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Sample records for anoxic hypersaline lakes

  1. Electricity generation by anaerobic bacteria and anoxic sediments from hypersaline soda lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, L.G.; Oremland, R.S.

    2008-01-01

    Anaerobic bacteria and anoxic sediments from soda lakes produced electricity in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). No electricity was generated in the absence of bacterial metabolism. Arsenate respiring bacteria isolated from moderately hypersaline Mono Lake (Bacillus selenitireducens), and salt-saturated Searles Lake, CA (strain SLAS-1) oxidized lactate using arsenate as the electron acceptor. However, these cultures grew equally well without added arsenate using the MFC anode as their electron acceptor, and in the process oxidized lactate more efficiently. The decrease in electricity generation by consumption of added alternative electron acceptors (i.e. arsenate) which competed with the anode for available electrons proved to be a useful indicator of microbial activity and hence life in the fuel cells. Shaken sediment slurries from these two lakes also generated electricity, with or without added lactate. Hydrogen added to sediment slurries was consumed but did not stimulate electricity production. Finally, electricity was generated in statically incubated "intact" sediment cores from these lakes. More power was produced in sediment from Mono Lake than from Searles Lake, however microbial fuel cells could detect low levels of metabolism operating under moderate and extreme conditions of salt stress. ?? 2008 US Government.

  2. Sulfidogenesis in hypersaline chloride-sulfate lakes of Kulunda Steppe (Altai, Russia)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorokin, D.Y.; Zacharova, E.E.; Pimenov, N.V.; Tourova, T.P.; Panteleeva, A.N.; Muyzer, G.

    2012-01-01

    The activity and culturable diversity of sulfidogens were investigated in anoxic sediments of four hypersaline lakes with pH 7.6-8.2 in the Kulunda Steppe (Altai, Russia). Sulfate reduction rates were low, varying from 0.1 to 6.0 nmol HS−/(cm3 h) with a maximum in the top 10 cm layer. Potential

  3. Desulfonatronovibrio halophilus sp. nov., a novel moderately halophilic sulfate-reducing bacterium from hypersaline chloride-sulfate lakes in Central Asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorokin, D.Y.; Tourova, T.P.; Abbas, B.; Suhacheva, M.V.; Muyzer, G.

    2012-01-01

    Four strains of lithotrophic sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) have been enriched and isolated from anoxic sediments of hypersaline chloride-sulfate lakes in the Kulunda Steppe (Altai, Russia) at 2 M NaCl and pH 7.5. According to the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the isolates were closely related

  4. Desulfonatronovibrio halophilus sp. nov., a novel moderately halophilic sulfate-reducing bacterium from hypersaline chloride–sulfate lakes in Central Asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorokin, D.Y.; Tourova, T.P.; Abbas, B.; Suhacheva, M.V.; Muyzer, G.

    2012-01-01

    Four strains of lithotrophic sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) have been enriched and isolated from anoxic sediments of hypersaline chloride–sulfate lakes in the Kulunda Steppe (Altai, Russia) at 2 M NaCl and pH 7.5. According to the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the isolates were closely related

  5. Microbial ecology of deep-sea hypersaline anoxic basins

    KAUST Repository

    Merlino, Giuseppe

    2018-05-09

    Deep hypersaline anoxic basins (DHABs) are unique water bodies occurring within fractures at the bottom of the sea, where the dissolution of anciently buried evaporites created dense anoxic brines that are separated by a chemocline/pycnocline from the overlying oxygenated deep-seawater column. DHABs have been described in the Gulf of Mexico, the Mediterranean Sea, the Black Sea and the Red Sea. They are characterized by prolonged historical separation of the brines from the upper water column due to lack of mixing and by extreme conditions of salinity, anoxia, and relatively high hydrostatic pressure and temperatures. Due to these combined selection factors, unique microbial assemblages thrive in these polyextreme ecosystems. The topological localization of the different taxa in the brine-seawater transition zone coupled with the metabolic interactions and niche adaptations determine the metabolic functioning and biogeochemistry of DHABs. In particular, inherent metabolic strategies accompanied by genetic adaptations have provided insights on how prokaryotic communities can adapt to salt-saturated condition. Here, we review the current knowledge on the diversity, genomics, metabolisms and ecology of prokaryotes in DHABs.

  6. Exploration of microbial diversity and community structure of Lonar Lake: the only hypersaline meteorite crater lake within basalt rock

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    Dhiraj ePaul

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lonar Lake is a hypersaline and hyperalkaline soda lake and the only meteorite impact crater in the world created in the basalt rocks. Although culture-dependent studies have been reported, the comprehensive understanding of microbial community composition and structure of Lonar Lake remain obscure. In the present study, microbial community structure associated with Lonar Lake sediment and water samples was investigated using high throughput sequencing. Microbial diversity analysis revealed the existence of diverse, yet near consistent community composition. The predominance of bacterial phyla Proteobacteria (30% followed by Actinobacteria (24%, Firmicutes (11% and Cyanobacteria (5% was observed. Bacterial phylum Bacteroidetes (1.12%, BD1-5 (0.5%, Nitrospirae (0.41% and Verrucomicrobia (0.28% were detected as relatively minor populations in Lonar Lake ecosystem. Within Proteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria represented the most abundant population (21-47% among all the sediments and as a minor population in water samples. Bacterial members Proteobacteria and Firmicutes were present significantly higher (p≥0.05 in sediment samples, whereas members of Actinobacteria, Candidate_division_TM7 and Cyanobacteria (p≥0.05 were significantly abundant in water samples. It was noted that compared to other hypersaline soda lakes, Lonar Lake samples formed one distinct cluster, suggesting a different microbial community composition and structure. The present study reports for the first time the different composition of indigenous microbial communities between the sediment and water samples of Lonar Lake. Having better insight of community structure of this Lake ecosystem could be useful in understanding the microbial role in the geochemical cycle for future functional exploration of the unique hypersaline Lonar Lake.

  7. Biodiversity of the Hypersaline Urmia Lake National Park (NW Iran

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    Alireza Asem

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Urmia Lake, with a surface area between 4000 to 6000 km2, is a hypersaline lake located in northwest Iran. It is the saltiest large lake in the world that supports life. Urmia Lake National Park is the home of an almost endemic crustacean species known as the brine shrimp, Artemia urmiana. Other forms of life include several species of algae, bacteria, microfungi, plants, birds, reptiles, amphibians and mammals. As a consequence of this unique biodiversity, this lake has been selected as one of the 59 biosphere reserves by UNESCO. This paper provides a comprehensive species checklist that needs to be updated by additional research in the future.

  8. Methane oxidation in anoxic lake waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Guangyi; Zopfi, Jakob; Niemann, Helge; Lehmann, Moritz

    2017-04-01

    Freshwater habitats such as lakes are important sources of methante (CH4), however, most studies in lacustrine environments so far provided evidence for aerobic methane oxidation only, and little is known about the importance of anaerobic oxidation of CH4 (AOM) in anoxic lake waters. In marine environments, sulfate reduction coupled to AOM by archaea has been recognized as important sinks of CH4. More recently, the discorvery of anaerobic methane oxidizing denitrifying bacteria represents a novel and possible alternative AOM pathway, involving reactive nitrogen species (e.g., nitrate and nitrite) as electron acceptors in the absence of oxygen. We investigate anaerobic methane oxidation in the water column of two hydrochemically contrasting sites in Lake Lugano, Switzerland. The South Basin displays seasonal stratification, the development of a benthic nepheloid layer and anoxia during summer and fall. The North Basin is permanently stratified with anoxic conditions below 115m water depth. Both Basins accumulate seasonally (South Basin) or permanently (North Basin) large amounts of CH4 in the water column below the chemocline, providing ideal conditions for methanotrophic microorganisms. Previous work revealed a high potential for aerobic methane oxidation within the anoxic water column, but no evidence for true AOM. Here, we show depth distribution data of dissolved CH4, methane oxidation rates and nutrients at both sites. In addition, we performed high resolution phylogenetic analyses of microbial community structures and conducted radio-label incubation experiments with concentrated biomass from anoxic waters and potential alternative electron acceptor additions (nitrate, nitrite and sulfate). First results from the unamended experiments revealed maximum activity of methane oxidation below the redoxcline in both basins. While the incubation experiments neither provided clear evidence for NOx- nor sulfate-dependent AOM, the phylogenetic analysis revealed the

  9. An Updated View of the Microbial Diversity in Deep Hypersaline Anoxic Basins

    KAUST Repository

    Mapelli, Francesca

    2017-03-02

    Deep hypersaline anoxic basins (DHABs) are marine extreme habitats, firstly discovered in the 1970s of the last century, located in several oceanographic regions, including the Mediterranean and Red Sea and the Gulf of Mexico. These basins are filled with brines that do not mix with the overlying seawater, due to a density difference. Brine and seawater result separated by a thick interface acting as a trap for particulate and cells. Some microbiological studies focused on seawater-brine interfaces of DHABs, showing that microbial populations are differentially distributed according to the gradient of salinity, oxygen, and nutrients occurring in such transition zones. Moreover, DHABs’ brines were intensively studied showing that specific bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryotic populations thrive there. In the last few years, cultivation and “omics”-based approaches have been used with samples collected from DHABs around the world, allowing clarifying metabolic processes of paramount ecological importance and pointing out the high biotechnological potential of the inhabiting extremophiles.

  10. Cyclic heliothermal behaviour of the shallow, hypersaline Lake Hayward, Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Jeffrey V.; Rosen, Michael R.; Coshell, Lee; Woodbury, Robert J.

    2018-05-01

    Lake Hayward is one of only about 30 hypersaline lakes worldwide that is meromictic and heliothermal and as such behaves as a natural salt gradient solar pond. Lake Hayward acts as a local groundwater sink, resulting in seasonally variable hypersaline lake water with total dissolved solids (TDS) in the upper layer (mixolimnion) ranging between 56 kg m-3 and 207 kg m-3 and the deeper layer (monimolimnion) from 153 kg m-3 to 211 kg m-3. This is up to six times the salinity of seawater and thus has the highest salinity of all eleven lakes in the Yalgorup National Park lake system. A program of continuously recorded water temperature profiles has shown that salinity stratification initiated by direct rainfall onto the lake's surface and local runoff into the lake results in the onset of heliothermal conditions within hours of rainfall onset. The lake alternates between being fully mixed and becoming thermally and chemically stratified several times during the annual cycle, with the longest extended periods of heliothermal behaviour lasting 23 and 22 weeks in the winters of 1992 and 1993 respectively. The objective was to quantify the heat budgets of the cyclical heliothermal behaviour of Lake Hayward. During the period of temperature profile logging, the maximum recorded temperature of the monimolimnion was 42.6 °C at which time the temperature of the mixolimnion was 29.4 °C. The heat budget of two closed heliothermal cycles initiated by two rainfall events of 50 mm and 52 mm in 1993 were analysed. The cycles prevailed for 11 and 20 days respectively and the heat budget showed net heat accumulations of 34.2 MJ m-3 and 15.4 MJ m-3, respectively. The corresponding efficiencies of lake heat gain to incident solar energy were 0.17 and 0.18 respectively. Typically, artificial salinity gradient solar ponds (SGSP) have a solar radiation capture efficiencies ranging from 0.10 up to 0.30. Results from Lake Hayward have implications for comparative biogeochemistry and its

  11. Cyclic heliothermal behaviour of the shallow, hypersaline Lake Hayward, Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Jeffrey V.; Rosen, Michael R.; Coshell, Lee; Woodbury, Robert J.

    2018-01-01

    Lake Hayward is one of only about 30 hypersaline lakes worldwide that is meromictic and heliothermal and as such behaves as a natural salt gradient solar pond. Lake Hayward acts as a local groundwater sink, resulting in seasonally variable hypersaline lake water with total dissolved solids (TDS) in the upper layer (mixolimnion) ranging between 56 kg m−3 and 207 kg m−3 and the deeper layer (monimolimnion) from 153 kg m−3 to 211 kg m−3. This is up to six times the salinity of seawater and thus has the highest salinity of all eleven lakes in the Yalgorup National Park lake system. A program of continuously recorded water temperature profiles has shown that salinity stratification initiated by direct rainfall onto the lake’s surface and local runoff into the lake results in the onset of heliothermal conditions within hours of rainfall onset.The lake alternates between being fully mixed and becoming thermally and chemically stratified several times during the annual cycle, with the longest extended periods of heliothermal behaviour lasting 23 and 22 weeks in the winters of 1992 and 1993 respectively. The objective was to quantify the heat budgets of the cyclical heliothermal behaviour of Lake Hayward.During the period of temperature profile logging, the maximum recorded temperature of the monimolimnion was 42.6 °C at which time the temperature of the mixolimnion was 29.4 °C.The heat budget of two closed heliothermal cycles initiated by two rainfall events of 50 mm and 52 mm in 1993 were analysed. The cycles prevailed for 11 and 20 days respectively and the heat budget showed net heat accumulations of 34.2 MJ m−3 and 15.4 MJ m−3, respectively. The corresponding efficiencies of lake heat gain to incident solar energy were 0.17 and 0.18 respectively. Typically, artificial salinity gradient solar ponds (SGSP) have a solar radiation capture efficiencies ranging from 0.10 up to 0.30. Results from Lake Hayward have

  12. Geo- and Biogeochemical Processes in a Heliothermal Hypersaline Lake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zachara, John M.; Moran, James J.; Resch, Charles T.; Lindemann, Stephen R.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Bowden, Mark E.; Cory, Alexandra B.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2016-03-17

    Water chemical variations were investigated over three annual hydrologic cycles in hypersaline, heliothermal, meromictic Hot Lake in north-central Washington State, USA. The lake, originally studied by Anderson (1958), contains diverse biota with dramatic zonation related to salinity and redox state. Water samples were collected at 10 cm depth intervals through the shallow lake (2.4 m) at a consistent location during 2012-2014, with comprehensive monitoring performed in 2013. Inorganic salt species, total dissolved solids (TDS), dissolved carbon forms (DOC, DIC), oxygen, sulfide, and methane were analyzed in lake water samples. Depth sonde measurements of pH and temperature were also performed to track their seasonal variations. A bathymetric survey of the lake was conducted to enable lake water volume and solute inventory calculations. Sediment cores were collected at low water and analyzed by x-ray diffraction to investigate sediment mineralogy. The primary dissolved salt in Hot Lake water was Mg2+-SO42- while sediments were dominated by gypsum (CaSO4•2H2O). Lake water concentrations increased with depth to reach saturation with epsomite that was exposed at lake bottom. At maximum volume in spring, Hot Lake exhibited a relatively dilute mixolimnion containing phyto- and zooplankton; a lower saline metalimnion with stratified oxygenic and anoxygenic photosynthetic microbiologic communities; and a stable, hypersaline monimolimnion, separated from above layers by a chemocline, containing high levels of sulfide and methane. The thickness of the mixolimnion regulates a heliothermal effect which creates temperatures in excess of 60 oC in the underlying metalimnion and monimolimnion. The mixolimnion was dynamic and actively mixed. It displayed large pH variations, in-situ calcium carbonate precipitation, and large evaporative volume losses. The depletion of this ephemeral layer by fall allowed deeper mixing into the volume-stable lower mixolimnion, more rapid heat

  13. Metagenomic insights into the uncultured diversity and physiology of microbes in four hypersaline soda lake brines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vavourakis, Charlotte D.; Ghai, Rohit; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco; Sorokin, Dimitry Y.; Tringe, Susannah G.; Hugenholtz, Philip; Muyzer, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Soda lakes are salt lakes with a naturally alkaline pH due to evaporative concentration of sodium carbonates in the absence of major divalent cations. Hypersaline soda brines harbor microbial communities with a high species- and strain-level archaeal diversity and a large proportion of still

  14. Metagenomic Insights into the Uncultured Diversity and Physiology of Microbes in Four Hypersaline Soda Lake Brines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vavourakis, C.D.; Ghai, R.; Rodriguez-valera, F.; Sorokin, D.Y.; Tringe, S.G.; Hugenholtz, P.; Muyzer, G.

    2016-01-01

    Soda lakes are salt lakes with a naturally alkaline pH due to evaporative concentration of sodium carbonates in the absence of major divalent cations. Hypersaline soda brines harbor microbial communities with a high species- and strain-level archaeal diversity and a large proportion of still

  15. Geo- and biogeochemical processes in a heliothermal hypersaline lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachara, John M.; Moran, James J.; Resch, Charles T.; Lindemann, Stephen R.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Bowden, Mark E.; Cory, Alexandra B.; Fredrickson, James K.

    2016-05-01

    Water chemical variations were investigated over three annual hydrologic cycles in hypersaline, heliothermal, meromictic Hot Lake in north-central Washington State, USA. The lake contains diverse biota with dramatic zonation related to salinity and redox state. Water samples were collected at 10-cm depth intervals through the shallow lake (2.4 m) during 2012-2014, with comprehensive monitoring performed in 2013. Inorganic salt species, dissolved carbon forms (DOC, DIC), oxygen, sulfide, and methane were analyzed in lake water samples. Depth sonde measurements of pH and temperature were also performed to track their seasonal variations. A bathymetric survey of the lake was conducted to enable lake water volume and solute inventory calculations. Sediment cores were collected at low water and analyzed by X-ray diffraction to investigate sediment mineralogy. The primary dissolved salt in Hot Lake water was Mg2+-SO42- whereas sediments were dominated by gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O). Lake water concentrations increased with depth, reaching saturation with epsomite (MgSO4·7H2O) that was exposed at lake bottom. At maximum volume in spring, Hot Lake exhibited a relatively dilute mixolimnion; a lower saline metalimnion with stratified oxygenic and anoxygenic photosynthetic microbiological communities; and a stable, hypersaline monimolimnion, separated from above layers by a chemocline, containing high levels of sulfide and methane. The thickness of the mixolimnion regulates a heliothermal effect that creates temperatures in excess of 60 °C in the underlying metalimnion and monimolimnion. The mixolimnion was dynamic in volume and actively mixed. It displayed large pH variations, in-situ calcium carbonate precipitation, and large evaporative volume losses. The depletion of this layer by fall allowed deeper mixing into the metalimnion, more rapid heat exchange, and lower winter lake temperatures. Solubility calculations indicate seasonal biogenic and thermogenic aragonite

  16. Total- and methyl-mercury concentrations and methylation rates across the freshwater to hypersaline continuum of the Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, William P.; Swanson, Neil; Black, Brooks; Rudd, Abigail; Carling, Gregory; Fernandez, Diego P.; Luft, John; Van Leeuwen, Jim; Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark C.

    2015-01-01

    We examined mercury (Hg) speciation in water and sediment of the Great Salt Lake and surrounding wetlands, a locale spanning fresh to hypersaline and oxic to anoxic conditions, in order to test the hypothesis that spatial and temporal variations in Hg concentration and methylation rates correspond to observed spatial and temporal trends in Hg burdens previously reported in biota. Water column, sediment, and pore water concentrations of methylmercury (MeHg) and total mercury (THg), as well as related aquatic chemical parameters were examined. Inorganic Hg(II)-methylation rates were determined in selected water column and sediment subsamples spiked with inorganic divalent mercury (204Hg(II)). Net production of Me204Hg was expressed as apparent first-order rate constants for methylation (kmeth), which were also expanded to MeHg production potential (MPP) rates via combination with tin reducible ‘reactive’ Hg(II) (Hg(II)R) as a proxy for bioavailable Hg(II). Notable findings include: 1) elevated Hg concentrations previously reported in birds and brine flies were spatially proximal to the measured highest MeHg concentrations, the latter occurring in the anoxic deep brine layer (DBL) of the Great Salt Lake; 2) timing of reduced Hg(II)-methylation rates in the DBL (according to both kmeth and MPP) coincides with reduced Hg burdens among aquatic invertebrates (brine shrimp and brine flies) that act as potential vectors of Hg propagation to the terrestrial ecosystem; 3) values ofkmeth were found to fall within the range reported by other studies; and 4) MPP rates were on the lower end of the range reported in methodologically comparable studies, suggesting the possibility that elevated MeHg in the anoxic deep brine layer results from its accumulation and persistence in this quasi-isolated environment, due to the absence of light (restricting abiotic photo demethylation) and/or minimal microbiological demethylation.

  17. Early diagenetic processes and sulphur speciation in pore waters and sediments of the hypersaline Tyro and Bannock basins, eastern Mediterranean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henneke, E.

    1993-01-01

    Anoxic hypersaline basins have been found in two different tectonic environments in the eastern Mediterranean. Within the Tyro area (the western Strabo Trench) there are three pull apart basins: the Tyro Basin, presently filled with anoxic hypersaline bottomwater, and the Poseidon and Kretheus

  18. Egg banks in hypersaline lakes of the South-East Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscatello, Salvatore; Belmonte, Genuario

    2009-01-01

    The cyst banks of 6 coastal hypersaline lakes of South-East Europe have been investigated. The study concerned the bottom sediments of Khersonesskoe and Koyashskoe lakes in the Crimea (Ukraine), Nartë saltworks (Albania), Vecchia Salina at Torre Colimena (Apulia, Italy), Pantano Grande and Pantano Roveto at Vendicari (Sicily, Italy). A total of 19 cyst types were recognised. The cyst banks of lakes were found to be well separated in the representation derived from a statistical multivariate data analysis. For all the lakes examined a comparison was possible between the resting community in sediments (cyst bank) and the active one in the water. The cyst banks contained more species than those recorded over a multi-year sampling effort in the water column. The study of cyst hatching, performed on 5 cyst types under lab conditions, demonstrated that cysts do not hatch under the same conditions. Furthermore, each cyst type shows a wide range of preferential hatching conditions, which allow us to confirm the ecological generalism of salt lake species. PMID:19292906

  19. Uranium Geochemistry in Hypersaline Soda Lakes in Eastern Mongolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linhoff, B. S.; Bennett, P.; Puntsag, T.

    2007-12-01

    Extremely high concentrations of uranium were discovered in water samples from hypersaline soda lakes in eastern Mongolia. The origin and fate of uranium in these lakes was examined using geochemical analyses and modeling, using samples collected from five lakes, six wells and one stream. Samples were analyzed for strontium and uranium isotopes, cations and trace metals, anions, alkalinity, and unstable field parameters. The lakes are small, shallow (chlorine to bromine ratios implying groundwater discharges to lake water and is subsequently evaporated. Evaporation is intense with lake waters having average chlorine concentrations 300 times that of well waters. Uranium in well samples is higher than typical for shallow groundwaters (7-101ppb) suggesting discharging groundwater as a probable source of uranium in lake water. Concentrations of uranium in lake water ranges from 57-14,900ppb making these lakes possibly the highest naturally occurring uranium concentration reported. Lake water alkalinity is strongly correlated to uranium abundance suggesting uranium is complexed with carbonate as the aqueous species UO2CO3. Consequently, the extremely high alkalinity of the most alkaline lake (pH = 9.8, 1288.8 meq alk/L) also has the highest uranium concentrations. Stable strontium isotopes were used to assess the degree of water rock interactions and the presence of 90Sr was checked for to test the possibility of input of nuclear fallout. 90Sr was not detected in lake water samples suggesting the high uranium is of natural origins. A large difference in the 87Sr/86Sr ratio was found between groundwater and lake water samples. Groundwater samples displayed large variation in the 87Sr/86Sr ratio (0.70612-0.709776) whereas lake water samples averaged a high radiogenic ratio (0.709432). The large variation in the strontium isotopes in groundwater samples suggests varying degrees of water rock interactions, however the least radiogenic samples likely are derived from

  20. Discovery of anaerobic lithoheterotrophic haloarchaea, ubiquitous in hypersaline habitats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorokin, D.Y.; Messina, E.; Smedile, F; Roman, P.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Ciordia, S.; Mena, M.C.; Ferrer, M.; Golyshin, P.N.; Kublanov, I.V.; Samarov, N.I.; Toshchakov, S.V.; La Cono, V.; Yakimov, M.M.

    2017-01-01

    Hypersaline anoxic habitats harbour numerous novel uncultured archaea whose metabolic and ecological roles remain to be elucidated. Until recently, it was believed that energy generation via dissimilatory reduction of sulfur compounds is not functional at salt saturation conditions. Recent discovery

  1. Sulphur-containing compounds in sulphur-rich crude oils from hypersaline lake sediments and their geochemical implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Guoying, S.; Jiamo, F.; Brassell, S.C.; Gowar, A.P.; Eglinton, G.; Leeuw, J.W. de; Schenck, P.A.

    1987-01-01

    Three sulphur-rich commercial crude oils have been studied, which contain sulphur as high as up to 4 —12 %. These samples were collected from Tertiary hypersaline lake sediments of the Jianghan Basin, Hubei Province at different depths, but above the oil generation threshold (2200m). FPD-GC and

  2. Archaeal and bacterial communities respond differently to environmental gradients in anoxic sediments of a California hypersaline lake, the Salton Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, Brandon K; Ehrhardt, Christopher J; Reifel, Kristen M; Moreno, Lilliana I; Valentine, David L

    2010-02-01

    Sulfidic, anoxic sediments of the moderately hypersaline Salton Sea contain gradients in salinity and carbon that potentially structure the sedimentary microbial community. We investigated the abundance, community structure, and diversity of Bacteria and Archaea along these gradients to further distinguish the ecologies of these domains outside their established physiological range. Quantitative PCR was used to enumerate 16S rRNA gene abundances of Bacteria, Archaea, and Crenarchaeota. Community structure and diversity were evaluated by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), quantitative analysis of gene (16S rRNA) frequencies of dominant microorganisms, and cloning and sequencing of 16S rRNA. Archaea were numerically dominant at all depths and exhibited a lesser response to environmental gradients than that of Bacteria. The relative abundance of Crenarchaeota was low (0.4 to 22%) at all depths but increased with decreased carbon content and increased salinity. Salinity structured the bacterial community but exerted no significant control on archaeal community structure, which was weakly correlated with total carbon. Partial sequencing of archaeal 16S rRNA genes retrieved from three sediment depths revealed diverse communities of Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeota, many of which were affiliated with groups previously described from marine sediments. The abundance of these groups across all depths suggests that many putative marine archaeal groups can tolerate elevated salinity (5.0 to 11.8% [wt/vol]) and persist under the anaerobic conditions present in Salton Sea sediments. The differential response of archaeal and bacterial communities to salinity and carbon patterns is consistent with the hypothesis that adaptations to energy stress and availability distinguish the ecologies of these domains.

  3. Diversity of virus-host systems in hypersaline Lake Retba, Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sime-Ngando, Télesphore; Lucas, Soizick; Robin, Agnès; Tucker, Kimberly Pause; Colombet, Jonathan; Bettarel, Yvan; Desmond, Elie; Gribaldo, Simonetta; Forterre, Patrick; Breitbart, Mya; Prangishvili, David

    2011-08-01

    Remarkable morphological diversity of virus-like particles was observed by transmission electron microscopy in a hypersaline water sample from Lake Retba, Senegal. The majority of particles morphologically resembled hyperthermophilic archaeal DNA viruses isolated from extreme geothermal environments. Some hypersaline viral morphotypes have not been previously observed in nature, and less than 1% of observed particles had a head-and-tail morphology, which is typical for bacterial DNA viruses. Culture-independent analysis of the microbial diversity in the sample suggested the dominance of extremely halophilic archaea. Few of the 16S sequences corresponded to known archeal genera (Haloquadratum, Halorubrum and Natronomonas), whereas the majority represented novel archaeal clades. Three sequences corresponded to a new basal lineage of the haloarchaea. Bacteria belonged to four major phyla, consistent with the known diversity in saline environments. Metagenomic sequencing of DNA from the purified virus-like particles revealed very few similarities to the NCBI non-redundant database at either the nucleotide or amino acid level. Some of the identifiable virus sequences were most similar to previously described haloarchaeal viruses, but no sequence similarities were found to archaeal viruses from extreme geothermal environments. A large proportion of the sequences had similarity to previously sequenced viral metagenomes from solar salterns. © 2010 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Succession of Bacterial Communities in a Seasonally Stratified Lake with an Anoxic and Sulfidic Hypolimnion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhe Diao

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Although bacteria play key roles in aquatic food webs and biogeochemical cycles, information on the seasonal succession of bacterial communities in lakes is still far from complete. Here, we report results of an integrative study on the successional trajectories of bacterial communities in a seasonally stratified lake with an anoxic hypolimnion. The bacterial community composition of epilimnion, metalimnion, and hypolimnion diverged during summer stratification and converged when the lake was mixed. In contrast, bacterial communities in the sediment remained relatively stable over the year. Phototrophic Cyanobacteria and heterotrophic Actinobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria and Planktomycetes were abundant in the aerobic epilimnion, Gammaproteobacteria (mainly Chromatiaceae dominated in the metalimnion, and Chlorobi, Betaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, and Firmicutes were abundant in the anoxic sulfidic hypolimnion. Anoxic but nonsulfidic conditions expanded to the surface layer during fall turnover, when the epilimnion, metalimnion and upper hypolimnion mixed. During this period, phototrophic sulfur bacteria (Chromatiaceae and Chlorobi disappeared, Polynucleobacter (Betaproteobacteria and Methylobacter (Gammaproteobacteria spread out from the former meta- and hypolimnion to the surface layer, and Epsilonproteobacteria dominated in the bottom water layer. Cyanobacteria and Planktomycetes regained dominance in early spring, after the oxygen concentration was restored by winter mixing. In total, these results show large spatio-temporal changes in bacterial community composition, especially during transitions from oxic to anoxic and from sulfidic to nonsulfidic conditions.

  5. Structural and functional analysis of a microbial mat ecosystem from a unique permanent hypersaline inland lake: ‘La Salada de Chiprana’ (NE Spain)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonkers, Henk M.; Ludwig, Rebecca; De Wit, Rutger

    2003-01-01

    The benthic microbial mat community of the only permanent hypersaline natural inland lake of Western Europe, ‘La Salada de Chiprana’, northeastern Spain, was structurally and functionally analyzed. The ionic composition of the lake water is characterized by high concentrations of magnesium...

  6. The first metazoa living in permanently anoxic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heiner Iben

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several unicellular organisms (prokaryotes and protozoa can live under permanently anoxic conditions. Although a few metazoans can survive temporarily in the absence of oxygen, it is believed that multi-cellular organisms cannot spend their entire life cycle without free oxygen. Deep seas include some of the most extreme ecosystems on Earth, such as the deep hypersaline anoxic basins of the Mediterranean Sea. These are permanently anoxic systems inhabited by a huge and partly unexplored microbial biodiversity. Results During the last ten years three oceanographic expeditions were conducted to search for the presence of living fauna in the sediments of the deep anoxic hypersaline L'Atalante basin (Mediterranean Sea. We report here that the sediments of the L'Atalante basin are inhabited by three species of the animal phylum Loricifera (Spinoloricus nov. sp., Rugiloricus nov. sp. and Pliciloricus nov. sp. new to science. Using radioactive tracers, biochemical analyses, quantitative X-ray microanalysis and infrared spectroscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy observations on ultra-sections, we provide evidence that these organisms are metabolically active and show specific adaptations to the extreme conditions of the deep basin, such as the lack of mitochondria, and a large number of hydrogenosome-like organelles, associated with endosymbiotic prokaryotes. Conclusions This is the first evidence of a metazoan life cycle that is spent entirely in permanently anoxic sediments. Our findings allow us also to conclude that these metazoans live under anoxic conditions through an obligate anaerobic metabolism that is similar to that demonstrated so far only for unicellular eukaryotes. The discovery of these life forms opens new perspectives for the study of metazoan life in habitats lacking molecular oxygen.

  7. Phylogenetic Diversity of Archaea and Bacteria in the Anoxic Zone of a Meromictic Lake (Lake Pavin, France)▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehours, Anne-Catherine; Evans, Paul; Bardot, Corinne; Joblin, Keith; Gérard, Fonty

    2007-01-01

    The compositions of archaeal and bacterial populations at different depths (60 m [mixolimnion-chemocline interface], 70 m [chemocline-subchemocline interface], 90 m, and 92 m [the water-sediment interface]) in the anoxic zone of the water column in Lake Pavin, a freshwater permanently stratified mountain lake in France, were determined. Phylogenetic trees were constructed from sequences to assess archaeal and bacterial diversity at the four sites. PMID:17261512

  8. Methane oxidation coupled to oxygenic photosynthesis in anoxic waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milucka, Jana; Kirf, Mathias; Lu, Lu; Krupke, Andreas; Lam, Phyllis; Littmann, Sten; Kuypers, Marcel MM; Schubert, Carsten J

    2015-01-01

    Freshwater lakes represent large methane sources that, in contrast to the Ocean, significantly contribute to non-anthropogenic methane emissions to the atmosphere. Particularly mixed lakes are major methane emitters, while permanently and seasonally stratified lakes with anoxic bottom waters are often characterized by strongly reduced methane emissions. The causes for this reduced methane flux from anoxic lake waters are not fully understood. Here we identified the microorganisms and processes responsible for the near complete consumption of methane in the anoxic waters of a permanently stratified lake, Lago di Cadagno. Interestingly, known anaerobic methanotrophs could not be detected in these waters. Instead, we found abundant gamma-proteobacterial aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria active in the anoxic waters. In vitro incubations revealed that, among all the tested potential electron acceptors, only the addition of oxygen enhanced the rates of methane oxidation. An equally pronounced stimulation was also observed when the anoxic water samples were incubated in the light. Our combined results from molecular, biogeochemical and single-cell analyses indicate that methane removal at the anoxic chemocline of Lago di Cadagno is due to true aerobic oxidation of methane fuelled by in situ oxygen production by photosynthetic algae. A similar mechanism could be active in seasonally stratified lakes and marine basins such as the Black Sea, where light penetrates to the anoxic chemocline. Given the widespread occurrence of seasonally stratified anoxic lakes, aerobic methane oxidation coupled to oxygenic photosynthesis might have an important but so far neglected role in methane emissions from lakes. PMID:25679533

  9. Constraints on evaporation and dilution of terminal, hypersaline lakes under negative water balance: The Dead Sea, Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilberman, Tami; Gavrieli, Ittai; Yechieli, Yoseph; Gertman, Isaac; Katz, Amitai

    2017-11-01

    The response of hypersaline terminal lakes to negative water balance was investigated by studying brines evaporating to extreme salinities in sinkholes along the western coast of the Dead Sea and during on-site evaporation experiments of the Dead Sea brine. Density and temperature were determined in the field and all samples were analyzed for their major and a few minor solutes. The activity of H2O (aH2O) in the brines was calculated, and the degree of evaporation (DE) was established using Sr2+as a conservative solute. The relations between density and water activity were obtained by polynomial regression, and the relation between the lake's volume and level was established using Hall's (1996) hypsographic model for the Dead Sea basin. Relating the results to the modern, long-term relative humidity (RH) over the basin shows that (a) The lowermost attainable level of a terminal lake undergoing evaporation with no inflow is dictated by the median RH; this level represents equilibrium between the brine's aH2O and RH; (b) Small, saline water bodies with high surface to volume ratios (A/V), such as the hypersaline brines in the sinkholes, are very sensitive to short term changes in RH; in these, the brines' aH2O closely follows the seasonal changes; (c) the level decline of the Dead Sea due to evaporation under present climatic conditions and assuming no inflow to the lake may continue down to 516-537 m below mean sea level (bmsl), corresponding to a water activity range of 0.46-0.39 in its brine, in equilibrium with the overlying relative air humidity; this suggests that the lake level cannot drop more than ∼100 m from its present level; and (d) The maximum RH values that existed over the precursor lake of the Dead Sea (Lake Lisan) during geologically reconstructed minima levels can be similarly calculated.

  10. Halo(natronoarchaea isolated from hypersaline lakes utilize cellulose and chitin as growth substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitry Y Sorokin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, extremely halophilic euryarchaeota were considered mostly as aerobic heterotrophs utilizing simple organic compounds as growth substrates. Almost nothing is known on the ability of these prokaryotes to utilize complex polysaccharides as cellulose, xylan and chitin. Although few haloarchaeal cellulases and chitinases were recently characterized, the analysis of currently available haloarchaeal genomes deciphered numerous genes encoding glycosidases (GHs of various families including endoglucanases and chitinases. However, all these haloarchaea were isolated and cultivated on simple substrates and their ability to grow on polysaccharides in situ or in vitro is unknown. This study examines several halo(natronoarchaeal strains from geographically distant hypersaline lakes for the ability to grow on insoluble polymers as a sole growth substrate in salt-saturated mineral media. Some of them belonged to known taxa, while other represented novel phylogenetic lineages within the class Halobacteria. All isolates produced extracellular extremely salt tolerant cellulases or chitinases, either cell-free or cell-bound. Obtained results demonstrate a presence of diverse population of haloarchaeal cellulo/chitinotrophs in hypersaline habitats indicating that euryarchaea participate in aerobic mineralization of recalcitrant organic polymers in salt-saturated environments.

  11. Anoxic environments and oil source bed genesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demaison, G J [Chevron Overseas Petroleum Inc., San Francisco, CA; Moore, G T

    1980-01-01

    The anoxic, aquatic, environment is a mass of water so depleted in oxygen that virtually all aerobic biological activity has ceased. Anoxic conditions occur where the demand for oxygen in the water column exceeds the supply. The specific cause for preferential lipid enrichment probably relates to the biochemistry of anaerobic bacterial activity. Recent evidence suggests that ancient organic-rich sediments containing hydrogen-rich kerogens (potential oil source beds) were deposited in similar anoxic environments. We propose the following classification for modern aquatic anoxic settings: (1) Large anoxic lakes - Permanent stratification promotes development of anoxic bottom water, particularly in large, deep lakes, which are not subject to seasonal overturn, e.g., Lake Tanganyika. (2) Anoxic silled basins - Landlocked silled basins with positive water balance tend to become anoxic. Typical are the Baltic and Black Seas. In arid region seas (Red and Mediterranean Seas), evaporation exceeds river inflow, causing negative water balance and well-aerated, nutrient-depleted bottom waters. (3) Anoxic layers caused by upwelling - Develop only when the oxygen supply in deep water cannot match demand by decaying organisms. Examples are the Benguela current and Peru coastal upwelling. (4) Open ocean anoxic layers - Found at intermediate depths in the northeastern Pacific and northern Indian Oceans; due to distance from deep, oxygenated polar water sources. Analogous to world-wide anoxic events at times of global climatic warm-ups and major transgressions, as in late Jurassic and middle Cretaceous time. Petroleum exploration can be greatly assisted by using geochemistry to identify paleo-anoxic events in the stratigraphic record. Recognition of the proposed anoxic models in ancient sedimentary basins should help in regional mapping of oil shales and oil-source beds. 17 figures.

  12. Anaerobic halo- alkaliphilic bacterial community of athalassic, hypersaline Mono lake and Owens Lake in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Detkova, Ekaterina N.; Bej, Asim K.; Marsic, Damien; Hoover, Richard B.

    2003-02-01

    The bacterial diversity of microbial extremophiles from the meromictic, hypersaline Mono Lake and a small evaporite pool in Owens Lake of California was studied. In spite of these regions had differing mineral background and different concentrations of NaCl in water they contain the same halo- alkaliphiles anaerobic bacterial community. Three new species of bacteria were detected in this community: primary anaerobe, dissipotrophic saccharolytic spirochete Spirochaeta americana strain AspG1T, primary anaerobe which is proteolytic Tindallia californiensis strain APOT, and secondary anaerobe, hydrogen using Desulfonatronum thiodismutans strain MLF1T, which is sulfate- reducer with chemo-litho-autotrophic metabolism. All of these bacteria are obligate alkaliphiles and dependent upon Na+ ions and CO32- ions in growth mediums. It is interesting that closest relationships for two of these species were isolates from samples of equatorial African soda Magadi lake: Spirochaeta americana AspG1T has 99.4% similarity on 16S rDNA- analyses with Spirochaeta alkalica Z- 7491T, and Tindallia californiensis APOT has 99.1% similarity with Tindallia magadiensis Z-7934T. But result of DNA-DNA- hybridization demonstrated less then 50% similarity between Spirochaeta americana AspG1T and Spirochaeta alkalica Z-7491T. Percent of homology between Tindallia californiensis APOT and Tindallia magadiensis Z-7934T is only 55%. The sulfate-reducer from the alkalic anaerobic community of Magadi lake Desulfonatronovibrio hydrogenovorans Z-7935T was phylogenetically distant from this sulfate-reducer in Mono lake, but genetically closer (99.7% similarity) to the sulfate-reducer, isolated from Central Asian alkalic lake Khadyn in Siberia Desulfonatronum lacustre Z-7951T. The study of key enzymes (hydrogenase and CO- hydrogenase) in Tindallia californiensis APOT and Desulfonatronum thiodismutans MLF1T showed the presence of high activity of both the enzymes in first and only hydrogenase in second

  13. Fallout plutonium in two oxic-anoxic environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, A.L.; Murray, J.W.; Schell, W.R.; Miller, L.G.

    1986-01-01

    The profiles of soluble fallout plutonium in two partially anoxic waters revealed minimum concentrations at the O 2 -H 2 S interface, indicating Pu removal onto particulate phases of Fe and other oxidized species that form during the redox cycle. In Saanich Inlet, an intermittently anoxic fjord in Vancouver Island, Canada, the concentration of soluble Pu in the anoxic zone was slightly less than in the oxygenated surface layer. In Soap Lake, a saline meromictic lake in eastern Washington State, Pu concentrations i the permanently anoxic zone were at least an order of magnitude higher than at the surface. Differences in the chemical characteristics of these two waters suggest important chemical species that influenced the observed Pu distribution. In the permanently anoxic zone of Soap Lake, high values of total alkalinity ranging from 940 to 1500 meq liter -1 , sulfide species from 38 to 128 μM, dissolved organic carbon from 163 to 237 mg liter -1 , and total dissolved solids from 80 to 140 ppt, all correlated with the observed high concentration of Pu. In Saanich Inlet, where total alkalinity ranged from 2.1 to 2.4 meq liter -1 and salinity from 25 to 32 per thousand and H 2 S concentration in May 1981 showed a maximum of 8μM, the observed Pu concentrations were significantly lower than for the Soap Lake monimolimnion

  14. Importance of the autumn overturn and anoxic conditions in the hypolimnion for the annual methane emissions from a temperate lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Encinas Fernández, Jorge; Peeters, Frank; Hofmann, Hilmar

    2014-07-01

    Changes in the budget of dissolved methane measured in a small temperate lake over 1 year indicate that anoxic conditions in the hypolimnion and the autumn overturn period represent key factors for the overall annual methane emissions from lakes. During periods of stable stratification, large amounts of methane accumulate in anoxic deep waters. Approximately 46% of the stored methane was emitted during the autumn overturn, contributing ∼80% of the annual diffusive methane emissions to the atmosphere. After the overturn period, the entire water column was oxic, and only 1% of the original quantity of methane remained in the water column. Current estimates of global methane emissions assume that all of the stored methane is released, whereas several studies of individual lakes have suggested that a major fraction of the stored methane is oxidized during overturns. Our results provide evidence that not all of the stored methane is released to the atmosphere during the overturn period. However, the fraction of stored methane emitted to the atmosphere during overturn may be substantially larger and the fraction of stored methane oxidized may be smaller than in the previous studies suggesting high oxidation losses of methane. The development or change in the vertical extent and duration of the anoxic hypolimnion, which can represent the main source of annual methane emissions from small lakes, may be an important aspect to consider for impact assessments of climate warming on the methane emissions from lakes.

  15. High-Quality Draft Single-Cell Genome Sequence Belonging to the Archaeal Candidate Division SA1, Isolated from Nereus Deep in the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Ngugi, David; Stingl, Ulrich

    2018-01-01

    Candidate division SA1 encompasses a phylogenetically coherent archaeal group ubiquitous in deep hypersaline anoxic brines around the globe. Recently, the genome sequences of two cultivated representatives from hypersaline soda lake sediments were published. Here, we present a single-cell genome sequence from Nereus Deep in the Red Sea that represents a putatively novel family within SA1.

  16. High-Quality Draft Single-Cell Genome Sequence Belonging to the Archaeal Candidate Division SA1, Isolated from Nereus Deep in the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Ngugi, David

    2018-05-09

    Candidate division SA1 encompasses a phylogenetically coherent archaeal group ubiquitous in deep hypersaline anoxic brines around the globe. Recently, the genome sequences of two cultivated representatives from hypersaline soda lake sediments were published. Here, we present a single-cell genome sequence from Nereus Deep in the Red Sea that represents a putatively novel family within SA1.

  17. Carbonate microbialites and hardgrounds from Manito Lake, an alkaline, hypersaline lake in the northern Great Plains of Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Last, Fawn M.; Last, William M.; Halden, Norman M.

    2010-03-01

    Manito Lake is a large, perennial, Na-SO 4 dominated saline to hypersaline lake located in the northern Great Plains of western Canada. Significant water level decrease over the past several decades has led to reduction in volume and surface area, as well as an increase in salinity. The salinity has increased from 10 ppt to about 50 ppt TDS. This decrease in water level has exposed large areas of nearshore microbialites. These organogenic structures range in size from several cm to over a meter and often form large bioherms several meters high. They have various external morphologies, vary in mineralogical composition, and show a variety of internal fabrics from finely laminated to massive. In addition to microbiolities and bioherms, the littoral zone of Manito Lake contains a variety of carbonate hardgrounds, pavements, and cemented clastic sediments. Dolomite and aragonite are the most common minerals found in these shoreline structures, however, calcite after ikaite, monohydrocalcite, magnesian calcite, and hydromagnesite are also present. The dolomite is nonstoichiometric and calcium-rich; the magnesian calcite has about 17 mol% MgCO 3. AMS radiocarbon dating of paired organic matter and endogenic carbonate material confirms little or no reservoir affect. Although there is abundant evidence for modern carbonate mineral precipitation and microbialite formation, most of the larger microbialites formed between about 2300 and 1000 cal BP, whereas the hardgrounds, cements, and laminated crusts formed about 1000-500 cal BP.

  18. Phylogenetic analysis of a microbialite-forming microbial mat from a hypersaline lake of the Kiritimati atoll, Central Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Dominik; Arp, Gernot; Reimer, Andreas; Reitner, Joachim; Daniel, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    On the Kiritimati atoll, several lakes exhibit microbial mat-formation under different hydrochemical conditions. Some of these lakes trigger microbialite formation such as Lake 21, which is an evaporitic, hypersaline lake (salinity of approximately 170‰). Lake 21 is completely covered with a thick multilayered microbial mat. This mat is associated with the formation of decimeter-thick highly porous microbialites, which are composed of aragonite and gypsum crystals. We assessed the bacterial and archaeal community composition and its alteration along the vertical stratification by large-scale analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences of the nine different mat layers. The surface layers are dominated by aerobic, phototrophic, and halotolerant microbes. The bacterial community of these layers harbored Cyanobacteria (Halothece cluster), which were accompanied with known phototrophic members of the Bacteroidetes and Alphaproteobacteria. In deeper anaerobic layers more diverse communities than in the upper layers were present. The deeper layers were dominated by Spirochaetes, sulfate-reducing bacteria (Deltaproteobacteria), Chloroflexi (Anaerolineae and Caldilineae), purple non-sulfur bacteria (Alphaproteobacteria), purple sulfur bacteria (Chromatiales), anaerobic Bacteroidetes (Marinilabiacae), Nitrospirae (OPB95), Planctomycetes and several candidate divisions. The archaeal community, including numerous uncultured taxonomic lineages, generally changed from Euryarchaeota (mainly Halobacteria and Thermoplasmata) to uncultured members of the Thaumarchaeota (mainly Marine Benthic Group B) with increasing depth.

  19. Phylogenetic analysis of a microbialite-forming microbial mat from a hypersaline lake of the Kiritimati atoll, Central Pacific.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Schneider

    Full Text Available On the Kiritimati atoll, several lakes exhibit microbial mat-formation under different hydrochemical conditions. Some of these lakes trigger microbialite formation such as Lake 21, which is an evaporitic, hypersaline lake (salinity of approximately 170‰. Lake 21 is completely covered with a thick multilayered microbial mat. This mat is associated with the formation of decimeter-thick highly porous microbialites, which are composed of aragonite and gypsum crystals. We assessed the bacterial and archaeal community composition and its alteration along the vertical stratification by large-scale analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences of the nine different mat layers. The surface layers are dominated by aerobic, phototrophic, and halotolerant microbes. The bacterial community of these layers harbored Cyanobacteria (Halothece cluster, which were accompanied with known phototrophic members of the Bacteroidetes and Alphaproteobacteria. In deeper anaerobic layers more diverse communities than in the upper layers were present. The deeper layers were dominated by Spirochaetes, sulfate-reducing bacteria (Deltaproteobacteria, Chloroflexi (Anaerolineae and Caldilineae, purple non-sulfur bacteria (Alphaproteobacteria, purple sulfur bacteria (Chromatiales, anaerobic Bacteroidetes (Marinilabiacae, Nitrospirae (OPB95, Planctomycetes and several candidate divisions. The archaeal community, including numerous uncultured taxonomic lineages, generally changed from Euryarchaeota (mainly Halobacteria and Thermoplasmata to uncultured members of the Thaumarchaeota (mainly Marine Benthic Group B with increasing depth.

  20. The long-term effect of hydrogen on the UO2 spent fuel stability under anoxic conditions: Findings from the Cigar Lake Natural Analogue study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruno, Jordi; Spahiu, Kastriot

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We have reviewed current information on the effect of hydrogen in UO 2 spent fuel. • We explored the radiolytic models generated in the Cigar Lake project. • The Cigar Lake data supports that H 2 reduces alpha radiolysis oxidants. • The results indicate the hydrogen effect is present after 100.000 years deposition. - Abstract: The present paradigm on UO 2 spent fuel stability under anoxic conditions assumes that the potential oxidative alteration of the matrix is suppressed in the presence of the hydrogen generated by the anoxic corrosion of iron by water. The observations from the Cigar Lake Natural Analogue project indicated the long-term stability of the uraninite ore under anoxic conditions and with substantial hydrogen generation. The radiolytic models developed in the analogue project have been used to test some of the hypothesis concerning the activation of hydrogen on the uranium(IV) oxide surface. Suggestions to pathways of radiolytic oxidant consumption by other processes than uranium dioxide or sulphide oxidation are presented. The stability of the ore body for billions of year indicates the presence of processes which neutralise radiolytic oxidants and one major factor may be the presence of dissolved hydrogen in the groundwaters contacting the ore body. The results from this test would indicate that hydrogen is activated on the surface of the Cigar Lake uraninites by alpha radiation consuming the generated radiolytic oxidants

  1. Brackish to hypersaline lake dolostones of the Mississippian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Carys; Kearsey, Timothy; Davies, Sarah; Millward, David; Marshall, John

    2016-04-01

    , and 9% of all dolostone beds in the Norham Core are pedogenically altered. The isotopic composition of dolomite beds is δ18O -3.6‰ to -1.7‰ and δ13C -2.6‰ to 1.6‰ which is consistent with a brackish as opposed to marine origin. The dolostones are categorised by their sedimentary composition: Facies 1: Cemented siltstone and sandstone; Facies 2: Homogeneous micrite to micro-crystaline dolomite, within a clay matrix; Facies 3: Bedded dolomite and siltstone; Facies 4: Mixed calcite and dolomite; Facies 5: Dolomite with gypsum and anhydrite. Formation processes are diverse, and include diagenetic cementation (Facies 1), deposition in saline (brackish) lakes (Facies 2), deposition in saline lakes with clastic sediment input (Facies 3), lagoonal to shallow-marine carbonate deposition (Facies 4), and hypersaline lake to sabkha environments (Facies 5). 60% of the beds are facies 2 or 3 and their sedimentology, fauna, ichnofauna and isotopic composition indicate a brackish-water origin. Other Mississippian dolostones from around the world also contain a fairly restricted fauna and have been interpreted as brackish water deposits. The mechanism of dolomite formation under these conditions is discussed. These dolostones provided extensive coastal lakes that may have been an important habitat for tetrapods and other transitional groups during the Mississippian.

  2. A pore water study of plutonium in a seasonally anoxic lake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buesseler, K.O.; Benoit, G.; Sholkovitz, E.R.

    1985-01-01

    Data are presented on the distribution of sup(239,240)Pu in the pore waters of two cores taken from a seasonally anoxic lake. The pore water sup(239,240)Pu profile exhibits a subsurface activity maximum of 230 +- 30 μBq kg -1 in the 3-6 cm interval in June, as compared to an activity of 5 +- 3 μBq kg -1 in the overlying water. The pore water sup(239,240)Pu profile in June follows the solid phase distribution pattern of sup(239,240)Pu and also the pore water distributions of Fe and Mn. Under more reducing conditions in August, pore water sup(239,240)Pu activities drop off to undetectable levels at all depths. This rapid change in the pore water sup(239,240)Pu activity reflects the dynamic nature of Pu diagenesis in these sediments. Potential diffusional fluxes of sup(239,240)Pu into the lake's hypolimnion in June are calculated to be on the order of 2.5 μBq cm -2 y -1 . This flux would not be significant in altering the solid phase sup(239,240)Pu inventory (2.8 x 10 4 μBq cm -2 ). (author)

  3. Do copepods inhabit hypersaline waters worldwide? A short review and discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anufriieva, Elena V.

    2015-11-01

    A small number of copepod species have adapted to an existence in the extreme habitat of hypersaline water. 13 copepod species have been recorded in the hypersaline waters of Crimea (the largest peninsula in the Black Sea with over 50 hypersaline lakes). Summarizing our own and literature data, the author concludes that the Crimean extreme environment is not an exception: copepod species dwell in hypersaline waters worldwide. There are at least 26 copepod species around the world living at salinity above 100; among them 12 species are found at salinity higher than 200. In the Crimea Cletocamptus retrogressus is found at salinity 360×10-3 (with a density of 1 320 individuals/m3) and Arctodiaptomus salinus at salinity 300×10-3 (with a density of 343 individuals/m3). Those species are probably the most halotolerant copepod species in the world. High halotolerance of osmoconforming copepods may be explained by exoosmolyte consumption, mainly with food. High tolerance to many factors in adults, availability of resting stages, and an opportunity of long-distance transportation of resting stages by birds and/or winds are responsible for the wide geographic distribution of these halophilic copepods.

  4. Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane in a French meromictic lake (Lake Pavin): Who is responsible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossi, V.; Attard, E.; Birgel, D.; Schaeffer, P.; Jézéquel, D.; Lehours, A.

    2012-12-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas and its biogeochemical cycle is of primary significance to the global carbon cycle. The Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane (AOM) has been estimated to be responsible for >90% of methane consumption. This biogeochemical process has been increasingly documented during the last two decades but the underlying microbial processes and their key agents remain incompletely understood. Freshwater lakes account for 2-10% of the total emissions of methane and are therefore an important part of the global methane cycle. Lake Pavin is a French meromictic crater lake with unusual hydrological characteristics: its morphology (depth >92m, mean diameter 750m) induce that waters below 60m are never mixed with overlying waters and remain permanently anoxic. The deep anoxic waters of Lake Pavin contain high concentrations (i.e. 4 mM) of methane but, contrary to other aquatic systems, almost no methane escapes from the lake. Previous biogeochemical and modeling studies suggest that methane is preferentially consumed within the oxic-anoxic transition zone (ca. 55-60 m depth) but that ca. 30% of methane oxidation occurs in the anoxic part of the lake. Phylogenetic (16S rRNA) analyses showed that ANME generally involved in AOM (ANME-1, -2 and -3) are not present in Lake Pavin. Other archaeal groups that do not have any cultured representatives so far appear well represented in the anoxic parts of the lake but their implication in AOM is not demonstrated. The analysis of lipid biomarkers using GC-MS and LC-MS revealed the presence of a low diversity of archaeal-specific biomarkers in the superficial sediments and in the anoxic waters of the lake. Archaeol and caldarcheaol (GDGT-0) are the two main archaeal core lipids detected; other biomarkers generally present in ANME such as pentamethylicosane or hydroxyarchaeol are not present. However, the stable carbon isotopic composition of archaeol (δ13C = -18‰) and of the biphytane chain of GDGT-0 (δ13C

  5. Metal impacts on microbial biomass in the anoxic sediments of a contaminated lake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gough, Heidi L.; Dahl, Amy L.; Nolan, Melissa A.; Gaillard, Jean-Francois; Stahl, David A.

    2008-04-26

    Little is known about the long-term impacts of metal contamination on the microbiota of anoxic lake sediments. In this study, we examined microbial biomass and metals (arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, iron, lead, manganese, and zinc) in the sediments of Lake DePue, a backwater lake located near a former zinc smelter. Sediment core samples were examined using two independent measures for microbial biomass (total microscopic counts and total phospholipid-phosphate concentrations), and for various fractions of each metal (pore water extracts, sequential extractions, and total extracts of all studied metals and zinc speciation by X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS). Zinc concentrations were up to 1000 times higher than reported for sediments in the adjacent Illinois River, and ranged from 21,400 mg/kg near the source to 1,680 mg/kg near the river. However, solid metal fractions were not well correlated with pore water concentrations, and were not good predictors of biomass concentrations. Instead, biomass, which varied among sites by as much as two-times, was inversely correlated with concentrations of pore water zinc and arsenic as established by multiple linear regression. Monitoring of other parameters known to naturally influence biomass in sediments (e.g., organic carbon concentrations, nitrogen concentrations, pH, sediment texture, and macrophytes) revealed no differences that could explain observed biomass trends. This study provides strong support for control of microbial abundance by pore water metal concentrations in contaminated freshwater sediments.

  6. Controls on the pH of hyper-saline lakes - A lesson from the Dead Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golan, Rotem; Gavrieli, Ittai; Ganor, Jiwchar; Lazar, Boaz

    2016-01-01

    high ionic strength (TDS = 348 g/L) and the dominance of the divalent cation, Mg2+. Other natural hyper-saline brines with high concentration of divalent cations such as Kunteyi Lake in China and Don-Juan Pond in Antarctica follow the same general pattern. In contrast, the high pH of soda lakes results not only from their high TA but also by the dominance of the monovalent cation, Na+. Our study emphasizes the strong control of brine composition on pKB‧ and pH. These factors should be taken into consideration when reconstructing past and present environmental evaporitic environments.

  7. Radiocarbon analysis of halophilic microbial lipids from an Australian salt lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, P. Sargent; Jones, Claudia M.; Fallon, Stewart J.; Brocks, Jochen J.; George, Simon C.

    2012-01-01

    Assigning accurate dates to hypersaline sediments opens important terrestrial records of local and regional paleoecologies and paleoclimatology. However, as of yet no conventional method of dating hypersaline systems has been widely adopted. Biomarker, mineralogical, and radiocarbon analyses of sediments and organic extracts from a shallow (13 cm) core from a hypersaline playa, Lake Tyrrell, southeastern Australia, produce a coherent age-depth curve beginning with modern microbial mats and extending to ~ 7500 cal yr BP. These analyses are furthermore used to identify and constrain the timing of the most recent change in hydrological regime at Lake Tyrrell, a shift from a clay deposit to the precipitation of evaporitic sands occurring at some time between ~ 4500 and 7000 yr. These analyses show the potential for widespread dating of hypersaline systems integrating the biomarker approach, reinforce the value of the radiocarbon content of biomarkers in understanding the flow of carbon in modern ecologies, and validate the temporal dimension of data provided by biomarkers when dating late Quaternary sediments.

  8. Anaerobic oxidation of methane by sulfate in hypersaline groundwater of the Dead Sea aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avrahamov, N; Antler, G; Yechieli, Y; Gavrieli, I; Joye, S B; Saxton, M; Turchyn, A V; Sivan, O

    2014-01-01

    Geochemical and microbial evidence points to anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) likely coupled with bacterial sulfate reduction in the hypersaline groundwater of the Dead Sea (DS) alluvial aquifer. Groundwater was sampled from nine boreholes drilled along the Arugot alluvial fan next to the DS. The groundwater samples were highly saline (up to 6300 mm chlorine), anoxic, and contained methane. A mass balance calculation demonstrates that the very low δ13CDIC in this groundwater is due to anaerobic methane oxidation. Sulfate depletion coincident with isotope enrichment of sulfur and oxygen isotopes in the sulfate suggests that sulfate reduction is associated with this AOM. DNA extraction and 16S amplicon sequencing were used to explore the microbial community present and were found to be microbial composition indicative of bacterial sulfate reducers associated with anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) driving AOM. The net sulfate reduction seems to be primarily controlled by the salinity and the available methane and is substantially lower as salinity increases (2.5 mm sulfate removal at 3000 mm chlorine but only 0.5 mm sulfate removal at 6300 mm chlorine). Low overall sulfur isotope fractionation observed (34ε = 17 ± 3.5‰) hints at high rates of sulfate reduction, as has been previously suggested for sulfate reduction coupled with methane oxidation. The new results demonstrate the presence of sulfate-driven AOM in terrestrial hypersaline systems and expand our understanding of how microbial life is sustained under the challenging conditions of an extremely hypersaline environment. PMID:25039851

  9. Use of an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) to Measure Hypersaline Bidirectional Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, K.K.; Loving, B.L.; ,

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey measures the exchange of flow between the north and south parts of Great Salt Lake, Utah, as part of a monitoring program. Turbidity and bidirectional flow through the breach in the causeway that divides the lake into two parts makes it difficult to measure discharge with conventional streamflow techniques. An acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) can be used to more accurately define the angles of flow and the location of the interface between the layers of flow. Because of the high salinity levels measured in Great Salt Lake (60-280 parts per thousand), special methods had to be developed to adjust ADCP-computed discharges for the increased speed of sound in hypersaline waters and for water entrained at the interface between flow layers.

  10. Viruses Occur Incorporated in Biogenic High-Mg Calcite from Hypersaline Microbial Mats

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wit, Rutger; Gautret, Pascale; Bettarel, Yvan; Roques, Cécile; Marlière, Christian; Ramonda, Michel; Nguyen Thanh, Thuy; Tran Quang, Huy; Bouvier, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Using three different microscopy techniques (epifluorescence, electronic and atomic force microscopy), we showed that high-Mg calcite grains in calcifying microbial mats from the hypersaline lake “La Salada de Chiprana”, Spain, contain viruses with a diameter of 50–80 nm. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer analysis revealed that they contain nitrogen and phosphorus in a molar ratio of ~9, which is typical for viruses. Nucleic acid staining revealed that they contain DNA or RNA. As characteristic for hypersaline environments, the concentrations of free and attached viruses were high (>1010 viruses per g of mat). In addition, we showed that acid treatment (dissolution of calcite) resulted in release of viruses into suspension and estimated that there were ~15 × 109 viruses per g of calcite. We suggest that virus-mineral interactions are one of the possible ways for the formation of nano-sized structures often described as “nanobacteria” and that viruses may play a role in initiating calcification. PMID:26115121

  11. Denitrification in a hypersaline lake–aquifer system (Pétrola Basin, Central Spain): The role of recent organic matter and Cretaceous organic rich sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gómez-Alday, J.J.; Carrey, R.; Valiente, N.; Otero, N.; Soler, A.; Ayora, C.; Sanz, D.

    2014-01-01

    Agricultural regions in semi-arid to arid climates with associated saline wetlands are one of the most vulnerable environments to nitrate pollution. The Pétrola Basin was declared vulnerable to NO 3 − pollution by the Regional Government in 1998, and the hypersaline lake was classified as a heavily modified body of water. The study assessed groundwater NO 3 − through the use of multi-isotopic tracers (δ 15 N, δ 34 S, δ 13 C, δ 18 O) coupled to hydrochemistry in the aquifer connected to the eutrophic lake. Hydrogeologically, the basin shows two main flow components: regional groundwater flow from recharge areas (Zone 1) to the lake (Zone 2), and a density-driven flow from surface water to the underlying aquifer (Zone 3). In Zones 1 and 2, δ 15 N NO 3 and δ 18 O NO 3 suggest that NO 3 − from slightly volatilized ammonium synthetic fertilizers is only partially denitrified. The natural attenuation of NO 3 − can occur by heterotrophic reactions. However, autotrophic reactions cannot be ruled out. In Zone 3, the freshwater–saltwater interface (down to 12–16 m below the ground surface) is a reactive zone for NO 3 − attenuation. Tritium data suggest that the absence of NO 3 − in the deepest zones of the aquifer under the lake can be attributed to a regional groundwater flow with long residence time. In hypersaline lakes the geometry of the density-driven flow can play an important role in the transport of chemical species that can be related to denitrification processes. - Highlights: • Denitrification comes about in a hypersaline lake–aquifer system. • Nitrate in the basin is derived from synthetic fertilizers slightly volatilized. • Organic carbon oxidation is likely to be the main electron donor in denitrification. • Density driven flow transports organic carbon to deeper zones of the aquifer

  12. A case for the protection of saline and hypersaline environments: a microbiological perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Varun G; Mormile, Melanie R

    2017-08-01

    Saline and hypersaline environments are known for their unique geochemical properties, microbial populations and aesthetic appeal. Microbial activities and a spectrum of diversity seen in hypersaline environments are distinct with many novel species being identified and reported on a regular basis. Many distinguishing characteristics about the adaptation, morphology, evolutionary history, and potential environmental and biotechnological applications of these organisms are continually investigated. An abundance of interdisciplinary activities and opportunities exist to explore and understand the importance of these environments that potentially hold promising solutions for current and future global issues. Therefore, it is critical to conserve these unique environments and limit the damage inflicted by anthropogenic influences. Increased salinization due to water diversions, undesired freshening, extensive mineral extraction, sewage effluents, pollution due to agricultural runoff and industrial processes, urbanization, and global climate change are factors negatively affecting hypersaline lakes and their surrounding environments. If these harmful effects continue to proceed at the current or even accelerated rates, irrevocable consequences for these environments will occur, resulting in the loss of potential opportunities to gain new knowledge of the biogeochemistry as well as beneficial microbial populations closely associated with these unique and interesting environments. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Organismal and spatial partitioning of energy and macronutrient transformations within a hypersaline mat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mobberley, Jennifer M.; Lindemann, Stephen R.; Bernstein, Hans C.; Moran, James J.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Babauta, Jerome; Hu, Dehong; Beyenal, Haluk; Nelson, William C.

    2017-03-21

    Phototrophic mat communities are model ecosystems for studying energy cycling and elemental transformations because complete biogeochemical cycles occur over millimeter-to-centimeter scales. Characterization of energy and nutrient capture within hypersaline phototrophic mats has focused on specific processes and organisms, however little is known about community-wide distribution of and linkages between these processes. To investigate energy and macronutrient capture and flow through a structured community, the spatial and organismal distribution of metabolic functions within a compact hypersaline mat community from Hot Lake have been broadly elucidated through species-resolved metagenomics and geochemical, microbial diversity, and metabolic gradient measurements. Draft reconstructed genomes of abundant organisms revealed three dominant cyanobacterial populations differentially distributed across the top layers of the mat suggesting niche separation along light and oxygen gradients. Many organisms contained diverse functional profiles, allowing for metabolic response to changing conditions within the mat. Organisms with partial nitrogen and sulfur metabolisms were widespread indicating dependence upon metabolite exchange. In addition, changes in community spatial structure were observed over the diel. These results indicate that organisms within the mat community have adapted to the temporally dynamic environmental gradients in this hypersaline mat through metabolic flexibility and fluid syntrophic interactions, including shifts in spatial arrangements.

  14. Metagenomic insights into the uncultured diversity and physiology of microbes in four hypersaline soda lake brines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Dafni Vavourakis

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Soda lakes are salt lakes with a naturally alkaline pH due to evaporative concentration of sodium carbonates in the absence of major divalent cations. Hypersaline soda brines harbor microbial communities with a high species- and strain-level archaeal diversity and a large proportion of still uncultured poly-extremophiles compared to neutral brines of similar salinities. We present the first ‘metagenomic snapshots’ of microbial communities thriving in the brines of four shallow soda lakes from the Kulunda Steppe (Altai, Russia covering a salinity range from 170 to 400 g/L. Both amplicon sequencing of 16S rRNA fragments and direct metagenomic sequencing showed that the top-level taxa abundance was linked to the ambient salinity: Bacteroidetes, Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria were dominant below a salinity of 250 g/L, Euryarchaeota at higher salinities. Within these taxa, amplicon sequences related to Halorubrum, Natrinema, Gracilimonas, purple non-sulfur bacteria (Rhizobiales, Rhodobacter and Rhodobaca and chemolithotrophic sulfur oxidizers (Thioalkalivibrio were highly abundant. Twenty-four draft population genomes from novel members and ecotypes within the Nanohaloarchaea, Halobacteria and Bacteroidetes were reconstructed to explore their metabolic features, environmental abundance and strategies for osmotic adaptation. The Halobacteria- and Bacteroidetes-related draft genomes belong to putative aerobic heterotrophs, likely with the capacity to ferment sugars in the absence of oxygen. Members from both taxonomic groups are likely involved in primary organic carbon degradation, since some of the reconstructed genomes encode the ability to hydrolyze recalcitrant substrates, such as cellulose and chitin. Putative sodium-pumping rhodopsins were found in both a Flavobacteriaceae- and a Chitinophagaceae-related draft genome. The predicted proteomes of both the latter and a Rhodothermaceae-related draft genome were indicative of a

  15. Diversity of methanogens and sulfate-reducing bacteria in the interfaces of five deep-sea anoxic brines of the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Guan, Yue

    2015-11-01

    Oceanic deep hypersaline anoxic basins (DHABs) are characterized by drastic changes in physico-chemical conditions in the transition from overlaying seawater to brine body. Brine-seawater interfaces (BSIs) of several DHABs across the Mediterranean Sea have been shown to possess methanogenic and sulfate-reducing activities, yet no systematic studies have been conducted to address the potential functional diversity of methanogenic and sulfate-reducing communities in the Red Sea DHABs. Here, we evaluated the relative abundance of Bacteria and Archaea using quantitative PCR and conducted phylogenetic analyses of nearly full-length 16S rRNA genes as well as functional marker genes encoding the alpha subunits of methyl-coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) and dissimilatory sulfite reductase (dsrA). Bacteria predominated over Archaea in most locations, the majority of which were affiliated with Deltaproteobacteria, while Thaumarchaeota were the most prevalent Archaea in all sampled locations. The upper convective layers of Atlantis II Deep, which bear increasingly harsh environmental conditions, were dominated by members of the class Thermoplasmata (Marine Benthic Group E and Mediterranean Sea Brine Lakes Group 1). Our study revealed unique microbial compositions, the presence of niche-specific groups, and collectively, a higher diversity of sulfate-reducing communities compared to methanogenic communities in all five studied locations. © 2015 Institut Pasteur.

  16. Diversity of methanogens and sulfate-reducing bacteria in the interfaces of five deep-sea anoxic brines of the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Guan, Yue; Hikmawan, Tyas; Antunes, Andre; Ngugi, David; Stingl, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Oceanic deep hypersaline anoxic basins (DHABs) are characterized by drastic changes in physico-chemical conditions in the transition from overlaying seawater to brine body. Brine-seawater interfaces (BSIs) of several DHABs across the Mediterranean Sea have been shown to possess methanogenic and sulfate-reducing activities, yet no systematic studies have been conducted to address the potential functional diversity of methanogenic and sulfate-reducing communities in the Red Sea DHABs. Here, we evaluated the relative abundance of Bacteria and Archaea using quantitative PCR and conducted phylogenetic analyses of nearly full-length 16S rRNA genes as well as functional marker genes encoding the alpha subunits of methyl-coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) and dissimilatory sulfite reductase (dsrA). Bacteria predominated over Archaea in most locations, the majority of which were affiliated with Deltaproteobacteria, while Thaumarchaeota were the most prevalent Archaea in all sampled locations. The upper convective layers of Atlantis II Deep, which bear increasingly harsh environmental conditions, were dominated by members of the class Thermoplasmata (Marine Benthic Group E and Mediterranean Sea Brine Lakes Group 1). Our study revealed unique microbial compositions, the presence of niche-specific groups, and collectively, a higher diversity of sulfate-reducing communities compared to methanogenic communities in all five studied locations. © 2015 Institut Pasteur.

  17. Light-Dependent Aerobic Methane Oxidation Reduces Methane Emissions from Seasonally Stratified Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, Kirsten; Milucka, Jana; Brand, Andreas; Littmann, Sten; Wehrli, Bernhard; Kuypers, Marcel M. M.; Schubert, Carsten J.

    2015-01-01

    Lakes are a natural source of methane to the atmosphere and contribute significantly to total emissions compared to the oceans. Controls on methane emissions from lake surfaces, particularly biotic processes within anoxic hypolimnia, are only partially understood. Here we investigated biological methane oxidation in the water column of the seasonally stratified Lake Rotsee. A zone of methane oxidation extending from the oxic/anoxic interface into anoxic waters was identified by chemical profiling of oxygen, methane and δ13C of methane. Incubation experiments with 13C-methane yielded highest oxidation rates within the oxycline, and comparable rates were measured in anoxic waters. Despite predominantly anoxic conditions within the zone of methane oxidation, known groups of anaerobic methanotrophic archaea were conspicuously absent. Instead, aerobic gammaproteobacterial methanotrophs were identified as the active methane oxidizers. In addition, continuous oxidation and maximum rates always occurred under light conditions. These findings, along with the detection of chlorophyll a, suggest that aerobic methane oxidation is tightly coupled to light-dependent photosynthetic oxygen production both at the oxycline and in the anoxic bottom layer. It is likely that this interaction between oxygenic phototrophs and aerobic methanotrophs represents a widespread mechanism by which methane is oxidized in lake water, thus diminishing its release into the atmosphere. PMID:26193458

  18. Microbiological reduction of Sb(V) in anoxic freshwater sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oremland, Ronald S.; Kulp, Thomas R.; Miller, Laurence G.; Braiotta, Franco; Webb, Samuel M.; Kocar, Benjamin D; Blum, Jodi S.

    2014-01-01

    Microbiological reduction of millimolar concentrations of Sb(V) to Sb(III) was observed in anoxic sediments from two freshwater settings: (1) a Sb- and As-contaminated mine site (Stibnite Mine) in central Idaho and 2) an uncontaminated suburban lake (Searsville Lake) in the San Francisco Bay Area. Rates of Sb(V) reduction in anoxic sediment microcosms and enrichment cultures were enhanced by amendment with lactate or acetate as electron donors but not by H2, and no reduction occurred in sterilized controls. Addition of 2-14C-acetate to Stibnite Mine microcosms resulted in the production of 14CO2 coupled to Sb(V) reduction, suggesting that this process proceeds by a dissimilatory respiratory pathway in those sediments. Antimony(V) reduction in Searsville Lake sediments was not coupled to acetate mineralization and may be associated with Sb-resistance. The microcosms and enrichment cultures also reduced sulfate, and the precipitation of insoluble Sb(III)-sulfide complexes was a major sink for reduced Sb. The reduction of Sb(V) by Stibnite Mine sediments was inhibited by As(V), suggesting that As(V) is a preferred electron acceptor for the indigenous community. These findings indicate a novel pathway for anaerobic microbiological respiration and suggest that communities capable of reducing high concentrations of Sb(V) commonly occur naturally in the environment.

  19. Denitrification in a hypersaline lake–aquifer system (Pétrola Basin, Central Spain): The role of recent organic matter and Cretaceous organic rich sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gómez-Alday, J.J., E-mail: JuanJose.Gomez@uclm.es [Hydrogeology Group, Institute for Regional Development (IDR), University of Castilla–La Mancha (UCLM), Campus Universitario s/n, 02071 Albacete (Spain); Carrey, R., E-mail: raulcarrey@ub.edu [Grup d’Mineralogia Aplicada i Medi Ambient, Dep. Cristallografia, Mineralogia i Dipòsits Minerals, Facultat de Geologia, Universitat de Barcelona, C/ Martí i Franquès s/n, 08028, Barcelona (Spain); Valiente, N., E-mail: Nicolas.Valiente@uclm.es [Hydrogeology Group, Institute for Regional Development (IDR), University of Castilla–La Mancha (UCLM), Campus Universitario s/n, 02071 Albacete (Spain); Otero, N., E-mail: notero@ub.edu [Grup d’Mineralogia Aplicada i Medi Ambient, Dep. Cristallografia, Mineralogia i Dipòsits Minerals, Facultat de Geologia, Universitat de Barcelona, C/ Martí i Franquès s/n, 08028, Barcelona (Spain); Soler, A., E-mail: albertsolergil@ub.edu [Grup d’Mineralogia Aplicada i Medi Ambient, Dep. Cristallografia, Mineralogia i Dipòsits Minerals, Facultat de Geologia, Universitat de Barcelona, C/ Martí i Franquès s/n, 08028, Barcelona (Spain); Ayora, C., E-mail: cayora1@gmail.com [Grup d' Hidrologia Subterrània (GHS), Institut de Diagnóstic Ambiental i Estudis de l' Aigua (IDAEA-CSIC), C/Jordi Girona 18, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Sanz, D. [Hydrogeology Group, Institute for Regional Development (IDR), University of Castilla–La Mancha (UCLM), Campus Universitario s/n, 02071 Albacete (Spain); and others

    2014-11-01

    Agricultural regions in semi-arid to arid climates with associated saline wetlands are one of the most vulnerable environments to nitrate pollution. The Pétrola Basin was declared vulnerable to NO{sub 3}{sup −} pollution by the Regional Government in 1998, and the hypersaline lake was classified as a heavily modified body of water. The study assessed groundwater NO{sub 3}{sup −} through the use of multi-isotopic tracers (δ{sup 15}N, δ{sup 34}S, δ{sup 13}C, δ{sup 18}O) coupled to hydrochemistry in the aquifer connected to the eutrophic lake. Hydrogeologically, the basin shows two main flow components: regional groundwater flow from recharge areas (Zone 1) to the lake (Zone 2), and a density-driven flow from surface water to the underlying aquifer (Zone 3). In Zones 1 and 2, δ{sup 15}N{sub NO{sub 3}} and δ{sup 18}O{sub NO{sub 3}} suggest that NO{sub 3}{sup −} from slightly volatilized ammonium synthetic fertilizers is only partially denitrified. The natural attenuation of NO{sub 3}{sup −} can occur by heterotrophic reactions. However, autotrophic reactions cannot be ruled out. In Zone 3, the freshwater–saltwater interface (down to 12–16 m below the ground surface) is a reactive zone for NO{sub 3}{sup −} attenuation. Tritium data suggest that the absence of NO{sub 3}{sup −} in the deepest zones of the aquifer under the lake can be attributed to a regional groundwater flow with long residence time. In hypersaline lakes the geometry of the density-driven flow can play an important role in the transport of chemical species that can be related to denitrification processes. - Highlights: • Denitrification comes about in a hypersaline lake–aquifer system. • Nitrate in the basin is derived from synthetic fertilizers slightly volatilized. • Organic carbon oxidation is likely to be the main electron donor in denitrification. • Density driven flow transports organic carbon to deeper zones of the aquifer.

  20. Microbially mediated barite dissolution in anoxic brines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouyang, Bingjie; Akob, Denise M.; Dunlap, Darren; Renock, Devon

    2017-01-01

    Fluids injected into shale formations during hydraulic fracturing of black shale return with extraordinarily high total-dissolved-solids (TDS) and high concentrations of barium (Ba) and radium (Ra). Barite, BaSO_4, has been implicated as a possible source of Ba as well as a problematic mineral scale that forms on internal well surfaces, often in close association with radiobarite, (Ba,Ra)SO_4. The dissolution of barite by abiotic processes is well quantified. However, the identification of microbial communities in flowback and produced water necessitates the need to understand barite dissolution in the presence of bacteria. Therefore, we evaluated the rates and mechanisms of abiotic and microbially-mediated barite dissolution under anoxic and hypersaline conditions in the laboratory. Barite dissolution experiments were conducted with bacterial enrichment cultures established from produced water from Marcellus Shale wells located in northcentral Pennsylvania. These cultures were dominated by anaerobic halophilic bacteria from the genus Halanaerobium. Dissolved Ba was determined by ICP-OES and barite surfaces were investigated by SEM and AFM. Our results reveal that: 1) higher amounts of barium (up to ∼5 × ) are released from barite in the presence of Halanaerobium cultures compared to brine controls after 30 days of reaction, 2) etch pits that develop on the barite (001) surface in the presence of Halanaerobium exhibit a morphology that is distinct from those that form during control experiments without bacteria, 3) etch pits that develop in the presence of Halanaerobium exhibit a morphology that is similar to the morphology of etch pits formed in the presence of strong organic chelators, EDTA and DTPA, and 4) experiments using dialysis membranes to separate barite from bacteria suggest that direct contact between the two is not required in order to promote dissolution. These results suggest that Halanaerobium increase the rate of barite dissolution in anoxic

  1. Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in hypersaline environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Fernando Martins

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Literature on hydrocarbon degradation in extreme hypersaline media presents studies that point to a negative effect of salinity increase on hydrocarbonoclastic activity, while several others report an opposite tendency. Based on information available in the literature, we present a discussion on the reasons that justify these contrary results. Despite the fact that microbial ability to metabolize hydrocarbons is found in extreme hypersaline media, indeed some factors are critical for the occurrence of hydrocarbon degradation in such environments. How these factors affect hydrocarbon degradation and their implications for the assessment of hydrocarbon biodegradation in hypersaline environments are presented in this review.

  2. Discovery of enzymes for toluene synthesis from anoxic microbial communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beller, Harry R.; Rodrigues, Andria V.; Zargar, Kamrun

    2018-01-01

    Microbial toluene biosynthesis was reported in anoxic lake sediments more than three decades ago, but the enzyme catalyzing this biochemically challenging reaction has never been identified. Here we report the toluene-producing enzyme PhdB, a glycyl radical enzyme of bacterial origin that catalyzes...... phenylacetate decarboxylation, and its cognate activating enzyme PhdA, a radical S-adenosylmethionine enzyme, discovered in two distinct anoxic microbial communities that produce toluene. The unconventional process of enzyme discovery from a complex microbial community (>300,000 genes), rather than from...... a microbial isolate, involved metagenomics- and metaproteomics-enabled biochemistry, as well as in vitro confirmation of activity with recombinant enzymes. This work expands the known catalytic range of glycyl radical enzymes (only seven reaction types had been characterized previously) and aromatic...

  3. Pressure retarded osmosis from hypersaline sources - A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bajraktari, Niada; Hélix-Nielsen, Claus; Madsen, Henrik T.

    2017-01-01

    for commercialization. The scope of this paper is to review the existing knowledge on the use of hypersaline waters in the salinity gradient process, pressure retarded osmosis. Although only few papers have had the specific aim of investigating hypersaline waters, concentrated solutions have been used in many papers...

  4. Microbial stratification and microbially catalyzed processes along a hypersaline chemocline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, A.; Joye, S. B.; Teske, A.

    2017-12-01

    Orca Basin is the largest deep hypersaline anoxic basin in the world, covering over 400 km2. Located at the bottom of the Gulf of Mexico, this body of water reaches depths of 200 meters and is 8 times denser (and more saline) than the overlying seawater. The sharp pycnocline prevents any significant vertical mixing and serves as a particle trap for sinking organic matter. These rapid changes in salinity, oxygen, organic matter, and other geochemical parameters present unique conditions for the microbial communities present. We collected samples in 10m intervals throughout the chemocline. After filtering the water, we used high-throughput bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA gene sequencing to characterize the changing microbial community along the Orca Basin chemocline. The results reveal a dominance of microbial taxa whose biogeochemical function is entirely unknown. We then used metagenomic sequencing and reconstructed genomes for select samples, revealing the potential dominant metabolic processes in the Orca Basin chemocline. Understanding how these unique geochemical conditions shape microbial communities and metabolic capabilities will have implications for the ocean's biogeochemical cycles and the consequences of expanding oxygen minimum zones.

  5. Anaerobic methane oxidation and aerobic methane production in an east African great lake (Lake Kivu)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roland, Fleur A.E.; Morana, Cédric; Darchambeau, François

    2018-01-01

    We investigated CH4 oxidation in the water column of Lake Kivu, a deep meromictic tropical lake with CH4-rich anoxic deep waters. Depth profiles of dissolved gases (CH4 and N2O) and a diversity of potential electron acceptors for anaerobic CH4 oxidation (NO3 −, SO4 2−, Fe and Mn oxides) were dete...

  6. Lake Cadagno

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonolla, Mauro; Storelli, Nicola; Danza, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Lake Cadagno (26 ha) is a crenogenic meromictic lake located in the Swiss Alps at 1921 m asl with a maximum depth of 21 m. The presence of crystalline rocks and a dolomite vein rich in gypsum in the catchment area makes the lake a typical “sulphuretum ” dominated by coupled carbon and sulphur...... cycles. The chemocline lies at about 12 m depth, stabilized by density differences of salt-rich water supplied by sub-aquatic springs to the monimolimnion and of electrolyte-poor surface water feeding the mixolimnion. Steep sulphide and light gradients in the chemocline support the growth of a large...... in the chemocline. Small-celled PSB together with the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfocapsa thiozymogenes sp. form stable aggregates in the lake, which represent small microenvironments with an internal sulphur cycle. Eukaryotic primary producers in the anoxic zones are dominated by Cryptomonas phaseolus...

  7. Investigations of Methane Production in Hypersaline Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebout, Brad M.

    2015-01-01

    The recent reports of methane in the atmosphere of Mars, as well as the findings of hypersaline paleo-environments on that planet, have underscored the need to evaluate the importance of biological (as opposed to geological) trace gas production and consumption. Methane in the atmosphere of Mars may be an indication of life but might also be a consequence of geologic activity and/or the thermal alteration of ancient organic matter. Hypersaline environments have now been reported to be extremely likely in several locations in our solar system, including: Mars, Europa, and Enceladus. Modern hypersaline microbial mat communities, (thought to be analogous to those present on the early Earth at a period of time when Mars was experiencing very similar environmental conditions), have been shown to produce methane. However, very little is known about the physical and/or biological controls imposed upon the rates at which methane, and other important trace gases, are produced and consumed in these environments. We describe here the results of our investigations of methane production in hypersaline environments, including field sites in Chile, Baja California Mexico, California, USA and the United Arab Emirates. We have measured high concentrations of methane in bubbles of gas produced both in the sediments underlying microbial mats, as well as in areas not colonized by microbial mats in the Guerrero Negro hypersaline ecosystem, Baja California Mexico, in Chile, and in salt ponds on the San Francisco Bay. The carbon isotopic (d13C) composition of the methane in the bubbles exhibited an extremely wide range of values, (ca. -75 per mille ca. -25 per mille). The hydrogen isotopic composition of the methane (d2H) ranged from -60 to -30per mille and -450 to -350per mille. These isotopic values are outside of the range of values normally considered to be biogenic, however incubations of the sediments in contact with these gas bubbles reveals that the methane is indeed being

  8. Update of “Biodiversity of the Hypersaline Urmia Lake National Park (NW Iran”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Asem

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Urmia Lake, an endorheic salt lake in northwestern Iran, was registered in the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands as a wetland of international importance, also a UNESCO biosphere reserve. In this review, we have updated our last checklist in 2014 with available information on the biodiversity of the lake.

  9. Diversity of sulfur-cycle prokaryotes in freshwater lake sediments investigated using aprA as the functional marker gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Tomohiro; Kojima, Hisaya; Takano, Yoshinori; Fukui, Manabu

    2013-09-01

    The diversity of sulfate-reducing prokaryotes (SRPs) and sulfur-oxidizing prokaryotes (SOPs) in freshwater lake ecosystems was investigated by cloning and sequencing of the aprA gene, which encodes for a key enzyme in dissimilatory sulfate reduction and sulfur oxidation. To understand their diversity better, the spatial distribution of aprA genes was investigated in sediments collected from six geographically distant lakes in Antarctica and Japan, including a hypersaline lake for comparison. The microbial community compositions of freshwater sediments and a hypersaline sediment showed notable differences. The clones affiliated with Desulfobacteraceae and Desulfobulbaceae were frequently detected in all freshwater lake sediments. The SOP community was mainly composed of four major phylogenetic groups. One of them formed a monophyletic cluster with a sulfur-oxidizing betaproteobacterium, Sulfuricella denitrificans, but the others were not assigned to specific genera. In addition, the AprA sequences, which were not clearly affiliated to either SRP or SOP lineages, dominated the libraries from four freshwater lake sediments. The results showed the wide distribution of some sulfur-cycle prokaryotes across geographical distances and supported the idea that metabolic flexibility is an important feature for SRP survival in low-sulfate environments. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Methylohalobius crimeensis gen. nov., sp. nov., a moderately halophilic, methanotrophic bacterium isolated from hypersaline lakes of Crimea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyer, Jürgen; Berger, Ursula; Hardt, Martin; Dunfield, Peter F

    2005-09-01

    A novel genus and species are proposed for two strains of methanotrophic bacteria isolated from hypersaline lakes in the Crimean Peninsula of Ukraine. Strains 10Ki(T) and 4Kr are moderate halophiles that grow optimally at 1-1.5 M (5.8-8.7%, w/v) NaCl and tolerate NaCl concentrations from 0.2 M up to 2.5 M (1.2-15%). This optimum and upper limit are the highest for any methanotrophic bacterium known to date. The strains are Gram-negative, aerobic, non-pigmented, motile, coccoid to spindle-shaped bacteria that grow on methane or methanol only and utilize the ribulose monophosphate pathway for carbon assimilation. They are neutrophilic (growth occurs only in the range pH 6.5-7.5) and mesophilic (optimum growth occurs at 30 degrees C). On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence phylogeny, strains 10Ki(T) and 4Kr represent a type I methanotroph within the 'Gammaproteobacteria'. However, the 16S rRNA gene sequence displays <91.5 % identity to any public-domain sequence. The most closely related methanotrophic bacterium is the thermophilic strain HB. The DNA G+C content is 58.7 mol%. The major phospholipid fatty acids are 18:1omega7 (52-61%), 16:0 (22-23%) and 16:1omega7 (14-20%). The dominance of 18:1 over 16:0 and 16:1 fatty acids is unique among known type I methanotrophs. The data suggest that strains 10Ki(T) and 4Kr should be considered as belonging to a novel genus and species of type I methanotrophic bacteria, for which the name Methylohalobius crimeensis gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. Strain 10Ki(T) (=DSM 16011(T)=ATCC BAA-967(T)) is the type strain.

  11. Organic geochemistry and brine composition in Great Salt, Mono, and Walker Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domagalski, Joseph L.; Orem, W.H.; Eugster, H.P.

    1989-01-01

    aromatic carbon and the absence of chemical structures indicative of the lignin of vascular plants. The dissolved organic carbon of the Mono Lake pore fluids is structurally related to humic acid and is also related to carbohydrate metabolism. The alkaline pore fluids, due to high pH, solubilize high molecular weight organic matter from the sediments. This hydrophilic material is a metal complexing agent. Despite very high algal productivities, organic carbon accumulation can be low in stratified lakes if the anoxic bottom waters are hypersaline with high concentrations of sulfate ion. Labile organic matter is recycled to the water column and the sedimentary organic matter is relatively nonsusceptible to bacterial metabolism. As a result, pore-fluid dissolved organic carbon and metal-organic complexation are low. ?? 1989.

  12. Salt lakes of Western Australia - Natural abiotic formation of volatile organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, T.; Studenroth, S.; Mulder, I.; Tubbesing, C.; Kotte, K.; Ofner, J.; Junkermann, W.; Schöler, H. F.

    2012-04-01

    Western Australia is a semi-/arid region that is heavily influenced by global climate change and agricultural land use. The area is known for its many ephemeral saline and hypersaline lakes with a wide range of hydrogeochemical parameters that have gradually changed over the last fifty years. Historically, the region was covered by eucalyptus trees and shrubs, but was cleared mainly within 10 years after WWII to make room for wheat and live stock. After the clearance of the deep rooted native plants the groundwater started to rise, bringing increased amounts of dissolved salts and minerals to the surface and discharging them into streams and lakes. Thus most of Western Australia is influenced by secondary salinisation (soil salting) [1]. Another problem is that the discharged minerals affect the pH of ground and surface water, which ranges from acidic to slightly basic. During the 2011 campaign surface water was measured with a pH between 2.5 and 7.1. Another phenomenon in Western Australia is the decrease of rainfall over the last decades assumed to be linked to the secondary salinisation. The rising saline and mineral rich groundwater increases the biotical and abiotical activity of the salt lakes. Halogenated and non-halogenated volatile organic compounds emitted from those lakes undergo fast oxidation and chemical reactions to form small particles modifying cloud microphysics and thus suppressing rain events [2]. Our objective is to gain a better understanding of this extreme environment with its hypersaline acidic lakes with regard to the potential abiotic formation of volatile organic compounds and its impact on the local climate. In spring 2011 fifty-three sediment samples from ten salt lakes in the Lake King region where taken, freeze-dried and ground. In order to simulate the abiotic formation of volatile organic compounds the soil samples were resuspended with water in gas-tight headspace vials. The headspace was measured using a purge and trap GC

  13. Limnology and plankton diversity of salt lakes from Transylvanian Basin (Romania: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mircea Alexe

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, we review the current knowledge on genesis, limnology and biodiversity of salt lakes distributed around the inner contour of Eastern Carpathian arc (Transylvanian Basin, Central Romania. Transylvanian salt lakes formed on ancient halite (NaCl deposits following natural processes or quarrying activities.  Most of these lakes are located in eastern (Sovata area, southern (Ocna Sibiului, and western (Turda-Cojocna parts of the Transylvanian Basin, have small surfaces (0.1-4 ha, variable depths (2-100 m, are hypersaline (>10%, w/v, total salts, mainly NaCl and permanently stratified. As consequence of steady salinity/density gradient, heat entrapment below surface layer (i.e., heliothermy develops in several Transylvanian lakes. The physical and chemical water stratification is mirrored in the partition of plankton diversity. Lakes with less saline (2-10% salinity water layers appear to harbor halotolerant representatives of phyto- (e.g., marine native Picochlorum spp. and Synechococcus spp., zoo- (e.g., Moina salina, and bacterioplankton (e.g., Actinobacteria, Verrucomicobia, whereas halophilic plankton communities (e.g., green algae Dunaliella sp., brine shrimp Artemia sp., and members of Halobacteria class dominate in the oxic surface of hypersaline (>10% salinity lakes. Molecular approaches (e.g., PCR-DGGE, 16S rRNA gene-based clone libraries, and DNA metabarcoding showed that the O2-depleted bottom brines of deep meromictic Transylvanian lakes are inhabited by known extremely halophilic anaerobes (e.g. sulfate-reducing Delta-Proteobacteria, fermenting Clostridia, methanogenic and polymer-degrading archaea in addition to representatives of uncultured/unclassified prokaryotic lineages. Overall, the plankton communities thriving in saline Transylvanian lakes seem to drive full biogeochemical cycling of main elements. However, the trophic interactions (i.e., food web structure and energy flow as well as impact of human

  14. Ecology of Hypersaline Microorganisms

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kerkar, S.

    of ancient seas. Deep Sea brines are relatively stable as a result of their higher density as reported in the Red Sea and Gulf of Mexico (MacDonald et al, 1990). Preliminary studies have suggested that microbial activity occurs in some Deep Sea hypersaline... partially characterized extreme halophile called ?Halobacterium sp GN101? (GN = Guerrero Negro, Mexico) (Ebert and Goebel, 1985). Hal R1 activity is typical with first activity detected during the transition from exponential to stationary phase...

  15. High-coercivity minerals from North African Humid Period soil material deposited in Lake Yoa (Chad)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Just, J.; Kroepelin, S.; Wennrich, V.; Viehberg, F. A.; Wagner, B.; Rethemeyer, J.; Karls, J.; Melles, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Holocene is a period of fundamental climatic change in North Africa. Humid conditions during the so-called African Humid Period (AHP) have favored the formation of big lake systems. Only very few of these lakes persist until today. One of them is Lake Yoa (19°03'N/20°31'E) in the Ounianga Basin, Chad, which maintains its water level by ground water inflow. Here we present the magnetic characteristics together with proxies for lacustrine productivity and biota of a sediment core (Co1240) from Lake Yoa, retrieved in 2010 within the framework of the Collaborative Research Centre 806 - Our Way to Europe (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft). Magnetic properties of AHP sediments show strong indications for reductive diagenesis. An up to ~ 80 m higher lake level is documented by lacustrine deposits in the Ounianga Basin, dating to the early phase of the AHP. The higher lake level and less strong seasonality restricted deep mixing of the lake. Development of anoxic conditions consequently lead to the dissolution of iron oxides. An exception is an interval with high concentration of high-coercivity magnetic minerals, deposited between 7800 - 8120 cal yr BP. This interval post-dates the 8.2 event, which was dry in Northern Africa and probably caused a reduced vegetation cover. We propose that the latter resulted in the destabilization of soils around Lake Yoa. After the re-establishment of humid conditions, these soil materials were eroded and deposited in the lake. Magnetic minerals appear well preserved in the varved Late Holocene sequence, indicating (sub-) oxic conditions in the lake. This is surprising, because the occurrence of varves is often interpreted as an indicator for anoxic conditions of the lake water. However, the salinity of lake water rose strongly after the AHP. We therefore hypothesize that the conservation of varves and absence of benthic organisms rather relates to the high salinity than to anoxic conditions.

  16. Bacterioplankton community composition along a salinity gradient of sixteen high-mountain lakes located on the Tibetan Plateau, China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Q.L.; Zwart, G.; Schauer, M.; Kamst-van Agterveld, M.P.; Hahn, M.W.

    2006-01-01

    The influence of altitude and salinity on bacterioplankton community composition (BCC) in 16 high-mountain lakes located at altitudes of 2,817 to 5,134 m on the Eastern Qinghai-Xizang (Tibetan) Plateau, China, spanning a salinity gradient from 0.02% (freshwater) to 22.3% (hypersaline), was

  17. Unexpected and novel putative viruses in the sediments of a deep-dark permanently anoxic freshwater habitat

    OpenAIRE

    Borrel, Guillaume; Colombet, Jonathan; Robin, Agnès; Lehours, Anne-Catherine; Prangishvili, David; Sime-Ngando, Télesphore

    2012-01-01

    Morphological diversity, abundance and community structure of viruses were examined in the deep and anoxic sediments of the volcanic Lake Pavin (France). The sediment core, encompassing 130 years of sedimentation, was subsampled every centimeter. High viral abundances were recorded and correlated to prokaryotic densities. Abundances of viruses and prokaryotes decreased with the depth, contrasting the pattern of virus-to-prokaryote ratio. According to fingerprint analyses, the community struct...

  18. Mechanisms of fenthion activation in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) acclimated to hypersaline environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavado, Ramon; Rimoldi, John M.; Schlenk, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies in rainbow trout have shown that acclimation to hypersaline environments enhances the toxicity to thioether organophosphate and carbamate pesticides. In order to determine the role of biotransformation in this process, the metabolism of the thioether organophosphate biocide, fenthion was evaluated in microsomes from gills, liver and olfactory tissues in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) acclimated to freshwater and 17 per mille salinity. Hypersalinity acclimation increased the formation of fenoxon and fenoxon sulfoxide from fenthion in liver microsomes from rainbow trout, but not in gills or in olfactory tissues. NADPH-dependent and independent hydrolysis was observed in all tissues, but only NADPH-dependent fenthion cleavage was differentially modulated by hypersalinity in liver (inhibited) and gills (induced). Enantiomers of fenthion sulfoxide (65% and 35% R- and S-fenthion sulfoxide, respectively) were formed in liver and gills. The predominant pathway of fenthion activation in freshwater appears to be initiated through initial formation of fenoxon which may be subsequently converted to the most toxic metabolite fenoxon R-sulfoxide. However, in hypersaline conditions both fenoxon and fenthion sulfoxide formation may precede fenoxon sulfoxide formation. Stereochemical evaluation of sulfoxide formation, cytochrome P450 inhibition studies with ketoconazole and immunoblots indicated that CYP3A27 was primarily involved in the enhancement of fenthion activation in hypersaline-acclimated fish with limited contribution of FMO to initial sulfoxidation

  19. Mono Lake sediments preserve a record of recent environmental change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meixnerova, J.; Betts, M.; Westacott, S.; Ingalls, M.; Miller, L. G.; Sessions, A. L.; Trower, L.; Geobiology Course, A.

    2017-12-01

    Modern Mono Lake is a geochemically unique closed-basin, hypersaline soda lake. Since 1941, anthropogenic water diversions have decreased the lake's volume and water level, driving changes in water chemistry and ecology. Mono Lake sediments offer an opportunity to investigate the nature and extent of these changes. We analyzed a 70 cm sediment core from the center of Mono Lake recording the past 116 years of deposition. At the time of recovery, the entire core was dark green. 16S rRNA gene analysis indicated a sedimentary bacterial community dominated by Cyanobacteria. SEM imaging revealed abundant, well-preserved diatom frustules below 10 cm core depth, in contrast they are nearly absent above 10 cm depth. Fatty acid (FAME) biomarkers for diatoms and algal sterols were present throughout the core in varying concentrations. Phytol was exceptionally abundant in the core; ratios of phytol/C-18 FAME were commonly >200. The δ13Corg ranged between -17.5 and -20‰ in the lower 52 cm of the core while the upper part shows significant decrease of δ13Corg to -28‰. We interpret the shift in δ13Corg as an ecological transition from mainly diatoms in the lower core towards the green alga Picocystis, which is the main primary producer today and has a δ13Corg value of -32.5‰. The onset of this change dates back 23 years, which roughly coincides with the highest reported salinity, 88 g/L in 1995. We hypothesize that diatoms gradually became marginalized as a result of hypersaline conditions. We also observed a variety of trends that may be characterized as unique fingerprints of Mono Lake. The unusually high abundance of phytol was consistent with the core's pervasive green coloring and could potentially indicate a higher preservation potential of phytol under alkaline conditions. Throughout the core, δ15Norg fluctuated between +10 and +13‰. Such atypical enrichment in δ15Norg could be explained by NH4 dissociation and subsequent NH3 volatilization under high p

  20. Saline lakes of the glaciated Northern Great Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushet, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Unless you have flown over the region or seen aerial photographs, it is hard to grasp the scale of the millions of lakes and wetlands that dot the prairie landscape of the glaciated Northern Great Plains (Figure 1). This region of abundant aquatic habitats within a grassland matrix provides for the needs of a wide diversity of wildlife species and has appropriately been deemed the "duck factory of North America." While the sheer number of lakes and wetlands within this area of the Northern Great Plains can be truly awe-inspiring, their diversity in terms of the chemical composition of their water adds an equally important component supporting biotic diversity and productivity. Water within these lakes and wetlands can range from extremely fresh with salinities approaching that of rainwater to hypersaline with salinity ten times greater than that of seawater. Additionally, while variation in salinity among these water bodies can be great, the ionic composition of lakes and wetlands with similar salinities can vary markedly, influencing the overall spatial and temporal diversity of the region's biota.

  1. Hypersaline waters - a potential source of foodborne toxigenic aspergilli and penicillia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butinar, Lorena; Frisvad, Jens Christian; Gunde-Cimerman, Nina

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies of hypersaline environments have revealed the dominant presence of melanized yeast-like fungi and related Cladosporium spp. In this study, we focused on the genera Aspergillus and Penicillium and their teleomorphic forms. From oligotrophic and eutrophic hypersaline waters around...... herbariorum, as they were quite evenly distributed among the sampled sites, and Aspergillus candidus, which was abundant, but more locally distributed. These species and their byproducts can accumulate downstream following evaporation of brine, and they can become entrapped in the salt crystals. Consequently...

  2. Microbial fuel cells in saline and hypersaline environments: Advancements, challenges and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grattieri, Matteo; Minteer, Shelley D

    2018-04-01

    This review is aimed to report the possibility to utilize microbial fuel cells for the treatment of saline and hypersaline solutions. An introduction to the issues related with the biological treatment of saline and hypersaline wastewater is reported, discussing the limitation that characterizes classical aerobic and anaerobic digestions. The microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology, and the possibility to be applied in the presence of high salinity, is discussed before reviewing the most recent advancements in the development of MFCs operating in saline and hypersaline conditions, with their different and interesting applications. Specifically, the research performed in the last 5years will be the main focus of this review. Finally, the future perspectives for this technology, together with the most urgent research needs, are presented. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Lake Cadagno

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonolla, Mauro; Storelli, Nicola; Danza, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    cycles. The chemocline lies at about 12 m depth, stabilized by density differences of salt-rich water supplied by sub-aquatic springs to the monimolimnion and of electrolyte-poor surface water feeding the mixolimnion. Steep sulphide and light gradients in the chemocline support the growth of a large...... in the chemocline. Small-celled PSB together with the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfocapsa thiozymogenes sp. form stable aggregates in the lake, which represent small microenvironments with an internal sulphur cycle. Eukaryotic primary producers in the anoxic zones are dominated by Cryptomonas phaseolus...

  4. Archaeal Communities in a Heterogeneous Hypersaline-Alkaline Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yendi E. Navarro-Noya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study the archaeal communities in extreme saline-alkaline soils of the former lake Texcoco, Mexico, with electrolytic conductivities (EC ranging from 0.7 to 157.2 dS/m and pH from 8.5 to 10.5 were explored. Archaeal communities in the 0.7 dS/m pH 8.5 soil had the lowest alpha diversity values and were dominated by a limited number of phylotypes belonging to the mesophilic Candidatus Nitrososphaera. Diversity and species richness were higher in the soils with EC between 9.0 and 157.2 dS/m. The majority of OTUs detected in the hypersaline soil were members of the Halobacteriaceae family. Novel phylogenetic branches in the Halobacteriales class were detected in the soil, and more abundantly in soil with the higher pH (10.5, indicating that unknown and uncharacterized Archaea can be found in this soil. Thirteen different genera of the Halobacteriaceae family were identified and were distributed differently between the soils. Halobiforma, Halostagnicola, Haloterrigena, and Natronomonas were found in all soil samples. Methanogenic archaea were found only in soil with pH between 10.0 and 10.3. Retrieved methanogenic archaea belonged to the Methanosarcinales and Methanomicrobiales orders. The comparison of the archaeal community structures considering phylogenetic information (UniFrac distances clearly clustered the communities by pH.

  5. Sediment Source Fingerprinting of the Lake Urmia Sand Dunes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmady-Birgani, Hesam; Agahi, Edris; Ahmadi, Seyed Javad; Erfanian, Mahdi

    2018-01-09

    Aeolian sand dunes are continuously being discovered in inner dry lands and coastal areas, most of which have been formed over the Last Glacial Maximum. Presently, due to some natural and anthropogenic implications on earth, newly-born sand dunes are quickly emerging. Lake Urmia, the world's second largest permanent hypersaline lake, has started shrinking, vast lands comprising sand dunes over the western shore of the lake have appeared and one question has been playing on the minds of nearby dwellers: where are these sand dunes coming from, What there was not 15 years ago!! In the present study, the determination of the source of the Lake Urmia sand dunes in terms of the quantifying relative contribution of each upstream geomorphological/lithological unit has been performed using geochemical fingerprinting techniques. The findings demonstrate that the alluvial and the fluvial sediments of the western upstream catchment have been transported by water erosion and they accumulated in the lower reaches of the Kahriz River. Wind erosion, as a secondary agent, have carried the aeolian sand-sized sediments to the sand dune area. Hence, the Lake Urmia sand dunes have been originating from simultaneous and joint actions of alluvial, fluvial and aeolian processes.

  6. Food Web Responses to Artificial Mixing in a Small Boreal Lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauri Arvola

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to simulate food web responses of small boreal lakes to changes in thermal stratification due to global warming, a 4 year whole-lake manipulation experiment was performed. Within that time, period lake mixing was intensified artificially during two successive summers. Complementary data from a nearby lake of similar size and basic water chemistry were used as a reference. Phytoplankton biomass and chlorophyll a did not respond to the greater mixing depth but an increase was observed in the proportional abundance of diatoms, and the proportional abundance of cryptophytes also increased immediately after the onset of mixing. Obligate anoxic green sulphur bacteria vanished at the onset of mixing but gradually recovered after re-establishment of hypolimnetic anoxic conditions. No major effect on crustacean zooplankton was found, but their diversity increased in the metalimnion. During the mixing, the density of rotifers declined but protozoan density increased in the hypolimnion. Littoral benthic invertebrate density increased during the mixing due to Ephemeroptera, Asellus aquaticus and Chironomidae, whereas the density of Chaoborus larvae declined during mixing and lower densities were still recorded one year after the treatment. No structural changes in fish community were found although gillnet catches increased after the onset of the study. The early growth of perch (Perca fluviatilis increased compared to the years before the mixing and in comparison to the reference lake, suggesting improved food availability in the experimental lake. Although several food web responses to the greater mixing depth were found, their persistence and ecological significance were strongly dependent on the extent of the disturbance. To better understand the impacts of wind stress on small lakes, long term whole-lake experiments are needed.

  7. Biological phosphorus uptake under anoxic and aerobic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kerrn-Jespersen, Jens Peter; Henze, Mogens

    1993-01-01

    Biological phosphorus removal was investigated under anoxic and aerobic conditions. Tests were made to establish whether phosphorus accumulating bacteria can take up phosphate under anoxic conditions and thus utilise nitrate as oxidant. Furthermore, it was tested how the amount of organic matter...... as oxidant. The phosphorus uptake was more rapid under aerobic conditions than under anoxic conditions. The explanation of this is that all phosphorus accumulating bacteria take up phosphate under aerobic conditions, whereas only part of the phosphorus accumulating bacteria take up phosphate under anoxic...

  8. Genome sequence of Halorhabdus tiamatea, the first archaeon isolated from a deep-sea anoxic brine lake.

    KAUST Repository

    Antunes, Andre

    2011-09-01

    We present the draft genome of Halorhabdus tiamatea, the first member of the Archaea ever isolated from a deep-sea anoxic brine. Genome comparison with Halorhabdus utahensis revealed some striking differences, including a marked increase in genes associated with transmembrane transport and putative genes for a trehalose synthase and a lactate dehydrogenase.

  9. Genome sequence of Halorhabdus tiamatea, the first archaeon isolated from a deep-sea anoxic brine lake.

    KAUST Repository

    Antunes, Andre; Alam, Intikhab; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Stingl, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    We present the draft genome of Halorhabdus tiamatea, the first member of the Archaea ever isolated from a deep-sea anoxic brine. Genome comparison with Halorhabdus utahensis revealed some striking differences, including a marked increase in genes associated with transmembrane transport and putative genes for a trehalose synthase and a lactate dehydrogenase.

  10. Pyrosequencing analysis of the protist communities in a High Arctic meromictic lake: DNA preservation and change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie eCharvet

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available High Arctic meromictic lakes are extreme environments characterized by cold temperatures, low nutrient inputs from their polar desert catchments and prolonged periods of low irradiance and darkness. These lakes are permanently stratified with an oxygenated freshwater layer (mixolimnion overlying a saline, anoxic water column (monimolimnion. The physical and chemical properties of the deepest known lake of this type in the circumpolar Arctic, Lake A, on the far northern coast of Ellesmere Island, Canada, have been studied over the last 15 years, but little is known about the lake’s biological communities. We applied high-throughput sequencing of the V4 region of the 18S ribosomal RNA gene to investigate the protist communities down the water column at three sampling times: under the ice at the end of winter in 2008, during an unusual period of warming and ice-out the same year, and again under the ice in mid-summer 2009. Sequences of many protist taxa occurred throughout the water column at all sampling times, including in the deep anoxic layer where growth is highly unlikely. Furthermore, there were sequences for taxonomic groups including diatoms and marine taxa, which have never been observed in Lake A by microscopic analysis. However the sequences of other taxa such as ciliates, chrysophytes, Cercozoa and Telonema varied with depth, between years and during the transition to ice-free conditions. These results imply that there are seasonally active taxa in the surface waters of the lake that are sensitive to depth and change with time. DNA from these taxa is superimposed upon background DNA from multiple internal and external sources that is preserved in the deep, cold, largely anoxic water column.

  11. Benthic protists and fungi of Mediterranean deep hypsersaline anoxic basin redoxcline sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhard, Joan M; Kormas, Konstantinos; Pachiadaki, Maria G; Rocke, Emma; Beaudoin, David J; Morrison, Colin; Visscher, Pieter T; Cobban, Alec; Starczak, Victoria R; Edgcomb, Virginia P

    2014-01-01

    Some of the most extreme marine habitats known are the Mediterranean deep hypersaline anoxic basins (DHABs; water depth ∼3500 m). Brines of DHABs are nearly saturated with salt, leading many to suspect they are uninhabitable for eukaryotes. While diverse bacterial and protistan communities are reported from some DHAB water-column haloclines and brines, the existence and activity of benthic DHAB protists have rarely been explored. Here, we report findings regarding protists and fungi recovered from sediments of three DHAB (Discovery, Urania, L' Atalante) haloclines, and compare these to communities from sediments underlying normoxic waters of typical Mediterranean salinity. Halocline sediments, where the redoxcline impinges the seafloor, were studied from all three DHABs. Microscopic cell counts suggested that halocline sediments supported denser protist populations than those in adjacent control sediments. Pyrosequencing analysis based on ribosomal RNA detected eukaryotic ribotypes in the halocline sediments from each of the three DHABs, most of which were fungi. Sequences affiliated with Ustilaginomycotina Basidiomycota were the most abundant eukaryotic signatures detected. Benthic communities in these DHABs appeared to differ, as expected, due to differing brine chemistries. Microscopy indicated that only a low proportion of protists appeared to bear associated putative symbionts. In a considerable number of cases, when prokaryotes were associated with a protist, DAPI staining did not reveal presence of any nuclei, suggesting that at least some protists were carcasses inhabited by prokaryotic scavengers.

  12. Could Methane Oxidation in Lakes Be Enhanced by Eutrophication?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Grinsven, S.; Villanueva, L.; Harrison, J.; S Sinninghe Damsté, J.

    2017-12-01

    Climate change and eutrophication both affect aquatic ecosystems. Eutrophication is caused by high nutrient inputs, leading to algal blooms, oxygen depletion and disturbances of the natural balances in aquatic systems. Methane, a potent greenhouse gas produced biologically by anaerobic degradation of organic matter, is often released from the sediments of lakes and marine systems to overlying water and the atmosphere. Methane oxidation, a microbial methane consumption process, can limit methane emission from lakes and reservoirs by 50-80%. Here, we studied methane oxidation in a seasonally stratified reservoir: Lacamas Lake in Washington, USA. We found this lake has a large summer storage capacity of methane in its deep water layer, with a very active microbial community capable of oxidizing exceptionally high amounts of methane. The natural presence of terminal electron acceptors is, however, too low to support these high potential rates. Addition of eutrophication-related nutrients such as nitrate and sulfate increased the methane removal rates by 4 to 7-fold. The microbial community was studied using 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing and preliminary results indicate the presence of a relatively unknown facultative anaerobic methane oxidizer of the genus Methylomonas, capable of using nitrate as an electron donor. Experiments in which anoxic and oxic conditions were rapidly interchanged showed this facultative anaerobic methane oxidizer has an impressive flexibility towards large, rapid changes in environmental conditions and this feature might be key to the unexpectedly high methane removal rates in eutrophied and anoxic watersheds.

  13. Groundwater interactions with Lobelia lakes- effects on the aquatic plant, Littorella uniflora

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ommen, Daniela Oliveira; Vinther, Hanne Fogh; Krüger, Laila

    Lake Hampen is representative of a group of lakes called Lobelia lakes. These are oligotrophic, clear water lakes which tend to have a low alkalinity. These lakes are termed “Lobelia lakes” due to the characteristic isoetid species which thrive in these conditions. Isoetids are small, evergreen...... aquatic plants whose leaves grow in a rosette form and have a large root base. The large root system enables the plants to better assimilate nutrients from the sediments, and the uptake of CO2 which is used for photosynthesis, and to release O2 into otherwise anoxic sediments. Lake Hampen is situated high...... up in the Jylland ridge and lies close to the groundwater boundary. This means that the groundwater flow between the aquifer and the lake is not constant, sometimes the groundwater flows from the aquifer into the lake (discharge) and other times it flows from the lake into the aquifer (recharge...

  14. Structural and functional analysis of a microbial mat ecosystem from a unique permanent hypersaline inland lake: 'La Salada de Chiprana' (NE Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonkers, Henk M; Ludwig, Rebecca; Wit, Rutger; Pringault, Olivier; Muyzer, Gerard; Niemann, Helge; Finke, Niko; Beer, Dirk

    2003-05-01

    The benthic microbial mat community of the only permanent hypersaline natural inland lake of Western Europe, 'La Salada de Chiprana', northeastern Spain, was structurally and functionally analyzed. The ionic composition of the lake water is characterized by high concentrations of magnesium and sulfate, which were respectively 0.35 and 0.5 M at the time of sampling while the total salinity was 78 g l(-1). Community composition was analyzed by microscopy, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) pigment analyses and by studying culturable bacteria from different functional groups. Therefore, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was applied on most probable number (MPN) dilution cultures. Microscopy revealed that a thin layer of Chloroflexus-like bacteria overlaid various cyanobacteria-dominated layers each characterized by different morphotypes. DGGE analysis of MPN dilution cultures from distinct mat layers showed that various phylotypes of anoxygenic phototrophic, aerobic heterotrophic, colorless sulfur-, and sulfate-reducing bacteria were present. The mats were furthermore functionally studied and attention was focussed on the relationship between oxygenic primary production and the flow of carbon through the microbial community. Microsensor techniques, porewater and sediment photopigment analysis were applied in order to estimate oxygenic photosynthetic rates, daily dynamics of (in)organic carbon porewater concentration and migration behavior of phototrophs. Chiprana microbial mats produced dissolved organic carbon (DOC) both during the day and night. It was estimated that 14% of the mats gross photosynthetic production and 49% of the mats net photosynthetic production diffused out of the mat in the form of low molecular mass fatty acids, although these compounds made up only 2% of the total DOC pool. The high flux of dissolved fatty acids from the microbial mat to the water column may explain why in this system Chloroflexus-like bacteria

  15. Primary and heterotrophic productivity relate to multikingdom diversity in a hypersaline mat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, Hans C.; Brislawn, Colin J.; Dana, Karl; Flores-Wentz, Tobias; Cory, Alexandra B.; Fansler, Sarah J.; Fredrickson, James K.; Moran, James J.

    2017-10-01

    Benthic microbial ecosystems are widespread yet knowledge gaps still remain on the relationships between the diversity of species across kingdoms and productivity. Here, we ask two fundamental questions: 1) How does species diversity relate to the rates of primary and heterotrophic productivity? 2) How do diel variations in light-energy inputs influence productivity and microbiome diversity? To answer these questions, microbial mats from a magnesium sulfate hypersaline Lake were used to establish microcosms. Both the number and relatedness between bacterial and eukaryotic taxa in the microbiome were assayed via amplicon based sequencing of 16S and 18S rRNA genes over two diel cycles. These results correlated with biomass productivity obtained from substrate-specific 13C stable isotope incorporation that enabled comparisons between primary and heterotrophic productivity. Both bacterial and eukaryotic species richness and evenness were related only to the rates of 13C labeled glucose and acetate biomass incorporation. Interestingly, measures of these heterotrophic relationships changed from positive and negative correlations depending on carbon derived from glucose and acetate, respectively. Bacterial and eukaryotic diversity of this ecosystem is also controlled, in part, energy constraints imposed by changing irradiance over a diel cycle.

  16. Rapid Return of Nitrogen but not Phosphorus to Ecosystem Nutrition During Decomposition of Quagga Mussel Tissue in Sand, Mud, or Water During Oxic or Anoxic Incubation: Implications for Phytoplankton Bioenergetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooney, E. M.; Cuhel, R. L.; Aguilar, C.

    2016-02-01

    In 2003 Quagga mussels were found to have invaded Lake Michigan. Their presence has changed the structure of the lake both ecologically (benthification) as well as chemically (oligotrophication). They consume large amounts of phytoplankton, which decreases the particulate nitrogen and phosphorous nutrients available to other consumers including zooplankton. As a result, fisheries productivity has decreased nearly 95%. Recently reaching the end of the first life cycle, in death they release a portion of these nutrients back into the freshwater system during decomposition. This work determined amounts of phosphorus and nitrogen nutrient recycling for several relevant sediment-water interface conditions: oxic vs anoxic in water, mud, or sand over a weeklong period. Concentrations of ammonium, soluble reactive phosphorus, and nitrate were used to analyze nutrient release as decomposition took place. In a short time up to 25% of tissue N was released as ammonia, and under oxic conditions in mud or sand, nitrification converted some of the ammonia to nitrate. Unexpectedly, mussels decaying in anoxic conditions released ammonium much more slowly. A slower rate of release in ammonium for the intact body with the shell (burial) was observed when compared to ground mussel tissue (detritivory). Nitrate was removed in anoxic incubations, indicating anaerobic denitrification. Phosphate release was initially higher under anoxic conditions than those decaying aerobically. There was no significant difference in the amount or rate of release of SRP between ground mussel and whole bodied with the shell. The anoxic treatment showed similar patterns of release for both ground mussel and intact body with shell. Most important, phosphate was subsequently removed in all treatments and diffusible nutrient was minimal (<100nM). The results link to nutrient assimilation patterns of deep phytoplankton communities, which can replace nitrate with ammonium as an N source.

  17. Microbiology of the Red Sea (and other) deep-sea anoxic brine lakes

    KAUST Repository

    Antunes, Andre

    2011-05-30

    Summary: The Red Sea harbours approximately 25 deep-sea anoxic brine pools. They constitute extremely unique and complex habitats with the conjugation of several extreme physicochemical parameters rendering them some of the most inhospitable environments on Earth. After 50 years of research mostly driven by chemists, geophysicists and geologists, the microbiology of the brines has been receiving increased interest in the last decade. Recent molecular and cultivation-based studies have provided us with a first glimpse on the enormous biodiversity of the local microbial communities, the identification of several new taxonomic groups, and the isolation of novel extremophiles that thrive in these environments. This review presents a general overview of these unusual biotopes and compares them with other similar environments in the Mediterranean Sea and the Gulf of Mexico, with a focus on their microbial ecology. © 2011 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Manganese and iron geochemistry in sediments underlying the redox-stratified Fayetteville Green Lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herndon, Elizabeth M.; Havig, Jeff R.; Singer, David M.; McCormick, Michael L.; Kump, Lee R.

    2018-06-01

    Manganese and iron are redox-sensitive elements that yield clues about biogeochemistry and redox conditions both in modern environments and in the geologic past. Here, we investigated Mn and Fe-bearing minerals preserved in basin sediments underlying Fayetteville Green Lake, a redox-stratified lake that serves as a geochemical analogue for Paleoproterozoic oceans. Synchrotron-source microprobe techniques (μXRF, μXANES, and μXRD) and bulk geochemical analyses were used to examine the microscale distribution and speciation of Mn, Fe, and S as a function of depth in the top 48 cm of anoxic lake sediments. Manganese was primarily associated with calcite grains as a manganese-rich carbonate that precipitated in the chemocline of the water column and settled through the euxinic basin to collect in lake sediments. Iron was preserved in framboidal iron sulfides that precipitated in euxinic bottom waters and underwent transformation to pyrite and marcasite in the sediments. Previous studies attribute the formation of manganese-rich carbonates to the diagenetic alteration of manganese oxides deposited in basins underlying oxygenated water. Our study challenges this paradigm by providing evidence that Mn-bearing carbonates form in the water column and accumulate in sediments below anoxic waters. Consequently, manganoan carbonates preserved in the rock record do not necessarily denote the presence of oxygenated bottom waters in ocean basins.

  19. Microbial ecology of soda lakes: investigating sulfur and nitrogen cycling at Mono Lake, CA, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbanks, D.; Phillips, A. A.; Wells, M.; Bao, R.; Fullerton, K. M.; Stamps, B. W.; Speth, D. R.; Johnson, H.; Sessions, A. L.

    2017-12-01

    Soda lakes represent unique ecosystems characterized by extremes of pH, salinity and distinct geochemical cycling. Despite these extreme conditions, soda lakes are important repositories of biological adaptation and have a highly functional microbial system. We investigated the biogeochemical cycling of sulfur and nitrogen compounds in Mono Lake, California, located east of the Sierra Nevada mountains. Mono lake is characterized by hyperalkaline, hypersaline and high sulfate concentrations and can enter prolonged periods of meromixis due to freshwater inflow. Typically, the microbial sulfur cycle is highly active in soda lakes with both oxidation and reduction of sulfur compounds. However, the biological sulfur cycle is connected to many other main elemental cycles such as carbon, nitrogen and metals. Here we investigated the interaction between sulfur and nitrogen cycling in Mono lake using a combination of molecular, isotopic, and geochemical observations to explore the links between microbial phylogenetic composition and functionality. Metagenomic and 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing were determined at two locations and five depths in May 2017. 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing analysis revealed organisms capable of both sulfur and nitrogen cycling. The relative abundance and distribution of functional genes (dsrA, soxAB, nifH, etc) were also determined. These genetic markers indicate the potential in situ relevance of specific carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur pathways in the water column prior to the transition to meromictic stratification. However, genes for sulfide oxidation, denitrification, and ammonification were present. Genome binning guided by the most abundant dsrA sequences, GC content, and abundance with depth identified a Thioalkalivibrio paradoxus bin containing genes capable of sulfur oxidation, denitrification, and nitrate reduction. The presence of a large number of sulfur and nitrogen cycling genes associated with Thioalkalivibrio paradoxus

  20. Paradox reconsidered: Methane oversaturation in well-oxygenated lake waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Kam W.; McGinnis, Daniel F.; Frindte, Katharina

    2014-01-01

    The widely reported paradox of methane oversaturation in oxygenated water challenges the prevailing paradigm that microbial methanogenesis only occurs under anoxic conditions. Using a combination of field sampling, incubation experiments, and modeling, we show that the recurring mid-water methane...... peak in Lake Stechlin, northeast Germany, was not dependent on methane input from the littoral zone or bottom sediment or on the presence of known micro-anoxic zones. The methane peak repeatedly overlapped with oxygen oversaturation in the seasonal thermocline. Incubation experiments and isotope...... analysis indicated active methane production, which was likely linked to photosynthesis and/or nitrogen fixation within the oxygenated water, whereas lessening of methane oxidation by light allowed accumulation of methane in the oxygen-rich upper layer. Estimated methane efflux from the surface water...

  1. Single neuron dynamics during experimentally induced anoxic depolarization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandt, B.; Stigen, Tyler; ten Haken, Bernard; Netoff, Theoden; van Putten, Michel Johannes Antonius Maria

    2013-01-01

    We studied single neuron dynamics during anoxic depolarizations, which are often observed in cases of neuronal energy depletion. Anoxic and similar depolarizations play an important role in several pathologies, notably stroke, migraine, and epilepsy. One of the effects of energy depletion was

  2. Identification of major planktonic sulfur oxidizers in stratified freshwater lake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisaya Kojima

    Full Text Available Planktonic sulfur oxidizers are important constituents of ecosystems in stratified water bodies, and contribute to sulfide detoxification. In contrast to marine environments, taxonomic identities of major planktonic sulfur oxidizers in freshwater lakes still remain largely unknown. Bacterioplankton community structure was analyzed in a stratified freshwater lake, Lake Mizugaki in Japan. In the clone libraries of 16S rRNA gene, clones very closely related to a sulfur oxidizer isolated from this lake, Sulfuritalea hydrogenivorans, were detected in deep anoxic water, and occupied up to 12.5% in each library of different water depth. Assemblages of planktonic sulfur oxidizers were specifically analyzed by constructing clone libraries of genes involved in sulfur oxidation, aprA, dsrA, soxB and sqr. In the libraries, clones related to betaproteobacteria were detected with high frequencies, including the close relatives of Sulfuritalea hydrogenivorans.

  3. Stable carbon isotope response to oceanic anoxic events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Xiumian; Wang Chengshan; Li Xianghui

    2001-01-01

    Based on discussion of isotope compositions and fractionation of marine carbonate and organic carbon, the author studies the relationship between oceanic anoxic events and changes in the carbon isotope fractionation of both carbonate and organic matter. During the oceanic anoxic events, a great number of organisms were rapidly buried, which caused a kind of anoxic conditions by their decomposition consuming dissolved oxygen. Since 12 C-rich organism preserved, atmosphere-ocean system will enrich relatively of 13 C. As a result, simultaneous marine carbonate will record the positive excursion of carbon isotope. There is a distinctive δ 13 C excursion during oceanic anoxic events in the world throughout the geological time. In the Cenomanian-Turonian anoxic event. this positive excursion arrived at ∼0.2% of marine carbonate and at ∼0.4% of organic matter, respectively. Variations in the carbon isotopic compositions of marine carbonate and organic carbon record the changes in the fraction of organic carbon buried throughout the geological time and may provide clues to the changes in rates of weathering and burial of organic carbon. This will provide a possibility of interpreting not only the changes in the global carbon cycle throughout the geological time, but also that in atmospheric p CO 2

  4. Deciphering the depositional environment of the laminated Crato fossil beds (Early Cretaceous, Araripe Basin, North-eastern Brazil)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heimhofer, Ulrich; Ariztegui, Daniel; Lenniger, Marc

    2010-01-01

    isotope geochemistry. Integration of lithological and petrographic evidence indicates that the bulk of the Nova Olinda limestone formed via authigenic precipitation of calcite from within the upper water column, most probably induced and/or mediated by phytoplankton and picoplankton activity...... equilibration with atmospheric CO2, probably in concert with stagnant conditions and low input of soil-derived carbon. Integration of lithological and isotopic evidence indicates a shift from closed to semi-closed conditions towards a more open lake system during the onset of laminite deposition in the Crato....... A significant contribution from a benthonic, carbonate-secreting microbial mat community is not supported by these results. Deposition took place under anoxic and, at least during certain episodes, hypersaline bottom water conditions, as evidenced by the virtually undisturbed lamination pattern, the absence...

  5. A Modeling Comparison of Methanogenesis from Noncompetitive vs Competitive Substrates in a Simulated Hypersaline Microbial Mat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, K. L.; Potter, C.; Hoehler, T.

    2005-12-01

    The well-documented assumption about methanogens that co-occur in hypersaline mat communities with sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) is that they rely entirely on non-competitive substrates for methanogenesis. The reason for this is that during sulfate reduction, sulfur-reducing bacteria efficiently utilize H2, leaving a concentration too low for methanogenesis. Early results from recent work on a hypersaline microbial mat from salt evaporation ponds of Guerrero Negro, Baja, Mexico cast doubt that methanogenesis only occurs via non-competitive substrates, because it shows an excess of H2 in the mat rather than a paucity. We explore the use of our simulation model of the microbial biogeochemistry of a hypersaline mat (named MBGC) to compare methane production rates in a 1 cm thick mat when the methanogens use competitive substrates versus noncompetitive substrates. In the `non-competitive substrate' version of the model, methanogens rely exclusively on methylated amines that are accumulated as compatible solutes in cyanobacteria and released after lysis. In contrast, the `competitive substrate' models examine methanogen use of substrates (such as H2 + acetate) with different SRB population sizes (from absent to low). The comparison of these models of methane and sulfide biogeochemistry of a hypersaline mat has both ecological and geobiological significance, as one hypothesis of Archean microbial mats is that they existed in a low sulfate environment.

  6. On the origins of hypersaline groundwater in the Nile Delta Aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Engelen, Joeri; Oude Essink, Gualbert H. P.; Kooi, Henk; Bierkens, Marc F. P.

    2017-04-01

    The fresh groundwater resources in the Nile Delta, Egypt, are of eminent socio-economic importance. These resources are under major stress due to population growth, the anticipated sea level rise and increased groundwater extraction rates, making fresh water availability the most challenging issue in this area. Up till now, numerous groundwater studies mainly focused on sea water intrusion on the top 100m of the groundwater system and assumed salinities not exceeding that of Mediterranean sea water, as there was no knowledge on groundwater in the deeper coastal parts of the Quaternary Nile Delta aquifer (that ranges up to 1000m depth). Recently, however, the Egyptian Research Institute for Groundwater (RIGW) collected salinity measurements and found a widespread occurrence of "hypersaline" groundwater: groundwater with salinities largely exceeding that of sea water at 600m depth (Nofal et al., 2015). This hypersaline groundwater greatly influences flow patterns and the fresh water potential of the aquifer. This research focuses on the origins of the hypersaline groundwater and the possible processes causing its transport. We consider all relevant salinization processes in the Nile Delta aquifer, over a time domain of up to 2.5 million years, which is the time span in which the aquifer got deposited. The following hypotheses were investigated with a combination of analytical solutions and numerical modelling: upward salt transport due to a) molecular diffusion, b) thermal buoyancy, c) consolidation-induced advection and dispersion, or downward transport due to d) composition buoyancy (salt inversion). We conclude that hypotheses a) and b) can be rejected, but c) and d) are both possible with the available information. An enhanced chemical analysis is suggested for further research, to determine the origins of this hypersaline water. This information in combination with the conclusions drawn in this research will give more insight in the potential amount of non

  7. Denitrification, anammox and fixed nitrogen removal in the water column of a tropical great lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darchambeau, François; Roland, Fleur; Crowe, Sean A.; De Brabandere, Loreto; Llirós, Marc; Garcia-Armisen, Tamara; Inceoglu, Ozgul; Michiels, Céline; Servais, Pierre; Morana, Cédric D. T.; Bouillon, Steven; Meysman, Filip; Veuger, Bart; Masilya, Pascal M.; Descy, Jean-Pierre; Borges, Alberto V.

    2013-04-01

    If rates of microbial denitrification in aquatic systems are poorly constrained, it is much more the case for tropical water bodies. Lake Kivu [2.50° S 1.59° S, 29.37° E 28.83° E] is one of the great lakes of the East African Rift. It is an oligotrophic lake characterized by anoxic deep waters rich in dissolved gases (methane and carbon dioxide) and nutrients, and by well oxygenated and nutrient-depleted surface waters. During the seasonally stratified rainy season (October to May), a nitrogenous zone characterized by the accumulation of nitrite (NO2-) and nitrate (NO3-) is often observed in the lower layer of the mixolimnion. It results from nitrification of ammonium released by decaying organic matter. With the seasonal uplift of the oxygen minimum zone, the nitrogenous zone becomes anoxic and might be the most preferential area for fixed nitrogen (N) removal in Lake Kivu. Our work aimed at identifying and quantifying the processes of N losses by denitrification and/or anammox in the nitrogenous zone of the Lake Kivu water column. During 5 sampling campaigns (March 2010, October 2010, June 2011, February 2012 and September 2012), isotopic labelling experiments were used to quantify denitrification and anammox rates along vertical profiles at two pelagic stations of the main lake. Moreover, N2:Ar ratios were estimated during the September 2012 campaign, and 16S rDNA pyrosequencing was used to describe bacterial community composition during the last 2 campaigns. No bacteria related to organisms performing anammox was observed and labelling experiments failed to detect anammox at any locations and any depths. In Lake Kivu, denitrifying bacteria were mainly related to Denitratisoma and Thiobacillus genus. Significant denitrification rates were observed at several occasions, especially under the oxic-anoxic interface in the bottom of the nitracline. The annual average denitrification rate was estimated at ~150 μmoles N m-2 d-1. Denitrification was not the only

  8. Fermentation couples Chloroflexi and sulfate-reducing bacteria to Cyanobacteria in hypersaline microbial mats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson Z Lee

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Past studies of hydrogen cycling in hypersaline microbial mats have shown an active nighttime cycle, with production largely from Cyanobacteria and consumption from sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB. However, the mechanisms and magnitude of hydrogen cycling have not been extensively studied. Two mats types near Guerrero Negro, Mexico -- permanently submerged Microcoleus microbial mats (GN-S, and intertidal Lyngbya microbial mats (GN-I -- were used in microcosm diel manipulation experiments with 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU, molybdate, ammonium addition, and physical disruption to understand the processes responsible for hydrogen cycling between mat microbes. Across microcosms, H2 production occurred under dark anoxic conditions with simultaneous production of a suite of organic acids. H2 production was not significantly affected by inhibition of nitrogen fixation, but rather appears to result from constitutive fermentation of photosynthetic storage products by oxygenic phototrophs. Comparison to accumulated glycogen and to CO2 flux indicated that, in the GN-I mat, fermentation released almost all of the carbon fixed via photosynthesis during the preceding day, primarily as organic acids. Across mats, although oxygenic and anoxygenic phototrophs were detected, cyanobacterial [NiFe]-hydrogenase transcripts predominated. Molybdate inhibition experiments indicated that SRBs from a wide distribution of dsrA phylotypes were responsible for H2 consumption. Incubation with 13C-acetate and nanoSIMS (secondary ion mass-spectrometry indicated higher uptake in both Chloroflexi and SRBs relative to other filamentous bacteria. These manipulations and diel incubations confirm that Cyanobacteria were the main fermenters in Guerrero Negro mats and that the net flux of nighttime fermentation byproducts (not only hydrogen was largely regulated by the interplay between Cyanobacteria, SRBs, and Chloroflexi.

  9. Testing the Role of Microbial Ecology, Redox-Mediated Deep Water Production and Hypersalinity on TEX86: Lipids and 16s Sequences from Archaea and Bacteria in the Water Column and Sediments of Orca Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, C.; Romero, I.; Ellis, G.; Goddard, E.; Krishnan, S.; Nigro, L. M.; Super, J. R.; Zhang, Y.; Zhuang, G.; Hollander, D. J.; Pagani, M.

    2014-12-01

    Mesophilic marine archaea and bacteria are known to substantially contribute to the oceanic microbial biomass and play critical roles in global carbon, nitrogen and nutrient cycles. The Orca Basin, a 2400 meter deep bathymetric depression on the continental slope of the north-central Gulf of Mexico, is an ideal environment to examine how redox-dependent biochemical processes control the input and cycling of bacterial and archaea-derived lipid compounds from formation in near-surface water, through secondary recycling processes operating at the redox-transition in the water column, to sedimentary diagenetic processes operating in oxic to anoxic zones within the basin. The lowermost 180 meters of the Orca Basin is characterized by an anoxic, hypersaline brine that is separated from the overlying oxic seawater by a well-defined redox sequence associated with a systematic increasing in salinity from 35 - 250‰. While surface water conditions are viewed as normal marine with a seasonally productive water column, the sub-oxic to anoxic transition zones within the deep-water column and the sediment spans over 200 m allowing the unique opportunity for discrete sampling of resident organisms and lipids. Here we present 16s rRNA sequence data of Bacteria and Archaea collected parallel to GDGT lipid profiles and in situ environmental measurements from the sediment and overlying water column in the intermediate zone of the basin, where movements of chemical transition zones are preserved. We evaluated GDGTs and corresponding taxa across the surface water, chlorophyll maximum, thermocline, and the deep redox boundary, including oxygenation, denitrification, manganese, iron and sulfate reduction zones, to determine if GDGTs are being produced under these conditions and how surface-derived GDGT lipids and the TEX86 signal may be altered. The results have implications for the application of the TEX86 paleotemperature proxy.

  10. Identification and characterization of bacteria in a selenium-contaminated hypersaline evaporation pond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, M P; Amini, A; Dojka, M A; Pickering, I J; Dawson, S C; Pace, N R; Terry , N

    2001-09-01

    Solar evaporation ponds are commonly used to reduce the volume of seleniferous agricultural drainage water in the San Joaquin Valley, Calif. These hypersaline ponds pose an environmental health hazard because they are heavily contaminated with selenium (Se), mainly in the form of selenate. Se in the ponds may be removed by microbial Se volatilization, a bioremediation process whereby toxic, bioavailable selenate is converted to relatively nontoxic dimethylselenide gas. In order to identify microbes that may be used for Se bioremediation, a 16S ribosomal DNA phylogenetic analysis of an aerobic hypersaline pond in the San Joaquin Valley showed that a previously unaffiliated group of uncultured bacteria (belonging to the order Cytophagales) was dominant, followed by a group of cultured gamma-Proteobacteria which was closely related to Halomonas species. Se K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy of selenate-treated bacterial isolates showed that they accumulated a mixture of predominantly selenate and a selenomethionine-like species, consistent with the idea that selenate was assimilated via the S assimilation pathway. One of these bacterial isolates (Halomonas-like strain MPD-51) was the best candidate for the bioremediation of hypersaline evaporation ponds contaminated with high Se concentrations because it tolerated 2 M selenate and 32.5% NaCl, grew rapidly in media containing selenate, and accumulated and volatilized Se at high rates (1.65 microg of Se g of protein(-1) x h(-1)), compared to other cultured bacterial isolates.

  11. A deep sea community at the Kebrit brine pool in the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Vestheim, Hege; Kaartvedt, Stein

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 25 deep sea brine pools occur along the mid axis of the Red Sea. These hypersaline, anoxic, and acidic environments have previously been reported to host diverse microbial communities. We visited the Kebrit brine pool in April 2013

  12. Salinivibrio costicola GL6, a Novel Isolated Strain for Biotransformation of Caffeine to Theobromine Under Hypersaline Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashengroph, Morahem

    2017-01-01

    The present study has been conducted towards isolation of moderately halophilic bacteria capable of transforming caffeine into theobromine. A total of 45 caffeine-degrading moderate halophiles were enriched from hypersaline lakes and examined for the biotransformation of caffeine to theobromine by thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and high-performance liquid chromatography analyses. Strain GL6, giving the highest yield of theobromine, was isolated from the Hoz Soltan Lake, 20 % w/v salinity, central Iran, and identified as Salinivibrio costicola based on morphological and biochemical features as well as its 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis (GeneBank Accession No. KT378066) and DNA-DNA relatedness. The biotransformation of caffeine with strain GL6 leads to the formation of two metabolites, identified as theobromine and paraxanthine, but the yield of paraxanthine was much lower. Further study on the production of theobromine from caffeine under resting cell experiment was carried out subsequently. The optimal yield of theobromine (56 %) was obtained after a 32-h incubation using 5 mM of caffeine and 15 g l -1 (wet weight) of biomass in 0.1 M saline phosphate buffer (pH 7.0 and 10 % w/v NaCl) under agitation 180 rpm at 30 °C. The biotransformed theobromine was purified by preparative TLC and subjected to FTIR and mass spectroscopy for chemical identification. This is the first evidence for biotransformation of caffeine into theobromine by strains of the genus Salinivibrio.

  13. Cooling, cryporitectant and hypersaline sensitivity of Penaeid shrimp embryos and nauplii larvae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alfaro Montoya, J.; Komen, J.; Huisman, E.A.

    2001-01-01

    The sensitivity of embryos of the penaeid shrimp, Trachypenaeus byrdi, to cooling, cryoprotectant exposure (dimethyl sulfoxide : DMSO, sucrose, methanol and glycerol), and hypersaline treatment was assessed in order to gain basic knowledge for cryopreservation procedures. In addition, cooling and

  14. Geophysical Investigations of Hypersaline Subglacial Water Systems in the Canadian Arctic: A Planetary Analog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutishauser, A.; Sharp, M. J.; Blankenship, D. D.; Skidmore, M. L.; Grima, C.; Schroeder, D. M.; Greenbaum, J. S.; Dowdeswell, J. A.; Young, D. A.

    2017-12-01

    Robotic exploration and remote sensing of the solar system have identified the presence of liquid water beneath ice on several planetary bodies, with evidence for elevated salinity in certain cases. Subglacial water systems beneath Earth's glaciers and ice sheets may provide terrestrial analogs for microbial habitats in such extreme environments, especially those with higher salinity. Geological data suggest that several ice caps and glaciers in the eastern Canadian High Arctic are partially underlain by evaporite-rich sedimentary rocks, and subglacial weathering of these rocks is potentially conducive to the formation of hypersaline subglacial waters. Here, we combine airborne geophysical data with geological constraints to identify and characterize hypersaline subglacial water systems beneath ice caps in Canada's Queen Elizabeth Islands. High relative bedrock reflectivity and specularity anomalies that are apparent in radio-echo sounding data indicate multiple locations where subglacial water is present in areas where modeled ice temperatures at the glacier bed are well below the pressure melting point. This suggests that these water systems are hypersaline, with solute concentrations that significantly depress the freezing point of water. From combined interpretations of geological and airborne-magnetic data, we define the geological context within which these systems have developed, and identify possible solute-sources for the inferred brine-rich water systems. We also derive subglacial hydraulic potential gradients using airborne laser altimetry and ice thickness data, and apply water routing models to derive subglacial drainage pathways. These allow us to identify marine-terminating glaciers where outflow of the brine-rich waters may be anticipated. These hypersaline subglacial water systems beneath Canadian Arctic ice caps and glaciers may represent robust microbial habitats, and potential analogs for brines that may exist beneath ice masses on planetary

  15. Management of Reflex Anoxic Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Investigators at the Roald Dahl EEG Unit, Alder Hey Children’s NHS Foundation, Liverpool, UK, review the definition, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and management of reflex anoxic seizures (RAS in children.

  16. Geosphere-biosphere interactions in bio-activity volcanic lakes: evidences from Hule and Rìo Cuarto (Costa Rica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacopo Cabassi

    Full Text Available Hule and Río Cuarto are maar lakes located 11 and 18 km N of Poás volcano along a 27 km long fracture zone, in the Central Volcanic Range of Costa Rica. Both lakes are characterized by a stable thermic and chemical stratification and recently they were affected by fish killing events likely related to the uprising of deep anoxic waters to the surface caused by rollover phenomena. The vertical profiles of temperature, pH, redox potential, chemical and isotopic compositions of water and dissolved gases, as well as prokaryotic diversity estimated by DNA fingerprinting and massive 16S rRNA pyrosequencing along the water column of the two lakes, have highlighted that different bio-geochemical processes occur in these meromictic lakes. Although the two lakes host different bacterial and archaeal phylogenetic groups, water and gas chemistry in both lakes is controlled by the same prokaryotic functions, especially regarding the CO2-CH4 cycle. Addition of hydrothermal CO2 through the bottom of the lakes plays a fundamental priming role in developing a stable water stratification and fuelling anoxic bacterial and archaeal populations. Methanogens and methane oxidizers as well as autotrophic and heterotrophic aerobic bacteria responsible of organic carbon recycling resulted to be stratified with depth and strictly related to the chemical-physical conditions and availability of free oxygen, affecting both the CO2 and CH4 chemical concentrations and their isotopic compositions along the water column. Hule and Río Cuarto lakes were demonstrated to contain a CO2 (CH4, N2-rich gas reservoir mainly controlled by the interactions occurring between geosphere and biosphere. Thus, we introduced the term of bio-activity volcanic lakes to distinguish these lakes, which have analogues worldwide (e.g. Kivu: D.R.C.-Rwanda; Albano, Monticchio and Averno: Italy; Pavin: France from volcanic lakes only characterized by geogenic CO2 reservoir such as Nyos and Monoun

  17. Isotopic fingerprints of anthropogenic molybdenum in lake sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappaz, Anthony; Lyons, Timothy W; Gordon, Gwyneth W; Anbar, Ariel D

    2012-10-16

    We measured the molybdenum isotope compositions (δ(98)Mo) of well-dated sediment cores from two lakes in eastern Canada in an effort to distinguish between natural and anthropogenic contributions to these freshwater aquatic systems. Previously, Chappaz et al. (1) ascribed pronounced 20th-century Mo concentration enrichments in these lakes to anthropogenic inputs. δ(98)Mo values in the deeper sediments (reflecting predominantly natural Mo sources) differ dramatically between the two lakes: -0.32 ± 0.17‰ for oxic Lake Tantare and +0.64 ± 0.09‰ for anoxic Lake Vose. Sediment layers previously identified as enriched in anthropogenic Mo, however, reveal significant δ(98)Mo shifts of ± 0.3‰, resulting in isotopically heavier values of +0.05 ± 0.18‰ in Lake Tantare and lighter values of +0.31 ± 0.03‰ in Lake Vose. We argue that anthropogenic Mo modifies the isotopic composition of the recent sediments, and we determine δ(98)Mo(anthropogenic) values of 0.1 ± 0.1‰ (Lake Vose) and 0.2 ± 0.2‰ (Lake Tantare). These calculated inputs are consistent with the δ(98)Mo of molybdenite (MoS(2)) likely delivered to the lakes via smelting of porphyry copper deposits (Lake Vose) or through combustion of coal and oil also containing Mo (Lake Tantare). Our results confirm the utility of Mo isotopes as a promising fingerprint of human impacts and perhaps the specific sources of contamination. Importantly, the magnitudes of the anthropogenic inputs are large enough, relative to the natural Mo cycles in each lake, to have an impact on the microbiological communities.

  18. Geophysical problems of radiocesium removal from running shallow lakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarasiuk, N.; Spirkauskaite, N.; Gvozdaite, R. and others

    2002-01-01

    Natural processes of radiocesium removal from three selected running shallow (mean depth -0.7-4.2 m) lakes (Zuvintas, Asavas-Asavelis, Juodis) in Lithuania during 1999-2001 are studied. Lake sediments are of a sapropelic and peat type, rich in organics (47-68 %). 137 Cs activity concentrations in surface sediments varied in the range 100-360 Bq kg -1 . A sum of exchangeable and potentially mobile fractions of 137 Cs activity concentrations in lake sediments is assessed to vary in the range 10-34 %. The 137 CS enrichment coefficient defined as a ratio of annual sums of seasonal values of water-soluble 137 Cs activity concentrations in rivers outflowing from and in flowing to lakes was assessed to be equal for selected lakes from 1.4 to 2.5. A course of seasonal data demonstrates the efficiency of lake self cleaning from radiocesium to be minimum in winter owing to the priority of lake surface flows and the temperature stratification, suppressing the water column vertical mixing. It is suggested that elevated radiocesium activity concentrations in the outflowing rivers during a winter-spring transitional period are due to the presence of lake bottom flows. Lake isothermal stratification, inducing the water column vertical mixing during warm seasons, reinforces lake self cleaning processes. Considerations on the seasonal variations of the depth of the anoxic level in sediments, as well as on the vertical mixing of the surface sediments owing to the methane production, are discussed. (author)

  19. Microbial ecology of deep-sea hypersaline anoxic basins

    KAUST Repository

    Merlino, Giuseppe; Barozzi, Alan; Michoud, Gregoire; Ngugi, David; Daffonchio, Daniele

    2018-01-01

    of mixing and by extreme conditions of salinity, anoxia, and relatively high hydrostatic pressure and temperatures. Due to these combined selection factors, unique microbial assemblages thrive in these polyextreme ecosystems. The topological localization

  20. Mobility of 137Cs in freshwater lakes: A mass balance and diffusion study of Lake St. Clair, Southeast Michigan, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinlong; Baskaran, Mark; Niedermiller, John

    2017-12-01

    Cesium-137 is one of the most widely utilized anthropogenic radionuclides, both as a tracer and chronometer in the environment. Its application as an effective chronometer requires a thorough understanding of its geochemical behavior in aqueous systems. In this study, we collected and analyzed a suite of time-series water samples over a period of 8 months (April - November 2015), for particulate and dissolved 137Cs activities from a watershed in southeast Michigan, USA, using Cu2Fe(CN)6-coated cartridges developed to pre-concentrate dissolved 137Cs. We also conducted a series of laboratory experiments with the natural freshwater sediment samples and water with different chemical composition. There were seasonal variations of both particulate and dissolved 137Cs activities in the watersheds of Lake St. Clair. The distribution coefficients of 137Cs determined over a period of 8 months varied between 0.14 × 105 and 6.1 × 105 mL g-1 (mean: 2.9 × 105 mL g-1). The annual input and export flux of total 137Cs activity via rivers into and out of Lake St. Clair were calculated to be 3.6 × 1010 Bq and 1.6 × 1010 Bq, respectively. The amount of 137Cs derived by diffusion from interstitial pore water to the water column was estimated to be 0.30 × 1010 Bq (8.3% of the total input flux) which is similar to the percentage of 137Cs desorption (13%-20%) from sediment placed in oxic soft water system over a period of 30-106 days. For the same concentrations of NH4+, Mn2+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Na+ and Sr2+ in a distilled water, our lab work showed that the sediment-sorbed 137Cs is displaced by ions in the order NH4+ > Mn2+ > K+ > Mg2+ ≈ Ca2+ > Na+ > Sr2+. In laboratory studies, 137Cs sorbed onto sediment was found to be less mobile in oxic soft water (Kd: 2.0 × 103 mL g-1) and more mobile in anoxic soft water (Kd: 0.2 × 103 mL g-1). In a hard water system, however, there is no significant difference in Kd values for both oxic and anoxic conditions. The sequence of Kd values is

  1. Trophic ecology and food consumption of fishes in a hypersaline tropical lagoon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida-Silva, P H; Tubino, R A; Zambrano, L C; Hunder, D A; Garritano, S R; Monteiro-Neto, C

    2015-06-01

    This study evaluated the trophic ecology (diet composition, trophic strategy, similarities and overlap between species, feeding period and food consumption) of six benthivorous fish species in Araruama Lagoon, the largest hypersaline tropical lagoon on the east coast of South America, with an area of 210 km(2) and an average salinity of 52. The burrfish Chilomycterus spinosus fed on Anomalocardia flexuosa shell deposits, ingesting associated fauna. The caitipa mojarra Diapterus rhombeus differed from all other species, having not only the highest proportions of algae and Nematoda, but also feeding on polychaete tentacles. The two mojarras Eucinostomus spp. showed similar trophic strategies, feeding mostly on Polychaeta. The corocoro grunt Orthopristis ruber also fed mainly on Polychaeta, but differed from Eucinostomus spp. in secondary items. The whitemouth croacker Micropogonias furnieri fed mainly on small Crustacea at night, showing a high number of secondary prey items with low frequencies and high prey-specific abundance. The daily food consumption (g food g(-1) fish mass) for Eucinostomus argenteus was 0·012 and was 0·031 and 0·027 for M. furnieri in two different sampling events. The diet similarities between Araruama Lagoon and other brackish and marine environments indicate that hypersalinity is not a predominant factor shaping the trophic ecology of fishes in this lagoon. The stability of hypersaline conditions, without a pronounced gradient, may explain the presence of several euryhaline fishes and invertebrates well adapted to this condition, resulting in a complex food web. © 2015 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  2. Photochemical synthesis of biomolecules under anoxic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folsome, C.; Brittain, A.; Zelko, M.

    1983-01-01

    The long-wavelength UV anoxic photosynthesis of uracil, various sugars (including deoxyribose and glycoaldehyde), amino acids, and other organic photoproducts is reported. The reactions were conducted in a mixture of water, calcium carbonate, hydrazine, and formaldehyde which were subjected to 24 hr or 72 hr radiation. Product yields were greatest when the hydrazine/formaldehyde ratio was one, and when the reactant concentrations were low. These data suggest that organic products can be formed in variety from those amounts of formaldehyde and hydazine precursors which are themselves formed under anoxic UV photochemical conditions.

  3. [New isolation methods and phylogenetic diversity of actinobacteria from hypersaline beach in Aksu].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yao; Xia, Zhanfeng; Cao, Xinbo; Li, Jun; Zhang, Lili

    2013-08-04

    We explored 4 new methods to improve the isolation of actinobacterial resources from high salt areas. Optimized media based on 4 new strategies were used for isolating actinobacteria from hypersaline beaches. Glycerin-arginine, trehalose-creatine, glycerol-asparticacid, mannitol-casein, casein-mannitol, mannitol-alanine, chitosan-asparagineand GAUZE' No. 1 were used as basic media. New isolation strategy includes 4 methods: ten-fold dilution culture, simulation of the original environment, actinobacterial culture guided by uncultured molecular technology detected, and reference of actinobacterial media for brackish marine environment. The 16S rRNA genes of the isolates were amplified with bacterial universal primers. The results of 16S rRNA gene sequences were compared with sequences obtained from GenBank databases. We constructed phylogenetic tree with the neighbor-joining method. No actinobacterial strains were isolated by 8 media of control group, while 403 strains were isolated by new strategies. The isolates by new methods were members of 14 genera (Streptomyces, Streptomonospora, Saccharomonospora, Plantactinospora, Nocardia, Amycolatopsis, Glycomyces, Micromonospora, Nocardiopsis, Isoptericola, Nonomuraea, Thermobifida, Actinopolyspora, Actinomadura) of 10 families in 8 suborders. The most abundant and diverse isolates were the two suborders of Streptomycineae (69.96%) and Streptosporangineaesuborder (9.68%) within the phylum Actinobacteria, including 9 potential novel species. New isolation methods significantly improved the actinobacterial culturability of hypersaline areas, and obtained many potential novel species, which provided a new and more effective way to isolate actinobacteria resources in hypersaline environments.

  4. Organic sedimentation in modern lacustrine systems: A case study from Lake Malawi, East Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Barry J. Katz,; Christopher A. Scholz,; Peter K. Swart,

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between depositional environment and sedimentary organic geochemistry in Lake Malawi, East Africa, and evaluates the relative significance of the various processes that control sedimentary organic matter (OM) in lacustrine systems. Total organic carbon (TOC) concentrations in recent sediments from Lake Malawi range from 0.01 to 8.80 wt% and average 2.83 wt% for surface sediments and 2.35 wt% for shallow core sediments. Hydrogen index (HI) values as determined by Rock-Eval pyrolysis range from 0 to 756 mg HC g−1 TOC and average 205 mg HC g−1 TOC for surface sediments and 228 mg HC g−1 TOC for shallow core samples. On average, variations in primary productivity throughout the lake may account for ~33% of the TOC content in Lake Malawi sediments (as much as 1 wt% TOC), and have little or no impact on sedimentary HI values. Similarly, ~33% to 66% of the variation in TOC content in Lake Malawi sediments appears to be controlled by anoxic preservation of OM (~1–2 wt% TOC), although some component of the water depth–TOC relationship may be due to physical sediment transport processes. Furthermore, anoxic preservation has a minimal effect on HI values in Lake Malawi sediments. Dilution of OM by inorganic sediment may account for ~16% of variability in TOC content in Lake Malawi sediments (~0.5 wt% TOC). The effect of inputs of terrestrial sediment on the organic character of surface sediments in these lakes is highly variable, and appears to be more closely related to the local depositional environment than the regional flux of terrestrial OM. Total nitrogen and TOC content in surface sediments collected throughout the lake are found to be highly correlated (r2 = 0.95), indicating a well-homogenized source of OM to the lake bottom. The recurring suspension and deposition of terrestrial sediment may account for significant amounts of OM deposited in offshore regions of the lake. This process effectively separates denser

  5. Lipid Biomarkers for a Hypersaline Microbial Mat Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnke, Linda L.; Embaye, Tsege; Turk, Kendra A.

    2003-01-01

    The use of lipid biomarkers and their carbon isotopic compositions are valuable tools for establishing links to ancient microbial ecosystems. As witnessed by the stromatolite record, benthic microbial mats grew in shallow water lagoonal environments where microorganisms had virtually no competition apart from the harsh conditions of hypersalinity, desiccation and intense light. Today, the modern counterparts of these microbial ecosystems find appropriate niches in only a few places where extremes eliminate eukaryotic grazers. Answers to many outstanding questions about the evolution of microorganisms and their environments on early Earth are best answered through study of these extant analogs. Lipids associated with various groups of bacteria can be valuable biomarkers for identification of specific groups of microorganisms both in ancient organic-rich sedimentary rocks (geolipids) and contemporary microbial communities (membrane lipids). Use of compound specific isotope analysis adds additional refinement to the identification of biomarker source, so that it is possible to take advantage of the 3C-depletions associated with various functional groups of organisms (i.e. autotrophs, heterotrophs, methanotrophs, methanogens) responsible for the cycling of carbon within a microbial community. Our recent work has focused on a set of hypersaline evaporation ponds at Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico which support the abundant growth of Microcoleus-dominated microbial mats. Specific biomarkers for diatoms, cyanobacteria, archaea, green nonsulfur (GNS), sulfate reducing, and methanotrophic bacteria have been identified. Analyses of the ester-bound fatty acids indicate a highly diverse microbial community, dominated by photosynthetic organisms at the surface.

  6. Brain Transcriptome Profiling Analysis of Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus Under Long-Term Hypersaline Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Liu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The fish brain plays an important role in controlling growth, development, reproduction, and adaptation to environmental change. However, few studies stem from the perspective of whole transcriptome change in a fish brain and its response to long-term hypersaline stress. This study compares the differential transcriptomic responses of juvenile Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus maintained for 8 weeks in brackish water (16 practical salinity units, psu and in freshwater. Fish brains from each treatment were collected for RNA-seq analysis to identify potential genes and pathways responding to hypersaline stress. A total of 27,089 genes were annotated, and 391 genes were expressed differently in the salinity treatment. Ten pathways containing 40 differentially expressed genes were identified in the tilapia brain. Antigen processing and presentation and phagosome were the two principally affected pathways in the immune system. Thirty-one of 40 genes were involved in various expressions associated with environmental information processing pathways such as neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, the Jak-STAT signaling pathway, cell adhesion molecules (CAMs, and the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway, which are the upstream pathways for modulation of immunity and osmoregulation. The most-changed genes (>5-fold were all down-regulated, including four growth hormone/prolactin gene families, i.e., prolactin precursor (−10.62, prolactin-1 (−11, somatotropin (−10.15, somatolactin-like (−6.18, and two other genes [thyrotropin subunit beta (−7.73 and gonadotropin subunit beta-2 (−5.06] that stimulated prolactin release in tilapia. The downregulation pattern of these genes corroborates the decrease in tilapia immunity with increasing salinity and reveals an adaptive mechanism of tilapia to long-term hypersaline stress. Ovarian steroidogenesis, isoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis, and phenylalanine metabolism are the

  7. Chemical Evolution of Groundwater Near a Sinkhole Lake, Northern Florida: 1. Flow Patterns, Age of Groundwater, and Influence of Lake Water Leakage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Brian G.; Lee, Terrie M.; Plummer, L. Niel; Busenberg, Eurybiades

    1995-06-01

    Leakage from sinkhole lakes significantly influences recharge to the Upper Floridan aquifer in poorly confined sediments in northern Florida. Environmental isotopes (oxygen 18, deuterium, and tritium), chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs: CFC-11, CCl3F; CFC-12, CCl2F2; and CFC-113, C2Cl3F3), and solute tracers were used to investigate groundwater flow patterns near Lake Barco, a seepage lake in a mantled karst setting in northern Florida. Stable isotope data indicated that the groundwater downgradient from the lake contained 11-67% lake water leakage, with a limit of detection of lake water in groundwater of 4.3%. The mixing fractions of lake water leakage, which passed through organic-rich sediments in the lake bottom, were directly proportional to the observed methane concentrations and increased with depth in the groundwater flow system. In aerobic groundwater upgradient from Lake Barco, CFC-modeled recharge dates ranged from 1987 near the water table to the mid 1970s for water collected at a depth of 30 m below the water table. CFC-modeled recharge dates (based on CFC-12) for anaerobic groundwater downgradient from the lake ranged from the late 1950s to the mid 1970s and were consistent with tritium data. CFC-modeled recharge dates based on CFC-11 indicated preferential microbial degradation in anoxic waters. Vertical hydraulic conductivities, calculated using CFC-12 modeled recharge dates and Darcy's law, were 0.17, 0.033, and 0.019 m/d for the surficial aquifer, intermediate confining unit, and lake sediments, respectively. These conductivities agreed closely with those used in the calibration of a three-dimensional groundwater flow model for transient and steady state flow conditions.

  8. Salinity shapes food webs in shallow lakes: implications for increasing aridity with climate change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, Nicolas; Yu, Jinlei; Gutierrez, Maria Florencia

    2015-01-01

    on community and food web structure in 24 lakes along a wide salinity gradient, from freshwater (0.5 g L-1) to hypersaline lakes (115 g L-1), in a semiarid region in North West China. Fish, zooplankton and macroinvertebrate communities were sampled during July 2014 for determination of taxonomy and size......A reduction in runoff and higher evaporation rates are expected to occur towards 2050 in arid and semiarid regions of the world, resulting in a reduction of water level and salinization of inland waters. Besides the natural process of catchment erosion, human activities such as irrigation of crops...... may also increase salinization. Reduced biodiversity in freshwater systems is the most commonly reported effect of salinization, which may have implications for food web structure and likely for ecosystem functioning as well. The objective of the study was to analyze the effects of salinity...

  9. Translational regulation in the anoxic turtle, Trachemys scripta elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szereszewski, Kama E; Storey, Kenneth B

    2017-12-14

    The red-eared slider turtle (Trachemys scripta elegans), has developed remarkable adaptive mechanisms for coping with decreased oxygen availability during winter when lakes and ponds become covered with ice. Strategies for enduring anoxia tolerance include an increase in fermentable fuel reserves to support anaerobic glycolysis, the buffering of end products to minimize acidosis, altered expression in crucial survival genes, and strong metabolic rate suppression to minimize ATP-expensive metabolic processes such as protein synthesis. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is at the center of the insulin-signaling pathway that regulates protein translation. The present study analyzed the responses of the mTOR signaling pathway to 5 (5H) or 20 h (20H) of anoxic submergence in liver and skeletal muscle of T. scripta elegans with a particular focus on regulatory changes in the phosphorylation states of targets. The data showed that phosphorylation of multiple mTOR targets was suppressed in skeletal muscle, but activated in the liver. Phosphorylated mTOR Ser2448 showed no change in skeletal muscle but had increased by approximately 4.5-fold in the liver after 20H of anoxia. The phosphorylation states of upstream positive regulators of mTOR (p-PDK-1 Ser241 , p-AKT Ser473 , and protein levels of GβL), the relative levels of dephosphorylated active PTEN, as well as phosphorylation state of negative regulators (TSC2 Thr1462 , p-PRAS40 Thr246 ) were generally found to be differentially regulated in skeletal muscle and in liver. Downstream targets of mTOR (p-p70 S6K Thr389 , p-S6 Ser235 , PABP, p-4E-BP1 Thr37/46 , and p-eIF4E Ser209 ) were generally unchanged in skeletal muscle but upregulated in most targets in liver. These findings indicate that protein synthesis is enhanced in the liver and suggests an increase in the synthesis of crucial proteins required for anoxic survival.

  10. A remarkable paradox: Freshwater algae (Botryococcus braunii) in an ancient hypersaline euxinic ecosytem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Grice, K.; Schouten, S.; Nissenbaum, A.; Charrach, J.

    1998-01-01

    Two relatively immature hypersaline sediments of Miocene/Pliocene age from the Sdom Formation, Dead Sea, Israel were studied using both GC-MS and irm-GCMS analyses. A novel series of extractable organosulfur compounds (OSC) derived from functionalised lipids of freshwater Botryococcus braunii algae

  11. Regionalization of precipitation characteristics in Iran's Lake Urmia basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazel, Nasim; Berndtsson, Ronny; Uvo, Cintia Bertacchi; Madani, Kaveh; Kløve, Bjørn

    2018-04-01

    Lake Urmia in northwest Iran, once one of the largest hypersaline lakes in the world, has shrunk by almost 90% in area and 80% in volume during the last four decades. To improve the understanding of regional differences in water availability throughout the region and to refine the existing information on precipitation variability, this study investigated the spatial pattern of precipitation for the Lake Urmia basin. Daily rainfall time series from 122 precipitation stations with different record lengths were used to extract 15 statistical descriptors comprising 25th percentile, 75th percentile, and coefficient of variation for annual and seasonal total precipitation. Principal component analysis in association with cluster analysis identified three main homogeneous precipitation groups in the lake basin. The first sub-region (group 1) includes stations located in the center and southeast; the second sub-region (group 2) covers mostly northern and northeastern part of the basin, and the third sub-region (group 3) covers the western and southern edges of the basin. Results of principal component (PC) and clustering analyses showed that seasonal precipitation variation is the most important feature controlling the spatial pattern of precipitation in the lake basin. The 25th and 75th percentiles of winter and autumn are the most important variables controlling the spatial pattern of the first rotated principal component explaining about 32% of the total variance. Summer and spring precipitation variations are the most important variables in the second and third rotated principal components, respectively. Seasonal variation in precipitation amount and seasonality are explained by topography and influenced by the lake and westerly winds that are related to the strength of the North Atlantic Oscillation. Despite using incomplete time series with different lengths, the identified sub-regions are physically meaningful.

  12. Quantity and quality of groundwater discharge in a hypersaline lake environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R.B.; Naftz, D.L.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Henderson, R.D.; Rosenberry, D.O.; Stolp, B.J.; Jewell, P.

    2014-01-01

    Geophysical and geochemical surveys were conducted to understand groundwater discharge to Great Salt Lake (GSL) and assess the potential significance of groundwater discharge as a source of selenium (Se). Continuous resistivity profiling (CRP) focusing below the sediment/water interface and fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing (FO-DTS) surveys were conducted along the south shore of GSL. FO-DTS surveys identified persistent cold-water temperature anomalies at 10 separate locations. Seepage measurements were conducted at 17 sites (mean seepage rate = 0.8 cm/day). High resistivity anomalies identified by the CRP survey were likely a mirabilite (Na2SO4·10H2O) salt layer acting as a semi-confining layer for the shallow groundwater below the south shore of the lake. Positive seepage rates measured along the near-shore areas of GSL indicate that a ∼1-m thick oolitic sand overlying the mirabilite layer is likely acting as a shallow, unconfined aquifer. Using the average seepage rate of 0.8 cm/day over an area of 1.6 km2, an annual Se mass loading to GSL of 23.5 kg was estimated. Determination of R/Ra values (calculated 3He/4He ratio over the present-day atmospheric 3He/4He ratio) 34S and δ18O isotopic values in samples of dissolved sulfate from the shallow groundwater below the mirabilite are almost identical to the isotopic signature of the mirabilite core material. The saturation index calculated for groundwater samples using PHREEQC indicates the water is at equilibrium with mirabilite. Water samples collected from GSL immediately off shore contained Se concentrations that were 3–4 times higher than other sampling sites >25 km offshore from the study site and may be originating from less saline groundwater seeps mixing with the more saline water from GSL. Additional evidence for mixing with near shore seeps is found in the δD and δ18O isotopic values and Br:Cl ratios. Geochemical modeling for a water sample collected in the vicinity of the study area

  13. [Effect of abiotic and biotic factors on the structural and functional organization of the saline lake ecosystems in Crimea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balushkina, E V; Golubkov, S M; Golubkov, M S; Litvinchuk, L F; Shadrin, N V

    2009-01-01

    Decrease of both zooplankton and zoobenthos species richness and a trend toward decrease of their biomass with the salinity increase was recorded in the hypersaline lakes of Crimea. The most of structural and functional characteristics of macrobenthos is positively correlated with abiotic and biotic characteristics of those lakes. Abundance, biomass, productivity of macrobenthos and ration of non-predating macrozoobenthos decrease with salinity increase, while they increase with the depth and growth of amount of chlorophyll a and primary production. Macrozoobenthos portion in the total zooplankton and macrozoobenthos biomass decreases with both salinity and depth increase. Zooplankton community is less controlled by abiotic factors as compared to macrozoobenthos, while the former's species number significantly decrease with salinity increase. Effect of salinity on zooplankton biomass is slightly significant, unlike that of macrozoobenthos. Comparison of total amount of rations of zooplankton and macrozoobenthos with amount of primary production indicates intense trophic interactions in the lakes under study.

  14. Acid azo dye remediation in anoxic-aerobic-anoxic microenvironment under periodic discontinuous batch operation: bio-electro kinetics and microbial inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkata Mohan, S; Suresh Babu, P; Naresh, K; Velvizhi, G; Madamwar, Datta

    2012-09-01

    Functional behavior of anoxic-aerobic-anoxic microenvironment on azo dye (C.I. Acid black 10B) degradation was evaluated in a periodic discontinuous batch mode operation for 26 cycles. Dye removal efficiency and azo-reductase activity (30.50 ± 1 U) increased with each feeding event until 13th cycle and further stabilized. Dehydrogenase activity also increased gradually and stabilized (2.0 ± 0.2 μg/ml) indicating the stable proton shuttling between metabolic intermediates providing higher number of reducing equivalents towards dye degradation. Voltammetric profiles showed drop in redox catalytic currents during stabilized phase also supports the consumption of reducing equivalents towards dye removal. Change in Tafel slopes, polarization resistance and other bioprocess parameters correlated well with the observed dye removal and biocatalyst behavior. Microbial community analysis documented the involvement of specific organism pertaining to aerobic and facultative functions with heterotrophic and autotrophic metabolism. Integrating anoxic microenvironment with aerobic operation might have facilitated effective dye mineralization due to the possibility of combining redox functions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Historical Fluxes of Toxic Trace Elements and Associated Implications in the Salton Sea Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odigie, K. O.; Hardisty, D. S.; Geraci, J. B.; Lyons, T. W.

    2017-12-01

    The Salton Sea is a polymictic, hypersaline lake that is predominantly sustained by wastewater and agricultural runoff from Mexico and the United States. It is a terminal lake that acts as a net sink for toxicants, which in addition to nutrients and increasing salinity, have dramatically transformed the lake over the past century. However, the impacts of these changes on the cycling and bio-accessibility of toxic elements and compounds and their associated human and environmental health implications are not well understood. This project aims to measure and model the fluxes of toxic elements, including selenium, lead, and mercury, in the lake over temporal and spatial scales by using geochemical data from the analysis of sediment cores, a pervasive salt crust, and the water column. The project also aims to elucidate the bio-accessibility and depositional environments of these elements. Preliminary results highlight two different oxygen concentration regimes in the lake: an increasingly anoxic condition in the bottom of the northern lobe and a seasonally variable oxygen deficiency in the bottom of the southern lobe. The deteriorating conditions at the lake could be exacerbated by a receding shoreline, which has already exposed several square kilometres of lake bed and is expected to continue as future inflows are diverted under the Quantification Settlement Agreement. Continued water conservation by Imperial Valley farmers and the increasing reuse of reclaimed water by Mexico are also expected to contribute to reduced inflows to the lake. Therefore, improved understanding of the cycling of toxic elements and their potential remobilization, including via wind entrainment (dust) associated with lake desiccation, will be valuable in protecting human and environmental health within the Salton Sea basin.

  16. Phylogeography, salinity adaptations and metabolic potential of the Candidate Division KB1 Bacteria based on a partial single cell genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M Nigro

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Deep-sea hypersaline anoxic basins (DHABs and other hypersaline environments contain abundant and diverse microbial life that has adapted to these extreme conditions. The bacterial Candidate Division KB1 represents one of several uncultured groups that has been consistently observed in hypersaline microbial diversity studies. Here we report the phylogeography of KB1, its phylogenetic relationships to Candidate Division OP1 Bacteria, and its potential metabolic and osmotic stress adaptations based on a partial single cell amplified genome (SAG of KB1 from Orca Basin, the largest hypersaline seafloor brine basin in the Gulf of Mexico. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis – previously developed based on 14C incorporation experiments with mixed-species enrichments from Mediterranean seafloor brines - that KB1 has adapted its proteins to elevated intracellular salinity, but at the same time KB1 apparently imports glycine betaine; this compatible solute is potentially not limited to osmoregulation but could also serve as a carbon and energy source.

  17. Anoxic denitrification of BTEX: Biodegradation kinetics and pollutant interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvajal, Andrea; Akmirza, Ilker; Navia, Daniel; Pérez, Rebeca; Muñoz, Raúl; Lebrero, Raquel

    2018-05-15

    Anoxic mineralization of BTEX represents a promising alternative for their abatement from O 2 -deprived emissions. However, the kinetics of anoxic BTEX biodegradation and the interactions underlying the treatment of BTEX mixtures are still unknown. An activated sludge inoculum was used for the anoxic abatement of single, dual and quaternary BTEX mixtures, being acclimated prior performing the biodegradation kinetic tests. The Monod model and a Modified Gompertz model were then used for the estimation of the biodegradation kinetic parameters. Results showed that both toluene and ethylbenzene are readily biodegradable under anoxic conditions, whereas the accumulation of toxic metabolites resulted in partial xylene and benzene degradation when present both as single components or in mixtures. Moreover, the supplementation of an additional pollutant always resulted in an inhibitory competition, with xylene inducing the highest degree of inhibition. The Modified Gompertz model provided an accurate fitting for the experimental data for single and dual substrate experiments, satisfactorily representing the antagonistic pollutant interactions. Finally, microbial analysis suggested that the degradation of the most biodegradable compounds required a lower microbial specialization and diversity, while the presence of the recalcitrant compounds resulted in the selection of a specific group of microorganisms. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Two fixed ratio dilutions for soil salinity monitoring in hypersaline wetlands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Herrero

    Full Text Available Highly soluble salts are undesirable in agriculture because they reduce yields or the quality of most cash crops and can leak to surface or sub-surface waters. In some cases salinity can be associated with unique history, rarity, or special habitats protected by environmental laws. Yet in considering the measurement of soil salinity for long-term monitoring purposes, adequate methods are required. Both saturated paste extracts, intended for agriculture, and direct surface and/or porewater salinity measurement, used in inundated wetlands, are unsuited for hypersaline wetlands that often are only occasionally inundated. For these cases, we propose the use of 1:5 soil/water (weight/weight extracts as the standard for expressing the electrical conductivity (EC of such soils and for further salt determinations. We also propose checking for ion-pairing with a 1:10 or more diluted extract in hypersaline soils. As an illustration, we apply the two-dilutions approach to a set of 359 soil samples from saline wetlands ranging in ECe from 2.3 dS m(-1 to 183.0 dS m(-1. This easy procedure will be useful in survey campaigns and in the monitoring of soil salt content.

  19. Two fixed ratio dilutions for soil salinity monitoring in hypersaline wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, Juan; Weindorf, David C; Castañeda, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Highly soluble salts are undesirable in agriculture because they reduce yields or the quality of most cash crops and can leak to surface or sub-surface waters. In some cases salinity can be associated with unique history, rarity, or special habitats protected by environmental laws. Yet in considering the measurement of soil salinity for long-term monitoring purposes, adequate methods are required. Both saturated paste extracts, intended for agriculture, and direct surface and/or porewater salinity measurement, used in inundated wetlands, are unsuited for hypersaline wetlands that often are only occasionally inundated. For these cases, we propose the use of 1:5 soil/water (weight/weight) extracts as the standard for expressing the electrical conductivity (EC) of such soils and for further salt determinations. We also propose checking for ion-pairing with a 1:10 or more diluted extract in hypersaline soils. As an illustration, we apply the two-dilutions approach to a set of 359 soil samples from saline wetlands ranging in ECe from 2.3 dS m(-1) to 183.0 dS m(-1). This easy procedure will be useful in survey campaigns and in the monitoring of soil salt content.

  20. Oil-bioremediation potential of two hydrocarbonoclastic, diazotrophic Marinobacter strains from hypersaline areas along the Arabian Gulf coasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mailem, D M; Eliyas, M; Radwan, S S

    2013-05-01

    Two halophilic, hydrocarbonoclastics bacteria, Marinobacter sedimentarum and M. flavimaris, with diazotrophic potential occured in hypersaline waters and soils in southern and northern coasts of Kuwait. Their numbers were in the magnitude of 10(3) colony forming units g(-1). The ambient salinity in the hypersaline environments was between 3.2 and 3.5 M NaCl. The partial 16S rRNA gene sequences of the two strains showed, respectively, 99 and 100% similarities to the sequences in the GenBank. The two strains failed to grow in the absence of NaCl, exhibited best growth and hydrocarbon biodegradation in the presence of 1 to 1.5 M NaCl, and still grew and maintained their hydrocarbonoclastic activity at salinities up to 5 M NaCl. Both species utilized Tween 80, a wide range of individual aliphatic hydrocarbons (C9-C40) and the aromatics benzene, biphenyl, phenanthrene, anthracene and naphthalene as sole sources of carbon and energy. Experimental evidence was provided for their nitrogen-fixation potential. The two halophilic Marinobacter strains successfully mineralized crude oil in nutrient media as well as in hypersaline soil and water microcosms without the use of any nitrogen fertilizers.

  1. Impacts of extreme weather events on highly eutrophic marine ecosystem (Rogoznica Lake, Adriatic coast)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciglenečki, I.; Janeković, I.; Marguš, M.; Bura-Nakić, E.; Carić, M.; Ljubešić, Z.; Batistić, M.; Hrustić, E.; Dupčić, I.; Garić, R.

    2015-10-01

    Rogoznica Lake is highly eutrophic marine system located on the Eastern Adriatic coast (43°32‧N, 15°58‧E). Because of the relatively small size (10,276 m2) and depth (15 m) it experiences strong natural and indirect anthropogenic influences. Dynamics within the lake is characterized by the extreme and highly variable environmental conditions (seasonal variations in salinity and temperature, water stratification and mixing, redox and euxinic conditions, concentrations of nutrients) which significantly influence the biology inside the lake. Due to the high phytoplankton activity, the upper part of the water column is well oxygenated, while hypoxia/anoxia usually occurs in the bottom layers. Anoxic part of the water column is characterized with high concentrations of sulfide (up to 5 mM) and nutrients (NH4+ up to 315 μM; PO43- up to 53 μM; SiO44- up to 680 μM) indicating the pronounced remineralization of the allochthonous organic matter, produced in the surface waters. The mixolimnion varies significantly within a season feeling effects of the Adriatic atmospheric and ocean dynamics (temperature, wind, heat fluxes, rainfall) which all affect the vertical stability and possibly induce vertical mixing and/or turnover. Seasonal vertical mixing usually occurs during the autumn/winter upon the breakdown of the stratification, injecting oxygen-rich water from the surface into the deeper layers. Depending on the intensity and duration of the vertical dynamics (slower diffusion and/or faster turnover of the water layers) anoxic conditions could developed within the whole water column. Extreme weather events such as abrupt change in the air temperature accompanied with a strong wind and consequently heat flux are found to be a key triggering mechanism for the fast turnover, introducing a large amount of nutrients and sulfur species from deeper parts to the surface. Increased concentration of nutrients, especially ammonium, phosphate, and silicates persisting for

  2. Physical and chemical consequences of artificially deepened thermocline in a small humic lake - a paired whole-lake climate change experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsius, M.; Saloranta, T.; Arvola, L.; Salo, S.; Verta, M.; Ala-Opas, P.; Rask, M.; Vuorenmaa, J.

    2010-05-01

    Climate change with higher air temperatures and changes in cloud cover, radiation and wind speed alters the heat balance and stratification patterns of lakes. A paired whole-lake thermocline manipulation experiment of a small (0.047 km2) shallow dystrophic lake (Halsjärvi) was carried out in southern Finland. A thermodynamic model (MyLake) was used for both predicting the impacts of climate change scenarios and for determining the manipulation target of the experiment. The model simulations assuming several climate change scenarios indicated large increases in the whole-lake monthly mean temperature (+1.4-4.4 °C in April-October for the A2 scenario), and shortening of the length of the ice covered period by 56-89 days. The thermocline manipulation resulted in large changes in the thermodynamic properties of the lake, and those were rather well consistent with the simulated future increases in the heat content during the summer-autumn season. The manipulation also resulted in changes in the oxygen stratification, and the expansion of the oxic water layer increased the spatial extent of the sediment surface oxic-anoxic interfaces. The experiment also affected several other chemical constituents; concentrations of TotN, NH4 and organic carbon showed a statistically significant decrease, likely due to both unusual hydrological conditions during the experiment period and increased decomposition and sedimentation. Changes in mercury processes and in the aquatic food web were also introduced. In comparison with the results of a similar whole-lake manipulation experiment in a deep, oligotrophic, clear-watered lake in Norway, it is evident that shallow dystrophic lakes, common in the boreal region, are more sensitive to physical perturbations. This means that projected climate change may strongly modify their physical and chemical conditions in the future.

  3. Autotrophic and heterotrophic nitrification-anoxic denitrification dominated the anoxic/oxic sewage treatment process during optimization for higher loading rate and energy savings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xueyu; Zheng, Shaokui; Zhang, Hangyu; Duan, Shoupeng

    2018-04-30

    This study clarified the dominant nitrogen (N)-transformation pathway and the key ammonia-oxidizing microbial species at three loading levels during optimization of the anoxic/oxic (A/O) process for sewage treatment. Comprehensive N-transformation activity analysis showed that ammonia oxidization was performed predominantly by aerobic chemolithotrophic and heterotrophic ammonia oxidization, whereas N 2 production was performed primarily by anoxic denitrification in the anoxic unit. The abundances of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), nitrite-oxidizing bacteria, and anaerobic AOB in activated sludge reflected their activities on the basis of high-throughput sequencing data. AOB amoA gene clone libraries revealed that the predominant AOB species in sludge samples shifted from Nitrosomonas europaea (61% at the normal loading level) to Nitrosomonas oligotropha (58% and 81% at the two higher loading levels). Following isolation and sequencing, the predominant culturable heterotrophic AOB in sludge shifted from Agrobacterium tumefaciens (42% at the normal loading level) to Acinetobacter johnsonii (52% at the highest loading level). Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Cyanobacterial diversity and halotolerance in a variable hypersaline environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkwood, Andrea E; Buchheim, Julie A; Buchheim, Mark A; Henley, William J

    2008-04-01

    The Great Salt Plains (GSP) in north-central Oklahoma, USA is an expansive salt flat (approximately 65 km(2)) that is part of the federally protected Salt Plains National Wildlife Refuge. The GSP serves as an ideal environment to study the microbial diversity of a terrestrial, hypersaline system that experiences wide fluctuations in freshwater influx and diel temperature. Our study assessed cyanobacterial diversity at the GSP by focusing on the taxonomic and physiological diversity of GSP isolates, and the 16S rRNA phylogenetic diversity of isolates and environmental clones from three sites (north, central, and south). Taxonomic diversity of isolates was limited to a few genera (mostly Phormidium and Geitlerinema), but physiological diversity based on halotolerance ranges was strikingly more diverse, even between strains of the same phylotype. The phylogenetic tree revealed diversity that spanned a number of cyanobacterial lineages, although diversity at each site was dominated by only a few phylotypes. Unlike other hypersaline systems, a number of environmental clones from the GSP were members of the heterocystous lineage. Although a number of cyanobacterial isolates were close matches with prevalent environmental clones, it is not certain if these clones reflect the same halotolerance ranges of their matching isolates. This caveat is based on the notable disparities we found between strains of the same phylotype and their inherent halotolerance. Our findings support the hypothesis that variable or poikilotrophic environments promote diversification, and in particular, select for variation in ecotype more than phylotype.

  5. Prokaryotic diversity in one of the largest hypersaline coastal lagoons in the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementino, M M; Vieira, R P; Cardoso, A M; Nascimento, A P A; Silveira, C B; Riva, T C; Gonzalez, A S M; Paranhos, R; Albano, R M; Ventosa, A; Martins, O B

    2008-07-01

    Araruama Lagoon is an environment characterized by high salt concentrations. The low raining and high evaporation rates in this region favored the development of many salty ponds around the lagoon. In order to reveal the microbial composition of this system, we performed a 16S rRNA gene survey. Among archaea, most clones were related to uncultured environmental Euryarchaeota. In lagoon water, we found some clones related to Methanomicrobia and Methanothermococcus groups, while in the saline pond water members related to the genus Haloarcula were detected. Bacterial community was dominated by clones related to Gamma-proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Synechococcus in lagoon water, while Salinibacter ruber relatives dominated in saline pond. We also detected the presence of Alpha-proteobacteria, Pseudomonas-like bacteria and Verrucomicrobia. Only representatives of the genus Ralstonia were cosmopolitan, being observed in both systems. The detection of a substantial number of clones related to uncultured archaea and bacteria suggest that the hypersaline waters of Araruama harbor a pool of novel prokaryotic phylotypes, distinct from those observed in other similar systems. We also observed clones related to halophilic genera of cyanobacteria that are specific for each habitat studied. Additionally, two bacterioplankton molecular markers with ecological relevance were analyzed, one is linked to nitrogen fixation (nifH) and the other is linked to carbon fixation by bacterial photosynthesis, the protochlorophyllide genes, revealing a specific genetic distribution in this ecosystem. This is the first study of the biogeography and community structure of microbial assemblages in Brazilian tropical hypersaline environments. This work is directed towards a better understanding of the free-living prokaryotic diversity adapted to life in hypersaline waters.

  6. Assessment of Lake Water Quality and Quantity Using Satellite Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, K. C.; Suresh, A.; Paredes Mesa, S.

    2017-12-01

    Lakes are one of the few sources of freshwater used throughout the world but due to human activities, its quality and availability has been decreasing. The drying of lakes is a concerning issue in different communities around the world. This problem can affect jobs and the lives of individuals who use lakes as a source of income, consumption and recreation. Another dilemma that has occurred in lakes is eutrophication which is the buildup of excess nutrients in the lakes caused by runoff. This natural process can lead to anoxic conditions that may have a detrimental impact on surrounding ecosystems. Therefore, causing a devastating impact to economies and human livelihood worldwide. To monitor these issues, satellite data can be used to assess the water quality of different lakes throughout the world. Landsat satellite data from the past 10 years was used to conduct this research. By using the IOP (Inherent Optical Properties) of chlorophyll and suspended solids in the visible spectrum, the presence of algal blooms and sediments was determined. ARCGIS was used to outline the areas of the lakes and obtain reflectance values for quantity and quality assessment. Because there is always a certain amount of contamination in the lake, this research is used to evaluate the condition of the lakes throughout the years. Using the data that we have collected, we are able to understand how the issues addressed can harm civilians seasonally. Key Words: Lakes, Water Quality, Algal Blooms, Eutrophication, Remote Sensing, Satellite DataData Source: Landsat 4, Landsat 5, Landsat 7, Landsat 8

  7. Massive expansion of marine archaea during a mid-Cretaceous oceanic anoxic event

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuypers, M.M.M.; Blokker, P.; Erbacher, J.

    2001-01-01

    molecular fossils indicates that these archaea were living chemoautotrophically. Their massive expansion may have been a response to the strong stratification of the ocean during this anoxic event. Indeed, the sedimentary record of archaeal membrane lipids suggests that this anoxic event marks a time......Biogeochemical and stable carbon isotopic analysis of black-shale sequences deposited during an Albian oceanic anoxic event (∼112 million years ago) indicate that up to 80 weight percent of sedimentary organic carbon is derived from marine, nonthermophilic archaea. The carbon-13 content of archaeal...

  8. Climate-induced changes in the trophic status of a Central European lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas HÜBENER

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available We present a case study of the development of Sacrower See, a stratified, eutrophic lake in northeastern Germany, over the past 13,000 years. Total epilimnetic phosphorus (TP concentrations were reconstructed quantitatively using a diatom-TP transfer function. Fossil chironomid assemblages were used to support the trophic reconstruction and helped assessing past hypolimnetic oxygen availability. The results indicate eutrophic and anoxic conditions during the Younger Dryas cold period (~12,700-11,600 cal. BP preceding the present interglacial. Throughout the early and mid-Holocene (~11,600-4000 cal. BP stable oligo- to mesotrophic conditions with diatom-inferred TP values of ~20 μg L-1 prevailed. First evidence of increasing Holocene TP is recorded at ~3500 cal. BP associated with Bronze Age human impact and for the past 900 years diatoms indicate increasing TP values of 30-60 μg L-1. During the early Holocene and the past two millennia chironomids indicated anoxic hypolimnetic conditions. The chironomid fauna is considered typical of oligo- to mesotrophic lakes. As a consequence of strongly increased primary production the hypolimnion of Sacrower See became anoxic again during the past 140 years. Our results indicate that highly productive eutrophic conditions can exist prior to cultural eutrophication. At Sacrower See the shift from eutrophic conditions in the Lateglacial to oligo-mesotrophic conditions in the early and mid-Holocene was associated with the climatic warming at the Younger Dryas/Holocene transition. The high productive state during the cold Younger Dryas is associated with changes in seasonality: the prolonged winters caused longer ice cover, stronger stratification, anoxia in the hypolimnion, and consequent internal phosphorus loading. During the warm Holocene, however, hypolimnetic anoxia and internal phosphorus loading decreased significantly, resulting in a substantially lower productivity.

  9. Expression of Key Ion Transporters in the Gill and Esophageal-Gastrointestinal Tract of Euryhaline Mozambique Tilapia Oreochromis mossambicus Acclimated to Fresh Water, Seawater and Hypersaline Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhengjun; Lui, Eei Yin; Wilson, Jonathan M.; Ip, Yuen Kwong; Lin, Qingsong; Lam, Toong Jin; Lam, Siew Hong

    2014-01-01

    The ability of euryhaline Mozambique tilapia to tolerate extreme environmental salinities makes it an excellent model for investigating iono-regulation. This study aimed to characterize and fill important information gap of the expression levels of key ion transporters for Na+ and Cl− in the gill and esophageal-gastrointestinal tract of Mozambique tilapia acclimated to freshwater (0 ppt), seawater (30 ppt) and hypersaline (70 ppt) environments. Among the seven genes studied, it was found that nkcc2, nkcc1a, cftr, nka-α1 and nka-α3, were more responsive to salinity challenge than nkcc1b and ncc within the investigated tissues. The ncc expression was restricted to gills of freshwater-acclimated fish while nkcc2 expression was restricted to intestinal segments irrespective of salinity challenge. Among the tissues investigated, gill and posterior intestine were found to be highly responsive to salinity changes, followed by anterior and middle intestine. Both esophagus and stomach displayed significant up-regulation of nka-α1 and nka-α3, but not nkcc isoforms and cftr, in hypersaline-acclimated fish suggesting a response to hypersalinity challenge and involvement of other forms of transporters in iono-regulation. Changes in gene expression levels were partly corroborated by immunohistochemical localization of transport proteins. Apical expression of Ncc was found in Nka-immunoreactive cells in freshwater-acclimated gills while Nkcc co-localized with Nka-immunoreactive cells expressing Cftr apically in seawater- and hypersaline-acclimated gills. In the intestine, Nkcc-stained apical brush border was found in Nka-immunoreactive cells at greater levels under hypersaline conditions. These findings provided new insights into the responsiveness of these genes and tissues under hypersalinity challenge, specifically the posterior intestine being vital for salt absorption and iono-osmoregulation in the Mozambique tilapia; its ability to survive in hypersalinity may be in

  10. Manganese Driven Carbon Oxidation along Oxic-Anoxic Interfaces in Forest Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, M. E.; Keiluweit, M.

    2017-12-01

    Soils are the largest and most dynamic terrestrial carbon pool, storing a total of 3000 Pg of C - more than the atmosphere and biosphere combined. Because microbial oxidation determines the proportion of carbon that is either stored in the soil or emitted as climate active CO2, its rate directly impacts the global carbon cycle. Recently, a strong correlation between oxidation rates and manganese (Mn) content has been observed in forest soils globally, leading researchers conclude that Mn "is the single main factor governing" the oxidation of plant-derived particulate organic carbon (POC). Many soils are characterized by steep oxygen gradients, forming oxic-anoxic transitions that enable rapid redox cycling of Mn. Oxic-anoxic interfaces have been shown to promote fungal Mn oxidation and the formation of ligand-stabilized Mn(III), which ranks second only to superoxide as the most powerful oxidizing agent in the environment. Here we examined fungal Mn(III) formation along redox gradients in forest soils and their impact on POC oxidation rates. In both field and laboratory settings, oxic-anoxic transition zones showed the greatest Mn(III) concentrations, along with enhanced fungal growth, oxidative potential, production of soluble oxidation products, and CO2 production. Additional electrochemical and X-ray (micro)spectroscopic analyses indicated that oxic-anoxic interfaces represent ideal niches for fungal Mn(III) formation, owing to the ready supply of Mn(II), ligands and O2. Combined, our results suggest that POC oxidation relies on fungal Mn cycling across oxic-anoxic interfaces to produce Mn(III) based oxidants. Because predicted changes in the frequency and timing of precipitation dramatically alter soil moisture regimes in forest soils, understanding the mechanistic link between Mn cycling and carbon oxidation along oxic-anoxic interfaces is becoming increasingly important.

  11. Hypersalinity Acclimation Increases the Toxicity of the Insecticide Phorate in Coho Salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavado, Ramon; Maryoung, Lindley A.; Schlenk, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies in euryhaline fish have shown that acclimation to hypersaline environments enhances the toxicity of thioether organophosphate and carbamate pesticides. To better understand the potential mechanism of enhanced toxicity, the effects of the organophosphate insecticide phorate were evaluated in coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) maintained in freshwater (salinity-dependent manner. In contrast, formation of phorate-oxon (gill; olfactory tissues), phorate sulfone (liver), and phorate-oxon sulfoxide (liver; olfactory tissues) was significantly enhanced in fish acclimated to higher salinities. From previous studies, it was expected that phorate and phorate sulfoxide would be less potent AChE inhibitors than phorate-oxon, with phorate-oxon sulfoxide being the most potent of the compounds tested. This trend was confirmed in this study. In summary, these results suggest that differential expression and/or catalytic activities of Phase I enzymes may be involved to enhance phorate oxidative metabolism and subsequent toxicity of phorate to coho salmon under hypersaline conditions. The outcome may be enhanced fish susceptibility to anticholineterase oxon sulfoxides. PMID:21488666

  12. Influence of different anoxic time exposures on active biomass, protozoa and filamentous bacteria in activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Perez, S; Fermoso, F G; Arnaiz, C

    Medium-sized wastewater treatment plants are considered too small to implement anaerobic digestion technologies and too large for extensive treatments. A promising option as a sewage sludge reduction method is the inclusion of anoxic time exposures. In the present study, three different anoxic time exposures of 12, 6 and 4 hours have been studied to reduce sewage sludge production. The best anoxic time exposure was observed under anoxic/oxic cycles of 6 hours, which reduced 29.63% of the biomass production compared with the oxic control conditions. The sludge under different anoxic time exposures, even with a lower active biomass concentration than the oxic control conditions, showed a much higher metabolic activity than the oxic control conditions. Microbiological results suggested that both protozoa density and abundance of filamentous bacteria decrease under anoxic time exposures compared to oxic control conditions. The anoxic time exposures 6/6 showed the highest reduction in both protozoa density, 37.5%, and abundance of filamentous bacteria, 41.1%, in comparison to the oxic control conditions. The groups of crawling ciliates, carnivorous ciliates and filamentous bacteria were highly influenced by the anoxic time exposures. Protozoa density and abundance of filamentous bacteria have been shown as promising bioindicators of biomass production reduction.

  13. Effect of salinity on diazotrophic activity and microbial composition of phototrophic communities from Bitter-1 soda lake (Kulunda Steppe, Russia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namsaraev, Zorigto; Samylina, Olga; Sukhacheva, Marina; Borisenko, Gennadii; Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Tourova, Tatiana

    2018-04-16

    Bitter-1 is a shallow hypersaline soda lake in Kulunda Steppe (Altai region, Russia). During a study period between 2005 and 2016, the salinity in the littoral area of the lake fluctuated within the range from 85 to 400 g/L (in July of each year). Light-dependent nitrogen fixation occurred in this lake up to the salt-saturating conditions. The rates increased with a decrease in salinity, both under environmental conditions and in laboratory simulations. The salinities below 100 g/L were favorable for light-dependent nitrogen fixation, while the process was dramatically inhibited above 200 g/L salts. The analysis of nifH genes in environmental samples and in enrichment cultures of diazotrophic phototrophs suggested that anaerobic fermenting and sulfate-reducing bacteria could participate in the dark nitrogen fixation process up to soda-saturating conditions. However, we cannot exclude the possibility that haloalkaliphilic nonheterocystous cyanobacteria (Euhalothece sp. and Geitlerinema sp.) and anoxygenic purple sulfur bacteria (Ectothiorhodospira sp.) might also play a role in the process at light conditions. The heterocystous cyanobacterium Nodularia sp. develops at low salinity (below 80 g/L) that is not characteristic for Bitter-1 Lake and thus does not make a significant contribution to the nitrogen fixation in this lake.

  14. Cenomanian-Turanian anoxic event and potential petroleum source rocks of the Upper Benue Trough, Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammed, B.

    2004-01-01

    Foraminiferal palaeoenviromental studies particularly planktonic/benthonic (p/b) ratio have been used to demarcate anoxic horizon within the Cenomanian-Turonian sequence of the Upper Benue trough. The foraminiferal faunal assemblages indicate a deep marine .anoxic I sequences. Geochemical analysis of organic matter yielded TOC values that are generally fair to moderate with average of 0.70,2.05 and 0.44% in Dukkul, Pindiga and Gongila Formations respectively. Hydrogen indices also indicate preponderance of gas -prone terrestrial type III organic matter. This seems to be inconsistent with anoxic/dysoxic environments in which organic matter is generally expected to be commonly more abundant, better preserved and more lipid rich. Therefore, it is suggested here that such a relatively deep marine anoxic environment was subsequently raised tectonically to very shallow levels (raised oxygen-minimum zone) where terrestrial organic matter were washed into the anoxic water. These terrestrial contributions diluted and downgraded the anoxic level such that TOCs are generally low to moderate and organic matter became generally of type III and IV

  15. Interactive effects of chemical and biological controls on food-web composition in saline prairie lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Ryan N; Wissel, Björn

    2012-11-27

    Salinity is restricting habitatability for many biota in prairie lakes due to limited physiological abilities to cope with increasing osmotic stress. Yet, it remains unclear how salinity effects vary among major taxonomic groups and what role other environmental parameters play in shaping food-web composition. To answer these questions, we sampled fish, zooplankton and littoral macroinvertebrates in 20 prairie lakes (Saskatchewan, Canada) characterized by large gradients in water chemistry and lake morphometry. We showed that salinity thresholds differed among major taxonomic groups, as most fishes were absent above salinities of 2 g L-1, while littoral macroinvertebrates were ubiquitous. Zooplankton occurred over the whole salinity range, but changed taxonomic composition as salinity increased. Subsequently, the complexity of fish community (diversity) was associated with large changes in invertebrate communities. The directional changes in invertebrate communities to smaller taxa indicated that complex fish assemblages resulted in higher predation pressure. Most likely, as the complexity of fish community decreased, controls of invertebrate assemblages shifted from predation to competition and ultimately to productivity in hypersaline lakes. Surprisingly, invertebrate predators did not thrive in the absence of fishes in these systems. Furthermore, the here identified salinity threshold for fishes was too low to be a result of osmotic stress. Hence, winterkill was likely an important factor eliminating fishes in low salinity lakes that had high productivity and shallow water depth. Ultimately, while salinity was crucial, intricate combinations of chemical and biological mechanisms also played a major role in controlling the assemblages of major taxonomic groups in prairie lakes.

  16. Metagenomic insights into the uncultured diversity and physiology of microbes in four hypersaline soda lake brines.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vavourakis, C. D.; Ghai, Rohit; Rodriguez-Valera, F.; Sorokin, D. Y.; Tringe, S. G.; Hugenholtz, P.; Muyzer, G.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 7, February (2016), č. článku 211. ISSN 1664-302X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-00243S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : soda lake brines * Nanohaloarchaea * Halobacteria * Bacteroidetes * hydrolytics * cellulase * chitinase * rhodopsin Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.076, year: 2016

  17. Survival and Recovery of Methanotrophic Bacteria Starved Under Oxic and Anoxic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roslev, Peter; King, Gary M.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of carbon deprivation on survival of methanotrophic bacteria were compared in cultures incubated in the presence and absence of oxygen in the starvation medium. Survival and recovery of the examined methanotrophs were generally highest for cultures starved under anoxic conditions as indicated by poststarvation measurements of methane oxidation, tetrazolium salt reduction, plate counts, and protein synthesis. Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b survived up to 6 weeks of carbon deprivation under anoxic conditions while maintaining a physiological state that allowed relatively rapid (hours) methane oxidation after substrate addition. A small fraction of cells starved under oxic and anoxic conditions (4 and 10%, respectively) survived more than 10 weeks but required several days for recovery on plates and in liquid medium. A non-spore-forming methanotroph, strain WP 12, displayed 36 to 118% of its initial methane oxidation capacity after 5 days of carbon deprivation. Oxidation rates varied with growth history prior to the experiments as well as with starvation conditions. Strain WP 12 starved under anoxic conditions showed up to 90% higher methane oxidation activity and 46% higher protein production after starvation than did cultures starved under oxic conditions. Only minor changes in biomass and niorpholow were seen for methanotrophic bacteria starved tinder anoxic conditions. In contrast, starvation under oxic conditions resulted in morphology changes and an initial 28 to 35% loss of cell protein. These data suggest that methanotrophic bacteria can survin,e carbon deprivation under anoxic conditions by using maintenance energy derived Solelyr from an anaerobic endogenous metabolism. This capability could partly explain a significant potential for methane oxidation in environments not continuously, supporting aerobic methanotrophic growth.

  18. Anoxic carbon degradation in Arctic sediments: Microbial transformations of complex substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnosti, Carol; Finke, Niko; Larsen, Ole

    2005-01-01

    of activity that it fueled, its soluble nature, and its relatively high (50%) carbohydrate content. The microbial community in these cold anoxic sediments clearly has the capacity to react rapidly to carbon input; extent and timecourse of remineralization of added carbon is similar to observations made......Complex substrates are degraded in anoxic sediments by the concerted activities of diverse microbial communities. To explore the effects of substrate complexity on carbon transformations in permanently cold anoxic sediments, four substrates—Spirulina cells, Isochrysis cells, and soluble high...... which they were derived. Although Spirulina and Iso-Ex differed in physical and chemical characteristics (solid/soluble, C/N ratio, lipid and carbohydrate content), nearly identical quantities of carbon were respired to CO2. In contrast, only 15% of Spir-Ex carbon was respired, despite the initial burst...

  19. PHYLOGENETIC ANALYSIS AND AUTECOLOGY OF SPORE-FORMING BACTERIA FROM HYPERSALINE ENVIRONMENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladka, G V; Romanovskaya, V A; Tashyreva, H O; Tashyrev, O B

    2015-01-01

    Multi-resistant to extreme factors spore-forming bacteria of Bacillus genus are isolated from hypersaline environments of the Crimea (Ukraine) and the Dead Sea (Israel). Phylogenetic analysis showed distinction of dominating extremophilic culturable species in studied regions. In Crimean environments they are B. mojavensis and B. simplex, in the Dead Sea ecosystem--B. subtilis subsp. spizizenii, B. subtilis subsp. subtilis, B. licheniformis and B. simplex. Isolates are simultaneously halotolerant and resistant to UV radiation. Strains isolated from the Dead Sea and the Crimea environments were resistant to UV: LD90 and LD99.99 made 100-170 J/m2 and 750-1500 J/m2 respectively. Spores showed higher UV-resistance (LD99.99-2500 J/m2) than the vegetative cells. However the number of spores made 0.02-0.007% of the whole cell population, and should not significantly affect the UV LD99.99 value. Isolates of both environments were halotolerant in the range of 0.1-10% NaCl and thermotolerant in the range of 20-50 °C, and didn't grow at 15 °C. Survival strategy of spore-forming bacteria from hypersaline environments under high UV radiation level can be performed by spore formation which minimize cell damage as well as efficient DNA-repair systems that remove damages.

  20. Vertical distribution and community composition of anammox bacteria in sediments of a eutrophic shallow lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, H; Han, C; Jin, Z; Wu, L; Deng, H; Zhu, G; Zhong, W

    2018-07-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the vertical distribution traits of anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) bacterial relative abundance and community composition along the oxic/anoxic sediment profiles in a shallow lake. The Illumina Miseq-based sequencing and quantitative polymerase chain reactions were utilized to analyse relative abundance of anammox hydrazine synthase (hzsB) gene in comparison with bacterial 16S rRNA genes, anammox bacterial relative abundance (the number of anammox sequences divided by total number of sequences), community composition and diversity in sediments. The relative abundance of hzsB gene at the low-nitrogen (LN) site in the lake sediments showed that the vertical distribution of anammox bacteria increased to a peak, then decreased with increasing depth. Moreover, the relative abundance of hzsB gene at the high-nitrogen site was significantly lower than that at the LN site. Additionally, the community composition results showed that Candidatus Brocadia sp. was the dominant genus. In addition, the anammox bacterial diversity was also site specific. Redundancy analysis showed that the total N and the NH 4 + -N content might be the most important factors affecting anammox bacterial community composition in the studied sites. The results revealed the specific vertical variance of anammox bacterial distribution and community composition in oxic/anoxic sediments of a eutrophic shallow lake. This is the first study to demonstrate that anammox bacteria displayed the particular distribution in freshwater sediments, which implied a strong response to the anthropogenic eutrophication. © 2018 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  1. Functional-Structural Analysis of Nitrogen-Cycle Bacteria in a Hypersaline Mat from the Omani Desert

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abed, Raeid M M; de Beer, Dirk; Stief, Peter

    2015-01-01

    to sequences from the Rhizobiales group. Sequences of the nosZ gene were the most diverse and clustered with sequences from various genera. Our results demonstrate that the hypersaline mat from Oman harbors nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria with the potential to perform respective processes at detectable...

  2. Investigating the causality of changes in the landscape pattern of Lake Urmia basin, Iran using remote sensing and time series analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrian, Majid Ramezani; Hernandez, Raul Ponce; Yavari, Ahmad Reza; Faryadi, Shahrzad; Salehi, Esmaeil

    2016-08-01

    Lake Urmia is the second largest hypersaline lake in the world in terms of surface area. In recent decades, the drop in water level of the lake has been one of the most important environmental issues in Iran. At present, the entire basin is threatened due to abrupt decline of the lake's water level and the consequent increase in salinity. Despite the numerous studies, there is still an ambiguity about the main cause of this environmental crisis. This paper is an attempt to detect the changes in the landscape structure of the main elements of the whole basin using remote sensing techniques and analyze the results against climate data with time series analysis for the purpose of achieving a more clarified illustration of processes and trends. Trend analysis of the different affecting factors indicates that the main cause of the drastic dry out of the lake is the huge expansion of irrigated agriculture in the basin between 1999 and 2014. The climatological parameters including precipitation and temperature cannot be the main reasons for reduced water level in the lake. The results show how the increase in irrigated agricultural area without considering the water resources limits can lead to a regional disaster. The approach used in this study can be a useful tool to monitor and assess the causality of environmental disaster.

  3. Biogeochemical processes controlling density stratification in an iron-meromictic lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixdorf, E.; Boehrer, B.

    2015-06-01

    Biogeochemical processes and mixing regime of a lake can control each other mutually. The prominent case of iron meromixis is investigated in Waldsee near Doebern, a small lake that originated from surface mining of lignite. From a four years data set of monthly measured electrical conductivity profiles, we calculated summed conductivity as a quantitative variable reflecting the amount of electro-active substances in the entire lake. Seasonal variations followed changing chemocline height. Coinciding changes of electrical conductivities in the monimolimnion indicated that a considerable share of substances, precipitated by the advancing oxygenated epilimnion, re-dissolved in the remaining anoxic deep waters and contributed considerably to the density stratification. In addition, we constructed a lab experiment, in which aeration of monimolimnetic waters removed iron compounds and organic material. Precipitates could be identified by visual inspection. Introduced air bubbles ascended through the water column and formed a water mass similar to the mixolimnetic Waldsee water. The remaining less dense water remained floating on the nearly unchanged monimolimnetic water. In conclusion, iron meromixis as seen in Waldsee did not require two different sources of incoming waters, but the inflow of iron rich deep groundwater and the aeration through the lake surface were fully sufficient.

  4. Microbial oceanography of anoxic oxygen minimum zones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulloa, Osvaldo; Canfield, Donald E; DeLong, Edward F

    2012-01-01

    oxide (N(2)O) gases. Anaerobic microbial processes, including the two pathways of N(2) production, denitrification and anaerobic ammonium oxidation, are oxygen-sensitive, with some occurring only under strictly anoxic conditions. The detection limit of the usual method (Winkler titrations) for measuring...

  5. Organic carbon mass accumulation rate regulates the flux of reduced substances from the sediments of deep lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Steinsberger

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The flux of reduced substances, such as methane and ammonium, from the sediment to the bottom water (Fred is one of the major factors contributing to the consumption of oxygen in the hypolimnia of lakes and thus crucial for lake oxygen management. This study presents fluxes based on sediment porewater measurements from different water depths of five deep lakes of differing trophic states. In meso- to eutrophic lakes Fred was directly proportional to the total organic carbon mass accumulation rate (TOC-MAR of the sediments. TOC-MAR and thus Fred in eutrophic lakes decreased systematically with increasing mean hypolimnion depth (zH, suggesting that high oxygen concentrations in the deep waters of lakes were essential for the extent of organic matter mineralization leaving a smaller fraction for anaerobic degradation and thus formation of reduced compounds. Consequently, Fred was low in the 310 m deep meso-eutrophic Lake Geneva, with high O2 concentrations in the hypolimnion. By contrast, seasonal anoxic conditions enhanced Fred in the deep basin of oligotrophic Lake Aegeri. As TOC-MAR and zH are based on more readily available data, these relationships allow estimating the areal O2 consumption rate by reduced compounds from the sediments where no direct flux measurements are available.

  6. Differences in lateral gene transfer in hypersaline versus thermal environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    House Christopher H

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of lateral gene transfer (LGT in the evolution of microorganisms is only beginning to be understood. While most LGT events occur between closely related individuals, inter-phylum and inter-domain LGT events are not uncommon. These distant transfer events offer potentially greater fitness advantages and it is for this reason that these "long distance" LGT events may have significantly impacted the evolution of microbes. One mechanism driving distant LGT events is microbial transformation. Theoretically, transformative events can occur between any two species provided that the DNA of one enters the habitat of the other. Two categories of microorganisms that are well-known for LGT are the thermophiles and halophiles. Results We identified potential inter-class LGT events into both a thermophilic class of Archaea (Thermoprotei and a halophilic class of Archaea (Halobacteria. We then categorized these LGT genes as originating in thermophiles and halophiles respectively. While more than 68% of transfer events into Thermoprotei taxa originated in other thermophiles, less than 11% of transfer events into Halobacteria taxa originated in other halophiles. Conclusions Our results suggest that there is a fundamental difference between LGT in thermophiles and halophiles. We theorize that the difference lies in the different natures of the environments. While DNA degrades rapidly in thermal environments due to temperature-driven denaturization, hypersaline environments are adept at preserving DNA. Furthermore, most hypersaline environments, as topographical minima, are natural collectors of cellular debris. Thus halophiles would in theory be exposed to a greater diversity and quantity of extracellular DNA than thermophiles.

  7. Differences in lateral gene transfer in hypersaline versus thermal environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Matthew E; Spear, John R; Oren, Aharon; House, Christopher H

    2011-07-08

    The role of lateral gene transfer (LGT) in the evolution of microorganisms is only beginning to be understood. While most LGT events occur between closely related individuals, inter-phylum and inter-domain LGT events are not uncommon. These distant transfer events offer potentially greater fitness advantages and it is for this reason that these "long distance" LGT events may have significantly impacted the evolution of microbes. One mechanism driving distant LGT events is microbial transformation. Theoretically, transformative events can occur between any two species provided that the DNA of one enters the habitat of the other. Two categories of microorganisms that are well-known for LGT are the thermophiles and halophiles. We identified potential inter-class LGT events into both a thermophilic class of Archaea (Thermoprotei) and a halophilic class of Archaea (Halobacteria). We then categorized these LGT genes as originating in thermophiles and halophiles respectively. While more than 68% of transfer events into Thermoprotei taxa originated in other thermophiles, less than 11% of transfer events into Halobacteria taxa originated in other halophiles. Our results suggest that there is a fundamental difference between LGT in thermophiles and halophiles. We theorize that the difference lies in the different natures of the environments. While DNA degrades rapidly in thermal environments due to temperature-driven denaturization, hypersaline environments are adept at preserving DNA. Furthermore, most hypersaline environments, as topographical minima, are natural collectors of cellular debris. Thus halophiles would in theory be exposed to a greater diversity and quantity of extracellular DNA than thermophiles.

  8. Microbial Oxidation of Pyrite Coupled to Nitrate Reduction in Anoxic Groundwater Sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Christian Juncher; Elberling, Bo; Jacobsen, Ole Stig

    2009-01-01

    denitrification process with pyrite as the primary electron donor. The process demonstrates a temperature dependency (Q10) of 1.8 and could be completely inhibited by addition of a bactericide (NaN3). Experimentally determined denitrification rates show that more than 50% of the observed nitrate reduction can...... be ascribed to pyrite oxidation. The apparent zero-order denitrification rate in anoxic pyrite containing sediment at groundwater temperature has been determined to be 2-3 µmol NO3- kg-1 day-1. The in situ groundwater chemistry at the boundary between the redoxcline and the anoxic zone reveals that between 65......-anoxic boundary in sandy aquifers thus determining the position and downward progression of the redox boundary between nitrate-containing and nitrate-free groundwater....

  9. Archaeal community changes in Lateglacial lake sediments: Evidence from ancient DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Engy; Parducci, Laura; Unneberg, Per; Ågren, Rasmus; Schenk, Frederik; Rattray, Jayne E.; Han, Lu; Muschitiello, Francesco; Pedersen, Mikkel W.; Smittenberg, Rienk H.; Yamoah, Kweku Afrifa; Slotte, Tanja; Wohlfarth, Barbara

    2018-02-01

    The Lateglacial/early Holocene sediments from the ancient lake at Hässeldala Port, southern Sweden provide an important archive for the environmental and climatic shifts at the end of the last ice age and the transition into the present Interglacial. The existing multi-proxy data set highlights the complex interplay of physical and ecological changes in response to climatic shifts and lake status changes. Yet, it remains unclear how microorganisms, such as Archaea, which do not leave microscopic features in the sedimentary record, were affected by these climatic shifts. Here we present the metagenomic data set of Hässeldala Port with a special focus on the abundance and biodiversity of Archaea. This allows reconstructing for the first time the temporal succession of major Archaea groups between 13.9 and 10.8 ka BP by using ancient environmental DNA metagenomics and fossil archaeal cell membrane lipids. We then evaluate to which extent these findings reflect physical changes of the lake system, due to changes in lake-water summer temperature and seasonal lake-ice cover. We show that variations in archaeal composition and diversity were related to a variety of factors (e.g., changes in lake water temperature, duration of lake ice cover, rapid sediment infilling), which influenced bottom water conditions and the sediment-water interface. Methanogenic Archaea dominated during the Allerød and Younger Dryas pollen zones, when the ancient lake was likely stratified and anoxic for large parts of the year. The increase in archaeal diversity at the Younger Dryas/Holocene transition is explained by sediment infilling and formation of a mire/peatbog.

  10. Electron Shuttling by Dissolved Humic Substances: Using Fluorescence Spectroscopy to Move Beyond the Laboratory to Natural Lakes, Streams and Groundwaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKnight, D. M.

    2017-12-01

    Humic substances are an important class of reactive chemical species in natural waters, and one important role is their capacity to as an electron acceptor and/or electron shuttle to ferric iron present as solid phase ferric oxides. Several lines of evidence point to quinone-like moieties being the main redox active moieties that can be used by microbes in respiration. Concomitantly, the humic fraction of dissolved organic mater (DOM) contains the dominant fluorophores in many natural waters. Examination of excitation emission matrices (EEMs) across redox gradients in diverse aquatic systems show that the EEMs are generally red-shifted under reducing conditions, such as anoxic bottom waters in lakes and hypoxic waters in riparian wetlands. Furthermore, there is striking similarity between the humic fluorophores that are resolved by statistical analysis and the fluorescence spectra of model quinone compounds, with the more reduced species having red-shifted fluorescence spectra. This apparent red-shift can be quantified based on the distribution of apparently "quinone-like", "semi-quinone-like" and "hydroquinone-like" fluorophores determined by the PARAFAC statistical analysis. Because fluorescence spectroscopy can be applied at ambient DOM concentrations for samples that have been maintained in an anoxic condition, fluorescence spectroscopy can provide insight into the role of humic electron shuttling in natural systems. Examples are presented demosntrating the changing EEMs in anoxic bottomwaters in a lake in the McMurdo Dry Valleys following a major flood event and the role of organic material in the mobilization of arsenic in shallow groundwater in South East Asia.

  11. Reassessment of anoxic storage of ethnographic rubber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shashoua, Yvonne; Dyer, Joanne; Ward, Clare

    2011-01-01

    This paper revisits the 1991–1995 British Museum field trial on anoxic storage, where 23 registered ethnographic rubber objects were enclosed in oxygen barrier film Cryovac BDF200 with sachets of the oxygen absorbent Ageless Z. A unique opportunity for study was presented since most of the enclos...

  12. Contaminant removal performances on domestic sewage using modified anoxic/anaerobic/oxic process and micro-electrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jun; Gao, Jingqing; Liu, Yifan; Xiao, Shuai; Zhang, Ruiqin; Zhang, Zhenya

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to enhance removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD), total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) from domestic sewage in a sequencing batch reactor with added new materials. A modified anoxic/anaerobic/oxic (MAAO) process, integrating a micro-electrolysis (ME) bed in an anoxic tank, and complex biological media (CBM) in anoxic, anaerobic and oxic tanks to treat domestic sewage, and their performances were investigated. The MAAO system was operated at controlled hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 8 h and mixed liquor recirculation (MLR) at 75%. The results showed that the MAAO system could effectively remove COD, TN and TP with average rates of 93%, 80% and 94%, respectively, in March, and 94%, 76% and 91%, respectively, in August. In this system, TP was primarily removed from the anoxic tank regardless of the operational conditions; removal contribution ratios to TP of the anoxic tank reached 56% both in March and August, indicating that the ME bed can effectively enhance phosphorus removal. TN was primarily removed from the anoxic and anaerobic tanks; removal contribution ratios to TN of anoxic and anaerobic tanks reached 36-38% and 37-38%, respectively. The oxic tank had the highest share of COD removal (56% both in March and August) in the removal of phosphorus. The outflow concentrations of COD, TN and TP were 3-46, 7-14 and 0.3-0.5 mg/L, respectively, in March, and 26-49, 9-15 and 0.04-0.1 mg/L, respectively, in August. COD and TN removal performances indicated that the innovative materials of the ME bed and CBM can effectively enhance COD and TN removal.

  13. MRI demonstration of cortical laminar necrosis and delayed white matter injury in anoxic encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, H.; Udaka, F.; Seriu, N.; Shindou, K.; Kameyama, M.; Tsujimura, M.

    1990-01-01

    We performed serial radiological examinations on a patient with anoxic encephalopathy. In the early term after the anoxic insult, T1-weighted MRI revealed high signal intensity area distributed laminarly in the cerebral cortex and diffusely in the putamen, which were thought to refect the cortical necrosis and necrosis in the putamen. Single photon emission computed tomography using I-123 isopropylamphetamine showed persistent hypoperfusion in the arterial watershed zones. T2-weighted MRI performed several months after the anoxic episode revealed diffuse high-intensity lesions in the arterial watershed zones. These delayed-onset white matter lesions continued to extend over several months. (orig.)

  14. Responses of trophic structure and zooplankton community to salinity and temperature in Tibetan lakes: Implication for the effect of climate warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qiuqi; Xu, Lei; Hou, Juzhi; Liu, Zhengwen; Jeppesen, Erik; Han, Bo-Ping

    2017-11-01

    Warming has pronounced effects on lake ecosystems, either directly by increased temperatures or indirectly by a change in salinity. We investigated the current status of zooplankton communities and trophic structure in 45 Tibetan lakes along a 2300 m altitude and a 76 g/l salinity gradient. Freshwater to hyposaline lakes mainly had three trophic levels: phytoplankton, small zooplankton and fish/Gammarus, while mesosaline to hypersaline lakes only had two: phytoplankton and large zooplankton. Zooplankton species richness declined significantly with salinity, but did not relate with temperature. Furthermore, the decline in species richness with salinity in lakes with two trophic levels was much less abrupt than in lakes with three trophic levels. The structural variation of the zooplankton community depended on the length of the food chain, and was significantly explained by salinity as the critical environmental variable. The zooplankton community shifted from dominance of copepods and small cladoceran species in the lakes with low salinity and three trophic levels to large saline filter-feeding phyllopod species in those lakes with high salinity and two trophic levels. The zooplankton to phytoplankton biomass ratio was positively related with temperature in two-trophic-level systems and vice versa in three-trophic-level systems. As the Tibetan Plateau is warming about three times faster than the global average, our results imply that warming could have a considerable impact on the structure and function of Tibetan lake ecosystems, either via indirect effects of salinization/desalinization on species richness, composition and trophic structure or through direct effects of water temperature on trophic interactions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Impacts of flamingos on saline lake margin and shallow lacustrine sediments in the Kenya Rift Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jennifer J.; Renaut, Robin W.; Owen, R. Bernhart

    2012-11-01

    Studies of modern, Holocene, and Pleistocene sediments around saline to hypersaline, alkaline Lake Bogoria and Lake Magadi show that evidence of flamingo activity in marginal areas of these lakes is nearly ubiquitous. Flamingos produce discrete structures such as webbed footprints (~ 9 cm long, ~ 11 cm wide) and nest mounds (~ 30 cm wide, ~ 20 cm high), and they also extensively rework sediments in delta front, delta plain, and shoreline areas. Large (~ 0.5-2 cm in diameter), pinched, 'bubble pores' and ped-like mud clumps are formed by the trampling and churning of wet clay-rich sediments in these settings. Flamingo nest mounds, although superficially similar to some thrombolite mounds, are typically internally structureless, unless formed on pre-existing sediments that preserve internal structures. The flamingo mounds consist of a dense, packed oval-shaped core, a surrounding 'body' of packed sediment, and an external layer with a ped-like texture of clumped mud. The nests may contain open holes from roots or feather shafts incorporated into the nest, and (or) burrows produced once the nests are abandoned. In areas with high densities of flamingos, lake margin sediments may be preferentially compacted, particularly at breeding sites, and become resistant to subaerial erosion and the effects of transgressive ravinement on time scales ranging from seasons to tens of thousands of years. The relatively well-compacted nest mounds and associated sediments also contribute to the stability of delta distributary channels during regressive-transgressive cycles, and can lead to the minor channelization of unconfined flows where currents are diverted around nest mounds. Pleistocene exhumed surfaces of relatively well-indurated lake margin sediments at Lake Bogoria and Lake Magadi that are interpreted as combined regressive and transgressive surfaces (flooding surface/sequence boundary) preserve evidence of flamingo activities, and are overlain by younger, porous lacustrine

  16. Increased thermohaline stratification as a possible cause for an ocean anoxic event in the Cretaceous period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbacher, J; Huber, B T; Norris, R D; Markey, M

    2001-01-18

    Ocean anoxic events were periods of high carbon burial that led to drawdown of atmospheric carbon dioxide, lowering of bottom-water oxygen concentrations and, in many cases, significant biological extinction. Most ocean anoxic events are thought to be caused by high productivity and export of carbon from surface waters which is then preserved in organic-rich sediments, known as black shales. But the factors that triggered some of these events remain uncertain. Here we present stable isotope data from a mid-Cretaceous ocean anoxic event that occurred 112 Myr ago, and that point to increased thermohaline stratification as the probable cause. Ocean anoxic event 1b is associated with an increase in surface-water temperatures and runoff that led to decreased bottom-water formation and elevated carbon burial in the restricted basins of the western Tethys and North Atlantic. This event is in many ways similar to that which led to the more recent Plio-Pleistocene Mediterranean sapropels, but the greater geographical extent and longer duration (approximately 46 kyr) of ocean anoxic event 1b suggest that processes leading to such ocean anoxic events in the North Atlantic and western Tethys were able to act over a much larger region, and sequester far more carbon, than any of the Quaternary sapropels.

  17. QTL Analysis of Anoxic Tolerance at Seedling Stage in Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang WANG

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Coleoptile lengths of 7-day-old seedlings under anoxic stress and normal conditions were investigated in two permanently segregated populations and their parents in rice (Oryza sativa L.. Using anoxic response index, a ratio of coleoptile length under anoxic stress to coleoptile length under normal conditions, as an indicator of seedling anoxic tolerance (SAT, QTLs for SAT were detected. Two loci controlling SAT, designated as qSAT-2-R and qSAT-7-R, were detected in a recombinant inbred line (RIL population (247 lines derived from a cross between Xiushui 79 (japonica variety and C Bao (japonica restorer line. qSAT-2-R, explaining 8.7% of the phenotype variation, was tightly linked with the SSR marker RM525. qSAT-7-R, explaining 9.8% of the phenotype variation, was tightly linked with the marker RM418. The positive alleles of the two loci came from C Bao. Six loci controlling SAT, designated as qSAT-2-B, qSAT-3-B, qSAT-5-B, qSAT-8-B, qSAT-9-B and qSAT-12-B, were detected in a backcross inbred line (BIL population (98 lines derived from a backcross of Nipponbare (japonica/Kasalath (indica//Nipponbare (japonica. The positive alleles of qSAT-2-B, qSAT-3-B and qSAT-9-B, which explained 16.2%, 11.4% and 9.5% of the phenotype variation, respectively, came from Nipponbare. Besides, the positive alleles of qSAT-5-B, qSAT-8-B and qSAT-12-B, which explained 7.3%, 5.8% and 14.0% of the phenotype variation, respectively, were from Kasalath.

  18. Hydrology and Salt Balance in a Large, Hypersaline Coastal Lagoon: Lagoa de Araruama, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjerfve, Björn; Schettini, C. A. F.; Knoppers, Bastiaan; Lessa, Guilherme; Ferreira, H. O.

    1996-06-01

    Lagoa de Araruama in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, is a hypersaline coastal lagoon as a result of semi-arid climate conditions, a small drainage basin and a choked entrance channel. The lagoon has been continuously hypersaline for at least 4·5 centuries, but the mean salinity has varied substantially. It has recently decreased from 57 to 52 as indicated by density (salinity) measurements between 1965 and 1990. Analysis of more than 20 years of salinity time series data, in addition to monthly lagoon cruises to measure the spatial salinity distribution, indicate that the lagoon salinity largely fluctuates in response to the difference between evaporation and precipitation. The major factor explaining the long-term trend of decreasing salinity in the lagoon is the constant pumping of 1 m 3s -1of freshwater to the communities surrounding the lagoon from an adjacent watershed, and subsequent discharge of this water into Lagoa de Araruama. The net salt budget is primarily a balance between the advective import of salt from the coastal ocean and eddy diffusive export of salt to the ocean, although the extensive mining of salt from the lagoon during past decades is also a small but significant contribution to the salt budget. The flushing half-life is proposed as a useful time scale of water exchange, is calculated based on a combination of hydrological and tidal processes, and is excellent for comparison of lagoons and assessing water quality changes. The flushing half-life measures 83·5 days for Lagoa de Araruama, considerably longer than for most other coastal lagoons. The proposed dredging of a second ocean channel to Lagoa de Araruama is probably not a good idea. It is likely to accelerate the decrease of lagoon salinity and somewhat improve the lagoon water exchange. At the same time, this will eliminate the apparent buffering capacity provided by the hypersaline environment, and thus may potentially cause water quality problems.

  19. The comparative limnology of Lakes Nyos and Monoun, Cameroon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kling, George; Evans, William C; Tanyileke, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Lakes Nyos and Monoun are known for the dangerous accumulation of CO2 dissolved in stagnant bottom water, but the shallow waters that conceal this hazard are dilute and undergo seasonal changes similar to other deep crater lakes in the tropics. Here we discuss these changes with reference to climatic and water-column data collected at both lakes during the years following the gas release disasters in the mid-1980s. The small annual range in mean daily air temperatures leads to an equally small annual range of surface water temperatures (ΔT ~6–7 °C), reducing deep convective mixing of the water column. Weak mixing aids the establishment of meromixis, a requisite condition for the gradual buildup of CO2 in bottom waters and perhaps the unusual condition that most explains the rarity of such lakes. Within the mixolimnion, a seasonal thermocline forms each spring and shallow diel thermoclines may be sufficiently strong to isolate surface water and allow primary production to reduce PCO2 below 300 μatm, inducing a net influx of CO2 from the atmosphere. Surface water O2 and pH typically reach maxima at this time, with occasional O2 oversaturation. Mixing to the chemocline occurs in both lakes during the winter dry season, primarily due to low humidity and cool night time air temperature. An additional period of variable mixing, occasionally reaching the chemocline in Lake Monoun, occurs during the summer monsoon season in response to increased frequency of major storms. The mixolimnion encompassed the upper ~40–50 m of Lake Nyos and upper ~15–20 m of Lake Monoun prior to the installation of degassing pipes in 2001 and 2003, respectively. Degassing caused chemoclines to deepen rapidly. Piping of anoxic, high-TDS bottom water to the lake surface has had a complex effect on the mixolimnion. Algal growth stimulated by increased nutrients (N and P) initially stimulated photosynthesis and raised surface water O2 in Lake Nyos, but O2 removal through oxidation of iron

  20. Lake Mixing Regime Influences Arsenic Transfer from Sediments into the Water Column and Uptake in Plankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawel, J.; Barrett, P. M.; Hull, E.; Burkart, K.; McLean, J.; Hargrave, O.; Neumann, R.

    2017-12-01

    The former ASARCO copper smelter in Ruston, WA, now a Superfund site, contaminated a large area of the south-central Puget Sound region with arsenic over its almost 100-year history. Arsenic, a priority Superfund contaminant and carcinogen, is a legacy pollutant impacting aquatic ecosystems in urban lakes downwind of the ASARCO emissions stack. We investigated the impact of lake mixing regime on arsenic transfer from sediments into lake water and aquatic biota. We regularly collected water column and plankton samples from four study lakes for two years, and deployed sediment porewater peepers and sediment traps to estimate arsenic flux rates to and from the sediments. In lakes with strong seasonal stratification, high aqueous arsenic concentrations were limited to anoxic hypolimnetic waters while low arsenic concentrations were observed in oxic surface waters. However, in polymictic, shallow lakes, we observed elevated arsenic concentrations throughout the entire oxic water column. Sediment flux estimates support higher rates of arsenic release from sediments and vertical transport. Because high arsenic in oxic waters results in spatial overlap between arsenate, a phosphate analog, and lake biota, we observed enhanced trophic transfer of arsenic in polymictic, shallow study lakes, with higher arsenic accumulation (up to an order of magnitude) in both phytoplankton and zooplankton compared to stratified lakes. Chemical and physical mechanisms for higher steady-state arsenic concentrations will be explored. Our work demonstrates that physical mixing processes coupled with sediment/water redox status exert significant control over bioaccumulation, making shallow, periodically-mixed urban lakes uniquely vulnerable to environmental and human health risks from legacy arsenic contamination.

  1. Biogeochemistry of Lakes in Western Papua, Indonesia - First Results of a Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallmeyer, J.; Nomosatryo, S.; Henny, C.; Kopalit, H.

    2016-12-01

    Despite years of exploration for mineral and hydrocarbon resources, the lakes of Western Papua have received very little attention from a limnogeologic perspective. In some cases not even the maximum water depth of the lakes is published. The only research carried out so far focused on the fish and invertebrate fauna of the lakes, because the macrofauna of Papuan Lakes is significantly different from other islands of western Indonesia. Most lakes harbor numerous endemic species. We carried out a first limnogeologic pilot campaign in spring 2016 to measure water column profiles and take short (max 80 cm long) sediment cores.Lake Sentani is seated in Mesozoic mafic bedrock and consists of four separate basins with maximum water depths of 30 to 40 m. Three basins are connected by shallow sills and one by a natural canal. Although all four basins share almost identical surface water chemistry and exhibit sub- to anoxic bottom waters, each basin has its distinct water column stratification and sediment geochemistry. Despite its coastal location and minimal elevation we could not identify an influx of seawater into the lake. Lake Ayamaru is located further inland on a densely forested karstified carbonate platform. The lake level has dropped significantly in recent years due to water loss into the karst, further reduction of open water surface is caused by massive growth of Pistia. Currently the lake has a maximum depth of around 2 m. Its sediment is mainly composed of carbonate minerals and methane saturated. Due to the carbonate bedrock the lake is highly alkaline (up to 20 meq/L) despite its very low salinity. The initial analyses show that these lakes offer unique biogeochemical conditions that require further in-depth studies.Our research will expand to lakes Anggi Giji and Anggi Gida, which are at almost 2000 m elevation. They have maximum depths of around 200 m and much colder surface waters (12-20°C) compared to the other two lakes that have about 30

  2. CORE-BASED INTEGRATED SEDIMENTOLOGIC, STRATIGRAPHIC, AND GEOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF THE OIL SHALE BEARING GREEN RIVER FORMATION, UINTA BASIN, UTAH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauren P. Birgenheier; Michael D. Vanden Berg,

    2011-04-11

    An integrated detailed sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and geochemical study of Utah's Green River Formation has found that Lake Uinta evolved in three phases (1) a freshwater rising lake phase below the Mahogany zone, (2) an anoxic deep lake phase above the base of the Mahogany zone and (3) a hypersaline lake phase within the middle and upper R-8. This long term lake evolution was driven by tectonic basin development and the balance of sediment and water fill with the neighboring basins, as postulated by models developed from the Greater Green River Basin by Carroll and Bohacs (1999). Early Eocene abrupt global-warming events may have had significant control on deposition through the amount of sediment production and deposition rates, such that lean zones below the Mahogany zone record hyperthermal events and rich zones record periods between hyperthermals. This type of climatic control on short-term and long-term lake evolution and deposition has been previously overlooked. This geologic history contains key points relevant to oil shale development and engineering design including: (1) Stratigraphic changes in oil shale quality and composition are systematic and can be related to spatial and temporal changes in the depositional environment and basin dynamics. (2) The inorganic mineral matrix of oil shale units changes significantly from clay mineral/dolomite dominated to calcite above the base of the Mahogany zone. This variation may result in significant differences in pyrolysis products and geomechanical properties relevant to development and should be incorporated into engineering experiments. (3) This study includes a region in the Uinta Basin that would be highly prospective for application of in-situ production techniques. Stratigraphic targets for in-situ recovery techniques should extend above and below the Mahogany zone and include the upper R-6 and lower R-8.

  3. Exploring Archaeal Communities And Genomes Across Five Deep-Sea Brine Lakes Of The Red Sea With A Focus On Methanogens

    KAUST Repository

    Guan, Yue

    2015-12-15

    The deep-sea hypersaline lakes in the Red Sea are among the most challenging, extreme, and unusual environments on the planet Earth. Despite their harshness to life, they are inhabited by diverse and novel members of prokaryotes. Methanogenesis was proposed as one of the main metabolic pathways that drive microbial colonization in similar habitats. However, not much is known about the identities of the methane-producing microbes in the Red Sea, let alone the way in which they could adapt to such poly extreme environments. Combining a range of microbial community assessment, cultivation and omics (genomics, transcriptomics, and single amplified genomics) approaches, this dissertation seeks to fill these gaps in our knowledge by studying archaeal composition, particularly methanogens, their genomic capacities and transcriptomic characteristics in order to elucidate their diversity, function, and adaptation to the deep-sea brines of the Red Sea. Although typical methanogens are not abundant in the samples collected from brine pool habitats of the Red Sea, the pilot cultivation experiment has revealed novel halophilic methanogenic species of the domain Archaea. Their physiological traits as well as their genomic and transcriptomic features unveil an interesting genetic and functional adaptive capacity that allows them to thrive in the unique deep-sea hypersaline environments in the Red Sea.

  4. Methane production and oxidation in lakes impacted by the May 18, 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lilley, M.D.; Baross, J.A.; Dahm, C.N.

    1988-01-01

    The concentrations of CH 4 and CH 4 oxidation rates were measured in lakes impacted by the May 18, 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens. The highest CH 4 concentrations were recorded during the first summer after the eruption and ranged in surface waters from 5 microM in the moderately impacted Ryan Lake to 28 microM in the heavily impacted North Coldwater Lake. At depths below the oxic/anoxic interface, CH 4 levels reached 250 microM in North Coldwater Lake, 184 microM in Spirit Lake, 70 microM in Castle Creek lake, and 60 microM in Ryan Lake. The CH 4 flux measurements from these lakes during the summer following the May 18, 1980 eruption were the highest ever recorded in lakes with ranges of 1.1-2.9 mmol CH 4 /sq m/day in the light to moderately impacted McBride and Ryan Lakes to ranges of 17.4-25.3 mmol CH 4 /sq m/day in the heavily impacted Castle Creek, North Coldwater, and Spirit Lakes. Evidence of CH 4 oxidation was seen in all of the lakes during the summer of 1981, and rates of CH 4 oxidation using C 14 -CH 4 were measured in spirit Lake from 1982 to 1986. The highest rates of CH 4 oxidation measured were during the summer stratification and ranged from 50 to 150 nmol CH 4 oxidized/L/day. methane oxidation rates were measured in waters having oxygen concentrations less than 100 microM with highest activity occurring at concentrations of 30-60 microM. 36 refs., 12 figs. 3 tabs

  5. Anaerobic animals from an ancient, anoxic ecological niche

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin William

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Tiny marine animals that complete their life cycle in the total absence of light and oxygen are reported by Roberto Danovaro and colleagues in this issue of BMC Biology. These fascinating animals are new members of the phylum Loricifera and possess mitochondria that in electron micrographs look very much like hydrogenosomes, the H2-producing mitochondria found among several unicellular eukaryotic lineages. The discovery of metazoan life in a permanently anoxic and sulphidic environment provides a glimpse of what a good part of Earth's past ecology might have been like in 'Canfield oceans', before the rise of deep marine oxygen levels and the appearance of the first large animals in the fossil record roughly 550-600 million years ago. The findings underscore the evolutionary significance of anaerobic deep sea environments and the anaerobic lifestyle among mitochondrion-bearing cells. They also testify that a fuller understanding of eukaryotic and metazoan evolution will come from the study of modern anoxic and hypoxic habitats.

  6. Arctic black shale formation during Cretaceous Oceanic Anoxic Event 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenniger, Marc; Nøhr-Hansen, Henrik; Hills, Len V.

    2014-01-01

    The Late Cretaceous Oceanic Anoxic Event 2 (OAE2) represents a major perturbation of the global carbon cycle caused by the widespread deposition of organic-rich black shales. Although the paleoceanographic response and the spatial extent of bottom-water anoxia in low and mid-paleolatitudes are re......The Late Cretaceous Oceanic Anoxic Event 2 (OAE2) represents a major perturbation of the global carbon cycle caused by the widespread deposition of organic-rich black shales. Although the paleoceanographic response and the spatial extent of bottom-water anoxia in low and mid...... caused massive organic-carbon burial on the Arctic shelf in general, with important implications for hydrocarbon source-rock distribution in the Arctic region....

  7. Nutrient budgets and trophic state in a hypersaline coastal lagoon: Lagoa de Araruama, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Marcelo F. L.; Kjerfve, Björn; Knoppers, Bastiaan; Landim de Souza, Weber F.; Damasceno, Raimundo N.

    2003-08-01

    Lagoa de Araruama in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, is a hypersaline lagoon with salinity varying spatially from 45 to 56. We collected water samples during monthly cruises throughout the lagoon, and along the streams feeding the system, from April 1991 to March 1992. Nutrients and other water quality parameters exhibited great spatial and temporal variations. Mass balance calculations indicate large amounts of anthropogenic nutrient inputs. The data indicate that the lagoon currently is oligotrophic but is in a state of transition to become a mesotrophic system. Molar dissolved inorganic nitrogen:dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIN/DIP) varied between 2.2:1 and 659:1 with a volume-weighted average of 22:1. The high DIN/DIP ratio contrasts with that found in nearby lagoons, suggesting that phytoplankton primary production is limited by phosphorus in Lagoa de Araruama. The major loss of DIP is apparently driven by biological assimilation and diagenic reactions in the sediments. Calculations indicate that the lagoon is slightly net autotrophic at +0.9 mol C m -2 yr -1. This suggests that the biomass of the primary producers is restricted by phosphorus availability. Phosphorus retention in the sediment and the hypersaline state of the lagoon prevent changes in autotrophic communities and the formation of eutrophic conditions.

  8. Screening of polyhydroxyalkanoate-producing bacteria and PhaC-encoding genes in two hypersaline microbial mats from Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina A. Martínez-Gutiérrez

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Hypersaline microbial mats develop through seasonal and diel fluctuations, as well as under several physicochemical variables. Hence, resident microorganisms commonly employ strategies such as the synthesis of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs in order to resist changing and stressful conditions. However, the knowledge of bacterial PHA production in hypersaline microbial mats has been limited to date, particularly in regard to medium-chain length PHAs (mcl-PHAs, which have biotechnological applications due to their plastic properties. The aim of this study was to obtain evidence for PHA production in two hypersaline microbial mats of Guerrero Negro, Mexico by searching for PHA granules and PHA synthase genes in isolated bacterial strains and environmental samples. Six PHA-producing strains were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing; three of them corresponded to a Halomonas sp. In addition, Paracoccus sp., Planomicrobium sp. and Staphylococcus sp. were also identified as PHA producers. Presumptive PHA granules and PHA synthases genes were detected in both sampling sites. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis showed that most of the phylotypes were distantly related to putative PhaC synthases class I sequences belonging to members of the classes Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria distributed within eight families, with higher abundances corresponding mainly to Rhodobacteraceae and Rhodospirillaceae. This analysis also showed that PhaC synthases class II sequences were closely related to those of Pseudomonas putida, suggesting the presence of this group, which is probably involved in the production of mcl-PHA in the mats. According to our state of knowledge, this study reports for the first time the occurrence of phaC and phaC1 sequences in hypersaline microbial mats, suggesting that these ecosystems may be a novel source for the isolation of short- and medium-chain length PHA producers.

  9. Natural attenuation potential of phenylarsenicals in anoxic groundwaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempel, Michael; Daus, Birgit; Vogt, Carsten; Weiss, Holger

    2009-09-15

    The extensive production of chemical warfare agents in the 20th century has led to serious contamination of soil and groundwater with phenyl arsenicals at former ammunition depots or warfare agent production sites worldwide. Most phenyl arsenicals are highly toxic for humans. The microbial degradation of phenylarsonic acid (PAA) and diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA) was investigated in microcosms made of anoxic groundwater/sediment mixtures taken from different depths of an anoxic, phenyl arsenical contaminated aquifer in Central Germany. DPAA was not transformed within 91 days incubation time in any of the microcosms. The removal of PAA can be described by a first order kinetics without a lag-phase (rate: 0.037 d(-1)). In sterilized microcosms, PAA concentrations always remained stable, demonstrating that PAA transformation was a biologically mediated process. PAA transformation occurred under sulfate-reducing conditions due to sulfate consumption and production of sulfide. The addition of lactate (1 mM), a typical substrate of sulfate-reducing bacteria, increased the transformation rate of PAA significantly up to 0.134 d(-1). The content of total arsenic was considerably reduced (> 75%). Intermediates of PAA transformation were detected by high performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS). Experiments with a pure strain and sterile controls of Desulfovibrio gigas spiked with PAA showed that the elimination process is linked to the presence of sulfide formed through bacterial activity. Phenyl arsenicals were likely immobilized in the sedimentthrough sulfur substitution and a subsequent sulfur bond under the prevailing sulfate reducing condition. The results of this study indicate that PAA can undergo microbiologically mediated transformation in anoxic aquifers, leading to reduced concentrations in groundwater, which indicate a (enhancend) natural attenuation potential.

  10. Microbial methane production in oxygenated water column of an oligotrophic lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossart, Hans-Peter; Frindte, Katharina; Dziallas, Claudia; Eckert, Werner; Tang, Kam W.

    2011-01-01

    The prevailing paradigm in aquatic science is that microbial methanogenesis happens primarily in anoxic environments. Here, we used multiple complementary approaches to show that microbial methane production could and did occur in the well-oxygenated water column of an oligotrophic lake (Lake Stechlin, Germany). Oversaturation of methane was repeatedly recorded in the well-oxygenated upper 10 m of the water column, and the methane maxima coincided with oxygen oversaturation at 6 m. Laboratory incubations of unamended epilimnetic lake water and inoculations of photoautotrophs with a lake-enrichment culture both led to methane production even in the presence of oxygen, and the production was not affected by the addition of inorganic phosphate or methylated compounds. Methane production was also detected by in-lake incubations of lake water, and the highest production rate was 1.8–2.4 nM⋅h−1 at 6 m, which could explain 33–44% of the observed ambient methane accumulation in the same month. Temporal and spatial uncoupling between methanogenesis and methanotrophy was supported by field and laboratory measurements, which also helped explain the oversaturation of methane in the upper water column. Potentially methanogenic Archaea were detected in situ in the oxygenated, methane-rich epilimnion, and their attachment to photoautotrophs might allow for anaerobic growth and direct transfer of substrates for methane production. Specific PCR on mRNA of the methyl coenzyme M reductase A gene revealed active methanogenesis. Microbial methane production in oxygenated water represents a hitherto overlooked source of methane and can be important for carbon cycling in the aquatic environments and water to air methane flux. PMID:22089233

  11. A shift of thermokarst lakes from carbon sources to sinks during the Holocene epoch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter Anthony, K. M.; Zimov, S. A.; Grosse, G.; Jones, Miriam C.; Anthony, P.; Chapin, F. S.; Finlay, J. C.; Mack, M. C.; Davydov, S.; Frenzel, P.F.; Frolking, S.

    2014-01-01

    Thermokarst lakes formed across vast regions of Siberia and Alaska during the last deglaciation and are thought to be a net source of atmospheric methane and carbon dioxide during the Holocene epoch1,2,3,4. However, the same thermokarst lakes can also sequester carbon5, and it remains uncertain whether carbon uptake by thermokarst lakes can offset their greenhouse gas emissions. Here we use field observations of Siberian permafrost exposures, radiocarbon dating and spatial analyses to quantify Holocene carbon stocks and fluxes in lake sediments overlying thawed Pleistocene-aged permafrost. We find that carbon accumulation in deep thermokarst-lake sediments since the last deglaciation is about 1.6 times larger than the mass of Pleistocene-aged permafrost carbon released as greenhouse gases when the lakes first formed. Although methane and carbon dioxide emissions following thaw lead to immediate radiative warming, carbon uptake in peat-rich sediments occurs over millennial timescales. We assess thermokarst-lake carbon feedbacks to climate with an atmospheric perturbation model and find that thermokarst basins switched from a net radiative warming to a net cooling climate effect about 5,000 years ago. High rates of Holocene carbon accumulation in 20 lake sediments (47±10 grams of carbon per square metre per year; mean±standard error) were driven by thermokarst erosion and deposition of terrestrial organic matter, by nutrient release from thawing permafrost that stimulated lake productivity and by slow decomposition in cold, anoxic lake bottoms. When lakes eventually drained, permafrost formation rapidly sequestered sediment carbon. Our estimate of about 160petagrams of Holocene organic carbon in deep lake basins of Siberia and Alaska increases the circumpolar peat carbon pool estimate for permafrost regions by over 50 per cent (ref. 6). The carbon in perennially frozen drained lake sediments may become vulnerable to mineralization as permafrost disappears7

  12. Does vivianite control phosphate solubility in anoxic meadow soils?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walpersdorf, Eva Christine; Bender Koch, Christian; Heiberg, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Vivianite (Fe3(PO4)2·8H2O) may precipitate in anoxic wetland soils where it may control orthophosphate (Pi) equilibrium solution concentrations at micromolar levels, and thus be of key importance in reducing excessive P from agricultural sources and eutrophication. However, vivianite equilibria...... and kinetics under in situ conditions are not fully understood and the occurrence of vivianite in wetland soils is rarely documented. In the present investigation we have monitored the temporal (November to June) variation in the pore water chemistry of a wet meadow soil (Sapric Medihemist) including...... restored. Even after 120 days following perturbation the supersaturation was still high (SIviv~6). It seems that vivianite does contribute to Pi immobilization in anoxic soil horizons, but due to slow precipitation kinetics such soils cannot maintain Pi concentrations at levels below critical thresholds...

  13. Microbial electricity driven anoxic ammonium removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilajeliu-Pons, Anna; Koch, Christin; Balaguer, Maria D; Colprim, Jesús; Harnisch, Falk; Puig, Sebastià

    2018-03-01

    Removal of nitrogen, mainly in form of ammonium (NH 4 + ), in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is a highly energy demanding process, mainly due to aeration. It causes costs of about half a million Euros per year in an average European WWTP. Alternative, more economical technologies for the removal of nitrogen compounds from wastewater are required. This study proves the complete anoxic conversion of ammonium (NH 4 + ) to dinitrogen gas (N 2 ) in continuously operated bioelectrochemical systems at the litre-scale. The removal rate is comparable to conventional WWTPs with 35 ± 10 g N m -3 d -1 with low accumulation of NO 2 - , NO 3 - , N 2 O. In contrast to classical aerobic nitrification, the energy consumption is considerable lower (1.16 ± 0.21 kWh kg -1 N, being more than 35 times less than for the conventional wastewater treatment). Biotic and abiotic control experiments confirmed that the anoxic nitrification was an electrochemical biological process mainly performed by Nitrosomonas with hydroxylamine as the main substrate (mid-point potential, E ox  = +0.67 ± 0.08 V vs. SHE). This article proves the technical feasibility and reduction of costs for ammonium removal from wastewater, investigates the underlying mechanisms and discusses future engineering needs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Algal and bacterial activities in acidic (pH 3) strip mine lakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyure, R.A.; Konopka, A.; Brooks, A.; Doemel, W.

    1987-01-01

    Reservoir 29 and Lake B are extremely acid lakes (epilimnion pHs of 2.7 and 3.2, respectively), because they receive acidic discharges from coal refuse piles. They differ in that the pH of profundal sediments in Reservoir 29 increased from 2.7 to 3.8 during the period of thermal stratification, whereas permanently anoxic sediments in Lake B had a pH of 6.2. The pH rise in Reservoir 29 sediments was correlated with a temporal increase in H 2 S concentration in the anaerobic hypolimnion from 0 to >1 mM. The chlorophyll a levels in the epilimnion of Reservoir 29 were low, and the rate of primary production was typical of an oligotrophic system. However, there was a dense 10-cm layer of algal biomass at the bottom of the metalimnion. Production by this layer was low owing to light limitation and possibly H 2 S toxicity. The specific photosynthetic rates of epilimnetic algae were low, which suggests that nutrient availability is more important than pH in limiting production. The highest photosynthetic rates were obtained in water samples incubated at pH 2.7 to 4. Heterotrophic bacterial activity (measured by [ 14 C]glucose metabolism) was greatest at the sediment/water interface. Bacterial production (assayed by thymidine incorporation) was as high in Reservoir 29 as in a nonacid mesotrophic Indiana lake

  15. Modeling of membrane bioreactor treating hypersaline oily wastewater by artificial neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pendashteh, Ali Reza; Fakhru'l-Razi, A.; Chaibakhsh, Naz; Abdullah, Luqman Chuah; Madaeni, Sayed Siavash; Abidin, Zurina Zainal

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Hypersaline oily wastewater was treated in a membrane bioreactor. → The effects of salinity and organic loading rate were evaluated. → The system was modeled by neural network and optimized by genetic algorithm. → The model prediction agrees well with experimental values. → The model can be used to obtain effluent characteristics less than discharge limits. - Abstract: A membrane sequencing batch reactor (MSBR) treating hypersaline oily wastewater was modeled by artificial neural network (ANN). The MSBR operated at different total dissolved solids (TDSs) (35,000; 50,000; 100,000; 150,000; 200,000; 250,000 mg/L), various organic loading rates (OLRs) (0.281, 0.563, 1.124, 2.248, and 3.372 kg COD/(m 3 day)) and cyclic time (12, 24, and 48 h). A feed-forward neural network trained by batch back propagation algorithm was employed to model the MSBR. A set of 193 operational data from the wastewater treatment with the MSBR was used to train the network. The training, validating and testing procedures for the effluent COD, total organic carbon (TOC) and oil and grease (O and G) concentrations were successful and a good correlation was observed between the measured and predicted values. The results showed that at OLR of 2.44 kg COD/(m 3 day), TDS of 78,000 mg/L and reaction time (RT) of 40 h, the average removal rate of COD was 98%. In these conditions, the average effluent COD concentration was less than 100 mg/L and met the discharge limits.

  16. Modeling of membrane bioreactor treating hypersaline oily wastewater by artificial neural network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pendashteh, Ali Reza [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor D.E. (Malaysia); Environmental Research Institute, Iranian Academic Center for Education, Culture and Research (ACECR), Rasht (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fakhru' l-Razi, A., E-mail: fakhrul@eng.upm.edu.my [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor D.E. (Malaysia); Chaibakhsh, Naz [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor D.E. (Malaysia); Abdullah, Luqman Chuah [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor D.E. (Malaysia); Madaeni, Sayed Siavash [Chemical Engineering Department, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abidin, Zurina Zainal [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor D.E. (Malaysia)

    2011-08-30

    Highlights: {yields} Hypersaline oily wastewater was treated in a membrane bioreactor. {yields} The effects of salinity and organic loading rate were evaluated. {yields} The system was modeled by neural network and optimized by genetic algorithm. {yields} The model prediction agrees well with experimental values. {yields} The model can be used to obtain effluent characteristics less than discharge limits. - Abstract: A membrane sequencing batch reactor (MSBR) treating hypersaline oily wastewater was modeled by artificial neural network (ANN). The MSBR operated at different total dissolved solids (TDSs) (35,000; 50,000; 100,000; 150,000; 200,000; 250,000 mg/L), various organic loading rates (OLRs) (0.281, 0.563, 1.124, 2.248, and 3.372 kg COD/(m{sup 3} day)) and cyclic time (12, 24, and 48 h). A feed-forward neural network trained by batch back propagation algorithm was employed to model the MSBR. A set of 193 operational data from the wastewater treatment with the MSBR was used to train the network. The training, validating and testing procedures for the effluent COD, total organic carbon (TOC) and oil and grease (O and G) concentrations were successful and a good correlation was observed between the measured and predicted values. The results showed that at OLR of 2.44 kg COD/(m{sup 3} day), TDS of 78,000 mg/L and reaction time (RT) of 40 h, the average removal rate of COD was 98%. In these conditions, the average effluent COD concentration was less than 100 mg/L and met the discharge limits.

  17. Anoxic and aerobic values for the yield coefficient of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-04-15

    Apr 15, 2008 ... Simulations with dual values (aerobic and anoxic conditions) for heterotrophic yield (modified ... mittently aerated processes can achieve a significant nitrate ...... dynamic calibration and long-term validation for an intermittently.

  18. Reduced phosphorus retention by anoxic bottom sediments after the remediation of an industrial acidified lake area: Indications from P, Al, and Fe sediment fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nürnberg, Gertrud K; Fischer, Rachele; Paterson, Andrew M

    2018-06-01

    Formerly acidified lakes and watersheds can become more productive when recovering from acidity, especially when exposed to anthropogenic disturbance and increased nutrient loading. Occasional toxic cyanobacterial blooms and other signs of eutrophication have been observed for a decade in lakes located in the Sudbury, Ontario, mining area that was severely affected by acid deposition before the start of smelter emission reductions in the 1970s. Oligotrophic Long Lake and its upstream lakes have been exposed to waste water input and development impacts from the City of Greater Sudbury and likely have a legacy of nutrient enrichment in their sediment. Based on observations from other published studies, we hypothesized that P, which was previously adsorbed by metals liberated during acidification caused by the mining activities, is now being released from the sediment as internal P loading contributing to increased cyanobacteria biomass. Support for this hypothesis includes (1) lake observations of oxygen depletion and hypolimnetic anoxia and slightly elevated hypolimnetic total P concentration and (2) P, Al, and Fe fractionation of two sediment layers (0-5, 5-10 cm), showing elevated concentrations of TP and iron releasable P (BD-fraction), decreased concentrations in fractions associated with Al, and fraction ratios indicating decreased sediment adsorption capacity. The comparison with two moderately enriched lakes within 200 km distance, but never directly affected by mining operations, supports the increasing similarity of Long Lake surficial sediment adsorption capacity with that of unaffected lakes. There is cause for concern that increased eutrophication including the proliferation of cyanobacteria of formerly acidic lakes is wide-spread and occurs wherever recovery coincides with anthropogenic disturbances and physical changes related to climate change. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Past climate clues from anoxic basin sediments: Cariaco basin (Venezuela) as a tropical climate type section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, L.C.

    2008-07-01

    This paper discusses how anoxic conditions in deep oceans are the result of a dynamic balance between oxygen supply and oxygen consumption. The author states that a significant consequence of ancient anoxic episodes was that the accumulation and preservation of organic matter in marine sediments were greatly enhanced, allowing the generation of potential petroleum source rocks. Changes in climatic conditions both in the short term as well as over longer periods of time are examined on the basis of oxygen isotope quantities found in ice-cores drilled in Greenland. The influence of these climatic changes on anoxic conditions in the oceans is discussed.

  20. The Lake Urmia environmental disaster in Iran: A look at aerosol pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossein Mardi, Ali; Khaghani, Ali; MacDonald, Alexander B; Nguyen, Phu; Karimi, Neamat; Heidary, Parisa; Karimi, Nima; Saemian, Peyman; Sehatkashani, Saviz; Tajrishy, Massoud; Sorooshian, Armin

    2018-08-15

    Lake Urmia (LU) once was the second largest hypersaline lake in the world, covering up to 6000km 2 , but has undergone catastrophic desiccation in recent years resulting in loss of 90% of its area and extensive coverage by playas and marshlands that represent a source of salt and dust. This study examines daily Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) between 2001 and 2015 over northwestern Iran, which encompasses LU. Intriguingly, salt emissions from the LU surface associated with ongoing desiccation do not drive the study region's AOD profile, whereas pollution transported from other regions and emissions around LU are more important. Signatures of increasing local crustal emissions are most evident outside of the peak dust season (January, February, and October) and on the periphery of LU. AOD has generally increased in the latter half of the study period with the onset of the AOD ramp-up starting a month earlier in the spring season when comparing 2009-2015 versus earlier years. Results indicate that suppression of emissions on the LU border is critical as the combined area of salt and salty soil bodies around LU have increased by two orders of magnitude in the past two decades, and disturbing these areas via activities such as grazing and salt harvesting on the lake surface can have more detrimental impacts on regional pollution as compared to benefits. These results have important implications for public health, climate, the hydrological cycle, and pollution control efforts. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of salinity on cell growth and β-carotene production in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urmia Lake, the second largest hyper-saline lake by area in the world, has fluctuated in salinity over time, but recently, it has reached a maximum of 360 g/l. Dunaliella is a type of halophile green-orange microalgae especially found in lake and salty fields and is known for its antioxidant activity; because of its ability to create ...

  2. Crushing of Subglacial Lake Sediment as a Source of Bio-utilisable Gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill Olivas, B.; Telling, J.; Michaud, A. B.; Skidmore, M. L.; Priscu, J. C.; Tranter, M.

    2017-12-01

    Recent research has shown microbial ecosystems exist under glaciers and ice sheets. The sources of energy to support these ecosystems are still not fully understood, particularly beneath the Antarctic Ice Sheet, where direct access to the atmosphere and in-washed organic matter and oxidising agents does not occur. Hence, sub-ice sheet energy sources are restricted to those in subglacial environments, except for ice-margin environments. This study focuses on sediments from Subglacial Lake Whillans (SLW), the first subglacial lake to be directly and cleanly sampled. Sediment from three depths in a shallow core extracted from SLW were used to assess the possible energy contributions from mechanochemical reactions to this subglacial ecosystem. To do this, the samples were crushed under an anoxic atmosphere using a ball mill. The sediments were then transferred into serum bottles under anoxic conditions. They were wetted and the headspace gas was subsequently sampled and analysed during a 40 day incubation. Results show the release of substantial amounts of hydrogen, which could potentially serve as an abiotic source of energy to microbes, in particular, methanogenic archaea. Significant amounts of short chain hydrocarbons (including methane and ethylene), possibly from the reactivation of ancient organic carbon, were also observed. Crushed samples showed a significant concentration of hydrogen peroxide produced on contact with water, as well as significant amounts of Si radicals, showing comminution of these sediments unlocks the potential for a wide range of redox conditions and reactions to develop within glacially eroded sediment under ice. This in turn provides a previously overlooked source of nutrients and energy for microbes to utilise.

  3. Anoxic microniches in marine sediments induced by aggregate settlement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehto, Niklas; Glud, Ronnie N.; Nordi, Gunnvør á

    2014-01-01

    an exponential increase in the mineralisation rate constant and a gradual exhaustion of reactive organic material. The peak value of the time-dependent reaction rate constant of organic matter mineralisation (kOMM) was seven to sixty times greater than analogous values measured previously in water column...... experiments. The validated model was used to investigate how the size and reactivity of parcels of organic matter influence the formation of anoxic microniches at the sediment–water interface of typical deep-sea environments. As well as kOMM, the concentration of reactive organic matter in the aggregate, its...... size and porosity were also critical in determining the likelihood of anoxic microniche formation. For the optimum fitted parameters describing kOMM and the concentration of reactive organic atter, the minimum diameter of the parcel to induce anoxia was 1.8 mm, hereas it was 2.8 mm to make...

  4. Anoxic and Oxic Oxidation of Rocks Containing Fe(II)Mg-Silicates and Fe(II)-Monosulfides as Source of Fe(III)-Minerals and Hydrogen. Geobiotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassez, Marie-Paule

    2017-12-01

    In this article, anoxic and oxic hydrolyses of rocks containing Fe (II) Mg-silicates and Fe (II)-monosulfides are analyzed at 25 °C and 250-350 °C. A table of the products is drawn. It is shown that magnetite and hydrogen can be produced during low-temperature (25 °C) anoxic hydrolysis/oxidation of ferrous silicates and during high-temperature (250 °C) anoxic hydrolysis/oxidation of ferrous monosulfides. The high-T (350 °C) anoxic hydrolysis of ferrous silicates leads mainly to ferric oxides/hydroxides such as the hydroxide ferric trihydroxide, the oxide hydroxide goethite/lepidocrocite and the oxide hematite, and to Fe(III)-phyllosilicates. Magnetite is not a primary product. While the low-T (25 °C) anoxic hydrolysis of ferrous monosulfides leads to pyrite. Thermodynamic functions are calculated for elementary reactions of hydrolysis and carbonation of olivine and pyroxene and E-pH diagrams are analyzed. It is shown that the hydrolysis of the iron endmember is endothermic and can proceed within the exothermic hydrolysis of the magnesium endmember and also within the exothermic reactions of carbonations. The distinction between three products of the iron hydrolysis, magnetite, goethite and hematite is determined with E-pH diagrams. The hydrolysis/oxidation of the sulfides mackinawite/troilite/pyrrhotite is highly endothermic but can proceed within the heat produced by the exothermic hydrolyses and carbonations of ferromagnesian silicates and also by other sources such as magma, hydrothermal sources, impacts. These theoretical results are confirmed by the products observed in several related laboratory experiments. The case of radiolyzed water is studied. It is shown that magnetite and ferric oxides/hydroxides such as ferric trihydroxide, goethite/lepidocrocite and hematite are formed in oxic hydrolysis of ferromagnesian silicates at 25 °C and 350 °C. Oxic oxidation of ferrous monosulfides at 25 °C leads mainly to pyrite and ferric oxides/hydroxides such as

  5. Wind effects on prey availability: How northward migrating waders use brackish and hypersaline lagoons in the Sivash, Ukraine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkuil, Yvonne I.; Koolhaas, Anita; Van Der Winden, Jan

    1993-01-01

    Large numbers of waders migrating northward in spring use the Sivash, a large system of shallow, brackish and hypersaline lagoons in the Black Sea and Azov Sea region (Ukraine). The bottoms of these lagoons are often uncovered by the wind. Hence, for waders the time and space available for feeding

  6. Pressure adaptation is linked to thermal adaptation in salt-saturated marine habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaide, María; Stogios, Peter J; Lafraya, Álvaro; Tchigvintsev, Anatoli; Flick, Robert; Bargiela, Rafael; Chernikova, Tatyana N; Reva, Oleg N; Hai, Tran; Leggewie, Christian C; Katzke, Nadine; La Cono, Violetta; Matesanz, Ruth; Jebbar, Mohamed; Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Yakimov, Michail M; Yakunin, Alexander F; Golyshin, Peter N; Golyshina, Olga V; Savchenko, Alexei; Ferrer, Manuel

    2015-02-01

    The present study provides a deeper view of protein functionality as a function of temperature, salt and pressure in deep-sea habitats. A set of eight different enzymes from five distinct deep-sea (3040-4908 m depth), moderately warm (14.0-16.5°C) biotopes, characterized by a wide range of salinities (39-348 practical salinity units), were investigated for this purpose. An enzyme from a 'superficial' marine hydrothermal habitat (65°C) was isolated and characterized for comparative purposes. We report here the first experimental evidence suggesting that in salt-saturated deep-sea habitats, the adaptation to high pressure is linked to high thermal resistance (P value = 0.0036). Salinity might therefore increase the temperature window for enzyme activity, and possibly microbial growth, in deep-sea habitats. As an example, Lake Medee, the largest hypersaline deep-sea anoxic lake of the Eastern Mediterranean Sea, where the water temperature is never higher than 16°C, was shown to contain halopiezophilic-like enzymes that are most active at 70°C and with denaturing temperatures of 71.4°C. The determination of the crystal structures of five proteins revealed unknown molecular mechanisms involved in protein adaptation to poly-extremes as well as distinct active site architectures and substrate preferences relative to other structurally characterized enzymes. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Scytonemin and Photosynthetic Pigment Proxies for Late Pleistocene/Holocene Environmental Change in the Eastern Great Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, J. M.; Van Mooy, B. A. S.

    2015-12-01

    Sedimentary pigments are biomarkers of photosynthetic organisms, most commonly derived from aquatic bacteria and algae but also with potential terrigenous sources. We detected a diverse pigment assemblage with variable down-core distributions in Great Salt Lake (GSL) sediments deposited since ca. 280 ka (GLAD1-GSL00, core 4). The most abundant pigments included derivatives of chlorophyll a, most likely from algae or cyanobacteria, bacteriochlorophyll c from green sulfur bacteria, okenone from purple sulfur bacteria, and scytonemin from UV-exposed cyanobacteria. Scytonemin is a biomarker for colonial cyanobacteria exposed to UV-radiation. In GSL it has potential sources from bioherms on the shoreline or microbiotic soil crusts from the adjacent Great Basin Desert. Scytonemin concentration was highest in the Upper Salt and Sapropel (USS) unit, deposited between 11.5-10 ka in shallow water (ca. 10 m), following deep pluvial Lake Bonneville (30-18 cal ka), the Provo lake level (ca. 18-15 cal ka), and the Gilbert transgression (11.6 cal ka). Scytonemin concentration was very low in sediments deposited during the deep lake phases, even though bioherms were prominent shoreline features. The USS was deposited under hypersaline waters and contained remarkably low concentrations of photosynthetic pigment derivatives that would be expected in organic-matter-rich sediments deposited under productive surface waters or anoxic bottom waters. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic data point toward a desert soil crust source for scytonemin in the USS, similar to what we previously observed in the Holocene Black Sea sapropel. We propose that increased aridity supported the widespread occurrence and erosion of microbiotic soil crusts during deposition of the USS. This is consistent with interpretations of Great Salt Lake hydrology, pointing toward a broader regional aridity event. Holocene sediments above the USS also contain scytonemin at relatively high concentration, consistent with

  8. Anoxic conditions drive phosphorus limitation in humid tropical forest soil microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, A.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Weber, P. K.; Blazewicz, S.; Silver, W. L.

    2017-12-01

    The elemental stoichiometry of carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) of soil microorganisms (C:N:P ratios) regulates transfers of energy and nutrients to higher trophic levels. In humid tropical forests that grow on P-depleted soils, the ability of microbes to concentrate P from their surroundings likely plays a critical role in P-retention and ultimately in forest productivity. Models predict that climate change will cause dramatic changes in rainfall patterns in the humid tropics and field studies have shown these changes can affect the redox state of tropical forest soils, influencing soil respiration and biogeochemical cycling. However, the responses of soil microorganisms to changing environmental conditions are not well known. Here, we incubated humid tropical soils under oxic or anoxic conditions with substrates differing in both C:P stoichiometry and lability, to assess how soil microorganisms respond to different redox regimes. We found that under oxic conditions, microbial C:P ratios were similar to the global optimal ratio (55:1), indicating most microbial cells can adapt to persistent aerated conditions in these soils. However, under anoxic conditions, the ability of soil microbes to acquire soil P declined and their C:P ratios shifted away from the optimal ratio. NanoSIMS elemental imaging of single cells extracted from soil revealed that under anoxic conditions, C:P ratios were above the microbial optimal value in 83% of the cells, in comparison to 41% under oxic conditions. These data suggest microbial growth efficiency switched from being energy limited under oxic conditions to P-limited under anoxic conditions, indicating that, microbial growth in low P humid tropical forests soils may be most constrained by P-limitation when conditions are oxygen-limited. We suggest that differential microbial responses to soil redox states could have important implications for productivity of humid tropical forests under future climate scenarios.

  9. Inputs and internal cycling of nitrogen to a causeway influenced, hypersaline lake, Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naftz, David L.

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen inputs to Great Salt Lake (GSL), located in the western USA, were quantified relative to the resident nitrogen mass in order to better determine numeric nutrient criteria that may be considered at some point in the future. Total dissolved nitrogen inputs from four surface-water sources entering GSL were modeled during the 5-year study period (2010–2014) and ranged from 1.90 × 106 to 5.56 × 106 kg/year. The railroad causeway breach was a significant conduit for the export of dissolved nitrogen from Gilbert to Gunnison Bay, and in 2011 and 2012, net losses of total nitrogen mass from Gilbert Bay via the Causeway breach were 9.59 × 105 and 1.51 × 106 kg. Atmospheric deposition (wet + dry) was a significant source of nitrogen to Gilbert Bay, exceeding the dissolved nitrogen load contributed via the Farmington Bay causeway surface-water input by >100,000 kg during 2 years of the study. Closure of two railroad causeway culverts in 2012 and 2013 likely initiated a decreasing trend in the volume of the higher density Deep Brine Layer and associated declines in total dissolved nitrogen mass contained in this layer. The large dissolved nitrogen pool in Gilbert Bay relative to the amount of nitrogen contributed by surface-water inflow sources is consistent with the terminal nature of GSL and the predominance of internal nutrient cycling. The opening of the new railroad causeway breach in 2016 will likely facilitate more efficient bidirectional flow between Gilbert and Gunnison Bays, resulting in potentially substantial changes in nutrient pools within GSL.

  10. Anoxic conditions are beneficial for abiotic diclofenac removal from water with manganese oxide (MnO2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Wenbo; Sutton, Nora B.; Rijnaarts, Huub H.M.; Langenhoff, Alette A.M.

    2018-01-01

    This is the first study examining pharmaceutical removal under anoxic conditions with MnO2. This study compares the abiotic removal of seven pharmaceuticals with reactive MnO2 particles in the presence of oxygen (oxic conditions) and in the absence of oxygen (anoxic conditions). Due to the novelty

  11. Massive Expansion of Marine Archaea During The Early Albian Oceanic Anoxic Event 1B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuypers, M. M.; Kuypers, M. M.; Blokker, P.; Erbacher, J.; Kinkel, H.; Pancost, R. D.; Pancost, R. D.; Schouten, S.; Sinninghe Damsté, J. S.

    2001-12-01

    Oceanic anoxic events (OAEs), periods of globally enhanced burial of organic matter (OM) in the marine realm, played an important role in the mid-Cretaceous `greenhouse climate' by effectively reducing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. It is generally believed that these OAEs were caused either by decreased remineralisation or increased production of phytoplanktonic OM. Here we show that enhanced organic carbon (OC) burial during the early Albian OAE1b (~112 My) was caused by a different process. Combined biogeochemical and stable carbon isotopic analyses indicate that black shales from this period contain up to 80% of OC derived from archaea. Archaea-derived isoprenoidal tetraether membrane lipids and free and macromolecularly bound isoprenoid alkanes are abundantly present in these black shales. More specifically the presence of certain ether lipids (cyclic biphytane tetraethers) indicates representatives of the pelagic archaea. To the best of our knowledge this is the earliest fossil evidence for marine planktonic archaea, extending their geological record by more than 60 million years. The diversity of archaeal lipids recovered from the OAE1b black shales suggests that they derive from a multitude of archaeal species. However, the specific 13C enrichment of all such lipids indicates a common `heavy' (13C-rich) carbon source for the archaea and/or a common pathway of carbon-fixation with a reduced 13C fractionation effect compared to the Calvin cycle used by algae, cyanobacteria and higher plants. The large differences (up to 12%) in 13C/12C ratios between the algal biomarkers and the much more abundant archaeal molecular fossils suggest that the latter were not living heterotrophically on photoautotrophic biomass. It seems likely that the archaea present during OAE1b used a chemical energy source (possibly ammonium) for carbon fixation since photoautotrophy within the domain of the Archaea is restricted to only a few species from hypersaline

  12. Influence of Large Lakes on Methane Greenhouse Forcing in the Early Eocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, J. H.; Granberg, D. L.; Kasprak, A. H.; Taylor, K. W.; Pancost, R. D.

    2011-12-01

    Long-duration elevated global temperatures and increased atmospheric pCO2 levels (~1000-2000 ppm) characterized the earliest portion of the Eocene (Ypressian; ~55 to 49 Ma). This extended period of global warmth was also punctuated by a series of short (sub-precessional) hyperthermal events in which atmospheric CO2 (>2000 ppm) and global temperatures rose with unprecedented and (as of yet) unexplained rapidity. This interval is perhaps the best temporal analog for assessing contemporary response of the biosphere and global carbon cycle to increased CO2 emissions. Although these hyperthermals appear paced by 100 Ka and 1 Ma scale orbital (eccentricity) cycles in the marine realm, high frequency forcing processes have not yet been examined, and long continental records have yet to be explored for their expression. To identify sub-eccentricity (Messel Shale, (Darmstadt, Germany.) We demonstrate that in addition to the expected 100 Ka eccentricity cycle, the 40 Ka cycle of obliquity is also an important component of climate variability as reflected in the lacustrine carbon cycle and hence a potential driver of global carbon cycling. We further investigated carbon cycle dynamics by examining biomarker evidence for changes in the terrestrial methane cycle during this time interval. Due to their increased volumes (>60,000 km2), highly stratified and cyclically anoxic lakes of the Eocene could have provided enough methane to alter global radiative forcing. This is consistent with our data, which demonstrate that the GRF and Messel Shale both exhibit strongly reducing conditions as well as abundant methanogen and methanotroph biomarkers. Further, the GRF lacustrine environment was highly stratified with, at times, euxinic waters extending into the photic zone, as inferred from the presence of isorenieratene derivatives. Thus, the GRF was likely an area of elevated methanogenic activity during this time. Increasing input of terrestrial matter into the GRF correlates with

  13. Methane as a biomarker in the search for extraterrestrial life: Lessons learned from Mars analog hypersaline environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebout, B.; Tazaz, A.; Kelley, C. A.; Poole, J. A.; Davila, A.; Chanton, J.

    2010-12-01

    Methane released from discrete regions on Mars, together with previous reports of methane determined with ground-based telescopes, has revived the possibility of past or even extant life near the surface on Mars, since 90% of the methane on Earth has a biological origin. This intriguing possibility is supported by the abundant evidence of large bodies of liquid water, and therefore of conditions conducive to the origin of life, early in the planet's history. The detection and analysis of methane is at the core of NASA’s strategies to search for life in the solar system, and on extrasolar planets. Because methane is also produced abiotically, it is important to generate criteria to unambiguously assess biogenicity. The stable carbon and hydrogen isotopic signature of methane, as well as its ratio to other low molecular weight hydrocarbons (the methane/(ethane + propane) ratio: C1/(C2 + C3)), has been suggested to be diagnostic for biogenic methane. We report measurements of the concentrations and stable isotopic signature of methane from hypersaline environments. We focus on hypersaline environments because spectrometers orbiting Mars have detected widespread chloride bearing deposits resembling salt flats. Other evaporitic minerals, e.g., sulfates, are also abundant in several regions, including those studied by the Mars Exploration Rovers. The presence of evaporitic minerals, together with the known evolution of the Martian climate, from warmer and wetter to cold and hyper-arid, suggest that evaporitic and hypersaline environments were common in the past. Hypersaline environments examined to date include salt ponds located in Baja California, the San Francisco Bay, and the Atacama Desert. Methane was found in gas produced both in the sediments, and in gypsum- and halite-hosted (endolithic) microbial communities. Maximum methane concentrations were as high as 40% by volume. The methane carbon isotopic (δ13C) composition showed a wide range of values, from about

  14. Using Biogenic Sulfur Gases as Remotely Detectable Biosignatures on Anoxic Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, Victoria S.; Claire, Mark W.; Kasting, James F.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract We used one-dimensional photochemical and radiative transfer models to study the potential of organic sulfur compounds (CS2, OCS, CH3SH, CH3SCH3, and CH3S2CH3) to act as remotely detectable biosignatures in anoxic exoplanetary atmospheres. Concentrations of organic sulfur gases were predicted for various biogenic sulfur fluxes into anoxic atmospheres and were found to increase with decreasing UV fluxes. Dimethyl sulfide (CH3SCH3, or DMS) and dimethyl disulfide (CH3S2CH3, or DMDS) concentrations could increase to remotely detectable levels, but only in cases of extremely low UV fluxes, which may occur in the habitable zone of an inactive M dwarf. The most detectable feature of organic sulfur gases is an indirect one that results from an increase in ethane (C2H6) over that which would be predicted based on the planet's methane (CH4) concentration. Thus, a characterization mission could detect these organic sulfur gases—and therefore the life that produces them—if it could sufficiently quantify the ethane and methane in the exoplanet's atmosphere. Key Words: Exoplanets—Biosignatures—Anoxic atmospheres—Planetary atmospheres—Remote life detection—Photochemistry. Astrobiology 11, 419–441. PMID:21663401

  15. Methane oxidation and methane fluxes in the ocean surface layer and deep anoxic waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, B. B.; Kilpatrick, K. A.; Novelli, P. C.; Scranton, M. I.

    1987-01-01

    Measured biological oxidation rates of methane in near-surface waters of the Cariaco Basin are compared with the diffusional fluxes computed from concentration gradients of methane in the surface layer. Methane fluxes and oxidation rates were investigated in surface waters, at the oxic/anoxic interface, and in deep anoxic waters. It is shown that the surface-waters oxidation of methane is a mechanism which modulates the flux of methane from marine waters to the atmosphere.

  16. Witwatersrand gold deposits formed by volcanic rain, anoxic rivers and Archaean life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Christoph A.

    2015-03-01

    The Witwatersrand Basin in South Africa is one of the best-preserved records of fluvial sedimentation on an Archaean continent. The basin hosts the worlds biggest gold resource in thin pebble beds, but the process for gold enrichment is debated. Mechanical accumulation of gold particles from flowing river water is the prevailing hypothesis, yet there is evidence for hydrothermal mobilization of gold by fluids invading the metasedimentary rocks after their burial. Earth's atmosphere three billion years ago was oxygen free, but already sustained some of the oldest microbial life on land. Here I use thermodynamic modelling and mass-balance calculations to show that these conditions could have led to the chemical transport and precipitation of gold in anoxic surface waters, reconciling the evidence for fluvial deposition with evidence for hydrothermal-like chemical reactions. I suggest that the release of sulphurous gases from large volcanic eruptions created acid rain that enabled the dissolution and transport of gold in surface waters as sulphur complexes. Precipitation of the richest gold deposits could have been triggered by chemical reduction of the dissolved gold onto organic material in shallow lakes and pools. I conclude that the Witwatersrand gold could have formed only during the Archaean, after the emergence of continental life but before the rise of oxygen in the Earth's atmosphere.

  17. Interpreting Precambrian δ15N: lessons from a new modern analogue, the volcanic crater lake Dziani Dzaha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ader, M.; Cadeau, P.; Jezequel, D.; Chaduteau, C.; Fouilland, E.; Bernard, C.; Leboulanger, C.

    2017-12-01

    Precambrian nitrogen biogeochemistry models rely on δ15N signatures in sedimentary rocks, but some of the underlying assumptions still need to be more robustly established. Especially when measured δ15N values are above 3‰. Several processes have been proposed to explain these values: non-quantitative reduction of nitrate to N2O/N2 (denitrification), non-quantitative oxidation of ammonium to N2O/N2, or ammonia degassing to the atmosphere. The denitrification hypothesis implies oxygenation of part the water column, allowing nitrate to accumulate. The ammonium oxidation hypothesis implies a largely anoxic water column, where ammonium can accumulates, with limited oxygenation of surface waters. This hypothesis is currently lacking modern analogues to be supported. We propose here that the volcanic crater lake Dziani Dzaha (Mayotte, Indian Ocean) might be one of them, on the basis of several analogies including: permanently anoxic conditions at depth in spite of seasonal mixing; nitrate content below detection limit in the oxic surface waters; accumulation of ammonium at depth during the stratified season; primary productivity massively dominated by cyanobacteria. One aspect may restrict the analogy: the pH value of 9-9.5. In this lake, δ15N values of primary producers and ammonium range from 6 to 9‰ and are recorded with a positive offset in the sediments (9ammonium was partly oxidized to N2O/N2.

  18. A perturbed hydrological cycle during Oceanic Anoxic Event 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Helmond, N.A.G.M.; Sluijs, A.; Reichart, G.J; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Slomp, C.P.; Brinkhuis, H.

    2014-01-01

    The Late Cretaceous Oceanic Anoxic Event 2 (OAE2; ca. 94 Ma) was one of the largest global carbon cycle perturbations during the Phanerozoic. OAE2 represents an important, although extreme, case study for modern trends because widespread anoxia and enhanced organic carbon burial during OAE2 were

  19. Wind effects on prey availability: How northward migrating waders use brackish and hypersaline lagoons in the sivash, Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkuil, Yvonne; Koolhaas, Anita; Van Der Winden, Jan

    Large numbers of waders migrating northward in spring use the Sivash, a large system of shallow, brackish and hypersaline lagoons in the Black Sea and Azov Sea region (Ukraine). The bottoms of these lagoons are often uncovered by the wind. Hence, for waders the time and space available for feeding depend on wind conditions. In hypersaline lagoons the benthic and pelagic fauna was very poor, consisting mainly of chironomid larvae (0.19 g AFDM·m -2) and brine shrimps Artemia salina, respectively. Brine shrimp abundance was correlated with salinity, wind force, wind direction and water depth. Dunlin Calidris alpina and curlew sandpiper Calidris ferruginea were the only species feeding on brine shrimp. As brine shrimp densities are higher in deeper water, smaller waders such as broad-billed sandpipers Limicola falcinellus are too short-legged to reach exploitable densities of brine shrimp. In brackish lagoons the benthic and pelagic fauna was rich, consisting of polychaetes, bivalves, gastropods, chironomid larvae, isopods and amphipods (8.9 to 30.5 g AFDM·m -2), but there were no brine shrimps. Prey biomass increased with the distance from the coast, being highest on the site that was most frequently inundated. Dunlin, broad-billed sandpiper and grey plover Pluvialis squatarola were the most abundant birds in the brackish lagoon. Due to the effects of wind-tides only a small area was usually available as a feeding site. Gammarus insensibilis was the alternative prey resource in the water layer, and their density varied with wind direction in the same way as brine shrimp. Curlew sandpipers and dunlins in the hypersaline lagoons and broad-billed sandpipers in the brackish lagoons often changed feeding sites, probably following the variation in prey availability. Only because of the large size and variety of lagoons are waders in the Sivash always able to find good feeding sites.

  20. Vertical distribution of bacteria and intensity of microbiological processes in two stratified gypsum Karst Lakes in Lithuania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krevs A.

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Physical-chemical parameters and the vertical distribution of bacteria and organic matter production-destruction processes were studied during midsummer stratification in two karst lakes (Kirkilai and Ramunelis located in northern Lithuania. The lakes were characterized by high sulfate concentrations (369–1248 mg·L-1. The O2/H2S intersection zone formed at 2–3 m depth. In Lake Kirkilai, the highest bacterial densities (up to 8.7 × 106 cell·mL-1 occurred at the O2/H2S intersection zone, whereas in Lake Ramunelis the highest densities were observed in the anoxic hypolimnion (up to 11 × 106 cell·mL-1. Pigment analysis revealed that green sulfur bacteria dominated in the microaerobic–anaerobic water layers in both lakes. The most intensive development of sulfate-reducing bacteria was observed in the anaerobic layer. Photosynthetic production of organic matter was highest in the upper layer. Rates of sulfate reduction reached 0.23 mg S2−·dm3·d-1 in the microaerobic-anaerobic water layer and 1.97 mg S2−·dm3·d-1 in sediments. Karst lakes are very sensitive to organic pollution, because under such impact in the presence of high sulfate amounts, sulfate reduction may become very intensive and, consequently, the increase in hydrogen sulfide and development of sulfur cycle bacteria may reduce the variety of other hydrobionts.

  1. Quantitative analysis of biogeochemically controlled density stratification in an iron-meromictic lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixdorf, E.; Boehrer, B.

    2015-11-01

    Lake stratification controls the cycling of dissolved matter within the water body. This is of particular interest in the case of meromictic lakes, where permanent density stratification of the deep water limits vertical transport, and a chemically different (reducing) milieu can be established. As a consequence, the geochemical setting and the mixing regime of a lake can stabilize each other mutually. We attempt a quantitative approach to the contribution of chemical reactions sustaining the density stratification. As an example, we chose the prominent case of iron meromixis in Waldsee near Doebern, a small lake that originated from near-surface underground mining of lignite. From a data set covering 4 years of monthly measured electrical conductivity profiles, we calculated summed conductivity as a quantitative variable reflecting the amount of electro-active substances in the entire lake. Seasonal variations followed the changing of the chemocline height. Coinciding changes of electrical conductivities in the monimolimnion indicated that a considerable share of substances, precipitated by the advancing oxygenated epilimnion, re-dissolved in the remaining anoxic deep waters and contributed considerably to the density stratification. In addition, we designed a lab experiment, in which we removed iron compounds and organic material from monimolimnetic waters by introducing air bubbles. Precipitates could be identified by visual inspection. Eventually, the remaining solutes in the aerated water layer looked similar to mixolimnetic Waldsee water. Due to its reduced concentration of solutes, this water became less dense and remained floating on nearly unchanged monimolimnetic water. In conclusion, iron meromixis as seen in Waldsee did not require two different sources of incoming waters, but the inflow of iron-rich deep groundwater and the aeration through the lake surface were fully sufficient for the formation of iron meromixis.

  2. High-resolution passive sampling of dissolved methane in the water column of lakes in Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, A. E.; Cadieux, S. B.; White, J. R.; Pratt, L. M.

    2013-12-01

    Arctic lakes are important participants in the global carbon cycle, releasing methane in a warming climate and contributing to a positive feedback to climate change. In order to yield detailed methane budgets and understand the implications of warming on methane dynamics, high-resolution profiles revealing methane behavior within the water column need to be obtained. Single day sampling using disruptive techniques has the potential to result in biases. In order to obtain high-resolution, undisturbed profiles of methane concentration and isotopic composition, this study evaluates a passive sampling method over a multi-day equilibration period. Selected for this study were two small lakes (Gatos Research Methane Carbon Isotope Analyzer. PDB sampling and pump sampling resulted in statistically similar concentrations (R2=0.89), ranging from 0.85 to 135 uM from PDB and 0.74 to 143 uM from pump sampling. In anoxic waters of the lake, where concentrations were high enough to yield robust isotopic results on the LGR MCIA, δ13C were also similar between the two methods, yielding -73‰ from PDB and -74‰ from pump sampling. Further investigation will produce results for a second lake and methane carbon and hydrogen isotopic composition for both lakes. Preliminary results for this passive sampling method are promising. We envision the use of this technique in future studies of dissolved methane and expect that it will provide a more finely resolved vertical profile, allowing for a more complete understanding of lacustrine methane dynamics.

  3. The relationship between the anoxic sensitivity and the extent of sensitization by nitrous oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewing, D.; Walton, H.L.; Guilfoil, D.S.; Ohm, M.B.

    1991-01-01

    Nitrous oxide reacts during irradiation to increase the yield of ·OH, a radical many believe to be a major cause of lethality. Logically, one would expect N 2 O to be a radiation sensitizer. In some instances it is, while in others it is not. In some cases we can explain why N 2 O fails to sensitize; factors such as dose rate, cell concentration, buffer composition and ionic strength all influence when N 2 O will sensitize and if it sensitizes, by what magnitude. Based on the results presented here with multiple strains of procaryotic and eucaryotic cells, we believe the anoxic sensitivity is another critical factor that governs whether N 2 O will sensitize. Our data, with data from the literature, show a relationship between the anoxic sensitivity and the N 2 O enhancement ratio. N 2 O does not sensitize in vitro unless the anoxic sensitivity (inactivation constant, K) is less than ∼ 0.2 daGy -1 . (author)

  4. Alternating anoxic feast/aerobic famine condition for improving granular sludge formation in sequencing batch airlift reactor at reduced aeration rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Junfeng; Bessière, Yolaine; Spérandio, Mathieu

    2009-12-01

    In this study the influence of a pre-anoxic feast period on granular sludge formation in a sequencing batch airlift reactor is evaluated. Whereas a purely aerobic SBR was operated as a reference (reactor R2), another reactor (R1) was run with a reduced aeration rate and an alternating anoxic-aerobic cycle reinforced by nitrate feeding. The presence of pre-anoxic phase clearly improved the densification of aggregates and allowed granular sludge formation at reduced air flow rate (superficial air velocity (SAV)=0.63cms(-1)). A low sludge volume index (SVI(30)=45mLg(-1)) and a high MLSS concentration (9-10gL(-1)) were obtained in the anoxic/aerobic system compared to more conventional results for the aerobic reactor. A granular sludge was observed in the anoxic/aerobic system whilst only flocs were observed in the aerobic reference even when operated at a high aeration rate (SAV=2.83cms(-1)). Nitrification was maintained efficiently in the anoxic/aerobic system even when organic loading rate (OLR) was increased up to 2.8kgCODm(-3)d(-1). In the contrary nitrification was unstable in the aerobic system and dropped at high OLR due to competition between autotrophic and heterotrophic growth. The presence of a pre-anoxic period positively affected granulation process via different mechanisms: enhancing heterotrophic growth/storage deeper in the internal anoxic layer of granule, reducing the competition between autotrophic and heterotrophic growth. These processes help to develop dense granular sludge at a moderate aeration rate. This tends to confirm that oxygen transfer is the most limiting factor for granulation at reduced aeration. Hence the use of an alternative electron acceptor (nitrate or nitrite) should be encouraged during feast period for reducing energy demand of the granular sludge process.

  5. Effects of Hypolimnetic Oxygenation on Mercury Cycling in Twin Lake, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beutel, M.; Dent, S.; Reed, B.; Moore, B.; Yonge, D.; Shallenberger, E.

    2010-12-01

    The accumulation of mercury in freshwater aquatic food webs is a widespread health concern. Nearly one-third of US lakes have fish consumption advisories in place due to elevated concentrations of mercury in fish tissue. Mercury, primarily from fossil fuel combustion, is widely deposited across the landscape in the form of ionic mercury. The deposited ionic mercury can be transformed to toxic methylmercury by anaerobic bacteria in anoxic waters and sediments. Once produced, methylmercury is taken up by algae and seston, and then biomagnified up the aquatic food web with levels increasing in successive trophic levels. This presentation summarizes three years (2008-2010) of mercury monitoring at North and South Twin Lakes, moderately deep (maximum depth ~15 m) meso-eutrophic lakes located on the Colville Indian Reservation in eastern Washington State. The objective of the study was to evaluate spatial and temporal patterns of the total and methyl mercury in the water column and zooplankton before and after the implementation of hypolimnetic oxygenation in North Twin Lake in 2009. The working hypothesis was that maintenance of an oxic hypolimnion would repress methylmercury enrichment in bottom waters, and subsequent uptake into zooplankton. Initial results confirm that oxygenation repressed hypolimnetic enrichment of methylmercury. In 2008, prior to oxygenation, peak levels of methylmercury in anaerobic bottom waters of North and South Twin Lakes were 0.4-0.6 ng/L. In 2009 levels were less than 0.05 ng/L in oxygenated North Twin Lake, but were again elevated in anaerobic bottom waters of South Twin Lake. Interestingly, during a two-week oxygenation test in North Twin Lake in the fall of 2008, bottom waters exhibited a short-term and reversible loss of methylmercury that correlated with a decrease in dissolved iron and manganese. Regarding zooplankton, total mercury was higher in zooplankton from oxygenated North Twin Lake relative to non-oxygenated South Twin Lake

  6. Assessing the role of bed sediments in the persistence of red mud pollution in a shallow lake (Kinghorn Loch, UK).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszewska, Justyna P; Heal, Kate V; Winfield, Ian J; Eades, Lorna J; Spears, Bryan M

    2017-10-15

    Red mud is a by-product of alumina production. Little is known about the long-term fate of red mud constituents in fresh waters or of the processes regulating recovery of fresh waters following pollution control. In 1983, red mud leachate was diverted away from Kinghorn Loch, UK, after many years of polluting this shallow and monomictic lake. We hypothesised that the redox-sensitive constituents of red mud leachate, phosphorus (P), arsenic (As) and vanadium (V), would persist in the Kinghorn Loch for many years following pollution control as a result of cycling between the lake bed sediment and the overlying water column. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a 12-month field campaign in Kinghorn Loch between May 2012 and April 2013 to quantify the seasonal cycling of P, As, and V in relation to environmental conditions (e.g., dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration, pH, redox chemistry and temperature) in the lake surface and bottom waters. To confirm the mechanisms for P, As and V release, a sediment core incubation experiment was conducted using lake sediment sampled in July 2012, in which DO concentrations were manipulated to create either oxic or anoxic conditions similar to the bed conditions found in the lake. The effects on P, As, and V concentrations and species in the water column were measured daily over an eight-day incubation period. Phosphate (PO 4 -P) and dissolved As concentrations were significantly higher in the bottom waters (75.9 ± 30.2 μg L -1 and 23.5 ± 1.83 μg L -1 , respectively) than in the surface waters (12.9 ± 1.50 μg L -1 and 14.1 ± 2.20 μg L -1 , respectively) in Kinghorn Loch. Sediment release of As and P under anoxic conditions was confirmed by the incubation experiment and by the significant negative correlations between DO and P and As concentrations in the bottom waters of the lake. In contrast, the highest dissolved V concentrations occurred in the bottom waters of Kinghorn Loch under oxic conditions (15.0

  7. Application of factor analysis and electrical resistivity to understand groundwater contributions to coastal embayments in semi-arid and hypersaline coastal settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bighash, Paniz; Murgulet, Dorina

    2015-11-01

    Groundwater contributions and sources of salinity to Oso Bay in south Texas were investigated using multivariate statistical analysis of geochemical data and multitemporal electrical resistivity tomography surveys. Both analysis of geochemical data and subsurface imaging techniques identified two commonalities for the investigated system: 1) hypersaline water occurs near the groundwater/surface water interface during wet conditions creating reverse hydraulic gradients due to density effects. The development and downward movement of these fluids as continuous plumes deflect fresher groundwater discharge downward and laterally away from the surface; and 2) more pronounced upwelling of fresher groundwater occurs during drought periods when density inversions are more defined and are expected to overcome dispersion and diffusion processes and create sufficiently large-enough unstable gradients that induce density-difference convection. Salinity mass-balance models derived from time-difference resistivity tomograph and in-situ salinity data reaffirm these findings indicating that groundwater upwelling is more prominent during dry to wet conditions in 2013 (~545.5m(3)/d) and is less pronounced during wet to dry conditions in 2012 (~262.7 m(3)/d) for the 224 m(2) area surveyed. Findings show that the highly saline nature of water in this area and changes in salinity regimes can be attributed to a combination of factors, namely: surface outflows, evapoconcentration, recirculation of hypersaline groundwaters, and potential trapped oil field brines. Increased drought conditions will likely exacerbate the rate at which salinity levels are increasing in bays and estuaries in semi-arid regions where both hypersaline groundwater discharge and high evaporation rates occur simultaneously. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Nitrogen fixation dynamics of two diazotrophic communities in Mono Lake, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oremland, R.S.

    1990-01-01

    Two types of diazotrophic microbial communities were found in the littoral zone of alkaline hypersaline Mono Lake, California. One consisted of anaerobic bacteria inhabiting the flocculent surface layers of sediments. Nitrogen fixation (acetylene reduction) by flocculent surface layers occurred under anaerobic conditions, was not stimulated by light or by additions of organic substrates, and was inhibited by O2, nitrate, and ammonia. The second community consisted of a ball-shaped association of a filamentous chlorophyte (Ctenocladus circinnatus) with diazotrophic, nonheterocystous cyanobacteria, as well as anaerobic bacteria (Ctenocladus balls). Nitrogen fixation by Ctenocladus balls was usually, but not always, stimulated by light. Rates of anaerobic dark fixation equaled those in the light under air. Fixation in the light was stimulated by 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea and by propanil [N-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)propanamide]. 3-(3,4-Dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethyl urea-elicited nitrogenase activity was inhibited by ammonia (96%) and nitrate (65%). Fixation was greatest when Ctenocladus balls were incubated anaerobically in the light with sulfide. Dark anaerobic fixation was not stimulated by organic substrates in short-term (4-h) incubations, but was in long-term (67-h) ones. Areal estimates of benthic N2 fixation were measured seasonally, using chambers. Highest rates (~29.3 ??mol of C2H4 m-2 h-1) occurred under normal diel regimens of light and dark. These estimates indicate that benthic N2 fixation has the potential to be a significant nitrogen source in Mono Lake.

  9. Evaporite-hydrocarbon relationships: The case of the Laminite-reef-evaporite system in the Messinian of the Mediterranean area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouchy, J.M. (Museum d' Histoire Naturelle, Paris (France))

    1988-08-01

    The peripheral Messinian evaporitic basins of the Mediterranean frequently show the association between pre-evaporitic laminites, carbonate complexes (red algae, corals, and stromatolites), and evaporites which constitute a sedimentary system, including potential source rocks, reservoirs, and a cover. The pre-evaporitic laminites (mainly diatomites and carbonates) characterize two different highly productive hydrodynamic systems which follow one another: (1) coastal upwellings during lower Messinian high sea level (transgressive phase), and (2) restriction (semiclosed or land-locked basins) related to closure from the Atlantic and subsequent lower sea level (regressive phase). Preservation of the organic matter results from periodic water stratification: local O{sub 2} minimum intermediary layer and anoxic bottom conditions mainly related to hypersalinity. Extensive carbonate complexes overlie the shores and the high areas - biogenic buildups (mainly red algae and poorly diversified corals) and bioclastic accumulations locally overlapped by a stromatolitic blanket. Diagenesis and dissolution-karstification during drawdown periods (hypersaline episodes) increase the primary porosity. The evaporites constitute an efficient cover. One major property of hypersaline environments is their high primary production whose traces are identified in the Messinian series as organic-rich layers (marine or hypersaline-adapted flora and fauna) and calcareous or gypsified stromatolites. Stratified waters or reducing conditions in the pore waters favor preservation of organic matter. The evaporitic conditions greatly influence the reservoir properties, increasing porosity or destroying it by interstitial precipitation.

  10. Small changes in climate can profoundly alter the dynamics and ecosystem services of tropical crater lakes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Émilie Saulnier-Talbot

    Full Text Available African tropical lakes provide vital ecosystem services including food and water to some of the fastest growing human populations, yet they are among the most understudied ecosystems in the world. The consequences of climate change and other stressors on the tropical lakes of Africa have been informed by long-term analyses, but these studies have largely focused on the massive Great Rift Valley lakes. Our objective was to evaluate how recent climate change has altered the functioning and services of smaller tropical lakes, which are far more abundant on the landscape. Based on a paired analysis of 20 years of high-resolution water column data and a paleolimnological record from a small crater lake in western Uganda, we present evidence that even a modest warming of the air (∼0.9°C increase over 20 years and changes in the timing and intensity of rainfall can have significant consequences on the dynamics of this common tropical lake type. For example, we observed a significant nonlinear increase (R(2 adj  = 0.23, e.d.f. = 7, p<0.0001 in thermal stability over the past 20 years. This resulted in the expansion of anoxic waters and consequent deterioration of fish habitat and appears to have abated primary production; processes that may impair ecosystem services for a vulnerable human population. This study on a system representative of small tropical crater lakes highlights the far-reaching effects of global climatic change on tropical waters. Increased research efforts into tropical aquatic ecosystem health and the development of sound management practices are necessary in order to strengthen adaptive capabilities in tropical regions.

  11. ENVIRONMENTAL CHARACTERISTICS AFFECTING REDUCTIVE TRANSFORMATION OF ORGANIC POLLUTANTS IN ANOXIC SEDIMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reductive transformations are important processes for determining the fate of organic pollutants in anoxic environments. These processes are most often microbially mediated by both direct and indirect means. For example, specific bacteria transform organic pollutants directly as ...

  12. Incineration of tannery sludge under oxic and anoxic conditions: study of chromium speciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavouras, P; Pantazopoulou, E; Varitis, S; Vourlias, G; Chrissafis, K; Dimitrakopulos, G P; Mitrakas, M; Zouboulis, A I; Karakostas, Th; Xenidis, A

    2015-01-01

    A tannery sludge, produced from physico-chemical treatment of tannery wastewaters, was incinerated without any pre-treatment process under oxic and anoxic conditions, by controlling the abundance of oxygen. Incineration in oxic conditions was performed at the temperature range from 300°C to 1200°C for duration of 2h, while in anoxic conditions at the temperature range from 400°C to 600°C and varying durations. Incineration under oxic conditions at 500°C resulted in almost total oxidation of Cr(III) to Cr(VI), with CaCrO4 to be the crystalline phase containing Cr(VI). At higher temperatures a part of Cr(VI) was reduced, mainly due to the formation of MgCr2O4. At 1200°C approximately 30% of Cr(VI) was reduced to Cr(III). Incineration under anoxic conditions substantially reduced the extent of oxidation of Cr(III) to Cr(VI). Increase of temperature and duration of incineration lead to increase of Cr(VI) content, while no chromium containing crystalline phase was detected. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Uranium isotope evidence for two episodes of deoxygenation during Oceanic Anoxic Event 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkson, Matthew O.; Stirling, Claudine H.; Jenkyns, Hugh C.; Dickson, Alexander J.; Porcelli, Don; Moy, Christopher M.; Pogge von Strandmann, Philip A. E.; Cooke, Ilsa R.; Lenton, Timothy M.

    2018-03-01

    Oceanic Anoxic Event 2 (OAE 2), occurring ˜94 million years ago, was one of the most extreme carbon cycle and climatic perturbations of the Phanerozoic Eon. It was typified by a rapid rise in atmospheric CO2, global warming, and marine anoxia, leading to the widespread devastation of marine ecosystems. However, the precise timing and extent to which oceanic anoxic conditions expanded during OAE 2 remains unresolved. We present a record of global ocean redox changes during OAE 2 using a combined geochemical and carbon cycle modeling approach. We utilize a continuous, high-resolution record of uranium isotopes in pelagic and platform carbonate sediments to quantify the global extent of seafloor anoxia during OAE 2. This dataset is then compared with a dynamic model of the coupled global carbon, phosphorus, and uranium cycles to test hypotheses for OAE 2 initiation. This unique approach highlights an intra-OAE complexity that has previously been underconstrained, characterized by two expansions of anoxia separated by an episode of globally significant reoxygenation coincident with the “Plenus Cold Event.” Each anoxic expansion event was likely driven by rapid atmospheric CO2 injections from multiphase Large Igneous Province activity.

  14. Environmental and zooplankton parameter changes during the drying of a saline shallow temporary lake in central Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia María Vignatti

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Central Argentina has numerous saline lakes sustained by groundwater sources and rainfall. These lakes are temporary and experience significant changes in water level and salinity, depending on wet and dry climate cycles. This study aims to investigate the scarcely known dynamics of environmental and zooplankton parameters during the drying phase of one of these lakes. Monthly samples were taken from December 2 012 to July 2 013 in the Ojo de Agua Uriburu lake, previous to its drying. At the beginning of the study, the lake’s depth was 0.7 m and its salinity was 16.65 g L−1, later, in July, its depth decreased to 0.06 m and its salinity increased to 92.9 g L−1. Zooplankton species richness was low (three crustaceans and three rotifers, with Boeckella poopoensis and Moina eugeniae dominating in the system. Maximum density and biomass were attained by the two dominant species in April (318.5 i nd L−1 and 3 029.1 µg L−1 dry weight; and 242.4 i nd L −1 and 1 530.4 µg L−1 dry weight, for B. poopoensis and M. ugeniae, respectively, and no correlation was found between these parameters and salinity. Maximum average body lengths for both species were observed in the last months of sampling (M. eugeniae: 1 020 ± 84.2 µm and B. poopoensis: 1 348.8 ± 89.0 µm. At this point of the study, neither juvenile nor larval stages were found. The increase in average body size is, arguably, the result of increased salinity in the system through a negative effect on reproduction. Because this lake reached hypersalinity, its ecological dynamics are unique among those of other temporary, saline lakes that dried in central Argentina. Similar studies on other temporary ecosystems are needed to increase the information on these little known ecological aspects.

  15. Phloem flow and sugar transport in Ricinus communis L. is inhibited under anoxic conditions of shoot or roots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peuke, A.D.; Gessler, A.; Trumbore, S.; Windt, C.W.; Homan, N.; Gerkema, E.; As, van H.

    2015-01-01

    Anoxic conditions should hamper the transport of sugar in the phloem, as this is an active process. The canopy is a carbohydrate source and the roots are carbohydrate sinks.By fumigating the shoot with N2 or flooding the rhizosphere, anoxic conditions in the source or sink, respectively, were

  16. PNAS Plus: Origin of first cells at terrestrial, anoxic geothermal fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulkidjanian, Armen Y.; Bychkov, Andrew Yu.; Dibrova, Daria V.; Galperin, Michael Y.; Koonin, Eugene V.

    2012-04-01

    All cells contain much more potassium, phosphate, and transition metals than modern (or reconstructed primeval) oceans, lakes, or rivers. Cells maintain ion gradients by using sophisticated, energy-dependent membrane enzymes (membrane pumps) that are embedded in elaborate ion-tight membranes. The first cells could possess neither ion-tight membranes nor membrane pumps, so the concentrations of small inorganic molecules and ions within protocells and in their environment would equilibrate. Hence, the ion composition of modern cells might reflect the inorganic ion composition of the habitats of protocells. We attempted to reconstruct the "hatcheries" of the first cells by combining geochemical analysis with phylogenomic scrutiny of the inorganic ion requirements of universal components of modern cells. These ubiquitous, and by inference primordial, proteins and functional systems show affinity to and functional requirement for K+, Zn2+, Mn2+, and phosphate. Thus, protocells must have evolved in habitats with a high K+/Na+ ratio and relatively high concentrations of Zn, Mn, and phosphorous compounds. Geochemical reconstruction shows that the ionic composition conducive to the origin of cells could not have existed in marine settings but is compatible with emissions of vapor-dominated zones of inland geothermal systems. Under the anoxic, CO2-dominated primordial atmosphere, the chemistry of basins at geothermal fields would resemble the internal milieu of modern cells. The precellular stages of evolution might have transpired in shallow ponds of condensed and cooled geothermal vapor that were lined with porous silicate minerals mixed with metal sulfides and enriched in K+, Zn2+, and phosphorous compounds.

  17. Environmental history of Lake Hovsgul from physical interpretation of remanent magnetization endmember analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosareva, Lina; Fabian, Karl; Shcherbakov, Valera; Nurgaliev, Danis

    2016-04-01

    The environmental history of Lake Hovsgul (Mongolia) is studied based on magnetic measurements of the core KDP-01. The drill hole reached a maximum depth of 53 m, from which sediment cores with a total length of 48 m were recovered. Coring gaps are due to the applied drilling technology. Following the approach by Heslop and Dillon, 2007, we develop the way of decomposition of the total magnetic fraction of a sample into not virtual but real three distinctive mineralogical components. For this, we first apply the end-member non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) modeling for the unmixing magnetic remanence curves. Having these results in hands, we decompose the hysteresis loops, backfield and strong field thermomagnetic curves into the components which now can be interpreted as certain mineralogical fractions. The likely interpretation of the components obtained is as follows. The soft component is represented by a coarse grained magnetite fraction as it typically results from terrigenous influx via fluvial transport. The second component is presented by a sharply defined magnetite grain size fraction in the 30-100 nm range that in lake environments is related to magnetosome chains of magnetotactic bacteria. It apparently covaries with a diamagnetic mineral, most likely carbonate. This indicates a link to organic authigenic fractions and fits to biogenic magnetite from magnetotactic bacteria. The third component also has a very high coercivity around 85 mT and is identified as a mixture of biogenic and abiotic greigite common in suboxic/anoxic sediments. The results of such the combined study are used to infer information on paleoclimatic and paleogeography conditions around the lake Hovsgul's area for the period of the last million years. A correlation between the outbursts of biogenic magnetite and greigite content with warm periods is found. Within some parts of the core the dominance of greigite contribution into magnetic signal is observed which we link to

  18. How well suited are maar lakes of Madagascar for palaeoenvironmental multi-proxy reconstructions? - First results from shallow seismic, sedimentological and hydrological investigations in Central and Northwest Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daut, Gerhard; Jasmin Krahn, Kim; Rabhobisoa, Jean-Jacques; Ornella Moanazafy, Sergénie; Haberzettl, Torsten; Kasper, Thomas; Mäusbacher, Roland; Schwalb, Antje

    2017-04-01

    Madagascar is well known for its unique flora and fauna which are frequently in the focus of scientific investigations. However, studies on environmental changes in Madagascar linked to Quaternary climatic and/or anthropogenic impact are scarce. The aim of this initial study is to evaluate the potential of maar lakes, situated in different climatic zones of Madagascar, for paleoenvironmental studies and to identify promising coring sites with continuous sediment sequences reaching far back in time. Therefore, in November 2016, a shallow seismic profiling campaign, combined with surface sediment, short gravity core (max. 1.8 m), water and plankton sampling was performed on three target sites. These were two deep maar lakes, i.e., Andraikiba (Central Madagascar, 50m waterdepth) as well as Amparahibe (46,5m waterdepth) and Andampy Ambatoloaka, a shallow (5m waterdepth during low tide) former maar lake now connected to the Ocean (both NW-Madagascar. Vertical water parameter measurements in Lake Amparahibe confirm anoxic bottom conditions, while dissolved oxygen values at the water surface are about 7.9 mg/L (103%). Temperature decreases with depth from 29.3 °C to 27.2 °C, and the lake is slightly alkaline with an electrical conductivity of around 245 µS/cm. Since Andampy Ambatoloaka is connected to the ocean, it shows slightly alkaline conditions as well, electrical conductivity is high ( 57.8 mS/cm) and dissolved oxygen and temperature values are relatively stable at about 8.2 mg/L (104%) and 28.1 °C, respectively. The shallow seismic survey shows an infill with layered sediments of >50 m thickness in Lake Andraikiba. In Lake Amparahibe natural gas in the sediment prevented deeper penetration, however the record shows 10 m of undisturbed, layered sediments in the uppermost part. Sediment cores obtained from both lakes consist of dark brownish to blackish, clayey to silty and partly laminated sediments. High values of magnetic susceptibilities (>1800*10-6 SI) and

  19. The relationship between the anoxic sensitivity and the extent of sensitization by nitrous oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewing, D.; Walton, H.L.; Guilfoil, D.S.; Ohm, M.B. (Hahnemann Univ., Philadelphia, PA (USA). Dept. of Radiation Oncology and Nuclear Medicine)

    1991-03-01

    Nitrous oxide reacts during irradiation to increase the yield of center dotOH, a radical many believe to be a major cause of lethality. Logically, one would expect N{sub 2}O to be a radiation sensitizer. In some instances it is, while in others it is not. In some cases we can explain why N{sub 2}O fails to sensitize; factors such as dose rate, cell concentration, buffer composition and ionic strength all influence when N{sub 2}O will sensitize and if it sensitizes, by what magnitude. Based on the results presented here with multiple strains of procaryotic and eucaryotic cells, we believe the anoxic sensitivity is another critical factor that governs whether N{sub 2}O will sensitize. Our data, with data from the literature, show a relationship between the anoxic sensitivity and the N{sub 2}O enhancement ratio. N{sub 2}O does not sensitize in vitro unless the anoxic sensitivity (inactivation constant, K) is less than {similar to} 0.2 daGy{sup -1}. (author).

  20. Salt resistance genes revealed by functional metagenomics from brines and moderate-salinity rhizosphere within a hypersaline environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador eMirete

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Hypersaline environments are considered one of the most extreme habitats on earth and microorganisms have developed diverse molecular mechanisms of adaptation to withstand these conditions. The present study was aimed at identifying novel genes involved in salt resistance from the microbial communities of brines and the rhizosphere from the Es Trenc saltern (Mallorca, Spain. The microbial diversity assessed by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene libraries revealed the presence of communities that are typical in such environments. Metagenomic libraries from brine and rhizosphere samples, were transferred to the osmosensitive strain Escherichia coli MKH13, and screened for salt resistance. As a result, eleven genes that conferred salt resistance were identified, some encoding for well known proteins previously related to osmoadaptation as a glycerol and a proton pump, whereas others encoded for proteins not previously related to this function in microorganisms as DNA/RNA helicases, an endonuclease III (Nth and hypothetical proteins of unknown function. Furthermore, four of the retrieved genes were cloned and expressed in Bacillus subtilis and they also exhibited salt resistance in this bacterium, broadening the spectrum of bacterial species where these genes can operate. This is the first report of salt resistance genes recovered from metagenomes of a hypersaline environment.

  1. Differential Gene Expression in Response to Salinity and Temperature in a Haloarcula Strain from Great Salt Lake, Utah

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Almeida-Dalmet

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Haloarchaea that inhabit Great Salt Lake (GSL, a thalassohaline terminal lake, must respond to the fluctuating climate conditions of the elevated desert of Utah. We investigated how shifting environmental factors, specifically salinity and temperature, affected gene expression in the GSL haloarchaea, NA6-27, which we isolated from the hypersaline north arm of the lake. Combined data from cultivation, microscopy, lipid analysis, antibiotic sensitivity, and 16S rRNA gene alignment, suggest that NA6-27 is a member of the Haloarcula genus. Our prior study demonstrated that archaea in the Haloarcula genus were stable in the GSL microbial community over seasons and years. In this study, RNA arbitrarily primed PCR (RAP-PCR was used to determine the transcriptional responses of NA6-27 grown under suboptimal salinity and temperature conditions. We observed alteration of the expression of genes related to general stress responses, such as transcription, translation, replication, signal transduction, and energy metabolism. Of the ten genes that were expressed differentially under stress, eight of these genes responded in both conditions, highlighting this general response. We also noted gene regulation specific to salinity and temperature conditions, such as osmoregulation and transport. Taken together, these data indicate that the GSL Haloarcula strain, NA6-27, demonstrates both general and specific responses to salinity and/or temperature stress, and suggest a mechanistic model for homeostasis that may explain the stable presence of this genus in the community as environmental conditions shift.

  2. Evolution of genomic diversity and sex at extreme environments: Fungal life under hypersaline Dead Sea stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kis-Papo, Tamar; Kirzhner, Valery; Wasser, Solomon P.; Nevo, Eviatar

    2003-01-01

    We have found that genomic diversity is generally positively correlated with abiotic and biotic stress levels (1–3). However, beyond a high-threshold level of stress, the diversity declines to a few adapted genotypes. The Dead Sea is the harshest planetary hypersaline environment (340 g·liter–1 total dissolved salts, ≈10 times sea water). Hence, the Dead Sea is an excellent natural laboratory for testing the “rise and fall” pattern of genetic diversity with stress proposed in this article. Here, we examined genomic diversity of the ascomycete fungus Aspergillus versicolor from saline, nonsaline, and hypersaline Dead Sea environments. We screened the coding and noncoding genomes of A. versicolor isolates by using >600 AFLP (amplified fragment length polymorphism) markers (equal to loci). Genomic diversity was positively correlated with stress, culminating in the Dead Sea surface but dropped drastically in 50- to 280-m-deep seawater. The genomic diversity pattern paralleled the pattern of sexual reproduction of fungal species across the same southward gradient of increasing stress in Israel. This parallel may suggest that diversity and sex are intertwined intimately according to the rise and fall pattern and adaptively selected by natural selection in fungal genome evolution. Future large-scale verification in micromycetes will define further the trajectories of diversity and sex in the rise and fall pattern. PMID:14645702

  3. Diversity of halophilic archaea from six hypersaline environments in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Birgul; Ozcengiz, Gulay; Coleri, Arzu; Cokmus, Cumhur

    2007-06-01

    The diversity of archaeal strains from six hypersaline environments in Turkey was analyzed by comparing their phenotypic characteristics and 16S rDNA sequences. Thirty-three isolates were characterized in terms of their phenotypic properties including morphological and biochemical characteristics, susceptibility to different antibiotics, and total lipid and plasmid contents, and finally compared by 16S rDNA gene sequences. The results showed that all isolates belong to the family Halobacteriaceae. Phylogenetic analyses using approximately 1,388 bp comparisions of 16S rDNA sequences demonstrated that all isolates clustered closely to species belonging to 9 genera, namely Halorubrum (8 isolates), Natrinema (5 isolates), Haloarcula (4 isolates), Natronococcus (4 isolates), Natrialba (4 isolates), Haloferax (3 isolates), Haloterrigena (3 isolates), Halalkalicoccus (1 isolate), and Halomicrobium (1 isolate). The results revealed a high diversity among the isolated halophilic strains and indicated that some of these strains constitute new taxa of extremely halophilic archaea.

  4. Abundance and δ13C values of fatty acids in lacustrine surface sediments: Relationships with in-lake methane concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stötter, Tabea; Bastviken, David; Bodelier, Paul L. E.; van Hardenbroek, Maarten; Rinta, Päivi; Schilder, Jos; Schubert, Carsten J.; Heiri, Oliver

    2018-07-01

    relationships were observed when sediments from near-shore and deep-water oxic environments (rs = 0.57 to 0.62) and those from anoxic deep-water environment (rs = 0.55 to 0.65) were examined separately. Our results confirm that robust relationships exist between in-lake CH4 concentrations and 13C-depleted groups of FAs in the examined sediments, agreeing with earlier suggestions that the availability of MOB-derived, 13C-depleted organic matter for aquatic invertebrates increases with increasing methane concentrations. However, we also show that these relationships are complex, with different relationships observed for oxic and anoxic sediments and highest values measured in sediments deposited in oxic environments overlain with relatively methane-rich water. Furthermore, although all three 13C-depleted FA groups identified in our survey are known to be produced by MOB, they also receive contributions by other organism groups, and this will have influenced their distribution in our dataset.

  5. Linking isoprenoidal GDGT membrane lipid distributions with gene abundances of ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota and uncultured crenarchaeotal groups in the water column of a tropical lake (Lake Challa, East Africa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckles, Laura K; Villanueva, Laura; Weijers, Johan W H; Verschuren, Dirk; Damsté, Jaap S Sinninghe

    2013-09-01

    Stratified lakes are important reservoirs of microbial diversity and provide habitats for niche differentiation of Archaea. In this study, we used a lipid biomarker/DNA-based approach to reveal the diversity and abundance of Archaea in the water column of Lake Challa (East Africa). Concentrations of intact polar lipid (IPL) crenarchaeol, a specific biomarker of Thaumarchaeota, were enhanced (1 ng l(-1) ) at the oxycline/nitrocline. The predominance of the more labile IPL hexose-phosphohexose crenarchaeol indicated the presence of an actively living community of Thaumarchaeota. Archaeal 16S rRNA clone libraries revealed the presence of thaumarchaeotal groups 1.1a and 1.1b at and above the oxycline. In the anoxic deep water, amoA gene abundance was an order of magnitude lower than at the oxycline and high abundance (∼90 ng l(-1) ) of an IPL with the acyclic glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether (GDGT-0) was evident. The predominance of archaeal 16S rRNA sequences affiliated to the uncultured crenarchaeota groups 1.2 and miscellaneous crenarchaeotic group (MCG) points to an origin of GDGT-0 from uncultured crenarchaeota. This study demonstrates the importance of thermal stratification and nutrient availability in the distribution of archaeal groups in lakes, which is relevant to constrain and validate temperature proxies based on archaeal GDGTs (i.e. TEX86 ). © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  6. [Number of bacteria and features of their activity in hypersaline reservoirs of the Crimea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrynin, E G

    1979-01-01

    The incidence of bacteria, their biomass production, and heterotrophic assimilation of CO2 by bacterioplankton were studied in the Crimean hypersaline water reservoirs from May to October of 1974. The total incidence of bacteria in the natural brine of these reservoirs varied from 20 to 70 x 10(6) cells per 1 ml. Such a high bacterial number may be caused by the combined action of water evaporation which increased the concentration of bacterial cells and active growth of microflora. Low values of bacterial production and heterotrophic CO2 assimilation should be attributed to weak activity of microflora in the reservoirs.

  7. Speciation and Distribution of Trace Metals and Organic Matter in Marine Lake as In Situ Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlakar, M.; Fiket, Ž.; Cuculić, V.; Cukrov, N.; Geček, S.

    2016-02-01

    Marine lakes are unique, isolated marine systems, also recognized as in situ "laboratories" in which geochemical processes on a different scale compared to the open sea, can be observed. Impact of organic matter cycling on distribution of trace metals in the marine lake Mir, located on Dugi Otok Island, in the central part of the eastern Adriatic Sea, was investigated. Intense spatial and seasonal variations of physico-chemical parameters and organic matter concentrations in the water column of the Lake are governed predominantly by natural processes. Enhanced oxygen consumption in the Lake during summer season, high organic carbon concentrations and low redox potential result in occasional occurrence of anoxic conditions in the bottom layers. Speciation modelling showed that dissolved trace metals Cu, Pb and Zn, are mostly bound to organic matter, while Cd, Co and Ni are present predominantly as free ions and inorganic complexes. Trace metals removal from the water column and their retention in the sediment was found to depend on the nature of the relationship between specific metal and high proportion of organic matter (up to 9%) and inorganic phases, Fe-oxyhydroxydes or biogenic calcite. Surrounding karstic background, with occasional occurrences of red soil characterize deposited sediments as coarse grained and carbonate rich, whose elemental composition is affected by bathymetry of the basin and overall biological production.

  8. Vertical distributions and speciation of dissolved rare earth elements in the anoxic brines of Bannock Basin, eastern Mediterranean Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schijf, Johan; Baar, Hein J.W. de; Millero, Frank J.; Byrne, R.H.

    1995-01-01

    Vertical distributions of dissolved rare earth elements (REEs) are presented for the anoxic, highly sulfidic brines of Bannock Basin in the eastern Mediterranean Sea. REE concentrations at the seawater-brine interface are the highest ever recorded in the water column of an anoxic basin and

  9. Biotransformation potential of phytosterols under anoxic and anaerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykstra, C M; Giles, H D; Banerjee, S; Pavlostathis, S G

    2014-01-01

    The biotransformation potential of three phytosterols (campesterol, stigmasterol and β-sitosterol) under denitrifying, sulfate-reducing and fermentative/methanogenic conditions was assessed. Using a group contribution method, the standard Gibbs free energy of phytosterols was calculated and used to perform theoretical energetic calculations. The oxidation of phytosterols under aerobic, nitrate-reducing, sulfate-reducing and methanogenic conditions was determined to be energetically feasible. However, using semi-continuously fed cultures maintained at 20-22 °C over 16 weekly feeding cycles (112 days; retention time, 21 days), phytosterol removal was observed under nitrate-reducing and sulfate-reducing conditions, but not under fermentative/methanogenic conditions. Under sulfate-reducing conditions, stigmast-4-en-3-one was identified as an intermediate of phytosterol biotransformation, a reaction more likely carried out by dehydrogenases/isomerases, previously reported to act on cholesterol under both oxic and anoxic (denitrifying) conditions. Further study of the biotransformation of phytosterols under anoxic/anaerobic conditions is necessary to delineate the factors and conditions leading to enhanced phytosterol biodegradation and the development of effective biological treatment systems for the removal of phytosterols from pulp and paper wastewaters and other phytosterol-bearing waste streams.

  10. A Case of Anoxic Brain Injury Presenting with Agraphia of kanji in the Foreground

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasutaka Kobayashi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A 63-year-old woman was hospitalized for rehabilitation from the aftereffects of an anoxic brain injury. In addition to a general cognitive decline, agraphia of kana and kanji was noted at the time of admission, which had advanced to agraphia which is dominant in kanji at the time of hospital discharge. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed no stroke lesions, and brain perfusion scintigraphy found a decreased blood flow in the bilateral parietal lobes. We hereby report on this case because case reports on agraphia caused by anoxic brain injury are extremely rare.

  11. Effective removal of bromate in nitrate-reducing anoxic zones during managed aquifer recharge for drinking water treatment: Laboratory-scale simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feifei; van Halem, Doris; Ding, Lei; Bai, Ying; Lekkerkerker-Teunissen, Karin; van der Hoek, Jan Peter

    2018-03-01

    The removal of bromate (BrO 3 - ) as a by-product of ozonation in subsequent managed aquifer recharge (MAR) systems, specifically in anoxic nitrate (NO 3 - )-reducing zones, has so far gained little attention. In this study, batch reactors and columns were used to explore the influence of NO 3 - and increased assimilable organic carbon (AOC) due to ozonation pre-treatment on BrO 3 - removal in MAR systems. 8 m column experiments were carried out for 10 months to investigate BrO 3 - behavior in anoxic NO 3 - -reducing zones of MAR systems. Anoxic batch experiments showed that an increase of AOC promoted microbial activity and corresponding BrO 3 - removal. A drastic increase of BrO 3 - biodegradation was observed in the sudden absence of NO 3 - in both batch reactors and columns, indicating that BrO 3 - and NO 3 - competed for biodegradation by denitrifying bacteria and NO 3 - was preferred as an electron acceptor under the simultaneous presence of NO 3 - and BrO 3 - . However, within 75 days' absence of NO 3 - in the anoxic column, BrO 3 - removal gradually decreased, indicating that the presence of NO 3 - is a precondition for denitrifying bacteria to reduce BrO 3 - in NO 3 - -reducing anoxic zones. In the 8 m anoxic column set-up (retention time 6 days), the BrO 3 - removal achieved levels as low as 1.3 μg/L, starting at 60 μg/L (98% removal). Taken together, BrO 3 - removal is likely to occur in vicinity of NO 3 - -reducing anoxic zones, so MAR systems following ozonation are potentially effective to remove BrO 3 - . Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Powering up the biogeochemical engine: The impact of exceptional ventilation of a deep meromictic lake on the lacustrine redox, nutrient, and methane balances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz Felix Lehmann

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Lake Lugano North Basin has been meromictic for several decades, with anoxic waters below 100m depth. Two consecutive cold winters in 2005 and 2006 induced exceptional deep mixing, leading to a transient oxygenation of the whole water column. With the ventilation of deep waters and the oxidation of large quantities of reduced solutes, the lake's total redox-balance turned positive, and the overall hypolimnetic oxygen demand of the lake strongly decreased. The disappearance of 150 t dissolved phosphorous (P during the first ventilation in March 2005 is attributed to the scavenging of water-column-borne P by newly formed metal oxyhydroxides and the temporary transfer to the sediments. The fixed nitrogen (N inventory was reduced by ~30% (~1000 t. The water-column turnover induced the nitratation of the previously NO3--free deep hypolimnion by oxidation of large amounts of legacy NH4+ and by mixing with NO3--rich subsurface water masses. Sediments with a strong denitrifying potential, but NO3--starved for decades, were brought in contact with NO3--replete waters, invigorating benthic denitrification and rapid fixed N loss from the lake in spite of the overall more oxygenated conditions. Similarly, a large microbial aerobic CH4 oxidation (MOx potential in the hypolimnion was capitalized with the ventilation of the deep basin. Almost all CH4, which had been built up over more than 40 years (~2800 t, was removed from the water column within 30 days. However, boosted MOx could only partly explain the disappearance of the CH4. The dominant fraction (75% of the CH4 evaded to the atmosphere, through storage flux upon exposure of anoxic CH4-rich water to the atmosphere. As of today, the North Basin seems far from homeostasis regarding its fixed N and CH4 budgets, and the deep basin's CH4 pool is recharging at a net production rate of ~66 t y-1. The size of impending CH4 outbursts will depend on the frequency and intensity of exceptional mixing events in

  13. Anaerobic/oxic/anoxic granular sludge process as an effective nutrient removal process utilizing denitrifying polyphosphate-accumulating organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishida, Naohiro; Kim, Juhyun; Tsuneda, Satoshi; Sudo, Ryuichi

    2006-07-01

    In a biological nutrient removal (BNR) process, the utilization of denitrifying polyphosphate-accumulating organisms (DNPAOs) has many advantages such as effective use of organic carbon substrates and low sludge production. As a suitable process for the utilization of DNPAOs in BNR, an anaerobic/oxic/anoxic granular sludge (AOAGS) process was proposed in this study. In spite of performing aeration for nitrifying bacteria, the AOAGS process can create anaerobic/anoxic conditions suitable for the cultivation of DNPAOs because anoxic zones exist inside the granular sludge in the oxic phase. Thus, DNPAOs can coexist with nitrifying bacteria in a single reactor. In addition, the usability of DNPAOs in the reactor can be improved by adding the anoxic phase after the oxic phase. These characteristics enable the AOAGS process to attain effective removal of both nitrogen and phosphorus. When acetate-based synthetic wastewater (COD: 600 mg/L, NH4-N: 60 mg/L, PO(4)-P: 10 mg/L) was supplied to a laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactor under the operation of anaerobic/oxic/anoxic cycles, granular sludge with a diameter of 500 microm was successfully formed within 1 month. Although the removal of both nitrogen and phosphorus was almost complete at the end of the oxic phase, a short anoxic period subsequent to the oxic phase was necessary for further removal of nitrogen and phosphorus. As a result, effluent concentrations of NH(4)-N, NO(x)-N and PO(4)-P were always lower than 1 mg/L. It was found that penetration depth of oxygen inside the granular sludge was approximately 100 microm by microsensor measurements. In addition, from the microbiological analysis by fluorescence in situ hybridization, existence depth of polyphosphate-accumulating organisms was further than the maximum oxygen penetration depth. The water quality data, oxygen profiles and microbial community structure demonstrated that DNPAOs inside the granular sludge may be responsible for denitrification in the

  14. Functional Role of Native and Invasive Filter-Feeders, and the Effect of Parasites: Learning from Hypersaline Ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Marta I; Paredes, Irene; Lebouvier, Marion; Green, Andy J

    2016-01-01

    Filter-feeding organisms are often keystone species with a major influence on the dynamics of aquatic ecosystems. Studies of filtering rates in such taxa are therefore vital in order to understand ecosystem functioning and the impact of natural and anthropogenic stressors such as parasites, climate warming and invasive species. Brine shrimps Artemia spp. are the dominant grazers in hypersaline systems and are a good example of such keystone taxa. Hypersaline ecosystems are relatively simplified environments compared with much more complex freshwater and marine ecosystems, making them suitable model systems to address these questions. The aim of this study was to compare feeding rates at different salinities and temperatures between clonal A. parthenogenetica (native to Eurasia and Africa) and the invasive American brine shrimp A. franciscana, which is excluding native Artemia from many localities. We considered how differences observed in laboratory experiments upscale at the ecosystem level across both spatial and temporal scales (as indicated by chlorophyll-a concentration and turbidity). In laboratory experiments, feeding rates increased at higher temperatures and salinities in both Artemia species and sexes, whilst A. franciscana consistently fed at higher rates. A field study of temporal dynamics revealed significantly higher concentrations of chlorophyll-a in sites occupied by A. parthenogenetica, supporting our experimental findings. Artemia parthenogenetica density and biomass were negatively correlated with chlorophyll-a concentration at the spatial scale. We also tested the effect of cestode parasites, which are highly prevalent in native Artemia but much rarer in the invasive species. The cestodes Flamingolepis liguloides and Anomotaenia tringae decreased feeding rates in native Artemia, whilst Confluaria podicipina had no significant effect. Total parasite prevalence was positively correlated with turbidity. Overall, parasites are likely to reduce

  15. Field observations of hypersaline runoff through a shallow estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Seyed Taleb; Siadatmousavi, Seyed Mostafa

    2018-03-01

    This study investigates a rare situation at the Mond River Estuary in the Persian Gulf, in which the classical estuarine density gradient coincides with hypersaline runoff entering from saline soils upstream of the estuary after severe precipitation. This builds a unique estuarine setting, where two salt water masses, one originating from the coastal ocean and the other being discharged from upstream confine a range of almost freshwater in the middle of estuary. This "freshwater lens estuary" (FLE) situation includes two saltwater sources with opposing senses of estuarine circulation. Therefore, the tidal damping by the strong river flood can occur, especially during neap tide when high Unsteadiness number (∼0.04) signified ebb oriented condition which was induced by straining residual lateral circulation near the FLE mouth. Transition from well-mixed to weak strain induced periodic stratification regimes indicated the importance of the spring-neap tidal variations. Close to the mouth, a 13.66-day periodic tidal asymmetry from the triad K1-O1-M2 (ebb-dominance during spring tide and flood-dominance in neap tide) was overcome by higher harmonics.

  16. Lipid biomarkers in Holocene and glacial sediments from ancient Lake Ohrid (Macedonia, Albania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Holtvoeth

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Organic matter preserved in Lake Ohrid sediments originates from aquatic and terrestrial sources. Its variable composition reflects climate-controlled changes in the lake basin's hydrology and related organic matter export, i.e. changes in primary productivity, terrestrial plant matter input and soil erosion. Here, we present first results from lipid biomarker investigations of Lake Ohrid sediments from two near-shore settings: site Lz1120 near the southern shore, with low-lying lands nearby and probably influenced by river discharge, and site Co1202 which is close to the steep eastern slopes. Variable proportions of terrestrial n-alkanoic acids and n-alkanols as well as compositional changes of ω-hydroxy acids document differences in soil organic matter supply between the sites and during different climate stages (glacial, Holocene, 8.2 ka cooling event. Changes in the vegetation cover are suggested by changes in the dominant chain length of terrestrial n-alkanols. Effective microbial degradation of labile organic matter and in situ contribution of organic matter derived from the microbes themselves are both evident in the sediments. We found evidence for anoxic conditions within the photic zone by detecting epicholestanol and tetrahymanol from sulphur-oxidising phototrophic bacteria and bacterivorous ciliates and for the influence of a settled human community from the occurrence of coprostanol, a biomarker for human and animal faeces (pigs, sheep, goats, in an early Holocene sample. This study illustrates the potential of lipid biomarkers for future environmental reconstructions using one of Europe's oldest continental climate archives, Lake Ohrid.

  17. Reconstructing paleo-precipitation amounts using a terrestrial hydrologic model: Lake Titicaca and the Salar de Uyuni, Peru and Bolivia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunnery, J. A.; Baker, P. A.; Coe, M. T.; Fritz, S. C.

    2010-12-01

    The Peruvian/Bolivian Altiplano has provided many information-rich records bearing on the history of the South American summer monsoon (SASM), a large-scale circulation system that is responsible for much of the precipitation over the Amazon basin and the southern tropics and subtropics. Examples of these paleoclimate time series include long, drill core records from Lake Titicaca (extending back to ca. 400 Ka, Fritz et al., 2007), the long drill core record from Salar de Uyuni (> 250 Ka, Baker et al., 2001; Fritz et al., 2004), paleo-lake level records from the Salar de Uyuni (e.g. Bills et al., 2004; Placzek et al, 2006); drill core records from the Rio Desaguadero valley (Rigsby et al., 2003), and ice core records from Quelccaya, Illimani, and Sajama (Thompson et al., 2000; Ramirez et al., 2003). Several previous studies using energy and water balance models have been applied to these records in attempts to provide quantitative constraints on paleo-temperature and paleo-precipitation (e.g. Kessler, 1984; Hastenrath and Kutzbach, 1985; Cross et al, 2001; Rowe and Dunbar, 2004; Arnold, 2002; Blodgett et al., 1997). For example, Blodgett et al. concluded that high paleolake stands in the Bolivian Altiplano, dated at ca. 16,000 cal. Yr BP (Bills et al., 1994) required precipitation 20% higher than modern at temperatures 5°C colder than modern. However, their model did not take into account the major overflow from Lake Titicaca. Using the THMB hydrologic model, we show that overflow from Lake Titicaca is necessary to produce and sustain large lakes in the Salar de Uyuni basin. This hydrological connection (via the Rio Desaguadero) between the northern and southern Altiplano likely was only established about 60,000 years ago. Prior to that, there were no sustained, large and deep paleolakes on the southern Altiplano. Rather, drill core evidence indicates a very long sequence of shallow, hypersaline lakes and playas.

  18. Focused transhepatic electroporation mediated by hypersaline infusion through the portal vein in rat model. Preliminary results on differential conductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pañella Clara

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Spread hepatic tumours are not suitable for treatment either by surgery or conventional ablation methods. The aim of this study was to evaluate feasibility and safety of selectively increasing the healthy hepatic conductivity by the hypersaline infusion (HI through the portal vein. We hypothesize this will allow simultaneous safe treatment of all nodules by irreversible electroporation (IRE when applied in a transhepatic fashion.

  19. A comparative study of phosphate sorption in lowland soils under oxic and anoxic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiberg, Lisa; Pedersen, Thomas Vils; Jensen, Henning S.

    2010-01-01

    of 36 to 93% of the dithionite-extractable FeIII (FeBD). Langmuir fitted Pi sorption isotherms showed a Pi release of up to 1.1 mmol kg-1 in six soils when Pi concentrations in the matrix (Psol) were lower than 10 µM. Phosphate desorption was attributed to dissolution of amorphous iron oxides......, and higher pH under anoxic conditions. The point of zero net sorption (EPC0) increased 2- to 10-fold on reduction. Five soils showed higher Pi sorption capacities in the anoxic than in the oxic state at higher Psol concentrations. Solubility calculations indicated that precipitation of vivianite or similar...

  20. The influence of climate change to European Lakes, with a special emphasis in the Balkan Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuusisto, Esko

    2004-01-01

    There are almost one and half million lakes in Europe, if small water bodies with an area down to 0.001 km 2 are included. The total area of lakes is over 200.000 km 2 , in addition the man-made reservoirs cover almost 100.000 km 2 . The largest lakes are located in the zone extending from southwestern Sweden through Finland to Russia, but there are many important lakes also in central and southern Europe. The Balkan countries have altogether about ten thousand lakes with a total area of over 4000 km 2 and total volume of almost loo km 3 . Over half of the total volume is in Lake Ohrid, which ranks the seventh in Europe both as to the volume and as to the maximum depth. However, there are around thirty lakes in Europe with their surface area larger than that of Lake Ohrid. In addition to the lakes, the Balkan countries also have thousands of reservoirs with a total water storage capacity of over 50 km 3 . The response of European lakes to climate change can be discussed by dividing the lakes into five categories: 1) deep temperate lakes, 2) shallow temperate lakes, 3) mountain lakes, 4) boreal lakes and 5) arctic lakes. The lakes in the Balkan region fall belong into the first three categories. Most of the deep temperate lakes are warm monomictic; convective overturn occurs in winter or early spring. The future climate change may suppress this overturn, giving these lakes the classification of oligomictic. This implies the enhancement of anoxic bottom conditions and an increased risk of eutrophication. The oxygen conditions can also be expected to deteriorate due to increased bacterial activity in deep waters and superficial bottom sediment. In shallow temperate lakes, higher water temperatures in the future will induce intensified primary production and bacterial decomposition. The probability of harmful extreme events, e.g. the mass production of algae, will increase. The impacts may extend to fishing and recreational use. In lakes with relatively long water

  1. Unexpected and novel putative viruses in the sediments of a deep-dark permanently anoxic freshwater habitat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrel, Guillaume; Colombet, Jonathan; Robin, Agnès; Lehours, Anne-Catherine; Prangishvili, David; Sime-Ngando, Télesphore

    2012-11-01

    Morphological diversity, abundance and community structure of viruses were examined in the deep and anoxic sediments of the volcanic Lake Pavin (France). The sediment core, encompassing 130 years of sedimentation, was subsampled every centimeter. High viral abundances were recorded and correlated to prokaryotic densities. Abundances of viruses and prokaryotes decreased with the depth, contrasting the pattern of virus-to-prokaryote ratio. According to fingerprint analyses, the community structure of viruses, bacteria and archaea gradually changed, and communities of the surface (0-10 cm) could be discriminated from those of the intermediate (11-27 cm) and deep (28-40 cm) sediment layers. Viral morphotypes similar to virions of ubiquitous dsDNA viruses of bacteria were observed. Exceptional morphotypes, previously never reported in freshwater systems, were also detected. Some of these resembled dsDNA viruses of hyperthermophilic and hyperhalophilic archaea. Moreover, unusual types of spherical and cubic virus-like particles (VLPs) were observed. Infected prokaryotic cells were detected in the whole sediment core, and their vertical distribution correlated with both viral and prokaryotic abundances. Pleomorphic ellipsoid VLPs were visible in filamentous cells tentatively identified as representatives of the archaeal genus Methanosaeta, a major group of methane producers on earth.

  2. A multi-proxy approach to understanding complex responses of salt-lake catchments to climate variability and human pressure: A Late Quaternary case study from south-eastern, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Samantha Elsie; Burjachs, Francesc; Ferrer-García, Carlos; Giralt, Santiago; Schulte, Lothar; Fernández-López de Pablo, Javier

    2018-03-01

    This article focuses on a former salt lake in the upper Vinalopó Valley in south-eastern Spain. The study spans the Late Pleistocene through to the Late Holocene, although with particular focus on the period between 11 ka cal BP and 3000 ka cal BP (which spans the Mesolithic and part of the Bronze Age). High resolution multi-proxy analysis (including pollen, non pollen palynomorphs, grain size, X-ray fluorescence and X-ray diffraction) was undertaken on the lake sediments. The results show strong sensitivity to both long term and small changes in the evaporation/precipitation ratio, affecting the surrounding vegetation composition, lake-biota and sediment geochemistry. To summarise the key findings the main general trends identified include: 1) Hyper-saline conditions and low lake levels at the end of the Late Glacial 2) Increasing wetness and temperatures which witnessed an expansion of mesophilic woodland taxa, lake infilling and the establishment of a more perennial lake system at the onset of the Holocene 3) An increase in solar insolation after 9 ka cal BP which saw the re-establishment of pine forests 4) A continued trend towards increasing dryness (climatic optimum) at 7 ka cal BP but with continued freshwater input 5) An increase in sclerophyllous open woody vegetation (anthropogenic?), and increasing wetness (climatic?) is represented in the lake record between 5.9 and 3 ka cal BP 6) The Holocene was also punctuated by several aridity pulses, the most prominent corresponding to the 8.2 ka cal BP event. These events, despite a paucity of well dated archaeological sites in the surrounding area, likely altered the carrying capacity of this area both regionally and locally, particularly during the Mesolithic-Neolithic transition, in terms of fresh water supply for human/animal consumption, wild plant food reserves and suitable land for crop growth.

  3. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vol 14, No 11 (2015), Biological treatment of drinking water by chitosan ... Vol 10, No 86 (2011), Biooxidation of indole and characteristics of the ... alkaliphilic Bacillus sp. strain KSUCr5 isolated from hypersaline Soda lakes, Abstract PDF.

  4. Anoxic degradation of nitrogenous heterocyclic compounds by activated sludge and their active sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Peng; Han, Hongjun; Zhuang, Haifeng; Hou, Baolin; Jia, Shengyong; Wang, Dexin; Li, Kun; Zhao, Qian

    2015-05-01

    The potential for degradation of five nitrogenous heterocyclic compounds (NHCs), i.e., imidazole, pyridine, indole, quinoline, and carbazole, was investigated under anoxic conditions with acclimated activated sludge. Results showed that NHCs with initial concentration of 50 mg/L could be completely degraded within 60 hr. The degradation of five NHCs was dependent upon the chemical structures with the following sequence: imidazole>pyridine>indole>quinoline>carbazole in terms of their degradation rates. Quantitative structure-biodegradability relationship studies of the five NHCs showed that the anoxic degradation rates were correlated well with highest occupied molecular orbital. Additionally, the active sites of NHCs identified by calculation were confirmed by analysis of intermediates using gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Recycling and burial of phosphorus in sediments of an anoxic fjord-the By Fjord, western Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viktorsson, Lena; Kononets, Mikhail; Roos, Per

    2013-01-01

    Recycling and burial of sediment phosphorus were studied in the By Fjord, western Sweden, during the years 2009 to 2010 using autonomous benthic landers and sediment sampling. The By Fjord is a small fjord with a shallow sill at its narrow mouth, which limits water exchange of the fjord's basin...... water. The water in the basin is exchanged only every 3 to 5 years and the water below sill level is anoxic or sulfidic between water renewals. Five sites were examined in the By Fjord; three shallow sites above the sill level with oxic bottom waters and two deeper sites with anoxic bottom waters...... anoxic site were also examined in the adjacent Koljo Fjord having similar characteristics as the By Fjord. In situ measurements of benthic fluxes of dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) showed that the fluxes from sediments with oxic overlying water (0.05-0.23 mmol m(-2) d(-1)) were much lower than...

  6. Chemical Evolution of Groundwater Near a Sinkhole Lake, Northern Florida: 2. Chemical Patterns, Mass Transfer Modeling, and Rates of Mass Transfer Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Brian G.; Plummer, L. Niel; Busenberg, Eurybiades; Revesz, Kinga M.; Jones, Blair F.; Lee, Terrie M.

    1995-06-01

    Chemical patterns along evolutionary groundwater flow paths in silicate and carbonate aquifers were interpreted using solute tracers, carbon and sulfur isotopes, and mass balance reaction modeling for a complex hydrologic system involving groundwater inflow to and outflow from a sinkhole lake in northern Florida. Rates of dominant reactions along defined flow paths were estimated from modeled mass transfer and ages obtained from CFC-modeled recharge dates. Groundwater upgradient from Lake Barco remains oxic as it moves downward, reacting with silicate minerals in a system open to carbon dioxide (CO2), producing only small increases in dissolved species. Beneath and downgradient of Lake Barco the oxic groundwater mixes with lake water leakage in a highly reducing, silicate-carbonate mineral environment. A mixing model, developed for anoxic groundwater downgradient from the lake, accounted for the observed chemical and isotopic composition by combining different proportions of lake water leakage and infiltrating meteoric water. The evolution of major ion chemistry and the 13C isotopic composition of dissolved carbon species in groundwater downgradient from the lake can be explained by the aerobic oxidation of organic matter in the lake, anaerobic microbial oxidation of organic carbon, and incongruent dissolution of smectite minerals to kaolinite. The dominant process for the generation of methane was by the CO2 reduction pathway based on the isotopic composition of hydrogen (δ2H(CH4) = -186 to -234‰) and carbon (δ13C(CH4) = -65.7 to -72.3‰). Rates of microbial metabolism of organic matter, estimated from the mass transfer reaction models, ranged from 0.0047 to 0.039 mmol L-1 yr-1 for groundwater downgradient from the lake.

  7. A comparative study of methanol as a supplementary carbon source for enhancing denitrification in primary and secondary anoxic zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginige, Maneesha P; Bowyer, Jocelyn C; Foley, Leah; Keller, Jürg; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2009-04-01

    A comparative study on the use of methanol as a supplementary carbon source to enhance denitrification in primary and secondary anoxic zones is reported. Three lab-scale sequencing batch reactors (SBR) were operated to achieve nitrogen and carbon removal from domestic wastewater. Methanol was added to the primary anoxic period of the first SBR, and to the secondary anoxic period of the second SBR. No methanol was added to the third SBR, which served as a control. The extent of improvement on the denitrification performance was found to be dependent on the reactor configuration. Addition to the secondary anoxic period is more effective when very low effluent nitrate levels are to be achieved and hence requires a relatively large amount of methanol. Adding a small amount of methanol to the secondary anoxic period may cause nitrite accumulation, which does not improve overall nitrogen removal. In the latter case, methanol should be added to the primary anoxic period. The addition of methanol can also improve biological phosphorus removal by creating anaerobic conditions and increasing the availability of organic carbon in wastewater for polyphosphate accumulating organisms. This potentially provides a cost-effective approach to phosphorus removal from wastewater with a low carbon content. New fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) probes targeting methanol-utilising denitrifiers were designed using stable isotope probing. Microbial structure analysis of the sludges using the new and existing FISH probes clearly showed that the addition of methanol stimulated the growth of specific methanol-utilizing denitrifiers, which improved the capability of sludge to use methanol and ethanol for denitrification, but reduced its capability to use wastewater COD for denitrification. Unlike acetate, long-term application of methanol has no negative impact on the settling properties of the sludge.

  8. The effect of lake sediment on the hatching success of Daphnia ephippial eggs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Radzikowski

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A large proportion of lake-Daphnia ephippia which are shed by females in the water column sink to the bottom, where they form an assemblage of dormant stages known as an egg bank. Although the quantity of zooplankton eggs in such assemblages may exceed tens of thousands per square meter, the annual hatch from this bank is usually extremely low (from zero to a few dozens animals per square meter per year. This low-hatching phenomenon may be caused by isolation from hatching stimuli by water or sediment layers, a mechanical barrier formed by sediment that does not allow hatchlings to reach the water, or by a bet-hedging strategy of the resting eggs. The aim of our study was to determine the extent to which coverage by lake sediment may affect the hatching of Daphnia dormant eggs. The ephippia of lake-Daphnia (longispina species complex, covered by sterilized lake sediment of different thicknesses (0, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 cm; 4 replicates per treatment, were incubated for 8 weeks in lab controlled conditions. The results indicate that even the thinnest tested layer (0.25 cm may completely inhibit hatching of ephippial eggs. A few Daphnia neonates were observed in two (of five sediment treatments, while dozens of animals hatched in the control one. In the second experiment we determined that the sediment sterilization process did not affect the hatching proportion of ephippial eggs (when compared to the treatment with unsterilized sediments. We hypothesize that the observed inhibition of Daphnia hatching in the main experiment, which may cause a serious problem for Cladoceran populations in lakes where no sediment mixing occurs, may be caused by low light intensity, anoxic conditions or a physical barrier created by the sediment.

  9. Differential modification of oxic and anoxic radiation damage by chemicals. I. Simulation of the action of caffeine by certain inorganic radical scavengers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesavan, P.C.; Sharma, G.J.; Afzal, S.M.J.

    1978-01-01

    Caffeine affords partial radioprotection against oxic damage, but potentiates anoxic damage in dry as well as presoaked barley seeds. Since our earlier studies have implicated a physicochemical pathway of action for such differential modification by caffeine, the effect of inorganic substances, known to scavenge specific categories of free radicals, on the oxic and anoxic components of radiation damage was investigated. It is found that the radiation-induced oxic damage is significantly reduced by potassium permanganate, potassium iodide, potassium nitrate, and potassium ferrocyanide which scavenge predominantly .H + e - /sub aq/, .OH, e - /sub aq/, and .OH radicals, respectively. Each of these four substances, like caffeine, also potentiates anoxic damage in dry seeds, but the anoxic damage in presoaked seeds is potentiated only by potassium ferrocyanide. These results do not confirm the view in the literature that the anoxic sensitization is largely mediated by .OH radicals. A discussion of these observations and the validity of comparing our seed data with those derived from experiments with bacterial spores and ''naked'' DNA solutions is presented

  10. Marine lake as in situ laboratory for studies of organic matter influence on speciation and distribution of trace metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlakar, Marina; Fiket, Željka; Geček, Sunčana; Cukrov, Neven; Cuculić, Vlado

    2015-07-01

    Karst marine lakes are unique marine systems, also recognized as in situ "laboratories" in which geochemical processes on a different scale compared to the open sea, can be observed. In this study, organic matter cycle and its impact on distribution of trace metals in the marine lake Mir, located on Dugi Otok Island, in the central part of the eastern Adriatic Sea, was investigated for the first time. Studied marine lake is small, isolated, shallow basin, with limited communication with the open sea. Intense spatial and seasonal variations of organic matter, dissolved and particulate (DOC, POC), and dissolved trace metals concentrations in the water column of the Lake are governed predominantly by natural processes. Enhanced oxygen consumption in the Lake during summer season, high DOC and POC concentrations and low redox potential result in occasional occurrence of anoxic conditions in the bottom layers with appearance of sulfur species. Speciation modeling showed that dissolved trace metals Cu, Pb and Zn, are mostly bound to organic matter, while Cd, Co and Ni are present predominantly as free ions and inorganic complexes. Trace metals removal from the water column and their retention in the sediment was found to depend on the nature of the relationship between specific metal and organic or inorganic phases, sulfides, Fe-oxyhydroxydes or biogenic calcite. The above is reflected in the composition of the sediments, which are, in addition to influence of karstic background and bathymetry of the basin, significantly affected by accumulation of detritus at the bottom of the Lake.

  11. An Updated View of the Microbial Diversity in Deep Hypersaline Anoxic Basins

    KAUST Repository

    Mapelli, Francesca; Barozzi, Alan; Michoud, Gregoire; Merlino, Giuseppe; Crotti, Elena; Borin, Sara; Daffonchio, Daniele

    2017-01-01

    bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryotic populations thrive there. In the last few years, cultivation and “omics”-based approaches have been used with samples collected from DHABs around the world, allowing clarifying metabolic processes of paramount ecological

  12. Anoxic monimolimnia: Nutrients devious feeders or bombs ready to explode?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianni, Areti; Zacharias, Ierotheos

    2015-04-01

    Coastal regions are under strong human influence and its environmental impact is reflected into their water quality. Oligotrophic estuaries and coastal systems have changed in mesotrophic and/or eutrophic, shown an increase in toxic algal blooms, hypoxic/anoxic events, and massive mortalities of many aquatic and benthic organisms. In strongly stratified and productive water basins, bottom water dissolved oxygen is depleted due to the excessive organic matter decomposition in these depths. Distribution and recycling of nutrients in their water column is inextricably dependent on oxygenation and redox conditions. Bottom water anoxia accelerates PO43-, NH4+ and H2S recycling and accumulation from organic matter decomposition. The anoxic, H2S, PO43- and NH4+ rich bottom water constitutes a toxic layer, threatening the balance of the entire ecosystem. In permanently stratified water basins, storm events could result in stratification destruction and water column total mixing. The turnover brings large amounts of H2S to the surface resulting in low levels of oxygen and massive fish kills. PO43- and NH4+ are released to the interface and surface waters promoting algal blooms. Μore organic matter is produced fueling anoxia. The arising question is, whether the balance of an anoxic water ecosystem is under the threat of its hypolimnetic nutrient and sulfide load, only in the case of storm events and water column total mixing. In polymictic water basins it is clear that the accumulated, in the bottom layer, nutrients will supply surface waters, after the pycnocline overturn. Besides this mechanism of basins' water quality degradation is nowadays recognized as one of the biggest obstacles in eutrophic environments management and restoration efforts. The role of internal load, in permanently stratified water basins, is not so clear. In the present study the impact of storm events on water column stability and bottom water anoxia of meromictic coastal basins, is investigated

  13. Bacterial community composition in the water column of a lake formed by a former uranium open pit mine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edberg, Frida; Andersson, Anders F; Holmström, Sara J M

    2012-11-01

    Mining of pyrite minerals is a major environmental issue involving both biological and geochemical processes. Here we present a study of an artificial lake of a former uranium open pit mine with the aim to connect the chemistry and bacterial community composition (454-pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes) in the stratified water column. A shift in the water chemistry from oxic conditions in the epilimnion to anoxic, alkaline, and metal and sulfide-rich conditions in the hypolimnion was corresponded by a strong shift in the bacterial community, with few shared operational taxonomic units (OTU) between the water layers. The epilimnetic bacterial community of the lake (~20 years old) showed similarities to other temperate freshwater lakes, while the hypolimnetic bacterial community showed similarity to extreme chemical environments. The epilimnetic bacterial community had dominance of Actinobacteria and Betaproteobacteria. The hypolimnion displayed a higher bacterial diversity and was dominated by the phototrophic green sulphur bacterium of the genus Chlorobium (ca. 40 % of the total community). Deltaproteobacteria were only represented in the hypolimnion and the most abundant OTUs were affiliated with ferric iron and sulfate reducers of the genus Geobacter and Desulfobulbus, respectively. The chemistry is clearly controlling, especially the hypolimnetic, bacterial community but the community composition also indicates that the bacteria are involved in metal cycling in the lake.

  14. Long term picoplankton dynamics in a warm-monomictic, tropical high altitude lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso LUGO VÁZQUEZ

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Long term analyses of the microbial loop, centred on the picoplankton dynamics, were carried out over a five-year (1998 to 2002 period in Lake Alchichica (Puebla, Mexico, a high altitude tropical athalassohaline lake. The hydrodynamics of the lake followed a warm-monomictic pattern with mixing at a minimum temperature during the early dry season while the stratification was pronounced in the late dry season and throughout the rainy season; anoxic conditions in the hypolimnion lasted <9 months. The annual mean concentrations of chlorophyll-a were below 4 μg L-1 in 1998, 1999 and 2001, however, 6.1 and 5.2 μg L-1 in 2000 and 2002, respectively. Total picoplankton, TPP, displayed a temporal pattern that followed the mixing-stratification cycle. The highest TPP values (the whole water column ≥5×106 cells mL-1 were found during mixing and early stratification (January-March. The minimum numbers were present during late stratification (October-November. The maximum TPP numbers were observed within the layer 0-20 m, which corresponded to the epilimnion during the stratification period. Neither the thermocline nor the deep chlorophyll maximum showed an elevated TPP concentration. In the hypolimnion, TPP numbers were low (frequently <1×106 cells mL-1 apparently as a result of the long period of anoxia. Notwithstanding autotrophic picoplankton (APP contributed even ≥30% of TPP (2001 to 2002; no significant correlation was found between TPP and chlorophyll-a.

  15. The comparative osmoregulatory ability of two water beetle genera whose species span the fresh-hypersaline gradient in inland waters (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae, Hydrophilidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Pallarés

    Full Text Available A better knowledge of the physiological basis of salinity tolerance is essential to understanding the ecology and evolutionary history of organisms that have colonized inland saline waters. Coleoptera are amongst the most diverse macroinvertebrates in inland waters, including saline habitats; however, the osmoregulatory strategies they employ to deal with osmotic stress remain unexplored. Survival and haemolymph osmotic concentration at different salinities were examined in adults of eight aquatic beetle species which inhabit different parts of the fresh-hypersaline gradient. Studied species belong to two unrelated genera which have invaded saline waters independently from freshwater ancestors; Nebrioporus (Dytiscidae and Enochrus (Hydrophilidae. Their osmoregulatory strategy (osmoconformity or osmoregulation was identified and osmotic capacity (the osmotic gradient between the animal's haemolymph and the external medium was compared between species pairs co-habiting similar salinities in nature. We show that osmoregulatory capacity, rather than osmoconformity, has evolved independently in these different lineages. All species hyperegulated their haemolymph osmotic concentration in diluted waters; those living in fresh or low-salinity waters were unable to hyporegulate and survive in hyperosmotic media (> 340 mosmol kg(-1. In contrast, the species which inhabit the hypo-hypersaline habitats were effective hyporegulators, maintaining their haemolymph osmolality within narrow limits (ca. 300 mosmol kg(-1 across a wide range of external concentrations. The hypersaline species N. ceresyi and E. jesusarribasi tolerated conductivities up to 140 and 180 mS cm(-1, respectively, and maintained osmotic gradients over 3500 mosmol kg(-1, comparable to those of the most effective insect osmoregulators known to date. Syntopic species of both genera showed similar osmotic capacities and in general, osmotic responses correlated well with upper salinity levels

  16. Hydrobiogeochemical interactions in 'anoxic' limestone drains for neutralization of acidic mine drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, E.I.; Cravotta, C.A.; Savela, C.E.; Nord, G.L.

    1999-01-01

    Processes affecting neutralization of acidic coal mine drainage were evaluated within 'anoxic' limestone drains (ALDs). Influents had pH???3.5 and dissolved oxygen treatment step is indicated to promote Al removal before diverting acidic mine water into alkalinity-producing materials. ?? 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  17. Increased Intracranial Pressure during Hemodialysis in a Patient with Anoxic Brain Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anton; Damholt, Mette B; Strange, Ditte G

    2017-01-01

    Dialysis disequilibrium syndrome (DDS) is a serious neurological complication of hemodialysis, and patients with acute brain injury are at increased risk. We report a case of DDS leading to intracranial hypertension in a patient with anoxic brain injury and discuss the subsequent dialysis strateg...

  18. Using biogenic sulfur gases as remotely detectable biosignatures on anoxic planets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domagal-Goldman, Shawn D; Meadows, Victoria S; Claire, Mark W; Kasting, James F

    2011-06-01

    We used one-dimensional photochemical and radiative transfer models to study the potential of organic sulfur compounds (CS(2), OCS, CH(3)SH, CH(3)SCH(3), and CH(3)S(2)CH(3)) to act as remotely detectable biosignatures in anoxic exoplanetary atmospheres. Concentrations of organic sulfur gases were predicted for various biogenic sulfur fluxes into anoxic atmospheres and were found to increase with decreasing UV fluxes. Dimethyl sulfide (CH(3)SCH(3), or DMS) and dimethyl disulfide (CH(3)S(2)CH(3), or DMDS) concentrations could increase to remotely detectable levels, but only in cases of extremely low UV fluxes, which may occur in the habitable zone of an inactive M dwarf. The most detectable feature of organic sulfur gases is an indirect one that results from an increase in ethane (C(2)H(6)) over that which would be predicted based on the planet's methane (CH(4)) concentration. Thus, a characterization mission could detect these organic sulfur gases-and therefore the life that produces them-if it could sufficiently quantify the ethane and methane in the exoplanet's atmosphere.

  19. Restoration and Purification of Dissolved Organic Nitrogen by Bacteria and Phytoremediation in Shallow Eutrophic Lakes Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Yue, Yi

    2018-06-01

    Endogenous organic nitrogen loadings in lake sediments have increased with human activity in recent decades. A 6-month field study from two disparate shallow eutrophic lakes could partly reveal these issues by analysing seasonal variations of biodegradation and phytoremediation in the sediment. This paper describes the relationship between oxidation reduction potential, temperature, microbial activity and phytoremediation in nitrogen cycling by calculation degradative index of dissolved organic nitrogen and amino acid decomposition. The index was being positive in winter and negative in summer while closely positive correlated with biodegradation. Our analysis revealed that rather than anoxic condition, biomass is the primary factor to dissolved organic nitrogen distribution and decomposition. Some major amino acids statistics also confirm the above view. The comparisons of organic nitrogen and amino acid in abundance and seasons in situ provides that demonstrated plants cue important for nitrogen removal by their roots adsorption and immobilization. In conclusion, enhanced microbial activity and phytoremediation with the seasons will reduce the endogenous nitrogen loadings by the coupled mineralization and diagenetic process.

  20. Oxygen intrusion into anoxic fjords leads to increased methylmercury availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiteberg Braaten, Hans Fredrik; Pakhomova, Svetlana; Yakushev, Evgeniy

    2013-04-01

    Mercury (Hg) appears in the oxic surface waters of the oceans at low levels (sub ng/L). Because inorganic Hg can be methylated into the toxic and bioaccumulative specie methylmercury (MeHg) levels can be high at the top of the marine food chain. Even though marine sea food is considered the main risk driver for MeHg exposure to people most research up to date has focused on Hg methylation processes in freshwater systems. This study identifies the mechanisms driving formation of MeHg during oxygen depletion in fjords, and shows how MeHg is made available in the surface water during oxygen intrusion. Studies of the biogeochemical structure in the water column of the Norwegian fjord Hunnbunn were performed in 2009, 2011 and 2012. In autumn of 2011 mixing flushing events were observed and lead to both positive and negative effects on the ecosystem state in the fjord. The oxygenated water intrusions lead to a decrease of the deep layer concentrations of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), ammonia and phosphate. On the other hand the intrusion also raised the H2S boundary from 8 m to a shallower depth of just 4 m. Following the intrusion was also observed an increase at shallower depths of nutrients combined with a decrease of pH. Before flushing events were observed concentrations of total Hg (TotHg) increased from 1.3 - 1.7 ng/L in the surface layer of the fjord to concentrations ranging from 5.2 ng/L to 6.4 ng/L in the anoxic zone. MeHg increased regularly from 0.04 ng/L in the surface water to a maximum concentration of 5.2 ng/L in the deeper layers. This corresponds to an amount of TotHg present as MeHg ranging from 2.1 % to 99 %. The higher concentrations of MeHg in the deeper layer corresponds to an area where no oxygen is present and concentrations of H2S exceeds 500 µM, suggesting a production of MeHg in the anoxic area as a result of sulphate reducing bacteria activity. After flushing the concentrations of TotHg showed a similar pattern ranging from 0.6 ng/L in the

  1. Petrophysical characterization of the lacustrine sediment succession drilled in Lake El'gygytgyn, Far East Russian Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. C. Gebhardt

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Seismic profiles of Far East Russian Lake El'gygytgyn, formed by a meteorite impact some 3.6 million years ago, show a stratified sediment succession that can be separated into subunits Ia and Ib at approximately 167 m below lake floor (=~3.17 Ma. The upper (Ia is well-stratified, while the lower is acoustically more massive and discontinuous. The sediments are intercalated with frequent mass movement deposits mainly in the proximal areas, while the distal region is almost free of such deposits at least in the upper part. In spring 2009, a long core drilled in the lake center within the framework of the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP penetrated the entire lacustrine sediment succession down to ~320 m below lake floor and about 200 m farther into the meteorite-impact-related bedrock. Downhole logging data down to 390 m below lake floor show that the bedrock and the lacustrine part differ significantly in their petrophysical characteristics. The contact between the bedrock and the lacustrine sediments is not abrupt, but rather transitional with a variable mixture of impact-altered bedrock clasts in a lacustrine matrix. Physical and chemical proxies measured on the cores can be used to divide the lacustrine part into five different statistical clusters. These can be plotted in a redox-condition vs. input-type diagram, with total organic carbon content and magnetic susceptibility values indicating anoxic or oxic conditions and with the Si / Ti ratio representing more clastic or more biogenic input. Plotting the clusters in this diagram allows identifying clusters that represent glacial phases (cluster I, super interglacials (cluster II, and interglacial phases (clusters III and IV.

  2. Fate of Metals in Relation to Water and Sediment Properties in a Subtropical Lake in Central Himalaya, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaotombi, Shaikhom; Gupta, Prem Kumar

    2017-04-01

    Lakes of Himalaya are one of the most fragile ecosystems on earth. Tourism and urban development in the upland region strongly affect its water resources. The high rate of sedimentation and organic matter deposition alters the ecological state of sediment bed, which indirectly influences on dynamics of metallic elements. We investigated spatial and temporal variations of water and sediment characteristic in Lake Sattal of Central Himalaya, India. Samples were collected seasonally from four sampling locations from January 2011 to December 2012. Pearson's correlation and Canonical correspondence analysis (CCAs) were applied to examine the dynamics and behaviors of heavy metals. Concentrations of elements were in the order of fluoride (Fl) > zinc (Zn) > copper (Cu) > iron (Fe) > manganese (Mn). Sand size fraction was higher in the littoral zone while clay particle was dominant in the profundal zone of the lake. Dissolved oxygen at sediment-water-interface (SWI) and water temperature were the major factors influencing the dynamics of metallic contents in the water column. Spatially, total organic matter (TOM) was higher in the deeper portion of the lake. Our study revealed that mobility of Fe is temperature-dependent, whereas speciation of Mn and Cu are primarily controlled by the suboxic condition of SWI in organic-rich site. Upland lakes are more vulnerable to anoxic condition and have severe implications on heavy metals speciation. Proper implementation of land use policies and management practices, including stormwater detention, can be integrated into resolving such problems.

  3. Environmental drivers of the benthic macroinvertebrates community in a hypersaline estuary (Northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlinda Railly Ferreira Medeiros

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The estuarine community of benthic macroinvertebrates spatially varies in response to changes in environmental variables in these ecosystems. Understanding this variability helps our understanding the mechanisms structuring these communities. Aim Assess the structural aspects of the benthic macroinvertebrate community in a hypersaline estuary, and to relate to environmental variables that influence the community structure along the estuary. Methods The study was conducted at Tubarão river estuary in May 2015. We sampled two estuarine areas (upper and lower, and in each zone were sampled six points composed of two replicas, one sampled in sandy bottom and the other in muddy bottom. Samples of benthic macroinvertebrates and estuarine environmental variables were collected. Environmental drivers of the benthic macroinvertebrate community were determined by Distance-based Linear Models analysis. The contribution of individual species to the dissimilarity between the areas and substrate types were determined by analysis of the percentage of similarity. Results The composition of benthic macroinvertebrate community differed between the upper and lower areas, although it was similar between the muddy and sandy bottoms. The variation in the benthic community between areas was mainly related to the influence of salinity in the upper area. In the lower area, the variation of the macroinvertebrates was related to salinity, associated with other variables in the sandy (temperature, turbidity and dissolved oxygen and muddy (temperature, total dissolved solids and dissolved oxygen substrates. Taxa which contributed most to the dissimilarity between the upper and lower areas were Nereididae (17.89%, Anomalocardia brasiliana (15% and Cirratulidae (10.43%. Conclusions Salinity was the main driver of the structural aspects of the benthic macroinvertebrate community in the upper area of the estuary, although in the lower area a set of

  4. LIMNOLOGY, LAKE BASINS, LAKE WATERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petre GÂŞTESCU

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Limnology is a border discipline between geography, hydrology and biology, and is also closely connected with other sciences, from it borrows research methods. Physical limnology (the geography of lakes, studies lake biotopes, and biological limnology (the biology of lakes, studies lake biocoenoses. The father of limnology is the Swiss scientist F.A. Forel, the author of a three-volume entitled Le Leman: monographie limnologique (1892-1904, which focuses on the geology physics, chemistry and biology of lakes. He was also author of the first textbook of limnology, Handbuch der Seenkunde: allgemeine Limnologie,(1901. Since both the lake biotope and its biohydrocoenosis make up a single whole, the lake and lakes, respectively, represent the most typical systems in nature. They could be called limnosystems (lacustrine ecosystems, a microcosm in itself, as the American biologist St.A. Forbes put it (1887.

  5. Anaerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification is the dominant methane sink in a deep lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutzmann, Joerg S.; Stief, Peter; Brandes, Josephin; Schink, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification, also known as “nitrate/nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation” (n-damo), was discovered in 2006. Since then, only a few studies have identified this process and the associated microorganisms in natural environments. In aquatic sediments, the close proximity of oxygen- and nitrate-consumption zones can mask n-damo as aerobic methane oxidation. We therefore investigated the vertical distribution and the abundance of denitrifying methanotrophs related to Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera with cultivation-independent molecular techniques in the sediments of Lake Constance. Additionally, the vertical distribution of methane oxidation and nitrate consumption zones was inferred from high-resolution microsensor profiles in undisturbed sediment cores. M. oxyfera-like bacteria were virtually absent at shallow-water sites (littoral sediment) and were very abundant at deep-water sites (profundal sediment). In profundal sediment, the vertical distribution of M. oxyfera-like bacteria showed a distinct peak in anoxic layers that coincided with the zone of methane oxidation and nitrate consumption, a strong indication for n-damo carried out by M. oxyfera-like bacteria. Both potential n-damo rates calculated from cell densities (660–4,890 µmol CH4⋅m−2⋅d−1) and actual rates calculated from microsensor profiles (31–437 µmol CH4⋅m−2⋅d−1) were sufficiently high to prevent methane release from profundal sediment solely by this process. Additionally, when nitrate was added to sediment cores exposed to anoxic conditions, the n-damo zone reestablished well below the sediment surface, completely preventing methane release from the sediment. We conclude that the previously overlooked n-damo process can be the major methane sink in stable freshwater environments if nitrate is available in anoxic zones. PMID:25472842

  6. Anaerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification is the dominant methane sink in a deep lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutzmann, Joerg S; Stief, Peter; Brandes, Josephin; Schink, Bernhard

    2014-12-23

    Anaerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification, also known as "nitrate/nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation" (n-damo), was discovered in 2006. Since then, only a few studies have identified this process and the associated microorganisms in natural environments. In aquatic sediments, the close proximity of oxygen- and nitrate-consumption zones can mask n-damo as aerobic methane oxidation. We therefore investigated the vertical distribution and the abundance of denitrifying methanotrophs related to Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera with cultivation-independent molecular techniques in the sediments of Lake Constance. Additionally, the vertical distribution of methane oxidation and nitrate consumption zones was inferred from high-resolution microsensor profiles in undisturbed sediment cores. M. oxyfera-like bacteria were virtually absent at shallow-water sites (littoral sediment) and were very abundant at deep-water sites (profundal sediment). In profundal sediment, the vertical distribution of M. oxyfera-like bacteria showed a distinct peak in anoxic layers that coincided with the zone of methane oxidation and nitrate consumption, a strong indication for n-damo carried out by M. oxyfera-like bacteria. Both potential n-damo rates calculated from cell densities (660-4,890 µmol CH4⋅m(-2)⋅d(-1)) and actual rates calculated from microsensor profiles (31-437 µmol CH4⋅m(-2)⋅d(-1)) were sufficiently high to prevent methane release from profundal sediment solely by this process. Additionally, when nitrate was added to sediment cores exposed to anoxic conditions, the n-damo zone reestablished well below the sediment surface, completely preventing methane release from the sediment. We conclude that the previously overlooked n-damo process can be the major methane sink in stable freshwater environments if nitrate is available in anoxic zones.

  7. Hydrology, water quality, and nutrient loads to the Bauman Park Lake, Cherry Valley, Winnebago County, Illinois, May 1996-April 1997

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Robert T.; Trugestaad, Aaron

    1998-01-01

    The Bauman Park Lake occupies a former sand and gravel quarry in the Village of Cherry Valley, Illinois. The lake is eutrophic, and nuisance growths of algae and aquatic macrophytes are supported by nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus) that are derived primarily from ground-water inflow, the main source of water for the lake. The lake has an average depth of about 18 feet, a maximum depth of about 28 feet, and a volume of 466 acre-feet at a stage of about 717 feet above sea level. The lake also is subject to thermal stratification, and although most of the lake is well oxidized, nearly anoxic conditions were present at the lake bottom during part of the summer of 1996. 4,648 pounds of nitrogen compounds were added to the Bauman Park Lake from May 1996 through April 1997. Phosphorus compounds were derived primarily from inflow from ground water (68.7 percent), sediments derived from shoreline erosion (15.6 percent), internal regeneration (11.7 percent), waterfowl excrement (1.6 percent), direct precipitation and overland runoff (1.2 percent), and particulate matter deposited from the atmosphere (1.2 percent). Nitrogen compounds were derived from inflow from ground water (62.1 percent), internal regeneration (19.6 percent), direct precipitation and overland runoff (10.1 percent), particulate matter deposited from the atmosphere (3.5 percent), sediments derived from shoreline erosion (4.4 percent), and waterfowl excrement (0.3 percent). About 13 pounds of phosphorus and 318 pounds of nitrogen compounds flow out of the lake to ground water. About 28 pounds of nitrogen is removed by denitrification. Algae and aquatic macrophytes utilize nitrate, nitrite, ammonia, and dissolved phosphorus. The availability of dissolved phosphorus in the lake water controls algal growth. Uptake of the nutrients, by aquatic macrophytes and algae, temporarily removes nutrients from the water column but not from the lake basin. Because the amount of nutrients entering the lake greatly exceeds

  8. Application of factor analysis and electrical resistivity to understand groundwater contributions to coastal embayments in semi-arid and hypersaline coastal settings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bighash, Paniz, E-mail: Bighash.p@gmail.com; Murgulet, Dorina

    2015-11-01

    Groundwater contributions and sources of salinity to Oso Bay in south Texas were investigated using multivariate statistical analysis of geochemical data and multitemporal electrical resistivity tomography surveys. Both analysis of geochemical data and subsurface imaging techniques identified two commonalities for the investigated system: 1) hypersaline water occurs near the groundwater/surface water interface during wet conditions creating reverse hydraulic gradients due to density effects. The development and downward movement of these fluids as continuous plumes deflect fresher groundwater discharge downward and laterally away from the surface; and 2) more pronounced upwelling of fresher groundwater occurs during drought periods when density inversions are more defined and are expected to overcome dispersion and diffusion processes and create sufficiently large-enough unstable gradients that induce density-difference convection. Salinity mass-balance models derived from time-difference resistivity tomograph and in-situ salinity data reaffirm these findings indicating that groundwater upwelling is more prominent during dry to wet conditions in 2013 (~ 545.5 m{sup 3}/d) and is less pronounced during wet to dry conditions in 2012 (~ 262.7 m{sup 3}/d) for the 224 m{sup 2} area surveyed. Findings show that the highly saline nature of water in this area and changes in salinity regimes can be attributed to a combination of factors, namely: surface outflows, evapoconcentration, recirculation of hypersaline groundwaters, and potential trapped oil field brines. Increased drought conditions will likely exacerbate the rate at which salinity levels are increasing in bays and estuaries in semi-arid regions where both hypersaline groundwater discharge and high evaporation rates occur simultaneously. - Highlights: • Study of salinity regimes in relation to groundwater in a coastal semiarid setting • Factor analysis defined dominant factors influencing water quality

  9. Application of factor analysis and electrical resistivity to understand groundwater contributions to coastal embayments in semi-arid and hypersaline coastal settings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bighash, Paniz; Murgulet, Dorina

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater contributions and sources of salinity to Oso Bay in south Texas were investigated using multivariate statistical analysis of geochemical data and multitemporal electrical resistivity tomography surveys. Both analysis of geochemical data and subsurface imaging techniques identified two commonalities for the investigated system: 1) hypersaline water occurs near the groundwater/surface water interface during wet conditions creating reverse hydraulic gradients due to density effects. The development and downward movement of these fluids as continuous plumes deflect fresher groundwater discharge downward and laterally away from the surface; and 2) more pronounced upwelling of fresher groundwater occurs during drought periods when density inversions are more defined and are expected to overcome dispersion and diffusion processes and create sufficiently large-enough unstable gradients that induce density-difference convection. Salinity mass-balance models derived from time-difference resistivity tomograph and in-situ salinity data reaffirm these findings indicating that groundwater upwelling is more prominent during dry to wet conditions in 2013 (~ 545.5 m 3 /d) and is less pronounced during wet to dry conditions in 2012 (~ 262.7 m 3 /d) for the 224 m 2 area surveyed. Findings show that the highly saline nature of water in this area and changes in salinity regimes can be attributed to a combination of factors, namely: surface outflows, evapoconcentration, recirculation of hypersaline groundwaters, and potential trapped oil field brines. Increased drought conditions will likely exacerbate the rate at which salinity levels are increasing in bays and estuaries in semi-arid regions where both hypersaline groundwater discharge and high evaporation rates occur simultaneously. - Highlights: • Study of salinity regimes in relation to groundwater in a coastal semiarid setting • Factor analysis defined dominant factors influencing water quality variations.

  10. Diversity of Heterotrophic Protists from Extremely Hypersaline Habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong Soo; Simpson, Alastair G B

    2015-09-01

    Heterotrophic protists (protozoa) are a diverse but understudied component of the biota of extremely hypersaline environments, with few data on molecular diversity within halophile 'species', and almost nothing known of their biogeographic distribution. We have garnered SSU rRNA gene sequences for several clades of halophilic protozoa from enrichments from waters of >12.5% salinity from Australia, North America, and Europe (6 geographic sites, 25 distinct samples). The small stramenopile Halocafeteria was found at all sites, but phylogenies did not show clear geographic clustering. The ciliate Trimyema was recorded from 6 non-European samples. Phylogenies confirmed a monophyletic halophilic Trimyema group that included possible south-eastern Australian, Western Australian and North American clusters. Several halophilic Heterolobosea were detected, demonstrating that Pleurostomum contains at least three relatively distinct clades, and increasing known continental ranges for Tulamoeba peronaphora and Euplaesiobystra hypersalinica. The unclassified flagellate Palustrimonas, found in one Australian sample, proves to be a novel deep-branching alveolate. These results are consistent with a global distribution of halophilic protozoa groups (∼ morphospecies), but the Trimyema case suggests that is worth testing whether larger forms exhibit biogeographic phylogenetic substructure. The molecular detection/characterization of halophilic protozoa is still far from complete at the clade level, let alone the 'species level'. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Poor outcome prediction by burst suppression ratio in adults with post-anoxic coma without hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qinglin; Su, Yingying; Hussain, Mohammed; Chen, Weibi; Ye, Hong; Gao, Daiquan; Tian, Fei

    2014-05-01

    Burst suppression ratio (BSR) is a quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG) parameter. The purpose of our study was to compare the accuracy of BSR when compared to other EEG parameters in predicting poor outcomes in adults who sustained post-anoxic coma while not being subjected to therapeutic hypothermia. EEG was registered and recorded at least once within 7 days of post-anoxic coma onset. Electrodes were placed according to the international 10-20 system, using a 16-channel layout. Each EEG expert scored raw EEG using a grading scale adapted from Young and scored amplitude-integrated electroencephalography tracings, in addition to obtaining qEEG parameters defined as BSR with a defined threshold. Glasgow outcome scales of 1 and 2 at 3 months, determined by two blinded neurologists, were defined as poor outcome. Sixty patients with Glasgow coma scale score of 8 or less after anoxic accident were included. The sensitivity (97.1%), specificity (73.3%), positive predictive value (82.5%), and negative prediction value (95.0%) of BSR in predicting poor outcome were higher than other EEG variables. BSR1 and BSR2 were reliable in predicting death (area under the curve > 0.8, P coma who do not undergo therapeutic hypothermia when compared to other qEEG parameters.

  12. Ferrous archaeological analogues for the understanding of the multi-secular corrosion mechanisms in an anoxic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saheb-Djahromi, M.

    2009-12-01

    Understanding the long term corrosion mechanisms of iron in an anoxic environment is essential in the field of the radioactive waste storage. In France, it is planned to store high level nuclear wastes in a multi-barrier system containing a glassy matrix surrounded by a stainless steel container, embedded in a low-carbon steel over-container. This system would be placed in a deep geological repository, which would impose anoxic conditions. As it must be efficient for a period of several thousands of years, one should understand the alteration mechanisms that are expected to occur in such a long time. To this purpose, a specific approach is developed on ferrous archaeological analogues with thick corrosion layer formed in natural conditions. In this study, the corrosion mechanisms have been assessed by examining nails aged of 400 years coming from the archaeological site of Glinet, selected as a reference site. The first point was a fine characterisation of the entire corrosion system metal / corrosion products / medium, through the use of coupled multi-scale analytical tools. The first results showed that the samples were corroded in an anoxic calco-carbonated environment. Moreover, the coupling of X-ray micro-diffraction, Raman microspectroscopy and dispersive energy spectroscopy has enabled to identify three corrosion systems composed of iron carbonates, siderite and chukanovite, and magnetite. Depending on the phase's layout in the system, the electronic resistance of the corrosion layers has been established, from resistive to conductive. In a second stage, re-corroding experiments in laboratory were performed. Firstly, the electrochemical behaviour of the corrosion system has shown that water reduction at the metallic interface is negligible. Furthermore, reaction tracing with copper and deuterium has allowed identifying the electron consumptions sites mainly localised on the external part, and the precipitation sites on the internal part of the corrosion

  13. High protists diversity in the plankton of sulfurous lakes and lagoons examined by 18s rRNA gene sequence analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triadó-Margarit, Xavier; Casamayor, Emilio O

    2015-12-01

    Diversity of small protists was studied in sulfidic and anoxic (euxinic) stratified karstic lakes and coastal lagoons by 18S rRNA gene analyses. We hypothesized a major sulfide effect, reducing protist diversity and richness with only a few specialized populations adapted to deal with low-redox conditions and high-sulfide concentrations. However, genetic fingerprinting suggested similar ecological diversity in anoxic and sulfurous than in upper oxygen rich water compartments with specific populations inhabiting euxinic waters. Many of them agreed with genera previously identified by microscopic observations, but also new and unexpected groups were detected. Most of the sequences matched a rich assemblage of Ciliophora (i.e., Coleps, Prorodon, Plagiopyla, Strombidium, Metopus, Vorticella and Caenomorpha, among others) and algae (mainly Cryptomonadales). Unidentified Cercozoa, Fungi, Stramenopiles and Discoba were recurrently found. The lack of GenBank counterparts was higher in deep hypolimnetic waters and appeared differentially allocated in the different taxa, being higher within Discoba and lower in Cryptophyceae. A larger number of populations than expected were specifically detected in the deep sulfurous waters, with unknown ecological interactions and metabolic capabilities. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Agricultural crop mapping and classification by Landsat images to evaluate water use in the Lake Urmia basin, North-west Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazel, Nasim; Norouzi, Hamid; Madani, Kaveh; Kløve, Bjørn

    2016-04-01

    Lake Urmia, once one of the largest hypersaline lakes in the world has lost more than 90% of its surface body mainly due to the intensive expansion of agriculture, using more than 90% of all water in the region. Access to accurate and up-to-date information on the extent and distribution of individual crop types, associated with land use changes and practices, has significant value in intensively agricultural regions. Explicit information of croplands can be useful for sustainable water resources, land and agriculture planning and management. Remote sensing, has been proven to be a more cost-effective alternative to the traditional statistically-based ground surveys for crop coverage areas that are costly and provide insufficient information. Satellite images along with ground surveys can provide the necessary information of spatial coverage and spectral responses of croplands for sustainable agricultural management. This study strives to differentiate different crop types and agricultural practices to achieve a higher detailed crop map of the Lake Urmia basin. The mapping approach consists of a two-stage supervised classification of multi-temporal multi-spectral high resolution images obtained from Landsat imagery archive. Irrigated and non-irrigated croplands and orchards were separated from other major land covers (urban, ranges, bare-lands, and water) in the region by means of maximum Likelihood supervised classification method. The field data collected during 2015 and land use maps generated in 2007 and Google Earth comparisons were used to form a training data set to perform the supervised classification. In the second stage, non-agricultural lands were masked and the supervised classification was applied on the Landsat images stack to identify seven major croplands in the region (wheat and barley, beetroot, corn, sunflower, alfalfa, vineyards, and apple orchards). The obtained results can be of significant value to the Urmia Lake restoration efforts which

  15. Modification of radiation-induced oxic and anoxic damage by caffeine and potassium permanganate in barley seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesavan, P.C.; Dodd, N.J.F.

    1976-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that both the immediate and post-irradiation oxygen effects in barley seeds decrease in magnitude in the presence of potassium permanganate and caffeine. This implied that these two types of oxygen effect have features in common. With the removal of the radiation-induced oxygen-sensitive sites, by anoxic hydration, caffeine potentiated the oxygen-independent component of damage, in seeds irradiated in a dry or pre-soaked state. Potassium permanganate, on the other hand, enhanced the anoxic radiation damage only in seeds irradiated in a dry state. The possible mode of action of KMnO 4 and caffeine in barley seeds is discussed. (author)

  16. Biological Phosphorus Release and Uptake Under Alternating Anaerobic and Anoxic Conditions In a Fixed-Film Reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kerrn-Jespersen, Jens Peter; Henze, Mogens; Strube, Rune

    1994-01-01

    Biological phosphorus removal was investigated in a fixed-film reactor with alternating anaerobic and anoxic conditions. The tests showed that biological phosphorus removal can be obtained in a fixed-film reactor with nitrate as oxidising agent. In the anaerobic period, 0.52 mg of PO4-P...... was released per mg of acetate taken up on an average. In the anoxic period, 2.0 mg of PO4-P was taken up per mg of NO3-N reduced on an average. The relationship between potassium released and phosphate released in the anaerobic phase was determined to be 0.37 mg K/mg P, while the relationship between...

  17. Exploiting the aerobic endospore-forming bacterial diversity in saline and hypersaline environments for biosurfactant production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida Couto, Camila Rattes; Alvarez, Vanessa Marques; Marques, Joana Montezano; de Azevedo Jurelevicius, Diogo; Seldin, Lucy

    2015-10-28

    Biosurfactants are surface-active biomolecules with great applicability in the food, pharmaceutical and oil industries. Endospore-forming bacteria, which survive for long periods in harsh environments, are described as biosurfactant producers. Although the ubiquity of endospore-forming bacteria in saline and hypersaline environments is well known, studies on the diversity of the endospore-forming and biosurfactant-producing bacterial genera/species in these habitats are underrepresented. In this study, the structure of endospore-forming bacterial communities in sediment/mud samples from Vermelha Lagoon, Massambaba, Dois Rios and Abraão Beaches (saline environments), as well as the Praia Seca salterns (hypersaline environments) was determined via denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Bacterial strains were isolated from these environmental samples and further identified using 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Strains presenting emulsification values higher than 30 % were grouped via BOX-PCR, and the culture supernatants of representative strains were subjected to high temperatures and to the presence of up to 20 % NaCl to test their emulsifying activities in these extreme conditions. Mass spectrometry analysis was used to demonstrate the presence of surfactin. A diverse endospore-forming bacterial community was observed in all environments. The 110 bacterial strains isolated from these environmental samples were molecularly identified as belonging to the genera Bacillus, Thalassobacillus, Halobacillus, Paenibacillus, Fictibacillus and Paenisporosarcina. Fifty-two strains showed emulsification values of at least 30%, and they were grouped into 18 BOX groups. The stability of the emulsification values varied when the culture supernatants of representative strains were subjected to high temperatures and to the presence of up to 20% NaCl. The presence of surfactin was demonstrated in one of the most promising strains. The environments studied can harbor endospore

  18. Regulation of electron transfer processes affects phototrophic mat structure and activity

    OpenAIRE

    Ha, Phuc T.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Atci, Erhan; Reardon, Patrick N.; Lindemann, Stephen R.; Fredrickson, James K.; Call, Douglas R.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2015-01-01

    Phototrophic microbial mats are among the most diverse ecosystems in nature. These systems undergo daily cycles in redox potential caused by variations in light energy input and metabolic interactions among the microbial species. In this work, solid electrodes with controlled potentials were placed under mats to study the electron transfer processes between the electrode and the microbial mat. The phototrophic microbial mat was harvested from Hot Lake, a hypersaline, epsomitic lake located ne...

  19. Quadruple sulfur isotope constraints on the origin and cycling of volatile organic sulfur compounds in a stratified sulfidic lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oduro, Harry; Kamyshny, Alexey; Zerkle, Aubrey L.; Li, Yue; Farquhar, James

    2013-11-01

    We have quantified the major forms of volatile organic sulfur compounds (VOSCs) distributed in the water column of stratified freshwater Fayetteville Green Lake (FGL), to evaluate the biogeochemical pathways involved in their production. The lake's anoxic deep waters contain high concentrations of sulfate (12-16 mmol L-1) and sulfide (0.12 μmol L-1 to 1.5 mmol L-1) with relatively low VOSC concentrations, ranging from 0.1 nmol L-1 to 2.8 μmol L-1. Sulfur isotope measurements of combined volatile organic sulfur compounds demonstrate that VOSC species are formed primarily from reduced sulfur (H2S/HS-) and zero-valent sulfur (ZVS), with little input from sulfate. Thedata support a role of a combination of biological and abiotic processes in formation of carbon-sulfur bonds between reactive sulfur species and methyl groups of lignin components. These processes are responsible for very fast turnover of VOSC species, maintaining their low levels in FGL. No dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) was detected by Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry (ESI-MS) in the lake water column or in planktonic extracts. These observations indicate a pathway distinct from oceanic and coastal marine environments, where dimethylsulfide (DMS) and other VOSC species are principally produced via the breakdown of DMSP by plankton species.

  20. Multi-secular corrosion behaviour of low carbon steel in anoxic soils: Characterisation of corrosion system on archaeological artefacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saheb, M.; Neff, D.; Dillmann, P.; Foy, E.; Saheb, M.; Dillmann, P.; Matthiesen, H.; Bellot-Gurlet, L.

    2009-01-01

    In the context of the prediction of materials behaviour used in the nuclear waste storage, the understanding of iron corrosion mechanisms in anoxic environment is of great importance. Information can be obtained using complementary analytical tools. Interactions between burial soil and archaeological artefacts are studied by performing on site soil measurements. Moreover, archaeological artefacts are studied on transverse sections using a combination of microbeam techniques. The specific interest of this project lies in the study of ferrous thick corrosion layers formed in anoxic environment. (authors)

  1. Complete nitrogen removal from municipal wastewater via partial nitrification by appropriately alternating anoxic/aerobic conditions in a continuous plug-flow step feed process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Shijian; Peng, Yongzhen; Qiu, Shuang; Zhu, Ao; Ren, Nanqi

    2014-05-15

    This study assessed the technical feasibility of removing nitrogen from municipal wastewater by partial nitrification (nitritation) in a continuous plug-flow step feed process. Nitrite in the effluent accumulated to over 81.5  ± 9.2% but disappeared with the transition of process operation from anoxic/oxic mode to the anaerobic/anoxic/oxic mode. Batch tests showed obvious ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) stimulation (advanced ammonia oxidation rate) and nitrite (NOB) oxidizing bacteria inhibition (reduced nitrite oxidation rate) under transient anoxic conditions. Two main factors contributed to nitritation in this continuous plug-flow process: One was the alternating anoxic and oxic operational condition; the step feed strategy guaranteed timely denitrification in anoxic zones, allowing a reduction in energy supply (nitrite) to NOB. Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis indicated that NOB population gradually decreased to 1.0  ± 0.1% of the total bacterial population (dominant Nitrospira spp., 1.55 × 10(9) copies/L) while AOB increased approximately two-fold (7.4  ± 0.9%, 1.25 × 10(10) copies/L) during the above anoxic to anaerobic transition. Most importantly, without addition of external carbon sources, the above wastewater treatment process reached 86.0  ± 4.2% of total nitrogen (TN) removal with only 7.23 ± 2.31 mg/L of TN in the effluent, which met the discharge requirements. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Parametrization of environment by geochemistry of the varved clastic and bio- chemogenic lake sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalugin, Ivan; Darin, Andrey; Babich, Valery; Markovich, Tatiana; Meydan, Feray

    2017-04-01

    As it well known, recent quantitative estimations of high-resolution environmental variability are based on geochemical records in lake sediments. Naturally, annually laminated sediments (varves) are the best objects for paleoclimatic study, because they allow to investigate seasonal variability for understanding long-term environmental pattern. Also, varved sediments seem to be applied as the model for identification of element-indicators for non-laminated sediments. The XRF scanner on Synchrotron Radiation provides big geochemical dataset for next mathematic treatment, including time series construction. XRF scanning realizes rapid and non-destructive determinations more than 30 trace elements in a range of concentration from 1 up to 10000 ppm in annual layers. That makes sedimentary cores comparable with tree-rings. Geochemical and physicochemical investigation of lake sediments provides basic information to identify geochemical signals with paleoclimate. In general, sediment consists of mineral component, organics and carbonates. The proportions between these components are affected by environmental parameters, because measured element content or their combinations show correlation with meteodata on instrumental time interval. That allows applying geochemical variability to reconstruct the environmental parameters in the form of time series. The proportions between main components are controlled by temperature, atmospheric precipitation, water salinity and other external forcings. So, layered structure of lake bottom sediments and detectable elements content variability both represent a continuous record of environmental history. Element composition and it's climatic response. Bottom sediments represent conditions of physical weathering, temperate bioproductivity and aridity, which concern to mountain lakes within extra tropical zone. The numerical values of the parameters can be computed by software of physical-chemical modeling for gas+water+rock multisystems

  3. Integrative approach to delineate natural attenuation of chlorinated benzenes in anoxic aquifers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stelzer, Nicole; Imfeld, Gwenael; Thullner, Martin; Lehmann, Juergen; Poser, Alexander; Richnow, Hans-H.; Nijenhuis, Ivonne

    2009-01-01

    Biodegradation of chlorobenzenes was assessed at an anoxic aquifer by combining hydrogeochemistry and stable isotope analyses. In situ microcosm analysis evidenced microbial assimilation of chlorobenzene (MCB) derived carbon and laboratory investigations asserted mineralization of MCB at low rates. Sequential dehalogenation of chlorinated benzenes may affect the isotope signature of single chlorobenzene species due to simultaneous depletion and enrichment of 13 C, which complicates the evaluation of degradation. Therefore, the compound-specific isotope analysis was interpreted based on an isotope balance. The enrichment of the cumulative isotope composition of all chlorobenzenes indicated in situ biodegradation. Additionally, the relationship between hydrogeochemistry and degradation activity was investigated by principal component analysis underlining variable hydrogeochemical conditions associated with degradation activity at the plume scale. Although the complexity of the field site did not allow straightforward assessment of natural attenuation processes, the application of an integrative approach appeared relevant to characterize the in situ biodegradation potential. - Lines of evidence for in situ biodegradation of chlorinated benzenes in an anoxic aquifer by combining hydrogeochemical and stable isotope data with multivariate statistics.

  4. Integrative approach to delineate natural attenuation of chlorinated benzenes in anoxic aquifers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stelzer, Nicole; Imfeld, Gwenael [Department of Isotope Biogeochemistry, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Thullner, Martin [Department of Environmental Microbiology, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Lehmann, Juergen [Ingenieurbuero Roth and Partner GmbH, Hans-Sachs-Str. 9, 76133 Karlsruhe (Germany); Poser, Alexander [Department of Isotope Biogeochemistry, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Richnow, Hans-H., E-mail: hans.richnow@ufz.d [Department of Isotope Biogeochemistry, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Nijenhuis, Ivonne [Department of Isotope Biogeochemistry, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany)

    2009-06-15

    Biodegradation of chlorobenzenes was assessed at an anoxic aquifer by combining hydrogeochemistry and stable isotope analyses. In situ microcosm analysis evidenced microbial assimilation of chlorobenzene (MCB) derived carbon and laboratory investigations asserted mineralization of MCB at low rates. Sequential dehalogenation of chlorinated benzenes may affect the isotope signature of single chlorobenzene species due to simultaneous depletion and enrichment of {sup 13}C, which complicates the evaluation of degradation. Therefore, the compound-specific isotope analysis was interpreted based on an isotope balance. The enrichment of the cumulative isotope composition of all chlorobenzenes indicated in situ biodegradation. Additionally, the relationship between hydrogeochemistry and degradation activity was investigated by principal component analysis underlining variable hydrogeochemical conditions associated with degradation activity at the plume scale. Although the complexity of the field site did not allow straightforward assessment of natural attenuation processes, the application of an integrative approach appeared relevant to characterize the in situ biodegradation potential. - Lines of evidence for in situ biodegradation of chlorinated benzenes in an anoxic aquifer by combining hydrogeochemical and stable isotope data with multivariate statistics.

  5. Sulfide Oxidation in the Anoxic Black-Sea Chemocline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    JØRGENSEN, BB; FOSSING, H.; WIRSEN, CO

    1991-01-01

    per day, occurred in anoxic water at the top of the sulfide zone concurrent with the highest rates of dark CO2 assimilation. The main soluble oxidized products of sulfide were thiosulfate (68-82%) and sulfate. Indirect evidence was presented for the formation of elemental sulfur which accumulated...... that the measured H2S oxidation rates were 4-fold higher than could be explained by the downward flux of organic carbon and too high to balance the availability of electron acceptors such as oxidized iron or manganese. A nitrate maximum at the lower boundary of the O2 zone did not extend down to the sulfide zone....

  6. Biogeochemical reactive-diffusive transport of heavy metals in Lake Coeur d'Alene sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevinc Sengoer, S.; Spycher, Nicolas F.; Ginn, Timothy R.; Sani, Rajesh K.; Peyton, Brent

    2007-01-01

    development of anoxic conditions within about a centimeter below the lake bottom. This effort provides insights on important biogeochemical processes affecting the cycling of metals in Lake Coeur d'Alene and similar metal-impacted lacustrine environments

  7. Upper Mississippi Pb as a mid-1800s chronostratigraphic marker in sediments from seasonally anoxic lakes in Eastern Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobeil, Charles; Tessier, André; Couture, Raoul-Marie

    2013-07-01

    Sediment cores from eight headwater lakes located in Southern Québec, Eastern Canada, were analyzed for Pb, stable Pb isotopes, and the radioelements 210Pb, 137Cs, 241Am and 226Ra. The depth profiles of stable Pb isotope ratios show, for the post-19th century period, the influence of several isotopically distinct anthropogenic lead sources, mainly including emissions from two Canadian smelters and from leaded gasoline combustion in Canada and in the United States. A most interesting feature of the profiles, however, is the presence of sharp stable Pb isotope ratio peaks near the depth horizon, where excess 210Pb becomes undetectable. Using a binary mixing model and assuming that natural Pb concentrations and isotopic compositions from the catchment are given by the pre-industrial sediments at the bottom of the cores, we find that a significant part of the anthropogenic Pb supplied to the sediments at this horizon originated from smelting activities in the Upper Mississippi Valley. We assess that the Pb isotope ratio peaks, also observed in the laminated sediments of the Pettaquamscutt Estuary, Rhode Island, USA, are an accurate chronostratigraphic marker for the validation of mid-19th century 210Pb-derived dates. Given that the study lakes are located up to 2000 km from the Mississippi Valley, we conclude that this isotopic Pb signal provides a widely distributed time-marker that is key to validate 210Pb chronologies in environmental archives from Eastern North America.

  8. Long-term performance and fouling analysis of full-scale direct nanofiltration (NF) installations treating anoxic groundwater

    KAUST Repository

    Beyer, Florian

    2014-10-01

    Long-term performance and fouling behavior of four full-scale nanofiltration (NF) plants, treating anoxic groundwater at 80% recovery for drinking water production, were characterized and compared with oxic NF and reverse osmosis systems. Plant operating times varied between 6 and 10 years and pretreatment was limited to 10μm pore size cartridge filtration and antiscalant dosage (2-2.5mgL-1) only. Membrane performance parameters normalized pressure drop (NPD), normalized specific water permeability (Kw) and salt retention generally were found stable over extended periods of operation (>6 months). Standard acid-base cleanings (once per year or less) were found to be sufficient to maintain satisfying operation during direct NF of the described iron rich (≤8.4mgL-1) anoxic groundwaters. Extensive autopsies of eight NF membrane elements, which had been in service since the plant startup (6-10 years), were performed to characterize and quantify the material accumulated in the membrane elements. Investigations using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), total organic carbon (TOC) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) measurements revealed a complex mixture of organic, biological and inorganic materials. The fouling layers that developed during half to one year of operation without chemical cleaning were very thin (<2. μm). Most bio(organic) accumulates were found in the lead elements of the installations while inorganic precipitates/deposits (aluminosilicates and iron(II)sulfides) were found in all autopsied membrane elements. The high solubility of reduced metal ions and the very slow biofilm development under anoxic conditions prevented rapid fouling during direct NF of the studied groundwaters. When compared to oxic NF and RO systems in general (e.g. aerated ground waters or surface waters), the operation and performance of the described anoxic installations (with minimal pretreatment) can be described as very stable. © 2014

  9. Abundant Trimethylornithine Lipids and Specific Gene Sequences Are Indicative of Planctomycete Importance at the Oxic/Anoxic Interface in Sphagnum-Dominated Northern Wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Eli K; Villanueva, Laura; Hopmans, Ellen C; Rijpstra, W Irene C; Mets, Anchelique; Dedysh, Svetlana N; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S

    2015-09-01

    Northern wetlands make up a substantial terrestrial carbon sink and are often dominated by decay-resistant Sphagnum mosses. Recent studies have shown that planctomycetes appear to be involved in degradation of Sphagnum-derived debris. Novel trimethylornithine (TMO) lipids have recently been characterized as abundant lipids in various Sphagnum wetland planctomycete isolates, but their occurrence in the environment has not yet been confirmed. We applied a combined intact polar lipid (IPL) and molecular analysis of peat cores collected from two northern wetlands (Saxnäs Mosse [Sweden] and Obukhovskoye [Russia]) in order to investigate the preferred niche and abundance of TMO-producing planctomycetes. TMOs were present throughout the profiles of Sphagnum bogs, but their concentration peaked at the oxic/anoxic interface, which coincided with a maximum abundance of planctomycete-specific 16S rRNA gene sequences. The sequences detected at the oxic/anoxic interface were affiliated with the Isosphaera group, while sequences present in the anoxic peat layers were related to an uncultured planctomycete group. Pyrosequencing-based analysis identified Planctomycetes as the major bacterial group at the oxic/anoxic interface at the Obukhovskoye peat (54% of total 16S rRNA gene sequence reads), followed by Acidobacteria (19% reads), while in the Saxnäs Mosse peat, Acidobacteria were dominant (46%), and Planctomycetes contributed to 6% of the total reads. The detection of abundant TMO lipids in planctomycetes isolated from peat bogs and the lack of TMO production by cultures of acidobacteria suggest that planctomycetes are the producers of TMOs in peat bogs. The higher accumulation of TMOs at the oxic/anoxic interface and the change in the planctomycete community with depth suggest that these IPLs could be synthesized as a response to changing redox conditions at the oxic/anoxic interface. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Uranium(IV) adsorption by natural organic matter in anoxic sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bone, Sharon E.; Dynes, James; Cliff, John B.; Barger, John

    2017-01-09

    Uranium is an important fuel source and a global environmental contaminant. It accumulates in the tetravalent state, U(IV), in anoxic sediments, including ore deposits, marine basins, and contaminated aquifers. However, very little is known about the speciation of U(IV) in low temperature geochemical environments, inhibiting the development of a conceptual model of U behavior. Until recently, U(IV) was assumed to exist predominantly as the sparingly soluble mineral uraninite (UO2) in anoxic sediments; yet studies now show that UO2 is not often dominant in these environments. However, a model of U(IV) speciation under environmentally relevant conditions has not yet been developed. Here we show that complexes of U(IV) adsorb on organic carbon and organic carbon-coated clays in an organic-rich natural substrate under field-relevant conditions. Whereas previous research assumed that the U(IV) product depended on the reduction pathway, our results demonstrate that UO2 formation can be inhibited simply by decreasing the U:solid ratio. Thus, it is the number and type of surface ligands that controls U(IV) speciation subsequent to U(VI) reduction. Projections of U transport and bioavailability, and thus its threat to human and ecosystem health, must consider retention of U(IV) ions within the local sediment environment.

  11. THE EXTREMELY HALOPHILIC MICROORGANISMS, A POSSIBLE MODEL FOR LIFE ON OTHER PLANETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergiu Fendrihan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The group of halophilic Archaea was discovered in the beginning of XX th century. They are able to live in more than 2-3 M of sodium chloride concentration that can be found in hypersaline natural lakes, in alkaline saline lakes, in man-made hypersaline mats, in rock salt, in very salted foods, on salted fish, on salted hides, in stromatolites, in saline soils. Their adaptations consist in resistance to high ionic contents with internal accumulation of K ions in order to face high Na ion content from the near environment. They belong to the Halobacteriaceae family. Their adaptation and their resistance to UV radiation and their resistance in oligotrophic conditions in rock salt, apparently over geological times, increase the possibility to find similar microorganisms in the Martian subsurface and in meteorites, and to support the panspermia theory. Some of the research of a working group in this field of activity and their possible uses are shortly reviewed here.

  12. Microplastic pollution in lakes and lake shoreline sediments - A case study on Lake Bolsena and Lake Chiusi (central Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Elke Kerstin; Paglialonga, Lisa; Czech, Elisa; Tamminga, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    Rivers and effluents have been identified as major pathways for microplastics of terrestrial sources. Moreover, lakes of different dimensions and even in remote locations contain microplastics in striking abundances. This study investigates concentrations of microplastic particles at two lakes in central Italy (Lake Bolsena, Lake Chiusi). A total number of six Manta Trawls have been carried out, two of them one day after heavy winds occurred on Lake Bolsena showing effects on particle distribution of fragments and fibers of varying size categories. Additionally, 36 sediment samples from lakeshores were analyzed for microplastic content. In the surface waters 2.68 to 3.36 particles/m(3) (Lake Chiusi) and 0.82 to 4.42 particles/m(3) (Lake Bolsena) were detected, respectively. Main differences between the lakes are attributed to lake characteristics such as surface and catchment area, depth and the presence of local wind patterns and tide range at Lake Bolsena. An event of heavy winds and moderate rainfall prior to one sampling led to an increase of concentrations at Lake Bolsena which is most probable related to lateral land-based and sewage effluent inputs. The abundances of microplastic particles in sediments vary from mean values of 112 (Lake Bolsena) to 234 particles/kg dry weight (Lake Chiusi). Lake Chiusi results reveal elevated fiber concentrations compared to those of Lake Bolsena what might be a result of higher organic content and a shift in grain size distribution towards the silt and clay fraction at the shallow and highly eutrophic Lake Chiusi. The distribution of particles along different beach levels revealed no significant differences. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Model photoautrophs isolated from a Proterozoic ocean analog - aerobic life under anoxic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, T. L.; de Beer, D.; Klatt, J.; Macalady, J.; Weber, M.; Lott, C.; Chennu, A.

    2016-12-01

    The 1-2 billion year delay before the final rise of oxygen at the end of the Proterozoic represents an important gap in our understanding of ancient biogeochemical cycling. Primary production fueled by sulfide-dependent anoxygenic photosynthesis, including the activity of metabolically versatile cyanobacteria, has been invoked as a mechanism for sustaining low atmospheric O2 throughout much of the Proterozoic. However, we understand very little about photoautotrophs that inhabit Proterozoic-like environments present on Earth today. Here we report on the isolation and characterization of a cyanobacterium and a green sulfur bacterium that are the dominant members of pinnacle mats in Little Salt Spring—a karst sinkhole in Florida with perennially low levels of dissolved oxygen and sulfide. The red pinnacle mats bloom in the anoxic basin of the sinkhole and receive light that is of very poor quality to support photosynthesis. Characterization of the isolates is consistent with observations of oxygenic and anoxygenic photosynthesis in situ—both organisms perform anoxygenic photosynthesis under conditions of very low light quality and quantity. Oxygenic photosynthesis by the cyanobacterium isolate is inhibited by the presence of sulfide and under optimal light conditions, rates of anoxygenic photosynthesis are nearly double that of oxygenic photosynthesis. The green sulfur bacterium is tolerant of oxygen and has a very low affinity for sulfide. In Little Salt Spring, oxygenic photosynthesis occurs for only four hours a day and the water column remains anoxic because of a continuous supply of sulfide. Isolation and characterization of these photoautotrophs combined with our high resolution microsensor data in situ highlight microbial biogeochemical cycling in this exceptional site where aerobic microorganisms persist in a largely anoxic ecosystem.

  14. Temporal acclimation of Microchloropsis gaditana CCMP526 in response to hypersalinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikaichamy, Anbarasu; Deore, Pranali; Srivastava, Sanjeeva; Coppel, Ross; Bulach, Dieter; Beardall, John; Noronha, Santosh

    2018-04-01

    Evaporation from culture ponds and raceways can subject algae to hypersalinity stress, and this is exacerbated by global warming. We investigated the effect of salinity on a marine microalga, Microchloropsis gaditana, which is of industrial significance because of its high lipid-accumulating capability. Both short-term (hours) and medium-term (days) effects of salinity were studied across various salinities (37.5, 55, 70 and 100 PSU). Salinity above 55 PSU suppressed cell growth and specific growth rate was significantly reduced at 100 PSU. Photosynthesis (F v /F m , rETR max and I k ) was severely affected at high salinity conditions. Total carbohydrate per cell increased ∼1.7-fold after 24 h, which is consistent with previous findings that salinity induces osmolyte production to counter osmotic shock. In addition, accumulation of lipid increased by ∼4.6-fold in response to salinity. Our findings indicate a possible mechanism of acclimation to salinity, opening up new frontiers for osmolytes in pharmacological and cosmetics applications. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Metabolic profiling of heat or anoxic stress in mouse C2C12 myotubes using multinuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Straadt, Ida K; Young, Jette F; Petersen, Bent O

    2010-01-01

    to anaerobic metabolism due to inhibition of the aerobic pathway in the mitochondria. Conversely, lower levels of unlabeled ((12)C) lactate were apparent at increasing severity of stress, which indicate that lactate is released from the myotubes to the medium. In conclusion, the metabolites identified......In the present study, the metabolic effects of heat and anoxic stress in myotubes from the mouse cell line C2C12 were investigated by using a combination of (13)C, (1)H, and (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and enrichment with [(13)C]-glucose. Both the (13)C and the (1)H NMR...... spectra showed reduced levels of the amino acids alanine, glutamate, and aspartate after heat or anoxic stress. The decreases were smallest at 42 degrees C, larger at 45 degrees C, and most pronounced after anoxic conditions. In addition, in both the (1)H and the (31)P NMR spectra, decreases in the high...

  16. Natronorubrum sediminis sp. nov., an archaeon isolated from a saline lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, M C; Castillo, A M; Corral, P; Minegishi, H; Ventosa, A

    2010-08-01

    Two novel haloalkaliphilic archaea, strains CG-6T and CG-4, were isolated from sediment of the hypersaline Lake Chagannor in Inner Mongolia, China. Cells of the two strains were pleomorphic, non-motile and strictly aerobic. They required at least 2.5 M NaCl for growth, with optimum growth at 3.4 M NaCl. They grew at pH 8.0-11.0, with optimum growth at pH 9.0. Hypotonic treatment with less than 1.5 M NaCl caused cell lysis. The two strains had similar polar lipid compositions, possessing C20C20 and C20C25 derivatives of phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylglycerol phosphate methyl ester. No glycolipids were detected. Comparison of 16S rRNA gene sequences and morphological features placed them in the genus Natronorubrum. 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities to strains of recognized species of the genus Natronorubrum were 96.2-93.8%. Detailed phenotypic characterization and DNA-DNA hybridization studies revealed that the two strains belong to a novel species in the genus Natronorubrum, for which the name Natronorubrum sediminis sp. nov. is proposed; the type strain is CG-6T (=CECT 7487T =CGMCC 1.8981T =JCM 15982T).

  17. Arsenic in an alkaline AMD treatment sludge: Characterization and stability under prolonged anoxic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beauchemin, Suzanne; Fiset, Jean-Francois; Poirier, Glenn; Ablett, James

    2010-01-01

    Lime treatment of acid mine drainage (AMD) generates large volumes of neutralization sludge that are often stored under water covers. The sludge consists mainly of calcite, gypsum and a widespread ferrihydrite-like Fe phase with several associated species of metal(loid) contaminants. The long-term stability of metal(loid)s in this chemically ill-defined material remains unknown. In this study, the stability and speciation of As in AMD sludge subjected to prolonged anoxic conditions is determined. The total As concentration in the sludge is 300 mg kg -1 . In the laboratory, three distinct water cover treatments were imposed on the sludge to induce different redox conditions (100%N 2 , 100%N 2 + glucose, 95%N 2 :5%H 2 ). These treatments were compared against a control of oxidized, water-saturated sludge. Electron micro-probe (EMP) analysis and spatially resolved synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) results indicate that As is dominantly associated with Fe in the sludge. In all treatments and throughout the experiment, measured concentrations of dissolved As were less than 5 μg L -1 . Dissolved Mn concentration in the N 2 + glucose treatment increased significantly compared to other treatments. Manganese and As K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy (XANES) analyses showed that Mn was the redox-active element in the solid-phase, while As was stable. Arsenic(V) was still the dominant species in all water-covered sludges after 9 months of anoxic treatments. In contrast, Mn(IV) in the original sludge was partially reduced into Mn(II) in all water-covered sludges. The effect was most pronounced in the N 2 + glucose treatment, suggesting microbial reduction. Micro-scale SXRF and XANES analysis of the treated sludge showed that Mn(II) accumulated in areas already enriched in Fe and As. Overall, the study shows that AMD sludges remain stable under prolonged anoxic conditions. External sources of chemical reductants or soluble C were needed to induce

  18. Nutrient Fluxes From Profundal Sediment of Ultra-Oligotrophic Lake Tahoe, California/Nevada: Implications for Water Quality and Management in a Changing Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beutel, Marc W.; Horne, Alexander J.

    2018-03-01

    A warming climate is expected to lead to stronger thermal stratification, less frequent deep mixing, and greater potential for bottom water anoxia in deep, temperate oligotrophic lakes. As a result, there is growing interest in understanding nutrient cycling at the profundal sediment-water interface of these rare ecosystems. This paper assessed nutrient content and nutrient flux rates from profundal sediment at Lake Tahoe, California/Nevada, USA. Sediment is a large reservoir of nutrients, with the upper 5 cm containing reduced nitrogen (˜6,300 metric tons) and redox-sensitive phosphorus (˜710 metric tons) equivalent to ˜15 times the annual external load. Experimental results indicate that if deep water in Lake Tahoe goes anoxic, profundal sediment will release appreciable amounts of phosphate (0.13-0.29 mg P/m2·d), ammonia (0.49 mg N/m2·d), and iron to overlaying water. Assuming a 10 year duration of bottom water anoxia followed by a deep-water mixing event, water column phosphate, and ammonia concentrations would increase by an estimated 1.6 µg P/L and 2.9 µg N/L, nearly doubling ambient concentrations. Based on historic nutrient enrichment assays this could lead to a ˜40% increase in algal growth. Iron release could have the dual effect of alleviating nitrate limitation on algal growth while promoting the formation of fine iron oxyhydroxide particles that degrade water clarity. If the depth and frequency of lake mixing decrease in the future as hydrodynamic models suggest, large-scale in-lake management strategies that impede internal nutrient loading in Lake Tahoe, such as bottom water oxygen addition or aluminum salt addition, may need to be considered.

  19. Metabolism in anoxic permeable sediments is dominated by eukaryotic dark fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke, Michael F.; Marriott, Philip J.; Glud, Ronnie N.; Hasler-Sheetal, Harald; Kamalanathan, Manoj; Beardall, John; Greening, Chris; Cook, Perran L. M.

    2017-01-01

    Permeable sediments are common across continental shelves and are critical contributors to marine biogeochemical cycling. Organic matter in permeable sediments is dominated by microalgae, which as eukaryotes have different anaerobic metabolic pathways to bacteria and archaea. Here we present analyses of flow-through reactor experiments showing that dissolved inorganic carbon is produced predominantly as a result of anaerobic eukaryotic metabolic activity. In our experiments, anaerobic production of dissolved inorganic carbon was consistently accompanied by large dissolved H2 production rates, suggesting the presence of fermentation. The production of both dissolved inorganic carbon and H2 persisted following administration of broad spectrum bactericidal antibiotics, but ceased following treatment with metronidazole. Metronidazole inhibits the ferredoxin/hydrogenase pathway of fermentative eukaryotic H2 production, suggesting that pathway as the source of H2 and dissolved inorganic carbon production. Metabolomic analysis showed large increases in lipid production at the onset of anoxia, consistent with documented pathways of anoxic dark fermentation in microalgae. Cell counts revealed a predominance of microalgae in the sediments. H2 production was observed in dark anoxic cultures of diatoms (Fragilariopsis sp.) and a chlorophyte (Pyramimonas) isolated from the study site, substantiating the hypothesis that microalgae undertake fermentation. We conclude that microalgal dark fermentation could be an important energy-conserving pathway in permeable sediments.

  20. Complete genome sequence of Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus strain AHT2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melton, Emily Denise; Sorokin, Dimitry Y.; Overmars, Lex; Chertkov, Olga; Clum, Alicia; Pillay, Manoj; Ivanova, Natalia; Shapiro, Nicole; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Woyke, Tanja; Lapidus, Alla L.; Muyzer, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus strain AHT2T is a strictly anaerobic sulfidogenic haloalkaliphile isolated from a composite sediment sample of eight hypersaline alkaline lakes in the Wadi al Natrun valley in the Egyptian Libyan Desert. D. alkaliphilus AHT2T is Gram-negative and

  1. Inducing the Alternative Oxidase Forms Part of the Molecular Strategy of Anoxic Survival in Freshwater Bivalves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusseppone, Maria S.; Rocchetta, Iara; Sabatini, Sebastian E.; Luquet, Carlos M.; Ríos de Molina, Maria del Carmen; Held, Christoph; Abele, Doris

    2018-01-01

    Hypoxia in freshwater ecosystems is spreading as a consequence of global change, including pollution and eutrophication. In the Patagonian Andes, a decline in precipitation causes reduced lake water volumes and stagnant conditions that limit oxygen transport and exacerbate hypoxia below the upper mixed layer. We analyzed the molecular and biochemical response of the North Patagonian bivalve Diplodon chilensis after 10 days of experimental anoxia (<0.2 mg O2/L), hypoxia (2 mg O2/L), and normoxia (9 mg O2/L). Specifically, we investigated the expression of an alternative oxidase (AOX) pathway assumed to shortcut the regular mitochondrial electron transport system (ETS) during metabolic rate depression (MRD) in hypoxia-tolerant invertebrates. Whereas, the AOX system was strongly upregulated during anoxia in gills, ETS activities and energy mobilization decreased [less transcription of glycogen phosphorylase (GlyP) and succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) in gills and mantle]. Accumulation of succinate and induction of malate dehydrogenase (MDH) activity could indicate activation of anaerobic mitochondrial pathways to support anoxic survival in D. chilensis. Oxidative stress [protein carbonylation, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) expression] and apoptotic intensity (caspase 3/7 activity) decreased, whereas an unfolded protein response (HSP90) was induced under anoxia. This is the first clear evidence of the concerted regulation of the AOX and ETS genes in a hypoxia-tolerant freshwater bivalve and yet another example that exposure to hypoxia and anoxia is not necessarily accompanied by oxidative stress in hypoxia-tolerant mollusks. PMID:29527172

  2. Inducing the Alternative Oxidase Forms Part of the Molecular Strategy of Anoxic Survival in Freshwater Bivalves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria S. Yusseppone

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia in freshwater ecosystems is spreading as a consequence of global change, including pollution and eutrophication. In the Patagonian Andes, a decline in precipitation causes reduced lake water volumes and stagnant conditions that limit oxygen transport and exacerbate hypoxia below the upper mixed layer. We analyzed the molecular and biochemical response of the North Patagonian bivalve Diplodon chilensis after 10 days of experimental anoxia (<0.2 mg O2/L, hypoxia (2 mg O2/L, and normoxia (9 mg O2/L. Specifically, we investigated the expression of an alternative oxidase (AOX pathway assumed to shortcut the regular mitochondrial electron transport system (ETS during metabolic rate depression (MRD in hypoxia-tolerant invertebrates. Whereas, the AOX system was strongly upregulated during anoxia in gills, ETS activities and energy mobilization decreased [less transcription of glycogen phosphorylase (GlyP and succinate dehydrogenase (SDH in gills and mantle]. Accumulation of succinate and induction of malate dehydrogenase (MDH activity could indicate activation of anaerobic mitochondrial pathways to support anoxic survival in D. chilensis. Oxidative stress [protein carbonylation, glutathione peroxidase (GPx expression] and apoptotic intensity (caspase 3/7 activity decreased, whereas an unfolded protein response (HSP90 was induced under anoxia. This is the first clear evidence of the concerted regulation of the AOX and ETS genes in a hypoxia-tolerant freshwater bivalve and yet another example that exposure to hypoxia and anoxia is not necessarily accompanied by oxidative stress in hypoxia-tolerant mollusks.

  3. Sedimentology, Mineralogy, Morphology, and Characterization of Purple Non-Sulfur Bacteria Communities from Modern Hypersaline Microbial Mats in Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez Colon, B. J.; Rivera-Lopez, E. O.; Ramirez-Martinez, W. R.; Rios-Velazquez, C.; Perez-Valentin, K. A.

    2017-12-01

    Microbial mats are organosedimentary structures which house complex guilds of microbial communities, held together by a gelatinous exopolymeric substance (EPS). This biofilm contributes to the formation of laminations by binding and trapping sediments, as well as in-situ organomineralization. Microbial mats commonly thrive in extreme habitats, such as the hypersaline environments, which have been studied throughout several coastal regions in the Caribbean. This project aims to study the morphology, sedimentology, and mineralogy of five different modern hypersaline microbial mats from Puerto Rico and Anegada that have not yet been studied, to assess their differences/similarities. At the same time, we intent to isolate and characterize purple non-sulfur bacteria (PNSB), which is an anoxyphototrophic microorganism that contributes to the pink pigmentation observed in the second layer of a typical microbial mat. Different layers within each mat were separated, dissected and dissolved to remove all organic material. The resulting sediment was then analyzed mineralogically using X-ray diffraction, and used to make petrographic thin sections. To isolate PNSB candidates, serial dilutions followed by filtration were performed to extracted sections from the pink layer of each mat. The samples were planted in Petri dishes with marine media and placed in Anaerobic Jars. Colonies Descriptions, Gram stain and molecular analysis using 16S rDNA gene was performed. Preliminary results show a diversity of mat morphologies throughout the ponds, similar to what has been observed in other hypersaline ponds and marshes in the Caribbean. Sedimentary analysis shows that the mats from Puerto Rico have similar allochthonous material (e.g. Halimeda sp. fragments). Microcodium fabrics, conoform structures, and hemispheroidal morphologies were observed as well. In Anegada, lithified microbialites were observed in the Red Pond location. Mineralogically, all samples were similar except for the

  4. Rock magnetic properties of sediments from Lake Sanabria and its catchment (NW Spain): paleoenvironmental implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrasoaña, J. C.; Borruel, V.; Gómez-Paccard, M.; Rico, M.; Valero-Garces, B.; Moreno-Caballud, A.; Soto, R.

    2013-12-01

    Lake Sanabria is located in the NW Spanish mountains at 1000 m a.s.l., and constitutes the largest lake of glacial origin in the Iberian Peninsula. Here we present an environmental magnetic study of a Late Pleistocene-Holocene sediment core from Lake Sanabria and from different lithologies that crop out in its catchment, which includes Paleozoic plutonic, metamorphic and vulcanosedimentary rocks, and Quaternary deposits of glacial origin. This study was designed to complement sedimentologic and geochemical studies aimed at unraveling the climatic evolution of the NW Iberian Peninsula during the last deglaciation. Our results indicate that magnetite and pyrrhotite dominate the magnetic assemblage of both the sediments from the lower half of the studied sequence (25.6 - 13 cal kyr BP) deposited in a proglacial environment, and the Paleozoic rocks that make up most of the catchment of the lake. The occurrence of these minerals both in the catchment rocks and in the lake sediments indicates that sedimentation was then driven by the erosion of a glacial flour, which suffered minimal chemical transformation in response to a rapid and short routing to the lake. Sediments from the upper half of the studied sequence, accumulated after 12.4 cal kyr BP in a fluviolacustrine environment, contain magnetite and greigite. This points to a prominent role of post-depositional reductive dissolution, driven by a sharp increase in the accumulation of organic matter into the lake and the creation of anoxic conditions in the sediments, in shaping the magnetic assemblage of Holocene sediments. Pyrrhotite is stable under reducing conditions as opposed to magnetite, which is unstable. We therefore interpret that previous pedogenic processes occurred in the then deglaciated catchment of the lake were responsible for the oxidation of pyrrhotite and authigenic formation of magnetite, which survived subsequent reductive diagenesis given its initial larger concentrations. This interpretation is

  5. Geochemical characterization and miospore biochronostratigraphy of the Frasnian anoxic event in the Parnaiba basin, Northeast Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, R.; De Melo, J.H.G.; Alves, D.B.; Loboziak, S.

    1995-01-01

    Radioactive shales of Frasnian age in the Parnaiba Basin present high concentrations of organic matter. They correspond to a condensed section related to the Devonian maximum marine transgression. Combined geochemical, palynological and clay mineral data point out to a dominant algal contribution in the composition of the organic matter, as well as to anoxic depositional settings. This radioactive shale interval corresponds to the onset of a long-lasting, global anoxic event which was to be intensified in the Late Frasnian, and thus can be regarded as a marker for chronostratigraphic correlations. It includes the main source rocks of Devonian age in the Palaeozoic basins of north Brazil, and therefore represents a target of potential interest for hydrocarbon exploration. (authors). 16 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab., 17 photos

  6. Geochemical characterization and miospore biochronostratigraphy of the Frasnian anoxic event in the Parnaiba basin, Northeast Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, R.; De Melo, J.H.G.; Alves, D.B. [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Loboziak, S. [Lille-1 Univ., 59 - Villeneuve-d`Ascq (France)

    1995-12-31

    Radioactive shales of Frasnian age in the Parnaiba Basin present high concentrations of organic matter. They correspond to a condensed section related to the Devonian maximum marine transgression. Combined geochemical, palynological and clay mineral data point out to a dominant algal contribution in the composition of the organic matter, as well as to anoxic depositional settings. This radioactive shale interval corresponds to the onset of a long-lasting, global anoxic event which was to be intensified in the Late Frasnian, and thus can be regarded as a marker for chronostratigraphic correlations. It includes the main source rocks of Devonian age in the Palaeozoic basins of north Brazil, and therefore represents a target of potential interest for hydrocarbon exploration. (authors). 16 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab., 17 photos.

  7. Deliberations on Microbial Life in the Subglacial Lake Vostok, East Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulat, S.; Alekhina, I.; Lipenkov, V.; Lukin, V.; Marie, D.; Petit, J.

    2004-12-01

    The objective was to estimate microbial contents of accretion (lake originating) ice from the Lake Vostok buried beneath 4-km thick East Antarctic ice sheet with the ultimate goal to discover microbial life in this extreme icy environment featured by no light, close to freezing point temperature, ultra-low DOC contents, and an excess of oxygen. The PCR based bacterial and archaeal 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing constrained by Forensic Biology and Ancient DNA research criteria was used as a main approach. Epifluorescent and confocal microscopies as well as flow cytometry were implemented. DNA study showed that the accretion ice is essentially bacteria- and archaea-free. Up to now, the only accretion ice type 1 featured by mica-clay sediments presence and namely one horizon of four studied (3607m) allowed the recovery a few bacterial phylotypes. This unexpectedly included the chemolithoautotrophic thermophile Hydrogenophilus thermoluteolus and two more unclassified phylotypes all passing numerous contaminant controls. In contrast, the deeper and cleaner accretion ice 2 (three cores) with no sediments presence and near detection limit gas contents gave no reliable signals. The microbes detected in accretion ice 1 are unbelievable to resist an excess of oxygen in the lake water body (700 - 1300 mg O2/l). They are supposed to be thriving in rather warm anoxic sediments in deep faults at the lake bottom and sporadically flushing out along with sediments to the lake veins in a shallow depth bay due to a seismotectonic activity likely operating in the lake environment. A few geophysical and geological evidences support this scenario. In the bay the presence of mica-clay sediments, higher accretion rate due to relief rise and likely oxygen-depleted upper layer of water can provide microbes with a chance to escape the high oxygen tension by the rapid entrapment into accretion ice 1. Sediment-free accretion ice 2, which forms above a deeper part of the lake, shows no

  8. Indications of human activity from amino acid and amino sugar analyses on Holocene sediments from lake Lonar, central India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, P.; Gaye, B.; Wiesner, M.; Prasad, S.; Basavaiah, N.; Stebich, M.; Anoop, A.; Riedel, N.; Brauer, A.

    2012-04-01

    The DFG funded HIMPAC (Himalaya: Modern and Past Climates) programme aims to reconstruct Holocene Indian Monsoon climate using a multi-proxy and multi-archive approach. First investigations made on sediments from a ca. 10 m long core covering the whole Holocene taken from the lake Lonar in central India's state Maharashtra, Buldhana District, serve to identify changes in sedimentation, lake chemistry, local vegetation and regional to supra-regional climate patterns. Lake Lonar occupies the floor of an impact crater that formed on the ~ 65 Ma old basalt flows of the Deccan Traps. It covers an area of ca. 1 km2 and is situated in India's core monsoon area. The modern lake has a maximum depth of about 5 m, is highly alkaline, and hyposaline, grouped in the Na-Cl-CO3 subtype of saline lakes. No out-flowing stream is present and only three small streams feed the lake, resulting in a lake level highly sensitive to precipitation and evaporation. The lake is eutrophic and stratified throughout most of the year with sub- to anoxic waters below 2 m depth. In this study the core sediments were analysed for their total amino acid (AA) and amino sugar (AS) content, the amino acid bound C and N percentage of organic C and total N in the sediment and the distribution of individual amino acids. The results roughly show three zones within the core separated by distinct changes in their AA content and distribution. (i) The bottom part of the core from ca. 12000 cal a BP to 11400 cal a BP with very low AA and AS percentage indicating high lithogenic contribution, most probably related to dry conditions. (ii) From 11400 cal a BP to 1200 cal a BP the sediments show moderate AA and AS percentages and low values for the ratios of proteinogenic AAs to their non-proteinogenic degradation products (e.g. ASP/β-ALA; GLU/γ-ABA). (iii) The top part of the core (land use. This hypothesis is corroborated by the dating of more than 10 temple ruins surrounding the lake, which were built in the 12

  9. Phenotypic characterization and 16S rDNA identification of culturable non-obligate halophilic bacterial communities from a hypersaline lake, La Sal del Rey, in extreme South Texas (USA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Kristen; Zaidan, Frederic; Elizondo, Omar R; Lowe, Kristine L

    2012-02-02

    La Sal del Rey ("the King's Salt") is one of several naturally-occurring salt lakes in Hidalgo County, Texas and is part of the Lower Rio Grande Valley National Wildlife Refuge. The research objective was to isolate and characterize halophilic microorganisms from La Sal del Rey. Water samples were collected from the lake and a small creek that feeds into the lake. Soil samples were collected from land adjacent to the water sample locations. Sample salinity was determined using a refractometer. Samples were diluted and cultured on a synthetic saline medium to grow halophilic bacteria. The density of halophiles was estimated by viable plate counts. A collection of isolates was selected, gram-stained, tested for catalase, and characterized using API 20E® test strips. Isolates were putatively identified by sequencing the 16S rDNA. Carbon source utilization by the microbial community from each sample site was examined using EcoPlate™ assays and the carbon utilization total activity of the community was determined. Results showed that salinity ranged from 4 parts per thousand (ppt) at the lake water source to 420 ppt in water samples taken just along the lake shore. The density of halophilic bacteria in water samples ranged from 1.2 × 102 - 5.2 × 103 colony forming units per ml (cfu ml-1) whereas the density in soil samples ranged from 4.0 × 105 - 2.5 × 106 colony forming units per gram (cfu g-1). In general, as salinity increased the density of the bacterial community decreased. Microbial communities from water and soil samples were able to utilize 12 - 31 carbon substrates. The greatest number of substrates utilized was by water-borne communities compared to soil-based communities, especially at lower salinities. The majority of bacteria isolated were gram-negative, catalase-positive, rods. Biochemical profiles constructed from API 20E® test strips showed that bacterial isolates from low-salinity water samples (4 ppt) showed the greatest phenotypic diversity

  10. Terrestrial CDOM in Lakes of Yamal Peninsula: Connection to Lake and Lake Catchment Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yury Dvornikov

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we analyze interactions in lake and lake catchment systems of a continuous permafrost area. We assessed colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM absorption at 440 nm (a(440CDOM and absorption slope (S300–500 in lakes using field sampling and optical remote sensing data for an area of 350 km2 in Central Yamal, Siberia. Applying a CDOM algorithm (ratio of green and red band reflectance for two high spatial resolution multispectral GeoEye-1 and Worldview-2 satellite images, we were able to extrapolate the a(λCDOM data from 18 lakes sampled in the field to 356 lakes in the study area (model R2 = 0.79. Values of a(440CDOM in 356 lakes varied from 0.48 to 8.35 m−1 with a median of 1.43 m−1. This a(λCDOM dataset was used to relate lake CDOM to 17 lake and lake catchment parameters derived from optical and radar remote sensing data and from digital elevation model analysis in order to establish the parameters controlling CDOM in lakes on the Yamal Peninsula. Regression tree model and boosted regression tree analysis showed that the activity of cryogenic processes (thermocirques in the lake shores and lake water level were the two most important controls, explaining 48.4% and 28.4% of lake CDOM, respectively (R2 = 0.61. Activation of thermocirques led to a large input of terrestrial organic matter and sediments from catchments and thawed permafrost to lakes (n = 15, mean a(440CDOM = 5.3 m−1. Large lakes on the floodplain with a connection to Mordy-Yakha River received more CDOM (n = 7, mean a(440CDOM = 3.8 m−1 compared to lakes located on higher terraces.

  11. Cross-regulation by CrcZ RNA controls anoxic biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusic, Petra; Tata, Muralidhar; Wolfinger, Michael T.; Sonnleitner, Elisabeth; Häussler, Susanne; Bläsi, Udo

    2016-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) can thrive in anaerobic biofilms in the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Here, we show that CrcZ is the most abundant PA14 RNA bound to the global regulator Hfq in anoxic biofilms grown in cystic fibrosis sputum medium. Hfq was crucial for anoxic biofilm formation. This observation complied with an RNAseq based transcriptome analysis and follow up studies that implicated Hfq in regulation of a central step preceding denitrification. CrcZ is known to act as a decoy that sequesters Hfq during relief of carbon catabolite repression, which in turn alleviates Hfq-mediated translational repression of catabolic genes. We therefore inferred that CrcZ indirectly impacts on biofilm formation by competing for Hfq. This hypothesis was supported by the findings that over-production of CrcZ mirrored the biofilm phenotype of the hfq deletion mutant, and that deletion of the crcZ gene augmented biofilm formation. To our knowledge, this is the first example where competition for Hfq by CrcZ cross-regulates an Hfq-dependent physiological process unrelated to carbon metabolism.

  12. Geochemistry, water balance, and stable isotopes of a “clean” pit lake at an abandoned tungsten mine, Montana, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gammons, Christopher H.; Pape, Barbara L.; Parker, Stephen R.; Poulson, Simon R.; Blank, Carrine E.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • An abandoned open pit mine is now a 30 m deep lake with excellent water quality. • Concentrations of sulfate, nutrients, and most trace metals are extremely low. • Based on water isotopes, the lake is 30% evaporated with a 2.5 yr residence time. • Stable isotopes of DIC and DO track in-lake bio-geochemical processes. • Phytoplankton are active at depths as great as 20 m. - Abstract: The Calvert Mine is a small tungsten-rich (scheelite) skarn deposit in a remote, mountainous region of southwest Montana, USA. The open-pit mine closed in the 1970s and subsequently flooded to form a pit lake that is roughly conical in shape, 30 m deep and 120 m in diameter, with no surface inlet or outlet. The lake is holomictic with a groundwater flow-through hydrology and an estimated residence time of 2.5–5 y. Water isotopes show that the lake is at an approximate steady state with respect to water balance and has experienced 30% evaporation. The lake has a near-neutral pH, exceptional clarity, and extremely low concentrations of nutrients, sulfate, and most metals, including tungsten. Manganese concentrations are slightly elevated and increase with depth towards the sediment–water interface. Despite seasonally anoxic conditions in the deep water, dissolved Fe concentrations are orders of magnitude lower than Mn, suggesting that insufficient organic carbon is present in the sediment of this oligotrophic lake to drive bacterial Fe reduction. Based on stable isotope fingerprinting, diffuse seepage that enters a nearby headwater stream at the base of a large waste-rock pile can be directly linked to the partially evaporated pit lake. However, this seepage has neutral pH and low metal concentrations, and poses no threats to the environment. Stable isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and dissolved oxygen (DO) are used to track the relative importance of photosynthesis and respiration with depth. In summer, a zone of high productivity exists near the

  13. Status and diurnal activity budget of non-breeding White-headed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In Algeria, the Globally Endangered White-headed Duck Oxyura leucocephala is resident throughout the year in the coastal wetlands of north-east Algeria and the Hauts Plateaux, where it occupies habitats that range from freshwater ponds and brackish marshes to hypersaline lakes. In autumn and winter, at two study sites ...

  14. SAR Imagery Applied to the Monitoring of Hyper-Saline Deposits: Death Valley Example (CA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasne, Yannick; Paillou, Philippe; Freeman, Anthony; Chapman, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    The present study aims at understanding the influence of salinity on the dielectric constant of soils and then on the backscattering coeff cients recorded by airborne/spaceborne SAR systems. Based on dielectric measurements performed over hyper-saline deposits in Death Valley (CA), as well as laboratory electromagnetic characterization of salts and water mixtures, we used the dielectric constants as input parameters of analytical IEM simulations to model both the amplitude and phase behaviors of SAR signal at C, and L-bands. Our analytical simulations allow to reproduce specif c copolar signatures recorded in SAR data, corresponding to the Cottonball Basin saltpan. We also propose the copolar backscattering ratio and phase difference as indicators of moistened and salt-affected soils. More precisely, we show that these copolar indicators should allow to monitor the seasonal variations of the dielectric properties of saline deposits.

  15. Effect of resuspension on the release of heavy metals and water chemistry in anoxic and oxic sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Kyung-Yup; Kim, Hong-Seok; Hwang, Inseong [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    Two types of river sediments with contrasting characteristics (anoxic or oxic) were resuspended and the release of heavy metals and changes in water chemistry were investigated. During resuspension of the anoxic sediment, the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration and redox potential of the water layer decreased abruptly within the first 1 min, followed by increases toward the end of the resuspension period. Heavy metals were released rapidly in the first 6 h, probably due to the oxidation of acid volatile sulfide (AVS) of the anoxic sediment, and then the aqueous phase concentrations of the heavy metals decreased due to resorption onto the sediment until the 12-h point. During resuspension of the oxic sediment, the DO concentration and redox potential remained relatively constant in the oxic ranges. The heavy metals were released from the oxic sediment gradually during a 24-h resuspension period. The temporal maximum concentrations of Ni, Cu, Zn, and Cd in the aqueous phases in both experiments frequently exceeded the USEPA water quality criteria or the water quality guidelines of Australia and New Zealand. This suggests that a resuspension event could bring about temporal water quality deterioration in the two sediment environments. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Sulfate Reduction and Thiosulfate Transformations in a Cyanobacterial Mat during a Diel Oxygen Cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    JØRGENSEN, BB

    1994-01-01

    Bacterial sulfate reduction and transformations of thiosulfate were studied with radiotracers in a Microcoleus chthono-plastes-dominated microbial mat growing in a hypersaline pond at the Red Sea. The study showed how a diel cycle of oxygen evolution affected respiration by sulfate-reducing bacte......Bacterial sulfate reduction and transformations of thiosulfate were studied with radiotracers in a Microcoleus chthono-plastes-dominated microbial mat growing in a hypersaline pond at the Red Sea. The study showed how a diel cycle of oxygen evolution affected respiration by sulfate......-reducing bacteria and the metabolism of thiosulfate through oxidative and reductive pathways. Sulfate reduction occurred in both oxic and anoxic layers of the mat and varied diurnally, apparently according to temperature rather than to oxygen. Time course experiments showed that the radiotracer method...... underestimated sulfate reduction in the oxic zone due to rapid reoxidation of the produced sulfide. Extremely high reduction rates of up to 10 mu mol cm(-3) d(-1) were measured just below the euphotic zone. Although thiosulfate was simultaneously oxidized, reduced and disproportionated by bacteria in all layers...

  17. Sanctuaries for lake trout in the Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Jon G.; Eshenroder, Randy L.; Hartman, Wilbur L.

    1987-01-01

    Populations of lake trout, severely depleted in Lake Superior and virtually extirpated from the other Great Lakes because of sea lamprey predation and intense fishing, are now maintained by annual plantings of hatchery-reared fish in Lakes Michigan, Huron, and Ontario and parts of Lake Superior. The extensive coastal areas of the Great Lakes and proximity to large populations resulted in fishing pressure on planted lake trout heavy enough to push annual mortality associated with sport and commercial fisheries well above the critical level needed to reestablish self-sustaining stocks. The interagency, international program for rehabilitating lake trout includes controlling sea lamprey abundance, stocking hatchery-reared lake trout, managing the catch, and establishing sanctuaries where harvest is prohibited. Three lake trout sanctuaries have been established in Lake Michigan: the Fox Island Sanctuary of 121, 500 ha, in the Chippewa-Ottawa Treaty fishing zone in the northern region of the lake; the Milwaukee Reef Sanctuary of 160, 000 ha in midlake, in boundary waters of Michigan and Wisconsin; and Julian's Reef Sanctuary of 6, 500 ha, in Illinois waters. In northern Lake Huron, Drummond Island Sanctuary of 55, 000 ha is two thirds in Indian treaty-ceded waters in Michigan and one third in Ontario waters of Canada. A second sanctuary, Six Fathom Bank-Yankee Reef Sanctuary, in central Lake Huron contains 168, 000 ha. Sanctuary status for the Canadian areas remains to be approved by the Provincial government. In Lake Superior, sanctuaries protect the spawning grounds of Gull Island Shoal (70, 000 ha) and Devils Island Shoal (44, 000 ha) in Wisconsin's Apostle Island area. These seven sanctuaries, established by the several States and agreed upon by the States, Indian tribes, the U.S. Department of the Interior, and the Province of Ontario, contribute toward solving an interjurisdictional fishery problem.

  18. Macro and Microelements Drive Diversity and Composition of Prokaryotic and Fungal Communities in Hypersaline Sediments and Saline-Alkaline Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kaihui; Ding, Xiaowei; Tang, Xiaofei; Wang, Jianjun; Li, Wenjun; Yan, Qingyun; Liu, Zhenghua

    2018-01-01

    Understanding the effects of environmental factors on microbial communities is critical for microbial ecology, but it remains challenging. In this study, we examined the diversity (alpha diversity) and community compositions (beta diversity) of prokaryotes and fungi in hypersaline sediments and salinized soils from northern China. Environmental variables were highly correlated, but they differed significantly between the sediments and saline soils. The compositions of prokaryotic and fungal communities in the hypersaline sediments were different from those in adjacent saline-alkaline soils, indicating a habitat-specific microbial distribution pattern. The macroelements (S, P, K, Mg, and Fe) and Ca were, respectively, correlated closely with the alpha diversity of prokaryotes and fungi, while the macronutrients (e.g., Na, S, P, and Ca) were correlated with the prokaryotic and fungal beta-diversity ( P ≤ 0.05). And, the nine microelements (e.g., Al, Ba, Co, Hg, and Mn) and micronutrients (Ba, Cd, and Sr) individually shaped the alpha diversity of prokaryotes and fungi, while the six microelements (e.g., As, Ba, Cr, and Ge) and only the trace elements (Cr and Cu), respectively, influenced the beta diversity of prokaryotes and fungi ( P analysis (VPA) showed that environmental variables jointly explained 55.49% and 32.27% of the total variation for the prokaryotic and fungal communities, respectively. Together, our findings demonstrate that the diversity and community composition of the prokaryotes and fungi were driven by different macro and microelements in saline habitats, and that geochemical elements could more widely regulate the diversity and community composition of prokaryotes than these of fungi.

  19. Macro and Microelements Drive Diversity and Composition of Prokaryotic and Fungal Communities in Hypersaline Sediments and Saline–Alkaline Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kaihui; Ding, Xiaowei; Tang, Xiaofei; Wang, Jianjun; Li, Wenjun; Yan, Qingyun; Liu, Zhenghua

    2018-01-01

    Understanding the effects of environmental factors on microbial communities is critical for microbial ecology, but it remains challenging. In this study, we examined the diversity (alpha diversity) and community compositions (beta diversity) of prokaryotes and fungi in hypersaline sediments and salinized soils from northern China. Environmental variables were highly correlated, but they differed significantly between the sediments and saline soils. The compositions of prokaryotic and fungal communities in the hypersaline sediments were different from those in adjacent saline–alkaline soils, indicating a habitat-specific microbial distribution pattern. The macroelements (S, P, K, Mg, and Fe) and Ca were, respectively, correlated closely with the alpha diversity of prokaryotes and fungi, while the macronutrients (e.g., Na, S, P, and Ca) were correlated with the prokaryotic and fungal beta-diversity (P ≤ 0.05). And, the nine microelements (e.g., Al, Ba, Co, Hg, and Mn) and micronutrients (Ba, Cd, and Sr) individually shaped the alpha diversity of prokaryotes and fungi, while the six microelements (e.g., As, Ba, Cr, and Ge) and only the trace elements (Cr and Cu), respectively, influenced the beta diversity of prokaryotes and fungi (P analysis (VPA) showed that environmental variables jointly explained 55.49% and 32.27% of the total variation for the prokaryotic and fungal communities, respectively. Together, our findings demonstrate that the diversity and community composition of the prokaryotes and fungi were driven by different macro and microelements in saline habitats, and that geochemical elements could more widely regulate the diversity and community composition of prokaryotes than these of fungi. PMID:29535703

  20. Focused Transhepatic Electroporation Mediated by Hypersaline Infusion through the Portal Vein in Rat Model. Preliminary Results on Differential Conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pañella, Clara; Castellví, Quim; Moll, Xavier; Quesada, Rita; Villanueva, Alberto; Iglesias, Mar; Naranjo, Dolores; Sánchez-Velázquez, Patricia; Andaluz, Anna; Grande, Luís; Ivorra, Antoni; Burdío, Fernando

    2017-12-01

    Spread hepatic tumours are not suitable for treatment either by surgery or conventional ablation methods. The aim of this study was to evaluate feasibility and safety of selectively increasing the healthy hepatic conductivity by the hypersaline infusion (HI) through the portal vein. We hypothesize this will allow simultaneous safe treatment of all nodules by irreversible electroporation (IRE) when applied in a transhepatic fashion. Sprague Dawley (Group A, n = 10) and Athymic rats with implanted hepatic tumour (Group B, n = 8) were employed. HI was performed (NaCl 20%, 3.8 mL/Kg) by trans-splenic puncture. Deionized serum (40 mL/Kg) and furosemide (2 mL/Kg) were simultaneously infused through the jugular vein to compensate hypernatremia. Changes in conductivity were monitored in the hepatic and tumour tissue. The period in which hepatic conductivity was higher than tumour conductivity was defined as the therapeutic window (TW). Animals were monitored during 1-month follow-up. The animals were sacrificed and selective samples were used for histological analysis. The overall survival rate was 82.4% after the HI protocol. The mean maximum hepatic conductivity after HI was 2.7 and 3.5 times higher than the baseline value, in group A and B, respectively. The mean maximum hepatic conductivity after HI was 1.4 times higher than tumour tissue in group B creating a TW to implement selective IRE. HI through the portal vein is safe when the hypersaline overload is compensated with deionized serum and it may provide a TW for focused IRE treatment on tumour nodules.

  1. Hypersalinity reduces the risk of cyanide toxicosis to insectivorous bats interacting with wastewater impoundments at gold mines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Stephen R; Donato, David B; Lumsden, Linda F; Coulson, Graeme

    2014-01-01

    Wildlife and livestock that ingest bioavailable cyanide compounds in gold mining tailings dams are known to experience cyanide toxicosis. Elevated levels of salinity in open impoundments have been shown to prevent wildlife cyanide toxicosis by reducing drinking and foraging. This finding appears to be consistent for diurnal wildlife interacting with open impoundments, however the risks to nocturnal wildlife of cyanide exposure are unknown. We investigated the activity of insectivorous bats in the airspace above both fresh (potable to wildlife) and saline water bodies at two gold mines in the goldfields of Western Australian. During this study, cyanide-bearing solutions stored in open impoundments at both mine sites were hypersaline (range=57,000-295,000 mg/L total dissolved solids (TDS)), well above known physiological tolerance of any terrestrial vertebrate. Bats used the airspace above each water body monitored, but were more active at fresh than saline water bodies. In addition, considerably more terminal echolocation buzz calls were recorded in the airspace above fresh than saline water bodies at both mine sites. However, it was not possible to determine whether these buzz calls corresponded to foraging or drinking bouts. No drinking bouts were observed in 33 h of thermal video footage recorded at one hypersaline tailings dam, suggesting that this water is not used for drinking. There is no information on salinity tolerances of bats, but it could be assumed that bats would not tolerate salinity in drinking water at concentrations greater than those documented as toxic for saline-adapted terrestrial wildlife. Therefore, when managing wastewater impoundments at gold mines to avoid wildlife mortalities, adopting a precautionary principle, bats are unlikely to drink solutions at salinity levels ≥50,000 mg/L TDS. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Metagenomic sequencing of two salton sea microbiomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, Erik R; Schackwitz, Wendy; Hess, Matthias

    2014-01-23

    The Salton Sea is the largest inland body of water in California, with salinities ranging from brackish freshwater to hypersaline. The lake experiences high nutrient input, and its surface water is exposed to temperatures up to 40°C. Here, we report the community profiles associated with surface water from the Salton Sea.

  3. Metagenomic Sequencing of Two Salton Sea Microbiomes

    OpenAIRE

    Hawley, Erik R.; Schackwitz, Wendy; Hess, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    The Salton Sea is the largest inland body of water in California, with salinities ranging from brackish freshwater to hypersaline. The lake experiences high nutrient input, and its surface water is exposed to temperatures up to 40°C. Here, we report the community profiles associated with surface water from the Salton Sea.

  4. Evolution of alkaline lakes - Lake Van case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillman Meyer, Felix; Viehberg, Finn; Bahroun, Sonya; Wolf, Annabel; Immenhauser, Adrian; Kwiecien, Ola

    2017-04-01

    Lake Van in Eastern Anatolia (Turkey) is the largest terminal soda lake on Earth. The lake sedimentary profile covers ca. 600 ka (Stockhecke et al. 2014) Based on lithological changes, the presence of freshwater microfossils and close-to-freshwater pH value in the pore water, members of ICDP PALEOVAN concluded that Lake Van might have started as an open lake. Here we show paleontological and geochemical evidence in favour of this idea and constrain the time, when Lake Van likely transformed into a closed lake. Additionally we provide the first conceptual model of how this closure may have happened. Our archives of choice are inorganic and biogenic carbonates, separated by wet sieving. We identified microfossil assemblages (fraction > 125 µm) and performed high-resolution oxygen isotope (delta18O) and elemental (Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca) analyses of the fraction plants growing in the photic zone as food supply. These two aspects point to an increasing salinity in a shallowing lake. The delta18O values of inorganic carbonates are relatively low during the initial phase of Lake Van and increase abruptly (ca. 7‰) after 530 ka BP. At approximately the same time combination of Sr/Ca and Mg/Ca data suggest first occurrence of aragonite. Again, these findings suggest geochemical changes of the lake water concurrent with transition documented by microfossils. Comparison between Lake Van and Lake Ohrid (Lacey et al. 2016) delta18O data, precludes regional climate change (e.g.: increased evaporation) as the main driver of observed changes. With no evidence for increased volcanic or tectonic activity (e.g.: tephra layers, deformation structures, slumping) in the Lake Van sedimentary profile around 530 ka, it seems unlikely that a pyroclastic flow blocked the outflow of the lake. Alternatively, a portion of inflow has been diverged which might have caused a change in the hydrological balance and lake level falling below its outlet. However, as no geomorphological data confirming this

  5. Chemical speciation and adsorption behavior of plutonium in natural waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, A.L.

    1983-01-01

    Dissolved Pu profiles in two partially anoxic basins--Saanich Inlet, an intermittently anoxic marine fiord in Vancouver Island, British Columbia, and Soap Lake, a saline, alkaline lake in eastern Washington state, revealed minimum concentrations at the O 2 /H 2 S interface. The Pu concentrations in the anoxic waters of Saanich Inlet were less than the surface concentrations; however, in Soap Lake, a 15- to 50-fold increase in Pu concentration in the anoxic monimolimnion correlated with large increases in the major ions, total alkalinity, and dissolved organic carbon. Laboratory experiments were designed to investigate the effects of pH, ionic strength, dissolved organic carbon, and carbonate ions on the adsorption of tracer amounts of Pu IV and Pu V. The Pu-goethite adsorption system provided the data base for developing a thermodynamic model of Pu interaction with an oxide surface and with dissolved ligands, using the MINEQL computer program. Pu IV and Pu V interacted very differently with goethite, which is consistent with their different hydrolytic character. A reduction of Pu V to Pu IV occurred on the goethite surface and also on montmorillonite and silica gel, suggesting that redox transformations are an important aspect of Pu adsorption. Increases in ionic strength (up to 3 M NaCl or NaNO 3 ) did not affect Pu IV or V adsorption. In the presence of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), Pu V reduction to Pu IV occurred in solution. Pu IV adsorption on goethite decreased only 30% in the presence of 240 ppm of natural DOC from Soap Lake; however, carbonate anions inhibited Pu IV adsorption on goethite at the alkalinity levels (1500 meq/L total alkalinity, 0.57 M CO 3 =) measured for Soap Lake monimolimnion waters

  6. Spatio-temporal dynamics of sulfate-reducing bacteria in extreme environment of Rogoznica Lake revealed by 16S rRNA analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čanković, Milan; Petrić, Ines; Marguš, Marija; Ciglenečki, Irena

    2017-08-01

    Highly eutrophic and euxinic seawater system of Rogoznica Lake (Croatia) was used as a study site for investigation of distribution, diversity and abundance of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) during stratified conditions in the summer and winter season, by targeting 6 phylogenetic subgroups of SRB. 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that community cannot be directly related to cultured SRB species but rather that Rogoznica Lake harbors habitat-specific SRB populations associated to bacteria belonging to δ-Proteobacteria with few Firmicutes and Verrucomicrobium-related populations. Clear spatial-temporal shifts in the SRB community structure were observed. Results implied existence of distinct SRB populations between the water column and sediment, as well as higher diversity of the SRB occupying water layer then the ones found in the sediment. Likewise, seasonal variations in populations were observed. While SRB community was more diverse in the winter compared to the summer season in the water layer, situation was opposite in the sediment. Water layer communities seem to be more susceptible to changes of physico-chemical parameters, while those in the sediment have prorogated response to these changes. Results indicate that SRB diversity is still highly underestimated in natural environments, especially in specific habitats such as Rogoznica Lake. Presented data show a complex SRB diversity and distribution supporting the idea that habitat-specific SRB communities are important part of the anaerobic food chain in degradation of organic matter as well as cycling of sulfur and carbon species in the Lake and similar anoxic environment.

  7. Bathymetry of Lake Erie and Lake Saint Clair

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathymetry of Lake Erie and Lake Saint Clair has been compiled as a component of a NOAA project to rescue Great Lakes lake floor geological and geophysical data and...

  8. Disproportionation of elemental sulfur by haloalkaliphilic bacteria from soda lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poser, Alexander; Lohmayer, Regina; Vogt, Carsten; Knoeller, Kay; Planer-Friedrich, Britta; Sorokin, Dimitry; Richnow, Hans-H; Finster, Kai

    2013-11-01

    Microbial disproportionation of elemental sulfur to sulfide and sulfate is a poorly characterized part of the anoxic sulfur cycle. So far, only a few bacterial strains have been described that can couple this reaction to cell growth. Continuous removal of the produced sulfide, for instance by oxidation and/or precipitation with metal ions such as iron, is essential to keep the reaction exergonic. Hitherto, the process has exclusively been reported for neutrophilic anaerobic bacteria. Here, we report for the first time disproportionation of elemental sulfur by three pure cultures of haloalkaliphilic bacteria isolated from soda lakes: the Deltaproteobacteria Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus and Desulfurivibrio sp. AMeS2, and a member of the Clostridia, Dethiobacter alkaliphilus. All cultures grew in saline media at pH 10 by sulfur disproportionation in the absence of metals as sulfide scavengers. Our data indicate that polysulfides are the dominant sulfur species under highly alkaline conditions and that they might be disproportionated. Furthermore, we report the first organism (Dt. alkaliphilus) from the class Clostridia that is able to grow by sulfur disproportionation.

  9. Lake whitefish diet, condition, and energy density in Lake Champlain and the lower four Great Lakes following dreissenid invasions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, Seth J.; Marsden, J. Ellen; Lantry, Brian F.

    2013-01-01

    Lake Whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis support some of the most valuable commercial freshwater fisheries in North America. Recent growth and condition decreases in Lake Whitefish populations in the Great Lakes have been attributed to the invasion of the dreissenid mussels, zebra mussels Dreissena polymorpha and quagga mussels D. bugensis, and the subsequent collapse of the amphipod, Diporeia, a once-abundant high energy prey source. Since 1993, Lake Champlain has also experienced the invasion and proliferation of zebra mussels, but in contrast to the Great Lakes, Diporeia were not historically abundant. We compared the diet, condition, and energy density of Lake Whitefish from Lake Champlain after the dreissenid mussel invasion to values for those of Lake Whitefish from Lakes Michigan, Huron, Erie, and Ontario. Lake Whitefish were collected using gill nets and bottom trawls, and their diets were quantified seasonally. Condition was estimated using Fulton's condition factor (K) and by determining energy density. In contrast to Lake Whitefish from some of the Great Lakes, those from Lake Champlain Lake Whitefish did not show a dietary shift towards dreissenid mussels, but instead fed primarily on fish eggs in spring, Mysis diluviana in summer, and gastropods and sphaeriids in fall and winter. Along with these dietary differences, the condition and energy density of Lake Whitefish from Lake Champlain were high compared with those of Lake Whitefish from Lakes Michigan, Huron, and Ontario after the dreissenid invasion, and were similar to Lake Whitefish from Lake Erie; fish from Lakes Michigan, Huron, and Ontario consumed dreissenids, whereas fish from Lake Erie did not. Our comparisons of Lake Whitefish populations in Lake Champlain to those in the Great Lakes indicate that diet and condition of Lake Champlain Lake Whitefish were not negatively affected by the dreissenid mussel invasion.

  10. Immobilization of metal wastes by reaction with H2S in anoxic basins: concept and elaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuiling, R D

    2013-10-01

    Metal wastes are produced in large quantities by a number of industries. Their disposal in isolated waste deposits is certain to cause many subsequent problems, because every material will sooner or later return to the geochemical cycle. The sealing of disposal sites usually starts to leak, often within a short time after the disposal site has been filled. The contained heavy metals are leached from the waste deposit and will contaminate the soil and the groundwater. It is evident that storage as metal sulfides in a permanently anoxic environment is the only safe way to handle metal wastes. The world's largest anoxic basin, the Black Sea, can serve as a georeactor. The metal wastes are sustainably transformed into harmless and immobile solids. These are incorporated in the lifeless bottom muds, where they are stored for millions of years.

  11. Carbon-14 speciation during anoxic corrosion of activated steel in a repository environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieland, E.; Cvetkovic, B.Z.; Kunz, D. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland). Lab. for Waste Management; Salazar, G.; Szidat, S. [Bern Univ. (Switzerland). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research

    2018-01-15

    Radioactive waste contains significant amounts of {sup 14}C which has been identified a key radionuclide in safety assessments. In Switzerland, the {sup 14}C inventory of a cement-based repository for low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste (L/ILW) is mainly associated with activated steel (∝85 %). {sup 14}C is produced by {sup 14}N activation in steel parts exposed to thermal neutron flux in light water reactors. Release of {sup 14}C occurs in the near field of a deep geological repository due to anoxic corrosion of activated steel. Although the {sup 14}C inventory of the L/ILW repository and the sources of {sup 14}C are well known, the formation of {sup 14}C species during steel corrosion is only poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to identify and quantify the {sup 14}C-bearing carbon species formed during the anoxic corrosion of iron and steel and further to determine the {sup 14}C speciation in a corrosion experiment with activated steel. All experiments were conducted in conditions similar to those anticipated in the near field of a cement-based repository.

  12. Food deprivation and prior anoxic coma have opposite effects on the activity of a visual interneuron in the locust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Kevin P; Britton, Samantha; Mangulins, Rebecca; Money, Tomas G A; Robertson, R Meldrum

    2017-04-01

    We compared how different metabolic stressors, anoxic coma and food deprivation, affected signaling in neural tissue. We used the locust's Descending Contralateral Movement Detector (DCMD) interneuron because its large axon, high firing frequencies, and rapid conduction velocity make it energetically expensive. We exposed locusts to a 30min anoxic coma or 1day of food deprivation and found contrasting effects on signaling within the axon. After a prior anoxic coma, the DCMD fired fewer high-frequency (>200Hz) action potentials (APs) (Control: 12.4±1.6; Coma: 6.3±0.9) with a reduction in axonal conduction velocity (CV) at all frequencies (∼4-8%) when presented with a standard looming visual stimulus. Prior anoxic coma was also associated with a loss of supernormal conduction by reducing both the number of supernormal APs and the firing frequency with the highest CV. Initially, food deprivation caused a significant increase in the number of low- and high-frequency APs with no differences observed in CV. After controlling for isolation, food deprivation resulted in an increase in high-frequency APs (>200Hz: Control: 17.1±1.7; Food-deprived: 19.9±1.3) and an increase in relative conduction velocity for frequencies >150Hz (∼2%). Action potentials of food-deprived animals had a smaller half-width (Control: 0.45±0.02ms; Food-deprived: 0.40±0.01ms) and decay time (Control: 0.62±0.03ms; Food-deprived: 0.54±0.02ms). Our data indicate that the effects of metabolic stress on neural signaling can be stressor-dependent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Review of the African distribution of the brine shrimp genus Artemia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Brine shrimp (genus Artemia) are small (8 to 12 mm long) cosmopolitan crustaceans (Anostraca) found predominately in hypersaline water bodies such as inland salt lakes and pans, coastal lagoons, and salt works at salinity levels above 40 g·ℓ-1. They have been extensively studied due to their high monetary value as ...

  14. Glacial lake inventory and lake outburst potential in Uzbekistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Maxim A; Sabitov, Timur Y; Tomashevskaya, Irina G; Glazirin, Gleb E; Chernomorets, Sergey S; Savernyuk, Elena A; Tutubalina, Olga V; Petrakov, Dmitriy A; Sokolov, Leonid S; Dokukin, Mikhail D; Mountrakis, Giorgos; Ruiz-Villanueva, Virginia; Stoffel, Markus

    2017-08-15

    Climate change has been shown to increase the number of mountain lakes across various mountain ranges in the World. In Central Asia, and in particular on the territory of Uzbekistan, a detailed assessment of glacier lakes and their evolution over time is, however lacking. For this reason we created the first detailed inventory of mountain lakes of Uzbekistan based on recent (2002-2014) satellite observations using WorldView-2, SPOT5, and IKONOS imagery with a spatial resolution from 2 to 10m. This record was complemented with data from field studies of the last 50years. The previous data were mostly in the form of inventories of lakes, available in Soviet archives, and primarily included localized in-situ data. The inventory of mountain lakes presented here, by contrast, includes an overview of all lakes of the territory of Uzbekistan. Lakes were considered if they were located at altitudes above 1500m and if lakes had an area exceeding 100m 2 . As in other mountain regions of the World, the ongoing increase of air temperatures has led to an increase in lake number and area. Moreover, the frequency and overall number of lake outburst events have been on the rise as well. Therefore, we also present the first outburst assessment with an updated version of well-known approaches considering local climate features and event histories. As a result, out of the 242 lakes identified on the territory of Uzbekistan, 15% are considered prone to outburst, 10% of these lakes have been assigned low outburst potential and the remainder of the lakes have an average level of outburst potential. We conclude that the distribution of lakes by elevation shows a significant influence on lake area and hazard potential. No significant differences, by contrast, exist between the distribution of lake area, outburst potential, and lake location with respect to glaciers by regions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Define of internal recirculation coefficient for biological wastewater treatment in anoxic and aerobic bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossinskyi, Volodymyr

    2018-02-01

    The biological wastewater treatment technologies in anoxic and aerobic bioreactors with recycle of sludge mixture are used for the effective removal of organic compounds from wastewater. The change rate of sludge mixture recirculation between bioreactors leads to a change and redistribution of concentrations of organic compounds in sludge mixture in bioreactors and change hydrodynamic regimes in bioreactors. Determination of the coefficient of internal recirculation of sludge mixture between bioreactors is important for the choice of technological parameters of biological treatment (wastewater treatment duration in anoxic and aerobic bioreactors, flow capacity of recirculation pumps). Determination of the coefficient of internal recirculation of sludge mixture requires integrated consideration of hydrodynamic parameter (flow rate), kinetic parameter (rate of oxidation of organic compounds) and physical-chemical parameter of wastewater (concentration of organic compounds). The conducted numerical experiment from the proposed mathematical equations allowed to obtain analytical dependences of the coefficient of internal recirculation sludge mixture between bioreactors on the concentration of organic compounds in wastewater, the duration of wastewater treatment in bioreactors.

  16. Ecophysiology of terminal carbon metabolizing bacteria in anoxic sedimentary environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phelps, T.J.

    1985-01-01

    Chemical, radiotracer, and microbiological experiments were used to understand the transformation of simple carbon compounds by anaerobic bacteria in diverse aquatic sediments and laboratory cultures. The mildly acidic sediments of Knack Lake (pH 6.2), displayed low rates of organic decomposition, and methane formation occurred almost exclusively from acetate. Low pH inhibited methanogenesis and organic decomposition. Fall turnover in Lake Mendota sediments was associated with dramatic changes in environmental parameters including: elevated concentrations of sulfate and carbon metabolites, increased rates of sulfate reduction, decreased levels of methanogenesis, increased ratio (by viable counts) of sulfate reducing to methanogenic bacteria, and higher 14 CO 2 / 14 C 4 + 14 CO 2 gas ratios produced during the biodegradation of 14 C-carbon substrates (e.g., acetate and methanol). Hydrogen consumption by sulfate reducers in Lake Mendota sediments and in co-cultures of Desulfovibrio vulgaris and Methanosarcina barkeri led to an alteration in the carbon and electron flow pathway resulting in increased CO 2 , sulfide production, and decreased methanogenesis. These data agreed with the environmental observations in Lake Mendota that high sulfate concentrations resulted in higher ratios of CO 2 /CH 4 produced from the degradation of organic matter. A new glycine-metabolizing acetogenic species was isolated and characterized from Knaack Lake which further extended the known diversity of anaerobic bacteria in nature

  17. Lake-level frequency analysis for Devils Lake, North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiche, Gregg J.; Vecchia, Aldo V.

    1996-01-01

    Two approaches were used to estimate future lake-level probabilities for Devils Lake. The first approach is based on an annual lake-volume model, and the second approach is based on a statistical water mass-balance model that generates seasonal lake volumes on the basis of seasonal precipitation, evaporation, and inflow. Autoregressive moving average models were used to model the annual mean lake volume and the difference between the annual maximum lake volume and the annual mean lake volume. Residuals from both models were determined to be uncorrelated with zero mean and constant variance. However, a nonlinear relation between the residuals of the two models was included in the final annual lakevolume model.Because of high autocorrelation in the annual lake levels of Devils Lake, the annual lake-volume model was verified using annual lake-level changes. The annual lake-volume model closely reproduced the statistics of the recorded lake-level changes for 1901-93 except for the skewness coefficient. However, the model output is less skewed than the data indicate because of some unrealistically large lake-level declines. The statistical water mass-balance model requires as inputs seasonal precipitation, evaporation, and inflow data for Devils Lake. Analysis of annual precipitation, evaporation, and inflow data for 1950-93 revealed no significant trends or long-range dependence so the input time series were assumed to be stationary and short-range dependent.Normality transformations were used to approximately maintain the marginal probability distributions; and a multivariate, periodic autoregressive model was used to reproduce the correlation structure. Each of the coefficients in the model is significantly different from zero at the 5-percent significance level. Coefficients relating spring inflow from one year to spring and fall inflows from the previous year had the largest effect on the lake-level frequency analysis.Inclusion of parameter uncertainty in the model

  18. Lake trout in northern Lake Huron spawn on submerged drumlins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Stephen C.; Binder, Thomas; Wattrus, Nigel J.; Faust, Matthew D.; Janssen, John; Menzies, John; Marsden, J. Ellen; Ebener, Mark P.; Bronte, Charles R.; He, Ji X.; Tucker, Taaja R.; Hansen, Michael J.; Thompson, Henry T.; Muir, Andrew M.; Krueger, Charles C.

    2014-01-01

    Recent observations of spawning lake trout Salvelinus namaycush near Drummond Island in northern Lake Huron indicate that lake trout use drumlins, landforms created in subglacial environments by the action of ice sheets, as a primary spawning habitat. From these observations, we generated a hypothesis that may in part explain locations chosen by lake trout for spawning. Most salmonines spawn in streams where they rely on streamflows to sort and clean sediments to create good spawning habitat. Flows sufficient to sort larger sediment sizes are generally lacking in lakes, but some glacial bedforms contain large pockets of sorted sediments that can provide the interstitial spaces necessary for lake trout egg incubation, particularly if these bedforms are situated such that lake currents can penetrate these sediments. We hypothesize that sediment inclusions from glacial scavenging and sediment sorting that occurred during the creation of bedforms such as drumlins, end moraines, and eskers create suitable conditions for lake trout egg incubation, particularly where these bedforms interact with lake currents to remove fine sediments. Further, these bedforms may provide high-quality lake trout spawning habitat at many locations in the Great Lakes and may be especially important along the southern edge of the range of the species. A better understanding of the role of glacially-derived bedforms in the creation of lake trout spawning habitat may help develop powerful predictors of lake trout spawning locations, provide insight into the evolution of unique spawning behaviors by lake trout, and aid in lake trout restoration in the Great Lakes.

  19. Lake sturgeon population characteristics in Rainy Lake, Minnesota and Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, W.E.; Kallemeyn, L.W.; Willis, D.W.

    2006-01-01

    Rainy Lake contains a native population of lake sturgeon Acipenser fulvescens that has been largely unstudied. The aims of this study were to document the population characteristics of lake sturgeon in Rainy Lake and to relate environmental factors to year-class strength for this population. Gill-netting efforts throughout the study resulted in the capture of 322 lake sturgeon, including 50 recaptures. Lake sturgeon in Rainy Lake was relatively plump and fast growing compared with a 32-population summary. Population samples were dominated by lake sturgeon between 110 and 150 cm total length. Age–structure analysis of the samples indicated few younger (<10 years) lake sturgeon, but the smallest gill net mesh size used for sampling was 102 mm (bar measure) and would not retain small sturgeon. Few lake sturgeon older than age 50 years were captured, and maximum age of sampled fish was 59 years. Few correlations existed between lake sturgeon year-class indices and both annual and monthly climate variables, except that mean June air temperature was positively correlated with year-class strength. Analysis of Rainy Lake water elevation and resulting lake sturgeon year-class strength indices across years yielded consistent but weak negative correlations between late April and early June, when spawning of lake sturgeon occurs. The baseline data collected in this study should allow Rainy Lake biologists to establish more specific research questions in the future.

  20. Zooplankton communities in a large prealpine lake, Lake Constance: comparison between the Upper and the Lower Lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard MAIER

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available The zooplankton communities of two basins of a large lake, Lake Constance, were compared during the years 2002 and 2003. The two basins differ in morphology, physical and chemical conditions. The Upper Lake basin has a surface area of 470 km2, a mean depth of 100 and a maximum depth of 250 m; the Lower Lake basin has a surface area of 62 km2, a mean depth of only 13 and a maximum depth of 40 m. Nutrient, chlorophyll-a concentrations and mean temperatures are somewhat higher in the Lower than in the Upper Lake. Total abundance of rotifers (number per m2 lake surface was higher and rotifer development started earlier in the year in the Lower than in the Upper Lake. Total abundance of crustaceans was higher in the Upper Lake in the year 2002; in the year 2003 no difference in abundance could be detected between the lake basins, although in summer crustacean abundance was higher in the Lower than in the Upper Lake. Crustacean communities differed significantly between lake basins while there was no apparent difference in rotifer communities. In the Lower Lake small crustaceans, like Bosmina spp., Ceriodaphnia pulchella and Thermocyclops oithonoides prevailed. Abundance (number per m2 lake surface of predatory cladocerans, large daphnids and large copepods was much lower in the Lower than in the Upper Lake, in particular during the summer months. Ordination with nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMS separated communities of both lakes along gradients that correlated with temperature and chlorophyll a concentration. Clutches of copepods were larger in the Lower than in the Upper Lake. No difference could be detected in clutch size of large daphnids between lake basins. Our results show that zooplankton communities in different basins of Lake Constance can be very different. They further suggest that the lack of large crustaceans in particular the lack of large predatory cladocerans in the Lower Lake can have negative effects on growth and

  1. Microscopic and Spectroscopic Characterisation of Waterlogged Archaeological Softwood from Anoxic Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Nanna Bjerregaard

    waterlogged sites and solely decayed by erosion bacteria to refine the understanding of the residual wood structure left after degradation. This was done not only to improve the ability to develop suitable and cost effective conservations treatments but also to improve the understanding of anaerobic decay...... mechanisms acting on plant biomass in waterlogged anoxic environment.Morphological analyses showed typical erosion bacteria decay patterns in the residual wood structure. Decay resistance of some cell types and cell wall compartments in preference to others is most likely explained not only by elevated...

  2. Isotopic composition of methane and inferred methanogenic substrates along a salinity gradient in a hypersaline microbial mat system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Elyn G; Bebout, Brad M; Kelley, Cheryl A

    2009-05-01

    The importance of hypersaline environments over geological time, the discovery of similar habitats on Mars, and the importance of methane as a biosignature gas combine to compel an understanding of the factors important in controlling methane released from hypersaline microbial mat environments. To further this understanding, changes in stable carbon isotopes of methane and possible methanogenic substrates in microbial mat communities were investigated as a function of salinity here on Earth. Microbial mats were sampled from four different field sites located within salterns in Baja California Sur, Mexico. Salinities ranged from 50 to 106 parts per thousand (ppt). Pore water and microbial mat samples were analyzed for the carbon isotopic composition of dissolved methane, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), and mat material (particulate organic carbon or POC). The POC delta(13)C values ranged from -6.7 to -13.5 per thousand, and DIC delta(13)C values ranged from -1.4 to -9.6 per thousand. These values were similar to previously reported values. The delta(13)C values of methane ranged from -49.6 to -74.1 per thousand; the methane most enriched in (13)C was obtained from the highest salinity area. The apparent fractionation factors between methane and DIC, and between methane and POC, within the mats were also determined and were found to change with salinity. The apparent fractionation factors ranged from 1.042 to 1.077 when calculated using DIC and from 1.038 to 1.068 when calculated using POC. The highest-salinity area showed the least fractionation, the moderate-salinity area showed the highest fractionation, and the lower-salinity sites showed fractionations that were intermediate. These differences in fractionation are most likely due to changes in the dominant methanogenic pathways and substrates used at the different sites because of salinity differences.

  3. Lake trout rehabilitation in Lake Erie: a case history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, Floyd C.; Muth, Kenneth M.; Kenyon, Roger

    1995-01-01

    Native lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) once thrived in the deep waters of eastern Lake Erie. The impact of nearly 70 years of unregulated exploitation and over 100 years of progressively severe cultural eutrophication resulted in the elimination of lake trout stocks by 1950. Early attempts to restore lake trout by stocking were unsuccessful in establishing a self-sustaining population. In the early 1980s, New York's Department of Environmental Conservation, Pennsylvania's Fish and Boat Commission, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service entered into a cooperative program to rehabilitate lake trout in the eastern basin of Lake Erie. After 11 years of stocking selected strains of lake trout in U.S. waters, followed by effective sea lamprey control, lake trout appear to be successfully recolonizing their native habitat. Adult stocks have built up significantly and are expanding their range in the lake. Preliminary investigations suggest that lake trout reproductive habitat is still adequate for natural reproduction, but natural recruitment has not been documented. Future assessments will be directed toward evaluation of spawning success and tracking age-class cohorts as they move through the fishery.

  4. Microbiology of Lonar Lake and other soda lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul Antony, Chakkiath; Kumaresan, Deepak; Hunger, Sindy; Drake, Harold L; Murrell, J Colin; Shouche, Yogesh S

    2013-01-01

    Soda lakes are saline and alkaline ecosystems that are believed to have existed throughout the geological record of Earth. They are widely distributed across the globe, but are highly abundant in terrestrial biomes such as deserts and steppes and in geologically interesting regions such as the East African Rift valley. The unusual geochemistry of these lakes supports the growth of an impressive array of microorganisms that are of ecological and economic importance. Haloalkaliphilic Bacteria and Archaea belonging to all major trophic groups have been described from many soda lakes, including lakes with exceptionally high levels of heavy metals. Lonar Lake is a soda lake that is centered at an unusual meteorite impact structure in the Deccan basalts in India and its key physicochemical and microbiological characteristics are highlighted in this article. The occurrence of diverse functional groups of microbes, such as methanogens, methanotrophs, phototrophs, denitrifiers, sulfur oxidizers, sulfate reducers and syntrophs in soda lakes, suggests that these habitats harbor complex microbial food webs that (a) interconnect various biological cycles via redox coupling and (b) impact on the production and consumption of greenhouse gases. Soda lake microorganisms harbor several biotechnologically relevant enzymes and biomolecules (for example, cellulases, amylases, ectoine) and there is the need to augment bioprospecting efforts in soda lake environments with new integrated approaches. Importantly, some saline and alkaline lake ecosystems around the world need to be protected from anthropogenic pressures that threaten their long-term existence. PMID:23178675

  5. Four years of continuous monitoring of the Meirama end-pit lake and its impact in the definition of future uses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Martin, J; Juncosa-Rivera, R; Falcón-Suárez, I; Canal-Vila, J

    2013-11-01

    Following the technical closure of the brown lignite Meirama mine (NW Spain) in April 2008, the reclamation of the mined area is being accomplished with the controlled flooding of its large pit. During the first 7 months of flooding, the sequential arrest of the ground water dewatering system led to the growth of an acidic water body of about 2 hm3. Since October 2008, the surface waters from some local streams have been diverted towards the pit so that these have become the major water input in the flooding process. Surface water has promoted a major change in the chemical composition of the lake water so that, at present, its surface has a circum neutral pH, net alkalinity, and low conductivity. At present, the lake has slightly more than one half of its final volume, and it is expected the overflow in 3 to 3.5 years. The lake is meromictic, with a sharp chemocline separating the acidic monimolimnion (pH≈3.2, acidity≈150 mg CaCO3/L, κ 25≈2.4 mS/cm) from the main water body (pH≈6.5, alkalinity≈15 mg CaCO3/L, κ 25≈0.3 mS/cm). Oxygen is being depleted at the bottom of the lake so that the monimolimnion became anoxic in January 2011. Above the chemocline, the composition of the lake is similar, but not identical, to that of the flooding stream waters. Close to the surface, some constituents (pH, metals) show strong seasonal variations in coincidence with the phytoplankton growing periods. Those parameters whose limits are legally prescribed comply with the corresponding water quality standards, and they are also consistent with the forecasting results obtained in early modeling. At present, a project considering the construction of an uptake tunnel to exploit the lake is being developed for the emergency water supply of the metropolitan area of A Coruña.

  6. Evidence of in situ microbial activity and sulphidogenesis in perennially sub-0 °C and hypersaline sediments of a high Arctic permafrost spring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarche-Gagnon, Guillaume; Comery, Raven; Greer, Charles W; Whyte, Lyle G

    2015-01-01

    The lost hammer (LH) spring perennially discharges subzero hypersaline reducing brines through thick layers of permafrost and is the only known terrestrial methane seep in frozen settings on Earth. The present study aimed to identify active microbial communities that populate the sediments of the spring outlet, and verify whether such communities vary seasonally and spatially. Microcosm experiments revealed that the biological reduction of sulfur compounds (SR) with hydrogen (e.g., sulfate reduction) was potentially carried out under combined hypersaline and subzero conditions, down to -20 °C, the coldest temperature ever recorded for SR. Pyrosequencing analyses of both 16S rRNA (i.e., cDNA) and 16S rRNA genes (i.e., DNA) of sediments retrieved in late winter and summer indicated fairly stable bacterial and archaeal communities at the phylum level. Potentially active bacterial and archaeal communities were dominated by clades related to the T78 Chloroflexi group and Halobacteria species, respectively. The present study indicated that SR, hydrogenotrophy (possibly coupled to autotrophy), and short-chain alkane degradation (other than methane), most likely represent important, previously unaccounted for, metabolic processes carried out by LH microbial communities. Overall, the obtained findings provided additional evidence that the LH system hosts active communities of anaerobic, halophilic, and cryophilic microorganisms despite the extreme conditions in situ.

  7. Hydrolysis and degradation of filtrated organic particulates in a biofilm reactor under anoxic and aerobic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janning, K.F.; Mesterton, K.; Harremoës, P.

    1997-01-01

    Two experiments were performed in order to investigate the anoxic and the aerobic degradation of filtrated organic matter in a biofilter. In submerged lab: scale reactors with Biocarbone media as filter material, accumulated particulate organic matter from pre-settled wastewater served as the only...

  8. Long-term performance and fouling analysis of full-scale direct nanofiltration (NF) installations treating anoxic groundwater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beyer, F.; Rietman, B.M.; Zwijnenburg, A.; Brink, van den P.; Vrouwenvelder, J.S.; Jarzembowska, M.; Laurinonyte, J.; Stams, A.J.M.; Plugge, C.M.

    2014-01-01

    Long-term performance and fouling behavior of four full-scale nanofiltration (NF) plants, treating anoxic groundwater at 80% recovery for drinking water production, were characterized and compared with oxic NF and reverse osmosis systems. Plant operating times varied between 6 and 10 years and

  9. Hyperbaric oxygen sensitizes anoxic Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm to ciprofloxacin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolpen, Mette; Lerche, Christian J; Kragh, Kasper Nørskov

    2017-01-01

    Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection is characterized by the presence of endobronchial antibiotic-tolerant biofilm subject to strong oxygen (O2) depletion due to the activity of surrounding polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The exact mechanisms affecting the antibiotic susceptibility...... metabolism activity and the endogenous formation of reactive O2 radicals (ROS). In this study we aimed to apply hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HBOT) in order to sensitize anoxic P. aeruginosa agarose-biofilms established to mimic situations with intense O2 consumption by the host response in the cystic...... fibrosis (CF) lung. Application of HBOT resulted in enhanced bactericidal activity of ciprofloxacin at clinically relevant durations and was accompanied by indications of restored aerobic respiration, involvement of endogenous lethal oxidative stress and increased bacterial growth. The findings highlight...

  10. Holocene Lake-Level Fluctuations of Lake Aricota, Southern Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Placzek, Christa; Quade, Jay; Betancourt, Julio L.

    2001-09-01

    Lacustrine deposits exposed around Lake Aricota, Peru (17° 22‧S), a 7.5-km2 lake dammed by debris flows, provide a middle to late Holocene record of lake-level fluctuations. Chronological context for shoreline deposits was obtained from radiocarbon dating of vascular plant remains and other datable material with minimal 14C reservoir effects (<350 yr). Diatomites associated with highstands several meters above the modern lake level indicate wet episodes. Maximum Holocene lake level was attained before 6100 14C yr B.P. and ended ∼2700 14C yr B.P. Moderately high lake levels occurred at 1700 and 1300 14C yr B.P. The highstand at Lake Aricota during the middle Holocene is coeval with a major lowstand at Lake Titicaca (16°S), which is only 130 km to the northeast and shares a similar climatology. Comparisons with other marine and terrestrial records highlight emerging contradictions over the nature of mid-Holocene climate in the central Andes.

  11. Evolutionary and geologic consequences of organic carbon fixing in the primitive anoxic ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, W. B. N.; Wilde, P.

    1983-03-01

    Steps leading to development of the modern photic-based marine food web are postulated as the result of modifications of the environment, enhanced by the activity of Archean sulfur chemoautotrophs. Such organisms (Anoxium) evolved in an anoxic ocean prior to 3.9 × 109 yr ago at Archean analogs of modern oceanic hydrothermal vents. At this time geothermal energy was more readily available to organisms than photic energy, given atmospheric conditions at the surface similar to Venus, where intensity is low and only middle and red visible wavelengths penetrate the cloudy CO2-rich atmosphere. Competition for the reduced sulfur developed due to oxidation and loss of sulfur to sediments. Consequently, evolutionary advantage shifted to Anoxium isolates that could use alternate energy sources such as light to supplement the diminished supplies of reduced sulfur. Initially, photo-sulfur organisms evolved similar to modern purple bacteria that absorb in the red visible spectra. Subsequent carbon fixing and oxidation improved both the quantity and range of light reaching the ocean surface. This permitted absorption in the blue visible range so that water splitting was now feasible, releasing free oxygen and accelerating oxidation. Eventually, reducing environments became restricted, completing the shift in the principal marine carbon-fixing activity from anoxic chemoautotrophic to aerobic photosynthetic organisms.

  12. The diversity of benthic mollusks of Lake Victoria and Lake Burigi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Molluscan diversity, abundance and distribution in sediments of Lake Victoria and its satellite lake, Lake Burigi, were investigated. The survey was carried out in January and February 2002 for Lake Victoria and in March and April 2002 for Lake Burigi. Ten genera were recorded from four zones of Lake Victoria while only ...

  13. Lake Morphometry for NHD Lakes in Great Lakes Region 4 HUC

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Lake morphometry metrics are known to influence productivity in lakes and are important for building various types of ecological and environmental models of lentic...

  14. Nitrate-dependent iron oxidation limits iron transport in anoxic ocean regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Florian; Löscher, Carolin R.; Fiskal, Annika; Sommer, Stefan; Hensen, Christian; Lomnitz, Ulrike; Wuttig, Kathrin; Göttlicher, Jörg; Kossel, Elke; Steininger, Ralph; Canfield, Donald E.

    2016-11-01

    Iron is an essential element for life on Earth and limits primary production in large parts of the ocean. Oxygen-free continental margin sediments represent an important source of bioavailable iron to the ocean, yet little of the iron released from the seabed reaches the productive sea surface. Even in the anoxic water of oxygen minimum zones, where iron solubility should be enhanced, most of the iron is rapidly re-precipitated. To constrain the mechanism(s) of iron removal in anoxic ocean regions we explored the sediment and water in the oxygen minimum zone off Peru. During our sampling campaign the water column featured two distinct redox boundaries separating oxic from nitrate-reducing (i.e., nitrogenous) water and nitrogenous from weakly sulfidic water. The sulfidic water mass in contact with the shelf sediment contained elevated iron concentrations >300 nM. At the boundary between sulfidic and nitrogenous conditions, iron concentrations dropped sharply to <20 nM coincident with a maximum in particulate iron concentration. Within the iron gradient, we found an increased expression of the key functional marker gene for nitrate reduction (narG). Part of this upregulation was related to the activity of known iron-oxidizing bacteria. Collectively, our data suggest that iron oxidation and removal is induced by nitrate-reducing microbes, either enzymatically through anaerobic iron oxidation or by providing nitrite for an abiotic reaction. Given the important role that iron plays in nitrogen fixation, photosynthesis and respiration, nitrate-dependent iron oxidation likely represents a key-link between the marine biogeochemical cycles of nitrogen, oxygen and carbon.

  15. Hypersaline sapropels act as hotspots for microbial dark matter

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Andrei, Adrian-Stefan; Baricz, A.; Robeson, M. S.; Pauşan, M. R.; Tamaş, T.; Chiriac, C.; Szekeres, E.; Barbu-Tudoran, L.; Levei, E. A.; Coman, C.; Podar, M.; Banciu, H.L.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 1 (2017), č. článku 6150. ISSN 2045-2322 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : 16S RIBOSOMAL-RNA * HALOPHILIC ARCHAEA * lake-sediments Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  16. Spatial and temporal genetic diversity of lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis (Mitchill)) from Lake Huron and Lake Erie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stott, Wendylee; Ebener, Mark P.; Mohr, Lloyd; Hartman, Travis; Johnson, Jim; Roseman, Edward F.

    2013-01-01

    Lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis (Mitchill)) are important commercially, culturally, and ecologically in the Laurentian Great Lakes. Stocks of lake whitefish in the Great Lakes have recovered from low levels of abundance in the 1960s. Reductions in abundance, loss of habitat and environmental degradation can be accompanied by losses of genetic diversity and overall fitness that may persist even as populations recover demographically. Therefore, it is important to be able to identify stocks that have reduced levels of genetic diversity. In this study, we investigated patterns of genetic diversity at microsatellite DNA loci in lake whitefish collected between 1927 and 1929 (historical period) and between 1997 and 2005 (contemporary period) from Lake Huron and Lake Erie. Genetic analysis of lake whitefish from Lakes Huron and Erie shows that the amount of population structuring varies from lake to lake. Greater genetic divergences among collections from Lake Huron may be the result of sampling scale, migration patterns and demographic processes. Fluctuations in abundance of lake whitefish populations may have resulted in periods of increased genetic drift that have resulted in changes in allele frequencies over time, but periodic genetic drift was not severe enough to result in a significant loss of genetic diversity. Migration among stocks may have decreased levels of genetic differentiation while not completely obscuring stock boundaries. Recent changes in spatial boundaries to stocks, the number of stocks and life history characteristics of stocks further demonstrate the potential of coregonids for a swift and varied response to environmental change and emphasise the importance of incorporating both spatial and temporal considerations into management plans to ensure that diversity is preserved.

  17. The behavior of scavenged isotopes in marine anoxic environments: 210Pb and 210Po in the water column of the Black Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, C.L.; Murray, J.W.

    1994-01-01

    Vertical profiles of dissolved and particulate 210 Pb and 210 Po were determined at two stations in the Black Sea in June 1988. Vertical fluxes of 210 Pb and 210 Po were also measured in the upper 150 m, using floating sediment traps. The fractionation of 210 Pb between dissolved and particulate phases in the Black Sea is strongly influenced by the redox conditions in the water column. Dissolved 210 Pb dominates in the oxic zone, while particulate 210 Pb is the major form in the deep sulfide-rich anoxic zone. The distribution of 210 Pb across the suboxic zone appears to be mainly controlled by redox cycling of manganese and iron. In the sulfide-rich layer coprecipitation of lead with iron sulfide is probably the dominant scavenging mechanism. A simple scavenging model was used to calculate the residence times of dissolved and particulate 210 Pb in the oxic, suboxic, and anoxic zones. The residence times of dissolved 210 Pb relative to scavenging by particles are 0.5-1, 2-3, and 3.5 years in the oxic, suboxic, and anoxic layers, respectively. The corresponding residence times of particulate 210 Pb relative to particle removal processes in the same layers are 0.1, 1.5-2.5, and 8.5 years, respectively. A particle settling velocity of about 40 m y -1 was derived from the 210 Pb/ 226 Ra disequilibrium in the deep Black Sea. The relatively short residence times of 210 Pb support the hypothesis that anoxic basins are important sites for boundary scavenging of 210 Pb. The 210 Po profiles indicate that biological rather than inorganic particles are the major carrier phases for Po in the Black sea. Based on the magnitude of distribution coefficients, the relative partitioning of Pb, Po, and Th to particles found in the oxic and anoxic layers of the Black Sea are Po > Th > Pb and Po = Pb > Th, respectively. Colloidal phases may be important for the scavenging of these radionuclides

  18. Factors involved in the (near) anoxic survival time of Cerastoderma edule: associated bacteria vs. endogenous fuel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babarro, J.M.F.; De Zwaan, A.

    2001-01-01

    The effect of several antibiotics, molybdate and hydrogen sulfide was tested on anoxic tolerance of the cockle Cerastoderma edule, as well as utilisation of glycogen. The aim was to evaluate the role of fuel depletion and growth of bacteria as a cause of mortality. The exponential increase of

  19. Nursing management of reflex anoxic seizures in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Neal; Kerr-Liddell, Rowan; Challis, Louise; Paul, Siba Prosad

    2017-04-13

    Children who present with transient loss of consciousness (T-LOC) are often first seen in emergency departments (EDs). Reflex anoxic seizure (RAS), vasovagal syncope and prolonged respiratory apnoea are benign, syncopal events that can be generally managed by explanation and reassurance. RAS is a short, paroxysmal, self-reverting episode of asystole that is triggered by pain, fear or anxiety and is caused by increased vagal response. It is an important differential diagnosis in pre-school age children who present with T-LOC, but is often underdiagnosed and can sometimes be misdiagnosed as epilepsy. Nurses working in EDs are among the first healthcare professionals to see children in acute settings and should therefore be aware of RAS, the presenting features and management options. This article discusses the epidemiology, pathophysiology and management of RAS, includes an illustrative case study and discusses the role of ED nurses.

  20. Association of a new type of gliding, filamentous, purple phototrophic bacterium inside bundles of Microcoleus chthonoplastes in hypersaline cyanobacterial mats

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amelio, E. D.; Cohen, Y.; Des Marais, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    An unidentified filamentous purple bacterium, probably belonging to a new genus or even a new family, is found in close association with the filamentous, mat-forming cyanobacterium Microcoleus chthonoplastes in a hypersaline pond at Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico, and in Solar Lake, Sinai, Egypt. This organism is a gliding, segmented trichome, 0.8-0.9 micrometer wide. It contains intracytoplasmic stacked lamellae which are perpendicular and obliquely oriented to the cell wall, similar to those described for the purple sulfur bacteria Ectothiorhodospira. These bacteria are found inside the cyanobacterial bundle, enclosed by the cyanobacterial sheath. Detailed transmission electron microscopical analyses carried out in horizontal sections of the upper 1.5 mm of the cyanobacterial mat show this cyanobacterial-purple bacterial association at depths of 300-1200 micrometers, corresponding to the zone below that of maximal oxygenic photosynthesis. Sharp gradients of oxygen and sulfide are established during the day at this microzone in the two cyanobacterial mats studied. The close association, the distribution pattern of this association and preliminary physiological experiments suggest a co-metabolism of sulfur by the two-membered community. This probable new genus of purple bacteria may also grow photoheterotrophically using organic carbon excreted by the cyanobacterium. Since the chemical gradients in the entire photic zone fluctuate widely in a diurnal cycle, both types of metabolism probably take place. During the morning and afternoon, sulfide migrates up to the photic zone allowing photoautotrophic metabolism with sulfide as the electron donor. During the day the photic zone is highly oxygenated and the purple bacteria may either use oxidized species of sulfur such as elemental sulfur and thiosulfate in the photoautotrophic mode or grow photoheterotrophically using organic carbon excreted by M. chthonoplastes. The new type of filamentous purple sulfur

  1. An open ocean record of the Toarcian oceanic anoxic event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. R. Gröcke

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Oceanic anoxic events were time intervals in the Mesozoic characterized by widespread distribution of marine organic matter-rich sediments (black shales and significant perturbations in the global carbon cycle. These perturbations are globally recorded in sediments as carbon isotope excursions irrespective of lithology and depositional environment. During the early Toarcian, black shales were deposited on the epi- and pericontinental shelves of Pangaea, and these sedimentary rocks are associated with a pronounced (ca. 7 ‰ negative (organic carbon isotope excursion (CIE which is thought to be the result of a major perturbation in the global carbon cycle. For this reason, the lower Toarcian is thought to represent an oceanic anoxic event (the T-OAE. If the T-OAE was indeed a global event, an isotopic expression of this event should be found beyond the epi- and pericontinental Pangaean localities. To address this issue, the carbon isotope composition of organic matter (δ13Corg of lower Toarcian organic matter-rich cherts from Japan, deposited in the open Panthalassa Ocean, was analysed. The results show the presence of a major (>6 ‰ negative excursion in δ13Corg that, based on radiolarian biostratigraphy, is a correlative of the lower Toarcian negative CIE known from Pangaean epi- and pericontinental strata. A smaller negative excursion in δ13Corg (ca. 2 ‰ is recognized lower in the studied succession. This excursion may, within the current biostratigraphic resolution, represent the excursion recorded in European epicontinental successions close to the Pliensbachian/Toarcian boundary. These results from the open ocean realm suggest, in conjunction with other previously published datasets, that these Early Jurassic carbon cycle perturbations affected the active global reservoirs of the exchangeable carbon cycle (deep marine, shallow marine, atmospheric.

  2. Community Structure and Activity of a Highly Dynamic and Nutrient-Limited Hypersaline Microbial Mat in Um Alhool Sabkha, Qatar

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Thani, Roda

    2014-03-21

    The Um Alhool area in Qatar is a dynamic evaporative ecosystem that receives seawater from below as it is surrounded by sand dunes. We investigated the chemical composition, the microbial activity and biodiversity of the four main layers (L1–L4) in the photosynthetic mats. Chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentration and distribution (measured by HPLC and hyperspectral imaging, respectively), the phycocyanin distribution (scanned with hyperspectral imaging), oxygenic photosynthesis (determined by microsensor), and the abundance of photosynthetic microorganisms (from 16S and 18S rRNA sequencing) decreased with depth in the euphotic layer (L1). Incident irradiance exponentially attenuated in the same zone reaching 1% at 1.7-mm depth. Proteobacteria dominated all layers of the mat (24%–42% of the identified bacteria). Anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria (dominated by Chloroflexus) were most abundant in the third red layer of the mat (L3), evidenced by the spectral signature of Bacteriochlorophyll as well as by sequencing. The deep, black layer (L4) was dominated by sulfate reducing bacteria belonging to the Deltaproteobacteria, which were responsible for high sulfate reduction rates (measured using 35S tracer). Members of Halobacteria were the dominant Archaea in all layers of the mat (92%–97%), whereas Nematodes were the main Eukaryotes (up to 87%). Primary productivity rates of Um Alhool mat were similar to those of other hypersaline microbial mats. However, sulfate reduction rates were relatively low, indicating that oxygenic respiration contributes more to organic material degradation than sulfate reduction, because of bioturbation. Although Um Alhool hypersaline mat is a nutrient-limited ecosystem, it is interestingly dynamic and phylogenetically highly diverse. All its components work in a highly efficient and synchronized way to compensate for the lack of nutrient supply provided during regular inundation periods.

  3. Energy density of lake whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis in Lakes Huron and Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothoven, S.A.; Nalepa, T.F.; Madenjian, C.P.; Rediske, R.R.; Schneeberger, P.J.; He, J.X.

    2006-01-01

    We collected lake whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis off Alpena and Tawas City, Michigan, USA in Lake Huron and off Muskegon, Michigan USA in Lake Michigan during 2002–2004. We determined energy density and percent dry weight for lake whitefish from both lakes and lipid content for Lake Michigan fish. Energy density increased with increasing fish weight up to 800 g, and then remained relatively constant with further increases in fish weight. Energy density, adjusted for weight, was lower in Lake Huron than in Lake Michigan for both small (≤800 g) and large fish (>800 g). Energy density did not differ seasonally for small or large lake whitefish or between adult male and female fish. Energy density was strongly correlated with percent dry weight and percent lipid content. Based on data from commercially caught lake whitefish, body condition was lower in Lake Huron than Lake Michigan during 1981–2003, indicating that the dissimilarity in body condition between the lakes could be long standing. Energy density and lipid content in 2002–2004 in Lake Michigan were lower than data for comparable sized fish collected in 1969–1971. Differences in energy density between lakes were attributed to variation in diet and prey energy content as well as factors that affect feeding rates such as lake whitefish density and prey abundance.

  4. Bruxism Associated with Anoxic Encephalopathy: Successful Treatment with Baclofen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bruce Janati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Bruxism is a movement disorder characterized by grinding and clenching of the teeth. Etiology of bruxism can be divided into three groups: psychosocial factors, peripheral factors, and pathophysiological factors. Methods. The clinical investigation was conducted at King Khaled Hospital in Hail, Saudi Arabia, in 2012. Results. A 16-year-old Saudi female was brought to the hospital in a comatose state and with generalized convulsive seizures secondary to acute anoxic encephalopathy. In the third week of hospitalization, while still in a state of akinetic mutism, she developed incessant bruxism which responded favorably to a GABA receptor agonist (baclofen. Conclusion. Our data support the hypothesis that bruxism emanates from imbalance or dysregulation of the neurotransmitter system. Larger scale studies will be needed to confirm this hypothesis.

  5. Identification and Characterization of Extremophile Microorganisms with Significance to Astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bej, Asim K.

    2003-01-01

    It is now well recognized that microorganisms thrive in extreme ecological conditions such as geothermal vents, polar region, acid and alkaline lakes, and the cold pressurized depth of the ocean floor of this planet. Morphological, physiological, biochemical and genetic adaptations to extreme environments by these extremophile microorganisms have generated immense interest amongst astrobiologists who increasingly believe in the existence of extraterrestrial life. The evidence collected by NASA's space probe Galileo suggested the presence of liquid water and volcanic activity on Mars and Jupiter's satellite Europa. Volcanic activity provides some of the heat necessary to keep the water on Europa from freezing that could provide important dissolved chemicals needed by living organisms. The possibility of the existence of hypersaline alkaline lakes and evaporites confined within closed volcanic basins and impact craters on Mars, and a layer of liquid water under the ice on Europa provide sufficient 'raison d'etre' to study microorganisms in similar extreme environments on Earth, which could provide us with a model that would help establish the existence of extraterrestrial life on other planetary bodies. The objectives of the summer research project were as follows: (1) application of molecular approaches to help establish new species of extremophile microorganisms isolated from a hypersaline alkaline lake; and (2) identification of a major cold-shock gene (cspA) homolog from a psychrotolerant microorganism, PmagG1.

  6. Effects of lake trout refuges on lake whitefish and cisco in the Apostle Islands Region of Lake Superior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuccarino-Crowe , Chiara M.; Taylor, William W.; Hansen, Michael J.; Seider, Michael J.; Krueger, Charles C.

    2016-01-01

    Lake trout refuges in the Apostle Islands region of Lake Superior are analogous to the concept of marine protected areas. These refuges, established specifically for lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) and closed to most forms of recreational and commercial fishing, were implicated as one of several management actions leading to successful rehabilitation of Lake Superior lake trout. To investigate the potential significance of Gull Island Shoal and Devils Island Shoal refuges for populations of not only lake trout but also other fish species, relative abundances of lake trout, lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis), and cisco (Coregonus artedi) were compared between areas sampled inside versus outside of refuge boundaries. During 1982–2010, lake trout relative abundance was higher and increased faster inside the refuges, where lake trout fishing was prohibited, than outside the refuges. Over the same period, lake whitefish relative abundance increased faster inside than outside the refuges. Both evaluations provided clear evidence that refuges protected these species. In contrast, trends in relative abundance of cisco, a prey item of lake trout, did not differ significantly between areas inside and outside the refuges. This result did not suggest indirect or cascading refuge effects due to changes in predator levels. Overall, this study highlights the potential of species-specific refuges to benefit other fish species beyond those that were the refuges' original target. Improved understanding of refuge effects on multiple species of Great Lakes fishes can be valuable for developing rationales for refuge establishment and predicting associated fish community-level effects.

  7. Arctic Ocean circulation during the anoxic Eocene Azolla event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speelman, Eveline; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap; März, Christian; Brumsack, Hans; Reichart, Gert-Jan

    2010-05-01

    The Azolla interval, as encountered in Eocene sediments from the Arctic Ocean, is characterized by organic rich sediments ( 4wt% Corg). In general, high levels of organic matter may be caused by increased productivity, i.e. extensive growth of Azolla, and/or enhanced preservation of organic matter, or a combination of both. Anoxic (bottom) water conditions, expanded oxygen minimum zones, or increased sedimentation rates all potentially increase organic matter preservation. According to plate tectonic, bathymetric, and paleogeographic reconstructions, the Arctic Ocean was a virtually isolated shallow basin, with one possible deeper connection to the Nordic Seas represented by a still shallow Fram Strait (Jakobsson et al., 2007), hampering ventilation of the Arctic Basin. During the Azolla interval surface waters freshened, while at the same time bottom waters appear to have remained saline, indicating that the Arctic was highly stratified. The restricted ventilation and stratification in concert with ongoing export of organic matter most likely resulted in the development of anoxic conditions in the lower part of the water column. Whereas the excess precipitation over evaporation maintained the freshwater lid, sustained input of Nordic Sea water is needed to keep the deeper waters saline. To which degree the Arctic Ocean exchanged with the Nordic Seas is, however, still largely unknown. Here we present a high-resolution trace metal record (ICP-MS and ICP-OES) for the expanded Early/Middle Eocene section capturing the Azolla interval from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 302 (ACEX) drilled on the Lomonosov Ridge, central Arctic Ocean. Euxinic conditions throughout the interval resulted in the efficient removal of redox sensitive trace metals from the water column. Using the sedimentary trace metal record we also constrained circulation in the Arctic Ocean by assessing the relative importance of trace metal input sources (i.e. fluvial, eolian, and

  8. Diffusive Gradients in Thin Films Reveals Differences in Antimony and Arsenic Mobility in a Contaminated Wetland Sediment during an Oxic-Anoxic Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsic, Maja; Teasdale, Peter R; Welsh, David T; Johnston, Scott G; Burton, Edward D; Hockmann, Kerstin; Bennett, William W

    2018-02-06

    Antimony (Sb) and arsenic (As) are priority environmental contaminants that often co-occur at mining-impacted sites. Despite their chemical similarities, Sb mobility in waterlogged sediments is poorly understood in comparison to As, particularly across the sediment-water interface (SWI) where changes can occur at the millimeter scale. Combined diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) and diffusive equilibration in thin films (DET) techniques provided a high resolution, in situ comparison between Sb, As, and iron (Fe) speciation and mobility across the SWI in contaminated freshwater wetland sediment mesocosms under an oxic-anoxic-oxic transition. The shift to anoxic conditions released Fe(II), As(III), and As(V) from the sediment to the water column, consistent with As release being coupled to the reductive dissolution of iron(III) (hydr)oxides. Conversely, Sb(III) and Sb(V) effluxed to the water column under oxic conditions and fluxed into the sediment under anoxic conditions. Porewater DGT-DET depth profiles showed apparent decoupling between Fe(II) and Sb release, as Sb was primarily mobilized across the SWI under oxic conditions. Solid-phase X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) revealed the presence of an Sb(III)-S phase in the sediment that increased in proportion with depth and the transition from oxic to anoxic conditions. The results of this study showed that Sb mobilization was decoupled from the Fe cycle and was, therefore, more likely linked to sulfur and/or organic carbon (e.g., most likely authigenic antimony sulfide formation or Sb(III) complexation by reduced organic sulfur functional groups).

  9. Hazards of volcanic lakes: analysis of Lakes Quilotoa and Cuicocha, Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Gunkel

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic lakes within calderas should be viewed as high-risk systems, and an intensive lake monitoring must be carried out to evaluate the hazard of potential limnic or phreatic-magmatic eruptions. In Ecuador, two caldera lakesLakes Quilotoa and Cuicocha, located in the high Andean region >3000 a.s.l. – have been the focus of these investigations. Both volcanoes are geologically young or historically active, and have formed large and deep calderas with lakes of 2 to 3 km in diameter, and 248 and 148 m in depth, respectively. In both lakes, visible gas emissions of CO2 occur, and an accumulation of CO2 in the deep water body must be taken into account.

    Investigations were carried out to evaluate the hazards of these volcanic lakes, and in Lake Cuicocha intensive monitoring was carried out for the evaluation of possible renewed volcanic activities. At Lake Quilotoa, a limnic eruption and diffuse CO2 degassing at the lake surface are to be expected, while at Lake Cuicocha, an increased risk of a phreatic-magmatic eruption exists.

  10. Anthropogenic influences on the input and biogeochemical cycling of nutrients and mercury in Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naftz, David [US Geological Survey, Salt Lake City 84119, UT (United States)], E-mail: dlnaftz@usgs.gov; Angeroth, Cory; Kenney, Terry [US Geological Survey, Salt Lake City 84119, UT (United States); Waddell, Bruce; Darnall, Nathan [US Fish and Wildlife Service, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Silva, Steven [US Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Perschon, Clay [Utah Division of Wildlife Resources, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Whitehead, John [Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2008-06-15

    Despite the ecological and economic importance of Great Salt Lake (GSL), little is known about the input and biogeochemical cycling of nutrients and trace elements in the lake. In response to increasing public concern regarding anthropogenic inputs to the GSL ecosystem, the US Geological Survey (USGS) and US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) initiated coordinated studies to quantify and evaluate the significance of nutrient and Hg inputs into GSL. A 6 per mille decrease in {delta}{sup 15}N observed in brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) samples collected from GSL during summer time periods is likely due to the consumption of cyanobacteria produced in freshwater bays entering the lake. Supporting data collected from the outflow of Farmington Bay indicates decreasing trends in {delta}{sup 15}N in particulate organic matter (POM) during the mid-summer time period, reflective of increasing proportions of cyanobacteria in algae exported to GSL on a seasonal basis. The C:N molar ratio of POM in outflow from Farmington Bay decreases during the summer period, supportive of the increased activity of N fixation indicated by decreasing {delta}{sup 15}N in brine shrimp and POM. Although N fixation is only taking place in the relatively freshwater inflows to GSL, data indicate that influx of fresh water influences large areas of the lake. Separation of GSL into two distinct hydrologic and geochemical systems from the construction of a railroad causeway in the late 1950s has created a persistent and widespread anoxic layer in the southern part of GSL. This anoxic layer, referred to as the deep brine layer (DBL), has high rates of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} reduction, likely increasing the Hg methylation capacity. High concentrations of methyl mercury (CH{sub 3}Hg) (median concentration = 24 ng/L) were observed in the DBL with a significant proportion (31-60%) of total Hg in the CH{sub 3}Hg form. Hydroacoustic and sediment-trap evidence indicate that turbulence introduced by internal waves

  11. The reduction of U(VI) on corroded iron under anoxic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, D.; Spahiu, K.

    2002-01-01

    The corrosion of iron and the interaction between corroded iron and U(VI) in anoxic conditions were investigated. The anoxic conditions were obtained by flushing an 99.97% Ar-0.03% CO 2 gas mixture through the test vessel, in which an oxygen trap and six reaction bottles containing synthetic groundwater (10 mM NaCl and 2 mM HCO 3 - .) were placed. The dark-green coloured corrosion product, formed on iron surface after three months corrosion in synthetic groundwater solutions, was identified by powder X-ray diffraction to be carbonate green rust, Fe 4 II Fe 2 III (OH) 12 CO 3 . The iron foil that reacted in a solution (10 ppm U(VI), 10 mM NaCl and 2 mM HCO 3 - ) for three months was analysed by SEM-EDS. The result shows that: (i) an uneven layer of carbonate green rust (1-5 μm thick) formed on the metallic iron; (ii) a thin (0.3 μm) uranium-rich layer deposited on top of the carbonate green rust layer; and (iii) some UO 2 crystals (3-5 μm sized) on the thin uranium layer. The experimental results proved that the U(VI) removal capacity of metal iron is not hindered by formation of a layer of carbonate green rust on the iron. Tests with cast iron and pure iron indicate that they have similar U(VI) removal capacities. At the end of experiment, U concentrations in solution approached the solubility of UO 2 (s), 10 -8 M. The stability of the carbonate green rust at the experimental conditions, pH, E h , [Fe 2+ ] and [HCO 3 - ], is discussed. (orig.)

  12. Influence of abiotic factors on bacterial proliferation and anoxic survival of the sea mussel Mytilus edulis L.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babarro, J.M.F.; De Zwaan, A.

    2002-01-01

    The effect of several abiotic factors (salinity, temperature and pH) on bacterial proliferation and survival time of the sea mussel Mytilus edulis L. were studied under anoxic incubations. In addition, the presence in the incubation media of ammonium and the volatile fatty acids propionate and

  13. Principles of lake sedimentology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janasson, L.

    1983-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive outline on the basic sedimentological principles for lakes, and focuses on environmental aspects and matters related to lake management and control-on lake ecology rather than lake geology. This is a guide for those who plan, perform and evaluate lake sedimentological investigations. Contents abridged: Lake types and sediment types. Sedimentation in lakes and water dynamics. Lake bottom dynamics. Sediment dynamics and sediment age. Sediments in aquatic pollution control programmes. Subject index

  14. The role of benthic macrofauna on nitrogen cycling in eutrophic lake sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svensson, J M

    1998-12-01

    This thesis concerns the role of sediment-living macrobenthos in the cycling of nitrogen species and nitrogen transformation in eutrophic freshwater sediments. In my thesis I have, employing {sup 15}N-isotope techniques in laboratory experiments, shown the importance of infaunal chironomid larvae and oligochaetes on denitrification in eutrophic lake sediments. Investigated benthic organisms not only expand the sediment surface with their permanent or non-permanent burrow constructions, they also transport water through the burrows continuously. This behaviour of intermittent water-pumping activity, provides the burrows with oxygen, and in addition, mediates the supply of nitrate to denitrifying zones. The highly dynamic oxygen climate within and narrow oxic zones around burrows, due to their radial geometry, provides a very short diffusion path for nitrate into surrounding anoxic zones. In my studies rates of denitrification were enhanced c. 3 to 6-fold by the influence of chironomids (Chironomus plumosus) and c. 2-fold by the influence of oligochaetes at comparable biomass. The difference in degree of stimulation is explained by species-specific habitat exploitation which could also be observed between different tube-dwelling species of chironomids. Besides chironomid biomass, the degree of enhancement of denitrification by chironomids was dependent on nitrate concentration in the overlying water, and water temperature. Nitrification was also seen to be stimulated by the infaunal macrobenthos but to a lesser degree than denitrification. It is suggested that bioturbated eutrophic sediment, under predominantly oxic bottom water conditions may act more pronouncedly as a sink for inorganic nitrogen relative to non-bioturbated sediment, and that bioturbated sediment above all, may be an important factor contributing to lowered transport of nitrogen to the coast. In order to sustain high nitrogen removal capacity in wetlands, ponds and lakes, it is further suggested

  15. Lake Afdera: a threatened saline lake in Ethiopia | Getahun | SINET ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lake Afdera is a saline lake located in the Afar region, Northern Ethiopia. Because of its inaccessibility it is one of the least studied lakes of the country. It supports life including three species of fish of which two are endemic. Recently, reports are coming out that this lake is used for salt extraction. This paper gives some ...

  16. Enhanced nitrogen removal from electroplating tail wastewater through two-staged anoxic-oxic (A/O) process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xinmei; Zhu, Chunyan; Huang, Bin; Yan, Qun; Zhang, Guangsheng

    2018-01-01

    Consisted of anaerobic (ANA), anoxic-1 (AN1), aerobic-1 (AE1), anoxic-2 (AN2), aerobic-2 (AE2) reactors and sediment tank, the two-staged A/O process was applied for depth treatment of electroplating tail wastewater with high electrical conductivity and large amounts of ammonia nitrogen. It was found that the NH 4 + -N and COD removal efficiencies reached 97.11% and 83.00%, respectively. Besides, the short-term salinity shock of the control, AE1 and AE2 indicated that AE1 and AE2 have better resistance to high salinity when the concentration of NaCl ranged from 1 to 10g/L. Meanwhile, it was found through high-throughput sequencing that bacteria genus Nitrosomonas, Nitrospira and Thauera, which are capable of nitrogen removal, were enriched in the two-staged A/O process. Moreover, both salt-tolerant bacteria and halophili bacteria were also found in the combined process. Therefore, microbial community within the two-staged A/O process could be acclimated to high electrical conductivity, and adapted for electroplating tail wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Anoxic Activated Sludge Monitoring with Combined Nitrate and Titrimetric Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, B.; Gernaey, Krist; Vanrolleghem, P.A.

    2002-01-01

    was with the carbon source in excess, since excess nitrate provoked nitrite build-up thereby complicating the data interpretation. A conceptual model could quantitatively describe the experimental observations and thus link the experimentally measured proton production with the consumption of electron acceptor......An experimental procedure for anoxic activated sludge monitoring with combined nitrate and titrimetric measurements is proposed and evaluated successfully with two known carbon sources, (-)acetate and dextrose. For nitrate measurements an ion-selective nitrate electrode is applied to allow...... for frequent measurements, and thereby the possibility for detailed determination of the denitrification biokinetics. An internal nitrate electrode calibration is implemented in the experiments to avoid the often-encountered electrode drift problem. It was observed that the best experimental design...

  18. Water quality of Lake Austin and Town Lake, Austin, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Freeman L.; Wells, Frank C.; Shelby, Wanda J.; McPherson, Emma

    1988-01-01

    Lake Austin and Town Lake are located on the Colorado River in Travis County, central Texas, and serve as a source of water for municipal and industrial water supplies, electrical-power generation, and recreation for more than 500,000 people in the Austin metropolitan area. Lake Austin, located immediately downstream of Lake Travis, extends for more than 20 miles into the western edge of the city of Austin. Town Lake extends through the downtown area of the city of Austin for nearly 6 miles where the Colorado River is impounded by Longhorn Dam.

  19. Refuge Lake Reclassification in 620 Minnesota Cisco Lakes under Future Climate Scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liping Jiang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cisco (Coregonus artedi is the most common coldwater stenothermal fish in Minnesota lakes. Water temperature (T and dissolved oxygen (DO in lakes are important controls of fish growth and reproduction and likely change with future climate warming. Built upon a previous study, this study uses a modified method to identify which of 620 cisco lakes in Minnesota can still support cisco populations under future climate and therefore be classified as cisco refuge lakes. The previous study used oxythermal stress parameter TDO3, the temperature at DO of 3 mg/L, simulated only from deep virtual lakes to classify 620 cisco lakes. Using four categories of virtual but representative cisco lakes in modified method, a one-dimensional water quality model MINLAKE2012 was used to simulate daily T and DO profiles in 82 virtual lakes under the past (1961–2008 and two future climate scenarios. A multiyear average of 31-day largest TDO3 over variable benchmark (VB periods, AvgATDO3VB, was calculated from simulated T and DO profiles using FishHabitat2013. Contour plots of AvgATDO3VB for four categories of virtual lakes were then developed to reclassify 620 cisco lakes into Tier 1 (AvgATDO3VB < 11 °C or Tier 2 refuge lakes, and Tier 3 non-refuge lakes (AvgATDO3VB > 17 °C. About 20% of 620 cisco lakes are projected to be refuge lakes under future climate scenarios, which is a more accurate projection (improving the prediction accuracy by ~6.5% from the previous study since AvgATDO3VB was found to vary by lake categories.

  20. Watershed vs. within-lake drivers of nitrogen: phosphorus dynamics in shallow lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginger, Luke J; Zimmer, Kyle D; Herwig, Brian R; Hanson, Mark A; Hobbs, William O; Small, Gaston E; Cotner, James B

    2017-10-01

    Research on lake eutrophication often identifies variables affecting amounts of phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) in lakes, but understanding factors influencing N:P ratios is important given its influence on species composition and toxin production by cyanobacteria. We sampled 80 shallow lakes in Minnesota (USA) for three years to assess effects of watershed size, proportion of watershed as both row crop and natural area, fish biomass, and lake alternative state (turbid vs. clear) on total N : total P (TN : TP), ammonium, total dissolved phosphorus (TDP), and seston stoichiometry. We also examined N:P stoichiometry in 20 additional lakes that shifted states during the study. Last, we assessed the importance of denitrification by measuring denitrification rates in sediment cores from a subset of 34 lakes, and by measuring seston δ 15 N in four additional experimental lakes before and after they were experimentally manipulated from turbid to clear states. Results showed alternative state had the largest influence on overall N:P stoichiometry in these systems, as it had the strongest relationship with TN : TP, seston C:N:P, ammonium, and TDP. Turbid lakes had higher N at given levels of P than clear lakes, with TN and ammonium 2-fold and 1.4-fold higher in turbid lakes, respectively. In lakes that shifted states, TN was 3-fold higher in turbid lakes, while TP was only 2-fold higher, supporting the notion N is more responsive to state shifts than is P. Seston δ 15 N increased after lakes shifted to clear states, suggesting higher denitrification rates may be important for reducing N levels in clear states, and potential denitrification rates in sediment cores were among the highest recorded in the literature. Overall, our results indicate lake state was a primary driver of N:P dynamics in shallow lakes, and lakes in clear states had much lower N at a given level of P relative to turbid lakes, likely due to higher denitrification rates. Shallow lakes are often

  1. Changes in Rongbuk lake and Imja lake in the Everest region of Himalaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W.; Doko, T.; Liu, C.; Ichinose, T.; Fukui, H.; Feng, Q.; Gou, P.

    2014-12-01

    The Himalaya holds the world record in terms of range and elevation. It is one of the most extensively glacierized regions in the world except the Polar Regions. The Himalaya is a region sensitive to climate change. Changes in the glacial regime are indicators of global climate changes. Since the second half of the last century, most Himalayan glaciers have melted due to climate change. These changes directly affected the changes of glacial lakes in the Himalayan region due to the glacier retreat. New glacial lakes are formed, and a number of them have expanded in the Everest region of the Himalayas. This paper focuses on the two glacial lakes which are Imja Lake, located at the southern slope, and Rongbuk Lake, located at the northern slope in the Mt. Everest region, Himalaya to present the spatio-temporal changes from 1976 to 2008. Topographical conditions between two lakes were different (Kruskal-Wallis test, p < 0.05). Rongbuk Lake was located at 623 m higher than Imja Lake, and radiation of Rongbuk Lake was higher than the Imja Lake. Although size of Imja Lake was larger than the Rongbuk Lake in 2008, the growth speed of Rongbuk Lake was accelerating since 2000 and exceeds Imja Lake in 2000-2008. This trend of expansion of Rongbuk Lake is anticipated to be continued in the 21st century. Rongbuk Lake would be the biggest potential risk of glacial lake outburst flood (GLOF) at the Everest region of Himalaya in the future.

  2. Modern limnology, sediment accumulation and varve formation processes in Lake Żabińskie, northeastern Poland: comprehensive process studies as a key to understand the sediment record

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicja Bonk

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Reconstructions of paleoclimatic and paleoenvironmental data from sediment records require a thorough knowledge of the physical, chemical and biological factors that influence sediment-formation processes and signal preservation in lake sediments. Lake Żabińskie, an eutrophic hardwater lake located in northeastern Poland (Masurian Lake District, provides an unique environment for the investigation of processes that lead to the varve formation. During a two-year long observation period we investigated limnological and hydrochemical conditions within the water column, recent sediment fluxes and laminations preserved in the sediments of this lake to understand the relationship between the lake water properties and the sediment formation processes. We demonstrate that different mixing patterns may occur in Lake Żabińskie, from dimictic to meromictic depending on the meteorological conditions. Regardless of the water mixing pattern, the lake was stratified during much of the year which led to significant differences between surface and near-bottom water environments. The hypolimnion was characterized by higher conductivity and anoxic conditions with only short periods of better oxygenation, which created conditions ideal for the formation and preservation of biogenic varves. The material collected from the sediment trap revealed notable changes in sediment fluxes with characteristic spring maxima and, optionally, a second late fall maxima. Considerable variability was also observed for the fluxes of total organic carbon, biogenic silica and calcite. Microscopic investigation of the topmost sediments revealed a complex structure of the varves showing a distinct spring calcite lamina followed by several fine calcite laminae interbedded with diatom-rich laminae and, finally, by an organic-rich lamina with minerogenic admixtures deposited during winter. This seasonal variability was also reflected in the chemical composition inferred from high

  3. Marine Microorganisms as Source of Stereoselective Esterases and Ketoreductases: Kinetic Resolution of a Prostaglandin Intermediate

    KAUST Repository

    De Vitis, Valerio; Guidi, Benedetta; Contente, Martina Letizia; Granato, Tiziana Mariarita; Conti, Paola; Molinari, Francesco; Crotti, Elena; Mapelli, Francesca; Borin, Sara S.; Daffonchio, Daniele; Romano, Diego

    2014-01-01

    A screening among bacterial strains isolated from water-brine interface of the deep hypersaline anoxic basins (DHABs) of the Eastern Mediterranean was carried out for the biocatalytical resolution of racemic propyl ester of anti-2-oxotricyclo[2.2.1.0]heptan-7-carboxylic acid (R,S)-1, a key intermediate for the synthesis of d-cloprostenol. Bacillus horneckiae 15A gave highly stereoselective reduction of (R,S)-1, whereas Halomonas aquamarina 9B enantioselectively hydrolysed (R,S)-1; in both cases, enantiomerically pure unreacted (R)-1 could be easily recovered and purified at molar conversion below 57–58 %, showing the potential of DHAB extremophile microbiome and marine-derived enzymes in stereoselective biocatalysis.

  4. Marine Microorganisms as Source of Stereoselective Esterases and Ketoreductases: Kinetic Resolution of a Prostaglandin Intermediate

    KAUST Repository

    De Vitis, Valerio

    2014-09-30

    A screening among bacterial strains isolated from water-brine interface of the deep hypersaline anoxic basins (DHABs) of the Eastern Mediterranean was carried out for the biocatalytical resolution of racemic propyl ester of anti-2-oxotricyclo[2.2.1.0]heptan-7-carboxylic acid (R,S)-1, a key intermediate for the synthesis of d-cloprostenol. Bacillus horneckiae 15A gave highly stereoselective reduction of (R,S)-1, whereas Halomonas aquamarina 9B enantioselectively hydrolysed (R,S)-1; in both cases, enantiomerically pure unreacted (R)-1 could be easily recovered and purified at molar conversion below 57–58 %, showing the potential of DHAB extremophile microbiome and marine-derived enzymes in stereoselective biocatalysis.

  5. Lake-wide distribution of Dreissena in Lake Michigan, 1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Guy W.; DeSorcie, Timothy J.; Holuszko, Jeffrey D.

    2001-01-01

    The Great Lakes Science Center has conducted lake-wide bottom trawl surveys of the fish community in Lake Michigan each fall since 1973. These systematic surveys are performed at depths of 9 to 110 m at each of seven index sites around Lake Michigan. Zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) populations have expanded to all survey locations and at a level to sufficiently contribute to the bottom trawl catches. The quagga (Dreissena bugensis), recently reported in Lake Michigan, was likely in the catches though not recognized. Dreissena spp. biomass ranged from about 0.6 to 15 kg/ha at the various sites in 1999. Dreissenid mussels were found at depths of 9 to 82 m, with their peak biomass at 27 to 46 m. The colonization of these exotic mussels has ecological implications as well as potential ramifications on the ability to sample fish consistently and effectively with bottom trawls in Lake Michigan.

  6. Large Lakes Dominate CO2 Evasion From Lakes in an Arctic Catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocher-Ros, Gerard; Giesler, Reiner; Lundin, Erik; Salimi, Shokoufeh; Jonsson, Anders; Karlsson, Jan

    2017-12-01

    CO2 evasion from freshwater lakes is an important component of the carbon cycle. However, the relative contribution from different lake sizes may vary, since several parameters underlying CO2 flux are size dependent. Here we estimated the annual lake CO2 evasion from a catchment in northern Sweden encompassing about 30,000 differently sized lakes. We show that areal CO2 fluxes decreased rapidly with lake size, but this was counteracted by the greater overall coverage of larger lakes. As a result, total efflux increased with lake size and the single largest lake in the catchment dominated the CO2 evasion (53% of all CO2 evaded). By contrast, the contribution from the smallest ponds (about 27,000) was minor (evasion at the landscape scale.

  7. Lake Michigan lake trout PCB model forecast post audit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scenario forecasts for total PCBs in Lake Michigan (LM) lake trout were conducted using the linked LM2-Toxics and LM Food Chain models, supported by a suite of additional LM models. Efforts were conducted under the Lake Michigan Mass Balance Study and the post audit represents th...

  8. Functional coupling of glycolysis and phosphocreatine utilization in anoxic fish muscle. : An in vivo 31P NMR study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Waarde, A; Van den Thillart, G; Erkelens, Cees; Addink, A; Lugtenburg, J

    1990-01-01

    Three fish species with different strategies for anoxic survival (goldfish, tilapia, and common carp) were exposed to environmental anoxia (4, 3, and 1 h, respectively). The concentrations of high energy phosphate compounds and inorganic phosphate, besides the intracellular pH in the epaxial muscle

  9. Effect of a Jurassic oceanic anoxic event on belemnite ecology and evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullmann, Clemens Vinzenz; Thibault, Nicolas Rudolph; Ruhl, Micha

    2014-01-01

    The Toarcian oceanic anoxic event (T-OAE; ∼183 million y ago) is possibly the most extreme episode of widespread ocean oxygen deficiency in the Phanerozoic, coinciding with rapid atmospheric pCO2 increase and significant loss of biodiversity in marine faunas. The event is a unique past tipping...... point in the Earth system, where rapid and massive release of isotopically light carbon led to a major perturbation in the global carbon cycle as recorded in organic and inorganic C isotope records. Modern marine ecosystems are projected to experience major loss in biodiversity in response to enhanced...

  10. Using Satellite Imagery to Monitor the Major Lakes; Case Study Lake Hamun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norouzi, H.; Islam, R.; Bah, A.; AghaKouchak, A.

    2015-12-01

    Proper lakes function can ease the impact of floods and drought especially in arid and semi-arid regions. They are important environmentally and can directly affect human lives. Better understanding of the effect of climate change and human-driven changes on lakes would provide invaluable information for policy-makers and local people. As part of a comprehensive study, we aim to monitor the land-cover/ land-use changes in the world's major lakes using satellite observations. As a case study, Hamun Lake which is a pluvial Lake, also known as shallow Lake, located on the south-east of Iran and adjacent to Afghanistan, and Pakistan borders is investigated. The Lake is the main source of resources (agriculture, fishing and hunting) for the people around it and politically important in the region since it is shared among three different countries. The purpose of the research is to find the Lake's area from 1972 to 2015 and to see if any drought or water resources management has affected the lake. Analyzing satellites imagery from Landsat shows that the area of the Lake changes seasonally and intra-annually. Significant seasonal effects are found in 1975,1977, 1987, 1993, 1996, 1998, 2000, 2009 and 2011, as well as, substantial amount of shallow water is found throughout the years. The precipitation records as well as drought historical records are studied for the lake's basin. Meteorological studies suggest that the drought, decrease of rainfalls in the province and the improper management of the Lake have caused environmental, economic and geographical consequences. The results reveal that lake has experienced at least two prolong dryings since 1972 which drought cannot solely be blamed as main forcing factor.Proper lakes function can ease the impact of floods and drought especially in arid and semi-arid regions. They are important environmentally and can directly affect human lives. Better understanding of the effect of climate change and human-driven changes on lakes

  11. Biological and chemical characterization of metal bioavailability in sediments from Lake Roosevelt, Columbia River, Washington, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besser, J.M.; Brumbaugh, W.G.; Ivey, C.D.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Moran, P.W.

    2008-01-01

    We studied the bioavailability and toxicity of copper, zinc, arsenic, cadmium, and lead in sediments from Lake Roosevelt (LR), a reservoir on the Columbia River in Washington, USA that receives inputs of metals from an upstream smelter facility. We characterized chronic sediment toxicity, metal bioaccumulation, and metal concentrations in sediment and pore water from eight study sites: one site upstream in the Columbia River, six sites in the reservoir, and a reference site in an uncontaminated tributary. Total recoverable metal concentrations in LR sediments generally decreased from upstream to downstream in the study area, but sediments from two sites in the reservoir had metal concentrations much lower than adjacent reservoir sites and similar to the reference site, apparently due to erosion of uncontaminated bank soils. Concentrations of acid-volatile sulfide in LR sediments were too low to provide strong controls on metal bioavailability, and selective sediment extractions indicated that metals in most LR sediments were primarily associated with iron and manganese oxides. Oligochaetes (Lumbriculus variegatus) accumulated greatest concentrations of copper from the river sediment, and greatest concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, and lead from reservoir sediments. Chronic toxic effects on amphipods (Hyalella azteca; reduced survival) and midge larvae (Chironomus dilutus; reduced growth) in whole-sediment exposures were generally consistent with predictions of metal toxicity based on empirical and equilibrium partitioning-based sediment quality guidelines. Elevated metal concentrations in pore waters of some LR sediments suggested that metals released from iron and manganese oxides under anoxic conditions contributed to metal bioaccumulation and toxicity. Results of both chemical and biological assays indicate that metals in sediments from both riverine and reservoir habitats of Lake Roosevelt are available to benthic invertebrates. These findings will be used as

  12. A long-term multi-proxy record of varved sediments highlights climate-induced mixing-regime shift in a large hard-water lake ~5000 years ago

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Finsinger

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The long-term terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem dynamics spanning between approximately 6200 and 4800 cal BP were investigated using pollen, diatoms, pigments, charcoal, and geochemistry from varved sediments collected in a large stratified perialpine lake, Lago Grande di Avigliana, in the Italian Alps. Marked changes were detected in diatom and pigment assemblages and in sediment composition at ~4900 cal BP. Organic matter rapidly increased and diatom assemblages shifted from oligotrophic to oligo-mesotrophic planktonic assemblages suggesting that nutrients increased at that time. Because land cover, erosion, and fire frequency did not change significantly, external nutrient sources were possibly not essential in controlling the lake-ecosystem dynamics. This is also supported by redundancy analysis, which showed that variables explaining significant amounts of variance in the diatom data were not the ones related to changes in the catchment. Instead, the broad coincidence between the phytoplankton dynamics and rising lake-levels, cooler temperatures, and stronger spring winds in the northern Mediterranean borderlands possibly points to the effects of climate change on the nutrient recycling in the lake by means of the control that climate can exert on mixing depth. We hypothesize that the increased P-release rates and higher organic-matter accumulation rates, proceeded by enhanced precipitation of iron sulphides, were possibly caused by deeper and stronger mixing leading to enhanced input of nutrients from the anoxic hypolimnion into the epilimnion. Although we cannot completely rule out the influence of minor land-cover changes due to human activities, it may be hypothesized that climate-induced cumulative effects related to mixing regime and P-recycling from sediments influenced the aquatic-ecosystem dynamics.

  13. Are iron-phosphate minerals a sink for phosphorus in anoxic Black Sea sediments?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikki Dijkstra

    Full Text Available Phosphorus (P is a key nutrient for marine organisms. The only long-term removal pathway for P in the marine realm is burial in sediments. Iron (Fe bound P accounts for a significant proportion of this burial at the global scale. In sediments underlying anoxic bottom waters, burial of Fe-bound P is generally assumed to be negligible because of reductive dissolution of Fe(III (oxyhydroxides and release of the associated P. However, recent work suggests that Fe-bound P is an important burial phase in euxinic (i.e. anoxic and sulfidic basin sediments in the Baltic Sea. In this study, we investigate the role of Fe-bound P as a potential sink for P in Black Sea sediments overlain by oxic and euxinic bottom waters. Sequential P extractions performed on sediments from six multicores along two shelf-to-basin transects provide evidence for the burial of Fe-bound P at all sites, including those in the euxinic deep basin. In the latter sediments, Fe-bound P accounts for more than 20% of the total sedimentary P pool. We suggest that this P is present in the form of reduced Fe-P minerals. We hypothesize that these minerals may be formed as inclusions in sulfur-disproportionating Deltaproteobacteria. Further research is required to elucidate the exact mineral form and formation mechanism of this P burial phase, as well as its role as a sink for P in sulfide-rich marine sediments.

  14. Are iron-phosphate minerals a sink for phosphorus in anoxic Black Sea sediments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, Nikki; Kraal, Peter; Kuypers, Marcel M M; Schnetger, Bernhard; Slomp, Caroline P

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is a key nutrient for marine organisms. The only long-term removal pathway for P in the marine realm is burial in sediments. Iron (Fe) bound P accounts for a significant proportion of this burial at the global scale. In sediments underlying anoxic bottom waters, burial of Fe-bound P is generally assumed to be negligible because of reductive dissolution of Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxides and release of the associated P. However, recent work suggests that Fe-bound P is an important burial phase in euxinic (i.e. anoxic and sulfidic) basin sediments in the Baltic Sea. In this study, we investigate the role of Fe-bound P as a potential sink for P in Black Sea sediments overlain by oxic and euxinic bottom waters. Sequential P extractions performed on sediments from six multicores along two shelf-to-basin transects provide evidence for the burial of Fe-bound P at all sites, including those in the euxinic deep basin. In the latter sediments, Fe-bound P accounts for more than 20% of the total sedimentary P pool. We suggest that this P is present in the form of reduced Fe-P minerals. We hypothesize that these minerals may be formed as inclusions in sulfur-disproportionating Deltaproteobacteria. Further research is required to elucidate the exact mineral form and formation mechanism of this P burial phase, as well as its role as a sink for P in sulfide-rich marine sediments.

  15. Spatial distribution of seepage at a flow-through lake: Lake Hampen, Western Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kidmose, Jacob Baarstrøm; Engesgaard, Peter Knudegaard; Nilsson, Bertel

    2011-01-01

    recharge patiern of the lake and relating these to the geologic history of the lake. Recharge of the surrounding aquifer by lake water occurs off shore in a narrow zone, as measured from lake–groundwater gradients. A 33-m-deep d18O profi le at the recharge side shows a lake d18O plume at depths...... that corroborates the interpretation of lake water recharging off shore and moving down gradient. Inclusion of lake bed heterogeneity in the model improved the comparison of simulated and observed discharge to the lake. The apparent age of the discharging groundwater to the lake was determined by CFCs, resulting...

  16. Kinetic modelling of bentonite-canister interaction. Long-term predictions of copper canister corrosion under oxic and anoxic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wersin, P; Spahiu, K; Bruno, J [MBT Tecnologia Ambiental, Cerdanyola (Spain)

    1994-09-01

    A new modelling approach for canister corrosion which emphasises chemical processes and diffusion at the bentonite-canister interface is presented. From the geochemical boundary conditions corrosion rates for both an anoxic case and an oxic case are derived and uncertainties thereof are estimated via sensitivity analyses. Time scales of corrosion are assessed by including calculations of the evolution of redox potential in the near field and pitting corrosion. This indicates realistic corrosion depths in the range of 10{sup -7} and 4*10{sup -5} mm/yr, respectively for anoxic and oxic corrosion. Taking conservative estimates, depths are increased by a factor of about 200 for both cases. From these predictions it is suggested that copper canister corrosion does not constitute a problem for repository safety, although certain factors such as temperature and radiolysis have not been explicitly included. The possible effect of bacterial processes on corrosion should be further investigated as it might enhance locally the described redox process. 35 refs, 11 figs, 6 tabs.

  17. Kinetic modelling of bentonite-canister interaction. Long-term predictions of copper canister corrosion under oxic and anoxic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wersin, P.; Spahiu, K.; Bruno, J.

    1994-09-01

    A new modelling approach for canister corrosion which emphasises chemical processes and diffusion at the bentonite-canister interface is presented. From the geochemical boundary conditions corrosion rates for both an anoxic case and an oxic case are derived and uncertainties thereof are estimated via sensitivity analyses. Time scales of corrosion are assessed by including calculations of the evolution of redox potential in the near field and pitting corrosion. This indicates realistic corrosion depths in the range of 10 -7 and 4*10 -5 mm/yr, respectively for anoxic and oxic corrosion. Taking conservative estimates, depths are increased by a factor of about 200 for both cases. From these predictions it is suggested that copper canister corrosion does not constitute a problem for repository safety, although certain factors such as temperature and radiolysis have not been explicitly included. The possible effect of bacterial processes on corrosion should be further investigated as it might enhance locally the described redox process. 35 refs, 11 figs, 6 tabs

  18. Viruses of haloarchaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, Alison W S; Williams, Timothy J; Erdmann, Susanne; Papke, R Thane; Cavicchioli, Ricardo

    2014-11-13

    In hypersaline environments, haloarchaea (halophilic members of the Archaea) are the dominant organisms, and the viruses that infect them, haloarchaeoviruses are at least ten times more abundant. Since their discovery in 1974, described haloarchaeoviruses include head-tailed, pleomorphic, spherical and spindle-shaped morphologies, representing Myoviridae, Siphoviridae, Podoviridae, Pleolipoviridae, Sphaerolipoviridae and Fuselloviridae families. This review overviews current knowledge of haloarchaeoviruses, providing information about classification, morphotypes, macromolecules, life cycles, genetic manipulation and gene regulation, and host-virus responses. In so doing, the review incorporates knowledge from laboratory studies of isolated viruses, field-based studies of environmental samples, and both genomic and metagenomic analyses of haloarchaeoviruses. What emerges is that some haloarchaeoviruses possess unique morphological and life cycle properties, while others share features with other viruses (e.g., bacteriophages). Their interactions with hosts influence community structure and evolution of populations that exist in hypersaline environments as diverse as seawater evaporation ponds, to hot desert or Antarctic lakes. The discoveries of their wide-ranging and important roles in the ecology and evolution of hypersaline communities serves as a strong motivator for future investigations of both laboratory-model and environmental systems.

  19. Viruses of Haloarchaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison W. S. Luk

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In hypersaline environments, haloarchaea (halophilic members of the Archaea are the dominant organisms, and the viruses that infect them, haloarchaeoviruses are at least ten times more abundant. Since their discovery in 1974, described haloarchaeoviruses include head-tailed, pleomorphic, spherical and spindle-shaped morphologies, representing Myoviridae, Siphoviridae, Podoviridae, Pleolipoviridae, Sphaerolipoviridae and Fuselloviridae families. This review overviews current knowledge of haloarchaeoviruses, providing information about classification, morphotypes, macromolecules, life cycles, genetic manipulation and gene regulation, and host-virus responses. In so doing, the review incorporates knowledge from laboratory studies of isolated viruses, field-based studies of environmental samples, and both genomic and metagenomic analyses of haloarchaeoviruses. What emerges is that some haloarchaeoviruses possess unique morphological and life cycle properties, while others share features with other viruses (e.g., bacteriophages. Their interactions with hosts influence community structure and evolution of populations that exist in hypersaline environments as diverse as seawater evaporation ponds, to hot desert or Antarctic lakes. The discoveries of their wide-ranging and important roles in the ecology and evolution of hypersaline communities serves as a strong motivator for future investigations of both laboratory-model and environmental systems.

  20. Aquatic macrophyte richness in Danish lakes in relation to alkalinity, transparency, and lake area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Ole Skafte; Sand-Jensen, Kaj

    2000-01-01

    We examined the relationship between environmental factors and the richness of submerged macrophytes species in 73 Danish lakes, which are mainly small, shallow, and have mesotrophic to hypertrophic conditions. We found that mean species richness per lake was only 4.5 in acid lakes of low...... alkalinity but 12.3 in lakes of high alkalinity due to a greater occurrence of the species-rich group of elodeids. Mean species richness per lake also increased significantly with increasing Secchi depth. No significant relationship between species richness and lake surface area was observed among the entire...... group of lakes or a subset of eutrophic lakes, as the growth of submerged macrophytes in large lakes may be restricted by wave action in shallow water and light restriction in deep water. In contrast, macrophyte species richness increased with lake surface area in transparent lakes, presumably due...

  1. LakeMIP Kivu: evaluating the representation of a large, deep tropical lake by a set of one-dimensional lake models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WIM Thiery

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The African great lakes are of utmost importance for the local economy (fishing, as well as being essential to the survival of the local people. During the past decades, these lakes experienced fast changes in ecosystem structure and functioning, and their future evolution is a major concern. In this study, for the first time a set of one-dimensional lake models are evaluated for Lake Kivu (2.28°S; 28.98°E, East Africa. The unique limnology of this meromictic lake, with the importance of salinity and subsurface springs in a tropical high-altitude climate, presents a worthy challenge to the seven models involved in the Lake Model Intercomparison Project (LakeMIP. Meteorological observations from two automatic weather stations are used to drive the models, whereas a unique dataset, containing over 150 temperature profiles recorded since 2002, is used to assess the model's performance. Simulations are performed over the freshwater layer only (60 m and over the average lake depth (240 m, since salinity increases with depth below 60 m in Lake Kivu and some lake models do not account for the influence of salinity upon lake stratification. All models are able to reproduce the mixing seasonality in Lake Kivu, as well as the magnitude and seasonal cycle of the lake enthalpy change. Differences between the models can be ascribed to variations in the treatment of the radiative forcing and the computation of the turbulent heat fluxes. Fluctuations in wind velocity and solar radiation explain inter-annual variability of observed water column temperatures. The good agreement between the deep simulations and the observed meromictic stratification also shows that a subset of models is able to account for the salinity- and geothermal-induced effects upon deep-water stratification. Finally, based on the strengths and weaknesses discerned in this study, an informed choice of a one-dimensional lake model for a given research purpose becomes possible.

  2. High net CO2 and CH4 release at a eutrophic shallow lake on a formerly drained fen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Daniela; Koebsch, Franziska; Larmanou, Eric; Augustin, Jürgen; Sachs, Torsten

    2016-05-01

    Drained peatlands often act as carbon dioxide (CO2) hotspots. Raising the groundwater table is expected to reduce their CO2 contribution to the atmosphere and revitalise their function as carbon (C) sink in the long term. Without strict water management rewetting often results in partial flooding and the formation of spatially heterogeneous, nutrient-rich shallow lakes. Uncertainties remain as to when the intended effect of rewetting is achieved, as this specific ecosystem type has hardly been investigated in terms of greenhouse gas (GHG) exchange. In most cases of rewetting, methane (CH4) emissions increase under anoxic conditions due to a higher water table and in terms of global warming potential (GWP) outperform the shift towards CO2 uptake, at least in the short term.Based on eddy covariance measurements we studied the ecosystem-atmosphere exchange of CH4 and CO2 at a shallow lake situated on a former fen grassland in northeastern Germany. The lake evolved shortly after flooding, 9 years previous to our investigation period. The ecosystem consists of two main surface types: open water (inhabited by submerged and floating vegetation) and emergent vegetation (particularly including the eulittoral zone of the lake, dominated by Typha latifolia). To determine the individual contribution of the two main surface types to the net CO2 and CH4 exchange of the whole lake ecosystem, we combined footprint analysis with CH4 modelling and net ecosystem exchange partitioning.The CH4 and CO2 dynamics were strikingly different between open water and emergent vegetation. Net CH4 emissions from the open water area were around 4-fold higher than from emergent vegetation stands, accounting for 53 and 13 g CH4 m-2 a-1 respectively. In addition, both surface types were net CO2 sources with 158 and 750 g CO2 m-2 a-1 respectively. Unusual meteorological conditions in terms of a warm and dry summer and a mild winter might have facilitated high respiration rates. In sum, even after 9

  3. Methane emissions from permafrost thaw lakes limited by lake drainage.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Huissteden, J.; Berrittella, C.; Parmentier, F.J.W.; Mi, Y.; Maximov, T.C.; Dolman, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    Thaw lakes in permafrost areas are sources of the strong greenhouse gas methane. They develop mostly in sedimentary lowlands with permafrost and a high excess ground ice volume, resulting in large areas covered with lakes and drained thaw-lake basins (DTLBs; refs,). Their expansion is enhanced by

  4. Great Lakes Bathymetry

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathymetry of Lakes Michigan, Erie, Saint Clair, Ontario and Huron has been compiled as a component of a NOAA project to rescue Great Lakes lake floor geological and...

  5. Lake and lake-related drainage area parameters for site investigation program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomqvist, P.; Brunberg, A.K. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Limnology; Brydsten, L [Umeaa Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Ecology and Environmental Science

    2000-09-01

    In this paper, a number of parameters of importance to a preliminary determination of the ecological function of lakes are presented. The choice of parameters have been made with respect to a model for the determination of the nature conservation values of lakes which is currently being developed by the authors of this report, but is also well suited for a general description of the lake type and the functioning of the inherent ecosystem. The parameters have been divided into five groups: (1) The location of the object relative important gradients in the surrounding nature; (2) The lake catchment area and its major constituents; (3) The lake morphometry; (4) The lake ecosystem; (5) Human-induced damages to the lake ecosystem. The first two groups, principally based on the climate, hydrology, geology and vegetation of the catchment area represent parameters that can be used to establish the rarity and representativity of the lake, and will in the context of site investigation program be used as a basis for generalisation of the results. The third group, the lake morphometry parameters, are standard parameters for the outline of sampling programmes and for calculations of the physical extension of different key habitats in the system. The fourth group, the ecosystem of the lake, includes physical, chemical and biological parameters required for determination of the stratification pattern, light climate, influence from the terrestrial ecosystem of the catchment area, trophic status, distribution of key habitats, and presence of fish and rare fauna and flora in the lake. In the context of site investigation program, the parameters in these two groups will be used for budget calculations of the flow of energy and material in the system. The fifth group, finally, describes the degree on anthropogenic influence on the ecosystem and will in the context of site investigation programmes be used to judge eventual malfunctioning within the entire, or parts of, the lake

  6. Lake and lake-related drainage area parameters for site investigation program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomqvist, P.; Brunberg, A.K.; Brydsten, L

    2000-09-01

    In this paper, a number of parameters of importance to a preliminary determination of the ecological function of lakes are presented. The choice of parameters have been made with respect to a model for the determination of the nature conservation values of lakes which is currently being developed by the authors of this report, but is also well suited for a general description of the lake type and the functioning of the inherent ecosystem. The parameters have been divided into five groups: 1) The location of the object relative important gradients in the surrounding nature; 2) The lake catchment area and its major constituents; 3) The lake morphometry; 4) The lake ecosystem; 5) Human-induced damages to the lake ecosystem. The first two groups, principally based on the climate, hydrology, geology and vegetation of the catchment area represent parameters that can be used to establish the rarity and representativity of the lake, and will in the context of site investigation program be used as a basis for generalisation of the results. The third group, the lake morphometry parameters, are standard parameters for the outline of sampling programmes and for calculations of the physical extension of different key habitats in the system. The fourth group, the ecosystem of the lake, includes physical, chemical and biological parameters required for determination of the stratification pattern, light climate, influence from the terrestrial ecosystem of the catchment area, trophic status, distribution of key habitats, and presence of fish and rare fauna and flora in the lake. In the context of site investigation program, the parameters in these two groups will be used for budget calculations of the flow of energy and material in the system. The fifth group, finally, describes the degree on anthropogenic influence on the ecosystem and will in the context of site investigation programmes be used to judge eventual malfunctioning within the entire, or parts of, the lake ecosystem

  7. X-ray microtomography characterization of carbonate microbialites from a hypersaline coastal lagoon in the Rio de Janeiro State—Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, A.S., E-mail: alemachado@lin.ufrj.br [Laboratório de Geologia Sedimentar—IGEO, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Laboratório de Instrumentação Nuclear—COPPE, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Dal Bó, P.F.F. [Laboratório de Geologia Sedimentar—IGEO, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Lima, I. [Laboratório de Instrumentação Nuclear—COPPE, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Borghi, L. [Laboratório de Geologia Sedimentar—IGEO, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Lopes, R. [Laboratório de Instrumentação Nuclear—COPPE, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2015-06-01

    The objective of the present study is to apply the micro-CT technique to assess recent microbialite samples from a hypersaline coastal lagoon in the Rio de Janeiro State. The study comprises structural assessment, mineralogical characterization and porosity distribution of each sample. Micro-CT is increasingly present in geological reservoir analyses, and has advantages over other laboratory techniques since it is non-invasive and allows 2D/3D visualization of inner structures without previous preparation method, such as slabbing, polishing, thinning or impregnation. This technique renders structural analyses which can be spatially resolved to a scale of micrometers. Results show that micro-CT technique is also adequate for the characterization of carbonate microbialites, providing excellent high resolution 3D images, that enabled to distinguish different mineralogies and porosity distribution beyond it is inner structure.

  8. X-ray microtomography characterization of carbonate microbialites from a hypersaline coastal lagoon in the Rio de Janeiro State—Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machado, A.S.; Dal Bó, P.F.F.; Lima, I.; Borghi, L.; Lopes, R.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to apply the micro-CT technique to assess recent microbialite samples from a hypersaline coastal lagoon in the Rio de Janeiro State. The study comprises structural assessment, mineralogical characterization and porosity distribution of each sample. Micro-CT is increasingly present in geological reservoir analyses, and has advantages over other laboratory techniques since it is non-invasive and allows 2D/3D visualization of inner structures without previous preparation method, such as slabbing, polishing, thinning or impregnation. This technique renders structural analyses which can be spatially resolved to a scale of micrometers. Results show that micro-CT technique is also adequate for the characterization of carbonate microbialites, providing excellent high resolution 3D images, that enabled to distinguish different mineralogies and porosity distribution beyond it is inner structure

  9. Diversity and stratification of archaea in a hypersaline microbial mat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Charles E; Spear, John R; Harris, J Kirk; Pace, Norman R

    2009-04-01

    The Guerrero Negro (GN) hypersaline microbial mats have become one focus for biogeochemical studies of stratified ecosystems. The GN mats are found beneath several of a series of ponds of increasing salinity that make up a solar saltern fed from Pacific Ocean water pumped from the Laguna Ojo de Liebre near GN, Baja California Sur, Mexico. Molecular surveys of the laminated photosynthetic microbial mat below the fourth pond in the series identified an enormous diversity of bacteria in the mat, but archaea have received little attention. To determine the bulk contribution of archaeal phylotypes to the pond 4 study site, we determined the phylogenetic distribution of archaeal rRNA gene sequences in PCR libraries based on nominally universal primers. The ratios of bacterial/archaeal/eukaryotic rRNA genes, 90%/9%/1%, suggest that the archaeal contribution to the metabolic activities of the mat may be significant. To explore the distribution of archaea in the mat, sequences derived using archaeon-specific PCR primers were surveyed in 10 strata of the 6-cm-thick mat. The diversity of archaea overall was substantial albeit less than the diversity observed previously for bacteria. Archaeal diversity, mainly euryarchaeotes, was highest in the uppermost 2 to 3 mm of the mat and decreased rapidly with depth, where crenarchaeotes dominated. Only 3% of the sequences were specifically related to known organisms including methanogens. While some mat archaeal clades corresponded with known chemical gradients, others did not, which is likely explained by heretofore-unrecognized gradients. Some clades did not segregate by depth in the mat, indicating broad metabolic repertoires, undersampling, or both.

  10. Rubidium-strontium ages from the Oxford Lake-Knee Lake greenstone belt, northern Manitoba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, G.S.; Cheung, S.-P.

    1980-01-01

    Rb-Sr whole-rock ages have been determined for rocks from the Oxford Lake-Knee Lake-Gods Lake geenstone belt in the Superior Province of northeastern Manitoba. The age of the Magill Lake Pluton is 2455 +- 35 Ma(lambda 87 Rb = 1.42 x 10 -11 yr -1 ), with an initial 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratio of 0.7078 +- 0.0043. This granite stock intrudes the Oxford Lake Group, so it is post-tectonic and probably related to the second, weaker stage of metamorphism. The age of the Bayly Lake Pluton is 2424 +- 74 Ma, with an initial 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratio of 0.7029 +- 0.0001. This granodioritic batholith complex does not intrude the Oxford Lake Group. It is syn-tectonic and metamorphosed. The age of volcanic rocks of the Hayes River Group, from Goose Lake (30 km south of Gods Lake Narrows), is 2680 +- 125 Ma, with an initial 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratio of 0.7014 +- 0.0009. The age for the Magill Lake and Bayly Lake Plutons can be interpreted as the minimum ages of granite intrusion in the area. The age for the Hayes River Group volcanic rocks is consistent with Rb-Sr ages of volcanic rocks from other Archean greenstone belts within the northwestern Superior Province. (auth)

  11. A Dynamical Downscaling study over the Great Lakes Region Using WRF-Lake: Historical Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, C.; Lofgren, B. M.

    2014-12-01

    As the largest group of fresh water bodies on Earth, the Laurentian Great Lakes have significant influence on local and regional weather and climate through their unique physical features compared with the surrounding land. Due to the limited spatial resolution and computational efficiency of general circulation models (GCMs), the Great Lakes are geometrically ignored or idealized into several grid cells in GCMs. Thus, the nested regional climate modeling (RCM) technique, known as dynamical downscaling, serves as a feasible solution to fill the gap. The latest Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) is employed to dynamically downscale the historical simulation produced by the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory-Coupled Model (GFDL-CM3) from 1970-2005. An updated lake scheme originated from the Community Land Model is implemented in the latest WRF version 3.6. It is a one-dimensional mass and energy balance scheme with 20-25 model layers, including up to 5 snow layers on the lake ice, 10 water layers, and 10 soil layers on the lake bottom. The lake scheme is used with actual lake points and lake depth. The preliminary results show that WRF-Lake model, with a fine horizontal resolution and realistic lake representation, provides significantly improved hydroclimates, in terms of lake surface temperature, annual cycle of precipitation, ice content, and lake-effect snowfall. Those improvements suggest that better resolution of the lakes and the mesoscale process of lake-atmosphere interaction are crucial to understanding the climate and climate change in the Great Lakes region.

  12. Studies of anoxiC conditions in Framvaren fjord, Gullmaren fjord and Byfjorden and of mixing between seawater and freshwater at the Kalix river and estuary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roos, P.

    2001-01-01

    The sediments in the anoxic Framvaren fjord acts as a source for actinides to the overlaying water column. The remobilisation process is most likely linked to early diagenetic alteration of the marine organic material in the sediments. This is indicated by the close correlation between Pu, Am and dissolved organic carbon depth profiles in the water column. Speciation studies of the plutonium and americium in the water column shows that both to a large degree are associated to colloidal material in the size range 0.01-0.45 μm. Less than 2% is retained by a 0.45 μm filter which is reflected in the low K D -values obtained of about 20 000, which is at least a factor of 10 lower than in typical coastal waters. It is also proven that the plutonium exist almost entirely in the trivalent state in the anoxic water column. This study is the first ever to show extensive remobilisation of plutonium and americium from sediments in anoxic marine basins. Similar remobilisation from sediments most likely occur in other anoxic marine waters where early diagenesis results in humic and fulvic acid production. Although the remobilised actinides in the Framvaren fjord at present don't pose any radiological hazard due to the lack of fish in anoxic waters, it is of great concern to identify processes involved in the remobilisation of actinides from anoxic sediments as such sediments likely will be a major source for actinides in the Baltic Sea and other oxygen sensitive basins in the long term perspective. In such basins the remobilised plutonium may reach oxygenated and biological productive waters by convection. Results from the temporarily oxygen deficient Gullmaren fjord on the Swedish west coast shows that remobilisation from sediments can not be identified during short (a few months) periods of oxygen deficient water. The rapid bioturbation (quantified by tracer studies) in this fjord results in that sedimenting organic material rapidly is buried and distributed within the upper

  13. Studies of anoxiC conditions in Framvaren fjord, Gullmaren fjord and Byfjorden and of mixing between seawater and freshwater at the Kalix river and estuary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roos, P. [Univ. of Lund, Lund (Sweden)

    2001-04-01

    The sediments in the anoxic Framvaren fjord acts as a source for actinides to the overlaying water column. The remobilisation process is most likely linked to early diagenetic alteration of the marine organic material in the sediments. This is indicated by the close correlation between Pu, Am and dissolved organic carbon depth profiles in the water column. Speciation studies of the plutonium and americium in the water column shows that both to a large degree are associated to colloidal material in the size range 0.01-0.45 {mu}m. Less than 2% is retained by a 0.45 {mu}m filter which is reflected in the low K{sub D}-values obtained of about 20 000, which is at least a factor of 10 lower than in typical coastal waters. It is also proven that the plutonium exist almost entirely in the trivalent state in the anoxic water column. This study is the first ever to show extensive remobilisation of plutonium and americium from sediments in anoxic marine basins. Similar remobilisation from sediments most likely occur in other anoxic marine waters where early diagenesis results in humic and fulvic acid production. Although the remobilised actinides in the Framvaren fjord at present don't pose any radiological hazard due to the lack of fish in anoxic waters, it is of great concern to identify processes involved in the remobilisation of actinides from anoxic sediments as such sediments likely will be a major source for actinides in the Baltic Sea and other oxygen sensitive basins in the long term perspective. In such basins the remobilised plutonium may reach oxygenated and biological productive waters by convection. Results from the temporarily oxygen deficient Gullmaren fjord on the Swedish west coast shows that remobilisation from sediments can not be identified during short (a few months) periods of oxygen deficient water. The rapid bioturbation (quantified by tracer studies) in this fjord results in that sedimenting organic material rapidly is buried and distributed

  14. [Characterizing chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in Lake Honghu, Lake Donghu and Lake Liangzihu using excitation-emission matrices (EEMs) fluorescence and parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yong-Qiang; Zhang, Yun-Lin; Niu, Cheng; Wang, Ming-Zhu

    2013-12-01

    Little is known about DOM characteristics in medium to large sized lakes located in the middle and lower reaches of Yangtze River, like Lake Honghu, Lake Donghu and Lake Liangzihu. Absorption, fluorescence and composition characteristics of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) are presented using the absorption spectroscopy, the excitation-emission ma trices (EEMs) fluorescence and parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) model based on the data collected in Sep-Oct. 2007 including 15, 9 and 10 samplings in Lake Honghu, Lake Donghu and Lake Liangzihu, respectively. CDOM absorption coefficient at 350 nm a(350) coefficient in Lake Honghu was significantly higher than those in Lake Donghu and Lake Liangzihu (t-test, pCDOM spectral slope in the wavelength range of 280-500 nm (S280-500) and a(350) (R2 =0. 781, p<0. 001). The mean value of S280-500 in Lake Honghu was significantly lower than those in Lake Donghu (t-test, pLake Liangzihu (t-test, p<0. 001). The mean value of spectral slope ratio SR in Lake Honghu was also significantly lower than those in Lake Donghu and Lake Liangzihu (t-test, p<0. 05). Two humic-like (C1, C2) and two protein-like fluorescent components (C3, C4) were identified by PARAFAC model, among which significant positive correlations were found between C1 and C2 (R2 =0. 884, p<0. 001), C3 and C4 (R2 =0. 677, p<0.001), respectively, suggesting that the sources of the two humic-like components as well as the two protein-like components were similar. However, no significant correlation has been found between those 4 fluorescent components and DOC concentration. Th e fluorescenceindices of FI255 (HIX), Fl265, FI310 (BIX) and Fl370 in Lake Donghu were all significantly higher than those in Lake Liangzihu (t-test, p <0.05) and Lake Honghu (t-test, p<0. 01), indicating that the eutrophication status in Lake Donghu was higher than Lake Honghu and Lake Liangzihu.

  15. Metabolism in anoxic permeable sediments is dominated by eukaryotic dark fermentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bourke, Michael F.; Marriott, Philip J.; Glud, Ronnie N.

    2017-01-01

    Permeable sediments are common across continental shelves and are critical contributors to marine biogeochemical cycling. Organic matter in permeable sediments is dominated by microalgae, which as eukaryotes have different anaerobic metabolic pathways to prokaryotes such as bacteria and archaea....... Here we present analyses of flow-through reactor experiments showing that dissolved inorganic carbon is produced predominantly as a result of anaerobic eukaryotic metabolic activity. In our experiments, anaerobic production of dissolved inorganic carbon was consistently accompanied by large dissolved H....../hydrogenase pathway of fermentative eukaryotic H2 production, suggesting that pathway as the source of H2 and dissolved inorganic carbon production. Metabolomic analysis showed large increases in lipid production at the onset of anoxia, consistent with documented pathways of anoxic dark fermentation in microalgae...

  16. Anoxic or aerial survival of bivalves and other euryoxic invertebrates as a useful response to environmental stress - A comprehensive review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Zwaan, A.; Eertman, R.H.M.

    1996-01-01

    Laboratory and field studies have demonstrated the applicability of anoxic/aerial survival as an early warning indicator of contaminant induced stress. The effects of xenobiotics, including heavy metals, organometals and organics as well as contaminated field sediments have been investigated. The

  17. Deglaciation, lake levels, and meltwater discharge in the Lake Michigan basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colman, Steven M.; Clark, J.A.; Clayton, L.; Hansel, A.K.; Larsen, C.E.

    1994-01-01

    The deglacial history of the Lake Michigan basin, including discharge and routing of meltwater, is complex because of the interaction among (1) glacial retreats and re-advances in the basin (2) the timing of occupation and the isostatic adjustment of lake outlets and (3) the depositional and erosional processes that left evidence of past lake levels. In the southern part of the basin, a restricted area little affected by differential isostasy, new studies of onshore and offshore areas allow refinement of a lake-level history that has evolved over 100 years. Important new data include the recognition of two periods of influx of meltwater from Lake Agassiz into the basin and details of the highstands gleaned from sedimentological evidence. Major disagreements still persist concerning the exact timing and lake-level changes associated with the Algonquin phase, approximately 11,000 BP. A wide variety of independent data suggests that the Lake Michigan Lobe was thin, unstable, and subject to rapid advances and retreats. Consequently, lake-level changes were commonly abrupt and stable shorelines were short-lived. The long-held beliefs that the southern part of the basin was stable and separated from deformed northern areas by a hinge-line discontinuity are becoming difficult to maintain. Numerical modeling of the ice-earth system and empirical modeling of shoreline deformation are both consistent with observed shoreline tilting in the north and with the amount and pattern of modern deformation shown by lake-level gauges. New studies of subaerial lacustrine features suggest the presence of deformed shorelines higher than those originally ascribed to the supposed horizontal Glenwood level. Finally, the Lake Michigan region as a whole appears to behave in a similar manner to other areas, both local (other Great Lakes) and regional (U.S. east coast), that have experienced major isostatic changes. Detailed sedimentological and dating studies of field sites and additional

  18. Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edsall, Thomas A.; Mac, Michael J.; Opler, Paul A.; Puckett Haecker, Catherine E.; Doran, Peter D.

    1998-01-01

    The Great Lakes region, as defined here, includes the Great Lakes and their drainage basins in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and New York. The region also includes the portions of Minnesota, Wisconsin, and the 21 northernmost counties of Illinois that lie in the Mississippi River drainage basin, outside the floodplain of the river. The region spans about 9º of latitude and 20º of longitude and lies roughly halfway between the equator and the North Pole in a lowland corridor that extends from the Gulf of Mexico to the Arctic Ocean.The Great Lakes are the most prominent natural feature of the region (Fig. 1). They have a combined surface area of about 245,000 square kilometers and are among the largest, deepest lakes in the world. They are the largest single aggregation of fresh water on the planet (excluding the polar ice caps) and are the only glacial feature on Earth visible from the surface of the moon (The Nature Conservancy 1994a).The Great Lakes moderate the region’s climate, which presently ranges from subarctic in the north to humid continental warm in the south (Fig. 2), reflecting the movement of major weather masses from the north and south (U.S. Department of the Interior 1970; Eichenlaub 1979). The lakes act as heat sinks in summer and heat sources in winter and are major reservoirs that help humidify much of the region. They also create local precipitation belts in areas where air masses are pushed across the lakes by prevailing winds, pick up moisture from the lake surface, and then drop that moisture over land on the other side of the lake. The mean annual frost-free period—a general measure of the growing-season length for plants and some cold-blooded animals—varies from 60 days at higher elevations in the north to 160 days in lakeshore areas in the south. The climate influences the general distribution of wild plants and animals in the region and also influences the activities and distribution of the human

  19. Lakes, Lagerstaetten, and Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordesch, E. G.; Park, L. E.

    2001-12-01

    The diversity of terrestrial systems is estimated to be greater than in the marine realm. However no hard data yet exists to substantiate this claim. Ancient lacustrine deposits may preserve an exceptionally diverse fossil fauna and aid in determining continental faunal diversities. Fossils preserved in lake deposits, especially those with exceptional preservation (i.e. Konservat Lagerstaetten), may represent a dependable method for determining species diversity changes in the terrestrial environment because of their faunal completeness. Important Konservat Lagerstaetten, such as the Green River Formation (US) and Messel (Germany), both Eocene in age, are found in lake sediments and show a remarkable faunal diversity for both vertebrates and invertebrates. To date information from nearly 25 lake lagerstaetten derived from different types of lake basins from the Carboniferous to the Miocene have been collected and described. Carboniferous sites derive from the cyclothems of Midcontinent of the US while many Cenozoic sites have been described from North and South America as well as Europe and Australia. Asian sites contain fossils from the Mesozoic and Cenozoic. With this data, insight into the evolutionary processes associated with lake systems can be examined. Do lakes act as unique evolutionary crucibles in contrast to marine systems? The speciation of cichlid fishes in present-day African lakes appears to be very high and is attributed to the diversity of environments found in large rift lakes. Is this true of all ancient lakes or just large rift lakes? The longevity of a lake system may be an important factor in allowing speciation and evolutionary processes to occur; marine systems are limited only in the existence of environments as controlled by tectonics and sea level changes, on the order of tens of millions of years. Rift lakes are normally the longest lived in the millions of years. Perhaps there are only certain types of lakes in which speciation of

  20. Suspended-sediment budget, flow distribution, and lake circulation for the Fox Chain of Lakes in Lake and McHenry Counties, Illinois, 1997-99

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, David L.; Holmes, Robert R.

    2000-01-01

    The Fox Chain of Lakes is a glacial lake system in McHenry and Lake Counties in northern Illinois and southern Wisconsin. Sedimentation and nutrient overloading have occurred in the lake system since the first dam was built (1907) in McHenry to raise water levels in the lake system. Using data collected from December 1, 1997, to June 1, 1999, suspended-sediment budgets were constructed for the most upstream lake in the system, Grass Lake, and for the lakes downstream from Grass Lake. A total of 64,900 tons of suspended sediment entered Grass Lake during the study, whereas a total of 70,600 tons of suspended sediment exited the lake, indicating a net scour of 5,700 tons of sediment. A total of 44,100 tons of suspended sediment was measured exiting the Fox Chain of Lakes at Johnsburg, whereas 85,600 tons entered the system downstream from Grass Lake. These suspended-sediment loads indicate a net deposition of 41,500 tons downstream from Grass Lake, which represents a trapping efficiency of 48.5 percent. A large amount of recreational boating takes place on the Fox Chain of Lakes during summer months, and suspended-sediment load was observed to rise from 110 tons per day to 339 tons per day during the 1999 Memorial Day weekend (May 26 ?31, 1999). Presumably, this rise was the result of the boating traffic because no other hydrologic event is known to have occurred that might have caused the rise. This study covers a relatively short period and may not represent the long-term processes of the Fox Chain of Lakes system, although the sediment transport was probably higher than an average year. The bed sediments found on the bottom of the lakes are composed of mainly fine particles in the silt-clay range. The Grass Lake sediments were characterized as black peat with an organic content of between 9 and 18 percent, and the median particle size ranged from 0.000811 to 0.0013976 inches. Other bed material samples were collected at streamflow-gaging stations on the

  1. 33 CFR 162.220 - Hoover Dam, Lake Mead, and Lake Mohave (Colorado River), Ariz.-Nev.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hoover Dam, Lake Mead, and Lake... REGULATIONS § 162.220 Hoover Dam, Lake Mead, and Lake Mohave (Colorado River), Ariz.-Nev. (a) Lake Mead and... the axis of Hoover Dam and that portion of Lake Mohave (Colorado River) extending 4,500 feet...

  2. Uranium geochemistry of Orca Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, F.F. Jr.; Sackett, W.M.

    1981-01-01

    Orca Basin, an anoxic, brine-filled depression at a depth of 2200 m in the Northwestern Gulf of Mexico continental slope, has been studied with respect to its uranium geochemistry. Uranium concentration profiles for four cores from within the basin were determined by delayed-neutron counting. Uranium concentrations ranged from 2.1 to 4.1 ppm on a salt-free and carbonate-corrected basis. The highest uranium concentrations were associated with the lowest percentage and delta 13 C organic carbon values. For comparison, cores from the brine-filled Suakin and Atlantis II Deeps, both in the Red Sea, were also analyzed. Uranium concentrations ranged from 1.2 to 2.6 ppm in the Suakin Deep and from 8.0 to 11.0 ppm in the Atlantis II Deep. No significant correlation was found between uranium concentrations and organic carbon concentrations and delta 13 C values for these cores. Although anoxic conditions are necessary for significant uranium uptake by non-carbonate marine sediments, other factors such as dilution by rapidly depositing materials and uranium supply via mixing and diffusion across density gradients may be as important in determining uranium concentrations in hypersaline basin sediments. (author)

  3. A terrestrial Eocene stack: tying terrestrial lake ecology to marine carbon cycling through the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grogan, D. S.; Whiteside, J. H.; Musher, D.; Rosengard, S. Z.; Vankeuren, M. A.; Pancost, R. D.

    2010-12-01

    The lacustrine Green River Formation is known to span ≥15 million years through the early-middle Eocene, and recent work on radioisotopic dating has provided a framework on which to build ties to the orbitally-tuned marine Eocene record. Here we present a spliced stack of Fischer assay data from drilled cores of the Green River Formation that span both an East-West and a North-South transect of the Uinta Basin of Utah. Detailed work on two cores demonstrate that Fischer assay measurements covary with total organic carbon and bulk carbon isotopes, allowing us to use Fisher assay results as a representative carbon cycling proxy throughout the stack. We provide an age model for this core record by combining radioisotopic dates of tuff layers with frequency analysis of Fischer assay measurements. Identification of orbital frequencies tied directly to magnetochrons through radioisotopic dates allows for a direct comparison of the terrestrial to the marine Eocene record. Our analysis indicates that the marker beds used to correlate the stack cores represent periods of enhanced lake productivity and extreme carbon burial; however, unlike the hyperthermal events that are clearly marked in the marine Eocene record, the hydrocarbon-rich "Mahogany Bed" period of burial does not correspond to a clear carbon isotope excursion. This suggests that the terrestrial realm may have experienced extreme ecological responses to relatively small perturbations in the carbon cycle during the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum. To investigate the ecological responses to carbon cycle perturbations through the hydrocarbon rich beds, we analyzed a suite of microbial biomarkers, finding evidence for cyanobacteria, dinoflagellates, and potentially green sulfur bacteria. These taxa indicate fluctuating oxic/anoxic conditions in the lake during abrupt intervals of carbon burial, suggesting a lake biogeochemical regime with no modern analogues.

  4. The role of clay minerals in the preservation of organic matter in sediments of Qinghai Lake, NW China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bingsong; Dong, Hailiang; Jiang, Hongchen; Lv, Guo; Eberl, Dennis D.; Li, Shanying; Kim, Jinwook

    2009-01-01

    The role of saline lake sediments in preserving organic matter has long been recognized. In order to further understand the preservation mechanisms, the role of clay minerals was studied. Three sediment cores, 25, 57, and 500 cm long, were collected from Qinghai Lake, NW China, and dissected into multiple subsamples. Multiple techniques were employed, including density fractionation, X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM), total organic carbon (TOC) and carbon compound analyses, and surface area determination. The sediments were oxic near the water-sediment interface, but became anoxic at depth. The clay mineral content was as much as 36.8%, consisting mostly of illite, chlorite, and halloysite. The TEM observations revealed that organic matter occurred primarily as organic matter-clay mineral aggregates. The TOC and clay mineral abundances are greatest in the mid-density fraction, with a positive correlation between the TOC and mineral surface area. The TOC of the bulk sediments ranges from 1 to 3% with the non-hydrocarbon fraction being predominant, followed by bitumen, saturated hydrocarbon, aromatic hydrocarbons, and chloroform-soluble bitumen. The bimodal distribution of carbon compounds of the saturated hydrocarbon fraction suggests that organic matter in the sediments was derived from two sources: terrestrial plants and microorganisms/algae. Depthrelated systematic changes in the distribution patterns of the carbon compounds suggest that the oxidizing conditions and microbial abundance near the water-sediment interface promote degradation of labile organic matter, probably in adsorbed form. The reducing conditions and small microbial biomass deeper in the sediments favor preservation of organic matter, because of the less labile nature of organic matter, probably occurring within clay mineral-organic matter aggregates that are inaccessible to microorganisms. These results have important implications for our

  5. First evidence of successful natural reproduction by planted lake trout in Lake Huron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nester, Robert T.; Poe, Thomas P.

    1984-01-01

    Twenty-two lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) swim-up fry, 24-27 mm long, were captured with emergent fry traps and a tow net in northwestern Lake Huron on a small nearshore reef off Alpena, Michigan, between May 10 and June 1, 1982. These catches represent the first evidence of successful production of swim-up fry by planted, hatchery-reared lake trout in Lake Huron since the lake trout rehabilitation program began in 1973.

  6. Estimation of lake water - groundwater interactions in meromictic mining lakes by modelling isotope signatures of lake water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seebach, Anne; Dietz, Severine; Lessmann, Dieter; Knoeller, Kay

    2008-03-01

    A method is presented to assess lake water-groundwater interactions by modelling isotope signatures of lake water using meteorological parameters and field data. The modelling of delta(18)O and deltaD variations offers information about the groundwater influx into a meromictic Lusatian mining lake. Therefore, a water balance model is combined with an isotope water balance model to estimate analogies between simulated and measured isotope signatures within the lake water body. The model is operated with different evaporation rates to predict delta(18)O and deltaD values in a lake that is only controlled by weather conditions with neither groundwater inflow nor outflow. Comparisons between modelled and measured isotope values show whether the lake is fed by the groundwater or not. Furthermore, our investigations show that an adaptation of the Craig and Gordon model [H. Craig, L.I. Gordon. Deuterium and oxygen-18 variations in the ocean and the marine atmosphere. In Stable Isotopes in Oceanographic Studies and Paleotemperature, Spoleto, E. Tongiorgi (Ed.), pp. 9-130, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Laboratorio di Geologia Nucleare, Pisa (1965).] to specific conditions in temperate regions seems necessary.

  7. Biological anoxic treatment of O2-free VOC emissions from the petrochemical industry: A proof of concept study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muñoz, Raúl; Souza, Theo S.O.; Glittmann, Lina; Pérez, Rebeca; Quijano, Guillermo

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The treatment of O 2 -free VOC emissions can be done by means of denitrifying processes. •Toluene vapors were successfully removed under anoxic denitrifying conditions. • A high bacterial diversity was observed. • Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria were the predominant phyla. • The nature and number of metabolites accumulated varied with the toluene load -- Abstract: An innovative biofiltration technology based on anoxic biodegradation was proposed in this work for the treatment of inert VOC-laden emissions from the petrochemical industry. Anoxic biofiltration does not require conventional O 2 supply to mineralize VOCs, which increases process safety and allows for the reuse of the residual gas for inertization purposes in plant. The potential of this technology was evaluated in a biotrickling filter using toluene as a model VOC at loads of 3, 5, 12 and 34 g m −3 h −1 (corresponding to empty bed residence times of 16, 8, 4 and 1.3 min) with a maximum elimination capacity of ∼3 g m −3 h −1 . However, significant differences in the nature and number of metabolites accumulated at each toluene load tested were observed, o- and p-cresol being detected only at 34 g m −3 h −1 , while benzyl alcohol, benzaldehyde and phenol were detected at lower loads. A complete toluene removal was maintained after increasing the inlet toluene concentration from 0.5 to 1 g m −3 (which entailed a loading rate increase from 3 to 6 g m −3 h −1 ), indicating that the system was limited by mass transfer rather than by biological activity. A high bacterial diversity was observed, the predominant phyla being Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria

  8. Lake Sturgeon, Acipenser fulvescens, movements in Rainy Lake, Minnesota and Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, W.E.; Kallemeyn, L.W.; Willis, D.W.

    2006-01-01

    Rainy Lake, Minnesota-Ontario, contains a native population of Lake Sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens) that has gone largely unstudied. The objective of this descriptive study was to summarize generalized Lake Sturgeon movement patterns through the use of biotelemetry. Telemetry data reinforced the high utilization of the Squirrel Falls geographic location by Lake Sturgeon, with 37% of the re-locations occurring in that area. Other spring aggregations occurred in areas associated with Kettle Falls, the Pipestone River, and the Rat River, which could indicate spawning activity. Movement of Lake Sturgeon between the Seine River and the South Arm of Rainy Lake indicates the likelihood of one integrated population on the east end of the South Arm. The lack of re-locations in the Seine River during the months of September and October may have been due to Lake Sturgeon moving into deeper water areas of the Seine River and out of the range of radio telemetry gear or simply moving back into the South Arm. Due to the movements between Minnesota and Ontario, coordination of management efforts among provincial, state, and federal agencies will be important.

  9. Determining lake surface water temperatures worldwide using a tuned one-dimensional lake model (FLake, v1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layden, Aisling; MacCallum, Stuart N.; Merchant, Christopher J.

    2016-06-01

    A tuning method for FLake, a one-dimensional (1-D) freshwater lake model, is applied for the individual tuning of 244 globally distributed large lakes using observed lake surface water temperatures (LSWTs) derived from along-track scanning radiometers (ATSRs). The model, which was tuned using only three lake properties (lake depth, snow and ice albedo and light extinction coefficient), substantially improves the measured mean differences in various features of the LSWT annual cycle, including the LSWTs of saline and high altitude lakes, when compared to the observed LSWTs. Lakes whose lake-mean LSWT persists below 1 °C for part of the annual cycle are considered to be seasonally ice-covered. For trial seasonally ice-covered lakes (21 lakes), the daily mean and standard deviation (2σ) of absolute differences between the modelled and observed LSWTs are reduced from 3.07 °C ± 2.25 °C to 0.84 °C ± 0.51 °C by tuning the model. For all other trial lakes (14 non-ice-covered lakes), the improvement is from 3.55 °C ± 3.20 °C to 0.96 °C ± 0.63 °C. The post tuning results for the 35 trial lakes (21 seasonally ice-covered lakes and 14 non-ice-covered lakes) are highly representative of the post-tuning results of the 244 lakes. For the 21 seasonally ice-covered lakes, the modelled response of the summer LSWTs to changes in snow and ice albedo is found to be statistically related to lake depth and latitude, which together explain 0.50 (R2adj, p = 0.001) of the inter-lake variance in summer LSWTs. Lake depth alone explains 0.35 (p = 0.003) of the variance. Lake characteristic information (snow and ice albedo and light extinction coefficient) is not available for many lakes. The approach taken to tune the model, bypasses the need to acquire detailed lake characteristic values. Furthermore, the tuned values for lake depth, snow and ice albedo and light extinction coefficient for the 244 lakes provide some guidance on improving FLake LSWT modelling.

  10. The study of a pilot-scale aerobic/Fenton/anoxic/aerobic process system for the treatment of landfill leachate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wenyong; Zhou, Yu; Min, Xiaobo; Liu, Jingyi; Li, Xinyu; Luo, Lin; Zhang, Jiachao; Mao, Qiming; Chai, Liyuan; Zhou, YaoYu

    2017-06-29

    In this study, a combined aerobic-Fenton-anoxic/aerobic system was designed for the remediation of raw landfill leachate in a pilot-scale experiment. This system included (i) a granular sludge biological oxidation procedure that achieves the accumulation of nitrite nitrogen ([Formula: see text]) under aerobic conditions; (ii) a Fenton process that improves the biodegradability of the biotreated leachate and (iii) an activated sludge biological oxidation component under anoxic and aerobic conditions. Additionally, a shortcut nitrification and denitrification pathway was achieved. The effects of free ammonia, temperature and pH on nitrite accumulation were discussed. The change in the biochemical oxygen demand/chemical oxygen demand ratio of the effluent after shortcut nitrification was also analysed. The microbial community in the reactor were also investigated. The problem of the lack of carbon source in the denitrification process can be solved by the Fenton reagent method. Moreover, it was beneficial to achieving nitrogen removal as well as the more extensive removal of organic matter. The treatment strategy employed in this study exhibited good results and provided the potential practical application for treating landfill leachate.

  11. Geochemical monitoring of volcanic lakes. A generalized box model for active crater lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Tassi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available

    In the past, variations in the chemical contents (SO42−, Cl−, cations of crater lake water have not systematically demonstrated any relationships with eruptive activity. Intensive parameters (i.e., concentrations, temperature, pH, salinity should be converted into extensive parameters (i.e., fluxes, changes with time of mass and solutes, taking into account all the internal and external chemical–physical factors that affect the crater lake system. This study presents a generalized box model approach that can be useful for geochemical monitoring of active crater lakes, as highly dynamic natural systems. The mass budget of a lake is based on observations of physical variations over a certain period of time: lake volume (level, surface area, lake water temperature, meteorological precipitation, air humidity, wind velocity, input of spring water, and overflow of the lake. This first approach leads to quantification of the input and output fluxes that contribute to the actual crater lake volume. Estimating the input flux of the "volcanic" fluid (Qf- kg/s –– an unmeasurable subsurface parameter –– and tracing its variations with time is the major focus during crater lake monitoring. Through expanding the mass budget into an isotope and chemical budget of the lake, the box model helps to qualitatively characterize the fluids involved. The (calculated Cl− content and dD ratio of the rising "volcanic" fluid defines its origin. With reference to continuous monitoring of crater lakes, the present study provides tips that allow better calculation of Qf in the future. At present, this study offers the most comprehensive and up-to-date literature review on active crater lakes.

  12. Water-quality and lake-stage data for Wisconsin lakes, water year 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manteufel, S. Bridgett; Robertson, Dale M.

    2017-05-25

    IntroductionThe U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with local and other agencies, collects data at selected lakes throughout Wisconsin. These data, accumulated over many years, provide a database for developing an improved understanding of the water quality of lakes. To make these data available to interested parties outside the USGS, the data are published annually in this report series. The locations of water-quality and lake-stage stations in Wisconsin for water year 2014 are shown in figure 1. A water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30. It is designated by the calendar year in which it ends. Thus, the periodOctober 1, 2013, through September 30, 2014, is called “water year 2014.”The purpose of this report is to provide information about the chemical and physical characteristics of Wisconsin lakes. Data that have been collected at specific lakes, and information to aid in the interpretation of those data, are included in this report. Data collected include measurements of in-lake water quality and lake stage. Time series of Secchi depths, surface total phosphorus, and chlorophyll a concentrations collected during nonfrozen periods are included for many lakes. Graphs of vertical profiles of temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, and specific conductance are included for sites where these parameters were measured. Descriptive information for each lake includes the location of the lake, area of the lake’s watershed, period for which data are available, revisions to previously published records, and pertinent remarks. Additional data, such as streamflow and water quality in tributary and outlet streams of some of the lakes, are published online at http://nwis.waterdata.usgs.gov/wi/nwis.Water-resources data, including stage and discharge data at most streamflow-gaging stations, are available online. The Wisconsin Water Science Center’s home page is at https://www.usgs.gov/centers/wisconsin-water-science-center. Information

  13. A deep sea community at the Kebrit brine pool in the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Vestheim, Hege

    2015-02-26

    Approximately 25 deep sea brine pools occur along the mid axis of the Red Sea. These hypersaline, anoxic, and acidic environments have previously been reported to host diverse microbial communities. We visited the Kebrit brine pool in April 2013 and found macrofauna present just above the brine–seawater interface (~1465 m). In particular, inactive sulfur chimneys had associated epifauna of sea anemones, sabellid type polychaetes, and hydroids, and infauna consisting of capitellid polychaetes, gastropods of the genus Laeviphitus (fam. Elachisinidae), and top snails of the family Cocculinidae. The deep Red Sea generally is regarded as extremely poor in benthos. We hypothesize that the periphery along the Kebrit holds increased biomass and biodiversity that are sustained by prokaryotes associated with the brine pool or co-occurring seeps.

  14. Microbial diversity of an anoxic zone of a hydroelectric power station reservoir in Brazilian Amazonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graças, Diego A; Miranda, Paulo R; Baraúna, Rafael A; McCulloch, John A; Ghilardi, Rubens; Schneider, Maria Paula C; Silva, Artur

    2011-11-01

    Microbial diversity was evaluated in an anoxic zone of Tucuruí Hydroelectric Power Station reservoir in Brazilian Amazonia using a culture-independent approach by amplifying and sequencing fragments of the 16S rRNA gene using metagenomic DNA as a template. Samples obtained from the photic, aphotic (40 m) and sediment (60 m) layers were used to construct six 16S rDNA libraries containing a total of 1,152 clones. The sediment, aphotic and photic layers presented 64, 33 and 35 unique archaeal operational taxonomic units (OTUs). The estimated richness of these layers was evaluated to be 153, 106 and 79 archaeal OTUs, respectively, using the abundance-based coverage estimator (ACE) and 114, 83 and 77 OTUs using the Chao1 estimator. For bacterial sequences, 114, 69 and 57 OTUs were found in the sediment, aphotic and photic layers, which presented estimated richnesses of 1,414, 522 and 197 OTUs (ACE) and 1,059, 1,014 and 148 OTUs (Chao1), respectively. Phylogenetic analyses of the sequences obtained revealed a high richness of microorganisms which participate in the carbon cycle, namely, methanogenic archaea and methanotrophic proteobacteria. Most sequences obtained belong to non-culturable prokaryotes. The present study offers the first glimpse of the huge microbial diversity of an anoxic area of a man-made lacustrine environment in the tropics.

  15. Fate and behavior of dissolved organic matter in a submerged anoxic-aerobic membrane bioreactor (MBR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongqing; Trzcinski, Antoine Prandota; Luo, Jinxue; Stuckey, David C; Tan, Soon Keat

    2018-02-01

    In this study, the production, composition, and characteristics of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in an anoxic-aerobic submerged membrane bioreactor (MBR) were investigated. The average concentrations of proteins and carbohydrates in the MBR aerobic stage were 3.96 ± 0.28 and 8.36 ± 0.89 mg/L, respectively. After membrane filtration, these values decreased to 2.9 ± 0.2 and 2.8 ± 0.2 mg/L, respectively. High performance size exclusion chromatograph (HP-SEC) analysis indicated a bimodal molecular weight (MW) distribution of DOMs, and that the intensities of all the peaks were reduced in the MBR effluent compared to the influent. Three-dimensional fluorescence excitation emission matrix (FEEM) indicated that fulvic and humic acid-like substances were the predominant DOMs in biological treatment processes. Precise identification and characterization of low-MW DOMs was carried out using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The GC-MS analysis indicated that the highest peak numbers (170) were found in the anoxic stage, and 54 (32%) compounds were identified with a similarity greater than 80%. Alkanes (28), esters (11), and aromatics (7) were the main compounds detected. DOMs exhibited both biodegradable and recalcitrant characteristics. There were noticeable differences in the low-MW DOMs present down the treatment process train in terms of numbers, concentrations, molecular weight, biodegradability, and recalcitrance.