WorldWideScience

Sample records for anorexia nervosa co-occurring

  1. Severe anorexia nervosa, co-occurring major depressive disorder and electroconvulsive therapy as maintenance treatment: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Poutanen, Outi; Huuhka, Kaija; Perko, Kaisa

    2009-01-01

    Introduction It is difficult to treat patients who, in addition to having severe anorexia nervosa, also have severe symptoms of major depressive disorder and a tendency for impulsive acting out behaviour. Our case report considers the feasibility of maintenance electroconvulsive therapy in such complicated cases. Case presentation This is a case report of a woman with anorexia nervosa and co-morbid severe major depressive disorder who was treated with electroconvulsive therapy as a maintenanc...

  2. Anorexia nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Lock, James; Fitzpatrick, Kathleen Kara

    2009-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is characterised by a low BMI, fear of gaining weight, denial of current low weight and its impact on health, and amenorrhoea. Estimated prevalence is highest in teenage girls, and may affect up to 0.7% of this group.Anorexia nervosa is related to family, sociocultural, genetic, and other biological factors. Psychiatric and personality disorders such as depression, anxiety disorders, obsessive compulsive disorder, and perfectionism, are commonly found in people who have an...

  3. Anorexia nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Fitzpatrick, Kathleen Kara; Lock, James

    2011-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is characterised by a low body mass index (BMI), fear of gaining weight, denial of current low weight and its impact on health, and amenorrhoea. Estimated prevalence is highest in teenage girls, and the condition may affect up to 0.7% of this group.Anorexia nervosa is related to family, sociocultural, genetic, and other biological factors. Psychiatric and personality disorders such as depression, anxiety disorders, obsessive compulsive disorder, and perfectionism are commo...

  4. Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerlage, Patricia A.

    The author traces the case histories of five anorexic female patients treated in the therapeutic milieu in a psychiatric inpatient unit. The history of anorexia nervosa is reviewed, incidence of the disorder is cited, and common characteristics are described. Case histories are presented in terms of events precipitating the weight loss, behavior…

  5. Anorexia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hard to adapt to a new culture (a theory called "culture clash"). The stress of trying to ... job), can lead to the onset of anorexia. Personality traits. Someone with anorexia may not like her ...

  6. Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    OpenAIRE

    Goldbloom, D S; Kennedy, S H; Kaplan, A S; Woodside, D. B.

    1989-01-01

    No definitive therapy exists for anorexia nervosa (AN) or bulimia nervosa (BN). Nevertheless, biologic and psychologic research into these disorders has increased over the last decade. We examine the various drugs available for treatment. Advances in pharmacotherapy for AN have been modest and have reflected efforts either to stimulate hunger and weight gain or to control complications of the starvation process. Food remains the "drug" of choice. Antidepressants have been found to be benefici...

  7. Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csapo, Marg

    1987-01-01

    The article reviews the literature on anorexia nervosa, with or without bulimia, and presents a comprehensive picture of this eating disorder, focusing on terminology, historical references, prevalence, prognosis, classification, diagnostic criteria, physical and psychological characteristics, evolution of the disability, etiology, treatment, and…

  8. Case 39: Anorexia nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anorexia nervosa is a disease affecting primarily young women who have distorted body images. Although their weight is less than 30 percent under ideal body weight, they see themselves as overweight. Anorectics often use diuretic and laxative agents to accomplish their weight loss. Patients with bul...

  9. Anorexia nervosa en adolescenten

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Elburg, A A; Danner, U N

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anorexia nervosa (AN), which is the most serious of the eating disorders, starts earlier in life and often continues into adulthood. AIM: To discuss the typical features of AN in adolescents. METHOD: We present an overview based on the literature about AN in adolescents and on analysis p

  10. [Pharmacotherapy for anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greetfeld, M; Cuntz, U; Voderholzer, U

    2012-01-01

    Psychotherapy is the treatment of choice for both anorexia nervosa and for bulimia nervosa. However, many patients are also treated by pharmaceutical drugs. For the clinician it is difficult to choose pharmacotherapy, because the drugs may not be licensed, because of pharmacodynamic problems due to underweight or purging behaviour, or because of comorbidity. The present review summarises the current knowledge on pharmacotherapy for anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa considering the available guidelines. In general, the knowledge based on studies is insufficient for anorexia nervosa. Up to now, there is no proof of efficacy for any antidepressant or atypical antipsychotic with respect to weight gain; atypical antipsychotics may be helpful for ruminating or excessive motor hyperactivity. For bulimia nervosa antidepressants are the pharmacotherapy of first choice. Long-term effects, however, are still unknown.

  11. Psychobiology of anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploog, D W; Pirke, K M

    1987-11-01

    The psychobiology of anorexia nervosa is described and explained under four headings; (1) the psychopathology as related to the motivation for fasting; (2) metabolic and somatic consequences of starvation, including brain morphology; (3) endocrine abnormalities in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and gonadal axis; and (4) the hunger drive and its possible perversions in terms of aspects of neuroethology and the reward system in the brain.

  12. Anorexia Nervosa and Bone

    OpenAIRE

    Misra, Madhusmita; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a condition of severe low weight that is associated with low bone mass, impaired bone structure and reduced bone strength, all of which contribute to increased fracture risk., Adolescents with AN have decreased rates of bone accrual compared with normal-weight controls, raising addition concerns of suboptimal peak bone mass and future bone health in this age group. Changes in lean mass and compartmental fat depots, hormonal alterations secondary to nutritional factors...

  13. Anorexia nervosa en adolescenten

    OpenAIRE

    van Elburg, A A; Danner, U N

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anorexia nervosa (AN), which is the most serious of the eating disorders, starts earlier in life and often continues into adulthood. AIM: To discuss the typical features of AN in adolescents. METHOD: We present an overview based on the literature about AN in adolescents and on analysis performed by experts. RESULTS: Youngsters with AN run considerable physical risks because their bodies are less well developed and are more easily injured. These injuries can be a lifelong handicap ...

  14. Early onset anorexia nervosa.

    OpenAIRE

    Fosson, A; Knibbs, J; Bryant-Waugh, R; Lask, B

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes 48 children, aged 14 years or less, who met diagnostic criteria for anorexia nervosa modified from Morgan and Russell. The characteristics of the sample (13 boys and 35 girls) are described along with features of the illness, associated family characteristics, treatment in hospital, and a brief description of treatment. Difficulties in diagnosis are addressed, with reference in particular to the high incidence of depression in this group. Finally, the importance and diffi...

  15. Acrocyanosis in anorexia nervosa.

    OpenAIRE

    Bhanji, S; Mattingly, D

    1991-01-01

    Acrocyanosis, an uncommon disorder of the peripheral circulation, may occur in patients with anorexia nervosa. It is not known why this should be, nor whether acrocyanosis correlates with any other features of the disorder. The findings in an unselected series of 155 anorectics are reported. Acrocyanosis occurred in 32 and was more prevalent among the more severely ill. It was associated also with pallor of the face and trunk, slower pulse rates and higher fasting plasma glucose levels. Acroc...

  16. Severe hypophosphataemia in anorexia nervosa.

    OpenAIRE

    Cariem, A. K.; Lemmer, E. R.; Adams, M. G.; Winter, T. A.; O'Keefe, S J

    1994-01-01

    In addition to well-described acid-base and electrolyte disturbances, anorexia nervosa may be complicated by severe hypophosphataemia. We report a case of anorexia nervosa complicated by life-threatening hypophosphataemia manifesting as generalized muscle weakness and bulbar muscle dysfunction, resulting in an aspiration pneumonia and cardiorespiratory arrest.

  17. Anorexia nervosa and necrotizing colitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Kaye, J. C.; Madden, M V; Leaper, D J

    1985-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is associated with a mortality approaching 5% in patients severely enough affected to warrant hospital care (Hsu, 1980). The main causes of death are inanition, electrolyte disturbances or suicide. We report here a case of necrotizing colitis associated with anorexia nervosa, an association which has not been described previously.

  18. Dopamine and anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Södersten, P; Bergh, C; Leon, M; Zandian, M

    2016-01-01

    We have suggested that reduced food intake increases the risk for anorexia nervosa by engaging mesolimbic dopamine neurons, thereby initially rewarding dieting. Recent fMRI studies have confirmed that dopamine neurons are activated in anorexia nervosa, but it is not clear whether this response is due to the disorder or to its resulting nutritional deficit. When the body senses the shortage of nutrients, it rapidly shifts behavior toward foraging for food as a normal physiological response and the mesolimbic dopamine neurons may be involved in that process. On the other hand, the altered dopamine status of anorexics has been suggested to result from a brain abnormality that underlies their complex emotional disorder. We suggest that the outcomes of the treatments that emerge from that perspective remain poor because they target the mental symptoms that are actually the consequences of the food deprivation that accompanies anorexia. On the other hand, a method that normalizes the disordered eating behavior of anorexics results in much better physiological, behavioral, and emotional outcomes. PMID:26608248

  19. [Franz Kafka's anorexia nervosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichter, M M

    1988-07-01

    The evidence for the hypothesis that the poet Franz Kafka had suffered from an atypical anorexia nervosa is presented. Kafka was slim and underweight throughout his life and showed an ascetic attitude and abjuration of physical enjoyment and pleasure (fasting, vegetarianism, sexual abstinence, emphasis on physical fitness). The analysis is mainly based on Kafka's own descriptions in his letters, diaries, and literary work. Kafka was achievement oriented, reported many sadomasochistic fantasies, and had an anancastic (obsessive-compulsive) depressive personality. In addition there is evidence for a disturbed psychosexual and gender identity development. Our results concerning Kafka's psychopathology do not question his genius as a poet. PMID:3061914

  20. [Franz Kafka's anorexia nervosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichter, M M

    1988-07-01

    The evidence for the hypothesis that the poet Franz Kafka had suffered from an atypical anorexia nervosa is presented. Kafka was slim and underweight throughout his life and showed an ascetic attitude and abjuration of physical enjoyment and pleasure (fasting, vegetarianism, sexual abstinence, emphasis on physical fitness). The analysis is mainly based on Kafka's own descriptions in his letters, diaries, and literary work. Kafka was achievement oriented, reported many sadomasochistic fantasies, and had an anancastic (obsessive-compulsive) depressive personality. In addition there is evidence for a disturbed psychosexual and gender identity development. Our results concerning Kafka's psychopathology do not question his genius as a poet.

  1. Anorexia nervosa during pregnancy.

    OpenAIRE

    Goldman, Ran D.; Koren, Gideon

    2003-01-01

    QUESTION: A 22-year-old patient in my clinic was diagnosed with anorexia nervosa (AN) 7 years ago. She is now married and planning her first pregnancy. She is still underweight. What should she expect during pregnancy, and are there any implications for her unborn baby? ANSWER: Women with AN are at higher risk of complications during pregnancy, mainly because of low body weight. Apgar scores and birth weights of infants born to mothers with AN have been found to be significantly lower than th...

  2. Lengdevekst ved anorexia nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Mortensen, Synnøve Gjelsten

    2012-01-01

    Bakgrunn:Normal pubertetsutvikling krever god ernæringsstatus og normale hormonelle forhold. Ved anorexia nervosa (AN) sees en rekke endokrine adaptasjonsresponser sekundært til sult, bl.a. hypogonadotrop hypogonadisme og en karakteristisk, høy GH-sekresjon med perifer GH-resistans og medfølgende lav produksjon av IGF-1 i lever og annet vev. Det er observert at mange som behandles for AN er små for alderen og forblir lave etter tilfriskning. Dette kan skyldes at den dysfunksjonelle regulering...

  3. Anorexia Nervosa: Sociocultural Factors and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jennifer

    This paper examines how the epidemiological findings of anorexia nervosa lead theorists to speculate a correlation between sociocultural factors and the development of anorexia nervosa. A section on the essential features of anorexia nervosa identifies five primary characteristics of anorexia: (1) severe weight loss; (2) a disturbance of body…

  4. Anorexia nervosa: an Indian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendhekar, D N; Arora, K; Lohia, D; Aggarwal, A; Jiloha, R C

    2009-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a condition thought to be associated with the western culture. However, the recent publication of a case series from Asia suggests that it is a syndrome related to a changing culture. We present a detailed clinical form of this syndrome based on descriptive analysis of 2 cases of anorexia nervosa. Both these patients were adolescent, school-going girls from middle socioeconomic class of urban background. They were pre-morbidly non-obese and did not have any pressures to pursue slimness for beauty. However, there was an identifiable psychosocial stressor as a precipitant in both of them. Both the patients had symptoms of refusal to eat followed by weight loss. We could not identify any risk factor in our patients for anorexia nervosa. Our report illustrates the differences in developmental and psychodynamic issues related to the development of anorexia nervosa, though the clinical symptoms may be similar. PMID:20120991

  5. Medical Complications of Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westmoreland, Patricia; Krantz, Mori J; Mehler, Philip S

    2016-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are serious psychiatric illnesses related to disordered eating and distorted body images. They both have significant medical complications associated with the weight loss and malnutrition of anorexia nervosa, as well as from the purging behaviors that characterize bulimia nervosa. No body system is spared from the adverse sequelae of these illnesses, especially as anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa become more severe and chronic. We review the medical complications that are associated with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, as well as the treatment for the complications. We also discuss the epidemiology and psychiatric comorbidities of these eating disorders.

  6. Acrodermatitis enteropathica with anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Tae; Kang, Jin Seuk; Baek, Jae Woo; Kim, Tae Kwon; Lee, Jin Woo; Jeon, Young Seung; Suh, Kee Suck

    2010-08-01

    Acrodermatitis enteropathica is a rare hereditary or acquired disorder of hypozincemia. It is characterized by acral and periorificial dermatitis, alopecia, diarrhea and growth retardation. Anorexia nervosa is characterized by low body weight, body image distortion with an obsessive fear and is also associated with various cutaneous findings including acrodermatitis enteropathica. We report a 37-year-old female with acrodermatitis enteropathica showing acquired zinc deficiency with anorexia nervosa. PMID:20649716

  7. Neurobiologische Faktoren bei Anorexia nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Schott, Regina

    2013-01-01

    Central serotonergic pathways may play an important role in the aetiology of anorexia nervosa (AN). This thesis aimed to investigate the serotonergic system in acute patients with anorexia nervosa (acAN), weight-recovered patients (recAN) and healthy controls (HCW). Platelets served as a validated model for peripheral serotonergic neurons. We investigated functional characteristics of the platelet 5-HT transporter, platelet 5-HT content, MAO-B activity and the relationship between MAO-B activ...

  8. Chronic Anorexia Nervosa: Medical Mimic

    OpenAIRE

    Borson, Soo; Katon, Wayne

    1981-01-01

    While anorexia nervosa is typically construed as an acute, dramatic disorder of younger women, long-term follow-up studies indicate that morbidity is chronic or relapsing in 30 percent to 50 percent of cases and sometimes leads to death. In older patients or those with atypical clinical features or obscure complications, chronic starvation may mimic other diseases, and rigid adherence to current diagnostic criteria may impede recognition and appropriate treatment. Anorexia nervosa should be v...

  9. Executive functions in anorexia nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Ignacio Jauregui-Lobera

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The pathophysiologic mechanisms that account for the development and persistence of anorexia nervosa (AN) remain unclear. With respect to the neuropsychological functioning, the executive functions have been reported to be altered, especially cognitive flexibility and decision-making processes. Objectives: The aim of this study was to review the current state of the neuropsychological studies focused on anorexia nervosa, especially those highlighting the executive functions. Met...

  10. Reproductive issues in anorexia nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffman, Elizabeth R.; Zerwas, Stephanie C; Bulik, Cynthia M.

    2011-01-01

    Despite a high prevalence of menstrual irregularities, women with anorexia nervosa are becoming pregnant. The physical and psychological demands of pregnancy and motherhood can represent an immense challenge for women already struggling with the medical and psychological stress of an eating disorder. This article summarizes key issues related to reproduction in women with anorexia nervosa, highlighting the importance of preconception counseling, adequate gestational weight gain, and sufficien...

  11. Adolescent Eating Disorder: Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muuss, Rolf E.

    1985-01-01

    Examines anorexia nervosa, an eating disorder seen with increasing frequency, especially among adolescent girls. Presents five theories about causation, discusses early characteristics, typical family patterns, physical and medical characteristics, social adjustment problems, and society's contribution to anorexia. Describes course of the…

  12. Homeostasis in anorexia nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per eSodersten

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Brainstem and hypothalamic orexigenic/anorexigenic networks are thought to maintain body weight homeostasis in response to hormonal and metabolic feedback from peripheral sites. This approach has not been successful in managing over- and underweight patients. It is suggested that concept of homeostasis has been misinterpreted; rather than exerting control, the brain permits eating in proportion to the amount of physical activity necessary to obtain food. In support, animal experiments have shown that while a hypothalamic orexigen excites eating when food is abundant, it inhibits eating and stimulates foraging when food is in short supply. As the physical price of food approaches zero, eating and body weight increase without constraints. Conversely, in anorexia nervosa body weight is homeostatically regulated, the high level of physical activity in anorexia is displaced hoarding for food that keeps body weight constantly low. A treatment based on this point of view, providing patients with computerized mealtime support to re-establish normal eating behavior, has brought 75% of patients with eating disorders into remission, reduced the rate of relapse to 10%, and eliminated mortality.

  13. Anorexia nervosa presenting as reversible hypoglycaemic coma.

    OpenAIRE

    Zalin, A. M.; Lant, A F

    1984-01-01

    Hypoglycaemic coma was the presenting feature in two patients with anorexia nervosa, both of whom rapidly regained consciousness following intravenous administration of glucose. This uncommon complication of malnutrition does not appear to have been reported previously in anorexia nervosa.

  14. Anorexia Nervosa or Not? A Case Presentation

    OpenAIRE

    Swanson, Richard W.; Haight, Kenneth R.

    1989-01-01

    The authors of this article present a case of diabetic gastroparesis, initially diagnosed as anorexia nervosa. They compare the symptoms and signs of diabetic gastroparesis with the diagnostic criteria for anorexia nervosa and discuss treatment with domperidone.

  15. Spontaneous pneumomediastinum: a complication of anorexia nervosa?

    OpenAIRE

    Fergusson, R J; Shaw, T R; Turnbull, C M

    1985-01-01

    We describe a patient with anorexia nervosa who developed a spontaneous pneumomediastinum. Five other patients have been reported with this association, suggesting that tissue changes in anorexia nervosa may predispose to this condition.

  16. The incidence of anorexia nervosa on Curacao

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek, HW; van Harten, PN; Hermans, KME; Katzman, MA; Matroos, GE; Susser, ES

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Although anorexia nervosa was once thought to occur only in affluent societies, cases have now been documented across the globe. To examine whether anorexia nervosa emerges in societies undergoing socioeconomic transition, the authors studied the incidence of anorexia nervosa on the Carib

  17. Anorexia nervosa e retardo mental

    OpenAIRE

    Adriana Trejger Kachani; Táki Athanássios Cordás

    2011-01-01

    OBJETIVO: Revisar a literatura pertinente, observando a prevalência, etiopatogenia, aspectos nutricionais, diagnóstico e tratamento da anorexia nervosa (AN) em pacientes com retardo mental (RM). MÉTODO: Revisão bibliográfica realizada nos sistemas Medline, SciELO e PubMed usando os descritores "transtornos alimentares", "anorexia nervosa" e "retardo mental". RESULTADOS: A AN pode se manifestar de formas atípicas em indivíduos com RM, exigindo critérios diagnósticos específicos. O mais utiliza...

  18. Adolescent Boys and Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, Felicia

    1994-01-01

    Notes that there has been steady increase in reported incidence of male adolescents with anorexia nervosa, from approximately 5% in 1985 to as much as 10% in 1987. Considers role of educators and counselors in early identification of this disorder, noting that young anorectic males have better prognosis for recovery if they receive treatment in…

  19. Hypoglycaemia associated with anorexia nervosa.

    OpenAIRE

    Fonseca, V; Ball, S; Marks, V; Havard, C W

    1991-01-01

    A 41 year old woman with severe emaciation due to longstanding anorexia nervosa presented with recurrent hypoglycaemia. During an episode of hypoglycaemia, serum insulin and C peptide were undetectable and plasma beta hydroxybutyrate, free fatty acids and lactate were inappropriately low. Response to intravenous glucagon was poor. Muscle enzymes were grossly elevated until she gained weight. Hypoglycaemia was abolished by weight gain.

  20. What People with Anorexia Nervosa Need to Know about Osteoporosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Osteoporosis Osteoporosis and Other Conditions What People With Anorexia Nervosa Need to Know About Osteoporosis Publication available ... focus(); */ } //--> Print-Friendly Page April 2016 What Is Anorexia Nervosa? Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder characterized ...

  1. Treatments of medical complications of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehler, Philip S; Krantz, Mori J; Sachs, Katherine V

    2015-01-01

    Inherent to anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are a plethora of medical complications which correlate with the severity of weight loss or the frequency and mode of purging. Yet, the encouraging fact is that most of these medical complications are treatable and reversible with definitive care and cessation of the eating-disordered behaviours. Herein, these treatments are described for both the medical complications of anorexia nervosa and those which are a result of bulimia nervosa.

  2. Treatments of medical complications of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Mehler, Philip S; Krantz, Mori J; Sachs, Katherine V.

    2015-01-01

    Inherent to anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are a plethora of medical complications which correlate with the severity of weight loss or the frequency and mode of purging. Yet, the encouraging fact is that most of these medical complications are treatable and reversible with definitive care and cessation of the eating-disordered behaviours. Herein, these treatments are described for both the medical complications of anorexia nervosa and those which are a result of bulimia nervosa.

  3. Does Anorexia Nervosa Resemble an Addiction?

    OpenAIRE

    Barbarich-Marsteller, Nicole C.; Foltin, Richard W.; Walsh, B. Timothy

    2011-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a severe psychiatric disorder characterized by unrelenting self-starvation and life-threatening weight loss. The relentlessness with which individuals with anorexia nervosa pursue starvation and in some cases exercise despite the negative physical, emotional, and social consequences parallels features of addictive disorders. From a clinical perspective, individuals with anorexia nervosa behave similarly to individuals with substance abuse by narrowing their behavioral repe...

  4. Treating Anorexia Nervosa in the Couple Context

    OpenAIRE

    Bulik, Cynthia M.; BAUCOM, DONALD H.; Kirby, Jennifer S.

    2012-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a serious mental illness that affects women and men of all ages. Despite the gravity of its chronic morbidity, risk of premature death, and societal burden, the evidence base for its treatment—especially in adults—is weak. Guided by the finding that family-based interventions confer benefit in the treatment of anorexia nervosa in adolescents, we developed a cognitive-behavioral couple-based intervention for adults with anorexia nervosa who are in committed relationships th...

  5. The issues of anorexia nervosa in childhood

    OpenAIRE

    ROUBÍKOVÁ, Alice

    2013-01-01

    Anorexia Nervosa is being described as an extreme starving. According to the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, it is a disease caused by an intentional weight loss, when the patient avoids most of the meals and uses other ways to lose his weight, for example induced vomiting, using laxatives, diuretics, excessive physical activity. Anorexia Nervosa means not only a physical illness, mostly a psychological disease. Anorexia Nervosa starts usually...

  6. Anorexia Nervosa, Obesity and Bone Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Misra, Madhusmita; Klibanski, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa and obesity are conditions at the extreme ends of the nutritional spectrum, associated with marked reductions versus increases respectively in body fat content. Both conditions are also associated with an increased risk for fractures. In anorexia nervosa, body composition and hormones secreted or regulated by body fat content are important determinants of low bone density, impaired bone structure and reduced bone strength. In addition, anorexia nervosa is characterized by inc...

  7. Endocrine Consequences of Anorexia Nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Misra, Madhusmita; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is prevalent in adolescents and young adults, and endocrine changes include hypothalamic amenorrhea, a nutritionally acquired growth hormone resistance with low insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), relative hypercortisolemia, decreases in leptin, insulin, amylin and incretins, and increases in ghrelin, PYY and adiponectin. These changes in turn have deleterious effects on bone, and may affect neurocognition, anxiety, depression and eating disorder psychopathology. Low b...

  8. Anorexia nervosa and bone metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Fazeli, Pouneh K.; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychiatric disorder characterized by self-induced starvation with a lifetime prevalence of 2.2% in women. The most common medical co-morbidity in women with AN is bone loss, with over 85% of women having bone mineral density values more than one standard deviation below an age comparable mean. The low bone mass in AN is due to multiple hormonal adaptations to under nutrition, including hypothalamic amenorrhea and growth hormone resistance. Importa...

  9. Anorexia nervosa and pancreatic ascites.

    OpenAIRE

    Isaacs, P.; Saunders, A J; Rosen, B. K.; Sladen, G E

    1986-01-01

    Acute alcoholic pancreatitis was undiagnosed in a patient with anorexia nervosa who subsequently developed pancreatic ascites and oedema, wrongly attributed to protein malnutrition alone. She became hyperphagic in an attempt to reverse the malnutrition and hence the abdominal swelling, indicating that the goal of attaining a thin shape was the major determinant of the eating disorder in this patient. Measurement of ascitic fluid amylase concentration should be carried out in all patients with...

  10. Anorexia nervosa – medical complications

    OpenAIRE

    Mehler, Philip S; Brown, Carrie

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to other mental health disorders, eating disorders have a high prevalence of concomitant medical complications. Specifically, patients suffering from anorexia nervosa (AN) have a litany of medical complications which are commonly present as part of their eating disorders. Almost every body system can be adversely, affected by this state of progressive malnutrition. Moreover, some of the complications can have permanent adverse effects even after there is a successful program of nu...

  11. Psychosomatic syndromes and anorexia nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Abbate-Daga Giovanni; Delsedime Nadia; Nicotra Barbara; Giovannone Cristina; Marzola Enrica; Amianto Federico; Fassino Secondo

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background In spite of the role of some psychosomatic factors as alexithymia, mood intolerance, and somatization in both pathogenesis and maintenance of anorexia nervosa (AN), few studies have investigated the prevalence of psychosomatic syndromes in AN. The aim of this study was to use the Diagnostic Criteria for Psychosomatic Research (DCPR) to assess psychosomatic syndromes in AN and to evaluate if psychosomatic syndromes could identify subgroups of AN patients. Methods 108 AN inp...

  12. Bone Metabolism in Anorexia Nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Fazeli, Pouneh K.; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN), a psychiatric disorder predominantly affecting young women, is characterized by self-imposed chronic nutritional deprivation and distorted body image. AN is associated with a number of medical co-morbidities including low bone mass. The low bone mass in AN is due to an uncoupling of bone formation and bone resorption, which is the result of hormonal adaptations aimed at decreasing energy expenditure during periods of low energy intake. Importantly, the low bone mass in ...

  13. Anorexia nervosa und Down Syndrom

    OpenAIRE

    Räder, Klaus; Specht, Friedrich; Reister, Monika

    1989-01-01

    Es wird über eine 24jährige Patientin mit einer Anorexia nervosa (AN) und einem Down-Syndrom (DS) berichtet. Nach Sichtung bisheriger Fallberichte zum gemeinsamen Auftreten beider Krankheiten wird versucht, einen weiteren Beitrag zur kontrovers diskutierten Frage zu leisten, ob bei geistig Retardierten eine primäre Anorexie auftreten kann, oder ob es sich vielmehr um anorektische Reaktionen bei anderweitigen Störungen z.B. im Rahmen depressiver Verstimmung handelt.

  14. QT interval in anorexia nervosa.

    OpenAIRE

    Cooke, R. A.; Chambers, J. B.; Singh, R.; Todd, G J; Smeeton, N C; Treasure, J; Treasure, T.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To determine the incidence of a long QT interval as a marker for sudden death in patients with anorexia nervosa and to assess the effect of refeeding. To define a long QT interval by linear regression analysis and estimation of the upper limit of the confidence interval (95% CI) and to compare this with the commonly used Bazett rate correction formula. DESIGN--Prospective case control study. SETTING--Tertiary referral unit for eating disorders. SUBJECTS--41 consecutive patients wi...

  15. Skin signs in anorexia nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Strumia, Renata

    2009-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality among adolescent females and young women. AN is associated with severe medical and psychological consequences, including death, osteoporosis, growth delay, and developmental delay. Skin signs are almost always detectable in severe AN and awareness of them may help in the early diagnosis of hidden AN. Skin signs are the expression of the medical consequences of starvation, vomiting, abuse of drugs, such as laxatives and di...

  16. Anorexia Nervosa: Treatment in the Family Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, Dana Heller

    2001-01-01

    One form of treatment for anorexia nervosa that continues to be developed is family therapy. In the following article, anorexia nervosa and its prevalence are defined, theories of its development are discussed, and family therapy interventions that have been applied to the treatment of the disorder are outlined. (Contains 15 references.) (GCP)

  17. Anorexia Nervosa/Bulimia: The Teenager's Dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, G. Sue

    Anorexia nervosa and bulimia are currently being studied with great intensity by the medical profession. Anorexia nervosa was first described in the medical literature in 1868, but was considered a rarity until the late 1930's. Bulimia was not identified in the medical literature until 1979. Recent studies suggest that approximately five percent…

  18. Action Monitoring and Perfectionism in Anorexia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieters, Guido L. M.; de Bruijn, Ellen R. A.; Maas, Yvonne; Hulstijn, Wouter; Vandereycken, Walter; Peuskens, Joseph; Sabbe, Bernard G.

    2007-01-01

    To study action monitoring in anorexia nervosa, behavioral and EEG measures were obtained in underweight anorexia nervosa patients (n=17) and matched healthy controls (n=19) while performing a speeded choice-reaction task. Our main measures of interest were questionnaire outcomes, reaction times, error rates, and the error-related negativity ERP…

  19. Action monitoring and perfectionism in anorexia nervosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieters, G.L.M.; Bruijn, E.R.A. de; Maas, Y.J.; Hulstijn, W.; Eycken, W. van der; Peuskens, J.; Sabbe, B.G.C.C.

    2006-01-01

    To study action monitoring in anorexia nervosa, behavioral and EEG measures were obtained in underweight anorexia nervosa patients (n = 17) and matched healthy controls (n = 19) while performing a speeded choice-reaction task. Our main measures of interest were questionnaire outcomes, reaction times

  20. Measuring Severity and Change in Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Eugene; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes the State of Mind (SOM) Questionnaire, which measures severity and change of clinical state in anorexia nervosa. A study of 42 anorexia patients and 4 control groups showed a strong correlation between depression as measured by the Beck Depression Inventory and the Anorexia Scale, which comprise the SOM. (JAC)

  1. Case Report on Anorexia Nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Preeti Srinivasa; Chandrashekar, M; Nikitha Harish; Gowda, Mahesh R.; Sumit Durgoji

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder characterized by excessive restriction on food intake and irrational fear of gaining weight, often accompanied by a distorted body self-perception. It is clinically diagnosed more frequently in females, with type and severity varying with each case. The current report is a case of a 25-year-old female, married for 5 years, educated up to 10 th standard, a homemaker, hailing from an upper social class Hindu (Marvadi) family, living with husband′s family i...

  2. Anorexia Nervosa: A Lifestyle Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Talbot, Yves

    1983-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a real lifestyle disorder. The apparent increase in frequency has been linked to the change of position of women in society. If families have an important role to play in the maintenance of the drama, they also hold the key to its resolution. The family physician in early contact with the anorectic patient is in an important position to involve the family in therapy and maximize the chances of recovery. The steps required are reframing, preparing the family involved for fa...

  3. Anorexia nervosa: un estudio de casos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lillyana Zusman Tinman

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available La Anorexia Nervosa es un trastorno de alimentación que se define (etimológicamente como una "pérdida nerviosa del apetito". Se caracteriza por la actitud consciente, voluntaria y rotunda de los sujetos  de tener un exceso de peso que intentan modificar por vía de la inanición. A partir del estudio de casos, se propone la distinción entre una Anorexia Nervosa Estructural -aquella en la que predomina el conflicto intrapsíquico primario y arcaico, y que manifiesta una conducta aislada y retraída- y una Anorexia Nervosa Reactiva, aquella en la que predomina un conflicto intrafamiliar algo más posterior y, por lo tanto, una personalidad más abierta y compatible con el medio. Anorexia Nervosa is an Eating Disorder defined (etimoligacally as a "nervouse loss of apetite". It is characterized by a conscious, voluntary and categoric attitude of the sick patient to refrain from eating. He/she has a firm conviction of having excess weight which they try to modify by starvation. Through a case study, a distinction between two types of Anorexia Nervosa is proposed: a Structural Anorexia Nervosa -in which an intrapsyhic, primary, arcaic conflic prevails, leading to an isolated, withdrawal conduct- and a Reactive Anorexia Nervosa, in which a later intrafamilial conflict prevails leading, therefore, to a more open personality, compatible with the enviroment.

  4. Case report on anorexia nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti Srinivasa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder characterized by excessive restriction on food intake and irrational fear of gaining weight, often accompanied by a distorted body self-perception. It is clinically diagnosed more frequently in females, with type and severity varying with each case. The current report is a case of a 25-year-old female, married for 5 years, educated up to 10 th standard, a homemaker, hailing from an upper social class Hindu (Marvadi family, living with husband′s family in Urban Bangalore; presented to our tertiary care centre with complaints of gradual loss of weight, recurrent episodes of vomiting, from a period of two years, menstrual irregularities from 1 year and amenorrhea since 6 months, with a probable precipitating factor being husband′s critical comment on her weight. Diagnosis of atypical anorexia nervosa was made, with the body mass index (BMI being 15.6. A multidisciplinary therapeutic approach was employed to facilitate remission. Through this case report the authors call for the attention of general practitioners and other medical practitioners to be aware of the symptomatology of eating disorders as most patients would overtly express somatic conditions similar to the reported case so as to facilitate early psychiatric intervention.

  5. Executive functions in anorexia nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Jauregui-Lobera

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The pathophysiologic mechanisms that account for the development and persistence of anorexia nervosa (AN remain unclear. With respect to the neuropsychological functioning, the executive functions have been reported to be altered, especially cognitive flexibility and decision-making processes. Objectives: The aim of this study was to review the current state of the neuropsychological studies focused on anorexia nervosa, especially those highlighting the executive functions. Methods: This was done by means of a searching process covering three relevant electronic databases, as well as an additional search on references included in the analysed papers. Eventually we have to mention other published reviews and a hand-search. Results and discussion: Comparing AN patients and healthy controls the results remain controversial and so remains the comparison of different eating disorders with respect to the neuropsychological dysfunction. The role of variables such as depression, anxiety and obsessionality needs to be clarified. There seems to be some base to state that some commonalities exist in the so-called extreme weight conditions (anorexia, obesity. The link between neuropsychological dysfunction in AN and biomarkers remains unclear. The role of neuropsychological deficits in AN, as initial factors or simply as mere consequences, remains unclear too. The link between the body image disturbances and the neuropsychological dysfunction needs to be clarified. The similarities between the AN neuropsychological dysfunction and that found in other mental disorders may be considered up to date as a mere approach. The same applies to the relationship between the AN patients´ neuropsychological performance and personality or gender.

  6. Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia: A Research Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeten, Mary K.

    1985-01-01

    The eating disorders called anorexia nervosa and bulimia are examined in terms of their symptomatology, etiology, and treatment, and in terms of how the extension home economist or teacher can help. Resources for additional information or help are listed. (CT)

  7. Anorexia nervosa: aetiology, assessment, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipfel, Stephan; Giel, Katrin E; Bulik, Cynthia M; Hay, Phillipa; Schmidt, Ulrike

    2015-12-01

    Anorexia nervosa is an important cause of physical and psychosocial morbidity. Recent years have brought advances in understanding of the underlying psychobiology that contributes to illness onset and maintenance. Genetic factors influence risk, psychosocial and interpersonal factors can trigger onset, and changes in neural networks can sustain the illness. Substantial advances in treatment, particularly for adolescent patients with anorexia nervosa, point to the benefits of specialised family-based interventions. Adults with anorexia nervosa too have a realistic chance of achieving recovery or at least substantial improvement, but no specific approach has shown clear superiority, suggesting a combination of re-nourishment and anorexia nervosa-specific psychotherapy is most effective. To successfully fight this enigmatic illness, we have to enhance understanding of the underlying biological and psychosocial mechanisms, improve strategies for prevention and early intervention, and better target our treatments through improved understanding of specific disease mechanisms. PMID:26514083

  8. Treatment of Adolescents with Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Dilip R.; Pratt, Helen D.; Greydanus, Donald E.

    2003-01-01

    Reviews research on the treatment of adolescents with anorexia nervosa, including the general approach, treatment setting, treatment of medical complications, nutritional management, psychopharmacotherapy, psychotherapy, treatment efficacy and outcome studies, comparison studies, and prevention programs. (EV)

  9. [Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. Psychological considerations for its treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barriguete Meléndez, J Armando; Rojo, Luis; Emmelhainz, Marisa

    2004-11-01

    It is presented the current perspectives in the study and treatment of the eating disorders, in specific: anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, epidemiology, and the interface among the different medical specialties, nutrition and sciences of the behavior, the diagnostic approaches, instruments and current therapeutic models.

  10. Biological Aspects of Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Allan S.; Woodside, D. Blake

    1987-01-01

    Reviews biological factors relevant to the understanding of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. Considers the physical presentation of these disorders; the medical complications of starvation, binging, and purging; and the cognitive and behavioral effects of starvation. Reviews neurophysiological and neurochemical aspects of these illnesses and…

  11. Update on endocrine disturbances in anorexia nervosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Støving, R K; Hangaard, J; Hagen, C

    2001-01-01

    The marked endocrine changes that occur in anorexia nervosa have aroused a great deal of interest, and over the last decade much research has been conducted in this field. The endocrine disturbances are not specific to this disorder, as they also occur in starvation states secondary to other causes...... of the large body of literature concerning endocrine aspects of anorexia nervosa with the main focus on the latest results, which provide leads for potential etiological theories....

  12. Ödipale Konstellationen bei Anorexia nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Deegener, Günther

    1982-01-01

    Es wird davon ausgegangen, daß ödipale Konflikte bei der Therapie von Patienten mit Anorexia nervosa oft nicht genügend beachtet werden. Nach allgemeinen theoretischen Einführungen zum ödipalen Konflikt sowie der psychosexuellen Entwicklung im Rahmen verschiedener Modellvorstellungen werden diese Probleme dann speziell in den Zusammenhang der Psychodynamik und Pathogenese der Anorexia nervosa integriert. Die Darstellungen werden anhand eines Fallbeispiels verdeutlicht.

  13. New Insights in Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorwood, Philip; Blanchet-Collet, Corinne; Chartrel, Nicolas; Duclos, Jeanne; Dechelotte, Pierre; Hanachi, Mouna; Fetissov, Serguei; Godart, Nathalie; Melchior, Jean-Claude; Ramoz, Nicolas; Rovere-Jovene, Carole; Tolle, Virginie; Viltart, Odile; Epelbaum, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is classically defined as a condition in which an abnormally low body weight is associated with an intense fear of gaining weight and distorted cognitions regarding weight, shape, and drive for thinness. This article reviews recent evidences from physiology, genetics, epigenetics, and brain imaging which allow to consider AN as an abnormality of reward pathways or an attempt to preserve mental homeostasis. Special emphasis is put on ghrelino-resistance and the importance of orexigenic peptides of the lateral hypothalamus, the gut microbiota and a dysimmune disorder of neuropeptide signaling. Physiological processes, secondary to underlying, and premorbid vulnerability factors-the "pondero-nutritional-feeding basements"- are also discussed. PMID:27445651

  14. New Insights in Anorexia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorwood, Philip; Blanchet-Collet, Corinne; Chartrel, Nicolas; Duclos, Jeanne; Dechelotte, Pierre; Hanachi, Mouna; Fetissov, Serguei; Godart, Nathalie; Melchior, Jean-Claude; Ramoz, Nicolas; Rovere-Jovene, Carole; Tolle, Virginie; Viltart, Odile; Epelbaum, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is classically defined as a condition in which an abnormally low body weight is associated with an intense fear of gaining weight and distorted cognitions regarding weight, shape, and drive for thinness. This article reviews recent evidences from physiology, genetics, epigenetics, and brain imaging which allow to consider AN as an abnormality of reward pathways or an attempt to preserve mental homeostasis. Special emphasis is put on ghrelino-resistance and the importance of orexigenic peptides of the lateral hypothalamus, the gut microbiota and a dysimmune disorder of neuropeptide signaling. Physiological processes, secondary to underlying, and premorbid vulnerability factors—the “pondero-nutritional-feeding basements”- are also discussed. PMID:27445651

  15. Anorexia nervosa e retardo mental

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Trejger Kachani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Revisar a literatura pertinente, observando a prevalência, etiopatogenia, aspectos nutricionais, diagnóstico e tratamento da anorexia nervosa (AN em pacientes com retardo mental (RM. MÉTODO: Revisão bibliográfica realizada nos sistemas Medline, SciELO e PubMed usando os descritores "transtornos alimentares", "anorexia nervosa" e "retardo mental". RESULTADOS: A AN pode se manifestar de formas atípicas em indivíduos com RM, exigindo critérios diagnósticos específicos. O mais utilizado atualmente é o Diagnostic Criteria for Psychiatric Disorders for Use with Adults with Learning Disabilities/Mental Retardation, conhecido por DC-LC. A prevalência é incerta e o tratamento ainda não está estabelecido, apesar de exigir treinamento específico da equipe. A alimentação costuma ser "pobre" e alimentos que engordam normalmente são evitados. Na maioria das vezes, é difícil acessar a complexa psicopatologia da AN nesses pacientes, em virtude das dificuldades de obter o relato de insatisfação e/ou distorção da imagem corporal, baixa autoestima e crenças alimentares. CONCLUSÃO: Muitos fatores indicam a necessidade de maiores estudos de AN no RM, entre eles a falta de critérios diagnósticos próprios validados e diretrizes para tratamento. Paralelamente, o debate da forma de acesso à conceitualização e ao tratamento dos distúrbios da imagem corporal nessa população deve ser intensificado.

  16. The diet of an individual diagnosed with anorexia nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    SRBOVÁ, Martina

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this Bachelor thesis entitled "A diet of individual with a diagnosis of anorexia nervosa" was to monitor the content and quality of the diet of people with a diagnosis of anorexia nervosa. Anorexia nervosa is a very serious disease belonging to the group of eating disorders. The prevalence of this disease increases, to which primarily affect media and requirements of today's society excessively slender figure, other factors that influence the formation of anorexia nervosa include b...

  17. Recovery from adolescent onset anorexia nervosa : a longitudinal study

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Karin

    2007-01-01

    Anorexia Nervosa is a psychiatric illness with peak onset in ages 14-17. Most cases recover within a few years, but the illness can have a fatal outcome or long duration. Multifactor causes of anorexia nervosa include genetics, personality, family, and socio-cultural factors. This study measures mortality, recovery from anorexia nervosa, and psychosocial outcome of patients with adolescent onset anorexia nervosa that were treated in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in northern Sweden from 1980...

  18. "Fasting Girls": Reflections on Writing the History of Anorexia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumberg, Joan Jacobs

    1986-01-01

    Reflects on the history of anorexia nervosa among adolescent ("fasting") girls, suggesting that its psychodynamics have changed over time. Focuses on the social and cultural processes by which anorexia nervosa became a disease. Argues for a conception of anorexia nervosa that incorporates culture as well as biomedical and psychological models.…

  19. Dermatologic signs in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, M A; Gupta, A K; Haberman, H F

    1987-10-01

    The dermatologic changes in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa may be the first signs to give the clinician a clue that an eating disorder is present, as many of these patients either deny their symptoms or secretly refuse to comply with treatment. The dermatologic signs are a result of (1) starvation or malnutrition, eg, lanugolike body hair, asteatotic skin, brittle hair and nails, and carotenodermia; (2) self-induced vomiting, eg, hand calluses, dental enamel erosion, gingivitis, and a Sjögrenlike syndrome; (3) use of laxatives, diuretics, or emetics and their dermatologic side effects; and (4) other concomitant psychiatric illness, eg, hand dermatitis from compulsive handwashing. Further, as most of the cutaneous signs are not specific to anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, failure to include eating disorders in the differential diagnosis may lead to misdiagnosis of the cutaneous symptoms. PMID:3310913

  20. Cognitive processes in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper, Myra; Fairburn, Christopher G.; Clark, David M.; David Clark; Christopher Fairburn

    1991-01-01

    The series of studies reported in this thesis aimed to improve our knowledge of the cognitive disturbance in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. Techniques from experimental cognitive psychology were used to test predictions made by cognitive theories of eating disorders. In the first study, subjects performed three tasks related to eating, weight and shape and self-statements were measured using concurrent verbalisation and a selfreport questionnaire. Compared to dieters ...

  1. [Zinc in patients with anorexia nervosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Røijen, S B; Worsaae, U; Zlotnik, G

    1991-03-01

    In a multicenter study, the relation between zinc status and anorexia nervosa was studied in 18 patients (15 females and 3 males in the age range of 11 to 25 years). Analysis of plasma zinc (by atomic absorption), plasma albumin (by electro-immuno diffusion method) and sense of taste (comparing quinine, zinc sulfate and water solutions), showed no significant abnormalities. Thus, the investigation does not support the hypothesis, that zinc status plays a significant role in the symptomatology of anorexia nervosa. PMID:2008719

  2. Anorexia nervosa: un estudio de casos

    OpenAIRE

    Lillyana Zusman Tinman

    2013-01-01

    La Anorexia Nervosa es un trastorno de alimentación que se define (etimológicamente) como una "pérdida nerviosa del apetito". Se caracteriza por la actitud consciente, voluntaria y rotunda de los sujetos  de tener un exceso de peso que intentan modificar por vía de la inanición. A partir del estudio de casos, se propone la distinción entre una Anorexia Nervosa Estructural -aquella en la que predomina el conflicto intrapsíquico primario y arcaico, y que manifiesta una conducta aislada y retraí...

  3. Normal gastric antral myoelectrical activity in early onset anorexia nervosa.

    OpenAIRE

    Ravelli, A M; Helps, B A; Devane, S P; Lask, B D; Milla, P J

    1993-01-01

    Anorexia, epigastric discomfort, nausea, and vomiting may result from disordered gastric motility and emptying. These features have been found in many adults with anorexia nervosa, but have never been investigated in early onset anorexia nervosa. In 14 patients with early onset anorexia nervosa (eight of whom had upper gastrointestinal tract symptoms), six children with other eating disorders, four children with non-ulcer dyspepsia, and 10 controls matched for age and sex, the non-invasive te...

  4. Reward processing in anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Charlotte; Tilbrook, Alan J; Rossell, Susan L; Enticott, Peter G; Fitzgerald, Paul B

    2012-04-01

    Individuals with anorexia nervosa (AN) demonstrate a relentless engagement in behaviors aimed to reduce their weight, which leads to severe underweight status, and occasionally death. Neurobiological abnormalities, as a consequence of starvation are controversial: evidence, however, demonstrates abnormalities in the reward system of patients, and recovered individuals. Despite this, a unifying explanation for reward abnormalities observed in AN and their relevance to symptoms of the illness, remains incompletely understood. Theories explaining reward dysfunction have conventionally focused on anhedonia, describing that patients have an impaired ability to experience reward or pleasure. We review taste reward literature and propose that patients' reduced responses to conventional taste-reward tasks may reflect a fear of weight gain associated with the caloric nature of the tasks, rather than an impaired ability to experience reward. Consistent with this, we propose that patients are capable of 'liking' hedonic taste stimuli (e.g., identifying them), however, they do not 'want' or feel motivated for the stimuli in the same way that healthy controls report. Recent brain imaging data on more complex reward processing tasks provide insights into fronto-striatal neural circuit dysfunction related to altered reward processing in AN that challenges the relevance of anhedonia in explaining reward dysfunction in AN. In this way, altered activity of the anterior cingulate cortex and striatum could explain patients' pathological engagement in behaviors they consider rewarding (e.g., self-starvation) that are otherwise aversive or punishing, to those without the eating disorder. Such evidence for altered patterns of brain activity associated with reward processing tasks in patients and recovered individuals may provide important information about mechanisms underlying symptoms of AN, their future investigation, and the development of treatment approaches. PMID:22349445

  5. Psychosomatic syndromes and anorexia nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbate-Daga Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In spite of the role of some psychosomatic factors as alexithymia, mood intolerance, and somatization in both pathogenesis and maintenance of anorexia nervosa (AN, few studies have investigated the prevalence of psychosomatic syndromes in AN. The aim of this study was to use the Diagnostic Criteria for Psychosomatic Research (DCPR to assess psychosomatic syndromes in AN and to evaluate if psychosomatic syndromes could identify subgroups of AN patients. Methods 108 AN inpatients (76 AN restricting subtype, AN-R, and 32 AN binge-purging subtype, AN-BP were consecutively recruited and psychosomatic syndromes were diagnosed with the Structured Interview for DCPR. Participants were asked to complete psychometric tests: Body Shape Questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory, Eating Disorder Inventory–2, and Temperament and Character Inventory. Data were submitted to cluster analysis. Results Illness denial (63% and alexithymia (54.6% resulted to be the most common syndromes in our sample. Cluster analysis identified three groups: moderate psychosomatic group (49%, somatization group (26%, and severe psychosomatic group (25%. The first group was mainly represented by AN-R patients reporting often only illness denial and alexithymia as DCPR syndromes. The second group showed more severe eating and depressive symptomatology and frequently DCPR syndromes of the somatization cluster. Thanatophobia DCPR syndrome was also represented in this group. The third group reported longer duration of illness and DCPR syndromes were highly represented; in particular, all patients were found to show the alexithymia DCPR syndrome. Conclusions These results highlight the need of a deep assessment of psychosomatic syndromes in AN. Psychosomatic syndromes correlated differently with both severity of eating symptomatology and duration of illness: therefore, DCPR could be effective to achieve tailored treatments.

  6. [Impaired theory of mind in anorexia nervosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gál, Zita; Egyed, Katalin; Pászthy, Bea; Németh, Dezsö

    2011-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a severe mental illness, which is characterized by a continuously growing occurrence in the population and by the shift of the onset for earlier ages. The understanding of factors playing role in AN and the importance of effective prevention is an essential issue in science as well as in the society. AN also affects the social domain of life, patients with AN may exhibit impaired social interaction, social isolation, difficulties in emotion recognition and egocentric thinking in cognitive processing. Therefore, the aim of present study was to investigate the theory of mind (ToM) deficits is anorexia nervosa. Although previous studies have reported ToM deficits in autism and in schizophrenia, the number of studies investigating ToM functioning in eating disorders are particularly low. Even though ToM difficulties, such as the affective ToM impairments were found in AN, however, the evidence of cognitive ToM deficits in anorexia patients is still lacking. Twenty anorexia nervosa patients and 20 healthy control adolescent girls participated in the experiment. EDI, BAT, Fallon-Rozin Test and Anamoprhic Micro Body Image Assesment Programme questionnaires and body-image tests were applied to discriminate anorexia nervosa group from healthy control group. The Hungarian version of Faux Pas Recognition Test was applied to evaluate ToM functioning. Compared to healthy control group, impairment in ToM functioning was found in AN group, especially in affective mental state attribution. Our results can raise new aspects for research, therapy and prevention of anorexia nervosa.

  7. Compulsory Treatment in Anorexia Nervosa : A Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elzakkers, Isis F. F. M.; Danner, Unna N.; Hoek, Hans W.; Schmidt, Ulrike; van Elburg, Annemarie A.

    2014-01-01

    ObjectiveCompulsory in-patient refeeding of patients with severe anorexia nervosa (AN) has caused considerable controversy. The effects of such treatment on longer-term outcome are not well known. The objective of this article is to review the evidence on the outcome of compulsory treatment for AN.

  8. Compulsory treatment in anorexia nervosa : A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elzakkers, Isis F F M; Danner, Unna N; Hoek, Hans W; Schmidt, Ulrike; van Elburg, Annemarie A

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Compulsory in-patient refeeding of patients with severe anorexia nervosa (AN) has caused considerable controversy. The effects of such treatment on longer-term outcome are not well known. The objective of this article is to review the evidence on the outcome of compulsory treatment for AN

  9. Behavioral neuroendocrinology and treatment of anorexia nervosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sodersten, P.; Nergardh, R.; Bergh, C.; Zandian, M.; Scheurink, A.

    2008-01-01

    Outcome in anorexia nervosa remains poor and a new way of looking at this condition is therefore needed. To this aim, we review the effects of food restriction and starvation in humans. It is suggested that body weight remains stable and relatively low when the access to food requires a considerable

  10. Male Anorexia Nervosa: A New Focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosscope-Happel, Cindy; Hutchins, David E.; Getz, Hildy G.; Hayes, Gerald L.

    2000-01-01

    Although anorexia nervosa affects over one million males yearly, it is often misdiagnosed or overlooked by mental health and medical practitioners. This article brings the problem to the forefront and outlines features that are unique to these males. Greater recognition of the disorder can lead to more accurate diagnoses and, subsequently, better…

  11. The Physical Educator and Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, Felicia F.

    1984-01-01

    The physical education teacher is in an advantageous position to observe a student who may have anorexia nervosa. Severe weight loss, hyperactivity, body image delusion, and amenorrhea are symptoms of this behavior disorder. Implications for the physical education teacher and athletic coach are offered. (DF)

  12. Anorexia Nervosa--A Teacher's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittner, Max

    The paper describes the physical and psychological symptoms of anorexia nervosa, treatment methods, and implications for the classroom. A rationale is offered for the predominance of upper-middle and upper class female adolescents in the anorectic population. Four models of treatment for the anorectic individual are considered: medical,…

  13. Juvenile Anorexia Nervosa: Family Therapy's Natural Niche

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, H. Charles

    2006-01-01

    Juvenile Anorexia Nervosa (AN) is a severe problem both in terms of presenting symptomatology and its tendency toward chronicity. Researchers have consistently shown that family-based approaches are superior to individual approaches for the treatment of juvenile AN. This article addresses the capacity deficit of trained family therapists to treat…

  14. Anorexia Nervosa with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pani, Adyapad; Santra, Gouranga; Biswas, Kali Das

    2015-09-01

    We report the case of an adolescent female, previously nonobese, belonging to educated average socioeconomic Muslim family. She stopped taking food, developed a perception of distorted body image with occasional episodes of binge eating and forced vomiting. She became amenorrheic and emaciated with loss of secondary sexual characters. She satisfied the criteria for anorexia nervosa with obsessive-compulsive disorder. PMID:27608877

  15. Body representation disturbances in anorexia nervosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keizer, A.

    2014-01-01

    One of the main symptoms of anorexia nervosa (AN) is a disturbed experience of body size and shape. Although patients are underweight, they experience their body as bigger than it in reality is. Previous studies were mainly conducted by (clinical) psychologists and psychiatrists, and almost exclusiv

  16. Anorexia Nervosa: Its Symptoms and Possible Cures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingaman, David E.

    This document presents a definition and description of anorexia nervosa as a disorder that occurs predominantly in girls and that can affect 1 out of every 250 girls between the ages of 12 and 18 years. The existence of a distorted mental body image among anorexics is discussed and symptoms of the disorder are described, including amenorrhea…

  17. Family Patterns Associated with Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigg, Darryl N.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Used family systems perspective to explore familial transactional patterns related to anorexia nervosa among 22 families with an anorexic child and 22 matched control families. Identified 7 family groups with unique family dynamics differentiating one from another. With no single family pattern characterizing families of anorexics, results…

  18. Eco-Systemic Analysis of Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppy, Margarette I.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Tested eco-systemic approach to understanding of anorexia nervosa. Compared 30 anorexics and parents to 34 matched control subjects and parents. Found that, compared to controls, families of anorexics were less supportive, helpful, and committed to each other. Family interactions perceived by anorexics were characterized by overprotective,…

  19. Anorexia Nervosa in Chinese Adolescents: Does Culture Make a Difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Kelly Y. C.

    2000-01-01

    Reports on clinical and psychosocial characteristics of 16 Chinese adolescents from Hong Kong with anorexia nervosa. Over 80% of these patients expressed a fear of fatness. Against the background of increasing Westernization of Hong Kong society, anorexia is taking on a Western pattern, in congruence with the notion that anorexia nervosa is a…

  20. Diagnosed Anxiety Disorders and the Risk of Subsequent Anorexia Nervosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Sandra M; Bulik, Cynthia M; Thornton, Laura M;

    2015-01-01

    Anxiety disorders and anorexia nervosa are frequently acknowledged to be highly comorbid conditions, but still, little is known about the clinical and aetiological cohesion of specific anxiety diagnoses and anorexia nervosa. Using the comprehensive Danish population registers, we aimed to determine...... the risk of anorexia nervosa in patients with register-detected severe anxiety disorders. We also explored whether parental psychopathology was associated with offspring's anorexia nervosa. Anxiety disorders increased the risk of subsequent anorexia nervosa, with the highest risk observed in obsessive......-compulsive disorder. Especially, male anxiety patients were at an increased risk for anorexia nervosa. Furthermore, an increased risk was observed in offspring of fathers with panic disorder. A diagnosis of an anxiety disorder, specifically obsessive-compulsive disorder, constitutes a risk factor for subsequent...

  1. [Anorexia nervosa as differential diagnosis in underweight patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapps, Nora; Skoda, Eva; Zipfel, Stephan

    2016-02-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a differential diagnosis in underweight patients, especially in young underweight women. Diagnostic criteria for anorexia nervosa are self-induced weight loss due to restrictive eating or purging behaviour, intense fear of gaining weight and disturbance in the way in which one`s shape is experienced, undue influence of body weight on self-evaluation and persistent lack of recognition of the seriousness of the current low body weight. Anorexia nervosa is associated with numerous medical complications. PMID:26886039

  2. Social Cognition in Child and Adolescents with Anorexia Nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    ipek Percinel; Kemal Utku Yazici; Oznur Bilac; Sezen Kose; Burcu Ozbaran

    2015-01-01

    Social cognition represents the mental processes of social interaction between oneself and others. In recent years, the interest in social cognition skills has increased in cases with eating disorders. Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder that is associated with the multiple factors in etiology. Treatment of anorexia nervosa is still controversial. The youths diagnosed with anorexia nervosa are known to be as the most difficult group in eating disorders for building therapeutic relations...

  3. The role of zinc in anorexia nervosa: etiology and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakan, R

    1979-07-01

    Zinc deficiency may play a role in the etiology of anorexia nervosa. The symptoms of anorexia nervosa and zinc deficiency are similar in a number of respects, e.g., weight loss, loss of appetite, amenorrhea in females, impotence in males, nausea and skin lesions. In both conditions females under 25 are most at risk. Stress, estrogen and dietary habits may also be involved in the complex of factors which create or exacerbate a zinc deficiency and result in anorexia nervosa. It is proposed that effectiveness in the treatment of anorexia nervosa. PMID:514114

  4. Dysthymia in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes Borda-Más

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Este estudio ex post facto analiza la presencia de distimia en 155 mujeres. Noventa y tres pacientes cumplían los criterios diagnósticos para un trastorno de la conducta alimentaria (TCA: 31 con anorexia nerviosa restrictiva (ANr, 31 con anorexia nerviosa purgativa/bulímica (ANp y 31 con bulimia nerviosa purgativa (BNp; y 62 mujeres constituían los dos grupos comparativos: 31 con alto riesgo de padecer un TCA (grupo comparativo sintomático: GC-S y 31 sin patología conocida (grupo comparativo no sintomático: GC-NS. Todas ellas cumplimentaron la versión española del MCMI-II. En los resultados encontramos diferencias significativas en las medias obtenidas por los grupos con TCA respecto a los dos grupos comparativos, y que presentaban el posible síndrome distímico [puntuaciones Tasa Base (TB > 74] el 50% de las pacientes con ANr, el 60% con ANp y el 63,30% de las pacientes con BNp. Sólo el 16,70% de las mujeres de alto riesgo y el 5,70% de las mujeres sin patología lo presentaban. Estos hallazgos indican que el síndrome distímico es frecuente en las mujeres con TCA, y en aquellas que presentan conductas purgativas aumenta levemente la severidad del mismo.

  5. Effectiveness of psychopharmacology in Anorexia Nervosa treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zadka Lukasz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The eating disorder that generates the highest death rate is that of anorexia nervosa, and current treatment is a combination of equalization of somatic state and patient education. Moreover, psychical symptoms occurring in the course of anorexia nervosa are thought to have a crucial influence on the course of the disease. Hence, in medical literature, the effectiveness of psychotherapeutic interventions is also widely described. Still, the implementation of appropriate psychopharmacology is now considered an additional method of treatment, rather than a therapy of choice. Yet, in spite of many years of research, there are no absolute recommendations given, nor are instructions within the scope of psychopharmacological treatment proffered, although the selection of psychopharmacological items must respect both the patient’s psychic and somatic states. In recent years, the popularity of psychopharmacological treatment has increased; therefore, we feel that it is justified to present the latest scientific information in this respect.

  6. Treatment of anorexia nervosa with antidepressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, J I; Pope, H G; Jonas, J M; Yurgelun-Todd, D

    1985-02-01

    Nine patients with anorexia nervosa were treated with antidepressant medications from three classes: tricyclics, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, and triazolopyridines. A tenth patient was treated with the combination of lithium carbonate and carbamazepine. With either the initial or a subsequent medication trial, four patients had displayed significant improvement in weight and in other anorexic and bulimic symptoms. Three additional patients had a marked or moderate improvement in bulimic symptoms, one with moderate and two without any weight gain. Two other patients had moderate weight gain. Side effects were a significant problem in many of the patients. These preliminary results suggest that antidepressants may be of benefit in the treatment of some patients with anorexia nervosa. PMID:3919068

  7. Olfactory identification ability in anorexia nervosa.

    OpenAIRE

    Kopala, L C; Good, K; Goldner, E M; Birmingham, C L

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The hypothesis tested was that patients with severe eating disorders would demonstrate olfactory identification deficits as a result of zinc deficiency or malnutrition. METHOD: The University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT) was administered to 27 hospitalized female patients with anorexia nervosa and 50 normal control female subjects. For a subgroup of patients, serum zinc levels and body mass indices were obtained at pre- and post-nutritional repletion phases. RE...

  8. [Role of leptin in anorexia nervosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccioni, G; D'Orazio, N; Menna, V; Lambo, M S; Guagnano, M T; Di Ilio, C

    2003-01-01

    Anorexia and bulimia nervosa are the main psychiatric disorders characterised by abnormal models of feeding and perception of people's personal physical appearance and weight. These symptoms are associated with a severe psychosocial uneasiness that leads to severe medical complications and this, to its turn, has a big impact on morbidity and sick rate of general population. Although researchers have made big improvements in individualising some likely pathogenic mechanisms that include different factors (genetic, neurochemical and sociocultural) and psychological development, the pathogenesis of these kinds of feeding disorders is still unknown. Leptina is a neurochemical factor particularly relevant. It is a 17 KD hormone, produced by adipocytes. At hypothalamic level, it is essential for regulating body weight and body development. Recent studies have identified some factors responsible for the production and the secretion of leptina. They are micro and macronurishing factors, hormones and the sympatic neurotic system that is the most important among them. It plays a very important role for some disorders of feeding behaviour, specifically for the anorexia nervosa, where we notice a reduction of leptina levels strictly correlated to a reduction of the fat component. Since anorexia nervosa is associated to medical, nourishing and psychological components, it involves different areas and needs complete measurement and administration. Therefore the approach to this kind of pathology has necessarily to predict a multidisciplinary administration of patients. The aim of our work has been to point out the possible interactions between leptina and the development and progression of anorexia nervosa, on the basis of recent works and reviews in medical literature. PMID:14994520

  9. Body perception and evaluation in anorexia nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Lutz, Annika

    2015-01-01

    Body image disturbance is a prominent feature in anorexia nervosa (AN) and encompasses alterations across the different dimensions of body image, that is, perception, affect, cognition, and behaviour. There is a wealth of research regarding the subjective experience of body image disturbance and evidence for underlying neuronal alterations is beginning to emerge. The present project was designed to assess basic processes underlying body image disturbance with the help of psychophysiological m...

  10. Anorexia nervosa complicating inflammatory bowel disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Mallett, P; MURCH, S.

    1990-01-01

    Two cases of inflammatory bowel disease, occurring in adolescence and complicated by anorexia nervosa, are presented. The management of the bowel disease with corticosteroids appeared to precipitate the eating disorder in one case whereas covert withdrawal of steroid treatment led to life threatening complications of inflammatory bowel disease in the other. The difficulties of managing two serious conditions, each ideally treated in a specialist centre, are discussed and the dangers of treati...

  11. Anorexia nervosa and food avoidance emotional disorder.

    OpenAIRE

    Higgs, J F; Goodyer, I M; Birch, J.

    1989-01-01

    A retrospective and longitudinal study was carried out on all children and adolescents who presented to a child psychiatry service over a period of 26 years to identify the nature, course, and outcome of cases meeting criteria for anorexia nervosa (n = 27). Two groups of the same age were identified for comparison, firstly those with food avoidance and emotional disorders (n = 23), and secondly those with emotional disorders but no symptoms associated with eating (n = 22). The results confirm...

  12. Anorexia Nervosa : Emotion, Cognition, and Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Parling, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a serious disorder with long-term consequences for those afflicted. No evidence-based care is available for adults with full or subthreshold AN. The thesis research investigated aspects of emotion and cognition relevant to the maintenance of AN that might inform psychological treatment. In addition, the effectiveness of a recent psychotherapy model of AN was investigated. Study I investigated alexithymia and emotional awareness and their associations with depression, ...

  13. The Significance of Bradycardia in Anorexia Nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Yahalom, Malka; Spitz, Marcelo; Sandler, Ludmila; Heno, Nawaf; Roguin, Nathan; Turgeman, Yoav

    2013-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a life-threatening condition, with a significant risk for death, due to cardiovascular complications. It is characterized by abnormal eating behavior and has the highest mortality rate of all psychiatric disorders. It has been associated with bradycardia (a heart rate [HR] of less than 60 beats per minute) (up to 95%), hypotension, mitral valve prolapse, and heart failure. The diagnosis of AN can be elusive, and more than half of all cases are undetected. The purpose ...

  14. Anorexia nervosa y terapia del comportamiento

    OpenAIRE

    Alfonso Martínez Taboas

    1981-01-01

    The clinical effectiveness of therapeutic techníques for the treatment of anorexia nervosa are reviewed. The most commonly used technique has been operant conditioning, of proved efficacy in the hospital but not always in the natural environment of the patient. Many cases su.ccessfuUy.treated show recovery of the problem. Recent atudies extend the treatment to the family and consider all the variables involved in the behavior. Severa! methodological shortcomings of the re...

  15. Factors Associated With Recovery from Anorexia Nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Zerwas, Stephanie; Lund, Brian C.; Holle, Ann Von; Thornton, Laura M.; Berrettini, Wade H.; Brandt, Harry; Crawford, Steven; Fichter, Manfred M.; Halmi, Katherine A.; Johnson, Craig; Kaplan, Allan S.; La Via, Maria; Mitchell, James; Rotondo, Alessandro; Strober, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies of prognostic factors of anorexia nervosa (AN) course and recovery have followed clinical populations after treatment discharge. This retrospective study examined the association between prognostic factors—eating disorder features, personality traits, and psychiatric comorbidity—and likelihood of recovery in a large sample of women with AN participating in a multi-site genetic study. The study included 680 women with AN. Recovery was defined as the offset of AN symptoms if th...

  16. Bone Metabolism in Adolescents with Anorexia Nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Misra, Madhusmita; Klibanski, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Adolescents with anorexia nervosa (AN) are at risk for low bone mass at multiple sites, associated with decreased bone turnover. Bone microarchitecture is also affected, with a decrease in bone trabecular volume and trabecular thickness, and an increase in trabecular separation. The adolescent years are typically the time when marked increases occur in bone mass accrual towards the attainment of peak bone mass, an important determinant of bone health and fracture risk in later life. AN often ...

  17. Extreme Achalasia Presenting as Anorexia Nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Goldsmith, P. J.; Decadt, B.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Achalasia may lead to cachexia if not diagnosed in an early stage. Surgery in cachectic patients is hazardous and complications may result in a protracted recovery or even death. Different treatment options have been described. In this paper, we report a stepwise surgical laparoscopic approach which appears to be safe and effective. Methods. Over a one-year period, a patient with a body mass index (BMI) below 17 being treated for anorexia nervosa was referred with dysphagia. Becau...

  18. OLANZAPINE TREATMENT IN ANOREXIA NERVOSA: CASE REPORT

    OpenAIRE

    Dadić-Hero, Elizabeta; Ružić, Klementina; Pernar, Mirjana; Kabalin, Milena; Medved, Paola

    2009-01-01

    A 15 year old patient suffering from psychiatric disturbances looked for psychiatric help but refused hospital admission. Following an ambulatory treatment, the patient was diagnosed with Anorexia nervosa. The patient, a girl, was 175 centimeters tall, weighting only 39 kilos. Within the clinical picture, there were few dominant disorders present; anxiety, depression, low self-esteem, fear of feminization, with recurrent psychotic episodes. By the implementation of an intensive psychothera...

  19. Hematological abnormalities in severe anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabel, Allison L; Gaudiani, Jennifer L; Statland, Barbara; Mehler, Philip S

    2013-05-01

    Little is known about the prevalence of hematologic abnormalities in adults with severe anorexia nervosa. We report the first major analysis of hematologic dysfunction in such patients. We retrospectively analyzed the charts of 53 men and women with severe anorexia nervosa, admitted between October 2008 and December 2010 for medical stabilization to our center, which has a national referral base. Patients were predominantly female (89 %), with a median age of 28 years (range 17-65), and were hospitalized for a median duration of 15 days (I.Q.R. 9-29). Nadir body mass index during hospitalization was markedly low at 12.4 kg/m(2) (range 8.4-15.7), and the mean discharge BMI was 13.8 kg/m(2) (range 10.2-16.8). 83 % of patients were anemic (hematocrit  400 k/μL) during their hospitalization. Eighty-nine percent of patients had resolved their neutropenia by discharge. Marked hematologic deficiencies are often present in patients with severe anorexia nervosa, generally attributed to starvation-mediated gelatinous marrow transformation which resolves with proper nutritional rehabilitation. Improved provider awareness of this association may reduce unnecessary testing and costly treatment interventions.

  20. Refeeding Hypophosphatemia in Adolescents With Anorexia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, Dasha

    2013-01-01

    The rate of adolescents presenting with anorexia nervosa (AN) is increasing. Medically unstable adolescents are admitted to the hospital for nutrition restoration. A lack of global consensus on appropriate refeeding practices of malnourished patients has resulted in inconsistent refeeding practices. Refeeding hypophosphatemia (RH) is the most common complication associated with refeeding the malnourished patient. This review sought to identify the range of refeeding rates adopted globally and the implication that total energy intake and malnutrition may have on RH while refeeding adolescents with anorexia nervosa. Studies were identified by a systematic electronic search of medical databases from 1980 to September 2012. Seventeen publications were identified, including 6 chart reviews, 1 observational study, and 10 case reports, with a total of 1039 subjects. The average refeeding energy intake was 1186 kcal/d, ranging from 125–1900 kcal/d, with a mean percentage median body mass index (% mBMI) of 78%. The average incidence rate of RH was 14%. A significant correlation between malnutrition (% mBMI) and post-refeeding phosphate was identified (R 2 = 0.6, P = .01). This review highlights the disparity in refeeding rates adopted internationally in treating malnourished adolescents with anorexia nervosa. Based on this review, the severity of malnutrition seems to be a marker for the development of RH more so than total energy intake. PMID:23459608

  1. The CT appearance of ''reversible'' cerebral pseudoatrophy in anorexia nervosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CT appearance of ''reversible'' cerebral pseudoatrophy resulting from anorexia nervosa was demonstrated. The CT studies were performed in 3 young women with typical clinical course of anorexia nervosa. In all of them computed tomography revealed dilatation of the subarachnoid fluid space. After 5 months of therapy the follow-up scans have reverted to normal in all cases. (author)

  2. Special Issue: Outcome of Anorexia Nervosa with Teenage Onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casper, Regina C., Ed.

    1996-01-01

    The articles of this special issue report on studies of the outcomes of treatment of adolescent anorexia nervosa. These studies leave no doubt about the mortality risk and debilitating nature of chronic anorexia nervosa, but they do suggest that the prognosis, given expert treatment, is favorable for the most part. (SLD)

  3. Anorexia Nervosa: A Misdiagnosis of the Adolescent Male.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svec, Henry

    1987-01-01

    Discusses rarity of anorexia nervosa among male population with primary reference to differences from female symptomatology. Presents case which implies that anorexia nervosa in the male may be a marker for other more severe pathology. Presents findings which suggest a diagnostic strategy based on familial, behavioral, environmental, educational,…

  4. An Adolescent with Anorexia Nervosa – A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Khairani, O; Majmin, SH; Saharuddin, A; Loh, SF; Azimah, NM; Tohid, H

    2011-01-01

    This case report illustrates an adolescent with clinical presentation of moderate anorexia nervosa with no significant co-morbidities. It highlights the management of anorexia nervosa in the outpatient setting by a multi-disciplinary health care team which includes a family physician, a dietician, a psychologist and a child psychiatrist.

  5. Adrenal Glucocorticoid and Androgen Precursor Dissociation in Anorexia Nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Lawson, E. A.; Misra, M.; Meenaghan, E; Rosenblum, L.; Donoho, D. A.; Herzog, D.; Klibanski, A.; Miller, K K

    2009-01-01

    Context: Anorexia nervosa is characterized by hypogonadism and relative hypercortisolemia. We have demonstrated that free testosterone levels are low in women with anorexia nervosa, with the lowest levels in those receiving oral contraceptives (OCPs), and that dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) sulfate is reduced only in those receiving OCPs.

  6. Anorexia nervosa: an increasing problem in children and adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Halmi, Katherine A.

    2009-01-01

    Information from eating disorder clinics across five continents suggests that anorexia nervosa is becoming an increasing problem in children and young adolescents. There is some indication that anxiety disorders in childhood may be a major risk factor for the development of anorexia nervosa. Early recognition and family treatment for this disorder are essential to prevent chronic impairment.

  7. Anorexia nervosa associated with energy-wasting disorders.

    OpenAIRE

    Sreenivasan, U.

    1984-01-01

    Some patients with anorexia nervosa and energy-wasting disorders have been found to be able to use their illness to lose weight. This paper presents two patients with diabetes mellitus and one with ulcerative colitis in whom the illness was complicated by anorexia nervosa.

  8. The paradoxical nature of sexuality in anorexia nervosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuiten, A; Panhuysen, G; Everaerd, W; Koppeschaar, H; Krabbe, P; Zelissen, P

    1993-01-01

    Psychosexual dysfunctioning is often put forward as an etiological factor in anorexia nervosa. In contrast, we hypothesize that anorexia nervosa patients were in general psychosexually normal before their illness, and that the problems in their sexual life arise only after the emergence of hypogonad

  9. Bullae, Bronchiectasis and Nutritional Emphysema in Severe Anorexia Nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria J Cook

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available STUDY OBJECTIVES: Pulmonary complications of anorexia nervosa are rarely documented. The case of a patient with anorexia nervosa and pulmonary disease is presented, a new quantitative computed tomography (CT method for the detection of emphysema is employed, the literature is reviewed and the concept of 'nutritional' emphysema is discussed.

  10. Death Related Themes in Anorexia Nervosa: A Practical Exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Janice; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Explored death-related themes in psychodynamic etiology of anorexia nervosa by comparing anorexic adolescent patients (n=28) to age-matched controls (n=238). Results suggest that death-related themes are of significance in the understanding and management of anorexia nervosa. (Author/ABL)

  11. Symptoms, Causes and Possible Treatment of Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odebunmi, Akin

    This document provides research findings, a discussion of etiology, case studies, and treatment approaches for anorexia nervosa. The research findings classify the anorexic patient by sex, age, presenting characteristics, socioeconomic status, premorbid personality, and cultural and familial characteristics. The etiology of anorexia nervosa is…

  12. A longitudinal investigation of mortality in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franko, Debra L; Keshaviah, Aparna; Eddy, Kamryn T; Krishna, Meera; Davis, Martha C; Keel, Pamela K; Herzog, David B

    2013-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Although anorexia nervosa has a high mortality rate, our understanding of the timing and predictors of mortality in eating disorders is limited. The authors investigated mortality in a long-term study of patients with eating disorders. METHOD Beginning in 1987, 246 treatment-seeking female patients with anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa were interviewed every 6 months for a median of 9.5 years to obtain weekly ratings of eating disorder symptoms, comorbidity, treatment participation, and psychosocial functioning. From January 2007 to December 2010 (median follow-up of 20 years), vital status was ascertained with a National Death Index search. RESULTS Sixteen deaths (6.5%) were recorded (lifetime anorexia nervosa, N=14; bulimia nervosa with no history of anorexia nervosa, N=2). The standardized mortality ratio was 4.37 (95% CI=2.4-7.3) for lifetime anorexia nervosa and 2.33 (95% CI=0.3-8.4) for bulimia nervosa with no history of anorexia nervosa. Risk of premature death among patients with lifetime anorexia nervosa peaked within the first 10 years of follow-up, resulting in a standardized mortality ratio of 7.7 (95% CI=3.7-14.2). The standardized mortality ratio varied by duration of illness and was 3.2 (95% CI=0.9-8.3) for patients with lifetime anorexia nervosa for 0 to 15 years (4/119 died), and 6.6 (95% CI=3.2-12.1) for those with lifetime anorexia nervosa for >15 to 30 years (10/67 died). Multivariate predictors of mortality included alcohol abuse, low body mass index, and poor social adjustment. CONCLUSIONS These findings highlight the need for early identification and intervention and suggest that a long duration of illness, substance abuse, low weight, and poor psychosocial functioning raise the risk for mortality in anorexia nervosa.

  13. Anorexia nervosa e gravidez: relato de caso Anorexia nervosa and pregnancy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano Gonçalves Nery

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Relata-se o caso de uma adolescente de 18 anos que desenvolveu quadro de hiperemese gravídica seguida de anorexia nervosa durante sua primeira gravidez, chegando a índice de massa corporal (IMC de 14,3 Kg/m². Os sintomas apresentados remitiram após o término prematuro da gestação. Apesar de a anorexia nervosa ser incomum na gravidez, seu diagnóstico é importante em virtude dos riscos para a saúde materna e fetal.The authors describe a case of an eighteen years-old adolescent who developed hyperemesis gravidarum followed by anorexia nervosa during her first pregnancy. Her body mass index (BMI achieved 14.3 Kg/m². The symptoms remitted after the premature delivery of the newborn. Although anorexia nervosa is uncommon in pregnancy, its diagnosis is important in view of the risks for the health of mother and fetus.

  14. [Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. II. Somatic complications of undernourishment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rijn, C A

    1998-08-15

    In anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, cachexia and deficient nourishment cause various physical abnormalities, especially of the endocrine and digestive systems and the heart. Disorders in the serotoninergic and dopaminergic systems contribute to development of an eating disorder, whereas an acquired deficiency of tryptophan impairs the serotoninergic system. Any problems of nutritional deficiencies, low blood sugar levels and gastrointestinal disorders disappear after normal nourishment is resumed. Hypotension and sinus bradycardia are manifestations of a physiological adjustment to a lower basal metabolism and need no treatment. Osteoporosis occurs from two years after the onset of weight loss; oestrogen supplementation may protect against this. In patients with infections, symptoms such as fever, leukocytosis and high BSE may be lacking. Hypoglycaemia incidentally leads to coma and death, and a lengthened QT interval to acute cardiac death. During restoration of the nutritional status, the intake of fluid and calories should initially be limited. During the first two weeks, the risk of cardiovascular complications is increased. PMID:9856167

  15. Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa: brains, bones and breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, Taylor B; Kreipe, Richard E

    2014-05-01

    Recent research has modified both the conceptualization and treatment of eating disorders. New diagnostic criteria reducing the "not otherwise specified" category should facilitate the early recognition and treatment of anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN). Technology-based studies identify AN and BN as "brain circuit" disorders; epidemiologic studies reveal that the narrow racial, ethnic and income profile of individuals no longer holds true for AN. The major organs affected long term-the brain and skeletal system-both respond to improved nutrition, with maintenance of body weight the best predictor of recovery. Twin studies have revealed gene x environment interactions, including both the external (social) and internal (pubertal) environments of boys and of girls. Family-based treatment has the best evidence base for effectiveness for younger patients. Medication plays a limited role in AN, but a major role in BN. Across diagnoses, the most important medicine is food.

  16. [Affective disorders in patients with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briukhin, A E; Onegina, E Iu

    2011-01-01

    Authors studied 109 patients with eating disorders, including 49 with anorexia nervosa (AN) and 60 with bulimia nervosa (BN), using psychopathological and experimental/psychological methods, psychometric scales and follow-up. Four variants (2 AN and 2 BN) of clinical presentations and dynamics of affective disorders were singled out. It has been shown that many features of their symptoms and responses of patients to the complex therapy (diet-, psycho- and pharmacotherapy) depend on the belonging of AN or BN to a group of borderline mental disorders or to endogenous diseases. Taking into account the revealed features of affective disorders, the authors have formulated recommendations for treatment tactics and prevention measures for these groups of patients.

  17. Anorexia nervosa: uma revisão

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eder Schmidt

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Os autores apresentam uma revisão de alguns pontos de vista com relação à anorexia nervosa. Alinham-se aspectos classificatórios, históricos, clínicos e terapêuticos. Reconhecida como a base para ocorrências místicas na Idade Média, foi entendida como uma apresentação histérica no século XVII, para tornar-se, logo em seguida, objeto das indagações freudianas. Discute-se a anorexia como uma apresentação da estrutura histérica, aqui abordada a partir dos conceitos freudianos sobre histeria, Édipo e feminino, e considerando-se o corpo físico como um mero suporte para articulações simbólicas. Para Freud, a anorexia nervosa seria um quadro pelo qual a histérica exprime sua aversão à sexualidade.

  18. Sexual function of women suffering from anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonidakis, Fragiskos; Kravvariti, Vasilliki; Varsou, Eleftheria

    2015-01-01

    The cross-sectional study aimed at examining the sexual function of young adult women suffering from eating disorders. The authors interviewed 53 women (26 with anorexia nervosa and 27 with bulimia nervosa) and 58 female students. Each participant was administered the Female Sexual Function Index, the Eating Attitudes Test, the Body Shape Questionnaire, and the Beck Depression Inventory. Comparisons among the 3 groups showed that patients with anorexia nervosa scored lower in each Female Sexual Function Index subscale than did healthy controls. There was no significant difference between bulimia nervosa and healthy controls. Sexual functionality of patients with anorexia nervosa was correlated only with body mass index (r = 0.5, p =.01). Sexual functionality of patients with bulimia nervosa was correlated only with the Beck Depression Inventory (r = -0.4, p =.03) Patients with anorexia nervosa had more disturbed sexual function than did controls. Sexual function can be related to the level of starvation and symptoms of depression.

  19. Young Women With Anorexia Nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Dahlborg Lyckhage

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to describe how young women living with self-identified anorexia narrate about their lives by blogging. Thirteen Swedish blogs were chosen and analyzed by means of qualitative content analysis. The results described falling ill, the illness itself, and the path to recovery. Low self-esteem, depressed state of mind, and self-destructive behavior were typical signs at the start of the illness. The women’s lives were characterized by a need for controlling their body by tormenting it and by the illness demanding all their concentration and energy. The women suffered from the feeling of being a disappointment to their family members. The illness was like an enemy that had to be defeated with the help of family members, health care professionals, and by means of therapy. A turning point occurred when the women felt at their worst or had tired of the illness and could concentrate on something other than their body and the eating disorder. Suffering from self-identified anorexia was described as experiencing low self-esteem. The illness took all of the women’s time and energy. For a turning point to be reached, the women needed support from family, friends, and health care professionals, including the use of distractions.

  20. Anorexia Nervosa: A Unified Neurological Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Hasan, Tasneem Fatema; Hasan, Hunaid

    2011-01-01

    The roles of corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF), opioid peptides, leptin and ghrelin in anorexia nervosa (AN) were discussed in this paper. CRF is the key mediator of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and also acts at various other parts of the brain, such as the limbic system and the peripheral nervous system. CRF action is mediated through the CRF1 and CRF2 receptors, with both HPA axis-dependent and HPA axis-independent actions, where the latter shows nil involvement of the a...

  1. Anorexia nervosa y terapia del comportamiento

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Martínez Taboas

    1981-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical effectiveness of therapeutic techníques for the treatment of anorexia nervosa are reviewed. The most commonly used technique has been operant conditioning, of proved efficacy in the hospital but not always in the natural environment of the patient. Many cases su.ccessfuUy.treated show recovery of the problem. Recent atudies extend the treatment to the family and consider all the variables involved in the behavior. Severa! methodological shortcomings of the research in the area are analyzed

  2. Medical management of acute severe anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norrington, Amy; Stanley, Ruth; Tremlett, Michael; Birrell, Ginny

    2012-04-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a common condition affecting young people. The medical management of AN on a general paediatric ward is challenging. It is important to identify young people who are at risk of medical complications, so early intervention can be instigated. This article aims to review the clinical practice and evidence supporting the current medical management of young people with AN. It provides a system-based approach to potential complications of the disease, guidance on feeding and the management of re-feeding syndrome. Approaches to legal and ethical challenges are also considered. While the importance of psychiatric treatment is recognised, the same is not discussed within this article.

  3. Anorexia nervosa: uma revisão

    OpenAIRE

    Eder Schmidt; Gustavo Ferreira da Mata

    2008-01-01

    Os autores apresentam uma revisão de alguns pontos de vista com relação à anorexia nervosa. Alinham-se aspectos classificatórios, históricos, clínicos e terapêuticos. Reconhecida como a base para ocorrências místicas na Idade Média, foi entendida como uma apresentação histérica no século XVII, para tornar-se, logo em seguida, objeto das indagações freudianas. Discute-se a anorexia como uma apresentação da estrutura histérica, aqui abordada a partir dos conceitos freudianos sobre histeria, Édi...

  4. Anorexia nervosa: a mistaken diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, Katie; Boggis, Nicola; Pandya, Nikila

    2016-01-01

    Eating disorders in the form of anorexia and bulimia are becoming increasingly common in young adults and children. Most of the patients are initially seen by their general practitioner (GP) and it may take several months before the facts are pieced together and an underlying eating disorder is identified. However, other medical conditions, albeit rare, should be considered when assessing these young adults as potentially missing them can lead to devastating consequences. This case highlights how a 15-year-old girl who presented to her GP with a history suggestive of an eating disorder and had a body mass index below the 0.4th centile, in fact had classical symptoms and clinical signs of primary adrenal failure, or Addison's disease. PMID:27005795

  5. Resting tachycardia, a warning sign in anorexia nervosa: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krantz Mori J

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among psychiatric disorders, anorexia nervosa has the highest mortality rate. During an exacerbation of this illness, patients frequently present with nonspecific symptoms. Upon hospitalization, anorexia nervosa patients are often markedly bradycardic, which may be an adaptive response to progressive weight loss and negative energy balance. When anorexia nervosa patients manifest tachycardia, even heart rates in the 80–90 bpm range, a supervening acute illness should be suspected. Case presentation A 52-year old woman with longstanding anorexia nervosa was hospitalized due to progressive leg pain, weakness, and fatigue accompanied by marked weight loss. On physical examination she was cachectic but in no apparent distress. She had fine lanugo-type hair over her face and arms with an erythematous rash noted on her palms and left lower extremity. Her blood pressure was 96/50 mm Hg and resting heart rate was 106 bpm though she appeared euvolemic. Laboratory tests revealed anemia, mild leukocytosis, and hypoalbuminemia. She was initially treated with enteral feedings for an exacerbation of anorexia nervosa, but increasing leukocytosis without fever and worsening left leg pain prompted the diagnosis of an indolent left lower extremity cellulitis. With antibiotic therapy her heart rate decreased to 45 bpm despite minimal restoration of body weight. Conclusions Bradycardia is a characteristic feature of anorexia nervosa particularly with significant weight loss. When anorexia nervosa patients present with nonspecific symptoms, resting tachycardia should prompt a search for potentially life-threatening conditions.

  6. Altered social reward and attention in anorexia nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karli K Watson

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Dysfunctional social reward and social orienting attend a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders including autism, schizophrenia, social anxiety, and psychopathy. Here we show that similar social reward and attention dysfunction attend anorexia nervosa, a disorder defined by avoidance of food and extreme weight loss. We measured the implicit reward value of social stimuli for female participants with (n=11 and without (n=11 anorexia nervosa using an econometric choice task and also tracked gaze patterns during free viewing of images of female faces and bodies. As predicted, the reward value of viewing bodies varied inversely with observed body weight for women with anorexia but not neurotypical women, in contrast with their explicit ratings of attractiveness. Surprisingly, women with anorexia nervosa, unlike neurotypical women, did not find female faces rewarding and avoided looking at both the face and eyes—independent of observed body weight. These findings demonstrate comorbid dysfunction in the neural circuits mediating gustatory and social reward in anorexia nervosa.

  7. Adipocytokines, gut hormones and growth factors in anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalska, Irina; Karczewska-Kupczewska, Monika; Strączkowski, Marek

    2011-09-18

    Anorexia nervosa is a complex eating disorder of unknown etiology which affects adolescent girls and young women and leads to chronic malnutrition. Clinical manifestations of prolonged semistarvation include a variety of physical features and psychiatric disorders. The study of different biological factors involved in the pathophysiology of anorexia nervosa is an area of active interest. In this review we have described the role of adipocytokines, neurotrophins, peptides of the gastrointestinal system and growth factors in appetite regulation, energy balance and insulin sensitivity in anorexia nervosa patients. PMID:21699889

  8. Anorexia nervosa and bulimia in adolescent males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, A E

    1984-12-01

    Anorexia nervosa or bulimia in adolescent males occurs ten times less frequently than in adolescent females. When they occur, however, they can be clearly identified and differentiated from disorders also associated with weight loss such as swallowing phobias. Early diagnosis and treatment leads to improved outcome. While the formal psychopathology of male anorectics is similar to that of females, there is often a different motivation for the initial weight loss in males. They are more often concerned with attaining an idealized male body and avoiding teasing or criticism about their appearance. When males become ill, they tend to develop the full anorectic syndrome or not to become ill at all. Recognition of the special needs of adolescent males for individualized treatment increases the change of optimal outcome. Anorexia nervosa and bulimia in the teenage male should be seen as an ineffective method of dealing with developmental crises by gaining a sense of effectiveness and control through weight reduction and food restriction. Treatment seeks to improve quickly the starvation-related aspects of the illness while attempting to find more appropriate methods of dealing with the life crises prompting the illness. The real goal of treatment is to make the anorectic or bulimic illness unnecessary by encouraging the patient to continue the work of individuation and separation so that challenges in development and problems in living are resolved in a direct rather than an indirect way through an eating disorder. PMID:6596548

  9. Perioperative management of severe anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, K; Hirose, M; Tanaka, K; Kawahito, S; Tamaki, T; Oshita, S

    2014-02-01

    As the prevalence of anorexia nervosa (AN) increased, surgery in severe AN patients also increased in the 2000s. We experienced a surgical case of a patient with severe AN, showing an extremely low BMI of 8.6 kg m(-2). We investigated the problems associated with this case and propose criteria to manage severe AN. We endeavour to report on the perioperative management of rare and severe symptoms and surgical indications of severely malnourished patients. All published reports were identified through comprehensive searches using PubMed, BioMedLib, and the Japan Medical Abstracts Society with the following terms and keywords: 'anorexia nervosa', 'eating disorder', 'hypoglycaemia', 'leucocytopaenia', 'gelatinous bone marrow', 'surgery', and 'operation'. In cases of AN with a BMI under 13 kg m(-2), marked hypoglycaemia, leucocytopaenia feeding syndrome until surgery. During the course of anaesthesia, careless loading of glucose or catecholamine may lead to disturbance of electrolytes or fatal arrhythmia. Intensive care and early feeding as soon as possible after surgery are important to prevent surgical site infection. Although not many perioperative cases of AN have been reported, clinicians must be aware of the danger and the causes of mortality in critical cases. Thus, the decision to undertake surgery must be taken carefully and close perioperative coordination among physicians, surgeons, psychiatrists, anaesthesiologists, and intensivists is essential.

  10. Do girls with anorexia nervosa have elevated autistic traits?

    OpenAIRE

    Baron-Cohen, Simon; Jaffa, Tony; Davies, Sarah; Auyeung, Bonnie; Allison, Carrie; Wheelwright, Sally

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with anorexia may have elevated autistic traits. In this study, we tested test whether patients with anorexia nervosa (anorexia) have an elevated score on a dimensional measure of autistic traits, the Autism Spectrum Quotient (AQ), as well as on trait measures relevant to the autism spectrum: the Empathy Quotient (EQ), and the Systemizing Quotient (SQ). Methods Two groups were tested: (1) female adolescents with anorexia: n = 66, aged 12 to 18 years; and (2) female adolesc...

  11. The Treatment of Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia: A Multidimensional Group Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, P. Scott

    This paper defines the eating disorders of anorexia nervosa, bulimia, and bulimia nervosa, a bulimic subtype of anorexia nervosa. The diagnosis of these disorders is discussed and similarities and differences among the three disorders are reviewed. Etiological factors are considered and current trends in treatment of anorexia nervosa, bulimia, and…

  12. Recovery from anorexia nervosa: a Durkheimian interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, C J

    1996-11-01

    Attempts to explain "eating disorders" in contemporary western society have concentrated on aetiology at the expense of resolution. Most "recovered" anorectics, however, question medical definitions of "anorexia nervosa" and clinical criteria for recovery. This article refers to a study of 32 people at different stages of the recovery process, to reconceptualize the problem in sociological terms. Durkheim's account of asceticism offers a fresh interpretive framework in which anorexia and recovery are understood as the negative and positive phases respectively of a ritual of self-transformation. In western culture, where appropriate myths and rituals of re-incorporation are not readily available following a period of symbolic fasting, it is not surprising that recovery from anorexia is not automatic. Participants in this study referred to anorexia as a spiritual quest and for them recovery involved a re-discovery (or creation) of a threefold connection: inner, with others and with "nature". These connections are, for them, the defining features of spirituality. The negative phase of the ritualistic quest (anorexia) involves a confrontation with the inevitability of death as a condition of the positive phase (recovery) in which people actively choose life. This new theoretical approach provides a non-medicalized understanding of anorexia and simultaneously enables a re-interpretation of the fasting of medieval women saints. Recent scholarship in this area is re-evaluated to demonstrate that the continuity between asceticism and anorexia lies in the use of food as a metaphorical attempt to confront the universal problem of one's own mortality. In certain historical situations, asceticism served a socially valuable symbolic purpose. In contemporary society, however, this meaning is no longer available. Instead, it is recovery which constitutes the active and metaphorical "rebellion" against forces of social control. Finally, the work of Van Gennep is used to explore

  13. Indirect evidence for decreased hypothalamic somatostatinergic tone in anorexia nervosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Støving, R K; Andersen, M; Flyvbjerg, A;

    2002-01-01

    in the central feeding mechanism in anorexia nervosa (AN). Peripheral administration of pyridostigmine (PD) minimizes the release of hypothalamic SRIH. DESIGN: To study the influence of hypothalamic somatostatinergic inhibition on the exaggerated somatotroph responsiveness to GHRH in patients with severe AN, two...... indirectly to greater SRIH withdrawal and greater GHRH release in anorexia nervosa. Moreover, hypothalamic SRIH activity seems to be inversely related to cortisol levels, indirectly supporting the hypothesis that SRIH and CRH neuronal activity are inversely related in anorexia nervosa. Leptin, which...... is believed to act on hypothalamic feeding mechanisms, seems to be positively related to SRIH activity. Finally, the present data demonstrate that the potentiating effect of pyridostigmine in anorexia nervosa is related to body mass index and increases upon weight gain, suggesting that the low...

  14. Anorexia Nervosa: The More It Grows, the More It Starves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldis, Katherine O.

    1986-01-01

    Presents a bibliography of books on anorexia nervosa that are appropriate for young adults. Includes fiction, autobiographies, informational books, and books on the related topics of bulimia, bulimarexia, and therapy. (EL)

  15. Disturbances of sex hormones in anorexia nervosa in the male.

    OpenAIRE

    McNab, D.; Hawton, K

    1981-01-01

    Sex hormone levels were measured in a male patient with anorexia nervosa throughout the course of his illness and recovery. Gonadotrophin levels returned to normal with weight gain but his testosterone remained low. Possible explanations for these findings are discussed.

  16. Adolescent male with anorexia nervosa: a case report from Iraq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Younis Maha S

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This is the first reported case of an adolescent male with anorexia nervosa in Iraq. This disorder is believed to be rare in males across cultures and uncommon for both genders in Arab countries. The patient met the DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for anorexia nervosa. He was hospitalized and received medical and psychiatric treatment at local facilities as discussed below and responded well to treatment.

  17. Severe anorexia nervosa in males: clinical presentations and medical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabel, Allison L; Rosen, Elissa; Mehler, Philip S

    2014-01-01

    The clinical presentation and medical complications of severe anorexia nervosa among males were examined to further the understanding of this increasingly prevalent condition. Fourteen males were admitted to a medical stabilization unit over the study period. Males with severe anorexia nervosa were found to have a multitude of significant medical and laboratory abnormalities, which are in need of treatment via judicious, nutritional rehabilitation and weight restoration to prevent additional morbidity and to facilitate transfer and admission to traditional eating disorder programs.

  18. Emotional facial expression in women recovered from anorexia nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Davies, Helen; Schmidt, Ulrike; Tchanturia, Kate

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent models of anorexia nervosa (AN) have emphasised the importance of social and emotional difficulties as maintenance factors of the disorder, however, empirical data are limited. The aim of this study was to examine whether altered emotional facial expression, previously observed in people currently ill with anorexia nervosa, is limited to the ill state or present in people recovered from the illness. Methods The sample consisted of 123 participants [49 AN, 21 recovered AN (Re...

  19. Anorexia Nervosa and Body Fat Distribution: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Marwan El Ghoch; Simona Calugi; Silvia Lamburghini; Riccardo Dalle Grave

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to conduct a systematic review of body fat distribution before and after partial and complete weight restoration in individuals with anorexia nervosa. Literature searches, study selection, method development and quality appraisal were performed independently by two authors, and data was synthesized using a narrative approach. Twenty studies met the inclusion criteria and were consequently analyzed. The review had five main findings. First, during anorexia nervosa ado...

  20. Defining recovery in Anorexia Nervosa - The importance of concept clarification

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this dissertation is to identify major problems that obscure understanding of recovery in Anorexia Nervosa, to differentiate recovery from other closely related concepts, and to highlight the importance of reaching a consensus on the use of terminology. Method: Literature review based on papers that address the concepts of recovery, remission and outcome in Anorexia Nervosa. Relevant literature included in this review was identified by searching the elect...

  1. Neurobiology of hyperactivity and reward: Agreeable restlessness in Anorexia Nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Scheurink, Anton J. W.; Boersma, Gretha J.; Nergardh, Ricard; Sodersten, Per; Nergårdh, Ricard; Södersten, Per

    2010-01-01

    Restricted food intake is associated with increased physical activity, very likely an evolutionary advantage, initially both functional and rewarding. The hyperactivity of patients with Anorexia Nervosa, however, is a main problem for recovery. This seemingly paradoxical reward of hyperactivity in Anorexia Nervosa is one of the main aspects in our framework for the neurobiological changes that may underlie the development of the disorder. Here, we focus on the neurobiological basis of hyperac...

  2. Diminished creatinine clearance in anorexia nervosa: reversal with weight gain.

    OpenAIRE

    Boag, F.; Weerakoon, J; Ginsburg, J; Havard, C W; Dandona, P

    1985-01-01

    To assess whether patients with anorexia nervosa have abnormalities in creatinine clearance, we measured plasma creatinine concentration, urinary creatinine excretion, and creatinine clearance in 10 patients with anorexia nervosa before and during treatment. Urinary creatinine excretion and creatinine clearance were diminished in all patients. Nine patients had significant decreases in their plasma creatinine and creatinine clearance was increased even when corrected for body weight and body ...

  3. Neurological Soft Signs in Stadien der Anorexia nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Oskamp, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Loss of cerebral gray and white matter volume which cause brain function deficits are described in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN). Neurological soft signs (NSS) are minor neurological signs which indicate non-specific cerebral dysfunction. First investigations have shown their presence in Anorexia nervosa (AN) - including particularly poor motor coordination and difficulties in sequencing complex motor tasks. It is uncertain whether these deficiencies are endophenotype of AN, independent...

  4. Could Dopamine Agonists Aid in Drug Development for Anorexia Nervosa?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido eFrank

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Anorexia nervosa is a severe psychiatric disorder most commonly starting during the teenage years and associated with food refusal and low body weight. Typically there is a loss of menses, intense fear of gaining weight and an often delusional quality of altered body perception. Anorexia nervosa is also associated with a pattern of high cognitive rigidity, which may contribute to treatment resistance and relapse. The complex interplay of state and trait biological, psychological and social factors has complicated identifying neurobiological mechanisms that contribute to the illness. The dopamine D1 and D2 neurotransmitter receptors are involved in motivational aspects of food approach, fear extinction and cognitive flexibility. They could therefore be important targets to improve core and associated behaviors in anorexia nervosa. Treatment with dopamine antagonists has shown little benefit, and it is possible that antagonists over time increase an already hypersensitive dopamine pathway activity in anorexia nervosa. On the contrary, application of dopamine receptor agonists could reduce circuit responsiveness, facilitate fear extinction and improve cognitive flexibility in anorexia nervosa, as they may be particularly effective during underweight and low gonadal hormone states. This article provides evidence that the dopamine receptor system could be a key factor in the pathophysiology of anorexia nervosa and dopamine agonists could be helpful in reducing core symptoms of the disorder. This review is a theoretical approach that primarily focuses on dopamine receptor function as this system has been mechanistically better described than other neurotransmitters that are altered in anorexia nervosa. However, those proposed dopamine mechanisms in anorexia nervosa also warrant further study with respect to their interaction with other neurotransmitter systems, such as serotonin pathways.

  5. Anorexia nervosa among teenage girls: Emerging or prevalent?

    OpenAIRE

    Hisam, Aliya; Rahman, Mahmood Ur; Mashhadi, Syed Fawad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To find out frequency of anorexia nervosa (AN) among teenage girls (TG) and to find out the knowledge and practice regarding anorexia nervosa among teenage girls. Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted at higher secondary public school, Rawalpindi from June 2013 till December 2013. A sample of 100 female students of the age group 13-19 years were inducted by systematic sampling technique. Mixed pretested questionnaire was filled after informed verbal consent. Data was ente...

  6. Could Dopamine Agonists Aid in Drug Development for Anorexia Nervosa?

    OpenAIRE

    Guido eFrank

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a severe psychiatric disorder most commonly starting during the teenage years and associated with food refusal and low body weight. Typically there is a loss of menses, intense fear of gaining weight and an often delusional quality of altered body perception. Anorexia nervosa is also associated with a pattern of high cognitive rigidity, which may contribute to treatment resistance and relapse. The complex interplay of state and trait biological, psychological and social fa...

  7. Could Dopamine Agonists Aid in Drug Development for Anorexia Nervosa?

    OpenAIRE

    Frank, Guido K.W.

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a severe psychiatric disorder most commonly starting during the teenage-years and associated with food refusal and low body weight. Typically there is a loss of menses, intense fear of gaining weight, and an often delusional quality of altered body perception. Anorexia nervosa is also associated with a pattern of high cognitive rigidity, which may contribute to treatment resistance and relapse. The complex interplay of state and trait biological, psychological, and social ...

  8. Could dopamine agonists aid in drug development for anorexia nervosa?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Guido K W

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a severe psychiatric disorder most commonly starting during the teenage-years and associated with food refusal and low body weight. Typically there is a loss of menses, intense fear of gaining weight, and an often delusional quality of altered body perception. Anorexia nervosa is also associated with a pattern of high cognitive rigidity, which may contribute to treatment resistance and relapse. The complex interplay of state and trait biological, psychological, and social factors has complicated identifying neurobiological mechanisms that contribute to the illness. The dopamine D1 and D2 neurotransmitter receptors are involved in motivational aspects of food approach, fear extinction, and cognitive flexibility. They could therefore be important targets to improve core and associated behaviors in anorexia nervosa. Treatment with dopamine antagonists has shown little benefit, and it is possible that antagonists over time increase an already hypersensitive dopamine pathway activity in anorexia nervosa. On the contrary, application of dopamine receptor agonists could reduce circuit responsiveness, facilitate fear extinction, and improve cognitive flexibility in anorexia nervosa, as they may be particularly effective during underweight and low gonadal hormone states. This article provides evidence that the dopamine receptor system could be a key factor in the pathophysiology of anorexia nervosa and dopamine agonists could be helpful in reducing core symptoms of the disorder. This review is a theoretical approach that primarily focuses on dopamine receptor function as this system has been mechanistically better described than other neurotransmitters that are altered in anorexia nervosa. However, those proposed dopamine mechanisms in anorexia nervosa also warrant further study with respect to their interaction with other neurotransmitter systems, such as serotonin pathways. PMID:25988121

  9. [Anesthesia in patients with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenker, J; Hagenah, U; Rossaint, R

    2010-03-01

    Eating disorders are typical diseases of adolescence and early adulthood. About 1-3% of female juveniles suffer from anorexia nervosa (AN) or bulimia nervosa (BN). Today AN is still the psychiatric disease with the highest mortality rate. The peri-operative mortality rate of patients suffering from AN is in the range up to 15%. The beginning of AN is a lingering process and the majority of patients show increasingly restrictive eating habits ending in cachexia. Patients are obsessed by the predominant idea of being obese in spite of having a significant underweight. Patients suffering from bulimia break the strict regimen by eating enormous amounts of high calorie food. Such eating attacks are followed by weight reducing measures, mostly vomiting. Most of the physical changes caused by AN are due to starvation and loss of weight. The most significant medical complications are alterations of the cardiovascular system accompanied by decreasing contractility of the heart, bradycardia, electrocardiographic changes as well as disequilibrium of electrolytic and water balance. Most of these symptoms can be reversed by putting on weight.

  10. Social Cognition in Child and Adolescents with Anorexia Nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ipek Percinel

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Social cognition represents the mental processes of social interaction between oneself and others. In recent years, the interest in social cognition skills has increased in cases with eating disorders. Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder that is associated with the multiple factors in etiology. Treatment of anorexia nervosa is still controversial. The youths diagnosed with anorexia nervosa are known to be as the most difficult group in eating disorders for building therapeutic relations. Studies, mostly suggests that there are difficulties in social cognitive functions in patients with anorexia nervosa. However, there are studies that reported different results. It seems that, the majority of studies which evaluate the social cognitive functions in patients with anorexia nervosa, are carried out with the adult age group. There are limited number of studies in child and adolescent age group. The purpose of this paper was to examinate the studies of social cognitive skills in children and adolescents diagnosed with anorexia nervosa and present the general characteristics. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2015; 7(2: 178-189

  11. Initial evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Brian C; Jimerson, Michelle; Haxton, Christina; Jimerson, David C

    2015-01-01

    Eating disorders are life-threatening conditions that are challenging to address; however, the primary care setting provides an important opportunity for critical medical and psychosocial intervention. The recently published Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th ed., includes updated diagnostic criteria for anorexia nervosa (e.g., elimination of amenorrhea as a diagnostic criterion) and for bulimia nervosa (e.g., criterion for frequency of binge episodes decreased to an average of once per week). In addition to the role of environmental triggers and societal expectations of body size and shape, research has suggested that genes and discrete biochemical signals contribute to the development of eating disorders. Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa occur most often in adolescent females and are often accompanied by depression and other comorbid psychiatric disorders. For low-weight patients with anorexia nervosa, virtually all physiologic systems are affected, ranging from hypotension and osteopenia to life-threatening arrhythmias, often requiring emergent assessment and hospitalization for metabolic stabilization. In patients with frequent purging or laxative abuse, the presence of electrolyte abnormalities requires prompt intervention. Family-based treatment is helpful for adolescents with anorexia nervosa, whereas short-term psychotherapy, such as cognitive behavior therapy, is effective for most patients with bulimia nervosa. The use of psychotropic medications is limited for anorexia nervosa, whereas treatment studies have shown a benefit of antidepressant medications for patients with bulimia nervosa. Treatment is most effective when it includes a multidisciplinary, teambased approach.

  12. Epidemiology of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa in Bornholm County, Denmark, 1970-1989

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagsberg, A K; Wang, A R

    1994-01-01

    In a retrospective study of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, potential cases were traced, studied, and diagnosed according to ICD-10. Forty-two cases were found in Bornholm County, comprising the island of Bornholm in Denmark, in a population of 47,000 from 1970 to 1989. Less than half...... the number of cases in the population year by year, also increased during the late part of the study period. In 1989 the incidence rate of the high-risk group of females 10 to 24 years of age was 136 per 100,000 for anorexia nervosa and 45 per 100,000 for bulimia nervosa, and the prevalence rate was 222 per...... 100,000 for anorexia nervosa and 89 per 100,000 for bulimia nervosa....

  13. Epidemiology of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa in Bornholm County, Denmark, 1970-1989

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagsberg, A K; Wang, A R

    1994-01-01

    In a retrospective study of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, potential cases were traced, studied, and diagnosed according to ICD-10. Forty-two cases were found in Bornholm County, comprising the island of Bornholm in Denmark, in a population of 47,000 from 1970 to 1989. Less than half of...... counting the number of cases in the population year by year, also increased during the late part of the study period. In 1989 the incidence rate of the high-risk group of females 10 to 24 years of age was 136 per 100,000 for anorexia nervosa and 45 per 100,000 for bulimia nervosa, and the prevalence rate...... was 222 per 100,000 for anorexia nervosa and 89 per 100,000 for bulimia nervosa....

  14. Emotion recognition and regulation in anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Amy; Sullivan, Sarah; Tchanturia, Kate; Treasure, Janet

    2009-01-01

    It is recognized that emotional problems lie at the core of eating disorders (EDs) but scant attention has been paid to specific aspects such as emotional recognition, regulation and expression. This study aimed to investigate emotion recognition using the Reading the Mind in the Eyes (RME) task and emotion regulation using the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS) in 20 women with anorexia nervosa (AN) and 20 female healthy controls (HCs). Women with AN had significantly lower scores on RME and reported significantly more difficulties with emotion regulation than HCs. There was a significant negative correlation between total DERS score and correct answers from the RME. These results suggest that women with AN have difficulties with emotional recognition and regulation. It is uncertain whether these deficits result from starvation and to what extent they might be reversed by weight gain alone. These deficits may need to be targeted in treatment.

  15. Extreme Achalasia Presenting as Anorexia Nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Goldsmith

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Achalasia may lead to cachexia if not diagnosed in an early stage. Surgery in cachectic patients is hazardous and complications may result in a protracted recovery or even death. Different treatment options have been described. In this paper, we report a stepwise surgical laparoscopic approach which appears to be safe and effective. Methods. Over a one-year period, a patient with a body mass index (BMI below 17 being treated for anorexia nervosa was referred with dysphagia. Because of the extreme cachexia, a laparoscopic feeding jejunostomy (LFJ was fashioned to enable long-term home enteral feeding. The patient underwent a laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM when the BMI was normal. Results. The patient recovered well following this stepwise approach. Conclusion. Patients with advanced achalasia usually present with extreme weight loss. In this small group of patients, a period of home enteral nutrition (HEN via a laparoscopically placed feeding jejunostomy allows weight gain prior to safe definitive surgery.

  16. Olanzapine treatment in anorexia nervosa: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadić-Hero, Elizabeta; Ruzić, Klementina; Pernar, Mirjana; Kabalin, Milena; Medved, Paola

    2009-03-01

    A 15 year old patient suffering from psychiatric disturbances looked for psychiatric help but refused hospital admission. Following an ambulatory treatment, the patient was diagnosed with Anorexia nervosa. The patient, a girl, was 175 centimeters tall, weighting only 39 kilos. Within the clinical picture, there were few dominant disorders present; anxiety, depression, low self-esteem, fear of feminization, with recurrent psychotic episodes. By the implementation of an intensive psychotherapeutic treatment, without the use of psychopharmacs, the weight was kept stable. In accordance with the girl's mother, a psychopharmacotherapy was commenced, a combination of olanzapine and paroxetine (the choice of psychopharmacs was lead by the side effects known). At the end of a 24-month period of a psychological treatment which was combined with psychopharmacotherapy, the patient exhibited no symptomatology and a stable clinical remission of the illness was achieved. PMID:19270636

  17. Genetic findings in anorexia and bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinney, Anke; Scherag, Susann; Hebebrand, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) are complex disorders associated with disordered eating behavior. Heritability estimates derived from twin and family studies are high, so that substantial genetic influences on the etiology can be assumed for both. As the monoaminergic neurotransmitter systems are involved in eating disorders (EDs), candidate gene studies have centered on related genes; additionally, genes relevant for body weight regulation have been considered as candidates. Unfortunately, this approach has yielded very few positive results; confirmed associations or findings substantiated in meta-analyses are scant. None of these associations can be considered unequivocally validated. Systematic genome-wide approaches have been performed to identify genes with no a priori evidence for their relevance in EDs. Family-based scans revealed linkage peaks in single chromosomal regions for AN and BN. Analyses of candidate genes in one of these regions led to the identification of genetic variants associated with AN. Currently, an international consortium is conducting a genome-wide association study for AN, which will hopefully lead to the identification of the first genome-wide significant markers.

  18. Anorexia Nervosa and Bulima Nervosa Critical Analysis of It's Treatment: Implications and Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flourish Itulua-Abumere

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The diagnostic consideration of the eating disorders anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa has been given much focus over the last two decades than previously, as clinicians have become more aware of the frequency of these disorders and the difficulties associated with their treatment. Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa as known in the DSM-IV as eating disorders are characterized by physically and/or psychologically harmful eating patterns. Although the psychological explanation of what we now call anorexia nervosa have been known about for centuries, it has only recently attracted much interest, due to greater public knowledge and increased incidence (according to Gross and MclLveen 2006, the latter claim has been disputed. Most people suffering from anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa start by fasting. Anorexia nervosa is a deliberate self-starvation. A person whose body weight is less than expected for his or her body height and weight is considered to be anorexic. In contract, bulimia involves binge eating a large quantity of food followed by purging by self-induced vomiting, enemas, laxatives, or diuretics.

  19. Neuroendokrine forstyrrelser ved anorexia nervosa - primoere eller sekundoere?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Støving, R K; Hansen-Nord, M; Hangaard, J;

    1996-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is associated with multiple endocrine abnormalities. Hypothalamic neuropeptides and monoamines are involved in the regulation of human appetite, and they are changed in several ways in anorexia nervosa. But it remains to be clarified whether these alterations are secondary...... or etiologic. Feeding behaviour in anorexia nervosa is characterised by a strong ambivalence and not by loss of appetite. Hypothalamic amenorrhea is a diagnostic criterion, and is not only secondary as it often precedes the weight loss and persists for a long time after weight and motor activity have returned...... to normal. Hypersecretion of corticotropin releasing hormone seems to be secondary to starvation, but at the same time it may keep up and intensify the anorexia, physical hyperactivity and amenorrhea. Low production of insulinlike growth factor-I and high growth hormone secretion reflects the nutritional...

  20. Dysfunctional metacognition and drive for thinness in typical and atypical anorexia nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Davenport, Emily; Rushford, Nola; Soon, Siew; McDermott, Cressida

    2015-01-01

    Background Anorexia nervosa is complex and difficult to treat. In cognitive therapies the focus has been on cognitive content rather than process. Process-oriented therapies may modify the higher level cognitive processes of metacognition, reported as dysfunctional in adult anorexia nervosa. Their association with clinical features of anorexia nervosa, however, is unclear. With reclassification of anorexia nervosa by DSM-5 into typical and atypical groups, comparability of metacognition and d...

  1. An examination of autism spectrum traits in adolescents with anorexia nervosa and their parents.

    OpenAIRE

    Rhind, C.; Bonfioli, E.; Hibbs, R.; Goddard, E; MacDonald, P; Gowers, S; Schmidt, U.; Tchanturia, K.; Micali, N; Treasure, J

    2014-01-01

    Background There may be a link between anorexia nervosa and autism spectrum disorders. The aims of this study were to examine whether adolescents with anorexia nervosa have autism spectrum and/or obsessive-compulsive traits, how many would meet diagnostic criteria for autism spectrum disorder, and whether these traits are shared by parents. Methods A total of 150 adolescents receiving outpatient treatment for anorexia nervosa or subthreshold anorexia nervosa and their parents completed the au...

  2. Wait Not, Want Not: Factors Contributing to the Development of Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Trish

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this literature review is to examine prevalence and incident rates of both anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. In addition, this article will review the psychological and sociological factors that contribute to the development and maintenance of an eating disorder. Finally, different treatment approaches will be discussed in…

  3. Total body water and total body potassium in anorexia nervosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the ill hospitalized patient with clinically relevant malnutrition, there is a measurable decrease in the ratio of the total body potassium to total body water (TBK/TBW) and a detectable increase in the ratio of total exchangeable sodium to total exchangeable potassium (Nae/Ke). To evaluate body composition analyses in anorexia nervosa patients with chronic uncomplicated semistarvation, TBK and TBW were measured by whole body K40 counting and deuterium oxide dilution in 10 females with stable anorexia nervosa and 10 age-matched female controls. The ratio of TBK/TBW was significantly (p less than 0.05) higher in anorexia nervosa patients than controls. The close inverse correlation found in published studies between TBK/TBW and Nae/Ke together with our results suggest that in anorexia nervosa, Nae/Ke may be low or normal. A decreased TBK/TBW is not a good indicator of malnutrition in the anorexia nervosa patient. The use of a decreased TBK/TBW ratio or an elevated Nae/Ke ratio as a definition of malnutrition may result in inappropriate nutritional management in the patient with severe nonstressed chronic semistarvation

  4. Neurofunctional areas related to food appetency in anorexia nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juán José Cervantes-Navarrete

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In Anorexia Nervosa the observable phenomenon is the suppression of appetite. Little is known about the biological and psychological (top-down bases that maintain this pathological state. However, Anorexia Nervosa is a biological, psychological and social model where the main behavioral characteristic is the inhibition of eating behavior; not by bottom-up but top-down regulation. Objective: To explore the areas of the brain associated with food appetency through functional magnetic resonance in women with anorexia nervosa. Methods: The subjects include 5 female with Restrictive type of Anorexia Nervosa and five controls female with similar in age and low weigh. The subjects were within the MRI scanner and while took fMRI they saw food images that would generate appetite. The subjects were in fasting state and mentally prepare by instruction “imagine you are eating the food presented in the following images”. Results: Compared differences in the activation between subjects four regions were found significant: the anterior cingulate, left front medial region and the left and right midbrain. Conclusions: The patients with Anorexia Nervosa present different activated cerebral areas to those of the controls during the visual exposition to food in hungry state and with evoke cognitions associated with eat food; those regions may be implicated in reward and self-control.

  5. Total body water and total body potassium in anorexia nervosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dempsey, D.T.; Crosby, L.O.; Lusk, E.; Oberlander, J.L.; Pertschuk, M.J.; Mullen, J.L.

    1984-08-01

    In the ill hospitalized patient with clinically relevant malnutrition, there is a measurable decrease in the ratio of the total body potassium to total body water (TBK/TBW) and a detectable increase in the ratio of total exchangeable sodium to total exchangeable potassium (Nae/Ke). To evaluate body composition analyses in anorexia nervosa patients with chronic uncomplicated semistarvation, TBK and TBW were measured by whole body K40 counting and deuterium oxide dilution in 10 females with stable anorexia nervosa and 10 age-matched female controls. The ratio of TBK/TBW was significantly (p less than 0.05) higher in anorexia nervosa patients than controls. The close inverse correlation found in published studies between TBK/TBW and Nae/Ke together with our results suggest that in anorexia nervosa, Nae/Ke may be low or normal. A decreased TBK/TBW is not a good indicator of malnutrition in the anorexia nervosa patient. The use of a decreased TBK/TBW ratio or an elevated Nae/Ke ratio as a definition of malnutrition may result in inappropriate nutritional management in the patient with severe nonstressed chronic semistarvation.

  6. Resting state functional connectivity in anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillipou, Andrea; Abel, Larry Allen; Castle, David Jonathan; Hughes, Matthew Edward; Nibbs, Richard Grant; Gurvich, Caroline; Rossell, Susan Lee

    2016-05-30

    Anorexia Nervosa (AN) is a serious psychiatric illness characterised by a disturbance in body image, a fear of weight gain and significantly low body weight. The factors involved in the genesis and maintenance of AN are unclear, though the potential neurobiological underpinnings of the condition are of increasing interest. Through the investigation of functional connectivity of the brain at rest, information relating to neuronal communication and integration of information that may relate to behaviours and cognitive symptoms can be explored. The aim of this study was to investigate functional connectivity of the default mode network, and sensorimotor and visual networks in AN. 26 females with AN and 27 healthy control participants matched for age, gender and premorbid intelligence underwent a resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging scan. Default mode network functional connectivity did not differ between groups. AN participants displayed reduced functional connectivity between the sensorimotor and visual networks, in comparison to healthy controls. This finding is discussed in terms of differences in visuospatial processing in AN and the distortion of body image experienced by these individuals. Overall, the findings suggest that sensorimotor and visual network connectivity may be related to visuospatial processing in AN, though, further research is required. PMID:27111812

  7. Oral zinc supplementation in anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safai-Kutti, S

    1990-01-01

    There is evidence to suggest that zinc (Zn) deficiency may be involved in the pathogenesis of anorexia nervosa (AN). In an open study of 20 females, aged 14-26 years, afflicted with AN the effect of oral zinc supplementation was investigated. In each case the diagnosis of AN was based on the criteria of DSM-III-R. After a careful history, complete physical examination and laboratory screening the subjects were started on 45-90 mg of Zn2+, as zinc sulfate, (SolvezinkR, Tika, Sweden) per day. During a follow-up period of 8-56 months 17 patients increased their body weight by more than 15%. The maximum gradual weight gain of 57% was encountered in one patient after 24 months of zinc therapy. The most rapid weight gain was recorded in a patient who increased her body weight by 24% over a period of 3 months. After the institution of zinc, weight loss was not registered in any of our patients. In 13 subjects the menstruation returned 1-17 months after the initiation of zinc therapy. None of our patients developed bulimia. The design of an ongoing multicenter placebo-controlled clinical trial of zinc supplementation to patients with AN is described. PMID:2291418

  8. Saccadic Eye Movements in Anorexia Nervosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Phillipou

    Full Text Available Anorexia Nervosa (AN has a mortality rate among the highest of any mental illness, though the factors involved in the condition remain unclear. Recently, the potential neurobiological underpinnings of the condition have become of increasing interest. Saccadic eye movement tasks have proven useful in our understanding of the neurobiology of some other psychiatric illnesses as they utilise known brain regions, but to date have not been examined in AN. The aim of this study was to investigate whether individuals with AN differ from healthy individuals in performance on a range of saccadic eye movements tasks.24 females with AN and 25 healthy individuals matched for age, gender and premorbid intelligence participated in the study. Participants were required to undergo memory-guided and self-paced saccade tasks, and an interleaved prosaccade/antisaccade/no-go saccade task while undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI.AN participants were found to make prosaccades of significantly shorter latency than healthy controls. AN participants also made an increased number of inhibitory errors on the memory-guided saccade task. Groups did not significantly differ in antisaccade, no-go saccade or self-paced saccade performance, or fMRI findings.The results suggest a potential role of GABA in the superior colliculus in the psychopathology of AN.

  9. Saccadic Eye Movements in Anorexia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillipou, Andrea; Rossell, Susan Lee; Gurvich, Caroline; Hughes, Matthew Edward; Castle, David Jonathan; Nibbs, Richard Grant; Abel, Larry Allen

    2016-01-01

    Background Anorexia Nervosa (AN) has a mortality rate among the highest of any mental illness, though the factors involved in the condition remain unclear. Recently, the potential neurobiological underpinnings of the condition have become of increasing interest. Saccadic eye movement tasks have proven useful in our understanding of the neurobiology of some other psychiatric illnesses as they utilise known brain regions, but to date have not been examined in AN. The aim of this study was to investigate whether individuals with AN differ from healthy individuals in performance on a range of saccadic eye movements tasks. Methods 24 females with AN and 25 healthy individuals matched for age, gender and premorbid intelligence participated in the study. Participants were required to undergo memory-guided and self-paced saccade tasks, and an interleaved prosaccade/antisaccade/no-go saccade task while undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Results AN participants were found to make prosaccades of significantly shorter latency than healthy controls. AN participants also made an increased number of inhibitory errors on the memory-guided saccade task. Groups did not significantly differ in antisaccade, no-go saccade or self-paced saccade performance, or fMRI findings. Discussion The results suggest a potential role of GABA in the superior colliculus in the psychopathology of AN. PMID:27010196

  10. Compulsivity in Anorexia Nervosa: a transdiagnostic concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Rose Godier

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The compulsive nature of weight loss behaviours central to Anorexia Nervosa (AN, such as relentless self-starvation and over-exercise, has led to the suggestion of parallels between AN and other compulsive disorders such as Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD and addictions. There is a huge unmet need for effective treatments in AN, which has high rates of morbidity and the highest mortality rate of any psychiatric disorder, yet a grave paucity of effective treatments. Viewing compulsivity as a transdiagnostic concept, seen in various manifestations across disorders, may help delineate the mechanisms responsible for the persistence of AN, and aid treatment development. We explore models of compulsivity that suggest dysfunction in cortico-striatal circuitry underpins compulsive behaviour, and consider evidence of aberrances in this circuitry across disorders. Excessive habit formation is considered as a mechanism by which initially rewarding weight loss behaviour in AN may become compulsive over time, and the complex balance between positive and negative reinforcement in this process is considered. The physiological effects of starvation in promoting compulsivity, positive reinforcement and habit formation are also discussed. Further research in AN may benefit from a focus on processes potentially underlying the development of compulsivity, such as aberrant reward processing and habit formation. We discuss the implications of a transdiagnostic perspective on compulsivity, and how it may contribute to the development of novel treatments for AN.

  11. Family cognitive remediation therapy for anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lask, Bryan; Roberts, Alice

    2015-04-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) in childhood and adolescence has a poor prognosis. It is possible that this may in part be due to the fact that cognitive weaknesses that appear to be risk factors for its development and maintenance are not being targeted in treatment. Through its focus on these deficits, cognitive remediation therapy (CRT) has been shown to be a promising intervention for AN. Furthermore, family interventions are widely recommended for this patient population, but to date no studies have reported the use of CRT in a family setting. This paper presents a case series in which family-based CRT was a significant component of the management. It was well received by patients and their families and previously treatment resistant patients became more engaged with the entire treatment process. In addition, all patients receiving family-based CRT went on to make progress towards recovery. These initial clinical observations suggest family-based CRT is likely to be a useful addition to treatment for child and adolescent AN and justifies formal evaluation. PMID:24096368

  12. Remission of anorexia nervosa after thyroidectomy: A report of two cases with Graves' disease and anorexia nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noguchi Hitoshi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report two patients with anorexia nervosa and Graves' disease who received subtotal thyroidectomy for Graves' disease and concomitantly experienced remission from anorexia nervosa. Both were young women (aged 20 and 26 at the time of surgery. Both had well controlled thyroid function and eating behavior at the time of surgery. Both were followed for over five years without relapse of anorexia nervosa or hyperthyroidism. These cases suggest the existence of an endocrine factor originating from the thyroid gland that is involved in the pathogenesis of anorexia nervosa. Since patients of thyroidectomy can remain in good health with supplement of thyroxine alone, it can be hypothesized that this anorexigenic endocrine factor is an evolutionary relic not necessary for the normal function of humans and does not have physiological effects unless secreted beyond normal levels. Given that, it implies the existence of a creature in the animal kingdom for which such an anorexigenic hormone is essential for survival. Migrating birds eat beyond their caloric expenditure before migration and become anorexic for the duration of their flight. It is also known that their thyroid function is elevated during migration. The normal physiology of migration is a complex mechanism involving the hypothalamic, pituitary, thyroid, adrenal and reproductive hormones. The mechanism of disease, however, can be simpler. A review of the literature is presented that suggest a heretofore unreported thyroid hormone, which is involved in the regulation of migration behavior, may be the responsible factor behind anorexia nervosa.

  13. Vegetarianism in anorexia nervosa? A review of 116 consecutive cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, M A; Touyz, S W; Dunn, S M; Beumont, P J

    A retrospective study was carried out of 116 consecutive patients with anorexia nervosa to ascertain the extent and nature of vegetarianism in this population. Sixty-three (54.3%) patients were found to be avoiding red meat. In only four (6.3%) of these did meat avoidance predate the onset of their anorexia nervosa. Of the remaining 59 patients (best termed pseudovegetarians), 25 (42.4%) patients continued to avoid red meat by the end of treatment. Pseudovegetarianism was associated with a longer duration of anorexia nervosa, a lower weight during the course of their illness, and living away from the parental home. The reintroduction of red meat into the diet was more likely if vegetarianism were of a short duration. PMID:3696039

  14. The occupational roles of women with anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiles-Cestari, Leila Maria; Ribeiro, Rosane Pilot Pessa

    2012-01-01

    This study's objective was to understand how occupational roles of individuals with anorexia nervosa are configured. The sample was composed of a control group and 11 adult women with anorexia nervosa being cared for by the Eating Disorders Care Group in a hospital in Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil. Socio-demographic and anthropometric data were collected and the Role Checklist was applied. The results revealed a significant loss of roles for women with anorexia nervosa in relation to the performance of the roles worker, friend, and amateur/hobbyist, supporting the idea that psychosocial harm may arise from this eating disorder. The evaluation of occupational roles in the treatment of eating disorders is an important strategy for planning Occupational Therapy activities and supporting the creation of healthier spaces to enable individuals to resume occupational roles, and acquire independence and autonomy. PMID:22699719

  15. Therapist adherence in the strong without anorexia nervosa (SWAN) study: A randomized controlled trial of three treatments for adults with anorexia nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Andony, Louise Julia; Tay, Elaine; Allen, Karina L; Wade, Tracey D.; Hay, Phillipa; Touyz, Stephen; McIntosh, Virginia V W; Treasure, Janet; Schmidt, Ulrike H.; Fairburn, Christopher G.; Erceg-Hurn, David M; Fursland, Anthea; Crosby, Ross D; Byrne, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To develop a psychotherapy rating scale to measure therapist adherence in the Strong Without Anorexia Nervosa (SWAN) study, a multi-center randomized controlled trial comparing three different psychological treatments for adults with anorexia nervosa. The three treatments under investigation were Enhanced Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT-E), the Maudsley Anorexia Nervosa Treatment for Adults (MANTRA), and Specialist Supportive Clinical Management (SSCM). Method The SWAN Psychother...

  16. Psychopathology and psychotherapy in adolescents with anorexia and bulimia nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Salbach-Andrae, Harriet

    2010-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) are multifactorial diseases, which are among the most prevalent disorders in child and adolescent psychiatry. Aesthetic sports are often considered as a risk factor for the development of an eating disorder. The present professorial dissertation for the first time demonstrates no higher risk for competitive athletes aged 12 to 18 years to develop an eating disorder. Research shows that psychiatric comorbidity is a very unfavorable prognostic ...

  17. A review of endocrine changes in anorexia nervosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Støving, R K; Hangaard, J; Hansen-Nord, M;

    1999-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a syndrome of unknown etiology. It is associated with multiple endocrine abnormalities. Hypothalamic monoamines (especially serotonin), neuropeptides (especially neuropeptide Y and cholecystokinin) and leptin are involved in the regulation of human appetite, and in several ways...... secretion reflect the nutritional deprivation. The nutritional therapy of patients with anorexia nervosa might be improved by administering an anabolic agent such as growth hormone or insulin-like growth factor I. So far none of the endocrine abnormalities have proved to be primary, however...

  18. Early-onset anorexia nervosa in girls with Asperger syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dudova I

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Iva Dudova, Jana Kocourkova, Jiri Koutek Department of Child Psychiatry, Charles University Second Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Motol, Prague, Czech Republic Abstract: Eating disorders frequently occur in conjunction with autism spectrum disorders, posing diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties. The comorbidity of anorexia nervosa and Asperger syndrome is a significant clinical complication and has been associated with a poorer prognosis. The authors are presenting the cases of an eleven-year-old girl and a five-and-a-half-year-old girl with comorbid eating disorders and Asperger syndrome. Keywords: eating disorders, early-onset anorexia nervosa, autism spectrum disorders, Asperger syndrome, diagnostics, therapy

  19. Anorexia nervosa: treatment expectations – a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Paulson-Karlsson, Gunilla

    2012-01-01

    Gunilla Paulson-Karlsson,1 Lauri Nevonen21Academy of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro and Anorexia-Bulimia Unit, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Centre, Queen Silvia Children's Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden; 2Academy of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, SwedenBackground: Anorexia nervosa is a serious illness with a high mortality rate, a poor outcome, and no empirically supported treatment of choice ...

  20. Anorexia nervosa: discourses of gender, subjectivity and the body

    OpenAIRE

    Malson, H. M.

    1995-01-01

    This thesis investigates how anorexia nervosa is constructed and deployed as a discursive social and psychological category, drawing critically on feminist psychoanalytic and Foucauldian theories of gender, subjectivity and discourse. The introduction provides a brief discussion of diagnostic criteria and the epidemiology of anorexia. It outlines the thesis as a whole, providing a brief explanation of the approach adopted in the thesis. Chapter 2 critically reviews rec...

  1. Osteopenia and bone fractures in a man with anorexia nervosa and hypogonadism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Women with anorexia nervosa have reduced skeletal mass. Both anorexia and osteopenia are less common in men. We describe a 22-year-old man with anorexia nervosa and severe osteopenia involving both cortical and trabecular bone who developed a pelvic fracture and multiple vertebral compression fractures. He was found to have secondary hypogonadotropic hypogonadism that was reversible with weight gain. This case illustrates the need to consider osteopenia as a potential complication of anorexia nervosa in males as well as females

  2. Osteopenia and bone fractures in a man with anorexia nervosa and hypogonadism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rigotti, N.A.; Neer, R.M.; Jameson, L.

    1986-07-18

    Women with anorexia nervosa have reduced skeletal mass. Both anorexia and osteopenia are less common in men. We describe a 22-year-old man with anorexia nervosa and severe osteopenia involving both cortical and trabecular bone who developed a pelvic fracture and multiple vertebral compression fractures. He was found to have secondary hypogonadotropic hypogonadism that was reversible with weight gain. This case illustrates the need to consider osteopenia as a potential complication of anorexia nervosa in males as well as females.

  3. Gut Dysbiosis in Patients with Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Chihiro; Tsuji, Hirokazu; Hata, Tomokazu; Gondo, Motoharu; Takakura, Shu; Kawai, Keisuke; Yoshihara, Kazufumi; Ogata, Kiyohito; Nomoto, Koji; Miyazaki, Kouji; Sudo, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychological illness with devastating physical consequences; however, its pathophysiological mechanism remains unclear. Because numerous reports have indicated the importance of gut microbiota in the regulation of weight gain, it is reasonable to speculate that AN patients might have a microbial imbalance, i.e. dysbiosis, in their gut. In this study, we compared the fecal microbiota of female patients with AN (n = 25), including restrictive (ANR, n = 14) and binge-eating (ANBP, n = 11) subtypes, with those of age-matched healthy female controls (n = 21) using the Yakult Intestinal Flora-SCAN based on 16S or 23S rRNA-targeted RT-quantitative PCR technology. AN patients had significantly lower amounts of total bacteria and obligate anaerobes including those from the Clostridium coccoides group, Clostridium leptum subgroup, and Bacteroides fragilis group than the age-matched healthy women. Lower numbers of Streptococcus were also found in the AN group than in the control group. In the analysis based on AN subtypes, the counts of the Bacteroides fragilis group in the ANR and ANBP groups and the counts of the Clostridium coccoides group in the ANR group were significantly lower than those in the control group. The detection rate of the Lactobacillus plantarum subgroup was significantly lower in the AN group than in the control group. The AN group had significantly lower acetic and propionic acid concentrations in the feces than the control group. Moreover, the subtype analysis showed that the fecal concentrations of acetic acid were lower in the ANR group than in the control group. Principal component analysis confirmed a clear difference in the bacterial components between the AN patients and healthy women. Collectively, these results clearly indicate the existence of dysbiosis in the gut of AN patients. PMID:26682545

  4. Gut Dysbiosis in Patients with Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Chihiro; Tsuji, Hirokazu; Hata, Tomokazu; Gondo, Motoharu; Takakura, Shu; Kawai, Keisuke; Yoshihara, Kazufumi; Ogata, Kiyohito; Nomoto, Koji; Miyazaki, Kouji; Sudo, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychological illness with devastating physical consequences; however, its pathophysiological mechanism remains unclear. Because numerous reports have indicated the importance of gut microbiota in the regulation of weight gain, it is reasonable to speculate that AN patients might have a microbial imbalance, i.e. dysbiosis, in their gut. In this study, we compared the fecal microbiota of female patients with AN (n = 25), including restrictive (ANR, n = 14) and binge-eating (ANBP, n = 11) subtypes, with those of age-matched healthy female controls (n = 21) using the Yakult Intestinal Flora-SCAN based on 16S or 23S rRNA-targeted RT-quantitative PCR technology. AN patients had significantly lower amounts of total bacteria and obligate anaerobes including those from the Clostridium coccoides group, Clostridium leptum subgroup, and Bacteroides fragilis group than the age-matched healthy women. Lower numbers of Streptococcus were also found in the AN group than in the control group. In the analysis based on AN subtypes, the counts of the Bacteroides fragilis group in the ANR and ANBP groups and the counts of the Clostridium coccoides group in the ANR group were significantly lower than those in the control group. The detection rate of the Lactobacillus plantarum subgroup was significantly lower in the AN group than in the control group. The AN group had significantly lower acetic and propionic acid concentrations in the feces than the control group. Moreover, the subtype analysis showed that the fecal concentrations of acetic acid were lower in the ANR group than in the control group. Principal component analysis confirmed a clear difference in the bacterial components between the AN patients and healthy women. Collectively, these results clearly indicate the existence of dysbiosis in the gut of AN patients.

  5. Gut Dysbiosis in Patients with Anorexia Nervosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chihiro Morita

    Full Text Available Anorexia nervosa (AN is a psychological illness with devastating physical consequences; however, its pathophysiological mechanism remains unclear. Because numerous reports have indicated the importance of gut microbiota in the regulation of weight gain, it is reasonable to speculate that AN patients might have a microbial imbalance, i.e. dysbiosis, in their gut. In this study, we compared the fecal microbiota of female patients with AN (n = 25, including restrictive (ANR, n = 14 and binge-eating (ANBP, n = 11 subtypes, with those of age-matched healthy female controls (n = 21 using the Yakult Intestinal Flora-SCAN based on 16S or 23S rRNA-targeted RT-quantitative PCR technology. AN patients had significantly lower amounts of total bacteria and obligate anaerobes including those from the Clostridium coccoides group, Clostridium leptum subgroup, and Bacteroides fragilis group than the age-matched healthy women. Lower numbers of Streptococcus were also found in the AN group than in the control group. In the analysis based on AN subtypes, the counts of the Bacteroides fragilis group in the ANR and ANBP groups and the counts of the Clostridium coccoides group in the ANR group were significantly lower than those in the control group. The detection rate of the Lactobacillus plantarum subgroup was significantly lower in the AN group than in the control group. The AN group had significantly lower acetic and propionic acid concentrations in the feces than the control group. Moreover, the subtype analysis showed that the fecal concentrations of acetic acid were lower in the ANR group than in the control group. Principal component analysis confirmed a clear difference in the bacterial components between the AN patients and healthy women. Collectively, these results clearly indicate the existence of dysbiosis in the gut of AN patients.

  6. Nurse evaluation of hyperactivity in anorexia nervosa : A comparative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Elburg, Annemarie A.; Hoek, Hans W.; Kas, Martien J.H.; van Engeland, Herman

    2007-01-01

    Up to 80% of patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) manifest elevated levels of physical activity or hyperactivity. A variety of methods have been used to evaluate activity levels, mostly questionnaires but also expensive and invasive methods such as actometry or other measurements of energy expenditur

  7. Drive for activity in patients with anorexia nervosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sternheim, Lot; Danner, Unna; Adan, Roger; van Elburg, Annemarie

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Hyperactivity and elevated physical activity are both considered symptom characteristics of anorexia nervosa (AN). It has been suggested that a drive for activity (DFA) may underlie these expressions, yet research into DFA in AN remains scant. This study investigated DFA levels in patient

  8. Drive for activity in patients with anorexia nervosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sternheim, Lot; Danner, Unna; Adan, Roger; Van Elburg, Annemarie

    2015-01-01

    Method Two hundred and forty female patients with AN completed measures for DFA, eating disorder (ED) pathology, anxiety, and clinical parameters. Objective Hyperactivity and elevated physical activity are both considered symptom characteristics of anorexia nervosa (AN). It has been suggested that a

  9. [Neurofeedback in the Treatment of Anorexia Nervosa: a Case Report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackner, N; Unterrainer, H F; Skliris, D; Wood, G; Dunitz-Scheer, M; Wallner-Liebmann, S J; Scheer, P J Z; Neuper, C

    2016-02-01

    Anorexia nervosa has been related to alterations in brain activity in terms of hyperactive EEG patterns. This case report illustrates the principles and results of a five-week neurofeedback treatment in a 29-year-old woman suffering from anorexia nervosa. A neurofeedback protocol to enhance alpha activity (8 - 12 Hz) was developed and conducted additionally to the standardized treatment for eating disorders in training sessions twice a week. Pre- and post-test measurements included resting state EEG measurements and a psychological test battery. The results show improvements from pre- to post-test in eating disorder psychopathology including psychological wellbeing, emotional competence, and eating behavior traits. In addition, a decrease in theta power (4 - 7 Hz), a well-known trait marker of anorexia nervosa, was measured. However, our data should be interpreted with caution because this is a single case study. Nevertheless, this report documents the practicability and method of neurofeedback as treatment adjunct in eating disorders from the clinical perspective. Although the use of neurofeedback in the treatment of anorexia nervosa is recommended in literature, empirical studies are still lacking. Randomized controlled trials to evaluate short- and long-term effects of neurofeedback are needed. PMID:26953548

  10. Bulimia and Anorexia Nervosa in Dental and Dental Hygiene Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Karen B. W.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Dentists and dental hygienists are in a unique position to identify an eating disorder patient from observed oral manifestations and to refer the patient for psychological therapy. The inclusion of information on general and oral complications of bulimia and anorexia nervosa in dental and dental hygiene curriculum was examined. (MLW)

  11. A Primary Prevention Program to Reduce Bulimia and Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullari, Salvatore; Redmon, William K.

    This paper presents a theoretical model for a primary prevention program for bulimia and anorexia nervosa to be used with adolescents and young women considered most at risk of developing these eating disorders. Characteristics of potential anorexics and bulimics are identified to aid in the selection of target groups for the program. It is…

  12. Reduced Automatic Motivational Orientation Towards Food in Restricting Anorexia Nervosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenstra, Esther M.; de Jong, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    A striking and characteristic feature of the restricting subtype of anorexia nervosa (AN) is that they are extremely successful in regulating their food intake in a destructive manner. A possible explanation for the persistent character of their restricted food intake could be a loss of the motivati

  13. Dronabinol in severe, enduring anorexia nervosa: A randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andries, Alin; Frystyk, Jan; Flyvbjerg, Allan;

    2013-01-01

    The evidence for pharmacological treatment of severe, longstanding anorexia nervosa (AN) is sparse and the few controlled pharmacologic studies have focused on a narrow range of drugs. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of treatment with a synthetic cannabinoid agonist...

  14. Perceived Personality Traits of Individuals with Anorexia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watters, Jessica E.; Malouff, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Prior research has found evidence of a general negative personality stereotype for individuals who have anorexia nervosa (AN). Methods: This study examined the expected personality characteristics of individuals with AN using the Five-Factor Model of personality to allow identification of specific personality traits that are part of…

  15. Anorexia Nervosa in Adolescence and Maudsley Family-Based Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Kim; Read, Shelly; Wallis, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a serious psychiatric disorder that usually occurs in adolescence. The course of the illness can be protracted. Current empirical evidence suggests that the Maudsley Family-Based Treatment (MFBT) is efficacious for adolescents. MFBT empowers parents as a crucial treatment resource to assist in their child's recovery. The…

  16. Nutritional adequacy of dietary intake in women with anorexia nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Understanding nutrient intake of anorexia nervosa (AN) patients is essential for the establishment of dietary treatment. Design: Women, aged 19 to 30 years, with both restricting and binge purge types of AN, participating in an ecological momentary assessment study, completed three nonc...

  17. Psychiatric Comorbidities among Female Adolescents with Anorexia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salbach-Andrae, Harriet; Lenz, Klaus; Simmendinger, Nicole; Klinkowski, Nora; Lehmkuhl, Ulrike; Pfeiffer, Ernst

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated current comorbid Axis I diagnoses associated with Anorexia Nervosa (AN) in adolescents. The sample included 101 female adolescents treated at a psychiatric unit for primary DSM-IV diagnoses of AN. 73.3% of the AN patients were diagnosed as having a current comorbidity of at least one comorbid Axis I diagnosis, with no…

  18. Neurobiology of hyperactivity and reward : Agreeable restlessness in Anorexia Nervosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheurink, Anton J. W.; Boersma, Gretha J.; Nergardh, Ricard; Sodersten, Per; Nergårdh, Ricard; Södersten, Per

    2010-01-01

    Restricted food intake is associated with increased physical activity, very likely an evolutionary advantage, initially both functional and rewarding. The hyperactivity of patients with Anorexia Nervosa, however, is a main problem for recovery. This seemingly paradoxical reward of hyperactivity in A

  19. Depression and Anorexia Nervosa of Persons with Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymanski, Ludwik S.; Biederman, Joseph

    1984-01-01

    Manifestations of depression in three adults wth Down syndrome, one of whom also exhibited anorexia nervosa, are described. Overall findings indicate that major depression in Down syndrome may be more frequent than previously assumed and that it can be diagnosed with standard diagnostic criteria, modified according to the patient's developmental…

  20. Heightened sensitivity to punishment and reward in anorexia nervosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glashouwer, Klaske A; Bloot, Lotte; Veenstra, Esther M; Franken, Ingmar H A; de Jong, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate reinforcement sensitivity in anorexia nervosa (AN). It was tested whether self-reported punishment (PS) and reward sensitivity (RS) differed between adolescents with AN and healthy controls, and/or between AN-subtypes. In addition, the predictive v

  1. [Somatic care and complications of anorexia nervosa in adolescent girls].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfer, Jennifer; Favaro, Alexandra; Ambresin, Anne-Emmanuelle

    2016-06-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a frequent condition that appears mainly during adolescence and may persist until adulthood. It can have serious consequences, which is why it must be quickly detected and treated. In this article, we describe the parameters to be followed in outpatient clinic, complications not to be missed and when a hospital treatment becomes necessary. PMID:27451511

  2. A Psychoeducational Group Approach for Individuals Recovering from Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapp, Lisa

    Although in-depth, long-term group psychotherapy is a beneficial therapeutic experience for adolescent females suffering from anorexia nervosa, these clients are notoriously resistant to treatment and to long-term, open-ended group settings. This dissidence may stem from a motivational deficiency toward changing their eating patterns and…

  3. Fast psychomotor functioning in underweight anorexia nervosa patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieters, G.F.F.M.; Sabbe, B.G.C.C.; Hulstijn, W.; Probst, M.; Eycken, W. van der; Peuskens, J.

    2003-01-01

    To explore whether underweight anorexia nervosa patients show psychomotor differences relative to normal controls, 32 female hospitalised patients, aged between 14 and 25 years, were compared with 32 healthy, normal weight controls, matched for sex, age and educational level. Using computerised anal

  4. Outpatient Treatment of Primary Anorexia Nervosa in Adult Males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziesat, Harold A., Jr.; Ferguson, James M.

    1984-01-01

    Describes three cases of adult-onset primary anorexia nervosa in males. For each case, the history and diagnostic patterns are considered, followed by a discussion of the course of outpatient treatment. The therapy was multimodal and included elements of behavioral contingency management, cognitive therapy, and dynamic psychotherapy. (JAC)

  5. ["Family groups" for relatives of patients with anorexia nervosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunswick, Astrid; Guy-Rubin, Aurore; Satori, Nadine

    2016-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa affects mainly young adults. During care, caregivers seek alliance with patients' friends and family to be able to relate to the patients' symptoms and also their environment. Collaborative work with families helps build confidence. The "family group" is an example of well-intended partnership. PMID:27157194

  6. Predictive factors of length of inpatient treatment in anorexia nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Strik Lievers, Luisa; Curt, Florence; Wallier, Jenny; Perdereau, Fabienne; Rein, Zoé; Jeammet, Philippe; Godart, Nathalie

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Objective To identify clinical variables influencing the length of stay (LOS) of inpatient treatment for anorexia nervosa (AN). Method We analyzed structured clinical charts of 300 consecutive hospitalizations for AN in a specialized eating disorder unit. The sample included patients from 12 to 22 years ...

  7. Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia: Questions and Answers for School Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, M. Joan

    1984-01-01

    School personnel can have a vital role in the early detection and treatment of anorexia nervosa and bulimia by understanding certain signs and symptoms. This article provides specific information about early detection, approaches to use when confronting the student, and methods to facilitate treatment. (Author/DF)

  8. Psychoneuroendocrinological aspects of anorexia nervosa: predictors of recovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elburg, A.A. van

    2007-01-01

    Anorexia Nervosa (AN) is a psychosomatic eating disorder of unknown aetiology, which primarily affects adolescent girls and young women and is characterized by aberrant patterns of eating behaviour and weight regulation which result in weight loss and endocrine abnormalities such as amenorrhea, dist

  9. Epidemiology and course of anorexia nervosa in the community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keski-Rahkonen, Anna; Hoek, Hans W.; Susser, Ezra S.; Linna, Milla S.; Sihvola, Elina; Raevuori, Anu; Bulik, Cynthia M.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Rissanen, Aila

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Most previous studies of the prevalence, incidence, and outcome of anorexia nervosa have been limited to cases detected through the health care system, which may bias our understanding of the disorder's incidence and natural course. The authors sought to describe the onset and outcomes of

  10. Long-term outcome in anorexia nervosa in the community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mustelin, Linda; Raevuori, Anu; Bulik, Cynthia M.; Rissanen, Aila; Hoek, Hans W.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Keski-Rahkonen, Anna

    2015-01-01

    ObjectiveFew studies have assessed outcomes of anorexia nervosa (AN) outside clinical settings. We aimed to assess mortality, recovery, and socio-demographic outcomes of AN in a community sample. MethodWomen in the nationwide FinnTwin16 cohort (born 1975-1979) were followed for 10 years after baseli

  11. A genome-wide association study of anorexia nervosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boraska, V; Franklin, C S; Floyd, J A B; Thornton, L M; Huckins, L M; Southam, L; Rayner, N W; Tachmazidou, I; Klump, K L; Treasure, J; Lewis, C M; Schmidt, U; Tozzi, F; Kiezebrink, K; Hebebrand, J; Gorwood, P; Adan, R A H; Kas, M J H; Favaro, A; Santonastaso, P; Fernández-Aranda, F; Gratacos, M; Rybakowski, F; Dmitrzak-Weglarz, M; Kaprio, J; Keski-Rahkonen, A; Raevuori, A; Van Furth, E F; Slof-Op 't Landt, M C T; Hudson, J I; Reichborn-Kjennerud, T; Knudsen, G P S; Monteleone, P; Kaplan, A S; Karwautz, A; Hakonarson, H; Berrettini, W H; Guo, Y; Li, D; Schork, N J; Komaki, G; Ando, T; Inoko, H; Esko, T; Fischer, K; Männik, K; Metspalu, A; Baker, J H; Cone, R D; Dackor, J; DeSocio, J E; Hilliard, C E; O'Toole, J K; Pantel, J; Szatkiewicz, J P; Taico, C; Zerwas, S; Trace, S E; Davis, O S P; Helder, S; Bühren, K; Burghardt, R; de Zwaan, M; Egberts, K; Ehrlich, S; Herpertz-Dahlmann, B; Herzog, W; Imgart, H; Scherag, A; Scherag, S; Zipfel, S; Boni, C; Ramoz, N; Versini, A; Brandys, M K; Danner, U N; de Kovel, C; Hendriks, J; Koeleman, B P C; Ophoff, R A; Strengman, E; van Elburg, Annemarie; Bruson, A; Clementi, M; Degortes, D; Forzan, M; Tenconi, E; Docampo, E; Escaramís, G; Jiménez-Murcia, S; Lissowska, J; Rajewski, A; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, N; Slopien, A; Hauser, J; Karhunen, L; Meulenbelt, I; Slagboom, P E; Tortorella, A; Maj, M; Dedoussis, G; Dikeos, D; Gonidakis, F; Tziouvas, K; Tsitsika, A; Papezova, H; Slachtova, L; Martaskova, D; Kennedy, J L; Levitan, R D; Yilmaz, Z; Huemer, J; Koubek, D; Merl, E; Wagner, G; Lichtenstein, P; Breen, G; Cohen-Woods, S; Farmer, A; McGuffin, P; Cichon, S; Giegling, I; Herms, S; Rujescu, D; Schreiber, S; Wichmann, H-E; Dina, C; Sladek, R; Gambaro, G; Soranzo, N; Julia, A; Marsal, S; Rabionet, R; Gaborieau, V; Dick, D M; Palotie, A; Ripatti, S; Widén, E; Andreassen, O A; Espeseth, T; Lundervold, A; Reinvang, I; Steen, V M; Le Hellard, S; Mattingsdal, M; Ntalla, I; Bencko, V; Foretova, L; Janout, V; Navratilova, M; Gallinger, S; Pinto, D; Scherer, S W; Aschauer, H; Carlberg, L; Schosser, A; Alfredsson, L; Ding, B; Klareskog, L; Padyukov, L; Courtet, P; Guillaume, S; Jaussent, I; Finan, C; Kalsi, G; Roberts, M; Logan, D W; Peltonen, L; Ritchie, G R S; Barrett, J C; Estivill, X; Hinney, A; Sullivan, P F; Collier, D A; Zeggini, E; Bulik, C M

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a complex and heritable eating disorder characterized by dangerously low body weight. Neither candidate gene studies nor an initial genome-wide association study (GWAS) have yielded significant and replicated results. We performed a GWAS in 2907 cases with AN from 14 countri

  12. The role of pharmacotherapy in anorexia nervosa and bulimia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolstoi, L G

    1989-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the basic pharmacology and the role of drugs that are used to treat anorexia nervosa and bulimia. The pharmacological treatment of eating disorders is based upon theoretical principles. The theoretical models include: (a) an illness secondary to other psychiatric disorders, (b) a disorder in the hypothalamic control of food intake, (c) a disorder of hypothalamic endocrine regulation, (d) a syndrome secondary to depressive illness, and (e) a disorder in the hypothalamic regulation of food intake. Theoretical models a, b, and c govern the choice of drug therapy for anorexia nervosa, and models d and e govern the choice of drug therapy for bulimia. Drugs used to treat anorexia nervosa and bulimia include tricyclic antidepressants and lithium carbonate. Chlorpromazine, metoclopramide, cyproheptadine, and clomiphene citrate have also been prescribed for the treatment of anorexia nervosa. Monoamine oxidase inhibitors are commonly prescribed to treat bulimia. Fenfluramine has the potential to be of therapeutic value in patients with bulimia. Although drug therapy plays a limited role in the treatment of eating disorders, drugs are commonly prescribed. Therefore, the nutritionist should be familiar with the basic pharmacology and the side effects related to drug therapy. PMID:2572619

  13. The Impact of Childhood Sexual Abuse in Anorexia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Jacqueline C.; Bewell, Carmen; Blackmore, Elizabeth; Woodside, D. Blake

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the impact of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) on clinical characteristics and premature termination of treatment in anorexia nervosa (AN). Method: The participants were 77 consecutive patients with AN admitted to an inpatient eating disorders unit. The patients were assessed in terms of eating disorder…

  14. Anorexia Nervosa: An Overview for the School Counselor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nufrio, Ronald M.

    Anorexia nervosa is a serious eating disorder which affects thousands of people every year. Ninety-five percent of all anorexics are females with the peak age of onset between 14 and 18. While anorexics fit into no specific stereotype, high-risk candidates are often perfectionists and model children who exhibit self-doubt, high conformity,…

  15. Humanistic Approaches to the Understanding and Treatment of Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmar, Helga; Bates, Brian

    1987-01-01

    Summarizes some attempts to understand the causes and consequent treatments of anorexia nervosa from the viewpoints of psychoanalytically informed, family, existential and feminist psychology. These perspectives, which focus on the individual experience of the anorexic, leave many questions unanswered, but provide fresh frameworks from which to…

  16. Effectiveness of individualized, integrative outpatient treatment for females with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freudenberg, Cara; Jones, Rebecca A; Livingston, Genvieve; Goetsch, Virginia; Schaffner, Angela; Buchanan, Linda

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of an individualized outpatient program was investigated in the treatment of bulimia nervosa (BN) and anorexia nervosa (AN). Participants included 151 females who received outpatient eating disorder treatment in the partial hospitalization program, the intensive outpatient program, or a combination of the two programs. Outcome measures included the Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI-2), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II), frequency of binge eating and purging, and mean body weight. Findings included significant increases in weight for the AN group, reductions in binge eating frequency for the BN group, and reductions in EDI-2 and BDI-II scores and purging frequency for both groups. This study provides preliminary support for the efficacy of a multimodal program for the treatment of both anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. PMID:26467107

  17. Readiness to Recover in Adolescent Anorexia Nervosa: Prediction of Hospital Admission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ametller, L.; Castro, J.; Serrano, E.; Martinez, E.; Toro, J.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To determine if motivation to change in anorexia nervosa during treatment is a predictor of hospitalisation in adolescent patients. Method: The Anorexia Nervosa Stages of Change Questionnaire (ANSOCQ), the Eating Disorders Inventory-2 (EDI-2) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) were administered to a group of 70 anorexia nervosa…

  18. A polysomnographic study in young psychiatric inpatients: major depression, anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Lauer, C J; Krieg, J. C.; Riemann, D; Zulley, Jürgen; Berger, M.

    1990-01-01

    The baseline EEG sleep patterns of 10 young depressed patients, 20 patients with anorexia nervosa, 10 patients with bulimia nervosa, and 10 healthy subjects were found to be indistinguishable, except for an increased REM density in the depressed patients. In eating disorder patients, a concomitant major depressive episode had no influence on EEG sleep. The results of the cholinergic REM sleep induction test revealed a significantly faster induction of REM sleep in the depressed patients when ...

  19. A psychological typology of females diagnosed with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa or binge eating disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Bernadetta Izydorczyk

    2015-01-01

    Background The present paper reports the results of research aimed at identifying intra-group differences among females suffering from different eating disorders (anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa or binge eating disorder) in terms of the subjects’ psychological traits, adoption of socio-cultural norms (through media pressure, internationalization of norms, and exposure to information concerning body image standards), and the level of body dissatisfaction. The following research question...

  20. Hypovitaminosis D3, Leukopenia, and Human Serotonin Transporter Polymorphism in Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Tasegian; Francesco Curcio; Laura Dalla Ragione; Francesca Rossetti; Samuela Cataldi; Michela Codini; Francesco Saverio Ambesi-Impiombato; Tommaso Beccari; Elisabetta Albi

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D3 has been described to have different extraskeletal roles by acting as parahormone in obesity, diabetes, cancer, cognitive impairment, and dementia and to have important regulatory functions in innate immunity. There are no studies showing extraskeletal changes associated with hypovitaminosis D3 in eating disorders. Methods. We have analyzed the blood of 18 patients affected by anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa collected over a 15-month period. We performed a panel of chemical an...

  1. Outpatient management of electrolyte imbalances associated with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Ann F

    2005-01-01

    Bulimia nervosa and anorexia nervosa are eating disorders with significant morbidity that often go undetected. Nurses and primary care providers are encouraged to recognize the early signs and symptoms of these disorders and to intervene appropriately. Several case reports in this article describe patients with these disorders and various related electrolyte abnormalities. Understanding electrolyte imbalances associated with both disorders may lead to earlier effective intervention and overall improved health outcomes.

  2. Neurobiology of anorexia and bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, Walter

    2008-04-22

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) are related disorders of unknown etiology that most commonly begin during adolescence in women. AN and BN have unique and puzzling symptoms, such as restricted eating or binge-purge behaviors, body image distortions, denial of emaciation, and resistance to treatment. These are often chronic and relapsing disorders, and AN has the highest death rate of any psychiatric disorder. The lack of understanding of the pathogenesis of this illness has hindered the development of effective interventions, particularly for AN. Individuals with AN and BN are consistently characterized by perfectionism, obsessive-compulsiveness, and dysphoric mood. Individuals with AN tend to have high constraint, constriction of affect and emotional expressiveness, ahendonia and asceticism, whereas individuals with BN tend to be more impulsive and sensation seeking. Such symptoms often begin in childhood, before the onset of an eating disorder, and persist after recovery, suggesting they are traits that create a vulnerability for developing an ED. There is growing acknowledgement that neurobiological vulnerabilities make a substantial contribution to the pathogenesis of AN and BN. Considerable evidence suggests that altered brain serotonin (5-HT) function contributes to dysregulation of appetite, mood, and impulse control in AN and BN. Brain imaging studies, using 5-HT specific ligands, show that disturbances of 5-HT function occur when people are ill, and persist after recovery from AN and BN. It is possible that a trait-related disturbance of 5-HT neuronal modulation predates the onset of AN and contributes to premorbid symptoms of anxiety, obsessionality, and inhibition. This dysphoric temperament may involve an inherent dysregulation of emotional and reward pathways which also mediate the hedonic aspects of feeding, thus making these individuals vulnerable to disturbed appetitive behaviors. Restricting food intake may become powerfully

  3. [Adaptation of psychodrama in psychotherapy of patients with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izydorczyk, Bernadetta

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the article was an attempt to present selected theoretical motifs and moreover self experience in the adaptation of elements of psychodrama by Moreno in psychodynamic psychotherapy (individual and group psychotherapy) in a group of people with anorexia and bulimia nervosa. Psychodrama through own creativity, spontaneity and taking action on the "here and now" stage helps to attain and intensify therapeutic aims which concern the consciousness of inner conflict of persons with anorexia and bulimia nervosa, which is translocated on their body.

  4. Anorexia nervosa: Divergent validity of a prototype narrative among anorexia relatives

    OpenAIRE

    Bárbara C. Machado; Óscar F. Gonçalves; Machado, Paulo P. P.; Margarida R. Henriques; António Roma-Torres; Isabel Brandão

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this ex post facto study was to test the divergent validity (degree of discrimination) of anorexia prototype narrative according to anorectic close confidents (relatives), as well as explore different characteristics of the participants which may be associated with the degree of prototype discrimination. Sixty-four relatives of individuals with anorexia nervosa participated in the study and were asked to indicate their degree of identification, according to their rel...

  5. Anorexia nervosa e bulimia nervosa: abordagem cognitivo-construtivista de psicoterapia Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa: a psychotherapeutic cognitive-constructivist approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano Nabuco de Abreu

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Dos transtornos alimentares, a anorexia nervosa e a bulimia nervosa são os que mais têm levado pacientes adolescentes, geralmente do sexo feminino e cada vez mais jovens, a buscar ajuda. Essa ajuda se dá através de um tratamento multidisciplinar envolvendo médicos psiquiatras, psicólogos e nutricionistas. A psicoterapia tem se mostrado um componente eficaz para a melhora dessas pacientes. O presente artigo tem por objetivo expor uma proposta de tratamento psicoterápico a partir da abordagem cognitivo-construtivista.Among the eating disorders, anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are the ones that have made adolescent patients - often females and aged younger and younger - seek for help. This help is provided through a multidisciplinary treatment involving psychiatrists, psychologists and dietists. Psychotherapy has shown to be an efficient component for these patients' improvement. The present article aims at presenting a proposal of psychotherapeutic treatment based on a cognitive-constructivist approach.

  6. Acquired zinc deficiency in association with anorexia nervosa: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Voorhees, A S; Riba, M

    1992-09-01

    Zinc deficiency, whether a result of an acquired or inherited abnormality of zinc metabolism, is associated with characteristic cutaneous findings. The inherited variety is known as acrodermatitis enteropathica. We present a case of zinc deficiency secondary to starvation induced by anorexia nervosa. Since the cutaneous stigmata of zinc deficiency and anorexia nervosa can initially be subtle and occasionally overlap, we believe that screening zinc levels in patients with anorexia nervosa with prominent cutaneous findings should be considered. PMID:1488378

  7. Anorexia nervosa and dialysis: we have no time when the body is so damaged!

    OpenAIRE

    Osório, Eva; Milheiro, Isabel; Brandão, Isabel; Roma Torres, António

    2013-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa remains challenging to treat and difficult to prevent. Nearly 5% of affected individuals die of this disease and 20% develop a chronic eating disorder. Anorexia nervosa may be associated with several medical complications of varying severity, including dysfunction of the renal system. Though there are some reports of renal failure in patients with anorexia nervosa, few reports are available concerning patients who required maintenance dialysis. We report a case of a patient w...

  8. Translational neuroscience of anorexia nervosa: A genetic and environmental interplay underlying behavioural hyperactivity in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Pjetri, E.

    2012-01-01

    Anorexia Nervosa is a severe mental illness, affecting young females more than males. Anorexia nervosa runs a chronic, relapsing course and is associated with high disability and mortality rates. The hallmark of the disease is keeping a low body weight, less than 85% of what is expected. The etiology of anorexia nervosa is complex (unknown), with risks involving environmental, temperamental, developmental and genetic factors. Though not specified in the diagnosis criteria, excessive physical ...

  9. Cerebral perfusion differences in women currently with and recovered from anorexia nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Sheng, Min; Lu, Hanzhang; Liu, Peiying; Thomas, Binu P.; McAdams, Carrie J.

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a serious psychiatric disorder characterized by restricted eating, a pursuit of thinness, and altered perceptions of body shape and size. Neuroimaging in anorexia nervosa has revealed morphological and functional alterations in the brain. A better understanding of physiological changes in anorexia nervosa could provide a brain-specific health marker relevant to treatment and outcomes. In this study, we applied several advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to...

  10. Anoreksija nervoza s prikazom primera: Anorexia nervosa with a case study:

    OpenAIRE

    Arzenšek, Pia; Lahe, Milica; Turčin, Zlatan

    2005-01-01

    The article presents the summary of the diploma work Anorexia nervosa with a case study. Anorexia nervosa (AN) is presented together with its causes, specific symptoms and complications and the fact that their understanding is of crucial importance for the choice of relevant mode of treatment. The article stresses the importance of the role of the nurse in hospital treatment of patients with anorexia nervosa, and presents the measure called involuntary hospitalization which can prevent vital ...

  11. Anorexia nervosa versus hyperinsulinism: therapeutic effects of neuropharmacological manipulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuad Lechin

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Fuad Lechin1,2, Bertha van der Dijs1,2, Betty Pardey-Maldonado1, Scarlet Baez1, Marcel E Lechin31Sections of Neuroendocrinology, Neuropharmacology, and Neurochemistry, Department of Pathophysiology, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas; 2Instituto de Vias Digestivas Caracas, Centro Clínico Profesional Caracas, Venezuela; 3Department of Internal Medicine, Texas A & M Health Science Center, College of Medicine, Texas, USABackground: We have demonstrated that anorexia nervosa is underpinned by overwhelming adrenal sympathetic activity which abolishes the neural sympathetic branch of the peripheral autonomic nervous system. This physiological disorder is responsible for gastrointestinal hypomotility, hyperglycemia, raised systolic blood pressure, raised heart rate, and other neuroendocrine disorders. Therefore, we prescribed neuropharmacological therapy to reverse this central and autonomic nervous system disorder, in order to normalize the clinical and neuroendocrine profile.Methods: The study included 22 female patients with anorexia nervosa (10 restricted type, 12 binge-eating type who received three months of treatment with amantadine 100 mg/day. We measured blood pressure, heart rate, and circulating neurotransmitters, (noradrenaline, adrenaline, dopamine, platelet serotonin, free plasma serotonin during supine resting, one minute of orthostasis, and a five-minute exercise test before and after one, two, and three months of treatment with amantadine, a drug which abrogates adrenal sympathetic activity by acting at the C1(Ad medullary nuclei responsible for this branch of the peripheral sympathetic activity.Results: We found the amantadine abolished symptoms of anorexia nervosa from the first oral dose onwards. Normalization of autonomic and cardiovascular parameters was demonstrated within the early days of therapy. Abrupt and sustained increases in the plasma noradrenaline

  12. Medical complications of anorexia nervosa and their treatments: an update on some critical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Carrie; Mehler, Philip S

    2015-12-01

    Anorexia nervosa has the highest mortality rate of any psychiatric disorder. Many of the deaths are attributable to medical complications which arise as the malnutrition and weight loss worsens. Every body system may be adversely affected by anorexia nervosa. Yet, remarkably, most of the medical complications of anorexia nervosa are treatable and reversible with optimal medical care, as part of a multidisciplinary team who are often involved in the care of these patients. Herein, we will describe the medical complications of anorexia nervosa and their treatments.

  13. Pneumococcal sepsis associated with adrenal apoplexy in a young woman with anorexia nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Nicola Maria Vitola; Dante Lo Pardo; Romualdo Cirillo; Matteo De Roberto; Pier Giovanni Crocco; Dario Caputo

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND A crude rate of mortality of 5% has been quoted for anorexia nervosa in recent studies. Nowadays the mechanism of death is unclear and various authors recommend that any anorexia nervosa death be reported and that, where possible, an autopsy be performed. METHODS In this work we present a case of sudden death in anorexia nervosa with unexpected autopsy findings. A 21-years-old woman with long-standing anorexia nervosa, severely underweight with a body mass index of 14.47 kg/m2, has...

  14. The occupational roles of women with anorexia nervosa Los papeles ocupacionales de mujeres con anorexia nervosa Os papéis ocupacionais de mulheres com anorexia nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Maria Quiles-Cestari

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This study’s objective was to understand how occupational roles of individuals with anorexia nervosa are configured. The sample was composed of a control group and 11 adult women with anorexia nervosa being cared for by the Eating Disorders Care Group in a hospital in Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil. Socio-demographic and anthropometric data were collected and the Role Checklist was applied. The results revealed a significant loss of roles for women with anorexia nervosa in relation to the performance of the roles worker, friend, and amateur/hobbyist, supporting the idea that psychosocial harm may arise from this eating disorder. The evaluation of occupational roles in the treatment of eating disorders is an important strategy for planning Occupational Therapy activities and supporting the creation of healthier spaces to enable individuals to resume occupational roles, and acquire independence and autonomy.El objetivo es entender como figuran los papeles ocupacionales de las personas con anorexia nervosa. La casuística fue compuesta por 11 personas diagnosticadas en tratamiento en el Grupo de Asistencia en Trastornos Alimentares de un Hospital de Ribeirão Preto-Brasil y un grupo control. Se recogieron variables sociodemográficas, antropométricas y por la “Lista de Identificación de Papeles Ocupacionales”. Los resultados muestran hubo cambio, con pérdida de papeles debido a la anorexia nerviosa, con pérdida de los papeles de trabajador, voluntario, amigo y pasatiempo amador, corroborando los perjuicios psicosociales derivados de este trastorno. La evaluación de los papeles ocupacionales en el tratamiento de los trastornos alimentares es una estrategia importante para la planificación de la terapia ocupacional por la concesión de subvenciones para crear ambientes más saludables, donde las posibilidades de crear el rescate de los papeles ocupacionales, la independencia y autonomía.O objetivo desta pesquisa foi compreender como se

  15. Anorexia Nervosa: A Unified Neurological Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasneem Fatema Hasan, Hunaid Hasan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The roles of corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF, opioid peptides, leptin and ghrelin in anorexia nervosa (AN were discussed in this paper. CRF is the key mediator of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis and also acts at various other parts of the brain, such as the limbic system and the peripheral nervous system. CRF action is mediated through the CRF1 and CRF2 receptors, with both HPA axis-dependent and HPA axis-independent actions, where the latter shows nil involvement of the autonomic nervous system. CRF1 receptors mediate both the HPA axis-dependent and independent pathways through CRF, while the CRF2 receptors exclusively mediate the HPA axis-independent pathways through urocortin. Opioid peptides are involved in the adaptation and regulation of energy intake and utilization through reward-related behavior. Opioids play a role in the addictive component of AN, as described by the “auto-addiction opioids theory”. Their interactions have demonstrated the psychological aspect of AN and have shown to prevent the functioning of the physiological homeostasis. Important opioids involved are β-lipotropin, β-endorphin and dynorphin, which interact with both µ and κ opioids receptors to regulate reward-mediated behavior and describe the higher incidence of AN seen in females. Moreover, ghrelin is known as the “hunger” hormone and helps stimulate growth hormone (GH and hepatic insulin-like-growth-factor-1(IGF-1, maintaining anabolism and preserving a lean body mass. In AN, high levels of GH due to GH resistance along with low levels of IGF-1 are observed. Leptin plays a role in suppressing appetite through the inhibition of neuropeptide Y gene. Moreover, the CRF, opioid, leptin and ghrelin mechanisms operate collectively at the HPA axis and express the physiological and psychological components of AN. Fear conditioning is an intricate learning process occurring at the level of the hippocampus, amygdala, lateral septum and the

  16. A Brief Review of the Biology of Anorexia Nervosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjögren, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Background: The etiology of Anorexia Nervosa (AN) is unknown. A stress model for AN and other Eating Disorders, has been proposed by Connan and depicts risk factors and precipitating events, including biological, but several steps in this have yet to be evidenced. In order to elucidate the biology...... PUBMED and the following search terms: “Anorexia Nervosa” and “biomarker” revealed 180 articles (8th of May 2015). Additional searches included the search terms “gene”, “genetic”, “epigenetic”, “appetite”, “hormone”, and a specific search on “biology” and “review”. Furthermore, articles of interest were...

  17. Dual-energy CT (DECT) imaging of tophi and monosodium urate deposits in a patient with longstanding anorexia nervosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weihe, Johan Petur; Birger Morillon, Melanie; Lambrechtsen, Jess;

    Dual-energy CT (DECT) imaging of tophi and monosodium urate deposits in a patient with longstanding anorexia nervosa......Dual-energy CT (DECT) imaging of tophi and monosodium urate deposits in a patient with longstanding anorexia nervosa...

  18. Prolonged QT interval in a man with anorexia nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macías-Robles, María Dolores; Perez-Clemente, Ana María; Maciá-Bobes, Carmen; Alvarez-Rueda, María Asunción; Pozo-Nuevo, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder characterized by the avoidance of food intake, which usually leads to a weight loss. Cardiac co-morbility is common and we can find sometimes a mass loss from the left ventricle, which can be seen by echocardiography. But the commonest complications are rhythm variations, typically bradycardia with a prolonged QT interval in up to a 40% of the cases, which altogether elevates ventricular tachycardia and sudden death risk. We present the case of a male who was diagnosed with anorexia nervosa and developed asthenia, a long QT interval and also a severe both hypokalaemia and hypomagnesaemia. We intend to discuss the pathogenic paths as well as prophylactic and therapeutic measures to this potentially-lethal pathology. PMID:19646241

  19. Prolonged QT interval in a man with anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macías-Robles, María Dolores; Perez-Clemente, Ana María; Maciá-Bobes, Carmen; Alvarez-Rueda, María Asunción; Pozo-Nuevo, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder characterized by the avoidance of food intake, which usually leads to a weight loss. Cardiac co-morbility is common and we can find sometimes a mass loss from the left ventricle, which can be seen by echocardiography. But the commonest complications are rhythm variations, typically bradycardia with a prolonged QT interval in up to a 40% of the cases, which altogether elevates ventricular tachycardia and sudden death risk. We present the case of a male who was diagnosed with anorexia nervosa and developed asthenia, a long QT interval and also a severe both hypokalaemia and hypomagnesaemia. We intend to discuss the pathogenic paths as well as prophylactic and therapeutic measures to this potentially-lethal pathology. PMID:19646241

  20. MRI demonstration of orbital lipolysis in anorexia nervosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this article is to describe the orbital changes due to lipolysis in anorexia nervosa. We examined a cachectic patient with MR imaging using T1-weighted images before and after contrast enhancement. Orbital fat edema has been observed in extreme forms of cachexia and the CT and MR findings have recently been reported. The imaging appearances have been explained by the disappearance of the fat tissue and the appearance of edema due to a disturbance in the electrolyte fluid balance. In the recent literature particular attention has been paid to the increased lipid peroxidation and lipolysis in anorexia nervosa. These metabolic processes result in an increased permeability of the vessel wall endothelium, which can explain the extravasation of the contrast agent in the orbital fat on MR imaging. (orig.)

  1. Peculiar enlargement of the nasopharynx in patients with anorexia nervosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examined the nasopharynx and brain in 17 patients with anorexia nervosa by CT and compared the findings with those of 44 normal subjects and of 5 patients of the same age with marked emaciation caused by various psychiatric disorders. An enlarged nasopharyngeal space with a flattened posterior wall and enlarged lateral pharyngeal recesses were demonstrated in all patients with anorexia nervosa whose weight was lowest at the time of the CT examination, and these CT features regressed or became normal quickly after they had gained some weight. This characteristic enlargement of the nasopharynx and lateral pharyngeal recesses was observed neither in the markedly emaciated patients (2 with schizophrenia, 1 with major depression, 1 with stupor and the other with an extremely unbalanced diet) nor in 44 normal subjects without emaciation. These features were therefore thought to be characteristic and of diagnostic significance. (orig.). With 5 figs., 3 tabs

  2. MRI demonstration of orbital lipolysis in anorexia nervosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demaerel, Philippe; Dekimpe, Piet; Wilms, Guy [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Muls, Erik [Department of Endocrinology, University Hospitals, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium)

    2002-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the orbital changes due to lipolysis in anorexia nervosa. We examined a cachectic patient with MR imaging using T1-weighted images before and after contrast enhancement. Orbital fat edema has been observed in extreme forms of cachexia and the CT and MR findings have recently been reported. The imaging appearances have been explained by the disappearance of the fat tissue and the appearance of edema due to a disturbance in the electrolyte fluid balance. In the recent literature particular attention has been paid to the increased lipid peroxidation and lipolysis in anorexia nervosa. These metabolic processes result in an increased permeability of the vessel wall endothelium, which can explain the extravasation of the contrast agent in the orbital fat on MR imaging. (orig.)

  3. EEG neurofeedback effects in the treatment of adolescent anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackner, Nina; Unterrainer, Human-Friedrich; Skliris, Dimitris; Shaheen, Sandra; Dunitz-Scheer, Marguerite; Wood, Guilherme; Scheer, Peter Jaron Zwi; Wallner-Liebmann, Sandra Johanna; Neuper, Christa

    2016-01-01

    A pre-post design including 22 females was used to evaluate the effectiveness of neurofeedback in the treatment of adolescent anorexia nervosa. Resting EEG measures and a psychological test-battery assessing eating behavior traits, clinical symptoms, emotionality, and mood were obtained. While both the experimental (n = 10) and control group (n = 12) received their usual maintenance treatment, the experimental group received 10 sessions of individual alpha frequency training over a period of 5 weeks as additional treatment. Significant training effects were shown in eating behavior traits, emotion regulation, and in relative theta power in the eyes closed condition. Although the results are limited due to the small sample size, these are the first empirical data demonstrating the benefits of neurofeedback as a treatment adjunct in individuals with anorexia nervosa. PMID:27027700

  4. Peculiar enlargement of the nasopharynx in patients with anorexia nervosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, K. [Department of Radiology, School of Dentistry, Niigata Univ. (Japan); Ito, J. [Department of Radiology, School of Dentistry, Niigata Univ. (Japan); Tokiguchi, S. [Department of Radiology, School of Dentistry, Niigata Univ. (Japan); Kuwabara, G. [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Niigata University, Niigata (Japan); Nishihara, M. [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Niigata University, Niigata (Japan)

    1995-11-01

    We examined the nasopharynx and brain in 17 patients with anorexia nervosa by CT and compared the findings with those of 44 normal subjects and of 5 patients of the same age with marked emaciation caused by various psychiatric disorders. An enlarged nasopharyngeal space with a flattened posterior wall and enlarged lateral pharyngeal recesses were demonstrated in all patients with anorexia nervosa whose weight was lowest at the time of the CT examination, and these CT features regressed or became normal quickly after they had gained some weight. This characteristic enlargement of the nasopharynx and lateral pharyngeal recesses was observed neither in the markedly emaciated patients (2 with schizophrenia, 1 with major depression, 1 with stupor and the other with an extremely unbalanced diet) nor in 44 normal subjects without emaciation. These features were therefore thought to be characteristic and of diagnostic significance. (orig.). With 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. The Disjointed Historical Trajectory of Anorexia Nervosa Before 1970.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Court, John P M; Kaplan, Allan S

    2016-01-01

    Responses in pre-modern eras to anorexia nervosa (as now understood) varied widely, from religious piety and sanctity through fear and superstition. While noting briefly the limited conceptualizations from pre-modern history this article is primarily focused from the late 19th century, commencing with helpful but tentative formulations of anorexia nervosa for early-modern medicine that were laid out, consistently between themselves, by Lesègue, Gull and Osler. Yet that promising biomedical advent was superseded for more than a half-century by deep, internal divisions and bitter rifts that festered between three medical disciplines: neurology; Freudian psychotherapy; and Kraepelinian biological psychiatry. Mid-20th century developments preceded the 1960-1980s' improved understanding of suffering and movement toward effective remediation introduced by Dr. Hilde Bruch. PMID:26769199

  6. Anorexia nervosa: from purgative behaviour to nephropathy. a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Manzato, Emilia; Mazzullo, Maria; Gualandi, Malvina; Zanetti, Tatiana; Scanelli, Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    Background Individuals who suffer from Anorexia Nervosa refuse to maintain a minimally normal body weight, are intensely afraid of gaining weight and exhibit a significant disturbance in the perception of the shape and size of their body. Postmenarchal females with this disorder are amenorrohic. In the Binge-Eating/Purging subtype individuals regularly engage in binge eating and purging behaviour (i.e self-induced vomiting or misuse of laxatives, diuretics, or enemas). Hypokalaemia is often s...

  7. Kwashiorkor-like zinc deficiency syndrome in anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esca, S A; Brenner, W; Mach, K; Gschnait, F

    1979-01-01

    This report deals with a 26-year-old white woman exhibiting signs of both Kwashiorkor (marasmus, pallor, hypopigmentation of hair and hepatomegaly) and acrodermatitis enteropathica (eczematous dermatitis predominantly on acral areas). Clinical and laboratory examinations excluded malabsorption syndrome and glucagonoma syndrome and revealed hypoproteinemia and marked zinc deficiency. Psychiatric examination disclosed anorexia nervosa. Substitution therapy led to rapid clearing of the skin lesions. PMID:92154

  8. Anorexia nervosa: a multifactorial disease of nutritional origin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannhauser, Pia P

    2002-01-01

    Nutrition in general, with infant and child nutrition in particular, have changed in the past century through altered farming practices and eating habits. Food intake in childhood can influence the expression of the genetic potential. In this paper it is attempted to show how childhood zinc deficiency, aggravated in puberty by high energy/low zinc ratio of the diet and stresses of various kinds, can influence both mental and physical development and ultimately lead to the development of anorexia nervosa. PMID:12467193

  9. Ghrelin: Central and Peripheral Implications in Anorexia Nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Méquinion, Mathieu; Langlet, Fanny; Zgheib, Sara; Dickson, Suzanne; Dehouck, Bénédicte; Chauveau, Christophe; Viltart, Odile

    2013-01-01

    Increasing clinical and therapeutic interest in the neurobiology of eating disorders reflects their dramatic impact on health. Chronic food restriction resulting in severe weight loss is a major symptom described in restrictive anorexia nervosa (AN) patients, and they also suffer from metabolic disturbances, infertility, osteopenia, and osteoporosis. Restrictive AN, mostly observed in young women, is the third largest cause of chronic illness in teenagers of industrialized countries. From a n...

  10. Prolonged QT interval in a man with anorexia nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Macías-Robles, María Dolores; Perez-Clemente, Ana María; Maciá-Bobes, Carmen; Alvarez-Rueda, María Asunción; Pozo-Nuevo, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder characterized by the avoidance of food intake, which usually leads to a weight loss. Cardiac co-morbility is common and we can find sometimes a mass loss from the left ventricle, which can be seen by echocardiography. But the commonest complications are rhythm variations, typically bradycardia with a prolonged QT interval in up to a 40% of the cases, which altogether elevates ventricular tachycardia and sudden death risk. We present the case of a male wh...

  11. Early-onset anorexia nervosa in girls with Asperger syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Dudova I; Kocourkova J; Koutek J

    2015-01-01

    Iva Dudova, Jana Kocourkova, Jiri Koutek Department of Child Psychiatry, Charles University Second Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Motol, Prague, Czech Republic Abstract: Eating disorders frequently occur in conjunction with autism spectrum disorders, posing diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties. The comorbidity of anorexia nervosa and Asperger syndrome is a significant clinical complication and has been associated with a poorer prognosis. The authors are presenting the cases ...

  12. Abnormal white matter properties in adolescent girls with anorexia nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Travis, Katherine E.; Neville H. Golden; FELDMAN, HEIDI M.; Murray Solomon; Jenny Nguyen; Aviv Mezer; Yeatman, Jason D.; Dougherty, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a serious eating disorder that typically emerges during adolescence and occurs most frequently in females. To date, very few studies have investigated the possible impact of AN on white matter tissue properties during adolescence, when white matter is still developing. The present study evaluated white matter tissue properties in adolescent girls with AN using diffusion MRI with tractography and T1 relaxometry to measure R1 (1/T1), an index of myelin content. Fifteen ...

  13. Neurocognitive and social cognition deficits in patients with anorexia nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Kułakowska, Dorota; Biernacka, Katarzyna; Wilkos, Ewelina; Rybakowski, Filip; Kucharska-Pietura, Katarzyna

    2014-01-01

    In the first part of the article the authors present a set of the actual concepts explaining problems of cognitive functions and social cognition currently observed in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN). It is possible; through the neuroimaging research, to get better understanding of the brain specifics in these individuals. Even though, the AN remains a disease with very complex and multifactorial etiology which remains a huge medical challenge. Currently, popular is the view that takes in...

  14. Cognitive remediation therapy for patients with anorexia nervosa: preliminary findings

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell Iain C; Davies Helen; Tchanturia Kate

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a severe mental illness. Drug treatments are not effective and there is no established first choice psychological treatment for adults with AN. Neuropsychological studies have shown that patients with AN have difficulties in cognitive flexibility: these laboratory based findings have been used to develop a clinical intervention based on Cognitive Remediation Therapy (CRT) which aims to use cognitive exercises to strengthen thinking skills. Aims 1) ...

  15. Current treatment for anorexia nervosa: efficacy, safety, and adherence

    OpenAIRE

    Lindsay P Bodell; Keel, Pamela K.

    2010-01-01

    Lindsay P Bodell, Pamela K KeelDepartment of Psychology, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, USAAbstract: Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a serious psychiatric illness associated with significant medical and psychiatric morbidity, psychosocial impairment, increased risk of death, and chronicity. Given the severity of the disorder, the establishment of safe and effective treatments is necessary. Several treatments have been tried in AN, but few favorable results have emerged. This paper review...

  16. Psychoneuroendocrinological aspects of anorexia nervosa: predictors of recovery

    OpenAIRE

    van Elburg, A A

    2007-01-01

    Anorexia Nervosa (AN) is a psychosomatic eating disorder of unknown aetiology, which primarily affects adolescent girls and young women and is characterized by aberrant patterns of eating behaviour and weight regulation which result in weight loss and endocrine abnormalities such as amenorrhea, disturbances in attitude and perception about weight and shape, and an intense fear of gaining weight. This thesis is based upon a follow up cohort study of 61 young girls and women consecutively refer...

  17. Time course of bone loss in patients with anorexia nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Olmos Martínez, José Manuel; Valero Díaz de Lamadrid, Carmen; Gómez del Barrio, José Andrés; Amado Señarís, José Antonio; Hernández Hernández, José Luis; Menéndez Arango, José; González Macías, Jesús

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the time course of bone mineral density (BMD) in women with anorexia nervosa (AN) during two years of follow-up. Methods: We prospectively studied 51 female with AN aged 18-38 years, and forty age-matched healthy women (19-34 years). BMD was measured in lumbar spine (LS), femoral neck (FN) and total hip (TH) by DXA. Results: At baseline, weight, body mass index, and lumbar and hip BMD were significantly (p

  18. Serum glutamine, set-shifting ability and anorexia nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Collier David A; Campbell Iain C; Tchanturia Kate; Schmidt Ulrike; Hashimoto Kenji; Nakazato Michiko; Iyo Masaomi; Treasure Janet

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Set-shifting is impaired in people with anorexia nervosa (AN), but the underlying physiological and biochemical processes are unclear. Animal studies have established that glutamatergic pathways in the prefrontal cortex play an important role in set-shifting ability. However, it is not yet understood whether levels of serum glutamatergic amino acids are associated with set-shifting performance in humans. The aim of this study was to determine whether serum concentrations o...

  19. Mirroring voices of mother, daughter and therapist in Anorexia Nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Weaver, Kathryn; Martin-McDonald, Kristine; Spiers, Judith

    2012-01-01

    "Die Erfahrungen von Frauen mit Essstörungen und die Deutungen, die Frauen aufgrund dieser Erfahrungen vollziehen, werden meist vor Professionellen im Gesundheitswesen zurückgehalten und sind deshalb in klinischen und akademischen Diskursen nur schlecht repräsentiert. In der hier vorgestellten Studie haben die Autorinnen sich - ausgehend von persönlichen Reflexionen, Tagebüchern und Briefen - mit der Beziehung zwischen einer Mutter, deren an Anorexia Nervosa leidender Tochter sowie einer Ther...

  20. Predictors of the resumption of menses in adolescent anorexia nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Dempfle, Astrid; Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate; Timmesfeld, Nina; Schwarte, Reinhild; Egberts, Karin M; Pfeiffer, Ernst; Fleischhaker, Christian; Wewetzer, Christoph; Bühren, Katharina

    2013-01-01

    Background: The resumption of menses is an important indicator of recovery in anorexia nervosa (AN). Patients with early-onset AN are at particularly great risk of suffering from the long-term physical and psychological consequences of persistent gonadal dysfunction. However, the clinical variables that predict the recovery of menstrual function during weight gain in AN remain poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of several clinical parameters on the resumpti...

  1. Ghrelin: Central and Peripheral Implications in Anorexia Nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Mathieu eMéquinion; Fanny eLanglet; Sara eZgheib; Suzanne eDickson; Bénédicte eDehouck; Christophe eChauveau; Odile eViltart

    2013-01-01

    Food intake and associated disorders are gaining large emphasis in our societies due to their dramatic physiological and psychological consequences on health. Chronic food restriction is a major symptom described in restrictive anorexia nervosa (AN) patients. This disease, mostly observed in young women is the third cause of chronic illness in teenagers. It leads to central and/or peripheral reprogramming that permits the organism to endure the reduced energy supplies. These drastic condition...

  2. Early-onset anorexia nervosa in girls with Asperger syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudova, Iva; Kocourkova, Jana; Koutek, Jiri

    2015-01-01

    Eating disorders frequently occur in conjunction with autism spectrum disorders, posing diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties. The comorbidity of anorexia nervosa and Asperger syndrome is a significant clinical complication and has been associated with a poorer prognosis. The authors are presenting the cases of an eleven-year-old girl and a five-and-a-half-year-old girl with comorbid eating disorders and Asperger syndrome.

  3. Early-onset anorexia nervosa in girls with Asperger syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudova, Iva; Kocourkova, Jana; Koutek, Jiri

    2015-01-01

    Eating disorders frequently occur in conjunction with autism spectrum disorders, posing diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties. The comorbidity of anorexia nervosa and Asperger syndrome is a significant clinical complication and has been associated with a poorer prognosis. The authors are presenting the cases of an eleven-year-old girl and a five-and-a-half-year-old girl with comorbid eating disorders and Asperger syndrome. PMID:26170676

  4. Body Image Disturbance and Emotional Regulation in Anorexia Nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a severe mental illness with a number of physical, psychological and social conditions. In spite of the severity of the disorder, we still lack empirical evidence to choose one treatment over another. The failure to show scientific evidence of effective treatment and prevention might rely on the complex psychological mechanisms involved in the disorder. To further improve our ability to help patients with AN, a better understanding of the specific mechanisms involved ...

  5. Anorexia nervosa and body fat distribution: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ghoch, Marwan; Calugi, Simona; Lamburghini, Silvia; Dalle Grave, Riccardo

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this paper was to conduct a systematic review of body fat distribution before and after partial and complete weight restoration in individuals with anorexia nervosa. Literature searches, study selection, method development and quality appraisal were performed independently by two authors, and data was synthesized using a narrative approach. Twenty studies met the inclusion criteria and were consequently analyzed. The review had five main findings. First, during anorexia nervosa adolescent females lose more central body fat, while adult females more peripheral fat. Second, partial weight restoration leads to greater fat mass deposition in the trunk region than other body regions in adolescent females. Third, after short-term weight restoration, whether partial or complete, adults show a central adiposity phenotype with respect to healthy age-matched controls. Fourth, central fat distribution is associated with increased insulin resistance, but does not adversely affect eating disorder psychopathology or cause psychological distress in female adults. Fifth, the abnormal central fat distribution seems to normalize after long-term maintenance of complete weight restoration, indicating that preferential central distribution of body fat is a transitory phenomenon. However, a discrepancy in the findings has been noted, especially between adolescents and adults; besides age and gender, these appear to be related to differences in the methodology and time of body composition assessments. The PROSPERO Registry-Anorexia Nervosa and Body Fat Distribution: A Systematic Review (CRD42014008738). PMID:25251296

  6. Anorexia Nervosa and Body Fat Distribution: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwan El Ghoch

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to conduct a systematic review of body fat distribution before and after partial and complete weight restoration in individuals with anorexia nervosa. Literature searches, study selection, method development and quality appraisal were performed independently by two authors, and data was synthesized using a narrative approach. Twenty studies met the inclusion criteria and were consequently analyzed. The review had five main findings. First, during anorexia nervosa adolescent females lose more central body fat, while adult females more peripheral fat. Second, partial weight restoration leads to greater fat mass deposition in the trunk region than other body regions in adolescent females. Third, after short-term weight restoration, whether partial or complete, adults show a central adiposity phenotype with respect to healthy age-matched controls. Fourth, central fat distribution is associated with increased insulin resistance, but does not adversely affect eating disorder psychopathology or cause psychological distress in female adults. Fifth, the abnormal central fat distribution seems to normalize after long-term maintenance of complete weight restoration, indicating that preferential central distribution of body fat is a transitory phenomenon. However, a discrepancy in the findings has been noted, especially between adolescents and adults; besides age and gender, these appear to be related to differences in the methodology and time of body composition assessments. The PROSPERO Registry—Anorexia Nervosa and Body Fat Distribution: A Systematic Review (CRD42014008738.

  7. Symptoms of psychosis in anorexia and bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miotto, Paola; Pollini, Barbara; Restaneo, Antonietta; Favaretto, Gerardo; Sisti, Davide; Rocchi, Marco B L; Preti, Antonio

    2010-02-28

    Despite evidence from case series, the comorbidity of eating disorders with psychosis is less investigated than their comorbidity with anxiety and mood disorders. We investigated the occurrence of symptoms of psychosis in 112 female patients diagnosed with DSM-IV eating disorders (anorexia nervosa=61, bulimia nervosa=51) and 631 high school girls in the same health district as the patients: the items of the SCL-90R symptom dimensions "paranoid ideation" and "psychoticism" were specifically examined. No case of co-morbid schizophrenia was observed among patients. Compared with controls, the patients with anorexia nervosa were more likely to endorse the item "Never feeling close to another person"; the patients with bulimia nervosa were more likely to endorse the item "Feeling others are to blame for your troubles". Both groups of patients were more likely than controls to endorse the item "Idea that something is wrong with your mind". The students who were identified by the EAT and the BITE as being "at risk" for eating disorders were more likely to assign their body a causative role in their problems. Symptoms of psychosis can be observed in patients with eating disorders, but these could be better explained within the psychopathology of the disorders rather than by assuming a link with schizophrenia.

  8. Unusual Presentation of Uncommon Disease: Anorexia Nervosa Presenting as Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome—A Case Report from Southeast Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Raheel Mushtaq; Sheikh Shoib; Tabindah Shah; Mudasir Bhat; Randhir Singh; Sahil Mushtaq

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa presenting as Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome is rare. The causes of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome are multiple like alcohol abuse, thyrotoxicosis, haemodialysis, severe malnutrition because of gastric carcinoma and pyloric obstruction, hyperemesis gravidarum, and prolonged parenteral feeding. We report a case of anorexia nervosa, who presented with Wernicke's encephalopathy and progressed to Korsakoff's syndrome. Knowledge, awareness, and early intervention of anorexia nervosa...

  9. Autism and anorexia nervosa: Two facets of the same disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odent, Michel

    2010-07-01

    We compiled data included in the Primal Health Research Database (www.primalhealthresearch.com) to test the hypothesis that when two pathological conditions or personality traits share the same critical period for gene-environment interaction, we should expect further similarities, particularly from clinical and pathophysiological perspectives. The keywords 'autism' and 'anorexia nervosa' (but not bulimia nervosa) lead to studies suggesting that for both conditions the perinatal period is critical. We take this example to look at other possible links between these pathological entities. From a clinical perspective, several teams have independently emphasized the importance of autistic traits in anorexia nervosa. Deficits in the processing of oxytocin have been demonstrated in both cases. Autistic groups have significantly lower blood oxytocin levels than normal groups, and oxytocin levels increase with age in the normal group only. In autistic groups there is a high ratio of intermediates of oxytocin synthesis (OX-T) to the nonapeptide oxytocin (OT). On the other hand, it has been reported that the level of oxytocin in the cerebrospinal fluid of anorexic women is significantly lower than the level of oxytocin in bulimic and control subjects. Scanning data reveal similar asymmetric functions with left hemisphere preponderance in autistic spectrum disorders and anorexia. A comparative study of the mirror neurons systems is another promising avenue for research. Such an accumulation of similarities from a great diversity of perspectives suggests that anorexia nervosa might be considered a female variant of the autistic spectrum. A plausible interpretation is that prenatal exposure to male hormones might protect against the expression of this disease: girls who have a twin brother are at low risk for anorexia nervosa, compared with girls who have a twin sister, and with controls; furthermore genetic linkage analyses do not detect change on the X chromosome. From an

  10. Manualized Family-Based Treatment for Anorexia Nervosa: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Grange, Daniel; Binford, Roslyn; Loeb, Katharine L.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to describe a case series of children and adolescents (mean age = 14.5 years, SD = 2.3; range 9-18) with anorexia nervosa who received manualized family-based treatment for their eating disorder. Method: Forty-five patients with anorexia nervosa were compared pre- and post-treatment on weight and menstrual…

  11. Translational neuroscience of anorexia nervosa: A genetic and environmental interplay underlying behavioural hyperactivity in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pjetri, E.

    2012-01-01

    Anorexia Nervosa is a severe mental illness, affecting young females more than males. Anorexia nervosa runs a chronic, relapsing course and is associated with high disability and mortality rates. The hallmark of the disease is keeping a low body weight, less than 85% of what is expected. The etiolog

  12. A Comparison of Short- And Long-Term Family Therapy for Adolescent Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, James; Agras, W. Stewart; Bryson, Susan; Kraemer, Helena C.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Research suggests that family treatment for adolescents with anorexia nervosa may be effective. This study was designed to determine the optimal length of such family therapy. Method: Eighty-six adolescents (12-18 years of age) diagnosed with anorexia nervosa were allocated at random to either a short-term (10 sessions over 6 months) or…

  13. Bulimics with and without Prior Anorexia Nervosa: A Comparison of Personality Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzman, Melanie A.; Wolchik, Sharlene A.

    A controversial issue in the literature on eating disorders is whether or not bulimia is a disorder distinct from anorexia nervosa. To compare the personality and behavioral characteristics of bulimic women with and without prior anorexia nervosa, 14 female college students (mean age 19.6 years, 86 percent white) were divided into two groups…

  14. Anorexia Nervosa/Bulimia. LC Science Tracer Bullet, TB 85-8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halasz, Hisako, Comp.

    This bibliography is intended to help readers locate material on anorexia nervosa and bulimia in the collections of the Library of Congress. A scope note briefly defines the terms "anorexia nervosa" and "bulimia" and discusses similarities and differences between the two eating disorders. Four references are included as introductions to the topic…

  15. Locus of Control, Psychopathology, and Weight Gain in Juvenile Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strober, Michael

    1982-01-01

    Based on a hypothesized disturbance in personal control and efficacy in anorexia nervosa, locus of control score in female adolescents with anorexia nervosa was compared to scores obtained from depressed and conduct-disordered controls and to adolescent female standardization norms. (Author/CL)

  16. Einfluss von Mirtazapin auf die Cortisolsekretion und die klinischen Parameter bei Patientinnen mit Anorexia nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Sighart, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Das Antidepressivum Mirtazapin senkt Cortisolsekretion im Speichel bei Patientinnen mit Anorexia nervosa statistisch signifikant über die Zeit. Es wurden bei 5 Patientinnen in einem Zeitraum von 21 Tagen Speichelproben genommen. Der Schluß lautet, dass eine Mirtazapintherapie sinnvoll sein könnte, Hypercortisolismus bei Anorexia nervosa zu behandeln und HPA-Achsendysfunktion wieder herzustellen.

  17. Coming Together to Calm the Hunger: Group Therapy Program for Adults Diagnosed with Anorexia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponech, Heather; McBride, Dawn Lorraine

    2012-01-01

    This project provides a comprehensive overview of the research literature on anorexia nervosa in female adults and concludes by offering 14 group therapy lesson plans for anorexia nervosa that therapists may use in their practice. There is a remarkable lack of research on the efficacy of treatment designed for individuals diagnosed with anorexia…

  18. Recovery of Normal Body Weight in Adolescents with Anorexia Nervosa: The Nurses’ Perspective on Effective Interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, René; Meijel, Berno van; Beukers, Laura; Ommen, Joyce van; Meerwijk, Esther; Elburg, Annemarie van

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about effective nursing interventions for adolescents with anorexia nervosa. The purpose of this study was to discover which aspects of nursing care are most effective, according to nurses, in recovery of normal body weight in adolescents with anorexia nervosa. METHODS: A qualitative

  19. Factors Associated with Recovery from Anorexia Nervosa : A Population-Based Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keski-Rahkonen, Anna; Raevuori, Anu; Bulik, Cynthia M.; Hoek, Hans W.; Rissanen, Aila; Kaprio, Jaakko

    2014-01-01

    Background: To examine factors associated with the outcome of anorexia nervosa among women from the general population. Method: Women (N = 2,881) from the 1975-1979 birth cohorts of Finnish twins were screened for lifetime DSM-IV anorexia nervosa (N = 55 cases) using questionnaires and the SCID inte

  20. A Developmental View of Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akeroyd-Guillory, Denise

    1988-01-01

    Conducted research, based on Erikson's theory of identity development, to examine anorexic's progression through early stages of development. Results support the view that the negative aspects of development are clearly present in the anorexic. Findings have implications for school counselors. Introductory questionnaire on anorexia is appended.…

  1. Association of CNR1 and FAAH endocannabinoid gene polymorphisms with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa: evidence for synergistic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteleone, P; Bifulco, M; Di Filippo, C; Gazzerro, P; Canestrelli, B; Monteleone, F; Proto, M C; Di Genio, M; Grimaldi, C; Maj, M

    2009-10-01

    Endocannabinoids modulate eating behavior; hence, endocannabinoid genes may contribute to the biological vulnerability to eating disorders. The rs1049353 (1359 G/A) single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of the gene coding the endocannabinoid CB1 receptor (CNR1) and the rs324420 (cDNA 385C to A) SNP of the gene coding fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), the major degrading enzyme of endocannabinoids, have been suggested to have functional effects on mature proteins. Therefore, we explored the possibility that those SNPs were associated to anorexia nervosa and/or bulimia nervosa. The distributions of the CNR1 1359 G/A SNP and of the FAAH cDNA 385C to A SNP were investigated in 134 patients with anorexia nervosa, 180 patients with bulimia nervosa and 148 normal weight healthy controls. Additive effects of the two SNPs in the genetic susceptibility to anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa were also tested. As compared to healthy controls, anorexic and bulimic patients showed significantly higher frequencies of the AG genotype and the A allele of the CNR1 1359 G/A SNP. Similarly, the AC genotype and the A allele of the FAAH cDNA 385C to A SNP were significantly more frequent in anorexic and bulimic individuals. A synergistic effect of the two SNPs was evident in anorexia nervosa but not in bulimia nervosa. Present findings show for the first time that the CNR1 1359 G/A SNP and the FAAH cDNA 385C to A SNP are significantly associated to anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, and demonstrate a synergistic effect of the two SNPs in anorexia nervosa.

  2. Anorexia nervosa: treatment expectations – a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulson-Karlsson G

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Gunilla Paulson-Karlsson,1 Lauri Nevonen21Academy of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro and Anorexia-Bulimia Unit, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Centre, Queen Silvia Children's Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden; 2Academy of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, SwedenBackground: Anorexia nervosa is a serious illness with a high mortality rate, a poor outcome, and no empirically supported treatment of choice for adults. Patients with anorexia nervosa strive for thinness in order to obtain self-control and are ambivalent toward change and toward treatment. In order to achieve a greater understanding of patients' own understanding of their situation, the aim of this study was to examine the expectations of potential anorexic patients seeking treatment at a specialized eating-disorder unit.Methods: A qualitative study design was used. It comprised 15 women between 18 and 25 years of age waiting to be assessed before treatment. The initial question was, "What do you expect, now that you are on the waiting list for a specialized eating-disorder unit?" A content analysis was used, and the text was coded, categorized according to its content, and further interpreted into a theme.Results: From the results emerged three main categories of what participants expected: "treatment content," "treatment professionals," and "treatment focus." The overall theme, "receiving adequate therapy in a collaborative therapeutic relationship and recovering," described how the participants perceived that their expectations could be fulfilled.Discussion: Patients' expectations concerning distorted thoughts, eating behaviors, a normal, healthy life, and meeting with a professional with knowledge and experience of eating disorders should be discussed before treatment starts. In the process of the therapeutic relationship, it is essential to continually address patients' motivations, in order to understand their personal motives behind

  3. Psychiatrists' attitudes towards autonomy, best interests and compulsory treatment in anorexia nervosa: a questionnaire survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stewart Anne

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The compulsory treatment of anorexia nervosa is a contentious issue. Research suggests that psychiatrists have a range of attitudes towards patients suffering from anorexia nervosa, and towards the use of compulsory treatment for the disorder. Methods A postal self-completed attitudinal questionnaire was sent to senior psychiatrists in the United Kingdom who were mostly general adult psychiatrists, child and adolescent psychiatrists, or psychiatrists with an interest in eating disorders. Results Respondents generally supported a role for compulsory measures under mental health legislation in the treatment of patients with anorexia nervosa. Compared to 'mild' anorexia nervosa, respondents generally were less likely to feel that patients with 'severe' anorexia nervosa were intentionally engaging in weight loss behaviours, were able to control their behaviours, wanted to get better, or were able to reason properly. However, eating disorder specialists were less likely than other psychiatrists to think that patients with 'mild' anorexia nervosa were choosing to engage in their behaviours or able to control their behaviours. Child and adolescent psychiatrists were more likely to have a positive view of the use of parental consent and compulsory treatment for an adolescent with anorexia nervosa. Three factors emerged from factor analysis of the responses named: 'Support for the powers of the Mental Health Act to protect from harm'; 'Primacy of best interests'; and 'Autonomy viewed as being preserved in anorexia nervosa'. Different scores on these factor scales were given in terms of type of specialist and gender. Conclusion In general, senior psychiatrists tend to support the use of compulsory treatment to protect the health of patients at risk and also to protect the welfare of patients in their best interests. In particular, eating disorder specialists tend to support the compulsory treatment of patients with anorexia nervosa

  4. Anorexia Nervosa Presented with Fever and Pancytopenia Due to Severe Constipation

    OpenAIRE

    Senay Akbay

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of eating disorders is on the increase in adolescence and childhood. The peak age of onset occurs between 14 and 19 years. Anorexia nervosa is diagnosed approximately nine times more often in females than in males. Anorexia nervosa is a eating disorder that occurs mainly in female adolescents and young women. Eating disorders are associated with severe and sometimes life-threatening medical and psychiatric comorbidities. Hematological abnormalities are common in anorexia nervos...

  5. Fractures in patients with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and other eating disorders--a nationwide register study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Peter; Emborg, Charlotte; Støving, René K;

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study fracture risk in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), or eating disorders not otherwise specified (EDNOS). METHOD: Cohort study including all Danes diagnosed with AN (n = 2,149), BN (n = 1,294), or EDNOS (n = 942) between 1977 and 1998. Each patient...

  6. Electrocortical processing of food and emotional pictures in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blechert, Jens; Feige, Bernd; Joos, Andreas; Zeeck, Almut; Tuschen-Caffier, Brunna

    2011-06-01

    Objective To compare the electrocortical processing of food pictures in participants with anorexia nervosa (n = 21), bulimia nervosa (n = 22), and healthy controls (HCs) (n = 32) by measuring the early posterior negativity, an event-related potential that reflects stimulus salience and selective attention. Methods We exposed these three groups to a rapid stream of high- and low-calorie food pictures, as well as standard emotional and neutral pictures. Results Event-related potentials in the time range of 220 milliseconds to 310 milliseconds on posterior electrodes differed between groups: patients with eating disorders showed facilitated processing of both high- and low-calorie food pictures relative to neutral pictures, whereas HC participants did so only for the high-calorie pictures. Subjective palatability of the pictures was rated highest by patients with anorexia nervosa, followed by the HC and bulimia nervosa groups. Conclusions Patients with eating disorders show a generalized attentional bias for food images, regardless of caloric value. This might explain the persistent preoccupation with food in these individuals.

  7. Hypovitaminosis D3, Leukopenia, and Human Serotonin Transporter Polymorphism in Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasegian, Anna; Curcio, Francesco; Dalla Ragione, Laura; Rossetti, Francesca; Cataldi, Samuela; Codini, Michela; Ambesi-Impiombato, Francesco Saverio; Beccari, Tommaso; Albi, Elisabetta

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D3 has been described to have different extraskeletal roles by acting as parahormone in obesity, diabetes, cancer, cognitive impairment, and dementia and to have important regulatory functions in innate immunity. There are no studies showing extraskeletal changes associated with hypovitaminosis D3 in eating disorders. Methods. We have analyzed the blood of 18 patients affected by anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa collected over a 15-month period. We performed a panel of chemical and clinical analyses: the assay of vitamin D3, the immunoblotting of vitamin D receptor and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, and the genotyping of 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter linked polymorphic region. Results. We choose 18 patients with a normal blood test profile such as thyroid hormones, hepatic and renal parameters, triglycerides, proteins, vitamin B12, and folic acid. Among these emerged the case of a woman with long-term anorexia nervosa and the case of a woman with long-term bulimia nervosa both complicated by anxiety and depression, severe hypovitaminosis D3, decrease of vitamin D receptor, leukopenia, and 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter linked polymorphic region short allele. Conclusion. The results induce hypothesising that the severe hypovitaminosis D3 might be responsible for the lack of the inflammatory response and the depressive symptoms in patients with long-term eating disorders. PMID:26903713

  8. Hypovitaminosis D3, Leukopenia, and Human Serotonin Transporter Polymorphism in Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasegian, Anna; Curcio, Francesco; Dalla Ragione, Laura; Rossetti, Francesca; Cataldi, Samuela; Codini, Michela; Ambesi-Impiombato, Francesco Saverio; Beccari, Tommaso; Albi, Elisabetta

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D3 has been described to have different extraskeletal roles by acting as parahormone in obesity, diabetes, cancer, cognitive impairment, and dementia and to have important regulatory functions in innate immunity. There are no studies showing extraskeletal changes associated with hypovitaminosis D3 in eating disorders. Methods. We have analyzed the blood of 18 patients affected by anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa collected over a 15-month period. We performed a panel of chemical and clinical analyses: the assay of vitamin D3, the immunoblotting of vitamin D receptor and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, and the genotyping of 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter linked polymorphic region. Results. We choose 18 patients with a normal blood test profile such as thyroid hormones, hepatic and renal parameters, triglycerides, proteins, vitamin B12, and folic acid. Among these emerged the case of a woman with long-term anorexia nervosa and the case of a woman with long-term bulimia nervosa both complicated by anxiety and depression, severe hypovitaminosis D3, decrease of vitamin D receptor, leukopenia, and 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter linked polymorphic region short allele. Conclusion. The results induce hypothesising that the severe hypovitaminosis D3 might be responsible for the lack of the inflammatory response and the depressive symptoms in patients with long-term eating disorders.

  9. Hypovitaminosis D3, Leukopenia, and Human Serotonin Transporter Polymorphism in Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Tasegian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D3 has been described to have different extraskeletal roles by acting as parahormone in obesity, diabetes, cancer, cognitive impairment, and dementia and to have important regulatory functions in innate immunity. There are no studies showing extraskeletal changes associated with hypovitaminosis D3 in eating disorders. Methods. We have analyzed the blood of 18 patients affected by anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa collected over a 15-month period. We performed a panel of chemical and clinical analyses: the assay of vitamin D3, the immunoblotting of vitamin D receptor and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, and the genotyping of 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter linked polymorphic region. Results. We choose 18 patients with a normal blood test profile such as thyroid hormones, hepatic and renal parameters, triglycerides, proteins, vitamin B12, and folic acid. Among these emerged the case of a woman with long-term anorexia nervosa and the case of a woman with long-term bulimia nervosa both complicated by anxiety and depression, severe hypovitaminosis D3, decrease of vitamin D receptor, leukopenia, and 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter linked polymorphic region short allele. Conclusion. The results induce hypothesising that the severe hypovitaminosis D3 might be responsible for the lack of the inflammatory response and the depressive symptoms in patients with long-term eating disorders.

  10. Hypovitaminosis D3, Leukopenia, and Human Serotonin Transporter Polymorphism in Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasegian, Anna; Curcio, Francesco; Dalla Ragione, Laura; Rossetti, Francesca; Cataldi, Samuela; Codini, Michela; Ambesi-Impiombato, Francesco Saverio; Beccari, Tommaso; Albi, Elisabetta

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D3 has been described to have different extraskeletal roles by acting as parahormone in obesity, diabetes, cancer, cognitive impairment, and dementia and to have important regulatory functions in innate immunity. There are no studies showing extraskeletal changes associated with hypovitaminosis D3 in eating disorders. Methods. We have analyzed the blood of 18 patients affected by anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa collected over a 15-month period. We performed a panel of chemical and clinical analyses: the assay of vitamin D3, the immunoblotting of vitamin D receptor and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, and the genotyping of 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter linked polymorphic region. Results. We choose 18 patients with a normal blood test profile such as thyroid hormones, hepatic and renal parameters, triglycerides, proteins, vitamin B12, and folic acid. Among these emerged the case of a woman with long-term anorexia nervosa and the case of a woman with long-term bulimia nervosa both complicated by anxiety and depression, severe hypovitaminosis D3, decrease of vitamin D receptor, leukopenia, and 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter linked polymorphic region short allele. Conclusion. The results induce hypothesising that the severe hypovitaminosis D3 might be responsible for the lack of the inflammatory response and the depressive symptoms in patients with long-term eating disorders. PMID:26903713

  11. Dying To Be Thin: Attachment to Death in Anorexia Nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yael Latzer

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Anorexia Nervosa (AN usually follows a prolonged course accompanied by significant morbidity and high mortality. AN patients have been found to have elevated and attempted suicide rates, with suicide being the second most common cause of death in AN after the complications of the disorder itself. The suicide risk in AN is similar to that in major depression or conduct disorder and linked mainly to longer duration of illness, lower weight, bingeing and purging, impulsivity-related manifestations, comorbid substance abuse, and affective disorder. This paper reviews suicidal tendency and disturbed body image, death and eating disorders, and attachment and death with clinical implications related to AN.

  12. Radionuclide study of gastric emptying in anorexia nervosa patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate gastric emptying, 20 patients with anorexia nervosa were given 150 μCi of Tc-99m triethylene tetraamine polystyrene resin in cereal and were imaged in the supine position. Data were accumulated at 5-minute intervals to determine the gastric emptying time (GET). The GET results were divided into three categories: prolonged (10 patients); rapid (eight); and normal (two). Although all patients had symptoms of gastric dysfunction, only 50% had prolonged GET. This study allows the objective documentation of gastric emptying and the separation of patients with rapid or normal GET from those with prolonged GET, who might benefit from metoclopramide

  13. [Anorexia nervosa is frequently associated with psychiatric co-morbidity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchenko, Anna; Arnfred, Sidse Marie Hemmingsen

    2015-09-21

    Recent literature is explored focusing on the relationship between symptoms of anorexia nervosa (AN) and other psychiatric disorders and lines of treatment. In AN, restrictive subtype, anxiety and obsessive-compulsive disorders are the most frequent co-morbidities. In AN, bulimic subtype, depression, emotional instability/borderline and dependency disorders are most frequent. Psychopharmacological treatment could be tried in cases with AN and co-morbid depression, but otherwise the evidence base is lacking and pharmacological treatment relies on case stories and experience. PMID:26418641

  14. Late Onset Anorexia Nervosa Treated With Olanzapine: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Santonastaso

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A case of late onset anorexia nervosa (AN treated with olanzapine is reported. The patient suffered AN onset at the age of 53 and was brought to our attention four years later in a very poor state of health due to extreme starvation and laxative abuse. She presented severe obsessions about food, a very disturbed body image, and “ascetic” rituals of self-punishment. There was no improvement of her symptoms with cognitive behavioural therapy, antidepressant drugs and inpatient nutritional therapy. After the prescription of olanzapine, the patient was more cooperative and able to maintain a stable acceptable weight, although her psychiatric and anorexic symptoms only improved partially.

  15. How much should I eat? Estimation of meal portions in anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milos, Gabriella; Kuenzli, Cornelia; Soelch, Chantal Martin; Schumacher, Sonja; Moergeli, Hanspeter; Mueller-Pfeiffer, Christoph

    2013-04-01

    Pathological concern regarding one's weight and weight gain is a crucial feature of anorexia nervosa. Consequently, anorexia nervosa patients often claim that they are uncertain regarding the amount of food they should eat. The present study investigated whether individuals with anorexia nervosa show an altered estimation of meal portion sizes and whether this estimation is modulated by an intent-to-eat instruction (where patients are asked to imagine having to eat the presented meal), meal type and meal portion size. Twenty-four women with anorexia nervosa and 27 healthy women estimated, using a visual analogue scale, the size of six different portions of three different meals, with and without intent-to-eat instructions. Subjects with anorexia nervosa estimated the size of small and medium meal portions (but not large meal servings) as being significantly larger, compared to estimates of healthy controls. The overestimation of small meal portions by anorexia nervosa subjects was significantly greater in the intent-to-eat, compared to general, condition. These findings suggest that disturbed perceptions associated with anorexia nervosa not only include interoceptive awareness (i.e., body weight and shape), but also extend to external disorder-related objects such as meal portion size. Specific therapeutic interventions, such as training regarding meal portion evaluation, could address these difficulties.

  16. [Anorexia nervosa and obsessive-compulsive disorder in a young Russian immigrant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iancu, I; Kikenzon, L; Ratzoni, G; Apter, A

    1993-04-15

    Anorexia nervosa is a psychiatric disorder characterized by excessive dieting, severe weight loss, disturbed body image and inexplicable fear of gaining weight. It afflicts mainly upper class women of developed countries. We present a 16-year-old recent immigrant from Russia, where she had developed anorexia nervosa, obsessive-compulsive disorder and depression. The management of this patient is presented in the light of the sociocultural theory of the pathogenesis of anorexia nervosa and the clinical link between eating disorders and depression and obsessive-compulsive disorders. PMID:8335272

  17. Dietary zinc intake of vegetarian and nonvegetarian patients with anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakan, R; Birmingham, C L; Aeberhardt, L; Goldner, E M

    1993-03-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) and zinc deficiency, found most frequently in young females, have a number of symptoms in common. These include weight loss, alterations in taste and appetite, depression, and amenorrhea. Approximately half of anorexia nervosa patients (ANs) are vegetarian (VANs), a practice that may increase their risk for zinc deficiency. This study compared the dietary intake of zinc and related nutrients in 9 outpatient VANs with that of 11 outpatient nonvegetarian patients with anorexia nervosa (NVANs). VANs reported significantly lower (p zinc, fat, and protein, and a significantly higher (p zinc intake should be routinely assessed in VANs and that zinc supplementation of their diets may be indicated. PMID:8477292

  18. Infantile anorexia nervosa: a developmental disorder or separation and individuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatoor, I

    1989-01-01

    Infantile anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder that has its onset during the early developmental stage of separation and individuation between the ages of six months and three years. Infantile anorexia nervosa is characterized by food refusal and leads to failure to thrive. The infant refuses to eat in an attempt to achieve autonomy and control with regard to the mother, a maneuver that serves to involve the mother more deeply in the infant's eating behavior and to meet the infant's need for attention. Mother and infant become embroiled in a battle of wills over the infant's food intake. The infant's feeding is directed by his emotional needs instead of physiological sensations of hunger and satiety, and he fails to develop somatopsychological differentiation. The infant's temperament and maternal conflicts over control, autonomy, and dependency appear to contribute to this eating disorder. Treatment is aimed toward helping the parents understand and promote the developmental process of somatopsychological differentiation. Initially, a behavioral-cognitive approach is used; however, parents who struggle with unresolved issues around dependency and control require further psychotherapy. PMID:2470708

  19. The socio-emotional processing stream in Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldershaw, A; Hambrook, D; Stahl, D; Tchanturia, K; Treasure, J; Schmidt, U

    2011-01-01

    The significance of socio-emotional factors in development and maintenance of Anorexia Nervosa (AN) has been noted, but the literature is poorly integrated without clear models guiding research or treatment. This systematic review retrieved experimental studies of social-cognitive or affective processing in AN and categorised them using Ochsner's "Social-Emotional Processing Stream." Ochsner's "Processing Stream", based on healthy data, comprises five constructs: (1) acquisition of and (2) recognition and response to social-affective stimuli, (3) low-level and (4) high-level mental state inference and (5) context-sensitive emotion regulation. Thirty-seven experimental studies in Anorexia Nervosa were identified, mapping on to four of the five constructs (not Construct 3). A meta-analysis of nine affect recognition studies was conducted. AN patients demonstrated impairments in each of the four domains with preliminary reports that some difficulties are trait-like, and others ameliorate following recovery. Socio-emotional data was integrated with previous reports of neural abnormalities to generate an AN specific model of socio-emotional processing. Additional research is required for further definition and to translate experimental findings into clinical practice.

  20. The socio-emotional processing stream in Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldershaw, A; Hambrook, D; Stahl, D; Tchanturia, K; Treasure, J; Schmidt, U

    2011-01-01

    The significance of socio-emotional factors in development and maintenance of Anorexia Nervosa (AN) has been noted, but the literature is poorly integrated without clear models guiding research or treatment. This systematic review retrieved experimental studies of social-cognitive or affective processing in AN and categorised them using Ochsner's "Social-Emotional Processing Stream." Ochsner's "Processing Stream", based on healthy data, comprises five constructs: (1) acquisition of and (2) recognition and response to social-affective stimuli, (3) low-level and (4) high-level mental state inference and (5) context-sensitive emotion regulation. Thirty-seven experimental studies in Anorexia Nervosa were identified, mapping on to four of the five constructs (not Construct 3). A meta-analysis of nine affect recognition studies was conducted. AN patients demonstrated impairments in each of the four domains with preliminary reports that some difficulties are trait-like, and others ameliorate following recovery. Socio-emotional data was integrated with previous reports of neural abnormalities to generate an AN specific model of socio-emotional processing. Additional research is required for further definition and to translate experimental findings into clinical practice. PMID:21070808

  1. Current treatment for anorexia nervosa: efficacy, safety, and adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay P Bodell

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Lindsay P Bodell, Pamela K KeelDepartment of Psychology, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, USAAbstract: Anorexia nervosa (AN is a serious psychiatric illness associated with significant medical and psychiatric morbidity, psychosocial impairment, increased risk of death, and chronicity. Given the severity of the disorder, the establishment of safe and effective treatments is necessary. Several treatments have been tried in AN, but few favorable results have emerged. This paper reviews randomized controlled trials in AN, and provides a synthesis of existing data regarding the efficacy, safety, and adherence associated with pharmacologic and psychological interventions. Randomized controlled trials for the treatment of AN published in peer-reviewed journals were identified by electronic and manual searches. Overall, pharmacotherapy has limited benefits in the treatment of AN, with some promising preliminary findings associated with olanzapine, an antipsychotic agent. No single psychological intervention has demonstrated clear superiority in treating adults with AN. In adolescents with AN, the evidence base is strongest for the use of family therapy over alternative individual psychotherapies. Results highlight challenges in both treating individuals with AN and in studying the effects of those treatments, and further emphasize the importance of continued efforts to develop novel interventions. Treatment trials currently underway and areas for future research are discussed.Keywords: anorexia nervosa, treatment, pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy, randomized controlled trials

  2. Processo de Enfermagem para pacientes com Anorexia Nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Pellegrino Toledo

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Relato de experiência da aplicação do Processo de Enfermagem a uma paciente portadora de Anorexia Nervosa, utilizando histórico, diagnósticos, intervenções e resultados de enfermagem. As intervenções foram fundamentadas nos diagnósticos de enfermagem: distúrbio da imagem corporal, nutrição desequilibrada menos que as necessidades corporais, ansiedade, baixa autoestima crônica, intolerância a atividade, controle ineficaz do regime terapêutico, risco de infecção, volume de líquidos deficiente e isolamento social. A partir da aplicação do Processo de Enfermagem, os resultados planejados foram alcançados, proporcionando melhor qualidade de vida, no período em que permaneceu internada. Os fatores psíquicos, neurológicos, endócrinos e imunológicos, peculiares na anorexia nervosa, propiciaram a elaboração de um Processo de Enfermagem, que contribuiu de maneira positiva para a complementação da reabilitação da saúde da mesma

  3. Spectral analysis of heart period variability in anorexia nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Platiša Mirjana M.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the response of autonomic cardiac control to postural change using spectral analysis, in patients with anorexia nervosa. Spectral components of total variability as well as of low and high frequencies were analyzed for 17 anorexic patients with mean body mass index (14.9 ± 1.9 kg/m2 and for 9 healthy age-matched women with body mass index (20.3 ± 1.7 kg/m2, in supine and standing postures. During standing posture, increased heart rate in all subjects was accompanied by the decrease in total variability and high frequency spectral powers. In supine posture, anorexic patients demonstrated the reduced low frequency spectral power. Compared to control women, during standing posture anorexic patients showed higher heart rate, reduced total variability and high frequency spectral powers. Statistically significant correlation was noticed between body mass index and spectral power of low frequency in both supine and standing posture. Alterations in autonomic cardiac control induced by anorexia nervosa could be estimated by spectral analysis of heart period variability.

  4. Investigation of Oxytocin Secretion in Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa: Relationships to Temperament Personality Dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteleone, Alessio Maria; Scognamiglio, Pasquale; Volpe, Umberto; Di Maso, Virginia; Monteleone, Palmiero

    2016-01-01

    Published studies suggested an implication of oxytocin in some temperament characteristics of personality. Therefore, we measured oxytocin secretion in 23 women with anorexia nervosa (AN), 27 with bulimia nervosa (BN) and 19 healthy controls and explored the relationships between circulating oxytocin and patients' personality traits. Plasma oxytocin levels were significantly reduced in AN women but not in BN ones. In healthy women, the attachment subscale scores of the reward dependence temperament and the harm avoidance (HA) scores explained 82% of the variability in circulating oxytocin. In BN patients, plasma oxytocin resulted to be negatively correlated with HA, whereas no significant correlations emerged in AN patients. These findings confirm a dysregulation of oxytocin production in AN but not in BN and show, for the first time, a disruption of the associations between hormone levels and patients' temperament traits, which may have a role in certain deranged behaviours of eating disorder patients. PMID:26259495

  5. Investigation of Oxytocin Secretion in Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa: Relationships to Temperament Personality Dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteleone, Alessio Maria; Scognamiglio, Pasquale; Volpe, Umberto; Di Maso, Virginia; Monteleone, Palmiero

    2016-01-01

    Published studies suggested an implication of oxytocin in some temperament characteristics of personality. Therefore, we measured oxytocin secretion in 23 women with anorexia nervosa (AN), 27 with bulimia nervosa (BN) and 19 healthy controls and explored the relationships between circulating oxytocin and patients' personality traits. Plasma oxytocin levels were significantly reduced in AN women but not in BN ones. In healthy women, the attachment subscale scores of the reward dependence temperament and the harm avoidance (HA) scores explained 82% of the variability in circulating oxytocin. In BN patients, plasma oxytocin resulted to be negatively correlated with HA, whereas no significant correlations emerged in AN patients. These findings confirm a dysregulation of oxytocin production in AN but not in BN and show, for the first time, a disruption of the associations between hormone levels and patients' temperament traits, which may have a role in certain deranged behaviours of eating disorder patients.

  6. Trail making task performance in inpatients with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vall, Eva; Wade, Tracey D

    2015-07-01

    Set-shifting inefficiencies have been consistently identified in adults with anorexia nervosa (AN). It is less clear to what degree similar inefficiencies are present in those with bulimia nervosa (BN). It is also unknown whether perfectionism is related to set-shifting performance. We employed a commonly used set-shifting measure, the Trail Making Test (TMT), to compare the performance of inpatients with AN and BN with a healthy control sample. We also investigated whether perfectionism predicted TMT scores. Only the BN sample showed significantly suboptimal performance, while the AN sample was indistinguishable from controls on all measures. There were no differences between the AN subtypes (restrictive or binge/purge), but group sizes were small. Higher personal standards perfectionism was associated with better TMT scores across groups. Higher concern over mistakes perfectionism predicted better accuracy in the BN sample. Further research into the set-shifting profile of individuals with BN or binge/purge behaviours is needed.

  7. Anorexia Nervosa Presented with Fever and Pancytopenia Due to Severe Constipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senay Akbay

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of eating disorders is on the increase in adolescence and childhood. The peak age of onset occurs between 14 and 19 years. Anorexia nervosa is diagnosed approximately nine times more often in females than in males. Anorexia nervosa is a eating disorder that occurs mainly in female adolescents and young women. Eating disorders are associated with severe and sometimes life-threatening medical and psychiatric comorbidities. Hematological abnormalities are common in anorexia nervosa. But severe bone marrow supression has rarely been reported. To our knowledge, there is not any publication in the literature about bone marrow supression due to constipation.We reported here a 17 years old girl diagnosed as anorexia nervosa who was not wasted yet, presented with constipation and developed fever and pancytopenia.

  8. Anorexia nervosa complicated by diabetes mellitus: the case for permissive hyperglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Carrie; Mehler, Philip S

    2014-09-01

    The coexistence of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus and anorexia nervosa results in an increased incidence of known diabetic complications such as retinopathy and nephropathy, presumably because blood glucose is difficult to control within the throes of comorbid anorexia nervosa. In addition, even when a diabetic patient with anorexia nervosa has committed to resolving his or her eating disorder, glucose control is again difficult and fraught with complexity and peril as will be highlighted in the following case report. Prudence dictates that strict glucose control is not indicated for the relatively short period of time that constitutes the early stage of refeeding in a patient with severe anorexia nervosa. Rather, "permissive hyperglycemia" may be the more optimal course to pursue, as a clinical strategy which is considerate of both the criticality of the refeeding treatment plan and of the long-term nature of the diabetic illness.

  9. Anorexia nervosa in pregnancy: a case report and review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinas, K; Daniilidis, A; Sikou, K; Tantanasis, T; Kasmas, S; Tzafettas, J

    2008-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a complex illness rarely encountered in pregnant women. It is a disorder characterized by markedly decreased food intake accompanied by a distorted body image, resulting in an inability to maintain the body weight within 85% of ideal body weight. We describe a case of a pregnant woman diagnosed with anorexia nervosa at 28 weeks of gestation. Her body mass index was 17 kg/m2. A live male infant weighing 2,08 kg was delivered prematurely via vaginal delivery at 35 weeks of gestation. Pregnant women with anorexia nervosa may have a higher risk of hypertension, miscarriage, difficult labour, premature delivery and intrauterine growth restriction. Management of pregnancy complicated with anorexia nervosa requires involvement of a multidisciplinary team and hospitalization in severe cases.

  10. Diurnal variation of the serum leptin concentration in patients with anorexia nervosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Støving, R K; Vinten, J; Handberg, A;

    1998-01-01

    , however, this has been reported to be absent in normal weighted amenorrheic athletes. Anorexia nervosa is associated with multiple endocrine abnormalities. Hypothalamic amenorrhoea often precedes the weight loss and may persist after weight recovery. We hypothesized that leptin could be involved...... in the regulation of eating behaviour and gonadal function in anorexia nervosa. DESIGN: We measured the concentration of leptin in serum samples taken after an overnight fast in 18 female anorexia nervosa patients and 11 controls. To study diurnal variation, eight patients and 11 controls were hospitalized for 24 h...... and had a standardized diet at regular times. Seven blood samples were obtained at 4 h intervals from each subject. PATIENTS: The patients fulfilled the DSM-IV criteria for anorexia nervosa. The mean body mass index for the patients was 14.2 +/- 2.3 kg/m2 and for controls 20.3 +/- 1.7 kg/m2. RESULTS...

  11. Bilateral superficial peroneal nerve entrapment secondary to anorexia nervosa: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Doğramacı Yunus; Kalacı Aydıner; Sevinç Teoman; Yanat Ahmet

    2008-01-01

    Abstract We report a case of severe weight loss secondary to anorexia nervosa causing bilateral superficial peroneal nerve entrapment in a young female patient who was treated successfully by bilateral surgical decompression.

  12. Acute gastric dilatation with infarction and perforation: Report of fatal outcome in patient with anorexia nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Saul, S. H.; Dekker, A.; Watson, C G

    1981-01-01

    This is a report of a 22-year-old woman with treated anorexia nervosa who died of complications of acute gastric dilatation—that is, infarction and perforation with severe and irreversible shock. Binge eating and drinking, precipitated by emotional crises, contributed to her acute gastric dilatation. This complication of anorexia nervosa has been previously reported, but, unlike the others, this case ended fatally. The literature is reviewed.

  13. Problematic Exercise in Anorexia Nervosa: Testing Potential Risk Factors against Different Definitions

    OpenAIRE

    Melissa Rizk; Christophe Lalanne; Sylvie Berthoz; Laurence Kern; Nathalie Godart

    2015-01-01

    "Hyperactivity" has a wide prevalence range of 31% to 80% in the anorexia nervosa literature that could be partly due to the plethora of definitions provided by researchers in this field. The purpose of this study was two-fold: 1) To assess the variance across prevalence rates of problematic exercise encountered in patients with anorexia nervosa, in relation to seven different definitions found in the literature. 2) To examine how core eating disorder symptoms and the dimensions of emotional ...

  14. Psychiatry in the flesh. Embodiment of troubled lives. Studies of anorexia nervosa and eating disorders.

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Body and mind – new perspectives on eating disorders In this doctoral dissertation the author focuses on models of understanding of how body and mind might interact in eating disorders, with particular emphasis on anorexia nervosa. The thesis ”Psychiatry in the flesh. Embodiment of troubled lives. Studies of anorexia nervosa and eating disorders” is based on six scientific articles which all have been published in referee-based psychiatric journals. Three of these scientific papers d...

  15. Inpatient Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Adolescents with Anorexia Nervosa: Immediate and Longer-Term Effects

    OpenAIRE

    RiccardoDalle Grave; Christofer G.Fairburn

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Inpatient treatment for anorexia nervosa is often successful in restoring body weight, but a high percentage of patients relapse following discharge. The aim of the present study was to establish the immediate and longer-term effects of a novel inpatient program for adolescents that was designed to produce enduring change. Method: Twenty-seven consecutive patients with severe anorexia nervosa were admitted to a 20-week inpatient treatment program based upon enhanced cognitive ...

  16. Enhanced cognitive behaviour therapy for adolescents with anorexia nervosa: An alternative to family therapy?

    OpenAIRE

    Dalle Grave, Riccardo; Calugi, Simona; Doll, Helen A.; Fairburn, Christopher G.

    2013-01-01

    A specific form of family therapy (family-based treatment) is the leading treatment for adolescents with anorexia nervosa. As this treatment has certain limitations, alternative approaches are needed. “Enhanced” cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT-E) is a potential candidate given its utility as a treatment for adults with eating disorder psychopathology. The aim of the present study was to establish, in a representative cohort of patients with marked anorexia nervosa, the immediate and longer t...

  17. Recovery of Normal Body Weight in Adolescents with Anorexia Nervosa: The Nurses’ Perspective on Effective Interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Bakker, René; van Meijel, Berno; Beukers, Laura; Ommen, Joyce van; Meerwijk, Esther; van Elburg, Annemarie

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about effective nursing interventions for adolescents with anorexia nervosa. The purpose of this study was to discover which aspects of nursing care are most effective, according to nurses, in recovery of normal body weight in adolescents with anorexia nervosa. METHODS: A qualitative descriptive research design was applied with individual in-depth interviews and a focus group. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the data. FINDINGS: Nurses state that they are in a key positio...

  18. ‘Feelings stronger than reason’: conflicting experiences of exercise in women with anorexia nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Kolnes, Liv-Jorunn

    2016-01-01

    Background Individuals with anorexia nervosa frequently feel ambivalent about treatment and weight restoration, and drop out and relapse rates in treatment are high. Increased insight into the function of the eating disorder is considered essential for achieving long-lasting, meaningful change. However, research investigating the functions of anorexia nervosa tends to focus on the role of the disease per se. Distinctions are rarely made across features. In particular, the subjective experienc...

  19. Experiences of specialist inpatient treatment for anorexia nervosa: a qualitative study from adult patients’ perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Vivien

    2012-01-01

    Background: Response to treatment in anorexia nervosa entails various challenges, including an increased risk of relapse and re-admission in those treated as inpatients. A better understanding of patients’ experiences is paramount to improve treatment acceptability and outcome. This qualitative study aimed to explore the lived experiences of adult female inpatients undergoing a specialist inpatient treatment programme for anorexia nervosa. Methods: Semi-structured interviews...

  20. ANOREXIA NERVOSA AS AN ADVERSE EFFECT OF MEDICATION IN A CASE OF CHRONIC SCHIZOPHRENIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary C.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: A 24 year old male patient presented to our department with anorexia nervosa in a long standing case of schizophrenia on treatment with resperidone and sodium valproate . The excessive weight gain due to side effect of medications resulted in development of anorexia nervosa in the patient. RESULT & CONCLUSION: We present this interesting case for its rarity and also to demonstrate how the use of the side effect of another medication can prove beneficial for therapeutic purpose.

  1. Treatment of anorexia nervosa with long-term risperidone in an outpatient setting: case study

    OpenAIRE

    Kracke, Elsa J; Tosh, Aneesh K.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction There are currently few studies focusing on the efficacy of long-term atypical antipsychotics to treat anorexia nervosa in the pediatric population. Case description This case report follows the treatment of a 17 year-old female with anorexia nervosa over her four-year undergraduate career. After two years of multidisciplinary treatment, low-dose risperidone was initiated due to persistence of her disease. She expressed decreased rigidity around meal times, her weight improved an...

  2. The possibility or coercion treatment? Anorexia nervosa – legal regulations. A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Tylec, Aneta; Olajossy, Marcin; Dubas-Ślemp, Halina; Spychalska, Katarzyna

    2013-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is diagnosed on the basis of well-defined diagnostic criteria and requires treatment, as it is associated with the highest mortality rate of all mental illnesses. In Poland, anorexia nervosa is not considered a mental illness, although the opinion of researchers and clinicians are divided. To reduce the death rate of AN correct and early diagnosis, appropriate treatment starting immediately and the appropriate regulations to allow people to take the AN treatment against their...

  3. What can we learn from the history of male anorexia nervosa?

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Chengyuan

    2014-01-01

    The eating disorders literature has focussed on females and little is known of the male experience. The overall image this has generated suggests a young woman in conflict with socio-cultural pressures which associate thinness with beauty. Historical studies have examined anorexia nervosa from an entirely female focus while ignoring how diagnostic categories have shaped approaches to the male body. This paper will track the case of the male with anorexia nervosa through changing theories of c...

  4. Autism spectrum disorder in individuals with anorexia nervosa and in their first- and second-degree relatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Susanne V; Tidselbak Larsen, Janne; Mouridsen, Svend E;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clinical and population-based studies report increased prevalence of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in individuals with anorexia nervosa and in their relatives. No nationwide study has yet been published on co-occurrence of these disorders. AIMS: To investigate comorbidity of ASD...... in individuals with anorexia nervosa, and aggregation of ASD and anorexia nervosa in their relatives. METHOD: In Danish registers we identified all individuals born in 1981-2008, their parents, and full and half siblings, and linked them to data on hospital admissions for psychiatric disorders. RESULTS: Risk...... of comorbidity of ASD in probands with anorexia nervosa and aggregation of ASD in families of anorexia nervosa probands were increased. However, the risk of comorbid and familial ASD did not differ significantly from comorbid and familial major depression or any psychiatric disorder in anorexia nervosa probands...

  5. Pneumococcal sepsis associated with adrenal apoplexy in a young woman with anorexia nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Maria Vitola

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND A crude rate of mortality of 5% has been quoted for anorexia nervosa in recent studies. Nowadays the mechanism of death is unclear and various authors recommend that any anorexia nervosa death be reported and that, where possible, an autopsy be performed. METHODS In this work we present a case of sudden death in anorexia nervosa with unexpected autopsy findings. A 21-years-old woman with long-standing anorexia nervosa, severely underweight with a body mass index of 14.47 kg/m2, has been taken to the Emergency Department in very critical conditions. Despite the attempts of resuscitation, she died shortly afterwards. Therefore an autopsy has been requested in order to clarify the causes of death. RESULTS The clinical picture, laboratory parameters, histology and microbiological investigations were consistent with pneumococcal sepsis associated adrenal apoplexy. CONCLUSIONS The cause of death in anorexia nervosa cannot reliably be established from antemortem clinical features. All anorexia nervosa deaths should be reported together with description of necropsy. This may lead to advances in the knowledge and treatment practices.

  6. Interleukin-7 Plasma Levels in Human Differentiate Anorexia Nervosa, Constitutional Thinness and Healthy Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germain, Natacha; Viltart, Odile; Loyens, Anne; Bruchet, Céline; Nadin, Katia; Wolowczuk, Isabelle; Estour, Bruno; Galusca, Bogdan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Interleukin-7 (IL-7) is a cytokine involved in energy homeostasis as demonstrated in rodents. Anorexia nervosa is characterized by restrained eating behavior despite adaptive orexigenic regulation profile including high ghrelin plasma levels. Constitutional thinness is a physiological condition of resistance to weight gain with physiological anorexigenic profile including high Peptide YY plasma level. Healthy obesity can be considered as a physiological state of resistance to weight loss with opposite appetite regulating profile to constitutional thinness including low Peptide YY plasma level. No studies in IL-7 are yet available in those populations. Therefore we evaluated circadian plasma levels of IL-7 in anorexia nervosa compared to constitutional thinness, healthy obese and control females. Materials and Methods 10 restrictive-type anorexia nervosa women, 5 bingeing/purging anorexia nervosa woman, 5 recovered restrictive anorexia nervosa women, 4 bulimic females, 10 constitutional thinness women, 7 healthy obese females, and 10 normal weight women controls were enrolled in this cross-sectional study, performed in endocrinology unit and academic laboratory. Twelve-point circadian profiles of plasma IL-7 levels were measured in each subject. Results 24h mean IL-7 plasma levels (pg/ml, mean±SEM) were decreased in restrictive-type anorexia nervosa (123.4±14.4, pobese patients (51±3.2, pobesity, with low IL-7, is once again in mirror image of constitutional thinness with normal high IL-7. PMID:27611669

  7. Unusual Presentation of Uncommon Disease: Anorexia Nervosa Presenting as Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome—A Case Report from Southeast Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raheel Mushtaq

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Anorexia nervosa presenting as Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome is rare. The causes of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome are multiple like alcohol abuse, thyrotoxicosis, haemodialysis, severe malnutrition because of gastric carcinoma and pyloric obstruction, hyperemesis gravidarum, and prolonged parenteral feeding. We report a case of anorexia nervosa, who presented with Wernicke's encephalopathy and progressed to Korsakoff's syndrome. Knowledge, awareness, and early intervention of anorexia nervosa by mental health professionals can prevent development of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

  8. Process evaluation of the MOSAIC trial: treatment experience of two psychological therapies for out-patient treatment of Anorexia Nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Zainal, K. A.; Renwick, B.; Keyes, A.; Lose, A.; Kenyon, M.; DeJong, H; Broadbent, H.; Serpell, L; Richards, L.; Johnson-Sabine, E.; Boughton, N.; Whitehead, L.; Treasure, J; Schmidt, U.; MOSAIC trial group

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study is part of a series of process evaluations within the MOSAIC Trial (Maudsley Outpatient Study of Treatments for Anorexia Nervosa and Related Conditions). This randomised controlled trial (RCT) compared two psychological treatments, the Maudsley Model for Treatment of Adults with Anorexia Nervosa (MANTRA) and Specialist Supportive Clinical Management (SSCM) for adult outpatients with Anorexia Nervosa. The present process study integrates quantitative (treatment acceptabi...

  9. Dialectical Behavior Therapy of Anorexia and Bulimia Nervosa among Adolescents: A Case Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salbach-Andrae, Harriet; Bohnekamp, Inga; Pfeiffer, Ernst; Lehmkuhl, Ulrike; Miller, Alec L.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe a case series of adolescents (mean age = 16.5 years, SD = 1.0) with anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) who received dialectical behavior therapy (DBT). Twelve outpatients with AN and BN took part in 25 weeks of twice weekly therapy consisting of individual therapy and a skills training group.…

  10. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Anorexia Nervosa: An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalle Grave, Riccardo; El Ghoch, Marwan; Sartirana, Massimiliano; Calugi, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for anorexia nervosa (AN), based on Beck's cognitive theory, was developed in a "generic" form in the early eighties. In recent years, however, improved knowledge of the mechanisms involved in maintaining eating disorder psychopathology has led to the development of a "specific" form of CBT, termed CBT-E (E = enhanced), designed to treat all forms of eating disorders, including AN, from outpatient to inpatient settings. Although more studies are required to assess the relative effectiveness of CBT-E with respect to other available treatments, the data indicate that in outpatient settings it is both viable and promising for adults and adolescents with AN. Encouraging results are also emerging from inpatient CBT-E, particularly in adolescents, and clinical services offering CBT-E at different levels of care are now offered in several countries around the world. However, CBT-E requires dissemination in order to become widely available to patients.

  11. Anorexia nervosa responding to zinc supplementation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, H; Arita, Y; Hara, Y; Kimura, T; Nawata, H

    1992-08-01

    An emaciated 16-year-old female with anorexia nervosa was hospitalized for treatment of vomiting, epigastralgia and diarrhea. The finding of a taste disorder, low serum alkaline phosphatase activity and relatively low serum zinc level strongly suggested a zinc deficiency. Zinc was initially administered intravenously (40 mumol/day) for 7 days, then orally (15 mg elemental zinc/day) for about 60 days. Her digestive symptoms disappeared after the second day of intravenous treatment and she began to gain weight. She rapidly regained her normal weight after one month of receiving the oral zinc supplementation. Both exocrine pancreatic function and intestinal absorption were improved by the prolonged oral administration of zinc. In such cases zinc supplementation may be a therapeutic option in addition to psychologic and other approaches to management. PMID:1526438

  12. [Pathogenesis of anorexia nervosa. Neurobiological risk factors and possible endophenotypes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pászthy, Bea; Törzsök-Sonnevend, Mária

    2014-01-26

    Anorexia nervosa is a serious, chronical state of illness which often starts in childhood or adolescence and has serious consequences on the quality of life. This review focuses on the heterogenity of the disease with emphasis on special diagnostic implications in case of childhood onset. Research findings of the last decade showed that genetic and neurobiological vulnerabilities are at least as potent risk factors as psychological, family constellations and sociocultural preferences. The heritability of eating disorders levels those of diseases predominantly influenced by biological factors. The authors give a summary of the most investigated neurobiologic and neurocognitive factors which could be the fundaments of a biological vulnerablilty. To date, no common risk factor could be identified, but some existing adversities can clearly be related to distinct subgroups with the disorder. The concept of endo- and subphenotypes leads to more specific and more efficient methods of therapy in other somatic and psychiatric diseases. PMID:24440724

  13. Cognitive Profile of Children and Adolescents with Anorexia Nervosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaersdam Telléus, Gry; Jepsen, Jens Richardt; Bentz, Mette;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Few studies of cognitive functioning in children and adolescents with anorexia nervosa (AN) have been conducted. The aim of this study was to examine the neurocognitive and intelligence profile of this clinical group. METHOD: The study was a matched case-control (N = 188), multi......-centre study including children and adolescents with AN (N = 94) and healthy control participants (N = 94). RESULTS: The results suggest that Full Scale Intelligence Quotient (Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-III/Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III) in this patient group is close to the normal...... population mean of 100. Individuals with AN exhibited significantly worse performance in nonverbal intelligence functions (i.e. Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-III/Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III, Perceptual Organization Index) and in verbal memory (Test of Memory and Learning-Second Edition...

  14. Anorexia Nervosa and Refeeding Syndrome. A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohji Azumagawa

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a case story of a 14-year-old girl with severe anorexia nervosa (AN (158 cm, 28 kg, –44.1% ideal body mass index, admitted with purpura, edema, and general fatigue. We treated her carefully and paid particular attention to prevent development of refeeding syndrome (RS, and her body weight increased satisfactorily. However, RS (edema, hypoalbuminemia, and heart failure occurred despite careful treatment. We used albumin and diuretics for treatment of RS, but severe liver damage resulted. RS was aggravated by the medical treatment. More attention should have been paid to her weight gain and medical treatment should have been initiated more slowly to prevent dramatic changes in the patient's fluid and electrolyte status.

  15. Purtscher-Like Retinopathy Associated with Anorexia Nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bugra Karasu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 21-year-old girl presented with acute painless vision loss in her right eye. There was no remarkable ocular history and she had a history of anorexia nervosa. At presentation best-corrected visual acuities were counting fingers from 2 meters and 20/20, in the right and left eyes, respectively. Slit lamp examination result was normal. Fundus examination revealed multiple cotton wool spots and intraretinal hemorrhages surrounding the optic disc and macula in the right eye. Fluorescein angiography showed capillary filling defect and leakage from optic disc in the late phase of the angiogram. One week later best-corrected visual acuities remained the same in both eyes with similar fundus appearance. One month after initial presentation visual acuity was 20/20 in both eyes with no abnormality in fundus appearance.

  16. Psychopharmacological options for adult patients with anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miniati, Mario; Mauri, Mauro; Ciberti, Agnese; Mariani, Michela Giorgi; Marazziti, Donatella; Dell'Osso, Liliana

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this review was to summarize evidence from research on psychopharmacological options for adult patients with anorexia nervosa (AN). Database searches of MEDLINE and PsycINFO (from January 1966 to January 2014) were performed, and original articles published as full papers, brief reports, case reports, or case series were included. Forty-one papers were screened in detail, and salient characteristics of pharmacological options for AN were summarized for drug classes. The body of evidence for the efficacy of pharmacotherapy in AN was unsatisfactory, the quality of observations was questionable (eg, the majority were not blinded), and sample size was often small. More trials are needed, while considering that nonresponse and nonremission are typical of patients with AN. PMID:26145463

  17. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Anorexia Nervosa: An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalle Grave, Riccardo; El Ghoch, Marwan; Sartirana, Massimiliano; Calugi, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for anorexia nervosa (AN), based on Beck's cognitive theory, was developed in a "generic" form in the early eighties. In recent years, however, improved knowledge of the mechanisms involved in maintaining eating disorder psychopathology has led to the development of a "specific" form of CBT, termed CBT-E (E = enhanced), designed to treat all forms of eating disorders, including AN, from outpatient to inpatient settings. Although more studies are required to assess the relative effectiveness of CBT-E with respect to other available treatments, the data indicate that in outpatient settings it is both viable and promising for adults and adolescents with AN. Encouraging results are also emerging from inpatient CBT-E, particularly in adolescents, and clinical services offering CBT-E at different levels of care are now offered in several countries around the world. However, CBT-E requires dissemination in order to become widely available to patients. PMID:26689208

  18. Purtscher-Like Retinopathy Associated with Anorexia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasu, Bugra; Gunay, Betul Onal; Erdogan, Gurkan; Kardes, Esra; Gunay, Murat

    2016-01-01

    A 21-year-old girl presented with acute painless vision loss in her right eye. There was no remarkable ocular history and she had a history of anorexia nervosa. At presentation best-corrected visual acuities were counting fingers from 2 meters and 20/20, in the right and left eyes, respectively. Slit lamp examination result was normal. Fundus examination revealed multiple cotton wool spots and intraretinal hemorrhages surrounding the optic disc and macula in the right eye. Fluorescein angiography showed capillary filling defect and leakage from optic disc in the late phase of the angiogram. One week later best-corrected visual acuities remained the same in both eyes with similar fundus appearance. One month after initial presentation visual acuity was 20/20 in both eyes with no abnormality in fundus appearance. PMID:27069703

  19. An Adolescent Boy with Comorbid Anorexia Nervosa and Hashimoto Thyroiditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehlivantürk Kızılkan, Melis; Kanbur, Nuray; Akgül, Sinem; Alikaşifoğlu, Ayfer

    2016-01-01

    Low triiodothyronine syndrome is a physiological adaptation encountered in anorexia nervosa (AN) and generally improves with sufficient weight gain. However, when a primary thyroid pathology accompanies AN, both the evaluation of thyroid hormone levels and the management of the co-morbid disease become more challenging. Hashimoto thyroiditis could complicate the management of AN by causing hyper- or hypothyroidism. AN could also negatively affect the treatment of Hashimoto thyroiditis by altering body weight and metabolic rate, as well as by causing drug non-compliance. We present the case of a 15-year-old boy with comorbid AN restrictive sub-type and Hashimoto thyroiditis. In this case report, we aimed to draw attention to the challenges that could be encountered in the diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of patients with AN when accompanied by Hashimoto thyroiditis. PMID:26757948

  20. Selective cognitive empathy deficit in adolescents with restrictive anorexia nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calderoni S

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Sara Calderoni,1 Pamela Fantozzi,1 Sandra Maestro,1 Elena Brunori,1 Antonio Narzisi,1 Giulia Balboni,2 Filippo Muratori1,31Department of Child Neurology and Psychiatry, IRCCS Stella Maris Foundation, 2Department of Surgery, Medical, Molecular and Critical Area Pathology, University of Pisa, 3Department of Developmental Medicine, University of Pisa, Pisa, ItalyBackground: A growing, but conflicting body of literature suggests altered empathic abilities in subjects with anorexia nervosa-restricting type (AN-R. This study aims to characterize the cognitive and affective empathic profiles of adolescents with purely AN-R.Methods: As part of a standardized clinical and research protocol, the Interpersonal Reactivity Index (IRI, a valid and reliable self-reported instrument to measure empathy, was administered to 32 female adolescents with AN-R and in 41 healthy controls (HC comparisons, matched for age and gender. Correlational analyses were performed to evaluate the links between empathy scores and psychopathological measures.Results: Patients scored significantly lower than HC on cognitive empathy (CE, while they did not differ from controls on affective empathy (AE. The deficit in CE was not related to either disease severity nor was it related to associated psychopathology.Conclusion: These results, albeit preliminary, suggest that a dysfunctional pattern of CE capacity may be a stable trait of AN-R that should be taken into account not only for the clinical management, but also in preventive and therapeutic intervention.Keywords: anorexia nervosa-restricting type, cognitive empathy, affective empathy, female adolescents, Interpersonal Reactivity Index

  1. [Association of anorexia nervosa and mitral valve prolapse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, K; Sakamoto, T; Hada, Y; Hasegawa, I; Takahashi, T; Suzuki, J; Takahashi, H

    1986-01-01

    Four cases of anorexia nervosa recently encountered were reported in respect to their cardiovascular manifestations including prolapse of the cardiac valves and other poorly recognized cardiac findings. All four patients, aged 13 to 32 years, were women and had marked emaciation (35 to 44% weight loss of the ideal body weight) with typical hormone abnormalities. Chest radiographs showed a small cardiac shadow, and sinus bradycardia with low voltage was present in their electrocardiograms. One case, 13-year-old, had a mid-systolic click and occasionally a late systolic murmur, and also an abdominal continuous hum. Echocardiography including two-dimensional color flow-mapping disclosed mitral valve prolapse in all, and tricuspid valve prolapse in two. Mild to moderate pericardial effusion was noted in all between the right ventricle and diaphragm, and pericardiocentesis in one case had no effect on the valve movements. No inflammatory changes were observed in the specimen of the pericardium and also of the fluid. An association of mitral valve prolapse and anerexia nervosa was discussed based on the previous studies, but the final conclusion remains unknown. PMID:3681005

  2. The impact of hyperactivity and leptin on recovery from anorexia nervosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elburg, A.A. van; Kas, M.J.H.; Hillebrand, J.J.G.; Eijkemans, R.J.C.; Engeland, H. van

    2007-01-01

    In anorexia nervosa (AN), hyperactivity is observed in about 80% of patients and has been associated with low leptin levels in the acute stage of AN and in anorexia animal models. To further understand the importance of this correlation in AN, we investigated the relationship between hypoleptinaemia

  3. Anorexia nervosa: the diagnosis. A postmodern ethics contribution to the bioethics debate on involuntary treatment for anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Sacha

    2014-03-01

    This paper argues that there is a relationship between understandings of anorexia nervosa (AN) and how the ethical issues associated with involuntary treatment for AN are identified, framed, and addressed. By positioning AN as a construct/discourse (hereinafter "AN: the diagnosis") several ethical issues are revealed. Firstly, "AN: the diagnosis" influences how the autonomy and competence of persons diagnosed with AN are understood by decision-makers in the treatment environment. Secondly, "AN: the diagnosis" impacts on how treatment and treatment efficacy are defined and the ethical justifiability of paternalism. Thirdly, "AN: the diagnosis" can limit the opportunity for persons with AN to construct an identity that casts them as a competent person. "AN: the diagnosis" can thus inherently affirm professional knowledge and values. Postmodern professional ethics can support professionals in managing these issues by highlighting the importance of taking responsibility for professional knowledge, values, and power and embracing moral uncertainty. PMID:24366443

  4. Massa óssea em pacientes com anorexia nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos Evaldo dos

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar a ingestão diária de cálcio e estabelecer sua correlação com a densidade óssea de pacientes com anorexia nervos. PACIENTES E MÉTODOS: quatorze mulheres com anorexia nervosa registraram, em diário alimentar padronizado, sua ingestão em 24 horas e foram submetidas ao exame de densitometria óssea. A análise estatística foi feita pelos testes do c² e correlação de Pearson, adotando-se como significância estatística p<0,05. RESULTADOS: a média da densidade óssea na coluna lombar foi de 0,95 ± 0,15 e no colo do fêmur foi de 0,88 ± 0,26. Houve correlação significativa entre o tempo de amenorréia e a perda de massa óssea, tanto na coluna lombar (r=-0,65; p=0,01 como no fêmur (r=-0,71; (p=0,0068. Com exceção de uma paciente, todas apresentavam ingestão de cálcio inferior ao recomendado pelo RDA, com média de 554,5 mg/dia (variando de 120 a 840 mg/dia. Observou-se que 64% das pacientes apresentavam algum grau de perda de massa óssea (osteopenia ou osteoporose na coluna e 57% no fêmur. Das seis pacientes com déficit na ingestão de cálcio inferior a 60%, nenhuma apresentou osteoporose, ao passo que das oito pacientes com déficit superior a 60% na ingestão de cálcio, três tinham osteoporose. CONCLUSÃO: Pacientes com anorexia nervosa têm baixa ingestão de cálcio e perda significativa de massa óssea, que estão diretamente relacionadas entre si. A baixa densidade óssea está, também, correlacionada com o tempo de amenorréia.

  5. Severity of eating disorder symptoms related to oxytocin receptor polymorphisms in anorexia nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Summer F.; Valencia, Celeste; Lutter, Michael; McAdams, Carrie J.

    2015-01-01

    Oxytocin is a peptide hormone important for social behavior, and differences in psychological traits have been associated with variants of the oxytocin receptor gene in healthy people. We examined whether small nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) correlated with clinical symptoms in women with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and healthy comparison (HC) women. Subjects completed clinical assessments and provided DNA for analysis. Subjects were divided into four groups: HC, subjects currently with anorexia nervosa (AN-C), subjects with a history of anorexia nervosa but in long-term weight recovery (AN-WR), and subjects with bulimia nervosa (BN). Five SNPs of the oxytocin receptor were examined. Minor allele carriers showed greater severity in most of the psychiatric symptoms. Importantly, the combination of having had anorexia and carrying either of the A alleles for two SNPS in the OXTR gene (rs53576, rs2254298) was associated with increased severity specifically for ED symptoms including cognitions and behaviors associated both with eating and appearance. A review of psychosocial data related to the OXTR polymorphisms examined is included in the discussion. OXTR polymorphisms may be a useful intermediate endophenotype to consider in the treatment of patients with anorexia nervosa. PMID:26106053

  6. Severity of eating disorder symptoms related to oxytocin receptor polymorphisms in anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Summer F; Valencia, Celeste; Lutter, Michael; McAdams, Carrie J

    2015-08-30

    Oxytocin is a peptide hormone important for social behavior and differences in psychological traits have been associated with variants of the oxytocin receptor gene in healthy people. We examined whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) correlated with clinical symptoms in women with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and healthy comparison (HC) women. Subjects completed clinical assessments and provided DNA for analysis. Subjects were divided into four groups: HC, subjects currently with anorexia nervosa (AN-C), subjects with a history of anorexia nervosa but in long-term weight recovery (AN-WR), and subjects with bulimia nervosa (BN). Five SNPs of the oxytocin receptor were examined. Minor allele carriers showed greater severity in most of the psychiatric symptoms. Importantly, the combination of having had anorexia and carrying either of the A alleles for two SNPS in the OXTR gene (rs53576, rs2254298) was associated with increased severity specifically for ED symptoms including cognitions and behaviors associated both with eating and appearance. A review of psychosocial data related to the OXTR polymorphisms examined is included in the discussion. OXTR polymorphisms may be a useful intermediate endophenotype to consider in the treatment of patients with anorexia nervosa.

  7. Severity of eating disorder symptoms related to oxytocin receptor polymorphisms in anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Summer F; Valencia, Celeste; Lutter, Michael; McAdams, Carrie J

    2015-08-30

    Oxytocin is a peptide hormone important for social behavior and differences in psychological traits have been associated with variants of the oxytocin receptor gene in healthy people. We examined whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) correlated with clinical symptoms in women with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and healthy comparison (HC) women. Subjects completed clinical assessments and provided DNA for analysis. Subjects were divided into four groups: HC, subjects currently with anorexia nervosa (AN-C), subjects with a history of anorexia nervosa but in long-term weight recovery (AN-WR), and subjects with bulimia nervosa (BN). Five SNPs of the oxytocin receptor were examined. Minor allele carriers showed greater severity in most of the psychiatric symptoms. Importantly, the combination of having had anorexia and carrying either of the A alleles for two SNPS in the OXTR gene (rs53576, rs2254298) was associated with increased severity specifically for ED symptoms including cognitions and behaviors associated both with eating and appearance. A review of psychosocial data related to the OXTR polymorphisms examined is included in the discussion. OXTR polymorphisms may be a useful intermediate endophenotype to consider in the treatment of patients with anorexia nervosa. PMID:26106053

  8. What can we learn from the history of male anorexia nervosa?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chengyuan

    2014-01-01

    The eating disorders literature has focussed on females and little is known of the male experience. The overall image this has generated suggests a young woman in conflict with socio-cultural pressures which associate thinness with beauty. Historical studies have examined anorexia nervosa from an entirely female focus while ignoring how diagnostic categories have shaped approaches to the male body. This paper will track the case of the male with anorexia nervosa through changing theories of causation and treatment approaches, from when the condition first emerged in 1873 to the present. In doing so, we gain a valuable new insight into how anorexia nervosa has been historically gendered and the far-reaching implications this has had for diagnosis and treatment of the male sufferer. Similarities between the sexes helped to establish male anorexia as a distinct category. However, this shifted focus away from important differences, which have yet unexplored implications in the assessment, diagnosis and management of disordered eating. Throughout history, there has been constant pressure to give a precise definition to anorexia nervosa, despite being fraught with medical uncertainties. This has resulted in inevitably harmful generalisations rooted in the dominant epidemiology. This paper reveals that anorexia nervosa is a truly global phenomenon which cannot be adequately constructed through exclusive studies of the female. There is consequently a pressing need to address the dearth of research examining eating disorders in males. PMID:25671131

  9. Using the Activity-based Anorexia Rodent Model to Study the Neurobiological Basis of Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Tara Gunkali; Chen, Yi-Wen; Aoki, Chiye

    2015-10-22

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychiatric illness characterized by excessively restricted caloric intake and abnormally high levels of physical activity. A challenging illness to treat, due to the lack of understanding of the underlying neurobiology, AN has the highest mortality rate among psychiatric illnesses. To address this need, neuroscientists are using an animal model to study how neural circuits may contribute toward vulnerability to AN and may be affected by AN. Activity-based anorexia (ABA) is a bio-behavioral phenomenon described in rodents that models the key symptoms of anorexia nervosa. When rodents with free access to voluntary exercise on a running wheel experience food restriction, they become hyperactive - running more than animals with free access to food. Here, we describe the procedures by which ABA is induced in adolescent female C57BL/6 mice. On postnatal day 36 (P36), the animal is housed with access to voluntary exercise on a running wheel. After 4 days of acclimation to the running wheel, on P40, all food is removed from the cage. For the next 3 days, food is returned to the cage (allowing animals free food access) for 2 hr daily. After the fourth day of food restriction, free access to food is returned and the running wheel is removed from the cage to allow the animals to recover. Continuous multi-day analysis of running wheel activity shows that mice become hyperactive within 24 hr following the onset of food restriction. The mice run even during the limited time during which they have access to food. Additionally, the circadian pattern of wheel running becomes disrupted by the experience of food restriction. We have been able to correlate neurobiological changes with various aspects of the animals' wheel running behavior to implicate particular brain regions and neurochemical changes with resilience and vulnerability to food-restriction induced hyperactivity.

  10. Phobic memory and somatic vulnerabilities in anorexia nervosa: a necessary unity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myslobodsky Michael

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Anorexia nervosa is a clinically significant illness that may be associated with permanent medical complications involving almost every organ system. The paper raises a question whether some of them are associated with premorbid vulnerability such as subcellular ion channel abnormalities ('channelopathy' that determines the clinical expression of the bodily response to self-imposed malnutrition. Aberrant channels emerge as a tempting, if rather speculative alternative to the notion of cognitively-driven neurotransmitter modulation deficit in anorexia nervosa. The concept of channelopathies is in keeping with some characteristics of anorexia nervosa, such as a genetically-based predisposition to hypophagia, early onset, cardiac abnormalities, an appetite-enhancing efficacy of some antiepileptic drugs, and others. The purpose of this article is to stimulate further basic research of ion channel biophysics in relation to restrictive anorexia.

  11. Partially restored resting-state functional connectivity in women recovered from anorexia nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Ilka; Geisler, Daniel; Tam, Friederike; King, Joseph A.; Ritschel, Franziska; Seidel, Maria; Bernardoni, Fabio; Murr, Julia; Goschke, Thomas; Calhoun, Vince D.; Roessner, Veit; Ehrlich, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Background We have previously shown increased resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) in the frontoparietal network (FPN) and the default mode network (DMN) in patients with acute anorexia nervosa. Based on these findings we investigated within-network rsFC in patients recovered from anorexia nervosa to examine whether these abnormalities are a state or trait marker of the disease. To extend the understanding of functional connectivity in patients with anorexia nervosa, we also estimated rsFC between large-scale networks. Methods Girls and women recovered from anorexia nervosa and pair-wise, age- and sex-matched healthy controls underwent a resting-state fMRI scan. Using independent component analyses (ICA), we isolated the FPN, DMN and salience network. We used standard comparisons as well as a hypothesis-based approach to test the findings of our previous rsFC study in this recovered cohort. Temporal correlations between network time-course pairs were computed to investigate functional network connectivity (FNC). Results Thirty-one patients recovered from anorexia nervosa and 31 controls participated in our study. Standard group comparisons revealed reduced rsFC between the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) and the FPN in the recovered group. Using a hypothesis-based approach we extended the previous finding of increased rsFC between the angular gyrus and the FPN in patients recovered from anorexia nervosa. No group differences in FNC were revealed. Limitations The study design did not allow us to conclude that the difference found in rsFC constitutes a scar effect of the disease. Conclusion This study suggests that some abnormal rsFC patterns found in patients recovered from anorexia nervosa normalize after long-term weight restoration, while distorted rsFC in the FPN, a network that has been associated with cognitive control, may constitute a trait marker of the disorder. PMID:27045551

  12. An Adolescent Case of Citrin Deficiency With Severe Anorexia Mimicking Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Satsuki; Yazaki, Masahide; Yamada, Shinji; Fukuyama, Tetsuhiro; Inui, Akio; Iwasaki, Yasushi; Ikeda, Shu-ichi

    2015-08-01

    We report a 12-year-old female citrin-deficient patient presenting with severe anorexia and body weight loss, mimicking the restricting type of anorexia nervosa (AN). She showed normal development until age 10 years when she started to play volleyball at school. She then became gradually anorexic, and her growth was stunted. At age 12, she was admitted to hospital because of severe anorexia and thinness. She was first thought to have AN, and drip infusion of glucose solution and high-calorie drinks were given, but her condition deteriorated further. She had a history of neonatal hepatitis and was therefore suspected to have citrin deficiency (CD). Genetic analysis of SLC25A13 revealed that she was compound heterozygous for 851del4 and IVS16ins3kb, and a diagnosis of CD was made. A low-carbohydrate diet with oral intake of arginine and ursodeoxycholic acid was started, and her condition gradually improved. The clinical features in our patient were similar to those of AN, and therefore AN may also be an important clinical sign in adolescent patients with CD.

  13. The CT appearance of ``reversible`` cerebral pseudoatrophy in anorexia nervosa; Obraz KT ``odwracalnego`` rzekomego zaniku mozgu w jadlowstrecie nerwowym

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boron, Z.; Kozlowska, R.; Grzegorzewski, M.; Nawrot, M.; Bulawska, I. [Katedra i Zaklad Radiologii i Diagnostyki Narzadowej, Akademia Medyczna, Bydgoszcz (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    The CT appearance of ``reversible`` cerebral pseudoatrophy resulting from anorexia nervosa was demonstrated. The CT studies were performed in 3 young women with typical clinical course of anorexia nervosa. In all of them computed tomography revealed dilatation of the subarachnoid fluid space. After 5 months of therapy the follow-up scans have reverted to normal in all cases. (author) 5 refs, 2 figs

  14. Dying on the Inside: What Every Teacher Needs to Know About Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia, and the Individual Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Marc

    This document provides teachers with information on the identifying features of anorexia nervosa and bulimia and suggests steps which teachers can take to encourage individual children in more positive behavior. The paper makes clear distinctions between anorexia nervosa, bulimia, and bulimarexia, describing the symptoms of each disorder. It is…

  15. Definition of a gastric emptying abnormality in patients with anorexia nervosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upper gastrointestinal symptoms may be prominent in anorexia nervosa. This study is an investigation of the gastric emptying of solid and liquid meal components in 16 female patients who met accepted psychiatric diagnostic criteria for anorexia nervosa. The results were compared with those of gastric emptying studies in 10 normal females of ideal body weight, 13 normal persons (12 males), and six patients with weight loss secondary to Crohn's disease with no psychiatric symptoms. A dual-isotope technique using chicken liver intracellularly labeled with technetium-/sup 99m/ (/sup 99m/Tc) bound to sulfur colloid as the solid-phase marker, and indium-111 (111In) -labeled water as the liquid-phase marker was used. In 13 of the 16 anorexia nervosa patients (80%), gastric emptying of solids was slower than the range in the two groups of normal subjects, and mean gastric emptying was significantly slower than in the weight-loss patients. Liquid emptying (water) in anorexia nervosa was normal and similar to the control groups studied. In 11 of the anorexia nervosa patients with delayed gastric emptying, intramuscular metoclopramide, 10 mg, significantly accelerated the mean gastric emptying from 60 through 120 min after the meal. The authors conclude that these data are consistent with an antral motility disturbance, either primary or secondary; and metoclopramide, a gastric prokinetic agent, accelerates (delayed) gastric emptying

  16. Two diagnoses become one? Rare case report of anorexia nervosa and Cushing’s syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawicka N

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Nadia Sawicka,* Maria Gryczyńska,* Jerzy Sowiński, Monika Tamborska-Zedlewska, Marek Ruchała Department of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Internal Medicine, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis impairment in anorexia nervosa is marked by hypercortisolemia, and psychiatric disorders occur in the majority of patients with Cushing’s syndrome. Here we report a patient diagnosed with anorexia nervosa who also developed Cushing’s syndrome. A 26-year-old female had been treated for anorexia nervosa since she was 17 years old, and also developed depression and paranoid schizophrenia. She was admitted to the Department of Endocrinology, Metabolism, and Internal Medicine with a preliminary diagnosis of Cushing’s syndrome. Computed tomography revealed a 27 mm left adrenal tumor, and she underwent laparoscopic adrenalectomy. She was admitted to hospital 6 months after this procedure, at which time she did not report any eating or mood disorder. This is a rare case report of a patient with anorexia nervosa in whom Cushing’s syndrome was subsequently diagnosed. Diagnostic difficulties were caused by the signs and symptoms presenting in the course of both disorders, ie, hypercortisolemia, osteoporosis, secondary amenorrhea, striae, hypokalemia, muscle weakness, and depression.Keywords: anorexia nervosa, Cushing’s syndrome, adrenalectomy, osteoporosis

  17. The inversion of the fall: on identity construction in anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollberger, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa can be comprehended as an illness in the broader context of Western culture. The myth of the Fall, narrating a forbidden act of eating, provides a symbolic background of a philosophical-anthropological comprehension of the identity of man, which frames a clinically relevant point of view of anorexia nervosa. The formation of identity in its broader anthropological sense and particularly with people suffering from anorexia nervosa is subjected to a philosophical and psychological analysis consulting the relevant philosophical, sociological and psychodynamic literature. The order of eating in terms of interdiction and disobedience anthropologically constitutes the identity of men: by ignoring the divine taboo, men can reach consciousness and culture. Philosophy and psychoanalytical theory have focused on this process regarding an emerging capacity to symbolize and on its relation to emancipation and the pursuit of autonomy. Under postmodern conditions with a decline of stable cultural value systems and traditional structures the process of an emancipatory identity construction becomes critical. Surrogates replace missing values; thus, injunctions such as to enjoy substitute interdictions. This paper sheds light on the impact of these cultural conditions and their postmodern changes on the identity construction of anorexia nervosa. Moreover, implications for psychotherapeutic treatment are outlined. Besides the medico-scientific models, a multifaceted understanding of anorexia nervosa has to consider cultural contexts and symbolic processes that matter in the disorder in order to provide a broader background for the treatment approach of the anorectic patient. PMID:24457444

  18. [An anorexia nervosa case and an approach to this case with pharmacotherapy and psychodrama techniques].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdel, Osman; Ateşci, Figen; Oğuzhanoğlu, Nalan K

    2003-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa in an eating disorder that primarily affects female adolescents and is more commonly seen in westernized countries. Although it is a sociocultural problem of developed societies, nowadays it is also increasing rapidly in developing cultures such as Turkey. Difficulties in the treatment of anorexia nervosa have directed clinicians to understand the disorder better. Although it is well known that various factors play a role in the etiology of anorexia nervosa, psychodynamic factors also have considerable importance. In addition, social and familial interactions contribute to the development of anorexia nervosa. In the light of these facts, treatment with psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy might be used to cure this disorder. In this article, the definitive features and process of anorexia nervosa along with its psychodynamics were discussed on the basis of a case. In the treatment of the patient, psychodrama techniques with drugs were thought to be useful. The patient became aware of the unfavourable relationship and improved by the use of this method. Thus she gained emotional-cognitive insight.

  19. Processo de Enfermagem para pacientes com Anorexia Nervosa Proceso de Enfermería para pacientes con Anorexia Nerviosa Nursing Process to patients with Anorexia Nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Pellegrino Toledo

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Relato de experiência da aplicação do Processo de Enfermagem a uma paciente portadora de Anorexia Nervosa, utilizando histórico, diagnósticos, intervenções e resultados de enfermagem. As intervenções foram fundamentadas nos diagnósticos de enfermagem: distúrbio da imagem corporal, nutrição desequilibrada menos que as necessidades corporais, ansiedade, baixa autoestima crônica, intolerância a atividade, controle ineficaz do regime terapêutico, risco de infecção, volume de líquidos deficiente e isolamento social. A partir da aplicação do Processo de Enfermagem, os resultados planejados foram alcançados, proporcionando melhor qualidade de vida, no período em que permaneceu internada. Os fatores psíquicos, neurológicos, endócrinos e imunológicos, peculiares na anorexia nervosa, propiciaram a elaboração de um Processo de Enfermagem, que contribuiu de maneira positiva para a complementação da reabilitação da saúde da mesmaRelato de experiencia de la aplicación del proceso de enfermería (PE a una paciente portadora de Anorexia Nerviosa, utilizando histórico, diagnósticos, intervenciones y resultados de enfermería. Las intervenciones fueron basadas en los diagnósticos de enfermería: trastorno de la imagen corporal, nutrición alterada ingesta inferior a las necesidades corporales, ansiedad, autoestima baja crónica, intolerancia a la actividad, manejo ineficaz del régimen terapéutico, riesgo de infección, déficits de volumen de líquidos y aislamiento social. A partir de la aplicación del Proceso de Enfermería, los resultados planeados fueron alcanzados, proporcionando mejor calidad de vida en el período en que permaneció hospitalizada. Los factores psíquicos, neurológicos, endócrinos y inmunológicos, peculiares en la anorexia nerviosa, propiciaron la elaboración de un Proceso de Enfermería, que contribuyó de manera positiva para la complementación de la rehabilitación de su salud

  20. Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia Nervosa, and Binge Eating Disorder in Midlife and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elran-Barak, Roni; Fitzsimmons-Craft, Ellen E; Benyamini, Yael; Crow, Scott J; Peterson, Carol B; Hill, Laura L; Crosby, Ross D; Mitchell, James E; Le Grange, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    We examined eating disorders in midlife and beyond by comparing frequency of anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), binge eating disorder (BED), and other specified feeding or eating disorder (OSFED) among midlife eating disorder treatment-seeking individuals and younger controls. We also compared demographic and eating disorder-related characteristics across diagnoses and age groups. Participants included 2,118 treatment-seeking adults who self-reported their eating-related symptoms on the Eating Disorder Questionnaire. Results showed that percent of patients with BN was significantly lower whereas percent of patients with BED and OSFED was significantly higher among midlife relative to younger patients. Percent of patients with AN did not differ between midlife and younger patients. Additionally, midlife and younger patients with BED and OSFED differed on several demographic (e.g., marital status) and eating disorder-related characteristics (e.g., BMI, compulsive exercising). This study suggests that BN is less common whereas BED and OSFED are more common among midlife eating disorder treatment-seeking individuals relative to younger controls. In addition, AN and BN present fairly similarly whereas BED and OSFED present fairly differently among midlife patients relative to younger controls. Attention to these differences and similarities is necessary to understand eating disorders in midlife.

  1. A case series investigation of association between co-morbid psychiatric disorder and the improvement in body mass index among patients with anorexia nervosa and eating disorder not otherwise specified of the anorexia nervosa type

    OpenAIRE

    Goh, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Background Anorexia nervosa and eating disorder not otherwise specified* (not fulfilling Anorexia Nervosa DSM IV criteria) are increasing in Singapore. Patients with eating disorders may also present with other psychiatric disorders such as depression and anxiety. The paper aims to investigate the association of co-morbid psychiatric disorders with the improvement of body mass index (BMI) in these patients. Methods A retrospective cohort analysis of 182 patients with anorexia and eating disor...

  2. A abordagem familiar no tratamento da anorexia e bulimia nervosa Family assessment in the treatment of anorexia and bulimia nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Weisz Cobelo

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available O final do século XX enfatiza a inclusão da família no tratamento de pacientes portadores de anorexia e bulimia nervosa. Pesquisas (Castro et al.,2000; Webster et al.,2000 colocam como relevante considerar a estrutura familiar, as práticas conversacionais e os legados transgeracionais como elementos que podem estar contribuindo, de modo significativo, no desenvolvimento ou na manutenção dos transtornos alimentares. No Ambulatório de Bulimia e Transtornos Alimentares e no Projeto de Atendimento a Crianças e Adolescentes do IPQ, o grande desafio dos terapeutas de família tem sido compartilhar com famílias e pacientes suas histórias repletas de inseguranças e angústias e construir uma ponte de união entre a família e a equipe multidisciplinar, para que a compreensão dos significados, refletida por todos, possa ser agilizada e transformada em novas contribuições de vida para as pacientes e seus familiares.The end of the 20th century emphasizes the inclusion of the family in the treatment of the patients with anorexia and bulimia nervosa. Researches (Castro et al.,2000; Webster et al.,2000 determine as relevant to consider the family structure, the interaction pattern, and the "transgeneration bequest" - the legacy that goes from one generation to the next - as elements that might contribute in a significant way to the development or maintenance of the eating disorders. At the Bulimia and Eating Disorders Ambulatory and in the IPQ's Project for Attendance of Children and Adolescents, the great challenge for the family therapists has been to share with the families and patients their histories full of insecurity and anguish. The therapists must also overcome the difficulties of building a bridge that brings together the family and the multidisciplinary team so that the comprehension of the meanings, reflected by all, might be quickly transformed into new life contributions to these patients and their families.

  3. Therapeutic potential of ghrelin in restricting-type anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, Mari; Ohwada, Rina; Akamizu, Takashi; Shibasaki, Tamotsu; Kangawa, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is an eating disorder characterized by a decrease in caloric intake and malnutrition. It is associated with a variety of medical morbidities as well as significant mortality. Nutritional support is of paramount importance to prevent impaired quality of life later in life in affected patients. Some patients with restricting-type AN who are fully motivated to gain body weight cannot increase their food intake because of malnutrition-induced gastrointestinal dysfunction. Chronicity of AN prevents participation in social activities and leads to increased medical expenses. Therefore, there is a pressing need for effective appetite-stimulating therapies for patients with AN. Ghrelin is the only orexigenic hormone that can be given intravenously. Intravenous infusion of ghrelin is reported to increase food intake and body weight in healthy subjects as well as in patients with poor nutritional status. Here, we introduce the results of a pilot study that investigated the effects of ghrelin on appetite, energy intake, and nutritional parameters in five patients with restricting-type AN, who are fully motivated to gain body weight but could not increase their food intake because of malnutrition-induced gastrointestinal dysfunction. PMID:22975066

  4. Role of the evolutionarily conserved starvation response in anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, D S; Horton, R Y; Aamodt, E J

    2011-06-01

    This review will summarize recent findings concerning the biological regulation of starvation as it relates to anorexia nervosa (AN), a serious eating disorder that mainly affects female adolescents and young adults. AN is generally viewed as a psychosomatic disorder mediated by obsessive concerns about weight, perfectionism and an overwhelming desire to be thin. By contrast, the thesis that will be developed here is that, AN is primarily a metabolic disorder caused by defective regulation of the starvation response, which leads to ambivalence towards food, decreased food consumption and characteristic psychopathology. We will trace the starvation response from yeast to man and describe the central role of insulin (and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1))/Akt/ F-box transcription factor (FOXO) signaling in this response. Akt is a serine/threonine kinase downstream of the insulin and IGF-1 receptors, whereas FOXO refers to the subfamily of Forkhead box O transcription factors, which are regulated by Akt. We will also discuss how initial bouts of caloric restriction may alter the production of neurotransmitters that regulate appetite and food-seeking behavior and thus, set in motion a vicious cycle. Finally, an integrated approach to treatment will be outlined that addresses the biological aspects of AN. PMID:20838399

  5. A qualitative investigation into anorexia nervosa: The inner perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrica Marzola

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The ego-syntonic nature of anorexia nervosa (AN emphasizes how some aspects of this disorder can be highly valuable to patients. To understand the different perspectives that patients with AN hold about their condition, we explored the meanings they attribute to it. Thirty-four AN patients were asked to write a letter to their condition describing what it represents and means to them. Letters were then evaluated using a standardized coding scheme. Three pro-codes resulted to be mostly represented: difference (i.e. feeling different from others because of AN, company (i.e. being protected by the disorder, and identity (i.e. being totally represented by the illness. Some anti-codes were also particularly used: anger/hate, expressing anger toward AN, fear/distress, betrayal/pretend (i.e. feeling cheated by the disorder, and loss/waste (i.e. describing a feeling of life being wasted. In addition to pro- and anti-codes, the ambivalence theme was also well represented. Given the complex adaptive function of this disorder, this study may provide a framework of different perspectives that therapists could refer to and patients could identify with during the therapeutic process toward discovering individual meanings of the disorder.

  6. Radionuclide gastric emptying studies in patients with anorexia nervosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate gastric emptying in anorexia nervosa patients, 26 patients (17 females, two males, ranging in age from 13 to 40 yr) with upper GI symptoms ingested 150-200 microCi [/sup 99m/Tc]triethelenetetraamine polysterene resin in cereal and were imaged in the supine position. Data were accumulated at 5 min intervals to obtain the gastric emptying time (GET). The results of the studies were divided into three categories: prolonged, 13 patients; rapid, 11; and normal 3. Twelve of 13 patients with prolonged GET were given 10 mg metoclopramide i.v. injections; nine of the 12 patients had a good response and three had no response. Five of the nine patients underwent metoclopramide therapy and four of the patients showed benefit from the therapy. One patient discontinued metoclopramide therapy because of somnolence. Although all patients had subjective symptoms of gastric dysfunction, our results indicated only 50% had objectively prolonged GET, and another 50% showed normal or even rapid GET. Therefore, this radionuclide study enables quantitatively objective documentation of gastric emptying, separation of those patients with rapid or normal GET from those with prolonged GET, thereby avoiding the possible side effects from metoclopramide medication, and prediction of effectiveness of metoclopramide therapy in patients with prolonged GET

  7. Neurocognitive and social cognition deficits in patients with anorexia nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kułakowska, Dorota

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the first part of the article the authors present a set of the actual concepts explaining problems of cognitive functions and social cognition currently observed in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN. It is possible; through the neuroimaging research, to get better understanding of the brain specifics in these individuals. Even though, the AN remains a disease with very complex and multifactorial etiology which remains a huge medical challenge. Currently, popular is the view that takes into consideration the integrating role of the insula and subcortical structures (such as hippocampus, amygdala, thalamus in the regulation of cognitive and emotional processes in people suffering from AN. There is still an open problem, however, of the selection of therapeutic interventions targeting these deficits. The second part of the article presents the attempt to describe deficits in neurocognitive and social cognition in people with AN occurring prior to illness, during and after the recovery. Particular attention has been paid to the most frequently described in the literature – neuro- cognitive deficits such as rigidity of thinking, weak central coherence, and deficits in social cognition, including mental processes of perception and expression of emotions, disorders of the theory of mind (ToM and empathy. The results of previous studies, their scarcity in Poland, do not give a satisfactory answer to the question whether the above mentioned disorders are a feature of endophenotype or condition in an episode of the disease. Research point to the more permanent nature, which may be more resistant to therapeutic modifications.

  8. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for anorexia nervosa: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galsworthy-Francis, Lisa; Allan, Steven

    2014-02-01

    Evidence for the effectiveness of psychological therapies for anorexia nervosa (AN) is inconsistent. There have been no systematic reviews solely on the effectiveness for Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) for AN. This review aimed to synthesise and appraise the recent evidence for CBT as a treatment for AN. Using specific search criteria, 16 relevant articles were identified which evaluated CBT alone or as part of a broader randomised/non-randomised trial. Various formats of CBT were utilised in the reviewed papers. Studies were evaluated using established quality criteria. The evidence reviewed suggested that CBT demonstrated effectiveness as a means of improving treatment adherence and minimising dropout amongst patients with AN. While CBT appeared to demonstrate some improvements in key outcomes (body mass index, eating-disorder symptoms, broader psychopathology), it was not consistently superior to other treatments (including dietary counselling, non-specific supportive management, interpersonal therapy, behavioural family therapy). Numerous methodological limitations apply to the available evidence. Further research and ongoing review is needed to evaluate the settings, patient groups and formats in which CBT may be effective as a treatment for AN.

  9. Contemporary views on the genetics of anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Pei-An Betty; Woodside, D Blake

    2016-04-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a serious mental illness characterized by severe dietary restriction that leads to high rates of morbidity, chronicity, and mortality. Unfortunately, effective treatment is lacking and few options are available. High rates of familial aggregation and significant heritability suggested that the complex etiology of AN is affected by both genetic and environmental factors. In this paper, we review studies that reported common and rare genetic variation that influence susceptibility of AN through candidate gene studies, genome-wide association studies, and sequencing-based studies. We also discuss gene expression, methylation, imaging genetics, and pharmacogenetics to demonstrate that these studies have collectively advanced our knowledge of how genetic variation contributes to AN susceptibility and clinical course. Lastly, we highlight the importance of gene by environment interactions (G×E) and share our enthusiasm for the use of nutritional genomic approaches to elucidate the interaction among nutrients, metabolic intermediates, and genetic variation in AN. A deeper understanding of how nutrition alters genome stability, how genetic variation influences uptake and metabolism of nutrients, and how response to food components affects disordered eating, will lead to personalized dietary interventions and effective nutraceutical and pharmacological treatments for AN. PMID:26944296

  10. Anorexia nervosa: estudo de caso com uma abordagem de sucesso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Cecília Vianna Cañete

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A anorexia nervosa (AN é doença grave de etiologia multifatorial, que envolve predisposição genética, fatores socioculturais, vulnerabilidades biológicas e também psicológicas. Caracteriza-se por séria restrição alimentar auto-imposta, com conseqüências orgânicas e psíquicas graves, e alta taxa de mortalidade. O objetivo deste artigo é descrever um caso de AN, tratado em grupo psicoterápico, heterogêneo, de adolescentes, sem focar no comportamento anoréxico. Analisaram-se as implicações da doença nos aspectos familiar, social, na escolaridade e na sexualidade da paciente. O método terapêutico empregado, em grupo heterogêneo, sem focar no comportamento anoréxico, mostrou-se eficaz tanto na aderência ao tratamento quanto na evolução do caso.

  11. An investigation of habit learning in Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godier, Lauren R; de Wit, Sanne; Pinto, Anthony; Steinglass, Joanna E; Greene, Ashley L; Scaife, Jessica; Gillan, Claire M; Walsh, B Timothy; Simpson, Helen-Blair; Park, Rebecca J

    2016-10-30

    Anorexia Nervosa (AN) is a disorder characterised by compulsive behaviour, such as self-starvation and excessive exercise, which develop in the pursuit of weight-loss. Recent theory suggests that once established, compulsive weight-loss behaviours in AN may become habitual. In two parallel studies, we measured whether individuals with AN showed a bias toward habits using two outcome-devaluation tasks. In Study 1, 23 women with AN (restrictive and binge/purge subtypes), and 18 healthy controls (HC) completed the slips-of-action paradigm, designed to assess reward-based habits. In Study 2, 13 women with restrictive AN, 14 women recovered from restrictive AN, and 17 female HC participants completed the slips-of-action paradigm, and an avoidance paradigm, designed to assess aversive habits. AN participants showed no deficit relative to HCs in the ability to use feedback to respond correctly to stimuli. Following devaluation of outcomes, all groups in both studies were equally able to withhold inappropriate responses, suggesting no deficit in the balance between goal-directed and habitual control of behaviour in these tasks in AN. These results suggest that individuals with AN do not show a generalised tendency to rely on habits in two outcome-devaluation tasks. Future research is needed to investigate the potential role of disorder-specific habits in the maintenance of behaviour in AN. PMID:27497292

  12. Gyrification brain abnormalities as predictors of outcome in anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favaro, Angela; Tenconi, Elena; Degortes, Daniela; Manara, Renzo; Santonastaso, Paolo

    2015-12-01

    Gyrification brain abnormalities are considered a marker of early deviations from normal developmental trajectories and a putative predictor of poor outcome in psychiatric disorders. The aim of this study was to explore cortical folding morphology in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN). A MRI brain study was conducted on 38 patients with AN, 20 fully recovered patients, and 38 healthy women. Local gyrification was measured with procedures implemented in FreeSurfer. Vertex-wise comparisons were carried out to compare: (1) AN patients and healthy women; (2) patients with a full remission at a 3-year longitudinal follow-up assessment and patients who did not recover. AN patients exhibited significantly lower gyrification when compared with healthy controls. Patients with a poor 3-year outcome had significantly lower baseline gyrification when compared to both healthy women and patients with full recovery at follow-up, even after controlling for the effects of duration of illness and gray matter volume. No significant correlation has been found between gyrification, body mass index, amount of weight loss, onset age, and duration of illness. Brain gyrification significantly predicted outcome at follow-up even after controlling for the effects of duration of illness and other clinical prognostic factors. Although the role of starvation in determining our findings cannot be excluded, our study showed that brain gyrification might be a predictor of outcome in AN. Further studies are needed to understand if brain gyrification abnormalities are indices of early neurodevelopmental alterations, the consequence of starvation, or the interaction between both factors.

  13. Executive functioning in anorexia nervosa patients and their unaffected relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galimberti, Elisa; Fadda, Emma; Cavallini, Maria Cristina; Martoni, Riccardo Maria; Erzegovesi, Stefano; Bellodi, Laura

    2013-08-15

    Formal genetic studies suggested a substantial genetic influence for anorexia nervosa (AN), but currently results are inconsistent. The use of the neurocognitive endophenotype approach may facilitate our understanding of the AN pathophysiology. We investigated decision-making, set-shifting and planning in AN patients (n=29) and their unaffected relatives (n=29) compared to healthy probands (n=29) and their relatives (n=29). The Iowa Gambling Task (IGT), the Tower of Hanoi (ToH) and the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) were administered. Concordance rates and heritability indices were also calculated in probands/relatives. Impaired performance on the IGT and the WCST were found in both AN probands and their relatives, although planning appeared to be preserved. The IGT heritability index suggested the presence of genetic effects that influence this measure. No evidence for genetic effects was found for the WCST. The results suggest the presence of a shared dysfunctional executive profile in women with AN and their unaffected relatives, characterized by deficient decision-making and set-shifting. Concordance analysis strongly suggests that these impairments aggregate in AN families, supporting the hypothesis that they may constitute biological markers for AN. Decision-making impairment presents a moderate heritability, suggesting that decision-making may be a candidate endophenotype for AN. PMID:23122554

  14. Nutritional Adequacy of Dietary Intake in Women with Anorexia Nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan K. Raatz

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Understanding nutrient intake of anorexia nervosa (AN patients is essential for the treatment. Therefore, estimates of total energy and nutrient consumption were made in a group of young women (19 to 30 years with restricting and binge purge subtypes of AN participating in an ecological momentary assessment study. Participants completed three nonconsecutive 24-hour diet recalls. Mean nutrient intakes were stratified by subtype and by quartiles of energy intake and compared to the age specific Dietary Reference Intake (DRI levels, as well as to the reported intakes from the What We Eat In America (WWEIA dietary survey 2011–2012. Reported intake was determined for energy, macronutrients, and micronutrients. The mean body mass index (BMI for all participants was 17.2 ± 0.1 kg/m2. Reported nutrient intake was insufficient for participants in quartiles 1–3 of both AN subtypes when compared to the DRIs. Intake reported by participants in quartile 4 of both subgroups met requirements for most nutrients and even met or exceeded estimated energy needs. Counseling of AN patients should be directed to total food consumption to improve energy intake and to reduce individual nutritional gaps.

  15. Radionuclide gastric emptying studies in patients with anorexia nervosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domstad, P.A.; Shih, W.J.; Humphries, L.; DeLand, F.H.; Digenis, G.A.

    1987-05-01

    To evaluate gastric emptying in anorexia nervosa patients, 26 patients (17 females, two males, ranging in age from 13 to 40 yr) with upper GI symptoms ingested 150-200 microCi (/sup 99m/Tc)triethelenetetraamine polysterene resin in cereal and were imaged in the supine position. Data were accumulated at 5 min intervals to obtain the gastric emptying time (GET). The results of the studies were divided into three categories: prolonged, 13 patients; rapid, 11; and normal 3. Twelve of 13 patients with prolonged GET were given 10 mg metoclopramide i.v. injections; nine of the 12 patients had a good response and three had no response. Five of the nine patients underwent metoclopramide therapy and four of the patients showed benefit from the therapy. One patient discontinued metoclopramide therapy because of somnolence. Although all patients had subjective symptoms of gastric dysfunction, our results indicated only 50% had objectively prolonged GET, and another 50% showed normal or even rapid GET. Therefore, this radionuclide study enables quantitatively objective documentation of gastric emptying, separation of those patients with rapid or normal GET from those with prolonged GET, thereby avoiding the possible side effects from metoclopramide medication, and prediction of effectiveness of metoclopramide therapy in patients with prolonged GET.

  16. Anorexia Nervosa and Its Associated Endocrinopathy in Young People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Madhusmita; Klibanski, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a condition of severe undernutrition associated with adaptive changes in many endocrine axes. These changes include hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, acquired growth hormone resistance with low insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) levels, hypercortisolemia, altered secretion of adipokines and appetite-regulating hormones, and low bone mineral density (BMD). Bone health is impaired subsequent to a low body mass index, decreased lean mass, and the endocrine changes described above. In addition to low areal BMD, AN is characterized by a decrease in volumetric BMD, changes in bone geometry, and reductions in strength estimates, leading to an increased risk for fracture. Weight restoration is essential for restoration of normal endocrine function; however, hypercortisolemia, high peptide YY levels, and ghrelin dynamics may not completely normalize. In some patients, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism persists despite weight restoration. Weight gain and menstrual recovery are critical for improving bone health in AN; however, residual deficits may persist. Physiologic estrogen replacement using transdermal, but not oral, estrogen increases bone accrual in adolescents with AN, while bisphosphonates improve BMD in adults. Recombinant human IGF-1 and teriparatide have been used in a few studies as bone anabolic therapies. More data are necessary to determine the optimal therapeutic strategies for low BMD in AN. PMID:26863308

  17. Radionuclide gastric emptying studies in patients with anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domstad, P A; Shih, W J; Humphries, L; DeLand, F H; Digenis, G A

    1987-05-01

    To evaluate gastric emptying in anorexia nervosa patients, 26 patients (17 females, two males, ranging in age from 13 to 40 yr) with upper GI symptoms ingested 150-200 microCi [99mTc]triethelenetetraamine polysterene resin in cereal and were imaged in the supine position. Data were accumulated at 5 min intervals to obtain the gastric emptying time (GET). The results of the studies were divided into three categories: prolonged, 13 patients; rapid, 11; and normal 3. Twelve of 13 patients with prolonged GET were given 10 mg metoclopramide i.v. injections; nine of the 12 patients had a good response and three had no response. Five of the nine patients underwent metoclopramide therapy and four of the patients showed benefit from the therapy. One patient discontinued metoclopramide therapy because of somnolence. Although all patients had subjective symptoms of gastric dysfunction, our results indicated only 50% had objectively prolonged GET, and another 50% showed normal or even rapid GET. Therefore, this radionuclide study enables quantitatively objective documentation of gastric emptying, separation of those patients with rapid or normal GET from those with prolonged GET, thereby avoiding the possible side effects from metoclopramide medication, and prediction of effectiveness of metoclopramide therapy in patients with prolonged GET. PMID:3572544

  18. Impaired processing of self-face recognition in anorexia nervosa.

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    Hirot, France; Lesage, Marine; Pedron, Lya; Meyer, Isabelle; Thomas, Pierre; Cottencin, Olivier; Guardia, Dewi

    2016-03-01

    Body image disturbances and massive weight loss are major clinical symptoms of anorexia nervosa (AN). The aim of the present study was to examine the influence of body changes and eating attitudes on self-face recognition ability in AN. Twenty-seven subjects suffering from AN and 27 control participants performed a self-face recognition task (SFRT). During the task, digital morphs between their own face and a gender-matched unfamiliar face were presented in a random sequence. Participants' self-face recognition failures, cognitive flexibility, body concern and eating habits were assessed with the Self-Face Recognition Questionnaire (SFRQ), Trail Making Test (TMT), Body Shape Questionnaire (BSQ) and Eating Disorder Inventory-2 (EDI-2), respectively. Subjects suffering from AN exhibited significantly greater difficulties than control participants in identifying their own face (p = 0.028). No significant difference was observed between the two groups for TMT (all p > 0.1, non-significant). Regarding predictors of self-face recognition skills, there was a negative correlation between SFRT and body mass index (p = 0.01) and a positive correlation between SFRQ and EDI-2 (p eating disorders could play a part in impaired self-face recognition. PMID:26420298

  19. The perception of affective touch in anorexia nervosa.

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    Crucianelli, Laura; Cardi, Valentina; Treasure, Janet; Jenkinson, Paul M; Fotopoulou, Aikaterini

    2016-05-30

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a disorder characterized by restricted eating, fears of gaining weight, and body image distortions. The etiology remains unknown; however impairments in social cognition and reward circuits contribute to the onset and maintenance of the disorder. One possibility is that AN is associated with reduced perceived pleasantness during social interactions. We therefore examined the perception of interpersonal, 'affective touch' and its social modulation in AN. We measured the perceived pleasantness of light, dynamic stroking touches applied to the forearm of 25 AN patients and 30 healthy controls using C Tactile (CT) afferents-optimal (3cm/s) and non-optimal (18cm/s) velocities, while simultaneously displaying images of faces showing rejecting, neutral and accepting expressions. CT-optimal touch, but not CT non-optimal touch, elicited significantly lower pleasantness ratings in AN patients compared with healthy controls. Pleasantness ratings were modulated by facial expressions in both groups in a similar fashion; namely, presenting socially accepting faces increased the perception of touch pleasantness more than neutral and rejecting faces. Our findings suggest that individuals with AN have a disordered, CT-based affective touch system. This impairment may be linked to their weakened interoceptive perception and distorted body representation. PMID:27137964

  20. Liver Autophagy in Anorexia Nervosa and Acute Liver Injury

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    Marouane Kheloufi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy, a lysosomal catabolic pathway for long-lived proteins and damaged organelles, is crucial for cell homeostasis, and survival under stressful conditions. During starvation, autophagy is induced in numerous organisms ranging from yeast to mammals, and promotes survival by supplying nutrients and energy. In the early neonatal period, when transplacental nutrients supply is interrupted, starvation-induced autophagy is crucial for neonates’ survival. In adult animals, autophagy provides amino acids and participates in glucose metabolism following starvation. In patients with anorexia nervosa, autophagy appears initially protective, allowing cells to copes with nutrient deprivation. However, when starvation is critically prolonged and when body mass index reaches 13 kg/m2 or lower, acute liver insufficiency occurs with features of autophagic cell death, which can be observed by electron microscopy analysis of liver biopsy samples. In acetaminophen overdose, a classic cause of severe liver injury, autophagy is induced as a protective mechanism. Pharmacological enhancement of autophagy protects against acetaminophen-induced necrosis. Autophagy is also activated as a rescue mechanism in response to Efavirenz-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. However, Efavirenz overdose blocks autophagy leading to liver cell death. In conclusion, in acute liver injury, autophagy appears as a protective mechanism that can be however blocked or overwhelmed.

  1. Altered social attention in anorexia nervosa during real social interaction

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    Dalmaso, Mario; Castelli, Luigi; Scatturin, Pietro; Carli, Lorenza; Todisco, Patrizia; Palomba, Daniela; Galfano, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    The capacity to devote attentional resources in response to body-related signals provided by others is still largely unexplored in individuals with Anorexia Nervosa (AN). Here, we tested this capacity through a novel paradigm that mimics a social interaction with a real partner. Healthy individuals (Experiment 1) and individuals with AN (Experiment 2) completed a task with another person which consisted in performing, alternatively, rapid aiming movements to lateralised targets. Generally, this task leads to a form of Inhibition of Return (IOR), which consists of longer reaction times when an individual has to respond to a location previously searched by either himself (individual IOR) or by the partner (social IOR) as compared to previously unexplored locations. IOR is considered as an important attentional mechanism that promotes an effective exploration of the environment during social interaction. Here, healthy individuals displayed both individual and social IOR that were both reliable and of the same magnitude. Individuals with AN displayed a non-significant individual IOR but a reliable social IOR that was also significantly stronger than individual IOR. These results suggest the presence of a reduced sensitivity in processing body-related stimuli conveyed by oneself in individuals with AN which is reflected in action-based attentional processes. PMID:26984784

  2. [Dietotherapy of patients with anorexia nervosa and eating disorders in inpatient clinic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladyshev, O A; Isakov, V A; Shakhovskaia, A K

    2011-01-01

    We assessed a nutritional status of patients with anorexia nervosa, theirs metabolical indicators and body structure with the use of bioimpedometry. Also we assessed a basal metabolic rate patients with anorexia nervosa with the use of indirect calorimethry method. We developed an algorithm of dietotherapy of patients with anorexia nervosa. In dependence of expressiveness degree of metabolical disorders of patients we suggested three different food allowance with different caloric content and different chemical compound of the food. The results show us the improvement of status of patients: their activity have risen up, mood have stabilized, anxiety have decreased, appetite have taken a turn for the better and their weight have stabilized too. PMID:21574467

  3. Inpatient cognitive behaviour therapy for adolescents with anorexia nervosa: immediate and longer-term effects

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    Riccardo eDalle Grave

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Inpatient treatment for anorexia nervosa is often successful in restoring body weight, but a high percentage of patients relapse following discharge. The aim of the present study was to establish the immediate and longer-term effects of a novel inpatient program for adolescents that was designed to produce enduring change. Method: Twenty-seven consecutive patients with severe anorexia nervosa were admitted to a 20-week inpatient treatment program based upon enhanced cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT-E. The patients were assessed before and after hospitalization, and six and 12 months later. Results: Twenty-six patients (96% completed the program. In these patients there was a substantial improvement in weight, eating disorder features and general psychopathology that was well maintained at 12-month follow-up. Conclusions: These findings suggest that inpatient CBT-E is a promising approach to the treatment of adolescents with severe anorexia nervosa.

  4. Increased reverse T/sub 3/ concentration in patients with anorexia nervosa

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    Baranowska, B.; Kaniewski, M.; Zgliczynski, S. (Centrum Medyczne Ksztalcenia Podyplomowego, Warsaw (Poland))

    1980-01-01

    In 20 female patients with anorexia nervosa, aging 16 - 26 years, the thyroid function was estimated by +- determining TSH secretion in response to TRH, and serum thyroxine (T/sub 4/), 3,5,3'L-triiodothyronine (T/sub 3/) and 3,3',5'L-triiodothyronine (reverse T/sub 3/) concentrations. 14 healthy women of the same age were included into the control group. If compared with control group, a marked supression of TRH stimulated TSH secretion and a lowering of serum T/sub 3/ concentration was found in patients with anorexia nervosa. On the other hand, serum reverse T/sub 3/ concentration was markedly higher in patients with anorexia nervosa than in control ones. Gain of body weight leads to normalization of thyroid hormones level in the serum. Obtained results show for peripheral mechanism of described hormonal disorders.

  5. Complement C3 serum levels in anorexia nervosa: a potential biomarker for the severity of disease?

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    Long Carlin S

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anorexia nervosa carries the highest mortality rate of any psychiatric disorder. Even the most critically ill anorexic patients may present with normal 'standard' laboratory values, underscoring the need for a new sensitive biomarker. The complement cascade, a major component of innate immunity, represents a driving force in the pathophysiology of multiple inflammatory disorders. The role of complement in anorexia nervosa remains poorly understood. The present study was designed to evaluate the role of complement C3 levels, the extent of complement activation and of complement hemolytic activity in serum, as potential new biomarkers for the severity of anorexia nervosa. Patients and methods This was a prospective cohort study on 14 patients with severe anorexia nervosa, as defined by a body mass index (BMI 2. Serum samples were obtained in a biweekly manner until hospital discharge. A total of 17 healthy subjects with normal BMI values served as controls. The serum levels of complement C3, C3a, C5a, sC5b-9, and of the 50% hemolytic complement activity (CH50 were quantified and correlated with the BMIs of patients and control subjects. Results Serum C3 levels were significantly lower in patients with anorexia nervosa than in controls (median 3.7 (interquartile range (IQR 2.5-4.9 vs 11.4 (IQR 8.9-13.7, P P Conclusions Complement C3 serum levels may represent a sensitive new biomarker for monitoring the severity of disease in anorexia nervosa. The finding from this preliminary pilot study will require further investigation in future prospective large-scale multicenter trials.

  6. Cancer Incidence among Patients with Anorexia Nervosa from Sweden, Denmark and Finland.

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    Lene Mellemkjaer

    Full Text Available A diet with restricted energy content reduces the occurrence of cancer in animal experiments. It is not known if the underlying mechanism also exists in human beings. To determine whether cancer incidence is reduced among patients with anorexia nervosa who tend to have a low intake of energy, we carried out a retrospective cohort study of 22 654 women and 1678 men diagnosed with anorexia nervosa at ages 10-50 years during 1968-2010 according to National Hospital Registers in Sweden, Denmark and Finland. The comparison group consisted of randomly selected persons from population registers who were similar to the anorexia nervosa patients in respect to sex, year of birth and place of residence. Patients and population comparisons were followed for cancer by linkage to Cancer Registries. Incidence rate ratios (IRR were estimated using Poisson models. In total, 366 cases of cancer (excluding non-melanoma skin cancer were seen among women with anorexia nervosa, and the IRR for all cancer sites was 0.97 (95% CI = 0.87-1.08 adjusted for age, parity and age at first child. There were 76 breast cancers corresponding to an adjusted IRR of 0.61 (95% CI = 0.49-0.77. Significantly increased IRRs were observed for esophageal, lung, and liver cancer. Among men with anorexia nervosa, there were 23 cases of cancer (age-adjusted IRR = 1.08; 95% CI = 0.71-1.66. There seems to be no general reduction in cancer occurrence among patients with anorexia nervosa, giving little support to the energy restriction hypothesis.

  7. Neuropathy and myopathy in two patients with anorexia and bulimia nervosa.

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    Alloway, R; Reynolds, E H; Spargo, E; Russell, G F

    1985-01-01

    Two adolescent patients with eating disorders and severe weight loss presented with neuromyopathy. The first was female and had a twenty months' history of bulimia nervosa with weight loss and episodic gorging and vomiting. The second was male with a two-year history of anorexia nervosa characterised by vegetarianism and increasing food restriction. Both had severe wasting and asymmetrical weakness of proximal limb muscles. The first patient deteriorated on refeeding and became temporarily pa...

  8. Cerebral perfusion differences in women currently with and recovered from anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Min; Lu, Hanzhang; Liu, Peiying; Thomas, Binu P; McAdams, Carrie J

    2015-05-30

    Anorexia nervosa is a serious psychiatric disorder characterized by restricted eating, a pursuit of thinness, and altered perceptions of body shape and size. Neuroimaging in anorexia nervosa has revealed morphological and functional alterations in the brain. A better understanding of physiological changes in anorexia nervosa could provide a brain-specific health marker relevant to treatment and outcomes. In this study, we applied several advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to quantify regional and global cerebral blood flow (CBF) in 25 healthy women (HC), 23 patients currently with anorexia (AN-C) and 19 patients in long-term weight recovery following anorexia (AN-WR). Specifically, CBF was measured with pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (pCASL) MRI and then verified by a different technique, phase contrast (PC) MRI. Venous T2 values were determined by T2 relaxation under spin tagging (TRUST) MRI, and were used to corroborate the CBF results. These novel techniques were implemented on a standard 3T MRI scanner without any exogenous tracers, and the total scan duration was less than 10min. Voxel-wise comparison revealed that the AN-WR group showed lower CBF in bilateral temporal and frontal lobes than the AN-C group. Compared with the HC group, the AN-C group also showed higher CBF in the right temporal lobe. Whole-brain-averaged CBF was significantly decreased in the AN-WR group compared with the AN-C group, consistent with the PC-MRI results. Venous T2 values were lower in the AN-WR group than in the AN-C group, consistent with the CBF results. A review of prior work examining CBF in anorexia nervosa is included in the discussion. This study identifies several differences in the cerebral physiological alterations in anorexia nervosa, and finds specific differences relevant to the current state of the disorder. PMID:25795596

  9. Neuromyopathic complications in a patient with anorexia nervosa and vitamin C deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, P W; Morton, J; Russell, G F

    1994-09-01

    A 19-year-old female patient with anorexia nervosa developed profound weight loss over 1 year associated with vegetarianism and excessive exercise. There was severe wasting and proximal muscle weakness in the legs and bilateral weakness of eye closure. A purpuric rash developed due to vitamin C deficiency. This case demonstrates a new neurological sign in anorexia nervosa indicating a weakness of the orbicularis oculi muscles as part of a more general myopathy. The myopathic and scorbutic features may have a common pathogenesis. PMID:7987355

  10. Chronic anorexia nervosa: enteral nutrition via percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy and liaison psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malfi, G; Agnello, E; Da Pont, M C; Palmo, A; Zullo, G; Monero, A; Macario, P F; Sterpone, S; Munno, D

    2006-12-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a complex mental disorder characterized by altered eating behaviour often resulting in life-threatening weight loss (1 month) enteral feeding at home, a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy was performed and a home nutrition support regimen that met her energy-protein intake requirements was prescribed. During the follow-up period, an overall improvement in nutritional status, general condition, mood and cognitive functioning was observed. Patient compliance with refeeding is notoriously problematic; however, enteral feeding interventions may be feasible in the long-term treatment of selected anorexia nervosa patients when closely followed-up by a multidisciplinary medical team.

  11. [Prevention and Treatment of Eating Disorders: The Health Care Network Anorexia and Bulimia nervosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigel, Angelika; Gumz, Antje; Kästner, Denise; Romer, Georg; Wegscheider, Karl; Löwe, Bernd

    2015-07-01

    The "Health care network anorexia and bulimia nervosa", a subproject of psychenet - the Hamburg network for mental health - aims to decrease the incidence of eating disorders as well as the risk for chronic illness courses. One focal project, therefore, evaluates a school-based prevention manual in a randomized controlled trial. The other one examines the impact of a systemic public health intervention on early treatment initiation in anorexia nervosa. The present article provides an overview about study design and interventions in both focal projects as well as preliminary results.

  12. Enhanced cognitive behaviour therapy for adults with anorexia nervosa: A UK–Italy study

    OpenAIRE

    Fairburn, Christopher G.; Cooper, Zafra; Doll, Helen A.; O'Connor, Marianne E.; Palmer, Robert L.; Dalle Grave, Riccardo

    2013-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is difficult to treat and no treatment is supported by robust evidence. As it is uncommon, it has been recommended that new treatments should undergo extensive preliminary testing before being evaluated in randomized controlled trials. The aim of the present study was to establish the immediate and longer-term outcome following “enhanced” cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT-E). Ninety-nine adult patients with marked anorexia nervosa (body mass index ≤ 17.5) were recruited from c...

  13. The experience of specialist inpatient treatment for anorexia nervosa: A qualitative study from adult patients' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Vivien; Chouliara, Zoe; Morris, Paul G; Collin, Paula; Power, Kevin; Yellowlees, Alex; Grierson, David; Papageorgiou, Elena; Cook, Moira

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study aimed to explore experiences of women currently undergoing specialist inpatient treatment for anorexia nervosa. Interviews were carried out with 21 women with a diagnosis of anorexia nervosa from a specialist adult inpatient eating disorder unit. Five master themes emerged using thematic analysis: (1) shifts in control, (2) experience of transition, (3) importance of supportive staff relationships, (4) sharing with peers and (5) process of recovery and self-discovery. Findings suggest that patients experience a process of change and adjustment in relation to levels of perceived personal control, attachment to the treatment environment and a sense of self-identity. PMID:24505059

  14. Cancer Incidence among Patients with Anorexia Nervosa from Sweden, Denmark and Finland

    OpenAIRE

    Lene Mellemkjaer; Papadopoulos, Fotios C.; Eero Pukkala; Anders Ekbom; Mika Gissler; Jane Christensen; Olsen, Jørgen H.

    2015-01-01

    A diet with restricted energy content reduces the occurrence of cancer in animal experiments. It is not known if the underlying mechanism also exists in human beings. To determine whether cancer incidence is reduced among patients with anorexia nervosa who tend to have a low intake of energy, we carried out a retrospective cohort study of 22 654 women and 1678 men diagnosed with anorexia nervosa at ages 10-50 years during 1968-2010 according to National Hospital Registers in Sweden, Denmark a...

  15. Underweight subjects with anorexia nervosa have an enhanced salivary cortisol response not seen in weight restored subjects with anorexia nervosa.

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    Monteleone, Alessio Maria; Monteleone, Palmiero; Serino, Ismene; Amodio, Roberta; Monaco, Francesco; Maj, Mario

    2016-08-01

    The cortisol response to awakening (CAR) has been reported to be enhanced in symptomatic patients with anorexia nervosa (AN). However, it has been not established whether the dysregulation of CAR was a primary phenomenon or a change secondary to malnutrition. Therefore, we aimed to explore the salivary CAR in both underweight and weigh-restored women with AN. Fifty-nine women volunteered for the study. They were 18 underweight AN women, 15 weight-restored AN women and 26 normal-weight healthy women. Saliva samples were collected in the morning, immediately on awakening and after 15, 30 and 60min to measure saliva levels of cortisol. Participants' anxiety levels in the morning of sampling were measured by the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. As compared to control women, underweight AN patients showed an enhanced CAR whereas weight-restored patients had a normal CAR. These results could be not explained by group differences in body mass index or levels of anxiety. These findings show, for the first time, that the enhanced CAR occurring in the acute phase of AN is not seen in weight-recovered patients, suggesting that the dysregulated activity of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis of symptomatic AN patients is a state-dependent phenomenon. PMID:27236605

  16. Underweight subjects with anorexia nervosa have an enhanced salivary cortisol response not seen in weight restored subjects with anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteleone, Alessio Maria; Monteleone, Palmiero; Serino, Ismene; Amodio, Roberta; Monaco, Francesco; Maj, Mario

    2016-08-01

    The cortisol response to awakening (CAR) has been reported to be enhanced in symptomatic patients with anorexia nervosa (AN). However, it has been not established whether the dysregulation of CAR was a primary phenomenon or a change secondary to malnutrition. Therefore, we aimed to explore the salivary CAR in both underweight and weigh-restored women with AN. Fifty-nine women volunteered for the study. They were 18 underweight AN women, 15 weight-restored AN women and 26 normal-weight healthy women. Saliva samples were collected in the morning, immediately on awakening and after 15, 30 and 60min to measure saliva levels of cortisol. Participants' anxiety levels in the morning of sampling were measured by the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. As compared to control women, underweight AN patients showed an enhanced CAR whereas weight-restored patients had a normal CAR. These results could be not explained by group differences in body mass index or levels of anxiety. These findings show, for the first time, that the enhanced CAR occurring in the acute phase of AN is not seen in weight-recovered patients, suggesting that the dysregulated activity of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis of symptomatic AN patients is a state-dependent phenomenon.

  17. The impact of hyperactivity and leptin on recovery from anorexia nervosa

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    van Elburg, A A; Kas, M. J. H.; Hillebrand, J.J.G.; Eijkemans, R.J.C.; van Engeland, H

    2007-01-01

    Summary In anorexia nervosa (AN), hyperactivity is observed in about 80% of patients and has been associated with low leptin levels in the acute stage of AN and in anorexia animal models. To further understand the importance of this correlation in AN, we investigated the relationship between hypoleptinaemia and hyperactivity in AN patients longitudinally and assessed their predictive value for recovery. Body weight, activity levels, and serum leptin levels were assessed in adolescents and adu...

  18. Focus on anorexia nervosa: modern psychological treatment and guidelines for the adolescent patient

    OpenAIRE

    Espie J; Eisler I

    2015-01-01

    Jonathan Espie,1 Ivan Eisler2 1Child and Adolescent Eating Disorders Service, Michael Rutter Centre, South London and Maudsley Hospital Foundation NHS Trust, 2Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London, UK Abstract: Anorexia nervosa is a serious condition associated with high mortality. Incidence is highest for female adolescents, and prevalence data highlight a pressing unmet need for treatment. While there is evidence that adolescent-onset anorexia has relatively high r...

  19. Ghrelin: central and peripheral implications in anorexia nervosa.

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    Méquinion, Mathieu; Langlet, Fanny; Zgheib, Sara; Dickson, Suzanne; Dehouck, Bénédicte; Chauveau, Christophe; Viltart, Odile

    2013-01-01

    Increasing clinical and therapeutic interest in the neurobiology of eating disorders reflects their dramatic impact on health. Chronic food restriction resulting in severe weight loss is a major symptom described in restrictive anorexia nervosa (AN) patients, and they also suffer from metabolic disturbances, infertility, osteopenia, and osteoporosis. Restrictive AN, mostly observed in young women, is the third largest cause of chronic illness in teenagers of industrialized countries. From a neurobiological perspective, AN-linked behaviors can be considered an adaptation that permits the endurance of reduced energy supply, involving central and/or peripheral reprograming. The severe weight loss observed in AN patients is accompanied by significant changes in hormones involved in energy balance, feeding behavior, and bone formation, all of which can be replicated in animals models. Increasing evidence suggests that AN could be an addictive behavior disorder, potentially linking defects in the reward mechanism with suppressed food intake, heightened physical activity, and mood disorder. Surprisingly, the plasma levels of ghrelin, an orexigenic hormone that drives food-motivated behavior, are increased. This increase in plasma ghrelin levels seems paradoxical in light of the restrained eating adopted by AN patients, and may rather result from an adaptation to the disease. The aim of this review is to describe the role played by ghrelin in AN focusing on its central vs. peripheral actions. In AN patients and in rodent AN models, chronic food restriction induces profound alterations in the « ghrelin » signaling that leads to the development of inappropriate behaviors like hyperactivity or addiction to food starvation and therefore a greater depletion in energy reserves. The question of a transient insensitivity to ghrelin and/or a potential metabolic reprograming is discussed in regard of new clinical treatments currently investigated. PMID:23549309

  20. Ghrelin: Central and Peripheral Implications in Anorexia Nervosa

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    Mathieu eMéquinion

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Food intake and associated disorders are gaining large emphasis in our societies due to their dramatic physiological and psychological consequences on health. Chronic food restriction is a major symptom described in restrictive anorexia nervosa (AN patients. This disease, mostly observed in young women is the third cause of chronic illness in teenagers. It leads to central and/or peripheral reprogramming that permits the organism to endure the reduced energy supplies. These drastic conditions induce severe weight loss, metabolic disturbances, infertility, osteopenia and osteoporosis. Moreover, increasing number of arguments consider AN as an addictive behaviour to food deprivation or weight loss or physical activity, usually associated with mood disorders. This suggests a potential alteration of the central reward system. Significant changes in hormones involved in energy metabolism, regulation of feeding behaviours and bone formation are described in AN patients, but also in animal models presenting a strong face validity. Surprisingly, the plasma levels of ghrelin, an orexigenic hormone, are increased. This hormone acts centrally to modulate food intake, but also peripherally mainly to maintain blood glucose and to regulate gastric motility. Such increase in plasma ghrelin levels seems paradoxical in light of the restrained eating adopted by these AN patients, but adaptive. The aim of this review is to describe the role played by ghrelin in AN focusing on its central vs peripheral action. The chronic food restriction induces both in AN patients and in rodent models a profound alteration in the « ghrelin » signal integration that lead to the development of inappropriate behaviours like hyperactivity or addiction to food starvation and therefore a greater depletion in energy reserves. The question of a transient insensitivity to ghrelin and/or a potential metabolic reprogramming is discussed in regard of new clinical treatments currently

  1. Cognitive remediation therapy for patients with anorexia nervosa: preliminary findings

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    Campbell Iain C

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anorexia nervosa (AN is a severe mental illness. Drug treatments are not effective and there is no established first choice psychological treatment for adults with AN. Neuropsychological studies have shown that patients with AN have difficulties in cognitive flexibility: these laboratory based findings have been used to develop a clinical intervention based on Cognitive Remediation Therapy (CRT which aims to use cognitive exercises to strengthen thinking skills. Aims 1 To conduct a preliminary investigation of CRT in patients with AN 2 to explore whether cognitive training improves performance in set shifting tasks 3 to explore whether CRT exercises are appropriate and acceptable to AN patients 4 to use the data to improve a CRT module for AN patients. Methods Intervention was comprised of ten 45 minute sessions of CRT. Four patients with AN were assessed before and after the ten sessions using five set shifting tests and clinical assessments. At the end, each patient wrote a letter providing feedback on the intervention. Results Post intervention, three of the five set shifting assessments showed a moderate to large effect size in performance and two showed a large effect size in performance, both indicative of improved flexibility. Patients were aware of an improvement in their cognitive flexibility qualitative feedback was generally positive towards CRT. Discussion This preliminary study suggests that CRT changed performance on flexibility tasks and may be beneficial for acute, treatment resistant patients with AN. Feedback gathered from this small case series has enabled modification of the intervention for a future larger study, for example, by linking exercises with real life behavioural tasks and including exercises that encourage global thinking. Conclusion This exploratory study has produced encouraging data supporting the use of CRT in patients with AN: it has also provided insight into how the module should be

  2. Abnormal white matter properties in adolescent girls with anorexia nervosa

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    Katherine E. Travis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Anorexia nervosa (AN is a serious eating disorder that typically emerges during adolescence and occurs most frequently in females. To date, very few studies have investigated the possible impact of AN on white matter tissue properties during adolescence, when white matter is still developing. The present study evaluated white matter tissue properties in adolescent girls with AN using diffusion MRI with tractography and T1 relaxometry to measure R1 (1/T1, an index of myelin content. Fifteen adolescent girls with AN (mean age = 16.6 years ± 1.4 were compared to fifteen age-matched girls with normal weight and eating behaviors (mean age = 17.1 years ± 1.3. We identified and segmented 9 bilateral cerebral tracts (18 and 8 callosal fiber tracts in each participant's brain (26 total. Tract profiles were generated by computing measures for fractional anisotropy (FA and R1 along the trajectory of each tract. Compared to controls, FA in the AN group was significantly decreased in 4 of 26 white matter tracts and significantly increased in 2 of 26 white matter tracts. R1 was significantly decreased in the AN group compared to controls in 11 of 26 white matter tracts. Reduced FA in combination with reduced R1 suggests that the observed white matter differences in AN are likely due to reductions in myelin content. For the majority of tracts, group differences in FA and R1 did not occur within the same tract. The present findings have important implications for understanding the neurobiological factors underlying white matter changes associated with AN and invite further investigations examining associations between white matter properties and specific physiological, cognitive, social, or emotional functions affected in AN.

  3. Atypical antipsychotics as augmentation therapy in anorexia nervosa.

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    Enrica Marzola

    Full Text Available Anorexia nervosa (AN is a life-threatening and difficult to treat mental illness with the highest mortality rates of any psychiatric disorder. We aimed to garner preliminary data on the real-world use of olanzapine and aripiprazole as augmentation agents of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs in adult inpatients affected by AN. We retrospectively evaluated the clinical charts of patients who were hospitalized between 2012 and 2014. Patients were evaluated upon admission and discharge. We investigated eating symptomatology, and both general and eating psychopathology using: Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety, Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, and Yale-Brown-Cornell Eating Disorders Scale. The charts of 75 patients were included in this study. The sample resulted equally distributed among those receiving SSRIs and either aripiprazole or olanzapine in addition to SSRIs. Notwithstanding a few baseline clinical differences, upon discharge all groups were significantly improved on all measures. Interestingly, aripiprazole showed the greatest effectiveness in reducing eating-related preoccupations and rituals with a large effect size. The body of evidence on medication management in AN is in dismal condition. Augmentation therapy is a well-established approach to a variety of mental disorders and it is often used in every-day clinical practice with patients affected by AN as well. Nevertheless, to date very little data is available on this topic. Results from our sample yielded promising results on the effectiveness of aripiprazole augmentation in reducing eating-related obsessions and compulsions. Randomized controlled trials are warranted to confirm these encouraging findings.

  4. Atypical Antipsychotics as Augmentation Therapy in Anorexia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzola, Enrica; Desedime, Nadia; Giovannone, Cristina; Amianto, Federico; Fassino, Secondo; Abbate-Daga, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a life-threatening and difficult to treat mental illness with the highest mortality rates of any psychiatric disorder. We aimed to garner preliminary data on the real-world use of olanzapine and aripiprazole as augmentation agents of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) in adult inpatients affected by AN. We retrospectively evaluated the clinical charts of patients who were hospitalized between 2012 and 2014. Patients were evaluated upon admission and discharge. We investigated eating symptomatology, and both general and eating psychopathology using: Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety, Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, and Yale-Brown-Cornell Eating Disorders Scale. The charts of 75 patients were included in this study. The sample resulted equally distributed among those receiving SSRIs and either aripiprazole or olanzapine in addition to SSRIs. Notwithstanding a few baseline clinical differences, upon discharge all groups were significantly improved on all measures. Interestingly, aripiprazole showed the greatest effectiveness in reducing eating-related preoccupations and rituals with a large effect size. The body of evidence on medication management in AN is in dismal condition. Augmentation therapy is a well-established approach to a variety of mental disorders and it is often used in every-day clinical practice with patients affected by AN as well. Nevertheless, to date very little data is available on this topic. Results from our sample yielded promising results on the effectiveness of aripiprazole augmentation in reducing eating-related obsessions and compulsions. Randomized controlled trials are warranted to confirm these encouraging findings. PMID:25922939

  5. Gyrification brain abnormalities as predictors of outcome in anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favaro, Angela; Tenconi, Elena; Degortes, Daniela; Manara, Renzo; Santonastaso, Paolo

    2015-12-01

    Gyrification brain abnormalities are considered a marker of early deviations from normal developmental trajectories and a putative predictor of poor outcome in psychiatric disorders. The aim of this study was to explore cortical folding morphology in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN). A MRI brain study was conducted on 38 patients with AN, 20 fully recovered patients, and 38 healthy women. Local gyrification was measured with procedures implemented in FreeSurfer. Vertex-wise comparisons were carried out to compare: (1) AN patients and healthy women; (2) patients with a full remission at a 3-year longitudinal follow-up assessment and patients who did not recover. AN patients exhibited significantly lower gyrification when compared with healthy controls. Patients with a poor 3-year outcome had significantly lower baseline gyrification when compared to both healthy women and patients with full recovery at follow-up, even after controlling for the effects of duration of illness and gray matter volume. No significant correlation has been found between gyrification, body mass index, amount of weight loss, onset age, and duration of illness. Brain gyrification significantly predicted outcome at follow-up even after controlling for the effects of duration of illness and other clinical prognostic factors. Although the role of starvation in determining our findings cannot be excluded, our study showed that brain gyrification might be a predictor of outcome in AN. Further studies are needed to understand if brain gyrification abnormalities are indices of early neurodevelopmental alterations, the consequence of starvation, or the interaction between both factors. PMID:26374960

  6. A genome-wide association study of anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boraska, V; Franklin, C S; Floyd, J A B; Thornton, L M; Huckins, L M; Southam, L; Rayner, N W; Tachmazidou, I; Klump, K L; Treasure, J; Lewis, C M; Schmidt, U; Tozzi, F; Kiezebrink, K; Hebebrand, J; Gorwood, P; Adan, R A H; Kas, M J H; Favaro, A; Santonastaso, P; Fernández-Aranda, F; Gratacos, M; Rybakowski, F; Dmitrzak-Weglarz, M; Kaprio, J; Keski-Rahkonen, A; Raevuori, A; Van Furth, E F; Slof-Op 't Landt, M C T; Hudson, J I; Reichborn-Kjennerud, T; Knudsen, G P S; Monteleone, P; Kaplan, A S; Karwautz, A; Hakonarson, H; Berrettini, W H; Guo, Y; Li, D; Schork, N J; Komaki, G; Ando, T; Inoko, H; Esko, T; Fischer, K; Männik, K; Metspalu, A; Baker, J H; Cone, R D; Dackor, J; DeSocio, J E; Hilliard, C E; O'Toole, J K; Pantel, J; Szatkiewicz, J P; Taico, C; Zerwas, S; Trace, S E; Davis, O S P; Helder, S; Bühren, K; Burghardt, R; de Zwaan, M; Egberts, K; Ehrlich, S; Herpertz-Dahlmann, B; Herzog, W; Imgart, H; Scherag, A; Scherag, S; Zipfel, S; Boni, C; Ramoz, N; Versini, A; Brandys, M K; Danner, U N; de Kovel, C; Hendriks, J; Koeleman, B P C; Ophoff, R A; Strengman, E; van Elburg, A A; Bruson, A; Clementi, M; Degortes, D; Forzan, M; Tenconi, E; Docampo, E; Escaramís, G; Jiménez-Murcia, S; Lissowska, J; Rajewski, A; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, N; Slopien, A; Hauser, J; Karhunen, L; Meulenbelt, I; Slagboom, P E; Tortorella, A; Maj, M; Dedoussis, G; Dikeos, D; Gonidakis, F; Tziouvas, K; Tsitsika, A; Papezova, H; Slachtova, L; Martaskova, D; Kennedy, J L; Levitan, R D; Yilmaz, Z; Huemer, J; Koubek, D; Merl, E; Wagner, G; Lichtenstein, P; Breen, G; Cohen-Woods, S; Farmer, A; McGuffin, P; Cichon, S; Giegling, I; Herms, S; Rujescu, D; Schreiber, S; Wichmann, H-E; Dina, C; Sladek, R; Gambaro, G; Soranzo, N; Julia, A; Marsal, S; Rabionet, R; Gaborieau, V; Dick, D M; Palotie, A; Ripatti, S; Widén, E; Andreassen, O A; Espeseth, T; Lundervold, A; Reinvang, I; Steen, V M; Le Hellard, S; Mattingsdal, M; Ntalla, I; Bencko, V; Foretova, L; Janout, V; Navratilova, M; Gallinger, S; Pinto, D; Scherer, S W; Aschauer, H; Carlberg, L; Schosser, A; Alfredsson, L; Ding, B; Klareskog, L; Padyukov, L; Courtet, P; Guillaume, S; Jaussent, I; Finan, C; Kalsi, G; Roberts, M; Logan, D W; Peltonen, L; Ritchie, G R S; Barrett, J C; Estivill, X; Hinney, A; Sullivan, P F; Collier, D A; Zeggini, E; Bulik, C M

    2014-10-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a complex and heritable eating disorder characterized by dangerously low body weight. Neither candidate gene studies nor an initial genome-wide association study (GWAS) have yielded significant and replicated results. We performed a GWAS in 2907 cases with AN from 14 countries (15 sites) and 14 860 ancestrally matched controls as part of the Genetic Consortium for AN (GCAN) and the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 3 (WTCCC3). Individual association analyses were conducted in each stratum and meta-analyzed across all 15 discovery data sets. Seventy-six (72 independent) single nucleotide polymorphisms were taken forward for in silico (two data sets) or de novo (13 data sets) replication genotyping in 2677 independent AN cases and 8629 European ancestry controls along with 458 AN cases and 421 controls from Japan. The final global meta-analysis across discovery and replication data sets comprised 5551 AN cases and 21 080 controls. AN subtype analyses (1606 AN restricting; 1445 AN binge-purge) were performed. No findings reached genome-wide significance. Two intronic variants were suggestively associated: rs9839776 (P=3.01 × 10(-7)) in SOX2OT and rs17030795 (P=5.84 × 10(-6)) in PPP3CA. Two additional signals were specific to Europeans: rs1523921 (P=5.76 × 10(-)(6)) between CUL3 and FAM124B and rs1886797 (P=8.05 × 10(-)(6)) near SPATA13. Comparing discovery with replication results, 76% of the effects were in the same direction, an observation highly unlikely to be due to chance (P=4 × 10(-6)), strongly suggesting that true findings exist but our sample, the largest yet reported, was underpowered for their detection. The accrual of large genotyped AN case-control samples should be an immediate priority for the field.

  7. A genome-wide association study of anorexia nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boraska, Vesna; Franklin, Christopher S; Floyd, James AB; Thornton, Laura M; Huckins, Laura M; Southam, Lorraine; Rayner, N William; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Klump, Kelly L; Treasure, Janet; Lewis, Cathryn M; Schmidt, Ulrike; Tozzi, Federica; Kiezebrink, Kirsty; Hebebrand, Johannes; Gorwood, Philip; Adan, Roger AH; Kas, Martien JH; Favaro, Angela; Santonastaso, Paolo; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando; Gratacos, Monica; Rybakowski, Filip; Dmitrzak-Weglarz, Monika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Keski-Rahkonen, Anna; Raevuori, Anu; Van Furth, Eric F; Landt, Margarita CT Slof-Op t; Hudson, James I; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted; Knudsen, Gun Peggy S; Monteleone, Palmiero; Kaplan, Allan S; Karwautz, Andreas; Hakonarson, Hakon; Berrettini, Wade H; Guo, Yiran; Li, Dong; Schork, Nicholas J.; Komaki, Gen; Ando, Tetsuya; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Esko, Tõnu; Fischer, Krista; Männik, Katrin; Metspalu, Andres; Baker, Jessica H; Cone, Roger D; Dackor, Jennifer; DeSocio, Janiece E; Hilliard, Christopher E; O'Toole, Julie K; Pantel, Jacques; Szatkiewicz, Jin P; Taico, Chrysecolla; Zerwas, Stephanie; Trace, Sara E; Davis, Oliver SP; Helder, Sietske; Bühren, Katharina; Burghardt, Roland; de Zwaan, Martina; Egberts, Karin; Ehrlich, Stefan; Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate; Herzog, Wolfgang; Imgart, Hartmut; Scherag, André; Scherag, Susann; Zipfel, Stephan; Boni, Claudette; Ramoz, Nicolas; Versini, Audrey; Brandys, Marek K; Danner, Unna N; de Kovel, Carolien; Hendriks, Judith; Koeleman, Bobby PC; Ophoff, Roel A; Strengman, Eric; van Elburg, Annemarie A; Bruson, Alice; Clementi, Maurizio; Degortes, Daniela; Forzan, Monica; Tenconi, Elena; Docampo, Elisa; Escaramís, Geòrgia; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Lissowska, Jolanta; Rajewski, Andrzej; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Slopien, Agnieszka; Hauser, Joanna; Karhunen, Leila; Meulenbelt, Ingrid; Slagboom, P Eline; Tortorella, Alfonso; Maj, Mario; Dedoussis, George; Dikeos, Dimitris; Gonidakis, Fragiskos; Tziouvas, Konstantinos; Tsitsika, Artemis; Papezova, Hana; Slachtova, Lenka; Martaskova, Debora; Kennedy, James L.; Levitan, Robert D.; Yilmaz, Zeynep; Huemer, Julia; Koubek, Doris; Merl, Elisabeth; Wagner, Gudrun; Lichtenstein, Paul; Breen, Gerome; Cohen-Woods, Sarah; Farmer, Anne; McGuffin, Peter; Cichon, Sven; Giegling, Ina; Herms, Stefan; Rujescu, Dan; Schreiber, Stefan; Wichmann, H-Erich; Dina, Christian; Sladek, Rob; Gambaro, Giovanni; Soranzo, Nicole; Julia, Antonio; Marsal, Sara; Rabionet, Raquel; Gaborieau, Valerie; Dick, Danielle M; Palotie, Aarno; Ripatti, Samuli; Widén, Elisabeth; Andreassen, Ole A; Espeseth, Thomas; Lundervold, Astri; Reinvang, Ivar; Steen, Vidar M; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Mattingsdal, Morten; Ntalla, Ioanna; Bencko, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Navratilova, Marie; Gallinger, Steven; Pinto, Dalila; Scherer, Stephen; Aschauer, Harald; Carlberg, Laura; Schosser, Alexandra; Alfredsson, Lars; Ding, Bo; Klareskog, Lars; Padyukov, Leonid; Finan, Chris; Kalsi, Gursharan; Roberts, Marion; Logan, Darren W; Peltonen, Leena; Ritchie, Graham RS; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Estivill, Xavier; Hinney, Anke; Sullivan, Patrick F; Collier, David A; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Bulik, Cynthia M

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a complex and heritable eating disorder characterized by dangerously low body weight. Neither candidate gene studies nor an initial genome wide association study (GWAS) have yielded significant and replicated results. We performed a GWAS in 2,907 cases with AN from 14 countries (15 sites) and 14,860 ancestrally matched controls as part of the Genetic Consortium for AN (GCAN) and the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 3 (WTCCC3). Individual association analyses were conducted in each stratum and meta-analyzed across all 15 discovery datasets. Seventy-six (72 independent) SNPs were taken forward for in silico (two datasets) or de novo (13 datasets) replication genotyping in 2,677 independent AN cases and 8,629 European ancestry controls along with 458 AN cases and 421 controls from Japan. The final global meta-analysis across discovery and replication datasets comprised 5,551 AN cases and 21,080 controls. AN subtype analyses (1,606 AN restricting; 1,445 AN binge-purge) were performed. No findings reached genome-wide significance. Two intronic variants were suggestively associated: rs9839776 (P=3.01×10-7) in SOX2OT and rs17030795 (P=5.84×10-6) in PPP3CA. Two additional signals were specific to Europeans: rs1523921 (P=5.76×10-6) between CUL3 and FAM124B and rs1886797 (P=8.05×10-6) near SPATA13. Comparing discovery to replication results, 76% of the effects were in the same direction, an observation highly unlikely to be due to chance (P=4×10-6), strongly suggesting that true findings exist but that our sample, the largest yet reported, was underpowered for their detection. The accrual of large genotyped AN case-control samples should be an immediate priority for the field. PMID:24514567

  8. Cholecystokinin revisited: CCK and the hunger trap in anorexia nervosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Cuntz

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Despite a number of studies in the past decades, the role of Cholecystokinin (CCK in anorexia nervosa (AN has remained uncertain. In this study a highly specific assay for the biologically active part of CCK was used in patients with bulimic as well as with the restricting type of AN who were followed over the course of weight gain. METHODS: Ten patients with restricting and 13 with bulimic AN were investigated upon admission (T0, after a weight gain of at least 2 kg on two consecutive weighting dates (T1, and during the last week before discharge (T2 from inpatient treatment in a specialized clinic. Blood samples were drawn under fasting conditions and 20 and 60 minutes following a standard meal (250 kcal. Data were compared to those of eight controls matched for sex and age. Gastrointestinal complaints of patients were measured by a questionnaire at each of the follow-up time points. RESULTS: At admission, AN patients exhibited CCK-levels similar to controls both prior to and after a test meal. Pre and post-meal CCK levels increased significantly after an initial weight gain but decreased again with further weight improvement. CCK release was somewhat lower in bulimic than in restricting type AN but both subgroups showed a similar profile. There was no significant association of CCK release to either initial weight or BMI, or their changes, but CCK levels at admission predicted gastrointestinal symptom improvement during therapy. CONCLUSIONS: Normal CCK profiles in AN at admission indicates hormonal responses adapted to low food intake while change of eating habits and weight gain results in initially increased CCK release (counteracting the attempts to alter eating behavior that returns towards normal levels with continuous therapy.

  9. Is deep brain stimulation a treatment option for anorexia nervosa?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudijn, Marloes S; Storosum, Jitschak G; Nelis, Elise; Denys, Damiaan

    2013-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a severe psychiatric disorder with high rates of morbidity, comorbidity and mortality, which in a subset of patients (21%) takes on a chronic course. Since an evidence based treatment for AN is scarce, it is crucial to investigate new treatment options, preferably focused on influencing the underlying neurobiological mechanisms of AN. The objective of the present paper was to review the evidence for possible neurobiological correlates of AN, and to hypothesize about potential targets for Deep brain stimulation (DBS) as a treatment for chronic, therapy-refractory AN. One avenue for exploring new treatment options based on the neurobiological correlates of AN, is the search for symptomatologic and neurobiologic parallels between AN and other compulsivity- or reward-related disorders. As in other compulsive disorders, the fronto-striatal circuitry, in particular the insula, the ventral striatum (VS) and the prefrontal, orbitofrontal, temporal, parietal and anterior cingulate cortices, are likely to be implicated in the neuropathogenesis of AN. In this paper we will review the few available cases in which DBS has been performed in patients with AN (either as primary diagnosis or as comorbid condition). Given the overlap in symptomatology and neurocircuitry between reward-related disorders such as obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and AN, and the established efficacy of accumbal DBS in OCD, we hypothesize that DBS of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and other areas associated with reward, e.g. the anterior cingulated cortex (ACC), might be an effective treatment for patients with chronic, treatment refractory AN, providing not only weight restoration, but also significant and sustained improvement in AN core symptoms and associated comorbidities and complications. Possible targets for DBS in AN are the ACC, the ventral anterior limb of the capsula interna (vALIC) and the VS. We suggest conducting larger efficacy studies that also explore the

  10. A psychological typology of females diagnosed with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa or binge eating disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernadetta Izydorczyk

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background The present paper reports the results of research aimed at identifying intra-group differences among females suffering from different eating disorders (anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa or binge eating disorder in terms of the subjects’ psychological traits, adoption of socio-cultural norms (through media pressure, internationalization of norms, and exposure to information concerning body image standards, and the level of body dissatisfaction. The following research question was asked: is it possible to distinguish specific profiles of psychological characteristics, as well as levels of body dissatisfaction, social pressure, media exposure and internalization of common standards of body image? Participants and procedure The clinical population consisted of 121 females aged 20-26. The research was conducted in the years 2007-2012. The following research methods and procedures were applied: 1 a clinical interview, 2 the Contour Drawing Rating Scale, 3 the Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI, 4 a Polish translation of the Socio-cultural Attitudes Towards Appearance Questionnaire (SATAQ-3. Results Cluster analysis of the research data allowed four significantly different clusters to be distinguished in the group of 121 examined females suffering from eating disorders. In the next step, analysis of variance (the ANOVA test was used to compare the differences between the examined clusters in terms of the investigated variables and their indicators. Conclusions Due to significant differences between the examined females in terms of the strength levels and the configuration of psychological and socio-cultural variables investigated in the present study, the females were classified into four different psychological types referred to as neurotic, perfectionist, impulsive and adolescent-narcissistic.

  11. Is glycyrrhizin sensitivity increased in anorexia nervosa and should licorice be avoided? Case report and review of the literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Støving, René K; Lingqvist, Linnéa E; Bonde, Rasmus K;

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Hypokalemia is a potentially life-threatening electrolyte disturbance in anorexia nervosa and is most frequently caused by purging behavior. We report a case of severe hypokalemia in anorexia nervosa induced by daily ingestion of approximately 20 g of licorice. METHODS: To confirm...... low daily dose of licorice suggests high glycyrrhizin sensitivity. CONCLUSION: Patients with anorexia nervosa not only have decreased food intake but also selective and sometimes bizarre eating habits that, in association with increased sensitivity to glycyrrhizin, may cause severe hypokalemia....

  12. An evaluation of trace metals, vitamins, and taste function in anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casper, R C; Kirschner, B; Sandstead, H H; Jacob, R A; Davis, J M

    1980-08-01

    Trace metals, vitamins, and other biochemical parameters were measured in 30 female patients hospitalized for anorexia nervosa with the aim of relating them to taste function, biochemical changes, and clinical signs found in this illness. Plasma zinc (71.9 +/- 14 microgram/100 ml; P zinc (129.5 +/- 121 microgram/24 hr), and copper (84 +/- 17 microgram/100 ml; P zinc and copper content of hair was normal. Anorexia nervosa patients showed hypogeusia, with the bitter and sour taste most severely affected, however plasma zinc levels did not correlate with taste recognition scores. Patients showed hypercarotenemia (214 +/- 129 microgram/100 ml; P zinc, copper, and total iron binding capacity levels increased whereas plasma carotene and cholesterol decreased to normal levels. It is concluded that the observed zinc, copper, and iron binding protein deficiencies, and hypogeusia, reflect the self-imposed nutritional restriction of anorexia nervosa patients. Zinc and other micronutrients released from catabolized tissue along with vitamin intake may mitigate against more severe deficiency states in anorexia nervosa. PMID:7405882

  13. When Does the "Duty to Protect" Apply with a Client Who has Anorexia Nervosa?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werth, James L., Jr.; Wright, Kimberly S.; Archambault, Rita J.; Bardash, Rebekah, J.

    2003-01-01

    Individuals with eating disorders, especially those with anorexia nervosa, have the potential to experience significant harm and even death as a result of behaviors related to their condition. Because of this risk, the authors argue that there is a duty to protect (i.e., an obligation to take some action when a person is engaging or considering…

  14. Overview of genetic research in anorexia nervosa : The past, the present and the future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandys, Marek K; de Kovel, Carolien G F; Kas, Martien J; van Elburg, Annemarie A; Adan, Roger A H

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Even though the evidence supporting the presence of a heritable component in the aetiology of anorexia nervosa (AN) is strong, the underlying genetic mechanisms remain poorly understood. The recent publication of a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of AN (Boraska, Mol Psychiatry, 2014

  15. Patients With Anorexia Nervosa Who Self-Injure: A Phenomenological Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschueren, Suzanne; Berends, Tamara; Kool-Goudzwaard, Nienke; Huigenbosch, Erwin van; Gamel, Claudia; Dingemans, Alexandra; Elburg, Annemarie van; Meijel, Berno van

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study investigates self-injury fromthe perspective of patients with anorexia nervosa. DESIGN AND METHODS: A phenomenological design was used. Twelve patients participated. Data were collected using a semi-structured interview guide. FINDINGS: Participants display self-injurious behavio

  16. Reversible brain atrophy and subcortical high signal on MRI in a patient with anorexia nervosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anorexia nervosa (AN), usually seen in young girls, is characterised by severe emaciation induced by self-imposed starvation. Enlargement of the ventricular system and sulci has been reported, as has high signal on T2-weighted images. We present a case with atrophic changes and high signal on T2-weighted images, which resolved completely following weight gain. (orig.)

  17. Restoring normal eating behaviour in adolescents with anorexia nervosa : A video analysis of nursing interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beukers, Laura; Berends, Tamara; de Man-van Ginkel, Janneke M.; van Elburg, Annemarie A.; van Meijel, Berno

    2015-01-01

    An important part of inpatient treatment for adolescents with anorexia nervosa is to restore normal eating behaviour. Health-care professionals play a significant role in this process, but little is known about their interventions during patients' meals. The purpose of the present study was to descr

  18. Reversible brain atrophy and subcortical high signal on MRI in a patient with anorexia nervosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drevelengas, A. [Asklipios-Aristotelio Diagnostic Centre, Thessaloniki (Greece); Dept. of Radiology, AHEPA University Hospital, Thessaloniki (Greece); Chourmouzi, D.; Boulogianni, G. [Asklipios-Aristotelio Diagnostic Centre, Thessaloniki (Greece); Pitsavas, G. [Paediatric Clinic, AHEPA University Hospital, Thessaloniki (Greece); Charitandi, A. [Dept. of Radiology, AHEPA University Hospital, Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2001-10-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN), usually seen in young girls, is characterised by severe emaciation induced by self-imposed starvation. Enlargement of the ventricular system and sulci has been reported, as has high signal on T2-weighted images. We present a case with atrophic changes and high signal on T2-weighted images, which resolved completely following weight gain. (orig.)

  19. How Schools Can Help Combat Student Eating Disorders. Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Michael P.

    This book presents a comprehensive review of anorexia nervosa and bulimia and the roles that schools can have in preventing, identifying, and treating these disorders. Chapter 1 provides an overview of student eating disorders and presents a case study of a high school student with an eating disorder. Chapter 2 discusses the nature of anorexia…

  20. The Clinical Utility of Personality Subtypes in Patients with Anorexia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildes, Jennifer E.; Marcus, Marsha D.; Crosby, Ross D.; Ringham, Rebecca M.; Dapelo, Marcela Marin; Gaskill, Jill A.; Forbush, Kelsie T.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Elucidation of clinically relevant subtypes has been proposed as a means of advancing treatment research, but classifying anorexia nervosa (AN) patients into restricting and binge-eating/purging types has demonstrated limited predictive validity. This study aimed to evaluate whether an approach to classifying eating disorder patients on…

  1. Comorbid Depression and Anxiety in Childhood and Adolescent Anorexia Nervosa: Prevalence and Implications for Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Elizabeth K.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Comorbid conditions are common in individuals with anorexia nervosa (AN) and can raise issues for diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment planning. Methods: First, reported prevalence rates for depression and anxiety in children and adolescents with AN were reviewed. Diagnostic issues and current understanding of the temporal onset and…

  2. Anticipation of Body-Scaled Action Is Modified in Anorexia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guardia, Dewi; Lafargue, Gilles; Thomas, Pierre; Dodin, Vincent; Cottencin, Olivier; Luyat, Marion

    2010-01-01

    Patients with anorexia nervosa frequently believe they are larger than they really are. The precise nature of this bias is not known: is it a false belief related to the patient's aesthetic and emotional attitudes towards her body? Or could it also reflect abnormal processing of the representation of the body in action? We tested this latter…

  3. Incidence of severe anorexia nervosa in Switzerland : 40 years of development (vol 35, pg 250, 2004)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milos, G; Spindler, A; Schnyder, U; Martz, J; Hoek, HW; Willi, J

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The current study examined the development of the incidence of severe anorexia nervosa with five sampling periods covering the years 1956-1995 in a geographically defined region of Switzerland. Method: Applying the same methodology as in the earlier sampling periods, the medical records o

  4. The Importance of Emotional Insight in Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for Anorexia Nervosa: An Adolescent Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupa, Megha; Girimaji, Satish; Muthuswamy, Selvi; Jacob, Preeti; Ravi, Malavika

    2013-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a rare but sever psychiatric disorder in adolescence, with chronicity and death being the most feared consequence. Emotional Insight into one's problem is considered a key determinant of success in therapy. The following case study of a 14-year-old client, describes the process of therapy as it unfolded across 45 sessions. An…

  5. Theory of Mind and the Brain in Anorexia Nervosa: Relation to Treatment Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte-Ruther, Martin; Mainz, Verena; Fink, Gereon R.; Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate; Konrad, Kerstin

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Converging evidence suggests deficits in theory-of-mind (ToM) processing in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN). The present study aimed at elucidating the neural mechanisms underlying ToM-deficits in AN. Method: A total of 19 adolescent patients with AN and 21 age-matched controls were investigated using functional magnetic resonance…

  6. Childhood Risk Factors for Lifetime Anorexia Nervosa by Age 30 Years in a National Birth Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, Dasha E.; Viner, Russell M.

    2009-01-01

    Whether previously identified childhood risk factors for anorexia nervosa (AN) predict self-reported lifetime AN by age 30 is examined. The cohort confirmed four risk and two protective factors out of the 22 suggested risk factors. The study used data from the 1970 British Cohort Study.

  7. Anorexia Nervosa and Autism Spectrum Disorders: Guided Investigation of Social Cognitive Endophenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucker, Nancy L.; Losh, Molly; Bulik, Cynthia M.; LaBar, Kevin S.; Piven, Joseph; Pelphrey, Kevin A.

    2007-01-01

    Death by suicide occurs in a disproportionate percentage of individuals with anorexia nervosa (AN), with a standardized mortality ratio indicating a 57-fold greater risk of death from suicide relative to an age-matched cohort. Longitudinal studies indicate impaired social functioning increases risk for fatal outcomes, while social impairment…

  8. Hyperactivity in Anorexia Nervosa : Warming Up Not Just Burning-Off Calories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carrera, Olaia; Adan, Roger A. H.; Gutierrez, Emilio; Danner, Unna N.; Hoek, Hans W.; van Elburg, Annemarie A.; Kas, Martien

    2012-01-01

    Excessive physical activity is a common feature in Anorexia Nervosa (AN) that interferes with the recovery process. Animal models have demonstrated that ambient temperature modulates physical activity in semi-starved animals. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of ambient temperatu

  9. Melting down the Ice Queen : an integrative treatment of anorexia nervosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartogs, Bregje M A; Eikmans, Kirsten M; Bartels-Velthuis, Agna A

    2013-01-01

    A 23-year-old woman with anorexia nervosa (AN) and a strong need for control was offered an integrative treatment, empowering the patient to be an active participant and advocating shared decision-making. To emphasise this, both the therapist and patient describe their views on the therapy. The inte

  10. Predictors of recovery of ovarian function during weight gain in anorexia nervosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Elburg, Annemarie A; Eijkemans, Marinus J C; Kas, Martien J H; Themmen, Axel P N; de Jong, Frank H; van Engeland, Herman; Fauser, Bart C J M

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether serum levels of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), inhibin B, and anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) can be used as predictors of recovery of ovarian function in anorexia nervosa after weight gain. DESIGN: Follow-up cohort study. SETTING: Two specialized treatment center

  11. Familial Contributions to the Etiology and Course of Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strober, Michael; Humphrey, Laura Lynn

    1987-01-01

    Discusses familial influences in anorexia nervosa and bulimia. Reviews descriptions of family interaction, familial correlates of course and phenomenology of symptoms, and studies of familial transmission. Concludes that certain personality factors, possibly genetically determined, predispose the individual to greater sensitivity and vulnerability…

  12. Assessment and Treatment of Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia in School Age Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Carole; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa and bulimia are major concerns for high school students, especially females. These syndromes interfere with normal functioning and social development and can be life-threatening. Definitions, characteristics, symptoms, and treatment approaches for these two eating disorders are discussed, and suggestions for involvement of the…

  13. Mandometer Treatment Not Superior to Treatment as Usual for Anorexia Nervosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Elburg, Annemarie A.; Hillebrand, Jacquelien J. G.; Huyser, Chaim; Snoek, Maartje; Kas, Martien; Hoek, Hans W.; Adan, Roger A. H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: A comparison of the efficacy of a novel treatment method for anorexia nervosa (AN), the Mandometer treatment (MT), with treatment as usual (TAU). Method: During treatment data were collected to determine weight recovery and outcome as assessed by the Morgan Russell Outcome Assessment Sche

  14. Mandometer treatment not superior to treatment as usual for anorexia nervosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Elburg, Annemarie A; Hillebrand, Jacquelien J G; Huyser, Chaim; Snoek, Maartje; Kas, Martien J H; Hoek, Hans W; Adan, Roger A H

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A comparison of the efficacy of a novel treatment method for anorexia nervosa (AN), the Mandometer treatment (MT), with treatment as usual (TAU). METHOD: During treatment data were collected to determine weight recovery and outcome as assessed by the Morgan Russell Outcome Assessment Sche

  15. Is anorexia nervosa a neuropsychiatric developmental disorder? An illustrative case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerbeshian, Jacob; Burd, Larry

    2009-01-01

    We propose the concept that anorexia nervosa is a neuropsychiatric developmental disorder. In support of the concept we present a case report of a 12-year-old girl with high functioning autistic disorder who developed Tourette syndrome and obsessive-compulsive disorder. She subsequently experienced

  16. Epidemiology of Anorexia Nervosa in Men : A Nationwide Study of Finnish Twins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raevuori, Anu; Hoek, Hans W.; Susser, Ezra; Kaprio, Jaakko; Rissanen, Aila; Keski-Rahkonen, Anna

    2009-01-01

    Background: To examine the epidemiology of anorexia nervosa in men, we screened Finnish male twins born in 1975-79. Methods and Findings: Men (N = 2122) from FinnTwin16 birth cohorts were screened for lifetime eating disorders by a questionnaire. The screen positives (N = 18), their male co-twins (N

  17. Lifetime anorexia nervosa in young men in the community : Five cases and their co-twins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raevuori, Anu; Keski-Rahkonen, Anna; Hoek, Hans W.; Sihvola, Elina; Rissanen, Aila; Kaprio, Jaakko

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To describe patterns, comorbidity, and outcomes from a case series of anorexia nervosa (AN) among young men from the general population and their co-twins. Method: Men (N = 2,122) born between 1975 and 1979 from Finnish twin cohorts were screened for lifetime eating disorders by questionn

  18. Epidemiology of anorexia nervosa in men: a nationwide study of Finnish twins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anu Raevuori

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To examine the epidemiology of anorexia nervosa in men, we screened Finnish male twins born in 1975-79. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Men (N = 2122 from FinnTwin16 birth cohorts were screened for lifetime eating disorders by a questionnaire. The screen positives (N = 18, their male co-twins (N = 10 and those with lifetime minimum BMI< or =17.5 (N = 21 were administered the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV anorexia nervosa. The incidence rate of anorexia nervosa for the presumed peak age of risk (10-24y was 15.7 per 100,000 person-years; its lifetime prevalence was 0.24%. All probands had recovered from eating disorders, but suffered from substantial psychiatric comorbidity, which also manifested in their co-twins. Additionally, male co-twins displayed significant dissatisfaction with body musculature, a male-specific feature of body dysmorphic disorder. CONCLUSIONS: Anorexia nervosa in males in the community is more common, transient and accompanied by more substantial comorbidity than previously thought.

  19. Incidence, prevalence and mortality of anorexia nervosa and other eating disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek, Hans Wijbrand

    2006-01-01

    Purpose of review The purpose of this review is to evaluate the recent literature on the incidence and prevalence of and mortality associated with eating disorders. Recent findings General-practice studies shove that the overall incidence rates of anorexia nervosa remained stable during the 1990s, c

  20. Effect of dronabinol therapy on physical activity in anorexia nervosa: a randomised, controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andries, Alin; Gram, Bibi; Støving, René Klinkby

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The level of physical activity is inappropriately high in up to 80 % of the patients suffering of anorexia nervosa (AN), as a result of conscious efforts to lose weight, affect regulation and biological adaptive changes to starvation induced by hypothermia and neuroendocrine mechanisms. ...

  1. Family-Based Treatment for Adolescent Anorexia Nervosa: A Promising Approach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Grange, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    Despite the fact that anorexia nervosa is a debilitating disorder with serious psychological and medical sequelae, few psychological treatments have been studied. Of these, interventions that involve the parents of the adolescent have proved to be most promising. This is especially true for those cases with a short duration of illness (less than 3…

  2. Hyperactivity in anorexia nervosa : warming up not just burning-off calories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carrera, Olaia; Adan, Roger A H; Gutierrez, Emilio; Danner, Unna N; Hoek, Hans W; van Elburg, Annemarie A; Kas, Martien J H

    2012-01-01

    Excessive physical activity is a common feature in Anorexia Nervosa (AN) that interferes with the recovery process. Animal models have demonstrated that ambient temperature modulates physical activity in semi-starved animals. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of ambient temperatu

  3. Perceived Treatment Effectiveness of Family Therapy for Chinese Patients Suffering from Anorexia Nervosa: A Qualitative Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Joyce L. C.; Lai, Kelly

    2006-01-01

    Although family therapy has become highly acceptable in the West, its applicability and acceptability for Chinese adolescents and young women with anorexia nervosa (AN) remains unknown. In this article, we report the results of a qualitative study using post-treatment in-depth interviews to understand the subjective perceptions of sufferers of AN…

  4. Automatic approach/avoidance tendencies towards food and the course of anorexia nervosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neimeijer, Renate A.M.; de Jong, Peter J.; Roefs, Anne

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of automatic approach/avoidance tendencies for food in Anorexia Nervosa (AN). We used a longitudinal approach and tested whether a reduction in eating disorder symptoms is associated with enhanced approach tendencies towards food an

  5. Skill Acquisition in Ski Instruction and the Skill Model's Application to Treating Anorexia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duesund, Liv; Jespersen, Ejgil

    2004-01-01

    The Dreyfus skill model has a wide range of applications to various domains, including sport, nursing, engineering, flying, and so forth. In this article, the authors discuss the skill model in connection with two different research projects concerning ski instruction and treating anorexia nervosa. The latter project has been published but not in…

  6. Locus of Control as a Measure of Ineffectiveness in Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Jane; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Using a multidimensional locus of control scale, scores of female anorexia nervosa patients (N=54) were compared to norms. Younger anorexic patients demonstrated higher internal control compared to norms on times related to fatalism and social-system control. Scores for older patients could not be differentiated from the norms. (Author)

  7. Position of the American Dietetic Association: Nutrition intervention in the treatment of anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and other eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    It is the position of the American Dietetic Association that nutrition intervention, including nutritional counseling, by a registered dietitian (RD) is an essential component of the team treatment of patients with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and other eating disorders during assessment and treatment across the continuum of care. Diagnostic criteria for eating disorders provide important guidelines for identification and treatment. However, it is thought that a continuum of disordered eating may exist that ranges from persistent dieting to subthreshold conditions and then to defined eating disorders, which include anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge eating disorder. Understanding the complexities of eating disorders, such as influencing factors, comorbid illness, medical and psychological complications, and boundary issues, is critical in the effective treatment of eating disorders. The nature of eating disorders requires a collaborative approach by an interdisciplinary team of psychological, nutritional, and medical specialists. The RD is an integral member of the treatment team and is uniquely qualified to provide medical nutrition therapy for the normalization of eating patterns and nutritional status. RDs provide nutritional counseling, recognize clinical signs related to eating disorders, and assist with medical monitoring while cognizant of psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy that are cornerstones of eating disorder treatment. Specialized resources are available for RDs to advance their level of expertise in the field of eating disorders. Further efforts with evidenced-based research must continue for improved treatment outcomes related to eating disorders along with identification of effective primary and secondary interventions.

  8. Symptoms of achalasia in young women mistaken as indicating primary anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacher, G; Wiesnagrotzki, S; Kiss, A

    1990-01-01

    The case of a young women with dysphagia, regurgitation, and weight loss, who was diagnosed as having anorexia nervosa but in whom reevaluation showed that achalasia was causing the symptoms, is presented together with related observations. Misinterpretation of esophageal symptoms may occur not only as a consequence of inadequate history taking and of being biased by a patient's emaciation, age, and gender, which leads to view certain aspects of the patient's history and behavior as suggesting a pathologic attitude towards eating and body weight, but also as a consequence of a misinterpretation of the symptoms as indicative of an eating disorder by the patients themselves. In some cases a disordered attitude toward eating and body weight may develop together or coexist with achalasia. The clinical evaluation of patients with symptoms suggestive of anorexia nervosa but also of bulimia nervosa should include the taking of a thorough history regarding swallowing and vomiting in order to recognize a possible esophageal motor disorder. PMID:2272221

  9. Focus on anorexia nervosa: modern psychological treatment and guidelines for the adolescent patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Espie J

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Jonathan Espie,1 Ivan Eisler2 1Child and Adolescent Eating Disorders Service, Michael Rutter Centre, South London and Maudsley Hospital Foundation NHS Trust, 2Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London, UK Abstract: Anorexia nervosa is a serious condition associated with high mortality. Incidence is highest for female adolescents, and prevalence data highlight a pressing unmet need for treatment. While there is evidence that adolescent-onset anorexia has relatively high rates of eventual recovery, the illness is often protracted, and even after recovery from the eating disorder there is an ongoing vulnerability to psychosocial problems in later life. Family therapy for anorexia in adolescence has evolved from a generic systemic treatment into an eating disorder-specific format (family therapy for anorexia nervosa, and this approach has been evidenced as an effective treatment. Individual treatments, including cognitive behavioral therapy, also have some evidence of effectiveness. Most adolescents can be effectively and safely managed as outpatients. Day-patient treatment holds promise as an alternative to inpatient treatment or as an intensive program following a brief medical admission. Evidence is emerging of advantages in detecting and treating adolescent anorexia nervosa in specialist community-based child and adolescent eating-disorder services accessible directly from primary care. Limitations and future directions for modern treatment are considered. Keywords: AN, evidence, family, therapy, FT-AN, inpatient, outpatient, day patient, specialist 

  10. The DSM-5 diagnostic criteria for anorexia nervosa may change its population prevalence and prognostic value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustelin, Linda; Silén, Yasmina; Raevuori, Anu; Hoek, Hans W; Kaprio, Jaakko; Keski-Rahkonen, Anna

    2016-06-01

    The definition of anorexia nervosa was revised for the Fifth Edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-5). We examined the impact of these changes on the prevalence and prognosis of anorexia nervosa. In a nationwide longitudinal study of Finnish twins born 1975-1979, the women (N = 2825) underwent a 2-stage screening for eating disorders at mean age 24. Fifty-five women fulfilled DSM-IV criteria for lifetime anorexia nervosa. When we recoded the interviews using DSM-5 criteria, we detected 37 new cases. We contrasted new DSM-5 vs. DSM-IV cases to assess their clinical characteristics and prognosis. We also estimated lifetime prevalences and incidences and tested the association of minimum BMI with prognosis. We observed a 60% increase in the lifetime prevalence of anorexia nervosa using the new diagnostic boundaries, from 2.2% to 3.6%. The new cases had a later age of onset (18.8 y vs. 16.5, p = 0.002), higher minimum BMI (16.9 vs. 15.5 kg/m(2), p = 0.0004), a shorter duration of illness (one year vs. three years, p = 0.002), and a higher 5-year probability or recovery (81% vs. 67%, p = 0.002). Minimum BMI was not associated with prognosis. It therefore appears that the substantial increase in prevalence of anorexia nervosa is offset by a more benign course of illness in new cases. Increased diagnostic heterogeneity underscores the need for reliable indicators of disease severity. Our findings indicate that BMI may not be an ideal severity marker, but should be complemented by prognostically informative criteria. Future studies should focus on identifying such factors in prospective settings. PMID:27014849

  11. The DSM-5 diagnostic criteria for anorexia nervosa may change its population prevalence and prognostic value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustelin, Linda; Silén, Yasmina; Raevuori, Anu; Hoek, Hans W; Kaprio, Jaakko; Keski-Rahkonen, Anna

    2016-06-01

    The definition of anorexia nervosa was revised for the Fifth Edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-5). We examined the impact of these changes on the prevalence and prognosis of anorexia nervosa. In a nationwide longitudinal study of Finnish twins born 1975-1979, the women (N = 2825) underwent a 2-stage screening for eating disorders at mean age 24. Fifty-five women fulfilled DSM-IV criteria for lifetime anorexia nervosa. When we recoded the interviews using DSM-5 criteria, we detected 37 new cases. We contrasted new DSM-5 vs. DSM-IV cases to assess their clinical characteristics and prognosis. We also estimated lifetime prevalences and incidences and tested the association of minimum BMI with prognosis. We observed a 60% increase in the lifetime prevalence of anorexia nervosa using the new diagnostic boundaries, from 2.2% to 3.6%. The new cases had a later age of onset (18.8 y vs. 16.5, p = 0.002), higher minimum BMI (16.9 vs. 15.5 kg/m(2), p = 0.0004), a shorter duration of illness (one year vs. three years, p = 0.002), and a higher 5-year probability or recovery (81% vs. 67%, p = 0.002). Minimum BMI was not associated with prognosis. It therefore appears that the substantial increase in prevalence of anorexia nervosa is offset by a more benign course of illness in new cases. Increased diagnostic heterogeneity underscores the need for reliable indicators of disease severity. Our findings indicate that BMI may not be an ideal severity marker, but should be complemented by prognostically informative criteria. Future studies should focus on identifying such factors in prospective settings.

  12. The possibility or coercion treatment? Anorexia nervosa – legal regulations. A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tylec, Aneta

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Anorexia nervosa is diagnosed on the basis of well-defined diagnostic criteria and requires treatment, as it is associated with the highest mortality rate of all mental illnesses. In Poland, anorexia nervosa is not considered a mental illness, although the opinion of researchers and clinicians are divided. To reduce the death rate of AN correct and early diagnosis, appropriate treatment starting immediately and the appropriate regulations to allow people to take the AN treatment against their will are necessary. In our work, we presented the treatment of patients with severe mental anorexia with a predominance of restrictive behavior as well as the issue of regulations relating to the compulsory treatment of people with eating disorders.

  13. Anorexia nervosa and Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dantas Clarissa R

    2010-07-01

    significant health issue for women, and the subgroup of patients with anorexia nervosa who also misuse alcohol is probably at a particular risk of developing Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. The present case report highlights this relevant issue.

  14. Serum glutamine, set-shifting ability and anorexia nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collier David A

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Set-shifting is impaired in people with anorexia nervosa (AN, but the underlying physiological and biochemical processes are unclear. Animal studies have established that glutamatergic pathways in the prefrontal cortex play an important role in set-shifting ability. However, it is not yet understood whether levels of serum glutamatergic amino acids are associated with set-shifting performance in humans. The aim of this study was to determine whether serum concentrations of amino acids related to glutamatergic neurotransmission (glutamine, glutamate, glycine, l-serine, d-serine are associated with set-shifting ability in people with acute AN and those after recovery. Methods Serum concentrations of glutamatergic amino acids were measured in 27 women with current AN (AN group, 18 women recovered from AN (ANRec group and 28 age-matched healthy controls (HC group. Set-shifting was measured using the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST and the Trail Making Task (TMT. Dimensional measures of psychopathology were used, including the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDEQ, the Maudsley Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory (MOCI and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS. Results Serum glutamine concentrations in the AN group (1,310.2 ± 265.6 μM, mean ± SD were significantly higher (by approximately 20% than those in the HC group (1,102.9 ± 152.7 μM, mean ± SD (F(2, 70 = 6.3, P = 0.003, 95% CI 61.2 to 353.4. Concentrations of serum glutamine were positively associated with markers of the illness severity: a negative correlation was present between serum glutamine concentrations and body mass index (BMI and lowest BMI and a positive correlation was found between duration of illness and EDEQ. The AN group showed significantly impaired set shifting in the WCST, both total errors, and perseverative errors. In the AN group, there were no correlations between serum glutamine concentrations and set shifting. Conclusions Serum

  15. A comparison of eating, exercise, shape, and weight related symptomatology in males with muscle dysmorphia and anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Stuart B; Rieger, Elizabeth; Hildebrandt, Tom; Karlov, Lisa; Russell, Janice; Boon, Evelyn; Dawson, Robert T; Touyz, Stephen W

    2012-03-01

    In the context of the lack of nosological clarity surrounding muscle dysmorphia, this paper aims to compare the symptomatic profile of muscle dysmorphia and anorexia nervosa in males whilst using measures sensitive to indexing male body image concerns. Twenty-one male muscle dysmorphia patients, 24 male anorexia nervosa patients, and 15 male gym-using controls completed the Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire, the Muscle Dysmorphia Disorder Inventory, the Compulsive Exercise Test, and a measure of appearance-enhancing substance use. Men with muscle dysmorphia and anorexia nervosa demonstrated widespread symptomatic similarities spanning the domains of disturbed body image, disordered eating, and exercise behaviour, whilst differences were consistent with the opposing physiques pursued in each condition. Furthermore, correlational analyses revealed significant associations between scores on muscle dysmorphia and eating disorder measures. The present findings provide moderate support for the notion that muscle dysmorphia may be nosologically similar to anorexia nervosa. PMID:22391410

  16. Orders of eating and eating disorders: food, bodies and anorexia nervosa in the German Democratic Republic, 1949-1990

    OpenAIRE

    Kerr-Boyle, N.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis is an historical study of anorexia nervosa in the German Democratic Republic. Its central premise is that any understanding of the existence of anorexia nervosa must be predicated upon an investigation of the material conditions, cultural discourses and social practices surrounding eating and the body, and the ways in which these conditions, discourses and practices constructed (gendered) subjectivities and behaviours. The thesis draws on archival material, questionnaires and oral...

  17. Patienters och sjuksköterskors upplevelser av omvårdnad vid anorexia nervosa : En litteraturstudie

    OpenAIRE

    Lindström, Rebecka; Selling, Tina

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anorexia nervosa is a common and very serious mental illness that most people know about. The fear of losing control and the low motivation for change makes it difficult for the patient to realize how serious the condition is. It is important that health professionals pay attention to these patients to reduce pain and to shorten the period of illness. Objective: The aim of this descriptive literature review was to describe how patients with anorexia nervosa experience being treate...

  18. Leptin and inhibin B as predictors of reproductive recovery in patients with anorexia nervosa during weight gain

    OpenAIRE

    Ćetković Aleksandar; Đurović Marina; Milić Nataša

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Anorexia nervosa represents an eating disorder that is associated with substantial psychological, social and physiological abnormalities, involving 0.5-2% of female population. Objective: The secretion patterns of inhibin B, as marker of gonadal activity, and leptin, as an indicator of energy balance and body composition, were analyzed in our cross-sectional study in order to asses the restoration of reproductive function in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) during gaining of ...

  19. Evaluation of Enhanced Attention to Local Detail in Anorexia Nervosa Using the Embedded Figures Test; an fMRI Study

    OpenAIRE

    Leon Fonville; Lao-Kaim, Nick P.; Vincent Giampietro; Frederique van den Eynde; Helen Davies; Naima Lounes; Christopher Andrew; Jeffrey Dalton; Andrew Simmons; Williams, Steven C. R.; Simon Baron-Cohen; Kate Tchanturia

    2013-01-01

    The behavioural literature in anorexia nervosa and autism spectrum disorders has indicated an overlap in cognitive profiles. One such domain is the enhancement of local processing over global processing. While functional imaging studies of autism spectrum disorder have revealed differential neural patterns compared to controls in response to tests of local versus global processing, no studies have explored such effects in anorexia nervosa. This study uses functional magnetic resonance imaging...

  20. Meal plan in the treatment of anorexia nervosa: a way of feeding the disorder and starving the patient

    OpenAIRE

    Maria João Padrão; Raquel Barbosa; Joaquim Luís Coimbra

    2013-01-01

    For the mainstream Psychology/Psychiatry, anorexia nervosa is considered an eating disorder characterized by the low body weight and by the restrictive eating pattern. The traditional psychiatric treatment consists in the establishment of a meal plan that must be scrupulously followed and, most frequently, in pharmacological treatment. We propose an alternative conceptualization of anorexia nervosa that envisages this disorder as pertaining to the control domain. In this sense, we formulate p...

  1. Reversible and non-reversible enlargement of cerebral spinal fluid spaces in anorexia nervosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brain CT studies of 35 patients with anoxia nervosa confirmed the observations of other authors: cerebral dystrophic changes correlate with weight loss and the reversibility of these changes also correlates with the normalization of body weight. Other corroborated facts are: the most numerous and most pronounced enlargements are of the cortical sulci and the interhemispheric fissure, moderate widening affects the ventricles and the rarest and most insignificant changes are those of the cerebellum. The reversibility of the changes showed a parallel to the extent of the changes themselves and to the duration of improvement of the body weight. The reversibility of the enlargement of the cortical sulci and of the distances between the frontal horns of the lateral ventricles was more often significant than that of the abnormal measurements of the cella media. This difference is based on minimal early acquired brain damage which occurs in 60% of our patients. This high incidence of early acquired minimal brain disease in patients with anorexia nervosa is here discussed as a nonspecific predisposing factor. Although there is no exact explanation of the etiology of the reversible enlargement of cerenral spinal fluid (CSF) spaces in anorexia nervosa, the changes resemble those in alcoholics. The mechanisms of brain changes in alcoholism, as shown experimentally, seem to us to throw light on the probable mechanism of reversible dystrophic brain changes in anorexia nervosa. (orig.)

  2. Reversible and non-reversible enlargement of cerebral spinal fluid spaces in anorexia nervosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artmann, H.; Grau, H.; Adelmann, M.; Schleiffer, R.

    1985-07-01

    Brain CT studies of 35 patients with anoxia nervosa confirmed the observations of other authors: cerebral dystrophic changes correlate with weight loss and the reversibility of these changes also correlates with the normalization of body weight. Other corroborated facts are: the most numerous and most pronounced enlargements are of the cortical sulci and the interhemispheric fissure, moderate widening affects the ventricles and the rarest and most insignificant changes are those of the cerebellum. The reversibility of the changes showed a parallel to the extent of the changes themselves and to the duration of improvement of the body weight. The reversibility of the enlargement of the cortical sulci and of the distances between the frontal horns of the lateral ventricles was more often significant than that of the abnormal measurements of the cella media. This difference is based on minimal early acquired brain damage which occurs in 60% of our patients. This high incidence of early acquired minimal brain disease in patients with anorexia nervosa is here discussed as a nonspecific predisposing factor. Although there is no exact explanation of the etiology of the reversible enlargement of cerenral spinal fluid (CSF) spaces in anorexia nervosa, the changes resemble those in alcoholics. The mechanisms of brain changes in alcoholism, as shown experimentally, seem to us to throw light on the probable mechanism of reversible dystrophic brain changes in anorexia nervosa.

  3. Cancer and Anorexia Nervosa in the Adolescence: A Family-Based Systemic Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella De Benedetta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Anorexia nervosa is difficult to diagnose in cancer patients since weight loss, aversion for food, and eating disturbances are frequent in patients undergoing chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Nevertheless, efforts are mandatory to recognize and manage this condition which may occur also in cancer patients with a special regard to adolescents. Methods. Through the clinical history of Anna, a 15-year-old adolescent with advanced cancer, we describe the effectiveness of a family-based systemic intervention to manage anorexia nervosa occurring in concomitance to osteosarcoma. Results. Through a two-year psychotherapy period involving different techniques applied to the whole family such as family genogram, family collage, and sculpture of family time, Anna was relieved from her condition. Conclusions. Upon early diagnosis and appropriate treatment, anorexia nervosa can be effectively approached in adolescent cancer patients. The presence of a life-threatening medical condition such as cancer may provide motivation for a patient to control disordered eating behavior in the context of an appropriate family-based systemic intervention. The general frame of anorexia occurring in cancer-bearing adolescents is reviewed and discussed.

  4. Historical evolution of the concept of anorexia nervosa and relationships with orthorexia nervosa, autism, and obsessive-compulsive spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dell'Osso L

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Liliana Dell’Osso,1 Marianna Abelli,1 Barbara Carpita,1 Stefano Pini,1 Giovanni Castellini,2 Claudia Carmassi,1 Valdo Ricca2 1Psychiatry Section, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, Pisa, 2Department of Neuroscience, Psychology, Drug Research and Child Health (NEUROFARBA, University of Florence, Florence, Italy Abstract: Eating disorders have been defined as “characterized by persistence disturbance of eating or eating-related behavior that results in the altered consumption or absorption of food and that significantly impairs health or psychosocial functioning”. The psychopathology of eating disorders changed across time under the influence of environmental factors, determining the emergence of new phenotypes. Some of these conditions are still under investigation and are not clearly identified as independent diagnostic entities. In this review, the historic evolution of the eating disorder concept up to the recent Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition, has been evaluated. We also examined literature supporting the inclusion of new emergent eating behaviors within the eating disorder spectrum, and their relationship with anorexia, autism, and obsessive–compulsive disorder. In particular, we focused on what is known about the symptoms, epidemiology, assessment, and diagnostic boundaries of a new problematic eating pattern called orthorexia nervosa that could be accepted as a new psychological syndrome, as emphasized by an increasing number of scientific articles in the last few years. Keywords: anorexia nervosa, autism spectrum disorders, eating disorders spectrum, obsessive–compulsive spectrum, orthorexia nervosa, DSM-5

  5. Long-Term Physiological Alterations and Recovery in a Mouse Model of Separation Associated with Time-Restricted Feeding: A Tool to Study Anorexia Nervosa Related Consequences

    OpenAIRE

    Zgheib, Sara; Méquinion, Mathieu; Lucas, Stéphanie; Leterme, Damien; Ghali, Olfa; Tolle, Virginie; Zizzari, Philippe; Bellefontaine, Nicole; Legroux-Gérot, Isabelle; Hardouin, Pierre; Broux, Odile; Viltart, Odile; Chauveau, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Background Anorexia nervosa is a primary psychiatric disorder, with non-negligible rates of mortality and morbidity. Some of the related alterations could participate in a vicious cycle limiting the recovery. Animal models mimicking various physiological alterations related to anorexia nervosa are necessary to provide better strategies of treatment. Aim To explore physiological alterations and recovery in a long-term mouse model mimicking numerous consequences of severe anorexia nervosa. Meth...

  6. Neural responses to kindness and malevolence differ in illness and recovery in women with anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdams, Carrie J; Lohrenz, Terry; Montague, P Read

    2015-12-01

    In anorexia nervosa, problems with social relationships contribute to illness, and improvements in social support are associated with recovery. Using the multiround trust game and 3T MRI, we compare neural responses in a social relationship in three groups of women: women with anorexia nervosa, women in long-term weight recovery from anorexia nervosa, and healthy comparison women. Surrogate markers related to social signals in the game were computed each round to assess whether the relationship was improving (benevolence) or deteriorating (malevolence) for each subject. Compared with healthy women, neural responses to benevolence were diminished in the precuneus and right angular gyrus in both currently-ill and weight-recovered subjects with anorexia, but neural responses to malevolence differed in the left fusiform only in currently-ill subjects. Next, using a whole-brain regression, we identified an office assessment, the positive personalizing bias, that was inversely correlated with neural activity in the occipital lobe, the precuneus and posterior cingulate, the bilateral temporoparietal junctions, and dorsal anterior cingulate, during benevolence for all groups of subjects. The positive personalizing bias is a self-report measure that assesses the degree with which a person attributes positive experiences to other people. These data suggest that problems in perceiving kindness may be a consistent trait related to the development of anorexia nervosa, whereas recognizing malevolence may be related to recovery. Future work on social brain function, in both healthy and psychiatric populations, should consider positive personalizing biases as a possible marker of neural differences related to kindness perception. PMID:26416161

  7. Abnormal functional global and local brain connectivity in female patients with anorexia nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisler, Daniel; Borchardt, Viola; Lord, Anton R.; Boehm, Ilka; Ritschel, Franziska; Zwipp, Johannes; Clas, Sabine; King, Joseph A.; Wolff-Stephan, Silvia; Roessner, Veit; Walter, Martin; Ehrlich, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous resting-state functional connectivity studies in patients with anorexia nervosa used independent component analysis or seed-based connectivity analysis to probe specific brain networks. Instead, modelling the entire brain as a complex network allows determination of graph-theoretical metrics, which describe global and local properties of how brain networks are organized and how they interact. Methods To determine differences in network properties between female patients with acute anorexia nervosa and pairwise matched healthy controls, we used resting-state fMRI and computed well-established global and local graph metrics across a range of network densities. Results Our analyses included 35 patients and 35 controls. We found that the global functional network structure in patients with anorexia nervosa is characterized by increases in both characteristic path length (longer average routes between nodes) and assortativity (more nodes with a similar connectedness link together). Accordingly, we found locally decreased connectivity strength and increased path length in the posterior insula and thalamus. Limitations The present results may be limited to the methods applied during preprocessing and network construction. Conclusion We demonstrated anorexia nervosa–related changes in the network configuration for, to our knowledge, the first time using resting-state fMRI and graph-theoretical measures. Our findings revealed an altered global brain network architecture accompanied by local degradations indicating wide-scale disturbance in information flow across brain networks in patients with acute anorexia nervosa. Reduced local network efficiency in the thalamus and posterior insula may reflect a mechanism that helps explain the impaired integration of visuospatial and homeostatic signals in patients with this disorder, which is thought to be linked to abnormal representations of body size and hunger. PMID:26252451

  8. The Maudsley Outpatient Study of Treatments for Anorexia Nervosa and Related Conditions (MOSAIC):Comparison of the Maudsley Model of Anorexia Nervosa Treatment for Adults (MANTRA) With Specialist Supportive Clinical Management (SSCM) in Outpatients With Broadly Defined Anorexia Nervosa: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Ulrike; Magill, Nicholas; Renwick, Bethany; Keyes, Alexandra; Kenyon, Martha; DeJong, Hannah; Lose, Anna; Broadbent, Hannah; Loomes, Rachel; Yasin, Huma; Watson, Charlotte; Ghelani, Shreena; Bonin, Eva-Maria; Serpell, Lucy; Richards, Lorna

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Anorexia nervosa (AN) in adults has poor outcomes, and treatment evidence is limited. This study evaluated the efficacy and acceptability of a novel, targeted psychological therapy for AN (Maudsley Model of Anorexia Nervosa Treatment for Adults; MANTRA) compared with Specialist Supportive Clinical Management (SSCM).METHOD: One hundred forty-two outpatients with broadly defined AN (body mass index [BMI] ≤ 18.5 kg/m2) were randomly allocated to receive 20 to 30 weekly sessions (depen...

  9. Neuropathy and myopathy in two patients with anorexia and bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alloway, R; Reynolds, E H; Spargo, E; Russell, G F

    1985-10-01

    Two adolescent patients with eating disorders and severe weight loss presented with neuromyopathy. The first was female and had a twenty months' history of bulimia nervosa with weight loss and episodic gorging and vomiting. The second was male with a two-year history of anorexia nervosa characterised by vegetarianism and increasing food restriction. Both had severe wasting and asymmetrical weakness of proximal limb muscles. The first patient deteriorated on refeeding and became temporarily paralysed. Both had a purpuric rash and haematological abnormalities. They made a complete recovery on a mixed diet: vitamin supplements were given to the first but not to the second patient. PMID:3863893

  10. [Anorexia nervosa with refeeding syndrome: prevention and treatment of RS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, Makiko; Okajima, Yoshirou; Takano, Eisuke; Kato, Satoshi

    2009-01-01

    Refeeding syndrome (RS), seen in the early stages of anorexia nervosa (AN) treatment, has not been paid sufficient attention regarding its strong association with poor outcomes. This report describes a case of AN restriction type (AN-R) with sequent RS appearance despite the introduction of progressive and careful low-calorie nutrition, and discusses RS treatment. The patient was a 16-year-old female. She was first diagnosed with AN at the age of 14 when she went on a diet, admitted into pediatrics, and recovered: however, AN recurred after she started high school, and her weight decreased to 31.8 kg. She was admitted to pediatrics again, refused to receive treatment, discharged from the hospital, and introduced to our department. Soon after she came to us, her weight went down to 29.6 kg, and continued to decrease to 26.8 kg. She was recommended to receive inpatient care, but she firmly refused. A few days later, her experience of loss of consciousness made her agree to receive inpatient care. At this time, she was already weakened and had difficulty performing voluntary body movements as well as excretion. She was treated carefully and placed on 125 kcal/day. On the 6th day of treatment, severe liver damage was observed, her serum phosphorus level went down to 2.0 mg/dL, and she was diagnosed with RS. The lowest concentration of serum phosphorus observed was 1.3 mg/dL with blood abnormality and delirium; however, our strict management with intravascular phosphorus administration supported her increased dietary intake, and the patient was able to leave the hospital on the 54th day after admission. Based on this experience, the pathogenesis of RS was overviewed, and RS prevention as well as treatment was discussed. It has been reported that low phosphorus levels are observed in approximately one quarter of AN patients, and, thus, immediate action and treatment of hypophosphatemia are necessary when considering RS occurrence. In this study, the observed serum

  11. A Cross-Sectional and Follow-Up Functional MRI Study with a Working Memory Task in Adolescent Anorexia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Fornieles, Josefina; Caldu, Xavier; Andres-Perpina, Susana; Lazaro, Luisa; Bargallo, Nuria; Falcon, Carles; Plana, Maria Teresa; Junque, Carme

    2010-01-01

    Structural and functional brain abnormalities have been described in anorexia nervosa (AN). The objective of this study was to examine whether there is abnormal regional brain activation during a working memory task not associated with any emotional stimuli in adolescent patients with anorexia and to detect possible changes after weight recovery.…

  12. Central and peripheral peptides regulating eating behaviour and energy homeostasis in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortorella, Alfonso; Brambilla, Francesca; Fabrazzo, Michele; Volpe, Umberto; Monteleone, Alessio Maria; Mastromo, Daniele; Monteleone, Palmiero

    2014-09-01

    A large body of literature suggests the occurrence of a dysregulation in both central and peripheral modulators of appetite in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN), but at the moment, the state or trait-dependent nature of those changes is far from being clear. It has been proposed, although not definitively proved, that peptide alterations, even when secondary to malnutrition and/or to aberrant eating behaviours, might contribute to the genesis and the maintenance of some symptomatic aspects of AN and BN, thus affecting the course and the prognosis of these disorders. This review focuses on the most significant literature studies that explored the physiology of those central and peripheral peptides, which have prominent effects on eating behaviour, body weight and energy homeostasis in patients with AN and BN. The relevance of peptide dysfunctions for the pathophysiology of eating disorders is critically discussed.

  13. {sup 1}H-MR spectroscopy in anorexia nervosa. Reversible cerebral metabolic changes; {sup 1}H-MR-Spektroskopie bei Anorexia nervosa: Reversible zerebrale Metabolitenaenderungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeckel, R.; Schlemmer, H.P.; Becker, G.; Koepke, J.; Georgi, M. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie; Gueckel, C.; Goepel, C.; Schmidt, M. [Zentralinstitut fuer Seelische Gesundheit, Mannheim (Germany). Klinik fuer Kinder- und Jugendpsychiatrie; Hentschel, F. [Zentralinstitut fuer Seelische Gesundheit, Mannheim (Germany). Neuroradiologie

    1999-04-01

    Purpose: By using localized {sup 1}H-MR spectroscopy in the brain of patients with anorexia nervosa we wanted to verify our preliminary results and to look for a reversibility of the metabolic changes under therapy. Methods: In 22 patients and 17 healthy volunteers (11 follow-up examinations) single voxel {sup 1}H-MR spectroscopy (TE=50 ms, TM=30 ms, TR=1500 ms, voxel (2 cm){sup 3}, acq.: 256) was used in two different localizations (thalamus and parieto-occipital region). The first examination of the patients was performed before therapy, the follow-up examination at the end of therapy. Results: In both regions of the brain we found a statistically significant elevation of the Cho/Cr-ratio in comparison to normal controls. The follow-up examinations revealed reversibility of the metabolic changes under successful therapy. Conclusion: {sup 1}H-MR spectroscopy reveals metabolic changes in the brain of patients with anorexia nervosa, which are reversible under successful therapy. These metabolic changes can be conclusively explained using a biochemical model. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: Im Rahmen dieser weiterfuehrenden Studie sollten die bisherigen Ergebnisse der lokalisierten {sup 1}H-MR-Spektroskopie des Gehirns an Patienten mit Anorexia nervosa verifiziert werden. Weiter sollte ueberprueft werden, ob die von uns nachgewiesenen metabolischen Veraenderungen unter Therapie reversibel sind. Methode: Die {sup 1}H-MR-Spektren wurden bei 22 Patientinnen und 17 Probanden (11 Verlaufskontrollen) in Einzelvolumentechnik (TE=50 ms, TM=30 ms, TR=1500 ms, Voxel: (2 cm){sup 3}, Acq.: 256) in zwei unterschiedlichen Hirnregionen (Thalamus, parieto-okzipitale Region) durchgefuehrt. Die erste Untersuchung der Patienten erfolgte bei Aufnahme und die Verlaufskontrolle zum Abschluss der stationaeren Behandlung. Ergebnisse: Bei den Patienten wurde in beiden Hirnregionen ein statistisch signifikant erhoehter Wert fuer das Cho/Cr-Verhaeltnis im Vergleich zu dem Normalkollektiv nachgewiesen

  14. Somatic comorbidity in anorexia nervosa: First results of a 21-year follow-up study on female inpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdur Laurence

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anorexia nervosa is a severe psychosomatic disease with somatic complications in the long-term course and a high mortality rate. Somatic comorbidities independent of anorexia nervosa have rarely been studied, but pose a challenge to clinical practitioners. We investigated somatic comorbidities in an inpatient cohort and compared somatically ill anorexic patients and patients without a somatic comorbidity. In order to evaluate the impact of somatic comorbidity for the long-term course of anorexia nervosa, we monitored survival in a long-term follow-up. Method One hundred and sixty-nine female inpatients with anorexia nervosa were treated at the Charité University Medical Centre, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Berlin, between 1979 and 2011. We conducted retrospective analyses using patient's medical and psychological records. Information on survival and mortality were required through the local registration office and was available for one hundred patients. The mean follow-up interval for this subgroup was m = 20.9 years (sd = 4.7, min = 13.3, max = 31.6, range = 18.3. We conducted survival analysis using cox regression and included somatic comorbidity in a multivariate model. Results N = 41 patients (24.3% showed a somatic comorbidity, n = 13 patients (7.7% showed somatic comorbidities related to anorexia nervosa and n = 26 patients (15.4% showed somatic comorbidities independent of anorexia nervosa, n = 2 patients showed somatic complications related to other psychiatric disorders. Patients with a somatic comorbidity were significantly older (m = 29.5, sd = 10.3 vs m = 25.0, sd = 8.7; p = .006, showed a later anorexia nervosa onset (m = 24.8, sd = 9.9 vs. m = 18.6, sd = 5.1; p Conclusion Somatic comorbidity seems to be an important factor for anorexia nervosa outcome and should be included in multivariate analyses on the long-term course of anorexia nervosa as an independent variable. Further investigations are needed in order to

  15. Anorexia nervosa "En maktlös tid" : Familjens upplevelser utifrån mammans perspektiv

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksson, Anna; Ivarsson, Belinda

    2008-01-01

    Bakgrund: Det är först på senare år som familjens upplevelse samband med att en dotter insjuknar i anorexia nervosa uppmärksammats. Familjemedlemmarna kan känna stor ånger, skuld och förtvivlan när en familjemedlem blir sjuk. Eftersom det visats att sjukdomen påverkar hela familjen är det också av stor vikt att fokusera på hur familjen mår och ge dem stöd. Syfte: Syftet med denna studie var att belysa familjens upplevelse beskrivet ur mammans perspektiv när dottern har anorexia nervosa. Metod...

  16. Alterations in tone of voice in patients with restrictive anorexia nervosa: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concepción García-Santana

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article is about the tone of voice (acoustic perception in patients with restrictive anorexia nervosa (AN-R. Our goal was to study whether or not there is an alteration of the tone in restrictive anorexia nervosa when the disease has started in the puberty. The total sample consisted of 148 subjects divided in two groups: control (n=102 and AN-R (n=46. The voice´s fundamental frequencies (F0 were determined based on the repetition of two phonemes ("a" and "i" and measured by a microphone Plantonic 300 and a digital recorder. We analyzed the voice´s F0 using Praat software. We present the first data for the normal range of the F0 in Spanish healthy women from 9 to 17 years old who were Spanish native speakers. Finally, we show a comparison of data between AN-R patients and control group.

  17. Research of Anorexia Nervosa%神经性厌食症的相关研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蓝倩; 刘平

    2016-01-01

    神经性厌食症是一种由多种原因导致的精神行为异常,由于临床非精神科医师对此病的病因及诊治了解不足,容易出现误诊、漏诊,因此笔者就神经性厌食症作一综述。%Anorexia Nervosa is a pathological behavior caused by a variety of reasons, But, The cause of the disease,diagnosis and treatment are short of knowledge by non-psychiatric department,which led to Misdiagnosis.So The author reviewed the Anorexia Nervosa.

  18. 神经性厌食症的相关研究%Research of Anorexia Nervosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蓝倩; 刘平

    2016-01-01

    神经性厌食症是一种由多种原因导致的精神行为异常,由于临床非精神科医师对此病的病因及诊治了解不足,容易出现误诊、漏诊,因此笔者就神经性厌食症作一综述。%Anorexia Nervosa is a pathological behavior caused by a variety of reasons, But, The cause of the disease,diagnosis and treatment are short of knowledge by non-psychiatric department,which led to Misdiagnosis.So The author reviewed the Anorexia Nervosa.

  19. Construction and validation of an anorexia nervosa scale on the MMPI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenvinge, J H; Engvik, H A

    1997-09-01

    The article describes the construction and validation of an anorexia nervosa subscale (ANOR) on the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI). The female subjects included 42 anorexic patients, 56 normal controls and 56 patient controls. Using an empirical discrimination procedure, 60 items contribute to the total homogeneity of the scale and the Chronbach's alpha is 0.86. The five items common with the Hysteria scale represent the highest number of common items with the main MMPI clinical scales. Crossvalidation findings support the results. Content analyses indicate that the ANOR covers important features of anorexia nervosa like a fear of sexual matters, disturbed social relations, rigidity, a depressed mood, low self esteem and a dissatisfaction with appearance. PMID:14655835

  20. Perception of parental attitudes and the level of female adolescents’ self-esteem affected with anorexia nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Witkowska, Bogumiła

    2013-01-01

    Aim. The article’s aim is to look for correlation between a parent - child relationship and the level of self-esteem in the perception of girls affected with anorexia nervosa (who meet the criteria of DSM-IV-TR). The differences in the perception of parental attitudes (of mothers and fathers) and self-esteem of girls suffering from anorexia nervosa and their healthy peers were also analyzed. Method. Two equally numbered groups of girls: the clinical group (30 persons affected with anorexia ne...