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Sample records for anopheles darlingi transmission

  1. Ecology of Anopheles darlingi Root with respect to vector importance: a review

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    Hiwat Hélène

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Anopheles darlingi is one of the most important malaria vectors in the Americas. In this era of new tools and strategies for malaria and vector control it is essential to have knowledge on the ecology and behavior of vectors in order to evaluate appropriateness and impact of control measures. This paper aims to provide information on the importance, ecology and behavior of An. darlingi. It reviews publications that addressed ecological and behavioral aspects that are important to understand the role and importance of An. darlingi in the transmission of malaria throughout its area of distribution. The results show that Anopheles darlingi is especially important for malaria transmission in the Amazon region. Although numerous studies exist, many aspects determining the vectorial capacity of An. darlingi, i.e. its relation to seasons and environmental conditions, its gonotrophic cycle and longevity, and its feeding behavior and biting preferences, are still unknown. The vector shows a high degree of variability in behavioral traits. This makes it difficult to predict the impact of ongoing changes in the environment on the mosquito populations. Recent studies indicate a good ability of An. darlingi to adapt to environments modified by human development. This allows the vector to establish populations in areas where it previously did not exist or had been controlled to date. The behavioral variability of the vector, its adaptability, and our limited knowledge of these impede the establishment of effective control strategies. Increasing our knowledge of An. darlingi is necessary.

  2. Anopheles darlingi bionomics and transmission of Plasmodium falciparum, Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium malariae in Amerindian villages of the Upper-Maroni Amazonian forest, French Guiana

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    Romain Girod

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available French Guiana is one of the areas in South America most affected by malaria and where the disease has become a serious public health problem. In spite of this situation, little recent entomological data are available from the main localities where the disease occurs, even though they are crucial for development of an effective vector control strategy. A longitudinal entomological survey was carried out from March 2000-February 2002 in three Amerindian villages, namely Twenké, Taluène and Cayodé, located in the Amazonian forest of the Upper-Maroni area, to assess anopheline mosquitoes and malaria transmission dynamics. Anopheles darlingi (Diptera: Culicidae was the most abundant mosquito species caught during the study. This efficient American malaria vector was active the entire year, but showed an evident peak of abundance during the main rainfall season, from April-June, with an average human biting rate of 255.5 bites per person per night. Parity rates were homogeneous all year, indicating no significant seasonal variability in female survival rates. Estimated vectorial capacity indices were higher during the rainy season, even though the risk of transmission was present throughout the year (VCI > 1. A total of 14 An. darlingi were found infected with Plasmodium falciparum, Plasmodium vivax or Plasmodium malariae. The annual circumsporozoite indices were 0.15, 0.14 and 0.05, and the entomological inoculation rates were 22.8, 27.4 and 14.4 infected bites per person per year in Twenké, Taluène and Cayodé, respectively. An. darlingiwas endo-exophagic and rather exophilic in these localities. The species was collected throughout the night but was more aggressive between 21:30-03:30 h and after 05:30 h. Parity rates were homogeneous during the entire night. Impregnated hammock and/or bed nets, coupled with the use of mosquito repellents, as well as the early treatment of malarial cases, appear to be the most suitable tools for fighting

  3. Is there an efficient trap or collection method for sampling Anopheles darlingi and other malaria vectors that can describe the essential parameters affecting transmission dynamics as effectively as human landing catches? - A Review

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    Lima, José Bento Pereira; Rosa-Freitas, Maria Goreti; Rodovalho, Cynara Melo; Santos, Fátima; Lourenço-de-Oliveira, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Distribution, abundance, feeding behaviour, host preference, parity status and human-biting and infection rates are among the medical entomological parameters evaluated when determining the vector capacity of mosquito species. To evaluate these parameters, mosquitoes must be collected using an appropriate method. Malaria is primarily transmitted by anthropophilic and synanthropic anophelines. Thus, collection methods must result in the identification of the anthropophilic species and efficiently evaluate the parameters involved in malaria transmission dynamics. Consequently, human landing catches would be the most appropriate method if not for their inherent risk. The choice of alternative anopheline collection methods, such as traps, must consider their effectiveness in reproducing the efficiency of human attraction. Collection methods lure mosquitoes by using a mixture of olfactory, visual and thermal cues. Here, we reviewed, classified and compared the efficiency of anopheline collection methods, with an emphasis on Neotropical anthropophilic species, especially Anopheles darlingi, in distinct malaria epidemiological conditions in Brazil. PMID:25185008

  4. Is there an efficient trap or collection method for sampling Anopheles darlingi and other malaria vectors that can describe the essential parameters affecting transmission dynamics as effectively as human landing catches? - A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Bento Pereira Lima

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Distribution, abundance, feeding behaviour, host preference, parity status and human-biting and infection rates are among the medical entomological parameters evaluated when determining the vector capacity of mosquito species. To evaluate these parameters, mosquitoes must be collected using an appropriate method. Malaria is primarily transmitted by anthropophilic and synanthropic anophelines. Thus, collection methods must result in the identification of the anthropophilic species and efficiently evaluate the parameters involved in malaria transmission dynamics. Consequently, human landing catches would be the most appropriate method if not for their inherent risk. The choice of alternative anopheline collection methods, such as traps, must consider their effectiveness in reproducing the efficiency of human attraction. Collection methods lure mosquitoes by using a mixture of olfactory, visual and thermal cues. Here, we reviewed, classified and compared the efficiency of anopheline collection methods, with an emphasis on Neotropical anthropophilic species, especially Anopheles darlingi, in distinct malaria epidemiological conditions in Brazil.

  5. Is there an efficient trap or collection method for sampling Anopheles darlingi and other malaria vectors that can describe the essential parameters affecting transmission dynamics as effectively as human landing catches? - A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, José Bento Pereira; Rosa-Freitas, Maria Goreti; Rodovalho, Cynara Melo; Santos, Fátima; Lourenço-de-Oliveira, Ricardo

    2014-08-01

    Distribution, abundance, feeding behaviour, host preference, parity status and human-biting and infection rates are among the medical entomological parameters evaluated when determining the vector capacity of mosquito species. To evaluate these parameters, mosquitoes must be collected using an appropriate method. Malaria is primarily transmitted by anthropophilic and synanthropic anophelines. Thus, collection methods must result in the identification of the anthropophilic species and efficiently evaluate the parameters involved in malaria transmission dynamics. Consequently, human landing catches would be the most appropriate method if not for their inherent risk. The choice of alternative anopheline collection methods, such as traps, must consider their effectiveness in reproducing the efficiency of human attraction. Collection methods lure mosquitoes by using a mixture of olfactory, visual and thermal cues. Here, we reviewed, classified and compared the efficiency of anopheline collection methods, with an emphasis on Neotropical anthropophilic species, especially Anopheles darlingi, in distinct malaria epidemiological conditions in Brazil. PMID:25185008

  6. Systematics and Population Level Analysis of Anopheles darlingi

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    Conn JE

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A new phylogenetic analysis of the Nyssorhynchus subgenus (Danoff-Burg and Conn, unpub. data using six data sets {morphological (all life stages; scanning electron micrographs of eggs; nuclear ITS2 sequences; mitochondrial COII, ND2 and ND6 sequences} revealed different topologies when each data set was analyzed separately but no heterogeneity between the data sets using the arn test. Consequently, the most accurate estimate of the phylogeny was obtained when all the data were combined. This new phylogeny supports a monophyletic Nyssorhynchus subgenus but both previously recognized sections in the subgenus (Albimanus and Argyritarsis were demonstrated to be paraphyletic relative to each other and four of the seven clades included species previously placed in both sections. One of these clades includes both Anopheles darlingi and An. albimanus, suggesting that the ability to vector malaria effectively may have originated once in this subgenus. Both a conserved (315 bp and a variable (425 bp region of the mitochondrial COI gene from 15 populations of An. darlingi from Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, French Guiana, Peru and Venezuela were used to examine the evolutionary history of this species and to test several analytical assumptions. Results demonstrated (1 parsimony analysis is equally informative compared to distance analysis using NJ; (2 clades or clusters are more strongly supported when these two regions are combined compared to either region separately; (3 evidence (in the form of remnants of older haplotype lineages for two colonization events; and (4 significant genetic divergence within the population from Peixoto de Azevedo (State of Mato Grosso, Brazil. The oldest lineage includes populations from Peixoto, Boa Vista (State of Roraima and Dourado (State of São Paulo.

  7. Larval food quantity affects development time, survival and adult biological traits that influence the vectorial capacity of Anopheles darlingi under laboratory conditions

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    Araújo Maisa; Gil Luiz Herman S; e-Silva Alexandre

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The incidence of malaria in the Amazon is seasonal and mosquito vectorial capacity parameters, including abundance and longevity, depend on quantitative and qualitative aspects of the larval diet. Anopheles darlingi is a major malaria vector in the Amazon, representing >95% of total Anopheles population present in the Porto Velho region. Despite its importance in the transmission of the Plasmodium parasite, knowledge of the larval biology and ecology is limited. Studies re...

  8. [Historical review of the distribution of Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus) darlingi (Diptera: Culicidae) in the Peruvian Amazon].

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    Fernández, Roberto; Vera, Hubert; Calderón, Guillermo

    2014-04-01

    Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus) darlingi has been reported since 1931 in border areas of the department of Loreto, mainly along the borders with Brazil and Colombia. In 1994, during an outbreak of malaria, An. darlingi was found in neighboring towns to Iquitos. At present, its distribution has expanded considerably in Loreto. This paper reviews literature available for all possible information on the distribution of mosquitoes, particularly anopheline in the Amazon region of the country, with special emphasis on An darlingi. Entomological collections were also conducted in the departments of Madre de Dios and Ucayali in order to know and verify the distribution of An. darlingi. At present, the distribution of the species is confined to localities in southeastern Peru with Bolivia border towns, in a town near the Abujao River in the department of Ucayali, and widely in the northeastern region of the Amazon basin of Loreto in Peru. PMID:25123872

  9. Deforestation and Malaria on the Amazon Frontier: Larval Clustering of Anopheles darlingi (Diptera: Culicidae) Determines Focal Distribution of Malaria.

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    Barros, Fábio S M; Honório, Nildimar A

    2015-11-01

    We performed bimonthly mosquito larval collections during 1 year, in an agricultural settlement in the Brazilian Amazon, as well as an analysis of malaria incidence in neighboring houses. Water collections located at forest fringes were more commonly positive for Anopheles darlingi larvae and Kulldorff spatial analysis pinpointed significant larval clusters at sites directly beneath forest fringes, which were called larval "hotspots." Remote sensing identified 43 "potential" hotspots. Sampling of these areas revealed an 85.7% positivity rate for A. darlingi larvae. Malaria was correlated with shorter distances to potential hotpots and settlers living within 400 m of potential hotspots had a 2.60 higher risk of malaria. Recently arrived settlers, usually located closer to the tip of the triangularly shaped deforestation imprints of side roads, may be more exposed to malaria due to their proximity to the forest fringe. As deforestation progresses, transmission decreases. However, forest remnants inside deforested areas conferred an increased risk of malaria. We propose a model for explaining frontier malaria in the Amazon: because of adaptation of A. darlingi to the forest fringe ecotone, humans are exposed to an increased transmission risk when in proximity to these areas, especially when small dams are created on naturally running water collections. PMID:26416110

  10. Complete mtDNA genomes of Anopheles darlingi and an approach to anopheline divergence time

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    James Anthony A

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The complete sequences of the mitochondrial genomes (mtDNA of members of the northern and southern genotypes of Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus darlingi were used for comparative studies to estimate the time to the most recent common ancestor for modern anophelines, to evaluate differentiation within this taxon, and to seek evidence of incipient speciation. Methods The mtDNAs were sequenced from mosquitoes from Belize and Brazil and comparative analyses of structure and base composition, among others, were performed. A maximum likelihood approach linked with phylogenetic information was employed to detect evidence of selection and a Bayesian approach was used to date the split between the subgenus Nyssorhynchus and other Anopheles subgenera. Results The comparison of mtDNA sequences within the Anopheles darlingi taxon does not provide sufficient resolution to establish different units of speciation within the species. In addition, no evidence of positive selection in any protein-coding gene of the mtDNA was detected, and purifying selection likely is the basis for this lack of diversity. Bayesian analysis supports the conclusion that the most recent ancestor of Nyssorhynchus and Anopheles+Cellia was extant ~94 million years ago. Conclusion Analyses of mtDNA genomes of Anopheles darlingi do not provide support for speciation in the taxon. The dates estimated for divergence among the anopheline groups tested is in agreement with the geological split of western Gondwana (95 mya, and provides additional support for explaining the absence of Cellia in the New World, and Nyssorhynchus in the Afro-Eurasian continents.

  11. Field evaluation of traditionally used plant-based insect repellents and fumigants against the malaria vector Anopheles darlingi in Riberalta, Bolivian Amazon.

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    Moore, Sarah J.; Hill, Nigel; Ruiz, Carmen; Cameron, Mary M.

    2007-01-01

    Inexpensive insect repellents may be needed to supplement the use of impregnated bed-nets in the Amazon region, where the primary malaria vector, Anopheles darlingi (Root), is exophilic and feeds in the early evening. Three plants that are traditionally used to repel mosquitoes in Riberalta, Bolivian Amazon, were identified by focus group, and then they were tested against An. darlingi as well as Mansonia indubitans (Dyar & Shannon)/Mansonia titillans (Walker). Cymbopogon citratus (Staph), Gu...

  12. Anopheles darlingi polytene chromosomes: revised maps including newly described inversions and evidence for population structure in Manaus.

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    Cornel, Anthony J; Brisco, Katherine K; Tadei, Wanderli P; Secundino, Nágila Fc; Rafael, Miriam S; Galardo, Allan Kr; Medeiros, Jansen F; Pessoa, Felipe Ac; Ríos-Velásquez, Claudia M; Lee, Yoosook; Pimenta, Paulo Fp; Lanzaro, Gregory C

    2016-05-01

    Salivary gland polytene chromosomes of 4th instar Anopheles darlingi Root were examined from multiple locations in the Brazilian Amazon. Minor modifications were made to existing polytene photomaps. These included changes to the breakpoint positions of several previously described paracentric inversions and descriptions of four new paracentric inversions, two on the right arm of chromosome 3 and two on the left arm of chromosome 3 that were found in multiple locations. A total of 18 inversions on the X (n = 1) chromosome, chromosome 2 (n = 7) and 3 (n = 11) were scored for 83 individuals from Manaus, Macapá and Porto Velho municipalities. The frequency of 2Ra inversion karyotypes in Manaus shows significant deficiency of heterozygotes (p < 0.0009). No significant linkage disequilibrium was found between inversions on chromosome 2 and 3. We hypothesize that at least two sympatric subpopulations exist within the An. darlingi population at Manaus based on inversion frequencies. PMID:27223867

  13. Anopheles darlingi polytene chromosomes: revised maps including newly described inversions and evidence for population structure in Manaus

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    Cornel, Anthony J; Brisco, Katherine K; Tadei, Wanderli P; Secundino, Nágila FC; Rafael, Miriam S; Galardo, Allan KR; Medeiros, Jansen F; Pessoa, Felipe AC; Ríos-Velásquez, Claudia M; Lee, Yoosook; Pimenta, Paulo FP; Lanzaro, Gregory C

    2016-01-01

    Salivary gland polytene chromosomes of 4th instar Anopheles darlingi Root were examined from multiple locations in the Brazilian Amazon. Minor modifications were made to existing polytene photomaps. These included changes to the breakpoint positions of several previously described paracentric inversions and descriptions of four new paracentric inversions, two on the right arm of chromosome 3 and two on the left arm of chromosome 3 that were found in multiple locations. A total of 18 inversions on the X (n = 1) chromosome, chromosome 2 (n = 7) and 3 (n = 11) were scored for 83 individuals from Manaus, Macapá and Porto Velho municipalities. The frequency of 2Ra inversion karyotypes in Manaus shows significant deficiency of heterozygotes (p < 0.0009). No significant linkage disequilibrium was found between inversions on chromosome 2 and 3. We hypothesize that at least two sympatric subpopulations exist within the An. darlingi population at Manaus based on inversion frequencies. PMID:27223867

  14. First Record of Anopheles darlingi Root (Diptera, Culicidae in the Volta Grande Environmental Reserve, Conceição das Alagoas Municipality, Minas Gerais, Brazil

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    Rafael Martins

    2015-04-01

    Resumo. Três espécimes de Anopheles darlingi Root foram encontrados na reserva ambiental Volta Grande, na área de influência da barragem do Rio Grande construída pela usina hidrelétrica de Volta Grande, em Conceição das Alagoas, Minas Gerais, Brasil. O mosquito An. darlingi é um dos principais vetores da malária humana no Brasil, devido à sua preferência alimentar por sangue humano, um fator que é acentuado pelo comportamento endofílico da espécie. O presente relato poderá ser útil à vigilância entomológica local para monitoramento dos impactos gerados pela formação do reservatório hidrelétrico, uma vez que a presença deste vetor neste tipo de ambiente indica um risco potencial de transmissão da malária.

  15. Evaluation of Methods for Sampling the Malaria Vector Anopheles darlingi (Diptera, Culicidae) in Suriname and the Relation With Its Biting Behavior

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    Hiwat-van Laar, H.; Rijk, de M.; Andriessen, R.; Koenraadt, C.J.M.; Takken, W.

    2011-01-01

    The effectiveness of CO2-baited and human-baited mosquito traps for the sampling of Anopheles darlingi Root was evaluated and compared with human landing collections in Suriname. Biting preferences of this mosquito on a human host were studied and related to trapping data. Traps used were the Center

  16. Population structure of the malaria vector Anopheles darlingi in a malaria-endemic region of Eastern Amazonian Brazil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conn, Jan E.; Vineis, Joseph H.; Bollback, Jonathan Paul;

    2006-01-01

    insecticides, but since the mid-1990s there has been a shift to patient treatment and focal insecticide fogging. Anopheles darlingi was believed to have been significantly reduced in a gold-mining community, Peixoto de Azevedo (in Mato Grosso State), in the early 1990s by insecticide use during a severe...

  17. Microsatellite data suggest significant population structure and differentiation within the malaria vector Anopheles darlingi in Central and South America

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    Achee Nicole L

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anopheles darlingi is the most important malaria vector in the Neotropics. An understanding of A. darlingi's population structure and contemporary gene flow patterns is necessary if vector populations are to be successfully controlled. We assessed population genetic structure and levels of differentiation based on 1,376 samples from 31 localities throughout the Peruvian and Brazilian Amazon and Central America using 5–8 microsatellite loci. Results We found high levels of polymorphism for all of the Amazonian populations (mean RS = 7.62, mean HO = 0.742, and low levels for the Belize and Guatemalan populations (mean RS = 4.3, mean HO = 0.457. The Bayesian clustering analysis revealed five population clusters: northeastern Amazonian Brazil, southeastern and central Amazonian Brazil, western and central Amazonian Brazil, Peruvian Amazon, and the Central American populations. Within Central America there was low non-significant differentiation, except for between the populations separated by the Maya Mountains. Within Amazonia there was a moderate level of significant differentiation attributed to isolation by distance. Within Peru there was no significant population structure and low differentiation, and some evidence of a population expansion. The pairwise estimates of genetic differentiation between Central America and Amazonian populations were all very high and highly significant (FST = 0.1859 – 0.3901, P DA and FST distance-based trees illustrated the main division to be between Central America and Amazonia. Conclusion We detected a large amount of population structure in Amazonia, with three population clusters within Brazil and one including the Peru populations. The considerable differences in Ne among the populations may have contributed to the observed genetic differentiation. All of the data suggest that the primary division within A. darlingi corresponds to two white gene genotypes between Amazonia (genotype 1

  18. Comportamiento estacional del Anopheles (nyssorhynchus darlingi root 1926 en localidades de Loreto y Madre de Dios, Perú 1999- 2000

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    Walter León C

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Determinar el comportamiento estacional del Anopheles darlingi en las localidades de Santa Clara (Loreto y Villa Luz (Madre de Dios. Materiales y métodos: En las localidades de Santa Clara y Villa Luz, entre agosto de 1999 y junio de 2000 se realizó mensualmente la inspección de criaderos, colecta de larvas de Anopheles darlingi por el método del cucharón y colecta de mosquitos adultos por el método cebo humano (intradomicilio y peri domicilió, trampa Shannon y refugio animal (extradomicilio. Se calcularon los indicadores: criadero positivo y densidad larvaria por cucharonada, índice de picadura hombre noche (IPHN, índice de picadura hombre hora (IPHH, índice esporozoítico y tasa de paridad. Resultados: El IPHN en ambas localidades se incrementó en la estación lluviosa con los valores más altos en mayo (Santa Clara y febrero (Villa Luz. En Santa Clara, el comportamiento de la picadura del Anopheles darlingi de agosto a diciembre de 1999, fue unimodal presentándose el pico de IPHH entre las 19.00 y 21.00 horas; sin embargo, de marzo a junio de 2000, el comportamiento fue bimodal con dos picos del IPHH: entre las 19.00 y 22.00 horas, y entre las 2.00 y 4.00 horas. En Villa Luz, el comportamiento de la picadura, de agosto a junio de 1999, se mantuvo unimodal, con el pico de IPHH entre las 21.00 y 24.00 horas. Las especies inmaduras de Anopheles darlingi representaron menos del 20% de las larvas encontradas en los criaderos permanentes. Conclusiones: El Anopheles darlingi presenta mayor densidad poblacional en meses de estación lluviosa, con comportamientos de picadura distintos según localidad y estación. Los criaderos evaluados no serían criaderos tan importantes de esta especie.

  19. Field evaluation of traditionally used plant-based insect repellents and fumigants against the malaria vector Anopheles darlingi in Riberalta, Bolivian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Sarah J; Hill, Nigel; Ruiz, Carmen; Cameron, Mary M

    2007-07-01

    Inexpensive insect repellents may be needed to supplement the use of impregnated bed-nets in the Amazon region, where the primary malaria vector, Anopheles darlingi (Root), is exophilic and feeds in the early evening. Three plants that are traditionally used to repel mosquitoes in Riberalta, Bolivian Amazon, were identified by focus group, and then they were tested against An. darlingi as well as Mansonia indubitans (Dyar & Shannon)/Mansonia titillans (Walker). Cymbopogon citratus (Staph), Guatemalan lemongrass, essential oil at 25% was used as a skin repellent, and it provided 74% protection for 2.5 h against predominantly An. darlingi and 95% protection for 2.5 h against Mansonia spp. Attalea princeps (name not verified) husks, burned on charcoal in the traditional way provided 35 and 51% protection against An. darlingi and Mansonia spp., respectively. Kerosene lamps, often used to light rural homes, were used as a heat source to volatilize 100% Mentha arvensis (Malinv ex. Bailey) essential oil, and they reduced biting by 41% inside traditional homes against Mansonia spp., although they were ineffective outdoors against An. darlingi. All three plant-based repellents provided significant protection compared with controls. Plant-based repellents, although less effective than synthetic alternatives, were shown by focus groups to be more culturally acceptable in this setting, in particular para-menthane-3, 8, idol derived from lemon eucalyptus, Corymbia citriodora (Hook). Plant-based repellents have the potential to be produced locally and therefore sold more cheaply than synthetic commercial repellents. Importantly, their low cost may encourage user compliance among indigenous and marginalized populations. PMID:17695017

  20. Larval control of Anopheles (Nyssorhinchus darlingi using granular formulation of Bacillus sphaericus in abandoned gold-miners excavation pools in the Brazilian Amazon Rainforest

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    Allan Kardec Ribeiro Galardo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Use of a Bacillus sphaericus based mosquito larvicide was evaluated as an intervention for malaria vector control at a mining site in Amapá, Brazil. Impacts on larval and adult densities of the primary vector Anopheles darlingi were measured over the course of a 52 week study period. METHODS: In Calçoene, State of Amapá, gold mining activity occurs in 19 mining sites in gold-miners of Lourenço. Large pools are formed in mining sites and naturally colonized by Anopheles darlingi. During one year, the impact of applications of VectoLex(r CG to these larval sources was evaluated. Applications of 20kg/ha were made as needed, based on 10 immature (3rd, 4th instars and pupae surveillance of health and established thresholds. RESULTS: One hundred percent initial control was observed 48h after each treatment. The pools received from 2-10 (5.3±1.6 treatments during the year. The average re-treatment interval in productive pools was 9.4±4.3 weeks. During weeks 3-52 of the study, mean density of late stage larvae was 78% and pupae were 93% lower in the treated pools than in untreated pools (p< 0.0001, n=51 while reduction of adult mosquitoes was 53% in comparison to the untreated area during the last five months of the study, which were the rainy season (p<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: VectoLex(r CG reduced immature Anopheles darlingi infestation levels during the entire study period, and reduced adult mosquito populations during the rainy season.

  1. Evaluation of larvicidal activity of the methanolic extracts of Piper alatabaccum branches and P. tuberculatum leaves and compounds isolated against Anopheles darlingi

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    Frances T. T. Trindade

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Piper is a notable genus among Piperaceae due to their secondary metabolites such as lignans, amides, esters and long chain fatty acids used as anti-herbivore defenses with comparable effects of pyrethroids, that holds a promise in insect control, including malaria vectors such as Anopheles darlingi, the main vector in the North of Brazil. Methanolic extracts of Piper tuberculatum Jacq., Piperaceae, and P. alatabaccum Trel. & Yunck., Piperaceae, and some isolated compounds, i.e, 3,4,5-trimetoxy-dihydrocinamic acid, dihydropiplartine; piplartine, piplartine-dihydropiplartine and 5,5',7-trimetoxy-3',4'-metilenodioxiflavone were tested as larvicides against A. darlingi. The Lethal Concentrations (LC50 and LC90 of methanolic extracts were 194 and 333 ppm for P. tuberculatum and 235 and 401 ppm for P. alatabacum, respectively. Isolated compounds had lower LC values, e.g. the LC50 and LC90 of the piplartine-dihidropiplartine isolated from both plant species was 40 and 79 ppm, respectively.

  2. Avaliação do desenvolvimento larval de Anopheles darlingi criado em laboratório sob diferentes dietas Evaluation of the larval development of Anopheles darlingi (Diptera - Culicidae raised in the laboratory on different diets

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    Eduardo Sterlino Bergo

    1990-04-01

    Full Text Available São testadas três dietas para larvas de A. darlingi, buscando-se os seguintes parâmetros indicativos de desenvolvimento nesta fase: tempo de evolução total e de cada estádio, sobrevivência ao estádio, diária e total. A metodologia utilizada na determinação desses parâmetros constitui-se da combinação de dois métodos de análise da estatística vital, adaptados ao estudo de populações mantidas em laboratório. Os tempos de evolução total e de cada estádio foram determinados gráficamente a partir das curvas de tendência dos estádios medianos da colônia, em inspeções sucessivas. Os valores de sobrevivência diária, ao estádio e total foram calculados a partir de tábuas de sobrevivência. Os resultados permitiram eleger a dieta composta de uma parte de farinha de peixe para duas partes de farinha de pão e duas partes de germe de trigo como a mais adequada ao desenvolvimento larval, com duração de 12,9 dias entre o primerio estádio e a emersão do adulto e sobrevivência total de 95%.Three diets for A. darlingi larvae were tested in order to arrive at the following parameters indicative of development in this phase: length of time, both for overall as for each stage of evolution and daily and total stage-survival. A methodology which combined two vital statistical methods of analysis, adjusted to the study of populations under laboratory conditions, was used for determining these parameters. The length of time for overall and for each stage of, evolution were graphically assessed on the basis of trend curves of colony median stages, in sequential surveys. Values for the total and the daily stage-survival were stimated from survival tables. Results permitted the selection of the most adequate diet for the larval development as that composed of one part of fish flour to two parts of bread flour and two parts of a heat germ, giving an average length of 12.9 days between the first larval stage and the emergent adult

  3. Malaria in Suriname: a new era : impact of modified intervention strategies on Anopheles darlingi populations and malaria incidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiwat-van Laar, H.

    2011-01-01

    Malaria is an infectious disease caused by Plasmodiumblood parasites which live inside the human host and are spread by Anopheles mosquitoes.Every year an estimated 225 million new cases and near 800.000 malaria deaths are reported. Control of the disease is a formidable task involving all three liv

  4. ECOLOGICAL CHANGE AS A FACTOR IN RENEWED MALARIA TRANSMISSION IN AN ERADICATED AREA. A LOCALIZED OUTBREAK OF A. AQUASALIS-TRANSMITTED MALARIA ON THE DEMERARA RIVER ESTUARY, BRITISH GUIANA, IN THE FIFTEENTH YEAR OF A. DARLINGI AND MALARIA ERADICATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    GIGLIOLI, G

    1963-01-01

    In British Guiana, the successful eradication of Anopheles darlingi and malaria from the coastal areas has caused a very rapid increase in the population and has favoured a considerable social and economic improvement and expansion of both agriculture and industry. Housing and industrial developments and the constantly expanding rice cultivation have taken over most of the accessible pasture-lands, displacing the livestock which previously abounded around villages and settlements. Mechanization on the roads and in the fields increases daily, and the horse, the mule, the donkey and the ploughing oxen are gradually becoming obsolete.In some areas these changes have already caused such an upset in the balance between the human and the livestock population that A. aquasalis, a very abundant species all along the coast, but until recently entirely "fixed" by the livestock population, is now shifting its attention from livestock to man. On the Demerara river estuary, an area where malaria transmission was interrupted sixteen years ago and where eradication has been continually maintained, this mosquito has been responsible for a sharp, but localized, outbreak of P. vivax malaria. An entirely new epidemiological problem thus presents itself.Environmental changes, introduced and fostered by successful malaria eradication, may thus cause an anopheline species, potentially capable of malaria transmission, but originally inactive and harmless as a vector, to alter its feeding habits and thereby renew transmission. The immediate and long-term significance of some secondary and potential vectors may therefore require renewed evaluation in the planning of malaria eradication campaigns. PMID:14056265

  5. [Egg morphology as an indirect method to identify Anopheles benarrochi, Anopheles oswaldoi and Anopheles rangeli (Diptera: Culicidae)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Dora Amparo; Quiñoes, Martha L; Sierra, Diana Maria; Calle, David A; Ruiz, Fredy; Erazo, Holmes F; Linton, Yvonne-Marie

    2003-12-01

    In the Department of Putumayo in southern Colombia, malaria transmission has continued in the absence of the 4 traditional Latin American vector species--Anopheles darlingi, Anopheles nuneztovari, Anopheles albimanus or Anopheles trinkae. Human bait collections yielded Anopheles mosquitoes and a morphological variant of Anopheles benarrochi, the adult females of which can easily be misidentified as Anopheles oswaldoi. Species identification of females of Anopheles in the subgenus Nyssorhynchus is generally difficult due to overlapping morphological characters; therefore, progeny of field collected females were link-reared to assess species identity. Herein a robust method is presented to identify the species Anopheles benarrochi, Anopheles oswaldoi and Anopheles rangeli from southern Colombia, using the morphology of the eggs induced from wild-caught females. Eggs of A. rangeli and A. benarrochi were differentiated on the basis of the anterior crown. In A. rangeli, this feature is positioned apically with high walls. In A. benarrochi, anterior crown is positioned more ventrally with comparatively shorter walls. No crown is present in A. oswaldoi. These differences are clear with the aid of a dissecting microscope and make accurate species determination possible even in field conditions. Egg morphology is shown to be an accurate, albeit indirect, method for the taxonomic determination for the three southern Colombian species and may also be useful in other regions of Latin America where the morphological variant of A. benarrochi is sympatric with A. oswaldoi. PMID:14968916

  6. Comparison of transmission parameters between Anopheles argyritarsis and Anopheles pseudopunctipennis in two ecologically different localities of Bolivia

    OpenAIRE

    Lardeux, Frédéric; Aliaga, Claudia; Tejerina, Rosenka; Torrez, Libia

    2013-01-01

    Background: Anopheles (Anopheles) pseudopunctipennis is a recognized malaria vector in the slopes of the Andes of Bolivia. There, other species might be involved in malaria transmission and one candidate could be Anopheles argyritarsis. Although it is generally admitted that this species is not a malaria vector in the neotropical region, its potential role in transmission is still controversial and this situation has to be cleared, at least for Bolivia. Comparing the vectorial efficiency of A...

  7. The Anopheles community and the role of Anopheles minimus on malaria transmission on the China-Myanmar border

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Guo; Yan, Guiyun; Zhang, Naixin; Zhong, Daibin; Wang, Ying(School of Physics, Shandong University, Jinan, 250100, PR China); He, Zhengbo; Yan, Zhentian; Fu, Wenbo; Yang, Feilong; Chen, Bin

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Malaria around the China-Myanmar border is a serious health problem in the countries of South-East Asia. An. minimus is a principle malaria vector with a wide geographic distribution in this area. Malaria is endemic along the boundary between Yunnan province in China and the Kachin State of Myanmar where the local Anopheles community (species composition) and the malaria transmission vectors have never been clarified. ...

  8. Malaria vectors in the Brazilian Amazon: Anopheles of the subgenus Nyssorhynchus Anopheles do subgênero Nyssorhynchus, vetores da malária na Amazônia brasileira

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanderli Pedro TADEI

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Various species of Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus were studied in the Amazon with the objective of determining their importance as malaria vectors. Of the 33 known Anopheles species occurring in the Amazon, only 9 were found to be infected with Plasmodium. The different species of this subgenus varied both in diversity and density in the collection areas. The populations showed a tendency towards lower density and diversity in virgin forest than in areas modified by human intervention. The principal vector, An. darlingi, is anthropophilic with a continuous activity cycle lasting the entire night but peaking at sunset and sunrise. These species (Nyssorhynchus are peridomiciliary, entering houses to feed on blood and immediately leaving to settle on nearby vegetation. Anopheles nuneztovari proved to be zoophilic, crepuscular and peridomiciliary. These habits may change depending on a series of external factors, especially those related to human activity. There is a possibility that sibling species exist in the study area and they are being studied with reference to An. darlingi, An. albitarsis and An. nuneztovari. The present results do not suggest the existence of subpopulations of An. darlingi in the Brazilian Amazon.Várias espécies de Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus foram estudadas na Amazônia a fim de se determinar sua importância na transmissão da malária. Das 33 espécies de Anopheles de ocorrência conhecida na Amazônia, apenas 8 foram encontradas infectadas por Plasmodium. O principal vetor, An. darlingi, é antropofílico com um ciclo contínuo de atividade que dura a noite inteira mas que tem picos ao anoitecer e ao amanhecer. As diferentes espécies desse subgênero variaram tanto em diversidade como em densidade nas áreas de coleta. A população de anofelinos apresentou tendências de menor densidade e diversidade em florestas virgens do que em áreas que sofreram intervenção humana. Essas espécies (Nyssorhynchus são peridomiciliares

  9. Peculiar liquid-feeding and pathogen transmission behavior of Aedes togoi and comparison with Anopheles sinensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Joon; Kang, Dooho; Lee, Seung Chul; Ha, Young-Ran

    2016-02-01

    Female mosquitoes transmit various diseases as vectors during liquid-feeding. Identifying the determinants of vector efficiency is a major scientific challenge in establishing strategies against these diseases. Infection rate and transmission efficiency are interconnected with the mosquito-induced liquid-feeding flow as main indexes of vector efficiency. However, the relationship between liquid-feeding characteristics and pathogen remains poorly understood. The liquid-feeding behavior of Aedes togoi and Anopheles sinensis was comparatively investigated in conjunction with vector efficiency via micro-particle image velocimetry. The flow rates and ratio of the ejection volume of Aedes togoi were markedly higher than those of Anophels sinensis. These differences would influence pathogen re-ingestion. Wall shear stresses of these mosquito species were also clearly discriminatory affecting the infective rates of vector-borne diseases. The variations in volume of two pump chambers and diameter of proboscis of these mosquito species were compared to determine the differences in the liquid-feeding process. Liquid-feeding characteristics influence vector efficiency; hence, this study can elucidate the vector efficiency of mosquitoes and the vector-pathogen interactions and contribute to the development of strategies against vector-borne diseases.

  10. The Anopheles-midgut APN1 structure reveals a new malaria transmission-blocking vaccine epitope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Sarah C; Armistead, Jennifer S; Mathias, Derrick K; Sandeu, Maurice M; Tao, Dingyin; Borhani-Dizaji, Nahid; Tarimo, Brian B; Morlais, Isabelle; Dinglasan, Rhoel R; Borg, Natalie A

    2015-07-01

    Mosquito-based malaria transmission-blocking vaccines (mTBVs) target midgut-surface antigens of the Plasmodium parasite's obligate vector, the Anopheles mosquito. The alanyl aminopeptidase N (AnAPN1) is the leading mTBV immunogen; however, AnAPN1's role in Plasmodium infection of the mosquito and how anti-AnAPN1 antibodies functionally block parasite transmission have remained elusive. Here we present the 2.65-Å crystal structure of AnAPN1 and the immunoreactivity and transmission-blocking profiles of three monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to AnAPN1, including mAb 4H5B7, which effectively blocks transmission of natural strains of Plasmodium falciparum. Using the AnAPN1 structure, we map the conformation-dependent 4H5B7 neoepitope to a previously uncharacterized region on domain 1 and further demonstrate that nonhuman-primate neoepitope-specific IgG also blocks parasite transmission. We discuss the prospect of a new biological function of AnAPN1 as a receptor for Plasmodium in the mosquito midgut and the implications for redesigning the AnAPN1 mTBV. PMID:26075520

  11. Feeding and indoor resting behaviour of the mosquito Anopheles longipalpis in an area of hyperendemic malaria transmission in southern Zambia

    OpenAIRE

    Kent, R.J.; Coetzee, M.; Mharakurwa, S.; Norris, D. E.

    2006-01-01

    Anopheles longipalpis (Theobald) (Diptera: Culicidae) is a predominantly zoophilic mosquito that has not been implicated in malaria transmission. However, this species was collected indoors with An. funestus s.l. in southern Zambia, where transmission of Plasmodium falciparum is hyperendemic, and we initially misidentified it morphologically and molecularly as An. funestus s.l. The indoor resting density and blood-feeding behaviour of An. longipalpis were investigated during the 2004 – 05 and...

  12. Active Compounds Against Anopheles minimus Carboxypeptidase B for Malaria Transmission-Blocking Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mongkol, Watcharakorn; Arunyawat, Uraiwan; Surat, Wunrada; Kubera, Anchanee

    2015-11-01

    Malaria transmission-blocking compounds have been studied to block the transmission of malaria parasites, especially the drug-resistant Plasmodium. Carboxypeptidase B (CPB) in the midgut of Anopheline mosquitoes has been demonstrated to be essential for the sexual development of Plasmodium in the mosquito. Thus, the CPB is a potential target for blocking compounds. The aim of this research was to screen compounds from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) diversity dataset and U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs that could reduce the Anopheles CPB activity. The cDNA fragment of cpb gene from An. minimus (cpbAmi) was amplified and sequenced. The three-dimensional structure of CPB was predicted from the deduced amino acid sequence. The virtual screening of the compounds from NCI diversity set IV and FDA-approved drugs was performed against CPBAmi. The inhibition activity against CPBAmi of the top-scoring molecules was characterized in vitro. Three compounds-NSC-1014, NSC-332670, and aminopterin with IC50 at 0.99 mM, 1.55 mM, and 0.062 mM, respectively-were found to significantly reduce the CPBAmi activity. PMID:26352934

  13. Overhead tank is the potential breeding habitat of Anopheles stephensi in an urban transmission setting of Chennai, India

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Shalu; Ravishankaran, Sangamithra; Justin, Johnson A; Asokan, Aswin; Mathai, Manu T.; Valecha, Neena; Thomas, Matthew B; Eapen, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Background Wells and overhead tanks (OHT) are the major breeding sources of the local malaria vector, Anopheles stephensi in the Indian city of Chennai; they play a significant role in vector breeding, and transmission of urban malaria. Many other man-made breeding habitats, such as cemented cisterns/containers, barrels or drums, sumps or underground tanks, and plastic pots/containers are maintained to supplement water needs, temporarily resulting in enhanced mosquito/vector breeding. Correla...

  14. Intraspecific chromosomal polymorphism in the Anopheles gambiae complex as a factor affecting malaria transmission in the Kisumu area of Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrarca, V; Beier, J C

    1992-02-01

    The paracentric inversion polymorphisms of Anopheles gambiae and An. arabiensis populations in the Kisumu area of western Kenya were studied in relation to parameters of Plasmodium falciparum transmission. Anopheles gambiae (n = 1,387) was polymorphic for inversions b on chromosomal arm 2R and a on arm 2L, with frequencies of the inverted arrangements of 17% and 43%, respectively. Anopheles arabiensis (n = 484) was polymorphic for inversion b on chromosomal arm 2R and a on 3R, with frequencies of the inverted arrangements of 58% and 5%, respectively. Observed karyotypic frequencies did not deviate from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, indicating a condition of panmixia (i.e., random mating) for both species. The overall degree of intraspecific polymorphism was low, confirming findings from other zones of East Africa. No significant differences in inversion frequencies of either An. gambiae or An. arabiensis were observed, either between collecting sites or between similar sampling periods of consecutive years. At the same time, a stable, significant two-fold difference in Plasmodium infection rates was detected among An. gambiae carriers of different inversion karyotypes on chromosome 2. A significant non-uniform distribution of human- and bovid-fed specimens was also detected among the carriers of different 2Rb inversion karyotypes in indoor resting An. arabiensis. Relationships among inversion karyotypes of the two major malaria vectors in the An. gambiae complex and key factors affecting malaria transmission intensity emphasize that intraspecific variation could contribute significantly to the diversity and stability of malaria vectorial systems in Africa. PMID:1539757

  15. Use of immunoradiometric assays employing monoclonal antibodies or synthetic peptides for the study of malaria transmission and immunity in migrant population of endemic areas in the Amazon Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Immunoradiometric assays (IRMA) and immunofluorence tests were used in combination with entomological techniques to study malaria epidemiology in areas in the Amazon Basin where non-immune migrant individuals have settled in recent years. Anopheles darlingi was found to be the most important vector accounting for 77% of the anophelines positive for sporozoites by the IRMA. The prevalence of anti-sporozoite and anti-blood stage antibodies was low and decreased with time after the last episode of malaria. Anti-sporozoite antibodies did not indicate immune status of the individual but may reflect malaria transmission. (author). 9 refs, 4 tabs

  16. Vector bionomics and malaria transmission in the Upper Orinoco River, Southern Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magris, Magda; Rubio-Palis, Yasmin; Menares, Cristóbal; Villegas, Leopoldo

    2007-06-01

    A longitudinal epidemiological and entomological study was carried out in Ocamo, Upper Orinoco River, between January 1994 and February 1995 to understand the dynamics of malaria transmission in this area. Malaria transmission occurs throughout the year with a peak in June at the beginning of the rainy season. The Annual Parasite Index was 1,279 per 1,000 populations at risk. Plasmodium falciparum infections accounted for 64% of all infections, P. vivax for 28%, and P. malariae for 4%. Mixed P. falciparum/P. vivax infections were diagnosed in 15 people representing 4% of total cases. Children under 10 years accounted for 58% of the cases; the risk for malaria in this age group was 77% higher than for those in the greater than 50 years age group. Anopheles darlingi was the predominant anopheline species landing on humans indoors with a biting peak between midnight and dawn. A significant positive correlation was found between malaria monthly incidence and mean number of An. darlingi caught. There was not a significant relationship between mean number of An. darlingi and rainfall or between incidence and rainfall. A total of 7295 anophelines were assayed by ELISA for detection of Plasmodium circumsporozoite (CS) protein. Only An. darlingi (55) was positive for CS proteins of P. falciparum (0.42%), P. malariae (0.25%), and P. vivax-247 (0.1%). The overall estimated entomological inoculation rate was 129 positive bites/person/year. The present study was the first longitudinal entomological and epidemiological study conducted in this area and set up the basic ground for subsequent intervention with insecticide-treated nets. PMID:17568935

  17. Vector bionomics and malaria transmission in the Upper Orinoco River, Southern Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Magris

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available A longitudinal epidemiological and entomological study was carried out in Ocamo, Upper Orinoco River, between January 1994 and February 1995 to understand the dynamics of malaria transmission in this area. Malaria transmission occurs throughout the year with a peak in June at the beginning of the rainy season. The Annual Parasite Index was 1,279 per 1,000 populations at risk. Plasmodium falciparum infections accounted for 64% of all infections, P. vivax for 28%, and P. malariae for 4%. Mixed P. falciparum/P. vivax infections were diagnosed in 15 people representing 4% of total cases. Children under 10 years accounted for 58% of the cases; the risk for malaria in this age group was 77% higher than for those in the greater than 50 years age group. Anopheles darlingi was the predominant anopheline species landing on humans indoors with a biting peak between midnight and dawn. A significant positive correlation was found between malaria monthly incidence and mean number of An. darlingi caught. There was not a significant relationship between mean number of An. darlingi and rainfall or between incidence and rainfall. A total of 7295 anophelines were assayed by ELISA for detection of Plasmodium circumsporozoite (CS protein. Only An. darlingi (55 was positive for CS proteins of P. falciparum (0.42%, P. malariae (0.25%, and P. vivax-247 (0.1%. The overall estimated entomological inoculation rate was 129 positive bites/person/year. The present study was the first longitudinal entomological and epidemiological study conducted in this area and set up the basic ground for subsequent intervention with insecticide-treated nets.

  18. Deforestation and Vectorial Capacity of Anopheles gambiae Giles Mosquitoes in Malaria Transmission, Kenya

    OpenAIRE

    Afrane, Yaw A; Little, Tom J.; Lawson, Bernard W; Githeko, Andrew K; Yan, Guiyun

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the effects of deforestation on microclimates and sporogonic development of Plasmodium falciparum parasites in Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes in an area of the western Kenyan highland prone to malaria epidemics. An. gambiae mosquitoes were fed with P. falciparum–infected blood through membrane feeders. Fed mosquitoes were placed in houses in forested and deforested areas in a highland area (1,500 m above sea level) and monitored for parasite development. Deforested sites had hig...

  19. Incrimination of Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus rangeli and An. (Nys. oswaldoi as natural vectors of Plasmodium vivax in Southern Colombia

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    Martha L Quiñones

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Malaria transmission in the Southern Colombian state of Putumayo continues despite the absence of traditional vector species, except for the presence of Anopheles darlingi near the southeastern border with the state of Amazonas. In order to facilitate malaria vector incrimination in Putumayo, 2445 morphologically identified Anopheles females were tested for natural infection of Plasmodium vivax by ELISA. Specimens tested included An. apicimacula (n = 2, An. benarrochi B (n = 1617, An. darlingi (n = 29, An. mattogrossensis (n = 7, An. neomaculipalpus (n = 7, An. oswaldoi (n = 362, An. peryassui (n = 1, An. punctimacula (n = 1, An. rangeli (n = 413, and An. triannulatus (n = 6. Despite being overwhelmingly the most anthropophilic species in the region and comprising 66.1% of the mosquitoes tested, An. benarrochi B was not shown to be a vector. Thirty-five An. rangeli and one An. oswaldoi were naturally infected with P. vivax VK210. Sequence data were generated for the nuclear second internal transcriber space region of 31 of these 36 vivax positive mosquitoes (86.1% to confirm their morphological identification. An. oswaldoi is known to be a species complex in Latin America, but its internal taxonomy remains unresolved. Herein we show that the An. oswaldoi found in the state of Putumayo is genetically similar to specimens from the state of Amapá in Brazil and from the Ocama region in the state of Amazonas in Venezuela, and that this form harbors natural infections of P. vivax. That An. rangeli and this member of the An. oswaldoi complex are incriminated as malaria vectors in Putumayo, is a novel finding of significance for malaria control in Southern Colombia, and possibly in other areas of Latin America.

  20. [Malaria, anopheles, the anti-malaria campaign in French Guyana: between dogmatism and judgment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raccurt, C P

    1997-01-01

    The recrudescence of malaria in French Guiana involves both border regions. One notes the predominance of Plasmodium falciparum along the Maroni River on the Surinam frontier and the transmission of both Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax in amerindian settlements along the Oyapock River on the Brazilian frontier. The main mosquito vector is the endoexophile species, Anopheles darlingi. The role of man-biting forest anophelines in malaria transmission is still unclear. At the present time, malaria control is based on curative treatment of the confirmed cases (approximately 4,000 cases a year by active and passive screening). Vector control is supported by annual houses insecticides spraying and, to a lesser degree, use of insecticide-impregnated bednets. The main limiting factors for successful control have been difficulty in implementing a strategy adapted to the cultures of the amerindian and bushnegro populations living on either side of the river-frontiers and in organizing effective cross-border cooperation. The alleged role of immigration in transmission dynamics has been more speculative than real. However the growth of the population and the increase of human activities inside rain forest areas have favorized Anopheles darlingi breeding by uncontrolled deforestation. This situation need to be monitored closely. Information campaigns to improve public awareness could be useful. Following measures could improve control in sparsely populated, remote areas: to promote an integrated preventive program for a real community-wide distribution of primary health care; to discontinue insecticides spraying in houses which is poorly accepted by the bushnegro population and unsuitable to the amerindian dwellings; to support the use of personal protection; to initiate an effective anopheline larvae control; to determine the impact of the transmission during day-time activities especially among very small settlements far from the main villages where members of the

  1. Reduction of malaria transmission to Anopheles mosquitoes with a six-dose regimen of co-artemether.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin J Sutherland

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Resistance of malaria parasites to chloroquine (CQ and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP is increasing in prevalence in Africa. Combination therapy can both improve treatment and provide important public health benefits if it curbs the spread of parasites harbouring resistance genes. Thus, drug combinations must be identified which minimise gametocyte emergence in treated cases, and so prevent selective transmission of parasites resistant to any of the partner drugs. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In a randomised controlled trial, 497 children with uncomplicated falciparum malaria were treated with CQ and SP (three doses and one dose respectively; n = 91, or six doses of artemether in fixed combination with lumefantrine (co-artemether [Coartem, Riamet] (n = 406. Carriage rates of Plasmodium falciparum gametocytes and trophozoites were measured 7, 14, and 28 d after treatment. The infectiousness of venous blood from 29 children carrying P. falciparum gametocytes 7 d after treatment was tested by membrane-feeding of Anopheles mosquitoes. Children treated with co-artemether were significantly less likely to carry gametocytes within the 4 weeks following treatment than those receiving CQ/SP (30 of 378 [7.94%] versus 42 of 86 [48.8%]; p < 0.0001. Carriers in the co-artemether group harboured gametocytes at significantly lower densities, for shorter periods (0.3 d versus 4.2 d; p < 0.0001 and were less infectious to mosquitoes at day 7 (p < 0.001 than carriers who had received CQ/SP. CONCLUSIONS: Co-artemether is highly effective at preventing post-treatment transmission of P. falciparum. Our results suggest that co-artemether has specific activity against immature sequestered gametocytes, and has the capacity to minimise transmission of drug-resistant parasites.

  2. Extended Malaria Parasite Clearance Time in African Children Following Artemisinincombination Therapy Enhances Transmission to Anopheles Mosquitoes

    OpenAIRE

    Beshir Khalid B; Sawa Patrick; Drakeley Chris J; Baidjoe Amrish Y; Mweresa Collins K; Yussuf Rahma U; Omar Sabah A; Hermsen Cornelus C; Shekalaghe Seif A; Schallig Henk DFH; Sauerwein Robert W; Sutherland Colin J; Hallett Rachel L; Bousema Teun

    2012-01-01

    Artemisinin resistance was recently shown to have spread or emerged on the Thailand/Myanmar border. Evidence is accumulating that the parasite clearance time after artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) is increasing in settings in Asia and Africa. It is currently unknown if an extended parasite clearance time after ACTs has consequences for the individual patient or confers a higher malaria transmission potential. 298 children in Mbita, Western Kenya, with uncomplicated falciparum malar...

  3. Mathematical evaluation of community level impact of combining bed nets and indoor residual spraying upon malaria transmission in areas where the main vectors are Anopheles arabiensis mosquitoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okumu Fredros O

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Indoor residual insecticide spraying (IRS and long-lasting insecticide treated nets (LLINs are commonly used together even though evidence that such combinations confer greater protection against malaria than either method alone is inconsistent. Methods A deterministic model of mosquito life cycle processes was adapted to allow parameterization with results from experimental hut trials of various combinations of untreated nets or LLINs (Olyset®, PermaNet 2.0®, Icon Life® nets with IRS (pirimiphos methyl, lambda cyhalothrin, DDT, in a setting where vector populations are dominated by Anopheles arabiensis, so that community level impact upon malaria transmission at high coverage could be predicted. Results Intact untreated nets alone provide equivalent personal protection to all three LLINs. Relative to IRS plus untreated nets, community level protection is slightly higher when Olyset® or PermaNet 2.0® nets are added onto IRS with pirimiphos methyl or lambda cyhalothrin but not DDT, and when Icon Life® nets supplement any of the IRS insecticides. Adding IRS onto any net modestly enhances communal protection when pirimiphos methyl is sprayed, while spraying lambda cyhalothrin enhances protection for untreated nets but not LLINs. Addition of DDT reduces communal protection when added to LLINs. Conclusions Where transmission is mediated primarily by An. arabiensis, adding IRS to high LLIN coverage provides only modest incremental benefit (e.g. when an organophosphate like pirimiphos methyl is used, but can be redundant (e.g. when a pyrethroid like lambda cyhalothin is used or even regressive (e.g. when DDT is used for the IRS. Relative to IRS plus untreated nets, supplementing IRS with LLINs will only modestly improve community protection. Beyond the physical protection that intact nets provide, additional protection against transmission by An. arabiensis conferred by insecticides will be remarkably small, regardless of

  4. Composition, abundance and aspects of temporal variation in the distribution of Anopheles species in an area of Eastern Amazonia

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    Ledayane Mayana Costa Barbosa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The diverse and complex environmental conditions of the Amazon Basin favor the breeding and development of Anopheles species. This study aimed to describe the composition, abundance and temporal frequency of Anopheles species and to correlate these factors with precipitation, temperature and relative humidity. Methods The study was conducted in the District of Coração, State of Amapá, Brazil. Samples were collected monthly during three consecutive nights, from 6:00 PM to 10:00 PM, from December 2010 to November 2011. In addition, four 12-hour collections (i.e., 6:00 PM to 6:00 AM were performed during this period. Results A total of 1,230 Anopheles specimens were collected. In the monthly collections, Anopheles darlingi was the predominant species, followed by An. braziliensis and An. albitarsis s.l., whereas An. darlingi, An. peryassui and An. braziliensis were the most frequent species collected in the 12-hour collections. The greatest number of anophelines was collected in September (the dry season. The highest frequency of anophelines was observed for An. darlingi during September, when there were the least rainfalls of the year, along with lower relative humidity and higher temperatures. There was little variation in the abundance of this species in other months, with the exception of slight increases in February, July and August. Conclusions The major malaria vectors, An. darlingi and An. albitarsis s.l. (likely An. marajoara, were the most abundant species collected in the study area. Consequently, prevention and control measures should be taken to prevent malaria outbreaks in the District of Coração.

  5. 3’-RACE Amplification of Aminopeptidase N Gene from Anopheles stephensi Applicable in Transmission Blocking Vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Bokharaei, Hanieh; Raz, Abbasali; Zakeri, Sedigheh; Djadid, Navid Dinparast

    2012-01-01

    Background Because of the lack of an effective and economical control strategy against malaria (the most devastating infectious disease in developing countries) Transmission-Blocking Vaccines (TBVs) concept has been raised in recent years, promising a more efficient way to malaria control. TBVs aim at interfering and/or blocking pathogen development within the vector, halting transmission to non-infected vertebrate host. Aminopeptidase N (APN) is one of the most potent proteins in parasite de...

  6. Diversity and transmission competence in lymphatic filariasis vectors in West Africa, and the implications for accelerated elimination of Anopheles-transmitted filariasis

    OpenAIRE

    de Souza Dziedzom K; Koudou Benjamin; Kelly-Hope Louise A; Wilson Michael D; Bockarie Moses J; Boakye Daniel A

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Lymphatic Filariasis (LF) is targeted for elimination by the Global Programme for the Elimination of Lymphatic Filariasis (GPELF). The strategy adopted is based on the density dependent phenomenon of Facilitation, which hypothesizes that in an area where the vector species transmitting Wuchereria bancrofti are Anopheles mosquitoes, it is feasible to eliminate LF using Mass Drug Administration (MDA) because of the inability of Anopheles species to transmit low-density microfilaraemia....

  7. Reduction of Malaria Transmission to Anopheles Mosquitoes with a Six-Dose Regimen of Co-Artemether.

    OpenAIRE

    Sutherland, Colin J.; Rosalynn Ord; Sam Dunyo; Musa Jawara; Drakeley, Christopher J; Neal Alexander; Rosalind Coleman; Margaret Pinder; Gijs Walraven; Targett, Geoffrey A. T

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Resistance of malaria parasites to chloroquine (CQ) and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) is increasing in prevalence in Africa. Combination therapy can both improve treatment and provide important public health benefits if it curbs the spread of parasites harbouring resistance genes. Thus, drug combinations must be identified which minimise gametocyte emergence in treated cases, and so prevent selective transmission of parasites resistant to any of the partner drugs. METHODS AND FI...

  8. Variação da densidade anofélica com o uso de mosquiteiros impregnados com deltametrina em uma área endêmica de malária na Amazônia Brasileira Variation of anopheles density with deltamethrin-impregnated mosquito nets in an endemic malaria area of the Brazilian Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Barberino Santos

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available Em 1992, foi realizado um ensaio de campo com mosquiteiros impregnados com deltametrina, em uma área endêmica de malária no Município de Costa Marques, Rondônia. No período de baixa transmissão, os mosquiteiros impregnados (MI diminuíram a densidade vetorial no intradomicílio, de modo semelhante, porém, aos mosquiteiros não impregnados (NI na maioria das avaliações-controle. Por outro lado, na época de alta transmissão, os MI provocaram diminuição significante da média horária de anofelinos capturados, ao passo que, nas casas com NI, verificou-se aumento do número de mosquitos capturados. No peridomicílio, em geral, não houve diferença do número de anofelinos capturados entre MI e NI. No grupo MI, a espécie mais capturada foi o An. darlingi (63,2%, mais freqüente no peridomicílio, seguida pelo An. deaneorum (35,3%, mais freqüente no intradomicílio. Os MI diminuíram a densidade vetorial no intradomicílio pelo efeito excito-repelente, sem diminuí-la, contudo, no peridomicílio.In 1992 a survey on the use of deltamethrin-impregnated mosquito nets was conducted in the municipality of Costa Marques, Rondonia. In the intradomicile, impregnated nets decreased the vector density at rates similar to those for non-impregnated nets during low-transmission periods; during high anopheline density periods, they led to a significant reduction in vector density, while in the non-impregnated net group there was an increase in the number of anophelines captured. There was no change in vector density in the peridomicile. In the impregnated net group, the most frequently captured species was Anopheles darlingi (63.2%, found mostly in the peridomicile, while Anopheles deaneorum (35.3% was most frequent indoors. The impregnated mosquito nets' excitatory-repellent effect decreased the intradomiciliary vector density but did not alter density in the peridomicile.

  9. Diversity and transmission competence in lymphatic filariasis vectors in West Africa, and the implications for accelerated elimination of Anopheles-transmitted filariasis

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    de Souza Dziedzom K

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lymphatic Filariasis (LF is targeted for elimination by the Global Programme for the Elimination of Lymphatic Filariasis (GPELF. The strategy adopted is based on the density dependent phenomenon of Facilitation, which hypothesizes that in an area where the vector species transmitting Wuchereria bancrofti are Anopheles mosquitoes, it is feasible to eliminate LF using Mass Drug Administration (MDA because of the inability of Anopheles species to transmit low-density microfilaraemia. Even though earlier studies have shown Anopheles species can exhibit the process of Facilitation in West Africa, observations point towards the process of Limitation in certain areas, in which case vector control is recommended. Studies on Anopheles species in West Africa have also shown genetic differentiation, cryptic taxa and speciation, insecticide resistance and the existence of molecular and chromosomal forms, all of which could influence the vectorial capacity of the mosquitoes and ultimately the elimination goal. This paper outlines the uniqueness of LF vectors in West Africa and the challenges it poses to the 2020 elimination goal, based on the current MDA strategies.

  10. Change in composition of the Anopheles gambiae complex and its possible implications for the transmission of malaria and lymphatic filariasis in north-eastern Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Derua, Yahya A; Alifrangis, Michael; Hosea, Kenneth M;

    2012-01-01

    . Both fresh and archived dried specimens were identified to sibling species of the An. gambiae s.l. complex by PCR. The same specimens were moreover examined for Plasmodium falciparum and Wuchereria bancrofti infection by PCR. RESULTS: As in earlier studies, An. gambiae s.s., Anopheles merus...... the most rare to the most common. P. falciparum infection was rarely detected in the examined specimens (and only in An. arabiensis) whereas W. bancrofti infection was prevalent and detected in all three sibling species. CONCLUSION: The study indicates that a major shift in An. gambiae s.l. sibling species...

  11. Change in composition of the Anopheles gambiae complex and its possible implications for the transmission of malaria and lymphatic filariasis in north-eastern Tanzania

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    Derua Yahya A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A dramatic decline in the incidence of malaria due to Plasmodium falciparum infection in coastal East Africa has recently been reported to be paralleled (or even preceded by an equally dramatic decline in malaria vector density, despite absence of organized vector control. As part of investigations into possible causes for the change in vector population density, the present study analysed the Anopheles gambiae s.l. sibling species composition in north-eastern Tanzania. Methods The study was in two parts. The first compared current species complex composition in freshly caught An. gambiae s.l. complex from three villages to the composition reported from previous studies carried out 2–4 decades ago in the same villages. The second took advantage of a sample of archived dried An. gambiae s.l. complex specimens collected regularly from a fourth study village since 2005. Both fresh and archived dried specimens were identified to sibling species of the An. gambiae s.l. complex by PCR. The same specimens were moreover examined for Plasmodium falciparum and Wuchereria bancrofti infection by PCR. Results As in earlier studies, An. gambiae s.s., Anopheles merus and Anopheles arabiensis were identified as sibling species found in the area. However, both study parts indicated a marked change in sibling species composition over time. From being by far the most abundant in the past An. gambiae s.s. was now the most rare, whereas An. arabiensis had changed from being the most rare to the most common. P. falciparum infection was rarely detected in the examined specimens (and only in An. arabiensis whereas W. bancrofti infection was prevalent and detected in all three sibling species. Conclusion The study indicates that a major shift in An. gambiae s.l. sibling species composition has taken place in the study area in recent years. Combined with the earlier reported decline in overall malaria vector density, the study suggests that this

  12. Taxonomy Icon Data: Anopheles stephensi [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Anopheles stephensi Anopheles stephensi Arthropoda Anopheles_stephensi_L.png Anopheles_stephen...si_NL.png Anopheles_stephensi_S.png Anopheles_stephensi_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_i...con/icon.cgi?i=Anopheles+stephensi&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Anopheles+stephensi&...t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Anopheles+stephensi&t=S htt...p://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Anopheles+stephensi&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=149 ...

  13. The reproductive biology of the Mashona mole - rat (\\kur{Fukomys darlingi}) from southern Malawi.

    OpenAIRE

    JERKOVIČOVÁ, Diana

    2010-01-01

    The population of the social Mashona mole - rat (Fukomys darlingi) from southern Malawi differs from the population from Zimbabwe in many aspects of its biology. In this study I have found remarkable differences also in the reproductive biology of these two populations. The most signifiant distinctions are double lenght of gestation and litters with more and larger pups in Malawian population. The analysis of reproductive and ecological parameters in bathyergids did not showed obvious differe...

  14. Distribution of Anopheles in Vietnam, with particular attention to malaria vectors of the Anopheles minimus complex

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    Van Bortel Wim

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The distribution of anopheline mosquitoes in Vietnam was examined, with a particular interest for the two sibling species of the Anopheles minimus complex (Cellia: Myzomyia, An. minimus and Anopheles harrisoni, respectively former species A and C. Because the morphological identification of both sibling species is difficult and may lead to misidentifications, accurate data on their respective distribution are missing. This is of fundamental importance since the two species seem to exhibit differential vectorial capacities for malaria transmission. Methods Large entomological surveys based on cattle collections and molecular identifications of An. minimus s.l. were carried out in 23 sites throughout northern, central and south-eastern regions of Vietnam. Results Based on previous molecular works and our data, the distribution of anopheline species and the relative densities of An. minimus and An. harrisoni were mapped. It is noteworthy that there was a high specific biodiversity at each study site. Anopheles minimus s.l. and Anopheles sinensis were the main anopheline species in the northern region, whereas Anopheles aconitus and Anopheles vagus were the most frequent ones in the central region. The southern limit of An. harrisoni was increased to the latitude of 11°N. Sympatry between both sibling species has been extended to new provinces. Conclusion Malaria transmission is still high in central Vietnam and along bordering countries. Therefore, it is important to know and map the precise distribution of the main and secondary malaria vectors in Vietnam for applying efficient vector control programmes. Moreover, these maps should be regularly updated and linked to environmental characteristics relative to disease epidemiology, and environmental and climatic changes occurring in southeast Asia.

  15. The role of reactive oxygen species on Plasmodium melanotic encapsulation in Anopheles gambiae

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Christophides, George K.; Cantera, Rafael; Charles, Bradley; Han, Yeon Soo; Meister, Stephan; Dimopoulos, George; Kafatos, Fotis C.; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2003-01-01

    Malaria transmission depends on the competence of some Anopheles mosquitoes to sustain Plasmodium development (susceptibility). A genetically selected refractory strain of Anopheles gambiae blocks Plasmodium development, melanizing, and encapsulating the parasite in a reaction that begins with tyrosine oxidation, and involves three quantitative trait loci. Morphological and microarray mRNA expression analysis suggest that the refractory and susceptible strains have broad physiological differe...

  16. Modern immunological approaches to assess malaria transmission and immunity and to diagnose plasmodial infection

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    C. T. Daniel-Ribeiro

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper reviews our recent data concerning the use of immunological methods employing monoclonal antibodies and synthetic peptides to study malaria transmission and immunity and to diagnose plasmodial infection. As concerns malaria transmission, we studied the main vectors of human malaria and the plasmodial species transmitted in endemic areas of Rondônia state, Brazil. The natural infection on anopheline was evaluated by immunoradiometric assay (IRMA using monoclonal antibodies to an immunodominant sporozoite surface antigen (CS protein demonstrated to be species specific. Our results showed that among six species of Anopheles found infected, An. darlingi was the main vector transmitting Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax malaria in the immediate vicinity of houses. In order to assess the level of anti-CS antibodies we studied, by IRMA using the synthetic peptide corresponding to the repetitive epitope of the sporozoite CS protein, sera of individuals living in the same areas where the entomological survey has been performed. In this assay the prevalence of anti-CS antibodies was very low and did not reflect the malaria transmission rate in the studied areas. In relation to malaria diagnosis, a monoclonal antibody specific to an epitope of a 50 kDa exoantigen, the major component of supernatant collected at the time of schizont rupture, was used as a probe for the detection of P. falciparum antigens. This assay seemed to be more sensitive than parasitological examination for malaria diagnosis since it was able to detect plasmodial antigens in both symptomatic and asymtomatic individuals with negative thick blood smear at different intervals after a last parasitologically confirmed confirmed attack of malaria.

  17. Biología de Anopheles (Kerteszia neivai H., D. & K., 1913 (Diptera: Culicidae en la Costa Pacifica de Colombia: IV - Estructura etárea y transmisión de malaria Biologia do Anopheles (Kerteszia neivai H., D. & K., 1913 (Diptera: Culicidae na Costa do Pacífico Colombiano: IV - Estrutura etária e transmissão da malária Biology of Anopheles (Kerteszia neivai H., D. & K., 1913 (Diptera: Culicidae on the Pacific Coast of Colombia: IV - Age structure and malaria transmission

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    César Murillo B.

    1989-10-01

    Full Text Available Con el fin de determinar la dinamica de transmisión de malaria en el poblado de Charambirá (Chocó, Colombia, se estudió la estructura etárea de Anopheles neivai (reconocido vector en la Costa Pacífica con base en su estado gonadotrófico. Se recolectaron mosquitos intradomiciliarmente durante el crepúsculo vespertino con cebos humanos y aspiradores bucales. Los mosquitos recolectados se mantuvieron en cajas cilíndricas de cartón con papel humedecido y dispensadores alimenticios hasta su disección al día siguiente. De los 200 mosquitos disecados entre septiembre y octubre de 1986,68 (34% presentaban huellas de menos de tres oviposturas y los restantes (66% habían efectuado al menos tres oviposturas. La diferencia entre el primer grupo considerado como mosquitos "no infectivos" y el segundo considerado como los "potencialmente infectivos" fue altamente significativa (X² = 10,68; P = 0,001. El 1,5% de A. neivai estudiados presentaban huellas correspondientes a 10 oviposturas mostrando una marcada longevidad y múltiples alimentaciones sanguíneas. Los resultados sugieren que existe un alto riesgo de contraer malaria en Charambirá durante el crepúsculo vespertino.Com o intuito de determinar a dinâmica de transmissão da malária no povoado de Charambirá (Chocó, Colômbia, foi estudada a estrutura etária do mosquito Anopheles neivai (reconhecido vetor da Costa Pacífica com base em seu estado gonadotrófico. As coletas foram realizadas intradomiciliarmente no crepúsculo vespertino com isca humana e auxílio de tubos de sucção manual. Os mosquitos coletados foram mantidos em caixas cilíndricas de papelão, contendo papel umidecido e alimento. Dos 200 mosquitos dissecados entre setembro e outubro de 1986, 68 (34% apresentaram vestígios de menos de três oviposturas (oviposições e os demais (66% apresentavam, pelo menos, três ovipoturas. A diferença entre o primeiro grupo considerado como mosquitos "não infectantes" e o

  18. Comparative susceptibility to Plasmodium falciparum of the molecular forms M and S of Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles arabiensis

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    Boudin Christian

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The different taxa belonging to Anopheles gambiae complex display phenotypic differences that may impact their contribution to malaria transmission. More specifically, their susceptibility to infection, resulting from a co-evolution between parasite and vector, might be different. The aim of this study was to compare the susceptibility of M and S molecular forms of Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles arabiensis to infection by Plasmodium falciparum. Methods F3 progenies of Anopheles gambiae s.l. collected in Senegal were infected, using direct membrane feeding, with P. falciparum gametocyte-containing blood sampled on volunteer patients. The presence of oocysts was determined by light microscopy after 7 days, and the presence of sporozoite by ELISA after 14 days. Mosquito species and molecular forms were identified by PCR. Results The oocyst rate was significantly higher in the molecular S form (79.07% than in the M form (57.81%, Fisher's exact test p Anopheles arabiensis (55.38%, Fisher's exact test vs. S group p An. gambiae S form (1.72 ± 0.26 than in the An. gambiae M form (0.64 ± 0.04, p An. arabiensis group (0.58 ± 0.04, vs. S group, p Anopheles arabiensis 50.85%, Fisher's exact test vs. S group p Conclusion Infected in the same experimental conditions, the molecular form S of An. gambiae is more susceptible to infection by P. falciparum than the molecular form M of An. gambiae and An. arabiensis.

  19. Environmental factors associated with the malaria vectors Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles funestus in Kenya

    OpenAIRE

    Hemingway Janet; Kelly-Hope Louise A; McKenzie F Ellis

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles funestus mosquito species complexes are the primary vectors of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in sub-Saharan Africa. To better understand the environmental factors influencing these species, the abundance, distribution and transmission data from a south-eastern Kenyan study were retrospectively analysed, and the climate, vegetation and elevation data in key locations compared. Methods Thirty villages in Malindi, Kilifi and Kwale Districts...

  20. Distribuição das espécies do gênero Anopheles (Diptera, Culicidae no Estado do Maranhão, Brasil Distribution of species from genus Anopheles (Diptera, Culicidae in the State of Maranhão, Brazil

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    José M. Macário Rebêlo

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Estudou-se a distribuição e diversidade de espécies de Anopheles em 123 municípios do Estado do Maranhão, Brasil. O método básico foi a captura de fêmeas dentro e nos arredores das habitações humanas, em intervalos compreendidos entre 18h e 6h, no período de janeiro de 1992 a dezembro de 2001. Foram capturados 84.467 exemplares distribuídos em 24 espécies, com o predomínio de A. triannulatus sensu lato (20.788, A. darlingi (19.083, A. nuneztovari (16.884, A. albitarsis s.l. (14.352, A. aquasalis (8.202 e A. evansae (2.885. As outras 18 espécies juntas representaram apenas 2,7%. As espécies encontradas no maior número de municípios foram: A. albitarsis s.l. (109 municípios, A. triannulatus s.l. (106, A. nuneztovari (93, A. darlingi (87 e A. evansae (64. A riqueza e a ampla distribuição das espécies de anofelinos no Maranhão concordam com a posição geográfica do estado, entre as macrorregiões que caracterizam o Brasil, resultando em uma fauna mista, com elementos representativos dessas regiões.We studied the distribution and diversity of Anopheles species in 123 counties (municipalities in the State of Maranhão, Brazil. The basic method consisted of capturing female specimens inside and around human dwellings between 6 PM and 6 AM from January 1992 to December 2001. A total of 84,467 specimens belonging to 24 species were captured, with a predominance of A. triannulatus sensu lato (20,788, A. darlingi (19,083, A. nuneztovari (16,884, A. albitarsis s.l. (14,352, A. aquasalis (8.202, and A. evansae (2,885. The other 18 species together accounted for only 2.7% of the total. The species found in the most counties were A. albitarsis s.l. (109 counties, A. triannulatus s.l. (106, A. nuneztovari (93, A. darlingi (87, and A. evansae (64. The richness and wide distribution of anopheline species in Maranhão agree with the State's geographic position among Brazil's macro-regions, resulting in a mixed fauna with representative

  1. Studies of Anopheles gambiae s.l (Diptera: Culicidae exhibiting different vectorial capacities in lymphatic filariasis transmission in the Gomoa district, Ghana

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    Amuzu Hilaria

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two lymphatic filariasis endemic communities Mampong and Hwida in Ghana have been regularly monitored for impact on transmission after annual mass drug administration (MDA with albendazole and ivermectin. After six MDAs even though the ABR for Mampong was 55883/person/year and that of Hwida was 2494/person/year, they both had ATPs of 15.21 infective larvae/person/year. Interestingly the human microfilaraemia levels had reduced significantly from 14% to 0% at Mampong and 12% to 3% at Hwida. In an attempt to understand this anomaly, we collected mosquitoes over a 5-month period using human landing catches to determine the species composition, the number of cibarial teeth, the lengths and widths of the cibarium and the cibarial dome of the vector populations. Results Out of 2553 mosquitoes caught at Mampong, 42.6% were An. gambiae s.l. All 280 identified further by PCR were An. gambiae s.s (275 M and 5 S molecular forms. At Hwida, 112 mosquitoes were obtained; 67 (59.8% were An. gambiae s.l, comprised of 40 (59.7% An. melas, 24 (35.8% An. gambiae s.s (17 and 5 M and S molecular forms respectively and 3 (4.5% unidentified. The mean number of teeth for An. melas was 14.1 (median = 14, range = 12-15, An. gambiae s.s., 15.7 (median = 15, range = 13-19 M form 15.5 (median = 15 range = 13-19 and S form 16 (median = 16, range 15-17. The observed differences in teeth numbers were significantly different between An. melas and An. gambiae s.s (p = 0.004, and the M form (p = 0.032 and the S form (p = 0.002. Conclusions In this study, An. gambiae s.s was the main vector at Mampong and was found to possess significantly more cibarial teeth than An. melas, the principal vector at Hwida. We postulate that the different impact observed after 6 MDAs may be due to An. gambiae s.s exhibiting 'facilitation' at Mampong and at Hwida An. melas the main vector exhibits 'limitation'. Thus it may be necessary to compliment MDA with vector control to

  2. Prevalence of antibodies to Trypanosoma cruzi, Toxoplasma gondii, Encephalitozonn cuniculi, Sarcocystis neurona, Besnoitia darlingi, and Neospora caninum in North American opossum, Didelphis virginiana, from Southern Louisian

    Science.gov (United States)

    We examined the prevalence of antibodies to zoonotic protozoan parasites (Trypanosoma cruzi, Toxoplasma gondii, and Encephalitozoon cuniculi) and protozoan’s of veterinary importance (Neospora caninum, Sarcocystis neurona and Besnoitia darlingi) in a population of North American opossums (Didelphis...

  3. In depth annotation of the Anopheles gambiae mosquito midgut transcriptome

    OpenAIRE

    Padrón, Alejandro; Molina-Cruz, Alvaro; Quinones, Mariam; Ribeiro, José MC; Ramphul, Urvashi; Rodrigues, Janneth; Shen, Kui; Haile, Ashley; Ramirez, José Luis; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2014-01-01

    Background Genome sequencing of Anopheles gambiae was completed more than ten years ago and has accelerated research on malaria transmission. However, annotation needs to be refined and verified experimentally, as most predicted transcripts have been identified by comparative analysis with genomes from other species. The mosquito midgut—the first organ to interact with Plasmodium parasites—mounts effective antiplasmodial responses that limit parasite survival and disease transmission. High-th...

  4. Serological response of cats to experimental Besnoitia darlingi and Besnoitia neotomofelis infections and prevalence of antibodies to these parasites in cats from Virginia and Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houk, Alice E; Rosypal, Alexa C; Grant, David C; Dubey, J P; Zajac, Anne M; Yabsley, Michael J; Lindsay, David S

    2011-04-01

    Besnoitia darlingi and Besnoitia neotomofelis are cyst-forming tissue apicomplexan parasites that use domestic cats (Felis domesticus) as definitive hosts and opossums (Didelphis virginiana ) and Southern Plains woodrats (Neotoma micropus) as intermediate hosts, respectively. Nothing is known about the prevalence of B. darlingi or B. neotomofelis in cats from the United States. Besnoitia darlingi infections have been reported in naturally infected opossums from many states in the United States, and B. neotomofelis infections have been reported from Southern Plains woodrats from Texas, but naturally infected cats have not been identified. The present study examined the IgG antibody response of cats to experimental infection (B. darlingi n  =  1 cat; B. neotomofelis n  =  3 cats). Samples from these cats were used to develop an indirect immunofluorescent antibody test (IFAT), which was then used to examine seroprevalence of IgG antibodies to tachyzoites of B. darlingi and B. neotomofelis in a population of domestic cats from Virginia (N  =  232 cats) and Pennsylvania (N  =  209). The serum from cats inoculated with B. darlingi or B. neotomofelis cross-reacted with each other's tachyzoites. The titers to heterologous tachyzoites were 1 to 3 dilutions lower than to homologous tachyzoites. Sera from B. darlingi- or B. neotomofelis-infected cats did not react with tachyzoites of Toxoplasma gondii or Neospora caninum or merozoites of Sarcocystis neurona using the IFAT. Antibodies to B. darlingi were found in 14% and 2% of cats from Virginia and Pennsylvania, respectively. Antibodies to B. neotomofelis were found in 5% and 4% of cats from Virginia and Pennsylvania, respectively. Nine cats from Virginia and 1 cat from Pennsylvania were positive for both. PMID:21506782

  5. Comparative evaluation of systemic drugs for their effects against Anopheles gambiae

    OpenAIRE

    Butters, Matthew P.; Kobylinski, Kevin C.; Deus, Kelsey M.; da Silva, Ines Marques; GRAY, MEG; sylla, massamba; Foy, Brian D.

    2011-01-01

    Laboratory and field studies have shown that ivermectin, a drug that targets invertebrate ligand-gated ion channels (LGICs), is potently active against Anopheles spp. mosquitoes at concentrations present in human blood after standard drug administrations; thus ivermectin holds promise as a mass human-administered endectocide that could help suppress malaria parasite transmission. We evaluated other systemic LGIC-targeting drugs for their activities against the African malaria vector Anopheles...

  6. Environmental factors associated with the malaria vectors Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles funestus in Kenya

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    Hemingway Janet

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles funestus mosquito species complexes are the primary vectors of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in sub-Saharan Africa. To better understand the environmental factors influencing these species, the abundance, distribution and transmission data from a south-eastern Kenyan study were retrospectively analysed, and the climate, vegetation and elevation data in key locations compared. Methods Thirty villages in Malindi, Kilifi and Kwale Districts with data on An. gambiae sensu strict, Anopheles arabiensis and An. funestus entomological inoculation rates (EIRs, were used as focal points for spatial and environmental analyses. Transmission patterns were examined for spatial autocorrelation using the Moran's I statistic, and for the clustering of high or low EIR values using the Getis-Ord Gi* statistic. Environmental data were derived from remote-sensed satellite sources of precipitation, temperature, specific humidity, Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI, and elevation. The relationship between transmission and environmental measures was examined using bivariate correlations, and by comparing environmental means between locations of high and low clustering using the Mann-Whitney U test. Results Spatial analyses indicated positive autocorrelation of An. arabiensis and An. funestus transmission, but not of An. gambiae s.s., which was found to be widespread across the study region. The spatial clustering of high EIR values for An. arabiensis was confined to the lowland areas of Malindi, and for An. funestus to the southern districts of Kilifi and Kwale. Overall, An. gambiae s.s. and An. arabiensis had similar spatial and environmental trends, with higher transmission associated with higher precipitation, but lower temperature, humidity and NDVI measures than those locations with lower transmission by these species and/or in locations where transmission by An. funestus was high. Statistical

  7. Identification and Characterization of Two Novel RNA Viruses from Anopheles gambiae Species Complex Mosquitoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carissimo, Guillaume; Eiglmeier, Karin; Reveillaud, Julie; Holm, Inge; Diallo, Mawlouth; Diallo, Diawo; Vantaux, Amélie; Kim, Saorin; Ménard, Didier; Siv, Sovannaroth; Belda, Eugeni; Bischoff, Emmanuel; Antoniewski, Christophe; Vernick, Kenneth D.

    2016-01-01

    Mosquitoes of the Anopheles gambiae complex display strong preference for human bloodmeals and are major malaria vectors in Africa. However, their interaction with viruses or role in arbovirus transmission during epidemics has been little examined, with the exception of O’nyong-nyong virus, closely related to Chikungunya virus. Deep-sequencing has revealed different RNA viruses in natural insect viromes, but none have been previously described in the Anopheles gambiae species complex. Here, we describe two novel insect RNA viruses, a Dicistrovirus and a Cypovirus, found in laboratory colonies of An. gambiae taxa using small-RNA deep sequencing. Sequence analysis was done with Metavisitor, an open-source bioinformatic pipeline for virus discovery and de novo genome assembly. Wild-collected Anopheles from Senegal and Cambodia were positive for the Dicistrovirus and Cypovirus, displaying high sequence identity to the laboratory-derived virus. Thus, the Dicistrovirus (Anopheles C virus, AnCV) and Cypovirus (Anopheles Cypovirus, AnCPV) are components of the natural virome of at least some anopheline species. Their possible influence on mosquito immunity or transmission of other pathogens is unknown. These natural viruses could be developed as models for the study of Anopheles-RNA virus interactions in low security laboratory settings, in an analogous manner to the use of rodent malaria parasites for studies of mosquito anti-parasite immunity. PMID:27138938

  8. Gene Expression-Based Biomarkers for Anopheles gambiae Age Grading

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Mei-Hui; Marinotti, Osvaldo; Zhong, Daibin; JAMES, ANTHONY A.; Walker, Edward; Guda, Tom; Kweka, Eliningaya J.; Githure, John; Yan, Guiyun

    2013-01-01

    Information on population age structure of mosquitoes under natural conditions is fundamental to the understanding of vectorial capacity and crucial for assessing the impact of vector control measures on malaria transmission. Transcriptional profiling has been proposed as a method for predicting mosquito age for Aedes and Anopheles mosquitoes, however, whether this new method is adequate for natural conditions is unknown. This study tests the applicability of transcriptional profiling for age...

  9. Bacterial Diversity Associated with Wild Caught Anopheles Mosquitoes from Dak Nong Province, Vietnam Using Culture and DNA Fingerprint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Chung Thuy; Aujoulat, Fabien; Veas, Francisco; Jumas-Bilak, Estelle; Manguin, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Background Microbiota of Anopheles midgut can modulate vector immunity and block Plasmodium development. Investigation on the bacterial biodiversity in Anopheles, and specifically on the identification of bacteria that might be used in malaria transmission blocking approaches, has been mainly conducted on malaria vectors of Africa. Vietnam is an endemic country for both malaria and Bancroftian filariasis whose parasitic agents can be transmitted by the same Anopheles species. No information on the microbiota of Anopheles mosquitoes in Vietnam was available previous to this study. Method The culture dependent approach, using different mediums, and culture independent (16S rRNA PCR – TTGE) method were used to investigate the bacterial biodiversity in the abdomen of 5 Anopheles species collected from Dak Nong Province, central-south Vietnam. Molecular methods, sequencing and phylogenetic analysis were used to characterize the microbiota. Results and Discussion The microbiota in wild-caught Anopheles was diverse with the presence of 47 bacterial OTUs belonging to 30 genera, including bacterial genera impacting Plasmodium development. The bacteria were affiliated with 4 phyla, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria, the latter being the dominant phylum. Four bacterial genera are newly described in Anopheles mosquitoes including Coxiella, Yersinia, Xanthomonas, and Knoellia. The bacterial diversity per specimen was low ranging from 1 to 4. The results show the importance of pairing culture and fingerprint methods to better screen the bacterial community in Anopheles mosquitoes. Conclusion Sampled Anopheles species from central-south Vietnam contained a diverse bacterial microbiota that needs to be investigated further in order to develop new malaria control approaches. The combination of both culture and DNA fingerprint methods allowed a thorough and complementary screening of the bacterial community in Anopheles mosquitoes. PMID:25747513

  10. Bacterial diversity associated with wild caught Anopheles mosquitoes from Dak Nong Province, Vietnam using culture and DNA fingerprint.

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    Chung Thuy Ngo

    Full Text Available Microbiota of Anopheles midgut can modulate vector immunity and block Plasmodium development. Investigation on the bacterial biodiversity in Anopheles, and specifically on the identification of bacteria that might be used in malaria transmission blocking approaches, has been mainly conducted on malaria vectors of Africa. Vietnam is an endemic country for both malaria and Bancroftian filariasis whose parasitic agents can be transmitted by the same Anopheles species. No information on the microbiota of Anopheles mosquitoes in Vietnam was available previous to this study.The culture dependent approach, using different mediums, and culture independent (16S rRNA PCR - TTGE method were used to investigate the bacterial biodiversity in the abdomen of 5 Anopheles species collected from Dak Nong Province, central-south Vietnam. Molecular methods, sequencing and phylogenetic analysis were used to characterize the microbiota.The microbiota in wild-caught Anopheles was diverse with the presence of 47 bacterial OTUs belonging to 30 genera, including bacterial genera impacting Plasmodium development. The bacteria were affiliated with 4 phyla, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria, the latter being the dominant phylum. Four bacterial genera are newly described in Anopheles mosquitoes including Coxiella, Yersinia, Xanthomonas, and Knoellia. The bacterial diversity per specimen was low ranging from 1 to 4. The results show the importance of pairing culture and fingerprint methods to better screen the bacterial community in Anopheles mosquitoes.Sampled Anopheles species from central-south Vietnam contained a diverse bacterial microbiota that needs to be investigated further in order to develop new malaria control approaches. The combination of both culture and DNA fingerprint methods allowed a thorough and complementary screening of the bacterial community in Anopheles mosquitoes.

  11. Serological response of cats to experimental Besnoitia darlingi and Besnoitia neotomofelis infections and prevalence of antibodies to these parasites in cats from Virginia and Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besnoitia darlingi and B. neotomofelis are tissue cyst-forming apicomplexan parasite that use domestic cats (Felis domesticus) as definitive hosts and opossums (Didelphis virginiana) and southern planes woodrats (Neotoma micropus) as intermediate hosts, respectively. Nothing is known about the preva...

  12. Identification of four evolutionarily related G protein-coupled receptors from the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belmont, Martin; Cazzamali, Giuseppe; Williamson, Michael;

    2006-01-01

    The mosquito Anopheles gambiae is an important vector for malaria, which is one of the most serious human parasitic diseases in the world, causing up to 2.7 million deaths yearly. To contribute to our understanding of A. gambiae and to the transmission of malaria, we have now cloned four...

  13. The resting sites and blood-meal sources of Anopheles minimus in Taiwan

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    Chen Yung-Chen

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The WHO declared Taiwan free from malaria in 1965, but in 2003 the reporting of two introduced cases in a rural area suggested a possible local transmission of this disease. Therefore, understanding the resting sites and the blood sources of Anopheles minimus is crucial in order to provide information for implementing vector control strategies. Methods During a two-year survey, mosquitoes were collected in houses and their surrounding areas and at the bank of larval habitats by backpack aspirators in 17 villages in rural areas of southern and eastern Taiwan for 1 hr. On the same day, blacklight traps were hung downward overnight. Blood-fed mosquito samples were analysed by PCR. Results Of the 195 total households surveyed by backpack aspirators, no Anopheles adults were collected inside the houses, while a single Anopheles minimus and a single Anopheles maculatus were collected outside of the houses. On the same day, 23 An. minimus, two An. maculatus, two Anopheles ludlowae, two Anopheles sinensis, and one Anopheles tessellatus were collected along the bank of larval habitats. In blacklight traps hung outside of the houses in the villages, 69 An. minimus, 62 An. ludlowae, 31 An. sinensis, and 19 An. maculatus were collected. In larval habitats, 98 An. ludlowae, 64 An. minimus, 49 An. sinensis, and 14 An. maculatus were collected. Of a total of 10 blood-fed samples, An. minimus fed on four animals including bovine (60%, dogs (20%, pig (10%, and non-chicken avian (10%. Conclusion Anopheles minimus, an opportunist feeder in Taiwan, was not collected inside the houses, but was found outside of the houses in villages and surrounding larval habitats. Therefore, an outdoor transmission of malaria is likely to occur and, thus, the bed nets, which are favoured for controlling the late biting of An. minimus, should be a very efficient and effective method for those local residents who sleep outdoors. Additionally, space spray of

  14. Factors affecting the vectorial competence of Anopheles gambiae: a question of scale

    OpenAIRE

    Takken, W; Lindsay, S. W.

    2003-01-01

    Malaria transmission in Africa is without doubt governed by the existence of a group of highly efficient vectors, of which Anopheles gambiae Giles sensu stricto is predominant. The endophilic and anthropophagic behaviours of this mosquito create an intimate association between the human reservoir and insect vectors of malaria. In this paper several mosquito-related and environmental factors that modulate the transmission intensity of malaria in Africa are discussed, in order to illustrate the...

  15. Biology & control of Anopheles culicifacies Giles 1901.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, V P; Dev, V

    2015-05-01

    Malaria epidemiology is complex due to multiplicity of disease vectors, sibling species complex and variations in bionomical characteristics, vast varied terrain, various ecological determinants. There are six major mosquito vector taxa in India, viz. Anopheles culicifacies, An. fluviatilis, An. stephensi, An. minimus, An. dirus and An. sundaicus. Among these, An. culicifacies is widely distributed and considered the most important vector throughout the plains and forests of India for generating bulk of malaria cases (>60% annually). Major malaria epidemics are caused by An. culicifaices. It is also the vector of tribal malaria except parts of Odisha and Northeastern States of India. An. culicifacies has been the cause of perennial malaria transmission in forests, and over the years penetrated the deforested areas of Northeast. An. culicifacies participates in malaria transmission either alone or along with An. stephensi or An. fluviatilis. The National Vector Borne Disease Control Programme (NVBDCP) spends about 80 per cent malaria control budget annually in the control of An. culicifacies, yet it remains one of the most formidable challenges in India. With recent advances in molecular biology there has been a significant added knowledge in understanding the biology, ecology, genetics and response to interventions, requiring stratification for cost-effective and sustainable malaria control. Research leading to newer interventions that are evidence-based, community oriented and sustainable would be useful in tackling the emerging challenges in malaria control. Current priority areas of research should include in-depth vector biology and control in problem pockets, preparation of malaria-risk maps for focused and selective interventions, monitoring insecticide resistance, cross-border initiative and data sharing, and coordinated control efforts for achieving transmission reduction, and control of drug-resistant malaria. The present review on An. culicifacies

  16. Multimodal pyrethroid resistance in malaria vectors, Anopheles gambiae s.s., Anopheles arabiensis, and Anopheles funestus s.s. in western Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawada, Hitoshi; Dida, Gabriel O; Ohashi, Kazunori; Komagata, Osamu; Kasai, Shinji; Tomita, Takashi; Sonye, George; Maekawa, Yoshihide; Mwatele, Cassian; Njenga, Sammy M; Mwandawiro, Charles; Minakawa, Noboru; Takagi, Masahiro

    2011-01-01

    Anopheles gambiae s.s., Anopheles arabiensis, and Anopheles funestus s.s. are the most important species for malaria transmission. Pyrethroid resistance of these vector mosquitoes is one of the main obstacles against effective vector control. The objective of the present study was to monitor the pyrethroid susceptibility in the 3 major malaria vectors in a highly malaria endemic area in western Kenya and to elucidate the mechanisms of pyrethroid resistance in these species. Gembe East and West, Mbita Division, and 4 main western islands in the Suba district of the Nyanza province in western Kenya were used as the study area. Larval and adult collection and bioassay were conducted, as well as the detection of point mutation in the voltage-gated sodium channel (1014L) by using direct DNA sequencing. A high level of pyrethroid resistance caused by the high frequency of point mutations (L1014S) was detected in An. gambiae s.s. In contrast, P450-related pyrethroid resistance seemed to be widespread in both An. arabiensis and An. funestus s.s. Not a single L1014S mutation was detected in these 2 species. A lack of cross-resistance between DDT and permethrin was also found in An. arabiensis and An. funestus s.s., while An. gambiae s.s. was resistant to both insecticides. It is noteworthy that the above species in the same area are found to be resistant to pyrethroids by their unique resistance mechanisms. Furthermore, it is interesting that 2 different resistance mechanisms have developed in the 2 sibling species in the same area individually. The cross resistance between permethrin and DDT in An. gambiae s.s. may be attributed to the high frequency of kdr mutation, which might be selected by the frequent exposure to ITNs. Similarly, the metabolic pyrethroid resistance in An. arabiensis and An. funestus s.s. is thought to develop without strong selection by DDT. PMID:21853038

  17. The cytochrome P450 CYP6P4 is responsible for the high pyrethroid resistance in knockdown resistance-free Anopheles arabiensis

    OpenAIRE

    Sulaiman S Ibrahim; Riveron, Jacob M.; Stott, Robert; Irving, Helen; Wondji, Charles S.

    2016-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides are the front line vector control tools used in bed nets to reduce malaria transmission and its burden. However, resistance in major vectors such as Anopheles arabiensis is posing a serious challenge to the success of malaria control. Herein, we elucidated the molecular and biochemical basis of pyrethroid resistance in a knockdown resistance-free Anopheles arabiensis population from Chad, Central Africa. Using heterologous expression of P450s in Escherichia coli couple...

  18. MALARIA VECTORS IN SAN JOSÉDEL GUAVIARE, ORINOQUIA, COLOMBIA

    OpenAIRE

    JIMÉNEZ, IRENE P.; Jan E Conn; Brochero, Helena

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine Anopheles species composition and their natural infectivity by human Plasmodium in 2 localities with the highest malaria transmission in San Jose del Guaviare, Guaviare, Colombia. A total of 1,009 Anopheles mosquitoes were collected using human landing catches during 8 months in 2010. Anopheles darlingi was the most abundant (83.2%) followed by An. albitarsis s.l. (8.6%), Anopheles braziliensis (3.8%), An. oswaldoi s.l. (1%), and An. rangeli (0.3%). Anoph...

  19. Evaluation of Insecticides Susceptibility and Malaria Vector Potential of Anopheles annularis s.l. and Anopheles vagus in Assam, India.

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    Sunil Dhiman

    Full Text Available During the recent past, development of DDT resistance and reduction to pyrethroid susceptibility among the malaria vectors has posed a serious challenge in many Southeast Asian countries including India. Current study presents the insecticide susceptibility and knock-down data of field collected Anopheles annularis sensu lato and An. vagus mosquito species from endemic areas of Assam in northeast India. Anopheles annularis s.l. and An. vagus adult females were collected from four randomly selected sentinel sites in Orang primary health centre (OPHC and Balipara primary health centre (BPHC areas, and used for testing susceptibility to DDT, malathion, deltamethrin and lambda-cyhalothrin. After insecticide susceptibility tests, mosquitoes were subjected to VectorTest™ assay kits to detect the presence of malaria sporozoite in the mosquitoes. An. annularis s.l. was completely susceptible to deltamethrin, lambda-cyhalothrin and malathion in both the study areas. An. vagus was highly susceptible to deltamethrin in both the areas, but exhibited reduced susceptibility to lambda-cyhalothrin in BPHC. Both the species were resistant to DDT and showed very high KDT50 and KDT99 values for DDT. Probit model used to calculate the KDT50 and KDT99 values did not display normal distribution of percent knock-down with time for malathion in both the mosquito species in OPHC (p<0.05 and An. vagus in BPHC (χ2 = 25.3; p = 0.0, and also for deltamethrin to An. vagus in BPHC area (χ2 = 15.4; p = 0.004. Minimum infection rate (MIR of Plasmodium sporozoite for An. vagus was 0.56 in OPHC and 0.13 in BPHC, while for An. annularis MIR was found to be 0.22 in OPHC. Resistance management strategies should be identified to delay the expansion of resistance. Testing of field caught Anopheles vectors from different endemic areas for the presence of malaria sporozoite may be useful to ensure their role in malaria transmission.

  20. Evaluation of Insecticides Susceptibility and Malaria Vector Potential of Anopheles annularis s.l. and Anopheles vagus in Assam, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhiman, Sunil; Yadav, Kavita; Rabha, Bipul; Goswami, Diganta; Hazarika, S.; Tyagi, Varun

    2016-01-01

    During the recent past, development of DDT resistance and reduction to pyrethroid susceptibility among the malaria vectors has posed a serious challenge in many Southeast Asian countries including India. Current study presents the insecticide susceptibility and knock-down data of field collected Anopheles annularis sensu lato and An. vagus mosquito species from endemic areas of Assam in northeast India. Anopheles annularis s.l. and An. vagus adult females were collected from four randomly selected sentinel sites in Orang primary health centre (OPHC) and Balipara primary health centre (BPHC) areas, and used for testing susceptibility to DDT, malathion, deltamethrin and lambda-cyhalothrin. After insecticide susceptibility tests, mosquitoes were subjected to VectorTest™ assay kits to detect the presence of malaria sporozoite in the mosquitoes. An. annularis s.l. was completely susceptible to deltamethrin, lambda-cyhalothrin and malathion in both the study areas. An. vagus was highly susceptible to deltamethrin in both the areas, but exhibited reduced susceptibility to lambda-cyhalothrin in BPHC. Both the species were resistant to DDT and showed very high KDT50 and KDT99 values for DDT. Probit model used to calculate the KDT50 and KDT99 values did not display normal distribution of percent knock-down with time for malathion in both the mosquito species in OPHC (pp = 0.0), and also for deltamethrin to An. vagus in BPHC area (χ2 = 15.4; p = 0.004). Minimum infection rate (MIR) of Plasmodium sporozoite for An. vagus was 0.56 in OPHC and 0.13 in BPHC, while for An. annularis MIR was found to be 0.22 in OPHC. Resistance management strategies should be identified to delay the expansion of resistance. Testing of field caught Anopheles vectors from different endemic areas for the presence of malaria sporozoite may be useful to ensure their role in malaria transmission. PMID:27010649

  1. Espécies de Anopheles no município de Pinheiro (Maranhão, área endêmica de malária Species of Anopheles in Pinheiro municipality (Maranhão, endemic area of malaria

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    Yrla Nívea Oliveira-Pereira

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available A riqueza, abundância relativa, flutuação sazonal, preferência por ambiente (peri e intradomicílio e horários de hematofagismo de espécies de Anopheles foram estudados no município de Pinheiro, Maranhão. As fêmeas foram capturadas mensalmente sobre iscas humanas de maio/1998 a abril/1999, das 18 às 6 horas. Foram coletados 1.321 espécimens pertencentes a 10 espécies de Anopheles, todas do subgênero Nyssorhynchus: A. argyritarsis com 62%, A. darlingi (21,7%, A. albitarsis (4,5%, A. galvaoi (4%, A. triannulatus (3,1% e A. evansae (2,8%. As espécies A. nuneztovari, A. braziliensis, A. rondoni e A. strodei representaram juntas 1,9%. Os anofelinos ocorreram o ano todo, não havendo diferença significativa no número de exemplares capturados entre as estações chuvosa (51,7% e seca (48,3%. A freqüência dos anofelinos no peridomicílio foi significativamente maior (p The Anophelae species of the municipal district of Pinheiro, Maranhão State, Brazil, were studied, considering their variety, relative abundance, seasonal fluctuation, preference by the peri and intra domiciles as well as the hours of hematophagism. The females were captured using human bait, on a monthly basis from May/1998 to April/1999, from 6 p.m. to 6 a.m. A total of 1,321 specimens of 10 species were captured, all belonging to the subgenus Nyssorhynchus. The most frequent species were A. argyritarsis (62%, A. darlingi (21.7%, A. albitarsis (4.5%, A. galvaoi (4.0%, A. triannulatus (3.1% and A. evansae (2.8%. The species A. nuneztovari, A. braziliensis, A. rondoni and A. strodei together represented 1.9%. The anophelines occurred all year round, with no significant difference in the number of specimens captured between the rainy (51.7% and dry season (48.3%. The frequency of the females in the peridomicile was significantly higher (p < 0.01 (82%, than in the intradomicile (18%, preferring to suck blood at dusk and in the first hours of the night.

  2. New selenoproteins identified in silico from the genome of Anopheles gambiae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Liang; LIU Qiong; CHEN Ping; GAO ZhongHong; XU HuiBi

    2007-01-01

    Selenoprotein is biosynthesized by the incorporation of selenocysteine into proteins, where the TGA codon in the open reading frame does not act as a stop signal but is translated into selenocysteine. The dual functions of TGA result in mis-annotation or lack of selenoproteins in the sequenced genomes of many species. Available computational tools fail to correctly predict selenoproteins. Thus, we developed a new method to identify selenoproteins from the genome of Anopheles gambiae computationally.Based on released genomic information, several programs were edited with PERL language to identify selenocysteine insertion sequence (SECIS) element, the coding potential of TGA codons, and cysteine-containing homologs of selenoprotein genes. Our results showed that 11365 genes were terminated with TGA codons, 918 of which contained SECIS elements. Similarity search revealed that 58genes contained Sec/Cys pairs and similar flanking regions around in-frame TGA codons. Finally, 7genes were found to fully meet requirements for selenoproteins, although they have not been annotated as selenoproteins in NCBI databases. Deduced from their basic properties, the newly found selenoproteins in the genome of Anopheles gambiae are possibly related to in vivo oxidation tolerance and protein regulation in order to interfere with anopheles' vectorial capacity of Plasmodium. This study may also provide theoretical bases for the prevention of malaria from anopheles transmission.

  3. Gene expression-based biomarkers for Anopheles gambiae age grading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mei-Hui; Marinotti, Osvaldo; Zhong, Daibin; James, Anthony A; Walker, Edward; Guda, Tom; Kweka, Eliningaya J; Githure, John; Yan, Guiyun

    2013-01-01

    Information on population age structure of mosquitoes under natural conditions is fundamental to the understanding of vectorial capacity and crucial for assessing the impact of vector control measures on malaria transmission. Transcriptional profiling has been proposed as a method for predicting mosquito age for Aedes and Anopheles mosquitoes, however, whether this new method is adequate for natural conditions is unknown. This study tests the applicability of transcriptional profiling for age-grading of Anopheles gambiae, the most important malaria vector in Africa. The transcript abundance of two An. gambiae genes, AGAP009551 and AGAP011615, was measured during aging under laboratory and field conditions in three mosquito strains. Age-dependent monotonic changes in transcript levels were observed in all strains evaluated. These genes were validated as age-grading biomarkers using the mark, release and recapture (MRR) method. The MRR method determined a good correspondence between actual and predicted age, and thus demonstrated the value of age classifications derived from the transcriptional profiling of these two genes. The technique was used to establish the age structure of mosquito populations from two malaria-endemic areas in western Kenya. The population age structure determined by the transcriptional profiling method was consistent with that based on mosquito parity. This study demonstrates that the transcription profiling method based on two genes is valuable for age determination of natural mosquitoes, providing a new approach for determining a key life history trait of malaria vectors. PMID:23936017

  4. Gene expression-based biomarkers for Anopheles gambiae age grading.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Hui Wang

    Full Text Available Information on population age structure of mosquitoes under natural conditions is fundamental to the understanding of vectorial capacity and crucial for assessing the impact of vector control measures on malaria transmission. Transcriptional profiling has been proposed as a method for predicting mosquito age for Aedes and Anopheles mosquitoes, however, whether this new method is adequate for natural conditions is unknown. This study tests the applicability of transcriptional profiling for age-grading of Anopheles gambiae, the most important malaria vector in Africa. The transcript abundance of two An. gambiae genes, AGAP009551 and AGAP011615, was measured during aging under laboratory and field conditions in three mosquito strains. Age-dependent monotonic changes in transcript levels were observed in all strains evaluated. These genes were validated as age-grading biomarkers using the mark, release and recapture (MRR method. The MRR method determined a good correspondence between actual and predicted age, and thus demonstrated the value of age classifications derived from the transcriptional profiling of these two genes. The technique was used to establish the age structure of mosquito populations from two malaria-endemic areas in western Kenya. The population age structure determined by the transcriptional profiling method was consistent with that based on mosquito parity. This study demonstrates that the transcription profiling method based on two genes is valuable for age determination of natural mosquitoes, providing a new approach for determining a key life history trait of malaria vectors.

  5. Invasion of Wolbachia into Anopheles and Other Insect Germlines in an Ex vivo Organ Culture System

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, Grant L.; Andrew D Pike; Ping Xue; Jason L Rasgon

    2012-01-01

    The common bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia manipulates its host's reproduction to promote its own maternal transmission, and can interfere with pathogen development in many insects making it an attractive agent for the control of arthropod-borne disease. However, many important species, including Anopheles mosquitoes, are uninfected. Wolbachia can be artificially transferred between insects in the laboratory but this can be a laborious and sometimes fruitless process. We used a simple ex viv...

  6. Evaluation of Insecticides Susceptibility and Malaria Vector Potential of Anopheles annularis s.l. and Anopheles vagus in Assam, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhiman, Sunil; Yadav, Kavita; Rabha, Bipul; Goswami, Diganta; Hazarika, S; Tyagi, Varun

    2016-01-01

    During the recent past, development of DDT resistance and reduction to pyrethroid susceptibility among the malaria vectors has posed a serious challenge in many Southeast Asian countries including India. Current study presents the insecticide susceptibility and knock-down data of field collected Anopheles annularis sensu lato and An. vagus mosquito species from endemic areas of Assam in northeast India. Anopheles annularis s.l. and An. vagus adult females were collected from four randomly selected sentinel sites in Orang primary health centre (OPHC) and Balipara primary health centre (BPHC) areas, and used for testing susceptibility to DDT, malathion, deltamethrin and lambda-cyhalothrin. After insecticide susceptibility tests, mosquitoes were subjected to VectorTest™ assay kits to detect the presence of malaria sporozoite in the mosquitoes. An. annularis s.l. was completely susceptible to deltamethrin, lambda-cyhalothrin and malathion in both the study areas. An. vagus was highly susceptible to deltamethrin in both the areas, but exhibited reduced susceptibility to lambda-cyhalothrin in BPHC. Both the species were resistant to DDT and showed very high KDT50 and KDT99 values for DDT. Probit model used to calculate the KDT50 and KDT99 values did not display normal distribution of percent knock-down with time for malathion in both the mosquito species in OPHC (puseful to ensure their role in malaria transmission. PMID:27010649

  7. Demasculinization of the Anopheles gambiae X chromosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnusson Kalle

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a number of organisms sex-biased genes are non-randomly distributed between autosomes and the shared sex chromosome X (or Z. Studies on Anopheles gambiae have produced conflicting results regarding the underrepresentation of male-biased genes on the X chromosome and it is unclear to what extent sexual antagonism, dosage compensation or X-inactivation in the male germline, the evolutionary forces that have been suggested to affect the chromosomal distribution of sex-biased genes, are operational in Anopheles. Results We performed a meta-analysis of sex-biased gene expression in Anopheles gambiae which provides evidence for a general underrepresentation of male-biased genes on the X-chromosome that increased in significance with the observed degree of sex-bias. A phylogenomic comparison between Drosophila melanogaster, Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus also indicates that the Anopheles X chromosome strongly disfavours the evolutionary conservation of male-biased expression and that novel male-biased genes are more likely to arise on autosomes. Finally, we demonstrate experimentally that transgenes situated on the Anopheles gambiae X chromosome are transcriptionally silenced in the male germline. Conclusion The data presented here support the hypothesis that the observed demasculinization of the Anopheles X chromosome is driven by X-chromosome inactivation in the male germline and by sexual antagonism. The demasculinization appears to be the consequence of a loss of male-biased expression, rather than a failure in the establishment or the extinction of male-biased genes.

  8. Adaptation through chromosomal inversions in Anopheles

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    Diego eAyala

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal inversions have been repeatedly involved in local adaptation in a large number of animals and plants. The ecological and behavioral plasticity of Anopheles species - human malaria vectors - is mirrored by high amounts of polymorphic inversions. The adaptive significance of chromosomal inversions has been consistently attested by strong and significant correlations between their frequencies and a number of phenotypic traits. Here, we provide an extensive literature review of the different adaptive traits associated with chromosomal inversions in the genus Anopheles. Traits having important consequences for the success of present and future vector control measures, such as insecticide resistance and behavioral changes, are discussed.

  9. Factors affecting fungus-induced larval mortality in Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles stephensi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bukhari, S.T.; Middelman, A.; Koenraadt, C.J.M.; Takken, W.; Knols, B.G.J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Entomopathogenic fungi have shown great potential for the control of adult malaria vectors. However, their ability to control aquatic stages of anopheline vectors remains largely unexplored. Therefore, how larval characteristics (Anopheles species, age and larval density), fungus (species

  10. Distinct population structure for co-occurring Anopheles goeldii and Anopheles triannulatus in Amazonian Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Sascha Naomi McKeon; Marta Moreno; Maria Anise Sallum; Marinete Marins Povoa; Jan Evelyn Conn

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate whether environmental heterogeneity contributes to the genetic heterogeneity in Anopheles triannulatus, larval habitat characteristics across the Brazilian states of Roraima and Pará and genetic sequences were examined. A comparison with Anopheles goeldii was utilised to determine whether high genetic diversity was unique to An. triannulatus. Student t test and analysis of variance found no differences in habitat characteristics between the species. Analysis of population structur...

  11. Insecticide susceptibility of Anopheles coluzzii and Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes in Ibadan, South-West Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Okorie, Patricia N.; Ademowo, George O.; Irving, Helen; Kelly-Hope, Louise A; Wondji, Charles S

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of insecticide resistance in Anopheles mosquitoes has great implications for malaria control in Nigeria. This study aimed to determine the dynamics of insecticide susceptibility levels and frequency of knockdown resistance (kdr) mutations (L1014F) in wild Anopheles coluzzii Coetzee & Wilkerson sp. n. and An. gambiae Giles ( (Diptera: Culicidae) from Ojoo and Bodija areas of Ibadan, South-West, Nigeria. Insecticide susceptibility to pyrethroids, organophosphates, carbamates and o...

  12. Thermal limits of wild and laboratory strains of two African malaria vector species, Anopheles arabiensis and Anopheles funestus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyons Candice L

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria affects large parts of the developing world and is responsible for almost 800,000 deaths annually. As climates change, concerns have arisen as to how this vector-borne disease will be impacted by changing rainfall patterns and warming temperatures. Despite the importance and controversy surrounding the impact of climate change on the potential spread of this disease, little information exists on the tolerances of several of the vector species themselves. Methods Using a ramping protocol (to assess critical thermal limits - CT and plunge protocol (to assess lethal temperature limits - LT information on the thermal tolerance of two of Africa’s important malaria vectors, Anopheles arabiensis and Anopheles funestus was collected. The effects of age, thermal acclimation treatment, sex and strain (laboratory versus wild adults were investigated for CT determinations for each species. The effects of age and sex for adults and life stage (larvae, pupae, adults were investigated for LT determinations. Results In both species, females are more tolerant to low and high temperatures than males; larvae and pupae have higher upper lethal limits than do adults. Thermal acclimation of adults has large effects in some instances but small effects in others. Younger adults tend to be more tolerant of low or high temperatures than older age groups. Long-standing laboratory colonies are sufficiently similar in thermal tolerance to field-collected animals to provide reasonable surrogates when making inferences about wild population responses. Differences between these two vectors in their thermal tolerances, especially in larvae and pupae, are plausibly a consequence of different habitat utilization. Conclusions Limited plasticity is characteristic of the adults of these vector species relative to others examined to date, suggesting limited scope for within-generation change in thermal tolerance. These findings and the greater tolerance

  13. The role of reactive oxygen species on Plasmodium melanotic encapsulation in Anopheles gambiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Christophides, George K; Cantera, Rafael; Charles, Bradley; Han, Yeon Soo; Meister, Stephan; Dimopoulos, George; Kafatos, Fotis C; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2003-11-25

    Malaria transmission depends on the competence of some Anopheles mosquitoes to sustain Plasmodium development (susceptibility). A genetically selected refractory strain of Anopheles gambiae blocks Plasmodium development, melanizing, and encapsulating the parasite in a reaction that begins with tyrosine oxidation, and involves three quantitative trait loci. Morphological and microarray mRNA expression analysis suggest that the refractory and susceptible strains have broad physiological differences, which are related to the production and detoxification of reactive oxygen species. Physiological studies corroborate that the refractory strain is in a chronic state of oxidative stress, which is exacerbated by blood feeding, resulting in increased steady-state levels of reactive oxygen species, which favor melanization of parasites as well as Sephadex beads. PMID:14623973

  14. Genomic Dark Matter Illuminated: Anopheles Y Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, Seth N; Neafsey, Daniel E

    2016-08-01

    Hall et al. have strategically used long-read sequencing technology to characterize the structure and highly repetitive content of the Y chromosome in Anopheles malaria mosquitoes. Their work confirms that this important but elusive heterochromatic sex chromosome is evolving extremely rapidly and harbors a remarkably small number of genes. PMID:27263828

  15. MALARIA VECTORS IN SAN JOSÉDEL GUAVIARE, ORINOQUIA, COLOMBIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    JIMÉNEZ, IRENE P.; CONN, JAN E.; BROCHERO, HELENA

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine Anopheles species composition and their natural infectivity by human Plasmodium in 2 localities with the highest malaria transmission in San Jose del Guaviare, Guaviare, Colombia. A total of 1,009 Anopheles mosquitoes were collected using human landing catches during 8 months in 2010. Anopheles darlingi was the most abundant (83.2%) followed by An. albitarsis s.l. (8.6%), Anopheles braziliensis (3.8%), An. oswaldoi s.l. (1%), and An. rangeli (0.3%). Anopheles darlingi showed the highest human biting rate, and it was found naturally infected with Plasmodium vivax VK210 (0.119%) using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. All species were collected biting both indoors and outdoors. Anopheles darlingi showed biting activity overnight with an indoor peak between 1200–0100 h. Therefore, we recommend that malaria prevention strategies focus on 1) insecticide-treated nets to reduce human–vector contact when people are most exposed and unprotected; 2) accurate diagnoses; 3) adequate treatment for patients; 4) more timely epidemiological notification; and 5) improved entomological surveillance. PMID:25102591

  16. Malaria vectors in San José del Guaviare, Orinoquia, Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Irene P; Conn, Jan E; Brochero, Helena

    2014-06-01

    This study was conducted to determine Anopheles species composition and their natural infectivity by human Plasmodium in 2 localities with the highest malaria transmission in San Jose del Guaviare, Guaviare, Colombia. A total of 1,009 Anopheles mosquitoes were collected using human landing catches during 8 months in 2010. Anopheles darlingi was the most abundant (83.2%) followed by An. albitarsis s.l. (8.6%), Anopheles braziliensis (3.8%), An. oswaldoi s.l. (1%), and An. rangeli (0.3%). Anopheles darlingi showed the highest human biting rate, and it was found naturally infected with Plasmodium vivax VK210 (0.119%) using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. All species were collected biting both indoors and outdoors. Anopheles darlingi showed biting activity overnight with an indoor peak between 1200-0100 h. Therefore, we recommend that malaria prevention strategies focus on 1) insecticide-treated nets to reduce human-vector contact when people are most exposed and unprotected; 2) accurate diagnoses; 3) adequate treatment for patients; 4) more timely epidemiological notification; and 5) improved entomological surveillance. PMID:25102591

  17. Prevalence of antibodies to Trypanosoma cruzi, Toxoplasma gondii, Encephalitozoon cuniculi, Sarcocystis neurona, Besnoitia darlingi, and Neospora caninum in North American opossums, Didelphis virginiana, from southern Louisiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houk, Alice E; Goodwin, David G; Zajac, Anne M; Barr, Stephen C; Dubey, J P; Lindsay, David S

    2010-12-01

    We examined the prevalence of antibodies to zoonotic protozoan parasites ( Trypanosoma cruzi, Toxoplasma gondii, and Encephalitozoon cuniculi) and protozoans of veterinary importance ( Neospora caninum, Sarcocystis neurona, and Besnoitia darlingi) in a population of North American opossums ( Didelphis virginiana) from Louisiana. Samples from 30 opossums were collected as part of a survey for T. cruzi in Louisiana. Frozen sera from these 30 opossums were examined using an indirect immunofluorescent antibody test (IFAT) against in vitro-produced antigenic stages of these protozoans. Additionally, 24 of the 30 samples were examined using hemoculture, and all 30 were examined in the modified direct agglutination test (MAT) for antibodies to To. gondii. The prevalences of reactive IFAT samples were as follows: 60% for T. cruzi, 27% for To. gondii, 23% for E. cuniculi, 17% for S. neurona, 47% for B. darlingi, and 0% for N. caninum. Hemoculture revealed that 16 (67%) of 24 samples were positive for T. cruzi, compared to 18 of 30 (60%) by IFAT. The sensitivity and specificity for the IFAT compared to hemoculture was 100% for each. The modified direct agglutination test revealed that 9 (30%) of the 30 samples from opossums had antibodies to To. gondii , compared to 8 (27%) using the IFAT. The sensitivity and specificity of the IFAT compared to the MAT was 100% and 72%, respectively. PMID:21158620

  18. Spatial association between malaria vector species richness and malaria in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Douglas O; Alimi, Temitope; Herrera, Socrates; Beier, John C; Quiñones, Martha L

    2016-06-01

    Malaria transmission in Colombia is highly variable in space and time. Using a species distribution model, we mapped potential distribution of five vector species including Anopheles albimanus, Anopheles calderoni, Anopheles darlingi, Anopheles neivai, and Anopheles nuneztovari in five Departments of Colombia where malaria transmission remains problematic. We overlaid the range maps of the five species to reveal areas of sympatry and related per-pixel species richness to mean annual parasite index (API) for 2011-2014 mapped by municipality (n = 287). The relationship between mean number of vector species per municipality and API was evaluated using a Poisson regression, which revealed a highly significant relationship between species richness and API (p = 0 for Wald Chi-Square statistic). The results suggest that areas of relatively high transmission in Colombia typically contain higher number of vector species than areas with unstable transmission and that future elimination strategies should account for vector species richness. PMID:26970373

  19. Vectorial status and insecticide resistance of Anopheles funestus from a sugar estate in southern Mozambique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nhamahanga Eduardo

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dual problems of rising insecticide resistance in the malaria vectors and increasing human malaria cases since 2001 in southern Mozambique are cause for serious concern. The selection of insecticides for use in indoor residual spraying (IRS programmes is highly dependent on the extent to which local mosquitoes are susceptible to the approved classes of insecticides. The insecticide resistance status and role in malaria transmission of Anopheles funestus was evaluated at the Maragra Sugar Estate in southern Mozambique where an IRS vector control programme has been in operation for seven years using the carbamate insecticide bendiocarb. Results No Anopheles species were captured inside the sugar estate control area. Anopheles funestus group captured outside of the estate represented 90% (n = 475 of the total collections. Of the specimens identified to species by PCR (n = 167, 95% were An. funestus s.s. One An. rivulorum was identified and seven specimens did not amplify. The Anopheles gambiae complex was less abundant (n = 53 and of those identified (n = 33 76% were An. arabiensis and 24% An. merus. Insecticide susceptibility tests showed that wild-caught and F-1 family An. funestus were resistant to deltamethrin (32.5% mortality and lambda-cyhalothrin (14.6% mortality, less so to bendiocarb (71.5% mortality and fully susceptible to both malathion and DDT (100%. Bendiocarb and pyrethroid resistance was nullified using 4% piperonyl butoxide (Pbo, strongly suggesting that both are mediated by P450 monooxygenase detoxification. ELISA tests of An. funestus for Plasmodium falciparum, gave a sporozoite rate of 6.02% (n = 166. One unidentified member of the An. gambiae complex tested positive for P. falciparum sporozoites. Conclusion Anopheles funestus was found to be the most abundant and principle vector of malaria in this area, with members of the An. gambiae complex being secondary vectors. Despite the continual use of

  20. The complete mitochondrial genome of Anopheles minimus (Diptera: Culicidae) and the phylogenetics of known Anopheles mitogenomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Ya-Qiong; Ding, Yi-Ran; Yan, Zhen-Tian; Si, Feng-Ling; Luo, Qian-Chun; Chen, Bin

    2016-06-01

    Anopheles minimus is an important vector of human malaria in southern China and Southeast Asia. The phylogenetics of mosquitoes has not been well resolved, and the mitochondrial genome (mtgenome) has proven to be an important marker in the study of evolutionary biology. In this study, the complete mtgenome of An. minimus was sequenced for the first time. It is 15 395 bp long and encodes 37 genes, including 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 22 transfer RNAs (tRNAs), two ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) and a non-coding region. The gene organization is consistent with those of known Anopheles mtgenomes. The mtgenome performs a clear bias in nucleotide composition with a positive AT-skew and a negative GC-skew. All 13 PCGs prefer to use the codon UUA (Leu), ATN as initiation codon but cytochrome-oxidase subunit 1 (COI) and ND5, with TCG and GTG, and TAA as termination codon, but COI, COII, COIII and ND4, all with the incomplete T. tRNAs have the typical clover-leaf structure, but tRNA(Ser(AGN)) is consistent with known Anopheles mtgenomes. The control region includes a conserved T-stretch and a (TA)n stretch, and has the highest A+T content at 93.1%. The phylogenetics of An. minimus with 18 other Anopheles species was constructed by maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference, based on concatenated PCG sequences. The subgenera, Cellia and Anopheles, and Nyssorhynchus and Kerteszia have mutually close relationships, respectively. The Punctulatus group and Leucosphyrus group of Neomyzomyia Series, and the Albitarsis group of Albitarsis Series were suggested to be monophyletic. The monophyletic status of the subgenera, Cellia, Anopheles, Nyssorhynchus and Kerteszia need to be further elucidated. PMID:26852698

  1. The bionomics of the malaria vector Anopheles farauti in Northern Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands: issues for successful vector control

    OpenAIRE

    Bugoro, Hugo; Hii, Jeffery L; Butafa, Charles; Iro’ofa, Charlie; Apairamo, Allen; Robert D Cooper; Chen, Cheng-Chen; Russell, Tanya L

    2014-01-01

    Background The north coast of Guadalcanal has some of the most intense malaria transmission in the Solomon Islands. And, there is a push for intensified vector control in Guadalcanal, to improve the livelihood of residents and to minimize the number of cases, which are regularly exported to the rest of the country. Therefore, the bionomics of the target vector, Anopheles farauti, was profiled in 2007–08; which was after 20 years of limited surveillance during which time treated bed nets (ITNs...

  2. Life-table studies revealed significant effects of deforestation on the development and survivorship of Anopheles minimus larvae

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiaoming; Zhou, Guofa; Zhong, Daibin; Wang, Xiaoling; Ying WANG; Yang, Zhaoqing; Cui, Liwang; Yan, Guiyun

    2016-01-01

    Background Many developing countries are experiencing rapid ecological changes such as deforestation and shifting agricultural practices. These environmental changes may have an important consequence on malaria due to their impact on vector survival and reproduction. Despite intensive deforestation and malaria transmission in the China-Myanmar border area, the impact of deforestation on malaria vectors in the border area is unknown. Methods We conducted life table studies on Anopheles minimus...

  3. Spatio-temporal variations of Anopheles coluzzii and An. gambiae and their Plasmodium infectivity rates in Lobito, Angola

    OpenAIRE

    Carnevale, Pierre; Toto, J. C.; Dos Santos, M.A.; Fortes, F; Allan, R; Manguin, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    From 2003 to 2007, entomological surveys were conducted in Lobito town (Benguela Province, Angola) to determine which Anopheles species were present and to identify the vectors responsible for malaria transmission in areas where workers of the Sonamet Company live. Two types of surveys were conducted: (1) time and space surveys in the low and upper parts of Lobito during the rainy and dry periods; (2) a two-year longitudinal study in Sonamet workers' houses provided with long-lasting insectic...

  4. Laboratory studies on the olfactory behaviour of Anopheles quadriannulatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pates, H.V.; Takken, W.; Curtis, C.F.

    2005-01-01

    The host preference of Anopheles quadriannulatus Theobald (Diptera: Culicidae), the zoophilic member of the malaria mosquito complex Anopheles gambiae Giles, was investigated in a dual-choice olfactometer. Naïve female mosquitoes were exposed to CO2, acetone, 1-octen-3-ol, and skin emanations from c

  5. Gene expression patterns associated with blood-feeding in the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae

    OpenAIRE

    Hogan James R; Lobo Neil F; Harker Brent W; Hillenmeyer Maureen E; Kern Marcia K; Hong Young S; Dana Ali N; Romans Patricia; Collins Frank H

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Blood feeding, or hematophagy, is a behavior exhibited by female mosquitoes required both for reproduction and for transmission of pathogens. We determined the expression patterns of 3,068 ESTs, representing ~2,000 unique gene transcripts using cDNA microarrays in adult female Anopheles gambiae at selected times during the first two days following blood ingestion, at 5 and 30 min during a 40 minute blood meal and at 0, 1, 3, 5, 12, 16, 24 and 48 hours after completion of t...

  6. Food of larval Anopheles culicifacies and Anopheles varuna in a stream habitat in Sri Lanka

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piyaratne, M K; Amerasinghe, P H; Amerasinghe, F P;

    2005-01-01

    No previous studies have been conducted on the natural food of larval Anopheles culicifacies s.l. (the major malaria vector) and An. varuna (a secondary vector) in Sri Lanka. The present study analyzed the contents of guts dissected from larvae collected from pools in a natural stream-cum-irrigat...

  7. Anopheles (Anopheles) petragnani Del Vecchio 1939-a new mosquito species for Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Norbert; Pfitzner, Wolf Peter; Czajka, Christina; Kaiser, Achim; Weitzel, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    The so far known species of the Anopheles Claviger Complex, Anopheles claviger s.s. and Anopheles petragnani, can only be distinguished by partial overlapping characteristics of immature stages and by nucleotide sequence variation of the genomic ribosomal DNA (rDNA) internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) region. The known distribution of An. petragnani is so far restricted to the western Mediterranean region, whereas An. claviger s.s. occurs across most of Europe, up to the Middle East and North Africa. In our study, we investigated the larval mosquito fauna in rock pools of the Murg valley (Black Forest, Germany) once a month from April to December 2015.Among other species, larvae belonging to the Anopheles Claviger Complex were found. The fourth instar larvae were morphologically identified by chaetotaxy of the head and abdomen. The results were confirmed by a multiplex PCR and additional sequencing of the amplificates.Of the 1289 collected larvae from the rock pools, seven belonged to the Anopheles Claviger Complex. Five individuals were determined morphologically as An. petragnani and two as An. claviger s.s. The associated mosquito fauna comprised of Aedes japonicus japonicus (548 individuals), Culex pipiens s.l. and Culex torrentium (493 individuals) and Culex hortensis (241 individuals).This is the first record of An. petragnani north of the Alps. Further studies will reveal whether this is an isolated population of An. petragnani and if the investigated rock pool breeding sites represent typical habitats of this species in temperate regions in Central Europe. PMID:27003404

  8. Chloroquine mediated modulation of Anopheles gambiae gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Abrantes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plasmodium development in the mosquito is crucial for malaria transmission and depends on the parasite's interaction with a variety of cell types and specific mosquito factors that have both positive and negative effects on infection. Whereas the defensive response of the mosquito contributes to a decrease in parasite numbers during these stages, some components of the blood meal are known to favor infection, potentiating the risk of increased transmission. The presence of the antimalarial drug chloroquine in the mosquito's blood meal has been associated with an increase in Plasmodium infectivity for the mosquito, which is possibly caused by chloroquine interfering with the capacity of the mosquito to defend against the infection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we report a detailed survey of the Anopheles gambiae genes that are differentially regulated by the presence of chloroquine in the blood meal, using an A. gambiae cDNA microarray. The effect of chloroquine on transcript abundance was evaluated separately for non-infected and Plasmodium berghei-infected mosquitoes. Chloroquine was found to affect the abundance of transcripts that encode proteins involved in a variety of processes, including immunity, apoptosis, cytoskeleton and the response to oxidative stress. This pattern of differential gene expression may explain the weakened mosquito defense response which accounts for the increased infectivity observed in chloroquine-treated mosquitoes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results of the present study suggest that chloroquine can interfere with several putative mosquito mechanisms of defense against Plasmodium at the level of gene expression and highlight the need for a better understanding of the impacts of antimalarial agents on parasite transmission.

  9. Ecotope-Based Entomological Surveillance and Molecular Xenomonitoring of Multidrug Resistant Malaria Parasites in Anopheles Vectors

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    Prapa Sorosjinda-Nunthawarasilp

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The emergence and spread of multidrug resistant (MDR malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum or Plasmodium vivax have become increasingly important in the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS. MDR malaria is the heritable and hypermutable property of human malarial parasite populations that can decrease in vitro and in vivo susceptibility to proven antimalarial drugs as they exhibit dose-dependent drug resistance and delayed parasite clearance time in treated patients. MDR malaria risk situations reflect consequences of the national policy and strategy as this influences the ongoing national-level or subnational-level implementation of malaria control strategies in endemic GMS countries. Based on our experience along with current literature review, the design of ecotope-based entomological surveillance (EES and molecular xenomonitoring of MDR falciparum and vivax malaria parasites in Anopheles vectors is proposed to monitor infection pockets in transmission control areas of forest and forest fringe-related malaria, so as to bridge malaria landscape ecology (ecotope and ecotone and epidemiology. Malaria ecotope and ecotone are confined to a malaria transmission area geographically associated with the infestation of Anopheles vectors and particular environments to which human activities are related. This enables the EES to encompass mosquito collection and identification, salivary gland DNA extraction, Plasmodium- and species-specific identification, molecular marker-based PCR detection methods for putative drug resistance genes, and data management. The EES establishes strong evidence of Anopheles vectors carrying MDR P. vivax in infection pockets epidemiologically linked with other data obtained during which a course of follow-up treatment of the notified P. vivax patients receiving the first-line treatment was conducted. For regional and global perspectives, the EES would augment the epidemiological surveillance and monitoring of MDR falciparum and

  10. Innate immunity against malaria parasites in Anopheles gambiae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Chenand; Zhi-Hui Weng; Liangbiao Zheng

    2008-01-01

    Malaria continues to exert a huge toll in the world today, causing approximately 400 million cases and killing between 1-2 million people annually. Most of the malaria burden is borne by countries in Africa. For this reason, the major vector for malaria in this continent, Anopheles gambiae, is under intense study. With the completion of the draft sequence of this important vector, efforts are underway to develop novel control strategies.One promising area is to harness the power of the innate immunity of this mosquito species to block the transmission of the malaria parasites. Recent studies have demonstrated that Toll and Imd signaling pathways and other immunity-related genes (encoding proteins possibly function in recognition or as effector molecules) play significant roles in two different arms of innate immunity: level of infection intensity and melanization of Plasmodium oocysts.The challenges in the future are to understand how the functions of these different genes are coordinated in defense against malaria parasites, and if different arms of innate immunity are cross-regulated or coordinated.

  11. Distribución espacial de Anopheles pseudopunctipennis en las Yungas de Salta, Argentina Spatial distribution of Anopheles pseudopunctipennis in the Yungas de Salta rainforest, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Julia Dantur Juri

    2005-08-01

    and abundance indices were estimated and the study sample sites were compared by ANOVA, cosine calculations and cluster analyses. RESULTS: Anopheles pseudopunctipennis was the most abundant species. An. argyritarsis, An. nuneztovari, An. rangeli and An. strodei were also collected. Except for An. nuneztovari that was not captured in the peridomiciliary area, the other species were collected in the three different environments. There were no differences in the diversity indices and between sample sites. However, the cluster analysis showed the transition area to be more abundant for all species. CONCLUSIONS: The highest abundance of species was found in the transition area, which, besides the peridomiciliary area, is the main area of risk for malarial transmission.

  12. Characterization and expression analysis of gene encoding heme peroxidase HPX15 in major Indian malaria vector Anopheles stephensi (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajla, Mithilesh; Kakani, Parik; Choudhury, Tania Pal; Gupta, Kuldeep; Gupta, Lalita; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2016-06-01

    The interaction of mosquito immune system with Plasmodium is critical in determining the vector competence. Thus, blocking the crucial mosquito molecules that regulate parasite development might be effective in controlling the disease transmission. In this study, we characterized a full-length AsHPX15 gene from the major Indian malaria vector Anopheles stephensi. This gene is true ortholog of Anopheles gambiae heme peroxidase AgHPX15 (AGAP013327), which modulates midgut immunity and regulates Plasmodium falciparum development. We found that AsHPX15 is highly induced in mosquito developmental stages and blood fed midguts. In addition, this is a lineage-specific gene that has identical features and 65-99% amino acids identity with other HPX15 genes present in eighteen worldwide-distributed anophelines. We discuss that the conserved HPX15 gene might serve as a common target to manipulate mosquito immunity and arresting Plasmodium development inside the vector host. PMID:26943999

  13. Comparative evaluation of systemic drugs for their effects against Anopheles gambiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butters, Matthew P; Kobylinski, Kevin C; Deus, Kelsey M; da Silva, Ines Marques; Gray, Meg; Sylla, Massamba; Foy, Brian D

    2012-01-01

    Laboratory and field studies have shown that ivermectin, a drug that targets invertebrate ligand-gated ion channels (LGICs), is potently active against Anopheles spp. mosquitoes at concentrations present in human blood after standard drug administrations; thus ivermectin holds promise as a mass human-administered endectocide that could help suppress malaria parasite transmission. We evaluated other systemic LGIC-targeting drugs for their activities against the African malaria vector Anopheles gambiae using in vitro blood feeding assays. Eprinomectin, selamectin, moxidectin, and N-tert-butyl nodulisporamide were evaluated as potentially systemic drugs having similar modes of action to ivermectin; all primarily are agonists of invertebrate glutamate-gated chloride ion channels. Additionally, nitenpyram and spinosad were evaluated as systemic drugs that primarily work as agonists of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor channels. Only eprinomectin killed An. gambiae at concentrations that were comparable to ivermectin. At sub-lethal doses, nitenpyram and moxidectin marginally affected mosquito re-blood feeding ability. The macrocyclic lactones, particularly eprinomectin, caused significantly increased knockdown and significantly inhibited recovery in blood fed females. These data are a first step in evaluating drugs that might be eventually combined with, or substituted for ivermectin for future malaria parasite transmission control. PMID:22019935

  14. Distinct population structure for co-occurring Anopheles goeldii and Anopheles triannulatus in Amazonian Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sascha Naomi McKeon

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate whether environmental heterogeneity contributes to the genetic heterogeneity in Anopheles triannulatus, larval habitat characteristics across the Brazilian states of Roraima and Pará and genetic sequences were examined. A comparison with Anopheles goeldii was utilised to determine whether high genetic diversity was unique to An. triannulatus. Student t test and analysis of variance found no differences in habitat characteristics between the species. Analysis of population structure of An. triannulatus and An. goeldii revealed distinct demographic histories in a largely overlapping geographic range. Cytochrome oxidase I sequence parsimony networks found geographic clustering for both species; however nuclear marker networks depicted An. triannulatus with a more complex history of fragmentation, secondary contact and recent divergence. Evidence of Pleistocene expansions suggests both species are more likely to be genetically structured by geographic and ecological barriers than demography. We hypothesise that niche partitioning is a driving force for diversity, particularly in An. triannulatus.

  15. Bionomics of the malaria vector Anopheles farauti in Temotu Province, Solomon Islands: issues for malaria elimination

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    Mackenzie Donna O

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the Solomon Islands, the Malaria Eradication Programmes of the 1970s virtually eliminated the malaria vectors: Anopheles punctulatus and Anopheles koliensis, both late night biting, endophagic species. However, the vector, Anopheles farauti, changed its behaviour to bite early in the evening outdoors. Thus, An. farauti mosquitoes were able to avoid insecticide exposure and still maintain transmission. Thirty years on and the Solomon Islands are planning for intensified malaria control and localized elimination; but little is currently known about the behaviour of the vectors and how they will respond to intensified control. Methods In the elimination area, Temotu Province, standard entomological collection methods were conducted in typical coastal villages to determine the vector, its ecology, biting density, behaviour, longevity, and vector efficacy. These vector surveys were conducted pre-intervention and post-intervention following indoor residual spraying and distribution of long-lasting insecticidal nets. Results Anopheles farauti was the only anopheline in Temotu Province. In 2008 (pre-intervention, this species occurred in moderate to high densities (19.5-78.5 bites/person/night and expressed a tendency to bite outdoors, early in the night (peak biting time 6-8 pm. Surveys post intervention showed that there was little, if any, reduction in biting densities and no reduction in the longevity of the vector population. After adjusting for human behaviour, indoor biting was reduced from 57% pre-intervention to 40% post-intervention. Conclusion In an effort to learn from historical mistakes and develop successful elimination programmes, there is a need for implementing complimentary vector control tools that can target exophagic and early biting vectors. Intensified indoor residual spraying and long-lasting insecticide net use has further promoted the early, outdoor feeding behaviour of An. farauti in the Solomon Islands

  16. Factors affecting fungus-induced larval mortality in Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles stephensi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takken Willem

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Entomopathogenic fungi have shown great potential for the control of adult malaria vectors. However, their ability to control aquatic stages of anopheline vectors remains largely unexplored. Therefore, how larval characteristics (Anopheles species, age and larval density, fungus (species and concentration and environmental effects (exposure duration and food availability influence larval mortality caused by fungus, was studied. Methods Laboratory bioassays were performed on the larval stages of Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles stephensi with spores of two fungus species, Metarhizium anisopliae and Beauveria bassiana. For various larval and fungal characteristics and environmental effects the time to death was determined and survival curves established. These curves were compared by Kaplan Meier and Cox regression analyses. Results Beauveria bassiana and Metarhizium anisopliae caused high mortality of An. gambiae and An. stephensi larvae. However, Beauveria bassiana was less effective (Hazard ratio (HR Metarhizium anisopliae. Anopheles stephensi and An. gambiae were equally susceptible to each fungus. Older larvae were less likely to die than young larvae (HR Conclusions This study shows that both fungus species have potential to kill mosquitoes in the larval stage, and that mortality rate depends on fungus species itself, larval stage targeted, larval density and amount of nutrients available to the larvae. Increasing the concentration of fungal spores or reducing the exposure time to spores did not show a proportional increase and decrease in mortality rate, respectively, because the spores clumped together. As a result spores did not provide uniform coverage over space and time. It is, therefore, necessary to develop a formulation that allows the spores to spread over the water surface. Apart from formulation appropriate delivery methods are also necessary to avoid exposing non-target organisms to fungus.

  17. Malaria Vectors in Ecologically Heterogeneous Localities of the Colombian Pacific Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo-Díaz, Nelson; Altamiranda, Mariano; Luckhart, Shirley; Conn, Jan E.; Correa, Margarita M.

    2014-01-01

    The Colombian Pacific region is second nationally in number of malaria cases reported. This zone presents great ecological heterogeneity and Anopheles species diversity. However, little is known about the current spatial and temporal distribution of vector species. This study, conducted in three ecologically different localities of the Pacific region, aimed to evaluate the composition and distribution of Anopheles species and characterize transmission intensity. A total of 4,016 Anopheles mosquitoes were collected representing seven species. The composition and dominant species differed in each locality. Three species were infected with malaria parasites: Anopheles darlingi and An. calderoni were infected with Plasmodium falciparum and An. nuneztovari with Plasmodium vivax VK210 and VK247. Annual EIRs varied from 3.5–7.2 infective bites per year. These results confirm the importance of the primary vector An. nuneztovari in areas disturbed by human interventions, of An. darlingi in deforested margins of humid tropical rainforest and An. albimanus and the suspected vector An. calderoni in areas impacted by urbanization and large-scale palm oil agriculture close to the coast. This constitutes the first report in the Colombia Pacific region of naturally infected An. darlingi, and in Colombia of naturally infected An. calderoni. Further studies should evaluate the epidemiological importance of An. calderoni in the Pacific region. PMID:25090233

  18. Malaria vectors in ecologically heterogeneous localities of the Colombian Pacific region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Naranjo-Díaz

    Full Text Available The Colombian Pacific region is second nationally in number of malaria cases reported. This zone presents great ecological heterogeneity and Anopheles species diversity. However, little is known about the current spatial and temporal distribution of vector species. This study, conducted in three ecologically different localities of the Pacific region, aimed to evaluate the composition and distribution of Anopheles species and characterize transmission intensity. A total of 4,016 Anopheles mosquitoes were collected representing seven species. The composition and dominant species differed in each locality. Three species were infected with malaria parasites: Anopheles darlingi and An. calderoni were infected with Plasmodium falciparum and An. nuneztovari with Plasmodium vivax VK210 and VK247. Annual EIRs varied from 3.5-7.2 infective bites per year. These results confirm the importance of the primary vector An. nuneztovari in areas disturbed by human interventions, of An. darlingi in deforested margins of humid tropical rainforest and An. albimanus and the suspected vector An. calderoni in areas impacted by urbanization and large-scale palm oil agriculture close to the coast. This constitutes the first report in the Colombia Pacific region of naturally infected An. darlingi, and in Colombia of naturally infected An. calderoni. Further studies should evaluate the epidemiological importance of An. calderoni in the Pacific region.

  19. Malaria vectors in ecologically heterogeneous localities of the Colombian Pacific region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo-Díaz, Nelson; Altamiranda, Mariano; Luckhart, Shirley; Conn, Jan E; Correa, Margarita M

    2014-01-01

    The Colombian Pacific region is second nationally in number of malaria cases reported. This zone presents great ecological heterogeneity and Anopheles species diversity. However, little is known about the current spatial and temporal distribution of vector species. This study, conducted in three ecologically different localities of the Pacific region, aimed to evaluate the composition and distribution of Anopheles species and characterize transmission intensity. A total of 4,016 Anopheles mosquitoes were collected representing seven species. The composition and dominant species differed in each locality. Three species were infected with malaria parasites: Anopheles darlingi and An. calderoni were infected with Plasmodium falciparum and An. nuneztovari with Plasmodium vivax VK210 and VK247. Annual EIRs varied from 3.5-7.2 infective bites per year. These results confirm the importance of the primary vector An. nuneztovari in areas disturbed by human interventions, of An. darlingi in deforested margins of humid tropical rainforest and An. albimanus and the suspected vector An. calderoni in areas impacted by urbanization and large-scale palm oil agriculture close to the coast. This constitutes the first report in the Colombia Pacific region of naturally infected An. darlingi, and in Colombia of naturally infected An. calderoni. Further studies should evaluate the epidemiological importance of An. calderoni in the Pacific region. PMID:25090233

  20. A Physical Map for an Asian Malaria Mosquito, Anopheles stephensi

    OpenAIRE

    Maria V Sharakhova; Xia, Ai; Tu, Zhijian; Shouche, Yogesh S.; Unger, Maria F; Sharakhov, Igor V

    2010-01-01

    Physical mapping is a useful approach for studying genome organization and evolution as well as for genome sequence assembly. The availability of polytene chromosomes in malaria mosquitoes provides a unique opportunity to develop high-resolution physical maps. We report a 0.6-Mb-resolution physical map consisting of 422 DNA markers hybridized to 379 chromosomal sites of the Anopheles stephensi polytene chromosomes. This makes An. stephensi second only to Anopheles gambiae in density of a phys...

  1. KARAKTERISTIK TEMPAT PERKEMBANGBIAKAN DAN DENSITAS LARVA ANOPHELES SUBPICTUS KABUPATEN BULUKUMBA

    OpenAIRE

    Faatimah, Dewi; Ishak, Hasanuddin; Selomo, Makmur

    2015-01-01

    Kabupaten Bulukumba merupakan salah satu daerah endemis malaria yang ada di Sulawesi Selatan dengan angka kesakitan (api) per 1.000 penduduk dengan 11 kasus (API 0,47???) tahun 2013. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengatahui gambaran densitas larva Anopheles subpictus dan Anopheles barbirostis berdasarkan suhu, pH, salinitas, dan jenis vegetasi air yang ada. Jenis penelitian ini adalah penelitian observasional dengan pendekatan deskritif. Sampel tempat perindukan dalam penelitian ini termasu...

  2. Wide cross-reactivity between Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles funestus SG6 salivary proteins supports exploitation of gSG6 as a marker of human exposure to major malaria vectors in tropical Africa

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    Petrarca Vincenzo

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Anopheles gambiae gSG6 is an anopheline-specific salivary protein which helps female mosquitoes to efficiently feed on blood. Besides its role in haematophagy, gSG6 is immunogenic and elicits in exposed individuals an IgG response, which may be used as indicator of exposure to the main African malaria vector A. gambiae. However, malaria transmission in tropical Africa is sustained by three main vectors (A. gambiae, Anopheles arabiensis and Anopheles funestus and a general marker, reflecting exposure to at least these three species, would be especially valuable. The SG6 protein is highly conserved within the A. gambiae species complex whereas the A. funestus homologue, fSG6, is more divergent (80% identity with gSG6. The aim of this study was to evaluate cross-reactivity of human sera to gSG6 and fSG6. Methods The A. funestus SG6 protein was expressed/purified and the humoral response to gSG6, fSG6 and a combination of the two antigens was compared in a population from a malaria hyperendemic area of Burkina Faso where both vectors were present, although with a large A. gambiae prevalence (>75%. Sera collected at the beginning and at the end of the high transmission/rainy season, as well as during the following low transmission/dry season, were analysed. Results According to previous observations, both anti-SG6 IgG level and prevalence decreased during the low transmission/dry season and showed a typical age-dependent pattern. No significant difference in the response to the two antigens was found, although their combined use yielded in most cases higher IgG level. Conclusions Comparative analysis of gSG6 and fSG6 immunogenicity to humans suggests the occurrence of a wide cross-reactivity, even though the two proteins carry species-specific epitopes. This study supports the use of gSG6 as reliable indicator of exposure to the three main African malaria vectors, a marker which may be useful to monitor malaria transmission

  3. Vectors and malaria transmission in deforested, rural communities in north-central Vietnam

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    Do Manh Cuong

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria is still prevalent in rural communities of central Vietnam even though, due to deforestation, the primary vector Anopheles dirus is uncommon. In these situations little is known about the secondary vectors which are responsible for maintaining transmission. Basic information on the identification of the species in these rural communities is required so that transmission parameters, such as ecology, behaviour and vectorial status can be assigned to the appropriate species. Methods In two rural villages - Khe Ngang and Hang Chuon - in Truong Xuan Commune, Quang Binh Province, north central Vietnam, a series of longitudinal entomological surveys were conducted during the wet and dry seasons from 2003 - 2007. In these surveys anopheline mosquitoes were collected in human landing catches, paired human and animal bait collections, and from larval surveys. Specimens belonging to species complexes were identified by PCR and sequence analysis, incrimination of vectors was by detection of circumsporozoite protein using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results Over 80% of the anopheline fauna was made up of Anopheles sinensis, Anopheles aconitus, Anopheles harrisoni, Anopheles maculatus, Anopheles sawadwongporni, and Anopheles philippinensis. PCR and sequence analysis resolved identification issues in the Funestus Group, Maculatus Group, Hyrcanus Group and Dirus Complex. Most species were zoophilic and while all species could be collected biting humans significantly higher densities were attracted to cattle and buffalo. Anopheles dirus was the most anthropophilic species but was uncommon making up only 1.24% of all anophelines collected. Anopheles sinensis, An. aconitus, An. harrisoni, An. maculatus, An. sawadwongporni, Anopheles peditaeniatus and An. philippinensis were all found positive for circumsporozoite protein. Heterogeneity in oviposition site preference between species enabled vector densities to be high in both

  4. Ecology and behavior of Anopheles arabiensis in relation to agricultural practices in central Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muturi, Ephantus J; Mwangangi, Joseph M; Beier, John C; Blackshear, Millon; Wauna, James; Sang, Rosemary; Mukabana, Wolfgang R

    2013-09-01

    Ecological changes associated with anthropogenic ecosystem disturbances can influence human risk of exposure to malaria and other vector-borne infectious diseases. This study in Mwea, Kenya, investigated the pattern of insecticide use in irrigated and nonirrigated agroecosystems and association with the density, survival, and blood-feeding behavior of the malaria vector Anopheles arabiensis. The parity rates of adult An. arabiensis from randomly selected houses were determined by examining their ovaries for tracheal distension, and polymerase chain reaction was used to identify the host blood meals. In addition, structured questionnaires were used to generate data on insecticide use. Anopheles arabiensis densities were highest in irrigated rice agroecosystems, intermediate in irrigated French beans agroecosystems, and lowest in the nonirrigated agroecosystem. Anopheles arabiensis adult survivorship was significantly lower in irrigated rice agroecosystems than in irrigated French beans agroecosystems. The human blood index (HBI) was significantly higher in the nonirrigated agroecosystem compared to irrigated agroecosystems. Moreover, there was marked variation in HBI among villages in irrigated agroecosystems with significantly lower HBI in Kangichiri and Mathangauta compared to Kiuria, Karima, and Kangai. The proportion of mosquitoes with mixed blood meals varied among villages ranging from 0.25 in Kangichiri to 0.83 in Kiuria. Sumithion, dimethoate, and alpha cypermethrin were the most commonly used insecticides. The 1st was used mostly in irrigated rice agroecosystems, and the last 2 were used mostly in irrigated French beans agroecosystems. These findings indicate that agricultural practices may influence the ecology and behavior of malaria vectors and ultimately the risk of malaria transmission. PMID:24199496

  5. PCR detection of malaria parasites in desiccated Anopheles mosquitoes is uninhibited by storage time and temperature

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    Rider Mark A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reliable methods to preserve mosquito vectors for malaria studies are necessary for detecting Plasmodium parasites. In field settings, however, maintaining a cold chain of storage from the time of collection until laboratory processing, or accessing other reliable means of sample preservation is often logistically impractical or cost prohibitive. As the Plasmodium infection rate of Anopheles mosquitoes is a central component of the entomological inoculation rate and other indicators of transmission intensity, storage conditions that affect pathogen detection may bias malaria surveillance indicators. This study investigated the effect of storage time and temperature on the ability to detect Plasmodium parasites in desiccated Anopheles mosquitoes by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Methods Laboratory-infected Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes were chloroform-killed and stored over desiccant for 0, 1, 3, and 6 months while being held at four different temperatures: 28, 37, -20 and -80°C. The detection of Plasmodium DNA was evaluated by real-time PCR amplification of a 111 base pair region of block 4 of the merozoite surface protein. Results Varying the storage time and temperature of desiccated mosquitoes did not impact the sensitivity of parasite detection. A two-way factorial analysis of variance suggested that storage time and temperature were not associated with a loss in the ability to detect parasites. Storage of samples at 28°C resulted in a significant increase in the ability to detect parasite DNA, though no other positive associations were observed between the experimental storage treatments and PCR amplification. Conclusions Cold chain maintenance of desiccated mosquito samples is not necessary for real-time PCR detection of parasite DNA. Though field-collected mosquitoes may be subjected to variable conditions prior to molecular processing, the storage of samples over an inexpensive and logistically

  6. Population genetic structure of Anopheles arabiensis and Anopheles gambiae in a malaria endemic region of southern Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Ferguson Heather M; Lee Yoosook; Knols Bart GJ; Ng'habi Kija R; Lanzaro Gregory C

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Genetic diversity is a key factor that enables adaptation and persistence of natural populations towards environmental conditions. It is influenced by the interaction of a natural population's dynamics and the environment it inhabits. Anopheles gambiae s.s. and Anopheles arabiensis are the two major and widespread malaria vectors in sub-Saharan Africa. Several studies have examined the ecology and population dynamics of these vectors. Ecological conditions along the Kilomb...

  7. DDT-resistance in Anopheles stephensi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DAVIDSON, G; JACKSON, C E

    1961-01-01

    In view of the increasing number of reports from different parts of the world indicating resistance to DDT in both adults and larvae of Anopheles stephensi, an important malaria vector, a series of laboratory studies has been carried out on the degree, the pattern and the mode of inheritance of resistance in this species. A DDT-resistant strain from Iraq and a susceptible strain from India were used.In four sets of observations made in the course of tests on both adults and larvae a monofactorial type of inheritance was indicated, and the factor involved was shown to be dependent for its expression on the genetic background.DDT-resistance in A. stephensi appears to be similar in most respects to that in A. sundaicus. PMID:13883789

  8. How malaria models relate temperature to malaria transmission

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Background: It is well known that temperature has a major influence on the transmission of malaria parasites to their hosts. However, mathematical models do not always agree about the way in which temperature affects malaria transmission.Methods: In this study, we compared six temperature dependent mortality models for the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto. The evaluation is based on a comparison between the models, and observations from semi-field and laboratory sett...

  9. Unexpected high losses of Anopheles gambiae larvae due to rainfall.

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    Krijn P Paaijmans

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Immature stages of the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae experience high mortality, but its cause is poorly understood. Here we study the impact of rainfall, one of the abiotic factors to which the immatures are frequently exposed, on their mortality. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show that rainfall significantly affected larval mosquitoes by flushing them out of their aquatic habitat and killing them. Outdoor experiments under natural conditions in Kenya revealed that the additional nightly loss of larvae caused by rainfall was on average 17.5% for the youngest (L1 larvae and 4.8% for the oldest (L4 larvae; an additional 10.5% (increase from 0.9 to 11.4% of the L1 larvae and 3.3% (from 0.1 to 3.4% of the L4 larvae were flushed away and larval mortality increased by 6.9% (from 4.6 to 11.5% and 1.5% (from 4.1 to 5.6% for L1 and L4 larvae, respectively, compared to nights without rain. On rainy nights, 1.3% and 0.7% of L1 and L4 larvae, respectively, were lost due to ejection from the breeding site. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study demonstrates that immature populations of malaria mosquitoes suffer high losses during rainfall events. As these populations are likely to experience several rain showers during their lifespan, rainfall will have a profound effect on the productivity of mosquito breeding sites and, as a result, on the transmission of malaria. These findings are discussed in the light of malaria risk and changing rainfall patterns in response to climate change.

  10. A High-Affinity Adenosine Kinase from Anopheles Gambiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M Cassera; M Ho; E Merino; E Burgos; A Rinaldo-Matthis; S Almo; V Schramm

    2011-12-31

    Genome analysis revealed a mosquito orthologue of adenosine kinase in Anopheles gambiae (AgAK; the most important vector for the transmission of Plasmodium falciparum in Africa). P. falciparum are purine auxotrophs and do not express an adenosine kinase but rely on their hosts for purines. AgAK was kinetically characterized and found to have the highest affinity for adenosine (K{sub m} = 8.1 nM) of any known adenosine kinase. AgAK is specific for adenosine at the nucleoside site, but several nucleotide triphosphate phosphoryl donors are tolerated. The AgAK crystal structure with a bound bisubstrate analogue Ap{sub 4}A (2.0 {angstrom} resolution) reveals interactions for adenosine and ATP and the geometry for phosphoryl transfer. The polyphosphate charge is partly neutralized by a bound Mg{sup 2+} ion and an ion pair to a catalytic site Arg. The AgAK structure consists of a large catalytic core in a three-layer {alpha}/{beta}/{alpha} sandwich, and a small cap domain in contact with adenosine. The specificity and tight binding for adenosine arise from hydrogen bond interactions of Asn14, Leu16, Leu40, Leu133, Leu168, Phe168, and Thr171 and the backbone of Ile39 and Phe168 with the adenine ring as well as through hydrogen bond interactions between Asp18, Gly64, and Asn68 and the ribosyl 2'- and 3'-hydroxyl groups. The structure is more similar to that of human adenosine kinase (48% identical) than to that of AK from Toxoplasma gondii (31% identical). With this extraordinary affinity for AgAK, adenosine is efficiently captured and converted to AMP at near the diffusion limit, suggesting an important role for this enzyme in the maintenance of the adenine nucleotide pool. mRNA analysis verifies that AgAK transcripts are produced in the adult insects.

  11. Pteridine fluorescence for age determination of Anopheles mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, D; Lehane, M J

    1999-02-01

    The age structure of mosquito populations is of great relevance to understanding the dynamics of disease transmission and in monitoring the success of control operations. Unfortunately, the ovarian dissection methods currently available for determining the age of adult mosquitoes are technically difficult, slow and may be of limited value, because the proportion of diagnostic ovarioles in the ovary declines with age. By means of reversed-phase HPLC this study investigated the malaria vectors Anopheles gambiae and An. stephensi to see if changes in fluorescent pteridine pigments, which have been used in other insects to determine the age of field-caught individuals, may be useful for age determination in mosquitoes. Whole body fluorescence was inversely proportional to age (P 91%) up to 30 days postemergence, with the regression values: y = 40580-706x for An. gambiae, and y = 52896-681x for An. stephensi. In both species the main pteridines were 6-biopterin, pterin-6-carboxylic acid and an unidentified fluorescent compound. An. gambiae had only 50-70% as much fluorescence as An. stephensi, and fluorescent compounds were relatively more concentrated in the head than in the thorax (ratios 1:0.8 An. gambiae; 1:0.5 An. stephensi). The results of this laboratory study are encouraging. It seems feasible that this simpler and faster technique of fluorescence quantification could yield results of equivalent accuracy to the interpretation of ovarian dissection. A double-blind field trial comparing the accuracy of this technique to marked, released and recaptured mosquitoes is required to test the usefulness of the pteridine method in the field. PMID:10194749

  12. Repellent efficacy of DEET, MyggA, neem (Azedirachta indica) oil and chinaberry (Melia azedarach) oil against Anopheles arabiensis, the principal malaria vector in Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Abiy, Ephrem; Gebre-Michael, Teshome; Balkew, Meshesha; Medhin, Girmay

    2015-01-01

    Background In Ethiopia, Anopheles arabiensis is the main vector responsible for the transmission of malaria in the country and its control mainly involves application of indoor residual spraying (IRS) and use of insecticide-treated bed nets (ITNs). Objective Although the role of repellents for reducing man-vector contact is documented in the literature, the response of An. arabiensis to repellents was not previously evaluated under field conditions in Ethiopia. Method The trial was conducted ...

  13. Molecular species identification, host preference and detection of myxoma virus in the Anopheles maculipennis complex (Diptera: Culicidae) in southern England, UK.

    OpenAIRE

    Brugman, VA; Hernández-Triana, LM; Prosser, SW; Weland, C; Westcott, DG; Fooks, AR; Johnson, N

    2015-01-01

    Background Determining the host feeding patterns of mosquitoes by identifying the origin of their blood-meals is an important part of understanding the role of vector species in current and future disease transmission cycles. Collecting large numbers of blood-fed mosquitoes from the field is difficult, therefore it is important to maximise the information obtained from each specimen. This study aimed to use mosquito genome sequence to identify the species within Anopheles maculipennis sensu l...

  14. Spatial and temporal distribution of the malaria mosquito Anopheles arabiensis in northern Sudan: influence of environmental factors and implications for vector control

    OpenAIRE

    Ageep, T.B.; Cox, J; M.M. Hassan; Knols, B.G.J.; Benedict, M.Q.; Malcolm, C. A.; Babiker, A.; Sayed, El, B.B.

    2009-01-01

    Background - Malaria is an important public health problem in northern Sudan, but little is known about the dynamics of its transmission. Given the characteristic low densities of Anopheles arabiensis and the difficult terrain in this area, future vector control strategies are likely to be based on area-wide integrated pest management (AW-IPM) that may include the sterile insect technique (SIT). To support the planning and implementation of future AW-IPM activities, larval surveys were carrie...

  15. Spatial and temporal distribution of the malaria mosquito Anopheles arabiensis in northern Sudan: influence of environmental factors and implications for vector control

    OpenAIRE

    Malcolm Colin A; Benedict Mark Q; Knols Bart GJ; Hassan M'oawia M; Cox Jonathan; Ageep Tellal B; Babiker Ahmed; El Sayed Badria B

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Malaria is an important public health problem in northern Sudan, but little is known about the dynamics of its transmission. Given the characteristic low densities of Anopheles arabiensis and the difficult terrain in this area, future vector control strategies are likely to be based on area-wide integrated pest management (AW-IPM) that may include the sterile insect technique (SIT). To support the planning and implementation of future AW-IPM activities, larval surveys were...

  16. Estimation of vectorial capacity of Anopheles minimus Theobald & An. fluviatilis James (Diptera: Culicidae) in a malaria endemic area of Odisha State, India

    OpenAIRE

    K Gunasekaran; S S Sahu; Jambulingam, P.

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: Anopheles minimus and An. fluviatilis were incriminated as the major malaria vectors in Keonjhar district of Odisha State recently. This study was carried out to elucidate the potential role of these two vector species in transmission of malaria during different seasons, and vectorial capacity of these species was also estimated. Methods: Three hilly and forested villages of Keonjhar district were randomly selected. Vectorial capacity (C) was calculated using the...

  17. Laser induced mortality of Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Matthew D.; Leahy, David J.; Norton, Bryan J.; Johanson, Threeric; Mullen, Emma R.; Marvit, Maclen; Makagon, Arty

    2016-02-01

    Small, flying insects continue to pose great risks to both human health and agricultural production throughout the world, so there remains a compelling need to develop new vector and pest control approaches. Here, we examined the use of short (<25 ms) laser pulses to kill or disable anesthetized female Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes, which were chosen as a representative species. The mortality of mosquitoes exposed to laser pulses of various wavelength, power, pulse duration, and spot size combinations was assessed 24 hours after exposure. For otherwise comparable conditions, green and far-infrared wavelengths were found to be more effective than near- and mid-infrared wavelengths. Pulses with larger laser spot sizes required lower lethal energy densities, or fluence, but more pulse energy than for smaller spot sizes with greater fluence. Pulse duration had to be reduced by several orders of magnitude to significantly lower the lethal pulse energy or fluence required. These results identified the most promising candidates for the lethal laser component in a system being designed to identify, track, and shoot down flying insects in the wild.

  18. Mermithid nematodes found in adult Anopheles from southeastern Senegal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobylinski Kevin C

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over two dozen mermithid nematodes have been described parasitizing mosquitoes worldwide, however, only two species were found in Africa. Mermithid nematodes kill their mosquito host upon emergence, which suggests that they could be developed as biological control agents of mosquitoes. Both Romanomermis culicivorax and Romanomermis iyengari have been reared for mass release to control numerous Anopheles species vector populations, and in one instance this may have led to reduced malaria prevalence in a human population. Methods Anopheles mosquitoes were collected during a malaria study in southeastern Senegal. Two different adult blood fed mosquitoes had a single mermithid nematode emerge from their anus while they were being held post-capture. Primers from the 18 S rDNA were developed to sequence nematode DNA and screen mosquitoes for mermithid DNA. 18 S rDNA from the Senegalese mermithid and other mermithid entries in GenBank were used to create a Maximum Parsimony tree of the Mermithidae family. Results The mermithid was present in 1.8% (10/551 of the sampled adult Anopheles species in our study area. The mermithid was found in An. gambiae s.s., An. funestus, and An. rufipes from the villages of Ndebou, Boundoucondi, and Damboucoye. Maximum parsimony analysis confirmed that the nematode parasites found in Anopheles were indeed mermithid parasites, and of the mermithid sequences available in GenBank, they are most closely related to Strelkovimermis spiculatus. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first report of mermithids from adult Anopheles mosquitoes in Senegal. The mermithid appears to infect Anopheles mosquitoes that develop in diverse larval habitats. Although maximum parsimony analysis determined the mermithid was closely related to Strelkovimermis spiculatus, several characteristics of the mermithid were more similar to the Empidomermis genus. Future mermithid isolations will hopefully allow: formal

  19. An expression map for Anopheles gambiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacCallum Robert M

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantitative transcriptome data for the malaria-transmitting mosquito Anopheles gambiae covers a broad range of biological and experimental conditions, including development, blood feeding and infection. Web-based summaries of differential expression for individual genes with respect to these conditions are a useful tool for the biologist, but they lack the context that a visualisation of all genes with respect to all conditions would give. For most organisms, including A. gambiae, such a systems-level view of gene expression is not yet available. Results We have clustered microarray-based gene-averaged expression values, available from VectorBase, for 10194 genes over 93 experimental conditions using a self-organizing map. Map regions corresponding to known biological events, such as egg production, are revealed. Many individual gene clusters (nodes on the map are highly enriched in biological and molecular functions, such as protein synthesis, protein degradation and DNA replication. Gene families, such as odorant binding proteins, can be classified into distinct functional groups based on their expression and evolutionary history. Immunity-related genes are non-randomly distributed in several distinct regions on the map, and are generally distant from genes with house-keeping roles. Each immunity-rich region appears to represent a distinct biological context for pathogen recognition and clearance (e.g. the humoral and gut epithelial responses. Several immunity gene families, such as peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGRPs and defensins, appear to be specialised for these distinct roles, while three genes with physically interacting protein products (LRIM1/APL1C/TEP1 are found in close proximity. Conclusions The map provides the first genome-scale, multi-experiment overview of gene expression in A. gambiae and should also be useful at the gene-level for investigating potential interactions. A web interface is available

  20. Ape malaria transmission and potential for ape-to-human transfers in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makanga, Boris; Yangari, Patrick; Rahola, Nil; Rougeron, Virginie; Elguero, Eric; Boundenga, Larson; Moukodoum, Nancy Diamella; Okouga, Alain Prince; Arnathau, Céline; Durand, Patrick; Willaume, Eric; Ayala, Diego; Fontenille, Didier; Ayala, Francisco J; Renaud, François; Ollomo, Benjamin; Prugnolle, Franck; Paupy, Christophe

    2016-05-10

    Recent studies have highlighted the large diversity of malaria parasites infecting African great apes (subgenus Laverania) and their strong host specificity. Although the existence of genetic incompatibilities preventing the cross-species transfer may explain host specificity, the existence of vectors with a high preference for a determined host represents another possibility. To test this hypothesis, we undertook a 15-mo-long longitudinal entomological survey in two forest regions of Gabon, where wild apes live, at different heights under the canopy. More than 2,400 anopheline mosquitoes belonging to 18 species were collected. Among them, only three species of Anopheles were found infected with ape Plasmodium: Anopheles vinckei, Anopheles moucheti, and Anopheles marshallii Their role in transmission was confirmed by the detection of the parasites in their salivary glands. Among these species, An. vinckei showed significantly the highest prevalence of infection and was shown to be able to transmit parasites of both chimpanzees and gorillas. Transmission was also shown to be conditioned by seasonal factors and by the heights of capture under the canopy. Moreover, human landing catches of sylvan Anopheles demonstrated the propensity of these three vector species to feed on humans when available. Our results suggest therefore that the strong host specificity observed in the Laveranias is not linked to a specific association between the vertebrate host and the vector species and highlight the potential role of these vectors as bridge between apes and humans. PMID:27071123

  1. Behavioural divergence of sympatric Anopheles funestus populations in Burkina Faso

    OpenAIRE

    Guelbeogo, Wamdaogo M.; Sagnon, N’Fale; Liu, Fang(Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China); Nora J Besansky; Costantini, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Background In Burkina Faso, two chromosomal forms of the malaria vector Anopheles funestus, Folonzo and Kiribina, are distinguished by contrasting frequencies of shared polymorphic chromosomal inversions. Sympatric and synchronous populations of Folonzo and Kiribina mate assortatively, as indicated by a significant deficit of heterokaryotypes, and genetic associations among inversions on independently segregating chromosome arms. The present study aimed to assess, by intensive longitudinal sa...

  2. Ecology of Anopheles spp. in Central Lombok Regency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majematang Mading

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Malaria remains a public health problem in West Nusa Tenggara Province. Central Lombok District is one of the areas with high case of malaria. Annual Malaria Incidence (AMI was increased from 5.9 ‰ in 2006, 6.7‰ up to 8.1‰ in 2008. The objective of the study is to describe the ecological condition of Anopheles spp. through observation, measurement of environmental variables, larvae and adult collection. This research was an observational research with cross-sectional study. The population of this study is all mosquitos and breeding habitats of Anopheles spp. that exist in the research location. Ecological observations carried out on anopheles breeding habitats including acidity, salinity, shaded places and aquatic biota. Air temperature and humidity measured at the adult mosquitoes trapping sites. The result showed that pH values of water is around 9.00, salinity in the breeding habitats around 14 ppm, and water biota (i.e. moss, grass, shrimps, fishes, tadpoles and crabs surrounded by bushes with larvae density 0,1-28,8 each dipping. The air measurement at the time was between 23°-27° Celsius and 65%-84% humidity. This research concludes that ecology and environmental conditions were supporting the development of larvae and adult mosquito of Anopheles spp.

  3. The evolution of the Anopheles 16 genomes project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neafsey, Daniel E.; Christophides, George K.; Collins, Frank H.; Emrich, Scott J.; Fontaine, Michael C.; Gelbart, William; Hahn, Matthew W.; Howell, Paul I.; Kafatos, Fotis C.; Lawson, Daniel; Muskavitch, Marc A. T.; Waterhouse, Robert M.; Williams, Louise J.; Besansky, Nora J.

    2013-01-01

    We report the imminent completion of a set of reference genome assemblies for 16 species of Anopheles mosquitoes. In addition to providing a generally useful resource for comparative genomic analyses, these genome sequences will greatly facilitate exploration of the capacity exhibited by some Anophe

  4. Overexpression and altered nucleocytoplasmic distribution of Anopheles ovalbumin-like SRPN10 serpins in Plasmodium-infected midgut cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielli, Alberto; Barillas-Mury, Carolina; Kumar, Sanjeev; Kafatos, Fotis C; Loukeris, Thanasis G

    2005-02-01

    The design of effective, vector-based malaria transmission blocking strategies relies on a thorough understanding of the molecular and cellular interactions that occur during the parasite sporogonic cycle in the mosquito. During Plasmodium berghei invasion, transcription from the SRPN10 locus, encoding four serine protease inhibitors of the ovalbumin family, is strongly induced in the mosquito midgut. Herein we demonstrate that intense induction as well as redistribution of SRPN10 occurs specifically in the parasite-invaded midgut epithelial cells. Quantitative analysis establishes that in response to epithelial invasion, SRPN10 translocates from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and this is followed by strong SRPN10 overexpression. The invaded cells exhibit signs of apoptosis, suggesting a link between this type of intracellular serpin and epithelial damage. The SRPN10 gene products constitute a novel, robust and cell-autonomous marker of midgut invasion by ookinetes. The SRPN10 dynamics at the subcellular level confirm and further elaborate the 'time bomb' model of P. berghei invasion in both Anopheles stephensi and Anopheles gambiae. In contrast, this syndrome of responses is not elicited by mutant P. berghei ookinetes lacking the major ookinete surface proteins, P28 and P25. Molecular markers with defined expression patterns, in combination with mutant parasite strains, will facilitate dissection of the molecular mechanisms underlying vector competence and development of effective transmission blocking strategies. PMID:15659062

  5. El niño, oscilación del sur (ENOS, con relación a la transmisión de malaria, densidad y paridad de An. albimanus y An. darlingi (diptera: culicidae en dos regiones de Colombia

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    Ricardo Mantilla

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available

    Una fuerte asociación ha sido registrada entre los incrementos en la transmisiónas forzadas por el fenómeno El Niño. Entre las posibles explicaciones para esta asociación está el efecto del clima sobre la dinámica de población de vectores, por ejemplo, generando cambios en la densidad y en las tasas de sobrevivencia de la población, y en la cantidad y calidad de sitios de reproducción, como también a través de cambios en el período de incubación extrínseco del parásito dentro del vector. Con el propósito de evaluar la influencia de ENOS sobre la densidad y paridad de Anopheles albimanus y An. darlingi, y su relación con la transmisión de malaria, se realizó un estudio longitudinal en Chocó y Casanare. En cada área se seleccionaron dos localidades y se realizaron muestreos entomológicos durante una semana cada mes, desde finales de 1997 hasta 1999. Este período cubrió los eventos El Niño 1997 -1998 y La Niña 1998 - 2000. En las localidades de Chocó se observó un importante incremento en el número de casos de malaria durante el evento ENOS, asociado con la temperatura. No se observó una asociación estadísticamente significativa entre los casos de malaria y la precipitación o la humedad relativa. La relación entre el incremento de malaria durante El Niño y las variables entomológicas no fue evidente. La densidad y paridad de ambas especies de vectores fluctuaron durante el período de estudio y no se encontró una asociación significativa entre estas variables y los factores climáticos como la temperatura. La precipitación y la humedad relativa. La densidad de larvas de An. albimanus fluctuó durante el estudio, y mostró altas densidades alrededor de julio - agosto. No se observó asociación entre la densidad de larvas con la densidad de adultos o las variables climáticas. El efecto del evento ENOS sobre las poblaciones de vectores

  6. Nigeria Anopheles vector database: an overview of 100 years' research.

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    Patricia Nkem Okorie

    Full Text Available Anopheles mosquitoes are important vectors of malaria and lymphatic filariasis (LF, which are major public health diseases in Nigeria. Malaria is caused by infection with a protozoan parasite of the genus Plasmodium and LF by the parasitic worm Wuchereria bancrofti. Updating our knowledge of the Anopheles species is vital in planning and implementing evidence based vector control programs. To present a comprehensive report on the spatial distribution and composition of these vectors, all published data available were collated into a database. Details recorded for each source were the locality, latitude/longitude, time/period of study, species, abundance, sampling/collection methods, morphological and molecular species identification methods, insecticide resistance status, including evidence of the kdr allele, and P. falciparum sporozoite rate and W. bancrofti microfilaria prevalence. This collation resulted in a total of 110 publications, encompassing 484,747 Anopheles mosquitoes in 632 spatially unique descriptions at 142 georeferenced locations being identified across Nigeria from 1900 to 2010. Overall, the highest number of vector species reported included An. gambiae complex (65.2%, An. funestus complex (17.3%, An. gambiae s.s. (6.5%. An. arabiensis (5.0% and An. funestus s.s. (2.5%, with the molecular forms An. gambiae M and S identified at 120 locations. A variety of sampling/collection and species identification methods were used with an increase in molecular techniques in recent decades. Insecticide resistance to pyrethroids and organochlorines was found in the main Anopheles species across 45 locations. Presence of P. falciparum and W. bancrofti varied between species with the highest sporozoite rates found in An. gambiae s.s, An. funestus s.s. and An. moucheti, and the highest microfilaria prevalence in An. gambiae s.l., An. arabiensis, and An. gambiae s.s. This comprehensive geo-referenced database provides an essential baseline on

  7. BIONOMICS AND ECOLOGY OF ANOPHELES LITORALIS ON BONGAO ISLAND, TAWI-TAWI PROVINCE, PHILIPPINES: IMPLICATIONS FOR VECTOR CONTROL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Ferdinand V; Torno, Majhalia M; Galang, Cristina; Baquilod, Mario; Bangs, Michael J

    2015-05-01

    Entomological surveys were conducted to identify Anopheles malaria vector species, their feeding and resting behaviors, and characterization of larval habitats on Bongao Island, Tawi-tawi Province, in July and November, 2007. Survey parameters included all-evening human-landing collections (HLC), evening buffalo-baited trap (BBT) collections, daytime indoor and outdoor adult resting collections, adult female age-grading, identification of natural Plasmodium infections in mosquitoes, larval habitat identification and physical/biological characterization, and adult insecticide susceptibility assays. Both surveys revealed the predominant and putative malaria vector species on Bongao Island is Anopheles litoralis. Anophelesflavirostris was collected on only one occasion. The HLC during the July survey produced approximately 4 mosquitoes/human/night (mhn). The November survey yielded 1.27 mhn due, in part, to inclement weather conditions during time of sampling. Anopheles litoralis host seeking behavior occurred throughout the evening (06:00 PM - 06:00 AM) with peak biting between 10:00 PM and 04:00 AM. This species exhibited stronger zoophilic behavior based on comparison of HLC and BBT data. HLC showed a slightly greater exophagic (outdoor) behavior (1.4:1 ratio). During the July collection, an older adult population was present (75% parous) compared to the lower numbers of An. litoralis dissected in November (25% parous). Albeit a small sample size (n=19), 10.5% of An. litoralis dissected contained midgut oocysts of Plasmodium. Daytime adult resting harborages included biotic and abiotic sites in and around partially shaded, brackish water habitats where immature stages were common. Anopheles litoralis was found susceptible to pirimiphos-methyl and four different synthetic pyrethroids. This survey provides further epidemiological evidence of the importance of An. litoralis in malaria transmission on Bongao Island, and presumably throughout much of the Sulu

  8. Development of a Gravid Trap for Collecting Live Malaria Vectors Anopheles gambiae s.l.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugassa, Sisay; Lindh, Jenny M.; Oyieke, Florence; Mukabana, Wolfgang R.; Lindsay, Steven W.; Fillinger, Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    Background Effective malaria vector control targeting indoor host-seeking mosquitoes has resulted in fewer vectors entering houses in many areas of sub-Saharan Africa, with the proportion of vectors outdoors becoming more important in the transmission of this disease. This study aimed to develop a gravid trap for the outdoor collection of the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae s.l. based on evaluation and modification of commercially available gravid traps. Methods Experiments were implemented in an 80 m2 semi-field system where 200 gravid Anopheles gambiae s.s. were released nightly. The efficacy of the Box, CDC and Frommer updraft gravid traps was compared. The Box gravid trap was tested to determine if the presence of the trap over water and the trap’s sound affected catch size. Mosquitoes approaching the treatment were evaluated using electrocuting nets or detergents added to the water in the trap. Based on the results, a new gravid trap (OviART trap) that provided an open, unobstructed oviposition site was developed and evaluated. Results Box and CDC gravid traps collected similar numbers (relative rate (RR) 0.8, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.6–1.2; p = 0.284), whereas the Frommer trap caught 70% fewer mosquitoes (RR 0.3, 95% CI 0.2–0.5; p < 0.001). The number of mosquitoes approaching the Box trap was significantly reduced when the trap was positioned over a water-filled basin compared to an open pond (RR 0.7 95% CI 0.6–0.7; p < 0.001). This effect was not due to the sound of the trap. Catch size increased by 60% (RR 1.6, 1.2–2.2; p = 0.001) with the new OviART trap. Conclusion Gravid An. Gambiae s.s. females were visually deterred by the presence of the trapping device directly over the oviposition medium. Based on these investigations, an effective gravid trap was developed that provides open landing space for egg-laying Anopheles. PMID:23861952

  9. Development of a gravid trap for collecting live malaria vectors Anopheles gambiae s.l.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sisay Dugassa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Effective malaria vector control targeting indoor host-seeking mosquitoes has resulted in fewer vectors entering houses in many areas of sub-Saharan Africa, with the proportion of vectors outdoors becoming more important in the transmission of this disease. This study aimed to develop a gravid trap for the outdoor collection of the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae s.l. based on evaluation and modification of commercially available gravid traps. METHODS: Experiments were implemented in an 80 m(2 semi-field system where 200 gravid Anopheles gambiae s.s. were released nightly. The efficacy of the Box, CDC and Frommer updraft gravid traps was compared. The Box gravid trap was tested to determine if the presence of the trap over water and the trap's sound affected catch size. Mosquitoes approaching the treatment were evaluated using electrocuting nets or detergents added to the water in the trap. Based on the results, a new gravid trap (OviART trap that provided an open, unobstructed oviposition site was developed and evaluated. RESULTS: Box and CDC gravid traps collected similar numbers (relative rate (RR 0.8, 95% confidence interval (CI 0.6-1.2; p = 0.284, whereas the Frommer trap caught 70% fewer mosquitoes (RR 0.3, 95% CI 0.2-0.5; p < 0.001. The number of mosquitoes approaching the Box trap was significantly reduced when the trap was positioned over a water-filled basin compared to an open pond (RR 0.7 95% CI 0.6-0.7; p < 0.001. This effect was not due to the sound of the trap. Catch size increased by 60% (RR 1.6, 1.2-2.2; p = 0.001 with the new OviART trap. CONCLUSION: Gravid An. Gambiae s.s. females were visually deterred by the presence of the trapping device directly over the oviposition medium. Based on these investigations, an effective gravid trap was developed that provides open landing space for egg-laying Anopheles.

  10. Genomic islands of speciation in Anopheles gambiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The African malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto (A. gambiae, provides a unique opportunity to study the evolution of reproductive isolation because it is divided into two sympatric, partially isolated subtaxa known as M form and S form. With the annotated genome of this species now available, high-throughput techniques can be applied to locate and characterize the genomic regions contributing to reproductive isolation. In order to quantify patterns of differentiation within A. gambiae, we hybridized population samples of genomic DNA from each form to Affymetrix GeneChip microarrays. We found that three regions, together encompassing less than 2.8 Mb, are the only locations where the M and S forms are significantly differentiated. Two of these regions are adjacent to centromeres, on Chromosomes 2L and X, and contain 50 and 12 predicted genes, respectively. Sequenced loci in these regions contain fixed differences between forms and no shared polymorphisms, while no fixed differences were found at nearby control loci. The third region, on Chromosome 2R, contains only five predicted genes; fixed differences in this region were also verified by direct sequencing. These "speciation islands" remain differentiated despite considerable gene flow, and are therefore expected to contain the genes responsible for reproductive isolation. Much effort has recently been applied to locating the genes and genetic changes responsible for reproductive isolation between species. Though much can be inferred about speciation by studying taxa that have diverged for millions of years, studying differentiation between taxa that are in the early stages of isolation will lead to a clearer view of the number and size of regions involved in the genetics of speciation. Despite appreciable levels of gene flow between the M and S forms of A. gambiae, we were able to isolate three small regions of differentiation where genes responsible for ecological and behavioral

  11. Malaria vector species in Colombia: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya-Lerma, James; Solarte, Yezid A; Giraldo-Calderón, Gloria Isabel; Quiñones, Martha L; Ruiz-López, Freddy; Wilkerson, Richard C; González, Ranulfo

    2011-08-01

    Here we present a comprehensive review of the literature on the vectorial importance of the major Anopheles malaria vectors in Colombia. We provide basic information on the geographical distribution, altitudinal range, immature habitats, adult behaviour, feeding preferences and anthropophily, endophily and infectivity rates. We additionally review information on the life cycle, longevity and population fluctuation of Colombian Anopheles species. Emphasis was placed on the primary vectors that have been epidemiologically incriminated in malaria transmission: Anopheles darlingi, Anopheles albimanus and Anopheles nuneztovari. The role of a selection of local, regional or secondary vectors (e.g., Anopheles pseudopunctipennis and Anopheles neivai) is also discussed. We highlight the importance of combining biological, morphological and molecular data for the correct taxonomical determination of a given species, particularly for members of the species complexes. We likewise emphasise the importance of studying the bionomics of primary and secondary vectors along with an examination of the local conditions affecting the transmission of malaria. The presence and spread of the major vectors and the emergence of secondary species capable of transmitting human Plasmodia are of great interest. When selecting control measures, the anopheline diversity in the region must be considered. Variation in macroclimate conditions over a species' geographical range must be well understood and targeted to plan effective control measures based on the population dynamics of the local Anopheles species. PMID:21881778

  12. Observations on the swarming and mating behaviour of Anopheles funestus from southern Mozambique

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    Thompson R

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Control of malaria by the release of genetically modified mosquitoes refractory to transmission is now becoming a possibility. In many areas of Africa, Anopheles gambiae is found together with an equally important vector, An. funestus. Given their sympatry and the likelihood of a similar mating period some aspects of the mating behaviour of An. gambiae s.l. and An. funestus are likely to differ. We therefore attempted to characterise the swarming behaviour of An. funestus and to determine if any aspects of the observed behaviour differed from that recorded for the M form of An. gambiae from São Tomé. Methods In March – May 2002 the swarming, mating, house exiting and resting behaviour of Anopheles funestus was studied by direct observation in Mozambique. Swarming males and insects in copula were collected by sweep net. Wing lengths of males collected resting, exiting houses, swarming and mating were measured and the wingbeat frequency distribution of individual insects, in free flight confined inside netting covered paper cups, was also determined. Results Mono-specific swarms occurred at sunset in relatively open areas close to houses used for resting. Mating pairs were seen 11 ± 3.7 min after the start of swarming. The number of total pairs observed being inversely proportional to the time difference between the start of swarming and the first pairing. The great majority of females mated before feeding. Male or female size did not appear to affect mating success or other behaviours. During the study, ambient temperatures decreased and female, but not male, wing size increased. At 516 Hz, the flight tone of female An. funestus was similar to the 497 Hz of the local An. gambiae. Males dispersed if light or dark artificial horizontal markers were placed underneath naturally occurring swarms. Conclusion Differential response to markers would be sufficient for swarming in An. funestus and An. gambiae s.l. to occur in

  13. Spatial and sex-specific dissection of the Anopheles gambiae midgut transcriptome

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    Mahairaki Vassiliki

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The midgut of hematophagous insects, such as disease transmitting mosquitoes, carries out a variety of essential functions that mostly relate to blood feeding. The midgut of the female malaria vector mosquito Anopheles gambiae is a major site of interactions between the parasite and the vector. Distinct compartments and cell types of the midgut tissue carry out specific functions and vector borne pathogens interact and infect different parts of the midgut. Results A microarray based global gene expression approach was used to compare transcript abundance in the four major female midgut compartments (cardia, anterior, anterior part of posterior and posterior part of posterior midgut and between the male and female Anopheles gambiae midgut. Major differences between the female and male midgut gene expression relate to digestive processes and immunity. Each compartment has a distinct gene function profile with the posterior midgut expressing digestive enzyme genes and the cardia and anterior midgut expressing high levels of antimicrobial peptide and other immune gene transcripts. Interestingly, the cardia expressed several known anti-Plasmodium factors. A parallel peptidomic analysis of the cardia identified known mosquito antimicrobial peptides as well as several putative short secreted peptides that are likely to represent novel antimicrobial factors. Conclusion The A. gambiae sex specific midgut and female midgut compartment specific transcriptomes correlates with their known functions. The significantly greater functional diversity of the female midgut relate to hematophagy that is associated with digestion and nutrition uptake as well as exposes it to a variety of pathogens, and promotes growth of its endogenous microbial flora. The strikingly high proportion of immunity related factors in the cardia tissue most likely serves the function to increase sterility of ingested sugar and blood. A detailed characterization of the

  14. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis of genes associated with acute desiccation stress in Anopheles gambiae.

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    Mei-Hui Wang

    Full Text Available Malaria transmission in sub-Saharan Africa varies seasonally in intensity. Outbreaks of malaria occur after the beginning of the rainy season, whereas, during the dry season, reports of the disease are less frequent. Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes, the main malaria vector, are observed all year long but their densities are low during the dry season that generally lasts several months. Aestivation, seasonal migration, and local adaptation have been suggested as mechanisms that enable mosquito populations to persist through the dry season. Studies of chromosomal inversions have shown that inversions 2La, 2Rb, 2Rc, 2Rd, and 2Ru are associated with various physiological changes that confer aridity resistance. However, little is known about how phenotypic plasticity responds to seasonally dry conditions. This study examined the effects of desiccation stress on transcriptional regulation in An. gambiae. We exposed female An. gambiae G3 mosquitoes to acute desiccation and conducted a genome-wide analysis of their transcriptomes using the Affymetrix Plasmodium/Anopheles Genome Array. The transcription of 248 genes (1.7% of all transcripts was significantly affected in all experimental conditions, including 96 with increased expression and 152 with decreased expression. In general, the data indicate a reduction in the metabolic rate of mosquitoes exposed to desiccation. Transcripts accumulated at higher levels during desiccation are associated with oxygen radical detoxification, DNA repair and stress responses. The proportion of transcripts within 2La and 2Rs (2Rb, 2Rc, 2Rd, and 2Ru (67/248, or 27% is similar to the percentage of transcripts located within these inversions (31%. These data may be useful in efforts to elucidate the role of chromosomal inversions in aridity tolerance. The scope of application of the anopheline genome demonstrates that examining transcriptional activity in relation to genotypic adaptations greatly expands the number of

  15. Inducible peroxidases mediate nitration of anopheles midgut cells undergoing apoptosis in response to Plasmodium invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Gupta, Lalita; Han, Yeon Soo; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2004-12-17

    Plasmodium berghei invasion of Anopheles stephensi midgut cells causes severe damage, induces expression of nitric-oxide synthase, and leads to apoptosis. The present study indicates that invasion results in tyrosine nitration, catalyzed as a two-step reaction in which nitric-oxide synthase induction is followed by increased peroxidase activity. Ookinete invasion induced localized expression of peroxidase enzymes, which catalyzed protein nitration in vitro in the presence of nitrite and H(2)O(2). Histochemical stainings revealed that when a parasite migrates laterally and invades more than one cell, the pattern of induced peroxidase activity is similar to that observed for tyrosine nitration. In Anopheles gambiae, ookinete invasion elicited similar responses; it induced expression of 5 of the 16 peroxidase genes predicted by the genome sequence and decreased mRNA levels of one of them. One of these inducible peroxidases has a C-terminal oxidase domain homologous to the catalytic moiety of phagocyte NADPH oxidase and could provide high local levels of superoxide anion (O(2)), that when dismutated would generate the local increase in H(2)O(2) required for nitration. Chemically induced apoptosis of midgut cells also activated expression of four ookinete-induced peroxidase genes, suggesting their involvement in general apoptotic responses. The two-step nitration reaction provides a mechanism to precisely localize and circumscribe the toxic products generated by defense reactions involving nitration. The present study furthers our understanding of the biochemistry of midgut defense reactions to parasite invasion and how these may influence the efficiency of malaria transmission by anopheline mosquitoes. PMID:15456781

  16. Flipping the paradigm on malaria transmission-blocking vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Dinglasan, Rhoel R.; Jacobs-Lorena, Marcelo

    2008-01-01

    The idea of malaria transmission-blocking vaccines (TBVs) surfaced more than two decades ago. Since then, the research paradigm focused on developing TBVs that target surface antigens of parasite sexual stages. Only recently has an effort emerged that flipped this paradigm, targeting antigens of the parasite’s obligate invertebrate vector, the Anopheles mosquito. Here, we review the current state of knowledge of mosquito-based TBVs and discuss the utility of this approach for future vaccine d...

  17. Malaria transmission and disease burden in Assam: challenges and opportunities

    OpenAIRE

    Dev, V; Sharma, V. P.; Hojai, D.

    2009-01-01

    Malaria is major public health illness in Assam and 30–40% of the population is estimated to be at high-risk. Despite decades of attempted control interventions, malaria transmission is perennial and persistent in most parts of the state mostly transmitted by Anopheles minimus. Malaria outbreaks are returning associated with high rise in Plasmodium falciparum and attributable death cases. Therapeutic efficacy investigations for treatment of malaria revealed that chloroquine resistance was wid...

  18. PCR identification of five species from the Anopheles maculipennis complex (Diptera: Culicidae) in North-Eastern Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanescu, Maria-Larisa; Acatrinei, Dumitru; Pavel, Ionuţ; Sulesco, Tatiana; Miron, Liviu

    2015-06-01

    The members of the Anopheles maculipennis complex have been incriminated for the transmission of the malaria in Europe, which was endemic until the middle of the century. The global warming and the intensification of the intercontinental travel constitute a risk of the re-emergence of the malaria in Europe, given the presence of the Anopheles vectors. The study has attempted the identification by using the PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction) of the members of the Anopheles maculipennis complex from the North-eastern area of Romania from the city of Iaşi. In total there have been identified by using the PCR amplifying the ITS2 sequence of the ribosomal DNA, 217 specimens belonging to the complex of A. maculipennis among which: 58 A. atroparvus, 18 A. melanoon, 2 A. labranchiae, 52 A. maculipennis and 87 A. messeae. The ITS2 sequences of the ribosomal DNA have been compared to those of the species belonging to the A. maculipennis available in GenBank. The Species A. labranchiae is reported for the first time in Romania, being identified in the larval stage IV. The adaptation of a new species to the climatic conditions present in the North-eastern Romania, confirms the phenomenon of global warming and also the intensification of the travelling. As a result of the analysis of the A. labranchiae sequence, this one corresponds to the extent of 96% to the species from Italy, registered in GenBank, given the fact that a high number of the inhabitants of the municipality of Iaşi are working in this country. PMID:26203997

  19. Comparative egg morphology of six species of the Albimanus section of Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus) (Diptera:Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lounibos, L P; Duzak, D; Linley, J R

    1997-03-01

    Scanning electron micrographs were used to describe and compare structures of eggs obtained from wild-caught females of 6 species of the Albimanus section of Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus) from South America, which includes important regional vectors of human malaria. Among species from the Oswaldoi Complex, eggs of Anopheles oswaldoi (Peryassu) were not differentiated from those of its sibling Anopheles konderi Galvão & Damasceno, and eggs of the former species from Brazil, Ecuador, and Suriname showed no regionally distinguishing characteristics. Eggs of Anopheles dunhami Causey were recognized by the reticulate beadwork of outer chorion on the dorsal plastron, 1 of several egg characters separating this species from the related Anopheles trinkae Faran and Anophels nuneztovari Gabaldón. In both species examined from the Strodei Complex, Anopheles strodei Root and Anopheles benarrochi Gabaldón, Cova Garcia & Lopez, the anterior frill forms a distinctive ventral crown separated from the floats. Anopheles triannulatus (Neiva & Pinto), collected from 4 geographic sites, differed in the occurrence of perforated mounds on the dorsal plastron, but these chorionic structures and the extent of overlap of floats varied among eggs from single females. Changes among related species in the structure of the anterior frill and dorsal plastron are described for phylogenetic and developmental inferences. PMID:9103756

  20. Relationship of Remote Sensing Normalized Differential Vegetation Index to Anopheles Density and Malaria Incidence Rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    To study the relationship of remote sensing normalized differential vegetation index (NDVI) to Anopheles density and malaria incidence rate. Methods Data of monthly average climate, environment, Anopheles density and malaria incidence rate, and remote sensing NDVI were collected from 27 townships of 10 counties in southeastern Yunnan Province from 1984 to 1993. The relationship of remote sensing ecological proxy index, NDVI, to Anopheles density and malaria incidence rate was studied by principal component analysis, factor analysis and grey correlation analysis. Results The correlation matrix showed that NDVI highly correlated with Anopheles density in 4 townships of Mengla, Jinghong, and Yuanjiang counties, but in other 23 townships the relationship was not clear. Principal component and factor analyses showed that remote sensing NDVI was the representative index of the first principal component and the first common factor of Anopheles density evaluation. Grey correlation analysis showed that in rainy season NDVI had a high grey correlation with Anopheles density and malaria incidence rate. The grey correlation analysis showed that in rainy season the grey degree of NDVI correlated with Anopheles. Minimus density was 0.730, and 0.713 with Anopheles sinensis density, and 0.800 with malarial incidence rate. Conclusion Remote sensing NDVI can serve as a sensitive evaluation index of Anopheles density and malaria incidence rate.

  1. Climate, environment and transmission of malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossati, Antonella; Bargiacchi, Olivia; Kroumova, Vesselina; Zaramella, Marco; Caputo, Annamaria; Garavelli, Pietro Luigi

    2016-06-01

    Malaria, the most common parasitic disease in the world, is transmitted to the human host by mosquitoes of the genus Anopheles. The transmission of malaria requires the interaction between the host, the vector and the parasite.The four species of parasites responsible for human malaria are Plasmodium falciparum, Plasmodium ovale, Plasmodium malariae and Plasmodium vivax. Occasionally humans can be infected by several simian species, like Plasmodium knowlesi, recognised as a major cause of human malaria in South-East Asia since 2004. While P. falciparum is responsible for most malaria cases, about 8% of estimated cases globally are caused by P. vivax. The different Plasmodia are not uniformly distributed although there are areas of species overlap. The life cycle of all species of human malaria parasites is characterised by an exogenous sexual phase in which multiplication occurs in several species of Anopheles mosquitoes, and an endogenous asexual phase in the vertebrate host. The time span required for mature oocyst development in the salivary glands is quite variable (7-30 days), characteristic of each species and influenced by ambient temperature. The vector Anopheles includes 465 formally recognised species. Approximately 70 of these species have the capacity to transmit Plasmodium spp. to humans and 41 are considered as dominant vector capable of transmitting malaria. The intensity of transmission is dependent on the vectorial capacity and competence of local mosquitoes. An efficient system for malaria transmission needs strong interaction between humans, the ecosystem and infected vectors. Global warming induced by human activities has increased the risk of vector-borne diseases such as malaria. Recent decades have witnessed changes in the ecosystem and climate without precedent in human history although the emphasis in the role of temperature on the epidemiology of malaria has given way to predisposing conditions such as ecosystem changes, political

  2. A maleness gene in the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzywinska, Elzbieta; Dennison, Nathan J; Lycett, Gareth J; Krzywinski, Jaroslaw

    2016-07-01

    The molecular pathways controlling gender are highly variable and have been identified in only a few nonmammalian model species. In many insects, maleness is conferred by a Y chromosome-linked M factor of unknown nature. We have isolated and characterized a gene, Yob, for the M factor in the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae Yob, activated at the beginning of zygotic transcription and expressed throughout a male's life, controls male-specific splicing of the doublesex gene. Silencing embryonic Yob expression is male-lethal, whereas ectopic embryonic delivery of Yob transcripts yields male-only broods. This female-killing property may be an invaluable tool for creation of conditional male-only transgenic Anopheles strains for malaria control programs. PMID:27365445

  3. On the conspecificity of Anopheles fluviatilis species S with Anopheles minimus species C

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    O P Singh; D Chandra; N Nanda; S K Sharma; Pe Than Htun; T Adak; S K Subbarao; A P Dash

    2006-12-01

    Anopheles fluviatilis and An. minimus complexes, each comprising of at least three sibling species, are closely related and important malaria vectors in Oriental Region. Recently An. fluviatilis species S, which is a highly efficient malaria vector in India, has been made conspecific with An. minimus species C (senior synonym) on the basis of homology in 335 base pair nucleotide sequence of D3 domain of 28S ribosomal DNA (rDNA). We examined the conspecificity of these two nominal species by obtaining and analysing the DNA sequences of nuclear ribosomal loci internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) and D2-D3 domain of 28S rDNA (28S-D2/D3) from those of An. fluviatilis S and An. minimus C. We found that the sequences of An. fluviatilis S are appreciably different from those of An. minimus C with pair-wise distance (Kimura-2-parametre model) of 3.6 and 0.7% for loci ITS2 and 28S-D2/D3, respectively. Pair-wise distance and phylogenetic analyses using ITS2 sequences of members of Minimus and Fluviatilis Complexes revealed that An. fluviatilis S is distantly related to An. minimus C as compared to any other members of the Fluviatilis Complex. These findings suggest that the two nominal species, An. fluviatilis S and An. minimus C, do not merit synonymy. The study also confirms that the reported species An. fluviatilis X is synonym with species S.

  4. Seasonality and Locality Affect the Diversity of Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles coluzzii Midgut Microbiota from Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendrin, Mathilde; Pels, Nana Adjoa P.; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy; Christophides, George K.; Wilson, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Symbiotic bacteria can have important implications in the development and competence of disease vectors. In Anopheles mosquitoes, the composition of the midgut microbiota is largely influenced by the larval breeding site, but the exact factors shaping this composition are currently unknown. Here, we examined whether the proximity to urban areas and seasons have an impact on the midgut microbial community of the two major malaria vectors in Africa, An. coluzzii and An. gambiae. Larvae and pupae were collected from selected habitats in two districts of Ghana during the dry and rainy season periods. The midgut microbiota of adults that emerged from these collections was determined by 454-pyrosequencing of the 16S ribosomal DNA. We show that in both mosquito species, Shewanellaceae constituted on average of 54% and 73% of the midgut microbiota from each site in the dry and rainy season, respectively. Enterobacteriaceae was found in comparatively low abundance below 1% in 22/30 samples in the dry season, and in 25/38 samples in the rainy season. Our data indicate that seasonality and locality significantly affect both the diversity of microbiota and the relative abundance of bacterial families with a positive impact of dry season and peri-urban settings. PMID:27322614

  5. Mating competitiveness of sterile male Anopheles coluzzii in large cages

    OpenAIRE

    Maïga, H.; Damiens, D.; Niang, A.; Sawadogo, SP; Fatherhaman, O.; Lees, RS; Roux, O.; Dabiré, RK; Ouédraogo, GA; Tripet, F; Diabaté, A.; Gilles, JR

    2014-01-01

    Background: Understanding the factors that account for male mating competitiveness is critical to the development of the sterile insect technique (SIT). Here, the effects of partial sterilization with 90 Gy of radiation on sexual competitiveness of Anopheles coluzzii allowed to mate in different ratios of sterile to untreated males have been assessed. Moreover, competitiveness was compared between males allowed one versus two days of contact with females. Methods: Sterile and untreated males ...

  6. Resistance Mechanisms of Anopheles stephensi (Diptera: Culicidae) to Temephos

    OpenAIRE

    Aboozar Soltani; Hassan Vatandoost; MohammadAli Oshaghi; Naseh Maleki-Ravasan; AhmadAli Enayati; Fatemeh Asgarian

    2014-01-01

    Background: Anopheles stephensi is a sub-tropical species and has been considered as one of the most important vector of human malaria throughout the Middle East and South Asian region including the malarious areas of southern Iran. Current reports confirmed An. stephensi resistance to temephos in Oman and India. However, there is no comprehensive research on mechanisms of temephos resistance in An. stephensi in the literature. This study was designed in order to clarify the enzymatic and mol...

  7. Highly evolvable malaria vectors : the genomes of 16 Anopheles mosquitoes

    OpenAIRE

    Neafsey, Daniel E; Waterhouse, Robert M.; Abai, Mohammad R.; Aganezov, Sergey S.; Alekseyev, Max A.; Allen, James E.; Amon, James; Arcà, Bruno; Arensburger, Peter; Artemov, Gleb; Assour, Lauren A.; Basseri, Hamidreza; Berlin, Aaron; Birren, Bruce W.; Blandin, Stephanie A.

    2015-01-01

    Variation in vectorial capacity for human malaria among Anopheles mosquito species is determined by many factors, including behavior, immunity, and life history. To investigate the genomic basis of vectorial capacity and explore new avenues for vector control, we sequenced the genomes of 16 anopheline mosquito species from diverse locations spanning similar to 100 million years of evolution. Comparative analyses show faster rates of gene gain and loss, elevated gene shuffling on the X chromos...

  8. Molecular characterization of DDT resistance in Anopheles gambiae from Benin

    OpenAIRE

    Djègbè, Innocent; Agossa, Fiacre R; Jones, Christopher M.; Poupardin, Rodolphe; Cornelie, Sylvie; Akogbéto, Martin; Ranson, Hilary; Corbel, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Background Insecticide resistance in the mosquito vector is the one of the main obstacles against effective malaria control. In order to implement insecticide resistance management strategies, it is important to understand the genetic factors involved. In this context, we investigated the molecular basis of DDT resistance in the main malaria vector from Benin. Methods Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes were collected from four sites across Benin and identified to species/molecular form. Mosquitoes ...

  9. Knockdown resistance (kdr) mutations in Indian Anopheles culicifacies populations

    OpenAIRE

    Dykes, Cherry L.; Kushwah, Raja Babu S.; Das, Manoj K; Sharma, Shri N.; Bhatt, Rajendra M; Veer, Vijay; Agrawal, Om P.; Adak, Tridibes; Singh, Om P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Anopheles culicifacies s.l. is one of the primary vectors of malaria in India responsible for the highest number of malaria cases. This vector is resistant to DDT in most parts of the country with indication of emerging resistance to pyrethroids. Since knockdown resistance (kdr) is known to confer cross-resistance between DDT and pyrethroids owing to a common target site of action, knowledge of prevalence of knockdown resistance (kdr) alleles is important from insecticide resistanc...

  10. Molecular characterization of DDT resistance in Anopheles gambiae from Benin

    OpenAIRE

    Djegbe, I.; Agossa, F. R.; Jones, C. M.; Poupardin, R; Cornélie, Sylvie; Akogbeto, M; Ranson, H.; Corbel, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Background: Insecticide resistance in the mosquito vector is the one of the main obstacles against effective malaria control. In order to implement insecticide resistance management strategies, it is important to understand the genetic factors involved. In this context, we investigated the molecular basis of DDT resistance in the main malaria vector from Benin. Methods: Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes were collected from four sites across Benin and identified to species/molecular form. Mosquitoe...

  11. Pyrethroid Resistance in an Anopheles funestus Population from Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Morgan, John C.; Irving, Helen; Okedi, Loyce M.; Steven, Andrew; Wondji, Charles S

    2010-01-01

    Background The susceptibility status of Anopheles funestus to insecticides remains largely unknown in most parts of Africa because of the difficulty in rearing field-caught mosquitoes of this malaria vector. Here we report the susceptibility status of the An. funestus population from Tororo district in Uganda and a preliminary characterisation of the putative resistance mechanisms involved. Methodology/Principal Findings A new forced egg laying technique used in this study significantly incre...

  12. Anopheles larval abundance and diversity in three rice agro-village complexes Mwea irrigation scheme, central Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mwangangi Joseph M

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The diversity and abundance of Anopheles larvae has significant influence on the resulting adult mosquito population and hence the dynamics of malaria transmission. Studies were conducted to examine larval habitat dynamics and ecological factors affecting survivorship of aquatic stages of malaria vectors in three agro-ecological settings in Mwea, Kenya. Methods Three villages were selected based on rice husbandry and water management practices. Aquatic habitats in the 3 villages representing planned rice cultivation (Mbui Njeru, unplanned rice cultivation (Kiamachiri and non-irrigated (Murinduko agro-ecosystems were sampled every 2 weeks to generate stage-specific estimates of mosquito larval densities, relative abundance and diversity. Records of distance to the nearest homestead, vegetation coverage, surface debris, turbidity, habitat stability, habitat type, rice growth stage, number of rice tillers and percent Azolla cover were taken for each habitat. Results Captures of early, late instars and pupae accounted for 78.2%, 10.9% and 10.8% of the total Anopheles immatures sampled (n = 29,252, respectively. There were significant differences in larval abundance between 3 agro-ecosystems. The village with 'planned' rice cultivation had relatively lower Anopheles larval densities compared to the villages where 'unplanned' or non-irrigated. Similarly, species composition and richness was higher in the two villages with either 'unplanned' or limited rice cultivation, an indication of the importance of land use patterns on diversity of larval habitat types. Rice fields and associated canals were the most productive habitat types while water pools and puddles were important for short periods during the rainy season. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that presence of other invertebrates, percentage Azolla cover, distance to nearest homestead, depth and water turbidity were the best predictors for Anopheles mosquito larval

  13. Mating competitiveness of sterile genetic sexing strain males (GAMA) under laboratory and semi-field conditions: Steps towards the use of the Sterile Insect Technique to control the major malaria vector Anopheles arabiensis in South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Munhenga, Givemore; Brooke, Basil D; Gilles, Jeremie R. L.; Slabbert, Kobus; Kemp, Alan,; Dandalo, Leonard C.; Wood, Oliver R.; Lobb, Leanne N.; Govender, Danny; Renke, Marius; Koekemoer, Lizette L

    2016-01-01

    Background Anopheles arabiensis Patton is primarily responsible for malaria transmission in South Africa after successful suppression of other major vector species using indoor spraying of residual insecticides. Control of An. arabiensis using current insecticide based approaches is proving difficult owing to the development of insecticide resistance, and variable feeding and resting behaviours. The use of the sterile insect technique as an area-wide integrated pest management system to suppl...

  14. Brachiola gambiae sp n. the microsporidian parasite of Anopheles gambiae and A-melas in Liberia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Weiser, Jaroslav; Žižka, Zdeněk

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 1 (2004), s. 73-80. ISSN 0065-1583 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5007907 Keywords : Anopheles gambiae * Anopheles melas * Brachiola gambiae Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 0.986, year: 2004

  15. Molecular functional characterization of appetence maturation and its nutrient-dependent control in the African malaria mosquito “Anopheles gambiae”

    OpenAIRE

    Arsic, Dany; Guerin, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Le moustique Anopheles gambiae (anophèle) est le principal vecteur du paludisme (malaria) en Afrique sub-saharienne. Les repas sanguins fréquents pris par les femelles adultes sur des êtres humains multiplient les occasions de transmission des parasites sanguins du genre Plasmodium responsables du paludisme. Une meilleure compréhension de la régulation des comportements de recherche d’hôte entrepris par les moustiques femelles, ainsi que de leurs comportements alimentaires et de leur reproduc...

  16. Remarkable diversity of intron-1 of the para voltage-gated sodium channel gene in an Anopheles gambiae/Anopheles coluzzii hybrid zone.

    OpenAIRE

    Santolamazza, F.; Caputo, B.; Nwakanma, DC; Fanello, C.; Petrarca, V.; Conway, DJ; Weetman, D; J. Pinto; Mancini, E.; della Torre, A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Genomic differentiation between Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles coluzzii - the major malaria vectors in sub-Saharan Africa - is localized into large “islands” toward the centromeres of chromosome-X and the two autosomes. Linkage disequilibrium between these genomic islands was first detected between species-specific polymorphisms within ribosomal DNA genes (IGS-rDNA) on the X-chromosome and a single variant at position 702 of intron 1 (Int-1702) of the para Voltage-Gated Sodium Cha...

  17. Next-generation site-directed transgenesis in the malaria vector mosquito Anopheles gambiae: self-docking strains expressing germline-specific phiC31 integrase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet M Meredith

    Full Text Available Diseases transmitted by mosquitoes have a devastating impact on global health and the situation is complicated due to difficulties with both existing control measures and the impact of climate change. Genetically modified mosquitoes that are refractory to disease transmission are seen as having great potential in the delivery of novel control strategies. The Streptomyces phage phiC31 integrase system has been successfully adapted for site-directed transgene integration in a range of insects, thus overcoming many limitations due to size constraints and random integration associated with transposon-mediated transformation. Using this technology, we previously published the first site-directed transformation of Anopheles gambiae, the principal vector of human malaria. Mosquitoes were initially engineered to incorporate the phiC31 docking site at a defined genomic location. A second phase of genetic modification then achieved site-directed integration of an anti-malarial effector gene. In the current publication we report improved efficiency and utility of the phiC31 integrase system following the generation of Anopheles gambiae self-docking strains. Four independent strains, with docking sites at known locations on three different chromosome arms, were engineered to express integrase under control of the regulatory regions of the nanos gene from Anopheles gambiae. The resulting protein accumulates in the posterior oocyte to provide integrase activity at the site of germline development. Two self-docking strains, exhibiting significantly different levels of integrase expression, were assessed for site-directed transgene integration and found to demonstrate greatly improved survival and efficiency of transformation. In the fight against malaria, it is imperative to establish a broad repertoire of both anti-malarial effector genes and tissue-specific promoters to regulate their expression, enabling those offering maximum effect with minimum fitness

  18. Immunity-related genes and gene families in Anopheles gambiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christophides, George K; Zdobnov, Evgeny; Barillas-Mury, Carolina; Birney, Ewan; Blandin, Stephanie; Blass, Claudia; Brey, Paul T; Collins, Frank H; Danielli, Alberto; Dimopoulos, George; Hetru, Charles; Hoa, Ngo T; Hoffmann, Jules A; Kanzok, Stefan M; Letunic, Ivica; Levashina, Elena A; Loukeris, Thanasis G; Lycett, Gareth; Meister, Stephan; Michel, Kristin; Moita, Luis F; Müller, Hans-Michael; Osta, Mike A; Paskewitz, Susan M; Reichhart, Jean-Marc; Rzhetsky, Andrey; Troxler, Laurent; Vernick, Kenneth D; Vlachou, Dina; Volz, Jennifer; von Mering, Christian; Xu, Jiannong; Zheng, Liangbiao; Bork, Peer; Kafatos, Fotis C

    2002-10-01

    We have identified 242 Anopheles gambiae genes from 18 gene families implicated in innate immunity and have detected marked diversification relative to Drosophila melanogaster. Immune-related gene families involved in recognition, signal modulation, and effector systems show a marked deficit of orthologs and excessive gene expansions, possibly reflecting selection pressures from different pathogens encountered in these insects' very different life-styles. In contrast, the multifunctional Toll signal transduction pathway is substantially conserved, presumably because of counterselection for developmental stability. Representative expression profiles confirm that sequence diversification is accompanied by specific responses to different immune challenges. Alternative RNA splicing may also contribute to expansion of the immune repertoire. PMID:12364793

  19. CLIP proteases and Plasmodium melanization in Anopheles gambiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2007-07-01

    Melanization is a potent immune response mediated by phenoloxidase (PO). Multiple Clip-domain serine proteases (CLIP) regulate PO activation as part of a complex cascade of proteases that are cleaved sequentially. The role of several CLIP as key activators or suppressors of the melanization responses of Anopheles gambiae to Plasmodium berghei (murine malaria) has been established recently using a genome-wide reverse genetics approach. Important differences in regulation of PO activation between An. gambiae strains were also identified. This review summarizes these findings and discusses our current understanding of the An. gambiae melanization responses to Plasmodium. PMID:17512801

  20. Plasmodium falciparum infection rates for some Anopheles spp. from Guinea-Bissau, West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, Michelle R; Cornel, Anthony J; Nieman, Catelyn C; Dinis, Joao; Marsden, Clare D; Weakley, Allison M; Han, Sarah; Rodrigues, Amabelia; Lanzaro, Gregory C; Lee, Yoosook

    2014-01-01

    Presence of Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (CSP) was detected by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in a sample of Anopheles gambiae s.s., A. melas and A. pharoensis collected in Guinea-Bissau during October and November 2009. The percentage of P. falciparum infected samples (10.2% overall; confidence interval (CI): 7.45-13.6%) was comparable to earlier studies from other sites in Guinea-Bissau (9.6-12.4%). The majority of the specimens collected were identified as A. gambiae which had an individual infection rate of 12.6 % (CI: 8.88-17.6) across collection sites. A small number of specimens of A. coluzzii, A. coluzzii x A. gambiae hybrids, A. melas and A. pharoensis were collected and had infection rates of 4.3% (CI:0.98-12.4), 4.1% (CI:0.35-14.5), 11.1% (CI:1.86-34.1) and 33.3% (CI:9.25-70.4) respectively. Despite being present in low numbers in indoor collections, the exophilic feeding behaviors of A. melas (N=18) and A. pharoensis (N=6) and high infection rates observed in this survey suggest falciparum-malaria transmission potential outside of the protection of bed nets. PMID:25383188

  1. Modelling Anopheles gambiae s.s. Population Dynamics with Temperature- and Age-Dependent Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen-Jucht, Céline; Erguler, Kamil; Shek, Chee Yan; Basáñez, María-Gloria; Parham, Paul E

    2015-06-01

    Climate change and global warming are emerging as important threats to human health, particularly through the potential increase in vector- and water-borne diseases. Environmental variables are known to affect substantially the population dynamics and abundance of the poikilothermic vectors of disease, but the exact extent of this sensitivity is not well established. Focusing on malaria and its main vector in Africa, Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto, we present a set of novel mathematical models of climate-driven mosquito population dynamics motivated by experimental data suggesting that in An. gambiae, mortality is temperature and age dependent. We compared the performance of these models to that of a "standard" model ignoring age dependence. We used a longitudinal dataset of vector abundance over 36 months in sub-Saharan Africa for comparison between models that incorporate age dependence and one that does not, and observe that age-dependent models consistently fitted the data better than the reference model. This highlights that including age dependence in the vector component of mosquito-borne disease models may be important to predict more reliably disease transmission dynamics. Further data and studies are needed to enable improved fitting, leading to more accurate and informative model predictions for the An. gambiae malaria vector as well as for other disease vectors. PMID:26030468

  2. Modelling Anopheles gambiae s.s. Population Dynamics with Temperature- and Age-Dependent Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen-Jucht, Céline; Erguler, Kamil; Shek, Chee Yan; Basáñez, María-Gloria; Parham, Paul E.

    2015-01-01

    Climate change and global warming are emerging as important threats to human health, particularly through the potential increase in vector- and water-borne diseases. Environmental variables are known to affect substantially the population dynamics and abundance of the poikilothermic vectors of disease, but the exact extent of this sensitivity is not well established. Focusing on malaria and its main vector in Africa, Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto, we present a set of novel mathematical models of climate-driven mosquito population dynamics motivated by experimental data suggesting that in An. gambiae, mortality is temperature and age dependent. We compared the performance of these models to that of a “standard” model ignoring age dependence. We used a longitudinal dataset of vector abundance over 36 months in sub-Saharan Africa for comparison between models that incorporate age dependence and one that does not, and observe that age-dependent models consistently fitted the data better than the reference model. This highlights that including age dependence in the vector component of mosquito-borne disease models may be important to predict more reliably disease transmission dynamics. Further data and studies are needed to enable improved fitting, leading to more accurate and informative model predictions for the An. gambiae malaria vector as well as for other disease vectors. PMID:26030468

  3. Low linkage disequilibrium in wild Anopheles gambiae s.l. populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris Caroline

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae, understanding diversity in natural populations and genetic components of important phenotypes such as resistance to malaria infection is crucial for developing new malaria transmission blocking strategies. The design and interpretation of many studies here depends critically on Linkage disequilibrium (LD. For example in association studies, LD determines the density of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs to be genotyped to represent the majority of the genomic information. Here, we aim to determine LD in wild An. gambiae s.l. populations in 4 genes potentially involved in mosquito immune responses against pathogens (Gambicin, NOS, REL2 and FBN9 using previously published and newly generated sequences. Results The level of LD between SNP pairs in cloned sequences of each gene was determined for 7 species (or incipient species of the An. gambiae complex. In all tested genes and species, LD between SNPs was low: even at short distances (2 2 ranged from 0.073 to 0.766. In most genes and species LD decayed very rapidly with increasing inter-marker distance. Conclusions These results are of great interest for the development of large scale polymorphism studies, as LD generally falls below any useful limit. It indicates that very fine scale SNP detection will be required to give an overall view of genome-wide polymorphism. Perhaps a more feasible approach to genome wide association studies is to use targeted approaches using candidate gene selection to detect association to phenotypes of interest.

  4. [Anopheles mosquitoes (Diptera, Culicidae) of the Tien Shan: morphological, cytogenetic, and molecular genetic analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordeev, M I; Zvantsov, A B; Goriacheva, I I; Shaĭkevich, E V; Ezhov, M N; Usenbaev, N T; Shapieva, Zh Zh; Zhakhongirov, Sh M

    2008-01-01

    Morphological, cytogenetic, and molecular genetic studies of the Anopheles fauna in the valley and foothills of the Tien Shan identified 5 species of malaria mosquitoes: An. artemievi Gordeev et al., An. messeae Fall, An. claviger Meigen, An. hyrcanus Pallas, An. pulcherrimus Theobald, and superpictus Grassi. An. claviger, An. hyrcanus, and An. messeae were prevalent in the Northern Tien-Shan. An. artemievi, An. claviger, An. hyrcanus, An. messeae, and An. superpictus were detected in the Western Tien Shan. An. artemievi was first recorded in Kazakhstan. An. artemievi, An. claviger, and An. superpictus were noted in the Inferior Tien Shan. An. messeae was first observed in the Issyk Kul hollow. An. artemievi, An. claviger, and An. superpictus were habitants of the foothills of the South-Western Tien Shan. An. artemievi, An. hyrcanus, An. superpictus, and An. pulcherrimus were in the plain. An. pulcherrimus and An. superpicts mosquitoes are regarded as important vectors in the new malaria foci of the Fergana regions. The role of An. artemievi in the transmission of malaria is to be specified. PMID:18822504

  5. Proteomics reveals major components of oogenesis in the reproductive tract of sugar-fed Anopheles aquasalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias-Lopes, Geovane; Borges-Veloso, Andre; Saboia-Vahia, Leonardo; Padrón, Gabriel; de Faria Castro, Cássia Luana; Guimarães, Ana Carolina Ramos; Britto, Constança; Cuervo, Patricia; De Jesus, Jose Batista

    2016-05-01

    Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus) aquasalis is a malaria vector mainly distributed along the coastal regions of South and Central America. In the absence of an effective vaccine against malaria, strategies for controlling the vector are the main tool for interrupting parasite transmission. Mechanisms of oogenesis and embryogenesis in anautogenous mosquitoes are mainly modulated by blood feeding. However, the expression, at the protein level, of genes involved in such mechanisms in sugar-fed females is unknown. In this work, total protein extracts of the reproductive tract of female An. aquasalis that were fed sugar were analyzed using liquid chromatography followed by mass spectrometry for protein identification and bioinformatic tools for data mining. We identified 922 proteins expressed in the organ, and using several databases, we attributed biological meaning for several of them. Remarkably, nine proteins involved in oogenesis were identified in females fed sugar. Putative vitellogenins, vitellogenin receptor, lipid storage droplet, transferrin, ferritin, and apolipoprotein, identified here, are proteins involved in egg development. Proteins involved in embryonic development, such as paxillin, exuperantia, several growth factors, and dorsal switch protein, were identified. Interestingly, in this study, we identified 15 peptidases of various classes such as aminopeptidases, carboxypeptidases, serine protease, cathepsin, and metalloprotease that could potentially interact with male seminal components. Here, we demonstrated that the reproductive tract of female An. aquasalis fed on sugar expresses proteins involved in oogenesis and embryonic development. These findings reveal unknown aspects of the physiology of this organ under the given nutritional conditions. PMID:26850722

  6. Gene expression patterns associated with blood-feeding in the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hogan James R

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Blood feeding, or hematophagy, is a behavior exhibited by female mosquitoes required both for reproduction and for transmission of pathogens. We determined the expression patterns of 3,068 ESTs, representing ~2,000 unique gene transcripts using cDNA microarrays in adult female Anopheles gambiae at selected times during the first two days following blood ingestion, at 5 and 30 min during a 40 minute blood meal and at 0, 1, 3, 5, 12, 16, 24 and 48 hours after completion of the blood meal and compared their expression to transcript levels in mosquitoes with access only to a sugar solution. Results In blood-fed mosquitoes, 413 unique transcripts, approximately 25% of the total, were expressed at least two-fold above or below their levels in the sugar-fed mosquitoes, at one or more time points. These differentially expressed gene products were clustered using k-means clustering into Early Genes, Middle Genes, and Late Genes, containing 144, 130, and 139 unique transcripts, respectively. Several genes from each group were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR in order to validate the microarray results. Conclusion The expression patterns and annotation of the genes in these three groups (Early, Middle, and Late genes are discussed in the context of female mosquitoes' physiological responses to blood feeding, including blood digestion, peritrophic matrix formation, egg development, and immunity.

  7. No Evidence for Lymphatic Filariasis Transmission in Big Cities Affected by Conflict Related Rural-Urban Migration in Sierra Leone and Liberia

    OpenAIRE

    de Souza, Dziedzom K.; Santigie Sesay; Moore, Marnijina G.; Rashid Ansumana; Narh, Charles A.; Karsor Kollie; Rebollo, Maria P.; Koudou, Benjamin G; Koroma, Joseph B; Bolay, Fatorma K.; Boakye, Daniel A.; Bockarie, Moses J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In West Africa, the principal vectors of lymphatic filariasis (LF) are Anopheles species with Culex species playing only a minor role in transmission, if any. Being a predominantly rural disease, the question remains whether conflict-related migration of rural populations into urban areas would be sufficient for active transmission of the parasite. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined LF transmission in urban areas in post-conflict Sierra Leone and Liberia that experienced ...

  8. Identification of field caught Anopheles gambiae s.s. and Anopheles arabiensis by TaqMan single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayoh Nabie M

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identification of Anopheles gambiae s.s. and Anopheles arabiensis from field-collected Anopheles gambiae s.l. is often necessary in basic and applied research, and in operational control programmes. The currently accepted method involves use of standard polymerase chain reaction amplification of ribosomal DNA (rDNA from the 3' 28S to 5' intergenic spacer region of the genome, and visual confirmation of amplicons of predicted size on agarose gels, after electrophoresis. This report describes development and evaluation of an automated, quantitative PCR method based upon TaqMan™ single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP genotyping. Methods Standard PCR, and TaqMan SNP genotyping with newly designed primers and fluorophore-labeled probes hybridizing to sequences of complementary rDNA specific for either An. gambiae s.s. or An. arabiensis, were conducted in three experiments involving field-collected An. gambiae s.l. from western Kenya, and defined laboratory strains. DNA extraction was from a single leg, sonicated for five minutes in buffer in wells of 96-well PCR plates. Results TaqMan SNP genotyping showed a reaction success rate, sensitivity, and species specificity comparable to that of standard PCR. In an extensive field study, only 29 of 3,041 (0.95% were determined to be hybrids by TaqMan (i.e., having rDNA sequences from both species, however, all but one were An. arabiensis by standard PCR, suggesting an acceptably low (ca. 1% error rate for TaqMan genotyping in mistakenly identifying species hybrids. Conclusion TaqMan SNP genotyping proved to be a sensitive and rapid method for identification of An. gambiae s.l. and An. arabiensis, with a high success rate, specific results, and congruence with the standard PCR method.

  9. Anopheles of Bolivia : new records with an updated and annotated checklist

    OpenAIRE

    Lardeux, Frédéric; Chavez, Tamara; Rodriguez, Roberto; Torrez, Libia

    2009-01-01

    Anopheles squamifemur has been identified from CDC light trap collections carried out at Arca de Israel, a small community located in the extreme north-east of Bolivia (Pando Department) on the banks of the river Madera, on the border with Brazil. Anopheles costai and An. forattinii have been identified in place of An. mediopunctatus which has been removed from the Bolivian list of Anopheles species. The first identification of An. trinkae in Bolivia by Dr. J.C. Lien in 1984 is cleared. The p...

  10. Bioinformatics-Based Identification of Chemosensory Proteins in African Malaria Mosquito, Anopheles gambiae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhengxi Li; Zuorui Shen; Jingjiang Zhou; Lin Field

    2003-01-01

    Chemosensory proteins (CSPs) are identifiable by four spatially conserved Cysteine residues in their primary structure or by two disulfide bridges in their tertiary structure according to the previously identified olfactory specific-D related proteins. A genomics- and bioinformatics-based approach is taken in the present study to identify the putative CSPs in the malaria-carrying mosquito, Anopheles gambiae. The results show that five out of the nine annotated candidates are the most possible Anopheles CSPs of A. gambiae. This study lays the foundation for further functional identification of Anopheles CSPs, though all of these candidates need additional experimental verification.

  11. Multiple insecticide resistance mechanisms in Anopheles gambiae s.l. populations from Cameroon, Central Africa

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    Nwane Philippe

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasing incidence of DDT and pyrethroid resistance in Anopheles mosquitoes is seen as a limiting factor for malaria vector control. The current study aimed at an in-depth characterization of An. gambiae s.l. resistance to insecticides in Cameroon, in order to guide malaria vector control interventions. Methods Anopheles gambiae s.l. mosquitoes were collected as larvae and pupae from six localities spread throughout the four main biogeographical domains of Cameroon and reared to adults in insectaries. Standard WHO insecticide susceptibility tests were carried out with 4% DDT, 0.75% permethrin and 0.05% deltamethrin. Mortality rates and knockdown times (kdt50 and kdt95 were determined and the effect of pre-exposure to the synergists DEF, DEM and PBO was assessed. Tested mosquitoes were identified to species and molecular forms (M or S using PCR-RFLP. The hot ligation method was used to depict kdr mutations and biochemical assays were conducted to assess detoxifying enzyme activities. Results The An. arabiensis population from Pitoa was fully susceptible to DDT and permethrin (mortality rates > 98% and showed reduced susceptibility to deltamethrin. Resistance to DDT was widespread in An. gambiae s.s. populations and heterogeneous levels of susceptibility to permethrin and deltamethrin were observed. In many cases, prior exposure to synergists partially restored insecticide knockdown effect and increased mortality rates, suggesting a role of detoxifying enzymes in increasing mosquito survival upon challenge by pyrethroids and, to a lower extent DDT. The distribution of kdr alleles suggested a major role of kdr-based resistance in the S form of An. gambiae. In biochemical tests, all but one mosquito population overexpressed P450 activity, whereas baseline GST activity was low and similar in all field mosquito populations and in the control. Conclusion In Cameroon, multiple resistance mechanisms segregate in the S form of An

  12. Three years of insecticide resistance monitoring in Anopheles gambiae in Burkina Faso: resistance on the rise?

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    Badolo Athanase

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and methods A longitudinal Anopheles gambiae s.l. insecticide-resistance monitoring programme was established in four sentinel sites in Burkina Faso. For three years, between 2008 and 2010, WHO diagnostic dose assays were used to measure the prevalence of resistance to all the major classes of insecticides at the beginning and end of the malaria transmission season. Species identification and genotyping for target site mutations was also performed and the sporozoite rate in adults determined. Results At the onset of the study, resistance to DDT and pyrethroids was already prevalent in An. gambiae s.l. from the south-west of the country but mosquitoes from the two sites in central Burkina Faso were largely susceptible. Within three years, DDT and permethrin resistance was established in all four sites. Carbamate and organophosphate resistance remains relatively rare and largely confined to the south-western areas although a small number of bendiocarb survivors were found in all sites by the final round of monitoring. The ace-1R target site resistance allele was present in all localities and its frequency exceeded 20% in 2010 in two of the sites. The frequency of the 1014F kdr mutation increased throughout the three years and by 2010, the frequency of 1014F in all sites combined was 0.02 in Anopheles arabiensis, 0.56 in An. gambiae M form and 0.96 in An. gambiae S form. This frequency did not differ significantly between the sites. The 1014S kdr allele was only found in An. arabiensis but its frequency increased significantly throughout the study (P = 0.0003 and in 2010 the 1014S allele frequency was 0.08 in An. arabiensis. Maximum sporozoite rates (12% were observed in Soumousso in 2009 and the difference between sites is significant for each year. Conclusion Pyrethroid and DDT resistance is now established in An. gambiae s.l. throughout Burkina Faso. Results from diagnostic dose assays are highly variable within and

  13. A proteomic investigation of soluble olfactory proteins in Anopheles gambiae.

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    Guido Mastrobuoni

    Full Text Available Odorant-binding proteins (OBPs and chemosensory proteins (CSPs are small soluble polypeptides that bind semiochemicals in the lymph of insect chemosensilla. In the genome of Anopheles gambiae, 66 genes encode OBPs and 8 encode CSPs. Here we monitored their expression through classical proteomics (2D gel-MS analysis and a shotgun approach. The latter method proved much more sensitive and therefore more suitable for tiny biological samples as mosquitoes antennae and eggs. Females express a larger number and higher quantities of OBPs in their antennae than males (24 vs 19. OBP9 is the most abundant in the antennae of both sexes, as well as in larvae, pupae and eggs. Of the 8 CSPs, 4 were detected in antennae, while SAP3 was the only one expressed in larvae. Our proteomic results are in fairly good agreement with data of RNA expression reported in the literature, except for OBP4 and OBP5, that we could not identify in our analysis, nor could we detect in Western Blot experiments. The relatively limited number of soluble olfactory proteins expressed at relatively high levels in mosquitoes makes further studies on the coding of chemical messages at the OBP level more accessible, providing for few specific targets. Identification of such proteins in Anopheles gambiae might facilitate future studies on host finding behavior in this important disease vector.

  14. Cloning, characterization, and expression of microRNAs from the Asian malaria mosquito, Anopheles stephensi

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    Tu Zhijian

    2008-05-01

    regulator of longevity and apoptosis in D. melanogaster, represented 25% of all sequenced miRNA clones from 17-day old An. stephensi female mosquitoes. An. stephensi miR-14 displayed a relatively strong signal from late embryonic to adult stages. miR-14 expression is consistent during the adult lifespan regardless of age, sex, and blood feeding status. Thus miR-14 is likely important across all mosquito life stages. Conclusion This study provides experimental evidence for 23 conserved and four new microRNAs in An. stephensi mosquitoes. Comparisons between miRNA gene clusters in Anopheles and Aedes mosquitoes, and in D. melanogaster suggest the loss or significant change of two miRNA genes in Ae. aegypti. Expression profile analysis of eight miRNAs, including the four new miRNAs, revealed distinct patterns from early embryo to adult stages in An. stephensi. Further analysis showed that miR-x2 is likely involved in female reproduction and its function may be conserved among divergent mosquitoes. Consistent expression of miR-14 suggests that it is likely important across all mosquito life stages from embryos to aged adults. Understanding the functions of mosquito miRNAs will undoubtedly contribute to a better understanding of mosquito biology including longevity, reproduction, and mosquito-pathogen interactions, which are important to disease transmission.

  15. Morphological and molecular characteristics of malaria vector anopheles superpictus populations in Iran

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    Shemshad K.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anopheles superpictus is one of the main malaria vectors in Iran. The mosquitoes of this species are found throughout the Iranian plateau up to 2000 meters above sea level in the Alborz Mountains, south of the Zagros Mountains, and in the plains near the Caspian Sea and Persian Gulf. It has been reported that different geographical populations of An. superpictus play different roles in malaria transmission. Based on the presence or absence of a black spot/band on the apical segment of the female maxillary palpi, two morphological forms have been reported in this species. This work has been conducted to study other morphological features as well as the genetic structure of these two forms of An. superpictus in Iran. Methods: The different morphological characteristics of 35 different populations were observed and recorded. An 887 bp portion of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI was amplified and assayed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP using 18 enzymes and PCR-direct sequencing techniques.Results: Among the morphological characteristics studied, there are significant differences between the two forms with regard to the length of the palp light band (p<0.01, wing length (p<0.5, and the distance from the branching point of the II/IV veins to the tip of the wing (p<0.05. Results also revealed that these two forms are sympatric in most localities of Iran. RFLP analysis and sequences of about 710 bp of the gene showed that there was great variation between and/or within the populations, but these variations were not associated with the morphological forms.Conclusion: This is the first comprehensive study on the morphological and molecular characteristics of An. superpictus in the literature. To determine the role of these morphological forms or genetic haplotypes in malaria transmission, further molecular, cytological, morphological, and epidemiological studies are necessary.

  16. Modeling the role of environmental variables on the population dynamics of the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto

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    Parham Paul E

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The impact of weather and climate on malaria transmission has attracted considerable attention in recent years, yet uncertainties around future disease trends under climate change remain. Mathematical models provide powerful tools for addressing such questions and understanding the implications for interventions and eradication strategies, but these require realistic modeling of the vector population dynamics and its response to environmental variables. Methods Published and unpublished field and experimental data are used to develop new formulations for modeling the relationships between key aspects of vector ecology and environmental variables. These relationships are integrated within a validated deterministic model of Anopheles gambiae s.s. population dynamics to provide a valuable tool for understanding vector response to biotic and abiotic variables. Results A novel, parsimonious framework for assessing the effects of rainfall, cloudiness, wind speed, desiccation, temperature, relative humidity and density-dependence on vector abundance is developed, allowing ease of construction, analysis, and integration into malaria transmission models. Model validation shows good agreement with longitudinal vector abundance data from Tanzania, suggesting that recent malaria reductions in certain areas of Africa could be due to changing environmental conditions affecting vector populations. Conclusions Mathematical models provide a powerful, explanatory means of understanding the role of environmental variables on mosquito populations and hence for predicting future malaria transmission under global change. The framework developed provides a valuable advance in this respect, but also highlights key research gaps that need to be resolved if we are to better understand future malaria risk in vulnerable communities.

  17. Limited usefulness of microsatellite markers from the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae when applied to the closely related species Anopheles melas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deitz, Kevin C; Reddy, Vamsi P; Reddy, Michael R; Satyanarayanah, Neha; Lindsey, Michael W; Overgaard, Hans J; Jawara, Musa; Caccone, Adalgisa; Slotman, Michel A

    2012-07-01

    Anopheles melas is a brackish water mosquito found in coastal West Africa where it is a dominant malaria vector locally. In order to facilitate genetic studies of this species, 45 microsatellite loci originally developed for Anopheles gambiae were sequenced in An. melas. Those that were suitable based on repeat number and flanking regions were examined in 2 natural populations from Equatorial Guinea. Only 15 loci were eventually deemed suitable as polymorphic markers in An. melas populations. These loci were screened in 4 populations from a wider geographic range. Heterozygosity estimates ranged from 0.18 to 0.79, and 2.5-15 average alleles were observed per locus, yielding 13 highly polymorphic markers and 2 loci with lower variability. To examine the usefulness of microsatellite markers when applied in a sibling species, the original An. gambiae specific markers were used to amplify 5 loci in An. melas. Null alleles were found for 1 An. gambiae marker. We discuss the pitfalls of using microsatellite loci across closely related species and conclude that in addition to the problem of null alleles associated with this practice, many loci may prove to be of very limited use as polymorphic markers even when used in a sibling species. PMID:22593601

  18. Molecular comparison of topotypic specimens confirms Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus) dunhami Causey (Diptera: Culicidae) in the Colombian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Freddy; Linton, Yvonne-Marie; Ponsonby, David J; Conn, Jan E; Herrera, Manuela; Quiñones, Martha L; Vélez, Iván D; Wilkerson, Richard C

    2010-11-01

    The presence of Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus) dunhami Causey in Colombia (Department of Amazonas) is confirmed for the first time through direct comparison of mtDNA cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) barcodes and nuclear rDNA second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) sequences with topotypic specimens of An. dunhami from Tefé, Brazil. An. dunhami was identified through retrospective correlation of DNA sequences following misidentification as Anopheles nuneztovari s.l. using available morphological keys for Colombian mosquitoes. That An. dunhami occurs in Colombia and also possibly throughout the Amazon Basin, is of importance to vector control programs, as this non-vector species is morphologically similar to known malaria vectors including An. nuneztovari, Anopheles oswaldoi and Anopheles trinkae. Species identification of An. dunhami and differentiation from these closely related species are highly robust using either DNA ITS2 sequences or COI DNA barcode. DNA methods are advocated for future differentiation of these often sympatric taxa in South America. PMID:21120360

  19. Molecular comparison of topotypic specimens confirms Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus dunhami Causey (Diptera: Culicidae in the Colombian Amazon

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    Freddy Ruiz

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The presence of Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus dunhami Causey in Colombia (Department of Amazonas is confirmed for the first time through direct comparison of mtDNA cytochrome c oxidase I (COI barcodes and nuclear rDNA second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2 sequences with topotypic specimens of An. dunhami from Tefé, Brazil. An. dunhami was identified through retrospective correlation of DNA sequences following misidentification as Anopheles nuneztovari s.l. using available morphological keys for Colombian mosquitoes. That An. dunhami occurs in Colombia and also possibly throughout the Amazon Basin, is of importance to vector control programs, as this non-vector species is morphologically similar to known malaria vectors including An. nuneztovari, Anopheles oswaldoi and Anopheles trinkae. Species identification of An. dunhami and differentiation from these closely related species are highly robust using either DNA ITS2 sequences or COI DNA barcode. DNA methods are advocated for future differentiation of these often sympatric taxa in South America.

  20. ANOSPEX: a stochastic, spatially explicit model for studying Anopheles metapopulation dynamics.

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    Olugbenga O Oluwagbemi

    Full Text Available Anopheles mosquitoes transmit malaria, a major public health problem among many African countries. One of the most effective methods to control malaria is by controlling the Anopheles mosquito vectors that transmit the parasites. Mathematical models have both predictive and explorative utility to investigate the pros and cons of different malaria control strategies. We have developed a C++ based, stochastic spatially explicit model (ANOSPEX; Ano pheles Spatially-Explicit to simulate Anopheles metapopulation dynamics. The model is biologically rich, parameterized by field data, and driven by field-collected weather data from Macha, Zambia. To preliminarily validate ANOSPEX, simulation results were compared to field mosquito collection data from Macha; simulated and observed dynamics were similar. The ANOSPEX model will be useful in a predictive and exploratory manner to develop, evaluate and implement traditional and novel strategies to control malaria, and for understanding the environmental forces driving Anopheles population dynamics.

  1. Chemical Composition and Repellent Activity of Achillea vermiculata and Satureja hortensis against Anopheles stephensi

    OpenAIRE

    Masoumeh Pirmohammadi; Mansoureh Shayeghi; Hassan Vatandoost; Mohammad Reza Abaei; Ali Mohammadi; Akbar Bagheri; Mehdi Khoobdel; Hasan Bakhshi; Maryam Pirmohammadi; Maryam Tavassoli

    2016-01-01

    Background: One of the best ways to control the malaria disease and to be protected human against Anopheles mos­quito biting is the use of repellents. Throughout repellents, herbal ones may be an appropriate and safe source for protection.Methods: Chemical constituents of Achillea vermiculata and Satoreja hortensis were determined by using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Efficacy and the protection time of these plants were assessed on Anopheles stephensi under the laboratory condition....

  2. Molecular comparison of topotypic specimens confirms Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus) dunhami Causey (Diptera: Culicidae) in the Colombian Amazon

    OpenAIRE

    Freddy Ruiz; Yvonne-Marie Linton; Ponsonby, David J; Conn, Jan E.; Manuela Herrera; Martha L Quiñones; Iván D. Vélez; Wilkerson, Richard C

    2010-01-01

    The presence of Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus) dunhami Causey in Colombia (Department of Amazonas) is confirmed for the first time through direct comparison of mtDNA cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) barcodes and nuclear rDNA second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) sequences with topotypic specimens of An. dunhami from Tefé, Brazil. An. dunhami was identified through retrospective correlation of DNA sequences following misidentification as Anopheles nuneztovari s.l. using available morphological keys...

  3. Gal4-based Enhancer-Trapping in the Malaria Mosquito Anopheles stephensi

    OpenAIRE

    O’Brochta, David A.; Pilitt, Kristina L.; Harrell, Robert A.; Aluvihare, Channa; Alford, Robert T.

    2012-01-01

    Transposon-based forward and reverse genetic technologies will contribute greatly to ongoing efforts to study mosquito functional genomics. A piggyBac transposon-based enhancer-trap system was developed that functions efficiently in the human malaria vector, Anopheles stephensi. The system consists of six transgenic lines of Anopheles stephensi, each with a single piggyBac-Gal4 element in a unique genomic location; six lines with a single piggyBac-UAStdTomato element; and two lines, each with...

  4. Existence of the rdl mutant alleles among the anopheles malaria vector in Indonesia

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    Asih Puji BS

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA receptor-chloride channel complex is known to be the target site of dieldrin, a cyclodiene insecticide. GABA-receptors, with a naturally occurring amino acid substitution, A302S/G in the putative ion-channel lining region, confer resistance to cyclodiene insecticides that includes aldrin, chlordane, dieldrin, heptachlor, endrin and endosulphan. Methods A total of 154 mosquito samples from 10 provinces of malaria-endemic areas across Indonesia (Aceh, North Sumatra, Bangka Belitung, Lampung, Central Java, East Nusa Tenggara, West Nusa Tenggara, West Sulawesi, Molucca and North Molucca were obtained and identified by species, using morphological characteristic. The DNA was individually extracted using chelex-ion exchanger and the DNA obtained was used for analyses using sequencing method. Results Molecular analysis indicated 11% of the total 154 Anopheles samples examined, carried Rdl mutant alleles. All of the alleles were found in homozygous form. Rdl 302S allele was observed in Anopheles vagus (from Central Java, Lampung, and West Nusa Tenggara, Anopheles aconitus (from Central Java, Anopheles barbirostris (from Central Java and Lampung, Anopheles sundaicus (from North Sumatra and Lampung, Anopheles nigerrimus (from North Sumatra, whereas the 302 G allele was only found in Anopheles farauti from Molucca. Conclusion The existence of the Rdl mutant allele indicates that, either insecticide pressure on the Anopheles population in these areas might still be ongoing (though not directly associated with the malaria control programme or that the mutant form of the Rdl allele is relatively stable in the absence of insecticide. Nonetheless, the finding suggests that integrated pest management is warranted in malaria-endemic areas where insecticides are widely used for other purposes.

  5. Biting patterns and host preference of Anopheles epiroticus in Chang Island, Trat Province, Eastern Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Ritthison, W.; Tainchum, K.; Manguin, Sylvie; Bangs, M.J.; Chareonviriyaphap, T.

    2014-01-01

    A study of species diversity of Anopheles mosquitoes, biting patterns, and seasonal abundance of important mosquito vectors was conducted in two villages of Chang Island, Trat Province, in eastern Thailand, one located along the coast and the other in the low hills of the central interior of the island. Of 5,399 captured female anophelines, 70.25% belong to the subgenus Cellia and remaining specimens to the subgenus Anopheles. Five important putative malaria vectors were molecularly identifie...

  6. Entomological indices of Anopheles gambiae sensu lato at a rural community in south-west Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    M.A.E. Noutcha; C.I. Anumdu

    2009-01-01

    Background & objectives: Investigations were conducted to obtain key entomological indices of Anopheles gambiae s.l. at Igbo-Ora, a rural community in south-west Nigeria. Methods: Mosquitoes were caught daily for a week from rooms where tenants had slept the previous night in each of the four months June, July (2001), and August, September (2002). Anopheles gambiae s.l. sibling species were PCR-identified, the blood meal origin was determined by direct ELISA, and the circumsporozoite antigen ...

  7. A reliable morphological method to assess the age of male Anopheles gambiae

    OpenAIRE

    Killeen Gerry F; Ng'habi Kija R; Huho Bernadette J; Nkwengulila Gamba; Knols Bart GJ; Ferguson Heather M

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Release of genetically-modified (GM) or sterile male mosquitoes for malaria control is hampered by inability to assess the age and mating history of free-living male Anopheles. Methods Age and mating-related changes in the reproductive system of male Anopheles gambiae were quantified and used to fit predictive statistical models. These models, based on numbers of spermatocysts, relative size of sperm reservoir and presence/absence of a clear area around the accessory gland...

  8. A reliable morphological method to assess the age of male Anopheles gambiae

    OpenAIRE

    Huho, B J; Ng'habi, K.R.; Kileen, G.F.; Nkwengulila, G.; Knols, B.G.J.; Ferguson, H.M.

    2006-01-01

    Background Release of genetically-modified (GM) or sterile male mosquitoes for malaria control is hampered by inability to assess the age and mating history of free-living male Anopheles. Methods Age and mating-related changes in the reproductive system of male Anopheles gambiae were quantified and used to fit predictive statistical models. These models, based on numbers of spermatocysts, relative size of sperm reservoir and presence/absence of a clear area around the accessory gla...

  9. Highly focused anopheline breeding sites and malaria transmission in Dakar

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    Bouzid Samia

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Urbanization has a great impact on the composition of the vector system and malaria transmission dynamics. In Dakar, some malaria cases are autochthonous but parasite rates and incidences of clinical malaria attacks have been recorded at low levels. Ecological heterogeneity of malaria transmission was investigated in Dakar, in order to characterize the Anopheles breeding sites in the city and to study the dynamics of larval density and adult aggressiveness in ten characteristically different urban areas. Methods Ten study areas were sampled in Dakar and Pikine. Mosquitoes were collected by human landing collection during four nights in each area (120 person-nights. The Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite (CSP index was measured by ELISA and the entomological inoculation rates (EIR were calculated. Open water collections in the study areas were monitored weekly for physico-chemical characterization and the presence of anopheline larvae. Adult mosquitoes and hatched larvae were identified morphologically and by molecular methods. Results In September-October 2007, 19,451 adult mosquitoes were caught among which, 1,101 were Anopheles gambiae s.l. The Human Biting Rate ranged from 0.1 bites per person per night in Yoff Village to 43.7 in Almadies. Seven out of 1,101 An. gambiae s.l. were found to be positive for P. falciparum (CSP index = 0.64%. EIR ranged from 0 infected bites per person per year in Yoff Village to 16.8 in Almadies. The An. gambiae complex population was composed of Anopheles arabiensis (94.8% and Anopheles melas (5.2%. None of the An. melas were infected with P. falciparum. Of the 54 water collection sites monitored, 33 (61.1% served as anopheline breeding sites on at least one observation. No An. melas was identified among the larval samples. Some physico-chemical characteristics of water bodies were associated with the presence/absence of anopheline larvae and with larval density. A very close parallel

  10. A comprehensive gene expression atlas of sex- and tissue-specificity in the malaria vector, Anopheles gambiae

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    Crisanti Andrea

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mosquito, Anopheles gambiae, is the primary vector of human malaria, a disease responsible for millions of deaths each year. To improve strategies for controlling transmission of the causative parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, we require a thorough understanding of the developmental mechanisms, physiological processes and evolutionary pressures affecting life-history traits in the mosquito. Identifying genes expressed in particular tissues or involved in specific biological processes is an essential part of this process. Results In this study, we present transcription profiles for ~82% of annotated Anopheles genes in dissected adult male and female tissues. The sensitivity afforded by examining dissected tissues found gene activity in an additional 20% of the genome that is undetected when using whole-animal samples. The somatic and reproductive tissues we examined each displayed patterns of sexually dimorphic and tissue-specific expression. By comparing expression profiles with Drosophila melanogaster we also assessed which genes are well conserved within the Diptera versus those that are more recently evolved. Conclusions Our expression atlas and associated publicly available database, the MozAtlas (http://www.tissue-atlas.org, provides information on the relative strength and specificity of gene expression in several somatic and reproductive tissues, isolated from a single strain grown under uniform conditions. The data will serve as a reference for other mosquito researchers by providing a simple method for identifying where genes are expressed in the adult, however, in addition our resource will also provide insights into the evolutionary diversity associated with gene expression levels among species.

  11. Salivary gland proteome analysis reveals modulation of anopheline unique proteins in insensitive acetylcholinesterase resistant Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes.

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    Sylvie Cornelie

    Full Text Available Insensitive acetylcholinesterase resistance due to a mutation in the acetylcholinesterase (ace encoding ace-1 gene confers cross-resistance to organophosphate and carbamate insecticides in Anopheles gambiae populations from Central and West Africa. This mutation is associated with a strong genetic cost revealed through alterations of some life history traits but little is known about the physiological and behavioural changes in insects bearing the ace-1(R allele. Comparative analysis of the salivary gland contents between An. gambiae susceptible and ace-1(R resistant strains was carried out to charaterize factors that could be involved in modifications of blood meal process, trophic behaviour or pathogen interaction in the insecticide-resistant mosquitoes. Differential analysis of the salivary gland protein profiles revealed differences in abundance for several proteins, two of them showing major differences between the two strains. These two proteins identified as saglin and TRIO are salivary gland-1 related proteins, a family unique to anopheline mosquitoes, one of them playing a crucial role in salivary gland invasion by Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites. Differential expression of two other proteins previously identified in the Anopheles sialome was also observed. The differentially regulated proteins are involved in pathogen invasion, blood feeding process, and protection against oxidation, relevant steps in the outcome of malaria infection. Further functional studies and insect behaviour experiments would confirm the impact of the modification of the sialome composition on blood feeding and pathogen transmission abilities of the resistant mosquitoes. The data supports the hypothesis of alterations linked to insecticide resistance in the biology of the primary vector of human malaria in Africa.

  12. Some strains of Plasmodium falciparum, a human malaria parasite, evade the complement-like system of Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Cruz, Alvaro; DeJong, Randall J; Ortega, Corrie; Haile, Ashley; Abban, Ekua; Rodrigues, Janneth; Jaramillo-Gutierrez, Giovanna; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2012-07-10

    Plasmodium falciparum lines differ in their ability to infect mosquitoes. The Anopheles gambiae L3-5 refractory (R) line melanizes most Plasmodium species, including the Brazilian P. falciparum 7G8 line, but it is highly susceptible to some African P. falciparum strains such as 3D7, NF54, and GB4. We investigated whether these lines differ in their ability to evade the mosquito immune system. Silencing key components of the mosquito complement-like system [thioester-containing protein 1 (TEP1), leucine-rich repeat protein 1, and Anopheles Plasmodium-responsive leucine-rich repeat protein 1] prevented melanization of 7G8 parasites, reverting the refractory phenotype. In contrast, it had no effect on the intensity of infection with NF54, suggesting that this line is able to evade TEP1-mediated lysis. When R females were coinfected with a line that is melanized (7G8) and a line that survives (3D7), the coinfection resulted in mixed infections with both live and encapsulated parasites on individual midguts. This finding shows that survival of individual parasites is parasite-specific and not systemic in nature, because parasites can evade TEP1-mediated lysis even when other parasites are melanized in the same midgut. When females from an extensive genetic cross between R and susceptible A. gambiae (G3) mosquitoes were infected with P. berghei, encapsulation was strongly correlated with the TEP1-R1 allele. However, P. falciparum 7G8 parasites were no longer encapsulated by females from this cross, indicating that the TEP1-R1 allele is not sufficient to melanize this line. Evasion of the A. gambiae immune system by P. falciparum may be the result of parasite adaptation to sympatric mosquito vectors and may be an important factor driving malaria transmission. PMID:22623529

  13. Factors influencing the spatial distribution of Anopheles larvae in Coimbatore District, Tamil Nadu, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, Naresh Kumar; Kadarkarai, Murugan; Kumar, Shobana; Pari, Madhiyazhagan; Thiyagarajan, Nataraj; Vincent, C Thomas; Barnard, Donald R

    2015-12-01

    Malaria causes extensive morbidity and mortality in humans and results in significant economic losses in India. The distribution of immature malaria-transmitting Anopheles mosquitoes was studied in 17 villages in Coimbatore District as a prelude to the development and implementation of vector control strategies that are intended to reduce the risk of human exposure to potentially infectious mosquitoes. Eight Anopheles species were recorded. The most numerous species were Anopheles vagus, Anopheles subpictus, and Anopheles hyrcanus. The location of mosquito development sites and the density of larvae in each village was evaluated for correlation with selected demographic, biologic, and land use parameters using remote sensing and geographic information systems (GIS) technology. We found the number of mosquito development sites in a village and the density of larvae in such sites to be positively correlated with human population density but not the surface area (km(2)) of the village. The number of mosquito development sites and the density of larvae in each site were not correlated. Data from this study are being used to construct a GIS-based mapping system that will enable the location of aquatic habitats with Anopheles larvae in the Coimbatore District, Tamil Nadu, India as target sites for the application of vector control. PMID:26364718

  14. Risk mapping of Anopheles gambiae s.l. densities using remotely-sensed environmental and meteorological data in an urban area: Dakar, Senegal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Machault

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: High malaria transmission heterogeneity in an urban environment is basically due to the complex distribution of Anopheles larval habitats, sources of vectors. Understanding 1 the meteorological and ecological factors associated with differential larvae spatio-temporal distribution and 2 the vectors dynamic, both may lead to improving malaria control measures with remote sensing and high resolution data as key components. In this study a robust operational methodology for entomological malaria predictive risk maps in urban settings is developed. METHODS: The Tele-epidemiology approach, i.e., 1 intensive ground measurements (Anopheles larval habitats and Human Biting Rate, or HBR, 2 selection of the most appropriate satellite data (for mapping and extracting environmental and meteorological information, and 3 use of statistical models taking into account the spatio-temporal data variability has been applied in Dakar, Senegal. RESULTS: First step was to detect all water bodies in Dakar. Secondly, environmental and meteorological conditions in the vicinity of water bodies favoring the presence of Anopheles gambiae s.l. larvae were added. Then relationship between the predicted larval production and the field measured HBR was identified, in order to generate An. gambiae s.l. HBR high resolution maps (daily, 10-m pixel in space. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: A robust operational methodology for dynamic entomological malaria predictive risk maps in an urban setting includes spatio-temporal variability of An. gambiae s.l. larval habitats and An. gambiae s.l. HBR. The resulting risk maps are first examples of high resolution products which can be included in an operational warning and targeting system for the implementation of vector control measures.

  15. Plasmodium sexual development and the role of Plasmepsin X in Plasmodium falciparum transmission to anopheles gambiae

    OpenAIRE

    Bounkeua, Viengngeun

    2010-01-01

    This work explored sexual development of the lethal human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. A method to cultivate Plasmodium falciparum sexual stage parasites in vitro was optimized and increased ookinete yield > 20-fold over previous reports. This method was adapted for Plasmodium vivax, a neglected human malaria parasite, and found to generate Plasmodium vivax ookinetes. The method was essential for investigation of the role of a novel aspartic protease, Plasmepsin X, in sexual stage...

  16. Inhibition of Anopheles gambiae odorant receptor function by mosquito repellents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsitoura, Panagiota; Koussis, Konstantinos; Iatrou, Kostas

    2015-03-20

    The identification of molecular targets of insect repellents has been a challenging task, with their effects on odorant receptors (ORs) remaining a debatable issue. Here, we describe a study on the effects of selected mosquito repellents, including the widely used repellent N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide (DEET), on the function of specific ORs of the African malaria vector Anopheles gambiae. This study, which has been based on quantitative measurements of a Ca(2+)-activated photoprotein biosensor of recombinant OR function in an insect cell-based expression platform and a sequential compound addition protocol, revealed that heteromeric OR (ORx/Orco) function was susceptible to strong inhibition by all tested mosquito repellents except DEET. Moreover, our results demonstrated that the observed inhibition was due to efficient blocking of Orco (olfactory receptor coreceptor) function. This mechanism of repellent action, which is reported for the first time, is distinct from the mode of action of other characterized insect repellents including DEET. PMID:25657000

  17. Inhibition of Anopheles gambiae Odorant Receptor Function by Mosquito Repellents*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsitoura, Panagiota; Koussis, Konstantinos; Iatrou, Kostas

    2015-01-01

    The identification of molecular targets of insect repellents has been a challenging task, with their effects on odorant receptors (ORs) remaining a debatable issue. Here, we describe a study on the effects of selected mosquito repellents, including the widely used repellent N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide (DEET), on the function of specific ORs of the African malaria vector Anopheles gambiae. This study, which has been based on quantitative measurements of a Ca2+-activated photoprotein biosensor of recombinant OR function in an insect cell-based expression platform and a sequential compound addition protocol, revealed that heteromeric OR (ORx/Orco) function was susceptible to strong inhibition by all tested mosquito repellents except DEET. Moreover, our results demonstrated that the observed inhibition was due to efficient blocking of Orco (olfactory receptor coreceptor) function. This mechanism of repellent action, which is reported for the first time, is distinct from the mode of action of other characterized insect repellents including DEET. PMID:25657000

  18. Transmission issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This session on transmission issues focused on the role that transmission plays in electricity markets and the importance of getting the market structure right in terms of generation divestiture with buy back contracts, demand side responsive programs, transmission upgrades and long term contracts. The difficulties of distinguishing between market power and scarcity were examined along with some of the complications that ensue if transmission experiences congestion, as exemplified by the August 2003 blackout in eastern North America. The presentations described the best ways to handle transmission issues, and debated whether transmission should be deregulated or follow market forces. Issues of interconnections and reliability of connections were also debated along with the attempt to integrate renewables into the grid. Some presentations identified what new transmission must be built and what must be done to ensure that transmission gets built. The challenges and business opportunities for transmission in Alberta were discussed with reference to plans to invest in new infrastructure, where it is going outside of the province and how it works with other jurisdictions. Manitoba's Conawapa Hydro Project and its 2000 MW tie line to Ontario was also discussed. Some examples of non-optimal use of interconnections in Europe were also discussed in an effort to learn from these mistakes and avoid them in Canada. tabs., figs

  19. Population genetic structure of Anopheles arabiensis and Anopheles gambiae in a malaria endemic region of southern Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferguson Heather M

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic diversity is a key factor that enables adaptation and persistence of natural populations towards environmental conditions. It is influenced by the interaction of a natural population's dynamics and the environment it inhabits. Anopheles gambiae s.s. and Anopheles arabiensis are the two major and widespread malaria vectors in sub-Saharan Africa. Several studies have examined the ecology and population dynamics of these vectors. Ecological conditions along the Kilombero valley in Tanzania influence the distribution and population density of these two vector species. It remains unclear whether the ecological diversity within the Kilombero valley has affected the population structure of An. gambiae s.l. populations. The goal of this study was to characterise the genetic structure of sympatric An. gambiae s.s and An. arabiensis populations along the Kilombero valley. Methodology Mosquitoes were collected from seven locations in Tanzania: six from the Kilombero valley and one outside the valley (~700 km away as an out-group. To archive a genome-wide coverage, 13 microsatellite markers from chromosomes X, 2 and 3 were used. Results High levels of genetic differentiation among An. arabiensis populations was observed, as opposed to An. gambiae s.s., which was genetically undifferentiated across the 6,650 km2 of the Kilombero valley landscape. It appears that genetic differentiation is not attributed to physical barriers or distance, but possibly by ecological diversification within the Kilombero valley. Genetic divergence among An. arabiensis populations (FST = 0.066 was higher than that of the well-known M and S forms of An. gambiae s. s. in West and Central Africa (FST = 0.035, suggesting that these populations are maintained by some level of reproductive isolation. Conclusion It was hypothesized that ecological diversification across the valley may be a driving force for observed An. arabiensis genetic divergence. The

  20. The neotype of anopheles albitarsis (Diptera: culicidae O neótipo de Anopheles albitarsis (Diptera: Culicidae

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    Maria Goreti Rosa-Freitas

    1989-09-01

    Full Text Available Anopheles albitarsis neotype is described from specimens collected in Baradero, Argentina, in Shannon's trap, in horse and pig stables and on the progeny of engorded females. The description includes illustrations of adult female, male and female genitalias, scanning electron miscroscopy of the eggs and complete chaetotaxy of pupa and larva. The importance for electing a neotype is based on the realization that An. albitarsis is a complex of cryptic species. It is an attempt to provide typt-locality specimens with which other memebers of the group can be compared.O neótipo de Anopheles albitarsis é descrito a partir de espécimens coletados em armadilha tipo Shannon, em estábulos de cavalos e porcos e progênies de fêmeas ingurgitadas em Baradero, Argentina, localidade-tipo da espécie. A descrição inclui ilustrações da fêmea adulda, genitálias masculina e feminina, ovos em microscopia eletrônica de varredura e da quetotaxia completa das larvas de 4º estádio e pupas. A eleição de um neótipo para albitarsis baseia-se em dados recentes que apontam a espécie como um complexo de espécies crípticas, o que evidencia a importância de uma descrição detalhada de espécimens da localidade-tipo com o qual outros membros do grupo possam ser comparados.

  1. Man biting rate seasonal variation of malaria vectors in Roraima, Brazil

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    Fábio Saito Monteiro de Barros

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Malaria control has been directed towards regional actions where more detailed knowledge of local determinants of transmission is of primary importance. This is a short report on range distribution and biting indices for Anopheles darlingi and An. albitarsis during the dry and rainy season that follows river level variation in a savanna/alluvial forest malaria system area in the Northern Amazon Basin. Distribution range and adult biting indices were at their highest during the rainy season for both An. darlingi and An. albitarsis. During the rainy season the neighboring alluvial forest was extensively flooded. This coincided with highest rates in malaria transmission with case clustering near the river. As the river receded, anopheline distribution range and density decreased. This decrease in distribution and density corresponded to a malaria decrease in the near area. An exponential regression function was derived to permit estimations of An. darlingi distribution over specified distances. Anopheline spatio-temporal variations lead to uneven malaria case distribution and are of important implications for control strategies.

  2. A CRISPR-Cas9 gene drive system targeting female reproduction in the malaria mosquito vector Anopheles gambiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Andrew; Galizi, Roberto; Kyrou, Kyros; Simoni, Alekos; Siniscalchi, Carla; Katsanos, Dimitris; Gribble, Matthew; Baker, Dean; Marois, Eric; Russell, Steven; Burt, Austin; Windbichler, Nikolai; Crisanti, Andrea; Nolan, Tony

    2016-01-01

    Gene drive systems that enable super-Mendelian inheritance of a transgene have the potential to modify insect populations over a timeframe of a few years. We describe CRISPR-Cas9 endonuclease constructs that function as gene drive systems in Anopheles gambiae, the main vector for malaria. We identified three genes (AGAP005958, AGAP011377 and AGAP007280) that confer a recessive female-sterility phenotype upon disruption, and inserted into each locus CRISPR-Cas9 gene drive constructs designed to target and edit each gene. For each targeted locus we observed a strong gene drive at the molecular level, with transmission rates to progeny of 91.4 to 99.6%. Population modeling and cage experiments indicate that a CRISPR-Cas9 construct targeting one of these loci, AGAP007280, meets the minimum requirement for a gene drive targeting female reproduction in an insect population. These findings could expedite the development of gene drives to suppress mosquito populations to levels that do not support malaria transmission. PMID:26641531

  3. Site-specific integration and expression of an anti-malarial gene in transgenic Anopheles gambiae significantly reduces Plasmodium infections.

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    Janet M Meredith

    Full Text Available Diseases transmitted by mosquitoes have a devastating impact on global health and this is worsening due to difficulties with existing control measures and climate change. Genetically modified mosquitoes that are refractory to disease transmission are seen as having great potential in the delivery of novel control strategies. Historically the genetic modification of insects has relied upon transposable elements which have many limitations despite their successful use. To circumvent these limitations the Streptomyces phage phiC31 integrase system has been successfully adapted for site-specific transgene integration in insects. Here, we present the first site-specific transformation of Anopheles gambiae, the principal vector of human malaria. Mosquitoes were initially engineered to incorporate the phiC31 targeting site at a defined genomic location. A second phase of genetic modification then achieved site-specific integration of Vida3, a synthetic anti-malarial gene. Expression of Vida3, specifically in the midgut of bloodfed females, offered consistent and significant protection against Plasmodium yoelii nigeriensis, reducing average parasite intensity by 85%. Similar protection was observed against Plasmodium falciparum in some experiments, although protection was inconsistent. In the fight against malaria, it is imperative to establish a broad repertoire of both anti-malarial effector genes and tissue-specific promoters for their expression, enabling those offering maximum effect with minimum fitness cost to be identified. In the future, this technology will allow effective comparisons and informed choices to be made, potentially leading to complete transmission blockade.

  4. Molecular Marker Confirmation for Member of Anopheles barbirostris Van Der Wulp 1884 in Different Localities

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    Tri Baskoro Tunggul Satoto

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Vector and non-vector forms of Anopheles barbirostris have been recognized in Indonesia. However, because of their similarity in morphology, they were considered to be a single species. This information has led to the hypothesis that Anopheles barbirostris is a complex of species, which are morphologically indistinguishable from each other by ordinary methods. Objectives of the research was to identify the member of Anopheles barbirostris by PCR Assay. Samples were taken from two localities in Java, two in Sulawesi, two in Flores Indonesia, one from Thailand, one from China. The study was to develop a PCR-based technique of rDNA ITS2 region. Results showed that there are at least four species within the Anopheles barbirostris population studied, namely Anopheles barbirostris species DW, DX, DY and DZ. The length of the sequence amplified for species W, species X, species Y, and species Z were 339bps, 247bps, 165bps. and 157bps, respectively. Verification of the method was carried out with 270 mosquitoes from eight different field-collection sites using various sampling methods. Samples collected from Singaraja-Flores were identified as species W and X. All specimens collected from human bite outdoors were identified as species X; this species showed to be predominant among indoor light trap, indoor human bite and indoor resting collections Samples from Reo-Flores were identified as species W and X. All specimens from Manado and Palopo in Sulawesiwere identified as species Z. Similarly only species Y was found in samples from Thailand, while specimens from Salaman and Jambu in Java were identified as species W or species X. These species-specific molecular markers for the Anopheles barbirostris, complex appear to be reliable over a wide geographical area. However, larger number of samples is still needed from throughout the range of this species.Key words: Anopheles barbirostris, ITS2, PCR, Specific primer diagnostic

  5. New highland distribution records of multiple Anopheles species in the Ecuadorian Andes

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    Hunter Fiona F

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several recent climate change reviews have stressed the possibility of some malaria vectors occupying regions of higher altitudes than previously recorded. Indeed, highland malaria has been observed in several African nations, possibly attributable to changes in land use, vector control and local climate. This study attempts to expand the current knowledge of the distribution of common Anopheles species in Ecuador, with particular attention to highland regions (> 500 m of the Andes. Methods Extensive field collections of larvae were undertaken in 2008, 2009 and 2010 throughout all regions of Ecuador (except the lower-altitude Amazonian plain and compared to historical distribution maps reproduced from the 1940s. Larvae were identified using both a morphological key and sequencing of the 800 bp region of the CO1 mitochondrial gene. In addition, spatial statistics (Getis-Ord Hotspot Analysis: Gi* were used to determine high and low-density clusters of each species in Ecuador. Results Distributions have been updated for five species of Anopheles in Ecuador: Anopheles albimanus, Anopheles pseudopunctipennis, Anopheles punctimacula, Anopheles eiseni and Anopheles oswaldoi s.l.. Historical maps indicate that An. pseudopunctipennis used to be widespread in highland Andean valleys, while other species were completely restricted to lowland areas. By comparison, updated maps for the other four collected species show higher maximum elevations and/or more widespread distributions in highland regions than previously recorded. Gi* analysis determined some highland hot spots for An. albimanus, but only cold spots for all other species. Conclusions This study documents the establishment of multiple anopheline species in high altitude regions of Ecuador, often in areas where malaria eradication programs are not focused.

  6. Odorant-Binding Proteins of the Malaria Mosquito Anopheles funestus sensu stricto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Cornel, Anthony J.; Leal, Walter S.

    2010-01-01

    Background The mosquito Anopheles funestus is one of the major malaria vector species in sub-Saharan Africa. Olfaction is essential in guiding mosquito behaviors. Odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) are highly expressed in insect olfactory tissues and involved in the first step of odorant reception. An improved understanding of the function of malaria mosquito OBPs may contribute to identifying new attractants/repellents and assist in the development of more efficient and environmentally friendly mosquito controlling strategies. Methodology In this study, a large screening of over 50 ecologically significant odorant compounds led to the identification of 12 ligands that elicit significant electroantennographic (EAG) responses from An. funestus female antennae. To compare the absolute efficiency/potency of these chemicals, corrections were made for differences in volatility by determining the exact amount in a stimulus puff. Fourteen AfunOBP genes were cloned and their expression patterns were analyzed. AfunOBP1, 3, 7, 20 and 66 showed olfactory tissue specificity by reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR). Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis showed that among olfactory-specific OBPs, AfunOBP1 and 3 are the most enriched OBPs in female antennae. Binding assay experiments showed that at pH 7, AfunOBP1 significantly binds to 2-undecanone, nonyl acetate, octyl acetate and 1-octen-3-ol but AfunOBP3, which shares 68% identify with AfunOBP1 at amino acid level, showed nearly no binding activity to the selected 12 EAG-active odorant compounds. Conclusion This work presents for the first time a study on the odorants and OBPs of the malaria vector mosquito An. funestus, which may provide insight into the An. funestus olfactory research, assist in a comparative study between major malaria mosquitoes An. gambiae and An. funestus olfactory system, and help developing new mosquito control strategies to reduce malaria transmission. PMID:21042539

  7. The molecular evolution of four anti-malarial immune genes in the Anopheles gambiae species complex

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    Simard Frederic

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background If the insect innate immune system is to be used as a potential blocking step in transmission of malaria, then it will require targeting one or a few genes with highest relevance and ease of manipulation. The problem is to identify and manipulate those of most importance to malaria infection without the risk of decreasing the mosquito's ability to stave off infections by microbes in general. Molecular evolution methodologies and concepts can help identify such genes. Within the setting of a comparative molecular population genetic and phylogenetic framework, involving six species of the Anopheles gambiae complex, we investigated whether a set of four pre-selected immunity genes (gambicin, NOS, Rel2 and FBN9 might have evolved under selection pressure imposed by the malaria parasite. Results We document varying levels of polymorphism within and divergence between the species, in all four genes. Introgression and the sharing of ancestral polymorphisms, two processes that have been documented in the past, were verified in this study in all four studied genes. These processes appear to affect each gene in different ways and to different degrees. However, there is no evidence of positive selection acting on these genes. Conclusion Considering the results presented here in concert with previous studies, genes that interact directly with the Plasmodium parasite, and play little or no role in defense against other microbes, are probably the most likely candidates for a specific adaptive response against P. falciparum. Furthermore, since it is hard to establish direct evidence linking the adaptation of any candidate gene to P. falciparum infection, a comparative framework allowing at least an indirect link should be provided. Such a framework could be achieved, if a similar approach like the one involved here, was applied to all other anopheline complexes that transmit P. falciparum malaria.

  8. African water storage pots for the delivery of the Entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae to the Malaria vectors Anopheles gambiae s.s. and Anopheles funestus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farenhorst, M.; Farina, D.; Scholte, E.J.; Takken, W.; Hunt, R.H.; Coetzee, M.; Knols, B.G.J.

    2008-01-01

    We studied the use of African water storage pots for point source application of Metarhizium anisopliae against the malaria vectors Anopheles gambiae s.s. and An. funestus. Clay pots were shown to be attractive resting sites for male and female An. gambiae s.s. and were not repellent after impregnat

  9. Confirmation of Anopheles (Anopheles calderoni Wilkerson, 1991 (Diptera: Culicidae in Colombia and Ecuador through molecular and morphological correlation with topotypic material

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    Ranulfo González

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The morphologically similar taxa Anopheles calderoni, Anopheles punctimacula, Anopheles malefactor and Anopheles guarao are commonly misidentified. Isofamilies collected in Valle de Cauca, Colombia, showed morphological characters most similar to An. calderoni, a species which has never previously been reported in Colombia. Although discontinuity of the postsubcostal pale spots on the costa (C and first radial (R1 wing veins is purportedly diagnostic for An. calderoni, the degree of overlap of the distal postsubcostal spot on C and R1 were variable in Colombian specimens (0.003-0.024. In addition, in 98.2% of larvae, seta 1-X was located off the saddle and seta 3-C had 4-7 branches in 86.7% of specimens examined. Correlation of DNA sequences of the second internal transcribed spacer and mtDNA cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene (COI barcodes (658 bp of the COI gene generated from Colombian progeny material and wild-caught mosquitoes from Ecuador with those from the Peruvian type series of An. calderoni confirmed new country records. DNA barcodes generated for the closely related taxa, An. malefactor and An. punctimacula are also presented for the first time. Examination of museum specimens at the University of the Valle, Colombia, revealed the presence of An. calderoni in inland localities across Colombia and at elevations up to 1113 m.

  10. Comparative Studies on the Stenogamous and Eurygamous Behavior of Eight Anopheles Species of the Hyrcanus Group (Diptera: Culicidae in Thailand

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    Adulsak Wijit

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Establishment of laboratory colony is essential for mosquito-borne-disease research. Mating behavior of stenogamous Anopheles peditaeniatus and seven eurygamous species (Anopheles argyropus, Anopheles crawfordi, Anopheles nigerrimus, Anopheles nitidus, Anopheles paraliae (=An. lesteri, Anopheles pursati and Anopheles sinensis, were investigated and compared in this study. The self-mating success of adult mosquitoes in different size cages at two density resting surface (DRS values, 3.6 and 7.2, was statistically significant between stenogamous and eurygamous species. The results obtained from comparative measurements of specific characters in adult females (maxillary palpomere and antennal sensilla characters and males (wing and genitalia indicate those characters might influence the mating success of An. peditaeniatus in a small cage. The gonostylus of An. peditaeniatus was shorter than the eurygamous species. Additionally, the lower frequency of clasper movement and shorter mating time could be important mechanisms that control the stenogamous behavior of An. peditaeniatus. Interestingly, for the first time, a cluster of large sensilla coeloconica was recorded on the antenna of An. argyropus and An. peditaeniatus females. There was no statistically significant difference in the mean number per female of those large antennal sensilla coeloconica among six of the eurygamous species.

  11. Identification of one capa and two pyrokinin receptors from the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Stine S; Cazzamali, Giuseppe; Williamson, Michael;

    2007-01-01

    We cloned the cDNA of three evolutionarily related G protein-coupled receptors from the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae and functionally expressed them in Chinese hamster ovary cells. One receptor, Ang-Capa-R, was only activated by the two Anopheles capa neuropeptides Ang-capa-1 (GPTVGLFAFPRVa......We cloned the cDNA of three evolutionarily related G protein-coupled receptors from the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae and functionally expressed them in Chinese hamster ovary cells. One receptor, Ang-Capa-R, was only activated by the two Anopheles capa neuropeptides Ang-capa-1...... (GPTVGLFAFPRVamide) and Ang-capa-2 (pQGLVPFPRVamide) with EC(50) values of 8.6x10(-9)M and 3.3x10(-9)M, respectively, but not by any other known mosquito neuropeptide. The second receptor, Ang-PK-1-R, was selectively activated by the Anopheles pyrokinin-1 peptides Ang-PK-1-1 (AGGTGANSAMWFGPRLamide) and Ang-PK-1......-2 (AAAMWFGPRLamide) with EC(50) values of 3.3x10(-8)M and 2.5x10(-8)M, respectively, but not by mosquito capa or pyrokinin-2 peptides. For the third receptor, Ang-PK-2-R, the most potent ligands were the pyrokinin-2 peptides Ang-PK-2-1 (DSVGENHQRPPFAPRLamide) and Ang-PK-2-2 (NLPFSPRLamide) with EC(50) values of 5.2x...

  12. Malaria in Kakuma refugee camp, Turkana, Kenya: facilitation of Anopheles arabiensis vector populations by installed water distribution and catchment systems

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    Cetron Martin S

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria is a major health concern for displaced persons occupying refugee camps in sub-Saharan Africa, yet there is little information on the incidence of infection and nature of transmission in these settings. Kakuma Refugee Camp, located in a dry area of north-western Kenya, has hosted ca. 60,000 to 90,000 refugees since 1992, primarily from Sudan and Somalia. The purpose of this study was to investigate malaria prevalence and attack rate and sources of Anopheles vectors in Kakuma refugee camp, in 2005-2006, after a malaria epidemic was observed by staff at camp clinics. Methods Malaria prevalence and attack rate was estimated from cases of fever presenting to camp clinics and the hospital in August 2005, using rapid diagnostic tests and microscopy of blood smears. Larval habitats of vectors were sampled and mapped. Houses were sampled for adult vectors using the pyrethrum knockdown spray method, and mapped. Vectors were identified to species level and their infection with Plasmodium falciparum determined. Results Prevalence of febrile illness with P. falciparum was highest among the 5 to 17 year olds (62.4% while malaria attack rate was highest among the two to 4 year olds (5.2/1,000/day. Infected individuals were spatially concentrated in three of the 11 residential zones of the camp. The indoor densities of Anopheles arabiensis, the sole malaria vector, were similar during the wet and dry seasons, but were distributed in an aggregated fashion and predominantly in the same zones where malaria attack rates were high. Larval habitats and larval populations were also concentrated in these zones. Larval habitats were man-made pits of water associated with tap-stands installed as the water delivery system to residents with year round availability in the camp. Three percent of A. arabiensis adult females were infected with P. falciparum sporozoites in the rainy season. Conclusions Malaria in Kakuma refugee camp was due mainly

  13. Anopheles gambiae Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase: Catalysis, Structure, and Inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor,E.; Rinaldo-Matthis, A.; Li, L.; Ghanem, M.; Hazleton, K.; Cassera, M.; Almo, S.; Schramm, V.

    2007-01-01

    The purine salvage pathway of Anopheles gambiae, a mosquito that transmits malaria, has been identified in genome searches on the basis of sequence homology with characterized enzymes. Purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) is a target for the development of therapeutic agents in humans and purine auxotrophs, including malarial parasites. The PNP from Anopheles gambiae (AgPNP) was expressed in Escherichia coli and compared to the PNPs from Homo sapiens (HsPNP) and Plasmodium falciparum (PfPNP). AgPNP has kcat values of 54 and 41 s-1 for 2'-deoxyinosine and inosine, its preferred substrates, and 1.0 s-1 for guanosine. However, the chemical step is fast for AgPNP at 226 s-1 for guanosine in pre-steady-state studies. 5'-Deaza-1'-aza-2'-deoxy-1'-(9-methylene)-Immucillin-H (DADMe-ImmH) is a transition-state mimic for a 2'-deoxyinosine ribocation with a fully dissociated N-ribosidic bond and is a slow-onset, tight-binding inhibitor with a dissociation constant of 3.5 pM. This is the tightest-binding inhibitor known for any PNP, with a remarkable Km/Ki* of 5.4 x 107, and is consistent with enzymatic transition state predictions of enhanced transition-state analogue binding in enzymes with enhanced catalytic efficiency. Deoxyguanosine is a weaker substrate than deoxyinosine, and DADMe-Immucillin-G is less tightly bound than DADMe-ImmH, with a dissociation constant of 23 pM for AgPNP as compared to 7 pM for HsPNP. The crystal structure of AgPNP was determined in complex with DADMe-ImmH and phosphate to a resolution of 2.2 Angstroms to reveal the differences in substrate and inhibitor specificity. The distance from the N1' cation to the phosphate O4 anion is shorter in the AgPNP{center_dot}DADMe-ImmH{center_dot}PO4 complex than in HsPNP{center_dot}DADMe-ImmH{center_dot}SO4, offering one explanation for the stronger inhibitory effect of DADMe-ImmH for AgPNP.

  14. Pyrethroid resistance in an Anopheles funestus population from Uganda.

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    John C Morgan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The susceptibility status of Anopheles funestus to insecticides remains largely unknown in most parts of Africa because of the difficulty in rearing field-caught mosquitoes of this malaria vector. Here we report the susceptibility status of the An. funestus population from Tororo district in Uganda and a preliminary characterisation of the putative resistance mechanisms involved. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A new forced egg laying technique used in this study significantly increased the numbers of field-caught females laying eggs and generated more than 4000 F1 adults. WHO bioassays indicated that An. funestus in Tororo is resistant to pyrethroids (62% mortality after 1 h exposure to 0.75% permethrin and 28% mortality to 0.05% deltamethrin. Suspected DDT resistance was also observed with 82% mortality. However this population is fully susceptible to bendiocarb (carbamate, malathion (organophosphate and dieldrin with 100% mortality observed after exposure to each of these insecticides. Sequencing of a fragment of the sodium channel gene containing the 1014 codon conferring pyrethroid/DDT resistance in An. gambiae did not detect the L1014F kdr mutation but a correlation between haplotypes and resistance phenotype was observed indicating that mutations in other exons may be conferring the knockdown resistance in this species. Biochemical assays suggest that resistance in this population is mediated by metabolic resistance with elevated level of GSTs, P450s and pNPA compared to a susceptible strain of Anopheles gambiae. RT-PCR further confirmed the involvement of P450s with a 12-fold over-expression of CYP6P9b in the Tororo population compared to the fully susceptible laboratory colony FANG. CONCLUSION: This study represents the first report of pyrethroid/DDT resistance in An. funestus from East Africa. With resistance already reported in southern and West Africa, this indicates that resistance in An. funestus may be more widespread

  15. Comparison of capture methods for the diagnosis of adult anopheline populations from State of Mato Grosso, Brazil Comparação de métodos de captura para o diagnóstico da população de anofelinos adultos do Estado de Mato Grosso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanci Akemi Missawa

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The present study compares human landing catches of primary malaria vectors with two alternative methods of capture: the Shannon trap and the Mosquito magnet. METHODS: This study used regression models to adjust capture data to a negative binominal distribution. RESULTS: Capture numbers and relative percentages obtained from the three methods vary strongly between species. The highest overall captures were obtained for Anopheles triannulatus with captures for the Shannon trap and the Mosquito magnet measuring more than 330% higher than captures obtained by human landings. For Anopheles darlingi, captures by the Shannon trap and the Mosquito magnet were about 14% and 26% of human landing catches, respectively. Another species with malaria transmission potential that was not sampled by human landing captures weascaptured by the Shannon trap and the Mosquito magnet (Anopheles oswaldoi. Both alternative sampling techniques can predict the human landing of Anopheles triannulatus, but without proportionality. Models for Anopheles darlingi counts, after totaling daily captures, are significant and proportional, but prediction models are more reliable when using the Shannon trap compared with the Mosquito magnet captures. CONCLUSIONS: These alternative capture methods can be partially recommended for the substitution of human landing captures or, at least, as complementary forms of monitoring for malarial mosquitoes.INTRODUÇÃO: O presente estudo compara a captura através da isca humana dos principais vetores da malária, com dois métodos alternativos de captura, a armadilha luminosa de Shannon e a armadilha Mosquito magnet. MÉTODOS: O presente estudo utiliza modelos de regressão para ajustar os dados obtidos para uma distribuição binomial negativa. RESULTADOS: Os números e as proporções relativas obtidas nos três métodos variaram fortemente entre as espécies. A maior densidade capturada foi de Anopheles triannulatus, atrav

  16. Transcriptome analysis of Anopheles stephensi embryo using expressed sequence tags

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kaustubh Gokhale; Deepak P Patil; Dhiraj P Dhotre; Rajnikant Dixit; Murlidhar J Mendki; Milind S Patole; Yogesh S Shouche

    2013-06-01

    Germ band retraction (GBR) stage is one of the important stages during insect development. It is associated with an extensive epithelial morphogenesis and may also be pivotal in generation of morphological diversity in insects. Despite its importance, only a handful of studies report the transcriptome repertoire of this stage in insects. Here, we report generation, annotation and analysis of ESTs from the embryonic stage (16–22 h post fertilization) of laboratory-reared Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes. A total of 1002 contigs were obtained upon clustering of 1140 high-quality ESTs, which demonstrates an astonishingly low transcript redundancy (12.1%). Putative functions were assigned only to 213 contigs (21%), comprising mainly of transcripts encoding protein synthesis machinery. Approximately 78% of the transcripts remain uncharacterized, illustrating a lack of sequence information about the genes expressed in the embryonic stages of mosquitoes. This study highlights several novel transcripts, which apart from insect development, may significantly contribute to the essential biological complexity underlying insect viability in adverse environments. Nonetheless, the generated sequence information from this work provides a comprehensive resource for genome annotation, microarray development, phylogenetic analysis and other molecular biology applications in entomology.

  17. Resistance Mechanisms of Anopheles stephensi (Diptera: Culicidae to Temephos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aboozar Soltani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anopheles stephensi is a sub-tropical species and has been considered as one of the most important vector of human malaria throughout the Middle East and South Asian region including the malarious areas of southern Iran. Current reports confirmed An. stephensi resistance to temephos in Oman and India. However, there is no comprehensive research on mechanisms of temephos resistance in An. stephensi in the literature. This study was designed in order to clarify the enzymatic and molecular mechanisms of temephos resistance in this species.Methods: Profile activities of α- and ß-esterases, mixed function oxidase (MFO, glutathione-S-transferase (GST, insensitive acetylcholinesterase, and para-nitrophenyl acetate (PNPA-esterase enzymes were tested for An. stephensi strain with resistance ratio of 15.82 to temephos in comparison with susceptible strain.Results: Results showed that the mean activity of α-EST, GST and AChE enzymes were classified as altered indicating metabolic mechanisms have considerable role in resistance of An. stephensi to temephos. Molecular study using PCR-RFLP method to trace the G119S mutation in ACE-1 gene showed lack of the mutation responsible for organophosphate insecticide resistance in the temephos-selected strain of An. stephensi.Conclusion: This study showed that the altered enzymes but not targets site insensitivity of ACE-1 are responsible for temephos resistance in An. stephensi in south of Iran.

  18. Observaciones sobre Phlebotomus y Anopheles en el Callejon de Huaylas

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    Arístides Herrer

    1943-03-01

    Full Text Available Se han llevado a cabo observaciones entomológicas en relación con la verruga y el paludismo en la zona del Callejón de Huaylas comprendida desde la ciudad de Yuramarca a la de Huarás, prestando especial atención a la región del Cañón del Pato. Se indica, como resultados de tales observaciones, la presencia de las titiras: Phlebotomus verrucarum, P. peruensis, P. noguchii y una especia nueva, señalando detenidamente las localidades donde se las han encontrado. El P. verrucarum, principal trasmisor de la verruga, se halla a lo largo de toda la zona estudiada, siendo su número bastante reducido en la ciudad de Huarás. Desde Yuramarca hasta cerca de la ciudad de Carás se ha encontrado únicamente el Anopheles pseudopunctipennis, tanto larvas como adultos. Sus criaderos se encuentran principalmente en las márgenes del río Santa, en las de algunos afluentes de éste y en numerosos, manantiales.

  19. The role of hemocytes in Anopheles gambiae antiplasmodial immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Jose Luis; Garver, Lindsey S; Brayner, Fábio André; Alves, Luiz Carlos; Rodrigues, Janneth; Molina-Cruz, Alvaro; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2014-01-01

    Hemocytes synthesize key components of the mosquito complement-like system, but their role in the activation of antiplasmodial responses has not been established. The effect of activating Toll signaling in hemocytes on Plasmodium survival was investigated by transferring hemocytes or cell-free hemolymph from donor mosquitoes in which the suppressor cactus was silenced. These transfers greatly enhanced antiplasmodial immunity, indicating that hemocytes are active players in the activation of the complement-like system, through an effector/effectors regulated by the Toll pathway. A comparative analysis of hemocyte populations between susceptible G3 and the refractory L3-5 Anopheles gambiae mosquito strains did not reveal significant differences under basal conditions or in response to Plasmodium berghei infection. The response of susceptible mosquitoes to different Plasmodium species revealed similar kinetics following infection with P. berghei,P. yoelii or P. falciparum, but the strength of the priming response was stronger in less compatible mosquito-parasite pairs. The Toll, Imd,STAT or JNK signaling cascades were not essential for the production of the hemocyte differentiation factor (HDF) in response to P. berghei infection, but disruption of Toll, STAT or JNK abolished hemocyte differentiation in response to HDF. We conclude that hemocytes are key mediators of A. gambiae antiplasmodial responses. PMID:23886925

  20. TEMPAT PERKEMBANGBIAKAN ANOPHELES ACONITUS DI KABUPATEN JEPARA, JAWA TENGAH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mardiana Mardiana

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Kabupaten Jepara adalah salah satu kabupaten endemis malaria di Jawa Tengah. Kasus malaria di Kabupaten Jepara terjadi akibat interaksi antara nyamuk/vektor, parasit, lingkungan dan manusia yang mengalami perubahan dari waktu ke waktu. Penelitian tempat perkembangbiakan vektor malaria Anopheles aconitus dilakukan di Desa Buaran, Kecamatan Mayong, Kabupaten Jepara, Jawa Tengah pada tahun 2000. Tujuan penelitian mengetahui pengaruh perubahan lingkungan alami dan perubahan buatan oleh manusia terhadap tempat perkembangbiakan An. aconitus. Metode penelitian dengan cara pengumpulan larva dan pupa yang dilakukan pada pagi hari dengan menggunakan cidukan di tempat-tempat genangan air yang diduga sebagai tempat perkembangbiakan An. aconitus Dari hasil pengambilan jentik di sawah, saluran irigasi, sungai dan lubang/kobakan bekas  galian pasir yang digenangi air, ternyata yang banyak ditemukan adalah jentik An. aconitus dari 6 spesies jentik nyamuk yang teridentifikasi. Habitat utama An. aconitus di Kabupaten Jepara adalah persawahan. Perubahan habitat terjadi dengan adanya perubahan lingkungan dan musim, dimana pada musim kemarau sebagian sawah menjadi kering, sehingga mempengaruhi peril'aku nyamuk  untuk mencari habitat yang baru seperti  sungai  dan  saluran irigasi. Selain perubahan musim juga adanya lubang/kobakan yang digenangan air bekas galian pasir di sepanjang tepi sungai, sebagai akibat perbuatan dari penduduk setempat, sehingga menjadi habitat baru dari nyamuk terutama An.aconitus. Kata Kunci : Tempat Perkembangbiakan, An. aconitus, Malaria,

  1. Effect of anti-mosquito hemolymph antibodies on fecundity and on the infectivity of malarial parasite Plasmodium vivax to Anopheles stephensi (Diptera:Insecta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulia, Monika; Suneja, Amita; Gakhar, Surendra K

    2002-06-01

    Rabbit antibodies to hemolymph antigens (102.5, 101, 100, 96, 88, 80, 64, 55, 43, 29, and 23 kDa) of Anopheles stephensi reduced fecundity as well as viability in An. stephensi. However, ingestion of these antibodies was not associated with a marked effect on the engorgement of mosquitoes but egg laying was significantly delayed. Antisera raised against hemolymph proteins were also used to identify cross reactive antigens/epitopes present in other tissues by Western blotting, as well as by in vivo ELISA. In addition, a significant reduction in oocyst development was also observed in An. stephensi mosquitoes that ingested anti-hemolymph antibodies along with Plasmodium vivax. The results confirmed the feasibility of targeting mosquito antigens as a novel anti-mosquito strategy, as well as confirmed the usefulness of such antigens for the development of a transmission-blocking vaccine. PMID:12195047

  2. Field evaluation of deet against Anopheles farauti at Ndendo (Santa Cruz) Island, Solomon Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frances, S P; Bugoro, H; Butafa, C; Cooper, R D

    2010-09-01

    Field efficacy studies comparing two formulations of deet (N,N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide) against mosquitoes were conducted on Ndendo Island, Solomon Islands. The repellent study was conducted at Pala village in November 2008, and the only mosquito species collected was Anopheles farauti Laveran. A formulation containing 35% deet in a gel provided >95% protection for 2 h, whereas a formulation containing 40% deet in ethanol in a spray applicator provided >95% for only 1 h. This field study demonstrated again that repellents containing deet provide a relatively short period of complete protection against Anopheles spp. PMID:20939380

  3. Humoral response to the Anopheles gambiae salivary protein gSG6: a serological indicator of exposure to Afrotropical malaria vectors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinzia Rizzo

    Full Text Available Salivary proteins injected by blood feeding arthropods into their hosts evoke a saliva-specific humoral response which can be useful to evaluate exposure to bites of disease vectors. However, saliva of hematophagous arthropods is a complex cocktail of bioactive factors and its use in immunoassays can be misleading because of potential cross-reactivity to other antigens. Toward the development of a serological marker of exposure to Afrotropical malaria vectors we expressed the Anopheles gambiae gSG6, a small anopheline-specific salivary protein, and we measured the anti-gSG6 IgG response in individuals from a malaria hyperendemic area of Burkina Faso, West Africa. The gSG6 protein was immunogenic and anti-gSG6 IgG levels and/or prevalence increased in exposed individuals during the malaria transmission/rainy season. Moreover, this response dropped during the intervening low transmission/dry season, suggesting it is sensitive enough to detect variation in vector density. Members of the Fulani ethnic group showed higher anti-gSG6 IgG response as compared to Mossi, a result consistent with the stronger immune reactivity reported in this group. Remarkably, anti-gSG6 IgG levels among responders were high in children and gradually declined with age. This unusual pattern, opposite to the one observed with Plasmodium antigens, is compatible with a progressive desensitization to mosquito saliva and may be linked to the continued exposure to bites of anopheline mosquitoes. Overall, the humoral anti-gSG6 IgG response appears a reliable serological indicator of exposure to bites of the main African malaria vectors (An. gambiae, Anopheles arabiensis and, possibly, Anopheles funestus and it may be exploited for malaria epidemiological studies, development of risk maps and evaluation of anti-vector measures. In addition, the gSG6 protein may represent a powerful model system to get a deeper understanding of molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the

  4. The multiplicity of malaria transmission: a review of entomological inoculation rate measurements and methods across sub-Saharan Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly-Hope Louise A; McKenzie F Ellis

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Plasmodium falciparum malaria is a serious tropical disease that causes more than one million deaths each year, most of them in Africa. It is transmitted by a range of Anopheles mosquitoes and the risk of disease varies greatly across the continent. The "entomological inoculation rate" is the commonly-used measure of the intensity of malaria transmission, yet the methods used are currently not standardized, nor do they take the ecological, demographic, and socioeconomic differences a...

  5. Community-Wide Distribution of Long-Lasting Insecticidal Nets Can Halt Transmission of Lymphatic Filariasis in Southeastern Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Richards, Frank O.; Emukah, Emmanuel; Graves, Patricia M; Nkwocha, Omeni; Nwankwo, Lawrence; Rakers, Lindsay; Mosher, Aryc; Patterson, Amy; Ozaki, Masayo; Nwoke, Bertram E. B.; Ukaga, Chinyere N.; Njoku, Chidiebere; Nwodu, Kenrick; Obasi, Andrew; Miri, Emmanuel S.

    2013-01-01

    Lymphatic filariasis (LF) in rural southeastern Nigeria is transmitted mainly by Anopheles spp. mosquitoes. Potential coinfection with Loa loa in this area has prevented use of ivermectin in the mass drug administration (MDA) strategy for LF elimination because of potential severe adverse L. loa-related reactions. This study determined if long-lasting insecticidal net (LLIN) distribution programs for malaria would interrupt LF transmission in such areas, without need for MDA. Monthly entomolo...

  6. HIV Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Abroad Treatment Basic Statistics Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... on HIV Syndicated Content Website Feedback HIV/AIDS HIV Transmission Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ...

  7. Repellent, irritant and toxic effects of 20 plant extracts on adults of the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae mosquito.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Deletre

    Full Text Available Pyrethroid insecticides induce an excito-repellent effect that reduces contact between humans and mosquitoes. Insecticide use is expected to lower the risk of pathogen transmission, particularly when impregnated on long-lasting treated bednets. When applied at low doses, pyrethroids have a toxic effect, however the development of pyrethroid resistance in several mosquito species may jeopardize these beneficial effects. The need to find additional compounds, either to kill disease-carrying mosquitoes or to prevent mosquito contact with humans, therefore arises. In laboratory conditions, the effects (i.e., repellent, irritant and toxic of 20 plant extracts, mainly essential oils, were assessed on adults of Anopheles gambiae, a primary vector of malaria. Their effects were compared to those of DEET and permethrin, used as positive controls. Most plant extracts had irritant, repellent and/or toxic effects on An. gambiae adults. The most promising extracts, i.e. those combining the three types of effects, were from Cymbopogon winterianus, Cinnamomum zeylanicum and Thymus vulgaris. The irritant, repellent and toxic effects occurred apparently independently of each other, and the behavioural response of adult An. gambiae was significantly influenced by the concentration of the plant extracts. Mechanisms underlying repellency might, therefore, differ from those underlying irritancy and toxicity. The utility of the efficient plant extracts for vector control as an alternative to pyrethroids may thus be envisaged.

  8. Effect of temperature on the development of the aquatic stages of Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayoh, M N; Lindsay, S W

    2003-10-01

    Global warming may affect the future pattern of many arthropod-borne diseases, yet the relationship between temperature and development has been poorly described for many key vectors. Here the development of the aquatic stages of Africa's principal malaria vector, Anopheles gambiae s.s. Giles, is described at different temperatures. Development time from egg to adult was measured under laboratory conditions at constant temperatures between 10 and 40 degrees C. Rate of development from one immature stage to the next increased at higher temperatures to a peak around 28 degrees C and then declined. Adult development rate was greatest between 28 and 32 degrees C, although adult emergence was highest between 22 and 26 degrees C. No adults emerged below 18 degrees C or above 34 degrees C. Non-linear models were used to describe the relationship between developmental rate and temperature, which could be used for developing process-based models of malaria transmission. The utility of these findings is demonstrated by showing that a map where the climate is suitable for the development of aquatic stages of A. gambiae s.s. corresponded closely with the best map of malaria risk currently available for Africa. PMID:14641976

  9. Physiology and development of the M and S molecular forms of Anopheles gambiae in Burkina Faso (West Africa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouline, K; Mamai, W; Agnew, P; Tchonfienet, M; Brengues, C; Dabire, R; Robert, V; Simard, F

    2012-12-01

    In West Africa, M and S molecular forms of Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto (Diptera: Culicidae) Giles, frequently occur together, although with different population bionomics. The S form typically breeds in rain-dependant water collections and is present during the rainy season only whereas the M form can thrive all year long in areas with permanent breeding opportunities. In the present study, we explored physiological and developmental trade-offs at play in laboratory colonies and field populations of the M and S forms that originated from an area of sympatry in Burkina Faso, where M and S larvae exhibit such habitat segregation. In the laboratory, larvae of the M form developed slower than the S form (mean values 9.51 and 8.85 days, respectively, Wilcoxon's test, P < 0.001). Although wing length and dry weight at emergence showed large variations, M females were on average 8% heavier than S females of similar wing length. Higher nutritional reserves (proteins and lipids) in teneral adults explained part of this weight difference, reflecting a better ability of the M form to garner resources at the larval stage. Furthermore, a higher rate of ovarian maturation was observed in the M form after a single bloodmeal. The relevance of these findings for parasite transmission is discussed. PMID:22681446

  10. Acetylcholinesterases from the Disease Vectors Aedes aegypti and Anopheles gambiae: Functional Characterization and Comparisons with Vertebrate Orthologues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engdahl, Cecilia; Knutsson, Sofie; Fredriksson, Sten-Åke; Linusson, Anna; Bucht, Göran; Ekström, Fredrik

    2015-01-01

    Mosquitoes of the Anopheles (An.) and Aedes (Ae.) genus are principal vectors of human diseases including malaria, dengue and yellow fever. Insecticide-based vector control is an established and important way of preventing transmission of such infections. Currently used insecticides can efficiently control mosquito populations, but there are growing concerns about emerging resistance, off-target toxicity and their ability to alter ecosystems. A potential target for the development of insecticides with reduced off-target toxicity is the cholinergic enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Herein, we report cloning, baculoviral expression and functional characterization of the wild-type AChE genes (ace-1) from An. gambiae and Ae. aegypti, including a naturally occurring insecticide-resistant (G119S) mutant of An. gambiae. Using enzymatic digestion and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry we found that the secreted proteins were post-translationally modified. The Michaelis-Menten constants and turnover numbers of the mosquito enzymes were lower than those of the orthologous AChEs from Mus musculus and Homo sapiens. We also found that the G119S substitution reduced the turnover rate of substrates and the potency of selected covalent inhibitors. Furthermore, non-covalent inhibitors were less sensitive to the G119S substitution and differentiate the mosquito enzymes from corresponding vertebrate enzymes. Our findings indicate that it may be possible to develop selective non-covalent inhibitors that effectively target both the wild-type and insecticide resistant mutants of mosquito AChE. PMID:26447952

  11. Acetylcholinesterases from the Disease Vectors Aedes aegypti and Anopheles gambiae: Functional Characterization and Comparisons with Vertebrate Orthologues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Engdahl

    Full Text Available Mosquitoes of the Anopheles (An. and Aedes (Ae. genus are principal vectors of human diseases including malaria, dengue and yellow fever. Insecticide-based vector control is an established and important way of preventing transmission of such infections. Currently used insecticides can efficiently control mosquito populations, but there are growing concerns about emerging resistance, off-target toxicity and their ability to alter ecosystems. A potential target for the development of insecticides with reduced off-target toxicity is the cholinergic enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE. Herein, we report cloning, baculoviral expression and functional characterization of the wild-type AChE genes (ace-1 from An. gambiae and Ae. aegypti, including a naturally occurring insecticide-resistant (G119S mutant of An. gambiae. Using enzymatic digestion and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry we found that the secreted proteins were post-translationally modified. The Michaelis-Menten constants and turnover numbers of the mosquito enzymes were lower than those of the orthologous AChEs from Mus musculus and Homo sapiens. We also found that the G119S substitution reduced the turnover rate of substrates and the potency of selected covalent inhibitors. Furthermore, non-covalent inhibitors were less sensitive to the G119S substitution and differentiate the mosquito enzymes from corresponding vertebrate enzymes. Our findings indicate that it may be possible to develop selective non-covalent inhibitors that effectively target both the wild-type and insecticide resistant mutants of mosquito AChE.

  12. Monoclonal antibodies AC-43 and AC-29 disrupt Plasmodium vivax development in the Indian malaria vector Anopheles culicifacies (Diptera: culicidae)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Manoj Chugh; B R Gulati; S K Gakhar

    2010-03-01

    A repertoire of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) was generated against the midgut proteins of Anopheles culicifacies mosquitoes. The mAbs AC-43 and AC-29 significantly inhibited Plasmodium vivax development inside the mosquito midgut. The number of oocysts that developed was reduced by 78.6% when mosquitoes ingested a combination of these two mAbs along with the blood meal. AC-43 mAb binds to the epitope common in 97, 80 and 43 kDa polypeptides from the midgut protein extract, as indicated by western blot analysis. Similarly, the mAb AC-29 recognized 52, 44, 40 and 29 kDa polypeptides. These female midgut-specific polypeptides are shared between An. culicifacies and An. stephensi, two major vectors of malaria in India. Deglycosylation assays revealed that -linked carbohydrates are the major components in epitopes corresponding to AC-43 and AC-29. Gold particle labelling revealed that both these mAbs preferentially bind to glycoproteins at the apical microvilli and the microvillus-associated network present inside transverse sections of the gut epithelium. These regions are particularly known to have receptors for ookinetes, which enable them to cross this epithelial barrier and provide them with certain necessary chemicals or components for further development into oocysts. Therefore, these glycoproteins appear to be potential candidates for a vectordirected transmission-blocking vaccine (TBV).

  13. Variation in susceptibility of African Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites to TEP1 mediated killing in Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldering, Maarten; Morlais, Isabelle; van Gemert, Geert-Jan; van de Vegte-Bolmer, Marga; Graumans, Wouter; Siebelink-Stoter, Rianne; Vos, Martijn; Abate, Luc; Roeffen, Will; Bousema, Teun; Levashina, Elena A; Sauerwein, Robert W

    2016-01-01

    Anopheles gambiae s.s. mosquitoes are efficient vectors for Plasmodium falciparum, although variation exists in their susceptibility to infection. This variation depends partly on the thioester-containing protein 1 (TEP1) and TEP depletion results in significantly elevated numbers of oocysts in susceptible and resistant mosquitoes. Polymorphism in the Plasmodium gene coding for the surface protein Pfs47 modulates resistance of some parasite laboratory strains to TEP1-mediated killing. Here, we examined resistance of P. falciparum isolates of African origin (NF54, NF165 and NF166) to TEP1-mediated killing in a susceptible Ngousso and a refractory L3-5 strain of A. gambiae. All parasite clones successfully developed in susceptible mosquitoes with limited evidence for an impact of TEP1 on transmission efficiency. In contrast, NF166 and NF165 oocyst densities were strongly reduced in refractory mosquitoes and TEP1 silencing significantly increased oocyst densities. Our results reveal differences between African P. falciparum strains in their capacity to evade TEP1-mediated killing in resistant mosquitoes. There was no significant correlation between Pfs47 genotype and resistance of a given P. falciparum isolate for TEP1 killing. These data suggest that polymorphisms in this locus are not the sole mediators of immune evasion of African malaria parasites. PMID:26861587

  14. Studies on the behaviour of peridomestic and endophagic M form Anopheles gambiae from a rice growing area of Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlwood, J D; Tomás, E V E; Salgueiro, P; Egyir-Yawson, A; Pitts, R J; Pinto, J

    2011-10-01

    The 'paddy paradox', the occurrence of large populations of vectors but low amounts of malaria transmission where irrigated rice is grown, was investigated in a village in Ghana where M form Anopheles gambiae are common. Peridomestic and indoor host-seeking mosquitoes were collected in tent traps and light traps over 21 consecutive nights at the start of the rainy season in June 2009 when the population increased exponentially from less than 100 per night to over 1000. Infection rates in the overall mosquito population were 0.3% and in the estimated parous population were 1.9%. Numbers of An. gambiae in the tent trap peaked between midnight and 02:40 am. The majority of insects were taking their first blood meal, as virgins or shortly after mating. More than expected were collected in the light trap during a rainstorm at the start of the rains but overall numbers were not affected. Fewer than expected were collected after a subsequent storm. Recruitment to the adult population decreased over the following days. It is hypothesised that the 'paddy paradox' is due to young pre-gravid insects dispersing more widely than gravid ones, not necessarily to low survival in the mosquito. PMID:21401973

  15. Insecticide-Treated Net Campaign and Malaria Transmission in Western Kenya: 2003-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Guofa; Lee, Ming-Chieh; Githeko, Andrew K; Atieli, Harrysone E; Yan, Guiyun

    2016-01-01

    Insecticide-treated nets (ITNs) are among the three major intervention measures that have reduced malaria transmission in the past decade. However, increased insecticide resistance in vectors, together with outdoor transmission, has limited the efficacy of the ITN scaling-up efforts. Observations on longitudinal changes in ITN coverage and its impact on malaria transmission allow policy makers to make informed adjustments to control strategies. We analyzed field surveys on ITN ownership, malaria parasite prevalence, and malaria vector population dynamics in seven sentinel sites in western Kenya from 2003 to 2015. We found that ITN ownership has increased from an average of 18% in 2003 to 85% in 2015. Malaria parasite prevalence in school children decreased by about 70% from 2003 to 2008 (the first mass distribution of free ITNs was in 2006) but has resurged by >50% since then. At the community level, use of ITNs reduced infections by 23% in 2008 and 43% in 2010, although the reduction was down to 25% in 2011. The indoor-resting density of the predominant vector, Anopheles gambiae, has been suppressed since 2007; however, Anopheles funestus populations have resurged and have increased 20-fold in some places since 2007. In conclusion, there is limited room for further increase in ITN coverage in western Kenya. The rebounding in malaria transmission highlights the urgent need of new or improved malaria control interventions so as to further reduce malaria transmission. PMID:27574601

  16. Resistance Status of the Malaria Vector Mosquitoes, Anopheles stephensi and Anopheles subpictus Towards Adulticides and Larvicides in Arid and Semi-Arid Areas of India

    OpenAIRE

    Tikar, S. N.; M J Mendki; Sharma, A K; D. Sukumaran; Veer, Vijay; Prakash, Shri; Parashar, B. D.

    2011-01-01

    Susceptibility studies of malaria vectors Anopheles stephensi Liston (Diptera: Culicidae) and An. subpictus Grassi collected during 2004–2007 from various locations of Arid and Semi-Arid Zone of India were conducted by adulticide bioassay of DDT, malathion, deltamethrin and larvicide bioassay of fenthion, temephos, chlorpyriphos and malathion using diagnostic doses. Both species from all locations exhibited variable resistance to DDT and malathion from majority of location. Adults of both the...

  17. Islands and Stepping-Stones: Comparative Population Structure of Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto and Anopheles arabiensis in Tanzania and Implications for the Spread of Insecticide Resistance.

    OpenAIRE

    Deodatus Maliti; Hilary Ranson; Stephen Magesa; William Kisinza; Juma Mcha; Khamis Haji; Gerald Killeen; David Weetman

    2014-01-01

    Population genetic structures of the two major malaria vectors Anopheles gambiae s.s. and An. arabiensis, differ markedly across Sub-Saharan Africa, which could reflect differences in historical demographies or in contemporary gene flow. Elucidation of the degree and cause of population structure is important for predicting the spread of genetic traits such as insecticide resistance genes or artificially engineered genes. Here the population genetics of An. gambiae s.s. and An. arabiensis in ...

  18. GENETIC ISOLATION WITHIN THE MALARIA MOSQUITO ANOPHELES MELAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deitz, Kevin C; Athrey, Giri; Reddy, Michael R; Overgaard, Hans J; Matias, Abrahan; Jawara, Musa; della Torre, Alessandra; Petrarca, Vincenzo; Pinto, Joao; Kiszewski, Anthony; Kengne, Pierre; Costantini, Carlo; Caccone, Adalgisa; Slotman, Michel A

    2014-01-01

    Anopheles melas is a brackish water-breeding member of the An. gambiae complex that is distributed along the coast of West Africa and is a major malaria vector within its range. Because little is known about the population structure of this species, we analyzed 15 microsatellite markers and 1,161 bp of mtDNA in 11 An. melas populations collected throughout its range. Compared to its sibling species An. gambiae, An. melas populations have a high level of genetic differentiation between them, representing its patchy distribution due to its fragmented larval habitat which is associated with mangroves and salt marsh grass. Populations clustered into three distinct groups representing Western Africa, Southern Africa, and Bioko Island populations that appear to be mostly isolated. Fixed differences in the mtDNA are present between all three clusters, and a Bayesian clustering analysis of the microsatellite data found no evidence for migration from mainland to Bioko Island populations, and little migration was evident between the Southern to the Western cluster. Surprisingly, mtDNA divergence between the three An. melas clusters is on par with levels of divergence between other species of the An. gambiae complex, and no support for monophyly was observed in a maximum likelihood phylogenetic analysis. Finally, an Approximate Bayesian Analysis of microsatellite data indicates that Bioko Island An. melas populations were connected to the mainland populations in the past, but became isolated, presumably when sea levels rose after the last glaciation period (≥10,000-11,000 years ago). This study has exposed species level genetic divergence within An. melas, and also has implications for control of this malaria vector. PMID:22882458

  19. The Anopheles dirus complex: spatial distribution and environmental drivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Defourny Pierre

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Anopheles dirus complex includes efficient malaria vectors of the Asian forested zone. Studies suggest ecological and biological differences between the species of the complex but variations within species suggest possible environmental influences. Behavioural variation might determine vector capacity and adaptation to changing environment. It is thus necessary to clarify the species distributions and the influences of environment on behavioural heterogeneity. Methods A literature review highlights variation between species, influences of environmental drivers, and consequences on vector status and control. The localisation of collection sites from the literature and from a recent project (MALVECASIA produces detailed species distributions maps. These facilitate species identification and analysis of environmental influences. Results The maps give a good overview of species distributions. If species status partly explains behavioural heterogeneity, occurrence and vectorial status, some environmental drivers have at least the same importance. Those include rainfall, temperature, humidity, shade, soil type, water chemistry and moon phase. Most factors are probably constantly favourable in forest. Biological specificities, behaviour and high human-vector contact in the forest can explain the association of this complex with high malaria prevalence, multi-drug resistant Plasmodium falciparum and partial control failure of forest malaria in Southeast Asia. Conclusion Environmental and human factors seem better than species specificities at explaining behavioural heterogeneity. Although forest seems essential for mosquito survival, adaptations to orchards and wells have been recorded. Understanding the relationship between landscape components and mosquito population is a priority in foreseeing the influence of land-cover changes on malaria occurrence and in shaping control strategies for the future.

  20. Hydric stress-dependent effects of Plasmodium falciparum infection on the survival of wild-caught Anopheles gambiae female mosquitoes

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    Aboagye-Antwi Fred

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whether Plasmodium falciparum, the agent of human malaria responsible for over a million deaths per year, causes fitness costs in its mosquito vectors is a burning question that has not yet been adequately resolved. Understanding the evolutionary forces responsible for the maintenance of susceptibility and refractory alleles in natural mosquito populations is critical for understanding malaria transmission dynamics. Methods In natural mosquito populations, Plasmodium fitness costs may only be expressed in combination with other environmental stress factors hence this hypothesis was tested experimentally. Wild-caught blood-fed Anopheles gambiae s.s. females of the M and S molecular form from an area endemic for malaria in Mali, West Africa, were brought to the laboratory and submitted to a 7-day period of mild hydric stress or kept with water ad-libitum. At the end of this experiment all females were submitted to intense desiccation until death. The survival of all females throughout both stress episodes, as well as their body size and infection status was recorded. The importance of stress, body size and molecular form on infection prevalence and female survival was investigated using Logistic Regression and Proportional-Hazard analysis. Results Females subjected to mild stress exhibited patterns of survival and prevalence of infection compatible with increased parasite-induced mortality compared to non-stressed females. Fitness costs seemed to be linked to ookinetes and early oocyst development but not the presence of sporozoites. In addition, when females were subjected to intense desiccation stress, those carrying oocysts exhibited drastically reduced survival but those carrying sporozoites were unaffected. No significant differences in prevalence of infection and infection-induced mortality were found between the M and S molecular forms of Anopheles gambiae. Conclusions Because these results suggest that infected

  1. Radiation-induced sterility for pupal and adult stages of the malaria moquito Anopheles arabiensis

    OpenAIRE

    Helinski, M.E.H.; Parker, A.G.; Knols, B.G.J.

    2006-01-01

    Background - In the context of the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT), radiation-induced sterility in the malaria mosquito Anopheles arabiensis Patton (Diptera: Culicidae) was studied. Male mosquitoes were exposed to gamma rays in the pupal or adult stage and dose-sterility curves were determined. Methods - Pupae were irradiated shortly before emergence (at 22-26 hrs of age), and adults

  2. Gene expression changes in the salivary glands of Anopheles coluzzii elicited by Plasmodium berghei infection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pinheiro-Silva, R.; Borges, L.; Coelho, L.P.; Cabezas-Cruz, A.; Valdés, James J.; do Rosário, V.; de la Fuente, J.; Domingos, A.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 8, SEP 23 2015 (2015), s. 485. ISSN 1756-3305 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Anopheles coluzzii * Salivary glands * Plasmodium berghei * Sporozoite * RNA-seq * Glucose transporter * RNAi Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.430, year: 2014

  3. Radiation-induced sterility for pupal and adult stages of the malaria mosquito Anopheles arabiensis

    OpenAIRE

    Knols Bart GJ; Parker Andrew G; Helinski Michelle EH

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background In the context of the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT), radiation-induced sterility in the malaria mosquito Anopheles arabiensis Patton (Diptera: Culicidae) was studied. Male mosquitoes were exposed to gamma rays in the pupal or adult stage and dose-sterility curves were determined. Methods Pupae were irradiated shortly before emergence (at 22–26 hrs of age), and adults

  4. Improvement of a synthetic lure for Anopheles gambiae using compounds produced by human skin microbiota

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhulst, N.O.; Mbadi, P.A.; Bukovinszkine-Kiss, G.; Mukabana, W.R.; Loon, van J.J.A.; Takken, W.; Smallegange, R.C.

    2011-01-01

    Background - Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto is considered to be highly anthropophilic and volatiles of human origin provide essential cues during its host-seeking behaviour. A synthetic blend of three human-derived volatiles, ammonia, lactic acid and tetradecanoic acid, attracts A. gambiae. In addi

  5. Control of pyrethroid-resistant Anopheles gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes with chlorfenapyr in Benin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N'Guessan, R.; Boko, P.; Odjo, A.; Knols, B.G.J.; Akogbeto, M.; Rowland, M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To compare the efficacy of chlorfenapyr applied on mosquito nets and as an indoor residual spray against populations of Anopheles gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus in an area of Benin that shows problematic levels of pyrethroid resistance. Method Eight-week trial conducted in experimental

  6. Anopheles of Bolivia: new records with an updated and annotated checklist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lardeux, Frédéric; Chávez, Tamara; Rodríguez, Roberto; Torrez, Libia

    2009-05-01

    Anopheles squamifemur has been identified from CDC light trap collections carried out at Arca de Israel, a small community located in the extreme north-east of Bolivia (Pando Department) on the banks of the river Madera, on the border with Brazil. Anopheles costai and An. forattinii have been identified in place of An. mediopunctatus which has been removed from the Bolivian list of Anopheles species. The first identification of An. trinkae in Bolivia by Dr. J.C. Lien in 1984 is cleared. The presence of An. deaneorum in Bolivia has been confirmed by our mosquito captures carried out in Guayaramerín (Pando Department, north-east of Bolivia), a border city separated from the type locality of An. deaneorum, the Brasilian city of Guajara-Mirin, by the large Mamoré River. These new findings increase to 43 the total number of known Anopheles species for Bolivia for which an updated and partially annotated checklist is given. PMID:19393981

  7. Olfaction in the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae : Electrophysiology and identification of kairomones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijerink, J.

    1999-01-01

    Female mosquitoes of the species Anopheles gambiae Giles sensu stricto are important vectors of human malaria in Africa. It is generally assumed that they locate their human host by odours. These odours are detected by olfactory receptor neurons situated within cuticular extensions on the antenna. T

  8. Role of Anopheles (Kerteszia bellator as malaria vector in Southeastern Brazil (Diptera: Culicidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oswaldo Paulo Forattini

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available New research concerning Anopheles bellator in the southeast of the State of São Paulo, Brazil, are reported. Adult females of this mosquito showed remarkable endophily and endophagy which was even greater than An. cruzii. The epidemiological role of this anopheline as a malaria vector is discussed.

  9. Behavioural response of the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae to host plant volatiles and synthetic blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugar feeding is critical for survival of malaria vectors and, although discriminative plant feeding previously has been shown to occur in Anopheles gambiae s.s., little is known about the cues mediating attraction to these plants. In this study, we investigated the role of olfaction in An. gambiae ...

  10. Role of Testis-Specific Gene Expression in Sex-Chromosome Evolution of Anopheles gambiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Dean A.; Russell, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Gene expression in Anopheles gambiae shows a deficiency of testis-expressed genes on the X chromosome associated with an excessive movement of retrogene duplication. We suggest that the degeneration of sex chromosomes in this monandrous species is likely the result of pressures from X inactivation, dosage compensation, and sexual antagonism. PMID:21890740

  11. Using a near-infrared spectrometer to estimate the age of anopheles mosquitoes exposed to pyrethroids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maggy T Sikulu

    Full Text Available We report on the accuracy of using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS to predict the age of Anopheles mosquitoes reared from wild larvae and a mixed age-wild adult population collected from pit traps after exposure to pyrethroids. The mosquitoes reared from wild larvae were estimated as <7 or ≥7 d old with an overall accuracy of 79%. The age categories of Anopheles mosquitoes that were not exposed to the insecticide papers were predicted with 78% accuracy whereas the age categories of resistant, susceptible and mosquitoes exposed to control papers were predicted with 82%, 78% and 79% accuracy, respectively. The ages of 85% of the wild-collected mixed-age Anopheles were predicted by NIRS as ≤8 d for both susceptible and resistant groups. The age structure of wild-collected mosquitoes was not significantly different for the pyrethroid-susceptible and pyrethroid-resistant mosquitoes (P = 0.210. Based on these findings, NIRS chronological age estimation technique for Anopheles mosquitoes may be independent of insecticide exposure and the environmental conditions to which the mosquitoes are exposed.

  12. Tyrosine Hydroxylase is crucial for maintaining pupal tanning and immunity in Anopheles sinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Liang; Du, Minghui; Liang, Xin; Hao, Youjin; He, Xiu; Si, Fengling; Mei, Ting; Chen, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the initial enzyme in the melanin pathway, catalyzes tyrosine conversion into Dopa. Although expression and regulation of TH have been shown to affect cuticle pigmentation in insects, no direct functional studies to date have focused on the specific physiological processes involving the enzyme during mosquito development. In the current study, silencing of AsTH during the time period of continuous high expression in Anopheles sinensis pupae led to significant impairment of cuticle tanning and thickness, imposing a severe obstacle to eclosion in adults. Meanwhile, deficiency of melanin in interference individuals led to suppression of melanization, compared to control individuals. Consequently, the ability to defend exogenous microorganisms declined sharply. Accompanying down-regulation of the basal expression of five antimicrobial peptide genes resulted in further significant weakening of immunity. TH homologs as well as the composition of upstream transcription factor binding sites at the pupal stage are highly conserved in the Anopheles genus, implying that the TH-mediated functions are crucial in Anopheles. The collective evidence strongly suggests that TH is essential for Anopheles pupae tanning and immunity and provides a reference for further studies to validate the utility of the key genes involved in the melanization pathway in controlling mosquito development. PMID:27416870

  13. Larvicidal effects of a neem (Azadirachta indica) oil formulation on the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okumu, F.O.; Knols, B.G.J.; Fillinger, U.

    2007-01-01

    Background - Larviciding is a key strategy used in many vector control programmes around the world. Costs could be reduced if larvicides could be manufactured locally. The potential of natural products as larvicides against the main African malaria vector, Anopheles gambiae s.s was evaluated. Method

  14. Sharing of antigens between Plasmodium falciparum and Anopheles albimanus Antígenos compartidos entre Plasmodium falciparum y Anopheles albimanus

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    Albina Wide

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The presence of common antigens between Plasmodium falciparum and Anopheles albimanus was demonstrated. Different groups of rabbits were immunized with: crude extract from female An. albimanus (EAaF, red blood cells infected with Plasmodium falciparum (EPfs, and the SPf66 synthetic malaria vaccine. The rabbit's polyclonal antibodies were evaluated by ELISA, Multiple Antigen Blot Assay (MABA, and immunoblotting. All extracts were immunogenic in rabbits according to these three techniques, when they were evaluated against the homologous antigens. Ten molecules were identified in female mosquitoes and also in P. falciparum antigens by the autologous sera. The electrophoretic pattern by SDS-PAGE was different for the three antigens evaluated. Cross-reactions between An. albimanus and P. falciparum were found by ELISA, MABA, and immunoblotting. Anti-P. falciparum and anti-SPf66 antibodies recognized ten and five components in the EAaF crude extract, respectively. Likewise, immune sera against female An. albimanus identified four molecules in the P. falciparum extract antigen. As far as we know, this is the first work that demonstrates shared antigens between anophelines and malaria parasites. This finding could be useful for diagnosis, vaccines, and the study of physiology of the immune response to malaria.Epítopes de antígenos compartidos entre Plasmodium falciparum y Anopheles albimanus fueron identificados. Diferentes grupos de conejos fueron inmunizados con: extracto crudo de mosquito hembra de An. albimanus (EAaH, glóbulos rojos infectados con P. falciparum (EPfs y la vacuna antimalárica sintética SPf66. Los anticuerpos policlonales producidos en conejos fueron evaluados por ELISA, inmunoensayo simultáneo de múltiples antígenos (MABA e Immunoblotting. Todos los extractos resultaron inmunogénicos cuando se evaluaron por ELISA, MABA e Immunoblotting. Diez moléculas fueron identificadas en los mosquitos hembras y diez en los antígenos de

  15. Comparative analyses reveal discrepancies among results of commonly used methods for Anopheles gambiaemolecular form identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinto João

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anopheles gambiae M and S molecular forms, the major malaria vectors in the Afro-tropical region, are ongoing a process of ecological diversification and adaptive lineage splitting, which is affecting malaria transmission and vector control strategies in West Africa. These two incipient species are defined on the basis of single nucleotide differences in the IGS and ITS regions of multicopy rDNA located on the X-chromosome. A number of PCR and PCR-RFLP approaches based on form-specific SNPs in the IGS region are used for M and S identification. Moreover, a PCR-method to detect the M-specific insertion of a short interspersed transposable element (SINE200 has recently been introduced as an alternative identification approach. However, a large-scale comparative analysis of four widely used PCR or PCR-RFLP genotyping methods for M and S identification was never carried out to evaluate whether they could be used interchangeably, as commonly assumed. Results The genotyping of more than 400 A. gambiae specimens from nine African countries, and the sequencing of the IGS-amplicon of 115 of them, highlighted discrepancies among results obtained by the different approaches due to different kinds of biases, which may result in an overestimation of MS putative hybrids, as follows: i incorrect match of M and S specific primers used in the allele specific-PCR approach; ii presence of polymorphisms in the recognition sequence of restriction enzymes used in the PCR-RFLP approaches; iii incomplete cleavage during the restriction reactions; iv presence of different copy numbers of M and S-specific IGS-arrays in single individuals in areas of secondary contact between the two forms. Conclusions The results reveal that the PCR and PCR-RFLP approaches most commonly utilized to identify A. gambiae M and S forms are not fully interchangeable as usually assumed, and highlight limits of the actual definition of the two molecular forms, which might

  16. DINAMIKA POPULASI Anopheles Aconitus KAITANYA DENGAN PREVALENSI MALARIA DI KECAMATAN CINEAM, TASIKMALAYA

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    Amrul Munif

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A study on the correlation of population dynamik An. aconitus with malaria prevalence was conducted in Cineam sub-district, Tasikmalaya district, West Java from August 1998 to March 2000. In 1996, outbreaks of malaria did not only occur in the coastal areas but was also spread throughout the more remote areas. Malaria transmission can be detected by the presence of infectious gametocyte dan non-immune individuals, as well as by looking at environmental factors (rainfall and also the density of vector population. The intensity of malaria transmission and the degree of malaria prevalence are affected greatly by the last factor.   The intensity is also determined by the degree of contact between the person and the vector. An. aconitus have been suspected as malaria vector in Cineam sub-district, Tasikmalaya district. The observation of the bionomics wich one component of mosquitoes and its relationship with malaria prevalence as well as the determination of Anopheles spp. as malaria vectors in endemic areas should be given attention as an effort in preventing malaria outbreaks. The high density of vector mosquitoes is partly caused by their high diversity. Determination of the prevalence value is based on the Slide positifrate (SPR that was obtained from analyzing blood samples of the  population. There was an examination on passive case detection (PCD, active case detection  (ACD, and mass blood survey (MBS of the population beforehand. Methods used in surveying dan catching the vector mosquitoes include using humans as bait both inside and outside the house, using light trap, by resting, and also spraying. The longitudinal survey methods were used. Each catched mosquito was identified by looking at its morphological features.The transmission of malaria was found to occur all year round with the highest peak found in August 1998 (SPR= 4.9%, but then declined drastically in May (SPR=2.46% and July 1999 (SPR= 2.4% The occurrence of human biting

  17. Vector capacity of Anopheles sinensis in malaria outbreak areas of central China

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    Pan Jia-Yun

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both falciparum and vivax malaria were historically prevalent in China with high incidence. With the control efforts, the annual incidence in the whole country has reduced to 0.0001% except in some areas in the southern borders after 2000. Despite this, the re-emergence or outbreak of malaria was unavoidable in central China during 2005–2007. In order to understand the role of the vector in the transmission of malaria during the outbreak period, the vector capacity of An. sinensis in Huanghuai valley of central China was investigated. Findings The study was undertaken in two sites, namely Huaiyuan county of Anhui province and Yongcheng county of Henan province. In each county, malaria cases were recorded for recent years, and transmission risk factors for each study village including anti-mosquito facilities and total number of livestock were recorded by visiting each household in the study sites. The specimens of mosquitoes were collected in two villages, and population density and species in each study site were recorded after the identification of different species, and the blood-fed mosquitoes were tested by ring precipitation test. Finally, various indicators were calculated to estimate vector capacity or dynamics, including mosquito biting rate (MBR, human blood index (HBI, and the parous rates (M. Finally, the vector capacity, as an important indicator of malaria transmission to predict the potential recurrence of malaria, was estimated and compared in each study site. About 93.0% of 80 households in Huaiyuan and 89.3% of 192 households in Yongcheng had anti-mosquito facilities. No cattle or pigs were found, only less than 10 sheep were found in each study village. A total of 94 and 107 Anopheles spp. mosquitos were captured in two study sites, respectively, and all of An. sinensis were morphologically identified. It was found that mosquito blood-feeding peak was between 9:00 pm and 12:00 pm. Man biting rate of

  18. Transcending Transmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoeneborn, Dennis; Trittin, Hannah

    2013-01-01

    Purpose – Extant research on corporate social responsibility (CSR) communication primarily relies on a transmission model of communication that treats organizations and communication as distinct phenomena. This approach has been criticized for neglecting the formative role of communication in the....... Organizations are stabilized by various non-human entities that “act” on their behalf. Accordingly, CSR communication should also take into account non-human agency and responsibility. Originality/value – This paper links the literature on CSR communication to broader debates in organizational communication...... studies and, in particular, to the CCO perspective. By applying the CCO view, it reconceptualizes CSR communication as a complex process of meaning negotiation....

  19. Morphological analysis of three populations of Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus) nuneztovari Gabaldón (Diptera: Culicidae) from Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo Ramos, Mayury; González Obando, Ranulfo; Fidel Suárez, Marco; López, David; Wilkerson, Richard; Sallum, Maria Anice Mureb

    2008-02-01

    Based on the results of comparative analyses of 1,039 specimens of several progenies of Anopheles nuneztovarifrom three localities in Colombia, eight costal wing spot patterns were observed. Patterns I and III were the most frequent: 77.96% and 11.36%, respectively. Using the diagnostic characters ratio of the length of the basal dark area of hind tarsomere II/length of hind tarsomere II, ratio of the length of the humeral pale spot/length of the pre-humeral dark spot, and the ratio of the length of the subcostal pale spot/length of the distal sector dark spot (DS-III2/Ta-III2, HP/PHD, SCP/DSD) approximately 5% of the adult females were misidentified as a species of Nyssorhynchus, different from An. nuneztovari. Approximately 5% of the specimens showed DS-III2/Ta-III2 ratio less than 0.25 (range 0.21 - 0.24), and among them 3.34% shared a HP/PHD ratio less than 1.50. Consequently, 1.52% of An. nuneztovari individuals can be misidentified as Anopheles oswaldoi. In those specimens with the DS-III2/Ta-III2 ratios higher than 0.25, 34.45% displayed SCP/DSD values greater than 0.50 and of these, 3.65% displayed HP/PHD values greater than 1.8. This combination of characters could lead one to misidentify samples of An. nuneztovari as Anopheles rangeli. Similarly, 2.43% of the females could be identified erroneously as either Anopheles aquasalis or Anopheles benarrochi. Individuals with a HP/PHD ratio greater than 2.0, could be misidentified as Anopheles trinkae, Anopheles strodei or Anopheles evansae. A distinct combination of diagnostic characters for An. nuneztovari from Colombia is proposed. PMID:18368239

  20. Morphological analysis of three populations of Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus nuneztovari Gabaldón (Diptera: Culicidae from Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayury Fajardo Ramos

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Based on the results of comparative analyses of 1,039 specimens of several progenies of Anopheles nuneztovarifrom three localities in Colombia, eight costal wing spot patterns were observed. Patterns I and III were the most frequent: 77.96% and 11.36%, respectively. Using the diagnostic characters ratio of the length of the basal dark area of hind tarsomere II/length of hind tarsomere II, ratio of the length of the humeral pale spot/length of the pre-humeral dark spot, and the ratio of the length of the subcostal pale spot/length of the distal sector dark spot (DS-III2/Ta-III2, HP/PHD, SCP/DSD approximately 5% of the adult females were misidentified as a species of Nyssorhynchus, different from An. nuneztovari. Approximately 5% of the specimens showed DS-III2/Ta-III2 ratio less than 0.25 (range 0.21 - 0.24, and among them 3.34% shared a HP/PHD ratio less than 1.50. Consequently, 1.52% of An. nuneztovari individuals can be misidentified as Anopheles oswaldoi. In those specimens with the DS-III2/Ta-III2 ratios higher than 0.25, 34.45% displayed SCP/DSD values greater than 0.50 and of these, 3.65% displayed HP/PHD values greater than 1.8. This combination of characters could lead one to misidentify samples of An. nuneztovari as Anopheles rangeli. Similarly, 2.43% of the females could be identified erroneously as either Anopheles aquasalis or Anopheles benarrochi. Individuals with a HP/PHD ratio greater than 2.0, could be misidentified as Anopheles trinkae, Anopheles strodei or Anopheles evansae. A distinct combination of diagnostic characters for An. nuneztovari from Colombia is proposed.

  1. A simplified high-throughput method for pyrethroid knock-down resistance (kdr) detection in Anopheles gambiae

    OpenAIRE

    Walker Edward D; Black William C; Randle Nadine P; McCall P J; Ranson Hilary; Lynd Amy; Donnelly Martin J

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background A single base pair mutation in the sodium channel confers knock-down resistance to pyrethroids in many insect species. Its occurrence in Anopheles mosquitoes may have important implications for malaria vector control especially considering the current trend for large scale pyrethroid-treated bednet programmes. Screening Anopheles gambiae populations for the kdr mutation has become one of the mainstays of programmes that monitor the development of insecticide resistance. Th...

  2. Potential Test of Papaya Leaf and Seed Extract (Carica Papaya) as Larvicides against Anopheles Mosquito Larvae Mortality. SP IN Jayapura, Papua Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Arsunan

    2015-01-01

    Anopheles mosquitoes, sp is the main vector of malaria disease that is widespread in many parts of the world including in Papua Province. There are four speciesof Anopheles mosquitoes, sp, in Papua namely: An.farauti, An.koliensis, An. subpictus, and An.punctulatus. Larviciding synthetic cause resistance. This study aims to analyze the potential of papaya leaf and seeds extracts (Carica papaya) as larvicides against the mosquitoes Anopheles sp. The experiment was conducted at the Laboratory o...

  3. Phylogenetic study of six species of Anopheles mosquitoes in Peninsular Malaysia based on inter-transcribed spacer region 2 (ITS2) of ribosomal DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Sum, Jia-Siang; Lee, Wenn-Chyau; Amir, Amirah; Braima, Kamil A; Jeffery, John; Abdul-Aziz, Noraishah M.; Fong, Mun-Yik; Lau, Yee-Ling

    2014-01-01

    Background Molecular techniques are invaluable for investigation on the biodiversity of Anopheles mosquitoes. This study aimed at investigating the spatial-genetic variations among Anopheles mosquitoes from different areas of Peninsular Malaysia, as well as deciphering evolutionary relationships of the local Anopheles mosquitoes with the mosquitoes from neighbouring countries using the anopheline ITS2 rDNA gene. Methods Mosquitoes were collected, identified, dissected to check infection statu...

  4. Long-Lasting Insecticidal Nets Are Synergistic with Mass Drug Administration for Interruption of Lymphatic Filariasis Transmission in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eigege, Abel; Miri, Emmanuel; Sallau, Adamu; Umaru, John; Mafuyai, Hayward; Chuwang, Yohanna S.; Danjuma, Goshit; Danboyi, Jacob; Adelamo, Solomon E.; Mancha, Bulus S.; Okoeguale, Bridget; Patterson, Amy E.; Rakers, Lindsay; Richards, Frank O.

    2013-01-01

    In central Nigeria Anopheles mosquitoes transmit malaria and lymphatic filariasis (LF). The strategy used for interrupting LF transmission in this area is annual mass drug administration (MDA) with albendazole and ivermectin, but after 8 years of MDA, entomological evaluations in sentinel villages showed continued low-grade mosquito infection rates of 0.32%. After long-lasting insecticidal net (LLIN) distribution by the national malaria program in late 2010, however, we were no longer able to detect infected vectors over a 24-month period. This is evidence that LLINs are synergistic with MDA in interrupting LF transmission. PMID:24205421

  5. Long-lasting insecticidal nets are synergistic with mass drug administration for interruption of lymphatic filariasis transmission in Nigeria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abel Eigege

    Full Text Available In central Nigeria Anopheles mosquitoes transmit malaria and lymphatic filariasis (LF. The strategy used for interrupting LF transmission in this area is annual mass drug administration (MDA with albendazole and ivermectin, but after 8 years of MDA, entomological evaluations in sentinel villages showed continued low-grade mosquito infection rates of 0.32%. After long-lasting insecticidal net (LLIN distribution by the national malaria program in late 2010, however, we were no longer able to detect infected vectors over a 24-month period. This is evidence that LLINs are synergistic with MDA in interrupting LF transmission.

  6. Conditions of malaria transmission in Dakar from 2007 to 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokhna Cheikh

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies in Dakar have highlighted the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of Anopheles gambiae s.l. biting rates. In order to improve the knowledge of the determinants of malaria transmission in this city, the present study reports the results of an extensive entomological survey that was conducted in 45 areas in Dakar from 2007 to 2010. Methods Water collections were monitored for the presence of anopheline larvae. Adult mosquitoes were sampled by human landing collection. Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoïte (CSP protein indexes were measured by ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the entomological inoculation rates were calculated. Results The presence of anopheline larvae were recorded in 1,015 out of 2,683 observations made from 325 water collections. A water pH of equal to or above 8.0, a water temperature that was equal to or above 30°C, the absence of larvivorous fishes, the wet season, the presence of surface vegetation, the persistence of water and location in a slightly urbanised area were significantly associated with the presence of anopheline larvae and/or with a higher density of anopheline larvae. Most of the larval habitats were observed in public areas, i.e., freely accessible. A total of 496,310 adult mosquitoes were caught during 3096 person-nights, and 44967 of these specimens were identified as An.gambiae s.l. The mean An. gambiae s.l. human-biting rate ranged from 0.1 to 248.9 bites per person per night during the rainy season. Anopheles arabiensis (93.14%, Anopheles melas (6.83% and An. gambiae s.s. M form (0.03% were the three members of the An. gambiae complex. Fifty-two An. arabiensis and two An. melas specimens were CSP-positive, and the annual CSP index was 0.64% in 2007, 0.09% in 2008-2009 and 0.12% in 2009-2010. In the studied areas, the average EIR ranged from 0 to 17.6 infected bites per person during the entire transmission season. Conclusion The spatial and temporal

  7. Malaria transmission and vector behaviour in a forested malaria focus in central Vietnam and the implications for vector control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Speybroeck Niko

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Vietnam, malaria is becoming progressively restricted to specific foci where human and vector characteristics alter the known malaria epidemiology, urging for alternative or adapted control strategies. Long-lasting insecticidal hammocks (LLIH were designed and introduced in Ninh Thuan province, south-central Vietnam, to control malaria in the specific context of forest malaria. An entomological study in this specific forested environment was conducted to assess the behavioural patterns of forest and village vectors and to assess the spatio-temporal risk factors of malaria transmission in the province. Methods Five entomological surveys were conducted in three villages in Ma Noi commune and in five villages in Phuoc Binh commune in Ninh Thuan Province, south-central Vietnam. Collections were made inside the village, at the plot near the slash-and-burn fields in the forest and on the way to the forest. All collected mosquito species were subjected to enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA to detect Plasmodium in the head-thoracic portion of individual mosquitoes after morphological identification. Collection data were analysed by use of correspondence and multivariate analyses. Results The mosquito density in the study area was low with on average 3.7 anopheline bites per man-night and 17.4 culicine bites per man-night. Plasmodium-infected mosquitoes were only found in the forest and on the way to the forest. Malaria transmission in the forested malaria foci was spread over the entire night, from dusk to dawn, but was most intense in the early evening as nine of the 13 Plasmodium positive bites occurred before 21H. The annual entomological inoculation rate of Plasmodium falciparum was 2.2 infective bites per person-year to which Anopheles dirus s.s. and Anopheles minimus s.s. contributed. The Plasmodium vivax annual entomological inoculation rate was 2.5 infective bites per person-year with Anopheles sawadwongporni

  8. Complex genome evolution in Anopheles coluzzii associated with increased insecticide usage in Mali.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Main, Bradley J; Lee, Yoosook; Collier, Travis C; Norris, Laura C; Brisco, Katherine; Fofana, Abdrahamane; Cornel, Anthony J; Lanzaro, Gregory C

    2015-10-01

    In certain cases, a species may have access to important genetic variation present in a related species via adaptive introgression. These novel alleles may interact with their new genetic background, resulting in unexpected phenotypes. In this study, we describe a selective sweep on standing variation on the X chromosome in the mosquito Anopheles coluzzii, a principal malaria vector in West Africa. This event may have been influenced by the recent adaptive introgression of the insecticide resistance gene known as kdr from the sister species Anopheles gambiae. Individuals carrying both kdr and a nearly fixed X-linked haplotype, encompassing at least four genes including the P450 gene CYP9K1 and the cuticular protein CPR125, have rapidly increased in relative frequency. In parallel, a reproductively isolated insecticide-susceptible A. gambiae population (Bamako form) has been driven to local extinction, likely due to strong selection from increased insecticide-treated bed net usage. PMID:26359110

  9. Anopheles gambiae exploits the treehole ecosystem in western Kenya: a new urban malaria risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omlin, Francois X; Carlson, John C; Ogbunugafor, C Brandon; Hassanali, Ahmed

    2007-12-01

    At six sites in western Kenya, we explored the presence of Anopheles immature stages in treeholes. An. gambiae larvae were found in 19 species, 13 of which are exotic. The most common exotic species were Delonix regia, Jacaranda mimosipholia, and Eucalyptus citrodora. In Kisumu city, longitudinal assessments of 10 Flamboyant trees showed repeated presence of An. gambiae s.s. in treeholes with water. Production of Anopheles larvae did not correlate with habitat volume but with habitat height, showing a strong but statistically insignificant negative correlation. During a dry season, eggs recovered by rinsing dry treeholes hatched into 2.5 +/- 3.06 An. gambiae and 7.9 +/- 8.2 Aedes larvae. In cage experiments, An. gambiae s.s. laid more eggs in water originating from treeholes than in distilled or lake water, implying preference for ovipositing in this habitat. Our findings indicate that treeholes represent a hitherto unrecognized habitat for malaria vectors, which needs further studies. PMID:18165501

  10. Integrated genetic map of Anopheles gambiae: use of RAPD polymorphisms for genetic, cytogenetic and STS landmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimopoulos, G; Zheng, L; Kumar, V; della Torre, A; Kafatos, F C; Louis, C

    1996-06-01

    Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers have been integrated in the genetic and cytogenetic maps of the malaria vector mosquito, Anopheles gambiae. Fifteen of these markers were mapped by recombination, relative to microsatellite markers that had been mapped previously. Thirty-four gel-purified RAPD bands were cloned and sequenced, generating sequence tagged sites (STSs) that can be used as entry points to the A. gambiae genome. Thirty one of these STSs were localized on nurse cell polytene chromosomes through their unique hybridization signal in in situ hybridization experiments. Five STSs map close to the breakpoints of polymorphic inversions, which are notable features of the Anopheles genome. The usefulness and limitations of this integrated mosquito map are discussed. PMID:8725241

  11. Ecology of Anopheles Stephensi in a Malarious Area, Southeast of Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Norair Piazak; Minoo Mashayekhi; Ezatoddin Javadian; Hamideh Edalat; Mohammad Reza Abai; Mohammad Ali Oshaghi; Hassan Vatandoost; Ahmad Mehravaran; Ahmad Ali Hanafi-Bojd

    2012-01-01

    District of Jiroft is situated in south-east of Iran which is one of the malarious regions. Anopheles stephensi is considered as one of the main malaria vector in this region. Ecology of this species was studied in the area to understand its vector behavior for implementation of effective vector control measures. Different methods like total catch, pit shelter, night bite collection on human and animal, larval dipping methods were used for species identification, seasonal activity, anthropoph...

  12. Participation of irradiated Anopheles arabiensis males in swarms following field release in Sudan

    OpenAIRE

    Ageep, Tellal B; Damiens, David; Alsharif, Bashir; Ahmed, Ayman; Salih, Elwaleed HO; Ahmed, Fayez TA; Diabaté, Abdoulaye; Lees, Rosemary S.; Gilles, Jeremie RL; El Sayed, Badria B

    2014-01-01

    Background The success of the sterile insect technique (SIT) depends the release of large numbers of sterile males, which are able to compete for mates with the wild male population within the target area. Unfortunately, the processes of colonisation, mass production and irradiation may reduce the competitiveness of sterile males through genetic selection, loss of natural traits and somatic damage. In this context, the capacity of released sterile Anopheles arabiensis males to survive, disper...

  13. Comparison of the functional features of the pump organs of Anopheles sinensis and Aedes togoi

    OpenAIRE

    Young-Ran Ha; Seung-Chul Lee; Seung-Jun Seo; Jeongeun Ryu; Dong-Kyu Lee; Sang-Joon Lee

    2015-01-01

    Mosquitoes act as vectors for severe tropical diseases. Mosquito-borne diseases are affected by various factors such as environmental conditions, host body susceptibility, and mosquito feeding behavior. Among these factors, feeding behavior is affected by the feeding pump system located inside the mosquito head and also depends on the species of mosquito. Therefore, the 3D morphological structures of the feeding pumps of Aedes togoi and Anopheles sinensis were comparatively investigated using...

  14. Rhodopsin coexpression in UV photoreceptors of Aedes aegypti and Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Xiaobang; Leming, Matthew T; Whaley, Michelle A.; O'Tousa, Joseph E.

    2014-01-01

    Differential rhodopsin gene expression within specialized R7 photoreceptor cells divides the retinas of Aedes aegypti and Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes into distinct domains. The two species express the rhodopsin orthologs Aaop8 and Agop8, respectively, in a large subset of these R7 photoreceptors that function as ultraviolet receptors. We show here that a divergent subfamily of mosquito rhodopsins, Aaop10 and Agop10, is coexpressed in these R7 photoreceptors. The properties of the A. aegypti ...

  15. Larvicidal Effects of a Neem (Azadirachta indica) Oil Formulation on the Malaria Vector Anopheles Gambiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Knols Bart GJ; Okumu Fredros O; Fillinger Ulrike

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Larviciding is a key strategy used in many vector control programmes around the world. Costs could be reduced if larvicides could be manufactured locally. The potential of natural products as larvicides against the main African malaria vector, Anopheles gambiae s.s was evaluated. Methods To assess the larvicidal efficacy of a neem (Azadirachta indica) oil formulation (azadirachtin content of 0.03% w/v) on An. gambiae s.s., larvae were exposed as third and fourth instars to...

  16. Chemical composition and insecticidal activity of plant essential oils from Benin against Anopheles gambiae (Giles)

    OpenAIRE

    Bossou, Annick; Mangelinckx, Sven; Yedomonhan, Hounnankpon; Boko, Pelagie M; Akogbeto, Martin C; De Kimpe, Norbert; Avlessi, Felicien; Sohounhloue, Dominique CK

    2013-01-01

    Background Insecticide resistance in sub-Saharan Africa and especially in Benin is a major public health issue hindering the control of the malaria vectors. Each Anopheles species has developed a resistance to one or several classes of the insecticides currently in use in the field. Therefore, it is urgent to find alternative compounds to conquer the vector. In this study, the efficacies of essential oils of nine plant species, which are traditionally used to avoid mosquito bites in Benin, we...

  17. Anopheles gambiae mosquito isolated neurons : a new biological model for optimizing insecticide/repellent efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    Lavialle-Defaix, C.; Apaire-Marchais, V; Legros, C.; Pennetier, Cédric; Mohamed, A; P. Licznar; Corbel, Vincent; Lapied, B

    2011-01-01

    To understand better the mode of action of insecticides and repellents used in vector-borne diseases control, we developed a new biological model based on mosquito neurons isolated from adults Anopheles gambiae heads. This cellular model is well adapted to multidisciplinary approaches: electrophysiology, pharmacology, molecular biology and biochemical assays. Using RT-PCR, we demonstrated that isolated neurons express the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit alpha 1 (Ag alpha 1 nAchR), tw...

  18. Mosquito repellent potential of Pithecellobium dulce leaf and seed against malaria vector Anopheles stephensi (Diptera: Culicidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Mohan Rajeswary; Marimuthu Govindarajan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the repellent properties of hexane, benzene, ethyl acetate, chloroform and methanol extract of Pithecellobium dulce (P. dulce) leaf and seed against Anopheles stephensi (An. stephensi). Methods: Repellent activity assay was carried out in a net cage (45 cm × 30 cm × 25 cm) containing 100 blood starved female mosquitoes of An. stephensi. This assay was carried out in the laboratory conditions according to the WHO 2009 protocol. Plant crude extracts of P. ...

  19. Mosquito repellent action of Blumea lacera (Asteraceae) against Anopheles stephensi and Culex quinquefasciatus.

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, S.P.; MITTAL, P.K.

    2014-01-01

    Petroleum ether extract of Blumea lacera was screened under laboratory conditions for repellent activity against mosquito vector Anopheles stephensi Liston and Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae). The repellent activity of Blumea lacera extract was tested against mosquitoes in comparison with the DEET, which was used as a positive control. Results obtained from the laboratory experiment showed that the extract was effective against mosquito vectors even at a low dose. A direct rel...

  20. The distribution of insecticide resistance in Anopheles gambiae s.l. populations from Cameroon: an update

    OpenAIRE

    Ndjemai, H. N. M.; Patchoke, S.; Atangana, J.; Etang, J.; Simard, Frédéric; Bilong, C. F. B.; Reimer, L.; Cornel, A.; Lanzaro, G.C.; Fondjo, E

    2009-01-01

    Insecticides are a key component of vector-based malaria control programmes in Cameroon. As part of ongoing resistance surveillance efforts, Anopheles gambiae s.l. female mosquitoes were exposed to organochlorine (DDT), a carbamate (bendiocarb), an organophosphate (malathion), and three pyrethroids (deltamethrin, lambda-cyhalothrin and permethrin) in WHO bioassay test kits. Results indicated a higher level of resistance (reduced mortality and knockdown effect) to DDT and pyrethroids in popula...

  1. Effective population size of Anopheles funestus chromosomal forms in Burkina Faso

    OpenAIRE

    Costantini Carlo; Sagnon N'Fale; Guelbeogo Wamdaogo M; Grushko Olga; Michel Andrew P; Besansky Nora J

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background As Anopheles funestus is one of the principal Afro-tropical malaria vectors, a more complete understanding of its population structure is desirable. In West and Central Africa, An. funestus population structure is complicated by the coexistence of two assortatively mating chromosomal forms. Effective population size (Ne) is a key parameter in understanding patterns and levels of intraspecific variation, as it reflects the role of genetic drift. Here, Ne was estimated from ...

  2. Effective population size of Anopheles funestus chromosomal forms in Burkina Faso - art. no. 115

    OpenAIRE

    Michel, A P; Grushko, O.; Guelbeogo, W.M.; Sagnon, N.; Costantini, Carlo; Besansky, N.J.

    2006-01-01

    Background: As Anopheles funestus is one of the principal Afro-tropical malaria vectors, a more complete understanding of its population structure is desirable. In West and Central Africa, An. funestus population structure is complicated by the coexistence of two assortatively mating chromosomal forms. Effective population size ( Ne) is a key parameter in understanding patterns and levels of intraspecific variation, as it reflects the role of genetic drift. Here, N-e was estimated from both c...

  3. Extensive circadian and light regulation of the transcriptome in the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae

    OpenAIRE

    Rund, Samuel SC; James E. Gentile; Duffield, Giles E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Mosquitoes exhibit 24 hr rhythms in flight activity, feeding, reproduction and development. To better understand the molecular basis for these rhythms in the nocturnal malaria vector Anopheles gambiae, we have utilized microarray analysis on time-of-day specific collections of mosquitoes over 48 hr to explore the coregulation of gene expression rhythms by the circadian clock and light, and compare these with the 24 hr rhythmic gene expression in the diurnal Aedes aegypti dengue vec...

  4. Visual and olfactory associative learning in the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto

    OpenAIRE

    Chilaka Nora; Perkins Elisabeth; Tripet Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Memory and learning are critical aspects of the ecology of insect vectors of human pathogens because of their potential effects on contacts between vectors and their hosts. Despite this epidemiological importance, there have been only a limited number of studies investigating associative learning in insect vector species and none on Anopheline mosquitoes. Methods A simple behavioural assays was developed to study visual and olfactory associative learning in Anopheles gambi...

  5. The impact of insecticides management linked with resistance expression in Anopheles spp. populations

    OpenAIRE

    Guilherme Liberato da Silva; Thiago Nunes Pereira; Noeli Juarez Ferla; Onilda Santos da Silva

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The resistance of some species of Anopheles to chemical insecticides is spreading quickly throughout the world and has hindered the actions of prevention and control of malaria. The main mechanism responsible for resistance in these insects appears to be the target site known as knock-down resistance (kdr), which causes mutations in the sodium channel. Even so, many countries have made significant progress in the prevention of malaria, focusing largely on vector control through long-...

  6. Development of sporogonic cycle of Plasmodium vivax in experimentally infected Anopheles albimanus mosquitoes

    OpenAIRE

    Martha L. Salas; Romero, Jackeline F.; Yesid Solarte; Victor Olano; Myriam A. Herrera; Sócrates Herrera

    1994-01-01

    The sporogonic cycle of Plasmodium vivax was established and maintained under laboratory conditions in two different strains of Anopheles albimanus mosquitoes using as a parasite source blood from human patients or from Aotus monkeys infected with the VCC-2 P.vivax colombian isolate. Both the Tecojate strain isolate from Guatemala and the Cartagena strain from the colombian Pacific coast were susceptible to infections with P.vivax. A higher percentage of Cartagena mosquitoes was infected per ...

  7. Olfaction in the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae : Electrophysiology and identification of kairomones

    OpenAIRE

    Meijerink, J

    1999-01-01

    Female mosquitoes of the species Anopheles gambiae Giles sensu stricto are important vectors of human malaria in Africa. It is generally assumed that they locate their human host by odours. These odours are detected by olfactory receptor neurons situated within cuticular extensions on the antenna. These cuticular extensions, called sensilla, contain numerous pores through which the odours can enter the sensillum and reach the olfactory receptor neuron membrane. Despite the fact that these mos...

  8. Imidacloprid and Thiamethoxam Induced Mutations in Internal Transcribed Spacer 2 (ITS2) of Anopheles stephensi

    OpenAIRE

    Bhinder, Preety; Chaudhry, Asha; Barna, Bhupinder; Kaur, Satvinderjeet

    2012-01-01

    The present article deals with the polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based genotoxicity evaluation of neonicotinoid pesticides, imidacloprid and thiamethoxam, by using the genome of a mosquito Anopheles stephensi taken as an experimental model. After treatment of the second instar larvae with LC20 of the pesticides for 24 h, the induced nucleotide sequence variations in the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) of freshly hatched unfed control and treated individuals was studied from the sequenc...

  9. Insecticide susceptibility status of Aedes aegypti and Anopheles stephensi larvae against temephos in Delhi, India

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, R. K.; P.K.Mittal; Gaurav Kumar; Dhiman, R.C.

    2014-01-01

    Temephos is used as a larvicide in urban areas in India to control the population of mosquito vectors viz. Anopheles stephensi and Aedes aegypti. The susceptibility status of Ae. aegypti and An. stephensi to temophos in various zones of Municipal Corporation of Delhi was evaluated using the WHO method for determining larval susceptibility test kit. Results revealed that the larval mortality of Ae. aegypti collected from different localities ranged between 64.88% to 98.22%. The highest mortali...

  10. The Population Genomics of Trans-Specific Inversion Polymorphisms in Anopheles gambiae

    OpenAIRE

    White, Bradley J.; Cheng, Changde; Sangaré, Djibril; Lobo, Neil F.; Collins, Frank H.; Besansky, Nora J

    2009-01-01

    In the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae polymorphic chromosomal inversions may play an important role in adaptation to environmental variation. Recently, we used microarray-based divergence mapping combined with targeted resequencing to map nucleotide differentiation between alternative arrangements of the 2La inversion. Here, we applied the same technique to four different polymorphic inversions on the 2R chromosome of An. gambiae. Surprisingly, divergence was much lower between alternativ...

  11. A behavioral mechanism underlying ecological divergence in the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae

    OpenAIRE

    Gimonneau, Geoffrey; Bouyer, Jérémy; Morand, Serge; Besansky, Nora J.; Diabate, Abdoulaye; Simard, Frédéric

    2010-01-01

    Disruptive selection mediated by predation on aquatic immature stages has been proposed as a major force driving ecological divergence and fostering speciation between the M and S molecular forms of the African malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae. In the dry savannahs of West Africa where both molecular forms co-occur, the S form thrives in temporary pools filled with rainwater, whereas the M form preferentially breeds in permanent freshwater habitats where predator pressure is higher. Here, ...

  12. Robust and regulatory expression of defensin A gene driven by vitellogenin promoter in transgenic Anopheles stephensi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN XiaoGuang; ZHANG YaJing; ZHENG XueLi; WANG ChunMei

    2007-01-01

    The use of genetically modified mosquitoes to reduce or replace field populations is a new strategy to control mosquito-borne diseases. The precondition of the implementation of this strategy is the ability to manipulate the genome of mosquitoes and to induce specific expression of the effector molecules driven by a suitable promoter. The objective of this study is to evaluate the expression of defensin A gene of Anopheles sinensis under the control of a vitellogenin promoter in transgenic Anopheles stephensi. The regulatory region of Anopheles gambiae vitellogenin was cloned and subcloned into transfer vector pSLFa consisting of an expression cassette with defensin A coding sequence. Then, the expression cassette was transferred into transformation vector pBac[3xP3-DsRedafm] using Asc I digestion. The recombinant plasmid DNA of pBac[3xP3DsRed-AgVgT2-DefA] and helper plasmid DNA of phsp-pBac were micro-injected into embryos of An. stephensi. The positive transgenic mosquitoes were screened by observing specific red fluorescence in the eyes of G1 larvae. Southern blot analysis showed that a single-copy transgene integrated into the genome of An. stephensi. RT-PCR analysis showed that the defensin A gene expressed specifically in fat bodies of female mosquitoes after a blood meal. Interestingly, the mRNA of defensin A is more stable compared with that of the endogenous vitellogenin gene. After multiple blood meals, the expression of defensin A appeared as a reducible and non-cycling type, a crucial feature for its anti-pathogen effect. From data above, we concluded that the regulatory function of the Vg promoter and the expression of defensin A gene were relatively conserved in different species of anopheles mosquitoes. These molecules could be used as candidates in the development of genetically modified mosquitoes.

  13. Energy-state dependent responses of Anopheles gambiae to an unobtainable host

    OpenAIRE

    Zappia, Simon Pierre William

    2011-01-01

    Understanding how blood-seeking behavior changes with different energy levels in the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae (Diptera: Culicidae), when confronted with an unobtainable blood-host, is of interest for vector control strategies. I used a straight-tube olfactometer to mimic a domicile containing (i) a simulated blood-host (human foot smell) protected by either a plain bednet or a DEET impregnated net and (ii) a sugar source (honey scent) some distance away. I manipulated the mosquito’s...

  14. Presence of the mosquito Anopheles hyrcanus in South Moravia, Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šebesta, Oldřich; Rettich, F.; Minář, Jan; Halouzka, Jiří; Hubálek, Zdeněk; Juřicová, Zina; Rudolf, Ivo; Šikutová, Silvie; Gelbič, Ivan; Reiter, P.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 3 (2009), s. 284-286. ISSN 0269-283X R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B08003 Grant ostatní: 6th Framework Programme(XE) GOCE-2003-010284 EDEN Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519; CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : Anopheles hyrcanus * mosquitoes * geographic range * Central Europe Subject RIV: FN - Epidemiology, Contagious Diseases ; Clinical Immunology Impact factor: 2.092, year: 2009

  15. Cloning and molecular characterization of two invertebrate-type lysozymes from Anopheles gambiae

    OpenAIRE

    Paskewitz, S M; Li, B.; Kajla, M. K.

    2008-01-01

    We sequenced and characterized two novel invertebrate-type lysozymes from the mosquito Anopheles gambiae. Alignment and phylogenetic analysis of these and a number of related insect proteins identified through bioinformatics strategies showed a high degree of conservation of this protein family throughout the Class Insecta. Expression profiles were examined for the two mosquito genes through semiquantitative and real-time PCR analysis. Lys i-1 transcripts were found in adult females in the fa...

  16. The JNK Pathway Is a Key Mediator of Anopheles gambiae Antiplasmodial Immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Garver, Lindsey S.; de Almeida Oliveira, Giselle; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2013-01-01

    The innate immune system of Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes limits Plasmodium infection through multiple molecular mechanisms. For example, midgut invasion by the parasite triggers an epithelial nitration response that promotes activation of the complement-like system. We found that suppression of the JNK pathway, by silencing either Hep, JNK, Jun or Fos expression, greatly enhanced Plasmodium infection; while overactivating this cascade, by silencing the suppressor Puckered, had the opposite ef...

  17. A mosquito lipoxin/lipocalin complex mediates innate immune priming in Anopheles gambiae

    OpenAIRE

    Ramirez, Jose Luis; de Almeida Oliveira, Giselle; Calvo, Eric; Dalli, Jesmond; Colas, Romain A.; Serhan, Charles N.; Ribeiro, Jose M.; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2015-01-01

    Exposure of Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes to Plasmodium infection enhances the ability of their immune system to respond to subsequent infections. However, the molecular mechanism that allows the insect innate immune system to ‘remember' a previous encounter with a pathogen has not been established. Challenged mosquitoes constitutively release a soluble haemocyte differentiation factor into their haemolymph that, when transferred into Naive mosquitoes, also induces priming. Here we show that t...

  18. A Peroxidase/Dual Oxidase System Modulates Midgut Epithelial Immunity in Anopheles gambiae

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Molina-Cruz, Alvaro; Gupta, Lalita; Rodrigues, Janneth; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2010-01-01

    Extracellular matrices in diverse biological systems are crosslinked by dityrosine covalent bonds catalyzed by the peroxidase/oxidase system. We show that the Immunomodulatory Peroxidase (IMPer), an enzyme secreted by the mosquito Anopheles gambiae midgut, and dual oxidase (Duox) form a dityrosine network that decreases gut permeability to immune elicitors and protects the microbiota by preventing activation of epithelial immunity. It also provides a suitable environment for malaria parasites...

  19. The STAT pathway mediates late phase immunity against Plasmodium in the mosquito Anopheles gambiae

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Lalita; Molina-Cruz, Alvaro; Kumar, Sanjeev; Rodrigues, Janneth; Dixit, Rajnikant; Zamora, Rodolfo E.; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2009-01-01

    The STAT family of transcription factors activate expression of immune system genes in vertebrates. The ancestral STAT gene (AgSTAT-A) appears to have duplicated in the mosquito Anopheles gambiae, giving rise to a second intronless STAT gene (AgSTAT-B), which we show regulates AgSTAT-A expression in adult females. AgSTAT-A participates in the transcriptional activation of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in response to bacterial and plasmodial infection. Activation of this pathway, however, is not...

  20. Genome expression analysis of Anopheles gambiae: Responses to injury, bacterial challenge, and malaria infection

    OpenAIRE

    Dimopoulos, George; Christophides, George K.; Meister, Stephan; SCHULTZ, JÖRG; White, Kevin P.; Barillas-Mury, Carolina; Kafatos, Fotis C.

    2002-01-01

    The complex gene expression responses of Anopheles gambiae to microbial and malaria challenges, injury, and oxidative stress (in the mosquito and/or a cultured cell line) were surveyed by using cDNA microarrays constructed from an EST-clone collection. The expression profiles were broadly subdivided into induced and down-regulated gene clusters. Gram+ and Gram− bacteria and microbial elicitors up-regulated a diverse set of genes, many belonging to the immunity class, and the response to malar...

  1. Ecological Genomics of Anopheles gambiae Along a Latitudinal Cline: A Population-Resequencing Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Changde; White, Bradley J.; Kamdem, Colince; Mockaitis, Keithanne; Costantini, Carlo; Matthew W Hahn; Besansky, Nora J

    2012-01-01

    The association between fitness-related phenotypic traits and an environmental gradient offers one of the best opportunities to study the interplay between natural selection and migration. In cases in which specific genetic variants also show such clinal patterns, it may be possible to uncover the mutations responsible for local adaptation. The malaria vector, Anopheles gambiae, is associated with a latitudinal cline in aridity in Cameroon; a large inversion on chromosome 2L of this mosquito ...

  2. Extensive permethrin and DDT resistance in Anopheles arabiensis from eastern and central Sudan

    OpenAIRE

    Jones Christopher M; Muzamil Hamid; Himeidan Yousif E; Ranson Hilary

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The distribution of insecticide treated nets (ITN) has been dramatically scaled up in eastern and central Sudan. Resistance to insecticides has already been reported in this region and there is an urgent need to develop appropriate resistance management strategies, which requires detailed information on the extent and causes of resistance. This study assessed resistance to permethrin and DDT in seven populations of Anopheles arabiensis from Sudan. Results Three out of the ...

  3. Multiple Origins of Knockdown Resistance Mutations in the Afrotropical Mosquito Vector Anopheles gambiae

    OpenAIRE

    Pinto, Joao; Lynd, Amy; Vicente, José L; Santolamazza, Federica; Randle, Nadine P.; Gentile, Gabriele; Moreno, Marta; Simard, Frédéric; Charlwood, Jaques Derek; Rosário, Virgilio E do; Caccone, Adalgisa; Torre, Alessandra della; Donelly, Martin J.

    2007-01-01

    How often insecticide resistance mutations arise in natural insect populations is a fundamental question for understanding the evolution of resistance and also for modeling its spread. Moreover, the development of resistance is regarded as a favored model to study the molecular evolution of adaptive traits. In the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae two point mutations (L1014F and L1014S) in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene, that confer knockdown resistance (kdr) to DDT and pyrethroid insec...

  4. Odorant-Binding Proteins of the Malaria Mosquito Anopheles funestus sensu stricto

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Wei; Cornel, Anthony J; Leal, Walter S.

    2010-01-01

    Background The mosquito Anopheles funestus is one of the major malaria vector species in sub-Saharan Africa. Olfaction is essential in guiding mosquito behaviors. Odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) are highly expressed in insect olfactory tissues and involved in the first step of odorant reception. An improved understanding of the function of malaria mosquito OBPs may contribute to identifying new attractants/repellents and assist in the development of more efficient and environmentally friendly...

  5. The evolution of TEP1, an exceptionally polymorphic immunity gene in Anopheles gambiae

    OpenAIRE

    Yan Guiyun; Soares Dinesh C; Jiggins Francis M; Callister Deborah M; Obbard Darren J; Little Tom J

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Host-parasite coevolution can result in balancing selection, which maintains genetic variation in the susceptibility of hosts to parasites. It has been suggested that variation in a thioester-containing protein called TEP1 (AGAP010815) may alter the ability of Anopheles mosquitoes to transmit Plasmodium parasites, and high divergence between alleles of this gene suggests the possible action of long-term balancing selection. We studied whether TEP1 is a case of an ancient b...

  6. Field evaluation of lambda-cyhalothrin (ICON 10 CS indoor residual spraying against Anopheles culicifacies in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Raghavendra, S.K. Ghosh, Alex Eapen, S.N. Tiwari, T.S. Satyanarayan, John Ravindran, U. Sreehari & A.P. Dash

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Field trials of lambda-cyhalothrin 10 CS (ICON 10 CS in indoor residual spraying(IRS with 25 mg a.i./m2 against Anopheles culicifacies was undertaken vs malathion IRS (25% WP–2 g a.i./m2 in Tumkur district, Karnataka; vs deltamethrin IRS (2.5% WP–20 mg a.i./m2 in Dharmapuri district; andvs lambda-cyhalothrin (10 WP–25 mg a.i./m2 in Ramanathapuram district, Tamil Nadu, India.Methods: Spray operations in the experimental villages were done by the National Institute of Malaria Research(NIMR and in the control villages by the respective State Health Department staff. Persistence of efficacy ofinsecticide sprayed in villages was assessed by contact bioassays against vector mosquitoes. Entomologicalindicators such as per structure density, parity rates of vector mosquitoes and sporozoite rates were measuredin all the three study areas using standard procedures. Mass blood surveys and active fever case detectionswere carried out in experimental and control villages to study the impact of IRS on malaria transmission.Results: Persistence of effectiveness of ICON 10 CS was observed up to 2–3 months in all the three studyareas. ICON 10 CS was found effective at par with or better than the insecticides used in the national programmein reducing the mosquito densities and in interrupting malaria transmission in the study villages. Vectordensity, parity rates and malaria cases considerably reduced in the ICON 10 CS-sprayed villages.Conclusion: Field trials at three sites have established that ICON 10 CS formulation was relatively moreeffective than malathion 25% WP, deltamethrin 2.5% WP and lambda-cyhalothrin 10% WP in some evaluationparameters like indoor resting mosquitoes, parity rates in vector mosquitoes and persistence of effectiveness.It can be used for IRS for malaria vector control with two rounds of spray at an interval of 3 months forcurtailing the malaria transmission and an additional round is recommended in

  7. Influence of Land-use on the Fitness of Anopheles gambiae, the Principal Vector of Malaria in Nigeria

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    Israel Kayode Olayemi

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Urbanization often results in profound environmental alterations that may promote the transmission of malaria. Though, land-use practices in urban areas have been linked with proliferations of suitable larval breeding habitats of malaria vectors, no attempt has been made to systematically investigate the influence of land-use practices on malaria transmission in Nigeria. Objectives: To elucidate the influence of land-use practices on larval development and adult body size of Anopheles gambiae (Diptera: Culicidae mosquitoes in Minna, Nigeria. Materials and Methods: Newly-hatched larvae of An. gmbiae mosquitoes were reared in semi-natural habitats stationed in five different sites, each representing the major land-use types in the area. The larvae were monitored daily for Duration of Immature Development (DID and Immature Survival Rate (ISR; while Wing Length (WL was used as an index of adult body size. Results: DID, ISR and WL varied significantly (P < 0.05 among the land-use categories; with lager numbers of bigger mosquitoes produced at a faster rate in the artificial than natural land-use sites. Water temperature for larval development was best in the Refuse Dump (RD site (mean = 28.11 ± 2.50oC and consequently the shortest DID (mean = 9.70 ± 0.74 days, as well as, the largest mosquitoes (mean WL = 3.10 ± 0.90 mm, were recorded in this land-use category. However, while ISR was highest (mean = 96.30 ± 2.78% in Farm Land (FL, the mosquitoes that emerged from this site were the smallest (mean WL = 1.96 ± 0.51mm. The Natural Vegetation (NV land-use category was the least productive, as the larvae took the longest time (13.29 ± 1.69 days to develop, and survived least (42.94 ± 7.50% in this site. Conclusion: The land-use practices in Minna enhanced the fitness of An. gambiae, and may increase the vectorial capacity of the species for malaria transmission in the area. Targeted larviciding interventions will greatly contribute to

  8. The mode of action of spatial repellents and their impact on vectorial capacity of Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto.

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    Sheila B Ogoma

    Full Text Available Malaria vector control relies on toxicity of insecticides used in long lasting insecticide treated nets and indoor residual spraying. This is despite evidence that sub-lethal insecticides reduce human-vector contact and malaria transmission. The impact of sub-lethal insecticides on host seeking and blood feeding of mosquitoes was measured. Taxis boxes distinguished between repellency and attraction inhibition of mosquitoes by measuring response of mosquitoes towards or away from Transfluthrin coils and humans. Protective effective distance of coils and long-term effects on blood feeding were measured in the semi-field tunnel and in a Peet Grady chamber. Laboratory reared pyrethroid susceptible Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto mosquitoes were used. In the taxis boxes, a higher proportion of mosquitoes (67%-82% were activated and flew towards the human in the presence of Transfluthrin coils. Coils did not hinder attraction of mosquitoes to the human. In the semi-field Tunnel, coils placed 0.3 m from the human reduced feeding by 86% (95% CI [0.66; 0.95] when used as a "bubble" compared to 65% (95% CI [0.51; 0.76] when used as a "point source". Mosquitoes exposed to coils inside a Peet Grady chamber were delayed from feeding normally for 12 hours but there was no effect on free flying and caged mosquitoes exposed in the semi-field tunnel. These findings indicate that airborne pyrethroids minimize human-vector contact through reduced and delayed blood feeding. This information is useful for the development of target product profiles of spatial repellent products that can be used to complement mainstream malaria vector control tools.

  9. Plasmodium falciparum malaria challenge by the bite of aseptic Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes: results of a randomized infectivity trial.

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    Kirsten E Lyke

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Experimental infection of malaria-naïve volunteers by the bite of Plasmodium falciparum-infected mosquitoes is a preferred means to test the protective effect of malaria vaccines and drugs. The standard model relies on the bite of five infected mosquitoes to induce malaria. We examined the efficacy of malaria transmission using mosquitoes raised aseptically in compliance with current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMPs. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Eighteen adults aged 18-40 years were randomized to receive 1, 3 or 5 bites of Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes infected with the chloroquine-sensitive NF54 strain of P. falciparum. Seventeen participants developed malaria; fourteen occurring on Day 11. The mean prepatent period was 10.9 days (9-12 days. The geometric mean parasitemia was 15.7 parasites/µL (range: 4-70 by microscopy. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR detected parasites 3.1 (range: 0-4 days prior to microscopy. The geometric mean sporozoite load was 16,753 sporozoites per infected mosquito (range: 1,000-57,500. A 1-bite participant withdrew from the study on Day 13 post-challenge and was PCR and smear negative. CONCLUSIONS: The use of aseptic, cGMP-compliant P. falciparum-infected mosquitoes is safe, is associated with a precise prepatent period compared to the standard model and appears more efficient than the standard approach, as it led to infection in 100% (6/6 of volunteers exposed to three mosquito bites and 83% (5/6 of volunteers exposed to one mosquito bite. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00744133.

  10. Evaluation of the effectiveness of malaria vector control measures in urban settings of Dakar by a specific anopheles salivary biomarker.

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    Papa Makhtar Drame

    Full Text Available Standard entomological methods for evaluating the impact of vector control lack sensitivity in low-malaria-risk areas. The detection of human IgG specific to Anopheles gSG6-P1 salivary antigen reflects a direct measure of human-vector contact. This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of a range of vector control measures (VCMs in urban settings by using this biomarker approach. The study was conducted from October to December 2008 on 2,774 residents of 45 districts of urban Dakar. IgG responses to gSG6-P1 and the use of malaria VCMs highly varied between districts. At the district level, specific IgG levels significantly increased with age and decreased with season and with VCM use. The use of insecticide-treated nets, by drastically reducing specific IgG levels, was by far the most efficient VCM regardless of age, season or exposure level to mosquito bites. The use of spray bombs was also associated with a significant reduction of specific IgG levels, whereas the use of mosquito coils or electric fans/air conditioning did not show a significant effect. Human IgG response to gSG6-P1 as biomarker of vector exposure represents a reliable alternative for accurately assessing the effectiveness of malaria VCM in low-malaria-risk areas. This biomarker tool could be especially relevant for malaria control monitoring and surveillance programmes in low-exposure/low-transmission settings.

  11. Crystal and Solution Studies of the “Plus-C” Odorant-binding Protein 48 from Anopheles gambiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsitsanou, Katerina E.; Drakou, Christina E.; Thireou, Trias; Vitlin Gruber, Anna; Kythreoti, Georgia; Azem, Abdussalam; Fessas, Dimitrios; Eliopoulos, Elias; Iatrou, Kostas; Zographos, Spyros E.

    2013-01-01

    Much physiological and behavioral evidence has been provided suggesting that insect odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) are indispensable for odorant recognition and thus are appealing targets for structure-based discovery and design of novel host-seeking disruptors. Despite the fact that more than 60 putative OBP-encoding genes have been identified in the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae, the crystal structures of only six of them are known. It is therefore clear that OBP structure determination constitutes the bottleneck for structure-based approaches to mosquito repellent/attractant discovery. Here, we describe the three-dimensional structure of an A. gambiae “Plus-C” group OBP (AgamOBP48), which exhibits the second highest expression levels in female antennae. This structure represents the first example of a three-dimensional domain-swapped dimer in dipteran species. A combined binding site is formed at the dimer interface by equal contribution of each monomer. Structural comparisons with the monomeric AgamOBP47 revealed that the major structural difference between the two Plus-C proteins localizes in their N- and C-terminal regions, and their concerted conformational change may account for monomer-swapped dimer conversion and furthermore the formation of novel binding pockets. Using a combination of gel filtration chromatography, differential scanning calorimetry, and analytical ultracentrifugation, we demonstrate the AgamOBP48 dimerization in solution. Eventually, molecular modeling calculations were used to predict the binding mode of the most potent synthetic ligand of AgamOBP48 known so far, discovered by ligand- and structure-based virtual screening. The structure-aided identification of multiple OBP binders represents a powerful tool to be employed in the effort to control transmission of the vector-borne diseases. PMID:24097978

  12. Susceptibility of Anopheles stephensi to Plasmodium gallinaceum: a trait of the mosquito, the parasite, and the environment.

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    Jen C C Hume

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vector susceptibility to Plasmodium infection is treated primarily as a vector trait, although it is a composite trait expressing the joint occurrence of the parasite and the vector with genetic contributions of both. A comprehensive approach to assess the specific contribution of genetic and environmental variation on "vector susceptibility" is lacking. Here we developed and implemented a simple scheme to assess the specific contributions of the vector, the parasite, and the environment to "vector susceptibility." To the best of our knowledge this is the first study that employs such an approach. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted selection experiments on the vector (while holding the parasite "constant" and on the parasite (while holding the vector "constant" to estimate the genetic contributions of the mosquito and the parasite to the susceptibility of Anopheles stephensi to Plasmodium gallinaceum. We separately estimated the realized heritability of (i susceptibility to parasite infection by the mosquito vector and (ii parasite compatibility (transmissibility with the vector while controlling the other. The heritabilities of vector and the parasite were higher for the prevalence, i.e., fraction of infected mosquitoes, than the corresponding heritabilities of parasite load, i.e., the number of oocysts per mosquito. CONCLUSIONS: The vector's genetics (heritability comprised 67% of "vector susceptibility" measured by the prevalence of mosquitoes infected with P. gallinaceum oocysts, whereas the specific contribution of parasite genetics (heritability to this trait was only 5%. Our parasite source might possess minimal genetic diversity, which could explain its low heritability (and the high value of the vector. Notably, the environment contributed 28%. These estimates are relevant only to the particular system under study, but this experimental design could be useful for other parasite-host systems. The prospects and

  13. IMP PCR primers detect single nucleotide polymorphisms for Anopheles gambiae species identification, Mopti and Savanna rDNA types, and resistance to dieldrin in Anopheles arabiensis

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    Howell Paul I

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymerase chain reactions to distinguish single-nucleotide polymorphisms are commonly used for mosquito identification and identifying insecticide resistance alleles. However, the existing methods used for primer design often result in analyses that are not robust or require additional steps. Methods Utilizing oligonucleotides that are unique in having an intentional mismatch to both templates three bases from the SNP at the 3-prime end, three new PCR assays that distinguish SNP targets using standard gel electrophoresis of undigested DNA fragments were developed and tested. These were applied to: (1 an alternative ribosomal DNA PCR assay to distinguish five members of the Anopheles gambiae complex; (2 detection of the Mopti and Savanna rDNA types; and (3 an assay to distinguish resistance to dieldrin (Rdl alleles in Anopheles arabiensis. Results Reproducible specific amplification of the target alleles was observed in all three assays. The results were consistent with existing analyses but proved simpler and the results more distinct in our hands. Conclusion The simplicity and effectiveness of the method should be utilized in these and other PCR analyses to increase their specificity and simplicity. These results have the potential to be extended not only to mosquito analyses but also to parasite and human polymorphisms.

  14. Observations on sporozoite detection in naturally infected sibling species of the Anopheles culicifacies complex and variant of Anopheles stephensi in India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Susanta Kumar Ghosh; Satyanarayan Tiwari; Kamaraju Raghavendra; Tiruchinapalli Sundaraj; Aditya Prasad Dash

    2008-09-01

    Sporozoites were detected in naturally infected sibling species of the primary rural vector Anopheles culicifacies complex in two primary health centres (PHCs) and a variant of the urban vector Anopheles stephensi in Mangalore city, Karnataka, south India while carrying out malaria outbreak investigations from 1998–2006. Sibling species of An. culicifacies were identified based on the banding patterns on ovarian polytene chromosomes, and variants of An. stephensi were identified based on the number of ridges on the egg floats. Sporozoites were detected in the salivary glands by the dissection method. Of the total 334 salivary glands of An. culicifacies dissected, 17 (5.08%) were found to be positive for sporozoites. Of the 17 positive samples, 11 were suitable for sibling species analysis; 10 were species A (an efficient vector) and 1 was species B (a poor vector). Out of 46 An. stephensi dissected, one was sporozoite positive and belonged to the type form (an efficient vector). In malaria epidemiology this observation is useful for planning an effective vector control programme, because each sibling species/variant differs in host specificity, susceptibility to malarial parasites, breeding habitats and response to insecticides.

  15. No Evidence for Lymphatic Filariasis Transmission in Big Cities Affected by Conflict Related Rural-Urban Migration in Sierra Leone and Liberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Dziedzom K.; Sesay, Santigie; Moore, Marnijina G.; Ansumana, Rashid; Narh, Charles A.; Kollie, Karsor; Rebollo, Maria P.; Koudou, Benjamin G.; Koroma, Joseph B.; Bolay, Fatorma K.; Boakye, Daniel A.; Bockarie, Moses J.

    2014-01-01

    Background In West Africa, the principal vectors of lymphatic filariasis (LF) are Anopheles species with Culex species playing only a minor role in transmission, if any. Being a predominantly rural disease, the question remains whether conflict-related migration of rural populations into urban areas would be sufficient for active transmission of the parasite. Methodology/Principal Findings We examined LF transmission in urban areas in post-conflict Sierra Leone and Liberia that experienced significant rural-urban migration. Mosquitoes from Freetown and Monrovia, were analyzed for infection with Wuchereria bancrofti. We also undertook a transmission assessment survey (TAS) in Bo and Pujehun districts in Sierra Leone. The majority of the mosquitoes collected were Culex species, while Anopheles species were present in low numbers. The mosquitoes were analyzed in pools, with a maximum of 20 mosquitoes per pool. In both countries, a total of 1731 An. gambiae and 14342 Culex were analyzed for W. bancrofti, using the PCR. Two pools of Culex mosquitoes and 1 pool of An. gambiae were found infected from one community in Freetown. Pool screening analysis indicated a maximum likelihood of infection of 0.004 (95% CI of 0.00012–0.021) and 0.015 (95% CI of 0.0018–0.052) for the An. gambiae and Culex respectively. The results indicate that An. gambiae is present in low numbers, with a microfilaria prevalence breaking threshold value not sufficient to maintain transmission. The results of the TAS in Bo and Pujehun also indicated an antigen prevalence of 0.19% and 0.67% in children, respectively. This is well below the recommended 2% level for stopping MDA in Anopheles transmission areas, according to WHO guidelines. Conclusions We found no evidence for active transmission of LF in cities, where internally displaced persons from rural areas lived for many years during the more than 10 years conflict in Sierra Leone and Liberia. PMID:24516686

  16. Using Stable Isotopes of Carbon and Nitrogen to Mark Wild Populations of Anopheles and Aedes Mosquitoes in South-Eastern Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opiyo, Mercy A.; Hamer, Gabriel L.; Lwetoijera, Dickson W.; Auckland, Lisa D.; Majambere, Silas; Okumu, Fredros O.

    2016-01-01

    Background Marking wild mosquitoes is important for understanding their ecology, behaviours and role in disease transmission. Traditional insect marking techniques include using fluorescent dyes, protein labels, radioactive labels and tags, but such techniques have various limitations; notably low marker retention and inability to mark wild mosquitoes at source. Stable isotopes are gaining wide spread use for non-invasive marking of arthropods, permitting greater understanding of mosquito dispersal and responses to interventions. We describe here a simple technique for marking naturally-breeding malaria and dengue vectors using stable isotopes of nitrogen (15N) and carbon (13C), and describe potential field applications. Methods We created man-made aquatic mosquito habitats and added either 15N-labelled potassium nitrate or 13C-labelled glucose, leaving non-adulterated habitats as controls. We then allowed wild mosquitoes to lay eggs in these habitats and monitored their development in situ. Pupae were collected promptly as they appeared and kept in netting cages. Emergent adults (in pools of ~4 mosquitoes/pool) and individually stored pupae were desiccated and analysed using Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS). Findings Anopheles gambiae s.l and Aedes spp. from enriched 13C and enriched 15N larval habitats had significantly higher isotopic levels than controls (P = 0.005), and both isotopes produced sufficient distinction between marked and unmarked mosquitoes. Mean δ15N for enriched females and males were 275.6±65.1 and 248.0±54.6, while mean δ15N in controls were 2.1±0.1 and 3.9±1.7 respectively. Similarly, mean δ13C for enriched females and males were 36.08±5.28 and 38.5±6.86, compared to -4.3±0.2 and -7.9±3.6 in controls respectively. Mean δ15N and δ13C was significantly higher in any pool containing at least one enriched mosquito compared to pools with all unenriched mosquitoes, P<0.001. In all cases, there were variations in standardized

  17. Seasonal and Spatial Dynamics of the Primary Vector of Plasmodium knowlesi within a Major Transmission Focus in Sabah, Malaysia.

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    Meng L Wong

    Full Text Available The simian malaria parasite Plasmodium knowlesi is emerging as a public health problem in Southeast Asia, particularly in Malaysian Borneo where it now accounts for the greatest burden of malaria cases and deaths. Control is hindered by limited understanding of the ecology of potential vector species.We conducted a one year longitudinal study of P. knowlesi vectors in three sites within an endemic area of Sabah, Malaysia. All mosquitoes were captured using human landing catch. Anopheles mosquitoes were dissected to determine, oocyst, sporozoites and parous rate. Anopheles balabacensis is confirmed as the primary vector of. P. knowlesi (using nested PCR in Sabah for the first time. Vector densities were significantly higher and more seasonally variable in the village than forest or small scale farming site. However An. balabacensis survival and P. knowlesi infection rates were highest in forest and small scale farm sites. Anopheles balabacensis mostly bites humans outdoors in the early evening between 1800 to 2000 hrs.This study indicates transmission is unlikely to be prevented by bednets. This combined with its high vectorial capacity poses a threat to malaria elimination programmes within the region.

  18. Host choice and human blood index of Anopheles pseudopunctipennis in a village of the Andean valleys of Bolivia

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    Bouchité Bernard

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Human Blood Index (HBI, proportion of bloodmeals of a mosquito population obtained from man is relevant to epidemiological assessment and to the modification of measures to interrupt malaria transmission since the vectorial capacity of the vector varies as the square of the HBI. Anopheles pseudopunctipennis is a main malaria vector in South America. Unfortunately, few data exist concerning HBI values in its range of distribution and none from Bolivia where this species is considered as an important malaria vector in the central Andes. Methods The host choice of An. pseudopunctipennis has been studied in Mataral, a characteristic village of the central Andes of Bolivia. Mosquito host feeding preference experiments (equal accessibility to host in homogenous environment were monitored using baited mosquito nets in latin square designs. Host feeding selection experiments (natural feeding pattern in heterogeneous environment was measured by bloodmeal analysis, using ELISA to determine the origin of blood. Mosquito bloodmeals were collected on various occasions, using various techniques in a variety of sampling sites. A survey of the possible blood sources has also been carried out in the village. Data were analysed with the forage ratio method. Results An. pseudopunctipennis chooses amongst hosts. Sheep, goats, donkeys and humans are the preferred hosts, while dogs, pigs and chicken are rarely bitten. An. pseudopunctipennis has an opportunistic behaviour, in particular within the preferred hosts. The HBI in Mataral is ≈40% and in the central Andes, may range from 30–50%, in accordance to other findings. A high proportion of mixed meals were encountered (8%, and cryptic meals are likely more numerous. There was no difference amongst the HBI from parous and nulliparous mosquitoes. Conclusion Forage ratio analysis is a powerful tool to interpret mosquito host choices. However, refinements in sampling strategies are still

  19. Zika and Sexual Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Address What's this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Zika and Sexual Transmission Language: English Español Português ... Healthcare Providers: Sexual Transmission of Zika Basics of Zika Virus and Sex Transmission Zika can be passed ...

  20. Survey of Transmission Cost Allocation Methodologies for Regional Transmission Organizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, S.; Porter, K.; Mudd, C.; Rogers, J.

    2011-02-01

    The report presents transmission cost allocation methodologies for reliability transmission projects, generation interconnection, and economic transmission projects for all Regional Transmission Organizations.

  1. Review of Temephos Discriminating Concentration for Monitoring the Susceptibility of Anopheles labranchiae (Falleroni, 1926), Malaria Vector in Morocco

    OpenAIRE

    Chandre, F; Ameur, B; Herrak, T.; E. Adlaoui; Elkohli, M.; Faraj, C.

    2010-01-01

    In Morocco, the resistance monitoring of Anopheles labranchiae larvae to temephos is done using discriminating concentration of 0.125 mg, which is half of the WHO recommended dose for Anopheles. However, this dosage seemed to be too high to allow an early detection of the resistance and its revision was found necessary. The present study was carried out during May-June 2008 and 2009 in nine provinces from the north-west of the country. The aim was to determine the lethal concentrations LC100 ...

  2. Anopheles subpictus carry human malaria parasites in an urban area of Western India and may facilitate perennial malaria transmission

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Ashwani; Hosmani, Rajeshwari; Jadhav, Shivaji; de Sousa, Trelita; Mohanty, Ajeet; Naik, Milind; Shettigar, Adarsh; Kale, Satyajit; Valecha, Neena; Chery, Laura; Rathod, Pradipsinh K.

    2016-01-01

    Background India contributes 1.5–2 million annual confirmed cases of malaria. Since both parasites and vectors are evolving rapidly, updated information on parasite prevalence in mosquitoes is important for vector management and disease control. Possible new vector-parasite interactions in Goa, India were tested. Methods A total of 1036 CDC traps were placed at four malaria endemic foci in Goa, India from May 2013 to April 2015. These captured 23,782 mosquitoes, of which there were 1375 femal...

  3. Following in Soper's footsteps: northeast Brazil 63 years after eradication of Anopheles gambiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killeen, Gerry F

    2003-10-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa has long suffered under the yoke of the Anopheles gambiae mosquito, but for northeast Brazil (figure 1) its arrival over 60 years ago was a new and horrifying experience. This African mosquito is an exceptionally effective malaria vector because it is well adapted to feeding upon people and to exploiting aquatic habitats associated with our daily activities. Anopheles gambiae sensu lato probably accounts for most of the world's malaria deaths and socioeconomic burden. Fortunately, the Brazilian experience had a happy ending. The prospect of A gambiae spreading across much of the Americas motivated a ruthlessly effective response that deserves a special and heroic place in the annals of public health. Building on the successes and infrastructure of the Yellow Fever Service for Aedes aegypti elimination, the Rockefeller Foundation and Brazilian government collaborated to form a new Malaria Service of the Northeast. This new entity rolled the invader back into oblivion with an aggressive eradication campaign, focusing primarily upon larviciding of all potential habitats. The driving force of this endeavour was an enigmatic man called Fred Soper whose sheer will and determination was a key element in this success, and a source of inspiration today (see Killeen GF, et al. Eradication of Anopheles gambiae from Brazil: lessons for malaria control in Africa? Lancet Infect Dis 2002; 2: 618-27). I recently took an opportunity to fulfil a long-held dream and follow in some of Soper's footsteps. Tired of gazing at yellowing maps like figure 1, I went to see the northeast of Brazil for myself. PMID:14522266

  4. Mitochondrial genome sequences reveal deep divergences among Anopheles punctulatus sibling species in Papua New Guinea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Logue Kyle

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Members of the Anopheles punctulatus group (AP group are the primary vectors of human malaria in Papua New Guinea. The AP group includes 13 sibling species, most of them morphologically indistinguishable. Understanding why only certain species are able to transmit malaria requires a better comprehension of their evolutionary history. In particular, understanding relationships and divergence times among Anopheles species may enable assessing how malaria-related traits (e.g. blood feeding behaviours, vector competence have evolved. Methods DNA sequences of 14 mitochondrial (mt genomes from five AP sibling species and two species of the Anopheles dirus complex of Southeast Asia were sequenced. DNA sequences from all concatenated protein coding genes (10,770 bp were then analysed using a Bayesian approach to reconstruct phylogenetic relationships and date the divergence of the AP sibling species. Results Phylogenetic reconstruction using the concatenated DNA sequence of all mitochondrial protein coding genes indicates that the ancestors of the AP group arrived in Papua New Guinea 25 to 54 million years ago and rapidly diverged to form the current sibling species. Conclusion Through evaluation of newly described mt genome sequences, this study has revealed a divergence among members of the AP group in Papua New Guinea that would significantly predate the arrival of humans in this region, 50 thousand years ago. The divergence observed among the mtDNA sequences studied here may have resulted from reproductive isolation during historical changes in sea-level through glacial minima and maxima. This leads to a hypothesis that the AP sibling species have evolved independently for potentially thousands of generations. This suggests that the evolution of many phenotypes, such as insecticide resistance will arise independently in each of the AP sibling species studied here.

  5. Gal4-based enhancer-trapping in the malaria mosquito Anopheles stephensi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brochta, David A; Pilitt, Kristina L; Harrell, Robert A; Aluvihare, Channa; Alford, Robert T

    2012-11-01

    Transposon-based forward and reverse genetic technologies will contribute greatly to ongoing efforts to study mosquito functional genomics. A piggyBac transposon-based enhancer-trap system was developed that functions efficiently in the human malaria vector, Anopheles stephensi. The system consists of six transgenic lines of Anopheles stephensi, each with a single piggyBac-Gal4 element in a unique genomic location; six lines with a single piggyBac-UAStdTomato element; and two lines, each with a single Minos element containing the piggyBac-transposase gene under the regulatory control of the hsp70 promoter from Drosophila melanogaster. Enhancer detection depended upon the efficient remobilization of piggyBac-Gal4 transposons, which contain the yeast transcription factor gene Gal4 under the regulatory control of a basal promoter. Gal4 expression was detected through the expression of the fluorescent protein gene tdTomato under the regulatory control of a promoter with Gal4-binding UAS elements. From five genetic screens for larval- and adult-specific enhancers, 314 progeny were recovered from 24,250 total progeny (1.3%) with unique patterns of tdTomato expression arising from the influence of an enhancer. The frequency of piggyBac remobilization and enhancer detection was 2.5- to 3-fold higher in female germ lines compared with male germ lines. A small collection of enhancer-trap lines are described in which Gal4 expression occurred in adult female salivary glands, midgut, and fat body, either singly or in combination. These three tissues play critical roles during the infection of Anopheles stephensi by malaria-causing Plasmodium parasites. This system and the lines generated using it will be valuable resources to ongoing mosquito functional genomics efforts. PMID:23173082

  6. Larvicidal activity of extracts from three Plumbago spp against Anopheles gambiae

    OpenAIRE

    Barasa M Maniafu; Lwande Wilber; Ndiege, Isaiah O.; Cornelius C Wanjala; Teresa Ayuko Akenga

    2009-01-01

    Three Plumbago spp have been tested for mosquito larvicidal activity. The crude extracts exhibiting the highest larvicidal activity against Anopheles gambiae were hexane (LC50 = 6.4 μg/mL) and chloroform (LC50 = 6.7 μg/mL) extracts from Plumbago zeylanica Linn, chloroform (LC50 = 6.7 ug/mL) extract from Plumbago stenophylla Bull and ethyl acetate (LC50 = 4.1 μg/mL) extract from Plumbago dawei Rolfe. These LC50 values were within 95% confidence limits. 5-hydroxy-2-methyl-1,4-nap...

  7. Chemical Constituents of Efficacy of Cymbopogon Olivieri (Boiss Bar Essential Oil Against Malaria Vector , Anopheles Stepensi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Hadjiakhoondi

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydrodistillation of aerial parts of Cymbopogon olivieri (Boiss. Bar (Andropogonae yielded 1.7% v/w of the essential oil. By GC and GC/MS twenty-two components, representing 94.80% of the total oil composition were identified. The major constituents were Δ-3 carene (22.46%, piperitone (44.90% and α-eudesmol (13.33%. The essential oil of Cymbopogon olivieri (Boiss. Bar showed interesting activity against larvaes of Anophel stephensi (LD50=321 .902 p.p.m..

  8. Anopheles gambiae heat shock protein cognate 70B impedes o'nyong-nyong virus replication

    OpenAIRE

    Higgs Stephen; Vanlandingham Dana L; Tsetsarkin Konstantin A; Hong Young S; Sim Cheolho; Collins Frank H

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Phylogenetic and functional analysis was conducted on an Anopheles gambiae gene, ENSANGG00000017398. Based on phylogenetic analysis, this gene belongs to the same lineage as Heat shock protein cognate 70-4 (Hsc70-4) in Drosophila. Accordingly, we propose to name this gene Heat shock protein cognate 70B (HSC70B). We previously reported that expression of HSC70B and other genes including elongation factor-1α (EF-1α) and the agglutinin attachment subunit (agglutinin) were up-...

  9. Chemical composition and insecticidal activity of plant essential oils from Benin against Anopheles gambiae (Giles)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Insecticide resistance in sub-Saharan Africa and especially in Benin is a major public health issue hindering the control of the malaria vectors. Each Anopheles species has developed a resistance to one or several classes of the insecticides currently in use in the field. Therefore, it is urgent to find alternative compounds to conquer the vector. In this study, the efficacies of essential oils of nine plant species, which are traditionally used to avoid mosquito bites in Benin, were investigated. Methods Essential oils of nine plant species were extracted by hydrodistillation, and their chemical compositions were identified by GC-MS. These oils were tested on susceptible “kisumu” and resistant “ladji-Cotonou” strains of Anopheles gambiae, following WHO test procedures for insecticide resistance monitoring in malaria vector mosquitoes. Results Different chemical compositions were obtained from the essential oils of the plant species. The major constituents identified were as follows: neral and geranial for Cymbopogon citratus, Z-carveol, E-p-mentha-1(7),8-dien-2-ol and E-p-mentha-2,8-dienol for Cymbopogon giganteus, piperitone for Cymbopogon schoenanthus, citronellal and citronellol for Eucalyptus citriodora, p-cymene, caryophyllene oxide and spathulenol for Eucalyptus tereticornis, 3-tetradecanone for Cochlospermum tinctorium and Cochlospermum planchonii, methyl salicylate for Securidaca longepedunculata and ascaridole for Chenopodium ambrosioides. The diagnostic dose was 0.77% for C. citratus, 2.80% for E. tereticornis, 3.37% for E. citriodora, 4.26% for C. ambrosioides, 5.48% for C. schoenanthus and 7.36% for C. giganteus. The highest diagnostic doses were obtained with S. longepedunculata (9.84%), C. tinctorium (11.56%) and C. planchonii (15.22%), compared to permethrin 0.75%. A. gambiae cotonou, which is resistant to pyrethroids, showed significant tolerance to essential oils from C. tinctorium and S. longepedunculata as expected but was

  10. Evaluation of a eucalyptus-based repellent against Anopheles spp. in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigg, J K

    1996-06-01

    A eucalyptus-based insect repellent (PMD) with the principal active ingredient p-menthane-3,8-diol was evaluated in the field in comparison with deet. In human landing catches in Tanzania, 3 formulations of PMD were tested against Anopheles gambiae and An. funestus. Repellents, applied to the legs and feet at doses chosen as used in practice, gave complete protection from biting for between 6 and 7.75 h, depending upon the formulation type, with no significant difference between PMD and deet in terms of efficacy and duration of protection. PMID:8827599

  11. Population genetics of the malaria vector Anopheles aconitus in China and Southeast Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Bin; Harbach, Ralph E.; Walton, Catherine; He, Zhengbo; Zhong, Daibin; Yan, Guiyun; Butlin, Roger K.

    2012-01-01

    Anopheles aconitus is a well-known vector of malaria and is broadly distributed in the Oriental Region, yet there is no information on its population genetic characteristics. In this study, the genetic differentiation among populations was examined using 140 mtDNA COII sequences from 21 sites throughout southern China, Myanmar, Vietnam, Thailand, Laos and Sri Lanka. The population in Sri Lanka has characteristic rDNA D3 and ITS2, mtDNA COII and ND5 haplotypes, and may be considered a distinct...

  12. A peroxidase/dual oxidase system modulates midgut epithelial immunity in Anopheles gambiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Molina-Cruz, Alvaro; Gupta, Lalita; Rodrigues, Janneth; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2010-03-26

    Extracellular matrices in diverse biological systems are cross-linked by dityrosine covalent bonds catalyzed by the peroxidase/oxidase system. We show that a peroxidase, secreted by the Anopheles gambiae midgut, and dual oxidase form a dityrosine network that decreases gut permeability to immune elicitors. This network protects the microbiota by preventing activation of epithelial immunity. It also provides a suitable environment for malaria parasites to develop within the midgut lumen without inducing nitric oxide synthase expression. Disruption of this barrier results in strong and effective pathogen-specific immune responses. PMID:20223948

  13. Immune factor Gambif1, a new rel family member from the human malaria vector, Anopheles gambiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Barillas-Mury, C; Charlesworth, A.; Gross, I; Richman, A; Hoffmann, J A; Kafatos, F C

    1996-01-01

    A novel rel family member, Gambif1 (gambiae immune factor 1), has been cloned from the human malaria vector, Anopheles gambiae, and shown to be most similar to Drosophila Dorsal and Dif. Gambif1 protein is translocated to the nucleus in fat body cells in response to bacterial challenge, although the mRNA is present at low levels at all developmental stages and is not induced by infection. DNA binding activity to the kappaB-like sites in the A.gambiae Defensin and the Drosophila Diptericin and...

  14. The JAK-STAT Pathway Controls Plasmodium vivax Load in Early Stages of Anopheles aquasalis Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Bahia, Ana C; Marina S Kubota; Antonio J Tempone; Helena R. C. Araújo; Bruno A M Guedes; Orfanó, Alessandra S.; Wanderli P Tadei; Ríos-Velásquez, Claudia M.; Han, Yeon S.; SECUNDINO Nágila F.C.; Barillas-Mury, Carolina; Pimenta, Paulo F. P.; Traub-Csekö, Yara M.

    2011-01-01

    Malaria affects 300 million people worldwide every year and 450,000 in Brazil. In coastal areas of Brazil, the main malaria vector is Anopheles aquasalis, and Plasmodium vivax is responsible for the majority of malaria cases in the Americas. Insects possess a powerful immune system to combat infections. Three pathways control the insect immune response: Toll, IMD, and JAK-STAT. Here we analyze the immune role of the A. aquasalis JAK-STAT pathway after P. vivax infection. Three genes, the tran...

  15. The JAK-STAT pathway controls Plasmodium vivax load in early stages of Anopheles aquasalis infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Bahia, Ana C; Marina S Kubota; Antonio J Tempone; Helena R. C. Araújo; Bruno A M Guedes; Orfanó, Alessandra S.; Wanderli P Tadei; Ríos-Velásquez, Claudia M.; Han, Yeon S.; SECUNDINO Nágila F.C.; Carolina Barillas-Mury; Pimenta, Paulo F. P.; Traub-Csekö, Yara M.

    2011-01-01

    Malaria affects 300 million people worldwide every year and 450,000 in Brazil. In coastal areas of Brazil, the main malaria vector is Anopheles aquasalis, and Plasmodium vivax is responsible for the majority of malaria cases in the Americas. Insects possess a powerful immune system to combat infections. Three pathways control the insect immune response: Toll, IMD, and JAK-STAT. Here we analyze the immune role of the A. aquasalis JAK-STAT pathway after P. vivax infection. Three genes, the tran...

  16. A Peroxidase/Dual Oxidase System Modulates Midgut Epithelial Immunity in Anopheles gambiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Molina-Cruz, Alvaro; Gupta, Lalita; Rodrigues, Janneth; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular matrices in diverse biological systems are crosslinked by dityrosine covalent bonds catalyzed by the peroxidase/oxidase system. We show that the Immunomodulatory Peroxidase (IMPer), an enzyme secreted by the mosquito Anopheles gambiae midgut, and dual oxidase (Duox) form a dityrosine network that decreases gut permeability to immune elicitors and protects the microbiota by preventing activation of epithelial immunity. It also provides a suitable environment for malaria parasites to develop within the midgut lumen without inducing nitric oxide synthase expression. Disruption of this barrier results in strong and effective pathogen-specific immune responses. PMID:20223948

  17. Molecular identification of a myosuppressin receptor from the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schöller, Susanne; Belmont, Martin; Cazzamali, Giuseppe;

    2005-01-01

    The insect myosuppressins (X1DVX2HX3FLRFamide) are neuropeptides that generally block insect muscle activities. We have used the genomic sequence information from the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae Genome Project to clone a G protein-coupled receptor that was closely related to the two......, showing that the receptor was quite selective for myosuppressin. These results also showed that the myosuppressin receptor needs a much larger portion than the C-terminal FLRFamide sequence for its activation. The insect myosuppressins are often grouped together with the insect FMRFamides under the name...

  18. Short report : Development of a molecular assay to detect predation on Anopheles gambiae complex larval stages

    OpenAIRE

    Schielke, E.; Costantini, Carlo; Carchini, G.; Sagnon, N.; J. Powell; Caccone, A

    2007-01-01

    We developed a molecular assay to detect predation on Anopheles gambiae sensu lato (s.l.) mosquitoes. This intergenic spacer ribosomal DNA polymerase chain reaction assay and restriction enzyme analysis uses An. gambiae-specific primers to detect mosquito DNA in the DNA extracts from whole invertebrate predators, which enables identification of species (An. gambiae s.s. versus An. arabiensis) and molecular forms (M versus S in An. gambiae s.s.). We show that An. gambiae s.l. DNA can be detect...

  19. Field investigation on the repellent activity of some aromatic plants by traditional means against Anopheles arabiensis and An. pharoensis (Diptera: Culicidae) around Koka, central Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugassa, Sisay; Medhin, Girmay; Balkew, Meshesha; Seyoum, Aklilu; Gebre-Michael, Teshome

    2009-10-01

    A study was undertaken to evaluate the impact of traditional application methods of mosquito repellent plants in the reduction of the human-vector contact of malaria vectors in central Ethiopia. The plants (Corymbia citriodora, Eucalyptus camaldulensis, Ocimum suave and Ocimum basilicum) were tested by thermal expulsion and direct burning on traditional stoves in the field against two important malaria vectors in Ethiopia (Anopheles arabiensis and An. pharoensis). A Latin-square design was applied for randomly assigning the treatment plants and control to experimental houses over different nights. The percentage repellency of each candidate plant by both application methods was estimated from the catches of mosquitoes in the treatment and control houses. On direct burning of the plants, O. basilicum showed the highest percentage repellency (73.11%, Pcitriodora on the other hand gave the highest repellency (72.87%, Pcitriodora exhibited the highest repellency (78.69%, Pcitriodora gave the highest repellency (72.9%, P65%) against the house-entry and biting of two important malaria vectors in Ethiopia, and thus have a potential to be used at least as supplements to other control methods. However, feasibility and actual impact on disease transmission need to be known on these and other potentially useful plants. PMID:19539591

  20. Study on Fungal Flora in the Midgut of the Larva and Adult of the Different Populations of the Malaria Vector Anopheles stephensi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Tajedin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Many microorganisms in midgut of mosquito challenge with their host and also other pathogens pre­sent in midgut. The aim of this study was presence of non-pathogens microorganisms like fungal flora which may be cru­cial on interaction between vectors and pathogens."nMethods: Different populations of Anopheles stephensi were reared in insectary and objected to determine fungal flora in their midguts. The midgut paunch of mosquito adults and larvae as well as breading water and larval food sam­ples transferred on Subaru-dextrose agar, in order to detect the environment fungus."nResults: Although four fungi, Aspergillus, Rhizopus, Geotrichum and Sacharomyces were found in the food and wa­ter, but only Aspiragilus observed in the midgut of larvae. No fungus was found in the midgut of adults. This is the first report on fungal flora in the midgut of the adults and larvae of An. stephensi and possible stadial transmission of fungi from immature stages to adults."nConclusion: The midgut environment of adults is not compatible for survivorship of fungi but the larval midgut may con­tain few fungi as a host or even pathogen.

  1. Plasmodium falciparum infection rates for some Anopheles spp. from Guinea-Bissau, West Africa [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4in

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle R. Sanford

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Presence of Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (CSP was detected by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA in a sample of Anopheles gambiae s.s., A. melas and A. pharoensis collected in Guinea-Bissau during October and November 2009. The percentage of P. falciparum infected samples (10.2% overall was comparable to earlier studies from other sites in Guinea-Bissau (9.6-12.4%. The majority of the specimens collected were identified as A. gambiae which had an individual infection rate of 12.6 % across collection sites. A small number of specimens of A. coluzzii, A. coluzzii x A. gambiae hybrids, A. melas and A. pharoensis were collected and had infection rates of 4.3%, 4.1%, 11.1% and 33.3% respectively. Despite being present in low numbers in indoor collections, the exophilic feeding behaviors of A. melas (N=18 and A. pharoensis (N=6 and high infection rates observed in this survey suggest falciparum-malaria transmission potential outside of the protection of bed nets.

  2. Malaria transmission potential could be reduced with current and future climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdock, C C; Sternberg, E D; Thomas, M B

    2016-01-01

    Several studies suggest the potential for climate change to increase malaria incidence in cooler, marginal transmission environments. However, the effect of increasing temperature in warmer regions where conditions currently support endemic transmission has received less attention. We investigate how increases in temperature from optimal conditions (27 °C to 30 °C and 33 °C) interact with realistic diurnal temperature ranges (DTR: ± 0 °C, 3 °C, and 4.5 °C) to affect the ability of key vector species from Africa and Asia (Anopheles gambiae and An. stephensi) to transmit the human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. The effects of increasing temperature and DTR on parasite prevalence, parasite intensity, and mosquito mortality decreased overall vectorial capacity for both mosquito species. Increases of 3 °C from 27 °C reduced vectorial capacity by 51-89% depending on species and DTR, with increases in DTR alone potentially halving transmission. At 33 °C, transmission potential was further reduced for An. stephensi and blocked completely in An. gambiae. These results suggest that small shifts in temperature could play a substantial role in malaria transmission dynamics, yet few empirical or modeling studies consider such effects. They further suggest that rather than increase risk, current and future warming could reduce transmission potential in existing high transmission settings. PMID:27324146

  3. Malaria transmission potential could be reduced with current and future climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdock, C. C.; Sternberg, E. D.; Thomas, M. B.

    2016-01-01

    Several studies suggest the potential for climate change to increase malaria incidence in cooler, marginal transmission environments. However, the effect of increasing temperature in warmer regions where conditions currently support endemic transmission has received less attention. We investigate how increases in temperature from optimal conditions (27 °C to 30 °C and 33 °C) interact with realistic diurnal temperature ranges (DTR: ± 0 °C, 3 °C, and 4.5 °C) to affect the ability of key vector species from Africa and Asia (Anopheles gambiae and An. stephensi) to transmit the human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. The effects of increasing temperature and DTR on parasite prevalence, parasite intensity, and mosquito mortality decreased overall vectorial capacity for both mosquito species. Increases of 3 °C from 27 °C reduced vectorial capacity by 51–89% depending on species and DTR, with increases in DTR alone potentially halving transmission. At 33 °C, transmission potential was further reduced for An. stephensi and blocked completely in An. gambiae. These results suggest that small shifts in temperature could play a substantial role in malaria transmission dynamics, yet few empirical or modeling studies consider such effects. They further suggest that rather than increase risk, current and future warming could reduce transmission potential in existing high transmission settings. PMID:27324146

  4. Effect of Bacillus sphaericus Neide on Anopheles (Diptera: Culicidae and associated insect fauna in fish ponds in the Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Augusto da Silva Ferreira

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTWe analyzed the effects of Bacillus sphaericus on Anopheles larvae and on the associated insect fauna in fish farming ponds. Five breeding sites in the peri-urban area of the city of Manaus, AM, Brazil, were studied. Seven samples were collected from each breeding site and B. sphaericus was applied and reapplied after 15 days. The samples were made at 24 h before application, 24 h post-application and 5 and 15 days post-application. We determined abundance, larval reduction and larval density for Anopheles, and abundance, richness, Shannon diversity index and classified according to the functional trophic groups for associated insect fauna. A total of 904 Anopheles larvae were collected and distributed into five species. Density data and larval reduction demonstrated the rapid effect of the biolarvicide 24 h after application. A total of 4874 associated aquatic insects belonging to six orders and 23 families were collected. Regression analysis of diversity and richness indicated that the application of the biolarvicide had no influence on these indices and thus no effect on the associated insect fauna for a period of 30 days. B. sphaericus was found to be highly effective against the larvae of Anopheles, eliminating the larvae in the first days after application, with no effect on the associated insect fauna present in the fish ponds analyzed.

  5. Electrophysiological responses of gustatory receptor neurons on the labella of the common malaria mosquito Anopheles quadrimaculatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    We recorded electrical responses from sensory cells associated with gustatory sensilla on the labella of female Anopheles quadrimaculatus to salt, sucrose, quinine (a feeding deterrent) and the insect repellent, N,N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide (DEET). A salt-sensitive cell responded to increasing con...

  6. Ultrastructure of a microsporidium brachiola gambiae n.sp.parasitising a mosquito anopheles gamblae, a malaria vector

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Weiser, Jaroslav; Žižka, Zdeněk

    - (2003), s. 35-36. ISSN 1214-021X. [Conference on Cell Biology /5./. České Budějovice, 08.09.2003-10.09.2003] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : anopheles gambiae * malaria * vector Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  7. Differential attractiveness of humans to the African malaria vector Anopheles gambiae Giles - Effects of host characteristics and parasite infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mukabana, W.R.

    2002-01-01

    The results of a series of studies designed to understand the principal factors that determine the differential attractiveness of humans to the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae are described in this thesis. Specific

  8. Studies on x-ray induced chromosomal translocations in Anopheles albimanus. II. Laboratory evaluation of sexual competitiveness of translocation males

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Success of a genetic control program in a sexually reproducing species depends largely on the mating competitiveness of the released individuals. The sexual vigor of male Anopheles albimanus mosquitoes carrying a Y-autosome translocation was evaluated in the laboratory and found to be equal to that of wild type males

  9. Man-biting activity of Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus albimanus and An. (Kerteszia neivai (Diptera: Culicidae in the Pacific Lowlands of Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yezid Solarte

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available The daily man-biting activity of Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus albimanus and An. (Kerteszia neivai was determined in four ecologically distinct settlements of the Naya River, Department of Valle, Colombia. Differences were found among the settlements with respect to the mosquito species present, intradomiciliary and extradomiciliary biting activity and population densities.

  10. Shift in species composition in the Anopheles gambiae complex after implementation of long-lasting insecticidal nets in Dielmo, Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sougoufara, S; Harry, M; Doucouré, S; Sembène, P M; Sokhna, C

    2016-09-01

    Long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs) and indoor residual spraying (IRS) are the cornerstones of malaria vector control. However, the effectiveness of these control tools depends on vector ecology and behaviour, which also largely determine the efficacy of certain Anopheles mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) as vectors. Malaria vectors in sub-Saharan Africa are primarily species of the Anopheles gambiae complex, which present intraspecific differences in behaviour that affect how they respond to vector control tools. The focus of this study is the change in species composition in the An. gambiae complex after the implementation of LLINs in Dielmo, Senegal. The main findings referred to dramatic decreases in the proportions of Anopheles coluzzii and An. gambiae after the introduction of LLINs, and an increase in the proportion of Anopheles arabiensis. Two years after LLINs were first introduced, An. arabiensis remained the most prevalent species and An. gambiae had begun to rebound. This indicated a need to develop additional vector control tools that can target the full range of malaria vectors. PMID:27058993

  11. First report of Metarhizium anisopliae IP 46 pathogenicity in adult Anopheles gambiae s.s. and An. arabiensis (Diptera; Culicidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mnyone, L.L.; Russell, T.L.; Lyimo, I.N.; Lwetoijera, D.W.; Kirby, M.J.; Luz, C.

    2009-01-01

    The entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae isolate IP 46, originating from a soil sample collected in 2001 in the Cerrado of Central Brazil, was tested for its ability to reduce the survival of adult male and female Anopheles gambiae s.s. and An. arabiensis mosquitoes. A 6-h exposure to the

  12. Additional selection for insecticide resistance in urban malaria vectors: DDT resistance in Anopheles arabiensis from Bobo-Dioulasso, Burkina Faso.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M Jones

    Full Text Available In the city of Bobo-Dioulasso in Burkina Faso, Anopheles arabiensis has superseded Anopheles gambiae s.s. as the major malaria vector and the larvae are found in highly polluted habitats normally considered unsuitable for Anopheles mosquitoes. Here we show that An. gambiae s.l. adults emerging from a highly polluted site in the city centre (Dioulassoba have a high prevalence of DDT resistance (percentage mortality after exposure to diagnostic dose=65.8% in the dry season and 70.4% in the rainy season, respectively. An investigation into the mechanisms responsible found an unexpectedly high frequency of the 1014S kdr mutation (allele frequency=0.4, which is found at very low frequencies in An. arabiensis in the surrounding rural areas, and an increase in transcript levels of several detoxification genes, notably from the glutathione transferase and cytochrome P450 gene families. A number of ABC transporter genes were also expressed at elevated levels in the DDT resistant An. arabiensis. Unplanned urbanisation provides numerous breeding grounds for mosquitoes. The finding that Anopheles mosquitoes adapted to these urban breeding sites have a high prevalence of insecticide resistance has important implications for our understanding of the selective forces responsible for the rapid spread of insecticide resistant populations of malaria vectors in Africa.

  13. Indirect evidence that agricultural pesticides select for insecticide resistance in the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luc, Djogbénou S; Benoit, Assogba; Laurette, Djossou; Michel, Makoutode

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the possible relationship between the agricultural use of insecticides and the emergence of insecticide resistance. Bioassays were conducted using simulated mosquito larval habitats and well known Anopheles gambiae strains. Soil samples were collected from vegetable production areas in Benin, including one site with insecticide use, one site where insecticides had not been used for two months, and a third where insecticides had not been used. Pupation and emergence rates were very low in pyrethroid-susceptible strains when exposed to soil that had been recently exposed to insecticides. Pupation and emergence rates in strains with the kdr mutation alone or both the kdr and Ace-1 mutations were much higher. Overall, strains with the kdr mutation survived at higher rates compared to that without kdr mutation. Although this study is observational, we provide indirect evidence indicating that soils from agricultural areas contain insecticide residues that can play a role in the emergence of insecticide resistance in Anopheles. This aspect should be taken into account to better utilize the insecticide in the context of integrated pest management programs. PMID:27232122

  14. Morphological assessment and molecular phylogenetics of the Funestus and Minimus groups of Anopheles (Cellia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garros, Claire; Harbach, Ralph E; Manguin, Sylvie

    2005-07-01

    A morphological comparison and molecular study of the Afrotropical Funestus and Afro-Oriental Minimus groups within the Myzomyia series of Anopheles (Cellia) was conducted to determine their phylogenetic affinities. Relationships were investigated using morphological characters and ribosomal (D3) and mitochondrial (COII) nucleotide sequences. Cross-identification of specimens from one group by using keys for the other group confirmed their morphological similarity, i.e., members of one group shared the key characters with members of the other group. Molecular analyses recognized five clades, not strictly related to geographical distribution: the Aconitus, Culicifacies, Funestus, Minimus, and Rivulorum subgroups. Morphological observations were congruent with the results of molecular analyses. Anopheles leesoni, an Afrotropical species, is closely related to the Oriental Minimus complex, and these taxa share a close relationship with the Fluviatilis complex that occurs from the Arabian Peninsula through India. The immature and adult stages of An. rivulorum in Africa bear morphological characters that distinguish this species from members of the Afrotropical Funestus subgroup. A composite scheme of classification based on the results and previously published information is proposed for the two groups. It is noted that An. fluviatilis species S is conspecific with An. minimus species C. PMID:16119539

  15. Population genetics of Plasmodium resistance genes in Anopheles gambiae: no evidence for strong selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obbard, D J; Linton, Y-M; Jiggins, F M; Yan, G; Little, T J

    2007-08-01

    Anopheles mosquitoes are the primary vectors for malaria in Africa, transmitting the disease to more than 100 million people annually. Recent functional studies have revealed mosquito genes that are crucial for Plasmodium development, but there is presently little understanding of which genes mediate vector competence in the wild, or evolve in response to parasite-mediated selection. Here, we use population genetic approaches to study the strength and mode of natural selection on a suite of mosquito immune system genes, CTL4, CTLMA2, LRIM1, and APL2 (LRRD7), which have been shown to affect Plasmodium development in functional studies. We sampled these genes from two African populations of An. gambiae s.s., along with several closely related species, and conclude that there is no evidence for either strong directional or balancing selection on these genes. We highlight a number of challenges that need to be met in order to apply population genetic tests for selection in Anopheles mosquitoes; in particular the dearth of suitable outgroup species and the potential difficulties that arise when working within a closely-related species complex. PMID:17688548

  16. FAUNA ANOPHELES DI DAERAH PANTAI BEKAS HUTAN MANGROVE KECAMATAN PADANG CERMIN KABUPATEN LAMPUNG SELATAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Sushanti Idris-Idram

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Intensive mosquito collections were carried out in two villages in subdistrict of Padangcermin during 1992-1993. The method of mosquito collections consisted of night landing on man indoor and outdoor, night resting indoor and outdoor around cattle shelters, light trap in cattle shelters, daytime resting indoor and outdoor, as well as larvae collections to identify anophelines breeding sites. Sixteen anophelines i.e. Anopheles sundaicus, An. subpictus, An. vagus, An. indefinitus, An. nigerrimus, An. peditaeniatus, An. kochi, An. barbirostris, An. bambumbrosus, An. annularis, An. separatus, An. tesselatus, An. aconitus, An. umbrosus, An. leucosphyrus and An. letifer were collected. Among these mosquitos, An. sundaicus was found predominant, followed by An. vagus and An. subpictus. Other species were collected in small numbers. The behavior of Anopheles sundaicus, An. subpictus and An. vagus were exophagic and endophilic. The larvae of An. sundaicus was found only in brackish standing water such as abandoned shrimp ponds, An. subpictus in brackish standing water as well as fresh standing water, while An. vagus was found only in fresh standing water. Breeding sites of An. sundaicus was characterized by pond with floating algae while An. subpictus and An. vagus were not depending on vegetation.

  17. Ecology of Anopheles dthali Patton in Bandar Abbas District, Hormozgan Province, Southern Iran

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    H Vatandoost

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Ecology of Anopheles dthali was studied in Bandar Abbas County, where there is indigenous malaria. Anopheles dthali plays as a secondary malaria vector in the region. It is active throughout the year in mountainous area with two peaks of activity, whereas in coastal area it has one peak. There is no report of hibernation or aestivation for this species in the re¬gion. Precipitin tests on specimens from different parts showed that 15.6-20.8% were positive for human blood. This species usually rests outdoors. It has different larval habitats. Insecticides susceptibility tests on adult females exhibited susceptibil¬ity to all insecticides recommended by WHO. LT50 for the currently used insecticide, lambda-cyhalothrin, is measured less than one minute. The irritability tests to pyrethroid insecticides, showed that permethrin and lambda-cyhalothrin had more irritancy compared to deltamethrin and cyfluthrin. Larval bioassay using malathion, chlorpyrifos, temephos and fenithrothion did not show any sing of resistance to these larvicides at the diagnostic dose. It is recommended that all the decision makers should consider the results of our study for any vector control measures in the region.

  18. Ecology of Anopheles dthali Patton in Bandar Abbas District, Hormozgan Province, Southern Iran

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    H Vatandoost

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Ecology of Anopheles dthali was studied in Bandar Abbas County, where there is indigenous malaria. Anopheles dthali plays as a secondary malaria vector in the region. It is active throughout the year in mountainous area with two peaks of activity, whereas in coastal area it has one peak. There is no report of hibernation or aestivation for this species in the re¬gion. Precipitin tests on specimens from different parts showed that 15.6-20.8% were positive for human blood. This species usually rests outdoors. It has different larval habitats. Insecticides susceptibility tests on adult females exhibited susceptibil¬ity to all insecticides recommended by WHO. LT50 for the currently used insecticide, lambda-cyhalothrin, is measured less than one minute. The irritability tests to pyrethroid insecticides, showed that permethrin and lambda-cyhalothrin had more irritancy compared to deltamethrin and cyfluthrin. Larval bioassay using malathion, chlorpyrifos, temephos and fenithrothion did not show any sing of resistance to these larvicides at the diagnostic dose. It is recommended that all the decision makers should consider the results of our study for any vector control measures in the region.

  19. BEBERAPA ASPEK BIONOMIK ANOPHELES SP DI KABUPATEN SUMBA TENGAH, PROVINSI NUSA TENGGARA TIMUR

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    Ni Wayan Dewi Adyana

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Research Some Aspects of Anopheles sp Bionomik in Central Sumba Regency, Province of East Nusa Tenggara. Committed in the territory Maradesa Health Center. Data were collected by catching adult mosquitoes by using bait People inside and outside the home, a collection of breaks in the wall and at home, continued with larval surveys in all potential breeding places.  The results showed that the biting behavior tends eksofagik found on An. kochi, An. aconitus and An.barbirostris with bite density peaks in An. aconitus (0.6 persons/hour with a biting peak at 20:00 to 21:00. Behavior tends eksofilik break in An. kochi, An. aconitus, An. tesselatus, An. barbirostris, An. vagus, An.flavirostris, An. maculatus and An. indefinitus with the highest density in An.aconitus (0.9 persons/hour at 1:00 a.m. to 2:00 a.m. Anopheles larvae breeding places found in the small hole in the ground, creek, wetland, non-permanent irrigation, water reservoirs in the vegetable garden, ditches, puddles, swamps, springs, with species that are found as An.kochi, An.aconitus, An. tesselatus, An. barbirostris, An. vagus, An. flavirostris, An. maculatus, An. indefinitus and An. annullaris

  20. Entomological indices of Anopheles gambiae sensu lato at a rural community in south-west Nigeria

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    M.A.E. Noutcha

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Investigations were conducted to obtain key entomological indices of Anopheles gambiae s.l. at Igbo-Ora, a rural community in south-west Nigeria. Methods: Mosquitoes were caught daily for a week from rooms where tenants had slept the previous night in each of the four months June, July (2001, and August, September (2002. Anopheles gambiae s.l. sibling species were PCR-identified, the blood meal origin was determined by direct ELISA, and the circumsporozoite antigen by sandwich ELISA. Mean weekly rates were calculated. Results: The mean human biting rates were 0.90 and 1.6 in 2001 and 2002 respectively. The mean weekly anthropophilic rates for An. gambiae s.l. were 82 and 86% in 2001 and 2002 respectively; they were high in An. gambiae s.s., An. arabiensis and non-identified species in the complex. The mean weekly circumsporozoite rates were 6.70% in 2001 and 6.30% in 2002. The mean weekly entomological inoculation rates (EIR were 4.95 and 5.05 in 2001 and 2002 respectively; the seasonal (6-month rates were high: 128.7 in 2001 and 131.3 in 2002, compared to data from other rural communities on the continent. Interpretation & conclusion: The implications of these findings on the role of An. gambiae s.l. in the holoendemicity of malaria at Igbo-Ora are discussed.

  1. Recent reduction in the water level of Lake Victoria has created more habitats for Anopheles funestus

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    Futami Kyoko

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The water level of Lake Victoria has fallen more than 1.5 m since 1998, revealing a narrow strip of land along the shore. This study determined whether the recent drop in the water level has created additional breeding grounds for malaria vectors. Methods The recent and past shorelines were estimated using landmarks and a satellite image. The locations of breeding habitats were recorded using a GPS unit during the high and low lake water periods. GIS was used to determine whether the breeding habitats were located on newly emerged land between the new and old shorelines. Results Over half of the breeding habitats existed on newly emerged land. Fewer habitats for the Anopheles gambiae complex were found during the low water level period compared to the high water period. However, more habitats for Anopheles funestus were found during the high water level period, and they were all located on the newly emerged land. Conclusion The recent reduction in water level of Lake Victoria has increased the amount of available habitat for A. funestus. The results suggest that the water drop has substantially affected the population of this malaria vector in the Lake Victoria basin, particularly because the lake has a long shoreline that may harbour many new breeding habitats.

  2. A reliable morphological method to assess the age of male Anopheles gambiae

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    Killeen Gerry F

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Release of genetically-modified (GM or sterile male mosquitoes for malaria control is hampered by inability to assess the age and mating history of free-living male Anopheles. Methods Age and mating-related changes in the reproductive system of male Anopheles gambiae were quantified and used to fit predictive statistical models. These models, based on numbers of spermatocysts, relative size of sperm reservoir and presence/absence of a clear area around the accessory gland, were evaluated using an independent sample of mosquitoes whose status was blinded during the experiment. Results The number of spermatocysts in male testes decreased with age, and the relative size of their sperm reservoir increased. The presence of a clear area around accessory glands was also linked to age and mating status. A quantitative model was able to categorize males from the blind trial into age groups of young (≤ 4 days and old (> 4 days with an overall efficiency of 89%. Using the parameters of this model, a simple table was compiled that can be used to predict male age. In contrast, mating history could not be reliably assessed as virgins could not be distinguished from mated males. Conclusion Simple assessment of a few morphological traits which are easily collected in the field allows accurate age-grading of male An. gambiae. This simple, yet robust, model enables evaluation of demographic patterns and mortality in wild and released males in populations targeted by GM or sterile male-based control programmes.

  3. Successful human infection with P. falciparum using three aseptic Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes: a new model for controlled human malaria infection.

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    Matthew B Laurens

    Full Text Available Controlled human malaria infection (CHMI is a powerful method for assessing the efficacy of anti-malaria vaccines and drugs targeting pre-erythrocytic and erythrocytic stages of the parasite. CHMI has heretofore required the bites of 5 Plasmodium falciparum (Pf sporozoite (SPZ-infected mosquitoes to reliably induce Pf malaria. We reported that CHMI using the bites of 3 PfSPZ-infected mosquitoes reared aseptically in compliance with current good manufacturing practices (cGMP was successful in 6 participants. Here, we report results from a subsequent CHMI study using 3 PfSPZ-infected mosquitoes reared aseptically to validate the initial clinical trial. We also compare results of safety, tolerability, and transmission dynamics in participants undergoing CHMI using 3 PfSPZ-infected mosquitoes reared aseptically to published studies of CHMI using 5 mosquitoes. Nineteen adults aged 18-40 years were bitten by 3 Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes infected with the chloroquine-sensitive NF54 strain of Pf. All 19 participants developed malaria (100%; 12 of 19 (63% on Day 11. The mean pre-patent period was 258.3 hours (range 210.5-333.8. The geometric mean parasitemia at first diagnosis by microscopy was 9.5 parasites/µL (range 2-44. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR detected parasites an average of 79.8 hours (range 43.8-116.7 before microscopy. The mosquitoes had a geometric mean of 37,894 PfSPZ/mosquito (range 3,500-152,200. Exposure to the bites of 3 aseptically-raised, PfSPZ-infected mosquitoes is a safe, effective procedure for CHMI in malaria-naïve adults. The aseptic model should be considered as a new standard for CHMI trials in non-endemic areas. Microscopy is the gold standard used for the diagnosis of Pf malaria after CHMI, but qPCR identifies parasites earlier. If qPCR continues to be shown to be highly specific, and can be made to be practical, rapid, and standardized, it should be considered as an alternative for diagnosis

  4. Outdoor host seeking behaviour of Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes following initiation of malaria vector control on Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea

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    Reddy Vamsi P

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Indoor-based anti-vector interventions remain the preferred means of reducing risk of malaria transmission in malaria endemic areas around the world. Despite demonstrated success in reducing human-mosquito interactions, these methods are effective solely against endophilic vectors. It may be that outdoor locations serve as an important venue of host seeking by Anopheles gambiae sensu lato (s.l. mosquitoes where indoor vector suppression measures are employed. This paper describes the host seeking activity of anopheline mosquito vectors in the Punta Europa region of Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea. In this area, An. gambiae sensu stricto (s.s. is the primary malaria vector. The goal of the paper is to evaluate the importance of An gambiae s.l. outdoor host seeking behaviour and discuss its implications for anti-vector interventions. Methods The venue and temporal characteristics of host seeking by anopheline vectors in a hyperendemic setting was evaluated using human landing collections conducted inside and outside homes in three villages during both the wet and dry seasons in 2007 and 2008. Additionally, five bi-monthly human landing collections were conducted throughout 2009. Collections were segregated hourly to provide a time distribution of host-seeking behaviour. Results Surprisingly high levels of outdoor biting by An. gambiae senso stricto and An. melas vectors were observed throughout the night, including during the early evening and morning hours when human hosts are often outdoors. As reported previously, An. gambiae s.s. is the primary malaria vector in the Punta Europa region, where it seeks hosts outdoors at least as much as it does indoors. Further, approximately 40% of An. gambiae s.l. are feeding at times when people are often outdoors, where they are not protected by IRS or LLINs. Repeated sampling over two consecutive dry-wet season cycles indicates that this result is independent of seasonality. Conclusions

  5. The limits and intensity of Plasmodium falciparum transmission: implications for malaria control and elimination worldwide.

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    Carlos A Guerra

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The efficient allocation of financial resources for malaria control using appropriate combinations of interventions requires accurate information on the geographic distribution of malaria risk. An evidence-based description of the global range of Plasmodium falciparum malaria and its endemicity has not been assembled in almost 40 y. This paper aims to define the global geographic distribution of P. falciparum malaria in 2007 and to provide a preliminary description of its transmission intensity within this range. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The global spatial distribution of P. falciparum malaria was generated using nationally reported case-incidence data, medical intelligence, and biological rules of transmission exclusion, using temperature and aridity limits informed by the bionomics of dominant Anopheles vector species. A total of 4,278 spatially unique cross-sectional survey estimates of P. falciparum parasite rates were assembled. Extractions from a population surface showed that 2.37 billion people lived in areas at any risk of P. falciparum transmission in 2007. Globally, almost 1 billion people lived under unstable, or extremely low, malaria risk. Almost all P. falciparum parasite rates above 50% were reported in Africa in a latitude band consistent with the distribution of Anopheles gambiae s.s. Conditions of low parasite prevalence were also common in Africa, however. Outside of Africa, P. falciparum malaria prevalence is largely hypoendemic (less than 10%, with the median below 5% in the areas surveyed. CONCLUSIONS: This new map is a plausible representation of the current extent of P. falciparum risk and the most contemporary summary of the population at risk of P. falciparum malaria within these limits. For 1 billion people at risk of unstable malaria transmission, elimination is epidemiologically feasible, and large areas of Africa are more amenable to control than appreciated previously. The release of this information in

  6. Mosquitocidal activity of Polygala arvensis Willd against Aedes aegypti (Linn., Anopheles stephensi (Liston. and Culex quinquefasciatus (Say. (Diptera: Culicidae

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    M. Deepa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available To determine the larvicidal, ovicidal and repellent activities of benzene and methanol extract of Polygala arvensis against Aedes aegypti, Anopheles stephensi and Culex quinquefasciatus Twenty five 3rd instar larvae of selected mosquitoes species were exposed to various concentrations (60-300 ppm and were assayed in the laboratory by using the protocol of WHO 2005; the 24 h LC50 values of the P. Arvensis leaf extract was determined following Probit analysis. The ovicidal activity was determined against Aedes aegypti, Anopheles stephensi and Culex quinquefasciatus exposed to variousconcentrations were tested under laboratory conditions and the hatch rates were assessed 120hrs post treatment. The repellent efficacy was determined against selected mosquitoes at three concentrations viz., 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 mg/cm2 under the laboratory conditions. The LC50 and LC90 values of benzene and methanol extract of P. arvensis against Aedes aegypti, Anopheles stephensi and Culex quinquefasciatus larvae in 24 h were 75.32, 88.26, 82.46, 58.21, 46.37, 42.68 and 260.48, 275.26, 251.39, 208.45, 189.82 and 130.44 ppm, respectively. It has been noticed that the higher concentrations of P. arvensis extractspossesses strong ovicidal activity at 200 ppm concentration against Ae. aegypti, An. stephensi and C. quinquefasciatus, no egg hatchability was recorded. In the same way, methanol extracts showed maximum ovicidal activity followed by benzene extract against selected vector mosquitoes. In repellent activity, among two extracts tested P. arvensis methanol extract had strong repellent action against selected mosquitoes as it provided 100% protection against Aedes aegypti, Anopheles stephensi and Culex quinquefasciatus for 280min. From the results it can be concluded the P. arvensis extract was an excellent potential for controlling Aedes aegypti, Anopheles stephensi and Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes.

  7. A Study of the Essential Oils of Four Sudanese Accessions of Basil (Ocimum basilicum L. Against Anopheles Mosquito Larvae

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    Azhari H. Nour

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Certain basil essential oils were claimed to have a larvicidal activity towards mosquito's larvae. To test this claim the essential oils of four accessions of basil grown in Sudan were selected and tested for Anopheles larvae. Malaria is the major health problem in the Sudan and the whole country is now considered endemic, with varying degrees, about 35,000 deaths every year due to malaria. Anopheles mosquito is the major vector of malaria disease in Sudan. Search for larvicidal active compound(s is one of several attempts to fine effective and affordable ways to control this mosquito. To determine the toxic effects of basil essential oils extracted by steam distillation against Anopheles larvae. Approach: For the larvicidal bioassay, three concentrations (100, 300, 500 ppm of essential oil solutions of four basil accessions were prepared; 1 mL of ethanol was used to solubilize the oil in water (999 mL. In each concentration of oil solution were inserted 20 larvae (third instars. A set of controls using 0.1% ethanol and untreated sets of larvae in (tap water, were also run for comparison. Data were evaluated through regression analysis, from the regression line; the LC50 values were read. The active ingredients were separated and/ or identified by TLC, IR and GC-MS. Results: Larvicidal activity of the essential oils is varied, lasted for about 9 h and thereafter decreased, LC50 values ranging from 190-300 ppm. Linalool, geraniol and eugenol are active components of basil essential oil against Anopheles larvae. Two accessions were caused 100% mortality at a concentration range 300-500 ppm for 3 h. Conclusion: These results indicated that basil essential oils have larvicidal activity towards Anopheles larvae. Therefore, could be affordable way to control this mosquito.

  8. Phenotypic dissection of a Plasmodium-refractory strain of malaria vector Anopheles stephensi: the reduced susceptibility to P. berghei and P. yoelii.

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    Naoaki Shinzawa

    Full Text Available Anopheline mosquitoes are the major vectors of human malaria. Parasite-mosquito interactions are a critical aspect of disease transmission and a potential target for malaria control. Current investigations into parasite-mosquito interactions frequently assume that genetically resistant and susceptible mosquitoes exist in nature. Therefore, comparisons between the Plasmodium susceptibility profiles of different mosquito species may contribute to a better understanding of vectorial capacity. Anopheles stephensi is an important malaria vector in central and southern Asia and is widely used as a laboratory model of parasite transmission due to its high susceptibility to Plasmodium infection. In the present study, we identified a rodent malaria-refractory strain of A. stephensi mysorensis (Ehime by comparative study of infection susceptibility. A very low number of oocysts develop in Ehime mosquitoes infected with P. berghei and P. yoelii, as determined by evaluation of developed oocysts on the basal lamina. A stage-specific study revealed that this reduced susceptibility was due to the impaired formation of ookinetes of both Plasmodium species in the midgut lumen and incomplete crossing of the midgut epithelium. There were no apparent abnormalities in the exflagellation of male parasites in the ingested blood or the maturation of oocysts after the rounding up of the ookinetes. Overall, these results suggest that invasive-stage parasites are eliminated in both the midgut lumen and epithelium in Ehime mosquitoes by strain-specific factors that remain unknown. The refractory strain newly identified in this report would be an excellent study system for investigations into novel parasite-mosquito interactions in the mosquito midgut.

  9. Estimation of vectorial capacity of Anopheles minimus Theobald & An. fluviatilis James (Diptera: Culicidae in a malaria endemic area of Odisha State, India

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    K Gunasekaran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Anopheles minimus and An. fluviatilis were incriminated as the major malaria vectors in Keonjhar district of Odisha State recently. This study was carried out to elucidate the potential role of these two vector species in transmission of malaria during different seasons, and vectorial capacity of these species was also estimated. Methods: Three hilly and forested villages of Keonjhar district were randomly selected. Vectorial capacity (C was calculated using the Macdonald′s formula as modified by Garret-Jones. The human landing density of the vector species was obtained from all night human landing collections (bait protected by bed-net. Man feeding habit was estimated by multiplying the human blood index with feeding frequency, which was obtained on daily basis from the duration of gonotrophic cycle. The probability of survival through the extrinsic incubation cycle was calculated from the probability of survival through one day and duration of sporogonic cycle. Results: The estimated vectorial capacity of An. minimus varied between 0.014 and 1.09 for Plasmodium falciparum (Pf and between 0.1 and 1.46 for P. vivax (Pv. The C of An. minimus for both Pf and Pv was higher during rainy season than the other two seasons. The estimated C of An. fluviatilis varied between 0.04 and 1.28 for Pf and between 0.20 and 1.54 for Pv. Interpretation & conclusions: Based on the estimated values of vectorial capacity of the two vector species, the area could be stratified and such stratification would reflect the difference in the intensity of transmission between different strata and accordingly the appropriate control strategy could be adopted for each stratum.

  10. Field evaluation of ultra-low volume applications with a mixture of d-allethrin and d-phenothrin for control of Anopheles albimanus in Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shono, Y; Jean-Francois, V; Saint Jean, Y; Itoh, T

    1991-09-01

    Ultra-low volume applications of d-allethrin and d-phenothrin could possibly reduce populations of Anopheles albimanus when used in conjunction with residual spraying of fenitrothion. The experiments were carried out in Les Cayes, Haiti. PMID:1791463

  11. Merchant Transmission Investment

    OpenAIRE

    Joskow, Paul L.; Tirole, Jean

    2003-01-01

    We examine the performance attributes of a merchant transmission investment framework that relies on ?market driven? transmission investment to provide the infrastructure to support competitive wholesale markets for electricity. Under a stringent set of assumptions, the merchant investment model appears to solve the natural monopoly problem and the associated need for regulating transmission companies traditionally associated with electric transmission networks. We expand the model to inc...

  12. Mansonia africana and Mansonia uniformis are Vectors in the transmission of Wuchereria bancrofti lymphatic filariasis in Ghana

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    Ughasi Josephine

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent data from Ghana indicates that after seven rounds of annual mass drug administration (MDA there is still sustained transmission albeit at low levels in certain areas where Anopheles melas, An. gambiae s.s., Mansonia and Culex species are the main biting mosquitoes. Anopheles gambiae s.l. and An. funestus are the known vectors in Ghana and a recent report indicated that An. melas could transmit at low level microfilaraemia. However, because An. melas is not found everywhere there was the need to determine whether any of the other culicine species could also be playing a role in the transmission of LF. Methods Indoor mosquitoes collected once a month for three months using pyrethrum spray catches in six communities within the Kommenda-Edina-Eguafo-Abirem (KEEA District, Central Region of Ghana were morphologically identified, dissected and examined for the presence of W. bancrofti. Additionally, stored mosquito samples collected during previous years in 8 communities from the Gomoa District also in the Central Region were similarly processed. The identities of all W. bancrofti parasites found were confirmed using an established PCR method. Results A total of 825 indoor resting mosquitoes comprising of 501 Anopheles species, 239 Mansonia species, 84 Culex species and 1 Aedes species were dissected and examined for the presence of W. bancrofti. Mansonia africana had infection and infectivity rates of 2.5%. and 2.1% respectively. Anopheles gambiae s.l. had an infection rate of 0.4% and a similar infectivity rate. None of the Culex sp. and Aedes sp were found with infection. From the stored mosquitoes the infection and infectivity rates for M. africana were 7.6% (N = 144 and 2.8% respectively whilst the corresponding rates for M. uniformis were 2.9% (N = 244 and 0.8%. Conclusions This is the first report of Mansonia species as vectors of lymphatic filariasis (LF in Ghana and in West Africa since that of 1958 in

  13. Activité larvicide sur Anopheles gambiae Giles et composition chimique des huiles essentielles extraites de quatre plantes cultivées au Cameroun

    OpenAIRE

    Tchoumbougnang F.; Dongmo PMJ.; Sameza ML.; Mbanjo EGN.; Fotso GBT.; Zollo PHA.; Menut C.

    2009-01-01

    Larvicidal activity against Anopheles gambiae Giles and chemical composition of essential oils from four plants cultivated in Cameroon. The chemical composition of the essential oils obtained by hydrodistillation of dry leaves from Cymbopogon citrates (DC.) Stapf, Ocimum canum Sims, Ocimum gratissimum L. var 'gratissimum' L. and Thymus vulgaris L. cultivated in Cameroon were analyzed and their larvicidal activity against fourth instar larvae of Anopheles gambiae Giles were determined. The yie...

  14. The automotive transmission book

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer, Robert; Jürgens, Gunter; Najork, Rolf; Pollak, Burkhard

    2015-01-01

    This book presents essential information on systems and interactions in automotive transmission technology and outlines the methodologies used to analyze and develop transmission concepts and designs. Functions of and interactions between components and subassemblies of transmissions are introduced, providing a basis for designing transmission systems and for determining their potentials and properties in vehicle-specific applications: passenger cars, trucks, buses, tractors, and motorcycles. With these fundamentals the presentation provides universal resources for both state-of-the-art and future transmission technologies, including systems for electric and hybrid electric vehicles.

  15. Larvicidal activity of extracts from three Plumbago spp against Anopheles gambiae

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    Barasa M Maniafu

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Three Plumbago spp have been tested for mosquito larvicidal activity. The crude extracts exhibiting the highest larvicidal activity against Anopheles gambiae were hexane (LC50 = 6.4 μg/mL and chloroform (LC50 = 6.7 μg/mL extracts from Plumbago zeylanica Linn, chloroform (LC50 = 6.7 ug/mL extract from Plumbago stenophylla Bull and ethyl acetate (LC50 = 4.1 μg/mL extract from Plumbago dawei Rolfe. These LC50 values were within 95% confidence limits. 5-hydroxy-2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone (plumbagin 1 (LC50 = 1.9 μg/mL and β-sitosterol 2 were characterised from ethyl acetate extract of root bark of P. dawei, a native medicinal plant growing in Kenya, based on spectral analysis and comparisons with data in literature.

  16. Avoidance Behavior to Essential Oils by Anopheles minimus, a Malaria Vector in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nararak, Jirod; Sathantriphop, Sunaiyana; Chauhan, Kamal; Tantakom, Siripun; Eiden, Amanda L; Chareonviriyaphap, Theeraphap

    2016-03-01

    Essential oils extracted from 4 different plant species--citronella (Cymbopogon nardus), hairy basil (Ocimum americanum), sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum), and vetiver (Vetiveria zizanioides)-were investigated for their irritant and repellent activities against Anopheles minimus, using an excito-repellency test system. Pure essential oils were used in absolute ethanol at the concentrations of 0.5%, 1%, 2.5%, and 5% (v/v) compared with deet. At the lowest concentration of 0.5%, hairy basil displayed the best irritant and repellent effects against An. minimus. Citronella and vetiver at 1-5% showed strong irritant effects with>80% escape, while repellent effects of both oils were observed at 1% and 2.5% citronella (73-89% escape) and at 5% vetiver (83.9% escape). Sweet basil had only moderate irritant action at 5% concentration (69.6% escape) and slightly repellent on test mosquitoes (mosquito repellent products for protection against An. minimus. PMID:27105214

  17. Mosquito repellent action of Blumea lacera (Asteraceae against Anopheles stephensi and Culex quinquefasciatus.

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    S.P. Singh

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Petroleum ether extract of Blumea lacera was screened under laboratory conditions for repellent activity against mosquito vector Anopheles stephensi Liston and Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae. The repellent activity of Blumea lacera extract was tested against mosquitoes in comparison with the DEET, which was used as a positive control. Results obtained from the laboratory experiment showed that the extract was effective against mosquito vectors even at a low dose. A direct relationship was observed with concentrations of Blumea lacera extract and the repellent activity. Percent repellency obtained at 6% concentration of theextract against An. stephensi and Cx. quinquefasciatus were 97and 98% at 0 hour and 78.8 and 76.2% after 6 hrs. DEET-2% however showed 100% repellency against An. stephensi and against Cx. quinquefasciatus up to 4 hours and 1 hour, respectively. These results show that Blumea lacera extract has the potential as an effective mosquito repellent.

  18. The distribution of insecticide resistance in Anopheles gambiae s.l. populations from Cameroon: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndjemaï, Hamadou N M; Patchoké, Salomon; Atangana, Jean; Etang, Josiane; Simard, Fréderic; Bilong, Charles F Bilong; Reimer, Lisa; Cornel, Anthony; Lanzaro, Gregory C; Fondjo, Etienne

    2009-11-01

    Insecticides are a key component of vector-based malaria control programmes in Cameroon. As part of ongoing resistance surveillance efforts, Anopheles gambiae s.l. female mosquitoes were exposed to organochlorine (DDT), a carbamate (bendiocarb), an organophosphate (malathion), and three pyrethroids (deltamethrin, lambda-cyhalothrin and permethrin) in WHO bioassay test kits. Results indicated a higher level of resistance (reduced mortality and knockdown effect) to DDT and pyrethroids in populations of A. gambiae s.s. than in A. arabiensis. The West and East African knockdown resistance (kdr) mutations were found in both species but at much higher frequencies in A. gambiae s.s. The West Africa kdr mutant was also more frequent in the A. gambiae S form than in the M form. No resistance to bendiocarb and malathion was found. Carbamate and organophosphorous compounds could thus be used as alternatives in locations in Cameroon where pyrethroid-resistant populations are found. PMID:19155034

  19. PRELIMINARY NOTES ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF DDT RESISTANCE IN ANOPHELES CULICIFACIES

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    A.Zaini

    1973-09-01

    Full Text Available Anopheles culicifacies is the vector of malaria in southeastern part of Iran, India, West Pakistan and Ceylon. In 1959 the LC50 % DDT in the Panchmahal district of Gujarat state (India had increased. DDT resistant population of A. culicifacies has been reported from West Pakistan, Burma and Iran. After application of DDT in 1959, the density of A. culicifacies decreased sharply. The susceptibility test carried out in 1963 showed that the LC50 was 0.5%.After DDT spraying, followed by Dieldrin, for about 10 years the density of A. culicifacies was so negligible that it was not possible to perform susceptibility tests. By April and May of 1973 the density of A.culicifacies in Saidabad, Khairabad and Hit in Baluchesten province, Southeast of Iran, increased to about 500 per shelter. The susceptibility tests carried out showed that A. culicfacies is resistant to DDT and susceptible to Dieldrin and Malathion.

  20. Molecular taxonomy provides new insights into anopheles species of the neotropical arribalzagia series.

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    Giovan F Gómez

    Full Text Available Phylogenetic analysis of partial mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase c subunit I (COI and nuclear internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2 sequences were used to evaluate initial identification and to investigate phylogenetic relationships of seven Anopheles morphospecies of the Arribalzagia Series from Colombia. Phylogenetic trees recovered highly supported clades for An. punctimaculas.s., An. calderoni, An. malefactor s.l., An. neomaculipalpus, An. apicimacula s.l., An. mattogrossensis and An. peryassui. This study provides the first molecular confirmation of An. malefactorfrom Colombia and discovered conflicting patterns of divergence for the molecular markers among specimens from northeast and northern Colombia suggesting the presence of two previously unrecognized Molecular Operational Taxonomic Units (MOTUs. Furthermore, two highly differentiated An. apicimacula MOTUs previously found in Panama were detected. Overall, the combined molecular dataset facilitated the detection of known and new Colombian evolutionary lineages, and constitutes the baseline for future research on their bionomics, ecology and potential role as malaria vectors.

  1. Systematic studies on Anopheles galvaoi Causey, Deane & Deane from the subgenus Nysssorhynchus blanchard (Diptera: Culicidae

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    Maria Anice Mureb Sallum

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Anopheles galvaoi, a member of the subgenus Nyssorhynchus, is redescribed based on morphological characters of the adults male and female, fourth-instar larva and pupa. Female, male genitalia, larval and pupal stages are illustrated. Data about medical importance, bionomics, and distribution are given based on literature records. Adult female of An. galvaoi can be easily misidentified as An. benarrochi Gabaldón and An. aquasalis Curry. A few characters are indicated for identifying female and immatures of An. galvaoi. Phylogenetic relationships among An. galvaoi and six other species of the Oswaldoi Subgroup are estimated using COII mtDNA and ITS2 rDNA gene sequences. Lectotype of An. galvaoi, an adult female from Rio Branco, State of Acre, is invalidated.

  2. The impact of insecticides management linked with resistance expression in Anopheles spp. populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Guilherme Liberato da; Pereira, Thiago Nunes; Ferla, Noeli Juarez; Silva, Onilda Santos da

    2016-06-01

    The resistance of some species of Anopheles to chemical insecticides is spreading quickly throughout the world and has hindered the actions of prevention and control of malaria. The main mechanism responsible for resistance in these insects appears to be the target site known as knock-down resistance (kdr), which causes mutations in the sodium channel. Even so, many countries have made significant progress in the prevention of malaria, focusing largely on vector control through long-lasting insecticide nets (LLINs), indoor residual spraying and (IRS) of insecticides. The objective of this review is to contribute with information on the more applied insecticides for the control of the main vectors of malaria, its effects, and the different mechanisms of resistance. Currently it is necessary to look for others alternatives, e.g. biological control and products derived from plants and fungi, by using other organisms as a possible regulator of the populations of malaria vectors in critical outbreaks. PMID:27383351

  3. Development of sporogonic cycle of Plasmodium vivax in experimentally infected Anopheles albimanus mosquitoes

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    Martha L. Salas

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available The sporogonic cycle of Plasmodium vivax was established and maintained under laboratory conditions in two different strains of Anopheles albimanus mosquitoes using as a parasite source blood from human patients or from Aotus monkeys infected with the VCC-2 P.vivax colombian isolate. Both the Tecojate strain isolate from Guatemala and the Cartagena strain from the colombian Pacific coast were susceptible to infections with P.vivax. A higher percentage of Cartagena mosquitoes was infected per trial, however the Tecojate strain developed higher sporozoite loads. Intravenous inoculation of Aotus monkeys with sporozoites obtained from both anopheline strains resulted in successful blood infections. Animals infected with sporozoites from the Tecojate strain presented a patent period of 21-32 days whereas parasitemia appeared between days 19-53 in monkeys infected with sporozites from Cartagena strain.

  4. Development of sporogonic cycle of Plasmodium vivax in experimentally infected Anopheles albimanus mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, M L; Romero, J F; Solarte, Y; Olano, V; Herrera, M A; Herrera, S

    1994-01-01

    The sporogonic cycle of Plasmodium vivax was established and maintained under laboratory conditions in two different strains of Anopheles albimanus mosquitoes using as a parasite source blood from human patients or from Aotus monkeys infected with the VCC-2 P.vivax colombian isolate. Both the Tecojate strain isolate from Guatemala and the Cartagena strain from the colombian Pacific coast were susceptible to infections with P.vivax. A higher percentage of Cartagena mosquitoes was infected per trial, however the Tecojate strain developed higher sporozoite loads. Intravenous inoculation of Aotus monkeys with sporozoites obtained from both anopheline strains resulted in successful blood infections. Animals infected with sporozoites from the Tecojate strain presented a patent period of 21-32 days whereas parasitemia appeared between days 19-53 in monkeys infected with sporozites from Cartagena strain. PMID:7565121

  5. COMPARATIVE TOXICITIES OF FOUR WHO-RECOMMENDED LARVICIDES AGAINST LAB STRAIN OF ANOPHELES STEPHENSI IN IRAN

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    H. Vatandoost

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available Investigation on the current response of An.stephensi larvae to four WHO recommended larvicides, i.e. Malathion, temephos, chlorpyrifos and fenitrothion, were carried out in the laboratory in 1999. Diagnostic concentrations of pesticides only yielded 100% mortality with malathion. In contrast, levels of susceptibility to temphos, chlorpyrifos (0.025 mg/l and temephos (0.625 mg/l killed 72%, 90% and 87% of the population of An. Stephensi, respectively. At the LC50 level the efficacies of chlorpyrifos and fenitrothion was higher than malathion and temephos. Relative toxicity of chlorpyrifos and fenitrothion was 6 and 24 times more than temephos and Malathion. The findings of this study suggest that the diagnostic dose of organophosphate larvicides depends on time, location, strain and genetically background of resistance to insecticides; hence they can be attributed to all species of anopheles.

  6. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers readily distinguish cryptic mosquito species (Diptera: Culicidae: Anopheles).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkerson, R C; Parsons, T J; Albright, D G; Klein, T A; Braun, M J

    1993-01-01

    The usefulness of random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) was examined as a potential tool to differentiate cryptic mosquito species. It proved to be a quick, effective means of finding genetic markers to separate two laboratory populations of morphologically indistinguishable African malaria vectors, Anopheles gambiae and An. arabiensis. In an initial screening of fifty-seven RAPD primers, 377 bands were produced, 295 of which differed between the two species. Based on criteria of interpretability, simplicity and reproducibility, thirteen primers were chosen for further screening using DNA from thirty individuals of each species. Seven primers produced diagnostic bands, five of which are described here. Some problematic characteristics of RAPD banding patterns are discussed and approaches to overcome these are suggested. PMID:8269099

  7. Molecular typing of bacteria of the genus Asaia in malaria vector Anopheles arabiensis Patton, 1905

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    S. Epis

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The acetic acid bacterium Asaia spp. was successfully detected in Anopheles arabiensis Patton, 1905, one of the major vector of human malaria in Sub-Saharan Africa. A collection of 45 Asaia isolates in cellfree media was established from 20 individuals collected from the field in Burkina Faso. 16S rRNA universal polymerase chain reaction (PCR and specific qPCR, for the detection of Asaia spp. were performed in order to reveal the presence of different bacterial taxa associated with this insect. The isolates were typed by internal transcribed spacer-PCR, BOX-PCR, and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR, proved the presence of different Asaia in A. arabiensis.

  8. El doctor moreno pérez y el anopheles crucians

    OpenAIRE

    Revista, Facultad de Medicina

    2011-01-01

    En el año de 1933, con ocasión del conflicto del Amazonas, el doctor Ignacio Moreno·Pérez trabajó como médico de sanidad en la hoya del río Caquetá. Prosiguiendo sus estudios sobre paludismo y mosquitos transmisores a que dedicó gran parte de su meritoria vida, practicó una inspección entomológica de las cercanías de Florencia, capital de la comisaria del Caquetá, y encontró una raza en aguas salobres de Anopheles crucians. El hallazgo comunicado por él en el informe de 1934 de la comisión de...

  9. Anopheles culicifacies breeding in Sri Lanka and options for control through water management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konradsen, F; Matsuno, Y; Amerasinghe, F P;

    1998-01-01

    This paper assesses the options for control of malaria vectors through different water management practices in a natural stream in Sri Lanka. The association between water level in the stream and breeding of the immature stages of the primary vector Anopheles culicifacies was investigated and the...... feasibility of using existing irrigation infrastructure to reduce the breeding potential discussed. The most feasible option would be to implement a management routine where water is released periodically from an upstream reservoir to reduce the number of breeding sites downstream. This study indicates that...... by regulating the water level above 20 cm in the stream throughout the dry season the breeding of A. culicifacies could be significantly reduced. The intervention would have only limited impact on the water lost for agriculture and the management input would be minimal. However, for the intervention...

  10. HOUSE-SCALE TRIAL OF FENFLUTHRIN (OMS-2013 AGAINST DDT RESISTANT ANOPHELES ACONITUS IN CENTRAL JAVA

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    Barodji Barodji

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Pengujian racun serangga fenfluthrin 5% w.d.p. dengan dosis 20 mg/m2 tingkat perumahan telah dilakukan untuk menanggulangi vektor malaria Anopheles aconitus yang sudah kebal terhadap DDT di desa Sekolo, Kecamatan Boja, Jawa Tengah. Penilaian entomologi dikerjakan dengan cara pengujian hayati kontak langsung, kontak tidak langsung dan penangkapan An. aconitus yang istirahat di dalam kandang pagi hari. Hasil pengujian hayati kontak langsung menunjukkan bahwa umur residu fenfluthrin yang disem­protkan pada permukaan dinding dengan dosis 20 mg/m2 adalah tidak lama (hanya sekitar 1 bulan. Umur residu yang efektip (kematian >70% hanya dipermukaan bambu pada 4 hari setelah penyemprot­an. Pengaruh fumigasi racun serangga ini sangat lemah, kematian hanya sebesar 14% dalam pengujian hayati kontak tidak langsung pada 4 hari setelah penyemprotan.

  11. Mosquito genomics. Highly evolvable malaria vectors: the genomes of 16 Anopheles mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neafsey, Daniel E; Waterhouse, Robert M; Abai, Mohammad R; Aganezov, Sergey S; Alekseyev, Max A; Allen, James E; Amon, James; Arcà, Bruno; Arensburger, Peter; Artemov, Gleb; Assour, Lauren A; Basseri, Hamidreza; Berlin, Aaron; Birren, Bruce W; Blandin, Stephanie A; Brockman, Andrew I; Burkot, Thomas R; Burt, Austin; Chan, Clara S; Chauve, Cedric; Chiu, Joanna C; Christensen, Mikkel; Costantini, Carlo; Davidson, Victoria L M; Deligianni, Elena; Dottorini, Tania; Dritsou, Vicky; Gabriel, Stacey B; Guelbeogo, Wamdaogo M; Hall, Andrew B; Han, Mira V; Hlaing, Thaung; Hughes, Daniel S T; Jenkins, Adam M; Jiang, Xiaofang; Jungreis, Irwin; Kakani, Evdoxia G; Kamali, Maryam; Kemppainen, Petri; Kennedy, Ryan C; Kirmitzoglou, Ioannis K; Koekemoer, Lizette L; Laban, Njoroge; Langridge, Nicholas; Lawniczak, Mara K N; Lirakis, Manolis; Lobo, Neil F; Lowy, Ernesto; MacCallum, Robert M; Mao, Chunhong; Maslen, Gareth; Mbogo, Charles; McCarthy, Jenny; Michel, Kristin; Mitchell, Sara N; Moore, Wendy; Murphy, Katherine A; Naumenko, Anastasia N; Nolan, Tony; Novoa, Eva M; O'Loughlin, Samantha; Oringanje, Chioma; Oshaghi, Mohammad A; Pakpour, Nazzy; Papathanos, Philippos A; Peery, Ashley N; Povelones, Michael; Prakash, Anil; Price, David P; Rajaraman, Ashok; Reimer, Lisa J; Rinker, David C; Rokas, Antonis; Russell, Tanya L; Sagnon, N'Fale; Sharakhova, Maria V; Shea, Terrance; Simão, Felipe A; Simard, Frederic; Slotman, Michel A; Somboon, Pradya; Stegniy, Vladimir; Struchiner, Claudio J; Thomas, Gregg W C; Tojo, Marta; Topalis, Pantelis; Tubio, José M C; Unger, Maria F; Vontas, John; Walton, Catherine; Wilding, Craig S; Willis, Judith H; Wu, Yi-Chieh; Yan, Guiyun; Zdobnov, Evgeny M; Zhou, Xiaofan; Catteruccia, Flaminia; Christophides, George K; Collins, Frank H; Cornman, Robert S; Crisanti, Andrea; Donnelly, Martin J; Emrich, Scott J; Fontaine, Michael C; Gelbart, William; Hahn, Matthew W; Hansen, Immo A; Howell, Paul I; Kafatos, Fotis C; Kellis, Manolis; Lawson, Daniel; Louis, Christos; Luckhart, Shirley; Muskavitch, Marc A T; Ribeiro, José M; Riehle, Michael A; Sharakhov, Igor V; Tu, Zhijian; Zwiebel, Laurence J; Besansky, Nora J

    2015-01-01

    Variation in vectorial capacity for human malaria among Anopheles mosquito species is determined by many factors, including behavior, immunity, and life history. To investigate the genomic basis of vectorial capacity and explore new avenues for vector control, we sequenced the genomes of 16 anopheline mosquito species from diverse locations spanning ~100 million years of evolution. Comparative analyses show faster rates of gene gain and loss, elevated gene shuffling on the X chromosome, and more intron losses, relative to Drosophila. Some determinants of vectorial capacity, such as chemosensory genes, do not show elevated turnover but instead diversify through protein-sequence changes. This dynamism of anopheline genes and genomes may contribute to their flexible capacity to take advantage of new ecological niches, including adapting to humans as primary hosts. PMID:25554792

  12. A mosquito lipoxin/lipocalin complex mediates innate immune priming in Anopheles gambiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Jose Luis; de Almeida Oliveira, Giselle; Calvo, Eric; Dalli, Jesmond; Colas, Romain A; Serhan, Charles N; Ribeiro, Jose M; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2015-01-01

    Exposure of Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes to Plasmodium infection enhances the ability of their immune system to respond to subsequent infections. However, the molecular mechanism that allows the insect innate immune system to 'remember' a previous encounter with a pathogen has not been established. Challenged mosquitoes constitutively release a soluble haemocyte differentiation factor into their haemolymph that, when transferred into Naive mosquitoes, also induces priming. Here we show that this factor consists of a Lipoxin/Lipocalin complex. We demonstrate that innate immune priming in mosquitoes involves a persistent increase in expression of Evokin (a lipid carrier of the lipocalin family), and in their ability to convert arachidonic acid to lipoxins, predominantly Lipoxin A4. Plasmodium ookinete midgut invasion triggers immune priming by inducing the release of a mosquito lipoxin/lipocalin complex. PMID:26100162

  13. Genome expression analysis of Anopheles gambiae: responses to injury, bacterial challenge, and malaria infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimopoulos, George; Christophides, George K; Meister, Stephan; Schultz, Jörg; White, Kevin P; Barillas-Mury, Carolina; Kafatos, Fotis C

    2002-06-25

    The complex gene expression responses of Anopheles gambiae to microbial and malaria challenges, injury, and oxidative stress (in the mosquito and/or a cultured cell line) were surveyed by using cDNA microarrays constructed from an EST-clone collection. The expression profiles were broadly subdivided into induced and down-regulated gene clusters. Gram+ and Gram- bacteria and microbial elicitors up-regulated a diverse set of genes, many belonging to the immunity class, and the response to malaria partially overlapped with this response. Oxidative stress activated a distinctive set of genes, mainly implicated in oxidoreductive processes. Injury up- and down-regulated gene clusters also were distinctive, prominently implicating glycolysis-related genes and citric acid cycle/oxidative phosphorylation/redox-mitochondrial functions, respectively. Cross-comparison of in vivo and in vitro responses indicated the existence of tightly coregulated gene groups that may correspond to gene pathways. PMID:12077297

  14. Energy metabolism affects susceptibility of Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes to Plasmodium infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Jose Henrique M; Gonçalves, Renata L S; Oliveira, Giselle A; Oliveira, Pedro L; Oliveira, Marcus F; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2011-06-01

    Previous studies showed that Anopheles gambiae L3-5 females, which are refractory (R) to Plasmodium infection, express higher levels of genes involved in redox-metabolism and mitochondrial respiration than susceptible (S) G3 females. Our studies revealed that R females have reduced longevity, faster utilization of lipid reserves, impaired mitochondrial state-3 respiration, increased rate of mitochondrial electron leak and higher expression levels of several glycolytic enzyme genes. Furthermore, when state-3 respiration was reduced in S females by silencing expression of the adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT), hydrogen peroxide generation was higher and the mRNA levels of lactate dehydrogenase increased in the midgut, while the prevalence and intensity of Plasmodium berghei infection were significantly reduced. We conclude that there are broad metabolic differences between R and S An. gambiae mosquitoes that influence their susceptibility to Plasmodium infection. PMID:21320598

  15. A mosquito lipoxin/lipocalin complex mediates innate immune priming in Anopheles gambiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Jose Luis; de Almeida Oliveira, Giselle; Calvo, Eric; Dalli, Jesmond; Colas, Romain A.; Serhan, Charles N.; Ribeiro, Jose M.; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2015-01-01

    Exposure of Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes to Plasmodium infection enhances the ability of their immune system to respond to subsequent infections. However, the molecular mechanism that allows the insect innate immune system to ‘remember' a previous encounter with a pathogen has not been established. Challenged mosquitoes constitutively release a soluble haemocyte differentiation factor into their haemolymph that, when transferred into Naive mosquitoes, also induces priming. Here we show that this factor consists of a Lipoxin/Lipocalin complex. We demonstrate that innate immune priming in mosquitoes involves a persistent increase in expression of Evokin (a lipid carrier of the lipocalin family), and in their ability to convert arachidonic acid to lipoxins, predominantly Lipoxin A4. Plasmodium ookinete midgut invasion triggers immune priming by inducing the release of a mosquito lipoxin/lipocalin complex. PMID:26100162

  16. Random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis of Anopheles nuneztovari (Diptera: Culicidae from Western and Northeastern Colombia

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    Carmen Elisa Posso

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD markers were used to analyze 119 DNA samples of three Colombian Anopheles nuneztovari populations to study genetic variation and structure. Genetic diversity, estimated from heterozygosity, averaged 0.34. Genetic flow was greater between the two populations located in Western Colombia (F ST: 0.035; Nm: 6.8 but lower between these two and the northeastern population (F ST: 0.08; Nm: 2.8. According to molecular variance analysis, the genetic distance between populations was significant (phiST 0.1131, P < 0.001. The variation among individuals within populations (phiST 0.8869, P < 0.001was also significant, suggesting a greater degree of population subdivision, not considered in this study. Both the parameters evaluated and the genetic flow suggest that Colombian An. nuneztovari populations are co-specific.

  17. Larvicidal activity of oak Quercus infectoria Oliv. (Fagaceae) gall extracts against Anopheles stephensi Liston.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aivazi, Ali-Ashraf; Vijayan, V A

    2009-06-01

    There is a growing interest in the use of botanical insecticides to reduce the use of synthetic pesticides in order to avoid environmental side effects. Anopheles stephensi is the primary vector of urban malaria, an endemic disease in India. So, an effort to assay An. stephensi larvae with gall extracts of Quercus infectoria was made under laboratory conditions at Mysore. Ethyl-acetate extract was found to be the most effective of all the five extracts tested for larvicidal activity against the fourth instar larvae, with LC(50) of 116.92 ppm followed by gallotannin, n-butanol, acetone, and methanol with LC(50) values of 124.62, 174.76, 299.26, and 364.61 ppm, respectively. The efficacy in killing mosquito larvae may make this plant promising for the development of new botanical larvicide. PMID:19148681

  18. Population genetic structure of urban malaria vector Anopheles stephensi in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Richa; Sharma, Arvind; Kumar, Ashwani; Dube, Madhulika; Gakhar, S K

    2016-04-01

    Malaria is a major public health problem in India because climatic condition and geography of India provide an ideal environment for development of malaria vector. Anopheles stephensi is a major urban malaria vector in India and its control has been hampered by insecticide resistance. In present study population genetic structure of A. stephensi is analyzed at macro geographic level using 13 microsatellite markers. Significantly high genetic differentiation was found in all studied populations with differentiation values (FST) ranging from 0.0398 to 0.1808. The geographic distance was found to be playing a major role in genetic differentiation between different populations. Overall three genetic pools were observed and population of central India was found to be coexisting in two genetic pools. High effective population size (Ne) was found in all the studied populations. PMID:26777030

  19. Anopheles gambiae eicosanoids modulate Plasmodium berghei survival from oocyst to salivary gland invasion

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    Susana Ramos

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Eicosanoids affect the immunity of several pathogen/insect models, but their role on the Anopheles gambiae response to Plasmodium is still unknown. Plasmodium berghei-infected mosquitoes were injected with an eicosanoid biosynthesis inhibitor, indomethacin (IN, or a substrate, arachidonic acid (AA, at day 7 or day 12 post-infection (p.i.. Salivary gland invasion was evaluated by sporozoite counts at day 21 p.i. IN promoted infection upon sporozoite release from oocysts, but inhibited infection when sporozoites were still maturing within the oocysts, as observed by a reduction in the number of sporozoites reaching the salivary glands. AA treatment had the opposite effect. We show for the first time that An. gambiae can modulate parasite survival through eicosanoids by exerting an antagonistic or agonistic effect on the parasite, depending on its stage of development.

  20. Development of a molecular assay to detect predation on Anopheles gambiae complex larval stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schielke, Erika; Costantini, Carlo; Carchini, Gianmaria; Sagnon, N'falé; Powell, Jeffrey; Caccone, Adalgisa

    2007-09-01

    We developed a molecular assay to detect predation on Anopheles gambiae sensu lato (s.l.) mosquitoes. This intergenic spacer ribosomal DNA polymerase chain reaction assay and restriction enzyme analysis uses An. gambiae-specific primers to detect mosquito DNA in the DNA extracts from whole invertebrate predators, which enables identification of species (An. gambiae s.s. versus An. arabiensis) and molecular forms (M versus S in An. gambiae s.s.). We show that An. gambiae s.l. DNA can be detected after ingestion by members of the families Lestidae (order Odonata) after four hours, Libellulidae (order Odonata) after six hours, and Notonectidae (order Hemiptera) after 24 hours. This method is an improvement over previously published methods because of ease of execution and increased time of detection after ingestion. PMID:17827361

  1. Polymorphisms in Anopheles gambiae immune genes associated with natural resistance to Plasmodium falciparum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Harris

    Full Text Available Many genes involved in the immune response of Anopheles gambiae, the main malaria vector in Africa, have been identified, but whether naturally occurring polymorphisms in these genes underlie variation in resistance to the human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, is currently unknown. Here we carried out a candidate gene association study to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associated with natural resistance to P. falciparum. A. gambiae M form mosquitoes from Cameroon were experimentally challenged with three local wild P. falciparum isolates. Statistical associations were assessed between 157 SNPs selected from a set of 67 A. gambiae immune-related genes and the level of infection. Isolate-specific associations were accounted for by including the effect of the isolate in the analysis. Five SNPs were significantly associated to the infection phenotype, located within or upstream of AgMDL1, CEC1, Sp PPO activate, Sp SNAKElike, and TOLL6. Low overall and local linkage disequilibrium indicated high specificity in the loci found. Association between infection phenotype and two SNPs was isolate-specific, providing the first evidence of vector genotype by parasite isolate interactions at the molecular level. Four SNPs were associated to either oocyst presence or load, indicating that the genetic basis of infection prevalence and intensity may differ. The validity of the approach was verified by confirming the functional role of Sp SNAKElike in gene silencing assays. These results strongly support the role of genetic variation within or near these five A. gambiae immune genes, in concert with other genes, in natural resistance to P. falciparum. They emphasize the need to distinguish between infection prevalence and intensity and to account for the genetic specificity of vector-parasite interactions in dissecting the genetic basis of Anopheles resistance to human malaria.

  2. Biochemical basis of permethrin resistance in Anopheles arabiensis from Lower Moshi, north-eastern Tanzania

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    Oxborough Richard M

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Development of resistance to different classes of insecticides is a potential threat to malaria control. With the increasing coverage of long-lasting insecticide-treated nets in Tanzania, the continued monitoring of resistance in vector populations is crucial. It may facilitate the development of novel strategies to prevent or minimize the spread of resistance. In this study, metabolic-based mechanisms conferring permethrin (pyrethroid resistance were investigated in Anopheles arabiensis of Lower Moshi, Kilimanjaro region of north-eastern Tanzania. Methods WHO susceptibility test kits were used to detect resistance to permethrin in An. arabiensis. The levels and mechanisms of permethrin resistance were determined using CDC bottle bioassays and microplate (biochemical assays. In bottle bioassays, piperonyl butoxide (PBO and s,s,s-tributyl phosphorotrithioate (DEF were used as synergists to inhibit mixed function oxidases and non-specific esterases respectively. Biochemical assays were carried out in individual mosquitoes to detect any increase in the activity of enzymes typically involved in insecticide metabolism (mixed function oxidases, α- and β-esterases. Results Anopheles arabiensis from the study area was found to be partially resistant to permethrin, giving only 87% mortality in WHO test kits. Resistance ratios at KT50 and KT95 were 4.0 and 4.3 respectively. The permethrin resistance was partially synergized by DEF and by PBO when these were mixed with permethrin in bottle bioassays and was fully synergized when DEF and PBO were used together. The levels of oxidase and β-esterase activity were significantly higher in An. arabiensis from Lower Moshi than in the laboratory susceptible strain. There was no difference in α-esterase activity between the two strains. Conclusion Elevated levels of mixed function oxidases and β-esterases play a role in detoxification of permethrin in the resistant An. arabiensis population

  3. Anopheles midgut epithelium evades human complement activity by capturing factor H from the blood meal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman Khattab

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Hematophagous vectors strictly require ingesting blood from their hosts to complete their life cycles. Exposure of the alimentary canal of these vectors to the host immune effectors necessitates efficient counteractive measures by hematophagous vectors. The Anopheles mosquito transmitting the malaria parasite is an example of hematophagous vectors that within seconds can ingest human blood double its weight. The innate immune defense mechanisms, like the complement system, in the human blood should thereby immediately react against foreign cells in the mosquito midgut. A prerequisite for complement activation is that the target cells lack complement regulators on their surfaces. In this work, we analyzed whether human complement is active in the mosquito midgut, and how the mosquito midgut cells protect themselves against complement attack. We found that complement remained active for a considerable time and was able to kill microbes within the mosquito midgut. However, the Anopheles mosquito midgut cells were not injured. These cells were found to protect themselves by capturing factor H, the main soluble inhibitor of the alternative complement pathway. Factor H inhibited complement on the midgut cells by promoting inactivation of C3b to iC3b and preventing the activity of the alternative pathway amplification C3 convertase enzyme. An interference of the FH regulatory activity by monoclonal antibodies, carried to the midgut via blood, resulted in increased mosquito mortality and reduced fecundity. By using a ligand blotting assay, a putative mosquito midgut FH receptor could be detected. Thereby, we have identified a novel mechanism whereby mosquitoes can tolerate human blood.

  4. Bendiocarb, a potential alternative against pyrethroid resistant Anopheles gambiae in Benin, West Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irish Seth

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anopheles gambiae, the main malaria vector in Benin has developed high level of resistance to pyrethroid insecticides, which is a serious concern to the future use of long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLIN and indoor residual spraying (IRS. In this context, one of the pathways available for malaria vector control would be to investigate alternative classes of insecticides with different mode of action than that of pyrethroids. The goal of this study was to evaluate under field conditions the efficacy of a carbamate (bendiocarb and an organophosphate (fenitrothion against pyrethroid-resistant An. gambiae s.s. Methods Wild populations and females from laboratory colonies of five days old An. gambiae were bio-assayed during this study. Two pyrethroids (deltamethrin and alphacypermethrin, an organophosphate (fenitrothion, a carbamate (bendiocarb and a mixture of an organophosphate (chlorpyriphos + a pyrethroid deltamethrin were compared in experimental huts as IRS treatments. Insecticides were applied in the huts using a hand-operated compression sprayer. The deterrency, exophily, blood feeding rate and mortality induced by these insecticides against An. gambiae were compared to the untreated control huts. Results Deltamethrin, alphacypermethrin and bendiocarb treatment significantly reduced mosquito entry into the huts (p An. gambiae (in the first month and 77.8% (in the fourth month. Bendiocarb and the mixture chlorpyriphos/deltamethrin mortality rates ranged from 97.9 to 100% the first month and 77.7-88% the third month respectively. Conclusion After four months, fenitrothion, bendiocarb and the mixture chlorpyriphos/deltamethrin performed effectively against pyrethroid-resistant Anopheles. These results showed that bendiocarb could be recommended as an effective insecticide for use in IRS operations in Benin, particularly as the mixture chlorpyriphos/deltamethrin does not have WHOPES authorization and complaints were mentioned

  5. Status of insecticide susceptibility in Anopheles arabiensis from Mwea rice irrigation scheme, Central Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vulule John M

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Control of the Anopheline mosquito vectors of malaria by use of insecticides has been shown to impact on both morbidity and mortality due to this disease. Evidence of insecticide resistance in different settings necessitates surveillance studies to allow prompt detection of resistance should it arise and thus enable its management. Possible resistance by Anopheles arabiensis mosquitoes from Mwea rice irrigation scheme in Central Kenya to insecticides in the four classes of insecticides approved by WHO for indoor residual spraying was investigated. Methods Susceptibility to DDT (an organochlorine, fenitrothion (an organophosphate, bendiocarb (a carbamate, lambdacyhalothrin and permethrin (both pyrethroids was tested using standard WHO diagnostic bioassay kits. Bioassays were performed on non-blood fed mosquitoes one- to three-day old. Knockdown was recorded every 10 min and mortality 24 h post-exposure was noted. Results Mortality 24 h post-exposure was 100% for all insecticides except for lambdacyhalothrin, which averaged 99.46%. Knockdown rates at 10 min intervals were not significantly different between the Mwea population and the susceptible KISUMU strain of Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto control. The KDT50 and KDT95 values for the Mwea population were either lower than those for the control or higher by factors of no more than 2 for most comparisons and compared well with those of An. gambiae sensu lato categorized as susceptible in other studies. Conclusion These results suggest that the Mwea population of An. arabiensis is susceptible to all the insecticides tested. This implies that vector control measures employing any of these insecticides would not be hampered by resistance.

  6. Prevalence of Plasmodium falciparum transmission reducing immunity among primary school children in a malaria moderate transmission region in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Noah H; Vengesai, Arthur; Mduluza, Takafira; Chipeta, James; Midzi, Nicholas; Bansal, Geetha P; Kumar, Nirbhay

    2016-11-01

    Malaria continues to cause alarming morbidity and mortality in more than 100 countries worldwide. Antigens in the various life cycle stages of malaria parasites are presented to the immune system during natural infection and it is widely recognized that after repeated malaria exposure, adults develop partially protective immunity. Specific antigens of natural immunity represent among the most important targets for the development of malaria vaccines. Immunity against the transmission stages of the malaria parasite represents an important approach to reduce malaria transmission and is believed to become an important tool for gradual elimination of malaria. Development of immunity against Plasmodium falciparum sexual stages was evaluated in primary school children aged 6-16 years in Makoni district of Zimbabwe, an area of low to modest malaria transmission. Malaria infection was screened by microscopy, rapid diagnostic tests and finally using nested PCR. Plasma samples were tested for antibodies against recombinant Pfs48/45 and Pfs47 by ELISA. Corresponding serum samples were used to test for P. falciparum transmission reducing activity in Anopheles stephensi and An. gambiae mosquitoes using the membrane feeding assay. The prevalence of malaria diagnosed by rapid diagnostic test kit (Paracheck)™ was 1.7%. However, of the randomly tested blood samples, 66% were positive by nested PCR. ELISA revealed prevalence (64% positivity at 1:500 dilution, in randomly selected 66 plasma samples) of antibodies against recombinant Pfs48/45 (mean A 405nm=0.53, CI=0.46-0.60) and Pfs47 (mean A405nm=0.91, CI=0.80-1.02); antigens specific to the sexual stages. The mosquito membrane feeding assay demonstrated measurable transmission reducing ability of the samples that were positive for Pfs48/45 antibodies by ELISA. Interestingly, 3 plasma samples revealed enhancement of infectivity of P. falciparum in An. stephensi mosquitoes. These studies revealed the presence of antibodies with

  7. Relationship between malaria and filariasis transmission indices in an endemic area along the Kenyan Coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ephantus J. Muturi, Charles M. Mbogo, Zipporah W. Ng’ang’a, Ephantus W. Kabiru, Charles Mwandawiro, Robert J. Novak & John C. Beier

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: An entomological survey was conducted to determine the relationshipbetween malaria and lymphatic filariasis transmission by Anopheles gambiae s.l. and An. funestus intwo inland villages along the Kenyan coast.Methods: Mosquitoes were sampled inside houses by pyrethrum spray sheet collection (PSC. In thelaboratory, the mosquitoes were sorted to species, dissected for examination of filarial infection andthe anophelines later tested for Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite proteins by an enzymelinkedimmunosorbent assay (ELISA.Results: From a total of 2,032 female mosquitoes collected indoors, An. gambiae s.l constituted 94.4%while the remaining 5.6% comprised of An. funestus and Culex quinquefasciatus. None of the Cx.quinquefasciatus was positive for filarial worms. P. falciparum sporozoite rate for An. gambiae s.l.from both villages was significantly higher than Wuchereria bancrofti infectivity rate. Similarly, theentomological inoculation rate for An. gambiae s.l. was significantly higher than the corresponding W.bancrofti infective biting rate and transmission potential for both the villages. Mass treatment of peoplewith filaricidal drugs in Shakahola in the ongoing global elimination of lymphatic filariasis campaignseemed to have reduced the indices of filariasis transmission but had no effect on malaria transmission.Interpretation & conclusion: These results indicate the intensity of malaria transmission by anophelinesto be much higher than that of lymphatic filariasis in areas where both diseases co-exist and re-emphasisethe need to integrate the control of the two diseases in such areas.

  8. The effects of urbanization on global Plasmodium vivax malaria transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Qiuyin

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many recent studies have examined the impact of urbanization on Plasmodium falciparum malaria endemicity and found a general trend of reduced transmission in urban areas. However, none has examined the effect of urbanization on Plasmodium vivax malaria, which is the most widely distributed malaria species and can also cause severe clinical syndromes in humans. In this study, a set of 10,003 community-based P. vivax parasite rate (PvPR surveys are used to explore the relationships between PvPR in urban and rural settings. Methods The PvPR surveys were overlaid onto a map of global urban extents to derive an urban/rural assignment. The differences in PvPR values between urban and rural areas were then examined. Groups of PvPR surveys inside individual city extents (urban and surrounding areas (rural were identified to examine the local variations in PvPR values. Finally, the relationships of PvPR between urban and rural areas within the ranges of 41 dominant Anopheles vectors were examined. Results Significantly higher PvPR values in rural areas were found globally. The relationship was consistent at continental scales when focusing on Africa and Asia only, but in the Americas, significantly lower values of PvPR in rural areas were found, though the numbers of surveys were small. Moreover, except for the countries in the Americas, the same trends were found at national scales in African and Asian countries, with significantly lower values of PvPR in urban areas. However, the patterns at city scales among 20 specific cities where sufficient data were available were less clear, with seven cities having significantly lower PvPR values in urban areas and two cities showing significantly lower PvPR in rural areas. The urban–rural PvPR differences within the ranges of the dominant Anopheles vectors were generally, in agreement with the regional patterns found. Conclusions Except for the Americas, the patterns of significantly lower

  9. Effects of Anti-Mosquito Salivary Glands and Deglycosylated Midgut Antibodies of Anopheles stephensi on Fecundity and Longevity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Mohammadzadeh Hajipirloo

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available With the aim of controlling malaria by reducing vector population, the effects of antibodies produced against salivary glands and deglycosylated midgut antigens of Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes on fecundity and longevity of the same species were tested. Three deglycosylated preparations of midgut and two preparations of salivary glands were produced, conjugated with aluminum hydroxide gel, and subcutaneously injected to shoulders of TO (Turner Out-bred mice. After 4 immunizations and assurance of enough antibody production against utilized antigenic suspensions, effects of blood feeding on immunized and control mice were assayed. Insoluble preparation of midgut showed the strongest effect with 23.5% reduction in egg laying, and increasing death rate of vectors in third day after feeding. No significant reduction in fecundity or survivorship was seen with other preparations. Anopheles midgut insoluble antigens are potential candidates for designing vaccines against malaria vectors and further investigations need to be done to find effective antigens and the best way of their use.

  10. Hydrostatic transmission design

    OpenAIRE

    Dalda Rivas, Ignacio

    2009-01-01

    This project treats the analysis of the hydrostatic transmission dynamic properties using a simulation model, which has been done with the simulation program AMESim. That simulation has been the main work in the project, especially because it is a good way to understand how a hydrostatic transmission works. The hydrostatic transmission are used in heavy vehicles such as earth moving machines, agriculture machines, forest machines, industrial and mining lifters. Nowadays, the demand of that...

  11. Series Transmission Line Transformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckles, Robert A.; Booth, Rex; Yen, Boris T.

    2004-06-29

    A series transmission line transformer is set forth which includes two or more of impedance matched sets of at least two transmissions lines such as shielded cables, connected in parallel at one end ans series at the other in a cascading fashion. The cables are wound about a magnetic core. The series transmission line transformer (STLT) which can provide for higher impedance ratios and bandwidths, which is scalable, and which is of simpler design and construction.

  12. The monetary transmission mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Ireland, Peter N.

    2006-01-01

    The monetary transmission mechanism describes how policy-induced changes in the nominal money stock or the short-term nominal interest rate impact on real variables such as aggregate output and employment. Specific channels of monetary transmission operate through the effects that monetary policy has on interest rates, exchange rates, equity and real estate prices, bank lending, and firm balance sheets. Recent research on the transmission mechanism seeks to understand how these channels work ...

  13. Use of carbon-13 as a population marker for Anopheles arabiensis in a sterile insect technique (SIT) context

    OpenAIRE

    Knols Bart GJ; Mayr Leo; Hood-Nowotny Rebecca

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Monitoring of sterile to wild insect ratios in field populations can be useful to follow the progress in genetic control programmes such as the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT). Of the numerous methods for marking insects most are not suitable for use in mass rearing and mass release. Suitable ones include dye marking, genetic marking and chemical marking. Methods The feasibility of using the stable isotope of carbon, 13C, as a potential chemical marker for Anopheles arabien...

  14. A major genetic locus controlling natural Plasmodium falciparum infection is shared by East and West African Anopheles gambiae

    OpenAIRE

    Koella Jacob C; Sharakhov Igor; Xia Ai; Lambrechts Louis; Markianos Kyriacos; Riehle Michelle M; Vernick Kenneth D

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Genetic linkage mapping identified a region of chromosome 2L in the Anopheles gambiae genome that exerts major control over natural infection by Plasmodium falciparum. This 2L Plasmodium-resistance interval was mapped in mosquitoes from a natural population in Mali, West Africa, and controls the numbers of P. falciparum oocysts that develop on the vector midgut. An important question is whether genetic variation with respect to Plasmodium-resistance exists across Africa, a...

  15. A Possible Mechanism for the Suppression of Plasmodium berghei Development in the Mosquito Anopheles gambiae by the Microsporidian Vavraia culicis

    OpenAIRE

    Bargielowski, Irka; Koella, Jacob C

    2009-01-01

    Background Microsporidian parasites of mosquitoes offer a possible way of controlling malaria, as they impede the development of Plasmodium parasites within the mosquito. The mechanism involved in this interference process is unknown. Methodology We evaluated the possibility that larval infection by a microsporidian primes the immune system of adult mosquitoes in a way that enables a more effective anti-Plasmodium response. To do so, we infected 2-day old larvae of the mosquito Anopheles gamb...

  16. Larvicidal and repellent properties of Adansonia digitata against medically important human malarial vector mosquito Anopheles stephensi (Diptera: Culicidae)

    OpenAIRE

    K. Krishnappa , K. Elumalai , S. Dhanasekaran & J. Gokulakrishnan

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: Development of plant-based alternative compounds for mosquito control has gainedimportance now-a-days, in view of increasing resistance in mosquito vectors to existing insecticides. The larvicidaland repellent activities of benzene, chloroform, hexane and methanol leaf extracts of Indian medicinal plant,Adansonia digitata were investigated against malarial vector, Anopheles stephensi.Methods: In all, 25 III instar larvae of An. stephensi were exposed to various concen...

  17. Population structure of newly established Anopheles funestus populations in the Senegal River basin using paracentric chromosomal inversions

    OpenAIRE

    Dia, I.; Samb, B.; Konate, L.; Fontenille, Didier

    2010-01-01

    Anopheles funestus is one of the major vectors of malaria in sub-saharan Africa. Because of several cycles of recurrent drought events that have occurred in the sahelian zone, this species had disappeared from this area since the 1970s following a disappearance of its specific breeding sites. Its comeback was, however, recently observed particularly in the Senegal River basin following the implementation of two dams. Because the implementation of hydro-agricultural and irrigation settings are...

  18. INSECTICIDAL ACTIVITIES OF ESSENTIAL OILS EXTRACTED FROM THREE SPECIES OF POACEAE ON ANOPHELES GAMBIAE SPP, MAJOR VECTOR OF MALARIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique C. K. Sohounhloué

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the insecticidal activities on Anopheles gambiae spp of the essential oils (EO extracted from the dry leaves of some species collected in Benin were studied. The essential oil yields are 2.8, 1.7 and 1.4�0respectively for Cymbopogon schoanenthus (L. Spreng (CS, Cymbopogon citratus Stapf. (CC and Cymbopogon giganteus (Hochst. Chiov (CG. The GC/MS analysis showed that the EO of CS had a larger proportion in oxygenated monoterpenes (86.3�20whereas those of the sheets of CC and CG are relatively close proportions (85.5�0and 82.7�0respectively with. The piperitone (68.5�  2-carene (11.5� and -eudesmol (4.6�20are the major components of the EO of CS while trans para-mentha-1(7,8-dien-2-ol (31.9� trans para-mentha-2,8-dien-1-ol (19.6� cis para-mentha-2,8-dien-1-ol (7.2� trans piperitol (6.3�20and limonene (6.3�20prevailed in the EO of CG. The EO of CC revealed a rich composition in geranial (41.3� neral (33� myrcene (10.4� and geraniol (6.6� The biological tests have shown that these three EO induced 100�0mortality of Anopheles gambiae to 1.1, 586.58 and 1549 µg•cm-2 respectively for CC, CS and CG. These effects are also illustrated by weak lethal concentration for 50�0anopheles population (CC: 0.306; CS: 152.453 and CG: 568.327 µg•cm-2 in the same order of reactivity. The EO of CC appeared most active on two stocks (sensitive and resistant of Anopheles gambiae.

  19. Physiology and development of the M and S molecular forms of Anopheles gambiae in Burkina Faso (West Africa)

    OpenAIRE

    Mouline, Karine; Mamai, W.; Agnew, P.; Tchonfienet, M.; Brengues, Cécile; Dabiré, R.; Robert, Vincent; Simard, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    In West Africa, M and S molecular forms of Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto (Diptera: Culicidae) Giles, frequently occur together, although with different population bionomics. The S form typically breeds in rain-dependant water collections and is present during the rainy season only whereas the M form can thrive all year long in areas with permanent breeding opportunities. In the present study, we explored physiological and developmental trade-offs at play in laboratory colonies and field pop...

  20. Baseline Susceptibility of Different Geographical Strains of Anopheles stephensi (Diptera: Culicidae) to Temephos in Malarious Areas of Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Aboozar Soltani; Hassan Vatandoost; Mohammad Ali Oshaghi; Ahmad Ali Enayati; Ahmad Raeisi; Mohammad Reza Eshraghian; Mohammad Mehdi Soltan-Dallal; Ahmad Ali Hanafi-Bojd; Mohammad Reza Abai; Fatemeh Rafi

    2013-01-01

    Background: Malaria still remains a public health problem in Iran. There are different vector control interventions such as insecticide spraying. The present study was carried out to determine the susceptibility status of Anopheles stephensi larvae to temephos as a national plan for monitoring and mapping of insecticide resistance Methods: Eight different localities in two main malarious provinces were determined as field collecting sites. Mosquitoes were collected from the field and reared i...

  1. Scanning electron microscopic (Sem studies on fourth instar larva and pupa of Anopheles (Cellia stephensi Liston (Anophelinae: Culicidae

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    Jagbir Singh Kirti

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Anopheles (Cellia stephensi Liston is a major vector species of malaria in Indian subcontinent. Taxonomists have worked on its various morphological aspects and immature stages to explore additional and new taxonomic attributes. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM studies have been conducted on the fourth instar larva and pupa of An. stephensi to find additional taxonomic features for the first time from Punjab state.

  2. A comprehensive transcriptomic view of renal function in the malaria vector, Anopheles gambiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overend, Gayle; Cabrero, Pablo; Halberg, Kenneth Agerlin;

    2015-01-01

    Renal function is essential to maintain homeostasis. This is particularly significant for insects that undergo complete metamorphosis; larval mosquitoes must survive a freshwater habitat whereas adults are terrestrial, and mature females must maintain ion and fluid homeostasis after blood feeding....... To investigate the physiological adaptations required for successful development to adulthood, we studied the Malpighian tubule transcriptome of Anopheles gambiae using Affymetrix arrays. We assessed transcription under several conditions; as third instar larvae, as adult males fed on sugar, as adult...

  3. An Epithelial Serine Protease, AgESP, Is Required for Plasmodium Invasion in the Mosquito Anopheles gambiae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rodrigues, J.; Oliveira, G. A.; Kotsyfakis, Michalis; Dixit, R.; Molina-Cruz, A.; Jochim, R.; Barillas-Mury, C.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 4 (2012), e35210. E-ISSN 1932-6203 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : malaria * mosquito * serine protease * sporozoites * ookinetes * gene silencing * midgut * salivary glands * Plasmodium falciparum * Anopheles gambiae Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.730, year: 2012 http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0035210

  4. Effect of larval environment on some life history parameters in anopheles gambiae s.s. (diptera:culicidae))

    OpenAIRE

    Jannat, Khandaker Noore

    2010-01-01

    The effects of larval density, nutrition and cannibalism risk on some life history parameters of Anopheles gambiae larvae were evaluated in the laboratory. Adult body size was inversely correlated with larval density whereas larval mortality and mean age at pupation varied across experiments. When density increased, the secondary sex ratio shifted toward female bias. Effects of different types of nutrition on larval life were compared by providing larvae with algae Chaetophora sp., fish food ...

  5. An Epithelial Serine Protease, AgESP, Is Required for Plasmodium Invasion in the Mosquito Anopheles gambiae

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues, Janneth; Oliveira, Giselle A.; Kotsyfakis, Michalis; Dixit, Rajnikant; Molina-Cruz, Alvaro; Jochim, Ryan; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2012-01-01

    Background Plasmodium parasites need to cross the midgut and salivary gland epithelia to complete their life cycle in the mosquito. However, our understanding of the molecular mechanism and the mosquito genes that participate in this process is still very limited. Methodology/Principal Findings We identified an Anopheles gambiae epithelial serine protease (AgESP) that is constitutively expressed in the submicrovillar region of mosquito midgut epithelial cells and in the basal side of the sali...

  6. Molecular interactions between Anopheles stephensi midgut cells and Plasmodium berghei: the time bomb theory of ookinete invasion of mosquitoes

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Yeon Soo; Thompson, Joanne; Kafatos, Fotis C.; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2000-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the interactions between Anopheles stephensi midgut epithelial cells and Plasmodium berghei ookinetes during invasion of the mosquito by the parasite. In this mosquito, P.berghei ookinetes invade polarized columnar epithelial cells with microvilli, which do not express high levels of vesicular ATPase. The invaded cells are damaged, protrude towards the midgut lumen and suffer other characteristic changes, including induction of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) exp...

  7. Living at the edge: biogeographic patterns of habitat segregation conform to speciation by niche expansion in Anopheles gambiae

    OpenAIRE

    Costantini Carlo; Ayala Diego; Guelbeogo Wamdaogo M; Pombi Marco; Some Corentin Y; Bassole Imael HN; Ose Kenji; Fotsing Jean-Marie; Sagnon N'Falé; Fontenille Didier; Besansky Nora J; Simard Frédéric

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Ongoing lineage splitting within the African malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae is compatible with ecological speciation, the evolution of reproductive isolation by divergent natural selection acting on two populations exploiting alternative resources. Divergence between two molecular forms (M and S) identified by fixed differences in rDNA, and characterized by marked, although incomplete, reproductive isolation is occurring in West and Central Africa. To elucidate the rol...

  8. Impacts of Agricultural Practices on Insecticide Resistance in the Malaria Vector Anopheles arabiensis in Khartoum State, Sudan

    OpenAIRE

    Abuelmaali, Sara A.; Elaagip, Arwa H.; Basheer, Mohammed A.; Frah, Ehab A.; Ahmed, Fayez T. A.; Elhaj, Hassabelrasoul F. A.; Seidahmed, Osama M. E.; Weetman, David; Mahdi Abdel Hamid, Muzamil

    2013-01-01

    Background Agricultural pesticides may play a profound role in selection of resistance in field populations of mosquito vectors. The objective of this study is to investigate possible links between agricultural pesticide use and development of resistance to insecticides by the major malaria vector Anopheles arabiensis in northern Sudan. Methodology/Principal Findings Entomological surveys were conducted during two agricultural seasons in six urban and peri-urban sites in Khartoum state. Agro-...

  9. Crystal structure of a novel type of odorant binding protein from Anopheles gambiae, belonging to the C+ class

    OpenAIRE

    Lagarde, Amandine; Spinelli, Silvia; Qiao, Huili; Tegoni, Mariella; Pelosi, Paolo; Cambillau, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Anopheles gambiae (Agam) relies on its olfactory system to target human prey, leading eventually to injection of Plasmodium falciparum, the malaria vector. Odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) are the first line of proteins involved in odorant recognition. They interact with olfactory receptors and thus constitute an interesting target for insect control. We undertook a large-scale study of proteins belonging to the olfactory system of Agam with the aim of preventing insect bites by designing stro...

  10. Crystal structure of a novel type of odorant binding protein from Anopheles gambiae, belonging to the C+ class

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Anopheles gambiae (Agam) relies on its olfactory system to target human prey, leading eventually to injection of Plasmodium falciparum, the malaria vector. Odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) are the first line of proteins involved in odorant recognition. They interact with olfactory receptors and thus constitute an interesting target for insect control. We undertook a large-scale study of proteins belonging to the olfactory system of Agam with the aim of preventing insect bit...

  11. Mitochondrial DNA Detects a Complex Evolutionary History with Pleistocene Epoch Divergence for the Neotropical Malaria Vector Anopheles nuneztovari Sensu Lato

    OpenAIRE

    Scarpassa, Vera Margarete; Conn, Jan E.

    2011-01-01

    Cryptic species and lineages characterize Anopheles nuneztovari s.l. Gabaldón, an important malaria vector in South America. We investigated the phylogeographic structure across the range of this species with cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) mitochondrial DNA sequences to estimate the number of clades and levels of divergence. Bayesian and maximum-likelihood phylogenetic analyses detected four groups distributed in two major monophyletic clades (I and II). Samples from the Amazon Basin were...

  12. Variation in susceptibility of African Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites to TEP1 mediated killing in Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes

    OpenAIRE

    Maarten Eldering; Isabelle Morlais; Geert-Jan van Gemert; Marga van de Vegte-Bolmer; Wouter Graumans; Rianne Siebelink-Stoter; Martijn Vos; Luc Abate; Will Roeffen; Teun Bousema; Levashina, Elena A.; Sauerwein, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    Anopheles gambiae s.s. mosquitoes are efficient vectors for Plasmodium falciparum, although variation exists in their susceptibility to infection. This variation depends partly on the thioester-containing protein 1 (TEP1) and TEP depletion results in significantly elevated numbers of oocysts in susceptible and resistant mosquitoes. Polymorphism in the Plasmodium gene coding for the surface protein Pfs47 modulates resistance of some parasite laboratory strains to TEP1-mediated killing. Here, w...

  13. A Serine Protease Homolog Negatively Regulates TEP1 Consumption in Systemic Infections of the Malaria Vector Anopheles gambiae

    OpenAIRE

    Yassine, Hassan; Kamareddine, Layla; Chamat, Soulaima; Christophides, George K.; Osta, Mike A.

    2014-01-01

    Clip domain serine protease homologs are widely distributed in insect genomes and play important roles in regulating insect immune responses, yet their exact functions remain poorly understood. Here, we show that CLIPA2, a clip domain serine protease homolog of Anopheles gambiae, regulates the consumption of the mosquito complement-like protein TEP1 during systemic bacterial infections. We provide evidence that CLIPA2 localizes to microbial surfaces in a TEP1-dependent manner whereby it negat...

  14. Life-table analysis of Anopheles malaria vectors: generational mortality as tool in mosquito vector abundance and control studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godwin Ray Anugboba Okogun

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Vector control will for sometime remain a primary weapon in the waragainst vector borne diseases. Malaria is of paramount importance in this with its associated highmorbidity and mortality especially in sub-Saharan Africa. This study on generational mortality associatedfactors in Anopheles mosquitoes life-table analysis was designed to investigate the fecundity,levels of mortality and mortality associated factors at the aquatic stages of anopheline malaria vectors.Methods: Mortality associated factors were investigated at the eggs, I and II instar larval, III and IVinstar larval and pupal stages of two anopheline species— Anopheles pseudopunctipennis (Theobaldand An. gambiae life-cycles in screen cages. Adult male and female mosquitoes were membrane filterfedand algae in culture medium formed the bulk of food substances for the larval stage. Environmentaltemperature of culture media, pH and some associated physio-chemical factors were also determined.Results: Results showed significant mortality rates at various aquatic stages. Infertility, cannibalismand environmental factors were the major factors responsible for mortality at the egg, larval and pupalstages respectively.Interpretation & conclusion: The aquatic stages of Anopheles mosquito mortality factor K and themortality factors at the various stages investigated k1, k2, k3 and k4 are discussed. Our recommendationsinclude further studies on the possible genetic modification of predacious An. pseudopunctipennislarvae and/or its modification for the production of sterile/infertile eggs as possible alternativesin the reduction and control of anopheline malaria burden.

  15. Characterization of the Rel2-regulated transcriptome and proteome of Anopheles stephensi identifies new anti-Plasmodium factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Andrew; Vadlamani, Alekhya; Sandiford, Simone L; Gacita, Anthony; Dimopoulos, George

    2014-09-01

    Mosquitoes possess an innate immune system that is capable of limiting infection by a variety of pathogens, including the Plasmodium spp. parasites responsible for human malaria. The Anopheles immune deficiency (IMD) innate immune signaling pathway confers resistance to Plasmodium falciparum. While some previously identified Anopheles anti-Plasmodium effectors are regulated through signaling by Rel2, the transcription factor of the IMD pathway, many components of this defense system remain uncharacterized. To begin to better understand the regulation of immune effector proteins by the IMD pathway, we used oligonucleotide microarrays and iTRAQ to analyze differences in mRNA and protein expression, respectively, between transgenic Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes exhibiting blood meal-inducible overexpression of an active recombinant Rel2 and their wild-type conspecifics. Numerous genes were differentially regulated at both the mRNA and protein levels following induction of Rel2. While multiple immune genes were up-regulated, a majority of the differentially expressed genes have no known immune function in mosquitoes. Selected up-regulated genes from multiple functional categories were tested for both anti-Plasmodium and anti-bacterial action using RNA interference (RNAi). Based on our experimental findings, we conclude that increased expression of the IMD immune pathway-controlled transcription factor Rel2 affects the expression of numerous genes with diverse functions, suggesting a broader physiological impact of immune activation and possible functional versatility of Rel2. Our study has also identified multiple novel genes implicated in anti-Plasmodium defense. PMID:24998399

  16. Larvicidal potential of carvacrol and terpinen-4-ol from the essential oil of Origanum vulgare (Lamiaceae) against Anopheles stephensi, Anopheles subpictus, Culex quinquefasciatus and Culex tritaeniorhynchus (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajan, Marimuthu; Rajeswary, Mohan; Hoti, S L; Benelli, Giovanni

    2016-02-01

    Mosquito-borne diseases represent a deadly threat for millions of people worldwide. However, the use of synthetic insecticides to control Culicidae may lead to resistance, high operational costs and adverse non-target effects. Nowadays, plant-borne mosquitocides may serve as suitable alternative in the fight against mosquito vectors. In this study, the mosquito larvicidal activity of Origanum vulgare (Lamiaceae) leaf essential oil (EO) and its major chemical constituents was evaluated against the malaria vectors Anopheles stephensi and An. subpictus, the filariasis vector Culex quinquefasciatus and the Japanese encephalitis vector Cx. tritaeniorhynchus. The chemical composition of the EO was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. GC-MS revealed that the essential oil of O. vulgare contained 17 compounds. The major chemical components were carvacrol (38.30%) and terpinen-4-ol (28.70%). EO had a significant toxic effect against early third-stage larvae of An. stephensi, An. subpictus, Cx. quinquefasciatus and Cx. tritaeniorhynchus, with LC50 values of 67.00, 74.14, 80.35 and 84.93 μg/ml. The two major constituents extracted from the O. vulgare EO were tested individually for acute toxicity against larvae of the four mosquito vectors. Carvacrol and terpinen-4-ol appeared to be most effective against An. stephensi (LC50=21.15 and 43.27 μg/ml, respectively) followed by An. subpictus (LC50=24.06 and 47.73 μg/ml), Cx. quinquefasciatus (LC50=26.08 and 52.19 μg/ml) and Cx. tritaeniorhynchus (LC50=27.95 and 54.87 μg/ml). Overall, this research adds knowledge to develop newer and safer natural larvicides against malaria, filariasis and Japanese encephalitis mosquito vectors. PMID:26850541

  17. The Role of Oxidative Stress in the Longevity and Insecticide Resistance Phenotype of the Major Malaria Vectors Anopheles arabiensis and Anopheles funestus.

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    Shüné V Oliver

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress plays numerous biological roles, both functional and pathological. The role of oxidative stress in various epidemiologically relevant biological traits in Anopheles mosquitoes is not well established. In this study, the effects of oxidative stress on the longevity and insecticide resistance phenotype in the major malaria vector species An. arabiensis and An. funestus were examined. Responses to dietary copper sulphate and hydrogen peroxide were used as proxies for the oxidative stress phenotype by determining the effect of copper on longevity and hydrogen peroxide lethal dose. Glutathione peroxidase and catalase activities were determined colorimetrically. Oxidative burden was quantified as protein carbonyl content. Changes in insecticide resistance phenotype were monitored by WHO bioassay. Insecticide resistant individuals showed an increased capacity for coping with oxidative stress, mediated by increased glutathione peroxidase and catalase activity. This effect was observed in both species, as well as in laboratory strains and F1 individuals derived from wild-caught An. funestus mothers. Phenotypic capacity for coping with oxidative stress was greatest in strains with elevated Cytochrome P450 activity. Synergism of oxidative stress defence enzymes by dietary supplementation with haematin, 3-Amino-1, 2, 4-triazole and Sodium diethyldithiocarbamate significantly increased pyrethroid-induced mortality in An. arabiensis and An. funestus. It is therefore concluded that defence against oxidative stress underlies the augmentation of the insecticide resistance phenotype associated with multiple blood-feeding. This is because multiple blood-feeding ultimately leads to a reduction of oxidative stress in insecticide resistant females, and also reduces the oxidative burden induced by DDT and pyrethroids, by inducing increased glutathione peroxidase activity. This study highlights the importance of oxidative stress in the longevity and

  18. Islands and stepping-stones: comparative population structure of Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto and Anopheles arabiensis in Tanzania and implications for the spread of insecticide resistance.

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    Deodatus Maliti

    Full Text Available Population genetic structures of the two major malaria vectors Anopheles gambiae s.s. and An. arabiensis, differ markedly across Sub-Saharan Africa, which could reflect differences in historical demographies or in contemporary gene flow. Elucidation of the degree and cause of population structure is important for predicting the spread of genetic traits such as insecticide resistance genes or artificially engineered genes. Here the population genetics of An. gambiae s.s. and An. arabiensis in the central, eastern and island regions of Tanzania were compared. Microsatellite markers were screened in 33 collections of female An. gambiae s.l., originating from 22 geographical locations, four of which were sampled in two or three years between 2008 and 2010. An. gambiae were sampled from six sites, An. arabiensis from 14 sites, and both species from two sites, with an additional colonised insectary sample of each species. Frequencies of the knock-down resistance (kdr alleles 1014S and 1014F were also determined. An. gambiae exhibited relatively high genetic differentiation (average pairwise FST = 0.131, significant even between nearby samples, but without clear geographical patterning. In contrast, An. arabiensis exhibited limited differentiation (average FST = 0.015, but strong isolation-by-distance (Mantel test r = 0.46, p = 0.0008. Most time-series samples of An. arabiensis were homogeneous, suggesting general temporal stability of the genetic structure. An. gambiae populations from Dar es Salaam and Bagamoyo were found to have high frequencies of kdr 1014S (around 70%, with almost 50% homozygote but was at much lower frequency on Unguja Island, with no. An. gambiae population genetic differentiation was consistent with an island model of genetic structuring with highly restricted gene flow, contrary to An. arabiensis which was consistent with a stepping-stone model of extensive, but geographically-restricted gene flow.

  19. Lectin-carbohydrate recognition mechanism of Plasmodium berghei in the midgut of malaria vector Anopheles stephensi using quantum dot as a new approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basseri, Hamid R; Javazm, Mahdi Salari; Farivar, Leila; Abai, Mohammad R

    2016-04-01

    Potential targets of Plasmodium ookinetes at the mosquito midgut walls were investigated in relation to interfering malarial transmission. In this study, the essential application of Quantum Dots (QDs) was used to examine the interaction between Plasmodium berghei ookinetes and the Anopheles stephensi midgut, based on lectin-carbohydrate recognition. Two significant lectins were utilized to determine this interaction. Two QDs, cadmium telluride (CdTe)/CdS and cadmium selenide (CdSe)/CdS, were employed in staining Plasmodium ookinete to study its interaction in the midgut of the mosquito vector in vivo. Concurrently, two lectins, wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) and concanavalin A (Con A), were inadvertently exploited to mask lectin binding sites between ookinetes and mosquito midgut cells. The numbers of ookinetes in both lumen and epithelial cells were eventually counted, following adequate preparation of wax sections extracted from whole midgut, and subsequent examination using a differential interference contrast a fluorescence microscopic technique. Interestingly, we detected that neither of the QDs mutated ookinete invasion into the midgut cells of the investigated mosquitoes. QD staining of ookinetes remained permanent despite the effective embedding procedure. The massive binding potency of ookinetes to midgut cells of the cross-examined mosquitoes undoubtedly revealed that Con A did not interrupt ookinete penetration into the midgut wall. In contrast, WGA inhibited ookinete invasion into the midgut cells. The results proved that QD nanoparticles are biocompatible, non-toxic to P. berghei and stable to photobleaching. The QDs staining, which was successfully implemented for ookinete labelling, is a simple and effective tool which plays a crucial role in bioimaging including the study of parasite-vector interactions. PMID:26772447

  20. Crystal and solution studies of the "Plus-C" odorant-binding protein 48 from Anopheles gambiae: control of binding specificity through three-dimensional domain swapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsitsanou, Katerina E; Drakou, Christina E; Thireou, Trias; Vitlin Gruber, Anna; Kythreoti, Georgia; Azem, Abdussalam; Fessas, Dimitrios; Eliopoulos, Elias; Iatrou, Kostas; Zographos, Spyros E

    2013-11-15

    Much physiological and behavioral evidence has been provided suggesting that insect odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) are indispensable for odorant recognition and thus are appealing targets for structure-based discovery and design of novel host-seeking disruptors. Despite the fact that more than 60 putative OBP-encoding genes have been identified in the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae, the crystal structures of only six of them are known. It is therefore clear that OBP structure determination constitutes the bottleneck for structure-based approaches to mosquito repellent/attractant discovery. Here, we describe the three-dimensional structure of an A. gambiae "Plus-C" group OBP (AgamOBP48), which exhibits the second highest expression levels in female antennae. This structure represents the first example of a three-dimensional domain-swapped dimer in dipteran species. A combined binding site is formed at the dimer interface by equal contribution of each monomer. Structural comparisons with the monomeric AgamOBP47 revealed that the major structural difference between the two Plus-C proteins localizes in their N- and C-terminal regions, and their concerted conformational change may account for monomer-swapped dimer conversion and furthermore the formation of novel binding pockets. Using a combination of gel filtration chromatography, differential scanning calorimetry, and analytical ultracentrifugation, we demonstrate the AgamOBP48 dimerization in solution. Eventually, molecular modeling calculations were used to predict the binding mode of the most potent synthetic ligand of AgamOBP48 known so far, discovered by ligand- and structure-based virtual screening. The structure-aided identification of multiple OBP binders represents a powerful tool to be employed in the effort to control transmission of the vector-borne diseases. PMID:24097978

  1. Mosquito larvicidal activity of silver nanoparticles synthesised using actinobacterium, Streptomyces sp. M25 against Anopheles subpictus, Culex quinquefasciatus and Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugasundaram, T; Balagurunathan, R

    2015-12-01

    The present work reports the larvicidal potential of microbially synthesised silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) by using an actinobacterium, Streptomyces sp. M25 isolated from Western Ghats, Tamil Nadu, India. The biomass of Streptomyces sp. was exposed to 1 mM silver nitrate (AgNO3) solution. The synthesis of AgNPs was confirmed by visual inspection followed by instrumental analysis such as UV-vis spectroscopy, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with selected area electron diffraction. Based on the TEM and XRD analysis, the average size of the AgNPs was determined to be 10-35 nm. The biosynthesised AgNPs exhibited significant larvicidal activity against malarial vector, Anopheles subpictus (LC50 51.34 mg/L and χ (2) value of 8.228), filarial vector, Culex quinquefasciatus (LC50 48.98 mg/L and χ (2) value of 14.307) and dengue vector, Aedes aegypti (LC50 60.23 mg/L and χ (2) value of 4.042), respectively. Similarly, AgNO3 had larvicidal activity against malarial vector, A. subpictus (LC50 42.544 mg/L and χ (2) value of 2.561), filarial vector, C. quinquefasciatus (LC50 44.922 mg/L and χ (2) value of 1.693) and dengue vector, A. aegypti (LC50 39.664 mg/L and χ (2) value of 5.724), respectively. The current study is a rapid, cost effective, eco-friendly and single step approach. The Streptomyces sp. M25 is a newly added source for the synthesis of AgNPs with improved larvicidal activity. PMID:26688633

  2. Spectral and HRTEM analyses of Annona muricata leaf extract mediated silver nanoparticles and its Larvicidal efficacy against three mosquito vectors Anopheles stephensi, Culex quinquefasciatus, and Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhosh, Shanthi Bhupathi; Ragavendran, Chinnasamy; Natarajan, Devarajan

    2015-12-01

    Mosquitoes transmit various diseases which mainly affect the human beings and every year cause millions of deaths globally. Currently available chemical and synthetic mosquitocidal agents pose severe side effects, pollute the environment vigorously, and become resistance. There is an urgent need to identify and develop the cost effective, compatible and eco-friendly product for mosquito control. The present study was aimed to find out the larvicidal potential of aqueous crude extract and green synthesized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) from Annona muricata leaves were tested against fourth instar larvae of three important mosquitoes i.e. Anopheles stephensi, Culex quinquefasciatus, and Aedes aegypti using different concentrations of AgNPs (10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 ppm) and the aqueous leaf extract (100, 200, 300, 400, and 500 ppm) for 24 and 48 h. The maximum mortality was noticed in AgNPs than aqueous leaf extract of A. muricata against tested mosquitoes with least LC50 values of 37.70, 31.29, and 20.65 ppm (24h) and 546.7, 516.2, and 618.4 ppm (48 h), respectively. All tested concentrations of AgNps exhibited 100% mortality in A. aegypti larvae at 48 hour observation. In addition, the plant mediated AgNPs were characterized by UV-vis spectrum, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, particle size analyser, X-ray diffraction, high resonance transmission electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis for confirmation of nanoparticle synthesis. Based on the findings of the study suggests that the use of A. muricata plant mediated AgNPs can act as an alternate insecticidal agents for controlling target mosquitoes. PMID:26410042

  3. Morphological Analysis of Anopheles vagus Donitz, 1902 (Diptera : Culicidae in fresh water and brackish water habitats = Variasi Morfologi Anopheles vagus Donitz, 1902 (Diptera : Culicidae dari Habitat Air Tawar dan Air Payau

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    Siti Alfiah

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available ENGLISHAbstractAnopheles subpictus had habitat variation and showed genetic difference. So, the variation of habitat of An. vagus may support the hypothesa that An. vagus had genetic and morphology variation, same as An. subpictus.The aimed of this research was analyze morphology and chaetotaxy difference between An. vagus in fresh water and brackish water. The subject of the study was An. vagus collected from Kesongo Village, Tuntang Subdistrict, Semarang (fresh water and Jatimalang Village, Purwodadi Subdistrict, Purworejo (brackish water. Anopheles vagus were collected and individually reared. One sample in every batch was used to make larvae skin, pupae skin and adult specimen of An. vagus. The result showed that there were intra and inter population variation between An. vagus in fresh water and brackish water. The variations were on the size and number of hair branches and filaments. The conclution of this research were the morphology and chaetotaxy of female An. vagus in fresh water and brackish water showed no different. Intra and interpopulation An. vagus in fresh water and brackish water were caused by the difference of geography location (allopatric speciation.INDONESIANVariasi habitat terjadi pada An. subpictus, variasi habitat yang berbeda menunjukkan variasi genetik yang berbeda. Oleh karena itu variasi habitat An. vagus diduga akan bepengaruh terhadap variasi genetik dan morfologi. Tujuan penelitian adalah menganalisis perbedaan morfologi dan kaetotaksi Anopheles vagus habitat air tawar dan air payau. Subyek penelitian adalah An. vagus habitat air tawar di Desa Kesongo, Kecamatan Tuntang, Kabupaten Semarang dan An. vagus habitat air payau di Desa Jatimalang, Kecamatan Purwodadi, Kabupaten Purworejo. Anopheles vagus yang diperoleh, di rearing secara individual. Tiap indukan diambil satu sampel keturunannya dan dibuat preparat skin larva, skin pupa dan nyamuk dewasa betina. Hasil menunjukkan bahwa Anopheles vagus betina habitat air

  4. Community-Wide Distribution of Long-Lasting Insecticidal Nets Can Halt Transmission of Lymphatic Filariasis in Southeastern Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Frank O.; Emukah, Emmanuel; Graves, Patricia M.; Nkwocha, Omeni; Nwankwo, Lawrence; Rakers, Lindsay; Mosher, Aryc; Patterson, Amy; Ozaki, Masayo; Nwoke, Bertram E. B.; Ukaga, Chinyere N.; Njoku, Chidiebere; Nwodu, Kenrick; Obasi, Andrew; Miri, Emmanuel S.

    2013-01-01

    Lymphatic filariasis (LF) in rural southeastern Nigeria is transmitted mainly by Anopheles spp. mosquitoes. Potential coinfection with Loa loa in this area has prevented use of ivermectin in the mass drug administration (MDA) strategy for LF elimination because of potential severe adverse L. loa-related reactions. This study determined if long-lasting insecticidal net (LLIN) distribution programs for malaria would interrupt LF transmission in such areas, without need for MDA. Monthly entomologic monitoring was conducted in sentinel villages before and after LLIN distribution to all households and all age groups (full coverage) in two districts, and to pregnant women and children less than five years of age in the other two districts. No change in human LF microfilaremia prevalence was observed, but mosquito studies showed a statistically significant decrease in LF infection and infectivity with full-coverage LLIN distribution. We conclude that LF transmission can be halted in southeastern Nigeria by full-coverage LLIN distribution, without MDA. PMID:23939708

  5. Poverty and price transmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elleby, Christian

    A key parameter determining the welfare impact from a world market shock is the transmission elasticity which measures the average domestic response to an international price change. Many studies have estimated price transmission elasticities for a large number of countries but the variation in t...

  6. Data Transmission Concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson, Chris

    1995-01-01

    Introduces some basic concepts related to the transmission of data from a computer to its peripherals to help distance educators make decisions regarding computer equipment purchases for their institutions. The following data transmission concepts are described: cables, serial and parallel, synchronous and asynchronous, bandwidth, and analog and…

  7. Nonlinear magnetoinductive transmission lines

    CERN Document Server

    Lazarides, Nikos; Tsironis, G P

    2011-01-01

    Power transmission in one-dimensional nonlinear magnetic metamaterials driven at one end is investigated numerically and analytically in a wide frequency range. The nonlinear magnetic metamaterials are composed of varactor-loaded split-ring resonators which are coupled magnetically through their mutual inductances, forming thus a magnetoiductive transmission line. In the linear limit, significant power transmission along the array only appears for frequencies inside the linear magnetoinductive wave band. We present analytical, closed form solutions for the magnetoinductive waves transmitting the power in this regime, and their discrete frequency dispersion. When nonlinearity is important, more frequency bands with significant power transmission along the array may appear. In the equivalent circuit picture, the nonlinear magnetoiductive transmission line driven at one end by a relatively weak electromotive force, can be modeled by coupled resistive-inductive-capacitive (RLC) circuits with voltage-dependent cap...

  8. Satellite-derived NDVI, LST, and climatic factors driving the distribution and abundance of Anopheles mosquitoes in a former malarious area in northwest Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantur Juri, María Julia; Estallo, Elizabet; Almirón, Walter; Santana, Mirta; Sartor, Paolo; Lamfri, Mario; Zaidenberg, Mario

    2015-06-01

    Distribution and abundance of disease vectors are directly related to climatic conditions and environmental changes. Remote sensing data have been used for monitoring environmental conditions influencing spatial patterns of vector-borne diseases. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Land Surface Temperature (LST) obtained from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), and climatic factors (temperature, humidity, wind velocity, and accumulated rainfall) on the distribution and abundance of Anopheles species in northwestern Argentina using Poisson regression analyses. Samples were collected from December, 2001 to December, 2005 at three localities, Aguas Blancas, El Oculto and San Ramón de la Nueva Orán. We collected 11,206 adult Anopheles species, with the major abundance observed at El Oculto (59.11%), followed by Aguas Blancas (22.10%) and San Ramón de la Nueva Orán (18.79%). Anopheles pseudopunctipennis was the most abundant species at El Oculto, Anopheles argyritarsis predominated in Aguas Blancas, and Anopheles strodei in San Ramón de la Nueva Orán. Samples were collected throughout the sampling period, with the highest peaks during the spring seasons. LST and mean temperature appear to be the most important variables determining the distribution patterns and major abundance of An. pseudopunctipennis and An. argyritarsis within malarious areas. PMID:26047182

  9. Combination therapy counteracts the enhanced transmission of drug-resistant malaria parasites to mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallett, Rachel L; Sutherland, Colin J; Alexander, Neal; Ord, Rosalynn; Jawara, Musa; Drakeley, Chris J; Pinder, Margaret; Walraven, Gijs; Targett, Geoffrey A T; Alloueche, Ali

    2004-10-01

    Malaria parasites carrying genes conferring resistance to antimalarials are thought to have a selective advantage which leads to higher rates of transmissibility from the drug-treated host. This is a likely mechanism for the increasing prevalence of parasites with resistance to chloroquine (CQ) and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine in sub-Saharan Africa. Combination therapy is the key strategy being implemented to reduce the impact of resistance, but its effect on the transmission of genetically resistant parasites from treated patients to mosquito vectors has not been measured directly. In a trial comparing CQ monotherapy to the combination CQ plus artesunate (AS) in Gambian children with uncomplicated falciparum malaria, we measured transmissibility by feeding Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes with blood from 43 gametocyte-positive patients through a membrane. In the CQ-treated group, gametocytes from patients carrying parasites with the CQ resistance-associated allele pfcrt-76T prior to treatment produced infected mosquitoes with 38 times higher Plasmodium falciparum oocyst burdens than mosquitoes fed on gametocytes from patients infected with sensitive parasites (P < 0.001). Gametocytes from parasites carrying the resistance-associated allele pfmdr1-86Y produced 14-fold higher oocyst burdens than gametocytes from patients infected with sensitive parasites (P = 0.011). However, parasites carrying either of these resistance-associated alleles pretreatment were not associated with higher mosquito oocyst burdens in the CQ-AS-treated group. Thus, combination therapy overcomes the transmission advantage enjoyed by drug-resistant parasites. PMID:15388456

  10. The role of cow urine in the oviposition site preference of culicine and Anopheles mosquitoes

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    Kweka Eliningaya J

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemical and behavioural ecology of mosquitoes plays an important role in the development of chemical cue based vector control. To date, studies available have focused on evaluating mosquito attractants and repellents of synthetic and human origins. This study, however, was aimed at seasonal evaluation of the efficiency of cow urine in producing oviposition cues to Anopheles gambiae s.l. and Culex quinquefasciatus in both laboratory and field conditions. Methods Oviposition response evaluation in laboratory conditions was carried out in mosquito rearing cages. The oviposition substrates were located in parallel or in diagonal positions inside the cage. Urine evaluation against gravid females of An. arabiensis and Cx. quinquefasciatus was carried out at Day 1, Day 3 and Day 7. Five millilitres (mls of cow urine was added to oviposition substrate while de-chlorinated water was used as a control. In field experiments, 500 mls of cow urine was added in artificial habitats with 2500 mls of de-chlorinated water and 2 kgs of soil. The experiment was monitored for thirty consecutive days, eggs were collected daily from the habitats at 7.00 hrs. Data analysis was performed using parametric and non-parametric tests for treatments and controls while attraction of the oviposition substrate in each species was presented using Oviposition Activity Index (OAI. Results The OAI was positive with ageing of cattle urine in culicine species in both laboratory and field experiments. The OAI for anopheline species was positive with fresh urine. The OAI during the rainy season was positive for all species tested while in the dry season the OAI for culicine spp and Anopheles gambiae s.l., changed with time from positive to negative values. Based on linear model analysis, seasons and treatments had a significant effect on the number of eggs laid in habitats, even though the number of days had no effect. Conclusion Oviposition substrates treated with

  11. Anopheles culicifacies breeding in brackish waters in Sri Lanka and implications for malaria control

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    Surendran Sinnathamby N

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anopheles culicifacies is the major vector of both falciparum and vivax malaria in Sri Lanka, while Anopheles subpictus and certain other species function as secondary vectors. In Sri Lanka, An. culicifacies is present as a species complex consisting of species B and E, while An. subpictus exists as a complex of species A-D. The freshwater breeding habit of An. culicifacies is well established. In order to further characterize the breeding sites of the major malaria vectors in Sri Lanka, a limited larval survey was carried out at a site in the Eastern province that was affected by the 2004 Asian tsunami. Methods Anopheline larvae were collected fortnightly for six months from a brackish water body near Batticaloa town using dippers. Collected larvae were reared in the laboratory and the emerged adults were identified using standard keys. Sibling species status was established based on Y-chromosome morphology for An. culicifacies larvae and morphometric characteristics for An. subpictus larvae and adults. Salinity, dissolved oxygen and pH were determined at the larval collection site. Results During a six month study covering dry and wet seasons, a total of 935 anopheline larvae were collected from this site that had salinity levels up to 4 parts per thousand at different times. Among the emerged adult mosquitoes, 661 were identified as An. culicifacies s.l. and 58 as An. subpictus s.l. Metaphase karyotyping of male larvae showed the presence of species E of the Culicifacies complex, and adult morphometric analysis the presence of species B of the Subpictus complex. Both species were able to breed in water with salinity levels up to 4 ppt. Conclusions The study demonstrates the ability of An. culicifacies species E, the major vector of falciparum and vivax malaria in Sri Lanka, to oviposit and breed in brackish water. The sibling species B in the An. subpictus complex, a well-known salt water breeder and a secondary malaria

  12. Insecticide resistance in Anopheles gambiae from south-western Chad, Central Africa

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    Etang Josiane

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Indoor residual spraying and insecticide-treated nets (ITN are essential components of malaria vector control in Africa. Pyrethroids are the only recommended compounds for nets treatment because they are fast-acting insecticides with low mammalian toxicity. However, there is growing concern that pyrethroid resistance may threaten the sustainability of ITN scaling-up programmes. Here, insecticide susceptibility was investigated in Anopheles gambiae sensu lato from an area of large scale ITN distribution programme in south-western Chad. Methods Susceptibility to 4% DDT, 0.05% deltamethrin, 0.75% permethrin, 0.1% bendiocarb and 5% malathion was assessed using the WHO standard procedures for adult mosquitoes. Tests were carried out with two to four days-old, non-engorged female mosquitoes. The An. gambiae Kisumu strain was used as a reference. Knockdown effect was recorded every 5 min and mortality scored 24 h after exposure. Mosquitoes were identified to species and molecular form by PCR-RFLP and genotypes at the kdr locus were determined in surviving specimens by Hot Oligonucleotide Ligation Assay (HOLA. Results During this survey, full susceptibility to malathion was recorded in all samples. Reduced susceptibility to bendiocarb (mortality rate of 96.1% was found in one sample out of nine assayed. Increased tolerance to pyrethroids was detected in most samples (8/9 with mortality rates ranging from 70.2 to 96.6% for deltamethrin and from 26.7 to 96.3% for permethrin. Pyrethroid tolerance was not associated with a significant increase of knock-down times. Anopheles arabiensis was the predominant species of the An. gambiae complex in the study area, representing 75 to 100% of the samples. Screening for kdr mutations detected the L1014F mutation in 88.6% (N = 35 of surviving An. gambiae sensu stricto S form mosquitoes. All surviving An. arabiensis (N = 49 and M form An. gambiae s.s. (N = 1 carried the susceptible allele

  13. Effect of discriminative plant-sugar feeding on the survival and fecundity of Anopheles gambiae

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    Jackson Robert R

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A previous study showed for Anopheles gambiae s.s. a gradation of feeding preference on common plant species growing in a malaria holoendemic area in western Kenya. The present follow-up study determines whether there is a relationship between the mosquito's preferences and its survival and fecundity. Methods Groups of mosquitoes were separately given ad libitum opportunity to feed on five of the more preferred plant species (Hamelia patens, Parthenium hysterophorus, Ricinus communis, Senna didymobotrya, and Tecoma stans and one of the less preferred species (Lantana camara. The mosquitoes were monitored daily for survival. Sugar solution (glucose 6% and water were used as controls. In addition, the fecundity of mosquitoes on each plant after (i only one blood meal (number of eggs oviposited, and (ii after three consecutive blood meals (proportion of females ovipositing, number of eggs oviposited and hatchability of eggs, was determined. The composition and concentration of sugar in the fed-on parts of each plant species were determined using gas chromatography. Using SAS statistical package, tests for significant difference of the fitness values between mosquitoes exposed to different plant species were conducted. Results and Conclusion Anopheles gambiae that had fed on four of the five more preferred plant species (T. stans, S. didymobotrya, R. communis and H. patens, but not P. hysterophorus lived longer and laid more eggs after one blood meal, when compared with An. gambiae that had fed on the least preferred plant species L. camara. When given three consecutive blood-meals, the percentage of females that oviposited, but not the number of eggs laid, was significantly higher for mosquitoes that had previously fed on the four more preferred plant species. Total sugar concentration in the preferred plant parts was significantly correlated with survival and with the proportion of females that laid eggs. This effect was

  14. Wireless Power Transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pragati S. Chawardol

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A great concern has been voiced in recent years over the extensive use of energy, the limited supply of resourses, and the pollution of the environment from the use of present energy conversion systems. Electrical power accounts for much of the energy consumed. One of the major issue in power system is the losses occurs during the transmission and distribution of electrical power. As the demand increases day by day, the power generation increases and the power loss is also increased. The major amount of power loss occurs during transmission and distribution. The resistance of the wire used in the electrical grid distribution system causes a loss of 26-30% of the energy generated. This loss implies that our present system of electrical distribution is only 70-74% efficient. The above discussed problem can be solved by choose an alternative option for power transmission which could provide much higher efficiency, low transmission cost and avoid power theft. Wireless power transmission is one of the promising technologies and may be the righteous alternative for efficient power transmission. This paper focuses on the past and future possible advancements in WPT. Also the proposed method and technologies in WPT that will make the loss of energy during transmission and distribution to minimum are discussed. Keyword

  15. Understanding Ebola Virus Transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth Judson

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available An unprecedented number of Ebola virus infections among healthcare workers and patients have raised questions about our understanding of Ebola virus transmission. Here, we explore different routes of Ebola virus transmission between people, summarizing the known epidemiological and experimental data. From this data, we expose important gaps in Ebola virus research pertinent to outbreak situations. We further propose experiments and methods of data collection that will enable scientists to fill these voids in our knowledge about the transmission of Ebola virus.

  16. Tractor Transmissions. A Teaching Reference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association for Agricultural Engineering and Vocational Agriculture, Athens, GA.

    The manual was developed as a reference for teaching students about transmissions in farm tractors. The manual is divided into five sections: (1) transmission history, (2) gears and bearings in transmission, (3) sliding-gear transmissions, (4) planetary gearing, and (5) glossary. The working principles of the sliding-gear transmission, the most…

  17. Transmissions in vehicles 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    Within the international VDI congress 'Gears in vehicles 2010' of the VDI Wissensforum GmbH (Duesseldorf, Federal Republic of Germany) between 22nd and 23rd June, 2010, in Friedrichshafen (Federal Republic of Germany), the following lectures were held: (1) 8HP70H - The moldhybrid transmission from ZF - Cjallenges and achievements (P. Gutmann); (2) GETRAG boosted range extender - A highly flexible electric powertrain for maximum CO{sub 2} reduction (S. Huepkes); (3) E-Transmission between full-hybrid and E-drive (P. Tenberge); (4) Reducing NO{sub x} and particulate emissions in electrified drivelines (R. Kuberczyk); (5) Simulation aided HEV and EV development: from the component to the whole powertrain (A. Gacometti); (6) Investigations on operating behaviour of the optimized CVT hybrid driveline (B.-R. Hoehn); (7) Customer-oriented dimensioning of electrified drivetrains (M. Eghtessad); (8) Decentralized optimal control strategy for parallel hybrid electric vehicles (A. Frenkel); (9) The new generation 6-speed automatic transmission AF40 (G. Bednarek); (10) Customized mechatronic solutions for integrated transmission control units (M. Wieczorek); (11) The optimal automatic transmission for front-transverse applications - Planetary transmissions or dual clutch transmissions? (G. Gumpoltsberger); (12) The new shift-by-wire gearshift lever for the Audi A8 - Requirements and concept (T. Guttenbergere); (13) The new shift-by-wire gearshift lever for the Audi A8 - Realization (A. Giefer); (14) Fuel-efficient transmissions of the future: Calculation of the efficiency factor for vehicle transmissions (B. Volpert); (15) HT-ACM: A new polymer generation for static and dynamic gearbox sealing solutions (E. Osen); (16) 'Energy efficiency equipped solutions by SKF' for power train applications - A contribution to CO{sub 2} - emission reduction and sustainability (T. Bobke); (17) 6-Ratio planetary shift transmission controlled by 4 external brakes, and design

  18. Using remote sensing to map larval and adult populations of Anopheles hyrcanus (Diptera: Culicidae a potential malaria vector in Southern France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger François

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although malaria disappeared from southern France more than 60 years ago, suspicions of recent autochthonous transmission in the French Mediterranean coast support the idea that the area could still be subject to malaria transmission. The main potential vector of malaria in the Camargue area, the largest river delta in southern France, is the mosquito Anopheles hyrcanus (Diptera: Culicidae. In the context of recent climatic and landscape changes, the evaluation of the risk of emergence or re-emergence of such a major disease is of great importance in Europe. When assessing the risk of emergence of vector-borne diseases, it is crucial to be able to characterize the arthropod vector's spatial distribution. Given that remote sensing techniques can describe some of the environmental parameters which drive this distribution, satellite imagery or aerial photographs could be used for vector mapping. Results In this study, we propose a method to map larval and adult populations of An. hyrcanus based on environmental indices derived from high spatial resolution imagery. The analysis of the link between entomological field data on An. hyrcanus larvae and environmental indices (biotopes, distance to the nearest main productive breeding sites of this species i.e., rice fields led to the definition of a larval index, defined as the probability of observing An. hyrcanus larvae in a given site at least once over a year. Independent accuracy assessments showed a good agreement between observed and predicted values (sensitivity and specificity of the logistic regression model being 0.76 and 0.78, respectively. An adult index was derived from the larval index by averaging the larval index within a buffer around the trap location. This index was highly correlated with observed adult abundance values (Pearson r = 0.97, p An. hyrcanus larval and adult populations from the landscape indices. Conclusion This work shows that it is possible to use

  19. Kansas Electric Transmission Lines

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This data set is a digital representation of the EletcircTransmission lines for the State of Kansas as maintained by the Kansas Corporation Commission. Data is...

  20. Transmission of Flu (Influenza)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Skip Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Flu (Influenza) Transmission How Flu Spreads Coughing and Sneezing People with flu can ... not be shared without washing thoroughly first. The Flu Is Contagious You may be able to pass ...

  1. Down hole transmission system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, David R.; Hall, Jr., H. Tracy

    2007-07-24

    A transmission system in a downhole component comprises a data transmission element in both ends of the downhole component. Each data transmission element houses an electrically conducting coil in a MCEI circular trough. The electrically conducting coil comprises at least two generally fractional loops. In the preferred embodiment, the transmission elements are connected by an electrical conductor. Preferably, the electrical conductor is a coaxial cable. Preferably, the MCEI trough comprises ferrite. In the preferred embodiment, the fractional loops are connected by a connecting cable. In one aspect of the present invention, the connecting cable is a pair of twisted wires. In one embodiment the connecting cable is a shielded pair of twisted wires. In another aspect of the present invention, the connecting cable is a coaxial cable. The connecting cable may be disposed outside of the MCEI circular trough.

  2. Gravity wave transmission diagram

    OpenAIRE

    Tomikawa, Y.

    2015-01-01

    A new method of obtaining power spectral distribution of gravity waves as a function of ground-based horizontal phase speed and propagation direction from airglow observations has recently been proposed. To explain gravity wave power spectrum anisotropy, a new gravity wave transmission diagram was developed in this study. Gravity wave transmissivity depends on the existence of critical and turning levels for waves that are determined by background horizontal wind distributio...

  3. Understanding Ebola Virus Transmission

    OpenAIRE

    Seth Judson; Joseph Prescott; Vincent Munster

    2015-01-01

    An unprecedented number of Ebola virus infections among healthcare workers and patients have raised questions about our understanding of Ebola virus transmission. Here, we explore different routes of Ebola virus transmission between people, summarizing the known epidemiological and experimental data. From this data, we expose important gaps in Ebola virus research pertinent to outbreak situations. We further propose experiments and methods of data collection that will enable scientists to fil...

  4. Eliminating Perinatal HIV Transmission

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-11-26

    In this podcast, CDC’s Dr. Steve Nesheim discusses perinatal HIV transmission, including the importance of preventing HIV among women, preconception care, and timely HIV testing of the mother. Dr. Nesheim also introduces the revised curriculum Eliminating Perinatal HIV Transmission intended for faculty of OB/GYN and pediatric residents and nurse midwifery students.  Created: 11/26/2012 by Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention.   Date Released: 11/26/2012.

  5. Glutamate Transmission in Addiction

    OpenAIRE

    Kalivas, Peter W.; LaLumiere, Ryan; Knackstedt, Lori; Shen, Haowei

    2008-01-01

    Cortico-striatal glutamate transmission has been implicated in both the initiation and expression of addiction related behaviors, such as locomotor sensitization and drug seeking. While glutamate transmission onto dopamine cells in the ventral tegmental area undergoes transient plasticity important for establishing addiction-related behaviors, glutamatergic plasticity in the nucleus accumbens is critical for the expression of these behaviors. This information points to the value of exploring ...

  6. Continuously Variable Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grana, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    Chain slides along two cones, in novel transmission concept. Transmission includes chain drive between two splined shafts. Chain sprockets follow surfaces of two cones. As one chain sprocket moves toward smaller diameter other chain sprocket moves toward larger diameter, thereby changing "gear" ratio. Movement initiated by tension applied to chain by planetary gear mechanism. Device positive, simple, and efficient over wide range of speed ratios.

  7. Gravity wave transmission diagram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomikawa, Yoshihiro

    2016-07-01

    A possibility of gravity wave propagation from a source region to the airglow layer around the mesopause has been discussed based on the gravity wave blocking diagram taking into account the critical level filtering alone. This paper proposes a new gravity wave transmission diagram in which both the critical level filtering and turning level reflection of gravity waves are considered. It shows a significantly different distribution of gravity wave transmissivity from the blocking diagram.

  8. Maternal environment shapes the life history and susceptibility to malaria of Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenz Lena M

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is becoming generally recognized that an individual's phenotype can be shaped not only by its own genotype and environmental experience, but also by its mother's environment and condition. Maternal environmental factors can influence mosquitoes' population dynamics and susceptibility to malaria, and therefore directly and indirectly the epidemiology of malaria. Methods In a full factorial experiment, the effects of two environmental stressors - food availability and infection with the microsporidian parasite Vavraia culicis - of female mosquitoes (Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto on their offspring's development, survival and susceptibility to malaria were studied. Results The offspring of A. gambiae s.s. mothers infected with V. culicis developed into adults more slowly than those of uninfected mothers. This effect was exacerbated when mothers were reared on low food. Maternal food availability had no effect on the survival of their offspring up to emergence, and microsporidian infection decreased survival only slightly. Low food availability for mothers increased and V. culicis-infection of mothers decreased the likelihood that the offspring fed on malaria-infected blood harboured malaria parasites (but neither maternal treatment influenced their survival up to dissection. Conclusions Resource availability and infection with V. culicis of A. gambiae s.s. mosquitoes not only acted as direct environmental stimuli for changes in the success of one generation, but could also lead to maternal effects. Maternal V. culicis infection could make offspring more resistant and less likely to transmit malaria, thus enhancing the efficacy of the microsporidian for the biological control of malaria.

  9. Larvicidal potential of essential oils against Musca domestica and Anopheles stephensi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Nitin; Malik, Anushree; Sharma, Satyawati; Dhiman, R C

    2016-06-01

    The larvicidal activity of Mentha piperita, Cymbopogan citratus (lemongrass), Eucalyptus globulus and Citrus sinensis (orange) essential oils and their combinations was evaluated against Musca domestica (housefly) and Anopheles stephensi (mosquitoes) through contact toxicity assay. Among all the tested essential oils/combinations, Me. piperita was found to be the most effective larvicidal agent against Mu. domestica and An. stephensi with LC50 values of 0.66 μl/cm(2) and 44.66 ppm, respectively, after 48 h. The results clearly highlighted that the addition of mentha oil to other oils (1:1 ratio) improved their larvicidal activity. The order of effectiveness of essential oils/combinations indicated that the pattern for An. stephensi follows the trend as mentha > mentha + lemongrass > lemongrass > mentha + eucalyptus > eucalyptus > mentha + orange > orange and for Mu. domestica as mentha > mentha + lemongrass > lemongrass > mentha + orange > orange > mentha + eucalyptus > eucalyptus. The images obtained from scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis indicated the toxic effect of Me. piperita as the treated larvae were observed to be dehydrated and deformed. This study demonstrates the effectiveness of tested essential oils/combinations against the larval stages of Mu. domestica and An. stephensi and has the potential for development of botanical formulations. PMID:26920567

  10. A user-friendly software to easily count Anopheles egg batches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mollahosseini Ali

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies on malaria vector ecology and development/evaluation of vector control strategies often require measures of mosquito life history traits. Assessing the fecundity of malaria vectors can be carried out by counting eggs laid by Anopheles females. However, manually counting the eggs is time consuming, tedious, and error prone. Methods In this paper we present a newly developed software for high precision automatic egg counting. The software written in the Java programming language proposes a user-friendly interface and a complete online manual. It allows the inspection of results by the operator and includes proper tools for manual corrections. The user can in fact correct any details on the acquired results by a mouse click. Time saving is significant and errors due to loss of concentration are avoided. Results The software was tested over 16 randomly chosen images from 2 different experiments. The results show that the proposed automatic method produces results that are close to the ground truth. Conclusions The proposed approaches demonstrated a very high level of robustness. The adoption of the proposed software package will save many hours of labor to the bench scientist. The software needs no particular configuration and is freely available for download on: http://w3.ualg.pt/∼hshah/eggcounter/.

  11. Morphological Differentiation May Mediate Mate-Choice between Incipient Species of Anopheles gambiae s.s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, Michelle R.; Demirci, Berna; Marsden, Clare D.; Lee, Yoosook; Cornel, Anthony J.; Lanzaro, Gregory C.

    2011-01-01

    The M and S molecular forms of Anopheles gambiae s.s. have been considered incipient species for more than ten years, yet the mechanism underlying assortative mating of these incipient species has remained elusive. The discovery of the importance of harmonic convergence of wing beat frequency in mosquito mating and its relation to wing size have laid the foundation for exploring phenotypic divergence in wing size of wild populations of the two forms. In this study, wings from field collected mosquitoes were measured for wing length and wing width from two parts of the sympatric distribution, which differ with respect to the strength of assortative mating. In Mali, where assortative mating is strong, as evidenced by low rates of hybridization, mean wing lengths and wing widths were significantly larger than those from Guinea-Bissau. In addition, mean wing widths in Mali were significantly different between molecular forms. In Guinea-Bissau, assortative mating appears comparatively reduced and wing lengths and widths did not differ significantly between molecular forms. The data presented in this study support the hypothesis that wing beat frequency may mediate assortative mating in the incipient species of A. gambiae and represent the first documentation of a morphological difference between the M and S molecular forms. PMID:22132169

  12. Diversity, differentiation, and linkage disequilibrium: prospects for association mapping in the malaria vector Anopheles arabiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, Clare Diana; Lee, Yoosook; Kreppel, Katharina; Weakley, Allison; Cornel, Anthony; Ferguson, Heather M; Eskin, Eleazar; Lanzaro, Gregory C

    2014-01-01

    Association mapping is a widely applied method for elucidating the genetic basis of phenotypic traits. However, factors such as linkage disequilibrium and levels of genetic diversity influence the power and resolution of this approach. Moreover, the presence of population subdivision among samples can result in spurious associations if not accounted for. As such, it is useful to have a detailed understanding of these factors before conducting association mapping experiments. Here we conducted whole-genome sequencing on 24 specimens of the malaria mosquito vector, Anopheles arabiensis, to further understanding of patterns of genetic diversity, population subdivision and linkage disequilibrium in this species. We found high levels of genetic diversity within the An. arabiensis genome, with ~800,000 high-confidence, single- nucleotide polymorphisms detected. However, levels of nucleotide diversity varied significantly both within and between chromosomes. We observed lower diversity on the X chromosome, within some inversions, and near centromeres. Population structure was absent at the local scale (Kilombero Valley, Tanzania) but detected between distant populations (Cameroon vs. Tanzania) where differentiation was largely restricted to certain autosomal chromosomal inversions such as 2Rb. Overall, linkage disequilibrium within An. arabiensis decayed very rapidly (within 200 bp) across all chromosomes. However, elevated linkage disequilibrium was observed within some inversions, suggesting that recombination is reduced in those regions. The overall low levels of linkage disequilibrium suggests that association studies in this taxon will be very challenging for all but variants of large effect, and will require large sample sizes. PMID:24281424

  13. Mosquito repellent potential of Pithecellobium dulce leaf and seed against malaria vector Anopheles stephensi (Diptera: Culicidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Rajeswary

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the repellent properties of hexane, benzene, ethyl acetate, chloroform and methanol extract of Pithecellobium dulce (P. dulce leaf and seed against Anopheles stephensi (An. stephensi. Methods: Repellent activity assay was carried out in a net cage (45 cm × 30 cm × 25 cm containing 100 blood starved female mosquitoes of An. stephensi. This assay was carried out in the laboratory conditions according to the WHO 2009 protocol. Plant crude extracts of P. dulce were applied at 1.0, 2.5, and 5.0 mg/cm2 separately in the exposed fore arm of study subjects. Ethanol was used as the sole control. Results: In this study, the applied plant crude extracts were observed to protect against mosquito bites. There were no allergic reactions experienced by the study subjects. The repellent activity of the extract was dependent on the concentration of the extract. Among the tested solvents, the leaf and seed methanol extract showed the maximum efficacy. The highest concentration of 5.0 mg/cm2 leaf and seed methanol extract of P. dulce provided over 180 min and 150 min protection, respectively. Conclusions: Crude extracts of P. dulce exhibit the potential for controlling malaria vector mosquito An. stephensi.

  14. Suitability of monotypic and mixed diets for Anopheles hermsi larval development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, Donald A; Walton, William E

    2016-06-01

    The developmental time and survival to eclosion of Anopheles hermsi Barr & Guptavanij fed monotypic and mixed diets of ten food types were examined in laboratory studies. Larvae fed monotypic diets containing animal detritus (freeze-dried rotifers, freeze-dried Daphnia pulicaria, and TetraMin® fish food flakes) and the mixotrophic protistan Cryptomonas ovata developed faster and survived better than larvae that were fed other monotypic diets. Survival to adulthood of larvae fed several concentrations of the diatom Planothidium (=Achnanthes) lanceolatum was poor (Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and filamentous Spirogyra communis, failed to complete larval development, regardless of the concentration tested. Cohorts fed a combination of food types (mixed diets) usually developed better than cohorts fed monotypic diets. Food types that failed to support complete development when fed alone often facilitated development to adulthood when fed in combination with food types containing >1% C20 polyunsaturated fatty acids as total fat, but regardless of essential fatty acid content, algae that produced mucilage and filaments that sank out of the feeding zone were poor quality diets. PMID:27232128

  15. Absorption and transport of radioactive tracers in the midgut of the malaria mosquito, Anopheles stephensi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three radiolabeled substances were mixed with fresh heparinized mouse blood and fed to female Anopheles stephensi through a chicken crop membrane. Resorption and transport in the anterior (A) and posterior (P, stomach) parts of the midgut were investigated by means of electron microscopic autoradiography. Digestion products of 125I-labeled bovine serum albumin (BSA) were resorbed only in the P-part, showing a biphasic pattern with maximal values 4 and 18 hr after feeding. Uptake of 3H-labeled amino acids started immediately after feeding in both midgut parts. [14C]glucose was mainly absorbed in the P-part. Labeled carbohydrate storage deposits formed during the initial phase of digestion and were mobilized around 36 hr after feeding. After feeding the mosquitoes on 125I-BSA, oocyte protein yolk spheres and abdominal cuticle became labeled. Ingestion of 3H-labeled amino acids caused the formation of silver grains over follicles and fat body lipids. Feeding on [14C]glucose resulted in labeled fat body carbohydrates and oocyte protein yolk spheres

  16. Preferencias alimenticias del Anopheles pseudopunctipennis y A. triannulatus en el Perú

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Acosta

    1960-01-01

    Full Text Available Mediante la prueba serológica de las pricipitinas, entre agosto y noviembre, 1958, se ha tratado de determinar las preferencias alimenticias del Anopheles pseudopunctipennis y del A. triannulatus en varias localidades peruanas, con los siguientes resultados: 1. En una serie, con insectos procedentes de dos regiones geográficas diferentes y usando sueros inmunes correspondientes a la especie humana y a varios animales inferiores, se obtuvo: a que el A. pseudopunctipennis no presenta comportamiento uniforme en cuanto a su alimentación en el hombre; y b que los animales inferiores sobre los que se alimenta con mayor frecuencia son la vaca y el perro. 2. En otra serie, en la que se usó tan sólo el suero anti-hombre, se verificó que el A. pseudopunctipennis había ingerido sangre humana entre el 87.3 y 100.0 por ciento. 3. En 0.5 por ciento de 977 especímenes del A. triannulatus se puso de manifiesto la presencia de sangre humana. 4. Se discute las circunstancias que condicionarían la preferencia que los insectos estudiados suelen mostrar en cuanto a sus huéspedes.

  17. Swarming and mating activity of Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes in semi-field enclosures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achinko, D; Thailayil, J; Paton, D; Mireji, P O; Talesa, V; Masiga, D; Catteruccia, F

    2016-03-01

    Anopheles gambiae Giles sensu stricto (Diptera: Culicidae) is the major Afro-tropical vector of malaria. Novel strategies proposed for the elimination and eradication of this mosquito vector are based on the use of genetic approaches, such as the sterile insect technique (SIT). These approaches rely on the ability of released males to mate with wild females, and depend on the application of effective protocols to assess the swarming and mating behaviours of laboratory-reared insects prior to their release. The present study evaluated whether large semi-field enclosures can be utilized to study the ability of males from a laboratory colony to respond to natural environmental stimuli and initiate normal mating behaviour. Laboratory-reared males exhibited spatiotemporally consistent swarming behaviour within the study enclosures. Swarm initiation, peak and termination time closely tracked sunset. Comparable insemination rates were observed in females captured in copula in the semi-field cages relative to females in small laboratory cages. Oviposition rates after blood feeding were also similar to those observed in laboratory settings. The data suggest that outdoor enclosures are suitable for studying swarming and mating in laboratory-bred males in field-like settings, providing an important reference for future studies aimed at assessing the comparative mating ability of strains for SIT and other vector control strategies. PMID:26508420

  18. Comprehensive genetic dissection of the hemocyte immune response in the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Lombardo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Reverse genetics in the mosquito Anopheles gambiae by RNAi mediated gene silencing has led in recent years to an advanced understanding of the mosquito immune response against infections with bacteria and malaria parasites. We developed RNAi screens in An. gambiae hemocyte-like cells using a library of double-stranded RNAs targeting 109 genes expressed highly or specifically in mosquito hemocytes to identify novel regulators of the hemocyte immune response. Assays included phagocytosis of bacterial bioparticles, expression of the antimicrobial peptide CEC1, and basal and induced expression of the mosquito complement factor LRIM1. A cell viability screen was also carried out to assess dsRNA cytotoxicity and to identify genes involved in cell growth and survival. Our results identify 22 novel immune regulators, including proteins putatively involved in phagosome assembly and maturation (Ca²⁺ channel, v-ATPase and cyclin-dependent protein kinase, pattern recognition (fibrinogen-domain lectins and Nimrod, immune modulation (peptidase and serine protease homolog, immune signaling (Eiger and LPS-induced factor, cell adhesion and communication (Laminin B1 and Ninjurin and immune homeostasis (Lipophorin receptor. The development of robust functional cell-based assays paves the way for genome-wide functional screens to study the mosquito immune response to infections with human pathogens.

  19. Molecular characterization, biological forms and sporozoite rate of Anopheles stephensi in southern Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ali Reza Chavshin; Mohammad Ali Oshaghi; Hasan Vatandoost; Ahmad Ali Hanafi-Bojd; Ahmad Raeisi; Fatemeh Nikpoor

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To identify the biological forms, sporozoite rate and molecular characterization of the Anopheles stephensi (An. stephensi) in Hormozgan and Sistan-Baluchistan provinces, the most important malarious areas in Iran. Methods: Wild live An. stephensi samples were collected from different malarious areas in southern Iran. The biological forms were identified based on number of egg-ridges. Molecular characterization of biological forms was verified by analysis of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I and II (mtDNA-COI/COII). The Plasmodium infection was examined in the wild female specimens by species-specific nested–PCR method. Results: Results showed that all three biological forms including mysorensis, intermediate and type are present in the study areas. Molecular investigations revealed no genetic variation between mtDNA COI/COII sequences of the biological forms and no Plasmodium parasites was detected in the collected mosquito samples. Conclusions:Presence of three biological forms with identical sequences showed that the known biological forms belong to a single taxon and the various vectorial capacities reported for these forms are more likely corresponded to other epidemiological factors than to the morphotype of the populations. Lack of malaria parasite infection in An. stephensi, the most important vector of malaria, may be partly due to the success and achievement of ongoing active malaria control program in the region.

  20. Segmental duplication implicated in the genesis of inversion 2Rj of Anopheles gambiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamadou B Coulibaly

    Full Text Available The malaria vector Anopheles gambiae maintains high levels of inversion polymorphism that facilitate its exploitation of diverse ecological settings across tropical Africa. Molecular characterization of inversion breakpoints is a first step toward understanding the processes that generate and maintain inversions. Here we focused on inversion 2Rj because of its association with the assortatively mating Bamako chromosomal form of An. gambiae, whose distinctive breeding sites are rock pools beside the Niger River in Mali and Guinea. Sequence and computational analysis of 2Rj revealed the same 14.6 kb insertion between both breakpoints, which occurred near but not within predicted genes. Each insertion consists of 5.3 kb terminal inverted repeat arms separated by a 4 kb spacer. The insertions lack coding capacity, and are comprised of degraded remnants of repetitive sequences including class I and II transposable elements. Because of their large size and patchwork composition, and as no other instances of these insertions were identified in the An. gambiae genome, they do not appear to be transposable elements. The 14.6 kb modules inserted at both 2Rj breakpoint junctions represent low copy repeats (LCRs, also called segmental duplications that are strongly implicated in the recent (approximately 0.4N(e generations origin of 2Rj. The LCRs contribute to further genome instability, as demonstrated by an imprecise excision event at the proximal breakpoint of 2Rj in field isolates.