WorldWideScience

Sample records for anomalous temperature dependence

  1. Anomalous Temperature Dependence of the Band Gap in Black Phosphorus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas, Cesar E P; Rocha, A R; Marini, Andrea

    2016-08-10

    Black phosphorus (BP) has gained renewed attention due to its singular anisotropic electronic and optical properties that might be exploited for a wide range of technological applications. In this respect, the thermal properties are particularly important both to predict its room temperature operation and to determine its thermoelectric potential. From this point of view, one of the most spectacular and poorly understood phenomena is indeed the BP temperature-induced band gap opening; when temperature is increased, the fundamental band gap increases instead of decreases. This anomalous thermal dependence has also been observed recently in its monolayer counterpart. In this work, based on ab initio calculations, we present an explanation for this long known and yet not fully explained effect. We show that it arises from a combination of harmonic and lattice thermal expansion contributions, which are in fact highly interwined. We clearly narrow down the mechanisms that cause this gap opening by identifying the peculiar atomic vibrations that drive the anomaly. The final picture we give explains both the BP anomalous band gap opening and the frequency increase with increasing volume (tension effect).

  2. Anomalous temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity of molten Sb

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Using the d.c. four-probe method, the electrical resistivity of high-purity liquid Sb has been accurately measured as functions of temperature. It is observed that the resistivity of liquid Sb changes abnormally with increasing temperature, which is very different from that of simple liquid metals. Based on the reported structure factor at several temperatures, the results obtained in this work have been discussed and interpreted qualitatively according to Ziman theory. The analysis suggests that the existence of shortrange order structure near the melting point can account for the abnormal phenomenon observed in the resistivity of liquid Sb, in which semimetal-metal transaction takes place in the melting process. At the same time, the progress of the structure change of liquid Sb with temperature has also been pointed out.``

  3. Anomalous temperature dependent photoluminescence properties of CdSxSe1-x quantum dots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    CdSxSe1-x quantum dots were fabricated by a simple spin-coating heat volatilization method on InP wafer.Temperature dependent photoluminescence of CdSxSe1-x quantum dots was carried out in a range of 10-300 K.The integrated photoluminescence intensity revealed an anomalous behavior with increasing temperature in the range of 180-200 K.The band gap energy showed a redshift of 61.34 meV when the temperature increased from 10 to 300 K.The component ratio of S to Se in the CdSxSe1-x quantum dots was valued by both the X-ray diffraction data and photoluminescence peak energy at room temperature according to Vegard Law.Moreover,the parameters of the Varshni relation for CdS0.9Se0.1 materials were also obtained using photoluminescence peak energy as a function of temperature and the best-fit curve:α=(3.5 ± 0.1)10-4 eV/K,and β=210 ± 10 K (close to the Debye temperature θD of the material).

  4. Anomalous temperature dependence of H{sub c2} in BiSrCuO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broto, J.M. [Service National Des Champs Magnetiques Pulses, 31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); Rakoto, H. [Service National Des Champs Magnetiques Pulses, 31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); Ousset, J.C. [Service National Des Champs Magnetiques Pulses, 31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); Coffe, G. [Service National Des Champs Magnetiques Pulses, 31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); Askenazy, S. [Service National Des Champs Magnetiques Pulses, 31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); Osofsky, M.S. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5000 (United States); Soulen, R.J. Jr. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5000 (United States); Wolf, S.A. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5000 (United States); Pari, P. [Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, Service de Physique de l`Etat Condense, Laboratoire des Basses Temperatures, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bozovic, I. [Edward L. Ginzton Research Center, Varian Associates, Palo Alto, CA 94304-1025 (United States); Eckstein, J.N. [Edward L. Ginzton Research Center, Varian Associates, Palo Alto, CA 94304-1025 (United States); Virshup, G.F. [Edward L. Ginzton Research Center, Varian Associates, Palo Alto, CA 94304-1025 (United States)

    1995-05-01

    H{sub c2}(T) has been measured for thin BSCO films at temperatures down to 65 mK and pulsed fields up to 35 T. H{sub c2}(T) diverged anomalously as the temperature decreased: at the lowest temperature, it was five times that expected for a conventional superconductor. Although deviations from the conventional behavior have been observed in other superconductors, such strong divergence over such a large range of reduced temperature has not been seen before. (orig.).

  5. Anomalous temperature dependence of the current in a metal-oxide-polymer resistive switching diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Henrique L; Rocha, Paulo R F; Kiazadeh, Asal [Center of Electronics Optoelectronics and Telecommunications (CEOT) Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); De Leeuw, Dago M [Philips Research Laboratories, Professor Holstlaan 4, 5656 AA Eindhoven (Netherlands); Meskers, Stefan C J, E-mail: hgomes@ualg.pt [Molecular Materials and Nanosystems, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2011-01-19

    Metal-oxide polymer diodes exhibit non-volatile resistive switching. The current-voltage characteristics have been studied as a function of temperature. The low-conductance state follows a thermally activated behaviour. The high-conductance state shows a multistep-like behaviour and below 300 K an enormous positive temperature coefficient. This anomalous behaviour contradicts the widely held view that switching is due to filaments that are formed reversibly by the diffusion of metal atoms. Instead, these findings together with small-signal impedance measurements indicate that creation and annihilation of filaments is controlled by filling of shallow traps localized in the oxide or at the oxide/polymer interface.

  6. Temperature dependence anomalous dielectric relaxation in Co doped ZnO nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ansari, Sajid Ali; Nisar, Ambreen; Fatma, Bushara [Centre of Excellence in Materials Science (Nanomaterials), Department of Applied Physics, Z.H. College of Engg. and Tech., Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh 202 002 (India); Khan, Wasi, E-mail: wasiamu@gmail.com [Centre of Excellence in Materials Science (Nanomaterials), Department of Applied Physics, Z.H. College of Engg. and Tech., Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh 202 002 (India); Chaman, M. [Centre of Excellence in Materials Science (Nanomaterials), Department of Applied Physics, Z.H. College of Engg. and Tech., Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh 202 002 (India); Mewat Engg. College (Wakf) Mewat, Haryana (India); Azam, Ameer [Centre of Excellence in Materials Science (Nanomaterials), Department of Applied Physics, Z.H. College of Engg. and Tech., Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh 202 002 (India); Centre of Nanotechnology, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Naqvi, A.H. [Centre of Excellence in Materials Science (Nanomaterials), Department of Applied Physics, Z.H. College of Engg. and Tech., Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh 202 002 (India)

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► We prepared Co doped ZnO by facile gel-combustion method. ► Studied temperature dependent dielectric properties in detail. ► Relaxation time shifts toward the higher temperature as increase in Co content. ► SEM analysis shows formation and agglomeration of nanoparticles. ► Dielectric constants, loss and ac conductivity increases with rise in temperature. ► The dielectric constant, loss and ac conductivity decreases as Co ion increases. -- Abstract: We have reported temperature and frequency dependence of dielectric behavior of nanocrystalline Zn{sub 1−x}Co{sub x}O (x = 0.0, 0.01, 0.05 and 0.1) samples prepared by gel-combustion method. The synthesized samples were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and LCR-meter, respectively. The XRD analysis reveals that ZnO has a hexagonal (wurtzite) crystal structure. The morphology and size of the nanoparticles (∼10–25 nm) were observed by SEM for 5% Co doped ZnO sample. In dielectric properties, complex permittivity (ε{sup *} = ε′ − jε″), loss tangent (tan δ) and ac conductivity (σ{sub ac}) in the frequency range 75 kHz to 5 MHz were analyzed with temperature range 150–400 °C. The experimental results indicate that ε′, ε″, tan δ and σ{sub ac} decreases with increase in frequency and temperature. The transition temperature as obtained in dispersion curve of dielectric constant shifts toward higher temperature with increase Co content.

  7. Anomalous electric field and temperature dependence of collector multiplication in InP/Ga0.47In0.53As heterojunction bipolar transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, D.; Hamm, R. A.; Feygenson, A.; Panish, M. B.

    1992-06-01

    The collector multiplication in InP/Ga0.47In0.53As heterojunction bipolar transistors was found to increase with temperature, and to have a weak electric field dependence. This anomalous behavior has a profound impact on device characteristics.

  8. Anomalous Temperature Dependence of Photoluminescence in InAs/InAlGaAs/InP Quantum Wire and Dot Hybrid Nanostructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xin-Rong; XU Bo; WANG Hai-Fei; ZHAO Guo-Qing; SHI Shu-Hui; SHEN Xiao-Zhi; LI Jun-Feng; WANG Zhan-Guo

    2011-01-01

    Self-assembled InAs quantum wires (QWRs) are fabricated on an InP substrate by solid-source molecular beam epitaxy (SSMBE). Photoluminescence (PL) spectra are investigated in these nanostructures as a function of temperature. An anomalous enhancement of PL intensity and a temperature insensitive PL emission are observed from lnAs nanostructures grown on InP substrates using lnAIGaAs as the matrix layer and the origin of this phenomenon is discussed. We attribute the anomalous temperature dependence of photoluminescence to the formation of Al-rich and In-rich region in the InAlGaAs buffer layer and the cap layer.%@@ Self-assembled InAs quantum wires (QWRs) are fabricated on an InP substrate by solid-source molecular beam epitaxy (SSMBE).Photoluminescence (PL) spectra are investigated in these nanostructures as a function of temperature.An anomalous enhancement of PL intensity and a temperature insensitive PL emission are observed from InAs nanostructures grown on InP substrates using InAlGaAs as the matrix layer and the origin of this phenomenon is discussed.We attribute the anomalous temperature dependence of photoluminescence to the formation of Al-rich and In-rich region in the InAlGaAs buffer layer and the cap layer.

  9. Anomalous diffusion in heterogeneous glass-forming liquids: temperature-dependent behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, J S

    2008-11-01

    In a preceding paper, Langer and Mukhopadhyay [Phys. Rev. E 77, 061505 (2008)] studied the diffusive motion of a tagged molecule in an heterogeneous glass-forming liquid at temperatures just above a glass transition. Among other features of this system, we postulated a relation between heterogeneity and stretched-exponential decay of correlations, and we also confirmed that systems of this kind generally exhibit non-Gaussian diffusion on intermediate length and time scales. Here I extend this analysis to higher temperatures approaching the point where the heterogeneities disappear and thermal activation barriers become small. I start by modifying the continuous-time random-walk theory proposed in Langer and Mukhopadhyay and supplement this analysis with an extension of the excitation-chain theory of glass dynamics. I also use a key result from the shear-transformation-zone theory of viscous deformation of amorphous materials. Elements of each of these theories are then used to interpret experimental data for orthoterphenyl, specifially, the diffusion and viscosity coefficients and neutron-scattering measurements of the self-intermediate scattering function. Reconciling the theory with these data sets provides insights into the crossover between super-Arrhenius and Arrhenius dynamics, length scales of spatial heterogeneities, violation of the Stokes-Einstein relation in glass-forming liquids, and the origin of stretched-exponential decay of correlations.

  10. Anomalous pressure dependence of the superconducting transition temperature of beta-pyrochlore AOs2O6 oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, T; Takeshita, N; Terakura, C; Takagi, H; Tokura, Y; Yonezawa, S; Muraoka, Y; Hiroi, Z

    2005-10-14

    High-pressure effects on the superconducting transitions of beta-pyrochlore oxide superconductors AOs(2)O(6) (A = Cs,Rb,K) are studied by measuring resistivity under high pressures up to 10 GPa. The superconducting transition temperature T(c) first increases with increasing pressure in every compound and then exhibits a broad maximum at 7.6 K (6 GPa), 8.2 K (2 GPa), and 10 K (0.6 GPa) for A = Cs, Rb, and K, respectively. Finally, the superconductivity is suppressed completely at a critical pressure near 7 GPa and 6 GPa for A = Rb and K and probably above 10 GPa for A = Cs. Characteristic changes in the coefficient A of the T(2) term in resistivity and residual resistivity are observed, both of which are synchronized with the corresponding change in T(c).

  11. Anomalous pressure dependence of the torsional levels in solid nitromethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavagnat, D.; Magerl, A.; Vettier, C.; Anderson, I. S.; Trevino, S. F.

    1985-01-01

    Inelastic neutron-scattering measurement of the torsional levels of CH3NO2 and CD3NO2 are presented as functions of pressure and temperature. In contrast to all previously observed pressure dependence of hindered rotors, the ground-state tunnel splitting increases and the energies of the bound torsional levels decrease with pressure. A potential which reproduces these anomalous effects is found and the source of the anomaly explained.

  12. Structural Origin of the Anomalous Temperature Dependence of the Local Magnetic Moments in the CaFe2As2 Family of Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortenzi, L.; Gretarsson, H.; Kasahara, S.; Matsuda, Y.; Shibauchi, T.; Finkelstein, K. D.; Wu, W.; Julian, S. R.; Kim, Young-June; Mazin, I. I.; Boeri, L.

    2015-01-01

    We report a combination of Fe K β x-ray emission spectroscopy and density functional reduced Stoner theory calculations to investigate the correlation between structural and magnetic degrees of freedom in CaFe2(As1-xPx) 2 . The puzzling temperature behavior of the local moment found in rare earth-doped CaFe2As2 [H. Gretarsson et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 047003 (2013)] is also observed in CaFe2(As1-xPx) 2 . We explain this phenomenon based on first-principles calculations with scaled magnetic interaction. One scaling parameter is sufficient to describe quantitatively the magnetic moments in both CaFe2(As1-xPx) 2 (x =0.055 ) and Ca0.78La0.22Fe2As2 at all temperatures. The anomalous growth of the local moments with increasing temperature can be understood from the observed large thermal expansion of the c -axis lattice parameter combined with strong magnetoelastic coupling. These effects originate from the strong tendency to form As-As dimers across the Ca layer in the CaFe2As2 family of materials. Our results emphasize the dual local-itinerant character of magnetism in Fe pnictides.

  13. Study of anomalous temperature dependence of itinerant holes in under- and overdoped La sub 2 sub - sub x Sr sub x CuO sub 4 single crystals using polarised soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Singhal, R K; Dalela, S; Sekhar, B; Jain, D C; Garg, K B

    2003-01-01

    Some experiments have recently shown that in the YBCO detwinned system charge aggregation takes place in the Cu-O sub 2 plane along the b-axis at T>>T sub c followed by formation of Cooper pairs, again in the normal state. Polarised X-ray absorption measurements at the O K and Cu L sub 3 absorption edges in E parallel b orientation have been carried out on underdoped and overdoped single crystals of La sub 2 sub - sub x Sr sub x CuO sub 4 through a temperature range of 10-300 K to study the dependence of the itinerant hole density. Both the crystals do show an anomalous temperature dependence but there is a wide divergence in the earlier and our results. This paper discusses the results and possible causes for the difference.

  14. Anomalous scaling in an age-dependent branching model

    OpenAIRE

    Keller-Schmidt, Stephanie; Tugrul, Murat; Eguíluz, Víctor M; Hernández-García, Emilio; Klemm, Konstantin

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a one-parametric family of tree growth models, in which branching probabilities decrease with branch age $\\tau$ as $\\tau^{-\\alpha}$. Depending on the exponent $\\alpha$, the scaling of tree depth with tree size $n$ displays a transition between the logarithmic scaling of random trees and an algebraic growth. At the transition ($\\alpha=1$) tree depth grows as $(\\log n)^2$. This anomalous scaling is in good agreement with the trend observed in evolution of biological species, thus p...

  15. Temperature dependence of the magnetization of canted spin structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Henrik; Lefmann, Kim; Brok, Erik;

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies of the low-temperature saturation magnetization of ferrimagnetic nanoparticles and diamagnetically substituted ferrites have shown an anomalous temperature dependence. It has been suggested that this is related to freezing of canted magnetic structures. We present models for the ......Numerous studies of the low-temperature saturation magnetization of ferrimagnetic nanoparticles and diamagnetically substituted ferrites have shown an anomalous temperature dependence. It has been suggested that this is related to freezing of canted magnetic structures. We present models...

  16. Anomalous scaling in an age-dependent branching model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller-Schmidt, Stephanie; Tuğrul, Murat; Eguíluz, Víctor M; Hernández-García, Emilio; Klemm, Konstantin

    2015-02-01

    We introduce a one-parametric family of tree growth models, in which branching probabilities decrease with branch age τ as τ(-α). Depending on the exponent α, the scaling of tree depth with tree size n displays a transition between the logarithmic scaling of random trees and an algebraic growth. At the transition (α=1) tree depth grows as (logn)(2). This anomalous scaling is in good agreement with the trend observed in evolution of biological species, thus providing a theoretical support for age-dependent speciation and associating it to the occurrence of a critical point.

  17. Anomalous collisional absorption of laser pulses in underdense plasma at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, M.

    2015-04-01

    In a previous paper [M. Kundu, Phys. Plasmas 21, 013302 (2014), 10.1063/1.4862038], fractional collisional absorption (α ) of laser light in underdense plasma was studied by using a classical scattering model of electron-ion collision frequency νei, where total velocity v =√{vth2+v02 } (with vth and v0 as the thermal and the ponderomotive velocity of an electron) dependent Coulomb logarithm lnΛ (v ) was shown to be responsible for the anomalous (unconventional) increase of νei and α (∝νei ) with the laser intensity I0 up to a maximum value about an intensity Ic in the low temperature (TeIc . One may object that the anomalous increase in νei and α were partly due to the artifact introduced in lnΛ through the maximum cutoff distance bmax∝v . In this work, we show similar anomalous increase in νei and α versus I0 (in the low temperature and underdense density regime) with more accurate quantum and classical kinetic models of νei without using lnΛ , but with a proper choice of the total velocity dependent inverse cutoff length kmax∝v2 (classical) or kmax∝v (quantum). For a given I0<5 ×1014Wcm -2 , νei versus Te also exhibits so far unnoticed identical anomalous increase as νei versus I0, even if the conventional kmax∝vth2 or kmax∝vth (without v0) is chosen. The total velocity dependent kmax in the kinetic models, as proposed here, is found to explain the anomalous increase of α with I0 measured in some earlier laser-plasma experiments.

  18. Anomalous phonon behavior: blueshift of the surface boson peak in silica glass with increasing temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steurer, W; Apfolter, A; Koch, M; Ernst, W E; Søndergård, E; Manson, J R; Holst, B

    2008-04-04

    We present helium atom scattering measurements of the boson peak at the surface of vitreous silica between 127.0 and 368.5 K. The most probable energy shows a strong temperature dependence and increases linearly with temperature in the measured range. The observed blueshift of the surface boson peak (shift rate 0.008+/-0.002 meV/K) is a factor of 4 to 10 times stronger than shift rates measured in the bulk by inelastic neutron and Raman scattering. We suggest that the anomalous shift direction of the boson peak to higher energies with increasing temperature has the same origin as the unusual temperature dependence of the bulk modulus of silica glass.

  19. Thickness Dependence of the Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in Magnetic Topological Insulator Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiao; Feng, Yang; Wang, Jing; Ou, Yunbo; Hao, Zhenqi; Liu, Chang; Zhang, Zuocheng; Zhang, Liguo; Lin, Chaojing; Liao, Jian; Li, Yongqing; Wang, Li-Li; Ji, Shuai-Hua; Chen, Xi; Ma, Xucun; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; Wang, Yayu; He, Ke; Xue, Qi-Kun

    2016-08-01

    The evolution of the quantum anomalous Hall effect with the thickness of Cr-doped (Bi,Sb)2 Te3 magnetic topological insulator films is studied, revealing how the effect is caused by the interplay of the surface states, band-bending, and ferromagnetic exchange energy. Homogeneity in ferromagnetism is found to be the key to high-temperature quantum anomalous Hall material.

  20. Effect of microstructure on anomalous strain-rate-dependent behaviour of bacterial cellulose hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xing; Shi, Zhijun; Lau, Andrew; Liu, Changqin; Yang, Guang; Silberschmidt, Vadim V

    2016-05-01

    This study is focused on anomalous strain-rate-dependent behaviour of bacterial cellulose (BC) hydrogel that can be strain-rate insensitive, hardening, softening, or strain-rate insensitive in various ranges of strain rate. BC hydrogel consists of randomly distributed nanofibres and a large content of free water; thanks to its ideal biocompatibility, it is suitable for biomedical applications. Motivated by its potential applications in complex loading conditions of body environment, its time-dependent behaviour was studied by means of in-aqua uniaxial tension tests at constant temperature of 37 °C at various strain rates ranging from 0.000 1s(-1) to 0.3s(-1). Experimental results reflect anomalous strain-rate-dependent behaviour that was not documented before. Micro-morphological observations allowed identification of deformation mechanisms at low and high strain rates in relation to microstructural changes. Unlike strain-rate softening behaviours in other materials, reorientation of nanofibres and kinematics of free-water flow dominate the softening behaviour of BC hydrogel at high strain rates.

  1. Temperature dependence of heterogeneous nucleation: Extension of the Fletcher model

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGraw, Robert; Winkler, Paul; Wagner, Paul

    2015-04-01

    Recently there have been several cases reported where the critical saturation ratio for onset of heterogeneous nucleation increases with nucleation temperature (positive slope dependence). This behavior contrasts with the behavior observed in homogeneous nucleation, where a decreasing critical saturation ratio with increasing nucleation temperature (negative slope dependence) seems universal. For this reason the positive slope dependence is referred to as anomalous. Negative slope dependence is found in heterogeneous nucleation as well, but because so few temperature-dependent measurements have been reported, it is not presently clear which slope condition (positive or negative) will become more frequent. Especially interesting is the case of water vapor condensation on silver nanoparticles [Kupc et al., AS&T 47: i-iv, 2013] where the critical saturation ratio for heterogeneous nucleation onset passes through a maximum, at about 278K, with higher (lower) temperatures showing the usual (anomalous) temperature dependence. In the present study we develop an extension of Fletcher's classical, capillarity-based, model of heterogeneous nucleation that explicitly resolves the roles of surface energy and surface entropy in determining temperature dependence. Application of the second nucleation theorem, which relates temperature dependence of nucleation rate to cluster energy, yields both necessary and sufficient conditions for anomalous temperature behavior in the extended Fletcher model. In particular it is found that an increasing contact angle with temperature is a necessary, but not sufficient, condition for anomalous temperature dependence to occur. Methods for inferring microscopic contact angle and its temperature dependence from heterogeneous nucleation probability measurements are discussed in light of the new theory.

  2. The formation of anomalous Hall effect depending on W atoms in ZnO thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Can, Musa Mutlu, E-mail: musamutlucan@gmail.com [Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Nanotechnology Research and Application Center, Sabancı University, Tuzla, 34956 İstanbul (Turkey); CNR-SPIN, Universitá di Napoli “Federico II”, Compl. Univ. di Monte S. Angelo, Via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Shah, S. Ismat [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Department of Material Science and Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Fırat, Tezer [Department of Physics Engineering, Hacettepe University, Beytepe 06800 Ankara (Turkey)

    2014-06-01

    This article investigates the effects of intrinsic point defects and extrinsic W atoms on magneto electrical properties in the ZnO lattice. The analyses were accomplished for ∼0.5% W including ZnO thin films, grown using a radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering system. The polarized spin current dependent magnetic formation was investigated by longitudinal and transverse magneto electrical measurements in a temperature range of 5 K to 300 K. The positive magneto resistivity (PMR) ratios reached 28.8%, 12.7%, and 17.6% at 5 K for thin films, having different post-deposition annealing conditions as a consequence of ionic W dependent defects in the lattice. Furthermore, an anomalous Hall effect, originating from polarized spin currents, was understood from the split in Hall resistance versus magnetic field (R{sub xy}(H)) curves for the thin film with high amount of Zn{sup 2+} and W{sup 6+} ionic defects.

  3. Dependence of (anomalous) fading of infra-red stimulated luminescence on trap occupancy in feldspars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morthekai, P.; Jain, Mayank; Gach, Grzegorz

    2013-01-01

    Dose dependency of anomalous fading of infra-red stimulated luminescence (IRSL) from feldspars has been investigated using radiations of different ionisation qualities. The rate of fading of the IRSL signal after proton irradiation (9.4–30%/decade) is on an average almost twice compared to that a......Dose dependency of anomalous fading of infra-red stimulated luminescence (IRSL) from feldspars has been investigated using radiations of different ionisation qualities. The rate of fading of the IRSL signal after proton irradiation (9.4–30%/decade) is on an average almost twice compared...

  4. Room-temperature anomalous Hall effect and magnetroresistance in (Ga, Co)-codoped ZnO diluted magnetic semiconductor films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Xue-Chao; Chen Zhi-Zhan; Shi Er-Wei; Liao Da-Qian; Zhou Ke-Jin

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports that the (Ga, Co)-codoped ZnO thin films have been grown by inductively coupled plasma enhanced physical vapour deposition. Room-temperature ferromagnetism is observed for the as-grown thin films. The x-ray absorption fine structure characterization reveals that Co2+ and Ga3+ ions substitute for Zn2+ ions in the ZnO lattice and exclude the possibility of extrinsic ferromagnetism origin. The ferromagnetic (Ga, Co)-codoped ZnO thin films exhibit carrier concentration dependent anomalous Hall effect and positive magnetoresistance at room temperature. The mechanism of anomalous Hall effect and magneto-transport in ferromagnetic ZnO-based diluted magnetic semiconductors is discussed.

  5. Tokamak Plasmas : Measurement of temperature fluctuations and anomalous transport in the SINP tokamak

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Kumar; S K Saha

    2000-11-01

    Temperature fluctuations have been measured in the edge region of the SINP tokamak. We find that these fluctuations have a comparatively high level (30–40%) and a broad spectrum. The temperature fluctuations show a quite high coherence with density and potential fluctuations and contribute considerably to the anomalous particle flux.

  6. Large anomalous Hall effect in a non-collinear antiferromagnet at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsuji, Satoru; Kiyohara, Naoki; Higo, Tomoya

    2015-11-12

    In ferromagnetic conductors, an electric current may induce a transverse voltage drop in zero applied magnetic field: this anomalous Hall effect is observed to be proportional to magnetization, and thus is not usually seen in antiferromagnets in zero field. Recent developments in theory and experiment have provided a framework for understanding the anomalous Hall effect using Berry-phase concepts, and this perspective has led to predictions that, under certain conditions, a large anomalous Hall effect may appear in spin liquids and antiferromagnets without net spin magnetization. Although such a spontaneous Hall effect has now been observed in a spin liquid state, a zero-field anomalous Hall effect has hitherto not been reported for antiferromagnets. Here we report empirical evidence for a large anomalous Hall effect in an antiferromagnet that has vanishingly small magnetization. In particular, we find that Mn3Sn, an antiferromagnet that has a non-collinear 120-degree spin order, exhibits a large anomalous Hall conductivity of around 20 per ohm per centimetre at room temperature and more than 100 per ohm per centimetre at low temperatures, reaching the same order of magnitude as in ferromagnetic metals. Notably, the chiral antiferromagnetic state has a very weak and soft ferromagnetic moment of about 0.002 Bohr magnetons per Mn atom (refs 10, 12), allowing us to switch the sign of the Hall effect with a small magnetic field of around a few hundred oersted. This soft response of the large anomalous Hall effect could be useful for various applications including spintronics--for example, to develop a memory device that produces almost no perturbing stray fields.

  7. The precise time-dependent solution of the Fokker–Planck equation with anomalous diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Ran; Du, Jiulin, E-mail: jiulindu@aliyun.com

    2015-08-15

    We study the time behavior of the Fokker–Planck equation in Zwanzig’s rule (the backward-Ito’s rule) based on the Langevin equation of Brownian motion with an anomalous diffusion in a complex medium. The diffusion coefficient is a function in momentum space and follows a generalized fluctuation–dissipation relation. We obtain the precise time-dependent analytical solution of the Fokker–Planck equation and at long time the solution approaches to a stationary power-law distribution in nonextensive statistics. As a test, numerically we have demonstrated the accuracy and validity of the time-dependent solution. - Highlights: • The precise time-dependent solution of the Fokker–Planck equation with anomalous diffusion is found. • The anomalous diffusion satisfies a generalized fluctuation–dissipation relation. • At long time the time-dependent solution approaches to a power-law distribution in nonextensive statistics. • Numerically we have demonstrated the accuracy and validity of the time-dependent solution.

  8. Temperature correction to the Casimir force in cryogenic range and anomalous skin effect

    CERN Document Server

    Svetovoy, V B

    2003-01-01

    Temperature correction to the Casimir force is considered for real metals at low temperatures. With the temperature decrease the mean free path for electrons becomes larger than the field penetration depth. In this condition description of metals with the impedance of anomalous skin effect is shown to be more appropriate than with the permittivity. The effect is crucial for the temperature correction. It is demonstrated that in the zero frequency limit the reflection coefficients should coincide with those of ideal metal if we demand the entropy to be zero at T=0. All the other prescriptions discussed in the literature for the $n=0$ term in the Lifshitz formula give negative entropy. It is shown that the temperature correction in the region of anomalous skin effect is not suppressed as it happens in the plasma model. This correction will be important in the future cryogenic measurements of the Casimir force.

  9. Temperature, pressure, and compositional effects on anomalous or "self" preservation of gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, L.A.; Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.

    2003-01-01

    We previously reported on a thermal regime where pure, polycrystalline methane hydrate is preserved metastably in bulk at up to 75 K above its nominal temperature stability limit of 193 K at 0.1 MPa, following rapid release of the sample pore pressure. Large fractions (>50 vol.%) of methane hydrate can be preserved for 2-3 weeks by this method, reflecting the greatly suppressed rates of dissociation that characterize this "anomalous preservation" regime. This behavior contrasts that exhibited by methane hydrate at both colder (193-240 K) and warmer (272-290 K) isothermal test conditions, where dissociation rates increase monotonically with increasing temperature. Here, we report on recent experiments that further investigate the effects of temperature, pressure, and composition on anomalous preservation behavior. All tests conducted on sI methane hydrate yielded self-consistent results that confirm the highly temperature-sensitive but reproducible nature of anomalous preservation behavior. Temperature-stepping experiments conducted between 250 and 268 K corroborate the relative rates measured previously in isothermal preservation tests, and elevated pore-pressure tests showed that, as expected, dissociation rates are further reduced with increasing pressure. Surprisingly, sII methane-ethane hydrate was found to exhibit no comparable preservation effect when rapidly depressurized at 268 K, even though it is thermodynamically stable at higher temperatures and lower pressures than sI methane hydrate. These results, coupled with SEM imaging of quenched sample material from a variety of dissociation tests, strongly support our earlier arguments that ice-"shielding" effects provided by partial dissociation along hydrate grain surfaces do not serve as the primary mechanism for anomalous preservation. The underlying physical-chemistry mechanism(s) of anomalous preservation remains elusive, but appears to be based more on textural or morphological changes within the hydrate

  10. Feynman–Kac equation for anomalous processes with space- and time-dependent forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairoli, Andrea; Baule, Adrian

    2017-04-01

    Functionals of a stochastic process Y(t) model many physical time-extensive observables, for instance particle positions, local and occupation times or accumulated mechanical work. When Y(t) is a normal diffusive process, their statistics are obtained as the solution of the celebrated Feynman–Kac equation. This equation provides the crucial link between the expected values of diffusion processes and the solutions of deterministic second-order partial differential equations. When Y(t) is non-Brownian, e.g. an anomalous diffusive process, generalizations of the Feynman–Kac equation that incorporate power-law or more general waiting time distributions of the underlying random walk have recently been derived. A general representation of such waiting times is provided in terms of a Lévy process whose Laplace exponent is directly related to the memory kernel appearing in the generalized Feynman–Kac equation. The corresponding anomalous processes have been shown to capture nonlinear mean square displacements exhibiting crossovers between different scaling regimes, which have been observed in numerous experiments on biological systems like migrating cells or diffusing macromolecules in intracellular environments. However, the case where both space- and time-dependent forces drive the dynamics of the generalized anomalous process has not been solved yet. Here, we present the missing derivation of the Feynman–Kac equation in such general case by using the subordination technique. Furthermore, we discuss its extension to functionals explicitly depending on time, which are of particular relevance for the stochastic thermodynamics of anomalous diffusive systems. Exact results on the work fluctuations of a simple non-equilibrium model are obtained. An additional aim of this paper is to provide a pedagogical introduction to Lévy processes, semimartingales and their associated stochastic calculus, which underlie the mathematical formulation of anomalous diffusion as a

  11. Anomalous fiber optic gyroscope signals observed above spinning rings at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajmar, M; Plesescu, F; Seifert, B [Space Propulsion and Advanced Concepts, Austrian Research Centers GmbH - ARC, A-2444 Seibersdorf (Austria)], E-mail: martin.tajmar@arcs.ac.at

    2009-02-01

    Precision fiber optic gyroscopes were mounted mechanically de-coupled above spinning rings inside a cryostat. Below a critical temperature (typically <30 K), the gyroscopes measure a significant deviation from their usual offset due to Earth's rotation. This deviation is proportional to the applied angular ring velocity with maximum signals towards lower temperatures. The anomalous gyroscope signal is about 8 orders of magnitude smaller then the applied angular ring velocity, compensating about one third of the Earth rotation offset at an angular top speed of 420 rad/s. Moreover, our data shows a parity violation as the effect appears to be dominant for rotation against the Earth's spin. No systematic effect was found to explain this effect including the magnetic environment, vibration and helium gas friction suggesting that our observation is a new low temperature phenomenon. Tests in various configurations suggest that the rotating low temperature helium may be the source of our anomalous signals.

  12. Temperature-induced anomalous structural changes of Al-12wt.%Sn-4wt.%Si melt and its influence on as-cast structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Zhiming

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The temperature dependence of the viscosity of liquid Al-12wt.%Sn-4wt.%Si was studied with a high-temperature viscosity apparatus. Anomalous changes of viscosity of the melt were found at 1,103 K and 968 K in the cooling process, which indicates anomalous structural changes of the melt. It is calculated that the anomalous structural change is associated with an abrupt decrease of atomic clusters’ size and activation energy in the melt. According to the temperature of the anomalous structural changes, melt heat treatment process (quenching from superheat to pouring temperature was performed on Al-12wt.%Sn-4wt.%Si melt prior to pouring, aimed to keep the small atomic clusters from higher temperature to lower pouring temperature. The results suggest that relatively small atomic clusters at the pouring temperature in the melt could generate a deep under-cooling of nucleation in the subsequent solidification process, and refine the as-cast structure. After being quenched from superheating to pouring temperature, the relatively small atomic clusters, especially the Si-Si clusters in the melt will grow to equilibrium state (relatively big atomic clusters with holding time, resulting in the prominent coarsening of the Si morphology in the as-cast structure.

  13. Anomalous Fiber Optic Gyroscope Signals Observed above Spinning Rings at Low Temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Tajmar, M; Seifert, B

    2008-01-01

    Precision fiber optic gyroscopes were mounted mechanically de-coupled above spinning rings inside a cryostat. Below a critical temperature (typically <30 K), the gyroscopes measure a significant deviation from their usual Earth rotation offset proportional to the applied angular ring velocity with maximum signals towards lower temperatures. The anomalous gyroscope signal is about 8 orders of magnitude smaller then the applied angular ring velocity, compensating about one third of the Earth rotation offset at an angular top speed of 420 rad/s. Moreover, our data shows a parity violation as the effect appears to be dominant for rotation against the Earth's spin. No systematic effect was found to explain this effect including the magnetic environment, vibration and helium gas friction suggesting that our observation is a new low temperature phenomenon. Tests in various configurations suggest that the anomalous signals is originating from the rotating helium in our facilities.

  14. Anomalous law of cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapas, Luciano C.; Ferreira, Rogelma M. S.; Rubí, J. Miguel; Oliveira, Fernando A.

    2015-03-01

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton's law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics.

  15. Anomalous law of cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapas, Luciano C; Ferreira, Rogelma M S; Rubí, J Miguel; Oliveira, Fernando A

    2015-03-14

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton's law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics.

  16. Prediction of near-room-temperature quantum anomalous Hall effect on honeycomb materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shu-Chun; Shan, Guangcun; Yan, Binghai

    2014-12-19

    Recently, the long-sough quantum anomalous Hall effect was realized in a magnetic topological insulator. However, the requirement of an extremely low temperature (approximately 30 mK) hinders realistic applications. Based on ab initio band structure calculations, we propose a quantum anomalous Hall platform with a large energy gap of 0.34 and 0.06 eV on honeycomb lattices comprised of Sn and Ge, respectively. The ferromagnetic (FM) order forms in one sublattice of the honeycomb structure by controlling the surface functionalization rather than dilute magnetic doping, which is expected to be visualized by spin polarized STM in experiment. Strong coupling between the inherent quantum spin Hall state and ferromagnetism results in considerable exchange splitting and, consequently, an FM insulator with a large energy gap. The estimated mean-field Curie temperature is 243 and 509 K for Sn and Ge lattices, respectively. The large energy gap and high Curie temperature indicate the feasibility of the quantum anomalous Hall effect in the near-room-temperature and even room-temperature regions.

  17. Size-dependent anomalous dielectric behavior in La2O3: SiO2 nano-glass composite system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, T. H.; Mukherjee, S.; Lin, Y. H.; Chou, C. C.; Yang, H. D.

    2012-12-01

    An intriguing anomalous dielectric behavior is observed in nanoparticle (NP) La2O3: SiO2 nano-glass composite system synthesized via sol-gel route at different calcination temperatures. Temperature dependent dielectric properties exhibit a notable dielectric broadening, indicating of diffuse phase transition with high ɛ', quite different from and much higher than pure bulk La2O3 and SiO2. We postulate such dielectric effect in the context of the oxygen vacancies of the rare earth oxide nano-glass composite, where lattice strain related with NPs and their size plays a vital role. Such a material might be treated as a potential candidate to solve the problem of devices miniaturization.

  18. Effects of Anomalous Electron Cross-Field Transport in a Low Temperature Magnetized Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raitses, Yevgeny

    2014-10-01

    The application of the magnetic field in a low pressure plasma can cause a spatial separation of low and high energy electrons. This so-called magnetic filter effect is used for many plasma applications, including ion and neutral beam sources, plasma processing of semiconductors and nanomaterials, and plasma thrusters. In spite of successful practical applications, the magnetic filter effect is not well understood. In this work, we explore this effect by characterizing the electron and ion energy distribution functions in a plasma column with crossed electric and magnetic fields. Experimental results revealed a strong dependence of spatial variations of plasma properties on the gas pressure. For xenon and argon gases, below ~ 1 mtorr, the increase of the magnetic field leads to a more uniform profile of the electron temperature. This surprising result is due to anomalously high electron cross-field transport that causes mixing of hot and cold electrons. High-speed imaging and probe measurements revealed a coherent structure rotating in E cross B direction with frequency of a few kHz. Theory and simulations describing this rotating structure has been developed and points to ionization and electrostatic instabilities as their possible cause. Similar to spoke oscillations reported for Hall thrusters, this rotating structure conducts the large fraction of the cross-field current. The use of segmented electrodes with an electrical feedback control is shown to mitigate these oscillations. Finally, a new feature of the spoke phenomenon that has been discovered, namely a sensitive dependence of the rotating oscillations on the gas pressure, can be important for many applications. This work was supported by DOE Contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  19. Anomalous law of cooling

    OpenAIRE

    Lapas, Luciano C.; Ferreira, Rogelma M. S.; Oliveira, Fernando A.; Rubí, J. Miguel

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergo a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton's law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature ma...

  20. Anomalous transport in fluid field with random waiting time depending on the preceding jump length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Li, Guo-Hua

    2016-11-01

    Anomalous (or non-Fickian) transport behaviors of particles have been widely observed in complex porous media. To capture the energy-dependent characteristics of non-Fickian transport of a particle in flow fields, in the present paper a generalized continuous time random walk model whose waiting time probability distribution depends on the preceding jump length is introduced, and the corresponding master equation in Fourier-Laplace space for the distribution of particles is derived. As examples, two generalized advection-dispersion equations for Gaussian distribution and lévy flight with the probability density function of waiting time being quadratic dependent on the preceding jump length are obtained by applying the derived master equation. Project supported by the Foundation for Young Key Teachers of Chengdu University of Technology, China (Grant No. KYGG201414) and the Opening Foundation of Geomathematics Key Laboratory of Sichuan Province, China (Grant No. scsxdz2013009).

  1. The Metastable Persistence of Vapor-Deposited Amorphous Ice at Anomalously High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, David F.; Jenniskens, Peter; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Studies of the gas release, vaporization behavior and infrared (IR) spectral properties of amorphous and crystalline water ice have direct application to cometary and planetary outgassing phenomena and contribute to an understanding of the physical properties of astrophysical ices. Several investigators report anomalous phenomena related to the warming of vapor-deposited astrophysical ice analogs. However gas release, ice volatilization and IR spectral features are secondary or tertiary manifestations of ice structure or morphology. These observations are useful in mimicking the bulk physical and chemical phenomena taking place in cometary and other extraterrestrial ices but do not directly reveal the structural changes which are their root cause. The phenomenological interpretation of spectral and gas release data is probably the cause of somewhat contradictory explanations invoked to account for differences in water ice behavior in similar temperature regimes. It is the microstructure, micromorphology and microchemical heterogeneity of astrophysical ices which must be characterized if the mechanisms underlying the observed phenomena are to be understood. We have been using a modified Transmission Electron Microscope to characterize the structure of vapor-deposited astrophysical ice analogs as a function of their deposition, temperature history and composition. For the present experiments, pure water vapor is deposited at high vacuum onto a 15 K amorphous carbon film inside an Hitachi H-500H TEM. The resulting ice film (approx. 0.05 micrometers thick) is warmed at the rate of 1 K per minute and diffraction patterns are collected at 1 K intervals. These patterns are converted into radial intensity distributions which are calibrated using patterns of crystalline gold deposited on a small part of the carbon substrate. The small intensity contributed by the amorphous substrate is removed by background subtraction. The proportions of amorphous and crystalline material

  2. A Two-Temperature Supernova Fallback Disk Model for Anomalous X-ray Pulsars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    We present a case study of the relevance of the radially pulsational instability of a two-temperature accretion disk around a neutron star to anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs). Our estimates are based on the approximation that such a neutron star disk with mass in the range of 10-6 - 10-5 M⊙ is formed by supernova fallback. We derive several peculiar properties of the accretion disk instability: a narrow interval of X-ray pulse periods; lower X-ray luminosities; a period derivative and an evolution time scale. All these results are in good agreement with the observations of the AXPs.

  3. Anomalous excitation-power-dependent photoluminescence of InGaAsN/GaAs T-shaped quantum wire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klangtakai, Pawinee; Pimanpang, Samuk [Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Khon Kaen University, 123 Mittraphap Rd., Muang, Khon Kaen, 40002 (Thailand); Nanotec-KKU Center of Excellence on Advanced Nanomaterials for Energy Production and Storage, Khon Kaen, 40002 (Thailand); Integrated Nanotechnology Research Center, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, 40002 (Thailand); Sanorpim, Sakuntam [Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Chulalongkorn University, Phayathai Rd., Patumwan, Bangkok, 10330 (Thailand); Karlsson, Fredrik; Holtz, Per Olof [Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Biology (IFM), Linkoeping University, 58183, Linkoeping (Sweden); Onabe, Kentaro [Department of Advanced Materials Science, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba, 277-8561 (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    The selected InGaAsN/GaAs T-shaped quantum wire (T-QWR) fabricated by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy has been investigated by microphotoluminescence (μ-PL) and excitation-power-dependent μ-PL. The optical characteristics of one-dimensional structure were taken at low-temperature (4 K) and room temperature (RT) to clarify the intersection of two familiar quantum wells (QWs) in the [001] and [110] directions, named QW1 and QW2, respectively. For the excitation-power-dependent measurement, the intensity of the excitation source was used in the range of 0.001I{sub 0} to I{sub 0}. The result shows that all of emissions related to QW1 and QWR peaks have a nonsymmetric line shape as evidenced by the tailing on the lower-energy side. All peaks shift to higher-energy side (blueshift) with the increase of the excitation power intensity. The blueshift and the low-energy tailing of PL peaks are attributed to the alloying effect. However, the emission peak related to QWR region shows a larger blueshift rate than that of QW1 on increasing of the excitation power intensity. This is an anomalous characteristic for the low-dimensional structure, affected by the large fluctuation state in the QWR region. This fluctuation state is combined of both edges of QWs (QW1 and QW2). (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. High-Temperature Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in n-p Codoped Topological Insulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Shifei; Qiao, Zhenhua; Deng, Xinzhou; Cubuk, Ekin D; Chen, Hua; Zhu, Wenguang; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Zhang, S B; Xu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2016-07-29

    The quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) is a fundamental quantum transport phenomenon that manifests as a quantized transverse conductance in response to a longitudinally applied electric field in the absence of an external magnetic field, and it promises to have immense application potential in future dissipationless quantum electronics. Here, we present a novel kinetic pathway to realize the QAHE at high temperatures by n-p codoping of three-dimensional topological insulators. We provide a proof-of-principle numerical demonstration of this approach using vanadium-iodine (V-I) codoped Sb_{2}Te_{3} and demonstrate that, strikingly, even at low concentrations of ∼2%  V and ∼1% I, the system exhibits a quantized Hall conductance, the telltale hallmark of QAHE, at temperatures of at least ∼50  K, which is 3 orders of magnitude higher than the typical temperatures at which it has been realized to date. The underlying physical factor enabling this dramatic improvement is tied to the largely preserved intrinsic band gap of the host system upon compensated n-p codoping. The proposed approach is conceptually general and may shed new light in experimental realization of high-temperature QAHE.

  5. Magnetic modulation doping in topological insulators toward higher-temperature quantum anomalous Hall effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mogi, M., E-mail: mogi@cmr.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Yoshimi, R.; Yasuda, K.; Kozuka, Y. [Department of Applied Physics and Quantum Phase Electronics Center (QPEC), University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Tsukazaki, A. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Takahashi, K. S. [RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), Wako 351-0198 (Japan); Kawasaki, M.; Tokura, Y. [Department of Applied Physics and Quantum Phase Electronics Center (QPEC), University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), Wako 351-0198 (Japan)

    2015-11-02

    Quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE), which generates dissipation-less edge current without external magnetic field, is observed in magnetic-ion doped topological insulators (TIs) such as Cr- and V-doped (Bi,Sb){sub 2}Te{sub 3}. The QAHE emerges when the Fermi level is inside the magnetically induced gap around the original Dirac point of the TI surface state. Although the size of gap is reported to be about 50 meV, the observable temperature of QAHE has been limited below 300 mK. We attempt magnetic-Cr modulation doping into topological insulator (Bi,Sb){sub 2}Te{sub 3} films to increase the observable temperature of QAHE. By introducing the rich-Cr-doped thin (1 nm) layers at the vicinity of both the surfaces based on non-Cr-doped (Bi,Sb){sub 2}Te{sub 3} films, we have succeeded in observing the QAHE up to 2 K. The improvement in the observable temperature achieved by this modulation-doping appears to be originating from the suppression of the disorder in the surface state interacting with the rich magnetic moments. Such a superlattice designing of the stabilized QAHE may pave a way to dissipation-less electronics based on the higher-temperature and zero magnetic-field quantum conduction.

  6. Dependence of anomalous resistivity on bulk drift velocity of electrons in the reconnecting current sheets in solar flares

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gui-Ping Wu; Guang-Li Huang; Hai-Sheng Ji

    2010-01-01

    Anomalous resistivity is critical for triggering fast magnetic reconnection in the nearly collisionless coronal plasma.Its nonlinear dependence on bulk drift velocity is usually assumed in MHD simulations.However,the mechanism for the production of anomalous resistivity and its evolution is still an open question.We numerically solved the one dimension Vlasov equation with the typical solar coronal parameters and realistic mass ratios to infer the relationship between anomalous resistivity and bulk drift velocity of electrons in the reconnecting current sheets as well as its nonlinear characteristics.Our principal findings are summarized as follows: 1)the relationship between the anomalous resistivity and bulk drift velocity of electrons relative to ions may be described as ηmax = 0.03724(vd/ve)5.702 Ω m for vd/ve in the range of 1.4-2.0 and ηmax = 0.8746(vd/ve)1.284 Ωm for vd/ve in the range of 2.5-4.5; 2)if drift velocity is just slightly larger than the threshold of ion-acoustic instability,the anomalous resistivity due to the wave-particle interactions is enhanced by about five orders as compared with classic resistivity due to Coulomb collisions.With the increase of drift velocity from 1.4ve to 4.5ve,the anomalous resistivity continues to increase 100 times; 3)in the rise phase of unstable waves,the anomalous resistivity has the same order as the one estimated from quasi-linear theory; after saturation of unstable waves,the anomalous resistivity decreases at least about one order as compared with its peak value; 4)considering that the final velocity of electrons ejected out of the reconnecting current sheet(RCS)decreases with the distance from the neutral point in the neutral plane,the anomalous resistivity decreases with the distance from the neutral point,which is favorable for the Petschek-like reconnection to take place.

  7. Anomalous composition-dependent dynamics of nanoconfined water in the interlayer of disordered calcium-silicates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qomi, Mohammad Javad Abdolhosseini; Bauchy, Mathieu; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Pellenq, Roland J-M

    2014-02-07

    With shear interest in nanoporous materials, the ultraconfining interlayer spacing of calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H) provides an excellent medium to study reactivity, structure, and dynamic properties of water. In this paper, we present how substrate composition affects chemo-physical properties of water in ultraconfined hydrophilic media. This is achieved by performing molecular dynamics simulation on a set of 150 realistic models with different compositions of calcium and silicon contents. It is demonstrated that the substrate chemistry directly affects the structural properties of water molecules. The motion of confined water shows a multi-stage dynamics which is characteristic of supercooled liquids and glassy phases. Inhomogeneity in that dynamics is used to differentiate between mobile and immobile water molecules. Furthermore, it is shown that the mobility of water molecules is composition-dependent. Similar to the pressure-driven self-diffusivity anomaly observed in bulk water, we report the first study on composition-driven diffusion anomaly, the self diffusivity increases with increasing confined water density in C-S-H. Such anomalous behavior is explained by the decrease in the typical activation energy required for a water molecule to escape its dynamical cage.

  8. Anomalous length dependence of the conductance of graphene nanoribbons with zigzag edges

    KAUST Repository

    Bilić, Ante

    2013-01-01

    Charge transport through two sets of symmetric graphene nanoribbons with zigzag shaped edges in a two-terminal device has been investigated, using density functional theory combined with the non-equilibrium Green\\'s function method. The conductance has been explored as a function of nanoribbon length, bias voltage, and the strength of terminal coupling. The set of narrower nanoribbons, in the form of thiolated linear acenes, shows an anomalous length dependence of the conductance, which at first exhibits a drop and a minimum, followed by an evident rise. The length trend is shown to arise because of a gradual transformation in the transport mechanism, which changes from being governed by a continuum of out-of-plane π type and in-plane state channels to being fully controlled by a single, increasingly more resonant, occupied π state channel. For the set of nanoribbons with a wider profile, a steady increase is observed across the whole length range, owing to the absence of the former transport mechanism. The predicted trends are confirmed by the inclusion of self-interaction correction in the calculations. For both sets of nanoribbons the replacement of the strongly coupling thiol groups by weakly bonding phenathroline has been found to cause a strong attenuation with the length and a generally low conductance. © 2013 American Institute of Physics.

  9. Stacking order dependence of inverse spin Hall effect and anomalous Hall effect in spin pumping experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang-Il; Seo, Min-Su; Park, Seung-Young, E-mail: parksy@kbsi.re.kr [Division of Materials Science, Korea Basic Science Institute, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong-Jun; Park, Byong-Guk [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-07

    The dependence of the measured DC voltage on the non-magnetic material (NM) in NM/CoFeB and CoFeB/NM bilayers is studied under ferromagnetic resonance conditions in a TE{sub 011} resonant cavity. The directional change of the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) voltage V{sub ISHE} for the stacking order of the bilayer can separate the pure V{sub ISHE} and the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) voltage V{sub AHE} utilizing the method of addition and subtraction. The Ta and Ti NMs show a broad deviation of the spin Hall angle θ{sub ISH}, which originates from the AHE in accordance with the high resistivity of NMs. However, the Pt and Pd NMs show that the kinds of NMs with low resistivity are consistent with the previously reported θ{sub ISH} values. Therefore, the characteristics that NM should simultaneously satisfy to obtain a reasonable V{sub ISHE} value in bilayer systems are large θ{sub ISH} and low resistivity.

  10. High-temperature large-gap quantum anomalous Hall insulating state in ultrathin double perovskite films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baidya, Santu; Waghmare, Umesh V.; Paramekanti, Arun; Saha-Dasgupta, Tanusri

    2016-10-01

    Towards the goal of realizing topological phases in thin films of correlated oxide and heterostructures, we propose here a quantum anomalous Hall insulator (QAHI) in ultrathin films of double perovskites based on mixed 3 d -5 d or 3 d -4 d transition-metal ions, grown along the [111] direction. Considering the specific case of ultrathin Ba2FeReO6 , we present a theoretical analysis of an effective Hamiltonian derived from first principles. We establish that a strong spin-orbit coupling at the Re site, t2 g symmetry of the low-energy d bands, polarity of its [111] orientation of perovskite structure, and mixed 3 d -5 d chemistry results in room temperature magnetism with a robust QAHI state of Chern number C =1 and a large band gap. We uncover and highlight a nonrelativistic orbital Rashba-type effect in addition to the spin-orbit coupling, that governs this QAHI state. With a band gap of ˜100 meV in electronic structure and magnetic transition temperature Tc˜300 K estimated by Monte Carlo simulations, our finding of the QAHI state in ultrathin Ba2FeReO6 is expected to stimulate experimental verification along with possible practical applications of its dissipationless edge currents.

  11. Charge-dependent correlations from event-by-event anomalous hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Hirono, Yuji; Kharzeev, Dmitri E

    2016-01-01

    We report on our recent attempt of quantitative modeling of the Chiral Magnetic Effect (CME) in heavy-ion collisions. We perform 3+1 dimensional anomalous hydrodynamic simulations on an event-by-event basis, with constitutive equations that contain the anomaly-induced effects. We also develop a model of the initial condition for the axial charge density that captures the statistical nature of random chirality imbalances created by the color flux tubes. Basing on the event-by-event hydrodynamic simulations for hundreds of thousands of collisions, we calculate the correlation functions that are measured in experiments, and discuss how the anomalous transport affects these observables.

  12. Anomalous results observed in magnetization of bulk high temperature superconductors—A windfall for applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Roy; Parks, Drew; Sawh, Ravi-Persad; Carpenter, Keith; Davey, Kent

    2016-04-01

    Recent experiments on pulsed-zero field cool magnetization of bulk high Jc YBCO (YBa2Cu3O7-δ) have shown unexpected results. For example, reproducible, non-destructive, rapid, giant field leaps (GFLs) to higher penetrated field are observed. The observations are inconsistent with the critical state model (CSM), in several aspects. Additional experiments have been pursued in an attempt to clarify the physics involved in the observed anomalies. Here, we present experimental results for the Jc dependence of the anomalous features. It is found that the sudden field increase in the GFL is a monotonically increasing function of Jc. The ratio of required pulsed field amplitude, BA,max, to obtain maximum trappable field, BT,max, which CSM predicts to be ≥2.0, gradually approaches 1.0 at high Jc. Tests using values of pulsed, applied field BA,max just below the GFL exhibit two additional anomalies: (i) At high Jc, the highest trapped field is up to ˜6 times lower than predicted by CSM, and (ii) the measured Lorentz force as a function of Jc deviates sharply from CSM predictions. The data rule out heating effects and pinning center geometry as possible physical causes of these anomalies. A speculative cause is considered.

  13. Temperature Dependence of Factors Controlling Isoprene Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Bryan N.; Yoshida, Yasuko; Damon, Megan R.; Douglass, Anne R.; Witte, Jacquelyn C.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the relationship of variability in the formaldehyde (HCHO) columns measured by the Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) to isoprene emissions in the southeastern United States for 2005-2007. The data show that the inferred, regional-average isoprene emissions varied by about 22% during summer and are well correlated with temperature, which is known to influence emissions. Part of the correlation with temperature is likely associated with other causal factors that are temperature-dependent. We show that the variations in HCHO are convolved with the temperature dependence of surface ozone, which influences isoprene emissions, and the dependence of the HCHO column to mixed layer height as OMI's sensitivity to HCHO increases with altitude. Furthermore, we show that while there is an association of drought with the variation in HCHO, drought in the southeastern U.S. is convolved with temperature.

  14. Stability and anomalous compressibility of Bose gases near resonance: The scale-dependent interactions and thermal effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shao-Jian; Zhou, Fei

    2015-07-01

    The stability of Bose gases near resonance has been a puzzling problem in recent years. In this article, we demonstrate that in addition to generating thermal pressure, thermal atoms enhance the repulsiveness of the scale-dependent interactions between condensed atoms due to a renormalization effect and further stabilize the Bose gases. Consequently, we find that, as a precursor of instability, the compressibility develops an anomalous structure as a function of scattering length and is drastically reduced compared with the mean-field value. Furthermore, the density profile of a Bose gas in a harmonic trap is found to develop a flat top near the center. This is due to the anomalous behavior of compressibility and can be a potential smoking gun for probing such an effect.

  15. Temperature Dependence of Atomic Decay Rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jian-Jun; CHENG Ze

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the decay rate of an atom in a two-dimensional optical microcavity in which there exists a Bose-Einstein condensation of photons. It is found that below the critical temperature Tc, the atomic decay rate depends on the absolute temperature T. Especially, at absolute zero temperature almost all photons are in the condensate state, and the atom can be approximately treated as if it is in vacuum.%We investigate the decay rate of an atom in a two-dimensional optical microcavity in which there exists a BoseEinstein condensation of photons.It is found that below the critical temperature To,the atomic decay rate depends on the absolute temperature T.Especially,at absolute zero temperature almost all photons are in the condensate state,and the atom can be approximately treated as if it is in vacuum.

  16. Temperature dependent extension of a hysteresis model

    OpenAIRE

    Sixdenier, Fabien; MESSAL, Oualid; Hilal, Alaa; Martin, Christian; Raulet, Marie-Ange

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Some soft magnetic materials (like ferrites but not only) are strongly dependent of the temperature. In order to predict their behaviour in electrical devices, engineers need hysteresis models able to take into account the temperature. This paper is an attempt to take into account the temperature in an existing model of hysteresis through its parameters. Variations of some parameters are issued from Weiss’s works and others have to be fitted numerically. Simulation res...

  17. Change of MMP dependent on temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudyk, Svetlana Nikolayevna; Søgaard, Erik Gydesen; Akwansa, Eugene

    2008-01-01

    substantially depend on temperature, - at  temperature 50oC the distance between A and B is longer, - at temperature 70oC the A-B part of curve is smooth and scarcely seen.      The observations made are important for determination of MMP. If point A is taken as MMP instead of point B, it is a big...

  18. Escherichia coli survival in waters: Temperature dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowing the survival rates of water-borne Escherichia coli is important in evaluating microbial contamination and making appropriate management decisions. E. coli survival rates are dependent on temperature, a dependency that is routinely expressed using an analogue of the Q10 mo...

  19. E. coli survival in waters: temperature dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowing the survival rates of water-borne Escherichia coli is important for evaluating microbial contamination and in making appropriate management decisions. E. coli survival rates are dependent on temperature; this dependency is routinely expressed using an analog of the Q10 model. This suggestion...

  20. Temperature dependence of commercially available diode detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Amarjit S; Zhu, Timothy C

    2002-04-01

    Temperature dependence of commercially available n- and p-type diodes were studied experimentally under both high instantaneous dose rate (pulsed) and low dose rate (continuous) radiation. The sensitivity versus temperature was measured at SSD = 80 or 100 cm, 10 x 10 cm2, and 5 cm depth in a 30 x 30 x 30 cm3 water phantom between 10 degrees C and 35 degrees C. The response was linear for all the diode detectors. The temperature coefficient (or sensitivity variation with temperature, svwt) was dose rate independent for preirradiated diodes. They were (0.30 +/- 0.01)%/degrees C, (0.36 +/- 0.03)%/degrees C, and (0.29 +/- 0.08)%/degrees C for QED p-type, EDP p-type, and Isorad n-type diodes, respectively. The temperature coefficient for unirradiated n-type diodes was different under low dose rate [(0.16 to 0.45)%/degrees C, continuous, cobalt] and high instantaneous dose rate [(0.07 +/- 0.02)%/degrees C, pulsed radiation]. Moreover, the temperature coefficient varies among individual diodes. Similarly, the temperature coefficient for a special unirradiated QED p-type diode was different under low dose rate (0.34%/degrees C, cobalt) and high instantaneous dose rate [(0.26 +/- 0.01)%/degrees C, pulsed radiation]. Sufficient preirradiation can eliminate dose rate dependence of the temperature coefficient. On the contrary, preirradiation cannot eliminate dose rate dependence of the diode sensitivity itself.

  1. Possible combined influences of absorbing aerosols and anomalous atmospheric circulation on summertime diurnal temperature range variation over the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jiaxi; Guan, Zhaoyong; Ma, Fenhua

    2016-12-01

    Based on the temperature data from the China Meteorological Administration, NCEP-NCAR reanalysis data, and the TOMS Aerosol Index (AI), we analyze the variations in the summertime diurnal temperature range (DTR) and temperature maxima in the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River (MLRYR) in China. The possible relationships between the direct warming effect of the absorbing aerosol and temperature variations are further investigated, although with some uncertainties. It is found that the summertime DTR exhibits a decreasing trend over the most recent 50 years, along with a slight increasing tendency since the 1980s. The trend of the maximum temperature is in agreement with those of the DTR and the absorbing aerosols. To investigate the causes of the large anomalies in the temperature maxima, composite analyses of the circulation anomalies are performed. When anomalous AI and anomalous maximum temperature over the MLRYR have the same sign, an anomalous circulation with a quasi-barotropic structure occurs there. This anomalous circulation is modulated by the Rossby wave energy propagations from the regions northwest of the MLRYR and influences the northwestern Pacific subtropical high over the MLRYR. In combination with aerosols, the anomalous circulation may increase the maximum temperature in this region. Conversely, when the anomalous AI and anomalous maximum temperature in the MLRYR have opposite signs, the anomalous circulation is not equivalently barotropic, which possibly offsets the warming effect of aerosols on the maximum temperature changes in this region. These results are helpful for a better understanding of the DTR changes and the occurrences of temperature extremes in the MLRYR region during boreal summer.

  2. Temperature Dependence of Thermal Conductivity of Nanofluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yu-Hua; QU Wei; FENG Jian-Chao

    2008-01-01

    Mechanism of thermal conductivity of nanofluids is analysed and calculated, including Brownian motion effects, particle agglomeration and viscosity, together influenced by temperature. The results show that only Brownian motion as reported is not enough to describe the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity of nanofluids. The change of particle agglomeration and viscosity with temperature are also important factors. As temperature increases, the reduction of the particle surface energy would decrease the agglomeration of nanopartides, and the reduction of viscosity would improve the Brownian motion. The results agree well with the experimental data reported.

  3. Dependence of electromagnetically induced transparency on temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Feng; Guo Rui-Min; Li Lu-Ming; Yang Dong-Hai; Chen Xu-Zong

    2004-01-01

    @@ We performed an experimental study on the dependence of the linewidth of electromagetically induced transparency (EIT) on the temperature of medium in a A-type configuration using caesium vapour. We found that the transparent window is narrowed in the EIT whose two ground levels are composed of two hyperfine levels, and broadened in the case when the two ground levels are degenerated Zeeman sublevels, as the temperature of vapour cell is increased. The explanation for the phenomena is given qualitatively.

  4. Investigations of Low Temperature Time Dependent Cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Sluys, W A; Robitz, E S; Young, B A; Bloom, J

    2002-09-30

    The objective of this project was to investigate metallurgical and mechanical phenomena associated with time dependent cracking of cold bent carbon steel piping at temperatures between 327 C and 360 C. Boiler piping failures have demonstrated that understanding the fundamental metallurgical and mechanical parameters controlling these failures is insufficient to eliminate it from the field. The results of the project consisted of the development of a testing methodology to reproduce low temperature time dependent cracking in laboratory specimens. This methodology was used to evaluate the cracking resistance of candidate heats in order to identify the factors that enhance cracking sensitivity. The resultant data was integrated into current available life prediction tools.

  5. Anomalous restoration of graphitic layers from graphene oxide in ethanol environment at ultrahigh temperature using solar furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Takashi; Miyata, Yuichiro; Shinoda, Yoshihiko; Kobayashi, Yoshihiro

    2016-02-01

    The restoration of graphitic structures from defective graphene oxide was examined in a reactive ethanol environment at ultrahigh temperatures. Structural analysis by Raman spectroscopy indicates that turbostratic structures as well as high crystallinity in multilayer graphene were accomplished by an ultrahigh-temperature process in an ethanol environment. This phenomenon is quite anomalous since it is in striking contrast to the results observed in inert environments, where graphitization proceeds significantly to form a Bernal stacking multilayer graphene. The suppression of graphitization in ethanol environments is probably caused by the simultaneous supply of carbon and etching species during the restoration process.

  6. Temperature dependence of DC SQUID magnetometer performances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granata, C. E-mail: c.granata@cib.na.cnr.it; Monaco, A.; Di Russo, C.; Lissitski, M.P.; Russo, M

    2004-05-01

    We report experimental results on temperature dependence of the main characteristics of fully integrated DC SQUID magnetometers realized on niobium technology. At T=4.2 K the sensor shown a white magnetic field noise spectral density of 2.9 fT/Hz{sup 1/2}. A slow increase of the field noise (about 20%) was observed with increasing temperature up to 5 K, giving a considerable tolerance of the working temperature of niobium magnetometers in some innovative multichannel systems for magnetoencephalography.

  7. Anomalous Ba/Ca signals associated with low temperature stresses in Porites corals from Daya Bay, northern South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tianran Chen; Kefu Yu; Shu Li; Tegu Chen; Qi Shi

    2011-01-01

    Barium to calcium (Ba/Ca) ratio in corals has been considered as a useful geochemical proxy for upwelling,river flood and other oceanic processes.However,recent studies indicated that additional environmental or biological factors can influence the incorporation of Ba into coral skeletons.In this study,Ba/Ca ratios of two Porites corals collected from Daya Bay,northern South China Sea were analyzed.Ba/Ca signals in the two corals were 'anomalous' in comparison with Ba behaviors seen in other near-shore corals influenced by upwelling or riverine runoff.Our Ba/Ca profiles displayed similar and remarkable patterns characterized by low and randomly fluctuating background signals periodically interrupted by sharp and large synchronous peaks,clearly indicating an environmental forcing.Further analysis indicated that the Ba/Ca profiles were not correlated with previously claimed environmental factors such as precipitation,coastal upwelling,anthropogenic activities or phytoplankton blooms in other areas.The maxima of Ba/Ca appeared to occur in the period of Sr/Ca maxima,coinciding with the winter minimum temperatures,which suggests that the anomalous high Ba/Ca signals were related to winter-time low sea surface temperature.We speculated that the Ba/Ca peaks in corals of the Daya Bay were most likely the results of enrichment of Ba-rich particles in their skeletons when coral polyps retracted under the stresses of anomalous winter low temperatures.In this case,Ba/Ca ratio in relatively high-latitude corals can be a potential proxy for tracing the low temperature stress.

  8. Temperature dependence of the hyperfine interaction at

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Garcia, Alberto; de la Presa, Patricia; Ayala, Alejandro

    2001-06-01

    The temperature dependence of the quadrupole hyperfine parameters covering the temperature range from 293 to 1173 K was measured at {sup 181}Ta probes in SrHfO{sub 3} by perturbed angular correlation spectroscopy. A fluctuating distribution of quadrupole interactions model was applied to interpret the data. At low temperatures above {approximately}300 K a static, asymmetric, and distributed electric quadrupole interaction was detected. At intermediate temperatures ({approx}600 K) a different quadrupole interaction appears, characterized by a fluctuating distribution of axially symmetric electric field gradient tensors. Above 873 K, the unique presence of a nuclear spin relaxation mechanism shows a second change in the perturbation acting on probes. These changes in the hyperfine interaction are consistent with the structural phase transitions detected by diffraction techniques. The probe effects were also analyzed, comparing {sup 181}Ta with {sup 111}Cd experiments.

  9. Temperature dependence of photoconductivity of color centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakhno, V.D. (AN SSSR, Moscow. Nauchno-Vychislitel' nyj Tsentr)

    A method to calculate thermal activation energy ..delta..E from photoconductivity of colour centres taking into account its temperature dependence is suggested. Comparison of ..delta..E for ionic crystals (KCl, KBr, KI, RbCl), prepared by theoretical and experimental ways is made. It is shown, that the calculated values of ..delta..E are close to the experimental ones and can be used to calculate values, the experimental data for which are absent.

  10. Temperature Dependence of Hydrogen Adsorption Isotherms

    OpenAIRE

    Tibus, Stefan; Klier, Jürgen; Leiderer, Paul

    2005-01-01

    In the past it has already been shown that adsorption isotherms of liquid or solid films are not described completely by the Frenkel-Halsey-Hill theory. Substrate roughness as well as thermal fluctuations have to be taken into account in understanding the adsorption behavior. The inclusion of thermal fluctuations into the adsorption theory has already been addressed and proven to provide an explanation for the deviations found in many experiments. However, a resulting temperature dependence ...

  11. Radial deformation of single-walled carbon nanotubes on quartz substrates and the resultant anomalous diameter-dependent reaction selectivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan Yang; Yu Liu; Daqi Zhang; Xiao Wang; Ruoming Li; Yan Li

    2015-01-01

    Owing to the unique conjugated structure, the chemical-reaction selectivity of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) has attracted great attention. By utilizing the radial deformation of SWNTs caused by the strong interactions with the quartz lattice, we achieve an anomalous diameter-dependent reaction selectivity of quartz lattice-oriented SWNTs in treatment with iodine vapor; this is distinctly different from the widely reported and well accepted higher reaction activity in small-diameter tubes compared to large-diameter tubes. The radial deformation of SWNTs on quartz substrate is verified by detailed Raman spectroscopy and mappings in both G-band and radial breathing mode. Due to the strong interaction between SWNTs and the quartz lattice, large-diameter tubes present a larger degree of radial deformation and more delocalized partial electrons are distributed at certain sidewall sites with high local curvature. It is thus easier for the carbon--carbon bonds at these high-curvature sites on large-diameter tubes to break down during reaction. This anomalous reaction activity offers a novel approach for selective removal of small-band~aD large-diameter tubes.

  12. Temperature dependent light transmission in ferrofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brojabasi, Surajit; Mahendran, V.; Lahiri, B. B.; Philip, John

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the influence of temperature on the magnetic field induced light transmission in a kerosene based ferrofluid containing oleic acid coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles, where the direction of propagation of light is parallel to the direction of the external magnetic field. At a fixed temperature the transmitted light intensity is found to monotonically increase with incident wavelength due to reduced extinction efficiency at higher wavelength. The transmitted intensity decreases with external magnetic field due to enhanced scattering from the field induced linear chain like structures along the direction of the external magnetic field and due to the build-up of standing waves inside the scattering medium. The extinction of the field induced transmitted light intensity is found to occur at a lower external field as the sample temperature is lowered. The rate of extinction of normalized transmitted light intensity decreased linearly with increasing sample temperature due to slower field induced aggregation kinetics because of an increased Brownian motion of the suspended nanoparticles and a reduced coupling constant. The observed temperature dependent magneto-optical properties of magnetic nanofluids can be exploited for applications in optical devices.

  13. Possible Kondo-Lattice-Enhanced Magnetic Ordering at Anomalously High Temperature in Nd Metal under Extreme Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, James S.; Song, Jing; Soni, Vikas; Lim, Jinhyuk

    Most elemental lanthanides order magnetically at temperatures To well below ambient, the highest being 292 K for Gd. Sufficiently high pressure is expected to destabilize the well localized magnetic 4 f state of the heavy lanthanides, leading to increasing influence of Kondo physics on the RKKY interaction. For pressures above 80 GPa, To for Dy and Tb begins to increase dramatically, extrapolating for Dy to a record-high value near 400 K at 160 GPa. This anomalous increase may be an heretofore unrecognized feature of the Kondo lattice state; if so, one would expect To to pass through a maximum and fall rapidly at even higher pressures. A parallel is suggested to the ferromagnet CeRh3B2 where To = 115 K at ambient pressure, a temperature more than 100-times higher than anticipated from simple de Gennes scaling. Here we discuss recent experiments on Nd where anomalous behavior in To (P) is found to occur at lower pressures, perhaps reflecting the fact that Nd's 4 f wave function is less localized. Work at Washington University is supported by NSF Grant DMR-1104742 and CDAC through NNSA/DOE Grant DE-FC52-08NA28554.

  14. Anomalously High Isotope Ratio 3He/4He and Tritium in Deuterium-Loaded Metal: Evidence for Nuclear Reaction in Metal Hydrides at Low Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Song-Sheng; HE Ming; WU Shao-Yong; QI Bu-Jia

    2012-01-01

    Anomalous 3He/4He ratios in deuterium-loaded titanium samples are observed to be about 1-4x10-1, much greater than the values (<10~4) in natural objects. Control experiments with the deuterium-unloaded titanium sample and original industrial deuterium gas are also carried out, but no anomalous 3He/4He values are observed. In addition, anomalous tritium in deuterium-loaded titanium samples are also observed. To explain the excess 3He and tritium in the deuterium-loaded titanium samples, it is required that the deuteron-induced nuclear reaction occurs in the samples at low temperature.%Anomalous 3He/4He ratios in deuterium-loaded titanium samples are observed to be about 1-4×10-1,much greater than the values (≤10-4) in natural objects.Control experiments with the deuterium-unloaded titanium sample and original industrial deuterium gas are also carried out,but no anomalous 3He/4He values are observed.In addition,anomalous tritium in deuterium-loaded titanium samples are also observed.To explain the excess 3He and tritium in the deuterium-loaded titanium samples,it is required that the deuteron-induced nuclear reaction occurs in the samples at low temperature.

  15. Anomalous magnetic reordering in magnetodielectric terbium iron garnet at low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahoubi, Mahieddine, E-mail: mlahoubi@hotmail.fr [Department of Physics, Laboratory L.P.S., Faculty of Sciences, Badji Mokhtar-Annaba University, PO Box -12, 23000 Annaba (Algeria); Ouladdiaf, Bachir [Institut Laue Langevin, BP 156, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2015-01-01

    The paper deals with five topics: i) the single three-dimensional irreductible representation (Γ{sub 4g}=T{sub 1g}) of the paramagnetic space group Ia3{sup ¯}d No. 230 is chosen according to the representation analysis of Bertaut for the interpretation of the neutron powder diffraction experiments performed on terbium iron garnet (Tb{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12}); ii) the use of the method of the “symmetry lowering device” of Bertaut in order to select the appropriate rhombohedral subgroup of Ia3{sup ¯}d which allows to deal with the case where the cubic description provides an incomplete answer to the changes observed below 160 K in the ferrimagnetic structure around the [1 1 1] axis from the Néel model toward the “double umbrella” observed at 13 K; iii) the magnetic modes belonging to the one-dimensional irreductible representation A{sub 2g} of the highest rhombohedral subgroup R3{sup ¯}c No. 167 are able to describe the occurrence of its anisotropic character which steeply increases below 160 K due to the concomitant anisotropic effects; iv) the broad anomaly observed near 54 K in the temperature dependences of the components of both sublattices of the Tb{sup 3+} ions in the Wyckoff positions (6e) and (6e′) is explained partially on the basis of the concept of Belov of the strong paraprocess which has been termed “exchange-enhanced paramagnetism” at the so-called “low-temperature point” (T{sub B}); v) the results are related to the magnetodielectric effect in low magnetic field and to the significant coupling between exchange magnons and ligand-field excitations reported recently in this compound. - Highlights: • We examine the changes of the “double umbrella” in TbIG using neutron diffraction. • Symmetry arguments of Bertaut clarify suitable rhombohedral space group at 13 K. • Its opening leads to an increasing of anisotropy of the Tb components below 160 K. • The “low-temperature point” of Belov explains partly its intricate

  16. Anomalous Particle Size Dependence of Magnetic Relaxation Phenomena in Goethite Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Cathrine; Madsen, Daniel Esmarch; Boothroyd, Chris B.

    2015-01-01

    By use of Mossbauer spectroscopy we have studied the magnetic properties of samples of goethite nanoparticles with different particle size. The spectra are influenced by fluctuations of the magnetization directions, but the size dependence is not in accordance with the Neel-Brown expression for s...

  17. Metallic transport and large anomalous Hall effect at room temperature in ferrimagnetic Mn{sub 4}N epitaxial thin film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Xi; Shigematsu, Kei [Department of Chemistry, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Chikamatsu, Akira, E-mail: chikamatsu@chem.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Fukumura, Tomoteru [Department of Chemistry, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Hirose, Yasushi; Hasegawa, Tetsuya [Department of Chemistry, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Kanagawa Academy of Science and Technology (KAST), Kawasaki 213-0012 (Japan)

    2014-08-18

    We report the electrical transport properties of ferrimagnetic Mn{sub 4}N (001) epitaxial thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition on MgO (001) substrates. The Mn{sub 4}N thin films were tetragonally distorted with a ratio of out-of-plane to in-plane lattice constants of 0.987 and showed perpendicular magnetic anisotropy with an effective magnetic anisotropy constant of 0.16 MJ/m{sup 3}, which is comparable with that of a recently reported molecular-beam-epitaxy-grown film. The thin films exhibited metallic transport with a room temperature resistivity of 125 μΩ cm in addition to a large anomalous Hall effect with a Hall angle tangent of 0.023.

  18. Anomalous Velocity Dependence of the Friction Coefficient of an Air Supported Pulley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crismani, Matteo; Nauenberg, Michael

    2009-11-01

    A standard undergraduate lab exercise to verify Newton's law, F = ma, is to measure the acceleration a of a glider of mass m suspended on an air track. In our experiment the glider is accelerated by a thin tape attached to the glider at one end, and to a weight of mass M at the other end. The weight hangs vertically via a pulley over which the tape is suspended by air pressure. In the absence of friction, the force pulling the glider is F = (M m/(M + m)g, where g is the acceleration of gravity. To the accuracy provided by the fast electronic timers (accurate to 1/10000 second) used in our experiment to measure the velocity and the acceleration of the glider, we verified that the friction due to the air track can be neglected. But we found that this is not the case for the friction due to the air pulley which adds a component -v/T to the force F on the glider, where T is the friction coefficient. We have measured the dependence of this coefficient on v, and found an excellent analytic fit to our data. This fit deviates considerable from the conventional assumption that 1/T is a constant and/or depends linearly on v.

  19. Anomalous Temperature Effects of the Entanglement of Two Coupled Qubits in Independent Environments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAN Chuan-Jia; CAO Shuai; XUE Zheng-Yuan; ZHU Shi-Liang

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the entanglement dynamical behavior of two coupled qubits via a Heisenberg XX interaction, which are connected with two independent finite temperature heat baths. By numerical simulations of the quantum master equation, it is found that the interesting phenomena of entanglement sudden death (ESD) as well as sudden birth (ESB) appear during the evolution process for particular initial states. We also show that two critical temperatures T1 (determining that the quantum state is entangled or separable) and T2 (where maximal stationary entanglement can be observed) exist, and stationary entanglement exhibits a non-monotonic behavior as a function of the finite temperature noise strength. These results enlarge the domain of the reasonable experimental temperature where stationary entanglement can be observable.%We investigate the entanglement dynamical behavior of two coupled qubits via a Heisenberg XX interaction,which are connected with two independent finite temperature heat baths.By numerical simulations of the quantum master equation,it is found that the interesting phenomena of entanglement sudden death (ESD) as well as sudden birth (ESB) appear during the evolution process for particular initial states.We also show that two critical temperatures T1 (determining that the quantum state is entangled or separable) and T2 (where maximal stationary entanglement can be observed) exist,and stationary entanglement exhibits a non-monotonic behavior as a function of the finite temperature noise strength.These results enlarge the domain of the reasonable experimental temperature where stationary entanglement can be observable.

  20. Temperature dependent spin structures in Hexaferrite crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, Y.C. [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Lin, J.G., E-mail: jglin@ntu.edu.tw [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Chun, S.H.; Kim, K.H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the Hexaferrite Ba{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 1.5}Zn{sub 2}Fe{sub 12}O{sub 22} (BSZFO) is studied due to its interesting characteristics of long-wavelength spin structure. Ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) is used to probe the magnetic states of BSZFO single crystal and its temperature dependence behavior is analyzed by decomposing the multiple lines of FMR spectra into various phases. Distinguished phase transition is observed at 110 K for one line, which is assigned to the ferro(ferri)-magnetic transition from non-collinear to collinear spin state. - Highlights: • For the first time Ferromagnetic Resonance is used to probe the local magnetic structure of Ba{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 1.5}Zn{sub 2}Fe{sub 12}O{sub 22.} • The multiphases in the single crystal is identified, which provides important information toward its future application for the magnetoelectric devices.

  1. Anomalous Weight Behavior in $YBa_{2}Cu_{3}O_{7}$ Compounds at Low Temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Rounds, F N

    1997-01-01

    YBa2Cu3O7 high temperature superconductor samples were weighed on an electronic balance during a warming cycle beginning at 77 degrees K. The experiment was configured so that the YBa2Cu3O7 material was weighed along with a magnet, a target mass, and liquid Nitrogen coolant. The weights were captured during Nitrogen evaporation. Results indicated unexpected variations in the system weight that appear as a function of temperature and possibly other parameters.

  2. Anomalously high charge/orbital ordering temperature in Bi{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}MnO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frontera, C.; Garcia-Munoz, J.L.; Carrillo, A.E. [ICMAB- CSIC, Campus de Bellaterra, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Aranda, M.A.G. [Depto. de Quimica Inorganica, Cristalografia y Mineralogia, Univ. de Malaga, 29071 Malaga (Spain); Ritter, C. [Institut Laue-Langevin, 38042 Grenoble-Cedex (France); Llobet, A. [Condensed Matter and Thermal Physics Group Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Ranno, L. [Lab. Louis Neel-CNRS, 38042-BP166, Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Respaud, M.; Broto, J.M. [SNCMP and LPMC,INSA, Complexe Scientifique du Rangueil, 31077 Toulouse (France); Vanacken, J. [LVSM, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Calleja, A.; Garcia, J. [Dept. d' Enginyeria Quimica i Metallurgia, Facultat de Quimica, Univ. de Barcelona, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    Neutron/synchrotron diffraction data and magnetic measurements provide direct evidence of charge/orbital ordering at anomalously high temperatures in Bi{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}MnO{sub 3}, as well as in other (Bi,Sr)MnO{sub 3} manganites. We report on the electronic and magnetic transitions of these oxides. The origin of the high value of the charge/orbital ordering temperature is discussed. (orig.)

  3. Polarisation-dependence of anomalous scattering in brominated DNA and RNA molecules, and importance of crystal orientation in SAD and MAD phasing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanishvili, R.; Besnard, C.; Camus, F.; Fleurant, M.; Pattison, P.; Bricogne, G.; Schiltz, M.; Biosciences Division; Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne; ESRF; Global Phasing Ltd.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper the anisotropy of anomalous scattering at the Br K-absorption edge in brominated nucleotides is investigated, and it is shown that this effect can give rise to a marked directional dependence of the anomalous signal strength in X-ray diffraction data. This implies that choosing the correct orientation for crystals of such molecules can be a crucial determinant of success or failure when using single- and multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (SAD or MAD) methods to solve their structure. In particular, polarized absorption spectra on an oriented crystal of a brominated DNA molecule were measured, and were used to determine the orientation that yields a maximum anomalous signal in the diffraction data. Out of several SAD data sets, only those collected at or near that optimal orientation allowed interpretable electron density maps to be obtained. The findings of this study have implications for instrumental choices in experimental stations at synchrotron beamlines, as well as for the development of data collection strategy programs.

  4. Spin-dependent electron-phonon interaction in SmFeAsO by low-temperature Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Guan, P F; Feng, D L; Chen, X H; Xie, S S; Chen, M W

    2010-11-03

    The interplay between spin dynamics and lattice vibration has been suggested as an important part of the puzzle of high-temperature superconductivity. Here, we report the strong interaction between spin fluctuation and phonon in SmFeAsO, a parent compound of the iron arsenide family of superconductors, revealed by low-temperature Raman spectroscopy. Anomalous zone-boundary-phonon Raman scattering from spin superstructure was observed at temperatures below the antiferromagnetic ordering point, which offers compelling evidence on spin-dependent electron-phonon coupling in pnictides.

  5. Temperature Dependent Wire Delay Estimation in Floorplanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Andreas Thor; Liu, Wei; Nannarelli, Alberto;

    2011-01-01

    Due to large variations in temperature in VLSI circuits and the linear relationship between metal resistance and temperature, the delay through wires of the same length can be different. Traditional thermal aware floorplanning algorithms use wirelength to estimate delay and routability. In this w......Due to large variations in temperature in VLSI circuits and the linear relationship between metal resistance and temperature, the delay through wires of the same length can be different. Traditional thermal aware floorplanning algorithms use wirelength to estimate delay and routability...

  6. Anomalous thickness-dependent strain states and strain-tunable magnetization in Zn-doped ferrite epitaxial films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Y. J.; Bao, J.; Gao, C., E-mail: zlluo@ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: cgao@ustc.edu.cn [National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); CAS Key Laboratory of Materials for Energy Conversion, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Yang, M. M.; Luo, Z. L., E-mail: zlluo@ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: cgao@ustc.edu.cn; Hu, C. S.; Chen, X. C.; Pan, G. Q. [National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Huang, H. L. [CAS Key Laboratory of Materials for Energy Conversion, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Zhang, S.; Wang, J. W.; Li, P. S.; Liu, Y.; Zhao, Y. G. [Department of Physics and State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics, Fine Processing, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Jiang, T.; Liu, Y. K.; Li, X. G. [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale and Department of Physics, University of Science, Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2014-05-07

    A series of Zn{sub x}Fe{sub 3−x}O{sub 4} (ZFO, x = 0.4) thin films were epitaxially deposited on single-crystal (001)-SrTiO{sub 3} (STO) substrates by radio frequency magnetron sputtering. The anomalous thickness-dependent strain states of ZFO films were found, i.e., a tensile in-plane strain exists in the thinner ZFO film and which monotonously turns into compressive in the thicker films. Considering the lattice constant of bulk ZFO is bigger than that of STO, this strain state cannot be explained in the conventional framework of lattice-mismatch-induced strain in the hetero-epitaxial system. This unusual phenomenon is proposed to be closely related to the Volmer-Weber film growth mode in the thinner films and incorporation of the interstitial atoms into the island's boundaries during subsequent epitaxial growth of the thicker films. The ZFO/STO epitaxial film is found in the nature of magnetic semiconductor by transport measurements. The in-plane magnetization of the ZFO/STO films is found to increase as the in-plane compressive strain develops, which is further proved in the (001)-ZFO/PMN-PT film where the film strain state can be in situ controlled with applied electric field. This compressive-strain-enhanced magnetization can be attributed to the strain-mediated electric-field-induced in-plane magnetic anisotropy field enhancement. The above results indicate that strain engineering on magnetic oxide semiconductor ZFO films is promising for novel oxide-electronic devices.

  7. Temperature dependence of ferromagnetic resonance measurements in nanostructured line arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raposo V.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We report the effect of temperature on the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR spectra of nanostructured line arrays. Different temperature dependences are observed for permalloy an nickel based samples. The qualitative features of the temperature dependence of the resonance field and linewidth can be described by the usual expression of slow relaxing linewidth mechanism and Bloch equation.

  8. Anomalous ion thermal transport in hot ion plasmas by the ion temperature gradient mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.Y.; Horton, W. (Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Inst. for Fusion Studies); Coppi, B. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Research Lab. of Electronics)

    1992-01-01

    Experiments show that the observed radial profiles of the ion thermal conductivity {chi}{sub i} have the opposite shapes with those obtained from the ion temperature gradient mode ({eta}{sub i} mode) turbulence model by the traditional mixing length estimate. In this work, this radial profile problem is reconsidered with an electromagnetic study of the linear stability of the toroidal {eta}{sub i} mode and a new rule for choosing the mixing length. It is first shown that the electromagnetic effect gives a significant stabilizing effect on the toroidal {eta}{sub i} mode, and that the observed reduction of {chi}{sub i}(r) in the core region can be explained by this electromagnetic effect. Secondly, in view of earlier numerical simulations showing the transfer of fluctuation energy to larger scales that those for the fastest growth rate, as well as fluctuation measurements indicating longer radial correlation lengths, a new mixing length formula is proposed to explain the radial increase of the {chi}{sub i}. It is shown the new formula fits well the observed {chi}{sub i}(r) profiles in two TFTR supershot discharges and also gives the scaling law in the current and the magnetic field which agrees better with experiment than the conventional formula.

  9. Anomalous ion thermal transport in hot ion plasmas by the ion temperature gradient mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.Y.; Horton, W. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Inst. for Fusion Studies; Coppi, B. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Research Lab. of Electronics

    1992-08-01

    Experiments show that the observed radial profiles of the ion thermal conductivity {chi}{sub i} have the opposite shapes with those obtained from the ion temperature gradient mode ({eta}{sub i} mode) turbulence model by the traditional mixing length estimate. In this work, this radial profile problem is reconsidered with an electromagnetic study of the linear stability of the toroidal {eta}{sub i} mode and a new rule for choosing the mixing length. It is first shown that the electromagnetic effect gives a significant stabilizing effect on the toroidal {eta}{sub i} mode, and that the observed reduction of {chi}{sub i}(r) in the core region can be explained by this electromagnetic effect. Secondly, in view of earlier numerical simulations showing the transfer of fluctuation energy to larger scales that those for the fastest growth rate, as well as fluctuation measurements indicating longer radial correlation lengths, a new mixing length formula is proposed to explain the radial increase of the {chi}{sub i}. It is shown the new formula fits well the observed {chi}{sub i}(r) profiles in two TFTR supershot discharges and also gives the scaling law in the current and the magnetic field which agrees better with experiment than the conventional formula.

  10. Temperature dependent electrical resistivity of liquid Sn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, A. V.; Sonvane, Y. A.; Patel, H. P.; Thakor, P. B.

    2016-05-01

    The present paper deals with the effect of temperature variation on the electrical resistivity (ρ) of liquid Sn(Tin). We have used a new parameter free pseudopotential along with screening Taylor et al and Farid et al local field correction functions. The Percus-Yevick Hard Sphere (PYHS) reference system is used to describe structural information. Zeeman formula has been used for finding resistivity with the variation of temperature. The balanced harmonies between present data and experimental data have been achieved with a minimal deviation. So, we concluded that our newly constructed model potential is an effective one to produce the data of electrical resistivity of liquid Sn(Tin) as a function of temperature.

  11. Temperature Dependent Residual Stress Models for Ultra-High-Temperature Ceramics on High Temperature Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruzhuan; Li, Weiguo

    2016-11-01

    The strength of SiC-depleted layer of ultra-high-temperature ceramics on high temperature oxidation degrades seriously. The research for residual stresses developed within the SiC-depleted layer is important and necessary. In this work, the residual stress evolutions in the SiC-depleted layer and the unoxidized substrate in various stages of oxidation are studied by using the characterization models. The temperature and oxidation time dependent mechanical/thermal properties of each phase in SiC-depleted layer are considered in the models. The study shows that the SiC-depleted layer would suffer from large tensile stresses due to the great temperature changes and the formation of pores on high temperature oxidation. The stresses may lead to the cracking and even the delamination of the oxidation layer.

  12. Parametric dependencies of JET electron temperature profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schunke, B. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Imre, K.; Riedel, K. [New York Univ., NY (United States)

    1994-07-01

    The JET Ohmic, L-Mode and H-Mode electron temperature profiles obtained from the LIDAR Thomson Scattering Diagnostic are parameterized in terms of the normalized flux parameter and a set of the engineering parameters like plasma current, toroidal field, line averages electron density... It is shown that the electron temperature profiles fit a log-additive model well. It is intended to use the same model to predict the profile shape for D-T discharges in JET and in ITER. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  13. Temperature dependence of the AGOR magnetic field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roobol, LP; Brandenburg, S; Schreuder, HW; Baron, E; Lieuvin, M

    1999-01-01

    It has been found necessary to change the magnet currents gradually during long term operation of the AGOR cyclotron due to temperature changes in the iron, which are caused by the correction coils. These changes influence the magnetisation in various ways: through a change in susceptibility, satura

  14. The universality of enzymatic rate-temperature dependency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Mikael; Wieczorek, Grzegorz; Rosenne, Shaked; Tawfik, Dan S

    2014-01-01

    Organismal adaptation to extreme temperatures yields enzymes with distinct configurational stabilities, including thermophilic and psychrophilic enzymes, which are adapted to high and low temperatures, respectively. These enzymes are widely assumed to also have unique rate-temperature dependencies. Thermophilic enzymes, for example, are considered optimal at high temperatures and effectively inactive at low temperatures due to excess rigidity. Surveying published data, we find that thermophilic, mesophilic, and psychrophilic enzymes exhibit indistinguishable rate-temperature dependencies. Furthermore, given the nonenzymatic rate-temperature dependency, all enzymes, regardless of their operation temperatures, become >10-fold less powerful catalysts per 25 °C temperature increase. Among other factors, this loss of rate acceleration may be ascribed to thermally induced vibrations compromising the active-site catalytic configuration, suggesting that many enzymes are in fact insufficiently rigid.

  15. Climate change and temperature-dependent sex determination in reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzen, F J

    1994-08-02

    Despite increasing concern over the possible impact of global temperature change, there is little empirical evidence of direct temperature effects on biotic interactions in natural systems. Clear assessment of the ecological and evolutionary impact of changing climatic temperature requires a natural system in which populations exhibit a direct unambiguous fitness response to thermal fluctuation. I monitored nests of a population of painted turtles (Chrysemys picta) with temperature-dependent sex determination to investigate the causal relationship between local climatic variation in temperature and offspring sex ratio. Consistent with theoretical predictions, annual offspring sex ratio was highly correlated with mean July air temperature, validating concerns about the effect of climate change on population demography. This correlation implies that even modest increases in mean temperature (evolve rapidly enough to counteract the negative fitness consequences of rapid global temperature change. Populations of species with temperature-dependent sex determination may serve as ideal indicators of the biological impact of global temperature change.

  16. Temperature dependent heterogeneous rotational correlation in lipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadashvand, Neda; Othon, Christina M.

    2016-12-01

    Lipid structures exhibit complex and highly dynamic lateral structure; and changes in lipid density and fluidity are believed to play an essential role in membrane targeting and function. The dynamic structure of liquids on the molecular scale can exhibit complex transient density fluctuations. Here the lateral heterogeneity of lipid dynamics is explored in free standing lipid monolayers. As the temperature is lowered the probes exhibit increasingly broad and heterogeneous rotational correlation. This increase in heterogeneity appears to exhibit a critical onset, similar to those observed for glass forming fluids. We explore heterogeneous relaxation in in a single constituent lipid monolayer of 1, 2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine by measuring the rotational diffusion of a fluorescent probe (1-palmitoyl-2-[1]-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine), which is embedded in the lipid monolayer at low labeling density. Dynamic distributions are measured using wide-field time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy. The observed relaxation exhibits a narrow, liquid-like distribution at high temperatures (τ ˜ 2.4 ns), consistent with previous experimental measures (Dadashvand et al 2014 Struct. Dyn. 1 054701, Loura and Ramalho 2007 Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1768 467-478). However, as the temperature is quenched, the distribution broadens, and we observe the appearance of a long relaxation population (τ ˜ 16.5 ns). This supports the heterogeneity observed for lipids at high packing densities, and demonstrates that the nanoscale diffusion and reorganization in lipid structures can be significantly complex, even in the simplest amorphous architectures. Dynamical heterogeneity of this form can have a significant impact on the organization, permeability and energetics of lipid membrane structures.

  17. Thermal fission rates with temperature dependent fission barriers

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    \\item[Background] The fission processes of thermal excited nuclei are conventionally studied by statistical models which rely on inputs of phenomenological level densities and potential barriers. Therefore the microscopic descriptions of spontaneous fission and induced fission are very desirable for a unified understanding of various fission processes. \\item[Purpose] We propose to study the fission rates, at both low and high temperatures, with microscopically calculated temperature-dependent fission barriers and mass parameters. \\item[Methods] The fission barriers are calculated by the finite-temperature Skyrme-Hartree-Fock+BCS method. The mass parameters are calculated by the temperature-dependent cranking approximation. The thermal fission rates can be obtained by the imaginary free energy approach at all temperatures, in which fission barriers are naturally temperature dependent. The fission at low temperatures can be described mainly as a barrier-tunneling process. While the fission at high temperatures ...

  18. Modelling temperature and concentration dependent solid/liquid interfacial energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippmann, Stephanie; Jung, In-Ho; Paliwal, Manas; Rettenmayr, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Models for the prediction of the solid/liquid interfacial energy in pure substances and binary alloys, respectively, are reviewed and extended regarding the temperature and concentration dependence of the required thermodynamic entities. A CALPHAD-type thermodynamic database is used to introduce temperature and concentration dependent melting enthalpies and entropies for multicomponent alloys in the temperature range between liquidus and solidus. Several suitable models are extended and employed to calculate the temperature and concentration dependent interfacial energy for Al-FCC with their respective liquids and compared with experimental data.

  19. Temperature dependence of the electronic gaps of semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardona, M.; Kremer, R.K.

    2014-11-28

    Understanding the temperature dependence of the direct and indirect gaps is indispensable for optimizing the applications of semiconductors. Experimentally, this temperature dependence can be very precisely determined by ellipsometry, by absorption or by luminescence spectroscopy. We have re-analyzed the temperature dependence of the direct and indirect gaps of some prominent tetrahedral semiconductors and improved available fits by applying a simple modified approach which uses statistical factors and the knowledge of prominent transverse-acoustic and transverse-optical bands in the measured or calculated phonon density of states of the semiconductors under consideration. - Highlights: • Re-analysis of the temperature dependence of the gaps of tetrahedral semiconductors • Modeling of the temperature dependence of the gaps of tetrahedral semiconductors • Simplified modeling using statistical factors and prominent phonon bands.

  20. Theory of temperature dependent phonon-renormalized properties

    OpenAIRE

    Monserrat, Bartomeu; Conduit, G. J.; Needs, R. J.

    2013-01-01

    We present a general harmonic theory for the temperature dependence of phonon-renormalized properties of solids. Firstly, we formulate a perturbation theory in phonon-phonon interactions to calculate the phonon renormalization of physical quantities. Secondly, we propose two new schemes for extrapolating phonon zero-point corrections from temperature dependent data that improve the accuracy by an order of magnitude compared to previous approaches. Finally, we consider the low-temperature limi...

  1. Temperature dependence of electronic heat capacity in Holstein model

    CERN Document Server

    Fialko, N S; Lakhno, V D

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of charge migration was modeled to calculate temperature dependencies of its thermodynamic equilibrium values such as energy and electronic heat capacity in homogeneous adenine fragments. The energy varies from nearly polaron one at T~0 to midpoint of the conductivity band at high temperatures. The peak on the graph of electronic heat capacity is observed at the polaron decay temperature.

  2. Temperature dependence of DNA condensation at high ionic concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Wei; Gao, Qingqing; Liu, Yanhui; Fan, Yangtao; Hu, Lin; Xu, Houqiang

    2016-08-01

    A series of experiments pointed out that compact states of DNA condensed by multivalent cation prefer higher temperature. The condensed DNA takes elongated coil or compact globule states and the population of the compact globule states increases with an increase in temperature. At the same time, a recent experimental work carried out in buffer solution without multivalent cation points out that DNA persistence length strongly depends on the temperature. DNA persistence length is a key parameter for quantitative interpretation of the conformational properties of DNA and related to the bending rigidity of DNA. It is necessary to revolve the effects of temperature dependence of persistence length on DNA condensation, and a model including the temperature dependence of persistence length and strong correlation of multivalent cation on DNA is provided. The autocorrelation function of the tangent vectors is found as an effective way to detect the temperature dependence of toroid conformations. With an increase in temperature, the first periodic oscillation in the autocorrelation function shifts left and the number of segments containing the first periodic oscillation decreases gradually. According to the experiments mentioned above, the long-axis length is defined to estimate the temperature dependence of condensation process further. At the temperatures defined in experiments mentioned above, the relation between long-axis length and temperature matches the experimental results.

  3. Temperature Dependence of Photoelectrical Properties of Single Selenium Nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Li-Ping

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Influence of temperature on photoconductivity of single Se nanowires has been studied. Time response of photocurrent at both room temperature and low temperature suggests that the trap states play an important role in the photoelectrical process. Further investigations about light intensity dependence on photocurrent at different temperatures reveal that the trap states significantly affect the carrier generation and recombination. This work may be valuable for improving the device optoelectronic performances by understanding the photoelectrical properties.

  4. Climate change and temperature-dependent sex determination in reptiles.

    OpenAIRE

    Janzen, F. J.

    1994-01-01

    Despite increasing concern over the possible impact of global temperature change, there is little empirical evidence of direct temperature effects on biotic interactions in natural systems. Clear assessment of the ecological and evolutionary impact of changing climatic temperature requires a natural system in which populations exhibit a direct unambiguous fitness response to thermal fluctuation. I monitored nests of a population of painted turtles (Chrysemys picta) with temperature-dependent ...

  5. Blow up Analysis for Anomalous Granular Gases

    OpenAIRE

    Rey, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    20 p.; International audience; We investigate in this article the long-time behaviour of the solutions to the energy-dependant, spatially-homogeneous, inelastic Boltzmann equation for hard spheres. This model describes a diluted gas composed of hard spheres under statistical description, that dissipates energy during collisions. We assume that the gas is ''anomalous'', in the sense that energy dissipation increases when temperature decreases. This allows the gas to cool down in finite time. W...

  6. Thermal fission rates with temperature dependent fission barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yi; Pei, J. C.

    2016-08-01

    Background: The fission processes of thermal excited nuclei are conventionally studied by statistical models which rely on inputs of phenomenological level densities and potential barriers. Therefore the microscopic descriptions of spontaneous fission and induced fission are very desirable for a unified understanding of various fission processes. Purpose: We propose to study the fission rates, at both low and high temperatures, with microscopically calculated temperature-dependent fission barriers and collective mass parameters. Methods: The fission barriers are calculated by the finite-temperature Skyrme-Hartree-Fock+BCS method. The mass parameters are calculated by the temperature-dependent cranking approximation. The thermal fission rates can be obtained by the imaginary free energy approach at all temperatures, in which fission barriers are naturally temperature dependent. The fission at low temperatures can be described mainly as a barrier-tunneling process. While the fission at high temperatures has to incorporate the reflection above barriers. Results: Our results of spontaneous fission rates reasonably agree with other studies and experiments. The temperature dependencies of fission barrier heights and curvatures have been discussed. The temperature dependent behaviors of mass parameters have also been discussed. The thermal fission rates from low to high temperatures with a smooth connection have been given by different approaches. Conclusions: Since the temperature dependencies of fission barrier heights and curvatures, and the mass parameters can vary rapidly for different nuclei, the microscopic descriptions of thermal fission rates are very valuable. Our studies without free parameters provide a consistent picture to study various fissions such as that in fast-neutron reactors, astrophysical environments, and fusion reactions for superheavy nuclei.

  7. Temperature and phase dependence of positron lifetimes in solid cyclohexane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard

    1985-01-01

    The temperature dependence of position lifetimes in both the brittle and plastic phases of cyclohaxane has been examined. Long-lived components in both phases are associated with the formation of positronium (Ps). Two long lifetimes attributable to ortho-Ps are resolvable in the plastic phase....... The longer of these (≈ 2.5 ns), which is temperature dependent, is ascribed to ortho-Ps trapped at vacancies. The shorter lifetime (≈ 0.9 ns), shows little temperature dependence. In contrast to most other plastic crystals, no sigmoidal behaviour of the average ortho-Ps lifetime is observed. A possibility...

  8. Temperature and cooling field dependent exchange coupling in [Cr/Gd]{sub 5} multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao, Z.W.; Chen, H.J.; Jiang, W.D.; Wang, J.F.; Yu, S.J. [Department of Physics, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou (China); Hou, Y.L.; Lu, B.; Ye, Q.L. [Department of Physics, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou (China)

    2016-09-15

    Exchange coupling has been investigated in the [Cr/Gd]{sub 5} multilayers deposited at 25, 200, and 400 C, where the Neel temperature (T{sub N}) of antiferromagnetic Cr is slightly higher than the Curie temperature (T{sub C}) of ferromagnetic Gd. It was found that the exchange coupling existed not only at T{sub C} < T < T{sub N}, but also above the temperature (T{sub N}) of antiferromagnetic orderings with incommensurate spin-density wave structures transiting to paramagnetic state. These results can be discussed in terms of the crucial role played by the antiferromagnetic spins of Cr with commensurate spin-density wave structures in the vicinity of the Cr/Gd interfaces. Moreover, the exchange coupling of the multilayers grown at different temperatures exhibited different dependencies on the measuring temperature and the cooling field, respectively. Positive exchange bias was observed in the multilayers grown at 200 and 400 C. The interfacial roughness, grain size, and the antiferromagnetic orderings of Cr may be responsible for the anomalous exchange coupling of the multilayers. In addition, the competition between the exchange coupling at Cr/Gd interfaces and the external field-Cr surface magnetic coupling can explain the appearance of negative or positive exchange bias. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Anomalous elastic properties of RF-sputtered amorphous TeO2+x thin film for temperature-stable SAW device applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewan, Namrata; Sreenivas, Kondepudy; Gupta, Vinay

    2008-03-01

    The anomalous elastic properties of TeO2+x thin films deposited by rf diode sputtering on substrates at room temperature have been studied. The deposited films are amorphous, and IR spectroscopy reveals the formation of Te-O bond. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirms the variation in the stoichiometry of TeO2+x film from x=0 to 1 with an increase in the oxygen percentage in processing gas composition. The elastic parameters of the films in comparison to the reported values for TeO2+x single crystal are found to be low. However, the temperature coefficients of elastic parameters of all deposited films exhibit anomalous behavior showing positive values for TC(C11) in the range (32.0 to 600.0)x10(-4) degrees C(-1) and TC(C44)=(35.0 to 645.5)x10(-4) degrees C(-1) against the negative values TC(C11)=-2.7x10(-4) degrees C(-1) and TC(C44)=-0.73x10(-4) degrees C(-1) reported for TeO2+x single crystal. The variation in the elastic parameters and their temperature coefficients is correlated with the change in the three-dimensional network of Te-O bonding. The anomalous elastic properties of the TeO2+x films grown in 100% O2 are useful for potential application in the design of temperature stable surface acoustic wave devices.

  10. Amino acid behavior in aqueous amide solutions: Temperature dependence of the L-phenylalanine–N,N-dimethylformamide interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kustov, Andrey V., E-mail: kustov@isuct.ru

    2013-08-20

    Highlights: • Thermodynamics of amino acid solvation in aqueous DMF solutions was studied at 288–318 K. • The pair interaction parameters were compared with those for urea solutions. • For hydrophobic solutes enthalpies and entropies of interaction reveal strong temperature changes. • The relationship between the temperature dependence of solvation and solute–solute interactions was found. - Abstract: We have studied thermodynamics of the L-phenylalanine (Phe) pair interaction with denaturing agents – urea (U) and dimethylformamide (DMF) at 288–318 K. Our study does indicate that enthalpies and entropies of the Phe–U interaction reveal the anomalous temperature dependence which does not occur for DMF solutions. The anomalous Phe behavior in U solutions appears to be closely related to peculiarities of U hydration. One more result is in the fact that for hydrophobic solutes such as L-phenylalanine and substituted amides it is not justified to use the results obtained at 298 K for predicting the solute behavior at physiological temperatures.

  11. Temperature dependence of postmortem MR quantification for soft tissue discrimination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zech, Wolf-Dieter; Schwendener, Nicole; Jackowski, Christian [University of Bern, From the Institute of Forensic Medicine, Bern (Switzerland); Persson, Anders; Warntjes, Marcel J. [University of Linkoeping, The Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV), Linkoeping (Sweden)

    2015-08-15

    To investigate and correct the temperature dependence of postmortem MR quantification used for soft tissue characterization and differentiation in thoraco-abdominal organs. Thirty-five postmortem short axis cardiac 3-T MR examinations were quantified using a quantification sequence. Liver, spleen, left ventricular myocardium, pectoralis muscle and subcutaneous fat were analysed in cardiac short axis images to obtain mean T1, T2 and PD tissue values. The core body temperature was measured using a rectally inserted thermometer. The tissue-specific quantitative values were related to the body core temperature. Equations to correct for temperature differences were generated. In a 3D plot comprising the combined data of T1, T2 and PD, different organs/tissues could be well differentiated from each other. The quantitative values were influenced by the temperature. T1 in particular exhibited strong temperature dependence. The correction of quantitative values to a temperature of 37 C resulted in better tissue discrimination. Postmortem MR quantification is feasible for soft tissue discrimination and characterization of thoraco-abdominal organs. This provides a base for computer-aided diagnosis and detection of tissue lesions. The temperature dependence of the T1 values challenges postmortem MR quantification. Equations to correct for the temperature dependence are provided. (orig.)

  12. Extraction of temperature dependent interfacial resistance of thermoelectric modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Min

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses an approach for extracting the temperature dependency of the electrical interfacial resistance associated with thermoelectric devices. The method combines a traditional module-level test rig and a nonlinear numerical model of thermoelectricity to minimize measurement errors...

  13. On the Temperature Dependence of the UNIQUAC/UNIFAC Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjold-Jørgensen, Steen; Rasmussen, Peter; Fredenslund, Aage

    1980-01-01

    Local composition models for the description of the properties of liquid mixtures do not in general give an accurate representation of excess Gibbs energy and excess enthalpy simultaneously. The introduction of temperature dependent interaction parameters leads to considerable improvements...

  14. Temperature Induced Stress Dependent Photoluminescence Properties of Nanocrystallite Zinc Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, Temperature induced stress dependent structural, optical and photoluminescence properties of nanoscrysllites ZnO (nc-ZnO films are reported. It is seen that crystallite size, band gap and PL intensity of nc-ZnO are strongly dependent on stress. Large compressive stress has been observed at temperature 350-400 °C while minimum stress obtained at temperature 450 °C. A small amount of expensive stress is obtained at temperature 500 and 500 °C. The surface topography of the nc-ZnO films has been studied using atomic force microscopy. The optical band gap of nc-ZnO has been decreased from 3.25 to 3.23 eV as a function of temperature induced stress. The luminescence property is dependent on stress of nc-ZnO films.

  15. Temperature Dependent Spectroscopic Studies of HiPco SWNT Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Keogh, Sinead; Hedderman, Theresa; Farrell, Gerald; Ruether, M.; Gregan, Elizabeth; McNamara, Mary; Chambers, Gordon; Byrne, Hugh

    2005-01-01

    Hybrid systems of the conjugated organic polymer poly(p-phenylene vinylene-co-2,5-dioctyIoxy-m-phenylene vinylene)(PmPV) and HiPco SWNTs are explored using spectroscopic and thermal techniques to determine specific interactions. Vibrational spectroscopy indicates a weak interaction and this is further elucidated using Differential Scanning Calorimetry, Temperature Dependent Raman Spectroscopy and Temperature Dependent Infrared Spectroscopy of the raw materials and the composite. An endothermi...

  16. Hysteresis and Temperature Dependency of Moisture Sorption – New Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rode, Carsten; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that sorption characteristics of building materials exhibit hysteresis in the way the equilibrium curves develop between adsorption and desorption, and that the sorption curves are also somewhat temperature dependent. However, these two facts are most often neglected in models...... measurements of hysteresis and temperature dependency of the moisture sorption characteristics of three different porous building materials: aerated concrete, cement paste and spruce. Scanning curves are measured for all three materials where periods with adsorption and desorption interrupt each other...

  17. Identification of temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and experimental verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Weizhen; Yi, Fajun; Zhu, Yanwei; Meng, Songhe

    2016-07-01

    A modified Levenberg-Marquardt method (LMM) for the identification of temperature-dependent thermal conductivity is proposed; the experiment and structure of the specimen for identification are also designed. The temperature-dependent thermal conductivities of copper C10200 and brass C28000 are identified to verify the effectiveness of the proposed identification method. The comparison between identified results and the measured data of laser flash diffusivity apparatus indicates the fine consistency and potential usage of the proposed method.

  18. Temperature and size-dependent Hamaker constants for metal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, K.; Pinchuk, P.

    2016-08-01

    Theoretical values of the Hamaker constant have been calculated for metal nanoparticles using Lifshitz theory. The theory describes the Hamaker constant in terms of the permittivity of the interacting bodies. Metal nanoparticles exhibit an internal size effect that alters the dielectric permittivity of the particle when its size falls below the mean free path of the conducting electrons. This size dependence of the permittivity leads to size-dependence of the Hamaker constant for metal nanoparticles. Additionally, the electron damping and the plasma frequency used to model the permittivity of the particle exhibit temperature-dependence, which lead to temperature dependence of the Hamaker constant. In this work, both the size and temperature dependence for gold, silver, copper, and aluminum nanoparticles is demonstrated. The results of this study might be of interest for studying the colloidal stability of nanoparticles in solution.

  19. Temperature dependent droplet impact dynamics on flat and textured surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azar Alizadeh; Vaibhav Bahadur; Sheng Zhong; Wen Shang; Ri Li; James Ruud; Masako Yamada; Liehi Ge; Ali Dhinojwala; Manohar S Sohal (047160)

    2012-03-01

    Droplet impact dynamics determines the performance of surfaces used in many applications such as anti-icing, condensation, boiling and heat transfer. We study impact dynamics of water droplets on surfaces with chemistry/texture ranging from hydrophilic to superhydrophobic and across a temperature range spanning below freezing to near boiling conditions. Droplet retraction shows very strong temperature dependence especially for hydrophilic surfaces; it is seen that lower substrate temperatures lead to lesser retraction. Physics-based analyses show that the increased viscosity associated with lower temperatures can explain the decreased retraction. The present findings serve to guide further studies of dynamic fluid-structure interaction at various temperatures.

  20. Temperature dependence of photovoltaic cells, modules, and systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emery, K.; Burdick, J.; Caiyem, Y. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) cells and modules are often rated in terms of a set of standard reporting conditions defined by a temperature, spectral irradiance, and total irradiance. Because PV devices operates over a wide range of temperatures and irradiances, the temperature and irradiance related behavior must be known. This paper surveys the temperature dependence of crystalline and thin-film, state-of-the-art, research-size cells, modules, and systems measured by a variety of methods. The various error sources and measurement methods that contribute to cause differences in the temperature coefficient for a given cell or module measured with various methods are discussed.

  1. Fractal model of anomalous diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gmachowski, Lech

    2015-12-01

    An equation of motion is derived from fractal analysis of the Brownian particle trajectory in which the asymptotic fractal dimension of the trajectory has a required value. The formula makes it possible to calculate the time dependence of the mean square displacement for both short and long periods when the molecule diffuses anomalously. The anomalous diffusion which occurs after long periods is characterized by two variables, the transport coefficient and the anomalous diffusion exponent. An explicit formula is derived for the transport coefficient, which is related to the diffusion constant, as dependent on the Brownian step time, and the anomalous diffusion exponent. The model makes it possible to deduce anomalous diffusion properties from experimental data obtained even for short time periods and to estimate the transport coefficient in systems for which the diffusion behavior has been investigated. The results were confirmed for both sub and super-diffusion.

  2. A new temperature-dependent equation of state of solids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kamal Kapoor; Anuj Kumar; Narsingh Dass

    2014-03-01

    In the present paper, a temperature-dependent equation of state (EOS) of solids is discussed which is found to be applicable in high-pressure and high-temperature range. Present equation of state has been applied in 18 solids. The calculated data are found in very good agreement with the data available from other sources.

  3. Gas diffusion and temperature dependence of bubble nucleation during irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foreman, A. J. E.; Singh, Bachu Narain

    1986-01-01

    of the diatomic nucleation of helium bubbles, assuming helium to diffuse substitutionally, with radiation-enhanced diffusion at lower temperatures. The calculated temperature dependence of the bubble density shows excellent agreement with that observed in 600 MeV proton irradiations, including a reduction...

  4. Temperature Dependence of GaN HEMT Small Signal Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali M. Darwish

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the temperature dependence of small signal parameters of GaN/SiC HEMTs across the 0–150°C range. The changes with temperature for transconductance (m, output impedance (ds and ds, feedback capacitance (dg, input capacitance (gs, and gate resistance (g are measured. The variations with temperature are established for m, ds, ds, dg, gs, and g in the GaN technology. This information is useful for MMIC designs.

  5. On the temperature dependence of flammability limits of gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Shigeo; Takizawa, Kenji; Takahashi, Akifumi; Tokuhashi, Kazuaki

    2011-03-15

    Flammability limits of several combustible gases were measured at temperatures from 5 to 100 °C in a 12-l spherical flask basically following ASHRAE method. The measurements were done for methane, propane, isobutane, ethylene, propylene, dimethyl ether, methyl formate, 1,1-difluoroethane, ammonia, and carbon monoxide. As the temperature rises, the lower flammability limits are gradually shifted down and the upper limits are shifted up. Both the limits shift almost linearly to temperature within the range examined. The linear temperature dependence of the lower flammability limits is explained well using a limiting flame temperature concept at the lower concentration limit (LFL)--'White's rule'. The geometric mean of the flammability limits has been found to be relatively constant for many compounds over the temperature range studied (5-100 °C). Based on this fact, the temperature dependence of the upper flammability limit (UFL) can be predicted reasonably using the temperature coefficient calculated for the LFL. However, some compounds such as ethylene and dimethyl ether, in particular, have a more complex temperature dependence.

  6. Universal temperature dependence of the magnetization of gapped spin chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Yoshitaka; Hotta, Chisa; Oshikawa, Masaki

    2007-08-03

    A Haldane chain under applied field is analyzed numerically, and a clear minimum of magnetization is observed as a function of temperature. We elucidate its origin using the effective theory near the critical field and propose a simple method to estimate the gap from the magnetization at finite temperatures. We also demonstrate that there exists a relation between the temperature dependence of the magnetization and the field dependence of the spin-wave velocity. Our arguments are universal for general axially symmetric one-dimensional spin systems.

  7. Extended temperature dependence of elastic constants in cubic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telichko, A V; Sorokin, B P

    2015-08-01

    To extend the theory of the temperature dependence of the elastic constants in cubic crystals beyond the second- and third-order elastic constants, the fourth-order elastic constants, as well as the non-linearity in the thermal expansion temperature dependence, have been taken into account. Theoretical results were represented as temperature functions of the effective elastic constants and compared with experimental data for a number of cubic crystals, such as alkali metal halides, and elements gold and silver. The relations obtained give a more accurate description of the experimental temperature dependences of second-order elastic constants for a number of cubic crystals, including deviations from linear behavior. A good agreement between theoretical estimates and experimental data has been observed.

  8. Arrhenius temperature dependence of in vitro tissue plasminogen activator thrombolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, George J.; Dhamija, Ashima; Bavani, Nazli; Wagner, Kenneth R.; Holland, Christy K.

    2007-06-01

    Stroke is a devastating disease and a leading cause of death and disability. Currently, the only FDA approved therapy for acute ischemic stroke is the intravenous administration of the thrombolytic medication, recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). However, this treatment has many contraindications and can have dangerous side effects such as intra-cerebral hemorrhage. These treatment limitations have led to much interest in potential adjunctive therapies, such as therapeutic hypothermia (T model. We find that the temperature dependence is well described by an Arrhenius temperature dependence with an effective activation energy Eeff of 42.0 ± 0.9 kJ mole-1. Eeff approximates the activation energy of the plasminogen-to-plasmin reaction of 48.9 kJ mole-1. A model to explain this temperature dependence is proposed. These results will be useful in predicting the effects of temperature in future lytic therapies.

  9. Fluctuation-stabilized marginal networks and anomalous entropic elasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennison, M; Sheinman, M; Storm, C; MacKintosh, F C

    2013-08-30

    We study the elastic properties of thermal networks of Hookean springs. In the purely mechanical limit, such systems are known to have a vanishing rigidity when their connectivity falls below a critical, isostatic value. In this work, we show that thermal networks exhibit a nonzero shear modulus G well below the isostatic point and that this modulus exhibits an anomalous, sublinear dependence on temperature T. At the isostatic point, G increases as the square root of T, while we find G∝Tα below the isostatic point, where α≃0.8. We show that this anomalous T dependence is entropic in origin.

  10. Temperature dependence of thermally-carbonized porous silicon humidity sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkqvist, M.; Paski, J.; Salonen, J.; Lehto, V.-P.

    2005-06-01

    Thermal carbonization of porous silicon (PS) at 820 °C under acetylene atmosphere is an appropriate method for humidity sensing purposes. It produces stable and hydrophilic surface still maintaining originally large specific surface area of PS. We report the temperature dependence of various electrical param- eters measured for the thermally-carbonized PS humidity sensor. Capacitance of the sensor in dry air (6 RH%) is almost constant at various temperatures, whereas in higher relative humidity values, the temperature dependence becomes evident. The resistance variation of the sensor is less dependent on RH as the temperature increases. While the capacitance showed linear behavior as a function of temperature, the resistance had a clear non-linear temperature dependence. In order to get information about the effects of frequency on capacitance values, we measured a phase angle and admittance of the sensor as a function of frequency at three different temperatures in low and high humidity. According to these results, it is preferable to operate this sensor construction using low frequency (<1 kHz).

  11. Temperature dependence of surface enhanced Raman scattering on C70

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Ying; Zhang Zhenlong; DU Yinxiao; DONG Hua; MO Yujun

    2005-01-01

    The temperature dependence of surface enhanced Raman scattering of the C70 molecule is reported.The Raman scattering of C70 molecules adsorbed on the surface of a silver mirror was measured at different temperatures. The experimental results indicate that the relative intensities of the Raman features vary with the temperature of the sample. When the temperature decreases from room temperature to 0℃, the relative intensities of certain Raman bands decrease abruptly. If we take the strongest band 1565cm-1 as a standard value 100, the greatest decrease approaches to 43%. However, with the further decrease in the temperature these relative intensities increase and resume the value at room temperature. And such a temperature dependence is reversible. Our results show that the adsorption state of the C70 molecules on the silver surface around 0℃changes greatly with the temperature, resulting in a decrease in relative intensities for some main Raman features of C70molecule. When the temperature is lower than 0℃, the adsorption state changes continually and more slowly. Synchronously, eight new Raman featu res, which have not ever been reported in literature, are observed in our experiment and this enriches the basic information of the vibrational modes for C70 molecule.

  12. Temperature dependence of crystal structure and digestibility of roasted diaspore

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周秋生; 李小斌; 彭志宏; 刘桂华

    2004-01-01

    Through X-ray diffraction patterns and scanning electronic micrographs, temperature dependence of the crystal structure of roasted diasporic bauxite at different temperatures and the digestibility of roasting production were investigated systematically. The lattice parameters of unit cell for chemically purified diaspore and unequilibrium alumina-contained oxide obtained from the diaspore roasted at different temperatures were determined. It is found that, with roasting temperature increasing, the roasting production changes from the original dense and perfect diaspore crystal into imperfect corundum with many microcracks and small pores on its surface and then into perfect corundum with low digestibility. The optimum roasting temperature with best digestibility is approximately 525 ℃ when residence time is about 25 min. It is thought that the change of crystal structure, formation of microcracks and small pores in the temperature field are the main essential reasons for improving digestibility of diasporic bauxite and its roasting production.

  13. Pressure and temperature dependence of growth and morphology of Escherichia coli: Experiments and Stochastic Model

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Pradeep

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the growth of Escherichia coli E.coli, a mesophilic bacterium, as a function of pressure $P$ and temperature $T$. E.coli can grow and divide in a wide range of pressure (1-400atm) and temperature ($23-40^{\\circ}$C). For $T>30^{\\circ}$ C, the division time of E.coli increases exponentially with pressure and exhibit a departure from exponential behavior at pressures between 250-400 atm for all the temperatures studied in our experiments. For $T<30^{\\circ}$ C, the division time shows an anomalous dependence on pressure -- first decreases with increasing pressure and then increases upon further increase of pressure. The sharp change in division time is followed by a sharp change in phenotypic transition of E. Coli at high pressures where bacterial cells switch to an elongating cell type. We propose a model that this phenotypic changes in bacteria at high pressures is an irreversible stochastic process whereas the switching probability to elongating cell type increases with increasing press...

  14. Temperature dependent elasticity and damping in dehydrated sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, T. W.; Struble, W.

    2013-12-01

    Work reported previously at this conference, outlining our observation of anomalously large elastic softening and damping in dehydrated Berea sandstone at elevated temperatures, has been analysed to study shear and compressional effects separately. Modeling of the sample using COMSOL software was necessary to identify modes, as the vibration spectrum of the sample is poorly approximated by a uniform isotropic solid. The first torsional mode of our evacuated, dry, core softens at nearly twice the rate of Young's modulus modes (bending and compressional) and is also damped nearly twice as strongly as temperature increases. We consider two possible models for explaining this behavior, based on the assumption that the mechanical properties of the sandstone are dominated by the framework of quartz grains and polycrystalline cementation, neglecting initially the effects of clay and feldspar inclusions. The 20cm x 2.54cm diameter core is dry such that the pressure of water vapor in the experiment chamber is below 1e-6 Torr at 70C, suggesting that surface water beyond a small number of monolayers is negligible. Our models consider (1) enhanced sliding of grain boundaries in the cementation at elevated temperature and reduced internal water content, and (2) strain microcracking of the cementatioin at low water content due to anisotropic expansion in the quartz grains. In model (1) interfaces parallel to polyhedral grain surfaces were placed in the cement bonds and assigned frictional properties. Model (2) has not yet been implemented. The overall elasticity of a 3-D several-grain model network was determined by modeling quasistatic loading and measuring displacements. Initial results with a small number of grains/bonds suggests that only the first model provides softening and damping for all the modes, however the details of the effects of defect motioin at individual interfaces as the source for the frictional properties is still being evaluated. Nonlinear effects are

  15. Temperature dependence of protein hydration hydrodynamics by molecular dynamics simulations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, E Y; Krishnan, V V

    2007-07-18

    The dynamics of water molecules near the protein surface are different from those of bulk water and influence the structure and dynamics of the protein itself. To elucidate the temperature dependence hydration dynamics of water molecules, we present results from the molecular dynamic simulation of the water molecules surrounding two proteins (Carboxypeptidase inhibitor and Ovomucoid) at seven different temperatures (T=273 to 303 K, in increments of 5 K). Translational diffusion coefficients of the surface water and bulk water molecules were estimated from 2 ns molecular dynamics simulation trajectories. Temperature dependence of the estimated bulk water diffusion closely reflects the experimental values, while hydration water diffusion is retarded significantly due to the protein. Protein surface induced scaling of translational dynamics of the hydration waters is uniform over the temperature range studied, suggesting the importance protein-water interactions.

  16. Temperature dependence of radiation-induced attenuation of optical fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingming Song; Jianhua Guo; Xueqin Wang; Jing Jin

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the temperature dependence of radiation-induced attenuation (RIA) at 1 310 nm for a Ge/P co-doped fiber after a steady-state γ-ray irradiation.A γ irradiation facility 60Co source is used to irradiate the fiber at a dose rate of 0.5 Gy/min,satisfying a total dose of 100 Gy.The test temperature ranges from-40 to 60 ℃ by 20 ℃,and the RIA of the fiber is obtained using a power measuring device.The experimental result demonstrates that RIA exhibits a steady,monotonic,and remarkable temperature dependence after approximately 48 h of accelerated annealing at 70 ℃.The optical fiber irradiated with a high dose and annealed sufficiently can be used as a temperature sensor.

  17. Temperature-dependent absorption cross sections for hydrogen peroxide vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicovich, J. M.; Wine, P. H.

    1988-03-01

    Relative absorption cross sections for hydrogen peroxide vapor were measured over the temperature ranges 285-381 K for lambda = 230 nm-295 nm and 300-381 K for lambda = 193 nm-350 nm. The well established 298 K cross sections at 202.6 and 228.8 nm were used as an absolute calibration. A significant temperature dependence was observed at the important tropospheric photolysis wavelengths lambda over 300 nm. Measured cross sections were extrapolated to lower temperatures, using a simple model which attributes the observed temperature dependence to enhanced absorption by molecules possessing one quantum of O-O stretch vibrational excitation. Upper tropospheric photodissociation rates calculated using the extrapolated cross sections are about 25 percent lower than those calculated using currently recommended 298 K cross sections.

  18. Temperature dependence of hydrophobic hydration dynamics: from retardation to acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duboué-Dijon, Elise; Fogarty, Aoife C; Laage, Damien

    2014-02-13

    The perturbation induced by a hydrophobic solute on water dynamics is essential in many biochemical processes, but its mechanism and magnitude are still debated. A stringent test of the different proposed pictures is provided by recent NMR measurements by Qvist and Halle (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2008, 130, 10345-10353) which showed that, unexpectedly, the perturbation changes in a non-monotonic fashion when the solution is cooled below room temperature. Here we perform and analyze molecular dynamics simulations of a small paradigm amphiphilic solute, trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), in dilute aqueous solutions over the 218-350 K temperature range. We first show that our simulations properly reproduce the non-monotonic temperature dependence. We then develop a model which combines our previously suggested entropic excluded-volume effect with a perturbation factor arising from the difference between local structural fluctuations in the shell and the bulk. Our model provides a detailed molecular understanding of the hydrophobic perturbation over the full temperature range investigated. It shows that the excluded-volume factor brings a dominant temperature-independent contribution to the perturbation at all temperatures, and provides a very good approximation at room temperature. The non-monotonic temperature dependence of the perturbation is shown to arise from the structural factor and mostly from relative shifts between the shell and bulk distributions of local structures, whose amplitude remains very small compared to the widths of those distributions.

  19. Temperature Dependence of GaN HEMT Small Signal Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    original work is properly cited. This study presents the temperature dependence of small signal parameters of GaN /SiC HEMTs across the 0–150◦C range...the performance of GaN /SiC device, two state-of-the-art AlGaN/ GaN HEMT devices were characterized at −25, 25, 75, and 125◦C base plate (on-wafer...number. 1. REPORT DATE NOV 2011 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Temperature Dependence of GaN HEMT

  20. Temperature and temporal dependence of neutral density transmittance standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, A.; Hamlin, J. D.

    2012-04-01

    The Schott series of NG glasses are frequently used to manufacture neutral density transmittance standards for validation of spectrophotometer systems as well as for comparisons of regular spectral transmittance scales. A study has been made of the temperature and temporal dependence of transmittance in these types of filters. The temperature dependence of transmittance is found to scale as -ln(T). The filter transmittance was found to vary significantly with time shortly after manufacture but appears to be stabilizing nine months after beginning measurements.

  1. Anomalous spectral dependence of optical polarization and its impact on spin detection in InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puttisong, Y.; Huang, Y. Q.; Buyanova, I. A.; Chen, W. M. [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, S-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Yang, X. J.; Subagyo, A.; Sueoka, K.; Murayama, A. [Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, Hokkaido University, Kita 14, Nishi 9, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0814 (Japan)

    2014-09-29

    We show that circularly polarized emission light from InGaAs/GaAs quantum dot (QD) ensembles under optical spin injection from an adjacent GaAs layer can switch its helicity depending on emission wavelengths and optical excitation density. We attribute this anomalous behavior to simultaneous contributions from both positive and negative trions and a lower number of photo-excited holes than electrons being injected into the QDs due to trapping of holes at ionized acceptors and a lower hole mobility. Our results call for caution in reading out electron spin polarization by optical polarization of the QD ensembles and also provide a guideline in improving efficiency of spin light emitting devices that utilize QDs.

  2. On the temperature dependence of the chiral vortical effects

    CERN Document Server

    Kalaydzhyan, Tigran

    2014-01-01

    We discuss the origins of temperature dependence of the axial vortical effect (AVE), i.e. generation of an axial current in a rotating chiral medium along the rotation axis. We show that the corresponding transport coefficient depends on the number of light weakly interacting degrees of freedom, rather than on the gravitational anomaly. We also comment on the role of low-dimensional defects in the rotating medium, and appearance of the chiral vortical effect due to them.

  3. Temperature Dependence of Photoinduced Birefringence in an Azobenzene Polymer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Hong-Tao; WANG Chang-Shun; PAN Xu; ZHANG Xiao-Qiang; WANG Chuan-Yu; SUN Cun-Ying

    2007-01-01

    The photoinduced birefringence in an azobenzene polymer is investigated at different temperatures between -20℃ to 50℃. It is found that there is a peak value of photoinduced birefringence in the temperature dependence of the photoinduced birefringence under a certain pumping intensity. With the pump light in 90 mW/cm2,the peak value of the photoinduced birefringence appeared at about 0℃. The effect of temperature on the photoinduced birefringence is discussed using the competition mechanism between the photoinduced reorientation and the thermal random motion.

  4. Temperature dependent energy levels of methylammonium lead iodide perovskite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foley, Benjamin J.; Marlowe, Daniel L.; Choi, Joshua J., E-mail: jjc6z@virginia.edu, E-mail: mgupta@virginia.edu, E-mail: scudiero@wsu.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States); Sun, Keye; Gupta, Mool C., E-mail: jjc6z@virginia.edu, E-mail: mgupta@virginia.edu, E-mail: scudiero@wsu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States); Saidi, Wissam A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15261 (United States); Scudiero, Louis, E-mail: jjc6z@virginia.edu, E-mail: mgupta@virginia.edu, E-mail: scudiero@wsu.edu [Chemistry Department and Materials Science and Engineering Program, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Temperature dependent energy levels of methylammonium lead iodide are investigated using a combination of ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy and optical spectroscopy. Our results show that the valence band maximum and conduction band minimum shift down in energy by 110 meV and 77 meV as temperature increases from 28 °C to 85 °C. Density functional theory calculations using slab structures show that the decreased orbital splitting due to thermal expansion is a major contribution to the experimentally observed shift in energy levels. Our results have implications for solar cell performance under operating conditions with continued sunlight exposure and increased temperature.

  5. Quark mass dependence of quarkonium properties at finite temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Ohno, H; Kaczmarek, O

    2014-01-01

    Quarkonium properties at finite temperature have been studied with quark masses of the charm and bottom quarks. Our simulations have been performed in quenched QCD with the $O(a)$-improved Wilson quarks on large and fine isotropic lattices with the spatial lattice extents $N_\\sigma =$ 96, 192 and the corresponding lattice spacings $a =$ 0.0190, 0.00967 fm, respectively, at temperatures in a range between about 0.7$T_c$ and 1.4$T_c$. We show temperature and quark mass dependence of quarkonium correlation functions and related physical quantities: the quark number susceptibility and the heavy quark diffusion constant.

  6. DETERMINATION OF TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION FOR ANNULAR FINS WITH TEMPERATURE DEPENDENT THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY BY HPM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davood Domairry Ganji

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, homotopy perturbation method has been used to evaluate the temperature distribution of annular fin with temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and to determine the temperature distribution within the fin. This method is useful and practical for solving the nonlinear heat transfer equation, which is associated with variable thermal conductivity condition. The homotopy perturbation method provides an approximate analytical solution in the form of an infinite power series. The annular fin heat transfer rate with temperature-dependent thermal conductivity has been obtained as a function of thermo-geometric fin parameter and the thermal conductivity parameter describing the variation of the thermal conductivity.

  7. Different 57Fe microenvironments in the nanosized iron cores in human liver ferritin and its pharmaceutical analogues on the basis of temperature dependent Mössbauer spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshtrakh, M. I.; Alenkina, I. V.; Klencsár, Z.; Kuzmann, E.; Semionkin, V. A.

    2017-02-01

    Mössbauer spectra of human liver ferritin and its pharmaceutical analogues Ferrum Lek and Maltofer® measured at various temperatures within the range of 295-83 K were fitted using five quadrupole doublets related to different 57Fe microenvironments in various layers/regions of the ferrihydrite and akaganéite iron cores. The observed anomalous temperature dependences of some Mössbauer parameters were considered as a result of low temperature structural rearrangements in different layers/regions in the iron core.

  8. First Numerical Simulations of Anomalous Hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Hongo, Masaru; Hirano, Tetsufumi

    2013-01-01

    Anomalous hydrodynamics is a low-energy effective theory that captures effects of quantum anomalies. We develop a numerical code of anomalous hydrodynamics and apply it to dynamics of heavy-ion collisions, where anomalous transports are expected to occur. This is the first attempt to perform fully non-linear numerical simulations of anomalous hydrodynamics. We discuss implications of the simulations for possible experimental observations of anomalous transport effects. From analyses of the charge-dependent elliptic flow parameters ($v_2^\\pm$) as a function of the net charge asymmetry $A_\\pm$, we quantitatively verify that the linear dependence of $\\Delta v_2 \\equiv v_2^- - v_2^+$ on the net charge asymmetry $A_\\pm$ cannot be regarded as a sensitive signal of anomalous transports, contrary to previous studies. We, however, find that the intercept $\\Delta v_2(A_\\pm=0)$ is sensitive to anomalous transport effects.

  9. The Temperature Dependence of Ice Viscosity (Vyazkost Lda v Zavisimosti ot Temperatury),

    Science.gov (United States)

    The role and significance of crystalline structure in the study of the plastic properties of ice has been demonstrated. An anomalous change in the...rate of plastic deformation of specimens of sufficiently regular crystalline structure occurs when they are subjected to sharp change in temperature

  10. AlN Bandgap Temperature Dependence from its Optical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-07

    AlN bandgap temperature dependence from its optical properties E. Silveira a,, J.A. Freitas b, S.B. Schujman c, L.J. Schowalter c a Depto. de Fisica ...range. The energy gap in semiconductors in general changes due to contributions from the electron–phonon interaction and due to the lattice thermal

  11. Temperature dependent fission fragment distribution in the Langevin equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Kun; MA Yu-Gang; ZHENG Qing-Shan; CAI Xiang-Zhou; FANG De-Qing; FU Yao; LU Guang-Cheng; TIAN Wen-Dong; WANG Hong-Wei

    2009-01-01

    The temperature dependent width of the fission fragment distributions was simulated in the Langevin equation by taking two-parameter exponential form of the fission fragment mass variance at scission point for each fission event. The result can reproduce experimental data well, and it permits to make reliable estimate for unmeasured product yields near symmetry fission.

  12. Temperature dependence of bag pressure from quasiparticle model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, N.; Singh, C. P.

    2001-03-01

    A quasiparticle model with effective thermal gluon and quark masses is used to derive a temperature /T- and baryon chemical potential /μ-dependent bag constant /B(μ,T). Consequences of such a bag constant are obtained on the equation of state (EOS) for a deconfined quark-gluon plasma (QGP).

  13. Temperature dependence of magnetocurrent in a magnetic tunnel transistor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Park, B.G.; Banerjee, T.; Min, B.C.; Sanderink, J.G.M.; Lodder, J.C.; Jansen, R.

    2005-01-01

    The temperature dependence of magnetocurrent (MC) and transfer ratio has been investigated in a magnetic tunnel transistor (MTT) with a ferromagnetic (FM) emitter of Co or Ni80Fe20. MTT devices of sizes ranging from 10 to 100 µm in diameter were fabricated using a standard photolithography process a

  14. Time- and temperature-dependent failures of a bonded joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sihn, Sangwook; Miyano, Yasushi; Tsai, S.W. [Stanford Univ., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1997-07-01

    Time and temperature dependent properties of a tubular lap bonded joint are reported. The joint bonds a cast iron rod and a composite pipe together with an epoxy type of an adhesive material containing chopped glass fiber. A new fabrication method is proposed.

  15. Inverse temperature dependence of the dust submillimeter spectral index

    CERN Document Server

    Dupac, X; Boudet, N; Giard, M; Lamarre, J M; Mény, C; Pajot, F; Ristorcelli, I; Serra, G; Stepnik, B; Torre, J P

    2003-01-01

    We present a compilation of PRONAOS-based results concerning the temperature dependence of the dust submillimeter spectral index, including data from Galactic cirrus, star-forming regions, dust associated to a young stellar object, and a spiral galaxy. We observe large variations of the spectral index (from 0.8 to 2.4) in a wide range of temperatures (11 to 80 K). These spectral index variations follow a hyperbolic-shaped function of the temperature, high spectral indices (1.6-2.4) being observed in cold regions (11-20 K) while low indices (0.8-1.6) are observed in warm regions (35-80 K). Three distinct effects may play a role in this temperature dependence: one is that the grain sizes change in dense environments, another is that the chemical composition of the grains is not the same in different environments, a third one is that there is an intrinsic dependence of the dust spectral index on the temperature due to quantum processes. This last effect is backed up by laboratory measurements and could be the do...

  16. Energy based model for temperature dependent behavior of ferromagnetic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sah, Sanjay; Atulasimha, Jayasimha

    2017-03-01

    An energy based model for temperature dependent anhysteretic magnetization curves of ferromagnetic materials is proposed and benchmarked against experimental data. This is based on the calculation of macroscopic magnetic properties by performing an energy weighted average over all possible orientations of the magnetization vector. Most prior approaches that employ this method are unable to independently account for the effect of both inhomogeneity and temperature in performing the averaging necessary to model experimental data. Here we propose a way to account for both effects simultaneously and benchmark the model against experimental data from 5 K to 300 K for two different materials in both annealed (fewer inhomogeneities) and deformed (more inhomogeneities) samples. This demonstrates that this framework is well suited to simulate temperature dependent experimental magnetic behavior.

  17. Effects of Temperature on Time Dependent Rheological Characteristics of Koumiss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdal Sabancı

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The rheological properties of koumiss were investigated at different temperatures (4, 10, and 20°C. Experimental shear stress–shear rate data were fitted to different rheological models. The consistency of koumiss was predicted by using the power-law model since it described the consistency of koumiss best with highest regression coefficient and lowest errors (root mean square error and chi-square. Koumiss exhibited shear thinning behavior (n<1. The flow activation energy for temperature dependency of consistency was 25.532 kJ/mol, and the frequency constant was 2.18×10-7Pa.sn. As the temperature increased the time dependent thixotropic characteristics of koumiss decreased.

  18. Fission Dynamics: The Quest of a Temperature Dependent Nuclear Viscosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Vardaci

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a journey within some open questions about the current use of a temperature dependent nuclear viscosity in models of nuclear fission and proposes an alternative experimental approach by using systems of intermediate fissility. This study is particularly relevant because: i systems of intermediate fissility offer a suitable frame-work since the intervals between the compound nucleus and scission point temperatures with increasing excitation energy are much smaller than in the case of heavier systems, ii the dependence of viscosity on the temperature may change with the fissility of the composite system; iii the opportunity to measure also observables in the evaporation residues channel translates into a larger set of effective constraints for the models.

  19. On the Temperature Dependence of the Casimir Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Brevik, I; Høye, J S; Milton, K A

    2004-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the Casimir force between a real metallic plate and a metallic sphere is analyzed on the basis of optical data concerning the dispersion relation of metals such as gold and copper. Realistic permittivities imply, in accordance with basic thermodynamic considerations, that the transverse electric zero mode does not contribute. This results in observable differences with the conventional prediction, which does not take this physical requirement into account. The results are shown to be consistent with the third law of thermodynamics, as well as with current experiments. However, the predicted temperature dependence should be detectable in future experiments. The inadequacies of approaches based on {\\it ad hoc} assumptions, such as the plasma dispersion relation and the use of surface impedance without transverse momentum dependence, are discussed.

  20. A Temperature-Dependent Battery Model for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo M. Rodrigues

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Energy consumption is a major issue in Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs, as nodes are powered by chemical batteries with an upper bounded lifetime. Estimating the lifetime of batteries is a difficult task, as it depends on several factors, such as operating temperatures and discharge rates. Analytical battery models can be used for estimating both the battery lifetime and the voltage behavior over time. Still, available models usually do not consider the impact of operating temperatures on the battery behavior. The target of this work is to extend the widely-used Kinetic Battery Model (KiBaM to include the effect of temperature on the battery behavior. The proposed Temperature-Dependent KiBaM (T-KiBaM is able to handle operating temperatures, providing better estimates for the battery lifetime and voltage behavior. The performed experimental validation shows that T-KiBaM achieves an average accuracy error smaller than 0.33%, when estimating the lifetime of Ni-MH batteries for different temperature conditions. In addition, T-KiBaM significantly improves the original KiBaM voltage model. The proposed model can be easily adapted to handle other battery technologies, enabling the consideration of different WSN deployments.

  1. A Temperature-Dependent Battery Model for Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Leonardo M; Montez, Carlos; Moraes, Ricardo; Portugal, Paulo; Vasques, Francisco

    2017-02-22

    Energy consumption is a major issue in Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs), as nodes are powered by chemical batteries with an upper bounded lifetime. Estimating the lifetime of batteries is a difficult task, as it depends on several factors, such as operating temperatures and discharge rates. Analytical battery models can be used for estimating both the battery lifetime and the voltage behavior over time. Still, available models usually do not consider the impact of operating temperatures on the battery behavior. The target of this work is to extend the widely-used Kinetic Battery Model (KiBaM) to include the effect of temperature on the battery behavior. The proposed Temperature-Dependent KiBaM (T-KiBaM) is able to handle operating temperatures, providing better estimates for the battery lifetime and voltage behavior. The performed experimental validation shows that T-KiBaM achieves an average accuracy error smaller than 0.33%, when estimating the lifetime of Ni-MH batteries for different temperature conditions. In addition, T-KiBaM significantly improves the original KiBaM voltage model. The proposed model can be easily adapted to handle other battery technologies, enabling the consideration of different WSN deployments.

  2. TEMPERATURE-DEPENDENT INFRARED OPTICAL CONSTANTS OF OLIVINE AND ENSTATITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeidler, S. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ), 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Mutschke, H. [Astrophysikalisches Institut und Universitäts-Sternwarte, Schillergässchen 2-3, D-07745 Jena (Germany); Posch, Th., E-mail: simon.zeidler@nao.ac.jp, E-mail: harald.mutschke@uni-jena.de, E-mail: thomas.posch@univie.ac.at [Institut für Astrophysik, Türkenschanzstraße 17, A-1180 Wien (Austria)

    2015-01-10

    Since the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) mission, it has become clear that dust in circumstellar disks and outflows consists partly of crystalline silicates of pyroxene and olivine type. An exact mineralogical analysis of the dust infrared emission spectra relies on laboratory spectra, which, however, have been mostly measured at room temperature so far. Given that infrared spectral features depend on the thermal excitation of the crystal's vibrational modes, laboratory spectra measured at various (low and high) temperatures, corresponding to the thermal conditions at different distances from the star, can improve the accuracy of such analyses considerably. We have measured the complex refractive index in a temperature range of 10-973 K for one mineral of each of those types of silicate, i.e., for an olivine and an enstatite of typical (terrestrial) composition. Thus, our data extend the temperature range of previous data to higher values and the compositional range to higher iron contents. We analyze the temperature dependence of oscillator frequencies and damping parameters governing the spectral characteristics of the bands and calculate absorption cross-sectional spectra that can be compared with astronomical emission spectra. We demonstrate the usefulness of our new data by comparing spectra calculated for a 100 K dust temperature with the ISO SWS spectrum of IRAS 09425-6040.

  3. Temperature-Dependent Dielectric Properties of Al/Epoxy Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zijun; Zhou, Wenying; Sui, Xuezhen; Dong, Lina; Cai, Huiwu; Zuo, Jing; Chen, Qingguo

    2016-06-01

    Broadband dielectric spectroscopy was carried out to study the transition in electrical properties of Al/epoxy nanocomposites over the frequency range of 1-107 Hz and the temperature range of -20°C to 200°C. The dielectric permittivity, dissipation factor, and electrical conductivity of the nanocomposites increased with temperature and showed an abrupt increase around the glass transition temperature ( T g). The results clearly reveal an interesting transition of the electrical properties with increasing temperature: insulator below 70°C, conductor at about 70°C. The behavior of the transition in electrical properties of the nanocomposites was explored at different temperatures. The presence of relaxation peaks in the loss tangent and electric modulus spectra of the nanocomposites confirms that the chain segmental dynamics of the polymer is accompanied by the absorption of energy given to the system. It is suggested that the temperature-dependent transition of the electric properties in the nanocomposite is closely associated with the α-relaxation. The large increase in the dissipation factor and electric conductivity depends on the direct current conduction of thermally activated charge carriers resulting from the epoxy matrix above T g.

  4. A Temperature-Dependent Battery Model for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Leonardo M.; Montez, Carlos; Moraes, Ricardo; Portugal, Paulo; Vasques, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Energy consumption is a major issue in Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs), as nodes are powered by chemical batteries with an upper bounded lifetime. Estimating the lifetime of batteries is a difficult task, as it depends on several factors, such as operating temperatures and discharge rates. Analytical battery models can be used for estimating both the battery lifetime and the voltage behavior over time. Still, available models usually do not consider the impact of operating temperatures on the battery behavior. The target of this work is to extend the widely-used Kinetic Battery Model (KiBaM) to include the effect of temperature on the battery behavior. The proposed Temperature-Dependent KiBaM (T-KiBaM) is able to handle operating temperatures, providing better estimates for the battery lifetime and voltage behavior. The performed experimental validation shows that T-KiBaM achieves an average accuracy error smaller than 0.33%, when estimating the lifetime of Ni-MH batteries for different temperature conditions. In addition, T-KiBaM significantly improves the original KiBaM voltage model. The proposed model can be easily adapted to handle other battery technologies, enabling the consideration of different WSN deployments. PMID:28241444

  5. Temperature dependent local atomic displacements in ammonia intercalated iron selenide superconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, E; Simonelli, L; Wakita, T; Marini, C; Lee, J-H; Olszewski, W; Terashima, K; Kakuto, T; Nishimoto, N; Kimura, T; Kudo, K; Kambe, T; Nohara, M; Yokoya, T; Saini, N L

    2016-01-01

    Recently, ammonia-thermal reaction has been used for molecular intercalation in layered FeSe, resulting a new Lix(NH3)yFe2Se2 superconductor with Tc ~ 45 K. Here, we have used temperature dependent extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) to investigate local atomic displacements in single crystals of this new superconductor. Using polarized EXAFS at Fe K-edge we have obtained direct information on the local Fe-Se and Fe-Fe bondlengths and corresponding mean square relative displacements (MSRD). We find that the Se-height in the intercalated system is lower than the one in the binary FeSe, suggesting compressed FeSe4 tetrahedron in the title system. Incidentally, there is hardly any effect of the intercalation on the bondlengths characteristics, revealed by the Einstein temperatures, that are similar to those found in the binary FeSe. Therefore, the molecular intercalation induces an effective compression and decouples the FeSe slabs. Furthermore, the results reveal an anomalous change in the atomic correlations across Tc, appearing as a clear decrease in the MSRD, indicating hardening of the local lattice mode. Similar response of the local lattice has been found in other families of superconductors, e.g., A15-type and cuprates superconductors. This observation suggests that local atomic correlations should have some direct correlation with the superconductivity.

  6. Temperature dependent local atomic displacements in ammonia intercalated iron selenide superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, E.; Simonelli, L.; Wakita, T.; Marini, C.; Lee, J.-H.; Olszewski, W.; Terashima, K.; Kakuto, T.; Nishimoto, N.; Kimura, T.; Kudo, K.; Kambe, T.; Nohara, M.; Yokoya, T.; Saini, N. L.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, ammonia-thermal reaction has been used for molecular intercalation in layered FeSe, resulting a new Lix(NH3)yFe2Se2 superconductor with Tc ~ 45 K. Here, we have used temperature dependent extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) to investigate local atomic displacements in single crystals of this new superconductor. Using polarized EXAFS at Fe K-edge we have obtained direct information on the local Fe-Se and Fe-Fe bondlengths and corresponding mean square relative displacements (MSRD). We find that the Se-height in the intercalated system is lower than the one in the binary FeSe, suggesting compressed FeSe4 tetrahedron in the title system. Incidentally, there is hardly any effect of the intercalation on the bondlengths characteristics, revealed by the Einstein temperatures, that are similar to those found in the binary FeSe. Therefore, the molecular intercalation induces an effective compression and decouples the FeSe slabs. Furthermore, the results reveal an anomalous change in the atomic correlations across Tc, appearing as a clear decrease in the MSRD, indicating hardening of the local lattice mode. Similar response of the local lattice has been found in other families of superconductors, e.g., A15-type and cuprates superconductors. This observation suggests that local atomic correlations should have some direct correlation with the superconductivity. PMID:27276997

  7. On the Temperature Dependence of Enzyme-Catalyzed Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcus, Vickery L; Prentice, Erica J; Hobbs, Joanne K; Mulholland, Adrian J; Van der Kamp, Marc W; Pudney, Christopher R; Parker, Emily J; Schipper, Louis A

    2016-03-29

    One of the critical variables that determine the rate of any reaction is temperature. For biological systems, the effects of temperature are convoluted with myriad (and often opposing) contributions from enzyme catalysis, protein stability, and temperature-dependent regulation, for example. We have coined the phrase "macromolecular rate theory (MMRT)" to describe the temperature dependence of enzyme-catalyzed rates independent of stability or regulatory processes. Central to MMRT is the observation that enzyme-catalyzed reactions occur with significant values of ΔCp(‡) that are in general negative. That is, the heat capacity (Cp) for the enzyme-substrate complex is generally larger than the Cp for the enzyme-transition state complex. Consistent with a classical description of enzyme catalysis, a negative value for ΔCp(‡) is the result of the enzyme binding relatively weakly to the substrate and very tightly to the transition state. This observation of negative ΔCp(‡) has important implications for the temperature dependence of enzyme-catalyzed rates. Here, we lay out the fundamentals of MMRT. We present a number of hypotheses that arise directly from MMRT including a theoretical justification for the large size of enzymes and the basis for their optimum temperatures. We rationalize the behavior of psychrophilic enzymes and describe a "psychrophilic trap" which places limits on the evolution of enzymes in low temperature environments. One of the defining characteristics of biology is catalysis of chemical reactions by enzymes, and enzymes drive much of metabolism. Therefore, we also expect to see characteristics of MMRT at the level of cells, whole organisms, and even ecosystems.

  8. Multiaxial Temperature- and Time-Dependent Failure Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, David; McLennan, Michael; Anderson, Gregory; Macon, David; Batista-Rodriquez, Alicia

    2003-01-01

    A temperature- and time-dependent mathematical model predicts the conditions for failure of a material subjected to multiaxial stress. The model was initially applied to a filled epoxy below its glass-transition temperature, and is expected to be applicable to other materials, at least below their glass-transition temperatures. The model is justified simply by the fact that it closely approximates the experimentally observed failure behavior of this material: The multiaxiality of the model has been confirmed (see figure) and the model has been shown to be applicable at temperatures from -20 to 115 F (-29 to 46 C) and to predict tensile failures of constant-load and constant-load-rate specimens with failure times ranging from minutes to months..

  9. Temperature dependent Raman and DFT study of creatine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangopadhyay, Debraj; Sharma, Poornima; Singh, Ranjan K

    2015-01-01

    Temperature dependent Raman spectra of creatine powder have been recorded in the temperature range 420-100K at regular intervals and different clusters of creatine have been optimized using density functional theory (DFT) in order to determine the effect of temperature on the hydrogen bonded network in the crystal structure of creatine. Vibrational assignments of all the 48 normal modes of the zwitterionic form of creatine have been done in terms of potential energy distribution obtained from DFT calculations. Precise analysis gives information about thermal motion and intermolecular interactions with respect to temperature in the crystal lattice. Formation of higher hydrogen bonded aggregates on cooling can be visualized from the spectra through clear signature of phase transition between 200K and 180K.

  10. Temperature dependence of contact resistance at metal/MWNT interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Eui; Moon, Kyoung-Seok; Sohn, Yoonchul

    2016-07-01

    Although contact resistance of carbon nanotube (CNT) is one of the most important factors for practical application of electronic devices, a study regarding temperature dependence on contact resistance of CNTs with metal electrodes has not been found. Here, we report an investigation of contact resistance at multiwalled nanotube (MWNT)/Ag interface as a function of temperature, using MWNT/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composite. Electrical resistance of MWNT/PDMS composite revealed negative temperature coefficient (NTC). Excluding the contact resistance with Ag electrode, the NTC effect became less pronounced, showing lower intrinsic resistivity with the activation energy of 0.019 eV. Activation energy of the contact resistance of MWNT/Ag interface was determined to be 0.04 eV, two times larger than that of MWNT-MWNT network. The increase in the thermal fluctuation assisted electron tunneling is attributed to conductivity enhancement at both MWNT/MWNT and MWNT/Ag interfaces with increasing temperature.

  11. Direct method for calculating temperature-dependent transport properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Yuan, Zhe; Wesselink, R. J. H.; Starikov, Anton A.; van Schilfgaarde, Mark; Kelly, Paul J.

    2015-06-01

    We show how temperature-induced disorder can be combined in a direct way with first-principles scattering theory to study diffusive transport in real materials. Excellent (good) agreement with experiment is found for the resistivity of Cu, Pd, Pt (and Fe) when lattice (and spin) disorder are calculated from first principles. For Fe, the agreement with experiment is limited by how well the magnetization (of itinerant ferromagnets) can be calculated as a function of temperature. By introducing a simple Debye-like model of spin disorder parameterized to reproduce the experimental magnetization, the temperature dependence of the average resistivity, the anisotropic magnetoresistance, and the spin polarization of a Ni80Fe20 alloy are calculated and found to be in good agreement with existing data. Extension of the method to complex, inhomogeneous materials as well as to the calculation of other finite-temperature physical properties within the adiabatic approximation is straightforward.

  12. Unconventional scaling of the anomalous Hall effect accompanying electron localization correction in the dirty regime

    KAUST Repository

    Lu, Y. M.

    2013-03-05

    Scaling of the anomalous Hall conductivity to longitudinal conductivity σAH∝σ2xx has been observed in the dirty regime of two-dimensional weak and strong localization regions in ultrathin, polycrystalline, chemically disordered, ferromagnetic FePt films. The relationship between electron transport and temperature reveals a quantitatively insignificant Coulomb interaction in these films, while the temperature dependent anomalous Hall conductivity experiences quantum correction from electron localization. At the onset of this correction, the low-temperature anomalous Hall resistivity begins to be saturated when the thickness of the FePt film is reduced, and the corresponding Hall conductivity scaling exponent becomes 2, which is above the recent unified theory of 1.6 (σAH∝σ1.6xx). Our results strongly suggest that the correction of the electron localization modulates the scaling exponent of the anomalous Hall effect.

  13. Ferromagnetism and temperature-dependent electronic structure in metallic films

    CERN Document Server

    Herrmann, T

    1999-01-01

    reduced at the surface compared to the inner layers. This observation clearly contradicts the well-known Stoner picture of band magnetism and can be explained in terms of general arguments which are based on exact results in the limit of strong Coulomb interaction. The magnetic behavior of the Hubbard films can be analyzed in detail by inspecting the local quasi particle density of states as well as the wave vector dependent spectral density. The electronic structure is found to be strongly spin-, layer-, and temperature-dependent. The last part of this work is concerned about the temperature-driven reorientation transition in thin metallic films. For the description of the magnetic anisotropy in thin films the dipole interaction as well as the spin-orbit interaction have to be included in the model. By calculating the temperature-dependence of the magnetic anisotropy energy it is found that both types of temperature-driven reorientation transitions, from out-of-plane to in-plane (''Fe-type'') and from in-pla...

  14. Depth Dependent Relationships between Temperature and Ocean Heterotrophic Prokaryotic Production

    KAUST Repository

    Lønborg, Christian

    2016-06-07

    Marine prokaryotes play a key role in cycling of organic matter and nutrients in the ocean. Using a unique dataset (>14,500 samples), we applied a space-for-time substitution analysis to assess the temperature dependence of prokaryotic heterotrophic production (PHP) in epi- (0-200 m), meso- (201-1000 m) and bathypelagic waters (1001-4000 m) of the global ocean. Here, we show that the temperature dependence of PHP is fundamentally different between these major oceanic depth layers, with an estimated ecosystem-level activation energy (E) of 36 ± 7 kJ mol for the epipelagic, 72 ± 15 kJ mol for the mesopelagic and 274 ± 65 kJ mol for the bathypelagic realm. We suggest that the increasing temperature dependence with depth is related to the parallel vertical gradient in the proportion of recalcitrant organic compounds. These Ea predict an increased PHP of about 5, 12, and 55% in the epi-, meso-, and bathypelagic ocean, respectively, in response to a water temperature increase by 1°C. Hence, there is indication that a major thus far underestimated feedback mechanism exists between future bathypelagic ocean warming and heterotrophic prokaryotic activity.

  15. A nanoscale temperature-dependent heterogeneous nucleation theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Y. Y. [Nanosurface Science and Engineering Research Institute, College of Mechatronics and Control Engineering, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, 518060 Guangdong (China); Yang, G. W., E-mail: stsygw@mail.sysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, Nanotechnology Research Center, School of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, 510275 Guangdong (China)

    2015-06-14

    Classical nucleation theory relies on the hypothetical equilibrium of the whole nucleation system, and neglects the thermal fluctuations of the surface; this is because the high entropic gains of the (thermodynamically extensive) surface would lead to multiple stable states. In fact, at the nanometer scale, the entropic gains of the surface are high enough to destroy the stability of the thermal equilibrium during nucleation, comparing with the whole system. We developed a temperature-dependent nucleation theory to elucidate the heterogeneous nucleation process, by considering the thermal fluctuations based on classical nucleation theory. It was found that the temperature not only affected the phase transformation, but also influenced the surface energy of the nuclei. With changes in the Gibbs free energy barrier, nucleation behaviors, such as the nucleation rate and the critical radius of the nuclei, showed temperature-dependent characteristics that were different from those predicted by classical nucleation theory. The temperature-dependent surface energy density of a nucleus was deduced based on our theoretical model. The agreement between the theoretical and experimental results suggested that the developed nucleation theory has the potential to contribute to the understanding and design of heterogeneous nucleation at the nanoscale.

  16. Temperature-dependent dielectric function of bulk SrTiO3: Urbach tail, band edges, and excitonic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoi, Pranjal Kumar; Schmidt, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    We report the temperature-dependent complex dielectric function of pristine bulk SrTiO3 between 4.2 and 300 K within the energy range of 0.6-6.5 eV determined by spectroscopic ellipsometry. Fundamental indirect and direct band-gap energies have been extracted and are discussed with regard to existing state-of-the-art theoretical calculations. Furthermore, the dielectric function around the fundamental direct gap is analyzed by considering excitonic states. The excitonic effects, including the Coulomb enhancement of the continuum, are characterized using an extension of the Elliott's formula considering both the real and imaginary parts of the dielectric function. The Urbach tail below the indirect edge shows an unconventional temperature-dependent behavior correlated to the microstructural changes near the structural phase transition around 105 K from the low-temperature tetragonal phase to the cubic phase. The temperature-dependent characterization reveals that the fundamental indirect edge as well as the Urbach tail are affected conspicuously by the structural phase transition while the fundamental direct edge is not. Moreover, the indirect edge follows Varshni's rule only in the cubic phase and the direct edge exhibits an anomalous linear increase with increasing temperature.

  17. Time- and temperature-dependent failures of a bonded joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sihn, Sangwook

    This dissertation summarizes my study of time- and temperature-dependent behavior of a tubular lap bonded joint to provide a design methodology for windmill blade structures. The bonded joint is between a cast-iron rod and a GFRP composite pipe. The adhesive material is an epoxy containing chopped glass fibers. We proposed a new fabrication method to make concentric and void-less specimens of the tubular joint with a thick adhesive bondline to stimulate the root bond of a blade. The thick bondline facilitates the joint assembly of actual blades. For a better understanding of the behavior of the bonded joint, we studied viscoelastic behavior of the adhesive materials by measuring creep compliance at several temperatures during loading period. We observed that the creep compliance depends highly on the period of loading and the temperature. We applied time-temperature equivalence to the creep compliance of the adhesive material to obtain time-temperature shift factors. We also performed constant-rate of monotonically increased uniaxial tensile tests to measure static strength of the tubular lap joint at several temperatures and different strain-rates. We observed two failure modes from load-deflection curves and failed specimens. One is the brittle mode, which was caused by weakness of the interfacial strength occurring at low temperature and short period of loading. The other is the ductile mode, which was caused by weakness of the adhesive material at high temperature and long period of loading. Transition from the brittle to the ductile mode appeared as the temperature or the loading period increased. We also performed tests under uniaxial tensile-tensile cyclic loadings to measure fatigue strength of the bonded joint at several temperatures, frequencies and stress ratios. The fatigue data are analyzed statistically by applying the residual strength degradation model to calculate statistical distribution of the fatigue life. Combining the time-temperature

  18. Temperature-Dependent Giant Magnetoimpedance Effect in Amorphous Soft Magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurniawan, M.; Roy, R. K.; Panda, A. K.; Greve, D. W.; Ohodnicki, P.; McHenry, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    Giant magnetoimpedance (GMI)-based devices offer potential as next-generation low-cost, flexible, ultrasensitive sensors. They can be used in applications that include current sensors, field sensors, stress sensors, and others. Challenging applications involve operation at high temperatures, and therefore studies of GMI temperature dependence and performance of soft magnetic materials are needed. We present a high-temperature GMI study on an amorphous soft magnetic microwire from room temperature to 560°C. The GMI ratio was observed to be nearly constant at ˜86% at low temperatures and to decrease rapidly at ˜290°C, finally reaching a near-zero value at 500°C. The rapid drop in GMI ratio at 290°C is associated with a reduction in the long-range ferromagnetic order as measured by the spontaneous magnetization ( M) at the Curie temperature ( T c). We also correlated the impedance with the magnetic properties of the material. From room temperature to 290°C, the impedance was found to be proportional to the square root of the magnetization to magnetic anisotropy ratio. Lastly, M( T) has been fit using a Handrich-Kobe model, which describes the system with a modified Brillouin function and an asymmetrical distribution of exchange interactions. We infer that the structural fluctuations of the amorphous phase result in a relatively small asymmetry in the fluctuation parameters.

  19. Temperature dependence of erythrocyte aggregation in vitro by backscattering nephelometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirko, Igor V.; Firsov, Nikolai N.; Ryaboshapka, Olga M.; Priezzhev, Alexander V.

    1997-05-01

    We apply backscattering nephelometry technique to register the alterations of the scattering signal from a whole blood sample due to appearance or disappearance of different types of erythrocyte aggregates in stasis and under controlled shear stress. The measured parameters are: the characteristic times of linear and 3D aggregates formation, and the strength of aggregates of different types. These parameters depend on the sample temperature in the range of 2 divided by 50 degrees C. Temporal parameters of the aggregation process strongly increase at temperature 45 degrees C. For samples of normal blood the aggregates strength parameters do not significantly depend on the sample temperature, whereas for blood samples from patients suffering Sjogren syndrome we observe high increase of the strength of 3D and linear aggregates and decrease of time of linear aggregates formation at low temperature of the sample. This combination of parameters is opposite to that observed in the samples of pathological blood at room temperature. Possible reasons of this behavior of aggregation state of blood and explanation of the observed effects will be discussed.

  20. Temperature-dependent solvation modulates the dimensions of disordered proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuttke, René; Hofmann, Hagen; Nettels, Daniel; Borgia, Madeleine B; Mittal, Jeetain; Best, Robert B; Schuler, Benjamin

    2014-04-01

    For disordered proteins, the dimensions of the chain are an important property that is sensitive to environmental conditions. We have used single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer to probe the temperature-induced chain collapse of five unfolded or intrinsically disordered proteins. Because this behavior is sensitive to the details of intrachain and chain-solvent interactions, the collapse allows us to probe the physical interactions governing the dimensions of disordered proteins. We find that each of the proteins undergoes a collapse with increasing temperature, with the most hydrophobic one, λ-repressor, undergoing a reexpansion at the highest temperatures. Although such a collapse might be expected due to the temperature dependence of the classical "hydrophobic effect," remarkably we find that the largest collapse occurs for the most hydrophilic, charged sequences. Using a combination of theory and simulation, we show that this result can be rationalized in terms of the temperature-dependent solvation free energies of the constituent amino acids, with the solvation properties of the most hydrophilic residues playing a large part in determining the collapse.

  1. Fission dynamics: The quest of a temperature dependent nuclear viscosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vardaci E.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This contribution presents a journey within the open questions about the current use of a temperature dependent nuclear viscosity in models of nuclear fission and proposes an alternative experimental approach by using systems of intermediate fissility. This study is particularly relevant because: i systems of intermediate fissility offer a suitable framework since the intervals between the compound nucleus and scission point temperatures with increasing excitation energy are much smaller than in the case of heavier systems, ii the measurement of observables in the ER channel translates into a larger set of effective constraints for the models.

  2. The importance of temperature dependent energy gap in the understanding of high temperature thermoelectric properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Saurabh; Pandey, Sudhir K.

    2016-10-01

    In this work, we show the importance of temperature dependent energy band gap, E g (T), in understanding the high temperature thermoelectric (TE) properties of material by considering LaCoO3 (LCO) and ZnV2O4 (ZVO) compounds as a case study. For the fix value of band gap, E g , deviation in the values of α has been observed above 360 K and 400 K for LCO and ZVO compounds, respectively. These deviation can be overcomed by consideration of temperature dependent band gap. The change in used value of E g with respect to temperature is ∼4 times larger than that of In As. This large temperature dependence variation in E g can be attributed to decrement in the effective on-site Coulomb interaction due to lattice expansion. At 600 K, the value of ZT for n and p-doped, LCO is ∼0.35 which suggest that it can be used as a potential material for TE device. This work clearly suggest that one should consider the temperature dependent band gap in predicting the high temperature TE properties of insulating materials.

  3. Temperature dependence of photoluminescence spectra for green light emission from InGaN/GaN multiple wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W; Zhao, D G; Jiang, D S; Chen, P; Liu, Z S; Zhu, J J; Shi, M; Zhao, D M; Li, X; Liu, J P; Zhang, S M; Wang, H; Yang, H; Zhang, Y T; Du, G T

    2015-06-15

    Three green light emitting InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) structures with different In composition grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition are investigated by the X-ray diffraction and the temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL) measurements. It is found that when the In composition increases in the InGaN/GaN MQWs, the PL spectral bandwidth may anomalously decrease with increasing temperature. The reduction of PL spectral bandwidth may be ascribed to the enhanced non-radiative recombination process which may lower the light emission efficiency of the localized luminescent centers with shallow localization energy in the high-In-content InGaN quantum wells and also cause a reduction of integrated PL intensity.

  4. Temperature dependence of carrier capture by defects in gallium arsenide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wampler, William R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Modine, Normand A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-08-01

    This report examines the temperature dependence of the capture rate of carriers by defects in gallium arsenide and compares two previously published theoretical treatments of this based on multi phonon emission (MPE). The objective is to reduce uncertainty in atomistic simulations of gain degradation in III-V HBTs from neutron irradiation. A major source of uncertainty in those simulations is poor knowledge of carrier capture rates, whose values can differ by several orders of magnitude between various defect types. Most of this variation is due to different dependence on temperature, which is closely related to the relaxation of the defect structure that occurs as a result of the change in charge state of the defect. The uncertainty in capture rate can therefore be greatly reduced by better knowledge of the defect relaxation.

  5. Quark mass and isospin dependence of the deconfining critical temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Fraga, E S; Villavicencio, C

    2008-01-01

    We propose a phenomenological framework to investigate the thermodynamics of strongly interacting matter which incorporates explicit dependence on quark masses, isospin and baryonic chemical potentials for the case of two flavors. In the low-energy sector, the system is described by a minimal chiral perturbation theory effective action, corresponding to a hot gas of pion quasiparticles and heavy nucleons. For the high-temperature sector we adopt a simple extension of the fuzzy bag model. Despite the simplicity of the setting, our findings for the critical temperature dependence on the pion mass and on the isospin chemical potential are in remarkably good agreement with lattice data. We also discuss the effects of mass asymmetry and baryon chemical potential.

  6. Temperature dependence of magnetic anisotropies in ultra-thin films

    CERN Document Server

    Hucht, A

    1999-01-01

    shown that in contrast to other works the temperature driven spin reorientation transition in the monolayer is discontinuous also in the simulations, whereas in general it is continuous for the bilayer. Consequently the molecular field theory and the Monte Carlo simulations agree qualitatively. Exemplary for thicker films the influence of an external magnetic field is investigated in the bilayer, furthermore the effective anisotropies K sub n (T) of the phenomenological Landau theory are calculated numerically for the microscopic model. Analytic expressions for the dependence of the anisotropies K sub n (T) on the parameters of the model are obtained by the means of perturbation theory, which lead to a deeper understanding of the spin reorientation transition. Accordingly to this the origin for the spin reorientation transition lies in the differing temperature dependence of the dipolar and spin-orbit parts of the K sub n (T). Additionally the magnetization in the surface of the film decreases more rapidly wi...

  7. Temperature Dependence of Biological Tissues Complex Permitivity at Microwave Frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmar Faktorova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In the paper an universal overview of polarizing mechanisms with an emphasis on dipolar materials as the investigated tissues are regarded. Experimental apparatus is presented with giving its specificity as well as the method used at calculation of complex permittivity. The experimental part is aimed at temperature dependence of complex permittivity measurement of pig biological tissues with different properties. Experimental results are presented graphically with the commentary for courses of particular tissues.

  8. Temperature Dependence of Biological Tissues Complex Permitivity at Microwave Frequencies

    OpenAIRE

    Dagmar Faktorova

    2008-01-01

    In the paper an universal overview of polarizing mechanisms with an emphasis on dipolar materials as the investigated tissues are regarded. Experimental apparatus is presented with giving its specificity as well as the method used at calculation of complex permittivity. The experimental part is aimed at temperature dependence of complex permittivity measurement of pig biological tissues with different properties. Experimental results are presented graphically with the commentary for courses o...

  9. Temperature dependent electronic correlation effects in GdN

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, A; Nolting, W.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate temperature dependent electronic correlation effects in the conduction bands of Gadolinium Nitride (GdN) based on the combination of many body analysis of the multi-band Kondo lattice model and the first principles TB-LMTO bandstructure calculations. The physical properties like the quasi-particle density of states (Q-DOS), spectral density (SD) and quasi-particle bandstructure (Q-BS) are calculated and discussed. The results can be compared with spin and angle resolved inverse...

  10. Temperature dependent bacteriophages of a tropical bacterial pathogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Rebecca Jane Clokie

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing awareness of the multiple ways that bacteriophages (phages influence bacterial evolution, population dynamics, physiology and pathogenicity. By studying a novel group of phages infecting a soil borne pathogen, we revealed a paradigm shifting observation that the phages switch their lifestyle according to temperature. We sampled soil from an endemic area of the serious tropical pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei, and established that podoviruses infecting the pathogen are frequently present in soil, and many of them are naturally occurring variants of a common virus type. Experiments on one phage in the related model Burkholderia thailandensis demonstrated that temperature defines the outcome of phage-bacteria interactions. At higher temperatures (37°C, the phage predominantly goes through a lytic cycle, but at lower temperatures (25°C, the phage remains temperate. This is the first report of a naturally occurring phage that follows a lytic or temperate lifestyle according to temperature. These observations fundamentally alter the accepted views on the abundance, population biology and virulence of B. pseudomallei. Furthermore, when taken together with previous studies, our findings suggest that the phenomenon of temperature dependency in phages is widespread. Such phages are likely to have a profound effect on bacterial life, and on our ability to culture and correctly enumerate viable bacteria.

  11. Temperature-Dependent Conformations of Model Viscosity Index Improvers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramasamy, Uma Shantini; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Martini, Ashlie

    2015-05-01

    Lubricants are comprised of base oils and additives where additives are chemicals that are deliberately added to the oil to enhance properties and inhibit degradation of the base oils. Viscosity index (VI) improvers are an important class of additives that reduce the decline of fluid viscosity with temperature [1], enabling optimum lubricant performance over a wider range of operating temperatures. These additives are typically high molecular weight polymers, such as, but not limited to, polyisobutylenes, olefin copolymer, and polyalkylmethacrylates, that are added in concentrations of 2-5% (w/w). Appropriate polymers, when dissolved in base oil, expand from a coiled to an uncoiled state with increasing temperature [2]. The ability of VI additives to increase their molar volume and improve the temperature-viscosity dependence of lubricants suggests there is a strong relationship between molecular structure and additive functionality [3]. In this work, we aim to quantify the changes in polymer size with temperature for four polyisobutylene (PIB) based molecular structures at the nano-scale using molecular simulation tools. As expected, the results show that the polymers adopt more conformations at higher temperatures, and there is a clear indication that the expandability of a polymer is strongly influenced by molecular structure.

  12. Temperature Dependency of Water Vapor Permeability of Shape Memory Polyurethane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Yue-min; HU Jin-lian; YAN Hao-jing

    2002-01-01

    Solution-cast films of shape memory polyurethane have beea investigated. Differential scanning calorimetry,DMA, tensile test, water vapor permeability and the shape merry effect were carried out to characterize these polyurethane membranes. Samples cast at higher temperatures contained more hard segment in the crystalline state than a sample cast at lower temperature. The change in the water vapor permeability (WVP) of SMPU films with respect to the temperature follows an S- shaped curve, and increases abruptly at Tm of the soft segment for the fractional free volume (FFV, the ratio of free volume and specific volume in polymers) increased linearly with temperature. The water vapor permeability dependency of the temperature and humidity contribute to the result of the change of diffusion and solubility with the surrounding air condition. The diffusion coefficient (D)are the function of temperature and show good fit the Arrhenius form but show different parameter values when above and below Tg. The crystalline state hardsegment is necessary for the good shape memory effect.

  13. Temperature dependent bacteriophages of a tropical bacterial pathogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Jinyu; Korbsrisate, Sunee; Withatanung, Patoo; Adler, Natalie Lazar; Clokie, Martha R. J.; Galyov, Edouard E.

    2014-01-01

    There is an increasing awareness of the multiple ways that bacteriophages (phages) influence bacterial evolution, population dynamics, physiology, and pathogenicity. By studying a novel group of phages infecting a soil borne pathogen, we revealed a paradigm shifting observation that the phages switch their lifestyle according to temperature. We sampled soil from an endemic area of the serious tropical pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei, and established that podoviruses infecting the pathogen are frequently present in soil, and many of them are naturally occurring variants of a common virus type. Experiments on one phage in the related model B. thailandensis demonstrated that temperature defines the outcome of phage-bacteria interactions. At higher temperatures (37°C), the phage predominantly goes through a lytic cycle, but at lower temperatures (25°C), the phage remains temperate. This is the first report of a naturally occurring phage that follows a lytic or temperate lifestyle according to temperature. These observations fundamentally alter the accepted views on the abundance, population biology and virulence of B. pseudomallei. Furthermore, when taken together with previous studies, our findings suggest that the phenomenon of temperature dependency in phages is widespread. Such phages are likely to have a profound effect on bacterial biology, and on our ability to culture and correctly enumerate viable bacteria. PMID:25452746

  14. Bandpass Dependence of X-ray Temperatures in Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Cavagnolo, Kenneth W; Voit, G Mark; Sun, Ming

    2008-01-01

    We explore the band dependence of the inferred X-ray temperature of the intracluster medium (ICM) for 192 well-observed galaxy clusters selected from the Chandra Data Archive. If the hot ICM is nearly isothermal in the projected region of interest, the X-ray temperature inferred from a broad-band (0.7-7.0 keV) spectrum should be identical to the X-ray temperature inferred from a hard-band (2.0-7.0 keV) spectrum. However, if unresolved cool lumps of gas are contributing soft X-ray emission, the temperature of a best-fit single-component thermal model will be cooler for the broad-band spectrum than for the hard-band spectrum. Using this difference as a diagnostic, the ratio of best-fitting hard-band and broad-band temperatures may indicate the presence of cooler gas even when the X-ray spectrum itself may not have sufficient signal-to-noise to resolve multiple temperature components. To test this possible diagnostic, we extract X-ray spectra from core-excised annular regions for each cluster in our archival sam...

  15. Temperature dependence of sorption of gases by coals and charcoals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakurovs, Richard; Day, Stuart; Weir, Steve; Duffy, Greg (CSIRO Energy Technology PO Box 330 Newcastle 2300 Australia)

    2008-02-01

    Modelling the sorption properties of coals for carbon dioxide under supercritical conditions is necessary for accurate prediction of the sequestering ability of coals in seams. We present recent data for sorption curves of three dry Argonne Premium coals, for carbon dioxide, methane and nitrogen at two different temperatures at pressures up to 15 MPa. The sorption capacity of coals tends to decrease with increasing temperature. An investigation into literature values for sorption of nitrogen and methane by charcoal also show sorption capacities that decrease dramatically with increasing temperature. This is inconsistent with expectations from Langmuir models of coal sorption, which predict a sorption capacity that is independent of temperature. We have successfully fitted the isotherms using a modified Dubinin-Radushkevich equation that uses gas density rather than pressure. A simple pore-filling model that assumes there is a maximum pore width that can be filled in supercritical conditions and that this maximum pore width decreases with increasing temperature, can explain this temperature dependence of sorption capacity. It can also explain why different supercritical gases give apparently different surface sorption capacities on the same material. The calculated heat of sorption for these gases on these coals is similar to those found for these gases on activated carbon. (author)

  16. Temperature dependence of the reconstruction of zigzag edges in graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Kuang; Robertson, Alex W; Fan, Ye; Allen, Christopher S; Lin, Yung-Chang; Suenaga, Kazu; Kirkland, Angus I; Warner, Jamie H

    2015-05-26

    We examine the temperature dependence of graphene edge terminations at the atomic scale using an in situ heating holder within an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope. The relative ratios of armchair, zigzag, and reconstructed zigzag edges from over 350 frames at each temperature are measured. Below 400 °C, the edges are dominated by zigzag terminations, but above 600 °C, this changes dramatically, with edges dominated by armchair and reconstructed zigzag edges. We show that at low temperature chemical etching effects dominate and cause deviation to the thermodynamics of the system. At high temperatures (600 and 800 °C), adsorbates are evaporated from the surface of graphene and chemical etching effects are significantly reduced, enabling the thermodynamic distribution of edge types to be observed. The growth rate of holes at high temperature is also shown to be slower than at room temperature, indicative of the reduced chemical etching process. These results provide important insights into the role of chemical etching effects in the hole formation, edge sputtering, and edge reconstruction in graphene.

  17. Dependence between temperature and clearance rate of Balanion comatum Wulff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Rychert

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The dependence between temperature and clearance rate of the ciliate Balanion comatum Wulff 1919 was assessed in the coastal zone of the southern Baltic Sea. Five in situ experiments were carried out with the use of wheat starch as a surrogate of food particles. The clearance rate rose from 1.4 to 7.0 µl cell-1 h-1 with a temperature rise from 8 to 19°C. B. comatum preferred particles of size 1.9-4.4 µm, and the clearance rates calculated for the preferred particles were consistently higher than those measured for the whole range of particles ingested (Wilcoxon's signed rank test, p = 0.04. The exponential dependence between temperature and clearance rates for preferred particles was statistically significant (R2 = 0.86, p = 0.02 and enabled the Q10 coefficient to be calculated. This amounted to 2.9 and lay within the range of typical values. The linear dependence (also drawn for preferred particles demonstrated a higher significance (R2 = 0.91, p = 0.02, indicating the linear dynamics of the process.

  18. Temperature dependence of densities of Sb and Bi melts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GENG HaoRan; SUN ChunJing; WANG Rui; QI XiaoGang; ZHANG Ning

    2007-01-01

    The densities of Sb and Bi melts were investigated by an improved Archimedean method. The results show that the density of the Sb melt decreases linearly with increasing temperature, but the density of the Bi melt firstly increases and then decreases as the temperature increases. There is a maximum density value of 10.002 g/cm3 at 310℃, about 39℃ above the melting point. The temperature dependence of the Sb melt is well fitted with the expression ρ= 6.8590-5.8105×10-4T, and that of the Bi melt is fitted with ρ=10.3312-1.18×10-3T. The results were discussed from a microstructure viewpoint.

  19. Pressure dependence of the melting temperature of metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlosser, Herbert; Vinet, Pascal; Ferrante, John

    1989-01-01

    A new method for the analysis of the experimental data for the pressure dependence of the melting temperature of metals is presented. The method combines Lindemann's law, the Debye model, and a first-order equation of state with the experimental observation that the Grueneisen parameter divided by the volume is constant. It is observed that, based on these assumptions, in the absence of phase transitions, plots of the logarithm of the normalized melting temperature versus the logarithm of the normalized pressure are straight lines. It is found that the normalized-melting--temperature versus normalized-pressure curves accurately satisfy the linear relationship for Al, Ag, Au, Cs, Cu, K, Na, Pt, and Rb. In addition, this technique provides a sensitive tool for detecting phase transitions.

  20. Density of biogas digestate depending on temperature and composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Mandy; Schneider, Nico

    2015-09-01

    Density is one of the most important physical properties of biogas digestate to ensure an optimal dimensioning and a precise design of biogas plant components like stirring devices, pumps and heat exchangers. In this study the density of biogas digestates with different compositions was measured using pycnometers at ambient pressure in a temperature range from 293.15 to 313.15K. The biogas digestates were taken from semi-continuous experiments, in which the marine microalga Nannochloropsis salina, corn silage and a mixture of both were used as feedstocks. The results show an increase of density with increasing total solid content and a decrease with increasing temperature. Three equations to calculate the density of biogas digestate were set up depending on temperature as well as on the total solid content, organic composition and elemental composition, respectively. All correlations show a relative deviation below 1% compared to experimental data.

  1. Anomalous thickness-dependent optical energy gap of ALD-grown ultra-thin CuO films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, T. S.; Terasaki, I.; Karppinen, M.

    2016-11-01

    Usually an inverse square relation between the optical energy gap and the size of crystallites is observed for semiconducting materials due to the strong quantum localization effect. Coulomb attraction that may lead to a proportional dependence is often ignored or considered less important to the optical energy gap when the crystallite size or the thickness of a thin film changes. Here we report a proportional dependence between the optical energy gap and the thickness of ALD-grown CuO thin films due to a strong Coulomb attraction. The ultrathin films deposited in the thickness range of 9-81 nm show a p-type semiconducting behavior when analyzed by Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity measurements. The indirect optical energy gap nature of the films is verified from UV-vis spectrophotometric measurements. A progressive increase in the indirect optical energy gap from 1.06 to 1.24 eV is observed with the increase in the thickness of the films. The data are analyzed in the presence of Coulomb attractions using the Brus model. The optical energy gap when plotted against the cubic root of the thickness of the films shows a linear dependence.

  2. Temperature Dependent Cyclic Deformation Mechanisms in Haynes 188 Superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, K. Bhanu Sankara; Castelli, Michael G.; Allen, Gorden P.; Ellis, John R.

    1995-01-01

    The cyclic deformation behavior of a wrought cobalt-base superalloy, Haynes 188, has been investigated over a range of temperatures between 25 and 1000 C under isothermal and in-phase thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) conditions. Constant mechanical strain rates (epsilon-dot) of 10(exp -3)/s and 10(exp -4)/s were examined with a fully reversed strain range of 0.8%. Particular attention was given to the effects of dynamic strain aging (DSA) on the stress-strain response and low cycle fatigue life. A correlation between cyclic deformation behavior and microstructural substructure was made through detailed transmission electron microscopy. Although DSA was found to occur over a wide temperature range between approximately 300 and 750 C the microstructural characteristics and the deformation mechanisms responsible for DSA varied considerably and were dependent upon temperature. In general, the operation of DSA processes led to a maximum of the cyclic stress amplitude at 650 C and was accompanied by pronounced planar slip, relatively high dislocation density, and the generation of stacking faults. DSA was evidenced through a combination of phenomena, including serrated yielding, an inverse dependence of the maximum cyclic hardening with epsilon-dot, and an instantaneous inverse epsilon-dot sensitivity verified by specialized epsilon-dot -change tests. The TMF cyclic hardening behavior of the alloy appeared to be dictated by the substructural changes occuring at the maximum temperature in the TMF cycle.

  3. Temperature dependent electroreflectance study of CdTe solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raadik, T., E-mail: taavi.raadik@ttu.ee [Tallinn University of Technology, Ehitajate tee 5, 19086 Tallinn (Estonia); Krustok, J.; Josepson, R.; Hiie, J. [Tallinn University of Technology, Ehitajate tee 5, 19086 Tallinn (Estonia); Potlog, T.; Spalatu, N. [Moldova State University, A. Mateevici str. 60, MD-2009 Chisinau (Moldova, Republic of)

    2013-05-01

    Cadmium telluride is a promising material for large scale photovoltaic applications. In this paper we study CdS/CdTe heterojunction solar cells with electroreflectance spectroscopy. Both CdS and CdTe layers in solar cells were grown sequentially without intermediate processing by the close-space sublimation method. Electroreflectance measurements were performed in the temperature range of T = 100–300 K. Two solar cells were investigated with conversion efficiencies of 4.1% and 9.6%. The main focus in this work was to study the temperature dependent behavior of the broadening parameter and the bandgap energy of CdTe thin film in solar cells. Room temperature bandgap values of CdTe were E{sub g} = 1.499 eV and E{sub g} = 1.481 eV for higher and lower efficiency solar cells, respectively. Measured bandgap energies are lower than for single crystal CdTe. The formation of CdTe{sub 1−x}S{sub x} solid solution layer on the surface of CdTe is proposed as a possible cause of lower bandgap energies. - Highlights: ► Temperature dependent electroreflectance measurements of CdS/CdTe solar cells ► Investigation of junction properties between CdS and CdTe ► Formation of CdTe{sub 1−} {sub x}S{sub x} solid solution layer in the junction area.

  4. Spacetime Dependence of Local Temperature in Relativistic Quantum Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Gransee, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The spacetime dependence of the inverse temperature four-vector $\\boldsymbol{\\beta}$ for certain states of the quantized Klein-Gordon field on (parts of) Minkowski spacetime is discussed. These states fulfill a recently proposed version of the Kubo-Martin-Schwinger (KMS) boundary value condition, the so-called "local KMS (LKMS) condition". It turns out that, depending on the mass parameter $m\\geq 0$, any such state can be extended either (i) to a LKMS state on some forward or backward lightcone, with $\\boldsymbol{\\beta}$ depending linearily on spacetime, or (ii) to a thermal equilibrium (KMS) state on all of Minkowski space with constant $\\boldsymbol{\\beta}$. This parallels previously known results for local thermal equilibrium (LTE) states of the quantized Klein-Gordon field. Furthermore, in the case of a massless field our results point to a discrepancy with some classic results in general approaches to (non-quantum) relativistic thermodynamics.

  5. A Conceptual Model to Link Anomalously High Temperature Gradients in the Cerros del Rio Volcanic Field to Regional Flow in the Espanola Basin, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillingham, E. J.; Keller, S. N.; McCullough, K. R.; Watters, J.; Weitering, B.; Wilce, A. M.; Folsom, M.; Kelley, S.; Pellerin, L.

    2015-12-01

    Temperature-depth well data along with electromagnetic (EM) data were collected by students of the Summer of Applied Geophysics Experience (SAGE) 2015 field season in the Espanola Basin, New Mexico. The data from this year, in addition to data acquired since 2013, were used to construct a conceptual east-west cross-section of the Espanola Basin and the adjacent highlands in order to evaluate the regional flow system. Vertical geothermal gradients from several monitoring wells were measured using a thermistor. Anomalously warm geothermal gradients were mapped in the Cerros del Rio volcanic field in the basin just east of the Rio Grande. Temperature gradients are up to 70℃/km, while the background geothermal gradients in the Rio Grande rift zone generally show 28℃-35℃/km. This anomaly extends to the Buckman well field, which supplies water to the city of Santa Fe. Overpumping of this well field has led to subsidence in the past. However, discharge temperature plots indicate that the temperature gradients of the Buckman field may be rebounding as pumping is reduced. Audiomagnetotelluric (AMT) and transient electromagnetic (TEM) data were acquired in the vicinity of three monitoring wells. TEM and AMT methods complement each other with the former having depths of investigation of less than ten to hundreds of meters and AMT having depths of investigation comparable to the wells deeper than 500m. These datasets were used collectively to image the subsurface stratigraphy and, more specifically, the hydrogeology related to shallow aquifers. The EM data collected at these wells showed a trend indicating a shallow aquifer with a shallower resistive layer of approximately 100 ohm-m at 70-100 meters depth. Beneath this resistive layer we resolved a more conductive, clay-rich layer of 10 ohm-m. These resistivity profiles compliment the electrical logs provided by Jet West, which indicate shallower sandstone interbedded with silt on top of more silt-dominant layers. Our

  6. Temperature-dependent dielectric properties of slightly hydrated horn keratin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Tasneem Zahra; Khan, Muhammad Abdullah

    2008-04-01

    With an aim to reveal the mechanism of protein-water interaction in a predominantly two phase model protein system this study investigates the frequency and temperature dependence of dielectric constant epsilon' and loss factor epsilon'' in cow horn keratin in the frequency range 30 Hz to 3 MHz and temperature range 30-200 degrees C at two levels of hydration. These two levels of hydration were achieved by exposing the sample to air at 50% relative humidity (RH) at ambient temperature and by evacuating the sample for 72 h at 105 degrees C. A low frequency dispersion (LFD) and an intermediate frequency alpha-dispersion were the two main dielectric responses observed in the air-dried sample. The LFD and the high frequency arm of the alpha-dispersion followed the same fractional power law of frequency. Within the framework of percolation cluster model these dispersions, respectively have been attributed to percolation of protons between and within the clusters of hydrogen-bonded water molecules bound to polar or ionizable protein components. The alpha-dispersion peak, which results from intra-cluster charge percolation conformed to Cole-Cole modified Debye equation. Temperature dependence of the dielectric constant in the air-dried sample exhibited peaks at 120 and 155 degrees C which have been identified as temperatures of onset of release of water bound to polar protein components in the amorphous and crystalline regions, respectively. An overall rise in the permittivity was observed above 175 degrees C, which has been identified as the onset of chain melting in the crystalline region of the protein.

  7. Anomalous pH dependent stability behavior of surfactant-free nonpolar oil drops in aqueous electrolyte solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clasohm, Lucy Y; Vakarelski, Ivan U; Dagastine, Raymond R; Chan, Derek Y C; Stevens, Geoffrey W; Grieser, Franz

    2007-08-28

    Recent advances in atomic force microscopy (AFM) force measurement techniques have allowed the direct measurement and theoretical interpretation of the interaction between a liquid droplet and a solid surface or between two liquid droplets. In this study, we investigated the interaction across an aqueous thin film between fluorocarbon (perfluoropentane) droplets, hydrocarbon (tetradecane) droplets, and a droplet and a flat mica surface in the absence of stabilizers. It was found that even at a relatively elevated electrolyte concentration of 0.1 M NaNO3, depending on the solution pH, interactions between two identical droplets or a droplet and a mica surface could be repulsive. A simple theoretical analysis of the magnitude and range of these interactive forces suggests that the DLVO theory cannot explain the observed behavior. The measured force behavior is discussed in the context of ion adsorption, and the arising charging effects, at the bare oil-water interface.

  8. Temperature-dependent magnetic EXAFS investigation of Gd

    CERN Document Server

    Wende, H; Poulopoulos, P N; Rogalev, A; Goulon, J; Schlagel, D L; Lograsso, T A; Baberschke, K

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic EXAFS (MEXAFS) is the helicity-dependent counterpart of the well-established EXAFS technique. By means of MEXAFS it is possible not only to analyze the local magnetic structure but also to learn about magnetic fluctuations. Here we present the MEXAFS of a Gd single crystal at the L sub 3 sub , sub 2 -edges in the temperature range of 10-250 K. For the first time MEXAFS was probed over a large range in reduced temperature of 0.04<=T/T sub C<=0.85 with T sub C =293 K. We show that the vibrational damping described by means of a Debye temperature of theta sub D =160 K must be taken into account for the spin-dependent MEXAFS before analyzing magnetic fluctuations. For a detailed analysis of the MEXAFS and the EXAFS, the experimental data are compared to ab initio calculations. This enables us to separate the individual single- from the multiple-scattering contributions. The MEXAFS data have been recorded at the ID 12A beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). To ensure that th...

  9. Anomalous Hall effect in Fe/Gd bilayers

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, W. J.

    2010-04-01

    Non-monotonic dependence of anomalous Hall resistivity on temperature and magnetization, including a sign change, was observed in Fe/Gd bilayers. To understand the intriguing observations, we fabricated the Fe/Gd bilayers and single layers of Fe and Gd simultaneously. The temperature and field dependences of longitudinal resistivity, Hall resistivity and magnetization in these films have also been carefully measured. The analysis of these data reveals that these intriguing features are due to the opposite signs of Hall resistivity/or spin polarization and different Curie temperatures of Fe and Gd single-layer films. Copyright (C) EPLA, 2010

  10. Nonlocal Anomalous Hall Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Steven S-L; Vignale, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    The anomalous Hall (AH) effect is deemed to be a unique transport property of ferromagnetic metals, caused by the concerted action of spin polarization and spin-orbit coupling. Nevertheless, recent experiments have shown that the effect also occurs in a nonmagnetic metal (Pt) in contact with a magnetic insulator [yttrium iron garnet (YIG)], even when precautions are taken to ensure that there is no induced magnetization in the metal. We propose a theory of this effect based on the combined action of spin-dependent scattering from the magnetic interface and the spin-Hall effect in the bulk of the metal. At variance with previous theories, we predict the effect to be of first order in the spin-orbit coupling, just as the conventional anomalous Hall effect-the only difference being the spatial separation of the spin-orbit interaction and the magnetization. For this reason we name this effect the nonlocal anomalous Hall effect and predict that its sign will be determined by the sign of the spin-Hall angle in the metal. The AH conductivity that we calculate from our theory is in order of magnitude agreement with the measured values in Pt/YIG structures.

  11. Nonlocal Anomalous Hall Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Steven S.-L.; Vignale, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    The anomalous Hall (AH) effect is deemed to be a unique transport property of ferromagnetic metals, caused by the concerted action of spin polarization and spin-orbit coupling. Nevertheless, recent experiments have shown that the effect also occurs in a nonmagnetic metal (Pt) in contact with a magnetic insulator [yttrium iron garnet (YIG)], even when precautions are taken to ensure that there is no induced magnetization in the metal. We propose a theory of this effect based on the combined action of spin-dependent scattering from the magnetic interface and the spin-Hall effect in the bulk of the metal. At variance with previous theories, we predict the effect to be of first order in the spin-orbit coupling, just as the conventional anomalous Hall effect—the only difference being the spatial separation of the spin-orbit interaction and the magnetization. For this reason we name this effect the nonlocal anomalous Hall effect and predict that its sign will be determined by the sign of the spin-Hall angle in the metal. The AH conductivity that we calculate from our theory is in order of magnitude agreement with the measured values in Pt /YIG structures.

  12. Determination of the temperature dependence of tungsten erosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maier, H., E-mail: Hans.Maier@ipp.mpg.de; Greuner, H.; Toussaint, U. von; Balden, M.; Böswirth, B.; Elgeti, S.

    2015-08-15

    We present the results of erosion measurements on actively cooled tungsten samples at quasi-constant surface temperature conditions performed in the high heat flux facility GLADIS. The samples were exposed to a H beam at a central power density of 10 MW/m{sup 2} up to a fluence of 10{sup 26} m{sup −2}. We observe a weak temperature dependence of the erosion yield. The data are compared with similar data obtained from loading with a H beam with He admixture. Both datasets are analysed in a probabilistic approach. We obtain activation energies of 0.04 eV and 0.06 eV for the cases with and without He, respectively.

  13. Temperature-dependent potential in cluster-decay process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharaei, R.; Zanganeh, V.

    2016-08-01

    Role of the thermal effects of the parent nucleus in the Coulomb barrier and the half-life of 28 cluster-decays is systematically analyzed within the framework of the proximity formalism, namely proximity potential 2010. The WKB approximation is used to determine the penetration probability of the emitted cluster. It is shown that the height and width of the Coulomb barrier in the temperature-dependent proximity potential are less than its temperature-independent version. Moreover, this investigation reveals that the calculated values of half-life for selected cluster-decays are in better agreement with the experimental data when the mentioned effects are imposed on the proximity approach. A discussion is also presented about the predictions of the present thermal approach for cluster-decay half-lives of the super-heavy-elements.

  14. Temperature Dependent Variations of Phonon Interactions in Nanocrystalline Cerium Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugandha Dogra Pandey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The temperature dependent anharmonic behavior of the phonon modes of nanocrystalline CeO2 was investigated in the temperature range of 80–440 K. The anharmonic constants have been derived from the shift in phonon modes fitted to account for the anharmonic contributions as well as the thermal expansion contribution using the high pressure parameters derived from our own high pressure experimental data reported previously. The total anharmonicity has also been estimated from the true anharmonicity as well as quasiharmonic component. In the line-width variation analysis, the cubic anharmonic term was found to dominate the quartic term. Finally, the phonon lifetime also reflected the trend so observed.

  15. On the temperature dependence of oceanic export efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cael, B. B.; Follows, Michael J.

    2016-05-01

    Quantifying the fraction of primary production exported from the euphotic layer (termed the export efficiency ef) is a complicated matter. Studies have suggested empirical relationships with temperature which offer attractive potential for parameterization. Here we develop what is arguably the simplest mechanistic model relating the two, using established thermodynamic dependencies for primary production and respiration. It results in a single-parameter curve that constrains the envelope of possible efficiencies, capturing the upper bounds of several ef-T data sets. The approach provides a useful theoretical constraint on this relationship and extracts the variability in ef due to temperature but does not idealize out the remaining variability which evinces the substantial complexity of the system in question.

  16. Temperature dependence of topological susceptibility using gradient flow

    CERN Document Server

    Taniguchi, Yusuke; Kanaya, Kazuyuki; Kitazawa, Masakiyo; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Umeda, Takashi; Iwami, Ryo; Wakabayashi, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    We study temperature dependence of the topological susceptibility with the $N_{f}=2+1$ flavors Wilson fermion. We have two major interests in this paper. One is a comparison of gluonic and fermionic definitions of the topological susceptibility. Two definitions are related by the chiral Ward-Takahashi identity but their coincidence is highly non-trivial for the Wilson fermion. By applying the gradient flow both for the gauge and quark fields we find a good agreement of these two measurements. The other is a verification of a prediction of the dilute instanton gas approximation at low temperature region $T_{pc}< T<1.5T_{pc}$, for which we confirm the prediction that the topological susceptibility decays with power $\\chi_{t}\\propto(T/T_{pc})^{-8}$ for three flavors QCD.

  17. Simulations of the temperature dependence of amide I vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminský, Jakub; Bouř, Petr; Kubelka, Jan

    2011-01-13

    For spectroscopic studies of peptide and protein thermal denaturation it is important to single out the contribution of the solvent to the spectral changes from those originated in the molecular structure. To obtain insights into the origin and size of the temperature solvent effects on the amide I spectra, combined molecular dynamics and density functional simulations were performed with the model N-methylacetamide molecule (NMA). The computations well reproduced frequency and intensity changes previously observed in aqueous NMA solutions. An empirical correction of vacuum frequencies in single NMA molecule based on the electrostatic potential of the water molecules provided superior results to a direct density functional average obtained for a limited number of solute-solvent clusters. The results thus confirm that the all-atom quantum and molecular mechanics approach captures the overall influence of the temperature dependent solvent properties on the amide I spectra and can improve the accuracy and reliability of molecular structural studies.

  18. Temperature dependence of the dielectric constant of acrylic dielectric elastomer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, Junjie; Chen, Hualing; Li, Bo; Chang, Longfei [Xi' an Jiaotong University, State Key Laboratory for Strength and Vibration of Mechanical Structures, Xi' an (China); Xi' an Jiaotong University, School of Mechanical Engineering, Xi' an (China)

    2013-02-15

    The dielectric constant is an essential electrical parameter to the achievable voltage-induced deformation of the dielectric elastomer. This paper primarily focuses on the temperature dependence of the dielectric constant (within the range of 173 K to 373 K) for the most widely used acrylic dielectric elastomer (VHB 4910). First the dielectric constant was investigated experimentally with the broadband dielectric spectrometer (BDS). Results showed that the dielectric constant first increased with temperature up to a peak value and then dropped to a relative small value. Then by analyzing the fitted curves, the Cole-Cole dispersion equation was found better to characterize the rising process before the peak values than the Debye dispersion equation, while the decrease process afterward can be well described by the simple Debye model. Finally, a mathematical model of dielectric constant of VHB 4910 was obtained from the fitted results which can be used to further probe the electromechanical stability of the dielectric elastomers. (orig.)

  19. Calibration of Gyros with Temperature Dependent Scale Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belur, Sheela V.; Harman, Richard

    2001-01-01

    The general problem of gyro calibration can be stated as the estimation of the scale factors, misalignments, and drift-rate biases of the gyro using the on-orbit sensor measurements. These gyro parameters have been traditionally treated as temperature-independent in the operational flight dynamics ground systems at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), a scenario which has been successfully applied in the gyro calibration of a large number of missions. A significant departure from this is the Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) mission where, due to the high thermal variations expected during the mission phase, it is necessary to model the scale factors as functions of temperature. This paper addresses the issue of gyro calibration for the MAP gyro model using a manufacturer-supplied model of the variation of scale factors with temperature. The problem is formulated as a least squares problem and solved using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm in the MATLAB(R) library function NLSQ. The algorithm was tested on simulated data with Gaussian noise for the quaternions as well as the gyro rates and was found to consistently converge close to the true values. Significant improvement in accuracy was noticed due to the estimation of the temperature-dependent scale factors as against constant scale factors.

  20. Temperature dependence of the electrical properties of hydrogen titanate nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Diego C. B.; Brandão, Frederico D.; Krambrock, Klaus; Ferlauto, Andre S. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais 31270-901 (Brazil); Fonseca, Fabio C. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares, IPEN/CNEN-SP, 05508-000 São Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-11-14

    The temperature dependence of the electrical properties of hydrogen-rich titanate nanotubes (H-TNTs) in the 90–270 °C range was investigated by impedance spectroscopy. Three types of dominant conduction were found which depend on the previous thermal treatment of the samples. For untreated samples, at low temperatures (T < 100 °C), electrical conductivity is relatively high (>10{sup −4} S/cm at T ≈ 90 °C) and is dominated by protonic transport within structural water molecules. For thermal annealing in inert atmosphere up to 150 °C, water molecules are released from the nanotube structure resulting in a dehydrated H{sub 2}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 7} phase. Such phase has a low, thermally-dependent, electrical conductivity (10{sup −8} S/cm at T ≈ 90 °C) with activation energy of 0.68 eV. For samples annealed up to 260 °C, loss of OH groups, and consequent generation of oxygen vacancies, occurs that result in the non-stoichiometric H{sub 2(1−z)}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 7−z} phase. This phase has much higher conductivity (10{sup −5} S/cm at T ≈ 90 °C) and lower associated activation energy (0.40 eV). The generation of oxygen vacancies is confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance measurements at room temperature, which revealed the presence of single-electron-trapped oxygen vacancies. The activation energy value found is consistent with the thermal ionization energy of the oxygen vacancies. Such defect formation represents the initial stage of the phase transformation from titanate to TiO{sub 2} (B). X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy measurements also support such interpretation.

  1. On the temperature dependence of polar stratospheric clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiocco, G.; Cacciani, M.; Di Girolamo, P. (Univ. La Spaienza, Rome (Italy)); Fua, D. (Univ. La Spaienza, Rome (Italy) CNR/IFA, Rome (Italy)); De Luisi, J. (NOAA, Boulder, CO (United States))

    1991-03-01

    Polar stratospheric clouds were frequently observed by lidar at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station during May-October 1988. The dependence of the backscattering cross section on the temperature can be referred to transitions of the HNO{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O system: it appears possible to distinguish the pure trihydrate from the mixed ice-trihydrate phase in the composition of the aerosol and, in some cases, to bracket the HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}O content of the ambient gas, and to provide indications on the size of the particles.

  2. The anomalous low and high temperatures of 2012 over Greece: an explanation from a meteorological and climatological perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolika, K.; Maheras, P.; Pytharoulis, I.; Anagnostopoulou, C.

    2013-09-01

    The year of 2012 is characterized, for Greece, as the hottest one in the available record dating back to 1958, presenting also the widest annual temperature range. During the summer and autumn months, numerous regions in the domain of study experienced record-breaking maximum and minimum temperatures. Conversely, the winter period was particularly cold and January was one of the coldest months in the last 55 yr. The analysis of the cold period indicates that the synoptic conditions resemble the positive phase of the Eastern Mediterranean Pattern (EMP). The predominance of these cool conditions seems to be primarily related to an intense NNW or NNE atmospheric circulation, as a consequence of the positive EMP phase. Moreover, the reduction of the floating sea ice emerged as a key driver to the formation of a low pressure pattern and the reinforcement of the trough south of Scandinavia, which in turn strengthened the Siberia High east of the trough. This reinforcement resulted in a blocking pattern and in the favorable conditions for the EMP formation The atmospheric circulation during the prolonged high-temperature period resembles, respectively, the negative phase of North Sea-Caspian Pattern teleconnection. The observed positive pole, in conjunction with the strong southwestern circulation, results in temperature increases and in the development of a smooth pressure field that contributes to the weakening of the Etesian winds and therefore to calm conditions over the continental areas.

  3. The anomalous low and high temperatures of 2012 over Greece - an explanation from a meteorological and climatological perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolika, K.; Maheras, P.; Pytharoulis, I.; Anagnostopoulou, C.

    2014-03-01

    2012 was the hottest year in Greece on the basis of the available record dating back to 1958, displaying at the same time the widest annual temperature range. During the summer and autumn months, numerous regions in the domain of study experienced record-breaking maximum and minimum temperatures. Conversely, the winter period was particularly cold and January one of the coldest months over the last 55 yr. The analysis of the cold period indicates that the synoptic conditions resemble the positive phase of the Eastern Mediterranean Pattern (EMP). The predominance of these cool conditions seems to be related primarily to an intense NNW or NNE atmospheric circulation, as a consequence of the positive EMP phase. Moreover, the reduction in the floating sea ice emerges as a key driver of the formation of a low-pressure pattern and the reinforcement of the trough south of Scandinavia, which in turn strengthened the Siberia High east of the trough. This reinforcement resulted in a blocking pattern and in favorable conditions for the EMP formation. The atmospheric circulation during the prolonged high-temperature period resembles, respectively, the negative phase of North Sea-Caspian Pattern teleconnection. The observed positive pole, in conjunction with the strong southwestern circulation, results in temperature increases and in the development of a smooth pressure field that contributes to the weakening of the Etesian winds and therefore to calm conditions over the continental areas.

  4. Optofluidic intracavity spectroscopy for spatially, temperature, and wavelength dependent refractometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindt, Joel D.

    A microfluidic refractometer was designed based on previous optofluidic intracavity spectroscopy (OFIS) chips utilized to distinguish healthy and cancerous cells. The optofluidic cavity is realized by adding high reflectivity dielectric mirrors to the top and bottom of a microfluidic channel. This creates a plane-plane Fabry-Perot optical cavity in which the resonant wavelengths are highly dependent on the optical path length inside the cavity. Refractometry is a useful method to determine the nature of fluids, including the concentration of a solute in a solvent as well as the temperature of the fluid. Advantages of microfluidic systems are the easy integration with lab-on-chip devices and the need for only small volumes of fluid. The unique abilities of the microfluidic refractometer in this thesis include its spatial, temperature, and wavelength dependence. Spatial dependence of the transmission spectrum is inherent through a spatial filtering process implemented with an optical fiber and microscope objective. A sequence of experimental observations guided the change from using the OFIS chip as a cell discrimination device to a complimentary refractometer. First, it was noted the electrode structure within the microfluidic channel, designed to trap and manipulate biological cells with dielectrophoretic (DEP) forces, caused the resonant wavelengths to blue-shift when the electrodes were energized. This phenomenon is consistent with the negative dn/dT property of water and water-based solutions. Next, it was necessary to develop a method to separate the optical path length into physical path length and refractive index. Air holes were placed near the microfluidic channel to exclusively measure the cavity length with the known refractive index of air. The cavity length was then interpolated across the microfluidic channel, allowing any mechanical changes to be taken into account. After the separation of physical path length and refractive index, it was of interest

  5. Temperature dependence of thermal conductivity of biological tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, A; Mahajan, R L

    2003-08-01

    In this paper, we present our experimental results on the determination of the thermal conductivity of biological tissues using a transient technique based on the principles of the cylindrical hot-wire method. A novel, 1.45 mm diameter, 50 mm long hot-wire probe was deployed. Initial measurements were made on sponge, gelatin and Styrofoam insulation to test the accuracy of the probe. Subsequent experiments conducted on sheep collagen in the range of 25 degrees C temperature. Further, these changes in the thermal conductivity were found to be reversible. However, when the tissue was heated beyond 55 degrees C, irreversible changes in thermal conductivity were observed. Similar experiments were also conducted for determining the thermal conductivity of cow liver. In this case, the irreversible effects were found to set in much later at around 90 degrees C. Below this temperature, in the range of 25 degrees C temperature. In the second part of our study, in vivo measurements were taken on the different organs of a living pig. Comparison with reported values for dead tissues shows the thermal conductivities of living organs to be higher, indicating thereby the dominant role played by blood perfusion in enhancing the net heat transfer in living tissues. The degree of enhancement is different in different organs and shows a direct dependence on the blood flow rate.

  6. Dependence of friction on roughness, velocity, and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Yi; Dubé, Martin; Grant, Martin

    2008-03-01

    We study the dependence of friction on surface roughness, sliding velocity, and temperature. Expanding on the classic treatment of Greenwood and Williamson, we show that the fractal nature of a surface has little influence on the real area of contact and the static friction coefficient. A simple scaling argument shows that the static friction exhibits a weak anomaly mu ~ A(0)(-chi/4), where A0 is the apparent area and chi is the roughness exponent of the surface. We then develop a method to calculate atomic-scale friction between a microscopic asperity, such as the tip of a friction force microscope (FFM) and a solid substrate. This method, based on the thermal activation of the FFM tip, allows a quantitative extraction of all the relevant microscopic parameters and reveals a universal scaling behavior of atomic friction on velocity and temperature. This method is extended to include a soft atomic substrate in order to simulate FFM scans more realistically. The tip is connected with the support of the cantilever by an ideal spring and the substrate is simulated with a ball-spring model. The tip and substrate are coupled with repulsive potentials. Simulations are done at different temperatures and scanning velocities on substrates with different elastic moduli. Stick-slip motion of the tip is observed, and the numerical results of the friction force and distribution of force maxima match the theoretical framework.

  7. Temperature-dependent adsorption of nitrogen on porous vycor glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Tito E.; Tsou, Hsi Lung

    1998-03-01

    Adsorption isotherms of N2 have been measured in the temperature range from 77 to 120 K in samples of porous vycor glass. From the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller theory the surface layer coverages are determined. These are found to be temperature dependent. When adsorption-isotherm coverage data are expressed as a function of the adsorption potential δμ, the result is roughly temperature independent for coverages ranging from submonolayer to thin film, below capillary condensation. This characteristic curve, which represents the distribution of adsorption sites vs the adsorption potential, is compared with results from two models for the adsorbate: Dubinin's isotherm for microporous solids and its extension to rough surfaces, which places importance on the porosity of the surface, and Halsey's extension of the Frankel-Halsey-Hill isotherm, which takes into account the long-range variations of the substrate adsorption potential. The impact of this work on the interpretation of N2 adsorption data in terms of a surface area is discussed.

  8. Anomalous Hall effect in polycrystalline Ni films

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Zaibing

    2012-02-01

    We systematically studied the anomalous Hall effect in a series of polycrystalline Ni films with thickness ranging from 4 to 200 nm. It is found that both the longitudinal and anomalous Hall resistivity increased greatly as film thickness decreased. This enhancement should be related to the surface scattering. In the ultrathin films (46 nm thick), weak localization corrections to anomalous Hall conductivity were studied. The granular model, taking into account the dominated intergranular tunneling, has been employed to explain this phenomenon, which can explain the weak dependence of anomalous Hall resistivity on longitudinal resistivity as well. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Strain rate and temperature dependent mechanical behavior of nanocrystalline gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanjgaokar, Nikhil J.

    Nanocrystalline metal films are candidate materials for microelectronics and Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS). The long term mechanical stability of metal films requires quantitative understanding of their thermo-mechanical behavior in the large range of operating strain rates and temperatures. This dissertation research studied (a) the role of thermally activated processes based on the strain rate and temperature dependent mechanical behavior of nanocrystalline Au thin films, and (b) deformation processes at nominally elastic loads that lead to creep strain over a moderate temperature range that is relevant to MEMS applications. The rate dependent mechanical behavior of nanocrystalline Au thin films was first investigated at room temperature ~ 25 °C and at strain rates between 10-6 to 20 s-1. The use of digital image correlation (DIC) facilitated repeatable and accurate measurements of fullfield strain from free-standing nanocrystalline Au thin films. The experimental stress-strain curves were used to calculate activation volumes for two film thicknesses (0.85 mum, and 1.75 mum), which were 4.5b3 and 8.1b3, at strain rates smaller than 10-4 s-1 and 12.5b3 and 14.6b3 at strain rates higher than 10-4 s-1. The reduced activation volume and increased strain rate sensitivity at slow strain rates were attributed to grain boundary (GB) diffusional processes that result in creep strain. The room temperature strain rate results were augmented with microscale strain rate experiments at temperatures up to 110 °C. Two methods for heating free-standing microscale thin film specimens, namely uniform heating using a custom-built microheater and resistive (Joule) heating, were evaluated using a combination of full-field strain measurements by optical microscopy and full-field temperature measurements by infrared (IR) thermal imaging. It was shown for the first time that the Joule specimen heating method results in large underestimation of the inelastic material properties

  10. Observation of Anomalous Properties associated with the Low Temperature Structural Distortion in β-FeSe and Related Superconductorsa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu M. K.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of Superconductivity in the tetragonal phase FeSe provides a unique platform for the detailed investigation of the correlation between the physical properties and crystal structure to better understand the possible origin of superconductivity in the new iron-based superconductors. We have carried out a series of properties characterizations by measuring magnetic susceptibility, Raman, NMR and femtosecond spectroscopy on single crystals and epitaxial thin films of the FeSe and Te-doped Fe(SeTe samples. Our results show clearly the presence of anomalies in all the characterized properties at the temperature where a structural distortion from tetragonal to orthorhombic (or monoclinic appears for all superconducting samples, but not in the non-superconducting ones. This structural distortion was observed not accompanied by a magnetic ordering as commonly occurs in the parent compounds of FeAs-based superconductors. All the observations suggest that the low temperature structural distortion is essential for the occurrence of superconductivity in the FeSe and related compounds. Details of the experimental results will be presented and discussed.

  11. Time-dependent radiolytic yields at room temperature and temperature-dependent absorption spectra of the solvated electrons in polyols

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The molar extinction coefficients at the absorption maximum of the solvated electron spectrum have been evaluated to be 900, 970, and 1000 mol-1·m2 for 1,2-ethanediol (12ED), 1,2-propanediol (12PD), and 1,3-propanediol (13PD), respectively. These values are two-third or three-fourth of the value usually reported in the published report.Picosecond pulse radiolysis studies have aided in depicting the radiolytic yield of the solvated electron in these solvents as a function of time from picosecond to microsecond. The radiolytic yield in these viscous solvents is found to be strongly different from that of the water solution. The temperature dependent absorption spectra of the solvated electron in 12ED, 12PD, and 13PD have been also investigated. In all the three solvents, the optical spectra shift to the red with increasing temperature. While the shape of the spectra does not change in 13PD, a widening on the blue side of the absorption band is observed in 12ED and 12PD at elevated temperatures.

  12. Temperature dependence of the electronic structure of semiconductors and insulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poncé, S., E-mail: samuel.pon@gmail.com; Gillet, Y.; Laflamme Janssen, J.; Gonze, X. [European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility and Institute of Condensed Matter and Nanosciences, Université catholique de Louvain, Chemin des étoiles 8, bte L07.03.01, B-1348 Louvain-la-neuve (Belgium); Marini, A. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Via Salaria Km 29.3, CP 10, 00016 Monterotondo Stazione (Italy); Verstraete, M. [European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility and Physique des matériaux et nanostructures, Université de Liège, Allée du 6 Août 17, B-4000 Liège (Belgium)

    2015-09-14

    The renormalization of electronic eigenenergies due to electron-phonon coupling (temperature dependence and zero-point motion effect) is sizable in many materials with light atoms. This effect, often neglected in ab initio calculations, can be computed using the perturbation-based Allen-Heine-Cardona theory in the adiabatic or non-adiabatic harmonic approximation. After a short description of the recent progresses in this field and a brief overview of the theory, we focus on the issue of phonon wavevector sampling convergence, until now poorly understood. Indeed, the renormalization is obtained numerically through a slowly converging q-point integration. For non-zero Born effective charges, we show that a divergence appears in the electron-phonon matrix elements at q → Γ, leading to a divergence of the adiabatic renormalization at band extrema. This problem is exacerbated by the slow convergence of Born effective charges with electronic wavevector sampling, which leaves residual Born effective charges in ab initio calculations on materials that are physically devoid of such charges. Here, we propose a solution that improves this convergence. However, for materials where Born effective charges are physically non-zero, the divergence of the renormalization indicates a breakdown of the adiabatic harmonic approximation, which we assess here by switching to the non-adiabatic harmonic approximation. Also, we study the convergence behavior of the renormalization and develop reliable extrapolation schemes to obtain the converged results. Finally, the adiabatic and non-adiabatic theories, with corrections for the slow Born effective charge convergence problem (and the associated divergence) are applied to the study of five semiconductors and insulators: α-AlN, β-AlN, BN, diamond, and silicon. For these five materials, we present the zero-point renormalization, temperature dependence, phonon-induced lifetime broadening, and the renormalized electronic band structure.

  13. Variable responses of benthic communities to anomalously warm sea temperatures on a high-latitude coral reef.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom C L Bridge

    Full Text Available High-latitude reefs support unique ecological communities occurring at the biogeographic boundaries between tropical and temperate marine ecosystems. Due to their lower ambient temperatures, they are regarded as potential refugia for tropical species shifting poleward due to rising sea temperatures. However, acute warming events can cause rapid shifts in the composition of high-latitude reef communities, including range contractions of temperate macroalgae and bleaching-induced mortality in corals. While bleaching has been reported on numerous high-latitude reefs, post-bleaching trajectories of benthic communities are poorly described. Consequently, the longer-term effects of thermal anomalies on high-latitude reefs are difficult to predict. Here, we use an autonomous underwater vehicle to conduct repeated surveys of three 625 m(2 plots on a coral-dominated high-latitude reef in the Houtman Abrolhos Islands, Western Australia, over a four-year period spanning a large-magnitude thermal anomaly. Quantification of benthic communities revealed high coral cover (>70%, comprising three main morphospecies prior to the bleaching event. Plating Montipora was most susceptible to bleaching, but in the plot where it was most abundant, coral cover did not change significantly because of post-bleaching increases in branching Acropora. In the other two plots, coral cover decreased while macroalgal cover increased markedly. Overall, coral cover declined from 73% to 59% over the course of the study, while macroalgal cover increased from 11% to 24%. The significant differences in impacts and post-bleaching trajectories among plots underline the importance of understanding the underlying causes of such variation to improve predictions of how climate change will affect reefs, especially at high-latitudes.

  14. Variable responses of benthic communities to anomalously warm sea temperatures on a high-latitude coral reef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridge, Tom C L; Ferrari, Renata; Bryson, Mitch; Hovey, Renae; Figueira, Will F; Williams, Stefan B; Pizarro, Oscar; Harborne, Alastair R; Byrne, Maria

    2014-01-01

    High-latitude reefs support unique ecological communities occurring at the biogeographic boundaries between tropical and temperate marine ecosystems. Due to their lower ambient temperatures, they are regarded as potential refugia for tropical species shifting poleward due to rising sea temperatures. However, acute warming events can cause rapid shifts in the composition of high-latitude reef communities, including range contractions of temperate macroalgae and bleaching-induced mortality in corals. While bleaching has been reported on numerous high-latitude reefs, post-bleaching trajectories of benthic communities are poorly described. Consequently, the longer-term effects of thermal anomalies on high-latitude reefs are difficult to predict. Here, we use an autonomous underwater vehicle to conduct repeated surveys of three 625 m(2) plots on a coral-dominated high-latitude reef in the Houtman Abrolhos Islands, Western Australia, over a four-year period spanning a large-magnitude thermal anomaly. Quantification of benthic communities revealed high coral cover (>70%, comprising three main morphospecies) prior to the bleaching event. Plating Montipora was most susceptible to bleaching, but in the plot where it was most abundant, coral cover did not change significantly because of post-bleaching increases in branching Acropora. In the other two plots, coral cover decreased while macroalgal cover increased markedly. Overall, coral cover declined from 73% to 59% over the course of the study, while macroalgal cover increased from 11% to 24%. The significant differences in impacts and post-bleaching trajectories among plots underline the importance of understanding the underlying causes of such variation to improve predictions of how climate change will affect reefs, especially at high-latitudes.

  15. Influenza virus transmission is dependent on relative humidity and temperature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anice C Lowen

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Using the guinea pig as a model host, we show that aerosol spread of influenza virus is dependent upon both ambient relative humidity and temperature. Twenty experiments performed at relative humidities from 20% to 80% and 5 degrees C, 20 degrees C, or 30 degrees C indicated that both cold and dry conditions favor transmission. The relationship between transmission via aerosols and relative humidity at 20 degrees C is similar to that previously reported for the stability of influenza viruses (except at high relative humidity, 80%, implying that the effects of humidity act largely at the level of the virus particle. For infected guinea pigs housed at 5 degrees C, the duration of peak shedding was approximately 40 h longer than that of animals housed at 20 degrees C; this increased shedding likely accounts for the enhanced transmission seen at 5 degrees C. To investigate the mechanism permitting prolonged viral growth, expression levels in the upper respiratory tract of several innate immune mediators were determined. Innate responses proved to be comparable between animals housed at 5 degrees C and 20 degrees C, suggesting that cold temperature (5 degrees C does not impair the innate immune response in this system. Although the seasonal epidemiology of influenza is well characterized, the underlying reasons for predominant wintertime spread are not clear. We provide direct, experimental evidence to support the role of weather conditions in the dynamics of influenza and thereby address a long-standing question fundamental to the understanding of influenza epidemiology and evolution.

  16. Temperature dependence of the deformation behavior of 316 stainless steel after low temperature neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawel-Robertson, J.E.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Grossbeck, M.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    The effects of low temperature neutron irradiation on the tensile behavior of 316 stainless steel have been investigated. A single heat of solution annealed 316 was irradiated to 7 and 18 dpa at 60, 200, 330, and 400{degrees}C. The tensile properties as a function of dose and as a function of temperature were examined. Large changes in yield strength, deformation mode, strain to necking, and strain hardening capacity were seen in this irradiation experiment. The magnitudes of the changes are dependent on both irradiation temperature and neutron dose. Irradiation can more than triple the yield strength over the unirradiated value and decrease the strain to necking (STN) to less than 0.5% under certain conditions. A maximum increase in yield strength and a minimum in the STN occur after irradiation at 330{degrees}C but the failure mode remains ductile.

  17. Temperature Dependence of Growth Mechanism for Nanoscale High Tc Superconductors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu-Ming Chen; Mustafa Yavuz; Jian-Xun Jin

    2008-01-01

    The growth mechanisms of high temper- ature Yttrium- and Bismuth-based-superconductors were investigated at nanoscale. We started with studying the growth relationships among the three phases of Bi-2201, Bi-2212, and Bi-2233, and then extended to another growth mechanism of Bi-2223 and the growth of yttrium-based high-temperature nanosupercon- ductors (nano-YBCO). A time dependence of growth experiment was performed. In this experiment, the Bi-based superconductors grew within different sintering periods, and its three phases were determined by X-ray diffraction. And then, a time dependence of growth model was suggested to explain the experimental facts. With this model, governing equations were derived to quantitatively describe the growth and decomposition mechanisms during sintering period. The results calculated from the derived equations were well in agreement with the experimental data. We also suggested an alternative growth mechanism for the Bi-2223 phase, which was supported by an observation of transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The nano-YBCO also grew, and their orthorhombic crystal structures were determined by the TEM. The superconducting properties of Bi-2223 were investigated by the measurements of ac magnetic susceptibility. It is expected that the derived equations will fit the alter- native experimental growth mechanism of the Bi-2223 phase and the nano-YBCO growth mechanism, too.

  18. Inclusion of temperature dependent shell corrections in Landau theory for hot rotating nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G Shanmugam; P Arumugam

    2001-07-01

    Landau theory used for studying hot rotating nuclei usually uses zero temperature Strutinsky smoothed total energy for the temperature dependent shell corrections. This is replaced in this work by the temperature dependent Strutinsky smoothed free energy. Our results show that this replacement has only marginal effect for temperatures greater than 1 MeV but plays significant role at lower temperatures.

  19. Temperature dependence of polyhedral cage volumes in clathrate hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakoumakos, B.C.; Rawn, C.J.; Rondinone, A.J.; Stern, L.A.; Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Ishii, Y.; Jones, C.Y.; Toby, B.H.

    2003-01-01

    The polyhedral cage volumes of structure I (sI) (carbon dioxide, methane, trimethylene oxide) and structure II (sII) (methane-ethane, propane, tetrahydrofuran, trimethylene oxide) hydrates are computed from atomic positions determined from neutron powder-diffraction data. The ideal structural formulas for sI and sII are, respectively, S2L6 ?? 46H2O and S16L???8 ?? 136H2O, where S denotes a polyhedral cage with 20 vertices, L a 24-cage, and L??? a 28-cage. The space-filling polyhedral cages are defined by the oxygen atoms of the hydrogen-bonded network of water molecules. Collectively, the mean cage volume ratio is 1.91 : 1.43 : 1 for the 28-cage : 24-cage : 20-cage, which correspond to equivalent sphere radii of 4.18, 3.79, and 3.37 A??, respectively. At 100 K, mean polyhedral volumes are 303.8, 227.8, and 158.8 A??3 for the 28-cage, 24-cage, and 20-cage, respectively. In general, the 20-cage volume for a sII is larger than that of a sI, although trimethylene oxide is an exception. The temperature dependence of the cage volumes reveals differences between apparently similar cages with similar occupants. In the case of trimethylene oxide hydrate, which forms both sI and sII, the 20-cages common to both structures contract quite differently. From 220 K, the sII 20-cage exhibits a smooth monotonic reduction in size, whereas the sI 20-cage initially expands upon cooling to 160 K, then contracts more rapidly to 10 K, and overall the sI 20-cage is larger than the sII 20-cage. The volumes of the large cages in both structures contract monotonically with decreasing temperature. These differences reflect reoriented motion of the trimethyelene oxide molecule in the 24-cage of sI, consistent with previous spectroscopic and calorimetric studies. For the 20-cages in methane hydrate (sI) and a mixed methane-ethane hydrate (sII), both containing methane as the guest molecule, the temperature dependence of the 20-cage volume in sII is much less than that in sI, but sII is overall

  20. Transient Heat Diffusion with Temperature-Dependent Conductivity and Time-Dependent Heat Transfer Coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raseelo J. Moitsheki

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Lie point symmetry analysis is performed for an unsteady nonlinear heat diffusion problem modeling thermal energy storage in a medium with a temperature-dependent power law thermal conductivity and subjected to a convective heat transfer to the surrounding environment at the boundary through a variable heat transfer coefficient. Large symmetry groups are admitted even for special choices of the constants appearing in the governing equation. We construct one-dimensional optimal systems for the admitted Lie algebras. Following symmetry reductions, we construct invariant solutions.

  1. Gain Flattening Filter Canceling Temperature Dependence of EDFA s gain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.; Ohmura; Y.; Ishizawa; H.; Nakaji; K.; Hashimoto; T.; Shibata; M.; Shigehara; A.; Inoue

    2003-01-01

    We have developed a gain flattening filter (GFF) for an erbium doped fiber (EDF) without temperature control systems. This GFF, which consists of temperature-sensitive long period gratings (LPGs) and a temperature compensated slanted fiber Bragg grating (SFBG), follows the gain shift of EDF with temperature. Gain variation of the EDFA less than 0.25dBp-p was achieved with the bandwidth of 37nm, and the temperature range 0-65℃ without any temperature control systems.

  2. Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in Co2MnGa and its anomalous Hall effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludbrook, B. M.; Ruck, B. J.; Granville, S.

    2017-02-01

    We report perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in the ferromagnetic Heusler alloy Co2MnGa in a MgO/Co2MnGa/Pd trilayer stack for Co2MnGa thicknesses up to 3.5 nm. There is a thickness- and temperature-dependent spin reorientation transition from perpendicular to in-plane magnetic anisotropy, which we study through the anomalous Hall effect. From the temperature dependence of the anomalous Hall effect, we observe the expected scaling of ρx y A H E with ρxx, suggesting that the intrinsic and side-jump mechanisms are largely responsible for the anomalous Hall effect in this material.

  3. Ab initio investigation of the anomalous phonon softening in FeSi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Robin; Madsen, Georg K. H.

    2016-10-01

    The anomalous softening of the acoustic phonon peak in FeSi has recently received considerable experimental attention. In our work, we investigate the effect of thermal disorder on the lattice dynamics and the filling of the narrow band gap of FeSi using density functional theory. We show, by comparing the phonon density of states from temperature-independent and temperature-dependent force constants, that thermal structural disorder together with thermal expansion explains the anomalously strong renormalization of the acoustic phonons. Furthermore, we find an intricate interplay between thermal disorder and volume in gap closure.

  4. Temperature dependence of microwave oscillations in magnetic tunnel junctions with a perpendicularly magnetized free layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Peng; Feng, Jiafeng, E-mail: hxwei@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: jiafengfeng@iphy.ac.cn; Wei, Hongxiang, E-mail: hxwei@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: jiafengfeng@iphy.ac.cn; Han, Xiufeng [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Fang, Bin; Zhang, Baoshun; Zeng, Zhongming [Key Laboratory of Nanodevices and Applications, Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ruoshui Road 398, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2015-01-05

    We experimentally study the temperature dependence of the spin-transfer-torque-induced microwave oscillations in MgO-based magnetic tunnel junction nanopillars with a perpendicularly magnetized free layer. We demonstrate that the oscillation frequency increases rapidly with decreasing temperature, which is mainly ascribed to the temperature dependence of both the saturation magnetization and the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. We also find that a strong temperature dependence of the output power while a nonmonotonic temperature dependence of spectral linewidth are maintained for a constant dc bias in measured temperature range. Possible mechanisms leading to the different dependences of oscillation frequency, output power, and linewidth are discussed.

  5. Analysis of Temperature Dependence of Silicon-on-Insulator Thermo-Optic Attenuator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yun-Tao; YU Jin-Zhong; CHEN Yuan-Yuan; SUN Fei; CHEN Shao-Wu

    2007-01-01

    The temperature dependence of silicon-on-insulator thermo-optic attenuators is analysed, which originates from the temperature dependence of characteristics of multimode interference. The attenuator depth and power consumption are independent of temperature while the insertion loss depends on the temperature heavily. The variation of the insertion loss decreases from 4.3 dB to 1 dB as the temperature increases from 273 K to 343 K.

  6. Tuning the temperature dependence for switching in dithienylethene photochromic switches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudernac, Tibor; Kobayashi, Takao; Uyama, Ayaka; Uchida, Kingo; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Feringa, Ben L

    2013-08-29

    Diarylethene photochromic switches use light to drive structural changes through reversible electrocyclization reactions. High efficiency in dynamic photoswitching is a prerequisite for applications, as is thermal stability and the selective addressability of both isomers ring-opened and -closed diarylethenes. These properties can be optimized readily through rational variation in molecular structure. The efficiency with regard to switching as a function of structural variation is much less understood, with the exception of geometric requirements placed on the reacting atoms. Ultimately, increasing the quantum efficiency of photochemical switching in diarylethenes requires a detailed understanding of the excited-state potential energy surface(s) and the mechanisms involved in switching. Through studies of the temperature dependence, photoswitching and theoretical studies demonstrate the occurrence or absence of thermal activation barriers in three constitutional isomers that bear distinct π-conjugated systems. We found that a decrease in the thermal barriers correlates with an increase in switching efficiency. The origin of the barriers is assigned to the decrease in π-conjugation that is concomitant with the progress of the photoreaction. Furthermore, we show that balanced molecular design can minimize the change in the extent of π-conjugation during switching and lead to optimal bidirectional switching efficiencies. Our findings hold implications for future structural design of diarylethene photochromic switches.

  7. 1D compressible flow with temperature dependent transport coefficients

    CERN Document Server

    Jenssen, Helge Kristian

    2009-01-01

    We establish existence of global-in-time weak solutions to the one dimensional, compressible Navier-Stokes system for a viscous and heat conducting ideal polytropic gas (pressure $p=K\\theta/\\tau$, internal energy $e=c_v \\theta$), when the viscosity $\\mu$ is constant and the heat conductivity $\\kappa$ depends on the temperature $\\theta$ according to $\\kappa(\\theta) = \\bar \\kappa \\theta^\\beta$, with $0\\leq\\beta<{3/2}$. This choice of degenerate transport coefficients is motivated by the kinetic theory of gasses. Approximate solutions are generated by a semi-discrete finite element scheme. We first formulate sufficient conditions that guarantee convergence to a weak solution. The convergence proof relies on weak compactness and convexity, and it applies to the more general constitutive relations $\\mu(\\theta) = \\bar \\mu \\theta^\\alpha$, $\\kappa(\\theta) = \\bar \\kappa \\theta^\\beta$, with $\\alpha\\geq 0$, $0 \\leq \\beta < 2$ ($\\bar \\mu, \\bar \\kappa$ constants). We then verify the sufficient conditions in the case...

  8. Dependence of protein recognition of temperature-sensitive imprinted hydrogels on preparation temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turan, Eylem; Ozçetin, Gökçen; Caykara, Tuncer

    2009-05-13

    Temperature-sensitive imprinted and non-imprinted hydrogels composed of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPA) and 2-acrylamido-2-methyl-propanosulfonic acid (AMPS) have been prepared by free-radical crosslinking copolymerization in aqueous solution at three different temperatures: 10 degrees C (below the lower critical solution temperature, LCST), 33 degrees C (at the LCST), and 40 degrees C (above the LCST). Myoglobin (Mb, MW 17 kDa) is used as the template biomolecule. The effects of the initial concentration and adsorption time over the Mb adsorption capacity of the hydrogels have been analyzed and found to be strongly dependent on the preparation temperature (T(prep)). The maximum Mb adsorption for the imprinted hydrogel prepared at 10 degrees C is 97.40 +/- 2.35 mg Mb x g(-1) dry gel in 0.32 mg x mL(-1) Mb solution at 22 degrees C. Moreover, batch adsorption equilibrium and selectivity studies have been performed using a reference molecule, hemoglobin (Hb, MW 65 kDa). The imprinted hydrogels have a 2.8-3.3 times higher adsorption capacity for Mb than the non-imprinted hydrogels prepared at the same T(prep)s, and also have a 1.8-2.7 times higher selectivity for the imprinted molecule.

  9. Gain Flattening Filter Canceling Temperature Dependence of EDFA's gain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Ohmura; Y. Ishizawa; H. Nakaji; K. Hashimoto; T. Shibata; M. Shigehara; A. Inoue

    2003-01-01

    We have developed a gain flattening filter(GFF) for an erbium doped fiber (EDF) without temperature control systems. This GFF, which consists of temperature-sensitive long period gratings (LPGs)and a temperature compensated slanted fiber Bragg grating (SFBG), follows the gain shift of EDF with temperature. Gain variation of the EDFA less than 0.25dBp-p was achieved with the bandwidth of 37nm,and the temperature range 0-65℃ without and temperature control systems.

  10. Temperature dependence of small polaron population decays in iron-doped lithium niobate by Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhaouech, I.; Guilbert, L.

    2016-10-01

    The population decay of light-induced small polarons in iron-doped lithium niobate is simulated by a Monte-Carlo method on the basis of Holstein's theory. The model considers random walks of both bound polarons (NbLi4+) and free polarons (NbNb4+) ending to deep traps (FeLi3+). The thermokinetic interplay between polaron species is introduced by trapping and de-trapping rates at niobium antisites (NbLi). The decay of the NbLi4+ population proceeds by three possible channels: direct trapping at FeLi3+ sites, hopping on niobium antisites and hopping on Nb regular sites after conversion to the free state. Up to three regimes, each one reflecting the predominance of one of these processes, appear with different activation energies in the Arrhenius plots of the decay time. The influence of FeLi and NbLi concentrations on the transition temperatures is evidenced. For both polaron species, the length of the final hop (trapping length) is found much larger than the usual hopping length and decreases at rising temperature. This trap size effect is a natural consequence of Holstein's theory and may explain some unclear features of polaron-related light-induced phenomena, such as the temperature-dependent stretching exponent of light-induced absorption decays and the anomalous increase of the photoconductivity at high doping levels.

  11. Anomalous Hall effects in pseudo-single-crystal γ'-Fe4N thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabara, Kazuki; Tsunoda, Masakiyo; Kokado, Satoshi

    2016-05-01

    The anomalous Hall effects (AHE) were investigated at various temperatures for the pseudo-single-crystal Fe4N films, deposited on MgO substrates with changing the degree of order (S) of the nitrogen site. Both the anomalous Hall resistivity and the longitudinal resistivity simply decrease with lowering temperature for all the specimens. The AHE of the Fe4N films is presumed to arise from an intrinsic mechanism because of the relationship between the anomalous Hall resistivity and longitudinal resistivity. The anomalous Hall conductivity, σAH, exhibits a specific behavior at low temperature. In the case of the film with S = 0.93, the σAH drastically drops below 50 K, while it simply increases with lowering temperature in the range of 50-300 K. This low-temperature anomaly decays with decreasing S of the film and nearly vanishes in the films with low S. The threshold temperature and the dependence on S of the low-temperature anomaly of the σAH well correspond to those of the anisotropic magnetoresistance effects in the Fe4N films, reported in the literatures. From these results, it is suggested that the low-temperature anomaly of the σAH originates from the crystal field effect which reflects the structural transformation from a cubic to a tetragonal symmetry below 50 K and provides a modulation of the orbital angular momentum of the 3d orbitals at the Fermi level.

  12. Experimental flammability limits and associated theoretical flame temperatures as a tool for predicting the temperature dependence of these limits

    OpenAIRE

    Zlochower, Isaac A.

    2012-01-01

    The utility and limitations of adiabatic flame temperature calculations and minimum mixture energies in predicting the temperature dependence of flammability limits are explored. The limiting flame temperatures at constant pressure (1 bar) are calculated using a standard widely-used thermodynamic computer program. The computation is based on the calculated limiting flame temperature value at the reference initial temperature and the experimental limit concentration. The values recently determ...

  13. Temperature-dependent macromolecular X-ray crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weik, Martin, E-mail: martin.weik@ibs.fr; Colletier, Jacques-Philippe [CEA, IBS, Laboratoire de Biophysique Moléculaire, F-38054 Grenoble (France); CNRS, UMR5075, F-38027 Grenoble (France); Université Joseph Fourier, F-38000 Grenoble (France)

    2010-04-01

    The dynamical behaviour of crystalline macromolecules and their surrounding solvent as a function of cryo-temperature is reviewed. X-ray crystallography provides structural details of biological macromolecules. Whereas routine data are collected close to 100 K in order to mitigate radiation damage, more exotic temperature-controlled experiments in a broader temperature range from 15 K to room temperature can provide both dynamical and structural insights. Here, the dynamical behaviour of crystalline macromolecules and their surrounding solvent as a function of cryo-temperature is reviewed. Experimental strategies of kinetic crystallography are discussed that have allowed the generation and trapping of macromolecular intermediate states by combining reaction initiation in the crystalline state with appropriate temperature profiles. A particular focus is on recruiting X-ray-induced changes for reaction initiation, thus unveiling useful aspects of radiation damage, which otherwise has to be minimized in macromolecular crystallography.

  14. Temperature-dependant study of phosphorus ion implantation in germanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razali, M. A.; Smith, A. J.; Jeynes, C.; Gwilliam, R. M.

    2012-11-01

    We present experimental results on shallow junction formation in germanium by phosphorus ion implantation and standard rapid thermal processing. An attempt is made to improve phosphorus activation by implanting phosphorus at high and low temperature. The focus is on studying the germanium damage and phosphorus activation as a function of implant temperature. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry with channelling and Hall Effect measurements are employed for characterisation of germanium damage and phosphorus activation, respectively. High and low temperature implants were found to be better compared to room temperature implant.

  15. Dependence of Arc Plasma Dispersion Capability on its Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yun-Yun; SONG Yang; HE An-Zhi; LI Zhen-Hua

    2008-01-01

    @@ The relationship between the dispersion capability and the temperature of argon arc plasma at Iatm is deduced in view of the plasma's refractive index equation.The results indicate that argon arc plasma has a normal dispersion and its dispersion capability is nonlinear to the plasma's temperature in a wide range of temperature and wavelength region.According to the results of numerical calculation, the preferred optical methods are believed to be suitable for the diagnosis of argon arc plasma in different temperature regions.

  16. Temperature-dependent phenotypic variation of Campylobacter jejuni lipooligosaccharides

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Semchenko, Evgeny A

    2010-11-30

    Abstract Background Campylobacter jejuni is a major bacterial cause of food-borne enteritis, and its lipooligosaccharide (LOS) plays an initiating role in the development of the autoimmune neuropathy, Guillain-Barré syndrome, by induction of anti-neural cross-reactive antibodies through ganglioside molecular mimicry. Results Herein we describe the existence and heterogeneity of multiple LOS forms in C. jejuni strains of human and chicken origin grown at 37°C and 42°C, respectively, as determined on sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide electrophoresis gels with carbohydrate-specific silver staining and blotting with anti-ganglioside ligands, and confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The C. jejuni NCTC 11168 original isolate (11168-O) was compared to its genome-sequenced variant (11168-GS), and both were found to have a lower-Mr LOS form, which was different in size and structure to the previously characterized higher-Mr form bearing GM1 mimicry. The lower-Mr form production was found to be dependent on the growth temperature as the production of this form increased from ~5%, observed at 37°C to ~35% at 42°C. The structure of the lower-Mr form contained a β-D-Gal-(1→3)-β-D-GalNAc disaccharide moiety which is consistent with the termini of the GM1, asialo-GM1, GD1, GT1 and GQ1 gangliosides, however, it did not display GM1 mimicry as assessed in blotting studies but was shown in NMR to resemble asialo-GM1. The production of multiple LOS forms and lack of GM1 mimicry was not a result of phase variation in the genes tested of NCTC 11168 and was also observed in most of the human and chicken isolates of C. jejuni tested. Conclusion The presence of differing amounts of LOS forms at 37 and 42°C, and the variety of forms observed in different strains, indicate that LOS form variation may play a role in an adaptive mechanism or a stress response of the bacterium during the colonization of different hosts.

  17. Thermal Aware Floorplanning Incorporating Temperature Dependent Wire Delay Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, AndreasThor; Liu, Wei; Nannarelli, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Temperature has a negative impact on metal resistance and thus wire delay. In state-of-the-art VLSI circuits, large thermal gradients usually exist due to the uneven distribution of heat sources. The difference in wire temperature can lead to performance mismatch because wires of the same length ...

  18. Temperature dependence of poly(lactic acid) mechanical properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Chengbo; Guo, Huilong; Li, Jingqing

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of polymers are not only determined by their structures, but also related to the temperature field in which they are located. The yield behaviors, Young's modulus and structures of injection-molded poly(lactic acid) (PLA) samples after annealing at different temperatures...

  19. Anomalous and planar Righi-Leduc effects in Ni80Fe20 ferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madon, B.; Pham, Do Ch.; Wegrowe, J.-E.; Lacour, D.; Hehn, M.; Polewczyk, V.; Anane, A.; Cros, V.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we report experimental evidence of anomalous and planar Righi-Leduc effects on NiFe . The Righi-Leduc effect is the thermal analog of the Hall effect, in which the electric current is replaced by the heat current and the electric field by the temperature gradient. When the material is ferromagnetic, it is well known that there are two other contributions to the Hall voltage which depend on the orientation of the magnetization. These two extra contributions are called the anomalous Hall effect when the magnetization is out of the plane of the sample and the planar Hall effect when the magnetization is in the plane of the sample. In the same way, an anomalous and a planar Righi-Leduc effects are shown to appear when a transverse temperature gradient is generated by a heat current.

  20. Ultrasensitive Anomalous Hall Effect in Ta/CoFe/Oxide/Ta Multilayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrahigh anomalous Hall sensitivity has been demonstrated in Ta/CoFe/Oxide/Ta multilayers. By changing oxides (MgO and HfO2 and annealing temperature, different annealing dependence of sensitivity was found in MgO-sample and HfO2-sample. For the MgO-sample, the anomalous Hall sensitivity reaches 18792 Ω/T in the as-deposited state and significantly reduces as annealing temperature increases. On the contrary, the sensitivity of the as-deposited HfO2-sample is only 765 Ω/T, while it remarkably increases with annealing temperature increasing, finally reaching 14741 Ω/T at 240°C. The opposite variation of anomalous sensitivity in two samples originates from the different change of magnetic anisotropy and anomalous Hall resistance during the annealing process. Our study provides a new perspective that both the choice of oxide material and the optimization of annealing treatment are important to the anomalous Hall sensitivity.

  1. Temperature dependent fission product removal efficiency due to pool scrubbing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, Shunsuke, E-mail: suchida@iae.or.jp [Institute of Applied Energy, 1-14-2, Nishi-Shimbashi, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-0003 (Japan); Itoh, Ayumi; Naitoh, Masanori; Okada, Hidetoshi; Suzuki, Hiroyuki [Institute of Applied Energy, 1-14-2, Nishi-Shimbashi, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-0003 (Japan); Hanamoto, Yukio [KAKEN, Inc., 1044, Hori-machi, Mito 310-0903 (Japan); Osakabe, Masahiro [Tokyo University of Marine Science & Technology, Koutou-ku, Tokyo 135-8533 (Japan); Fujikawa, Masahiro [Japan Broadcasting Corporation, 2-2-1, Jinnan, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-8001 (Japan)

    2016-03-15

    Highlights: • Pool temperature effects on the FP removal were not clearly concluded in the previous publications. • It was confirmed that the removal efficiency decreased with temperature around the boiling point. • A modified empirical formula for FP removal was proposed as a function of sub-cooling temperature. • DF could be predicted with an accuracy within a factor of 2 with the proposed formula. - Abstract: The wet-well of boiling water reactors plays important roles not only to suppress the pressure in the primary containment vessel due to steam scrubbing effects during severe accidents but also to mitigate release of radioactive fission products (FP), aerosols and particulates, into the environment. The effects of steam scrubbing in the wet-well on FP removal have been well studied and reported by changing major parameters determining the removal efficiencies, e.g., aerosol diameters, submergence (depth of scrubbing nozzles) and steam/non-condensable gas volume fraction. Unfortunately, the effects of pool temperature on the FP removal were not clearly concluded in the previous publications, though it would be easily expected that boiling in the pool resulted in reduced aerosol removal efficiency. In order to determine the temperature effects on FP removal efficiency, amounts of cesium in aerosols released from scrubbing pool were measured by changing pool temperature in mini and medium scale scrubbing experiments, and then, it was confirmed that the removal efficiency clearly decreased with temperature around the boiling point. Then, a modified empirical formula to express the FP removal around the boiling point temperature was proposed as a function of sub-cooling temperature by applying the effective steam volume fraction, which was designated as the volume ratio of condensed steam in the pool versus the sum of input steam and non-condensable gas. By comparing the measured removal efficiency with the calculated, it was validated that the

  2. Experimental confirmation of the gravitation force negative temperature dependence

    CERN Document Server

    Dmitriev, A L

    2011-01-01

    The experiment with weighing PZT-piezoelectric ceramics, heated up by a high-frequency signal for the temperature of 1.6 C is briefly described. The negative change of piezoelectric ceramics weight having relative value of is confidently registered. The sign and the order of the value of relative temperature change of piezoelectric ceramics weight correspond to the measurements of weight of non-magnetic metal bars which were conducted earlier. What is emphasized as expedient for development of physics of gravitation is conducting similar measurements with use of various materials as samples and in a wide range of temperatures.

  3. Theoretical analysis for temperature dependence of laser- induced damage threshold of optical thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, K.; Motokoshi, S.; Somekawa, T.; Jitsuno, T.; Fujita, M.; Tanaka, KA; Azechi, H.

    2016-03-01

    The temperature dependence of the laser-induced damage threshold on optical coatings was studied in detail for laser pulses from 123 K to 473 K at different temperatures. The laser-induced damage threshold increased with decreasing temperatures when we tested long pulses (200 ps and 4 ns). The temperature dependence, however, was reversed for pulses shorter than a few picoseconds (100 fs testing). We propose a scaling model with a flowchart that includes three separate processes: free-electron generation, electron multiplication, and electron heating. Furthermore, we calculated the temperature dependence of laser-induced damage thresholds at different temperatures. Our calculation results agreed well with the experimental results.

  4. Temperature dependence of the PER in PM-PCF coil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Zhao; Meng Chen; Gang Li

    2012-01-01

    A piece of domestic polarization-maintaining photonic crystal fiber (PM-PCF,964 m in length) is made into a fiber coil,and its polarization extinction ratio (PER) is measured in a temperature range of -45-80 ℃ before and after PM-PCF is wound and solidified.A fiber coil made of commercial panda PM fiber (PMF) is also fabricated and measured for comparison.Our experiments show that the PER variation of the PM-PCF coil (2.25 dB) is far smaller than that of the panda PMF coil (10 dB) in the whole temperature range because PM-PCF is intrinsically insensitive to the temperature variation and stress in the fiber coil induced by the winding and solidification process.This characteristic is important for the real application of PM-PCFs in temperature-insensitive fiber interferometers,fiber sensors,and optical fiber gyroscopes.

  5. Optical fiber temperature sensor based on wavelength-dependent detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhigang Li(李志刚); Zhenhui Du(杜振辉); Baoguang Wang(王宝光); Chengzhi Jiang(蒋诚志)

    2004-01-01

    Semiconductor fiber temperature sensors have been used widely in many fields, but most of them pick up temperature by measuring the optical intensity of certain fixed narrow-band in absorption spectrum.Furthermore, they are sensitive to the loss of optical intensity and the fluctuation of light source power.The novel temperature measurement system proposed in this paper is based on the semiconductor absorption theory and the spectral analysis of method. To measure temperature, the sensor model detects not the certain narrow-band spectrum but the most spectra of the optical absorption edge. Therefore the measurement accuracy and the stability can be improved greatly. Experimental results are in agreement with theoretical analysis results perfectly.

  6. Temperature-dependent enthalpy of oxygenation in Antarctic fish hemoglobins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fago, A.; Wells, R.M.G.; Weber, Roy E.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of temperature on the oxygen-binding properties of the hemoglobins of three cold-adapted Antarctic fish species, Dissostichus mawsoni, Pagothenia borchgrevinki and Trematomus, sp., has been investigated under different pH values and buffer conditions. A clear non linear van't Hoff plot...... an adaptation to the low-temperature habitat needs to be revised. (C) 1997 Elsevier Science Inc Udgivelsesdato: 1997/10...

  7. Temperature dependence of the coercive field of gas atomized Fe{sub 73.5}Si{sub 13.5}B{sub 9}Nb{sub 3}Cu{sub 1}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Escorial, A., E-mail: age@cenim.csic.es [CENIM-CSIC, Avda, Gregorio del Amo, 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Lieblich, M. [CENIM-CSIC, Avda, Gregorio del Amo, 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Hernando, A.; Aragon, A.; Marin, P. [Instituto de Magnetismo Aplicado, IMA, P.O. Box 155, 28230 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-09-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An anomalous thermal dependence of the coercive field of gas atomized Fe{sub 73.5}Si{sub 13.5}B{sub 9}Nb{sub 3}Cu{sub 1} powder particles under 25 {mu}m powder particle, increasing Hc as temperature increases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is proposed that Cu rich regions at inter-grain boundaries could act as exchange decoupling regions contributing to the thermal increase of coercivity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This anomalous thermal dependence points out that tailoring microstructure and size, by controlling the cooling rate of more adequate multiphase systems, could be a promising procedure to develop soft or hard magnets, avoiding Rare Earths metals that is nowadays an important target for the engineering of magnetic materials. - Abstract: In this work, the dependence of the coercive field of Fe{sub 73.5}Si{sub 13.5}B{sub 9}Nb{sub 3}Cu{sub 1} gas atomized powder with the temperature for different particle sizes has been studied, observing an anomalous behavior in the under 25 powder particle size fraction. This unusual behavior is related with the microstructure of the powder, and is attributed to the presence of a multiphase magnetic system, with non-magnetic regions decoupling the ferromagnetic domains.

  8. Size- and temperature-dependent Young's modulus and size-dependent thermal expansion coefficient of thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiao-Ye; Huang, Bao-Ling; Zhang, Tong-Yi

    2016-08-21

    Nanomaterials possess a high surface/volume ratio and surfaces play an essential role in size-dependent material properties. In the present study, nanometer-thick thin films were taken as an ideal system to investigate the surface-induced size- and temperature-dependent Young's modulus and size-dependent thermal expansion coefficient. The surface eigenstress model was further developed with the consideration of thermal expansion, leading to analytic formulas of size- and temperature-dependent Young's modulus, and size-dependent thermal expansion coefficient of thin films. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on face-centered cubic (fcc) Ag, Cu, and Ni(001) thin films were conducted at temperatures ranging from 300 K to 600 K. The MD simulation results are perfectly consistent with the theoretical predictions, thereby verifying the theoretical approach. The newly developed surface eigenstress model will be able to attack similar problems in other types of nanomaterials.

  9. S Z constraints on the dependence of the CMB temperature on redshift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamagna, L.; Battistelli, E. S.; De Gregori, S.; De Petris, M.; Luzzi, G.; Savini, G.

    2007-03-01

    Precise measurements of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (S-Z) effect on clusters of galaxies can be used to constrain anomalous scalings of the CMB temperature as a function of redshift, providing an unbiased test of the current cosmological paradigms. This is possible through a precise characterization of the S-Z spectrum as a function of frequency and all the higher order effects which determine small corrections to the amplitude of the effect. Combined with excellent systematic modeling and high quality, routine observations of the S-Z effect on a moderate-to-high redshift sample of galaxy clusters at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths, this method can constrain deviations from standard scalings of the CMB temperature based on zero-redshift precisions comparable with that of COBE/FIRAS. We describe here the analysis procedure and a pioneering approach to the problem using existing multifrequency S-Z observations.

  10. Temperature Dependent Seed Germination of Dalbergia nigra Allem (Leguminosae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda G. A. Ferraz-Grande

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The germination of endangered species Dalbergia nigra was studied and 30.5° C was found as optimum temperature, although the species presented a broad temperature range where germination occurs and light had no effect. The analysis of kinetics of seed germination confirmed the asynchronized germination below and above the optimum temperature. The light insensitive seed and germination also at high temperatures indicated that D. nigra could occur both in understories and gaps where the mean temperature was high.A germinação de sementes de Dalbergia nigra Allem, comumente conhecida como jacarandá-da-Bahia, caviúna, jacarandá, uma espécie em extinção, foi estudada e determinamos a temperatura ótima de 30,5° C. A espécie apresenta uma ampla faixa de temperatura onde a germinação ocorre e a luz branca não influenciou o processo. A análise da cinética da germinação de sementes confirma a germinação não sincronizada acima e abaixo da temperatura ótima de germinação. A semente insensível à luz e a germinação também em altas temperaturas indicam que D. nigra pode ocorrer tanto na sombra da vegetação bem como em clareiras.

  11. Blow up Analysis for Anomalous Granular Gases

    CERN Document Server

    Rey, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    We investigate in this article the long-time behaviour of the solutions to the energy-dependent, spatially-homogeneous, inelastic Boltzmann equation for hard spheres. This model describes a diluted gas composed of hard spheres under statistical description, that dissipates energy during collisions. We assume that the gas is "anomalous", in the sense that the energy dissipation increases when the temperature decreases. This allows the gas to cool down in finite time. We study the existence, uniqueness and attractiveness of blow up profiles for this model and the cooling law associated, generalizing the classical Haff's Law for granular gases. To this end, we give some new estimates about the third order moment of the inelastic Boltzmann equation with drift term and we introduce new strongly "non-linear" self-similar variables

  12. Mechanical behaviour of ferritic ODS steels - Temperature dependancy and anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, B.; Steckmeyer, A.; Rouffie, A.-L.; Malaplate, J.; Garnier, J.; Ratti, M.; Wident, P.; Ziolek, L.; Tournie, I.; Rabeau, V.; Gentzbittel, J. M.; Kruml, T.; Kubena, I.

    2012-11-01

    Ferritic 14%Cr and 18%Cr ODS steels produced at CEA in round bars or plates were tested mechanically. The present paper reports results obtained in tension, impact, fatigue, creep and toughness tests. These tests were carried out at various temperatures and in different directions. These materials show a pronounced anisotropy at all tested temperatures. No matter the loading, the transversal direction is always found to be far less resistant than the longitudinal one. This anisotropy is mainly observed in terms of damage mechanisms, with intergranular fracture preferentially occurring along the extrusion direction. This intergranular fracture mode leads to very low and anisotropic toughness values and to the absence of tertiairy creep stage, pointing out the unstable nature of fracture, even at high temperature. The unrealistically high values of the Norton exponent measured in creep suggests the existence of a threshold stress, which is consistent with the mainly kinematic nature of the stress as revealed by fatigue tests.

  13. Temperature Dependent Ultrasonic Study in Scandium Antimonide Semiconductor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper analysis of wave propagation of elastic wave in scandium antimonide semiconductor was investigated. In scandium antimonide semiconductor, NaCl structure was found. Ultrasonic properties like ultrasonic attenuation, sound velocities, acoustic coupling constants, and thermal relaxation time have been investigated in cubic scandium antimonide semiconductor. Second and third order elastic constant have been computed for the evaluation of above said ultrasonic properties. Second and third elastic constant was studied at the various temperatures. Longitudinal and shear velocity was calculated by using the elastic constant. Longitudinal and shear velocity increase with increase the temperature. Ultrasonic attenuation either from longitudinal or shear wave propagation in cubic materials increase with increase the temperature.

  14. Temperature-dependent permittivity of annealed and unannealed gold films

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Po-Ting; Lin, Cheng-Wei; Liu, Hsiang-Lin; Chang, Chih-Wei; Chu, Shi-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Due to local field enhancement and subwavelength confinements, nano-plasmonics provide numerous novel applications. Simultaneously, as an efficient nanoscale heat generator from inherent absorption, thermo-plasmonics is emerging as an important branch. However, although significant temperature increase is involved in applications, detailed characterization of metal permittivity at different temperatures is lacking. In this work, we extract the permittivity of gold film from 300K to the annealing temperature of 570K. By comparing annealed and unannealed films, more than one-order difference in thermo-derivative of permittivity is revealed, resulting in unexpectedly large variation of plasmonic properties. Our result is valuable not only for characterizing extensively used unannealed nanoparticles, but also for designing future thermo-nano-plasmonic systems.

  15. TEMPERATURE DEPENDANT BEHAVIOUR OBSERVED IN THE AFIP-6 IRRADIATION TEST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. B. Robinson; D. M. Wachs; P. Medvedev; S.J. Miller; F. J. Rice; M. K. Meyer; D. M. Perez

    2012-03-01

    The AFIP-6 test assembly was irradiated for one cycle in the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory. The experiment was designed to test two monolithic fuel plates at power and burn-ups which bounded the operating conditions of both ATR and HFIR driver fuel. Both plates contained a solid U-Mo fuel foil with a zirconium diffusion barrier between 6061-aluminum cladding plates bonded by hot isostatic pressing. The experiment was designed with an orifice to restrict the coolant flow in order to obtain prototypic coolant temperature conditions. While these coolant temperatures were obtained, the reduced flow resulted in a sufficiently low heat transfer coefficient that failure of the fuel plates occurred. The increased fuel temperature led to significant variations in the fission gas retention behaviour of the U-Mo fuel. These variations in performance are outlined herein.

  16. Temperature dependence of isotopic quantum effects in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, R T; Benmore, C J; Neuefeind, J; Kohara, S; Tomberli, B; Egelstaff, P A

    2005-02-04

    The technique of high energy x-ray diffraction has been used to measure the temperature variation of hydrogen versus deuterium isotopic quantum effects on the structure of water. The magnitude of the effect is found to be inversely proportional to the temperature, varying by a factor of 2.5 over the range 6 to 45 degrees C. In addition, the H216O versus H218O effect has been measured at 26 degrees C and the structural difference shown to be restricted to the nearest neighbor molecular interactions. The results are compared to recent simulations and previously measured isochoric temperature differentials; additionally, implications for H/D substitution experiments are considered.

  17. Soil Temperature Dependent Growth of Cotton Seedlings Before Emergence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Soil temperature is an important variable governing plant growth and development.Studies were conducted under laboratory conditions to determine the effect of soil temperature on root and shoot growth of cotton during emergence.Cotton seedlings were grown for 192 h at 20,32 and 38℃ in soil packed in 300 mm long and 50 mm diameter cylinders.The data indicated that the longest roots(173 ram)as well as shoots(152 mm)were recorded at 32 ℃ followed by 20 (130 mm root and 82 mm shoot)and 38℃(86 mm root and 50 mm shoot).Roots grown at 20 and 38 ℃ were 20% and 50% shorter,respectively,than those grown at 32℃ after 192 h.Roots and shoots exhibited the lowest length and dry biomass at 38℃.Shoot lengths grown at 20(74 ram)and 38℃(51 mm)were 44% and 61% shorter than those grown at 32℃(131 mm)after 180 h growth period,respectively.Growth at all three temperatures followed a similar pattern.Initially there was a linear growth phase followed by the reduction or cessation of growth.Time to cessation of growth varied with temperature and decreased faster at higher temperatures.Sowing of cotton should be accomlplished before seedbed reaches a soil temperature(≥38℃)detrimental for emergence.Further,the seedbeds should be capable of providing sufficient moisture and essential nutrients for emerging seedling before its seed reserves are exhausted to enhance seedling establishment in soil.

  18. Temperature dependency of the silicon heterojunction lifetime model based on the amphoteric nature of dangling bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, R.; Poli, I.; Deligiannis, D.; Zeman, M.; Smets, A. H. M.

    2016-11-01

    This work adapts a model to simulate the carrier injection dependent minority carrier lifetime of crystalline silicon passivated with hydrogenated amorphous silicon at elevated temperatures. Two existing models that respectively calculate the bulk lifetime and surface recombination velocity are used and the full temperature dependency of these models are explored. After a thorough description of these temperature dependencies, experimental results using this model show that the minority carrier lifetime changes upon annealing of silicon heterojunction structures are not universal. Furthermore, comparisons of the temperature dependent model to using the room temperature model at elevated temperatures is given and significant differences are observed when using temperatures above 100 °C. This shows the necessity of taking temperature effects into account during in-situ annealing experiments.

  19. Microbial interactions with the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa and their dependence on temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dziallas, Claudia; Grossart, Hans-Peter

    2012-01-01

    cultures changed in a temperature-dependent manner, its quality greatly varied under the same environmental conditions, but with different associated bacterial communities. Furthermore, temperature affected quantity and quality of cell-bound microcystins, whereby interactions between M. aeruginosa...

  20. Dependence of Growing High-Quality Gem Diamonds on Growth Rates by Temperature Gradient Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZANG Chuan-Yi; JIA Xiao-Peng; REN Guo-Zhong; WANG Xian-Cheng

    2004-01-01

    @@ Using the temperature gradient method under high pressure and high temperature, we investigate the dependence of growing high-quality gem diamond crystals on the growth rates. It is found that the lower the growth rate of gem diamond crystals, the larger the temperature range of growing high-quality gem diamond crystals, and the easier the control of temperature.

  1. Altitude dependence of atmospheric temperature trends: Climate models versus observation

    CERN Document Server

    Douglass, D H; Singer, F

    2004-01-01

    As a consequence of greenhouse forcing, all state of the art general circulation models predict a positive temperature trend that is greater for the troposphere than the surface. This predicted positive trend increases in value with altitude until it reaches a maximum ratio with respect to the surface of as much as 1.5 to 2.0 at about 200 to 400 hPa. However, the temperature trends from several independent observational data sets show decreasing as well as mostly negative values. This disparity indicates that the three models examined here fail to account for the effects of greenhouse forcings.

  2. Temperature dependence of the upper critical field of high- Tc superconductors from isothermal magnetization data: influence of a temperature dependent Ginzburg-Landau parameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, I. L.; Ott, H. R.

    2003-11-01

    We show that the scaling procedure, recently proposed for the evaluation of the temperature variation of the normalized upper critical field of type-II superconductors, may easily be modified in order to take into account a possible temperature dependence of the Ginzburg-Landau parameter κ. As an example we consider κ( T) as it follows from the microscopic theory of superconductivity.

  3. Temperature dependent dielectric and conductivity studies of polyvinyl alcohol-ZnO nanocomposite films by impedance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemalatha, K. S.; Sriprakash, G.; Ambika Prasad, M. V. N.; Damle, R.; Rukmani, K.

    2015-10-01

    Dielectric and conductivity behaviors of nano ZnO doped polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) composites for various concentrations of dopant were investigated using impedance spectroscopy for a wide range of temperatures (303 K-423 K) and frequencies (5 Hz-30 MHZ). The dielectric properties of host polymer matrix have been improved by the addition of nano ZnO and are found to be highly temperature dependent. Anomalous dielectric behavior was observed in the frequency range of 2.5 MHz-5 MHz. Increase in dielectric permittivity and dielectric loss was observed with respect to temperature. The Cole-Cole plot could be modeled by low resistance regions in a high resistance matrix and the lowest resistance was observed for the 10 mol. % films. The imaginary part of the electric modulus showed asymmetric peaks with the relaxation following Debye nature below and non-Debye nature above the peaks. The ac conductivity is found to obey Jonscher's power law, whereas the variation of dc conductivity with temperature was found to follow Arrhenius behavior. Two different activation energy values were obtained from Arrhenius plot indicating that two conduction mechanisms are involved in the composite films. Fitting the ac conductivity data to Jonscher's law indicates that large polaron assisted tunneling is the most likely conduction mechanism in the composites. Maximum conductivity is observed at 423 K for all the samples and it is optimum for 10 mol. % ZnO doped PVA composite film. Significant increase in dc and ac conductivities in these composite films makes them a potential candidate for application in electronic devices.

  4. Temperature dependent dielectric and conductivity studies of polyvinyl alcohol-ZnO nanocomposite films by impedance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemalatha, K. S.; Damle, R.; Rukmani, K., E-mail: rukmani9909@yahoo.co.in [Department of Physics, Bangalore University, Bangalore 560056 (India); Sriprakash, G. [Department of Physics, Maharani' s Science College for Women, Bangalore 560001 (India); Ambika Prasad, M. V. N. [Department of Physics, Gulbarga University, Gulbarga 585106 (India)

    2015-10-21

    Dielectric and conductivity behaviors of nano ZnO doped polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) composites for various concentrations of dopant were investigated using impedance spectroscopy for a wide range of temperatures (303 K–423 K) and frequencies (5 Hz–30 MHZ). The dielectric properties of host polymer matrix have been improved by the addition of nano ZnO and are found to be highly temperature dependent. Anomalous dielectric behavior was observed in the frequency range of 2.5 MHz–5 MHz. Increase in dielectric permittivity and dielectric loss was observed with respect to temperature. The Cole-Cole plot could be modeled by low resistance regions in a high resistance matrix and the lowest resistance was observed for the 10 mol. % films. The imaginary part of the electric modulus showed asymmetric peaks with the relaxation following Debye nature below and non-Debye nature above the peaks. The ac conductivity is found to obey Jonscher's power law, whereas the variation of dc conductivity with temperature was found to follow Arrhenius behavior. Two different activation energy values were obtained from Arrhenius plot indicating that two conduction mechanisms are involved in the composite films. Fitting the ac conductivity data to Jonscher's law indicates that large polaron assisted tunneling is the most likely conduction mechanism in the composites. Maximum conductivity is observed at 423 K for all the samples and it is optimum for 10 mol. % ZnO doped PVA composite film. Significant increase in dc and ac conductivities in these composite films makes them a potential candidate for application in electronic devices.

  5. Temperature dependence of excitonic transition in ZnSe/ZnCdSe quantum wells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Zi-zheng; LIANG Xi-xia; BAN Shi-liang

    2005-01-01

    A theoretical calculation for the temperature dependence of the excitonic transition in ZnSe/ZnCdSe quantum wells is performed. The exciton binding energy is calculated with a variational technique by considering the temperature-dependence parameters. Our results show that the exciton binding energy reduces linearly with temperature increasing. We find that the strain due to lattice mismatch and differential thermal expansion decreases with the temperature increasing.

  6. Temperature dependence of the Al2O3:C response in medical luminescence dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edmund, Jens Morgenthaler; Andersen, Claus Erik

    2007-01-01

    is not varied. The RL response only depends on the irradiation temperature. We recommend that calibration should be carried out at the same irradiation temperature at which the measurement is performed (i.e. at body temperature for in vivo measurements). The overall change in the integrated OSL and RL signals...... and detection wavelengths. The reported temperature dependence seems to be a general property of Al2O3:C. (C) 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  7. Temperature dependence of fluctuation time scales in spin glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kenning, Gregory G.; Bowen, J.; Sibani, Paolo;

    2010-01-01

    Using a series of fast cooling protocols we have probed aging effects in the spin glass state as a function of temperature. Analyzing the logarithmic decay found at very long time scales within a simple phenomenological barrier model, leads to the extraction of the fluctuation time scale of the s...

  8. Temperature dependence of atomic vibrations in mono-layer graphene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allen, C.S.; Liberti, E.; Kim, J.S.; Xu, Q.; Fan, Y.; He, K.; Robertson, A.W.; Zandbergen, H.W.; Warner, J.H.; Kirkland, A.I.

    2015-01-01

    We have measured the mean square amplitude of both in- and out-of-plane lattice vibrations for mono-layer graphene at temperatures ranging from ∼100 K to 1300 K. The amplitude of lattice vibrations was calculated from data extracted from selected area electron diffraction patterns recorded across a

  9. Temperature dependence of OSL decay curves: Experimental and theoretical aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McKeever, S.W.S.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Agersnap Larsen, N.;

    1997-01-01

    The factors which affect the shape of Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) decay curves are examined, both experimentally and theoretically, in an effort to understand and describe the behavior of OSL as a function of temperature. The processes considered include: (1) retrapping by shallow traps...

  10. Enzyme surface rigidity tunes the temperature dependence of catalytic rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaksen, Geir Villy; Åqvist, Johan; Brandsdal, Bjørn Olav

    2016-07-12

    The structural origin of enzyme adaptation to low temperature, allowing efficient catalysis of chemical reactions even near the freezing point of water, remains a fundamental puzzle in biocatalysis. A remarkable universal fingerprint shared by all cold-active enzymes is a reduction of the activation enthalpy accompanied by a more negative entropy, which alleviates the exponential decrease in chemical reaction rates caused by lowering of the temperature. Herein, we explore the role of protein surface mobility in determining this enthalpy-entropy balance. The effects of modifying surface rigidity in cold- and warm-active trypsins are demonstrated here by calculation of high-precision Arrhenius plots and thermodynamic activation parameters for the peptide hydrolysis reaction, using extensive computer simulations. The protein surface flexibility is systematically varied by applying positional restraints, causing the remarkable effect of turning the cold-active trypsin into a variant with mesophilic characteristics without changing the amino acid sequence. Furthermore, we show that just restraining a key surface loop causes the same effect as a point mutation in that loop between the cold- and warm-active trypsin. Importantly, changes in the activation enthalpy-entropy balance of up to 10 kcal/mol are almost perfectly balanced at room temperature, whereas they yield significantly higher rates at low temperatures for the cold-adapted enzyme.

  11. Le Chatelier's Principle Applied to the Temperature Dependence of Solubility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treptow, Richard S.

    1984-01-01

    One effect of temperature is its influence on solubility, and that effect is used as a common example when teaching Le Chatelier's principle. Attempts to clarify the question of whether the principle holds in the case of the solubility of ionic compounds in water by investigating the literature data in detail. (JN)

  12. Temperature-Dependent Nickel Release from Nickel-Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menne, T.; Solgaard, Per Bent

    1979-01-01

    Ni release from Danish 1 krone coins and metal buttons from jeans was measured at 20.degree. C in distilled water and at 35.degree. C in distilled water and synthetic sweat. The temperature elevation increased the Ni release from the coins and 2 of the 9 metal buttons investigated. The sensitivity...

  13. Temperature-dependent VNIR spectroscopy of hydrated Mg-sulfates

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, S.; Carli, C.; Tosi, F.; Beck, P.; Schmitt, B.; Piccioni, G.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Capaccioni, F.; Di Iorio, T.; Philippe, Sylvain

    2017-01-01

    We investigate two poly-hydrated magnesium sulfates, hexahydrite (MgSO4 · 6H2O) and epsomite (MgSO4 · 7H2O), in the visible and infrared (VNIR) spectral range 0.5/4.0 μm, as particulate for three different grain size ranges: 20-50 μm, 75-100 μm and 125-150 μm. All samples were measured in the 93-298 K temperature range. The spectra of these hydrated salts are characterized by strong OH absorption bands in the 1.0-1.5 μm region, and by H2O absorption bands near 2 and 3 μm. Other weak features show up at low temperatures near 1.75 μm (in both hexahydrite and epsomite) and 2.2 μm (only in hexahydrite). The spectral behavior of the absorption bands of these two minerals has been analyzed as a function of both grain size and temperature, deriving trends related to specific spectral parameters such as band center, band depth, band area, and band width. Hydrated minerals, in particular mono- and poly-hydrated sulfates, are present in planetary objects such as Mars and the icy Galilean satellites. Safe detection of these minerals shall rely on detailed laboratory investigation of these materials in different environmental conditions. Hence an accurate spectral analysis of such minerals as a function of temperature is key to better understand and constrain future observations.

  14. Temperature-dependent structure of Tb-doped magnetite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rice, Katherine P.; Russek, Stephen E., E-mail: stephen.russek@nist.gov; Shaw, Justin M.; Usselman, Robert J.; Evarts, Eric R.; Silva, Thomas J.; Nembach, Hans T. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States); Geiss, Roy H. [Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523 (United States); Arenholz, Elke [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Advanced Light Source, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Idzerda, Yves U. [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, Montana 59717 (United States)

    2015-02-09

    High quality 5 nm cubic Tb-doped magnetite nanoparticles have been synthesized by a wet-chemical method to investigate tailoring of magnetic properties for imaging and biomedical applications. We show that the Tb is incorporated into the octahedral 3+ sites. High-angle annular dark-field microscopy shows that the dopant is well-distributed throughout the particle, and x-ray diffraction measurements show a small lattice parameter shift with the inclusion of a rare-earth dopant. Magnetization and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism data indicate that the Tb spins are unpolarized and weakly coupled to the iron spin lattice at room temperature, and begin to polarize and couple to the iron oxide lattice at temperatures below 50 K. Broadband ferromagnetic resonance measurements show no increase in magnetic damping at room temperature for Tb-doped nanoparticles relative to undoped nanoparticles, further confirming weak coupling between Fe and Tb spins at room temperature. The Gilbert damping constant, α, is remarkably low for the Tb-doped nanoparticles, with α = 0.024 ± 0.003. These nanoparticles, which have a large fixed moment, a large fluctuating moment and optically active rare-earth elements, are potential high-relaxivity T1 and T2 MRI agents with integrated optical signatures.

  15. Temperature-dependent structure of Tb-doped magnetite nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Katherine P.; Russek, Stephen E.; Geiss, Roy H.; Shaw, Justin M.; Usselman, Robert J.; Evarts, Eric R.; Silva, Thomas J.; Nembach, Hans T.; Arenholz, Elke; Idzerda, Yves U.

    2015-02-01

    High quality 5 nm cubic Tb-doped magnetite nanoparticles have been synthesized by a wet-chemical method to investigate tailoring of magnetic properties for imaging and biomedical applications. We show that the Tb is incorporated into the octahedral 3+ sites. High-angle annular dark-field microscopy shows that the dopant is well-distributed throughout the particle, and x-ray diffraction measurements show a small lattice parameter shift with the inclusion of a rare-earth dopant. Magnetization and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism data indicate that the Tb spins are unpolarized and weakly coupled to the iron spin lattice at room temperature, and begin to polarize and couple to the iron oxide lattice at temperatures below 50 K. Broadband ferromagnetic resonance measurements show no increase in magnetic damping at room temperature for Tb-doped nanoparticles relative to undoped nanoparticles, further confirming weak coupling between Fe and Tb spins at room temperature. The Gilbert damping constant, α, is remarkably low for the Tb-doped nanoparticles, with α = 0.024 ± 0.003. These nanoparticles, which have a large fixed moment, a large fluctuating moment and optically active rare-earth elements, are potential high-relaxivity T1 and T2 MRI agents with integrated optical signatures.

  16. Temperature Dependences on Various Types of Photovoltaic (PV) Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audwinto, I. A.; Leong, C. S.; Sopian, K.; Zaidi, S. H.

    2015-09-01

    Temperature is one of the key roles in PV technology performance, since with the increases of temperature the open-circuit voltage will drop accordingly so do the electrical efficiency and power output generation. Different types of Photovoltaic (PV) panels- silicon solar panels and thin film solar panels; mono-crystalline, poly-crystalline, CIS, CIGS, CdTe, back-contact, and bi-facial solar panel under 40°C to 70°C approximately with 5°C interval have been comparatively analyzed their actual performances with uniformly distribution of light illumination from tungsten halogen light source, ±500W/m2. DC-Electronic Load and Data Logger devices with “Lab View” data program interface were used to collect all the necessary parameters in this study. Time needed to achieve a certain degree of temperature was recorded. Generally, each of the panels needed 15 minutes to 20 minutes to reach 70°C. Halogen based light source is not compatible in short wave-length in response to thin-film solar cell. Within this period of times, all the panels are facing a performance loss up to 15%. Other parameters; Pmax, Vmax, Imax, Voc, Isc, Rserries, Rshunt, Fillfactor were collected as study cases. Our study is important in determining Photovoltaic type selection and system design as for study or industrial needed under different temperature condition.

  17. Direct method for calculating temperature-dependent transport properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Y.; Yuan, Z.; Wesselink, R.J.H.; Starikov, A.A.; Schilfgaarde, van M.; Kelly, P.J.

    2015-01-01

    We show how temperature-induced disorder can be combined in a direct way with first-principles scattering theory to study diffusive transport in real materials. Excellent (good) agreement with experiment is found for the resistivity of Cu, Pd, Pt (and Fe) when lattice (and spin) disorder are calcula

  18. Anomalous temperature variation of thermoelectric power in CdO and Ag{sub 2}O substituted lead vanadate glass system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhujanga Rao, Ch. [Department of Physics, Andhra University, Visakhapatnam 530 003, AP (India)]. E-mail: bhujang_rao@yahoo.com; Ramesh, K.V. [Department of Engineering physics, GITAM College Of Engineering, Rushikonda Visakhapatnam 530 045, AP (India)]. E-mail: kv_ramesh5@yahoo.co.in; Sastry, D.L. [Department of Physics, Andhra University, Visakhapatnam 530 003, AP (India)]. E-mail: sastry_dl@yahoo.co.in

    2006-06-15

    Thermoelectric power studies on eutectic lead vanadate glass system in which CdO or Ag{sub 2}O is substituted for PbO upto 15 mol% are reported in the temperature range 300-500 K. It was observed that while the un-substituted samples exhibit almost temperature-independent thermoelectric power, the CdO and Ag{sub 2}O substituted samples exhibit thermoelectric power with marked temperature dependence. The Ag{sub 2}O substituted samples remain n-type with an increase in the magnitude of thermoelectric power while the CdO substituted samples exhibit a change from n- to p-type as the temperature is increased. Application of Emin's formula gives a reasonable estimate of the disorder energy (W {sub D}) for Ag{sub 2}O substituted samples, while for CdO substituted samples the W {sub D} values obtained are supposed to be too large to be acceptable. These observations are discussed in the light of recently reported results on similar systems.

  19. Finite-element technique applied to heat conduction in solids with temperature dependent thermal conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Ramirez, G.; Oden, J. T.

    1969-01-01

    Finite element method applied to heat conduction in solids with temperature dependent thermal conductivity, using nonlinear constitutive equation for heat ABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGHIABCDEFGH

  20. On the gauge dependence of vacuum transitions at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garny, Mathias [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Konstandin, Thomas [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland)

    2012-05-15

    In principle, observables as for example the sphaleron rate or the tunneling rate in a first-order phase transition are gauge-independent. However, in practice a gauge dependence is introduced in explicit perturbative calculations due to the breakdown of the gradient expansion of the effective action in the symmetric phase. We exemplify the situation using the effective potential of the Abelian Higgs model in the general renormalizable gauge. Still, we find that the quantitative dependence on the gauge choice is small for gauges that are consistent with the perturbative expansion.

  1. A Study of the Temperature Dependence of Bienzyme Systems and Enzymatic Chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Kotov

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available It is known that most enzyme-facilitated reactions are highly temperature dependent processes. In general, the temperature coefficient, Q10, of a simple reaction reaches 2.0–3.0. Nevertheless, some enzyme-controlled processes have much lower Q10 (about 1.0, which implies that the process is almost temperature independent, even if individual reactions involved in the process are themselves highly temperature dependent. In this work, we investigate a possible mechanism for this apparent temperature compensation: simple mathematical models are used to study how varying types of enzyme reactions are affected by temperature. We show that some bienzyme-controlled processes may be almost temperature independent if the modules involved in the reaction have similar temperature dependencies, even if individually, these modules are strongly temperature dependent. Further, we show that in non-reversible enzyme chains the stationary concentrations of metabolites are dependent only on the relationship between the temperature dependencies of the first and last modules, whilst in reversible reactions, there is a dependence on every module. Our findings suggest a mechanism by which the metabolic processes taking place within living organisms may be regulated, despite strong variation in temperature.

  2. Temperature-dependent high resolution absorption cross sections of propane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beale, Christopher A.; Hargreaves, Robert J.; Bernath, Peter F.

    2016-10-01

    High resolution (0.005 cm-1) absorption cross sections have been measured for pure propane (C3H8). These cross sections cover the 2550-3500 cm-1 region at five temperatures (from 296 to 700 K) and were measured using a Fourier transform spectrometer and a quartz cell heated by a tube furnace. Calibrations were made by comparison to the integrated cross sections of propane from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. These are the first high resolution absorption cross sections of propane for the 3 μm region at elevated temperatures. The cross sections provided may be used to monitor propane in combustion environments and in astronomical sources such as the auroral regions of Jupiter, brown dwarfs and exoplanets.

  3. The temperature dependence of the friction in the fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaji, Shuhei [Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Wako, Saitama (Japan)

    1996-03-01

    We study the slow collective motion at finite excitation on the basis of the linear response theory. The transport coefficients such as friction {gamma}, inertia M and local stiffness C formulated within a locally harmonic approximation are computed along the fission path of {sup 224}Th. It is found that the effective damping rate {eta} = {gamma}/=2{radical}(M|C|)= increases with the temperature T in accord with the fission experiment with the emission of {gamma}-rays. (author)

  4. The Temperature-Dependent Nature of Coronal Dimmings

    CERN Document Server

    Robbrecht, Eva

    2010-01-01

    The opening-up of the magnetic field during solar eruptive events is often accompanied by a dimming of the local coronal emission. From observations of filament eruptions recorded with the Extreme-Ultraviolet Imager on STEREO during 2008-2009, it is evident that these dimmings are much more pronounced in 19.5 nm than in the lower-temperature line 17.1 nm, as viewed either on the disk or above the limb. We conclude that most of the cooler coronal plasma is not ejected but remains gravitationally bound when the loops open up. This result is consistent with Doppler measurements by Imada and coworkers, who found that the upflow speeds in a transient coronal hole increased dramatically above a temperature of 1 MK; it is also consistent with the quasistatic behavior of polar plumes, as compared with the hotter interplume regions that are the main source of the fast solar wind. When the open flux reconnects and closes down again, the trapped plasma is initially heated to such high temperatures that it is no longer v...

  5. Temperature Dependence of Short-Range Order in β-Brass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, O.W.; Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage

    1967-01-01

    Critical scattering of neutrons around the superlattice reflections (1, 0, 0) and (1, 1, 1) from a single crystal of beta-brass has been measured at temperatures from 2 to 25deg C above the transition temperature. The temperature dependence of the critical peak intensity, proportional to the susc......Critical scattering of neutrons around the superlattice reflections (1, 0, 0) and (1, 1, 1) from a single crystal of beta-brass has been measured at temperatures from 2 to 25deg C above the transition temperature. The temperature dependence of the critical peak intensity, proportional...

  6. Nuclear Quadrupole Double Resonance Investigation of the Anomalous Temperature Coefficients of the Strong Hydrogen Bonds in Sodium and Potassium Deuterium Diacetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Eric Max

    This thesis was directed at learning more about the unusual electronic environment near hydrogen within strong hydrogen bonds. "Strong" hydrogen bonds are unique in that the hydrogen atom is symmetrically located, or nearly so, between two electronegative atoms; the bond energies are relatively large. In a "normal" hydrogen bond the hydrogen atom is bonded to, and thus physically closer to, a parent atom, and only weakly attracted to another electronegative atom; bond energies are typically small. To examine these bonds, deuterium was substituted for hydrogen and the electric quadrupole coupling constant (QCC) of deuterium was measured using field cycling nuclear magnetic resonance. The electric quadrupole moment of deuterium is sensitive to changes in the surrounding electric field gradient, and is thus a good probe of the immediate electronic structure. The results show that the temperature dependence of the QCC is opposite to, and much larger than, what one would normally expect to observe for deuterium. The QCC is found to decrease strongly with decreasing temperature. This project was the first to study in detail the temperature dependence of deuterium QCCs in strong hydrogen bonds. The magnitude of the deuterium QCCs for the diacetates was found to be strongly depressed relative to typical values for deuterium. These results parallel large shifts in the infrared vibrational frequencies observed in many molecules which contain strong hydrogen bonds. The asymmetry parameter, which is a measure of the departure from axial symmetry of the electric field gradient (EFG) at deuterium, was found to be unusually large for what are known to be linear, or nearly linear, three-center bonds. Based on ab initio Hartree-Fock calculations aimed at determining the EFG at H in the archetypal bifluoride ion, F-H-F^-, the electronic charge density is drastically depleted at H. It is believed that the large reduction in the charge density allows the deuterium EFG to be highly

  7. Temperature Dependence of Diffusivities in Liquid Elements (LMD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banish, R. Michael; Rosenberger, Franz

    1998-01-01

    This research was to advance the understanding of diffusion mechanisms in liquid metals and alloys through accurate diffusivity measurements over a wide range of temperatures, including the proximity of the materials melting points. Specifically, it was driven towards developing a methodology (and subsequent flight hardware) to enable several diffusion coefficient measurements (i.e., at several different temperatures) to be performed using a single sample. The Liquid Metal Diffusion (LMD) was funded as a Flight Definition Project in February 1993 in response to NRA 91-OSSA-20 (Microgravity Science and Applications Division). The Science Concept Review for LAID was held during April 1994. In January 1995 we were informed that we had failed this review and the project was change to ground-based activities only. A new proposal was submitted for the next NRA addressing the panels concerns. As part of NASA's Risk Mitigation program, a scaled-down version of the hardware was funded in July of 1995 for a flight opportunity utilizing experiment on the Microgravity Isolation Mount. This experiment was to determine the self-diffusivity of indium at 185 C. The LMD was transferred to the Mir Space Station in STS-81 and returned on STS-84 (January - May 1997). Three, out of five, self-diffusion data sets were returned. A description of this experiment/hardware is included below. This summary is only intended to give the reader an overview of the results obtained for the tasks outlined in the original proposal. Research that was not published is explained in more detail. At the end of this report is a list of refereed publications and invited talks that were given as a result of this work. The reader is directed to these for further details. Attachment: Real-time diffusivity measurements in liquids at several temperatures with one sample, On the insensitivity of liquid diffusivity measurements to deviations from 1D transport, and Numerical simulations of the convective

  8. Exact conditions on the temperature dependence of density functionals

    CERN Document Server

    Burke, Kieron; Grabowski, Paul E; Pribram-Jones, Aurora

    2015-01-01

    Universal exact conditions guided the construction of most ground-state density functional approximations in use today. We derive the relation between the entropy and Mermin free energy density functionals for thermal density functional theory. Both the entropy and sum of kinetic and electron-electron repulsion functionals are shown to be monotonically increasing with temperature, while the Mermin functional is concave downwards. Analogous relations are found for both exchange and correlation. The importance of these conditions is illustrated in two extremes: the Hubbard dimer and the uniform gas.

  9. Exact conditions on the temperature dependence of density functionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, K.; Smith, J. C.; Grabowski, P. E.; Pribram-Jones, A.

    2016-05-01

    Universal exact conditions guided the construction of most ground-state density functional approximations in use today. We derive the relation between the entropy and Mermin free energy density functionals for thermal density functional theory. Both the entropy and sum of kinetic and electron-electron repulsion functionals are shown to be monotonically increasing with temperature, while the Mermin functional is concave downwards. Analogous relations are found for both exchange and correlation. The importance of these conditions is illustrated in two extremes: the Hubbard dimer and the uniform gas.

  10. Temperature Dependence of Magnetic Properties of SmCo/FeCo Multilayer Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Sm22Co78/Fe65Co35/Sm22Co78/Fe65Co35 multilayer films were prepared by magnetron sputter ing. The temperature dependence of coercivity (He), remanence (Mr) and reduced remanence (Mr/Ms) has been measured. The coercivity decreases with increasing of temperature. The remanence decreases with increasing the temperature from 26 to 100C, and then increases with continuously increasing the temperature from 100 to 150℃. The reduced remanence increases with increasing the temperature.

  11. The charmonium dissociation in an "anomalous wind"

    CERN Document Server

    Sadofyev, Andrey V

    2016-01-01

    We study the charmonium dissociation in a strongly coupled chiral plasma in the presence of magnetic field and axial charge imbalance. This type of plasma carries ``anomalous flow" induced by the chiral anomaly and exhibits novel transport phenomena such as chiral magnetic effect. We found that the ``anomalous flow" would modify the charmonium color screening length by using the gauge/gravity correspondence. We derive an analytical expression quantifying the ``anomalous flow" experienced by a charmonium for a large class of chiral plasma with a gravity dual. We elaborate on the similarity and {\\it qualitative} difference between anomalous effects on the charmonium color screening length which are {\\it model-dependent} and those on the heavy quark drag force which are fixed by the second law of thermodynamics. We speculate on the possible charmonium dissociation induced by chiral anomaly in heavy ion collisions.

  12. Electrical conduction in polycrystalline CVD diamond: Temperature dependent impedance measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, H.; Williams, O.A.; Jackman, R.B. [Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University College London, Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom); Rudkin, R.; Atkinson, A. [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2002-10-16

    In this paper, we report the first measurement of impedance on freestanding diamond films from 0.1 Hz to 10 MHz up to 300 C. A wide range of CVD materials have been investigated, but here we concentrate on 'black' diamond grown by MWPECVD. The Cole-Cole (Z' via Z{sup ''}) plots are well fitted to a RC parallel circuit model and the equivalent resistance and capacitance for the diamond films have been estimated using the Zview curve fitting. The results show only one single semicircle response at each temperature measured. It was found that the resistance decreases from 62 M{omega} at room temperature to 4 k{omega} at 300 C, with an activation energy around 0.51 eV. The equivalent capacitance is maintained at the level of 10{sup 2} pF up to 300 C, suggesting that the diamond grain boundaries are dominating the conduction. At 400 C, the impedance at low frequencies shows a linear tail, which can be explained that the ac polarization of diamond/Au interface occurs. (Abstract Copyright [2002], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  13. Temperature dependent rheological property of copper oxide nanoparticles suspension (nanofluid).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Devdatta P; Das, Debendra K; Chukwu, Godwin A

    2006-04-01

    A nanofluid is the dispersion of metallic solid particles of nanometer size in a base fluid such as water or ethylene glycol. The presence of these nanoparticles affects the physical properties of a nanofluid via various factors including shear stress, particle loading, and temperature. In this paper the rheological behavior of copper oxide (CuO) nanoparticles of 29 nm average diameter dispersed in deionized (DI) water is investigated over a range of volumetric solids concentrations of 5 to 15% and various temperatures varying from 278-323 degrees K. These experiments showed that these nanofluids exhibited time-independent pseudoplastic and shear-thinning behavior. The suspension viscosities of nanofluids decrease exponentially with respect to the shear rate. Suspension viscosity follows the correlation in the form ln(mus) = A(1/T)-B, where constants A and B are the functions of volumetric concentrations. The calculated viscosities from the developed correlations and experimental values were found to be within +/- 10% of their values.

  14. Temperature dependent simulation of diamond depleted Schottky PIN diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathwar, Raghuraj; Dutta, Maitreya; Koeck, Franz A. M.; Nemanich, Robert J.; Chowdhury, Srabanti; Goodnick, Stephen M.

    2016-06-01

    Diamond is considered as an ideal material for high field and high power devices due to its high breakdown field, high lightly doped carrier mobility, and high thermal conductivity. The modeling and simulation of diamond devices are therefore important to predict the performances of diamond based devices. In this context, we use Silvaco® Atlas, a drift-diffusion based commercial software, to model diamond based power devices. The models used in Atlas were modified to account for both variable range and nearest neighbor hopping transport in the impurity bands associated with high activation energies for boron doped and phosphorus doped diamond. The models were fit to experimentally reported resistivity data over a wide range of doping concentrations and temperatures. We compare to recent data on depleted diamond Schottky PIN diodes demonstrating low turn-on voltages and high reverse breakdown voltages, which could be useful for high power rectifying applications due to the low turn-on voltage enabling high forward current densities. Three dimensional simulations of the depleted Schottky PIN diamond devices were performed and the results are verified with experimental data at different operating temperatures

  15. Temperature Dependence on The Synthesis of Jatropha Biolubricant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resul, Muhammad Faiz M Gunam; Ghazi, Tinia Idaty Mohd; Idris, Azni, E-mail: tinia@eng.upm.edu.my [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2011-02-15

    Jatropha oil has good potential as the renewable energy as well as lubricant feedstock. The synthesis of jatropha biolubricant was performed by transesterification of jatropha methyl ester (JME) with trimethyl-ol-propane (TMP) with sodium methoxide (NaOCH3) catalyst. The effects of temperature on the synthesis were studied at a range between 120 deg. C and 200 deg. C with pressure kept at 10mbar. The conversion of JME to jatropha biolubricant was found to be the highest (47%) at 200 deg. C. However, it was suggested that the optimum temperature of the reaction is at 150 deg. C due to insignificant improvement in biolubricant production. To maintain forward reaction, the excess amount of JME was maintained at 3.9:1 ratios to TMP. Kinetic study was done and compared. The synthesis was found to follow a second order reaction with overall rate constant of 1.49 x 10-1 (%wt/wt.min.deg. C)-1. The estimated activation energy was 3.94 kJ/mol. Pour point for jatropha biolubricant was at -3 deg. C and Viscosity Index (VI) ranged from 178 to 183. The basic properties of jatropha biolubricant, pour point and viscosities are found comparable to other plant based biolubricant, namely palm oil and soybean based biolubricant.

  16. Temperature Dependence on The Synthesis of Jatropha Biolubricant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunam Resul, Muhammad Faiz M.; Idaty Mohd Ghazi, Tinia; Idris, Azni

    2011-02-01

    Jatropha oil has good potential as the renewable energy as well as lubricant feedstock. The synthesis of jatropha biolubricant was performed by transesterification of jatropha methyl ester (JME) with trimethyl-ol-propane (TMP) with sodium methoxide (NaOCH3) catalyst. The effects of temperature on the synthesis were studied at a range between 120°C and 200°C with pressure kept at 10mbar. The conversion of JME to jatropha biolubricant was found to be the highest (47%) at 200°C. However, it was suggested that the optimum temperature of the reaction is at 150°C due to insignificant improvement in biolubricant production. To maintain forward reaction, the excess amount of JME was maintained at 3.9:1 ratios to TMP. Kinetic study was done and compared. The synthesis was found to follow a second order reaction with overall rate constant of 1.49 × 10-1 (%wt/wt.min.°C)-1. The estimated activation energy was 3.94 kJ/mol. Pour point for jatropha biolubricant was at -3°C and Viscosity Index (VI) ranged from 178 to 183. The basic properties of jatropha biolubricant, pour point and viscosities are found comparable to other plant based biolubricant, namely palm oil and soybean based biolubricant.

  17. Large anomalous Hall effect driven by a nonvanishing Berry curvature in the noncolinear antiferromagnet Mn3Ge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Ajaya K; Fischer, Julia Erika; Sun, Yan; Yan, Binghai; Karel, Julie; Komarek, Alexander C; Shekhar, Chandra; Kumar, Nitesh; Schnelle, Walter; Kübler, Jürgen; Felser, Claudia; Parkin, Stuart S P

    2016-04-01

    It is well established that the anomalous Hall effect displayed by a ferromagnet scales with its magnetization. Therefore, an antiferromagnet that has no net magnetization should exhibit no anomalous Hall effect. We show that the noncolinear triangular antiferromagnet Mn3Ge exhibits a large anomalous Hall effect comparable to that of ferromagnetic metals; the magnitude of the anomalous conductivity is ~500 (ohm·cm)(-1) at 2 K and ~50 (ohm·cm)(-1) at room temperature. The angular dependence of the anomalous Hall effect measurements confirms that the small residual in-plane magnetic moment has no role in the observed effect except to control the chirality of the spin triangular structure. Our theoretical calculations demonstrate that the large anomalous Hall effect in Mn3Ge originates from a nonvanishing Berry curvature that arises from the chiral spin structure, and that also results in a large spin Hall effect of 1100 (ħ/e) (ohm·cm)(-1), comparable to that of platinum. The present results pave the way toward the realization of room temperature antiferromagnetic spintronics and spin Hall effect-based data storage devices.

  18. Temperature dependent nonlinear Hall effect in macroscopic Si-MOS antidot array

    OpenAIRE

    Kuntsevich, A. Yu.; Shupltetsov, A. V.; Nunuparov, M. S.

    2015-01-01

    By measuring magnetoresistance and Hall effect in classically moderate perpendicular magnetic field in Si-MOSFET-type macroscopic antidot array we found a novel effect: nonlinear with field, temperature- and density-dependent Hall resistivity. We discuss qualitative explanation of the phenomenon and suggest that it might originate from strong temperature dependence of the resistivity and mobility in the shells of the antidots.

  19. Temperature dependence of the magnetization of disc shaped NiO nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Stine Nyborg; Lindgard, P.A.; Lefmann, Kim

    2002-01-01

    as a temperature dependent contribution of a structural peak in contrast to bulk NiO. The two magnetic signals vanish at the same temperature. The data are interpreted on the basis of an extended mean field model on disc shaped NiO particles. This model includes the finite size dependence of the effective field...

  20. Dependence of electric strength on the ambient temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Čaja, Alexander, E-mail: alexander.caja@fstroj.uniza.sk, E-mail: patrik.nemec@fstroj.uniza.sk, E-mail: milan.malcho@fstroj.uniza.sk; Nemec, Patrik, E-mail: alexander.caja@fstroj.uniza.sk, E-mail: patrik.nemec@fstroj.uniza.sk, E-mail: milan.malcho@fstroj.uniza.sk; Malcho, Milan, E-mail: alexander.caja@fstroj.uniza.sk, E-mail: patrik.nemec@fstroj.uniza.sk, E-mail: milan.malcho@fstroj.uniza.sk [University of Žilina, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Department of Power Engeneering, Univerzitná 1, 010 26 Žilina (Slovakia)

    2014-08-06

    At present, the volume concentration of electronic components in their miniaturization to different types of microchips and increasing their performance raises the problem of cooling such elements due to the increasing density of heat flow of heat loss. Compliance with safe operating temperature of active semiconductor element is very closely related to the reliability and durability not only components, but also the entire device. Often it is also necessary to electrically isolate the unit from the side of the cooler air. Cooling demand by natural convection is typical for applications with high operating reliability. To the reliability of the system for removing heat loss increased, it is necessary to minimize need to use the mechanically or electrically powered elements, such as circulation pumps or fans. Experience to date with applications of heat pipe in specific systems appears to be the most appropriate method of cooling.

  1. Temperature Dependence of PMD of the Optical Cables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, S.J. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    2000-03-01

    This report is relevant to the project {sup K}EPCO All-Optical Network Project{sup w}hich is being carried out by Computer and Communication Group in Power System Laboratory. This report is planned to be used as a reference guide for the PMD strategy of the KEPCO optical networks. The PMD of the optical cable installed in the air as OPGW is greatly affected by the environmental temperature change, unlike that of the optical cable installed underground. The variance was turned out to be 70% larger compared with that of underground optical cable and the time scale of the PMD was less than 5 min, in the worst case. Hence, the compensation technology should be chosen taking into account the properties of the aerial optical cables. (author). 6 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Temperature dependence of the lowest excitonic transition for an InAs ultrathin quantum well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S. D.; Porwal, S.; Sharma, T. K.; Rustagi, K. C.

    2006-03-01

    Temperature dependent photoluminescence and photoreflectance techniques are used to investigate the lowest excitonic transition of InAs ultrathin quantum well. It is shown that the temperature dependence of the lowest energy transition follows the band gap variation of GaAs barrier, which is well reproduced by calculated results based on the envelope function approximation with significant corrections due to strain and temperature dependences of the confinement potential. A redshift in photoluminescence peak energy compared to photoreflectance is observed at low temperatures. This is interpreted to show that the photoluminescence signal originates from the recombination of carriers occupying the band-tail states below the lowest critical point.

  3. Simulation of Temperature-Dependent Charge Transport in Organic Semiconductors with Various Degrees of Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, Alexander; Kranz, Julian J; Elstner, Marcus

    2016-07-12

    Different trends in the temperature dependence of the mobility can be observed in organic semiconductors, which constitutes a serious challenge for theoretical approaches. In this work, we apply an atomistic bottom-up simulation for the calculation of temperature-dependent mobilities of a broad selection of materials, ranging from single crystal to amorphous solid. We evaluate how well the method is able to distinguish temperature dependences of different materials and how the findings relate to experimental observations. The applied method is able to cover the full range of temperature dependencies from activated transport in amorphous materials to band-like transport in crystals. In well-characterized materials, we find good agreement with the experiment and a band-like temperature dependence. In less-ordered materials, we find discrepancies from the experiment that indicated that experimentally studied materials possess a higher degree of disorder than do the simulated defect-free morphologies.

  4. Integrated optic current transducers incorporating photonic crystal fiber for reduced temperature dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Woo-Sung; Kim, Sung-Moon; Oh, Min-Cheol

    2015-08-24

    Optical current transducers (OCT) are indispensable for accurate monitoring of large electrical currents in an environment suffering from severe electromagnetic interference. Temperature dependence of OCTs caused by its components, such as wave plates and optical fibers, should be reduced to allow temperature-independent operation. A photonic crystal fiber with a structural optical birefringence was incorporated instead of a PM fiber, and a spun PM fiber was introduced to overcome the temperature-dependent linear birefringence of sensing fiber coil. Moreover, an integrated optic device that provides higher stability than fiber-optics was employed to control the polarization and detect the phase of the sensed optical signal. The proposed OCT exhibited much lower temperature dependence than that from a previous study. The OCT satisfied the 0.5 accuracy class (IIEC 60044-8) and had a temperature dependence less than ± 1% for a temperature range of 25 to 78 °C.

  5. Anomalous ionic conductivity of Sc sub 2 (WO sub 4) sub 3 mediated by structural changes at high pressures and temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Secco, R A; Imanaka, N; Adachi, G

    2002-01-01

    The ionic conductivity of Sc sub 2 (WO sub 4) sub 3 at 400 deg. C shows a normal decrease with increase in pressure up to 2.9 GPa but then increases anomalously at pressures up to 4.3 GPa. Synchrotron in situ x-ray diffraction results show that Sc sub 2 (WO sub 4) sub 3 undergoes pressure-induced amorphization at pressures coincident with the reversal in conductivity behaviour. The loss of crystal structure at high pressure may be associated with the property of negative thermal expansion in Sc sub 2 (WO sub 4) sub 3.

  6. Effect of interband interactions on the pressure dependence on transition temperature of MgB2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbuu, Okechukwu A.; Abah, Obinna

    2015-12-01

    A two-band BCS model with interactions, both phonon and non-phonon induced interactions, were employed to investigate the pressure dependence on superconducting transition temperature of two-band superconductor. We derived the transition temperature and its pressure dependence within Bogoliubov--Valatin formalism for magnesium diboride superconductor. We examined the influence of interband interactions on transition temperature at varying pressure and analyzed the relevance of this calculation in magnesium diboride, MgB2.

  7. Temperature dependence of the Raman-active phonon frequencies in indium sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasanly, N. M.; Özkan, H.; Aydinli, A.; Yilmaz, İ.

    1999-03-01

    The temperature dependence of the Raman-active mode frequencies in indium sulfide was measured in the range from 10 to 300 K. The analysis of the temperature dependence of the A g intralayer optical modes show that Raman frequency shift results from the change of harmonic frequency with volume expansion and anharmonic coupling to phonons of other branches. The pure-temperature contribution (phonon-phonon coupling) is due to three- and four-phonon processes.

  8. Temperature-Dependent Diffusion Coefficients from ab initio Computations: Hydrogen in Nickel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E Wimmer; W Wolf; J Sticht; P Saxe; C Geller; R Najafabadi; G Young

    2006-03-16

    The temperature-dependent mass diffusion coefficient is computed using transition state theory. Ab initio supercell phonon calculations of the entire system provide the attempt frequency, the activation enthalpy, and the activation entropy as a function of temperature. Effects due to thermal lattice expansion are included and found to be significant. Numerical results for the case of hydrogen in nickel demonstrate a strong temperature dependence of the migration enthalpy and entropy. Trapping in local minima along the diffusion path has a pronounced effect especially at low temperatures. The computed diffusion coefficients with and without trapping bracket the available experimental values over the entire temperature range between 0 and 1400 K.

  9. Measured Temperature Dependence of the cos-phi Conductance in Josephson Tunnel Junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, O. H.; Mygind, Jesper; Pedersen, Niels Falsig

    1977-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the cosϕ conductance in Sn-O-Sn Josephson tunnel junctions has been measured just below the critical temperature, Tc. From the resonant microwave response at the junction plasma frequency as the temperature is decreased from Tc it is deduced that the amplitude...

  10. Study of temperature dependent local structure by polarized Cu K-edge EXAFS measurements on La sub 2 sub - sub x Sr sub x CuO sub 4 (x=0.105, 0.13, 0.20)

    CERN Document Server

    Saini, N L; Bianconi, A; Oyanagi, H; Ito, T; Oka, K

    2003-01-01

    We have studied temperature dependent local structure of superconducting La sub 2 sub - sub x Sr sub x CuO sub 4 (0.105, 0.13, 0.20) single crystals by Cu K-edge extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements with polarization parallel to the in-plane Cu-O bonds. We find that, while underdoped crystals (x=0.105, 0.13) show anomalous temperature dependence, similar to the case of optimally doped system (x=0.15), overdoped crystal (x=0.20) does not reveal such anomaly. Correlated Debye-Waller factor (DWF) of the Cu-O bonds (distance broadening) has been used as an order parameter to determine characteristic local displacements in the CuO sub 2 plane. The amplitude of temperature dependent step-like increase in the DWF at low temperature decreases with increasing doping. It has been discussed that decreasing electron-lattice interaction with increasing doping, shown by angle resolved photoemission measurements, is closely related to the evolving anomalous local CuO sub 2 distortion and charge inho...

  11. Experimental determination of monoethanolamine protonation constant and its temperature dependency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma’mun Sholeh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon dioxide as one of the major contributors to the global warming problem is produced in large quantities by many important industries and its emission seems to rise from year to year. Aminebased absorption is one of the methods to capture CO2 from its sources. As a reactive system, mass transfer and chemical reaction take place simultaneously. In a vapor-liquid equilibrium model for the CO2-amine-water system, some parameters such as mass transfer coefficients and chemical equilibrium constants need to be known. However, some parameters could be determined experimentally and the rests could be regressed from the model. The protonation constant (pKa, as one of the model parameters, could then be measured experimentally. The purpose of this study is to measure the pKa of monoethanolamine (MEA at a range of temperatures from 303 to 330K by a potentiometric titration method. The experimental data obtained were in a good agreement with the literature data. The pKa data from this work together with those from the literature were then correlated in an empirical correlation to be used for future research.

  12. DFPT approach to the temperature dependence of electronic band energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulanger, Paul; Cote, Michel; Gonze, Xavier

    2010-03-01

    The energy bands of semiconductors exhibit significant shifts and broadening with temperature at constant volume. This is an effect of the direct renormalization of band energies due to electron-phonon interactions. In search of an efficient linear response DFT approach to this effect, beyond semi-empirical approximation or frozen- phonon DFT, we have implemented formulas derived by Allen and Heine [J. Phys. C 9, 2305 (1976)] inside the ABINIT package. We have found that such formulas need a great number of bands, O(1000), to properly converge the thermal corrections of deep potential well atoms, i.e. elements of the first row. This leads to heavy computational costs even for simple systems like diamond. The DFPT formalism can be used to circumvent entirely the need for conduction bands by computing the first-order wave-functions using the self-consistent Sternheimer equation. We will compare the results of both formalism demonstrating that the DFPT approach reproduces the correct converged results of the formulas of Allen and Heine.

  13. Global strong solution to compressible Navier-Stokes equations with density dependent viscosity and temperature dependent heat conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Ran; Guo, Ai; Zhu, Changjiang

    2017-04-01

    We obtain existence and uniqueness of global strong solution to one-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations for ideal polytropic gas flow, with density dependent viscosity and temperature dependent heat conductivity under stress-free and thermally insulated boundary conditions. Here we assume viscosity coefficient μ (ρ) = 1 +ρα and heat conductivity coefficient κ (θ) =θβ for all α ∈ [ 0 , ∞) and β ∈ (0 , + ∞).

  14. Effect of temperature-dependent energy-level shifts on a semiconductor's Peltier heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emin, David

    1984-11-01

    The Peltier heat of a charge carrier in a semiconductor is calculated for the situation in which the electronic energy levels are temperature dependent. The temperature dependences of the electronic energy levels, generally observed optically, arise from their dependences on the vibrational energy of the lattice (e.g., as caused by thermal expansion). It has been suggested that these temperature dependences will typically have a major effect on the Peltier heat. The Peltier heat associated with a given energy level is a thermodynamic quantity; it is the product of the temperature and the change of the entropy of the system when a carrier is added in that level. As such, the energy levels cannot be treated as explicitly temperature dependent. The electron-lattice interaction causing the temperature dependence must be expressly considered. It is found that the carrier's interaction with the atomic vibrations lowers its electronic energy. However, the interaction of the carrier with the atomic vibrations also causes an infinitesimal lowering (~1N) of each of the N vibrational frequencies. As a result, there is a finite carrier-induced increase in the average vibrational energy. Above the Debye temperature, this cancels the lowering of the carrier's electronic energy. Thus, the standard Peltier-heat formula, whose derivation generally ignores the temperature dependence of the electronic energy levels, is regained. This explains the apparent success of the standard formula in numerous analyses of electronic transport experiments.

  15. Temperature dependence of amino acid side chain IR absorptions in the amide I' region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Benjamin A; Literati, Alex; Ball, Borden; Kubelka, Jan

    2014-05-01

    Amide I' IR spectra are widely used for studies of structural changes in peptides and proteins as a function of temperature. Temperature dependent absorptions of amino acid side-chains that overlap the amide I' may significantly complicate the structural analyses. While the side-chain IR spectra have been investigated previously, thus far their dependence on temperature has not been reported. Here we present the study of the changes in the IR spectra with temperature for side-chain groups of aspartate, glutamate, asparagine, glutamine, arginine, and tyrosine in the amide I' region (in D2O). Band fitting analysis was employed to extract the temperature dependence of the individual spectral parameters, such as peak frequency, integrated intensity, band width, and shape. As expected, the side-chain IR bands exhibit significant changes with temperature. The majority of the spectral parameters, particularly the frequency and intensity, show linear dependence on temperature, but the direction and magnitude vary depending on the particular side-chain group. The exception is arginine, which exhibits a distinctly nonlinear frequency shift with temperature for its asymmetric CN3H5(+) bending signal, although a linear fit can account for this change to within ~1/3 cm(-1). The applicability of the determined spectral parameters for estimations of temperature-dependent side-chain absorptions in peptides and proteins are discussed.

  16. ANOMALOUS MAGNETIC FILMS,

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three types of anomalous nickel-iron magnetic films characterized by hysteresigraph and torque-magnetometer measurements; bitter-pattern observations; reprint from ’ Journal of Applied Physics .’

  17. Monitoring operating temperature and supply voltage in achieving high system dependability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khan, Muhammad Aamir; Kerkhoff, Hans G.

    2013-01-01

    System dependability being a set of number of attributes, of which the important reliability, heavily depends on operating temperature and supply voltage. Any change beyond the designed specifications may change the system performance and could result in system reliability and hence dependability pr

  18. Anomalous role change of tertiary amino and ester groups as hydrogen acceptors in eudragit E based solid dispersion depending on the concentration of naproxen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Hiroshi; Wakabayashi, Shinobu; Kikuchi, Junko; Ida, Yasuo; Kadota, Kazunori; Tozuka, Yuichi

    2015-04-01

    Eudragit E (EGE) is a basic polymer incorporating tertiary amino and ester groups. The role of the functional groups of EGE in the formation of solid dispersion (SD) with Naproxen (NAP) was investigated. The glass transition temperature (Tg) of EGE decreased with the plasticizing effect of NAP up to 20% weight ratio. Addition of NAP at over 30% induced a rise in Tg, with the maximum value being reached at 60% NAP. Further addition of NAP led to a rapid drop of the Tg. A dramatic difference of physical stability between the SDs including 60 and 70% NAP was confirmed. The SD including 70% NAP rapidly crystallized at 40 °C with 75% relative humidity, while the amorphous state could be maintained over 6 months in the SD with 60% NAP. The infrared and (13)C solid state-NMR spectra of the SDs suggested a formation of ionic interaction between the carboxylic acid of NAP and the amino group of EGE. The SD with 20% NAP raised the (13)C spin-lattice relaxation (T1) of the amino group, but it decreased with over 30% NAP. The change in the (13)C-T1 disappeared with 70% NAP. The (13)C-T1 of the ester group rose depending on the amount of NAP. From these findings, we concluded that the role as hydrogen acceptor shifted from the amine to the ester group with an increase in amount of NAP. Furthermore, the amino group of EGE did not contribute to the interaction at over 70% NAP. These phenomena could be strongly correlated with Tg and stability.

  19. Study of the Energy Dependence of the Anomalous Mean Free Path Effect by Means of High-energy ($\\geq$12 GeV/nucleon) Helium Nuclei

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The proposal concerns an extension to higher energies of previous experiments which have provided evidence for anomalously short reaction mean free paths among projectile fragments from heavy ion interactions.\\\\ \\\\ It is intended to provide information on the interaction properties of projectile fragments, mainly 3He, P, D, T as well as of scattered 4He nuclei in passive detectors exposed to beams of energies exceeding those available in previous experim factor of about 7. \\\\ \\\\ Interaction mean free paths and event topologies will be measured in a nuclear emulsion stack (LBL) of 7.5~cm~x~5~cm~x~25~cm dimensions. Decay effects will be recorded by comparing the activity of spallation residues in dense and diluted copper target assemblies (Marburg). Target fragmentation will be studied in a stack of silverchloride crystal foils (Frankfurt) of about 7~cm~x~6~cm~x~1~cm dimensions. The \\alpha beam ejected at EJ~62 will be used to provide both exposures at high intensity of 10|1|2 alphas on th and at low intensity ...

  20. Temperature Dependence and Magnetic Field Dependence of Quantum Point Contacts in Si-Inversion Layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, S.L.; Son, P.C. van; Wees, B.J. van; Klapwijk, T.M.

    1992-01-01

    The conductance of ballistic point contacts in high-mobility Si-inversion layers has been studied at several temperatures between 75 and 600 mK both without and in a magnetic field (up to 12T). When the width of constriction is varied in zero magnetic field, step-like features at multiples of 4e2/h

  1. Temperature dependence of nonlinear auto-oscillator linewidths: Application to spin-torque nano-oscillators

    OpenAIRE

    Tiberkevich, V. S.; Slavin, A. N.; Kim, Joo-Von

    2008-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the generation linewidth for an auto-oscillator with a nonlinear frequency shift is calculated. It is shown that the frequency nonlinearity creates a finite correlation time, tau, for the phase fluctuations. In the low-temperature limit in which the spectral linewidth is smaller than 1/tau, the line shape is approximately Lorentzian and the linewidth is linear in temperature. In the opposite high-temperature limit in which the linewidth is larger than 1/tau, the ...

  2. The effect of temperature dependent tissue parameters on acoustic radiation force induced displacements

    CERN Document Server

    Suomi, Visa; Konofagou, Elisa; Cleveland, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Multiple ultrasound elastography techniques rely on acoustic radiation force (ARF) in monitoring high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy. However, ARF is dependent on tissue attenuation and sound speed, both of which are also known to change with temperature making the therapy monitoring more challenging. Furthermore, the viscoelastic properties of tissue are also temperature dependent, which affects the displacements induced by ARF. The aim of this study is to quantify the temperature dependent changes in the acoustic and viscoelastic properties of liver and investigate their effect on ARF induced displacements by using both experimental methods and simulations. Furthermore, the temperature dependent viscoelastic properties of liver are experimentally measured over a frequency range of 0.1-200 Hz at temperatures reaching 80 C, and both conventional and fractional Zener models are used to fit the data. The fractional Zener model was found to fit better with the experimental viscoelasticity data with ...

  3. Temperature dependent coercivity and magnetization of light rare-earth Nd doped permalloy thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Chen [Physics Department, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China); Fu, Yu [Physics Department, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China); Institut Nanosciences et Cryogénie, CEA, 38054 Grenoble (France); Zhang, Dong [Physics Department, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China); School of Physics Science and Information Engineering, Liaocheng University, Liaocheng 252059 (China); Yuan, Shijun [Physics Department, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China); Zhai, Ya, E-mail: yazhai@seu.edu.cn [Physics Department, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China); Dong, Shuai [Physics Department, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China); Zhai, Hongru [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2015-01-15

    The temperature dependence of the magnetic properties of Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} thin films with dilute Nd dopants has been studied. The effect of Nd dopants on the hysteresis loops of Nd-doped Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} thin films is small at room temperature but large at low temperature. The measurements show an interesting temperature dependence of the coercivity with different concentrations of Nd impurities, which might be related to the film structure. The temperature dependence of the saturation magnetization for Nd-doped Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} thin films is fitted by a theoretical expression of spin-wave excitation plus Stoner-type-like contribution, in which the spin-wave excitation plays a main role at low temperature. The spin-wave stiffness constant D evaluated from the fitting shows a strong doping concentration dependence. - Highlights: • The abnormal coercivity behavior of Nd-doped Permalloy thin films is studied. • The mechanism of temperature dependence of coercivity is discussed. • The effect of Nd dopants on temperature dependence of Ms is studied. • Spin-wave excitations and Stoner-type excitations are discussed quantitatively.

  4. Effects of internal conductance on the temperature dependence of the photosynthetic rate in spinach leaves from contrasting growth temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamori, Wataru; Noguchi, Ko; Hanba, Yuko T; Terashima, Ichiro

    2006-08-01

    The photosynthetic rate may be strongly limited by internal conductance from the intercellular airspace to the chloroplast stroma (g(i)). However, the effects of growth and leaf temperature on g(i) are still unclarified. In this work, we determined the temperature dependence of g(i) in spinach leaves grown at 30/25 degrees C (high temperature; HT) and 15/10 degrees C (low temperature; LT), using the concurrent measurements of the gas exchange rate and stable carbon isotope ratio. Moreover, we quantified the effects of g(i) on the temperature dependence of the photosynthetic rate. We measured g(i) and the photosynthetic rate at a CO(2) concentration of 360 microl l(-1) under saturating light (A(360)) at different leaf temperatures. The optimum temperature for A(360) was 28.5 degrees C in HT leaves and 22.9 degrees C in LT leaves. The optimum temperatures for g(i) were almost similar to those of A(360) in both HT and LT leaves. There was a strong linear relationship between A(360) and g(i). The photosynthetic rates predicted from the C(3) photosynthesis model taking account of g(i) agreed well with A(360) in both HT and LT leaves. The temperature coefficients (Q(10)) of g(i) between 10 and 20 degrees C were 2.0 and 1.8 in HT and LT leaves, respectively. This suggests that g(i) was determined not only by physical diffusion but by processes facilitated by protein(s). The limitation of the photosynthetic rate imposed by g(i) increased with leaf temperature and was greater than the limitation of the stomatal conductance at any temperature, in both HT and LT leaves. This study suggests that g(i) substantially limits the photosynthetic rate, especially at higher temperatures.

  5. Analysis of polysilicon micro beams buckling with temperature-dependent properties

    CERN Document Server

    Shamshirsaz, M; Asgari, M B; Tayefeh, M

    2008-01-01

    The suspended electrothermal polysilicon micro beams generate displacements and forces by thermal buckling effects. In the previous electro-thermal and thermo-elastic models of suspended polysilicon micro beams, the thermo-mechanical properties of polysilicon have been considered constant over a wide rang of temperature (20- 900 degrees C). In reality, the thermo-mechanical properties of polysilicon depend on temperature and change significantly at high temperatures. This paper describes the development and validation of theoretical and Finite Element Model (FEM) including the temperature dependencies of polysilicon properties such as thermal expansion coefficient and Young's modulus. In the theoretical models, two parts of elastic deflection model and thermal elastic model of micro beams buckling have been established and simulated. Also, temperature dependent buckling of polysilicon micro beam under high temperature has been modeled by Finite Element Analysis (FEA). Analytical results and numerical results ...

  6. Temperature-dependent Neel wall dynamics in GaMnAs/GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honolka, J; Herrera Diez, L; Kremer, R K; Kern, K [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Heisenbergstrasse 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Placidi, E; Arciprete, F, E-mail: j.honolka@fkf.mpg.d [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma ' Tor Vergata' and CNR-INFM, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Roma (Italy)

    2010-09-15

    Extensive Kerr microscopy studies reveal strongly temperature-dependent domain wall (DW) dynamics in Hall bars made from compressively strained GaMnAs. Depending on the temperature, magnetic charging of the DWs is observed, and the nucleation rates depend on the Hall geometry with respect to the crystal axes. Above a critical temperature where a biaxial-to-uniaxial anisotropy transition occurs, a drastic increase in nucleation events is observed. Below this temperature, the nucleation of domains tends to be rather insensitive to temperature. This spatially resolved study of the DW dynamics in patterned GaMnAs at variable temperature has important implications for potential applications in single DW magneto-logic devices made from ferromagnetic semiconductors.

  7. Temperature Dependence of the Raman Spectra and Phase Transition of Zirconia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尤静林; 蒋国昌; 杨松华; 马金昌; 徐匡迪

    2001-01-01

    A newly constructed high-temperature Raman spectrometer was used to study the temperature-dependence Raman spectra (up to 2023 K) and transformation of zirconia crystal. High-temperature Raman scattering is a useful tool in characterizing the different structures of zirconia and offers the possibility of identifying the phase transformation. It shows that monoclinic zirconia transforms to tetragonal phase at about 1440 K during the process of increasing temperature, but shows a lower transformation temperature from tetragonal to monoclinic phase at about 1323 K while the temperature decreases.

  8. Temperature dependence of photoluminescence from ordered GaInP{sub 2} epitaxial layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prutskij, T. [Instituto de Ciencias, BUAP, Apartado Postal 207, 72000 Puebla, Pue. (Mexico); Pelosi, C. [IMEM/CNR, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/A, 43010 Parma (Italy)

    2010-01-15

    The temperature behavior of the integrated intensity of photoluminescence (PL) emission from ordered GaInP{sub 2} epitaxial layer was measured at temperatures of 10 - 300 K. Within this temperature range the PL emission is dominated by band-to-band radiative recombination. The PL intensity temperature dependence has two regions: at low temperatures it quenches rapidly as the temperature increases, and above 100 K it reduces slowly. This temperature behavior is compared with that of disordered GaInP{sub 2} layer. The specter of the PL emission of the disordered layer has two peaks, which are identified as due to donor-accepter (D-A) and band-to-band recombination. The PL intensity quenching of these spectral bands is very different: With increasing temperature, the D-A peak intensity remains almost unchanged at low temperatures and then decreases at a higher rate. The intensity of the band-to-band recombination peak decays gradually, having a higher rate at low temperatures than at higher temperatures. Comparing these temperature dependencies of these PL peaks of ordered and disordered alloys and the temperature behavior of their full width at half maximum (FWHM), we conclude that the different morphology of these alloys causes their different temperature behavior. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  9. The dependence of surface temperature on IGBTs load and ambient temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Čaja; Marek, Patsch

    2015-05-01

    Currently, older power electronics and electrotechnics are improvement and at the same time developing new and more efficient devices. These devices produce in their activities a significant part of the heat which, if not effectively drained, causing damage to these elements. In this case, it is important to develop new and more efficient cooling system. The most widespread of modern methods of cooling is the cooling by heat pipe. This contribution is aimed at cooling the insulated-gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) elements by loop heat pipe (LHP). IGBTs are very prone to damage due to high temperatures, and therefore is the important that the surface temperature was below 100°C. It was therefore created a model that examined what impact of surface temperature on the IGBT element and heat removal at different load and constant ambient temperature.

  10. The dependence of surface temperature on IGBTs load and ambient temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Čaja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, older power electronics and electrotechnics are improvement and at the same time developing new and more efficient devices. These devices produce in their activities a significant part of the heat which, if not effectively drained, causing damage to these elements. In this case, it is important to develop new and more efficient cooling system. The most widespread of modern methods of cooling is the cooling by heat pipe. This contribution is aimed at cooling the insulated-gate bipolar transistor (IGBT elements by loop heat pipe (LHP. IGBTs are very prone to damage due to high temperatures, and therefore is the important that the surface temperature was below 100°C. It was therefore created a model that examined what impact of surface temperature on the IGBT element and heat removal at different load and constant ambient temperature.

  11. Temperature-dependent gelation process in colloidal dispersions by diffusing wave spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiaxue; Boyko, Volodymyr; Yi, Zhiyong; Men, Yongfeng

    2013-11-19

    Temperature-dependent microrheology of a concentrated charge-stabilized poly(methyl methacrylate) colloidal dispersion with different salt concentrations was investigated by diffusing wave spectroscopy in backscattering mode. The critical temperature where the system undergoes aggregation and gelation depends upon the particle volume fraction or salt concentration. The viscoelastic properties of the systems have been discussed using Maxwell and Kelvin-Voigt models. Temperature-dependent crossover (G' = G″) frequency has been used to calculate activation energies representing a critical energy of interaction of gel formation.

  12. Microstructure and temperature dependence of the microhardness of W–4V–1La{sub 2}O{sub 3} and W–4Ti–1La{sub 2}O{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savoini, B., E-mail: begona.savoini@uc3m.es; Martínez, J.; Muñoz, A.; Monge, M.A.; Pareja, R.

    2013-11-15

    W–4V–1La{sub 2}O{sub 3} and W–4Ti–1La{sub 2}O{sub 3} (wt.%) alloys have been produced by mechanical alloying and subsequent hot isostatic pressing. Electron microscopy observations revealed that these alloys exhibit a submicron grain structure with a dispersion of La oxide nanoparticles. Large V or Ti pools with martensitic characteristics are found segregated in the interstices between the W particles of the respective alloys. Microhardness tests were carried out over the temperature range 300–1073 K in vacuum. The microhardness–temperature curve for W–4V–1La{sub 2}O{sub 3} exhibited the expected decreasing trend with increasing temperature although the microhardness stayed constant between ∼473 and 773 K. The W–4Ti–1La{sub 2}O{sub 3} presented quite different temperature dependence with an anomalous microhardness increase for temperatures above ∼473 K.

  13. Exponential temperature dependence of the penetration depth in single crystal MgB2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzano, F; Carrington, A; Hussey, N E; Lee, S; Yamamoto, A; Tajima, S

    2002-01-28

    The temperature dependence of the London penetration depth, lambda(T), was measured in both single crystal and polycrystalline MgB2 samples by a high-resolution, radio frequency technique. A clear exponential temperature dependence of lambda(T) was observed at low temperature, indicating s-wave pairing. A BCS fit to the lowest temperature data gives an in-plane energy gap Delta of 30+/-2 K (2Delta/T(c) = 1.5+/-0.1), which is significantly smaller than the standard BCS weak coupling value of 3.5. We find that the data are best described by a two-gap model.

  14. The Temperature Dependence of the Debye-Waller Factor of Magnesium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sledziewska-Blocka, D.; Lebech, Bente

    1976-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the average Debye-Waller factor for magnesium was measured by means of neutron diffraction spectrometry. The experimental results obtained in the temperature range from 5 to 256 K are compared with theoretical calculations, using the harmonic and quasi-harmonic appro......The temperature dependence of the average Debye-Waller factor for magnesium was measured by means of neutron diffraction spectrometry. The experimental results obtained in the temperature range from 5 to 256 K are compared with theoretical calculations, using the harmonic and quasi...

  15. Tunneling magnetoresistance dependence on the temperature in a ferromagnetic Zener diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comesana, E; Aldegunde, M; GarcIa-Loureiro, A, E-mail: enrique.comesana@usc.e [Departamento de Electronica e Computacion, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2009-11-15

    In the present work we focus on the study of the temperature dependence of the tunnelling current in a ferromagnetic Zener diode. We predict the tunneling magnetoresistance dependence on the temperature. Large doping concentrations lead to magnetic semiconductors with Curie temperature T{sub C} near or over room temperature and this will facilitate the introduction of new devices that make use of the ferromagnetism effects. According to our calculations the tunneling magnetoresistance has the form TMR {proportional_to} (T{sup n}{sub C}-T{sup n}).

  16. In-situ high temperature irradiation setup for temperature dependent structural studies of materials under swift heavy ion irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulriya, P. K.; Kumari, Renu; Kumar, Rajesh; Grover, V.; Shukla, R.; Tyagi, A. K.; Avasthi, D. K.

    2015-01-01

    An in-situ high temperature (1000 K) setup is designed and installed in the materials science beam line of superconducting linear accelerator at the Inter-University Accelerator Centre (IUAC) for temperature dependent ion irradiation studies on the materials exposed with swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation. The Gd2Ti2O7 pyrochlore is irradiated using 120 MeV Au ion at 1000 K using the high temperature irradiation facility and characterized by ex-situ X-ray diffraction (XRD). Another set of Gd2Ti2O7 samples are irradiated with the same ion beam parameter at 300 K and simultaneously characterized using in-situ XRD available in same beam line. The XRD studies along with the Raman spectroscopic investigations reveal that the structural modification induced by the ion irradiation is strongly dependent on the temperature of the sample. The Gd2Ti2O7 is readily amorphized at an ion fluence 6 × 1012 ions/cm2 on irradiation at 300 K, whereas it is transformed to a radiation-resistant anion-deficient fluorite structure on high temperature irradiation, that amorphized at ion fluence higher than 1 × 1013 ions/cm2. The temperature dependent ion irradiation studies showed that the ion fluence required to cause amorphization at 1000 K irradiation is significantly higher than that required at room temperature irradiation. In addition to testing the efficiency of the in-situ high temperature irradiation facility, the present study establishes that the radiation stability of the pyrochlore is enhanced at higher temperatures.

  17. Temperature dependence of the lifetime of excited benzyl and other arymethyl radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miesel, D.; Das, P.K.; Hug, G.L.; Bhattacharyya, K.; Fessenden, R.W.

    1986-08-06

    The temperature dependence of the fluorescence lifetime of benzyl, benzyl-d/sub 7/, ..cap alpha..-methylbenzyl, and triphenylmethyl radicals has been studied in 2-methyltetrahydroduran from 77 to 300 K. Temperature independent and unusual temperature dependent relaxation pathways are observed for the excited states of all four radicals. Activation energies for the temperature-dependent relaxation process are approx.1400 cm/sup -1/ for all these radicals, and frequency factors are in the range of (2-20) x 10/sup 11/ s/sup -1/. For Ph/sub 3/C radicals, the temperature-dependent process leads to observable photochemistry. However, no photochemistry is observed to result from the thermally activated relaxation of benzyl radicals. Possible pathways of these nonradiative decay processes are discussed and contrasted with the weak temperature dependence for the relaxation of diphenylmethyl radicals. It is proposed that the temperature-dependent route for the radiationless decay of benzyl radicals results from differential vibronic mixing of the two excited states, the 1/sup 2/A/sub 2/ and 2/sup 2/B/sub 2/ states. Most efficient in that mixing seems to be C-C stretching vibrational modes.

  18. Temperature dependence of pulse-induced mechanoluminescence excitation in coloured alkali halide crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Namita Rajput; S Tiwari; B P Chandra

    2004-12-01

    In practice, the relative efficiencies of different crystals are often determined under identical conditions of temperature and excitation. If the temperature of a crystal is increased or decreased with respect to room temperature, luminescence efficiency may get increased or decreased according to the composition of the crystal. When coloured crystals of NaCl, NaBr, KCl and KBr are excited by pulse-induced excitation at different temperatures, the mechanoluminescence (ML) intensity increases with temperature. The ML intensity of first peak, ml, second peak, _m2 and the total ML intensity, T, initially increase with temperature and then tend to attain an optimum value for a particular temperature of crystals. The ratio, m2/ml, is found to increase with increasing temperature of the crystals. The expression derived on the basis of rate equations, are able to explain the temperature dependence of ML intensity on several parameters.

  19. Measuring temperature-dependent activation energy in thermally activated processes: a 2D Arrhenius plot method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian V; Johnston, Steven W; Yan, Yanfa; Levi, Dean H

    2010-03-01

    Thermally activated processes are characterized by two key quantities, activation energy (E(a)) and pre-exponential factor (nu(0)), which may be temperature dependent. The accurate measurement of E(a), nu(0), and their temperature dependence is critical for understanding the thermal activation mechanisms of non-Arrhenius processes. However, the classic 1D Arrhenius plot-based methods cannot unambiguously measure E(a), nu(0), and their temperature dependence due to the mathematical impossibility of resolving two unknown 1D arrays from one 1D experimental data array. Here, we propose a 2D Arrhenius plot method to solve this fundamental problem. Our approach measures E(a) at any temperature from matching the first and second moments of the data calculated with respect to temperature and rate in the 2D temperature-rate plane, and therefore is able to unambiguously solve E(a), nu(0), and their temperature dependence. The case study of deep level emission in a Cu(In,Ga)Se(2) solar cell using the 2D Arrhenius plot method reveals clear temperature dependent behavior of E(a) and nu(0), which has not been observable by its 1D predecessors.

  20. Temperature-dependent dynamic mechanical properties of magnetorheological elastomers under magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, Benxiang, E-mail: jubenxiang@qq.com [National Instrument Functional Materials Engineering Technology Research Center, Chongqing 400707 (China); Tang, Rui; Zhang, Dengyou; Yang, Bailian [National Instrument Functional Materials Engineering Technology Research Center, Chongqing 400707 (China); Yu, Miao; Liao, Changrong [College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2015-01-15

    Both anisotropic and isotropic magnetorheological elastomer (MRE) samples were fabricated by using as-prepared polyurethane (PU) matrix and carbonyl iron particles. Temperature-dependent dynamic mechanical properties of MRE were investigated and analyzed. Due to the unique structural features of as-prepared matrix, temperature has a greater impact on the properties of as-prepared MRE, especially isotropic MRE. With increasing of temperature and magnetic field, MR effect of isotropic MRE can reach up to as high as 4176.5% at temperature of 80 °C, and the mechanism of the temperature-dependent in presence of magnetic field was discussed. These results indicated that MRE is a kind of temperature-dependent material, and can be cycled between MRE and MR plastomer (MRP) by varying temperature. - Highlights: • Both anisotropic and isotropic MRE were fabricated by using as-prepared matrix. • Temperature-dependent properties of MRE under magnetic field were investigated. • As-prepared MRE can transform MRE to MRP by adjusting temperature.

  1. Petrology of Anomalous Eucrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Peng, Z. X.; Ross, D. K.

    2015-01-01

    Most mafic achondrites can be broadly categorized as being "eucritic", that is, they are composed of a ferroan low-Ca clinopyroxene, high-Ca plagioclase and a silica phase. They are petrologically distinct from angritic basalts, which are composed of high-Ca, Al-Ti-rich clinopyroxene, Carich olivine, nearly pure anorthite and kirschsteinite, or from what might be called brachinitic basalts, which are composed of ferroan orthopyroxene and high-Ca clinopyroxene, intermediate-Ca plagioclase and ferroan olivine. Because of their similar mineralogy and composition, eucrite-like mafic achondrites formed on compositionally similar asteroids under similar conditions of temperature, pressure and oxygen fugacity. Some of them have distinctive isotopic compositions and petrologic characteristics that demonstrate formation on asteroids different from the parent of the HED clan (e.g., Ibitira, Northwest Africa (NWA) 011). Others show smaller oxygen isotopic distinctions but are otherwise petrologically and compositionally indistinguishable from basaltic eucrites (e.g., Pasamonte, Pecora Escarpment (PCA) 91007). The degree of uniformity in delta O-17 of eucrites and diogenites is one piece of evidence considered to favor of a magma-ocean scenario for their petrogenesis. Given that the O isotopic differences separating Pasamonte and PCA 91007 from other eucrites are small, and that there is an absence of other distinguishing characteristics, a legitimate question is: Did the HED parent asteroid fail to homogenize via a magma-ocean stage, thus explaining outliers like Pasamonte? We are initiating a program of study of anomalous eucrite-like achondrites as one part of our effort to seek a resolution of this issue. Here we present preliminary petrologic information on Asuka (A-) 881394, Elephant Moraine (EET) 87520 and EET 87542. We will have studied several more by conference time.

  2. Temperature dependence of the switching field in all-perpendicular spin-valve nanopillars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopman, D. B.; Bedau, D.; Wolf, G.; Mangin, S.; Fullerton, E. E.; Katine, J. A.; Kent, A. D.

    2013-09-01

    We present temperature dependent switching measurements of the Co/Ni multilayered free element of 75-nm-diameter spin-valve nanopillars. Angular dependent hysteresis measurements as well as switching field measurements taken at low temperature are in agreement with a model of thermal activation over a perpendicular anisotropy barrier. However, the statistics of switching (i.e. the mean switching field and the variance of the switching field distribution) from 20 up to 400 K are in disagreement with a Néel-Brown model that assumes a temperature independent barrier height and anisotropy field. We introduce a modified Néel-Brown model that fits the experimental data in which we attribute a T3/2 dependence to the barrier height and the anisotropy field due to the temperature dependent magnetization and anisotropy energy.

  3. Temperature dependence of the spin polarization in the fractional quantum Hall effects

    OpenAIRE

    Murthy, Ganpathy

    2000-01-01

    Using a Hamiltonian formulation of Composite Fermions that I recently developed with R. Shankar, I compute the dependence of the spin polarization on the temperature for the translationally invariant fractional quantum Hall states at $\

  4. Temperature dependence of the spin relaxation in highly degenerate ZnO thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prestgard, M. C.; Siegel, G.; Tiwari, A., E-mail: tiwari@eng.utah.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States); Materials Research Science and Engineering Center, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States); Roundy, R.; Raikh, M. [Materials Research Science and Engineering Center, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States)

    2015-02-28

    Zinc oxide is considered a potential candidate for fabricating next-generation transparent spintronic devices. However, before this can be achieved, a thorough scientific understanding of the various spin transport and relaxation processes undergone in this material is essential. In the present paper, we are reporting our investigations into these processes via temperature dependent Hanle experiments. ZnO thin films were deposited on c-axis sapphire substrates using a pulsed laser deposition technique. Careful structural, optical, and electrical characterizations of the films were performed. Temperature dependent non-local Hanle measurements were carried out using an all-electrical scheme for spin injection and detection over the temperature range of 20–300 K. From the Hanle data, spin relaxation time in the films was determined at different temperatures. A detailed analysis of the data showed that the temperature dependence of spin relaxation time follows the linear-in-momentum Dyakonov-Perel mechanism.

  5. Temperature dependence of the switching field in all-perpendicular spin-valve nanopillars

    OpenAIRE

    Gopman, D. B.; Bedau, D.; Wolf, G.; Mangin, S; Fullerton, E. E.; Katine, J. A.; Kent, A. D.

    2013-01-01

    We present temperature dependent switching measurements of the Co/Ni multilayered free element of 75 nm diameter spin-valve nanopillars. Angular dependent hysteresis measurements as well as switching field measurements taken at low temperature are in agreement with a model of thermal activation over a perpendicular anisotropy barrier. However, the statistics of switching (mean switching field and switching variance) from 20 K up to 400 K are in disagreement with a N\\'{e}el-Brown model that as...

  6. The temperature dependence of optically stimulated luminescence from α-Al2O3:C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markey, B.G.; McKeever, S.W.S.; Akselrod, M.S.;

    1996-01-01

    The results of experimental measurements and computer simulations on optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) from alpha-Al2O3:C are described. The intensity of the OSL observed during illumination of irradiated specimens with visible light is temperature dependent. Optical stimulation is observed...... from the main dosimetric traps, and from deep traps. The temperature dependence appears to be due to the presence of shallow traps, with a possible additional contribution from thermally assisted optical excitation....

  7. Irradiance and Temperature Dependence of Photo-Induced Orientation in Two Azobenzene-Based Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-06-23

    and Almeria Natansohn* Department of Chemistry, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, K7L 3N6 Paul Rochon Department of Physics, Royal Military...1. IRRADIANCE AND TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF PHOTO-INDUCED ORIENTATION IN TWO AZOBENZENE-BASED POLYMERS Dennis Hore and Almeria Natansohn...IRRADIANCE AND TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF PHOTO-INDUCED ORIENTATION IN TWO AZOBENZENE-BASED POLYMERS Dennis Hore and Almeria Natansohn Department of

  8. The effect of interfacial intermixing on magnetization and anomalous Hall effect in Co/Pd multilayers

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Zaibing

    2015-05-01

    The effect of interfacial intermixing on magnetization and anomalous Hall effect (AHE) in Co/Pd multilayers is studied by using rapid thermal annealing to enhance the interfacial diffusion. The dependence of saturation magnetization and coercivity on the temperature of rapid thermal annealing at 5 K is discussed. It is found that AHE is closely related to the relative thickness of the Co and Pd layers. Localized paramagnetism has been observed which destroys AHE, while AHE can be enhanced by annealing.

  9. Temperature-dependent infrared reflectivity studies of multiferroic TbMnO3: Evidence for spin-phonon coupling

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pradeep Kumar; Surajit Saha; C R Serrao; A K Sood; C N R Rao

    2010-02-01

    We have measured near normal incidence far-infrared (FIR) reflectivity spectra of a single crystal of TbMnO3 from 10 K to 300 K in the spectral range of 50 cm-1 –700 cm-1. Fifteen transverse optic (TO) and longitudinal optic (LO) modes are identified in the imaginary part of the dielectric function 2 ()$ and energy loss function Im(−1/()), respectively. Some of the observed phonon modes show anomalous softening below the magnetic transition temperature N (∼ 46 K). We attribute this anomalous softening to the spin-phonon coupling caused by phonon modulation of the superexchange integral between the Mn3+ spins. The effective charge of oxygen (O) calculated using the measured LO–TO splitting increases below N.

  10. Peculiarities of temperature dependent ion beam sputtering and channeling of crystalline bismuth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langegger, Rupert; Hradil, Klaudia; Steiger-Thirsfeld, Andreas; Bertagnolli, Emmerich; Lugstein, Alois

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we report on the surface evolution of focused ion beam treated single crystalline Bi(001) with respect to different beam incidence angles and channeling effects. 'Erosive' sputtering appears to be the dominant mechanism at room temperature (RT) and diffusion processes during sputtering seem to play only a minor role for the surface evolution of Bi. The sputtering yield of Bi(001) shows anomalous behavior when increasing the beam incidence angle along particular azimuthal angles of the specimen. The behavior of the sputtering yield could be related to channeling effects and the relevant channeling directions are identified. Dynamic annealing processes during ion irradiation retain the crystalline quality of the Bi specimen allowing ion channeling at RT. Lowering the specimen temperature to T = -188 °C reduces dynamic annealing processes and thereby disables channeling effects. Furthermore unexpected features are observed at normal beam incidence angle. Spike-like features appear during the ion beam induced erosion, whose growth directions are not determined by the ion beam but by the channeling directions of the Bi specimen.

  11. A STUDY OF TEMPERATURE-DEPENDENT VALENCE BOND STRUCTURE OF TITANIUM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    X.B. Li; Y.Q. Xie; Y.Z. Nie; H.J. Peng; H.J. Tao; F.X. Yu

    2007-01-01

    On the basis of energy and shape method for the determination of the valence bond (VB) structures of crystal, the valence bond structure of titanium is redetermined at room temperature and calculated in the whole temperature range of 0-1943K. The outer shell electronic distribution of Ti is ec2.9907 .(sc0.4980 + dc2.4927) ef1.0093 in crystal. The temperature dependences of the VB structures of hcp and bcc phases are the same. The VB structures of hcp and bcc phases monotonically increase or decrease with the increase in temperature, but show discontinuous changes at the phase-transformation temperature 1155K.

  12. Temperature Dependence of Rheology and Polymer Diffusion in Silica/Polystyrene Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Wei-Shao; Clarke, Nigel; Composto, Russell; Meth, Jeffrey; Winey, Karen

    2015-03-01

    Time-temperature superposition using the WLF equation is well-established for both the zero shear viscosity and the polymer diffusion coefficient in homopolymer melts. This talk will present the temperature-dependence of polymer dynamics in polymer nanocomposites comprised of polystyrene and phenyl-capped silica nanoparticles (0 - 50 vol%). The WLF equation fits the temperature dependence of the tracer polymer diffusion coefficient and the fitting parameter (B/fo) decreases smoothly with nanoparticle concentration suggesting an increase in the thermal expansion coefficient for the free volume. The WLF equation also fits the temperature dependence of the zero shear viscosity from oscillatory shear experiments, although the fitting parameter (B/fo) increases substantially with nanoparticle concentration. This discrepancy between the diffusion and rheology will be discussed with respect to the reptation model, which predicts that the temperature dependence of polymer diffusion depends predominately on the temperature dependence of local viscosity, and the elastic response in nanocomposites. National Science Foundation DMR-12-10379.

  13. Anomalous phonon behaviour in V sub 3 Si

    CERN Document Server

    Yethiraj, M

    2002-01-01

    In earlier studies of phonons in V sub 3 Si, a gradual softening of the (hh0) branch was observed and attributed to the martensitic transition in this compound, which precedes the onset of superconductivity by a few degrees K. In this work, the temperature dependence of the transverse acoustic (TA) branch along the hh0 direction was studied in greater detail and it is shown that while the TA hh0 mode starts to soften at relatively high temperatures (>200 K), an anomalous softening, which is rather localized in q, occurs just below T sub c. The intensity of this soft-phonon peak correlates extremely well with the onset of the superconducting phase and appears to vary as the order parameter with temperature and applied field. The similarities in the phonon softening and Fermi-surface anisotropy between this compound and the rare-earth nickel borocarbides suggest the existence of a common mechanism for the superconducting transition. (orig.)

  14. Temperature-dependent magnetostriction as the key factor for martensite reorientation in magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'vov, Victor A.; Kosogor, Anna

    2016-09-01

    The magnetic field application leads to spatially inhomogeneous magnetostriction of twinned ferromagnetic martensite. When the increasing field and magnetostrictive strain reach certain threshold values, the motion of twin boundaries and magnetically induced reorientation (MIR) of twinned martensite start. The MIR leads to giant magnetically induced deformation of twinned martensite. In the present article, the threshold field (TF) and temperature range of observability of MIR were calculated for the Ni-Mn-Ga martensite assuming that the threshold strain (TS) is temperature-independent. The calculations show that if the TS is of the order of 10-4, the TF strongly depends on temperature and MIR can be observed only above the limiting temperature (~220 K). If the TS is of the order of 10-6, the TF weakly depends on temperature and MIR can be observed at extremely low temperatures. The obtained theoretical results are in agreement with available experimental data.

  15. Modelling temperature-dependent heat production over decades in High Arctic coal waste rock piles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hollesen, Jørgen; Elberling, Bo; Jansson, P.E.

    2011-01-01

    controlling the internal build up of heat leading to potential self-incineration. However, site specific measurements of temperature-dependent heat production as well as simulation results show that the heat produced from pyrite oxidation alone cannot cause such a temperature increase and that processes......Subsurface heat production from oxidation of pyrite is an important process that may increase subsurface temperatures within coal waste rock piles and increase the release of acid mine drainage, AMD. Waste rock piles in the Arctic are especially vulnerable to changes in subsurface temperatures...... as the release of AMD normally is limited by permafrost. Here we show that temperatures within a 20 year old heat-producing waste rock pile in Svalbard (78°N) can be modelled by the one-dimensional heat and water flow model (CoupModel) with a new temperature-dependent heat-production module that includes both...

  16. Diameter and Temperature Dependence of Thermal Conductivity of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Rui-Qin

    2011-01-01

    Temperature and diameter dependence of the thermal conductivity of several armchair single-walled carbon nan-otubes (SWNTs) are studied by nonequilibrium molecular dynamics method with Brenner II potential. The thermal conductivities are calculated at temperatures from WOK to 600K. It is found that the thermal conductivity decreases as the temperature increases and increases as the diameter of SWNT increases. The results demonstrate that these two phenomena are due to the onset of the Umklapp process.%@@ Temperature and diameter dependence of the thermal conductivity of several armchair single-walled carbon nan- otubes (SWNTs) are studied by nonequilibrium molecular dynamics method with Brenner Ⅱ potential.The thermal conductivities are calculated at temperatures from 100K to 600K.It is found that the thermal con- ductivity decreases as the temperature increases and increases as the diameter of SWNT increases.The results demonstrate that these two phenomena are due to the onset of the Umklapp process.

  17. New precise determination of the high temperature unusual temperature dependent thermopower of liquid divalent cadmium and zinc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giordanengo, B. [Laboratoire de Physique des Liquides et des Interfaces, 1 Boulevard Arago, 57 078 Metz Cedex 03 (France). E-mail: boris at lpli.sciences.univ-metz.fr; Ben Moussa, A.; Makradi, A.; Chaaba, H.; Gasser, J.-G. [Laboratoire de Physique des Liquides et des Interfaces, 1 Boulevard Arago, 57 078 Metz Cedex 03 (France)

    2000-04-17

    We do not know any precise measurement of the absolute thermopower (ATP) of liquid cadmium and zinc at high temperatures. For liquid cadmium, there are, in the literature, apparent contradictory results. Bath and Kliem and North and Wagner observed that the ATP increases with temperature between 350 deg. C and 650 deg. C, but Bradley observed the opposite behaviour between 600 deg. C and 750 deg. C. In this work we measured accurately the absolute thermopower of liquid cadmium from the melting point up to 900 deg. C. We find a maximum around 520 deg. C, and then the thermopower decreases down to a surprising negative value. To our knowledge, it is the first time that such an unusual behaviour is reported. Nevertheless, it is qualitatively consistent with all the authors mentioned and the apparent contradictory results should only be due to the different temperature ranges of measurements. Using the ATP expression from the Faber-Ziman formalism, we can fit very well the experimental absolute thermopower versus temperature curve with only one adjustable parameter. For this, we have considered that the temperature dependence of the ATP is dominated by the resistivity, and we have introduced the experimental resistivity temperature dependence in the ATP expression. The very good fitting quality demonstrates that our hypothesis is consistent. In contrast, the liquid zinc ATP only increases with temperature. Nevertheless, near 1100 deg. C, the highest temperature achieved, it shows saturation that may be an indication of a decrease at higher temperature. The same type of fitting gives also quite good results. (author)

  18. New precise determination of the high temperature unusual temperature dependent thermopower of liquid divalent cadmium and zinc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordanengo, B.; Ben Moussa, A.; Makradi, A.; Chaaba, H.; Gasser, J.-G.

    2000-04-01

    We do not know any precise measurement of the absolute thermopower (ATP) of liquid cadmium and zinc at high temperatures. For liquid cadmium, there are, in the literature, apparent contradictory results. Bath and Kliem and North and Wagner observed that the ATP increases with temperature between 350 °C and 650 °C, but Bradley observed the opposite behaviour between 600 °C and 750 °C. In this work we measured accurately the absolute thermopower of liquid cadmium from the melting point up to 900 °C. We find a maximum around 520 °C, and then the thermopower decreases down to a surprising negative value. To our knowledge, it is the first time that such an unusual behaviour is reported. Nevertheless, it is qualitatively consistent with all the authors mentioned and the apparent contradictory results should only be due to the different temperature ranges of measurements. Using the ATP expression from the Faber-Ziman formalism, we can fit very well the experimental absolute thermopower versus temperature curve with only one adjustable parameter. For this, we have considered that the temperature dependence of the ATP is dominated by the resistivity, and we have introduced the experimental resistivity temperature dependence in the ATP expression. The very good fitting quality demonstrates that our hypothesis is consistent. In contrast, the liquid zinc ATP only increases with temperature. Nevertheless, near 1100 °C, the highest temperature achieved, it shows saturation that may be an indication of a decrease at higher temperature. The same type of fitting gives also quite good results.

  19. Temperature dependence of acoustic harmonics generated by nonlinear ultrasound wave propagation in water at various frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maraghechi, Borna; Hasani, Mojtaba H; Kolios, Michael C; Tavakkoli, Jahan

    2016-05-01

    Ultrasound-based thermometry requires a temperature-sensitive acoustic parameter that can be used to estimate the temperature by tracking changes in that parameter during heating. The objective of this study is to investigate the temperature dependence of acoustic harmonics generated by nonlinear ultrasound wave propagation in water at various pulse transmit frequencies from 1 to 20 MHz. Simulations were conducted using an expanded form of the Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov nonlinear acoustic wave propagation model in which temperature dependence of the medium parameters was included. Measurements were performed using single-element transducers at two different transmit frequencies of 3.3 and 13 MHz which are within the range of frequencies simulated. The acoustic pressure signals were measured by a calibrated needle hydrophone along the axes of the transducers. The water temperature was uniformly increased from 26 °C to 46 °C in increments of 5 °C. The results show that the temperature dependence of the harmonic generation is different at various frequencies which is due to the interplay between the mechanisms of absorption, nonlinearity, and focusing gain. At the transmit frequencies of 1 and 3.3 MHz, the harmonic amplitudes decrease with increasing the temperature, while the opposite temperature dependence is observed at 13 and 20 MHz.

  20. Temperature dependence of the cosphi conductance in Josephson tunnel junctions determined from plasma resonance experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Niels Falsig; Sørensen, O. H.; Mygind, Jesper

    1978-01-01

    The microwave response at 9 GHz of Sn-O-Sn tunnel-junction current biased at zero dc voltage has been measured just below the critical temperature Tc of the Sn films. The temperature dependence of the cosφ conductance is determined from the resonant response at the junction plasma frequency fp...... of the experiment....

  1. Temperature dependence of photoluminescence property in BaIn2O4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huiyong Deng; Qiwei Wang; Ping Ren; Jie Wu; Junchao Tao; Xin Chen; Ning Dai

    2011-01-01

    The temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL) spectra of BaIn2O4, prepared by coprecipitation, are measured and discussed. Aside from the reported 3.02-eV violet emission, the 1.81-eV yellow emission involved with oxygen vacancy is also observed at room temperature wherein the deep donor level is at 1.2 eV.With the temperature increasing, the peak energies for both emissions show a red shift. Moreover, the yellow emission intensity decreases while the violet emission intensity increases. The temperature dependence of the yellow emission intensity fits very well into the one-step quenching process equation, indicating a fitted activation energy at 19.2 meV.%@@ The temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL) spectra of BaIn2O4, prepared by coprecipitation, are measured and discussed. Aside from the reported 3.02-eV violet emission, the 1.81-eV yellow emission involved with oxygen vacancy is also observed at room temperature wherein the deep donor level is at 1.2 eV.With the temperature increasing, the peak energies for both emissions show a red shift. Moreover, the yellow emission intensity decreases while the violet emission intensity increases. The temperature dependence of the yellow emission intensity fits very well into the one-step quenching process equation, indicating a fitted activation energy at 19.2 meV.

  2. Temperature dependence of magnetically induced deformation of Ni-Mn-Ga martensite

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'Vov, V. A.; Glavatska, N.; Aaltio, I.; Söderberg, O.; Glavatskiy, I.; Hannula, S.-P.

    2008-05-01

    In the present work the contributions of the temperature-dependent (i) crystal lattice parameters (related to the magnetic anisotropy energy), (ii) Young's modulus, (iii) saturation magnetization and (iv) thermal fluctuations of the microstress to the temperature dependence of the magnetic field induced strain (MFIS) in Ni-Mn-Ga martensite are considered in the framework of a statistical model. Both individual and cooperative effects of these factors on the achievable MFIS value and on the characteristic values of the magnetic fields, which trigger and saturate MFIS, are estimated. It is shown that all the factors affect both the achievable MFIS value and characteristic fields under the real experimental conditions, and none of them can be neglected in the quantitative theoretical analysis of the experimental strain-field dependencies obtained for different temperature values. In addition, the influence of specimen shape on the characteristic fields is illustrated for different temperature values. For the available experimental dependencies (i) (iii) and the reasonable set of model parameters the switching magnetic field proved to be equal to 160 kA/m when the temperature was by 15 K below the martensite start temperature and raised to 320 kA/m when the temperature was by 45 K below the martensite start temperature. Obtained results agree with the experimental data reported by O. Heczko and L. Straka, in J. Appl. Phys. 94, 7139 (2003).

  3. Indications for a changing electricity demand pattern : The temperature dependence of electricity demand in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hekkenberg, M.; Benders, R. M. J.; Moll, H. C.; Uiterkamp, A. J. M. Schoot

    2009-01-01

    This study assesses the electricity demand pattern in the relatively temperate climate of the Netherlands (latitude 52 degrees 30'N). Daily electricity demand and average temperature during the period from 1970 until 2007 are investigated for possible trends in the temperature dependence of electric

  4. Temperature Dependence of the Radio-Frequency Dielectric Properties of Chicken Meat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dielectric properties of chicken breast meat were measured with an open-ended coaxial-line probe between 200 MHz and 20 GHz at temperature ranging from -20 oC to +25 oC. At a given frequency, the temperature dependence reveals a sharp increase of the dielectric constant and dielectric loss factor a...

  5. Temperature gating and competing temperature-dependent effects in DNA molecular wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibowo, Denni; Narenji, Alaleh; Kassegne, Sam

    2017-02-01

    While recent research in electron-transport mechanism on a double strands DNA seems to converge into a consensus, experiments in direct electrical measurements on a long DNA molecules still lead to a conflicting result This study is the continuation of our previous research in electrical characterization of DNA molecular wires, where we furtherly investigate the effects of temperature on the electrical conductivity of DNA molecular wires by measuring its impedance response. We found that at higher temperatures, the expected increase in charge hopping mechanism may account for the decrease in impedance (and hence increase in conductivity) supporting the 'charge hopping mechanism' theory. UV light exposure, on the other hand, causes damage to GC base pairs reducing the path available for hopping mechanism and hence resulting in increased impedance - this again supporting the 'charge hopping mechanism' theory. We also report that λ-DNA molecular wires have differing impedance responses at two temperature regimes: impedance increases between 4 °C - 40 °C and then decreases between 40 °C - melting point (˜110 °C), after which λ-DNA denatures resulting in no current transduction. We submit that the low impedance of λ-DNA molecular wires observed at moderate to high frequencies may have significant implications to the field of DNA-based bionanoelectronics.

  6. Temperature and humidity dependence of secondary organic aerosol yield from the ozonolysis of β-pinene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. J. Nielsen

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The temperature dependence of secondary organic aerosol (SOA formation from ozonolysis of β-pinene was studied in a flow reactor at 263 K–303 K and 1007 hPa under dry and humid conditions (0% and 26%–68% relative humidity, respectively. The observed SOA yields were of similar magnitude as predicted by a two-product model based on detailed gas phase chemistry (Jenkin, 2004, reaching maximum values of 0.18–0.39 at high particle mass concentrations (Mo. Under dry conditions, however, the measurement data exhibited significant oscillatory deviations from the predicted linear increase with inverse temperature (up to 50% at high Mo. Under humid conditions the SOA yield exhibited a linear decrease with inverse temperature, which is opposite to modelled temperature dependence and implies that the model substantially overestimates the yield at low temperatures and underestimates it at high temperatures (deviations up to 80% at high Mo. For the atmospherically relevant concentration level of Mo=10 μg m−3 and temperature range 263 K–293 K, the results from humid experiments in this study indicate that the SOA yield of β-pinene ozonolysis may be well represented by an average value of 0.15 with an uncertainty estimate of ±0.05. When fitting the measurement data with a two-product model, both the partitioning coefficients (Kom,i and the stoichiometric yields (αi of the low-volatile and semi-volatile model species were found to vary with temperature. The results indicate that not only the reaction product vapour pressures but also the relative contributions of different gas-phase or multiphase reaction channels are strongly dependent on temperature and the presence of water vapour. In fact, the oscillatory positive temperature dependence observed under dry conditions and the negative temperature dependence observed under humid conditions indicate that the SOA yield is governed much more by the temperature and humidity dependence of the involved

  7. Tuning anomalous Hall conductivity in L1[sub 0] FePt films by long range chemical ordering

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, M.

    2011-02-24

    For L10 FePt films, the anomalous Hall conductivity σ xy=-a σxx-b, where a=a0f(T), b=b 0f(T), and f (T) is the temperature dependence factor of the spontaneous magnetization. With increasing chemical long range ordering S, a0 changes its sign accompanied by a reduction of its magnitude and b0 increases monotonically. The spin-orbit coupling strength is suggested to increase with increasing S. As an approach, the long range chemical ordering can be used to control the anomalous Hall effect in ferromagnetic alloy films. © 2011 American Institute of Physics.

  8. Shape Dependence of Low-Temperature Magnetic Relaxation of Mn12Ac

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hai-Qing; SU Shao-Kui; JING Xiu-nian; LIU Ying; LI Yan-rong; HE Lun-Hua; GE Pei-Wen; YAN Qi-Wei; WANG Yun-Ping

    2008-01-01

    We report the discovery that the low-temperature magnetic relaxation in Mn,12 Ac single crystals strongly depends on the shape of the samples. The relaxation time exhibits a minimum at the phase transition point between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic phases. The shape dependence is attributed to the dipolar interaction between molecular magnets.

  9. Anomalous chiral superfluidity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lublinsky, Michael, E-mail: lublinsky@phys.uconn.ed [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Physics Department, Ben-Gurion University, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel); Zahed, Ismail [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States)

    2010-02-08

    We discuss both the anomalous Cartan currents and the energy-momentum tensor in a left chiral theory with flavor anomalies as an effective theory for flavored chiral phonons in a chiral superfluid with the gauged Wess-Zumino-Witten term. In the mean-field (leading tadpole) approximation the anomalous Cartan currents and the energy-momentum tensor take the form of constitutive currents in the chiral superfluid state. The pertinence of higher order corrections and the Adler-Bardeen theorem is briefly noted.

  10. Improved AIOMFAC model parameterisation of the temperature dependence of activity coefficients for aqueous organic mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ganbavale

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a new, improved parameterisation of the temperature dependence of activity coefficients in the AIOMFAC (Aerosol Inorganic–Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients model applicable for aqueous as well as water-free organic solutions. For electrolyte-free organic and organic–water mixtures the AIOMFAC model uses a group-contribution approach based on UNIFAC (UNIversal quasi-chemical Functional-group Activity Coefficients. This group-contribution approach explicitly accounts for interactions among organic functional groups and between organic functional groups and water. The previous AIOMFAC version uses a simple parameterisation of the temperature dependence of activity coefficients, aimed to be applicable in the temperature range from ~275 to ~400 K. With the goal to improve the description of a wide variety of organic compounds found in atmospheric aerosols, we extend the AIOMFAC parameterisation for the functional groups carboxyl, hydroxyl, ketone, aldehyde, ether, ester, alkyl, aromatic carbon-alcohol, and aromatic hydrocarbon to atmospherically relevant low temperatures with the introduction of a new temperature dependence parameterisation. The improved temperature dependence parameterisation is derived from classical thermodynamic theory by describing effects from changes in molar enthalpy and heat capacity of a multicomponent system. Thermodynamic equilibrium data of aqueous organic and water-free organic mixtures from the literature are carefully assessed and complemented with new measurements to establish a comprehensive database, covering a wide temperature range (~190 to ~440 K for many of the functional group combinations considered. Different experimental data types and their processing for the estimation of AIOMFAC model parameters are discussed. The new AIOMFAC parameterisation for the temperature dependence of activity coefficients from low to high temperatures shows an overall improvement of

  11. Temperature-dependent hyperfine interactions at {sup 111}Cd-C complex in germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mola, Genene Tessema [University of Kwazulu-Natal, School Chemistry and Physics, Pietermaritzburg Campus, Private Bag X01, Scottsville (South Africa)

    2013-09-15

    The temperature dependent nuclear hyperfine interaction of {sup 111}Cd-carbon complex in germanium has been studied using the perturbed {gamma}-{gamma} angular correlation (PAC) method. The parameters of the hyperfine interaction representing substitutional carbon-cadmium complex in germanium ({nu} {sub Q1}=207(1) MHz ({eta}=0.16)) shows dependence on temperature. The formation and thermal stability of the complex has been reported by the same author earlier. It was found in this study that the quadrupole coupling constant of the interaction increases at sample temperature below 293 K. The results are encouraging toward better understanding of the complex in the host matrix. (orig.)

  12. Temperature dependence of spin-orbit torques in Cu-Au alloys

    KAUST Repository

    Wen, Yan

    2017-03-07

    We investigated current driven spin-orbit torques in Cu40Au60/Ni80Fe20/Ti layered structures with in-plane magnetization. We have demonstrated a reliable and convenient method to separate dampinglike torque and fieldlike torque by using the second harmonic technique. It is found that the dampinglike torque and fieldlike torque depend on temperature very differently. Dampinglike torque increases with temperature, while fieldlike torque decreases with temperature, which are different from results obtained previously in other material systems. We observed a nearly linear dependence between the spin Hall angle and longitudinal resistivity, suggesting that skew scattering may be the dominant mechanism of spin-orbit torques.

  13. Temperature-dependent energy band gap variation in self-organized InAs quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeo, Inah [CEA/CNRS/UJF Joint Team ' ' Nanophysics and Semiconductors,' ' Institut Neel-CNRS, BP 166, 25 rue des Martyrs, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Dong Song, Jin; Lee, Jungil [Nanophotonics Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-10

    We investigated the temperature-dependent variation of the photoluminescence emission energy of self-organized InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) grown by conventional Stranski-Krastanov (SK) molecular beam epitaxy and migration-enhanced molecular beam epitaxy (MEMBE) and that of MEMBE InAs QDs in a symmetric and an asymmetric In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As/GaAs well. The temperature-dependent energy variation of each QD is analyzed in low and high temperature regions, including a sigmoidal behavior of conventional SK quantum dots with the well-known Varshni and semi-empirical Fan models.

  14. Rheology of a primary and secondary sewage sludge mixture: dependency on temperature and solid concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroutian, Saeid; Eshtiaghi, Nicky; Gapes, Daniel J

    2013-07-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the rheology of mixed primary and secondary sludge and its dependency on solid content and temperature. Results of this study showed that the temperature and solid concentration are critical parameters affecting the mixed sludge rheology. It was found that the yield stress increases with an increase in the sludge solid content and decreases with increasing temperature. The rheological behaviour of sludges was modelled using the Herschel-Bulkley model. The results of the model showed a good agreement with experimental data. Depending on the total solid content, the average error varied between 3.25% and 6.22%.

  15. Experimental determination of the temperature dependence of water activities for a selection of aqueous organic solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ganbavale

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This work presents experimental data of the temperature dependence of water activity in aqueous organic solutions relevant for tropospheric conditions (200–273 K. Water activity (aw at low temperatures (T is a crucial parameter for predicting homogeneous ice nucleation. We investigated temperature dependent water activities, ice freezing and melting temperatures of solutions, and vapour pressures of a selection of atmospherically relevant aqueous organic systems. To measure aw over a wide composition range and with a focus on low temperatures, we use various aw measurement techniques and instruments: a dew point water activity meter, an electrodynamic balance (EDB, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, and a setup to measure the total gas phase pressure at equilibrium over aqueous solutions. Water activity measurements were performed for aqueous multicomponent and multifunctional organic mixtures containing the functional groups typically found in atmospheric organic aerosols, such as hydroxyl, carboxyl, ketone, ether, ester, and aromatic groups. The aqueous organic systems studied at several fixed compositions over a considerable temperature range differ significantly in their temperature dependence. Aqueous organic systems of 1,4-butanediol and methoxyacetic acid show a moderate decrease in aw with decreasing temperature. The aqueous M5 system (a multicomponent system containing five different dicarboxylic acids and aqueous 2-(2-ethoxyethoxyethanol solutions both show a strong increase of water activity with decreasing temperature at high solute concentrations for TTaw can be reversed at low temperatures and that linear extrapolations of high temperature data may lead to erroneous predictions. To avoid this, experimentally determined aw at low temperature are needed to improve thermodynamic models towards lower temperatures and for improved predictions of the ice nucleation ability of organic–water systems.

  16. Temperature dependence of universal fluctuations in the two-dimensional harmonic XY model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, G

    2006-04-01

    We compute exact analytical expressions for the skewness and kurtosis in the two-dimensional harmonic XY model. These quantities correspond to the third and fourth normalized moments of the probability density function (PDF) of the magnetization of the model. From their behavior, we conclude that they depend explicitly on the system temperature even in the thermodynamic limit, and hence the PDF itself must depend on it. Our results correct the hypothesis called universal fluctuations, they confirm and extend previous results which showed a T dependence of the PDF, including perturbative expansions within the XY model up to first order in temperature.

  17. Temperature dependence of magnetic susceptibility in the vicinity of martensitic transformation in ferromagnetic shape memory alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zablotskii, V; Pérez-Landazábal, J I; Recarte, V; Gómez-Polo, C

    2010-08-11

    Temperature dependences of low-field quasistatic magnetic susceptibility in the vicinity of martensitic transitions in an NiFeGa alloy are studied both by experiment and analytically. Pronounced reversible jumps of the magnetic susceptibility were observed near the martensitic transition temperature. A general description of the temperature dependences of the susceptibility in ferromagnetic austenite and martensite phases and the susceptibility jump at the transition is suggested. As a result, the main factors governing the temperature dependences of the magnetic susceptibility in the magnetic shape memory alloys are revealed. The magnetic susceptibility jump value is found to be related to changes of: (i) magnetic anisotropy; (ii) magnetic domain wall geometrical constraints (those determined by the alignment and size of twin variants) and (iii) mean magnetic domain spacing.

  18. Scaling Laws for Convection with Temperature-dependent Viscosity and Grain-damage

    CERN Document Server

    Foley, Bradford J

    2014-01-01

    Numerical experiments of convection with grain-damage are used to develop scaling laws for convective heat flow, mantle velocity, and plate velocity across the stagnant lid and plate-tectonic regimes. Three main cases are presented in order of increasing complexity: a simple case wherein viscosity is only dependent on grainsize, a case where viscosity depends on temperature and grainsize, and finally a case where viscosity is temperature and grainsize sensitive, and the grain-growth (or healing) is also temperature sensitive. In all cases, convection with grain-damage scales differently than Newtonian convection due to the effects of grain-damage. For the fully realistic case, numerical results show stagnant lid convection, fully mobilized convection that resembles the temperature-independent viscosity case, and partially mobile or transitional convection, depending on damage to healing ratio, Rayleigh number, and the activation energies for viscosity and healing. Applying our scaling laws for the fully reali...

  19. Angular dependence of coercivity with temperature in Co-based nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bran, C.; Espejo, A. P.; Palmero, E. M.; Escrig, J.; Vázquez, M.

    2015-12-01

    The magnetic behavior of arrays of Co and CoFe nanowire arrays has been measured in the temperature range between 100 and 300 K. We have paid particular attention to the angular dependence of magnetic properties on the applied magnetic field orientation. The experimental angular dependence of coercivity has been modeled according to micromagnetic analytical calculations, and we found that the propagation of a transversal domain wall mode gives the best fitting with experimental observations. That reversal mode holds in the whole measuring temperature range, for nanowires with different diameters and crystalline structure. Moreover, the quantitative strength of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy and its magnetization easy axis are determined to depend on the crystalline structure and nanowires diameter. The evolution of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy with temperature for nanowires with different composition gives rise to an opposite evolution of coercivity with increasing temperature: it decreases for CoFe while it increases for Co nanowire arrays.

  20. Angular dependence of coercivity with temperature in Co-based nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bran, C., E-mail: cristina.bran@icmm.csic.es [Institute of Materials Science of Madrid, CSIC, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Espejo, A.P. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (USACH) and Center for the Development of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (CEDENNA), Avenida Ecuador 3493, 9170124 Santiago (Chile); Palmero, E.M. [Institute of Materials Science of Madrid, CSIC, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Escrig, J. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (USACH) and Center for the Development of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (CEDENNA), Avenida Ecuador 3493, 9170124 Santiago (Chile); Vázquez, M. [Institute of Materials Science of Madrid, CSIC, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-12-15

    The magnetic behavior of arrays of Co and CoFe nanowire arrays has been measured in the temperature range between 100 and 300 K. We have paid particular attention to the angular dependence of magnetic properties on the applied magnetic field orientation. The experimental angular dependence of coercivity has been modeled according to micromagnetic analytical calculations, and we found that the propagation of a transversal domain wall mode gives the best fitting with experimental observations. That reversal mode holds in the whole measuring temperature range, for nanowires with different diameters and crystalline structure. Moreover, the quantitative strength of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy and its magnetization easy axis are determined to depend on the crystalline structure and nanowires diameter. The evolution of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy with temperature for nanowires with different composition gives rise to an opposite evolution of coercivity with increasing temperature: it decreases for CoFe while it increases for Co nanowire arrays.

  1. Temperature Field of Turbulent Flow in a Well with Account for the Dependence of Thermal Conductivity Coefficient on Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, A. I.; Shabarov, A. B.; Akhmetova, O. V.

    2017-01-01

    A method of solving the problem on nonstationary heat transfer of turbulent flow with variable coefficients and nonlinearity caused by the dependence of the thermal conductivity of oil on temperature is considered. The method consists of the joint application of the asymptotic methods of small and formal parameters. Based on the analysis of experimental data on the dependence of the thermal conductivity coefficient on temperature, it is shown that this dependence can be presented by a linear function in the form of the Taylor series containing the small parameter. The expansion of the problem in the small parameter leads to a linear problem in zero approximation that can be solved by using the asymptotic method of formal parameter. To determine the first coefficient of the expansion in the small parameter, a unique procedure of uncoupling has been developed. Analytical dependences of temperature in a well and in the surrounding rocks on time and spatial coordinates have been found that account for the orthotropy of the thermophysical properties of the media.

  2. MAF2 Is Regulated by Temperature-Dependent Splicing and Represses Flowering at Low Temperatures in Parallel with FLM.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara A Airoldi

    Full Text Available Plants enter their reproductive phase when the environmental conditions are favourable for the successful production of progeny. The transition from vegetative to reproductive phase is influenced by several environmental factors including ambient temperature. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, SHORT VEGETATIVE PHASE (SVP is critical for this pathway; svp mutants cannot modify their flowering time in response to ambient temperature. SVP encodes a MADS-box transcription factor that directly represses genes that promote flowering. SVP binds DNA in complexes with other MADS-box transcription factors, including FLOWERING LOCUS M (FLM, which acts with SVP to repress the floral transition at low temperatures. Small temperature changes post-transcriptionally regulate FLM through temperature-dependent alternative splicing (TD-AS. As ambient temperature increases, the predominant FLM splice isoform shifts to encode a protein incapable of exerting a repressive effect on flowering. Here we characterize a closely related MADS-box transcription factor, MADS AFFECTING FLOWERING2 (MAF2, which has independently evolved TD-AS. At low temperatures the most abundant MAF2 splice variant encodes a protein that interacts with SVP to repress flowering. At increased temperature the relative abundance of splice isoforms shifts in favour of an intron-retaining variant that introduces a premature termination codon. We show that this isoform encodes a protein that cannot interact with SVP or repress flowering. At lower temperatures MAF2 and SVP repress flowering in parallel with FLM and SVP, providing an additional input to sense ambient temperature for the control of flowering.

  3. Uniaxial Time-Dependent Ratcheting of SS304 Stainless Steel at High Temperatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KANG Guo-zheng; ZHANG Juan; SUN Ya-fang; KAN Qian-hua

    2007-01-01

    The uniaxial time-dependent strain cyclic behaviors and ratcheting of SS304 stainless steel were studied at high temperatures (350 ℃ and 700 ℃). The effects of straining and stressing rates, holding time at the peak and/or valley of each cycle in addition to ambient temperature on the cyclic softening/hardening behavior and ratcheting of the material were discussed. It can be seen from experimental results that the material presents remarkable time dependence at 700 ℃, and the ratcheting strain depends greatly on the stressing rate, holding time and ambient temperature. Some significant conclusions are obtained, which are useful to build a constitutive model describing the time-dependent cyclic deformation of the material.

  4. Temperature dependences of the contact resistivity in ohmic contacts to n{sup +}-InN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachenko, A. V.; Belyaev, A. E. [National Academy of Sciences, Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics (Ukraine); Boltovets, N. S. [“Orion” Research Institute (Ukraine); Brunkov, P. N.; Jmerik, V. N.; Ivanov, S. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Kapitanchuk, L. M. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Paton Electric Welding Institute (Ukraine); Konakova, R. V., E-mail: konakova@isp.kiev.ua; Klad’ko, V. P.; Romanets, P. N.; Saja, P. O.; Safryuk, N. V.; Sheremet, V. N. [National Academy of Sciences, Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics (Ukraine)

    2015-04-15

    The temperature dependences of the contact resistivity (ρ{sub c}) of ohmic contacts based on the Au-Ti-Pd-InN system are measured at an InN doping level of 2 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup −3} in the temperature range of 4.2–300 K. At temperatures T > 150 K, linearly increasing dependences ρ{sub c}(T) are obtained. The dependences are explained within the mechanism of thermionic current flow through metal shunts associated with dislocations. Good agreement between theoretical and experimental dependences is achieved assuming that the flowing current is limited by the total resistance of the metal shunts, and the density of conductive dislocations is ∼5 × 10{sup 9} cm{sup −2}. Using the X-ray diffraction method, the density of screw and edge dislocations in the structure under study is measured: their total density exceeds 10{sup 10} cm{sup −2}.

  5. Calculation of temperature distribution in adiabatic shear band based on gradient-dependent plasticity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王学滨

    2004-01-01

    A method for calculation of temperature distribution in adiabatic shear band is proposed in terms of gradient-dependent plasticity where the characteristic length describes the interactions and interplaying among microstructures. First, the increment of the plastic shear strain distribution in adiabatic shear band is obtained based on gradient-dependent plasticity. Then, the plastic work distribution is derived according to the current flow shear stress and the obtained increment of plastic shear strain distribution. In the light of the well-known assumption that 90% of plastic work is converted into the heat resulting in increase in temperature in adiabatic shear band, the increment of the temperature distribution is presented. Next, the average temperature increment in the shear band is calculated to compute the change in flow shear stress due to the thermal softening effect. After the actual flow shear stress considering the thermal softening effect is obtained according to the Johnson-Cook constitutive relation, the increment of the plastic shear strain distribution, the plastic work and the temperature in the next time step are recalculated until the total time is consumed. Summing the temperature distribution leads to rise in the total temperature distribution. The present calculated maximum temperature in adiabatic shear band in titanium agrees with the experimental observations. Moreover, the temperature profiles for different flow shear stresses are qualitatively consistent with experimental and numerical results. Effects of some related parameters on the temperature distribution are also predicted.

  6. Analytic model for description of temperature dependent rate phenomena in arthropods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logan, J.A.; Wollkind, D.J.; Hoyt, S.C.; Tanigoshi, L.K.

    1976-12-15

    A new description of temperature-dependent, rate phenomena was deduced to describe developmental time and ovipositional data for the McDaniel spider mite, Tetranychus mcdanieli McGregor. The derived equation accounted for asymmetry about optimum temperature and was of particular utility for description of systems operating at or above optimum temperatures. Ovipositional and developmental rate functions were used in a temperature-driven, discrete-time, simulation model describing McDaniel spider mite population dynamics. Temperature dependence of the instantaneous population growth rate was determined by fitting the derived rate-temperature function to data generated through simulation at various fixed temperatures. The functional relationship of important population parameters to temperature provided the mechanism for inclusion of phenological effects on mite populations in a synoptic apple pest management model. Two derived functions were fit to several published rate-temperature data sets. Adequacy of description (as indicated by R/sup 2/ values) indicated general applicability of both functions for description of temperature-controlled, biological processes. Further, it was concluded that the singular perturbation method of matched asymptotes has potentially wide application in ecology, and an Appendix detailing the application of this method is included.

  7. Modeling the temperature dependent interfacial tension between organic solvents and water using dissipative particle dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayoral, E; Goicochea, A Gama

    2013-03-07

    The interfacial tension between organic solvents and water at different temperatures is predicted using coarse-grained, mesoscopic Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) simulations. The temperature effect of the DPD repulsive interaction parameters, aij, for the different components is calculated from the dependence of the Flory-Huggins χ parameter on temperature, by means of the solubility parameters. Atomistic simulations were carried out for the calculation of the solubility parameters for different organic compounds at different temperatures in order to estimate χ and then the aij coefficients. We validate this parametrization through the study of the interfacial tension in a mixture of benzene and water, and cyclohexane and water, varying the temperature. The predictions of our simulations are found to be in good agreement with experimental data taken from the literature, and show that the use of the solubility parameter at different temperatures to obtain the repulsive DPD parameters is a good alternative to introduce the effect of temperature in these systems.

  8. Temperature dependence of electromechanical properties of PLZT /57/43 ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Shukla; V K Agrawal; I M L Das; Janardan Singh; S L Srivastava

    2010-08-01

    The compositions of lead lanthanum zirconate titanate PLZT [Pb(Zr0.57Ti0.43)O3 + at% of La, where = 3, 5, 6, 10 and 12] have been synthesized using mixed oxide route. The temperature dependent electromechanical parameters have been determined using vector impedance spectroscopy (VIS). The charge constant 31 and elastic compliance $s^{E}_{11}$ show a peak in all the samples at a temperature mt much below the ferroelectric – paraelectric transition temperature, whereas the series resonance frequency s shows a dip at these temperatures. The Poisson’s ratio increases with temperature showing a broad peak at a temperature higher than mt. The voltage constant 31 decreases and the planar coupling coefficient p remains constant up to half of the mt and then falls sharply with . Half of the mt can, therefore, be used for specifying the working temperature limit of the piezoceramics for the device applications.

  9. The instantaneous rate dependence in low temperature laboratory rock friction and rock deformation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeler, N.M.; Tullis, T.E.; Kronenberg, A.K.; Reinen, L.A.

    2007-01-01

    Earthquake occurrence probabilities that account for stress transfer and time-dependent failure depend on the product of the effective normal stress and a lab-derived dimensionless coefficient a. This coefficient describes the instantaneous dependence of fault strength on deformation rate, and determines the duration of precursory slip. Although an instantaneous rate dependence is observed for fracture, friction, crack growth, and low temperature plasticity in laboratory experiments, the physical origin of this effect during earthquake faulting is obscure. We examine this rate dependence in laboratory experiments on different rock types using a normalization scheme modified from one proposed by Tullis and Weeks [1987]. We compare the instantaneous rate dependence in rock friction with rate dependence measurements from higher temperature dislocation glide experiments. The same normalization scheme is used to compare rate dependence in friction to rock fracture and to low-temperature crack growth tests. For particular weak phyllosilicate minerals, the instantaneous friction rate dependence is consistent with dislocation glide. In intact rock failure tests, for each rock type considered, the instantaneous rate dependence is the same size as for friction, suggesting a common physical origin. During subcritical crack growth in strong quartzofeldspathic and carbonate rock where glide is not possible, the instantaneous rate dependence measured during failure or creep tests at high stress has long been thought to be due to crack growth; however, direct comparison between crack growth and friction tests shows poor agreement. The crack growth rate dependence appears to be higher than the rate dependence of friction and fracture by a factor of two to three for all rock types considered. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  10. Temperature dependent two-phase behaviour of magnetisation and spin polarisation in NiPt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefers, Markus; Thomas, Andy; Reiss, Guenter [Bielefeld University, Universitaetsstrasse 25, D-33615 Bielefeld (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    We investigated the temperature dependent behaviour of magnetisation and spin polarisation in NiCu and NiPt alloys. The advantage of these alloys is the reduced Curie temperature compared with pure Nickel. The whole range of magnetisation is accessible in experiment for these alloys. Magnetic tunnel junctions with these alloys as free electrode were prepared by dc-magnetron sputtering in an UHV system with a base pressure of 1 . 10{sup -7} mbar and argon ion beam etching. TMR ratio was measured temperature dependent with a dc 2-point method. Spin polarisation was calculated by Julliere's formula. Magnetisation was measured with a SQUID for different temperatures. The NiPt alloy showed a maximum for in-plane magnetisation and spin polarisation at about 190 K. There are indications for a perpendicular magnetic anisotropy at low temperatures in the NiPt alloy.

  11. Temperature-dependent structural relaxation in As{sub 40}Se{sub 60} glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golovchak, R., E-mail: roman_ya@yahoo.com [Lviv Sci. and Res. Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' , 202 Stryjska str., 79031 Lviv (Ukraine); Kozdras, A. [Opole University of Technology, 75, Ozimska str., Opole, PL-45370 (Poland); Academy of Management and Administration, 18 Niedzialkowski str., Opole, PL-45085 (Poland); Shpotyuk, O. [Jan Dlugosz University, 13/15, al. Armii Krajowej, 42201, Czestochowa (Poland); Gorecki, Cz. [Opole University of Technology, 75, Ozimska str., Opole, PL-45370 (Poland); Kovalskiy, A.; Jain, H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Lehigh University, 5 East Packer Avenue, Bethlehem, PA 18015-3195 (United States)

    2011-08-01

    The origin of structural relaxation in As{sub 40}Se{sub 60} glass at different annealing temperatures is studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and in situ extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) methods. Strong physical aging effect, expressed through the increase of endothermic peak area in the vicinity of T{sub g}, is recorded by DSC technique at the annealing temperatures T{sub a}>90{sup o}C. EXAFS data show that the observed structural relaxation is not associated with significant changes in the short-range order of this glass. An explanation is proposed for this relaxation behavior assuming temperature-dependent constraints. -- Highlights: → In this study we report experimental evidence for temperature-dependent constraints theory. → Structural relaxation of As{sub 2}Se{sub 3} glass at higher annealing temperatures is studied by DSC technique. → Accompanied changes in the structure are monitored by in situ EXAFS measurements.

  12. Temperature Dependence of Exchange Bias and Coercivity in Ferromagnetic Layer Coupled with Polycrystalline Antiferromagnetic Layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Jin-Wei; HU Jing-Guo; CHEN Guang

    2004-01-01

    The temperature dependence of exchange bias and coercivity in a ferromagnetic layer coupled with an antiferromagnetic layer is discussed.In this model,the temperature dependence comes from the thermal instability of the system states and the temperature modulated relative magnetic parameters.Morever,the thermal fluctuation of orientations of easy axes of antiferromagnetic grains at preparing has been considered.From the present model,the experimental results can be illustrated qualitatively for available magnetic parameters.Based on our discussion,we can conclude that soft ferromagnetic layer coupled by hard antiferromagnetic layer may be very applicable to design magnetic devices.In special exchange coupling,we can get high exchange bias and low coercivity almost independent of temperature for proper temperature ranges.

  13. Temperature dependence of the universal contact parameter in a unitary Fermi gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhnle, E D; Hoinka, S; Dyke, P; Hu, H; Hannaford, P; Vale, C J

    2011-04-29

    The contact I, introduced by Tan, has emerged as a key parameter characterizing universal properties of strongly interacting Fermi gases. For ultracold Fermi gases near a Feshbach resonance, the contact depends upon two quantities: the interaction parameter 1/(k(F)a), where k(F) is the Fermi wave vector and a is the s-wave scattering length, and the temperature T/T(F), where T(F) is the Fermi temperature. We present the first measurements of the temperature dependence of the contact in a unitary Fermi gas using Bragg spectroscopy. The contact is seen to follow the predicted decay with temperature and shows how pair-correlations at high momentum persist well above the superfluid transition temperature.

  14. A temperature-dependent surface free energy model for solid single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tianbao; Fang, Daining; Yang, Yazheng

    2017-01-01

    A temperature-dependent theoretical model for the surface free energy of the solid single crystals is established. This model relates the surface free energy at the elevated temperatures to that at the reference temperature, the temperature-dependent specific heat at constant pressure and coefficient of the linear thermal expansion, the heat of phase transition, the melting heat, and the vapor heat. As examples, the surface free energies of Fe, Cu, Al, Ni, and Pb from 0 K to melting points are calculated and are in reasonable agreement with these from Tyson's theories and the experimental results. This model has obvious advantages compared to Tyson's semi-empirical equations from the aspect of physical meaning, applicable condition, and accuracy. The study shows that the surface free energy of the solid single crystals firstly remains approximately constant and then decreases linearly as temperature increases from 0 K to melting point.

  15. Temperature dependent electrical characteristics of Zn/ZnSe/n-GaAs/In structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sağlam, M.; Güzeldir, B.

    2016-04-01

    We have reported a study of the I-V characteristics of Zn/ZnSe/n-GaAs/In sandwich structure in a wide temperature range of 80-300 K by a step of 20 K, which are prepared by Successive Ionic Layer Adsorption and Reaction (SILAR) method. The main electrical parameters, such as ideality factor and zero-bias barrier height determined from the forward bias I-V characteristics were found strongly depend on temperature and when the increased, the n decreased with increasing temperature. The ideality factor and barrier height values as a function of the sample temperature have been attributed to the presence of the lateral inhomogeneities of the barrier height. Furthermore, the series resistance have been calculated from the I-V measurements as a function of temperature dependent.

  16. Temperature Dependence of Sound Velocity in High-Strength Fiber-Reinforced Plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Ryuji; Yoneyama, Keiichi; Ogasawara, Futoshi; Ueno, Masashi; Okuda, Yuichi; Yamanaka, Atsuhiko

    2003-08-01

    Longitudinal sound velocity in unidirectional hybrid composites or high-strength fiber-reinforced plastics (FRPs) was measured along the fiber axis over a wide temperature range (from 77 K to 420 K). We investigated two kinds of high-strength crystalline polymer fibers, polyethylene (Dyneema) and polybenzobisoxazole (Zylon), which are known to have negative thermal expansion coefficients and high thermal conductivities along the fiber axis. Both FRPs had very high sound velocities of about 9000 m/s at low temperatures and their temperature dependences were very strong. Sound velocity monotonically decreased with increasing temperature. The temperature dependence of sound velocity was much stronger in Dyneema-FRP than in Zylon-FRP.

  17. New correlation for the temperature-dependent viscosity for saturated liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jianxiang; Zhang, Laibin

    2016-11-01

    Based on the recent progress on both the temperature dependence of surface tension [H. L. Yi, J. X. Tian, A. Mulero and I. Cachading, J. Therm. Anal. Calorim. 126 (2016) 1603, and the correlation between surface tension and viscosity of liquids [J. X. Tian and A. Mulero, Ind. Eng. Chem. Res. 53 (2014) 9499], we derived a new multiple parameter correlation to describe the temperature-dependent viscosity of liquids. This correlation is verified by comparing with data from NIST Webbook for 35 saturated liquids including refrigerants, hydrocarbons and others, in a wide temperature range from the triple point temperature to the one very near to the critical temperature. Results show that this correlation predicts the NIST data with high accuracy with absolute average deviation (AAD) less than 1% for 21 liquids and more than 3% for only four liquids, and is clearly better than the popularly used Vogel-Fulcher-Tamman (VFT) correlation.

  18. Temperature-dependent striped antiferromagnetism of LaFeAsO in a Green's function approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gui-Bin; Liu, Bang-Gui

    2009-05-13

    We use a Green's function method to study the temperature-dependent average moment and magnetic phase-transition temperature of the striped antiferromagnetism of LaFeAsO, and other similar compounds, as the parents of FeAs-based superconductors. We consider the nearest and the next-nearest couplings in the FeAs layer, and the nearest coupling for inter-layer spin interaction. The dependence of the transition temperature T(N) and the zero-temperature average spin on the interaction constants is investigated. We obtain an analytical expression for T(N) and determine our temperature-dependent average spin from zero temperature to T(N) in terms of unified self-consistent equations. For LaFeAsO, we obtain a reasonable estimation of the coupling interactions with the experimental transition temperature T(N) = 138 K. Our results also show that a non-zero antiferromagnetic (AFM) inter-layer coupling is essential for the existence of a non-zero T(N), and the many-body AFM fluctuations reduce substantially the low-temperature magnetic moment per Fe towards the experimental value. Our Green's function approach can be used for other FeAs-based parent compounds and these results should be useful to understand the physical properties of FeAs-based superconductors.

  19. Anomalous pion decay revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Battistel, O A; Nemes, M C; Hiller, B

    1999-01-01

    An implicit four dimensional regularization is applied to calculate the axial-vector-vector anomalous amplitude. The present technique always complies with results of Dimensional Regularization and can be easily applied to processes involving odd numbers of $\\gamma_5$ matrices. This is illustrated explicitely in the example of this letter.

  20. Soft-/rapidity- anomalous dimensions correspondence

    CERN Document Server

    Vladimirov, Alexey A

    2016-01-01

    We establish a correspondence between ultraviolet singularities of soft factors for multi-particle production and rapidity singularities of soft factors for multi-parton scattering. This correspondence is a consequence of a conformal mapping between scattering geometries. The correspondence is valid to all orders of perturbation theory and in this way provides a proof of rapidity renormalization procedure for multi-parton scattering soft factors (including the transverse momentum dependent (TMD) soft factor as a special case). As a by-product we obtain an exact relation between the rapidity anomalous dimension and the well-known soft anomalous dimension. The three-loop rapidity anomalous dimensions for TMD and a general multi-parton scattering are derived.

  1. Dependence of nitrogen concentration in type Ib diamonds on synthesis temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Yu; JIA XiaoPeng; ZANG ChuanYi; LI ShangSheng; XIAO HongYu; ZHANG YaFei; HUANG GuoFeng; LI Rui; HAN QiGang; MA LiQiu; LI Yong; CHEN XiaoZhou; ZHANG Chong; MA HongAn

    2009-01-01

    Type Ib diamonds were grown by the temperature gradient method (TGM) at 5.5 GPa and 1500-1560 K in a china-type cubic anvil high pressure apparatus using Ni70Mn25Co5 alloy as solvent/catalyst. The concentration of nitrogen (CN) in type Ib diamonds synthesized at different synthesis temperatures was measured by a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. The dependence of CN in diamond on synthesis temperature was studied. For the type Ib diamonds synthesized using Ni70Mn25Co5 as catalyst, its CN decreases along with the increase of synthesis temperature.

  2. Temperature dependence of photoluminescence from submonolayer deposited InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Zhangcheng; Leosson, K.; Birkedal, Dan;

    2002-01-01

    The temperature dependence of photoluminescence (PL) from self-assembled InGaAs quantum dots (QD's) grown by submonolayer deposition mode (non-SK mode), is investigated. It is found that the PL spectra are dominated by the ground-state transitions at low temperatures, but increasingly...... by the excited-state transitions at higher temperatures. The emission linewidth of the ground-state transitions of QDs ensembles first decreases and then increases with the increase of temperature, which results from the carrier transfer between dots via barrier states....

  3. Temperature-Dependent Raman Spectra and Microstructure of Barium Metaborate Crystals and Its Melts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尤静林; 蒋国昌; 侯怀宇; 吴永全; 陈辉; 徐匡迪

    2002-01-01

    We have measured the Raman spectra of β- and α-barium metaborate in crystal and liquid states from room temperature to 1873K, with a semiconductor laser as the laser source, coupled with a time-resolved detection system to eliminate the dense thermal emission background when temperature was considerably high.Temperature-dependent Raman spectra can clearly indicate that the phase transformation from β- to α-barium metaborate has been completed during 1273 - 1300 K. Variations of different kinds of microstructure units with temperature are identified and discussed.

  4. Temperature Dependence of the Inhibition of Positronium by Chlorine- Substituted Hydrocarbons in Non-Polar Liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wikander, G.; Mogensen, O.E.; Pedersen, Niels Jørgen

    1984-01-01

    was roughly 14 times stronger at −30°C than at 67°C in toluene, m-xylene, and mesitylene, while that of CCl4 displayed hardly any temperature dependence in hexane and toluene. Previously, the Ps inhibition by C6H2Cl4 in various liquids at 20°C was explained by a competition between electron pick off......− might be much shorter at low than at high temperatures. (2) The positron mobility might decrease very strongly with decreasing temperature. (3) Positrons possibly trapped on C6H2Cl4 might thermally detach at high but not at low temperatures....

  5. Anomalous inverse bremsstrahlung heating of laser-driven plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Mrityunjay

    2016-05-01

    Absorption of laser light in plasma via electron-ion collision (inverse bremsstrahlung) is known to decrease with the laser intensity as I 0 -3/2 or with the electron temperature as T e -3/2 where Coulomb logarithm ln Λ = 0.5ln(1 + k 2 min/k 2 max) in the expression of electron-ion collision frequency v ei is assumed to be independent of ponderomotive velocity v 0 = E0/ω which is unjustified. Here k -1 min = v th/max(ω, ω p), and k -1 max = Z/v 2 th are maximum and minimum cut-off distances of the colliding electron from the ion, v th = √T e is its thermal velocity, ω, ω p are laser and plasma frequency. Earlier with a total velocity v = (v 2 0 + v 2 th)1/2 dependent ln Λ(v) it was reported that v ei and corresponding fractional laser absorption (α) initially increases with increasing intensity, reaches a maximum value, and then fall according to the conventional I 0 -3/2 scaling. This anomalous increase in v ei and α may be objected due to an artifact introduced in ln Λ(v) through k-1 min ∝ v. Here we show similar anomalous increase of v ei and α versus I 0 (in the low temperature and under-dense density regime) with quantum and classical kinetic models of v ei without using ln Λ, but a proper choice of the total velocity dependent inverse cut-off length kmax -1 ∝ v 2 (in classical case) or kmax ∝ v (in quantum case). For a given I 0 15 eV, anomalous growth of vei and a disappear. The total velocity dependent k max in kinetic models, as proposed here, may explain anomalous increase of a with I 0 measured in some earlier laser-plasma experiments. This work may be important to understand collisional absorption in the under-dense pre-plasma region due to low intensity pre-pulses and amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) pedestal in the context of laser induced inertial confinement fusion.

  6. Anomalous band-filling dependence of the quasiparticle density of states and the gap ratio 2 Δ0/ kBTc in strong-coupling superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasushi, Yokoya; Yoshiko, Oi Nakamura

    1996-02-01

    Within the framework of the Eliashberg theory including the energy-dependent Lorentzian electronic density of states (EDOS), the behavior of the quasiparticle density of states (QDOS) is studied for strong-coupling superconductors. Our numerical calculation shows that when the EDOS has structure it can give an additional structure to the QDOS besides the usual fine structures due to the strong electron-phonon coupling when the carrier concentration has appropriate values. It is also found that the inclusion of the energy-varying EDOS leads to unusual band-filling dependence of the gap ratio 2 Δ0/ kBTc: The calculation with the band-filling n being varied, reveals that the gap ratio does not necessarily take its maximum value of half-filling, but at a value of n far away from half-filling. This may occur as the electron-phonon coupling becomes very strong.

  7. Temperature dependence of a microstructured SiC coherent thermal source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervé, Armande; Drévillon, Jérémie; Ezzahri, Younès; Joulain, Karl; De Sousa Meneses, Domingos; Hugonin, Jean-Paul

    2016-09-01

    By ruling a grating on a polar material that supports surface phonon-polaritons such as silicon carbide (SiC), it is possible to create directional and monochromatic thermal sources. So far, most of the studies have considered only materials with room temperature properties as the ones tabulated in Palik's handbooks. Recently, measurements have provided experimental data of the SiC dielectric function at different temperatures. Here we study, numerically, the effect of the temperature dependence of the dielectric function on the thermal emission of SiC gratings (1D grating, in a first approach), heated at different temperatures. When materials are heated, the position of the grating emissivity peak shifts towards higher wavelength values. A second consequence of the temperature dependence of optical properties is that room temperature designed gratings are not optimal for higher temperatures. However, by modifying the grating parameters, it is possible to find an emission peak, with a maximum of emissivity near 1, for each temperature. We tried first to catch some patterns in the emissivity variation. Then, we obtained a grating, which leads to an optimum emissivity for all available temperature data for SiC.

  8. Effects of activation energy and activation volume on the temperature-dependent viscosity of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwang-Hua, Chu Rainer

    2016-08-01

    Water transport in a leaf is vulnerable to viscosity-induced changes. Recent research has suggested that these changes may be partially due to variation at the molecular scale, e.g., regulations via aquaporins, that induce reductions in leaf hydraulic conductance. What are the quantitative as well as qualitative changes in temperature-dependent viscosity due to the role of aquaporins in tuning activation energy and activation volume? Using the transition-state approach as well as the boundary perturbation method, we investigate temperature-dependent viscosity tuned by activation energy and activation volume. To validate our approach, we compare our numerical results with previous temperature-dependent viscosity measurements. The rather good fit between our calculations and measurements confirms our present approach. We have obtained critical parameters for the temperature-dependent (shear) viscosity of water that might be relevant to the increasing and reducing of leaf hydraulic conductance. These parameters are sensitive to temperature, activation energy, and activation volume. Once the activation energy increases, the (shear) viscosity of water increases. Our results also show that as the activation volume increases (say, 10-23m3 ), the (shear) viscosity of water decreases significantly and the latter induces the enhancing of leaf hydraulic conductance. Within the room-temperature regime, a small increase in the activation energy will increase the water viscosity or reduce the leaf hydraulic conductance. Our approach and results can be applied to diverse plant or leaf attributes.

  9. Temperature dependence of the superconducting proximity effect quantified by scanning tunneling spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stępniak, A.; Caminale, M.; Leon Vanegas, A. A.; Oka, H.; Sander, D., E-mail: sander@mpi-halle.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Mikrostrukturphysik, Weinberg 2, 06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Kirschner, J. [Max-Planck-Institut für Mikrostrukturphysik, Weinberg 2, 06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Institut für Physik, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, 06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany)

    2015-01-15

    Here, we present the first systematic study on the temperature dependence of the extension of the superconducting proximity effect in a 1–2 atomic layer thin metallic film, surrounding a superconducting Pb island. Scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) measurements reveal the spatial variation of the local density of state on the film from 0.38 up to 1.8 K. In this temperature range the superconductivity of the island is almost unaffected and shows a constant gap of a 1.20 ± 0.03 meV. Using a superconducting Nb-tip a constant value of the proximity length of 17 ± 3 nm at 0.38 and 1.8 K is found. In contrast, experiments with a normal conductive W-tip indicate an apparent decrease of the proximity length with increasing temperature. This result is ascribed to the thermal broadening of the occupation of states of the tip, and it does not reflect an intrinsic temperature dependence of the proximity length. Our tunneling spectroscopy experiments shed fresh light on the fundamental issue of the temperature dependence of the proximity effect for atomic monolayers, where the intrinsic temperature dependence of the proximity effect is comparably weak.

  10. A space and time scale-dependent nonlinear geostatistical approach for downscaling daily precipitation and temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Jha, Sanjeev Kumar

    2015-07-21

    A geostatistical framework is proposed to downscale daily precipitation and temperature. The methodology is based on multiple-point geostatistics (MPS), where a multivariate training image is used to represent the spatial relationship between daily precipitation and daily temperature over several years. Here, the training image consists of daily rainfall and temperature outputs from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model at 50 km and 10 km resolution for a twenty year period ranging from 1985 to 2004. The data are used to predict downscaled climate variables for the year 2005. The result, for each downscaled pixel, is daily time series of precipitation and temperature that are spatially dependent. Comparison of predicted precipitation and temperature against a reference dataset indicates that both the seasonal average climate response together with the temporal variability are well reproduced. The explicit inclusion of time dependence is explored by considering the climate properties of the previous day as an additional variable. Comparison of simulations with and without inclusion of time dependence shows that the temporal dependence only slightly improves the daily prediction because the temporal variability is already well represented in the conditioning data. Overall, the study shows that the multiple-point geostatistics approach is an efficient tool to be used for statistical downscaling to obtain local scale estimates of precipitation and temperature from General Circulation Models. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Temperature dependence of the superconducting proximity effect quantified by scanning tunneling spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Stępniak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Here, we present the first systematic study on the temperature dependence of the extension of the superconducting proximity effect in a 1–2 atomic layer thin metallic film, surrounding a superconducting Pb island. Scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS measurements reveal the spatial variation of the local density of state on the film from 0.38 up to 1.8 K. In this temperature range the superconductivity of the island is almost unaffected and shows a constant gap of a 1.20 ± 0.03 meV. Using a superconducting Nb-tip a constant value of the proximity length of 17 ± 3 nm at 0.38 and 1.8 K is found. In contrast, experiments with a normal conductive W-tip indicate an apparent decrease of the proximity length with increasing temperature. This result is ascribed to the thermal broadening of the occupation of states of the tip, and it does not reflect an intrinsic temperature dependence of the proximity length. Our tunneling spectroscopy experiments shed fresh light on the fundamental issue of the temperature dependence of the proximity effect for atomic monolayers, where the intrinsic temperature dependence of the proximity effect is comparably weak.

  12. Assessing the Temperature Dependence of Narrow-Band Raman Water Vapor Lidar Measurements: A Practical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteman, David N.; Venable, Demetrius D.; Walker, Monique; Cardirola, Martin; Sakai, Tetsu; Veselovskii, Igor

    2013-01-01

    Narrow-band detection of the Raman water vapor spectrum using the lidar technique introduces a concern over the temperature dependence of the Raman spectrum. Various groups have addressed this issue either by trying to minimize the temperature dependence to the point where it can be ignored or by correcting for whatever degree of temperature dependence exists. The traditional technique for performing either of these entails accurately measuring both the laser output wavelength and the water vapor spectral passband with combined uncertainty of approximately 0.01 nm. However, uncertainty in interference filter center wavelengths and laser output wavelengths can be this large or larger. These combined uncertainties translate into uncertainties in the magnitude of the temperature dependence of the Raman lidar water vapor measurement of 3% or more. We present here an alternate approach for accurately determining the temperature dependence of the Raman lidar water vapor measurement. This alternate approach entails acquiring sequential atmospheric profiles using the lidar while scanning the channel passband across portions of the Raman water vapor Q-branch. This scanning is accomplished either by tilt-tuning an interference filter or by scanning the output of a spectrometer. Through this process a peak in the transmitted intensity can be discerned in a manner that defines the spectral location of the channel passband with respect to the laser output wavelength to much higher accuracy than that achieved with standard laboratory techniques. Given the peak of the water vapor signal intensity curve, determined using the techniques described here, and an approximate knowledge of atmospheric temperature, the temperature dependence of a given Raman lidar profile can be determined with accuracy of 0.5% or better. A Mathematica notebook that demonstrates the calculations used here is available from the lead author.

  13. Temperature and humidity dependence of secondary organic aerosol yield from the ozonolysis of β-pinene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. von Hessberg

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The temperature dependence of secondary organic aerosol (SOA formation from ozonolysis of β-pinene was studied in a flow reactor at 263 K–303 K and 1007 hPa under dry and humid conditions (0% and 26%–68% relative humidity, respectively. The observed SOA yields reached maximum values of 0.18–0.39 at high particle mass concentrations (Mo. Under dry conditions, the measurement data showed an overall increase in SOA yield with inverse temperature, but significant oscillatory deviations from the predicted linear increase with inverse temperature (up to 50% at high Mo was observed. Under humid conditions the SOA yield exhibited a linear decrease with inverse temperature. For the atmospherically relevant concentration level of Mo=10 μg m−3 and temperature range 263 K–293 K, the results from humid experiments in this study indicate that the SOA yield of β-pinene ozonolysis may be well represented by an average value of 0.15 with an uncertainty estimate of ±0.05. When fitting the measurement data with a two-product model, both the partitioning coefficients (Kom,i and the stoichiometric yields (αi of the low-volatile and semi-volatile model species were found to vary with temperature. The results indicate that not only the reaction product vapour pressures but also the relative contributions of different gas-phase or multiphase reaction channels are strongly dependent on temperature and the presence of water vapour. In fact, the oscillatory positive temperature dependence observed under dry conditions and the negative temperature dependence observed under humid conditions indicate that the SOA yield is governed much more by the temperature and humidity dependence of the involved chemical reactions than by vapour pressure temperature dependencies. We suggest that the elucidation and modelling of SOA formation need to take into account the

  14. Determination of the temperature-dependent cell membrane permeabilities using microfluidics with integrated flow and temperature control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Cifeng; Ji, Fujun; Shu, Zhiquan; Gao, Dayong

    2017-02-28

    We developed an integrated microfluidic platform for instantaneous flow and localized temperature control. The platform consisted of a flow-focusing region for sample delivery and a cross-junction region embedded with a microheater for cell trapping and localized temperature control by using an active feedback control system. We further used it to measure the membrane transport properties of Jurkat cells, including the osmotically inactive cell volume (Vb) and cell membrane permeabilities to water (Lp) and to cryoprotective agent (CPA) solutions (dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) in this study) (PS) at various temperatures (room temperature, 30 °C, and 37 °C). Such characteristics of cells are of great importance in many applications, especially in optimal cryopreservation. With the results, the corresponding activation energy for water and CPA transport was calculated. The comparison of the results from the current study with reference data indicates that the developed platform is a reliable tool for temperature-dependent cell behavior study, which provides valuable tools for general cell manipulation applications with precise temperature control.

  15. Modeling and Compensating Temperature-Dependent Non-Uniformity Noise in IR Microbolometer Cameras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Alejandro; Pezoa, Jorge E; Figueroa, Miguel

    2016-07-19

    Images rendered by uncooled microbolometer-based infrared (IR) cameras are severely degraded by the spatial non-uniformity (NU) noise. The NU noise imposes a fixed-pattern over the true images, and the intensity of the pattern changes with time due to the temperature instability of such cameras. In this paper, we present a novel model and a compensation algorithm for the spatial NU noise and its temperature-dependent variations. The model separates the NU noise into two components: a constant term, which corresponds to a set of NU parameters determining the spatial structure of the noise, and a dynamic term, which scales linearly with the fluctuations of the temperature surrounding the array of microbolometers. We use a black-body radiator and samples of the temperature surrounding the IR array to offline characterize both the constant and the temperature-dependent NU noise parameters. Next, the temperature-dependent variations are estimated online using both a spatially uniform Hammerstein-Wiener estimator and a pixelwise least mean squares (LMS) estimator. We compensate for the NU noise in IR images from two long-wave IR cameras. Results show an excellent NU correction performance and a root mean square error of less than 0.25 ∘ C, when the array's temperature varies by approximately 15 ∘ C.

  16. Angular radiation temperature simulation for time-dependent capsule drive prediction in inertial confinement fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jing, Longfei; Yang, Dong; Li, Hang; Zhang, Lu; Lin, Zhiwei; Li, Liling; Kuang, Longyu [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Jiang, Shaoen, E-mail: jiangshn@vip.sina.com; Ding, Yongkun [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Huang, Yunbao, E-mail: huangyblhy@gmail.com [Mechatronics School of Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510080 (China)

    2015-02-15

    The x-ray drive on a capsule in an inertial confinement fusion setup is crucial for ignition. Unfortunately, a direct measurement has not been possible so far. We propose an angular radiation temperature simulation to predict the time-dependent drive on the capsule. A simple model, based on the view-factor method for the simulation of the radiation temperature, is presented and compared with the experimental data obtained using the OMEGA laser facility and the simulation results acquired with VISRAD code. We found a good agreement between the time-dependent measurements and the simulation results obtained using this model. The validated model was then used to analyze the experimental results from the Shenguang-III prototype laser facility. More specifically, the variations of the peak radiation temperatures at different view angles with the albedo of the hohlraum, the motion of the laser spots, the closure of the laser entrance holes, and the deviation of the laser power were investigated. Furthermore, the time-dependent radiation temperature at different orientations and the drive history on the capsule were calculated. The results indicate that the radiation temperature from “U20W112” (named according to the diagnostic hole ID on the target chamber) can be used to approximately predict the drive temperature on the capsule. In addition, the influence of the capsule on the peak radiation temperature is also presented.

  17. Frequency analysis of temperature-dependent interferometric signal for the measurement of the temperature coefficient of refractive index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jianqin; Shen, Jun; Neill, W. Stuart

    2016-07-01

    A method of frequency analysis for the measurement of the temperature coefficient of refractive index (dn/dT) using a Fabry-Perot interferometer was developed and tested against ethanol and water. The temperature-dependent interferometric signal described by Airy's formula was analyzed in both the temperature and frequency domains. By fast Fourier transform, a low-pass filter was designed and employed to eliminate the noise superimposed on the signal. dn/dT was determined accurately from the noise-removed signal by peak analysis. Furthermore, the signal frequency parameters may be utilized for the material thermophysical property characterization. This method lays the foundation for an online dn/dT instrument for monitoring chemical processes.

  18. INS, DFT and temperature dependent IR investigations of dynamical properties of low temperature phase of choline chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawlukojć, A., E-mail: andrzej@jinr.ru [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Dorodna 16 str., 03-195 Warsaw (Poland); Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Hetmańczyk, Ł. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Faculty of Chemistry, Jagiellonian University, Ingardena 3 str., 30-060 Cracow (Poland)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • Choline chloride was investigated by INS and IR. • DFT calculations for solids state model were performed. • Full vibrational analysis was performed. • Activation energy for the CH{sub 3} group reorientation was obtained. - Abstract: Within the framework of the research the inelastic neutron scattering and temperature dependent infra-red spectroscopy investigations of the low temperature phase of choline chloride were performed. The infra-red spectra in wavenumber region 4000–80 cm{sup −1} and in a temperature range 9–300 K were collected. The density functional theory calculations with the periodic boundary conditions for determination and description of the normal modes in the vibration spectra of choline chloride were applied. Bands assigned to the CH{sub 3} torsional vibration were observed at 288 and 249 cm{sup −1}. From the analysis of the temperature dependence of the full-width-at-half-maximum the activation energy for CH{sub 3} group reorientation is found to be equal to 1.6 ± 0.2 kcal/mol.

  19. Increased temperature produces changes in the bioactive composition of tomato, depending on its developmental stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Virginia; Hellín, Pilar; Fenoll, Jose; Flores, Pilar

    2015-03-11

    The present study examines the effect of an increased day temperature on vitamin C and carotenoid concentrations in tomato, depending on the developmental stage of fruits when the stress is imposed. Plants were cultivated in a growth chamber initially at 24 °C, and the day temperature was increased to 32 °C when fruits belonging to six different fruit development stages could be differentiated. Vitamin C, phytoene, phytofluene, lycopene, γ-carotene, and violaxantin concentrations were significantly lower when a temperature of 32 °C was imposed during the advanced stages of fruit development compared to the levels observed in the control treatment. However, no effect or increased concentrations were observed when the temperature was increased in earlier stages, indicating the adaptation of the plant metabolism to high temperature. Finally, no effect on β-carotene concentration was observed, regardless of the fruit developmental stage when the temperature increase was applied.

  20. Temperature Dependence of the Raman Spectra of Na2Si2O5

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YOU Jing-Lin; JIANG Guo-Chang; XU Kuang-Di

    2001-01-01

    The microstructures of Na2Si2O5 from room temperature up to 1773 K are studied by high-temperature Paman spectroscopy. Deconvolutions of complex Raman spectra of crystal and amorphous states (glass and melt) are described. The results show that the temperature-dependent Raman spectra clearly indicate phase transition.The relative abundance of various kinds of SiO4 tetrahedrons (each Si binding to different numbers of bridging oxygens) can be qualitatively and quantitatively resolved as to be varied obviously with different temperatures.This shows that high-temperature Raman spectroscopy provides a useful tool for microstructure research under high temperature and helps to explain the properties of silicate glasses and melts.

  1. Fabrication and temperature dependence of a GaInP/GaAs/Ge tandem solar cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔敏; 陈诺夫; 杨晓丽; 张汉

    2012-01-01

    GaInP/GaAs/Ge tandem solar cells were fabricated by a MOCVD technique.The photoelectric properties of the solar cells were characterized by a current-voltage test method.The dependence of the solar cell's characteristics on temperature were investigated from 30 to 170 ℃ at intervals of 20 ℃.Test results indicated that with increasing temperature,Jsc of the cell increased slightly with a temperature coefficient of 9.8 (μA/cm2)/℃.Voc reduced sharply with a coefficient of-5.6 mV/℃.FF was reduced with a temperature coefficient of-0.00063/℃.Furthermore,the conversion efficiency decreased linearly with increasing temperature which decreased from 28% at 30 ℃ to 22.1% at 130 ℃.Also,detailed theoretical analyses for temperature characteristics of the solar cell were given.

  2. Temperature dependence of Raman scattering and anharmonic properties in LiNbO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kokanyan, Ninel; Chapron, David; Fontana, Marc D. [Universite de Lorraine, Laboratoire Materiaux Optiques, Photonique et Systemes (LMOPS), Metz (France); Supelec, Laboratoire Materiaux Optiques, Photonique et Systemes (LMOPS), Metz (France)

    2014-11-15

    The temperature dependence of the Raman spectrum in LiNbO{sub 3} is investigated from 100 to 700 K. The various sources of asymmetry of Raman bands and artefacts are discussed before analyzing the temperature dependence of A{sub 1} and E first-order phonon lines. The phonon frequency downshift and damping increase on heating are interpreted in terms of normal volume expansion and third- and fourth-order anharmonic potentials. Anharmonic contributions are highly anisotropic and mainly explain the temperature dependences of both frequency and damping of A{sub 1} optical vibrational modes along the ferroelectric axis. Results are consistent with Caciuc et al. (Phys Rev B 61:8806, 2000) predictions. (orig.)

  3. Plate-like convection induced by symmetries in fluids with temperature-dependent viscosity

    CERN Document Server

    Curbelo, Jezabel

    2014-01-01

    The study of instabilities in fluids in which viscosity experiences a transition at a certain temperature range is of great interest for the understanding of planetary interiors, since this phenomena models the melting and solidification of a magma ocean and thus is suitable for representing a lithosphere over a convecting mantle. To this end, we study a 2D convection problem in which viscosity depends on temperature by abruptly changing its value by a factor 400 within a narrow temperature gap at which magma melts. We perform a study which combines bifurcation analysis and time dependent simulations. Solutions such as limit cycles are found that are fundamentally related to the presence of symmetry. Sporadically during these cycles, through abrupt bursts, spontaneous plate-like behaviors that rapidly evolve towards a stagnant lid regime emerge. The plate-like evolution alternates motions towards either right or left, introducing temporary asymmetries on the convecting styles. Further time dependent regimes w...

  4. The Size Effect on the Temperature Dependence of the Resistivity of Metal Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.V. Odnodvorets

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the temperature dependences of the electrical conductivity of thin metal films is per-formed. It is shown that the size dependence of the effective parameter of the electron-phonon interaction is connected with amplification of high-temperature electron-phonon interaction at the decrease in the film thickness which appears as a result of the shift of the phonon spectrum to higher frequencies. We have found that the slope of the experimental temperature dependences of the resistance for Pd, Pt, and Sc films, as in the case of Mo, Cr, Ag, Au, and PdAu films, according to the data of other authors, increases with the decrease in the thickness. As the film thickness decreases the average phonon energy increases that leads to the increase in the efficiency of the electron-phonon scattering and, finally, to the increase in the resistivity.

  5. Temperature dependence of dislocation dynamics during nano-indentation in metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathinam, Murugavel

    Temperature dictates mechanical properties of materials. In present day applications, materials are rarely utilized at room temperature alone. Meanwhile, temperatures may have drastic effects on the mechanical responses of materials, such as the deformation and fracture properties at different temperatures. Nanoscale testing of materials at non-ambient temperatures is now possible. The ability to perform nanotest measurements at elevated temperatures opens up significant new possibilities in nanotechnology. Sub-zero and high temperature analysis using nanoindentation technology is the first of its kind. Materials behave differently in real-life environments due to thermal loading. The objective of this thesis is to investigate the response of metals to nanoindentation at temperatures above and below the normal room temperature, using a combination of experiments and computer simulations. The metals studied include both face-center-cubic (FCC) and body-center-cubic (BCC) elements, and dislocation dynamics is the focus of this mechanics study. The experiments are performed with tailor-made Berkovitch tip of radius 100 nm at temperatures of 265 K, 388 K, 348 K, 473 K and 623 K. Single-crystals of tungsten, gold, Aluminum and polycrystalline copper are considered for the investigation. The indentation is done for BCC tungsten on the (111) and (110) crystallographic surfaces, FCC gold on the (111) and (110) crystallographic surfaces, single crystal aluminum with (100) crystallographic orientation and polycrystalline copper at different temperatures. Both the behaviour of material during loading and unloading are analyzed, and the processes are examined both experimentally and by computer simulations. Emphases are placed on the defects generation mechanisms during the elastic plastic contact of crystals. Special attention has been devoted to the elastic response before the onset of plastic yield. The temperature dependency experiments and computer simulations yield very

  6. Effect Of Pressure On The Temperature Dependence Of Water Solubility In Forsterite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bali, E.; Bolfan-Casanova, N.; Koga, K.

    2005-12-01

    Water storage capacity of the upper mantle largely depends on water solubility in mantle olivine. Realistic models must take into account the simultaneous effects of variables such as pressure, temperature, iron content and silica activity. Previous experimental studies have shown that the water solubility in olivine increases with increasing water fugacity up to 12 GPa at 1100°C. Water incorporation in olivine was also observed to increase with increasing temperature and increasing iron content at 0.3 GPa, however the temperature dependence was not studied at higher pressures. Interestingly, the only high-pressure data available, that is for wadsleyite and ringwoodite, show that their water solubility decreases with increasing temperature. The goal of this study is to determine the dependence of water maximum concentration on temperature at pressures higher than 0.3 GPa. We performed experiments at 3 and 6 GPa, and temperatures ranging from 1000 to 1400°C in the MgO-SiO2-H2O system using a multi-anvil apparatus. The olivine and orthopyroxene molar ratio was 1 to 1 in the starting material with 5 wt% H2O. The samples were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The mineralogical assemblage consisted of olivine+orthopyroxene+fluid at temperatures below 1250°C both at 3 and 6 GPa and olivine+melt+/-orthopyroxene at higher temperatures. At 3 GPa, above 1325°C orthopyroxene was missing from the assemblage, whereas in case of the 6 GPa experiments it was present even at higher temperatures. This indicates a change in fluid composition from 3 to 6 GPa. Preliminary data using unpolarized FTIR measurements, but comparing same orientations, indicate that water solubility in olivine at 6 GPa decreases with increasing temperature. This observation agrees with the results on wadsleyite and ringwoodite, but contradict the results of the existing low-pressure data. The explaination we propose for the change in temperature

  7. Inverse Temperature Dependence of Nuclear Quantum Effects in DNA Base Pairs

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, Wei; Rossi, Mariana; Feng, Yexin; Li, Xin-Zheng; Michaelides, Angelos

    2016-01-01

    Despite the inherently quantum mechanical nature of hydrogen bonding, it is unclear how nuclear quantum effects (NQEs) alter the strengths of hydrogen bonds. With this in mind, we use ab initio path integral molecular dynamics to determine the absolute contribution of NQEs to the binding in DNA base pair complexes, arguably the most important hydrogen-bonded systems of all. We find that depending on the temperature, NQEs can either strengthen or weaken the binding within the hydrogen-bonded complexes. As a somewhat counterintuitive consequence, NQEs can have a smaller impact on hydrogen bond strengths at cryogenic temperatures than at room temperature. We rationalize this in terms of a competition of NQEs between low-frequency and high-frequency vibrational modes. Extending this idea, we also propose a simple model to predict the temperature dependence of NQEs on hydrogen bond strengths in general.

  8. Temperature dependence of Hall electron density of GaN-based heterostructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Jin-Feng; Zhang Jin-Cheng; Hao Yue

    2004-01-01

    The theoretic calculation and analysis of the temperature dependence of Hall electron density of a sample AlGaN/GaN heterostructure has been carried out in the temperature range from 77 to 300K. The densities of the twodimensional electron gas and the bulk electrons are solved by self-consistent calculation of one-dimensional Schrodinger and Poisson equations at different temperatures, which allow for the variation of energy gap and structure strain, and are used for evaluation of the temperature dependence of Hall electron density. The calculated Hall electron density agrees with the measured one quite well with the appropriate bulk mobility data. Analysis revealed that for the temper ature range considered, even in the heterostructures with a small bulk conductance the factors that determine the Hall mobility and electron density could be of different sources, and not just the two-dimensional electron gas as generally supposed.

  9. Biophysical Insights from Temperature-Dependent Single-Molecule Förster Resonance Energy Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmstrom, Erik D.; Nesbitt, David J.

    2016-05-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence microscopy techniques can be used in combination with micrometer length-scale temperature control and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) in order to gain detailed information about fundamental biophysical phenomena. In particular, this combination of techniques has helped foster the development of remarkable quantitative tools for studying both time- and temperature-dependent structural kinetics of biopolymers. Over the past decade, multiple research efforts have successfully incorporated precise spatial and temporal control of temperature into single-molecule FRET (smFRET)-based experiments, which have uncovered critical thermodynamic information on a wide range of biological systems such as conformational dynamics of nucleic acids. This review provides an overview of various temperature-dependent smFRET approaches from our laboratory and others, highlighting efforts in which such methods have been successfully applied to studies of single-molecule nucleic acid folding.

  10. Flavor dependence of baryon melting temperature in effective models of QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Rincon, Juan M.; Sintes, Benjamin; Aichelin, Joerg

    2015-06-01

    We apply the three-flavor (Polyakov-)Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model to generate baryons as quark-diquark bound states using many-body techniques at finite temperature. All the baryonic states belonging to the octet and decuplet flavor representations are generated in the isospin-symmetric case. For each state we extract the melting temperature at which the baryon may decay into a quark-diquark pair. We seek for an evidence of the strangeness dependence of the baryon melting temperature as suggested by the statistical thermal models and supported by lattice quantum chromodynamics results. A clear and robust signal for this claim is found, pointing to a flavor dependence of the hadronic deconfinement temperature.

  11. Nonlocal thermo-elastic wave propagation in temperature-dependent embedded small-scaled nonhomogeneous beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Farzad; Reza Barati, Mohammad; Haghi, Parisa

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, the thermo-elastic wave propagation analysis of a temperature-dependent functionally graded (FG) nanobeam supported by Winkler-Pasternak elastic foundation is studied using nonlocal elasticity theory. The nanobeam is modeled via a higher-order shear deformable refined beam theory which has a trigonometric shear stress function. The temperature field has a nonlinear distribution called heat conduction across the nanobeam thickness. Temperature-dependent material properties change gradually in the spatial coordinate according to the Mori-Tanaka model. The governing equations of the wave propagation of the refined FG nanobeam are derived by using Hamilton's principle. The analytic dispersion relation of the embedded nonlocal functionally graded nanobeam is obtained by solving an eigenvalue problem. Numerical examples show that the wave characteristics of the functionally graded nanobeam are related to the temperature distribution, elastic foundation parameters, nonlocality and material composition.

  12. An improved temperature-dependent large signal model of microwave GaN HEMTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changsi, Wang; Yuehang, Xu; Zhang, Wen; Zhikai, Chen; Ruimin, Xu

    2016-07-01

    Accurate modeling of the electrothermal effects of GaN electronic devices is critical for reliability design and assessment. In this paper, an improved temperature-dependent model for large signal equivalent circuit modeling of GaN HEMTs is proposed. To accurately describe the thermal effects, a modified nonlinear thermal sub-circuit which is related not only to power dissipation, but also ambient temperature is used to calculate the variations of channel temperature of the device; the temperature-dependent parasitic and intrinsic elements are also taken into account in this model. The parameters of the thermal sub-circuit are extracted by using the numerical finite element method. The results show that better performance can be achieved by using the proposed large signal model in the range of -55 to 125 °C compared with the conventional model with a linear thermal sub-circuit. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61106115).

  13. Biophysical Insights from Temperature-Dependent Single-Molecule Förster Resonance Energy Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmstrom, Erik D; Nesbitt, David J

    2016-05-27

    Single-molecule fluorescence microscopy techniques can be used in combination with micrometer length-scale temperature control and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) in order to gain detailed information about fundamental biophysical phenomena. In particular, this combination of techniques has helped foster the development of remarkable quantitative tools for studying both time- and temperature-dependent structural kinetics of biopolymers. Over the past decade, multiple research efforts have successfully incorporated precise spatial and temporal control of temperature into single-molecule FRET (smFRET)-based experiments, which have uncovered critical thermodynamic information on a wide range of biological systems such as conformational dynamics of nucleic acids. This review provides an overview of various temperature-dependent smFRET approaches from our laboratory and others, highlighting efforts in which such methods have been successfully applied to studies of single-molecule nucleic acid folding.

  14. Intrinsic temperature-dependent evolutions in the electron-boson spectral density obtained from optical data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jungseek

    2016-03-01

    We investigate temperature smearing effects on the electron-boson spectral density function (I2χ(ω)) obtained from optical data using a maximum entropy inversion method. We start with two simple model input I2χ(ω), calculate the optical scattering rates at selected temperatures using the model input spectral density functions and a generalized Allen’s formula, then extract back I2χ(ω) at each temperature from the calculated optical scattering rate using the maximum entropy method (MEM) which has been used for analysis of optical data of high-temperature superconductors including cuprates, and finally compare the resulting I2χ(ω) with the input ones. From this approach we find that the inversion process can recover the input I2χ(ω) almost perfectly when the quality of fits is good enough and also temperature smearing (or thermal broadening) effects appear in the I2χ(ω) when the quality of fits is not good enough. We found that the coupling constant and the logarithmically averaged frequency are robust to the temperature smearing effects and/or the quality of fits. We use these robust properties of the two quantities as criterions to check whether experimental data have intrinsic temperature-dependent evolutions or not. We carefully apply the MEM to two material systems (one optimally doped and the other underdoped cuprates) and conclude that the I2χ(ω) extracted from the optical data contain intrinsic temperature-dependent evolutions.

  15. Temperature dependence of birefringence in olarization-maintaining photonic crystal fibres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Hong; Chen Meng; Li Gang

    2012-01-01

    In this paper,the temperature dependence of birefringence in polarization maintaining photonic crystal fibres (PMPCFs) is investigated theoretically and experimentally.Utilizing the structural parameters of the PM-PCF samples in the experiment,two effects leading to the birefringence variation under different temperatures are analysed,which are the thermal expansion of silica material and the refractive index variation due to the temperature variation.The actual birefringence variation of the PM-PCF is the combination of the two effects,which is in the order of 10-9 K-1 for both fibre samples.Calculation results also show that the influence of refractive index variation is the dominant contribution,which determines the tendency of the fibre birefringence variation with varying temperature.Then,the birefringence beat lengths of the two fibre samples are measured under the temperature,which varies from -40 ℃ to 80 ℃.A traditional PANDA-type polarization maintaining fibre (PMF) is also measured in the same way for comparison.The experimental results indicate that the birefringence variation of the PM-PCF due to temperature variation is far smaller than that of the traditional PMF,which agrees with the theoretical analysis.The ultra-low temperature dependence of the birefringence in the PM-PCF has great potential applications in temperature-insensitive fibre interferometers,fibre sensors,and fibre gyroscopes.

  16. Precise quantization of anomalous Hall effect near zero magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bestwick, A. J. [Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Fox, E. J. [Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Kou, Xufeng [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Pan, Lei [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Wang, Kang L. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Goldhaber-Gordon, D. [Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-05-04

    In this study, we report a nearly ideal quantum anomalous Hall effect in a three-dimensional topological insulator thin film with ferromagnetic doping. Near zero applied magnetic field we measure exact quantization in the Hall resistance to within a part per 10,000 and a longitudinal resistivity under 1 Ω per square, with chiral edge transport explicitly confirmed by nonlocal measurements. Deviations from this behavior are found to be caused by thermally activated carriers, as indicated by an Arrhenius law temperature dependence. Using the deviations as a thermometer, we demonstrate an unexpected magnetocaloric effect and use it to reach near-perfect quantization by cooling the sample below the dilution refrigerator base temperature in a process approximating adiabatic demagnetization refrigeration.

  17. Temperature dependency of the hysteresis behaviour of PZT actuators using Preisach model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mangeot, Charles; Zsurzsan, Tiberiu-Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    The Preisach model is a powerful tool for modelling the hysteresis phenomenon on multilayer piezo actuators under large signal excitation. In this paper, measurements at different temperatures are presented, showing the effect on the density of the Preisach matrix. An energy-based approach...... is presented, aiming at defining a temperature-dependent phenomenological model of hysteresis for a better understanding of the non-linear effects in piezo actuators....

  18. On the temperature dependence of the lower wavelength cutoff of a series of Schott glass filters

    OpenAIRE

    Hickey, J. R.; BRETT, D.A.; Drummond, A J

    2011-01-01

    The authors have extended the work of Ångström & Drummond concerning the temperature dependence of the three meteorological standard filters (Schott OG 1, RG 2 and RG 8) and here give values of the temperature coefficient of the center of lower cutoff for seven other Schott sharp cutoff filters. The results demonstrate that there is a definite relationship between the normalized cutoff wavelength and this coefficient, the coefficient increasing semi-logarithmically with wavelength over th...

  19. Experimental investigation of the energy and temperature dependence of beryllium self sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korshunov, S.N.; Guseva, M.I.; Stolijarova, V.G. [RRC Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-09-01

    The low-Z metal beryllium is considered as plasma facing material (PFM) for the ITER. It is expected that operation temperature range of beryllium PFM will be (670 - 1070) K. While experimental Be-sputtering data bases exist for H{sup +}, D{sup +} and He{sup +}-ions, the self-sputtering yields of Be have only been estimated by computer simulation. In this paper we report the experimental results on the energy and temperature dependence of the beryllium self-sputtering yield (S). The energy dependence of S{sup s} in the energy range (0.5 - 10.0) keV was measured at 670 K. The self-sputtering yield of Be attains its maximal value at the ion energy of 1.5 keV, being equal to 0.32 {+-} at./ion. Comparison of the experimental results and theoretical prediction shows a good agreement for energy dependence of S{sup s}. The temperature dependence of S{sup s} in the temperature range (370-1070)K was obtained for 0.9keV Be{sup +}-ions. The value of S{sup s} is not changed up to 870 K. It sharply increases at the temperatures above 870 attaining the value of 0.75 at./ion at 1070 K.

  20. Temperature and field dependence of the anisotropy of MgB2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angst, M; Puzniak, R; Wisniewski, A; Jun, J; Kazakov, S M; Karpinski, J; Roos, J; Keller, H

    2002-04-22

    The anisotropy gamma of the superconducting state of high quality single crystals of MgB2 was determined, using torque magnetometry with two different methods. The anisotropy of the upper critical field was found to be temperature dependent, decreasing from gamma approximately 6 at 15 K to 2.8 at 35 K. Reversible torque data near T(c) reveal a field dependent anisotropy, increasing nearly linearly from gamma approximately equal to 2 in zero field to 3.7 in 10 kOe. The unusual temperature dependence is a true bulk property and can be explained by nonlocal effects of anisotropic pairing and/or the k--> dependence of the effective mass tensor.

  1. Preisach modeling of temperature-dependent ferroelectric response of piezoceramics at sub-switching regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, Diego Alejandro; García, Jose Eduardo

    2016-04-01

    The Preisach model is a classical method for describing nonlinear behavior in hysteretic systems. According to this model, a hysteretic system contains a collection of simple bistable units which are characterized by an internal field and a coercive field. This set of bistable units exhibits a statistical distribution that depends on these fields as parameters. Thus, nonlinear response depends on the specific distribution function associated with the material. This model is satisfactorily used in this work to describe the temperature-dependent ferroelectric response in PZT- and KNN-based piezoceramics. A distribution function expanded in Maclaurin series considering only the first terms in the internal field and the coercive field is proposed. Changes in coefficient relations of a single distribution function allow us to explain the complex temperature dependence of hard piezoceramic behavior. A similar analysis based on the same form of the distribution function shows that the KNL-NTS properties soften around its orthorhombic to tetragonal phase transition.

  2. Temperature-dependence of Threshold Current Density-Length Product in Metallization Lines: A Revisit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saptono Duryat, Rahmat; Kim, Choong-Un

    2016-04-01

    One of the important phenomena in Electromigration (EM) is Blech Effect. The existence of Threshold Current Density-Length Product or EM Threshold has such fundamental and technological consequences in the design, manufacture, and testing of electronics. Temperature-dependence of Blech Product had been thermodynamically established and the real behavior of such interconnect materials have been extensively studied. The present paper reviewed the temperature-dependence of EM threshold in metallization lines of different materials and structure as found in relevant published articles. It is expected that the reader can see a big picture from the compiled data, which might be overlooked when it was examined in pieces.

  3. Magnetic field and temperature dependence of the critical vortex velocity in type-II superconducting films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimaldi, G; Leo, A; Cirillo, C; Attanasio, C; Nigro, A; Pace, S [CNR-INFM Laboratorio Regionale SuperMat, Via Salvador Allende, I-84081 Baronissi (Italy)], E-mail: grimaldi@sa.infn.it

    2009-06-24

    We study the vortex dynamics in the instability regime induced by high dissipative states well above the critical current in Nb superconducting strips. The magnetic field and temperature behavior of the critical vortex velocity corresponding to the observed dynamic instability is ascribed to intrinsic non-equilibrium phenomena. The Larkin-Ovchinnikov (LO) theory of electronic instability in high velocity vortex motion has been applied to interpret the temperature dependence of the critical vortex velocity. The magnetic field dependence of the vortex critical velocity shows new features in the low-field regime not predicted by LO.

  4. Temperature Dependence and Magnetic Properties of Injection Molding Tool Materials Used in Induction Heating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerrier, Patrick; Nielsen, Kaspar Kirstein; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2015-01-01

    , in this paper, been characterized for their temperature-dependent magnetic properties. The properties have been measured using a vibrating sample magnetometer, able to reach to 350 °C. The established material database comprises the B–H loops, from which the mean B–H curve, relative permeability versus magnetic......To analyze the heating phase of an induction heated injection molding tool precisely, the temperature-dependent magnetic properties, B–H curves, and the hysteresis loss are necessary for the molding tool materials. Hence, injection molding tool steels, core materials among other materials have...

  5. Magnetic field and temperature dependence of the critical vortex velocity in type-II superconducting films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, G; Leo, A; Cirillo, C; Attanasio, C; Nigro, A; Pace, S

    2009-06-24

    We study the vortex dynamics in the instability regime induced by high dissipative states well above the critical current in Nb superconducting strips. The magnetic field and temperature behavior of the critical vortex velocity corresponding to the observed dynamic instability is ascribed to intrinsic non-equilibrium phenomena. The Larkin-Ovchinnikov (LO) theory of electronic instability in high velocity vortex motion has been applied to interpret the temperature dependence of the critical vortex velocity. The magnetic field dependence of the vortex critical velocity shows new features in the low-field regime not predicted by LO.

  6. Nonlinear Temperature Dependence of Magnetization of Two-Band Superconductors Near Upper Critical Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Temperature dependence of the magnetization M(T) of two-band superconductors is studied in the vicinity of upper critical field Hc2 by using a two-band Ginzburg-Landau (GL) theory. It is shown that magnetization M(T) has a nonlinear character due to positive curvature of upper critical field Hc2(T) and temperature dependence of effective Ginzburg-Landau parameter (n)eff(T). The results are shown to be in qualitative agreement with experimental data for the superconducting magnesium diboride, MgB2.

  7. Temperature dependence of magnetism near defects in SrB sub 6

    CERN Document Server

    Jarlborg, T

    2003-01-01

    The temperature (T) dependence of magnetic moments in SrB sub 6 is studied through spin-polarized band calculations for a supercell of Sr sub 2 sub 7 B sub 1 sub 5 sub 6 containing a B sub 6 vacancy. The magnetic moment decays rather quickly with T despite the fact that only electronic Fermi-Dirac effects are included. This result and the T dependence of moments near an La impurity can hardly explain the reports of a very high Curie temperature in hexaborides, but suggest that the magnetism is caused by some other type of impurity. (letter to the editor)

  8. Temperature dependence of magnetic moments of nanoparticles and their dipole interaction in magnetic fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebedev, A.V.

    2015-01-15

    Magnetic susceptibility measurements were carried out for magnetite-based fluids over a wide temperature range. The fluids were stabilized with commonly used surfactants (fatty acids) and new surfactants (polypropylene glycol and tallow acids). The coefficients of temperature dependence of the particle magnetic moments were determined by fitting of the measured and calculated values of magnetic susceptibility. The influence of the inter-particle dipole–dipole interaction on the susceptibility was taken into account in the framework of A.O. Ivanov's model. The corrections for thermal expansion were determined by density measurements of the carrier fluid. The obtained values of temperature coefficients correlate to the solidification temperature of the fluid samples. For fluids with a low solidification temperature the value of the temperature coefficient of particle magnetization coincides with its value for bulk magnetite. - Highlights: • Susceptibility measurements made for magnetic fluids over a wide temperature range. • Temperature coefficients of particle magnetization found from susceptibility data. • The value of coefficients correlates to the solidification temperature of the fluid. • For the lowest solidification temperature the coefficient corresponds to that of bulk magnetite.

  9. Temperature dependency of the Ga/In distribution in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 absorbers in high temperature processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, B. J.; Demes, T.; Lill, P. C.; Haug, V.; Hergert, F.; Zweigart, S.; Herr, U.

    2016-05-01

    The current article reports about the influence of temperature and glass substrate on Ga/In interdiffusion and chalcopyrite phase formation in the stacked elemental layer process. According to the Shockley-Queisser limit the optimum for single junction devices is near 1.4 eV, which is strongly coupled on the Ga/(Ga+In) ratio of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin film solar cells. To increase the Ga content in the active region of the Cu(In,Ga)Se2 a 70:30 CuGa alloy target is used. An increase of the selenization temperature leads to a more homogeneous Ga/In distribution and a less pronounced Ga agglomeration at the back contact. The Ga/In interdiffusion rates for different selenization temperatures and substrates were estimated with the model of a two layer system. At the highest selenization temperature used an absorber band gap of 1.12 eV was realized, which is similar to typical values of absorbers produced during the co-evaporation process. The Na diffusion into the Cu(In,Ga)Se2 is weakly temperature dependent but strongly influenced by the choice of the glass substrate composition.

  10. Phase separation time/temperature dependence of thermoplastics-modified thermosetting systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiujuan ZHANG; Xiaosu YI; Yuanze XU

    2008-01-01

    The cure-induced phase separation processes of various thermoplastics(TP)-modified thermosetting systems which show upper critical solution temperature (UCST) or lower critical solution temperature (LCST) were studied with emphasis on the temperature depend-ency of the phase separation time and its potential application in the cure time-temperature processing win-dow.We found that the phase separation time/temper-ature relationship follows the simple Arrhenius equation.The cure-induced phase separation activation energy Ea(ps) generated from the linear fitting of the Arrhenius equation is irrelevant to the detection means of phase separation time.We also found that Ea(ps) is insensitive to TP content,TP molecular weight and curing rate,but it changes with the cure reaction kinetics and the chemical environment of the systems.With the established phase separation time-temperature dependence relation,we can easily establish the whole cure time-temperature transformation (TTT) diagram with morphology information which is a useful map for the TP/TS compo-sites processing industry.

  11. Temperature response of soil respiration is dependent on concentration of readily decomposable C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Larionova

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Temperature acclimation of soil organic matter (SOM decomposition is one of the major uncertainties in predicting soil CO2 efflux associated with the increase in global mean temperature. A reasonable explanation for an apparent acclimation proposed by Davidson and colleagues (2006 based on Michaelis-Menten kinetics suggests that temperature sensitivity decreases when both maximal activity of respiratory enzymes (Vmax and half-saturation constant (Ks cancel each other upon temperature increase. We tested the hypothesis of the canceling effect by the mathematical simulation of data obtained in incubation experiments with forest and arable soils. Our data support the hypothesis and suggest that concentration of readily decomposable C substrate (as glucose equivalents and temperature dependent substrate release are the important factors controlling temperature sensitivity of soil respiration. The highest temperature sensitivity of soil respiration was observed when substrate release was temperature dependent and C substrate concentration was much lower than Ks. Increase of substrate content to the half-saturation constant by glucose addition resulted in temperature acclimation associated with the canceling effect. Addition of the substrate to the level providing respiration at a maximal rate Vmax leads to the acclimation of the whole microbial community as such. However, growing microbial biomass was more sensitive to the temperature alterations. This study improves our understanding of the instability of temperature sensitivity of soil respiration under field conditions, attributing this phenomenon to changes in concentration of readily decomposable C substrate.

  12. Temperature dependent surface modification of molybdenum due to low energy He{sup +} ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tripathi, J.K., E-mail: jtripat@purdue.edu [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment (CMUXE), School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Novakowski, T.J.; Joseph, G. [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment (CMUXE), School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Linke, J. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, EURATOM Association, Jülich D-52425 (Germany); Hassanein, A. [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment (CMUXE), School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, we report on the temperature dependent surface modifications in molybdenum (Mo) samples due to 100 eV He{sup +} ion irradiation in extreme conditions as a potential candidate to plasma-facing components in fusion devices alternative to tungsten. The Mo samples were irradiated at normal incidence, using an ion fluence of 2.6 × 10{sup 24} ions m{sup −2} (with a flux of 7.2 × 10{sup 20} ions m{sup −2} s{sup −1}). Surface modifications have been studied using high-resolution field emission scanning electron-(SEM) and atomic force (AFM) microscopy. At 773 K target temperature homogeneous evolution of molybdenum nanograins on the entire Mo surface were observed. However, at 823 K target temperature appearance of nano-pores and pin-holes nearby the grain boundaries, and Mo fuzz in patches were observed. The fuzz density increases significantly with target temperatures and continued until 973 K. However, at target temperatures beyond 973 K, counterintuitively, a sequential reduction in the fuzz density has been seen till 1073 K temperatures. At 1173 K and above temperatures, only molybdenum nano structures were observed. Our temperature dependent studies confirm a clear temperature widow, 823–1073 K, for Mo fuzz formation. Ex-situ high resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies on Mo fuzzy samples show the evidence of MoO{sub 3} 3d doublets. This elucidates that almost all the Mo fuzz were oxidized during open air exposure and are thick enough as well. Likewise the microscopy studies, the optical reflectivity measurements also show a sequential reduction in the reflectivity values (i.e., enhancement in the fuzz density) up to 973 K and after then a sequential enhancement in the reflectivity values (i.e., reduction in the fuzz density) with target temperatures. This is in well agreement with microscopy studies where we observed clear temperature window for Mo fuzz growth.

  13. Abnormal temperature dependence of the coercive field in FePt thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzmán, J.M. [Facultad de Ciencias Químicas – Universidad Nacional de Córdoba – 5000 Córdoba (Argentina); Álvarez, N.; Salva, H.R.; Vásquez Mansilla, M.; Gómez, J. [Centro Atómico Bariloche (CNEA), Instituto Balseiro (U. N. Cuyo) and Conicet, 8400 Bariloche, Río Negro (Argentina); Butera, A., E-mail: butera@cab.cnea.gov.ar [Centro Atómico Bariloche (CNEA), Instituto Balseiro (U. N. Cuyo) and Conicet, 8400 Bariloche, Río Negro (Argentina)

    2013-12-15

    We have observed notable changes in the magnetic response of FePt thin films that we have attributed to a transition in the magnetic domain structure when the film thickness or the temperature is varied. The critical thickness for this transition depends on the Q-factor, Q=K{sub ⊥}/2πM{sub s}{sup 2}, so that a change in the domain structure is expected when changes in the perpendicular anisotropy, K{sub ⊥}, or the saturation magnetization, M{sub s}, occur. At room temperature these samples have Q∼0.3, and a transition between planar to stripe-like domains occurs for a film thickness d∼30nm. Due to the different thermal expansion of the FePt alloy and the Si substrate a reduction in Q is predicted when the temperature is lowered. From magnetization vs. field loops measured at different temperatures below T=300 K, we have effectively observed a change in the coercive field which can be associated to a transition from stripe-like to in-plane domains. The transition temperature range is broad, indicating a gradual variation between the two magnetic configurations, but changes systematically with film thickness, consistent with an interfacial induced stress. A model that includes the temperature dependence of the strain and the magnetization, predicts correctly the observation of a larger critical thickness at lower temperatures. - Highlights: • The magnetic domain configuration of disordered FePt films can be thermally switched between in-plane domains and stripe domains. • Results are explained by considering the full temperature dependence of the induced stress which produces an out-of-plane anisotropy axis. • The transition temperature changes systematically with film thickness, consistent with an interfacial induced stress.

  14. Temperature dependence of the liquid eutectic lead-lithium alloy density

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alchagirov; Boris; B.; Mozgovoi; Alexandr; G.; Taova; Tamara; M.

    2005-01-01

    Lead-lithium alloys are of great interest for practice as the advanced materials to be used in new technique, nuclear energetics, and so forth. Terefore, study on the physico-chemical properties of the latter is of major significance. An analysis of the available literature shows that there are a few works, devoted to study of Pb-Li alloys densities. However, temperature dependence of the density ρ(T), and its temperature coefficientK=dρ/dT for eutectic alloy were obtained by either extrapolation of the density data up to the eutectic alloy's composition, or calculation method. There is a certain discrepancy amounting to as high as 4%, while the allowable error in the density measurements is less than 0.5%. The discrepancy between the results for the temperature coefficients of density amounts to 80%.In this work we present the experimental data on the temperature dependence of Ph0.83 Li0.17 eutectic alloy's density in the temperature range 520K to 643 K. The alloys were prepared using Pb and Li with 99. 999% and 99.8% contents of the basic elements, respectively. We use the improved device, which permits to get the results with error less than 0. 15%. The results of 115 measurements of density in 520K to 643K temperature range were processed by the least-square method. Density polytherm of Pb0.83 Li0. 17 eutectic alloy is described by linear equation ρ(T) =9507.89-0. 79813(T-508) , kg/m3 ,where T is the absolute temperature by K. Mearsurement error was 0. 12% at 95% reliability.Discrepancy in the temperature coefficient data was 1.08%.Thus, the temperature dependence of the Pb-Li eutectic alloy density was studied by the precise two-capillary method. The obtained results may be recommended as the most reliable reference data.

  15. Rate of egg maturation in marine turtles exhibits 'universal temperature dependence'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Sam B; Blount, Jonathan D; Godley, Brendan J; Witt, Matthew J; Broderick, Annette C

    2011-09-01

    1. The metabolic theory of ecology (MTE) predicts that, after correcting for body mass variation among organisms, the rates of most biological processes will vary as a universal function of temperature. However, empirical support for 'universal temperature dependence' (UTD) is currently equivocal and based on studies of a limited number of traits. 2. In many ectothermic animals, the rate at which females produce mature eggs is temperature dependent and may be an important factor in determining the costs of reproduction. 3. We tested whether the rate of egg maturation in marine turtles varies with environmental temperature as predicted by MTE, using the time separating successive clutches of individual females to estimate the rate at which eggs are formed. We also assessed the phenotypic contribution to this rate, by using radio telemetry to make repeated measurements of interclutch intervals for individual green turtles (Chelonia mydas). 4. Rates of egg maturation increased with seasonally increasing water temperatures in radio-tracked green turtles, but were not repeatable for individual females, and did not vary according to maternal body size or reproductive investment (number and size of eggs produced). 5. Using a collated data set from several different populations and species of marine turtles, we then show that a single relationship with water temperature explains most of the variation in egg maturation rates, with a slope that is statistically indistinguishable from the UTD predicted by MTE. However, several alternative statistical models also described the relationship between temperature and egg maturation rates equally parsimoniously. 6. Our results offer novel support for the MTE's predicted UTD of biological rates, although the underlying mechanisms require further study. The strong temperature dependence of egg maturation combined with the apparently weak phenotypic contribution to this rate has interesting behavioural implications in ectothermic

  16. Temperature and angular momentum dependence of the quadrupole deformation in sd-shell

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P A Ganai; J A Sheikh; I Maqbool; R P Singh

    2009-11-01

    Temperature and angular momentum dependence of the quadrupole deformation is studied in the middle of the sd-shell for 28Si and 27Si isotopes using the spherical shell model approach. The shell model calculations have been performed using the standard universal sd-shell (USD) interaction and the canonical partition function constructed from the calculated eigensolutions. It is shown that the extracted average quadrupole moments show a transitional behaviour as a function of temperature and the infered transitional temperature is shown to vary with angular momentum. The quadrupole deformation of the individual eigenstate is also analysed.

  17. Temperature Dependence of Polarizability and Dispersion in Three, Two and One Dimensional Electron Gases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Baorong; KONG Linghua; LV Jianhong; HU Xiwei

    2009-01-01

    Both temperature dependence of polarizability and plasmon dispersion in unmagnetized metal (or semiconductor) electron gases are investigated in this paper.It is obtained that,with a continuous variation of temperature in a large region,the polarizability and dispersion change non-monotonously.The static polarizability x(q,ω=0,μ,T) and dispersion ωp(q,T) for finite T in three,two and one dimensional electron gases are calculated numerically.In addition,dispersion relation ω(q) at a definite temperature (T≠0) is similar to that at T=0.

  18. Temperature-dependent Structural Relaxation in As40Se60 Glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R Golovchak; A Kozdras; O Shpotyuk; C Gorecki; A Kovalskkiy; H Jain

    2011-12-31

    The origin of structural relaxation in As{sub 40}Se{sub 60} glass at different annealing temperatures is studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and in situ extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) methods. Strong physical aging effect, expressed through the increase of endothermic peak area in the vicinity of Tg, is recorded by DSC technique at the annealing temperatures T{sub a} > 90 C. EXAFS data show that the observed structural relaxation is not associated with significant changes in the short-range order of this glass. An explanation is proposed for this relaxation behavior assuming temperature-dependent constraints.

  19. DEPENDENCE OF QUALITATIVE BEHAVIOR OF THE NUMERICAL SOLUTIONS ON THE IGNITION TEMPERATURE FOR A COMBUSTION MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-ting Zhang; Lung-an Ying

    2005-01-01

    We study the dependence of qualitative behavior of the numerical solutions (obtained by a projective and upwind finite difference scheme) on the ignition temperature for a combustion model problem with general initial condition. Convergence to weak solution is proved under the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy condition. Some condition on the ignition temperature is given to guarantee the solution containing a strong detonation wave or a weak detonation wave. Finally, we give some numerical examples which show that a strong detonation wave can be transformed to a weak detonation wave under some well-chosen ignition temperature.

  20. Temperature dependence of radiation damage and its annealing in silicon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziock, H.J.; Boissevain, J.G.; Holzscheiter, K.; Kapustinsky, J.S.; Palounek, A.P.T.; Sondheim, W.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Barberis, E.; Cartiglia, N.; Leslie, J.; Pitzl, D.; Rowe, W.A.; Sadrozinski, H.F.W.; Seiden, A.; Spencer, E.; Wilder, M. [California Univ., Santa Cruz, CA (United States). Inst. for Particle Physics; Ellison, J.A.; Fleming, J.K.; Jerger, S.; Joyce, D.; Lietzke, C.; Reed, E.; Wimpenny, S.J. [California Univ., Riverside, CA (United States); Ferguson, P. [Missouri Univ., Rolla, MO (United States); Frautschi, M.A.; Matthews, J.A.J.; Skinner, D. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1992-12-01

    The radiation damage resulting from the large particle fluences predicted at the Superconducting Super Collider will induce significant leakage currents in silicon detectors. In order to limit those currents, we plan to operate the detectors at reduced temperatures ({approximately}0{degree} C). In this paper, we present the results of a study of temperature effects on both the initial radiation damage and the long-term annealing of that damage in silicon PIN detectors. Depletion voltage results are reported. The detectors were exposed to approximately 10{sup 14}/cm{sup 2} 650 MeV protons. Very pronounced temperature dependencies were observed.

  1. Temperature dependence of radiation damage and its annealing in silicon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziock, H.J.; Boissevain, J.G.; Holzscheiter, K.; Kapustinsky, J.S.; Palounek, A.P.T.; Sondheim, W.E. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Barberis, E.; Cartiglia, N.; Leslie, J.; Pitzl, D.; Rowe, W.A.; Sadrozinski, H.F.W.; Seiden, A.; Spencer, E.; Wilder, M. (Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States). Santa Cruz Inst. for Particle Physics); Ellison, J.A.; Fleming, J.K.; Jerger, S.; Joyce, D.; Lietzke, C.; Reed, E.; Wimpenny, S.J. (Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States)); Ferguson, P. (Univ. of Missouri, Rolla, MO (United States)); Frautschi, M.A.; Matthews, J.A.J.; Skinner, D. (Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States))

    1993-08-01

    The radiation damage resulting from the large particle fluences predicted at the Superconducting Super Collider will induce significant leakage currents in silicon detectors. In order to limit those currents, the authors plan to operate the detectors at reduced temperatures ([approximately] 0 C). In this paper, they present the results of a study of temperature effects on both the initial radiation damage and the long-term annealing of that damage in silicon PIN detectors. Depletion voltage results are reported. The detectors were exposed to approximately 10[sup 14]/cm[sup 2] 650 MeV protons. Very pronounced temperature dependencies were observed.

  2. Temperature dependence of radiation damage and its annealing in silicon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziock, H.J.; Boissevain, J.G.; Holzscheiter, K.; Kapustinsky, J.S.; Palounek, A.P.T.; Sondheim, W.E. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Barberis, E.; Cartiglia, N.; Leslie, J.; Pitzl, D.; Rowe, W.A.; Sadrozinski, H.F.W.; Seiden, A.; Spencer, E.; Wilder, M. (California Univ., Santa Cruz, CA (United States). Inst. for Particle Physics); Ellison, J.A.; Fleming, J.K.; Jerger, S.; Joyce, D.; Lietzke, C.; Re

    1992-01-01

    The radiation damage resulting from the large particle fluences predicted at the Superconducting Super Collider will induce significant leakage currents in silicon detectors. In order to limit those currents, we plan to operate the detectors at reduced temperatures ([approximately]0[degree] C). In this paper, we present the results of a study of temperature effects on both the initial radiation damage and the long-term annealing of that damage in silicon PIN detectors. Depletion voltage results are reported. The detectors were exposed to approximately 10[sup 14]/cm[sup 2] 650 MeV protons. Very pronounced temperature dependencies were observed.

  3. Influence of Fermion Determinant on the Temperature Dependence of Gluon Condensates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jue-Ping

    2000-01-01

    The contribution of the fermion determinant to the gluon condensates at a finite temperature is calculated in the framework of the grand partition function for a weak-interacting instanton medium of a disordered phase. It is found that the temperature behavior of both chromomagnetic and chromoelectric gluon condensates depends sensitively on the flavor number. The more the flavors are, the faster the gluon condensates decrease. In the three-flavor case, the gluon condensates would be vanish (or the scale invariance would be restored) approximately at the temperature of 180 MeV.

  4. A Temperature-Dependent Thermal Model of IGBT Modules Suitable for Circuit-Level Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Rui; Wang, Huai; Pedersen, Kristian Bonderup;

    2016-01-01

    A basic challenge in the IGBT transient simulation study is to obtain the realistic junction temperature, which demands not only accurate electrical simulations but also precise thermal impedance. This paper proposed a transient thermal model for IGBT junction temperature simulations during short...... circuits or overloads. The updated Cauer thermal model with varying thermal parameters is obtained by means of FEM thermal simulations with temperature-dependent physical parameters. The proposed method is applied to a case study of a 1700 V/1000 A IGBT module. Furthermore, a testing setup is built up...

  5. Temperature-dependent electroluminescence from GeSn heterojunction light-emitting diode on Si substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chiao; Li, Hui; Huang, Ssu-Hsuan; Lin, Li-Chien; Cheng, Hung-Hsiang

    2016-04-01

    The electroluminescence from a Ge/GeSn/Ge p-i-n light-emitting diode on Si was investigated under different temperatures ranging from 25 to 150 K. The diode was operated at a low injection current density of 13 A/cm2. We obtained no-phonon- and phonon-assisted replicas in emission spectra. Also, the relationship between indirect bandgap energy and temperature was investigated. The temperature-dependent bandgap energy followed Varshni’s empirical expression with α = 4.884 × 10-4 eV/K and β = 130 K.

  6. The temperature dependence of refractive index of hemoglobin at the wavelengths 930 and 1100 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazareva, Ekaterina N.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the refractive index of hemoglobin was measured at different temperatures within a physiological range and above that is characteristic to light-blood interaction at laser therapy. Measurements were carried out using the multi-wavelength Abbe refractometer (Atago, Japan). The refractive index was measured at two NIR wavelengths of 930 nm and 1100 nm. Samples of hemoglobin solutions with concentration of 80, 120 and 160 g/l were investigated. The temperature was varied between 25 and 55 °C. It was shown that the dependence of the refractive index of hemoglobin is nonlinear with temperature, which may be associated with changes in molecular structure of hemoglobin.

  7. Anomalous diffusion of epicentres

    CERN Document Server

    Sotolongo-Costa, Oscar; Posadas, A; Luzon, F

    2007-01-01

    The classification of earthquakes in main shocks and aftershocks by a method recently proposed by M. Baiesi and M. Paczuski allows to the generation of a complex network composed of clusters that group the most correlated events. The spatial distribution of epicentres inside these structures corresponding to the catalogue of earthquakes in the eastern region of Cuba shows anomalous anti-diffusive behaviour evidencing the attractive nature of the main shock and the possible description in terms of fractional kinetics.

  8. The effect of temperature dependence of viscosity on a Brownian heat engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taye, Mesfin Asfaw; Duki, Solomon Fekade

    2015-12-01

    We modeled a Brownian heat engine as a Brownian particle that hops in a periodic ratchet potential where the ratchet potential is coupled with a spatially varying temperature. The strength for the viscous friction γ( x) is considered to decrease exponentially when the temperature T( x) of the medium increases ( γ( x) = B e - AT( x)) as proposed originally by Reynolds [O. Reynolds, Phil. Trans. R. Soc. London 177, 157 (1886)]. Our result depicts that the velocity of the motor is considerably higher when the viscous friction is temperature dependent than that of the case where the viscous friction is temperature independent. The dependence of the efficiency η as well as the coefficient of performance of the refrigerator P ref on model parameters is also explored. If the motor designed to achieve a high velocity against a frictional drag, in the absence of external load f, we show that Carnot efficiency or Carnot refrigerator is unattainable even at quasistatic limit as long as the viscous friction is temperature dependent A ≠ 0. On the contrary, in the limit A → 0 or in general in the presence of an external load (for any A) f ≠ 0, at quasistatic limit, Carnot efficiency or Carnot refrigerator is attainable as long as the heat exchange via kinetic energy is omitted. For all cases, far from quasistatic limit, the efficiency and the coefficient of performance of the refrigerator are higher for constant γ case than the case where γ is temperature dependent. On the other hand, if one includes the heat exchange at the boundary of the heat baths, Carnot efficiency or Carnot refrigerator is unattainable even at quasistatic limit. Moreover, the dependence for the optimized and maximum power efficiencies on the determinant model parameters is explored.

  9. Temperature dependence of rapidly adapting mechanically activated currents in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zhanfeng; Ling, Jennifer; Gu, Jianguo G

    2012-08-01

    Rapidly adapting mechanically activated channels (RA) are expressed on somatosensory neurons and thought to play a role in mechanical transduction. Because mechanical sensations can be significantly affected by temperatures, we examined thermal sensitivity of RA currents in cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons to see if RA channel activity is highly temperature-dependent. RA currents were evoked from DRG neurons by membrane displacements and recorded by the whole-cell patch-clamp recording technique. We found that RA currents were significantly enhanced by warming temperatures from 22 to 32 °C and reduced by cooling temperatures from 24 to 14 °C. RA channel activation exhibited steep temperature-dependence with a large temperature coefficient (Q10>5) and a high activation energy (Ea>30 kcal/mol). We further showed that RA channel activation by mechanical stimulation led to membrane depolarization, which could result in action potential firing at 22 °C or 32 °C but not at 14 °C. Taken together, our results provide the measurements of thermal dynamics and activation energy of RA channels, and suggest that a high energy barrier is present for RA channels to open. These findings are in agreement with temperature sensitivity of mechanical sensations in mammals.

  10. Temperature-Dependent Line Shift and Broadening of CO Infrared Transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drascher; Giesen; Wang; Schmücker; Schieder; Winnewisser; Joubert; Bonamy

    1998-12-01

    The temperature dependence of lineshift and broadening of the rovibrational transitions R(18) and R(20) of the CO fundamental band, perturbed by Ar, N2, O2, and H2, have been measured with high frequency accuracy and at temperatures between 160 and 270 K in steps of 20 K. A wavelength stabilized tunable diode laser spectrometer has been combined with a low temperature long path cell of 134 m absorption length and 1 m basis length. For all measurements the CO pressure was below 0.1 mbar to avoid self-shift and self-broadening. In case of line broadening the temperature dependence is quite well reproduced by an exponential relation, b(T) = b(T0)(T/T0)-n. For all foreign gases, the exponent n has been obtained (0.53 temperatures, but there is no exponential behavior of the shift versus temperature. The line broadening and shift for CO with Ar and the broadening of CO by N2 and O2 have been compared to calculations from the semi-classical theory of Robert and Bonamy. Sufficient agreement has been achieved for the line broadening, while the calculated shifts are for all temperatures larger than the measured values. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  11. Temperature dependence of ice-on-rock friction at realistic glacier conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, C.; Savage, H.; Nettles, M.

    2017-02-01

    Using a new biaxial friction apparatus, we conducted experiments of ice-on-rock friction in order to better understand basal sliding of glaciers and ice streams. A series of velocity-stepping and slide-hold-slide tests were conducted to measure friction and healing at temperatures between -20°C and melting. Experimental conditions in this study are comparable to subglacial temperatures, sliding rates and effective pressures of Antarctic ice streams and other glaciers, with load-point velocities ranging from 0.5 to 100 µm s-1 and normal stress σn = 100 kPa. In this range of conditions, temperature dependences of both steady-state friction and frictional healing are considerable. The friction increases linearly with decreasing temperature (temperature weakening) from μ = 0.52 at -20°C to μ = 0.02 at melting. Frictional healing increases and velocity dependence shifts from velocity-strengthening to velocity-weakening behaviour with decreasing temperature. Our results indicate that the strength and stability of glaciers and ice streams may change considerably over the range of temperatures typically found at the ice-bed interface. This article is part of the themed issue 'Microdynamics of ice'.

  12. Temperature-dependent development of diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae) on two brassicaceous host plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ALI GOLIZADEH; KARIM KAMALI; YAGHOUB FATHIPOUR; HABIB ABBASIPOUR

    2007-01-01

    The effect of temperature on the development of the Plutella xylostella(Linnaeus) (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae), was evaluated at eight constant temperatures (10, 15,20, 25, 28, 30, 32.5 and 35℃), with relative humidity of 65% and a photoperiod of 14:10(L: D) hours on two host plants, cauliflower, Brassica oleracea var. botrytis and cabbage,Brassica oleracea var. capitata. The low temperature threshold was estimated to be 7.06℃and 7.84℃ and the thermal constant was 263.74 and 261.58 degree-days for P. xylostella on cauliflower and cabbage, respectively, using the linear model. Data were fitted to various nonlinear temperature-dependent models, and the low and high temperature thresholds, as well as the optimum temperature for development, has been estimated. Criteria of choice from the literature were used to evaluate models and to select the most suitable equation for P. xylostella development on each host plant. Conclusively, linear and Briere-2 models are recommended for the description of temperature-dependent development of P. xylostella on two host plants.

  13. Temperature dependence of ice-on-rock friction at realistic glacier conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, C; Savage, H; Nettles, M

    2017-02-13

    Using a new biaxial friction apparatus, we conducted experiments of ice-on-rock friction in order to better understand basal sliding of glaciers and ice streams. A series of velocity-stepping and slide-hold-slide tests were conducted to measure friction and healing at temperatures between -20°C and melting. Experimental conditions in this study are comparable to subglacial temperatures, sliding rates and effective pressures of Antarctic ice streams and other glaciers, with load-point velocities ranging from 0.5 to 100 µm s(-1) and normal stress σn = 100 kPa. In this range of conditions, temperature dependences of both steady-state friction and frictional healing are considerable. The friction increases linearly with decreasing temperature (temperature weakening) from μ = 0.52 at -20°C to μ = 0.02 at melting. Frictional healing increases and velocity dependence shifts from velocity-strengthening to velocity-weakening behaviour with decreasing temperature. Our results indicate that the strength and stability of glaciers and ice streams may change considerably over the range of temperatures typically found at the ice-bed interface.This article is part of the themed issue 'Microdynamics of ice'.

  14. The temperature dependence of luminescence from a long-lasting phosphor exposed to ionizing radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Kowatari, M; Satoh, Y; Iinuma, K; Uchida, S I

    2002-01-01

    The temperature dependence of luminescence from a long-lasting phosphor (LLP), SrAl sub 2 O sub 4 : Eu sup 2 sup + ,Dy sup 3 sup + , exposed to ionizing radiation has been measured to understand the LLP luminescence mechanism. Evaluation of the decay constants of the LLP exposed to alpha-, beta- or gamma-rays at temperatures from 200 to 390 K showed that the decay constant is divided into four components ranging from 10 sup - sup 4 to 10 sup - sup 1 s sup - sup 1 with activation energies of 0.02-0.35 eV. Total luminous intensity from the LLP with changing irradiation temperature has its maximum value around the room temperature. Irradiation at elevated temperature (390 K) has the total luminescence pattern with monotonous decrease as temperature rises. As a result of evaluating the temperature dependence of luminescence, the luminescence mechanism is considered as follows: (1.) holes generated by irradiation are stored at Dy sup 3 sup + sites (hole traps) and then released to recombine with electrons trapped ...

  15. Orientation, temperature, and frequency dependence of nonresonant microwave absorption in HTSC powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gould, A.; Huang, M.; Bhagat, S.M. (Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742-4111 (USA) Center for Superconductivity Research, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742-4111 (USA)); Tyagi, S. (Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 11004 (USA))

    1991-04-15

    Hysteresis in the microwave-power absorption of HTSC powders was studied as a function of temperature ({ital T}), field-sweep amplitude ({ital H}{sub max}), and orientation between the dc field ({bold H}{sub dc}) and the wave vector of the microwaves ({bold k}). It was found that (i) the sizable low-temperature hysteresis effects occur only if {bold H}{sub dc}{parallel}{bold k}, (ii) the temperature and frequency dependence of the hysteresis is strongly affected by {ital H}{sub max}, (iii) the high- and low-temperature virgin curves are quite different, and (iv) the minimum of the absorption signal increases with {ital H}{sub max} and {ital T}. The low-temperature hysteresis loops were found to be similar to loops obtained from nonlinear equations describing cusp catastrophes.

  16. Temperature Dependence of Characteristics for Multimode Interference Based 3-dB Coupler in SOI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The temperature dependence of characteristics for multimode interference(MMI) based 3-dB coupler in silicon-on-insulator is analyzed, which originates from the relatively high thermo-optic coefficient of silicon. For restricted interference 3-dB MMI coupler, the output power uniformity is ideally 0 at room temperature and becomes 0.32dB when temperature rises up to 550K.For symmetric interference 3-dB MMI coupler, the power uniformity keeps ideally 0 due to its intrinsic symmetric interference mechanism. With the temperature rising, the excess loss of the both devices increases. The performance deterioration due to temperature variety is more obvious to restricted interference MMI 3-dB coupler, comparing with that of symmetric interference MMI 3-dB coupler.

  17. Temperature and field dependent Mossbauer studies of the metallic inclusions in synthetic MDAS diamond grits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bharuth-Ram, K.; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Mørup, Steen

    2001-01-01

    at temperatures of 300 K and 80 K, in zero field and in an external field of 0.60 T, on the metallic inclusions in these grits. The Mossbauer spectra of the inclusions are rather complex, reflecting the contributions of several different magnetic phases. Our results show that the temperature variation...... order observed in the larger grits collapsing as one went to smaller grit sizes. Two sets of De Beers MDAS diamond grits of US mesh size 400-500 (d=30-38 mum) and 200-230 (d=63-75 mum) were selected for temperature- and field-dependent investigations. Transmission Mossbauer measurements were made...... of the Mossbauer spectra is not due to superparamagnetic relaxation of ferromagnetic inclusions but rather to magnetic ordering temperatures of the order of room temperature. Based on the spectral lineshapes and elemental analyses, we suggest the inclusions in the 63-75 mum grits contain iron mainly in Fe...

  18. Temperature-dependent far-infrared properties of Bi_(12) GeO_(20) single crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Muhammad Kamran; Dai Yao-Min; Ma Ji-Yun; Li Bo-Hong; He Shi-Kun; Zhang Wei-Jun; Zheng Xiao-Rui; Qiu Xiang-Gang

    2009-01-01

    Far-infrared reflectivity spectra of bismuth germanium oxide(Bi_(12)GeO_(20))single crystals are measured from room temperature down to 10 K. All the reflectivity spectra are fitted to a complex dielectric function ε(w) in the factorised form. Phonon modes at low frequency are found to develop upon decreasing temperature and gain considerable spectrum weight below 150 K. The temperature dependent static dielectric constants are obtained from the Lyddane-Sachs-Teller relation based on the obtained oscillator parameters. The dielectric constants are found to increase upon decreasing temperature. which is attributed to the charge transfer among the ions in the unit cell with the temperature varying.

  19. The effect of temperature dependent tissue parameters on acoustic radiation force induced displacements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suomi, Visa; Han, Yang; Konofagou, Elisa; Cleveland, Robin O.

    2016-10-01

    Multiple ultrasound elastography techniques rely on acoustic radiation force (ARF) in monitoring high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy. However, ARF is dependent on tissue attenuation and sound speed, both of which are also known to change with temperature making the therapy monitoring more challenging. Furthermore, the viscoelastic properties of tissue are also temperature dependent, which affects the displacements induced by ARF. The aim of this study is to quantify the temperature dependent changes in the acoustic and viscoelastic properties of liver and investigate their effect on ARF induced displacements by using both experimental methods and simulations. Furthermore, the temperature dependent viscoelastic properties of liver are experimentally measured over a frequency range of 0.1-200 Hz at temperatures reaching 80 °C, and both conventional and fractional Zener models are used to fit the data. The fractional Zener model was found to fit better with the experimental viscoelasticity data with respect to the conventional model with up to two orders of magnitude lower sum of squared errors (SSE). The characteristics of experimental displacement data were also seen in the simulations due to the changes in attenuation coefficient and lesion development. At low temperatures before thermal ablation, attenuation was found to affect the displacement amplitude. At higher temperature, the decrease in displacement amplitude occurs approximately at 60-70 °C due to the combined effect of viscoelasticity changes and lesion growth overpowering the effect of attenuation. The results suggest that it is necessary to monitor displacement continuously during HIFU therapy in order to ascertain when ablation occurs.

  20. Spin-orbit-induced anomalous pH-dependence in (1)H NMR spectra of Co(III) amine complexes: a diagnostic tool for structure elucidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegetschweiler, Kaspar; Kuppert, Dirk; Huppert, Jochen; Straka, Michal; Kaupp, Martin

    2004-06-02

    The pH-dependent (1)H NMR characteristics of a series of Co(III)-(polyamin)-aqua and Co(III)-(polyamin)-(polyalcohol) complexes, [Co(tach)(ino-kappa(3)-O(1,3,5))](3+) (1(3+)), [Co(tach)(ino-kappa(3)-Omicron(1,2,6))](3+) (2(3+)), [Co(tach)(taci-kappa-Nu(1)-kappa(2)-O(2,6))](3+) (3(3+)), [Co(ditame)(H(2)O)](3+) (4(3+)), and [Co(tren)(H(2)O)(2)](3+) (5(3+)), were studied in D(2)O by means of titration experiments (tach = all-cis-cyclohexane-1,3,5-triamine, ino = cis-inositol, taci = 1,3,5-triamino-1,3,5-trideoxy-cis-inositol, tren = tris(2-aminoethyl)amine, ditame = 2,2,6,6-tetrakis-(aminomethyl)-4-aza-heptane). A characteristic shift was observed for H(-C) hydrogen atoms in the alpha-position of a coordinated amino group upon deprotonation of a coordinated oxygen donor. For a cis-H-C-N-Co-O-H arrangement, deprotonation of the oxygen donor resulted in an additional shielding (shift to lower frequency) of the H(-C) proton, whereas for a trans-H-C-N-Co-O-H arrangement, deprotonation resulted in a deshielding (shift to higher frequency). The effect appears to be of rather general nature: it is observed for primary (1(3+)-5(3+)), secondary (4(3+)), and tertiary (5(3+)) amino groups, and for the deprotonation of an alcohol (1(3+)-3(3+)) or a water (4(3+), 5(3+)) ligand. Spin-orbit-corrected density functional calculations show that the high-frequency deprotonation shift for the trans-position is largely caused by a differential cobalt-centered spin-orbit effect on the hydrogen nuclear shielding. This effect is conformation dependent due to a Karplus-type behavior of the spin-orbit-induced Fermi-contact shift and thus only significant for an approximately antiperiplanar H-C-N-Co arrangement. The differential spin-orbit contribution to the deprotonation shift in the trans-position arises from the much larger spin-orbit shift for the protonated than for the deprotonated state. This is in turn due to a trans-effect of the deprotonated (hydroxo or alkoxo) ligand, which weakens