoxified opioid-dependent subjects.

  8. The Role of α1-Adrenoceptor Antagonists in the Treatment of Prostate and Other Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallory Batty

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This review evaluates the role of α-adrenoceptor antagonists as a potential treatment of prostate cancer (PCa. Cochrane, Google Scholar and Pubmed were accessed to retrieve sixty-two articles for analysis. In vitro studies demonstrate that doxazosin, prazosin and terazosin (quinazoline α-antagonists induce apoptosis, decrease cell growth, and proliferation in PC-3, LNCaP and DU-145 cell lines. Similarly, the piperazine based naftopidil induced cell cycle arrest and death in LNCaP-E9 cell lines. In contrast, sulphonamide based tamsulosin did not exhibit these effects. In vivo data was consistent with in vitro findings as the quinazoline based α-antagonists prevented angiogenesis and decreased tumour mass in mice models of PCa. Mechanistically the cytotoxic and antitumor effects of the α-antagonists appear largely independent of α 1-blockade. The proposed targets include: VEGF, EGFR, HER2/Neu, caspase 8/3, topoisomerase 1 and other mitochondrial apoptotic inducing factors. These cytotoxic effects could not be evaluated in human studies as prospective trial data is lacking. However, retrospective studies show a decreased incidence of PCa in males exposed to α-antagonists. As human data evaluating the use of α-antagonists as treatments are lacking; well designed, prospective clinical trials are needed to conclusively demonstrate the anticancer properties of quinazoline based α-antagonists in PCa and other cancers.

  9. Survey of H2-antagonist usage in acute upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, B D; Meriano, F V; Phipps, T L; Ho, H; Zuckerman, M J

    1990-02-01

    H2-antagonists are frequently used in the management of upper gastrointestinal (UGI) hemorrhage despite their lack of proven efficacy. In order to determine the pattern of H2-antagonist usage for this indication, we retrospectively reviewed the charts of 137 patients admitted with acute UGI bleeding over a 1-year period at two teaching hospitals in West Texas. An H2-antagonist was ordered in 89% of patients (77%) intravenous, 12% oral). It was administered within 2 h of admission in 25% of these patients, within 4 h in 54%, and within 8 h in 78%. An H2-antagonist was ordered among the initial six orders in 49% and among the initial 10 orders in 77% of patients. Considering orders for specific therapies, an H2-antagonist was in the initial three orders in 60% of patients and among the initial six orders in 97%. Of the patients who were prescribed an H2-antagonist and who also had upper endoscopy, the drug was ordered prior to endoscopy in 86%. This review of H2-antagonist usage in the management of acute UGI bleeding has identified a prescribing pattern of writing for these drugs early in the sequence of order writing, with the drugs being given early in the course of hospitalization.

  10. Agonists and Antagonists of TGF-β Family Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chenbei

    2016-08-01

    The discovery of the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) family ligands and the realization that their bioactivities need to be tightly controlled temporally and spatially led to intensive research that has identified a multitude of extracellular modulators of TGF-β family ligands, uncovered their functions in developmental and pathophysiological processes, defined the mechanisms of their activities, and explored potential modulator-based therapeutic applications in treating human diseases. These studies revealed a diverse repertoire of extracellular and membrane-associated molecules that are capable of modulating TGF-β family signals via control of ligand availability, processing, ligand-receptor interaction, and receptor activation. These molecules include not only soluble ligand-binding proteins that were conventionally considered as agonists and antagonists of TGF-β family of growth factors, but also extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and proteoglycans that can serve as "sink" and control storage and release of both the TGF-β family ligands and their regulators. This extensive network of soluble and ECM modulators helps to ensure dynamic and cell-specific control of TGF-β family signals. This article reviews our knowledge of extracellular modulation of TGF-β growth factors by diverse proteins and their molecular mechanisms to regulate TGF-β family signaling.

  11. Antagonistic evolution in an aposematic predator-prey signaling system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speed, Michael P; Franks, Daniel W

    2014-10-01

    Warning signals within species, such as the bright colors of chemically defended animals, are usually considered mutualistic, monomorphic traits. Such a view is however increasingly at odds with the growing empirical literature, showing nontrivial levels of signal variation within prey populations. Key to understanding this variation, we argue, could be a recognition that toxicity levels frequently vary within populations because of environmental heterogeneity. Inequalities in defense may undermine mutualistic monomorphic signaling, causing evolutionary antagonism between loci that determine appearance of less well-defended and better defended prey forms within species. In this article, we apply a stochastic model of evolved phenotypic plasticity to the evolution of prey signals. We show that when toxicity levels vary, then antagonistic interactions can lead to evolutionary conflict between alleles at different signaling loci, causing signal evolution, "red queen-like" evolutionary chase, and one or more forms of signaling equilibria. A key prediction is that variation in the way that predators use information about toxicity levels in their attack behaviors profoundly affects the evolutionary characteristics of the prey signaling systems. Environmental variation is known to cause variation in many qualities that organisms signal; our approach may therefore have application to other signaling systems.

  12. Preliminary investigations into triazole derived androgen receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altimari, Jarrad M; Niranjan, Birunthi; Risbridger, Gail P; Schweiker, Stephanie S; Lohning, Anna E; Henderson, Luke C

    2014-05-01

    A range of 1,4-substituted-1,2,3-N-phenyltriazoles were synthesized and evaluated as non-steroidal androgen receptor (AR) antagonists. The motivation for this study was to replace the N-phenyl amide portion of small molecule antiandrogens with a 1,2,3-triazole and determine effects, if any, on biological activity. The synthetic methodology presented herein is robust, high yielding and extremely rapid. Using this methodology a series of 17 N-aryl triazoles were synthesized from commercially available starting materials in less than 3h. After preliminary biological screening at 20 and 40 μM, the most promising three compounds were found to display IC50 values of 40-50 μM against androgen dependent (LNCaP) cells and serve as a starting point for further structure-activity investigations. All compounds in this work were the focus of an in silico study to dock the compounds into the human androgen receptor ligand binding domain (hARLBD) and compare their predicted binding affinity with known antiandrogens. A comparison of receptor-ligand interactions for the wild type and T877A mutant AR revealed two novel polar interactions. One with Q738 of the wild type site and the second with the mutated A877 residue.

  13. Iontophoresis of endothelin receptor antagonists in rats and men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthieu Roustit

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The treatment of scleroderma-related digital ulcers is challenging. The oral endothelin receptor antagonist (ERA bosentan has been approved but it may induce liver toxicity. The objective of this study was to test whether ERAs bosentan and sitaxentan could be locally delivered using iontophoresis. METHODS: Cathodal and anodal iontophoresis of bosentan and sitaxentan were performed on anaesthetized rat hindquarters without and during endothelin-1 infusion. Skin blood flow was quantified using laser-Doppler imaging and cutaneous tolerability was assessed. Iontophoresis of sitaxentan (20 min, 20 or 100 µA was subsequently performed on the forearm skin of healthy men (n = 5. RESULTS: In rats neither bosentan nor sitaxentan increased skin blood flux compared to NaCl. When simultaneously infusing endothelin-1, cathodal iontophoresis of sitaxentan increased skin blood flux compared to NaCl (AUC(0-20 were 44032.2 ± 12277 and 14957.5 ± 23818.8 %BL.s, respectively; P = 0.01. In humans, sitaxentan did not significantly increase skin blood flux as compared to NaCl. Iontophoresis of ERAs was well tolerated both in animals and humans. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that cathodal iontophoresis of sitaxentan but not bosentan partially reverses endothelin-induced skin vasoconstriction in rats, suggesting that sitaxentan diffuses into the dermis. However, sitaxentan does not influence basal skin microvascular tone in rats or in humans.

  14. Discovery and Characterization of an Endogenous CXCR4 Antagonist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onofrio Zirafi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available CXCL12-CXCR4 signaling controls multiple physiological processes and its dysregulation is associated with cancers and inflammatory diseases. To discover as-yet-unknown endogenous ligands of CXCR4, we screened a blood-derived peptide library for inhibitors of CXCR4-tropic HIV-1 strains. This approach identified a 16 amino acid fragment of serum albumin as an effective and highly specific CXCR4 antagonist. The endogenous peptide, termed EPI-X4, is evolutionarily conserved and generated from the highly abundant albumin precursor by pH-regulated proteases. EPI-X4 forms an unusual lasso-like structure and antagonizes CXCL12-induced tumor cell migration, mobilizes stem cells, and suppresses inflammatory responses in mice. Furthermore, the peptide is abundant in the urine of patients with inflammatory kidney diseases and may serve as a biomarker. Our results identify EPI-X4 as a key regulator of CXCR4 signaling and introduce proteolysis of an abundant precursor protein as an alternative concept for chemokine receptor regulation.

  15. Nalmefene: intravenous safety and kinetics of a new opioid antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, R; Howes, J; Gentile, J; Hsu, H B; Hsiao, J; Garg, D; Weidler, D; Meyer, M; Tuttle, R

    1986-01-01

    In a placebo-controlled, double-blind study we evaluated the safety and kinetics of a new narcotic antagonist, nalmefene, after 2, 6, 12, and 24 mg intravenous doses to healthy men. At each dose level four subjects received active drug and two received placebo. The drug was well tolerated at all dose levels with only mild and transient side effects, the most common of which was lightheadedness. The plasma concentration-time data were best fit with a triexponential equation, and the terminal elimination phase had a harmonic mean t1/2 of 8 to 9 hours. Only about 5% of the dose was excreted in the urine as intact nalmefene, with up to 60% excreted as nalmefene glucuronide. Although intersubject differences were noted, mean or dose-normalized mean kinetic parameters such as clearance, steady-state volume of distribution, terminal t1/2, and AUC showed no consistent trends related to increasing doses, indicating that nalmefene has linear pharmacokinetics.

  16. Bioisosteric phentolamine analogs as potent alpha-adrenergic antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seoung-Soo; Bavadekar, Supriya A; Lee, Sang-Il; Patil, Popat N; Lalchandani, S G; Feller, Dennis R; Miller, Duane D

    2005-11-01

    The synthesis and biological evaluation of a new series of bioisosteric phentolamine analogs are described. Replacement of the carbon next to the imidazoline ring of phentolamine with a nitrogen atom provides compounds (2, 3) that are about 1.6 times and 4.1 times more potent functionally than phentolamine on rat alpha1-adrenergic receptors, respectively. In receptor binding assays, the affinities of phentolamine and its bioisosteric analogs were determined on the human embryonic kidney (HEK) and Chinese Hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines expressing the human alpha1- and alpha2-AR subtypes, respectively. Analogs 2 and 3, both, displayed higher binding affinities at the alpha2- versus the alpha1-ARs, affinities being the least at the alpha1B-AR. Binding affinities of the methoxy ether analog 2 were greater than those of the phenolic analog 3 at all six alpha-AR subtypes. One of the nitrogen atoms in the imidazoline ring of phentolamine was replaced with an oxygen atom to give compounds 4 and 5, resulting in a 2-substituted oxazoline ring. The low functional antagonist activity on rat aorta, and binding potencies of these two compounds on human alpha1A- and alpha2A-AR subtypes indicate that a basic functional group is important for optimum binding to the alpha1- and alpha2A-adrenergic receptors.

  17. Blood flow distribution with adrenergic and histaminergic antagonists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, C.H.; Davis, D.L.; Sutton, E.T.

    1989-03-01

    Superficial fibular nerve stimulation (SFNS) causes increased pre- and post-capillary resistances as well as increased capillary permeability in the dog hind paw. These responses indicate possible adrenergic and histaminergic interactions. The distribution of blood flow between capillaries and arteriovenous anastomoses (AVA) may depend on the relative effects of these neural inputs. Right hind paws of anesthetized heparinized dogs were vascularly and neurally isolated and perfused with controlled pressure. Blood flow distribution was calculated from the venous recovery of 85Sr-labeled microspheres (15 microns). The mean transit times of 131I-albumin and 85Sr-labeled microspheres were calculated. The effects of adrenergic and histaminergic antagonists with and without SFNS were determined. Phentolamine blocked the entire response to SFNS. Prazosin attenuated increases in total and AVA resistance. Yohimbine prevented increased total resistance, attenuated the AVA resistance increase, and revealed a decrease in capillary circuit resistance. Pyrilamine attenuated total resistance increase while SFNS increased capillary and AVA resistances. Metiamide had no effect on blood flow distribution with SFNS. The increase in AVA resistance with SFNS apparently resulted from a combination of alpha 1 and alpha 2 receptor stimulation but not histaminergic effects.

  18. Montelukast: More than a Cysteinyl Leukotriene Receptor Antagonist?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory R. Tintinger

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The prototype cysteinyl leukotriene receptor antagonist, montelukast, is generally considered to have a niche application in the therapy of exercise- and aspirin-induced asthma. It is also used as add-on therapy in patients whose asthma is poorly controlled with inhaled corticosteroid monotherapy, or with the combination of a long-acting β(2-agonist and an inhaled corticosteroid. Recently, however, montelukast has been reported to possess secondary anti-inflammatory properties, apparently unrelated to conventional antagonism of cysteinyl leukotriene receptors. These novel activities enable montelukast to target eosinophils, monocytes, and, in particular, the corticosteroid-insensitive neutrophil, suggesting that this agent may have a broader spectrum of anti-inflammatory activities than originally thought. If so, montelukast is potentially useful in the chemotherapy of intermittent asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cystic fibrosis, and viral bronchiolitis, which, to a large extent, involve airway epithelial cell/neutrophil interactions. The primary objective of this mini-review is to present evidence for the cysteinyl leukotrien–independent mechanisms of action of montelukast and their potential clinical relevance.

  19. Locomotor adaptation to a soleus EMG-controlled antagonistic exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Keith E; Kinnaird, Catherine R; Ferris, Daniel P

    2013-04-01

    Locomotor adaptation in humans is not well understood. To provide insight into the neural reorganization that occurs following a significant disruption to one's learned neuromuscular map relating a given motor command to its resulting muscular action, we tied the mechanical action of a robotic exoskeleton to the electromyography (EMG) profile of the soleus muscle during walking. The powered exoskeleton produced an ankle dorsiflexion torque proportional to soleus muscle recruitment thus limiting the soleus' plantar flexion torque capability. We hypothesized that neurologically intact subjects would alter muscle activation patterns in response to the antagonistic exoskeleton by decreasing soleus recruitment. Subjects practiced walking with the exoskeleton for two 30-min sessions. The initial response to the perturbation was to "fight" the resistive exoskeleton by increasing soleus activation. By the end of training, subjects had significantly reduced soleus recruitment resulting in a gait pattern with almost no ankle push-off. In addition, there was a trend for subjects to reduce gastrocnemius recruitment in proportion to the soleus even though only the soleus EMG was used to control the exoskeleton. The results from this study demonstrate the ability of the nervous system to recalibrate locomotor output in response to substantial changes in the mechanical output of the soleus muscle and associated sensory feedback. This study provides further evidence that the human locomotor system of intact individuals is highly flexible and able to adapt to achieve effective locomotion in response to a broad range of neuromuscular perturbations.

  20. [Vascular calcifications, the hidden side effects of vitamin K antagonists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennis, Youssef; Vengadessane, Subashini; Bodeau, Sandra; Gras, Valérie; Bricca, Giampiero; Kamel, Saïd; Liabeuf, Sophie

    2016-09-01

    Despite the availability of new oral anticoagulants, vitamin K antagonists (VKA, such as fluindione, acenocoumarol or warfarin) remain currently the goal standard medicines for oral prevention or treatment of thromboembolic disorders. They inhibit the cycle of the vitamin K and its participation in the enzymatic gamma-carboxylation of many proteins. The VKA prevent the activation of the vitamin K-dependent blood clotting factors limiting thus the initiation of the coagulation cascade. But other proteins are vitamin K-dependent and also remain inactive in the presence of VKA. This is the case of matrix Gla-protein (MGP), a protein that plays a major inhibitory role in the development of vascular calcifications. Several experimental and epidemiological results suggest that the use of the VKA could promote the development of vascular calcifications increasing thus the cardiovascular risk. This risk seems to be higher in patients with chronic kidney disease or mellitus diabetes who are more likely to develop vascular calcifications, and may be due to a decrease of the MGP activity. This review aims at summarizing the data currently available making vascular calcifications the probably underestimated side effects of VKA.

  1. Effect of antagonist muscle fatigue on knee extension torque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltman, J G M; Sargeant, A J; Ball, D; Maganaris, C N; de Haan, A

    2003-09-01

    The effect of hamstring fatigue on knee extension torque was examined at different knee angles for seven male subjects. Before and after a dynamic flexion fatigue protocol (180 degrees s(-1), until dynamic torque had declined by 50%), maximal voluntary contraction extension torque was measured at four knee flexion angles (90 degrees, 70 degrees, 50 degrees and 30 degrees ). Maximal torque generating capacity and voluntary activation of the quadriceps muscle were determined using electrical stimulation. Average rectified EMG of the biceps femoris was determined. Mean dynamic flexion torque declined by 48+/-11%. Extensor maximal voluntary contraction torque, maximal torque generating capacity, voluntary activation and average rectified EMG at the four knee angles were unaffected by the hamstring fatigue protocol. Only at 50 degrees knee angle was voluntary activation significantly lower (15.7%) after fatigue ( P<0.05). In addition, average rectified EMG before fatigue was not significantly influenced by knee angle. It was concluded that a fatigued hamstring muscle did not increase the maximal voluntary contraction extension torque and knee angle did not change coactivation. Three possible mechanisms may explain the results: a potential difference in recruited fibre populations in antagonist activity compared with the fibres which were fatigued in the protocol, a smaller loss in isometric torque generating capacity of the hamstring muscle than was expected from the dynamic measurements and/or a reduction in voluntary activation.

  2. Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonists for Treatment of Hypertension and Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sica, Domenic A

    2015-01-01

    Spironolactone and eplerenone are both mineralocorticoid-receptor antagonists. These compounds block both the epithelial and nonepithelial actions of aldosterone, with the latter assuming increasing clinical relevance. Spironolactone and eplerenone both affect reductions in blood pressure either as mono- or add-on therapy; moreover, they each afford survival benefits in diverse circumstances of heart failure and the probability of renal protection in proteinuric chronic kidney disease. However, as use of mineralocorticoid-blocking agents has expanded, the hazards inherent in taking such drugs have become more apparent. Whereas the endocrine side effects of spironolactone are in most cases little more than a cosmetic annoyance, the potassium-sparing effects of both spironolactone and eplerenone can prove disastrous, even fatal, if sufficient degrees of hyperkalemia emerge. For most patients, however, the risk of developing hyperkalemia in and of itself should not discourage the sensible clinician from bringing these compounds into play. Hyperkalemia should always be considered a possibility in patients receiving either of these medications; therefore, anticipatory steps should be taken to minimize the likelihood of its occurrence if long-term therapy of these agents is being considered.

  3. Spatial working memory in rats: effects of monoaminergic antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, W W; Rush, J R

    1983-01-01

    To assess the possible involvement of the monoaminergic neurotransmitters norepinephrine, dopamine and serotonin in the maintenance of spatial working memory rats were treated with antagonists 0 or 2 hr after completing the first 4 choices in an 8 arm maze. Haloperidol (0.25-1 mg/kg), when administered 2 hr after Choice 4, produced a small but consistent impairment in performance on retention tests given 5 hr after the first 4 choices. This deficit closely resembled natural forgetting in terms of the type of errors committed. By contrast, haloperidol in the same doses given 0 hr after Choice 4 or 3 hr before the first 4 choices did not affect retention. Likewise treatment with propranolol (10-20 mg/kg), phentolamine (5-20 mg/kg) or methysergide (5-15 mg/kg) did not impair spatial memory, regardless of when these drugs were injected within the session. Evidently dopaminergic neuronal systems are important in the maintenance of normal spatial working memory.

  4. Antagonistic functions of two stardust isoforms in Drosophila photoreceptor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulgakova, Natalia A; Rentsch, Michaela; Knust, Elisabeth

    2010-11-15

    Membrane-associated guanylate kinases (MAGUKs) are scaffolding proteins that organize supramolecular protein complexes, thereby partitioning the plasma membrane into spatially and functionally distinct subdomains. Their modular organization is ideally suited to organize protein complexes with cell type- or stage-specific composition, or both. Often more than one MAGUK isoform is expressed by one gene in the same cell, yet very little is known about their individual in vivo functions. Here, we show that two isoforms of Drosophila stardust, Sdt-H (formerly called Sdt-B2) and Sdt-D, which differ in their N terminus, are expressed in adult photoreceptors. Both isoforms associate with Crumbs and PATJ, constituents of the conserved Crumbs-Stardust complex. However, they form distinct complexes, localized at the stalk, a restricted region of the apical plasma membrane. Strikingly, Sdt-H and Sdt-D have antagonistic functions. While Sdt-H overexpression increases stalk membrane length and prevents light-dependent retinal degeneration, Sdt-D overexpression reduces stalk length and enhances light-dependent retinal degeneration. These results suggest that a fine-tuned balance of different Crumbs complexes regulates photoreceptor homeostasis.

  5. Histamine and histamine receptor antagonists in cancer biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaya, Bruno; Nicolau-Galmés, Francesca; Jangi, Shawkat M; Ortega-Martínez, Idoia; Alonso-Tejerina, Erika; Burgos-Bretones, Juan; Pérez-Yarza, Gorka; Asumendi, Aintzane; Boyano, María D

    2010-07-01

    Histamine has been demonstrated to be involved in cell proliferation, embryonic development, and tumour growth. These various biological effects are mediated through the activation of specific histamine receptors (H1, H2, H3, and H4) that differ in their tissue expression patterns and functions. Although many in vitro and in vivo studies of the modulatory roles of histamine in tumour development and metastasis have been reported, the effect of histamine in the progression of some types of tumours remains controversial; however, recent findings on the role of histamine in the immune system have shed new light on this question. This review focuses on the recent advances in understanding the roles of histamine and its receptors in tumour biology. We report our recent observations of the anti-tumoural effect of H1 histamine antagonists on experimental and human melanomas. We have found that in spite of exogenous histamine stimulated human melanoma cell proliferation, clonogenic ability and migration activity in a dose-dependent manner, the melanoma tumour growth was not modulated by in vivo histamine treatment. On the contrary, terfenadine-treatment in vitro induced melanoma cell death by apoptosis and in vivo terfenadine treatment significantly inhibited tumour growth in murine models. These observations increase our understanding of cancer biology and may inspire novel anticancer therapeutic strategies.

  6. Effect of platelet activating factor antagonist treatment on gentamicin nephrotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rodriguez-Barbero

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available To assess whether PAF could be involved in the gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity, we have studied the effect of PAF antagonist BN-52021 on renal function in rats after gentamicin (GENTA treatment. Experiments were completed in 21 Wistar rats divided into three groups: group GENTA was injected with gentamicin 100 mg kg−1 body wt/day s.c. for 6 days. Group GENTA + BN received gentamicin and BN-52021 i.p. 5 mg kg−1 body wt/day. A third group served as control. Rats were placed in meta-bolic cages and plasma creatinine and creatinine clearance were measured daily. GENTA group showed a progressive increase in plasma creatinine, a drop in creatinine clearance and an increase in urinary excretion of N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase and alkaline phosphatase. GENTA + BN group showed a lesser change in plasma creatinine and a creatinine clearance, but no difference with GENTA group in urinary excretion of NAG and AP were observed. Histological examination revealed a massive cortical tubular necrosis in rats treated with gentamicin, whereas in BN-52021 injected animals tubular damage was markedly attenuated. The present results suggest a role for PAF in the gentamicininduced nephro-toxicity.

  7. A new class of NO-donor H3-antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosco, Paolo; Bertinaria, Massimo; Di Stilo, Antonella; Marini, Elisabetta; Rolando, Barbara; Sorba, Giovanni; Fruttero, Roberta; Gasco, Alberto

    2004-05-01

    Synthesis and pharmacological characterisation of a series of compounds obtained by joining, through appropriate spacers, NO-donor furoxan and nitrooxy moieties to the imidazole ring, as well as their structurally related analogues devoid of NO-donating properties are described. All the products were studied for their capacity to interact with H3-receptors present on the guinea-pig ileum and with H2-receptors present on guinea-pig right atrium. The whole series of products displayed reversible H3-antagonistic activity. No activity on H2-receptors was observed when the products were tested at 10 microM concentration. Many of the products were also able to induce partial relaxation when added to the bath after electrical contraction of the guinea-pig ileum during the study of their H3-antagonism. This phenomenon seems to be dependent on various factors; for some compounds it proved to be dependent on NO-mediated sGC activation, for other products it could be due to their weak M3-antagonism. The investigation of the lipophilic-hydrophilic balance of all the products indicates, for many of them, an ideal value to cross the blood-brain barrier.

  8. Orexin receptor antagonists as therapeutic agents for insomnia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Clementina Equihua

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Insomnia is a common clinical condition characterized by difficulty initiating or maintaining sleep, or non-restorative sleep with impairment of daytime functioning.Currently, treatment for insomnia involves a combination of cognitive behavioral therapy and pharmacological therapy. Among pharmacological interventions, the most evidence exists for benzodiazepine receptor agonist drugs (GABAA receptor, although concerns persist regarding their safety and their limited efficacy. The use of these hypnotic medications must be carefully monitored for adverse effects.Orexin (hypocretin neuropeptides have been shown to regulate transitions between wakefulness and sleep by promoting cholinergic/monoaminergic neural pathways. This has led to the development of a new class of pharmacological agents that antagonize the physiological effects of orexin. The development of these agents may lead to novel therapies for insomnia without the side effect profile of hypnotics (e.g. impaired cognition, disturbed arousal, and motor balance difficulties. However, antagonizing a system that regulates the sleep-wake cycle may create an entirely different side effect profile. In this review, we discuss the role of orexin and its receptors on the sleep-wake cycle and that of orexin antagonists in the treatment of insomnia.

  9. Angiotensin II AT1 receptor antagonists inhibit platelet adhesion and aggregation by nitric oxide release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinowski, Leszek; Matys, Tomasz; Chabielska, Ewa; Buczko, Włodzimierz; Malinski, Tadeusz

    2002-10-01

    This study investigated the process of nitric oxide (NO) release from platelets after stimulation with different angiotensin II type 1 (AT1)-receptor antagonists and its effect on platelet adhesion and aggregation. Angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonist-stimulated NO release in platelets was compared with that in human umbilical vein endothelial cells by using a highly sensitive porphyrinic microsensor. In vitro and ex vivo effects of angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonists on platelet adhesion to collagen and thromboxane A2 analog U46619-induced aggregation were evaluated. Losartan, EXP3174, and valsartan alone caused NO release from platelets and endothelial cells in a dose-dependent manner in the range of 0.01 to 100 micro mol/L, which was attenuated by NO synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. The angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonists had more than 70% greater potency in NO release in platelets than in endothelial cells. The degree of inhibition of platelet adhesion (collagen-stimulated) and aggregation (U46619-stimulated) elicited by losartan, EXP3174, and valsartan, either in vitro or ex vivo, closely correlated with the NO levels produced by each of these drugs alone. The inhibiting effects of angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonists on collagen-stimulated adhesion and U46619-stimulated aggregation of platelets were significantly reduced by pretreatment with N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. Neither the AT2 receptor antagonist PD123319, the cyclooxygenase synthase inhibitor indomethacin, nor the selective thromboxane A2/prostaglandin H2 receptor antagonist SQ29,548 had any effect on angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonist-stimulated NO release in platelets and endothelial cells. The presented studies clearly indicate a crucial role of NO in the arterial antithrombotic effects of angiotensin II AT1-receptor antagonists.

  10. The risk of tuberculosis related to tumour necrosis factor antagonist therapies: a TBNET consensus statement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solovic, I; Sester, M; Gomez-Reino, J J

    2010-01-01

    risk of reactivating latent infections, especially tuberculosis (TB). Following TNF antagonist therapy, the relative risk for TB is increased up to 25 times, depending on the clinical setting and the TNF antagonist used. Interferon-¿ release assays or, as an alternative in individuals without a history...... of bacille Calmette-Guérin vaccination, tuberculin skin testing is recommended to screen all adult candidates for TNF antagonist treatment for the presence of latent infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Moreover, paediatric practice suggests concomitant use of both the tuberculin skin test...

  11. [Comparative pharmacophore analysis of dual dopamine D2/5-HT(2A) receptor antagonists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yan-shen; Guo, Zong-ru

    2009-03-01

    Dual dopamine D2/5-HT2A receptor antagonists have potent activity and are referred to atypical antipsychotics due to their lower propensity to elicit EPS and their moderate efficacy toward negative symptoms. However, an on-going challenge in developing atypical antipsychotics drugs is to maintain the favorable profiles and avoid of cardiovascular risk. In this paper, comparative pharmacophore analysis of dual dopamine D2/5-HT2A receptor antagonists, hERG K+ channel blockers, and alA adrenoceptor antagonists is carried out, and the results could give some insight into multi-target drug design.

  12. Development of selective agonists and antagonists of P2Y receptors

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Although elucidation of the medicinal chemistry of agonists and antagonists of the P2Y receptors has lagged behind that of many other members of group A G protein-coupled receptors, detailed qualitative and quantitative structure–activity relationships (SARs) were recently constructed for several of the subtypes. Agonists selective for P2Y1, P2Y2, and P2Y6 receptors and nucleotide antagonists selective for P2Y1 and P2Y12 receptors are now known. Selective nonnucleotide antagonists were report...

  13. Discovery and mapping of an intracellular antagonist binding site at the chemokine receptor CCR2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zweemer, Annelien J M; Bunnik, Julia; Veenhuizen, Margo;

    2014-01-01

    be divided into two groups with most likely two topographically distinct binding sites. The aim of the current study was to identify the binding site of one such group of ligands, exemplified by three allosteric antagonists, CCR2-RA-[R], JNJ-27141491, and SD-24. We first used a chimeric CCR2/CCR5 receptor......The chemokine receptor CCR2 is a G protein-coupled receptor that is involved in many diseases characterized by chronic inflammation, and therefore a large variety of CCR2 small molecule antagonists has been developed. On the basis of their chemical structures these antagonists can roughly...

  14. Pharmacology of glutamate receptor antagonists in the kindling model of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löscher, W

    1998-04-01

    It is widely accepted that excitatory amino acid transmitters such as glutamate are involved in the initiation of seizures and their propagation. Most attention has been directed to synapses using NMDA receptors, but more recent evidence indicates potential roles for ionotropic non-NMDA (AMPA/kainate) and metabotropic glutamate receptors as well. Based on the role of glutamate in the development and expression of seizures, antagonism of glutamate receptors has long been thought to provide a rational strategy in the search for new, effective anticonvulsant drugs. Furthermore, because glutamate receptor antagonists, particularly those acting on NMDA receptors, protect effectively in the induction of kindling, it was suggested that they may have utility in epilepsy prophylaxis, for example, after head trauma. However, first clinical trials with competitive and uncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonists in patients with partial (focal) seizures, showed that these drugs lack convincing anticonvulsant activity but induce severe neurotoxic adverse effects in doses which were well tolerated in healthy volunteers. Interestingly, the only animal model which predicted the unfavorable clinical activity of competitive NMDA antagonists in patients with chronic epilepsy was the kindling model of temporal lobe epilepsy, indicating that this model should be used in the search for more effective and less toxic glutamate receptor antagonists. In this review, results from a large series of experiments on different categories of glutamate receptor antagonists in fully kindled rats are summarized and discussed. NMDA antagonists, irrespective whether they are competitive, high- or low-affinity uncompetitive, glycine site or polyamine site antagonists, do not counteract focal seizure activity and only weakly, if at all, attenuate propagation to secondarily generalized seizures in this model, indicating that once kindling is established, NMDA receptors are not critical for the expression of

  15. ANTAGONISTIC ACTIVITY OF SERRATIA MARCESCENS AGAINST PYRICULARIA ORYZAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. JAIGANESH

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Rice is an important crop, widely affected by quite a number of diseases that results in higher yield losses. Among the fungal diseases, blast incited by Pyricularia oryzae is a major disease. The biological method of plant disease management seems to be an alternative to chemical fungicides in managing the blast disease. A new bio control agent viz., Serratia marcescens appears to be an ideal agent for the control of P. oryzae, because it produces chitinolytic enzymes which causes degradation of the fungal cell walls, induction of plant defence reaction and certain antifungal low molecular weight molecules. A study was undertaken to investigate the effect of a new bio control agent like S. marcescens against P. oryzae. The talc based formulation of S. marcescens (@ 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 and 2.5 kg/ha was sprayed on old IR 50 rice plants in fields. Out of the six-bio protectants tested, S. marcescens was found very effective against P. oryzae under in vitro conditions. S. marcescens could be isolated from shoots as well as roots emerging from the treated seeds and the plant parts from treated seeds inhibited P. oryzae. The antagonist S. marcescens survived in the phyllosphere even 80 days after spray. The results revealed that rice blast control was achieved by spraying S. marcescens @ 1.0 kg/ha. The increasing dose of talc-based inoculum when applied on foliage increased the phyllosphere population of S. marcescens and controlled rice blast. The maximum disease control was achieved when inoculum was applied at 2.5 kg/ha.

  16. Pediatric heart failure therapy with beta-adrenoceptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foerster, Susan R; Canter, Charles E

    2008-01-01

    Management of chronic heart failure in pediatrics has been altered by the adult literature showing improvements in mortality and hospitalization rates with the use of beta-adrenoceptor antagonists (beta-blockers) for routine therapy of all classes of ischemic and non-ischemic heart failure. Many pediatric heart failure specialists have incorporated these agents into their routine management of pediatric heart failure related to dilated cardiomyopathy or ventricular dysfunction in association with congenital heart disease. Retrospective and small prospective case series have shown encouraging improvements in cardiac function and symptoms, but interpretation has been complicated by the high rate of spontaneous recovery in pediatric patients. A recently completed pediatric double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial showed no difference between placebo and two doses of carvedilol over a 6-month period of follow-up, with significant improvement of all three groups over the course of evaluation. Experience with adults has suggested that only certain beta-blockers, including carvedilol, bisoprolol, nebivolol, and metoprolol succinate, should be used in the treatment of heart failure and that patients with high-grade heart failure may derive the most benefit. Other studies surmise that early or prophylactic use of these medications may alter the risk of disease progression in some high-risk subsets, such as patients receiving anthracyclines or those with muscular dystrophy. This article reviews these topics using experience as well as data from all the recent pediatric studies on the use of beta-blockers to treat congestive heart failure, especially when related to systolic ventricular dysfunction.

  17. Update on leukotriene receptor antagonists in preschool children wheezing disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montella Silvia

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Asthma is the most common chronic disease in young children. About 40% of all preschool children regularly wheeze during common cold infections. The heterogeneity of wheezing phenotypes early in life and various anatomical and emotional factors unique to young children present significant challenges in the clinical management of this problem. Anti-inflammatory therapy, mainly consisting of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS, is the cornerstone of asthma management. Since Leukotrienes (LTs are chemical mediators of airway inflammation in asthma, the leukotriene receptor antagonists (LTRAs are traditionally used as potent anti-inflammatory drugs in the long-term treatment of asthma in adults, adolescents, and school-age children. In particular, montelukast decreases airway inflammation, and has also a bronchoprotective effect. The main guidelines on asthma management have confirmed the clinical utility of LTRAs in children older than five years. In the present review we describe the most recent advances on the use of LTRAs in the treatment of preschool wheezing disorders. LTRAs are effective in young children with virus-induced wheeze and with multiple-trigger disease. Conflicting data do not allow to reach definitive conclusions on LTRAs efficacy in bronchiolitis or post-bronchiolitis wheeze, and in acute asthma. The excellent safety profile of montelukast and the possibility of oral administration, that entails better compliance from young children, represent the main strengths of its use in preschool children. Montelukast is a valid alternative to ICS especially in poorly compliant preschool children, or in subjects who show adverse effects related to long-term steroid therapy.

  18. Endothelin receptor antagonist and airway dysfunction in pulmonary arterial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borst Mathias M

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH, peripheral airway obstruction is frequent. This is partially attributed to the mediator dysbalance, particularly an excess of endothelin-1 (ET-1, to increased pulmonary vascular and airway tonus and to local inflammation. Bosentan (ET-1 receptor antagonist improves pulmonary hemodynamics, exercise limitation, and disease severity in IPAH. We hypothesized that bosentan might affect airway obstruction. Methods In 32 IPAH-patients (19 female, WHO functional class II (n = 10, III (n = 22; (data presented as mean ± standard deviation pulmonary vascular resistance (11 ± 5 Wood units, lung function, 6 minute walk test (6-MWT; 364 ± 363.7 (range 179.0-627.0 m, systolic pulmonary artery pressure, sPAP, 79 ± 19 mmHg, and NT-proBNP serum levels (1427 ± 2162.7 (range 59.3-10342.0 ng/L were measured at baseline, after 3 and 12 months of oral bosentan (125 mg twice per day. Results and Discussion At baseline, maximal expiratory flow at 50 and 25% vital capacity were reduced to 65 ± 25 and 45 ± 24% predicted. Total lung capacity was 95.6 ± 12.5% predicted and residual volume was 109 ± 21.4% predicted. During 3 and 12 months of treatment, 6-MWT increased by 32 ± 19 and 53 ± 69 m, respectively; p Conclusion This study gives first evidence in IPAH, that during long-term bosentan, improvement of hemodynamics, functional parameters or serum biomarker occur independently from persisting peripheral airway obstruction.

  19. Hepcidin antagonists for potential treatments of disorders with hepcidin excess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poli eMaura

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of hepcidin clarified the basic mechanism of the control of systemic iron homeostasis. Hepcidin is mainly produced by the liver as a propeptide and processed by furin into the mature active peptide. Hepcidin binds ferroportin, the only cellular iron exporter, causing the internalization and degradation of both. Thus hepcidin blocks iron export from the key cells for dietary iron absorption (enterocytes, recycling of haemoglobin iron (the macrophages and the release of storage iron from hepatocytes, resulting in the reduction of systemic iron availability. The BMP/HJV/SMAD pathway is the major regulator of hepcidin expression that responds to iron status. Also inflammation stimulates hepcidin via the IL6/STAT3 pathway with a support of an active BMP/HJV/SMAD pathway. In some pathological conditions hepcidin level is inadequately elevated and reduces iron availability in the body, resulting in anemia. These conditions occur in the genetic Iron Refractory Iron Deficiency Anemia (IRIDA and the common Anemia of Chronic Disease (ACD or Anemia of Inflammation. Currently, there is no definite treatment for ACD. Erythropoiesis stimulating agents and intravenous iron have been proposed in some cases but they are scarcely effective and may have adverse effects. Alternative approaches aimed to a pharmacological control of hepcidin expression have been attempted, targeting different regulatory steps. They include hepcidin sequestering agents (antibodies, anticalins and aptamers, inhibitors of BMP/SMAD or of IL6/STAT3 pathway or of hepcidin transduction (siRNA/shRNA or ferroportin stabilizers. In this review we summarized the biochemical interactions of the proteins involved in the BMP/HJV/SMAD pathway and its natural inhibitors, the murine and rat models with high hepcidin levels currently available and finally the progresses in the development of hepcidin antagonists, with particular attention to the role of heparins and heparin sulphate

  20. Melanin concentrating hormone receptor 1 (MCHR1) antagonists - Still a viable approach for obesity treatment?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Högberg, T.; Frimurer, T.M.; Sasmal, P.K.

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is a global epidemic associated with multiple severe diseases. Several pharmacotherapies have been investigated including the melanin concentrating hormone (MCH) and its receptor 1. The development of MCHR1 antagonists are described with a specific perspective on different chemotypes...

  1. Antagonist muscle moment is increased in ACL deficient subjects during maximal dynamic knee extension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkjær, Tine; Simonsen, Erik B; Magnusson, S Peter;

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Coactivation of the hamstring muscles during dynamic knee extension may compensate for increased knee joint laxity in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficient subjects. This study examined if antagonist muscle coactivation during maximal dynamic knee extension was elevated...... in subjects with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficiency compared to age-matched healthy controls. METHODS: Electromyography (EMG) and net knee joint moments were recorded during maximal concentric quadriceps and eccentric hamstring contractions, performed in an isokinetic dynamometer (ROM: 90......-10°, angular speed: 30°/s). Hamstring antagonist EMG recorded during concentric quadriceps contraction was converted into antagonist moment based on the EMG-moment relationship observed during eccentric agonist contractions. RESULTS: The magnitude of antagonist hamstring EMG was 65.5% higher in ACL deficient...

  2. A novel antagonistic role of natural compound icariin on neurotoxicity of amyloid β peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhui Liu

    2015-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: The results indicated a novel antagonistic role of icariin in the neurotoxicity of Aβ1-42 via inhibiting its aggregation, suggesting that icariin might have potential therapeutic benefits to delay or modify the progression of AD.

  3. The risk of tuberculosis related to tumour necrosis factor antagonist therapies: a TBNET consensus statement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solovic, I.; Sester, M.; Gomez-Reino, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    Anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) monoclonal antibodies or soluble TNF receptors have become an invaluable treatment against chronic inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease and psoriasis. Individuals who are treated with TNF antagonists are at an increased...... and an interferon-gamma release assay, as there are insufficient data in children to recommend one test over the other. Consequently, targeted preventive chemotherapy is highly recommended for all individuals with persistent M. tuberculosis-specific immune responses undergoing TNF antagonist therapy...... risk of reactivating latent infections, especially tuberculosis (TB). Following TNF antagonist therapy, the relative risk for TB is increased up to 25 times, depending on the clinical setting and the TNF antagonist used. Interferon-gamma release assays or, as an alternative in individuals without...

  4. Epimuscular myofascial force transmission between antagonistic and synergistic muscles can explain movement limitation in spastic paresis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijing, Peter A.

    2007-01-01

    Details and concepts of intramuscular, extramuscular and intermuscular myofascial force transmission are reviewed. Some new experimental data are added regarding myofascial force transmission between antagonistic muscles across the interosseal membrane of the lower hind limb of the rat. Combined wit

  5. Population pharmacokinetic modeling of a subcutaneous depot for GnRH antagonist degarelix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornøe, Christoffer Wenzel; Agersø, Henrik; Nielsen, Henrik Aalborg;

    Purpose. The objective of this study is to develop a population pharmacokinetic (PK) model that describes the subcutaneous (SC) depot formation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist degarelix, which is being developed for treatment of prostate cancer, exhibiting dose-volume and dose...... depot model describes the PK profile of GnRH antagonist degarelix. This modeling approach might also be applicable for other depot-formulated drugs exhibiting complex PK profiles....

  6. Population Pharmacokinetic Modeling of a Subcutaneous Depot for GnRH Antagonist Degarelix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornøe, Christoffer Wenzel; Agersø, Henrik; Nielsen, Henrik Aalborg;

    2004-01-01

    Purpose. The objective of this study is to develop a population pharmacokinetic (PK) model that describes the subcutaneous (SC) depot formation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone ( GnRH) antagonist degarelix, which is being developed for treatment of prostate cancer, exhibiting dose-volume and dose...... depot model describes the PK profile of GnRH antagonist degarelix. This modeling approach might also be applicable for other depot-formulated drugs exhibiting complex PK profiles....

  7. The discovery of the benzazepine class of histamine H3 receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, David M; Apps, James; Bailey, Nicholas; Bamford, Mark J; Beresford, Isabel J; Briggs, Michael A; Calver, Andrew R; Crook, Barry; Davis, Robert P; Davis, Susannah; Dean, David K; Harris, Leanne; Heightman, Tom D; Panchal, Terry; Parr, Christopher A; Quashie, Nigel; Steadman, Jon G A; Schogger, Joanne; Sehmi, Sanjeet S; Stean, Tania O; Takle, Andrew K; Trail, Brenda K; White, Trevor; Witherington, Jason; Worby, Angela; Medhurst, Andrew D

    2013-12-15

    This Letter describes the discovery of a novel series of H3 receptor antagonists. The initial medicinal chemistry strategy focused on deconstructing and simplifying an early screening hit which rapidly led to the discovery of a novel series of H3 receptor antagonists based on the benzazepine core. Employing an H3 driven pharmacodynamic model, the series was then further optimised through to a lead compound that showed robust in vivo functional activity and possessed overall excellent developability properties.

  8. Histamine H3 receptor antagonist decreases cue-induced alcohol reinstatement in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuutinen, Saara; Mäki, Tiia; Rozov, Stanislav; Bäckström, Pia; Hyytiä, Petri; Piepponen, Petteri; Panula, Pertti

    2016-07-01

    We have earlier found that the histamine H3 receptor (H3R) antagonism diminishes motivational aspects of alcohol reinforcement in mice. Here we studied the role of H3Rs in cue-induced reinstatement of alcohol seeking in C57BL/6J mice using two different H3R antagonists. Systemic administration of H3R antagonists attenuated cue-induced alcohol seeking suggesting that H3R antagonists may reduce alcohol craving. To understand how alcohol affects dopamine and histamine release, a microdialysis study was performed on C57BL/6J mice and the levels of histamine, dopamine and dopamine metabolites were measured in the nucleus accumbens. Alcohol administration was combined with an H3R antagonist pretreatment to reveal whether modulation of H3R affects the effects of alcohol on neurotransmitter release. Alcohol significantly increased the release of dopamine in the nucleus accumbens but did not affect histamine release. Pretreatment with H3R antagonist ciproxifan did not modify the effect of alcohol on dopamine release. However, histamine release was markedly increased with ciproxifan. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that H3R antagonism attenuates cue-induced reinstatement of alcohol seeking in mice. Alcohol alone does not affect histamine release in the nucleus accumbens but H3R antagonist instead increases histamine release significantly suggesting that the mechanism by which H3R antagonist inhibits alcohol seeking found in the present study and the decreased alcohol reinforcement, reward and consumption found earlier might include alterations in the histaminergic neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens. These findings imply that selective antagonists of H3Rs could be a therapeutic strategy to prevent relapse and possibly diminish craving to alcohol use. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Histamine Receptors'.

  9. Effects of ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists on rat dural artery diameter in an intravital microscopy model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, K Y; Gupta, S; de Vries, R;

    2010-01-01

    studies have shown that glutamate receptor antagonists affect the pathophysiology of migraine. This study investigated whether antagonists of NMDA (ketamine and MK801), AMPA (GYKI52466) and kainate (LY466195) glutamate receptors affected dural vasodilatation induced by alpha-CGRP, capsaicin......During migraine, trigeminal nerves may release calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), inducing cranial vasodilatation and central nociception; hence, trigeminal inhibition or blockade of craniovascular CGRP receptors may prevent this vasodilatation and abort migraine headache. Several preclinical...

  10. Biological Control of Chickpea Collar Rot by Co-inoculation of Antagonistic Bacteria and Compatible Rhizobia

    OpenAIRE

    Hameeda, B.; Harini, G.; Rupela, O. P.; Kumar Rao, J. V. D. K.; Reddy, Gopal

    2010-01-01

    Two hundred and seven bacteria were isolated from composts and macrofauna and screened for plant growth promoting and antagonistic traits. Seven of the 207 isolates showed antagonistic activity against Sclerotium rolfsii in plate culture. Inhibition of S. rolfsii by the bacterial isolates ranged between 61 and 84%. Two of the seven isolates were Bacillus sp. and rest belonged to Pseudomonas sp. Two isolates, Pseudomonas sp. CDB 35 and Pseudomonas sp. BWB 21 was compatible with chickpea Rhizob...

  11. Synthesis and dual histamine H₁ and H₂ receptor antagonist activity of cyanoguanidine derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadek, Bassem; Alisch, Rudi; Buschauer, Armin; Elz, Sigurd

    2013-11-15

    Premedication with a combination of histamine H₁ receptor (H₁R) and H₂ receptor (H₂R) antagonists has been suggested as a prophylactic principle, for instance, in anaesthesia and surgery. Aiming at pharmacological hybrids combining H₁R and H₂R antagonistic activity, a series of cyanoguanidines 14-35 was synthesized by linking mepyramine-type H₁R antagonist substructures with roxatidine-, tiotidine-, or ranitidine-type H₂R antagonist moieties. N-desmethylmepyramine was connected via a poly-methylene spacer to a cyanoguanidine group as the "urea equivalent" of the H₂R antagonist moiety. The title compounds were screened for histamine antagonistic activity at the isolated ileum (H₁R) and the isolated spontaneously beating right atrium (H₂R) of the guinea pig. The results indicate that, depending on the nature of the H₂R antagonist partial structure, the highest H₁R antagonist potency resided in roxatidine-type compounds with spacers of six methylene groups in length (compound 21), and tiotidine-type compounds irrespective of the alkyl chain length (compounds 28, 32, 33), N-cyano-N'-[2-[[(2-guanidino-4-thiazolyl)methyl]thio]ethyl]-N″-[2-[N-[2-[N-(4-methoxybenzyl)-N-(pyridyl)-amino] ethyl]-N-methylamino]ethyl] guanidine (25, pKB values: 8.05 (H₁R, ileum) and 7.73 (H₂R, atrium) and the homologue with the mepyramine moiety connected by a six-membered chain to the tiotidine-like partial structure (compound 32, pKB values: 8.61 (H₁R) and 6.61 (H₂R) were among the most potent hybrid compounds. With respect to the development of a potential pharmacotherapeutic agent, structural optimization seems possible through selection of other H₁R and H₂R pharmacophoric moieties with mutually affinity-enhancing properties.

  12. Synthesis and Dual Histamine H1 and H2 Receptor Antagonist Activity of Cyanoguanidine Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bassem Sadek

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Premedication with a combination of histamine H1 receptor (H1R and H2 receptor (H2R antagonists has been suggested as a prophylactic principle, for instance, in anaesthesia and surgery. Aiming at pharmacological hybrids combining H1R and H2R antagonistic activity, a series of cyanoguanidines 14–35 was synthesized by linking mepyramine-type H1R antagonist substructures with roxatidine-, tiotidine-, or ranitidine-type H2R antagonist moieties. N-desmethylmepyramine was connected via a poly-methylene spacer to a cyanoguanidine group as the “urea equivalent” of the H2R antagonist moiety. The title compounds were screened for histamine antagonistic activity at the isolated ileum (H1R and the isolated spontaneously beating right atrium (H2R of the guinea pig. The results indicate that, depending on the nature of the H2R antagonist partial structure, the highest H1R antagonist potency resided in roxatidine-type compounds with spacers of six methylene groups in length (compound 21, and tiotidine-type compounds irrespective of the alkyl chain length (compounds 28, 32, 33, N-cyano-N'-[2-[[(2-guanidino-4-thiazolylmethyl]thio]ethyl]-N″-[2-[N-[2-[N-(4-methoxybenzyl-N-(pyridyl-amino] ethyl]-N-methylamino]ethyl] guanidine (25, pKB values: 8.05 (H1R, ileum and 7.73 (H2R, atrium and the homologue with the mepyramine moiety connected by a six-membered chain to the tiotidine-like partial structure (compound 32, pKB values: 8.61 (H1R and 6.61 (H2R were among the most potent hybrid compounds. With respect to the development of a potential pharmacotherapeutic agent, structural optimization seems possible through selection of other H1R and H2R pharmacophoric moieties with mutually affinity-enhancing properties.

  13. Action of CB1 and CB2 antagonists/inverse agonists on mantle cell lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Chui, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the effects of antagonists to the cannabinoid receptors in MCL cell lines were studied. Results presented in this study show that signalling through cannabinoid receptor with antagonists such as SR141716, SR144528 decreases cell viability but hemopressin when analyzing with XTT. The decrease in cell viability by SR141716 is caused by apoptosis triggered after 5 hours of treatment. The CB1 expression was confirmed in all MCL cell lines tested via western blotting but the express...

  14. The Effect of Sympathetic Antagonists on the Antidepressant Action of Alprazolam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorash ZM

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Alprazolam is an anti-anxiety drug shown to be effective in the treatment of depression. In this study, the effect of sympathetic receptor antagonists on alprazolam–induced antidepressant action was studied using a mouse model of forced swimming behavioral despair. The interaction of three sympathetic receptor antagonists with benzodiazepines, which may impact the clinical use of alprazolam, was also studied. Behavioral despair was examined in six groups of albino mice. Drugs were administered intraperitoneally. The control group received only a single dose of 1% Tween 80. The second group received a single dose of alprazolam, and the third group received an antagonist followed by alprazolam. The fourth group was treated with imipramine, and the fifth group received an antagonist followed by imipramine. The sixth group was treated with a single dose of an antagonist alone (atenolol, a β1-selective adrenoceptor antagonist; propranolol, a non selective β-adrenoceptor antagonist; and prazocin, an α1-adrenoceptor antagonist. Results confirmed the antidepressant action of alprazolam and imipramine. Prazocin treatment alone produced depression, but it significantly potentiated the antidepressant actions of imipramine and alprazolam. Atenolol alone produced an antidepressant effect and potentiated the antidepressant action of alprazolam. Propranolol treatment alone produced depression, and antagonized the effects of alprazolam and imipramine, even producing depression in combined treatments. In conclusion, our results reveal that alprazolam may produce antidepressant effects through the release of noradrenaline, which stimulates β2 receptors to produce an antidepressant action. Imipramine may act by activating β2 receptors by blocking or down-regulating β1 receptors.

  15. Data on the oral CRTh2 antagonist QAW039 (fevipiprant) in patients with uncontrolled allergic asthma

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    This article contains data on clinical endpoints (Peak Flow Expiratory Rate, fractional exhaled nitric oxide and total IgE serum levels) and plasma pharmacokinetic parameters concerning the use of the oral CRTh2 antagonist QAW039 (fevipiprant) in mild to moderate asthma patients. Information on experimental design and methods on how this data was obtained is also described. Further interpretation and discussion of this data can be found in the article “The oral CRTh2 antagonist QAW039 (fevipi...

  16. Antimüllerian hormone in gonadotropin releasing-hormone antagonist cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arce, Joan-Carles; La Marca, Antonio; Mirner Klein, Bjarke

    2013-01-01

    To assess the relationships between serum antimüllerian hormone (AMH) and ovarian response and treatment outcomes in good-prognosis patients undergoing controlled ovarian stimulation using a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist protocol.......To assess the relationships between serum antimüllerian hormone (AMH) and ovarian response and treatment outcomes in good-prognosis patients undergoing controlled ovarian stimulation using a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist protocol....

  17. Effects of H1–receptor antagonists in antidepressant tests in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Chitra C. Khanwelkar

    2008-01-01

    : Considering the vast data suggesting the role of brain histamine(HA) in behaviour,emotions,anxiety and depression;four H1-receptor antagonists; promethazine, diphenhydramine, cyclizine and pheniramine were subjected to antidepressant tests in rats. All H1 – antagonists behaved like antidepressants in animal tests. They antagonized reserpine induced catalepsy, potentiated methamphetamine induced stereotypy and reduced the period of immobility in Porsolt’s behavioural despair test. It is sug...

  18. The molecular marker of antagonistic genes of biological bacteria against rice sheath blight by RAPD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@Forrty-one isolates of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens were differentiated from 184 G + bacterial strains having genetic similarities over 75%based on BOX-PCR fingerprint. Antagonism against to Rhizotonia solani in vitro was tested.Four isolates of B. arayloliquefaciens (2 isolates with antagonistic ability, G 396 + and G229 +, and 2 isolates without antagonistic ability, G433-and G434-) were selected to screen effective primers for RAPD analysis. Of 124 random primers (AA, AB, AC, AD, AE, AM, and AL) tested.

  19. Anti-idiotypic antibody: A new strategy for the development of a growth hormone receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Hainan; Zheng, Xin; Khan, Muhammad Akram; Li, Steven

    2015-11-01

    In general, traditional growth hormone receptor antagonist can be divided into two major classes: growth hormone (GH) analogues and anti-growth hormone receptor (GHR) antibodies. Herein, we tried to explore a new class of growth hormone receptor (GHR) antagonist that may have potential advantages over the traditional antagonists. For this, we developed a monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibody growth hormone, termed CG-86. A series of experiments were conducted to characterize and evaluate this antibody, and the results from a competitive receptor-binding assay, Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assays (ELISA) and epitope mapping demonstrate that CG-86 behaved as a typical Ab2β. Next, we examined its antagonistic activity using in vitro cell models, and the results showed that CG-86 could effectively inhibit growth hormone receptor-mediated signalling and effectively inhibit growth hormone-induced Ba/F3-GHR638 proliferation. In summary, these studies show that an anti-idiotypic antibody (CG-86) has promise as a novel growth hormone receptor antagonist. Furthermore, the current findings also suggest that anti-idiotypic antibody may represent a novel strategy to produce a new class of growth hormone receptor antagonist, and this strategy may be applied with other cytokines or growth factors.

  20. The variability of co-activation pattern of antagonist muscles in human infant crawling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Qi L; Wu, Xiao Y; Nong Xiao; Zeng, Si Y; Zheng, Xiao L; Di Wu; Hou, Wen S

    2016-08-01

    Infant crawling is part of normal human gross motor development, and a 4-beat gait that involves rhythmical flexion and extension of limbs and the underlying muscle co-activation of antagonist muscle around the joint. However, detection the co-activation pattern of antagonist muscle are sparse due to the general difficulty of measuring locomotion in human infants. In this paper, sEMG of antagonist muscles and the corresponding kinematics data of limbs were collected when infants were crawling on hands and knees at their self-selected speed. The infant's gross motor developmental status was assessed by the global Gross Motor Function Measure Scale (GMFM-88) as well. The method based on EMG-EMG plots was used to quantify the variability of co-activation pattern of antagonist muscle. After that, we observed that antagonist muscles of upper limb (triceps brachii and biceps brachii) showed less variability of co-activation pattern of muscles than lower limb(quadriceps femoris and hamstrings) during crawling, and this variability was also varied in different crawling phases (stance and swing). Furthermore, we found some varied behaviors in the co-activation patterns of antagonist muscles when gross motor developmental level increased. The preliminary work suggests that such adaptive changes may be related to the adjustment of neuromuscular in the early stage of gross motor development.

  1. Molecular Gymnastics: Mechanisms of HIV-1 Resistance to CCR5 Antagonists and Impact on Virus Phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Michael; Borm, Katharina; Flynn, Jacqueline K; Lewin, Sharon R; Churchill, Melissa J; Gorry, Paul R

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) enters host cells through the binding of its envelope glycoproteins (Env) to the host cell receptor CD4 and then subsequent binding to a chemokine coreceptor, either CCR5 or CXCR4. CCR5 antagonists are a relatively recent class addition to the armamentarium of anti-HIV-1 drugs. These compounds act by binding to a hydrophobic pocket formed by the transmembrane helices of CCR5 and altering the conformation of the extracellular domains, such that they are no longer recognized by Env. Maraviroc is the first drug within this class to be licenced for use in HIV-1 therapy regimens. HIV resistance to CCR5 antagonists occurs either through outgrowth of pre-existing CXCR4-using viruses, or through acquisition of the ability of CCR5-using HIV-1 to use the antagonist bound form of CCR5. In the latter scenario, the mechanism underlying resistance is through complex alterations in the way that resistant Envs engage CCR5. These significant changes are unlikely to occur without consequence to the viral entry phenotype and may also open up new avenues to target CCR5 antagonist resistant viruses. This review discusses the mechanism of action of CCR5 antagonists, how HIV resistance to CCR5 antagonists occurs, and the subsequent effects on Env function.

  2. Ondansetron, a selective 5-HT3 antagonist, antagonizes methamphetamine-induced anorexia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginawi, O T; Al-Majed, A A; Al-Suwailem, A K

    2005-03-01

    Effects of some selective serotonergic (5-HT) antagonists on methamphetamine-induced anorexia were investigated in male mice. The least possible dose of methamphetamine alone that caused significant anorectic activity was 11 micromolkg(-1), i.p. (2 mgkg(-1)). Various doses of some selective serotonergic receptor antagonists were administered half an hour before the above mentioned dose of methamphetamine. Methiothepin potentiated, whereas NAN-190, methysergide, mianserin and ondansetron antagonized methamphetamine-induced anorectic activity. The least possible doses of these antagonists which modified methamphetamine-induced anorexia were as follows: methiothepin (1.1 micromolkg(-1), i.p.), NAN-190 (4.2 micromolkg(-1), i.p.), methysergide (2.1 micromolkg(-1), i.p.), mianserin (3.3 micromolkg(-1), i.p.) and ondansetron (0.003 micromolkg(-1), i.p.). The serotonergic antagonists at the above mentioned doses did not modify the food intake of animals not treated with methamphetamine, except for methiothepin, which produced a significant reduction, and mianserin, which produced a significant increase in food intake. The results of the present study indicated that the anorectic activity induced by methamphetamine is related to the interactions of methamphetamine with 5-HT receptor. Since a very small dose (0.003 micromolkg(-1)) of ondansetron (the 5-HT(3) antagonist), as compared with the other antagonists used in this study, antagonized the anorexia induced by methamphetamine, the 5-HT(3) receptor is likely to be the site for this interaction.

  3. Novel antagonists of alcohol inhibition of l1-mediated cell adhesion: multiple mechanisms of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkemeyer, Michael F; Menkari, Carrie E; Charness, Michael E

    2002-11-01

    1-Octanol antagonizes ethanol inhibition of L1-mediated cell adhesion and prevents ethanol teratogenesis in mouse whole embryo culture. Herein, we identify a new series of alcohol antagonists and study their mechanism of action. Cell aggregation assays were carried out in ethanol-sensitive, human L1-transfected NIH/3T3 cells in the absence and presence of 100 mM ethanol or 2 mM 1-butanol and candidate antagonists. Antagonist potency for 1-alcohols increased progressively over 5 log orders from 1-pentanol (C5) to 1-dodecanol (C12). Antagonist potency declined from 1-dodecanol (C12) to 1-tridecanol (C13), and 1-tetradecanol (C14) and 1-pentadecanol (C15) were inactive. The presence and position of a double bond in the 1-butanol molecule determined whether a compound was a full agonist (1-butanol), a mixed agonist-antagonist (2-buten-1-ol), or an antagonist (3-buten-1-ol). Increasing the concentration of agonist (1-butanol or ethanol) overcame the antagonism of 3-buten-1-ol, benzyl alcohol, cyclopentanol, and 3-pentanol, but not that of 4-methyl-1-pentanol, 2-methyl-2-pentanol, 1-pentanol, 2-pentanol, 1-octanol, and 2,6-di-isopropylphenol (propofol), suggesting that the mechanisms of antagonism may differ between these groups of compounds. These findings suggest that selective straight, branched, and cyclic alcohols may act at multiple, discrete sites to antagonize the actions of ethanol and 1-butanol on L1-mediated cell-cell adhesion.

  4. Co-Adaptive Aiding and Automation Enhance Operator Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Institutional Review Board. The multi-RPA operation task was a PC-based supervisory control simulation of a “ suppression of enemy air defense” mission...image contained zero to eight targets drawn from three visually distinct types, as well as 25 to 30 nontarget distractors . Each target type was to be

  5. Isolation and Characterisation of Antagonistic Actinobacteria from Mangrove Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkata Raghava Rao

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available 1024x768 The aim of the present study was to isolate and screen actinobacteria having antagonistic activities against pathogenic microorganisms. A total of twenty actinobacteria strains were isolated from the mangrove sediment. Of these four active isolates were identified as Streptomyces species by means of morphological, physiological, biochemical and cultural characteristics. These isolates were subjected to shake flask fermentation and the secondary metabolites were extracted with ethyl acetate and screened for their antimicrobial activities against selected bacterial and fungal pathogens. The results showed that among the active isolates, four isolates (BC 01, BC 02, BC 03 and BC 04 showed promising activities against the selected test pathogens. These four extracted isolates were analyzed for UV Spectrophotometric and HPLC. Spectral data of the extracted compound revealed its antimicrobial nature. The UV spectrum of the methanol extracts for the active isolates showed absorbance peaks ranging between 207-223 nm. Two to three bioactive regions were detected on the HPLC. The results indicate that Streptomyces strains isolated from mangrove sediment produce potential antibacterial, antifungal and broad spectrum antibiotic compounds. Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  6. Penicillium expansum versus antagonist yeasts and patulin degradation in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Rodrigo Coelho

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Taking into account the preliminary antagonistic/biodegradation property showed by Pichia membranifaciens and Sporobolomyces roseus, which decreased the initial patulin concentration of 588.4 to 290.0 µg/mL, ability of P. ohmeri 158 in biocontrol against Penicillium expansum and patulin decrease in vitro was performed. The culture supernatant of P. ohmeri 158 was effective against 66.17% micelial growth, indicating antibiosis related with the killer phenomenon. The initial patulin concentration of 223 µg in the presence of P. ohmeri 158 cells was decreased over 83% of the original concentration, when incubated at 25ºC/2 days and > 99% after 5 days incubation time, with undetectable patulin level after 15 days. The initial pH 4.0 decreased to pH 3.3 along 15 days experiment, suggesting that patulin decrease was an active process and a consequence of yeast metabolism. The results suggested that P. ohmeri 158 could be a promising alternative for the inhibition of P. expansum growth and patulin degradation.Considerando o antagonismo e degradação de patulina detectados em Pichia membranifaciens e Sporobolomyces roseus no estudo preliminar, este trabalho avaliou o efeito antagônico de Pichia ohmeri 158 no desenvolvimento de Penicillium expansum e a degradação de patulina "in vitro". O sobrenadante do cultivo de P. ohmeri 158 inibiu 66,17% do desenvolvimento micelial, indicando antibiose relacionada ao fator killer. A concentração inicial de patulina (223 µg na presença de células íntegras de P. ohmeri foi reduzida em mais de 83% após dois dias de incubação a 25ºC e superior a 99% após 5 dias, com níveis indetectáveis no 15º dia. O decréscimo do pH 4,0 inicial para pH 3,3 sugeriu que a eliminação de patulina é um processo ativo e uma conseqüência do metabolismo da levedura. Os resultados obtidos concluem que P. ohmeri 158 é uma alternativa promissora na inibição do desenvolvimento de P. expansum e na degradação de

  7. Implementation of a fluorescence-based screening assay identifies histamine H3 receptor antagonists clobenpropit and iodophenpropit as subunit-selective N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Kasper B; Mullasseril, Praseeda; Dawit, Sara; Kurtkaya, Natalie L; Yuan, Hongjie; Vance, Katie M; Orr, Anna G; Kvist, Trine; Ogden, Kevin K; Le, Phuong; Vellano, Kimberly M; Lewis, Iestyn; Kurtkaya, Serdar; Du, Yuhong; Qui, Min; Murphy, T J; Snyder, James P; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Traynelis, Stephen F

    2010-06-01

    N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are ligand-gated ion channels that mediate a slow, Ca(2+)-permeable component of excitatory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system and play a pivotal role in synaptic plasticity, neuronal development, and several neurological diseases. We describe a fluorescence-based assay that measures NMDA receptor-mediated changes in intracellular calcium in a BHK-21 cell line stably expressing NMDA receptor NR2D with NR1 under the control of a tetracycline-inducible promoter (Tet-On). The assay selectively identifies allosteric modulators by using supramaximal concentrations of glutamate and glycine to minimize detection of competitive antagonists. The assay is validated by successfully identifying known noncompetitive, but not competitive NMDA receptor antagonists among 1800 screened compounds from two small focused libraries, including the commercially available library of pharmacologically active compounds. Hits from the primary screen are validated through a secondary screen that used two-electrode voltage-clamp recordings on recombinant NMDA receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. This strategy identified several novel modulators of NMDA receptor function, including the histamine H3 receptor antagonists clobenpropit and iodophenpropit, as well as the vanilloid receptor transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 1 (TRPV1) antagonist capsazepine. These compounds are noncompetitive antagonists and the histamine H3 receptor ligand showed submicromolar potency at NR1/NR2B NMDA receptors, which raises the possibility that compounds can be developed that act with high potency on both glutamate and histamine receptor systems simultaneously. Furthermore, it is possible that some actions attributed to histamine H3 receptor inhibition in vivo may also involve NMDA receptor antagonism.

  8. Genetic determinants of response and adverse effects following vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parameshwar S.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vitamin K antagonist anticoagulants (warfarin/acenocoumarol are commonly used anticoagulants that require careful clinical management to balance the risks of over anticoagulation and bleeding with those of under anticoagulation and clotting. Genetic variants of the enzyme that metabolizes vitamin K antagonist anticoagulant, cytochrome P-450 2C9 (CYP2C9, and of a key pharmacologic target of vitamin K antagonists anticoagulant, vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKORC1, contribute to differences in patients responses to various anticoagulant doses. Methods: In thirty patients on oral vitamin K antagonist anticoagulant therapy, presented with either clotting manifestations (valve thrombosis, pulmonary embolism and DVT or prolonged INR/bleeding manifestations, we assessed CYP2C9 genotypes, VKORC1 haplotypes, clinical characteristics, response to therapy (as determined by the international normalized ratio [INR], and bleeding events. Results: Of the thirty patients, thirteen patients INR was high and four patients presented with major bleeding and four with minor bleeding manifestations. Out of thirteen patients with high INR, ten patients showed CYP2C9 polymorphism ( 1/ 3 and 2/ 3 of poor metabolizer genotype. Most of the high INR patients were recently started on oral vitamin K antagonist anticoagulant. Most patients presented with clotting manifestations with below therapeutic INR are noncompliant with anticoagulants. Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that the CYP2C9 polymorphisms are associated with an increased risk of over anticoagulation and of bleeding events among patients on vitamin K antagonists' anticoagulant setting. Screening for CYP2C9 variants may allow clinicians to develop dosing protocols and surveillance techniques to reduce the risk of adverse drug reactions in patients receiving vitamin K antagonist anticoagulants. However the cost-effectiveness of genotyping of patients must be considered. [Int J Res Med Sci

  9. Cloning and analysis of the antagonistic related genes of Enterobacter cloacae B8

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Xuping; ZHU Junli; YAO Xunping; HE Shicheng; HUANG Haining; CHEN Weiliang; LI Debao

    2004-01-01

    To understand the antagonistic mechanism of the broad spectrum antagonistic Enterobacter cloacae B8,Tn5 transposon-mediated mutagenesis is performed using suicide plasmid pZJ25. Two mutant strains that lost antagonistic character are isolated. Tagging with kanr gene on Tn5,an antagonistic related DNA fragment, the F fragment, right of the Tn5 insertion site is cloned in a plasmid named pTLF,from one of the mutant strains B8F. The 735 bp F fragment is then sequenced after subcloning. Genomic DNA of the original B8 strain is isolated, digested with Pst I and ligated to Pst I cassette. DNA fragments left and right of the F fragment are amplified from the Pst I cassette library using cassette primer and specific primers designed according to known sequence. 1106 bp sequence left of the F fragment and 664bp sequence right of the F fragment are finally obtained. Bioinformatics analysis shows that the contig assembled from the sequences of the cloned antagonistic related DNA fragments of B8 encodes three ORFs and is homogeneous to admM,admN and admO genes of Pantoea agglomerans andrimid biosynthetic gene cluster (AY192157). The ORF, named anrF gene which encodes a polyketide synthase, knocked out by Tn5 insertion, is a homology of admM and the insertion site of Tn5 is at 214 bp upstream of the stop codon. It is concluded that the anrF gene is a gene related to the antagonistic activity of E. cloacae B8, and speculated that the antagonistic substance produced by B8 is an andrimid.

  10. Evaluation of antagonist coactivation strategies elicited from electrically stimulated muscles under load-moving conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, B H; Katz, S R; Baratta, R V; Solomonow, M; D'Ambrosia, R D

    1997-07-01

    Muscle coactivation strategies that produce ankle dorsiflexion and plantar flexion were elicited by electrical stimulation of the tibialis anterior (TA) and soleus (SOL) muscles of the cat, and examined under several loading conditions. Four different load types were used: free-limb motion (no load), fly-wheel, and two pendulums, each with a different lever arm. Three types of coactivation strategies were considered. The first coactivation strategy consisted of antagonist activity that decreased as the agonist activity increased. The second strategy consisted of increasing antagonist activity with increasing agonist activity. And, in the third strategy, antagonist coactivation decreased at low force levels, then increased at high force levels. The three strategies were evaluated based on the joint angle's peak-to-peak movement and its ability to track a linear input command given by the correlation coefficient of the output signal versus linear input. Results showed that increasing antagonist activity resulted in decreasing peak-to-peak angle and a decreased signal tracking capability for each load condition. The latter, however, was not as obvious in the flywheel load (as compared with free-moving and pendulum conditions). A decreasing peak-to-peak torque for pendulum loads was also observed with increasing antagonist activity. In all loading conditions, maximal peak-to-peak angle and torque were present when a moderate degree of antagonist activity was engaged, and signal tracking capability improved with earlier engagement of the antagonist muscles. It is suggested that strategies using a combination of low-level coactivation, as described in the physiological literature and previous functional electrical stimulation (FES) studies, could satisfactorily address the issues of controllability and efficiency while maintaining long-term joint integrity.

  11. Structure-Based Design of a Periplasmic Binding Protein Antagonist that Prevents Domain Closure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borrok, M. Jack; Zhu, Yimin; Forest, Katrina T.; Kiessling, Laura L.; (UW)

    2009-07-31

    Many receptors undergo ligand-induced conformational changes to initiate signal transduction. Periplasmic binding proteins (PBPs) are bacterial receptors that exhibit dramatic conformational changes upon ligand binding. These proteins mediate a wide variety of fundamental processes including transport, chemotaxis, and quorum sensing. Despite the importance of these receptors, no PBP antagonists have been identified and characterized. In this study, we identify 3-O-methyl-D-glucose as an antagonist of glucose/galactose-binding protein and demonstrate that it inhibits glucose chemotaxis in E. coli. Using small-angle X-ray scattering and X-ray crystallography, we show that this antagonist acts as a wedge. It prevents the large-scale domain closure that gives rise to the active signaling state. Guided by these results and the structures of open and closed glucose/galactose-binding protein, we designed and synthesized an antagonist composed of two linked glucose residues. These findings provide a blueprint for the design of new bacterial PBP inhibitors. Given the key role of PBPs in microbial physiology, we anticipate that PBP antagonists will have widespread uses as probes and antimicrobial agents.

  12. Wear Behavior of Ceramic CAD/CAM Crowns and Natural Antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ella A. Naumova

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Evaluation of wear behavior of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM crowns from various restorative materials and natural antagonists. Method: Full CAD/CAM crowns fabricated with nanoceramic resin (Lava Ultimate (LU, a glass ceramic in a resin interpenetrating matrix (Vita Enamic (VE and a lithium silicate reinforced ceramic enriched with zirconia (Vita Suprinity (VS were cemented on human molars. The crown and antagonists were subjected to simulated chewing. 3D data sets, before and after the chewing simulation, were generated and matched. Occlusal surface roughness, vertical and volume loss of the crowns and antagonists were analyzed. Results: Crown roughness was significantly different between the LU and VE groups after chewing simulation. Crown vertical loss differed in all groups. The highest crown volume loss was found in the LU group, and the lowest in the VE group. Comparisons between the LU and VE groups and the LU and VS groups were significantly different. The highest antagonist volume loss was reached in the VE group, the lowest was in the LU group. Conclusion: Roughness increased after chewing simulation. LU crowns are the most natural antagonist-friendly; these were the most susceptible to vertical and volume loss. Of the tested materials, the VE crowns are the most stable regarding occlusion.

  13. Orexin 1 receptor antagonists in compulsive behaviour and anxiety: possible therapeutic use.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio eMerlo-Pich

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Fifteen years after the discovery of hypocretin/orexin a large body of evidence has been collected supporting its critical role in the modulation of several regulatory physiological functions. While reduced levels of hypocretin/orexin were early on associated with narcolepsy, increased levels have been linked in recent years to pathological states of hypervigilance and, in particular, to insomnia. The filing to FDA of the dual-activity orexin receptor antagonist (DORA suvorexant for the indication of insomnia further corroborates the robustness of such evidences. However, as excessive vigilance is also typical of anxiety and panic episodes, as well as of abstinence and craving in substance misuse disorders, in this review we briefly discuss the evidence supporting the development of hypocretin/orexin receptor 1 (OX1 antagonists for these indications. Experiments using the OX1 antagonist SB-334867 and mutant mice have involved the OX1 receptor in mediating the compulsive reinstatement of drug seeking for ethanol, nicotine, cocaine, cannabinoids and morphine. More recently, data have been generated with the novel selective OX1 antagonists GSK1059865 and ACT-335827 on behavioural and cardiovascular response to stressors and panic-inducing agents in animals. Concluding, while waiting for pharmacologic data to become available in humans, risks and benefits for the development of an OX1 receptor antagonist for Binge Eating and Anxiety Disorders are discussed.

  14. Dual action of neurokinin-1 antagonists on Mas-related GPCRs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azimi, Ehsan; Reddy, Vemuri B.; Shade, Kai-Ting C.; Anthony, Robert M.; Pereira, Paula Juliana Seadi; Lerner, Ethan A.

    2016-01-01

    The challenge of translating findings from animal models to the clinic is well known. An example of this challenge is the striking effectiveness of neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R) antagonists in mouse models of inflammation coupled with their equally striking failure in clinical investigations in humans. Here, we provide an explanation for this dichotomy: Mas-related GPCRs (Mrgprs) mediate some aspects of inflammation that had been considered mediated by NK-1R. In support of this explanation, we show that conventional NK-1R antagonists have off-target activity on the mouse receptor MrgprB2 but not on the homologous human receptor MRGPRX2. An unrelated tripeptide NK-1R antagonist has dual activity on MRGPRX2. This tripeptide both suppresses itch in mice and inhibits degranulation from the LAD-2 human mast cell line elicited by basic secretagogue activation of MRGPRX2. Antagonists of Mrgprs may fill the void left by the failure of NK-1R antagonists. PMID:27734033

  15. A long-acting GH receptor antagonist through fusion to GH binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Ian R; Pradhananga, Sarbendra L; Speak, Rowena; Artymiuk, Peter J; Sayers, Jon R; Ross, Richard J

    2016-10-12

    Acromegaly is a human disease of growth hormone (GH) excess with considerable morbidity and increased mortality. Somatostatin analogues are first line medical treatment but the disease remains uncontrolled in up to 40% of patients. GH receptor (GHR) antagonist therapy is more effective but requires frequent high-dose injections. We have developed an alternative technology for generating a long acting potent GHR antagonist through translational fusion of a mutated GH linked to GH binding protein and tested three candidate molecules. All molecules had the amino acid change (G120R), creating a competitive GHR antagonist and we tested the hypothesis that an amino acid change in the GH binding domain (W104A) would increase biological activity. All were antagonists in bioassays. In rats all antagonists had terminal half-lives >20 hours. After subcutaneous administration in rabbits one variant displayed a terminal half-life of 40.5 hours. A single subcutaneous injection of the same variant in rabbits resulted in a 14% fall in IGF-I over 7 days.

  16. Evaluation of the protagonist-antagonist dichotomy in Spanish television content targeting children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. García-Castillo, Ph.D.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study is to analyse the profile of the protagonist-antagonist dichotomy in all children’s television content, of all genres, offered by Spanish television channels. The analysis of protagonist and antagonist characters focuses on variables such as: type and number, age, gender, nationality, skills, relationship between the characters, characterisation, means used to achieve goals, consequences of the action of the antagonist over the antagonist and vice versa. The sample consists of 168 series that were analysed using descriptive content analysis and multivariate analysis. The results showed that over 50% of the series do not have an antagonist and that when there is one the most common type is a single human, which appears in more than 15% of the analysed series, followed by the fantastic creature type, which is present in just 10%. In 80% of the series the skills of the protagonists are social and human, and in 45.24% the exhibited skill is intelligence.

  17. Novel pyrazole derivatives as neutral CB₁ antagonists with significant activity towards food intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manca, Ilaria; Mastinu, Andrea; Olimpieri, Francesca; Falzoi, Matteo; Sani, Monica; Ruiu, Stefania; Loriga, Giovanni; Volonterio, Alessandro; Tambaro, Simone; Bottazzi, Mirko Emilio Heiner; Zanda, Matteo; Pinna, Gérard Aimè; Lazzari, Paolo

    2013-04-01

    In spite of rimonabant's withdrawal from the European market due to its adverse effects, interest in the development of drugs based on CB1 antagonists is revamping on the basis of the peculiar properties of this class of compounds. In particular, new strategies have been proposed for the treatment of obesity and/or related risk factors through CB1 antagonists, i.e. by the development of selectively peripherally acting agents or by the identification of neutral CB1 antagonists. New compounds based on the lead CB1 antagonist/inverse agonist rimonabant have been synthesized with focus on obtaining neutral CB1 antagonists. Amongst the new derivatives described in this paper, the mixture of the two enantiomers (±)-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-3-(2-cyclohexyl-1-hydroxyethyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole ((±)-5), and compound 5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-3-[(Z)-2-cyclohexyl-1-fluorovinyl]-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole ((Z)-6), showed interesting pharmacological profiles. According to the preliminary pharmacological evaluation, these novel pyrazole derivatives showed in fact both neutral CB1 antagonism behaviour and significant in vivo activity towards food intake.

  18. Combining Ability and Parent-Offspring Correlation of Maize (Zea may L.) Grainβ-Carotene Content with a Complete Diallel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Run; CAO Mo-ju; XIAO Lan-hai; WANG Jing; LU Yan-li; RONG Ting-zhao; PAN Guang-tang; WU Yuan-qi; TANG Qi-lin; LAN Hai

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin A deficiency has become a worldwide problem. Biofortified foods can potentially be an inexpensive, locally adaptable, and long-term solution to dietary-nutrient deficiency. In order to improve theβ-carotene content in maize grain by breeding and minimize vitamin A deficiency, a complete diallel cross was designed with eight inbred lines of maize, and 64 combinations were obtained in this study. The experimental combinations were planted in Yunnan and Sichuan provinces, respectively, with a random complete block design. Theβ-carotene contents in the grains of the experimental materials were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Among the tested materials, the effect difference of general combining ability of theβ-carotene content was significant;however, the effect difference of the special combining ability and the reciprocal effect were not significant. Theβ-carotene content of maize grain was not influenced significantly by the cross and the reciprocal cross. There was a significant correlation about theβ-carotene content in the maize grains between the F1 and their parents. The combinations with high β-carotene content were obviously influenced by the environment, and the mean value ofβ-carotene content for the experimental materials planted in Ya’an of Sichuan was higher than that planted in Yuanjiang of Yunnan, with the results being significant at the 0.01 level.

  19. Effects of calmodulin antagonists on radiation-induced lipid peroxidation in microsomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varshney, R.; Kale, R.K. (Jawaharlal Nehru Univ., New Delhi (India). School of Life Sciences)

    1990-11-01

    Rat liver microsomes were irradiated with {gamma}-rays at a dose of 1.31 Gy s{sup -1}. The extent of lipid peroxidation, measured in terms of malondialdehyde (MDA) formed, increased with radiation dose. The presence of calmodulin antagonists during irradiation decreased lipid peroxidation. The order of their protective efficiency was: chlorpromazine (CPZ)>promethazine (PMZ)>trimeprazine (TMZ). Their protective effect was diminished in the presence of ferrous (Fe{sup 2+}) ions and was restored on addition of EDTA. However, calmodulin antagonists considerably inhibited radiation-induced lipid peroxidation in the presence of ferric (Fe{sup 3+}) ions. Calmodulin antagonists also decreased the cytochrome P-450 content of microsomes. These results are discussed with respect to their applicability to radiotherapy. A possible mechanism for the inhibition of radiation-induced lipid peroxidation is suggested. (author).

  20. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Substituted Desloratadines as Potent Arginine Vasopressin V2 Receptor Antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Mu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-one non-peptide substituted desloratadine class compounds were synthesized as novel arginine vasopressin receptor antagonists from desloratadine via successive acylation, reduction and acylation reactions. Their structures were characterized by 1H-NMR and HRMS, their biological activity was evaluated by in vitro and in vivo studies. The in vitro binding assay and cAMP accumulation assay indicated that these compounds are potent selective V2 receptor antagonists. Among them compounds 1n, 1t and 1v exhibited both high affinity and promising selectivity for V2 receptors. The in vivo diuretic assay demonstrated that 1t presented remarkable diuretic activity. In conclusion, 1t is a potent novel AVP V2 receptor antagonist candidate.

  1. Therapeutic potential of CRF receptor antagonists: a gut-brain perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrichs, S C; Taché, Y

    2001-04-01

    Activation of the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) family of neuropeptide receptors in the brain and periphery appears to mediate stress-related changes in a variety of physiological and functional domains. Comparative pharmacology of CRF receptor agonists suggests that CRF, urocortin, sauvagine and urotensin consistently mimic, and conversely peptide CRF receptor antagonists lessen, the functional consequences of stressor exposure. Together with the development of novel non-peptide CRF receptor antagonists, a growing number of CRF receptor selective ligands are available to elucidate the neurobiology and physiological role of CRF systems. The present review considers available preclinical evidence as well as results from one Phase II clinical trial which address the hypothesis that CRF receptor antagonists may represent a new option for pharmacotherapy of stress-related disorders.

  2. Growth Hormone Receptor Antagonist Treatment Reduces Exercise Performance in Young Males

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goto, K.; Doessing, S.; Nielsen, R.H.

    2009-01-01

    period, they exercised to determine exercise performance and hormonal and metabolic responses. Participants: Twenty healthy males participated in the study. Intervention: Subjects were treated with the GHR antagonist (n = 10; 10 mg/d) or placebo (n = 10). After the treatment period, they performed...... a maximal oxygen uptake ((V) over dotO(2max)) test and a prolonged exercise test, consisting of 60 min of submaximal cycling followed by exercise to fatigue at 90% of (V) over dotO(2max). Main Outcome Measures: (V) over dotO(2max) was measured before and after the treatment period. Hormonal and metabolic......Context: The effects of GH on exercise performance remain unclear. Objective: The aim of the study was to examine the effects of GH receptor (GHR) antagonist treatment on exercise performance. Design: Subjects were treated with the GHR antagonist pegvisomant or placebo for 16 d. After the treatment...

  3. Discovery of novel indazole derivatives as dual angiotensin II antagonists and partial PPARγ agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamotte, Yann; Faucher, Nicolas; Sançon, Julien; Pineau, Olivier; Sautet, Stéphane; Fouchet, Marie-Hélène; Beneton, Véronique; Tousaint, Jean-Jacques; Saintillan, Yannick; Ancellin, Nicolas; Nicodeme, Edwige; Grillot, Didier; Martres, Paul

    2014-02-15

    Identification of indazole derivatives acting as dual angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor antagonists and partial peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) agonists is described. Starting from Telmisartan, we previously described that indole derivatives were very potent partial PPARγ agonists with loss of AT1 receptor antagonist activity. Design, synthesis and evaluation of new central scaffolds led us to the discovery of pyrrazolopyridine then indazole derivatives provided novel series possessing the desired dual activity. Among the new compounds, 38 was identified as a potent AT1 receptor antagonist (IC50=0.006 μM) and partial PPARγ agonist (EC50=0.25 μM, 40% max) with good oral bioavailability in rat. The dual pharmacology of compound 38 was demonstrated in two preclinical models of hypertension (SHR) and insulin resistance (Zucker fa/fa rat).

  4. Dicentrine is preferentially antagonistic to rat aortic than splenic α1-adrenoceptor stimulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MUSTAFA Mohd Rais; ACHIKE Francis Ifejika

    2000-01-01

    AIM: Dicentrine is a known α1-adrenoceptor antagonist, but its α1-adrenoceptor subtype selectivity has not yet been determined. We therefore, investigated the putative α1-adrenoceptor subtype selectivity of this agent. METHODS: Graded isometric contractile responses of rat aortic rings and spleen to phenylephrine were observed in the absence or presence of various concentrations of dicentrine. The pA2 values for dicentrine were determined.RESULTS: Aortic tissues were more sensitive to phenylephrine-induced connaction than the spleen tissues. Dicentrine was approximately 100 times more potent as an antagonist to the aortic contraction, than it was to the splenic contractions. CONCLUSION: Dicenuine is an a1-adrenoceptor antagonist which is more selective towards the putative α1D-adrenoceptor subtype of the rat aorta than the α1s-adrenoceptor of the spleen.

  5. Synthesis and biological evaluation of new opioid agonist and neurokinin-1 antagonist bivalent ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardanyan, Ruben; Kumirov, Vlad K; Nichol, Gary S; Davis, Peg; Liktor-Busa, Erika; Rankin, David; Varga, Eva; Vanderah, Todd; Porreca, Frank; Lai, Josephine; Hruby, Victor J

    2011-10-15

    Newly designed bivalent ligands-opioid agonist/NK1-antagonists have been synthesized. The synthesis of new starting materials-carboxy-derivatives of Fentanyl (1a-1c) was developed. These products have been transformed to 'isoimidium perchlorates' (2a-c). The new isoimidium perchlorates have been successfully implemented in nucleophilic addition reactions, with l-tryptophan 3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)benzyl ester to give the target compounds-amides (3a-c). Perchlorates (2a-c) successfully undergo reactions with other nucleophiles such as alcohols, amines or hydrazines. The obtained compound 3b exhibited μ-opioid agonist activity and NK1-antagonist activity and may serve as a useful lead compound for the further design of a new series of opioid agonist/NK1-antagonist compounds.

  6. Pathophysiology of the cysteinyl leukotrienes and effects of leukotriene receptor antagonists in asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, H

    2001-01-01

    Cysteinyl leukotrienes, synthesized de novo from cell membrane phospholipids, are proinflammatory mediators that play an important role in the pathophysiology of asthma. These mediators are among the most potent of bronchoconstrictors and cause vasodilation, increased microvascular permeability, ...... antagonists are additive with those of beta agonists. These data provide strong support for the use of leukotriene receptor antagonists for treating asthma.......Cysteinyl leukotrienes, synthesized de novo from cell membrane phospholipids, are proinflammatory mediators that play an important role in the pathophysiology of asthma. These mediators are among the most potent of bronchoconstrictors and cause vasodilation, increased microvascular permeability...... ciliary motility, which may hinder mucociliary clearance. Asthmatic patients demonstrate increased production of cysteinyl leukotrienes during naturally occurring asthma and acute asthma attacks as well as after allergen and exercise challenge. The leukotriene receptor antagonists montelukast, zafirlukast...

  7. Using a pharmacophore representation concept to elucidate molecular similarity of dopamine antagonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atlamazoglou, V.; Thireou, T.; Eliopoulos, E.

    2007-05-01

    The pharmacophoric concept plays an important role in ligand-based drug design methods to describe the similarity and diversity of molecules, and could also be exploited as a molecular representation scheme. A three-point pharmacophore method was used as a molecular representation perception. This procedure was implemented for dopamine antagonists of the D2 receptor subtype. The molecular structures of the antagonists included in this analysis were categorized into two structurally distinct classes. Using structural superposition with internal energy minimization, two pharmacophore models were deduced. Based on these two models other D2 antagonists that fulfil them were derived and studied. This procedure aided the identification of the common 3D patterns present in diverse molecules that act at the same biological target and the extraction of a common molecular framework for the two structural classes. The pharmacophoric information was found to be suitable for guiding superposition of structurally diverse molecules, using a more biologically meaningful selection of the targeting points.

  8. Role of leukotriene antagonists and antihistamines in the treatment of allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobanoğlu, Bengü; Toskala, Elina; Ural, Ahmet; Cingi, Cemal

    2013-04-01

    Allergic rhinitis is the most common atopic disorder seen in ENT clinics. It is diagnosed by history, physical exam and objective testing. Patient education, environmental control measures, pharmacotherapy, and allergen-specific immunotherapy are the cornerstones of allergic rhinitis treatment and can significantly reduce the burden of disease. Current treatment guidelines include antihistamines, intranasal corticosteroids, oral and intranasal decongestants, intranasal anticholinergics, intranasal cromolyn, and leukotriene receptor antagonists. In the mechanism of allergic rhinitis, histamine is responsible for major allergic rhinitis symptoms such as rhinorrhea, nasal itching and sneezing. Its effect on nasal congestion is less evident. In contrast, leukotrienes result in increase in nasal airway resistance and vascular permeability. Antihistamines and leukotriene receptor antagonists are commonly used in the treatment of allergic rhinitis. The published literature about combined antihistamines and leukotriene antagonists in mono- or combination therapy is reviewed and presented.

  9. Opioid analgesics as noncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebert, B; Thorkildsen, C; Andersen, S;

    1998-01-01

    Much evidence points to the involvement of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the development and maintainance of neuropathic pain. In neuropathic pain, there is generally involved a presumed opioid-insensitive component, which apparently can be blocked by NMDA receptor antagonists. However......, in order to obtain complete analgesia, a combination of an NMDA receptor antagonist and an opioid receptor agonist is needed. Recent in vitro data have demonstrated that methadone, ketobemidone, and dextropropoxyphene, in addition to being opioid receptor agonists, also are weak noncompetitive NMDA...... receptor antagonists. Clinical anecdotes suggest that the NMDA receptor antagonism of these opioids may play a significant role in the pharmacological action of these compounds; however, no clinical studies have been conducted to support this issue. In the present commentary, we discuss evidence...

  10. Orexin Receptor Antagonists: New Therapeutic Agents for the Treatment of Insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roecker, Anthony J; Cox, Christopher D; Coleman, Paul J

    2016-01-28

    Since its discovery in 1998, the orexin system, composed of two G-protein coupled receptors, orexins 1 and 2, and two neuropeptide agonists, orexins A and B, has captured the attention of the scientific community as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of obesity, anxiety, and sleep/wake disorders. Genetic evidence in rodents, dogs, and humans was revealed between 1999 and 2000, demonstrating a causal link between dysfunction or deletion of the orexin system and narcolepsy, a disorder characterized by hypersomnolence during normal wakefulness. These findings encouraged efforts to discover agonists to treat narcolepsy and, alternatively, antagonists to treat insomnia. This perspective will focus on the discovery and development of structurally diverse orexin antagonists suitable for preclinical pharmacology studies and human clinical trials. The work described herein culminated in the 2014 FDA approval of suvorexant as a first-in-class dual orexin receptor antagonist for the treatment of insomnia.

  11. GnRH antagonist in in vitro fertilization: where we are now.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, D B; Mitchell-Leef, D

    2003-10-01

    This review focuses on the recent literature concerning the use of GnRH antagonists in ovulation induction for in vitro fertilization (IVF). The GnRH antagonists, ganirelix acetate (Orgalutran/Antagon) and cetrorelix (Cetrotide), have come into increasingly common use since their release in the last 3 years. This class of GnRH analogue has several potential advantages over GnRH agonists. Among these advantages are: 1) shorter duration of injectable drug treatment, 2) decreased gonadotropin requirement per cycle, 3) improved patient convenience and 4) lower overall treatment cost. As clinicians gain experience with these drugs, optimal treatment paradigms will likely emerge. This review will discuss current strategies and potential applications for the GnRH antagonists.

  12. Discovery of antagonists of tick dopamine receptors via chemical library screening and comparative pharmacological analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejendal, Karin F K; Meyer, Jason M; Brust, Tarsis F; Avramova, Larisa V; Hill, Catherine A; Watts, Val J

    2012-11-01

    Ticks transmit a wide variety of disease causing pathogens to humans and animals. Considering the global health impact of tick-borne diseases, there is a pressing need to develop new methods for vector control. We are exploring arthropod dopamine receptors as novel targets for insecticide/acaricide development because of their integral roles in neurobiology. Herein, we developed a screening assay for dopamine receptor antagonists to further characterize the pharmacological properties of the two D₁-like dopamine receptors (Isdop1 and Isdop2) identified in the Lyme disease vector, Ixodes scapularis, and develop a screening assay for receptor antagonists. A cell-based, cyclic AMP luciferase reporter assay platform was implemented to screen the LOPAC(1280) small molecule library for Isdop2 receptor antagonists, representing the first reported chemical library screen for any tick G protein-coupled receptor. Screening resulted in the identification of 85 "hit" compounds with antagonist activity at the Isdop2 receptor. Eight of these chemistries were selected for confirmation assays using a direct measurement of cAMP, and the effects on both Isdop1 and Isdop2 were studied for comparison. Each of these eight compounds showed antagonistic activity at both Isdop1 and Isdop2, although differences were observed regarding their relative potencies. Furthermore, comparison of the pharmacological properties of the tick dopamine receptors with that of the AaDOP2 receptor from the yellow fever mosquito and the human dopamine D₁ receptor (hD₁) revealed species-specific pharmacological profiles of these receptors. Compounds influencing dopaminergic functioning, such as the dopamine receptor antagonists discovered here, may provide lead chemistries for discovery of novel acaricides useful for vector control

  13. Radiolabelled GLP-1 receptor antagonist binds to GLP-1 receptor-expressing human tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waser, Beatrice; Reubi, Jean Claude [University of Berne, Division of Cell Biology and Experimental Cancer Research, Institute of Pathology, PO Box 62, Berne (Switzerland)

    2014-06-15

    Radiolabelled glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists have recently been shown to successfully image benign insulinomas in patients. For the somatostatin receptor targeting of tumours, however, it was recently reported that antagonist tracers were superior to agonist tracers. The present study therefore evaluated various forms of the {sup 125}iodinated-Bolton-Hunter (BH)-exendin(9-39) antagonist tracer for the in vitro visualization of GLP-1 receptor-expressing tissues in rats and humans and compared it with the agonist tracer {sup 125}I-GLP-1(7-36)amide. Receptor autoradiography studies with {sup 125}I-GLP-1(7-36)amide agonist or {sup 125}I-BH-exendin(9-39) antagonist radioligands were performed in human and rat tissues. The antagonist {sup 125}I-BH-exendin(9-39) labelled at lysine 19 identifies all human and rat GLP-1 target tissues and GLP-1 receptor-expressing tumours. Binding is of high affinity and is comparable in all tested tissues in its binding properties with the agonist tracer {sup 125}I-GLP-1(7-36)amide. For comparison, {sup 125}I-BH-exendin(9-39) with the BH labelled at lysine 4 did identify the GLP-1 receptor in rat tissues but not in human tissues. The GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin(9-39) labelled with {sup 125}I-BH at lysine 19 is an excellent GLP-1 radioligand that identifies human and rat GLP-1 receptors in normal and tumoural tissues. It may therefore be the molecular basis to develop suitable GLP-1 receptor antagonist radioligands for in vivo imaging of GLP-1 receptor-expressing tissues in patients. (orig.)

  14. Serotonin (5-HT3 receptor antagonists for the reduction of symptoms of low anterior resection syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itagaki R

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Ryohei Itagaki, Keiji Koda, Masato Yamazaki, Kiyohiko Shuto, Chihiro Kosugi, Atsushi Hirano, Hidehito Arimitsu, Risa Shiragami, Yukino Yoshimura, Masato Suzuki Department of Surgery, Teikyo University Chiba Medical Center, Anesaki, Ichihara, Chiba, Japan Purpose: Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]3 receptor antagonists are effective for the treatment of diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D, in which exaggerated intestinal/colonic hypermotility is often observed. Recent studies have suggested that the motility disorder, especially spastic hypermotility, seen in the neorectum following sphincter-preserving operations for rectal cancer may be the basis of the postoperative defecatory malfunction seen in these patients. We investigated the efficacy of 5-HT3 receptor antagonists in patients suffering from severe low anterior resection syndrome. Patients and methods: A total of 25 male patients with complaints of uncontrollable urgency or fecal incontinence following sphincter-preserving operations were enrolled in this study. Defecatory status, assessed on the basis of incontinence score (0–20, urgency grade (0–3, and number of toilet visits per day, was evaluated using a questionnaire before and 1 month after the administration of the 5-HT3 antagonist ramosetron. Results: All the parameters assessed improved significantly after taking ramosetron for 1 month. The effect was more prominent in cases whose anastomotic line was lower, ie, inside the anal canal. Defecatory function was better in patients who commenced ramosetron therapy within 6 months postoperatively, as compared to those who were not prescribed ramosetron for more than 7 months postoperatively. Conclusion: These results suggest that 5-HT3 antagonists are effective for the treatment of low anterior resection syndrome, as in diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome. The improvement in symptoms is not merely time dependent, but it is related to treatment with 5

  15. 7-Chloroarctinone-b as a new selective PPARγ antagonist potently blocks adipocyte differentiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-tao LI; Li LI; Jing CHEN; Tian-cen HU; Jin HUANG; Yue-wei GUO; Hua-liang JIANG; Xu SHEN

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARy) is a therapeutic target for obesity, cancer and diabetes mellitus. In order to develop potent lead compounds for obesity treatment, we screened a natural product library for novel PPARy antagonists with inhibitory effects on adipocyte differentiation. Methods: Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology and cell-based transactivation assay were used to screen for PPARy antago-nists. To investigate the antagonistic mechanism of the active compound, we measured its effect on PPARy/RXRα heterodimerization and PPARy co-activator recruitment using yeast two-hybrid assay, Gal4/UAS cell-based assay and SPR based assay. The 3T3-L1 cell differentiation assay was used to evaluate the effect of the active compound on adipocyte differentiation. Results: A new thiophene-acetylene type of natural product, 7-chloroarctinone-b (CAB), isolated from the roots of Rhaponticum uniflo-rum, was discovered as a novel PPARγ antagonist capable of inhibiting rosiglitazone-induced PPARγ transcriptional activity. SPR analy-sis suggested that CAB bound tightly to PPARγ and considerably antagonized the potent PPARy agonist rosigtitazone-stimulated PPARγ-LBD/RXRα-LBD binding. Gal4/UAS and yeast two-hybrid assays were used to evaluate the antagonistic activity of CAB on rosiglitazone-induced recruitment of the coactivator for PPARy. CAB could efficiently antagonize both hormone and rosiglitazone-induced adipocyte differentiation in cell culture. Conclusion: CAB shows antagonistic activity to PPARγ and can block the adipocyte differentiation, indicating it may be of potential use as a lead therapeutic compound for obesity.

  16. Antagonists of the human A(2A) receptor. Part 6: Further optimization of pyrimidine-4-carboxamides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Roger J; Bamford, Samantha J; Clay, Alex; Gaur, Suneel; Haymes, Tim; Jackson, Philip S; Jordan, Allan M; Klenke, Burkhard; Leonardi, Stefania; Liu, Jeanette; Mansell, Howard L; Ng, Sean; Saadi, Mona; Simmonite, Heather; Stratton, Gemma C; Todd, Richard S; Williamson, Douglas S; Yule, Ian A

    2009-09-15

    Antagonists of the human A(2A) receptor have been reported to have potential therapeutic benefit in the alleviation of the symptoms associated with neurodegenerative movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease. As part of our efforts to discover potent and selective antagonists of this receptor, we herein describe the detailed optimization and structure-activity relationships of a series of pyrimidine-4-carboxamides. These optimized derivatives display desirable physiochemical and pharmacokinetic profiles, which have led to promising oral activity in clinically relevant models of Parkinson's disease.

  17. Identification of clinical candidates from the benzazepine class of histamine H3 receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, David M; Apps, James; Bailey, Nicholas; Bamford, Mark J; Beresford, Isabel J; Brackenborough, Kim; Briggs, Michael A; Brough, Stephen; Calver, Andrew R; Crook, Barry; Davis, Rebecca K; Davis, Robert P; Davis, Susannah; Dean, David K; Harris, Leanne; Heslop, Teresa; Holland, Vicky; Jeffrey, Phillip; Panchal, Terrance A; Parr, Christopher A; Quashie, Nigel; Schogger, Joanne; Sehmi, Sanjeet S; Stean, Tania O; Steadman, Jon G A; Trail, Brenda; Wald, Jeffrey; Worby, Angela; Takle, Andrew K; Witherington, Jason; Medhurst, Andrew D

    2013-12-15

    This Letter describes the discovery of GSK189254 and GSK239512 that were progressed as clinical candidates to explore the potential of H3 receptor antagonists as novel therapies for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease and other dementias. By carefully controlling the physicochemical properties of the benzazepine series and through the implementation of an aggressive and innovative screening strategy that employed high throughput in vivo assays to efficiently triage compounds, the medicinal chemistry effort was able to rapidly progress the benzazepine class of H3 antagonists through to the identification of clinical candidates with robust in vivo efficacy and excellent developability properties.

  18. Discovery of new SCH 39166 analogs as potent and selective dopamine D1 receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Li; Sasikumar, T K; Burnett, Duane A; Su, Jing; Tang, Haiqun; Ye, Yuanzan; Mazzola, Robert D; Zhu, Zhaoning; McKittrick, Brian A; Greenlee, William J; Fawzi, Ahmad; Smith, Michelle; Zhang, Hongtao; Lachowicz, Jean E

    2010-02-01

    A series of novel dopamine D(1) antagonists derived from functionalization of the D-ring of SCH 39166 were prepared. A number of these compounds displayed subnanomolar D(1) activity and more than 1000-fold selectivity over D(2). We found C-3 derivatization afforded compounds with superior overall profile in comparison to the C-2 and C-4 derivatization. A number of highly potent D(1) antagonists were discovered which have excellent selectivity over other dopamine receptors and improved PK profile compared to SCH 39166.

  19. Chemogenomic discovery of allosteric antagonists at the GPRC6A receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gloriam, David E.; Wellendorph, Petrine; Johansen, Lars Dan;

    2011-01-01

    and pharmacological character: (1) chemogenomic lead identification through the first, to our knowledge, ligand inference between two different GPCR families, Families A and C; and (2) the discovery of the most selective GPRC6A allosteric antagonists discovered to date. The unprecedented inference of...... pharmacological activity across GPCR families provides proof-of-concept for in silico approaches against Family C targets based on Family A templates, greatly expanding the prospects of successful drug design and discovery. The antagonists were tested against a panel of seven Family A and C G protein-coupled receptors...

  20. Unprecedented NES non-antagonistic inhibitor for nuclear export of Rev from Sida cordifolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Satoru; Kaneko, Masafumi; Shiomi, Atsushi; Yang, Guang-Ming; Yamaura, Toshiaki; Murakami, Nobutoshi

    2010-03-15

    Bioassay-guided separation from the MeOH extract of the South American medicinal plant Sida cordifolia resulted in isolation of (10E,12Z)-9-hydroxyoctadeca-10,12-dienoic acid (1) as an unprecedented NES non-antagonistic inhibitor for nuclear export of Rev. This mechanism of action was established by competitive experiment by the biotinylated probe derived from leptomycin B, the known NES antagonistic inhibitor. Additionally, structure-activity relationship analysis by use of the synthesized analogs clarified cooperation of several functionalities in the Rev-export inhibitory activity of 1.

  1. CGRP receptor antagonists and antibodies against CGRP and its receptor in migraine treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edvinsson, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Recently developed calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonistic molecules have shown promising results in clinical trials for acute treatment of migraine attacks. Drugs from the gepant class of CGRP receptor antagonists are effective and do not cause vasoconstriction, one...... for treatment of chronic migraine (attacks >15 days/month). Initial results from phase I and II clinical trials have revealed promising results with minimal side effects and significant relief from chronic migraine as compared with placebo. The effectiveness of these various molecules raises the question...... to understand the localization of CGRP and the CGRP receptor components in these possible sites of migraine-related regions and their relation to the BBB....

  2. Antianxiety actions of Ca2+ channel antagonists with Vogel-type conflict test in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Y; Kataoka, Y; Watanabe, Y; Miyazaki, A; Taniyama, K

    1994-10-13

    We examined the effects of various derivatives of Ca2+ channel antagonists in a modified rat Vogel-type conflict model. Flunarizine (10 and 20 mg/kg), nicardipine (20 mg/kg), and verapamil (20 mg/kg), given as single i.p. injections, significantly increased punished lickings by 50-110%. Chronic administration of diltiazem, at 20 mg/kg i.p. for 8 days, a dose ineffective with a single i.p. injection, produced a significant anticonflict action. The possibility that Ca2+ channel antagonists have anxiolytic action should be considered.

  3. Discovery of 2-substituted benzoxazole carboxamides as 5-HT3 receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhicai; Fairfax, David J; Maeng, Jun-Ho; Masih, Liaqat; Usyatinsky, Alexander; Hassler, Carla; Isaacson, Soshanna; Fitzpatrick, Kevin; DeOrazio, Russell J; Chen, Jianqing; Harding, James P; Isherwood, Matthew; Dobritsa, Svetlana; Christensen, Kevin L; Wierschke, Jonathan D; Bliss, Brian I; Peterson, Lisa H; Beer, Cathy M; Cioffi, Christopher; Lynch, Michael; Rennells, W Martin; Richards, Justin J; Rust, Timothy; Khmelnitsky, Yuri L; Cohen, Marlene L; Manning, David D

    2010-11-15

    A new class of 2-substituted benzoxazole carboxamides are presented as potent functional 5-HT(3) receptor antagonists. The chemical series possesses nanomolar in vitro activity against human 5-HT(3)A receptors. A chemistry optimization program was conducted and identified 2-aminobenzoxazoles as orally active 5-HT(3) receptor antagonists with good metabolic stability. These novel analogues possess drug-like characteristics and have potential utility for the treatment of diseases attributable to improper 5-HT(3) receptor function, especially diarrhea predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D).

  4. Transport of beta-blockers and calcium antagonists by diffusion in cat myocardium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haunsø, Stig; Sejrsen, Per; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup

    1991-01-01

    Beta-blockers and calcium antagonists have been claimed to possess cardioprotective properties. This study addresses the question of whether a significant amount of these drugs will reach the cardiac myocytes during no-flow ischemia, where solute transport depends solely on diffusion. In anesthet......Beta-blockers and calcium antagonists have been claimed to possess cardioprotective properties. This study addresses the question of whether a significant amount of these drugs will reach the cardiac myocytes during no-flow ischemia, where solute transport depends solely on diffusion...

  5. Data on the oral CRTh2 antagonist QAW039 (fevipiprant in patients with uncontrolled allergic asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veit J. Erpenbeck

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article contains data on clinical endpoints (Peak Flow Expiratory Rate, fractional exhaled nitric oxide and total IgE serum levels and plasma pharmacokinetic parameters concerning the use of the oral CRTh2 antagonist QAW039 (fevipiprant in mild to moderate asthma patients. Information on experimental design and methods on how this data was obtained is also described. Further interpretation and discussion of this data can be found in the article “The oral CRTh2 antagonist QAW039 (fevipiprant: a phase II study in uncontrolled allergic asthma” (Erpenbeck et al., in press [1].

  6. Discovery of Isoquinolinoquinazolinones as a Novel Class of Potent PPARγ Antagonists with Anti-adipogenic Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yifeng; Han, Younho; Khadka, Daulat Bikram; Zhao, Chao; Lee, Kwang Youl; Cho, Won-Jea

    2016-01-01

    Conformational change in helix 12 can alter ligand-induced PPARγ activity; based on this reason, isoquinolinoquinazolinones, structural homologs of berberine, were designed and synthesized as PPARγ antagonists. Computational docking and mutational study indicated that isoquinolinoquinazolinones form hydrogen bonds with the Cys285 and Arg288 residues of PPARγ. Furthermore, SPR results demonstrated strong binding affinity of isoquinolinoquinazolinones towards PPARγ. Additionally, biological assays showed that this new series of PPARγ antagonists more strongly inhibit adipocyte differentiation and PPARγ2-induced transcriptional activity than GW9662. PMID:27695006

  7. Data on the oral CRTh2 antagonist QAW039 (fevipiprant) in patients with uncontrolled allergic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erpenbeck, Veit J; Popov, Todor A; Miller, David; Weinstein, Steven F; Spector, Sheldon; Magnusson, Baldur; Osuntokun, Wande; Goldsmith, Paul; Weiss, Markus; Beier, Jutta

    2016-12-01

    This article contains data on clinical endpoints (Peak Flow Expiratory Rate, fractional exhaled nitric oxide and total IgE serum levels) and plasma pharmacokinetic parameters concerning the use of the oral CRTh2 antagonist QAW039 (fevipiprant) in mild to moderate asthma patients. Information on experimental design and methods on how this data was obtained is also described. Further interpretation and discussion of this data can be found in the article "The oral CRTh2 antagonist QAW039 (fevipiprant): a phase II study in uncontrolled allergic asthma" (Erpenbeck et al., in press) [1].

  8. A RNA antagonist of hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha, EZN-2968, inhibits tumor cell growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greenberger, Lee M; Horak, Ivan D; Filpula, David;

    2008-01-01

    pathways, is associated with poor prognosis in many types of cancer. Therefore, down-regulation of HIF-1alpha protein by RNA antagonists may control cancer growth. EZN-2968 is a RNA antagonist composed of third-generation oligonucleotide, locked nucleic acid, technology that specifically binds and inhibits...... the expression of HIF-1alpha mRNA. In vitro, in human prostate (15PC3, PC3, and DU145) and glioblastoma (U373) cells, EZN-2968 induced a potent, selective, and durable antagonism of HIF-1 mRNA and protein expression (IC(50), 1-5 nmol/L) under normoxic and hypoxic conditions associated with inhibition of tumor...

  9. 5-HT2B Receptor Antagonists Inhibit Fibrosis and Protect from RV Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Wiebke Janssen; Yves Schymura; Tatyana Novoyatleva; Baktybek Kojonazarov; Mario Boehm; Astrid Wietelmann; Himal Luitel; Kirsten Murmann; Damian Richard Krompiec; Aleksandra Tretyn; Soni Savai Pullamsetti; Norbert Weissmann; Werner Seeger; Hossein Ardeschir Ghofrani; Ralph Theo Schermuly

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The serotonin (5-HT) pathway was shown to play a role in pulmonary hypertension (PH), but its functions in right ventricular failure (RVF) remain poorly understood. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effects of Terguride (5-HT2A and 2B receptor antagonist) or SB204741 (5-HT2B receptor antagonist) on right heart function and structure upon pulmonary artery banding (PAB) in mice. Methods. Seven days after PAB, mice were treated for 14 days with Terguride (0.2 mg/kg b...

  10. Adenosine A2A receptor antagonists exert motor and neuroprotective effects by distinct cellular mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Liqun; Shen, Hai-Ying; Coelho, Joana E.; Araújo, Inês M.; HUANG, QING-YUAN; Day, Yuan-Ji; Rebola, Nelson; Canas, Paula M.; Rapp, Erica Kirsten; Ferrara, Jarrod; Taylor, Darcie; Müller, Christa E.; Linden, Joel; Cunha, Rodrigo A.; Chen, Jiang-Fan

    2008-01-01

    To investigate whether the motor and neuroprotective effects of adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) antagonists are mediated by distinct cell types in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) model of Parkinson's disease.We used the forebrain A2AR knock-out mice coupled with flow cytometric analyses and intracerebroventricular injection to determine the contribution of A2ARs in forebrain neurons and glial cells to A2AR antagonist-mediated motor and neuroprotective effects.The selecti...

  11. [BACILLUS STRAINS'S SCREENING--ACTIVE ANTAGONISTS OF BACTERIAL AND FUNGAL PHYTOPATHOGENS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabova, A Yu; Dragovoz, I V; Kruchkova, L A; Pasichnik, L A; Avdeeva, L V

    2015-01-01

    Antagonistic activity 100 strains of Bacillus bacteria towards to museum and actual strains of phytopathogenic bacteria and fungy was defined. Relation between level of antagonistic activity to phytopathogenic bacteria and genus accessory of the last was shown. The medium level of antagonism to fungal phytopathogens at 30% of the studied strains of Bacillus bacteria was shown. 5 strains of Bacillus sp. with high and medium levels of antagonism to phytopathogens bacterial and fungy nature was selected and considered as perspective for creation of biological preparations for plant protection.

  12. THE INTERACTION OF SELECTIVE AND NONSELECTIVE ANTAGONISTS WITH PREJUNCTIONAL AND POSTJUNCTIONAL MUSCARINIC RECEPTOR SUBTYPES IN THE GUINEA-PIG TRACHEA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TENBERGE, REJ; ROFFEL, AF; ZAAGSMA, J

    1993-01-01

    Muscarinic receptor antagonists were used to study prejunctional M2 and postjunctional M3 receptors in the isolated guinea pig trachea. The effects of four M2-selective muscarinic receptor antagonists (gallamine, methoctramine, AQ-RA 741 and AF-DX 116) were studied on twitch contractions, elicited b

  13. The effect of antagonistic micro-organisms on the brood of honeybees (Apis mellifera) and bumblebees (Bombus terrestris) 2003

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steen, van der J.J.M.; Dik, A.J.

    2002-01-01

    Several plant pathogenic fungi enter the plant trough open flowers. Spores of antagonistic micro-organisms present on the flowers can successfully compete with the possible pathogens. Honeybees and bumblebees can be used for transporting these antagonistic micro-organisms from the hive into flowers

  14. AMPA and GABA receptor antagonists and their interaction in rats with a genetic form of absence epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaminski, R.M.; Rijn, C.M. van; Turski, W.A.; Czuczwar, S.J.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van

    2001-01-01

    The effects of combined and single administration of the -amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor antagonist, 7,8-methylenedioxy-1-(4-aminophenyl)-4-methyl-3-acetyl-4,5-dihydro-2,3 -benzodiazepine (LY 300164), and of the GABAB receptor antagonist -aminopropyl-n-butyl-phosp

  15. Identification of a novel NR2B-selective NMDA receptor antagonist using a virtual screening approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mony, Laetitia; Triballeau, Nicolas; Paoletti, Pierre; Acher, Francine C; Bertrand, Hugues-Olivier

    2010-09-15

    We report the identification of a novel NR2B-selective NMDAR antagonist with an original scaffold, LSP10-0500. This compound was identified by a virtual high-throughput screening approach on the basis of a quantitative pharmacophore model of NR2B-specific NMDAR antagonists. A SAR study around LSP10-0500 is also described.

  16. Pharmacophore-guided design, synthesis and evaluation of quinazoline-arylpiperazines as new α1-adrenoceptor antagonists

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Fang; Min Yong Li; Lin Xia

    2007-01-01

    A series of arylpiperazinesquinazoline-2,4-diamine compounds were designed and synthesized based on pharmacophore for uro-selective α1-adrenoceptor antagonists and 3D chemical database searching. The in vitro functional analysis showed that compounds 9 and 14 showed better and similar α1-AR antagonistic activity compared with prazosin.

  17. Isolation from the Sorghum bicolor Mycorrhizosphere of a Bacterium Compatible with Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Development and Antagonistic towards Soilborne Fungal Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budi, S. W.; van Tuinen, D.; Martinotti, G.; Gianinazzi, S.

    1999-01-01

    A gram-positive bacterium with antagonistic activity towards soilborne fungal pathogens has been isolated from the mycorrhizosphere of Sorghum bicolor inoculated with Glomus mosseae. It has been identified as Paenibacillus sp. strain B2 based on its analytical profile index and on 16S ribosomal DNA analysis. Besides having antagonistic activity, this bacterium stimulates mycorrhization. PMID:10543835

  18. Examining SLV-323, a novel NK1 receptor antagonist, in a chronic psychosocial stress model for depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Czeh, B; Pudovkina, O; van der Hart, MGC; Simon, M; Heilbronner, U; Michaelis, T; Watanabe, T; Frahm, J; Fuchs, E

    2005-01-01

    Rationale: Substance P antagonists have been proposed as candidates for a new class of antidepressant compounds. Objectives: We examined the effects of SLV-323, a novel neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) antagonist, in the chronic psychosocial stress paradigm of adult male tree shrews. Methods: Animals we

  19. TGF-.beta. antagonists as mitigators of radiation-induced tissue damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcellos-Hoff, Mary H.

    1997-01-01

    A method for treating tissue damage caused by radiation is described by use of a TGF-.beta. antagonist, such as an anti-TGF-.beta. antibody or a TGF-.beta. latency associated protein. It is administered not more than a week after exposure, and is particularly useful in mitigating the side effects of breast cancer therapy.

  20. TGF-{beta} antagonists as mitigators of radiation-induced tissue damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcellos-Hoff, M.H.

    1997-04-01

    A method for treating tissue damage caused by radiation is described by use of a TGF-{beta} antagonist, such as an anti-TGF-{beta} antibody or a TGF-{beta} latency associated protein. It is administered not more than a week after exposure, and is particularly useful in mitigating the side effects of breast cancer therapy.

  1. Editing and Scaling of Instrument Packets for the Clinical Evaluation of Narcotic Antagonists. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldt, Robert F.; Gitomer, Nancy L.

    Efforts of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) as a contractor to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) include: (1) assessment of the usefulness of naltrexone, a narcotic antagonist, in the rehabilitation of several types of opiate-dependent individuals; (2) assessment of any drawbacks to the use of naltrexone; and (3) appraisal of…

  2. Bicyclic and tricyclic heterocycle derivatives as histamine H3 receptor antagonists for the treatment of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lera Ruiz, Manuel; Zheng, Junying; Berlin, Michael Y; McCormick, Kevin D; Aslanian, Robert G; West, Robert; Hwa, Joyce; Lachowicz, Jean; van Heek, Margaret

    2013-11-01

    A novel series of non-imidazole bicyclic and tricyclic histamine H3 receptor antagonists has been discovered. Compound 17 was identified as a centrally penetrant molecule with high receptor occupancy which demonstrates robust oral activity in rodent models of obesity. In addition compound 17 possesses clean CYP and hERG profiles and shows no behavioral changes in the Irwin test.

  3. Design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of 4-phenylpyrrole derivatives as novel androgen receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Satoshi; Matsunaga, Nobuyuki; Hitaka, Takenori; Yamada, Masami; Hara, Takahito; Miyazaki, Junichi; Santou, Takashi; Kusaka, Masami; Yamaoka, Masuo; Kanzaki, Naoyuki; Furuya, Shuichi; Tasaka, Akihiro; Hamamura, Kazumasa; Ito, Mitsuhiro

    2012-01-01

    A series of 4-phenylpyrrole derivatives D were designed, synthesized, and evaluated for their potential as novel orally available androgen receptor antagonists therapeutically effective against castration-resistant prostate cancers. 4-Phenylpyrrole compound 1 exhibited androgen receptor (AR) antagonistic activity against T877A and W741C mutant-type ARs as well as wild-type AR. An arylmethyl group incorporated into compound 1 contributed to enhancement of antagonistic activity. Compound 4n, 1-{[6-chloro-5-(hydroxymethyl)pyridin-3-yl]methyl}-4-(4-cyanophenyl)-2,5-dimethyl-1H-pyrrole-3-carbonitrile exhibited inhibitory effects on tumor cell growth against the bicalutamide-resistant LNCaP-cxD2 cell line as well as the androgen receptor-dependent JDCaP cell line in a mouse xenograft model. These results demonstrate that this series of pyrrole compounds are novel androgen receptor antagonists with efficacy against prostate cancer cells, including castration-resistant prostate cancers such as bicalutamide-resistant prostate cancer.

  4. Does the presence of antagonist remaining teeth affect implant overdenture success? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkubo, C; Baek, K W

    2010-04-01

    Many patients who need implant overdentures are not completely edentulous; they still have antagonist natural teeth or implant fixed prostheses. In such cases, however, little is known about whether existing natural teeth affect the success of implant overdentures positively or act as a complicating factor. This systematic review attempts to clarify the correlation between existing remaining teeth and the survival/success rate of maxillary and mandibular implant overdentures. An assessment of available relevant articles published in English from 1990 to 2009 was performed using an online database and a manual search in libraries. Although the opposing natural dentition was not sufficiently described in the literature, 10 articles about the mandible and 10 articles about the maxilla were selected. As there was no controlled study on the natural teeth opposing implant overdentures, this review could not reach a clear conclusion. The review did reveal a remarkably high success/survival rate for mandibular implant overdentures; maxillary implant overdentures showed a lower rate. The presence of antagonist teeth hardly seems to be a risk factor for success for mandibular implant overdentures. For maxillary implant overdentures, the existence of antagonist teeth might act negatively for implant survival, but they are certainly not a contraindication. Although a few articles stated this relationship, we could not find an apparent correlation between the remaining antagonist teeth and the success of the implant overdentures. A detailed description of the opposing dentate status and results of randomized controlled clinical trials would be required to characterize this evidence-based implant overdenture treatment.

  5. Intracerebroventricular administration of histamine H3 receptor antagonists decreases seizures in rat models of epilepsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, C; Hirai, T; Fujii, Y; Harusawa, S; Kurihara, T; Kamei, C

    2004-05-01

    The effects of histamine H3 antagonists on amygdaloid kindled and maximal electroshock seizures in rats were studied to determine their potential as new antiepileptic drugs. Under pentobarbital anesthesia, rats were fixed to a stereotaxic apparatus and a stainless steel guide cannula for drug administration was implanted into the lateral ventricle. In amygdaloid kindled seizures, electrodes were implanted into the right amygdala and electroencephalogram was recorded bipolarly; stimulation was applied bipolarly every day by a constant current stimulator and continued until a generalized convulsion was obtained. In the maximal electroshock (MES) seizure test, electroconvulsion was induced by stimulating animals through ear-clip electrodes, and the durations of tonic and clonic seizures were measured. Thioperamide, clobenpropit, iodophenpropit, VUF5514, VUF5515 and VUF4929 caused a dose-dependent inhibition of both seizure stage and afterdischarge (AD) duration of amygdaloid kindled seizures. The duration of tonic seizure induced by MES was also inhibited by H3 antagonists, but the duration of clonic seizures were unchanged. Among the H3 antagonists tested, clobenpropit and iodophenpropit were somewhat more potent than the other drugs on amygdaloid kindled seizures and MES seizures, respectively. These results indicate that some H3 antagonists may be useful as antiepileptic drugs, especially for secondary generalized seizures and/or tonic-clonic seizures in humans.

  6. Effect of the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist telcagepant in human cranial arteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Edvinsson (Lars); K.Y. Chan (Kayi); S. Eftekhari; E. Nilsson (Elisabeth); R. de Vries (René); H. Säveland (Hans); C.M.F. Dirven (Clemens); A.H.J. Danser (Jan)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a neuronal messenger in intracranial sensory nerves and is considered to play a significant role in migraine pathophysiology. Materials and methods: We investigated the effect of the CGRP receptor antagonist, telcagepant, on CGRP-in

  7. Tying up Nicotine: New Selective Competitive Antagonist of the Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ida Nymann; Crestey, François; Jensen, Anders A;

    2015-01-01

    Conformational restriction of the pyrrolidine nitrogen in nicotine by the introduction of an ethylene bridge provided a potent and selective antagonist of the α4β2-subtype of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Resolution by chiral SFC, pharmacological characterization of the two enantiomers...

  8. Long-term use of aldosterone-receptor antagonists in uncontrolled hypertension: A retrospective analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.M. Jansen (Pieter); K. Verdonk (Koen); B.P. Imholz (Ben); A.H.J. Danser (Jan); A.H. van den Meiracker (Anton)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground. The long-term efficacy of aldosterone-receptor antagonists (ARAs) as add-on treatment in uncontrolled hypertension has not yet been reported. Methods. Data from 123 patients (21 with primary aldosteronism, 102 with essential hypertension) with difficult-to-treat hypertension

  9. Pyrazolo Derivatives as Potent Adenosine Receptor Antagonists: An Overview on the Structure-Activity Relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siew Lee Cheong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past few decades, medicinal chemistry research towards potent and selective antagonists of human adenosine receptors (namely, A1, A2A, A2B, and A3 has been evolving rapidly. These antagonists are deemed therapeutically beneficial in several pathological conditions including neurological and renal disorders, cancer, inflammation, and glaucoma. Up to this point, many classes of compounds have been successfully synthesized and identified as potent human adenosine receptor antagonists. In this paper, an overview of the structure-activity relationship (SAR profiles of promising nonxanthine pyrazolo derivatives is reported and discussed. We have emphasized the SAR for some representative structures such as pyrazolo-[4,3-e]-1,2,4-triazolo-[1,5-c]pyrimidines; pyrazolo-[3,4-c] or -[4,3-c]quinolines; pyrazolo-[4,3-d]pyrimidinones; pyrazolo-[3,4-d]pyrimidines and pyrazolo-[1,5-a]pyridines. This overview not only clarifies the structural requirements deemed essential for affinity towards individual adenosine receptor subtypes, but it also sheds light on the rational design and optimization of existing structural templates to allow us to conceive new, more potent adenosine receptor antagonists.

  10. Acute Effects of Different Agonist and Antagonist Stretching Arrangements on Static and Dynamic Range of Motion

    OpenAIRE

    Amiri-Khorasani; Kellis

    2015-01-01

    Background Traditionally, stretching exercises are considered as basic components of warm up aiming to prepare the musculoskeletal system for performance and to prevent injuries. Objectives The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of different agonist and antagonist stretching arrangements within a pre-exercise warm-up on hip static (SROM) and dynamic range of motion (DROM). Materia...

  11. Study of the n-methyl-d-aspartate antagonistic properties of anticholinergic drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonough, J.H.; Shih, T.M.

    1995-12-31

    A study of the N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonistic properties of anticholinergic drugs. PHARMACOL BIOCHEM BEHAV. 51(2/3) 249-253, 1995. Drugs that act at the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor complex have the ability to terminate nerve agent-induced seizures and modulate the neuropathologic consequences of agent exposure. Drugs with mixed anticholinergic and anti-NMDA properties potentially provide an ideal class of compounds for development as anticonvulsant treatments for nerve agent casualties. The present experiment evaluated the potential NMDA antagonist activity of 11 anticholinergic drugs by determining whether pretreatment with the compound was capable of protecting mice from the lethal effects of NMDA. The following anticholinergic drugs antagonized NMDA lethality and are ranked according to their potency: mecamylamine > procyclidine = benactyzine > biperiden > tribexyphenidyl. The anticholinergics atropine, aprophen, azaprophen, benztropine, 3-quinudidinyl benzilate (QNB), and scopolamine failed to show NMDA antagonist properties. In addition, and unexpectedly, diazepam, ethanol, and pentobarbital were also shown to be capable of antagonizing NMDA lethality over a certain range of doses. The advantages and limitations of using antagonism of NMDA lethality in mice as a bioassay for determining the NMDA antagonist properties of drugs are also discussed.

  12. Temporal trends in the prescription of vitamin K antagonists in patients with atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friberg, J; Gislason, G H; Gadsbøll, N;

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Anticoagulation therapy is recommended in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and risk factors for stroke. We studied the temporal trends in the prescription of vitamin K antagonists (VKA) in patients with a first hospital diagnosis of AF in Denmark, 1995-2002. DESIGN: The Danish...

  13. Optimization of arylindenopyrimidines as potent adenosine A(2A)/A(1) antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shook, Brian C; Rassnick, Stefanie; Chakravarty, Devraj; Wallace, Nathaniel; Ault, Mark; Crooke, Jeffrey; Barbay, J Kent; Wang, Aihua; Leonard, Kristi; Powell, Mark T; Alford, Vernon; Hall, Daniel; Rupert, Kenneth C; Heintzelman, Geoffrey R; Hansen, Kristen; Bullington, James L; Scannevin, Robert H; Carroll, Karen; Lampron, Lisa; Westover, Lori; Russell, Ronald; Branum, Shawn; Wells, Kenneth; Damon, Sandra; Youells, Scott; Beauchamp, Derek; Li, Xun; Rhodes, Kenneth; Jackson, Paul F

    2010-05-01

    Two reactive metabolites were identified in vivo for the dual A(2A)/A(1) receptor antagonist 1. Two strategies were implemented to successfully mitigate the metabolic liabilities associated with 1. Optimization of the arylindenopyrimidines led to a number of amide, ether, and amino analogs having comparable in vitro and in vivo activity.

  14. Novel selective thiazoleacetic acids as CRTH2 antagonists developed from in silico derived hits. Part 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimstrup, Marie; Rist, Øystein; Receveur, Jean-Marie;

    2010-01-01

    Structure-activity relationships have been established by exploring the eastern and western side of 5-thiazolyleacetic acids as CRTH2 (chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecule expressed on Th2 cells) antagonists. Benzhydryl motifs in the 2-position of the thiazole was found to be most advanta...

  15. Novel selective thiazoleacetic acids as CRTH2 antagonists developed from in silico derived hits. Part 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rist, Oystein; Grimstrup, Marie; Receveur, Jean-Marie;

    2009-01-01

    Structure-activity relationships of three related series of 4-phenylthiazol-5-ylacetic acids, derived from two hits emanating from a focused library obtained by in silico screening, have been explored as CRTH2 (chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecule expressed on Th2 cells) antagonists. Seve...

  16. SB-258741: a 5-HT7 receptor antagonist of potential clinical interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouzet, Bruno

    2002-01-01

    Recently, a series of 5-HT7 receptor antagonists have been developed (24,29,36,68). Among them SB-258741, R-(+)-1-(toluene-3-sulfonyl)-2-[2-(4-methylpiperidin-1-yl)ethyl]-pyrrolidine, (compound "13" in 36,37) was one of the most potent and specific compounds. Due to a lack of specific ligands the pharmacology of 5-HT7 receptor antagonists is still relatively unexplored. It has been suggested, however, that 5-HT7 receptor ligands could be useful in the therapy of various disorders such as sleep disorders, schizophrenia, depression, migraine, epilepsy, pain, or memory impairment. Many of these conceivable indications are not supported by pharmacological data. It is, therefore, of particular interest to review the data generated from studies of one of these most potent and specific 5-HT7 receptor antagonists, SB-258741, with a goal of testing the validity of the proposed clinical indications. In this review, the author describes pharmacology of this compound in order to define its potential clinical use. The available safety pharmacology data are discussed in an attempt to predict potential side effects of specific 5-HT7 receptor antagonists.

  17. Evidence for homogeneity of thromboxane A2 receptor using structurally different antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swayne, G T; Maguire, J; Dolan, J; Raval, P; Dane, G; Greener, M; Owen, D A

    1988-08-01

    Nine structurally dissimilar thromboxane antagonists (SQ 29548, ICI 185282, AH 23848, BM 13505 (Daltroban), BM 13177 (Sulotroban), SK&F 88046, L-636499, L-640035 and a Bayer compound SK&F 47821) were studied for activity as thromboxane A2 receptor antagonists. The assays used were inhibition of responses induced by the thromboxane mimetic, U46619, on human washed platelet aggregation, rabbit platelet aggregation, rabbit aortic strip contraction, anaesthetised guinea-pig bronchoconstriction, and a radio-labelled ligand (125I-PTA-OH) binding assay as a measure of affinity for the human platelet receptor. The results of the present study, with activities spanning at least four orders of magnitude along with statistically significant correlations (at least P less than 0.01), strongly suggests that between assays, antagonists and species a homogenous population of thromboxane A2 receptors exists. This finding is in contrast to those of a close series of 13-azapinane antagonists studied by other workers which have suggested receptor heterogeneity.

  18. Extended studies on the effect of glutamate antagonists on ischemic CA-1 damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diemer, Nils Henrik; Balchen, T; Bruhn, T;

    1996-01-01

    Glutamate receptors are numerous on the ischemia vulnerable CA-1 pyramidal cells. Postischemic use of the AMPA antagonist NBQX has shown up to 80% protection against cell death. Three aspects of this were studied: In the first study, male Wistar rats were given NBQX (30 mg/kg x 3) either 20 hours...

  19. Effect of the Urotensin Receptor Antagonist Palosuran in Hypertensive Patients With Type 2 Diabetic Nephropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Vogt; C. Chiurchiu; H. Chadha-Boreham; P. Danaietash; J. Dingemanse; S. Hadjadj; H. Krum; G. Navis; E. Neuhart; A.I. Parvanova; P. Ruggenenti; A.J. Woittiez; R. Zimlichman; G. Remuzzi; D. de Zeeuw

    2010-01-01

    The urotensin system has been hypothesized to play an important role in the pathophysiology of diabetic nephropathy. In this multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2-period crossover study, the effects of the urotensin receptor antagonist palosuran on urinary albumin excretion an

  20. NO in exhaled air of asthmatic children is reduced by the leukotriene receptor antagonist montelukast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, H; Loland, L; Oj, J A

    1999-01-01

    Nitric oxide in exhaled air (FENO) is increased in asthmatic children, probably reflecting aspects of airway inflammation. We have studied the effect of the leukotriene receptor antagonist (LTRA) montelukast on FENO with a view to elucidate potential anti-inflammatory properties of LTRAs. Twenty-...

  1. Features of isolation and identification of phytopathogenic bacteria and search of their natural antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. Stonchyus

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Microflora of vegetables affected by bacteriosis was isolated and investigated. On the basis of morphological, cultural, physiological and biochemical characteristics of selected strains they were identified, and their plants pathogenicity was shown. The antagonistic influence of strain Bacillus thuringiensis var. thuringiensis IMV B-7186 on isolated bacterial culture was studied.

  2. I. Effects of a Dopamine Receptor Antagonist on Fathead Minnow, Pimephales promelas ,Reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study used a 21 d fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) reproduction assay to test the hypothesis that exposure to the dopamine 2 receptor (D2R) antagonist, haloperidol, would impair fish reproduction. Additionally, a 96 h experiment with fathead minnows and zebrafish (Danio ...

  3. Glycine betaine improves oxidative stress tolerance and biocontrol efficacy of antagonistic yeast Cystofilobasidium infirmominiatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effect of H2O2-induced oxidative stress on the viability of the yeast antagonist, Cystofilobasidium infirmominiatum, as well as the effect of exogenous glycine betaine (GB) on yeast viability under oxidative stress, was determined. GB treatment improved the tolerance of C. infirmominiatum to ox...

  4. Glycine betaine improves oxidative stress tolerance and biocontrol efficacy of the antagonistic yeast Cystofilobasidium infirmominiatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effect of hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress on the viability of the yeast antagonist, Cystofilobasidium infirmominiatum, as well as the effect of exogenous glycine betaine (GB) on yeast viability under oxidative stress, was determined. GB treatment improved the tolerance of C. infirmom...

  5. Possible sites of action of the new calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eftekhari, Sajedeh; Edvinsson, Lars

    2010-01-01

    synapses CGRP results in vasodilatation via receptors on the smooth muscle cells. At central synapses, CGRP acts postjunctionally on second-order neurons to transmit pain centrally via the brainstem and midbrain to higher cortical pain regions. The recently developed CGRP-receptor antagonists have...

  6. Effect of the cannabinoid receptor-1 antagonist rimonabant on lipolysis in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølhøj, Signe; Hansen, Harald S; Schweiger, Martina

    2010-01-01

    The cannabinoid receptor 1 antagonist, rimonabant, reduces food intake and body weight, but contradictory findings have been reported as to whether the weight-reducing effect is fully accounted for by the reduced food intake or if rimonabant also mediates a lipolytic effect. In the present study...

  7. Probable interaction between an oral vitamin K antagonist and turmeric (Curcuma longa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daveluy, Amélie; Géniaux, Hélène; Thibaud, Lucile; Mallaret, Michel; Miremont-Salamé, Ghada; Haramburu, Françoise

    2014-01-01

    We report a probable interaction between a vitamin K antagonist, fluindione, and the herbal medicine turmeric that resulted in the elevation of the international normalized ratio (INR). The case presented here underlines the importance of considering potential exposure to herbal medications when assessing adverse effects.

  8. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulation usage according to age among patients with atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staerk, Laila; Fosbøl, Emil Loldrup; Gadsbøll, Kasper;

    2016-01-01

    Among atrial fibrillation (AF) patients, Danish nationwide registries (2011-2015) were used to examine temporal trends of initiation patterns of oral anticoagulation (OAC) treatment according to age. Overall, 43,299 AF patients initiating vitamin K antagonists (VKA) (42%), dabigatran (29...

  9. Predictors of Congestive Heart Failure after Treatment with an Endothelin Receptor Antagonist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekman, Jamo; Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo; Viberti, Giancarlo; Green, Damien; Mann, Johannes F. E.; de Zeeuw, Dick

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives The Avosentan on Time to Doubling of Serum Creatinine, End Stage Renal Disease or Death (ASCEND) trial tested the renoprotective effect of the endothelin receptor antagonist avosentan in patients with diabetes and nephropathy, but the study was terminated due to an excess o

  10. Ovarian response prediction in GnRH antagonist treatment for IVF using anti-Mullerian hormone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamdine, O.; Eijkemans, M.J.; Lentjes, E.W.; Torrance, H.L.; Macklon, N.S.; Fauser, B.C.; Broekmans, F.J.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: What is the clinical value of anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH) for the prediction of high or low ovarian response in controlled ovarian stimulation for IVF using GnRH antagonist treatment? SUMMARY ANSWER: AMH as a single test has substantial accuracy for ovarian response prediction in Gn

  11. Scintigraphic detection of pulmonary aspergillosis in rabbits with a radiolabeled leukotriene b4 antagonist.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eerd-Vismale, J.E.M. van; Rennen, H.J.J.M.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Harris, T.D.; Edwards, D.S.; Corstens, F.H.M.; Boerman, O.C.

    2004-01-01

    Radiolabeled chemotactic peptides have been studied for their applicability to the visualization of infectious and inflammatory foci. Because a radiolabeled leukotriene B4 (LTB4) antagonist allowed visualization of intramuscular E. coli abscesses in rabbits within a few hours after injection, we dec

  12. Imaging of infection and inflammation with an improved 99mTc-labeled LTB4 antagonist.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eerd-Vismale, J.E.M. van; Broekema, M.; Harris, T.D.; Edwards, D.S.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Corstens, F.H.M.; Boerman, O.C.

    2005-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated that the bivalent (111)In-labeled leukotriene B4 (LTB4) antagonist DPC11870 reveals infectious and inflammatory lesions in various rabbit models. The radioactive tracer accumulates quickly at the site of infection and clears rapidly from the circulation, resulting in high-q

  13. Therapeutic efficacy and immunological response of CCL5 antagonists in models of contact skin reaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Canavese

    Full Text Available Skin-infiltrating T-cells play a predominant role in allergic and inflammatory skin diseases such as atopic dermatitis, psoriasis and allergic contact dermatitis. These T-cells are attracted by several chemotactic factors including the chemokine CCL5/RANTES, a CC chemokine inducing both the migration and activation of specific leukocyte subsets. CCL5 has been found to be associated with various cell-mediated hypersensitive disorders such as psoriasis, atopic dermatitis and irritant contact dermatitis. We have used two antagonists, the first, Met-CCL5, a dual CCR1/CCR5 antagonist and the second, a variant in which GAG binding is abrogated, (44AANA(47-CCL5, which acts as a dominant negative inhibitor of CCL5. The antagonists were tested in two models of contact skin reaction. The first, irritant contact dermatitis (ICD is a pathological non-specific inflammatory skin condition arising from the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines by keratinocytes in response to haptens, usually chemicals. The second, contact hypersensitivity (CHS is a T-cell dependent model, mimicking in part the T-cell-mediated skin diseases such as psoriasis. In both models, the CCL5 antagonists showed therapeutic efficacy by reducing swelling by 50% as well as the reduction of soluble mediators in homogenates derived from challenged ears. These results demonstrate that blocking the receptor or the ligand are both effective strategies to inhibit skin inflammation.

  14. Bartonella quintana lipopolysaccharide is a natural antagonist of Toll-like receptor 4.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popa, C.; Abdollahi-Roodsaz, S.; Joosten, L.A.B.; Takahashi, N.; Sprong, T.; Matera, G.; Liberto, M.C.; Foca, A.; Deuren, M. van; Kullberg, B.J.; Berg, W.B. van den; Meer, J.W.M. van der; Netea, M.G.

    2007-01-01

    Bartonella quintana is a gram-negative microorganism that causes trench fever and chronic bacteremia. B. quintana lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was unable to induce the production of proinflammatory cytokines in human monocytes. Interestingly, B. quintana LPS is a potent antagonist of Toll-like receptor

  15. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists for heart failure with reduced ejection fraction : integrating evidence into clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zannad, Faiez; Stough, Wendy Gattis; Rossignol, Patrick; Bauersachs, Johann; McMurray, John J. V.; Swedberg, Karl; Struthers, Allan D.; Voors, Adriaan A.; Ruilope, Luis M.; Bakris, George L.; O'Connor, Christopher M.; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Mentz, Robert J.; Cohen-Solal, Alain; Maggioni, Aldo P.; Beygui, Farzin; Filippatos, Gerasimos S.; Massy, Ziad A.; Pathak, Atul; Pina, Ileana L.; Sabbah, Hani N.; Sica, Domenic A.; Tavazzi, Luigi; Pitt, Bertram

    2012-01-01

    Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRAs) improve survival and reduce morbidity in patients with heart failure, reduced ejection fraction (HFREF), and mild-to-severe symptoms, and in patients with left ventricular systolic dysfunction and heart failure after acute myocardial infarction. These cl

  16. Structure of a stapled peptide antagonist bound to nutlin-resistant Mdm2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Min Qi Chee

    Full Text Available As key negative regulator of the p53 tumour suppressor, Mdm2 is an attractive therapeutic target. Small molecules such as Nutlin have been developed to antagonise Mdm2, resulting in p53-dependent death of tumour cells. We have recently described a mutation in Mdm2 (M62A, which precludes binding of Nutlin, but not p53. This Nutlin-resistant variant is not, however, refractory to binding and inhibition by stapled peptide antagonists targeting the same region of Mdm2. A detailed understanding of how stapled peptides are recalcitrant to Mdm2 mutations conferring Nutlin-resistance will aid in the further development of potent Mdm2 antagonists. Here, we report the 2.00 Å crystal structure of a stapled peptide antagonist bound to Nutlin resistant Mdm2. The stapled peptide relies on an extended network of interactions along the hydrophobic binding cleft of Mdm2 for high affinity binding. Additionally, as seen in other stapled peptide structures, the hydrocarbon staple itself contributes to binding through favourable interactions with Mdm2. The structure highlights the intrinsic plasticity present in both Mdm2 and the hydrocarbon staple moiety, and can be used to guide future iterations of both small molecules and stapled peptides for improved antagonists of Mdm2.

  17. Synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of DHβE analogs as neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Tue H.; Jensen, Anders A.; Lund, Mads Henrik;

    2014-01-01

    Dihydro-β-erythroidine (DHβE) is a member of the Erythrina family of alkaloids and a potent competitive antagonist of the α4β2-subtype of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Guided by an X-ray structure of DHβE in complex with an ACh binding protein, we detail the design, synthesis...

  18. Dynamics of coupled mutualistic and antagonistic interactions, and their implications for ecosystem management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgelin, E; Loeuille, N

    2014-04-07

    Understanding the interplay of antagonistic and mutualistic interactions is an important challenge for predicting the fate of ecological communities. So far, studies of propagation of disturbances have focused on a single interaction type (antagonistic or mutualistic), leaving out part of the natural diversity. We develop a model that describes the dynamics of a plant species interacting with one antagonistic (e.g. an herbivore) and one mutualistic (e.g. a pollinator) species confronted to a perturbation to assess how each interaction type will affect the other. We analyze the effect of additional mortality as a press perturbation acting on the plant's partners. We study how the intensity of the disturbance and the relative sensitivities of partner species determine community structure, as well as extinction orders. We show that due to indirect effects between the two types of interactions, additional mortality on both pollinators and herbivores can either decrease or increase their densities. The presence of pollinators can stabilize the antagonistic interaction by preventing cyclic dynamics in the plant-herbivore system. We propose explanatory mechanisms based on indirect effects and discuss the implications of our results for the conservation of interactions and communities. Our results suggest that, in agricultural landscapes, direct effects of insecticides on herbivore densities can be fully offset by indirect effects mediated through pollinators. The loss of pollinators, due to insecticide use, can also destabilize the dynamics of insect herbivores.

  19. N-Oxide analogs of WAY-100635 : new high affinity 5-HT (1A) receptor antagonists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oberwinkler - Marchais, Sandrine; Nowicki, B; Pike, VW; Halldin, C; Sandell, J; Chou, YH; Gulyas, B; Brennum, LT; Farde, L; Wikstrom, H V

    2005-01-01

    WAY-100635 [N-(2-(1-(4-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazinyl)ethyl))-N-(2-pyridinyl)cyclohexanecarboxamide] 1 and its O-des-methyl derivative DWAY 2 are well-known high affinity 5-HT1A receptor antagonists. which when labeled with carbon-II (beta(+): t(1/2) 20.4min) in the carbonyl group are effective radiol

  20. N-Oxide analogs of WAY-100635 : new high affinity 5-HT1A receptor antagonists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marchais-Oberwinkler, S; Nowicki, B; Pike, VW; Halldin, C; Sandell, J; Chou, YH; Gulyas, B; Brennum, LT; Farde, L; Wikstrom, HV

    2005-01-01

    WAY-100635 [N-(2-(1-(4-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazinyl)ethyl))-N-(2-pyridinyl)cyclohexanecarboxamide] 1 and its O-des-methyl derivative DWAY 2 are well-known high affinity 5-HT1A receptor antagonists. which when labeled with carbon-II (beta(+): t(1/2) 20.4min) in the carbonyl group are effective radiol

  1. Hit to lead SAR study on benzoxazole derivatives for an NPY Y5 antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omori, Naoki; Kouyama, Naoki; Yukimasa, Akira; Watanabe, Kana; Yokota, Yasunori; Tanioka, Hideki; Nambu, Hirohide; Yukioka, Hideo; Sato, Norihito; Tanaka, Yukari; Sekiguchi, Kazutaka; Okuno, Takayuki

    2012-03-01

    We report a hit to lead study on a novel benzoxazole NPY Y5 antagonist. Starting from HTS hit 1, structure-activity relationships were developed. Compound 12 showed reduction of food intake and a tendency to suppress body weight gain over the 21-day experimental period.

  2. Pyrrolidin-3-yl-N-methylbenzamides as potent histamine 3 receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Dahui; Gross, Jonathan L; Sze, Jean Y; Adedoyin, Adedayo B; Bowlby, Mark; Di, Li; Platt, Brian J; Zhang, Guoming; Brandon, Nicholas; Comery, Thomas A; Robichaud, Albert J

    2011-10-01

    On the basis of the previously reported benzimidazole 1,3'-bipyrrolidine benzamides (1), a series of related pyrrolidin-3-yl-N-methylbenzamides were synthesized and evaluated as H(3) receptor antagonists. In particular, compound 32 exhibits potent H(3) receptor binding affinity, improved pharmaceutical properties and a favorable in vivo profile.

  3. The necessity and effectiveness of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist in the treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Atsuhisa

    2015-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD), and diabetic nephropathy is the most common primary disease necessitating dialysis treatment in the world including Japan. Major guidelines for treatment of hypertension in Japan, the United States and Europe recommend the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin-receptor blockers, which suppress the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), as the antihypertensive drugs of first choice in patients with coexisting diabetes. However, even with the administration of RAS inhibitors, failure to achieve adequate anti-albuminuric, renoprotective effects and a reduction in cardiovascular events has also been reported. Inadequate blockade of aldosterone may be one of the reasons why long-term administration of RAS inhibitors may not be sufficiently effective in patients with diabetic nephropathy. This review focuses on treatment in diabetic nephropathy and discusses the significance of aldosterone blockade. In pre-nephropathy without overt nephropathy, a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist can be used to enhance the blood pressure-lowering effects of RAS inhibitors, improve insulin resistance and prevent clinical progression of nephropathy. In CKD categories A2 and A3, the addition of a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist to an RAS inhibitor can help to maintain 'long-term' antiproteinuric and anti-albuminuric effects. However, in category G3a and higher, sufficient attention must be paid to hyperkalemia. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists are not currently recommended as standard treatment in diabetic nephropathy. However, many studies have shown promise of better renoprotective effects if mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists are appropriately used.

  4. Evolution of the Bifunctional Lead μ Agonist / δ Antagonist Containing the Dmt-Tic Opioid Pharmacophore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balboni, Gianfranco; Salvadori, Severo; Trapella, Claudio; Knapp, Brian I; Bidlack, Jean M; Lazarus, Lawrence H; Peng, Xuemei; Neumeyer, John L

    2010-02-17

    Based on a renewed importance recently attributed to bi- or multifunctional opioids, we report the synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of some analogues derived from our lead μ agonist / δ antagonist, H-Dmt-Tic-Gly-NH-Bzl. Our previous studies focused on the importance of the C-teminal benzyl function in the induction of such bifunctional activity. The introduction of some substituents in the para position of the phenyl ring (-Cl, -CH(3), partially -NO(2), inactive -NH(2)) was found to give a more potent μ agonist / antagonist effect associated with a relatively unmodified δ antagonist activity (pA(2) = 8.28-9.02). Increasing the steric hindrance of the benzyl group (using diphenylmethyl and tetrahydroisoquinoline functionalities) substantially maintained the μ agonist and δ antagonist activities of the lead compound. Finally and quite unexpectedly D-Tic2, considered as a wrong opioid message now; inserted into the reference compound in lieu of L-Tic, provided a μ agonist / δ agonist better than our reference ligand (H-Dmt-Tic-Gly-NH-Ph) and was endowed with the same pharmacological profile.

  5. Bicyclams, selective antagonists of the human chemokine receptor CXCR4, potently inhibit feline immunodeficiency virus replication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horzinek, M.C.; Egberink, H.F.; Clercq, E. de; Vliet, A.L.W. van; Balzarini, J.; Bridger, G.J.; Henson, G.; Schols, D.

    1999-01-01

    Bicyclams are low-molecular-weight anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) agents that have been shown to act as potent and selective CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) antagonists. Here, we demonstrate that bicyclams are potent inhibitors of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) replication when evalua

  6. Cannabinoid receptor antagonists and the metabolic syndrome: Novel promising therapeutical approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervino, C; Pasquali, R; Pagotto, U

    2007-01-01

    Recent findings in animals and in humans have shown that cannabinoid type 1 receptor antagonists are suitable to become the most promising validated class of drugs to tackle obesity and related disorders. This mini-review will provide a concise and updated revision of the state of art on this topic.

  7. A comparison of calcium antagonists and diazepam in reducing ethanol withdrawal tremors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone, G H; Majchrowicz, E; Martin, P R; Linnoila, M; Nutt, D J

    1989-01-01

    The calcium antagonists nimodipine and dantrolene were compared with diazepam in an animal model of tolerance and physical dependence upon ethanol. Nimodipine and dantrolene were both effective in suppressing withdrawal tremors but diazepam was clearly superior to both agents. These results suggest that the ethanol withdrawal syndrome is only partially mediated by increased calcium flux.

  8. Dynamics of Antagonistic Potency of Rhodobacter capsulatus PG Lipopolysaccharide against Endotoxin-Induced Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabanov, D S; Serov, D A; Zubova, S V; Grachev, S V; Prokhorenko, I R

    2016-03-01

    The dynamics of antagonistic potency of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) isolated from Rhodobacter capsulatus PG on the synthesis of proinflammatory (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-8, IL-6, IFN-γ) and antiinflammatory (IL-10, IL-1Ra) cytokines induced by highly stimulatory endotoxins from Escherichia coli or Salmonella enterica have been studied. Using human whole blood, we have shown that R. capsulatus PG LPS inhibited most pronouncedly the endotoxin-induced synthesis of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-8, and IL-6 during the first 6 h after endotoxin challenge. Similarly, the endotoxin-induced release of IFN-γ was abolished by R. capsulatus PG LPS as well (24 h). In contrast to the above-mentioned cytokines, the relatively weak antagonistic activity of R. capsulatus PG LPS against endotoxin-triggered production of IL-6 and IL-8 was revealed. Since R. capsulatus PG LPS displays more potent antagonistic activity against deleterious effects of S. enterica LPS than those of E. coli LPS in the cases of such cytokines as IL-1β (6 and 24 h), IL-6 and IL-8 (4 h), we conclude that the effectiveness of protective action of antagonist is mostly determined by the primary lipid A structure of the employed agonist.

  9. Screening of Antagonistic Bacteria from Phyllosphere towards Tobacco Brown Spot Fungus Alternaria alternata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Chengsheng; KONG Fanyu; LI Duochuan; WANG Jing; WANG Fenglong

    2006-01-01

    The possibility of employing antagonistic bacteria for the control of tobacco brown spot was studied. Approximately 136 strains of bacteria were isolated from phyllospheres of tobacco and 9 of these possessed high levels of antagonistic properties. They significantly reduced brown spot in detached tobacco leaves when artificially inoculated with Alternaria alternata. Culture filtrate of the most effective bacterial isolate which designated as Tpb88 was shown to be very efficient in inhibiting mycelial growth of A alternata in dual cultures. Culture filtrate of Tpb88 inhibited germination and germ tube elongation of A alternata. The results showed that the culture filtrate directly inhibited spore germination of A. alternata, especially during the first hours of the paired cultivation. The rate of antagonistic activity of culture filtrate of Tpb88 depended on its concentration in the mixture. The greatest inhibition of spore germination was ob served at the highest concentration of filtrate (filtrate to fungal spores inocula mixed in proportion 1: 50). These suggest that the hypothetic mechanism of Tpb88 against tobacco brown spot is to produce antagonistic substances.

  10. Antagonists of chemoattractants reveal separate receptors for cAMP, folic acid and pterin in Dictyostelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haastert, Peter J.M. van; Wit, René J.W. de; Konijn, Theo M.

    1982-01-01

    Adenosine 3’,5’-monophosphate (cAMP), folic acid and pterin are chemoattractants in the cellular slime molds. The cAMP analog, 3’-amino-cAMP, inhibits a chemotactic reaction to cAMP at a concentration at which the analog is chemotactically inactive. The antagonistic effect of 3’-amino-cAMP on the ch

  11. [N-allyl-Dmt1]-endomorphins are micro-opioid receptor antagonists lacking inverse agonist properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marczak, Ewa D; Jinsmaa, Yunden; Li, Tingyou; Bryant, Sharon D; Tsuda, Yuko; Okada, Yoshio; Lazarus, Lawrence H

    2007-10-01

    [N-allyl-Dmt1]-endomorphin-1 and -2 ([N-allyl-Dmt1]-EM-1 and -2) are new selective micro-opioid receptor antagonists obtained by N-alkylation with an allyl group on the amino terminus of 2',6'-dimethyl-L-tyrosine (Dmt) derivatives. To further characterize properties of these compounds, their intrinsic activities were assessed by functional guanosine 5'-O-(3-[35S]thiotriphosphate) binding assays and forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation in cell membranes obtained from vehicle, morphine, and ethanol-treated SK-N-SH cells and brain membranes isolated from naive and morphine-dependent mice; their mode of action was compared with naloxone or naltrexone, which both are standard nonspecific opioid-receptor antagonists. [N-allyl-Dmt1]-EM-1 and -2 were neutral antagonists under all of the experimental conditions examined, in contrast to naloxone and naltrexone, which behave as neutral antagonists only in membranes from vehicle-treated cells and mice but act as inverse agonists in membranes from morphine- and ethanol-treated cells as well as morphine-treated mice. Both endomorphin analogs inhibited the naloxone- and naltrexone-elicited withdrawal syndromes from acute morphine dependence in mice. This suggests their potential therapeutic application in the treatment of drug addiction and alcohol abuse without the adverse effects observed with inverse agonist alkaloid-derived compounds that produce severe withdrawal symptoms.

  12. Montelukast, a leukotriene receptor antagonist, modulates lung CysLT1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGYan-Jun; ZHANGLei; WANGShao-Bin; SHENHua-Hao; WEIEr-Qing

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To determine the expressions of cysteinyl leukotriene receptors, CysLT, and CysLT2 , in airway eosinophilic inflammation of OVA-induced asthmatic mice and the modulation by montelukast, a CysLT1 receptor antagonist. METHODS: Asthma model was induced by chronic exposure to ovalbumin (OVA) in C57BL/6 mice. The eosinophils in

  13. Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone receptor antagonist may reduce postmenopausal flushing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gastel, P. van; Zanden, M. van der; Telting, D.; Filius, M.; Bancsi, L.; Boer, H. de

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Hormone therapy (HT) is the most effective treatment of postmenopausal (PMP) flushing; however, its use is often contraindicated. As an alternative option, we explored the efficacy of the luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptor antagonist cetrorelix in women with severe PMP

  14. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulation agents in anticoagulant naive atrial fibrillation patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jonas Bjerring; Sørensen, Rikke; Hansen, Morten Lock

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulation (NOAC) agents have been approved for stroke prophylaxis in atrial fibrillation (AF). We investigated 'real-world' information on how these drugs are being adopted. METHODS AND RESULTS: Using Danish nationwide administrative registers, we identif...

  15. Infusions of alpha-2 noradrenergic agonists and antagonists into the amygdala: effects on kindling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, M R; Corcoran, M E

    1993-12-31

    We reported previously that activation of alpha-2 adrenoceptors with infusions of clonidine into the amygdala/pyriform region is sufficient to retard kindling. To characterize further the involvement in kindling of alpha-2 receptors in the amygdala/pyriform, we exposed rats to unilateral intraamygdaloid infusions of a variety of noradrenergic drugs followed by either low-frequency stimulation of the amygdala, to induce rapid kindling, or conventional high-frequency stimulation. Infusions and electrical stimulation were administered once every 48 h. The prophylactic effects of clonidine were blocked by simultaneous infusion of idazoxan, an alpha-2 adrenergic antagonist, which suggests strongly that these effects were produced at an alpha-2 receptor. Intraamygdaloid infusions of xylazine, another alpha-2 agonist, also significantly retarded low-frequency kindling. Unexpectedly, intraamygdaloid infusions of the alpha-2 antagonists idazoxan, yohimbine, and SK&F 104856 failed to accelerate kindling. Infusion of the alpha-1 antagonist corynanthine also failed to affect kindling. We propose that the alpha-2 adrenoceptors in the amygdala/pyriform region contribute to the prophylactic effects of systemically administered clonidine and that the facilitation of kindling observed after systemic administration of alpha-2 antagonists may be due to blockade of alpha-2 adrenoceptors outside of the amygdala/pyriform region.

  16. Potent, selective, and orally efficacious antagonists of melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Francis X; Al-Barazanji, Kamal A; Bigham, Eric C; Bishop, Michael J; Britt, Christy S; Carlton, David L; Feldman, Paul L; Goetz, Aaron S; Grizzle, Mary K; Guo, Yu C; Handlon, Anthony L; Hertzog, Donald L; Ignar, Diane M; Lang, Daniel G; Ott, Ronda J; Peat, Andrew J; Zhou, Hui-Qiang

    2006-11-30

    The high expression of MCH in the hypothalamus with the lean hypophagic phenotype coupled with increased resting metabolic rate and resistance to high fat diet-induced obesity of MCH KO mice has spurred considerable efforts to develop small molecule MCHR1 antagonists. Starting from a lead thienopyrimidinone series, structure-activity studies at the 3- and 6-positions of the thienopyrimidinone core afforded potent and selective MCHR1 antagonists with representative examples having suitable pharmacokinetic properties. Based on structure-activity relationships, a structural model for MCHR1 was constructed to explain the binding mode of these antagonists. In general, a good correlation was observed between pKas and activity in the right-hand side of the template, with Asp123 playing an important role in the enhancement of binding affinity. A representative example when evaluated chronically in diet-induced obese mice resulted in good weight loss effects. These antagonists provide a viable lead series in the discovery of new therapies for the treatment of obesity.

  17. The discovery and optimization of pyrimidinone-containing MCH R1 antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertzog, Donald L; Al-Barazanji, Kamal A; Bigham, Eric C; Bishop, Michael J; Britt, Christy S; Carlton, David L; Cooper, Joel P; Daniels, Alex J; Garrido, Dulce M; Goetz, Aaron S; Grizzle, Mary K; Guo, Yu C; Handlon, Anthony L; Ignar, Diane M; Morgan, Ronda O; Peat, Andrew J; Tavares, Francis X; Zhou, Huiqiang

    2006-09-15

    Optimization of a series of constrained melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 (MCH R1) antagonists has provided compounds with potent and selective MCH R1 activity. Details of the optimization process are provided and the use of one of the compounds in an animal model of diet-induced obesity is presented.

  18. GnRH-agonist versus GnRH-antagonist IVF cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papanikolaou, E G; Pados, G; Grimbizis, G

    2012-01-01

    In view of the current debate concerning possible differences in efficacy between the two GnRH analogues used in IVF stimulated cycles, the current study aimed to explore whether progesterone control in the late follicular phase differs when GnRH antagonist is used as compared with GnRH agonist...

  19. Friendly and Antagonistic Contact Between Former Spouses After Divorce : Patterns and Determinants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, Tamar F.C.; Graaf, Paul M. de; Kalmijn, Matthijs

    2005-01-01

    This study presents descriptive and explanatory analyses of contact between former spouses, using data on 1,791 previously married men andwomen in the Netherlands. The authors employ a typology of relationships between former spouses, differentiating between friendly contact, antagonistic contact, a

  20. Muscarinic receptor antagonists, from folklore to pharmacology; finding drugs that actually work in asthma and COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulton, Bart C; Fryer, Allison D

    2011-05-01

    In the lungs, parasympathetic nerves provide the dominant control of airway smooth muscle with release of acetylcholine onto M3 muscarinic receptors. Treatment of airway disease with anticholinergic drugs that block muscarinic receptors began over 2000 years ago. Pharmacologic data all indicated that antimuscarinic drugs should be highly effective in asthma but clinical results were mixed. Thus, with the discovery of effective β-adrenergic receptor agonists the use of muscarinic antagonists declined. Lack of effectiveness of muscarinic antagonists is due to a variety of factors including unwanted side effects (ranging from dry mouth to coma) and the discovery of additional muscarinic receptor subtypes in the lungs with sometimes competing effects. Perhaps the most important problem is ineffective dosing due to poorly understood differences between routes of administration and no effective way of testing whether antagonists block receptors stimulated physiologically by acetylcholine. Newer muscarinic receptor antagonists are being developed that address the problems of side effects and receptor selectivity that appear to be quite promising in the treatment of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  1. Conidial persistence and competitive ability of the antagonist Ulocladium atrum on strawberry leaves.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boff, P.; Kraker, de J.; Bruggen, van A.H.C.; Gerlagh, M.; Köhl, J.

    2001-01-01

    The persistence of conidia and competitive ability of Ulocladium atrum, an antagonist of Botrytis cinerea, were studied in field plots of strawberry in The Netherlands. Single application of conidial suspensions (2 ± 106 conidia ml-1) of U. atrum were sprayed on the canopy and repeated 14 times, eac

  2. The effect of the benzodiazepine antagonist flumazenil on regional cerebral blood flow in human volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolf, J; Friberg, L; Jensen, J

    1990-01-01

    The influence of the benzodiazepine antagonist flumazenil on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was investigated in ten healthy, alert volunteers. The design was a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, cross-over study. rCBF was measured by 133-Xe inhalation and single photon emission...

  3. A cross-laboratory preclinical study on the effectiveness of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist in stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maysami, Samaneh; Wong, Raymond; Pradillo, Jesus M; Denes, Adam; Dhungana, Hiramani; Malm, Tarja; Koistinaho, Jari; Orset, Cyrille; Rahman, Mahbubur; Rubio, Marina; Schwaninger, Markus; Vivien, Denis; Bath, Philip M; Rothwell, Nancy J; Allan, Stuart M

    2016-03-01

    Stroke represents a global challenge and is a leading cause of permanent disability worldwide. Despite much effort, translation of research findings to clinical benefit has not yet been successful. Failure of neuroprotection trials is considered, in part, due to the low quality of preclinical studies, low level of reproducibility across different laboratories and that stroke co-morbidities have not been fully considered in experimental models. More rigorous testing of new drug candidates in different experimental models of stroke and initiation of preclinical cross-laboratory studies have been suggested as ways to improve translation. However, to our knowledge, no drugs currently in clinical stroke trials have been investigated in preclinical cross-laboratory studies. The cytokine interleukin 1 is a key mediator of neuronal injury, and the naturally occurring interleukin 1 receptor antagonist has been reported as beneficial in experimental studies of stroke. In the present paper, we report on a preclinical cross-laboratory stroke trial designed to investigate the efficacy of interleukin 1 receptor antagonist in different research laboratories across Europe. Our results strongly support the therapeutic potential of interleukin 1 receptor antagonist in experimental stroke and provide further evidence that interleukin 1 receptor antagonist should be evaluated in more extensive clinical stroke trials.

  4. Phenylthiophenecarboxamide antagonists of the olfactory receptor co-receptor subunit from a mosquito.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sisi Chen

    Full Text Available Insects detect environmental chemicals using chemosensory receptors, such as the ORs, a family of odorant-gated ion channels. Insect ORs are multimeric complexes of unknown stoichiometry, formed by a common subunit (the odorant receptor co-receptor subunit, Orco and one of many variable subunits that confer odorant specificity. The recent discovery of Orco directed ligands, including both agonists and antagonists, suggests Orco as a promising target for chemical control of insects. In addition to competitively inhibiting OR activation by Orco agonists, several Orco antagonists have been shown to act through a non-competitive mechanism to inhibit OR activation by odorants. We previously identified a series of Orco antagonists, including N-(4-ethylphenyl-2-thiophenecarboxamide (OX1a, previously referred to as OLC20. Here, we explore the chemical space around the OX1a structure to identify more potent Orco antagonists. Cqui\\Orco+Cqui\\Or21, an OR from Culex quinquefasciatus (the Southern House Mosquito that responds to 3-methylindole (skatole and is thought to mediate oviposition behavior, was expressed in Xenopus oocytes and receptor function assayed by two-electrode voltage clamp electrophysiology. 22 structural analogs of OX1a were screened for antagonism of OR activation by an Orco agonist. By varying the moieties decorating the phenyl and thiophene rings, and altering the distance between the rings, we were able to identify antagonists with improved potency. Detailed examination of three of these compounds (N-mesityl-2-thiophenecarboxamide, N-(4-methylbenzyl-2-thiophenecarboxamide and N-(2-ethylphenyl-3-(2-thienyl-2-propenamide demonstrated competitive inhibition of receptor activation by an Orco agonist and non-competitive inhibition of receptor activation by an odorant. The ability to inhibit OR activation by odorants may be a general property of this class of Orco antagonist, suggesting that odorant mediated behaviors can be manipulated

  5. Aldosterone and aldosterone receptor antagonists in patients with chronic heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nappi J

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Jean M Nappi, Adam SiegClinical Pharmacy and Outcome Sciences, South Carolina College of Pharmacy, Medical University of South Carolina Campus, Charleston, SC, USAAbstract: Aldosterone is a mineralocorticoid hormone synthesized by the adrenal glands that has several regulatory functions to help the body maintain normal volume status and electrolyte balance. Studies have shown significantly higher levels of aldosterone secretion in patients with congestive heart failure compared with normal patients. Elevated levels of aldosterone have been shown to elevate blood pressure, cause left ventricular hypertrophy, and promote cardiac fibrosis. An appreciation of the true role of aldosterone in patients with chronic heart failure did not become apparent until the publication of the Randomized Aldactone Evaluation Study. Until recently, the use of aldosterone receptor antagonists has been limited to patients with severe heart failure and patients with heart failure following myocardial infarction. The Eplerenone in Mild Patients Hospitalization and Survival Study in Heart Failure (EMPHASIS-HF study added additional evidence to support the expanded use of aldosterone receptor antagonists in heart failure patients. The results of the EMPHASIS-HF trial showed that patients with mild-to-moderate (New York Heart Association Class II heart failure had reductions in mortality and hospitalizations from the addition of eplerenone to optimal medical therapy. Evidence remains elusive about the exact mechanism by which aldosterone receptor antagonists improve heart failure morbidity and mortality. The benefits of aldosterone receptor antagonist use in heart failure must be weighed against the potential risk of complications, ie, hyperkalemia and, in the case of spironolactone, possible endocrine abnormalities, in particular gynecomastia. With appropriate monitoring, these risks can be minimized. We now have evidence that patients with mild-to-severe symptoms

  6. Antarlides: A New Type of Androgen Receptor (AR) Antagonist that Overcomes Resistance to AR-Targeted Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Shun; Fujimaki, Takahiro; Panbangred, Watanalai; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Imoto, Masaya

    2016-02-18

    Prostate cancer is treated with androgen receptor (AR) antagonists but most patients experience disease progression after long-term treatment with these compounds. Therefore, new AR antagonists are required for patient follow-up treatment. In the course of screening for a new AR antagonist, we isolated the novel compounds antarlides A-E (1-5) from Streptomyces sp. BB47. Antarlides are mutually isomeric with respect to the double bond and have a 22-membered-ring macrocyclic structure. The full stereostructure of 1 was established by chemical modifications, including methanolysis, the Trost method, acetonide formation, and the PGME method. 1-5 inhibited the binding of androgen to ARs in vitro. In addition, 2 inhibited the transcriptional activity of not only wild-type AR but also mutant ARs, which are seen in patients with acquired resistance to clinically used AR antagonists. Therefore, antarlides are a potent new generation of AR antagonists that overcome resistance.

  7. Discovery of non-peptide small molecular CXCR4 antagonists as anti-HIV agents: Recent advances and future opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Heng; Kang, Dongwei; Huang, Boshi; Liu, Na; Zhao, Fabao; Zhan, Peng; Liu, Xinyong

    2016-05-23

    CXCR4 plays vital roles in HIV-1 life cycle for it's essential in mediating the interaction of host and virus and completing the entry process in the lifecycle of HIV-1 infection. Compared with some traditional targets, CXCR4 provides a novel and less mutated drug target in the battle against AIDS. Its antagonists have no cross resistance with other antagonists. Great achievements have been made recent years and a number of small molecular CXCR4 antagonists with diversity scaffolds have been discovered. In this review, recent advances in the discovery of CXCR4 antagonists with special attentions on their evolution and structure-activity relationships of representative CXCR4 antagonists are described. Moreover, some classical medicinal chemistry strategies and novel methodologies are also introduced.

  8. Characterization of PCS1055, a novel muscarinic M4 receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croy, Carrie H; Chan, Wai Y; Castetter, Andrea M; Watt, Marla L; Quets, Anne T; Felder, Christian C

    2016-07-05

    Identification of synthetic ligands selective for muscarinic receptor subtypes has been challenging due to the high sequence identity and structural homology among the five muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. Here, we report the pharmacological characterization of PCS1055, a novel muscarinic M4 receptor antagonist. PCS1055 inhibited radioligand [(3)H]-NMS binding to the M4 receptor with a Ki=6.5nM. Though the potency of PCS1055 is lower than that of pan-muscarinic antagonist atropine, it has better subtype selectivity over previously reported M4-selective reagents such as the muscarinic-peptide toxins (Karlsson et al., 1994; Santiago and Potter, 2001a) at the M1 subtype, and benzoxazine ligand PD102807 at the M3-subtype (Bohme et al., 2002). A detailed head-to-head comparison study using [(3)H]-NMS competitive binding assays characterizes the selectivity profiles of PCS1055 to that of other potent muscarinic-antagonist compounds PD102807, tropicamide, AF-DX-384, pirenzapine, and atropine. In addition to binding studies, the subtype specificity of PCS1055 is also demonstrated by functional receptor activation as readout by GTP-γ-[(35)S] binding. These GTP-γ-[(35)S] binding studies showed that PCS1055 exhibited 255-, 69.1-, 342- and >1000-fold greater inhibition of Oxo-M activity at the M4 versus the M1-, M2(-), M3-or M5 receptor subtypes, respectively. Schild analyses indicates that PCS1055 acts as a competitive antagonist to muscarinic M4 receptor, and confirms the affinity of the ligand to be low nanomolar, Kb=5.72nM. Therefore, PCS1055 represents a new M4-preferring antagonist that may be useful in elucidating the roles of M4 receptor signaling.

  9. Switch from antagonist to agonist after addition of a DOTA chelator to a somatostatin analog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reubi, Jean Claude; Cescato, Renzo; Waser, Beatrice [University of Berne, Division of Cell Biology and Experimental Cancer Research, Institute of Pathology, PO Box 62, Berne (Switzerland); Erchegyi, Judit; Rivier, Jean E. [The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, The Clayton Foundation Laboratories for Peptide Biology, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2010-08-15

    Peptide receptor targeting has become an increasingly attractive method to target tumors diagnostically and radiotherapeutically. Peptides linked to a variety of chelators have been developed for this purpose. They have, however, rarely been tested for their agonistic or antagonistic properties. We report here on a somatostatin antagonist that switched to an agonist upon coupling to a DOTA chelator. Two novel somatostatin analogs, 406-040-15 and its DOTA-coupled counterpart 406-051-20, with and without cold Indium labeling, were tested for their somatostatin receptor subtypes 1-5 (sst{sub 1}-sst{sub 5}) binding affinity using receptor autoradiography. Moreover, they were tested functionally for their ability to affect sst{sub 2} and sst{sub 3} internalization in vitro in HEK293 cells stably expressing the human sst{sub 2} or sst{sub 3} receptor, using an immunofluorescence microscopy-based internalization assay. All three compounds were characterized as pan-somatostatin analogs having a high affinity for all five sst. In the sst{sub 2} internalization assay, all three compounds showed an identical behavior, namely, a weak agonistic effect complemented by a weak antagonistic effect, compatible with the behavior of a partial agonist. Conversely, in the sst{sub 3} internalization assay, 406-040-15 was a full antagonist whereas its DOTA-coupled counterpart, 406-051-20, with and without Indium labeling, switched to a full agonist. Adding the DOTA chelator to the somatostatin analog 406-040-15 triggers a switch at sst{sub 3} receptor from an antagonist to an agonist. This indicates that potential radioligands for tumor targeting should always be tested functionally before further development, in particular if a chelator is added. (orig.)

  10. Similarities and Distinctions in Actions of Surface-Directed and Classic Androgen Receptor Antagonists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Ho Suh

    Full Text Available The androgen receptor (AR surface-directed antagonist MJC13 inhibits AR function and proliferation of prostate cancer (PC cells. These effects are related to arrest of an AR/chaperone complex in the cytoplasm. Here, we compared MJC13 and classic AR antagonists such as flutamide and bicalutamide. Microarray analysis and confirmatory qRT-PCR reveals that MJC13 and flutamide inhibit dihydrotestosterone (DHT-dependent genes in LNCaP PC cells. Both compounds are equally effective on a genome wide basis and as effective as second generation AR antagonists (MDV3100, ARN-509 at selected genes. MJC13 inhibits AR binding to the prostate specific antigen (PSA promoter more strongly than flutamide, consistent with different mechanisms of action. Examination of efficacy of MJC13 in conditions that reflect aspects castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC reveals that it inhibits flutamide activation of an AR mutant (ART877A that emerges during flutamide withdrawal syndrome, but displays greatly restricted gene-specific activity in 22Rv1 cells that express a constitutively active truncated AR and is inactive against glucocorticoid receptor (GR, which can co-opt androgen-dependent signaling networks in CRPC. Importantly, MJC13 inhibits AR interactions with SRC2 and β-catenin in the nucleus and, unlike flutamide, strongly inhibits amplification of AR activity obtained with transfected SRC2 and β-catenin. MJC13 also inhibits DHT and β-catenin-enhanced cell division in LNCaP cells. Thus, a surface-directed antagonist can block AR activity in some conditions in which a classic antagonist fails and may display utility in particular forms of CRPC.

  11. Similarities and Distinctions in Actions of Surface-Directed and Classic Androgen Receptor Antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Ji Ho; Chattopadhyay, Arundhati; Sieglaff, Douglas H; Storer Samaniego, Cheryl; Cox, Marc B; Webb, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) surface-directed antagonist MJC13 inhibits AR function and proliferation of prostate cancer (PC) cells. These effects are related to arrest of an AR/chaperone complex in the cytoplasm. Here, we compared MJC13 and classic AR antagonists such as flutamide and bicalutamide. Microarray analysis and confirmatory qRT-PCR reveals that MJC13 and flutamide inhibit dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-dependent genes in LNCaP PC cells. Both compounds are equally effective on a genome wide basis and as effective as second generation AR antagonists (MDV3100, ARN-509) at selected genes. MJC13 inhibits AR binding to the prostate specific antigen (PSA) promoter more strongly than flutamide, consistent with different mechanisms of action. Examination of efficacy of MJC13 in conditions that reflect aspects castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) reveals that it inhibits flutamide activation of an AR mutant (ART877A) that emerges during flutamide withdrawal syndrome, but displays greatly restricted gene-specific activity in 22Rv1 cells that express a constitutively active truncated AR and is inactive against glucocorticoid receptor (GR), which can co-opt androgen-dependent signaling networks in CRPC. Importantly, MJC13 inhibits AR interactions with SRC2 and β-catenin in the nucleus and, unlike flutamide, strongly inhibits amplification of AR activity obtained with transfected SRC2 and β-catenin. MJC13 also inhibits DHT and β-catenin-enhanced cell division in LNCaP cells. Thus, a surface-directed antagonist can block AR activity in some conditions in which a classic antagonist fails and may display utility in particular forms of CRPC.

  12. Left-shifted Nav channels in injured bilayer: primary targets for neuroprotective Nav antagonists?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine E Morris

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In sodium channel (Nav-rich axon initial segments and nodes of Ranvier, mechanical, ischemic and inflammatory injuries render these voltage-gated channels dangerously leaky. Extrapolating from recombinant Nav1.6 behavior (Wang et al 2009 Am J Physiol 297:C823, we postulate that the structural degradation of axolemmal bilayer, a common feature of neuoropathologic conditions, fosters ENa dissipation by favoring left-shifted Nav channel operation. This sick excitable cell Nav-leak would encompass left-shifted Itransient and Ipersistent components (fast-mode Iwindow, slow-mode Ipersistent. Ideally, bilayer damage-induced malfunction of Nav channels could be studied in Nav-rich myelinated axon nodes, exploiting the INa(v,t hysteresis of sawtooth ramp voltage clamp. We hypothesize that protective lipophilic Nav antagonists (e.g., ranolazine, riluzole partition more avidly into disorderly bilayers of traumatically (ischemically, etc damaged axons than into well-packed undamaged bilayers. Whereas inhibitors using aqueous routes would access all Navs equally, differential partitioning into sick bilayer would co-localize lipophilic antagonists with sick Nav channels, allowing for more specific targeting of impaired cells. Molecular fine-tuning effective antagonists for maximal partitioning into damaged-membrane milieus (thereby avoiding healthy cells could help reduce Nav antagonist side-effects. In potentially salvageable neurons of traumatic and/or ischemic penumbra, in inflammatory neuropathies, in muscular dystrophy, in myocytes of cardiac infarct borders, Nav-leak driven excitotoxicity too easily overwhelms cellular repair mechanisms. Precision-tuned Nav antagonist variants that preferred mildly, as opposed to severely, damaged Nav-rich axolemma or sarcolemma might be suitable for the prolonged continuous administration needed to allow for excitable cell remodeling and hence for improved functional recovery.

  13. Internalization of the chemokine receptor CCR4 can be evoked by orthosteric and allosteric receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajram, Laura; Begg, Malcolm; Slack, Robert; Cryan, Jenni; Hall, David; Hodgson, Simon; Ford, Alison; Barnes, Ashley; Swieboda, Dawid; Mousnier, Aurelie; Solari, Roberto

    2014-04-15

    The chemokine receptor CCR4 has at least two natural agonist ligands, MDC (CCL22) and TARC (CCL17) which bind to the same orthosteric site with a similar affinity. Both ligands are known to evoke chemotaxis of CCR4-bearing T cells and also elicit CCR4 receptor internalization. A series of small molecule allosteric antagonists have been described which displace the agonist ligand, and inhibit chemotaxis. The aim of this study was to determine which cellular coupling pathways are involved in internalization, and if antagonists binding to the CCR4 receptor could themselves evoke receptor internalization. CCL22 binding coupled CCR4 efficiently to β-arrestin and stimulated GTPγS binding however CCL17 did not couple to β-arrestin and only partially stimulated GTPγS binding. CCL22 potently induced internalization of almost all cell surface CCR4, while CCL17 showed only weak effects. We describe four small molecule antagonists that were demonstrated to bind to two distinct allosteric sites on the CCR4 receptor, and while both classes inhibited agonist ligand binding and chemotaxis, one of the allosteric sites also evoked receptor internalization. Furthermore, we also characterize an N-terminally truncated version of CCL22 which acts as a competitive antagonist at the orthosteric site, and surprisingly also evokes receptor internalization without demonstrating any agonist activity. Collectively this study demonstrates that orthosteric and allosteric antagonists of the CCR4 receptor are capable of evoking receptor internalization, providing a novel strategy for drug discovery against this class of target.

  14. A high-throughput screening assay to identify bacterial antagonists against Fusarium verticillioides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa-López, Alejandro Miguel; Cordero-Ramírez, Jesús Damián; Quiroz-Figueroa, Francisco Roberto; Maldonado-Mendoza, Ignacio Eduardo

    2014-07-01

    A high-throughput antagonistic assay was developed to screen for bacterial isolates capable of controlling the maize fungal phytopathogen Fusarium verticillioides. This assay combines a straightforward methodology, in which the fungus is challenged with bacterial isolates in liquid medium, with a novel approach that uses the plant lectin wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) coupled to a fluorophore (Alexa-Fluor® 488) under the commercial name of WGA, Alexa Fluor® 488 conjugate. The assay is performed in a 96-well plate format, which reduces the required laboratory space and streamlines quantitation and automation of the process, making it fast and accurate. The basis of our assay is that fungal biomass can be assessed by WGA, Alexa Fluor® 488 conjugate staining, which recognizes the chitin in the fungal cell wall and thus permits the identification of potential antagonistic bacteria that inhibit fungal growth. This principle was validated by chitin-competition binding assays against WGA, Alexa Fluor® 488 conjugate; confocal laser microscopy confirmed that the fluorescent WGA, Alexa Fluor® 488 conjugate binds to the chitin of the fungal cell wall. The majority of bacterial isolates did not bind to the WGA, Alexa Fluor® 488 conjugate. Furthermore, including washing steps significantly reduced any bacterial staining to background levels, even in the rare cases where bacterial isolates were capable of binding to WGA. Confirmatory conventional agar plate antagonistic assays were also conducted to validate our technique. We are now successfully employing this large-scale antagonistic assay as a pre-screening step for potential fungal antagonists in extensive bacteria collections (on the order of thousands of isolates).

  15. Antagonism of apomorphine-enhanced startle by alpha 1-adrenergic antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, M; Kehne, J H; Commissaris, R L

    1985-02-05

    The present study investigated the possible involvement of central noradrenergic neurons in mediating the excitatory effect of the dopamine agonist apomorphine on the acoustic startle response in rats. Experiment 1 assessed the effects of intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of adrenergic antagonists on apomorphine-enhanced startle. The excitation of startle produced by apomorphine (1.0-3.0 mg/kg i.p.) was blocked by the alpha 1-adrenergic antagonists prazosin (0.03-1.0 mg/kg) and WB-4101 (1.0 mg/kg). Prazosin was very potent in this regard, having an ED50 of 0.03 mg/kg. Blockade of beta-adrenergic receptors with propranolol (20 mg/kg) or blockade of peripheral alpha-adrenergic receptors with phentolamine (10 mg/kg) failed to alter the effect of apomorphine. Prazosin did not block the enhancement of startle produced by other drugs (5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine, strychnine), nor did it alter the entry of apomorphine into the brain. The alpha 1-adrenergic antagonists piperoxane (0.03 mg/kg), yohimbine (0.03 mg/kg) or RX781094 (0.07 mg/kg) markedly potentiated apomorphine excitation. These data indicated that specific blockade of central alpha 1-adrenergic receptors prevents apomorphine-enhanced startle. In contrast to the effects of alpha 1-adrenergic antagonists, Experiment 2 found that other drugs that produce an acute (clonidine, 0.040 mg/kg) or chronic (intraventricular 6-hydroxydopamine, 2 X 200 micrograms; DSP4, 50 mg/kg i.p.) disruption of noradrenergic transmission failed to affect apomorphine excitation. Thus, the ability of alpha 1-adrenergic antagonists to block apomorphine's excitation of startle cannot be explained by a simple dopamine-norepinephrine interaction. Alternative hypothesis are discussed.

  16. The Effect of Coasting on Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection Outcome in Antagonist and Agonist Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İltemir Duvan Z.Candan,

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Coasting can reduce the ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS risk in ovulation induction cycles before intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI. This study aimed to investigate the effect of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH agonist and GnRH antagonist protocols to controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH cycles with coasting on the parameters of ICSI cycles and the outcome. Materials and Methods In a retrospective cohort study, 117 ICSI cycles were per- formed and coasting was applied due to hyperresponse, between 2006 and 2011. The ICSI outcomes after coasting were then compared between the GnRH agonist group (n=91 and the GnRH antagonist group (n=26. Results The duration of induction and the total consumption of gonadotropins were found to be similar. Estradiol (E2 levels on human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG day were found higher in the agonist group. Coasting days were similar when the two groups were compared. The number of mature oocytes and the fertilization rates were similar in both groups; however, the number of grade 1 (G1 embryos and the number of transferred embryos were higher in the agonist group. Implantation rates were significantly higher in the antagonist group compared to the agonist group. Pregnancy rates/embryo transfer rates were higher in the antagonist group; however, this difference was not statistically significant (32.8% for agonist group vs. 39.1% for antagonist group, P>0.05. Conclusion The present study showed that applying GnRH-agonist and GnRH-antago- nist protocols to coasted cycles did not result in any differences in cycle parameters and clinical pregnancy rates.

  17. Species differences in the effects of the κ-opioid receptor antagonist zyklophin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirohi, Sunil; Aldrich, Jane V; Walker, Brendan M

    2016-03-01

    We have shown that dysregulation of the dynorphin/kappa-opioid receptor (DYN/KOR) system contributes to escalated alcohol self-administration in alcohol dependence and that KOR antagonists with extended durations of action selectively reduce escalated alcohol consumption in alcohol-dependent animals. As KOR antagonism has gained widespread attention as a potential therapeutic target to treat alcoholism and multiple neuropsychiatric disorders, we tested the effect of zyklophin (a short-acting KOR antagonist) on escalated alcohol self-administration in rats made alcohol-dependent using intermittent alcohol vapor exposure. Following dependence induction, zyklophin was infused centrally prior to alcohol self-administration sessions and locomotor activity tests during acute withdrawal. Zyklophin did not impact alcohol self-administration or locomotor activity in either exposure condition. To investigate the neurobiological basis of this atypical effect for a KOR antagonist, we utilized a κ-, μ-, and δ-opioid receptor agonist-stimulated GTPyS coupling assay to examine the opioid receptor specificity of zyklophin in the rat brain and mouse brain. In rats, zyklophin did not affect U50488-, DAMGO-, or DADLE-stimulated GTPyS coupling, whereas the prototypical KOR antagonist nor-binaltorphimine (norBNI) attenuated U50488-induced stimulation in the rat brain tissue at concentrations that did not impact μ- and δ-receptor function. To reconcile the discrepancy between the present rat data and published mouse data, comparable GTPyS assays were conducted using mouse brain tissue; zyklophin effects were consistent with KOR antagonism in mice. Moreover, at higher concentrations, zyklophin exhibited agonist properties in rat and mouse brains. These results identify species differences in zyklophin efficacy that, given the rising interest in the development of short-duration KOR antagonists, should provide valuable information for therapeutic development efforts.

  18. CysLT(1)R antagonists inhibit tumor growth in a xenograft model of colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savari, Sayeh; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Yuan; Sime, Wondossen; Sjölander, Anita

    2013-01-01

    The expression of the inflammatory G-protein coupled receptor CysLT1R has been shown to be upregulated in colon cancer patients and associated with poor prognosis. The present study investigated the correlation between CysLT1R and colon cancer development in vivo using CysLT1R antagonists (ZM198,615 or Montelukast) and the nude mouse xenograft model. Two drug administration regimens were established. The first regimen was established to investigate the importance of CysLT1R in tumor initiation. Nude mice were inoculated with 50 µM CysLT1R antagonist-pretreated HCT-116 colon cancer cells and received continued treatment (5 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneally). The second regimen aimed to address the role of CysLT1R in tumor progression. Nude mice were inoculated with non-pretreated HCT-116 cells and did not receive CysLT1R antagonist treatment until recordable tumor appearance. Both regimens resulted in significantly reduced tumor size, attributed to changes in proliferation and apoptosis as determined by reduced Ki-67 levels and increased levels of p21(WAF/Cip1) (Pcolon cancer cell line HCT-116 and CysLT1R antagonists. In addition to significant reductions in cell proliferation, adhesion and colony formation, we observed induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. The ability of Montelukast to inhibit growth of human colon cancer xenograft was further validated by using two additional colon cancer cell lines, SW-480 and HT-29. Our results demonstrate that CysLT1R antagonists inhibit growth of colon cancer xenografts primarily by reducing proliferation and inducing apoptosis of the tumor cells.

  19. Predicting the relative binding affinity of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists by density functional methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Katarina; Hogner, Anders; Ogg, Derek; Packer, Martin J.; Hansson, Eva; Granberg, Kenneth L.; Evertsson, Emma; Nordqvist, Anneli

    2015-12-01

    In drug discovery, prediction of binding affinity ahead of synthesis to aid compound prioritization is still hampered by the low throughput of the more accurate methods and the lack of general pertinence of one method that fits all systems. Here we show the applicability of a method based on density functional theory using core fragments and a protein model with only the first shell residues surrounding the core, to predict relative binding affinity of a matched series of mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists. Antagonists of MR are used for treatment of chronic heart failure and hypertension. Marketed MR antagonists, spironolactone and eplerenone, are also believed to be highly efficacious in treatment of chronic kidney disease in diabetes patients, but is contra-indicated due to the increased risk for hyperkalemia. These findings and a significant unmet medical need among patients with chronic kidney disease continues to stimulate efforts in the discovery of new MR antagonist with maintained efficacy but low or no risk for hyperkalemia. Applied on a matched series of MR antagonists the quantum mechanical based method gave an R2 = 0.76 for the experimental lipophilic ligand efficiency versus relative predicted binding affinity calculated with the M06-2X functional in gas phase and an R2 = 0.64 for experimental binding affinity versus relative predicted binding affinity calculated with the M06-2X functional including an implicit solvation model. The quantum mechanical approach using core fragments was compared to free energy perturbation calculations using the full sized compound structures.

  20. Peripheral mGluR5 antagonist attenuated craniofacial muscle pain and inflammation but not mGluR1 antagonist in lightly anesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ho Jeong; Choi, Hyo Soon; Ju, Jin Sook; Bae, Yong Chul; Kim, Sung Kyo; Yoon, Young Wook; Ahn, Dong Kuk

    2006-10-16

    The present study investigated the role of peripheral group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) in MO-induced nociceptive behaviour and inflammation in the masseter muscles of lightly anesthetized rats. Experiments were carried out on male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 300-400 g. After initial anesthesia with sodium pentobarbital (40 mg/kg, i.p.), one femoral vein was cannulated and connected to an infusion pump for intravenous infusion of sodium pentobarbital. The rate of infusion was adjusted to provide a constant level of anesthesia. Mustard oil (MO, 30 microl) was injected into the mid-region of the left masseter muscle via a 30-gauge needle over 10s. After 30 microl injection of 5, 10, 15, or 20% MO into the masseter muscle, the total number of hindpaw shaking behaviour and extravasated Evans' blue dye concentration in the masseter muscle were significantly higher in the MO-treated group in a dose-dependent manner compared with the vehicle (mineral oil)-treated group. Intramuscular pretreatment with 3 or 5% lidocaine reduced MO-induced hindpaw shaking behaviour and increases in extravasated Evans' blue dye concentration. Intramuscular pretreatment with 5 mM MCPG, non-selective group I/II mGluR antagonist, or MPEP, a selective group I mGluR5 antagonist, produced a significant attenuation of MO-induced hindpaw shaking behaviour and increases in extravasated Evans' blue dye concentration in the masseter muscle while LY367385, a selective group I mGluR1 antagonist, did not affect MO-induced nociceptive behaviour and inflammation in the masseter muscle. These results indicate that peripheral mGluR5 plays important role in mediating MO-induced nociceptive behaviour and inflammation in the craniofacial muscle.

  1. Xerostomia: prevalence and pharmacotherapy. With special reference to beta-adrenoceptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nederfors, T

    1996-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis was to estimate the prevalence of subjectively perceived dry mouth, xerostomia, in a representative general adult population, and the possible co-morbidity between xerostomia and on-going pharmacotherapy. Further, to evaluate the effects of beta-adrenoceptor antagonists on saliva flow rate and composition. The prevalence of xerostomia was evaluated by means of a questionnaire mailed to a random sample of 4.200 adult subjects living in the southern part of the province of Halland, Sweden. Three hundred men and equally many women aged 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70 and 80 years were selected from the national census register. From 3311 (81%) evaluable questionnaires was concluded that, in the studied population, 21.3% of the men and 27.3% of the women reported xerostomia. The difference between the sexes was statistically significant, women reporting higher prevalence of dry mouth than men. It was also found that xerostomia was significantly age-related. Further, it was demonstrated that there was a strong co-morbidity between reported prevalence of dry mouth and on-going pharmacotherapy. Generally, no specific drug or drug-group proved to be especially xerogenic, rather, polypharmacy was strongly correlated to reported symptoms of dry mouth, and it was also a significant correlation between increasing xerostomia and the number of medications taken. The effects of beta-adrenoceptor antagonists on saliva flow rate and composition were evaluated both in healthy volunteers and in hypertensive patients. The effects of one week of treatment with the non-selective (propranolol) and the beta 1-selective (atenolol) adrenoceptor antagonists were compared with that of placebo in three different clinical trials, including 38, 11 and 19 healthy volunteers, respectively. Two of these studies were focused on the effects on whole saliva secretion rate and composition and the third study on the secretions from the parotid and the submandibular

  2. Testosterone dynamics and psychopathic personality traits independently predict antagonistic behavior towards the perceived loser of a competitive interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geniole, Shawn N; Busseri, Michael A; McCormick, Cheryl M

    2013-11-01

    Few studies have investigated the influence of changes in testosterone on subsequent competitive, antagonistic behavior in humans. Further, little is known about the extent to which such effects are moderated by personality traits. Here, we collected salivary measures of testosterone before and after a rigged competition. After the competition, participants were given the opportunity to act antagonistically against the competitor (allocate a low honorarium). We hypothesized that changes in testosterone throughout the competition would predict antagonistic behavior such that greater increases would be associated with the allocation of lower honorariums. Further, we investigated the extent to which personality traits related to psychopathy (fearless dominance, FD; self-centered impulsivity, SCI; and coldheartedness) moderated this relationship. In men (n=104), greater increases in testosterone and greater FD were associated with more antagonistic behavior, but testosterone concentrations did not interact with personality measures. In women (n=97), greater FD and SCI predicted greater antagonistic behavior, but there were no significant endocrine predictors or interactions with personality measures. In a secondary set of analyses, we found no support for the dual-hormone hypothesis that the relationship between baseline testosterone concentrations and behavior is moderated by cortisol concentrations. Thus, results are consistent with previous findings that in men, situation-specific testosterone reactivity rather than baseline endocrine function is a better predictor of future antagonistic behavior. The results are discussed with respect to the Challenge Hypothesis and the Biosocial Model of Status, and the possible mechanisms underlying the independent relations of testosterone and personality factors with antagonistic behavior.

  3. IDENTIFICATION OF ANTAGONISTS OF Xanthomonas campestris ISOLATED FROM RHIZOSPHERE ZONE OF BROCCOLI FARM AT KEMBANG MERTA VILLAGE, TABANAN, BALI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadya Treesna Wulansari

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The main objectives of this research were to isolate and identify antagonists of Xanthomonas campestris from rhizosphere zone of broccoli plants. Soil samples were collected from broccoli farm located at Kembang Merta village, Tabanan, Bali. Isolation and identification of the antagonists were conducted at the Laboratory of Microbiology, Udayana University. Two fungal (Trichoderma harzianum and Trichoderma viride and two bacterial (Bacillus sp. and Pseudomonas sp. antagonists potentially to be developed as biocontrol agents of Xanthomonas campestris were successfully identified in this research

  4. Novel benzamide-based histamine h3 receptor antagonists: the identification of two candidates for clinical development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letavic, Michael A; Aluisio, Leah; Apodaca, Richard; Bajpai, Manoj; Barbier, Ann J; Bonneville, Anne; Bonaventure, Pascal; Carruthers, Nicholas I; Dugovic, Christine; Fraser, Ian C; Kramer, Michelle L; Lord, Brian; Lovenberg, Timothy W; Li, Lilian Y; Ly, Kiev S; Mcallister, Heather; Mani, Neelakandha S; Morton, Kirsten L; Ndifor, Anthony; Nepomuceno, S Diane; Pandit, Chennagiri R; Sands, Steven B; Shah, Chandra R; Shelton, Jonathan E; Snook, Sandra S; Swanson, Devin M; Xiao, Wei

    2015-04-09

    The preclinical characterization of novel phenyl(piperazin-1-yl)methanones that are histamine H3 receptor antagonists is described. The compounds described are high affinity histamine H3 antagonists. Optimization of the physical properties of these histamine H3 antagonists led to the discovery of several promising lead compounds, and extensive preclinical profiling aided in the identification of compounds with optimal duration of action for wake promoting activity. This led to the discovery of two development candidates for Phase I and Phase II clinical trials.

  5. Cardiovascular studies with SK&F 93319, an antagonist of histamine at both H1- and H2-receptors.

    OpenAIRE

    Harvey, C A; Owen, D A

    1984-01-01

    Cardiovascular studies have been made in anaesthetized cats with SK&F 93319, an antagonist of histamine at both H1- and H2-receptors. SK&F 93319, 8 X 10(-8) and 4 X 10(-7) mol kg-1 min-1 antagonized depressor responses to injections of histamine and the maximum displacement of histamine dose-response curves exceeded that which can be obtained with either an H1-receptor antagonist or an H2-receptor antagonist alone. SK&F 93319, 8 X 10(-8) and 4 X 10(-7) mol kg-1 min-1, also caused dose-depende...

  6. ANALYSIS OF INTERLEUKIN-1 RECEPTOR ANTAGONIST GENE POLYMORPHISM IN CHINESE PATIENTS WITH ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheng Bi; De-sheng Wang; Guo-lin Li; Shang-ha Pan

    2004-01-01

    Objective To identify an interaction between the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist gene polymorphism and risk of Alzheimer's disease.Methods The study included 117 healthy controls, 85 patients with Alzheimer's disease in a Northeastern Chinese population of Han nationality. Genotypes were determined by a polymerase chain reaction amplification of the intron 2 fragment,harbouring a variable number of short tandem nucleotide sequences. Amplification products were separated on a 2% agarose gel.Results The allele 2 frequency was 27% in healthy controls, and 21% in patients with Alzheimer's disease. Thus for allele 2 as well as for all other alleles, genotypes, or carriage rates, no significant differences compared with controls.Conclusions No association ofinterleukin-1 receptor antagonist gene polymorphism with Alzheimer's disease was identified in this population. It is also possible that the increased risk and disease modifying effects are caused by linkage disequilibrium with other genomic variants in other nearby genes.

  7. Investigation of the teratogenic potential of VLA-4 antagonist derivatives in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Ken; Matsuoka, Toshiki; Suzuki, Chiharu; Kinoshita, Junzo; Takayama, Gensuke; Shimomura, Kazuhiro

    2014-11-01

    Very late antigen-4 (VLA-4), which is concerned with cell-cell adhesion, plays important roles in development of the heart, and some VLA-4 antagonists cause cardiac anomalies. In this study, we evaluated the teratogenic potential of VLA-4 antagonist derivatives as screening, and investigated the conditions that induce cardiac anomalies. Seventeen compounds were orally administered to pregnant rats throughout the organogenesis period, and fetal examinations were performed. In addition, drug concentrations in the embryos were assayed. As a result, the incidence of ventricular septal defect (VSD) ranged from 0 to 100% depending on the compound. Plasma drug concentrations in the dams were related to increased incidence of VSD; however, these incidences were not increased when the concentration of the compound in the embryos at 24h after dosing was low. It is considered that continuous pharmacological activity in the embryo for more than 24h might disrupt closure of the ventricular septum.

  8. Blockade of the stimulus properties of mescaline by a serotonin antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, J C

    1975-04-01

    It is known that the effects of mescaline (3, 4, 5-trimethoxyphenylethylamine), a hallucinogen, can function as a discriminative stimulus. The present investigation examined the ability of cinanserin, a serotinin antagonist, to block the stimulus properties of mescaline in the rat. After a reliable discrimination was established between the effects following the injection of mescaline (10 mg/kg) and those following administration of saline, subjects were pretreated with cinanserin HC1 (3 mg/kg) and then treated with mescaline. Such pretreatment was found to block discrimination, i.e., the response rate following the administration of mescaline plus cinanserin was appropriate for the saline condition. The present data suggest that antagonists of serotonin may be useful in furthering our understanding of phenethylamine hallucinogens.

  9. PROTECTIVE EFFECTS OF CALCIUM ANTAGONIST ON VASCULAR SYSTEM AGAINST TOXICITY INDUCED BY MERCURIC CHLORIDE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马欣; 厉英倩; 白宇飞; 刘明

    2004-01-01

    Objective To explore the toxic effects of mercuric chloride (HgCl2) on vascular smooth muscle as well as its relationship to calcium antagonist. Methods By using isolated vascular tension methods, we studied the effect of HgCl2 on isolated rabbit aortic rings. Results HgCl2 (1-100μmol*L-1) caused a concentration-dependent contraction of rabbit aortic rings, which did not change with phentolamin or without endothelium. In KH solution with Ca2+ , the maximum contraction amplitude reduced by(61.2±3.3)%. Nifedipine produced a concentration-dependent decrease of the maximum contraction amplitude. Conclusion Calcium antagonist has protective effects on vascular smooth muscle against damage induced by HgCl2.

  10. Calcium channel antagonists increase morphine-induced analgesia and antagonize morphine tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, E; Tamayo, L; Amigo, M

    1988-04-13

    The influence of calcium channel blockers on morphine-induced analgesia and on tolerance to the chronic administration of the opiate was investigated in mice. The effects of a test dose of morphine were significantly increased by the administration of diltiazem, flunarizine, nicardipine and verapamil. In contrast, nifedipine induced an antagonistic effect. The calcium channel antagonists did not change the reaction time to thermal stimulation in mice (hot plate test). The administration of nifedipine, flunarizine and verapamil reduced the intensity of the tolerance induced by a single dose of morphine administered in a slow release preparation. Diltiazem induced a non-significant decrease of the process. The present results are in accordance with the known interaction of acute and chronic morphine administration with the intracellular calcium concentration in neurones of the central nervous system.

  11. Substituted fused bicyclic pyrrolizinones as potent, orally bioavailable hNK1 antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morriello, Gregori J; Mills, Sander G; Johnson, Tricia; Reibarkh, Mikhail; Chicchi, Gary; DeMartino, Julie; Kurtz, Marc; Davies, P; Tsao, K L C; Zheng, Song; Tong, Xinchun; Carlson, Emma; Townson, Karen; Tattersall, F D; Wheeldon, Alan; Boyce, Susan; Collinson, Neil; Rupniak, Nadia; Moore, Stephen; DeVita, Robert J

    2010-03-15

    Previous work on human NK(1) (hNK(1)) antagonists in which the core of the structure is a 5,5-fused pyrrolizinone has been disclosed. The structural-activity-relationship studies on simple alpha- and beta-substituted compounds of this series provided several potent and bioavailable hNK(1) antagonists that displayed excellent brain penetration as observed by their good efficacy in the gerbil foot-tapping (GFT) model assay. Several of these compounds exhibited 100% inhibition of the foot-tapping response at 0.1 and 24h with ID(50)'s of less than 1 mpk. One particular alpha-substituted compound (2b) had an excellent pharmacokinetic profile across preclinical species with reasonable in vivo functional activity and minimal ancillary activity.

  12. Tranylcypromine substituted cis-hydroxycyclobutylnaphthamides as potent and selective dopamine D₃ receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianyong; Levant, Beth; Jiang, Cheng; Keck, Thomas M; Newman, Amy Hauck; Wang, Shaomeng

    2014-06-12

    We report a class of potent and selective dopamine D3 receptor antagonists based upon tranylcypromine. Although tranylcypromine has a low affinity for the rat D3 receptor (K(i) = 12.8 μM), our efforts have yielded (1R,2S)-11 (CJ-1882), which has K(i) values of 2.7 and 2.8 nM at the rat and human dopamine D3 receptors, respectively, and displays respective selectivities of >10000-fold and 223-fold over the rat and human D2 receptors. Evaluation in a β-arrestin functional assay showed that (1R,2S)-11 is a potent and competitive antagonist at the human D3 receptor.

  13. Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships and Docking Studies of Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenssen, Håvard; Mehrabian, Mohadeseh; Kyani, Anahita

    2012-01-01

    Defining the role of calcitonin gene-related peptide in migraine pathogenesis could lead to the application of calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists as novel migraine therapeutics. In this work, quantitative structure-activity relationship modeling of biological activities of a large range...... of calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists was performed using a panel of physicochemical descriptors. The computational studies evaluated different variable selection techniques and demonstrated shuffling stepwise multiple linear regression to be superior over genetic algorithm-multiple linear regression....... The linear quantitative structure-activity relationship model revealed better statistical parameters of cross-validation in comparison with the non-linear support vector regression technique. Implementing only five peptide descriptors into this linear quantitative structure-activity relationship model...

  14. Synthesis, Optimization, and Evaluation of Novel Small Molecules as Antagonists of WDR5-MLL Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolshan, Yuri; Getlik, Matthäus; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Wasney, Gregory A; Hajian, Taraneh; Poda, Gennadiy; Nguyen, Kong T; Wu, Hong; Dombrovski, Ludmila; Dong, Aiping; Senisterra, Guillermo; Schapira, Matthieu; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Brown, Peter J; Al-Awar, Rima; Vedadi, Masoud; Smil, David

    2013-03-14

    The WD40-repeat protein WDR5 plays a critical role in maintaining the integrity of MLL complexes and fully activating their methyltransferase function. MLL complexes, the trithorax-like family of SET1 methyltransferases, catalyze trimethylation of lysine 4 on histone 3, and they have been widely implicated in various cancers. Antagonism of WDR5 and MLL subunit interaction by small molecules has recently been presented as a practical way to inhibit activity of the MLL1 complex, and N-(2-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)-5-substituted-phenyl) benzamides were reported as potent and selective antagonists of such an interaction. Here, we describe the protein crystal structure guided optimization of prototypic compound 2 (K dis = 7 μM), leading to identification of more potent antagonist 47 (K dis = 0.3 μM).

  15. Postcountershock myocardial damage after pretreatment with adrenergic and calcium channel antagonists in halothane-anesthetized dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaba, D.M.; Metz, S.; Maze, M.

    1985-05-01

    Transthoracic electric countershock can cause necrotic myocardial lesions in humans as well as experimental animals. The authors investigated the effect on postcountershock myocardial damage of pretreatment with prazosin, an alpha-1 antagonist; L-metoprolol, a beta-1 antagonist, and verapamil, a calcium channel-blocking agent. Twenty dogs were anesthetized with halothane and given two transthoracic countershocks of 295 delivered joules each after drug or vehicle treatment. Myocardial injury was quantitated 24 h following countershock by measuring the uptake of technetium-99m pyrophosphate in the myocardium. Elevated technetium-99m pyrophosphate uptake occurred in visible lesions in most dogs regardless of drug treatment. For each of four parameters of myocardial damage there was no statistically significant difference between control animals and those treated with prazosin, metoprolol, or verapamil. These data suggest that adrenergic or calcium channel-mediated mechanisms are not involved in the pathogenesis of postcountershock myocardial damage.

  16. Exploring Western Ghats microbial diversity for antagonistic microorganisms against fungal phytopathogens of pepper and chickpea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.N. RAMKUMAR

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Newly isolated microbial cultures from Western Ghat soil samples of Kerala region in India were screened for antagonistic activity by well diffusion and dual culture plating against Phytophthora capsici and Rhizoctonia solani, infecting pepper and chickpea, respectively. Bioactive samples were made by varying solvent extraction of the culture broths of the potent isolates belongs to Actinomycetes, Pseudomonas, Bacillus and Trichoderma. The efficacy of the isolates to produce other potent antifungal metabolites such as cell wall degrading enzymes, HCN and volatile compounds were also checked. Treatment with antagonistic isolates in vivo under greenhouse conditions revealed significant reduction of the disease intensity of foot rot disease of black pepper and collar rot of chick pea.

  17. Immunoactive effects of cannabinoids: considerations for the therapeutic use of cannabinoid receptor agonists and antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greineisen, William E; Turner, Helen

    2010-05-01

    The active constituents of Cannabis sativa have been used for centuries as recreational drugs and medicinal agents. Today, marijuana is the most prevalent drug of abuse in the United States and, conversely, therapeutic use of marijuana constituents are gaining mainstream clinical and political acceptance. Given the documented contributions of endocannabinoid signaling to a range of physiological systems, including cognitive function, and the control of eating behaviors, it is unsurprising that cannabinoid receptor agonists and antagonists are showing significant clinical potential. In addition to the neuroactive effects of cannabinoids, an emerging body of data suggests that both endogenous and exogenous cannabinoids are potently immunoactive. The central premise of this review article is that the immunological effects of cannabinoids should be considered in the context of each prescribing decision. We present evidence that the immunological effects of cannabinoid receptor agonists and antagonists are highly relevant to the spectrum of disorders for which cannabinoid therapeutics are currently offered.

  18. Treatment of canine pyometra with the gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist acyline: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Pablo R; Blanco, Paula G; Gobello, Cristina

    2015-03-01

    To describe the effect of the third-generation gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist acyline in the treatment of 4 diestrous bitches with the cystic endometrial hyperplasia-pyometra complex. The 4 bitches were treated with 330 μg/kg of subcutaneous acyline on day 0 and antibiotics, and followed up for 2 weeks. One closed-cervix case showed cervical dilatation 36 hours after treatment, and all the 4 animals showed resolution of clinical signs starting on day 3 posttreatment. Ultrasonographic uterine diameters and luminal contents decreased in the bitches having high progesterone serum concentrations before treatment but not in those with low levels. Serum progesterone importantly decreased from high to basal concentrations in the 3 "ultrasonographically cured" animals. No local or systemic side effects related to the treatment were observed. The gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist acyline may have a promising place for the medical treatment of cystic endometrial hyperplasia-pyometra complex in dogs.

  19. Discovery of Potent and Highly Selective A2B Adenosine Receptor Antagonist Chemotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Maatougui, Abdelaziz; Azuaje, Jhonny; González-Gómez, Manuel; Miguez, Gabriel; Crespo, Abel; Carbajales, Carlos; Escalante, Luz; García-Mera, Xerardo; Gutiérrez-de-Terán, Hugo; Sotelo, Eddy

    2016-03-10

    Three novel families of A2B adenosine receptor antagonists were identified in the context of the structural exploration of the 3,4-dihydropyrimidin-2(1H)-one chemotype. The most appealing series contain imidazole, 1,2,4-triazole, or benzimidazole rings fused to the 2,3-positions of the parent diazinone core. The optimization process enabled identification of a highly potent (3.49 nM) A2B ligand that exhibits complete selectivity toward A1, A2A, and A3 receptors. The results of functional cAMP experiments confirmed the antagonistic behavior of representative ligands. The main SAR trends identified within the series were substantiated by a molecular modeling study based on a receptor-driven docking model constructed on the basis of the crystal structure of the human A2A receptor.

  20. Insights into cardio-oncology:Polypharmacology of quinazoline-based α1-adrenoceptor antagonists

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Salvatore; Patanè

    2015-01-01

    New uses of cardiovascular drugs with proven experience are emerging,including for treating cancer.Quinazoline is a compound made up of two fused six member simple aromatic rings,benzene and pyrimidine rings,with several biological effects.Cardiologists first used quinazoline-based α1-adrenoceptor antagonists prazosin,doxazosin,and terazosin; currently available data support their use as safe,well tolerated,and effective add-on therapy in uncontrolled hypertension with additional favourable metabolic effects.Recent findings highlight the anticancer effects of quinazoline-based α1-adrenoceptor antagonists,indicating that they may have a significant role in uncontrolled hypertensive cancer patients without signs of ischemia.

  1. Biocontrol Efficacy of Two Antagonistic Yeasts Against Postharvest Diseases in Peach Fruits During Storage Periods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Li; TIAN Shi-ping; QIN Guo-zheng; XU Yong

    2003-01-01

    Two antagonistic yeasts, Thichosporon pullulans and Cryptococcus laurentii, were investigated for their biocontrol potential to blue mold rot and rhizopus rot on harvested peach fruits (Prunus persica L. Batsch, cv. Okubao), alone or in combination with a Iow dose of iprodione (50 μg mi-1 ). The results indicated that T. pullulans and C. laurentii were effective at reducing disease incidence and severity of blue mold rot and rhizopus rot in peach fruits. Biocontrol efficacy of C. laurentii and T. pullulans were significantly enhanced by combination with a Iow dose of iprodione (50 μg mi-1) against blue mold and rhizopus rot in peach fruits. T. pullulans and C. laurentii combined with a low dose of iprodione (50 μg mi-1 ) resulted in better disease control than either iprodione or the yeasts used alone. Dipping fruits in suspensions of antagonist cells showed the similar control effect as the treatment with iprodione (500 μg ml-1 ).

  2. Immobility from administration of the alpha1-adrenergic antagonist, terazosin, in the IVth ventricle in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Eric A; Lin, Yan; Quartermain, David

    2003-12-26

    Brain alpha1-adrenoceptors have been shown to be essential for motor activity and movement in mice using intraventricular injection of alpha1-antagonists. To facilitate subsequent neuroanatomical mapping of these receptors, the present study was undertaken to replicate these effects in the rat. Rats were administered the alpha1-antagonist, terazosin, in the absence and presence of the alpha1-agonist, phenylephrine, in the IVth ventricle and were tested for their motor activity responses to an environmental change. Terazosin was found to produce a dose-dependent, virtually complete cessation of behavioral activity that was reversed by coinfusion of phenylephrine. The results could not be explained by sedation. It is concluded that central alpha1-adrenoceptors are essential for behavioral activation in rats as in mice.

  3. Couple Control Model Implementation on Antagonistic Mono- and Bi-Articular Actuators

    CERN Document Server

    Prattico, Flavio; Yamamoto, Shin-ichiroh

    2014-01-01

    Recently, robot assisted therapy devices are increasingly used for spinal cord injury (SCI) rehabilitation in assisting handicapped patients to regain their impaired movements. Assistive robotic systems may not be able to cure or fully compensate impairments, but it should be able to assist certain impaired functions and ease movements. In this study, a couple control model for lower-limb orthosis of a body weight support gait training system is proposed. The developed leg orthosis implements the use of pneumatic artificial muscle as an actuation system. The pneumatic muscle was arranged antagonistically to form two pair of mono-articular muscles (i.e., hip and knee joints), and a pair of bi-articular actuators (i.e., rectus femoris and hamstring). The results of the proposed couple control model showed that, it was able to simultaneously control the antagonistic mono- and bi-articular actuators and sufficiently performed walking motion of the leg orthosis.

  4. Neurokinin-1 receptor antagonists for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Fahad

    2012-07-01

    Chemotherapy can be a life-prolonging treatment for many cancer patients, but it is often associated with profound nausea and vomiting that is so distressing that patients may delay or decline treatment to avoid these side effects. The discovery of several NK1 receptor antagonists is a big revolution to dealt this problem. NK1 receptor antagonists prevent both acute and delayed chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). These agents act centrally at NK-1 receptors in vomiting centers within the central nervous system to block their activation by substance P released as an unwanted consequence of chemotherapy. By controlling nausea and vomiting, these agents help improve patients' daily living and their ability to complete multiple cycles of chemotherapy. They are effective for both moderately and highly emetogenic chemotherapy regimens. Their use might be associated with increased infection rates; however, additional appraisal of specific data from RCTs is needed.

  5. Discovery and characterization of non-competitive antagonists of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparini, F; Floersheim, P; Flor, P J; Heinrich, M; Inderbitzin, W; Ott, D; Pagano, A; Stierlin, C; Stoehr, N; Vranesic, I; Kuhn, R

    2001-01-01

    We have investigated the mechanism of inhibition of the new group I mGluR antagonists CPCCOEt and MPEP and determined that both compounds have a non-competitive mode of inhibition. Furthermore using chimeric/mutated receptors constructs we have found that these antagonists act at a novel pharmacological site located in the trans-membrane (TM). Specific non-conserved amino acid residues in the TM domain have been identified which are necessary for the inhibition by CPCCOEt and MPEP of the mGlul and mGlu5 receptors, respectively. Using molecular modeling a model of the TM domain was built for both mGlu1 and mGlu5 receptor subtypes. Docking of CPCCOEt and MPEP into their respective model allowed the modelisation of the novel binding site.

  6. Dual Alleviation of Acute and Neuropathic Pain by Fused Opioid Agonist-Neurokinin 1 Antagonist Peptidomimetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betti, Cecilia; Starnowska, Joanna; Mika, Joanna; Dyniewicz, Jolanta; Frankiewicz, Lukasz; Novoa, Alexandre; Bochynska, Marta; Keresztes, Attila; Kosson, Piotr; Makuch, Wioletta; Van Duppen, Joost; Chung, Nga N; Vanden Broeck, Jozef; Lipkowski, Andrzej W; Schiller, Peter W; Janssens, Frans; Ceusters, Marc; Sommen, François; Meert, Theo; Przewlocka, Barbara; Tourwé, Dirk; Ballet, Steven

    2015-12-10

    Herein, the synthesis and biological evaluation of dual opioid agonists-neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) antagonists is described. In these multitarget ligands, the two pharmacophores do not overlap, and this allowed maintaining high NK1R affinity and antagonist potency in compounds 12 and 13. Although the fusion of the two ligands resulted in slightly diminished opioid agonism at the μ- and δ-opioid receptors (MOR and DOR, respectively), as compared to the opioid parent peptide, balanced MOR/DOR activities were obtained. Compared to morphine, compounds 12 and 13 produced more potent antinociceptive effects in both acute (tail-flick) and neuropathic pain models (von Frey and cold plate). Similarly to morphine, analgesic tolerance developed after repetitive administration of these compounds. To our delight, compound 12 did not produce cross-tolerance with morphine and high antihyperalgesic and antiallodynic effects could be reinstated after chronic administration of each of the two compounds.

  7. [Antagonists of the type 3 serotonin receptor (5 -HT3) in IBS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komoto, Shunsuke; Miura, Soichiro

    2006-08-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common chronic gastrointestinal (GI) disorder, but its pathophysiology remains unknown. 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, serotonin) is an important neurotransmitter involved in the brain-gut connection. Alosetron, a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, has been demonstrated in randomized, placebo-controlled trials (RCT) to be effective in diarrhea-predominant IBS(IBS-D). Constipation is the most common adverse event. Alosetron improved abdominal pain and discomfort and stool consistency in both female and male patients, but it did not improve other symptoms (sense of urgency, stool frequency and bloating) in male patients. Although less is known about the gender differences in therapeutic benefit, a new 5-HT3 antagonist, cilansetron, has demonstrated effectiveness in male and female IBS-D patients and is currently under clinical trials.

  8. Binding and functional pharmacological characteristics of gepant-type antagonists in rat brain and mesenteric arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sheykhzade, Majid; Amandi, Nilofar; Pla, Monica Vidal

    2017-01-01

    receptors was investigated in rat brain membranes using a radioligand competitive binding assay. Furthermore, the histological location of the key components of CGRP receptor (RAMP1 and CLR) was assessed by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: Our functional studies clearly show that all gepants are reversible...... competitive antagonists producing Schild plot slopes not significantly different from unity and thus suggesting presence of a uniform CGRP receptor population in the arteries. A uniform receptor population was also confirmed by radioligand competitive binding studies showing similar affinities for the gepants...... results indicate that, despite species differences in the CGRP receptor affinity, the antagonistic nature of these gepants, the distribution pattern of CGRP receptor components and the mechanism behind CGRP-induced vasodilation seem to be similar in resistance-sized arteries of human and rats....

  9. Binding and functional pharmacological characteristics of gepant-type antagonists in rat brain and mesenteric arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sheykhzade, Majid; Amandi, Nilofar; Pla, Monica Vidal

    2017-01-01

    receptors was investigated in rat brain membranes using a radioligand competitive binding assay. Furthermore, the histological location of the key components of CGRP receptor (RAMP1 and CLR) was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results: Our functional studies clearly show that all gepants are reversible...... competitive antagonists producing Schild plot slopes not significantly different from unity and thus suggesting presence of a uniform CGRP receptor population in the arteries. A uniform receptor population was confirmed by radioligand competitive binding studies showing similar affinities for the gepants......: The present results indicate that, despite species differences in the CGRP receptor affinity, the antagonistic nature of these gepants, the distribution pattern of CGRP receptor components and the mechanism behind CGRP-induced vasodilation seem to be similar in resistance-sized arteries of human and rats....

  10. Therapeutic Opportunities for Caffeine and A2A Receptor Antagonists in Retinal Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boia, Raquel; Ambrósio, António Francisco; Santiago, Ana Raquel

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine, the major component of coffee, is the most consumed psychostimulant in the world. Caffeine is an adenosine analog and acts as a nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist. The majority of the effects of caffeine are mainly mediated by the blockade of adenosine receptors, and the proved neuroprotective effects of caffeine in brain disorders have been mimicked by the blockade of adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR). A growing body of evidence demonstrates that microglia-mediated neuroinflammation plays a key role in the pathophysiology of brain and retinal diseases. Moreover, the control of microglia reactivity by blocking A2AR has been proposed to be the mechanism underlying the observed protective effects of caffeine. Hence, it is conceivable that caffeine and A2AR antagonists offer therapeutic value for the treatment of retinal diseases, mainly those involving microglia-mediated neuroinflammation.

  11. The safety of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (anakinra in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Riente

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The safety profile of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (anakinra has been studied with randomised, placebo-controlled trials involving 2932 patients affected by rheumatoid arthritis. The most frequently reported adverse events were represented by injection site reactions (71% and headache (13.6%. No statistically significant difference in the incidence of infections was observed among the patients treated with the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist and the patients receiving placebo. In particular, the incidence of serious infections was 1,8% in rheumatoid arthritis patients on anakinra therapy and 0,7% in patients on placebo. The reported serious infections consisted of pneumonia, cellulitis, bone and joint infections, bursitis. No case of opportunistic infections or tubercolosis was observed. The results of clinical studies suggest that anakinra is a new well-tolerated drug for the treatment of patients affected by rheumatoid arthritis.

  12. PAF antagonistic activity of 2-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoic acid glucose ester from Gentiana scabra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, H; Kim, H K; Lee, H K

    1998-08-01

    In order to find out anti-platelet activating factor (PAF) from natural resources, Korean medicinal plants used for the treatments of peripheral circulation disorders were tested for their possible protective effects on PAF-induced anaphylactic shock. From the above screening, the methanol extract of Gentiana scabra showed a potent antagonistic activity against PAF. Water suspension of the extract was partitioned with CH2Cl2 and EtOAc, successively. The EtOAc fraction which showed the highest activity was chromatographed on silica gel to yield 6 fractions. From the fraction which showed higher PAF-antagonistic activity than the other fractions, compound 1 was isolated by recrystallization. On the basis of spectral data, compound 1 was identified as 2-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoic acid glucose ester. The compound prevented the mice from the PAF-induced death at a dose of 300 micrograms/mouse.

  13. 3D printing antagonistic systems of artificial muscle using projection stereolithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peele, Bryan N; Wallin, Thomas J; Zhao, Huichan; Shepherd, Robert F

    2015-09-09

    The detailed mechanical design of a digital mask projection stereolithgraphy system is described for the 3D printing of soft actuators. A commercially available, photopolymerizable elastomeric material is identified and characterized in its liquid and solid form using rheological and tensile testing. Its capabilities for use in directly printing high degree of freedom (DOF), soft actuators is assessed. An outcome is the ∼40% strain to failure of the printed elastomer structures. Using the resulting material properties, numerical simulations of pleated actuator architectures are analyzed to reduce stress concentration and increase actuation amplitudes. Antagonistic pairs of pleated actuators are then fabricated and tested for four-DOF, tentacle-like motion. These antagonistic pairs are shown to sweep through their full range of motion (∼180°) with a period of less than 70 ms.

  14. Furoxan analogues of the histamine H3-receptor antagonist imoproxifan and related furazan derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosco, Paolo; Bertinaria, Massimo; Di Stilo, Antonella; Cena, Clara; Sorba, Giovanni; Fruttero, Roberta; Gasco, Alberto

    2005-08-01

    Synthesis and pharmacological characterisation of a series of compounds in which the oxime substructure present in imoproxifan was constrained in the pentatomic NO-donor furoxan ring, as well as their structurally related furazan analogues devoid of NO-donating properties, are described. The whole series of products displayed reversible histamine H3-antagonistic activity on guinea-pig ileum. 4-(4-(3-(1H-Imidazol-4-yl)propoxy)phenyl)furoxan-3-carbonitrile 16 was also able to induce partial relaxation when added to the bath after electrical contraction of the guinea-pig ileum during the study of its H3-antagonistic properties. This phenomenon seems to be dependent on NO-mediated sGC activation. The lipophilic-hydrophilic balance of all the products was investigated.

  15. Molecular characterization of soil bacteria antagonistic to Rhizoctonia solani, sheath blight of rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padaria, Jasdeep C; Singh, Aqbal

    2009-05-01

    Bacillus pumillus MTCC7615 has been identified as a potent isolate against Rhizocotonia solani, the fungal pathogen causing sheath blight in rice. The study aimed at probing the role of a 23kb size plasmid pJCP07 of Bacillus pumillus MTCC7615 in its fungal antagonism towards Rhizocotonia solani. Plasmid pJCP07 was found to be involved in production of a fungal antagonistic compound as demonstrated by plasmid curing and conjugational transfer experiments. Tn5 insertional studies further confirmed that the plasmid pJCP07 of Bacillus pumillus MTCC7615 carries some of the gene(s) involved in production of compound antagonistic to Rhizocotonia solani. The plasmid pJCP07 is thus a mobilizable medium-sized plasmid carrying genes responsible for antagonism of Bacillus pumillus MTCC7615 towards Rhizocotonia solani.

  16. Screening of antagonistic activity of microorganisms against Colletotrichum acutatum and Colletotrichum gloeosporioides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živković Svetlana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The antagonistic activities of five biocontrol agents: Trichoderma harzianum, Gliocladium roseum, Bacillus subtilis, Streptomyces noursei and Streptomyces natalensis, were tested in vitro against Colletotrichum acutatum and Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, the causal agents of anthracnose disease in fruit crops. The microbial antagonists inhibited mycelial growth in the dual culture assay and conidial germination of Colletotrichum isolates. The two Streptomyces species exhibited the strongest antagonism against isolates of C. acutatum and C. gloeosporioides. Microscopic examination showed that the most common mode of action was antibiosis. The results of this study identify T. harzianum, G. roseum, B. subtilis, S. natalensis and S. noursei as promising biological control agents for further testing against anthracnose disease in fruits. .

  17. Impact of selected antagonistic fungi on Fusarium species – toxigenic cereal pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delfina Popiel

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium-ear blight is a destructive disease in various cereal-growing regions and leads to significant yield and quality losses for farmers and to contamination of cereal grains with mycotoxins, mainly deoxynivalenol and derivatives, zearalenone and moniliformin. Fusarium pathogens grow well and produce significant inoculum on crop resiudues. Reduction of mycotoxins production and pathogen sporulation may be influenced by saprophytic fungi, exhibiting antagonistic effect. Dual culture bioassays were used to examine the impact of 92 isolates (belonging to 29 fungal species against three toxigenic species, i.e. Fusarium avenaceum (Corda Saccardo, F. culmorum (W.G.Smith Saccardo and F. graminearum Schwabe. Both F.culmorum and F. graminearum isolates produce trichothecene mycotoxins and mycohormone zearalenone and are considered to be the most important cereal pathogens worldwide. Infection with those pathogens leads to accumulation of mycotoxins: deoxynivalenol (DON and zearalenone (ZEA in grains. Fusarium avenaceum isolates are producers of moniliformin (MON and enniatins. Isolates of Trichoderma sp. were found to be the most effective ones to control the growth of examined Fusarium species. The response of Fusarium isolates to antagonistic activity of Trichoderma isolates varied and also the isolates of Trichoderma differed in their antagonistic activity against Fusarium isolates. The production of MON by two isolates of F. avenaceum in dual culture on rice was reduced by 95% to 100% by T. atroviride isolate AN 35. The same antagonist reduced the amount of moniliformin from 100 μg/g to 6.5 μg/g when inoculated to rice culture contaminated with MON, which suggests the possible decomposition of this mycotoxin.

  18. Modification of formalin-induced nociception by different histamine receptor agonists and antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzin, Davood; Nosrati, Farnaz

    2007-01-15

    The present study evaluated the effects of different histamine receptor agonists and antagonists on the nociceptive response in the mouse formalin test. Intracerebroventricular (20-40 microg/mouse i.c.v.) or subcutaneous (1-10 mg/kg s.c.) injection of HTMT (H(1) receptor agonist) elicited a dose-related hyperalgesia in the early and late phases. Conversely, intraperitoneal (20 and 30 mg/kg i.p.) injection of dexchlorpheniramine (H(1) receptor antagonist) was antinociceptive in both phases. At a dose ineffective per se, dexchlorpheniramine (10 mg/kg i.p.) antagonized the hyperalgesia induced by HTMT (40 mug/mouse i.c.v. or 10 mg/kg s.c.). Dimaprit (H(2) receptor agonist, 30 mg/kg i.p.) and ranitidine (H(2) receptor antagonist, 20 and 40 mg/kg i.p.) reduced the nociceptive responses in the early and late phases. No significant change in the antinociceptive activity was found following the combination of dimaprit (30 mg/kg i.p.) with ranitidine (10 mg/kg i.p.). The antinociceptive effect of dimaprit (30 mg/kg i.p.) was prevented by naloxone (5 mg/kg i.p.) in the early phase or by imetit (H(3) receptor agonist, 25 mg/kg i.p.) in both early and late phases. The histamine H(3) receptor agonist imetit was hyperalgesic following i.p. administration of 50 mg/kg. Imetit-induced hyperalgesia was completely prevented by treatment with a dose ineffective per se of thioperamide (H(3) receptor antagonist, 5 mg/kg i.p.). The results suggest that histamine H(1) and H(3) receptor activations increase sensitivity to nociceptive stimulus in the formalin test.

  19. No Effect of Nutritional Adenosine Receptor Antagonists on Exercise Performance in the Heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-01

    not temperate, conditions after administration of a dopamine reuptake inhib- itor in humans (52) and improved thermoregulation in rats after...acute nutritional adenosine antagonist (caffeine and quercetin) administration on endurance exercise performance in the heat. An underlying assumption...both achieved with a small (0.6 mg/kg) intracerebroventricular dose of caffeine, while the same intraperitoneal dose had no effects. It remains

  20. Dihydromorphine-peptide hybrids with delta receptor agonistic and mu receptor antagonistic actions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, C.B.; Medzihradsky, F.; Woods, J.H.

    1986-03-05

    The actions of two morphine derivatives with short peptide side chains were evaluated upon the contraction of the isolated mouse vas deferens and upon displacement of /sup 3/H-etorphine from rat brain membranes. NIH-9833 (N-(6,14-endoetheno-7,8-dihydromorphine-7-alpha-carbonyl)-L-phenylalanyl-L-leucine ethyl ester HCl) was a potent agonist upon the vas deferens. Its EC50 for inhibition of the twitch was 1.2 +/- 0.1 nM. Both naltrexone (10/sup -7/ M) a relatively nonselective opioid antagonist, and ICI-174864 (10/sup -/' M) a highly selective delta receptor antagonist, blocked the actions of NIH-9833 which indicates that this drug is a delta receptor agonist. In contrast, NIH-9835 (N-(6,14-endoetheno-7,8-dihydromorphine-7-alpha-carbonyl)-L-glycyl-L-phenylalanyl-L-leucine ethyl ester HCl), which differs from NIH-9835 by the presence of a single amino acid residue, was devoid of opioid agonistic activity but was a potent antagonist of the inhibitory actions on the vas deferens of morphine and sufentanil. NIH-9833 and NIH-9835 were potent displacers of /sup 3/H-etorphine from rat cerebral membranes with EC50's of 0.58 nM and 1.7 nM, respectively. The observation that addition of a single glycyl group changes a dihydromorphine-peptide analog from a potent delta receptor agonist to an equally potent mu receptor antagonist suggests that the two receptor sites might be structurally quite similar.

  1. Using a Cocontraction Ratio to Predict Antagonistic Behavior During Elbow Motion

    CERN Document Server

    Pontonnier, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Inverse dynamics methods for muscle forces prediction are globally unable to predict antagonistic activity during a joint motion. This is due to a lack of physiological information describing how forces are shared between flexors and extensors. The aim of this study is the definition and the use of a new EMG-based cocontraction ratio in an inverse dynamics muscle forces prediction approach applied to the elbow flexion motion. Results show the relevance of the ratio.

  2. Current perspectives on selective dopamine D(3) receptor antagonists as pharmacotherapeutics for addictions and related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidbreder, Christian A; Newman, Amy H

    2010-02-01

    Repeated exposure to drugs of abuse produces long-term molecular and neurochemical changes that may explain the core features of addiction, such as the compulsive seeking and taking of the drug, as well as the risk of relapse. A growing number of new molecular and cellular targets of addictive drugs have been identified, and rapid advances are being made in relating those targets to specific behavioral phenotypes in animal models of addiction. In this context, the pattern of expression of the dopamine (DA) D(3) receptor in the rodent and human brain and changes in this pattern in response to drugs of abuse have contributed primarily to direct research efforts toward the development of selective DA D(3) receptor antagonists. Growing preclinical evidence indicates that these compounds may actually regulate the motivation to self-administer drugs and disrupt drug-associated cue-induced craving. This report will be divided into three parts. First, preclinical evidence in support of the efficacy of selective DA D(3) receptor antagonists in animal models of drug addiction will be reviewed. The effects of mixed DA D(2)/D(3) receptor antagonists will not be discussed here because most of these compounds have low selectivity at the D(3) versus D(2) receptor, and their efficacy profile is related primarily to functional antagonism at D(2) receptors and possibly interactions with other neurotransmitter systems. Second, major advances in medicinal chemistry for the identification and optimization of selective DA D(3) receptor antagonists and partial agonists will be analyzed. Third, translational research from preclinical efficacy studies to so-called proof-of-concept studies for drug addiction indications will be discussed.

  3. Remote functionalization of SCH 39166: discovery of potent and selective benzazepine dopamine D1 receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasikumar, T K; Burnett, Duane A; Greenlee, William J; Smith, Michelle; Fawzi, Ahmad; Zhang, Hongtao; Lachowicz, Jean E

    2010-02-01

    A series of novel benzazepine derived dopamine D(1) antagonists have been discovered. These compounds are highly potent at D(1) and showed excellent selectivity over D(2) and D(4) receptors. SAR studies revealed that a variety of functional groups are tolerated on the D-ring of known tetracyclic benzazepine analog 2, SCH 39166, leading to compounds with nanomolar potency at D(1) and good selectivity over D(2)-like receptors.

  4. Drosophila BRUCE inhibits apoptosis through non-lysine ubiquitination of the IAP-antagonist REAPER

    OpenAIRE

    Domingues, C.; Ryoo, H D

    2011-01-01

    Active caspases execute apoptosis to eliminate superfluous or harmful cells in animals. In Drosophila, living cells prevent uncontrolled caspase activation through an inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) family member, dIAP1, and apoptosis is preceded by the expression of IAP-antagonists, such as Reaper, Hid and Grim. Strong genetic modifiers of this pathway include another IAP family gene encoding an E2 ubiquitin conjugating enzyme domain, dBruce. Although the genetic effects of dBruce mutan...

  5. Effects of different rest intervals between antagonist paired sets on repetition performance and muscle activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Marianna F; Willardson, Jeffrey M; Paz, Gabriel A; Miranda, Humberto

    2014-09-01

    Recent evidence suggests that exercising the antagonist musculature acutely enhances subsequent performance for the agonist musculature. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of different rest intervals between sets for exercises that involve antagonistic muscle groups, a technique referred to as antagonist paired sets (APS). Fifteen recreationally trained men were tested for knee extension (KE) exercise performance, with or without previous knee flexion (KF) exercise for the antagonist musculature. The following protocols were performed in random order with 10 repetition maximum loads for the KF and KE exercises: (a) traditional protocol (TP)-1 set of KE only to repetition failure; (b) paired sets with minimal allowable rest (PMR)-1 set of KF followed immediately by a set of KE; (c) P30-30-second rest between paired sets of KF and KE; (d) P1-1-minute rest between paired sets; (e) P3-3-minute rest between paired sets; and (f) P5-5-minute rest between paired sets. The number of repetitions performed and electromyographic (EMG) activity of vastus lateralis, vastus medialis (VM), and rectus femoris (RF) muscles were recorded during the KE set in each protocol. It was demonstrated that significantly greater KE repetitions were completed during the PMR, P30, and P1 protocols vs. the TP protocol. Significantly greater EMG activity was demonstrated for the RF muscle during the KE exercise in the PMR and P30 vs. the TP, P3, and P5, respectively. In addition, significantly greater EMG activity was demonstrated for the VM muscle during the PMR vs. all other protocols. The results of this study indicate that no rest or relatively shorter rest intervals (30 seconds and 1 minute) between APS might be more effective to elicit greater agonist repetition enhancement and muscle activation.

  6. An agonist–antagonist cerebellar nuclear system controlling eyelid kinematics during motor learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raudel eSánchez-Campusano

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The presence of two antagonistic groups of deep cerebellar nuclei neurons has been reported as necessary for a proper dynamic control of learned motor responses. Most models of cerebellar function seem to ignore the biomechanical need for a double activation–deactivation system controlling eyelid kinematics, since most of them accept that, for closing the eyelid, only the activation of the orbicularis oculi muscle (via the red nucleus to the facial motor nucleus is necessary, without a simultaneous deactivation of levator palpebrae motoneurons (via unknown pathways projecting to the perioculomotor area. We have analyzed the kinetic neural commands of two antagonistic types of cerebellar posterior interpositus neuron (types A and B, the electromyographic activity of the orbicularis oculi muscle, and eyelid kinematic variables in alert behaving cats during classical eyeblink conditioning, using a delay paradigm. We addressed the hypothesis that the interpositus nucleus can be considered an agonist–antagonist system controlling eyelid kinematics during motor learning. To carry out a comparative study of the kinetic–kinematic relationships, we applied timing and dispersion pattern analyses. We concluded that, in accordance with a dominant role of cerebellar circuits for the facilitation of flexor responses, type A neurons fire during active eyelid downward displacements ─ i.e., during the active contraction of the orbicularis oculi muscle. In contrast, type B neurons present a high tonic rate when the eyelids are wide open, and stop firing during any active downward displacement of the upper eyelid. From a functional point of view, it could be suggested that type B neurons play a facilitative role for the antagonistic action of the levator palpebrae muscle. From an anatomical point of view, the possibility that cerebellar nuclear type B neurons project to the perioculomotor area ─ i.e., more or less directly onto levator palpebrae

  7. Classification of 5-HT1A receptor agonists and antagonists using GA-SVM method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-lian ZHU; Hai-yan CAI; Zhi-jian XU; Yong WANG; He-yao WANG; Ao ZHANG; Wei-liang ZHU

    2011-01-01

    Aim:To construct a reliable computational model for the classification of agonists and antagonists of 5-HT1A receptor.Methods:Support vector machine (SVM),a well-known machine learning method,was employed to build a prediction model,and genetic algorithm (GA) was used to select the most relevant descriptors and to optimize two important parameters,C and r of the SVM model.The overall dataset used in this study comprised 284 ligands of the 5-HT1A receptor with diverse structures reported in the literatures.Results:A SVM model was successfully developed that could be used to predict the probability of a ligand being an agonist or antagonist of the 5-HT1A receptor.The predictive accuracy for training and test sets was 0.942 and 0.865,respectively.For compounds with probability estimate higher than 0.7,the predictive accuracy of the model for training and test sets was 0.954 and 0.927,respectively.To further validate our model,the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was plotted,and the Area-Under-the-ROC-Curve (AUC) value was calculated to be 0.883 for training set and 0.906 for test set.Conclusion:A reliable SVM model was successfully developed that could effectively distinguish agonists and antagonists among the ligands of the 5-HT1A receptor.To our knowledge,this is the first effort for the classification of 5-HT1A receptor agonists and antagonists based on a diverse dataset.This method may be used to classify the ligands of other members of the GPCR family.

  8. Schild (apparent pA2) analysis of a kappa-opioid antagonist in Planaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffa, Robert B; Baron, David A; Tallarida, Ronald J

    2006-07-01

    Previous investigators have provided radioimmunological and immunocytochemical evidence for an enkephalinergic (opioid) system in Planaria and described naloxone-sensitive qualitative behavioral responses to kappa-opioid receptor agonists. We report the application of Schild-analysis to the antagonism of a selective kappa agonist (U-50,488H) by a selective kappa antagonist (nor-BNI) in a quantitative in vivo endpoint. The results provide further evidence of a kappa-opioid-like receptor in planarians.

  9. Serotonin receptor antagonists discriminate between PKA- and PKC-mediated plasticity in aplysia sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitriu, Bogdan; Cohen, Jonathan E; Wan, Qin; Negroiu, Andreea M; Abrams, Thomas W

    2006-04-01

    Highly selective serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) receptor antagonists developed for mammals are ineffective in Aplysia due to the evolutionary divergence of neurotransmitter receptors and because the higher ionic strength of physiological saline for marine invertebrates reduces antagonist affinity. It has therefore been difficult to identify antagonists that specifically block individual signaling cascades initiated by 5-HT. We studied two broad-spectrum 5-HT receptor antagonists that have been characterized biochemically in Aplysia CNS: methiothepin and spiperone. Methiothepin is highly effective in inhibiting adenylyl cyclase (AC)-coupled 5-HT receptors in Aplysia. Spiperone, which blocks phospholipase C (PLC)-coupled 5-HT receptors in mammals, does not block AC-coupled 5-HT receptors in Aplysia. In electrophysiological studies, we explored whether methiothepin and spiperone can be used in parallel to distinguish between the AC-cAMP and PLC-protein kinase C (PKC) modulatory cascades that are initiated by 5-HT. 5-HT-induced broadening of the sensory neuron action potential in the presence of tetraethylammonium/nifedipine, which is mediated by modulation of the S-K+ currents, was used an assay for the AC-cAMP cascade. Spike broadening initiated by 5 microM 5-HT was unaffected by 100 microM spiperone, whereas it was effectively blocked by 100 microM methiothepin. Facilitation of highly depressed sensory neuron-to-motor neuron synapses by 5-HT was used as an assay for the PLC-PKC cascade. Spiperone completely blocked facilitation of highly depressed synapses by 5 microM 5-HT. In contrast, methiothepin produced a modest, nonsignificant, reduction in the facilitation of depressed synapses. Interestingly, these experiments revealed that the PLC-PKC cascade undergoes desensitization during exposure to 5-HT.

  10. Opioid receptor antagonists increase [Ca2+]i in rat arterial smooth muscle cells in hemorrhagic shock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li KAI; Zhong-feng WANG; Yu-liang SHI; Liang-ming LIU; De-yao HU

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To examine the effects of opioid receptor antagonists and norepinephrine on intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in mesenteric arterial (MA) smooth muscle cells (SMC) isolated from normal and hemorrhagic shocked rats in the vascular hyporesponse stage. METHODS: The rat model of hemorrhagic shock was made by withdrawing blood to decrease the artery mean blood pressure to 3.73-4.26 kPa and keeping at the level for 3 h.[Ca2+]i of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) were detected by the laser scan confocal microscopy. RESULTS:In the hyporesponse VMSC of rats in hemorrhagic shock, selective δ-, κ-, and μ-opioid receptor antagonists (naltrindole, nor-binaltorphimine, and β-funaltrexamine, 100 nmol/L) as well as norepinephrine 5 μmol/L significantly increased [Ca2+]i by 47 %±13 %, 37 %±14 %, 33 %±10 %, and 54 %±17 %, respectively, although their effects were lower than those in the normal rat cells (the increased values were 148 %±54 %, 130 %±44 %, 63 %±17 %and 110 %±38 %, respectively); and the norepinephrine-induced increase in [Ca2+]i was further augmented by three δ-, κ-, and μ-opioid receptor antagonists (50 nmol/L, respectively) application (from 52 %± 16 % to 99 %±29 %,146 %±54 % and 137 %±47 %, respectively). CONCLUSION: The disorder of [Ca2+]i regulation induced by hemorrhagic shock was mediated by opioid receptor and α-adrenoceptor, which may be partly responsible for the vascular hyporesponse, and the opioid receptor antagonists improved the response of resistance arteries to vascular stimulants in decompensatory stage of hemorrhagic shock.

  11. Inter-genomic sexual conflict drives antagonistic coevolution in harvester ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Michael; Cahan, Sara Helms

    2014-12-22

    The reproductive interests of males and females are not always aligned, leading to sexual conflict over parental investment, rate of reproduction and mate choice. Traits that increase the genetic interests of one sex often occur at the expense of the other, selecting for counter-adaptations leading to antagonistic coevolution. Reproductive conflict is not limited to intraspecific interactions; interspecific hybridization can produce pronounced sexual conflict between males and females of different species, but it is unclear whether such conflict can drive sexually antagonistic coevolution between reproductively isolated genomes. We tested for hybridization-driven sexually antagonistic adaptations in queens and males of the socially hybridogenetic 'J' lineages of Pogonomyrmex harvester ants, whose mating system promotes hybridization in queens but selects against it in males. We conducted no-choice mating assays to compare patterns of mating behaviour and sperm transfer between inter- and intra-lineage pairings. There was no evidence for mate discrimination on the basis of pair type, and the total quantity of sperm transferred did not differ between intra- and inter-lineage pairs; however, further dissection of the sperm transfer process into distinct mechanistic components revealed significant, and opposing, cryptic manipulation of copulatory investment by both sexes. Males of both lineages increased their rate of sperm transfer to high-fitness intra-lineage mates, with a stronger response in the rarer lineage for whom mating mistakes are the most likely. By contrast, the total duration of copulation for intra-lineage mating pairs was significantly shorter than for inter-lineage crosses, suggesting that queens respond to prevent excessive sperm loading by prematurely terminating copulation. These findings demonstrate that sexual conflict can lead to antagonistic coevolution in both intra-genomic and inter-genomic contexts. Indeed, the resolution of sexual conflict

  12. Antagonist profile of ibodutant at the tachykinin NK2 receptor in guinea pig isolated bronchi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santicioli, Paolo; Meini, Stefania; Giuliani, Sandro; Lecci, Alessandro; Maggi, Carlo Alberto

    2013-10-24

    In this study we have characterized the pharmacological profile of the non-peptide tachykinin NK2 receptor antagonist ibodutant (MEN15596) in guinea pig isolated main bronchi contractility. The antagonist potency of ibodutant was evaluated using the selective NK2 receptor agonist [βAla(8)]NKA(4-10)-mediated contractions of guinea pig isolated main bronchi. In this assay ibodutant (30, 100 and 300nM) induced a concentration-dependent rightward shift of the [βAla(8)]NKA(4-10) concentration-response curves without affecting the maximal contractile effect. The analysis of the results yielded a Schild-plot linear regression with a slope not different from unity (0.95, 95% c.l. 0.65-1.25), thus indicating a surmountable behaviour. The calculated apparent antagonist potency as pKB value was 8.31±0.05. Ibodutant (0.3-100nM), produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of the nonadrenergic-noncholinergic (NANC) contractile response induced by electrical field stimulation (EFS) of intrinsic airway nerves in guinea pig isolated main bronchi. At the highest concentration tested (100nM) ibodutant almost abolished the EFS-induced bronchoconstriction (95±4% inhibition), the calculated IC50 value was 2.98nM (95% c.l. 1.73-5.16nM). In bronchi from ovalbumin (OVA) sensitized guinea pigs ibodutant (100nM) did not affect the maximal contractile response to OVA, but completely prevented the slowing in the fading of the motor response induced by phosphoramidon pretreatment linked to the endogenous neurokinin A release. Altogether, the present study demonstrate that ibodutant is a potent NK2 receptor antagonist in guinea pig airways.

  13. Development of screening assays to test novel integrin antagonists in allergic inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Spartà, Antonino Maria

    2009-01-01

    Aim of the research: to develop a prototype of homogeneous high-throughput screening (HTS) for identification of novel integrin antagonists for the treatment of ocular allergy and to better understand the mechanisms of action of integrin-mediated levocabastine antiallergic action. Results: This thesis provides evidence that adopting scintillation proximity assay (SPA) levocabastine (IC50=406 mM), but not the first-generation antihistamine chlorpheniramine, displaces [125I]fibronectin (F...

  14. Vaninolol: a new selective beta 1-adrenoceptor antagonist derived from vanillin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, B N; Hwang, T L; Liao, C F; Chen, I J

    1994-07-05

    The beta-adrenoceptor blocking properties of vaninolol ((+/-)4-[4'-(2-hydroxy-3-tert-butyl-aminopropoxy)-3'-methoxyphenyl]- 3-buten-2-one), derived from vanillin, were first investigated under in vivo and in vitro conditions. Vaninolol (0.1, 0.5, 1.0 mg/kg, i.v.), as well as propranolol, produced a dose-dependent bradycardia response and a sustained pressor action in urethane-anesthetized normotensive rats. Vaninolol inhibited the tachycardia effects induced by (-)isoproterenol, but had no blocking effect on the arterial pressor responses induced by phenylephrine. These findings suggested that vaninolol possessed beta-adrenergic blocking activity, but was without alpha-adrenergic blocking activity. In isolated guinea-pig tissues, vaninolol antagonized (-)isoproterenol-induced positive inotropic and chronotropic effects of the atria and tracheal relaxation responses in a concentration-dependent manner. The parallel shift to the right of the concentration-response curve of (-)isoproterenol suggested that vaninolol was a beta-adrenoceptor competitive antagonist. The effect of vaninolol was more potent on the atria than on tracheal tissues, indicating it had some beta 1-adrenoceptor selectivity. On the other hand, the order of the hydrophilicity was atenolol > vaninolol > propranolol. In addition, vaninolol had a mild direct cardiac depression at high concentrations and was without intrinsic sympathomimetic activity (ISA). Furthermore, binding characteristics of vaninolol and other beta-adrenoceptor antagonists were evaluated in [3H]dihydroalprenolol binding to guinea-pig ventricular membranes. The order of potency of beta-adrenoceptor antagonists in competing for the binding sites was (-)propranolol > vaninolol > or = atenolol. In conclusion, vaninolol was found to be a selective beta 1-adrenoceptor antagonist with relatively low lipophilicity in comparison with propranolol, devoid of ISA, and had a mild myocardial depressant effect.

  15. Potent heteroarylpiperidine and carboxyphenylpiperidine 1-alkyl-cyclopentane carboxamide CCR2 antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasternak, Alexander; Goble, Stephen D; Vicario, Pasquale P; Di Salvo, Jerry; Ayala, Julia M; Struthers, Mary; DeMartino, Julie A; Mills, Sander G; Yang, Lihu

    2008-02-01

    This report describes replacement of the 4-(4-fluorophenyl)piperidine moiety in our CCR2 antagonists with 4-heteroaryl piperidine and 4-(carboxyphenyl)-piperidine subunits. Some of the resulting analogs retained potency in our CCR2 binding assay and had improved selectivity versus the I(Kr) channel; poor selectivity against I(Kr) had been a liability of earlier analogs in this series.

  16. Partial Agonist and Antagonist Activities of a Mutant Scorpion β-Toxin on Sodium Channels*

    OpenAIRE

    Karbat, Izhar; Ilan, Nitza; Zhang, Joel Z.; Cohen, Lior; Kahn, Roy; Benveniste, Morris; Scheuer, Todd; Catterall, William A.; Gordon, Dalia; Gurevitz, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Scorpion β-toxin 4 from Centruroides suffusus suffusus (Css4) enhances the activation of voltage-gated sodium channels through a voltage sensor trapping mechanism by binding the activated state of the voltage sensor in domain II and stabilizing it in its activated conformation. Here we describe the antagonist and partial agonist properties of a mutant derivative of this toxin. Substitution of seven different amino acid residues for Glu15 in Css4 yielded toxin derivatives with both increased a...

  17. Adenosine receptor antagonists alter the stability of human epileptic GABAA receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseti, Cristina; Martinello, Katiuscia; Fucile, Sergio; Piccari, Vanessa; Mascia, Addolorata; Di Gennaro, Giancarlo; Quarato, Pier Paolo; Manfredi, Mario; Esposito, Vincenzo; Cantore, Gianpaolo; Arcella, Antonella; Simonato, Michele; Fredholm, Bertil B.; Limatola, Cristina; Miledi, Ricardo; Eusebi, Fabrizio

    2008-01-01

    We examined how the endogenous anticonvulsant adenosine might influence γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor stability and which adenosine receptors (ARs) were involved. Upon repetitive activation (GABA 500 μM), GABAA receptors, microtransplanted into Xenopus oocytes from neurosurgically resected epileptic human nervous tissues, exhibited an obvious GABAA-current (IGABA) run-down, which was consistently and significantly reduced by treatment with the nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist CGS15943 (100 nM) or with adenosine deaminase (ADA) (1 units/ml), that inactivates adenosine. It was also found that selective antagonists of A2B (MRS1706, 10 nM) or A3 (MRS1334, 30 nM) receptors reduced IGABA run-down, whereas treatment with the specific A1 receptor antagonist DPCPX (10 nM) was ineffective. The selective A2A receptor antagonist SCH58261 (10 nM) reduced or potentiated IGABA run-down in ≈40% and ≈20% of tested oocytes, respectively. The ADA-resistant, AR agonist 2-chloroadenosine (2-CA) (10 μM) potentiated IGABA run-down but only in ≈20% of tested oocytes. CGS15943 administration again decreased IGABA run-down in patch-clamped neurons from either human or rat neocortex slices. IGABA run-down in pyramidal neurons was equivalent in A1 receptor-deficient and wt neurons but much larger in neurons from A2A receptor-deficient mice, indicating that, in mouse cortex, GABAA-receptor stability is tonically influenced by A2A but not by A1 receptors. IGABA run-down from wt mice was not affected by 2-CA, suggesting maximal ARs activity by endogenous adenosine. Our findings strongly suggest that cortical A2–A3 receptors alter the stability of GABAA receptors, which could offer therapeutic opportunities. PMID:18809912

  18. A novel series of glucagon receptor antagonists with reduced molecular weight and lipophilicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipski, Kevin J; Bian, Jianwei; Ebner, David C; Lee, Esther C Y; Li, Jian-Cheng; Sammons, Matthew F; Wright, Stephen W; Stevens, Benjamin D; Didiuk, Mary T; Tu, Meihua; Perreault, Christian; Brown, Janice; Atkinson, Karen; Tan, Beijing; Salatto, Christopher T; Litchfield, John; Pfefferkorn, Jeffrey A; Guzman-Perez, Angel

    2012-01-01

    A novel series of glucagon receptor antagonists has been discovered. These pyrazole ethers and aminopyrazoles have lower molecular weight and increased polarity such that the molecules fall into better drug-like property space. This work has culminated in compounds 44 and 50 that were shown to have good pharmacokinetic attributes in dog, in contrast to rats, in which clearance was high; and compound 49, which demonstrated a dose-dependent reduction in glucose excursion in a rat glucagon challenge experiment.

  19. Nicalin and its binding partner Nomo are novel Nodal signaling antagonists

    OpenAIRE

    Haffner, Christof; Frauli, Mélanie; Topp, Stephanie; Irmler, Martin; Hofmann, Kay; Regula, Jörg T.; Bally-Cuif, Laure; Haass, Christian

    2004-01-01

    Nodals are signaling factors of the transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) superfamily with a key role in vertebrate development. They control a variety of cell fate decisions required for the establishment of the embryonic body plan. We have identified two highly conserved transmembrane proteins, Nicalin and Nomo (Nodal modulator, previously known as pM5), as novel antagonists of Nodal signaling. Nicalin is distantly related to Nicastrin, a component of the Alzheimer's disease-associated γ-secr...

  20. Relaxant effect of the H2-receptor antagonist oxmetidine on guinea-pig and human airways.

    OpenAIRE

    Advenier, C; Gnassounou, J. P.; Scarpignato, C.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of three different H2-receptor antagonists (cimetidine, ranitidine and oxmetidine) were tested on isolated preparations of guinea-pig trachea and human bronchus against contractions induced by acetylcholine, histamine and potassium chloride (KCl). In addition, their influence on calcium concentration-response curves in guinea-pig tracheal spirals was examined in a potassium-rich solution (30 mM). Finally, their effects were studied in vivo against acetylcholine and histamine-induc...

  1. Downstream Regulatory Element Antagonist Modulator (DREAM), a target for anti-thrombotic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jaehyung

    2017-03-01

    Circulating platelets participate in the process of numerous diseases including thrombosis, inflammation, and cancer. Thus, it is of great importance to understand the underlying mechanisms mediating platelet activation under disease conditions. Emerging evidence indicates that despite the lack of a nucleus, platelets possess molecules that are involved in gene transcription in nucleated cells. This review will summarize downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM), a transcriptional repressor, and highlight recent findings suggesting its novel non-transcriptional role in hemostasis and thrombosis.

  2. Synthesis and antitumor activity of nitric oxide releasing derivatives of AT1 antagonist

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Chun Zhang; Jin Pei Zhou; Xiao Ming Wu; Wei Hong Pan

    2009-01-01

    A series of novel nitric oxide-donating derivatives (7a-e, 8a-e) were synthesized by coupling furoxan and nitric oxide with irbesartan analogue and their cytotoxicity against BEL7402 cells in vitro were evaluated by MTI" method. It was found that 8c exhibits the most cytotoxic activities with IC.so value of 12.5 umol/L. The hybrids of ATI antagonist and nitric oxide donor appear to have beneficial effects on antitumor.

  3. Gingival hyperplasia in renal allograft recipients receiving cyclosporin-A and calcium antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, G N; Fullinfaw, R; Higgins, T J; Walker, R G; Francis, D M; Wiesenfeld, D

    1993-04-01

    Although it is established that the immunosuppressant cyclosporin-A (CsA) and calcium antagonists [Nifedipine (Nif) and Diltiazem (Dz)] can independently induce gingival enlargement, little has been documented on the significance of the salivary CsA levels and the combined effect of CsA and a calcium antagonist upon gingival tissues. In the present cross-sectional investigation, clinical periodontal parameters and the pharmacologic profiles of CsA, Nif, and Dz were determined for 66 renal transplant recipients. Subjects were divided into the following groups: Group (Gp) 1: CsA [n = 18]; Gp 2: CsA + Nif [n = 15]; Gp 3: CsA + Dz [n = 12] and a negative Control Gp 4: azathioprine [n = 21]. A gingival enlargement score was assessed for each patient from study models using a hyperplastic index (HI). Pharmacologic profiles included CsA whole blood and whole saliva levels as measured by fluorescence polarization immunoassay. The HI scores between Gp 1, 2 and 3 were not significantly different. However, when compared with controls (Gp 4), there was a significant difference in HI and all individual groups (Gp 1, 2, 3) (p < 0.05). Gingival hyperplasia was only weakly related to plaque and calculus but was unrelated to CsA dose (mg/kg/day), duration of CsA therapy (months), CsA blood or saliva levels (ng/ml), or the concurrent administration of a Nif or Dz. Gingival enlargement was found to occur in 49% of subjects who were either on CsA or CsA and a calcium antagonist. It is concluded that CsA alone or in combination with a calcium antagonist caused a significant increase in gingival enlargement compared with controls.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Structure of the BTB domain of Keap1 and its interaction with the triterpenoid antagonist CDDO.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Cleasby

    Full Text Available The protein Keap1 is central to the regulation of the Nrf2-mediated cytoprotective response, and is increasingly recognized as an important target for therapeutic intervention in a range of diseases involving excessive oxidative stress and inflammation. The BTB domain of Keap1 plays key roles in sensing environmental electrophiles and in mediating interactions with the Cul3/Rbx1 E3 ubiquitin ligase system, and is believed to be the target for several small molecule covalent activators of the Nrf2 pathway. However, despite structural information being available for several BTB domains from related proteins, there have been no reported crystal structures of Keap1 BTB, and this has precluded a detailed understanding of its mechanism of action and interaction with antagonists. We report here the first structure of the BTB domain of Keap1, which is thought to contain the key cysteine residue responsible for interaction with electrophiles, as well as structures of the covalent complex with the antagonist CDDO/bardoxolone, and of the constitutively inactive C151W BTB mutant. In addition to providing the first structural confirmation of antagonist binding to Keap1 BTB, we also present biochemical evidence that adduction of Cys 151 by CDDO is capable of inhibiting the binding of Cul3 to Keap1, and discuss how this class of compound might exert Nrf2 activation through disruption of the BTB-Cul3 interface.

  5. Stress tolerance and biocontrol performance of the yeast antagonist, Candida diversa, change with morphology transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangkun; Chi, Mengshan; Chen, Huizhen; Sui, Yuan; Li, Yan; Liu, Yongsheng; Zhang, Xiaojing; Sun, Zhiqiang; Liu, Guoqing; Wang, Qi; Liu, Jia

    2016-02-01

    As an eco-friendly management method, biological control of postharvest diseases, utilizing antagonistic yeasts, is a research topic receiving considerable attention. Detailed knowledge on the biology of yeast antagonists is crucial when considering their potential application and development as biocontrol products. Changes in the growth form, such as single-cell to pseudohyphae, have been associated with the mode of action in postharvest biocontrol yeasts. In this study, the antagonistic yeast, Candida diversa, reversibly shifted from a single-cell morphology on yeast peptone dextrose (YPD) medium with 2 % agar to a pseudohyphal morphology on YPD with 0.3 % agar. The tolerance of the pseudohyphal form to heat and oxidative stresses, as well as the biocontrol efficacy against Botrytis cinerea on apple and kiwifruit stored at 25 and 4 °C, was significantly higher as compared to the single-cell form. This study provides new information on the ability of C. diversa to change its morphology and the impact of the morphology shift on stress tolerance and biocontrol performance.

  6. Procognitive properties of drugs with single and multitargeting H3 receptor antagonist activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolic, Katarina; Filipic, Slavica; Agbaba, Danica; Stark, Holger

    2014-07-01

    The histamine H3 receptor (H3 R) is an important modulator of numerous central control mechanisms. Novel lead optimizations for H3 R antagonists/inverse agonists involved studies of structure-activity relationships, cross-affinities, and pharmacokinetic properties of promising ligands. Blockade of inhibitory histamine H3 autoreceptors reinforces histaminergic transmission, while antagonism of H3 heteroreceptors accelerates the corticolimbic liberation of acetylcholine, norepinephrine, glutamate, dopamine, serotonin and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). The H3 R positioned at numerous neurotransmission crossroads indicates therapeutic applications of small-molecule H3 R modulators in a number of psychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases with various clinical candidates available. Dual target drugs displaying H3 R antagonism/inverse agonism with inhibition of acetylcholine esterase (AChE), histamine N-methyltransferase (HMT), or serotonin transporter (SERT) are novel class of procognitive agents. Main chemical diversities, pharmacophores, and pharmacological profiles of procognitive agents acting as H3 R antagonists/inverse agonists and dual H3 R antagonists/inverse agonists with inhibiting activity on AChE, HMT, or SERT are highlighted here.

  7. Antagonistic activity of Lactobacillus acidophilus LA10 against Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis SE86 in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane Scapin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is one of the main pathogens responsible for foodborne illness in Brazil. Probiotic bacteria can play a role in defense and recovery from enteropathogenic -infections. In this study, the ability of Lactobacillus acidophilus LA10 to colonise and exert anta-gonistic effects in the gastrointestinal tract was tested before and during experimental infection in conventional mice contaminated with S. Enteritidis (SE86. A dose of 0.1 mL containing 10(8 viable cells of SE86 and L. acidophilus LA10 was orally administered by gavage to mice. The experiment was divided into groups. As a negative control, Group 1 was administered only sterile saline solution. As a positive control, Group 2 was administered only SE86. Group 3 was first administered SE86, and after 10 days, treated with L. acidophilus LA10. Group 4 was first administered L. acidophilus LA10,and after 10 days, challenged with SE86.The results demonstrated that a significant number of SE86 cells were able to colonize the gastrointestinal tract of mice, specifically in the colon and ileum. L. acidophilus LA10 demonstrated an antagonistic effect against SE86, with better results observed for Group 3 over Group 4. Thus, L. acidophilus LA10 shows potential antagonistic effects against S. Enteritidis SE86, especially if administered after infection.

  8. The discovery of novel human androgen receptor antagonist chemotypes using a combined pharmacophore screening procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voet, Arnout; Helsen, Christine; Zhang, Kam Y J; Claessens, Frank

    2013-04-01

    Unraveling the mechanisms involved in castration- and therapy-resistant prostate cancer has led to a renewed interest in androgen receptor (AR)-targeted therapeutics. Anti-androgens that block the activity of the AR therefore remain a valid therapeutic option. However, they must be more effective than, or display a distinct mechanism of action or binding mode from those of bicalutamide and hydroxyflutamide, which are currently in clinical use. For that reason, the second-generation anti-androgen MDV3100 was developed. MDV3100, however, shares its 4-cyano-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl group with bicalutamide and hydroxyflutamide required for binding to the AR. In this work, we used a combined strategy to find new antagonist structures distinct from the 4-cyano-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl group to avoid cross-resistance for these compounds and to find structures without agonist activity on mutant ARs (AR W741C and AR T877A). We found two novel chemotypes with AR-antagonistic activity (IC(50): 3-6 μM) by virtual screening and confirmed their biological activity in an androgen-responsive reporter assay. The design of our computational approach was validated by the observation of strongly decreased or absence of agonistic activity on the two mutant ARs. Further structural derivatization to optimize the potency of these compounds can render these chemotypes into very promising, alternative AR antagonists for prostate cancer therapy.

  9. Interfering with Resistance to Smoothened Antagonists by Inhibition of the PI3K Pathway in Medulloblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonamici, Silvia; Williams, Juliet; Morrissey, Michael; Wang, Anlai; Guo, Ribo; Vattay, Anthony; Hsiao, Kathy; Yuan, Jing; Green, John; Ospina, Beatrice; Yu, Qunyan; Ostrom, Lance; Fordjour, Paul; Anderson, Dustin L.; Monahan, John E.; Kelleher, Joseph F.; Peukert, Stefan; Pan, Shifeng; Wu, Xu; Maira, Sauveur-Michel; Garcia-Echeverria, Carlos; Briggs, Kimberly J.; Watkins, D. Neil; Yao, Yung-mae; Lengauer, Christoph; Warmuth, Markus; Sellers, William R.; Dorsch, Marion

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in Hedgehog (Hh) pathway genes, leading to constitutive activation of Smoothened (Smo), occur in medulloblastoma. Antagonists of Smo induce tumor regression in mouse models of medulloblastoma and hold great promise for treating this disease. However, acquired resistance has emerged as a challenge to targeted therapeutics and may limit their anti-cancer efficacy. Here, we describe novel mechanisms of acquired resistance to Smo antagonists in medulloblastoma. NVP-LDE225, a potent and selective Smo antagonist, inhibits Hh signaling and induces tumor regressions in allograft models of medulloblastoma that are driven by mutations of Patched (Ptch), a tumor suppressor in the Hh pathway. However, evidence of resistance was observed during the course of treatment. Molecular analysis of resistant tumors revealed distinct resistance mechanisms. Chromosomal amplification of Gli2, a downstream effector of Hh signaling, or more rarely point mutations in Smo led to reactivated Hh signaling and restored tumor growth. Unexpectedly, analysis of pathway gene-expression signatures selectively deregulated in resistant tumors identified increased phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling as another potential resistance mechanism. Probing the functional relevance of increased PI3K signaling, we demonstrated that the combination of NVP-LDE225 with the PI3K class I inhibitor NVP-BKM120 or the dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor NVP-BEZ235 markedly delayed the development of resistance. Our findings have important clinical implications for future treatment strategies in medulloblastoma. PMID:20881279

  10. Extended N-Arylsulfonylindoles as 5-HT6 Receptor Antagonists: Design, Synthesis & Biological Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Vera

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Based on a known pharmacophore model for 5-HT6 receptor antagonists, a series of novel extended derivatives of the N-arylsulfonyindole scaffold were designed and identified as a new class of 5-HT6 receptor modulators. Eight of the compounds exhibited moderate to high binding affinities and displayed antagonist profile in 5-HT6 receptor functional assays. Compounds 2-(4-(2-methoxyphenylpiperazin-1-yl-1-(1-tosyl-1H-indol-3-ylethanol (4b, 1-(1-(4-iodophenylsulfonyl-1H-indol-3-yl-2-(4-(2-methoxyphenylpiperazin-1-ylethanol (4g and 2-(4-(2-methoxyphenylpiperazin-1-yl-1-(1-(naphthalen-1-ylsulfonyl-1H-indol-3-ylethanol (4j showed the best binding affinity (4b pKi = 7.87; 4g pKi = 7.73; 4j pKi = 7.83. Additionally, compound 4j was identified as a highly potent antagonist (IC50 = 32 nM in calcium mobilisation functional assay.

  11. Rodent antinociception following acute treatment with different histamine receptor agonists and antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzin, Davood; Asghari, Ladan; Nowrouzi, Mahvash

    2002-06-01

    The effects of different histamine receptor agonists and antagonists on the nociceptive threshold were investigated in mice by two different kinds of noxious stimuli: thermal (hot plate) and chemical (acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing). Intracerebroventricular (icv) injection of the histamine H(1) receptor agonist, HTMT (6-[2-(4-imidazolyl)ethylamino]-N-(4-trifluoromethylphenyl) heptanecarboxamide) (50 microg/mouse), produced a hypernociception in the hot plate and writhing tests. Conversely, intraperitoneal (ip) injection of dexchlorpheniramine (30 and 40 mg/kg) and diphenhydramine (20 and 40 mg/kg) increased the pain threshold in both tests. The histamine H(2) receptor agonist, dimaprit (50 and 100 microg/mouse icv), or antagonist, ranitidine (50 and 100 microg/mouse icv), raised the pain threshold in both hot plate and writhing tests. In the mouse hot plate test, the histamine H(3) receptor agonist, imetit (50 mg/kg ip), reduced the pain threshold, while the histamine H(3) receptor antagonist, thioperamide (10 and 20 mg/kg ip), produced an antinociception. The hypernociceptive effects of HTMT and imetit were antagonized by dexchlorpheniramine (20 mg/kg ip) and thioperamide (5 mg/kg ip), respectively. The results suggest that histaminergic mechanisms may be involved in the modulation of nociceptive stimuli.

  12. Diversity and Antagonistic Activity of Actinomycete Strains From Myristica Swamp Soils Against Human Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varghese Rlnoy

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Under the present investigation Actinomycetes were isolated from the soils of Myristica swamps of southern Western Ghats and the antagonistic activity against different human bacterial pathogens was evaluated. Results of the present study revealed that Actinomycetes population in the soils of Myristica swamp was spatially and seasonally varied. Actinomycetes load was varied from 24×104 to 71×103, from 129×103 to 40×103 and from 31×104 to 84×103 in post monsoon, monsoon and pre monsoon respectively. A total of 23 Actinomycetes strains belonging to six genera were isolated from swamp soils. Identification of the isolates showed that most of the isolates belonged to the genus Streptomyces (11, followed by Nocardia (6, Micromonospora (3, Pseudonocardia (1, Streptosporangium (1, and Nocardiopsis (1. Antagonistic studies revealed that 91.3% of Actinomycete isolates were active against one or more tested pathogens, of that 56.52% exhibited activity against Gram negative and 86.95% showed activity against Gram positive bacteria. 39.13% isolates were active against all the bacterial pathogens selected and its inhibition zone diameter was also high. 69.5% of Actinomycetes were exhibited antibacterial activity against Listeria followed by Bacillus cereus (65.21%, Staphylococcus (60.86%, Vibrio cholera (52.17%, Salmonella (52.17% and E. coli (39.13%. The results indicate that the Myristica swamp soils of Southern Western Ghats might be a remarkable reserve of Actinomycetes with potential antagonistic activity.

  13. The 5-HT2A receptor antagonist M100907 produces antiparkinsonian effects and decreases striatal glutamate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Twum eAnsah

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available 5-HT plays a regulatory role in voluntary movements of the basal ganglia and have a major impact on disorders of the basal ganglia such as Parkinson’s disease (PD. Clinical studies have suggested that 5-HT2 receptor antagonists may be useful in the treatment of the motor symptoms of PD. We hypothesized that 5-HT2A receptor antagonists may restore motor function by regulating glutamatergic activity in the striatum. Mice treated with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP exhibited decreased performance on the beam-walking apparatus. Peripheral administration of the 5-HT2A receptor antagonist M100907 improved performance of MPTP-treated mice on the beam-walking apparatus. In vivo microdialysis revealed an increase in striatal extracellular glutamate in MPTP-treated mice and local perfusion of M100907 into the dorsal striatum significantly decreased extracellular glutamate levels in saline and MPTP-treated mice. Our studies suggest that blockade of 5-HT2A receptors may represent a novel therapeutic target for the motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease.

  14. Dopamine D3 receptor antagonists as potential therapeutics for the treatment of neurological diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuele Maramai

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available D3 receptors represent a major focus of current drug design and development of therapeutics for dopamine-related pathological states. Their close homology with the D2 receptor subtype makes the development of D3 selective antagonists a challenging task. In this review, we explore the relevance and therapeutic utility of D3 antagonists or partial agonists endowed with multireceptor affinity profile in the field of central nervous system disorders such as schizophrenia and drug abuse. In fact, the peculiar distribution and low brain abundance of D3 receptors make them a valuable target for the development of drugs devoid of motor side effects classically elicited by D2 antagonists. Recent research efforts were devoted to the conception of chemical templates possibly endowed with a multi-target profile, especially with regards to other G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs.A comprehensive overview of the recent literature in the field is herein provided. In particular, the evolution of the chemical templates has been tracked, according to the growing advancements in both the structural information and the refinement of the key pharmacophoric elements.The receptor/multireceptor affinity and functional profiles for the examined compounds has been covered, together with their most significant pharmacological applications.

  15. Alpha-1 adrenergic antagonists in aircrew for the treatment of benign prostatic hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthies, Andrew K; Tachikawa, Nina J

    2013-01-01

    Benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH) affects the majority of men later in life. Other than surgery, finasteride (Proscar) is currently the only pharmacologic option available for U.S. Air Force (USAF) aircrew. This article will evaluate the current literature regarding the treatment of benign prostatic hypertrophy with FDA approved tamsulosin (Flomax) and alfuzosin (Uroxatrol), third-generation alpha-1 adrenergic antagonists. Current literature supports the fact that some third-generation alpha blockers limit the side effects of hypotension when compared to other alpha blockers as a result of the specificity of subtype binding of the receptors and the sustained release formulation. Alpha blockers are currently used almost universally for the treatment of BPH; however, they are currently not approved for USAF aircrew. This article will review the aeromedical implications of the side effects of alpha-1 adrenergic antagonists (alfuzosin, tamsulosin), which affect aircrew while performing aeronautical duties, and examine whether alpha-1 adrenergic antagonists should be acceptable medications in certain situations depending on airframe and aeronautical duties.

  16. FGFR antagonist induces protective autophagy in FGFR1-amplified breast cancer cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi; Xie, Xiaoyan; Li, Xinyi; Wang, Peiqi; Jing, Qian; Yue, Jiaqi; Liu, Yang; Cheng, Zhong; Li, Jingyi; Song, Haixing; Li, Guoyu; Liu, Rui; Wang, Jinhui

    2016-05-20

    Breast cancer, representing approximately 30% of all gynecological cancer cases diagnosed yearly, is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality for women. Amplification of FGFR1 is frequently observed in breast cancers and is associated with poor prognosis. Though FGFRs have long been considered as anti-cancer drug targets, and a cluster of FGFR antagonists are currently under clinical trials, the precise cellular responses under the treatment of FGFR antagonists remains unclear. Here, we show that PD166866, an FGFR1-selective inhibitor, inhibits proliferation and triggers anoikis in FGFR1-amplified breast cancer cell lines. Notably, we demonstrate that PD166866 induces autophagy in FGFR1-amplified breast cancer cell lines, while blockage of autophagy by Atg5 knockdown further enhances the anti-proliferative activities of PD166866. Moreover, mechanistic study reveals that PD166866 induces autophagy through repressing Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. Together, the present study provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the anti-tumor activities of FGFR antagonists, and may further assist the FGFRs-based drug discovery.

  17. A novel synthetic smoothened antagonist transiently inhibits pancreatic adenocarcinoma xenografts in a mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin F Strand

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hedgehog (Hh signaling is over-activated in several solid tumors where it plays a central role in cell growth, stroma recruitment and tumor progression. In the Hh signaling pathway, the Smoothened (SMO receptor comprises a primary drug target with experimental small molecule SMO antagonists currently being evaluated in clinical trials. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using Shh-Light II (Shh-L2 and alkaline phosphatase (AP based screening formats on a "focused diversity" library we identified a novel small molecule inhibitor of the Hh pathway, MS-0022 (2-bromo-N-(4-(8-methylimidazo[1,2-a]pyridin-2-ylphenylbenzamide. MS-0022 showed effective Hh signaling pathway inhibition at the level of SMO in the low nM range, and Hh pathway inhibition downstream of Suppressor of fused (SUFU in the low µM range. MS-0022 reduced growth in the tumor cell lines PANC-1, SUIT-2, PC-3 and FEMX in vitro. MS-0022 treatment led to a transient delay of tumor growth that correlated with a reduction of stromal Gli1 levels in SUIT-2 xenografts in vivo. SIGNIFICANCE: We document the in vitro and in vivo efficacy and bioavailability of a novel small molecule SMO antagonist, MS-0022. Although MS-0022 primarily interferes with Hh signaling at the level of SMO, it also has a downstream inhibitory effect and leads to a stronger reduction of growth in several tumor cell lines when compared to related SMO antagonists.

  18. Antagonist muscle co-activation of limbs in human infant crawling: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Qi L; Wu, Xiao Y; Xiao, Nong; Zeng, Si Y; Wan, Xiao P; Zheng, Xiao L; Hou, Wen S

    2015-01-01

    Muscle Co-activation (MCo) is the simultaneous muscular activation of agonist and antagonist muscle groups, which provides adequate joint stability, movement accuracy during movement. Infant crawling is an important stage of motor function development that manifests non-synchronization growth and development of upper and lower limbs due to the well-known gross motor development principle of head to toe. However, the effect of MCo level for agonist and antagonist muscle groups on motor function development of limbs has not been previously reported. In this paper, sEMG signals were collected from triceps brachii (TB) and biceps brachii (BB), quadriceps femoris (QF) and hamstrings (HS) of limbs when fourteen infants were crawling at their self-selected speed. Antagonist muscle co-activation was evaluated by measuring two common indexes (co-activation index and Pearson's correlation coefficient).A significant difference was observed between upper limbs and lower limbs, but the relationship between MCo and speed of crawling was poor. This study is an opening for further investigation including a longitudinal study and compare against infant with CNS disorders.

  19. Cannabinoid antagonist SLV326 induces convulsive seizures and changes in the interictal EEG in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruin, Natasja; Heijink, Liesbeth; Kruse, Chris; Vinogradova, Lyudmila; Lüttjohann, Annika; van Luijtelaar, Gilles; van Rijn, Clementina M.

    2017-01-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 antagonists have been investigated for possible treatment of e.g. obesity-related disorders. However, clinical application was halted due to their symptoms of anxiety and depression. In addition to these adverse effects, we have shown earlier that chronic treatment with the CB1 antagonist rimonabant may induce EEG-confirmed convulsive seizures. In a regulatory repeat-dose toxicity study violent episodes of “muscle spasms” were observed in Wistar rats, daily dosed with the CB1 receptor antagonist SLV326 during 5 months. The aim of the present follow-up study was to investigate whether these violent movements were of an epileptic origin. In selected SLV326-treated and control animals, EEG and behavior were monitored for 24 hours. 25% of SLV326 treated animals showed 1 to 21 EEG-confirmed generalized convulsive seizures, whereas controls were seizure-free. The behavioral seizures were typical for a limbic origin. Moreover, interictal spikes were found in 38% of treated animals. The frequency spectrum of the interictal EEG of the treated rats showed a lower theta peak frequency, as well as lower gamma power compared to the controls. These frequency changes were state-dependent: they were only found during high locomotor activity. It is concluded that long term blockade of the endogenous cannabinoid system can provoke limbic seizures in otherwise healthy rats. Additionally, SLV326 alters the frequency spectrum of the EEG when rats are highly active, suggesting effects on complex behavior and cognition. PMID:28151935

  20. Antagonistic activity of antibiotic producing Streptomyces sp. against fish and human pathogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazmul Hossain

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, attempts were made to isolate Streptomyces sp. from soil samples of two different regions of Bangladesh and evaluate their antagonistic activity against fish and human pathogenic bacteria. A total of 10 isolates were identified as Streptomyces sp. based on several morphological, physiological and biochemical tests. Cross streak method was used to observe the antagonistic activity of the Streptomyces sp. isolates against different fish pathogens belonging to the genus Aeromonas, Pseudomonas and Edwardsiella and human clinical isolates belonging to the genus Klebsiella, Salmonella and Streptococcus. Seven Streptomyces sp. isolates showed antagonism against both fish and human pathogenic bacteria. Four isolates viz., N24, N26, N28 and N47 showed broad spectrum of antagonistic activity (80-100% against all genera of fish and human pathogenic bacteria. The isolate N49 exhibited highest spectrum of antagonism against all fish pathogens (90-100% but comparatively lower degree of antagonism against human pathogens (50-60%. Rest of the two isolates (N21 and N23 showed variability in their antagonism. Results showed that broad spectrum antibiotic(s could be developed from the isolates N24, N26, N28 and N47against several human and fish pathogens. The isolate N49 could be a potential source of antibiotic, especially for fish pathogenic bacteria.

  1. Altered activation of the antagonist muscle during practice compromises motor learning in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Ting; Kwon, MinHyuk; Fox, Emily J; Christou, Evangelos A

    2014-08-15

    Aging impairs the activation of muscle; however, it remains unclear whether it contributes to deficits in motor learning in older adults. The purpose of this study was to determine whether altered activation of antagonistic muscles in older adults during practice inhibits their ability to transfer a motor task ipsilaterally. Twenty young (25.1 ± 3.9 yr; 10 men, 10 women) and twenty older adults (71.5 ± 4.8 yr; 10 men, 10 women) participated. Half of the subjects practiced 100 trials of a rapid goal-directed task with ankle dorsiflexion and were tested 1 day later with elbow flexion (transfer). The rest did not perform any ankle practice and only performed the task with elbow flexion. The goal-directed task consisted of rapid movement (180 ms) to match a spatiotemporal target. For each limb, we recorded the EMG burst activity of the primary agonist and antagonist muscles. The rate of improvement during task acquisition (practice) was similar for young and older adults (P > 0.3). In contrast, only young adults were able to transfer the task to the upper limb. Specifically, young adults who practiced ankle dorsiflexion exhibited ∼30% (P movement error and ∼60% (P adults who received equal practice and young adults who did not receive any ankle dorsiflexion practice. These results provide novel evidence that the deficient motor learning in older adults may be related to a differential activation of the antagonist muscle, which compromises their ability to acquire the task during practice.

  2. Pharmacology of JB-9315, a new selective histamine H2-receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, B; Montero, M J; Sevilla, M A; San Román, L

    1998-02-01

    1. The histamine H2-receptor antagonistic activity and antisecretory and antiulcer effects of JB-9315 were studied in comparison with the standard H2 blocker ranitidine. 2. In vitro, JB-9315 is a competitive antagonist of histamine H2 receptors in the isolated, spontaneously beating guinea-pig right atrium, with a pA2 value of 7.30 relative to a value of 7.36 for ranitidine. JB-9315 was specific for the histamine H2 receptor because, at high concentration, it did not affect histamine- or acetylcholine-induced contractions in guinea-pig isolated ileum or rat isolated duodenum, respectively. 3. JB-9315 dose dependently inhibited histamine-, pentagastrin- or carbachol-stimulated acid secretion and basal secretion in the perfused stomach preparation of the anesthetized rat. In the pylorus-ligated rat after intraperitoneal administration, total acid output over 4 h was inhibited by JB-9315 with an ID50 of 32.8 mg/kg, confirming its H2-receptor antagonist properties. 4. JB-9315 showed antiulcer activity against cold stress plus indomethacin-induced lesions with an ID50 of 6.8 mg/kg. 5. JB-9315, 50 and 100 mg/kg, inhibited macroscopic gastric hemorrhagic lesions induced by ethanol. In contrast, ranitidine (50 mg/kg) failed to reduce these lesions. 6. These results indicate that JB-9315 is a new antiulcer drug that exerts a cytoprotective effect in addition to its gastric antisecretory activity.

  3. Effects of histamine H(1) receptor antagonists on depressive-like behavior in diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Shoko; Miyata, Shigeo; Onodera, Kenji; Kamei, Junzo

    2006-02-01

    We previously reported that streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice showed depressive-like behavior in the tail suspension test. It is well known that the central histaminergic system regulates many physiological functions including emotional behaviors. In this study, we examined the role of the central histaminergic system in the diabetes-induced depressive-like behavior in the mouse tail suspension test. The histamine contents in the hypothalamus were significantly higher in diabetic mice than in non-diabetic mice. The histamine H(1) receptor antagonist chlorpheniramine (1-10 mg/kg, s.c.) dose-dependently and significantly reduced the duration of immobility in both non-diabetic and diabetic mice. In contrast, the selective histamine H(1) receptor antagonists epinastine (0.03-0.3 microg/mouse, i.c.v.) and cetirizine (0.01-0.1 microg/mouse, i.c.v.) dose-dependently and significantly suppressed the duration of immobility in diabetic mice, but not in non-diabetic mice. Spontaneous locomotor activity was not affected by histamine H(1) receptor antagonists in either non-diabetic or diabetic mice. In addition, the number and affinity of histamine H(1) receptors in the frontal cortex were not affected by diabetes. In conclusion, we suggest that the altered neuronal system mediated by the activation of histamine H(1) receptors is involved, at least in part, in the depressive-like behavior seen in diabetic mice.

  4. Plasma DNA methylation of Wnt antagonists predicts recurrence of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji-Bin Liu; Fu-Lin Qiang; Jing Dong; Jin Cai; Shu-Hui Zhou; Min-Xin Shi; Ke-Ping Chen; Zhi-Bin Hu

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To detect the effects of plasma DNA methylation of Wnt antagonists/inhibitors on recurrence of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC).METHODS: We used methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction to detect hypermethylation of the promoter of four Wnt antagonists/inhibitors (SFRP-1, WIF-1, DKK-3 and RUNX3) using DNA from the plasma of ESCC patients (n = 81) and analyzed the association between promoter hypermethylation of Wnt pathway modulator genes and the two-year recurrence of ESCC.RESULTS: Hypermethylation of SFRP-1, DKK-3 and RUNX-3 was significantly associated with an increased risk of ESCC recurrence (P = 0.001, 0.003 and 0.001 for SFRP-1, DKK-3 and RUNX3, respectively). Patients carrying two to three methylated genes had a significantly elevated risk of recurrence compared with those not carrying methylated genes (odds ratio = 15.69, 95% confidential interval: 2.97-83). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was 77.1 for ESCC recurrence prediction (sensitivity = 66.67 and specificity = 83.3). When combining methylated genes and the clinical stage, the AUC was 83.69, with a sensitivity of 76.19 and a specificity of 83.3.CONCLUSION: The status of promoter hypermethylation of Wnt antagonists/inhibitors in plasma may serve as a non-invasive prognostic biomarker for ESCC.

  5. Extended N-Arylsulfonylindoles as 5-HT₆ Receptor Antagonists: Design, Synthesis & Biological Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, Gonzalo; Lagos, Carlos F; Almendras, Sebastián; Hebel, Dan; Flores, Francisco; Valle-Corvalán, Gissella; Pessoa-Mahana, C David; Mella-Raipán, Jaime; Montecinos, Rodrigo; Recabarren-Gajardo, Gonzalo

    2016-08-16

    Based on a known pharmacophore model for 5-HT₆ receptor antagonists, a series of novel extended derivatives of the N-arylsulfonyindole scaffold were designed and identified as a new class of 5-HT₆ receptor modulators. Eight of the compounds exhibited moderate to high binding affinities and displayed antagonist profile in 5-HT₆ receptor functional assays. Compounds 2-(4-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazin-1-yl)-1-(1-tosyl-1H-indol-3-yl)ethanol (4b), 1-(1-(4-iodophenylsulfonyl)-1H-indol-3-yl)-2-(4-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazin-1-yl)ethanol (4g) and 2-(4-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazin-1-yl)-1-(1-(naphthalen-1-ylsulfonyl)-1H-indol-3-yl)ethanol (4j) showed the best binding affinity (4b pKi = 7.87; 4g pKi = 7.73; 4j pKi = 7.83). Additionally, compound 4j was identified as a highly potent antagonist (IC50 = 32 nM) in calcium mobilisation functional assay.

  6. Antagonist capacity of Newly Isolated Strains of Pseudomonas Fluorescens against Three Important Phytopathogenic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reynaldo D.L. Cruz-Quiroz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Phytopatogenic bacteria cause several damages to plants with important economical consequences. They provoke losses of product quality affecting all commercial chain of crops, for this reason, their control is a priority. Approach: We evaluated antagonist capacity of newly isolated Pseudonomas fluorescens strains against three important phytopatogenic bacteria (Clavibacter michiganensis, Xanthomonas axonopodis and Erwinia carotovora. Soils from commercial cropping of Capsicum annum L of several Mexican regions were used to isolate P. fluorescens strains. Results: Isolates producing flourescein were purified on King B agar and biochemically identified. Crude extracts with and without cells were produced in King B broths and their antagonist capacities were evaluated by the plate diffusion procedure on nutritive agar. Conclusion: Obtained results demonstrated that cell free extracts exhibited a limited antagonist capacity in comparison of those extracts with cells, which showed an excellent capacity to inhibit the growth of C. michiganensis, X. axonopodis and E. carotovora, demonstrating the intracellular nature of the bioactive metabolites associated to bacterial growth inhibition.

  7. Retinoid antagonists inhibit normal patterning during limb regeneration in the axolotl, Ambystoma mexicanum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rincón, Sonia V; Scadding, Steven R

    2002-04-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) has been detected in the regenerating limb of the axolotl, and exogenous RA can proximalize, posteriorize, and ventralize blastemal cells. Thus, RA may be an endogenous regulatory factor during limb regeneration. We have investigated whether endogenous retinoids are essential for patterning during axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) limb regeneration by using retinoid antagonists that bind to specific RAR (retinoic acid receptor) or RXR (retinoid X receptor) retinoid receptor subtypes. Retinoid antagonists (Ro41-5253, Ro61-8431, LE135, and LE540) were administered to regenerating limbs using implanted silastin blocks loaded with each antagonist. The skeletal pattern of regenerated limbs treated with Ro41-5253 or Ro61-8431 differed only slightly from control limbs. Treatment with LE135 inhibited limb regeneration, while treatment with LE540 allowed relatively normal limb regeneration. When LE135 and LE540 were implanted together, regeneration was not completely inhibited and a hand-like process regenerated. These results demonstrate that interfering with retinoid receptors can modify pattern in the regenerating limb indicating that endogenous retinoids are important during patterning of the regenerating limb.

  8. Attenuation of morphine antinociceptive tolerance by cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altun, Ahmet; Yildirim, Kemal; Ozdemir, Ercan; Bagcivan, Ihsan; Gursoy, Sinan; Durmus, Nedim

    2015-09-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptor antagonists may be useful for their potential to increase or prolong opioid analgesia while attenuating the development of opioid tolerance. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of AM251 (a selective CB1 antagonist) and JTE907 (a selective CB2 antagonist) on morphine analgesia and tolerance in rats. Adult male Wistar albino rats weighing 205-225 g were used in these experiments. To constitute morphine tolerance, we used a 3 day cumulative dosing regimen. After the last dose of morphine was injected on day 4, morphine tolerance was evaluated by analgesia tests. The analgesic effects of morphine (5 mg/kg), ACEA (a CB1 receptor agonist, 5 mg/kg), JWH-015 (a CB2 receptor agonist, 5 mg/kg), AM251 (1 mg/kg) and JTE907 (5 mg/kg) were considered at 30-min intervals (0, 30, 60, 90, and 120 min) by tail-flick and hot-plate analgesia tests. Our findings indicate that ACEA and JWH907 significantly increased morphine analgesia and morphine antinociceptive tolerance in the analgesia tests. In contrast, the data suggested that AM251 and JTE907 significantly attenuated the expression of morphine tolerance. In conclusion, we observed that co-injection of AM251 and JTE907 with morphine attenuated expression of tolerance to morphine analgesic effects and decreased the morphine analgesia.

  9. TRPA1 and TRPV1 Antagonists Do Not Inhibit Human Acidosis-Induced Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Matthias G; Namer, Barbara; Reeh, Peter W; Fischer, Michael J M

    2017-01-03

    Acidosis occurs in a variety of pathophysiological and painful conditions where it is thought to excite or contribute to excitation of nociceptive neurons. Despite potential clinical relevance the principal receptor for sensing acidosis is unclear, but several receptors have been proposed. We investigated the contribution of the acid-sensing ion channels, transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) and transient receptor potential ankyrin type 1 (TRPA1) to peripheral pain signaling. We first established a human pain model using intraepidermal injection of the TRPA1 agonist carvacrol. This resulted in concentration-dependent pain sensations, which were reduced by experimental TRPA1 antagonist A-967079. Capsaicin-induced pain was reduced by the TRPV1 inhibitor BCTC. Amiloride was used to block acid-sensing ion channels. Testing these antagonists in a double-blind and randomized experiment, we probed the contribution of the respective channels to experimental acidosis-induced pain in 15 healthy human subjects. A continuous intraepidermal injection of pH 4.3 was used to counter the buffering capacity of tissue and generate a prolonged painful stimulation. In this model, addition of A-967079, BCTC or amiloride did not reduce the reported pain. In conclusion, target-validated antagonists, applied locally in human skin, have excluded the main hypothesized targets and the mechanism of the human acidosis-induced pain remains unclear.

  10. Personalized medicine: theranostics (therapeutics diagnostics) essential for rational use of tumor necrosis factor-alpha antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendtzen, Klaus

    2013-04-01

    With the discovery of the central pathogenic role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha in many immunoinflammatory diseases, specific inhibition of this pleiotropic cytokine has revolutionized the treatment of patients with several non-infectious inflammatory disorders. As a result, genetically engineered anti-TNF-alpha antibody constructs now constitute one of the heaviest medicinal expenditures in many countries. All currently used TNF antagonists may dramatically lower disease activity and, in some patients, induce remission. Unfortunately, however, not all patients respond favorably, and safety can be severely impaired by immunogenicity, i.e., the ability of a drug to induce anti-drug antibodies (ADA). Assessment of ADA is therefore an important component of the evaluation of drug safety in both pre-clinical and clinical studies and in the process of developing less immunogenic and safer biopharmaceuticals. Therapeutics diagnostics, also called theranostics, i.e., monitoring functional drug levels and neutralizing ADA in the circulation, is central to more effective use of biopharmaceuticals. Hence, testing-based strategies rather than empirical dose-escalation may provide more cost-effective use of TNF antagonists as this allows therapies tailored according to individual requirements rather than the current universal approach to diagnosis. The objective of the present review is to discuss the reasons for recommending theranostics to implement an individualized use of TNF antagonists and to highlight some of the methodological obstacles that have obscured cost-effective ways of using these therapies.

  11. Antagonistic activity of Lactobacillus acidophilus LA10 against Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis SE86 in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scapin, Diane; Grando, Williani Fabiola; Rossi, Eliandra Mirlei; Perez, Karla Joseane; Malheiros, Patrícia da Silva; Tondo, Eduardo Cesar

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is one of the main pathogens responsible for foodborne illness in Brazil. Probiotic bacteria can play a role in defense and recovery from enteropathogenic infections. In this study, the ability of Lactobacillus acidophilus LA10 to colonise and exert antagonistic effects in the gastrointestinal tract was tested before and during experimental infection in conventional mice contaminated with S. Enteritidis (SE86). A dose of 0.1 mL containing 108 viable cells of SE86 and L. acidophilus LA10 was orally administered by gavage to mice. The experiment was divided into groups. As a negative control, Group 1 was administered only sterile saline solution. As a positive control, Group 2 was administered only SE86. Group 3 was first administered SE86, and after 10 days, treated with L. acidophilus LA10. Group 4 was first administered L. acidophilus LA10, and after 10 days, challenged with SE86. The results demonstrated that a significant number of SE86 cells were able to colonize the gastrointestinal tract of mice, specifically in the colon and ileum. L. acidophilus LA10 demonstrated an antagonistic effect against SE86, with better results observed for Group 3 over Group 4. Thus, L. acidophilus LA10 shows potential antagonistic effects against S. Enteritidis SE86, especially if administered after infection. PMID:24159284

  12. Effects of Proton Pump Inhibitors and H2 Receptor Antagonists on the Ileum Motility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atilla Kurt

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To investigate the effects of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs and H2 receptor antagonists on ileum motility in rats with peritonitis and compare changes with control group rats. Methods. Peritonitis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture in 8 rats. Another of 8 rats underwent a sham operation and were accepted as controls. Twenty-four hours later after the operation, the rats were killed, and their ileum smooth muscle was excised and placed in circular muscle direction in a 10 mL organ bath. Changes in amplitude and frequency of contractions were analyzed before and after PPIs and H2 receptor blockers. Results. PPI agents decreased the motility in a dose-dependent manner in ileum in both control and intraabdominal sepsis groups. While famotidine had no significant effect on ileum motility, ranitidine and nizatidine enhanced motility in ileum in both control and intraabdominal sepsis groups. This excitatory effect of H2 receptor antagonists and inhibitor effects of PPIs were significantly high in control group when compared to the peritonitis group. The inhibitor effect of pantoprazole on ileum motility was significantly higher than the other two PPI agents. Conclusions. It was concluded that H2 receptor antagonists may be more effective than PPIs for recovering the bowel motility in the intraabdominal sepsis situation.

  13. Neurokinin-1 receptor antagonists as antitumor drugs in gastrointestinal cancer: A new approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Muñoz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal (GI cancer is the term for a group of cancers affecting the digestive system. After binding to the neurokinin-1 (NK-1 receptor, the undecapeptide substance P (SP regulates GI cancer cell proliferation and migration for invasion and metastasis, and controls endothelial cell proliferation for angiogenesis. SP also exerts an antiapoptotic effect. Both SP and the NK-1 receptor are located in GI tumor cells, the NK-1 receptor being overexpressed. By contrast, after binding to the NK-1 receptor, NK-1 receptor antagonists elicit the inhibition (epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition of the proliferation of GI cancer cells in a concentration-dependent manner, induce the death of GI cancer cells by apoptosis, counteract the Warburg effect, inhibit cancer cell migration (counteracting invasion and metastasis, and inhibit angiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor inhibition. NK-1 receptor antagonists are safe and well tolerated. Thus, the NK-1 receptor could be considered as a new target in GI cancer and NK-1 receptor antagonists (eg, aprepitant could be a new promising approach for the treatment of GI cancer.

  14. Quantitative kinetics analysis of BMP2 uptake into cells and its modulation by BMP antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alborzinia, Hamed; Schmidt-Glenewinkel, Hannah; Ilkavets, Iryna; Breitkopf-Heinlein, Katja; Cheng, Xinlai; Hortschansky, Peter; Dooley, Steven; Wölfl, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are members of the TGFβ family of signaling proteins and play an important role during development and in tissue formation. BMP signaling is a well-studied process, which is initiated through binding of cognate receptors and processed through activation of Smad downstream mediators. A hallmark of BMP signaling is its modulation at the extracellular level through specific antagonists. Although it had been shown that BMP and TGFβ receptors are internalized following activation, little is known about the fate of BMP ligands. We prepared biologically active fluorescently labeled BMP2 and quantitatively analyzed its binding and uptake in cells using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Exogenous BMP2 was rapidly bound to the cell surface and subsequently internalized in a time-dependent manner and accumulated in the cell center. Although binding to the cell surface was limited by binding sites at the beginning, internalization continously increased with time, after a short delay. Using different inhibitors we found that internalization of BMP2 through endosomal particles occurred in a clathrin-dependent pathway. Furthermore, uptake of BMP2 was modulated in strikingly different ways by BMP2 antagonists. Although Noggin and Gremlin increased BMP2 uptake, Chordin blocked BMP2 uptake, which was concentration dependent in both cases. In conclusion, our findings present interesting mechanisms for the modulation of BMP signaling by concentration gradients of BMP ligands and antagonists in a dose- and time-dependent manner, which can provide an explanation of some properties of the BMP regulatory network.

  15. Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome prevention strategies: use of gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesinger, Georg

    2010-11-01

    The most serious complication of ovarian stimulation for in vitro fertilization is severe ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS), a rare but potentially life-threatening condition. The present review discusses the place of gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonists (GnRH-ant) in primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention of OHSS. Sound evidence indicates that the routine use of GnRH-ant instead of GnRH agonists (GnRHa) during ovarian stimulation drastically reduces the relative risk of OHSS. GnRH-ant are therefore useful for primary OHSS prevention, and an increased use of antagonists should help reduce the overall incidence of severe OHSS with its associated risks and complications. In patients on antagonist protocols identified to be at risk of developing severe OHSS, replacing human chorionic gonadotropin with GnRHa as a trigger of final oocyte maturation has been proposed as an effective measure of secondary prevention. A concept of combining GnRHa triggering with cryopreservation of all oocytes or embryos has yielded promising results as far as total avoidance of OHSS is concerned while providing a good chance of pregnancy for the patient in later frozen-thawed embryo transfers. In patients with early onset of OHSS, reinitiation of GnRH-ant in the luteal phase as a measure of tertiary prevention might lead to rapid regression of the syndrome; however only limited data on this new concept are available in the literature.

  16. Sisters' curse: sexually antagonistic effects constrain the spread of a mitochondrial haplogroup superior in sperm competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padua, Michael V; Zeh, David W; Bonilla, Melvin M; Zeh, Jeanne A

    2014-12-22

    Maternal inheritance of mitochondria creates a sex-specific selective sieve with implications for male longevity, disease susceptibility and infertility. Because males are an evolutionary dead end for mitochondria, mitochondrial mutations that are harmful or beneficial to males but not females cannot respond directly to selection. Although the importance of this male/female asymmetry in evolutionary response depends on the extent to which mitochondrial mutations exert antagonistic effects on male and female fitness, few studies have documented sex-specific selection acting on mitochondria. Here, we exploited the discovery of two highly divergent mitochondrial haplogroups (A and B2) in central Panamanian populations of the pseudoscorpion Cordylochernes scorpioides. Next-generation sequencing and phylogenetic analyses suggest that selection on the ND4 and ND4L mitochondrial genes may partially explain sexually antagonistic mitochondrial effects on reproduction. Males carrying the rare B2 mitochondrial haplogroup enjoy a marked advantage in sperm competition, but B2 females are significantly less sexually receptive at second mating than A females. This reduced propensity for polyandry is likely to significantly reduce female lifetime reproductive success, thereby limiting the spread of the male beneficial B2 haplogroup. Our findings suggest that maternal inheritance of mitochondria and sexually antagonistic selection can constrain male adaptation and sexual selection in nature.

  17. Study of Positive and Negative Consequences of Using GnRH Antagonist in Intrauterine Insemination Cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Bagheri

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To assess the usefulness of premature luteinization hormone (LH surge preventionin an intrauterine insemination (IUI cycle by GnRH antagonist administration.Materials and Methods: Sixty patients with unexplained or mild male infertility or minimalto mild endometriosis were enrolled in this prospective randomized controlled trial. There weretwenty patients in group A (with GnRH antagonist and 40 patients in group B (without GnRHantagonist.In all of the participants, clomiphene citrate and human menopausal gonadotropin (CC+HMG wereused for ovarian stimulation. When at least one follicle with ≥ 16 mm diameter was seen, LH surgewas checked by a urinary LH kit. In patients with negative results, human chorionic gonadotropinwas continued in both groups, but in group A 0.25 mg Ganirelix SQ was administered for two days,,then in both groups human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG was injected on the third day and IUIwas done 36-40 hours later. Ongoing pregnancy was the primary outcome.Results: Baseline characters and clinical parameters were similar in both groups with the exceptionof ≥14 mm follicles which were higher in group A (p value= 0.003. The pregnancy rate in bothgroups was not significantly different, although it was higher in group B (10% in group A and 15%in group B.Conclusion: At least in CC+HMG stimulated cycles for IUI, the occurrence of premature LHsurge could have a useful rule and GnRH antagonist administration could be an inappropriateintervention.

  18. Comparative analysis of microsatellites in five different antagonistic Trichoderma species for diversity assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Shalini; Kashyap, Prem Lal; Kumar, Sudheer; Srivastava, Alok Kumar; Ramteke, Pramod W

    2016-01-01

    Microsatellites provide an ideal molecular markers system to screen, characterize and evaluate genetic diversity of several fungal species. Currently, there is very limited information on the genetic diversity of antagonistic Trichoderma species as determined using a range of molecular markers. In this study, expressed and whole genome sequences available in public database were used to investigate the occurrence, relative abundance and relative density of SSRs in five different antagonistic Trichoderma species: Trichoderma atroviride, T. harzianum, T. reesei, T. virens and T. asperellum. Fifteen SSRs loci were used to evaluate genetic diversity of twenty isolates of Trichoderma spp. from different geographical regions of India. Results indicated that relative abundance and relative density of SSRs were higher in T. asperellum followed by T. reesei and T. atroviride. Tri-nucleotide repeats (80.2%) were invariably the most abundant in all species. The abundance and relative density of SSRs were not influenced by the genome sizes and GC content. Out of eighteen primer sets, only 15 primer pairs showed successful amplification in all the test species. A total of 24 alleles were detected and five loci were highly informative with polymorphism information content values greater than 0.40, these markers provide useful information on genetic diversity and population genetic structure, which, in turn, can exploit for establishing conservation strategy for antagonistic Trichoderma isolates.

  19. Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR: their potential as antagonists and biocontrol agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anelise Beneduzi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria that colonize plant roots and promote plant growth are referred to as plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR. PGPR are highly diverse and in this review we focus on rhizobacteria as biocontrol agents. Their effects can occur via local antagonism to soil-borne pathogens or by induction of systemic resistance against pathogens throughout the entire plant. Several substances produced by antagonistic rhizobacteria have been related to pathogen control and indirect promotion of growth in many plants, such as siderophores and antibiotics. Induced systemic resistance (ISR in plants resembles pathogen-induced systemic acquired resistance (SAR under conditions where the inducing bacteria and the challenging pathogen remain spatially separated. Both types of induced resistance render uninfected plant parts more resistant to pathogens in several plant species. Rhizobacteria induce resistance through the salicylic acid-dependent SAR pathway, or require jasmonic acid and ethylene perception from the plant for ISR. Rhizobacteria belonging to the genera Pseudomonas and Bacillus are well known for their antagonistic effects and their ability to trigger ISR. Resistance-inducing and antagonistic rhizobacteria might be useful in formulating new inoculants with combinations of different mechanisms of action, leading to a more efficient use for biocontrol strategies to improve cropping systems.

  20. SOCS1 mimetics and antagonists: a complementary approach to positive and negative regulation of immune function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chulbul M. Ahmed

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS are inducible intracellular proteins that play essential regulatory roles in both immune and non-immune function. Of the eight known members, SOCS1 and SOCS3 in conjunction with regulatory T cells play key roles in regulation of the immune system. Molecular tools such as gene transfections and siRNA have played a major role in our functional understanding of the SOCS proteins where a key functional domain of 12 amino acid residues called the kinase inhibitory region (KIR has been identified on SOCS1 and SOCS3. KIR plays a key role in inhibition of the JAK2 tyrosine kinase which in turn plays a key role in cytokine signaling. A peptide corresponding to KIR (SOCS1-KIR bound to the activation loop of JAK2 and inhibited tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT1α transcription factor by JAK2. Cell internalized SOCS1-KIR is a potent therapeutic in the experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE mouse model of multiple sclerosis and showed promise in a psoriasis model and a model of diabetes associated cardiovascular disease. By contrast, a peptide, pJAK2(1001-1013, that corresponds to the activation loop of JAK2 is a SOCS1 antagonist. The antagonist enhanced innate and adaptive immune response against a broad range of viruses including herpes simplex virus, vaccinia virus, and an EMC picornavirus. SOCS mimetics and antagonists are thus potential therapeutics for negative and positive regulation of the immune system.