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Sample records for anomalous x-ray fluorescence

  1. X-ray Fluorescence Sectioning

    CERN Document Server

    Cong, Wenxiang

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an x-ray fluorescence imaging system for elemental analysis. The key idea is what we call "x-ray fluorescence sectioning". Specifically, a slit collimator in front of an x-ray tube is used to shape x-rays into a fan-beam to illuminate a planar section of an object. Then, relevant elements such as gold nanoparticles on the fan-beam plane are excited to generate x-ray fluorescence signals. One or more 2D spectral detectors are placed to face the fan-beam plane and directly measure x-ray fluorescence data. Detector elements are so collimated that each element only sees a unique area element on the fan-beam plane and records the x-ray fluorescence signal accordingly. The measured 2D x-ray fluorescence data can be refined in reference to the attenuation characteristics of the object and the divergence of the beam for accurate elemental mapping. This x-ray fluorescence sectioning system promises fast fluorescence tomographic imaging without a complex inverse procedure. The design can be ad...

  2. X-ray fluorescence holography

    CERN Document Server

    Hayashi, K; Takahashi, Y

    2003-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) is a new structural analysis method of determining a 3D atomic arrangement around fluorescing atoms. We developed an XFH apparatus using advanced X-ray techniques and succeeded in obtaining high-quality hologram data. Furthermore, we introduced applications to the structural analysis of a thin film and the environment around dopants and, discussed the quantitative analysis of local lattice distortion. (author)

  3. X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The seventh edition of Philips' Review of Literature on x-ray fluorescence spectrometry starts with a list of conference proceedings on the subject, organised by the Philips organisation at regular intervals in various European countries. It is followed by a list of bulletins. The bibliography is subdivided according to spectra, equipment, applications and absorption analysis

  4. Glitches in Anomalous X-ray Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Dib, Rim; Gavriil, Fotis P

    2007-01-01

    (Abridged). We report on 8.7 and 7.6yr of RXTE observations of the Anomalous X-ray Pulsars (AXPs) RXS J170849.0-400910 and 1E 1841-045, respectively. These observations, part of a larger RXTE AXP monitoring program, have allowed us to study the long-term timing, pulsed flux, and pulse profile evolution of these objects. We report on four new glitches, one from RXS J170849.0-400910 and three from 1E 1841-045. One of the glitches from 1E 1841-045 is among the largest ever seen in a neutron star, having fractional frequency jump (delta nu)/nu=1.6E-5. With nearly all known persistent AXPs now seen to glitch, such behavior is clearly generic to this source class. We compare AXP glitches with those in radio pulsars. We show that in terms of fractional frequency change, AXPs are among the most actively glitching neutron stars, with glitch amplitudes in general larger than in radio pulsars. However, in terms of absolute glitch amplitude, AXP glitches are unremarkable. We show that the largest observed AXP glitches sh...

  5. Detection limits in x-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray fluorescence spectrometry is a well established analytical technique for elemental analysis of solids, powders, or liquids. This extended abstract briefly discusses the detection limits or sensitivity of x-ray spectrometers in x-ray fluorescence analysis

  6. On the X-ray Spectra of Anomalous X-ray Pulsars and Soft Gamma Repeaters

    OpenAIRE

    Kaspi, Victoria M.; Boydstun, Kristen

    2010-01-01

    We revisit the apparent correlation between soft X-ray band photon index and spin-down rate ύ previously reported for Anomalous X-ray Pulsars (AXPs) and Soft Gamma Repeaters (SGRs) by Marsden & White. Our analysis, improved thanks to new source discoveries, better spectral parameter measurements in previously known sources, and the requirement of source quiescence for parameter inclusion, shows evidence for the previously noted trend, although with greater scatter. This trend supp...

  7. Magnetar-like X-ray bursts from an anomalous X-ray pulsar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavriil, F P; Kaspi, V M; Woods, P M

    2002-09-12

    Anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) are a class of rare X-ray emitting pulsars whose energy source has been perplexing for some 20 years. Unlike other X-ray emitting pulsars, AXPs cannot be powered by rotational energy or by accretion of matter from a binary companion star, hence the designation 'anomalous'. Many of the rotational and radiative properties of the AXPs are strikingly similar to those of another class of exotic objects, the soft-gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs). But the defining property of the SGRs--their low-energy-gamma-ray and X-ray bursts--has not hitherto been observed for AXPs. Soft-gamma-ray repeaters are thought to be 'magnetars', which are young neutron stars whose emission is powered by the decay of an ultra-high magnetic field; the suggestion that AXPs might also be magnetars has been controversial. Here we report two X-ray bursts, with properties similar to those of SGRs, from the direction of the anomalous X-ray pulsar 1E1048.1 - 5937. These events imply a close relationship (perhaps evolutionary) between AXPs and SGRs, with both being magnetars.

  8. First X-ray fluorescence CT experimental results at the SSRF X-ray imaging beamline

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Biao; YANG Qun; XIE Hong-Lan; DU Guo-Hao; XIAO Wi-Qiao

    2011-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence CT is a non-destructive technique for detecting elemental composition and distribution inside a specimen. In this paper, the first experimental results of X-ray fluorescence CT obtained at the SSRF X-ray imaging beamline (BL13W1) are described. The test samples were investigated and the 2D elemental image was reconstructed using a filtered back-projection algorithm. In the sample the element Cd was observed. Up to now, the X-ray fluorescence CT could be carried out at the SSRF X-ray imaging beamline.

  9. Surface-Enhanced X-Ray Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Surface-enhanced x-ray fluorescence (SEn-XRF) spectroscopy is a form of surface- enhanced spectroscopy that was conceived as a means of obtaining greater sensitivity in x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy. As such, SEn-XRF spectroscopy joins the ranks of such other, longer-wavelength surface-enhanced spectroscopies as those based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS), and surfaceenhanced infrared Raman absorption (SEIRA), which have been described in previous NASA Tech Briefs articles. XRF spectroscopy has been used in analytical chemistry for determining the elemental compositions of small samples. XRF spectroscopy is rapid and quantitative and has been applied to a variety of metal and mineralogical samples. The main drawback of XRF spectroscopy as practiced heretofore is that sensitivity has not been as high as required for some applications. In SEn-XRF as in the other surface-enhanced spectroscopies, one exploits several interacting near-field phenomena, occurring on nanotextured surfaces, that give rise to local concentrations of incident far-field illumination. In this case, the far-field illumination comes from an x-ray source. Depending on the chemical composition and the geometry of a given nanotextured surface, these phenomena could include the lightning-rod effect (concentration of electric fields at the sharpest points on needlelike surface features), surface plasmon resonances, and grazing incidence geometric effects. In the far field, the observable effect of these phenomena is an increase in the intensity of the spectrum of interest - in this case, the x-ray fluorescence spectrum of chemical elements of interest that may be present within a surface layer at distances no more than a few nanometers from the surface.

  10. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past few years, total reflection X-ray flourescence analysis (TXRF) has found an increasing number of assignments and applications. Experience of trace element analysis using TXRF and examples of applications are already widespread. Therefore, users of TXRF had the opportunity of an intensive exchange of their experience at the 1st workshop on total reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis which took place on May 27th and 28th 1986 at the GKSS Research Centre at Geesthacht. In a series of lectures and discussions dealing with the analytical principle itself, sample preparation techniques and applications as well as comuter programs for spectrum evaluation, the present state of development and the range of applications were outlined. 3 studies out of a total of 14 were included separately in the INIS and ENERGY databases. With 61 figs., 12 tabs

  11. In vivo X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements on five occupationally exposed persons have shown that it is possible to use X-ray fluorescence analysis for in vivo measurements of lead in the skeleton. The technique for calibrating in vivo X-ray fluorescence measurements of lead in bone tissue has been studied in detail and a two-component phantom simulating the bone and the soft tissue parts of the finger constructed. The technique has been used for in vivo measurements on 22 occupationally exposed persons. The minimum detectable concentration of lead in fingerbones was found to be around 20 μg x g-1. The lead concentrations in their skeletons and blood were compared: the correlation was poor. The variations in lead concentrations in the skeleton have been studied in occupationally exposed persons and in samples from archaeological skeletons. The sensitivity and the minimum detectable concentration of cadmium in the kidney cortex in in vivo measurements has been studied by measurements on kidney models. The minimum detectable concentration was 20 μg x g-1 at a skin-kidney distance of 30 mm and 40 μg x g-1 at 40 mm. Five persons occupationally exposed were studied. (Author)

  12. Laser-based X-ray and electron source for X-ray fluorescence studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle Brozas, F.; Crego, A.; Roso, L.; Peralta Conde, A.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we present a modification to conventional X-rays fluorescence using electrons as excitation source and compare it with the traditional X-ray excitation for the study of pigments. For this purpose, we have constructed a laser-based source capable to produce X-rays as well as electrons. Because of the large penetration depth of X-rays, the collected fluorescence signal is a combination of several material layers of the artwork under study. However, electrons are stopped in the first layers, allowing a more superficial analysis. We show that the combination of both excitation sources can provide extremely valuable information about the structure of the artwork.

  13. On the X-ray Spectra of Anomalous X-ray Pulsars and Soft Gamma Repeaters

    CERN Document Server

    Kaspi, Victoria M

    2010-01-01

    We revisit the apparent correlation between soft X-ray band photon index and spin-down rate nudot previously reported for Anomalous X-ray Pulsars (AXPs) and Soft Gamma Repeaters (SGRs) by Marsden & White (2001). Our analysis, improved thanks to new source discoveries, better spectral parameter measurements in previously known sources, and the requirement of source quiescence for parameter inclusion, shows evidence for the previously noted trend, although with greater scatter. This trend supports the twisted magnetosphere model of magnetars although the scatter suggests that factors other than nudot are also important. We also note possible correlations involving the spectra of AXPs and SGRs in the hard X-ray band. Specifically, the hard-band photon index shows a possible correlation with inferred nudot and B, as does the degree of spectral turnover. If the former trend is correct, then the hard-band photon index for AXP 1E 1048.1-5937 should be ~0--1. This may be testable with long integrations by INTEGRA...

  14. Long-Term Monitoring of Anomalous X-ray Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Gavriil, F P; Chakraborty, D; Gavriil, Fotis P.; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Chakrabarty, Deepto

    2001-01-01

    We report on long-term monitoring of anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) using the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. Using phase-coherent timing, we find a wide variety of behaviors among the sources, ranging from high stability (in 1E 2259.1+586 and 4U 0142+61), to instabilities so severe that phase-coherent timing is not possible (in 1E 1048.1-5937). We note a correlation in which timing stability in AXPs decreases with increasing spin-down rate. The timing stability of soft gamma repeaters in quiescence is consistent with this trend, which is similar to one seen in radio pulsars. We consider high signal-to-noise ratio average pulse profiles as a function of energy for each AXP, and find a variety of behaviors. We find no large variability in pulse morphology nor in pulsed flux as a function of time.

  15. Spectral Properties of Anomalous X-ray Pulsars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ye Lu; Wei Wang; Yong-Heng Zhao

    2003-01-01

    We examine the spectra of the persistent emission from anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) and their variation with the spin-down rate Ω. Based on an accretion-powered model, the influences of both the magnetic field and the mass accretion rate on the spectral properties of AXPs are addressed. We then investigate the relation between the spectral property of AXPs and mass accretion rate M. The result shows that there exists a linear correlation between the photon index and the mass accretion rate: the spectral hardness increases with increasing M. A possible emission mechanism for the explanation of the spectral properties of AXPs is also discussed.

  16. Coded Aperture Imaging for Fluorescent X-rays-Biomedical Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haboub, Abdel; MacDowell, Alastair; Marchesini, Stefano; Parkinson, Dilworth

    2013-06-01

    Employing a coded aperture pattern in front of a charge couple device pixilated detector (CCD) allows for imaging of fluorescent x-rays (6-25KeV) being emitted from samples irradiated with x-rays. Coded apertures encode the angular direction of x-rays and allow for a large Numerical Aperture x- ray imaging system. The algorithm to develop the self-supported coded aperture pattern of the Non Two Holes Touching (NTHT) pattern was developed. The algorithms to reconstruct the x-ray image from the encoded pattern recorded were developed by means of modeling and confirmed by experiments. Samples were irradiated by monochromatic synchrotron x-ray radiation, and fluorescent x-rays from several different test metal samples were imaged through the newly developed coded aperture imaging system. By choice of the exciting energy the different metals were speciated.

  17. Precision Timing of Two Anomalous X-Ray Pulsars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspi; Chakrabarty; Steinberger

    1999-11-01

    We report on long-term X-ray timing of two anomalous X-ray pulsars, 1RXS J170849.0-400910 and 1E 2259+586, using the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer. In monthly observations made over 1.4 and 2.6 yr for the two pulsars, respectively, we have obtained phase-coherent timing solutions which imply that these objects have been rotating with great stability throughout the course of our observations. For 1RXS J170849.0-400910, we find a rotation frequency of 0.0909169331(5) Hz and frequency derivative -15.687&parl0;4&parr0;x10-14 Hz s-1 for epoch MJD 51215.931. For 1E 2259+586, we find a rotation frequency of 0.1432880613(2) Hz and frequency derivative -1.0026&parl0;7&parr0;x10-14 Hz s-1 for epoch MJD 51195.583. The rms phase residuals from these simple models are only approximately 0.01 cycles for both sources. We show that the frequency derivative for 1E 2259+586 is inconsistent with that inferred from incoherent frequency observations made over the last 20 yr. Our observations are consistent with the magnetar hypothesis and make binary accretion scenarios appear unlikely.

  18. Laser-based X-ray and electron source for X-ray fluorescence studies

    CERN Document Server

    Brozas, F Valle; Roso, L; Conde, A Peralta

    2016-01-01

    In this work we present a modification to conventional X-rays fluorescence using electrons as excitation source, and compare it with the traditional X-ray excitation for the study of pigments. For this purpose we have constructed a laser-based source capable to produce X-rays as well as electrons. Because of the large penetration depth of X-rays, the collected fluorescence signal is a combination of several material layers of the artwork under study. However electrons are stopped in the first layers allowing therefore a more superficial analysis. We show that the combination of both excitation sources can provide extremely valuable information about the structure of the artwork.

  19. A new look at Anomalous X-ray Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G S

    2014-01-01

    We explore a possibility to explain the phenomenon of the Anomalous X-ray Pulsars (AXP) and Soft Gamma-ray Repeaters (SGR) within the scenario of fall-back magnetic accretion onto a young isolated neutron star. The X-ray emission of the pulsar in this case is originated due to accretion of matter onto the surface of the neutron star from the magnetic slab surrounding its magnetosphere. The expected spin-down rate of the neutron star within this approach is close to the observed value. We show that these neutron stars are relatively young and are going through a transition from the propeller state to the accretor state. The pulsars activity in the gamma-rays is connected with their relative youth and is provided by the energy stored in the non-equilibrium layer located in the crust of low-mass neutron stars. This energy can be released due to mixing of matter in the neutron star crust with super heavy nuclei approaching its surface and getting unstable. The nuclei fission in the low-density region initiates ch...

  20. Period clustering of the anomalous X-ray pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G S

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we address the question of why the observed periods of the Anomalous X-ray Pulsars (AXPs) and Soft Gamma-ray Repeaters (SGRs) are clustered in the range 2-12s. We explore a possibility to answer this question assuming that AXPs and SGRs are the descendants of High Mass X-ray Binaries (HMXBs) which have been disintegrated in the core-collapse supernova explosion. The spin period of neutron stars in HMXBs evolves towards the equilibrium period, P_eq. For a wide range of relevant accretion parameters, its value falls in the interval of observed periods of AXPs and SGRs. After the explosion of its massive companion, the neutron star turns out to be embedded into a dense gaseous envelope, the accretion from which leads to the formation of a residual magnetically levitating (ML) disk. We show that the expected mass of a disk in this case is 10^-7 - 10^-8 M_sun which is sufficient to maintain the process of accretion at the rate 10^14 - 10^15 g/s over a time span of a few thousand years. During this pe...

  1. Research in quantitative microscopic X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A feasibility study of quantitative elemental microanalysis of biological materials and glass samples by microbeam X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy was completed. The research included testing the homogeneity of existing standards for X-ray fluorescence calibration and verification of a fundamental parameters method for quantitative analysis. The goal was to evaluate the X-ray fluorescence spectrometer as a tool for elemental analysis at the microscale level. Glass Standard Reference Materials were analyzed. The glass specimens consisted of flat, optically polished slabs having three different thicknesses. For calibration, metal thin films were used. The microbeam X-ray fluorescence spectrometer utilizing capillary optics with effective beam diameter equal to about 30 μm has been applied in this research. Sources of uncertainties considered in this work were detector and X-ray tube stability, specimen movement, and spectral deconvolution. Concentrations of analytes were calculated using a fundamental parameters approach. Coherently and incoherently scattered lines of tube target were used for matrix correction and to estimate the mass thickness of the sample. The synchrotron microbeam X-ray fluorescence technique was used for quantitative analysis of human brain tissue samples. In measurements the monochromatic and polychromatic synchrotron microbeams were applied. The same area of tissue sample was scanned with the use of both X-ray microbeams. The concentrations of selected elements were computed. A reasonably good agreement between results of both analyses was obtained

  2. X-ray fluorescence logging in molybdenum deposit exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Described is the methods for X-ray fluorescence logging in molybdenum deposit exploration in South Kazakhstan. X-ray fluorescence logging was carried out with GKS-1N four-channel gamma spectrometer with SP-4 hole device containing clamping. 109Cd isotope of 10μCi activity was used as a source for excitation of characteristic radiation of molybdenum K-line (E=22 keV, T=470 days) and a proportional counter with the resolution of 12% along 125Sb (E=27 keV) line was used as a detector. Described are methods for interpretation of X-ray flUorescence logs using a nomogram for molybdenum determination in holes filled with water. The sensitivity threshold is 0.05% of molybdenum. Economic efficiency of deposit exploration with the help of holes and subsequent X-ray fluorescence logging is 2.8 mln roubles

  3. System for Gamma an X rays fluorescence spectrometric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A system for spectrometry of gamma or fluorescence X rays is presented. It sis composed by a Si(Li) semiconductors detector, a charge sensitive preamplifier, a high voltage power supply, a spectrometric amplifier and a monolithic 1024 channels multichannel analyzers or an IBM compatible 4096 channels add - on- card multichannel analyzer. The system can be configured as a 1024 or 4096 channels gamma or fluorescent X rays spectrometer

  4. X-ray Fluorescent Fe Kalpha Lines from Stellar Photospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Drake, Jeremy J; Swartz, Douglas A

    2007-01-01

    X-ray spectra from stellar coronae are reprocessed by the underlying photosphere through scattering and photoionization events. While reprocessed X-ray spectra reaching a distant observer are at a flux level of only a few percent of that of the corona itself, characteristic lines formed by inner shell photoionization of some abundant elements can be significantly stronger. The emergent photospheric spectra are sensitive to the distance and location of the fluorescing radiation and can provide diagnostics of coronal geometry and abundance. Here we present Monte Carlo simulations of the photospheric Kalpha doublet arising from quasi-neutral Fe irradiated by a coronal X-ray source. Fluorescent line strengths have been computed as a function of the height of the radiation source, the temperature of the ionising X-ray spectrum, and the viewing angle. We also illustrate how the fluorescence efficiencies scale with the photospheric metallicity and the Fe abundance. Based on the results we make three comments: (1) fl...

  5. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) set-up with a low power X-ray tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sheenu; Deep, Kanan; Jain, Lalita; Ansari, M A; Mittal, Vijay Kumar; Mittal, Raj

    2010-10-01

    The X-ray fluorescence set-up with a 100 W X-ray tube comprises a computer controlled system developed for remote operation and monitoring of tube and an adjustable stable 3D arrangement to procure variable excitation energies with low scattered background. The system was tested at different filament currents/anode voltages. The MDL of the set-up at 0.05-1.00 mA/4-12 kV is found approximately (1-100)ppm for K and L excitations and approximately (200-700)ppm for M excitations of elements and improves with filament current and anode voltage. Moreover, L measurements for Sm and Eu at five K X-ray energies of elements(Z=29-40) and analytical determination in some synthetic samples were undertaken. PMID:20570160

  6. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) set-up with a low power X-ray tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Sheenu; Deep, Kanan [Nuclear Science Laboratories, Physics Department, Punjabi University, Patiala 147 002 (India); Jain, Lalita; Ansari, M.A. [Laser Electronic Support Section, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT), Indore (India); Mittal, Vijay Kumar [Nuclear Science Laboratories, Physics Department, Punjabi University, Patiala 147 002 (India); Mittal, Raj, E-mail: rmsingla@yahoo.co [Nuclear Science Laboratories, Physics Department, Punjabi University, Patiala 147 002 (India)

    2010-10-15

    The X-ray fluorescence set-up with a 100 W X-ray tube comprises a computer controlled system developed for remote operation and monitoring of tube and an adjustable stable 3D arrangement to procure variable excitation energies with low scattered background. The system was tested at different filament currents/anode voltages. The MDL of the set-up at 0.05-1.00 mA/4-12 kV is found {approx}(1-100) ppm for K and L excitations and {approx}(200-700) ppm for M excitations of elements and improves with filament current and anode voltage. Moreover, L measurements for Sm and Eu at five K X-ray energies of elements(Z=29-40) and analytical determination in some synthetic samples were undertaken.

  7. On Fossil Disk Models of Anomalous X-Ray Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Francischelli, G J

    2002-01-01

    Currently, two competing models are invoked in order to explain the observable properties of Anomalous X-ray Pulsars (AXPs). One model assumes that AXP emission is powered by a strongly magnetized neutron star - i.e., a magnetar. Other groups have postulated that the unusually long spin periods associated with AXPs could, instead, be due to accretion. As there are severe observational constraints on any binary accretion model, fossil disk models have been suggested as a plausible alternative. Here we analyze fossil disk models of AXPs in some detail, and point out some of their inherent inconsistencies. For example, we find that, unless it has an exceptionally high magnetic field strength, a neutron star in a fossil disk cannot be observed as an AXP if the disk opacity is dominated by Kramers' law. However, standard alpha-disk models show that a Kramers opacity must dominate for the case log B > 12, making it unlikely that a fossil disk scenario can successfully produce AXPs. Additionally, we find that in ord...

  8. Understanding the X-ray spectrum of anomalous X-ray pulsars and soft gamma-ray repeaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hard X-rays above 10 keV are detected from several anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) and soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs), and different models have been proposed to explain the physical origin within the frame of either a magnetar model or a fallback disk system. Using data from Suzaku and INTEGRAL, we study the soft and hard X-ray spectra of four AXPs/SGRs: 1RXS J170849−400910, 1E 1547.0−5408, SGR 1806−20 and SGR 0501+4516. It is found that the spectra could be well reproduced by the bulk-motion Comptonization (BMC) process as was first suggested by Trümper et al., showing that the accretion scenario could be compatible with X-ray emission from AXPs/SGRs. Simulated results from the Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope using the BMC model show that the spectra would have discrepancies from the power-law, especially the cutoff at ∼200 keV. Thus future observations will allow researchers to distinguish different models of the hard X-ray emission and will help us understand the nature of AXPs/SGRs. (paper)

  9. X-ray fluorescence cross sections for K and L x rays of the elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, M.O.; Nestor, C.W. Jr.; Sparks, C.J. Jr.; Ricci, E.

    1978-06-01

    X-ray fluorescence cross sections are calculated for the major x rays of the K series 5 less than or equal to Z less than or equal to 101, and the three L series 12 less than or equal to Z less than or equal to 101 in the energy range 1 to 200 keV. This calculation uses Scofield's theoretical partical photoionization cross sections, Krause's evaluation of fluorescence and Coster-Kronig yields, and Scofield's theoretical radiative rates. Values are presented in table and graph format, and an estimate of their accuracy is made. The following x rays are considered: K..cap alpha../sub 1/, K..cap alpha../sub 1/,/sub 2/, K..beta../sub 1/, K..beta../sub 1/,/sub 3/, L..cap alpha../sub 1/, L..cap alpha../sub 1/,/sub 2/, L..beta../sub 1/, L..beta../sub 2/,/sub 15/, L..beta../sub 3/, Ll, L..gamma../sub 1/, L..gamma../sub 4/, and L/sub 1/ ..-->.. L/sub 2/,/sub 3/. For use in x-ray fluorescence analysis, K..cap alpha.. and L..cap alpha.. fluorescence cross sections are presented at specific energies: TiK identical with 4.55 keV, CrK identical with 5.46 keV, CoK identical with 7.00 keV, CuK identical with 8.13 keV, MoK..cap alpha.. identical with 17.44 keV, AgK identical with 22.5 keV, DyK identical with 47.0 keV, and /sup 241/Am identical with 59.54 keV. Supplementary material includes fluorescence and Coster--Kronig yields, fractional radiative rates, fractional fluorescence yields, total L-shell fluorescence cross sections, fluorescence and Coster-Kronig yields in condensed matter, effective fluorescence yields, average L-shell fluorescence yield, L-subshell photoionization cross section ratios, and conversion factors from barns per atom to square centimeters per gram.

  10. X-ray fluorescence in IAEA Member States: Peru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Under the IAEA TC project PER/2/018 (1993-1994) on 'Nuclear Training' an EDXRF spectrometer based on Cd-109 radioisotope source was installed. Then in 1998 a Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence module was attached under the project PER/9/020 on 'Analytical Nuclear Techniques for Environmental Control'. The XRF laboratory belongs to the Chemistry Department of Science Direction - General Direction for Promotion and Technical Development of the Peruvian Institute of Nuclear Energy and is located at the auxiliary laboratories of the Nuclear Centre. The following three thesis for degree in chemistry were completed: 1. 'Multielemental Analysis of archeological bones by X-ray Fluorescence for the reconstruction of diets at First Period in the Lima Culture'; 2. 'Determination of heavy metals in water of the Rimac river by Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence'; 3. 'Multielemental Analysis of sea water samples by Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence, using pre-concentration with APDC/MIBK' (in edition). Currently we are working on another thesis dealing with 'Multielemental analysis of biological marine samples by Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence and pre-concentration after microwave digestion'. In order to get the accreditation, we are working on validation of the analytical methods for determination of Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se and Pb in natural water by using Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence technique. The EDXRF spectrometer with Cd-109 excitation is used for the analysis of clays, potteries, soil, sediments, geological materials, bones, etc., mainly for the archaeological applications. (author)

  11. Detection of terrestrial radionuclides with X-ray fluorescence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trojek, T; Čechák, T

    2015-06-01

    This paper provides an overview of analytical methods frequently used to identify terrestrial radionuclides in samples. While radioactivity is normally measured through the ionising radiation produced during the spontaneous decay of unstable atoms, selected radionuclides or their chemical elements can be quantified with instrumental techniques based on stimulated emission or counting of atoms. The advantages and disadvantages of these analytical methods are discussed. Particular attention is paid to X-ray fluorescence analysis of materials containing uranium and thorium. It is also possible to determine the area distributions of these chemical elements in samples with the use of scanning X-ray fluorescence systems. PMID:25977354

  12. Quantitative X ray analysis system. User's manual and guide to X ray fluorescence technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This guide covers trimmed and re-arranged version 3.6 of the Quantitative X ray Analysis System (QXAS) software package that includes the most frequently used methods of quantitative analysis. QXAS is a comprehensive quantitative analysis package that has been developed by the IAEA through research and technical contracts. Additional development has also been carried out in the IAEA Laboratories in Seibersdorf where QXAS was extensively tested. New in this version of the manual are the descriptions of the Voigt-profile peak fitting, the backscatter fundamental parameters' and emission-transmission methods of chemical composition analysis, an expanded chapter on the X ray fluorescence physics, and completely revised and increased number of practical examples of utilization of the QXAS software package. The analytical data accompanying this manual were collected in the IAEA Seibersdorf Laboratories in the years 2006/2007

  13. MSL Chemistry and Mineralogy X-Ray Diffraction X-Ray Fluorescence (CheMin) Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Wayne; Blake, Dave; Harris, William; Morookian, John Michael; Randall, Dave; Reder, Leonard J.; Sarrazin, Phillipe

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Chemistry and Mineralogy Xray Diffraction (XRD), X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) (CheMin) Instrument, an element of the landed Curiosity rover payload, which landed on Mars in August of 2012. The scientific goal of the MSL mission is to explore and quantitatively assess regions in Gale Crater as a potential habitat for life - past or present. The CheMin instrument will receive Martian rock and soil samples from the MSL Sample Acquisition/Sample Processing and Handling (SA/SPaH) system, and process it utilizing X-Ray spectroscopy methods to determine mineral composition. The Chemin instrument will analyze Martian soil and rocks to enable scientists to investigate geophysical processes occurring on Mars. The CheMin science objectives and proposed surface operations are described along with the CheMin hardware with an emphasis on the system engineering challenges associated with developing such a complex instrument.

  14. HIgh Rate X-ray Fluorescence Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grudberg, Peter Matthew [XIA LLC

    2013-04-30

    The purpose of this project was to develop a compact, modular multi-channel x-ray detector with integrated electronics. This detector, based upon emerging silicon drift detector (SDD) technology, will be capable of high data rate operation superior to the current state of the art offered by high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors, without the need for liquid nitrogen. In addition, by integrating the processing electronics inside the detector housing, the detector performance will be much less affected by the typically noisy electrical environment of a synchrotron hutch, and will also be much more compact than current systems, which can include a detector involving a large LN2 dewar and multiple racks of electronics. The combined detector/processor system is designed to match or exceed the performance and features of currently available detector systems, at a lower cost and with more ease of use due to the small size of the detector. In addition, the detector system is designed to be modular, so a small system might just have one detector module, while a larger system can have many you can start with one detector module, and add more as needs grow and budget allows. The modular nature also serves to simplify repair. In large part, we were successful in achieving our goals. We did develop a very high performance, large area multi-channel SDD detector, packaged with all associated electronics, which is easy to use and requires minimal external support (a simple power supply module and a closed-loop water cooling system). However, we did fall short of some of our stated goals. We had intended to base the detector on modular, large-area detectors from Ketek GmbH in Munich, Germany; however, these were not available in a suitable time frame for this project, so we worked instead with pnDetector GmbH (also located in Munich). They were able to provide a front-end detector module with six 100 m^2 SDD detectors (two monolithic arrays of three elements each) along with

  15. The Mapping X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer (MAPX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, David; Sarrazin, Philippe; Bristow, Thomas; Downs, Robert; Gailhanou, Marc; Marchis, Franck; Ming, Douglas; Morris, Richard; Sole, Vincente Armando; Thompson, Kathleen; Walter, Philippe; Wilson, Michael; Yen, Albert; Webb, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    MapX will provide elemental imaging at =100 micron spatial resolution over 2.5 X 2.5 centimeter areas, yielding elemental chemistry at or below the scale length where many relict physical, chemical, and biological features can be imaged and interpreted in ancient rocks. MapX is a full-frame spectroscopic imager positioned on soil or regolith with touch sensors. During an analysis, an X-ray source (tube or radioisotope) bombards the sample surface with X-rays or alpha-particles / gamma rays, resulting in sample X-ray Fluorescence (XRF). Fluoresced X-rays pass through an X-ray lens (X-ray µ-Pore Optic, "MPO") that projects a spatially resolved image of the X-rays onto a CCD. The CCD is operated in single photon counting mode so that the positions and energies of individual photons are retained. In a single analysis, several thousand frames are stored and processed. A MapX experiment provides elemental maps having a spatial resolution of =100 micron and quantitative XRF spectra from Regions of Interest (ROI) 2 centimers = x = 100 micron. ROI are compared with known rock and mineral compositions to extrapolate the data to rock types and putative mineralogies. The MapX geometry is being refined with ray-tracing simulations and with synchrotron experiments at SLAC. Source requirements are being determined through Monte Carlo modeling and experiment using XMIMSIM [1], GEANT4 [2] and PyMca [3] and a dedicated XRF test fixture. A flow-down of requirements for both tube and radioisotope sources is being developed from these experiments. In addition to Mars lander and rover missions, MapX could be used for landed science on other airless bodies (Phobos/Deimos, Comet nucleus, asteroids, the Earth's moon, and the icy satellites of the outer planets, including Europa.

  16. X-ray fluorescence microscopy of olfactory receptor neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ducic, T; Herbst, J; Novakova, E; Salditt, T [Institute for X-ray Physics, Georg-August-University, Friedrich-Hund-Pl. 1, 37077 Goettingen (Germany); Breunig, E; Schild, D [Department of Molecular Neurophysiology, Georg-August University Goettingen (Germany); Susini, J; Tucoulu, R, E-mail: tducic@gwdg.d [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility ESRF, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, 38043 Grenoble (France)

    2009-09-01

    We report a x-ray fluorescence microscopy study of cells and tissues from the olfactory system of Xenopus laevis. In this experiment we focus on sample preparation and experimental issues, and present first results of fluorescence maps of the elemental distribution of Cl, K, Ca, P, S and Na both in individual isolated neural cells and in cross-sections of the same tissue.

  17. Rapid analysis by X-ray fluorescence excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of the energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry for a quick multielement analysis of different samples (sedimented dust, motor oil, watery solutions) is discussed. Using a source of 30 mCi 239Pu for the X-ray excitation it is possible to determine the concentration of the elements Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br, Sr, and Pb in a single working operation with a detection efficiency between 1000 ppm for Ca and about 10 ppm for Zn, Br, Sr and Pb using a testing time of 1000 seconds. (author)

  18. Submicron hard X-ray fluorescence imaging of synthetic elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Mark P., E-mail: mjensen@anl.gov [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Aryal, Baikuntha P. [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Gorman-Lewis, Drew [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Paunesku, Tatjana [Department of Radiation Oncology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Lai, Barry; Vogt, Stefan [X-ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Woloschak, Gayle E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States)

    2012-04-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Actinide elements are mapped with L-edge X-rays and better than 400 nm resolution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A typical detection limit was 2.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -20} moles Pu {mu}m{sup -2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer XANES measurements provide chemical information in 0.1 {mu}m{sup 2} spots. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Selection of materials for encapsulation is important for avoiding interferences. - Abstract: Synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) using hard X-rays focused into sub-micron spots is a powerful technique for elemental quantification and mapping, as well as microspectroscopic measurements such as {mu}-XANES (X-ray absorption near edge structure). We have used XFM to image and simultaneously quantify the transuranic element plutonium at the L{sub 3} or L{sub 2}-edge as well as Th and lighter biologically essential elements in individual rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells after exposure to the long-lived plutonium isotope {sup 242}Pu. Elemental maps demonstrate that plutonium localizes principally in the cytoplasm of the cells and avoids the cell nucleus, which is marked by the highest concentrations of phosphorus and zinc, under the conditions of our experiments. The minimum detection limit under typical acquisition conditions with an incident X-ray energy of 18 keV for an average 202 {mu}m{sup 2} cell is 1.4 fg Pu or 2.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -20} moles Pu {mu}m{sup -2}, which is similar to the detection limit of K-edge XFM of transition metals at 10 keV. Copper electron microscopy grids were used to avoid interference from gold X-ray emissions, but traces of strontium present in naturally occurring calcium can still interfere with plutonium detection using its L{sub {alpha}} X-ray emission.

  19. Effect of Electric Voltage and Current of X-ray Chamber on the Element inthe Zirconium Alloy Analysis X-ray by X-ray Fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The using of x-ray fluorescence in the chemical analysis depend heavilyon the parameters of x-ray chamber, for examples : electric voltage andelectric current. That parameter give effect in the result of determine ofSn, Cr, Fe and Ni in the zirconium alloy. 20 kV electric voltages are used onthe Mo x-ray chamber shall product x-ray of zirconium in the sample materialcan give effect in the stability of the analysis result (deviation more than5%). The result of analysis of elements in the zirconium alloy shall givedeviation less than 5% when using of electric voltage of the x-ray chamberless than 19 kV. The sensitivity of analysis can be reached by step upelectric current of x-ray chamber. (author)

  20. Portable energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence and X-ray diffraction and radiography system for archaeometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendoza Cuevas, Ariadna, E-mail: ariadna@mail.or [Archaeometry Laboratory, Colegio Universitario San Geronimo de La Habana, Obispo, entre San Ignacio y Mercaderes, Habana Vieja, cp 10 100, Havana (Cuba); Perez Gravie, Homero, E-mail: homero.perezgravie@mail.co [Archaeometry Laboratory, Colegio Universitario San Geronimo de La Habana, Obispo, entre San Ignacio y Mercaderes, Habana Vieja, cp 10 100, Havana (Cuba)

    2011-03-21

    Starting on a laboratory developed portable X-ray fluorescence (PXRF) spectrometer; three different analytical results can be performed: analysis of chemical elements, analysis of major chemical crystalline phase and structural analysis, which represents a contribution to a new, low cost development of portable X-ray analyzer; since these results are respectively obtained with independent equipments for X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction and radiography. Detection limits of PXRF were characterized using standard reference materials for ceramics, glass, bronze and bones, which are the main materials requiring quantitative analysis in art and archeological objects. A setup for simultaneous energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence and diffraction (ED (XRF-XRD)) in the reflection mode has been tested for in situ and non-destructive analysis according to the requirements of art objects inspection. The system uses a single low power X-ray tube and an X-ray energy dispersive detector to measure X-ray diffraction spectrum at a fixed angle. Application to the identification of jadeite-jade mineral in archeological objects by XRD is presented. A local high resolution radiography image obtained with the same low power X-ray tube allows for studies in painting and archeological bones.

  1. X-ray fluorescence measurements of dissolved gas and cavitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Daniel J.; Kastengren, Alan L.; Swantek, Andrew B.; Matusik, Katarzyna E.; Powell, Christopher F.

    2016-10-01

    The dynamics of dissolved gas and cavitation are strongly coupled, yet these phenomena are difficult to measure in-situ. Both create voids in the fluid that can be difficult to distinguish. We present an application of X-ray fluorescence in which liquid density and total noncondensible gas concentration (both dissolved and nucleated) are simultaneously measured. The liquid phase is doped with 400 ppm of a bromine tracer, and dissolved air is removed and substituted with krypton. Fluorescent emission at X-ray wavelengths is simultaneously excited from the Br and Kr with a focused monochromatic X-ray beam from a synchrotron source. We measure the flow in a cavitating nozzle 0.5 mm in diameter. From Br fluorescence, total displacement of the liquid is measured. From Kr fluorescence, the mass fraction of both dissolved and nucleated gas is measured. Volumetric displacement of liquid due to both cavitation and gas precipitation can be separated through estimation of the local equilibrium dissolved mass fraction. The uncertainty in the line of sight projected densities of the liquid and gas phases is 4-6 %. The high fluorescence yields and energies of Br and Kr allow small mass fractions of gas to be measured, down to 10-5, with an uncertainty of 8 %. These quantitative measurements complement existing optical diagnostic techniques and provide new insight into the diffusion of gas into cavitation bubbles, which can increase their internal density, pressure and lifetimes by orders of magnitude.

  2. High-spatial-resolution nanoparticle x-ray fluorescence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Jakob C.; Vâgberg, William; Vogt, Carmen; Lundström, Ulf; Larsson, Daniel H.; Hertz, Hans M.

    2016-03-01

    X-ray fluorescence tomography (XFCT) has potential for high-resolution 3D molecular x-ray bio-imaging. In this technique the fluorescence signal from targeted nanoparticles (NPs) is measured, providing information about the spatial distribution and concentration of the NPs inside the object. However, present laboratory XFCT systems typically have limited spatial resolution (>1 mm) and suffer from long scan times and high radiation dose even at high NP concentrations, mainly due to low efficiency and poor signal-to-noise ratio. We have developed a laboratory XFCT system with high spatial resolution (sub-100 μm), low NP concentration and vastly decreased scan times and dose, opening up the possibilities for in-vivo small-animal imaging research. The system consists of a high-brightness liquid-metal-jet microfocus x-ray source, x-ray focusing optics and an energy-resolving photon-counting detector. By using the source's characteristic 24 keV line-emission together with carefully matched molybdenum nanoparticles the Compton background is greatly reduced, increasing the SNR. Each measurement provides information about the spatial distribution and concentration of the Mo nanoparticles. A filtered back-projection method is used to produce the final XFCT image.

  3. Development and applications of grazing exit micro X-ray fluorescence instrument using a polycapillary X-ray lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A polycapillary X-ray lens is an effective optics to obtain a μm-size X-ray beam for micro-X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (μ-XRF). We developed a μ-XRF instrument using a polycapillary X-ray lens, which also enabled us to perform Grazing Exit μ-XRF (GE-μ-XRF). The evaluated diameter of the primary X-ray beam was 48 μm at the focal distance of the X-ray lens. Use of this instrument enabled two-dimensional mapping of the elemental distributions during growth of the plant 'Quinoa'. The results of the mapping revealed elemental transition during growth. In addition, a small region of thin film was analyzed by GE-μ-XRF. We expect that GE-μ-XRF will become an effective method of estimating the film thickness of a small region

  4. Development and applications of grazing exit micro X-ray fluorescence instrument using a polycapillary X-ray lens*1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emoto, T.; Sato, Y.; Konishi, Y.; Ding, X.; Tsuji, K.

    2004-08-01

    A polycapillary X-ray lens is an effective optics to obtain a μm-size X-ray beam for micro-X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (μ-XRF). We developed a μ-XRF instrument using a polycapillary X-ray lens, which also enabled us to perform Grazing Exit μ-XRF (GE-μ-XRF). The evaluated diameter of the primary X-ray beam was 48 μm at the focal distance of the X-ray lens. Use of this instrument enabled two-dimensional mapping of the elemental distributions during growth of the plant "Quinoa". The results of the mapping revealed elemental transition during growth. In addition, a small region of thin film was analyzed by GE-μ-XRF. We expect that GE-μ-XRF will become an effective method of estimating the film thickness of a small region.

  5. Development and applications of grazing exit micro X-ray fluorescence instrument using a polycapillary X-ray lens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emoto, T.; Sato, Y.; Konishi, Y.; Ding, X.; Tsuji, K. E-mail: tsuji@a-chem.eng.osaka-cu.ac.jp

    2004-08-31

    A polycapillary X-ray lens is an effective optics to obtain a {mu}m-size X-ray beam for micro-X-ray fluorescence spectrometry ({mu}-XRF). We developed a {mu}-XRF instrument using a polycapillary X-ray lens, which also enabled us to perform Grazing Exit {mu}-XRF (GE-{mu}-XRF). The evaluated diameter of the primary X-ray beam was 48 {mu}m at the focal distance of the X-ray lens. Use of this instrument enabled two-dimensional mapping of the elemental distributions during growth of the plant 'Quinoa'. The results of the mapping revealed elemental transition during growth. In addition, a small region of thin film was analyzed by GE-{mu}-XRF. We expect that GE-{mu}-XRF will become an effective method of estimating the film thickness of a small region.

  6. Proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena, E-mail: bazalova@stanford.edu; Xing, Lei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-5847 and Global Station for Quantum Medical Science and Engineering, Global Institution for Collaborative Research and Education (GI-CoRE), Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8648 (Japan); Ahmad, Moiz [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-5847 (United States); Matsuura, Taeko; Takao, Seishin; Shirato, Hiroki; Umegaki, Kikuo [Department of Medical Physics, Proton Beam Therapy Center, Hokkaido University Hospital, Sapporo 060-8648, Japan and Global Station for Quantum Medical Science and Engineering, Global Institution for Collaborative Research and Education (GI-CoRE), Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8648 (Japan); Matsuo, Yuto [Department of Medical Physics, Proton Beam Therapy Center, Hokkaido University Hospital, Sapporo 060-8648 (Japan); Fahrig, Rebecca [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT (pXFCT) imaging of gold in a small animal sized object by means of experiments and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Methods: First, proton-induced gold x-ray fluorescence (pXRF) was measured as a function of gold concentration. Vials of 2.2 cm in diameter filled with 0%–5% Au solutions were irradiated with a 220 MeV proton beam and x-ray fluorescence induced by the interaction of protons, and Au was detected with a 3 × 3 mm{sup 2} CdTe detector placed at 90° with respect to the incident proton beam at a distance of 45 cm from the vials. Second, a 7-cm diameter water phantom containing three 2.2-diameter vials with 3%–5% Au solutions was imaged with a 7-mm FWHM 220 MeV proton beam in a first generation CT scanning geometry. X-rays scattered perpendicular to the incident proton beam were acquired with the CdTe detector placed at 45 cm from the phantom positioned on a translation/rotation stage. Twenty one translational steps spaced by 3 mm at each of 36 projection angles spaced by 10° were acquired, and pXFCT images of the phantom were reconstructed with filtered back projection. A simplified geometry of the experimental data acquisition setup was modeled with the MC TOPAS code, and simulation results were compared to the experimental data. Results: A linear relationship between gold pXRF and gold concentration was observed in both experimental and MC simulation data (R{sup 2} > 0.99). All Au vials were apparent in the experimental and simulated pXFCT images. Specifically, the 3% Au vial was detectable in the experimental [contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) = 5.8] and simulated (CNR = 11.5) pXFCT image. Due to fluorescence x-ray attenuation in the higher concentration vials, the 4% and 5% Au contrast were underestimated by 10% and 15%, respectively, in both the experimental and simulated pXFCT images. Conclusions: Proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT imaging of 3%–5% gold solutions in a

  7. Proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT (pXFCT) imaging of gold in a small animal sized object by means of experiments and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Methods: First, proton-induced gold x-ray fluorescence (pXRF) was measured as a function of gold concentration. Vials of 2.2 cm in diameter filled with 0%–5% Au solutions were irradiated with a 220 MeV proton beam and x-ray fluorescence induced by the interaction of protons, and Au was detected with a 3 × 3 mm2 CdTe detector placed at 90° with respect to the incident proton beam at a distance of 45 cm from the vials. Second, a 7-cm diameter water phantom containing three 2.2-diameter vials with 3%–5% Au solutions was imaged with a 7-mm FWHM 220 MeV proton beam in a first generation CT scanning geometry. X-rays scattered perpendicular to the incident proton beam were acquired with the CdTe detector placed at 45 cm from the phantom positioned on a translation/rotation stage. Twenty one translational steps spaced by 3 mm at each of 36 projection angles spaced by 10° were acquired, and pXFCT images of the phantom were reconstructed with filtered back projection. A simplified geometry of the experimental data acquisition setup was modeled with the MC TOPAS code, and simulation results were compared to the experimental data. Results: A linear relationship between gold pXRF and gold concentration was observed in both experimental and MC simulation data (R2 > 0.99). All Au vials were apparent in the experimental and simulated pXFCT images. Specifically, the 3% Au vial was detectable in the experimental [contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) = 5.8] and simulated (CNR = 11.5) pXFCT image. Due to fluorescence x-ray attenuation in the higher concentration vials, the 4% and 5% Au contrast were underestimated by 10% and 15%, respectively, in both the experimental and simulated pXFCT images. Conclusions: Proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT imaging of 3%–5% gold solutions in a small animal

  8. Analysis of silicate rocks by x-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aims at developing an all-purpose method for the determination of various elements in silicate rocks, by means of X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. The sample is prepared by borax fusion, in the presence of cobalt oxide acting as an inner standard meant for eliminating certain errors. Contents are computed in comparison with outer standards having a chemical composition akin to that of the rock sample under analysis. (authors)

  9. Total Reflection X Ray Fluorescence: an approach to nano analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the last decade, Total Reflection X Ray Fluorescence (TXRF) has become an extremely powerful method of element analysis. It allows nanoanalytical investigations in three different ways: (i) use of minute sample amounts of only some 100 nanograms, (i i) determination of extreme traces down to nanograms per liter and (i i i) depth profiling of near surface layers of only 10 nanometer thickness. The basic principles of TXRF are described and examples of applications are demonstrated

  10. Bone lead measured by X-ray fluorescence: epidemiologic methods.

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, H; Aro, A; Rotnitzky, A

    1995-01-01

    In vivo X-ray fluorescence (XRF) measurement of bone lead concentration (XRF) has emerged as an important technique for future epidemiological studies of long-term toxicity. Several issues germane to epidemiologic methodology need to be addressed, however. First, sources of variability in measurements of bone lead need to be quantified, including imprecision related to the physical measurement itself and the variability of lead deposition over the two main compartments of bones (cortical vs. ...

  11. Elemental analysis using a handheld X-Ray fluorescence spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groover, Krishangi; Izbicki, John

    2016-06-24

    The U.S. Geological Survey is collecting geologic samples from local stream channels, aquifer materials, and rock outcrops for studies of trace elements in the Mojave Desert, southern California. These samples are collected because geologic materials can release a variety of elements to the environment when exposed to water. The samples are to be analyzed with a handheld X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer to determine the concentrations of up to 27 elements, including chromium.

  12. Identifications studies of Lauha Bhasma by X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, S. C.; Reddy, K. R. C; Sastry, G. V. S

    2012-01-01

    Procedures for preparation of Lauha Bhasma are described in ancient texts of Ayurveda. These procedures also begin with different source material for iron such as Teekshna Lauha and Kanta Lauha etc. In the present study, we have selected different source materials viz. magnetite iron ore for Kanta Lauha and pure (Armco grade) iron turnings for Teekshna Lauha. The standard procedures of preparation of Lauha Bhasma are carried out in identical conditions for these two raw materials. The final product from the Puta are characterized by using X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy to understanding the crystallographic form or forms of iron oxides and their composition at the end of each Puta. The iron content at the end of repeated Putas (18 for Kanta Lauha and 20 for Teekshna Lauha) have shown a decrease in case of Teekshna Lauha since the starting material is pure iron while it showed only marginal decreases in the case of Kanta Lauha because the Fe3O4 of magnetite is undergoing oxidation to Fe2O3. The trace elements remain within the Bhasma in the form of various oxides of Si, Al, Ca, etc. PMID:23049200

  13. Trends in environmental science using microscopic X-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fittschen, Ursula Elisabeth Adriane, E-mail: ursula.fittschen@chemie.uni-hamburg.de [Department of Chemistry, University of Hamburg, Martin-Luther-King-Platz 6, 20146 Hamburg (Germany); Falkenberg, Gerald [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Notkestr. 85, 22603 Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-08-15

    Microscopic X-ray fluorescence (micro-XRF) is a versatile tool in environmental analysis. We review work done in this field from 2008 to 2010 and highlight new aspects. Overall, there is a strong trend to combine fluorescence data with other data like diffraction or absorption spectroscopy. Also, the use of laboratory based instrumentation has become wide spread as more commercial instruments are available. At laboratories and synchrotron sites the trend towards higher spatial resolution is still persistent hitting sub micrometer values in case of synchrotron set ups.

  14. Long-Term RXTE Monitoring of Anomalous X-ray Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Gavriil, F P; Gavriil, Fotis P.; Kaspi, Victoria M.

    2001-01-01

    We report on the long-term monitoring of three anomalous X-ray pulsars using the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). We present a phase-coherent timing ephemeris for 4U 0142+61, and show that it has rotated with high stability over 4.4 yr, with RMS phase deviations of 7% of the pulse period from a simple fit including only $\

  15. X-ray scattering in X-ray fluorescence spectra with X-ray tube excitation - Modelling, experiment, and Monte-Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodoroaba, V.-D., E-mail: Dan.Hodoroaba@bam.d [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Division VI.4 Surface Technologies, D-12200 Berlin (Germany); Radtke, M. [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Division I.3 Structure Analysis, Polymer Analysis, D-12200 Berlin (Germany); Vincze, L. [Ghent University, Department of Analytical Chemistry, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Rackwitz, V.; Reuter, D. [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Division VI.4 Surface Technologies, D-12200 Berlin (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    X-ray scattering may contribute significantly to the spectral background of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectra. Based on metrological measurements carried out with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) having attached a well characterised X-ray source (polychromatic X-ray tube) and a calibrated energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) the accuracy of a physical model for X-ray scattering is systematically evaluated for representative samples. The knowledge of the X-ray spectrometer efficiency, but also of the spectrometer response functions makes it possible to define a physical spectral background of XRF spectra. Background subtraction relying on purely mathematical procedures is state-of-the-art. The results produced by the analytical model are at least as reliable as those obtained by Monte-Carlo simulations, even without considering the very challenging contribution of multiple scattering. Special attention has been paid to Compton broadening. Relevant applications of the implementation of the analytical model presented in this paper are the prediction of the limits of detection for particular cases or the determination of the transmission of X-ray polycapillary lenses.

  16. X-ray scattering in X-ray fluorescence spectra with X-ray tube excitation - Modelling, experiment, and Monte-Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray scattering may contribute significantly to the spectral background of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectra. Based on metrological measurements carried out with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) having attached a well characterised X-ray source (polychromatic X-ray tube) and a calibrated energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) the accuracy of a physical model for X-ray scattering is systematically evaluated for representative samples. The knowledge of the X-ray spectrometer efficiency, but also of the spectrometer response functions makes it possible to define a physical spectral background of XRF spectra. Background subtraction relying on purely mathematical procedures is state-of-the-art. The results produced by the analytical model are at least as reliable as those obtained by Monte-Carlo simulations, even without considering the very challenging contribution of multiple scattering. Special attention has been paid to Compton broadening. Relevant applications of the implementation of the analytical model presented in this paper are the prediction of the limits of detection for particular cases or the determination of the transmission of X-ray polycapillary lenses.

  17. A Two-Temperature Supernova Fallback Disk Model for Anomalous X-ray Pulsars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    We present a case study of the relevance of the radially pulsational instability of a two-temperature accretion disk around a neutron star to anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs). Our estimates are based on the approximation that such a neutron star disk with mass in the range of 10-6 - 10-5 M⊙ is formed by supernova fallback. We derive several peculiar properties of the accretion disk instability: a narrow interval of X-ray pulse periods; lower X-ray luminosities; a period derivative and an evolution time scale. All these results are in good agreement with the observations of the AXPs.

  18. Long-term evolution of anomalous X-ray pulsars and soft gamma repeaters

    OpenAIRE

    Benli, Onur; Ertan, Unal

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated the long-term evolution of individual anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) and soft gamma repeaters (SGRs) with relatively well constrained X-ray luminosity and rotational properties. In the frame of the fallback disc model, we have obtained the ranges of disc mass and dipole field strength that can produce the observed source properties. We have compared our results with those obtained earlier for dim isolated neutron stars (XDINs). Our results show that (1) the X-ray luminosi...

  19. Applications of synchrotron x-ray fluorescence to extraterrestrial materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutton, S.R.; Rivers, M.L.; Smith, J.V.

    1986-01-01

    Synchrotron x-ray fluorescence (SXRF) is a valuable technique for trace element analyses of extraterrestrial materials permitting minimum detection limits less than 1 ppM for 20 micrometer spots. SXRF measurements have been performed on iron meteorites and micrometeorites using white synchrotron radiation and an energy dispersive x-ray detector at the National Synchrotron Light Source (X-26C), Brookhaven National Laboratory (NY). Partitioning of Cu between troilite (FeS) and metal in the nine iron meteorites studied suggests sub-solidus re-equilibration in these objects. A technique has been developed for determining self-absorption corrections for filtered, continuum excitation of small specimens, such as stratospheric particles and refractory inclusions in meteorites.

  20. Hybrid fluorescence tomography/x-ray tomography improves reconstruction quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, R. B.; Ale, A.; Sarantopoulos, A.; Freyer, M.; Söhngen, R.; Zientkowska, M.; Ntziachristos, V.

    2009-07-01

    A novel hybrid imaging system for simultaneous X-ray and Fluorescence Tomography is presented, capitalizing on 360°-projection free-space fluorescence tomography. The system is implemented within a commercial micro-CT scanner allowing reconstructions with a resolution of 95μm. Acquired data sets are intrinsically coregistered in the same coordinate system and can be used to correctly localize reconstructed fluorescence distributions with morphological features. More importantly, the micro-CT data, automatically segmented into different organ and tissue segments can be used to guide the fluorescence reconstruction algorithm and reduce the ill coditioning of the inverse problem. We showcase the use of the system and the improvements in image quality for lesions in brain and lung.

  1. X-ray fluorescence in Member States: Slovenia. Applications of X ray fluorescence spectrometry in biology and food science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our objective here is to present briefly two applications of the XRF elemental analysis, which we recently started: applying the XRF analysis after sample excitation by radioisotope sources, X ray tubes in the standard and the total reflection modes (TXRF), as well as by PIXE and microPIXE. The fluorescence X ray spectra shown below are typical examples of data and information on basis of which all the applications were realized. It is obvious that the use of the techniques, which produce the above spectra require a good knowledge of the nuclear spectroscopy, and also skills to adjust the experimental set-up including the source of fluorescence excitation, selection of appropriate X ray detection system (geometry of experiment), as well as proper sampling and sample preparation, considering the characteristics of a large variety of different materials to be examined. And finally one needs to define the application and establish good collaboration with the users and/or scientists in a number of interesting fields. We would like to present here just two examples of such a comprehensive approach to the application of XRF analysis

  2. X-Ray Diffraction and X-Ray Fluorescent Analyses of Prehistoric Pottery Shards from Ulu Kelantan

    OpenAIRE

    Zuliskandar Ramli; Nik H.S.N. Abdul Rahman; Adnan Jusoh; Yunus Sauman

    2011-01-01

    Problem statement: X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and X-Ray Fluorescent (XRF) were used in order to obtain mineralogical and elemental composition of seven pottery shards that have been unearthed during the excavation at Peraling Cave and Cha Cave in Ulu Kelantan, Malaysia. Approach: Peraling Cave and Cha Cave were prehistoric sites dating from 10, 000 BC which were inhabited by Hoabinhian people and then continuously used by people of Neolithic culture around 3000 BC. Results: Mineralogical and ele...

  3. Rare earth aerosol analysis by x-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analytical method for the determination of four lanthanides in air filter samples is described. The method involves simultaneous quantitative determinations of La, Ce, Pr, and Nd at the microgram level by x-ray fluorescence spectrometry without chemical separation of these rare earths and without serious interferences from the dust matrices on the filters. The method has been used successfully to analyze some air filter samples collected at a rare earth processing refinery in Illinois. A description of the development of the method is given as well as the results obtained by using this method on the air filter samples. The reproducibility of the results was generally +-5%

  4. Portable X-ray Fluorescence Unit for Analyzing Crime Scenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visco, A.

    2003-12-01

    Goddard Space Flight Center and the National Institute of Justice have teamed up to apply NASA technology to the field of forensic science. NASA hardware that is under development for future planetary robotic missions, such as Mars exploration, is being engineered into a rugged, portable, non-destructive X-ray fluorescence system for identifying gunshot residue, blood, and semen at crime scenes. This project establishes the shielding requirements that will ensure that the exposure of a user to ionizing radiation is below the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's allowable limits, and also develops the benchtop model for testing the system in a controlled environment.

  5. Studies of some alloys using x-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this project an attempt has been made for the study of alloys commonly used using x-ray fluorescence ( XRF ) technique. The alloys selected for the study included gold jewellery, steels, brasses and coins. The XRF method proved to be simple, fast, non-destructive and reliable as compared to chemical methods. The results showed that most of the gold jewellery used in this country have carat value of 18 and 21. Also most coins used in different countries are alloys of Cu and Ni. A simple spark method was used for the determination of C in steels, since C is not possible to analyze by XRF. ( Author )

  6. X-ray scattering in X-ray fluorescence spectra with X-ray monochromatic, polarised excitation - Modelling, experiment, and Monte-Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodoroaba, V.-D., E-mail: Dan.Hodoroaba@bam.de [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Division 6.4 Surface Technologies, D-12200 Berlin (Germany); Radtke, M.; Reinholz, U.; Riesemeier, H. [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Division 1.3 Structure Analysis, Polymer Analysis, D-12200 Berlin (Germany); Vincze, L. [Ghent University, Department of Analytical Chemistry, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Reuter, D. [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Division 6.4 Surface Technologies, D-12200 Berlin (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    A systematic series of measurements has been carried out with monochromatic X-ray excitation with synchrotron radiation in order to check a physical model on X-ray scattering. The model has recently been successfully tested for the case of polychromatic, unpolarised excitation emitted by an X-ray tube. Our main purpose is the modelling of a physical background in X-ray fluorescence spectra, so that improved quantitative results can be achieved especially for strongly scattering specimens. The model includes single Rayleigh and Compton scattering in the specimen, the effect of bound electrons, the challenging Compton broadening and the polarisation degree. Representative specimens, measurement geometries and excitation energies have been selected with synchrotron monochromatic light at BAMline/BESSY II. Monte-Carlo simulations have been also carried out in order to evaluate the quality of the results achieved with the model.

  7. X-ray scattering in X-ray fluorescence spectra with X-ray monochromatic, polarised excitation - Modelling, experiment, and Monte-Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A systematic series of measurements has been carried out with monochromatic X-ray excitation with synchrotron radiation in order to check a physical model on X-ray scattering. The model has recently been successfully tested for the case of polychromatic, unpolarised excitation emitted by an X-ray tube. Our main purpose is the modelling of a physical background in X-ray fluorescence spectra, so that improved quantitative results can be achieved especially for strongly scattering specimens. The model includes single Rayleigh and Compton scattering in the specimen, the effect of bound electrons, the challenging Compton broadening and the polarisation degree. Representative specimens, measurement geometries and excitation energies have been selected with synchrotron monochromatic light at BAMline/BESSY II. Monte-Carlo simulations have been also carried out in order to evaluate the quality of the results achieved with the model.

  8. Determination of X-ray excitation spectra in micro X-ray fluorescence spectrometry with capillary optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, R. D.; Sosa, C.; Sbarato, V.; Leani, J.; Sánchez, H. J.

    2016-03-01

    The quantitative X-ray fluorescence microanalysis by fundamental parameters requires the knowledge of the energy distribution of the excitation beam. When this beam is produced by capillary optics, its high intensity and anisotropy complicate a direct determination. An alternative is an indirect determination based on measurement of induced X-ray fluorescence in a set of targets. In this work the X-ray excitation spectrum is determined by an iterative deconvolution process of the fundamental parameter expression for the X-ray fluorescence intensities. The method has the advantage that it does not require any assumption about the energy distribution of the X-ray source or the energy dependence of the lens transmission. Numerous XRF targets of pure elements with emission lines covering the full energy range of the X-ray source are employed. The only requirement on the targets is a high homogeneity in its composition. In fact, it does not impose any condition on the sample thickness. The accuracy observed in the validation process implemented with reference materials is similar to that reported with alternative approaches: 5% for main components, 10% for minor elements and 15% for trace elements.

  9. Count rates and structure factors in anomalous soft x-ray scattering from cuprate superconductors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbamonte, P; Rusydi, A; Logvenov, G; Bozovic, [No Value; Sawatzky, GA; Venema, L.C.; Bozovic,; Pavuna, D

    2002-01-01

    It has recently been shown that x-ray diffraction from the doped holes in cuprates can be enhanced by 3-4 orders of magnitude by exploiting resonance effects in the oxygen K shell. This new type of anomalous scattering is direct way of probing ground state inhomogeneity in the mobile carrier liquid

  10. Soft Gamma Repeaters and Anomalous X-ray Pulsars: Magnetar Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, P. M.; Thompson, C.

    2005-01-01

    This article is a review of Soft Gamma Repeaters and Anomalous X-ray Pulsars. It contains a brief historical record of the emergence of these classes of neutron stars, a thorough overview of the observational data, a succinct summary of the magnetar model, and suggested directions for future research in this field.

  11. X-Ray Diffraction and Fluorescence Instrument for Mineralogical Analysis at the Lunar Surface Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a compact and lightweight X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) / X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) instrument for analysis of mineralogical composition of regolith,...

  12. X-Ray Diffraction and Fluorescence Instrument for Mineralogical Analysis at the Lunar Surface Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop LUNA, a compact and lightweight X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) / X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) instrument for mineralogical analysis of regolith, rock...

  13. Determination of beryllium by using X-ray fluorescence spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawisza, Beata

    2008-03-01

    X-ray fluorescence spectrometry method is subject to certain difficulties and inconveniences for the elements having the atomic number 9 or less. These difficulties become progressively more severe as the atomic number decreases, and are quite serious for beryllium, which is practically indeterminable directly by XRF. Therefore, an indirect determination of beryllium that is based on the evaluation of cobalt in the precipitate is taken into consideration. In the thesis below, there is a description of a new, simple, and precise method by selective precipitation using hexamminecobalt(III) chloride and ammonium carbonate-EDTA solution as a complexing agent for the determining of a trace amount of beryllium using X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. The optimum conditions for [Co(NH(3))(6)][Be(2)(OH)(3)(CO(3))(2)(H(2)O)(2)].(3)H(2)O complex formation were studied. The complex was collected on the membrane filter, and the Co Kalpha line was measured by XRF. The method presents the advantages of the sample preparation and the elimination of the matrix effects due to the thin film obtained. The detection limit of the proposed method is 0.2 mg of beryllium. The method was successfully applied to beryllium determination in copper/ beryllium/cobalt alloys.

  14. Preparation of tissue samples for X-ray fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chwiej, Joanna; Szczerbowska-Boruchowska, Magdalena; Lankosz, Marek; Wojcik, Slawomir; Falkenberg, Gerald; Stegowski, Zdzislaw; Setkowicz, Zuzanna

    2005-12-01

    As is well-known, trace elements, especially metals, play an important role in the pathogenesis of many disorders. The topographic and quantitative elemental analysis of pathologically changed tissues may shed some new light on processes leading to the degeneration of cells in the case of selected diseases. An ideal and powerful tool for such purpose is the Synchrotron Microbeam X-ray Fluorescence technique. It enables the carrying out of investigations of the elemental composition of tissues even at the single cell level. The tissue samples for histopathological investigations are routinely fixed and embedded in paraffin. The authors try to verify the usefulness of such prepared tissue sections for elemental analysis with the use of X-ray fluorescence microscopy. Studies were performed on rat brain samples. Changes in elemental composition caused by fixation in formalin or paraformaldehyde and embedding in paraffin were examined. Measurements were carried out at the bending magnet beamline L of the Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor HASYLAB in Hamburg. The decrease in mass per unit area of K, Br and the increase in P, S, Fe, Cu and Zn in the tissue were observed as a result of the fixation. For the samples embedded in paraffin, a lower level of most elements was observed. Additionally, for these samples, changes in the composition of some elements were not uniform for different analyzed areas of rat brain.

  15. X-ray fluorescence in Member States: Venezuela

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The direct analysis of biological samples is the main research challenge of the scientific group at the Unidad de Analisis Instrumental of the Agronomy Faculty, Universidad Centro Occidental Lisandro Alvarado, (UCLA) Edo. Lara, Venezuela. The technique of total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) plays an important role in the scientific activities of the laboratory. In this field, the research is devoted to the design, development, evaluation and application of methods for the analysis of biological and related samples, such as biological tissues, fluids, biota, soil and water samples. The studies involve the evaluation of feasibility for direct determination of analytes, the in situ (in quartz sample holder) preparation techniques, the in situ pre-concentration and speciation among others studies. The methods are developed for the application in clinical studies, agronomy, environmental monitoring, bioremediation, statistical processing of data and neural network applications. The following projects are described: Direct analysis of biological samples by TXRF; Determination of calcium, potassium, manganese, iron, cooper and zinc levels in representative samples of two onion cultivars using TXRF and ultrasound extraction procedure; Evaluation of vermicompost as bioadsorbent substrate of Pb, Ni, V and Cr for waste waters remediation using total reflection X-ray fluorescence; Determination by TXRF of total As in onion plants growing in contaminated substrates

  16. Astrophysics of the Soft Gamma Repeaters and Anomalous X-Ray Pulsars

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Christopher

    2000-01-01

    I summarize the recent advances in our understanding of the Soft Gamma Repeaters: in particular their spin behavior, persistent emission and hyper-Eddington outbursts. The giant flares on 5 March 1979 and 27 August 1998 provide compelling physical evidence for magnetic fields stronger than 10 B_{QED} = 4.4 x 10^{14} G, consistent with the rapid spindown detected in two of these sources. The persistent X-ray emission and variable spindown of the 6-12 s Anomalous X-ray Pulsars are compared and ...

  17. Period Clustering of the Anomalous X-Ray Pulsars and Magnetic Field Decay in Magnetars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colpi; Geppert; Page

    2000-01-20

    We confront theoretical models for the rotational, magnetic, and thermal evolution of an ultramagnetized neutron star, or magnetar, with available data on the anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs). We argue that, if the AXPs are interpreted as magnetars, their clustering of spin periods between 6 and 12 s (observed at present in this class of objects), their period derivatives, their thermal X-ray luminosities, and the association of two of them with young supernova remnants can only be understood globally if the magnetic field in magnetars decays significantly on a timescale of the order of 104 yr.

  18. X-ray fluorescence in IAEA Member States: Sri Lanka

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (ED-XRF) facility was established in 2001 under the Technical Cooperation project on Development and Utilization of Nuclear Analytical Technology (SRL/2/005). The XRF facility consists of X-ray tube with Mo anode, secondary targets and Si/Li detector coupled with portable inspector MCA and Genie 2000 spectrum acquisition software. Qualitative and Quantitative analysis is being carried out using QXAS-BFP (Backscatter Fundamental Parameter method) for thick samples, QAES (P.Kump, Slovenia) for both intermediate thickness and thin samples. The EDXRF facility is used for the elemental analysis of soil /sediments samples, plant materials, air filters, alloys and water samples. The analytical services are provided for research institutions, Universities, Geological and Environmental assessment companies to determine major, minor and trace elements in various materials. Since 1998 the XRF group has also participated in the IAEA/RCA project on Isotopes and related techniques to assess Air Pollution. Currently, three research projects on the application of EDXRF technique in environmental studies are being carried out (author)

  19. Environmental studies in Khartoum area using x-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work an attempt has been made for the analysis of some soil, plant, sediments and fish samples of relevance to environmental pollution in Khartoum area. These samples have been collected from different places in residential areas, so as to cover industrial areas, agricultural and residential areas, as well as Tuti Island as control area. Special attention has been dedicated to the analysis of lead concentrations resulting from automobile-emissions in soils and to other toxic metals such as Cr in some industries. The samples were analysed by x-ray fluorescence (XRF) technique. The results obtained using XRF measurements and computer software called QXAS for data analysis. The concentrations of lead and some heavy metals such as Cr in soils from certain locations were alarming and may create pollution problems in the near future. The results obtained from different countries. The results are generally lower than the international limits. (Author)

  20. Laboratory micro-X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy instrumentation and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Haschke, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Micro-X-ray fluorescence offers the possibility for a position- sensitive and non-destructive analysis that can be used for the analysis of non-homogeneous materials and layer systems. This analytical technique has shown a dynamic development in the last 15 years and is used for the analysis of small particles, inclusions, of elemental distributions for a wide range of different applications both in research and quality control. The first experiments were performed on synchrotrons but there is a requirement for laboratory instruments which offers a fast and immediate access for analytical results. The book discuss the main components of a µ-XRF instrument and the different measurement modes, it gives an overview about the various instruments types, considers the special requirements for quantification of non-homogeneous materials and presents a wide range of application for single point and multi-point analysis as well as for distribution analysis in one, two and three dimensions.

  1. Determination of thorium by fluorescent x-ray spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, I.; Axelrod, J.M.

    1955-01-01

    A fluorescent x-ray spectrographic method for the determination of thoria in rock samples uses thallium as an internal standard. Measurements are made with a two-channel spectrometer equipped with quartz (d = 1.817 A.) analyzing crystals. Particle-size effects are minimized by grinding the sample components with a mixture of silicon carbide and aluminum and then briquetting. Analyses of 17 samples showed that for the 16 samples containing over 0.7% thoria the average error, based on chemical results, is 4.7% and the maximum error, 9.5%. Because of limitations of instrumentation, 0.2% thoria is considered the lower limit of detection. An analysis can be made in about an hour.

  2. Using X-ray Fluorescence to Date Petroglyphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, James

    2009-10-01

    Petroglyphs were created by ancient peoples of the Colorado Plateau who pecked figures of cultural or religious significance into the desert varnish, the ubiquitous dark patina covering the rock surfaces of the region. Manganese (Mn) is a significant elemental component of desert varnish that is often at trace levels in the substrate rock. As such, F. Lytle has shown that under certain conditions, it may be possible to estimate the age of petroglpyhs using Mn levels. In this work we use x-ray fluorescence to measure Mn levels in the desert varnish of petroglyphs and then use dated graffiti to attempt to calibrate the Mn level with age. Preliminary results from petroglyph panels in eastern Utah will be presented.

  3. Uranium concentrate analysis by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination of As, Ca, Fe, Mo, P, S, Si. Th, V and U in uranium concentrates by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy has been studied. As and U are determined in nitric solutions and for the rest of elements analysis is performed by a bead fusion technique using Li2B4O7 and Li2CO3 as fluxes. Although the uranium matrix minimizes the absorption and enhancement effects, because of the content variations of this element it is advisable to operate at a constant level of U3O8. Despite the high matrix absorption and the large dilution of the samples, sensitivity and speed are found to be satisfactory as the result of the use of a high sensitivity automatic spectrometer. The spectral interferences of Mo on S and P, and of Pb on As have been particularly considered. (author)

  4. Promising X-ray fluorescence tests for superconducting tunneljunction detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrich, Stephan; Robinson, Arthur L.

    2001-05-15

    Scientists in the Physical Biosciences Division of the Ernest Orlando Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) studying transition metals in proteins with fluorescence-detected L-edge absorption spectroscopy have found the measurements to be extremely challenging. The difficulty is that the metal centers are present in very dilute concentrations so that their weak fluorescence is often obscured by strong background signals carbon and oxygen. To solve this problem, the Berkeley group has been working with researchers from the Advanced Detector Group at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory on an energy-dispersive superconducting tunnel junction x-ray detector. These devices in principle have the energy resolution needed to reveal the metal signal. The most recent results with the latest version of the detector on Beamline 4.0.1-2 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) illustrate the promise of the cryogenic detector strategy not only for this application but also for spectroscopy of other types of dilute samples. Transition-metal complexes are key elements in many biologically important processes that are catalyzed by proteins (enzymes), photosynthesis being a prime example. The changes in that occur in electronic structure throughout a catalytic cycle are the subject of much research aimed at understanding the mechanisms of these processes. L-edge x-ray spectroscopy offers several advantages relative to the more common K-edge techniques, since it involves allowed transitions to the d-orbitals associated with metal-ligand bonding. It also has a rich multiplet structure interpretable by theory and higher spectral resolution.

  5. Structure investigation of metal ions clustering in dehydrated gel using x-ray anomalous dispersion effect

    CERN Document Server

    Soejima, Y; Sugiyama, M; Annaka, M; Nakamura, A; Hiramatsu, N; Hara, K

    2003-01-01

    The structure of copper ion clusters in dehydrated N-isopropylacrylamide/sodium acrylate (NIPA/SA) gel has been studied by means of small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) method. In order to distinguish the intensity scattered by Cu ions, the X-ray anomalous dispersion effect around the Cu K absorption edge has been coupled with SAXS. It is found that the dispersion effect dependent on the incident X-ray energy is remarkable only at the momentum transfer q = 0.031 A sup - sup 1 , where a SAXS peak is observed. The results indicate that copper ions form clusters in the dehydrated gel, and that the mean size of clusters is the same as that of SA clusters produced by microphase separation. It is therefore naturally presumed that copper ions are adsorbed into the SA molecules. On the basis of the presumption, a mechanism is proposed for microphase-separation and clustering of Cu ions.

  6. Initial idea to use optical flats for x-ray fluorescence analysis and recent applications to diffraction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Described in this work is the initial idea of using an optical flat for X-ray fluorescence analysis based upon studies of anomalous surface reflection (ASR). To develop total-reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis (TXRF) as one of the most powerful tools for microchemical analysis, various experiments such as the micro-determinations of uranium in sea-water, iron in human blood and rare earth elements in hot spring-water were attempted. Furthermore, the physically interesting experiment on Compton scattering under total-reflection conditions was conducted. Recent applications of the total-reflection phenomenon to diffraction studies, i.e. total-reflection X-ray diffraction (TXRD), are also presented. (author)

  7. Advances in understanding the anomalous dispersion of plasmas in the X-ray regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsen, J; Cheng, K T; Johnson, W R

    2008-09-24

    Over the last several years we have predicted and observed plasmas with an index of refraction greater than one in the soft X-ray regime. These plasmas are usually a few times ionized and have ranged from low-Z carbon plasmas to mid-Z tin plasmas. Our main computational tool has been the average atom code AVATOMKG that enables us to calculate the index of refraction for any plasma at any wavelength. In the last year we have improved this code to take into account many-atomic collisions. This allows the code to converge better at low frequencies. In this paper we present our search for plasmas with strong anomalous dispersion that could be used in X-ray laser interferometer experiments to help understand this phenomena. We discuss the calculations of anomalous dispersion in Na vapor and Ne plasmas near 47 nm where we predict large effects. We also discuss higher Z plasmas such as Ce and Yb plasmas that look very interesting near 47 nm. With the advent of the FLASH X-ray free electron laser in Germany and the LCLS X-FEL coming online at Stanford in another year we use the average atom code to explore plasmas at higher X-ray energy to identify potential experiments for the future. In particular we look near the K shell lines of near solid carbon plasmas and predict strong effects. During the next decade X-ray free electron lasers and other X-ray sources will be available to probe a wider variety of plasmas at higher densities and shorter wavelengths so understanding the index of refraction in plasmas will be even more essential.

  8. Searching for plasmas with anomalous dispersion in the soft X-ray regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsen, J; Johnson, W R; Cheng, K T

    2007-08-24

    Over the last decade the electron density of plasmas has been measured using X-ray laser interferometers in the 14 to 47 nm wavelength regime. With the same formula used in decades of experiments with optical interferometers, the data analysis assumes the index of refraction is due only to the free electrons, which makes the index less than one. Over the last several years, interferometer experiments in C, Al, Ag, and Sn plasmas have observed plasmas with index of refraction greater than one at 14 or 47 nm and demonstrated unequivocally that the usual formula for calculating the index of refraction is not always valid as the contribution from bound electrons can dominate the free electrons in certain cases. In this paper we search for other materials with strong anomalous dispersion that could be used in X-ray laser interferometer experiments to help understand this phenomena. An average atom code is used to calculate the plasma properties. This paper discusses the calculations of anomalous dispersion in Ne and Na plasmas near 47 nm and Xe plasmas near 14 nm. With the advent of the FLASH X-ray free electron laser in Germany and the LCLS X-FEL coming online at Stanford in 2 years the average atom code will be an invaluable tool to explore plasmas at higher X-ray energy to identify potential experiments for the future. During the next decade X-ray free electron lasers and other X-ray sources will be used to probe a wider variety of plasmas at higher densities and shorter wavelengths so understanding the index of refraction in plasmas will be even more essential.

  9. Azimuthal anisotropy of the scattered radiation in grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Gangadhar, E-mail: gdas@rrcat.gov.in; Tiwari, M. K.; Singh, A. K.; Ghosh, Haranath [Indus Synchrotrons Utilisation Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore-452013 (India)

    2015-06-24

    The Compton and elastic scattering radiations are the major contributor to the spectral background of an x-ray fluorescence spectrum, which eventually limits the element detection sensitivities of the technique to µg/g (ppm) range. In the present work, we provide a detail mathematical descriptions and show that how polarization properties of the synchrotron radiation influence the spectral background in the x-ray fluorescence technique. We demonstrate our theoretical understandings through experimental observations using total x-ray fluorescence measurements on standard reference materials. Interestingly, the azimuthal anisotropy of the scattered radiation is shown to have a vital role on the significance of the x-ray fluorescence detection sensitivities.

  10. An optical counterpart to the anomalous X-ray pulsar 4U0142+61.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulleman, F; van Kerkwijk, M H; Kulkarni, S R

    2000-12-01

    The energy source of the anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) is not understood, hence their designation as anomalous. Unlike binary X-ray pulsars, no companions are seen, so the energy cannot be supplied by accretion of matter from a companion star. The loss of rotational energy, which powers radio pulsars, is insufficient to power AXPs. Two models are generally considered: accretion from a large disk left over from the birth process, or decay of a very strong magnetic field (10(15) G) associated with a 'magnetar'. The lack of counterparts at other wavelengths has hampered progress in our understanding of these objects. Here we report deep optical observations of the field around 4U0142+61, which is the brightest AXP in X-rays. The source has no associated supernova remnant, which, together with its spin-down timescale of approximately 10(5) yr (ref. 5), suggests that it may be relatively old. We find an object with peculiar optical colours at the position of the X-ray source, and argue that it is the optical counterpart. The optical emission is too faint to admit the presence of a large accretion disk, but may be consistent with magnetospheric emission from a magnetar.

  11. Quo Vadis total reflection X-ray fluorescence?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The multielement trace analytical method 'total reflection X-ray fluorescence' (TXRF) has become a successfully established method in the semiconductor industry, particularly, in the ultra trace element analysis of silicon wafer surfaces. TXRF applications can fulfill general industrial requirements on daily routine of monitoring wafer cleanliness up to 300 mm diameter under cleanroom conditions. Nowadays, TXRF and hyphenated TXRF methods such as 'vapor phase decomposition (VPD)-TXRF', i.e. TXRF with a preceding surface and acid digestion and preconcentration procedure, are automated routine techniques ('wafer surface preparation system', WSPS). A linear range from 108 to 1014 [atoms/cm2] for some elements is regularly controlled. Instrument uptime is higher than 90%. The method is not tedious and can automatically be operated for 24 h/7 days. Elements such as S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Br, Sn, Sb, Ba and Pb are included in the software for standard peak search. The detection limits of recovered elements are between 1x1011 and 1x107 [atoms/cm2] depending upon X-ray excitation energy and the element of interest. For the determination of low Z elements, i.e. Na, Al and Mg, TXRF has also been extended but its implementation for routine analysis needs further research. At present, VPD-TXRF determination of light elements is viable in a range of 109 [atoms/cm2]. Novel detectors such as silicon drift detectors (SDD) with an active area of 5 mm2, 10 mm2 or 20 mm2, respectively, and multi-array detectors forming up to 70 mm2 are commercially available. The first SDD with 100 mm2 (!) area and integrated backside FET is working under laboratory conditions. Applications of and comparison with ICP-MS, HR-ICP-MS and SR-TXRF, an extension of TXRF capabilities with an extremely powerful energy source, are also reported

  12. Experimental demonstration of direct L-shell x-ray fluorescence imaging of gold nanoparticles using a benchtop x-ray source

    OpenAIRE

    Manohar, Nivedh; Reynoso, Francisco J.; Cho, Sang Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a proof-of-principle L-shell x-ray fluorescence (XRF) imaging system that locates and quantifies sparse concentrations of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) using a benchtop polychromatic x-ray source and a silicon (Si)-PIN diode x-ray detector system.

  13. Fast x-ray fluorescence microtomography of hydrated biological samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enzo Lombi

    Full Text Available Metals and metalloids play a key role in plant and other biological systems as some of them are essential to living organisms and all can be toxic at high concentrations. It is therefore important to understand how they are accumulated, complexed and transported within plants. In situ imaging of metal distribution at physiological relevant concentrations in highly hydrated biological systems is technically challenging. In the case of roots, this is mainly due to the possibility of artifacts arising during sample preparation such as cross sectioning. Synchrotron x-ray fluorescence microtomography has been used to obtain virtual cross sections of elemental distributions. However, traditionally this technique requires long data acquisition times. This has prohibited its application to highly hydrated biological samples which suffer both radiation damage and dehydration during extended analysis. However, recent advances in fast detectors coupled with powerful data acquisition approaches and suitable sample preparation methods can circumvent this problem. We demonstrate the heightened potential of this technique by imaging the distribution of nickel and zinc in hydrated plant roots. Although 3D tomography was still impeded by radiation damage, we successfully collected 2D tomograms of hydrated plant roots exposed to environmentally relevant metal concentrations for short periods of time. To our knowledge, this is the first published example of the possibilities offered by a new generation of fast fluorescence detectors to investigate metal and metalloid distribution in radiation-sensitive, biological samples.

  14. Flow method and apparatus for screening chemicals using micro x-ray fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Benjamin P.; Havrilla, George J.; Miller, Thomasin C.; Lewis, Cris; Mahan, Cynthia A.; Wells, Cyndi A.

    2009-04-14

    Method and apparatus for screening chemicals using micro x-ray fluorescence. A method for screening a mixture of potential pharmaceutical chemicals for binding to at least one target binder involves flow-separating a solution of chemicals and target binders into separated components, exposing them to an x-ray excitation beam, detecting x-ray fluorescence signals from the components, and determining from the signals whether or not a binding event between a chemical and target binder has occurred.

  15. The Fading of Transient Anomalous X-Ray Pulsar XTE J1810-197

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, J. P.; Gotthelf, E. V.

    2005-01-01

    Three observations of the 5.54 s transient anomalous X-ray pulsar XTE J1810-197 obtained over 6 months with the Newton X-ray Multi-Mirror (XMM-Newton) mission are used to study its spectrum and pulsed light curve as the source fades from outburst. The decay is consistent with an exponential of time constant ~300 days but not a power law as predicted in some models of sudden deep crustal heating events. All spectra are well fitted by a blackbody plus a steep power law, a problematic model that is commonly fitted to anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs). A two-temperature blackbody fit is also acceptable and better motivated physically in view of the faint optical/IR fluxes, the X-ray pulse shapes that weakly depend on energy in XTE J1810-197, and the inferred emitting areas that are less than or equal to the surface area of a neutron star. The fitted temperatures remained the same while the flux declined by 46%, which can be interpreted as a decrease in area of the emitting regions. The pulsar continues to spin down, albeit at a reduced rate of (5.1+/-1.6)×10-12 s s-1. The inferred characteristic age τc≡P/2P~17,000 yr, magnetic field strength Bs~1.7×1014 G, and outburst properties are consistent with both the outburst and quiescent X-ray luminosities being powered by magnetic field decay, i.e., XTE J1810-197 is a magnetar.

  16. Portable x-ray fluorescence spectrometer. Innovative technology summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the application of portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry to characterize materials related to deactivation and decommissioning (D and D) of contaminated facilities. Two portable XRF instruments manufactured by TN Spectrace were used in a technology evaluation as part of the Large-Scale Demonstration Project (LSDP) held at the Chicago Pile-5 Research Reactor (CP-5) located at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The LSDP is sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science and Technology, Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Are (DDFA). The objective of the LSDP is to demonstrate innovative technologies or technology applications potentially beneficial to the D and D of contaminated facilities. The portable XRF technology offers several potential benefits for rapid characterization of facility components and contaminants, including significant cost reduction, fast turnaround time,a nd virtually no secondary waste. Field work for the demonstration of the portable XRF technology was performed from August 28--September 3, 1996 and October 30--December 13, 1996

  17. Portable x-ray fluorescence spectrometer. Innovative technology summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    This report describes the application of portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry to characterize materials related to deactivation and decommissioning (D and D) of contaminated facilities. Two portable XRF instruments manufactured by TN Spectrace were used in a technology evaluation as part of the Large-Scale Demonstration Project (LSDP) held at the Chicago Pile-5 Research Reactor (CP-5) located at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The LSDP is sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science and Technology, Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Are (DDFA). The objective of the LSDP is to demonstrate innovative technologies or technology applications potentially beneficial to the D and D of contaminated facilities. The portable XRF technology offers several potential benefits for rapid characterization of facility components and contaminants, including significant cost reduction, fast turnaround time,a nd virtually no secondary waste. Field work for the demonstration of the portable XRF technology was performed from August 28--September 3, 1996 and October 30--December 13, 1996.

  18. Relation between the structure and catalytic activity for automotive emissions. Use of x-ray anomalous dispersion effect

    CERN Document Server

    Mizuki, J; Tanaka, H

    2003-01-01

    The employment of the X-ray anomalous dispersion effect allows us to detect the change in structure of catalytic converters with the environment exposed. Here we show that palladium atoms in a perovskite crystal move into and out of the crystal by anomalous X-ray diffraction and absorption techniques. This movement of the precious metal plays an important role to keep the catalytic activity long-lived. (author)

  19. Pinhole X-ray Fluorescence Imaging of Gadolinium Nanoparticles: A Preliminary Monte Carlo Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Seong Moon; Sung, Won Mo; Ye, Sung Joon [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    X-ray fluorescence imaging is a modality for the element-specific imaging of a subject through analysis of characteristic x-rays produced by exploiting the interaction of high atomic number elements and incoming x-rays. Previous studies have utilized a polychromatic x-ray source to investigate the production of in vivo x-ray fluorescence images for the assessment of concentrations and locations of gold nanoparticles. However, previous efforts have so far been unable to detect low concentrations, such as 0.001% gold by weight, which is an expected concentration accumulated in tumors. We examined the feasibility of a monochromatic synchrotron x-rays implementation of pinhole x-ray fluorescence imaging by Monte Carlo simulations using MCNP5. In the current study, gadolinium (Gd) nanoparticles, which have been widely used as a contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging and also as a dose enhancer in radiation therapy, were chosen for tumor targeting. Since a monochromatic x-ray source is used, the increased x-ray fluorescence signals allow the detection of low concentrations of Gd. Two different monochromatic x-ray beam energies, 50.5 keV near the Kedge energy (i.e., 50.207 keV) of Gd and 55 keV, were compared by their respective imaging results. Using Monte Carlo simulations the feasibility of imaging low concentrations of Gd nanoparticles (e.g., 0.001 wt%) with x-ray fluorescence using monochromatic synchrotron x-rays of two different energies was shown. In the case of imaging a single Gd column inserted in the center of a water phantom, the fluorescence signals from 0.05 wt% and 0.1 wt% Gd columns irradiated with a 50.5 keV photon beam were higher than those irradiated with 55 keV. Below 0.05 wt% region no significant differences were found.

  20. Pinhole X-ray Fluorescence Imaging of Gadolinium Nanoparticles: A Preliminary Monte Carlo Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray fluorescence imaging is a modality for the element-specific imaging of a subject through analysis of characteristic x-rays produced by exploiting the interaction of high atomic number elements and incoming x-rays. Previous studies have utilized a polychromatic x-ray source to investigate the production of in vivo x-ray fluorescence images for the assessment of concentrations and locations of gold nanoparticles. However, previous efforts have so far been unable to detect low concentrations, such as 0.001% gold by weight, which is an expected concentration accumulated in tumors. We examined the feasibility of a monochromatic synchrotron x-rays implementation of pinhole x-ray fluorescence imaging by Monte Carlo simulations using MCNP5. In the current study, gadolinium (Gd) nanoparticles, which have been widely used as a contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging and also as a dose enhancer in radiation therapy, were chosen for tumor targeting. Since a monochromatic x-ray source is used, the increased x-ray fluorescence signals allow the detection of low concentrations of Gd. Two different monochromatic x-ray beam energies, 50.5 keV near the Kedge energy (i.e., 50.207 keV) of Gd and 55 keV, were compared by their respective imaging results. Using Monte Carlo simulations the feasibility of imaging low concentrations of Gd nanoparticles (e.g., 0.001 wt%) with x-ray fluorescence using monochromatic synchrotron x-rays of two different energies was shown. In the case of imaging a single Gd column inserted in the center of a water phantom, the fluorescence signals from 0.05 wt% and 0.1 wt% Gd columns irradiated with a 50.5 keV photon beam were higher than those irradiated with 55 keV. Below 0.05 wt% region no significant differences were found

  1. X-ray fluorescence in IAEA Member States: Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Instrumental facilities of the ICMUV include: a Total-reflection X-Ray Fluorencence (TXRF), a static and a portable Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometers. These equipments are employed in the field of the art and archaeometry, and some applications in this area are implemented. The portable EDXRF spectrometer is advisable to perform 'in situ' and on-line analysis in a multidisciplinary environment, the static EDXRF equipment is good to perform analysis on paper and metal pieces. The TXRF spectrometry is the best technique for very sensitive analysis of trace elements in microsamples. Using the last technique we have analyzed the cottons used by the restorers in the different steps of the restoration process; it appeared that the method is a good tool to study the composition of different layers and zones of the work of art. Current projects include: 1. Analysis of valuable antique ceramics that can be investigated only when the analysis does not result in any damage. EDXRF measurements with portable instrumentation provide non-destructive analysis that completely eliminates sampling. An alternative method to determine the overglaze or underglaze pigment decoration is the microscopic examination of a ceramic cross section, but this examination requires sampling and damage to the physical integrity of the object. The aim of our work is to apply nondestructive technique ensuring the physical integrity of the object. We have proposed a portable EDXRF spectrometer to identify the underglaze and overglaze pigment decoration of ceramics on the basis of different values for the ratio between the Pb(Lα) line from the main element of the glaze cover and the Kα lines from the main elements (Co, Mn, Ni) found in the pigment, when the angle of the incidence radiation is varied. If the position of the detector is fixed, these ratios (Pb(Lα)/Co(Kα), etc.) increases with the angle for underglaze decoration, and decreases for overglaze decoration

  2. Structure determination of thin CoFe films by anomalous x-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gloskovskii, Andrei; Stryganyuk, Gregory; Ouardi, Siham [Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Fecher, Gerhard H.; Felser, Claudia [Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, D-01187 Dresden (Germany); Hamrle, Jaroslav; Pistora, Jaromir [Department of Physics and Nanotechnology Centre, VSB-Technical University of Ostrava, 70833 Ostrava (Czech Republic); Bosu, Subrojati; Saito, Kesami; Sakuraba, Yuya; Takanashi, Koki [Institute for Materials Research (IMR), Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2012-10-01

    This work reports on the investigation of structure-property relationships in thin CoFe films grown on MgO. Because of the very similar scattering factors of Fe and Co, it is not possible to distinguish the random A2 (W-type) structure from the ordered B2 (CsCl-type) structure with commonly used x-ray sources. Synchrotron radiation based anomalous x-ray diffraction overcomes this problem. It is shown that as grown thin films and 300 K post annealed films exhibit the A2 structure with a random distribution of Co and Fe. In contrast, films annealed at 400 K adopt the ordered B2 structure.

  3. Quantitative x-ray fluorescence analysis using monochromatic synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of high-intensity, tunable monochromatic x-rays for the quantitative analysis of biological and geochemical specimens at the 10-8 g level is described. Incident x-rays were obtained from the new LBL-EXXON permanent magnet wiggler beamline at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. The sample detector geometry was designed to make optimal use of polarization advantages for background reduction. Questions regarding the sensitivity and accuracy of the measurements were studied with particular emphasis on the advantages of tuning the x-ray energies for optimum excitation for specific elements. The implications of these measurements with respect to the use of x-ray microprobe beams will be discussed

  4. Romanian medieval earring analysis by X-ray fluorescence technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Several instrumental techniques of elemental analysis are now used for the characterization of archaeological materials. The combination between archaeological and analytical information can provide significant knowledge on the constituting material origin, heritage authentication and restoration, provenance, migration, social interaction and exchange. Surface mapping techniques such as X-Ray Fluorescence have become a powerful tool for obtaining qualitative and semi-quantitative information about the chemical composition of cultural heritage materials, including metallic archaeological objects. In this study, the material comes from the Middle Age cemetery of Feldioara (Romania). The excavation of the site located between the evangelical church and the parsonage led to the discovery of several funeral artifacts in 18 graves among a total of 127 excavated. Even if the inventory was quite poor, some of the objects helped in establishing the chronology. Six anonymous Hungarian denarii (silver coins) were attributed to Geza II (1141-1161) and Stefan III (1162-1172), placing the cemetery in the second half of the XII century. This period was also confirmed by three loop shaped earrings with the end in 'S' form (one small and two large earrings). The small earring was found during the excavation in grave number 86, while the two others were discovered together in grave number 113. The anthropological study shown that skeletons excavated from graves 86 and 113 belonged respectively to a child (1 individual, medium level preservation, 9 months +/- 3 months) and to an adult (1 individual). In this work, elemental mapping were obtained by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) technique from Jobin Yvon Horiba XGT-5000 instrument offering detailed elemental images with a spatial resolution of 100μm. The analysis revealed that the earrings were composed of copper, zinc and tin as major elements. Minor elements were also determined. The comparison between the two large earrings

  5. Romanian medieval earring analysis by X-ray fluorescence technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Therese, Laurent; Guillot, Philippe, E-mail: philippe.guillot@univ-jfc.fr [Laboratoire Diagnostics des Plasmas, CUFR J.F.C, Albi (France); Muja, Cristina [Laboratoire Diagnostics des Plasmas, CUFR J.F.C, Albi (France); Faculty of Biology, University of Bucharest (Romania); Vasile Parvan Institute of Archaeology, Bucharest, (Romania)

    2011-07-01

    Full text: Several instrumental techniques of elemental analysis are now used for the characterization of archaeological materials. The combination between archaeological and analytical information can provide significant knowledge on the constituting material origin, heritage authentication and restoration, provenance, migration, social interaction and exchange. Surface mapping techniques such as X-Ray Fluorescence have become a powerful tool for obtaining qualitative and semi-quantitative information about the chemical composition of cultural heritage materials, including metallic archaeological objects. In this study, the material comes from the Middle Age cemetery of Feldioara (Romania). The excavation of the site located between the evangelical church and the parsonage led to the discovery of several funeral artifacts in 18 graves among a total of 127 excavated. Even if the inventory was quite poor, some of the objects helped in establishing the chronology. Six anonymous Hungarian denarii (silver coins) were attributed to Geza II (1141-1161) and Stefan III (1162-1172), placing the cemetery in the second half of the XII century. This period was also confirmed by three loop shaped earrings with the end in 'S' form (one small and two large earrings). The small earring was found during the excavation in grave number 86, while the two others were discovered together in grave number 113. The anthropological study shown that skeletons excavated from graves 86 and 113 belonged respectively to a child (1 individual, medium level preservation, 9 months +/- 3 months) and to an adult (1 individual). In this work, elemental mapping were obtained by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) technique from Jobin Yvon Horiba XGT-5000 instrument offering detailed elemental images with a spatial resolution of 100{mu}m. The analysis revealed that the earrings were composed of copper, zinc and tin as major elements. Minor elements were also determined. The comparison between the two

  6. X-ray fluorescence in IAEA Member States: Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Environmental Research Laboratory (ERL) has got EDXRF system with total reflection module. These facilities are used for training, research and analytical services. Training is provided for Physics, Chemistry and Geology for both undergraduate and postgraduate students. The samples analysed in our laboratory include environmental, geological, biological, water, steel and alloy materials. The Research activities are carried out in support of environmental studies for air, water, soils and plant materials and optimisation of measurement protocols. We provides analytical services for the determination of major and minor elements in small-scale prospectors and miners of mineral ores with major constituents such as K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, As, Pb and Zr. Presently we are monitoring environmental pollution due to toxic heavy metals in industrial workplaces. Other analytical services rendered by the laboratory include determination of trace elements in Nigerian bitumen samples, determination of toxic heavy metals like Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, As, Pb, Cd, Hg in various stages of dam water in Ile-Ife- the university community. The laboratory also offered analytical services to other research institutions, Universities, governmental agencies, geological and environmental assessment companies. ERL group is currently participating in different projects/conferences organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Vienna with the following papers presented: (1) Determination of atmospheric concentration of toxic metals along urban motorway in two Nigerian cities using TXRF technique (2) Assessment of Occupational Exposure to Toxic Metals in some Paint and Secondary Iron and Steel Industries in Lagos, Nigeria using TXRF Technique. One of the postgraduate projects already completed is on Determination of Concentration of Toxic Metals in the Ambient Air in Lagos and Ile-Ife, Nigeria, using Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence Technique. (author)

  7. SARS E protein in phospholipid bilayers: an anomalous X-ray reflectivity study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khattari, Z. [Institut fuer Roentgenphysik, Universitaet Goettingen, Geiststrasse 11, 37073 Goettingen (Germany); Brotons, G. [Institut fuer Roentgenphysik, Universitaet Goettingen, Geiststrasse 11, 37073 Goettingen (Germany); Arbely, E. [Alexander Silberman Institute of Life Sciences, Department of Biological Chemistry, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Givat-Ram, Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel); Arkin, I.T. [Alexander Silberman Institute of Life Sciences, Department of Biological Chemistry, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Givat-Ram, Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel); Metzger, T.H. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Boite Postale 220, 38043 Grenoble (France); Salditt, T. [Institut fuer Roentgenphysik, Universitaet Goettingen, Geiststrasse 11, 37073 Goettingen (Germany)]. E-mail: tsaldit@gwdg.de

    2005-02-28

    We report on an anomalous X-ray reflectivity study to locate a labelled residue of a membrane protein with respect to the lipid bilayer. From such experiments, important constraints on the protein or peptide conformation can be derived. Specifically, our aim is to localize an iodine-labelled phenylalanine in the SARS E protein, incorporated in DMPC phospholipid bilayers, which are deposited in the form of thick multilamellar stacks on silicon surfaces. Here, we discuss the experimental aspects and the difficulties associated with the Fourier synthesis analysis that gives the electron density profile of the membranes.

  8. Soft gamma-ray repeaters and anomalous X-ray pulsars as highly magnetized white dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata

    2016-01-01

    We show that the soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs) and anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) can be explained as recently proposed highly magnetized white dwarfs (B-WDs). The radius and magnetic field of B-WDs are perfectly adequate to explain energies in SGRs/AXPs as the rotationally powered energy. While the highly magnetized neutron stars require an extra, observationally not well established yet, source of energy, the magnetized white dwarfs, yet following Chandrasekhar's theory (C-WDs), exhibit large ultra-violet luminosity which is observationally constrained from a strict upper limit.

  9. [Methods of detector response function establishment in X-ray fluorescence spectra analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhe; Tuo, Xian-Guo; Yang, Jian-Bo; Liu, Ming-Zhe; Cheng, Yi; Wang, Lei; Zhou, Jian-Bin

    2012-11-01

    During the measurement and analysis process of X-ray fluorescence spectra, it is very helpful to improve the analyze speed, accuracy and automaticity of X-ray fluorescence spectra analysis by establishing detector response function(DRF), which represents the shape of full energy peak and can provide former basic data for subsequent X-ray analysis technique. For the theory and model of semiconductor DRF in X-ray energy spectrum measurements, methods of three typical detector response function model establishment, key parameters of full energy peak standard deviation and Fano factor calculation, etc. are discussed, and meanwhile, the summarization and contrast of existing studies are shown in this paper. Finally, the suggestion for modeling methods of DRF in X-ray fluorescence spectra measurements is provided. PMID:23387190

  10. X-ray fluorescence in IAEA Member States: Albania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The activities on Energy-Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence Laboratory at the Institute of Nuclear Physics (INP) in Tirana, Albania started about 30 years ago from using simple systems consisting of single channel analysers, radioisotope sources and gas proportional or scintillation counters along with balanced filters for the separation of analytical lines. These systems were applied for the determination of single elements. A few portable prototypes were developed and successfully used for the determination of chromium and copper in ores, both in the lab and institute (ore processing plants) conditions. Later, through different TC projects with IAEA, the lab has been equipped with the following systems: X-ray tube excited EDXRF spectrometer with secondary target excitation; radioisotope excited EDXRF system; TXRF module; field portable XRF system based on a Cd-109 disc source; Si-PIN detector and pocket MCA. From the beginning our work has been focused on research, applications and training. Due to the fact that our EDXRF systems are made of different parts that are put together, our research activities are mainly related to optimization of excitation geometry and the development of optimized analytical procedures for the analysis of different group of elements in several kinds of samples. Some of these procedures include: determination of major and minor elements in soils, sediments, mineral ores and different type of rocks; determination of sulphur and some trace elements (V, Ni, etc.) in oil, bitumen and asphaltene; determination of some trace metals in sea and surface waters; determination of elemental composition of aerosols loaded on filters; determination of some trace elements in biological samples. An important point of our work is related with the quality of the analytical results. For this reason we have participated in some of the intercomparison runs organized by AQCS of the IAEA and in the GeoPT proficiency tests. In most cases our reported

  11. Long-term evolution of anomalous X-ray pulsars and soft gamma repeaters

    CERN Document Server

    Benli, Onur

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated the long-term evolution of individual anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) and soft gamma repeaters (SGRs) with relatively well constrained X-ray luminosity and rotational properties. In the frame of the fallback disc model, we have obtained the ranges of disc mass and dipole field strength that can produce the observed source properties. We have compared our results with those obtained earlier for dim isolated neutron stars (XDINs). Our results show that (1) the X-ray luminosity, period and period derivative of the individual AXP/SGR sources can be produced self-consistently in the fallback disc model with very similar basic disc parameters to those used earlier in the same model to explain the long-term evolution of XDINs, (2) except two sources, AXP/SGRs are evolving in the accretion phase; these two exceptional sources, like XDINs, completed their accretion phase in the past and are now evolving in the final propeller phase and still slowing down with the disc torques, (3) the dipole field ...

  12. Optical pulsations from the anomalous X-ray pulsar 4U0142+61.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, B; Martin, C

    2002-05-30

    Anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) differ from ordinary radio pulsars in that their X-ray luminosity is orders of magnitude greater than their rate of rotational energy loss, and so they require an additional energy source. One possibility is that AXPs are highly magnetized neuron stars or 'magnetars' having surface magnetic fields greater than 10(14) G. This would make them similar to the soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs), but alternative models that do not require extreme magnetic fields also exist. An optical counterpart to the AXP 4U0142+61 was recently discovered, consistent with emission from a magnetar, but also from a magnetized hot white dwarf, or an accreting isolated neutron star. Here we report the detection of optical pulsations from 4U0142+61. The pulsed fraction of optical light (27 per cent) is five to ten times greater than that of soft X-rays, from which we conclude that 4U0142+61 is a magnetar. Although this establishes a direct relationship between AXPs and the soft gamma-ray repeaters, the evolutionary connection between AXPs, SGRs and radio pulsars remains controversial.

  13. Sampling, storage and sample preparation procedures for X ray fluorescence analysis of environmental materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X ray fluorescence (XRF) method is one of the most commonly used nuclear analytical technique because of its multielement and non-destructive character, speed, economy and ease of operation. From the point of view of quality assurance practices, sampling and sample preparation procedures are the most crucial steps in all analytical techniques, (including X ray fluorescence) applied for the analysis of heterogeneous materials. This technical document covers recent modes of the X ray fluorescence method and recent developments in sample preparation techniques for the analysis of environmental materials. Refs, figs, tabs

  14. X-ray fluorescence analyzers for investigating postmediaeval pottery from Southern Moravia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trojek, Tomás; Hlozek, Matin; Cechák, Tomás; Musílek, Ladislav

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with an investigation of ceramic archaeological finds with the use of in-situ X-ray fluorescence analysis. Firstly, three configurations of X-ray fluorescence analyzers constructed and used at the Czech Technical University in Prague are described and compared for use in a non-destructive survey of siliceous materials. Detection limits, depth of analysis, the relation of the analyzed area, the homogeneity of the samples, and variations in the element concentrations are discussed. Secondly, many shards of postmediaeval pottery from Southern Moravia are analyzed with X-ray fluorescence analysis and some of them also with electron microprobe analysis. Selected results are described. PMID:19914840

  15. A POLYNOMIAL CORRECTION TECHNIQUE USING RhKα COMPTON PEAK IN X-RAY FLUORESCENCE SPECTROMETRY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    包生祥

    2003-01-01

    @@ Compton scattering radiation of an X ray tube target line is widely used for matrix absorption correction in X-ray fluorescence analysis of heavy trace elements in light matrix samples,Compton scatter ing internal standard technique has been a routine method in geological samples since Reynolds recommended the method in 1963.

  16. X-ray fluorescence in IAEA Member States: Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Laboratory of Material Analysis (LMA) of the Institute of Nuclear Physics (INP) at the National Center for Scientific Research (NCSR) 'Demokritos', has been involved very actively during the past few years in the development, evaluation and analytical application of portable X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) instruments, applied in particular for the non-destructive analysis of cultural materials. The study, conservation and preservation of cultural materials are considered nowadays issues of main concern for countries and international cultural organizations. Due to the strong interest and motivation from archaeologists, conservators and archaeometrical scientists in Greece and elsewhere, a large network has been developed involving the LMA and archaeologists/conservator scientists from Museums (Benaki Museum in Athens), Cultural Foundations (Thera Foundation P. Nomikos), the Greek Ministry of Culture-Conservation Department, Foreign Schools in Greece (American School of Classical Studies, French School of Athens), Universities (Department of Conservation of Antiquities and Works of Art in the Technological Educational Institution of Athens, University of Cincinnatti, Universite de Paris I, Pantheon Sorbonne), private sectors (THETIS, Thetis Authentics - Science and Techniques for Art History Conservation Ltd) and Institutions (Centre de Recherche et de Rastauration des Musees de France, LNS-INFN, LANDIS group). A variety of cultural materials/artifacts have been examined so far, including ceramic vases with colored decoration, bronze artifacts, wall-painting pigments, traces of polychromy on marble sculptures, Gold and Silver ancient jewelry, Gemstones, Roman Coins. Our research and analytical applications of the in-situ XRF analysis have been focused so far on the following: 1) optimum selection and integration of portable XRF instrumentation for improving analytical and sensitivity range; 2) evaluation of the potential of in-situ XRF analysis to provide specific

  17. Research on U,Np,Pu Excitation Parameter With X-ray Fluorescence Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>X-ray fluorescence analysis is a characteristic analysis technique widely applied in the geology environment and chemical industry. It is also an important quality control analytical method in nuclear

  18. Forensic application of total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry for elemental characterization of ink samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhara, Sangita [Fuel Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Misra, N.L., E-mail: nlmisra@barc.gov.i [Fuel Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Maind, S.D. [NAA Unit of Central Forensic Science Laboratory Hyderabad at Analytical Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Kumar, Sanjukta A. [Analytical Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Chattopadhyay, N. [NAA Unit of Central Forensic Science Laboratory Hyderabad at Analytical Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Aggarwal, S.K. [Fuel Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2010-02-15

    The possibility of applying Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence for qualitative and quantitative differentiation of documents printed with rare earth tagged and untagged inks has been explored in this paper. For qualitative differentiation, a very small amount of ink was loosened from the printed documents by smoothly rubbing with a new clean blade without destroying the manuscript. 50 muL of Milli-Q water was put on this loose powder, on the manuscript, and was agitated by sucking and releasing the suspension two to three times with the help of a micropipette. The resultant dispersion was deposited on quartz sample support for Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence measurements. The Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence spectrum of tagged and untagged inks could be clearly differentiated. In order to see the applicability of Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence for quantitative determinations of rare earths and also to countercheck such determinations in ink samples, the amounts of rare earth in painted papers with single rare earth tagged inks were determined by digesting the painted paper in HNO{sub 3}/HClO{sub 4}, mixing this solution with the internal standard and recording their Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence spectra after calibration of the instrument. The results thus obtained were compared with those obtained by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry and were found in good agreement. The average precision of the Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence determinations was 5.5% (1sigma) and the average deviation of Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence determined values with that of Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry was 7.3%. These studies have shown that Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence offers a promising and potential application in forensic work of this nature.

  19. Some application of the X-ray fluorescence by radioisotopic excitation on rocks and ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work presents some principal concepts in which is founded the X-ray fluorescence, by radioisotopic stimulation technic. In the next itens the factors responsible by the introduction of the error in the dosage, and the analytical process are analysed. Some of possible applications of this methodology, principally in the mineral research, following this technique is compared with others analytical methods, including the conventional, X-ray fluorescence. (C.D.G.)

  20. Forensic application of total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry for elemental characterization of ink samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhara, Sangita; Misra, N. L.; Maind, S. D.; Kumar, Sanjukta A.; Chattopadhyay, N.; Aggarwal, S. K.

    2010-02-01

    The possibility of applying Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence for qualitative and quantitative differentiation of documents printed with rare earth tagged and untagged inks has been explored in this paper. For qualitative differentiation, a very small amount of ink was loosened from the printed documents by smoothly rubbing with a new clean blade without destroying the manuscript. 50 μL of Milli-Q water was put on this loose powder, on the manuscript, and was agitated by sucking and releasing the suspension two to three times with the help of a micropipette. The resultant dispersion was deposited on quartz sample support for Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence measurements. The Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence spectrum of tagged and untagged inks could be clearly differentiated. In order to see the applicability of Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence for quantitative determinations of rare earths and also to countercheck such determinations in ink samples, the amounts of rare earth in painted papers with single rare earth tagged inks were determined by digesting the painted paper in HNO 3/HClO 4, mixing this solution with the internal standard and recording their Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence spectra after calibration of the instrument. The results thus obtained were compared with those obtained by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry and were found in good agreement. The average precision of the Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence determinations was 5.5% (1 σ) and the average deviation of Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence determined values with that of Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry was 7.3%. These studies have shown that Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence offers a promising and potential application in forensic work of this nature.

  1. Method for detecting binding events using micro-X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Benjamin P.; Havrilla, George J.; Mann, Grace

    2010-12-28

    Method for detecting binding events using micro-X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. Receptors are exposed to at least one potential binder and arrayed on a substrate support. Each member of the array is exposed to X-ray radiation. The magnitude of a detectable X-ray fluorescence signal for at least one element can be used to determine whether a binding event between a binder and a receptor has occurred, and can provide information related to the extent of binding between the binder and receptor.

  2. Development of low-energy x-ray fluorescence micro-distribution analysis using a laser plasma x-ray source and multilayer optics?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuik, R.; Shmaenok, L. A.; Fledderus, H.; Andreev, S. S.; Shamov, E. A.; Zuev, S. Y.; Salashchenko, N. N.; F. Bijkerk,

    1999-01-01

    A new technique is presented for low-energy X-ray fluorescence micro-distribution analysis of low-Z elements at micrometer spatial resolutions. The technique is based on the use of a laser plasma X-ray source and spherically curved multilayer optics. A large collimator is used to focus the light fro

  3. ISS Ammonia Leak Detection Through X-Ray Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Jordan; Barthelmy, Scott; Skinner, Gerry

    2013-01-01

    Ammonia leaks are a significant concern for the International Space Station (ISS). The ISS has external transport lines that direct liquid ammonia to radiator panels where the ammonia is cooled and then brought back to thermal control units. These transport lines and radiator panels are subject to stress from micrometeorites and temperature variations, and have developed small leaks. The ISS can accommodate these leaks at their present rate, but if the rate increased by a factor of ten, it could potentially deplete the ammonia supply and impact the proper functioning of the ISS thermal control system, causing a serious safety risk. A proposed ISS astrophysics instrument, the Lobster X-Ray Monitor, can be used to detect and localize ISS ammonia leaks. Based on the optical design of the eye of its namesake crustacean, the Lobster detector gives simultaneously large field of view and good position resolution. The leak detection principle is that the nitrogen in the leaking ammonia will be ionized by X-rays from the Sun, and then emit its own characteristic Xray signal. The Lobster instrument, nominally facing zenith for its astrophysics observations, can be periodically pointed towards the ISS radiator panels and some sections of the transport lines to detect and localize the characteristic X-rays from the ammonia leaks. Another possibility is to use the ISS robot arm to grab the Lobster instrument and scan it across the transport lines and radiator panels. In this case the leak detection can be made more sensitive by including a focused 100-microampere electron beam to stimulate X-ray emission from the leaking nitrogen. Laboratory studies have shown that either approach can be used to locate ammonia leaks at the level of 0.1 kg/day, a threshold rate of concern for the ISS. The Lobster instrument uses two main components: (1) a microchannel plate optic (also known as a Lobster optic) that focuses the X-rays and directs them to the focal plane, and (2) a CCD (charge

  4. X-ray and Near-IR Variability of the Anomalous X-ray Pulsar 1E 1048.1-5937: From Quiescence Back to Activity

    CERN Document Server

    Tam, Cindy R; Dib, Rim; Kaspi, Victoria M; Woods, Peter M; Bassa, Cees

    2007-01-01

    (Abridged) Monitoring of the anomalous X-ray pulsar 1E 1048.1-5937 in 2005-2006 with the RXTE, CXO, and HST has revealed that the source entered a phase of X-ray and near-IR radiative quiescence, simultaneous with timing stability. During its ~2001-2004 active period, the source exhibited two large, long-term X-ray pulsed-flux flares as well as short bursts, and large (>10x) torque changes. A series of four simultaneous observations with CXO and HST approximately equispaced in 2006 showed that its X-ray flux and spectrum and near-IR flux, both variable prior to 2005, stabilized. The near-IR flux (m_{F110W} > 24.8 mag, m_{F160W} ~ 22.70 mag) is considerably fainter in 2006 than previously measured. Recently, in 2007 March, this newfound quiescence was interrupted by a sudden flux enhancement, spectral changes and a pulse morphology change, simultaneous with a large spin-up glitch and near-IR enhancement. Specifically, our RXTE observations revealed a sudden pulsed flux increase by a factor of ~3 in the 2-10 ke...

  5. Application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy and anomalous small angle scattering to RNA polymerase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy is ideally suited for the investigation of the electronic structure and the local environment (≤∝5 A) of specific atoms in biomolecules. While the edge region provides information about the valence state of the absorbing atom, the chemical identity of neighboring atoms, and the coordination geometry, the EXAFS region contains information about the number and average distance of neighboring atoms and their relative disorder. The development of sensitive detection methods has allowed studies using near-physiological concentrations (as low as ∝100 μM). With careful choice of model compounds, judicious use of fitting procedures, and consideration of the results of biochemical and other spectrOScopic results, this data has provided pivotal information about the structures of these active sites which store energy in their conformation changes or ligand exchanges. Although the application of anomalous small angle scattering to biomolecules has occurred more recently, it clearly provides a method of determining distances between active sites that are outside the range of X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The wavelength dependence of the X-ray scattering power varies rapidly near the edge of the absorbing atom in both amplitude and phase. This behavior selectively alters the contribution of the absorbing atom to the scattering pattern. The structure-function relationship of the intermediate states provide the key to understanding the mechanisms of these complex molecules. It is this precise structural information about the active sites that is not obtainable by other spectroscopic techniques. Combination of these techniques offers a unique approach to the determination of the organization of active sites in biomolecules, especially metalloenzymes. Application of these methods to the substrate and template binding sites of RNA polymerase which contain zinc atoms demonstrates the versatility of this approach. (orig.)

  6. Radiation embrittlement studies using anomalous small-angle x-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, D. E.; Kestel, B. J.; Seifert, S.; Jemian, P. R.; Odette, G. R.; Klingensmith, D.; Gragg, D.

    1999-12-06

    Anomalous small angle x-ray scattering (ASAXS) was performed on an Fe-O.9 wt.% Cu-1.0 wt.% Mn alloy subjected to annealing or electron irradiation. ASAXS takes advantage of natural variations in the atomic scattering factor which exist at energies very near an element's x-ray absorption edge. By performing systematic SAXS experiments at energies near these absorption edges of the constituent alloy elements it is possible to vary the contrast of scattering centers containing the elements and in doing so quantify scatterer composition. The results of such an analysis for the samples in this work indicate the presence of Cu-rich, Cu{sub 85}Mn{sub 15} precipitates in the alloy. By applying the maximum entropy technique to the scattering data, it was possible to extract size distributions of scattering centers fog the different treatments. The results demonstrate the ability to detect and characterize small (11 {angstrom} radius) scatterers at quite low irradiation damage levels (5x10{sup {minus} 4} displacements per atom).

  7. Radiation embrittlement studies using anomalous small-angle X-ray scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anomalous small angle x-ray scattering (ASAXS) was performed on an Fe-O.9 wt.% Cu-1.0 wt.% Mn alloy subjected to annealing or electron irradiation. ASAXS takes advantage of natural variations in the atomic scattering factor which exist at energies very near an element's x-ray absorption edge. By performing systematic SAXS experiments at energies near these absorption edges of the constituent alloy elements it is possible to vary the contrast of scattering centers containing the elements and in doing so quantify scatterer composition. The results of such an analysis for the samples in this work indicate the presence of Cu-rich, Cu85Mn15 precipitates in the alloy. By applying the maximum entropy technique to the scattering data, it was possible to extract size distributions of scattering centers fog the different treatments. The results demonstrate the ability to detect and characterize small (11 A radius) scatterers at quite low irradiation damage levels (5x10-4 displacements per atom)

  8. Anomalous elastic scattering of x-ray photon by an atom with an open shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the non-relativistic approximation for the wavefunctions of the one-electron states and in the dipole approximation for the scattering amplitude the effect of relaxation of atomic shells in the field of core vacancies, multiplet splitting, Auger and radiative vacancy decays and virtual processes of one-photon double excitation/ionization from the atomic ground state on the differential cross section of anomalous elastic scattering of the linearly polarized x-ray photon by the copper atom near its 1s-shell ionization threshold are studied. The results of calculations are found to be in agreement with the high-precision synchrotron radiation experiment by Arp et al (1993 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 26 4381)

  9. Anomalous elastic scattering of x-ray photon by an atom with an open shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopersky, A N; Petrov, I D; Nadolinsky, A M; Yavna, V A; Koneev, R V [Rostov State University of Transport Communication, Chair of Mathematics, Rostov-on-Don, 344038 (Russian Federation)

    2004-08-28

    In the non-relativistic approximation for the wavefunctions of the one-electron states and in the dipole approximation for the scattering amplitude the effect of relaxation of atomic shells in the field of core vacancies, multiplet splitting, Auger and radiative vacancy decays and virtual processes of one-photon double excitation/ionization from the atomic ground state on the differential cross section of anomalous elastic scattering of the linearly polarized x-ray photon by the copper atom near its 1s-shell ionization threshold are studied. The results of calculations are found to be in agreement with the high-precision synchrotron radiation experiment by Arp et al (1993 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 26 4381)

  10. X-Ray Diffraction and X-Ray Fluorescent Analyses of Prehistoric Pottery Shards from Ulu Kelantan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuliskandar Ramli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: X-Ray Diffraction (XRD and X-Ray Fluorescent (XRF were used in order to obtain mineralogical and elemental composition of seven pottery shards that have been unearthed during the excavation at Peraling Cave and Cha Cave in Ulu Kelantan, Malaysia. Approach: Peraling Cave and Cha Cave were prehistoric sites dating from 10, 000 BC which were inhabited by Hoabinhian people and then continuously used by people of Neolithic culture around 3000 BC. Results: Mineralogical and elemental analyses were carried out to determine whether the pottery found in the archaeological sites was locally made or trading items. Several clay samples from rivers in Ulu Kelantan such as Perias River, Chai River, Peralon River, Nenggiri River, Betis River and Jenera River were taken to be analysed. Conclusion/Recommendations: Mineralogical and elemental content of the pottery shards showed that the pottery shards did not originate from the Ulu Kelantan area and one of the samples contained clinochlore mineral. Clinochlore forms from the metamorphic and hydrothermal alterations of other iron and magnesium silicate minerals and is usually found in igneus rock and metamorphic rock formation.

  11. Development of a portable system of X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper develops a compact and portable spectrometry system that will be used at the Laboratory of Applied Physics to the Biomedical and Environmental Sciences of the Institute of Physics/UERJ, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The laboratory both prepares the samples and develops the X-ray spectrometry techniques. The techniques of X-ray diffraction and fluorescence on various samples (biological, industrial and environmental) are used, attending to pos-graduation and graduation students, with multidisciplinary characteristics. The Mini-X system consists of X-ray mini tube MINI-X from Amptek with tungsten (W) target, and a compact spectrometer X123, also from Amptek that includes a detector, pre-amplifier, digital pulse processor, and multichannel. All the system is controlled by dedicated microprocessor. This work will present both a methodology for alignment and calibration of the system as far the first measurements performed using the X-ray fluorescence technique on standard samples. The multi elementary analysis by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) is based on the measurements of the characteristic X-ray intensity emitted by the chemical elements components of the samples when excited. Therefore, from the development of this compact and versatile system it will be possible to obtain the fluorescent intensities of the analysed samples at the Laboratory, not only at the research area but at the teaching area. Besides, new laboratory practices are being developed for the discipline of medical physics

  12. Cryo X-ray microscope with flat sample geometry for correlative fluorescence and nanoscale tomographic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Gerd; Guttmann, Peter; Rehbein, Stefan; Werner, Stephan; Follath, Rolf

    2012-02-01

    X-ray imaging offers a new 3-D view into cells. With its ability to penetrate whole hydrated cells it is ideally suited for pairing fluorescence light microscopy and nanoscale X-ray tomography. In this paper, we describe the X-ray optical set-up and the design of the cryo full-field transmission X-ray microscope (TXM) at the electron storage ring BESSY II. Compared to previous TXM set-ups with zone plate condenser monochromator, the new X-ray optical layout employs an undulator source, a spherical grating monochromator and an elliptically shaped glass capillary mirror as condenser. This set-up improves the spectral resolution by an order of magnitude. Furthermore, the partially coherent object illumination improves the contrast transfer of the microscope compared to incoherent conditions. With the new TXM, cells grown on flat support grids can be tilted perpendicular to the optical axis without any geometrical restrictions by the previously required pinhole for the zone plate monochromator close to the sample plane. We also developed an incorporated fluorescence light microscope which permits to record fluorescence, bright field and DIC images of cryogenic cells inside the TXM. For TXM tomography, imaging with multi-keV X-rays is a straightforward approach to increase the depth of focus. Under these conditions phase contrast imaging is necessary. For soft X-rays with shrinking depth of focus towards 10nm spatial resolution, thin optical sections through a thick specimen might be obtained by deconvolution X-ray microscopy. As alternative 3-D X-ray imaging techniques, the confocal cryo-STXM and the dual beam cryo-FIB/STXM with photoelectron detection are proposed. PMID:22273540

  13. Characteristics of X-ray fluorescence of nuclear materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Seunghoon; Kwak, Sung-Woo; Shin, Jung-Ki; Park, Uk-Rayng; Jung, Heejun [Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    LED is a technique of determination of uranium concentration as a continuous X-ray energy beams transmit a uranium liquid sample for safeguards. Compared to K-edge densitometer, due to relatively lower energy (L-edge energy is 17.17 keV) of Uranium L series energy than K-series energy, L-edge densitometer does not require high purity germanium detector with liquid nitride cooling. Therefore, the Ledge densitometer is appropriate for portable equipment for on-site nuclear material inspection and safeguards at facility sites. XRF combined with LED is a technique of finding of nuclear materials from reflected characteristic X-ray photons. In this study, characteristics of XRF of nuclear materials are simulated Monte Carlo method (Geant4) for feasibility of the system for determination of concentration of nuclear species. The analysis method of uranium concentration or minor actinides is applied using combination of linear extrapolation from jump of L-edge of sample and ratio between uranium and minor actinide from XRF measurement. In this study, The XRF ch aracteristics was simulated from Monte Carlo method. The peaks were obtained from nuclear material mixture. The estimated nuclear material concentration is low due to the volume effect of the sample. The correction factor or minimization of the effect is required.

  14. Automatic energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence analysing apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention discloses a number of improvements for an energy dispersive X-ray analysis system having computer supervised data collection, display and processing. The systems with which the improved circuitry and methods may be used include a dual interlocking bus structure so that the analyzer and computer functions communicate directly with each other and the user has immediate keyboard control of both. Such a system normally includes a system base control, a control console and a display console. The portions of the system which have been improved include a new type of ratemeter which gives a voltage output proportional to the intensity of the energy window or windows under consideration, an output which is an absolute digital representation of the intensity count rate, circuitry for input multiplexing and multiple output voltage buffering of the ratemeter to accomodate multiple single channel signals, and a new dead time correction to enable meaningful single channel intensity data to be handled by the system. An extension of the ratemeter is also disclosed for use in conjunction with X-ray mapping, enabling enhancements to be made on mapping SCA data

  15. Nano-structured titanium and aluminium nitride coatings: Study by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption and anomalous diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuilier, M.-H., E-mail: marie-helene.tuilier@uha.fr [Universite de Haute Alsace (UHA), Laboratoire Physique et Mecanique Textile (LPMT), EA 4365 -conventionnee au CNRS, Equipe PPMR, F-68093 Mulhouse (France); Pac, M.-J. [Universite de Haute Alsace (UHA), Laboratoire Physique et Mecanique Textile (LPMT), EA 4365 - conventionnee au CNRS, Equipe PPMR, F-68093 Mulhouse (France); Anokhin, D.V. [Universite de Haute Alsace (UHA), CNRS, Institut de Science des Materiaux de Mulhouse (IS2M), LRC 7228, F-68093 Mulhouse (France); Moscow State University, Faculty of Fundamental Physical and Chemical Engineering, 119991, Moscow, GSP-1, 1-51 Leninskie Gory (Russian Federation); Ivanov, D.A. [Universite de Haute Alsace (UHA), CNRS, Institut de Science des Materiaux de Mulhouse (IS2M), LRC 7228, F-68093 Mulhouse (France); Rousselot, C. [Universite de Franche-Comte, FEMTO-ST (UMR CNRS 6174), F-25211 Montbeliard (France); Thiaudiere, D. [Synchrotron Soleil, Saint Aubin, F-91192 Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2012-12-30

    Titanium and aluminium nitride thin films, Ti{sub 1-x}Al{sub x}N (x = 0, x = 0.5, x = 0.68), deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering on silicon substrates are investigated by combining two different X-ray diffraction experiments carried out using synchrotron radiation. Grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction and Ti K-edge diffraction anomalous near edge structure spectroscopy provide information on the micro- and nano-structure of the films respectively, which play a crucial role in the functionality of coatings. The spectroscopic data of Ti{sub 0.50}Al{sub 0.50}N film show that Ti atoms in crystallized domains and grain boundaries are all in octahedral cubic local order, but their growth mode is quite different. It is found that the crystallized part of the Ti{sub 0.50}Al{sub 0.50}N film has a single-crystalline nature, whereas the TiN one presents a fibrillar microstructure. For Ti{sub 0.32}Al{sub 0.68}N film, grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction provides information on the uniaxial texture along the [001] direction of the hexagonal lattice. A sharp Ti K pre-edge peak is observed in diffraction anomalous near edge spectrum that definitely shows that Ti atoms are incorporated in the hexagonal lattice of those fibrillar domains. Moreover, the difference observed between Ti K-edge diffraction anomalous and X-ray absorption pre-edge regions proves that a significant part of Ti atoms is located in nanocrystallites with cubic symmetry outside of the crystallized domains. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We study nano and micro-structures of TiN, Ti{sub 0.50}Al{sub 0.50}N and Ti{sub 0.32}Al{sub 0.68}N films. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anomalous diffraction solves the crystallized part regardless of grain boundaries. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TiN microstructure is fibrillar, Ti{sub 0.5}Al{sub 0.5}N presents single crystalline domains. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For Ti{sub 0.32}Al{sub 0.68}N, Ti atoms are located in nanocrystallites with cubic symmetry

  16. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence analysis in environmental and earth sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adams F.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Compared to other microscopic analytical tools X-ray microscopy techniques have the advantage that the large penetration depth of X-rays in matter allows one to investigate the interior of an object without destructive sample preparation. In combination with X-ray fluorescence tomography, analytical information from inside of a specimen can be obtained. Different X-ray analytical techniques can be used to produce contrast, X-ray absorption, fluorescence, and diffraction, to yield chemical, elemental, and structural information about the sample. Scanning microscopy on the basis of various lens systems in synchrotron radiation sources provides a routine spatial resolution of now about 100 nanometer but in the foreseeable future a 10–20 nanometer spatial resolution can be expected. X-ray absorption spectrometry can also provide chemical (speciation information on the sample. All this makes X-ray microscopy attractive to many fields of science. In this paper the techniques are briefly reviewed and a number of applications in the earth, planetary and cosmos sciences are illustrated with state-of-the art examples, while applications in the environmental sciences and biology are also briefly discussed.

  17. Monte Carlo simulation applied in total reflection x-ray fluorescence: Preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meira, Luiza L. C.; Inocente, Guilherme F.; Vieira, Leticia D.; Mesa, Joel [Departamento de Fisica e Biofisica - Instituto de Biociencias de Botucatu, Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (Brazil)

    2013-05-06

    The X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) analysis is a technique for the qualitative and quantitative determination of chemical constituents in a sample. This method is based on detection of the characteristic radiation intensities emitted by the elements of the sample, when properly excited. A variant of this technique is the Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence (TXRF) that utilizes electromagnetic radiation as excitation source. In total reflection of X-ray, the angle of refraction of the incident beam tends to zero and the refracted beam is tangent to the sample support interface. Thus, there is a minimum angle of incidence at which no refracted beam exists and all incident radiation undergoes total reflection. In this study, we evaluated the influence of the energy variation of the beam of incident x-rays, using the MCNPX code (Monte Carlo NParticle) based on Monte Carlo method.

  18. Quantitative analysis results of CE-1 X-ray fluorescence spectrometer ground base experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Xing-Zhu; GAO Min; YANG Jia-Wei; WANG Huan-Yu; ZHANG Cheng-Mo; CHEN Yong; ZHANG Jia-Yu; PENG Wen-Xi; CAO Xue-Lei; LIANG Xiao-Hua; WANG Jin-Zhou

    2008-01-01

    As the nearest celestial body to the earth, the moon has become a hot spot again in astronomy field recently. The element analysis is a much important subject in many lunar projects. Remote X-ray spectrometry plays an important role in the geochemical exploration of the solar bodies. Because of th equasi-vacuum atmosphere on the moon, which has no absorption of X-ray, the X-ray fluorescence analysis is an effective way to determine the elemental abundance of lunar surface. The CE-1 X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (CE-1/XFS) aims to map the major elemental compositions on the lunar surface. This paper describes a method for quantitative analysis of elemental compositions. A series of ground base experiments are done to examine the capability of XFS. The obtained results, which show a reasonable agreement with the certified values at a 30% uncertainty level for major elements, are presented.

  19. On the viability of exploiting L-shell fluorescence for X-ray polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskopf, M. C.; Sutherland, P. G.; Elsner, R. F.; Ramsey, B. D.

    1985-01-01

    It has been suggested that one may build an X-ray polarimeter by exploiting the polarization dependence of the angular distribution of L-shell fluorescence photons. In this paper the sensitivity of this approach to polarimetry is examined theoretically. The calculations are applied to several detection schemes using imaging proportional counters that would have direct application in X-ray astronomy. It is found, however, that the sensitivity of this method for measuring X-ray polarization is too low to be of use for other than laboratory applications.

  20. Age Determination by X-ray Fluorescence Rubidium-Strontium Ratio Measurement in Lepidolite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, L F

    1960-07-29

    X-ray fluorescence analysis of several lepidolites whose rubidium and strontium concentrations had already been determined by neutron activation and stable isotope dilution, or both, indicates that this technique can be used for rapid nondestructive reconnaissance rubidiumstrontium studies, and that an x-ray analysis method comparable in accuracy to isotope dilution can probably be developed for dating Precambrian lepidolites, as the simple technique presently used has many obvious possibilities for improvement.

  1. K X-ray fluorescent source for energy-channel calibration of the spectrometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A new K X-ray fluorescent source for calibrating the X or γ-ray multichannel analyzer spectrometer is introduced. A detailed description of the K fluorescent source device is given. The calibration method used and experimental results obtained are presented. The purity and efficiency of K fluorescence photons from this device are discussed. This new fluorescent source may be used as a substitute for radioactive nuclides for the energy-channel calibration of some MCA spectrometers.

  2. Chemical Characterization of Nuclear Materials: Development a New Combined X-Ray Fluorescence and Raman Spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New mobile analytical device based on combination of X-ray fluorescence and Raman spectrometer has been developed for prompt and quantitative characterization of chemical component from Al to U in nuclear waste or undeclared materials. The excitation source of the X-ray fluorescence spectrometer is an air-cooled X-ray tube with Ag transmission anode. For collection of secondary X-ray photons and data processing, a compact Amptek X-ray detector system is applied with silicon drift X-ray detector. The XRF system operates in confocal mode with focal volume around 1-4 mm3. Varying the geometrical position and orientation of the sample optional part of its surface can be analyzed. The Raman unit includes thermoelectrically cooled laser source having 500 mW power at wavelength 785 nm. In order to obtain spectral information from sample surface a reflection-type probe is connected by optical fibres to the Raman spectrometer. A mini focusing optics is set up to the sensor-fibre that provides the system to operate as confocal optical device in reflection mode. The XRF spectrometer with X-ray detector, Raman probe and X-ray tube are mechanically fixed and hermetically connected to an aluminium chamber, which can be optionally filled with helium. The chamber is mounted on a vertical stage that provides moving it to the sample surface. A new model and computer code have been developed for XRF quantitative analysis which describes the mathematical relationship between the concentration of sample elements and their characteristic X-ray intensities. For verification of the calculations standard reference alloy samples were measured. The results was in good agreement with certified concentrations in range of 0.001-100 w%. According to these numerical results this new method is successfully applicable for quick and non-destructive quantitative analysis of waste materials without using standard samples. (author)

  3. Application of focused-beam flat-sample method to synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction with anomalous scattering effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, M.; Katsuya, Y.; Matsushita, Y.

    2013-03-01

    The focused-beam flat-sample method (FFM), which is a method for high-resolution and rapid synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction measurements by combination of beam focusing optics, a flat shape sample and an area detector, was applied for diffraction experiments with anomalous scattering effect. The advantages of FFM for anomalous diffraction were absorption correction without approximation, rapid data collection by an area detector and good signal-to-noise ratio data by focusing optics. In the X-ray diffraction experiments of CoFe2O4 and Fe3O4 (By FFM) using X-rays near the Fe K absorption edge, the anomalous scattering effect between Fe/Co or Fe2+/Fe3+ can be clearly detected, due to the change of diffraction intensity. The change of observed diffraction intensity as the incident X-ray energy was consistent with the calculation. The FFM is expected to be a method for anomalous powder diffraction.

  4. Determination of trace elements in Syrian medicinal plants and their infusions by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence and total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khuder, A. [Department of Chemistry, Atomic Energy Commission, P.O. Box 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic)], E-mail: scientific2@aec.org.sy; Sawan, M.Kh.; Karjou, J. [Department of Chemistry, Atomic Energy Commission, P.O. Box 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic); Razouk, A.K. [Department of Agriculture, Atomic Energy Commission, P.O. Box 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic)

    2009-07-15

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and total-reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) techniques suited well for a multi-element determination of K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Rb, and Sr in some Syrian medicinal plant species. The accuracy and the precision of both techniques were verified by analyzing the Standard Reference Materials (SRM) peach-1547 and apple leaves-1515. A good agreement between the measured concentrations of the previously mentioned elements and the certified values were obtained with errors less than 10.7% for TXRF and 15.8% for XRF. The determination of Br was acceptable only by XRF with an error less than 24%. Furthermore, the XRF method showed a very good applicability for the determination of K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Rb, Sr, and Br in infusions of different Syrian medicinal plant species, namely anise (Anisum vulgare), licorice root (Glycyrrhiza glabra), and white wormwood (Artemisia herba-alba)

  5. Surface characterization of selected polymer thin films by total-reflection x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy and x-ray reflectivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of available x-ray characterizations tools for grazing incidence techniques was done to be able to probe nano-size thin films. Alignment of a Philips x-ray powder diffractometer was improved to let it perform as an x-ray reflectometer. X-ray reflectometry was coupled with total-reflection x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. Evaluation of the performance of this grazing incidence techniques was done by preparing polymer thin films of carboxymethylcellulose, carrageenan and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). The thickness of the films were varied by varying the process parameters such as concentration, spin speed and spin time. Angle-dispersive total-reflection x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy profiles of three films showed film formation only in carrageenan and PVP. For both carrageenan and PVP, an increase in concentration yielded a corresponding increase in intensity of the fluorescent or scattered peaks. XRR profiles of carrageenan thin films yielded a mean value for the critical angle close to quartz substrate. Thickness measurements of the prepared carrageenan thin films showed that concentration was the main determinant for final film thickness over the other process parameters. Sulfur fluorescent intensity derived from the TXRF measurement showed a linear relationship with the measured thickness by XRR. For PVP, measured critical angle is lower than quartz. Poor adhesion of the polymer onto the substrate yielded a limited number of thickness measurements made from the XRR profiles. (Author)

  6. X-ray fluorescence in IAEA Member States: Peru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of the XRF technique performed in our laboratories in the field of archaeology began in 1994. It started with the analysis of different samples, as an incisive tooth, a fragment of occipital, a rib fragment, a segment of dorsal vertebra and small glasses found in the internal surface of a Nazca Culture mummy. In the paleopathological study performed by Dr. Guido Lombardi a 109Cd excitation source and an X ray spectrometry system were used. The elemental concentrations of Ca, Fe, Zn, and Sr were determined for the paleonutricion studies by using the relationships of Zn/Ca and Sr/Ca. The XRF technique also contributed to the mycobacterium tuberculosis detection in a mummy, supplementing other non destructive tests carried out previously. In recent years, 29 right clavicles belonging to mature individuals were analyzed out of 143 found in the Villa El Salvador area. Sr and Zn concentrations were used to determine the relative proportion of vegetable and animal foods in the population's diet under study. It was concluded that the old residents of this town manifested an omnivorous feeding with carnivorous tendency, due to consumption of products of marine origin. Ceramics have also been analyzed to determine the chemical composition of the paste which was used in the production process. 39 fragments of ceramic from the place called Lomo de Corvina of Villa El Salvador, low valley in Lurin town were analyzed. The analysis of these samples was focused on quantitative determination of Ti, Fe, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr and Nb, to complement the results obtained by neutron activation analysis. Identification of the pigments used for production of art objects is of great importance for its characterization, authentication and/or restoration. For this reason, we are currently working on identification of pigments used in the decoration of archaeological ceramics. This work started from construction of a portable XRF spectrometer based on a small size, low power X ray tube

  7. X-ray fluorescence spectrometry for high throughput analysis of atmospheric aerosol samples: The benefits of synchrotron X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowiecki, Nicolas; Lienemann, Peter; Zwicky, Christoph N.; Furger, Markus; Richard, Agnes; Falkenberg, Gerald; Rickers, Karen; Grolimund, Daniel; Borca, Camelia; Hill, Matthias; Gehrig, Robert; Baltensperger, Urs

    2008-09-01

    The determination of trace element mass concentrations in ambient air with a time resolution higher than one day represents an urgent need in atmospheric research. It involves the application of a specific technique both for the aerosol sampling and the subsequent analysis of the collected particles. Beside the intrinsic sensitivity of the analytical method, the sampling interval and thus the quantity of collected material that is available for subsequent analysis is a major factor driving the overall trace element detection power. This is demonstrated for synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (SR-XRF) of aerosol samples collected with a rotating drum impactor (RDI) in hourly intervals and three particle size ranges. The total aerosol mass on the 1-h samples is in the range of 10 µg. An experimental detection of the nanogram amounts of trace elements with the help of synchrotron X-rays was only achievable by the design of a fit-for-purpose sample holder system, which considered the boundary conditions both from particle sampling and analysis. A 6-µm polypropylene substrate film has evolved as substrate of choice, due to its practical applicability during sampling and its suitable spectroscopic behavior. In contrast to monochromatic excitation conditions, the application of a 'white' beam led to a better spectral signal-to-background ratio. Despite the low sample mass, a counting time of less than 30 s per 1-h aerosol sample led to sufficient counting statistics. Therefore the RDI-SR-XRF method represents a high-throughput analysis procedure without the need for any sample preparation. The analysis of a multielemental mass standard film by SR-XRF, laboratory-based wavelength-dispersive XRF spectrometry and laboratory-based micro XRF spectrometry showed that the laboratory-based methods were no alternatives to the SR-XRF method with respect to sensitivity and efficiency of analysis.

  8. Portable total reflection x-ray fluorescence spectrometer for ultra trace elemental determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been believed that the use of high power monochromatic incident X-rays such as monochromatic synchrotron radiation is essential for improving detection limits in the total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) analysis. On the other hand, we have reported that polychromatic excitation improves detection limits in the TXRF analysis compared with monochromatic excitation. We have developed portable TXRF spectrometers using polychromatic X-rays from a low power (several watts) X-ray tube, and a 10 pg (10-11 g) detection limit is achieved with the weak polychromatic X-rays. This low detection limit is obtained using the following methods with polychromatic excitation: (1) measuring smaller amounts of a sample, (2) optimization of a tube voltage, and tube current, (3) optimization of a glancing angle, (4) the use of an appropriate target material of an X-ray tube, and (5) the use of an X-ray waveguide. In the present paper, experimental set-up of the present portable spectrometer and the change of detection sensitivity by changing experimental conditions such as tube voltage are explained. Applications to trace elemental analysis of urine and pigments are also shown. (author)

  9. X-ray Fluorescence in Member States: Peru. Recent Activities in X ray Fluorescence Laboratory of the Peruvian Institute of Nuclear Energy - Peru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multielemental X ray fluorescence non-destructive analysis of the bony remainders attributed to the conqueror Mr. Francisco Pizarro for a study of contamination post-mortem, kind of diet and paleopathologies: The elementary chemical analysis of bones provides very important information that allows studying topics like post mortem contamination, diet and diverse paleopathologies that are observed based on the concentration of the elements identified. The bony remains of the conqueror Don Francisco Pizarro were analyzed by using an energy dispersive X ray fluorescence system with a Cd-109 source of 25 mCi. The spectra were analyzed by IAEA-AXIL-QXAS software. The quantification was carried out with the option of simple quantitative analysis, with the method of elemental sensitivity. The presence of the elements: Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn, Sr and Pb was mainly observed confirming a vegetarian diet and the presence of the surrounding materials. Archaeometric study of metallic pieces from Museo Inka - Universidad Nacional San Antonio Abad from Cusco, Peru: An archaeometric study of metallic pieces, pins (tupus), has been presented. These pieces were found in excavation of Sacsayhuaman strength, Cusco - Peru, from the Inca culture. Metallographic, X ray diffraction and X ray fluorescence analysis of these pieces reveal that pins presents neither the same technology of preparation nor the same elemental composition. All the pieces include copper, as major element, combined with As or Pb. Some of them have a superficial layer of gold and/or silver. Ornamental Nasca ceramics pigments identification by X ray diffraction and X ray fluorescence analysis. The Nasca culture was developed in the southern coast of Peru (100 BC to 650 AD), during the Early Intermediate Period. The most significant remain of the Nasca Culture is the fine polychrome pottery. The goal of this work is to identify the pigments used in 54 pottery fragments recovered nearby Palpa and Cahuachi by using XRF and XRD

  10. A new X-ray pinhole camera for energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence imaging with high-energy and high-spatial resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romano, F.P., E-mail: romanop@lns.infn.it [IBAM, CNR, Via Biblioteca 4, 95124 Catania (Italy); INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Altana, C. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Cosentino, L.; Celona, L.; Gammino, S.; Mascali, D. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Pappalardo, L. [IBAM, CNR, Via Biblioteca 4, 95124 Catania (Italy); INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Rizzo, F. [INFN-LNS, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy)

    2013-08-01

    A new X-ray pinhole camera for the Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (ED-XRF) imaging of materials with high-energy and high-spatial resolution, was designed and developed. It consists of a back-illuminated and deep depleted CCD detector (composed of 1024 × 1024 pixels with a lateral size of 13 μm) coupled to a 70 μm laser-drilled pinhole-collimator, positioned between the sample under analysis and the CCD. The X-ray pinhole camera works in a coaxial geometry allowing a wide range of magnification values. The characteristic X-ray fluorescence is induced on the samples by irradiation with an external X-ray tube working at a maximum power of 100 W (50 kV and 2 mA operating conditions). The spectroscopic capabilities of the X-ray pinhole camera were accurately investigated. Energy response and energy calibration of the CCD detector were determined by irradiating pure target-materials emitting characteristic X-rays in the energy working-domain of the system (between 3 keV and 30 keV). Measurements were performed by using a multi-frame acquisition in single-photon counting. The characteristic X-ray spectra were obtained by an automated processing of the acquired images. The energy resolution measured at the Fe–Kα line is 157 eV. The use of the X-ray pinhole camera for the 2D resolved elemental analysis was investigated by using reference-patterns of different materials and geometries. The possibility of the elemental mapping of samples up to an area of 3 × 3 cm{sup 2} was demonstrated. Finally, the spatial resolution of the pinhole camera was measured by analyzing the profile function of a sharp-edge. The spatial resolution determined at the magnification values of 3.2 × and 0.8 × (used as testing values) is about 90 μm and 190 μm respectively. - Highlights: • We developed an X-ray pinhole camera for the 2D X-ray fluorescence imaging. • X-ray spectra are obtained by a multi-frame acquisition in single photon mode. • The energy resolution in the X-ray

  11. Analysis of archaeological ceramics by total-reflection X-ray fluorescence: Quantitative approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Ruiz, R. [Servicio Interdepartamental de Investigacion, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Modulo C-9, Laboratorio de TXRF, Crta. Colmenar, Km 15, Cantoblanco, E-28049, Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: ramon.fernandez@uam.es; Garcia-Heras, M. [Grupo de Arqueometria de Vidrios y Materiales Ceramicos, Instituto de Historia, Centro de Ciencias Humanas y Sociales, CSIC, C/ Albasanz, 26-28, 28037 Madrid (Spain)

    2008-09-15

    This paper reports the quantitative methodologies developed for the compositional characterization of archaeological ceramics by total-reflection X-ray fluorescence at two levels. A first quantitative level which comprises an acid leaching procedure, and a second selective level, which seeks to increase the number of detectable elements by eliminating the iron present in the acid leaching procedure. Total-reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry has been compared, at a quantitative level, with Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis in order to test its applicability to the study of this kind of materials. The combination of a solid chemical homogenization procedure previously reported with the quantitative methodologies here presented allows the total-reflection X-ray fluorescence to analyze 29 elements with acceptable analytical recoveries and accuracies.

  12. Determination of plutonium in nitric acid solutions using energy dispersive L X-ray fluorescence with a low power X-ray generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Py, J. [Laboratoire Chrono-Environnement, UMR CNRS 6249, Université de Franche-Comté, 16 route de Gray, F-25030 Besançon (France); Commissariat à l’Énergie Atomique, Centre de Valduc, F-21120 Is-sur-Tille (France); Groetz, J.-E., E-mail: jegroetz@univ-fcomte.fr [Laboratoire Chrono-Environnement, UMR CNRS 6249, Université de Franche-Comté, 16 route de Gray, F-25030 Besançon (France); Hubinois, J.-C.; Cardona, D. [Commissariat à l’Énergie Atomique, Centre de Valduc, F-21120 Is-sur-Tille (France)

    2015-04-21

    This work presents the development of an in-line energy dispersive L X-ray fluorescence spectrometer set-up, with a low power X-ray generator and a secondary target, for the determination of plutonium concentration in nitric acid solutions. The intensity of the L X-rays from the internal conversion and gamma rays emitted by the daughter nuclei from plutonium is minimized and corrected, in order to eliminate the interferences with the L X-ray fluorescence spectrum. The matrix effects are then corrected by the Compton peak method. A calibration plot for plutonium solutions within the range 0.1–20 g L{sup −1} is given.

  13. Development of a total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometer for ultra-trace element analysis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M K Tiwari; B Gowrishankar; V K Raghuvanshi; R V Nandedkar; K J S Sawhney

    2002-10-01

    A simple and fairly inexpensive total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometer has been designed, constructed and realized. The spectrometer is capable of ultra-trace multielement analysis as well as performs surface characterization of thin films. The TXRF setup comprises of an X-ray generator, a slitcollimator arrangement, a monochromator/cutoff-stage, a sample reflector stage and an X-ray detection system. The glancing angle of incidence on the two reflectors is implemented using a sine-bar mechanism that enables precise angle adjustments. An energy dispersive detector and a GM counter are employed for measuring respectively the fluorescence intensities and the direct X-ray beam intensity. A Cu-target X-ray generator with its line focus window is used as an excitation source. The spectrometer is quite portable with its compact design and use of a peltier cooled solid state detector for energy dispersive detection. Alignment and characterization of the TXRF system has been performed and the minimum detection limits for various elements have been determined to be in the range of 100 pg to 5 ng even at low X-ray generator powers of 30 kV, 5 mA. The capability of the TXRF system developed for thin film characterization is also demonstrated.

  14. Calculating the X-Ray Fluorescence from the Planet Mercury Due to High-Energy Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbine, T. H.; Trombka, J. I.; Bergstrom, P. M., Jr.; Christon, S. P.

    2005-01-01

    The least-studied terrestrial planet is Mercury due to its proximity to the Sun, which makes telescopic observations and spacecraft encounters difficult. Our lack of knowledge about Mercury should change in the near future due to the recent launching of MESSENGER, a Mercury orbiter. Another mission (BepiColombo) is currently being planned. The x-ray spectrometer on MESSENGER (and planned for BepiColombo) can characterize the elemental composition of a planetary surface by measuring emitted fluorescent x-rays. If electrons are ejected from an atom s inner shell by interaction with energetic particles such as photons, electrons, or ions, electrons from an outer shell can transfer to the inner shell. Characteristic x-rays are then emitted with energies that are the difference between the binding energy of the ion in its excited state and that of the ion in its ground state. Because each element has a unique set of energy levels, each element emits x-rays at a unique set of energies. Electrons and ions usually do not have the needed flux at high energies to cause significant x-ray fluorescence on most planetary bodies. This is not the case for Mercury where high-energy particles were detected during the Mariner 10 flybys. Mercury has an intrinsic magnetic field that deflects the solar wind, resulting in a bow shock in the solar wind and a magnetospheric cavity. Electrons and ions accelerated in the magnetosphere tend to follow its magnetic field lines and can impact the surface on Mercury s dark side Modeling has been done to determine if x-ray fluorescence resulting from the impact of high-energy electrons accelerated in Mercury's magnetosphere can be detected by MESSENGER. Our goal is to understand how much bulk chemical information can be obtained from x-ray fluorescence measurements on the dark side of Mercury.

  15. X-RAY DIFFRACTION AND X-RAY FLUORESCENCE ANALYSIS OF POTTERY SHARDS FROM NEW ARCHAEOLOGICAL SURVEY IN SOUTH REGION OF SISTAN, IRAN

    OpenAIRE

    Sarhaddi-Dadian, Hossein; Ramli, Zuliskandar; Shuhaimi, Nik Hassan; Rahman, Nik Abdul; Mehrafarin, Reza

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine whether pottery shards from new archaeological survey in south region of Sistan are locally made or imported. Many artefacts especially pottery shards have been found during the archaeological survey. These pottery shards are variable in color; from buff, grey, black, and red. The analytical techniques involved X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), that were applied to determine the major and trace elements and also the mineral content of ...

  16. Quantification estimate methods for synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bewer, Brian, E-mail: brian.bewer@lightsource.ca

    2015-03-15

    Synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy is a method which allows low elemental concentrations to be measured within a sample. To maintain biological or medical relevance increased importance is being placed on quantifying these in situ localized elemental concentrations. For third generation synchrotron light sources, which have the potential for high sample throughput, a rapid method of obtaining a quantification estimate is needed. Non-destructive transmission and surface analysis techniques for first transition metals, or elements of higher atomic number, using reference standards are examined for different sample property regimes to elucidate methods of quantitative synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy.

  17. X-ray fluorescence analysis and optical emission spectrometry of an roman mirror from Tomis, Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The miscellaneous population of Roman Empire, their diverse cultural tradition, their ability to assimilate the roman civilization spirits, had determined a permanent reassessment superimposed upon the roman contribution. Analysis was undertaken using optical emission spectrometry and non-destructive X-ray fluorescence. X-ray fluorescence analysis is a well-established method and is often used in archaeometry and other work dealing with valuable objects pertaining to the history of art and civilization. Roman mirror analysed has been found not to be made of speculum (a high tin bronze). (authors)

  18. X-RAY FLUORESCENCE ANALYSIS OF HANFORD LOW ACTIVITY WASTE SIMULANTS METHOD DEVELOPMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jurgensen, A; David Missimer, D; Ronny Rutherford, R

    2007-08-08

    The x-ray fluorescence laboratory (XRF) in the Analytical Development Directorate (ADD) of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to develop an x-ray fluorescence spectrometry method for elemental characterization of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) pretreated low activity waste (LAW) stream to the LAW Vitrification Plant. The WTP is evaluating the potential for using XRF as a rapid turnaround technique to support LAW product compliance and glass former batching. The overall objective of this task was to develop an XRF analytical method that provides rapid turnaround time (<8 hours), while providing sufficient accuracy and precision to determine variations in waste.

  19. Grazing-emission X-ray fluorescence spectrometry: principles and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bokx, P.K. de; Kok, C.; Bailleul, A.; Wiener, G.; Urbach, H.P. [Philips Research Labs., Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    1997-06-20

    In grazing emission X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (GEXRF), the sample is irradiated at approximately normal incidence, and only that part of fluorescence radiation is detected that is emitted at grazing angles. This configuration allows the use of wavelength-dispersive detection. This type of detection has the advantages of substantially better energy resolution at longer wavelengths (light elements, L and M lines of heavier elements) and a much larger dynamic range than the energy-dispersive detectors currently used in grazing X-ray techniques. Typical examples are presented of applications that are made possible by this new technique. (Author).

  20. Influence of crystallinity and polymer matrix on additive quantification by X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Additives are added to polymers during their synthesis, processing or when mixing to other materials and they play an important role on the polymer properties. The objective of this work is to study the influence of the polymer matrix and crystallinity on silicon and other additives quantification by X-ray fluorescence. Initial results showed that X-ray fluorescence can be used to characterize and quantify silicon in polypropylene and in high density polyethylene but it did not show reliable results to linear low density polyethylene and low density polyethylene. (author)

  1. X-ray fluorescence in IAEA Member States: Sri Lanka

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An ED-XRF facility was established in the analytical laboratory of the Atomic Energy Authority of Sri Lanka in 2001 under the technical assistance received through a IAEA TC project. The facility comprises of a X ray tube (Rich - Seifert), a sample holder with secondary target assembly and a Si (Li) detector. The laboratory has also got the necessary facilities to analyze water samples by co-precipitating technique using APDC. Our XRF laboratory has already established analytical procedures to use emission transmission methods (AXIl-QAES, P. Kump), back-scatter fundamental parameter method (QXAS-BFP), APDC co-precipitation method and thin and thick sample analysis method. Selected activities carried out by the XRF Laboratory are: Research study on heavy metal concentration levels in crow feathers collected from different environments and in industrial effluents released to a main water body (i.e the Kelani River); Research study on hyper accumulating capacity of flora in Ussangoda area (Serpentine mineral deposited area); Study on the possibility of removing heavy metals in liquid waste by bricks (low cost waste water treatment method); Study on heavy metal contamination in soil collected from Tsunami affected areas; Elemental analysis of air particulate matter to identify pollutants and pollution sources; Provision of analytical services to archaeological studies; Alloy analysis for technical evaluations. In Sri Lanka, there is a rising demand for this analytical service as it can provide the customer relatively fast and reliable results at low cost. AEA has decided to upgrade the existing facility to TXRF through the IAEA technical assistance to meet the demand for the services to analyse water and other liquid samples. In addition, Quality Assurance and Quality control procedures have been implemented for validation of analytical methods and check of accuracy of analytical results obtained

  2. Oscillating dipole model for the X-ray standing wave enhanced fluorescence in periodic multilayers

    OpenAIRE

    André, Jean-Michel; Le Guen, Karine; Jonnard, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    International audience Periodic multilayers give rise to enhanced X-ray fluorescence when a regime of standing waves occurs within the structure. This regime may concern the primary radiation used to induce the fluorescence, the secondary radiation of fluorescence or both of them. Until now, existing models only dealt with standing wave regime of primary radiation. We present a theoretical approach based on the oscillating dipole model and the coupled-wave theory that can treat efficiently...

  3. Bumpy Spin-Down of Anomalous X-Ray Pulsars The Link with Magnetars

    CERN Document Server

    Melatos, A

    1999-01-01

    The two anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) with well-sampled timing histories, 1E 1048.1-5937 and 1E 2259+586, are known to spin down irregularly, with `bumps' superimposed on an overall linear trend. Here we show that if AXPs are non-accreting magnetars, i.e. isolated neutron stars with surface magnetic fields B_0 > 10^{10} T, then they spin down electromagnetically in exactly the manner observed, due to an effect called `radiative precession'. Internal hydromagnetic stresses deform the star, creating a fractional difference epsilon=(I_3-I_1)/I_1 ~ 10^{-8} between the principal moments of inertia I_1 and I_3; the resulting Eulerian precession couples to an oscillating component of the electromagnetic torque associated with the near-zone radiation fields, and the star executes an anharmonic wobble with period tau_pr ~ 2 pi / epsilon Omega(t) ~ 10 yr, where Omega(t) is the rotation frequency as a function of time t. We solve Euler's equations for a biaxial magnet rotating in vacuo; show that the computed Omega(t) ...

  4. Soft gamma-ray repeaters and anomalous X-ray pulsars as highly magnetized white dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata

    2016-01-01

    We explore the possibility that soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs) and anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) are powered by highly magnetized white dwarfs (B-WDs). We take a sample of SGRs and AXPs and provide the possible parameter space in mass, radius, and surface magnetic field based on their observed properties (period and its derivative) and the assumption that these sources obey the mass-radius relation derived for the B-WDs. The radius and magnetic field of B-WDs are adequate to explain energies in SGRs/AXPs as the rotationally powered energy. In addition, B-WDs also adequately explain the perplexing radio transient GCRT J1745-3009 as a white dwarf pulsar. Note that the radius and magnetic fields of B-WDs are neither extreme (unlike of highly magnetized neutron stars) nor ordinary (unlike of magnetized white dwarfs, yet following the Chandrasekhar's mass-radius relation (C-WDs)). In order to explain SGRs/AXPs, while the highly magnetized neutron stars require an extra, observationally not well established yet, ...

  5. Exceptional flaring activity of the anomalous X-ray pulsar 1E 1547.0-5408

    CERN Document Server

    Savchenko, V; Beckmann, V; Produit, N; Walter, R

    2009-01-01

    (Abridged) We studied an exceptional period of activity of the anomalous X-ray pulsar 1E 1547.0-5408 in January 2009, during which about 200 bursts were detected by INTEGRAL. The major activity episode happened when the source was outside the field of view of all the INTEGRAL instruments. But we were still able to study the properties of 84 bursts detected simultaneously by the anti-coincidence shield of the spectrometer SPI and by the detector of the imager ISGRI. We find that the luminosity of the 22 January 2009 bursts of 1E 1547.0-5408 was > 1e42 erg/s. This luminosity is comparable to that of the bursts of soft gamma repeaters (SGR) and is at least two orders of magnitude larger than the luminosity of the previously reported bursts from AXPs. Similarly to the SGR bursts, the brightest bursts of 1E 1547.0-5408 consist of a short spike of ~100 ms duration with a hard spectrum, followed by a softer extended tail of 1-10 s duration, which occasionally exhibits pulsations with the source spin period of ~2 s. ...

  6. Soft gamma-ray repeaters and anomalous X-ray pulsars as highly magnetized white dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata; Rao, A. R.

    2016-05-01

    We explore the possibility that soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs) and anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) are powered by highly magnetized white dwarfs (B-WDs). We take a sample of SGRs and AXPs and provide the possible parameter space in mass, radius, and surface magnetic field based on their observed properties (period and its derivative) and the assumption that these sources obey the mass-radius relation derived for the B-WDs. The radius and magnetic field of B-WDs are adequate to explain energies in SGRs/AXPs as the rotationally powered energy. In addition, B-WDs also adequately explain the perplexing radio transient GCRT J1745-3009 as a white dwarf pulsar. Note that the radius and magnetic fields of B-WDs are neither extreme (unlike of highly magnetized neutron stars) nor ordinary (unlike of magnetized white dwarfs, yet following the Chandrasekhar's mass-radius relation (C-WDs)). In order to explain SGRs/AXPs, while the highly magnetized neutron stars require an extra, observationally not well established yet, source of energy, the C-WDs predict large ultra-violet luminosity which is observationally constrained from a strict upper limit. Finally, we provide a set of basic differences between the magnetar and B-WD hypotheses for SGRs/AXPs.

  7. The Magnetar Nature and the Outburst Mechanism of a Transient Anomalous X-ray Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guver, Tolga; Ozel, Feryal; Gogus, Ersin; Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2007-01-01

    Anomalous X-ray Pulsars (AXPs) belong to a class of neutron stars believed to harbor the strongest magnetic fields in the universe, as indicated by their energetic bursts and their rapid spindowns. However, a direct measurement of their surface field strengths has not been made to date. It is also not known whether AXP outbursts result from changes in the neutron star magnetic field or crust properties. Here we report the first, spectroscopic measurement of the surface magnetic field strength of an AXP, XTE J1810-197, and solidify its magnetar nature. The field strength obtained from detailed spectral analysis and modeling is remarkably close to the value inferred from the rate of spindown of this source and remains nearly constant during numerous observations spanning over two orders of magnitude in source flux. The surface temperature, on the other hand, declines steadily and dramatically following the 2003 outburst of this source. Our findings demonstrate that heating occurs in the upper neutron star crust during an outburst and sheds light on the transient behaviour of AXPs.

  8. Detailed Physical Modeling Reveals the Magnetar Nature of a Transient Anomalous X-ray Pulsar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guever, T.; Oezel, F.; Goegues, E.; Kouveliotou, C.

    2007-01-01

    Anomalous X-ray Pulsars (AXPs) belong to a class of neutron stars believed to harbor the strongest magnetic fields in the universe, as indicated by their energetic bursts and their rapid spindowns. However, a direct measurement of their surface field strengths has not been made to date. It is also not known whether AXP outbursts result from changes in the neutron star magnetic field or crust properties. Here we report the first, spectroscopic measurement of the surface magnetic field strength of an AXP, XTE J1810-197, and solidify its magnetar nature. The field strength obtained from detailed spectral analysis and modeling is remarkably close to the value inferred from the rate of spindown of this source and remains nearly constant during numerous observations spanning over two orders of magnitude in source flux. The surface temperature, on the other hand, declines steadily and dramatically following the 2003 outburst of this source. Our findings demonstrate that heating occurs in the upper neutron star crust during an outburst and sheds light on the transient behaviour of AXPs.

  9. Anomalous elastic scattering of x-ray photons by a neon-like ion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopersky, A N; Nadolinsky, A M; Dzuba, D V; Yavna, V A [Rostov State University of Transport Communication, Rostov-on-Don, 344038 (Russian Federation)

    2005-05-28

    In the non-relativistic approximation for the wavefunctions of the one-electron states and in the dipole approximation for the scattering amplitude, the effect of radial monopole rearrangement of electron shells within the field of a vacancy and of the processes of one-photon double excitation/ionization on the absolute values and the shapes of the differential cross sections of anomalous non-zero-angle elastic scattering of linearly polarized x-ray photons by the Ne atom and by the neon-like Si{sup 4+} and Ar{sup 8+} ions in the vicinity of K- and KL{sub 23}-ionization thresholds is studied. The results of calculations for the Ne atom were found to be in agreement with the high-precision synchrotron radiation experiments by Coreno et al (1999 Phys. Rev. A 59 2494; K-ionization threshold) and by Avaldi et al (1996 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 29 L737; KL{sub 23}-ionization threshold). The results of calculations for the Si{sup 4+} and Ar{sup 8+} ions are predictions.

  10. Anomalous elastic scattering of x-ray photons by a neon-like ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the non-relativistic approximation for the wavefunctions of the one-electron states and in the dipole approximation for the scattering amplitude, the effect of radial monopole rearrangement of electron shells within the field of a vacancy and of the processes of one-photon double excitation/ionization on the absolute values and the shapes of the differential cross sections of anomalous non-zero-angle elastic scattering of linearly polarized x-ray photons by the Ne atom and by the neon-like Si4+ and Ar8+ ions in the vicinity of K- and KL23-ionization thresholds is studied. The results of calculations for the Ne atom were found to be in agreement with the high-precision synchrotron radiation experiments by Coreno et al (1999 Phys. Rev. A 59 2494; K-ionization threshold) and by Avaldi et al (1996 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 29 L737; KL23-ionization threshold). The results of calculations for the Si4+ and Ar8+ ions are predictions

  11. Total-reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis of Austrian wine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concentration of major, minor and trace elements in Austrian wine was determined by total-reflection X-ray fluorescence using gallium as internal standard. A multi-elemental analysis was possible by pipetting 6 μl of wine directly on the reflector and drying. Total-reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis was performed with Atomika EXTRA II A (Cameca) X-rays from a Mo tube with a high-energy cut-off at 20 keV in total-reflection geometry. The results showed that it was possible to identify only by the elemental analysis as fingerprint the vineyards and year of vintage among 11 different wines

  12. Sediment U, Th, K content analyzed using X-ray fluorescence spectrometry for ESR dating samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accurate measurement of dose rate is the key issues to obtain reliable ESR age. In this article, we used X-ray fluorescence spectrometry to determine the U, Th, K content of the fluvial sediments. And the standard working curves were established using the national rock reference material. Setting the lower X-ray power and the matrix effect, U, Th, K content in the fluvial sediment were investigated. The results show that the method recovery rate of U and Th is less than 15%. Comparing with the measurement data from the α-counting and Atomic Spectrometry analysis, the dose rate difference is less than 5%. It shows that the X-ray fluorescence spectrometry method can fit for the requirement for obtaining the U, Th, K content of fluvial sediment for ESR dating. (authors)

  13. Quantitative X-ray fluorescence analysis of samples of less than 'infinite thickness': Difficulties and possibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray fluorescence spectrometry due to its nondestructive nature is widely applied in analysis of single layers and multiple layer films (e.g. semiconductors, electrooptic and solar cell devices, coatings, corrosion and paint layers), individual particles (airborne, fly ash, gunshot residue particles, etc.), art and archeological objects (manuscripts, paintings, icons) and many others. Quantitative analysis of these materials, frequently classified as samples of less than infinite thickness (thin or intermediate-thickness samples), required applying adequate matrix correction methods taking into account complex dependence of analyte fluorescent radiation intensity on full matrix composition and sample thickness. In this article, the matrix correction methods including fundamental parameters, Monte Carlo simulations, influence coefficients algorithms and methods based on X-ray transmission measurements are reviewed. The difficulties in the analysis of single layer and multiple layer films and the accuracy of fundamental parameter methods in simultaneous determination of their thickness and composition are discussed. The quantitative analysis of individual particles and inhomogeneous and/or complex structure materials using fundamental parameter and Monte Carlo simulation methods in micro-beam X-ray fluorescence spectrometry are also reviewed. Some references are devoted to the analysis of light matrix samples, e.g. geological, environmental and biological samples, in which undetectable low-Z elements are present (so-called 'dark matrix') using backscattered fundamental parameter methods. Since the samples of less than infinite thickness are partially transparent for X-ray beams, the transmission measurements present possibilities that are unattainable for bulk samples. Thus, the emission-transmission method and also new instruments allowing measurements of the primary X-ray beam transmitted through the sample together with measurements of X-ray fluorescence

  14. Ray-tracing of a Real-Time X-Ray Fluorescence Microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author is doing the conceptual design of the Real-time X-ray Fluorescence Microscope (R-XRFM) which can perform elemental mapping by X-ray fluorescence without scanning the sample. Doubly curved crystal of a Johansson type monochromator or a Johann type monochromator will be used as a point-to-point focus monochromator in R-XRFM and the performances in each case were evaluated by simulation calculation using ray-tracing method. From the result of the calculation in conditions of a 60 mm diameter α-quartz crystal monochromator, a 300 mm radius Rowland circle, and an X-ray fluorescence wavelength of Al Kα1, in both cases of the Johansson type and in case of the Johann type 40 mm in width, it was found that the angular resolution is 0.010deg, and there is a possibility that R-XRFM can perform elemental mapping identifying the differences in the fluorescent X-ray wavelength of the aluminum due to the difference in the coordination number. In the case of Johansson type, it was found that the X-rays converge on the detector surface with the spatial resolution < 0.001-1.3 μm from the analyzing area of 0-50 μm square, and with the spatial resolution 1.3-2.5 μm from the analyzing area of 50-100 μm square. In the case of Johann type 40 mm in width, it was found that the X-rays converge on a detector surface with the spatial resolution 1.5-3.7 μm from the analyzing area of 0-100 μm square. (author)

  15. X-ray Fluorescence in Member States: Spain. Activities at the Laboratory of X ray Analytical Applications (LARX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1. Determination of Metal Residues in Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients According to Current Legislation by Using XRF Spectrometry. Safety and efficacy of pharmaceuticals are two fundamental issues of importance in drug therapy. Therefore, the determination of potential impurities in different stages of the manufacturing processes, and especially in the final product, is necessary to prevent potential risk to human health. Metals can be introduced in the active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) through different sources (raw materials, reagents, catalysts, reactors, etc) and, consequently, they are potential impurities in the drug substances and are routinely monitored. 2. Application of XRF Spectrometry in Phytoremediation Activities Around Mining Areas. In the last decade, the use of plants for the stabilization (phytostabilization) and clean-up (phytoremediation) of metal contaminated environments has gained popularity among government agencies worldwide, as alternate or complementary cost-effective non-invasive technology to the engineering based remediation methods. In view of the considerable number of analyses necessary in phytoremediation and plant biology studies, it is important that the analytical procedures used for elemental determination in plant tissues should be fast and cheap, with simple sample preparation, and of adequate accuracy and precision. Last years, we have developed several analytical methodologies, using diverse configurations of XRF spectrometers (EDXRF, WDXRF, HE-P-EDXRF), to determine elemental composition of vegetation grown in mining areas. Recently, in collaboration with a research group from the Department of Chemical Engineering, Agriculture and Food Technology of the University of Girona (Spain), we have studied the possibilities and limitations of a low-cost benchtop energy dispersive X ray fluorescence (EDXRF) instrument to be employed as analytical technique for studying the potential use of sunflowers (Helianthus annuus) for

  16. Use of a Superconducting Tunnel Junction for X-Ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiller, L

    2001-03-06

    A superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) in combination with a superconducting absorber of radiation may function as a highly resolving x-ray spectrometer. Electronic excitations, or quasiparticles, are created when a superconductor absorbs an x ray and are detected as an excess tunnel current through the junction. The number of quasiparticles created and the magnitude of the excess current is proportional to the energy of the absorbed x ray. This is similar to existing semiconductor-based spectrometers that measure electron-hole pairs, but with 1000 times more excitations. The energy measurement therefore can be up to 30 times more precise with a superconducting detector than with a semiconductor detector. This work describes the development and testing of an STJ spectrometer design for x-ray fluorescence applications. First, the basic principles of the STJ spectrometer are explained. This is followed by detailed simulations of the variance in the number of quasiparticles produced by absorption of an x ray. This variance is inherent in the detector and establishes an upper limit on the resolving power of the spectrometer. These simulations include effects due to the materials used in the spectrometer and to the multilayer structure of the device. Next, the spectrometer is characterized as functions of operating temperature, incident x-ray energy, and count rate. Many of these tests were performed with the spectrometer attached to a synchrotron radiation port. Finally, example x-ray fluorescence spectra of materials exposed to synchrotron radiation are presented. These materials are of interest to semiconductor processing and structural biology, two fields that will benefit immediately from the improved resolving power of the STJ spectrometer.

  17. Preliminary experiment of fluorescent X-ray computed tomography to detect dual agents for biological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Q; Takeda, T; Yuasa, T; Hasegawa, Y; Wu, J; Thet-Thet-Lwin; Hyodo, K; Dilmanian, F A; Itai, Y; Akatsuka, T

    2001-05-01

    The simultaneous observation of various information, such as blood flow, tissue metabolism and distribution of receptors, is quite important in order to understand the functional state of biomedical objects. The simultaneous detectability of contrast agents by fluorescent X-ray computed tomography (FXCT) with synchrotron radiation is examined in this study. The system consisted of a silicon (111) double-crystal monochromator, an X-ray slit system, a scanning table, a PIN diode, a highly purified germanium detector and an X-ray charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. The monochromatic X-ray beam energy was adjusted to 37.0 keV and collimated into a pencil beam of 1 x 1 mm. The fluorescent spectra of the K alpha lines for iodine and xenon were detected simultaneously. FXCT could image the distribution of both iodine and xenon agents in a phantom clearly and the contrast ratio was significantly better than that of transmission X-ray computed tomography images. PMID:11486409

  18. Development of an X-ray fluorescence holographic measurement system for protein crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato-Tomita, Ayana; Shibayama, Naoya; Happo, Naohisa; Kimura, Koji; Okabe, Takahiro; Matsushita, Tomohiro; Park, Sam-Yong; Sasaki, Yuji C.; Hayashi, Kouichi

    2016-06-01

    Experimental procedure and setup for obtaining X-ray fluorescence hologram of crystalline metalloprotein samples are described. Human hemoglobin, an α2β2 tetrameric metalloprotein containing the Fe(II) heme active-site in each chain, was chosen for this study because of its wealth of crystallographic data. A cold gas flow system was introduced to reduce X-ray radiation damage of protein crystals that are usually fragile and susceptible to damage. A χ-stage was installed to rotate the sample while avoiding intersection between the X-ray beam and the sample loop or holder, which is needed for supporting fragile protein crystals. Huge hemoglobin crystals (with a maximum size of 8 × 6 × 3 mm3) were prepared and used to keep the footprint of the incident X-ray beam smaller than the sample size during the entire course of the measurement with the incident angle of 0°-70°. Under these experimental and data acquisition conditions, we achieved the first observation of the X-ray fluorescence hologram pattern from the protein crystals with minimal radiation damage, opening up a new and potential method for investigating the stereochemistry of the metal active-sites in biomacromolecules.

  19. X-ray fluorescence analysis study. Final report, December 1, 1970-December 31, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kneip, T J; Laurer, G R

    1978-01-01

    This report has described the most significant experiments and the results obtained, during the development of a system for the detection and measurement of Pb in blood using radioisotope-excited x-ray fluorescence analysis, over the contract period. Briefly, the report described: detector selection; source selection; source-sample-detector geometry; sample preparation; system calibration; and separation technique. (PSB)

  20. Some applications of x-ray fluorescence spectrography to the determination of uranium and thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several methods for the determination of uranium and thorium by X-ray fluorescence spectrography are described. In pure solutions the sensitivity for these elements is 5-10 ppm. For solutions containing gross concentrations of impurities, strontium is added as an internal standard. Precision and accuracy of the determinations are about 1% when working in the optimum concentration range. (author)

  1. Determination of rhenium in molybdenite by X-ray fluorescence. A combined chemical-spectrometric technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solt, M.W.; Wahlberg, J.S.; Myers, A.T.

    1969-01-01

    Rhenium in molybdenite is separated from molybdenum by distillation of rhenium heptoxide from a perchloric-sulphuric acid mixture. It is concentrated by precipitation of the sulphide and then determined by X-ray fluorescence. From 3 to 1000 ??g of rhenium can be measured with a precision generally within 2%. The procedure tolerates larger amounts of molybdenum than the usual colorimetric methods. ?? 1969.

  2. Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry: A Long Overdue Addition to the Chemistry Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Peter T.

    2011-01-01

    Portable Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) analyzers have undergone significant improvements over the past decade. Salient advantages of XRF for elemental analysis include minimal sample preparation, multielement analysis capabilities, detection limits in the low parts per million (ppm) range, and analysis times on the order of 1 min.…

  3. Pattern recognition on X-ray fluorescence records from Copenhagen lake sediments using principal component analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schreiber, Norman; Garcia, Emanuel; Kroon, Aart;

    2014-01-01

    Principle Component Analysis (PCA) was performed on chemical data of two sediment cores from an urban fresh-water lake in Copenhagen, Denmark. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) core scanning provided the underlying datasets on 13 variables (Si, K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Rb, Cd, Pb). Principle Com...

  4. Confirmation of molecular formulas of metallic complexes through X-ray fluorescence quantitative analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray fluorescence spectrophotometry was employed to determined the metal content in a series of five transition element complexes (Mn, Ti, Zn, V). The results confirmed the molecular formulas of these complexes, already proposed on the basis of elemental microanalysis, solution condutimetry and other analytical methods. (C.L.B.)

  5. Influence of angle's ranges for recording an X-ray fluorescence hologram on reconstructed atomic images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Hong-Lan; CHEN Jian-Wen; GAO Hong-Yi; ZHU Hua-Feng; LI Ru-Xin; XU Zhi-Zhan

    2004-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) is a novel method for three-dimensional (3D) imaging of atomic structure. Theoretically, in an XFH experiment, one has to measure the fluorescence energy on a spherical surface to get well-resolved 3D images of atoms. But in practice, the experimental system arrangement does not allow the measurement of the fluorescent intensity oscillations in the full sphere. The holographic information losses because of the limited sampling range (less than 4π) will directly result in defective reconstructed atomic images. In this work, the atomic image of a Fe single crystal (001) was reconstructed by numerically simulating X-ray fluorescence holograms of the crystal at different recording angle's ranges and step lengths. Influences of the ranges of azimuth angles and polar angles and the step length of polar angles on the reconstructed atomic images were discussed.

  6. Improving x-ray fluorescence signal for benchtop polychromatic cone-beam x-ray fluorescence computed tomography by incident x-ray spectrum optimization: A Monte Carlo study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manohar, Nivedh [Nuclear/Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs, Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Jones, Bernard L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States); Cho, Sang Hyun, E-mail: scho@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics and Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: To develop an accurate and comprehensive Monte Carlo (MC) model of an experimental benchtop polychromatic cone-beam x-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XFCT) setup and apply this MC model to optimize incident x-ray spectrum for improving production/detection of x-ray fluorescence photons from gold nanoparticles (GNPs). Methods: A detailed MC model, based on an experimental XFCT system, was created using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) transport code. The model was validated by comparing MC results including x-ray fluorescence (XRF) and scatter photon spectra with measured data obtained under identical conditions using 105 kVp cone-beam x-rays filtered by either 1 mm of lead (Pb) or 0.9 mm of tin (Sn). After validation, the model was used to investigate the effects of additional filtration of the incident beam with Pb and Sn. Supplementary incident x-ray spectra, representing heavier filtration (Pb: 2 and 3 mm; Sn: 1, 2, and 3 mm) were computationally generated and used with the model to obtain XRF/scatter spectra. Quasimonochromatic incident x-ray spectra (81, 85, 90, 95, and 100 keV with 10 keV full width at half maximum) were also investigated to determine the ideal energy for distinguishing gold XRF signal from the scatter background. Fluorescence signal-to-dose ratio (FSDR) and fluorescence-normalized scan time (FNST) were used as metrics to assess results. Results: Calculated XRF/scatter spectra for 1-mm Pb and 0.9-mm Sn filters matched (r ≥ 0.996) experimental measurements. Calculated spectra representing additional filtration for both filter materials showed that the spectral hardening improved the FSDR at the expense of requiring a much longer FNST. In general, using Sn instead of Pb, at a given filter thickness, allowed an increase of up to 20% in FSDR, more prominent gold XRF peaks, and up to an order of magnitude decrease in FNST. Simulations using quasimonochromatic spectra suggested that increasing source x-ray energy, in the

  7. Improving x-ray fluorescence signal for benchtop polychromatic cone-beam x-ray fluorescence computed tomography by incident x-ray spectrum optimization: A Monte Carlo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To develop an accurate and comprehensive Monte Carlo (MC) model of an experimental benchtop polychromatic cone-beam x-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XFCT) setup and apply this MC model to optimize incident x-ray spectrum for improving production/detection of x-ray fluorescence photons from gold nanoparticles (GNPs). Methods: A detailed MC model, based on an experimental XFCT system, was created using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) transport code. The model was validated by comparing MC results including x-ray fluorescence (XRF) and scatter photon spectra with measured data obtained under identical conditions using 105 kVp cone-beam x-rays filtered by either 1 mm of lead (Pb) or 0.9 mm of tin (Sn). After validation, the model was used to investigate the effects of additional filtration of the incident beam with Pb and Sn. Supplementary incident x-ray spectra, representing heavier filtration (Pb: 2 and 3 mm; Sn: 1, 2, and 3 mm) were computationally generated and used with the model to obtain XRF/scatter spectra. Quasimonochromatic incident x-ray spectra (81, 85, 90, 95, and 100 keV with 10 keV full width at half maximum) were also investigated to determine the ideal energy for distinguishing gold XRF signal from the scatter background. Fluorescence signal-to-dose ratio (FSDR) and fluorescence-normalized scan time (FNST) were used as metrics to assess results. Results: Calculated XRF/scatter spectra for 1-mm Pb and 0.9-mm Sn filters matched (r ≥ 0.996) experimental measurements. Calculated spectra representing additional filtration for both filter materials showed that the spectral hardening improved the FSDR at the expense of requiring a much longer FNST. In general, using Sn instead of Pb, at a given filter thickness, allowed an increase of up to 20% in FSDR, more prominent gold XRF peaks, and up to an order of magnitude decrease in FNST. Simulations using quasimonochromatic spectra suggested that increasing source x-ray energy, in the

  8. Full Field X-Ray Fluorescence Imaging Using Micro Pore Optics for Planetary Surface Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrazin, P.; Blake, D. F.; Gailhanou, M.; Walter, P.; Schyns, E.; Marchis, F.; Thompson, K.; Bristow, T.

    2016-01-01

    Many planetary surface processes leave evidence as small features in the sub-millimetre scale. Current planetary X-ray fluorescence spectrometers lack the spatial resolution to analyse such small features as they only provide global analyses of areas greater than 100 mm(exp 2). A micro-XRF spectrometer will be deployed on the NASA Mars 2020 rover to analyse spots as small as 120m. When using its line-scanning capacity combined to perpendicular scanning by the rover arm, elemental maps can be generated. We present a new instrument that provides full-field XRF imaging, alleviating the need for precise positioning and scanning mechanisms. The Mapping X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometer - "Map-X" - will allow elemental imaging with approximately 100µm spatial resolution and simultaneously provide elemental chemistry at the scale where many relict physical, chemical and biological features can be imaged in ancient rocks. The arm-mounted Map-X instrument is placed directly on the surface of an object and held in a fixed position during measurements. A 25x25 mm(exp 2) surface area is uniformly illuminated with X-rays or alpha-particles and gamma-rays. A novel Micro Pore Optic focusses a fraction of the emitted X-ray fluorescence onto a CCD operated at a few frames per second. On board processing allows measuring the energy and coordinates of each X-ray photon collected. Large sets of frames are reduced into 2d histograms used to compute higher level data products such as elemental maps and XRF spectra from selected regions of interest. XRF spectra are processed on the ground to further determine quantitative elemental compositions. The instrument development will be presented with an emphasis on the characterization and modelling of the X-ray focussing Micro Pore Optic. An outlook on possible alternative XRF imaging applications will be discussed.

  9. High resolution x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy - a new technique for site- and spin-selectivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray spectroscopy has long been used to elucidate electronic and structural information of molecules. One of the weaknesses of x-ray absorption is its sensitivity to all of the atoms of a particular element in a sample. Through out this thesis, a new technique for enhancing the site- and spin-selectivity of the x-ray absorption has been developed. By high resolution fluorescence detection, the chemical sensitivity of K emission spectra can be used to identify oxidation and spin states; it can also be used to facilitate site-selective X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) and site-selective Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS). The spin polarization in K fluorescence could be used to generate spin selective XANES or spin-polarized EXAFS, which provides a new measure of the spin density, or the nature of magnetic neighboring atoms. Finally, dramatic line-sharpening effects by the combination of absorption and emission processes allow observation of structure that is normally unobservable. All these unique characters can enormously simplify a complex x-ray spectrum. Applications of this novel technique have generated information from various transition-metal model compounds to metalloproteins. The absorption and emission spectra by high resolution fluorescence detection are interdependent. The ligand field multiplet model has been used for the analysis of Kα and Kβ emission spectra. First demonstration on different chemical states of Fe compounds has shown the applicability of site selectivity and spin polarization. Different interatomic distances of the same element in different chemical forms have been detected using site-selective EXAFS

  10. High resolution x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy - a new technique for site- and spin-selectivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xin [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Applied Science

    1996-12-01

    X-ray spectroscopy has long been used to elucidate electronic and structural information of molecules. One of the weaknesses of x-ray absorption is its sensitivity to all of the atoms of a particular element in a sample. Through out this thesis, a new technique for enhancing the site- and spin-selectivity of the x-ray absorption has been developed. By high resolution fluorescence detection, the chemical sensitivity of K emission spectra can be used to identify oxidation and spin states; it can also be used to facilitate site-selective X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) and site-selective Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS). The spin polarization in K fluorescence could be used to generate spin selective XANES or spin-polarized EXAFS, which provides a new measure of the spin density, or the nature of magnetic neighboring atoms. Finally, dramatic line-sharpening effects by the combination of absorption and emission processes allow observation of structure that is normally unobservable. All these unique characters can enormously simplify a complex x-ray spectrum. Applications of this novel technique have generated information from various transition-metal model compounds to metalloproteins. The absorption and emission spectra by high resolution fluorescence detection are interdependent. The ligand field multiplet model has been used for the analysis of K{alpha} and K{beta} emission spectra. First demonstration on different chemical states of Fe compounds has shown the applicability of site selectivity and spin polarization. Different interatomic distances of the same element in different chemical forms have been detected using site-selective EXAFS.

  11. In vivo X-ray fluorescence of lead in bone: review and current issues.

    OpenAIRE

    Todd, A. C.; Chettle, D R

    1994-01-01

    Bone lead measurements can assess long-term lead dosimetry because the residence time of lead in bone is long. Bone lead measurements thus complement blood and plasma lead measurements, which reflect more short-term exposure. Although the noninvasive, in vivo measurement of lead in bone by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) has been under development since the 1970s, its use is still largely confined to research institutions. There are three principal methods used that vary both in the how lead X-rays ...

  12. Trends in hard X-ray fluorescence mapping: environmental applications in the age of fast detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lombi, E.; Donner, E. [University of South Australia, Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation, Mawson Lakes, South Australia (Australia); CRC CARE, PO Box 486, Salisbury, South Australia (Australia); Jonge, M.D. de; Paterson, D. [Australian Synchrotron, X-ray Fluorescence Microscopy, 800 Blackburn Road, Clayton, Victoria (Australia); Ryan, C.G. [CSIRO Earth Science and Resource Engineering, Normanby Road, Clayton, Victoria (Australia)

    2011-06-15

    Environmental samples are extremely diverse but share a tendency for heterogeneity and complexity. This heterogeneity poses methodological challenges when investigating biogeochemical processes. In recent years, the development of analytical tools capable of probing element distribution and speciation at the microscale have allowed this challenge to be addressed. Of these available tools, laterally resolved synchrotron techniques such as X-ray fluorescence mapping are key methods for the in situ investigation of micronutrients and inorganic contaminants in environmental samples. This article demonstrates how recent advances in X-ray fluorescence detector technology are bringing new possibilities to environmental research. Fast detectors are helping to circumvent major issues such as X-ray beam damage of hydrated samples, as dwell times during scanning are reduced. They are also helping to reduce temporal beamtime requirements, making particularly time-consuming techniques such as micro X-ray fluorescence ({mu}XRF) tomography increasingly feasible. This article focuses on {mu}XRF mapping of nutrients and metalloids in environmental samples, and suggests that the current divide between mapping and speciation techniques will be increasingly blurred by the development of combined approaches. (orig.)

  13. Molar concentration from sequential 2-D water-window X-ray ptychography and X-ray fluorescence in hydrated cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, M. W. M.; Elgass, K. D.; Junker, M. D.; de Jonge, M. D.; van Riessen, G. A.

    2016-04-01

    Recent developments in biological X-ray microscopy have allowed structural information and elemental distribution to be simultaneously obtained by combining X-ray ptychography and X-ray fluorescence microscopy. Experimentally, these methods can be performed simultaneously; however, the optimal conditions for each measurement may not be compatible. Here, we combine two distinct measurements of ultrastructure and elemental distribution, with each measurement performed under optimised conditions. By combining optimised ptychography and fluorescence information we are able to determine molar concentrations from two-dimensional images, allowing an investigation into the interactions between the environment sensing filopodia in fibroblasts and extracellular calcium. Furthermore, the biological ptychography results we present illustrate a point of maturity where the technique can be applied to solve significant problems in structural biology.

  14. Atomic Rayleigh scattering cross-sections and the associated anomalous dispersion in the X-ray regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elastic scattering cross-sections for Pd, Ag, Cd, In, Sn, Sb, Pt, Au and Pb are measured at an angle of 90 circle in the X-ray region 5.41≤E≤8.04 keV. These energies fall between the high-energy side of the L- and M-shell absorption edges of the atoms considered. The present atomic region is significant for solid X-rays to assess the contribution of resonance and solid-state environmental effects. Also it is the anomalous scattering region for many of the atoms of the periodic table. Experimental results are compared with theoretical calculations based on form factor formalisms including the anomalous corrections and available recent S-matrix values. Based on the experimental evidence, the present results indicate the influence of solid-state environmental effects, the importance of anomalous corrections nearer to absorption edges, the correctness of revised high-energy limit values, the superiority of S-matrix predictions over form factor values on measured elastic scattering cross-sections in the X-ray regime and also show the resonance behavior around K,L and M absorption edges. (orig.)

  15. Optimizing Monocapillary Optics for Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction, Fluorescence Imaging, and Spectroscopy Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilderback, Donald H.; Kazimirov, Alexander; Gillilan, Richard; Cornaby, Sterling; Woll, Arthur; Zha, Chang-Sheng; Huang, Rong

    2007-01-01

    A number of synchrotron x-ray applications such as powder diffraction in diamond anvil cells, microbeam protein crystallography, x-ray fluorescence imaging, etc. can benefit from using hollow glass monocapillary optics to improve the flux per square micron on a sample. We currently draw glass tubing into the desired elliptical shape so that only one-bounce under total reflection conditions is needed to bring the x-ray beam to a focus at a 25 to 50 mm distance beyond the capillary tip. For modest focal spot sizes of 10 to 20 microns, we can increase the intensity per square micron by factors of 10 to 1000. We show some of the results obtained at CHESS and Hasylab with capillaries focusing 5 to 40 keV radiation, their properties, and how even better the experimental results could be if more ideal capillaries were fabricated in the future.

  16. Comparing the Ag-content of poltinniks using X-ray fluorescence

    CERN Document Server

    Ferguson, S

    2013-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence experiments have been performed in order to analyze the elemental composition of four Russian 50-kopek coins ("poltinniks") minted during 1913, 1921, and 1924. By comparing the intensities of the Ag K{\\alpha} X-rays emitted by the poltinniks, we were able to determine whether the Ag-content of the coins were equal. One of the goals of this study was to determine whether or not legislation was carried out that required the proportions of Ag and Cu used in the minting of coins in 1924 to be identical to those minted in previous years. Also, the intensities of the Ag K{\\alpha} X-rays emitted by 1924 poltinniks minted in London and Leningrad were compared. Our results suggest that the percent difference in the proportions of Ag present in each of the coins is no more than 5.5%.

  17. Extraction X-ray fluorescence determination of gold in natural samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behaviour of gold and other elements impeding its X-ray fluorescence (XRF) determination, namely, of zinc, lead, and arsenic, has been studied during their extraction by TBP from hydrochloric, nitric, and aqua regia solutions using solid extractant (SE(TBP)). Gold extraction from pulps after aqua regia leaching, with the gold distribution coefficient (D) being equal to about 104, was observed as the most favourable one for the quantitative and selective recovery of gold. For extraction from hydrochloric solutions the DAu value does not depend on the gold content of initial solutions (10-8 - 10-4 M), but it decreases substantially with increasing extraction temperature (from 5x105 at 20 deg C to 9x103 at 70 deg C). An anomalously high distribution coefficient of lead (DPb=103) was observed during extraction from hydrochloric solutions in the presence of chlorine. This fact could be explained by the formation of the chlorocomplexes of lead (IV). The XRF method of gold determination in natural samples has been developed, which includes the aqua regia decomposition of the samples, recovery of gold from the pulp after its leaching by SE(TBP) and back - extraction using a 0.025 M hot thiourea solution providing a thin sample film for secondary XRF spectrometry. For 25 g of the sample material the limit of determination is set at 0.01 g per ton (10-6%). The accuracy of the technique has been checked on different reference materials. The results agree within 10%. 16 refs.; 5 figs.; 1 tab

  18. Application of X-ray fluorescence analytical techniques in phytoremediation and plant biology studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nečemer, Marijan; Kump, Peter; Ščančar, Janez; Jaćimović, Radojko; Simčič, Jurij; Pelicon, Primož; Budnar, Miloš; Jeran, Zvonka; Pongrac, Paula; Regvar, Marjana; Vogel-Mikuš, Katarina

    2008-11-01

    Phytoremediation is an emerging technology that employs the use of higher plants for the clean-up of contaminated environments. Progress in the field is however handicapped by limited knowledge of the biological processes involved in plant metal uptake, translocation, tolerance and plant-microbe-soil interactions; therefore a better understanding of the basic biological mechanisms involved in plant/microbe/soil/contaminant interactions would allow further optimization of phytoremediation technologies. In view of the needs of global environmental protection, it is important that in phytoremediation and plant biology studies the analytical procedures for elemental determination in plant tissues and soil should be fast and cheap, with simple sample preparation, and of adequate accuracy and reproducibility. The aim of this study was therefore to present the main characteristics, sample preparation protocols and applications of X-ray fluorescence-based analytical techniques (energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry—EDXRF, total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry—TXRF and micro-proton induced X-ray emission—micro-PIXE). Element concentrations in plant leaves from metal polluted and non-polluted sites, as well as standard reference materials, were analyzed by the mentioned techniques, and additionally by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). The results were compared and critically evaluated in order to assess the performance and capability of X-ray fluorescence-based techniques in phytoremediation and plant biology studies. It is the EDXRF, which is recommended as suitable to be used in the analyses of a large number of samples, because it is multi-elemental, requires only simple preparation of sample material, and it is analytically comparable to the most frequently used instrumental chemical techniques. The TXRF is compatible to FAAS in sample preparation, but relative to AAS it is fast

  19. Evaluation of different synchrotron beamline configurations for X-ray fluorescence analysis of environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberie, Sean R; Iceman, Christopher R; Cahill, Catherine F; Cahill, Thomas M

    2014-08-19

    Synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF) is a powerful elemental analysis tool, yet synchrotrons are large, multiuser facilities that are generally not amenable to modification. However, the X-ray beamlines from synchrotrons can be modified by simply including X-ray filters or removing monochromators to improve the SR-XRF analysis. In this study, we evaluated four easily applied beamline configurations for the analysis of three representative environmental samples, namely a thin aerosol sample, an intermediate thickness biological sample, and a thick rare earth mineral specimen. The results showed that the "white beam" configuration, which was simply the full, polychromatic output of the synchrotron, was the optimal configuration for the analysis of thin samples with little mass. The "filtered white beam" configuration removed the lower energy X-rays from the excitation beam so it gave better sensitivity for elements emitting more energetic X-rays. The "filtered white beam-filtered detector" configuration sacrifices the lower energy part of the spectrum (<15 keV) for improved sensitivity in the higher end (∼26 to 48 keV range). The use of a monochromatic beam, which tends to be the standard mode of operation for most SR-XRF analyses reported in the literature, gave the least sensitive analysis. PMID:25025342

  20. An imaging X-ray fluorescence spectrometer for near earth objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a novel imaging X-ray spectrometer to be flown on a space mission to a Near Earth Object (NEO) (the Moon, a near Earth asteroid or a comet). In either of the first two cases the instrument will record X-ray fluorescence excited from the surface by the solar X-ray flux to form 'compositional maps' of its surface, providing valuable information on the evolution of these objects. In the case of a comet, the device will study the X-ray emission resulting from its interaction with the solar wind. During cruise when the spacecraft is en-route to the NEO the instrument will be used to make astronomical observations of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), X-ray binary stars and coronal sources in star clusters such as the Pleiades or Hyades. The instrument, proposed for ESA's SMART-1 mission, is a miniature telescope, of 37.5 cm focal length, based on microchannel plate (MCP) optics and charged coupled device (CCD) detectors providing both imaging and a medium resolution ∼50-100 eV spectroscopic capability; sufficient to resolve the L lines of Ca, Ti, Fe, and the K lines of O, Mg, Al and Si with an angular resolution ∼10 arcmin and a 6x6 deg. field of view

  1. A flexible setup for angle-resolved X-ray fluorescence spectrometry with laboratory sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanier, M; Herzog, C; Grötzsch, D; Kramer, F; Mantouvalou, I; Lubeck, J; Weser, J; Streeck, C; Malzer, W; Beckhoff, B; Kanngießer, B

    2016-03-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis is one of the standard tools for the analysis of stratified materials and is widely applied for the investigation of electronics and coatings. The composition and thickness of the layers can be determined quantitatively and non-destructively. Recent work showed that these capabilities can be extended towards retrieving stratigraphic information like concentration depth profiles using angle-resolved XRF (ARXRF). This paper introduces an experimental sample chamber which was developed as a multi-purpose tool enabling different measurement geometries suited for transmission measurements, conventional XRF, ARXRF, etc. The chamber was specifically designed for attaching all kinds of laboratory X-ray sources for the soft and hard X-ray ranges as well as various detection systems. In detail, a setup for ARXRF using an X-ray tube with a polycapillary X-ray lens as source is presented. For such a type of setup, both the spectral and lateral characterizations of the radiation field are crucial for quantitative ARXRF measurements. The characterization is validated with the help of a stratified validation sample. PMID:27036820

  2. X-ray fluorescence applied to the fission time study of Z=120 element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Characteristic X-rays of the element Z=120 have been identified in the reaction 238U+64Ni at 6,6 MeV per nucleon. They have been detected in coincidence with fission fragments arising from composite systems with 120 protons formed during the reaction. Pieces of information about the formation probability by fusion of Z=120 nuclei and on the fission time of this nucleus have been inferred from the X-ray multiplicity. From the maximal measured X-ray multiplicity and with the assumption of an exponential distribution of fission times, we have determined an inferior limit of 4.0*10-18 s for the mean fission time of Z=120 nuclei. This maximal measured X-ray has also allowed us to state that at best 38% of capture reactions (it means quasi-fission + fusion reactions) correspond to quasi-fission reactions associated with times below than 10-19 seconds. This relatively low percentage of quasi-fission reactions is not consistent with the very low fusion probabilities generally expected for our system. This work has shown that the X-ray fluorescence technique can be used successfully for studying the stability of super-heavy elements

  3. X-ray fluorescence analysis of low concentrations metals in geological samples and technological products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagoida, I. A.; Trushin, A. V.

    2016-02-01

    For the past several years many nuclear physics methods of quantitative elemental analysis have been designed. Many of these methods have applied in different devices which have become useful and effective instrument in many industrial laboratories. Methods of a matter structure analysis are based on the intensity detection of the X-ray radiation from the nuclei of elements which are excited by external X-ray source. The production of characteristic X-rays involves transitions of the orbital electrons of atoms in the target material between allowed orbits, or energy states, associated with ionization of the inner atomic shells. One of these methods is X-ray fluorescence analysis, which is widespread in metallurgical and processing industries and is used to identify and measure the concentration of the elements in ores and minerals on a conveyor belt. Samples of copper ore with known concentrations of elements, were taken from the Ural deposit. To excite the characteristic X-rays radionuclide sources 109Cd, with half-life 461.4 days were used. After finding the calibration coefficients, control measurements of samples and averaging of overall samples were made. The measurement error did not exceed 3%.

  4. A flexible setup for angle-resolved X-ray fluorescence spectrometry with laboratory sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanier, M.; Herzog, C.; Grötzsch, D.; Kramer, F.; Mantouvalou, I.; Lubeck, J.; Weser, J.; Streeck, C.; Malzer, W.; Beckhoff, B.; Kanngießer, B.

    2016-03-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis is one of the standard tools for the analysis of stratified materials and is widely applied for the investigation of electronics and coatings. The composition and thickness of the layers can be determined quantitatively and non-destructively. Recent work showed that these capabilities can be extended towards retrieving stratigraphic information like concentration depth profiles using angle-resolved XRF (ARXRF). This paper introduces an experimental sample chamber which was developed as a multi-purpose tool enabling different measurement geometries suited for transmission measurements, conventional XRF, ARXRF, etc. The chamber was specifically designed for attaching all kinds of laboratory X-ray sources for the soft and hard X-ray ranges as well as various detection systems. In detail, a setup for ARXRF using an X-ray tube with a polycapillary X-ray lens as source is presented. For such a type of setup, both the spectral and lateral characterizations of the radiation field are crucial for quantitative ARXRF measurements. The characterization is validated with the help of a stratified validation sample.

  5. Soft-x-ray fluorescence study of buried silicides in antiferromagnetically coupled Fe/Si multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlisle, J.A.; Chaiken, A.; Michel, R.P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Multilayer films made by alternate deposition of two materials play an important role in electronic and optical devices such as quantum-well lasers and x-ray mirrors. In addition, novel phenomena like giant magnetoresistance and dimensional crossover in superconductors have emerged from studies of multilayers. While sophisticated x-ray techniques are widely used to study the morphology of multilayer films, progress in studying the electronic structure has been slower. The short mean-free path of low-energy electrons severely limits the usefulness of photoemission and related electron free path of low-energy electrons severely limit spectroscopies for multilayer studies. Soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF) is a bulk-sensitive photon-in, photon-out method to study valence band electronic states. Near-edge x-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) measured with partial photon yield can give complementary bulk-sensitive information about unoccupied states. Both these methods are element-specific since the incident x-ray photons excite electrons from core levels. By combining NEXAFS and SXF measurements on buried layers in multilayers and comparing these spectra to data on appropriate reference compounds, it is possible to obtain a detailed picture of the electronic structure. Results are presented for a study of a Fe/Si multilayer system.

  6. Application of X ray fluorescence techniques for the determination of hazardous and essential trace elements in environmental and biological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The utilization of X ray fluorescence (XRF) technique for the determination of trace element concentrations in environmental and biological samples is presented. The analytical methods used include energy dispersive X ray fluorescence (EDXRF), total reflection X ray fluorescence (TXRF), micro-beam X ray fluorescence and direct in situ X-ray fluorescence analysis. The measurements have been performed with X ray tube- and radioisotope-based energy dispersive X ray fluorescence spectrometers. Both liquid nitrogen- and thermo electrically-cooled silicon detectors were utilized in the analysis. Samples analysed include soil, water, plant material, and airborne particulate matter collected on filters. Depending on the technique and the investigated elements, the above-mentioned samples were analysed either directly or indirectly (after decomposing the sample in a mineralization process or/and chemical preconcentration procedure). The achieved detection limits for different techniques, established by measuring appropriate reference standards, are presented. The utilization of the micro-beam XRF technique for studying element distribution in heterogeneous samples and investigating the 3D- and 2D-morphology of minute samples by means of computerized X ray absorption and X ray fluorescence tomography is described. The different X ray techniques have their unique advantages. The micro-beam X ray fluorescence set-up has an advantage of producing very well collimated primary X ray beam (by means of X ray capillary optics the beam is collimated down to about 15 μm in diameter), in front of which the analysed sample can be precisely positioned, providing local information about the sample composition. TXRF technique has its leading edge in analysis of liquid samples, and as a reference method for a conventional bulk EDXRF analysis of heterogeneous materials such as air particulates collected on filter where the particle size effects can seriously influence the

  7. Anomalous small-angle X-ray scattering of nanoporous two-phase atomistic models for amorphous silicon–germanium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chehaidar, A., E-mail: Abdallah.Chehaidar@fss.rnu.tn

    2015-09-15

    The present work deals with a detailed analysis of the anomalous small-angle X-ray scattering in amorphous silicon–germanium alloy using the simulation technique. We envisage the nanoporous two-phase alloy model consisting in a mixture of Ge-rich and Ge-poor domains and voids at the nanoscale. By substituting Ge atoms for Si atoms in nanoporous amorphous silicon network, compositionally heterogeneous alloys are generated with various composition-contrasts between the two phases. After relaxing the as-generated structure, we compute its radial distribution function, and then we deduce by the Fourier transform technique its anomalous X-ray scattering pattern. Using a smoothing procedure, the computed X-ray scattering patterns are corrected for the termination errors due to the finite size of the model, allowing so a rigorous quantitative analysis of the anomalous small-angle scattering. Our simulation shows that, as expected, the anomalous small-angle X-ray scattering technique is a tool of choice for characterizing compositional heterogeneities coexisting with structural inhomogeneities in an amorphous alloy. Furthermore, the sizes of the compositional nanoheterogeneities, as measured by anomalous small-angle X-ray scattering technique, are X-ray energy independent. A quantitative analysis of the separated reduced anomalous small-angle X-ray scattering, as defined in this work, provided a good estimate of their size.

  8. Analytical characterization of a new mobile X-ray fluorescence and X-ray diffraction instrument combined with a pigment identification case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van de Voorde, Lien, E-mail: lien.vandevoorde@ugent.be [Ghent University, Department of Analytical Chemistry, X-ray Microspectroscopy and Imaging Research Group, Krijgslaan 281 S12, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Vekemans, Bart [Ghent University, Department of Analytical Chemistry, X-ray Microspectroscopy and Imaging Research Group, Krijgslaan 281 S12, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Verhaeven, Eddy [Antwerp University, Faculty of Design Sciences, Mutsaardstraat 31, B-2000 Antwerpen (Belgium); Tack, Pieter; De Wolf, Robin; Garrevoet, Jan [Ghent University, Department of Analytical Chemistry, X-ray Microspectroscopy and Imaging Research Group, Krijgslaan 281 S12, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Vandenabeele, Peter [Ghent University, Department of Archaeology, Archaeometry Research Group, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 35, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Vincze, Laszlo [Ghent University, Department of Analytical Chemistry, X-ray Microspectroscopy and Imaging Research Group, Krijgslaan 281 S12, B-9000 Gent (Belgium)

    2015-08-01

    A new, commercially available, mobile system combining X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence has been evaluated which enables both elemental analysis and phase identification simultaneously. The instrument makes use of a copper or molybdenum based miniature X-ray tube and a silicon-Pin diode energy-dispersive detector to count the photons originating from the samples. The X-ray tube and detector are both mounted on an X-ray diffraction protractor in a Bragg–Brentano θ:θ geometry. The mobile instrument is one of the lightest and most compact instruments of its kind (3.5 kg) and it is thus very useful for in situ purposes such as the direct (non-destructive) analysis of cultural heritage objects which need to be analyzed on site without any displacement. The supplied software allows both the operation of the instrument for data collection and in-depth data analysis using the International Centre for Diffraction Data database. This paper focuses on the characterization of the instrument, combined with a case study on pigment identification and an illustrative example for the analysis of lead alloyed printing letters. The results show that this commercially available light-weight instrument is able to identify the main crystalline phases non-destructively, present in a variety of samples, with a high degree of flexibility regarding sample size and position. - Highlights: • New X-ray fluorescence and X-ray diffraction instrument for non-destructive analysis • Commercially available, mobile system • One of the lightest and most compact of its kind • Characterization, data acquisition and analysis are performed. • Results of measurements on pigment model samples and cultural heritage materials.

  9. Study of uranium contamination of ground water in Punjab using X-ray fluorescence technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of reports have appeared in public media about uranium ingestion being a possible cause for cancer and increased birth rate abnormalities among children in the Malwa region of Punjab state in India. These reports link problems like cancer and Autism, with the presence of uranium in the ground waters of Malwa region. The concentration of uranium in drinking water from sources as varied as ground water, canal water supply and reverse osmosis system have been investigated using X-ray fluorescence technique. Samples from the thermal power plants in the regions and nearby ground waters were also analyzed to identify the source of contamination. The samples were collected with assistance of the officials from the Government of Punjab. More than half a litre of each of the water samples was dried at 60 deg-80 deg in an oven. Residue was collected using larger quantities of water samples in case of RO water samples. The elemental analysis of the residue was carried out using the Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometer consisting of an 42Mo-anode X-ray tube (Panalytical, 2.5 kW) as an excitation source and a Si(Li) detector. A combination of selective absorbers of 30Zn, 38Sr, and 39Y was used in the incident beam for improving the detection limit for Uranium by reducing the background and removing the 42Mo K X-rays. The detection limit in ppb/litre depends upon the amount of residue

  10. Analyses of archaeological pottery samples using X-ray fluorescence technique for provenance study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archaeological artifacts reveal information on past human activities, artifact preparation technology, art and possible trade. Ceramics are the most stable and abundant material in archaeological context. Pottery is the most abundant tracers in all archaeological excavations. Compared to major elements, elements present at trace concentrations levels are source specific and they maintain same concentration levels in source clay as well as finished products e.g., fired clay potteries. As it is difficult to find out exact source or origin, provenance study is carried out first to establish whether objects under study are from the same or different sources/origin. Various analytical techniques like instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), Ion beam analysis (IBA) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) have been used for obtaining elemental concentrations in archaeological potteries. Portable X-ray fluorescence (pXRF) spectrometry provides a non-destructive means for elemental characterization of a wide range of archaeological materials. Ten archaeological pottery samples were collected from Kottapuram, Kerala under the supervision of archaeological survey of India. Portable X-ray fluorescence (pXRF) spectrometry using a handheld Olympus Innov-X Delta XRF device, ACD BARC, has been used for chemical characterization of the pottery samples. The instrument is equipped with the Delta Rhodium (Rh) anode X-Ray tube and uses a Silicon Drift Detector (resolution <200 eV at 5.95 keV Mn Kα X-ray). NIST 2781 SRM was analyzed for quality control purpose. Ten elements namely Fe, Ti, Mn, Co, Cu, Zn, Pb, Zr, Mo and Se were chosen for cluster analysis and their concentration values were utilized for multivariate statistical analysis using WinSTAT 9.0

  11. Monitoring the mass of UF6 gas and uranium deposits in aluminium pipes using X-ray fluorescence and X-ray transmission gauges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to determine the enrichment of UF6 gas in centrifuge plant pipework it is necessary to measure the mass of the gas (pressure) and the mass per unit area of any uranium deposited on the pipe. This paper shows that it is possible to determine the pressure of the UF6 gas in pipes 120 mm in diameter using an energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer. Results are also given of transmission measurements made using a low power X-ray generator operated at two different applied voltages. A method of using the two measurements to determine the mass per unit area of deposited uranium is described. (author)

  12. Oscillating dipole model for the X-ray standing wave enhanced fluorescence in periodic multilayers

    CERN Document Server

    André, Jean-Michel; Jonnard, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Periodic multilayers give rise to enhanced X-ray fluorescence when a regime of standing waves occurs within the structure. This regime may concern the primary radiation used to induce the fluorescence, the secondary radiation of fluorescence or both of them. Until now, existing models only dealt with standing wave regime of primary radiation. We present a theoretical approach based on the oscillating dipole model and the coupled-wave theory that can treat efficiently any standing wave regime. We compare our simulations to experimental data available in the literature.

  13. Energetic electron processes fluorescence effects for structured nanoparticles X-ray analysis and nuclear medicine applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taborda, A.; Desbrée, A.; Carvalho, A.; Chaves, P. C.; Reis, M. A.

    2016-08-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles are widely used as contrast agents for nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and can be modified for improved imaging or to become tissue-specific or even protein-specific. The knowledge of their detailed elemental composition characterisation and potential use in nuclear medicine applications, is, therefore, an important issue. X-ray fluorescence techniques such as particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) or X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF), can be used for elemental characterisation even in problematic situations where very little sample volume is available. Still, the fluorescence coefficient of Fe is such that, during the decay of the inner-shell ionised atomic structure, keV Auger electrons are produced in excess to X-rays. Since cross-sections for ionisation induced by keV electrons, for low atomic number atoms, are of the order of 103 barn, care should be taken to account for possible fluorescence effects caused by Auger electrons, which may lead to the wrong quantification of elements having atomic number lower than the atomic number of Fe. Furthermore, the same electron processes will occur in iron oxide nanoparticles containing 57Co, which may be used for nuclear medicine therapy purposes. In the present work, simple approximation algorithms are proposed for the quantitative description of radiative and non-radiative processes associated with Auger electrons cascades. The effects on analytical processes and nuclear medicine applications are quantified for the case of iron oxide nanoparticles, by calculating both electron fluorescence emissions and energy deposition on cell tissues where the nanoparticles may be embedded.

  14. Application of the X-ray fluorescence analysis and X-ray diffraction in geochemical studies of the Pleistocene tills from Holy Cross Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubala-Kukuś, A.; Ludwikowska-Kȩdzia, M.; Banaś, D.; Braziewicz, J.; Majewska, U.; Pajek, M.; Wudarczyk-Moćko, J.

    2013-12-01

    X-ray fluorescence analysis methods (wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis (WDXRF) and total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF)) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) have been applied in complementary geochemical studies of the Pleistocene till samples. The XRPD technique gave information about the mineral composition of the analyzed samples while the WDXRF and TXRF studies allowed the fast elemental analysis. The till samples were collected from different regions of Holy Cross Mountains (located in central Poland) which are still not unambiguously described in the context of the geochemical studies of the Quaternary sediments. The analysis was concentrated on the geochemical composition of the till samples both for materials occurring on the surface (characterized by continuous weathering processes) and for samples taken from core borehole. The overriding purpose of these studies is determination of the local lithotype of the tills and its lithologic and petrographic diagnostic properties, including the chemical composition of clay and minerals found in the clay. In the presented work the experimental sets up, sample preparation procedure and measurements programme will be discussed in details. Finally, the elemental and mineral compositions will be presented for studied different groups of the samples.

  15. Probing symmetry and symmetry breaking in resonant soft-x-ray fluorescence spectra of molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glans, P.; Gunnelin, K.; Guo, J. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Conventional non-resonant soft X-ray emission brings about information about electronic structure through its symmetry and polarization selectivity, the character of which is governed by simple dipole rules. For centro-symmetric molecules with the emitting atom at the inversion center these rules lead to selective emission through the required parity change. For the more common classes of molecules which have lower symmetry or for systems with degenerate core orbitals (delocalized over identical sites), it is merely the local symmetry selectivity that provides a probe of the local atomic orbital contribution to the molecular orbital. For instance, in X-ray spectra of first row species the intensities essentially map the p-density at each particular atomic site, and, in a molecular orbital picture, the contribution of the local p-type atomic orbitals in the LCAO description of the molecular orbitals. The situation is different for resonant X-ray fluorescence spectra. Here strict parity and symmetry selectivity gives rise to a strong frequency dependence for all molecules with an element of symmetry. In addition to symmetry selectivity the strong frequency dependence of resonant X-ray emission is caused by the interplay between the shape of a narrow X-ray excitation energy function and the lifetime and vibrational broadenings of the resonantly excited core states. This interplay leads to various observable effects, such as linear dispersion, resonance narrowing and emission line (Stokes) doubling. Also from the point of view of polarization selectivity, the resonantly excited X-ray spectra are much more informative than the corresponding non-resonant spectra. Examples are presented for nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon dioxide molecules.

  16. New developments of X-ray fluorescence imaging techniques in laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Kouichi; Matsuno, Tsuyoshi; Takimoto, Yuki; Yamanashi, Masaki; Kometani, Noritsugu; Sasaki, Yuji C.; Hasegawa, Takeshi; Kato, Shuichi; Yamada, Takashi; Shoji, Takashi; Kawahara, Naoki

    2015-11-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis is a well-established analytical technique with a long research history. Many applications have been reported in various fields, such as in the environmental, archeological, biological, and forensic sciences as well as in industry. This is because XRF has a unique advantage of being a nondestructive analytical tool with good precision for quantitative analysis. Recent advances in XRF analysis have been realized by the development of new x-ray optics and x-ray detectors. Advanced x-ray focusing optics enables the making of a micro x-ray beam, leading to micro-XRF analysis and XRF imaging. A confocal micro-XRF technique has been applied for the visualization of elemental distributions inside the samples. This technique was applied for liquid samples and for monitoring chemical reactions such as the metal corrosion of steel samples in the NaCl solutions. In addition, a principal component analysis was applied for reducing the background intensity in XRF spectra obtained during XRF mapping, leading to improved spatial resolution of confocal micro-XRF images. In parallel, the authors have proposed a wavelength dispersive XRF (WD-XRF) imaging spectrometer for a fast elemental imaging. A new two dimensional x-ray detector, the Pilatus detector was applied for WD-XRF imaging. Fast XRF imaging in 1 s or even less was demonstrated for Euro coins and industrial samples. In this review paper, these recent advances in laboratory-based XRF imaging, especially in a laboratory setting, will be introduced.

  17. Observation of X-ray shadings in synchrotron radiation-total reflection X-ray fluorescence using a color X-ray camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Absorption effects and the impact of specimen shape on TXRF analysis has been discussed intensively. Model calculations indicated that ring shaped specimens should give better results in terms of higher counts per mass signals than filled rectangle or circle shaped specimens. One major reason for the difference in signal is shading effects. Full field micro-XRF with a color X-ray camera (CXC) was used to investigate shading, which occurs when working with small angles of excitation as in TXRF. The device allows monitoring the illuminated parts of the sample and the shaded parts at the same time. It is expected that sample material hit first by the primary beam shade material behind it. Using the CXC shading could be directly visualized for the high concentration specimens. In order to compare the experimental results with calculation of the shading effect the generation of controlled specimens is crucial. This was achieved by “drop on demand” technology. It allows generating uniform, microscopic deposits of elements. The experimentally measured shadings match well with those expected from calculation. - Highlights: • Use of a color X-ray camera and drop on demand printing to diagnose X-ray shading • Specimens were obtained uniform and well-defined in shape and concentration by printing. • Direct visualization and determination of shading in such specimens using the camera

  18. Observation of X-ray shadings in synchrotron radiation-total reflection X-ray fluorescence using a color X-ray camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fittschen, Ursula Elisabeth Adriane, E-mail: ursula.fittschen@chemie.uni-hamburg.de [Institut für Anorganische und Angewandte Chemie, Universität Hamburg, Martin-Luther-King-Platz 6, 20146 Hamburg (Germany); Menzel, Magnus [Institut für Anorganische und Angewandte Chemie, Universität Hamburg, Martin-Luther-King-Platz 6, 20146 Hamburg (Germany); Scharf, Oliver [IfG Institute for Scientific Instruments GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Radtke, Martin; Reinholz, Uwe; Buzanich, Günther [BAM Federal Institute of Materials Research and Testing, Berlin (Germany); Lopez, Velma M.; McIntosh, Kathryn [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Streli, Christina [Atominstitut, TU Wien, Vienna (Austria); Havrilla, George Joseph [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Absorption effects and the impact of specimen shape on TXRF analysis has been discussed intensively. Model calculations indicated that ring shaped specimens should give better results in terms of higher counts per mass signals than filled rectangle or circle shaped specimens. One major reason for the difference in signal is shading effects. Full field micro-XRF with a color X-ray camera (CXC) was used to investigate shading, which occurs when working with small angles of excitation as in TXRF. The device allows monitoring the illuminated parts of the sample and the shaded parts at the same time. It is expected that sample material hit first by the primary beam shade material behind it. Using the CXC shading could be directly visualized for the high concentration specimens. In order to compare the experimental results with calculation of the shading effect the generation of controlled specimens is crucial. This was achieved by “drop on demand” technology. It allows generating uniform, microscopic deposits of elements. The experimentally measured shadings match well with those expected from calculation. - Highlights: • Use of a color X-ray camera and drop on demand printing to diagnose X-ray shading • Specimens were obtained uniform and well-defined in shape and concentration by printing. • Direct visualization and determination of shading in such specimens using the camera.

  19. Determination of rare-earth elements in rocks by isotope-excited X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kunzendorf, Helmar; Wollenberg, H.A.

    1970-01-01

    Isotope-excited X-ray fluorescence spectrometry furnishes a rapid determination of rare-earth elements in unprepared rock samples. The samples are excited by 241Am γ-rays, generating X-ray spectra on a multichannel pulse-height analyser. Gaussian peaks of the Kα and Kβ X-ray energies are treated......-ray spectrometric scan of a longitudinally sliced drill core showed a close correlation between rare-earth abundances and appropriate minerals....

  20. Correlated imaging of living biological cells with a soft X-ray microscope and a fluorescence microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soft X-ray microscope is a very powerful tool to observe cellular organelles of living biological. However the inner structures are very complicated and it is difficult to identify the organelles obtained with the soft X-ray microscopes. We have proposed a correlated imaging with a soft X-ray microscope and a fluorescence microscope that is to observe the same biological cells with the both microscopes at the same time. (author)

  1. Elemental mapping of biofortified wheat grains using micro X-ray fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, I.; Pataco, I. M.; Mourinho, M. P.; Lidon, F.; Reboredo, F.; Pessoa, M. F.; Carvalho, M. L.; Santos, J. P.; Guerra, M.

    2016-06-01

    Micro X-ray fluorescence has been used to obtain elemental maps of biofortified wheat grains. Two varieties of wheat were used in the study, Triticum aestivum L. and Triticum durum desf. Two treatments, with different nutrient concentration, were applied to the plants during the whole plant growth cycle. From the obtained elemental maps it was possible to extract information regarding the plant's physiological processes under the biofortification procedures. Both macro and micronutrients were mapped, providing useful insight into the posterior food processing mechanisms of this biofortified staple food. We have also shown that these kind of studies can now be performed with laboratory benchtop apparatus, rather than using synchrotron radiation, increasing the overall attractiveness of micro X-ray fluorescence in the study of highly heterogeneous biological samples.

  2. Trace elements determination in red and white wines using total-reflection X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several wines produced in different regions from south of Brazil and available in markets in Rio de Janeiro were analyzed for their contents of elements such as: P, S, Cl, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Rb and Sr. Multi-element analysis was possible with simple sample preparation and subsequent analysis by total-reflection X-ray fluorescence using synchrotron radiation. The measurement was carried at the X-ray fluorescence beamline in the Synchrotron Light Source Laboratory in Campinas, Brazil. The levels of the various elements obtained were lower in the Brazilian wines than the values generally found in the literature. The present study indicates the capability of multi-element analysis for determining the contents of various elements present in wines coming from Brazil vineyards by using a simple, sensitive and precise method

  3. Total reflection X-Ray Fluorescence in medicine. Technique and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The developments Total reflection X-Ray Fluorescence techniques is make the method appropriate for sample, accurate and precise analysis of heavy element in organic fluid and tissue in health related and pollutions problems, Application include analysis as an advantageous aid in drug synthesis and characterization, trace elements determination in amniotic fluid in fetus malformation studies, analysis of brain specimens and cerebrospinal fluid in central nervous system disorders, the influence of trace elements in cataract genesis and blood, body fluids and tissue drug level- monitoring. Accuracy, precision and detection limits attained in the analysis of platinum in minute amounts of serum from oncological pediatric patients undergoing chemotherapy which Pt-containing drugs shows Total reflection X-Ray Fluorescence could be used for routine analysis as an aid in clinical practice

  4. X-ray fluorescence and absorption analysis of krypton in irradiated nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analysis of krypton in irradiated uranium dioxide fuel has been successfully achieved by x-ray fluorescence and x-ray absorption. The present study focuses on the analytical challenge of sample and sub-sample production to perform the analysis with the restricted conditions dictated by the radioprotection regulations. It deals also with all potential interferences that could affect the quality of the measurement in fluorescence as well as in absorption mode. The impacts of all dissolved gases in the fuel matrix are accounted for the analytical result quantification. The krypton atomic environment is ruled by the presence of xenon. Other gases such as residual argon and traces of helium or hydrogen are negligible. The results are given in term of density for krypton and xenon (∼20 nm-3). The presence of dissolved, interstitial and nano-phases are discussed together with other analytical techniques that could be applied to gain information on fission gas behaviour in nuclear fuels. (author)

  5. From papyrus to paper: Elemental characterization by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manso, M.; Costa, M. [Universidade de Lisboa, Centro Fisica Atomica, Faculdade de Ciencias, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto, 2, 1649-003 Lisbon (Portugal); Carvalho, M.L. [Universidade de Lisboa, Centro Fisica Atomica, Faculdade de Ciencias, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto, 2, 1649-003 Lisbon (Portugal)], E-mail: luisa@cii.fc.ul.pt

    2007-09-21

    The use of the elemental composition, determined by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF), to characterize ancient and modern papyrus and parchment, and newspaper from three different years is reported. The concentrations of S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Ga, As, Br, Rb, Sr, Ba and Pb were determined in these samples in order to proceed to its characterization. From this work, we can conclude that the obtained results allow distinguishing modern and ancient documents by its elemental amount. It was observed, with few exceptions, that the modern samples present lower elemental concentration than the older ones. Furthermore, in the newspaper samples the number of detected elements depends on the newspaper's age, and decreases from the oldest (1919) to the most recent (2005). X-ray fluorescence spectrometry is a good elemental technique with the main advantage of being non-destructive, which makes it the perfect tool for the elemental analysis of cultural heritage.

  6. From papyrus to paper: Elemental characterization by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manso, M.; Costa, M.; Carvalho, M. L.

    2007-09-01

    The use of the elemental composition, determined by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF), to characterize ancient and modern papyrus and parchment, and newspaper from three different years is reported. The concentrations of S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Ga, As, Br, Rb, Sr, Ba and Pb were determined in these samples in order to proceed to its characterization. From this work, we can conclude that the obtained results allow distinguishing modern and ancient documents by its elemental amount. It was observed, with few exceptions, that the modern samples present lower elemental concentration than the older ones. Furthermore, in the newspaper samples the number of detected elements depends on the newspaper's age, and decreases from the oldest (1919) to the most recent (2005). X-ray fluorescence spectrometry is a good elemental technique with the main advantage of being non-destructive, which makes it the perfect tool for the elemental analysis of cultural heritage.

  7. Determination of copper in geological materials by X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray fluorescence has been applied to the determination of copper content of geological materials in the concentration range of 0.01 to % CuO. A molybdenum target tube Is used, samples being presented in finely-ground powder form. Various methods for the correction for background and Instrumental copper interferences have been considered. To correct for matrix effects different tube scattered primary radiations have been tested as references or internal standards. MoK(41 - (C) provides the most suitable results. The use of influence empirical coefficients for the effect of iron on copper and of mass absorption coefficients has also been considered. For samples with a high content of lead, several procedures to correct for I t s influence have been investigated. Comparison between data obtained by X-ray fluorescence and wet-chemical techniques indicated good agreement. (Author) 6 refs

  8. Role of importance of X-ray fluorescence analysis of forensic samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In the field of forensic science, it is very important to investigate the evidential samples obtained at various crime scenes. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) is used widely in forensic science [1]. Its main strength is its non-destructive nature, thus preserving evidence [2, 3]. In this paper, we report the application of XRF to examine the evidences like purity gold and silver jewelry (Indian Ornaments), remnants of glass pieces and paint chips recovered from crime scenes. The experimental measurements on these samples have been made using X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (LAB Center XRF-1800) procured from Shimazdu Scientific Inst., USA. The results are explained in terms of quantitative/ qualitative analysis of trace elements. (author)

  9. An evaluation of the x-ray-fluorescence analysis of rocks and silicates under routine conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report correlates the analytical results obtained by four laboratories using X-ray-fluorescence analysis on ten reference silicate samples that were incorporated in the analytical programmes required by the Geological Survey of the Republic of South Africa over a five-year period. The results and their statistical treatment are given, together with a comparison of the results for similar material issued by the Centre de Recherches Petrographiques et Geochimiques and the British Ceramic Research Association using wet-chemical methods. This study shows that the analysis, by X-ray-fluorescence measurement, of rocks and silicate samples for the commonly determined constituents is more precise than analysis by classical wet-chemical procedures

  10. Beer analysis by synchrotron radiation total reflection X-ray fluorescence (SR-TXRF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, Silvana [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Civil, Arquitetura e Urbanismo. Dept. de Recursos Hidricos]. E-mail: silvana@fec.unicamp.br; Vives, Ana Elisa S. de [Universidade Metodista de Piracicaba (UNIMEP), Santa Barbara D' Oeste, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia, Arquitetura e Urbanismo]. E-mail: aesvives@unimep.br; Nascimento Filho, Virgilio F. [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear]. E-mail: virgilio@cena.usp.br; Zucchi, Orgheda L.D.A. [Sao Paulo Univ., Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas de Ribeirao Preto]. E-mail: olzucchi@fcfrp.usp.br

    2005-07-01

    In this work the concentrations of P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Zn and Br in twenty-nine brands of national and international beers were determined by Synchrotron Radiation Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence analysis (SR-TXRF). The results were compared with the limits established by the Brazilian Legislation and the nutritive values established by National Agricultural Library (NAL). The measurements were performed at the X-ray Fluorescence Beamline at Synchrotron Light Source Laboratory, in Campinas, Sao Paulo, Brazil, using a polychromatic beam for excitation. A small volume of 5 {mu}L of sample beers containing just an internal standard, used to correct geometry effects, were analyzed without any pre-treatment. The measuring time was 100 s and the detection limits obtained varied from 1{mu}g.L{sup -1} for Mn and Fe to 15{mu}g.L{sup -1} for P. (author)

  11. Application of X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy in Analysis of Oil Paint Pigments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, Cassandra; Formica, Sarah

    2011-10-01

    X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy is a rapid, noninvasive technique for both detecting and identifying chemical elements within a given sample. At North Georgia College and State University, a sealed tube x-ray source and slightly focusing polycapillary optic are used in nondestructive XRF analysis of oil paint pigments. Oil paints contain both organic and inorganic matter, and the inorganic ingredients such as titanium, vanadium, iron, zinc, and other elements are easily detected by XRF, which can be used to uniquely differentiate between various paint pigments. To calibrate the XRF system for paint color identification, six different colors of oil paint were fluoresced and identified based off of their characteristic spectra. By scanning the paint sample in two dimensions, the characteristic XRF spectra obtained were compiled to produce an XRF replica of the painting.

  12. Macro and micro full field x-ray fluorescence with an X-ray pinhole camera presenting high energy and high spatial resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Francesco Paolo; Caliri, Claudia; Cosentino, Luigi; Gammino, Santo; Giuntini, Lorenzo; Mascali, David; Neri, Lorenzo; Pappalardo, Lighea; Rizzo, Francesca; Taccetti, Francesco

    2014-11-01

    This work describes a tabletop (50 cm × 25 cm × 25 cm) full field X-ray pinhole camera (FF-XPC) presenting high energy- and high spatial-resolution. The FF-XPC consists of a conventional charge-coupled device (CCD) detector coupled, in a coaxial geometry, to a pinhole collimator of small diameter. The X-ray fluorescence (XRF) is induced on the samples with an external low-power X-ray tube. The use of the CCD as an energy dispersive X-ray detector was obtained by adopting a multi-image acquisition in single photon counting and by developing a processing algorithm to be applied in real-time to each of the acquired image-frames. This approach allowed the measurement of X-ray spectra with an energy resolution down to 133 eV at the reference value of 5.9 keV. The detection of the X-ray fluorescence through the pinhole-collimator allowed the two-dimensional elemental mapping of the irradiated samples. Two magnifications (M), determined by the relative sample-pinhole-CCD distances, are used in the present setup. A low value of M (equal to 0.35×) allows the macro-FF-XRF of large area samples (up to 4 × 4 cm(2)) with a spatial resolution down to 140 μm; a large magnification (M equal to 6×) is used for the micro-FF-XRF of small area samples (2.5 × 2.5 mm(2)) with a spatial resolution down to 30 μm.

  13. A set-up of micro-X-ray fluorescence system based on polycapillary X-ray optics and applications for archaeology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper concerns in the structures, performances and characteristics and applications for archaeology of a new micro-X-ray fluorescence system based on rotating anode X-ray generator and polycapillary X-ray optics. The polycapillary X-ray optics used here can focus the primary X-ray beam down to some tens of micrometers in diameters that allows for non-destructive and local analysis of sub-mm samples with minor/ trace level sensitivity. In order to prove the potentials of this instrument used in archaeology, a piece of Chinese ancient blue and white porcelain produced in Ming Dynasty was analyzed. The results show that intensities of Mn-Kα, Co-Kα are variable in agree with the thick of blue glaze. The correlation analysis indicates the Mn and Co have the best correlations. So, the concentrations or ratios of Mn and Co are crucial to determine the provenance and identify from a fake one of Chinese ancient blue and white porcelain. (authors)

  14. Quantitative determination of uranium in organic solution by X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An X-ray fluorescent method for the determination of uranium in tributilphosphate-kerosene-nitriacid solution has been developed. Chemical properties of the matrix elements were studied in order to select a convenient procedure to determine samples and standards on the same way. The method avoids the destruction of the organic material and has proved to be very useful for the fast control of uranium concentration. (Author)

  15. Evaluation of Portable X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) Analyzer for Zirconium-Thickness Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenn Moore

    2013-09-01

    This Technical Evaluation Report provides details of preliminary testing/experiments performed using a handheld X-ray fluorescence analyzer. The analyzer will be utilized in upcoming fuel-foil-rolling optimization studies at the INL. The studies are being performed in support of DOE’s Office of Global Threat Reduction -- Reactor Conversion Subprogram. Details of the equipment used, operating parameters, and measurement results are provided in this report.

  16. Quantitatively Imaging Chromosomes by Correlated Cryo-Fluorescence and Soft X-Ray Tomographies

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Elizabeth A.; McDermott, Gerry; Do, Myan; Leung, Karen; Panning, Barbara; Le Gros, Mark A.; Larabell, Carolyn A.

    2014-01-01

    Soft x-ray tomography (SXT) is increasingly being recognized as a valuable method for visualizing and quantifying the ultrastructure of cryopreserved cells. Here, we describe the combination of SXT with cryogenic confocal fluorescence tomography (CFT). This correlative approach allows the incorporation of molecular localization data, with isotropic precision, into high-resolution three-dimensional (3-D) SXT reconstructions of the cell. CFT data are acquired first using a cryogenically adapted...

  17. Determination of potassium concentration in organic samples by means of x-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By means of x-ray fluorescence analysis and the inner standard method using KH2PO4 as the added chemical compound, potassium concentration of roots, stems , leaf, flowers and grains from Quinua (Chenopodium Quinoa Willd). which was previously treated with a nitrogen ed fertilizers has been determined taking into account the increasing effect the average atomic number due to used standard. Experimental errors are lower than 10 %

  18. Multielemental analysis of surface sediments in Havana bay (Cuba) using X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multielemental Analysis was performed in Superficial Sediments in Havana Bay. Twenty one samples were analysed by Dispersive Energy X- Ray Fluorescence using an spectrometer based on Si (Li) semiconductor detector an a 109 Cd source. The results showed a similar behaviour in the levels of contamination related with neutron activation analysis. The data suggest that an anthropogenic input into the bay from domestic sewage and industries occurred. (Full text)

  19. Determination of rhenium in molybdenite by X-ray fluorescence: A combined chemical-spectrometric technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solt, M W; Wahlberg, J S; Myers, A T

    1969-01-01

    Rhenium in molybdenite is separated from molybdenum by distillation of rhenium heptoxide from a perchloric-sulphuric acid mixture. It is concentrated by precipitation of the sulphide and then determined by X-ray fluorescence. From 3 to 1000 microg of rhenium can be measured with a precision generally within 2%. The procedure tolerates larger amounts of molybdenum than the usual colorimetric methods. PMID:18960464

  20. Determination of low concentrations of thorium in geological materials by X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An X-ray fluorescence method for the determination of thorium in geological samples down to 2 ppm ThO2 has been developed. To achieve this determination limit an exposed area of the sample 42.5 mm in diameter is used, working with a molybdenum target tube operated at 90 kV and 30 m A. Corrections for background and line interference of the Rb Kα radiation have been carefully considered and empirical correction coefficients calculated. (Author) 3 refs

  1. Chemical composition of soils and biosolid by X-ray fluorescence technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the present work was to investigate the chemical composition of biosolid and soil treated with biosolid using the energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence. The elements Br, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ga, Mn, Ni, Pb, Se, Sr, Ti and Zn were quantified and the results had been compared with Brazilian legislation. The Ni, Cu, Cr and Zn amounts were below the maximum values allowed. (author)

  2. Criteria to stablish an absolute semiquantitative analytic method by x-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work had been developed by fluorescence x-ray laboratory of Nuclear Studies Centre form Ecuador, it pretent to stablish an appropiate discernement of a FRX spectrum to know the concentration range form sample elements, minerals principaly, submit to a FRX. The study tries to stablish the best way to calibration the instruments like the adecuate samples preparation to do the analysis by FRX

  3. X-ray fluorescence analysis of ancient and medieval brass artifacts from south Moravia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper deals with an investigation of archeological finds using X-ray fluorescence analysis and microanalysis. The main aim of the investigation was to prove the production of brass in the South Moravian Region (part of the Czech Republic) in former times. The probable brass production technology is described. Various objects dating back to Antiquity and to the Middle Ages were investigated using two X-ray fluorescence systems, and the results of the analyses are discussed. The measurements showed, e.g., that fragments of Roman scale armor and a belt fitting dating back to Antiquity were made of brass. Brass was also identified on the surfaces of various ancient and medieval molds and melting pots. - Highlights: ► Semiquantitative X-ray fluorescence analysis of archeological finds. ► Two different gilding techniques of a brass belt terminal found in Brno. ► Use of brass before the Great Moravian period. ► Evidence of brass casting in the 12th century in Brno.

  4. X-ray fluorescence analysis of ancient and medieval brass artifacts from south Moravia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hlozek, M. [Methodical Centre of Conservation-Technical Museum in Brno, Purkynova 105, 612 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Komoroczy, B. [Institute of Archeology of the Academy of Science of the Czech Republic, Kralovopolska 147, 612 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Trojek, T., E-mail: tomas.trojek@fjfi.cvut.cz [Department of Dosimetry and Application of Ionizing Radiation, Czech Technical University in Prague, Brehova 7, 115 19 Praha 1 (Czech Republic)

    2012-07-15

    This paper deals with an investigation of archeological finds using X-ray fluorescence analysis and microanalysis. The main aim of the investigation was to prove the production of brass in the South Moravian Region (part of the Czech Republic) in former times. The probable brass production technology is described. Various objects dating back to Antiquity and to the Middle Ages were investigated using two X-ray fluorescence systems, and the results of the analyses are discussed. The measurements showed, e.g., that fragments of Roman scale armor and a belt fitting dating back to Antiquity were made of brass. Brass was also identified on the surfaces of various ancient and medieval molds and melting pots. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Semiquantitative X-ray fluorescence analysis of archeological finds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two different gilding techniques of a brass belt terminal found in Brno. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Use of brass before the Great Moravian period. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Evidence of brass casting in the 12th century in Brno.

  5. X-ray fluorescence analysis in application for study of human brain tissue and body fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thin slices of human brain tissue and body fluids were investigated using Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometry. Distribution of elements in brain tissue samples was studied using Microbeam X-Ray Fluorescence (MXRF) method. Total Reflection X-Ray fluorescence (TXRF) analysis was applied for determination of elemental contens in cerebrospinal fluid, serum and whole blood. The main goal of the study was to optimize analytical procedures for investigation of biomedical specimens using EDXRF method. MXRF method is useful for investigation of P, S, Cl, K, Ca and Fe. Moreover, it can be also applied for distinguishing between white and gray matter of the human brain. Two sample preparation methods were applied in TXRF spectrometry with respect to detection limit. In the first method the body fluids were analysed without any sample preparation. The other measurements were performed for the body fluids digested with nitric acid. For both methods gallium was used as an internal standard. Accuracy of the TXRF method was assessed using Certified Reference Material, A-13 (freeze-dried animal blood). High sensitivity of TXRF and proper sample preparation allowed to detect wide spectrum of elements between Cl and Sr. Faster and easier first sample preparation method allowed to detect elements including volatile ones like Cl or Br whereas digestion of fluids with nitric acid improved the detection limits significantly. Elemental analysis of thin brain tissue samples and body fluids will be applied for study of role of trace elements in selected neurological diseases. (author)

  6. Fluorescence x-ray standing wave study on (AlAs)(GaAs) superlattices

    CERN Document Server

    Lessmann, A; Munkholm, A; Schuster, M; Riechert, H; Materlik, G

    1999-01-01

    X-ray standing waves (XSW) were used to investigate the structure of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) grown (AlAs) sub 3 (GaAs) sub 7 short-period superlattices (SPSL). The modulation of the Al K, As L, and Ga L x-ray fluorescence induced by XSW was measured at the zero-order superlattice (SL) satellite (AlAs)(GaAs)(004,0) and the GaAs(004) substrate Bragg reflection. From the shape of the fluorescence yield modulations and the diffraction pattern, a model of the interfaces is derived by comparing the experimental data with dynamical calculations of the x-ray wave field distribution and reflectivity. A straightforward analysis of the fluorescence measurements at the SL satellite shows that in AlAs layers a high crystalline order is established, whereas in GaAs layers a fraction of the Ga and As atoms is not on ideal lattice sites, but is displaced towards the substrate. The data can be explained by a model in which, at each AlAs/GaAs interface of the GaAs layers, two Ga atom planes are displaced by 0.035 nm and 0...

  7. Clumpy tori around type II active galactic nuclei as revealed by X-ray fluorescent lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiren; Liu, Yuan; Li, Xiaobo; Xu, Weiwei; Gou, Lijun; Cheng, Cheng

    2016-06-01

    The reflection spectrum of a torus around an active galactic nucleus (AGN) is characterized by X-ray fluorescent lines, which are most prominent for type II AGNs. A clumpy torus allows photons reflected from the back-side of the torus to leak through the front regions that are free of obscuration. The observed X-ray fluorescent lines are therefore sensitive to the clumpiness of the torus. We analysed a sample of type II AGNs observed with the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS), and measured the fluxes for the Si Kα and Fe Kα lines. The measured Fe Kα/Si Kα ratios, spanning a range between 5 and 60, are far smaller than the ratios predicted from simulations of smooth tori, indicating that the tori of the studied sources have clumpy distributions rather than smooth ones. We compared the measured Fe Kα/Si Kα ratios with simulation results of clumpy tori. The Circinus galaxy has a Fe Kα/Si Kα ratio of ˜60, which is close to the simulation results for N = 5, where N is the average number of clumps along the line of sight. The Fe Kα/Si Kα ratios of the other sources are all below the simulation results for N = 2. Overall, this shows that the non-Fe fluorescent lines in the soft X-ray band are a potentially powerful probe of the clumpiness of tori around AGNs.

  8. Handheld X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometers: Radiation Exposure Risks of Matrix-Specific Measurement Scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouillon, Marek; Kristensen, Louise J; Gore, Damian B

    2015-07-01

    This study investigates X-ray intensity and dispersion around handheld X-ray fluorescence (XRF) instruments during the measurement of a range of sample matrices to establish radiation exposure risk during operation. Four handheld XRF instruments representing three manufacturers were used on four smooth, flat-lying materials of contrasting matrix composition. Dose rates were measured at 10, 20, 30, and 40 cm intervals every 30° around the instrument at 0 and 45° from the horizontal, as well as vertically from the instrument screen. The analysis of polyethylene recorded dose rates 156 times higher (on average) than steel measurements and 34 times higher than both quartz sand and quartz sandstone. A worst-case exposure scenario was assumed where a user analyses a polyethylene material at arms reach for 1 h each working day for one year. This scenario resulted in an effective body dose of 73.5 μSv, equivalent to three to four chest X-rays (20 μSv) a year, 20 times lower than the average annual background radiation exposure in Australia and well below the annual exposure limit of 1 mSv for non-radiation workers. This study finds the advantages of using handheld XRF spectrometers far outweighs the risk of low radiation exposure linked to X-ray scattering from samples. PMID:26037330

  9. Probing bismuth ferrite nanoparticles by hard x-ray photoemission: Anomalous occurrence of metallic bismuth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated bismuth ferrite nanoparticles (∼75 nm and ∼155 nm) synthesized by a chemical method, using soft X-ray (1253.6 eV) and hard X-ray (3500, 5500, and 7500 eV) photoelectron spectroscopy. This provided an evidence for the variation of chemical state of bismuth in crystalline, phase pure nanoparticles. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis using Mg Kα (1253.6 eV) source showed that iron and bismuth were present in both Fe3+ and Bi3+ valence states as expected for bismuth ferrite. However, hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of the bismuth ferrite nanoparticles using variable photon energies unexpectedly showed the presence of Bi0 valence state below the surface region, indicating that bismuth ferrite nanoparticles are chemically inhomogeneous in the radial direction. Consistently, small-angle X-ray scattering reveals a core-shell structure for these radial inhomogeneous nanoparticles.

  10. The use of portable X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry (PXRFS) for clinical practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last years X-Ray Fluorescence (X RF) technique has been applied to clinical finality at IPEN/CNEN-S P, in collaboration with blood banks and research centers from Brazil. The major advantage for using this analytic technique for chemistry clinical is the viability to use small quantities of blood (25 to 100μL) comparatively to conventional analyses preformed using serum (at least 500 μL to 10 m L). Besides, the execution is faster and the procedure is not destructive. Now, we intend to check the viability of using a portable X- Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry (PXRFS) for clinical blood examination. In this study the biological samples came from Blood Banks of Sao Paulo city (Brazil). Each sample was collected in a vacuum plastic tube (without anticoagulants) attached to the donors arm and, immediately after the collection exactly, 100 μ L of whole blood was transferred to the filter paper (Whatman, n 41) using a calibrated micropipette and it was dried for few minutes using an infrared lamp. Samples were prepared in duplicate. The X RF analysis was performed using Mini X spectrometer from Amptek, model X-123 Sdd with Ag X-ray tube. The characteristics X-ray fluorescent intensities (Kα lines) were measured with a Si detector (Si Drift 25 m m2 x 500 μm / 0.5 mil) Be (window / 1.5) and biological samples were irradiated for 300s using 30 kV and 5 μA excitation. The quantitative analysis was performed using WINAXIL software program. We intend to stimulate the use of this small spectrometry as an alternative for diagnostic of the clinical diseases that have high prevalence in Brazilian population

  11. Investigation of drug loading behavior of dendrimers nano-vectors with synchrotron radiation hard X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Synchrotron Radiation X-ray fluorescence analysis is an advanced method of quantitative elemental analysis. It is a scientific platform for life science, material science, and environmental science. Purpose: In this present study, the drug loading behavior of dendrimers nano-vectors was investigated by using the method of Synchrotron Radiation X-ray fluorescence analysis. Methods: The copper (Ⅱ) ions were loaded into acetyl-modified generation 5(G5) PAMAM dendrimers. We monitored and imaged the distribution of copper in A549 cell by Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) to observe the cellular uptake of copper-dendrimers conjugates. Results: The results of hard X-ray fluorescence mapping showed a stronger fluorescence of Cu in the cells treated with G5-Ac-Cu than that of control. Conclusions: This investigation provided a method of using synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence analysis to study the drug loading behavior of dendrimers. (authors)

  12. Total reflection x-ray fluorescence: Determination of an optimum geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Total reflection X-Ray Fluorescence (TXRF) is a widely used technique in which the normal trace element detection capability of hard x-ray fluorescence (XRF) is enhanced by use of an x-ray reflective substrate. TXRF is more sensitive than normal photon induced XRF due to the reduction of the substrate scattering and fluorescence signals. This reduction comes about because in total external reflection, the photon field only penetrates about 20 angstrom into the surface, instead of typically 50 μm for a silicon substrate at normal incidence for 10 KeV photons. The technique is used in many fields of trace element analysis, and is widely used in the determination of metal impurity concentrations on and in the surface of silicon wafers. The Semiconductor Industry Association roadmap (SIA) indicates a need for wafer contamination detection at the 107atoms/cm2 level in the next few years. Current commercial systems using rotating anode x-ray sources presently routinely operate with a sensitivity level of around 1010 atoms/cm2 and this has led to interest in the use of synchrotron radiation to extend the sensitivity by three orders of magnitude. The pioneering work of Pianetta and co-workers at SSRL has clearly shown that this should be possible, using a fully optimized source and detector. The purpose of this work is to determine whether ALS would be a suitable source for this type of highly sensitive wafer TXRF. At first look it appears improbable as the SSRL work used a high flux multipole wiggler source, and it is clear that the detected fluorescence for relevant concentrations is small. In addition, SSRL operates at 3.0 GeV rather than 1.9 GeV, and is therefore more naturally suited to hard x-ray experiments. The aim of this work was therefore to establish a theoretical model for the scattering and fluorescence processes, so that one could predict the differences between alternative geometries and select an optimum configuration

  13. Assessment of asthmatic inflammation using hybrid fluorescence molecular tomography-x-ray computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaopeng; Prakash, Jaya; Ruscitti, Francesca; Glasl, Sarah; Stellari, Fabio Franco; Villetti, Gino; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear imaging plays a critical role in asthma research but is limited in its readings of biology due to the short-lived signals of radio-isotopes. We employed hybrid fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) and x-ray computed tomography (XCT) for the assessment of asthmatic inflammation based on resolving cathepsin activity and matrix metalloproteinase activity in dust mite, ragweed, and Aspergillus species-challenged mice. The reconstructed multimodal fluorescence distribution showed good correspondence with ex vivo cryosection images and histological images, confirming FMT-XCT as an interesting alternative for asthma research.

  14. FLUORESCENT X-RAY-ANALYSIS OF URANIUM USING INTERNAL STANDARD AND FILTER METHODS

    OpenAIRE

    Arikan, P.; Özmen, A.

    1987-01-01

    Interna1 standard and filter methods for fluorescent X-ray analysis of uranium in ores are investigated. In the first method, successful application of strontium K-X internal standard line for uranium L-X analyte line is carried out. Standardization with strontium eliminated the absorption-enhancement effect in analysis. In the second method, strontium and thorium are chosen as filters for uranium L-X and K-X fluorescent rays respectively. Attenuation (Hull) filters are used to remove ULβ, UK...

  15. Monochromatic X-ray propagation in multi-Z media for imaging and diagnostics including Kα Resonance Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphal, Maximillian; Lim, Sara; Nahar, Sultana; Pradhan, Anil

    2016-05-01

    Aimed at monochromatic X-ray imaging and therapy, broadband, monochromatic, and quasi-monochromatic X-ray sources and propagation through low and high-Z (HZ) media were studied with numerically and experimentally. Monte Carlo simulations were performed using the software package Geant4, and a new code Photx, to simulate X-ray image contrast, depth of penetration, and total attenuation. The data show that monochromatic and quasi-monochromatic X-rays achieve improved contrast at lower absorbed radiation doses compared to conventional broadband 120 kV or CT scans. Experimental quasi-monochromatic high-intensity laser-produced plasma sources and monochromatic synchrotron beam data are compared. Physical processes responsible for X-ray photoexcitation and absorption are numerically modelled, including a novel mechanism for accelerating Kα resonance fluorescence via twin monochromatic X-ray beam. Potential applications are medical diagnostics and high-Z material detection. Acknowledgement: Ohio Supercomputer Center, Columbus, OH.

  16. Comparative anomalous small-angle X-ray scattering study of hotwire and plasma grown amorphous silicon-germanium alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Goerigk, G.; Williamson, D. L.

    2001-01-01

    The nanostructure of hydrogenated amorphous silicon-germanium alloys, a-Si1-xGex:H, prepared by the hotwire deposition technique (x=0.06-0.79) and by the plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique (x=0 and 0.50) was analyzed by anomalous small-angle x-ray scattering experiments. For all alloys with x >0 the Ge component was found to be inhomogeneously distributed with correlation lengths of about 1 nm. A systematic increase of the separated scattering was found due to the increasing ...

  17. Development of a single-cell X-ray fluorescence flow cytometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Andrew M; Kurecka, Patrick; Yim, Tsz Kwan; Kozemchak, Claire; Deb, Aniruddha; Dostál, Lubomír; Sun, Cheng Jun; Brewe, Dale L; Barrea, Raul; Penner-Hahn, James E

    2016-07-01

    An X-ray fluorescence flow cytometer that can determine the total metal content of single cells has been developed. Capillary action or pressure was used to load cells into hydrophilic or hydrophobic capillaries, respectively. Once loaded, the cells were transported at a fixed vertical velocity past a focused X-ray beam. X-ray fluorescence was then used to determine the mass of metal in each cell. By making single-cell measurements, the population heterogeneity for metals in the µM to mM concentration range on fL sample volumes can be directly measured, a measurement that is difficult using most analytical methods. This approach has been used to determine the metal composition of 936 individual bovine red blood cells (bRBC), 31 individual 3T3 mouse fibroblasts (NIH3T3) and 18 Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) cells with an average measurement frequency of ∼4 cells min(-1). These data show evidence for surprisingly broad metal distributions. Details of the device design, data analysis and opportunities for further sensitivity improvement are described. PMID:27359138

  18. Dose distribution calculation for in-vivo X-ray fluorescence scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueroa, R. G. [Universidad de la Frontera, Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Av. Francisco Salazar 1145, Temuco 4811230, Araucania (Chile); Lozano, E. [Instituto Nacional del Cancer, Unidad de Fisica Medica, Av. Profesor Zanartu 1010, Santiago (Chile); Valente, M., E-mail: figueror@ufro.cl [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, Av. Ravadavia 1917, C1033AAJ, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2013-08-01

    In-vivo X-ray fluorescence constitutes a useful and accurate technique, worldwide established for constituent elementary distribution assessment. Actually, concentration distributions of arbitrary user-selected elements can be achieved along sample surface with the aim of identifying and simultaneously quantifying every constituent element. The method is based on the use of a collimated X-ray beam reaching the sample. However, one common drawback for considering the application of this technique for routine clinical examinations was the lack of information about associated dose delivery. This work presents a complete study of the dose distribution resulting from an in-vivo X-ray fluorescence scanning for quantifying biohazard materials on human hands. Absorbed dose has been estimated by means of dosimetric models specifically developed to this aim. In addition, complete dose distributions have been obtained by means of full radiation transport calculations in based on stochastic Monte Carlo techniques. A dedicated subroutine has been developed using the Penelope 2008 main code also integrated with dedicated programs -Mat Lab supported- for 3 dimensional dose distribution visualization. The obtained results show very good agreement between approximate analytical models and full descriptions by means of Monte Carlo simulations. (Author)

  19. Scanning protein analysis of electrofocusing gels using X-ray fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuyama, Satoshi; Matsunaga, Akihiro; Sakamoto, Shinichi; Iida, Yutaka; Suzuki, Yoshinari; Ishizaka, Yukihito; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Shimura, Mari

    2013-05-01

    Recently, "metallomics," in addition to genomics and proteomics, has become a focus as a novel approach to identify sensitive fluctuations in homeostasis that accompany metabolic processes, such as stress responses, differentiation, and proliferation. Cellular elements and associated protein behavior provide important clues for understanding cellular and disease mechanism(s). It is important to develop a system for measuring the native status of the protein. In this study, we developed an original freeze-dried electrofocusing native gel over polyimide film (native-gel film) for scanning protein analysis using synchrotron radiation excited X-ray fluorescence (SPAX). To our knowledge, this is the first report detailing the successful mapping of metal-associated proteins of electrofocusing gels using X-ray fluorescence. SPAX can provide detection sensitivity equivalent to that of LA-ICP-MS. In addition to this increased sensitivity, SPAX has the potential to be combined with other X-ray spectroscopies. Our system is useful for further applications in proteomics investigating cellular element-associated protein behaviors and disease mechanisms.

  20. Measurement of plutonium in spent nuclear fuel by self-induced x-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoover, Andrew S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rudy, Cliff R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Steve J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Charlton, William S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stafford, A [TEXAS A& M; Strohmeyer, D [TEXAS A& M; Saavadra, S [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Direct measurement of the plutonium content in spent nuclear fuel is a challenging problem in non-destructive assay. The very high gamma-ray flux from fission product isotopes overwhelms the weaker gamma-ray emissions from plutonium and uranium, making passive gamma-ray measurements impossible. However, the intense fission product radiation is effective at exciting plutonium and uranium atoms, resulting in subsequent fluorescence X-ray emission. K-shell X-rays in the 100 keV energy range can escape the fuel and cladding, providing a direct signal from uranium and plutonium that can be measured with a standard germanium detector. The measured plutonium to uranium elemental ratio can be used to compute the plutonium content of the fuel. The technique can potentially provide a passive, non-destructive assay tool for determining plutonium content in spent fuel. In this paper, we discuss recent non-destructive measurements of plutonium X-ray fluorescence (XRF) signatures from pressurized water reactor spent fuel rods. We also discuss how emerging new technologies, like very high energy resolution microcalorimeter detectors, might be applied to XRF measurements.

  1. Reverse engineering the ancient ceramic technology based on X-ray fluorescence spectromicroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sciau, Philippe; Leon, Yoanna; Goudeau, Philippe; Fakra, Sirine C.; Webb, Sam; Mehta, Apurva

    2011-07-06

    We present results of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microprobe analyses of ancient ceramic cross-sections aiming at deciphering the different firing protocols used for their production. Micro-focused XRF elemental mapping, Fe chemical mapping and Fe K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy were performed on pre-sigillata ceramics from southern Gaul, and terra Sigillata vessels from Italy and southern Gaul. Pieces from the different workshops and regions showed significant difference in the starting clay material, clay conditioning and kiln firing condition. By contrast, sherds from the same workshop exhibited more subtle differences and possible misfirings. Understanding the precise firing conditions and protocols would allow recreation of kilns for various productions. Furthermore, evolution and modification of kiln design would shed some light on how ancient potters devised solutions to diverse technological problems they encountered.

  2. Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis of marine pollution indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A methodology for the application of EDXRF with a X-ray tube, in the analysis of elements is shown in the following matrices: microalgae, marine algae, marine sediments and corals. Various methods were applied: one using a relative external standard, a fundamental parameters method, an absolute method based on elemental sensitivity, a method which used X-ray fluorescence excitation measured in the back side of the sample for low contents heavy elements determination and a TRXRF method. The thin layer samples were prepared using a plastic resin. The analyzed samples of marine algae, marine sediments and corals belong to a marine ecosystem from the North of Havana City, the most affected area by natural metereological phenomena and human impact. (author)

  3. Use of x-ray fluorescence and diffraction techniques in studying ancient ceramics of Sri Lanka

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceramics were produced for centuries in Sri Lanka for various purposes. Ancient ceramic articles such as pottery, bricks, tiles, sewer pipes, etc, were made from naturally occurring raw materials. Use of X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) in characterizing of two ancient ceramic samples from two different archaeological sites in Sri Lanka is presented. The information obtained in this manner is used to figure out the ancient ceramic technology, particularly to learn about the raw materials used, the source of raw materials, processing parameters such as firing temperature or binders used in ceramic production. This information then can be used to explore the archaeometric background such as the nature and extent of cultural and technological interaction between different periods of history in Sri Lanka.

  4. Trace element determination in amniotic fluid by total reflection X-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greaves, E.D.; Sajo-Bohus, L.; Castelli, C.; Borgerg, C. [Universidad Simon Bolivar, Caracas (Venezuela); Meitin, J.; Liendo, J.

    1995-03-01

    A new method is reported for the determination of Fe, Cu, Zn, and Br in amniotic fluid (AF) by Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence. The irradiation of AF samples with monochromatic X-Rays reduces the scattering background from the organic matrix and avoids the need for sample digestion. Sample manipulation is reduced to centrifuging and adding cobalt as internal standard. Lower detection limits obtained are 109, 53, 44 and 37 ppb for Fe, Cu, Zn and Br respectively. Measurement precision depends on element concentrations and can be as low as 1.5% SD. Results of the analysis of 34 AF samples from Venezuelan pregnant patients agree with previously reported ranges of Fe, Cu and Zn. Other elements observed but not quantified are Cl, K, Ca in all spectra and Pb and Sr in some of them. (author).

  5. Use of x-ray fluorescence and diffraction techniques in studying ancient ceramics of Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunaratne, B. S. B.

    2012-07-01

    Ceramics were produced for centuries in Sri Lanka for various purposes. Ancient ceramic articles such as pottery, bricks, tiles, sewer pipes, etc, were made from naturally occurring raw materials. Use of X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) in characterizing of two ancient ceramic samples from two different archaeological sites in Sri Lanka is presented. The information obtained in this manner is used to figure out the ancient ceramic technology, particularly to learn about the raw materials used, the source of raw materials, processing parameters such as firing temperature or binders used in ceramic production. This information then can be used to explore the archaeometric background such as the nature and extent of cultural and technological interaction between different periods of history in Sri Lanka.

  6. X-Ray Fluorescence Analysis of Fine Atmospheric Aerosols from a Site in Mexico City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Hernández-López

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A study was performed in the Winter of the year 2015 in a Southwestern site in the MAMC (Ciudad Universitaria, collecting PM2.5 samples with a MiniVol. As a part of wider study focused to fully characterize aerosols at this site, an X-ray Fluorescence (XRF spectrometer (based on an Rh X-ray tube built to analyze environmental samples, was used to characterize the sample set. A total of 16 elements (Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, and Pb were detected in most samples and mean concentrations were calculated. Cluster analysis was also applied to the elemental concentrations to find possible correlations among the elements.

  7. A multi-channel monolithic Ge detector system for fluorescence x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Construction and performance of a monolithic quad-pixel Ge detector for fluorescence x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at synchrotron radiation sources are described. The detector semiconductor element has an active surface area of 4.0 cm2 which is electrically separated into four 1.0 cm2 pixels, with little interfacial dead volume. Spatial response of the array shows that cross-talk between adjacent pixels is 55Fe test source (MnKα, 5.9 keV), energy resolution of better than 200 eV is achieved with a 4 μsec peaking time. At 0.5 μsec peaking time, pulse pileup results in a 75% throughput efficiency for an incoming count rate of 100 kHz. Initial XAS fluoresncece measurements at the beamline 4 wiggler end stations at SSRL show that the detector system has several advantages over commercial x-ray spectrometers for low-concentration counting

  8. Metals determination in wood treated by synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vives, Ana Elisa Sirito de [Universidade Metodista de Piracicaba (UNIMEP), Santa Barbara D' Oeste, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia, Arquitetura e Urbanismo]. E-mail: aesvives@unimep.br; Silva, Richard Maximiliano da Cunha [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: maxcunha@cena.usp.br; Medeiros, Jean Gabriel da Silva; Tomazello Filho, Mario [Sao Paulo Univ., Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz]. E-mail: jeangm@esalq.usp.br; mtomazel@esalq.usp.br; Moreira, Silvana [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Civil, Arquitetura e Urbanismo]. E-mail: Silvana@fec.unicamp.br; Zucchi, Orgheda Luiza Araujo Domingues [Sao Paulo Univ., Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas]. E-mail: olzucchi@fcfrp.usp.br; Barroso, Regina Cely [Universidade do Estado, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: cely@uerj.br

    2005-07-01

    The paper describes the use of X-Ray fluorescence analysis for distribution and quantification of metals in the hardwood (Eucalyptus sp) and softwood (Pinus sp) treated with CCA (copper-chromium-arsenic). The sapwood/heartwood for hardwood sample and the growth-rings for softwood sample were analyzed. The samples were scanned in 320 mm steps in the vertical direction. For excitation of the elements a white beam synchrotron radiation of {approx} 320 x 180 mm was employed and for the X-ray detection a Si(Li) semiconductor detector. The elements K, Ca, Cr, Mn, Cu, Zn and As were determined. Fundamental parameters were used to quantify the elements concentrations. (author)

  9. Energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence analysis of latin-american pottery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence Analysis (EDXRF) induced by low power X- Ray tubes provides relatively inexpensive, fast and quantitative method of analysis with good reproducibility and sensitivity, in the field of archaeometry in general and for the analysis of ceramics in particular. Ancient Latin-American potteries have been analyzed: tupiguarani Brazilian pottery from the Fazenda Sta Dalmacia, Cambe', city; Mayan pottery from the Yucatan, Mexico, tainos cuban pottery, from Baracoa region. Minor and trace elements have been identified, that can be classified into three groups, following their atomic number and the EDXRF excitation energy: elements with low atomic number, such as K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn; elements with medium atomic number such as Rb, Sr, Y, and Zr; and Ba

  10. Simultaneous measurements of X-ray reflectivity and grazing incidence fluorescence at BL-16 beamline of Indus-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Gangadhar; Kane, S. R.; Khooha, Ajay; Singh, A. K.; Tiwari, M. K., E-mail: mktiwari@rrcat.gov.in [Indus Synchrotrons Utilization Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore-452013 (India)

    2015-05-15

    A new multipurpose x-ray reflectometer station has been developed and augmented at the microfocus beamline (BL-16) of Indus-2 synchrotron radiation source to facilitate synchronous measurements of specular x-ray reflectivity and grazing incidence x-ray fluorescence emission from thin layered structures. The design and various salient features of the x-ray reflectometer are discussed. The performance of the reflectometer has been evaluated by analyzing several thin layered structures having different surface interface properties. The results reveal in-depth information for precise determination of surface and interface properties of thin layered materials demonstrating the immense potential of the combined measurements of x-ray reflectivity and grazing incidence fluorescence on a single reflectometer.

  11. Simultaneous measurements of X-ray reflectivity and grazing incidence fluorescence at BL-16 beamline of Indus-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Gangadhar; Kane, S R; Khooha, Ajay; Singh, A K; Tiwari, M K

    2015-05-01

    A new multipurpose x-ray reflectometer station has been developed and augmented at the microfocus beamline (BL-16) of Indus-2 synchrotron radiation source to facilitate synchronous measurements of specular x-ray reflectivity and grazing incidence x-ray fluorescence emission from thin layered structures. The design and various salient features of the x-ray reflectometer are discussed. The performance of the reflectometer has been evaluated by analyzing several thin layered structures having different surface interface properties. The results reveal in-depth information for precise determination of surface and interface properties of thin layered materials demonstrating the immense potential of the combined measurements of x-ray reflectivity and grazing incidence fluorescence on a single reflectometer. PMID:26026553

  12. Development of a reconstruction software of elemental maps by micro X-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Andre Pereira de; Braz, Delson; Mota, Carla Lemos, E-mail: apalmeid@gmail.co, E-mail: delson@lin.ufrj.b, E-mail: clemos@con.ufrj.b [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Energia Nuclear; Oliveira, Luis Fernando de; Barroso, Regina Cely; Pinto, Nivia Graciele Villela, E-mail: cely@uerj.b, E-mail: lfolive@uerj.b, E-mail: nitatag@gmail.co [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (IF/UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Cardoso, Simone Coutinho [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (IF/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Moreira, Silvana [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (FEC/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil) Faculdade de Engenharia Civil, Arquitetura e Urbanismo

    2009-07-01

    The technique of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) using SR microbeams is a powerful analysis tool for studying elemental composition in several samples. One application of this technique is the analysis done through the mapping of chemical elements forming a matrix of data. The aim of this work is the presentation of the program MapXRF, an in-house software designed to optimize the processing and mapping of fluorescence intensities data. This program uses spectra generated by QXAS as input data and separates the intensities of each chemical element found in the fluorescence spectra in files themselves. From these files, the program generates the intensity maps that can be visualized in any program of treatment of images. The proposed software was tested using fluorescence data obtained in the XRF beamline at National Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS), Brazil. Automatic 2D scans were performed and element distribution maps were obtained in form of a matrix of data. (author)

  13. Development of a software for reconstruction of X-ray fluorescence intensity maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Andre Pereira de; Braz, Delson; Mota, Carla Lemos, E-mail: apalmeid@gmail.co, E-mail: delson@lin.ufrj.b, E-mail: clemos@con.ufrj.b [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear; Oliveira, Luis Fernando de; Barroso, Regina Cely; Pinto, Nivia Graciele Villela, E-mail: cely@uerj.b, E-mail: lfolive@uerj.b, E-mail: nitatag@gmail.co [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Cardoso, Simone Coutinho, E-mail: simone@if.ufrj.b [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Moreira, Silvana, E-mail: silvana@fec.unicamp.b [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Civil, Arquitetura e Urbanismo

    2009-07-01

    The technique of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) using SR microbeams is a powerful analysis tool for studying elemental composition in several samples. One application of this technique is the analysis done through the mapping of chemical elements forming a matrix of data. The aim of this work is the presentation of the program MapXRF, an in-house software designed to optimize the processing and mapping of fluorescence intensities data. This program uses spectra generated by QXAS as input data and separates the intensities of each chemical element found in the fluorescence spectra in files themselves. From these files, the program generates the intensity maps that can be visualized in any program of treatment of images. The proposed software was tested using fluorescence data obtained in the XRF beamline of XRF at Synchrotron Light National Laboratory (LNLS), Brazil. Automatic 2D scans were performed and element distribution maps were obtained in the form of a matrix of data. (author)

  14. The accuracy of X-ray fluorescence spectrometric determination of Rb and Sr contents in rock sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that application of the Compton scattering method in the X-ray fluorescence spectrometric determination of the trace elements Rb and Sr in rock samples can provide element contents at an accuracy level +- 1 %

  15. Study of the elemental composition of Chenopodium Quinoa Willd by fast neutron activation analysis and X ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By means of x-ray fluorescence and fast neutron activation analysis the nitrogen content has been determined in samples of roots, stems, leaf, flowers and grains from Quinua (Chenopodium Quinoa Willd), which was previously treated with fertilizer

  16. Long-Term Spectral and Temporal Evolution of Anomalous X-Ray Pulsar XTE J1810-197

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vurgun, Eda; Gogus, Ersin; Chakraborty, Manoneeta; Guver, Tolga

    2016-07-01

    We present spectral and timing studies of the first transient Anomalous X-ray Pulsar XTE J1810-197, a 5.54 s pulsar discovered in 2003, when its X-ray luminosity increased ~100 fold. We investigate the long-term behaviour of the surface temperature,emitting area, and the pulsed fraction. X-ray spectra are well fitted by a two-component blackbody model in which the cool component is most likely arising from the whole surface of star and the hot component is arising from a relatively small hot spot on it. The spectral analysis has also shown evidence for the presence of an absorbtion line feature around 1.2 keV in almost all observations. We fit this absorption feature with an asymmetric gaussian component since it shows an asymmetric structure. The pulse fraction exhibits slightly different temporal evolution in higher and lower energy bands. We will discuss correlative behaviour between the spectral and timing parameters in order to constrain magnetar cooling models.

  17. Advanced combined application of micro-X-ray diffraction/micro-X-ray fluorescence with conventional techniques for the identification of pictorial materials from Baroque Andalusia paintings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, L K; Montalbani, S; Chiavari, G; Cotte, M; Solé, V A; Bueno, J; Duran, A; Justo, A; Perez-Rodriguez, J L

    2009-11-15

    The process of investigating paintings includes the identification of materials to solve technical and historical art questions, to aid in the deduction of the original appearance, and in the establishment of the chemical and physical conditions for adequate restoration and conservation. In particular, we have focused on the identification of several samples taken from six famous canvases painted by Pedro Atanasio Bocanegra, who created a very special collection depicting the life of San Ignacio, which is located in the church of San Justo y Pastor of Granada, Spain. The characterization of the inorganic and organic compounds of the textiles, preparation layers, and pictorial layers have been carried out using an XRD diffractometer, SEM observations, EDX spectrometry, FT-IR spectrometry (both in reflection and transmission mode), pyrolysis/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and synchrotron-based micro-X-ray techniques. In this work, the advantages over conventional X-ray diffraction of using combined synchrotron-based micro-X-ray diffraction and micro-X-ray fluorescence in the identification of multi-layer paintings is demonstrated. PMID:19782194

  18. X-ray fluorescent lines from the Compton-thick AGN in M5

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Weiwei; Gou, Lijun; Liu, Jiren

    2015-01-01

    The cold disk/torus gas surrounding AGN emits fluorescent lines when irradiated by hard X-ray photons. The fluorescent lines of elements other than Fe and Ni are rarely detected due to their relative faintness. We report the detection of K$\\alpha$ lines of neutral Si, S, Ar, Ca, Cr, and Mn, along with the prominent Fe K$\\alpha$, Fe K$\\beta$, and Ni K$\\alpha$ lines, from the deep Chandra observation of the low-luminosity Compton-thick AGN in M51. The Si K$\\alpha$ line at 1.74 keV is detected at $\\sim3\\sigma$, the other fluorescent lines have a significance between 2 and 2.5 $\\sigma$, while the Cr line has a significance of $\\sim1.5\\sigma$. These faint fluorescent lines are made observable due to the heavy obscuration of the intrinsic spectrum of M51, which is revealed by Nustar observation above 10 keV. The hard X-ray continuum of M51 from Chandra and Nustar can be fitted with a power-law spectrum with an index of 1.8, reprocessed by a torus with an equatorial column density of $N_{\\rm H}\\sim7\\times10^{24}$ cm...

  19. Determination of soluble elements in water by x-ray fluorescence spectrometry after preconcentration with polyvinylpyrrolidone-thionalide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for the quantitative determination of soluble elements such as Fe, Cu, Zn, Se, Cd, Sn, Te, Hg, and Pb in water is described. This method is based on preconcentrating the dissolved elements with the combined organic precipitating reagents polyvinylpyrrolidone and thionalide, filtering the precipitate to form a suitable x-ray sample, and analyzing the sample by x-ray fluorescence. Large concentrations of calcium and magnesium do not interfere when the method is applied to natural and waste water samples. X-ray fluorescence analysis can achieve detection limits in the microgram-per-liter range for all elements tested

  20. Anomalous fluorescence line intensity in megavoltage bremsstrahlung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Nino; Litz, Marc; Merkel, George; Schumer, Joseph; Seely, John; Carroll, Jeff

    2009-11-01

    A Cauchois transmission crystal spectrometer intended for laser plasma diagnostics has measured an anomalous ratio between the fluorescence lines in megavoltage bremsstrahlung. When observed in reflection, Kα1 fluorescence is twice as strong as the Kβ line, as is usual. However, in forward-directed bremsstrahlung from a 2 MV end point linear accelerator with a tungsten converter, the Kα1 and Kβ fluorescence are approximately equal. The anomalous fluorescence line ratio, unity, reflects the large amount of fluorescence generated on the side of the converter where the electrons enter, and the differential attenuation of the fluorescence photons as they pass through the converter to opposite side. Understanding of fluorescence in megavoltage bremsstrahlung is relevant to the explanation of anomalous line ratios in spectra produced by high-energy electrons generated by intense femtosecond laser irradiation.

  1. Observation of parametric X-ray radiation in an anomalous diffraction region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexeyev, V. I.; Eliseyev, A. N.; Irribarra, E.; Kishin, I. A.; Kubankin, A. S.; Nazhmudinov, R. M.

    2016-08-01

    A new possibility to expand the energy region of diffraction processes based on the interaction of relativistic charged particles with crystalline structures is presented. Diffracted photons related to parametric X-ray radiation produced by relativistic electrons are detected below the low energy threshold for the X-ray diffraction mechanism in crystalline structures for the first time. The measurements were performed during the interaction of 7 MeV electrons with a textured polycrystalline tungsten foil and a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite crystal. The experiment results are in good agreement with a developed model based on the PXR kinematical theory. The developed experimental approach can be applied to separate the contributions of real and virtual photons to the total diffracted radiation generated during the interaction of relativistic charged particles with crystalline targets.

  2. Wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence imaging using a high-sensitivity imaging sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmori, Takashi; Kato, Shuichi; Doi, Makoto; Shoji, Takashi; Tsuji, Kouichi

    2013-05-01

    A new wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WD-XRF) imaging spectrometer equipped with a high-sensitivity imaging sensor was developed in our laboratory. In this instrument, a straight polycapillary optic was applied instead of a Soller slit as well as a 2D imaging X-ray detector instead of X-ray counters, which are used in conventional WD-XRF spectrometers. Therefore, images of elemental distribution were available after a short exposure time. Ni Kα images and Cu Kα images were clearly obtained at corresponding diffraction angles for a short exposure time of 10 s. By optimizing the spectrometer, the time required for imaging is reduced, leading to XRF image movies. It is difficult to distinguish two peaks (Ti Kα (4.508 keV) and Ba Lα (4.465 keV)) due to the poor energy resolution of EDXRS. However, Ti and Ba images could be successfully observed by the WD-XRF imaging spectrometer. The energy resolution of the developed spectrometer was 25 eV at the Ti Kα peak.

  3. TX 2000: total reflection and 45o energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This equipment, developed by Ital Structures, combines two kinds of energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence techniques, the first using total reflection geometry and the second conventional 45o geometry. The equipment is completely controlled by a PC and to reach the condition of total reflection is very easy because it is enough to load the file with the right position for the corresponding energy. In this apparatus we used an x-ray tube with an alloy anode of Mo/W with a long fine focus at 2200 W. To monochromatize the x-ray beam while choosing, for example, the Mo K alpha or W L alpha or a piece of white spectrum of 33 keV, we use a highly reflective multilayer made of Si/W with 2d = 45.5 Ao. The detector used in the equipment is a lithium drifted silicon detector (Si(Li)) with an excellent energy resolution of 135 eV at 5.9 keV and 1000 cps. We developed two programs written in Windows 95, 98 and NT for a 32 bit microprocessor. The first one is called TYACQ32 and has the following functions: first, complete control of the hardware, second automatic alignment of the TX 2000 spectrometer and third acquisition of spectra. The second program is EDXRF32. This is a program to accomplish spectrum and quantitative analysis for TXRF and EDXRF 45o degrees analysis. (author)

  4. Phase-resolved x-ray ferromagnetic resonance measurements in fluorescence yield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcham, M. K.; Keatley, P. S.; Neudert, A.; Hicken, R. J.; Cavill, S. A.; Shelford, L. R.; van der Laan, G.; Telling, N. D.; Childress, J. R.; Katine, J. A.; Shafer, P.; Arenholz, E.

    2010-10-14

    Phase-resolved x-ray ferromagnetic resonance (XFMR) has been measured in fluorescence yield, extending the application of XFMR to opaque samples on opaque substrates. Magnetization dynamics were excited in a Co{sub 50}Fe{sub 50}(0.7)/Ni{sub 90}Fe{sub 10}(5) bilayer by means of a continuous wave microwave excitation, while x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) spectra were measured stroboscopically at different points in the precession cycle. By tuning the x-ray energy to the L{sub 3} edges of Ni and Fe, the dependence of the real and imaginary components of the element specific magnetic susceptibility on the strength of an externally applied static bias field was determined. First results from measurements on a Co{sub 50}Fe{sub 50}(0.7)/Ni{sub 90}Fe{sub 10}(5)/Dy(1) sample confirm that enhanced damping results from the addition of the Dy cap.

  5. Multilayers quantitative X-ray fluorescence analysis applied to easel paintings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Viguerie, Laurence; Sole, V Armando; Walter, Philippe

    2009-12-01

    X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) allows a rapid and simple determination of the elemental composition of a material. As a non-destructive tool, it has been extensively used for analysis in art and archaeology since the early 1970s. Whereas it is commonly used for qualitative analysis, recent efforts have been made to develop quantitative treatment even with portable systems. However, the interpretation of the results obtained with this technique can turn out to be problematic in the case of layered structures such as easel paintings. The use of differential X-ray attenuation enables modelling of the various layers: indeed, the absorption of X-rays through different layers will result in modification of intensity ratio between the different characteristic lines. This work focuses on the possibility to use XRF with the fundamental parameters method to reconstruct the composition and thickness of the layers. This method was tested on several multilayers standards and gives a maximum error of 15% for thicknesses and errors of 10% for concentrations. On a painting test sample that was rather inhomogeneous, the XRF analysis provides an average value. This method was applied in situ to estimate the thickness of the layers a painting from Marco d'Oggiono, pupil of Leonardo da Vinci.

  6. Methodology for determination of inorganic elements in vitamin supplements by X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A methodology is present for qualification of inorganic elements in alimentary supplements, using a portable system of low power X-ray, in the analysis of two commercial products, both found as pills. The PXRF (Portable X-ray Fluorescence) is a X-ray mini tube, Ag filter at tube exit, a Si-Pin semiconductor and a Ag collimator at the detector entry, specific circuitry for this type of system and a microcomputer for the data acquisition and analysis. Samples and standards were diluted in boric acid, and the samples were prepared in a 1:10 rate, and the standards vary of 1:2, 1;5, 1:10. 1:15 and 1:100. Results were obtained for Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe, Cu e Zn, with values varying from 0.14 to 8.45 for the sample A, and from 0.17 to 17.94 for the sample B. The PXRF portable system demonstrated to be a multi elementary analysis tool with high analytical speed, and can be applied in situ no only for quality control but also for monitoring of inspection organism

  7. X-ray fluorescence and computed radiography analysis of a famous brazilian painting from XIX century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work used Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) and Computed Radiography (CR) to evaluate the general conditions of the painting 'Gioventu' (Eliseu Visconti, 1898), identifying possible problems, areas that revealed signs of previous retouchings and the pigments used by the artist. EDXRF measurements were carried out with a portable system consisting of an X-ray tube Oxford TF3005 with W anode, operating at 25 kV and 100 μA, and a Si-PIN XR-100CR detector from Amptek. Several spectra were obtained in each color, with an acquisition time of 300 s and a beam collimation of 2 mm. The spectra were analyzed using the software QXAS-AXIL (IAEA). The results revealed that the drawings were made over a preparatory layer of lead white. Some pigments identified were: yellow, red and brown ochre; umbra; vermilion; cobalt blue; etc. The experimental setup used in the CR analysis consisted of an Oxford X-ray source, operating at 50 kV and 200 μA, placed at 85 cm from the painting, a GE CR 50P portable computed radiography scanner and a Fuji imaging plate detector. The exposure time was 600 s. The radiographic images revealed that the painting was in a good state of conservation and also a complete composition hidden underneath the visible paint layer.(author)

  8. New Homogeneous Standards by Atomic Layer Deposition for Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence and Absorption Spectroscopies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butterworth, A.L.; Becker, N.; Gainsforth, Z.; Lanzirotti, A.; Newville, M.; Proslier, T.; Stodolna, J.; Sutton, S.; Tyliszczak, T.; Westphal, A.J.; Zasadzinski, J. (UCB)

    2012-03-13

    Quantification of synchrotron XRF analyses is typically done through comparisons with measurements on the NIST SRM 1832/1833 thin film standards. Unfortunately, these standards are inhomogeneous on small scales at the tens of percent level. We are synthesizing new homogeneous multilayer standards using the Atomic Layer Deposition technique and characterizing them using multiple analytical methods, including ellipsometry, Rutherford Back Scattering at Evans Analytical, Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence (SXRF) at Advanced Photon Source (APS) Beamline 13-ID, Synchrotron X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) at Advanced Light Source (ALS) Beamlines 11.0.2 and 5.3.2.1 and by electron microscopy techniques. Our motivation for developing much-needed cross-calibration of synchrotron techniques is borne from coordinated analyses of particles captured in the aerogel of the NASA Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector (SIDC). The Stardust Interstellar Dust Preliminary Examination (ISPE) team have characterized three sub-nanogram, {approx}1{micro}m-sized fragments considered as candidates to be the first contemporary interstellar dust ever collected, based on their chemistries and trajectories. The candidates were analyzed in small wedges of aerogel in which they were extracted from the larger collector, using high sensitivity, high spatial resolution >3 keV synchrotron x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (SXRF) and <2 keV synchrotron x-ray transmission microscopy (STXM) during Stardust ISPE. The ISPE synchrotron techniques have complementary capabilities. Hard X-ray SXRF is sensitive to sub-fg mass of elements Z {ge} 20 (calcium) and has a spatial resolution as low as 90nm. X-ray Diffraction data were collected simultaneously with SXRF data. Soft X-ray STXM at ALS beamline 11.0.2 can detect fg-mass of most elements, including cosmochemically important oxygen, magnesium, aluminum and silicon, which are invisible to SXRF in this application. ALS beamline 11.0.2 has spatial resolution

  9. Sample preparation of waste water to determine metallic contaminants by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trace X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy analysis in liquid samples is preceded by sample preparation, which usually consists in the precipitation of the metallic ions and concentration over a thin cellulose filter. The samples preparation of waste water by this method is not efficient, due to the great amount of organic and insoluble matter that they contain. The purpose of this work was to determine the optimal value of pH in order to adsorbe all the insoluble matter contained in a waste water sample in the activated charcoal, so that the metallic ions could be precipitated and concentrated on a thin filter and determinated by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. A survey about the adsorption of some ions in activated charcoal in function of the pH was made for the following: Cr3+, Fe3+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Se2+, Hg2+, and Pb2+. It was observed that at pH 0, the ions are not adsorbed, but Cu2+ and Zn2+ are adsorbed in small amount; at pH 14, the ions are adsorbed, excluding Se, which is not adsorbed at any value of pH. If a waste water sample is treated at pH 0 with activated charcoal to adsorbe the organic and insoluble matter, most of the metallic ions are not adsorbed by the activated charcoal and could be precipitated with APDC (ammonium 1-pirrolidine dithio carbamate salt) and concentrated on a thin filter. The analysis of the metallic ions contained on the filter and those adsorbed in the activated charcoal by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, gave the total amount of the ions in the sample. (author)

  10. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence and archaeometry: Application in the Argentinean cultural heritage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez, Cristina [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. Gral Paz 1499 (B1650KNA) San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Laboratorio de Quimica de Sistemas Heterogeneos, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad de Buenos Aires, P. Colon 850 (C1063ACU), Buenos Aires (Argentina)], E-mail: Cristina.Vazquez@cnea.gov.ar; Albornoz, Ana [Agencia Rio Negro Cultura, Museo de la Patagonia F.P.Moreno, Centro Civico s/n Bariloche, Rio Negro (Argentina); Hajduk, Adam [CONICET, Museo de la Patagonia F.P.Moreno, Centro Civico s/n Bariloche, Rio Negro (Argentina); Elkin, Dolores [CONICET Instituto Nacional de Antropologia y Pensamiento Latinoamericano, 3 de febrero 1378 (C1426AEL) Buenos Aires (Argentina); Custo, Graciela; Obrustky, Alba [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. Gral Paz 1499 (B1650KNA) San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2008-12-15

    Archaeometry is an interdisciplinary research area involved in the development and use of scientific methods in order to answer questions concerned with the human history. In this way the knowledge of archaeological objects through advanced chemical and physical analyses permits a better preservation and conservation of the cultural heritage and also reveals materials and technologies used in the past. In this sense, analytical techniques play an important role in order to provide chemical information about cultural objects. Considering the non destructive characteristic of this study, analytical techniques must be adequate in order to prevent any alteration or damage and in addition to allow the conservation of their integrity. Taking into account the irreplaceable character of the archaeological and artistic materials considered in this study, analytical techniques must be adequate in order to prevent any alteration or damage and in addition to allow the conservation of their integrity. Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry as a geometric variant of conventional X-ray fluorescence is a proved microanalytical technique considering the small amount of sample required for the analysis. A few micrograms are enough in order to reveal valuable information about elemental composition and in this context it is highly recommended for artwork studies. In this paper a case study is presented in which Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry has been successfully employed in the archaeometry field. Examples from Argentinean cultural heritage sites related with the determination of pigments in paintings on canvas and in rock sites as well as in underwater archaeology research are shown.

  11. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence and archaeometry: Application in the Argentinean cultural heritage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archaeometry is an interdisciplinary research area involved in the development and use of scientific methods in order to answer questions concerned with the human history. In this way the knowledge of archaeological objects through advanced chemical and physical analyses permits a better preservation and conservation of the cultural heritage and also reveals materials and technologies used in the past. In this sense, analytical techniques play an important role in order to provide chemical information about cultural objects. Considering the non destructive characteristic of this study, analytical techniques must be adequate in order to prevent any alteration or damage and in addition to allow the conservation of their integrity. Taking into account the irreplaceable character of the archaeological and artistic materials considered in this study, analytical techniques must be adequate in order to prevent any alteration or damage and in addition to allow the conservation of their integrity. Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry as a geometric variant of conventional X-ray fluorescence is a proved microanalytical technique considering the small amount of sample required for the analysis. A few micrograms are enough in order to reveal valuable information about elemental composition and in this context it is highly recommended for artwork studies. In this paper a case study is presented in which Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry has been successfully employed in the archaeometry field. Examples from Argentinean cultural heritage sites related with the determination of pigments in paintings on canvas and in rock sites as well as in underwater archaeology research are shown

  12. Analysis of agricultural soils by using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, we describe an Energy Dispersive x-ray Fluorescence System with a x-ray tube excitation for trace analysis of environmental samples (soil). The system was used to analyze the contamination of metals in treated soils with doses of 10, 20 and 30 ton/ha of compound organic of urban garbage of the type Fertilurb and 10 ton/ha of aviary bed (manure of birds). Samples of roots and foliages of plant radishes cultivated in these soils were also analyzed. The soil samples were collected in five different depths of 0,5, 5-10, 10-20, 20-40 and 40-60 cm. The experimental set-up is composed by an OXFORD X-ray (30 kV, 50 μA and W anode), an ORTEC Si-Li detector, with an energy resolution of about 180 eV at 5.9 keV and an ORTEC multichannel-analyser. The X-ray spectrum tube is quasi-monochromatic by using of Ti filter. Samples were prepared in pellet form with superficial density in the range of 100 mg/cm2. The fundamental parameter method was used in order to verify the elemental concentration. It was possible to determine the concentrations of thirteen elements: K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Br, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr and Pb in the treated soils with compounds organic. The results indicate that the values found for K, Ca, Rb, Sr, Zr and Pb are significantly above the upper confidence limits for the control soil (α = 0.05). There is a real different between these elements compared to their relationship in the control soils, (α=0,05). There is a real difference between these elements compared to their relationship in the control soils, confirming the influence of the organic compounds in the soil. (author)

  13. X-ray fluorescence imaging system for fast mapping of pigment distributions in cultural heritage paintings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielińska, A.; Dąbrowski, W.; Fiutowski, T.; Mindur, B.; Wiącek, P.; Wróbel, P.

    2013-10-01

    Conventional X-ray fluorescence imaging technique uses a focused X-ray beam to scan through the sample and an X-ray detector with high energy resolution but no spatial resolution. The spatial resolution of the image is then determined by the size of the exciting beam, which can be obtained either from a synchrotron source or from an X-ray tube with a micro-capillary lens. Such a technique based on a pixel-by-pixel measurement is very slow and not suitable for imaging large area samples. The goal of this work is to develop a system capable of simultaneous imaging of large area samples by using a wide field uniform excitation X-ray beam and a position sensitive and energy dispersive detector. The development is driven by possible application of such a system to imaging of distributions of hidden pigments containing specific elements in cultural heritage paintings, which is of great interest for the cultural heritage research. The fluorescence radiation from the area of 10 × 10 cm2 is projected through a pinhole camera on the Gas Electron Multiplier detector of the same area. The detector is equipped with two sets of orthogonal readout strips. The strips are read out by the GEMROC Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASIC)s, which deliver time and amplitude information for each hit. This ASIC architecture combined with a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) based readout system allows us to reconstruct the position and the total energy of each detected photon for high count rates up to 5 × 106 cps. Energy resolution better than 20% FWHM for the 5.9 keV line and spatial resolution of 1 mm FWHM have been achieved for the prototype system. Although the energy resolution of the Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detector is, by principle, not competitive with that of specialised high energy resolution semiconductor detectors, it is sufficient for a number of applications. Compared to conventional micro-XRF techniques the developed system allows shortening of the

  14. X-ray fluorescence imaging system for fast mapping of pigment distributions in cultural heritage paintings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conventional X-ray fluorescence imaging technique uses a focused X-ray beam to scan through the sample and an X-ray detector with high energy resolution but no spatial resolution. The spatial resolution of the image is then determined by the size of the exciting beam, which can be obtained either from a synchrotron source or from an X-ray tube with a micro-capillary lens. Such a technique based on a pixel-by-pixel measurement is very slow and not suitable for imaging large area samples. The goal of this work is to develop a system capable of simultaneous imaging of large area samples by using a wide field uniform excitation X-ray beam and a position sensitive and energy dispersive detector. The development is driven by possible application of such a system to imaging of distributions of hidden pigments containing specific elements in cultural heritage paintings, which is of great interest for the cultural heritage research. The fluorescence radiation from the area of 10 × 10 cm2 is projected through a pinhole camera on the Gas Electron Multiplier detector of the same area. The detector is equipped with two sets of orthogonal readout strips. The strips are read out by the GEMROC Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASIC)s, which deliver time and amplitude information for each hit. This ASIC architecture combined with a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) based readout system allows us to reconstruct the position and the total energy of each detected photon for high count rates up to 5 × 106 cps. Energy resolution better than 20% FWHM for the 5.9 keV line and spatial resolution of 1 mm FWHM have been achieved for the prototype system. Although the energy resolution of the Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detector is, by principle, not competitive with that of specialised high energy resolution semiconductor detectors, it is sufficient for a number of applications. Compared to conventional micro-XRF techniques the developed system allows shortening of the

  15. Background estimation methods for quantitative x-ray fluorescence analysis of gold nanoparticles in biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Liqiang; Wu, Di; Li, Yuhua; Chen, Wei R.; Liu, Hong

    2014-02-01

    Accurate background estimation to isolate the fluorescence signals is an important issue for quantitative X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis of gold nanoparticles (GNPs). Though a good estimation can be obtained experimentally through acquiring the background spectrum of water solution, it inevitably leads to unnecessary second exposure in reality. Thus, several numerical methods such as trapezoidal shape estimation, interpolation by polynomial fitting and SNIP (Statistics sensitive Nonlinear Iterative Peak-Clipping) algorithm are proposed to achieve this goal. This paper aims to evaluate the estimation results calculated by these numerical methods through comparing with that acquired using the experimental way, in term of mean squared error (MSE). Four GNP/water solutions with various concentrations from 0.0% to 1.0% by weight are prepared. Then, ten spectra are acquired for each solution for further analysis, under the identical condition of using pencil beam x-ray and single spectrometer. Finally, the experimental and numerical methods are performed on these spectra within the optimally determined energy window and their statistical characteristics are analyzed and compared. These numerical background estimation methods as well as the evaluation methods can be easily extended to analyze the fluorescence signals of other nanoparticle biomarkers such as gadolinium, platinum and Barium in multiple biomedical applications.

  16. Use of X-ray Fluorescence Analysis for the Determination of Rare Earth Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Rainer

    2016-09-01

    X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) is a powerful tool for the analysis of solid material. That is the reason why the technique was applied for the determination of rare earth elements (REEs) since about 1970. At present, energy-dispersive XRF and wavelength-dispersive XRF are used for the analysis of pressed powder pellets or fused Li-borate beads containing REEs. The production of reliable results can only be achieved by careful optimization of the parameter, in particular the selection of spectral lines. The quantification is based on a calibration realized by using reference samples.

  17. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of medieval silver coins by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry was applied for the analysis of historical silver coins to determine the elemental composition in a fast and non-destructive way. Ag, Cu and trace elements (V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Hg, Pd, Zr, Mo, Rh, Ru) were determined in coins of King Mathias (Hungary, 1458-1490). A new data evaluation technique was used to avoid the problems arising from the different sizes, surfaces and geometries. The appropriateness of this method was confirmed by analysing certified silver/copper standard alloys. (author)

  18. Chemical characterization of clay SRM by X-ray fluorescence – results comparison from different laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Roberto Appoloni

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Two Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence equipments have been compared in order to verify its performance for clay characterization and potential application to the study in archaeometric field and industry. Two clay standard reference materials (SRM, IPT-42 and IPT-51 and one IAEA intercomparison sample were analyzed by two different methodologies and equipments. Asentamiento Universitario Zapala laboratory has a Shimadzu EDX-800HS bench top equipment and 13 elements from S to Zr were quantified in the standards. Applied Nuclear Physics Laboratory has a portable EDXRF system. It was possible to quantify K, Ti and Fe and qualitatively to identify Mn, Rb, Zn and Zr.

  19. Soil ratio evaluation in industrial sugar cane by energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radioisotope induced energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis has been used for the determination of total contents of Al, Si, Ti, Fe, and Zr, chosen as soil tracers in sugar cane consignments. These elements have been evaluated in ten different types of soils from the sugar cane growing area of the sate of Sao Paulo, aiming to establish elemental ratios which could helping the identification and quantification of the soil loaded with the stalks in the field during harvesting of sugar cane. (author). 16 refs, 9 figs, 1 tab

  20. Determination of copper in the environment by X-ray fluorescence method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effective rapid X-ray fluorescence method for determination of copper in atmospheric air, soil, food, plants, and biological media is developed. Sup(238)Pu radionuclide, RPSCh-01 device, S1-6R proportional counter or scintillator detector with NaI(Tl) crystal were used during the analyses. Methods of preparation of samples for analysis are described in short. Calculation was performed using calibration curve. This method is widely tested in sanitary investigations in the region of large copper-sulphur integrated industrial plant. Sensitivity of determination is 0.05 μg, analysis accuracy is 3-5%

  1. In-Situ Silver Acetylide Silver Nitrate Explosive Deposition Measurements Using X-Ray Fluorescence.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Covert, Timothy T.

    2014-09-01

    The Light Initiated High Explosive facility utilized a spray deposited coating of silver acetylide - silver nitrate explosive to impart a mechanical shock into targets of interest. A diagnostic was required to measure the explosive deposition in - situ. An X - ray fluorescence spectrometer was deployed at the facility. A measurement methodology was developed to measure the explosive quantity with sufficient accuracy. Through the use of a tin reference material under the silver based explosive, a field calibration relationship has been developed with a standard deviation of 3.2 % . The effect of the inserted tin material into the experiment configuration has been explored.

  2. The determination, by x-ray-fluorescence spectrometry, of gold in activated charcoal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A rapid method is described for the determination of gold in activated charcoal by X-ray-fluorescence spectrometry. Compensation for matrix effects is achieved by means of platinum that is added for use as an internal standard. Calibration is achieved by use of a series of synthetic standards that are made by the spiking of barren charcoal with gold and platinum. The limit of determination is about 8 p.p.m. of gold, and the relative standard deviation is 1,2 per cent at a concentration level of 2300 p.p.m

  3. X-Ray fluorescence analysis of trace elements in fruit juice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Sheng-Xiang; Wang, Zhi-Hong; Liu, Jing-Song

    1999-12-01

    X-Ray fluorescence spectrometry is applied to the determination of trace elements in fruit juice characterized by a high content of sugar and other soluble solid substances. Samples are prepared by evaporation, carbonization and pressing into discs. The synthesis of standards is described in detail. All element concentrations are directly estimated from linear calibration curves obtained without any matrix correction. The results of the analysis are in good agreement with those given by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry and atomic absorption spectrometry techniques.

  4. Clinical applications of total reflection X-Ray Fluorescence in the treatment of cancer, Preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple procedure is presents in which direct irradiation of small (10 ?l) quantities of blood serum, without chemical treatment or internal standard addition, allows reliable quantification of the PT plasma level with a 300 ppb detection limit and precision of 7% (n=7) It is shown that the method allows determination of the time evolution of the drug concentration and the drug half life in the patient the results indicated the viability of an improvement in the clinical practice of chemotherapy by the routine analysis of platinum with total reflection X-Ray Fluorescence

  5. The x-rays fluorescence applied to the analysis of alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is based on the utilization of the Fluorescence of X Rays. This technique of non destructive trial, has the purpose to establish a routine method, for the control of the conformation of industrial samples used. It makes an analysis with a combination of the algorithms of Rasberry-Heinrich and Claisse-Thinh. Besides, the numerical implementation of non usual techniques in this type of analysis. Such as the Linear Programming applied to the solution of super determined systems, of equations and the utilization of methods of relaxation to facilitate the convergence to the solutions. (author)

  6. Synchrotron total reflection X-ray fluorescence at BL-16 microfocus beamline of Indus-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiwari, M. K., E-mail: mktiwari@rrcat.gov.in; Singh, A. K., E-mail: mktiwari@rrcat.gov.in; Das, Gangadhar, E-mail: mktiwari@rrcat.gov.in; Chowdhury, Anupam, E-mail: mktiwari@rrcat.gov.in; Lodha, G. S., E-mail: mktiwari@rrcat.gov.in [Indus Synchrotrons Utilisation Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore-452013 (India)

    2014-04-24

    Determination of ultra trace elements is important in many disciplines both in basic and applied sciences. Numerous applications show their importance in medical science, environmental science, materials science, food processing and semiconductor industries and in maintaining the quality control of ultra pure chemicals and reagents. We report commissioning of a synchrotron based total reflection x-ray fluorescence (TXRF) facility on the BL-16 microfocus beamline of Indus-2. This paper describes the performance of the BL-16 TXRF spectrometer and the detailed description of its capabilities through examples of measured results.

  7. Synchrotron total reflection X-ray fluorescence at BL-16 microfocus beamline of Indus-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Determination of ultra trace elements is important in many disciplines both in basic and applied sciences. Numerous applications show their importance in medical science, environmental science, materials science, food processing and semiconductor industries and in maintaining the quality control of ultra pure chemicals and reagents. We report commissioning of a synchrotron based total reflection x-ray fluorescence (TXRF) facility on the BL-16 microfocus beamline of Indus-2. This paper describes the performance of the BL-16 TXRF spectrometer and the detailed description of its capabilities through examples of measured results

  8. Determination of Fission Products in Irradiated Fuel by X-Ray Fluorescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg; Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage; Andersen, Niels Hessel

    in irradiated U02 fuel samples. About 0.1 mm thin s l i c e s of fuel p e l l e t s (full cross sections) are irradiated by 50 keV X-rays. The i n t e n s i t y of the Xe (Cs, Ba) Ko fluorescence radiation generated i s measured by means of a Ge detector f i t t ed with a collimator. The s l i t i s 0.5 mm wide...

  9. Heavy metals analysis in blood by the X-ray fluorescence method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analytical procedure for determination of heavy metals in blood is described. Blood was taken from active smelter workers, samples were stored in special flasks at 2 grades C. After freeze drying, dried samples was analyzed using X-ray fluorescence, sources excited: Pu-238 and Cd-109 was used. Br in Pb interferences were corrected. The agreement of the results with values in similar workers is satisfactory Median Pb level was 42.6 micro grams/100 ml (total blood), Cu was less 2.5 micro grams/g (dry blood) and Zn was 11 micro grams/g (dry blood). (author)

  10. Investigation of trace elements in hair of athletes by synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trace elements Fe, Zn and Ca in hair samples taken from four athletes have been determined by using SR X-ray fluorescence analysis technique. Each sample is scanned point by point at 1.5 mm of interval, which corresponds to 5 days of hair growth. Preliminary results show that the change of iron content in hair is related to exercise capacity of athletes, but no observable change is found for Zn and Ca content. It is verified that sport is one of the causes leading to iron deficiency of athletes

  11. Determination of low concentrations of uranium in granite samples by X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An x-ray fluorescence method for the determination of uranium in granite samples for concentrations ranging from 3 to 100 ppm U3O8 has been developed. To this purpose a sample holder, specially designed, allowing the irradiation of sample surfaces 42.5 mm in diameter and a molybdenum tube operating with a power of 2700 W (90 kV, 30 mA) are used. The background influence and the spectral interferences from rubidium and strontium have been taken into account and specific correction coefficients have been computed. A Basic program facilitates the report of the analytical results. (author)

  12. An x-ray fluorescence study of lake sediments from ancient Turkey using synchrotron radiation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alatas, A.; Alp, E. E.; Friedman, E. S.; Jennings, G.; Johnson, C. E.; Lai, B.; Mini, S. M.; Sato, Y.; Wilkinson, T. J.; Yener, K. A.

    1999-03-10

    Sediments from relic Lake Golbasi were analyzed by X-ray fluorescence with synchrotrons radiation to determine changes in element concentrations over time with selected elements serving as proxies for environmental change. Increases in Ca and Sr suggest soil formation during a dry period, from ca. 4500 BC to ca. 200 AD at which point K, Rb, Zr, Ti, and Y increase, indicating the return of a wet environment. Soil erosion, represented by Cr and Ni, increases ca. 7000 BC, probably as a consequence of environmental change, prior to suggested exploitation of natural resources by the newly urbanized society of the third millennium BC.

  13. X-Ray Diffraction and Fluorescence Measurements for In Situ Planetary Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansford, G.; Hill, K. S.; Talboys, D.; Vernon, D.; Ambrosi, R.; Bridges, J.; Hutchinson, I.; Marinangeli, L.

    2011-12-01

    The ESA/NASA ExoMars mission, due for launch in 2018, has a combined X-ray fluorescence/diffraction instrument, Mars-XRD, as part of the onboard analytical laboratory. The results of some XRF (X-ray fluorescence) and XRD (X-ray diffraction) tests using a laboratory chamber with representative performance are reported. A range of standard geological reference materials and analogues were used in these tests. The XRD instruments are core components of the forthcoming NASA Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) and ESA/NASA ExoMars missions and will provide the first demonstrations of the capabilities of combined XRD/XRF instrumentation in situ on an extraterrestrial planetary surface. The University of Leicester team is part of the Italy-UK collaboration that is responsible for building the ExoMars X-ray diffraction instrument, Mars-XRD [1,2]. Mars-XRD incorporates an Fe-55 radioisotope source and three fixed-position charge-coupled devices (CCDs) to simultaneously acquire an X-ray fluorescence spectrum and a diffraction pattern providing a measurement of both elemental and mineralogical composition. The CCDs cover an angular range of 2θ = 6° to 73° enabling the analysis of a wide range of geologically important minerals including phyllosilicates, feldspars, oxides, carbonates and evaporites. The identification of hydrous minerals may help identify past Martian hydrothermal systems capable of preserving traces of life. Here we present some initial findings from XRF and XRD tests carried out at the University of Leicester using an Fe-55 source and X-ray sensitive CCD. The XRF/XRD test system consists of a single CCD on a motorised arm, an Fe-55 X-ray source, a collimator and a sample table which approximately replicate the reflection geometry of the Mars-XRD instrument. It was used to test geological reference standard materials and Martian analogues. This work was funded by the Science and Technology Facilities Council, UK. References [1] Marinangeli, L., Hutchinson, I

  14. First combined total reflection X-ray fluorescence and grazing incidence X-ray absorption spectroscopy characterization of aeolian dust archived in Antarctica and Alpine deep ice cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cibin, G. [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxon OX110DE (United Kingdom); IMONT/EIM, Ente Italiano della Montagna, P.za dei Caprettari 70, 00176 Roma (Italy); Universita' degli Studi di Roma Tre, Dipartimento di Scienze Geologiche, L.go S. Leonardo Murialdo 1, 00146 Roma (Italy)], E-mail: giannantonio.cibin@diamond.ac.uk; Marcelli, A. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, P.O. Box 13, 00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Maggi, V. [Universita degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Dipartimento di Scienze dell' Ambiente e del Territorio, Piazza della Scienza 1, 20126 Milano (Italy); Sala, M. [Universita degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Dipartimento di Scienze dell' Ambiente e del Territorio, Piazza della Scienza 1, 20126 Milano (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra ' A. Desio' , Sez. Mineralogia, Via Mangiagalli 34, 20133 Milano (Italy); Marino, F.; Delmonte, B. [Universita degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Dipartimento di Scienze dell' Ambiente e del Territorio, Piazza della Scienza 1, 20126 Milano (Italy); Albani, S. [Universita degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Dipartimento di Scienze dell' Ambiente e del Territorio, Piazza della Scienza 1, 20126 Milano (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Siena, Dottorato in Scienze Polari, via Laterina 8, 53100 Siena (Italy); Pignotti, S. [IMONT/EIM, Ente Italiano della Montagna, P.za dei Caprettari 70, 00176 Roma (Italy)

    2008-12-15

    Aeolian mineral dust archived in polar and mid latitude ice cores represents a precious proxy for assessing environmental and climatic variations at different timescales. In this respect, the identification of dust mineralogy plays a key role. In this work we performed the first preliminary X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) experiments on mineral dust particles extracted from Antarctic and from Alpine firn cores using grazing incidence geometry at the Fe K-edge. A dedicated high vacuum experimental chamber was set up for normal-incidence and total-reflection X-Ray Fluorescence and Absorption Spectroscopy analyses on minor amounts of mineral materials at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Results show that this experimental technique and protocol allows recognizing iron inclusion mineral fraction on insoluble dust in the 1-10 {mu}g range.

  15. Characterization of the Carancas-Puno meteorite by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffractometry and transmission Moessbauer spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceron Loayza, Maria L., E-mail: malucelo@hotmail.com; Bravo Cabrejos, Jorge A. [Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Laboratorio de Analisis de Suelos, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas (Peru)

    2011-11-15

    We report the results of the study of a meteorite that impacted an inhabited zone on 15 September 2007 in the neighborhood of the town of Carancas, Puno Region, about 1,300 km south of Lima. The analysis carried out by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffractometry and transmission Moessbauer spectroscopy (at room temperature and at 4.2 K), reveal the presence in the meteorite sample of magnetic sites assigned to taenite (Fe,Ni) and troilite (Fe,S) phases, and of two paramagnetic doublets assigned to Fe{sup 2 + }, one associated with olivine and the other to pyroxene. In accord with these results, this meteorite is classified as a type IV chondrite meteorite.

  16. A new detector system for low energy X-ray fluorescence coupled with soft X-ray microscopy: First tests and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianoncelli, Alessandra; Bufon, Jernej; Ahangarianabhari, Mahdi; Altissimo, Matteo; Bellutti, Pierluigi; Bertuccio, Giuseppe; Borghes, Roberto; Carrato, Sergio; Cautero, Giuseppe; Fabiani, Sergio; Giacomini, Gabriele; Giuressi, Dario; Kourousias, George; Menk, Ralf Hendrik; Picciotto, Antonino; Piemonte, Claudio; Rachevski, Alexandre; Rashevskaya, Irina; Stolfa, Andrea; Vacchi, Andrea; Zampa, Gianluigi; Zampa, Nicola; Zorzi, Nicola

    2016-04-01

    The last decades have witnessed substantial efforts in the development of several detector technologies for X-ray fluorescence (XRF) applications. In spite of the increasing trend towards performing, cost-effective and reliable XRF systems, detectors for soft X-ray spectroscopy still remain a challenge, requiring further study, engineering and customization in order to yield effective and efficient systems. In this paper we report on the development, first characterization and tests of a novel multielement detector system based on low leakage current silicon drift detectors (SDD) coupled to ultra low noise custom CMOS preamplifiers for synchrotron-based low energy XRF. This new system exhibits the potential for improving the count rate by at least an order of magnitude resulting in ten-fold shorter dwell time at an energy resolution similar to that of single element silicon drift detectors.

  17. First combined total reflection X-ray fluorescence and grazing incidence X-ray absorption spectroscopy characterization of aeolian dust archived in Antarctica and Alpine deep ice cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aeolian mineral dust archived in polar and mid latitude ice cores represents a precious proxy for assessing environmental and climatic variations at different timescales. In this respect, the identification of dust mineralogy plays a key role. In this work we performed the first preliminary X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) experiments on mineral dust particles extracted from Antarctic and from Alpine firn cores using grazing incidence geometry at the Fe K-edge. A dedicated high vacuum experimental chamber was set up for normal-incidence and total-reflection X-Ray Fluorescence and Absorption Spectroscopy analyses on minor amounts of mineral materials at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Results show that this experimental technique and protocol allows recognizing iron inclusion mineral fraction on insoluble dust in the 1-10 μg range

  18. Combined phase and X-Ray fluorescence imaging at the sub-cellular level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work presents some recent developments in the field of hard X-ray imaging applied to biomedical research. As the discipline is evolving quickly, new questions appear and the list of needs becomes bigger. Some of them are dealt with in this manuscript. It has been shown that the ID22NI beamline of the ESRF can serve as a proper experimental setup to investigate diverse aspects of cellular research. Together with its high spatial resolution, high flux and high energy range the experimental setup provides bigger field of view, is less sensitive to radiation damages (while taking phase contrast images) and suits well chemical analysis with emphasis on endogenous metals (Zn, Fe, Mn) but also with a possibility for exogenous one's like these found in nanoparticles (Au, Pt, Ag) study. Two synchrotron-based imaging techniques, fluorescence and phase contrast imaging were used in this research project. They were correlated with each other on a number of biological cases, from bacteria E.coli to various cells (HEK 293, PC12, MRC5VA, red blood cells). The explorations made in the chapter 5 allowed preparation of more established and detailed analysis, described in the next chapter where both techniques, X-ray fluorescence and phase contrast imaging, were exploited in order to access absolute metal projected mass fraction in a whole cell. The final image presents for the first time true quantitative information at the sub-cellular level, not biased by the cell thickness. Thus for the first time a fluorescence map serves as a complete quantitative image of a cell without any risk of misinterpretation. Once both maps are divided by each other pixel by pixel (fluorescence map divided by the phase map) they present a complete and final result of the metal (Zn in this work) projected mass fraction in ppm of dry weight. For the purpose of this calculation the analysis was extended to calibration (non-biological) samples. Polystyrene spheres of a known diameter and known

  19. A scenario of the formation of isolated X-ray pulsars with anomalously long period

    CERN Document Server

    Ikhsanov, N R; Beskrovnaya, N G

    2014-01-01

    A scenario of the formation of isolated X-ray pulsars is discussed with an application to one of the best studied objects of this class 1E 161348-5055. This moderately luminous, 10^33 - 10^35 erg/s, pulsar with a relatively soft spectrum, kT ~ 0.6-0.8 keV, is associated with an isolated neutron star, which is located near the center of the young (~2000 yr) compact supernova remnant RCW 103 and rotates steadily (|d\

  20. Analysis of mineral water from Brazil using total reflection X-ray fluorescence by synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The total reflection X-ray fluorescence using synchrotron radiation (SRTXRF) has become a competitive technique for the determination of trace elements in samples that the concentrations are lower than 100 ng ml-1. In this work, thirty-seven mineral waters commonly available in supermarkets of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, were analyzed by SRTXRF. The measurements were performed at the X-Ray Fluorescence Beamline at Brazilian National Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS), in Campinas, Sao Paulo, using a polychromatic beam with maximum energy of 20 keV for the excitation. Standard solutions with gallium as internal standard were prepared for calibration of the system. Mineral water samples of 10 μl were added to Perspex sample carrier, dried under infrared lamp and analyzed for 200 s measuring time. It was possible to determine the concentrations of the following elements: Si, S, K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ge, Rb, Sr, Ba and Pb. The elemental concentration values were compared with the limits established by the Brazilian legislation

  1. Mapping Metal Elements of Shuangbai Dinosaur Fossil by Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence Microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y.; Qun, Y; Ablett, J

    2008-01-01

    The metal elements mapping of Shuangbai dinosaur fossil, was obtained by synchrotron x-ray fluorescence (SXRF). Eight elements, Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, As, Y and Sr were determined. Elements As and Y were detected for the first time in the dinosaur fossil. The data indicated that metal elements are asymmetrical on fossil section. This is different from common minerals. Mapping metals showed that metal element As is few. The dinosaur most likely belongs to natural death. This is different from Zigong dinosaurs which were found dead from poisoning. This method has been used to find that metals Fe and Mn are accrete, and the same is true for Sr and Y. This study indicated that colloid granule Fe and Mn, as well as Sr and Y had opposite electric charges in lithification process of fossils. By this analysis, compound forms can be ascertained. Synchrotron light source x-ray fluorescence is a complementary method that shows mapping of metal elements at the dinosaur fossil, and is rapid, exact and intuitionist. This study shows that dinosaur fossil mineral imaging has a potential in reconstructing the paleoenvironment and ancient geology.

  2. Heavy metals analysis in fishes by the X-ray fluorescence method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the sources of contamination in human beings we find ingestion of heavy metals. As it is common practice to pour industrial wastes in waters where fishes feed, some toxic elements present in water may pass to human beings through ingestion. It is therefore important to determine the concentrations of heavy metals present in fishes, mainly in those living in waters close to industrial zones or villages. Concentrations of heavy metals in tissue of fishes amount to ppm, hence making necessary the use of very sensitive analytical techniques which do not require a too complex preparation of the sample in order to avoid the loss or contamination of interesting elements of analysis while handling them, thus falsifying the results. The X-Ray Fluorescence method covers these requirements and is not destructive nor multi-elemental. The development of the technique of element analysis in fishes by X-Ray Fluorescence comprised several aspects. from sampling and storage to quantification, specially stressing the preparation of samples. The work was carried out with a Si-Li detector/monitor for solid state and associated electronic equipment. Cd-109 and Pu-238 sources were used to produce excitation, detection limits near 1 ppm were obtained in the majority of elements the technique attained for the analysis of this kind of samples fulfills the celerity, precision, accuracy, and sensitivity requirements. (author)

  3. Spectral Interferences Manganese (Mn) - Europium (Eu) Lines in X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanc, Beril; Kaya, Mustafa; Gumus, Lokman; Kumral, Mustafa

    2016-04-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry is widely used for quantitative and semi quantitative analysis of many major, minor and trace elements in geological samples. Some advantages of the XRF method are; non-destructive sample preparation, applicability for powder, solid, paste and liquid samples and simple spectrum that are independent from chemical state. On the other hand, there are some disadvantages of the XRF methods such as poor sensitivity for low atomic number elements, matrix effect (physical matrix effects, such as fine versus course grain materials, may impact XRF performance) and interference effect (the spectral lines of elements may overlap distorting results for one or more elements). Especially, spectral interferences are very significant factors for accurate results. In this study, semi-quantitative analyzed manganese (II) oxide (MnO, 99.99%) was examined. Samples were pelleted and analyzed with XRF spectrometry (Bruker S8 Tiger). Unexpected peaks were obtained at the side of the major Mn peaks. Although sample does not contain Eu element, in results 0,3% Eu2O3 was observed. These result can occur high concentration of MnO and proximity of Mn and Eu lines. It can be eliminated by using correction equation or Mn concentration can confirm with other methods (such as Atomic absorption spectroscopy). Keywords: Spectral Interferences; Manganese (Mn); Europium (Eu); X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry Spectrum.

  4. Analytical approaches for determination of bromine in sediment core samples by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashkova, Galina V; Aisueva, Tatyana S; Finkelshtein, Alexander L; Ivanov, Egor V; Shchetnikov, Alexander A

    2016-11-01

    Bromine has been recognized as a valuable indicator for paleoclimatic studies. Wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WDXRF) and total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) methods were applied to study the bromine distributions in lake sediment cores. Conventional WDXRF technique usually requires relatively large mass of a sediment sample and a set of calibration samples. Some analytical approaches were developed to apply WDXRF to small sediment core samples in the absence of adequate calibration samples with a known Br content. The mass of a sample to be analyzed was reduced up to 200-300mg and the internal standard method with correction using fundamental parameters was developed for Br quantification. TXRF technique based on the direct analysis of a solid suspension using 20mg of sediment sample by internal standard method was additionally tested. The accuracy of the WDXRF and TXRF techniques was assessed by the comparative analysis of reference materials of sediments, soil and biological samples. In general, good agreement was achieved between the reference values and the measured values. The detection limits of Br were 1mg/kg and 0.4mg/kg for WDXRF and TXRF respectively. The results of the Br determination obtained with different XRF techniques were comparable to each other and used for paleoclimatic reconstructions. PMID:27591627

  5. Determination of selenium in biological samples with an energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoli; Yu, Zhaoshui

    2016-05-01

    Selenium is both a nutrient and a toxin. Selenium-especially organic selenium-is a core component of human nutrition. Thus, it is very important to measure selenium in biological samples. The limited sensitivity of conventional XRF hampers its widespread use in biological samples. Here, we describe the use of high-energy (100kV, 600W) linearly polarized beam energy-dispersive X-Ray fluorescence spectroscopy (EDXRF) in tandem with a three-dimensional optics design to determine 0.1-5.1μgg(-1) levels of selenium in biological samples. The effects of various experimental parameters such as applied voltage, acquisition time, secondary target and various filters were thoroughly investigated. The detection limit of selenium in biological samples via high-energy (100kV, 600W) linearly polarized beam energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy was decreased by one order of magnitude versus conventional XRF (Paltridge et al., 2012) and found to be 0.1μg/g. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to describe EDXRF measurements of Se in biological samples with important implications for the nutrition and analytical chemistry communities. PMID:26922394

  6. Applications of X-ray fluorescence holography to determine local lattice distortions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Kouichi, E-mail: khayashi@imr.tohoku.ac.jp [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Happo, Naohisa [Graduate School of Information Sciences, Hiroshima City University, Hiroshima 731-3194 (Japan); Hosokawa, Shinya [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • We summarized topics of X-ray fluorescence holography focused on the local lattice distortions. • We found details of behaviors of nearest neighbor atoms around dopants. • We found the average distributions of the atoms at the individual sites in mixed crystals. • Distorted and undistorted sires sometimes coexist in a same mixed crystal. - Abstract: X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) is a method for investigating atomic order up to the medium ranges, and can provide 3D atomic images around specific elements within a radius of nm order. In addition to these characteristics, XFH is sensitive to positional fluctuations of atoms, and therefore it is useful for characterizing the local lattice distortions around specific elements. We have applied XFH to dopants and mixed crystals. We found interesting features in local lattice distortions, such as the displacements of first-neighbor atoms around dopants, far-sighted views of the atomistic fluctuations in mixed crystals, and the coexistence of distorted/undistorted sites in the same material.

  7. Bromine and bromide content in soils: Analytical approach from total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardo, Helena; Queralt, Ignasi; Tapias, Josefina; Candela, Lucila; Margui, Eva

    2016-08-01

    Monitoring total bromine and bromide concentrations in soils is significant in many environmental studies. Thus fast analytical methodologies that entail simple sample preparation and low-cost analyses are desired. In the present work, the possibilities and drawbacks of low-power total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (TXRF) for the determination of total bromine and bromide contents in soils were evaluated. The direct analysis of a solid suspension using 20 mg of fine ground soil (soils (Br content range in soils = 5-40 mg kg(-1)). Information about bromide determination in soils is also possible by analyzing the Br content in water soil extracts. In this case, the TXRF analysis can be directly performed by depositing 10 μL of the internal standardized soil extract sample on a quartz glass reflector in a measuring time of 1500 s. The bromide limit of detection by this approach was 10 μg L(-1). Good agreement was obtained between the TXRF results for the total bromine and bromide determinations in soils and those obtained by other popular analytical techniques, e.g. energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (total bromine) and ionic chromatography (bromide). As a study case, the TXRF method was applied to study bromine accumulation in two agricultural soils fumigated with a methyl bromide pesticide and irrigated with regenerated waste water. PMID:27179429

  8. Screening heavy metals levels in hair of sanitation workers by X-ray fluorescence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Md Khudzari, Jauharah; Wagiran, Husin; Hossain, I; Ibrahim, Noorddin

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a study of human hair as a bio-indicator for detection of heavy metals as part of environmental health surveillance programs project to develop a subject of interest in the biomedical and environmental sciences. A total of 34 hair samples were analyzed that consisting of 29 samples from sanitation workers and five samples from students. The hair samples were prepared and treated in accordance to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) recommendations. The concentrations of heavy metals were analyzed using the energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) technique by X-50 Mobile X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) at Oceanography Institute, Universiti Malaysia Terengganu. The performance of EDXRF analyzer was tested by Standard Reference Material (SRM 2711) Montana Soil which was in good agreement with certified value within 14% deviations except for Hg. While seven heavy metals: Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Se, and Sb were detected in both groups, three additional elements, i.e. As, Hg and Pb, were detected only in sanitation workers group. For sanitation workers group, the mean concentration of six elements, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Se, and Sb, shows elevated concentration as compared to the control samples concentration. Results from both groups were compared and discussed in relation to their respective heavy metals concentrations. PMID:22846873

  9. Elemental concentration analysis in prostate tissues using total reflection X-ray fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitão, R. G.; Palumbo, A.; Souza, P. A. V. R.; Pereira, G. R.; Canellas, C. G. L.; Anjos, M. J.; Nasciutti, L. E.; Lopes, R. T.

    2014-02-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) currently represents the second most prevalent malignant neoplasia in men, representing 21% of all cancer cases. Benign Prostate Hyperplasia (BPH) is an illness prevailing in men above the age of 50, close to 90% after the age of 80. The prostate presents a high zinc concentration, about 10-fold higher than any other body tissue. In this work, samples of human prostate tissues with cancer, BPH and normal tissue were analyzed utilizing total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation technique (SR-TXRF) to investigate the differences in the elemental concentrations in these tissues. SR-TXRF analyses were performed at the X-ray fluorescence beamline at Brazilian National Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS), in Campinas, São Paulo. It was possible to determine the concentrations of the following elements: P, S, K, Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn and Rb. By using Mann-Whitney U test it was observed that almost all elements presented concentrations with significant differences (α=0.05) between the groups studied.

  10. X-ray fluorescence and absorption analysis of krypton in irradiated nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degueldre, Claude; Mieszczynski, Cyprian; Borca, Camelia; Grolimund, Daniel; Martin, Matthias; Bertsch, Johannes

    2014-10-01

    The analysis of krypton in irradiated uranium dioxide fuel has been successfully achieved by X-ray fluorescence and X-ray absorption. The present study focuses on the analytical challenge of sample and sub-sample production to perform the analysis with the restricted conditions dictated by the radioprotection regulations. It deals also with all potential interferences that could affect the quality of the measurement in fluorescence as well as in absorption mode. The impacts of all dissolved gases in the fuel matrix are accounted for the analytical result quantification. The krypton atomic environment is ruled by the presence of xenon. Other gases such as residual argon and traces of helium or hydrogen are negligible. The results are given in term of density for krypton (∼3 nm-3) and xenon (∼20 nm-3). The presence of dissolved, interstitial and nano-phases are discussed together with other analytical techniques that could be applied to gain information on fission gas behaviour in nuclear fuels.

  11. The determination, by x-ray-fluorescence spectrometry, of gold and uranium on resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problems encountered in the determination of gold and uranium that are present simultaneously in a sample of resin were considered, and new background positions, as well as correction factors for background lift and partial spectral overlap, were determined for use in the X-ray-fluorescence measurement of these elements. The agreement between the results obtained by the use of the X-ray-fluorescence method and those obtained by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry were found to be satisfactory. The relative standard deviation in the former measurements is 0,005 at a concentration of 1000 p.p.m., and the working range of the calibrations is 15 to 1000 p.p.m. These limits can be extended by further dilution of the sample. The limits of determination are 6 p.p.m. in the briquette prepared from a sample of resin and 18 p.p.m. in the sample when the maximum mass of the sample is 3 g. The procedure is intended primarily for use in the rapid determination of gold and uranium when no analyses for other elements are required. The time taken for the analysis is 2 hours for 10 samples when 6 standards are used. A computer programme that was developed for the processing of the data is appended as part of a laboratory method

  12. [Application of the racial algorithm in energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence overlapped spectrum analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Guo-Qiang; Luo, Yao-Yao; Ge, Liang-Quan; Zhang, Qing-Xian; Gu, Yi; Cheng, Feng

    2014-02-01

    In the energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrum analysis, scintillation detector such as NaI (Tl) detector usually has a low energy resolution at around 8%. The low energy resolution causes problems in spectral data analysis especially in the high background and low counts condition, it is very limited to strip the overlapped spectrum, and the more overlapping the peaks are, the more difficult to peel the peaks, and the qualitative and quantitative analysis can't be carried out because we can't recognize the peak address and peak area. Based on genetic algorithm and immune algorithm, we build a new racial algorithm which uses the Euclidean distance as the judgment of evolution, the maximum relative error as the iterative criterion to be put into overlapped spectrum analysis, then we use the Gaussian function to simulate different overlapping degrees of the spectrum, and the racial algorithm is used in overlapped peak separation and full spectrum simulation, the peak address deviation is in +/- 3 channels, the peak area deviation is no more than 5%, and it is proven that this method has a good effect in energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence overlapped spectrum analysis.

  13. Direct analysis of biological samples by total reflection X-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lue M, Marco P. [Unidad de Analisis Instrumental, Departamento de Quimica y Suelos, Decanato de Agronomia, Universidad Centro-occidental Lisandro Alvarado, Apartado Postal 4076, Cabudare 3023 (Venezuela)]. E-mail: luemerumarco@yahoo.es; Hernandez-Caraballo, Edwin A. [Instituto Venezolano-Andino para la Investigacion Quimica (IVAIQUIM), Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de los Andes, Merida 5101 (Venezuela)

    2004-08-31

    The technique of total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) is well suited for the direct analysis of biological samples due to the low matrix interferences and simultaneous multi-element nature. Nevertheless, biological organic samples are frequently analysed after digestion procedures. The direct determination of analytes requires shorter analysis time, low reactive consumption and simplifies the whole analysis process. On the other hand, the biological/clinical samples are often available in minimal amounts and routine studies require the analysis of large number of samples. To overcome the difficulties associated with the analysis of organic samples, particularly of solid ones, different procedures of sample preparation and calibration to approach the direct analysis have been evaluated: (1) slurry sampling, (2) Compton peak standardization, (3) in situ microwave digestion, (4) in situ chemical modification and (5) direct analysis with internal standardization. Examples of analytical methods developed by our research group are discussed. Some of them have not been previously published, illustrating alternative strategies for coping with various problems that may be encountered in the direct analysis by total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry.

  14. Synchrotron x-ray sources and new opportunities in the soil and environmental sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains the following papers: characteristics of the advanced photon source and comparison with existing synchrotron facilities; x-ray absorption spectroscopy: EXAFS and XANES -- A versatile tool to study the atomic and electronic structure of materials; applications of x-ray spectroscopy and anomalous scattering experiments in the soil and environmental sciences; X-ray fluorescence microprobe and microtomography

  15. Synchrotron x-ray sources and new opportunities in the soil and environmental sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulze, D. (Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN (USA)); Anderson, S. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (USA)); Mattigod, S. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

    1990-07-01

    This report contains the following papers: characteristics of the advanced photon source and comparison with existing synchrotron facilities; x-ray absorption spectroscopy: EXAFS and XANES -- A versatile tool to study the atomic and electronic structure of materials; applications of x-ray spectroscopy and anomalous scattering experiments in the soil and environmental sciences; X-ray fluorescence microprobe and microtomography.

  16. Combined evaluation of grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence and X-ray reflectivity data for improved profiling of ultra-shallow depth distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingerle, D; Meirer, F; Pepponi, G; Demenev, E; Giubertoni, D; Wobrauschek, P; Streli, C

    2014-09-01

    The continuous downscaling of the process size for semiconductor devices pushes the junction depths and consequentially the implantation depths to the top few nanometers of the Si substrate. This motivates the need for sensitive methods capable of analyzing dopant distribution, total dose and possible impurities. X-ray techniques utilizing the external reflection of X-rays are very surface sensitive, hence providing a non-destructive tool for process analysis and control. X-ray reflectometry (XRR) is an established technique for the characterization of single- and multi-layered thin film structures with layer thicknesses in the nanometer range. XRR spectra are acquired by varying the incident angle in the grazing incidence regime while measuring the specular reflected X-ray beam. The shape of the resulting angle-dependent curve is correlated to changes of the electron density in the sample, but does not provide direct information on the presence or distribution of chemical elements in the sample. Grazing Incidence XRF (GIXRF) measures the X-ray fluorescence induced by an X-ray beam incident under grazing angles. The resulting angle dependent intensity curves are correlated to the depth distribution and mass density of the elements in the sample. GIXRF provides information on contaminations, total implanted dose and to some extent on the depth of the dopant distribution, but is ambiguous with regard to the exact distribution function. Both techniques use similar measurement procedures and data evaluation strategies, i.e. optimization of a sample model by fitting measured and calculated angle curves. Moreover, the applied sample models can be derived from the same physical properties, like atomic scattering/form factors and elemental concentrations; a simultaneous analysis is therefore a straightforward approach. This combined analysis in turn reduces the uncertainties of the individual techniques, allowing a determination of dose and depth profile of the implanted

  17. Diffraction enhanced imaging and x-ray fluorescence microtomography for analyzing biological samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, H.S.; Pereira, G.R.; Lopes, R.T. [Laboratorio de Instrumentacao Nuclear-COPPE/UFRJ-RJ (Brazil); Anjos, M.J. [Instituto de Fisica-UERJ-RJ (Brazil); Faria, P. [Instituto Nacional do Cancer-INCa-RJ (Brazil); Kellermann, G.; Perez, C.A. [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron-Campinas-SP (Brazil); Tirao, G. [Faculdad de Mat. Astronomia y Fisica (FAMAF), UNC. Cordoba (Argentina); Mazzaro, I. [Laboratorio de Optica de Raios X e Instrumentacao-UFPR-Curitiba-PR (Brazil); Giles, C. [Laboratorio de Cristalografia Aplicada e Raios X-UNICAMP-Campinas-SP (Brazil)

    2007-07-15

    In this work, breast tissue samples were investigated in order to verify the distribution of certain elements by x-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XRFCT) correlated with the characteristics and pathology of each tissue observed by diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI). The DEI system can show details in low attenuation tissues. It is based on the contrast imaging obtained by extinction, diffraction and refraction characteristics and can improve reduction in false positive and false negative diagnoses. XRFCT allows mapping of all elements within the sample, since even a minute fluorescence signal can be detected. DEI imaging techniques revealed the complex structure of the disease, confirmed by the histological section, and showed microstructures in all planes of the sample. The XRFCT showed the distribution of Zn, Cu and Fe at higher concentration. (authors)

  18. Analysis of stainless steel samples by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M K Tiwari; A K Singh; K J S Sawhney

    2001-12-01

    A simple method for the analysis of stainless steel samples is presented which is based on radioisotope excited energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometry and does not require any type-standards. Both absorption and enhancement effects have been taken into account in the fundamental parameter method for quantitative analysis and an iterative approach is followed for calculation of concentrations in steel samples. Non-linear least square fitting (NL-LSF) procedures have been used to determine accurately the fluorescent peak intensities. The method has been tested by analysing several CRM standard reference samples and 304 and 316 steel samples assuming as unknown. The EDXRF results have also been compared with the results of analysis of same samples by vacuum emission spark spectrometry (VES). Obtained values for concentration in steel samples match quite well with their certified values.

  19. Promising X-ray fluorescent tests for superconducting tunnel junction detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrich, Stephan; Robinson, Art

    2001-01-11

    Scientists in the Physical Biosciences Division of the Ernest Orlando Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) studying transition metals in proteins with fluorescence-detected L-edge absorption spectroscopy have found the measurements to be extremely challenging. The difficulty is that the metal centers are present in very dilute concentrations so that their weak fluorescence is often obscured by strong background signals from carbon and oxygen. To solve this problem, the Berkeley group has been working with researchers from the Advanced Detector Group at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory on an energy-dispersive superconducting tunnel junction x-ray detector. These devices in principle have the energy resolution needed to reveal the metal signal. The most recent results with the latest version of the detector on Beamline 4.0.1-2 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) illustrate the promise of the cryogenic detector strategy not only for this application but also for spectroscopy of other types of dilute samples.

  20. Medieval glass from the Cathedral in Paderborn: a comparative study using X-ray absorption spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence, and inductively coupled laser ablation mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hormes, J. [University of Saskatchewan, Canadian Light Source Inc., Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Louisiana State University, CAMD, Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Roy, A.; Bovenkamp, G.L. [Louisiana State University, CAMD, Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Simon, K. [University of Goettingen, Geochemistry, Centre for Geosciences, Goettingen (Germany); Kim, C.Y. [University of Saskatchewan, Canadian Light Source Inc., Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Boerste, N. [Faculty for Theology Paderborn, Paderborn (Germany); Gai, S. [LWL - Archaeologie fuer Westfalen, Muenster (Germany)

    2013-04-15

    We have investigated four stained glass samples recovered from an archaeological excavation at the Cathedral in Paderborn (Germany) between 1978 and 1980. On two of the samples there are parts of paintings. Concentrations of major elements were determined using two independent techniques: LA-ICP-MS (a UV laser ablation microsampler combined with an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer) and synchrotron radiation X-ray excited X-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF). The SR-XRF data were quantified by using the program package PyMCA developed by the software group of the ESRF in Grenoble. Significant differences were found between the concentrations determined by the two techniques that can be explained by concentration gradients near the surface of the glasses caused, for example, by corrosion/leaching processes and the different surface sensitivities of the applied techniques. For several of the elements that were detected in the glass and in the colour pigments used for the paintings X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra were recorded in order to determine the chemical speciation of the elements of interest. As was expected, most elements in the glass were found as oxides in their most stable form. Two notable exceptions were observed: titanium was not found as rutile - the most stable form of TiO{sub 2} - but in the form of anatase, and lead was not found in one defined chemical state but as a complex mixture of oxide, sulphate, and other compounds. (orig.)

  1. Medieval glass from the Cathedral in Paderborn: a comparative study using X-ray absorption spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence, and inductively coupled laser ablation mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated four stained glass samples recovered from an archaeological excavation at the Cathedral in Paderborn (Germany) between 1978 and 1980. On two of the samples there are parts of paintings. Concentrations of major elements were determined using two independent techniques: LA-ICP-MS (a UV laser ablation microsampler combined with an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer) and synchrotron radiation X-ray excited X-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF). The SR-XRF data were quantified by using the program package PyMCA developed by the software group of the ESRF in Grenoble. Significant differences were found between the concentrations determined by the two techniques that can be explained by concentration gradients near the surface of the glasses caused, for example, by corrosion/leaching processes and the different surface sensitivities of the applied techniques. For several of the elements that were detected in the glass and in the colour pigments used for the paintings X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra were recorded in order to determine the chemical speciation of the elements of interest. As was expected, most elements in the glass were found as oxides in their most stable form. Two notable exceptions were observed: titanium was not found as rutile - the most stable form of TiO2 - but in the form of anatase, and lead was not found in one defined chemical state but as a complex mixture of oxide, sulphate, and other compounds. (orig.)

  2. Comparison of the data of X-ray microtomography and fluorescence analysis in the study of bone-tissue structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadchikov, V. E.; Senin, R. A.; Blagov, A. E.; Buzmakov, A. V.; Gulimova, V. I.; Zolotov, D. A.; Orekhov, A. S.; Osadchaya, A. S.; Podurets, K. M.; Savel'ev, S. V.; Seregin, A. Yu.; Tereshchenko, E. Yu.; Chukalina, M. V.; Kovalchuk, M. V.

    2012-09-01

    The possibility of localizing clusters of heavy atoms is substantiated by comparing the data of X-ray microtomography at different wavelengths, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray fluorescence analysis. The proximal tail vertebrae of Turner's thick-toed gecko ( Chondrodactylus turneri) have been investigated for the first time by both histological and physical methods, including X-ray microtomography at different wavelengths and elemental analysis. This complex methodology of study made it possible to reveal the regions of accumulation of heavy elements in the aforementioned bones of Turner's thick-toed gecko.

  3. L-shell x-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XFCT) imaging of Cisplatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XFCT) imaging has been focused on the detection of K-shell x-rays. The potential utility of L-shell x-ray XFCT is, however, not well studied. Here we report the first Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of preclinical L-shell XFCT imaging of Cisplatin. We built MC models for both L- and K-shell XFCT with different excitation energies (15 and 30 keV for L-shell and 80 keV for K-shell XFCT). Two small-animal sized imaging phantoms of 2 and 4 cm diameter containing a series of objects of 0.6 to 2.7 mm in diameter at 0.7 to 16 mm depths with 10 to 250 µg mL−1 concentrations of Pt are used in the study. Transmitted and scattered x-rays were collected with photon-integrating transmission detector and photon-counting detector arc, respectively. Collected data were rearranged into XFCT and transmission CT sinograms for image reconstruction. XFCT images were reconstructed with filtered back-projection and with iterative maximum-likelihood expectation maximization without and with attenuation correction. While K-shell XFCT was capable of providing an accurate measurement of Cisplatin concentration, its sensitivity was 4.4 and 3.0 times lower than that of L-shell XFCT with 15 keV excitation beam for the 2 cm and 4 cm diameter phantom, respectively. With the inclusion of excitation and fluorescence beam attenuation correction, we found that L-shell XFCT was capable of providing fairly accurate information of Cisplatin concentration distribution. With a dose of 29 and 58 mGy, clinically relevant Cisplatin Pt concentrations of 10 µg mg−1 could be imaged with L-shell XFCT inside a 2 cm and 4 cm diameter object, respectively. (paper)

  4. X-ray fluorescence study of organic-inorganic polymer conversion into ceramics induced by ion irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Kurmaev, E. Z.; Moewes, A.; Krietemeyer, M.; Endo, K; Ida, Tomonori; Shimada, S.

    1999-01-01

    Changes to the local and electronic structures of phenyltriethoxysilane ~PTES! films when irradiated at room temperature with gold ion concentrations of 531014 to 2.531015 cm22 and with carbon ion concentrations of 531015 cm22 were studied using x-ray emission and photoelectron spectroscopies. The fluorescent ultrasoft silicon LII,III and carbon Ka x-ray emission spectra of unirradiated and irradiated PTES films were measured at the Advanced Light Source, and the Center for Advanc...

  5. L2,3 subshell X-ray fluorescence yields and Coster-Kronig transition probabilities of Nd and Yb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray spectra emitted in the radioactive decay of 17.7y 145Pm and 1.9y 171Tm were studied using a three-parameter technique for XX.t coincidence measurements. The following L2 and L3 subshell X-ray fluorescence yields, ω2, ω3, Coster-Kronig transition probabilities, f23, and radiative decay branching ratios, s2, s3, were determined for Nd (Z=60) and Yb (Z=70). (orig./WL)

  6. Long-Term RXTE Monitoring of the Anomalous X-ray Pulsar 1E 1048.1-5937

    CERN Document Server

    Kaspi, V M; Chakraborty, D; Lackey, J R; Muno, M P; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Gavriil, Fotis P.; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Lackey, Jessica R.; Muno, Michael P.

    2000-01-01

    We report on long-term monitoring of the anomalous X-ray pulsar (AXP) 1E 1048.1-5937 using the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). The timing behavior of this pulsar is different from that of other AXPs being monitored with RXTE. In particular, we show that the pulsar shows significant deviations from simple spin-down such that phase-coherent timing has not been possible over time spans longer than a few months. We find that the deviations from simple spin down are not consistent with single "glitch" type events, nor are they consistent with radiative precession. We show that in spite of the rotational irregularities, the pulsar exhibits neither pulse profile changes nor large pulsed flux variations. We discuss the implications of our results for AXP models. In the context of the magnetar model, we suggest that 1E 1048.1-5937 may be a transition object between the soft gamma-ray repeater and AXP populations, and the AXP most likely to one day undergo an outburst.

  7. 10 Years of RXTE Monitoring of Anomalous X-ray Pulsar 4U 0142+61: Long-Term Variability

    CERN Document Server

    Dib, R; Gavriil, F P; Dib, Rim; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Gavriil, Fotis P.

    2006-01-01

    We report on 10 yr of monitoring of the 8.7-s Anomalous X-ray Pulsar 4U 0142+61 using the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). This pulsar exhibited stable rotation from 2000 until February 2006: the RMS phase residual for a spin-down model which includes nu, nudot, and nuddot is 2.3%. We report a possible phase-coherent timing solution valid over a 10-yr span extending back to March 1996. A glitch may have occured between 1998 and 2000, but it is not required by the existing data. We also report that the source's pulse profile has been evolving in the past 6 years, such that the dip of emission between its two peaks has been getting shallower since 2000, almost as if the profile is recovering to its pre-2000 morphology, in which there was no clear distinction between the peaks. These profile variations are seen in the 2-4 keV band but not in 6-8 keV. Finally, we present the pulsed flux time series of the source in 2-10 keV. There is evidence of a slow but steady increase in the source's pulsed flux since 2000...

  8. A glitch and an anti-glitch in the anomalous X-ray pulsar 1E 1841-045

    CERN Document Server

    Mus, Sinem Sasmaz; Gogus, Ersin

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the long-term spin properties of the anomalous X-ray pulsar (AXP) 1E 1841-045 by performing a temporal analysis of archival RXTE observations spanning about 5.2 yr from 2006 September to 2011 December. We identified two peculiar timing anomalies within ~1 yr of each other: a glitch with Delta(nu)/nu ~ 4.8 x 10^{-6} near MJD 54303; and an anti-glitch with Delta(nu)/nu ~ -5.8 x 10^{-7} near MJD 54656. The glitch that we identified, which is the fourth glitch seen in this source in the 13 yr of RXTE monitoring, is similar to the last two detected glitches. The anti-glitch from 1E 1841-045, however, is the first to be identified. The amplitude of the anti-glitch was comparable with that recently observed in AXP 1E 2259+586. We found no significant variations in the pulsed X-ray output of the source during either the glitch or the anti-glitch. We discuss our results in relation to the standard pulsar glitch mechanisms for the glitch, and to plausible magnetospheric scenarios for the anti-glitch.

  9. Contribution of inner shell Compton ionization to the X-ray fluorescence line intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Jorge E.; Scot, Viviana; Di Giulio, Eugenio

    2016-10-01

    The Compton effect is a potential ionization mechanism of atoms. It produces vacancies in inner shells that are filled with the same mechanism of atomic relaxation as the one following photo-absorption. This contribution to X-ray fluorescence emission is frequently neglected because the total Compton cross-section is apparently much lower than the photoelectric one at useful X-ray energies. However, a more careful analysis suggests that is necessary to consider single shell cross sections (instead of total cross sections) as a function of energy. In this article these Compton cross sections are computed for the shells K, L1-L3 and M1-M5 in the framework of the impulse approximation. By comparing the Compton and the photoelectric cross-section for each shell it is then possible to determine the extent of the Compton correction to the intensity of the corresponding characteristic lines. It is shown that for the K shell the correction becomes relevant for excitation energies which are too high to be influent in X-ray spectrometry. In contrast, for L and M shells the Compton contribution is relevant for medium-Z elements and medium energies. To illustrate the different grades of relevance of the correction, for each ionized shell, the energies for which the Compton contribution reaches the extent levels of 1, 5, 10, 20, 50 and 100% of the photoelectric one are determined for all the elements with Z = 11-92. For practical applications it is provided a simple formula and fitting coefficients to compute average correction levels for the shells considered.

  10. Micro energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis of polychrome lead-glazed Portuguese faiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guilherme, A.; Pessanha, S. [Departamento de Fisica da Faculdade de Ciencias, Centro de Fisica Atomica da Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto, 2, 1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal); Carvalho, M.L., E-mail: luisa@cii.fc.ul.p [Departamento de Fisica da Faculdade de Ciencias, Centro de Fisica Atomica da Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto, 2, 1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal); Santos, J.M.F. dos [GIAN, Physics Department, Coimbra University, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); Coroado, J. [Instituto Politecnico Tomar, Dep. Arte Conservacao and Restauro, P-2300313 Tomar (Portugal)

    2010-04-15

    Several glazed ceramic pieces, originally produced in Coimbra (Portugal), were submitted to elemental analysis, having as premise the pigment manufacture production recognition. Although having been produced in Coimbra, their location changed as time passed due to historical reasons. A recent exhibition in Coimbra brought together a great number of these pieces and in situ micro Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (mu-EDXRF) analyses were performed in order to achieve some chemical and physical data on the manufacture of faiences in Coimbra. A non-commercial mu-EDXRF equipment for in situ analysis was employed in this work, carrying some important improvements when compared to the conventional ones, namely, analyzing spot sizes of about 100 mum diameter. The combination of a capillary X-ray lens with a new generation of low power microfocus X-ray tube and a drift chamber detector enabled a portable unit for micro-XRF with a few tens of mum lateral resolution. The advantages in using a portable system emphasized with polycapillary optics enabled to distinguish proximal different pigmented areas, as well as the glaze itself. These first scientific results on the pigment analysis of the collection of faiences seem to point to a unique production center with own techniques and raw materials. This conclusion arose with identification of the blue pigments having in its constitution Mn, Fe Co and As and the yellows as a result of the combination between Pb and Sb. A statistical treatment was used to reveal groups of similarities on the pigments elemental profile.

  11. Micro energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis of polychrome lead-glazed Portuguese faiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilherme, A.; Pessanha, S.; Carvalho, M. L.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Coroado, J.

    2010-04-01

    Several glazed ceramic pieces, originally produced in Coimbra (Portugal), were submitted to elemental analysis, having as premise the pigment manufacture production recognition. Although having been produced in Coimbra, their location changed as time passed due to historical reasons. A recent exhibition in Coimbra brought together a great number of these pieces and in situ micro Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (µ-EDXRF) analyses were performed in order to achieve some chemical and physical data on the manufacture of faiences in Coimbra. A non-commercial µ-EDXRF equipment for in situ analysis was employed in this work, carrying some important improvements when compared to the conventional ones, namely, analyzing spot sizes of about 100 µm diameter. The combination of a capillary X-ray lens with a new generation of low power microfocus X-ray tube and a drift chamber detector enabled a portable unit for micro-XRF with a few tens of µm lateral resolution. The advantages in using a portable system emphasized with polycapillary optics enabled to distinguish proximal different pigmented areas, as well as the glaze itself. These first scientific results on the pigment analysis of the collection of faiences seem to point to a unique production center with own techniques and raw materials. This conclusion arose with identification of the blue pigments having in its constitution Mn, Fe Co and As and the yellows as a result of the combination between Pb and Sb. A statistical treatment was used to reveal groups of similarities on the pigments elemental profile.

  12. In vivo elemental analysis in occupational medicine using X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technique for the in vivo determination of cadmium in the kidney cortex using X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF) has been developed for clinical use. The method uses the Cd K-alfa X-rays. The radiation from the tube was polarized by scattering at 90 degrees in a plastic disc. Using a Si(Li) detector the minimum detectable concentration (MDC) of cadmium in the renal cortex was about 6 ppm for an effective dose equivalent of 3 micro-Sievert. The precision of the method was estimated to be about 23 percent. The clinical usefulness was confirmed by studying 20 occupationally exposed cadmium workers and three controls. The cadmium workers showed levels of cadmium in the kidney in the range 47-317 ppm, and controls showed levels below 30 ppm. Using XRF in vivo large-scale measurements of lead in the fingerbone of more than 100 lead workers were performed. The technique used included two 57-Co sources for excitation and a higher-purity Ge detector for the analysis of the Pb K-alfa X-rays. The MDC was about 20 ppm for an effective dose equivalent of 0.1 micro-Sievert. The precision of the method was estimated to be about 15 per cent. The in vivo measurements showed levels of fingerbone-Pb up to 148 ppm. The existence of a significant endogenous exposure from lead in the skeleton was confirmed. The fingerbone-Pb was correlated to time-integrated blood-Pb indicating that it could be used as a rough estimated of time-integrated exposure. The results from the measurements were used to develop a three-compartment (cortical bone, trabecular bone, blood/soft tissues) model. Using this model, lead levels in fingerbone, vertebrae and blood could be predicted in good agreement with observations. (author)

  13. Americium characterization by X-ray fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy in plutonium uranium mixed oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plutonium uranium mixed oxide (MOX) fuels are currently used in nuclear reactors. The actinides in these fuels need to be analyzed after irradiation for assessing their behaviour with regard to their environment and the coolant. In this work the study of the atomic structure and next-neighbour environment of Am in the (Pu,U)O2 lattice in an irradiated (60 MW d kg−1) MOX sample was performed employing micro-X-ray fluorescence (µ-XRF) and micro-X-ray absorption fine structure (µ-XAFS) spectroscopy. The chemical bonds, valences and stoichiometry of Am (∼0.66 wt%) are determined from the experimental data gained for the irradiated fuel material examined in its peripheral zone (rim) of the fuel. In the irradiated sample Am builds up as Am3+ species within an [AmO8]13− coordination environment (e.g. >90%) and no (III XAFS spectra recorded for the irradiated MOX sub-sample in the rim zone for a 300 μm×300 μm beam size area investigated over six scans of 4 h. The records remain constant during multi-scan. The analysis of the XAFS signal shows that Am is found as trivalent in the UO2 matrix. This analytical work shall open the door of very challenging analysis (speciation of fission product and actinides) in irradiated nuclear fuels. - Highlights: • Americium was characterized by microX-ray absorption spectroscopy in irradiated MOX fuel. • The americium redox state as determined from XAS data of irradiated fuel material was Am(III). • In the sample, the Am3+ face an AmO813− coordination environment in the (Pu,U)O2 matrix. • The americium dioxide is reduced by the uranium dioxide matrix

  14. Resonant inelastic scattering in dilute magnetic semiconductors by x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawniczak-Jablonska, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)]|[Institute of Physics, Warsaw (Poland); Jia, J.J.; Underwood, J.H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    As modern, technologically important materials have become more complex, element specific techniques have become invaluable in studying the electronic structure of individual components from the system. Soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF) and absorption (SXA) spectroscopies provide a unique means of measuring element and angular momentum density of electron states, respectively, for the valence and conducting bands in complex materials. X-ray absorption and the decay through x-ray emission are generally assumed to be two independent one-photon processes. Recent studies, however have demonstrated that SXF excited near the absorption threshold generate an array of spectral features that depend on nature of materials, particularly on the localization of excited states in s and d-band solids and that these two processes can no be longer treated as independent. Resonant SXF offers thus the new way to study the dynamics of the distribution of electronic valence states in the presence of a hole which is bound to the electron low lying in the conduction band. This process can simulate the interaction between hole-electron pair in wide gap semiconductors. Therefore such studies can help in understanding of transport and optics phenomena in the wide gap semiconductors. The authors report the result of Mn and S L-resonant emission in Zn{sub 1{minus}x}Mn{sub x}S (with x=0.2 and 0.3) and MnS as the energy of exciting radiation is tuned across the Mn and S L{sub 3,2} absorption edge, along with the resonant excited spectra from elemental Mn as a reference.

  15. Quantification of metals in lipstick by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The objective of this work is to analyze lipstick and lip balm by Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence and verify if the concentration of the found elements are in accordance with federal rules. Two lip balm and 30 lipstick commercially available were analyzed without preparation. The samples were rubbed on a mylar film until they form a relatively homogeneous layer over entire surface of the film. The superficial density of the samples ranged from 0,0004 to 0,015 g cm-2 , which characterize thin film geometry. Sensitivity values were determined using MicroMatter standards. The measurement system, from Applied Nuclear Physics Laboratory of UEL, consists in a Si-PIN X-ray detector (221 eV resolution for 5,9 keV line, 25 μm Be window) and a mini X-ray tube (4W, Ag target, 50 μm Ag filter). One of the lip balm presented 2620 ± 477 μg g-1 of Ti and in the other sample none inorganic elements, which characterize a formulation based on organic compounds. In the lipstick were found the following elements and the number of samples in which it appears, with its respective range of concentration in μg g-1: Ti (17) 691 to 12721, Fe (22) 237 to 16377, Zn (3) 105 to 2850, Br (2) 510 to 3097, Sr(4) 254 to 1170, Ba (2) 58170 to 90506 and Bi (1) 16275 ± 798. According to Brazilian federal rules (ANVISA 79.094) it is not permitted the presence of As and Pb in the formulations. The methodology demonstrated to be suitable for quantification of metals at in natura samples of lipsticks, discarding sample preparation. In sequence a detailed study of the influence of these elements on human health will be performed. (author)

  16. Quantification of metals in lipstick by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wouk, Luana Cristina; Melquiades, Fabio Luiz [Universidade Estadual do Centro Oeste (UNICENTRO), PR (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica

    2011-07-01

    Full text: The objective of this work is to analyze lipstick and lip balm by Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence and verify if the concentration of the found elements are in accordance with federal rules. Two lip balm and 30 lipstick commercially available were analyzed without preparation. The samples were rubbed on a mylar film until they form a relatively homogeneous layer over entire surface of the film. The superficial density of the samples ranged from 0,0004 to 0,015 g cm{sup -2} , which characterize thin film geometry. Sensitivity values were determined using MicroMatter standards. The measurement system, from Applied Nuclear Physics Laboratory of UEL, consists in a Si-PIN X-ray detector (221 eV resolution for 5,9 keV line, 25 {mu}m Be window) and a mini X-ray tube (4W, Ag target, 50 {mu}m Ag filter). One of the lip balm presented 2620 {+-} 477 {mu}g g{sup -1} of Ti and in the other sample none inorganic elements, which characterize a formulation based on organic compounds. In the lipstick were found the following elements and the number of samples in which it appears, with its respective range of concentration in {mu}g g{sup -1}: Ti (17) 691 to 12721, Fe (22) 237 to 16377, Zn (3) 105 to 2850, Br (2) 510 to 3097, Sr(4) 254 to 1170, Ba (2) 58170 to 90506 and Bi (1) 16275 {+-} 798. According to Brazilian federal rules (ANVISA 79.094) it is not permitted the presence of As and Pb in the formulations. The methodology demonstrated to be suitable for quantification of metals at in natura samples of lipsticks, discarding sample preparation. In sequence a detailed study of the influence of these elements on human health will be performed. (author)

  17. X-ray fluorescence in Member States: Argentina. Characterization of black vulcanites coming from Rincon Chico 2 site, Neuquen, Argentina, by using X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The investigation of prehistoric hunter-gatherers archaeological sites in the Limay river basin (provinces of Neuquen and Rio Negro) raised different questions concerning the lithic technology. In Rincon Chico 2, a site located on the margin of the Limay river in the Neuquen province and nowadays submerged by the Piedra del Aguila reservoir, many tools and debitage made in black volcanic rock has been found. The identification of this raw material can give information about possible sources of provenance. The rocks were classified macroscopically either as basalt (with coarse grains) or dacite (with fine grains) However, in several cases, a dual behaviour was observed in the fracture zone: the texture was coarse on the surface and very fine, sometimes almost vitreous, in the interior. Following this observation, it was decided to introduce a new more general category called 'black vulcanites'. Looking for the origin and more precise identification of this raw material, artifactual samples and a set of black vulcanite fragments coming from Paso Limay, a dacite source located 50 km from the archaeological site, were characterized by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry using a Philips Minipal energy dispersive system. Samples were analysed as loose powder. Statistical analysis reveals greater variability between artefact samples than between the samples from the source itself. This discrepancy is more evident if Fe, Ti and Zn are used as markers. These results suggests that the quarry at Paso Limay was not the main source of provenance of the black vulcanites utilized by the hunter-gatherers occupying Rincon Chico. (author)

  18. Deformulation of a solid pharmaceutical form using computed tomography and X-ray fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira Junior, J. M.; Balcão, V. M.; Vila, M. M. D. C.; Aranha, N.; Yoshida, V. M. H.; Chaud, M. V.; Mangine Filho, S.

    2015-07-01

    Deformulation of medicines is of undeniable importance, since it can be utilized both to unravel the chemical composition of the excipients integrating a pharmaceutical formulation of a specific medicine and as an important tool to conduct morphometric studies of the formulation under study. Such strategy may be utilized in analytical studies aiming at quantifying the components of reference drugs, or in the identification of putative counterfeit pharmaceuticals. Deformulation makes use of physicochemical analysis tools to characterize, from the chemical point of view, the components integrating medicine pharmaceutical formulations and from the physical point of view, the morphological part of the pharmaceutical formulation. The techniques of computer tomography (SkyScan 1174 - Bruker microCT) and X-ray fluorescence analyses (using an X-ray source with W-anode from Hammatsu Photonics and Silicon Drift detector from Amptek) were successfully used in performing a process of deformulation of a solid pharmaceutical formulation of tablets, utilized herein as a model medicine for controlled drug release. The analytical methods used in this work, proved their effectiveness for the main goal of this study, which aimed to characterize a pharmaceutical formulation via its deconstruction.

  19. Ambiental applications of Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The National Institute of Nuclear Investigations, through the Management of Environmental Sciences has recently acquired a Total Reflection X Ray Fluorescence equipment, Ital Structures I T-2000. This is the first reflection equipment that operates in Mexico, and it allows to increase the analytic capacity in the environmental surface area of the country. This completely automated equipment is used in the environmental samples analysis, which means natural and wastewaters, silts and soils, blood, urine, fish, plankton, vegetables, filters with particulated matter, among other, using as quantification method the one called internal standard. The limits of detection vary from 4 up to 100 μg/L depending of the element and the used x-rays tube. This equipment allows to give support to different projects related with the contamination and the environmental protection in Mexico, just as the study of the distribution heavy metals in water and silt from different bodies of water, the metal accumulation in plankton, aquatic flowers, fish and birds, the study of particulate matter in Mexico City atmosphere, and in the identification of heavy metals in ground waters polluted with leached derived from mining industry

  20. Fundamental parameter based quantification algorithm for confocal nano-X-ray fluorescence analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoonjans, Tom, E-mail: Tom.Schoonjans@UGent.be [X-ray Microspectroscopy and Imaging Research Group (XMI), Department of Analytical Chemistry, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281 S12, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Silversmit, Geert; Vekemans, Bart [X-ray Microspectroscopy and Imaging Research Group (XMI), Department of Analytical Chemistry, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281 S12, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Schmitz, Sylvia [Geosciences Institute/Mineralogy, Goethe University Frankfurt, Altenhoeferallee 1, D-60438 Frankfurt (Germany); Burghammer, Manfred; Riekel, Christian [ESRF, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, BP220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Brenker, Frank E. [Geosciences Institute/Mineralogy, Goethe University Frankfurt, Altenhoeferallee 1, D-60438 Frankfurt (Germany); Vincze, Laszlo, E-mail: Laszlo.Vincze@UGent.be [X-ray Microspectroscopy and Imaging Research Group (XMI), Department of Analytical Chemistry, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281 S12, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2012-01-15

    A new method for the quantification of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) was derived based on the fundamental parameter method (FPM). The FPM equations were adapted to accommodate the special case of confocal nano-XRF, i.e. X-ray nano-beam excitation coupled with confocal detection, taking into account the special characteristics of the detector channel polycapillary. A thorough error estimation algorithm based on the Monte Carlo method was applied, producing a detailed analysis of the uncertainties of the quantification results. The new FPM algorithm was applied on confocal nano-XRF data obtained from cometary dust returned by NASA's Stardust mission, recorded at beamline ID13 of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new method for the quantification of confocal XRF is presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The quantification is based on the fundamental parameter method (FPM). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The new FPM algorithm was applied for the analysis of unique cometary dust particles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The cometary particles were returned by NASA's Stardust mission in 2006. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Error estimation is based on the Monte Carlo method.

  1. Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence from useless tyres samples with a Si PIN detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concentration of Zn from discard tyre samples is of environmental interest, since on its production are used S for the rubber vulcanization process, and Zn O as reaction catalyze. The useless tyres are been used for asphalt pave, burn in cement industry and thermoelectric power plant and in erosion control of agriculture areas. Analyses of these samples requires frequently chemical digestion that is expensive and take a long time. Trying to eliminate these limitations, the objective of this work was use Energy Dispersive X Ray Fluorescence technique (EDXRF) with a portable system as the technique is multi elementary and needs a minimum sample preparation. Five useless tyres samples were grind in a knife mill and after this in a cryogenic mill, and analyzed in pellets form, using a X ray mini tube (Ag target, Mo lter, 25 kV/20 A) for 200 s and a Si-PIN semiconductor detector coupled to a multichannel analyzer. Were obtained Zn concentrations in the range of 40.6 to 44.2 g g1, representing nearly 0.4. (author)

  2. Radiography and X-ray fluorescence used to analyze cultural and artistic artifacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizzutto, Marcia A.; Kajiya, Elizabeth M.; Campos, Pedro H.O.V. de; Almeida, Paula A.D., E-mail: rizzutto@if.usp.br, E-mail: elizabethkajiya@gmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Since 2003 the analyses of artistic and cultural heritage objects at LAMFI-USP (Laboratorio de Analises de Materiais com Feixes Ionicos), initially restricted to ion beam methods, are growing steadily. Since then, alternative methodologies and procedures have been incorporated to better characterize these objects, which possess distinct physical characteristics and also high cultural and monetary value. The examinations in this kind of objects were expanded to other non-destructive analytical techniques like portable EDXRF (Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence) analysis, X-ray radiography, visible photography, UV (ultraviolet) and IR (infrared) light imaging that are helping to better understand these art objects, particularly paintings. These techniques are helping the analyses of the conservation state of the objects and also revealing characteristics of the painter such as underlying drawings, which help understand the creative process of the artist. These new procedures of analysis are aimed to enable better analytic research in archaeology and artistic and cultural heritage objects and to provide results that subsidize authentic investigations of art objects as well as the origin of archaeological artifacts, while stimulating archeometry and 'arteometry' research in Brazilian Museums. (author)

  3. Modeling of x-ray fluorescence using MCNPX and Geant4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajasingam, Akshayan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hoover, Andrew S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fensin, Michael L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Stephen J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) is one of thirteen non-destructive assay techniques being researched for the purpose of quantifying the Pu mass in used fuel assemblies. The modeling portion of this research will be conducted with the MCNPX transport code. The research presented here was undertaken to test the capability of MCNPX so that it can be used to benchmark measurements made at the ORNL and to give confidence in the application of MCNPX as a predictive tool of the expected capability of XRF in the context of used fuel assemblies. The main focus of this paper is a code-to-code comparison between MCNPX and Geant4 code. Since XRF in used fuel is driven by photon emission and beta decay of fission fragments, both terms were independently researched. Simple cases and used fuel cases were modeled for both source terms. In order to prepare for benchmarking to experiments, it was necessary to determine the relative significance of the various fission fragments for producing X-rays.

  4. In vivo monitoring of toxic metals: assessment of neutron activation and x-ray fluorescence techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To date, cadmium, lead, aluminum, and mercury have been measured in vivo in humans. The possibilities of monitoring other toxic metals have also been demonstrated, but no human studies have been performed. Neutron activation analysis appears to be most suitable for Cd and Al measurements, while x-ray fluorescence is ideally suited for measurement of lead in superficial bone. Filtered neutron beams and polarized x-ray sources are being developed which will improve in vivo detection limits. Even so, several of the current facilities are already suitable for use in epidemiological studies of selected populations with suspected long-term low-level ''environmental'' exposures. Evaluation and diagnosis of patients presenting with general clinical symptoms attributable to possible toxic metal exposure may be assisted by in vivo examination. Continued in vivo monitoring of industrial workers, especially follow-up measurements, will provide the first direct assessment of changes in body burden and a direct measure of the biological life-times of these metals in humans. 50 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  5. 3D Imaging of Transition Metals in the Zebrafish Embryo by X-ray Fluorescence Microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourassa, Daisy; Gleber, Sophie-Charlotte; Vogt, Stefan; Yi, Hong; Will, Fabian; Richter, Heiko; Shin, Chong Hyun; Fahrni, Christoph J.

    2014-01-01

    Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) microtomography has emerged as a powerful technique for the 3D visualization of the elemental distribution in biological samples. The mechanical stability, both of the instrument and the specimen, is paramount when acquiring tomographic projection series. By combining the progressive lowering of temperature method (PLT) with femtosecond laser sectioning, we were able to embed, excise, and preserve a zebrafish embryo at 24 hours post fertilization in an X-ray compatible, transparent resin for tomographic elemental imaging. Based on a data set comprised of 60 projections, acquired with a step size of 2 μm during 100 hours of beam time, we reconstructed the 3D distribution of zinc, iron, and copper using the iterative maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) reconstruction algorithm. The volumetric elemental maps, which entail over 124 million individual voxels for each transition metal, revealed distinct elemental distributions that could be correlated with characteristic anatomical features at this stage of embryonic development. PMID:24992831

  6. Semiconductor Si(Li)-spectrometer with thermoelectric cooling for X-ray fluorescence logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A miniature silicon-lithium spectrometer has been developed in Leningrad University. The spectrometer consists of a well device, 36 mm in diameter and 1200 mm heigh, cable and terrestrial equipment set. Power supply to thermoelectric battery (15 mV) from the surface of power supply rectifier connected with the cable through a decoupling device is a specific feature of the spectrometer. Amplifier and pulse-height analyzer consisting of specially developed discriminators and a ratio meter are the main components of the terrestrial equipment set. The circuit of analysis block discriminators of an automatic X-ray radiometric fluorescence analyzer is used as the basis for discriminators. To facilitate measurements of spectra and determination of amplifier formation constants a multichannel pulse analyzer, digit printing block and oscillograph have been introduced in the composition of the terrestrial equipment. The spectrometer has been tested in rising and horizontal holes of underground drilling at gold-silver deposit. Test results confirm the prospects of the application of X-ray logging spectrometers with Si(Li) semiconductor detectors in geology and mining. The spectrometer block diagram as well as roentgenooptic sensor diagram with Si(Li) semiconductor detector and well logs are presented

  7. Depth Profile of Elemental Concentration of Soil Samples from a Farm Land Within Kaduna, Using X-ray Fluorescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Oyeyemi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The variation of soil elemental composition was studied to identify the minimum depth needed for optimum yield of crop. The percentage elemental concentration of soil obtained at depth ranging from 0.02-0.30 m at a farm land located in Kaduna state, Nigeria was carried out using X-ray fluorescence. Twenty five different elements were identified. Gallium, thorium, Uranium and Potassium were some of the Natural Occurring Radioactive Materials found at different concentration from depth of 0.02-0.06 m,but found missing beyond 0.06 m. Concentration of Potassium and other elements reduces and increases non-linearly with depth to a minimum concentration of 7.2% at depth of 0.11 m. It further increases and reduces in same trend with depth; Iron and Cobalt gave an anomalous high concentration of 75.6 and 8.5%, respectively at this depth. All other elements have minimum concentration at 0.11 m.

  8. Characterising anomalous transport in accretion disks from X-ray observations

    CERN Document Server

    Greenhough, J; Chaty, S; Dendy, R O; Rowlands, G

    2002-01-01

    Whilst direct observations of internal transport in accretion disks are not yet possible, measurement of the energy emitted from accreting astrophysical systems can provide useful information on the physical mechanisms at work. Here we examine the unbroken multi-year time variation of the total X-ray flux from three sources: Cygnus X-1, the microquasar GRS1915+105, and for comparison the nonaccreting Crab nebula. To complement previous analyses, we demonstrate that the application of advanced statistical methods to these observational time-series reveals important contrasts in the nature and scaling properties of the transport processes operating within these sources. We find the Crab signal resembles Gaussian noise; the Cygnus X-1 signal is a leptokurtic random walk whose self-similar properties persist on timescales up to three years; and the GRS1915+105 signal is similar to that from Cygnus X-1, but with self-similarity extending possibly to only a few days. This evidence of self-similarity provides a robu...

  9. Standard test methods for chemical analysis of ceramic whiteware materials using wavelength dispersive X-Ray fluorescence spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2004-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover the determination of ten major elements (SiO2, Al2O3, Fe2O3, MgO, CaO, Na2O, K2O, TiO2, P2O5, MnO, and LOI in ceramic whitewares clays and minerals using wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (WDXRF). The sample is first ignited, then fused with lithium tetraborate and the resultant glass disc is introduced into a wavelength dispersive X-ray spectrometer. The disc is irradiated with X-rays from an X-ray tube. X-ray photons emitted by the elements in the samples are counted and concentrations determined using previously prepared calibration standards. (1) In addition to 10 major elements, the method provides a gravimetric loss-on-ignition. Note 1—Much of the text of this test method is derived directly from Major element analysis by wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, included in Ref (1). 1.2 Interferences, with analysis by WDXRF, may result from mineralogical or other structural effects, line overlaps, and matrix effects. The structure of the...

  10. The determination of trace elements in uranium ores by x-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination of 17 trace elements (As, Ba, Co, Cr, Cu, Mo, Nb, Ni, Pb, Rb, Sr, Th, U, V, Y, Zn and Zr) in uranium ores by x-ray fluorescence spectrometry was investigated in this study. The determination of major elements was also necessary for the calculation of mass absorption coefficients. Initially a method was developed for the determination of the elements of interest in unmineralised silicates. Correction for absorption of radiation by the sample were made by means of mass absorption coefficients which were obtained from the relation between the inverse of the mass absorption coefficient and the intensity of the Compton scattering peak. The Feather and Willis method was used for determining the background intensity at the peak positions as well as for mass absorption coefficients. It was observed that the background intensity in the region of the uranium lines increases with increasing uranium content of the sample

  11. Energy-dispersive x-ray-fluorescence analysis for on-line uranium-concentration measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An on-line monitor capable of near-real-time measurement of uranium concentrations in process streams has been developed and demonstrated. The monitor, which uses energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence analysis techniques, has been evaluated in the laboratory and in a solvent extraction column study using natural uranium. Concentrations in the range 0.5 to 150 g/l have been measured in both flowing aqueous and organic streams. For streams with uranium concentrations in the range 20 to 150 g/l, data collection times of 300 seconds are sufficient to measure the concentration with less than 2% error. Streams which have lower concentrations require longer data collection times to provide the same measurement error. The results are used for nuclear material inventory and process control

  12. X-Ray Fluorescence to Determine Zn in Bolivian Children using Hair Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tellería Narvaez, C.A.; Fernández Alcázar, S.; Barrientos Zamora, F.G.; Chungara Castro, J.; Luna Lauracia, I.; Mamani Tola, H.; Mita Peralta, E.; Muñoz Gosálvez, A.O. [Centro de Investigaciones y Aplicaciones Nucleares (CIAN-Viacha), Viacha (Bolivia, Plurinational State of); Romero Bolaños, L.E. [Instituto Boliviano de Ciencia y Tecnología Nuclear Av. 6 de Agosto 2905, La Paz (Bolivia, Plurinational State of); Ramírez Ávila, G.M., E-mail: gramirez@ulb.ac.be [Instituto de Investigaciones Físicas, Universidad Mayor de San Andrés, Campus Universitario Cota Cota, Casilla 8635, La Paz (Bolivia, Plurinational State of)

    2014-06-15

    As a first step in the evaluation of nutritional levels in Bolivian children (8–13 years-old), we carried out X-Ray Fluorescence measurements in hair samples of children belonging to different social classes and living either in rural areas or in cities. The aim of this study is to contribute to health policies tending to improve the global health of children and consequently avoid malnutrition. Our method intends to have maximum reliability and at the same time be as simple as possible from an experimental point of view. Additionally, we use this method to determine some other elements such as Fe, Cu, Pb, As and Hg, the latter three considered as contaminants that could be present in children living in areas which neighbor mines and industries. This work will be complemented by some biological and medical tests.

  13. Instrumental aspects of tube-excited energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry is an attractive and widely used method for sensitive multi-element analysis. The method suffers from the extreme density of spectral components in a rather limited energy range which implies the need for computer based spectrum analysis. The method of iterative least squares analysis is the most powerful tool for this. It requires a systematic and accurate description of the spectral features. Other important necessities for accurate analysis are the calibration of the spectrometer and the correction for matrix absorption effects in the sample; they can be calculated from available physical constants. Ours and similar procedures prove that semi-automatic analyses are possible with an accuracy of the order of 5%. (author)

  14. Use of X-ray fluorescence analysis for the determination of hafnium in zircalloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination of hafnium at trace levels (ppm) in the presence of zirconium by X-ray fluorescence technique is presented. The samples were prepared in the form of double-layer pellets, with boric acid as the binding material. The most sensitive first order line of hafnium HfLα (0.157 nm), which is used analyticaly, has approximately 67% overlapping with second order line of zirconium ZrKα1, (0.079 nm). As the excitation potencial of zirconium is larger than hafnium, the best condition was selected, so that the interference of zirconium intensity would not be significant in hafnium analytical line. The method allowed the determination of hafnium above 5.0 ppm (LLd = 1.5 ppm) with an accuracy of less than 10%. (Author)

  15. Accuracy of X-ray fluorescence spectrometric determination of Rb and Sr concentrations in rock samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that application of the Compton scattering for matrix correction in the X-ray fluorescence spectrometric determination of the trace elements Rb and Sr in rock samples can provide concentrations at a relative accuracy level of 1%. The empirical method applies to rock samples showing differences in mass absorption up to a factor of two. The accuracy of the method has been tested by analysis of 57 samples analysed for Rb and Sr by mass spectrometric isotope dilution. In addition a few of the U.S. Geological Survey reference rock powders, showing significantly different mass absorption, were analysed for Rb and Sr. It is demonstrated that the mica effect, if significant, is smaller than 1% relative. There is no advantage in the use of the LiF(220) analysing crystal as a substitute for the LiF(200). The method appears to be insensitive to the pellet thickness. (author)

  16. X-ray fluorescence analysis of archaeological finds and art objects: Recognizing gold and gilding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trojek, Tomas, E-mail: tomas.trojek@fjfi.cvut.cz [Department of Dosimetry and Application of Ionizing Radiation, Czech Technical University in Prague, Brehova 7, 11519 Praha 1 (Czech Republic); Hlozek, Martin [Methodical Centre of Conservation-Technical Museum in Brno, Purkynova 105, 612 00 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2012-07-15

    Many cultural heritage objects were gilded in the past, and nowadays they can be found in archeological excavations or in historical buildings dating back to the Middle Ages, or from the modern period. Old gilded artifacts have been studied using X-ray fluorescence analysis and 2D microanalysis. Several techniques that enable the user to distinguish gold and gilded objects are described and then applied to investigate artifacts. These techniques differ in instrumentation, data analysis and numbers of measurements. The application of Monte Carlo calculation to a quantitative analysis of gilded objects is also introduced. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Three techniques of gilding identification with XRF analysis are proposed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These techniques are applied to gold and gilded art and archeological objects. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Composition of a substrate material is determined by a Monte Carlo simulation.

  17. Noninvasive in vivo percutaneous absorption measurements using x-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new, noninvasive method for determining percutaneous absorption in vivo has been developed using radioisotope induced X-ray fluorescence (XRF). The absorption rate of 5-iodouracil in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) was determined on four female Sprague-Dawley albino rats. The technique has also been used to investigate the penetration enhancing effects of ethyl acetate (EtoAc), N-methyl 2-pyrrolidinone (NMP), and DMSO with 2-iodobenzoic acid as the model compound. Several absorption kinetics were observed; zero order for EtoAc, first order for NMP, and a two compartment model for DMSO. The advantage of this disappearance measurement over the traditional radiolabeling method is that XRF is a simple, economical method in which the subject receives only a localized, low radiation dose (8 mR/5 min)

  18. Forensic classification of counterfeit banknote paper by X-ray fluorescence and multivariate statistical methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hongling; Yin, Baohua; Zhang, Jie; Quan, Yangke; Shi, Gaojun

    2016-09-01

    Counterfeiting of banknotes is a crime and seriously harmful to economy. Examination of the paper, ink and toners used to make counterfeit banknotes can provide useful information to classify and link different cases in which the suspects use the same raw materials. In this paper, 21 paper samples of counterfeit banknotes seized from 13 cases were analyzed by wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence. After measuring the elemental composition in paper semi-quantitatively, the normalized weight percentage data of 10 elements were processed by multivariate statistical methods of cluster analysis and principle component analysis. All these paper samples were mainly classified into 3 groups. Nine separate cases were successfully linked. It is demonstrated that elemental composition measured by XRF is a useful way to compare and classify papers used in different cases. PMID:27342345

  19. Colouration of medieval glass bracelets studied by total reflection x-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contents of 3d-transition metals (Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn) in fragments of medieval glass bracelets, found in the necropolis of Stambolovo and the castle of Mezek, Bulgaria, were determined by total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) analysis using gallium as internal standard. The samples were analysed as slurries in Triton X 114. The experimental parameters: grain size of the glass sample, concentrations of glass sample, Triton X114 and internal standard in the slurry, volume of the slurry aliquot taken for analysis, as well as the excitation time, were optimised. For method validation the certified reference material BAM-S005 Type A soda-lime glass was used. It was proven that the elements Co, Mn and Fe are responsible for colour generation in the investigated glass samples. The precision of the determinations is characterised by an RSD in the range 3–11%

  20. Elemental Analysis of Variably Contaminated Cremains Using X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilpin, Megan; Christensen, Angi M

    2015-07-01

    Analyzing and identifying skeletal remains becomes increasingly difficult when remains have been cremated, especially in cases where the cremated material may have been intentionally contaminated with nonskeletal material. This study examined the potential of X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) to detect the presence of nonskeletal contaminants in samples of cremains. Eleven samples of cremains were variably combined with concrete mix and analyzed using XRF. Photon counts of elements in each sample were analyzed, and the coefficient of determination (R(2)) using unweighted linear regression as a function of percent cremains was calculated. Results showed that with changes in the proportion of skeletal material and contaminant, there were significant (R(2) > 0.90) changes in detected levels of phosphorus, potassium, zinc, aluminum, and sulfur. The use of XRF is concluded to be a valid approach in the identification of the presence of nonskeletal material in potentially contaminated cremains.

  1. Multielement analysis of soils: a proposal involving a portable X-ray fluorescence equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Terra

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Portable instruments are excellent choices to perform precision agriculture since they allow in situ information about soil composition. In such a way, results are obtained quickly and inputs can be applied promptly, depending on the local soil characteristics. This study aims to develop a method to measure inorganic elements at in natura soils using a portable EDXRF (Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence equipment and multivariate calibration through Partial Least Square Regression (PLS. Seven certified reference standards are used to build the PLS models for Si, K, Ca, Mn and Fe. Two standards are separated for external PLS validation. Finally, the results show that a maximum of 21% is obtained for relative deviation.

  2. Atomic layer deposition to prevent metal transfer from implants: An X-ray fluorescence study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilo, Fabjola; Borgese, Laura; Prost, Josef; Rauwolf, Mirjam; Turyanskaya, Anna; Wobrauschek, Peter; Kregsamer, Peter; Streli, Christina; Pazzaglia, Ugo; Depero, Laura E.

    2015-12-01

    We show that Atomic Layer Deposition is a suitable coating technique to prevent metal diffusion from medical implants. The metal distribution in animal bone tissue with inserted bare and coated Co-Cr alloys was evaluated by means of micro X-ray fluorescence mapping. In the uncoated implant, the migration of Co and Cr particles from the bare alloy in the biological tissues is observed just after one month and the number of particles significantly increases after two months. In contrast, no metal diffusion was detected in the implant coated with TiO2. Instead, a gradient distribution of the metals was found, from the alloy surface going into the tissue. No significant change was detected after two months of aging. As expected, the thicker is the TiO2 layer, the lower is the metal migration.

  3. X-Ray Fluorescence to Determine Zn in Bolivian Children using Hair Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a first step in the evaluation of nutritional levels in Bolivian children (8–13 years-old), we carried out X-Ray Fluorescence measurements in hair samples of children belonging to different social classes and living either in rural areas or in cities. The aim of this study is to contribute to health policies tending to improve the global health of children and consequently avoid malnutrition. Our method intends to have maximum reliability and at the same time be as simple as possible from an experimental point of view. Additionally, we use this method to determine some other elements such as Fe, Cu, Pb, As and Hg, the latter three considered as contaminants that could be present in children living in areas which neighbor mines and industries. This work will be complemented by some biological and medical tests

  4. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis of airborne particulate matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klockenkaemper, R.; Bayer, H.; Bohlen, A. von [Institut fuer Spektrochemie und Angewandte Spektroskopie, Dortmund (Germany)

    1995-03-01

    The collection of air dust by a `Berner`- and a `Battelle`-impactor was adapted to the subsequent analysis by Total reflection X-Ray Fluorescence (TXRF). A suitable impactor material has to be chosen in order to avoid high blank values, collection losses and memory effects. Stainless steel even coated by TiN is not at all suitable. Titanium and aluminium are less favourable than makrolon or another high polymer which may even be antistatic. Small sampling volumes of only 1 m{sup 3} and short sampling times of about 1 h are sufficient for a multielement analysis by TXRF. Low detection limits of ng/m{sup 3} and a repeatability of some % can be realized. (author).

  5. First Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence round-robin test of water samples: Preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borgese, Laura; Bilo, Fabjola [Chemistry for Technologies Laboratory, University of Brescia, Brescia (Italy); Tsuji, Kouichi [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka City University, Osaka (Japan); Fernández-Ruiz, Ramón [Servicio Interdepartamental de Investigación (SIdI), Laboratorio de TXRF, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Margui, Eva [Department of Chemistry, University of Girona, Girona (Spain); Streli, Christina [TU Wien, Atominstitut,Radiation Physics, Vienna (Austria); Pepponi, Giancarlo [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Povo, Trento (Italy); Stosnach, Hagen [Bruker Nano GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Yamada, Takashi [Rigaku Corporation, Takatsuki, Osaka (Japan); Vandenabeele, Peter [Department of Archaeology, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Maina, David M.; Gatari, Michael [Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Nairobi, Nairobi (Kenya); Shepherd, Keith D.; Towett, Erick K. [World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF), Nairobi (Kenya); Bennun, Leonardo [Laboratorio de Física Aplicada, Departamento de Física, Universidad de Concepción (Chile); Custo, Graciela; Vasquez, Cristina [Gerencia Química, Laboratorio B025, Centro Atómico Constituyentes, San Martín (Argentina); Depero, Laura E., E-mail: laura.depero@unibs.it [Chemistry for Technologies Laboratory, University of Brescia, Brescia (Italy)

    2014-11-01

    Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence (TXRF) is a mature technique to evaluate quantitatively the elemental composition of liquid samples deposited on clean and well polished reflectors. In this paper the results of the first worldwide TXRF round-robin test of water samples, involving 18 laboratories in 10 countries are presented and discussed. The test was performed within the framework of the VAMAS project, interlaboratory comparison of TXRF spectroscopy for environmental analysis, whose aim is to develop guidelines and a standard methodology for biological and environmental analysis by means of the TXRF analytical technique. - Highlights: • The discussion of the first worldwide TXRF round-robin test of water samples (18 laboratories of 10 countries) is reported. • Drinking, waste, and desalinated water samples were tested. • Data dispersion sources were identified: sample concentration, preparation, fitting procedure, and quantification. • The protocol for TXRF analysis of drinking water is proposed.

  6. Recent trends in total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry for biological applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review is focused on the application of total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometry in the field of biological research. In the last decade, most papers were published by authors who applied laboratory-scale TXRF equipments. The application of synchrotron radiation as excitation source (SR-TXRF) shows a slowly increasing tendency. In the cited papers the micro-, trace and multielement capability of these TXRF techniques was demonstrated in the clinical and medical laboratory practice, as well as in various plant physiological studies. For speciation of elements in biological matrices, the TXRF was used as element specific detector following an off-line separation step (e.g., thin layer chromatography, high performance liquid chromatography), however, these off-line methods are not competitive with the on-line coupled HPLC-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

  7. Procedure of trace element analysis in oyster tissues by using X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The procedure of trace element analysis such as Ca, Mn, Fe, Zn, Cu, Pb in molluscs (oyster tissues) was established by using X-ray fluorescence techniques. The procedure was investigated from the sample collection, drying, ashing ratio to the analytical techniques by using Cd-109, detector Si (Li) and the peak processing MCAPLUS program was applied for this study. The procedure is based on direct comparison with certified concentrations of international standard reference SRM 1566b Oyster Tissue of National Institute of Standards and Technology, Department of commerce, United States of America for Ca, Mn, Fe, Zn, Cu and the Standard Addition Methods for Pb. The accuracy of the Standard Addition Methods was estimated by CRM281 Rye Grass of Community Bureau of Reference-BCR, European Commission. The results of 10 samples which were collected from several markets in Hanoi are shown. (author)

  8. X-ray fluorescence analysis of trace elements in blood serum from diabetic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The wave dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WDXRF) technique was used for analysis of trace elements in blood serum from 23 nondiabetic healthy individuals (control group) and 58 type II diabetic patients who attended the diabetic clinics. The elements Na, Mg, Al, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Se, Mo, Cd, Hg and Pb were identified and their concentrations were estimated. Physical basis of used analytical methods, experimental set-up and the procedure of sample preparation are described. The maximum increase in trace elements in the blood samples of the workers compared with the control group was observed for Pb but also for Rb, As and Br

  9. Trace element distribution in human teeth by x-ray fluorescence spectrometry and multivariate statistical analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Oprea, Cristiana; Gustova, Marina V; Oprea, Ioan A; Buzguta, Violeta L

    2014-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRFS) was used as a multielement method of evaluation of individual whole human tooth or tooth tissues for their amounts of trace elements. Measurements were carried out on human enamel, dentine, and dental cementum, and some differences in tooth matrix composition were noted. In addition, the elemental concentrations determined in teeth from subjects of different ages, nutritional states, professions and gender, living under various environmental conditions and dietary habits, were included in a comparison by multivariate statistical analysis (MVSA) methods. By factor analysis it was established that inorganic components of human teeth varied consistently with their source in the tissue, with more in such tissue from females than in that from males, and more in tooth incisor than in tooth molar.

  10. Analytic Comparison between X-ray Fluorescence CT and K-edge CT

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Peng; Cong, Wenxiang; Wei, Biao

    2013-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XFCT) and K-edge computed tomography (CT) are two important modalities to quantify a distribution of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) in a small animal for preclinical studies. It is valuable to determine which modality is more efficient for a given application. In this paper, we report a theoretical analysis in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for the two modalities, showing that there is a threshold for the GNPs concentration and XFCT has a better SNR than K-edge CT if GNPs concentration is less than this threshold. Numerical simulations are performed and two kinds of phantoms are used to represent multiple concentration levels and feature sizes. Experimental results illustrate that XFCT is superior to K-edge CT when contrast concentration is lower than 0.4% which coincides with the theoretical analysis.

  11. X-ray fluorescence analysis of wear metals in used lubricating oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddox, W. E.; Kelliher, W. C.

    1986-01-01

    Used oils from several aircraft at NASA's Langley Research Center were analyzed over a three year period using X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and atomic emission spectrometry. The results of both analyses are presented and comparisons are made. Fe and Cu data for oil from four internal combustion engines are provided and XRF and atomic emission spectrometry measurements were found to be in perfect agreement. However, distributions were found in the case of oil from a jet aircraft engine whereby the latter method gave values for total iron concentration in the oil and did not distinguish between suspended particles and oil additives. XRF does not have these particle-size limitations; moreover, it is a faster process. It is concluded that XRF is the preferred method in the construction of a man-portable oil wear analysis instrument.

  12. 100-OL-1 Operable Unit Field Portable X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) Analyzer Pilot Study Plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunn, Amoret L.; Fritz, Brad G.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2014-07-15

    A pilot study is being conducted to support the approval of the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Work Plan to evaluate the 100-OL-1 Operable Unit (OU) pre-Hanford orchard lands. Based on comments received by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Washington State Department of Ecology, the pilot study will evaluate the use of field portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry measurements for evaluating lead and arsenic concentrations on the soil surface as an indicator of past use of lead arsenate pesticide residue in the OU. The work will be performed in the field during the summer of 2014, and assist in the planning for the characterization activities in the RI/FS.

  13. [Progress in application of microbeam X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy in forensic science].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Hui-Fang; Liu, Chao; Hu, Sun-Lin; Wang, Song-Cai; Sun, Li-Min; Huang, Wei; Zhang, Xiao-Ting; Li, Shuang-Lin

    2013-02-01

    Microbeam X-ray fluorescence (micro-XRF) spectrometry has been raised as an analytical technique of microbeam during the recent years. With its advantages of high sensitivity, small sample requirement, high testing accuracy and non-destruction, the technique is widely utilized in forensic science. This review bases on recent researches at home and abroad, describes its applications including identification of gunshot residue, visualization of fingerprints, discrimination of drug source, production process, and other material evidences of analysis in crime scene. Thanks to the advances in technology, intelligent and portable micro-XRF equipment has appeared to be applied. It is believed that it may be more popular and frequent in administration of forensic science in the near future.

  14. Calcium and Phosphorus Detection Using Benchtop Versus Handheld X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzel, Aaron R; Christensen, Angi M; Marvin, Susan M

    2016-01-01

    Elemental analysis of calcium (Ca) and phosphorus (P) has been shown to be useful in differentiating skeletal and nonskeletal material. X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) is an attractive, nondestructive technique for forensic anthropologists, and the development of portable XRF instrumentation is promising for field applications. This study examines the performance of handheld XRF instrumentation operated in air compared to a traditional benchtop XRF device that has the ability to control the analysis atmosphere. Both instruments can be used to effectively distinguish skeletal from nonskeletal remains. However, as the measurement atmosphere affects detection levels for calcium and phosphorus, Ca/P ratios obtained from the instruments and analysis conditions were found to differ significantly, with analyses conducted in air showing significantly lower phosphorus detection. Consequently, comparison of Ca/P ratios to conclude skeletal versus nonskeletal origin must be based on data collected under similar analysis conditions.

  15. L shell X-ray fluorescence parameters of Pb in phthalocyanine complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The L shell X-ray intensity ratios Li/Lα (i=l, β and γ), the production cross-sections σLi (i=l, α, β and γ) and the L3 subshell fluorescence yields ωL3 have been investigated for the element Pb in the phthalocyanine complexes. The measurements have been performed using an 241Am annular radioactive source and an Ultra-LEGe detector with a resolution of 150 eV at 5.9 keV. The experimental values have been compared with the theoretical values of pure Pb element. - Highlights: • The L shell XRF parameters of Pb in the phthalocyanine complexes were investigated. • These parameters were obtained using EDXRF method. • The results are agreement with the theoretical values

  16. Characterization of nuclear materials by total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear energy is one of the available energy options for long term energy security of world. In order to produce electricity using this mode of energy generation in an efficient and safe manner, it is necessary that the materials used for such energy generation comply with the specifications assigned. The major and trace composition of these materials is an important specification for their quality control. Different analytical techniques are used for such quality control. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) is a comparatively new technique having several features well suited for trace and major element determinations in nuclear materials. However, this technique has not been used so far extensively for characterization of nuclear materials. The present paper gives a brief introduction of TXRF, its suitability for nuclear material characterization and some details of the TXRF studies made in our laboratory for the characterization of nuclear materials. (author)

  17. X-Ray fluorescence of microquantities of hafnium in zirconium by precipitation as thin film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of Zr and Hf in the nuclear industry represents and increasing need for the development of reliable chemical methods to determine Hf traces in Zr matrix. A precipitation method in amoniacal medium was developed. A thin film is obtained where matrix effects are absent or minimized. Hf in the range of 5-70.10-9Kg in a 5.10-6Kg Zr matrix was studied. Fluorescence Hf Lα and Hf Lβ X-rays are excited by a W-anode tube 17 kV-25mA and 50kV-25mA. Radiation scattered by the tube was used as internal standard. Bartlett criterion was used for the regression analysis. Determination limit was fixed in 5±4. 10-9Kg Hf at a 95 % probability. (Author)

  18. Metals determination in coffee sample by total reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis (TXRF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vives, Ana Elisa Sirito de [Universidade Metodista de Piracicaba (UNIMEP), Santa Barbara D' Oeste, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia, Arquitetura e Urbanismo]. E-mail: aesvives@unimep.br; Moreira, Silvana [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Civil, Arquitetura e Urbanismo]. E-mail: Silvana@fec.unicamp.br; Brienza, Sandra Maria Boscolo [ Universidade Metodista de Piracicaba (UNIMEP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Matematicas, da Natureza e de Tecnologia da Informacao]. E-mail: sbrienza@unimep.br; Zucchi, Orgheda Luiza Araujo Domingues [Sao Paulo Univ., Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas]. E-mail: olzucchi@fcfrp.usp.br; Nascimento Filho, Virgilio Franco do [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: virgilio@cena.usp.br

    2005-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the inorganic concentration in five brands of coffee, three of them nationally marketed and the others of an exportation kind. The samples were prepared by infusion with deionized water. To carry out the calibration, standard solutions were prepared with different concentrations of Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni, Zn and Se. The measurements were carried out using a white beam of synchrotron radiation for excitation and a Si (Li) semiconductor detector for detection. By employing Synchrotron Radiation Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence Analysis (SR-TXRF) it was possible to evaluate the concentrations of P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Rb and Ba. The detection limits for 300 s counting time were in the range of 0.03 (Ca) to 30 ng.g{sup -1} (Rb), respectively. (author)

  19. X-Ray Fluorescence to Determine Zn in Bolivian Children using Hair Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellería Narvaez, C. A.; Fernández Alcázar, S.; Barrientos Zamora, F. G.; Chungara Castro, J.; Luna Lauracia, I.; Mamani Tola, H.; Mita Peralta, E.; Muñoz Gosálvez, A. O.; Romero Bolaños, L. E.; Ramírez Ávila, G. M.

    2014-06-01

    As a first step in the evaluation of nutritional levels in Bolivian children (8-13 years-old), we carried out X-Ray Fluorescence measurements in hair samples of children belonging to different social classes and living either in rural areas or in cities. The aim of this study is to contribute to health policies tending to improve the global health of children and consequently avoid malnutrition. Our method intends to have maximum reliability and at the same time be as simple as possible from an experimental point of view. Additionally, we use this method to determine some other elements such as Fe, Cu, Pb, As and Hg, the latter three considered as contaminants that could be present in children living in areas which neighbor mines and industries. This work will be complemented by some biological and medical tests.

  20. [Determination of major elements in superphosphate by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Yu-Kui; Li, He; Shen, Jian-Bo; Zhang, Fu-Suo

    2008-11-01

    Phosphate fertilizer is one of the most important fertilizers. The authors determined nine kinds of major elements in superphosphate, the most important phosphate fertilizer, by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. The detection range of SiO2, Al2O3, TFe2O3, MnO, MgO, CaO, Na2O, K2O and P2O5 is 15.0%-90.0%, 0.20%-25.0%, 0.20%-25.0%, 0.01%-0.35%, 0.20%-40.0%, 0.10%-35.0%, 0.10%-7.50%, 0.05%-7.50% and 1.00%-100.00% respectively, and the precision of the method for SiO2, Al2O3, TFe2O3, MnO, MgO, CaO, Na2O, K2O and P2O5 range from 0.20% to 0.005%, so the method of X-ray fluorescence spectrometry is a fast and effectual method for detecting the composition of phosphate fertilizer. The contents of the above elements showed (1) the detected superphosphate content is 18.101% of P2O5, which is accordant to the labeled level (> or = 16%); (2) the detected superphosphate contains much SiO2, TFe2O3, MgO, CaO and K2O, which are necessary for plant growth and the content of which is 16.954%, 1.495%, 1.580%, 21.428% and 1.585% respectively. These data showed that phosphate fertilizer sometimes can supply some trace elements for plants, but we should eliminate the interference effect of these elements when we research the role of phosphorus; (3) superphosphate contains 3.225% of Al2O3, so the authors should attention to the aluminium poison when superphosphate is used chronically. PMID:19271522

  1. High resolution X-ray fluorescence imaging for a microbeam radiation therapy treatment planning system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chtcheprov, Pavel; Inscoe, Christina; Burk, Laurel; Ger, Rachel; Yuan, Hong; Lu, Jianping; Chang, Sha; Zhou, Otto

    2014-03-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) uses an array of high-dose, narrow (~100 μm) beams separated by a fraction of a millimeter to treat various radio-resistant, deep-seated tumors. MRT has been shown to spare normal tissue up to 1000 Gy of entrance dose while still being highly tumoricidal. Current methods of tumor localization for our MRT treatments require MRI and X-ray imaging with subject motion and image registration that contribute to the measurement error. The purpose of this study is to develop a novel form of imaging to quickly and accurately assist in high resolution target positioning for MRT treatments using X-ray fluorescence (XRF). The key to this method is using the microbeam to both treat and image. High Z contrast media is injected into the phantom or blood pool of the subject prior to imaging. Using a collimated spectrum analyzer, the region of interest is scanned through the MRT beam and the fluorescence signal is recorded for each slice. The signal can be processed to show vascular differences in the tissue and isolate tumor regions. Using the radiation therapy source as the imaging source, repositioning and registration errors are eliminated. A phantom study showed that a spatial resolution of a fraction of microbeam width can be achieved by precision translation of the mouse stage. Preliminary results from an animal study showed accurate iodine profusion, confirmed by CT. The proposed image guidance method, using XRF to locate and ablate tumors, can be used as a fast and accurate MRT treatment planning system.

  2. Identifying microbial habitats in soil using quantum dots and x-ray fluorescence microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, S. L.; Whiteside, M. D.; Sholto-Douglas, D.; Dohnalkova, A.; Durall, D. M.; Gursoy, D.; Jones, M. D.; Kovarik, L.; Lai, B.; Roehrig, C.; Sullivan, S.; Vogt, S.; Kemner, K. M.

    2015-12-01

    The metabolic activities of soil microbes are the primary drivers of biogeochemical processes controlling the terrestrial carbon cycle, nutrient availability to plants, contaminant remediation, water quality, and other ecosystem services. However, we have a limited understanding of microbial metabolic processes such as nutrient uptake rates, substrate preferences, or how microbes and microbial metabolism are distributed throughout the three-dimensional pore network of the soil. Here we use a novel combination of imaging techniques with quantum dots (QDs, engineered semiconductor nanoparticles that produce size or composition-dependent fluorescence) to locate bacteria in the three-dimensional pore network of a soil aggregate. First, we show using confocal and aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopies that bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and Pseudomonas protogens) actively take up and internalize CdSe/ZnS core/shell QDs conjugated to biologically relevant substrates. Next, we show that cells bearing QDs can be identified using fluorescence imaging with hard x-rays at 2ID-D at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Finally, we demonstrate that the Se constituent to the QDs can be used to label bacteria in three-dimensional tomographic reconstructions of natural soil at 0.5 nm spatial resolution using hard x-rays at 2ID-E at the APS. This is the first time soil bacteria have been imaged in the intact soil matrix at such high resolution. These results offer a new way to experimentally investigate basic bacterial ecology in situ, revealing constraints on microbial function in soil that will help improve connections between pore-scale and ecosystem-scale processes in models.

  3. Uranium and plutonium solution assays by transmission-corrected x-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryon, R W; Ruhter, W D; Rudenko, V; Sirontinin, A; Petrov, A A

    1999-09-08

    We have refined and tested a previously developed x-ray fluorescence analysis technique for uranium and plutonium solutions that compensates for variations in the absorption of the exciting gamma rays and fluorescent x-rays. We use {sup 57}Co to efficiently excite the K lines of the elements, and a mixed {sup 57}Co plus {sup 153}Gd transmission source to correct for variations in absorption. The absorption correction is a unique feature of our technique. It is possible to accurately calibrate the system with a single solution standard. There does not need to be a close match in composition (i.e., absorption) between the standard(s) and solutions to be analyzed. Specially designed equipment incorporates a planar intrinsic germanium detector, excitation and transmission radioisotopes, and specimen holder. The apparatus can be inserted into a rubber glove of a glovebox, keeping the apparatus outside and the solutions inside the glovebox, thereby protecting the user and the equipment from possible contamination. An alternate design may be used in chemical reprocessing plants, providing continuous monitoring, by measuring the trans-actinides through stainless steel piping. This technique has been tested at the Bochvar Research Institute of Inorganic Materials in Moscow for possible use in the Russian complex of nuclear facilities. This is part of a cooperative program between laboratories in the United States and Russia to strengthen systems of nuclear materials protection, control, and accountability (MPC and A). A part of this program is to accurately measure and track inventories of materials, thus the need for good non-destructive analytical techniques such as the one described here.

  4. Quantitative micro x-ray fluorescence analyses without reference standard material; Referenzprobenfreie quantitative Mikro-Roentgenfluoreszenzanalyse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolff, Timo

    2009-07-15

    X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF) is a standard method for non-destructive investigations. Due to the development of polycapillary optics and SDDdetectors requiring no cooling with liquid nitrogen, XRF becomes a suitable method for a large number of applications, e. g. for the analysis of objects in arts and archaeology. Spectrometers developed for those purposes allow investigations outside of laboratories und provide excitation areas with diameters of 10-70 {mu}m. In most applications, quantification of XRF data is realized by the usage of standard reference materials. Due to absorption processes in the samples the accuracy of the results depends strongly on the similarity of the sample and the reference standard. In cases where no suitable references are available, quantification can be done based on the ''fundamental parameter (fp) method''. This quantification procedure is based on a set of equations describing the fluorescence production and detection mathematical. The cross sections for the interaction of x-rays with matter can be taken from different databases. During an iteration process the element concentrations can be determined. Quantitative XRF based on fundamental parameters requires an accurate knowledge of the excitation spectrum. In case of a conventional setup this spectrum is given by the X-ray tube spectrum and can be calculated. The use of polycapillary optics in micro-XRF spectrometers changes the spectral distribution of the excitation radiation. For this reason it is necessary to access the transmission function of the used optic. The aim of this work is to find a procedure to describe this function for routine quantification based on fundamental parameters. Most of the measurements have been carried out using a commercial spectrometer developed for applications in arts and archaeology. On the one hand the parameters of the lens, used in the spectrometer, have been investigated by different experimental characterization

  5. Characterization of X-ray polycapillary optics by LiF crystal radiation detectors through confocal fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfigli, Francesca; Hampai, Dariush; Dabagov, Sultan B.; Montereali, Rosa Maria

    2016-08-01

    Solid-state radiation imaging detectors based on photoluminescent colour centres in lithium fluoride (LiF) crystals have been successfully tested for both advanced 2D and 3D characterizations of X-ray polycapillary optics by a table-top laboratory system. Polycapillary optics can control X-ray beams propagation and allows obtaining quasi-parallel beam (half-lens) or focused beams (full-lens). The combination of a fine-focused micro X-ray tube and a polycapillary lens can provide the high intensity radiation fluxes that are necessary for high resolution X-ray imaging. In this paper we present novel results about advanced characterization of these complex optics by 2D as well as 3D confocal laser fluorescence microscopy of X-ray irradiated LiF crystal detectors. Two dimensional high spatial resolution images on a wide field of view of transmitted X-rays through a semi-lens and 3D direct inspection of the coloured volumes produced in LiF crystals by both focused and parallel X-ray beam transmitted by a full and a semi-lens, respectively, as well as their 3D reconstructions were obtained. The results show that the photoluminescent colour centres volume in LiF crystals combined with an optical sectioning reading system provide information about tomography of transmitted X-ray beams by policapillary optics in a single exposure process. For the first time, the use of LiF crystal plates as versatile radiation imaging luminescent detectors have been used to characterize the operation of polycapillary optics as X-ray lens, in focusing and parallel mode.

  6. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence studies of a bromine-labelled cyclic RGD peptide interacting with individual tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first example of synchrotron X-ray fluorescence imaging of cultured mammalian cells in cyclic peptide research is reported. The study reports the first quantitative analysis of the incorporation of a bromine-labelled cyclic RGD peptide and its effects on the biodistribution of endogenous elements (for example, K and Cl) within individual tumor cells. The first example of synchrotron X-ray fluorescence imaging of cultured mammalian cells in cyclic peptide research is reported. The study reports the first quantitative analysis of the incorporation of a bromine-labelled cyclic RGD peptide and its effects on the biodistribution of endogenous elements (for example, K and Cl) within individual tumor cells

  7. 2D/3D cryo x-ray fluorescence imaging at the bionanoprobe at the advanced photon source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S., E-mail: sichen@aps.anl.gov; Vine, D. J.; Lai, B. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Paunesku, T.; Yuan, Y.; Woloschak, G. E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwester University, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Deng, J. [Applied Physics, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Jin, Q.; Hong, Y. P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Flachenecker, C.; Hornberger, B. [Carl Zeiss X-ray Microscopy, Pleasanton, CA 94588 (United States); Brister, K. [Synchrotron Research Center, Northwestern University, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Jacobsen, C. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Applied Physics, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Chemistry of Life Processes Institute, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Vogt, S. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwester University, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States)

    2016-01-28

    Trace elements, particularly metals, play very important roles in biological systems. Synchrotron-based hard X-ray fluorescence microscopy offers the most suitable capabilities to quantitatively study trace metals in thick biological samples, such as whole cells and tissues. In this manuscript, we have demonstrated X-ray fluorescence imaging of frozen-hydrated whole cells using the recent developed Bionanoprobe (BNP). The BNP provides spatial resolution down to 30 nm and cryogenic capabilities. Frozen-hydrated biological cells have been directly examined on a sub-cellular level at liquid nitrogen temperatures with minimal sample preparation.

  8. Determination of niobium content in Zr-Nb alloys by Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantitative determination of niobium content in zirconium alloys, viz. Zr-2.5% Nb and Zr-1% Nb by Wavelength Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer (WDXRFS) has been described in the paper. The results are compared with those obtained by Direct Reading Emission Spectrometer (DRES) for Zr-2.5%Nb samples. For Zr-1%Nb samples, analysis by wavelength dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry in two modes viz. through solution mode and by nondestructive solid sample analysis were performed and the results are compared. A RSD of < 1% is obtained in the technique. (author)

  9. [Energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry--a forensic chemistry method for determination of shooting distance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havel, J

    2003-10-01

    The article follows up the experiences Energo-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF) as the forensic necrochemical method as the tool for detection of metals (gunshot residues--GSR) in connection with gunshot-wounds of persons--authors: dipl. Ing. J. Havel and dipl. Ing. K. Zelenka and Energo-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF) as the forensic method as the tool for identification of inlets (gunshot--entries) and outlets (gunshot--exits)--author: dipl. Ing. J. Havel. PMID:14661530

  10. Reconstruction of Elemental Distribution Images from Synchrotron Radiation X-Ray Fluorescence Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toque, Jay Arre; Ide-Ektessabi, Ari

    Synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (SRXRF) is a powerful technique for studying trace elements in biological samples and other materials in general. Its features including capability to perform measurements in air and water, noncontact and nondestructive assay are superior to other elemental analysis techniques. In this study, a technique for reconstructing elemental distribution mapping of trace elements from spectral data was developed. The reconstruction was made possible by using the measured fluorescent signals to obtain local differences in elemental concentrations. The proposed technique features interpolation and background subtraction using matrix transformations of the spectral data to produce an enhanced distribution images. It is achieved by employing polychromatic or monochromatic color assignments proportional to the fluorescence intensities for displaying single-element or multiple-element distributions respectively. Some typical applications (i.e., macrophage and tissue surrounding an implant) were presented and the samples were imaged using the proposed method. The distribution images of the trace elements of the selected samples were used in conjunction with other analytical techniques to draw relevant observations, which cannot be achieved using conventional techniques such as metallic uptake and corresponding cellular response. The elemental distribution images produced from this study were found to have better quality compared to images produced using other analytical techniques (e.g., SIMS, PIXE, XPS, etc).

  11. Distribution and speciation of bromine in mammalian tissue and fluids by X-ray fluorescence imaging and X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceko, Melanie J; Hummitzsch, Katja; Hatzirodos, Nicholas; Bonner, Wendy; James, Simon A; Kirby, Jason K; Rodgers, Raymond J; Harris, Hugh H

    2015-05-01

    Bromine is one of the most abundant and ubiquitous trace elements in the biosphere and until recently had not been shown to perform any essential biological function in animals. A recent study demonstrated that bromine is required as a cofactor for peroxidasin-catalysed formation of sulfilimine crosslinks in Drosophila. In addition, bromine dietary deficiency is lethal in Drosophila, whereas bromine replenishment restores viability. The aim of this study was to examine the distribution and speciation of bromine in mammalian tissues and fluids to provide further insights into the role and function of this element in biological systems. In this study we used X-ray fluorescence (XRF) imaging and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to examine the distribution of bromine in bovine ovarian tissue samples, follicular fluid and aortic serum, as well as human whole blood and serum and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to identify the chemical species of bromine in a range of mammalian tissue (bovine, ovine, porcine and murine), whole blood and serum samples (bovine, ovine, porcine, murine and human), and marine samples (salmon (Salmo salar), kingfish (Seriola lalandi) and Scleractinian coral). Bromine was found to be widely distributed across all tissues and fluids examined. In the bovine ovary in particular it was more concentrated in the sub-endothelial regions of arterioles. Statistical comparison of the near-edge region of the X-ray absorption spectra with a library of bromine standards led to the conclusion that the major form of bromine in all samples analysed was bromide. PMID:25675086

  12. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD and X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF Analysis of Proto-historic Votive Tablets from Chawas Cave, Hulu Kelantan, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuliskandar Ramli

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This research was conducted to determine the origin of votive tablets found in prehistoric and proto-historic site of Chawas Cave in Hulu Kelantan. The votive tablets found in Chawas Cave showed several Buddhist images which are associated with the Srivijaya Kingdom which existed from 7th century AD until 12th century AD. To determine if the votive tablets were produced by communities that lived in Hulu Kelantan, hence the study of the chemical composition of the votive tablets should be carried out. Two techniques were employed in this research, namely the X-Ray Diffraction (XRD and X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF techniques. The techniques will determine the mineral content as well as the major and trace element content of the votive tablets. Analysis showed that all the votive tablet samples have mineral known as clinochlore. Clinochlore is one of the chlorites, namely a group of phyllosilicate minerals. Chlorite is commonly found in igneous rocks as an alteration product of mafic minerals such as pyroxene, amphibole and biotite. The votive tablets were found in a cave which consisted of limestone cave formation and it showed that the votive tablets were not produced by the local community of Hulu Kelantan. Major elements also showed that the chemical composition of the votive tablets is not similar to the composition of clay samples taken from several rivers in Hulu Kelantan.

  13. Investigation by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence and X-ray powder diffraction of the chemical composition of white clay ceramic tiles from Veliki Preslav

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blagoev, K., E-mail: kblagoev@issp.bas.bg [Institute of Solid State Physics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tzarigradsko Chaussee, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Grozeva, M., E-mail: margo@issp.bas.bg [Institute of Solid State Physics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tzarigradsko Chaussee, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Malcheva, G., E-mail: bobcheva@issp.bas.bg [Institute of Solid State Physics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tzarigradsko Chaussee, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Neykova, S., E-mail: sevdalinaneikova@abv.bg [National Institute of Archaeology with Museum, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 2 Saborna, 1000 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents the results of the application of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, and X-ray powder diffraction in assessing the chemical and phase composition of white clay decorative ceramic tiles from the medieval archaeological site of Veliki Preslav, a Bulgarian capital in the period 893–972 AC, well-known for its original ceramic production. Numerous white clay ceramic tiles with highly varied decoration, produced for wall decoration of city's churches and palaces, were found during the archaeological excavations in the old capital. The examination of fourteen ceramic tiles discovered in one of the city's monasteries is aimed at characterization of the chemical profile of the white-clay decorative ceramics produced in Veliki Preslav. Combining different methods and comparing the obtained results provides complementary information regarding the white-clay ceramic production in Veliki Preslav and complete chemical characterization of the examined artefacts. - Highlights: ► LIBS, XRF and XRD analyses of medieval white-clay ceramic tiles fragments are done. ► Different elements and phases, presented in the ceramics fragments were determined. ► Differences in the tiles' raw material mineral composition are found. ► Information of the tiles' production process and the raw clay deposits is obtained.

  14. Silver speciation in liver of marine mammals by synchrotron X-ray absorption fine structure and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Emiko; Ikemoto, Tokutaka; Hokura, Akiko; Terada, Yasuko; Kunito, Takashi; Yamamoto, Takahito; Yamada, Tadasu K; Rosas, Fernando C W; Fillmann, Gilberto; Tanabe, Shinsuke; Nakai, Izumi

    2011-06-01

    The chemical form of Ag in the livers of five species of marine mammals was examined using X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopies. The XAFS analysis suggested that Ag(2)Se was present in the livers of the Franciscana dolphin (Pontoporia blainvillei), Dall's porpoise (Phocoenoides dalli), and Baird's beaked whale (Berardius bairdii), whereas Ag(2)S was present in the livers of the striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba) and pygmy killer whale (Feresa attenuata). XRF spectroscopy results revealed that the distribution patterns of Ag and Se in a thin section of the liver of the Franciscana dolphin were the same; this also implied that Ag was associated with Se in the liver. Thus, the interaction of Ag with Se or S may offer significant protection against the toxicity of Ag in marine mammals. The formation of either Ag(2)Se or Ag(2)S might depend on the Hg levels in the liver. Ag(2)Se was observed in liver samples with relatively high Ag/Hg ratio, whereas liver samples with low Ag/Hg ratio contained Ag(2)S. PMID:21491037

  15. Immediate screening of lead exposure in the workplace using portable X-ray fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorce, Jean-Philippe; Roff, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The use of a portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (PXRF) equipped with a miniaturised X-ray tube producing a small 8 mm diameter X-ray beam required the validation of two new sampling protocols for the immediate screening of occupational lead exposure. First, lead in dust and fumes, collected by Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM) inhalable samplers on 25 mm diameter membrane filters, is quantified using PXRF. To account for irregular dust deposition, the filters are rotated manually by quarter turns. Multiple PXRF readings are collected from the central region and from two locations in the outer region. The inner region is distinguishable from the outer region, but the two outer region locations are indistinguishable. High correlations (R(2) > 0.99) are found between the PXRF results and historical results obtained using a reference method based on a laboratory wavelength-dispersive sequential XRF instrument (WDXRF) for lead loadings between 1-161 μg. The PXRF results from the outer regions of the filters show a bias of -13% with respect to the WDXRF. Once this bias is allowed for, 95% of all PXRF results lie within -28% and +38% of the WDXRF results. Neither instrument accounts for potential dust accumulation on the walls of the IOM sampler. Therefore, methods based on their use can only be considered semi-quantitative. Second, a protocol combining direct PXRF measurements on workplace surfaces with surface wipes is designed for immediate on-site quantification of removable surface lead residues. The quantification of such residues by this method is compared with subsequent off-site wet chemistry analysis of the surface wipes. The two methods show a good correlation (R(2) ∼ 0.88). The ratio of the amount of removable residues determined by PXRF and wipe sampling is close to one with range 0.26-3.94. It is demonstrated that PXRF can be used as an effective tool for the immediate screening of occupational lead exposure. Although this article focused on

  16. Total reflection x-ray fluorescence spectrometers for multielemental analysis: status of commercial equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multi-elemental analysis by total reflection x-ray fluorescence spectrometry has evolved during two decades. At the present there are commercial equipment available for the chemical analysis in all kind of biological and mineral samples. The electronic industry has also been benefited from the scientific and technological developments in the field of TXRF. The basic components of the spectrometers can be summarized as follow: a) excitation source; b) geometric arrangement (optics) for collimation and monochromatization of the primary radiation; c) x-ray detector; d) hardware and software for operation of the instrument, data acquisition and spectral deconvolution to determine the concentrations of the element present in the sample (quantitative analysis). As optional there are manufacturers offering the conventional 45 degrees geometry for direct excitation of bulky liquid or solid samples. Personal communications of the author and the commercial brochures available at the moment of writing this presentation have allowed to list the following type of components used in the TXRF spectrometers for multi-elemental analysis (the devices used in the electronic industry to analyze silicon wafers are excluded). Excitation: high power x-ray tube, output from 1300 to 2000 watts; metal ceramic low power-ray tube, output up to 50 watts. Different anodes are used but molybdenum, tungsten and copper are frequent. The excitation systems can be customized according to the requirements of the laboratory. Detector: Si-Li semi-conductor liquid nitrogen cooled; silicon solid state thermoelectrically cooled (silicon drift detector SDD and Si-PIN diode). Optics: multilayer monochromator of Si-W or Ni-C; double multilayer monochromator. Electronics: spectroscopy amplifier, analog to digital converter adapted to a PC compatible computer with software in Windows environment for the whole operation of the spectrometer and for qualy/quantitative analysis of samples are standards in the

  17. Rapid and reliable diagnosis of Wilson disease using X-ray fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaščáková, Slávka; Kewish, Cameron M; Rouzière, Stéphan; Schmitt, Françoise; Sobesky, Rodolphe; Poupon, Joël; Sandt, Christophe; Francou, Bruno; Somogyi, Andrea; Samuel, Didier; Jacquemin, Emmanuel; Dubart-Kupperschmitt, Anne; Nguyen, Tuan Huy; Bazin, Dominique; Duclos-Vallée, Jean-Charles; Guettier, Catherine; Le Naour, François

    2016-07-01

    Wilson's disease (WD) is a rare autosomal recessive disease due to mutations of the gene encoding the copper-transporter ATP7B. The diagnosis is hampered by the variability of symptoms induced by copper accumulation, the inconstancy of the pathognomonic signs and the absence of a reliable diagnostic test. We investigated the diagnostic potential of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) that allows quantitative analysis of multiple elements. Studies were performed on animal models using Wistar rats (n = 10) and Long Evans Cinnamon (LEC) rats (n = 11), and on human samples including normal livers (n = 10), alcohol cirrhosis (n = 8), haemochromatosis (n = 10), cholestasis (n = 6) and WD (n = 22). XRF experiments were first performed using synchrotron radiation to address the elemental composition at the cellular level. High-resolution mapping of tissue sections allowed measurement of the intensity and the distribution of copper, iron and zinc while preserving the morphology. Investigations were further conducted using a laboratory X-ray source for irradiating whole pieces of tissue. The sensitivity of XRF was highlighted by the discrimination of LEC rats from wild type even under a regimen using copper deficient food. XRF on whole formalin-fixed paraffin embedded needle biopsies allowed profiling of the elements in a few minutes. The intensity of copper related to iron and zinc significantly discriminated WD from other genetic or chronic liver diseases with 97.6% specificity and 100% sensitivity. This study established a definite diagnosis of Wilson's disease based on XRF. This rapid and versatile method can be easily implemented in a clinical setting.

  18. Determination of trace element levels in leaves of Nerium oleander using X-Ray Fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Ramon S.; Sanches, Francis A.C.R.A.; Neves, Arthur O.P.; Oliveira, Luis F.; Oliveira, Davi F.; Anjos, Marcelino J. [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica Armando Dias Tavares. Dept. de Fisica Aplicada e Termodinamica

    2013-07-01

    The environmental pollution by human activity has been one of the most concerns in the last years, principally due to rapid urban growth in the cities and the industrialization process. The air pollution can be increased due to several different kinds of emissions: urban traffic, industrial activities, burning fuel, civil industry of construction/demolition, fires and natural phenomena. Many of these emissions move from long distances due to convections currents and finally tend to deposit mainly in the plants leaves and in the soil. Thus, the plants leaves works as a natural sampler by the emissions deposit in these ones. In this study Nerium oleander leaves were used to measure the environmental pollutions levels in different sampling urban regions in the city of Rio de Janeiro/RJ: Andarai, Benfica, Bonsucesso, Caju, Engenho de Dentro, Engenho Novo, Estacio, Grajau, Inhauma, Lins, Maracana, Maria da Graca, Meier, Praca da Bandeira, Riachuelo, Rio Comprido, Sao Cristovao, Tijuca, Vila Isabel and city Center. The control samples were collected in Campo Grande near of Parque Nacional da Pedra Branca/RJ (National Park of Pedra Branca/RJ). The leaves were collected from adult plants and after the collection the samples were cleaned and placed in the greenhouse for drying, then were mashed and pressed into tablets forms. The analyses were performed using the energy dispersion X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF), developed on the own laboratory and based in a SiPIN detector and a mini X ray tube. It was possible to detect 16 elements in the analyzed samples: K, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Br, Rb, Sr, Ba and Pb. The results shows that, in the studied areas, the analysis of the Nerium oleander plant shows a low-cost option and with a substantial efficiency as an environmental pollution biomonitor. (author)

  19. Rapid and reliable diagnosis of Wilson disease using X-ray fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaščáková, Slávka; Kewish, Cameron M; Rouzière, Stéphan; Schmitt, Françoise; Sobesky, Rodolphe; Poupon, Joël; Sandt, Christophe; Francou, Bruno; Somogyi, Andrea; Samuel, Didier; Jacquemin, Emmanuel; Dubart-Kupperschmitt, Anne; Nguyen, Tuan Huy; Bazin, Dominique; Duclos-Vallée, Jean-Charles; Guettier, Catherine; Le Naour, François

    2016-07-01

    Wilson's disease (WD) is a rare autosomal recessive disease due to mutations of the gene encoding the copper-transporter ATP7B. The diagnosis is hampered by the variability of symptoms induced by copper accumulation, the inconstancy of the pathognomonic signs and the absence of a reliable diagnostic test. We investigated the diagnostic potential of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) that allows quantitative analysis of multiple elements. Studies were performed on animal models using Wistar rats (n = 10) and Long Evans Cinnamon (LEC) rats (n = 11), and on human samples including normal livers (n = 10), alcohol cirrhosis (n = 8), haemochromatosis (n = 10), cholestasis (n = 6) and WD (n = 22). XRF experiments were first performed using synchrotron radiation to address the elemental composition at the cellular level. High-resolution mapping of tissue sections allowed measurement of the intensity and the distribution of copper, iron and zinc while preserving the morphology. Investigations were further conducted using a laboratory X-ray source for irradiating whole pieces of tissue. The sensitivity of XRF was highlighted by the discrimination of LEC rats from wild type even under a regimen using copper deficient food. XRF on whole formalin-fixed paraffin embedded needle biopsies allowed profiling of the elements in a few minutes. The intensity of copper related to iron and zinc significantly discriminated WD from other genetic or chronic liver diseases with 97.6% specificity and 100% sensitivity. This study established a definite diagnosis of Wilson's disease based on XRF. This rapid and versatile method can be easily implemented in a clinical setting. PMID:27499926

  20. Novel handheld x-ray fluorescence spectrometer for routine testing for the presence of lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rensing, Noa M.; Tiernan, Timothy C.; Squillante, Michael R.

    2011-06-01

    RMD is developing a safe, inexpensive, and easy to operate lead detector for retailers and consumers that can reliably detect dangerous levels of lead in toys and other household products. Lead and its compounds have been rated as top chemicals that pose a great threat to human health. However, widespread testing for environmental lead is rarely undertaken until lead poisoning has already been diagnosed. The problem is not due to the accuracy or sensitivity of existing lead detection technology, but rather to the high expense, safety and licensing barriers of available test equipment. An inexpensive and easy to use lead detector would enable the identification of highly contaminated objects and areas and allow for timely and cost effective remediation. The military has similar needs for testing for lead and other heavy elements such as mercury, primarily in the decontamination of former military properties prior to their return to civilian use. RMD's research and development efforts are abased on advanced solid-state detectors combined with recently patented lead detection techniques to develop a consumer oriented lead detector that will be widely available and easy and inexpensive to use. These efforts will result in an instrument that offers: (1) high sensitivity, to identify objects containing dangerous amounts of lead, (2) low cost to encourage widespread testing by consumers and other end users and (3) convenient operation requiring no training or licensing. In contrast, current handheld x-ray fluorescence spectrometers either use a radioactive source requiring licensing and operating training, or use an electronic x-ray source that limits their sensitivity to surface lead.

  1. Analysis of arsenic pollution in groundwater aquifers by X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The serious contamination of groundwater in the southeastern plain of the province of Cordoba (Argentina), a phenomenon mentioned in the literature for over 80 years, has given rise to this initial hydrologic study covering an area over 250 km2. This study analyzes a rural area near a little town called La Francia, and is motivated by the existence of an important pollution with arsenic in the first-aquifer groundwater of the region. This phenomenon has been mentioned for a long time and evidenced by the high incidence of diseases associated with this element in the local population. By means of the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) technique, and using an energy-dispersive spectrometer, 50 samples of groundwater of the rural zone of La Francia from about 100 m deep (second aquifer), were analyzed. The samples were excited with a 3 kW X-ray tube and measured using a reflecting geometry with 45 deg. of incident and take-off directions. Preconcentration techniques for the preparation of the samples were employed in order to obtain an adequate signal-to-noise ratio. The As concentration in water was obtained using calibration curves and the internal standard method for quantification. A high percentage of the analyzed samples showed concentrations lesser than or equal to 0.05 mg l-1. This value corresponds to the maximum pollutant level for humans. The maximum measured value reaches 3 mg l-1 in samples collected in perforations of first-aquifer wells and in some second-aquifer isolated wells

  2. Quantitative X-ray fluorescence analysis of samples of less than 'infinite thickness': Difficulties and possibilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sitko, Rafal, E-mail: rafal.sitko@us.edu.p [Institute of Chemistry, Silesian University, 40-006 Katowice (Poland)

    2009-11-15

    X-ray fluorescence spectrometry due to its nondestructive nature is widely applied in analysis of single layers and multiple layer films (e.g. semiconductors, electrooptic and solar cell devices, coatings, corrosion and paint layers), individual particles (airborne, fly ash, gunshot residue particles, etc.), art and archeological objects (manuscripts, paintings, icons) and many others. Quantitative analysis of these materials, frequently classified as samples of less than infinite thickness (thin or intermediate-thickness samples), required applying adequate matrix correction methods taking into account complex dependence of analyte fluorescent radiation intensity on full matrix composition and sample thickness. In this article, the matrix correction methods including fundamental parameters, Monte Carlo simulations, influence coefficients algorithms and methods based on X-ray transmission measurements are reviewed. The difficulties in the analysis of single layer and multiple layer films and the accuracy of fundamental parameter methods in simultaneous determination of their thickness and composition are discussed. The quantitative analysis of individual particles and inhomogeneous and/or complex structure materials using fundamental parameter and Monte Carlo simulation methods in micro-beam X-ray fluorescence spectrometry are also reviewed. Some references are devoted to the analysis of light matrix samples, e.g. geological, environmental and biological samples, in which undetectable low-Z elements are present (so-called 'dark matrix') using backscattered fundamental parameter methods. Since the samples of less than infinite thickness are partially transparent for X-ray beams, the transmission measurements present possibilities that are unattainable for bulk samples. Thus, the emission-transmission method and also new instruments allowing measurements of the primary X-ray beam transmitted through the sample together with measurements of X-ray

  3. High energy x-ray diffraction/x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy for high-throughput analysis of composition spread thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-throughput crystallography is an important tool in materials research, particularly for the rapid assessment of structure-property relationships. We present a technique for simultaneous acquisition of diffraction images and fluorescence spectra on a continuous composition spread thin film using a 60 keV x-ray source. Subsequent noninteractive data processing provides maps of the diffraction profiles, thin film fiber texture, and composition. Even for highly textured films, our diffraction technique provides detection of diffraction from each family of Bragg reflections, which affords direct comparison of the measured profiles with powder patterns of known phases. These techniques are important for high throughput combinatorial studies as they provide structure and composition maps which may be correlated with performance trends within an inorganic library.

  4. Raman and fluorescence characteristics of resonant inelastic X-ray scattering from doped superconducting cuprates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H Y; Jia, C J; Chen, Z Y; Wohlfeld, K; Moritz, B; Devereaux, T P; Wu, W B; Okamoto, J; Lee, W S; Hashimoto, M; He, Y; Shen, Z X; Yoshida, Y; Eisaki, H; Mou, C Y; Chen, C T; Huang, D J

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of spin excitations are essential for an understanding of spin-mediated pairing for superconductivity; and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) provides a considerable opportunity to probe high-energy spin excitations. However, whether RIXS correctly measures the collective spin excitations of doped superconducting cuprates remains under debate. Here we demonstrate distinct Raman- and fluorescence-like RIXS excitations of Bi1.5Pb0.6Sr1.54CaCu2O(8+δ). Combining photon-energy and momentum dependent RIXS measurements with theoretical calculations using exact diagonalization provides conclusive evidence that the Raman-like RIXS excitations correspond to collective spin excitations, which are magnons in the undoped Mott insulators and evolve into paramagnons in doped superconducting compounds. In contrast, the fluorescence-like shifts are due primarily to the continuum of particle-hole excitations in the charge channel. Our results show that under the proper experimental conditions RIXS indeed can be used to probe paramagnons in doped high-Tc cuprate superconductors. PMID:26794437

  5. On the emitting region of X-ray fluorescent lines around Compton-thick AGN

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jiren

    2016-01-01

    X-ray fluorescent lines are unique features of the reflection spectrum of the torus when irradiated by the central AGN. Their intrinsic line width can be used to probe the line-emitting region. Previous studies have focused on the Fe Ka line at 6.4 keV, which is the most prominent fluorescent line. These studies, however, are limited by the spectral resolution of currently available instruments, the best of which is $\\sim1860$ km s$^{-1}$ afforded by the Chandra High-Energy Grating (HEG). The HEG spectral resolution is improved by a factor of 4 at 1.74 keV, where the Si Ka line is located. We measured the FWHM of the Si Ka line for Circinus, Mrk 3, and NGC 1068, which are $570\\pm240$, $730\\pm320$, and $320\\pm280$ km s$^{-1}$, respectively. They are $3-5$ times smaller than those measured with the Fe Ka line previously. It shows that the intrinsic widths of the Fe Ka line are most likely to be over-estimated. The measured widths of the Si Ka line put the line-emitting region outside the dust sublimation radius...

  6. Multielemental analysis in cigarettes using total reflection X-ray fluorescence with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: It is well known that trace elements have important ejects in the life processes. Some of these elements are toxic for the human even at a very low level of intake. It is known that tobacco plant easily absorbs the heavy metals from the soil, especially Cd and Ni, accumulating them in its leaves. Part of these metals are transferred from tobacco to human body where they will be accumulated and damage some organs, mainly kidneys and liver. In this way, cigarettes are responsible for the death of millions of people in the world, about one death every eight seconds. The aim of this work was to determine the elemental concentrations of ten different elements in tobacco of Brazilian cigarettes used Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence with Synchrotron Radiation method. The fluorescence measurements were carried out at Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory, Campinas - Sao Paulo. A qualitative analysis of spectral peaks showed that the samples contained potassium, calcium, titanium, chromium, manganese, iron, copper, rubidium and strontium. Among these elements, calcium, potassium and iron presented the highest concentrations. There was a wide range in the elemental concentrations in the tobacco, due various factors, such as agricultural practices, soil characteristics, climatic conditions and plant varieties. Our results are in good concern with the results reported by the scientific literature

  7. [Influence of the Experiment Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence Measurement of Uranium by Different Excitation Source].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Chao; Ge, Liang-quan; Liu, Duan; Zhang, Qing-xian; Gu, Yi; Luo, Yao-yao; Zhao, Jian-kun

    2016-03-01

    Aiming at the self-excitation effect on the interference of measurements which exist in the process of Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence method for uranium measurement. To solve the problem of radioactive isotopes only used as excitation source in determination of uranium. Utilizing the micro X-ray tube to test Self-excitation effect to get a comparison of the results obtained by three different uranium ore samples--109 Cd, 241 Am and Mirco X-ray tube. The results showed that self-excitation effect produced the area measure of characteristic X-ray peak is less than 1% of active condition, also the interference of measurements can be negligible. Photoelectric effect cross-section excited by 109 Cd is higher, corresponding fluorescence yield is higher than excited by 241 Am as well due to characteristics X-ray energy of 109 Cd, 22.11 & 24.95 KeV adjacent to absorption edge energy of L(α), 21.75 KeV, based on the above, excitation efficiency by 109 Cd is higher than 241 Am; The fact that measurement error excited by 241 Am is significantly greater than by 109 Cd is mainly due to peak region overlap between L energy peaks of uranium and Scattering peak of 241 Am, 26.35 keV, These factors above caused the background of measured Spectrum higher; The error between the uranium content in ore samples which the X-ray tube as the excitation source and the chemical analysis results is within 10%. Conclusion: This paper come to the conclusion that the technical quality of uranium measurement used X-ray tube as excitation source is superior to that in radioactive source excitation mode. PMID:27400534

  8. Ultraviolet germicidal irradiation and its effects on elemental distributions in mouse embryonic fibroblast cells in x-ray fluorescence microanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapidly-frozen hydrated (cryopreserved) specimens combined with cryo-scanning x-ray fluorescence microscopy provide an ideal approach for investigating elemental distributions in biological cells and tissues. However, because cryopreservation does not deactivate potentially infectious agents associated with Risk Group 2 biological materials, one must be concerned with contamination of expensive and complicated cryogenic x-ray microscopes when working with such materials. We employed ultraviolet germicidal irradiation to decontaminate previously cryopreserved cells under liquid nitrogen, and then investigated its effects on elemental distributions under both frozen hydrated and freeze dried states with x-ray fluorescence microscopy. We show that the contents and distributions of most biologically important elements remain nearly unchanged when compared with non-ultraviolet-irradiated counterparts, even after multiple cycles of ultraviolet germicidal irradiation and cryogenic x-ray imaging. This provides a potential pathway for rendering Risk Group 2 biological materials safe for handling in multiuser cryogenic x-ray microscopes without affecting the fidelity of the results

  9. Quantitative imaging of gold nanoparticle distribution in a tumor-bearing mouse using benchtop x-ray fluorescence computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohar, Nivedh; Reynoso, Francisco J.; Diagaradjane, Parmeswaran; Krishnan, Sunil; Cho, Sang Hyun

    2016-02-01

    X-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XFCT) is a technique that can identify, quantify, and locate elements within objects by detecting x-ray fluorescence (characteristic x-rays) stimulated by an excitation source, typically derived from a synchrotron. However, the use of a synchrotron limits practicality and accessibility of XFCT for routine biomedical imaging applications. Therefore, we have developed the ability to perform XFCT on a benchtop setting with ordinary polychromatic x-ray sources. Here, we report our postmortem study that demonstrates the use of benchtop XFCT to accurately image the distribution of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) injected into a tumor-bearing mouse. The distribution of GNPs as determined by benchtop XFCT was validated using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. This investigation shows drastically enhanced sensitivity and specificity of GNP detection and quantification with benchtop XFCT, up to two orders of magnitude better than conventional x-ray CT. The results also reaffirm the unique capabilities of benchtop XFCT for simultaneous determination of the spatial distribution and concentration of nonradioactive metallic probes, such as GNPs, within the context of small animal imaging. Overall, this investigation identifies a clear path toward in vivo molecular imaging using benchtop XFCT techniques in conjunction with GNPs and other metallic probes.

  10. The determination, by x-ray-fluorescence spectrometry, of gold, silver, and base metals on activated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method proposed involves ashing of the sample at a low temperature in a muffle furnace, mixing of the ash with alumina and boric acid in a Siebtechnik mill, and briquetting of the mixture. The elements are measured in the briquette by the use of x-ray fluorescence spectrometry. The detailed laboratory method is given in an appendix

  11. Rapid and direct determination of percentage tungsten in tantalum-10% tungsten alloy by Wavelength Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for rapid and direct determination of percentage tungsten in tungsten-tantalum alloy by Wavelength Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry has been developed for the routine determination of tungsten in tantalum-10% tungsten alloy samples. A RSD of < 1% is obtained in the technique. (author)

  12. Analytical Instrument of X-ray Fluorescence Determine Concentration of U and Pu in Organic Solution at the Same Time

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    An instrument is developed to measure the concentration of U, Pu and the intensity of gamma ray in samples of 1AP organic phase at the same time. The Ag cold cathode is used to excite L series X-ray fluorescence of U and Pu. The Si-pin detector is

  13. Development of off-line layer chromatographic and total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometric methods for arsenic speciation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihucz, Victor G. [Joint Research Group of Environmental Chemistry of Hungarian Academy of Sciences and L. Eoetvoes University, P. O. Box 32, H-1518 Budapest (Hungary); Hungarian Satellite Centre of Trace Elements Institute to UNESCO, P. O. Box 32, H-1518 Budapest (Hungary); Moricz, Agnes M. [L. Eoetvoes University, Department of Chemical Technology and Environmental Chemistry, P.O. Box 32, H-1518 Budapest (Hungary); Kroepfl, Krisztina [Joint Research Group of Environmental Chemistry of Hungarian Academy of Sciences and L. Eoetvoes University, P. O. Box 32, H-1518 Budapest (Hungary); Szikora, Szilvia [Joint Research Group of Environmental Chemistry of Hungarian Academy of Sciences and L. Eoetvoes University, P. O. Box 32, H-1518 Budapest (Hungary); Tatar, Eniko [Hungarian Satellite Centre of Trace Elements Institute to UNESCO, P. O. Box 32, H-1518 Budapest (Hungary); L. Eoetvoes University, Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, P.O. Box 32, H-1518 Budapest (Hungary); Parra, Lue Meru Marco [Universidad Centro-occidental Lisandro Alvarado, Decanato de Agronomia, Departamento de Quimica y Suelos Unidad de Analisis Instrumental, Apartado Postal 4076, Cabudare 3023 (Venezuela); Zaray, Gyula [Joint Research Group of Environmental Chemistry of Hungarian Academy of Sciences and L. Eoetvoes University, P. O. Box 32, H-1518 Budapest (Hungary) and Hungarian Satellite Centre of Trace Elements Institute to UNESCO, P. O. Box 32, H-1518 Budapest (Hungary) and L. Eoetvoes University, Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, P.O. Box 32, H-1518 Budapest (Hungary)]. E-mail: zaray@ludens.elte.hu

    2006-11-15

    Rapid and low cost off-line thin layer chromatography-total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and overpressured thin layer chromatography-total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry methods have been developed for separation of 25 ng of each As(III), As(V), monomethyl arsonic acid and dimethylarsinic acid applying a PEI cellulose stationary phase on plastic sheets and a mixture of acetone/acetic acid/water = 2:1:1 (v/v/v) as eluent system. The type of eluent systems, the amounts (25-1000 ng) of As species applied to PEI cellulose plates, injection volume, development distance, and flow rate (in case of overpressured thin layer chromatography) were taken into consideration for the development of the chromatographic separation. Moreover, a microdigestion method employing nitric acid for the As spots containing PEI cellulose scratched from the developed plates divided into segments was developed for the subsequent total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry analysis. The method was applied for analysis of root extracts of cucumber plants grown in As(III) containing modified Hoagland nutrient solution. Both As(III) and As(V) were detected by applying the proposed thin layer chromatography/overpressured thin layer chromatography-total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry methods.

  14. X-ray Fluorescence Observations of the Moon by SMART-1/D-CIXS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, Manuel; Swinyard, B.; Joy, K. H.; Kellett, Barry J.; Crawford, Ian A.; Howe, Chris J.

    2008-09-01

    Introduction The SMART-1 mission to the Moon included in its payload D-CIXS, a compact X-ray spectrometer [1], [2] SMART-1 was a technology evaluation mission, and D-CIXS was the first of a new generation of planetary X-ray spectrometers. Novel technologies enabled new capabilities for measuring the fluorescent yield of a planetary surface or atmosphere which is illuminated by solar X-rays. During the extended SMART-1 cruise phase, observations of the Earth showed strong argon emission, providing a good source for calibration and demonstrating the potential of the technique. At the Moon, observations showed a first unambiguous remote sensing of calcium in the lunar regolith (Grande et al 2007) (Fig 1). Data obtained were broadly consistent with current understanding of mare and highland composition. Ground truth was provided by the returned Apollo and Luna sample sets. We have extended our observations to comparisons of Lunar near and farside, and by careful analysis enabled new elemental lines to be observed. Observations: In March, 2005, the SMART-1 spacecraft reached its nominal lunar orbit, and we began full commissioning for lunar operations. During the pre-commissioning period in mid-January, 2005, observations of the lunar surface were made which coincided with the occurrence of several major M and X class flares. This opportunity provided an excellent chance to observe spatially localized fluorescence from the lunar surface. X-ray fluorescent elemental lines from the lunar surface are detected by all three facets of D-CIXS while the XSM instrument observes the input solar spectrum. At the end of this interval, a long duration M-class solar flare began at 06:00 UTC on the 15th of January, 2005. The flare lasted for more than 1 hour but only ~30 minutes corresponded to D-CIXS observations. At this time SMART-1 was orbiting over the Moon's near-side eastern limb from about the equator, traveling northwards. As SMART-1 flew north, its altitude was also

  15. A WHITE DWARF MERGER AS PROGENITOR OF THE ANOMALOUS X-RAY PULSAR 4U 0142+61?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rueda, J. A.; Boshkayev, K.; Izzo, L.; Ruffini, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica and ICRA, Sapienza Universita di Roma, P.le Aldo Moro 5, I-00185 Rome (Italy); Loren-Aguilar, P. [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom); Kuelebi, B. [Institut de Ciencies de l' Espai (CSIC), Facultat de Ciencies, Campus UAB, Torre C5-parell, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Aznar-Siguan, G.; Garcia-Berro, E., E-mail: jorge.rueda@icra.it, E-mail: enrique.garcia-berro@upc.edu [Institute for Space Studies of Catalonia, c/Gran Capita 2-4, Edif. Nexus 104, E-08034 Barcelona (Spain)

    2013-08-01

    It has been recently proposed that massive, fast-rotating, highly magnetized white dwarfs could describe the observational properties of some of soft gamma-ray repeaters and anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs). Moreover, it has also been shown that high-field magnetic white dwarfs can be the outcome of white dwarf binary mergers. The products of these mergers consist of a hot central white dwarf surrounded by a rapidly rotating disk. Here we show that the merger of a double degenerate system can explain the characteristics of the peculiar AXP 4U 0142+61. This scenario accounts for the observed infrared excess. We also show that the observed properties of 4U 0142+6 are consistent with an approximately 1.2 M{sub Sun} white dwarf, remnant of the coalescence of an original system made of two white dwarfs of masses 0.6 M{sub Sun} and 1.0 M{sub Sun }. Finally, we infer a post-merging age {tau}{sub WD} Almost-Equal-To 64 kyr and a magnetic field B Almost-Equal-To 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} G. Evidence for such a magnetic field may come from the possible detection of the electron cyclotron absorption feature observed between the B and V bands at Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 15} Hz in the spectrum of 4U 0142+61.

  16. The distribution of Sr2+ counterions around polyacrylate chains analyzed by anomalous small-angle X-ray scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goerigk, G.; Schweins, R.; Huber, K.; Ballauff, M.

    2004-05-01

    The distribution of Sr counterions around negatively charged sodium polyacrylate chains (NaPA) in aqueous solution was studied by anomalous small-angle X-ray scattering. Different ratios of the concentrations of SrCl2/[NaPA] reveal dramatic changes in the scattering curves. At the lower ratio the scattering curves indicate a coil-like behavior, while at the higher ratio the scattering curves are contracted to smaller q-values, caused by the collapse of the NaPA coil. The form factor of the scattering contribution of the counterions was separated and analyzed. For the scattering curves of the collapsed chains, this analysis agrees with the model of a pearl necklace, consisting of collapsed sphere-like subdomains which are connected by stretched chain segments. An averaged radius of the pearls of 19 nm and a distance between neighbouring pearls close to 60 nm could be established for the collapsed state of the NaPA chains.

  17. A white dwarf merger as progenitor of the anomalous X-ray pulsar 4U 0142+61?

    CERN Document Server

    Rueda, J A; Izzo, L; Ruffini, R; Aguilar, P Loren; Kulebi, B; Siguan, G Aznar; Berro, E Garcia

    2013-01-01

    It has been recently proposed that massive fast-rotating highly-magnetized white dwarfs could describe the observational properties of some of Soft Gamma-Ray Repeaters (SGRs) and Anomalous X-Ray Pulsars (AXPs). Moreover, it has also been shown that high-field magnetic (HFMWDs) can be the outcome of white dwarf binary mergers. The products of these mergers consist of a hot central white dwarf surrounded by a rapidly rotating disk. Here we show that the merger of a double degenerate system can explain the characteristics of the peculiar AXP 4U 0142+61. This scenario accounts for the observed infrared excess. We also show that the observed properties of 4U 0142+6 are consistent with an approximately $1.2 M_{\\sun}$ white dwarf, remnant of the coalescence of an original system made of two white dwarfs of masses $0.6\\, M_{\\sun}$ and $1.0\\, M_{\\sun}$. Finally, we infer a post-merging age $\\tau_{\\rm WD}\\approx 64$ kyr, and a magnetic field $B\\approx 2\\times 10^8$ G. Evidence for such a magnetic field may come from th...

  18. Probing the graphite band structure with resonant soft-x-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlisle, J.A.; Shirley, E.L.; Hudson, E.A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF) spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation offers several advantages over surface sensitive spectroscopies for probing the electronic structure of complex multi-elemental materials. Due to the long mean free path of photons in solids ({approximately}1000 {angstrom}), SXF is a bulk-sensitive probe. Also, since core levels are involved in absorption and emission, SXF is both element- and angular-momentum-selective. SXF measures the local partial density of states (DOS) projected onto each constituent element of the material. The chief limitation of SXF has been the low fluorescence yield for photon emission, particularly for light elements. However, third generation light sources, such as the Advanced Light Source (ALS), offer the high brightness that makes high-resolution SXF experiments practical. In the following the authors utilize this high brightness to demonstrate the capability of SXF to probe the band structure of a polycrystalline sample. In SXF, a valence emission spectrum results from transitions from valence band states to the core hole produced by the incident photons. In the non-resonant energy regime, the excitation energy is far above the core binding energy, and the absorption and emission events are uncoupled. The fluorescence spectrum resembles emission spectra acquired using energetic electrons, and is insensitive to the incident photon`s energy. In the resonant excitation energy regime, core electrons are excited by photons to unoccupied states just above the Fermi level (EF). The absorption and emission events are coupled, and this coupling manifests itself in several ways, depending in part on the localization of the empty electronic states in the material. Here the authors report spectral measurements from highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

  19. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence trace mercury determination by trapping complexation: Application in advanced oxidation technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Custo, Graciela [Unidad de Actividad Quimica, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. Gral Paz 1499 (B1650KNA) San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Litter, Marta I. [Unidad de Actividad Quimica, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. Gral Paz 1499 (B1650KNA) San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Escuela de Posgrado, Universidad de General San Martin, San Lorenzo 3391 Villa Ballester, 1653. Prov. de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Rodriguez, Diana [Universidad Nacional de Lujan, Ruta 5 y 7. Prov. de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Vazquez, Cristina [Unidad de Actividad Quimica, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. Gral Paz 1499 (B1650KNA) San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina) and Laboratorio de Quimica de Sistemas Heterogeneos, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad de Buenos Aires, P. Colon 850 (C1063ACU), Buenos Aires (Argentina)]. E-mail: Cristina.Vazquez@cnea.gov.ar

    2006-11-15

    It is well known that Hg species cause high noxious effects on the health of living organisms even at very low levels (5 {mu}g/L). Quantification of this element is an analytical challenge due to the peculiar physicochemical properties of all Hg species. The regulation of the maximal allowable Hg concentration led to search for sensitive methods for its determination. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence is a proved instrumental analytical tool for the determination of trace elements. In this work, the use of total reflection X-ray fluorescence for Hg quantification is investigated. However, experimental determination by total reflection X-ray fluorescence requires depositing a small volume of sample on the reflector and evaporation of the solvent until dryness to form a thin film. Because of volatilization of several Hg forms, a procedure to capture these volatile species in liquid samples by using complexing agents is proposed. Acetate, oxalic acid, ethylenediaminetetracetic acid and ammonium pyrrolidine-dithiocarbamate were assayed for trapping the analytes into the solution during the preparation of the sample and onto the reflector during total reflection X-ray fluorescence measurements. The proposed method was applied to evaluate Hg concentration during TiO{sub 2}-heterogeneous photocatalysis, one of the most known advanced oxidation technologies. Advanced oxidation technologies are processes for the treatment of effluents in waters and air that involve the generation of very active oxidative and reductive species. In heterogeneous photocatalysis, Hg is transformed to several species under ultraviolet illumination in the presence of titanium dioxide. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence was demonstrated to be applicable in following the extent of the heterogeneous photocatalysis reaction by determining non-transformed Hg in the remaining solution.

  20. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence trace mercury determination by trapping complexation: Application in advanced oxidation technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custo, Graciela; Litter, Marta I.; Rodríguez, Diana; Vázquez, Cristina

    2006-11-01

    It is well known that Hg species cause high noxious effects on the health of living organisms even at very low levels (5 μg/L). Quantification of this element is an analytical challenge due to the peculiar physicochemical properties of all Hg species. The regulation of the maximal allowable Hg concentration led to search for sensitive methods for its determination. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence is a proved instrumental analytical tool for the determination of trace elements. In this work, the use of total reflection X-ray fluorescence for Hg quantification is investigated. However, experimental determination by total reflection X-ray fluorescence requires depositing a small volume of sample on the reflector and evaporation of the solvent until dryness to form a thin film. Because of volatilization of several Hg forms, a procedure to capture these volatile species in liquid samples by using complexing agents is proposed. Acetate, oxalic acid, ethylenediaminetetracetic acid and ammonium pyrrolidine-dithiocarbamate were assayed for trapping the analytes into the solution during the preparation of the sample and onto the reflector during total reflection X-ray fluorescence measurements. The proposed method was applied to evaluate Hg concentration during TiO 2-heterogeneous photocatalysis, one of the most known advanced oxidation technologies. Advanced oxidation technologies are processes for the treatment of effluents in waters and air that involve the generation of very active oxidative and reductive species. In heterogeneous photocatalysis, Hg is transformed to several species under ultraviolet illumination in the presence of titanium dioxide. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence was demonstrated to be applicable in following the extent of the heterogeneous photocatalysis reaction by determining non-transformed Hg in the remaining solution.

  1. Some considerations on X-ray fluorescence use in museum measurements - The case of medieval silver coins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to give a general layout for the potential applications of Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (ED-XRF) technique for ancient silver coin characterization, using in-situ (in museums) measurements. Examples concerning originality testing, provenance (mines, workshops) identification, counterfeits selection, historical studies (manufacturing technologies, commercial, military and political relationships) are given. Two study cases of medieval coins are described: German brakteaten pfennige and Moldavian groschen. Other analysis methods and their use in the study of medieval coins are illustrated with the example of Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) technique. (authors)

  2. A study of ancient pottery by means of X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, multivariate statistics and mineralogical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy was used to determine the composition of 64 potsherds from the Hellenistic settlement of Orraon, in northwestern Greece. Data classification by principal components analysis revealed four distinct groups of pottery, pointing to different local production practices rather than different provenance. The interpretation of statistical grouping was corroborated by a complementary X-ray diffraction analysis. Compositional and mineralogical data, combined with archaeological and materials' science criteria, allowed addressing various aspects of pottery making, such as selection of raw clays, tempers and firing conditions

  3. Investigation of measuring hazardous substances in printed circuit boards using the micro-focus X-ray fluorescence screening

    CERN Document Server

    Fu, M L; Fakhrtdinov, R; Grigoriev, M; Quan, B S; Le, Z C; Roshchupkin, D

    2014-01-01

    Printed circuit boards (PCBs) are widely used in most electrical and electronic equipments or products. Hazardous substances such as Pb, Hg, Cd, etc, can be present in high concentrations in PCBs and the degradation and release of these substances poses a huge threat to humans and the environment. To investigation the chemical composition of PCBs in domestic market of China, a practical micro-focus X-ray fluorescence system is setup to make the elements analysis, especially for detecting hazardous substances. Collimator is adopted to focus the X-ray emitted from X-ray tube. BRUKER X-ray detector with proportional counter is used to detect the emitted fluorescence from the PCB samples. Both single layer PCB samples and double layers PCB samples made of epoxy glass fiber are purchased from the domestic market of China. Besides, a MC55 wireless communication module made by SIEMENS in Germany is used as the reference material. Experimental results from the fluorescence spectrums of the testing points of PCB sampl...

  4. X-ray fluorescence activities at Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Manoranjan Sarkar

    2011-02-01

    This paper covers different aspects related to X-ray fluorescence activities at Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata, India. In its first part, experiments on basic physical problems are illustrated and in the second part, some applications related to X-ray fluorescence are discussed.

  5. The use of the X-ray fluorescence on the monitoring of heavy metals in water samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the purpose to evaluate the degree of contamination for weighed metals in the region of the lakes of Santa Gertrudes, water samples had been analyzed using the technique of x-ray fluorescence with energy dispersion. For the production of x-rays characteristic were used a tube of x-rays and for the detection a detector of Si(Li). The pre-concentration of the samples for precipitation with ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate was carried through, for the determination of the concentration of interest metals, presents on the level of traces. The gotten limits of detention for Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu and Zn had been of 1,4; 1,8; 2,2; 3,0; 3,5 and 4,0 ng.ml-1, respectively

  6. Coelectrodeposition of Ternary Mn-Oxide/Polypyrrole Composites for ORR Electrocatalysts: A Study Based on Micro-X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and X-ray Fluorescence Mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedetto Bozzini

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Low energy X-ray fluorescence (XRF and soft X-ray absorption (XAS microspectroscopies at high space-resolution are employed for the investigation of the coelectrodeposition of composites consisting of a polypyrrole(PPy-matrix and Mn-based ternary dispersoids, that have been proposed as promising electrocatalysts for oxygen-reduction electrodes. Specifically, we studied Mn–Co–Cu/PP, Mn–Co–Mg/PPy and Mn–Ni–Mg/PPy co-electrodeposits. The Mn–Co–Cu system features the best ORR electrocatalytic activity in terms of electron transfer number, onset potential, half-wave potential and current density. XRF maps and micro-XAS spectra yield compositional and chemical state distributions, contributing unique molecular-level information on the pulse-plating processes. Mn, Ni, Co and Mg exhibit a bimodal distribution consisting of mesoscopic aggregates of micrometric globuli, separated by polymer-rich ridges. Within this common qualitative scenario, the individual systems exhibit quantitatively different chemical distribution patterns, resulting from specific electrokinetic and electrosorption properties of the single components. The electrodeposits consist of Mn3+,4+-oxide particles, accompanied by combinations of Co0/Co2+, Ni0/Ni2+ and Cu0,+/Cu2+ resulting from the alternance of cathodic and anodic pulses. The formation of highly electroactive Mn3+,4+ in the as-fabricated material is a specific feature of the ternary systems, deriving from synergistic stabilisation brought about by two types of bivalent dopants as well as by galvanic contact to elemental metal; this result represents a considerable improvement in material quality with respect to previously studied Mn/PPy and Mn-based/PPy binaries.

  7. X-ray fluorescence in investigations of cultural relics and archaeological finds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musilek, Ladislav, E-mail: musilek@fjfi.cvut.cz [Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Brehova 7, 115 19 Praha 1 (Czech Republic); Cechak, Tomas; Trojek, Tomas [Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Brehova 7, 115 19 Praha 1 (Czech Republic)

    2012-07-15

    Some characteristic features of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis make it an ideal method for investigations of cultural relics and archaeological finds. It has therefore become a standard method used in archaeometry. Paintings, frescos, manuscripts, pottery, metalwork, glass, and many other objects are analysed with the aim of recognising their materials, production technologies and origin, and for identifying counterfeits. This paper reviews various techniques used in XRF analyses of works of art, summarises the advantages and limitations of the method, and presents some typical examples of its use. The general review is supplemented by some techniques used and some results achieved at CTU-FNSPE in Prague. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Review of XRF analysis in archaeometry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Instrumentation for XRF analysis with various sources of radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Materials and artefacts, which can be measured and information, which can be obtained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer XRF analysis of artworks at the CTU Prague.

  8. Hazardous metals in vintage plastic toys measured by a handheld X-ray fluorescence spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Gillian Zaharias; Harris, Zoe E

    2015-01-01

    Over 100 plastic toys from the 1970s and 1980s, both polyvinyl chloride ("vinyl") and nonvinyl, were analyzed in the study described here using a handheld X-ray fluorescence spectrometer to quantify hazardous metal content. A sampling of recent vinyl toys was also tested. The majority of nonvinyl samples were Fisher Price brand toys. The vinyl toys consisted largely of Barbie dolls and other dolls. Overall, lead or cadmium was found in 67% of vintage plastic toys, frequently at concentrations exceeding current U.S. and European limits. Arsenic was detected at levels of concern in 16% of the samples. In the nonvinyl toys, heavy metal content was found to correlate with certain colors of plastic. The likely sources of the detected metals are discussed. None of the contemporary vinyl toys contained detectable cadmium, lead, or arsenic. Given that vintage toys remain in widespread use by children in homes and other locations, the results illuminate a potential source of heavy metal exposure for children.

  9. Characterization and classification of spirituous beverages by total reflection x-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The total reflection x-ray fluorescence (TXRF) technique was applied for the multi-elemental analysis of spirituous beverages like rum, cocuy (typical spirituous beverage in Venezuela), whiskey and wine, in order to classify the samples by product processing and geographical origin by chemometric analysis. Special attention was paid to the cocuy samples, since there is a lack of quality control of this beverage, mainly due to the home-made product processing. The use of the Compton peak information was evaluated for the determination of organic content in samples. In the specifically case of cocuy samples the Compton peak area was correlated to the ash content for detection of adulteration with sugar syrup. Cocuy samples were also analyzed using gas chromatography, for pH, acidity, ash content and refractometry, in order to develop the recognition pattern. The TXRF analysis was carried out in a Canberra spectrometer, using the K α-line of a Motube, by a direct procedure previously developed. The analysis of the data was done by using principal components analysis and a confidence test. The results show that TXRF and chemometric analysis is a useful tool for quality control of spirituous beverages, not only concerning to metal content, but also in the evaluation of sugar and non volatile organic content. (author)

  10. Study of the hydrogen peroxide bleaching agent effects on bovine enamel using X-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, Ruda F.; Calazans, Fernanda S.; Miranda, Mauro S.; Santos, Ramon S.; Anjos, Marcelino J.; Assis, Joaquim T. [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Hydrogen Peroxide's a bleaching agent capable of oxidizing a wide range of colored organic, causing discoloration and hence bleaching of the substrate, but some authors related the occurrence of side effects related to bleaching of the tooth structure, such as changes in morphology superficial. It was used 6 bovine incisors, each tooth was initially evaluated six times in different areas to obtain the count of elements phosphorus and calcium using X-Ray Fluorescence. The teeth were randomly divided in two groups: both groups were submitted to bleaching in office with hydrogen peroxide 38%, once a week during three weeks. Group 1 was stored in distilled water and group 2 in artificial saliva, between the sessions. The measurements were repeated every seven days before the bleaching treatment. Besides that, changes in mineral levels were always assessed in the same area and using the same procedure. It was observed that the bleaching was not able to demineralize the tooth enamel studied. (author)

  11. Determination of metals in air samples using X-Ray fluorescence associated the APDC preconcentration technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nardes, Raysa C.; Santos, Ramon S.; Sanches, Francis A.C.R.A.; Gama Filho, Hamilton S.; Oliveira, Davi F.; Anjos, Marcelino J., E-mail: rc.nardes@gmail.com, E-mail: ramonziosp@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: francissanches@gmail.com, E-mail: hamiltongamafilho@hotmail.com, E-mail: davi.oliveira@uerj.br, E-mail: marcelin@uerj.br [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica. Departamento de Fisica Aplicada e Termodinamica

    2015-07-01

    Air pollution has become one of the leading quality degradation factors of life for people in large urban centers. Studies indicate that the suspended particulate matter in the atmosphere is directly associated with risks to public health, in addition, it can cause damage to fauna, flora and public / cultural patrimonies. The inhalable particulate materials can cause the emergence and / or worsening of chronic diseases related to respiratory system and other diseases, such as reduced physical strength. In this study, we propose a new method to measure the concentration of total suspended particulate matter (TSP) in the air using an impinger as an air cleaning apparatus, preconcentration with APDC and Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence technique (TXRF) to analyze the heavy metals present in the air. The samples were collected from five random points in the city of Rio de Janeiro/Brazil. Analyses of TXRF were performed at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS). The technique proved viable because it was able to detect five important metallic elements to environmental studies: Cr, Fe, Ni, Cu and Zn. This technique presented substantial efficiency in determining the elementary concentration of air pollutants, in addition to low cost. It can be concluded that the metals analysis technique in air samples using an impinger as sample collection instrument associated with a complexing agent (APDC) was viable because it is a low-cost technique, moreover, it was possible the detection of five important metal elements in environmental studies associated with industrial emissions and urban traffic. (author)

  12. Diagnostic copper imaging of Menkes disease by synchrotron radiation-generated X-ray fluorescence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinebuchi, Miyuki; Matsuura, Akihiro; Kiyono, Tohru; Nomura, Yumiko; Kimura, Sachiko

    2016-01-01

    Copper (Cu) is an indispensable metal for normal development and function of humans, especially in central nervous system (CNS). However, its redox activity requires accurate Cu transport system. ATP7A, a main Cu(2+) transporting-ATPase, is necessary to efflux Cu across the plasma membrane and synthesize cuproenzymes. Menkes disease (MD) is caused by mutations in ATP7A gene. Clinically, MD is Cu deficiency syndrome and is treated with Cu-histidine injections soon after definite diagnosis. But outcome of the most remains poor. To estimate the standard therapy, Cu distribution in the treated classic MD patients is analyzed by synchrotron-generated X-ray fluorescence technique (SR-XRF), which identifies and quantifies an individual atom up to at subcellular level of resolution with wide detection area. SR-XRF analysis newly reveals that Cu exists in spinal cord parenchyma and flows out via venous and lymph systems. By systemic analysis, excess Cu is detected in the proximal tubular cells of the kidney, the mucosal epithelial cells of the intestine, and the lymph and venous systems. The current study suggests that the standard therapy supply almost enough Cu for patient tissues. But given Cu passes through the tissues to venous and lymph systems, or accumulate in the cells responsible for Cu absorption. PMID:27629586

  13. X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy and Monte Carlo characterization of a unique nuragic artifact (Sardinia, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunetti, Antonio; Depalmas, Anna; di Gennaro, Francesco; Serges, Alessandra; Schiavon, Nicola

    2016-07-01

    The chemical composition of a unique bronze artifact known as the "Cesta" ("Basket") belonging to the ancient Nuragic civilization of the Island of Sardinia, Italy has been analyzed by combining X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy (XRF) with Monte Carlo simulations using the XRMC code. The "Cesta" had been discovered probably in the XVIII century with the first graphic representation reported around 1761. In a later draft (dated 1764), the basket has been depicted as being carried upside-down on the shoulder of a large bronze warrior Barthélemy (1761), Pinza (1901), Winckelmann (1776) . The two pictorial representations differed only by the presence of handles in the most recent one. XRF measurements revealed that the handles of the object are composed by brass while the other parts are composed by bronze suggesting the handles as being a later addition to the original object. The artifact is covered at its surface by a fairly thick corrosion patina. In order to determine the bronze bulk composition without the need for removing the outer patina, the artifact has been modeled as a two layer object in Monte Carlo simulations.

  14. Synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence analysis on altered mineral muscovite in gold deposit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Yun-Hui; YUAN Wan-Ming; WANG Li-Hua; HAN Chun-Ming; HUANG Yu-Ying; HE Wei

    2005-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SRXRF) microprobe was used to ananlyse altered mineral muscovite and its surrounding feldspar in Yuerya gold deposit. The major, minor and trace elements of the two minerals were detected and analyzed. SRXRF analysis showed that the Yuerya muscovite had a complex chemical composition, containing K, Fe, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Co, Cu, Zn and many trace or ultra-trace elements. Since muscovite resulted from the alteration of hydrothermal ore fluid acting on feldspar (plagioclase), the difference of chemical composition between the two minerals shows the components of ore fluid, which are characterized by the enrichment of alkaline and alkaline-earth metal elements K, Ca and ore-associated elements Fe, Cu, Zn. And gold, silver and platinum, invisible under microscope, were detected in some areas of muscovite, but not found in feldspar. Especially platinum, a mantle material, is rarely seen in the earth crust but now found in the gold deposit of magmatic sources; its appearance approves the idea of mantle flux participating in the gold mineralization, which suggests that the tectonic event controlling gold mineralization in the Yuerya district is a mantle phenomenon.

  15. Sample pretreatment strategies for total reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis: A tutorial review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De La Calle, I.; Cabaleiro, N.; Romero, V.; Lavilla, I.; Bendicho, C., E-mail: bendicho@uvigo.es

    2013-12-01

    In the last years, there has been a revival of total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (TXRF), which was firstly applied for analytical purposes in the late 80s. The aim of this work is to discuss and compare the current approaches for sample pretreatment including in situ microdigestion, slurry preparation, acid digestion, extraction, etc. prior to TXRF analysis. Advantages and drawbacks inherent to each of those procedures are considered. A comprehensive revision in the period January 2008–July 2013 about different sample preparation strategies prior to TXRF analysis apart from early pioneering reports dealing with sample pretreatment are included in the review. Non-conventional sample pretreatment approaches such as microflow online preconcentration, lab-on-a-chip, etc., are also discussed. Finally, future prospects in sample preparation prior to TXRF analysis are outlined. - Highlights: • We review sample pretreatment for TXRF in a comprehensive way. • Strategies for analysis of solid, liquid and gaseous samples are discussed. • A tutorial review is presented covering the period January 2008–July 2013. • Future prospects for sample pretreament approaches in TXRF are outlined.

  16. New applications of the good old wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Andrzej Kuczumow; Paweł Wolski

    2011-02-01

    Wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence can be characterized by its advantages and drawbacks. Unbeaten spectral resolution in a range below 5 keV, good operational stability, excellent ability of making averaged analysis, and good presentation of peak shape which gives the basis for the chemical speciation are the advantages. Among the drawbacks, the following are important: system with sequential analysis of particular elements, low output of energy supplied to the device, and great cost of instrument which can be amortized only in routine operations. In routine geological and environmental analyses, the WD-XRF performs better than other simpler instrumental or wet techniques. WD-XRF is continuously improved, by applying new multilayer interference mirrors (MIM) for detection and quantification of very light elements. Bad spectral resolution of MIM noted earlier is now improved by tailoring their shape to the shape of gratings. The progress in the long wavelength spectral region joined with efficient and precise wavelength resolution systems enables the application of WD-XRF for speciation analysis. In another effort, XRF spectrometry is treated as a tool for obtaining quantitative basis for the judgement on Linnaean systematic classification of plants and opens the field to a new discipline – quantitative biology.

  17. Applications of a glazing incidence X-ray fluorescence analysis to forensic samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A glazing incidence X-ray fluorescence analysis (GIXF) has been applied to forensic samples: a counterfeit 100-dollar bill, fragments of polyvinyl tapes, a trace of semen, illegal drugs, fingerprints and fake V.S.O.P brandy. Strontium could not be detected on the magnet-respondent letter of the counterfeit bill and Br was detected on the magnet-nonrespondent part of the counterfeit bill, while such phenomena could not be noticed on a true bill. Fragments of black vinyl tapes related to a sexual assault case could be discriminated from each other. Zinc as a characteristic ingredient could be detected in a trace of semen. Bromine was detected in each of what is called a pure methamphetamine crystal and K, Ca, Fe, Zn etc. were detected in heroin powders. Lead was sharply detected in gunshot residues attached to a finger after gunfiring. Sulfur as a contaminant was abundant in fake V.S.O.P brandy, while no S was detected in genuine V.S.O.P brandy. (author)

  18. Analysis of some ores and soils by x-ray fluorescence and neutron activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was carried out to investigate the compositions of some samples from Ingassana region, some marble samples, and some ceramic samples which were collected from different parts of Sudan. The investigations involved the use of two nuclear analytical techniques, namely x-ray fluorescence (XRF) and neutron activation analysis (NAA). The elements of interest in this study were Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni, Au and Pt. It is to be noted that Au and Pt were determined by using XRF for the first time in this laboratory. Some of the results were compared with those obtained by chemical method. It was found that the NAA method gave better results for low z elements such as Al, Si and XRF gave better results for higher z elements such as Ca, Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni, Au and Pt. The results showed low concentrations from the economic point of view for Cr, higher concentrations of Ni, but considerable concentrations of Au and Pt in the samples obtained from Ingassana region. The marble samples showed high values of Ca in 2 samples. The ceramic samples showed good results with regard to ceramic work in most of the samples. (Author)

  19. X-Ray Fluorescence and Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy analysis of Roman silver denarii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pardini, L. [Istituto di Chimica dei Composti Organometallici del CNR, Research Area of Pisa, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); El Hassan, A. [National Institute for Laser- Enhanced Sciences (NILES), Cairo University Giza (Egypt); Ferretti, M. [Istituto per le Tecnologie Applicate ai Beni Culturali, Area della Ricerca del CNR di Montelibretti Roma (Italy); Foresta, A.; Legnaioli, S.; Lorenzetti, G. [Istituto di Chimica dei Composti Organometallici del CNR, Research Area of Pisa, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Nebbia, E. [Universita degli Studi di Torino (Italy); Catalli, F. [Monetiere di Firenze, Museo Archeologico Nazionale Firenze (Italy); Harith, M.A. [National Institute for Laser- Enhanced Sciences (NILES), Cairo University Giza (Egypt); Diaz Pace, D. [Institute of Physics ' Arroyo Seco' , Faculty of Science, Tandil (Argentina); Anabitarte Garcia, F. [Photonics Engineering Group, University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Scuotto, M. [Dipartimento di Scienze Archeologiche, Via Galvani 1, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Palleschi, V., E-mail: vincenzo.palleschi@cnr.it [Istituto di Chimica dei Composti Organometallici del CNR, Research Area of Pisa, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Archeologiche, Via Galvani 1, 56126 Pisa (Italy)

    2012-08-15

    In this paper we present the results of a study performed on a large collection of silver Roman republican denarii, encompassing about two centuries of history. The joint use of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy allowed for an accurate determination of the coins' elemental composition; the measurements, performed mostly in situ at the 'Monetiere' in Florence, revealed a striking connection between the 'quality' of the silver alloy and some crucial contemporary events. This finding was used to classify a group of denarii whose dating was otherwise impossible. The comparison with other contemporary denarii disproves a recent theory on the origin of the so called 'serrated' denarii (denarii showing notched chisel marks on the edge of the coin). - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We studied a large collection of Roman republican silver denarii. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer XRF and LIBS allowed to determine the precious metal content of the coins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A correlation of the 'quality' of the alloy with some contemporary events was found. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The study allowed to controvert a recent theory on the so called 'serrated' denarii.

  20. Comparison of gold leaf thickness in Namban folding screens using X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, the thickness of the gold leaf applied in six Japanese folding screens is compared using a nondestructive approach. Four screens belonging to the Momoyama period (∝1573-1603) and two screens belonging to the early Edo period (∝1603-1868) were analyzed in situ using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence, and the thickness of the applied gold leaf was evaluated using a methodology based on the attenuation of the different characteristic lines of gold in the gold leaf layer. Considering that the leaf may well not be made of pure gold, we established that, for the purpose of comparing the intensity ratios of the Au lines, layers made with gold leaf of high grade can be considered identical. The gold leaf applied in one of the screens from the Edo period was found to be thinner than the gold leaf applied in the other ones. This is consistent with the development of the beating technology to obtain ever more thin gold leafs. (orig.)

  1. Comparison of gold leaf thickness in Namban folding screens using X-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pessanha, Sofia; Madeira, Teresa I.; Manso, Marta [Centro de Fisica Atomica da Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon (Portugal); Guerra, Mauro; Carvalho, Maria Luisa [Centro de Fisica Atomica da Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon (Portugal); Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Departamento de Fisica, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Caparica (Portugal); Gac, Agnes le [Centro de Fisica Atomica da Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon (Portugal); Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Departamento de Conservacao e Restauro, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Caparica (Portugal)

    2014-09-15

    In this work, the thickness of the gold leaf applied in six Japanese folding screens is compared using a nondestructive approach. Four screens belonging to the Momoyama period (∝1573-1603) and two screens belonging to the early Edo period (∝1603-1868) were analyzed in situ using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence, and the thickness of the applied gold leaf was evaluated using a methodology based on the attenuation of the different characteristic lines of gold in the gold leaf layer. Considering that the leaf may well not be made of pure gold, we established that, for the purpose of comparing the intensity ratios of the Au lines, layers made with gold leaf of high grade can be considered identical. The gold leaf applied in one of the screens from the Edo period was found to be thinner than the gold leaf applied in the other ones. This is consistent with the development of the beating technology to obtain ever more thin gold leafs. (orig.)

  2. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis of trace-elements in candies marketed in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trace metals concentrations in food are significant for nutrition, due either to their nature or toxicity. Sweets, including chewing gum and candies, are not exactly a food, but they usually are unwearied consumed by children, the most vulnerable age-group to any kind of metal contamination in the food chain. The presence of relatively high concentrations of heavy metals such as Lead elicits concern since children are highly susceptible to heavy metals poisoning. Trace-metals concentrations were determined for six different flavors of a Mexican candy by means of Total X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry. Triplicate samples of the various candy's flavours (strawberry, pineapple, lemon, blackberry, orange and chilli) were digested in 8 mL of a mix of supra-pure HNO3 and H2O2 (6 mL: 2 mL) in a microwave oven MARS-X. Results show the presence of essential and toxic elements such as Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br, Rb, Sr, and Pb. All metal concentrations were higher and significantly different (α = 0.05) in chilli candy, compared to other candy flavours. Lead concentration fluctuated in the range of 0.102 to 0.342 μg g-1. A discussion about risk consumption and concentration allowed by Mexican and International Norms is made. As a part of the Quality Control Program, a NIST standard of 'Citrus Leaves' and a blank were treated in the same way.

  3. Sample sizing of biological materials analyzed by energy dispersion X-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paiva, Jose D.S.; Franca, Elvis J.; Magalhaes, Marcelo R.L.; Almeida, Marcio E.S.; Hazin, Clovis A., E-mail: dan-paiva@hotmail.com, E-mail: ejfranca@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: marcelo_rlm@hotmail.com, E-mail: maensoal@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: chazin@cnen.gov.b [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Analytical portions used in chemical analyses are usually less than 1g. Errors resulting from the sampling are barely evaluated, since this type of study is a time-consuming procedure, with high costs for the chemical analysis of large number of samples. The energy dispersion X-ray fluorescence - EDXRF is a non-destructive and fast analytical technique with the possibility of determining several chemical elements. Therefore, the aim of this study was to provide information on the minimum analytical portion for quantification of chemical elements in biological matrices using EDXRF. Three species were sampled in mangroves from the Pernambuco, Brazil. Tree leaves were washed with distilled water, oven-dried at 60 deg C and milled until 0.5 mm particle size. Ten test-portions of approximately 500 mg for each species were transferred to vials sealed with polypropylene film. The quality of the analytical procedure was evaluated from the reference materials IAEA V10 Hay Powder, SRM 2976 Apple Leaves. After energy calibration, all samples were analyzed under vacuum for 100 seconds for each group of chemical elements. The voltage used was 15 kV and 50 kV for chemical elements of atomic number lower than 22 and the others, respectively. For the best analytical conditions, EDXRF was capable of estimating the sample size uncertainty for further determination of chemical elements in leaves. (author)

  4. Determination of metals in air samples using X-Ray fluorescence associated the APDC preconcentration technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Air pollution has become one of the leading quality degradation factors of life for people in large urban centers. Studies indicate that the suspended particulate matter in the atmosphere is directly associated with risks to public health, in addition, it can cause damage to fauna, flora and public / cultural patrimonies. The inhalable particulate materials can cause the emergence and / or worsening of chronic diseases related to respiratory system and other diseases, such as reduced physical strength. In this study, we propose a new method to measure the concentration of total suspended particulate matter (TSP) in the air using an impinger as an air cleaning apparatus, preconcentration with APDC and Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence technique (TXRF) to analyze the heavy metals present in the air. The samples were collected from five random points in the city of Rio de Janeiro/Brazil. Analyses of TXRF were performed at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS). The technique proved viable because it was able to detect five important metallic elements to environmental studies: Cr, Fe, Ni, Cu and Zn. This technique presented substantial efficiency in determining the elementary concentration of air pollutants, in addition to low cost. It can be concluded that the metals analysis technique in air samples using an impinger as sample collection instrument associated with a complexing agent (APDC) was viable because it is a low-cost technique, moreover, it was possible the detection of five important metal elements in environmental studies associated with industrial emissions and urban traffic. (author)

  5. Sample Preparation for in vitro Analysis of Iodine in Thyroid Tissue using X-ray Fluorescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gertrud Berg

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Iodine is enriched and stored in the thyroid gland. Due to several factors, the size of the thyroid iodine pool varies both between individuals and within individuals over time. Excess iodine as well as iodine deficiency may promote thyroid cancer. Therefore, knowledge of iodine content and distribution within thyroid cancer tissue is of interest. X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS are two methods that can be used to assess iodine content in thyroid tissue. With both techniques, choice of sample preparation affects the results. Aldehyde fixatives are required for SIMS analysis while a freezing method might be satisfactory for XRF analysis. The aims of the present study were primarily to evaluate a simple freezing technique for preserving samples for XRF analysis and also to use XRF to evaluate the efficacy of using aldehyde fixatives to prepare samples for SIMS analysis. Ten porcine thyroids were sectioned into four pieces that were either frozen or fixed in formaldehyde, glutaraldehyde, or a modified Karnovsky fixative. The frozen samples were assessed for iodine content with XRF after 1 and 2 months, and the fixed samples were analyzed for iodine content after 1 week. Freezing of untreated tissue yielded no significant iodine loss, whereas fixation with aldehydes yielded an iodine loss of 14–30%, with Karnovsky producing the least loss.

  6. X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy Study of Coating Thickness and Base Metal Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolin, T. D.; Leszczuk, Y.

    2008-01-01

    For electrical, electronic, and electromechanical (EEE) parts to be approved for space use, they must be able to meet safety standards approved by NASA. A fast, reliable, and precise method is needed to make sure these standards are met. Many EEE parts are coated in gold (Au) and nickel (Ni), and the thickness coating is crucial to a part s performance. A nondestructive method that is efficient in measuring coating thickness is x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy. The XRF spectrometer is a machine designed to measure layer thickness and composition of single or multilayered samples. By understanding the limitations in the collection of the data by this method, accurate composition and thickness measurements can be obtained for samples with Au and Ni coatings. To understand the limitations of data found, measurements were taken with the XRF spectrometer and compared to true values of standard reference materials (SRM) that were National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) traceable. For every sample, six different parameters were varied to understand measurement error: coating/substrate combination, number of layers, counting interval, collimator size, coating thickness, and test area location. Each measurement was taken in accordance with standards set by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) International Standard B 568.

  7. Synchrotron radiation X-ray micro-fluorescence: Protocol to study mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, Karla Mayra; Bönecker, Marcelo; Perez, Carlos Alberto; Mantesso, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    The micro-X-ray fluorescence by synchrotron radiation (μ-XRF) is a method to determine the composition of tissues without destroying the samples. However, this technique has never been used for the analysis of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). This study compared different protocols for fixing, storing, preserving, and establishing the correct numbers of dental derived MSC submitted to μ-XRF analysis. Stem cells were obtained from human dental tissue. After cell expansion, and MACS isolation, the samples were fixed and the following quantities of cells 1 × 10(4) to 1 × 10(7) were divided in two groups: G1: fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde diluted in phosphate-buffered saline solution, and G2: fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde diluted in MilliQ water. The G1 cells showed precipitation of chemical components from the solution resulting in the formation of salt crystals while G2 cells were clear and almost transparent in the sample holder. With regards to cells concentration, the best results occurred when four droplets of 1 × 10(7) cells were analyzed. This work shows that to identify and study the distribution of trace elements in MSC by μ-XRF, the best protocol is fixation in 4% paraformaldehyde diluted with MilliQ water at 4°C and a concentration of four incremental droplets of 1 × 10(7) cells. PMID:26749077

  8. Collection of airborne particulate matter for a subsequent analysis by total reflection X-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klockenkaemper, R.; Bayer, H.; Bohlen, A. von; Schmeling, M.; Klockow, D. [Institut fuer Spektrochemie und Angewandte Spektroskopie, Dortmund (Germany)

    1995-06-01

    The collection of airborne particulate matter by filtration and impaction was adapted to total reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis (TXRF). Cellulose nitrate filters were used for collecting in a Berner impactor. Single filter spots were punched out, placed on quartz-glass carriers, dissolved by tetrahydrofuran and re-precipitated prior to element determinations by TXRF. In a Battelle-type impactor, airborne dust was collected on Plexiglass carriers coated with medical Vaseline. The loaded carriers were directly analyzed by TXRF. In both cases, quantification was simply performed by the addition of an internal standard after sampling. Impactors were made of a suitable material in order to investigate high blank values, collection losses and memory effects. It could be shown that stainless steel, even coated with TiN, is less suitable and should be avoided as an impactor material. Although aluminum is partly recommendable, titanium and the polymer Makrolon are quite appropriate. By using an impactor made of these materials, a reliable multielement determination in airborne dust is made possible with low detection limits as low as 1 ng/m{sup 3} and a satisfactory repeatability of a few %. Short sampling times of only 1 h or less can be realized. The total procedure is simple and time-saving, and can be recommended for routine investigations of airborne particulate matter. (author).

  9. Elemental analysis of mining wastes by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Fernandez, O. [Laboratory of X-ray Analytical Applications, Institute of Earth Sciences ' Jaume Almera' , CSIC, Sole Sabaris s/n, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)]. E-mail: ogonzalez@ija.csic.es; Queralt, I. [Laboratory of X-ray Analytical Applications, Institute of Earth Sciences ' Jaume Almera' , CSIC, Sole Sabaris s/n, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Carvalho, M.L. [Centro de Fisica Atomica, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto, 21649-003 Lisboa (Portugal); Garcia, G. [Area Edafologia y Quimica Agricola, Departmento de Ciencia y Tecnologia Agraria, Universidad Politecnica de Cartagena, Paseo Alfonso XIII 48, 30203 Cartagena (Spain)

    2007-08-15

    An energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) tri-axial geometry experimental spectrometer has been employed to determine the concentrations of 13 different elements (K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Rb, Sr and Pb) in mine wastes from different depths of two mine tailings from the Cartagena-La Union (Spain) mining district. The elements were determined and quantified using the fundamental parameters method. The concentrations of Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn and Pb were compared to the values from the European and Spanish legislation to evaluate the environmental risk and to classify the wastes as inert wastes or as wastes that have to be control land-filled. The results obtained demonstrate that these wastes can be considered as inert for the considered elements, apart from the concentration levels of Zn and Pb. Whilst Zn slightly overpasses the regulatory levels, Pb mean value exceeds three to six times the value to be considered as Class I potential land-filling material.

  10. Quantitative comparison of preparation methodologies for X-ray fluorescence microscopy of brain tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) facilitates high-sensitivity quantitative imaging of trace metals at high spatial resolution over large sample areas and can be applied to a diverse range of biological samples. Accurate determination of elemental content from recorded spectra requires proper calibration of the XFM instrument under the relevant operating conditions. Here, we describe the manufacture, characterization, and utilization of multi-element thin-film reference foils for use in calibration of XFM measurements of biological and other specimens. We have used these internal standards to assess the two-dimensional distribution of trace metals in a thin tissue section of a rat hippocampus. The data used in this study was acquired at the XFM beamline of the Australian Synchrotron using a new 384-element array detector (Maia) and at beamline 2-ID-E at the Advanced Photon Source. Post-processing of samples by different fixation techniques was investigated, with the conclusion that differences in solvent type and sample handling can significantly alter elemental content. The present study highlights the quantitative capability, high statistical power, and versatility of the XFM technique for mapping trace metals in biological samples, e.g., brain tissue samples in order to help understand neurological processes, especially when implemented in conjunction with a high-performance detector such as Maia. (orig.)

  11. Quantitative imaging of cell-permeable magnetic resonance contrast agents using x-ray fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endres, Paul J; Macrenaris, Keith W; Vogt, Stefan; Allen, Matthew J; Meade, Thomas J

    2006-01-01

    The inability to transduce cellular membranes is a limitation of current magnetic resonance imaging probes used in biologic and clinical settings. This constraint confines contrast agents to extracellular and vascular regions of the body, drastically reducing their viability for investigating processes and cycles in developmental biology. Conversely, a contrast agent with the ability to permeate cell membranes could be used in visualizing cell patterning, cell fate mapping, gene therapy, and, eventually, noninvasive cancer diagnosis. Therefore, we describe the synthesis and quantitative imaging of four contrast agents with the capability to cross cell membranes in sufficient quantity for detection. Each agent is based on the conjugation of a Gd(III) chelator with a cellular transduction moiety. Specifically, we coupled Gd(III)-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid DTPA and Gd(III)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid with an 8-amino acid polyarginine oligomer and an amphipathic stilbene molecule, 4-amino-4'-(N,N-dimethylamino)stilbene. The imaging modality that provided the best sensitivity and spatial resolution for direct detection of the contrast agents is synchrotron radiation x-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF). Unlike optical microscopy, SR-XRF provides two-dimensional images with resolution 10(3) better than (153)Gd gamma counting, without altering the agent by organic fluorophore conjugation. The transduction efficiency of the intracellular agents was evaluated by T(1) analysis and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to determine the efficacy of each chelate-transporter combination. PMID:17150161

  12. Determination of Ca/P molar ratio in hydroxyapatite (HA) by X-ray fluorescence technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scapin, Marcos A.; Guilhen, Sabine N.; Cotrim, Marycel E.B.; Pires, Maria Ap. F., E-mail: mascapin@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) is a mineral composed of calcium phosphate employed for endodontics, restorative dentistry and other applications in orthopedics and prosthesis. Additionally, this biomaterial is an inexpensive but efficient adsorbent for the removal of heavy metals and other unwanted species of contaminated liquid effluents. This is especially interesting when low-cost effective remediation is required. A Ca / P molar ratio of 1.667 is consistent with the theoretical Ca / P ratio for calcium hydroxyapatite with a compositional formula of Ca{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2}, which properties are well discussed in the literature. The aim of this work was to implement and validate a methodology for simultaneous determination of major and minor constituents in the hydroxyapatite (HA) as well as providing the Ca / P molar ratio. To accomplish these achievements, wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (WDXRF) was applied. This is a non-destructive technique that requires no chemical treatment, enabling fast chemical analysis in a wide variety of samples, with no hazardous waste being generated as a result of the process of determination. A standard reference material from NIST (SRM 1400 – Bone Ash) was used to validate the methodology for the determination of magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, iron, zinc, strontium and the Ca / P ratio in HA samples by WDXRF. The Z-score test was applied as a statistical tool and showed that the calculated values were of less than 1.8 for all the measured analytes. (author)

  13. Non-destructive investigation of a time capsule using neutron radiography and X-ray fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, B. L.; Vanderstelt, J.; O'Meara, J.; McNeill, F. E.

    2016-01-01

    Non-destructive analytical techniques are becoming increasingly important for the study of objects of cultural heritage interest. This study applied two techniques: X-ray fluorescence and neutron radiography, for the investigation of a capped, tubular metal object recovered from an urban construction site in Gore Park, Hamilton, Canada. The site is an urban park containing a World War I commemorative monument that underwent renovation and relocation. Historical documentation suggested that the object buried underneath the monument was a time capsule containing a paper document listing the names of 1800 Canadians who died during WWI. The purpose of this study was to assess the condition of the object, and to verify if it was what the historical records purported. XRF analysis was used to characterize the elemental composition of the metal artifact, while neutron radiography revealed that its contents were congruent with historical records and remained intact after being interred for 91 years. Results of this study demonstrate the value of non-destructive techniques for the analysis and preservation of cultural heritage.

  14. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence as a tool for food screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgese, Laura; Bilo, Fabjola; Dalipi, Rogerta; Bontempi, Elza; Depero, Laura E.

    2015-11-01

    This review provides a comprehensive overview of the applications of total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) in the field of food analysis. Elemental composition of food is of great importance, since food is the main source of essential, major and trace elements for animals and humans. Some potentially toxic elements, dangerous for human health may contaminate food, entering the food chain from the environment, processing, and storage. For this reason the elemental analysis of food is fundamental for safety assessment. Fast and sensitive analytical techniques, able to detect major and trace elements, are required as a result of the increasing demand on multi-elemental information and product screening. TXRF is suitable for elemental analysis of food, since it provides simultaneous multi-elemental identification in a wide dynamic range of concentrations. Several different matrices may be analyzed obtaining results with a good precision and accuracy. In this review, the most recent literature about the use of TXRF for the analysis of food is reported. The focus is placed on the applications within food quality monitoring of drinks, beverages, vegetables, fruits, cereals, animal derivatives and dietary supplements. Furthermore, this paper provides a critical outlook on the developments required to transfer these methods from research to the industrial and analytical laboratories contexts.

  15. Iontophoresis: mechanism of action studied by potentiometry and x-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puttemans, F.J.; Massart, D.L.; Gilles, F.; Lievens, P.C.; Jonckeer, M.H.

    1982-04-01

    Physiotherapists often apply electrotherapeutic treatments to the knees with sponges impregnated with potassium iodide (KI). To study the fate of iodine applied in this way, the amount of iodide (I-) that penetrates the skin was determined using an iodide-selective electrode. The I- uptake was shown to take place only when galvanic current was applied. Iontophoresis did not result in superficial migration of the applied ions on the skin from one pole to the other, but led to penetration into the skin. The hyperemia, which occurs at the zone of application during iontophoresis, did not affect the uptake of subsequent treatments. Only very slight differences in uptake were observed for each patient with sequential application, whereas the interindividual differences were more pronounced. Combined evidence from all experiments suggested that about 10% of the applied KI had penetrated the skin. X-ray fluorescence scans of the volunteers' thyroid gland, before and after a series of 10 iontophoretic treatments, to establish whether I- was taken up by the thyroid, showed that the average iodine content of the gland was increased by more than 30%.

  16. Investigation of polyelectrolytes by total reflection x-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water soluble polyelectrolyte samples containing mono-, bi- and trivalent metal ions were investigated without any pretreatment. Acid digestion of linear polymers may lead to a product insoluble in water so the digestion has to be avoided. The aim of this paper was the determination of analytical characteristics and limitations of the total reflection x-ray fluorescence (TXRF) analysis for poly (vinylalcohol-vinylsulphate) salts and poly (acrylic acid, acrylamide) copolymers containing the following cations: K+, Cs+, Ba2+, Cu2+ and La3+. On the basis of our results efficiency of ion-exchange during preparation of polyelectrolytes and stoichiometry of the end-product were determined. TXRF results were compared with data gained by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) measurements except in the case of Cs+ which has poor sensitivity in ICP-AES. Good agreement was found between the results of the two techniques and calculations from titrimetric data. Concentration of Li+ and Mg2+ in polymer samples was measured by ICP-AES. In majority of cases film-like dry residues of aqueous solutions of polyelectrolytes can be characterized by homogeneous spatial distribution of metal ions within the organic matrix. This is because the migration of the ions is hindered during drying process. Determination of metals in polyelectrolyte films by TXRF is quite ideal as model for analysis of plant, animal or human tissues which is a frequent task in environmental and inorganic biomedical analytical chemistry. (author)

  17. Determination of Ca/P molar ratio in hydroxyapatite (HA) by X-ray fluorescence technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) is a mineral composed of calcium phosphate employed for endodontics, restorative dentistry and other applications in orthopedics and prosthesis. Additionally, this biomaterial is an inexpensive but efficient adsorbent for the removal of heavy metals and other unwanted species of contaminated liquid effluents. This is especially interesting when low-cost effective remediation is required. A Ca / P molar ratio of 1.667 is consistent with the theoretical Ca / P ratio for calcium hydroxyapatite with a compositional formula of Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2, which properties are well discussed in the literature. The aim of this work was to implement and validate a methodology for simultaneous determination of major and minor constituents in the hydroxyapatite (HA) as well as providing the Ca / P molar ratio. To accomplish these achievements, wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (WDXRF) was applied. This is a non-destructive technique that requires no chemical treatment, enabling fast chemical analysis in a wide variety of samples, with no hazardous waste being generated as a result of the process of determination. A standard reference material from NIST (SRM 1400 – Bone Ash) was used to validate the methodology for the determination of magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, iron, zinc, strontium and the Ca / P ratio in HA samples by WDXRF. The Z-score test was applied as a statistical tool and showed that the calculated values were of less than 1.8 for all the measured analytes. (author)

  18. Quantitative determination of Sulfur and Chlorine in Crude Oils by x-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Given the importance of sulfur and chlorine content in crude petroleum, and that the actual methods used in the country to its determination are slow and cumbersome, the present work consisted in applying a new method, based on X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, to make this analysis as fast as possible with greater sensibility and precision. Samples of crude petroleum were analyzed using two different quantitative methods: a) through calibration curves elaborated with standard aqueous solutions of inorganic salts of S and Cl and b) through standard addition method using CS2 as standard for S and CCl4 for Cl. The measuring system consisted of Fe-55 radioactive source (10 mCi), Si-Li semiconductor detector, spectrum amplifier, multichannel analyzer and a DIGITAL Computer. The peak areas and their deviations were obtained through AXIL software. The values of area and deviation joined to weight of sample and amount of standard added were used to calculate the concentration of the analite and its deviation. In conclusion, calibration curves enable only semiquantitative analysis. However, the standard addition method has advantages over ASTM methods D 129-64 and D 808-63 for sulfur and chlorine respectively. The main advantage is the great speed with which an analysis is made: 20 minutes, while ASTM methods need approximately 16 hours. Likewise it was obtained: sensibility 0.05%; accuracy: maximum 0.02%, minimum 10%; and precision: maximum 2%, minimum 10%. (author)

  19. Evaluation of Field Portable X-Ray Fluorescence Performance for the Analysis of Ni in Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Guo-dong; Lei, Mei; Zhou, Guang-dong; Chen, Tong-bin; Qiu, Rong-liang

    2015-03-01

    As a rapid, in-situ analysis method, Field portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (FP-XRF) can be widely applied in soil heavy metals analysis field. Whereas, some factors may affect FP-XRF performance and restrict the application. Studies have proved that FP-XRF has poorer performance when the concentration of target element is low, and soil moisture and particle size will affect FP-XRF performance. But few studies have been conducted in depth. This study took an example of Ni, demonstrated the relationship between Ni concentration and FP-XRF performance on accuracy and precision, and gave a critical value. Effects of soil moisture and particle size on accuracy and precision also had been compared. Results show that, FP-XRF performance is related to Ni concentration and the critical value is 400 mg x kg(-1). Relative standard deviation (RSD) and relative uncertainty decrease while the Ni concentration is below 400 mg x kg(-1), hence FP-XRF performance improves with increasing Ni concentration in this range; RSD and relative uncertainty change little while the Ni concentration is above 400 mg x kg(-1), hence FP-XRF performance does not have correlation with Ni concentration any more. For in-situ analysis, the relative uncertainty contributed by soil moisture is 3.77%, and the relative certainty contributed by particle size is 0.56%. Effect of soil moisture is evidently more serious than particle size both on accuracy and precision.

  20. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis of pollen as an indicator for atmospheric pollution*1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepponi, G.; Lazzeri, P.; Coghe, N.; Bersani, M.; Gottardini, E.; Cristofolini, F.; Clauser, G.; Torboli, A.

    2004-08-01

    The viability of pollen is affected by environmental pollution and its use as a bio-indicator is proposed. Such effects can be observed and quantified by biological tests. However, a more accurate identification of the agents affecting the viability is required in order to validate the biological assay for environmental monitoring. The chemical analysis of pollen is meant to ascertain the existence of a correlation between its reduced biological functions and the presence of pollutants. Moreover, such biological systems act as accumulators and allow the detection and quantification of species present in the environment at low concentrations. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis (TXRF) has been chosen for the investigation due to its high sensitivity, multielement capability and wide dynamic range. Corylus avellana L. (hazel) pollen has been collected in areas with different anthropic impact in the province of Trento, Italy. For the TXRF measurements, a liquid sample is needed, especially if a quantitative analysis is required. In the present work, the analysis after a microwave digestion has been compared with the analysis of a suspension of the pollen samples. In both cases, an internal standard has been used for the quantification. The concentrations of 17 elements ranging from Al to Pb have been determined in 13 samples. Analysis of the suspensions showed to be comparable to that of digested samples in terms of spectral quality, but the latter preparation method gave better reproducibility. Sub-ppm lowest limits of detection were obtained for iron and heavier elements detected.

  1. Downsizing of Johansson spectrometer for X-ray fluorescence trace analysis with brilliant undulator source

    CERN Document Server

    Sakurai, K; Inoue, K; Yagi, N

    2001-01-01

    The downsizing of a Johansson-type X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer has been examined as a way of enhancing detection efficiency with a tolerable loss of energy resolution. A compact spectrometer equipped with a Ge(2 2 0) analyzing crystal with a Rowland radius of 120 mm has been tested with a highly brilliant helical undulator source at BL40XU, SPring-8. The energy resolution obtained for cobalt K alpha sub 1 (6930.32 eV) was 8.8 eV, which is 10-20 times better than that obtained using a Si(Li) detector, and effectively improved the signal-to-background ratio for XRF spectra. The combination of the present spectrometer and a third generation synchrotron source could provide new opportunities for trace analytical applications, which have been difficult so far by conventional synchrotron XRF experiments based on a Si(Li) detector system. The detection limit obtained for solid bulk samples has reached a level of several tens of ppb.

  2. Diagnostic copper imaging of Menkes disease by synchrotron radiation-generated X-ray fluorescence analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinebuchi, Miyuki; Matsuura, Akihiro; Kiyono, Tohru; Nomura, Yumiko; Kimura, Sachiko

    2016-01-01

    Copper (Cu) is an indispensable metal for normal development and function of humans, especially in central nervous system (CNS). However, its redox activity requires accurate Cu transport system. ATP7A, a main Cu2+ transporting-ATPase, is necessary to efflux Cu across the plasma membrane and synthesize cuproenzymes. Menkes disease (MD) is caused by mutations in ATP7A gene. Clinically, MD is Cu deficiency syndrome and is treated with Cu-histidine injections soon after definite diagnosis. But outcome of the most remains poor. To estimate the standard therapy, Cu distribution in the treated classic MD patients is analyzed by synchrotron-generated X-ray fluorescence technique (SR-XRF), which identifies and quantifies an individual atom up to at subcellular level of resolution with wide detection area. SR-XRF analysis newly reveals that Cu exists in spinal cord parenchyma and flows out via venous and lymph systems. By systemic analysis, excess Cu is detected in the proximal tubular cells of the kidney, the mucosal epithelial cells of the intestine, and the lymph and venous systems. The current study suggests that the standard therapy supply almost enough Cu for patient tissues. But given Cu passes through the tissues to venous and lymph systems, or accumulate in the cells responsible for Cu absorption. PMID:27629586

  3. Multi-elemental analysis of marine sediments of Manila Bay using x-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis of the marine sediments of Manila Bay was done by employing X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. The general trends observed in sediments are increasing (Ca and Sr), decreasing (Zr), or constant (Cl, Na, S, K) with respect to depth, sometimes, no trend can be observed. These trends are further explained by correlations present among these elements, plus all the other elements. The two X RF data analysis methods Auto Quantify and AXIL were also compared on the basis of the correlation plot obtained. AutoQuantify gave clearer correlations; thus, results from this method were used for constructing correlation plots. Correlations using Microsoft Excel and Stat graphics Centurion X V show that there are naturally occurring [lithogenic (Si, Ti, Al, Mg, Rb, Zn and Fe), biogenic (Ca, Mg), and conservative (Na, Cl)] and non-naturally occurring [mostly anthropogenic, brought to the bodies of water by aeolian or fluvial input (heavy metals Pb-Cu-Zn and Ni-Cr)] correlation present in the sediments. Moreover, pairs of elements that may coexist in a source and not coexist in another (Cr and Mg, Cr and Ni) have also been observed. The heavy metal enrichment was attributed to the burning of fossil fuels, iron and steel manufacturing (present in Valenzuela-Bulacan area), ferry and fishing services and other industrialization activities present in Manila Bay. Marine organisms are affected by the presence of these heavy metals by means of bioaccumulations, and may later on affect humans because of trophic transfer and bio magnification. (author)

  4. Geochemical analysis of marine sediments using fused glass disc by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Ning; ZHANG Qin; YAO De; LI Guohui

    2008-01-01

    A method was developed for content determination of Na, Mg, Al, Si, P,S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Nb, Zr, Y, Sr, Rb, Ba, La and Ce etc. covering 26 major, minor, and trace elements in marine sediment samples using fused glass disc by X-ray Fluorescence spectrometry. Calibration was made using marine sediment certified reference materials and the synthetic standard samples prepared by mixing several marine sediments with stream sediment and carbonate standard samples in different proportions. The matrix effect was corrected using theoretical alpha coefficients, experience coefficients and the scattered radiation as the internal standard (for the trace elements). The accuracy of the method was evaluated by analysis of certified reference materials GBW07314, GBW07334 and GSMS6. The results are in good agreement with the certified values of the standards with RSD less than 2.60%, except for Y, Cr, Ga, Ce, La, Nb, Rb, and V with RSD less than 9.0% (n=12).

  5. Quantitative comparison of preparation methodologies for X-ray fluorescence microscopy of brain tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, Simon A.; Sexton, Brett A.; Hoobin, Pamela; Mayo, Sheridan C. [CSIRO, Materials Science and Engineering and the Preventative Health Flagship, Clayton, VIC (Australia); Myers, Damian E. [St. Vincent s Hospital, Department of Surgery/Orthopaedics, Fitzroy, VIC (Australia); University of Melbourne, Department of Surgery, Parkville, VIC (Australia); Jonge, Martin D. de; Paterson, David; Howard, Daryl L. [Australian Synchrotron, Clayton, VIC (Australia); Vogt, Stefan [Argonne National Laboratory, X-ray Science Division, Argonne, IL (United States); Ryan, Chris G. [CSIRO, Earth Science and Resources Engineering, Clayton, VIC (Australia); University of Melbourne, School of Physics, Parkville, VIC (Australia); University of Tasmania, CODES Centre of Excellence, Hobart, TAS (Australia); Altissimo, Matteo [Melbourne Centre for Nanofabrication, Clayton, VIC (Australia); Moorhead, Gareth F. [CSIRO, Materials Science and Engineering and the Preventative Health Flagship, Clayton, VIC (Australia); University of Melbourne, School of Physics, Parkville, VIC (Australia); Wilkins, Stephen W. [CSIRO, Materials Science and Engineering and the Preventative Health Flagship, Clayton, VIC (Australia); Monash University, School of Physics, Clayton, VIC (Australia)

    2011-08-15

    X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) facilitates high-sensitivity quantitative imaging of trace metals at high spatial resolution over large sample areas and can be applied to a diverse range of biological samples. Accurate determination of elemental content from recorded spectra requires proper calibration of the XFM instrument under the relevant operating conditions. Here, we describe the manufacture, characterization, and utilization of multi-element thin-film reference foils for use in calibration of XFM measurements of biological and other specimens. We have used these internal standards to assess the two-dimensional distribution of trace metals in a thin tissue section of a rat hippocampus. The data used in this study was acquired at the XFM beamline of the Australian Synchrotron using a new 384-element array detector (Maia) and at beamline 2-ID-E at the Advanced Photon Source. Post-processing of samples by different fixation techniques was investigated, with the conclusion that differences in solvent type and sample handling can significantly alter elemental content. The present study highlights the quantitative capability, high statistical power, and versatility of the XFM technique for mapping trace metals in biological samples, e.g., brain tissue samples in order to help understand neurological processes, especially when implemented in conjunction with a high-performance detector such as Maia. (orig.)

  6. Algorithms for a hand-held miniature x-ray fluorescence analytical instrument

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elam, W.T.; Newman, D.; Ziemba, F. [and others

    1998-12-31

    The purpose of this joint program was to provide technical assistance with the development of a Miniature X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) Analytical Instrument. This new XRF instrument is designed to overcome the weaknesses of spectrometers commercially available at the present time. Currently available XRF spectrometers (for a complete list see reference 1) convert spectral information to sample composition using the influence coefficients technique or the fundamental parameters method. They require either a standard sample with composition relatively close to the unknown or a detailed knowledge of the sample matrix. They also require a highly-trained operator and the results often depend on the capabilities of the operator. In addition, almost all existing field-portable, hand-held instruments use radioactive sources for excitation. Regulatory limits on such sources restrict them such that they can only provide relatively weak excitation. This limits all current hand-held XRF instruments to poor detection limits and/or long data collection times, in addition to the licensing requirements and disposal problems for radioactive sources. The new XRF instrument was developed jointly by Quantrad Sensor, Inc., the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), and the Department of Energy (DOE). This report describes the analysis algorithms developed by NRL for the new instrument and the software which embodies them.

  7. Improving precision of X-ray fluorescence analysis of lanthanide mixtures using partial least squares regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsanov, Dmitry; Panchuk, Vitaly; Goydenko, Alexander; Khaydukova, Maria; Semenov, Valentin; Legin, Andrey

    2015-11-01

    This study addresses the problem of simultaneous quantitative analysis of six lanthanides (Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd) in mixed solutions by two different X-ray fluorescence techniques: energy-dispersive (EDX) and total reflection (TXRF). Concentration of each lanthanide was varied in the range 10- 6-10- 3 mol/L, low values being around the detection limit of the method. This resulted in XRF spectra with very poor signal to noise ratio and overlapping bands in case of EDX, while only the latter problem was observed for TXRF. It was shown that ordinary least squares approach in numerical calibration fails to provide for reasonable precision in quantification of individual lanthanides. Partial least squares (PLS) regression was able to circumvent spectral inferiorities and yielded adequate calibration models for both techniques with RMSEP (root mean squared error of prediction) values around 10- 5 mol/L. It was demonstrated that comparatively simple and inexpensive EDX method is capable of ensuring the similar precision to more sophisticated TXRF, when the spectra are treated by PLS.

  8. A newly micro-X-ray fluorescence spectrometer and application for non-destructive analysis of archaeological objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structure, performance and characteristics and the applications in archaeology of a new micro-X-ray fluorescence system based on rotating anode X-ray generator and polycapillary X-ray optics has been introducted in this paper. The polycapillary X-ray optics used here can focus the primary X-ray beam down to some tens of micro meters in diameters that enables non-destructive local analysis of sub-mm samples with minor/trace level sensitivity. In order to prove the potentials of this instrument used in archaeology, a piece of Chinese ancient blue and white porcelain produced in Ming Dynasty was analyzed. The results showed that intensities of MnKα, CoKα lines varied in accordance with the thickness of blue glaze. Correlation analysis indicated that the Mn and Co have good linear correlations. So, the concentrations or ratio of Mn and Co were crucial to determine the provenance of a Chinese ancient blue and white porcelain or to descriminate the true one from a fake. (authors)

  9. Preparation of specimens for analysis by: X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence analysis; Preparacion de especimenes para analisis por: Difraccion de rayos X y Fluorescencia de rayos X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banos L, L. [IIM, UNAM, A.P. 70-360, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    Specimen preparation is one of the most important requirements in the analysis of samples by X-ray Diffraction and X-ray Fluorescence. This statement is especially true for samples containing different types of materials. There are many forms of specimen suitable for X-ray analysis and the type of the sample as received will generally determine the method of pretreatment. It is convenient to refer to the material received for analysis as the sample, and that, which is actually analyzed as the specimen. The powder Diffraction method assumes that the particles in the specimen are ideally random orientation and that there are enough crystallites in the specimen to achieve a representative intensity distribution for these crystallites. X ray Fluorescence is essentially a comparative method of analysis, it is vital that all standards and unknowns be presented to the spectrometer in a reproducible and identical manner. (Author) 3 refs., 6 figs.

  10. Structural Basis of X-ray-Induced Transient Photo-bleaching in a Photoactivatable Green Fluorescent Protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have observed the photoactivatable fluorescent protein IrisFP in a transient dark state with near-atomic resolution. This dark state is assigned to a radical species that either relaxes to the ground state or evolves into a permanently bleached chromophore. We took advantage of X-rays to populate the radical, which presumably forms under illumination with visible light by an electron-transfer reaction in the triplet state. The combined X-ray diffraction and in crystallo UV-vis absorption, fluorescence, and Raman data reveal that radical formation in IrisFP involves pronounced but reversible distortion of the chromophore, suggesting a transient loss of π conjugation. These results reveal that the methylene bridge of the chromophore is the Achilles' heel of fluorescent proteins and help unravel the mechanisms of blinking and photo-bleaching in FPs, which are of importance in the rational design of photo-stable variants. and is also partly reversible. (authors)

  11. Lead tolerance and cellular distribution in Elsholtzia splendens using synchrotron radiation micro-X-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jie [MOE Key Laboratory of Environment Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Tian, Shengke [MOE Key Laboratory of Environment Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Science, Indian River Research and Education Center, Fort Pierce, FL 34945 (United States); Lu, Lingli; Shohag, M.J.I.; Liao, Haibing [MOE Key Laboratory of Environment Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Yang, Xiaoe, E-mail: xyang@zju.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Environment Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Elsholtzia splendens had a good ability of lead tolerance and accumulation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pb was mostly restricted to the vascular bundles and epidermis tissues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pb and Ca shared most similar distribution patterns in E. splendens. - Abstract: Hydroponic experiments were conducted to investigate the tolerance and spatial distribution of lead (Pb) in Elsholtzia splendens-a copper (Cu) accumulator plant using synchrotron-based micro-X-ray fluorescence. According to chlorophyll concentration and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, E. splendens displayed certain tolerance at 100 {mu}M Pb treatment. Lead concentration in roots, stems and leaves of E. splendens reached 45,183.6, 1657.6, and 380.9 mg kg{sup -1}, respectively. Pb was mostly accumulated in the roots, and there were also high concentrations of Pb been transported into stems and leaves. Micro-XRF analysis of the stem and leaf cross section revealed that Pb was mostly restricted in the vascular bundles and epidermis tissues of both stem and leaf of E. splendens. The correlation between distribution of K, Ca, Zn and Pb were analyzed. There were significant positive correlations (P < 0.01) among Pb and Ca, K, Zn distribution both in stem and leaf of E. splendens. However, among the three elements, Ca shared the most similar distribution pattern and the highest correlation coefficients with Pb in both stem and leaf cross section of E. splendens. This suggests that Ca may play an important role in Pb accumulation in stem and leaf of E. splendens.

  12. X-ray Fluorescence in Member States: Venezuela. X ray Fluorescence in Venezuela at the Agronomy Faculty, Laboratory Unidad de Analisis Instrumental, Universidad Centroccidental Lisandro Alvarado, Venezuela

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research in the field of XRF was devoted to the development of methods for arsenic determination and the application of the TXRF technique in bioremediation studies and archeometry. X ray techniques and chemometrics were used for the determination of composition as well as for classification and provenance studies of archeological samples. The projects were conducted in collaboration with the Laboratory of Nuclear Physics at Universidad Simon Bolivar, Venezuela, the University of Concepcion and the University of Arica, Chile, the University of Buenos Aires, the CNEA (Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica de Argentina), and the Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria of Brasil

  13. Element distribution in the brain sections of rats measured by synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, N. Q.; Zhang, F.; Wang, X. F.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Chai, Z. F.; Huang, Y. Y.; He, W.; Zhao, X. Q.; Zuo, A. J.; Yang, R.

    2004-02-01

    The concentration of trace elements in brain sections was measured by synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence. The relative concentration was calculated by means of the normalization of Compton scattering intensity approximately 22 keV, after the normalization for collecting time of X-ray spectrum and the counting of the ion chamber, and subtracting the contribution of the polycarbonate film for supporting sample. Furthermore, the statistical evaluation of the element distribution in various regions of the brain sections of the 20-day-old rats was tested. For investigating the distribution of elements in the brain of iodine deficient rats, Wistar rats were fed with iodine deficient diet and deionized water (ID group). The rats were fed the same iodine deficient diet, but drank KIO 3 solution as control (CT group). The results showed that the contents of calcium (Ca) in thalamus (TH) and copper (Cu) and iron (Fe) in cerebral cortex (CX) of ID rats were significantly lower than that of control rats, while the contents of phosphor (P), sulfur (S), potassium (K), rubidium (Rb), bromine (Br), chlorine (Cl), zinc (Zn), Ca and Cu of ID in hippocampus (H) and the contents of Br, Cl, Zn and Ca in cerebral cortex of ID rats were significantly higher. Especially, the difference of Br, Cl, Zn and Ca in H between ID and CT was more significant. The contents of all elements measured in H were higher than (or equal to) CX and/or TH for both groups, except low Cl of the control rats. Furthermore Zn and Cu contents along the hippocampal fissure in both groups were 1.5 ( Ptimes higher than in hippocampus, respectively. Considering the results of cluster analysis our study shows that the marked alterations in the spatial distribution of Zn and Ca of ID rats brain during brain development stages. In addition, the effect of the perfusion with 0.9% NaCl solution before taking brain on the distribution of elements in the brain sections was observed and discussed.

  14. X-ray fluorescence spectrometry using Synchrotron Radiation with applications in unmanned aircraft environmental sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberie, Sean Richard Gopal

    In this thesis I present an analytical optimization of the Synchrotron Radiation X-Ray Fluorescence (SR-XRF) technique for applications in unmanned aircraft aerosol studies. In environmental and atmospheric science, there is a pressing need for aerosol measurements at various altitudes in the atmosphere and spanning large regions. This need is currently either ignored, or met to a limited degree by studies that employ manned aircraft. There is, however, a great deal of opportunity to improve and expand on these studies using the emerging technology of unmanned aircraft systems. A newly developed aerosol sampler makes this opportunity a near-reality by its ability to collect aerosol samples in-situ from unmanned aircraft platforms. The challenge lies in analyzing these samples for elemental composition. In airborne aerosol studies, the ability to resolve where a sample was collected both spatially and temporally is limited by the sensitivity of the analysis technique. In aircraft-based aerosol collection, the length of the aerosol sample spot corresponds to distance. Thus the spatial resolution of an airborne study is limited by the amount of mass that must be collected for analysis. The SR-XRF optimizations outlined in this thesis decrease the amount of sample mass required for detectable elemental concentrations, allowing aerosol samples to be analyzed in smaller areas corresponding to smaller time steps. Since, in a flight path, time steps are directly correlated with distance, analysis of smaller time steps results in the ability to measure aerosols at higher spatial resolution. Four SR-XRF analysis configurations were experimentally tested: monochromatic beam, white beam, filtered white beam, and filtered white beam-filtered detector to determine which configuration gave the highest elemental sensitivity and selectivity. Of these tested methods, the straight polychromatic white beam configuration resulted in the best sensitivity for elements across a large

  15. In-Situ Anomalous Small-Angle X-ray Scattering Studies of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell Catalyst Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, James Andrew

    Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are a promising high efficiency energy conversion technology, but their cost effective implementation, especially for automotive power, has been hindered by degradation of the electrochemically-active surface area (ECA) of the Pt nanoparticle electrocatalysts. While numerous studies using ex-situ post-mortem techniques have provided insight into the effect of operating conditions on ECA loss, the governing mechanisms and underlying processes are not fully understood. Toward the goal of elucidating the electrocatalyst degradation mechanisms, we have followed particle size distribution (PSD) growth evolutions of Pt and Pt-alloy nanoparticle catalysts during potential cycling in an aqueous acidic environment (with and without flow of electrolyte) and in a fuel cell environment using in-situ anomalous small-angle X-ray scattering (ASAXS). The results of this thesis show a surface area loss mechanism of Pt nanoparticles supported on carbon to be predominantly controlled by Pt dissolution, the particle size dependence of Pt dissolution, the loss of dissolved Pt into the membrane and electrolyte, and, to a lesser extent, the re-deposition of dissolved Pt onto larger particles. The relative extent of these loss mechanisms are shown to be dependent on the environment, the temperature, and the potential cycling conditions. Correlation of ASAXS-determined particle growth with both calculated and voltammetrically-determined oxide coverages demonstrates that the oxide coverage is playing a key role in the dissolution process and in the corresponding growth of the mean Pt nanoparticle size and loss of ECA. This understanding potentially reduces the complex changes in PSDs and ECA resulting from various voltage profiles to the response to a single variable, oxide coverage. A better understanding of the degradation mechanisms of Pt and Pt-alloy nanoparticle distributions could lead to more stable electrocatalysts while

  16. In situ anomalous small-angle X-ray scattering studies of platinum nanoparticle fuel cell electrocatalyst degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, James A; Kariuki, Nancy N; Subbaraman, Ram; Kropf, A Jeremy; Smith, Matt C; Holby, Edward F; Morgan, Dane; Myers, Deborah J

    2012-09-12

    Polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) are a promising high-efficiency energy conversion technology, but their cost-effective implementation, especially for automotive power, has been hindered by degradation of the electrochemically active surface area (ECA) of the Pt nanoparticle electrocatalysts. While numerous studies using ex situ post-mortem techniques have provided insight into the effect of operating conditions on ECA loss, the governing mechanisms and underlying processes are not fully understood. Toward the goal of elucidating the electrocatalyst degradation mechanisms, we have followed Pt nanoparticle growth during potential cycling of the electrocatalyst in an aqueous acidic environment using in situ anomalous small-angle X-ray scattering (ASAXS). ASAXS patterns were analyzed to obtain particle size distributions (PSDs) of the Pt nanoparticle electrocatalysts at periodic intervals during the potential cycling. Oxide coverages reached under the applied potential cycling protocols were both calculated and determined experimentally. Changes in the PSD, mean diameter, and geometric surface area identify the mechanism behind Pt nanoparticle coarsening in an aqueous environment. Over the first 80 potential cycles, the dominant Pt surface area loss mechanism when cycling to 1.0-1.1 V was found to be preferential dissolution or loss of the smallest particles with varying extents of reprecipitation of the dissolved species onto existing particles, resulting in particle growth, depending on potential profile. Correlation of ASAXS-determined particle growth with both calculated and voltammetrically determined oxide coverages demonstrates that the oxide coverage is playing a key role in the dissolution process and in the corresponding growth of the mean Pt nanoparticle size and loss of ECA. This understanding potentially reduces the complex changes in PSD and ECA resulting from various voltage profiles to a response dependent on oxide coverage. PMID:22857132

  17. In situ examination of uranium contaminated soil particles by micro-X-ray absorption and micro-fluorescence spectroscopies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two complimentary spectroscopic techniques, X-ray absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy have been conducted at spatial scales of 1 to 25 μm on uranium contaminated soil sediments collected from two former nuclear materials processing facilities of the DOE: Fernald, OH and Savannah River Site, SC. A method of imbedding particles in a non-reactive Si polymer was developed such that individual particles could be examined before and after extraction with a wide range of chemicals typically used in sequential extraction techniques and others proposed for ex situ chemical intervention technologies. Using both the micro-X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and micro-X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) techniques, both elemental and oxidation state distribution maps were generated on individual particles before and following chemical extraction. XANES can determine the relative proportion of U(VI) and U(IV) in phases comprising individual particles before and after extraction and showed that greater than 85% of the uranium existed as hexavalent U(VI). Fluorescence spectra of contaminated particles containing mainly U(VI) revealed populations of uranyl hydroxide phases and demonstrated the relative efficacy and specificity of each extraction method. Correlation of XAS and fluorescence data at micron scales provides information of U oxidation state as well as chemical form in heterogeneous samples. (author)

  18. Determination of transition metal ion distribution in cubic spinel Co1.5Fe1.5O4 using anomalous x-ray diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. N. Singh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We report anomalous x-ray diffraction studies on Co ferrite with composition Co1.5Fe1.5O4 to obtain the distribution of transition metal ions in tetrahedral and octahedral sites. We synthesize spinel oxide (Co1.5Fe1.5O4 through co-precipitation and subsequent annealing route. The imaginary part (absorption of the energy dependent anomalous form factor is measured and the real part is calculated theoretically through Kramers–Krönig transformation to analyze anomalous x-ray diffraction peak intensities. Fe and Co K-edge x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES spectra are used to estimate charge states of transition metals. Our analysis, within experimental errors, suggests 44% of the tetrahedral sites contain Co in +2 oxidation state and the rest 56% sites contain Fe in +2 and +3 oxidation states. Similarly, 47% of the octahedral sites contain Fe in +3 oxidation states, whereas, the rest of the sites contain Co in +2 and +3 oxidation states. While a distinct pre-edge feature in the Fe K-edge XANES is observed, Co pre-edge remains featureless. Implications of these results to magnetism are briefly discussed.

  19. Trends in anomalous small-angle X-ray scattering in grazing incidence for supported nano-alloyed and core-shell metallic nano-particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As atomic structure and morphology of particles are directly correlated to their functional properties, experimental methods probing local and average features of particles at the nano-scale elicit a growing interest. Anomalous small-angle X-ray scattering (ASAXS) is a very attractive technique to investigate the size, shape and spatial distribution of nano-objects embedded in a homogeneous matrix or in porous media. The anomalous variation of the scattering factor close to an absorption edge enables element specific investigations. In the case of supported nano-objects, the use of grazing incidence is necessary to limit the probed depth. The combination of grazing incidence with the anomalous technique provides a powerful new method, anomalous grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (AGISAXS), to disentangle complex chemical patterns in supported multi-component nano-structures. Nevertheless, a proper data analysis requires accurate quantitative measurements associated to an adapted theoretical framework. This paper presents anomalous methods applied to nano-alloys phase separation in the 1-10 nm size range, and focuses on the application of AGISAXS in bimetallic systems: nano-composite films and core-shell supported nano-particles

  20. Recent results of synchrotron radiation induced total reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis at HASYLAB, beamline L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streli, C. [Atominstitut, Vienna University of Technology, Stadionallee 2, A-1020 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: streli@ati.ac.at; Pepponi, G. [ITC-irst, Povo (Italy); Wobrauschek, P. [Atominstitut, Vienna University of Technology, Stadionallee 2, A-1020 Vienna (Austria); Jokubonis, C. [Atominstitut, Vienna University of Technology, Stadionallee 2, A-1020 Vienna (Austria); Falkenberg, G. [Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor at Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestr. 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Zaray, G. [Institute of Inorganic and Applied Chemistry, 3 EOTVOS Univ, Budapest (Hungary); Broekaert, J. [Institute of Anorganic and Applied Chemistry, University Hamburg, Martin-Luther-King-Platz 6, 20146 Hamburg (Germany); Fittschen, U. [Institute of Anorganic and Applied Chemistry, University Hamburg, Martin-Luther-King-Platz 6, 20146 Hamburg (Germany); Peschel, B. [Institute of Anorganic and Applied Chemistry, University Hamburg, Martin-Luther-King-Platz 6, 20146 Hamburg (Germany)

    2006-11-15

    At the Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor (HASYLAB), Beamline L, a vacuum chamber for synchrotron radiation-induced total reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis, is now available which can easily be installed using the adjustment components for microanalysis present at this beamline. The detector is now in the final version of a Vortex silicon drift detector with 50-mm{sup 2} active area from Radiant Detector Technologies. With the Ni/C multilayer monochromator set to 17 keV extrapolated detection limits of 8 fg were obtained using the 50-mm{sup 2} silicon drift detector with 1000 s live time on a sample containing 100 pg of Ni. Various applications are presented, especially of samples which are available in very small amounts: As synchrotron radiation-induced total reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis is much more sensitive than tube-excited total reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis, the sampling time of aerosol samples can be diminished, resulting in a more precise time resolution of atmospheric events. Aerosols, directly sampled on Si reflectors in an impactor were investigated. A further application was the determination of contamination elements in a slurry of high-purity Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. No digestion is required; the sample is pipetted and dried before analysis. A comparison with laboratory total reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis showed the higher sensitivity of synchrotron radiation-induced total reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis, more contamination elements could be detected. Using the Si-111 crystal monochromator also available at beamline L, XANES measurements to determine the chemical state were performed. This is only possible with lower sensitivity as the flux transmitted by the crystal monochromator is about a factor of 100 lower than that transmitted by the multilayer monochromator. Preliminary results of X-ray absorption near-edge structure measurements for As in xylem sap from cucumber plants fed with As(III) and As(V) are