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Sample records for anoxic corrosion mechanisms

  1. Ferrous archaeological analogues for the understanding of the multi-secular corrosion mechanisms in an anoxic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saheb-Djahromi, M.

    2009-12-01

    Understanding the long term corrosion mechanisms of iron in an anoxic environment is essential in the field of the radioactive waste storage. In France, it is planned to store high level nuclear wastes in a multi-barrier system containing a glassy matrix surrounded by a stainless steel container, embedded in a low-carbon steel over-container. This system would be placed in a deep geological repository, which would impose anoxic conditions. As it must be efficient for a period of several thousands of years, one should understand the alteration mechanisms that are expected to occur in such a long time. To this purpose, a specific approach is developed on ferrous archaeological analogues with thick corrosion layer formed in natural conditions. In this study, the corrosion mechanisms have been assessed by examining nails aged of 400 years coming from the archaeological site of Glinet, selected as a reference site. The first point was a fine characterisation of the entire corrosion system metal / corrosion products / medium, through the use of coupled multi-scale analytical tools. The first results showed that the samples were corroded in an anoxic calco-carbonated environment. Moreover, the coupling of X-ray micro-diffraction, Raman microspectroscopy and dispersive energy spectroscopy has enabled to identify three corrosion systems composed of iron carbonates, siderite and chukanovite, and magnetite. Depending on the phase's layout in the system, the electronic resistance of the corrosion layers has been established, from resistive to conductive. In a second stage, re-corroding experiments in laboratory were performed. Firstly, the electrochemical behaviour of the corrosion system has shown that water reduction at the metallic interface is negligible. Furthermore, reaction tracing with copper and deuterium has allowed identifying the electron consumptions sites mainly localised on the external part, and the precipitation sites on the internal part of the corrosion

  2. Copper corrosion experiments under anoxic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ollila, Kaija [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    2013-06-15

    This report gives results from the corrosion experiments with copper under anoxic conditions. The objective was to study whether hydrogen-evolving corrosion reaction could occur. Copper foil samples were exposed in deaerated deionized water in Erlenmeyer flasks in the glove box with inert atmosphere. Four corrosion experiments (Cu1, Cu2, Cu3 and Cu4) were started, as well as a reference test standing in air. Cu1 and Cu2 had gas tight seals, whereas Cu3 and Cu4 had palladium foils as hydrogen permeable enclosure. The test vessels were stored during the experiments in a closed stainless steel vessel to protect them from the trace oxygen of the gas atmosphere and light. After the reaction time of three and a half years, there were no visible changes in the copper surfaces in any of the tests in the glove box, in contrast the Cu surfaces looked shiny and unaltered. The Cu3 test was terminated after the reaction time of 746 days. The analysis of the Pd-membrane showed the presence of H2 in the test system. If the measured amount of 7.2{center_dot}10{sup 5} mol H{sub 2} was the result of formation of Cu{sub 2}O this would correspond to a 200 nm thick corrosion layer. This was not in agreement with the measured layer thickness with SIMS, which was 6{+-}1 nm. A clear weight loss observed for the Cu3 test vessel throughout the test period suggests the evaporation of water through the epoxy sealing to the closed steel vessel. If this occurred, the anaerobic corrosion of steel surface in humid oxygen-free atmosphere could be a source of hydrogen. A similar weight loss was not observed for the parallel test (Cu4). The reference test standing in air showed visible development of corrosion products.

  3. Multi-secular corrosion behaviour of low carbon steel in anoxic soils: Characterisation of corrosion system on archaeological artefacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saheb, M.; Neff, D.; Dillmann, P.; Foy, E.; Saheb, M.; Dillmann, P.; Matthiesen, H.; Bellot-Gurlet, L.

    2009-01-01

    In the context of the prediction of materials behaviour used in the nuclear waste storage, the understanding of iron corrosion mechanisms in anoxic environment is of great importance. Information can be obtained using complementary analytical tools. Interactions between burial soil and archaeological artefacts are studied by performing on site soil measurements. Moreover, archaeological artefacts are studied on transverse sections using a combination of microbeam techniques. The specific interest of this project lies in the study of ferrous thick corrosion layers formed in anoxic environment. (authors)

  4. Mechanisms and energetics of surface reactions at the copper-water interface. A critical literature review with implications for the debate on corrosion of copper in anoxic water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Adam Johannes; Brinck, Tore [Applied Physical Chemistry, KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2012-06-15

    In order to make a critical analysis of the discussion of corrosion of copper in pure anoxic water it is necessary to understand the chemical reactivity at the copper-water interface. Even though the most fundamental issue, i.e. the nature and existence of a hypothetical product that is thermodynamically stable, is still under debate, it is clear that if anoxic corrosion really exists, it must be initiated through oxidative surface reactions at the copper-water interface. This report presents a survey of the peer reviewed literature on the reactivity of copper surfaces in water. Reactions discussed involve molecular adsorption of water, dissociation of the OH-bonds in adsorbed water molecules and hydroxyl groups, the disproportionation/synproportionation equilibrium between hydroxyl groups/hydroxide ions, water molecules and atomic oxygen, the surface diffusion of adsorbed species, and the formation of hydrogen gas (molecular hydrogen). Experimental, as well as theoretical (quantum chemical) studies are reviewed. It is concluded that a limited amount of hydrogen gas (H{sub 2}) should be formed as the result of dissociative water adsorption at certain copper surfaces. Quantitative estimates of the amounts of H2 that could form at the copper-water interface are made. Assuming that the water-cleavage/hydrogen-formation reaction proceeds on an ideal [110] or [100] surface until a hydroxyl monolayer (ML) is reached, the amount of H{sub 2} formed is {approx} 2.4 ng cm{sup -2} copper surface. Based on the literature cited, this is most likely possible, thermodynamically as well as kinetically. Although not proven, it is not unlikely that the reaction can proceed until an oxide ML is formed, which would give 4.8 ng cm{sup -2}. If the formation of an oxide ML is thermodynamically feasible the surface will probably react further, since Cu{sub 2}O(s) is known to activate and cleave the water molecule when it adsorbs at the Cu{sub 2}O(s) surface. Assuming the formation of a

  5. Determination of sulfur isotopic composition for the study of iron sulfides origin, biotic or abiotic, in anoxic corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grousset, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    The first goal of this project was to develop a methodology based on the study of the sulfur isotopic composition enabling the determination of iron sulfides origin, biotic or abiotic, within the corrosion products layers (CPL). Then, the aim was to apply this methodology to real corrosion systems in order to determine the mechanisms of iron sulfides formation. Sulfur isotopic analyses methodologies, adapted to micrometric iron sulfides layers observed in real corrosion systems, were developed in nanoSIMS and ToF-SIMS. The study of iron sulfides formed in anoxic carbonated medium with or without sulphate-reducing bacteria validated the use of these methods for the determination of iron sulfides origin. The application of these methods coupled with the precise characterization of irons sulfides formed in the real corrosion systems show two kind of corrosion pattern. In pattern 1, the iron sulfides are localized in the external part of the CPL. They result from the Fe 2+ migration from the metal surface to areas rich in biotic S 2- . In this pattern, corrosion rates are lower than 20 μm/year for laboratory systems, and lower than 5 μm/year for archaeological objects. In pattern 2, the large presence of conductive phases in the CPL results in the delocalization of electrons, and so a disequilibrium of the charges at the metal's surface. That leads to the migration of biotic S 2- in the CPL till the metal where they precipitate in iron sulphides. This pattern shows high corrosion rates (∼100 μm/an) that might be resulting from the accumulation of bio-corrosion and chloride corrosion mechanisms. (author) [fr

  6. Carbon-14 speciation during anoxic corrosion of activated steel in a repository environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieland, E.; Cvetkovic, B.Z.; Kunz, D. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland). Lab. for Waste Management; Salazar, G.; Szidat, S. [Bern Univ. (Switzerland). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research

    2018-01-15

    Radioactive waste contains significant amounts of {sup 14}C which has been identified a key radionuclide in safety assessments. In Switzerland, the {sup 14}C inventory of a cement-based repository for low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste (L/ILW) is mainly associated with activated steel (∝85 %). {sup 14}C is produced by {sup 14}N activation in steel parts exposed to thermal neutron flux in light water reactors. Release of {sup 14}C occurs in the near field of a deep geological repository due to anoxic corrosion of activated steel. Although the {sup 14}C inventory of the L/ILW repository and the sources of {sup 14}C are well known, the formation of {sup 14}C species during steel corrosion is only poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to identify and quantify the {sup 14}C-bearing carbon species formed during the anoxic corrosion of iron and steel and further to determine the {sup 14}C speciation in a corrosion experiment with activated steel. All experiments were conducted in conditions similar to those anticipated in the near field of a cement-based repository.

  7. Kinetic modelling of bentonite-canister interaction. Long-term predictions of copper canister corrosion under oxic and anoxic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wersin, P.; Spahiu, K.; Bruno, J.

    1994-09-01

    A new modelling approach for canister corrosion which emphasises chemical processes and diffusion at the bentonite-canister interface is presented. From the geochemical boundary conditions corrosion rates for both an anoxic case and an oxic case are derived and uncertainties thereof are estimated via sensitivity analyses. Time scales of corrosion are assessed by including calculations of the evolution of redox potential in the near field and pitting corrosion. This indicates realistic corrosion depths in the range of 10 -7 and 4*10 -5 mm/yr, respectively for anoxic and oxic corrosion. Taking conservative estimates, depths are increased by a factor of about 200 for both cases. From these predictions it is suggested that copper canister corrosion does not constitute a problem for repository safety, although certain factors such as temperature and radiolysis have not been explicitly included. The possible effect of bacterial processes on corrosion should be further investigated as it might enhance locally the described redox process. 35 refs, 11 figs, 6 tabs

  8. Kinetic modelling of bentonite-canister interaction. Long-term predictions of copper canister corrosion under oxic and anoxic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wersin, P; Spahiu, K; Bruno, J [MBT Tecnologia Ambiental, Cerdanyola (Spain)

    1994-09-01

    A new modelling approach for canister corrosion which emphasises chemical processes and diffusion at the bentonite-canister interface is presented. From the geochemical boundary conditions corrosion rates for both an anoxic case and an oxic case are derived and uncertainties thereof are estimated via sensitivity analyses. Time scales of corrosion are assessed by including calculations of the evolution of redox potential in the near field and pitting corrosion. This indicates realistic corrosion depths in the range of 10{sup -7} and 4*10{sup -5} mm/yr, respectively for anoxic and oxic corrosion. Taking conservative estimates, depths are increased by a factor of about 200 for both cases. From these predictions it is suggested that copper canister corrosion does not constitute a problem for repository safety, although certain factors such as temperature and radiolysis have not been explicitly included. The possible effect of bacterial processes on corrosion should be further investigated as it might enhance locally the described redox process. 35 refs, 11 figs, 6 tabs.

  9. Investigation of Eh, pH and corrosion potential of steel in anoxic groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peat, R.; Brabon, S.; Fennell, P.A.H.; Rance, A.P.; Smart, N.R. [AEA Technology (United Kingdom)

    2001-01-01

    SKB intend to dispose of the spent nuclear fuel produced by Sweden's eleven nuclear reactors by encapsulating it in corrosion-resistant copper canisters containing a cast iron or carbon steel insert. After encapsulation, the fuel will be transported to a geological repository, where the containers will be deposited at a depth of 500 to 700 m in granitic rock and surrounded by a bentonite clay backfill material. If, or when the copper corrosion shield fails, the iron insert will be in contact with oxygen-free water and hydrogen-producing, anaerobic corrosion will start. SKB have carried out modelling calculations of the oxidising power (Eh) of groundwater and wished to confirm the results by carrying out experimental measurements. The objective of the work described in this report was to demonstrate the feasibility of monitoring Eh, pH and corrosion potential in a cell where anaerobic corrosion of steel in artificial groundwater was occurring. To this end, gas cells similar to those used previously for anaerobic corrosion rate measurements were used as the basis for the design of an electrochemical cell. The cell incorporated electrodes to provide an in situ measurement of the redox potential, Eh, the pH and the corrosion potential of carbon steel. The main stages of the work were: Design of the electrochemical cell; Preparation of silver-silver chloride and calomel reference electrodes; Calibration of the reference electrodes and commercial glass pH electrodes against a standard hydrogen electrode; Assembly of the test cell under anoxic conditions; Monitoring the cell before and after the addition of steel wires to the test solution. Details of the design of the test cell and the experimental procedures used are described. Two cells were set up. The first employed a silver-silver chloride reference electrode, which was failed after approximately 400 hours, and the second cell therefore used a calomel reference electrode. The results of the electrode

  10. Shadow Corrosion Mechanism of Zircaloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullberg, Mats; Lysell, Gunnar; Nystrand, Ann-Charlotte

    2004-02-01

    Local corrosion enhancement appears on zirconium-base alloys in-core in boiling water reactors when the zirconium alloy is in close proximity to another metal. The visual appearance often resembles a shadow of the other component. The phenomenon is therefore referred to as 'shadow corrosion'. Shadow corrosion has been known for more than 25 years. Mechanisms based on either galvanic corrosion or local radiolysis effects have been proposed as explanations. Both types of mechanism have seemed to explain some facets of the phenomenon. Normally, shadow corrosion is of no practical significance. However, an enhanced and potentially serious form of shadow corrosion was discovered in 1996. This discovery stimulated new experiments that fully supported neither of the longstanding theories. Thus, there is till now no generally accepted understanding of the shadow corrosion phenomenon. The aim of the present investigation was to analyse the available data and to identify, if possible, a plausible mechanism of shadow corrosion. It was found that the experimental evidence is, with a few exceptions, remarkably consistent with a galvanic mechanism. The main exception is that shadow corrosion may occur also when the two metals are nominally electrically insulated. One way to account for the main exception could be to invoke the effect of photoconductivity. Photoconductivity results when a semiconductor or an insulator is irradiated with photons of UV or higher energy. The photons elevate electrons from the valence band to the conduction band, thereby raising the electron conductivity of the solid. In particular, photoconductivity lowers the electrical resistance of the normally insulating oxide on zirconium base alloys. Photoconductivity therefore also has the potential to explain why shadow corrosion is only seen in, or in proximity to, a nuclear reactor core. The suggested mechanism of shadow corrosion can be tested in a reasonably simple experiment in a research reactor

  11. Influence of temperature on corrosion rate and porosity of corrosion products of carbon steel in anoxic bentonite environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoulil, J.; Kaňok, J.; Kouřil, M.; Parschová, H.; Novák, P.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •The corrosion rate is not significantly dependent on temperature. •Corrosion products at higher temperatures have different color. •Corrosion products at higher temperatures are more compact. •The change in corrosion products nature is reversible. -- Abstract: The study focuses on the porosity of layers of corrosion products and its impact on corrosion rate of carbon steel in moist bentonite. Measurements were performed in an aggressive Czech type of bentonite – Rokle B75 at temperatures of 90 and 40 °C. Aggressiveness of B75 bentonite consists in low content of chlorides. Presence of chlorides in pore solution allows formation of more protective magnetite. The evaluation was made by electrochemical techniques (red/ox potential, open circuit potential, linear polarization resistance, impedance spectroscopy) and resistometric sensor measurements. The result imply that the higher the temperature the more compact is the layer of corrosion products that slightly decelerates corrosion rate compared to the state at 40 °C. The state of corrosion products at both temperatures is reversible

  12. Influence of temperature on corrosion rate and porosity of corrosion products of carbon steel in anoxic bentonite environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoulil, J., E-mail: jan.stoulil@vscht.cz [Department of Metals and Corrosion Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, Prague (Czech Republic); Kaňok, J.; Kouřil, M. [Department of Metals and Corrosion Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, Prague (Czech Republic); Parschová, H. [Department of Power Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, Prague (Czech Republic); Novák, P. [Department of Metals and Corrosion Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •The corrosion rate is not significantly dependent on temperature. •Corrosion products at higher temperatures have different color. •Corrosion products at higher temperatures are more compact. •The change in corrosion products nature is reversible. -- Abstract: The study focuses on the porosity of layers of corrosion products and its impact on corrosion rate of carbon steel in moist bentonite. Measurements were performed in an aggressive Czech type of bentonite – Rokle B75 at temperatures of 90 and 40 °C. Aggressiveness of B75 bentonite consists in low content of chlorides. Presence of chlorides in pore solution allows formation of more protective magnetite. The evaluation was made by electrochemical techniques (red/ox potential, open circuit potential, linear polarization resistance, impedance spectroscopy) and resistometric sensor measurements. The result imply that the higher the temperature the more compact is the layer of corrosion products that slightly decelerates corrosion rate compared to the state at 40 °C. The state of corrosion products at both temperatures is reversible.

  13. Recognition and Analysis of Corrosion Failure Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Suess

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion has a vast impact on the global and domestic economy, and currently incurs losses of nearly $300 billion annually to the U.S. economy alone. Because of the huge impact of corrosion, it is imperative to have a systematic approach to recognizing and mitigating corrosion problems as soon as possible after they become apparent. A proper failure analysis includes collection of pertinent background data and service history, followed by visual inspection, photographic documentation, material evaluation, data review and conclusion procurement. In analyzing corrosion failures, one must recognize the wide range of common corrosion mechanisms. The features of any corrosion failure give strong clues as to the most likely cause of the corrosion. This article details a proven approach to properly determining the root cause of a failure, and includes pictographic illustrations of the most common corrosion mechanisms, including general corrosion, pitting, galvanic corrosion, dealloying, crevice corrosion, microbiologically-influenced corrosion (MIC, corrosion fatigue, stress corrosion cracking (SCC, intergranular corrosion, fretting, erosion corrosion and hydrogen damage.

  14. Nuclear waste glass corrosion mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantzen, C.M.

    1987-04-01

    Dissolution of nuclear waste glass occurs by corrosion mechanisms similar to those of other solids, e.g., metallurgical and mineralogic systems. Metallurgical phenomena such as active corrosion, passivation and immunity have been observed to be a function of the glass composition and the solution pH. Hydration thermodynamics was used to quantify the role of glass composition and its effect on the solution pH during dissolution. A wide compositional range of natural, lunar, medieval, and nuclear waste glasses, as well as some glass-ceramics were investigated. The factors observed to affect dissolution in deionized water are pertinent to the dissolution of glass in natural environments such as the groundwaters anticipated to interact with nuclear waste glass in a geologic repository. The effects of imposed pH and oxidation potential (Eh) conditions existing in natural environments on glass dissolution is described in the context of Pourbaix diagrams, pH potential diagrams, for glass

  15. Effect of Sulfide Concentration on Copper Corrosion in Anoxic Chloride-Containing Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Decheng; Dong, Chaofang; Xu, Aoni; Man, Cheng; He, Chang; Li, Xiaogang

    2017-04-01

    The structure and property of passive film on copper are strongly dependent on the sulfide concentration; based on this, a series of electrochemical methods were applied to investigate the effect of sulfide concentration on copper corrosion in anaerobic chloride-containing solutions. The cyclic voltammetry and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis demonstrated that the corrosion products formed on copper in anaerobic sulfide solutions comprise Cu2S and CuS. And the corrosion resistance of copper decreased with increasing sulfide concentration and faster sulfide addition, owing to the various structures of the passive films observed by the atomic force microscope and scanning electron microscope. A p-type semiconductor character was obtained under all experimental conditions, and the defect concentration, which had a magnitude of 1022-1023 cm-3, increased with increasing sulfide concentration, resulting in a higher rate of both film growth and dissolution.

  16. Corrosion mechanism applicable to biodegradable magnesium implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atrens, Andrej, E-mail: Andrejs.Atrens@uq.edu.au [University of Queensland, Division of Materials, Brisbane, Qld 4072 (Australia); Liu Ming; Zainal Abidin, Nor Ishida [University of Queensland, Division of Materials, Brisbane, Qld 4072 (Australia)

    2011-12-15

    Much of our understanding of the Mg corrosion mechanism is based on research using aggressive chloride based solutions like 3% NaCl, which are appropriate for understand the corrosion for applications such as auto construction. The chloride ions tend to cause break down of the partly protective surface film on the Mg alloy surface. The corrosion rate increases with exposure time until steady state is reached, which may take several weeks. An overview is provided of the aspects which determine the corrosion of Mg alloys: (i) measurement details; (ii) impurity elements Fe, Ni, Cu and Co; (iii) second phases; (iv) surface films and surface condition and (v) stress corrosion cracking (SCC). This understanding is used to help understand Mg corrosion for Mg as a biodegradable implant for medical applications. Solutions that elucidate these applications tend to form surface films and the corrosion rate tends to decrease with immersion time.

  17. Corrosion mechanism of copper in palm biodiesel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazal, M.A.; Haseeb, A.S.M.A.; Masjuki, H.H.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Corrosion of copper in biodiesel increases with the increase of immersion time. ► The corrosion patina is found to be composed of CuO, Cu 2 O, CuCO 3 and Cu(OH) 2 . ► Green CuCO 3 was found as the major corrosion product. ► The mechanisms governing corrosion of copper in palm biodiesel are discussed. - Abstract: Biodiesel is a promising alternative fuel. However, it causes enhanced corrosion of automotive materials, especially of copper based components. In the present study, corrosion mechanism of copper was investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Compositional change of biodiesel due to the exposure of copper was also investigated. Corrosion patina on copper is found to be composed of Cu 2 O, CuO, Cu(OH) 2 and CuCO 3. Dissolved O 2 , H 2 O, CO 2 and RCOO − radical in biodiesel seem to be the leading factors in enhancing the corrosiveness of biodiesel.

  18. Stress corrosion of alloy 600: mechanism proposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnin, T.

    1993-01-01

    A fissuring model by stress corrosion based on interactions corrosion-plasticity on the fissure top is proposed to describe the generally intergranular bursting of INCONEL 600 in the PWR. The calculation shows, and some observations check experimentally, that a pseudo intergranular cracking bound to the zigzag micro facets formation along the joints may be so that a completely intergranular bursting. This pseudo intergranular mode makes up a signature of the proposed mechanism. It may be suggested that it may exist one continuity mechanism between the trans and intergranular cracking by stress corrosion of ductile cubic centered faces materials. 2 figs

  19. Mechanisms of metal dusting corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hummelshøj, Thomas Strabo

    In this thesis the early stages of metal dusting corrosion is addressed; the development of carbon expanded austenite, C, and the decomposition hereof into carbides. Later stages of metal dusting corrosion are explored by a systematic study of stainless steel foils exposed to metal dusting...... deformed stainless steel flakes is transformed to expanded martensite/austenite during low-temperature carburization. Various experimental procedures to experimentally determine the concentration dependent diffusion coefficient of carbon in expanded austenite are evaluated. The most promising procedure...... powders and flakes. The nature of the decomposition products, carbides of the form M23C6 and M7C3, were evaluated by X-ray diffraction, light optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and thermodynamic modelling. The decomposition was found to be dependent on several parameters such as thermal...

  20. Iron corrosion in an anoxic soil: Comparison between thermodynamic modelling and ferrous archaeological artefacts characterised along with the local in situ geochemical conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saheb, M.; Neff, D.; Michelin, A.; Dillmann, P. [CEA Saclay, CNRS, LAPA SIS2M, UMR3299, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Saheb, M. [ANDRA, F-92298 Chatenay Malabry (France); Descostes, M. [CEA Saclay, DEN DANS DPC SECR, Lab Radionuclides Migrat Measurements and Modelling, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Descostes, M. [Univ Evry, CEA, CNRS, UMR 8587, Evry (France); Dillmann, P. [CNRS, Inst Rech Archeomat, UMR 5060, F-75700 Paris (France)

    2010-07-01

    This article is part of an ongoing study on the long-term corrosion behaviour of ferrous archaeological artefacts. The aim of this study is to correlate the corrosion products formed on ancient artefacts in an anoxic medium to the environmental data using thermodynamic modelling. For this purpose, measurement campaigns have been conducted on the archaeological site of Glinet (16. century, High Normandy (Seine-Maritime), France) where the evolution of the pore water chemistry has been recorded for a period of one year. Three evolution steps have been distinguished after the oxidizing perturbation which was induced by the piezometers installation. The first step was related to an oxidizing environment in which pore water was in equilibrium with a Fe(III) precipitated phase: ferri-hydrite (FeOOH center dot 0.4 H{sub 2}O). The second step was considered as an intermediate step and Fe speciation had evolved; equilibrium was achieved between ferri-hydrite and a Fe(II) carbonate phase: siderite (Fe(II)CO{sub 3}). The last step of the evolution was related to a reducing stage where pore water was in equilibrium with magnetite (Fe(II, III){sub 3}O{sub 4}) and with chukanovite (Fe(II){sub 2}(OH){sub 2}CO{sub 3}). As these phases were present in the corrosion layers formed on the archaeological samples, it is possible to conclude that the thermodynamic approach was helpful in developing a better understanding of the effect of geochemical conditions on the composition and mineralogy of the corrosion products formed on archaeological artefacts. This work could be used as a reference for further corrosion studies, especially on long-term corrosion processes applied to nuclear waste disposal. (authors)

  1. Corrosion problems of materials for mechanical, power and chemical engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouska, P.; Cihal, V.; Malik, K.; Vyklicky, M.; Stefec, R.

    1988-01-01

    The proceedings contain 47 contributions, out of which 8 have been inputted in INIS. These are concerned with various corrosion problems of WWER primary circuit components and their testing. The factors affecting the corrosion resistance are analyzed, the simultaneous corrosion action of decontamination of steels is assessed, and the corrosion cracking of special steels is dealt with. The effects of deformation on the corrosion characteristics are examined for steel to be used in fast reactors. The corrosion potentials were measured for various steels. A testing facility for corrosion-mechanical tests is briefly described. (M.D.). 5 figs., 5 tabs., 25 refs

  2. Insight into silicate-glass corrosion mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cailleteau, C; Angeli, F; Gin, S; Jollivet, P [CEA VALRHO, DEN, Lab Etude Comportement Long Terme, F-30207 Bagnols Sur Ceze, (France); Devreux, F [Ecole Polytech, CNRS, Lab Phys Mat Condensee, F-91128 Palaiseau, (France); Jestin, J [CEA, CNRS, Lab Leon Brillouin, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Spalla, O [CEA, DSM, Lab Interdisciplinaire Org Nanometr et Supramol, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France)

    2008-07-01

    The remarkable chemical durability of silicate glass makes it suitable for a wide range of applications. The slowdown of the aqueous glass corrosion kinetics that is frequently observed at long time is generally attributed to chemical affinity effects (saturation of the solution with respect to silica). Here, we demonstrate a new mechanism and highlight the impact of morphological transformations in the alteration layer on the leaching kinetics. A direct correlation between structure and reactivity is revealed by coupling the results of several structure-sensitive experiments with numerical simulations at mesoscopic scale. The sharp drop in the corrosion rate is shown to arise from densification of the outer layers of the alteration film, leading to pore closure. The presence of insoluble elements in the glass can inhibit the film restructuring responsible for this effect. This mechanism may be more broadly applicable to silicate minerals. (authors)

  3. ERG review of waste package corrosion mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geisert, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    The Engineering Review Group (ERG) was established by the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI) to help evaluate engineering-related issues in the US Department of Energy's nuclear waste repository program. The ERG reviewed the waste package corrosion mechanisms. This report documents the ERG's comments and recommendations on these subjects and the ONWI response to the specific points raised by the ERG. 1 ref

  4. Stress-corrosion mechanisms in silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciccotti, Matteo

    2009-01-01

    The present review is intended to revisit the advances and debates in the comprehension of the mechanisms of subcritical crack propagation in silicate glasses almost a century after its initial developments. Glass has inspired the initial insights of Griffith into the origin of brittleness and the ensuing development of modern fracture mechanics. Yet, through the decades the real nature of the fundamental mechanisms of crack propagation in glass has escaped a clear comprehension which could gather general agreement on subtle problems such as the role of plasticity, the role of the glass composition, the environmental condition at the crack tip and its relation to the complex mechanisms of corrosion and leaching. The different processes are analysed here with a special focus on their relevant space and time scales in order to question their domain of action and their contribution in both the kinetic laws and the energetic aspects.

  5. Corrosion of metal iron in contact with anoxic clay at 90 °C: Characterization of the corrosion products after two years of interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlegel, Michel L.; Bataillon, Christian; Brucker, Florence; Blanc, Cécile; Prêt, Dimitri; Foy, Eddy; Chorro, Matthieu

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Generalized, heterogeneous corrosion is observed. • The corrosion interface is made of several layers with distinct mineralogy. • Magnetite, chukanovite, Fe-phyllosilicate, ankerite are identified from metal to clay. • The estimated corrosion damage (15 μm in two years) supports surface passivation. • The corrosion products contain only half of oxidized Fe. - Abstract: Chemical and mineralogical properties of solids formed upon free corrosion of two iron probes (one massive iron rod, and one model overpack made by two pipes covering the ends of a glass rod) in saturated clay rock (Callovo-Oxfordian formation, East of Paris Basin, France) at 90 °C over two years were investigated by microscopic and spectroscopic techniques (X-ray tomography, scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, Raman microspectroscopy, micro-X-ray diffraction, and micro-X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy). The corrosion rate of the massive rod was monitored in situ by electrochemical impedance spectrometry, and found to decrease from about 90 μm/year during the first month of reaction, to less than 1 μm/year after two years. X-ray tomography revealed the presence of several fractures suggesting the presence of preferential flow and diffusion pathways along the iron samples. Microscopic observations revealed similar corrosion interfaces for both samples. Corrosion heterogeneously affected the interface, with damaged thickness from ∼0 to 80 μm. In extensively damaged areas, an inner discontinuous layer of magnetite in contact with metal, an intermediate chukanovite (Fe 2 CO 3 (OH) 2 ) layer (only when magnetite is present, and only for the overpack), and an outer layer of poorly ordered Fe phyllosilicate were observed. In areas with little damage, only the Fe-silicate solids are observed. The clay transformation layer is predominantly made of ankerite ((Fe,Ca,Mg)CO 3 ) forming a massive unit near the trace of the original

  6. Corrosion of Steel in Concrete, Part I – Mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Küter, André; Møller, Per; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2006-01-01

    prematurely. Reinforcement corrosion is identified to be the foremost cause of deterioration. Steel in concrete is normally protected by a passive layer due the high alkalinity of the concrete pore solution; corrosion is initiated by neutralization through atmospheric carbon dioxide and by ingress...... of depassivation ions, especially chloride ions. The background and consequences of deterioration of reinforced concrete structures caused by steel corrosion are summarized. Selected corrosion mechanisms postulated in the literature are briefly discussed and related to observations. The key factors controlling...... initiation and propagation of corrosion of steel in concrete are outlined....

  7. Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion: Causative Organisms and Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-31

    enviromental composition as a potential method for reversing microbiologically influenced corrosion, Corrosion (NAC’E) International. Houston. Texas...International fellow and associate editor for Biofouling, The Journal of Bioadhesion and Biofilm Research. J. Lee is a Materials and Corrosion Engineer

  8. The corrosion and corrosion mechanical properties evaluation for the LBB concept in VVERs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruscak, M.; Chvatal, P.; Karnik, D.

    1997-04-01

    One of the conditions required for Leak Before Break application is the verification that the influence of corrosion environment on the material of the component can be neglected. Both the general corrosion and/or the initiation and, growth of corrosion-mechanical cracks must not cause the degradation. The primary piping in the VVER nuclear power plant is made from austenitic steels (VVER 440) and low alloy steels protected with the austenitic cladding (VVER 1000). Inspection of the base metal and heterogeneous weldments from the VVER 440 showed that the crack growth rates are below 10 m/s if a low oxygen level is kept in the primary environment. No intergranular cracking was observed in low and high oxygen water after any type of testing, with constant or periodic loading. In the framework of the LBB assessment of the VVER 1000, the corrosion and corrosion mechanical properties were also evaluated. The corrosion and corrosion mechanical testing was oriented predominantly to three types of tests: stress corrosion cracking tests corrosion fatigue tests evaluation of the resistance against corrosion damage. In this paper, the methods used for these tests are described and the materials are compared from the point of view of response on static and periodic mechanical stress on the low alloyed steel 10GN2WA and weld metal exposed in the primary circuit environment. The slow strain rate tests and static loading of both C-rings and CT specimens were performed in order to assess the stress corrosion cracking characteristics. Cyclic loading of CT specimens was done to evaluate the kinetics of the crack growth under periodical loading. Results are shown to illustrate the approaches used. The data obtained were evaluated also from the point of view of comparison of the influence of different structure on the stress corrosion cracking appearance. The results obtained for the base metal and weld metal of the piping are presented here.

  9. Factors and mechanisms affecting corrosion of steel in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehqanian, Ch.

    1986-01-01

    Atomic power plants possess reinforced concrete structures which are exposed to sea water or sea atmosphere. Sea water or its surrounding environment contain very corrosive species which cause corrosion of metal in concrete. It should be mentioned that corrosion of steel in concrete is a complex problem that is not completely understood. Some of the factors which influence the corrosion mechanism and can be related to the pore solution composition is discussed. Chloride ion caused problems are the main source of the corrosion damage seen on the reinforced concrete structures. Corrosion rate in concrete varies and depends on the way chloride ion diffuses into concrete. In addition, the associated cations can influence diffusion of chloride into concrete. The type of portland cement and also the concrete mix design all affect the corrosion behaviour of steel in concrete

  10. Recognition and Analysis of Corrosion Failure Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Steven Suess

    2006-01-01

    Corrosion has a vast impact on the global and domestic economy, and currently incurs losses of nearly $300 billion annually to the U.S. economy alone. Because of the huge impact of corrosion, it is imperative to have a systematic approach to recognizing and mitigating corrosion problems as soon as possible after they become apparent. A proper failure analysis includes collection of pertinent background data and service history, followed by visual inspection, photographic documentation, materi...

  11. Downhole corrosion mechanisms and mitigation strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDougall, D. [Baker Hughes Canada, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Pipeline corrosion refers to its deterioration because of a reaction with its environment. Although the physical condition of the metal at the anode initiates the corrosion process, it is the chemistry and composition of the electrolyte that controls the rate of the corrosion reaction and the severity of the corrosion. This presentation described the role of corrosion rate accelerators, with particular reference to dissolved gases such as oxygen, hydrogen sulfides and carbon dioxide, as well as pH levels, salinity, flow rate, temperature and presence of solids such as iron sulfides and sulfur. The effects of these accelerators were shown to be additive. Mitigation strategies include using materials such as resistant metal alloys or fiberglass, and applying coatings and chemical inhibitors. The importance of corrosion monitoring was also emphasized, with particular reference to the value of examining the number of corrosion related failures that have occurred over a fixed period of time. It was concluded that the ability to analyze samples of failed materials results in a better understanding of the cause of the failure, and is an integral part of designing any successful corrosion control program. tabs., figs.

  12. Some proposed mechanisms for internal cladding corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, M.H.; Pickering, S.; Whitlow, W.H.

    1977-01-01

    In spite of extensive research during recent years, a comprehensive model for internal cladding corrosion in fast reactor oxide fuel pins has not yet been established. In this paper, a model is proposed which accounts for many of the features normally associated with this type of corrosion. The model is composed of a number of parts which describe the chronological sequence of events at the fuel/cladding interface. The corrosion reaction is visualised as being primarily chemical in character, involving the cladding steel, the fuel and the more aggressive fission products, notably caesium in the presence of oxygen. The model attempts to explain how corrosion starts, how it depends on the oxygen potential, why it occurs non-uniformly; also covered are phase changes within the cladding steel and morphological features such as the intergranular form of attack and the distribution of corrosion products in the fuel/cladding gap. (author)

  13. Some proposed mechanisms for internal cladding corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, M H; Pickering, S; Whitlow, W H [EURATOM (United Kingdom)

    1977-04-01

    In spite of extensive research during recent years, a comprehensive model for internal cladding corrosion in fast reactor oxide fuel pins has not yet been established. In this paper, a model is proposed which accounts for many of the features normally associated with this type of corrosion. The model is composed of a number of parts which describe the chronological sequence of events at the fuel/cladding interface. The corrosion reaction is visualised as being primarily chemical in character, involving the cladding steel, the fuel and the more aggressive fission products, notably caesium in the presence of oxygen. The model attempts to explain how corrosion starts, how it depends on the oxygen potential, why it occurs non-uniformly; also covered are phase changes within the cladding steel and morphological features such as the intergranular form of attack and the distribution of corrosion products in the fuel/cladding gap. (author)

  14. [Analysis of carbon balance and study on mechanism in anoxic-oxic-settling-anaerobic sludge reduction process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Xiao-Min; Gao, Xu; Zhang, Man-Man; Jia, Li; Guo, Jin-Song

    2012-07-01

    In order to deeply explore the mechanism of sludge reduction in OSA system, carbon balance was performed in an anoxic-oxic-settling-anaerobic (A + OSA) system and a reference AO system to investigate effects of inserting a sludge holding tank in sludge cycle line on the sludge reduction process. Meanwhile, carbon mass change in each reaction unit was identified in terms of solid, liquid and gas phases. The causes of excess sludge reduction in A + OSA system were deduced. The carbon balance results show that when the hydraulic retention time in the sludge holding tank is 7.14 h, carbon percent in solid phase of the sludge reduction system is nearly 50% higher than that of the reference system, supporting the consequence that sludge reduction rate of 49.98% had been achieved. The insertion of a sludge holding tank in the sludge return circuit can be effective in sludge reduction. Carbon changes in each unit reveal that the amount of carbon consumed for biosynthesis in the anoxic and oxic tanks (main reaction zone) of the sludge reduction system is higher than in that of the reference system. Sludge decay is observed in the sludge holding tank. Furthermore, CH4 released from the sludge holding tank is significantly higher than that from the main reaction zone. The DGGE profiles show that there are hydrolytic-fermentative bacteria in the sludge holding tank related to sludge decay. The excess sludge reduction in the A + OSA system could be a result of the combination of sludge decay in the sludge holding tank and sludge compensatory growth in the main reaction cell.

  15. Mechanical Properties and Corrosion Characteristics of Thermally Aged Alloy 22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebak, R B; Crook, P

    2002-01-01

    Alloy 22 (UNS N06022) is a candidate material for the external wall of the high level nuclear waste containers for the potential repository site at Yucca Mountain. In the mill-annealed (MA) condition, Alloy 22 is a single face centered cubic phase. When exposed to temperatures on the order of 600 C and above for times higher than 1 h, this alloy may develop secondary phases that reduce its mechanical toughness and corrosion resistance. The objective of this work was to age Alloy 22 at temperatures between 482 C and 760 C for times between 0.25 h and 6,000 h and to study the mechanical and corrosion performance of the resulting material. Aging was carried out using wrought specimens as well as gas tungsten arc welded (GTAW) specimens. Mechanical and corrosion testing was carried out using ASTM standards. Results show-that the higher the aging temperature and the longer the aging time, the lower the impact toughness of the aged material and the lower its corrosion resistance. However, extrapolating both mechanical and corrosion laboratory data predicts that Alloy 22 will remain corrosion resistant and mechanically robust for the projected lifetime of the waste container

  16. Mechanical Characterization and Corrosion Testing of X608 Al Alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhakaran, Ramprashad; Choi, Jung-Pyung; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Catalini, David; Lavender, Curt A.; Rohatgi, Aashish

    2016-02-07

    This paper describes the mechanical characterization and corrosion testing of X608 Al alloy that is being considered for A-pillar covers for heavy-duty truck applications. Recently, PNNL developed a thermo-mechanical process to stamp A-pillar covers at room temperature using this alloy, and the full-size prototype was successfully stamped by a tier-1 supplier. This study was conducted to obtain additional important information related to the newly developed forming process, and to further improve its mechanical properties. The solutionization temperature, pre-strain and paint-bake heat-treatment were found to influence the alloy’s fabricability and mechanical properties. Natural aging effect on the formability was investigated by limiting dome height (LDH) tests. Preliminary corrosion experiments showed that the employed thermo-mechanical treatments did not significantly affect the corrosion behavior of Al X608.

  17. Corrosion mechanisms of containment glasses for fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogues, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    After a review of nuclear energy production and waste vitrification principles, the aqueous corrosion mechanisms of the containment glasses and the various parameters affecting the corrosion are studied: effects of glass composition, temperature, lixiviation agent pH, lixiviation duration and mode. Conventional mass loss measurement and solution analyses are coupled to sophisticated surface analysis techniques. The hydrolyzed layer formation and the solubility limits are discussed. 87 figs., 30 tabs., 144 refs

  18. Research on corrosion mechanism of suspension insulator steel foot of direct current system and measures for corrosion inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, He; Yang, Yueguang; Su, Guolei; Wang, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Hourong; Sun, Xiaoyu; Fan, Youping

    2017-09-01

    There are increasingly serious electrocorrosion phenomena on insulator hardware caused by direct current transmission due to the wide-range popularization of extra high voltage direct current transmission engineering in our country. Steel foot corrosion is the main corrosion for insulators on positive polarity side of transmission lines. On one hand, the corrosion leads to the tapering off of steel foot diameter, having a direct influence on mechanical property of insulators; on the other hand, in condition of corrosion on steel foot wrapped in porcelain ware, the volume of the corrosion product is at least 50% more than that of the original steel foot, leading to bursting of porcelain ware, threatening safe operation of transmission lines. Therefore, it is necessary to conduct research on the phenomenon and propose feasible measures for corrosion inhibition. Starting with the corrosion mechanism, this article proposes two measures for corrosion inhibition, and verifies the inhibition effect in laboratory conditions, providing reference for application in engineering.

  19. Corrosion on Mars: An Investigation of Corrosion Mechanisms Under Relevant Simulated Martian Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz M.; Li, Wenyan; Johansen, Michael R.; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Calle, Carlos I.

    2017-01-01

    , showed that there is an interaction between the small amount of oxygen present in the Mars gas and the alloy when there is a scratch that removes the protective aluminum oxide film. Further studies are needed to consider many other important components of the Mars environment that can affect this interaction such as: the effect of oxidants, the effect of radiation on their oxidizing properties and the possible catalytic effects of the clays present in the Martian regolith. The results of this one-year project provide strong justification for further investigation of the corrosion mechanism of materials relevant to long-term surface operations in support of future human exploration missions on Mars.

  20. Mechanisms of interaction between arsenian pyrite and aqueous arsenite under anoxic and oxic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Guohong; Gao, Tianyu; Hong, Jun; Luo, Yao; Liu, Lihu; Tan, Wenfeng; Liu, Fan

    2018-05-01

    Pyrite affects the conversion and migration processes of arsenic in soils and waters. Adsorption and redox reactions of arsenite (As(III)) occur on the surface of pyrite, and the interaction processes are influenced by the arsenic incorporated into pyrite. This work examined the effects of arsenic content, pH and oxygen on the interaction between arsenian pyrite and aqueous As(III) and investigated the underlying mechanisms. The results indicated that arsenic incorporation led to a high content of Fe(III) in pyrite, and that As(III) was mainly adsorbed on pyrite surface and part of As(III) was oxidized to As(V) by the newly formed intermediates including hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen peroxide. The oxidation rate increased with increasing arsenic content in the pyrite and the presence of air (oxygen), and first decreased and then increased with increasing pH from 3.0 to 11.0. Hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen peroxide significantly contributed to the oxidation of pyrite and aqueous As(III) in acidic and alkaline solutions, respectively. Although pyrite oxidation increased with increasing arsenic content as indicated by the elevated concentrations of elemental S and SO42-, the percentage of released arsenic in total arsenic of the arsenian pyrite decreased due to the adsorption of arsenic on the surface of newly formed ferric (hydr)oxides, especially the ferric arsenate precipitate formed in high pH solutions. The present study enables a better understanding of the important interaction process of dissolved arsenite and natural pyrites in the study of groundwater contamination, arsenic migration/sequestration, and acid mine drainage formation.

  1. Corrosion fatigue of biomedical metallic alloys: mechanisms and mitigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Renato Altobelli; de Oliveira, Mara Cristina Lopes

    2012-03-01

    Cyclic stresses are often related to the premature mechanical failure of metallic biomaterials. The complex interaction between fatigue and corrosion in the physiological environment has been subject of many investigations. In this context, microstructure, heat treatments, plastic deformation, surface finishing and coatings have decisive influence on the mechanisms of fatigue crack nucleation and growth. Furthermore, wear is frequently present and contributes to the process. However, despite all the effort at elucidating the mechanisms that govern corrosion fatigue of biomedical alloys, failures continue to occur. This work reviews the literature on corrosion-fatigue-related phenomena of Ti alloys, surgical stainless steels, Co-Cr-Mo and Mg alloys. The aim was to discuss the correlation between structural and surface aspects of these materials and the onset of fatigue in the highly saline environment of the human body. By understanding such correlation, mitigation of corrosion fatigue failure may be achieved in a reliable scientific-based manner. Different mitigation methods are also reviewed and discussed throughout the text. It is intended that the information condensed in this article should be a valuable tool in the development of increasingly successful designs against the corrosion fatigue of metallic implants. Copyright © 2011 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Bacterial corrosion in low-temperature geothermal. Mechanisms of corrosion by sulphate-reducing bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daumas, Sylvie

    1987-01-01

    Within the frame of researches aimed at determining the causes of damages noticed on geothermal equipment, this research thesis aims at assessing the respective importance of physical-chemical processes and bacterial intervention in corrosion phenomena. It proposes an ecological approach of the fluid sampled in the Creil geothermal power station. The aim is to define the adaptation and activity degree of isolated sulphate-reducing bacteria with respect to their environment conditions. The author studied the effect of the development of these bacteria on the corrosion of carbon steel used in geothermal. Thus, he proposes a contribution to the understanding of mechanisms related to iron attack by these bacteria. Electrochemical techniques have been adapted to biological processes and used to measure corrosion [fr

  3. Mechanism of Corrosion of Activated Aluminum Particles by Hot Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razavi-Tousi, S.S.; Szpunar, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanism of corrosion in aluminum particles by hot water treatment for hydrogen generation is evaluated. The aluminum powder was activated by ball milling for different durations, which modified size and microstructure of the particles. Open circuit potential test was carried out to elucidate different stages of the reaction. Tafel test was used to explain the effect of ball milling and growth of hydroxide layer on corrosion of the particles. Surface, cross section and thickness of the grown hydroxide on the aluminum particles were studied in a scanning electron microscope. The corrosion potential of the aluminum powders depends on microstructure of the aluminum particles, growth of the hydroxide layer and a change in pH because of cathodic reactions. The hydrogen production test showed that a deformed microstructure and smaller particle size accelerates the corrosion rate of aluminum by hot water, the effect of the deformed microstructure being more significant at the beginning of the reaction. Effect of growth of the hydroxide layer on corrosion mechanism is discussed

  4. Long term alteration of glass/iron systems in anoxic conditions: contribution of archaeological analogues to the study of mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michelin, A.

    2011-01-01

    The knowledge of glass alteration mechanisms arouses a great interest over the last decades, particularly in the nuclear field, since vitrification is used to stabilize high-level radioactive wastes in many countries. In the French concept, these nuclear glasses would be stored in geological repositories. This multi-barrier system (glass matrix, stainless steel container, low carbon steel over-container, geological barrier) must ensure the durable confinement of radionuclides. But laboratory experiments do not permit to predict directly the behaviour of these materials over typically a million-year timescale and the extrapolation of short-term laboratory data to long time periods remains problematic. Part of the validation of the predictive models relies on natural and archaeological analogues. Here, the analogues considered are vitreous slags produced as wastes by a blast furnace working during the 16. century in the iron making site of Glinet (Normandy, France). The choice of these specific artefacts is due to the presence of particular interface between corrosion products and glass matrix inside the blocks. Thus, they can help us to understand the influence of iron corrosion products from the steel containers on the glass alteration mechanisms and kinetics. A first part of this work concerns the characterization of the archaeological artefacts especially the interfacial area between glass and corrosion products inside cracks using micro and nano-beam techniques (μRaman spectroscopy, FEG-SEM, TEM, STXM...). This study has enabled to suggest an alteration process with different geochemical steps that leads to alteration profile observed. One of these steps is the precipitation of an iron silicate phase. In a second time, leaching experiments were set up on a synthetic glass of similar composition than the archaeological one to understand the first stages of alteration with and without iron. Two phenomena can be observed: silicon sorption and precipitation of iron

  5. Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slabaugh, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    Presents some materials for use in demonstration and experimentation of corrosion processes, including corrosion stimulation and inhibition. Indicates that basic concepts of electrochemistry, crystal structure, and kinetics can be extended to practical chemistry through corrosion explanation. (CC)

  6. Corrosion resistance of zirconium: general mechanisms, behaviour in nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinard Legry, G.

    1990-01-01

    Corrosion resistance of zirconium results from the strong affinity of this metal for oxygen; as a result a thin protective oxide film is spontaneously formed in air or aqueous media, its thickness and properties depending on the physicochemical conditions at the interface. This film passivates the underlying metal but obviously if the passive film is partially or completely removed, localised or generalised corrosion phenomena will occur. In nitric acid, this depassivation may be chemical (fluorides) or mechanical (straining, creep, fretting). In these cases it is useful to determine the physicochemical conditions (concentration, temperature, potential, stress) which will have to be observed to use safely zirconium and its alloys in nitric acid solutions [fr

  7. The basic corrosion mechanisms of HLW glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conradt, R.; Roggendorf, H.; Ostertag, R.

    1986-01-01

    During the years 1975 to 1984, the Commission of the European Communities organized and promoted an R and D programme on the testing and evaluation of solidified high-level waste forms with the purpose of providing a scientific basis for the management and storage of radioactive waste. A fair number of materials were tested under a broad variation of experimental data. The Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Silicatforschung, Wuerzburg, has undertaken to perform a synoptic evaluation of the above data. The purpose of this evaluation is: - to compile the data from the individual national contributors (as presented in the joint annual reports of the EC) with respect to: the materials, or the experimental parameters, or further aspects, and to harmonize them with respect to their presentation, choice of units, etc., - to compare the results to the international state of information, - to elaborate and demonstrate common features of the diverse materials, e.g. common patterns of the corrosion behaviour, - to check the validity of present models, - to define shortcomings and questions that are still open

  8. Mechanical damage due to corrosion of parts of pump technology and valves of LWR power installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hron, J.; Krumpl, M.

    1986-01-01

    Two types are described of uneven corrosion of austenitic chromium-nickel steel: pitting and slit corrosion. The occurrence of slit corrosion is typical of parts of pumping technology and valves. The corrosion damage of austenitic chromium-nickel steels spreads as intergranular, transgranular or mixed corrosion. In nuclear power facilities with LWR's, intergranular corrosion is due to chlorides and sulphur compounds while transgranular corrosion is due to the presence of dissolved oxygen and chlorides. In mechanically stressed parts, stress corrosion takes place. The recommended procedures are discussed of reducing the corrosion-mechanical damage of pumping equipment of light water reactors during design, production and assembly. During the service of the equipment, corrosion cracks are detected using nondestructive methods and surface cracks are repaired by grinding and welding. (E.S.)

  9. Mechanisms of leaching and corrosions of vitrified radioactive waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanza, F.; Conradt, R.; Hall, A.R.; Malow, G.; Trocellier, P.; Van Iseghem, P.

    1985-01-01

    The estimation of the risk connected with the storage of radioactive waste in geological formations asks for reliable extrapolation of the data for leaching and corrosion of glasses to very long times. As a consequence the knowledge of the physico-chemical mechanisms which dominate the leaching phenomena can be very useful. In the corrosion due to aqueous solution three main mechanisms can be identified: ion exchange, matrix dissolution and formation of a surface layer. The work performed in the different laboratories has allowed to evaluate the relative importance of the various mechanism. The alkali ion exchange does not seems to be predominant in defining the release of the various elements, the matrix dissolution being the most important. The surface composition is important as the compounds present could dominate the matrix dissolution kinetic. Besides the surface layer could form an impervious layer, which, if stable in time, could protect effectively the glass

  10. Chemical and mechanical control of corrosion product transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hede Larsen, O; Blum, R [I/S Fynsvaerket, Faelleskemikerne, Odense (Denmark); Daucik, K [I/S Skaerbaekvaerket, Faelleskemikerne, Fredericia (Denmark)

    1996-12-01

    The corrosion products formed in the condensate and feedwater system of once-through boilers are precipitated and deposited inside the evaporator tubes mainly in the burner zone at the highest heat flux. Depositions lead to increased oxidation rate and increased metal temperature of the evaporator tubes, hereby decreasing tube lifetime. This effect is more important in the new high efficiency USC boilers due to increased feedwater temperature and hence higher thermal load on the evaporator tubes. The only way to reduce the load on the evaporator tubes is to minimise corrosion product transport to the boiler. Two general methods for minimising corrosion product transport to the boiler have been evaluated through measurement campaigns for Fe in the water/steam cycle in supercritical boilers within the ELSAM area. One method is to reduce corrosion in the low temperature condensate system by changing conditioning mode from alkaline volatile treatment (AVT) to oxygenated treatment (OT). The other method is to filtrate part of the condensate with a mechanical filter at the deaerator. The results show, that both methods are effective at minimising Fe-transport to the boiler, but changing to OT has the highest effect and should always be used, whenever high purity condensate is maintained. Whether mechanical filtration also is required, depends on the boiler, specifically the load on the evaporator. A simplified calculation model for lifetime evaluation of evaporator tubes has been developed. This model has been used for evaluating the effect of corrosion product transport to the boiler on evaporator tube lifetime. Conventional supercritical boilers generally can achieve sufficient lifetime by AVT and even better by OT, whereas all measures to reduce Fe-content of feedwater, including OT and mechanical filtration, should be taken, to ensure sufficient lifetime for the new boilers with advanced steam data - 290 bar/580 deg. C and above. (au)

  11. Mechanical and corrosion properties of AA8011 sheets and foils:

    OpenAIRE

    Asanović, Vanja; Dalijić, Kemal; Radonjić, Dragan

    2006-01-01

    The mechanical and corrosion properties of a twin-roll cast Al-Fe-Si aluminum alloy with 0.74 % Fe and 0.52 % Si (AA8011) were investigated. The influence of the thermo-mehanical processing route on the mechanical behavior of AA8011 sheets was determined. Comparisons were made with AA3003 and A199.5 sheets. The restoration of the mechanical properties was used in the analysis of the recrystallization behavior of the twin-roll cast AA8011 alloy deformed under cold-working conditions and subseq...

  12. Study on stainless steel electrode based on dynamic aluminum liquid corrosion mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Hua; Yang, Ruifeng

    2009-01-01

    Scanning electrion microscope (SEM) was performed for investigations on the corrosion mechanism of stainless steel electrode in dynamic melting aluminum liquid. Microstructures and composition analysis was made by electron probe analysis (EPA) combined with metallic phase analysis. It can be concluded that the corrosion process is mainly composed of physical corrosion (flowing and scouring corrosion) and chemical corrosion (forming FeAl and Fe2Al5) and the two mechanisms usually exist simultaneously. The corrosion interface thickness is about 10 μm, which is different to usual interface width of hundreds μm in the static melting Al with iron matrix.

  13. Corrosion behavior, mechanical properties, and long-term aging of nickel-plated uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dini, J.W.; Johnson, H.R.; Schoenfelder, C.W.

    1976-01-01

    The behavior of nickel-plated uranium upon exposure to moist nitrogen was evaluated. Plating thicknesses of 0.051 mm (2 mil) were adequate to prevent corrosion. Specimens with thinner coats showed some corrosion and some reduction in mechanical properties during subsequent testing. Plated samples exposed to dry air at ambient pressure for 10 y showed no corrosion and no degradation of mechanical properties. Surface and bulk hydrogen content, as well as free hydrogen generated during the test, were measured to determine the extent of corrosion. Results support an earlier proposed mechanism for uranium corrosion at low humidities

  14. New approach to the elucidation of corrosion mechanism of ceramics by the ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, J.; Hayashi, K.; Tachi, Y.; Kano, S.

    1998-08-01

    Ceramics possessing high temperature strength are promising materials for the structural application in severe environment. The development of ceramics has been carried out in order to use them in FBR environment such as liquid sodium. In particular, corrosion behavior of ceramics has been investigated to improve the corrosion resistance in liquid sodium. However, the corrosion mechanism of ceramics was not comprehended in detail even now. Because corrosion products which were deposited on the surface of test pieces during corrosion test and played an important role in corrosion behavior, were not detected distinctly after thr corrosion test. In this study, an ion implantation technique was applied to understand the corrosion mechanism of ceramics in stead of the conventional corrosion test. Sodium ions were implanted in ceramics (100 keV, 1.9 x 10 17 ions/cm 2 ) and then heat treatment was performed at either 923 K or 823 K for 36 ks in argon atmosphere. After that, products on the surface were analyzed using SEM and TEM observation and X-ray diffraction. Consequently, the corrosion products were not identified exactly, but their presence was confirmed on the surface. It was caused by the minute amount of corrosion products. In future, it is necessary to carry systematically out the implantation and heat treatment under various conditions. Therefore, it seems that the beneficial information will be obtained to understand the corrosion mechanism of ceramics. (author)

  15. Corrosion mechanisms of aluminum alloys in waters of low conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haddad, Roberto E; Lanazani, Liliana; Rodriguez, Sebastian

    2006-01-01

    After completing their burn cycle, nuclear fuels in experimental reactors made with aluminum alloys have to remain for long periods in distilled water, in interim storage. While aluminum alloys are resistant to corrosion in pure water, severe deterioration occurs in elements that have been immersed for periods of up to 30 years. Pitting-like surface alterations can even occur in nuclear quality waters (conductivity below 5 μS/cm and dissolved ions content below detection thresholds) in time periods of less than one year. An important factor that could become a potential promoter of this phenomena is the presence of dust particles and others, that could settle on the metallic surface, generating a locally aggressive medium. A simple immersion experiment demonstrates that these points can become initiation sites for pitting with very low concentrations of chlorides (under 10 ppm), especially if the electrochemical potential is increased by contact with another metallic material, even staying below the pitting potential in this medium. There are several corrosion mechanisms acting simultaneously, depending on the nature of the deposits. Pitting under glass particles has been detected, which may be related to a simple crevice corrosion process. In the case of iron oxides, however, the results depend on the type of oxide. Pits more than 100 microns deep have been obtained in 7 day immersion tests, so in spent fuel storage sites these mechanisms could easily cause penetration of the 500 micron aluminum plates during the time covering the interim storage under water, which could be decades, with similar chemical conditions (CW)

  16. XPS and Auger investigation of mechanisms affecting corrosion inhibition of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, R.M.; Surman, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    Atmospheric corrosion of metal surfaces need not be extremely obvious to cause extensive damage to many products. Very small corrosion pits and spots can cause defects in critical copper sources, often resulting in the catastrophic failure of complete electronic assemblies. Microscopic corrosion in steel can lead to the complete failure of subsequently added coatings or furnishings, the automotive industry has become aware. In addition, corrosion at its earliest stages can initiate other corrosion at a later date, resulting in inferior finishings or coatings. A major interest in atmospheric corrosion is in the mechanism by which the initial corrosion initiated and propagated. The initial phase involves the attack of the very other surface layers, hence it is difficult to observe with conventional techniques such as SEM/EDX. This paper presents some of the results obtained by both Auger electron spectroscopy and x- ray photoelectron spectroscopy, of steel and copper samples exposed to corrosive materials under controlled conditions

  17. Corrosion and Mechanical Properties of HANA-6 Strip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Myung Ho; Kim, Jun Hwan; Park, Sang Yoon; Choi, Byoung Kwon; Jeong, Yong Hwan; Kim, Yoon Ho; Chung, Jin Gon

    2007-01-01

    The Zircaloy-4, one of zirconium alloys, has been used as a nuclear fuel and structural material because it has a satisfactory mechanical strength and corrosion resistance. As in many plants it was attempted to increase their discharge burn-up and power level, the development of new zirconium alloys for a high burn-up fuel material has been required. In response to these needs, in 1997 KAERI started the development of some Zr-based new alloys, called HANA alloys, for high burn-up fuel cladding material and has tested the out-of-pile and in-pile performance of these HANA claddings after manufacturing the claddings with HANA alloys. The sample specimens of the HANA cladding tubes showed a good performance for both corrosion resistance and creep properties at an irradiation test up to 12GWD/MtU in Halden test reactor as well as at various out of- pile tests. It is also scheduled to start the verification test of the in-pile performance of the HANA claddings in a commercial reactor by the end of 2007. KAERI and KNFC are also trying to extend the applicability of these alloys to the spacer grid for PWR nuclear fuel. As one of these attempts, KAERI has tested the properties of HANA-6 strips of 241.3 mm in width, and both 0.457 and 0.667 mm in thickness manufactured with a larger scale in width than a laboratory scale. The same test is scheduled to carry out for HANA-4 strips with a time lag. This paper summarized the results of the corrosion test, tensile test and bending test for the HANA- 6 strips up to now

  18. Electrochemical study of bio-corrosion mechanisms at the carbon steel interface in presence of iron-reducing and hydrogenotrophic bacteria in the nuclear waste disposal context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite-de-Souza-Moreira, Rebeca

    2013-01-01

    The safety of deep geological repository for nuclear waste is a very important and topical matter especially for the nuclear industry. Such as nuclear fuel the high level waste have to be stored for time frames of millions of years in metallic containers. Typically these containers should be placed in deep geological clay formations 500 metres underground. Corrosion processes, will take place after the re-saturation of the geological medium and under the prevalent anoxic conditions may lead to the generation of hydrogen. This gas accumulates in clay environment through the years and eventually becomes hazardous for steel containers. In the particular environment of geological repositories does not provide much biodegradable substances. This is the reason that hydrogen represents a new suitable energy source for hydrogenotrophic bacteria. Thereby formed bacterial bio-films on the containers may contribute to a process of fast decay of the steel, the so called bio-corrosion. The aim of this study is to characterize the electrochemical interfaces in order to obtain the mechanisms of bio-corrosion of carbon steels in presence of iron reducing and hydrogenotrophic bacterium Shewanella oneideinsis. The products of corrosion processes, namely hydrogen and iron (III) oxides are used as electron donor and acceptor, respectively. The amount of hydrogen consumed by Shewanella could be estimated with 10"-"4 mol s"-"1 using Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy (SECM) techniques. The influence of the local hydrogen generation was evaluated via chrono-amperometry. When hydrogen was locally generated above a carbon steel substrate an accelerated corrosion process can be observed. Eventually, using Local Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (LEIS) techniques, the mechanism of the generalised corrosion process was demonstrated. (author)

  19. Study on electrochemical corrosion mechanism of steel foot of insulators for HVDC lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Weihua; Sun, Xiaoyu; Fan, Youping

    2017-09-01

    The main content of this paper is the mechanism of electrochemical corrosion of insulator steel foot in HVDC transmission line, and summarizes five commonly used artificial electrochemical corrosion accelerated test methods in the world. Various methods are analyzed and compared, and the simulation test of electrochemical corrosion of insulator steel feet is carried out by water jet method. The experimental results show that the experimental environment simulated by water jet method is close to the real environment. And the three suspension modes of insulators in the actual operation, the most serious corrosion of the V type suspension hardware, followed by the tension string suspension, and the linear string corrosion rate is the slowest.

  20. Mechanical and Corrosion Properties of Magnesium-Bioceramic Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowalski K.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium alloys have recently attracted much attention as a new generation of biodegradable metallic materials. In this work, Mg1Mn1Zn0.3Zr-bioceramic nanocomposites and their scaffolds were synthesized using a combination of mechanical alloying and a space-holder sintering process. The phase and microstructure analysis was carried out using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and the properties were measured using hardness and corrosion testing equipment. Nanostructured Mg-bioceramic composites with a grain sizes below 73 nm were synthesized. The Vickers hardnesses for the bulk nanostructured Mg-based composites are two times greater than that of pure microcrystalline Mg metal (50 HV0.3. Produced Mg-based bionanomaterials can be applied in medicine.

  1. Ni-P/Zn-Ni compositionally modulated multilayer coatings - Part 2: Corrosion and protection mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadormanesh, Behrouz; Ghorbani, Mohammad

    2018-06-01

    The Ni-P/Zn-Ni compositionally modulated multilayer coatings CMMCs were electrodeposited from a single bath by switching the deposition current density. The corrosion resistance of the deposits was studied and compared with that of monolayers of Ni-P and Zn-Ni alloys via Tafel polarization, EIS and salt spray tests. Characterization of corrosion products by means of EDS and XRD revealed more details from the corrosion mechanism of the monolayers and multilayers. The corrosion current density of Ni-P/Zn-Ni CMMCs were around one tenth of Zn-Ni monolayer. The CMMC with incomplete layers performed lower polarization resistance and higher corrosion current density compared to the CMMC with complete layers. The electrical circuit that was proposed for modeling the corrosion process based on the EIS spectrum, proved that layering reduces the porosity and consequently improves the barrier properties. Although, layering of Zn-Ni layers with Ni-P deposits increased the time to red rust in salt spray test, the time for white rust formation decreased. The corrosion mechanism of both Zn-Ni and Ni-P (containing small amount of Zn) was preferential dissolution of Zn and the corrosion products were comprised of mainly Zn hydroxychloride and Zn hydroxycarbonate. Also, Ni and P did not take part in the corrosion products. Based on the electrochemical character of the layers and the morphology of the corroded surface, the corrosion mechanism of multilayers was discussed.

  2. Effect of mechanical treatment on intergranular corrosion of 6064 alloy bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sláma, P.; Nacházel, J.

    2017-02-01

    Aluminium Al-Mg-Si-type alloys (6xxx-series) exhibit good mechanical properties, formability, weldability and good corrosion resistance in various environments. They often find use in automotive industry and other applications. Some alloys, however, particularly those with higher copper levels, show increased susceptibility to intergranular corrosion. Intergranular corrosion (IGC) is typically related to the formation of microgalvanic cells between cathodic, more noble phases and depleted (precipitate-free) zones along grain boundaries. It is encountered mainly in AlMgSi alloys containing Cu, where it is thought to be related to the formation Q-phase precipitates (Al4Mg8Si7Cu2) along grain boundaries. The present paper describes the effects of mechanical working (extrusion, drawing and straightening) and artificial aging on intergranular corrosion in rods of the 6064 alloy. The resistance to intergranular corrosion was mapped using corrosion tests according to EN ISO 11846, method B. Corrosion tests showed dependence of corrosion type on mechanical processing of the material. Intergranular, pitting and transgranular corrosion was observed. Artificial ageing influenced mainly the depth of the corrosion.

  3. Corrosion of Iron by Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria: New Views of an Old Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrelfs, Julia

    2014-01-01

    About a century ago, researchers first recognized a connection between the activity of environmental microorganisms and cases of anaerobic iron corrosion. Since then, such microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) has gained prominence and its technical and economic implications are now widely recognized. Under anoxic conditions (e.g., in oil and gas pipelines), sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are commonly considered the main culprits of MIC. This perception largely stems from three recurrent observations. First, anoxic sulfate-rich environments (e.g., anoxic seawater) are particularly corrosive. Second, SRB and their characteristic corrosion product iron sulfide are ubiquitously associated with anaerobic corrosion damage, and third, no other physiological group produces comparably severe corrosion damage in laboratory-grown pure cultures. However, there remain many open questions as to the underlying mechanisms and their relative contributions to corrosion. On the one hand, SRB damage iron constructions indirectly through a corrosive chemical agent, hydrogen sulfide, formed by the organisms as a dissimilatory product from sulfate reduction with organic compounds or hydrogen (“chemical microbially influenced corrosion”; CMIC). On the other hand, certain SRB can also attack iron via withdrawal of electrons (“electrical microbially influenced corrosion”; EMIC), viz., directly by metabolic coupling. Corrosion of iron by SRB is typically associated with the formation of iron sulfides (FeS) which, paradoxically, may reduce corrosion in some cases while they increase it in others. This brief review traces the historical twists in the perception of SRB-induced corrosion, considering the presently most plausible explanations as well as possible early misconceptions in the understanding of severe corrosion in anoxic, sulfate-rich environments. PMID:24317078

  4. Superheater fireside corrosion mechanisms in MSWI plants: Lab-scale study and on-site results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brossard, J.M.; Chaucherie, X.; Nicol, F. [Veolia Environnement R and D, Zone Portuaire de Limay, 291 Avenue Dreyfous Ducas, Limay 78520 (France); Diop, I. [Veolia Environnement R and D, Zone Portuaire de Limay, 291 Avenue Dreyfous Ducas, Limay 78520 (France); Institut Jean Lamour, departement Chimie et physique des solides et des surfaces, UMR 7198 CNRS - Universite Henri Poincare Nancy 1, Vandoeuvre-Les-Nancy (France); Rapin, C.; Vilasi, M. [Institut Jean Lamour, departement Chimie et physique des solides et des surfaces, UMR 7198 CNRS - Universite Henri Poincare Nancy 1, Vandoeuvre-Les-Nancy (France)

    2011-06-15

    Combustion of municipal waste generates highly corrosive gases (HCl, SO{sub 2}, NaCl, KCl, and heavy metals chlorides) and ashes containing alkaline chlorides and sulfates. Currently, corrosion phenomena are particularly observed on superheater's tubes. Corrosion rates depend mainly on installation design, operating conditions i.e., gas and steam temperature and velocity of the flue gas containing ashes. This paper presents the results obtained using an innovative laboratory-scale corrosion unit, which simulates MSWI (Municipal Solid Waste Incineration) boilers conditions characterized by a temperature gradient at the metal tube in the presence of corrosive gases and ashes. The presented corrosion tests were realized on carbon steel at fixed metal temperature (400 C). The influence of the flue gas temperature, synthetic ashes composition, and flue gas flow pattern were investigated. After corrosion test, cross sections of tube samples were characterized to evaluate thickness loss and estimate corrosion rate while the elements present in corrosion layers were analyzed. Corrosion tests were carried out twice in order to validate the accuracy and reproducibility of results. First results highlight the key role of molten phase related to the ash composition and flue gas temperature as well as the deposit morphology, related to the flue gas flow pattern, on the mechanisms and corrosion rates. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Superconductor thin films: topotactic corrosion mechanism of YBa2Cu3O7 with water vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boerner, R.; Schoellhorn, R.; Kabius, B.; Schubert, J.

    1995-01-01

    Corrosion in high-T c superconductors (HTSC) caused by water vapor is examined. HTSC thin films prepared using the laser ablation technique are shown to lose their superconducting properties due to the topotactic formation of a new hydroxylated phase which is a result of the corrosion. The mechanism of the corrosion process, which could be important in future applications of HTSC, is discussed. (orig.)

  6. Effects of Variations in Salt-Spray Conditions on the Corrosion Mechanisms of an AE44 Magnesium Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly J. Martin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of how corrosion affects magnesium alloys is of utmost importance as the automotive and aerospace industries have become interested in the use of these lightweight alloys. However, the standardized salt-spray test does not produce adequate corrosion results when compared with field data, due to the lack of multiple exposure environments. This research explored four test combinations through three sets of cycles to determine how the corrosion mechanisms of pitting, intergranular corrosion, and general corrosion were affected by the environment. Of the four test combinations, Humidity-Drying was the least corrosive, while the most corrosive test condition was Salt Spray-Humidity-Drying. The differences in corrosivity of the test conditions are due to the various reactions needed to cause corrosion, including the presence of chloride ions to cause pit nucleation, the presence of humidity to cause galvanic corrosion, and the drying phase which trapped chloride ions beneath the corrosion by-products.

  7. Coupling between corrosion and biphasic transport in porous media: Application to the evolution of a radioactive wastes disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dridi, W.

    2005-04-01

    In the actual concepts of geological disposal, high level radioactive wastes are packed in metallic containers surrounded by a partially or totally saturated clay media. In contact with the interstitial water, anoxic corrosion of this container will start producing hydrogen. In the scope of safety assessment, the present study deals with two main topics: prediction of the long-term corrosion of carbon steel with respect to clay water content and evaluation of the risk of damage of the clay barrier related to gas production. Elementary processes controlling the kinetics of corrosion are limited to oxide growth and mass transfer through the porosity of this film. Thanks to a macroscopic description of theses processes, followed by an interfacial kinetic law, a mechanistic modeling of the anoxic corrosion in partially saturated porous media is proposed. This approach is validated when confronted to the long-term corrosion tests performed in saturated clay. Both modeling and laboratory experiments have confirmed that kinetics of anoxic corrosion in partially saturated clay is mainly controlled by the surrounding relative humidity as in the case of aerated or atmospheric corrosion. In the gas generation topic, some numerical simulations are performed concerning the oedometric and triaxial test dealing with gas migration in saturated clay. Finally, long-term calculations are conducted concerning hydro-mechanical impact of corrosion in deep geological repositories. Due to a more realistic prediction of the long-term corrosion, the risks of gas overpressures, local desaturation and mechanical damage are reduced. (author)

  8. Effects of annealing on the corrosion behavior and mechanical properties of Ti-Al-V alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, T. K.; Choi, B. S.; Baek, J. H.; Choi, B. K.; Jeong, Y. H.; Lee, D. J.; Jang, M. H.; Jeong, Y. H.

    2002-01-01

    In order to determine the annealing condition after cold rolling, the effects of annealing on the corrosion behavior and mechanical properties of Ti-Al-V alloy were evaluated. The results of tensile tests at room temperature showed that the strengths and the ductility were almost independent of the annealing temperature. The results of hardness test also revealed that the hardness was independent of the annealing, However, the results of corrosion test in an ammoniated water of pH 9.98 at 360 .deg. C showed that the corrosion resistance depended on the annealing temperature, and the corrosion rate was accelerated with increasing annealing temperature. Hydrogen contents absorbed during the corrosion test of 120 days also increased with the annealing temperature. It may be attributed to the growth of α' precipitates by annealing. It is thus suggested that the lower annealing temperatures provide the better corrosion properties without degrading the tensile properties

  9. Mechanism of magnetite formation in high temperature corrosion by model naphthenic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Peng; Robbins, Winston; Bota, Gheorghe

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Magnetite scales were found in naphthenic acid (NAP) corrosion. • Magnetite scales were formed due to thermal decomposition of iron naphthenates. • Formation and protectiveness of magnetite scales depended on structure of NAP. • Carboxylic acids confirm corrosion observations for commercial NAP. - Abstract: Naphthenic acid (NAP) corrosion is a major concern for refineries. The complexity of NAP in crude oil and the sulfidation process hinder a fundamental knowledge of their corrosive behavior. Studies with model acids were performed to explore the corrosion mechanism and magnetite scales were found on carbon steel. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and X-ray diffraction methods detected differences in the quantity and quality of magnetite formed by model acids. These scales exhibited different resistance to higher severity NAP corrosion in a flow through apparatus. Magnetite is proposed to be formed by thermal decomposition of iron naphthenates.

  10. Electrochemistry and capillary condensation theory reveal the mechanism of corrosion in dense porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanoni, Matteo; Angst, Ueli M; Elsener, Bernhard

    2018-05-09

    Corrosion in carbonated concrete is an example of corrosion in dense porous media of tremendous socio-economic and scientific relevance. The widespread research endeavors to develop novel, environmentally friendly cements raise questions regarding their ability to protect the embedded steel from corrosion. Here, we propose a fundamentally new approach to explain the scientific mechanism of corrosion kinetics in dense porous media. The main strength of our model lies in its simplicity and in combining the capillary condensation theory with electrochemistry. This reveals that capillary condensation in the pore structure defines the electrochemically active steel surface, whose variability upon changes in exposure relative humidity is accountable for the wide variability in measured corrosion rates. We performed experiments that quantify this effect and find good agreement with the theory. Our findings are essential to devise predictive models for the corrosion performance, needed to guarantee the safety and sustainability of traditional and future cements.

  11. Mechanism research on coupling effect between dew point corrosion and ash deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yun-Gang; Zhao, Qin-Xin; Zhang, Zhi-Xiang; Zhang, Zhi-Chao; Tao, Wen-Quan

    2013-01-01

    In order to study the coupling mechanism between ash deposition and dew point corrosion, five kinds of tube materials frequently used as anti-dew point corrosion materials were selected as research objects. Dew point corrosion and ash deposition experiments were performed with a new type experimental device in a Chinese thermal power plant. The microstructures of the materials and the composition of ash deposition were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS). The results showed that the ash deposition layer could be divided into non-condensation zone, the main condensation zone and the secondary condensation zone. The acid vapor condensed in the main condensation zone rather than directly on the tube wall surface. The dew point corrosion mainly is oxygen corrosion under the condition of the viscosity ash deposition, and the corrosion products are composed of the ash and acid reaction products in the outer layer, iron sulfate in the middle layer, and iron oxide in the inner layer. The innermost layer is the main corrosion layer. With the increase of the tube wall temperature, the ash deposition changes from the viscosity ash deposition to the dry loose ash deposition, the ash deposition rate decreases dramatically and dew point corrosion is alleviated efficiently. The sulfuric dew point corrosion resistance of the five test materials is as follows: 316L > ND > Corten>20G > 20 steel. -- Highlights: ► Dew point corrosion and ash deposition tests of five materials were performed. ► Acid vapor condensed in the ash deposit rather than directly on the tube surface. ► Dew point corrosion resistance is as follow: 316L > ND > Corten>20G > 20 steel. ► Dew point corrosion mainly is oxygen corrosion under viscosity ash deposition

  12. Grain boundary defects initiation at the outer surface of dissimilar welds: corrosion mechanism studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Bouvier, O.; Yrieix, B.

    1995-11-01

    Dissimilar welds located on the primary coolant system of the French PWR I plants exhibit grain boundary defects in the true austenitic zones of the first buttering layer. If grain boundaries reach the interface, they can extend to the martensitic band. Those defects are filled with compact oxides. In addition, the ferritic base metal presents some pits along the interface. Nowadays, three mechanisms are proposed to explain the initiation of those defects: stress corrosion cracking, intergranular corrosion and high temperature intergranular oxidation. This paper is dealing with the study of the mechanisms involved in the corrosion phenomenon. Intergranular corrosion tests performed on different materials show that only the first buttering layer, even with some δ ferrite, is sensitized. The results of stress corrosion cracking tests in water solutions show that intergranular cracking is possible on a bulk material representative of the first buttering layer. It is unlikely on actual dissimilar welds where the ferritic base metal protects the first austenitic layer by galvanic coupling. Therefore, the stress corrosion cracking assumption cannot explain the initiation of the defects in aqueous environment. The results of the investigations and of the corrosion studies led to the conclusion that the atmosphere could be the only possible aggressive environment. This conclusion is based on natural atmospheric exposure and accelerated corrosion tests carried out with SO 2 additions in controlled atmosphere. They both induce a severe intergranular corrosion on true sensitized austenitic materials. This corrosion studies cannot conclude definitively on the causes of the defect initiation on field, but they show that the atmospheric corrosion could produce intergranular attacks in the pure austenitic zones of the first buttering layer of the dissimilar welds and that this corrosion is stress assisted. (author). 1 ref., 6 figs., 4 tabs

  13. Mechanical Behavior of Stainless Steel Fiber-Reinforced Composites Exposed to Accelerated Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Brien, Caitlin; McBride, Amanda; E. Zaghi, Arash; Burke, Kelly A.; Hill, Alex

    2017-01-01

    Recent advancements in metal fibers have introduced a promising new type of stainless steel fiber with high stiffness, high failure strain, and a thickness corrosion. The main goal of this study is to compare the impact of corrosion on the mechanical properties of steel fiber-reinforced composites with those of conventional types of stainless steel. By providing experimental evidences, this study may promote the application of steel fiber-reinforced composite as a viable alternative to conventional metals. Samples of steel fiber-reinforced polymer and four different types of stainless steel were subjected to 144 and 288 h of corrosion in ferric chloride solution to simulate accelerated corrosion conditions. The weight losses due to corrosion were recorded. The corroded and control samples were tested under monotonic tensile loading to measure the ultimate stresses and strains. The effect of corrosion on the mechanical properties of the different materials was evaluated. The digital image correlation (DIC) technique was used to investigate the failure mechanism of the corrosion-damaged specimens. Overall, steel fiber-reinforced composites had the greatest corrosion resistance. PMID:28773132

  14. Investigation of corrosion resistance of alloys with high mechanical characteristics in some environments of food industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tremoureux, Yves

    1978-01-01

    This research thesis aimed at improving knowledge in the field of stress-free corrosion of alloys with high mechanical characteristics in aqueous environments, at highlighting some necessary aspects of their behaviour during cleaning or disinfection, and at selecting alloys which possess a good stress-free corrosion resistance in view of a later investigation of their stress corrosion resistance. After a presentation of the metallurgical characteristics of high mechanical strength alloys and the report of a bibliographical study on corrosion resistance of these alloys, the author presents and discusses the results obtained in the study of a possible migration of metallic ions in a milk product which is submitted to a centrifugation, and of the corrosion resistance of selected alloys with respect to the different media they will be in contact with during ultra-centrifugation. The following alloys have been used in this research: Marval 18, Marphynox, Marval X12, 17-4PH steel, Inconel 718 [fr

  15. ELECTROCHEMICAL STUDIES OF URANIUM METAL CORROSION MECHANISM AND KINETICS IN WATER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudanova, Natalya; Maslennikov, Alexander; Peretroukhine, Vladimir F.; Delegard, Calvin H.

    2006-01-01

    During long-term underwater storage of low burn-up uranium metal fuel, a corrosion product sludge forms containing uranium metal grains, uranium dioxide, uranates and, in some cases, uranium peroxide. Literature data on the corrosion of non-irradiated uranium metal and its alloys do not allow unequivocal prediction of the paragenesis of irradiated uranium in water. The goal of the present work conducted under the program 'CORROSION OF IRRADIATED URANIUM ALLOYS FUEL IN WATER' is to study the corrosion of uranium and uranium alloys and the paragenesis of the corrosion products during long-term underwater storage of uranium alloy fuel irradiated at the Hanford Site. The elucidation of the physico-chemical nature of the corrosion of irradiated uranium alloys in comparison with non-irradiated uranium metal and its alloys is one of the most important aspects of this work. Electrochemical methods are being used to study uranium metal corrosion mechanism and kinetics. The present part of work aims to examine and revise, where appropriate, the understanding of uranium metal corrosion mechanism and kinetics in water

  16. Mechanisms of Copper Corrosion in Aqueous Environments. A report from the Swedish National Council for Nuclear Waste's scientific workshop, on November 16, 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    In 2010 the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company, SKB, plans to submit its license application for the final repository of spent nuclear fuel. The proposed method is the so-called KBS-3 method and implies placing the spent nuclear fuel in copper canisters, surrounded by a buffer of bentonite clay, at 500 m depth in the bedrock. The site selected by SKB to host the repository is located in the municipality of Oesthammar on the Swedish east coast. The copper canister plays a key role in the design of the repository for spent nuclear fuel in Sweden. The long-term physical and chemical stability of copper in aqueous environments is fundamental for the safety evolution of the proposed disposal concept. However, the corrosion resistance of copper has been questioned by results obtained under anoxic conditions in aqueous solution. These observations caused some head-lines in the Swedish newspapers as well as public and political concerns. Consequently, the Swedish National Council for Nuclear Waste organized a scientific workshop on the issue 'Mechanisms of Copper Corrosion in Aqueous Environments'. The purpose of the workshop was to address the fundamental understanding of the corrosion characteristics of copper regarding oxygen-free environments, and to identify what additional information is needed to assess the validity of the proposed corrosion mechanism and its implication on the containment of spent nuclear fuel in a copper canister. This seminar report is based on the presentations and discussions at the workshop. It also includes written statements by the members of the expert panel

  17. Mechanisms of Copper Corrosion in Aqueous Environments. A report from the Swedish National Council for Nuclear Waste's scientific workshop, on November 16, 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-07-01

    In 2010 the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company, SKB, plans to submit its license application for the final repository of spent nuclear fuel. The proposed method is the so-called KBS-3 method and implies placing the spent nuclear fuel in copper canisters, surrounded by a buffer of bentonite clay, at 500 m depth in the bedrock. The site selected by SKB to host the repository is located in the municipality of Oesthammar on the Swedish east coast. The copper canister plays a key role in the design of the repository for spent nuclear fuel in Sweden. The long-term physical and chemical stability of copper in aqueous environments is fundamental for the safety evolution of the proposed disposal concept. However, the corrosion resistance of copper has been questioned by results obtained under anoxic conditions in aqueous solution. These observations caused some head-lines in the Swedish newspapers as well as public and political concerns. Consequently, the Swedish National Council for Nuclear Waste organized a scientific workshop on the issue 'Mechanisms of Copper Corrosion in Aqueous Environments'. The purpose of the workshop was to address the fundamental understanding of the corrosion characteristics of copper regarding oxygen-free environments, and to identify what additional information is needed to assess the validity of the proposed corrosion mechanism and its implication on the containment of spent nuclear fuel in a copper canister. This seminar report is based on the presentations and discussions at the workshop. It also includes written statements by the members of the expert panel

  18. Mechanism of Corrosion by Naphthenic Acids and Organosulfur Compounds at High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Peng

    Due to the law of supply and demand, the last decade has witnessed a skyrocketing in the price of light sweet crude oil. Therefore, refineries are increasingly interested in "opportunity crudes", characterized by their discounted price and relative ease of procurement. However, the attractive economics of opportunity crudes come with the disadvantage of high acid/organosulfur compound content, which could lead to corrosion and even failure of facilities in refineries. However, it is generally accepted that organosulfur compounds may form protective iron sulfide layers on the metal surface and decrease the corrosion rate. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the corrosive property of crudes at high temperatures, the mechanism of corrosion by acids (naphthenic acids) in the presence of organosulfur compounds, and methods to mitigate its corrosive effect. In 2004, an industrial project was initiated at the Institute for Corrosion and Multiphase Technology to investigate the corrosion by naphthenic acids and organosulfur compounds. In this project, for each experiment there were two experimentation phases: pretreatment and challenge. In the first pretreatment phase, a stirred autoclave was filled with a real crude oil fraction or model oil of different acidity and organosulfur compound concentration. Then, the stirred autoclave was heated to high temperatures to examine the corrosivity of the oil to different materials (specimens made from CS and 5% Cr containing steel were used). During the pretreatment, corrosion product layers were formed on the metal surface. In the second challenge phase, the steel specimens pretreated in the first phase were inserted into a rotating cylinder autoclave, called High Velocity Rig (HVR). The HVR was fed with a high-temperature oil solution of naphthenic acids to attack the iron sulfide layers. Based on the difference of specimen weight loss between the two steps, the net corrosion rate could be calculated and the protectiveness

  19. Mechanism and degree of chemical elements effect on atmosphere corrosion resistance of steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vu Din' Vuj

    1991-01-01

    It follows from the proposed regression equations that falourable effect of chemical elements on steel resistance to atmospheric corrosion is determined by their ability to increase interatom bond stability in iron crystal lattice and form corrosion products with high protection properties. Element positive influence on steel corrosion resistance decreases in the following order: S, P, Si, Mn, Cu, Cr, Ni, C in semiurban tropical atmosphere and S, Mn, Sr, Cu, Ni, Cr in coastal atmosphere. In the latter case C increases corrosion in a greater degree as compared to P. Small ammounts of Mo decrease steel resistance in semiurban atmosphere and almost do not influence it in the coastal one. Possible mechanisms of individual element influence on steel corrosion resistance are considered

  20. About some corrosion mechanisms of AZ91D magnesium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballerini, Gaia; Bardi, Ugo; Bignucolo, Roberto; Ceraolo, Giuseppe

    2005-01-01

    The present work is dedicated to a study of the corrosion resistance of AZ91D (91% Mg) alloy in wet environments. Three industrial alloys obtained by die-casting or sand casting were subjected to salt spray corrosion tests (ASTM-B117 standard) and immersion tests. Weight loss kinetic curves were measured. Surface analysis was performed by X-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPS). After corrosion the sand cast alloy presents a surface mainly enriched in hydroxides and carbonates while the die-cast alloy presents a surface enriched also in mixed Mg-Al oxides. The quantitative analysis of the rate Mg/Al shows an enrichment in aluminium for the die-cast alloys in comparison to the sand cast alloy

  1. Chromium steel corrosion rates and mechanisms in aqueous nickel chloride at 300C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forrest, J.E.; Broomfield, J.P.; Mitra, P.K.

    1985-01-01

    Rapid corrosion of PWR steam generator carbon steel support structures and consequential denting of steam generator tubes led to investigation of alternative support designs and materials. In recent designs of steam generators the carbon steel drilled hole tube support plate has been replaced by one of quatrefoil or trefoil shape to minimize the contact area. These plates are now made of more corrosion resistant chromium steel (approx. 12%Cr) to ensure that they are less vulnerable to attack in the event of adverse boiler water chemistry. This study was initiated to examine the corrosion behavior of a range of chromium steels in the acid chloride environments characteristic of tube/support plate crevices under adverse boiler water conditions. Objectives of the study were to: 1) determine the relative susceptibility of candidate tube support plate steels to acid chloride corrosion; 2) investigate the corrosion product morphology and its relationship to the corrosion mechanism; 3) determine the effect of environment aggressiveness on 12%Cr (A405) steel corrosion rates and mechanisms; and 4) investigate the effect of restraint stress/environment on denting potential of A405. Experimental method and results are discussed

  2. The corrosion mechanisms for primer coated 2219-T87 aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danford, Merlin D.; Knockemus, Ward W.

    1987-01-01

    To investigate metal surface corrosion and the breakdown of metal protective coatings, the ac Impedance Method was applied to zinc chromate primer coated 2219-T87 aluminum. The EG&GPARC Model 368 ac Impedance Measurement System, along with dc measurements with the same system using the Polarization Resistance Method, was used to monitor changing properties of coated aluminum disks immersed in 3.5 percent NaCl solutions buffered at pH 5.5 and pH 8.2 over periods of 40 days each. The corrosion system can be represented by an electronic analog called an equivalent circuit consisting of resistors and capacitors in specific arrangements. This equivalent circuit parallels the impedance behavior of the corrosion system during a frequency scan. Values for resistances and capacitances, that can be assigned in the equivalent circuit following a least squares analysis of the data, describe changes occurring on the corroding metal surface and in the protective coatings. A suitable equivalent circuit has been determined which predicts the correct Bode phase and magnitude for the experimental sample. The dc corrosion current density data are related to equivalent circuit element parameters.

  3. Mechanical Performance versus Corrosion Damage Indicators for Corroded Steel Reinforcing Bars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Caprili

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The experimental results of a testing campaign including tensile and low-cycle fatigue tests on different reinforcing steel bar types in the as-delivered and corroded condition are presented. Experimental data were statistically analyzed adopting ANOVA technique; Performance Indicators (PIs, describing the mechanical performance characteristics of reinforcements, and Corrosion Damage Indicators (CDIs, describing the detrimental effects of corrosion phenomena, were determined and correlated in order to evaluate the influence of corrosion on the behaviour of reinforcing steels, providing useful information for designers in addition to what is presented in current standards.

  4. Mechanical and corrosion properties of binary Mg–Dy alloys for medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Lei; Huang Yuanding; Peng Qiuming; Feyerabend, Frank; Kainer, Karl Ulrich; Willumeit, Regine; Hort, Norbert

    2011-01-01

    Microstructure, mechanical and corrosion properties of binary magnesium–dysprosium (Mg-5, 10, 15, 20 wt.% Dy) alloys were investigated for medical applications. In the as-cast condition, the distribution of Dy is quite inhomogeneous. Mg–10Dy alloy exhibits a moderate tensile and compression yield strength, and the best elongation and corrosion resistance. After T4 (solutionizing) treatment, the distribution of Dy becomes homogeneous. The tensile and compression yield strength of all Mg–Dy alloys decreases. The elongation remains unchanged, while the corrosion resistance is largely improved after T4 treatment.

  5. Mechanical and corrosion properties of binary Mg-Dy alloys for medical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Lei, E-mail: lei.yang@hzg.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Institute of Materials Research, Max-Planck-Str. 1, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Yuanding, Huang; Qiuming, Peng; Feyerabend, Frank; Kainer, Karl Ulrich; Willumeit, Regine; Hort, Norbert [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Institute of Materials Research, Max-Planck-Str. 1, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    Microstructure, mechanical and corrosion properties of binary magnesium-dysprosium (Mg-5, 10, 15, 20 wt.% Dy) alloys were investigated for medical applications. In the as-cast condition, the distribution of Dy is quite inhomogeneous. Mg-10Dy alloy exhibits a moderate tensile and compression yield strength, and the best elongation and corrosion resistance. After T4 (solutionizing) treatment, the distribution of Dy becomes homogeneous. The tensile and compression yield strength of all Mg-Dy alloys decreases. The elongation remains unchanged, while the corrosion resistance is largely improved after T4 treatment.

  6. Testing the permeability and corrosion resistance of micro-mechanically interlocked joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byskov-Nielsen, Jeppe; Holm, Allan Hjarbæk; Højsholt, Rune

    2011-01-01

    Micro-mechanical interlocking (MMI) can be applied to create new and interesting composite materials. We have employed laser structuring to achieve MMI between stainless steel and plastic with extremely high joint strength. However, the water permeability and corrosion resistance of the joint must...... is conducted. The permeability seems to be consistent with the Hagen–Poiseuille equation independent of the laser structuring technique and is orders of magnitudes larger than the diffusion rate through the plastic. Two different types of corrosion tests have been undertaken, and we show that care must...... be taken in order not to degrade the corrosion resistance of the sample to an unacceptable level....

  7. Evaluation of mechanically treated cerium (IV) oxides as corrosion inhibitors for galvanized steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deflorian, F., E-mail: flavio.deflorian@ing.unitn.it [Department of Materials Engineering and Industrial Technology, University of Trento, Via Mesiano 77, 38123 Trento (Italy); Fedel, M.; Rossi, S. [Department of Materials Engineering and Industrial Technology, University of Trento, Via Mesiano 77, 38123 Trento (Italy); Kamarchik, P. [PPG Industries, Coatings Innovation Center, 4325 Rosanna Drive, Allison Park, PA 15101 (United States)

    2011-09-30

    The use of cerium salts as corrosion inhibitors for hot dip galvanized steel has been object of a numerous studies in the last few years. The role of cerium ions as corrosion inhibitors was proved: cerium is able to block the cathodic sites of the metal, forming insoluble hydroxides and oxides on the zinc surface. This fact leads to a dramatic decrease of the cathodic current densities and, therefore, to a reduction the overall corrosion processes. On the other hand, the potential of cerium oxides as corrosion inhibitors was also proposed. However, the real effectiveness of this kind of anticorrosive pigments has not been clarified yet. In this work cerium (IV) oxides are considered as corrosion inhibitors for galvanized steel. The corrosion inhibition mechanism of mechanically treated (milled) CeO{sub 2} alone and in combination with milled SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles was investigated. For this purpose milled CeO{sub 2}, CeO{sub 2} and SiO{sub 2} milled together and milled SiO{sub 2} particles were studied as corrosion inhibitors in water solution. Therefore, the different mechanically treated particles were dispersed in 0.1 M NaCl solution to test their effectiveness as corrosion inhibitors for galvanized steel. The galvanized steel was immersed in the different solutions and the corrosion inhibition efficiency of the different particles was measured by means of electrochemical techniques. For this purpose, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements were carried out, monitoring the evolution of the corrosion processes occurring at the metal surface with the immersion time in the solution. The effect of the different pigments was also investigated by carrying out anodic and cathodic polarization measurements. The polarization curves were acquired under conditions of varied pH. The experimental measurements suggest that the mechanical treatment performed on the SiO{sub 2} and CeO{sub 2} particles promote the formation of an effective corrosion pigment

  8. Corrosion mechanism of a Ni-based alloy in supercritical water: Impact of surface plastic deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payet, Mickaël; Marchetti, Loïc; Tabarant, Michel; Chevalier, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The dissolution of Ni and Fe cations occurs during corrosion of Ni-based alloys in SCW. • The nature of the oxide layer depends locally on the alloy microstructure. • The corrosion mechanism changes when cold-work increases leading to internal oxidation. - Abstract: Ni–Fe–Cr alloys are expected to be a candidate material for the generation IV nuclear reactors that use supercritical water at temperatures up to 600 °C and pressures of 25 MPa. The corrosion resistance of Alloy 690 in these extreme conditions was studied considering the surface finish of the alloy. The oxide scale could suffer from dissolution or from internal oxidation. The presence of a work-hardened zone reveals the competition between the selective oxidation of chromium with respect to the oxidation of nickel and iron. Finally, corrosion mechanisms for Ni based alloys are proposed considering the effects of plastically deformed surfaces and the dissolution.

  9. Mechanical properties and corrosion behaviour of MIG welded 5083 aluminium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durmus, Huelya [Celal Bayar Univ., Turgutlu-Manisa (Turkey)

    2011-07-01

    For this study 5083 Aluminium alloy plates, as used in automobiles and watercraft, were experimentally MIG welded. The plates were joined with different wires and at various currents. The effects of welding with different parameters on the mechanical and corrosion properties were investigated. The corrosion behaviour of the MIG welded 5083 Aluminium base material was also investigated. The effects of the chemical composition of the filler material on the mechanical properties were examined by metallographic inspection and tensile testing. By EDS and XRD analyses of specimens it turned out that different structures in the weld metal (Cu3Si) affect its mechanical properties. The mechanical properties of the specimens welded with 5356 filler metal were found as quite well improved as compared to those specimens welded with 4043 and 5183 filler material. The results of the metallographic analysis, and mechanical and corrosion tests exhibited that the 5356 filler material was most suitable for the 5083 Al alloy base material. (orig.)

  10. Proceedings: 1991 EPRI workshop on secondary-side intergranular corrosion mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partridge, M.J.; Zemitis, W.S.

    1992-08-01

    A workshop on ''Secondary-Side Intergranular Corrosion Mechanisms'' was organized by EPRI as an effort to give those working in this area an opportunity to share their results, ideas, and plans. Topics covered included: (1) caustic induced intergranular attack/stress corrosion cracking (IGA/IGSCC), (2) plant experience, (3) boric acid as an IGA/IGSCC remedial measure, (4) lead induced IGA/IGSCC, and (5) acid induced IGA/IGSCC

  11. Corrosion and mechanical performance of AZ91 exposed to simulated inflammatory conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Emily K; Der, Stephanie; Ehrensberger, Mark T

    2016-03-01

    Magnesium (Mg) and its alloys, including Mg-9%Al-1%Zn (AZ91), are biodegradable metals with potential use as temporary orthopedic implants. Invasive orthopedic procedures can provoke an inflammatory response that produces hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and an acidic environment near the implant. This study assessed the influence of inflammation on both the corrosion and mechanical properties of AZ91. The AZ91 samples in the inflammatory protocol were immersed for three days in a complex biologically relevant electrolyte (AMEM culture media) that contained serum proteins (FBS), 150 mM of H2O2, and was titrated to a pH of 5. The control protocol immersed AZ91 samples in the same biologically relevant electrolyte (AMEM & FBS) but without H2O2 and the acid titration. After 3 days all samples were switched into fresh AMEM & FBS for an additional 3-day immersion. During the initial immersion, inflammatory protocol samples showed increased corrosion rate determined by mass loss testing, increased Mg and Al ion released to solution, and a completely corroded surface morphology as compared to the control protocol. Although corrosion in both protocols slowed once the test electrolyte solution was replaced at 3 days, the samples originally exposed to the simulated inflammatory conditions continued to display enhanced corrosion rates as compared to the control protocol. These lingering effects may indicate the initial inflammatory corrosion processes modified components of the surface oxide and corrosion film or initiated aggressive localized processes that subsequently left the interface more vulnerable to continued enhanced corrosion. The electrochemical properties of the interfaces were also evaluated by EIS, which found that the corrosion characteristics of the AZ91 samples were potentially influenced by the role of intermediate adsorption layer processes. The increased corrosion observed for the inflammatory protocol did not affect the flexural mechanical properties of the AZ91

  12. Coupling between corrosion and biphasic transport in porous media: Application to the evolution of a radioactive wastes disposal; Couplage entre corrosion et comportement diphasique dans un milieu poreux: Application a l'evolution d'un stockage des dechets radioactifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dridi, W

    2005-04-15

    In the actual concepts of geological disposal, high level radioactive wastes are packed in metallic containers surrounded by a partially or totally saturated clay media. In contact with the interstitial water, anoxic corrosion of this container will start producing hydrogen. In the scope of safety assessment, the present study deals with two main topics: prediction of the long-term corrosion of carbon steel with respect to clay water content and evaluation of the risk of damage of the clay barrier related to gas production. Elementary processes controlling the kinetics of corrosion are limited to oxide growth and mass transfer through the porosity of this film. Thanks to a macroscopic description of theses processes, followed by an interfacial kinetic law, a mechanistic modeling of the anoxic corrosion in partially saturated porous media is proposed. This approach is validated when confronted to the long-term corrosion tests performed in saturated clay. Both modeling and laboratory experiments have confirmed that kinetics of anoxic corrosion in partially saturated clay is mainly controlled by the surrounding relative humidity as in the case of aerated or atmospheric corrosion. In the gas generation topic, some numerical simulations are performed concerning the oedometric and triaxial test dealing with gas migration in saturated clay. Finally, long-term calculations are conducted concerning hydro-mechanical impact of corrosion in deep geological repositories. Due to a more realistic prediction of the long-term corrosion, the risks of gas overpressures, local desaturation and mechanical damage are reduced. (author)

  13. Influence of mechanical stress level in preliminary stress-corrosion testing on fatigue strength of a low-carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleskerova, S.A.; Pakharyan, V.A.

    1978-01-01

    Effect of corrosion and mechanical factors of preliminary stress corrosion of a metal in its fatigue strength, has been investigated. Smooth cylindrical samples of 20 steel have been tested. Preliminary corrosion under stress has been carried out under natural sea conditions. It is shown that mechanical stresses in the case of preliminary corrosion affect fatigue strength of low-carbon steels, decreasing the range of limited durability and fatigue limit. This effect increases with the increase of stress level and agressivity of corrosive medium

  14. Graphene coating for anti-corrosion and the investigation of failure mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Y X; Duan, C Y; Chen, Y F; Wang, Y; Liu, H Y

    2017-01-01

    Graphene produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) methods has been considered as a promising corrosion prevention layer because of its exceptional structure and impermeability. However, the anti-corrosion performance and the failure mechanism are still controversial. In this study, graphene layers with different quality levels, crystallite sizes, and layer numbers were prepared on the surface of Cu by a CVD process. The effects of grain boundaries (GBs) on the failure of graphene layers to provide adequate protection were investigated in detail by combining graphene transfer techniques, computation, and anti-corrosion measurements. Our results reveal that corrosion rates decrease marginally upon the increase of graphene layer number, and this rather weak dependence on thickness likely arises from the aligned nature of the GBs in CVD-grown few-layer graphene. This problem can potentially be overcome by layer-by-layer graphene transfer technique, in which corrosion is found to be arrested locally when transferred graphene is present on top of the as-grown graphene. However, this advantage is not reflected in corrosion studies performed on large-scale samples, where cracks or imperfect interfaces could offset the advantages of GB misalignment. With improvements in technology, the layer-by-layer assembly technique could be used to develop an effective anti-corrosion barrier. (paper)

  15. Mechanical damage and corrosion in the primary system purification cooler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sainz, R.A.; Fiorini, R.H.; Semino, C.J.

    1987-01-01

    Through the routine measurements of tritium activity and isotopic content in the exchanger's cooling water, a loss of heavy water was detected. During the decommissioning programmed for October 1986, the equipment was dismantled and the tubes losses were identified through helium fugue tests; subsequently, a 100% inspection of the tubes by atmospheric currents were performed, verifying reductions exceeding 50% of the original width in 70 tubes of the first section at the top plate level. These indications were verified through the study of the two extracted tubes, one of them observing a passing failure where marks appeared at all levels of the support and corrosion plates through splits at the top plates level. The corrosion causes were due to the low cooling flow which results from the primary system's reduction regarding the purification flow design, thus permitting the deposits accumulation. (Author)

  16. Zn/55Al coating microstructure and corrosion mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, A. Ramus; Panossian, Z.; Camargo, P.L.; Moreira, M. Ferreira; Silva, I.C. da; Ribeiro de Carvalho, J.E.

    2006-01-01

    In the present work Zn/55Al coatings from different suppliers were studied. The results revealed the presence of at least two different phases in the interdendritic and in the dendritic areas that compose the coating. Analyses done in the cross section of test panels exposed for five years in six different atmospheres showed that the corrosion process begins in the aluminium-rich phase present in the interdendritic area

  17. Methane oxidation coupled to oxygenic photosynthesis in anoxic waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milucka, Jana; Kirf, Mathias; Lu, Lu; Krupke, Andreas; Lam, Phyllis; Littmann, Sten; Kuypers, Marcel MM; Schubert, Carsten J

    2015-01-01

    Freshwater lakes represent large methane sources that, in contrast to the Ocean, significantly contribute to non-anthropogenic methane emissions to the atmosphere. Particularly mixed lakes are major methane emitters, while permanently and seasonally stratified lakes with anoxic bottom waters are often characterized by strongly reduced methane emissions. The causes for this reduced methane flux from anoxic lake waters are not fully understood. Here we identified the microorganisms and processes responsible for the near complete consumption of methane in the anoxic waters of a permanently stratified lake, Lago di Cadagno. Interestingly, known anaerobic methanotrophs could not be detected in these waters. Instead, we found abundant gamma-proteobacterial aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria active in the anoxic waters. In vitro incubations revealed that, among all the tested potential electron acceptors, only the addition of oxygen enhanced the rates of methane oxidation. An equally pronounced stimulation was also observed when the anoxic water samples were incubated in the light. Our combined results from molecular, biogeochemical and single-cell analyses indicate that methane removal at the anoxic chemocline of Lago di Cadagno is due to true aerobic oxidation of methane fuelled by in situ oxygen production by photosynthetic algae. A similar mechanism could be active in seasonally stratified lakes and marine basins such as the Black Sea, where light penetrates to the anoxic chemocline. Given the widespread occurrence of seasonally stratified anoxic lakes, aerobic methane oxidation coupled to oxygenic photosynthesis might have an important but so far neglected role in methane emissions from lakes. PMID:25679533

  18. Causes and mechanisms of thermal embrittlement and corrosion cracking of complex α-titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ushkov, S.S.; Rybin, V.V.; Razuvaeva, I.N.; Nesterova, E.V.; Gunbina, O.A.

    1995-01-01

    Effect of aging under 500 deg C on mechanical and corrosion-mechanical properties of Ti-6Al base titanium α-alloys with zirconium and carbon additions is studied. Using electron microscopy one determines the reasons of reduction of plasticity and of corrosion-mechanical strength of alloys after aging. It is determined that in the given alloys there are two different processes with occurrence different kinetics: the first one-formation of grain-boundary precipitations of Ti 2 (Fe, Ni) intermetallic compound responsible for plasticity reduction; and the second one-homogeneous decomposition of Ti-Al solid solution responsible for reduction of corrosion-mechanical properties. 14 refs., 6 figs

  19. The importance of the strain rate and creep on the stress corrosion cracking mechanisms and models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aly, Omar F.; Mattar Neto, Miguel; Schvartzman, Monica M.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking is a nuclear, power, petrochemical, and other industries equipment and components (like pressure vessels, nozzles, tubes, accessories) life degradation mode, involving fragile fracture. The stress corrosion cracking failures can produce serious accidents, and incidents which can put on risk the safety, reliability, and efficiency of many plants. These failures are of very complex prediction. The stress corrosion cracking mechanisms are based on three kinds of factors: microstructural, mechanical and environmental. Concerning the mechanical factors, various authors prefer to consider the crack tip strain rate rather than stress, as a decisive factor which contributes to the process: this parameter is directly influenced by the creep strain rate of the material. Based on two KAPL-Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory experimental studies in SSRT (slow strain rate test) and CL (constant load) test, for prediction of primary water stress corrosion cracking in nickel based alloys, it has done a data compilation of the film rupture mechanism parameters, for modeling PWSCC of Alloy 600 and discussed the importance of the strain rate and the creep on the stress corrosion cracking mechanisms and models. As derived from this study, a simple theoretical model is proposed, and it is showed that the crack growth rate estimated with Brazilian tests results with Alloy 600 in SSRT, are according with the KAPL ones and other published literature. (author)

  20. Study of alloy 600'S stress corrosion cracking mechanisms in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rios, R.

    1994-06-01

    In order to better understand the mechanisms involved in Alloy 600's stress corrosion cracking in PWR environment, laboratory tests were performed. The influence of parameters pertinent to the mechanisms was studies : hydrogen and oxygen overpressures, local chemical composition, microstructure. The results show that neither hydrogen nor dissolution/oxidation, despite their respective roles in the process, are sufficient to account for experimental facts. SEM observation of micro-cleavage facets on specimens' fracture surfaces leads to pay attention to a new mechanism of corrosion/plasticity interactions. (author). 113 refs., 73 figs., 15 tabs., 4 annexes

  1. Study of alloy 600 (NC15Fe) stress corrosion cracking mechanisms in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rios, Richard

    1993-01-01

    In order to better understand the mechanisms involved in Alloy 600's stress corrosion cracking in PWR environment, laboratory tests were performed. The influence of parameters pertinent to the mechanisms was studies: hydrogen and oxygen overpressures, local chemical composition, microstructure. The results show that neither hydrogen nor dissolution/oxidation, despite their respective roles in the process, are sufficient to account for experimental facts. SEM observation of micro-cleavage facets on specimens' fracture surfaces leads to pay attention to a new mechanism of corrosion/plasticity interactions. (author) [fr

  2. Corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goel, V.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on alloy corrosion cracking. Topics considered at the conference included the effect of niobium addition on intergranular stress corrosion cracking, corrosion-fatigue cracking in fossil-fueled-boilers, fracture toughness, fracture modes, hydrogen-induced thresholds, electrochemical and hydrogen permeation studies, the effect of seawater on fatigue crack propagation of wells for offshore structures, the corrosion fatigue of carbon steels in seawater, and stress corrosion cracking and the mechanical strength of alloy 600

  3. Effect of forging process on microstructure, mechanical and corrosion properties of biodegradable Mg-1Ca alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harandi, Shervin Eslami; Hasbullah Idris, Mohd; Jafari, Hassan

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Forging temperature demonstrates more pronounced effect compared to forging speed. → Precipitation of Mg 2 Ca phase at grain boundaries accelerates corrosion rate. → Forging process doesn't provide the corrosion resistance required for bone healing. -- Abstract: The performance of Mg-1Ca alloy, a biodegradable metallic material, may be improved by hot working in order that it may be of use in bone implant applications. In this study, Mg-1Ca cast alloy was preheated to different temperatures before undergoing forging process with various forging speeds. Macro- and microstructure of the samples were examined by stereo and scanning electron microscopes (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), respectively. To determine the mechanical properties of the alloy, hardness value and plastic deformation ability of the samples were measured. To investigate the corrosion behaviour of the alloy, immersion and electrochemical tests were performed on the samples in simulated body fluid and the corrosion products were characterized by SEM/EDS. The results showed that increasing forging temperature decreased grain size led to improved hardness value and plastic deformation ability of the alloy, whereas no significant effect was observed by changing forging speed. Moreover, forging at higher temperatures led to an increase in the amount of Mg 2 Ca phase at grain boundaries resulted in higher corrosion rates. It can be concluded that although forging process improved the mechanical properties of the alloy, it does not satisfy the corrosion resistance criteria required for bone healing.

  4. Corrosion Mechanism and Bond-Strength Study on Galvanized Steel in Concrete Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouril, M.; Pokorny, P.; Stoulil, J. [University of Chemistry and Technology, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2017-04-15

    Zinc coating on carbon steels give the higher corrosion resistance in chloride containing environments and in carbonated concrete. However, hydrogen evolution accompanies the corrosion of zinc in the initial activity in fresh concrete, which can lead to the formation of a porous structure at the reinforcement -concrete interface, which can potentially reduce the bond-strength of the reinforcement with concrete. The present study examines the mechanism of the corrosion of hot-dip galvanized steel in detail, as in the model pore solutions and real concrete. Calcium ion plays an important role in the corrosion mechanism, as it prevents the formation of passive layers on zinc at an elevated alkalinity. The corrosion rate of galvanized steel decreases in accordance with the exposure time; however, the reason for this is not the zinc transition into passivity, but the consumption of the less corrosion-resistant phases of hot-dip galvanizing in the concrete environment. The results on the electrochemical tests have been confirmed by the bond-strength test for the reinforcement of concrete and by evaluating the porosity of the cement adjacent to the reinforcement.

  5. Studies on Fusion Welding of High Nitrogen Stainless Steel: Microstructure, Mechanical and corrosion Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Raffi; Srinivasa Rao, K.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2018-03-01

    An attempt has been made in the present investigation to weld high nitrogen steel of 5mm thick plates using various process i.e., shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and autogenous electron beam welding (EBW) process. Present work is aimed at studying the microstructural changes and its effects on mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. Microstructure is characterized by optical, scanning electron microscopy and electron back scattered diffraction technique. Vickers hardness, tensile properties, impact toughness and face bend ductility testing of the welds was carried out. Pitting corrosion resistance of welds was determined using potentio-dynamic polarization testing in 3.5%NaCl solution. Results of the present investigation established that SMA welds made using Cr-Mn-N electrode were observed to have a austenite dendritic grain structure in the weld metal and is having poor mechanical properties but good corrosion resistance. GTA welds made using 18Ni (MDN 250) filler wire were observed to have a reverted austenite in martensite matrix of the weld metal and formation of unmixed zone at the fusion boundary which resulted in better mechanical properties and poor corrosion resistance. Fine grains and uniform distribution of delta ferrite in the austenite matrix and narrow width of weld zone are observed in autogeneous electron beam welds. A good combination of mechanical properties and corrosion resistance was achieved for electron beam welds of high nitrogen steel when compared to SMA and GTA welds.

  6. Evaluation on mechanical and corrosion properties of steam generator tubing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In Sup; Lee, Byong Whi; Lee, Sang Kyu; Lee, Young Ho; Kim, Jun Whan; Lee, Ju Seok; Kwon, Hyuk Sang; Kim, Su Jung [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-06-15

    Steam generator is one of the major components of nuclear reactor pressure boundary. It's main function os transferring heat which generated in the reactor to turbine generator through steam generator tube. In these days, steam generator tubing materials of operating plant are used Inconel 600 alloys. But according to the operation time, there are many degradation phenomena which included mechanical damage due to flow induced vibration and corrosion damage due to PWSCC, IGA/SCC and pitting etc. Recently Inconel 690 alloys are selected as new and replacement steam generator tubes for domestic nuclear power plant. But there are few study about mechanical and corrosion properties of Inconel 600 and 690. The objectives of this study is to evaluate and compare mechanical and corrosion propertied of steam generator tube materials.

  7. Evaluation on mechanical and corrosion properties of steam generator tubing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, In Sup; Lee, Byong Whi; Lee, Sang Kyu; Lee, Young Ho; Kim, Jun Whan; Lee, Ju Seok; Kwon, Hyuk Sang; Kim, Su Jung

    1998-06-01

    Steam generator is one of the major components of nuclear reactor pressure boundary. It's main function os transferring heat which generated in the reactor to turbine generator through steam generator tube. In these days, steam generator tubing materials of operating plant are used Inconel 600 alloys. But according to the operation time, there are many degradation phenomena which included mechanical damage due to flow induced vibration and corrosion damage due to PWSCC, IGA/SCC and pitting etc. Recently Inconel 690 alloys are selected as new and replacement steam generator tubes for domestic nuclear power plant. But there are few study about mechanical and corrosion properties of Inconel 600 and 690. The objectives of this study is to evaluate and compare mechanical and corrosion propertied of steam generator tube materials

  8. Characterization of wear mechanism by tribo-corrosion of nickel base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionescu, C.C.

    2012-01-01

    Some components of nuclear power plants, as steam generator tubes are made from Ni base alloys. These components are exposed to severe environment of high temperature and high pressure and submitted to contact mechanical stresses. These Ni - based alloys properties are determined by their ability to form on their surface an inner protective barrier film mainly composed of Cr 2 O 3 . The steam generator tubes are among the most difficult components to maintain, on the hand, because of their safety importance and secondly, the exchange tubes are subject to various degradation mechanisms, because of the harsh conditions of work. Wear by tribo-corrosion is a physicochemical aging mechanism which occurs in the management of the nuclear power plants life time. Tribo-corrosion is an irreversible process which involves mechanical and chemical / electrochemical interactions between surfaces in relative motion, in the presence of a corrosive environment. The goal of this study was to quantify in terms of quantity and quality the wear generated by tribo-corrosion process on Ni - Cr model alloys. Two model alloys: Ni -15Cr and Ni -30Cr were used to highlight, evaluate and compare the influence of the chromium content on the formation of the protective oxide layer and the role played by the latter one on the kinetics and mechanisms of wear by tribo-corrosion. The tribo-corrosion experiments were performed by using a pin-on-disc tribometer under controlled electrochemical conditions in LiOH - H 3 BO 3 solution. The corrosion - wear degradation of the protective layer during continuous and intermittent unidirectional sliding tests was investigated by a three-stage tribo-corrosion protocol. In the first stage, electrochemical techniques (open circuit potential measurements and electrochemical impedance measurements) were used without applying unidirectional sliding to monitor and evaluate the characteristics of protective oxide layer formed on the surface of the two model alloys

  9. Indoor atmospheric corrosion of historical ferrous alloys. System characterisation, mechanisms and modelling discussion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monnier, J.

    2008-12-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of indoor atmospheric corrosion in iron alloys is of primary importance in several fields, including for the conservation of Middle Ages monuments or the long term storage of nuclear waste. In this research, a double approach was developed, combining fine characterisation of corrosion systems and design of experiments to answers specific questions related to mechanisms understanding. Iron indoor atmospheric corrosion was investigated on samples coming from the reinforcing chain of the Amiens cathedral (15. century). In the first stage, the corrosion system has been extensively characterised from the macroscopic to the nano-metric scale. In particular, structural micro-analysis (μ-Raman, μ-XRD, μ-XAS) has been used to locate, identify and quantify the oxidised phases. Rust layers are composed of a matrix of nano-metric goethite, with low quantities of lepidocrocite and akaganeite mostly located in the extern part of the corrosion system. In addition, clear marblings are dispersed in the matrix, which are sometimes connected with the metal core. Although these may contain maghemite, these marblings are generally made of ferri-hydrite/feroxyhite phases. In the second stage, specific experiments have been carried out in an unsaturated marked medium to locate oxygen reduction sites in the rust layers. Several cases were evidenced, depending on the rust layer morphology. In addition, reduction processes of model phases have been studied in situ, using an electrochemical cell coupled with structural characterisation techniques. This combination highlighted the influence of reduction mode and pH on the type of reduced phase formed. From the obtained results, several mechanisms are proposed to explain the long term indoor atmospheric corrosion of iron, including rust layers morphology and phases properties. The different hypotheses have been integrated in a proposed method to diagnosis ancient ferrous systems stability. These hypotheses also

  10. Corrosion engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontana, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    This book emphasizes the engineering approach to handling corrosion. It presents corrosion data by corrosives or environments rather than by materials. It discusses the corrosion engineering of noble metals, ''exotic'' metals, non-metallics, coatings, mechanical properties, and corrosion testing, as well as modern concepts. New sections have been added on fracture mechanics, laser alloying, nuclear waste isolation, solar energy, geothermal energy, and the Statue of Liberty. Special isocorrosion charts, developed by the author, are introduced as a quick way to look at candidates for a particular corrosive.

  11. Structure, mechanical and corrosion properties of powdered stainless steel Kh13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radomysel'skij, I.D.; Napara-Volgina, S.G.; Orlova, L.N.; Apininskaya, L.M.

    1982-01-01

    Structure, mechanical and corrosion properties are studied for compact powdered stainless steel, Grade Kh13, produced from prealloyed powder and a mixture of chromium and iron powders by hot vacuum pressing (HVP) following four schemes: HVP of unsintered billets; HVP of presintered billets; HVP of unsintered billets followed by diffusion annealing; HVP of sintered billets followed by diffusion annealing. Analysis of the structure, mechanical and corrosion properties of Kh13 steel produced according to the four schemes confirmed that production of this steel by the HVP method without presintering of porous billets and diffusion annealing of compact stampings is possible only when prealloyed powder of particular composition is used as a starting material

  12. Contribution of local probes in the understanding of mechanical effect on localized corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vignal, Vincent; Oltra, Roland; Mary, Nicolas

    2004-01-01

    Understanding the actual effects of mechanical stresses on the processes leading to pitting corrosion necessitates to develop both a mechanical approach and electrochemical experiments at a microscopic scale. Typical embrittlement can be observed after straining around MnS inclusions on a re-sulfurized 316 stainless steels and their corrosion sensitivity have been classified using the micro-capillary electrochemical cell technique. It has been shown that the numerical simulation of the location of stress gradients is possible before the local electrochemical analysis and could be a very interesting way to define the pitting susceptibility of micro-cracked areas during straining. (authors)

  13. A copper container corrosion model for the in-room emplacement of used CANDU fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.

    1996-11-01

    Copper containers in a Canadian nuclear fuel waste disposal vault are expected to undergo uniform corrosion and, possibly, pitting. The corrosion behaviour of the containers will be dictated by the evolution of environmental conditions within the disposal vault. The environment will evolve from an early warm, oxidizing phase, during which fast uniform corrosion and pitting may occur, to an indefinite period of cool, anoxic conditions, during which the container will only be susceptible to slow uniform corrosion. The results of corrosion and electrochemical studies of the uniform corrosion of Cu in O 2 -containing Cl - solutions are discussed and a detailed reaction mechanism presented. The relevant literature on pitting corrosion is briefly reviewed and models for the prediction of pit depth discussed. The potential for microbially influenced corrosion and stress-corrosion cracking is discussed, as are vapour-phase corrosion and the effects of β-radiation. The use of natural analogues for justifying long-term corrosion predictions is also considered. Finally, a model for uniform corrosion and pitting is presented and container lifetimes predicted. Copper containers having a minimum wall thickness of 25.4 mm are not predicted to fail by corrosion in periods 6 a. Thus, despite the assumption of poor rock quality made here, the safety of the entire disposal concept can be assured by the use of a long-lived container. (author). 125 refs., 1 tab., 24 figs

  14. Mechanical and corrosion behaviors of developed copper-based metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manvandra Kumar; Gautam, Rakesh Kumar; Prakash, Rajiv; Ji, Gopal

    2018-03-01

    This work investigates mechanical properties and corrosion resistances of cast copper-tungsten carbide (WC) metal matrix composites (MMCs). Copper matrix composites have been developed by stir casting technique. Different sizes of micro and nano particles of WC particles are utilized as reinforcement to prepare two copper-based composites, however, nano size of WC particles are prepared by high-energy ball milling. XRD (X-rays diffraction) characterize the materials for involvement of different phases. The mechanical behavior of composites has been studied by Vickers hardness test and compression test; while the corrosion behavior of developed composites is investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in 0.5 M H2SO4 solutions. The results show that hardness, compressive strength and corrosion resistance of copper matrix composites are very high in comparison to that of copper matrix, which attributed to the microstructural changes occurred during composite formation. SEM (Scanning electron microscopy) reveals the morphology of the corroded surfaces.

  15. The use of skewness, kurtosis and neural networks for determining corrosion mechanism from electrochemical noise data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, S.; Bell, G.E.C.; Edgemon, G.L.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the work undertaken to de-skill the complex procedure of determining corrosion mechanisms derived from electrochemical noise data. The use of neural networks is discussed and applied to the real time generated electrochemical noise data files with the purpose of determining characteristics particular to individual types of corrosion mechanisms. The electrochemical noise signals can have a wide dynamic range and various methods of raw data pre-processing prior to neural network analysis were investigated. Normalized data were ultimately used as input to the final network analysis. Various network schemes were designed, trained and tested. Factors such as the network learning schedule and network design were considered before a final network was implemented to achieve a solution. Neural networks trained using general and localized corrosion data from various material environment systems were used to analyze data from simulated nuclear waste tank environments with favorable results

  16. Laboratory studies of the corrosion and mechanical properties of titanium grade-12 under WIPP repository conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorensen, N.R.

    1990-01-01

    The author reviews laboratory work done at the Sandia Laboratories on the properties of titanium grade 12. The effect of gamma radiation on corrosion and mechanical properties has been investigated; no real effect has been detected on corrosion rate, Charpy impact energy, or tensile properties at 90 degrees and 10 4 rad/h. No structural changes are evident under examination by SEM or TEM. There is also no evidence of crevice corrosion after five years of exposure. The effect of radiation on hydrogen uptake was also investigated. Radiation appears to reduce the extent of uptake. The microstructure of titanium-12 changes with the addition of hydrogen to a structure with alternating layers of alpha and beta phase. A decrease in mechanical properties is associated with this change

  17. Mechanical and corrosion properties of Ni-Cr-Fe Alloy 600 related to primary side SCC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begley, J.A.; Jacko, R.J.; Gold, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    The two-fold objective of the program is to provide the mechanical property data required for the development of a strain rate damage model for environmentally assisted cracking of Inconel 600 and to evaluate critical damage model parameters in primary water environments by conducting a series of stress corrosion tests. The test program includes mechanical property tests at 20 0 C, 316 0 C and strain rate tests to determine critical strain rate SCC parameters in primary water environments. Data are presented from slow strain rate tensile tests, stress relaxation tests and creep tests. A short discussion of the Gerber-Garud Strain Rate Damage Model is included to provide the background rationale for the test program. Utilitarian aspects of the Strain Rate Damage Model and the test program data are presented. Analysis of accelerated stress corrosion testing at high temperatures, and the contribution of thermally activated inelastic deformation to apparent activation energies for stress corrosion cracking is emphasized

  18. Contribution to the study of uranium dioxide aqueous corrosion mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallien, J.-P.

    1994-01-01

    The corrosion of uranium dioxide by a synthetical ground water has been studied in order to understand the behaviour of nuclear fuels in the hypothesis of a direct storage. An original leaching unit has been carried out in order to control the parameters occurring in the oxidation-dissolution of the uranium dioxide and to condition the leachate (in particular the temperature and the partial pressure of the carbon dioxide). A ground water in equilibrium with the geological enveloping site has been reconstituted from data acquired on the site. The influence of two parameters has been followed: the carbon dioxide carbon pressure and the redox potential. Each experiment has been carried out at 96 C during one month and the time-history of the solutions and of the solids has been studied. In oxidizing conditions, the uranium concentration in solution has been controlled by an U(VI) complex (one oxide, one hydroxide or a carbonate). The possibility of a control by an U(IV) complex (as coffinite, uraninite or uraninite B) has been confirmed in the case of reducing leaching. An original interpretation of the Rutherford backscattering spectra has allowed to describe the decomposition of the samples in a succession of layers of different densities. A very good agreement between the analyses of the solids and those of the solutions has been obtained in the experiments occurring in reducing conditions. Complementary leaching involving solutions containing stable isotopes (deuterium, O 18 ) have revealed the formation of an hydrated layer and the contribution of grain boundaries to the corrosion phenomenon of uranium dioxide. The results of the current hydro-geochemistry study on the uranium Oklo deposit prove the realism of the experiments that have been carried out in the laboratory. (O.M.)

  19. Corrosion aspects of steel radioactive waste containers in cementitious materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smart, Nick

    2012-01-01

    Nick Smart from Serco, UK, gave an overview of the effects of cementitious materials on the corrosion of steel during storage and disposal of various low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes. Steel containers are often used as an overpack for the containment of radioactive wastes and are routinely stored in an open atmosphere. Since this is an aerobic and typically humid environment, the steel containers can start to corrode whilst in storage. Steel containers often come into contact with cementitious materials (e.g. grout encapsulants, backfill). An extensive account of different steel container designs and of steel corrosion mechanisms was provided. Steel corrosion rates under conditions buffered by cementitious materials have been evaluated experimentally. The main conclusion was that the cementitious environment generally facilitates the passivation of steel materials. Several general and localised corrosion mechanisms need to be considered when evaluating the performance of steel containers in cementitious environments, and environmental thresholds can be defined and used with this aim. In addition, the consequences of the generation of gaseous hydrogen by the corrosion of carbon steel under anoxic conditions must be taken into account. Discussion of the paper included: Is crevice corrosion really significant in cementitious systems? Crevice corrosion is unlikely in the cementitious backfill considered because it will tend to neutralise any acidic conditions in the crevice. What is the role of microbially-induced corrosion (MIC) in cementitious systems? Microbes are likely to be present in a disposal facility but their effect on corrosion is uncertain

  20. Development of a resilient mechanical sealing solution to resist electro corrosion in ultrapure feedwater applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loenhout, Gerard van [Flowservice Flow Solutions Division, Etten-Leur (Netherlands); Enders, Klaus; Schmerberg, Rainer [Vattenfall Europe Generation AG, Peitz (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    Ever since the introduction of mechanical seals on high speed boiler feed pumps in the sixties, mechanical seals have proven to be a reliable, cost effective sealing method. However, since the introduction of combined water treatment chemistry used in today's modern fossil-fuelled power stations, keeping mechanical seal reliability high, became a challenge. A pragmatic approach is presented. A resilient sealing solution was developed to resist electro corrosion for such critical feed water pumps. (orig.)

  1. Corrosion resistance, mechanical properties, corrosion fatigue strength and cytocompatibility of new Ti alloys without Al and V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Y; Rao, S; Ito, Y; Tateishi, T

    1998-07-01

    The effects of various metallic ions using various metallic powders on the relative growth ratio of fibroblasts L929 and osteoblasts MC3T3-E1 cells were carried out. Ti, Zr, Sn, Nb and Ta had evidently no effect on the relative growth ratios of cells. Otherwise, Al and V ions exhibit cytotoxicity from a concentration of > or = 0.2 ppm. This Al effect on cells tend to be stronger in medium containing small quantity of V ions (alloy exhibited a higher corrosion resistance in physiological saline solution. The addition of 0.02%O and 0.05%N to Ti-Zr alloy improved the mechanical properties at room temperature and corrosion fatigue strength. The relative growth ratios for the new Ti alloy plate and the alloy block extraction were unity. Further, the relative growth ratios were almost unity for the new Ti alloy against apatite ceramic pins up to 10(5) wear cycles in Eagle's MEM solution. However, there was a sharp decrease for Ti-6%Al-4%V ELI alloy from 3 x 10(4) wear cycles as V ion was released during wear into the wear test solution since the pH of the Eagle's MEM increases with increasing wear cycles.

  2. Reactions of plutonium dioxide with water and oxygen-hydrogen mixtures: Mechanisms for corrosion of uranium and plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haschke, John M.; Allen, Thomas H.; Morales, Luis A.

    1999-06-18

    Investigation of the interactions of plutonium dioxide with water vapor and with an oxygen-hydrogen mixture show that the oxide is both chemically reactive and catalytically active. Correspondence of the chemical behavior with that for oxidation of uranium in moist air suggests that similar catalytic processes participate in the mechanism of moisture-enhanced corrosion of uranium and plutonium. Evaluation of chemical and kinetic data for corrosion of the metals leads to a comprehensive mechanism for corrosion in dry air, water vapor, and moist air. Results are applied in confirming that the corrosion rate of Pu in water vapor decreases sharply between 100 and 200 degrees C.

  3. Mechanical and corrosion properties of newly developed biodegradable Zn-based alloys for bone fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojtěch, D; Kubásek, J; Serák, J; Novák, P

    2011-09-01

    In the present work Zn-Mg alloys containing up to 3wt.% Mg were studied as potential biodegradable materials for medical use. The structure, mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of these alloys were investigated and compared with those of pure Mg, AZ91HP and casting Zn-Al-Cu alloys. The structures were examined by light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and tensile and hardness testing were used to characterize the mechanical properties of the alloys. The corrosion behavior of the materials in simulated body fluid with pH values of 5, 7 and 10 was determined by immersion tests, potentiodynamic measurements and by monitoring the pH value evolution during corrosion. The surfaces of the corroded alloys were investigated by SEM, energy-dispersive spectrometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It was found that a maximum strength and elongation of 150MPa and 2%, respectively, were achieved at Mg contents of approximately 1wt.%. These mechanical properties are discussed in relation to the structural features of the alloys. The corrosion rates of the Zn-Mg alloys were determined to be significantly lower than those of Mg and AZ91HP alloys. The former alloys corroded at rates of the order of tens of microns per year, whereas the corrosion rates of the latter were of the order of hundreds of microns per year. Possible zinc doses and toxicity were estimated from the corrosion behavior of the zinc alloys. It was found that these doses are negligible compared with the tolerable biological daily limit of zinc. Copyright © 2011 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Management of Reflex Anoxic Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Investigators at the Roald Dahl EEG Unit, Alder Hey Children’s NHS Foundation, Liverpool, UK, review the definition, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and management of reflex anoxic seizures (RAS in children.

  5. A novel high-strength and highly corrosive biodegradable Fe-Pd alloy: Structural, mechanical and in vitro corrosion and cytotoxicity study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čapek, Jaroslav; Msallamová, Šárka; Jablonská, Eva; Lipov, Jan; Vojtěch, Dalibor

    2017-10-01

    Recently, iron-based materials have been considered as candidates for the fabrication of biodegradable load-bearing implants. Alloying with palladium has been found to be a suitable approach to enhance the insufficient corrosion rate of iron-based alloys. In this work, we have extensively compared the microstructure, the mechanical and corrosion properties, and the cytotoxicity of an FePd2 (wt%) alloy prepared by three different routes - casting, mechanical alloying and spark plasma sintering (SPS), and mechanical alloying and the space holder technique (SHT). The properties of the FePd2 (wt%) were compared with pure Fe prepared in the same processes. The preparation route significantly influenced the material properties. Materials prepared by SPS possessed the highest values of mechanical properties (CYS~750-850MPa) and higher corrosion rates than the casted materials. Materials prepared by SHT contained approximately 60% porosity; therefore, their mechanical properties reached the lowest values, and they had the highest corrosion rates, approximately 0.7-1.2mm/a. Highly porous FePd2 was tested in vitro according to the ISO 10993-5 standard using L929 cells, and two-fold diluted extracts showed acceptable cytocompatibility. In general, alloying with Pd enhanced both mechanical properties and corrosion rates and did not decrease the cytocompatibility of the studied materials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Implications of recent developments in the plastic fracture mechanics field to the PCI stress corrosion problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, E.

    1980-01-01

    Fractographic observations on irradiated Zircaloy cladding stress corrosion fracture surfaces are considered against the background of recent developments in the plastic fracture mechanics field. Dimples have been observed on the fracture surfaces of failed cladding, even though the cracks in metallographic sections are tight, i.e., crack propagation is associated with a low crack tip opening angle. This result is interpreted as providing evidence for an environmentally assisted ductile mode of fracture. The presence of this fracture mode forms the basis of an argument, which adds further support for the view that power ramp stress corrosion cladding failures are caused by stress concentrations that produce stress gradients in the cladding. (orig.)

  7. Influence of austempering heat treatment on mechanical and corrosion properties of ductile iron samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Janjić

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of metals are closely related to the microstructure characteristics of the material. The paper compares the results of these two sets of properties after investigating samples of base ductile iron and heat-treated samples of the base austempered ductile iron (ADI. The basic material is perlite ferritic iron alloyed with copper and nickel. To test the corrosion rate of the base material (ductile iron and the heattreated samples (ADI, electrochemical techniques of potentiostatic polarization were used (the technique of Tafel curves extrapolation and the potentiodynamic polarization technique.

  8. Corrosion mechanisms downstream the nuclear cycle: from processing-recycling to transmutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balbaud-Celerier, F.

    2010-01-01

    The author gives a detailed overview of his scientific and research activities in the field of material behaviour in environments met during the downstream part of the nuclear cycle. In the first part, he presents his works on material corrosion in concentrated and high temperature nitric acid, and more particularly on the phenomenon which governs this corrosion: the nitric acid reduction mechanism. In the second part, he reports researches performed within the frame of hybrid reactor development for the processing of future fuels. In both parts, he also discusses the perspectives for new researches and developments

  9. Corrosion effect of fast reactor fuel claddings on their mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davydov, E.F.; Krykov, F.N.; Shamardin, V.K.

    1985-01-01

    Fast reactor fuel cladding corrosion effect on its mechanical properties was investigated. UO 2 fuel elements were irradiated in the BOP-60 reactor at the linear heat rate of 42 kw/m. Fuel cladding is made of stainless steel OKh16N15M3BR. Calculated maximum cladding temperature is 920 K. Neutron fluence in the central part of fuel elements is 6.3x10 26 m+H- 2 . To investigate the strength changes temperature dependence of corrossion depth, cladding strength reduction factors was determined. Samples plasticity reduction with corrosion layer increase is considered to be a characteristic feature

  10. FUNDAMENTAL MECHANISMS OF CORROSION OF ADVANCED LIGHT WATER REACTOR FUEL CLADDING ALLOYS AT HIGH BURNUP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lott, Randy G.

    2003-01-01

    OAK (B204) The corrosion behavior of nuclear fuel cladding is a key factor limiting the performance of nuclear fuel elements, improved cladding alloys, which resist corrosion and radiation damage, will facilitate higher burnup core designs. The objective of this project is to understand the mechanisms by which alloy composition, heat treatment and microstructure affect corrosion rate. This knowledge can be used to predict the behavior of existing alloys outside the current experience base (for example, at high burn-up) and predict the effects of changes in operation conditions on zirconium alloy behavior. Zirconium alloys corrode by the formation f a highly adherent protective oxide layer. The working hypothesis of this project is that alloy composition, microstructure and heat treatment affect corrosion rates through their effect on the protective oxide structure and ion transport properties. The experimental task in this project is to identify these differences and understand how they affect corrosion behavior. To do this, several microstructural examination techniques including transmission electron microscope (TEM), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and a selection of fluorescence and diffraction techniques using synchrotron radiation at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) were employed

  11. Microstructure, mechanical and corrosion properties of Mg-Dy-Gd-Zr alloys for medical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, L; Huang, Y; Feyerabend, F; Willumeit, R; Mendis, C; Kainer, K U; Hort, N

    2013-11-01

    In previous investigations, a Mg-10Dy (wt.%) alloy with a good combination of corrosion resistance and cytocompatibility showed great potential for use as a biodegradable implant material. However, the mechanical properties of Mg-10Dy alloy are not satisfactory. In order to allow the tailoring of mechanical properties required for various medical applications, four Mg-10(Dy+Gd)-0.2Zr (wt.%) alloys were investigated with respect to microstructure, mechanical and corrosion properties. With the increase in Gd content, the number of second-phase particles increased in the as-cast alloys, and the age-hardening response increased at 200°C. The yield strength increased, while the ductility reduced, especially for peak-aged alloys with the addition of Gd. Additionally, with increasing Gd content, the corrosion rate increased in the as-cast condition owing to the galvanic effect, but all the alloys had a similar corrosion rate (~0.5 mm year(-1)) in solution-treated and aged condition. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Long-term corrosion inhibition mechanism of microarc oxidation coated AZ31 Mg alloys for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, Yanhong; Bandopadhyay, Sukumar; Chen, Cheng-fu; Ning, Chengyun; Guo, Yuanjun

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► The corrosion behavior is significantly affected by the long-term immersion. ► The degradation is inhibited due to the corrosion product layer. ► The corrosion resistance is enhanced by optimized MAO electrolyte concentrations. ► The corrosion inhibition mechanism is presented by a Flash animation. - Abstract: This paper addresses the long-term corrosion behavior of microarc oxidation coated Mg alloys immersed in simulated body fluid for 28 days. The coatings on AZ31 Mg alloys were produced in the electrolyte of sodium phosphate (Na 3 PO 4 ) at the concentration of 20 g/L, 30 g/L and 40 g/L, respectively. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and optical micrograph were used to observe the microstructure of the samples before and after corrosion. The composition of the MAO coating and corrosion products were determined by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). Corrosion product identification showed that hydroxyapatite (HA) was formed on the surface of the corroded samples. The ratio of Ca/P in HA determined by the X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) technique showed that HA is an acceptable biocompatible implant material. The potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were employed to characterize the corrosion rate and the electrochemical impedance. The corrosion resistance of the coated Mg alloys can be enhanced by optimizing the electrolyte concentrations for fabricating samples, and is enhanced after immersing the coated samples in simulated body fluid for more than 14 days. The enhanced corrosion resistance after long-term immersion is attributed to a corrosion product layer formed on the sample surface. The inhibition mechanism of the corrosion process is discussed and presented with an animation

  13. Program of assessment of mechanical and corrosion mechanical properties of reactor internals materials due to operation conditions in WWERs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruscak, M.; Zamboch, M.

    1998-01-01

    Reactor internals are subject to three principle operation influences: neutron and gamma irradiation, mechanical stresses, both static and dynamic, and coolant chemistry. Several cases of damage have been reported in previous years in both boiling and pressure water reactors. They are linked with the term of irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking as a possible damage mechanism. In WWERs, the principal material used for reactor internals is austenitic titanium stabilized stainless steel 08Kh18N10T, however high strength steels are used as well. To assess the changes of mechanical properties and to determine whether sensitivity to intergranular cracking can be increased by high neutron fluences, the experimental program has been started. The goal is to assure safe operation of the internals as well as life management for all planned operation period. The program consists of tests of material properties, both mechanical and corrosion-mechanical. Detailed neutron fluxes calculation as well as stress and deformation calculations are part of the assessment. Model of change will be proposed in order to plan inspections of the facility. In situ measurements of internals will be used to monitor exact status of structure during operation. Tensile specimens manufactured from both base metal and model weld joint have been irradiated to the total fluences of 3-20 dpa. Changes of mechanical properties are tested by the tensile test, stress corrosion cracking tests are performed in the autoclave with water loop and active loading. Operation temperature, pressure and water chemistry are chosen for the tests. (author)

  14. Identified corrosion and erosion mechanisms in SCO2 Brayton Cycles.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleming, Darryn D.; Kruizenga, Alan Michael

    2014-06-01

    Supercritical Carbon Dioxide (S-CO2) is an efficient and flexible working fluid for power production. Research to interface S-CO2 systems with nuclear, thermal solar, and fossil energy sources is currently underway. To proceed, we must address concerns regarding compatibility of materials, at high temperature, and compatibility between significantly different heat transfer fluids. Dry, pure S-CO2 is thought to be relatively inert [1], while the addition of ppm levels of water and oxygen result in formation of a protective chromia layer and iron oxide [2]. Thin oxides are favorable as diffusion barriers, and for their minimal impact on heat transfer. While S-CO2 is typically understood to be the secondary fluid, many varieties of primary fluids exist for nuclear applications. Molten salts, for use in the Molten Salt Reactor concept, are given as an example to contrast the materials requirements of primary and secondary fluids. Thin chromia layers are soluble in molten salt systems (nitrate, chloride, and fluoride based salts) [3-8], making materials selection for heat exchangers a precarious balancing act between high temperature oxidation (S-CO2) and metal dissolution (salt side of heat exchanger). Because concerns have been raised regarding component lifetimes, S-CO2 work has begun to characterize starting materials and to establish a baseline by analysis of 1) as-received stainless steel piping, and 2) piping exposed to S-CO2 under typical operating conditions with Sandia National Laboratories Brayton systems. A second issue discovered by SNL involves substantial erosion in the turbine blade and inlet nozzle. It is believed that this is caused by small particulates that originate from different materials around the loop that are entrained by the S-CO2 to the nozzle, where they impact the inlet nozzle vanes, causing erosion. We believe that, in some way, this is linked to the purity of the S-CO2, the corrosion contaminants, and the metal particulates that

  15. Comparative Studies on microstructure, mechanical and corrosion behaviour of DMR 249A Steel and its welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Raffi; Dilkush; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.; Srinivasa Rao, K.

    2018-03-01

    DMR249A Medium strength (low carbon) Low-alloy steels are used as structural components in naval applications due to its low cost and high availability. An attempt has been made to weld the DMR 249A steel plates of 8mm thickness using shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). Welds were characterized for metallography to carry out the microstructural changes, mechanical properties were evaluated using vickers hardness tester and universal testing machine. Potentio-dynamic polarization tests were carried out to determine the pitting corrosion behaviour. Constant load type Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) testing was done to observe the cracking tendency of the joints in a 3.5%NaCl solution. Results of the present study established that SMA welds resulted in formation of relatively higher amount of martensite in ferrite matrix when compared to gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). It is attributed to faster cooling rates achieved due to high thermal efficiency. Improved mechanical properties were observed for the SMA welds and are due to higher amount of martensite. Pitting corrosion and stress corrosion cracking resistance of SMA welds were poor when compared to GTA welds.

  16. A modelling of the mechanisms occurring during the atmospheric corrosion of iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marechal, L.; Perrin, S.; Hoerle, S.; Mazaudier, F.; Dillmann, P.

    2004-01-01

    In order to predict the long-term corrosion of metallic containers in storage conditions, a modelling of atmospheric corrosion of iron is proposed. This modelling takes into account the mechanisms which occur during the three stages of a wet-dry cycle. During the wetting stage, the reduction of lepidocrocite (g-FeOOH), a constituent of the rust layer, is considered to be the rate-limiting step of the corrosion. During the second stage of the cycle, the wet period, the reduction of dissolved oxygen on the lepidocrocite, previously reduced, is controlling the mechanism. The amount of oxidized metal depends on the quantity of reduced lepidocrocite and also on the oxygen diffusion in the electrolyte and the rust layer. At the end of the cycle, the blocking of the anodic sites is considered to describe the extinction of electrochemical corrosion during the drying. It appears that each stage of the cycle depends mainly on the chemical and morphological properties of the rust layer. (authors)

  17. Experimental Investigation into Corrosion Effect on Mechanical Properties of High Strength Steel Bars under Dynamic Loadings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Chen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The tensile behaviors of corroded steel bars are important in the capacity evaluation of corroded reinforced concrete structures. The present paper studies the mechanical behavior of the corroded high strength reinforcing steel bars under static and dynamic loading. High strength reinforcing steel bars were corroded by using accelerated corrosion methods and the tensile tests were carried out under different strain rates. The results showed that the mechanical properties of corroded high strength steel bars were strain rate dependent, and the strain rate effect decreased with the increase of corrosion degree. The decreased nominal yield and ultimate strengths were mainly caused by the reduction of cross-sectional areas, and the decreased ultimate deformation and the shortened yield plateau resulted from the intensified stress concentration at the nonuniform reduction. Based on the test results, reduction factors were proposed to relate the tensile behaviors with the corrosion degree and strain rate for corroded bars. A modified Johnson-Cook strength model of corroded high strength steel bars under dynamic loading was proposed by taking into account the influence of corrosion degree. Comparison between the model and test results showed that proposed model properly describes the dynamic response of the corroded high strength rebars.

  18. Corrosion mechanism and model of pulsed DC microarc oxidation treated AZ31 alloy in simulated body fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu Yanhong, E-mail: ygu2@alaska.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK 99775 (United States); Chen Chengfu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK 99775 (United States); Bandopadhyay, Sukumar [Department of Mining Engineering, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK 99775 (United States); Ning Chengyun [College of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Zhang Yongjun [Department of Mining Engineering, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK 99775 (United States); Guo Yuanjun [College of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2012-06-01

    This paper addresses the effect of pulse frequency on the corrosion behavior of microarc oxidation (MAO) coatings on AZ31 Mg alloys in simulated body fluid (SBF). The MAO coatings were deposited by a pulsed DC mode at four different pulse frequencies of 300 Hz, 500 Hz, 1000 Hz and 3000 Hz with a constant pulse ratio. Potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) tests were used for corrosion rate and electrochemical impedance evaluation. The corroded surfaces were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and optical microscopy. All the results exhibited that the corrosion resistance of MAO coating produced at 3000 Hz is superior among the four frequencies used. The XRD spectra showed that the corrosion products contain hydroxyapatite, brucite and quintinite. A model for corrosion mechanism and corrosion process of the MAO coating on AZ31 Mg alloy in the SBF is proposed.

  19. Corrosion mechanism and model of pulsed DC microarc oxidation treated AZ31 alloy in simulated body fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Yanhong; Chen Chengfu; Bandopadhyay, Sukumar; Ning Chengyun; Zhang Yongjun; Guo Yuanjun

    2012-01-01

    This paper addresses the effect of pulse frequency on the corrosion behavior of microarc oxidation (MAO) coatings on AZ31 Mg alloys in simulated body fluid (SBF). The MAO coatings were deposited by a pulsed DC mode at four different pulse frequencies of 300 Hz, 500 Hz, 1000 Hz and 3000 Hz with a constant pulse ratio. Potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) tests were used for corrosion rate and electrochemical impedance evaluation. The corroded surfaces were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and optical microscopy. All the results exhibited that the corrosion resistance of MAO coating produced at 3000 Hz is superior among the four frequencies used. The XRD spectra showed that the corrosion products contain hydroxyapatite, brucite and quintinite. A model for corrosion mechanism and corrosion process of the MAO coating on AZ31 Mg alloy in the SBF is proposed.

  20. Mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of supermartensitic stainless steel surfaces nitrided by plasma immersion ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schibicheski, Bruna Corina Emanuely; Souza, Gelson Biscaia de; Oliveira, Willian Rafael de; Serbena, Francisco Carlos, E-mail: bruna_schibicheski@hotmail.com [Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa (UEPG), PR (Brazil); Marino, Cláudia E.B. [Universidade Federal do Paraná (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full text: The supermartensitic stainless steel UNS S41426 is employed in marine oil and gas extraction ducts, where it is subjected to severe conditions of temperature, pressure and exposure to corrosive agents (as the H{sub 2}S). In such environments, pitting corrosion is a major cause of degradation of metallic alloys [1]. This work investigated the effectiveness of the nitrogen inlet, attained here by the plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) technique, in improving the mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of the material surface. Samples were initially austenitized at 1100°C with a subsequent room temperature oil quenching in order to obtain a fully martensitic structure. The nitriding was carried out under 10 kV implantation energy and 30 ms pulse width. The temperatures ranged from 300 °C to 400°C, achieved by controlling the pulse repetition rates. Samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, instrumented indentation, scanning electron microscopy, potentiodynamic anodic polarization tests (in NaCl solution), and cathodic hydrogenation tests (in H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution). The PIII nitriding produced stratified layers up to 30 mm thick containing nitrogen expanded martensite and iron nitride phases (γ’-Fe{sub 4}N, ε- Fe{sub 2+x}N), depending on the treatment temperature. Consequently, the surface hardness increased from ∼3GPa (reference) up to ∼13GPa (400°C). Regarding the corrosion resistance, the nitrided surfaces presented a significant improvement as compared with the pristine surface, evidenced by the increase of the corrosion potential, which was also correlated to the hydrogen embrittlement reduction and the subsequent suppression of morphological changes. References: [1] M.G. Fontana, Corrosion Engineering, Singapore: McGraw-Hill, 1987. [2] B.C.E.S. Kurelo et al., Applied Surface Science 349 (2015) 403-414. (author)

  1. Mechanical properties, corrosion, and biocompatibility of Mg-Zr-Sr-Dy alloys for biodegradable implant applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yunfei; Lin, Jixing; Wen, Cuie; Zhang, Dongmei; Li, Yuncang

    2017-11-28

    This study investigates the microstructure, mechanical properties, corrosion behavior, and biocompatibility of magnesium (Mg)-based Mg1Zr2SrxDy (x = 0, 1, 1.63, 2.08 wt %) alloys for biodegradable implant applications. The corrosion behavior of the Mg-based alloys has been evaluated in simulated body fluid using an electrochemical technique and hydrogen evolution. The biocompatibility of the Mg-based alloys has been assessed using SaSO2 cells. Results indicate that the addition of Dy to Mg-Zr-Sr alloy showed a positive impact on the corrosion behavior and significantly decreased the degradation rates of the alloys. The degradation rate of Mg1Zr2Sr1.0Dy decreased from 17.61 to 12.50 mm year -1 of Mg1Zr2Sr2.08Dy based on the hydrogen evolution. The ultimate compressive strength decreased from 270.90 MPa for Mg1Zr2Sr1Dy to 236.71 MPa for Mg1Zr2Sr2.08Dy. An increase in the addition of Dy to the Mg-based alloys resulted in an increase in the volume fraction of the Mg 2 Dy phase, which mitigated the galvanic effect between the Mg 17 Sr 2 phase and the Mg matrix, and led to an increase in the corrosion resistance of the base alloy. The biocompatibility of the Mg-based alloys was enhanced with decreasing corrosion rates. Mg1Zr2Sr2.08Dy exhibited the lowest corrosion rate and the highest biocompatibility compared with the other Mg-based alloys. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Enhanced mechanical properties and increased corrosion resistance of a biodegradable magnesium alloy by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, Leon; Koo, Youngmi; Neralla, Sudheer; Sankar, Jagannathan; Yun, Yeoheung

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) method was developed to control corrosion, porosity, and mechanical property. • Mechanical properties of PEO-coated AZ31 alloys were affected by the different electrolyte. • Mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of PEO-coated AZ31 alloys were compared with uncoated one. - Abstract: We report the enhanced mechanical properties of AZ31 magnesium alloys by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coating in NaOH, Na_2SiO_3, KF and NaH_2PO_4·2H_2O containing electrolytes. Mechanical properties including wear resistance, surface hardness and elastic modulus were increased for PEO-coated AZ31 Mg alloys (PEO-AZ31). DC polarization in Hank's solution indicating that the corrosion resistance significantly increased for PEO-coating in KF-contained electrolyte. Based on these results, the PEO coating method shows promising potential for use in biodegradable implant applications where tunable corrosion and mechanical properties are needed.

  3. Microstructure, mechanical property and corrosion behavior of interpenetrating (HA + β-TCP)/MgCa composite fabricated by suction casting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, X.; Dong, L.H.; Li, J.T.; Li, X.L.; Ma, X.L.; Zheng, Y.F.

    2013-01-01

    The novel interpenetrating (HA + β-TCP)/MgCa composites were fabricated by infiltrating MgCa alloy into porous HA + β-TCP using suction casting technique. The microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion behaviors of the composites have been evaluated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), mechanical testing, electrochemical and immersion tests. It was shown that the composites had compact structure and the interfacial bonding between MgCa alloy and HA + β-TCP scaffolds was very well. The ultimate compressive strength of the composites was about 500–1000 fold higher than that of the original porous scaffolds, and it still retained quarter-half of the strength of the bulk MgCa alloy. The electrochemical and immersion tests indicated that the corrosion resistance of the composites was better than that of the MgCa matrix alloy, and the corrosion products of the composite surface were mainly Mg(OH) 2 , HA and Ca 3 (PO 4 ) 2 . Meanwhile, the mechanical and corrosive properties of the (HA + β-TCP)/MgCa composites were adjustable by the choice of HA content. - Highlights: • The composites were fabricated by infiltrating MgCa alloy into porous HA + β-TCP. • The microstructure, mechanical and corrosion properties were investigated. • It showed composites had compact structures and good interfacial bonding. • The mechanical and corrosive properties can be adjustable by the HA content. • The corrosion mechanism of the composite has been explained

  4. Microstructures, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of Hastelloy C22 coating produced by laser cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Qin-Ying; Zhang, Yang-Fei; Bai, Shu-Lin; Liu, Zong-De

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Hastelloy C22 coatings were prepared by diode laser cladding technique. ► Higher laser speed resulted in smaller grain size. ► Size-effect played the key role in the hardness measurements by different ways. ► Coating with higher laser scanning speed displayed higher nano-scratch resistance. ► Small grain size was beneficial for improvement of coating corrosion resistance. -- Abstract: The Hastelloy C22 coatings H1 and H2 were prepared by laser cladding technique with laser scanning speeds of 6 and 12 mm/s, respectively. Their microstructures, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance were investigated. The microstructures and phase compositions were studied by metallurgical microscope, scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction analysis. The hardness and scratch resistance were measured by micro-hardness and nanoindentation tests. The polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were tested by electrochemical workstation. Planar, cellular and dendritic solidifications were observed in the coating cross-sections. The coatings metallurgically well-bonded with the substrate are mainly composed of primary phase γ-nickel with solution of Fe, W, Cr and grain boundary precipitate of Mo 6 Ni 6 C. The hardness and corrosion resistance of steel substrate are significantly improved by laser cladding Hastelloy C22 coating. Coating H2 shows higher micro-hardness than that of H1 by 34% and it also exhibits better corrosion resistance. The results indicate that the increase of laser scanning speed improves the microstuctures, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of Hastelloy C22 coating

  5. Mechanism of selective corrosion in electrical resistance seam welded carbon steel pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Fajardo, Pedro; Godinez Salcedo, Jesus; Gonzalez Velasquez, Jorge L. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico D.F., (Mexico). Escuela Superior de Ingenieria Quimica e Industrias Extractivas. Dept. de Ingenieria Metalurgica

    2009-07-01

    In this investigation the studies of the mechanism of selective corrosion in electrical resistance welded (ERW) carbon steel pipe was started. Metallographic characterizations and evaluations for inclusions were performed. The susceptibility of ERW pipe to selective corrosion in sea water (NACE 1D182, with O{sub 2} or CO{sub 2} + H{sub 2}S) was studied by the stepped potential Potentiostatic electrochemical test method in samples of 1 cm{sup 3} (ASTM G5) internal surface of the pipe (metal base-weld). The tests were looking for means for predicting the susceptibility of ERW pipe to selective corrosion, prior to placing the pipeline in service. Manganese sulfide inclusions are observed deformed by the welding process and they are close to the weld centerline. A slight decarburization at the weld line is observed, and a distinct out bent fiber pattern remains despite the post-weld seam annealing. The microstructure of the weld region consists of primarily polygonal ferrite grains mixed with small islands of pearlite. It is possible to observe the differences of sizes of grain of the present phases in the different zones. Finally, scanning electron microscopic observation revealed that the corrosion initiates with the dissolution of MnS inclusions and with small crack between the base metal and ZAC. (author)

  6. Corrosion mechanism of model zinc-magnesium alloys in atmospheric conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prosek, T.; Nazarov, A.; Bexell, U.; Thierry, D.; Serak, J.

    2008-01-01

    Recently, superior corrosion properties of zinc coatings alloyed with magnesium have been reported. Corrosion behaviour of model zinc-magnesium alloys was studied to understand better the protective mechanism of magnesium in zinc. Alloys containing from 1 to 32 wt.% magnesium, pure zinc, and pure magnesium were contaminated with sodium chloride and exposed to humid air for 28 days. Composition of corrosion products was analyzed using infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), ion chromatography (IC), and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The exposure tests were completed with scanning Kelvin probe (SKP) and electrochemical measurements. Weight loss of ZnMg alloys with 1-16 wt.% magnesium was lower than that of pure zinc. Up to 10-fold drop in weight loss was found for materials with 4-8 wt.% Mg in the structure. The improved corrosion stability of ZnMg alloys was connected to the presence of an Mg-based film adjacent to the metal surface. It ensured stable passivity in chloride environment and limited the efficiency of oxygen reduction

  7. New Mechanism on Synergistic Effect of Nitrite and Triethanolamine Addition on the Corrosion of Ductile Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. T. Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In general, we compared the different inhibition mechanisms of organic inhibitor with that of anodic inhibitor. When triethanolamine or nitrite was added separately to tap water for inhibiting the corrosion of ductile cast iron, large amounts of inhibitor were needed. This is because the corrosion inhibitors had to overcome the galvanic corrosion that occurs between graphite and matrix. In this work, we investigated the corrosion of ductile cast iron in tap water with/without inhibitors. The corrosion rate was measured using chemical immersion test and electrochemical methods, including anodic polarization test. The inhibited surface was analyzed using EPMA and XPS. Test solutions were analyzed by performing FT-IR measurement. When triethanolamine and nitrite coexisted in tap water, synergistic effect built up, and the inhibition effect was ca. 30 times more effective than witnessed with single addition. This work focused on the synergistic effect brought about by nitrite and triethanolamine and its novel mechanism was also proposed.

  8. Mechanism study of c.f.c Fe-Ni-Cr alloy corrosion in supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payet, M.

    2011-01-01

    Supercritical water can be use as a high pressure coolant in order to improve the thermodynamic efficiency of power plants. For nuclear concept, lifetime is an important safety parameter for materials. Thus materials selection criteria concern high temperature yield stress, creep resistance, resistance to irradiation embrittlement and also to both uniform corrosion and stress corrosion cracking.This study aims for supplying a new insight on uniform corrosion mechanism of Fe-Ni-Cr f.c.c. alloys in deaerated supercritical water at 600 C and 25 MPa. Corrosion tests were performed on 316L and 690 alloys as sample autoclaves taking into account the effect of surface finishes. Morphologies, compositions and crystallographic structure of the oxides were determined using FEG scanning electron microscopy, glow discharge spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. If supercritical water is expected to have a gas-like behaviour in the test conditions, the results show a significant dissolution of the alloy species. Thus the corrosion in supercritical water can be considered similar to corrosion in under-critical water assuming the higher temperature and its effect on the solid state diffusion. For alloy 690, the protective oxide layer formed on polished surface consists of a chromia film topped with an iron and nickel mixed chromite or spinel. The double oxide layer formed on 316L steel seems less protective with an outer porous layer of magnetite and an inhomogeneous Cr-rich inner layer. For each alloy, the study of the inner protective scale growth mechanisms by marker or tracer experiments reveals that diffusion in the oxide scale is governed by an anionic process. However, surface finishes impact deeply the growth mechanisms. Comparisons between the results for the steel suggest that there is a competition between the oxidation of iron and chromium in supercritical water. Sufficient available chromium is required in order to form a thin oxide layer. Highly deformed or ultra fine

  9. Mechanisms of browning development in aggregates of marine organic matter formed under anoxic conditions: A study by mid-infrared and near-infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecozzi, Mauro; Acquistucci, Rita; Nisini, Laura; Conti, Marcelo Enrique

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we analyze some chemical aspects concerning the browning development associated to the aggregation of marine organic matter (MOM) occurring in anoxic conditions. Organic matter samples obtained by the degradation of different algal samples were daily taken to follow the evolution of the aggregation process and the associated browning process. These samples were examined by Fourier transform mid infrared (FTIR) and Fourier transform near infrared (FTNIR) spectroscopy and the colour changes occurring during the above mentioned aggregation process were measured by means of Colour Indices (CIs). Spectral Cross Correlation Analysis (SCCA) was applied to correlate changes in CI values to the structural changes of MOM observed by FTIR and FTNIR spectra which were also submitted to Two-Dimensional Hetero Correlation Analysis (2HDCORR). SCCA results showed that all biomolecules present in MOM aggregates such as carbohydrates, proteins and lipids are involved in the browning development. In particular, SCCA results of algal mixtures suggest that the observed yellow-brown colour can be linked to the development of non enzymatic (i.e. Maillard) browning reactions. SCCA results for MOM furthermore suggest that aggregates coming from brown algae also showed evidence of browning related to enzymatic reactions. In the end 2HDCORR results indicate that hydrogen bond interactions among different molecules of MOM can play a significant role in the browning development.

  10. A fracture mechanics model for iodine stress corrosion crack propagation in Zircaloy tubing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crescimanno, P.J.; Campbell, W.R.; Goldberg, I.

    1984-01-01

    A fracture mechanics model is presented for iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking in Zircaloy tubing. The model utilizes a power law to relate crack extension velocity to stress intensity factor, a hyperbolic tangent function for the influence of iodine concentration, and an exponential function for the influence of temperature and material strength. Comparisons of predicted to measured failure times show that predicted times are within a factor of two of the measured times for a majority of the specimens considered

  11. Effects of solution treatment on mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of 4A duplex stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Panpan; Wang, Aiqin; Wang, Wenyan [Henan Univ. of Science and Technology, Luoyang (China). School of Material Science and Engineering; Xie, Jingpei [Henan Univ. of Science and Technology, Luoyang (China). Collaborative Innovation Center of Nonferrous Metals

    2018-02-15

    In this study, 4A duplex stainless steels were prepared via remelting in an intermediate frequency furnace and subsequently solution treated at different temperatures. The effects of solution treatment on the mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of 4A duplex stainless steel were investigated. Microstructures were characterized via optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The mechanical properties were evaluated via hardness test, tensile test, and impact test experiments. The point corrosion resistance was studied via chemical immersion and potentiodynamic anodic polarization. The results showed that with increasing solution temperature in the range of 1223 - 1423 K, the tensile strength and hardness first decreased and then increased, and minimum values were obtained at 1323 K. The σ phase precipitated at the boundaries of the α/γ phases in samples solution treated at 1223 K, decreasing both impact energy and pitting potential of the experimental steels. When experimental steels were solution treated at 1373 K for 2 h, a suitable volume fraction of α/γ was uniformly distributed throughout the microstructure, and the steels exhibited optimal mechanical properties and pitting corrosion resistance.

  12. Studies on microstructure, mechanical and corrosion properties of high nitrogen stainless steel shielded metal arc welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Raffi; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.; Srinivasa Rao, K.

    2018-03-01

    The present work is aimed at studying the microstructure, mechanical and corrosion properties of high nitrogen stainless steel shielded metal arc (SMA) welds made with Cromang-N electrode. Basis for selecting this electrode is to increase the solubility of nitrogen in weld metal due to high chromium and manganese content. Microstructures of the welds were characterized using optical microscopy (OM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) mainly to determine the morphology, phase analysis, grain size and orientation image mapping. Hardness, tensile and ductility bend tests were carried out to determine mechanical properties. Potentio-dynamic polarization testing was carried out to study the pitting corrosion resistance using a GillAC basic electrochemical system. Constant load type testing was carried out to study stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviour of welds. The investigation results shown that the selected Cr–Mn–N type electrode resulted in favourable microstructure and completely solidified as single phase coarse austenite. Mechanical properties of SMA welds are found to be inferior when compared to that of base metal and is due to coarse and dendritic structure.

  13. Chromium-modified a-C films with advanced structural, mechanical and corrosive-resistant characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ming, Miao Yi [International Chinese-Belarusian scientific laboratory on vacuum-plasma technology, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Francisk Skorina Gomel State University, Gomel 246019 (Belarus); Jiang, Xiaohong, E-mail: jxh0668@sina.com [International Chinese-Belarusian scientific laboratory on vacuum-plasma technology, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Francisk Skorina Gomel State University, Gomel 246019 (Belarus); Piliptsou, D.G., E-mail: pdg_@mail.ru [International Chinese-Belarusian scientific laboratory on vacuum-plasma technology, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Francisk Skorina Gomel State University, Gomel 246019 (Belarus); Zhuang, Yuzhao; Rogachev, A.V.; Rudenkov, A.S. [International Chinese-Belarusian scientific laboratory on vacuum-plasma technology, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Francisk Skorina Gomel State University, Gomel 246019 (Belarus); Balmakou, A. [Faculty of Material Science and Technology, Slovak University of Technology, Trnava 91724 (Slovakia)

    2016-08-30

    Highlights: • Influence of the chromium interlayer on the structure and mechanical properties of a-C:Cr films. • Residual stress and wear of a-C:Cr and Cr/a-C varies due to their phase and surface morphology. • Chromium-modified a-C films with advanced structural, mechanical and corrosive-resistant characteristics. - Abstract: To improve structural, mechanical and chemical properties of diamond-like carbon films, we developed amorphous carbon chromium-modified composite films fabricated by means of cathode magnetic filtered arc deposition. The properties were analyzed by Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy for the purpose of the structure characterization, elemental analysis and topology examination. Moreover, we also assessed residual stress, the coefficient of friction, hardness, the elastic modulus and corrosion parameters through X-ray double-crystal surface profilometry, tribo-testing, nanoindenter-testing, as well as contact angle measurements and potentiodynamic polarization analysis. As a result of a comparative analysis, we revealed a substantial improvement in the characteristics of developed composite films in comparison with amorphous carbon films. For example, Cr-modification is resulted, in greater integrated performance, toughness and corrosion resistance; the residual stress was reduced substantially.

  14. The anaerobic corrosion of carbon steel and cast iron in artificial groundwaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smart, N.R.; Blackwood, D.J.; Werme, L.

    2001-07-01

    In Sweden, high level radioactive waste will be disposed of in a canister with a copper outer and a cast iron or carbon steel inner. If the iron insert comes into contact with anoxic geological water, anaerobic corrosion leading to the generation of hydrogen will occur. This paper presents a study of the anaerobic corrosion of carbon steel and cast iron in artificial Swedish granitic groundwaters. Electrochemical methods and gas collection techniques were used to assess the mechanisms and rates of corrosion and the associated hydrogen gas production over a range of conditions. The corrosion rate is high initially but is anodically limited by the slow formation of a duplex magnetite film. The effects of key environmental parameters such as temperature and ionic strength on the anaerobic corrosion rate are discussed

  15. The anaerobic corrosion of carbon steel and cast iron in artificial groundwaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smart, N.R. [AEA Technology plc, Culham Science Centre (United Kingdom); Blackwood, D.J. [National Univ. of Singapore (Singapore); Werme, L. [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2001-07-01

    In Sweden, high level radioactive waste will be disposed of in a canister with a copper outer and a cast iron or carbon steel inner. If the iron insert comes into contact with anoxic geological water, anaerobic corrosion leading to the generation of hydrogen will occur. This paper presents a study of the anaerobic corrosion of carbon steel and cast iron in artificial Swedish granitic groundwaters. Electrochemical methods and gas collection techniques were used to assess the mechanisms and rates of corrosion and the associated hydrogen gas production over a range of conditions. The corrosion rate is high initially but is anodically limited by the slow formation of a duplex magnetite film. The effects of key environmental parameters such as temperature and ionic strength on the anaerobic corrosion rate are discussed.

  16. Corrosion mechanism of 13Cr stainless steel in completion fluid of high temperature and high concentration bromine salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yan; Xu, Lining; Lu, Minxu; Meng, Yao; Zhu, Jinyang; Zhang, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The corrosion behavior of 13Cr steel exposed to bromine salt completion fluid containing high concentration bromine ions was investigated. • There are passive circles around pits on the 13Cr steel surface after 7 d of exposure. • Macroscopic galvanic corrosion formed between the passive halo and the pit. • The mechanism of pitting corrosion on 13Cr stainless steel exposed to heavy bromine brine was established. - Abstract: A series of corrosion tests of 13Cr stainless steel were conducted in a simulated completion fluid environment of high temperature and high concentration bromine salt. Corrosion behavior of specimens and the component of corrosion products were investigated by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM), confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicate that 13Cr steel suffers from severe local corrosion and there is always a passive halo around every pit. The formation mechanism of the passive halo is established. OH − ligand generates and adsorbs in a certain scale because of abundant OH − on the surface around the pits. Passive film forms around each pit, which leads to the occurrence of passivation in a certain region. Finally, the dissimilarities in properties and morphologies of regions, namely the pit and its corresponding passive halo, can result in different corrosion sensitivities and may promote the formation of macroscopic galvanic pairs

  17. The Modeling of Ultimate Bearing Capacity of Fiber Reinforced Polymer and Its acidic/alkaline Corrosion Mechanism Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Liping

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the overall property of fiber reinforced polymer (FRP was researched. It is currently widely used in all areas, mainly in civil engineering. The huge need of this material drives the research of its mechanical property and corrosion mechanism. It is proven that the FRP can significantly strengthen the whole structure due to the support of fiber. And by applying osmosis hypothesis into the explanation of corrosion of FRP, we concluded that its corrosion rate is much slower than common materials, like steel. Generally, based on these conclusions, FRP is suitable for most of the facilities in civil engineering.

  18. EFFECT OF INTERMETALLIC PHASES ON CORROSION BEHAVIOR AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF DUPLEX STAINLESS STEEL AND SUPER-DUPLEX STAINLESS STEEL

    OpenAIRE

    Prabhu Paulraj; Rajnish Garg

    2015-01-01

    Duplex Stainless Steels (DSS) and Super Duplex Stainless Steel (SDSS) have excellent integration of mechanical and corrosion properties. However, the formation of intermetallic phases is a major problem in their usage. The mechanical and corrosion properties are deteriorated due to the presence of intermetallic phases. These phases are induced during welding, prolonged exposure to high temperatures, and improper heat treatments. The main emphasis of this review article is on intermetallic pha...

  19. Mechanical properties of layers of corrosion products at steel / concrete interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehoux, Anita

    2012-01-01

    To take account of the development of corrosion products layers in residual lifetime calculations of reinforced concrete structures requires a good knowledge of the mechanical properties of these products. Our study aims to determine the mechanical properties of layers of corrosion products. The approach consists of an identification of the microstructure properties complemented by homogenization calculations to calculate a mesoscopic behavior in linear elasticity of layers of corrosion products. The study includes a series of experimental campaigns at the microscopic scale. Vickers micro indentation tests analyzed by a Gaussian mixture model approach allowed the acquisition of hardness and elastic moduli at the microscale. An identification of the microstructure products is performed by Raman microspectrometry. The microstructure's characterization brings valuable information for homogenization calculations. The first approach has consisted of calculations of random media homogenization by self-consistent and generalized self-consistent schemes. In the second approach, effective modulus calculations were performed using numerical microstructures resulting from 2D images taken with an optical microscope. The corpus is composed of samples of different ages and origins, their microstructures were compared. (author) [fr

  20. Alpha prime effect on mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of UR 52N+ duplex stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontes, Talita Filier

    2009-01-01

    Alpha prime phase leads to decreased corrosion resistance and mechanical properties losses of duplex stainless steels. In this work mechanical and electrochemical tests were performed in duplex stainless steel UR 52N+ aged at 475 degree C for various periods in order to determine the sensibility of these tests to alpha prime presence. Hardness tests showed a gradual increase in its values; on the other hand, impact tests revealed that the material aged for 12h losses about 80% of energy absorption capacity of the solution annealed sample. Notwithstanding cyclic polarization tests showed that significant changes are only noted for aging times greater than 96h. (author)

  1. Corrosion and Fatigue of Aluminum Alloys: Chemistry, Micro-Mechanics and Reliability

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wei, Robert

    1997-01-01

    Lehigh University undertook a multidisciplinary program of research to develop a basic mechanistic understanding of localized corrosion and corrosion fatigue crack nucleation and growth in aluminum...

  2. Influence of ageing treatment on microstructure, mechanical and bio-corrosion properties of Mg-Dy alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Huang, Yuanding; Feyerabend, Frank; Willumeit, Regine; Kainer, Karl Ulrich; Hort, Norbert

    2012-09-01

    Mg-Dy alloys have shown to be promising for medical applications. In order to investigate the influence of ageing treatment on their mechanical and corrosion properties, three Mg-xDy alloys (x=10, 15, 20 wt%) were prepared. Their microstructure, mechanical and corrosion behavior were investigated. The results indicate that ageing at 250 °C has little influence on the mechanical and corrosion properties. In contrast, ageing at 200 °C significantly increases the yield strength, and reduces the ductility. After ageing at 200 °C, the corrosion rate of Mg-20Dy alloy increases largely in 0.9 wt% NaCl solution, but remains unchanged in cell culture medium. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. EFFECT OF INTERMETALLIC PHASES ON CORROSION BEHAVIOR AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF DUPLEX STAINLESS STEEL AND SUPER-DUPLEX STAINLESS STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhu Paulraj

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Duplex Stainless Steels (DSS and Super Duplex Stainless Steel (SDSS have excellent integration of mechanical and corrosion properties. However, the formation of intermetallic phases is a major problem in their usage. The mechanical and corrosion properties are deteriorated due to the presence of intermetallic phases. These phases are induced during welding, prolonged exposure to high temperatures, and improper heat treatments. The main emphasis of this review article is on intermetallic phases and their effects on corrosion and mechanical properties. First the effect of various alloying elements on DSS and SDSS has been discussed followed by formation of various intermetallic phases. The intermetallic phases affect impact toughness and corrosion resistance significantly. Their deleterious effect on weldments has also been reviewed.

  4. Microstructure, mechanical properties, bio-corrosion properties and antibacterial properties of Ti-Ag sintered alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mian; Zhang, Erlin; Zhang, Lan

    2016-05-01

    In this research, Ag element was selected as an antibacterial agent to develop an antibacterial Ti-Ag alloy by a powder metallurgy. The microstructure, phase constitution, mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and antibacterial properties of the Ti-Ag sintered alloys have been systematically studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), compressive test, electrochemical measurements and antibacterial test. The effects of the Ag powder size and the Ag content on the antibacterial property and mechanical property as well as the anticorrosion property have been investigated. The microstructure results have shown that Ti-Ag phase, residual pure Ag and Ti were the mainly phases in Ti-Ag(S75) sintered alloy while Ti2Ag was synthesized in Ti-Ag(S10) sintered alloy. The mechanical test indicated that Ti-Ag sintered alloy showed a much higher hardness and the compressive yield strength than cp-Ti but the mechanical properties were slightly reduced with the increase of Ag content. Electrochemical results showed that Ag powder size had a significant effect on the corrosion resistance of Ti-Ag sintered alloy. Ag content increased the corrosion resistance in a dose dependent way under a homogeneous microstructure. Antibacterial tests have demonstrated that antibacterial Ti-Ag alloy was successfully prepared. It was also shown that the Ag powder particle size and the Ag content influenced the antibacterial activity seriously. The reduction in the Ag powder size was benefit to the improvement in the antibacterial property and the Ag content has to be at least 3wt.% in order to obtain a strong and stable antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. The bacterial mechanism was thought to be related to the Ti2Ag and its distribution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Cluster analysis of stress corrosion mechanisms for steel wires used in bridge cables through acoustic emission particle swarm optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongsheng; Yang, Wei; Zhang, Wenyao

    2017-05-01

    Stress corrosion is the major failure type of bridge cable damage. The acoustic emission (AE) technique was applied to monitor the stress corrosion process of steel wires used in bridge cable structures. The damage evolution of stress corrosion in bridge cables was obtained according to the AE characteristic parameter figure. A particle swarm optimization cluster method was developed to determine the relationship between the AE signal and stress corrosion mechanisms. Results indicate that the main AE sources of stress corrosion in bridge cables included four types: passive film breakdown and detachment of the corrosion product, crack initiation, crack extension, and cable fracture. By analyzing different types of clustering data, the mean value of each damage pattern's AE characteristic parameters was determined. Different corrosion damage source AE waveforms and the peak frequency were extracted. AE particle swarm optimization cluster analysis based on principal component analysis was also proposed. This method can completely distinguish the four types of damage sources and simplifies the determination of the evolution process of corrosion damage and broken wire signals. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Characterization and corrosion behaviour of CoNi alloys obtained by mechanical alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olvera, S. [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, ESIQIE, Departamento de Ingeniería en Metalurgia y Materiales, México, D. F. (Mexico); Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Facultad de Ciencias, Departamento de Química-Física Aplicada, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Sánchez-Marcos, J. [Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Facultad de Ciencias, Departamento de Química-Física Aplicada, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Palomares, F.J. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, ICMM-CSIC, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Salas, E. [Spline Spanish CRG Beamline at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facilities, ESRF, BP 220-38043, Grenoble Cedex (France); Arce, E.M. [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, ESIQIE, Departamento de Ingeniería en Metalurgia y Materiales, México, D. F. (Mexico); Herrasti, P., E-mail: pilar.herrasti@uam.es [Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Facultad de Ciencias, Departamento de Química-Física Aplicada, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-07-01

    CoNi alloys including Co{sub 30}Ni{sub 70}, Co{sub 50}Ni{sub 50} and Co{sub 70}Ni{sub 30} were prepared via mechanical alloying using Co and Ni powders. The crystallinity and short-range order were studied using X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The results show that the milling process increases the number of vacancies, especially around the Co atoms, while the milling time decreases the crystalline size and enhances the crystallinity. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to characterise the chemical composition of the samples surface. The magnetic properties were analysed using zero-field cooling, field cooling and a magnetic hysteresis loops. The magnetic saturation moment is approximately 1.05 μ{sub B}/atom; this value decreases with the mechanical alloying time, and it is proportional to the cobalt concentration. The polarization and impedance curves in different media (NaCl, H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and NaOH) showed similar corrosion resistance values. The corrosion resistance increased in the order NaCl, H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and NaOH. A good passivation layer was formed in NaOH due to the cobalt and nickel oxides on the particle surfaces. - Highlights: • Ni{sub x}Co{sub 100-x} alloys were synthesized by mechanical alloying • Milling time decrease size and enhances crystallinity. • Oxygen is not present in a significant percentage in bulk but is detected on the surface. • Magnetic saturation moment is 1.05 mB/atom and decrease with mechanical allowing time • Corrosion resistance is higher in NaOH than in NaCl or HCl solutions.

  7. Characterization and corrosion behaviour of CoNi alloys obtained by mechanical alloying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olvera, S.; Sánchez-Marcos, J.; Palomares, F.J.; Salas, E.; Arce, E.M.; Herrasti, P.

    2014-01-01

    CoNi alloys including Co 30 Ni 70 , Co 50 Ni 50 and Co 70 Ni 30 were prepared via mechanical alloying using Co and Ni powders. The crystallinity and short-range order were studied using X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The results show that the milling process increases the number of vacancies, especially around the Co atoms, while the milling time decreases the crystalline size and enhances the crystallinity. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to characterise the chemical composition of the samples surface. The magnetic properties were analysed using zero-field cooling, field cooling and a magnetic hysteresis loops. The magnetic saturation moment is approximately 1.05 μ B /atom; this value decreases with the mechanical alloying time, and it is proportional to the cobalt concentration. The polarization and impedance curves in different media (NaCl, H 2 SO 4 and NaOH) showed similar corrosion resistance values. The corrosion resistance increased in the order NaCl, H 2 SO 4 and NaOH. A good passivation layer was formed in NaOH due to the cobalt and nickel oxides on the particle surfaces. - Highlights: • Ni x Co 100-x alloys were synthesized by mechanical alloying • Milling time decrease size and enhances crystallinity. • Oxygen is not present in a significant percentage in bulk but is detected on the surface. • Magnetic saturation moment is 1.05 mB/atom and decrease with mechanical allowing time • Corrosion resistance is higher in NaOH than in NaCl or HCl solutions

  8. Mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of Mg-Gd-Ca-Zr alloys for medical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ling-Ling; Huang, Yuanding; Yang, Lei; Feyerabend, Frank; Mendis, Chamini; Willumeit, Regine; Ulrich Kainer, Karl; Hort, Norbert

    2015-07-01

    Magnesium alloys are promising candidates for biomedical applications. In this work, influences of composition and heat treatment on the microstructure, the mechanical properties and the corrosion behavior of Mg-Gd-Ca-Zr alloys as potential biomedical implant candidates were investigated. Mg5Gd phase was observed at the grain boundaries of Mg-10Gd-xCa-0.5Zr (x=0, 0.3, 1.2wt%) alloys. Increase in the Ca content led to the formation of additional Mg2Ca phase. The Ca additions increased both the compressive and the tensile yield strengths, but reduced the ductility and the corrosion resistance in cell culture medium. After solution heat treatment, the Mg5Gd particles dissolved in the Mg matrix. The compressive strength decreased, while the corrosion resistance improved in the solution treated alloys. After ageing at 200°C, metastable β' phase formed on prismatic planes and a new type of basal precipitates have been observed, which improved the compressive and tensile ultimate strength, but decreased the ductility. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The Formation Mechanism and Corrosion Resistance of a Composite Phosphate Conversion Film on AM60 Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Xiangna; Wang, Chao; Zhang, Qinyong

    2018-01-01

    Magnesium alloy AM60 has high duc and toughness, which is expected to increase in demand for automotive applications. However, it is too active, and coatings have been extensively studied to prevent corrosion. In this work, a Ba-containing composite phosphate film has been prepared on the surface of AM60. The composition and formation mechanism of the film have been investigated using a scanning electronic microscope equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray diffractometry tests. The corrosion resistance of the film has been measured by electrochemical and immersion tests. The results show that the deposition film has fully covered the substrate but there are some micro-cracks. The structure of the film is complex, and consists of MgHPO4·3H2O, MnHPO4·2.25H2O, BaHPO4·3H2O, BaMg2(PO4)2, Mg3(PO4)2·22H2O, Ca3(PO4)2·xH2O, and some amorphous phases. The composite phosphate film has better anticorrosion performance than the AM60 and can protect the bare alloy from corrosion for more than 12 h in 0.6 M NaCl. PMID:29518038

  10. Rapid Tempering of Martensitic Stainless Steel AISI420: Microstructure, Mechanical and Corrosion Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi-Khazaei, Bijan; Mollaahmadi, Akbar

    2017-04-01

    In this research, the effect of rapid tempering on the microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of AISI 420 martensitic stainless steel has been investigated. At first, all test specimens were austenitized at 1050 °C for 1 h and tempered at 200 °C for 1 h. Then, the samples were rapidly reheated by a salt bath furnace in a temperature range from 300 to 1050 °C for 2 min and cooled in air. The tensile tests, impact, hardness and electrochemical corrosion were carried out on the reheated samples. Scanning electron microscopy was used to study the microstructure and fracture surface. To investigate carbides, transmission electron microscopy and also scanning electron microscopy were used. X-ray diffraction was used for determination of the retained austenite. The results showed that the minimum properties such as the tensile strength, impact energy, hardness and corrosion resistance were obtained at reheating temperature of 700 °C. Semi-continuous carbides in the grain boundaries were seen in this temperature. Secondary hardening phenomenon was occurred at reheating temperature of 500 °C.

  11. The Formation Mechanism and Corrosion Resistance of a Composite Phosphate Conversion Film on AM60 Alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Lan, Xiangna; Wang, Chao; Zhang, Qinyong

    2018-03-08

    Magnesium alloy AM60 has high duc and toughness, which is expected to increase in demand for automotive applications. However, it is too active, and coatings have been extensively studied to prevent corrosion. In this work, a Ba-containing composite phosphate film has been prepared on the surface of AM60. The composition and formation mechanism of the film have been investigated using a scanning electronic microscope equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray diffractometry tests. The corrosion resistance of the film has been measured by electrochemical and immersion tests. The results show that the deposition film has fully covered the substrate but there are some micro-cracks. The structure of the film is complex, and consists of MgHPO₄·3H₂O, MnHPO₄·2.25H₂O, BaHPO₄·3H₂O, BaMg₂(PO₄)₂, Mg₃(PO₄)₂·22H₂O, Ca₃(PO₄)₂·xH₂O, and some amorphous phases. The composite phosphate film has better anticorrosion performance than the AM60 and can protect the bare alloy from corrosion for more than 12 h in 0.6 M NaCl.

  12. Microstructure, mechanical property, corrosion behavior, and in vitro biocompatibility of Zr-Mo alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, F Y; Wang, B L; Qiu, K J; Li, L; Lin, J P; Li, H F; Zheng, Y F

    2013-02-01

    In this study, the microstructure, mechanical properties, corrosion behaviors, and in vitro biocompatibility of Zr-Mo alloys as a function of Mo content after solution treatment were systemically investigated to assess their potential use in biomedical application. The experimental results indicated that Zr-1Mo alloy mainly consisted of an acicular structure of α' phase, while ω phase formed in Zr-3Mo alloy. In Zr-5Mo alloy, retained β phase and a small amount of precipitated α phase were observed. Only the retained β phase was obtained in Zr-10Mo alloy. Zr-1Mo alloy exhibited the greatest hardness, bending strength, and modulus among all experimental Zr-Mo alloys, while β phase Zr-10Mo alloy had a low modulus. The results of electrochemical corrosion indicated that adding Mo into Zr improved its corrosion resistance which resulted in increasing the thermodynamic stability and passivity of zirconium. The cytotoxicity test suggested that the extracts of the studied Zr-Mo alloys produced no significant deleterious effect to fibroblast cells (L-929) and osteoblast cells (MG 63), indicating an excellent in vitro biocompatibility. Based on these facts, certain Zr-Mo alloys potentially suitable for different biomedical applications were proposed. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Microstructures, mechanical properties and corrosion resistances of extruded Mg-Zn-Ca-xCe/La alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, L B; Zhang, Q X; Jiang, Z H; Zhang, J B; Meng, J; Cheng, L R; Zhang, H J

    2016-09-01

    Magnesium alloys are considered as good candidates for biomedical applications, the influence of Ce/La microalloying on the microstructure, mechanical property and corrosion performance of extruded Mg-5.3Zn-0.6Ca (wt%) alloy has been investigated in the current study. After Ce/La addition, the conventional Ca2Mg6Zn3 phases are gradually replaced by new Mg-Zn-Ce/La-(Ca) phases (T1'), which can effectively divide the Ca2Mg6Zn3 phase. The Ca2Mg6Zn3/T1' structure in Mg-Zn-Ca-0.5Ce/La alloy is favorably broken into small particles during the extrusion, resulting in an obvious refinement of secondary phase. The dynamic recrystallized grain size is dramatically decreased after 0.5Ce/La addition, and the tensile yield strength is improved, while further addition reverses the effect, due to the grain coarsening. However, the corrosion resistance of extruded Mg-Zn-Ca alloy deteriorates after Ce/La addition, because the diameter of secondary phase particle is remarkably decreased, which increases the amount of cathodic sites and accelerates the galvanic corrosion process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Mechanical Properties Variation of B500SD High Ductility Reinforcement Regarding its Corrosion Degree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cobo, A.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion effects on reinforcement become evident in the bar section reduction and in the variation of mechanical properties related to ductility. In this research work, 96 B500SD steel bars, previously subjected to different corrosion variables, have been tested. Results show that the elongation of the bars diminishes and the ratio between the maximum tensile stress and the elastic limit increases as the corrosion degree advances. These phenomena can be explained by studying the necking effect and the different steel composition through the manufacture process.

    Los efectos de la corrosión sobre las armaduras se manifiestan por la pérdida de sección y la variación de las propiedades mecánicas relacionadas con la ductilidad. En este trabajo se han ensayado a tracción 96 barras de acero B500SD que previamente se han sometido a niveles variables de corrosión. Los resultados muestran que los alargamientos de las barras disminuyen y el cociente entre la tensión máxima y el límite elástico aumenta conforme el nivel de corrosión avanza. A partir del estudio del efecto de entalla y de la distinta constitución metalográfica del acero a nivel de sección debido a su procedimiento de fabricación, se pueden explicar los fenómenos anteriores.

  15. Fabrication of biodegradable Zn-Al-Mg alloy: Mechanical properties, corrosion behavior, cytotoxicity and antibacterial activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhsheshi-Rad, H R; Hamzah, E; Low, H T; Kasiri-Asgarani, M; Farahany, S; Akbari, E; Cho, M H

    2017-04-01

    In this work, binary Zn-0.5Al and ternary Zn-0.5Al-xMg alloys with various Mg contents were investigated as biodegradable materials for implant applications. Compared with Zn-0.5Al (single phase), Zn-0.5Al-xMg alloys consisted of the α-Zn and Mg 2 (Zn, Al) 11 with a fine lamellar structure. The results also revealed that ternary Zn-Al-Mg alloys presented higher micro-hardness value, tensile strength and corrosion resistance compared to the binary Zn-Al alloy. In addition, the tensile strength and corrosion resistance increased with increasing the Mg content in ternary alloys. The immersion tests also indicated that the corrosion rates in the following order Zn-0.5Al-0.5MgAl-0.3MgAl-0.1MgAl. The cytotoxicity tests exhibited that the Zn-0.5Al-0.5Mg alloy presents higher viability of MC3T3-E1 cell compared to the Zn-0.5Al alloy, which suggested good biocompatibility. The antibacterial activity result of both Zn-0.5Al and Zn-0.5Al-Mg alloys against Escherichia coli presented some antibacterial activity, while the Zn-0.5Al-0.5Mg significantly prohibited the growth of Escherichia coli. Thus, Zn-0.5Al-0.5Mg alloy with appropriate mechanical properties, low corrosion rate, good biocompatibility and antibacterial activities was believed to be a good candidate as a biodegradable implant material. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Microstructure, Mechanical and Corrosion Properties of Friction Stir-Processed AISI D2 Tool Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasavol, Noushin; Jafari, Hassan

    2015-05-01

    In this study, AISI D2 tool steel underwent friction stir processing (FSP). The microstructure, mechanical properties, and corrosion resistance of the FSPed materials were then evaluated. A flat WC-Co tool was used; the rotation rate of the tool varied from 400 to 800 rpm, and the travel speed was maintained constant at 385 mm/s during the process. FSP improved mechanical properties and produced ultrafine-grained surface layers in the tool steel. Mechanical properties improvement is attributed to the homogenous distribution of two types of fine (0.2-0.3 μm) and coarse (1.6 μm) carbides in duplex ferrite-martensite matrix. In addition to the refinement of the carbides, the homogenous dispersion of the particles was found to be more effective in enhancing mechanical properties at 500 rpm tool rotation rate. The improved corrosion resistance was observed and is attributed to the volume fraction of low-angle grain boundaries produced after friction stir process of the AISI D2 steel.

  17. Microstructure, mechanical and corrosion behavior of high strength AA7075 aluminium alloy friction stir welds – Effect of post weld heat treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Vijaya Kumar

    2015-12-01

    It was observed that the hardness and strength of weld were observed to be comparatively high in peak aged (T6 condition but the welds showed poor corrosion resistance. The resistance to pitting corrosion was improved and the mechanical properties were maintained by RRA treatment. The resistance to pitting corrosion was improved in RRA condition with the minimum loss of weld strength.

  18. A technique to investigate the mechanism of uniform corrosion in the presence of a semi-permeable membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.

    1987-01-01

    A technique to investigate the mechanism of uniform corrosion in the presence of a semi-permeable membrane is described. For both the anodic and cathodic half-reactions three possible rate-determining steps are considered: transport of species through the bulk solution diffusion layer, transport of species through the membrane and the electrochemical reaction itself. The technique is based on the measurement of the corrosion potential, E CORR , of a rotating disc electrode under steady-state conditions. The variation of E CORR with the oxidant concentration, the thickness of the diffusion layer and the membrane thickness is used to identify the rate-determining step for each half-reaction. This technique should be of use in the study of the corrosion behaviour of candidate materials for nuclear waste disposal containers. An understanding of the mechanism of uniform corrosion will enable confident predictions to be made concerning the long-term behaviour of such containers

  19. Corrosion/95 conference papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    The papers in this conference represent the latest technological advances in corrosion control and prevention. The following subject areas are covered: cathodic protection in natural waters; materials for fossil fuel combustion and conversion systems; modern problems in atmospheric corrosion; innovative ideas for controlling the decaying infrastructure; deposits and their effects on corrosion in industry; volatile high temperature and non aqueous corrosion inhibitors; corrosion of light-weight and precoated metals for automotive application; refining industry corrosion; corrosion in pulp and paper industry; arctic/cold weather corrosion; materials selection for waste incinerators and associated equipment; corrosion measurement technology; environmental cracking of materials; advancing technology in the coating industry; corrosion in gas treating; green inhibition; recent advances in corrosion control of rail equipment; velocity effects and erosion corrosion in oil and gas production; marine corrosion; corrosion of materials in nuclear systems; underground corrosion control; corrosion in potable and industrial water systems in buildings and its impact on environmental compliance; deposit related boiler tube failures; boiler systems monitoring and control; recent developments and experiences in reactive metals; microbiologically influenced corrosion; corrosion and corrosion control for steel reinforced concrete; international symposium on the use of 12 and 13 Cr stainless steels in oil and gas production environments; subsea corrosion /erosion monitoring in production facilities; fiberglass reinforced pipe and tubulars in oilfield service; corrosion control technology in power transmission and distribution; mechanisms and methods of scale and deposit control; closing the loop -- results oriented cooling system monitoring and control; and minimization of aqueous discharge

  20. Synthesis, mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of powder metallurgy processed Fe/Mg2Si composites for biodegradable implant applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora-Jasinska, M; Paternoster, C; Mostaed, E; Tolouei, R; Casati, R; Vedani, M; Mantovani, D

    2017-12-01

    Recently, Fe and Fe-based alloys have shown their potential as degradable materials for biomedical applications. Nevertheless, the slow corrosion rate limits their performance in certain situations. The shift to iron matrix composites represents a possible approach, not only to improve the mechanical properties, but also to accelerate and tune the corrosion rate in a physiological environment. In this work, Fe-based composites reinforced by Mg 2 Si particles were proposed. The initial powders were prepared by different combinations of mixing and milling processes, and finally consolidated by hot rolling. The influence of the microstructure on mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of Fe/Mg 2 Si was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction were used for the assessment of the composite structure. Tensile and hardness tests were performed to characterize the mechanical properties. Potentiodynamic and static corrosion tests were carried out to investigate the corrosion behavior in a pseudo-physiological environment. Samples with smaller Mg 2 Si particles showed a more homogenous distribution of the reinforcement. Yield and ultimate tensile strength increased when compared to those of pure Fe (from 400MPa and 416MPa to 523MPa and 630MPa, respectively). Electrochemical measurements and immersion tests indicated that the addition of Mg 2 Si could increase the corrosion rate of Fe even twice (from 0.14 to 0.28mm·year -1 ). It was found that the preparation method of the initial composite powders played a major role in the corrosion process as well as in the corrosion mechanism of the final composite. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Contribution of archaeological analogs to the estimation of average corrosion rates and long term corrosion mechanisms of low carbon steel in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neff, D.

    2003-11-01

    . This corrosion form, constituted among others by a siderite layer is due to a particular environment: waterlogged soil containing wood. In the whole, analyses conducted in the TM show that it is composed of goethite badly crystallized in comparison with those of the DPL. Moreover, in this zone, the average elemental iron amount decreases progressively from the metal to the soil in which it stabilizes. In order to know the behaviour of the identified phases in soil water, some thermodynamic data have been involved to calculate their solubility in function of pH, potential and various water composition. The first conclusion concerns the influence of the composition and the structure of the material which is not important for the corrosion behaviour. From the results, some hypothesis have been formulated on the long term corrosion mechanisms of hypo-eutectoids steels in the considered environment. The role of the cracks formed in the DPL during the burial was evidenced. Moreover, these corrosion products undertake a dissolution in the soil water and a reprecipitation, explaining the progressive decrease of the iron amount in the TM. Lastly, some average corrosion rates have been measured with the help of the analytical and thermodynamic results: they do not exceed 4 μm/year. (author)

  2. Mechanisms of irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking in austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Was, G.S.; Busby, G.T.

    2004-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Service and laboratory experience have shown that irradiation enhances the stress corrosion cracking of austenitic alloys in high temperature water. The degree of irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) increases with dose as the microstructure undergoes significant changes, including dislocation loop formation, grain boundary segregation and hardening. These changes occur simultaneously and at comparable rates, complicating the attribution of IASCC to specific components of the microstructure. Each of the principal effects of irradiation have been considered as potential causes of IASCC, but the multivariable nature of the problem obscures a definitive determination of the mechanism. Rather, the mechanism of IASCC is more likely due to a combination of factors, some which have not yet been considered. Among these effects is the heterogeneity of deformation caused by the irradiated microstructure, and the interaction of localized deformation bands with grain boundaries. Current understanding and proposed mechanisms of IASCC will be reviewed, and recent progress on the role of heterogeneous deformation on IASCC will be presented. (authors)

  3. Chloride-induced corrosion mechanism and rate of enamel- and epoxy-coated deformed steel bars embedded in mortar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Fujian; Chen, Genda; Brow, Richard K.

    2016-01-01

    The chloride-induced corrosion mechanisms of uncoated, pure enamel (PE)-coated, mixed enamel (ME)-coated, double enamel (DE)-coated, and fusion bonded epoxy (FBE)-coated deformed steel bars embedded in mortar cylinders are investigated in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution and compared through electrochemical tests and visual inspection. Corrosion initiated after 29 or 61 days of tests in all uncoated and enamel-coated steel bars, and after 244 days of tests in some FBE-coated steel bars. In active stage, DE- and FBE-coated steel bars are subjected to the highest and lowest corrosion rates, respectively. The uncoated and ME-coated steel bars revealed relatively uniform corrosion while the PE-, DE-, and FBE-coated steel bars experienced pitting corrosion around damaged coating areas. Due to the combined effect of ion diffusion and capillary suction, wet–dry cyclic immersion caused more severe corrosion than continuous immersion. Both exposure conditions affected the corrosion rate more significantly than the water–cement ratio in mortar design.

  4. Influence of irradiation and radiolysis on the corrosion rates and mechanisms of zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verlet, Romain

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear fuel of pressurized water reactors (PWR) in the form of uranium oxide UO 2 pellets (or MOX) is confined in a zirconium alloy cladding. This cladding is very important because it represents the first containment barrier against the release of fission products generated by the nuclear reaction to the external environment. Corrosion by the primary medium of zirconium alloys, particularly the Zircaloy-4, is one of the factors limiting the reactor residence time of the fuel rods (UO 2 pellets + cladding). To optimize core management and to extend the lifetime of the fuel rods in reactor, new alloys based on zirconium-niobium (M5) have been developed. However, the corrosion mechanisms of these are not completely understood because of the complexity of these materials, corrosion environment and the presence of radiation from the nuclear fuel. Therefore, this thesis specifically addresses the effects of radiolysis and defects induced by irradiation with ions in the matrix metal and the oxide layer on the corrosion rate of Zircaloy-4 and M5. The goal is to separate the influence of radiation damage to the metal, that relating to defects created in the oxide and that linked to radiolysis of the primary medium on the oxidation rate of zirconium alloys in reactor. 1) Regarding effect of irradiation of the metal on the oxidation rate: type dislocation loops appear and increase the oxidation rate of the two alloys. For M5, in addition to the first effect, a precipitation of fines needles of niobium reduced the solid solution of niobium concentration in the metal and ultimately in the oxide, which strongly reduces the oxidation rate of the alloy. 2) Regarding the effect of irradiation of the oxide layer on the oxidation rate: defects generated by the nuclear cascades in the oxide increase the oxidation rate of the two materials. For M5, germination of niobium enriched zones in irradiated oxide also causes a decrease of the niobium concentration in solid solution

  5. Effect of fission product interactions on the corrosion and mechanical properties of HTGR alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aronson, S.; Chow, J.G.Y.; Soo, P.; Friedlander, M.

    1978-01-01

    Preliminary experiments have been carried out to determine how fission product interactions may influence the mechanical integrity of reference HTGR structural metals. In this work Type 304 stainless steel, Incoloy 800 and Hastelloy X were heated to 550 to 650 0 C in the presence of CsI. It was found that no corrosion of the alloys occurred unless air or oxygen was also present. A mechanism for the observed behavior is proposed. A description is also given of some long term exposures of HTGR materials to more prototypic, low concentrations of I 2 , Te 2 and CsI in the presence of low partial pressures of O 2 . These samples are scheduled for mechanical bend tests after exposure to determine the degree of embrittlement

  6. Microbial electricity driven anoxic ammonium removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilajeliu-Pons, Anna; Koch, Christin; Balaguer, Maria D; Colprim, Jesús; Harnisch, Falk; Puig, Sebastià

    2018-03-01

    Removal of nitrogen, mainly in form of ammonium (NH 4 + ), in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is a highly energy demanding process, mainly due to aeration. It causes costs of about half a million Euros per year in an average European WWTP. Alternative, more economical technologies for the removal of nitrogen compounds from wastewater are required. This study proves the complete anoxic conversion of ammonium (NH 4 + ) to dinitrogen gas (N 2 ) in continuously operated bioelectrochemical systems at the litre-scale. The removal rate is comparable to conventional WWTPs with 35 ± 10 g N m -3 d -1 with low accumulation of NO 2 - , NO 3 - , N 2 O. In contrast to classical aerobic nitrification, the energy consumption is considerable lower (1.16 ± 0.21 kWh kg -1 N, being more than 35 times less than for the conventional wastewater treatment). Biotic and abiotic control experiments confirmed that the anoxic nitrification was an electrochemical biological process mainly performed by Nitrosomonas with hydroxylamine as the main substrate (mid-point potential, E ox  = +0.67 ± 0.08 V vs. SHE). This article proves the technical feasibility and reduction of costs for ammonium removal from wastewater, investigates the underlying mechanisms and discusses future engineering needs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The effect of carbon content on mechanical properties, failure and corrosion resistance of deposited chromium metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Леонід Кімович Лещинськiй

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that if choosing a metal composition for surfacing rolls and rollers of continuous casting machines, both the carbon impact on the mechanical and functional properties and the critical values of the chromium concentration, which determine the corrosion resistance of the metal with regard to electrochemical corrosion theory, should be considered as well. The paper studied the effect of chromium and carbon steel the X5-X12 type on the structure, technological strength, mechanical properties, fracturing resistance and corrosion resistance of the weld metal. The composition of chromium tool steels (deposited metal (X5-used for the rolls of hot rolling mills and (X12-used for continuous casting machines rollers correspond to these values. The impact of carbon on the properties of the deposited metal containing chromium was considered by comparing the data for both types of the deposited metal. It was found that for both types of the deposited metal (X5 and X12, the limiting value of the carbon content, providing an optimal combination of strength, ductility, failure resistance is the same. If the carbon content is more than the limiting value – (0,25% the technological strength and failure resistance of the deposited metal significantly reduce. With increasing carbon content from 0,18 to 0,25% the martensite structure has a mixed morphology – lath and plate. The strength and toughness of the deposited metal grow. Of particular interest is simultaneous increase in the specific work of failure resulted from crack inhibition at the boundary with far less solid and more ductile ferrite. As for the 5% chromium metal, the X12 type composition with 0,25% C, is borderline. With a further increase in the carbon content of the metal both ductility and failure resistance sharply decrease and with 0,40% C the growth rate of fatigue crack increases by almost 1,5 times

  8. Effect of pulse current parameters on the mechanical and corrosion properties of anodized nanoporous aluminum coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammadi, Iman; Ahmadi, Shahab; Afshar, Abdollah

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the effects of pulse current parameters on corrosion resistance and mechanical properties of anodized coatings were evaluated. Hardness measurements, polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests were employed to investigate the mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of these coatings. Also, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) was used to analyze the surface morphology and microstructure of the coatings. It was found that the properties of anodized coatings were dependent on various parameters, among which, time, temperature and pulse current parameters (current density limit, frequency and duty cycle) were optimized. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) was conducted in order to optimize the results of designed experiments for predicting the hardness of anodic Al_2O_3 coatings. Experimental results showed that the temperature and the interaction of quadratic behavior of minimum current density with frequency and duty cycle were the most important factors influencing the hardness of these coatings. It was indicated that the highest hardness value of 642 HV was attained at the maximum and minimum current densities of 4.4, 1.27 A/dm"2, respectively, a frequency of 82 Hz, procedure time of 27.2 min, duty cycle of 80.2% and the bath temperature of 13.5 °C. In addition, the FE-SEM micrographs showed that the highest density is obtained through the mentioned optimum conditions. Moreover, the electrochemical tests revealed that the highest polarization resistance obtained at optimum conditions was more than 20 times greater than the other samples. - Highlights: • Electrolyte temperature undesirably influences the hardness of anodized coatings. • Maximum hardness of coatings was evaluated by optimization of effective parameters. • The diameter of alumina nanotube considerably affects hardness of anodized coating. • R_P of the sample formed at optimum condition was at least 20 times more than others. • Porosity is the

  9. Effect of pulse current parameters on the mechanical and corrosion properties of anodized nanoporous aluminum coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadi, Iman, E-mail: imanmohammadi68@gmail.com; Ahmadi, Shahab; Afshar, Abdollah

    2016-11-01

    In this study, the effects of pulse current parameters on corrosion resistance and mechanical properties of anodized coatings were evaluated. Hardness measurements, polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests were employed to investigate the mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of these coatings. Also, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) was used to analyze the surface morphology and microstructure of the coatings. It was found that the properties of anodized coatings were dependent on various parameters, among which, time, temperature and pulse current parameters (current density limit, frequency and duty cycle) were optimized. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) was conducted in order to optimize the results of designed experiments for predicting the hardness of anodic Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coatings. Experimental results showed that the temperature and the interaction of quadratic behavior of minimum current density with frequency and duty cycle were the most important factors influencing the hardness of these coatings. It was indicated that the highest hardness value of 642 HV was attained at the maximum and minimum current densities of 4.4, 1.27 A/dm{sup 2}, respectively, a frequency of 82 Hz, procedure time of 27.2 min, duty cycle of 80.2% and the bath temperature of 13.5 °C. In addition, the FE-SEM micrographs showed that the highest density is obtained through the mentioned optimum conditions. Moreover, the electrochemical tests revealed that the highest polarization resistance obtained at optimum conditions was more than 20 times greater than the other samples. - Highlights: • Electrolyte temperature undesirably influences the hardness of anodized coatings. • Maximum hardness of coatings was evaluated by optimization of effective parameters. • The diameter of alumina nanotube considerably affects hardness of anodized coating. • R{sub P} of the sample formed at optimum condition was at least 20 times more than others

  10. Corrosion/94 conference papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    The approximately 500 papers from this conference are divided into the following sections: Rail transit systems--stray current corrosion problems and control; Total quality in the coatings industry; Deterioration mechanisms of alloys at high temperatures--prevention and remediation; Research needs and new developments in oxygen scavengers; Computers in corrosion control--knowledge based system; Corrosion and corrosivity sensors; Corrosion and corrosion control of steel reinforced concrete structures; Microbiologically influenced corrosion; Practical applications in mitigating CO 2 corrosion; Mineral scale deposit control in oilfield-related operations; Corrosion of materials in nuclear systems; Testing nonmetallics for life prediction; Refinery industry corrosion; Underground corrosion control; Mechanisms and applications of deposit and scale control additives; Corrosion in power transmission and distribution systems; Corrosion inhibitor testing and field application in oil and gas systems; Decontamination technology; Ozone in cooling water applications, testing, and mechanisms; Corrosion of water and sewage treatment, collection, and distribution systems; Environmental cracking of materials; Metallurgy of oil and gas field equipment; Corrosion measurement technology; Duplex stainless steels in the chemical process industries; Corrosion in the pulp and paper industry; Advances in cooling water treatment; Marine corrosion; Performance of materials in environments applicable to fossil energy systems; Environmental degradation of and methods of protection for military and aerospace materials; Rail equipment corrosion; Cathodic protection in natural waters; Characterization of air pollution control system environments; and Deposit-related problems in industrial boilers. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  11. Enhanced mechanical properties and increased corrosion resistance of a biodegradable magnesium alloy by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Leon; Koo, Youngmi; Neralla, Sudheer; Sankar, Jagannathan; Yun, Yeoheung

    2016-06-01

    We report the enhanced mechanical properties of AZ31 magnesium alloys by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coating in NaOH, Na 2 SiO 3 , KF and NaH 2 PO 4 ·2H 2 O containing electrolytes. Mechanical properties including wear resistance, surface hardness and elastic modulus were increased for PEO-coated AZ31 Mg alloys (PEO-AZ31). DC polarization in Hank's solution indicating that the corrosion resistance significantly increased for PEO-coating in KF-contained electrolyte. Based on these results, the PEO coating method shows promising potential for use in biodegradable implant applications where tunable corrosion and mechanical properties are needed.

  12. γ-radiation induced corrosion of copper in bentonite-water systems under anaerobic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karin Norrfors, K.; Björkbacka, Åsa; Kessler, Amanda; Wold, Susanna; Jonsson, Mats

    2018-03-01

    In this work we have experimentally studied the impact of bentonite clay on the process of radiation-induced copper corrosion in anoxic water. The motivation for this is to further develop our understanding of radiation-driven processes occurring in deep geological repositories for spent nuclear fuel where copper canisters containing the spent nuclear fuel will be embedded in compacted bentonite. Experiments on radiation-induced corrosion in the presence and absence of bentonite were performed along with experiments elucidating the impact irradiation on the Cu2+ adsorption capacity of bentonite. The experiments presented in this work show that the presence of bentonite clay has no or very little effect on the magnitude of radiation-induced corrosion of copper in anoxic aqueous systems. The absence of a protective effect similar to that observed for radiation-induced dissolution of UO2 is attributed to differences in the corrosion mechanism. This provides further support for the previously proposed mechanism where the hydroxyl radical is the key radiolytic oxidant responsible for the corrosion of copper. The radiation effect on the bentonite sorption capacity of Cu2+ (reduced capacity) is in line with what has previously been reported for other cations. The reduced cation sorption capacity is partly attributed to a loss of Al-OH sites upon irradiation.

  13. Anoxic environments and oil source bed genesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demaison, G J [Chevron Overseas Petroleum Inc., San Francisco, CA; Moore, G T

    1980-01-01

    The anoxic, aquatic, environment is a mass of water so depleted in oxygen that virtually all aerobic biological activity has ceased. Anoxic conditions occur where the demand for oxygen in the water column exceeds the supply. The specific cause for preferential lipid enrichment probably relates to the biochemistry of anaerobic bacterial activity. Recent evidence suggests that ancient organic-rich sediments containing hydrogen-rich kerogens (potential oil source beds) were deposited in similar anoxic environments. We propose the following classification for modern aquatic anoxic settings: (1) Large anoxic lakes - Permanent stratification promotes development of anoxic bottom water, particularly in large, deep lakes, which are not subject to seasonal overturn, e.g., Lake Tanganyika. (2) Anoxic silled basins - Landlocked silled basins with positive water balance tend to become anoxic. Typical are the Baltic and Black Seas. In arid region seas (Red and Mediterranean Seas), evaporation exceeds river inflow, causing negative water balance and well-aerated, nutrient-depleted bottom waters. (3) Anoxic layers caused by upwelling - Develop only when the oxygen supply in deep water cannot match demand by decaying organisms. Examples are the Benguela current and Peru coastal upwelling. (4) Open ocean anoxic layers - Found at intermediate depths in the northeastern Pacific and northern Indian Oceans; due to distance from deep, oxygenated polar water sources. Analogous to world-wide anoxic events at times of global climatic warm-ups and major transgressions, as in late Jurassic and middle Cretaceous time. Petroleum exploration can be greatly assisted by using geochemistry to identify paleo-anoxic events in the stratigraphic record. Recognition of the proposed anoxic models in ancient sedimentary basins should help in regional mapping of oil shales and oil-source beds. 17 figures.

  14. The effect of quench rate on the microstructure, mechanical properties, and corrosion behavior of U-6 Wt Pct Nb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckelmeyer, K.H.; Romiy, A.D.; Weirick, L.J.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of cooling rate on microstructure, mechanical behavior, corrosion resistance, and subsequent age hardenability is discussed. Cooling rates in excess of 20 Ks -1 cause the parent γ-phase to transform martensitically to a niobium supersaturated variant of the α-phase. This phase exhibits low hardness and strength, high ductility, good corrosion resistance, and age hardenability. As cooling rate decreases from 10 Ks -1 to 0.2 Ks -1 , microstructural changes (consistent with spinodal decomposition) occur to an increasing extent. These changes produce increases in hardness and strength and decreases in ductility, corrosion resistance, and age hardenability. At cooling rates less than 0.2 Ks -1 the parent phase undergoes cellular decomposition to a coarse two-phase lamellar microstructure which exhibits intermediate strength and ductility, reduced corrosion resistance, and no age hardenability. An analysis of the cooling rates indicates that fully martensitic microstructures can be obtained in plates as thick as 50 mm

  15. Effects of Ca on microstructure, mechanical and corrosion properties and biocompatibility of Mg-Zn-Ca alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ping; Li, Nian Feng; Lei, Ting; Liu, Lin; Ouyang, Chun

    2013-06-01

    Zn and Ca were selected as alloying elements to develop an Mg-Zn-Ca alloy system for biomedical application due to their good biocompatibility. The effects of Ca on the microstructure, mechanical and corrosion properties as well as the biocompatibility of the as-cast Mg-Zn-Ca alloys were studied. Results indicate that the microstructure of Mg-Zn-Ca alloys typically consists of primary α-Mg matrix and Ca₂Mg₆Zn₃/Mg₂Ca intermetallic phase mainly distributed along grain boundary. The yield strength of Mg-Zn-Ca alloy increased slightly with the increase of Ca content, whilst its tensile strength increased at first and then decreased. Corrosion tests in the simulated body fluid revealed that the addition of Ca is detrimental to corrosion resistance due to the micro-galvanic corrosion acceleration. In vitro hemolysis and cytotoxicity assessment disclose that Mg-5Zn-1.0Ca alloy has suitable biocompatibility.

  16. Effect of Multipass Friction Stir Processing on Mechanical and Corrosion Behavior of 2507 Super Duplex Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, M. K.; Gunasekaran, G.; Rao, A. G.; Kashyap, B. P.; Prabhu, N.

    2017-02-01

    The microstructure, mechanical properties, and corrosion behavior of 2507 super duplex stainless steel after multipass friction stir processing (FSP) were examined. A significant refinement in grain size of both ferrite and austenite was observed in stir zone resulting in improved yield and tensile strength. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and anodic polarization studies in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution showed nobler corrosion characteristics with increasing number of FSP passes. This was evident from the decrease in corrosion current density, decrease in passive current density, and increase in polarization resistance. Also, the decrease in density of defects, based on Mott-Schottky analysis, further confirms the improvement in corrosion resistance of 2507 super duplex stainless steel after multipass FSP.

  17. Strengthening mechanisms and mechanical properties of high interstitial stainless steel for drill collar and its corrosion resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunkyung

    Two types (CN66, CN71) of high interstitial stainless steels (HISSs) were investigated for down-hole application in sour gas well environments. Experiments were designed to identify factors that have a significant effect on mechanical properties. The three factors examined in the study were carbon + nitrogen content (0.66 or 0.71 mass %), cooling rate in quenching (air or water), and heat treatment time (2 or 4 hours). The results showed that the cooling rate, C+N content, and the two-factor interaction of these variables have a significant effect on the mechanical properties of HISSs. Based on the statistical analysis results on mechanical properties, extensive analyses were undertaken to understand the strengthening mechanisms of HISSs. Microstructure analysis revealed that a pearlite phase with a high carbide and/or nitride content is dissolved in the matrix by heat treatment at 1,200 ºC which is considered the dissolution to increase the concentration of interstitial elements in steels. The distribution of elements in HISSs was investigated by quantitative mapping using EPMA, which showed that the high carbon concentration (carbide/cementite) area was decreased by increases in both the cooling rate and C+N content. The ferrite volume fraction of each specimen is increased by an increase in cooling rate, because there is insufficient time to form austenite from retained ferrite. The lattice expansion of HISS was investigated by the calculation of lattice parameters under various conditions, and these investigations confirm the solid solution strengthening effect on HISSs. CN66 with heat treatment at fast cooling has the highest wear resistance; a finding that was consistent with hardening mechanisms that occur due to an increased ferrite volume fraction. In addition, precipitates on the surface and the chemical bonding of chromium were investigated. As the amount of CrN bonding increased, the wear resistance also increased. This study also assessed the

  18. Effect of mechanical pre-loadings on corrosion resistance of chromium-electroplated steel rods in marine environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubina Helbert, Varvara; Dhondt, Matthieu; Homette, Remi; Arbab Chirani, Shabnam; Calloch, Sylvain

    2018-03-01

    Providing high hardness, low friction coefficient, as well as, relatively good corrosion resistance, chromium-plated coatings (∼20 μm) are widely used for steel cylinder rods in marine environment. However, the standardized corrosion test method (ISO 9227, NSS) used to evaluate efficiency of this type of coatings does not take into account in-service mechanical loadings on cylinder rods. Nevertheless, the uniform initial network of microcracks in chromium coating is changing under mechanical loadings. Propagation of these microcracks explains premature corrosion of the steel substrate. The aim of the study was to evaluate relationship between mechanical loadings, propagation of microcracks network and corrosion resistance of chromium coatings. After monotonic pre-loading tests, it was demonstrated by microscopic observations that the microcracks propagation started at stress levels higher than the substrate yield stress (520 MPa). The microcracks become effective, i.e. they have instantly undergone through the whole coating thickness to reach the steel substrate. The density of effective microcracks increases with the total macroscopic level, i.e. the intercrack distance goes from 60 ± 5 μm at 1% of total strain to approximately 27 ± 2 μm at 10%. Electrochemical measurements have shown that the higher the plastic strain level applied during mechanical loading, the more the corrosion potential of the sample decreased until reaching the steel substrate value of approximately ‑0.65 V/SCE after 2 h of immersion. The polarization curves have also highligthed an increase in the corrosion current density with the strain level. Therefore, electrochemical measurements could be used to realize quick and comprehensive assesment of the effect of monotonic pre-loadings on corrosion properties of the chromium coating.

  19. Microstructure, mechanical properties, bio-corrosion properties and antibacterial properties of Ti–Ag sintered alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Mian [Key Lab. for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials, Education Ministry of China, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Zhang, Erlin, E-mail: zhangel@atm.neu.edu.cn [Key Lab. for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials, Education Ministry of China, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Zhang, Lan [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2016-05-01

    In this research, Ag element was selected as an antibacterial agent to develop an antibacterial Ti–Ag alloy by a powder metallurgy. The microstructure, phase constitution, mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and antibacterial properties of the Ti–Ag sintered alloys have been systematically studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), compressive test, electrochemical measurements and antibacterial test. The effects of the Ag powder size and the Ag content on the antibacterial property and mechanical property as well as the anticorrosion property have been investigated. The microstructure results have shown that Ti–Ag phase, residual pure Ag and Ti were the mainly phases in Ti–Ag(S75) sintered alloy while Ti{sub 2}Ag was synthesized in Ti–Ag(S10) sintered alloy. The mechanical test indicated that Ti–Ag sintered alloy showed a much higher hardness and the compressive yield strength than cp-Ti but the mechanical properties were slightly reduced with the increase of Ag content. Electrochemical results showed that Ag powder size had a significant effect on the corrosion resistance of Ti–Ag sintered alloy. Ag content increased the corrosion resistance in a dose dependent way under a homogeneous microstructure. Antibacterial tests have demonstrated that antibacterial Ti–Ag alloy was successfully prepared. It was also shown that the Ag powder particle size and the Ag content influenced the antibacterial activity seriously. The reduction in the Ag powder size was benefit to the improvement in the antibacterial property and the Ag content has to be at least 3 wt.% in order to obtain a strong and stable antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. The bacterial mechanism was thought to be related to the Ti{sub 2}Ag and its distribution. - Highlights: • Ti–Ag alloy with up to 99% antibacterial rate was developed by powder metallurgy. • The effects of the Ag powder size and the Ag content on the

  20. Mechanical Suppression of SCC and Corrosion Fatigue Failures in 300M Steel Landing Gear

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Prevey, Paul; Jayaraman, N; Ontko, Neal; Shepard, Mike; Ware, Robert; Coate, Jack

    2004-01-01

    300M steel is widely used in landing gear because of its ultra high strength with high fracture toughness, but is vulnerable to both corrosion fatigue and stress corrosion cracking, with potentially...

  1. Corrosion and Fatigue of Aluminum Alloys: Chemistry, Micro-Mechanics and Reliability

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wei, Robert

    1998-01-01

    ... No. F49620-96-1-0245 to continue to develop a basic mechanistic understanding of the material degradation processes of localized corrosion and corrosion fatigue crack nucleation and growth in aluminum...

  2. Mechanisms of the multi-secular atmospheric corrosion of ferrous alloys: The case of the Metz cathedral reinforcements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchar, Marie

    2015-01-01

    The study of the mechanisms of the multi-secular atmospheric corrosion of ferrous alloys has various applications, from the preservation and restoration of cultural heritage metals, to the evaluation of their long term behaviour, specifically when they are used for the storage containers surrounding nuclear wastes. The study of the corrosion product layers (CPL) developed during 5 centuries on the Metz cathedral reinforcements brings new results for a better understanding of the complex processes involved in the formation of the atmospheric CPL. The phases and chemical elements constituting the CPL of these reinforcements were characterized at the micrometric scale (μDRX, Raman μ-spectroscopy (μRS), SEM-EDS). Results specifically showed that these CPL differ from other multi-secular systems previously studied by their very high content in ferri-hydrite (5Fe 2 O 3 , 9H 2 O). This very reactive phase is distributed in the whole CPL and mixed at the microscopic scale with goethite (a-FeOOH) and lepidocrocite (g-FeOOH). Diffusion experiments of bromide ions followed by in situ X-ray μ-fluorescence allowed a better understanding of the transport of dissolved species in the porous network of the CPL. Furthermore, a test of the corrosion system behavior in conditions simulating the wetting stage of the RH cycle of atmospheric corrosion, also followed in situ by μRS, highlighted the reduction of ferri-hydrite at the metal/CPL interface. These results allowed to verify for the first time a fundamental hypothesis about the mechanisms of very long term atmospheric corrosion. Finally, re-corrosion experiments of the corrosion system were monitored in a climatic chamber simulating accelerated atmospheric cycles in an 18 O-labelled environment. Then the detection of the 18 O isotope linked to the precipitated phases, by nuclear reaction analysis using a nuclear microprobe, allowed to localise the formation sites of the new corrosion products. All these results improve the

  3. Effects of Heat Input on Microstructure, Corrosion and Mechanical Characteristics of Welded Austenitic and Duplex Stainless Steels: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghusoon Ridha Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of input heat of different welding processes on the microstructure, corrosion, and mechanical characteristics of welded duplex stainless steel (DSS are reviewed. Austenitic stainless steel (ASS is welded using low-heat inputs. However, owing to differences in the physical metallurgy between ASS and DSS, low-heat inputs should be avoided for DSS. This review highlights the differences in solidification mode and transformation characteristics between ASS and DSS with regard to the heat input in welding processes. Specifically, many studies about the effects of heat energy input in welding process on the pitting corrosion, intergranular stress, stresscorrosion cracking, and mechanical properties of weldments of DSS are reviewed.

  4. Enhancement of mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of friction stir welded joint of AA2014 using water cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinhmar, S., E-mail: sinhmarsunil88@gmail.com; Dwivedi, D.K.

    2017-01-27

    An investigation on the microstructure, mechanical properties, and corrosion behavior of friction stir welded joint of AA2014 in natural cooled (NC) and water cooled (WC) conditions have been reported. Optical microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) with Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), Vicker's microhardness, tensile testing, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and electrochemical potentiodynamic polarization corrosion test (Tafel curve) were carried out to characterize the friction stir weld joints in both the cooling conditions. Water cooling resulted in higher strength and microhardness of friction stir weld joint compared to the natural cooling. The width of heat affected zone was reduced by the use of water cooling during friction stir welding (FSW) and minimum hardness zone was shifted towards weld center. The corrosion test was performed in 3.5% NaCl solution. Corrosion resistance of water cooled joint was found higher than natural cooled FSW joint. The precipitation behavior of weld nugget and heat affected zone impacts the corrosion resistance of FSW joint of AA 2014. Hardness, tensile, and corrosion properties of FSW joints produced under NC and WC conditions have been discussed in the light of microstructure.

  5. Enhancement of mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of friction stir welded joint of AA2014 using water cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinhmar, S.; Dwivedi, D.K.

    2017-01-01

    An investigation on the microstructure, mechanical properties, and corrosion behavior of friction stir welded joint of AA2014 in natural cooled (NC) and water cooled (WC) conditions have been reported. Optical microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) with Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), Vicker's microhardness, tensile testing, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and electrochemical potentiodynamic polarization corrosion test (Tafel curve) were carried out to characterize the friction stir weld joints in both the cooling conditions. Water cooling resulted in higher strength and microhardness of friction stir weld joint compared to the natural cooling. The width of heat affected zone was reduced by the use of water cooling during friction stir welding (FSW) and minimum hardness zone was shifted towards weld center. The corrosion test was performed in 3.5% NaCl solution. Corrosion resistance of water cooled joint was found higher than natural cooled FSW joint. The precipitation behavior of weld nugget and heat affected zone impacts the corrosion resistance of FSW joint of AA 2014. Hardness, tensile, and corrosion properties of FSW joints produced under NC and WC conditions have been discussed in the light of microstructure.

  6. Corrosion mechanism and bioactivity of borate glasses analogue to Hench’s bioglass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona A. Ouis

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Bioactive borate glasses (from the system Na2O-CaO-B2O3-P2O5 and corresponding glass-ceramics as a new class of scaffold material were prepared by full replacement of SiO2 with B2O3 in Hench patented bioactive glass. The prepared samples were investigated by differential thermal analysis (DTA, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis. The DTA data were used to find out the proper heat treatment temperatures for preparation of the appropriate glass-ceramics with high crystallinity. The prepared crystalline glass-ceramics derivatives were examined by XRD to identify the crystalline phases that were precipitated during controlled thermal treatment. The FTIR spectroscopy was used to justify the formation of hydroxyapatite as an indication of the bioactivity potential or activity of the studied ternary borate glasses or corresponding glass-ceramics after immersion in aqueous phosphate solution. The corrosion results are interpreted on the basis of suggested recent views on the corrosion mechanism of such modified borate glasses in relation to their composition and constitution.

  7. Enhanced mechanical properties and increased corrosion resistance of a biodegradable magnesium alloy by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Leon; Koo, Youngmi [FIT BEST Laboratory, Engineering Research Center, Department of Chemical, Biological, and Bio Engineering, North Carolina A& T State University, Greensboro, NC 27411 (United States); Neralla, Sudheer [Jet-Hot LLC, Burlington, NC 27215 (United States); Sankar, Jagannathan [FIT BEST Laboratory, Engineering Research Center, Department of Chemical, Biological, and Bio Engineering, North Carolina A& T State University, Greensboro, NC 27411 (United States); Yun, Yeoheung, E-mail: yyun@ncat.edu [FIT BEST Laboratory, Engineering Research Center, Department of Chemical, Biological, and Bio Engineering, North Carolina A& T State University, Greensboro, NC 27411 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) method was developed to control corrosion, porosity, and mechanical property. • Mechanical properties of PEO-coated AZ31 alloys were affected by the different electrolyte. • Mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of PEO-coated AZ31 alloys were compared with uncoated one. - Abstract: We report the enhanced mechanical properties of AZ31 magnesium alloys by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coating in NaOH, Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3}, KF and NaH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}·2H{sub 2}O containing electrolytes. Mechanical properties including wear resistance, surface hardness and elastic modulus were increased for PEO-coated AZ31 Mg alloys (PEO-AZ31). DC polarization in Hank's solution indicating that the corrosion resistance significantly increased for PEO-coating in KF-contained electrolyte. Based on these results, the PEO coating method shows promising potential for use in biodegradable implant applications where tunable corrosion and mechanical properties are needed.

  8. Stress corrosion mechanisms of alloy-600 polycrystals and monocrystals in primary water: effect of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foct, F.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the mechanisms involved in Alloy 600 primary water stress corrosion cracking. Therefore, this work is mainly focussed on the two following points. The first one is to understand the influence of hydrogen on SCC of industrial Alloy 600 and the second one is to study the crack initiation and propagation on polycrystals and single crystals. A cathodic potential applied during slow strain rate tests does not affect crack initiation but increases the slow crack growth rate by a factor 2 to 5. Cathodic polarisation, cold work and 25 cm 3 STP/kg hydrogen content increase the slow CGR so that the K ISCC (and therefore fast CGR) is reached. The influence of hydrogenated primary water has been studied for the first time on Alloy 600 single crystals. Cracks cannot initiate on tensile specimens but they can propagate on pre-cracked specimens. Transgranular cracks present a precise crystallographic aspect which is similar to that of 316 alloy in MgCl 2 solutions. Moreover, the following results improve the description of the cracking conditions. Firstly, the higher the hydrogen partial pressure, the lower the Alloy 600 passivation current transients. Since this result is not correlated with the effect of hydrogen on SCC, cracking is not caused by a direct effect of dissolved hydrogen on dissolution. Secondly, hydrogen embrittlement of Alloy 600 disappears at temperatures above 200 deg.C. Thirdly, grain boundary sliding (GBS) does not directly act on SCC but shows the mechanical weakness of grain boundaries. Regarding the proposed models for Alloy 600 SCC, it is possible to draw the following conclusions. Internal oxidation or absorbed hydrogen effects are the most probable mechanisms for initiation. Dissolution, internal oxidation and global hydrogen embrittlement models cannot explain crack propagation. On the other hand, the Corrosion Enhanced Plasticity Model gives a good description of the SCC propagation. (author)

  9. Corrosion mechanisms and behaviour of actinides in the 'R7T7' nuclear glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillet, Sylvie

    1987-01-01

    This research thesis reports the study of aqueous corrosion of the R7T7 nuclear glass and of the identified corrosion mechanisms in conditions of static lixiviation which are close to that expected during long term storage in a geological environment. More specifically, this work aims at assessing the durability of this glass which has been selected for the vitrification of solutions from pressurized water reactors. The main glass alteration phenomena have been studied. The first part addresses the study of the alteration of the glassy matrix, and aims at identifying corrosion mechanisms in various lixiviation conditions (high temperature, saturation). The second part addresses the action of different materials present in the environment on the glassy matrix by simulating as well as possible a storage case. Based on the obtained results, a mathematical model is developed to predict the glass behaviour on the long term. Finally, the glass confinement power with respect to actinides is studied [fr

  10. The effect of Sn on autoclave corrosion performance and corrosion mechanisms in Zr–Sn–Nb alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, J.; Frankel, P.; Polatidis, E.; Blat, M.; Ambard, A.; Comstock, R.J.; Hallstadius, L.; Hudson, D.; Smith, G.D.W.; Grovenor, C.R.M.; Klaus, M.; Cottis, R.A.; Lyon, S.; Preuss, M.

    2013-01-01

    The desire to improve the corrosion resistance of Zr cladding material for high burn-up has resulted in a general trend among fuel manufacturers to develop alloys with reduced levels of Sn. While commonly accepted, the reason for the improved corrosion performance observed for low-tin zirconium alloys in high-temperature aqueous environments remains unclear. High-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction was used to characterize the oxides formed by autoclave exposure on Zr–Sn–Nb alloys with tin concentration ranging from 0.01 to 0.92 wt.%. The alloys studied included the commercial alloy ZIRLO® (ZIRLO® is a registered trademark of Westinghouse Electric Company LLC in the USA and may be registered in other countries throughout the world. All rights reserved. Unauthorized use is strictly prohibited.) and two variants of ZIRLO with significantly lower tin levels, referred to here as A-0.6Sn and A-0.0Sn. The nature of the oxide grown on tube samples from each alloy was investigated via cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy. Atom probe analysis of ZIRLO demonstrated that the tin present in the alloy passes into the oxide as it forms, with no significant difference in the Sn/Zr ratio between the two. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements on the oxides formed on each alloy revealed that the monoclinic and tetragonal oxide phases display highly compressive in-plane residual stresses with the magnitudes dependent on the phase and alloy. The amount of tetragonal phase present and, more importantly, the level of tetragonal-to-monoclinic phase transformation both decrease with decreasing tin levels, suggesting that tin is a tetragonal oxide phase stabilizing element. It is proposed that in Zr–Nb–Sn alloys with low Sn, the tetragonal phase is mainly stabilized by very small grain size and therefore remains stable throughout the corrosion process. In contrast, alloys with higher tin levels can in addition grow larger, stress stabilized, tetragonal grains that

  11. Long term corrosion of iron in concrete and in atmospheric conditions: a contribution of archaeological analogues to mechanism comprehension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burger, E.; Demoulin, A.; Dillman, Ph.; Neff, D.; Berge, P.; Burger, E.; Perrin, St.; L'hostis, V.; Dillman, Ph.; Millard, A.

    2009-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The prediction of iron (or low alloy steel) corrosion on very long term period is necessary in two different purposes: (i) the preservation and conservation of cultural heritage and (ii) the French storage and repository concept for the radioactive wastes. In order to determine the evolution of corrosion processes for very long period, mechanistic models have been developed. In these models that are based on a phenomenological approach to evaluate the average corrosion rates, two different environments are considered: concrete (steel reinforcements) and atmospheric. The study of archaeological analogues is a very pertinent tool for the validation of these models. First, physico-chemical analysis on old corrosion layers lead to a precise localisation and identification of the phases present in the corrosion system. Moreover, experimental reinduced corrosions of ancient samples under controlled parameters (temperature, relative humidity) bring new insight on the mechanisms involved. In particular, one crucial question related to the wet-dry cycle is the localisation of oxygen reduction sites in the rust layer. For this purpose, specific experiments have been set up to re-corrode the ancient samples in marked medium (using 18 O 2 ). Samples were exposed to cycling between high and low relative humidity, produced by saline saturated solutions. Then cross-sections of samples obtained were investigated by nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) 18 O(p,α) 15 N on the Pierre Sue Laboratory nuclear microprobe. In this presentation the 18 O distribution profiles are discussed and interpreted in order to bring new insight on corrosion mechanisms. A comparative interpretation is made for each medium (concrete and atmosphere)

  12. Characterization of the corrosion protection mechanism of cerium-based conversion coatings on high strength aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinc, William Ross

    The aim of the work presented in this dissertation is to investigate the corrosion protection mechanism of cerium-based conversion coatings (CeCCs) used in the corrosion protection of high strength aluminum alloys. The corrosion resistance of CeCCs involves two general mechanisms; barrier and active. The barrier protection mechanism was influenced by processing parameters, specifically surface preparation, post-treatment, and the use of gelatin. Post-treatment and the addition of gelatin to the coating solution resulted in fewer cracks and transformation of the coating to CePO4, which increased the corrosion resistance by improving the barrier aspect of CeCCs. CeCCs were found to best act as barriers when crack size was limited and CePO4 was present in the coating. CeCCs were found to protect areas of the substrate that were exposed in the coating, indicating that the coatings were more than simple barriers. CeCCs contained large cracks, underneath which subsurface crevices were connected to the surface by the cracks. Despite the observation that no cerium was present in crevices, coatings with crevices exhibited significant corrosion protection. The impedance of post-treated coatings with crevices increased during salt spray exposure. The increase in impedance was associated with the formation of protective oxides / hydroxides; however, crevice-free coatings also exhibited active protection leading to the conclusion that the formation of interfacial layers between the CeCC and the substrate also contributed to the active protection. Based on the overall results of the study, the optimal corrosion protection of CeCCs occurred when processing conditions produced coatings with morphologies and compositions that facilitated both the barrier and active protection mechanisms.

  13. Microstructures, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of the Zr−xTi (Ag) alloys for dental implant application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, W.F., E-mail: cuiwf@atm.neu.edu.cn; Liu, N.; Qin, G.W.

    2016-06-15

    The Zr−xTi (Ag) alloys were designed for the application of dental implants. The microstructures of Zr−20Ti and Zr−40Ti alloy were observed using optical microscope and transmission electronic microscope. The hardness and compressive tests were performed to evaluate the mechanical properties of the Zr−xTi alloys. The electrochemical behavior of the Zr−xTi alloys with and without 6% Ag was investigated in the acidified artificial saliva containing 0.1% NaF (pH = 4). For comparison, the electrochemical behavior of cp Ti was examined in the same condition. The results show that the quenched Zr−20Ti and Zr−40Ti alloy exhibit acicular martensite microstructures containing twin substructure. They display good mechanical properties with the hardness of ∼330HV, the yield strength of ∼1000 MPa and the strain to fracture of ∼25% at room temperature. Adding 6% Ag to Zr−20Ti alloy enhances the passivity breakdown potential and the self-corrosion potential, but hardly affects the corrosion current density and the impedance modulus. 6% Ag in Zr−40Ti alloy distinctly increases pitting corrosion resistance, which is attributed the formation of thick, dense and stable passive film under the joint action of titanium and silver. In comparison with cp Ti, Zr−40Ti−6Ag alloy possesses the same good corrosion resistance in the rigorous oral environment as well as the superior mechanical properties. - Highlights: • The quenched Zr20Ti and Zr40Ti obtain acicular martensite microstructure. • Zr20Ti and Zr40Ti possess high hardness, strength and strain to fracture. • Increasing Ti content decreases corrosion current density. • Adding Ag enhances passivation breakdown potentials of Zr20Ti and Zr40Ti. • Zr40Ti6Ag has optimum mechanical properties and pitting corrosion resistance.

  14. Nickel-Titanium Alloys: Corrosion "Proof" Alloys for Space Bearing, Components and Mechanism Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    DellaCorte, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    An intermetallic nickel-titanium alloy, 60NiTi (60 wt% Ni, 40 wt% Ti), is shown to be a promising candidate tribological material for space mechanisms. 60NiTi offers a broad combination of physical properties that make it unique among bearing materials. 60NiTi is hard, electrically conductive, highly corrosion resistant, readily machined prior to final heat treatment, and is non-magnetic. Despite its high Ti content, 60NiTi is non-galling even under dry sliding. No other bearing alloy, metallic or ceramic, encompasses all of these attributes. Since 60NiTi contains such a high proportion of Ti and possesses many metallic properties, it was expected to exhibit poor tribological performance typical of Ti alloys, namely galling type behavior and rapid lubricant degradation. In this poster-paper, the oil-lubricated behavior of 60NiTi is presented.

  15. A coupled carbonation-rust formation mechanical damage model for steel corrosion in reinforced concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Huyen; Bary, B.; L'Hostis, Valerie; DeLarrard, T.

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims at presenting a strategy to simulate the corrosion of steel reinforcement due to carbonation of concrete in atmospheric environment. We propose a model coupling drying, carbonation, diffusion of oxygen, formation of rust and mechanics to describe these phenomena. The rust layer is assumed to be composed of two sub-layers with different elastic modulus. An unstable layer with a low modulus (from 0.1 to 5 GPa) is located next to the transformed medium, and another more stable one with a higher modulus (from 100 to 150 GPa) at the interface with steel reinforcement. This model is applied to a numerical meso-structure composed of 4 phases: mortar matrix, randomly distributed aggregates, steel rebar and rust layers to underline the effect of aggregates on damage initiation and corresponding crack pattern of concrete cover. (authors)

  16. Mechanical and corrosion resistance of a new nanostructured Ti-Zr-Ta-Nb alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raducanu, D; Vasilescu, E; Cojocaru, V D; Cinca, I; Drob, P; Vasilescu, C; Drob, S I

    2011-10-01

    In this work, a multi-elementary Ti-10Zr-5Nb-5Ta alloy, with non-toxic alloying elements, was used to develop an accumulative roll bonding, ARB-type procedure in order to improve its structural and mechanical properties. The alloy was obtained by cold crucible semi-levitation melting technique and then was ARB deformed following a special route. After three ARB cycles, the total deformation degree per layer is about 86%; the calculated medium layer thickness is about 13 μm. The ARB processed alloy has a low Young's modulus of 46 GPa, a value very close to the value of the natural cortical bone (about 20 GPa). Data concerning ultimate tensile strength obtained for ARB processed alloy is rather high, suitable to be used as a material for bone substitute. Hardness of the ARB processed alloy is higher than that of the as-cast alloy, ensuring a better behaviour as a implant material. The tensile curve for the as-cast alloy shows an elastoplastic behaviour with a quite linear elastic behaviour and the tensile curve for the ARB processed alloy is quite similar with a strain-hardening elastoplastic body. Corrosion behaviour of the studied alloy revealed the improvement of the main electrochemical parameters, as a result of the positive influence of ARB processing. Lower corrosion and ion release rates for the ARB processed alloy than for the as-cast alloy, due to the favourable effect of ARB thermo-mechanical processing were obtained. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparative Studies on Microstructure, Mechanical and Pitting Corrosion of Post Weld Heat Treated IN718 Superalloy GTA and EB Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilkush; Mohammed, Raffi; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.; Srinivasa Rao, K.

    2018-03-01

    In the present study, an attempt has been made to weld Inconel 718 nickel-base superalloy (IN718 alloy) using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and electron beam welding (EBW) processes. Both the weldments were subjected to post-weld heat treatment condition as follows -980°C / 20 min followed by direct aging condition (DA) as 720°C/8 h/FC followed by 620°C/8 h/AC. The GTA and EB welds of IN718 alloy were compared in two conditions as-received and 980STA conditions. Welds were characterized to observe mechanical properties, pitting corrosion resistance by correlating with observed microstructures. The rate of higher cooling ranges, the fusion zone of EBW exhibited discrete and relative finer lave phases whereas the higher niobium existed laves with coarser structure were observed in GTAW. The significant dissolution of laves were observed at 980STA of EBW. Due to these effects, the EBW of IN718 alloy showed the higher mechanical properties than GTAW. The electrochemical potentiostatic etch test was carried out in 3.5wt% sodium chloride (NaCl) solution to study the pitting corrosion behaviour of the welds. Results of the present investigation established that mechanical properties and pitting corrosion behaviour are significantly better in post weld heat treated condition. The comparative studies showed that the better combination of mechanical properties and pitting corrosion resistance were obtained in 980STA condition of EBW than GTAW.

  18. Studies on microstructure, mechanical and pitting corrosion behaviour of similar and dissimilar stainless steel gas tungsten arc welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Raffi; Dilkush; Srinivasa Rao, K.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2018-03-01

    In the present study, an attempt has been made to weld dissimilar alloys of 5mm thick plates i.e., austenitic stainless steel (316L) and duplex stainless steel (2205) and compared with that of similar welds. Welds are made with conventional gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process with two different filler wires namely i.e., 309L and 2209. Welds were characterized using optical microscopy to observe the microstructural changes and correlate with mechanical properties using hardness, tensile and impact testing. Potentio-dynamic polarization studies were carried out to observe the pitting corrosion behaviour in different regions of the welds. Results of the present study established that change in filler wire composition resulted in microstructural variation in all the welds with different morphology of ferrite and austenite. Welds made with 2209 filler showed plate like widmanstatten austenite (WA) nucleated at grain boundaries. Compared to similar stainless steel welds inferior mechanical properties was observed in dissimilar stainless steel welds. Pitting corrosion resistance is observed to be low for dissimilar stainless steel welds when compared to similar stainless steel welds. Overall study showed that similar duplex stainless steel welds having favorable microstructure and resulted in better mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. Relatively dissimilar stainless steel welds made with 309L filler obtained optimum combination of mechanical properties and pitting corrosion resistance when compared to 2209 filler and is recommended for industrial practice.

  19. Corrosion mechanism of Z3 CN18.10 stainless steel in the presence of nitric acid condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balbaud, Fanny

    1998-01-01

    In installations handling concentrated boiling nitric acid, a severe intergranular corrosion can sometimes occur in condensation zones constituted of non-sensitized Z3 CN 18.10 stainless steel. Corrosion tests in reactors and in a specific loop, CIRCE, allowed to specify the conditions of occurrence of this type of corrosion and showed the similitude with the corrosion in non-renewed liquid nitric acid: the specific parameters linked to the condensate phase are the high ratio metallic surface area to volume of condensate and the low renewing rate which induce a concentration of oxidation products of the metal and of reduction products of nitric acid. The initiation of the intergranular corrosion is attributed to the increase in the reduction rate of nitric acid by an autocatalytic mechanism which was demonstrated by electrochemical measurements on platinum and on stainless steel. The reduction mechanism involves a charge transfer step where nitrous acid, the electro-active species, is reduced into nitrogen monoxide and a chemical regeneration reaction of nitrous acid. The thermodynamic study led to a representation of the chemical and electrochemical properties of nitric acid. This study allowed also to determine the Gibbs free energy of formation of nitrous acid in solution in concentrated nitric acid at 100 deg. C. The diagram, constructed in coordinates log(P O 2 ) / [-log(P HNO 3 )] or E eXperimental / [-log(P HNO 3 )], shows that the final reduction product of nitric acid depends on the concentration of nitric acid: at 100 deg. C, NO is obtained for concentrations lower than 8 mol.L -1 and NO 2 is obtained for higher concentrations. All these results allowed to propose a corrosion mechanism of Z3 CN 18.10 stainless steel in the presence of nitric acid condensates. [fr

  20. Comprehension and modelling of chromia-forming alloys corrosion mechanisms in nuclear glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmucker, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear wastes management consists in the confinement of the radioactive wastes in a glass matrix. This is made by inductive melting in a hot crucible at an operating temperature around 1150 C. These crucibles are constituted of nickel based superalloys with high chromium content. They are submitted to a harsh corrosion by the molten glass, eventually leading to their replacement. The protection of the crucible against corrosion is best provided by the establishment of a protective chromium oxide layer at the surface of the alloy. A binary chromia-forming alloy (Ni-30Cr) is studied in this work. Three different binary and ternary glass compositions are chosen in order to understand the influence of the glass basicity and glass viscosity on the corrosion kinetics. Besides, the de-correlation of the formation and dissolution kinetics of the oxide layer allows the modelling of the overall oxide growth in the molten glass. For that purpose, the oxide formation kinetics in molten glass media is assimilated to the oxidation kinetics of the alloy in gaseous media with oxygen partial pressure that are representative of the redox properties of the glasses. Studies of the oxidation kinetics and of the diffusion mechanisms have shown that the oxidation kinetics is independent on the oxygen pressure in the range of 10"-"1"3 up to 10"-"3 atm O_2 at 1150 C. The present work has shown that the dissolution kinetics of the oxide layer is governed by the diffusion of Cr(III) in the glass melt. This dissolution kinetics has been evaluated from the diffusion coefficient and the solubility limit of Cr(III) in the glass. Finally, the overall growth kinetics of the Cr_2O_3 layer in the glass has been successfully modelled for each glass, thanks to the knowledge of (i) the solubility limit of Cr(III), (ii) its diffusion coefficient in the glasses and (iii) the oxidation kinetics of the alloy. The presented model also allows quantifying the influence of each of these parameters on the

  1. Stress Corrosion Cracking of alloy 600 in high temperature water: a study of mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boursier, J.M.; Bouvier, O. de; Gras, J.M.; Noel, D.; Vaillant, F.; Rios, R.

    1992-12-01

    Investigations of the stress corrosion cracking behaviour of Alloy 600 tubing in high temperature water were performed in order to get a precise knowledge of the different stages of the cracking and their dependence on various parameters. The compatibility of the results with the main mechanisms to be considered was examined. Results showed three stages in the cracking: a true incubation time, a slow-rate propagation period followed by a rapid-propagation stage. Tests separating stress and strain rate contributions show that the strain rate is the main parameter which controls the crack propagation. The hydrogen overpressure was found to increase the crack growth rate up to 1-4 bar, but a strong decrease is observed from 4 to 20 bar. Analysis of the hydrogen ingress in the metal showed that it is neither correlated to the hydrogen overpressure nor to the severity of cracking; so cracking resulting from an hydrogen-model is unlikely. No detrimental effect of oxygen (4 bar) was noticed both in the mill-annealed and the sensitized conditions. Finally, none of the classical mechanisms, neither hydrogen-assisted cracking nor slip-step dissolution, can correctly describe the observed behaviour. Some fractographic examinations, and an influence of primary water on the creep rate of Alloy 600, lead to consider that other recent mechanisms, involving an interaction between dissolution and plasticity, have to be considered

  2. Physical-chemical model for the mechanism of glass corrosion with particular consideration of simulated radioactive waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grambow, B.

    1985-01-01

    A physical-chemical model for the mechanism of glass corrosion is described. This model can be used for predicting, interpreting, and extrapolating experimental results. In static leaching tests the rate of corrosion generally decreases with time. Some authors assume that the surface layer, which grows during the course of the reaction, protects the underlying glass from further attack by the aqueous phase. Other authors assume that the saturation effects in solution are responsible for reducing the rate of the reaction. It is demonstrated within the scope of this work that examples can be found for both concepts; however, transport processes in the surface layer and/or in solution can be excluded as rate-determining processes within a majority of the examined cases. The location of the corrosion reaction is the boundary surface between the surface layer and the not yet attacked glass (transition zone)

  3. Analysis of mechanisms induced by sliding and corrosion: dedicated apparatus for PWR environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vernot, JPh

    2004-01-01

    In pressurized water reactors (PWR), some components are submitted to relative motions due to necessary operational processes (localisation and positioning adjustment) or by not wished effects (flow induced vibration). Thus, components and associated supports are typically excited by a large range of kinematics so than complex combinations of wear can occur. Those excitations can lead to sliding, fretting, impact, etc. Furthermore, typical environment in PWR coupling of temperature (320 deg. C), pressure (154 bars) and chemistry solution (deaerated, low conductivity water) involve specific corrosion processes. Apparently, research performed to date did not deal with all the specific parameters involved at PWR conditions. For this purpose, a specific apparatus has been developed in Framatome Technical Center for a better understanding of this complex degradation mechanism where mechanical and corrosion effects are occurring at the same time. Thanks to electromagnets excitation, mechanical investigations can be proposed with the following combined contact type: pure impact, pure sliding and impact plus sliding for several kinds of sample as rod in a ring, rod against a guide. Motion can be induced on a local area or for the total length (orbital excitation). The relative displacement and the contact force are acquired continuously and permit to establish normal and tangential forces, angular position, sliding distance. On the other hand, electrochemistry measurements have been adapted to the specific apparatus and work in the high temperature water environment. The standard mounting with three electrodes has been qualified so that it is possible to adjust or measure current and potential. All the system is computer controlled and with the present apparatus relationship between mechanical parameters and re-passivation can be studied for specific environments, materials and solicitations. In a first step, potential dynamic polarization curves have been established for

  4. Mechanical, tribological and corrosion properties of CrBN films deposited by combined direct current and radio frequency magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahodova, Vera; Ding, Xing-zhao; Seng, Debbie H.L.; Gulbinski, W.; Louda, P.

    2013-01-01

    Cr–B–N films were deposited on stainless steel substrates by a combined direct current and radio frequency (RF) reactive unbalanced magnetron sputtering process using two elemental Cr and one compound BN targets. Boron content in the as-deposited films was qualitatively analyzed by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy. Films' microstructure, mechanical and tribological properties were characterized by X-ray diffraction, nanoindentation and pin-on-disk tribometer experiments. Corrosion behavior of the Cr–B–N films was evaluated by electrochemical potentiodynamic polarization method in a 3 wt.% NaCl solution. All the films were crystallized into a NaCl-type cubic structure. At lower RF power applied on the BN target (≤ 600 W), films are relatively randomly oriented, and films' crystallinity increased with increasing RF power. With increasing RF power further (≥ 800 W), films became (200) preferentially oriented, and films' crystallinity decreased gradually. With incorporation of a small amount of boron atoms into the CrN films, hardness, wear- and corrosion-resistance were all improved evidently. The best wear and corrosion resistance was obtained for the film deposited with 600 W RF power applied on the BN target. - Highlights: • CrBN films deposited by direct current and radio frequency magnetron sputtering. • CrBN exhibited higher hardness, wear- and corrosion-resistance than pure CrN. • The best wear- and corrosion-resistant film was deposited with 600 W RF power

  5. Corrosion Inhibiting Mechanism of Nitrite Ion on the Passivation of Carbon Steel and Ductile Cast Iron for Nuclear Power Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. T. Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available While NaNO2 addition can greatly inhibit the corrosion of carbon steel and ductile cast iron, in order to improve the similar corrosion resistance, ca. 100 times more NaNO2 addition is needed for ductile cast iron compared to carbon steel. A corrosion and inhibition mechanism is proposed whereby NO2- ion is added to oxidize. The NO2- ion can be reduced to nitrogen compounds and these compounds may be absorbed on the surface of graphite. Therefore, since nitrite ion needs to oxidize the surface of matrix and needs to passivate the galvanic corroded area and since it is absorbed on the surface of graphite, a greater amount of corrosion inhibitor needs to be added to ductile cast iron compared to carbon steel. The passive film of carbon steel and ductile cast iron, formed by NaNO2 addition showed N-type semiconductive properties and its resistance, is increased; the passive current density is thus decreased and the corrosion rate is then lowered. In addition, the film is mainly composed of iron oxide due to the oxidation by NO2- ion; however, regardless of the alloys, nitrogen compounds (not nitrite were detected at the outermost surface but were not incorporated in the inner oxide.

  6. Anti-corrosion mechanism of epoxy-resin and different content Fe2O3 coatings on magnesium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Tao; Kong, Fan-mei; Bai, Rui-qin; Zhang, Ru-liang

    2016-12-01

    In this study, anti-corrosion coatings were prepared and coated successfully on magnesium alloy substrates by mixing nanopowders, solvent, curing agent with epoxy resin. The effect of the amount of iron trioxide (Fe2O3) on the adhesion strength and corrosion resistance on magnesium alloy was investigated with standard protocols, and electrochemical measurements were also made in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solutions. The surface morphology and corrosion mechanism after corrosion tests was characterized using FESEM analysis. Nanoparticles in matrix acted as filler, and interstitial cross-linked spaces and other coating artifacts regions (micro cracks and voids) would all affect the anti-corrosion properties of coating. The results showed the proper powder content not only provided adhesion strength to these coatings but also improved obviously their anticorrosion. Hydrogen bound to the amine nitrogen (1N) could take part in the curing process rather than hydrogen of the amide site due to the smaller Δ G and the more stable configuration.

  7. Study on the Effects of Corrosion Inhibitor According to the Functional Groups for Cu Chemical Mechanical Polishing in Neutral Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Won; Kim, Jae Jeong [Institute of Chemical Process, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    As the aluminum (Al) metallization process was replaced with copper (Cu), the damascene process was introduced, which required the planarization step to eliminate over-deposited Cu with Chemical Mechanical Polishing (CMP) process. In this study, the verification of the corrosion inhibitors, one of the Cu CMP slurry components, was conducted to find out the tendency regarding the carboxyl and amino functional group in neutral environment. Through the results of etch rate, removal rate, and chemical ability of corrosion inhibitors based on 1H-1,2,4-triazole as the base corrosion inhibitor, while the amine functional group presents high Cu etching ability, carboxyl functional group shows lower Cu etching ability than base-corrosion inhibitor which means that it increases passivation effect by making strong passivation layer. It implies that the corrosion inhibitor with amine functional group was proper to apply for 1st Cu CMP slurry owing to the high etch rate and with carboxyl functional group was favorable for the 2nd Cu CMP slurry due to the high Cu removal rate/dissolution rate ratio.

  8. Effect of Precipitate State on Mechanical Properties, Corrosion Behavior, and Microstructures of Al-Zn-Mg-Cu Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xiaoyan; Li, Yao; Xu, Guofu; Huang, Jiwu; Yin, Zhimin

    2018-03-01

    The mechanical properties, corrosion behavior and microstructures of the Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy under various ageing treatments were investigated comparatively. The results show that the tensile strength and corrosion resistance are strongly affected by the precipitate state. Massive fine intragranular precipitates contribute to high strength. Discontinuous coarse grain boundary precipitates containing high Cu content, as well as the narrow precipitate free zone, result in low corrosion susceptibility. After the non-isothermal ageing (NIA) treatment, the tensile strength of 577 MPa is equivalent to that of 579 MPa for the T6 temper. Meanwhile, the stress corrosion susceptibility r tf and the maximum corrosion depth are 97.8% and 23.5 μm, which are comparable to those of 92.8% and 26.7 μm for the T73 temper. Moreover, the total ageing time of the NIA treatment is only 7.25 h, which is much less than that of 48.67 h for the retrogression and re-ageing condition.

  9. Effect of Nb on the Microstructure, Mechanical Properties, Corrosion Behavior, and Cytotoxicity of Ti-Nb Alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Mi-Kyung; Kim, Jai-Youl; Hwang, Moon-Jin; Song, Ho-Jun; Park, Yeong-Joon

    2015-09-09

    In this paper, the effects of Nb addition (5-20 wt %) on the microstructure, mechanical properties, corrosion behavior, and cytotoxicity of Ti-Nb alloys were investigated with the aim of understanding the relationship between phase/microstructure and various properties of Ti-xNb alloys. Phase/microstructure was analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), SEM, and TEM. The results indicated that the Ti-xNb alloys (x = 10, 15, and 20 wt %) were mainly composed of α + β phases with precipitation of the isothermal ω phase. The volume percentage of the ω phase increased with increasing Nb content. We also investigated the effects of the alloying element Nb on the mechanical properties (including Vickers hardness and elastic modulus), oxidation protection ability, and corrosion behavior of Ti-xNb binary alloys. The mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of Ti-xNb alloys were found to be sensitive to Nb content. These experimental results indicated that the addition of Nb contributed to the hardening of cp-Ti and to the improvement of its oxidation resistance. Electrochemical experiments showed that the Ti-xNb alloys exhibited superior corrosion resistance to that of cp-Ti. The cytotoxicities of the Ti-xNb alloys were similar to that of pure titanium.

  10. Corrosion-electrochemical and mechanical properties of aluminium-berylium alloys alloyed by rare-earth metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safarov, A.M.; Odinaev, Kh.E.; Shukroev, M.Sh.; Saidov, R.Kh.

    1997-01-01

    In order to study influence of rare earth metals on corrosion-electrochemical and mechanical properties of aluminium-berylium alloys the alloys contain 1 mass % beryllium and different amount of rare earth metals were obtained.-electrochemical and mechanical properties of aluminium-berylium alloys. The electrochemical characteristics of obtained alloys, including stationary potential, potentials of passivation beginning and full passivation, potentials of pitting formation and re passivation were defined.

  11. Improvement of mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of biodegradable Mg-Nd-Zn-Zr alloys by double extrusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiaobo, E-mail: xbxbzhang2003@163.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing Institute of Technology, Nanjing, 211167 (China); Wang, Zhangzhong [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing Institute of Technology, Nanjing, 211167 (China); Yuan, Guangyin [National Engineering Research Center of Light Alloy Net Forming, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, 200240 (China); Xue, Yajun [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing Institute of Technology, Nanjing, 211167 (China)

    2012-08-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microstructure of Mg-Nd-Zn-Zr alloys was refined and homogenized by double extrusion process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mechanical properties of the alloys were significantly enhanced by double extrusion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The biocorrosion resistance of the alloys was improved by double extrusion. - Abstract: Mg-Nd-Zn-Zr alloy is a novel and promising biodegradable magnesium alloy due to good biocompatibility, desired uniform corrosion mode and outstanding corrosion resistance in simulated body fluid (SBF). However, the corrosion resistance and mechanical properties should be improved to meet the requirement of the biodegradable implants, such as plates, screws and cardiovascular stents. In the present study, double extrusion process was adopted to refine microstructure and improve mechanical properties of Mg-2.25Nd-0.11Zn-0.43Zr and Mg-2.70Nd-0.20Zn-0.41Zr alloys. The corrosion resistance of the alloys after double extrusion was also studied. The results show that the microstructure of the alloys under double extrusion becomes much finer and more homogeneous than those under once extrusion. The yield strength, ultimate tensile strength and elongation of the alloys under double extrusion are over 270 MPa, 300 MPa and 32%, respectively, indicating that outstanding mechanical properties of Mg-Nd-Zn-Zr alloy can be obtained by double extrusion. The results of immersion experiment and electrochemical measurements in SBF show that the corrosion resistance of Alloy 1 and Alloy 2 under double extrusion was increased by 7% and 8% respectively compared with those under just once extrusion.

  12. Improvement of mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of biodegradable Mg–Nd–Zn–Zr alloys by double extrusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xiaobo; Wang, Zhangzhong; Yuan, Guangyin; Xue, Yajun

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Microstructure of Mg–Nd–Zn–Zr alloys was refined and homogenized by double extrusion process. ► The mechanical properties of the alloys were significantly enhanced by double extrusion. ► The biocorrosion resistance of the alloys was improved by double extrusion. - Abstract: Mg–Nd–Zn–Zr alloy is a novel and promising biodegradable magnesium alloy due to good biocompatibility, desired uniform corrosion mode and outstanding corrosion resistance in simulated body fluid (SBF). However, the corrosion resistance and mechanical properties should be improved to meet the requirement of the biodegradable implants, such as plates, screws and cardiovascular stents. In the present study, double extrusion process was adopted to refine microstructure and improve mechanical properties of Mg–2.25Nd–0.11Zn–0.43Zr and Mg–2.70Nd–0.20Zn–0.41Zr alloys. The corrosion resistance of the alloys after double extrusion was also studied. The results show that the microstructure of the alloys under double extrusion becomes much finer and more homogeneous than those under once extrusion. The yield strength, ultimate tensile strength and elongation of the alloys under double extrusion are over 270 MPa, 300 MPa and 32%, respectively, indicating that outstanding mechanical properties of Mg–Nd–Zn–Zr alloy can be obtained by double extrusion. The results of immersion experiment and electrochemical measurements in SBF show that the corrosion resistance of Alloy 1 and Alloy 2 under double extrusion was increased by 7% and 8% respectively compared with those under just once extrusion.

  13. Mechanical, Corrosion and Biological Properties of Room-Temperature Sputtered Aluminum Nitride Films with Dissimilar Nanostructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Besleaga

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum Nitride (AlN has been long time being regarded as highly interesting material for developing sensing applications (including biosensors and implantable sensors. AlN, due to its appealing electronic properties, is envisaged lately to serve as a multi-functional biosensing platform. Although generally exploited for its intrinsic piezoelectricity, its surface morphology and mechanical performance (elastic modulus, hardness, wear, scratch and tensile resistance to delamination, adherence to the substrate, corrosion resistance and cytocompatibility are also essential features for high performance sustainable biosensor devices. However, information about AlN suitability for such applications is rather scarce or at best scattered and incomplete. Here, we aim to deliver a comprehensive evaluation of the morpho-structural, compositional, mechanical, electrochemical and biological properties of reactive radio-frequency magnetron sputtered AlN nanostructured thin films with various degrees of c-axis texturing, deposited at a low temperature (~50 °C on Si (100 substrates. The inter-conditionality elicited between the base pressure level attained in the reactor chamber and crystalline quality of AlN films is highlighted. The potential suitability of nanostructured AlN (in form of thin films for the realization of various type of sensors (with emphasis on bio-sensors is thoroughly probed, thus unveiling its advantages and limitations, as well as suggesting paths to safely exploit the remarkable prospects of this type of materials.

  14. Mechanical, Corrosion and Biological Properties of Room-Temperature Sputtered Aluminum Nitride Films with Dissimilar Nanostructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besleaga, Cristina; Dumitru, Viorel; Trinca, Liliana Marinela; Popa, Adrian-Claudiu; Negrila, Constantin-Catalin; Kołodziejczyk, Łukasz; Luculescu, Catalin-Romeo; Ionescu, Gabriela-Cristina; Ripeanu, Razvan-George; Vladescu, Alina; Stan, George E

    2017-11-17

    Aluminum Nitride (AlN) has been long time being regarded as highly interesting material for developing sensing applications (including biosensors and implantable sensors). AlN, due to its appealing electronic properties, is envisaged lately to serve as a multi-functional biosensing platform. Although generally exploited for its intrinsic piezoelectricity, its surface morphology and mechanical performance (elastic modulus, hardness, wear, scratch and tensile resistance to delamination, adherence to the substrate), corrosion resistance and cytocompatibility are also essential features for high performance sustainable biosensor devices. However, information about AlN suitability for such applications is rather scarce or at best scattered and incomplete. Here, we aim to deliver a comprehensive evaluation of the morpho-structural, compositional, mechanical, electrochemical and biological properties of reactive radio-frequency magnetron sputtered AlN nanostructured thin films with various degrees of c -axis texturing, deposited at a low temperature (~50 °C) on Si (100) substrates. The inter-conditionality elicited between the base pressure level attained in the reactor chamber and crystalline quality of AlN films is highlighted. The potential suitability of nanostructured AlN (in form of thin films) for the realization of various type of sensors (with emphasis on bio-sensors) is thoroughly probed, thus unveiling its advantages and limitations, as well as suggesting paths to safely exploit the remarkable prospects of this type of materials.

  15. Velocities and mechanisms of AISI 304 steel corrosion in heated acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, B.M.; Guedes, C.D.

    1984-01-01

    The corrosion resistance of stainless steel on H 2 SO 4 at temperature higher than 60 0 C is studied. The weight loss technique and the analysis of the different components in solution are used. A proposition is made about the reason for the loss of resistance to corrosion of the stainless steel at this high temperature. (C.L.B.) [pt

  16. Mechanism of pitting corrosion protection of metals and alloys in new-generation water treatment plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grachev Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article authors set out a principle of pitting corrosion protection, suggested a new class of multilayer materials with high corrosion resistance. They substantiated the choice of the layers for the multilayer material designed for exploitation in oxidizing and non-oxidizing environment. The sphere of application of the multilyer materials was defined.

  17. Effect of PWHT on Microstructure, Mechanical and Corrosion Behaviour of Gas Tungsten Arc Welds of IN718 Superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilkush; Mohammed, Raffi; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.; Srinivasa Rao, K.

    2018-03-01

    The present work aims to improve corrosion resistance and mechanical behavior of the welds with suitable post weld heat treatment i.e. direct aging and solutionizing treatments (980STA, 1080STA). Gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) has been performed on Inconel 718 (IN718) nickel based super alloy plates with 3mm thickness. The structural –property relationship of the post weld heat treated samples is judged by correlating the microstructural changes with observed mechanical behavior and pitting corrosion resistance of the welds As-recevied, direct aging (DA), 980STA,1080STA were studied. Welds were characterized for microstructure changes with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy (OM).Vickers micro- hardness tester was used to measure the hardness of the weldments. Potential-dynamic polarization testing was carried out to study the pitting corrosion resistance in 3.5%NaCl (Sodium chloride) solution at 30°C.Results of the present study established that post weld heat treatments resulted in promoting the element segregation diffusion and resolve them from brittle laves particles in the matrix. Increased precipitation of strengthening phases lead to a significant increase in fusion zone hardness of 1080STA post weld heat treated condition compared to as welded, direct aged, 980STA conditions. Due to significant changes in the microstructural behavior of 1080STA condition resulted in superior pitting corrosion resistance than 980STA, direct aged and as- recevied conditions of IN718 GTA welds

  18. Evaluation of Microstructure, Mechanical Properties and Corrosion Resistance of Friction Stir-Welded Aluminum and Magnesium Dissimilar Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Jagesvar; Taiwade, Ravindra V.; Sapate, Sanjay G.; Patil, Awanikumar P.; Dhoble, Ashwinkumar S.

    2017-10-01

    Microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of dissimilar friction stir-welded aluminum and magnesium alloys were investigated by applying three different rotational speeds at two different travel speeds. Sound joints were obtained in all the conditions. The microstructure was examined by an optical and scanning electron microscope, whereas localized chemical information was studied by energy-dispersive spectroscopy. Stir zone microstructure showed mixed bands of Al and Mg with coarse and fine equiaxed grains. Grain size of stir zone reduced compared to base metals, indicated by dynamic recrystallization. More Al patches were observed in the stir zone as rotational speed increased. X-ray diffraction showed the presence of intermetallics in the stir zone. Higher tensile strength and hardness were obtained at a high rotational speed corresponding to low travel speed. Tensile fractured surface indicated brittle nature of joints. Dissimilar friction stir weld joints showed different behaviors in different corrosive environments, and better corrosion resistance was observed at a high rotational speed corresponding to low travel speed (FW3) in a sulfuric and chloride environments. Increasing travel speed did not significantly affect on microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance as much as the rotational speed.

  19. Effect of coating mild steel with CNTs on its mechanical properties and corrosion behaviour in acidic medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulmalik Abdulrahaman, Mahmud; Kamaldeeen Abubakre, Oladiran; Ambali Abdulkareem, Saka; Oladejo Tijani, Jimoh; Aliyu, Ahmed; Afolabi, Ayo Samuel

    2017-03-01

    The study investigated the mechanical properties and corrosion behaviour of mild steel coated with carbon nanotubes at different coating conditions. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were synthesized via the conventional chemical vapour deposition reaction using bimetallic Fe-Ni catalyst supported on kaolin, with acetylene gas as a carbon source. The HRSEM/HRTEM analysis of the purified carbon materials revealed significant reduction in the diameters of the purified MWCNT bundles from 50 nm to 2 nm and was attributed to the ultrasonication assisted dispersion with surfactant (gum arabic) employed in purification process. The network of the dispersed MWCNTs was coated onto the surfaces of mild steel samples, and as the coating temperature and holding time increased, the coating thickness reduced. The mechanical properties (tensile strength, yield strength, hardness value) of the coated steel samples increased with increase in coating temperature and holding time. Comparing the different coating conditions, coated mild steels at the temperature of 950 °C for 90 min holding time exhibited high hardness, yield strength and tensile strength values compared to others. The corrosion current and corrosion rate of the coated mild steel samples decreased with increase in holding time and coating temperature. The lowest corrosion rate was observed on sample coated at 950 °C for 90 min.

  20. Study on the Microstructure, Mechanical Properties and Corrosion Behavior of Mg-Zn-Ca Alloy Wire for Biomaterial Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Maobo; Xu, Guangquan; Liu, Debao; Zhao, Yue; Ning, Baoqun; Chen, Minfang

    2018-03-01

    Due to their excellent biocompatibility and biodegradability, magnesium alloy wires have attracted much attention for biomaterial applications including orthopedic K-wires and sutures in wound closure. In this study, Mg-3Zn-0.2Ca alloy wires were prepared by cold drawing combined with proper intermediate annealing process. Microstructures, texture, mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of Mg-3Zn-0.2Ca alloy wire in a simulated body fluid were investigated. The results showed that the secondary phase and average grain size of the Mg-3Zn-0.2Ca alloy were refined in comparison with the as-extruded alloy and a strong (0002)//DD basal fiber texture system was formed after multi-pass cold drawing. After the annealing, most of the basal planes were tilted to the drawing direction (DD) by about 35°, presenting the characteristics of random texture, and the texture intensity decreased. The as-annealed wire shows good mechanical properties with the ultimate tensile strength (UTS), yield strength (YS) and elongation of 253 ± 8.5 MPa, 212 ± 11.3 MPa and 9.2 ± 0.9%, respectively. Electrochemical and hydrogen evolution measurements showed that the corrosion resistance of the Mg-3Zn-0.2Ca alloy wire was improved after the annealing. The immersion test indicated that the Mg-3Zn-0.2Ca wire exhibited uniform corrosion behavior during the initial period of immersion, but then exhibited local corrosion behavior.

  1. Rebar corrosion due to carbonation in structural reinforced concretes for near-surface LLW repositories: A critical failure mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torok, J

    1995-03-01

    The concrete roof of a near-surface radioactive waste repository is the principle protection against water infiltration and intrusion. The following potential roof failure mechanism is examined: carbon dioxide generated by the biodegradation of organic materials in the repository initiates corrosion of reinforcing steel embedded in the concrete roof. Because the bottom surface of the roof is mostly under tension, it is susceptible to cracking. The migration path for carbon dioxide is through cracks in the concrete between the bottom of the roof and the reinforcing bars. Carbonate corrosion of the reinforcing bars may result in concrete spalling, more extensive rebar corrosion and ultimately structural failure. Attention is brought to this failure mechanism because it has generally been overlooked in repository performance assessments. Literature relevant to the above failure is reviewed. Prerequisites for rebar corrosion are the presence of carbon dioxide and oxygen in the repository gas, high relative humidity and through-cracks in the concrete. High carbon dioxide concentrations and relative humidity are expected in the repository. The oxygen concentration in the repository is expected to be very low, and that is expected to minimize rebar corrosion rates. Cracks are likely to form in locations with high tensile stresses. Healing of the cracks could be a mitigating factor, but based on our analysis, it can not be relied on. To minimize the potential of this failure mechanism occurring with the Intrusion Resistant Underground Structure (IRUS), Canada`s proposed near-surface repository, carbon dioxide from the repository gas will be absorbed by the reactive, porous concrete placed between the waste and the roof. (author). 4 refs.

  2. Rebar corrosion due to carbonation in structural reinforced concretes for near-surface LLW repositories: A critical failure mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torok, J.

    1995-03-01

    The concrete roof of a near-surface radioactive waste repository is the principle protection against water infiltration and intrusion. The following potential roof failure mechanism is examined: carbon dioxide generated by the biodegradation of organic materials in the repository initiates corrosion of reinforcing steel embedded in the concrete roof. Because the bottom surface of the roof is mostly under tension, it is susceptible to cracking. The migration path for carbon dioxide is through cracks in the concrete between the bottom of the roof and the reinforcing bars. Carbonate corrosion of the reinforcing bars may result in concrete spalling, more extensive rebar corrosion and ultimately structural failure. Attention is brought to this failure mechanism because it has generally been overlooked in repository performance assessments. Literature relevant to the above failure is reviewed. Prerequisites for rebar corrosion are the presence of carbon dioxide and oxygen in the repository gas, high relative humidity and through-cracks in the concrete. High carbon dioxide concentrations and relative humidity are expected in the repository. The oxygen concentration in the repository is expected to be very low, and that is expected to minimize rebar corrosion rates. Cracks are likely to form in locations with high tensile stresses. Healing of the cracks could be a mitigating factor, but based on our analysis, it can not be relied on. To minimize the potential of this failure mechanism occurring with the Intrusion Resistant Underground Structure (IRUS), Canada's proposed near-surface repository, carbon dioxide from the repository gas will be absorbed by the reactive, porous concrete placed between the waste and the roof. (author). 4 refs

  3. Microstructure, mechanical properties, bio-corrosion properties and cytotoxicity of as-extruded Mg-Sr alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Chaoyong [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Pan, Fusheng, E-mail: fspan@cqu.edu.cn [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Magnesium Alloys, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Chongqing Academy of Science and Technology, Chongqing 401123 (China); Zhang, Lei; Pan, Hucheng; Song, Kai; Tang, Aitao [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2017-01-01

    In this study, as-extruded Mg-Sr alloys were studied for orthopedic application, and the microstructure, mechanical properties, bio-corrosion properties and cytotoxicity of as-extruded Mg-Sr alloys were investigated by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, tensile and compressive tests, immersion test, electrochemical test and cytotoxicity test. The results showed that as-extruded Mg-Sr alloys were composed of α-Mg and Mg{sub 17}Sr{sub 2} phases, and the content of Mg{sub 17}Sr{sub 2} phases increased with increasing Sr content. As-extruded Mg-Sr alloy with 0.5 wt.% Sr was equiaxed grains, while the one with a higher Sr content was long elongated grains and the grain size of the long elongated grains decreased with increasing Sr content. Tensile and compressive tests showed an increase of both tensile and compressive strength and a decrease of elongation with increasing Sr content. Immersion and electrochemical tests showed that as-extruded Mg-0.5Sr alloy exhibited the best anti-corrosion property, and the anti-corrosion property of as-extruded Mg-Sr alloys deteriorated with increasing Sr content, which was greatly associated with galvanic couple effect. The cytotoxicity test revealed that as-extruded Mg-0.5Sr alloy did not induce toxicity to cells. These results indicated that as-extruded Mg-0.5Sr alloy with suitable mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and good cytocompatibility was potential as a biodegradable implant for orthopedic application. - Highlights: • Biodegradable as-extruded Mg-Sr alloys were fabricated. • Microstructure of alloys changed with increasing Sr content. • Mechanical properties of alloys could be controlled by adjusting the Sr content. • Corrosion properties of alloys decreased with increasing Sr content. • As-extruded Mg-0.5Sr alloy was potential for orthopedic application.

  4. Development of Semi-Stochastic Algorithm for Optimizing Alloy Composition of High-Temperature Austenitic Stainless Steels (H-Series) for Desired Mechanical and Corrosion Properties.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dulikravich, George S.; Sikka, Vinod K.; Muralidharan, G.

    2006-06-01

    The goal of this project was to adapt and use an advanced semi-stochastic algorithm for constrained multiobjective optimization and combine it with experimental testing and verification to determine optimum concentrations of alloying elements in heat-resistant and corrosion-resistant H-series stainless steel alloys that will simultaneously maximize a number of alloy's mechanical and corrosion properties.

  5. Modelling of Corrosion Cracks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    Modelling of corrosion cracking of reinforced concrete structures is complicated as a great number of uncertain factors are involved. To get a reliable modelling a physical and mechanical understanding of the process behind corrosion in needed.......Modelling of corrosion cracking of reinforced concrete structures is complicated as a great number of uncertain factors are involved. To get a reliable modelling a physical and mechanical understanding of the process behind corrosion in needed....

  6. Methane oxidation and methane fluxes in the ocean surface layer and deep anoxic waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, B. B.; Kilpatrick, K. A.; Novelli, P. C.; Scranton, M. I.

    1987-01-01

    Measured biological oxidation rates of methane in near-surface waters of the Cariaco Basin are compared with the diffusional fluxes computed from concentration gradients of methane in the surface layer. Methane fluxes and oxidation rates were investigated in surface waters, at the oxic/anoxic interface, and in deep anoxic waters. It is shown that the surface-waters oxidation of methane is a mechanism which modulates the flux of methane from marine waters to the atmosphere.

  7. Effects of microstructure transformation on mechanical properties, corrosion behaviors of Mg-Zn-Mn-Ca alloys in simulated body fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuan; Li, Jianxing; Li, Jingyuan

    2018-04-01

    Magnesium and its alloys have unique advantages to act as resorbable bone fixation materials, due to their moderate mechanical properties and biocompatibility, which are similar to those of human tissue. However, early resorption and insufficient mechanical strength are the main problems that hinder their application. Herein, the effects of microstructure transformation on the mechanical properties and corrosion performance of Mg-Zn-Mn-Ca were investigated with electrochemical and immersion measurements at 37 °C in a simulated body fluid (SBF). The results showed that the number density of Ca 2 Mg 6 Zn 3 /Mg 2 Ca precipitates was remarkably reduced and grain sizes were gradually increased as the temperature increased. The alloy that received the 420 °C/24 h treatment demonstrated the best mechanical properties and lowest corrosion rate (5.94 mm/a) as well as presented a compact and denser film than the others. The improvement in mechanical properties could be explained by the eutectic compounds and phases (Mg 2 Ca/Ca 2 Mg 6 Zn 3 ) gradually dissolving into a matrix, which caused severely lattice distortion and facilitated structural re-arrangement of the increased Ca solute. Moreover, the difference in potential between the precipitates and the matrix is the main essence for micro-galvanic corrosion formation as well as accelerated the dissolution activity and current exchange density at the Mg/electrolyte interface. As a result, the best Mg alloys corrosion resistance must be matched with a moderate grain size and phase volume fractions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Corrosion/96 conference papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    Topics covered by this conference include: cathodic protection in natural waters; cleaning and repassivation of building HVAC systems; worldwide opportunities in flue gas desulfurization; advancements in materials technology for use in oil and gas service; fossil fuel combustion and conversion; technology of corrosion inhibitors; computers in corrosion control--modeling and information processing; recent experiences and advances of austenitic alloys; managing corrosion with plastics; corrosion measurement technology; corrosion inhibitors for concrete; refining industry; advances in corrosion control for rail and tank trailer equipment; CO 2 corrosion--mechanisms and control; microbiologically influenced corrosion; corrosion in nuclear systems; role of corrosion in boiler failures; effects of water reuse on monitoring and control technology in cooling water applications; methods and mechanisms of scale and deposit control; corrosion detection in petroleum production lines; underground corrosion control; environmental cracking--relating laboratory results and field behavior; corrosion control in reinforced concrete structures; corrosion and its control in aerospace and military hardware; injection and process addition facilities; progress reports on the results of reinspection of deaerators inspected or repaired per RP0590 criteria; near 100% volume solids coating technology and application methods; materials performance in high temperature environments containing halides; impact of toxicity studies on use of corrosion/scale inhibitors; mineral scale deposit control in oilfield related operations; corrosion in gas treating; marine corrosion; cold climate corrosion; corrosion in the pulp and paper industry; gaseous chlorine alternatives in cooling water systems; practical applications of ozone in recirculating cooling water systems; and water reuse in industry. Over 400 papers from this conference have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  9. Mechanical behavior of precipitation hardenable steels exposed to highly corrosive environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Ferdinand

    1994-01-01

    Unexpected occurrences of failures, due to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of structural components, indicate a need for improved characterization of materials and more advanced analytical procedures for reliably predicting structures performance. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to determine the stress corrosion susceptibility of 15 - 5 PH steel over a wide range of applied strain rates in a highly corrosive environment. The selected environment for this investigation was a 3.5 percent NaCl aqueous solution. The material selected for the study was 15 - 5 PH steel in the H 900 condition. The Slow Strain Rate technique was used to test the metallic specimens.

  10. Metallurgical and mechanical parameters controlling alloy 718 stress corrosion cracking resistance in PWR primary water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deleume, J.

    2007-11-01

    Improving the performance and reliability of the fuel assemblies of the pressurized water reactors requires having a perfect knowledge of the operating margins of both the components and the materials. The choice of alloy 718 as reference material for this study is justified by the industrial will to identify the first order parameters controlling the excellent resistance of this alloy to Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC). For this purpose, a specific slow strain rate (SSR) crack initiation test using tensile specimen with a V-shaped hump in the middle of the gauge length was developed and modeled. The selectivity of such SSR tests in simulated PWR primary water at 350 C was clearly established by characterizing the SCC resistance of nine alloy 718 thin strip heats. Regardless of their origin and in spite of a similar thermo-mechanical history, they did not exhibit the same susceptibility to SCC crack initiation. All the characterized alloy 718 heats develop oxide scale of similar nature for various exposure times to PWR primary medium in the temperature range [320 C - 360 C]. δ phase precipitation has no impact on alloy 718 SCC initiation behavior when exposed to PWR primary water, contrary to interstitial contents and the triggering of plastic instabilities (PLC phenomenon). (author)

  11. The mechanism of cathodic electrodeposition of epoxy coatings and the corrosion behaviour of the electrodeposited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VESNA B. MISKOVIC-STANKOVIC

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available The model of organic film growth on a cathode during electrodeposition process proposes the current density-time and film thickness-time relationships and enables the evaluation of the rate contants for the electrochemical reaction of OH– ion evolution and for the chemical reaction of organic film deposition. The dependences of film thickness and rate constants on the applied voltage, bath temperature and resin concentration in the electrodeposition bath have also been obtained. The deposition parameters have a great effect on the cathodic electrodeposition process and on the protective properties of the obtained electrodeposited coatings. From the time dependences of the pore resistance, coating capacitance and relative permittivity, obtained from impedance measurements, the effect of applied voltage, bath temperature and resin concentration on the protective properties of electrodeposited coatings has been shown. Using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, gravimetric liquid sorption experiments, differential scanning calorimetry and optical miscroscopy, the corrosion stability of epoxy coatings was investigated. A mechanism for the penetration of electrolyte through an organic coating has been suggested and the shape and dimensions of the conducting macropores have been determined. It was shown that conduction through a coating depends only on the conduction through the macropores, although the quantity of electrolyte in the micropores of the polymer net is about one order of magnitude greater than that inside the conducting macropores.

  12. Aspects and mechanisms of austenitic stainless steel corrosion in case of sodium leaks under mineral wool insulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertrand, C.; Ardellier, A.

    1996-01-01

    Sodium pipe rupture tests representative of Fast Reactors Accidents have been carried out on austenitic stainless steel surfaces. These tests improve our knowledge of small sodium leakage propagation in mineral wool insulation. They explain the new and unexpected aspects of the crevice corrosion phenomenon which has been observed on austenitic stainless steel pipe surfaces. Experimental results show that corrosion is limited to a peripheral annular zone, which extends out in concentric waves. The diameter of this corrosion zone is practically constant. Tests show that sodium does not expand directly on the pipe surface. Sodium sprays through mineral wool insulation, where chemical reaction between silica fibers, occluded oxygen and water vapor occur at the same time. Simultaneously, there is a diffusion phenomenon of liquid Na droplets on the mineral wool fibers. The study allows to prove the electrochemical nature of the corrosion. The excess liquid Na, spraying as droplets induces an anodic dissolution mechanism by differential aeration. This phenomenon explains the random microscopic and macroscopic aspects of material removal. (authors). 1 ref., 16 figs

  13. Influence of Cr and Y Addition on Microstructure, Mechanical Properties, and Corrosion Resistance of SPSed Fe-Based Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthaiah, V. M. Suntharavel; Mula, Suhrit

    2018-03-01

    Present work investigates the microstructural stability during spark plasma sintering (SPS) of Fe-Cr-Y alloys, its mechanical properties and corrosion behavior for its possible applications in nuclear power plant and petrochemical industries. The SPS was carried out for the Fe-7Cr-1Y and Fe-15Cr-1Y alloys at 800 °C, 900 °C, and 1000 °C due to their superior thermal stability as reported in Muthaiah et al. [Mater Charact 114:43-53, 2016]. Microstructural analysis through TEM and electron back scattered diffraction confirmed that the grain sizes of the sintered samples depicted a dual size grain distribution with >50 pct grains within a range of 200 nm and remaining grains in the range 200 nm to 2 µm. The best combination of hardness, wear resistance, and corrosion behavior was achieved for the samples sintered at 1000 °C. The high hardness (9.6 GPa), minimum coefficient of friction (0.25), and extremely low wear volume (0.00277 × 10-2 mm3) and low corrosion rate (3.43 mpy) are discussed in the light of solid solution strengthening, grain size strengthening, grain boundary segregation, excellent densification due to diffusion bonding, and precipitation hardening due to uniformly distributed nanosize Fe17Y2 phase in the alloy matrix. The SEM analysis of the worn surface and corroded features corroborated well with the wear resistance and corrosion behavior of the corresponding samples.

  14. Robust tribo-mechanical and hot corrosion resistance of ultra-refractory Ta-Hf-C ternary alloy films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yate, Luis; Coy, L Emerson; Aperador, Willian

    2017-06-08

    In this work we report the hot corrosion properties of binary and ternary films of the Ta-Hf-C system in V 2 O 5 -Na 2 SO 4 (50%wt.-50%wt.) molten salts at 700 °C deposited on AISI D3 steel substrates. Additionally, the mechanical and nanowear properties of the films were studied. The results show that the ternary alloys consist of solid solutions of the TaC and HfC binary carbides. The ternary alloy films have higher hardness and elastic recoveries, reaching 26.2 GPa and 87%, respectively, and lower nanowear when compared to the binary films. The corrosion rates of the ternary alloys have a superior behavior compared to the binary films, with corrosion rates as low as 0.058 μm/year. The combination and tunability of high hardness, elastic recovery, low nanowear and an excellent resistance to high temperature corrosion demonstrates the potential of the ternary Ta-Hf-C alloy films for applications in extreme conditions.

  15. The interface microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of dissimilar joints during multipass laser welding for nuclear power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Lu, Xiaofeng; Zhu, Xiaolei; Huang, Jian; Liu, Luwei; Wu, Yixiong

    2018-05-01

    This study presents the interface microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of dissimilar joints between Inconel 52M overlays and 316L stainless steel during multipass laser welding for nuclear power plants. The results indicate that the microstructure at the interface beside 316L stainless steel consists of cellular with the width of 30-40 μm, which also exhibits numerous Cr and Mo-rich precipitates like flocculent structure and in chains along grain boundaries as a mixed chemical solution for etching. Many dendritic structure with local melting characteristics and Nb-rich precipitates are exhibited at the interface beside Inconel 52M overlays. Such Nb-rich precipitates at the interface beside Inconel 52M overlays deteriorate the tensile strength and toughness of dissimilar joints at room temperature. The tensile strength of 316L stainless steel at 350 °C significantly decreases with the result that dissimilar joints are fractured in 316L stainless steel. The correlation between corrosion behavior and microstructure of weld metals is also discussed. The difference in high corrosion potential between Nb-rich precipitates and the matrix could result in establishing effective galvanic couples, and thus accelerating the corrosion of weld metals.

  16. Protection of type 316 austenitic stainless steel from intergranular stress corrosion cracking by thermo-mechanical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiuchi, Kiyoshi; Tsuji, Hirokazu; Kondo, Tatsuo

    1980-03-01

    Thermomechanical treatment that causes carbide stabilizing aging of cold worked material followed by recrystallization heating made standard stainless steels highly resistant to intergranular corrosion and stress corrosion cracking in different test environments. After a typical thermal history of simulated welding, several IGSCC susceptibility tests were made. The results showed that the treatment was successful in type 316 steel in wide range of conditions, while type 304 was protected only to a small extent even by closely controlled treatment. Response of the materials to the sensitizing heating in terms of impurity segregation at grain boundaries was also examined by means of microchemical analysis. Advantage of method is that no special care is required in selecting heats of material, so that conventional type 316 is usable by improving the mechanical properties substantially through the treatment. In some optimized cases the mechanical property improvement was typically recognized by the yield strength by about 20% higher at room temperature, compared with the material mill annealed. (author)

  17. Corrosion-electrochemical behaviour and mechanical properties ofaluminium alloy-321, alloyed by barium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganiev, I.; Mukhiddinov, G.N.; Kargapolova, T.V.; Mirsaidov, U.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of present work is studying of influence of barium additionson electrochemical corrosion of casting aluminium-copper alloy Al-321,containing as base alloying components copper, chromium, manganese, titanium,zirconium, cadmium

  18. Microbially mediated barite dissolution in anoxic brines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouyang, Bingjie; Akob, Denise M.; Dunlap, Darren; Renock, Devon

    2017-01-01

    Fluids injected into shale formations during hydraulic fracturing of black shale return with extraordinarily high total-dissolved-solids (TDS) and high concentrations of barium (Ba) and radium (Ra). Barite, BaSO_4, has been implicated as a possible source of Ba as well as a problematic mineral scale that forms on internal well surfaces, often in close association with radiobarite, (Ba,Ra)SO_4. The dissolution of barite by abiotic processes is well quantified. However, the identification of microbial communities in flowback and produced water necessitates the need to understand barite dissolution in the presence of bacteria. Therefore, we evaluated the rates and mechanisms of abiotic and microbially-mediated barite dissolution under anoxic and hypersaline conditions in the laboratory. Barite dissolution experiments were conducted with bacterial enrichment cultures established from produced water from Marcellus Shale wells located in northcentral Pennsylvania. These cultures were dominated by anaerobic halophilic bacteria from the genus Halanaerobium. Dissolved Ba was determined by ICP-OES and barite surfaces were investigated by SEM and AFM. Our results reveal that: 1) higher amounts of barium (up to ∼5 × ) are released from barite in the presence of Halanaerobium cultures compared to brine controls after 30 days of reaction, 2) etch pits that develop on the barite (001) surface in the presence of Halanaerobium exhibit a morphology that is distinct from those that form during control experiments without bacteria, 3) etch pits that develop in the presence of Halanaerobium exhibit a morphology that is similar to the morphology of etch pits formed in the presence of strong organic chelators, EDTA and DTPA, and 4) experiments using dialysis membranes to separate barite from bacteria suggest that direct contact between the two is not required in order to promote dissolution. These results suggest that Halanaerobium increase the rate of barite dissolution in anoxic

  19. Microstructures, mechanical and corrosion properties and biocompatibility of as extruded Mg-Mn-Zn-Nd alloys for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ying-Long; Li, Yuncang; Luo, Dong-Mei; Ding, Yunfei; Hodgson, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Extruded Mg-1Mn-2Zn-xNd alloys (x=0.5, 1.0, 1.5 mass %) have been developed for their potential use as biomaterials. The extrusion on the alloys was performed at temperature of 623K with an extrusion ratio of 14.7 under an average extrusion speed of 4mm/s. The microstructure, mechanical property, corrosion behavior and biocompatibility of the extruded Mg-Mn-Zn-Nd alloys have been investigated in this study. The microstructure was examined using X-ray diffraction analysis and optical microscopy. The mechanical properties were determined from uniaxial tensile and compressive tests. The corrosion behavior was investigated using electrochemical measurement. The biocompatibility was evaluated using osteoblast-like SaOS2 cells. The experimental results indicate that all extruded Mg-1Mn-2Zn-xNd alloys are composed of both α phase of Mg and a compound of Mg7Zn3 with very fine microstructures, and show good ductility and much higher mechanical strength than that of cast pure Mg and natural bone. The tensile strength and elongation of the extruded alloys increase with an increase in neodymium content. Their compressive strength does not change significantly with an increase in neodymium content. The extruded alloys show good biocompatibility and much higher corrosion resistance than that of cast pure Mg. The extruded Mg-1Mn-2Zn-1.0Nd alloy shows a great potential for biomedical applications due to the combination of enhanced mechanical properties, high corrosion resistance and good biocompatibility. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Study of new heat treatment parameters for increasing mechanical strength and stress corrosion cracking resistance of 7075 Aluminium alloy

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, G.; Rivolta, B.; Gerosa, R.; Derudi, U.

    2013-01-01

    For many years 7075 Aluminum alloys have been widely used especially in those applications for which highmechanical performances are required. It is well known that the alloy in the T6 condition is characterized bythe highest ultimate and yield strengths, but, at the same time, by poor stress corrosion cracking (SCC)resistance. For this reason, in the aeronautic applications, new heat treatments have been introduced toproduce T7X conditions, which are characterized by lower mechanical strengt...

  1. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES AND CORROSION PROTECTION OF CARBON STEEL COATED WITH AN EPOXY BASED POWDER COATING CONTAINING MONTMORILONITE FUNCTIONALIZED WITH SILANE

    OpenAIRE

    Paula Tibola Bertuoli; Veronica Perozzo Frizzo; Diego Piazza; Lisete Cristine Scienza; Ademir José Zattera

    2014-01-01

    In the present work the MMT-Na+ clay was functionalized with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (γ-APS) and incorporated in a commercial formulation epoxy-based powder coating in a proportion of 8 wt% and applied on 1008 carbon steel panels by electrostatic spray. Adhesion, flexibility, impact and corrosion performance in salt spray chamber tests were performed to evaluate the coatings. The presence of clay did not affect the mechanical properties of the film, however greater subcutaneo...

  2. Mechanisms of Corrosion of Copper-Nickel Alloys in Sulfide-Polluted Seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-02-01

    anaerobic bacteria, which convert the natural sulfate content of the seawater into sulfides. Also, the putrefaction of organic compounds containing...corrosion rate bozause the Cu2 0 growth3 292 probably follows a parabolic rate law. The corrosion behavior at high oxygen concentrations (> 7.0 g/m ) is...determined using the rotating ring disk electrode method or SRI’s recently developed rotating cylinder- collector electrode.3 In these methods, the

  3. Kinetic mechanism of steel corrosion in clay soils by impedance measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arpaia, M.; Pernice, P.; Costantini, A.

    1990-01-01

    The corrosion of steel in clay soil at m.c. 15% has been studied for a long exposure time by electrochemical methods. A.c. impedance measurements results show that at a short exposure time the corrosion process is controlled by the diffusion of H + coupled with a rate determining homogeneous reaction, whereas at a long exposure time the process is controlled by pure diffusion. We have hypothesized that the rate determining homogeneous reaction might be the clay particles cations exchange. (orig.)

  4. Microstructure, texture evolution, mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of ECAP processed ZK60 magnesium alloy for biodegradable applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostaed, Ehsan; Hashempour, Mazdak; Fabrizi, Alberto; Dellasega, David; Bestetti, Massimiliano; Bonollo, Franco; Vedani, Maurizio

    2014-09-01

    Ultra-fine grained ZK60 Mg alloy was obtained by multi-pass equal-channel angular pressing at different temperatures of 250°C, 200°C and 150°C. Microstructural observations showed a significant grain refinement after ECAP, leading to an equiaxed and ultrafine grain (UFG) structure with average size of 600nm. The original extrusion fiber texture with planes oriented parallel to extrusion direction was gradually undermined during ECAP process and eventually it was substituted by a newly stronger texture component with considerably higher intensity, coinciding with ECAP shear plane. A combination of texture modification and grain refinement in UFG samples led to a marked reduction in mechanical asymmetric behavior compared to the as-received alloy, as well as adequate mechanical properties with about 100% improvement in elongation to failure while keeping relatively high tensile strength. Open circuit potential, potentiodynamic and weight loss measurements in a phosphate buffer solution electrolyte revealed an improved corrosion resistance of UFG alloy compared to the extruded one, stemming from a shift of corrosion regime from localized pitting in the as-received sample to a more uniform corrosion mode with reduced localized attack in ECAP processed alloy. Compression tests on immersed samples showed that the rate of loss of mechanical integrity in the UFG sample was lower than that in the as-received sample. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Fe and Fe-P Foam for Biodegradable Bone Replacement Material: Morphology, Corrosion Behaviour, and Mechanical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Hrubovčáková

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron and iron-phosphorus open-cell foams were manufactured by a replica method based on a powder metallurgical approach to serve as a temporary biodegradable bone replacement material. Iron foams alloyed with phosphorus were prepared with the aim of enhancing the mechanical properties and manipulating the corrosion rate. Two different types of Fe-P foams containing 0.5 wt.% of P were prepared: Fe-P(I foams from a phosphated carbonyl iron powder and Fe-P(II foams from a mixture of carbonyl iron and commercial Fe3P. The microstructure of foams was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. The mechanical properties and the corrosion behaviour were studied by compression tests and potentiodynamic polarization in Hank’s solution and a physiological saline solution. The results showed that the manufactured foams exhibited an open, interconnected, microstructure similar to that of a cancellous bone. The presence of phosphorus improved the mechanical properties of the foams and decreased the corrosion rate as compared to pure iron foams.

  6. Study of alloy 600`S stress corrosion cracking mechanisms in high temperature water; Etude des mecanismes de corrosion sous contrainte de l`alliage 600 dans l`eau a haute temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rios, R

    1994-06-01

    In order to better understand the mechanisms involved in Alloy 600`s stress corrosion cracking in PWR environment, laboratory tests were performed. The influence of parameters pertinent to the mechanisms was studies : hydrogen and oxygen overpressures, local chemical composition, microstructure. The results show that neither hydrogen nor dissolution/oxidation, despite their respective roles in the process, are sufficient to account for experimental facts. SEM observation of micro-cleavage facets on specimens` fracture surfaces leads to pay attention to a new mechanism of corrosion/plasticity interactions. (author). 113 refs., 73 figs., 15 tabs., 4 annexes.

  7. The applicability of alkaline-resistant glass fiber in cement mortar of road pavement: Corrosion mechanism and performance analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Xiaochun

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The main technical requirements of road pavement concrete are high flexural strength and fatigue durability. Adding glass fiber into concrete could greatly increase flexural strength and wearing resistance of concrete. However, glass fiber has the great potential of corrosion during the cement hydration, which will directly affect the long-term performance and strength stability. In this paper, accelerated corrosion experiments have been done to find out the corrosion mechanism and property of alkali-resistant glass fiber in cement mortar. The applicability and practicability of alkaline-resistant glass fiber in road concrete have been illustrated in the analysis of flexural strength changing trend of cement mortar mixed with different proportions of activated additives to protect the corrosion of glass fiber by cement mortar. The results have shown that a 30% addition of fly ash or 10% addition of silica fume to cement matrix could effectively improve the corrosion resistance of alkali-resistant glass fiber. The optimal mixing amount of alkali-resistant glass fiber should be about 1.0 kg/m3 in consideration of ensuring the compressive strength of reinforced concrete in road pavement. The closest-packing method has been adopted in the mixture ratio design of alkali-resistant glass fiber reinforced concrete, not only to reduce the alkalinity of the cement matrix through large amount addition of activated additives but also to greatly enhance the flexural performance of concrete with the split pressure ratio improvement of 12.5–16.7%. The results suggested a prosperous application prospect for alkaline-resistant glass fiber reinforced concrete in road pavement.

  8. Erosion-corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aghili, B.

    1999-05-01

    A literature study on erosion-corrosion of pipings in the nuclear industry was performed. Occurred incidents are reviewed, and the mechanism driving the erosion-corrosion is described. Factors that influence the effect in negative or positive direction are treated, as well as programs for control and inspection. Finally, examples of failures from databases on erosion-corrosion are given in an attachment

  9. Management of Reinforcement Corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Küter, André; Geiker, Mette Rica; Møller, Per

    Reinforcement corrosion is the most important cause for deterioration of reinforced concrete structures, both with regard to costs and consequences. Thermodynamically consistent descriptions of corrosion mechanisms are expected to allow the development of innovative concepts for the management...... of reinforcement corrosion....

  10. Microstructure, mechanical properties and bio-corrosion properties of Mg-Si(-Ca, Zn) alloy for biomedical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Erlin; Yang, Lei; Xu, Jianwei; Chen, Haiyan

    2010-05-01

    Mg-Si alloy was investigated for biomedical application due to the biological function of Si in the human body. However, Mg-Si alloy showed a low ductility due to the presence of coarse Mg(2)Si. Ca and Zn elements were used to refine and modify the morphology of Mg(2)Si in order to improve the corrosion resistance and the mechanical properties. The cell toxicity of Mg, Zn and Ca metals was assessed by an MTT test. The test results indicated that increasing the concentrations of Mg, Zn and Ca ions did not cause cell toxicity, which showed that the release of these three elements would not lead to cell toxicity. Then, microstructure, mechanical properties and bio-corrosion properties of as-cast Mg-Si(-Ca, Zn) alloys were investigated by optical microscopy, scanning electronic microscopy, mechanical properties testing and electrochemical measurement. Ca element can slightly refine the grain size and the morphology Mg(2)Si phase in Mg-Si alloy. The bio-corrosion resistance of Mg-Si alloys was improved by the addition of Ca due to the reduction and refinement of Mg(2)Si phase; however, no improvement was observed in the strength and elongation. The addition of 1.6% Zn to Mg-0.6Si can modify obviously the morphology of Mg(2)Si phase from course eutectic structure to a small dot or short bar shape. As a result, tensile strength, elongation and bio-corrosion resistance were all improved significantly; especially, the elongation improved by 115.7%. It was concluded that Zn element was one of the best alloying elements of Mg-Si alloy for biomedical application. Copyright (c) 2009 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Progress in the understanding of the long-term corrosion behaviour of copper canisters

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Fraser; Lilja, Christina; Vähänen, Marjut

    2013-07-01

    highly compacted bentonite buffer which (i) inhibits the transport of reactants to, and of corrosion products away from, the canister surface, (ii) limits the amount of atmospheric O2 initially trapped in the repository, and (iii) suppresses microbial activity close to the canister surface [5,6,9]. The environment will evolve with time as the initially trapped atmospheric O2 is consumed and as the canister cools. This evolution can be described as a transition from an early period of warm, oxidising conditions to an indefinite period of cool, anoxic conditions. In turn, this environmental evolution will impact the corrosion behaviour of the canister. Localised corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) will only be possible for a limited period of time initially when there is sufficient oxidant available to support these forms of corrosion. This aerobic phase is only expected to last a few tens or hundreds of years [10,11]. For the vast majority of the service life of the canister, the redox conditions will be determined by the absence of O2 and the presence of sulphide. Although obvious, it is important to remember that the corrosion behaviour is determined by the environmental conditions at the canister surface. Because of the presence of the compacted bentonite, the environment at the canister surface will be quite different from that in the ground water in the rock. In particular, the interfacial concentration of HS- will be small as the rate of corrosion in the presence of sulphide is transport limited [1,2,12]. The low interfacial [HS-] has important implications for various sulphur-related corrosion mechanisms. The relatively high salinity of the ground water (and, hence, of the bentonite pore water) promotes the general dissolution of copper and inhibits localised corrosion and SCC [5,6].

  12. The effect of temperature and concentration on the corrosion inhibition mechanism of an amphiphilic amido-amine in CO2 saturated solution

    OpenAIRE

    Desimone, Paula Mariela; Gordillo, Gabriel Jorge; Simison, Silvia Noemi

    2017-01-01

    The corrosion inhibition mechanism of the N-[2-[(2-aminoethyl)amino]ethyl]-9-octadecenamide on mild steel surface in CO2-saturated 5% NaCl solution has been studied. The inhibition efficiency decreases with increasing temperature. Adsorption of the inhibitor studied is found to follow the Frumkin adsorption isotherm. EIS results show that the mechanism of its corrosion inhibition at concentrations higher than critical micelle concentration is by forming a protective porous bi-layer. The a...

  13. Microstructure, Mechanical and Corrosion Properties of Friction Stir Welding High Nitrogen Martensitic Stainless Steel 30Cr15Mo1N

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Geng

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available High nitrogen martensitic stainless steel 30Cr15Mo1N plates were successfully welded by friction stir welding (FSW at a tool rotation speed of 300 rpm with a welding speed of 100 mm/min, using W-Re tool. The sound joint with no significant nitrogen loss was successfully produced. Microstructure, mechanical and corrosion properties of an FSW joint were investigated. The results suggest that the grain size of the stir zone (SZ is larger than the base metal (BM and is much larger the case in SZ-top. Some carbides and nitrides rich in chromium were found in BM while not observed in SZ. The martensitic phase in SZ could transform to austenite phase during the FSW process and the higher peak temperature, the greater degree of transformation. The hardness of SZ is significantly lower than that of the BM. An abrupt change of hardness defined as hard zone (HZ was found in the thermo-mechanically affected zone (TMAZ on the advancing side (AS, and the HZ is attributed to a combination result of temperature, deformation, and material flow behavior. The corrosion resistance of SZ is superior to that of BM, which can be attributed to less precipitation and lower angle boundaries (LABs. The corrosion resistance of SZ-bottom is slight higher than that of SZ-top because of the finer grained structure.

  14. Effect of copper addition on mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and antibacterial property of 316L stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xi, Tong [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Shahzad, M. Babar [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Xu, Dake [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Sun, Ziqing; Zhao, Jinlong [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Yang, Chunguang, E-mail: cgyang@imr.ac.cn [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Qi, Min [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Yang, Ke, E-mail: kyang@imr.ac.cn [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2017-02-01

    The effects of addition of different Cu content (0, 2.5 and 3.5 wt%) on mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and antibacterial performance of 316L austenitic stainless steel (SS) after solution and aging treatment were investigated by mechanical test, transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), electrochemical corrosion, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and antibacterial test. The results showed that the Cu addition and heat treatment had no obvious influence on the microstructure with complete austenite features. The yield strength (YS) after solution treatment was almost similar, whereas the aging treatment obviously increased the YS due to formation of tiny Cu-rich precipitates. The pitting and protective potential of the solution treated Cu-bearing 316L SS in 0.9 wt% NaCl solution increased with increasing Cu content, while gradually declined after aging, owing to the high density Cu-rich precipitation. The antibacterial test proved that higher Cu content and aging were two compulsory processes to exert good antibacterial performance. The XPS results further indicated that aging enhanced the Cu enrichment in passive film, which could effectively stimulate the Cu ions release from the surface of passive film. - Highlights: • Higher Cu addition and aging guaranteed an excellent antibacterial property. • The Cu addition and heat treatment had no obvious influence on the microstructure. • The lower corrosion resistance for aging was attributed to Cu-rich precipitates.

  15. Improved mechanical performance and delayed corrosion phenomena in biodegradable Mg-Zn-Ca alloys through Pd-alloying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, S; Pellicer, E; Fornell, J; Blanquer, A; Barrios, L; Ibáñez, E; Solsona, P; Suriñach, S; Baró, M D; Nogués, C; Sort, J

    2012-02-01

    The influence of partial substitution of Mg by Pd on the microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion behaviour of Mg(72-x)Zn(23)Ca(5)Pd(x) (x=0, 2 and 6 at.%) alloys, synthesized by copper mould casting, is investigated. While the Mg(72)Zn(23)Ca(5) alloy is mainly amorphous, the addition of Pd decreases the glass-forming ability, thus favouring the formation of crystalline phases. From a mechanical viewpoint, the hardness increases with the addition of Pd, from 2.71 GPa for x=0 to 3.9 GPa for x=6, mainly due to the formation of high-strength phases. In turn, the wear resistance is maximized for an intermediate Pd content (i.e., Mg(70)Zn(23)Ca(5)Pd(2)). Corrosion tests in a simulated body fluid (Hank's solution) indicate that Pd causes a shift in the corrosion potential towards more positive values, thus delaying the biodegradability of this alloy. Moreover, since the cytotoxic studies with mouse preosteoblasts do not show dead cells after culturing for 27 h, these alloys are potential candidates to be used as biomaterials. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Forming mechanism and avoiding measures of blue-ring on electronic beam welding sample after water corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Defang; Luo Xiandian; Tong Shenxiu; Guo Xulin; Peng Haiqing

    2001-01-01

    After water corrosion in compliance with ASTM G2, the blue ring appears on the nuclear fuel rod samples of AFA 2G welded by using a Big Chamber Electron Beam Welder made in Russia. The characteristics, appearance, chemical composition, microstructure of b lue ring a nd some condition test are described. The mechanism of forming blue ring may be depicted as following: welding metal vapor and the splash produced by secondary and scatter electrons on metal clamp and gun body deposit in the area between HAZ and substrate because of the water cooling down effects on the clamp; these deposits, after water corrosion, appears as blue ring on the fuel rod surface. Avoiding measure is that the side of the clamp closing to weld seal is chamfered, while making the welding chamber cleaner

  17. New Insights in the Long-Term Atmospheric Corrosion Mechanisms of Low Alloy Steel Reinforcements of Cultural Heritage Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Bouchar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Reinforcing clamps made of low alloy steel from the Metz cathedral and corroded outdoors during 500 years were studied by OM, FESEM/EDS, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The corrosion product layer is constituted of a dual structure. The outer layer is mainly constituted of goethite and lepidocrocite embedding exogenous elements such as Ca and P. The inner layer is mainly constituted of ferrihydrite. The behaviour of the inner layer under conditions simulating the wetting stage of the RH wet/dry atmospheric corrosion cycle was observed by in situ micro-Raman spectroscopy. The disappearance of ferrihydrite near the metal/oxide interface strongly suggests a mechanism of reductive dissolution caused by the oxidation of the metallic substrate and was observed for the first time in situ on an archaeological system.

  18. Corrosion and Mechanical Properties of Al-5 At. Pct Cr Produced by Cryomilling and Subsequent Consolidation at Various Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel, J.; Darling, K. A.; Murdoch, H. A.; Gupta, R. K.

    2018-04-01

    An Al-5 at. pct Cr alloy was produced by high-energy ball milling at liquid nitrogen temperature followed by consolidation using equal-channel axial extrusion at 200 °C, 300 °C and 450 °C. The microstructure and corrosion response were compared with a cast alloy of the same composition. Rather than the intermetallics expected by the phase diagram and seen in the cast alloy, consolidated HEBM alloys exhibited extended solid solubility of Cr in the aluminum matrix in addition to a finely dispersed Cr-rich phase. This led to improvement in the corrosion behavior as investigated via potentiodynamic polarization and constant immersion tests in NaCl solution. Hardness and tensile tests were performed to evaluate the mechanical properties. The highest consolidation temperature (450 °C) contributed to significant grain growth and Cr diffusion, lessening the beneficial effects of processing with HEBM.

  19. The mechanisms underlying corrosion product formation and deposition in nuclear power plant circuits through the action of galvanic and thermal electromotive forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brusakov, V.P.; Sedov, V.M.; Khitrov, Yu.A.; Brusov, K.N.; Razmashkin, N.V.; Versin, V.V.; Rybalchenko, I.L.

    1983-01-01

    From a theoretical standpoint, the processes of formation of corrosion products in nuclear power plant circuits, deposition of corrosion products on the circuit surfaces, formation of an equilibrium concentration of corrosion products in the coolant, and distribution of radionuclides resulting from corrosion in different parts of the circuit are considered. It is shown that the main driving forces for the mass-transfer processes in the circuits are the thermal and galvanic electromotive forces (EMF) of the microcouples. On the basis of the theoretical concepts developed the authors have obtained analytical dependences for calculating the individual stages of the process of corrosion product transfer in the circuits. The mechanisms underlying the processes which occur as a result of thermal and galvanic EMFs are considered, together with the factors influencing these processes. The results of verification of the dependences by computational methods are given and they are compared with operational data from nuclear and conventional thermal power plants and with experimental data. (author)

  20. Investigation of the Degradation Mechanisms of Particulate Reinforced Epoxy Coatings and Zinc-Rich Coatings Under an Erosion and Corrosion Environment for Oil and Gas Industry Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dailin

    During oil and gas production and transportation, the presence of an oil-sand slurry, together with the presence of CO2, H2S, oxygen, and seawater, create an erosive/abrasive and corrosive environment for the interior surfaces of undersea pipelines transporting oil and gas from offshore platforms. Erosion/wear and corrosion are often synergic processes leading to a much greater material loss of pipeline cross-section than that caused by each individual process alone. Both organic coatings and metallic sacrificial coatings have been widely employed to provide protection to the pipeline steels against corrosion through barrier protection and cathodic protection, and these protection mechanisms have been well studied. However, coating performance under the synergic processes of erosion/wear and corrosion have been much less researched and coating degradation mechanisms when erosion/wear and corrosion are both going on has not been well elucidated. In the work presented in this dissertation, steel panels coated with filler reinforced epoxy coatings and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) reinforced zinc-rich coatings have been evaluated under erosion/wear followed by an exposure to a corrosive environment. Electrochemical tests and material characterization methods have been applied to study the degradation mechanisms of the coatings during the tests and coating degradation mechanisms have been proposed. While organic coatings with a lower amount of filler particles provided better protection in a corrosive environment alone and in solid particle impingement erosion testing alone, organic coatings with a higher amount of filler particles showed better performance during wear testing alone. A higher amount of filler particles was also beneficial in providing protection against wear and corrosion environment, and erosion and corrosion environment. Coating thickness played a significant role in the barrier properties of the coatings under both erosion and corrosion tests. When the

  1. Effect of erbium modification on the microstructure, mechanical and corrosion characteristics of binary Mg–Al alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seetharaman, Sankaranarayanan, E-mail: seetharaman.s@nus.edu.sg [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National University of Singapore, 9 Engineering Drive 1, 117576 (Singapore); Blawert, Carsten [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Magnesium Innovation Centre, Max-Planck-Straße 1, D-21502, Geesthacht (Germany); Ng, Baoshu Milton [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National University of Singapore, 9 Engineering Drive 1, 117576 (Singapore); Wong, Wai Leong Eugene [School of Mechanical and Systems Engineering, New Castle University International Singapore, 180 Ang Mo Kio Avenue 8, 569830 (Singapore); Goh, Chwee Sim [ITE Technology Development Centre, ITE College Central, 2 Ang Mo Kio Drive, 567720 (Singapore); Hort, Norbert [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Magnesium Innovation Centre, Max-Planck-Straße 1, D-21502, Geesthacht (Germany); Gupta, Manoj, E-mail: mpegm@nus.edu.sg [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National University of Singapore, 9 Engineering Drive 1, 117576 (Singapore)

    2015-11-05

    In this study, new erbium modified Mg–Al alloys were developed by integrating trace erbium (in the form of Al{sub 94.67}Er{sub 5.33} master alloy) into pure Mg using disintegrated melt deposition technique. The developed Er- modified Mg–Al alloys were investigated for their microstructural, mechanical and corrosion characteristics in comparison with their unmodified counterparts. Microstructural investigation revealed (i) improved purity, (ii) (marginal) grain refinement, (iii) more uniform second phase distribution and (iv) Al{sub 3}Er phase formation due to Er modification. Mechanical property measurements revealed an overall enhancement under indentation, tension and compression loads. A remarkable improvement in tensile ductility (without adverse effects on strength) by +19%, +29%, and +58% was obtained in Mg–3Al–0.1Er, Mg–6Al–0.3Er and Mg–9Al–0.5Er when compared to Mg–3Al, Mg–6Al and Mg–9Al respectively. While the Mg–6Al–0.3Er alloy exhibited best ductility, the Mg–9Al–0.5Er has the best strength under both tension and compression loads. Corrosion characteristics evaluated by hydrogen evolution, salt spray and electrochemical impedance experiments revealed improved corrosion resistance of Er modified Mg–Al alloys by the enhanced purity levels and the formation of Al–Er phases. - Highlights: • New erbium modified Mg–Al alloys successfully synthesized using DMD method. • Erbium modification promoted Al{sub 3}Er formation and improved the purity. • Remarkable improvement in tensile ductility obtained after erbium modification. • The developed erbium modified Mg–Al alloys exhibit improved corrosion resistance.

  2. Structure, mechanical properties, corrosion behavior and cytotoxicity of biodegradable Mg–X (X = Sn, Ga, In) alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubásek, J., E-mail: Jiri.Kubasek@vscht.cz [Department of Metals and Corrosion Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, Prague, Technická 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Vojtěch, D. [Department of Metals and Corrosion Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, Prague, Technická 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Lipov, J.; Ruml, T. [Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, Institute of Chemical Technology, Prague, Technická 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2013-05-01

    As-cast Mg–Sn, Mg–Ga and Mg–In alloys containing 1–7 wt.% of alloying elements were studied in this work. Structural and chemical analysis of the alloys was performed by using light and scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectrometry, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and glow discharge spectrometry. Mechanical properties were determined by Vickers hardness measurements and tensile testing. Corrosion behavior in a simulated physiological solution (9 g/l NaCl) was studied by immersion tests and potentiodynamic measurements. The cytotoxicity effect of the alloys on human osteosarcoma cells (U-2 OS) was determined by an indirect contact assay. Structural investigation revealed the dendritic morphology of the as-cast alloys with the presence of secondary eutectic phases in the Mg–Sn and Mg–Ga alloys. All the alloying elements showed hardening and strengthening effects on magnesium. This effect was the most pronounced in the case of Ga. All the alloying elements at low concentrations of approximately 1 wt.% were also shown to positively affect the corrosion resistance of Mg. But at higher concentrations of Ga and Sn the corrosion resistance worsened due to galvanic effects of secondary phases. Cytotoxicity tests indicated that Ga had the lowest toxicity, followed by Sn. The most severe toxicity was observed in the case of In. - Highlights: ► Gallium addition (up to 7 wt.%) improves the strength and toughness of as-cast Mg. ► The effect of indium addition (up to 7 wt.%) on mechanical properties is small. ► Gallium, Tin and Indium addition improves the corrosion resistance of as-cast Mg. ► Gallium shows no toxic effect on osteosarcoma cells. ► Tin and indium show serious toxic effect on osteosarcoma cells.

  3. Microstructure, mechanical properties, bio-corrosion properties and cytotoxicity of as-extruded Mg-Sr alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chaoyong; Pan, Fusheng; Zhang, Lei; Pan, Hucheng; Song, Kai; Tang, Aitao

    2017-01-01

    In this study, as-extruded Mg-Sr alloys were studied for orthopedic application, and the microstructure, mechanical properties, bio-corrosion properties and cytotoxicity of as-extruded Mg-Sr alloys were investigated by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, tensile and compressive tests, immersion test, electrochemical test and cytotoxicity test. The results showed that as-extruded Mg-Sr alloys were composed of α-Mg and Mg 17 Sr 2 phases, and the content of Mg 17 Sr 2 phases increased with increasing Sr content. As-extruded Mg-Sr alloy with 0.5wt.% Sr was equiaxed grains, while the one with a higher Sr content was long elongated grains and the grain size of the long elongated grains decreased with increasing Sr content. Tensile and compressive tests showed an increase of both tensile and compressive strength and a decrease of elongation with increasing Sr content. Immersion and electrochemical tests showed that as-extruded Mg-0.5Sr alloy exhibited the best anti-corrosion property, and the anti-corrosion property of as-extruded Mg-Sr alloys deteriorated with increasing Sr content, which was greatly associated with galvanic couple effect. The cytotoxicity test revealed that as-extruded Mg-0.5Sr alloy did not induce toxicity to cells. These results indicated that as-extruded Mg-0.5Sr alloy with suitable mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and good cytocompatibility was potential as a biodegradable implant for orthopedic application. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of erbium modification on the microstructure, mechanical and corrosion characteristics of binary Mg–Al alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seetharaman, Sankaranarayanan; Blawert, Carsten; Ng, Baoshu Milton; Wong, Wai Leong Eugene; Goh, Chwee Sim; Hort, Norbert; Gupta, Manoj

    2015-01-01

    In this study, new erbium modified Mg–Al alloys were developed by integrating trace erbium (in the form of Al 94.67 Er 5.33 master alloy) into pure Mg using disintegrated melt deposition technique. The developed Er- modified Mg–Al alloys were investigated for their microstructural, mechanical and corrosion characteristics in comparison with their unmodified counterparts. Microstructural investigation revealed (i) improved purity, (ii) (marginal) grain refinement, (iii) more uniform second phase distribution and (iv) Al 3 Er phase formation due to Er modification. Mechanical property measurements revealed an overall enhancement under indentation, tension and compression loads. A remarkable improvement in tensile ductility (without adverse effects on strength) by +19%, +29%, and +58% was obtained in Mg–3Al–0.1Er, Mg–6Al–0.3Er and Mg–9Al–0.5Er when compared to Mg–3Al, Mg–6Al and Mg–9Al respectively. While the Mg–6Al–0.3Er alloy exhibited best ductility, the Mg–9Al–0.5Er has the best strength under both tension and compression loads. Corrosion characteristics evaluated by hydrogen evolution, salt spray and electrochemical impedance experiments revealed improved corrosion resistance of Er modified Mg–Al alloys by the enhanced purity levels and the formation of Al–Er phases. - Highlights: • New erbium modified Mg–Al alloys successfully synthesized using DMD method. • Erbium modification promoted Al 3 Er formation and improved the purity. • Remarkable improvement in tensile ductility obtained after erbium modification. • The developed erbium modified Mg–Al alloys exhibit improved corrosion resistance

  5. Measurements and mechanisms of localized aqueous corrosion in aluminum-lithium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchheit, Rudolph G., Jr.; Stoner, Glenn E.

    1990-01-01

    Like most heat treatable aluminum alloys, localized corrosion and stress corrosion of Al-Li-Cu alloys is strongly dependent on the nature and distribution of second phase particles. To develop a mechanistic understanding of the role of localized corrosion in the stress corrosion process, bulk samples of T(sub 1) (Al2CuLi) and a range of Al-Cu-Fe impurity phases were prepared for electrochemical experiments. Potentiodynamic polarization and galvanic couple experiments were performed in standard 0.6 M NaCl and in simulated crevice solutions to assess corrosion behavior of these particles with respect to the alpha-Al matrix. A comparison of time to failure versus applied potential using a constant load, smooth bar SCC test technique in Cl(-), Cl(-)/CrO4(2-), and Cl(-)/CO3(2-) environments shows that rapid failures are to be expected when applied potentials are more positive than the breakaway potential (E sub br) of T(sub 1) (crack tip) but less than E(sub br) of alpha-Al (crack walls). It is shown that this criterion is not satisfied in aerated Cl(-) solutions. Accordingly, SCC resistance is good. This criterion is satisfied, however, in an alkaline isolated fissure exposed to a CO2 containing atmosphere. Rapid failure induced by these fissures was recently termed preexposure embrittlement. Anodic polarization shows that the corrosion behavior of T(sub 1) is relatively unaffected in alkaline CO3(2-) environments but the alpha-Al phase is rapidly passivated. X ray diffraction of crevice walls from artificial crevices suggests that passivation of alpha-Al occurs as hydrotalcite-type compound (LiAl2(OH)6)2(+) - CO3(2-) - nH2O.

  6. Failure of MPC overpack and inner container under corrosion and mechanical stresses in a backfilled drift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladkany, S.G.; Rajagopalan, R.

    1995-01-01

    The thickness and time at failure of the 100mm thick overpack and the 9.5mm thick inner container of a Multi-purpose canister have been assessed due to loads resulting from temperature, overburden, backfill pressure and seismic loads. Critical stresses at various reduced thicknesses, resulting from pitting corrosion over the years of emplacement, have been evaluated using Finite element analysis. Both simple and continuous support conditions of the overpack have been considered in the analysis. The anticipated failure time due to corrosion of overpack and inner container is further reduced due to overburden, self and seismic loads

  7. First-Principles Approach to Model Electrochemical Reactions: Understanding the Fundamental Mechanisms behind Mg Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surendralal, Sudarsan; Todorova, Mira; Finnis, Michael W.; Neugebauer, Jörg

    2018-06-01

    Combining concepts of semiconductor physics and corrosion science, we develop a novel approach that allows us to perform ab initio calculations under controlled potentiostat conditions for electrochemical systems. The proposed approach can be straightforwardly applied in standard density functional theory codes. To demonstrate the performance and the opportunities opened by this approach, we study the chemical reactions that take place during initial corrosion at the water-Mg interface under anodic polarization. Based on this insight, we derive an atomistic model that explains the origin of the anodic hydrogen evolution.

  8. Determination of the corrosion mechanisms of high level waste containing glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conradt, R.; Roggendorf, H.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of the reported work was to determine the corrosion behaviour of the inactive HLW glass SM 58 LW 11 in Q-solution at temperatures up to 200 0 C and elevated pressures up to 13 MPa. In particular, a parametric study on the effects of time, temperature, pressure, crystallization, metallic impurities a.o. was performed. Further tests helped to identify the rate determining steps in the entire process and the most likely long-term corrosion law. (orig./RB)

  9. Photochemical synthesis of biomolecules under anoxic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folsome, C.; Brittain, A.; Zelko, M.

    1983-01-01

    The long-wavelength UV anoxic photosynthesis of uracil, various sugars (including deoxyribose and glycoaldehyde), amino acids, and other organic photoproducts is reported. The reactions were conducted in a mixture of water, calcium carbonate, hydrazine, and formaldehyde which were subjected to 24 hr or 72 hr radiation. Product yields were greatest when the hydrazine/formaldehyde ratio was one, and when the reactant concentrations were low. These data suggest that organic products can be formed in variety from those amounts of formaldehyde and hydazine precursors which are themselves formed under anoxic UV photochemical conditions.

  10. Effect of Annealing Temperature on the Mechanical and Corrosion Behavior of a Newly Developed Novel Lean Duplex Stainless Steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yanjun; Hu, Jincheng; Li, Jin; Jiang, Laizhu; Liu, Tianwei; Wu, Yanping

    2014-09-12

    The effect of annealing temperature (1000-1150 °C) on the microstructure evolution, mechanical properties, and pitting corrosion behavior of a newly developed novel lean duplex stainless steel with 20.53Cr-3.45Mn-2.08Ni-0.17N-0.31Mo was studied by means of optical metallographic microscopy (OMM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), magnetic force microscopy (MFM), scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy (SKPFM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), uniaxial tensile tests (UTT), and potentiostatic critical pitting temperature (CPT). The results showed that tensile and yield strength, as well as the pitting corrosion resistance, could be degraded with annealing temperature increasing from 1000 up to 1150 °C. Meanwhile, the elongation at break reached the maximum of 52.7% after annealing at 1050 °C due to the effect of martensite transformation induced plasticity (TRIP). The localized pitting attack preferentially occurred at ferrite phase, indicating that the ferrite phase had inferior pitting corrosion resistance as compared to the austenite phase. With increasing annealing temperature, the pitting resistance equivalent number (PREN) of ferrite phase dropped, while that of the austenite phase rose. Additionally, it was found that ferrite possessed a lower Volta potential than austenite phase. Moreover, the Volta potential difference between ferrite and austenite increased with the annealing temperature, which was well consistent with the difference of PREN.

  11. The Effect of Vibration during Friction Stir Welding on Corrosion Behavior, Mechanical Properties, and Machining Characteristics of Stir Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajad Fouladi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Different methods have been applied to refine various characteristics of the zone (or nugget obtained by friction stir welding (FSW. In the current research, joining components are vibrated normal to the weld line during FSW to refine the zone microstructure. This process is described as friction stir vibration welding (FSVW. The effect of FSVW on mechanical properties, corrosion behavior, and machining characteristics of the zone are investigated. Al5052 alloy specimens are welded using FSW and FSVW processes and their different characteristics are compared and discussed. The results show that the strength and ductility of the welded parts increase when the vibration is applied. The outcomes also show that corrosion resistance of the nugget for FSV-welded specimens is lower than FS welded samples, and machining force of the former specimens is higher than the latter ones. These are related to smaller grain size in the zone of FSV-welded specimens compared to FS welded parts. Smaller grain size leads to a greater volume fraction of grain boundaries and, correspondingly, higher strength and hardness, as well as lower corrosion resistance.

  12. Structure, mechanical properties, corrosion behavior and cytotoxicity of biodegradable Mg-X (X=Sn, Ga, In) alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubásek, J; Vojtěch, D; Lipov, J; Ruml, T

    2013-05-01

    As-cast Mg-Sn, Mg-Ga and Mg-In alloys containing 1-7 wt.% of alloying elements were studied in this work. Structural and chemical analysis of the alloys was performed by using light and scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectrometry, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and glow discharge spectrometry. Mechanical properties were determined by Vickers hardness measurements and tensile testing. Corrosion behavior in a simulated physiological solution (9 g/l NaCl) was studied by immersion tests and potentiodynamic measurements. The cytotoxicity effect of the alloys on human osteosarcoma cells (U-2 OS) was determined by an indirect contact assay. Structural investigation revealed the dendritic morphology of the as-cast alloys with the presence of secondary eutectic phases in the Mg-Sn and Mg-Ga alloys. All the alloying elements showed hardening and strengthening effects on magnesium. This effect was the most pronounced in the case of Ga. All the alloying elements at low concentrations of approximately 1 wt.% were also shown to positively affect the corrosion resistance of Mg. But at higher concentrations of Ga and Sn the corrosion resistance worsened due to galvanic effects of secondary phases. Cytotoxicity tests indicated that Ga had the lowest toxicity, followed by Sn. The most severe toxicity was observed in the case of In. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Revealing Nanoscale Passivation and Corrosion Mechanisms of Reactive Battery Materials in Gas Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuzhang; Li, Yanbin; Sun, Yongming; Butz, Benjamin; Yan, Kai; Koh, Ai Leen; Zhao, Jie; Pei, Allen; Cui, Yi

    2017-08-09

    Lithium (Li) metal is a high-capacity anode material (3860 mAh g -1 ) that can enable high-energy batteries for electric vehicles and grid-storage applications. However, Li metal is highly reactive and repeatedly consumed when exposed to liquid electrolyte (during battery operation) or the ambient environment (throughout battery manufacturing). Studying these corrosion reactions on the nanoscale is especially difficult due to the high chemical reactivity of both Li metal and its surface corrosion films. Here, we directly generate pure Li metal inside an environmental transmission electron microscope (TEM), revealing the nanoscale passivation and corrosion process of Li metal in oxygen (O 2 ), nitrogen (N 2 ), and water vapor (H 2 O). We find that while dry O 2 and N 2 (99.9999 vol %) form uniform passivation layers on Li, trace water vapor (∼1 mol %) disrupts this passivation and forms a porous film on Li metal that allows gas to penetrate and continuously react with Li. To exploit the self-passivating behavior of Li in dry conditions, we introduce a simple dry-N 2 pretreatment of Li metal to form a protective layer of Li nitride prior to battery assembly. The fast ionic conductivity and stable interface of Li nitride results in improved battery performance with dendrite-free cycling and low voltage hysteresis. Our work reveals the detailed process of Li metal passivation/corrosion and demonstrates how this mechanistic insight can guide engineering solutions for Li metal batteries.

  14. Corrosion and corrosion control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khanna, A.S.; Totlani, M.K.

    1995-01-01

    Corrosion has always been associated with structures, plants, installations and equipment exposed to aggressive environments. It effects economy, safety and product reliability. Monitoring of component corrosion has thus become an essential requirement for the plant health and safety. Protection methods such as appropriate coatings, cathodic protection and use of inhibitors have become essential design parameters. High temperature corrosion, especially hot corrosion, is still a difficult concept to accommodate in corrosion allowance; there is a lack of harmonized system of performance testing of materials at high temperatures. In order to discuss and deliberate on these aspects, National Association for Corrosion Engineers International organised a National Conference on Corrosion and its Control in Bombay during November 28-30, 1995. This volume contains papers presented at the symposium. Paper relevant to INIS is indexed separately. refs., figs., tabs

  15. Dictionary corrosion and corrosion control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This dictionary has 13000 entries in both languages. Keywords and extensive accompanying information simplify the choice of word for the user. The following topics are covered: Theoretical principles of corrosion; Corrosion of the metals and alloys most frequently used in engineering. Types of corrosion - (chemical-, electro-chemical, biological corrosion); forms of corrosion (superficial, pitting, selective, intercrystalline and stress corrosion; vibrational corrosion cracking); erosion and cavitation. Methods of corrosion control (material selection, temporary corrosion protection media, paint and plastics coatings, electro-chemical coatings, corrosion prevention by treatment of the corrosive media); Corrosion testing methods. (orig./HP) [de

  16. Effect of alloying Mo on mechanical strength and corrosion resistance of Zr-1% Sn-1% Nb-1% Fe alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugondo

    2011-01-01

    It had been done research on Zr-1%Sn-1%Nb-1%Fe-(x)%Mo alloy. The ingot was prepared by means of electrical electrode technique. The chemical analysis was identified by XRF, the metallography examination was perform by an optical microscope, the hardness test was done by Vickers microhardness, and the corrosion test was done in autoclave. The objective of this research were making Zr-1%Sn-1%Nb-1%Fe-(x)%Mo alloy with Mo concentration; comparing effect of Mo concentration to metal characteristics of Zr-1%Sn-1%Nb-1%Fe which covered microstructure; composition homogeneity, mechanical strength; and corrosion resistance in steam, and determining the optimal Mo concentration in Zr-1%Sn-1%Nb-1%Fe-(x)% Mo alloy for nuclear fuel cladding which had corrosion resistance and high hardness. The results were as follow: The alloying Mo refined grains at concentration in between 0,1%-0,3% and the concentration more than that could coarsened grains. The hardness of the Zr-1%Sn-1%Nb-1%Fe-(x)%Mo alloy was controlled either by the flaw or the dislocation, the intersection of the harder alloying element, the solid solution of the alloying element and the second phase formation of ZrMo 2 . The corrosion rate of the Zr-1%Sn-1%Nb-1%Fe-(x)%Mo alloy was controlled by the second phase of ZrMo 2 . The 0.3% Mo concentration in Zr-1%Sn-1%Nb-1%Fe-(x)%Mo alloy was the best for second phase formation. The Mo concentration in between 0,3-0,5% in Zr-1%Sn-1%Nb-1%Fe-(x)%Mo alloy was good for the second phase formation and the solid solution. (author)

  17. On the contribution of electrochemical methods in the study of corrosion mechanisms in automotive body steel sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massinon, D.; Dauchelle, D.; Charbonnier, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    Complex mechanisms and interactions seem to govern the degradation of automotive body panels. The multimaterial nature of the system (steel, coating, conversion layer and paint), together with the variety of agressions it can encounter makes it a difficult task to characterize the corrosion mechanism(s). To this aim, physical analysis of corroded surfaces have recently yielded new insights on the role of some parameters and especially the quality of the interfaces, i.e. paint/coating and coating/steel. Electrochemistry, on the other hand, has given much information on phenomena such as selective dissolution, galvanic protection of steel by a coating, or oxygen diffusion through an organic coating. More and more is being known about the role of the paint and the mechanisms of its adhesion on a metallic substrate. However, a link between those theories is still missing and a full understanding of the corrosion phenomenon has not been achieved yet. We have developed original techniques in order to look into the corroded specimens with the most sophisticated physical analysis tools. The observed phenomena can be simulated and, whenever possible, quantified. This approach requires the use of different electrochemical techniques which will be presented in this paper. (author) 8 refs., 15 figs

  18. Microstructure, Mechanical Properties and Corrosion Behavior of Porous Mg-6 wt.% Zn Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yang; Kang, Yijun; Li, Ding; Yu, Kun; Xiao, Tao; Wang, Qiyuan; Deng, Youwen; Fang, Hongjie; Jiang, Dayue; Zhang, Yu

    2018-03-01

    Porous Mg-based scaffolds have been extensively researched as biodegradable implants due to their attractive biological and excellent mechanical properties. In this study, porous Mg-6 wt.% Zn scaffolds were prepared by powder metallurgy using ammonium bicarbonate particles as space-holder particles. The effects of space-holder particle content on the microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of the Mg-6 wt.% Zn scaffolds were studied. The mean porosity and pore size of the open-cellular scaffolds were within the range 6.7-52.2% and 32.3-384.2 µm, respectively. Slight oxidation was observed at the grain boundaries and on the pore walls. The Mg-6 wt.% Zn scaffolds were shown to possess mechanical properties comparable with those of natural bone and had variable in vitro degradation rates. Increased content of space-holder particles negatively affected the mechanical behavior and corrosion resistance of the Mg-6 wt.% Zn scaffolds, especially when higher than 20%. These results suggest that porous Mg-6 wt.% Zn scaffolds are promising materials for application in bone tissue engineering.

  19. Corrosion protection of metals by phosphate coatings and ecologically beneficial alternatives. Properties and mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weng Duan.

    1995-01-01

    The corrosion and protection characteristics of inorganic zinc and manganese phosphate coatings in aqueous solution have been examined by physical methods, accelerated corrosion tests and electrochemical polarization and impedance measurements. Some water-soluble organic films have been evaluated for the temporary protection of metal parts as the ecologically beneficial alternatives to phosphate coatings. The results show that zinc phosphate is a better insulator than manganese phosphate, but the porosity of the former is inferior to that of the latter. In neutral and alkaline solutions the anodic current of both zinc and manganese phosphates decreases and their open potential moves in a positive direction. In acidic medium both the polarization current and the open potential are close to those of the substrate. Confirmed by the impedance measurements, the corrosion of phosphated steel in acidic solution is controlled by a dissolution reaction, in neutral medium is first reaction controlled then diffusion controlled, and in alkaline environment only diffusion controlled. The insulation of acrylate+copolymer, epoxy and inhibitor+bonding materials is superior to that of zinc or manganese phosphates. In general, most of the alternatives can afford a better temporary protection for metal parts compared to inorganic phosphate coatings. The corrosion failure of inorganic phosphate coatings is mainly induced by the electrochemical dissolution of the substrate. This electrochemical process initiates at the bottom of the pores within the coating. In neutral solution, the hydrolysis of corrosion products decrease the pH value of the solution in the anodic zone, resulting in an acidic dissolution of phosphate coatings. At the same time, the depolarization of oxygen increases the pH value in the cathodic zone, causing an alkaline hydrolysis of phosphates. (author) figs., tabs., 149 refs

  20. On the mechanisms of the corrosion of weathering steel by SO{sub 2} in laboratory studies: influence of the environmental parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marco, J. F., E-mail: jfmarco@iqfr.csic.es [Instituto de Química Física “Rocasolano”, CSIC (Spain)

    2017-11-15

    We report here on the mechanisms underlying the corrosion of weathering steel in accelerated laboratory tests using artificially polluted SO{sub 2}-atmospheres. The role of corrosion parameters such as the SO{sub 2} concentration, the exposure time, the relative humidity and temperature of the environment are discussed in detail. Through the extensive use of Mössbauer spectroscopy in both its transmission and electron detection modes, as well as with the help of other analysis techniques, the characterization of the different corrosion products at the various stages of the corrosion process has been carried out. The results complement the data obtained in field studies and help to understand the mechanisms involved in this complex phenomenon.

  1. Identification of corrosion and damage mechanisms by using scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis: contribution to failure analysis case histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantazopoulos, G.; Vazdirvanidis, A.

    2014-03-01

    Emphasis is placed on the evaluation of corrosion failures of copper and machineable brass alloys during service. Typical corrosion failures of the presented case histories mainly focussed on stress corrosion cracking and dezincification that acted as the major degradation mechanisms in components used in piping and water supply systems. SEM assessment, coupled with EDS spectroscopy, revealed the main cracking modes together with the root-source(s) that are responsible for the damage initiation and evolution. In addition, fracture surface observations contributed to the identification of the incurred fracture mechanisms and potential environmental issues that stimulated crack initiation and propagation. Very frequently, the detection of chlorides among the corrosion products served as a suggestive evidence of the influence of working environment on passive layer destabilisation and metal dissolution.

  2. Erosion and erosion-corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isomoto, Yoshinori

    2008-01-01

    It is very difficult to interpret the technical term of erosion-corrosion' which is sometimes encountered in piping systems of power plants, because of complicated mechanisms and several confusing definitions of erosion-corrosion phenomena. 'FAC (flow accelerated corrosion)' is recently introduced as wall thinning of materials in power plant systems, as a representative of 'erosion-corrosion'. FAC is, however, not necessarily well understood and compared with erosion-corrosion. This paper describes firstly the origin, definition and fundamental understandings of erosion and erosion-corrosion, in order to reconsider and reconfirm the phenomena of erosion, erosion-corrosion and FAC. Next, typical mapping of erosion, corrosion, erosion-corrosion and FAC are introduced in flow velocity and environmental corrosiveness axes. The concept of damage rate in erosion-corrosion is finally discussed, connecting dissolution rate, mass transfer of metal ions in a metal oxide film and film growth. (author)

  3. Exploratory shaft liner corrosion estimate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, D.R.

    1985-10-01

    An estimate of expected corrosion degradation during the 100-year design life of the Exploratory Shaft (ES) is presented. The basis for the estimate is a brief literature survey of corrosion data, in addition to data taken by the Basalt Waste Isolation Project. The scope of the study is expected corrosion environment of the ES, the corrosion modes of general corrosion, pitting and crevice corrosion, dissimilar metal corrosion, and environmentally assisted cracking. The expected internal and external environment of the shaft liner is described in detail and estimated effects of each corrosion mode are given. The maximum amount of general corrosion degradation was estimated to be 70 mils at the exterior and 48 mils at the interior, at the shaft bottom. Corrosion at welds or mechanical joints could be significant, dependent on design. After a final determination of corrosion allowance has been established by the project it will be added to the design criteria. 10 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs

  4. Effect of Welding Process on Microstructure, Mechanical and Pitting Corrosion Behaviour of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Raffi; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.; Srinivasa Rao, K.

    2018-03-01

    An attempt has been made to weld 2205 Duplex stainless steel of 6mm thick plate using conventional gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and activated gas tungsten arc welding (A- GTAW) process using silica powder as activated flux. Present work is aimed at studying the effect of welding process on depth of penetration, width of weld zone of 2205 duplex stainless steel. It also aims to observe the microstructural changes and its effect on mechanical properties and pitting corrosion resistance of 2205 duplex stainless steel welds. Metallography is done to observe the microstructural changes of the welds using image analyzer attached to the optical microscopy. Hardness studies, tensile and ductility bend tests were evaluated for mechanical properties. Potentio-dynamic polarization studies were carried out using a basic GillAC electro-chemical system in 3.5% NaCl solution to observe the pitting corrosion behaviour. Results of the present investigation established that increased depth of penetration and reduction of weld width in a single pass by activated GTAW with the application of SiO2 flux was observed when compared with conventional GTAW process. It may be attributed to the arc constriction effect. Microstructure of the weld zones for both the welds is observed to be having combination of austenite and delta ferrite. Grain boundary austenite (GBA) with Widmanstatten-type austenite (WA) of plate-like feature was nucleated from the grain boundaries in the weld zone of A-GTAW process. Mechanical properties are relatively low in activated GTAW process and are attributed to changes in microstructural morphology of austenite. Improved pitting corrosion resistance was observed for the welds made with A-GTAW process.

  5. Reassessment of anoxic storage of ethnographic rubber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shashoua, Yvonne; Dyer, Joanne; Ward, Clare

    2011-01-01

    This paper revisits the 1991–1995 British Museum field trial on anoxic storage, where 23 registered ethnographic rubber objects were enclosed in oxygen barrier film Cryovac BDF200 with sachets of the oxygen absorbent Ageless Z. A unique opportunity for study was presented since most of the enclos...

  6. Microbial oceanography of anoxic oxygen minimum zones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulloa, Osvaldo; Canfield, Donald E; DeLong, Edward F

    2012-01-01

    oxide (N(2)O) gases. Anaerobic microbial processes, including the two pathways of N(2) production, denitrification and anaerobic ammonium oxidation, are oxygen-sensitive, with some occurring only under strictly anoxic conditions. The detection limit of the usual method (Winkler titrations) for measuring...

  7. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES AND CORROSION PROTECTION OF CARBON STEEL COATED WITH AN EPOXY BASED POWDER COATING CONTAINING MONTMORILONITE FUNCTIONALIZED WITH SILANE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Tibola Bertuoli

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present work the MMT-Na+ clay was functionalized with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (γ-APS and incorporated in a commercial formulation epoxy-based powder coating in a proportion of 8 wt% and applied on 1008 carbon steel panels by electrostatic spray. Adhesion, flexibility, impact and corrosion performance in salt spray chamber tests were performed to evaluate the coatings. The presence of clay did not affect the mechanical properties of the film, however greater subcutaneous migration was assessed after the completion of salt spray testing, which can compromise the use of paints obtained as primers.

  8. Generalized corrosion of nickel base alloys in high temperature aqueous media: a contribution to the comprehension of the mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchetti-Sillans, L.

    2007-11-01

    In France, nickel base alloys, such as alloy 600 and alloy 690, are the materials constituting steam generators (SG) tubes of pressurized water reactors (PWR). The generalized corrosion resulting from the interaction between these alloys and the PWR primary media leads, on the one hand, to the formation of a thin protective oxide scale (∼ 10 nm), and on the other hand, to the release of cations in the primary circuit, which entails an increase of the global radioactivity of this circuit. The goal of this work is to supply some new comprehension elements about nickel base alloys corrosion phenomena in PWR primary media, taking up with underlining the effects of metallurgical and physico-chemical parameters on the nature and the growth mechanisms of the protective oxide scale. In this context, the passive film formed during the exposition of alloys 600, 690 and Ni-30Cr, in conditions simulating the PWR primary media, has been analyzed by a set of characterization techniques (SEM, TEM, PEC and MPEC, XPS). The coupling of these methods leads to a fine description, in terms of nature and structure, of the multilayered oxide forming during the exposition of nickel base alloys in primary media. Thus, the protective part of the oxide scale is composed of a continuous layer of iron and nickel mixed chromite, and Cr 2 O 3 nodules dispersed at the alloy / mixed chromite interface. The study of protective scale growth mechanisms by tracers and markers experiments reveals that the formation of the mixed chromite is the consequence of an anionic mechanism, resulting from short circuits like grain boundaries diffusion. Besides, the impact of alloy surface defects has also been studied, underlining a double effect of this parameter, which influences the short circuits diffusion density in oxide and the formation rate of Cr 2 O 3 nodules. The sum of these results leads to suggest a description of the nickel base alloys corrosion mechanisms in PWR primary media and to tackle some

  9. Investigation of Mechanical, Microstructural and Corrosion behaviour of Titanium subjected to Laser Peening with and without Ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjith Kumar, G.; Sowmya Joshi, K.; Rajyalakshmi, G.; Kalainathan, S.; Prabhakaran, S.

    2018-02-01

    Present competitive world is looking for Components with high strength and fatigue resistance finding their applications in aerospace, turbine parts and especially bio-medical devices with high bio-compatibility. Advanced surface engineering techniques are required to produce parts of higher complexities and desirable surface qualities. Laser peening stood first in a row of all various surface treatments of metallic component. This paper discusses about the mechanical properties like hardness and roughness then the surface morphology and the corrosion behaviour of the laser peened titanium samples with and without coating.

  10. General corrosion, irradiation-corrosion, and environmental-mechanical evaluation of nuclear-waste-package structural-barrier materials. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westerman, R.E.; Pitman, S.G.; Nelson, J.L.

    1982-09-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory is studying the general corrosion, irradiation-corrosion, and environmentally enhanced crack propagation of five candidate materials in high-temperature aqueous environments simulating those expected in basalt and tuff repositories. The materials include three cast ferrous materials (ductile cast iron and two low-alloy Cr-Mo cast steels) and two titanium alloys, titanium Grade 2 (commercial purity) and Grade 12 (a Ti-Ni-Mo alloy). The general corrosion results are being obtained by autoclave exposure of specimens to slowly replenished simulated ground water flowing upward through a bed of the appropriate crushed rock (basalt or tuff), which is maintained at the desired test temperature (usually 250 0 C). In addition, tests are being performed in deionized water. Metal penetration rates of iron-base alloys are being derived by stripping off the corrosion product film and weighing the specimen after the appropriate exposure time. The corrosion of titanium alloy specimens is being determined by weight gain methods. The irradiation-corrosion studies are similar to the general corrosion tests, except that the specimen-bearing autoclaves are held in a 60 Co gamma radiation field at dose rates up to 2 x 10 6 rad/h. For evaluating the resistance of the candidate materials to environmentally enhanced crack propagation, three methods are being used: U-bend and fracture toughness specimens exposed in autoclaves; slow strain rate studies in repository-relevant environments to 300 0 C; and fatigue crack growth rate studies at ambient pressure and 90 0 C. The preliminary data suggest a 1-in. corrosion allowance for iron-base barrier elements intended for 1000-yr service in basalt or tuff repositories. No evidence has yet been found that titanium Grade 2 or Grade 12 is susceptible to environmentally induced crack propagation or, by extension, to stress corrosion cracking

  11. The corrosion mechanism of the sintered (Ce, Nd)-Fe-B magnets prepared by double main phase and single main phase approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaoning; Zhu, Minggang; Zhou, Dong; Song, Liwei; Guo, Zhaohui; Li, Jia; Li, Wei

    2018-05-01

    The sintered (Ce, Nd)-Fe-B magnets were produced widely by Double Main Phase (DMP) method in China as the magnetic properties of the DMP magnets are superior to those of single main phase (SMP) magnets with the same nominal composition. In this work, the microstructure and corrosion mechanism of the sintered (Ce0.2Nd0.8)30FebalB (wt.%) magnets prepared by DMP and SMP method were studied in detail. Compared to SMP magnets, the DMP magnets have more positive corrosion potential, lower corrosion current density, larger electron transfer resistance, and lower mass loss of the free corrosion experiment in 0.5mol/l Na2SO4 aqueous solution. All of the results show that the DMP magnets have better corrosion resistance than SMP magnets. The back scattered electron images show that the crystalline grains of the DMP magnets are sphericity with a smooth surface while the SMP ones have plenty of edges and corners. Besides, the distribution of Ce/Nd is much more uneven in both magnetic phase and rare earth (Re)-rich phase of the DMP magnets than those of SMP magnets. After corrosion, DMP magnets show eroded magnetic phase and intact Re-rich phase, which indicate that galvanic corrosion of the Re-rich phase acting as the cathode appears.

  12. Novel electrochemical approach to study corrosion mechanism of Al-Au wire-bond pad interconnections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elisseeva, O. V.; Bruhn, A.; Cerezo, J.

    2013-01-01

    A gold-aluminium material combination is typically employed as an interconnection for microelectronic devices. One of the reliability risks of such devices is that of corrosion of aluminium bond pads resulting from the galvanic coupling between an aluminium bond pad and a gold wire. The research...... presented in this manuscript focuses on studying bond pad corrosion by selecting an appropriate model system and a dedicated set of electrochemical and analytical experimental tools. Taking into account the complex three-dimensional structure and the small dimensions of Au-Al interconnections (around 50......-100 μm), a dedicated and novel experimental approach was developed. Au-Al covered silicon chips were developed under clean room conditions. Three-dimensional electrodes were mimicked as flat, two-dimensional bond pad model systems, allowing the use of microelectrochemical local probe techniques. Thin...

  13. Preliminary study of corrosion mechanisms of actinides alloys: calibration of FT-IR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnien, Veronique; Cadignan, Marx; Faivret, Olivier; Rosa, Gaelle

    2008-01-01

    In situ analyzes of gaseous atmospheres could be performed by FT-IR spectroscopy in order to study the corrosion reactions of actinides. Nevertheless experimental conditions and the nature of studied species have a strong effect on IR absorption laws. Thus a prior calibration of our set-up is required to obtain an accurate estimation of gas concentration. For this purpose, the behavior of several air pure gases has been investigated according to their concentration from IR spectra. Reproducible results revealed subsequent increases of the most significant peak areas with gas pressure and small deviations from Beer Lambert's law. This preliminary work allowed to determine precise absorption laws for each studied pure gas in our in situ experimental conditions. Besides our FT-IR set-up was well suitable to quantitative analysis of gaseous atmosphere during corrosion reactions. Finally the effect of foreign gas will be investigated through more complex air mixtures to obtain a complete calibration network. (authors)

  14. Corrosion of PWR steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnsey, R.

    1979-01-01

    Some designs of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generators have experienced a variety of corrosion problems which include stress corrosion cracking, tube thinning, pitting, fatigue, erosion-corrosion and support plate corrosion resulting in 'denting'. Large international research programmes have been mounted to investigate the phenomena. The operational experience is reviewed and mechanisms which have been proposed to explain the corrosion damage are presented. The implications for design development and for boiler and feedwater control are discussed. (author)

  15. Mechanism of Pitting Corrosion Prevention by Nitrite in Carbon Steel Exposed to Dilute Salt Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapp, Philip E.; Zee, John W. van

    2002-01-01

    The research has developed a broad fundamental understanding of the inhibition action of nitrite ions in preventing nitrate pitting corrosion of carbon steel tanks containing high-level radioactive waste. This fundamental understanding can be applied to specific situations during waste removal for permanent disposition and waste tank closure to ensure that the tanks are maintained safely. The results of the research provide the insight necessary to develop solutions that prevent further degradation

  16. Corrosion of metallic materials. Dry corrosion, aqueous corrosion and corrosion by liquid metal, methods of protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helie, Max

    2015-01-01

    This book is based on a course on materials given in an engineering school. The author first gives an overview of metallurgy issues: metallic materials (pure metals, metallic alloys), defects of crystal lattices (point defects, linear defects or dislocations), equilibrium diagrams, steels and cast, thermal processing of steels, stainless steels, aluminium and its alloys, copper and its alloys. The second part addresses the properties and characterization of surfaces and interfaces: singularity of a metal surface, surface energy of a metal, energy of grain boundaries, adsorption at a material surface, metal-electrolyte interface, surface oxide-electrolyte interface, techniques of surface analysis. The third chapter addresses the electrochemical aspects of corrosion: description of the corrosion phenomenon, free enthalpy of a compound and free enthalpy of a reaction, case of dry corrosion (thermodynamic aspect, Ellingham diagram, oxidation mechanisms, experimental study, macroscopic modelling), case of aqueous corrosion (electrochemical thermodynamics and kinetics, experimental determination of corrosion rate). The fourth part addresses the different forms of aqueous corrosion: generalized corrosion (atmospheric corrosion, mechanisms and tests), localized corrosion (galvanic, pitting, cracking, intergranular, erosion and cavitation), particular cases of stress cracking (stress corrosion, fatigue-corrosion, embrittlement by hydrogen), and bi-corrosion (of non alloyed steels, of stainless steels, and of aluminium and copper alloys). The sixth chapter addresses the struggle and the protection against aqueous corrosion: methods of prevention, scope of use of main alloys, geometry-based protection of pieces, use of corrosion inhibitors, use of organic or metallic coatings, electrochemical protection. The last chapter proposes an overview of corrosion types in industrial practices: in the automotive industry, in the oil industry, in the aircraft industry, and in the

  17. Study of the aqueous corrosion mechanisms and kinetics of the AlFeNi aluminium based alloy used for the fuel cladding in the Jules Horowitz research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wintergerst, M.

    2009-05-01

    For the Jules Horowitz new material-testing reactor (JHR), an aluminium base alloy, called AlFeNi, will be used for the cladding of the fuel plates. This alloy (Al - 1% Fe - 1% Ni - 1 % Mg), which is already used as fuel cladding, was developed for its good corrosion resistance in water at high temperatures. However, few studies dealing with the alteration process in water and the relationships with irradiation effects have been performed on this alloy. The conception of the JHR fuel requires a better knowledge of the corrosion mechanisms. Corrosion tests were performed in autoclaves at 70 C, 165 C and 250 C on AlFeNi plates representative of the fuel cladding. Several techniques were used to characterize the corrosion scale: SEM, TEM, EPMA, XRD, Raman spectroscopy. Our observations show that the corrosion scale is made of two main layers: a dense amorphous scale close to the metal and a porous crystalline scale in contact with the water. More than the morphology, the chemical compositions of both layers are different. This duplex structure results from a mixed growth mechanism: an anionic growth to develop the inner oxide and a cationic diffusion followed by a dissolution-precipitation process to form the outer one. Dynamic experiments at 70 C and corrosion kinetics measurements have demonstrated that the oxide growth process is controlled by a diffusion step associated to a dissolution/precipitation process. A corrosion mechanism of the AlFeNi alloy in aqueous media has been proposed. Then post-irradiation exams performed on irradiated fuel plates were used to investigate the effects of the irradiation on the corrosion behaviour in the reactor core. (author)

  18. Improved mechanical and corrosion properties of nickel composite coatings by incorporation of layered silicates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tientong, J. [University of North Texas, Department of Chemistry, 1155 Union Circle #305070, Denton, TX 76203 (United States); Ahmad, Y.H. [Center for Advanced Materials, P.O. Box 2713, Qatar University, Doha (Qatar); Nar, M.; D' Souza, N. [University of North Texas, Department of Mechanical and Energy Engineering, Denton, TX 76207 (United States); Mohamed, A.M.A. [Center for Advanced Materials, P.O. Box 2713, Qatar University, Doha (Qatar); Golden, T.D., E-mail: tgolden@unt.edu [University of North Texas, Department of Chemistry, 1155 Union Circle #305070, Denton, TX 76203 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Layered silicates as exfoliated montmorillonite are incorporated into nickel films by electrodeposition, enhancing both corrosion resistance and hardness. Films were deposited onto stainless steel from a plating solution adjusted to pH 9 containing nickel sulfate, sodium citrate, and various concentrations of exfoliated montmorillonite. The presence of the incorporated layered silicate was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The composite films were also compact and smooth like the pure nickel films deposited under the same conditions as shown by scanning electron microscopy. X-ray diffraction results showed that incorporation of layered silicates into the film do not affect the nickel crystalline fcc structure. The nanocomposite films exhibited improved stability and adhesion. Pure nickel films cracked and peeled from the substrate when immersed in 3.5% NaCl solution within 5 days, while the nanocomposite films remained attached even after 25 days. The corrosion resistance of the nickel nanocomposites was also improved compared to nickel films. Nickel-layered silicate composites showed a 25% increase in Young's modulus and a 20% increase in hardness over pure nickel films. - Highlights: • 0.05–2% of layered silicates are incorporated into crystalline nickel films. • Resulting composite films had improved stability and adhesion. • Corrosion resistance improved for the composite films. • Hardness improved 20% and young's modulus improved 25% for the composite films.

  19. Modeling of primary water stress corrosion cracking at control rod drive mechanism nozzles of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aly, Omar Fernandes

    2006-01-01

    One of the main failure mechanisms that cause risks to pressurized water reactors is the primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) occurring in alloys. It can occurs, besides another places, at the control reactor displacement mechanism nozzles. It is caused by the joint effect of tensile stress, temperature, susceptible metallurgical microstructure and environmental conditions of the primary water. These cracks can cause accidents that reduce nuclear safety by blocking the rod's displacement and may cause leakage of primary water, reducing the reactor's life. In this work it is proposed a study of the existing models and a modeling proposal to primary water stress corrosion cracking in these nozzles in a nickel based Alloy 600. It is been superposed electrochemical and fracture mechanics models, and validated using experimental and literature data. The experimental data were obtained at CDTN-Brazilian Nuclear Technology Development Center, in a recent installed slow strain rate testing equipment. In the literature it is found a diagram that indicates a thermodynamic condition for the occurrence of some PWSCC sub modes in Alloy 600: it was used potential x pH diagrams (Pourbaix diagrams), for Alloy 600 in high temperature primary water (300 deg C till 350 deg C). Over it, were located the PWSCC sub modes, using experimental data. It was added a third parameter called 'stress corrosion strength fraction'. However, it is possible to superpose to this diagram, other parameters expressing PWSCC initiation or growth kinetics from other models. Here is the proposition of the original contribution of this work: from an original experimental condition of potential versus pH, it was superposed, an empiric-comparative, a semi-empiric-probabilistic, an initiation time, and a strain rate damage models, to quantify respectively the PWSCC susceptibility, the failure time, and in the two lasts, the initiation time of stress corrosion cracking. It was modeling from our

  20. An analysis methodology of degradation by corrosion mechanisms and preventive actions of the negative effects in the NPP circuits with direct impact in the long-term development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinu, A.

    2010-01-01

    The corrosion mechanisms, implied in the degradation processes of several alloys, preoccupied the scientific world, producers and users of metallic materials, as well. Due to permanent presence of a potential danger, a great importance was given to corrosion evaluation and prevention in power domain, also including the nuclear power. The main activities have as aim the development of techniques and methods of investigation of structural materials corrosion. Also, there were developed methods of chemical investigation of the environment as well as data bases that allow the simulation of several corrosion types, characteristic of different materials systems and/or media. This made possible the prediction of safe operation life of several structural components. In this context, the paper presents the most important results of project with acronym 'PERFORMCOR' developed in the framework of PNCDI II, 'Capacities' Programme, Modulus I, with the aim of ensuring a R and D infrastructure upgrade of 'LADICON' laboratory of INR - Pitesti. (author)

  1. Effect of assembled time on the corrosion behaviors of SAMs film on the AM60B alloy and its assembled mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xianbin; Shan, Dayong; Song, Yingwei; Han, En-hou

    2015-01-01

    The influence of assembled time on the corrosion behaviors of SAMs film on the AM60B alloy and its assembled mechanism have been investigated by electrochemical measurements, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. The self-assembled experiment on the AM60B magnesium alloy indicates that the corrosion susceptibility decreases with increasing assembled time until 24 h on cast AM60B alloy and then increases with increase of the assembled time proved by EIS measurement and potentiodynamic curves. The self-assembled experiments on pure magnesium and various heat treated cast AM60B magnesium alloy illuminate that the dissolved aluminum in magnesium solid solution is the key factor for assembled efficiency and is hard to self-assemble on the pure magnesium without aluminum. The corrosion resistance of self-assembled film on AM60B magnesium alloy is monotonically increasing with the dissolved aluminum. The results of XPS analysis reveal the assembled mechanism on AM60B and corroborate the function of Al element. - Highlights: • It is hard to self-assemble on the pure magnesium. • 24 h assembled film has the low corrosion susceptibility by EIS and polarization. • The corrosion susceptibility of SAMs film lie on the Al atom state in AM60B. • The corrosion susceptibility of SAMs film is decreasing with the dissolved Al

  2. Effect of assembled time on the corrosion behaviors of SAMs film on the AM60B alloy and its assembled mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xianbin, E-mail: xbliu@imr.ac.cn; Shan, Dayong; Song, Yingwei; Han, En-hou

    2015-01-15

    The influence of assembled time on the corrosion behaviors of SAMs film on the AM60B alloy and its assembled mechanism have been investigated by electrochemical measurements, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. The self-assembled experiment on the AM60B magnesium alloy indicates that the corrosion susceptibility decreases with increasing assembled time until 24 h on cast AM60B alloy and then increases with increase of the assembled time proved by EIS measurement and potentiodynamic curves. The self-assembled experiments on pure magnesium and various heat treated cast AM60B magnesium alloy illuminate that the dissolved aluminum in magnesium solid solution is the key factor for assembled efficiency and is hard to self-assemble on the pure magnesium without aluminum. The corrosion resistance of self-assembled film on AM60B magnesium alloy is monotonically increasing with the dissolved aluminum. The results of XPS analysis reveal the assembled mechanism on AM60B and corroborate the function of Al element. - Highlights: • It is hard to self-assemble on the pure magnesium. • 24 h assembled film has the low corrosion susceptibility by EIS and polarization. • The corrosion susceptibility of SAMs film lie on the Al atom state in AM60B. • The corrosion susceptibility of SAMs film is decreasing with the dissolved Al.

  3. Embrittlement and anodic process in stress corrosion cracking: study of the influent micro-mechanical parameters; Fragilisation et processus anodiques en corrosion sous contrainte: etude des parametres micro-mecaniques influents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tinnes, J.Ph

    2006-11-15

    We study the influence of local mechanical parameters on crack propagation in Stress Corrosion Cracking, at the scale of the microstructure. Two systems are compared: the CuAl{sub 9}Ni{sub 3}Fe{sub 2} copper-aluminium alloy in synthetic sea water under cathodic polarization, where the crack propagation mechanism is related to strain-assisted anodic dissolution, and the 316L austenitic stainless steel in MgCl{sub 2} solution, where embrittlement mechanisms related to hydrogen effects prevail. We use micro-notched tensile specimen that allow to study isolated short cracks. These experiments are modelled by means of finite elements calculations, and further characterized by Electron Back scattered Diffraction (EBSD) in the case of the 316L alloy. In terms of the local mechanical parameters that control propagation, fundamental differences are outlined between the two systems. They are discussed from the viewpoint of the available models of Stress Corrosion Cracking. (author)

  4. Microstructure, mechanical properties and bio-corrosion properties of Mg-Zn-Mn-Ca alloy for biomedical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Erlin; Yang Lei

    2008-01-01

    Microstructure, mechanical properties and bio-corrosion properties of as-cast Mg-Zn-Mn-Ca alloys were investigated for biomedical application in detail by optical microscopy, scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), mechanical properties testing and electrochemical measurement. SEM and optical microscopy observation indicated that the grain size of the as-cast alloys significantly decreased with the increasing of Ca content up to 0.5 wt.%. Further increasing of Ca content did not refine the grain more. The phase constitute was mainly controlled by the atomic ratio of Zn to Ca. When the ratio was more than 1.0-1.2, the alloy was mainly composed of primary Mg and lamellar eutectic (α-Mg + Ca 2 Mg 6 Zn 3 ), while the alloy was composed of primary Mg and divorced eutectic (α-Mg + Mg 2 Ca + Ca 2 Mg 6 Zn 3 ) when the atomic ratio was less than 1.0-1.2. The yield strength of the as-cast alloy increased but the elongation and the tensile strength increased first and then decreased with the increasing of Ca content. It was thought that Mg 2 Ca phase deteriorated the tensile strength and ductility. Electrochemical measurements indicated that Mg 2 Ca phase improved the corrosion resistance of the as-cast alloy

  5. Effect of steel reinforcement with different degree of corrosion on degeneration of mechanical performance of reinforced concrete frame joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Xu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Beam-column joints which shoulders high-level and vertical shearing effect that maintains balance of beam and column end is the major component influencing the performance of the whole framework. Post earthquake investigation suggests that collapse of frame structure is induced by failure of joints in most cases. Thus, beam-column joints must have strong bearing capacity and good ductility, and reinforced concrete structure just meets the above requirement. But corrosion caused by long time use of reinforced concrete framework will lead to degeneration of mechanical performance of joints. To find out the rule of effect of steel reinforcement with different corrosion rate on degeneration of bearing capacity of reinforced concrete framework joints, this study made a nonlinear numerical analysis on fifteen models without stirrup in the core area of reinforced concrete frame joints using displacement method considering axial load ratio of column end and constraint condition. This work aims to find out the key factor that influences mechanical performance of joints, thus to provide a basis for repair and reinforcement of degenerated framework joints.

  6. Study on the Mechanical Properties and Corrosion Behaviors of Fe-(20, 45) wt%Gd Intermetallics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Bo Kyeong; Baik, Youl; Choi, Yong [Dankook University, Chungnam (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Byung Moon [Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    Fe-(20, 45 wt%) Gd intermetallics were vacuum arc melted as the mother alloy of a neutron shielding and absorbing material. The structure of the cast Fe-20 wt%Gd intermetallics had primary dendrites with a short width of about 2 μm, which became coarse with increasing Gd content. The final compositions of the Fe-20 wt%Gd and Fe-45 wt%Gd intermetallics determined by Rietveld refinement were mainly Fe{sub 3}Gd with 26.6 at%Fe{sub 2}Gd, and Fe{sub 3}Gd with various intermetallics like 13.9 at%Fe{sub 2}Gd, 7.3 at%Fe{sub 9}Gd and 3.9 at%Fe{sub 17}Gd{sub 2}, respectively. The micro-hardnesses, yield strength, ultimate compressive strength and elongation of the Fe-20 wt%Gd intermetallics were 629±12 Hv, 753 MPa, 785 MPa and 4%, respectively, and those of the Fe-45 wt%Gd intermetallics were 741±13 Hv, 772 MPa, 823 MPa and 3%. Passivity was not present in artificial sea water at room temperature. The corrosion potentials and the corrosion rates of the Fe-20 wt%Gd and Fe-45 wt%Gd intermetallics were –624 mV{sub SHE}, 2.771 mA/cm{sup 2} , and –804 mV{sub SHE}, 3.397 mA/cm{sup 2} , respectively. The corroded surface of the Fe-Gd intermetallics contained corrosion products like gadolinium with iron, which detached to leave a trail of pits.

  7. Achievments of corrosion science and corrosion protection technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontana, M.; Stehjl, R.

    1985-01-01

    Problems of corrosion-mechanical strength of metals, effect of corrosive media on creep characteristics are presented. New concepts of the mechanism of corrosion cracking and its relation to hydrogen embrittlement are described. Kinetics and mechanism of hydrogen embrittlement effect on the process of corrosion cracking of different steels and alloys are considered. The dependence of such types of failure on various structural factors is shown. Data on corrosion cracking of high-strength aluminium and titanium alloys, mechanism of the processes and protective methods are given

  8. A study on the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in hot alkaline-sulfide solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasse, Kevin Robert

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) generally have superior strength and corrosion resistance as compared to most standard austenitic and ferritic stainless grades owing to a balanced microstructure of austenite and ferrite. As a result of having favorable properties, DSS have been selected for the construction of equipment in pulp and paper, chemical processing, nuclear, oil and gas as well as other industries. The use of DSS has been restricted in some cases because of stress corrosion cracking (SCC), which can initiate and grow in either the ferrite or austenite phase depending on the environment. Thorough understanding of SCC mechanisms of DSS in chloride- and hydrogen sulfide-containing solutions has been useful for material selection in many environments. However, understanding of SCC mechanisms of DSS in sulfide-containing caustic solutions is limited, which has restricted the capacity to optimize process and equipment design in pulp and paper environments. Process environments may contain different concentrations of hydroxide, sulfide, and chloride, altering corrosion and SCC susceptibility of each phase. Crack initiation and growth behavior will also change depending on the relative phase distribution and properties of austenite and ferrite. The role of microstructure and environment on the SCC of standard grade UNS S32205 and lean grade UNS S32101 in hot alkaline-sulfide solution were evaluated in this work using electrochemical, film characterization, mechanical testing, X-ray diffraction, and microscopy techniques. Microstructural aspects, which included residual stress state, phase distribution, phase ratio, and microhardness, were related to the propensity for SCC crack initiation in different simulated alkaline pulping liquors at 170 °C. Other grades of DSS and reference austenitic and superferritic grades of stainless steel were studied using exposure coupons for comparison to understand compositional effects and individual phase susceptibility

  9. Electrochemistry study of the influence of local hydrogen generation in carbon steel bio-corrosion mechanisms in presence of iron reducing bacteria (Shewanella oneidensis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, R.; Libert, M.; Tribollet, B.; Vivier, V.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The safe disposal of nuclear waste is a major concern for the nuclear energy industry. The high-level long-lived waste (HLNW) should be maintained for millions of years in clay formations at 500 metres depth in order to prevent the migration of radionuclides. Thence, different kinds of materials such as, carbon steel, stainless steel, concrete, clay, etc., are chosen aiming to last as long as possible and to preserve the radioactivity properties. In contrast, the anoxic corrosion of the different metallic envelopes is an expected phenomenon due to the changes on the environmental conditions (such as re-saturation) within HLNW repositories. In this context, corrosion products like iron oxides (i.e. magnetite, Fe 3 O 4 ), and hydrogen will be also expected. On the one hand, hydrogen poses a significant threat to the nuclear waste repository when it is accumulated for a long time in the surrounding clay - such hydrogen production may damage the barrier properties of the geological formation, affecting the safety of the repository. On the other hand, hydrogen production represents a new energy source for bacterial growth, especially in such environments with low content of biodegradable organic matter. Moreover, some hydrogeno-trophic bacteria can also use Fe 3+ as an electron acceptor for their development. Therefore, the biological activity and biofilm formation could interfere in the metal corrosion behaviour. This phenomenon is widely known by MIC (Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion), which can represent a huge problem when promoting local corrosion. The objective of this study is to better understand the influence of local hydrogen formation in the carbon steel bio-corrosion process in the presence of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a model of Iron Reducing Bacteria (IRB), in order to evaluate the impact of the bacterial activity in terms of long term behaviour of geological disposal materials. In this study

  10. Influence of Simulated Acid Rain Corrosion on the Uniaxial Tensile Mechanical Properties of Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-zi Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study on the uniaxial tensile property of concrete exposed to the acid rain environment was carried out. Acid rain with pH level of 1.0 was deposed by the mixture of sulfate and nitric acid solution in the laboratory. Dumbbell-shaped concrete specimens were immersed in the simulated acid rain completely. After being exposed to the deposed mixture for a certain period, uniaxial tensile test was performed on the concrete specimens. The results indicate that elastic modulus, tensile strength, and peak strain have a slight increase at the initial corrosion stage, and with the extension of corrosion process, elastic modulus and tensile strength decrease gradually, while the peak strain still increases. It is found that the compressive strength is more sensitive than the tensile strength in aggressive environment. Based on the experimental results, an equation was proposed to describe the ascending branch of the stress-strain curve of the concrete corroded by acid rain.

  11. The effects of zirconium and beryllium on microstructure evolution, mechanical properties and corrosion behaviour of as-cast AZ63 alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jafari, Hassan; Amiryavari, Peyman

    2016-01-01

    Alloying elements are able to strongly modify the microstructure characteristics of Mg–Al–Zn alloys which dominate mechanical and corrosion properties of the alloys. In this research, the individual effects of Zr and Be additions on the microstructure, mechanical and corrosion properties of as-cast AZ63 alloy were explored. The results revealed that the addition of Zr leads to microstructure refinement in as-cast AZ63 alloy, resulting in improved tensile and hardness properties. 0.0001 and 0.001 wt% Be containing cast AZ63 alloy exhibited microstructure coarsening, while morphological alteration from sixford symmetrical to irregular shape grain was observed for the alloy containing 0.01 and 0.1 wt% Be. No specific Be compound was detected. In addition, mechanical properties of AZ63 alloy containing Zr was improved due to the microstructure modification, while Be containing alloy responded reverse behaviour. The corrosion resistance of AZ63 alloy was improved after the addition of Zr and Be due to the grain refinement and passivation effects, respectively. However, when the Zr content exceeds 0.5 wt%, the formation of Al 2 Zr affected the corrosion resistance. In other words, AZ63–0.5Zr alloy provided the lowest corrosion rate.

  12. Mechanical and bio-corrosion properties of quaternary Mg–Ca–Mn–Zn alloys compared with binary Mg–Ca alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhsheshi-Rad, H.R.; Idris, M.H.; Abdul-Kadir, M.R.; Ourdjini, A.; Medraj, M.; Daroonparvar, M.; Hamzah, E.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Quaternary alloy show better mechanical and corrosion properties than binary alloy. • Mg–2Ca–0.5Mn–2Zn alloy showed suitable mechanical properties for bone application. • The improved corrosion resistance with addition of Mn and Zn into the Mg–Ca alloy. • Formation of protective surface film Mn-containing magnesium on quaternary alloy. • Secondary phases have strong effect on micro-galvanic corrosion of Mg alloys. - Abstract: Binary Mg–xCa alloys and the quaternary Mg–Ca–Mn–xZn were studied to investigate their bio-corrosion and mechanical properties. The surface morphology of specimens was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The results of mechanical properties show that the yield strength (YS), ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and elongation of quaternary alloy increased significantly with the addition of zinc (Zn) up to 4 wt.%. However, further addition of Zn content beyond 4 wt.% did not improve yield strength and ultimate tensile strength. In contrast, increasing calcium (Ca) content has a deleterious effect on binary Mg–Ca alloys. Compression tests of the magnesium (Mg) alloys revealed that the compression strength of quaternary alloy was higher than that of binary alloy. However, binary Mg–Ca alloy showed higher reduction in compression strength after immersion in simulated body fluid. The bio-corrosion behaviour of the binary and quaternary Mg alloys were investigated using immersion tests and electrochemical tests. Electrochemical tests shows that the corrosion potential (E corr ) of binary Mg–2Ca significantly shifted toward nobeler direction from −1996.8 to −1616.6 mV SCE with the addition of 0.5 wt.% manganese (Mn) and 2 wt.% Zn content. However, further addition of Zn to 7 wt.% into quaternary alloy has the reverse effect. Immersion tests show that the quaternary

  13. Structural, mechanical and corrosion studies of Cr-rich inclusions in 152 cladding of dissimilar metal weld joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yifeng; Wang, Jianqiu; Han, En-Hou; Yang, Chengdong

    2018-01-01

    Cr-rich inclusions were discovered in 152 cladding at the inner wall of domestic dissimilar metal weld joint, and their morphologies, microstructures, mechanical properties and corrosion behaviors were systematically characterized by SEM, TEM, nanoindentation and FIB. The results indicate that the Cr-rich inclusions originate from large-size Cr particles in 152 welding electrode flux, and they are 50-150 μm in size in most cases, and there is a continuous transition zone of 2-5 μm in width between the Cr inclusion core and 152 cladding matrix, and the transition zone consists of Ni & Fe-rich dendritic austenite and Cr23C6 and Cr matrix. The transition zone has the highest nanoindentation hardness (7.66 GPa), which is much harder than the inclusion core (5.14 GPa) and 152 cladding (3.71 GPa). In-situ microscopic tensile tests show that cracks initialize preferentially in transition zone, and then propagate into the inclusion core, and creep further into 152 cladding after penetrating the core area. The inclusion core and its transition zone both share similar oxide film structure with nickel-base 152 cladding matrix in simulated primary water, while those two parts present better general corrosion resistance than 152 cladding matrix due to higher Cr concentration.

  14. Phase evolution, mechanical and corrosion behavior of Fe(100-x) Ni(x) alloys synthesized by powder metallurgy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Neera; Parkash, Om; Kumar, Devendra

    2018-03-01

    In the present investigation, Fe(100-x) Ni(x) alloys (x = 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 wt%) were synthesized through the evolution of γ-taenite and α-kamacite phases by powder metallurgy route using commercially available Fe and Ni powders. Mechanically mixed powders of Fe and Ni were compacted at room temperature and sintered at three different temperatures 1000, 1200 and 1250 °C for 1 h. Both Ni concentration and sintering temperature have shown a strong impact on the phase formation, tribological and electrochemical behavior. Micro structural study has shown the formation of taenite (γ-Fe,Ni) and kamacite (α-Fe,Ni) phases in the sintered specimens. An increase in Ni fraction resulted in formation of more taenite which reduces hardness and wear resistance of specimens. Increasing the sintering temperature decreased the defect concentration with enhanced taenite formation, aiding to higher densification. Taenite formed completely in Fe50Ni50 after sintering at 1250 °C. Tribological test revealed the maximum wear resistance for Fe70Ni30 specimen due to the presence of both kamacite and taenite in significant proportions. The formation of taenite as well as the decrease in defect concentration improves the corrosion resistance of the specimens significantly in 1M HCl solution. A maximum corrosion protection efficiency of around ∼87% was achieved in acidic medium for Fe50Ni50, sintered at 1250 °C.

  15. Mechanical and environmental effects on stress corrosion cracking of low carbon pipeline steel in a soil solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contreras, A.; Hernández, S.L.; Orozco-Cruz, R.; Galvan-Martínez, R.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Mechanical and environmental effects on SCC of X52 steel were investigated. ► Slow strain rate tests (SSRT) were performed in a soil solution (NS4). ► Different levels of polarization potentials were applied to mitigating SCC. ► SSRT results indicate that X52 pipeline steel was susceptible to SCC. ► SCC susceptibility increase as the yielding and ultimate tensile stress increase. -- Abstract: Mechanical and environmental effects on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of X52 pipeline steel were investigated using slow strain rate tests (SSRT) performed in a glass autoclave containing a soil solution at strain rate of 1 × 10 −6 in./s at room temperature. Polarization potentials of −100, −200 and −400 mV referred to open circuit potential (OCP) was applied in order to establish the effectiveness of cathodic protection in mitigating SCC of X52 pipeline steel. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) tests and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations were done in order to analyze the SCC process. SSRT results indicate that X52 pipeline steel was susceptible to SCC. Susceptibility to SCC increase as the yielding stress (YS) and ultimate tensile stress (UTS) increase. The EIS results showed that the highest corrosion of the steel sample was obtained when the highest cathodic over potential was applied. SEM observations of these specimens showed a brittle type of fracture with transgranular appearance. The failure and SCC of X52 steel in soil solution was explained by hydrogen mechanism.

  16. The interrelation between mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and microstructure of Pb-Sn casting alloys for lead-acid battery components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peixoto, Leandro C.; Osorio, Wislei R.; Garcia, Amauri [Department of Materials Engineering, University of Campinas - UNICAMP, PO Box 6122, 13083-970, Campinas - SP (Brazil)

    2010-01-15

    It is well known that there is a strong influence of thermal processing variables on the solidification structure and as a direct consequence on the casting final properties. The morphological microstructural parameters such as grain size and cellular or dendritic spacings will depend on the heat transfer conditions imposed by the metal/mould system. There is a need to improve the understanding of the interrelation between the microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of dilute Pb-Sn casting alloys which are widely used in the manufacture of battery components. The present study has established correlations between cellular microstructure, ultimate tensile strength and corrosion resistance of Pb-1 wt% Sn and Pb-2.5 wt% Sn alloys by providing a combined plot of these properties as a function of cell spacing. It was found that a compromise between good corrosion resistance and good mechanical properties can be attained by choosing an appropriate cell spacing range. (author)

  17. Corrosion behavior and mechanism of MAO coated Ti{sub 6}Al{sub 4}V with a grain-fined surface layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Yanhong, E-mail: gu_yanhong@163.com [School of Mechanical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Petrochemical Technology, Beijing 102617 (China); Chen, Lingling, E-mail: daisy_chenlingling@163.com [School of Mechanical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Petrochemical Technology, Beijing 102617 (China); College of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Yue, Wen, E-mail: yw@cugb.edu.cn [School of Engineering and Technology, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Chen, Ping, E-mail: chenp@ustb.edu.cn [School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Chen, Fei, E-mail: chenfei@bipt.edu.cn [School of Mechanical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Petrochemical Technology, Beijing 102617 (China); Ning, Chengyun, E-mail: imcyning@scut.edu.cn [College of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2016-04-15

    In order to enhance the corrosion behavior of Ti{sub 6}Al{sub 4}V, a MAO coating was prepared on the surface refined by ultrasonic cold forging technology (UCFT). The surface roughness value and the grain were evaluated by atomic force microscope (AFM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The microstructure and phase component of the coated samples were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The corrosion behavior of all the samples was examined by potentiodynamic polarization and electrode impedance spectroscopy (EIS) tests in a 3.5% NaCl solution. The results show that UCFT can reduce the surface roughness value and refine the grains. The micro-pore size of the UCFT-MAO sample is smaller and the pore number is less than those of MAO sample. The thickness of the coated sample is about 10 μm. The UCFT-MAO sample possesses the highest micro-hardness among all the samples. The UCFT-MAO sample has the best corrosion resistance with the lowest corrosion current density and the highest electrochemical impedance, which is attributed to UCFT pretreatment prior to MAO process on titanium alloys. The influence of UCFT on the corrosion process and corrosion mechanism were discussed. - Highlights: • UCFT was used to refine the grain before MAO coatings were prepared on Ti alloys. • UCFT treated Ti alloys have decreased surface roughness and refined grain. • Surface performance of MAO coatings on UCFT treated Ti alloys has been improved. • The influence of UCFT on the corrosion behavior and mechanism of MAO coatings was discussed.

  18. Investigation of Amourphous Deposits and Potential Corrosion Mechanisms in Offshore Water Injection Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eroini, Violette; Oehler, Mike Christian; Graver, Britt Kathrine

    2017-01-01

    Increasing incidence of amorphous deposits in both production and water injection systems has caused considerable problems for offshore oil fields. Amorphous deposits, which are a widely recognized, but often poorly explained phenomenon, are typically comprised of both organic (biological...... or hydrocarbons) and inorganic material, but with compositions that vary considerably. One recurrent form of deposits, found in offshore water injection flowlines and wells, consisting mainly of magnetite as the corrosion product, was further investigated with the objectives of explaining its formation......, composed of both organic and inorganic compounds, has caused concerns within operating assets due to the detrimental effect on production and injection, in addition to challenges with intervention and integrity. The variety of deposits and poor understanding of their nature has led to confusion...

  19. Analysis of stress intensity factors for a new mechanical corrosion specimen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rassineux, B.; Crouzet, D.; Le Hong, S.

    1996-03-01

    Electricite de France is conducting a research program to determine corrosion cracking rates in the steam generators Alloy 600 tubes of the primary system. The objective is to correlate the cracking rates with the specimen stress intensity factor K I . One of the samples selected for the purpose of this study is the longitudinal notched specimen TEL (TEL: ''Tubulaire a Entailles Longitudinales''). This paper presents the analysis of the stress intensity factor and its experimental validation. The stress intensity factor has been evaluated for different loads using 3D finite element calculations with the Hellen-Parks and G(θ) methods. Both crack initiation and propagation are considered. As an assessment of the method, the numerical simulations are in good agreement with the fatigue crack growth rates measured experimentally for TEL and compact tension (CT) specimens. (authors). 8 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  20. Stress corrosion of Zircaloy-4. Fracture mechanics study of the intergranular - transgranular transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farina, Silvia B.; Duffo, Gustavo S.

    2003-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of Zircaloy-4 wires was studied in 1M NaCl, 1M KBr and 1M KI aqueous solutions, and in iodine alcoholic solutions. In all cases, intergranular attack preceded transgranular propagation. It is generally accepted that the intergranular-transgranular transition occurs when a critical value of the stress intensity factor is reached. In the present work it was confirmed that the transition from intergranular to transgranular propagation cracking in Zircaloy-4 wires also occurs when a critical value of the stress intensity factor is reached. This critical stress intensity factor in wire samples is independent of the solution tested and close to 10 MPa.m-1/2. This value is in good agreement with those reported in the literature measured by different techniques. (author)

  1. Review of corrosion causes and corrosion control in a technical facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charng, T.; Lansing, F.

    1982-06-01

    Causes of corrosion of metals and their alloys are reviewed. The corrosion mechanism is explained by electrochemical reaction theory. The causes and methods of controlling of both physiochemical corrosion and biological corrosion are presented. Factors which influence the rate of corrosion are also discussed

  2. Mechanical properties and wear and corrosion resistance of electrodeposited Ni-Co/SiC nanocomposite coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Lei; Sun Chufeng; Gao Ping; Zhou Feng; Liu Weimin

    2006-01-01

    Ni-Co/SiC nanocomposite coatings with various contents of SiC nano-particulates were prepared by electrodeposition in a Ni-Co plating bath containing SiC nano-particulates to be co-deposited. The influences of the nanoparticulates concentration, current density, stirring rate and temperature of the plating bath on the composition of the coatings were investigated. The shape and size of the SiC nano-particulates were observed and determined using a transmission electron microscope. The polarization behavior of the composite plating bath was examined on a PAR-273A potentiostat/galvanostat device. The wear behavior of the Ni-Co/SiC nanocomposite coatings was evaluated on a ball-on-disk UMT-2MT test rig. The worn surface morphologies of the Ni-Co/SiC nanocomposite coatings were observed using a scanning electron microscope. The corrosion behavior of the nanocomposite coatings was evaluated by charting the Tafel curves of the solution of 0.5 mol L -1 NaCl at room temperature. It was found that the cathodic polarization potential of the composite electrolyte increased with increasing SiC concentration in the plating bath. The microhardness and wear and corrosion resistance of the nanocomposite coatings also increased with increasing content of the nano-SiC in the plating bath, and the morphologies of the nanocomposite coatings varied with varying SiC concentration in the plating bath as well. Moreover, the co-deposited SiC nano-particulates were uniformly distributed in the Ni-Co matrix and contributed to greatly increase the microhardness and wear resistance of the Ni-Co alloy coating

  3. Measurements and mechanisms of localized aqueous corrosion in aluminum-lithium-copper alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Douglas; Stoner, Glenn E.

    1991-01-01

    Summary information is included for electrochemical aspects of stress corrosion cracking in alloy 2090 and an introduction to the work to be initiated on the new X2095 (Weldalite) alloy system. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) was studied in both S-T and L-T orientations in alloy 2090. A constant load TTF test was performed in several environments with a potentiostatically applied potential. In the same environments the electrochemical behavior of phases found along subgrain boundaries was assessed. It was found that rapid failure due to SCC occurred when the following criteria was met: E(sub BR,T1) is less than E(sub applied) is less than E(sub Br, matrix phase). Although the L-T orientation is usually considered more resistant to SCC, failures in this orientation occurred when the stated criteria was met. This may be due to the relatively isotropic geometry of the subgrains which measure approximately 12 to 25 microns in diameters. Initial studies of alloy X2095 includes electrochemical characterization of three compositional variations each at three temperatures. The role of T(sub 1) dissolution in SCC behavior is addressed using techniques similar to those used in the research of 2090 described. SCC susceptibility is also studied using alternate immersion facilities at Reynolds Metals Corporation. Pitting is investigated in terms of stability, role of precipitate phases and constituent particles, and as initiation sites for SCC. In all research endeavors, attempts are made to link electrochemistry to microstructure. Previous work on 2090 provides a convenient basis for comparison since both alloys contain T(sub 1) precipitates but with different distributions. In 2090 T(sub 1) forms preferentially on subgrain boundaries whereas in X2095 the microstructure appears to be more homogeneous with finer T(sub 1) particles. Another point for comparison is the delta prime strengthening phase found in 2090 but absent in X2095.

  4. Effects of microstructure and local mechanical fields on intergranular stress corrosion cracking of a friction stir welded aluminum–copper–lithium 2050 nugget

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhondt, Matthieu; Aubert, Isabelle; Saintier, Nicolas; Olive, Jean Marc

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Applied stress changes the corrosion mode from pitting to intergranular cracking. • Residual stresses are sufficient to induce intergranular stress corrosion cracking. • Effect of crystallographic texture on the development of IGSCC evidenced by EBSD. • Cubic elasticity drives the local orientation of the intergranular cracking. • Tomography observations show the 3D nature of the corrosion development. - Abstract: The effects of the microstructure and mechanical fields on intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of the nugget zone of heat treated welds obtained by friction stir welding in the AA2050 aluminum alloy have been investigated at different scales. At low strain rate, in 1.0 NaCl aqueous solution, IGSCC develops in the microstructure, whereas only pitting corrosion is observed without any mechanical stress. Based on surface observations, EBSD analysis and X-ray tomography, the key role of sub-millimetric textured bands (induced by the welding process) on the IGSCC is demonstrated. Analyses at a more local scale show the grain boundary (low angle boundary, special coincident site lattice boundary or high angle boundary) do not have a significant effect on crack initiation. Crystal plasticity finite element calculations show that the threshold normal stress at grain boundaries for IGSCC development is about 80% of the macroscopic stress. It is also highlighted by crystal plasticity calculations that there is a drastic effect of the local stress field on the shape of cracks. Finally, it is shown that plasticity induced residual stresses are sufficient for the formation of IGSCC

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF A REPRODUCIBLE SCREENING METHOD TO DETERMINE THE MECHANISM AND EFFECT OF ORGANIC ACIDS AND OTHER CONTAMINANTS ON THE CORROSION OF ALUMINUM-FINNED COPPER-TUBE HEAT EXCHANGE COILS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard A. Corbett; Dave Severance

    2005-02-01

    Formicary corrosion is an insidious form of localized pitting corrosion. Notoya (1997b) wrote, ?In Japan, this type of corrosion is found in approximately 10% of cases of premature failure of copper tubes.? Attack characteristically features very small surface pits which are not visible to the un-aided eye, and random directional changes in the underlying copper metal. Attack is rapid. Failures have occurred before installation, shortly thereafter, or within several years later. Objectives of this Research Project Conduct an in depth literature search on the subject of formicary corrosion. Define the corrosion mechanism. Develop a test method that will reproduce formicary corrosion. Develop a test method for screening candidate materials that could cause formicary corrosion.

  6. Long-term corrosion of rebars embedded in aerial and hydraulic binders - Mechanisms and crucial physico-chemical parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitty, Walter-John; Berger, Pascal; Dillmann, Philippe; L'Hostis, Valerie

    2008-01-01

    The prediction of long-term behaviour of reinforced concrete structures involved in the nuclear industry requires the comprehension of the mechanism involved in long-term corrosion. Yet, studies on archeological artefacts allowed to identify a typical layout constituted of four layers: the metal, the dense product layer (DPL), the transformed medium (TM) and the binder. Oxygen reaction sites were labelled using oxygen 18 ( 18 O) and it was evidenced that the cathodic sites are located at the metal/dense product layer interface. So, oxygen has to crossed the DPL to react at the M/DPL interface or inside the marblings, and measurements of the effective tritiated water (2.6 ± 0.1 x 10 -11 m 2 /s) and iodide (1.0 ± 0.3 x 10 -11 m 2 /s) diffusivity of this layer saturated with water were made. Indeed, these two molecules have a diffusivity in water very closed to oxygen diffusivity

  7. Influence of laser treatment of beta phase on texture, mechanical properties and water corrosion of zircaloy 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darchis, L.; Brun, G.; Baron, J.L.

    1987-06-01

    Two heat treatments by laser of zircaloy 4 cladding tubes are compared: one is superficial (1/1Oth of the thickness) and the other full thickness. In the full thickness treatment a global attenuation of preferential orientations is induced without marked gradient with the same texture found in a classical heat treatment. A peculiar texture is observed when beta transformation affects only 1/10. Mechanical properties measured by elongation and burst tests at 20 and 400 0 C are decreased by 40 to 60% for full thickness treatment and only 1 to 5% for superficial treatment. Water corrosion resistance at 360 0 C in conditions found for PWR is slightly increased by treatment on full thickness. No decrease of behavior is observed after 6 months on the martensitic structure obtained by superficial treatment [fr

  8. Expansion due to the anaerobic corrosion of iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smart, N.R.; Rance, A.P.; Fennell, P.A.H. [Serco Assurance, Culham Science Centre (United Kingdom)

    2006-12-15

    The proposed design for a final repository for spent fuel and other long-lived residues in Sweden is based on the multi-barrier principle. The waste will be encapsulated in sealed cylindrical canisters, which will then be placed in vertical storage holes drilled in a series of caverns excavated from the granite bedrock at a depth of about 500 m and surrounded by compacted bentonite clay. The canister design is based on a thick cast inner container, designed to provide mechanical strength and to keep individual fuel bundles at a safe distance from one another, thereby minimising the risk of criticality. The container is fitted inside an inherently corrosion resistant copper overpack that is designed to provide containment over the long timescales required. As part of the safety case for the repository, one of the scenarios being addressed by SKB involves the early mechanical failure of the outer copper overpack, allowing water to enter the outer container and corrode the inner one. One consequence of this failure would be the long-term build up of corrosion product, which could induce stresses in the spent fuel canister. A programme of experimental work was undertaken to investigate the effect of corrosion product formation on the generation of stresses in the outer copper container. This report describes the construction of an apparatus to directly measure the expansion caused by the anaerobic corrosion of ferrous material in a simulated repository environment whilst under representative compressive loads. This apparatus, known as the 'stress cell' consisted of a stack of interleaved carbon steel and copper discs that was subjected to a compressive load simulating the loads expected in a repository and immersed in simulated anoxic groundwater at 69 deg C. The stack was mounted in a rigid frame and a system of levers was used to amplify any expansion caused by corrosion; the expansion of the stack was measured using sensitive displacement transducers

  9. Expansion due to the anaerobic corrosion of iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smart, N.R.; Rance, A.P.; Fennell, P.A.H.

    2006-12-01

    The proposed design for a final repository for spent fuel and other long-lived residues in Sweden is based on the multi-barrier principle. The waste will be encapsulated in sealed cylindrical canisters, which will then be placed in vertical storage holes drilled in a series of caverns excavated from the granite bedrock at a depth of about 500 m and surrounded by compacted bentonite clay. The canister design is based on a thick cast inner container, designed to provide mechanical strength and to keep individual fuel bundles at a safe distance from one another, thereby minimising the risk of criticality. The container is fitted inside an inherently corrosion resistant copper overpack that is designed to provide containment over the long timescales required. As part of the safety case for the repository, one of the scenarios being addressed by SKB involves the early mechanical failure of the outer copper overpack, allowing water to enter the outer container and corrode the inner one. One consequence of this failure would be the long-term build up of corrosion product, which could induce stresses in the spent fuel canister. A programme of experimental work was undertaken to investigate the effect of corrosion product formation on the generation of stresses in the outer copper container. This report describes the construction of an apparatus to directly measure the expansion caused by the anaerobic corrosion of ferrous material in a simulated repository environment whilst under representative compressive loads. This apparatus, known as the 'stress cell' consisted of a stack of interleaved carbon steel and copper discs that was subjected to a compressive load simulating the loads expected in a repository and immersed in simulated anoxic groundwater at 69 deg C. The stack was mounted in a rigid frame and a system of levers was used to amplify any expansion caused by corrosion; the expansion of the stack was measured using sensitive displacement transducers. Initially

  10. Effect of sintering processing on microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of Ti–24Nb–4Zr–7.9Sn alloy for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Shibo; Chu, Aimin; Wu, Haijiang; Cai, Chunbo; Qu, Xuanhui

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Ti–24Nb–4Zr–7.9Sn alloy is prepared by powder metallurgy method. • The alloy prepared at 1250 °C for 2 h has more β-matrix and tiny α-precipitation. • The alloy prepared at 1250 °C for 2 h possesses good mechanical properties. • The alloy prepared at 1250 °C for 2 h exhibits better corrosion resistance. - Abstract: Ti–24Nb–4Zr–7.9Sn alloy was prepared by Powder Metallurgy (PM) method using titanium hydride powder, niobium powder, zirconium powder, and tin powder as raw materials. The effect of sintering processing on microstructure, mechanical properties, and corrosion resistance was investigated in details. The alloy possessed dominant β-matrix and a little α-precipitation. The mechanical properties of the alloy sintered at 1250 °C for 2 h were better than those of the alloys with other sintering processing, which would avoid stress shielding and thus prevent bone resorption in orthopedic implants applications. As long-term stability in biological environment is required, the electrochemical behaviors in a simulated body fluid (Hank’s solution and simulated saliva solution) were also evaluated. Potentiodynamic polarization curves exhibited that the sample sintered at 1250 °C for 2 h had better corrosion properties than those of other sintering processing. The good corrosion resistance combined with better mechanical biocompatibility made the Ti–24Nb–4Zr–7.9Sn alloy suitable for use as orthopedic implants

  11. Role of hydrogen in the intergranular cracking mechanism by stress corrosion in primary medium of nickel based alloys 600 and 690

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odemer, G.; Coudurier, A.; Jambon, F.; Chene, J.; Odemer, G.; Coudurier, A.; Chene, J.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this work is to characterize the sensitivity to hydrogen embrittlement of alloys 600 and 690 in order to better understand the eventual role of hydrogen in the stress corrosion mechanism which affects these alloys when they are exposed in PWR primary medium. (O.M.)

  12. Significant Corrosion Resistance in an Ultrafine-Grained Al6063 Alloy with a Bimodal Grain-Size Distribution through a Self-Anodic Protection Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdieh Shakoori Oskooie

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The bimodal microstructures of Al6063 consisting of 15, 30, and 45 vol. % coarse-grained (CG bands within the ultrafine-grained (UFG matrix were synthesized via blending of high-energy mechanically milled powders with unmilled powders followed by hot powder extrusion. The corrosion behavior of the bimodal specimens was assessed by means of polarization, steady-state cyclic polarization and impedance tests, whereas their microstructural features and corrosion products were examined using optical microscopy (OM, scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM, electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS, and X-ray diffraction (XRD techniques. The bimodal Al6063 containing 15 vol. % CG phase exhibits the highest corrosion resistance among the bimodal microstructures and even superior electrochemical behavior compared with the plain UFG and CG materials in the 3.5% NaCl solution. The enhanced corrosion resistance is attributed to the optimum cathode to anode surface area ratio that gives rise to the formation of an effective galvanic couple between CG areas and the UFG matrix. The operational galvanic coupling leads to the domination of a “self-anodic protection system” on bimodal microstructure and consequently forms a uniform thick protective passive layer over it. In contrast, the 45 vol. % CG bimodal specimen shows the least corrosion resistance due to the catastrophic galvanic corrosion in UFG regions. The observed results for UFG Al6063 suggest that metallurgical tailoring of the grain structure in terms of bimodal microstructures leads to simultaneous enhancement in the electrochemical behavior and mechanical properties of passivable alloys that are usually inversely correlated. The mechanism of self-anodic protection for passivable metals with bimodal microstructures is discussed here for the first time.

  13. Methane oxidation in anoxic lake waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Guangyi; Zopfi, Jakob; Niemann, Helge; Lehmann, Moritz

    2017-04-01

    Freshwater habitats such as lakes are important sources of methante (CH4), however, most studies in lacustrine environments so far provided evidence for aerobic methane oxidation only, and little is known about the importance of anaerobic oxidation of CH4 (AOM) in anoxic lake waters. In marine environments, sulfate reduction coupled to AOM by archaea has been recognized as important sinks of CH4. More recently, the discorvery of anaerobic methane oxidizing denitrifying bacteria represents a novel and possible alternative AOM pathway, involving reactive nitrogen species (e.g., nitrate and nitrite) as electron acceptors in the absence of oxygen. We investigate anaerobic methane oxidation in the water column of two hydrochemically contrasting sites in Lake Lugano, Switzerland. The South Basin displays seasonal stratification, the development of a benthic nepheloid layer and anoxia during summer and fall. The North Basin is permanently stratified with anoxic conditions below 115m water depth. Both Basins accumulate seasonally (South Basin) or permanently (North Basin) large amounts of CH4 in the water column below the chemocline, providing ideal conditions for methanotrophic microorganisms. Previous work revealed a high potential for aerobic methane oxidation within the anoxic water column, but no evidence for true AOM. Here, we show depth distribution data of dissolved CH4, methane oxidation rates and nutrients at both sites. In addition, we performed high resolution phylogenetic analyses of microbial community structures and conducted radio-label incubation experiments with concentrated biomass from anoxic waters and potential alternative electron acceptor additions (nitrate, nitrite and sulfate). First results from the unamended experiments revealed maximum activity of methane oxidation below the redoxcline in both basins. While the incubation experiments neither provided clear evidence for NOx- nor sulfate-dependent AOM, the phylogenetic analysis revealed the

  14. Review on stress corrosion and corrosion fatigue failure of centrifugal compressor impeller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiao; Chen, Songying; Qu, Yanpeng; Li, Jianfeng

    2015-03-01

    Corrosion failure, especially stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue, is the main cause of centrifugal compressor impeller failure. And it is concealed and destructive. This paper summarizes the main theories of stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue and its latest developments, and it also points out that existing stress corrosion cracking theories can be reduced to the anodic dissolution (AD), the hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC), and the combined AD and HIC mechanisms. The corrosion behavior and the mechanism of corrosion fatigue in the crack propagation stage are similar to stress corrosion cracking. The effects of stress ratio, loading frequency, and corrosive medium on the corrosion fatigue crack propagation rate are analyzed and summarized. The corrosion behavior and the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue in corrosive environments, which contain sulfide, chlorides, and carbonate, are analyzed. The working environments of the centrifugal compressor impeller show the behavior and the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue in different corrosive environments. The current research methods for centrifugal compressor impeller corrosion failure are analyzed. Physical analysis, numerical simulation, and the fluid-structure interaction method play an increasingly important role in the research on impeller deformation and stress distribution caused by the joint action of aerodynamic load and centrifugal load.

  15. Atmospheric Corrosion Behavior and Mechanism of a Ni-Advanced Weathering Steel in Simulated Tropical Marine Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei; Zeng, Zhongping; Cheng, Xuequn; Li, Xiaogang; Liu, Bo

    2017-12-01

    Corrosion behavior of Ni-advanced weathering steel, as well as carbon steel and conventional weathering steel, in a simulated tropical marine atmosphere was studied by field exposure and indoor simulation tests. Meanwhile, morphology and composition of corrosion products formed on the exposed steels were surveyed through scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction. Results indicated that the additive Ni in weathering steel played an important role during the corrosion process, which took part in the formation of corrosion products, enriched in the inner rust layer and promoted the transformation from loose γ-FeOOH to dense α-FeOOH. As a result, the main aggressive ion, i.e., Cl-, was effectively separated in the outer rust layer which leads to the lowest corrosion rate among these tested steels. Thus, the resistance of Ni-advanced weathering steel to atmospheric corrosion was significantly improved in a simulated tropical marine environment.

  16. Anoxic monimolimnia: Nutrients devious feeders or bombs ready to explode?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianni, Areti; Zacharias, Ierotheos

    2015-04-01

    Coastal regions are under strong human influence and its environmental impact is reflected into their water quality. Oligotrophic estuaries and coastal systems have changed in mesotrophic and/or eutrophic, shown an increase in toxic algal blooms, hypoxic/anoxic events, and massive mortalities of many aquatic and benthic organisms. In strongly stratified and productive water basins, bottom water dissolved oxygen is depleted due to the excessive organic matter decomposition in these depths. Distribution and recycling of nutrients in their water column is inextricably dependent on oxygenation and redox conditions. Bottom water anoxia accelerates PO43-, NH4+ and H2S recycling and accumulation from organic matter decomposition. The anoxic, H2S, PO43- and NH4+ rich bottom water constitutes a toxic layer, threatening the balance of the entire ecosystem. In permanently stratified water basins, storm events could result in stratification destruction and water column total mixing. The turnover brings large amounts of H2S to the surface resulting in low levels of oxygen and massive fish kills. PO43- and NH4+ are released to the interface and surface waters promoting algal blooms. Μore organic matter is produced fueling anoxia. The arising question is, whether the balance of an anoxic water ecosystem is under the threat of its hypolimnetic nutrient and sulfide load, only in the case of storm events and water column total mixing. In polymictic water basins it is clear that the accumulated, in the bottom layer, nutrients will supply surface waters, after the pycnocline overturn. Besides this mechanism of basins' water quality degradation is nowadays recognized as one of the biggest obstacles in eutrophic environments management and restoration efforts. The role of internal load, in permanently stratified water basins, is not so clear. In the present study the impact of storm events on water column stability and bottom water anoxia of meromictic coastal basins, is investigated

  17. Structure, corrosion behavior and mechanical property of a novel poly(vinyl alcohol) composite in simulated body fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan; Suo, Jinping; Zou, Peng; Jia, Lintao; Wang, Shifang

    2010-01-01

    The data for long-term drug-delivery systems are scarce compared to the short-term systems because the required research efforts are more time-consuming. In this study, we report a novel cross-linked composite based on poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) containing cupric ions for long-term delivery, which is helpful for contraception and trace element balance in the human body. The composition, corrosion products, crystal structure, chemical structure and mechanical stability of the composite, after being immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF) for one year, were studied by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and mechanical testing. The results show that no other new elements, such as P, Cl and Ca, appear on the surface of the composite and no Cu(2)O was formed after immersion in SBF for one year. The effectiveness of copper can be greatly improved and the side-effects caused by these compounds might also be eliminated. Furthermore, this novel composite exhibits long-term mechanical stability in SBF. The present in vitro long-term data suggest that this novel copper-containing composite may serve as a substitute for conventional materials of copper-containing intrauterine devices (Cu-IUDs) and as a carrier for controlled-release material in a variety of other applications.

  18. Resilient and Corrosion-Proof Rolling Element Bearings Made from Superelastic Ni-Ti Alloys for Aerospace Mechanism Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Noebe, Ronald D.; Stanford, Malcolm; Padula, Santo A.

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical components (bearings, gears, mechanisms) typically utilize hard materials to minimize wear and attain long life. In such components, heavily loaded contact points (e.g., meshing gear teeth, bearing ball-raceway contacts) experience high contact stresses. The combination of high hardness, heavy loads and high elastic modulus often leads to damaging contact stress. In addition, mechanical component materials, such as tool steel or silicon nitride exhibit limited recoverable strain (typically less than 1 percent). These material attributes can lead to Brinell damage (e.g., denting) particularly during transient overload events such as shock impacts that occur during the launching of space vehicles or the landing of aircraft. In this paper, a superelastic alloy, 60NiTi, is considered for rolling element bearing applications. A series of Rockwell and Brinell hardness, compressive strength, fatigue and tribology tests are conducted and reported. The combination of high hardness, moderate elastic modulus, large recoverable strain, low density, and intrinsic corrosion immunity provide a path to bearings largely impervious to shock load damage. It is anticipated that bearings and components made from alloys with such attributes can alleviate many problems encountered in advanced aerospace applications.

  19. Corrosion Resistance and Mechanical Properties of TIG and A-TIG Welded Joints of Lean Duplex Stainless Steel S82441 / 1.4662

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brytan Z.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results of pitting corrosion resistance of TIG (autogenous and with filler metal and A-TIG welded lean duplex stainless steel S82441/1.4662 evaluated according to ASTM G48 method, where autogenous TIG welding process was applied using different amounts of heat input and shielding gases like pure Ar and Ar+N2 and Ar+He mixtures. The results of pitting corrosion resistance of the welded joints of lean duplex stainless steel S82441 were studied in as weld conditions and after different mechanical surface finish treatments. The results of the critical pitting temperature (CPT determined according to ASTM G48 at temperatures of 15, 25 and 35°C were presented. Three different surface treatment after welding were applied: etching, milling, brushing + etching. The influence of post weld surface treatment was studied in respect to the pitting corrosion resistance, basing on CPT temperature.

  20. Microstructure, mechanical properties and stress corrosion cracking of Al–Zn–Mg–Zr alloy sheet with trace amount of Sc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Xing [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Pan, Qinglin, E-mail: pql1964@126.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Li, Bo [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Liu, Zhiming; Huang, Zhiqi [Guangdong Fenglu Aluminum Co., Ltd, Foshan 528133 (China); Yin, Zhimin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China)

    2015-11-25

    Microstructural and property evolution of the Al–Zn–Mg–0.10%Sc–0.10%Zr alloy sheet during its preparation were investigated in detail by means of optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Vickers micro-hardness test and room temperature tensile test. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of the Al–Zn–Mg–0.10%Sc–0.10%Zr alloy under different heat treatments was studied using slow strain rate test. The results showed that serious dendritic segregation existed in as-cast condition. The suitable homogenization treatment for Al–Zn–Mg–0.10%Sc–0.10%Zr alloy was 470 °C/24 h. After homogenization treatment, dissoluble Zn and Mg enriched non-equilibrium phases dissolved into α-Al matrix completely. The suitable solid solution-aging treatment for Al–Zn–Mg–0.10%Sc–0.10%Zr alloy was solution treated at 470 °C for 60 min, followed by water quenching and then aged at 120 °C for 24 h. Under this aging temper, the grain structures were composed of sub-grains, η′ phases and nanometer-sized, spherical Al{sub 3}(Sc, Zr) particles. Grain boundary precipitates (GBPs) area fraction was found to be an important parameter to evaluate the SCC susceptibility. The improved corrosion resistance from increasing aging temperature or prolonging aging time was due to the discontinuous η precipitates along the grain boundary and the high area fraction of GBPs. The main strengthening mechanisms of Al–Zn–Mg–0.10%Sc–0.10%Zr alloy are precipitation strengthening derived from η′ precipitates, dispersion strengthening, sub-grain strengthening and grain refinement caused by coherent Al{sub 3}(Sc, Zr) particles. - Highlights: • The suitable homogenization treatment of the alloy has been identified. • Evolution of microstructure and mechanical properties is investigated. • Strengthening mechanisms of the alloy has been established. • The basic mechanism has

  1. Biological phosphorus uptake under anoxic and aerobic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kerrn-Jespersen, Jens Peter; Henze, Mogens

    1993-01-01

    Biological phosphorus removal was investigated under anoxic and aerobic conditions. Tests were made to establish whether phosphorus accumulating bacteria can take up phosphate under anoxic conditions and thus utilise nitrate as oxidant. Furthermore, it was tested how the amount of organic matter...... as oxidant. The phosphorus uptake was more rapid under aerobic conditions than under anoxic conditions. The explanation of this is that all phosphorus accumulating bacteria take up phosphate under aerobic conditions, whereas only part of the phosphorus accumulating bacteria take up phosphate under anoxic...

  2. Martensitic Transformations and Mechanical and Corrosion Properties of Fe-Mn-Si Alloys for Biodegradable Medical Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drevet, Richard; Zhukova, Yulia; Malikova, Polina; Dubinskiy, Sergey; Korotitskiy, Andrey; Pustov, Yury; Prokoshkin, Sergey

    2018-03-01

    The Fe-Mn-Si alloys are promising materials for biodegradable metallic implants for temporary healing process in the human body. In this study, three different compositions are considered (Fe23Mn5Si, Fe26Mn5Si, and Fe30Mn5Si, all in wt pct). The phase composition analysis by XRD reveals ɛ-martensite, α-martensite, and γ-austenite in various proportions depending on the manganese amount. The DSC study shows that the starting temperature of the martensitic transformation ( M s) of the alloys decreases when the manganese content increases (416 K, 401 K, and 323 K (143 °C, 128 °C, and 50 °C) for the Fe23Mn5Si, Fe26Mn5Si, and Fe30Mn5Si alloys, respectively). Moreover, mechanical compression tests indicate that these alloys have a much lower Young's modulus ( E) than pure iron (220 GPa), i.e., 145, 133, and 118 GPa for the Fe23Mn5Si, Fe26Mn5Si, and Fe30Mn5Si alloys, respectively. The corrosion behavior of the alloys is studied in Hank's solution at 310 K (37 °C) using electrochemical experiments and weight loss measurements. The corrosion kinetics of the Fe-Mn-Si increases with the manganese content (0.48, 0.59, and 0.80 mm/year for the Fe23Mn5Si, Fe26Mn5Si, and Fe30Mn5Si alloys, respectively). The alloy with the highest manganese content shows the most promising properties for biomedical applications as a biodegradable and biomechanically compatible implant material.

  3. Mechanism of formation of corrosion layers on nickel and nickel-based alloys in melts containing oxyanions--a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzvetkoff, Tzvety; Gencheva, Petia

    2003-01-01

    A review of the corrosion of Ni and Ni-based alloys in melts containing oxyanions (nitrate, sulphate, hydroxide and carbonate) is presented, emphasising the mechanism of growth, the composition and structure of the passivating oxide films formed on the material in such conditions. First, the thermodynamical background involving solubility and point defect chemistry calculations for oxides formed on Ni, Cr and Ni-Cr alloys in molten salt media is briefly commented. The main passivation product on the Ni surface has been reported to be cubic NiO. In the transition stage, further oxidation of the compact NiO layer has been shown to take place in which Ni(III) ions and nickel cation vacancies are formed. Transport of nickel cation vacancies has been proposed to neutralise the charges of the excess oxide ions formed in the further oxidation reaction. Ex situ analysis studies reported in the literature indicated the possible formation of Ni 2 O 3 phase in the anodic layer. During the third stage of oxidation, a survey of the published data indicated that oxygen evolution from oxyanion melts is the predominant reaction taking place on the Ni/NiO electrode. This has been supposed to lead to a further accumulation of oxygen ions in the oxide lattice presumably as oxygen interstitials, and a NiO 2 phase formation has been also suggested. Literature data on the composition of the oxide film on industrial Ni-based alloys and superalloys in melts containing oxyanions are also presented and discussed. Special attention is paid to the effect of the composition of the alloy, the molten salt mixture and the gas atmosphere on the stability and protective ability of corrosion layers

  4. Insights on the Role of Copper Addition in the Corrosion and Mechanical Properties of Binary Zr-Cu Metallic Glass Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junlei Tang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of copper addition on the corrosion resistance and mechanical properties of binary Zr100–xCux (x = 30, 50, 80, 90 at.% glassy coatings was investigated by means of electrochemical measurements, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, energy dispersive analysis spectroscopy (EDS, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and nano-indentation techniques. The corrosion resistance in 0.01 M deaerated H2SO4 solution and the mechanical properties of the Zr-Cu glassy coatings depend considerably upon the copper content in the glassy matrix. The top surfaces of the Zr-Cu coatings with lower Cu content were covered by a compact protective ZrO2 passive film. The competition between the oxidation of Zr atoms (ZrO2 film formation and the oxidation–dissolution of Cu atoms assumed the most important role in the electrochemical behavior of the Zr-Cu glassy coatings. The generation of ZrO2 on the surface benefited the formation of passive film; and the corrosion resistance of the metallic glass coatings depended on the coverage degree of ZrO2 passive film. The evolution of free volume affected both the mechanical and corrosion behaviors of the Zr-Cu glassy coatings.

  5. Effect of cerium on structure modifications of a hybrid sol–gel coating, its mechanical properties and anti-corrosion behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cambon, Jean-Baptiste; Esteban, Julien; Ansart, Florence; Bonino, Jean-Pierre; Turq, Viviane; Santagneli, S.H.; Santilli, C.V.; Pulcinelli, S.H.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► New sol–gel routes to replace chromates for corrosion protection of aluminum. ► Effect of cerium concentration on the microstructure of xerogel. ► Electrochemical and mechanical performances of hybrid coating with different cerium contents. ► Good correlation between the different results with an optimal cerium content of 0.01 M. -- Abstract: An organic–inorganic hybrid coating was developed to improve the corrosion resistance of the aluminum alloy AA 2024-T3. Organic and inorganic coatings derived from glycidoxypropyl-trimethoxysilane (GPTMS) and aluminum tri-sec-butoxide Al(O s Bu) 3 , with different cerium contents, were deposited onto aluminum by dip-coating process. Corrosion resistance and mechanical properties were investigated by electrochemical impedance measurements and nano-indentation respectively. An optimal cerium concentration of 0.01 M was evidenced. To correlate and explain the hybrid coating performances in relation to the cerium content, NMR experiments were performed. It has been shown that when the cerium concentration in the hybrid is higher than 0.01 M there are important modifications in the hybrid structure that account for the mechanical properties and anti-corrosion behavior of the sol–gel coating.

  6. A systematic study of mechanical properties, corrosion behavior and biocompatibility of AZ31B Mg alloy after ultrasonic nanocrystal surface modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xiaoning; Qin, Haifeng; Gao, Hongyu; Mankoci, Steven; Zhang, Ruixia; Zhou, Xianfeng; Ren, Zhencheng; Doll, Gary L; Martini, Ashlie; Sahai, Nita; Dong, Yalin; Ye, Chang

    2017-09-01

    Magnesium alloys have tremendous potential for biomedical applications due to their good biocompatibility, osteoconductivity, and degradability, but can be limited by their poor mechanical properties and fast corrosion in the physiological environment. In this study, ultrasonic nanocrystal surface modification (UNSM), a recently developed surface processing technique that utilizes ultrasonic impacts to induce plastic strain on metal surfaces, was applied to an AZ31B magnesium (Mg) alloy. The mechanical properties, corrosion resistance, and biocompatibility of the alloy after UNSM treatment were studied systematically. Significant improvement in hardness, yield stress and wear resistance was achieved after the UNSM treatment. In addition, the corrosion behavior of UNSM-treated AZ31B was not compromised compared with the untreated samples, as demonstrated by the weight loss and released element concentrations of Mg and Al after immersion in alpha-minimum essential medium (α-MEM) for 24h. The in vitro biocompatibility of the AZ31B Mg alloys toward adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) before and after UNSM processing was also evaluated using a cell culture study. Comparable cell attachments were achieved between the two groups. These studies showed that UNSM could significantly improve the mechanical properties of Mg alloys without compromising their corrosion rate and biocompatibility in vitro. These findings suggest that UNSM is a promising method to treat biodegradable Mg alloys for orthopaedic applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Laser Nitriding of the Newly Developed Ti-20Nb-13Zr at.% Biomaterial Alloy to Enhance Its Mechanical and Corrosion Properties in Simulated Body Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, M. A.; Kumar, A. Madhan; Yilbas, Bekir S.; Al-Aqeeli, N.

    2017-11-01

    Despite the widespread application of Ti alloy in the biomedical field, surface treatments are typically applied to improve its resistance to corrosion and wear. A newly developed biomedical Ti-20Nb-13Zr at.% alloy (TNZ) was laser-treated in nitrogen environment to improve its surface characteristics with corrosion protection performance. Surface modification of the alloy by laser was performed through a Nd:YAG laser. The structural and surface morphological alterations in the laser nitrided layer were investigated by XRD and a FE-SEM. The mechanical properties have been evaluated using nanoindentation for laser nitride and as-received samples. The corrosion protection behavior was estimated using electrochemical corrosion analysis in a physiological medium (SBF). The obtained results revealed the production of a dense and compact film of TiN fine grains (micro-/nanosize) with 9.1 µm below the surface. The mechanical assessment results indicated an improvement in the modulus of elasticity, hardness, and resistance of the formed TiN layer to plastic deformation. The electrochemical analysis exhibited that the surface protection performance of the laser nitrided TNZ substrates in the SBF could be considerably enhanced compared to that of the as-received alloy due to the presence of fine grains in the TiN layer resulting from laser nitriding. Furthermore, the untreated and treated Ti-20Nb-13Zr alloy exhibited higher corrosion resistance than the CpTi and Ti6Al4V commercial alloys. The improvements in the surface hardness and corrosion properties of Ti alloy in a simulated body obtained using laser nitriding make this approach a suitable candidate for enhancing the properties of biomaterials.

  8. Magnesium implant alloy with low levels of strontium and calcium: The third element effect and phase selection improve bio-corrosion resistance and mechanical performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bornapour, M., E-mail: mandana.bornapour@mail.mcgill.ca [Light Metals and Advanced Magnesium Materials, Mining and Materials Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 2B2 (Canada); Biointerface Lab, Mining and Materials Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 2B2 (Canada); Celikin, M. [Light Metals and Advanced Magnesium Materials, Mining and Materials Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 2B2 (Canada); Cerruti, M. [Biointerface Lab, Mining and Materials Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 2B2 (Canada); Pekguleryuz, M. [Light Metals and Advanced Magnesium Materials, Mining and Materials Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 2B2 (Canada)

    2014-02-01

    Low density, non-toxicity, biodegradability and mechanical properties similar to human tissues such as bone make magnesium (Mg) alloys attractive for biomedical applications ranging from bone to cardiovascular implants. The most important challenge that still prevents the widespread use of Mg implants is their rapid degradation rate. In this study we investigate the combined effect of calcium (Ca) and strontium (Sr) on the corrosion behavior of Mg via in vitro immersion and electrochemical tests in simulated body fluid (SBF), and analyze changes in mechanical properties. We show that the combined addition of 0.3 wt.% Sr and 0.4 wt.% Ca decreases the corrosion rate of Mg both in terms of mass loss and hydrogen evolution more effectively than the single addition of either alloying element. We investigate the microstructure of as-cast specimens and the morphology of the corrosion products using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electron probe micro-analysis, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Tensile and three point bending tests reveal that the ternary alloy Mg–0.3Sr–0.3Ca has a good combination of mechanical properties and corrosion resistance with hydrogen evolution rates of 0.01 mL/cm{sup 2}/h in SBF. Higher concentrations of Sr and Ca alter the resulting microstructure leading to increased corrosion rates in SBF by promoting the micro-galvanic corrosion between the α-Mg matrix and intermetallic phases of Mg{sub 17}Sr{sub 2} and Mg{sub 2}Ca along the grain boundaries. These results indicate that the combined addition of optimal amounts of Ca and Sr is a promising approach to decrease the high degradation rate of Mg implants in physiological conditions, as well as attaining high ductility in the alloy. The better properties of the Mg–0.3Sr–0.3Ca alloy are related to the new intermetallic phases found in this sample. The optimum composition is attributed to the “third element effect”, as seen in the corrosion

  9. Hyperbaric oxygen sensitizes anoxic Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm to ciprofloxacin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolpen, Mette; Lerche, Christian J; Kragh, Kasper Nørskov

    2017-01-01

    Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection is characterized by the presence of endobronchial antibiotic-tolerant biofilm subject to strong oxygen (O2) depletion due to the activity of surrounding polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The exact mechanisms affecting the antibiotic susceptibility...... metabolism activity and the endogenous formation of reactive O2 radicals (ROS). In this study we aimed to apply hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HBOT) in order to sensitize anoxic P. aeruginosa agarose-biofilms established to mimic situations with intense O2 consumption by the host response in the cystic...... fibrosis (CF) lung. Application of HBOT resulted in enhanced bactericidal activity of ciprofloxacin at clinically relevant durations and was accompanied by indications of restored aerobic respiration, involvement of endogenous lethal oxidative stress and increased bacterial growth. The findings highlight...

  10. Safety-classified steel cylinder reinforced concrete pipelines: mechanism of corrosion, diagnosis and maintenance strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aimonino, J.; Jacq, S.

    2015-01-01

    EDF operates 6 km of safety-classified steel cylinder reinforced concrete pipelines spread over 8 PWR nuclear reactors located on the sea coast. These pipelines, placed in galleries, convey approximately 3000 m 3 /h of sea water under a pressure of 4 bar. They have been in operation since the mid eighties or early nineties. Their service life is limited by different scenarios of corrosion by pitting due to the presence of chlorides from sea water. Pipelines are subjected to frequent visual checks that can lead to immediate temporary reinforcement and subsequent replacement. In addition, a diagnosis methodology was developed in order to better anticipate the maintenance operations and in order to assess the remaining service life of pipelines. This methodology combines autopsies of replaced pipes with periodic campaigns of exhaustive half-cell potential mapping. For exhaustive campaigns, the grid spacing was 30 cm x 30 cm, refined to 10 cm x 10 cm in singular zones, on the entire external concrete surface of pipelines, which represents around 6x10 5 measurement points for 6 km of pipelines. Robust specifications were drawn up for the measurement method and the interpretation of the results, initially based on RILEM and ASTM recommendations and then significantly reinforced based on operational feedback. These specifications ensure the implementation and the interpretation of half-cell potential mapping can be carried out on a very large scale and enable the comparison of results between successive campaigns. The diagnosis methodology was a decisive factor in the planning of a preventive maintenance strategy which would enable a pipeline service life of 60 years. (authors)

  11. Marine sulfate-reducing bacteria cause serious corrosion of iron under electroconductive biogenic mineral crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enning, Dennis; Venzlaff, Hendrik; Garrelfs, Julia; Dinh, Hang T; Meyer, Volker; Mayrhofer, Karl; Hassel, Achim W; Stratmann, Martin; Widdel, Friedrich

    2012-01-01

    Iron (Fe0) corrosion in anoxic environments (e.g. inside pipelines), a process entailing considerable economic costs, is largely influenced by microorganisms, in particular sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). The process is characterized by formation of black crusts and metal pitting. The mechanism is usually explained by the corrosiveness of formed H2S, and scavenge of ‘cathodic’ H2 from chemical reaction of Fe0 with H2O. Here we studied peculiar marine SRB that grew lithotrophically with metallic iron as the only electron donor. They degraded up to 72% of iron coupons (10 mm × 10 mm × 1 mm) within five months, which is a technologically highly relevant corrosion rate (0.7 mm Fe0 year−1), while conventional H2-scavenging control strains were not corrosive. The black, hard mineral crust (FeS, FeCO3, Mg/CaCO3) deposited on the corroding metal exhibited electrical conductivity (50 S m−1). This was sufficient to explain the corrosion rate by electron flow from the metal (4Fe0 → 4Fe2+ + 8e−) through semiconductive sulfides to the crust-colonizing cells reducing sulfate (8e− + SO42− + 9H+ → HS− + 4H2O). Hence, anaerobic microbial iron corrosion obviously bypasses H2 rather than depends on it. SRB with such corrosive potential were revealed at naturally high numbers at a coastal marine sediment site. Iron coupons buried there were corroded and covered by the characteristic mineral crust. It is speculated that anaerobic biocorrosion is due to the promiscuous use of an ecophysiologically relevant catabolic trait for uptake of external electrons from abiotic or biotic sources in sediments. PMID:22616633

  12. Effect of the Heat Treatment on the Mechanical Property and Corrosion Resistance of CU - 7Al - 2.5Si Alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Syung-Yul; Won, Jong-Pil; Park, Dong-Hyun; Moon, Kyung-Man; Lee, Myeong-Hoon; Jeong, Jin-A [Korea Maritime and Ocean Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Tae-Sil [Pohang College, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    Recently, the fuel oil of diesel engines of marine ships has been increasingly changed to heavy oil of low quality as the oil price is getting higher and higher. Therefore, the spiral gear attached at the motor of the oil purifier which plays an important role to purify the heavy oil is also easy to expose at severe environmental condition due to the purification of the heavy oil in higher temperature. Thus, the material of the spiral gear requires a better mechanical strength, wear and corrosion resistance. In this study, the heat treatment(tempering) with various holding time at temperature of 500 .deg. C was carried out to the alloy of Cu-7Al-2.5Si as centrifugal casting, and the properties of both hardness and corrosion resistance with and without heat treatment were investigated with observation of the microstructure and with electrochemical methods, such as measurement of corrosion potential, cathodic and anodic polarization curves, cyclic voltammogram, and a.c. impedance. in natural seawater solution. The α, β and γ{sub 2} phases were observed in the material in spite of no heat treatment due to quenching effect of a spin mold. However, their phases, that is, β and γ{sub 2} phases decreased gradually with increasing the holding time at a constant temperature of 500 .deg. C. The hardness more or less decreased with heat treatment, however its corrosion resistance was improved with the heat treatment. Furthermore, the longer holding time, the better corrosion resistance. In addition, when the holding time was 48hrs, its corrosion current density showed the lowest value. The pattern of corroded surface was nearly similar to that of the pitting corrosion, and this morphology was greatly observed in the case of no heat treatment. It is considered that γ{sub 2} phase at the grain boundary was corroded preferentially as an anode. However, the pattern of general corrosion exhibited increasingly due to decreasing the γ{sub 2} phase with heat treatment

  13. Corrosion control. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradford, S.A.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this text is to train engineers and technologists not just to understand corrosion but to control it. Materials selection, coatings, chemical inhibitors, cathodic and anodic protection, and equipment design are covered in separate chapters. High-temperature oxidation is discussed in the final two chapters ne on oxidation theory and one on controlling oxidation by alloying and with coatings. This book treats corrosion and high-temperature oxidation separately. Corrosion is divided into three groups: (1) chemical dissolution including uniform attack, (2) electrochemical corrosion from either metallurgical or environmental cells, and (3) stress-assisted corrosion. Corrosion is logically grouped according to mechanisms rather than arbitrarily separated into different types of corrosion as if they were unrelated. For those university students and industry personnel who approach corrosion theory very hesitantly, this text will present the electrochemical reactions responsible for corrosion summed up in only five simple half-cell reactions. When these are combined on a polarization diagram, which is also explained in detail, the electrochemical processes become obvious. For those who want a text stripped bare of electrochemical theory, several noted sections can be omitted without loss of continuity. However, the author has presented the material in such a manner that these sections are not beyond the abilities of any high school graduate who is interested in technology

  14. Facile fabrication of superhydrophobic surface with excellent mechanical abrasion and corrosion resistance on copper substrate by a novel method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Fenghua; Yao, Kai

    2014-06-11

    A novel method for controllable fabrication of a superhydrophobic surface with a water contact angle of 162 ± 1° and a sliding angle of 3 ± 0.5° on copper substrate is reported in this Research Article. The facile and low-cost fabrication process is composed from the electrodeposition in traditional Watts bath and the heat-treatment in the presence of (heptadecafluoro-1,1,2,2-tetradecyl) triethoxysilane (AC-FAS). The superhydrophobicity of the fabricated surface results from its pine-cone-like hierarchical micro-nanostructure and the assembly of low-surface-energy fluorinated components on it. The superhydrophobic surface exhibits high microhardness and excellent mechanical abrasion resistance because it maintains superhydrophobicity after mechanical abrasion against 800 grit SiC sandpaper for 1.0 m at the applied pressure of 4.80 kPa. Moreover, the superhydrophobic surface has good chemical stability in both acidic and alkaline environments. The potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy test shows that the as-prepared superhydrophobic surface has excellent corrosion resistance that can provide effective protection for the bare Cu substrate. In addition, the as-prepared superhydrophobic surface has self-cleaning ability. It is believed that the facile and low-cost method offer an effective strategy and promising industrial applications for fabricating superhydrophobic surfaces on various metallic materials.

  15. Microstructure and mechanical properties of friction welded AISI 1040/AISI 304L steels before and after electrochemical corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarsilmaz, Furkan [Firat Univ., Elazig (Turkey). Dept. of Mechatronics Engineering; Kirik, Ihsan [Batman Univ. (Turkey); Ozdemir, Niyazi [Firat Univ., Elazig (Turkey)

    2018-03-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate the effect of welding parameters both on the electrochemical corrosion behavior and tensile strength of pre- and post-electrochemical corrosion of friction welded dissimilar steels. The microstructural changes of AISI 1040/AISI 304L friction welded couples and also parent materials were analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy. The electrochemical behaviors of AISI1040/AISI304L joints were comparatively investigated by potentiodynamic polarization curve test and by electrochemical impedance spectra. Moreover, tensile strength experiments were carried out determining the behavior of friction welded joints of pre- and post-electrochemical corrosion and results indicated that the maximum tensile test value of the dissimilar welded pre-electrochemical corrosion was higher than those of post-electrochemical corrosion and was also very close to AISI 1040 parent material value.

  16. The effect of temperature and concentration on the corrosion inhibition mechanism of an amphiphilic amido-amine in CO2 saturated solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desimone, M.P.; Gordillo, G.; Simison, S.N.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Behaviour of N-[2-[(2-aminoethyl)amino]ethyl]-9-octadecenamide (AAOA) as CO 2 corrosion inhibitor. → The adsorption of the AAOA corrosion inhibitor obeys a Frumkin adsorption isotherm. → The inhibition efficiency of the AAOA depends on temperature and concentration. → There is a change in the adsorption mode of the inhibitor with concentration. → AAOA is mainly physi- or chemisorbed for low or high concentrations, respectively. - Abstract: The corrosion inhibition mechanism of the N-[2-[(2-aminoethyl)amino]ethyl]-9-octadecenamide on mild steel surface in CO 2 -saturated 5% NaCl solution has been studied. The inhibition efficiency decreases with increasing temperature. Adsorption of the inhibitor studied is found to follow the Frumkin adsorption isotherm. EIS results show that the mechanism of its corrosion inhibition at concentrations higher than critical micelle concentration is by forming a protective porous bi-layer. The activation energy, thermodynamic parameters and electrochemical results reveal a change in the adsorption mode of the inhibitor studied: the inhibitor could primarily be physically adsorbed at low concentrations, while chemisorption is favoured as concentration increases.

  17. Effects of Aging and W Addition on the Corrosion Resistance and Mechanical Properties of Fe-Cr-Mn-N Stainless Steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Yu Taek; Joo, Uk Hyon; Park, Yong Soo; Kim, Young Sik

    2000-01-01

    The characteristics of the mechanical properties and sensitization behaviors in Fe-Cr-Mn stainless steels by W addition and aging treatment were studied. Yield strength, tensile strength, elongation and impact energy decreased, and hardness increased slightly by aging treatment. W-containing alloys showed especially a larger degree of brittle characteristics due to the hard chi(χ) phase formed from the decomposition of ferrite. Carbides precipitated in grain boundary had a bad effect on impact energy rather than on strength and hardness. Ni addition suppressed the formation of ferrite and resulted in some improvement of mechanical properties. Anodic polarization tests showed that the corrosion resistance of aged alloys decreased by the formation of carbides and secondary austenite. It was observed that W addition made no improvement of the pitting potential and passive current density of aged alloys in the HCI solution. But Ni and W decreased critical current density in the sulfuric acid and made easier formation of passive film, contributing to corrosion resistance. From the results of EPR (Electrochemical Potentiokinetic Reactivation). DOS (Degree of Sensitization) increased with aging time and carbides and ferrite were preferentially attacked. It was observed that Ni delayed the sensitization. It can be concluded from the previous results that the selective dissolution of ferrite is due to the ferrite decomposition to chi (χ) phase and secondary austenite. In the secondary austenite. Cr and W which are known to improve the corrosion resistance were depleted. Therefore, it seems that ferrite phase became sensitive to corrosion

  18. Modeling the effects of evolving redox conditions on the corrosion of copper containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kng, F.; LeNeveu, D.M.; Jobe, D.J.

    1994-01-01

    The corrosive environment around the containers in a Canadian nuclear fuel waste disposal vault will change over time from open-quotes warm and oxidizingclose quotes to open-quotes cool and anoxic.close quotes As the conditions change, so too will the corrosion behaviour of the containers. For copper containers, uniform corrosion and, possibly, pitting will occur during the initial aggressive phase, to be replaced by slow uniform corrosion during the long-term anoxic period. The corrosion behaviour of copper has been studied over a range of conditions representing all phases in the evolution of the vault environment. The results of these studies are summarized and used to illustrate how a model can be developed to predict the corrosion behaviour and container lifetimes over long periods of time. Lifetimes in excess of 10 6 a are predicted for 25-mm-thick copper containers under Canadian disposal conditions

  19. Single neuron dynamics during experimentally induced anoxic depolarization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandt, B.; Stigen, Tyler; ten Haken, Bernard; Netoff, Theoden; van Putten, Michel Johannes Antonius Maria

    2013-01-01

    We studied single neuron dynamics during anoxic depolarizations, which are often observed in cases of neuronal energy depletion. Anoxic and similar depolarizations play an important role in several pathologies, notably stroke, migraine, and epilepsy. One of the effects of energy depletion was

  20. New facts in mechanism, development and inspection of stress corrosion vulnerability in gas trunk lines; Nouveaux elements dans le mecanisme, le developpement et le diagnostic de la vulnerabilite a la corrosion sous tension des conduites de gaz principales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, K. [Tyumentransgaz, (Russian Federation)

    2000-07-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of the buried pipelines has been acknowledged a serious problem long ago. The author's researches (1) for a long period of time have established that SCC occurrence in pipe metal is affected by a combination of three factors: - Metal quality - availability of structural reasons contributing to occurrence and development of original microcracks; - Appropriate level of active stresses (considering inner residual stresses in the structure of metal), exceeding threshold level for occurrence and development of microcracks at rated operating conditions of the pipeline; - Availability of corrosive environment saturated with soil microorganisms, its access to the metal surface and interaction of the environment and metal structure. Operating failure mechanism and kinetics were proposed for buried pipelines - they give insight into, and enable to classify SCC cases as a local bio-corrosion process occurring in abnormal, in terms of content non-metallic spots, and offer to explain, in full, the features of the process that were hard to interpret before. (author)

  1. The reduction of U(VI) on corroded iron under anoxic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, D.; Spahiu, K.

    2002-01-01

    The corrosion of iron and the interaction between corroded iron and U(VI) in anoxic conditions were investigated. The anoxic conditions were obtained by flushing an 99.97% Ar-0.03% CO 2 gas mixture through the test vessel, in which an oxygen trap and six reaction bottles containing synthetic groundwater (10 mM NaCl and 2 mM HCO 3 - .) were placed. The dark-green coloured corrosion product, formed on iron surface after three months corrosion in synthetic groundwater solutions, was identified by powder X-ray diffraction to be carbonate green rust, Fe 4 II Fe 2 III (OH) 12 CO 3 . The iron foil that reacted in a solution (10 ppm U(VI), 10 mM NaCl and 2 mM HCO 3 - ) for three months was analysed by SEM-EDS. The result shows that: (i) an uneven layer of carbonate green rust (1-5 μm thick) formed on the metallic iron; (ii) a thin (0.3 μm) uranium-rich layer deposited on top of the carbonate green rust layer; and (iii) some UO 2 crystals (3-5 μm sized) on the thin uranium layer. The experimental results proved that the U(VI) removal capacity of metal iron is not hindered by formation of a layer of carbonate green rust on the iron. Tests with cast iron and pure iron indicate that they have similar U(VI) removal capacities. At the end of experiment, U concentrations in solution approached the solubility of UO 2 (s), 10 -8 M. The stability of the carbonate green rust at the experimental conditions, pH, E h , [Fe 2+ ] and [HCO 3 - ], is discussed. (orig.)

  2. Modification of the iron mechanical- and corrosion features by ion implantation in surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumvol, I.J.R.

    1981-01-01

    The physical mechanisms responsable by the tin ion implantation in the iron surface at moderated doses are studied. Several techniques are used such as alpha-particle Rutherford backscattering, conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. (L.C.) [pt

  3. Microstructural, mechanical, corrosion and cytotoxicity characterization of the hot forged FeMn30(wt.%) alloy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čapek, Jaroslav; Kubásek, J.; Vojtěch, D.; Jablonská, E.; Lipov, J.; Ruml, T.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 58, Jan (2016), s. 900-908 ISSN 0928-4931 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP108/12/G043 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : FeMn alloys * biodegradability * cytotoxicity * microstructure * mechanical properties Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 4.164, year: 2016

  4. Corrosion fatigue of steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spaehn, H.; Wagner, G.H.

    1976-01-01

    Corrosion fatigue phenomena can be classified into two main groups according to the electrochemical state of the metal surface in the presence of electrolytes: the active and the passive state with an important sub-group of corrosion fatigue in the unstable passive state. The allowable stress for structures exposed to the conjoint action of corrosion and fatigue is influenced by many factors: kind of media, number of cycles, frequency, mean stress, size, notches, loading mode, alloy composition and mechanical strength. A critical literature review shows contradictory results if a classification by the electrochemical surface state is not applied. Case histories and counter measures illustrate the practical importance of corrosion fatigue in many branches of industry as well as the urgent need for a better knowledge about the mutual influence of the phenomena to get rules by which the engineer can appraise the risk of corrosion fatigue. (orig.) [de

  5. Effect of the existing form of Cu element on the mechanical properties, bio-corrosion and antibacterial properties of Ti-Cu alloys for biomedical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Erlin; Wang, Xiaoyan; Chen, Mian; Hou, Bing

    2016-12-01

    Ti-Cu alloys have exhibited strong antibacterial ability, but Ti-Cu alloys prepared by different processes showed different antibacterial ability. In order to reveal the controlling mechanism, Ti-Cu alloys with different existing forms of Cu element were prepared in this paper. The effects of the Cu existing form on the microstructure, mechanical, corrosion and antibacterial properties of Ti-Cu alloys have been systematically investigated. Results have shown that the as-cast Ti-Cu alloys showed a higher hardness and mechanical strength as well as a higher antibacterial rate (51-64%) but a relatively lower corrosion resistance than pure titanium. Treatment at 900°C/2h (T4) significantly increased the hardness and the strength, improved the corrosion resistance but had little effect on the antibacterial property. Treatment at 900°C/2h+400°C/12h (T6) increased further the hardness and the mechanical strength, improved the corrosion resistance and but also enhanced the antibacterial rate (>90%) significantly. It was demonstrated that the Cu element in solid solution state showed high strengthening ability but low antibacterial property while Cu element in Ti2Cu phase exhibited strong strengthening ability and strong antibacterial property. Ti2Cu phase played a key role in the antibacterial mechanism. The antibacterial ability of Ti-Cu alloy was strongly proportional to the Cu content and the surface area of Ti2Cu phase. High Cu content and fine Ti2Cu phase would contribute to a high strength and a strong antibacterial ability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Oxygen intrusion into anoxic fjords leads to increased methylmercury availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiteberg Braaten, Hans Fredrik; Pakhomova, Svetlana; Yakushev, Evgeniy

    2013-04-01

    Mercury (Hg) appears in the oxic surface waters of the oceans at low levels (sub ng/L). Because inorganic Hg can be methylated into the toxic and bioaccumulative specie methylmercury (MeHg) levels can be high at the top of the marine food chain. Even though marine sea food is considered the main risk driver for MeHg exposure to people most research up to date has focused on Hg methylation processes in freshwater systems. This study identifies the mechanisms driving formation of MeHg during oxygen depletion in fjords, and shows how MeHg is made available in the surface water during oxygen intrusion. Studies of the biogeochemical structure in the water column of the Norwegian fjord Hunnbunn were performed in 2009, 2011 and 2012. In autumn of 2011 mixing flushing events were observed and lead to both positive and negative effects on the ecosystem state in the fjord. The oxygenated water intrusions lead to a decrease of the deep layer concentrations of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), ammonia and phosphate. On the other hand the intrusion also raised the H2S boundary from 8 m to a shallower depth of just 4 m. Following the intrusion was also observed an increase at shallower depths of nutrients combined with a decrease of pH. Before flushing events were observed concentrations of total Hg (TotHg) increased from 1.3 - 1.7 ng/L in the surface layer of the fjord to concentrations ranging from 5.2 ng/L to 6.4 ng/L in the anoxic zone. MeHg increased regularly from 0.04 ng/L in the surface water to a maximum concentration of 5.2 ng/L in the deeper layers. This corresponds to an amount of TotHg present as MeHg ranging from 2.1 % to 99 %. The higher concentrations of MeHg in the deeper layer corresponds to an area where no oxygen is present and concentrations of H2S exceeds 500 µM, suggesting a production of MeHg in the anoxic area as a result of sulphate reducing bacteria activity. After flushing the concentrations of TotHg showed a similar pattern ranging from 0.6 ng/L in the

  7. Generalized corrosion of nickel base alloys in high temperature aqueous media: a contribution to the comprehension of the mechanisms; Corrosion generalisee des alliages a base nickel en milieu aqueux a haute temperature: apport a la comprehension des mecanismes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchetti-Sillans, L

    2007-11-15

    In France, nickel base alloys, such as alloy 600 and alloy 690, are the materials constituting steam generators (SG) tubes of pressurized water reactors (PWR). The generalized corrosion resulting from the interaction between these alloys and the PWR primary media leads, on the one hand, to the formation of a thin protective oxide scale ({approx} 10 nm), and on the other hand, to the release of cations in the primary circuit, which entails an increase of the global radioactivity of this circuit. The goal of this work is to supply some new comprehension elements about nickel base alloys corrosion phenomena in PWR primary media, taking up with underlining the effects of metallurgical and physico-chemical parameters on the nature and the growth mechanisms of the protective oxide scale. In this context, the passive film formed during the exposition of alloys 600, 690 and Ni-30Cr, in conditions simulating the PWR primary media, has been analyzed by a set of characterization techniques (SEM, TEM, PEC and MPEC, XPS). The coupling of these methods leads to a fine description, in terms of nature and structure, of the multilayered oxide forming during the exposition of nickel base alloys in primary media. Thus, the protective part of the oxide scale is composed of a continuous layer of iron and nickel mixed chromite, and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} nodules dispersed at the alloy / mixed chromite interface. The study of protective scale growth mechanisms by tracers and markers experiments reveals that the formation of the mixed chromite is the consequence of an anionic mechanism, resulting from short circuits like grain boundaries diffusion. Besides, the impact of alloy surface defects has also been studied, underlining a double effect of this parameter, which influences the short circuits diffusion density in oxide and the formation rate of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} nodules. The sum of these results leads to suggest a description of the nickel base alloys corrosion mechanisms in PWR primary

  8. Influence of ECAP process on mechanical and corrosion properties of pure Mg and ZK60 magnesium alloy for biodegradable stent applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostaed, Ehsan; Vedani, Maurizio; Hashempour, Mazdak; Bestetti, Massimiliano

    2014-01-01

    Equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) was performed on ZK60 alloy and pure Mg in the temperature range 150–250 °C. A significant grain refinement was detected after ECAP, leading to an ultrafine grain size (UFG) and enhanced formability during extrusion process. Comparing to conventional coarse grained samples, fracture elongation of pure Mg and ZK60 alloy were significantly improved by 130% and 100%, respectively, while the tensile strength remained at high level. Extrusion was performed on ECAP processed billets to produce small tubes (with outer/inner diameter of 4/2.5 mm) as precursors for biodegradable stents. Studies on extruded tubes revealed that even after extrusion the microstructure and microhardness of the UFG ZK60 alloy were almost stable. Furthermore, pure Mg tubes showed an additional improvement in terms of grain refining and mechanical properties after extrusion. Electrochemical analyses and microstructural assessments after corrosion tests demonstrated two major influential factors in corrosion behavior of the investigated materials. The presence of Zn and Zr as alloying elements simultaneously increases the nobility by formation of a protective film and increase the local corrosion damage by amplifying the pitting development. ECAP treatment decreases the size of the second phase particles thus improving microstructure homogeneity, thereby decreasing the localized corrosion effects. PMID:25482411

  9. Influence of minor combined addition of Cr and Pr on microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion behaviors of an ultrahigh strength Al-Zn-Mg-Cu-Zr alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming; Huang, Lanping; Chen, Kanghua; Liu, Wensheng

    2018-01-01

    This work focuses on controlling grain boundary structure in an ultra-high strength Al-8.6Zn-2.5Mg-2.2Cu-0.16Zr (wt.%) alloy by the combined addition of trace Cr (0.1wt.%) and Pr (0.14wt.%), and evaluating mechanical properties and localized corrosion behaviors of the alloy in the peak aged condition. The introduction of trace Cr and Pr leads to the formation of nanoscale Cr, Pr-containing Al 3 Zr and Zr-containing PrCr 2 Al 20 dispersoids which can obviously inhibit the recrystallization and sub-grain growth of the super-high strength Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys, and retain the deformation-recovery microstructure dominated by low-angle grain boundaries. The nearly ellipsoidal dispersoids with a size of 10-35nm are discretely distributed and precipitate free zones are hardly formed in low-angle grain boundaries. This new alloy composition exhibits better combined properties, higher resistance to stress corrosion, exfoliation corrosion and inter-granular corrosion with the undamaged strength, ductility and fracture toughness. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Analysis of stress intensity factors for a new mechanical corrosion specimen; Analyse du facteur d`intensite de contrainte pour une nouvelle eprouvette de mecanique corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rassineux, B; Crouzet, D; Le Hong, S

    1996-03-01

    Electricite de France is conducting a research program to determine corrosion cracking rates in the steam generators Alloy 600 tubes of the primary system. The objective is to correlate the cracking rates with the specimen stress intensity factor K{sub I}. One of the samples selected for the purpose of this study is the longitudinal notched specimen TEL (TEL: ``Tubulaire a Entailles Longitudinales``). This paper presents the analysis of the stress intensity factor and its experimental validation. The stress intensity factor has been evaluated for different loads using 3D finite element calculations with the Hellen-Parks and G({theta}) methods. Both crack initiation and propagation are considered. As an assessment of the method, the numerical simulations are in good agreement with the fatigue crack growth rates measured experimentally for TEL and compact tension (CT) specimens. (authors). 8 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Modifications of mechanical characteristics and iron corrosion by ionic implantation on surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumvol, I.J.

    1980-01-01

    Tin ionic implantation on pure iron surface at moderate doses (5x10 15 to 5x10 16 ) Sn + Cu -2 ) has proven to be very efficient in improving the metal characteristics to oxidation and abrasion at high temperature. The abrasion volumetric coefficient K v , is reduced from up to 100 times, and the oxidation tax constant is reduced from up to 10 times. The physical mechanisms responsible for these phenomena are studied using different techniques of surface analysis; as Rutherford backscattering of alpha particles, Moessbauer spectroscopy of conversion electrons and sweeping electronic microscopy. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  12. Critical Study of Corrosion Damaged Concrete Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Sallehuddin Shah Ayop; John Cairns

    2013-01-01

    Corrosion of steel reinforcement in concrete is one of the major problems with respect to the durability of reinforced concrete structures. The degradation of the structure strength due to reinforcement corrosion decreases its design life. This paper presents the literature study on the influence of the corrosion on concrete structure starting from the mechanism of the corrosion until the deterioration stage and the structural effects of corrosion on concrete structures.

  13. Stress corrosion and corrosion fatigue crack growth monitoring in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senadheera, T.; Shipilov, S.A.

    2003-01-01

    Environmentally assisted cracking (including stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue) is one of the major causes for materials failure in a wide variety of industries. It is extremely important to understand the mechanism(s) of environmentally assisted crack propagation in structural materials so as to choose correctly from among the various possibilities-alloying elements, heat treatment of steels, parameters of cathodic protection, and inhibitors-to prevent in-service failures due to stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue. An important step towards understanding the mechanism of environmentally assisted crack propagation is designing a testing machine for crack growth monitoring and that simultaneously provides measurement of electrochemical parameters. In the present paper, a direct current (DC) potential drop method for monitoring crack propagation in metals and a testing machine that uses this method and allows for measuring electrochemical parameters during stress corrosion and corrosion fatigue crack growth are described. (author)

  14. Aluminum surface corrosion and the mechanism of inhibitors using pH and metal ion selective imaging fiber bundles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szunerits, Sabine; Walt, David R

    2002-02-15

    The localized corrosion behavior of a galvanic aluminum copper couple was investigated by in situ fluorescence imaging with a fiber-optic imaging sensor. Three different, but complementary methods were used for visualizing remote corrosion sites, mapping the topography of the metal surface, and measuring local chemical concentrations of H+, OH-, and Al3+. The first method is based on a pH-sensitive imaging fiber, where the fluorescent dye SNAFL was covalently attached to the fiber's distal end. Fluorescence images were acquired as a function of time at different areas of the galvanic couple. In a second method, the fluorescent dye morin was immobilized on the fiber-optic imaging sensor, which allowed the in situ localization of corrosion processes on pure aluminum to be visualized over time by monitoring the release of Al3+. The development of fluorescence on the aluminum surface defined the areas associated with the anodic dissolution of aluminum. We also investigated the inhibition of corrosion of pure aluminum by CeCl3 and 8-hydroxyquinoline. The decrease in current, the decrease in the number of active sites on the aluminum surface, and the faster surface passivation are all consistent indications that cerium chloride and 8-hydroxyquinoline inhibit corrosion effectively. From the number and extent of corrosion sites and the release of aluminum ions monitored with the fiber, it was shown that 8-hydroxyquinoline is a more effective inhibitor than cerium chloride.

  15. Contribution of archaeological analogs to the estimation of average corrosion rates and long term corrosion mechanisms of low carbon steel in soil; Apport des analogues archeologiques a l'estimation des vitesses moyennes et a l'etude des mecanismes de corrosion a tres long terme des aciers non allies dans les sols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neff, D

    2003-11-15

    identified. This corrosion form, constituted among others by a siderite layer is due to a particular environment: waterlogged soil containing wood. In the whole, analyses conducted in the TM show that it is composed of goethite badly crystallized in comparison with those of the DPL. Moreover, in this zone, the average elemental iron amount decreases progressively from the metal to the soil in which it stabilizes. In order to know the behaviour of the identified phases in soil water, some thermodynamic data have been involved to calculate their solubility in function of pH, potential and various water composition. The first conclusion concerns the influence of the composition and the structure of the material which is not important for the corrosion behaviour. From the results, some hypothesis have been formulated on the long term corrosion mechanisms of hypo-eutectoids steels in the considered environment. The role of the cracks formed in the DPL during the burial was evidenced. Moreover, these corrosion products undertake a dissolution in the soil water and a reprecipitation, explaining the progressive decrease of the iron amount in the TM. Lastly, some average corrosion rates have been measured with the help of the analytical and thermodynamic results: they do not exceed 4 {mu}m/year. (author)

  16. THE ROLE OF SHIELDING GAS ON MECHANICAL, METALLURGICAL AND CORROSION PROPERTIES OF CORTEN STEEL WELDED JOINTS OF RAILWAY COACHES USING GMAW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byju John

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This analysis lays emphasis on finding a suitable combination of shielding gas for welding underframe members such as sole bar of Railway Coaches made of corten steel; for improved mechanical, metallurgical and corrosion properties of welds using copper coated solid MIG/MAG welding filler wire size 1.2 mm conforming to AWS/SFA 5.18 ER 70 S in Semi-automatic GMAW process. Solid filler wire is preferred by welders due to less fumes, practically no slag and easy manipulation of welding torch with smooth wire flow during corrosion repair attention, when compared to Flux cored wire. Three joints using Gas metal arc welding (GMAW with shielding gases viz., Pure CO2, (80% Ar – 20% CO2 and (90% Ar – 10% CO2 were made from test pieces cut from Sole bar material of Railway Coach. Study of Mechanical properties such as tensile strength, hardness and toughness revealed that welded joint made using shielding gas (80% Ar – 20% CO2 has better Mechanical properties compared to the other two shielding gases and comparable to that of Parent metal. Type of Shielding gas used has influence on the chemical composition and macro & micro structures. The Tafel extrapolation study of freshly ground samples in 3.5% NaCl solution revealed that the welded joint made using shielding gas (80% Ar – 20% CO2 has also better corrosion resistance which is comparable to the Parent metal as well as similar commercial steels.

  17. Corrosion of steel structures in sea-bed sediment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    corrosion mechanism, measurement of metal corrosion rate, corrosion ... cables, steel rigs, pipelines and other marine facilities, is ..... make high strength steel material to crack with stress ... of SBS has yet been very limited, and selection of.

  18. From nuclear field to cultural heritage conservation - Understanding of the long term corrosion mechanisms of ferrous alloys through multi scale characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neff, D.

    2012-01-01

    The corrosion of metals such as steel presents a high variability depending on the environments of alteration (aqueous aerated and deaerated atmosphere, binders and concrete...) and durations considered. As part of my research, in order to understand these mechanisms over long periods the study of archaeological artefacts corroded over tens to hundreds of years has been chosen. This research was crucial in many application areas, ranging from the preservation of objects of cultural heritage and studies for the storage and disposal of radioactive waste in deep geological environment. In this area the archaeological artefacts constitute unparalleled analogues for the study of corrosion of steel elements embedded in the multi-barrier to separate the radionuclides from the biosphere. Characterization of corrosion systems was conducted through a methodology based on the coupling of multi scale techniques for materials characterization (SEM-EDS, Raman microspectroscopy, micro XRD, XAS synchrotron radiation...) providing information on the location, morphology, composition and structure of the crystalline phases present in a layer of corrosion products. Moreover, studies of the reaction processes and of the chemical or electrochemical reactivity of the systems by re-corrosion experiments of archaeological objects in labeled medium (D 2 O, 18 O) or under external stimuli (chemical, electrochemical) have highlighted phenomena controlling the corrosion process at the micrometric scale. Perspectives of my research are the study of further constraints of the corrosion processes such as the presence of bacteria in the environment, the study of processes at the nano-scale (TEM, STXM) but also the methodological development of new analytical approaches based on a combination of morphological imaging methods (FEG-SEM), composition (EDS), structure (μXRD under synchrotron radiation) or hyper spectral (Raman microspectroscopy) to determine the synergy of the nano and microscale

  19. Synergetic effects of Sc and Zr microalloying and heat treatment on mechanical properties and exfoliation corrosion behavior of Al-Mg-Mn alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Yongyi; Li, Shu; Deng, Ying; Zhou, Hua; Xu, Guofu; Yin, Zhimin

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical properties, exfoliation corrosion behavior and microstructure of Al-5.98Mg-0.47Mn and Al-6.01Mg-0.45Mn-0.25Sc-0.10Zr (wt%) alloy sheets under various homogenizing and annealing processes were investigated comparatively by tensile tests, electrochemical measurements, X-ray diffraction technique and microscopy methods. The as-cast alloys mainly consist of Fe and Mn enriched impurity phases, Mg and Mn enriched non-equilibrium aluminides and Mg 3 Al 2 phases. During homogenization treatment, solvable intermetallics firstly precipitate and then dissolve into matrix. The optimized homogenization processes for removing micro-segregation and obtaining maximum precipitation strengthening of secondary Al 3 (Sc, Zr) particles are 440 °C×8 h and 300 °C×8 h, respectively. Sc and Zr additions can make the yield strength of Al-Mg-Mn alloy increase by 21 MPa (6.9%), 120 MPa (61.2%) and 127 MPa (68.3%), when annealed at 270 °C, 300 °C and 330 °C, respectively, indicating that Orowan precipitation strengthening caused by secondary Al 3 (Sc, Zr) nano-particles is much greater than grain boundary strengthening from primary Al 3 (Sc, Zr) micro-particles. Increasing homogenization and annealing degrees and adding Sc and Zr all can decrease corrosion current density and improve exfoliation corrosion resistance. The exfoliation corrosion behavior is dominant by anodic dissolution occurring at the interface between intermetallics and α(Al) matrix. After homogenizing at 440 °C for 8 h and annealing at 300 °C for 1 h, yield strength, ultimate strength, elongation to failure and exfoliation corrosion rank are 196 MPa, 360 MPa, 20.2% and PA (slight pitting corrosion) in Al-Mg-Mn alloy, and reach to 316 MPa, 440 MPa, 17.0% and PA in Al-Mg-Mn-Sc-Zr alloy, respectively, revealing that high strength, high ductility and admirable corrosion resistance of Al-Mg-Mn alloys can be achieved by the synergetic effects of Sc and Zr microalloying and heat treatment.

  20. Impact of Cyclic Loading on Chloride Diffusivity and Mechanical Performance of RC Beams under Seawater Corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Pang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study was conducted to investigate the impact of cyclic loading on the mechanical performance and chloride diffusivity of RC beams exposed to seawater wet-dry cycles. To induce initial damage to RC beam specimen, cyclic loading controlled by max load and cycles was applied. Then beam specimens underwent 240 wet-dry cycles of seawater. Results show that the chloride content increased as max load and cycle increased. The chloride content at steel surface increased approximatively linearly as average crack width increased. Moreover, the max load had more influence on chloride content at steel surface than cycle. The difference of average chloride diffusion coefficient between tension and compression concrete was little at uncracked position. Average chloride diffusion coefficient increased as crack width increased when crack width was less than 0.11 mm whereas the increasing tendency was weak when crack width exceeded 0.11 mm. The residual yield load and ultimate load of RC beams decreased as max load and cycle increased. Based on univariate analysis of variance, the max load had more adverse effect on yield load and ultimate load than cycle.

  1. Corrosion mechanism of carbon brick in the blast furnace hearth by potassium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Ke-xin; Zhang, Jian-liang; Liu, Zheng-jian; Liu, Zhuang-zhuang; Deng, Yong; Fan, Xiaoyue

    2017-11-01

    Alkali plays a significant role in the formation of brittle layer of carbon brick in the blast furnace hearth. The brittle layer in a commercial blast furnace hearth was investigated. Large amounts of potassium compounds were found in the brittle layer. Subsequently, the carbon bricks which reacted with potassium in the simulation of blast furnace hearth under different contents of potassium in the brick (0.25, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 wt.%) during various reaction times (0.5, 1, 2 and 4 h) were experimentally studied. Finally, the formation mechanism of the brittle layer in carbon brick was clarified. The investigation results show that a large number of cracks are present in the brittle layer. The average potassium content in the brittle layer is 1 wt.%. According to the experimental results, cracks in the carbon brick can be formed by the attack of potassium. The reason for the formation of the brittle layer in the carbon brick is that the liquid potassium permeates into the carbon brick through the pores and cracks, and then reacts with SiO2 and Al2O3 in CO atmosphere. The generated potassium compounds nepheline and leucite lead to the volume expansion and the damage of the carbon brick.

  2. Effect of liquid phase sintering on the mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of infiltrated austenitic stainless steel; Efeito da sinterizacao com fase liquida sobre as propriedades mecanicas e resistencia a corrosao do aco inoxidavel austenitico infiltrado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, Cristine F. [Rio Grande do Sul Univ., Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Engenharia Metalurgica e dos Materiais; Matos Dias, Arao de; Schaeffer, Lirio [Rio Grande do Sul Univ., Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia. Lab. de Metalurgia do Po

    1996-12-31

    First, this work presents some considerations on the properties and corrosion resistance of the stainless steels and its relation with porosity. The infiltration technique of copper into compacted steels is presented as an efficacy alternative to improve both mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. In experimental development, it was carried out mechanical tests with stainless steel AISI 316 L to ratify the copper infiltration effects on the yield stress of the material, and corrosion tests in salt spray. The results confirm a considerable improvement in properties on the whole to infiltrated stainless steel. (author) 18 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. In vitro and in vivo corrosion, cytocompatibility and mechanical properties of biodegradable Mg-Y-Ca-Zr alloys as implant materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Da-Tren; Hong, Daeho; Saha, Partha; Ferrero, Jordan; Lee, Boeun; Tan, Zongqing; Dong, Zhongyun; Kumta, Prashant N

    2013-11-01

    This study introduces a class of biodegradable Mg-Y-Ca-Zr alloys novel to biological applications and presents evaluations for orthopedic and craniofacial implant applications. Mg-Y-Ca-Zr alloys were processed using conventional melting and casting techniques. The effects of increasing Y content from 1 to 4 wt.% as well as the effects of T4 solution treatment were assessed. Basic material phase characterization was conducted using X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Compressive and tensile tests allowed for the comparison of mechanical properties of the as-cast and T4-treated Mg-Y-Ca-Zr alloys to pure Mg and as-drawn AZ31. Potentiodynamic polarization tests and mass loss immersion tests were used to evaluate the corrosion behavior of the alloys. In vitro cytocompatibility tests on MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblast cells were also conducted. Finally, alloy pellets were implanted into murine subcutaneous tissue to observe in vivo corrosion as well as local host response through H&E staining. SEM/EDS analysis showed that secondary phase intermetallics rich in yttrium were observed along the grain boundaries, with the T4 solution treatment diffusing the secondary phases into the matrix while increasing the grain size. The alloys demonstrated marked improvement in mechanical properties over pure Mg. Increasing the Y content contributed to improved corrosion resistance, while solution-treated alloys resulted in lower strength and compressive strain compared to as-cast alloys. The Mg-Y-Ca-Zr alloys demonstrated excellent in vitro cytocompatibility and normal in vivo host response. The mechanical, corrosion and biological evaluations performed in this study demonstrated that Mg-Y-Ca-Zr alloys, especially with the 4 wt.% Y content, would perform well as orthopedic and craniofacial implant biomaterials. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The role of hydrogenotrophic iron-reducing bacteria on the corrosion process in the context of geological disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerber-Schutz, Marta

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear industry must to demonstrate the feasibility and safety of high level nuclear waste (HLNW) disposal. The generally recognised strategy for HLNW disposal is based on a multi-barrier system made by metallic packages surrounded by geological formation. The nuclear waste repository will be water re-saturated with time, and then the metallic corrosion process will take place. The aqueous corrosion will produce dihydrogen (H 2 ) that represents a new energetic source (electron donor) for microbial development. Moreover, the formation of Fe(II,III) solid corrosion products, such as magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ), will provide electron acceptors favoring the development of iron-reducing bacteria (IRB). The activity of hydrogenotrophic and IRB can potentially alter the protective properties of passivating oxide layers (i.e. magnetite) which could reactivate corrosion. The main objective of this study is to evaluate the role of hydrogenotrophic and IRB activities on anoxic corrosion process by using geochemical indicators. Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 was chosen as model organism, and both abiotic and biotic conditions were investigated. In a first setup of experiments, our results indicate that synthetic magnetite is destabilized in the presence of hydrogenotrophic IRB due to structural Fe(III) reduction coupled to H 2 oxidation. The extent of Fe(III) bioreduction is notably enhanced with the increase in the H 2 concentration in the system: 4% H 2 ≤ 10% H 2 ≤ 60% H 2 . In a second setup of experiments, our results indicate that corrosion extent changes according to the solution composition and the surface of metallic sample (iron powder and carbon steel coupon). Moreover, the solid corrosion products are different for each sample: vivianite, siderite and chukanovite are the main mineral phases identified in the experiments with iron powder, while vivianite and magnetite are identified with carbon steel coupons. Our results demonstrate that corrosion rate is

  5. Corrosion of dental nickel-aluminum bronze with a minor gold content-mechanism and biological impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardlin, Berit I; Lindholm-Sethson, Britta; Dahl, Jon E

    2009-02-01

    To study corrosion and to evaluate biological effects in vitro of corrosion products of a copper-aluminum-nickel alloy with 2% gold. The alloy NPGtrade mark+2 with the nominal composition Cu:77.3; Al:7.8; Ni:4.3; Fe:3.0; Zn:2.7; Au:2.0; and Mn:1.7 was characterized. Static immersion in acidic saline, pH 2.2-2.4, was used to determine release of metallic elements in a milieu simulating the condition of plaque build-up in interproximal areas of the tooth. Corrosion and surface reactions in saline and artificial saliva were studied by electrochemical techniques including registration of open-circuit-potentials, polarization curves and impedance spectra. Extracts were made in cell culture media and acidic saline and used for MTT test for cytotoxicity and HET-CAM method for irritation. The mean amount of elements released in the acidic saline were in microg cm(-2) : Cu:632; Al:210; Ni:144; Fe:122; Zn:48; Mn:52. No protective film was formed on the surface of the alloy, as extensive corrosion was observed in both saline and artificial saliva. The corrosion rate was higher in saline than in artificial saliva. Acidic extracts of the alloy diluted up to 64 times reduced cell viability with 80% or more. The extract induced coagulation of the blood vessels of the CAM and was rated as moderate irritant solution. The nickel-aluminum bronze showed high corrosion rate caused by an inability to create a protective surface layer. High levels of toxic elements were found after static immersion testing, and the corrosion products had a distinct adverse effect on the biological activity. Copyright 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Photogeochemical reactions of manganese under anoxic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W.; Yee, N.; Piotrowiak, P.; Falkowski, P. G.

    2017-12-01

    Photogeochemistry describes reactions involving light and naturally occurring chemical species. These reactions often involve a photo-induced electron transfer that does not occur in the absence of light. Although photogeochemical reactions have been known for decades, they are often ignored in geochemical models. In particular, reactions caused by UV radiation during an ozone free early Earth could have influenced the available oxidation states of manganese. Manganese is one of the most abundant transition metals in the crust and is important in both biology and geology. For example, the presence of manganese (VI) oxides in the geologic record has been used as a proxy for oxygenic photosynthesis; however, we suggest that the high oxidation state of Mn can be produced abiotically by photochemical reactions. Aqueous solutions of manganese (II) as well as suspensions of rhodochrosite (MnCO3) were irradiated under anoxic condition using a 450 W mercury lamp and custom built quartz reaction vessels. The photoreaction of the homogeneous solution of Mn(II) produced H2 gas and akhtenskite (ɛ-MnO2) as the solid product . This product is different than the previously identified birnessite. The irradiation of rhodochrosite suspensions also produced H2 gas and resulted in both a spectral shift as well as morphology changes of the mineral particles in the SEM images. These reactions offer alternative, abiotic pathways for the formation of manganese oxides.

  7. Mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of nitrided or oxinitrided, and powder painted regular and interstitial free (IF) drawing steel sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogalski, Z.; Latas, Z. [Instytut Mechaniki Precyzyjnej, ul. Duchnicka 3, 01-796 Warszawa (Poland)

    2004-06-01

    Specimens of 0.8 mm thick regular and interstitial free (IF) drawing steel sheet have been nitrided in fluidised bed for 2 hours at 620 C and 560 C with and without a post-oxidation, and slow and accelerated cooling. As a result, surface hardness, yield and tensile strength of the sheets increased considerably without a critical loss of ductility. Resistance welds between the sheets did not lose their original strength after nitriding-oxinitriding. Nitrided-oxinitrided at 620 C and then powder painted sheets, as compared with powder painted raw sheets, were more corrosion resistant in neutral salt spray and climatic tests. Some mechanical and anticorrosion properties of the IF steel sheet that had undergone the nitriding-oxinitriding processes were definitely better than those of equally processed regular steel sheet. (Abstract Copyright [2004], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.) [German] Proben aus 0,8 mm dickem Blech aus Ziehmassenstahl sowie aus Ziehstahl ohne interstitiel geloeste Legierungsanteile (IF), werden im Wirbelbett in 2 Stunden bei 620 und 560 {sup o}C nitriert mit nachfolgenden Oxidierung sowie alternativ ohne Oxidierung und mit langsamer und beschleunigter Abkuehlung. Infolge dessen nehmen die Haerte, die Dehngrenze und die Zugfestigkeit der Bleche zu, ohne kritischen Zaehigkeitsverlust. Die Widerstandsschweisswulste zwischen den Blechen nach dem Nitrieren-Oxinitrieren haben nicht an Festigkeit verloren. Die bei 620 {sup o}C nitrierten-oxinitrierten und nachfolgend mit Pulverlack beschichteten Bleche sind bei den Versuchen in Salznebel und bei klimatischen Versuchen korrosionbestaendiger im Vergleich mit den mit nur Pulverlack beschichteten Rohblechen. Manche der mechanischen und korrosionsverhalten betreffenden Eigenschaften der Bleche aus IF-Staehle sind entscheidend besser als fuer das ebenso behandelte Blech aus Ziehmassenstahl. (Abstract Copyright [2004], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  8. Theoretical challenges in understanding the inhibition mechanism of aluminum corrosion in basic media in the presence of some p-phenol derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lashgari, Mohsen

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Research highlights: → Quantum electrochemical/thermodynamical models for inhibition mechanism. → A new insight based on local deactivation of corrosive agents at interface region. → Protonation/deprotonation cycle of phenolic species inside electrical double layer. - Abstract: Using quantum electrochemical/thermodynamical approaches based on coupled cluster/polarized continuum models and density functional theory (CM/PCM-DFT), we investigated the corrosion inhibition mechanism of Al/NaOH system in the presence of some p-phenol derivatives. The influencing parameters on inhibitory action, i.e. charges on oxygen and hydrogen atoms of hydroxyl group, charge transfer, interaction energy, molecular activity and softness, electric dipole moment and de-solvation free energy, were determined for both neutral and deprotonated species at metal|solution interface. A good correlation was observed between these parameters and inhibition efficiency data reported in the literature. By introducing an appropriate thermodynamic procedure, we also determined the proton-loss tendency of the molecules nearby interface. The results were amazing and revealed a complicated protonation/deprotonation cycle for inhibitor species inside electrical double layer; the corrosive agents in the vicinity of metal surface become locally neutralized and pushed away.

  9. Mechanical characteristics of heterogeneous structures obtained by high-temperature brazing of corrosion-resistant steels with rapidly quenched non-boron nickel-based alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalin, B.; Penyaz, M.; Ivannikov, A.; Sevryukov, O.; Bachurina, D.; Fedotov, I.; Voennov, A.; Abramov, E.

    2018-01-01

    Recently, the use rapidly quenched boron-containing nickel filler metals for high temperature brazing corrosion resistance steels different classes is perspective. The use of these alloys leads to the formation of a complex heterogeneous structure in the diffusion zone that contains separations of intermediate phases such as silicides and borides. This structure negatively affects the strength characteristics of the joint, especially under dynamic loads and in corrosive environment. The use of non-boron filler metals based on the Ni-Si-Be system is proposed to eliminate this structure in the brazed seam. Widely used austenitic 12Cr18Ni10Ti and ferrite-martensitic 16Cr12MoSiWNiVNb reactor steels were selected for research and brazing was carried out. The mechanical characteristics of brazed joints were determined using uniaxial tensile and impact toughness tests, and fractography was investigated by electron microscopy.

  10. Study of corrosion susceptibility of stainless steel-304 and stainless steel-316 under mechanical stress in diluted boiling nitric acid with chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desjardins, D.; Puiggali, M.; El Kheloui, A.; Petit, M.C.; Clement, C.; Berge, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    A detailed study of corrosion of stressed 304 and 316 stainless steels in boiling solutions of diluted nitric acid in presence of chloride is presented. After a chemical study of the electrolyte, the different kinds of corrosion observed are represented on HNO 3 concentration - Cl - concentration diagrams. A more fundamental study based on several electrochemical techniques (forward scan and return potentiodynamic curves, potentiokinetic curves with different scan rates, sample depassivation by rapid straining under potentiostatic control) is carried out. The results allow to confirm the observations and to explain them in terms of competition between anodic dissolution, depassivation, repassivation processes with a precise analyze of the role of the solution and of the mechanical stress [fr

  11. Effect of Exchanging Advancing and Retreating Side Materials on Mechanical Properties and Electrochemical Corrosion Resistance of Dissimilar 6013-T4 and 7003 Aluminum Alloys FSW Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhixia; Liang, Haimei; Zhao, Yong; Yan, Keng

    2018-03-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) was used to weld dissimilar joints between Al 6013-T4 and Al7003 alloys in this work. The effect of exchanging advancing (AS) and retreating (RS) side material on microstructure, mechanical behaviors and electrochemical corrosion resistance was discussed. Results showed that different joint cross sections were obtained when exchanging AS and RS materials. The material on the AS would be more deformed during the welding process. When the Al6013 placed on the AS, the plastic flow of weld is more sufficient. Whether on the AS or RS, the Al6013-T4 side is the weak region for both tensile specimens and hardness samples. The fracture position corresponds to the minimum hardness position. Also, more strengthening phase can be retained in the joint, and the joint of A6R7 has better corrosion resistance.

  12. Approach to corrosion mechanisms for a carbon steel in a solution of sodium chloride at 3 pc and its inhibition by means of organic molecules. Compared benefit of the use of stationary and transient electrochemical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duprat, Michel

    1981-01-01

    Within the context of an increased use of seawater as coolant in various industrial installations, this research thesis had two main objectives: the search for inhibitor organic compounds with optimal efficiency, and a better understanding of the mechanisms of corrosion inhibition by the best compounds within the considered organic compounds. After having reported a bibliographical study on carbon steel corrosion in seawater or in a sodium chloride solution at 3 pc, and on the inhibition of this corrosion, the author presents the experimental conditions (materials and methods). He reports the use of stationary and un-stationary electrochemical methods for the study of the steel-solution interface without inhibitor in order to get a better knowledge of corrosion electrochemical processes and to determine more precisely the corrosion rate. The last part addresses the study of the same interface but in presence of various inhibitors

  13. Mechanism of action of shoulder-modifying anoxic radiosensitizers and their use in combination with other treatment modalities. Coordinated programme on improvement in radiotherapy of cancer using modifiers of radiosensitivity of cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    Research during the period of the Research Agreement has focused on four approaches to increased killing of tumor cells: hypoxic sensitizers, protective agents, hyperthermia and chemotherapeutic drugs. Various considerations have been examined, both in vitro and, to a lesser extent, in vivo, but the chief emphasis has been on the basic mechanisms involved. Results have been published in more than twenty publications and may be summarized as follows. Chemical sensitization: Results with the glutathione-oxidant ''diamide'' confirmed the importance of cellular GSH in the oxygen effect. Moreover, the possibility of combining agents like diamide with the nitroimidazole agents (e.g. misonidazole) was examined. Perhaps the most fundamental observation was the decrease in survival curve shoulder seen, for hypoxic cells, when irradiation was done in the presence of diamide. Chemical protection: The thio-phosphate WR2721, with respect to protection of various tissues and to the basis for its differential protection of normal tissues vs tumors was tested. Other studies have examined the mechanism(s) by which thiols protect against X-ray damage and the effects of certain chemotherapy drugs (e.g. Cis-platinum). Hyperthermia: Heat has been studied in conjunction with neutron irradiation (there is no differential effect on hypoxic cells) and at lower temperatures (40 0 ). The latter treatment (40 0 C for 2 hrs) removes the shoulder from the euoxic X-ray survival curve. Chemotherapy agents: These studies have explored the effects of clinically-used drugs on euoxic and hypoxic cells. No differences in efficiency are seen for acutely hypoxic cells. A system has been developed for chronic hypoxic in vitro and here different drug effects may be seen. Of particular interest is the decrease in OER observed in chronically hypoxic cells, possibly due to a decreased cellular content of glutathione. The damage due to Cis-platinum can be protected against, in large measure, by cysteamine

  14. A Multifunctional Coating for Autonomous Corrosion Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz M.; Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Jolley, Scott t.

    2011-01-01

    Nearly all metals and their alloys are subject to corrosion that causes them to lose their structural integrity or other critical functionality. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to indicate it and control it. The multi-functionality of the coating is based on microencapsulation technology specifically designed for corrosion control applications. This design has, in addition to all the advantages of existing microcapsulation designs, the corrosion controlled release function that triggers the delivery of corrosion indicators and inhibitors on demand, only when and where needed. Microencapsulation of self-healing agents for autonomous repair of mechanical damage to the coating is also being pursued. Corrosion indicators, corrosion inhibitors, as well as self-healing agents, have been encapsulated and dispersed into several paint systems to test the corrosion detection, inhibition, and self-healing properties of the coating. Key words: Corrosion, coating, autonomous corrosion control, corrosion indication, corrosion inhibition, self-healing coating, smart coating, multifunctional coating, microencapsulation.

  15. Effects of fabrication practices and techniques on the corrosion and mechanical properties of Ni-Cr-Mo nickel based alloys UNS N10276, N06022, N06686, and N06625

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinshaw, E.B.; Crum, J.R.

    1996-01-01

    Ni-Cr-Mo alloys have excellent resistance to both oxidizing and reducing type environments; however, heat treating, surface condition, welding, and type of welding consumable can have a significant affect on the corrosion resistance and mechanical properties of these alloys. It is also important when performing standard ASTM intergranular corrosion tests on welded test coupons to make an accurate comparison of alloys being tested. A standard weld procedure and consistent post-weld sample conditioning method should be incorporated into the comparison test program. An evaluation of the effect of various fabrication practices on the corrosion resistance of the alloy was performed using accelerated corrosion tests ASTM G28B. The fabrication conditions examined were as-welded, welded-pickled, welded-annealed-pickled, welded annealed ground, welded-ground, using over matching filler metals, and various levels of heat input. In addition to fabrication techniques, the effect of ASTM G28B test duration on corrosion rates of UNS N10276, N06022, N06686, and N06625 was evaluated. ASTM G28A intergranular corrosion and mechanical testing using welded coupons of UNS N06625 were also performed to determine the affect of post-weld annealing and aging heat treatments on the corrosion resistance and mechanical properties of UNS N06625

  16. Fatigue and Corrosion in Metals

    CERN Document Server

    Milella, Pietro Paolo

    2013-01-01

    This textbook, suitable for students, researchers and engineers, gathers the experience of more than 20 years of teaching fracture mechanics, fatigue and corrosion to professional engineers and running experimental tests and verifications to solve practical problems in engineering applications. As such, it is a comprehensive blend of fundamental knowledge and technical tools to address the issues of fatigue and corrosion. The book initiates with a systematic description of fatigue from a phenomenological point of view, since the early signs of submicroscopic damage in few surface grains and continues describing, step by step, how these precursors develop to become mechanically small cracks and, eventually, macrocracks whose growth is governed by fracture mechanics. But fracture mechanics is also introduced to analyze stress corrosion and corrosion assisted fatigue in a rather advanced fashion. The author dedicates a particular attention to corrosion starting with an electrochemical treatment that mechanical e...

  17. Anoxic and aerobic values for the yield coefficient of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-04-15

    Apr 15, 2008 ... Simulations with dual values (aerobic and anoxic conditions) for heterotrophic yield (modified ... mittently aerated processes can achieve a significant nitrate ...... dynamic calibration and long-term validation for an intermittently.

  18. Effect of Cu on microstructure, mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and cytotoxicity of CoCrW alloy fabricated by selective laser melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yanjin; Ren, Ling; Xu, Xiongcheng; Yang, Yang; Wu, Songquan; Luo, Jiasi; Yang, Mingyu; Liu, Lingling; Zhuang, Danhong; Yang, Ke; Lin, Jinxin

    2018-05-01

    In the study, CoCrWCu alloys with differing Cu content (2, 3, 4 wt%) were prepared by selective laser melting using mixture powders consisting of CoCrW and Cu, aiming at investigating the effect of Cu on the microstructures, mechanical properties, corrosion behavior and cytotoxicity. The SEM observations indicated that the Cu content up to 3 wt% caused the Si-rich precipitates to segregate along grain boundaries and in the grains, and EBSD analysis suggested that the Cu addition decreased the recrystallization degree and increased the grain diameter and fraction of big grains. The tensile tests found that the increasing Cu content led to a decrease of mechanical properties compared with Cu-free CoCrW alloy. The electrochemical tests revealed that the addition of Cu shifted the corrosion potential toward nobler positive, but increased the corrosion current density. Also, a more protective passive film was formed when 2 wt% Cu content was added, but the higher Cu content up to 3 wt% was detrimental to the corrosion resistance. It was noted that there was no cytotoxicity for Cu-bearing CoCrW alloys to MG-63 cell and the cells could spread well on the surfaces of studied alloys. Meanwhile, the Cu-bearing CoCrW alloy exhibited an excellent antibacterial performance against E.coli when Cu content was up to 3 wt%. It is suggested that the feasible fabrication of Cu-bearing CoCrW alloy by SLM using mixed CoCrW and Cu powders is a promising candidate for use in antibacterial oral repair products. This current study also can aid in the further design of antibacterial Cu-containing CoCrW alloying powders. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Influence of Silver nanoparticles addition on the phase transformation, mechanical properties and corrosion behaviour of Cu–Al–Ni shape memory alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saud, Safaa N.; Hamzah, E., E-mail: esah@fkm.utm.my; Abubakar, T.; Bakhsheshi-Rad, H.R.; Farahany, S.; Abdolahi, A.; Taheri, M.M.

    2014-11-05

    Highlights: • Thermal analysis showed four different phase β, α, NiAl and γ2 during solidification. • The martensite appeared in the microstructure as a plate and needle like shape. • Shape recovery ratio of 80% was obtained after Ag nanoparticles addition. • Effect of Ag nanoparticles on the corrosion behaviour of Cu–Al–Ni SMA was investigated. - Abstract: Incorporation of silver nanoparticles into Cu-based shape memory alloys is recommended to enhance their phase transformation behaviour. However, this incorporation can affect their transformation temperatures, mechanical, microstructural and corrosion characteristics. Four different phase reactions β, α, NiAl and γ{sub 2} were detected on a derivative curve during the solidification by-computer-aided cooling curve thermal analysis. The highest fraction solid (82%) was calculated for the parent phase (β) based on the Newtonian baseline method. The microstructural changes and mechanical properties were investigated using field emission scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction tensile test and shape memory effect test. It was found that the addition of Ag can control the phase morphology and orientations along with the formation of the Ag-rich precipitates, and thus the tensile strength, elongation, fracture stress–strain, yield strength and shape memory effect are improved. Remarkably, the shape recovery ratio reached approximately 80% of the original shape. The corrosion behaviour of the Cu–Al–Ni shape memory alloy were investigated using electrochemical tests in NaCl solution and their results showed that the corrosion potential (E{sub corr}) of Cu–Al–Ni SMA is shifted towards the nobler direction from −307.4 to −277.1 m V{sub SCE} with the addition of 0.25 wt.% Ag.

  20. Electrochemical characterisation speeds up prediction of corrosion behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuring, E.W.; Hooijmans, J.W. [ECN Environment and Energy Engineering, Petten (Netherlands)

    2013-04-15

    The contents of this presentation show the following elements: Introduction; Corrosion in real life; Why Electrochemical characterisation of corrosion; Applications (corrosion resistance coatings, corrosion behaviour (brazed) joints); Available electrochemical corrosion techniques; Standards; Conclusions. In the Conclusions the corrosion screening method is summarized: ECN method fast; within 1h -1 week results depending on test method; Fast pre-selection of promising materials/combinations (cost savings); Determining of corrosion initiation; Determination of corrosion mechanisms and propagation; Life time predictions possible; Strong combination with metallographic post-investigation; Ranking materials / constructions for corrosion performance.

  1. Nuclear corrosion science and engineering

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Understanding corrosion mechanisms, the systems and materials they affect, and the methods necessary for accurately measuring their incidence is of critical importance to the nuclear industry for the safe, economic and competitive running of its plants. This book reviews the fundamentals of nuclear corrosion. Corrosion of nuclear materials, i.e. the interaction between these materials and their environments, is a major issue for plant safety as well as for operation and economic competitiveness. Understanding these corrosion mechanisms, the systems and materials they affect, and the methods to accurately measure their incidence is of critical importance to the nuclear industry. Combining assessment techniques and analytical models into this understanding allows operators to predict the service life of corrosion-affected nuclear plant materials, and to apply the most appropriate maintenance and mitigation options to ensure safe long term operation. This book critically reviews the fundamental corrosion mechani...

  2. Corrosion resistance after mechanical deformation of the Ti30Ta experimental alloy for using in biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Kerolene Barboza da; Konatu, Reginaldo Toshihiro; Oliveira, Liliane Lelis de; Nakazato, Roberto Zenhei; Claro, Ana Paula Rosifini Alves, E-mail: rosifini@feg.unesp.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Guaratinguetá, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais

    2017-10-15

    In this study the corrosion resistance of Ti30Ta experimental alloy was evaluated when submitted to different deformation rates. Alloys were processed in arc melting, furnace, forged and treated. The samples were machined in accordance with ASTME9-09 standard to carry out compression tests. The influence of deformation was evaluated by optical microscopy and XRD, and Electrochemical parameters were analyzed in the most severe condition of deformation (22%). Corrosion resistance exhibited the same behavior for two conditions, 22% and without deformation. (author)

  3. Dynamic thermo-chemo-mechanical strain of Zircaloy-4 slotted rings for evaluating strategies that mitigate stress corrosion cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrier, G.A.; Metzler, J.; Farahani, M.; Chan, P.K.; Corcoran, E.C. [Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in Zircaloy-4 fuel sheaths has been investigated by static loading of slotted ring samples under hot and corrosive conditions. However, in nuclear reactors, power ramps can have short (e.g., 10-20 minutes) and recurring time frames due to dynamic processes such as on-power refuelling, adjuster rod manoeuvres, and load following. Therefore, to enable out-reactor dynamic testing, an apparatus was designed to dynamically strain slotted ring samples under SCC conditions. This apparatus can additionally be used to test fatigue properties. Unique capabilities of this apparatus and preliminary results obtained from static and dynamic tests are presented. (author)

  4. Stress corrosion cracking of alloy 600 in water at high temperature: contribution to a phenomenological approach to the understanding of mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abadie, Pascale

    1998-01-01

    This research thesis aims at being a contribution to the understanding of mechanisms of stress corrosion cracking of an alloy 600 in water at high temperature. More precisely, it aimed at determining, by using quantitative data characterizing cracking phenomenology, which mechanism(s) is (are) able to explain crack initiation and crack growth. These data concern quantitative characterization of crack initiation, of crack growth and of the influence of two cracking parameters (strain rate, medium hydrogen content). They have been obtained by quantifying cracking through the application of a morphological model. More precisely, these data are: evolution of crack density during a tensile test at slow rate, value of initial crack width with respect to grain boundary length, and relationship between crack density and medium hydrogen content. It appears that hydrogen absorption seems to be involved in the crack initiation mechanism. Crack growth mechanisms and crack growth rates are also discussed [fr

  5. Translational regulation in the anoxic turtle, Trachemys scripta elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szereszewski, Kama E; Storey, Kenneth B

    2017-12-14

    The red-eared slider turtle (Trachemys scripta elegans), has developed remarkable adaptive mechanisms for coping with decreased oxygen availability during winter when lakes and ponds become covered with ice. Strategies for enduring anoxia tolerance include an increase in fermentable fuel reserves to support anaerobic glycolysis, the buffering of end products to minimize acidosis, altered expression in crucial survival genes, and strong metabolic rate suppression to minimize ATP-expensive metabolic processes such as protein synthesis. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is at the center of the insulin-signaling pathway that regulates protein translation. The present study analyzed the responses of the mTOR signaling pathway to 5 (5H) or 20 h (20H) of anoxic submergence in liver and skeletal muscle of T. scripta elegans with a particular focus on regulatory changes in the phosphorylation states of targets. The data showed that phosphorylation of multiple mTOR targets was suppressed in skeletal muscle, but activated in the liver. Phosphorylated mTOR Ser2448 showed no change in skeletal muscle but had increased by approximately 4.5-fold in the liver after 20H of anoxia. The phosphorylation states of upstream positive regulators of mTOR (p-PDK-1 Ser241 , p-AKT Ser473 , and protein levels of GβL), the relative levels of dephosphorylated active PTEN, as well as phosphorylation state of negative regulators (TSC2 Thr1462 , p-PRAS40 Thr246 ) were generally found to be differentially regulated in skeletal muscle and in liver. Downstream targets of mTOR (p-p70 S6K Thr389 , p-S6 Ser235 , PABP, p-4E-BP1 Thr37/46 , and p-eIF4E Ser209 ) were generally unchanged in skeletal muscle but upregulated in most targets in liver. These findings indicate that protein synthesis is enhanced in the liver and suggests an increase in the synthesis of crucial proteins required for anoxic survival.

  6. Friction welding of a nickel free high nitrogen steel: influence of forge force on microstructure, mechanical properties and pitting corrosion resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrityunjoy Hazra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, nickel free high nitrogen austenitic stainless steel specimens were joined by continuous drive friction welding process by varying the amount of forge (upsetting force and keeping other friction welding parameters such as friction force, burn-off, upset time and speed of rotation as constant at appropriate levels. The joint characterization studies include microstructural examination and evaluation of mechanical (micro-hardness, impact toughness and tensile and pitting corrosion behaviour. The integrity of the joint, as determined by the optical microscopy was very high and no crack and area of incomplete bonding were observed. Welds exhibited poor Charpy impact toughness than the parent material. Toughness for friction weld specimens decreased with increase in forge force. The tensile properties of all the welds were almost the same (irrespective of the value of the applied forge force and inferior to those of the parent material. The joints failed in the weld region for all the weld specimens. Weldments exhibited lower pitting corrosion resistance than the parent material and the corrosion resistance of the weld specimens was found to decrease with increase in forge force.

  7. The Passive Film Growth Mechanism of New Corrosion-Resistant Steel Rebar in Simulated Concrete Pore Solution: Nanometer Structure and Electrochemical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jin-Yang; Wang, Danqian; Chu, Hong-Yan; Ma, Han; Liu, Yao; Gao, Yun; Shi, Jinjie; Sun, Wei

    2017-04-14

    An elaborative study was carried out on the growth mechanism and properties of the passive film for a new kind of alloyed corrosion-resistant steel (CR steel). The passive film naturally formed in simulated concrete pore solutions (pH = 13.3). The corrosion resistance was evaluated by various methods including open circuit potential (OCP), linear polarization resistance (LPR) measurements, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Meanwhile, the 2205 duplex stainless steel (SS steel) was evaluated for comparison. Moreover, the passive film with CR steel was studied by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), and the Mott‑Schottky approach. The results showed that the excellent passivity of CR steel could be detected in a high alkaline environment. The grain boundaries between the fine passive film particles lead to increasing Cr oxide content in the later passivation stage. The filling of cation vacancies in the later passivation stage as well as the orderly crystalized inner layer contributed to the excellent corrosion resistance of CR steel. A passive film growth model for CR steel was proposed.

  8. An assessment of microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of dissimilar welds between Inconel 718 and 310S austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortezaie, A.; Shamanian, M.

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, dissimilar welding between Inconel 718 nickel-base superalloy and 310S austenitic stainless steel using gas tungsten arc welding process was performed to determine the relationship between the microstructure of the welds and the resultant mechanical and corrosion properties. For this purpose, three filler metals including Inconel 625, Inconel 82 and 310 stainless steel were used. Microstructural observations showed that weld microstructures for all filler metals were fully austenitic. In tension tests, welds produced by Inconel 625 and 310 filler metals displayed the highest and the lowest ultimate tensile strength, respectively. The results of Charpy impact tests indicated that the maximum fracture energy was related to Inconel 82 weld metal. According to the potentiodynamic polarization test results, Inconel 82 exhibited the highest corrosion resistance among all tested filler metals. Finally, it was concluded that for the dissimilar welding between Inconel 718 and 310S, Inconel 82 filler metal offers the optimum properties at room temperature. - Highlights: • Three filler metals including Inconel 625, Inconel 82 and 310 SS were used. • A columnar to equiaxed dendritic structure was seen for IN-625 weld metal. • A granular austenitic microstructure obtained for Inconel 82 weld metal. • Microstructure of 310 weld metal includes solidification cracks along SSGB. • IN-82 weld metal showed the highest corrosion potential

  9. A Comparative Study of the Microstructure, Mechanical Properties and Corrosion Resistance of Ni- or Fe- Based Composite Coatings by Laser Cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, M. Q.; Shi, J.; Lei, L.; Cui, Z. Y.; Wang, H. L.; Wang, X.

    2018-04-01

    Ni- and Fe-based composite coatings were laser cladded on 40Cr steel to improve the surface mechanical property and corrosion resistance, respectively. The microstructure and phase composition were analyzed by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) equipped with an energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS). The micro-hardness, tribological properties and electrochemical corrosion behavior of the coatings were evaluated. The results show that the thickness of both the coatings is around 0.7 mm, the Ni-based coating is mainly composed of γ-(Ni, Fe), FeNi3, Ni31Si12, Ni3B, CrB and Cr7C3, and the Fe-based coating is mainly composed of austenite and (Fe, Cr)7C3. Micro-hardness of the Ni-based composite coating is about 960 HV0.3, much higher than that of Fe-based coating (357.4 HV0.3) and the 40Cr substrate (251 HV0.3). Meanwhile, the Ni-based composite coating possesses better wear resistance than the Fe-based coating validated by the worn appearance and the wear loss. Electrochemical results suggested that Ni-based coating exhibited better corrosion resistance than the Fe-based coating. The 40Cr substrate could be well protected by the Ni-based coating.

  10. Effect of pH and chloride on the micro-mechanism of pitting corrosion for high strength pipeline steel in aerated NaCl solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yafei; Cheng, Guangxu; Wu, Wei; Qiao, Qiao; Li, Yun; Li, Xiufeng

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Pitting behavior of X80 steel in aerated NaCl solutions is studied systematically. • Unique large pit morphology is observed in neutral/acidic NaCl solutions. • In low pH solutions, pit will propagate in the horizontal direction, leading to the shallow shape of pitting morphology; in high pH solutions, the pit sizes are much smaller. • Film growth, which is dependent on the pH and chloride concentration, has great influence on the cathodic reaction by affecting oxygen diffusion process. - Abstract: The pitting corrosion mechanism of high strength pipeline steel in aerated NaCl solutions with different pH and chloride content was investigated, using potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The pitting behavior in alkaline solutions was found to be significantly different from that in neutral and acidic solutions. Electrochemical results and SEM images indicate that the product film formed on the steel surface results in different corrosion behavior in an alkaline solution. SEM images show that pH and chloride concentration in the bulk solution have a great influence on the pitting morphology. Unique large pit morphology due to corrosion in neutral/acidic solutions with 0.05 mol/L NaCl was observed. The relationship between solution pH and the effect of chloride concentration is also discussed

  11. Information system of corrosion and mechanical properties for steels used in nuclear power plants with PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahodova, M.; Novotny, R.; Sajdl, P.

    1998-01-01

    This paper gives information about a new developed database system which contains information about chemical constitution of steels used in nuclear power plants. It enables to hold data from corrosion tests and allows to insert graphs and pictures into the form. This system is an application of MS Access. (orig.)

  12. Information system of corrosion and mechanical properties for steels used in nuclear power plants with PWR reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahodova, M.; Novotny, R.; Sajdl, P. [Inst. of Chemical Technology, Prague (Czech Republic). Dept. of Power Engineering

    1998-11-01

    This paper gives information about a new developed database system which contains information about chemical constitution of steels used in nuclear power plants. It enables to hold data from corrosion tests and allows to insert graphs and pictures into the form. This system is an application of MS Access. (orig.)

  13. Corrosion mechanisms for metal alloy waste forms: experiment and theory Level 4 Milestone M4FT-14LA0804024 Fuel Cycle Research & Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiang-Yang [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Taylor, Christopher D. [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Fontana Corrosion Center; Kim, Eunja [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Goff, George Scott [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kolman, David Gary [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-07-31

    This document meets Level 4 Milestone: Corrosion mechanisms for metal alloy waste forms - experiment and theory. A multiphysics model is introduces that will provide the framework for the quantitative prediction of corrosion rates of metallic waste forms incorporating the fission product Tc. The model requires a knowledge of the properties of not only the metallic waste form, but also the passive oxide films that will be generated on the waste form, and the chemistry of the metal/oxide and oxide/environment interfaces. in collaboration with experimental work, the focus of this work is on obtaining these properties from fundamental atomistic models. herein we describe the overall multiphysics model, which is based on MacDonald's point-defect model for passivity. We then present the results of detailed electronic-structure calculations for the determination of the compatibility and properties of Tc when incorporated into intermetallic oxide phases. This work is relevant to the formation of multi-component oxides on metal surfaces that will incorporate Tc, and provide a kinetic barrier to corrosion (i.e. the release of Tc to the environment). Atomistic models that build upon the electronic structure calculations are then described using the modified embedded atom method to simulate metallic dissolution, and Buckingham potentials to perform classical molecular dynamics and statics simulations of the technetium (and, later, iron-technetium) oxide phases. Electrochemical methods were then applied to provide some benchmark information of the corrosion and electrochemical properties of Technetium metal. The results indicate that published information on Tc passivity is not complete and that further investigation is warranted.

  14. Direct Metal Laser Sintering of Ti6Al4V for Biomedical Applications: Microstructure, Corrosion Properties, and Mechanical Treatment of Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janette Brezinová

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Ti6Al4V samples have been prepared by Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS with varied laser power. Some of the samples were stress-relief annealed. The microstructure of materials was investigated using a light microscopy. Columnar grains of martensite dominate in as-made microstructure. Stress-relief annealing led to the white acicular phase growth in the structure with a fishbone arrangement on the boundary of some original martensitic needles. Mechanical properties of materials were characterized through hardness measurement in two directions relating to the sample building direction. It was found that the hardness of materials increased with a laser power and values varied from 370 to 415 HV 0.3/30. After stress-relief annealing, the structure of materials being homogenized, pattern spacing dissolved and the hardness in both directions became stabilized at values of 350–370 HV 0.3/30. The laser power affects the corrosion rate of the material. The lowest corrosion rate was recorded at the maximum laser power (190 W. Heat treatment does not affect the corrosion rate remarkably, however it leads to stabilization of corrosion potential of materials Ecorr. The surface of the samples was modified by an abrasive blasting using spherical (zirblast and sharp-edged (white corundum blasting abrasives and three levels of air pressure. The abrasive blasting of sintered materials led to a decrease of the surface roughness of materials with air pressure increasing. Blasting with zirblast led to a more significant decrease of roughness parameters compared with surfaces blasted with sharp-edged white aluminum. Different shapes of abrasives caused characteristic surface morphology.

  15. Microstructure, local mechanical properties and stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of an SA508-52M-316LN safe-end dissimilar metal weld joint by GTAW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ming, Hongliang; Zhu, Ruolin [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Materials and Safety Assessment, Liaoning KeyLaboratory for Safety and Assessment Technique of Nuclear Materials, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19 Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang, Zhiming [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Materials and Safety Assessment, Liaoning KeyLaboratory for Safety and Assessment Technique of Nuclear Materials, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Wang, Jianqiu, E-mail: wangjianqiu@imr.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Materials and Safety Assessment, Liaoning KeyLaboratory for Safety and Assessment Technique of Nuclear Materials, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Han, En.-Hou.; Ke, Wei [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Materials and Safety Assessment, Liaoning KeyLaboratory for Safety and Assessment Technique of Nuclear Materials, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Su, Mingxing [Shanghai Research Center for Weld and Detection Engineering Technique of Nuclear Equipment, Shanghai 201306 (China)

    2016-07-04

    The microstructure, local mechanical properties and local stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of an SA508-52M-316LN domestic dissimilar metal welded safe-end joint used for AP1000 nuclear power plant prepared by automatic gas tungsten arc welding was studied in this work by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (with electron back scattering diffraction and an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy system), micro-hardness testing, local mechanical tensile testing and local slow strain rate tests. The micro-hardness, local mechanical properties and stress corrosion cracking susceptibility across this dissimilar metal weld joint vary because of the complex microstructure across the fusion area and the dramatic chemical composition change across the fusion lines. Briefly, Type I boundaries and Type II boundaries exist in 52Mb near the SA508-52Mb interface, a microstructure transition was found in SA508 heat affected zone, the residual strain and grain boundary character distribution changes as a function of the distance from the fusion boundary in 316LN heat affected zone, micro-hardness distribution and local mechanical properties along the DMWJ are heterogeneous, and 52Mw-316LN interface has the highest SCC susceptibility in this DMWJ while 316LN base metal has the lowest one.

  16. Study of the aqueous corrosion mechanisms and kinetics of the AlFeNi aluminium based alloy used for the fuel cladding in the Jules Horowitz research reactor; Etude des mecanismes et des cinetiques de corrosion aqueuse de l'alliage d'aluminium AlFeNi utilise comme gainage du combustible nucleaire de reacteurs experimentaux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wintergerst, M.

    2009-05-15

    For the Jules Horowitz new material-testing reactor (JHR), an aluminium base alloy, called AlFeNi, will be used for the cladding of the fuel plates. This alloy (Al - 1% Fe - 1% Ni - 1 % Mg), which is already used as fuel cladding, was developed for its good corrosion resistance in water at high temperatures. However, few studies dealing with the alteration process in water and the relationships with irradiation effects have been performed on this alloy. The conception of the JHR fuel requires a better knowledge of the corrosion mechanisms. Corrosion tests were performed in autoclaves at 70 C, 165 C and 250 C on AlFeNi plates representative of the fuel cladding. Several techniques were used to characterize the corrosion scale: SEM, TEM, EPMA, XRD, Raman spectroscopy. Our observations show that the corrosion scale is made of two main layers: a dense amorphous scale close to the metal and a porous crystalline scale in contact with the water. More than the morphology, the chemical compositions of both layers are different. This duplex structure results from a mixed growth mechanism: an anionic growth to develop the inner oxide and a cationic diffusion followed by a dissolution-precipitation process to form the outer one. Dynamic experiments at 70 C and corrosion kinetics measurements have demonstrated that the oxide growth process is controlled by a diffusion step associated to a dissolution/precipitation process. A corrosion mechanism of the AlFeNi alloy in aqueous media has been proposed. Then post-irradiation exams performed on irradiated fuel plates were used to investigate the effects of the irradiation on the corrosion behaviour in the reactor core. (author)

  17. Investigation on microstructural, anti-corrosion and mechanical properties of doped Zn–Al–SnO2 metal matrix composite coating on mild steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayomi, O.S.I.; Popoola, A.P.I.; Aigbodion, V.S.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Properties of nanocomposite Zn–Al coating containing SnO 2 nanoparticles. • The morphology and structure of the coating were analysed. • The anticorrosion activities of the coating prepared. • The mechanical properties were found to improve with the amount of the SnO 2 embedded. - Abstract: In this study, the microstructural, mechanical and anti-corrosion properties of nanocomposite Zn–Al coating containing SnO 2 nanoparticles prepared from sulphates electrolyte by electrodeposition on mild steel substrate was investigated. The morphologies of the coating were analysed using SEM/EDS, AFM Raman and X-ray diffraction. The anticorrosion behaviour of the coating prepared with different concentrations of SnO 2 (7 and 13 g/L) and potential of (0.3 and 0.5 V) was examined in 3.65% NaCl solution by using linear polarization techniques. The wear and hardness properties of the coatings were performed under accelerated reciprocating dry sliding wear tests and diamond micro-hardness tester respectively. The results obtained showed that the incorporation of SnO 2 in the plating bath brings an increase in corrosion resistance and mechanical properties of Zn–Al–SnO 2 composite coatings. The SEM images showed a homogeneous grain structure and finer morphology of the coatings. The hardness values was found to improve with the amount of the SnO 2 embedded into the Zn–Al metal deposit and effective deposition parameters

  18. Corrosion Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Charles V.

    A description is provided for a Corrosion and Corrosion Control course offered in the Continuing Engineering Education Program at the General Motors Institute (GMI). GMI is a small cooperative engineering school of approximately 2,000 students who alternate between six-week periods of academic study and six weeks of related work experience in…

  19. Fallout plutonium in two oxic-anoxic environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, A.L.; Murray, J.W.; Schell, W.R.; Miller, L.G.

    1986-01-01

    The profiles of soluble fallout plutonium in two partially anoxic waters revealed minimum concentrations at the O 2 -H 2 S interface, indicating Pu removal onto particulate phases of Fe and other oxidized species that form during the redox cycle. In Saanich Inlet, an intermittently anoxic fjord in Vancouver Island, Canada, the concentration of soluble Pu in the anoxic zone was slightly less than in the oxygenated surface layer. In Soap Lake, a saline meromictic lake in eastern Washington State, Pu concentrations i the permanently anoxic zone were at least an order of magnitude higher than at the surface. Differences in the chemical characteristics of these two waters suggest important chemical species that influenced the observed Pu distribution. In the permanently anoxic zone of Soap Lake, high values of total alkalinity ranging from 940 to 1500 meq liter -1 , sulfide species from 38 to 128 μM, dissolved organic carbon from 163 to 237 mg liter -1 , and total dissolved solids from 80 to 140 ppt, all correlated with the observed high concentration of Pu. In Saanich Inlet, where total alkalinity ranged from 2.1 to 2.4 meq liter -1 and salinity from 25 to 32 per thousand and H 2 S concentration in May 1981 showed a maximum of 8μM, the observed Pu concentrations were significantly lower than for the Soap Lake monimolimnion

  20. Stable carbon isotope response to oceanic anoxic events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Xiumian; Wang Chengshan; Li Xianghui

    2001-01-01

    Based on discussion of isotope compositions and fractionation of marine carbonate and organic carbon, the author studies the relationship between oceanic anoxic events and changes in the carbon isotope fractionation of both carbonate and organic matter. During the oceanic anoxic events, a great number of organisms were rapidly buried, which caused a kind of anoxic conditions by their decomposition consuming dissolved oxygen. Since 12 C-rich organism preserved, atmosphere-ocean system will enrich relatively of 13 C. As a result, simultaneous marine carbonate will record the positive excursion of carbon isotope. There is a distinctive δ 13 C excursion during oceanic anoxic events in the world throughout the geological time. In the Cenomanian-Turonian anoxic event. this positive excursion arrived at ∼0.2% of marine carbonate and at ∼0.4% of organic matter, respectively. Variations in the carbon isotopic compositions of marine carbonate and organic carbon record the changes in the fraction of organic carbon buried throughout the geological time and may provide clues to the changes in rates of weathering and burial of organic carbon. This will provide a possibility of interpreting not only the changes in the global carbon cycle throughout the geological time, but also that in atmospheric p CO 2

  1. Influence of Temperature and Chloride Concentration on Passivation Mechanism and Corrosion of a DSS2209 Welded Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachemi, Hania; Azzaz, Mohamed; Djeghlal, Mohamed Elamine

    2016-10-01

    The passivity behavior of a 2209 duplex stainless steel welded joint was investigated using potentiodynamic polarization, Mott-Schottky analysis and EIS measurements. In order to evaluate the contribution of temperature, chloride concentration and microstructure, a sequence of polarization tests were carried out in aerated NaCl solutions selected according to robust design of a three level-three factors Taguchi L9 orthogonal array. Analysis of signal-to-noise ratio and ANOVA were achieved on all measured data, and the contribution of every control factor was estimated. The results showed that the corrosion resistance of 2209 duplex stainless steel welded joint is related to the evolution of the passive film formed on the surface. It was found that the passive film on the welded zone possessed n- and p-type semiconductor characteristics. With the increase of solution temperature and chlorides concentration, the corrosion resistance of the passive film is more affected in the weldment than in the base metal.

  2. Microbially induced corrosion of carbon steel in deep groundwater environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauliina eRajala

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The metallic low and intermediate level radioactive waste generally consists of carbon steel and stainless steels. The corrosion rate of carbon steel in deep groundwater is typically low, unless the water is very acidic or microbial activity in the environment is high. Therefore, the assessment of microbially induced corrosion of carbon steel in deep bedrock environment has become important for evaluating the safety of disposal of radioactive waste. Here we studied the corrosion inducing ability of indigenous microbial community from a deep bedrock aquifer. Carbon steel coupons were exposed to anoxic groundwater from repository site 100 m depth (Olkiluoto, Finland for periods of three and eight months. The experiments were conducted at both in situ temperature and room temperature to investigate the response of microbial population to elevated temperature. Our results demonstrate that microorganisms from the deep bedrock aquifer benefit from carbon steel introduced to the nutrient poor anoxic deep groundwater environment. In the groundwater incubated with carbon steel the planktonic microbial community was more diverse and 100-fold more abundant compared to the environment without carbon steel. The betaproteobacteria were the most dominant bacterial class in all samples where carbon steel was present, whereas in groundwater incubated without carbon steel the microbial community had clearly less diversity. Microorganisms induced pitting corrosion and were found to cluster inside the corrosion pits. Temperature had an effect on the species composition of microbial community and also affected the corrosion deposits layer formed on the surface of carbon steel.

  3. Initial stages of AZ91 Mg alloy micro-arc anodizing: Growth mechanisms and effect on the corrosion resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veys-Renaux, Delphine; Rocca, Emmanuel; Martin, Julien; Henrion, Gérard

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The dielectric breakdown occurs for a specific value of capacitance. • Before breakdown, Si is incorporated to the anodic film under MgSiO 3 form. • After breakdown, Si is incorporated to the anodic film also under Mg 2 SiO 4 form. • The presence of Mg 2 SiO 4 in the anodic film provides good corrosion resistance due to sealing of the porosities. - Abstract: In the framework of the new ecological regulations, micro-arc oxidation (MAO) appears as an alternative to usual processes in the field of corrosion protection of Mg alloys. In this work, the initial stages of anodic layer growth in KOH-based electrolytes are studied up to and beyond the initiation of the micro-arc regime. The properties of the first anodized film preceding the occurrence of the dielectric breakdown (corresponding to the start of the micro-arc regime) are mainly determined by the incorporation of additives (fluorides or silicates) in the film, as shown by in situ electrochemical measurements. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and micro-Raman spectroscopy reveal both the change of morphology and chemical state of silicate and fluoride in the anodized layer before and after the micro-arc regime. In terms of electrochemical behaviour, investigated by stationary methods and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in reference corrosive water, the anodic film grown in the silicate medium provides the best corrosion resistance thanks to a thick layer containing Mg 2 SiO 4 , whose degradation products seal the porosities of the coating

  4. Mechanisms of Zr surface corrosion determined via molecular dynamics simulations with charge-optimized many-body (COMB) potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noordhoek, Mark J.; Liang, Tao; Chiang, Tsu-Wu; Sinnott, Susan B.; Phillpot, Simon R.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • An interatomic potential for zirconium–zirconium oxide–zirconium hydride is presented. • Diffusion of oxygen and hydrogen into Zr (0 0 0 1). • Deposition of O 2 and H 2 O on low-index Zr surfaces. • Surface structure affects resulting corrosion behavior. - Abstract: A charge-optimized many-body (COMB) potential is proposed for the zirconium–zirconium oxide–zirconium hydride system. This potential is developed to describe the energetics of the interactions of oxygen and hydrogen with zirconium metal. We perform classical molecular dynamics simulations showing the initial corrosion behavior of three low-index zirconium surfaces via the deposition of O 2 and H 2 O molecules. The basal (0 0 0 1) surface shows greater resistance to oxygen diffusion than the prism (101 ¯ 0) and (112 ¯ 0) surfaces. We suggest ways in which the surface structure has a unique role in the experimentally observed enhanced corrosion of the prism surfaces

  5. Mechanism of pitting corrosion prevention by nitrite in carbon steel exposed to dilute salt solutions. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapp, P.E.; Zee, J. van.

    1998-01-01

    'The overall goal of this project is to develop a fundamental understanding of the role of nitrite in preventing the breakdown of protective oxide(s) on carbon steel and the onset of pitting. Pitting corrosion of carbon steel exposed to dilute alkaline salt solutions can be induced by nitrate, sulfate, and chloride ions and is prevented by sufficient concentration of nitrite. A significant example of this material/electrolyte system is the storage and processing of DOE''s high-level radioactive liquid waste in carbon steel tanks. Added nitrite in the waste has a considerable downstream impact on the immobilization of the waste in a stable glass form. Waste tank integrity and glass production efficiency may benefit from the fundamental understanding of nitrite''s role in preventing pitting. This report summarizes progress after approximately six months of effort in this three-year EMSP project. Initial experimental and theoretical work has focused on the electrochemical behavior of carbon steel in simplified non-radioactive solutions that simulate complex dilute radioactive waste solutions. These solutions contain corrosion-inducing species such as nitrate and chloride and the corrosion-inhibiting nitrite at moderately alkaline pHs. The electrochemical behavior of interest here is that of the open-circuit potential of the steel specimen at equilibrium in the experimental electrolyte and the measures of the steel''s passivity and passivity breakdown.'

  6. Evaluation of the mechanical and corrosion protection performance of electrodeposited hydroxyapatite on the high energy electron beam treated titanium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopi, D.; Sherif, El-Sayed M.; Rajeswari, D.; Kavitha, L.; Pramod, R.; Dwivedi, Jishnu; Polaki, S.R.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Ti–6Al–4V alloy was surface treated by high energy low current DC electron beam. • Successful electrodeposition of HAP was achieved on surface treated Ti–6Al–4V. • The as-formed coating possessed improved surface wettability and adhesion strength. • Maximum corrosion protection performance was exhibited by the as-formed coating. - Abstract: In our present study, the Ti–6Al–4V alloy surface was modified by irradiating with the high energy low current DC electron beam (HELCDEB) using 700 keV DC accelerator. Following this, the HELCDEB treated surface was coated with hydroxyapatite by adopting electrodeposition method. The microstructure and hardness of HELCDEB treated Ti–6A1–4V alloy with and without electrodeposited hydroxyapatite were investigated. Also, the electrochemical corrosion characteristics of the samples in simulated body fluid (SBF) was studied by potentiodynamic polarisation and electrochemical impedence techniques (EIS) which showed an enhanced corrosion resistance and revealed an improved life time for the hydroxyapatite coating developed on the HELCDEB treated Ti–6A1–4V alloy than the untreated sample

  7. A mechanism for corrosion product deposition on the carbon steel piping in the residual heat removal system of BWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aizawa, Motohiro; Chiba, Yoshinori; Hosokawa, Hideyuki; Ohsumi, Katsumi; Uchida, Shunsuke; Ishizawa, Noboru

    2002-01-01

    The dose rate of the residual heat removal (RHR) piping has been considered to be caused by accumulation of insoluble (crud) radioactive corrosion products on carbon steel surfaces. Soft shutdown procedures (i.e., plant shutdown with moderate coolant temperature reduction rate) used to be applied to reduce crud radioactivity release from the fuel surface, but these are no longer used because of the need for shorter plant shutdown times. In order to apply other suitable countermeasures to reduce RHR dose rate, assessment of plant data, experiments on deposition of crud and ion species on carbon steel, and mass balance evaluation of radioactive corrosion products based on plant and laboratory data were carried out and the following findings were made. (1) Deposits of ion species on carbon steel surfaces of the RHR piping was much more numerous than for crud. (2) Ion species accumulation behavior on RHR piping, which is temperature dependent, can be evaluated with the calculation model used for the dehydration reaction of corrosion products generated during the wet lay-up period. (3) Deposition amounts could be reduced to 1/2.5 when the starting RHR system operation temperature was lowered from 155degC to 120degC. (author)

  8. Influence of Friction Stir Welding (FSW on Mechanical and Corrosion Properties of AW-7020M and Aw-7020 Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dudzik Krzysztof

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Friction welding associated with mixing the weld material (FSW - Friction Stir Welding is an alternative to MIG and TIG welding techniques for Al-alloys. This paper presents experimental results obtained from static tension tests on specimens made of AW-7020M and AW-7020 alloys and their joints welded by using FSW method carried out on flat specimens, according to Polish standards : PN-EN ISO 4136:2011 and PN-EN ISO 6892-1:2010. Results of corrosion resistance tests are also presented. The tests were performed by using the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS. EIS measurement was conducted with the use of three-electrode system in a substitute sea water environment (3,5% NaCl - water solution. The impedance tests were carried out under corrosion potential. Voltage signal amplitude was equal to 10mV, and its frequency range - 100 kHz ÷ 0,1 Hz. Atlas 0531 EU&IA potentiostat was used for the tests. For the tested object an equivalent model was selected in the form of a substitute electric circuit. Results of the impedance spectroscopy tests are presented in the form of parameters which characterize corrosion process, as well as on Nyquist’s graphs together with the best-fit theoretical curve.

  9. In-situ corrosion measurements of WWII shipwrecks in Chuuk Lagoon, quantification of decay mechanisms and rates of deterioration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Donald Macleod

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper is based on a series of measurements taken on WWII historic shipwrecks that resulted from the effects of Operation Hailstone in February 1944 on the Japanese merchant fleet which was assembled in Chuuk lagoon, Federated States of Micronesia. More than 65 shipwrecks and 250 aircraft were sunk during two main bombing raids. The vessels lost covered a wide range of underwater orientation and water depths and so provided a perfect suite of corrosion experiments. Since the fuel on board the aircraft was either readily burnt at the time or was lost through volatilisation, the wrecked planes present no pollution problems today. However the bunker fuel kept inside on-board storage tanks does present a real conservation management crisis. In-situ measurements on many vessels have determined how water depth, the localised wreck topography, dissolved oxygen levels, temperature and salinity affects the corrosion rate of cast iron and mild steel. Thus corrosion rates can be calculated with confidence.

  10. Corrosion and wear behavior of Ni60CuMoW coatings fabricated by combination of laser cladding and mechanical vibration processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hongxi, E-mail: piiiliuhx@sina.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Xu, Qian [Faculty of Adult Education, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650051 (China); Wang, Chuanqi; Zhang, Xiaowei [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China)

    2015-02-05

    Highlights: • Ni60CuMoW coatings were fabricated by mechanical vibration assisted laser cladding hybrid process. • The maximum micro-hardness of the coating with mechanical vibration increases by 16%. • The mass loss and friction coefficient of the coating decreases by 17% and 16%, respectively. • The E{sub corr} positive shifts 1134.9 mV and i{sub corr} decreases by nearly one order of magnitude. • The ideal vibration parameters is vibration frequency 200 Hz and vibration amplitude 140 μm. - Abstract: Ni60CuMoW composite coatings were fabricated on 45 medium carbon steel using mechanical vibration assisted laser cladding surface modification processing. The microstructure, element distribution, phase composition, microhardness, wear and corrosion resistance of cladding coatings were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy disperse spectroscopy (EDS), hardness tester, friction and wear apparatus and electrochemical workstation. The results indicate that the microstructure of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} (Cr{sub 23}C{sub 6} or (Fe, Ni){sub 23}C{sub 6}) carbide dispersion strengthening phase is uniformly distributed in eutectic (Ni, Fe) phase. The in-situ BCr and MoC compounds distribute in lamellar structure Fe{sub 3}B and dendrite Fe{sub 3}Ni{sub 3}Si, and some new W{sub 2}C phases also generated in Ni60CuMoW coating. In addition, the coarse dendrite has been replaced by some fine grain structure at the bonding interface. The fine grain hard phase makes the average microhardness of cladding coating increase from 720 to 835 HV{sub 0.5}. Under the condition of 200 Hz mechanical vibration frequency, the wear mass loss and friction coefficient of Ni60CuMoW coating are 7.6 mg and 0.068, 17% and 16% lower than the coating without mechanical vibration, respectively. The corrosion potential of cladding coating with mechanical vibration increases by 1134.9 mV and the corrosion current density decreases by nearly one order of

  11. Effect of sewage sludge ash (SSA on the mechanical performance and corrosion levels of reinforced Portland cement mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andión, L. G.ª

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The article describes a study conducted to determinecorrosion in reinforcement embedded in Portland cement(PC mortars with different percentages of sewage sludgeash (SSA admixtures. The polarization resistancetechnique was used to determine the steel corrosion rate(Icorr in the test specimens. The samples were subjectedto different environmental conditions and aggressiveagents: 100% relative humidity (RH, accelerated carbonationat 70% RH and seawater immersion. Portlandcement was partially substituted for SSA in the mixes atrates of 0, 10, 20, 30 and 60% (by mass to make thedifferent mortars. The results show that where cementwas replaced by SSA at rates of up to 10% by mass,mortar corrosion performance was comparable to thebehaviour observed in SSA-free mortars (control mortar:0% SSA. Data for higher rates are also shown. From themechanical standpoint, SSA exhibited moderate pozzolanicactivity and the best performance when SSA wasadded at a rate of 10% to mixes with a water/(binder:PC + SSA (w/b ratio of 0.5.Se ha estudiado el nivel de corrosion que presentan lasarmaduras embebidas en morteros fabricados con cementoPortland (CP con diferentes porcentajes de sustitucion deceniza de lodo de depuradora (CLD. Se ha utilizado la tecnicade la Resistencia a la Polarizacion para determinar lavelocidad de corrosion del acero embebido en las muestrasestudiadas. Las muestras se han sometido a diferentes condicionesambientales y agentes agresivos: 100% de humedadrelativa (HR, carbonatacion acelerada al 70% HR einmersion en agua de mar. Para la fabricacion de los distintosmorteros, el cemento Portland ha sido parcialmente sustituidopor CLD en los siguientes porcentajes en masa: 0,10, 20, 30 y 60%. Los resultados muestran que sustitucionesde cemento por CLD de hasta el 10% en masa no alteranel comportamiento frente a la corrosion de los morterosal compararlos con los morteros libres de CLD (morteroscontrol: 0% de sustitucion de cemento por CLD. Se

  12. Corrosion of Al-7075 by uranium hexafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The results of the Al-7075 corrosion by uranium hexafluoride are presented in this work. The kinetic study shows that corrosion process occurs by two temperature dependent mechanism and that the alloy can be safely used up to 140 0 C. The corrosion film is formed by uranium oxifluoride with variable composition in depth. Two alternative corrosion models are proposed in order to explain the experimental results, as well as the tests taht will be carried out to confirm one of them [pt

  13. Alternating anoxic feast/aerobic famine condition for improving granular sludge formation in sequencing batch airlift reactor at reduced aeration rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Junfeng; Bessière, Yolaine; Spérandio, Mathieu

    2009-12-01

    In this study the influence of a pre-anoxic feast period on granular sludge formation in a sequencing batch airlift reactor is evaluated. Whereas a purely aerobic SBR was operated as a reference (reactor R2), another reactor (R1) was run with a reduced aeration rate and an alternating anoxic-aerobic cycle reinforced by nitrate feeding. The presence of pre-anoxic phase clearly improved the densification of aggregates and allowed granular sludge formation at reduced air flow rate (superficial air velocity (SAV)=0.63cms(-1)). A low sludge volume index (SVI(30)=45mLg(-1)) and a high MLSS concentration (9-10gL(-1)) were obtained in the anoxic/aerobic system compared to more conventional results for the aerobic reactor. A granular sludge was observed in the anoxic/aerobic system whilst only flocs were observed in the aerobic reference even when operated at a high aeration rate (SAV=2.83cms(-1)). Nitrification was maintained efficiently in the anoxic/aerobic system even when organic loading rate (OLR) was increased up to 2.8kgCODm(-3)d(-1). In the contrary nitrification was unstable in the aerobic system and dropped at high OLR due to competition between autotrophic and heterotrophic growth. The presence of a pre-anoxic period positively affected granulation process via different mechanisms: enhancing heterotrophic growth/storage deeper in the internal anoxic layer of granule, reducing the competition between autotrophic and heterotrophic growth. These processes help to develop dense granular sludge at a moderate aeration rate. This tends to confirm that oxygen transfer is the most limiting factor for granulation at reduced aeration. Hence the use of an alternative electron acceptor (nitrate or nitrite) should be encouraged during feast period for reducing energy demand of the granular sludge process.

  14. Effects of annealing on the microstructure, corrosion resistance, and mechanical properties of RE{sub 65}Co{sub 25}Al{sub 10} (RE=Ce, La, Pr, Sm, and Gd) bulk metallic glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Zhou [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Jinan, No. 336, West Road of Nan Xinzhuang, Jinan 250022 (China); Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Preparation and Measurement of Building Materials, University of Jinan, No. 336, West Road of Nan Xinzhuang, Jinan 250022 (China); Xing, Qi; Sun, Zhenxi; Xu, Jing; Zhao, Zhengfeng [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Jinan, No. 336, West Road of Nan Xinzhuang, Jinan 250022 (China); Chen, Shuying; Liaw, Peter K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Wang, Yan, E-mail: mse_wangy@ujn.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Jinan, No. 336, West Road of Nan Xinzhuang, Jinan 250022 (China); Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Preparation and Measurement of Building Materials, University of Jinan, No. 336, West Road of Nan Xinzhuang, Jinan 250022 (China)

    2015-02-25

    The effects of annealing on the microstructure, corrosion resistance and mechanical properties of the RE{sub 65}Co{sub 25}Al{sub 10} (RE=Ce, La, Pr, Sm, and Gd) bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) were studied. Microstructural changes are induced after annealing below the onset crystallization temperature of 484 K, resulting in the variation of thermal stability and crystallization behavior. A proper annealing enhances the corrosion resistance in 3.5 wt% NaCl solution, which can be attributed to reduction of the electrochemical activity and galvanic coupling effects in the chloride solution. Moreover, the RE-based BMG annealed at 484 K possesses the higher corrosion potential and lower corrosion current density, combined with the corrosion morphologies, which suggests the best corrosion resistance. Annealing can also obviously change the mechanical properties and fracture morphologies. It presents that free volume annihilation can cause more difficulty in the elastic atom rearrangement for the as-annealed RE-based BMGs.

  15. Aspects of high temperature corrosion of boiler tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spiegel, M.; Bendick, W. [Salzgitter-Mannesmann-Forschung GmbH, Duisburg (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The development of new boiler steels for power generation has to consider significant creep strength as well as oxidation and corrosion resistance. High temperature corrosion of boiler materials concerns steam oxidation as well as fireside corrosion of parts, in contact with the flue gas. It will be shown that depending on the quality of the fuel, especially chlorine and sulphur are responsible for most of the fireside corrosion problems. Corrosion mechanisms will be presented for flue gas induced corrosion (HCl) and deposit induced corrosion (chlorides and sulfates). Especially for the 700 C technology, deposit induced corrosion issues have to be considered and the mechanisms of corrosion by molten sulfates 'Hot Corrosion' will be explained. Finally, an overview will be given on the selection of suitable materials in order to minimise corrosion relates failures. (orig.)

  16. Is Copper Immune to Corrosion When in Contact With Water and Aqueous Solutions?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macdonald, Digby D.; Sharifi-Asl, Samin (Pennsylvania State Univ., PA (United States). Center for Electrochemical Science and Technology, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    2011-03-15

    Objectives The aim of this project has been to increase knowledge and to contribute to the research community in the area of copper corrosion in a repository environment. For SSM, the most important subject is to provide better conditions for a science based evaluation of a repository for spent nuclear fuel. In this respect, this project aimed at conducting a comprehensive theoretical study on corrosion of copper in repository environment based on an expected composition of dissolved species in the groundwater in the Forsmark area. In addition the thermodynamic immunity of copper in pure anoxic water has been especially addressed as this was one of the initial conditions made by SKB for selecting copper as canister material. Results The authors have shown, in so-called corrosion Domain Diagrams, that copper in a thermodynamic sense can be considered as immune in pure anoxic water (without dissolved oxygen) only under certain conditions. It is shown that copper will corrode in pure anoxic water with very low concentrations of [Cu+] and very low partial pressures of hydrogen gas. At higher concentrations of [Cu+] and partial pressures of hydrogen, copper is found to be thermodynamically immune and will not corrode. The rate of copper corrosion in the repository water environment will thus depend on the transport of corrosion products away from the copper surface or the transport of corroding species to the copper surface. The degree to which this affects the corrosion of copper canisters in the repository environment has not been further studied. Still, the result shows that copper cannot be considered as thermodynamically immune in the presence of pure anoxic water, this implicate that one of SKB:s initial conditions for selecting copper as a canister material can be questioned. To what degree this may influence the corrosion of copper canisters in the repository environment still needs to be investigated. Of other species present in the water at repository depth in

  17. Is Copper Immune to Corrosion When in Contact With Water and Aqueous Solutions?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, Digby D.; Sharifi-Asl, Samin

    2011-03-01

    Objectives The aim of this project has been to increase knowledge and to contribute to the research community in the area of copper corrosion in a repository environment. For SSM, the most important subject is to provide better conditions for a science based evaluation of a repository for spent nuclear fuel. In this respect, this project aimed at conducting a comprehensive theoretical study on corrosion of copper in repository environment based on an expected composition of dissolved species in the groundwater in the Forsmark area. In addition the thermodynamic immunity of copper in pure anoxic water has been especially addressed as this was one of the initial conditions made by SKB for selecting copper as canister material. Results The authors have shown, in so-called corrosion Domain Diagrams, that copper in a thermodynamic sense can be considered as immune in pure anoxic water (without dissolved oxygen) only under certain conditions. It is shown that copper will corrode in pure anoxic water with very low concentrations of [Cu + ] and very low partial pressures of hydrogen gas. At higher concentrations of [Cu + ] and partial pressures of hydrogen, copper is found to be thermodynamically immune and will not corrode. The rate of copper corrosion in the repository water environment will thus depend on the transport of corrosion products away from the copper surface or the transport of corroding species to the copper surface. The degree to which this affects the corrosion of copper canisters in the repository environment has not been further studied. Still, the result shows that copper cannot be considered as thermodynamically immune in the presence of pure anoxic water, this implicate that one of SKB:s initial conditions for selecting copper as a canister material can be questioned. To what degree this may influence the corrosion of copper canisters in the repository environment still needs to be investigated. Of other species present in the water at repository

  18. The first metazoa living in permanently anoxic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heiner Iben

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several unicellular organisms (prokaryotes and protozoa can live under permanently anoxic conditions. Although a few metazoans can survive temporarily in the absence of oxygen, it is believed that multi-cellular organisms cannot spend their entire life cycle without free oxygen. Deep seas include some of the most extreme ecosystems on Earth, such as the deep hypersaline anoxic basins of the Mediterranean Sea. These are permanently anoxic systems inhabited by a huge and partly unexplored microbial biodiversity. Results During the last ten years three oceanographic expeditions were conducted to search for the presence of living fauna in the sediments of the deep anoxic hypersaline L'Atalante basin (Mediterranean Sea. We report here that the sediments of the L'Atalante basin are inhabited by three species of the animal phylum Loricifera (Spinoloricus nov. sp., Rugiloricus nov. sp. and Pliciloricus nov. sp. new to science. Using radioactive tracers, biochemical analyses, quantitative X-ray microanalysis and infrared spectroscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy observations on ultra-sections, we provide evidence that these organisms are metabolically active and show specific adaptations to the extreme conditions of the deep basin, such as the lack of mitochondria, and a large number of hydrogenosome-like organelles, associated with endosymbiotic prokaryotes. Conclusions This is the first evidence of a metazoan life cycle that is spent entirely in permanently anoxic sediments. Our findings allow us also to conclude that these metazoans live under anoxic conditions through an obligate anaerobic metabolism that is similar to that demonstrated so far only for unicellular eukaryotes. The discovery of these life forms opens new perspectives for the study of metazoan life in habitats lacking molecular oxygen.

  19. Studies on the influence of metallurgical variables on the stress corrosion behavior of AISI 304 stainless steel in sodium chloride solution using the fracture mechanics approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khatak, H.S.; Gnanamoorthy, J.B.; Rodriguez, P.

    1996-01-01

    Stress corrosion data on a nuclear grade AISI type 304 stainless steel in a boiling solution of 5M NaCl + 0.15M Na 2 SO 4 + 3 mL/L HCl (bp 381 K) for various metallurgical conditions of the steel are presented in this article. The metallurgical conditions used are solution annealing, sensitization, 10 pct cold work, 20 pct cold work, solution annealing + sensitization, 10 pct cold work + sensitization, and 20 pct cold work + sensitization. The fracture mechanics approach has been used to obtain quantitative data on the stress corrosion crack growth rates. The stress intensity factor, K I , and J integral, J I , have been used as evaluation parameters. The crack growth rates have been measured using compact tension type samples under both increasing and decreasing stress intensity factors. A crack growth rate of 5 x 10 -11 m/s was chosen for the determination of threshold parameters. Results of the optical microscopic and fractographic examinations are presented. Acoustic signals were recorded during crack growth. Data generated from acoustic emissions, activation energy measurements, and fractographic features indicate hydrogen embrittlement as the possible mechanism of cracking

  20. A mechanical property and stress corrosion evaluation of VIM-ESR-VAR work strengthened and direct double aged Inconel 718 bar material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montano, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    Presented are the mechanical properties and the stress corrosion resistance of triple melted vacuum induction melted (VIM), electro-slag remelted (ESR), and vacuum arc remelted (VAR), solution treated, work strengthened and direct double aged Inconel 718 alloy bars 4.00 in. (10.16) and 5.75 in. (14.60 cm) diameter. Tensile, charpy v-notched impact, and compact tension specimens were tested at ambient temperature in both the longitudinal and transverse directions. Longitudinal tensile and yield strengths in excess of 220 ksi (1516.85 MPa) and 200 ksi (1378.00 MPa) respectively, were realized at ambient temperature. Additional charpy impact and compact tension tests were performed at -100 F (-73 C). Longitudinal charpy impact strength equalled or exceeded 12.0 ft-lbs (16.3 Joules) at ambient and at -100 F(-73 C) while longitudinal compact (LC) tension fracture toughness strength remained above 79 ksi (86.80 MPa) at ambient and at -100 F(-73 C) temperatures. No failures occurred in the longitudinal or transverse tensile specimens stressed to 75 and 100 percent of their respective yield strengths and exposed to a salt fog environment for 180 days. Tensile tests performed after the stress corrosion test indicated no mechanical property degradation.

  1. Investigation of the Microstructural, Mechanical and Corrosion Properties of Grade A Ship Steel-Duplex Stainless Steel Composites Produced via Explosive Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Yakup; Kahraman, Nizamettin; Durgutlu, Ahmet; Gülenç, Behçet

    2017-08-01

    Grade A ship-building steel-AISI 2304 duplex stainless steel composite plates were manufactured via explosive welding. The AISI 2304 plates were used to clad the Grade A plates. Optical microscopy studies were conducted on the joining interface for characterization of the manufactured composite plates. Notch impact, tensile-shear, microhardness, bending and twisting tests were carried out to determine the mechanical properties of the composites. In addition, the surfaces of fractured samples were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and neutral salt spray (NSS) and potentiodynamic polarization tests were performed to examine corrosion behavior. Near the explosion zone, the interface was completely flat, but became wavy as the distance from the explosion zone increased. The notch impact tests indicated that the impact strength of the composites decreased with increasing distance from the explosion zone. The SEM studies detected brittle behavior below the impact transition temperature and ductile behavior above this temperature. Microhardness tests revealed that the hardness values increased with increasing distance from the explosion zone and mechanical tests showed that no visible cracking or separation had occurred on the joining interface. The NSS and potentiodynamic polarization tests determined that the AISI 2304 exhibited higher corrosion resistance than the Grade A steel.

  2. Effects of Rare Earth Metals addition and aging treatment on the corrosion resistance and mechanical properties of super duplex stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yong-Soo; Kim, Soon-Tae; Lee, In-Sung; Song, Chi-Bok

    2002-05-01

    Effects of rare earth metals addition and aging treatment on corrosion resistance and mechanical properties of super duplex stainless steels were investigated using optical/SEM/TEM metallographic examination, an X-ray diffraction test, a potentiodynamic anodic polarization test and a tensile test. The performance of the experimental alloy with 0.32% REM addition was compared with commercial super duplex stainless steel such as SAF 2507 when they were exposed to solution annealing heat treatment and aging treatment. The corrosion resistance in Cl- environments and mechanical properties of the experimental alloy were found superior to those of the commercial duplex stainless steel. The REM with larger atomic radii than those of Cr, Mo and W may fill vacancies inside the matrix and around the grain boundaries, retarding formation of harmful intermetallic σ and η phases. In addition, fine REM oxides/oxy-sulfides (1-3 μm) seemed to enhance the retardation effects. With REM additions, strength and ductility increased due to the phase and grain refinement caused by fine REM oxides and oxy-sulfides.

  3. Degradation of aged plants by corrosion: 'Long cell action' in unresolved corrosion issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saji, Genn

    2009-01-01

    In a series of previously published papers the author has identified that 'long cell action' corrosion plays a pivotal role in practically all unresolved corrosion issues for all types of nuclear power plants (e.g. PWR/VVER, BWR/RBMK and CANDU). Some of these unresolved issues are IGSCC, PWSCC, AOA and FAC (erosion-corrosion). In conventional corrosion science it is well established that 'long cell action' can seriously accelerate or suppress the local cell corrosion activities. Although long cell action is another fundamental mechanism of corrosion, especially in a 'soil corrosion' arena, potential involvement of this corrosion process has never been studied in nuclear and fossil power plants as far as the author has been able to establish. The author believes that the omission of this basic corrosion mechanism is the root cause of practically all un-resolved corrosion issues. In this paper, the author further elaborated on his assessment to other key corrosion issues, e.g. steam generator and turbine corrosion issues, while briefly summarizing previous discussions for completeness purposes, as well as introducing additional experimental and theoretical evidence of this basic corrosion mechanism. Due to the importance of this potential mechanism the author is calling for institutional review activities and further verification experiments in the form of a joint international project.

  4. pitting corrosion susceptibility pitting corrosion susceptibility of aisi

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    2DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING, UNIVERSITY OF BENIN, BENIN- CITY, EDO STATE, NIGERIA. E-mail addresses: ... fluids and aggressive chemicals. Pitting corrosion ... the kitchen, food manufacturing and dispensing and.

  5. The Influence of Plasma-Based Nitriding and Oxidizing Treatments on the Mechanical and Corrosion Properties of CoCrMo Biomedical Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noli, Fotini; Pichon, Luc; Öztürk, Orhan

    2018-04-01

    Plasma-based nitriding and/or oxidizing treatments were applied to CoCrMo alloy to improve its surface mechanical properties and corrosion resistance for biomedical applications. Three treatments were performed. A set of CoCrMo samples has been subjected to nitriding at moderate temperatures ( 400 °C). A second set of CoCrMo samples was oxidized at 395 °C in pure O2. The last set of CoCrMo samples was nitrided and subsequently oxidized under the experimental conditions of previous sets (double treatment). The microstructure and morphology of the layers formed on the CoCrMo alloy were investigated by X-ray diffraction, Atomic Force Microscopy, and Scanning Electron Microscopy. In addition, nitrogen and oxygen profiles were determined by Glow Discharge Optical Emission Spectroscopy, Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy, Energy-Dispersive X-ray, and Nuclear Reaction Analysis. Significant improvement of the Vickers hardness of the CoCrMo samples after plasma nitriding was observed due to the supersaturated nitrogen solution and the formation of an expanded FCC γ N phase and CrN precipitates. In the case of the oxidized samples, Vickers hardness improvement was minimal. The corrosion behavior of the samples was investigated in simulated body fluid (0.9 pct NaCl solution at 37 °C) using electrochemical techniques (potentiodynamic polarization and cyclic voltammetry). The concentration of metal ions released from the CoCrMo surfaces was determined by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis. The experimental results clearly indicate that the CoCrMo surface subjected to the double surface treatment consisting in plasma nitriding and plasma oxidizing exhibited lower deterioration and better resistance to corrosion compared to the nitrided, oxidized, and untreated samples. This enhancement is believed to be due to the formation of a thicker and more stable layer.

  6. Corrosion resistance and protection mechanism of hot-dip Zn-Al-Mg alloy coated steel sheet under accelerated corrosion environment; Yoyu Zn-Al-Mg kei gokin mekki koban no sokushin fushoku kankyoka ni okeru taishokusei toi boshoku kiko

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komatsu, A.; Izutani, H.; Tsujimura, T.; Ando, A.; Kittaka, T. [NKK Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-08-01

    Corrosion behavior of hot-dip Zn-6%Al 0-3%Mg alloy coated steel sheets in cyclic corrosion test (CCT) has been investigated. The corrosion resistance was improved with increasing Mg content in the coating layer, and the highest corrosion resistance was observed at 3% Mg. In Zn-6%Al-3%Mg alloy coated steel sheet, the formations of zinc carbonate hydroxide and zinc oxide were suppressed for longer duration compared with Zn-0.2%Al and Zn-4.5%Al-0.l%Mg alloy coated