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Sample records for anomalous temperature dependence

  1. Anomalous Temperature Dependence of Vibrational Lifetimes in Water and Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woutersen, Sander; Emmerichs, Uli; Nienhuys, Han-Kwang; Bakker, Huib J.

    1998-08-01

    We have used femtosecond two-color midinfrared spectroscopy to determine the temperature dependence of the OH-stretching lifetime in dilute HDO:D2O solution, both in the liquid and solid (ice Ih) state. Like many other properties of water, the vibrational lifetime shows a remarkable temperature dependence: In liquid water the vibrational relaxation of the OH-stretching mode is twice as slow as in ice, and becomes even slower with increasing temperature.

  2. Anomalous temperature dependence of excitation transfer between quantum dots

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Král, Karel; Menšík, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 4 (2015), 325-330. ISSN 2164-6627 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD14011; GA MŠk LH12236; GA MŠk LH12186 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389013 Keywords : excitation transfer * quantum dots * temperature dependence * electron-phonon interaction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  3. Anomalous temperature dependence of the fluorescence lifetime of phycobiliproteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a single photon counting technique we have investigated fluorescence decay spectra of phycobiliproteins with picosecond time resolution. The studies were performed in a wide range of temperatures—from 4 to 300 K. Comparing the fluorescence decay kinetics of samples rapidly frozen in liquid nitrogen with samples that were frozen slowly revealed that the temperature-dependent changes of phycobiliproteins fluorescence lifetime reflect the presence of three different stages, with a phase transition between 273 and 263 K that strongly depends on the rate of freezing. When the temperature decreases from 300 to 273 K, the fluorescence lifetime increases from 1.6 to 1.8 ns. In the region from 273 to 263 K we observed a decrease of the fluorescence lifetime, which strongly depends on the freezing rate: a slight decrease at high freezing rate and a drop down to 200 ps lifetime at slow freezing rate. In the low-temperature regime from 263 to 4 K a linear increase in the fluorescence lifetime was observed for all samples. It was found that the strong temperature dependence of the phycobiliprotein fluorescence, especially in the range between 263 and 273 K, is due to the interaction of the solvent with the chromophore bound to the protein. This feature is explained by a photoisomerization of the phycobiliproteins into a quenching form which is naturally prevented by the protein environment. The formation of ice microcrystals at low freezing rate eliminates this ‘protective’ effect of the protein environment. (letter)

  4. Anomalous temperature dependence of the fluorescence lifetime of phycobiliproteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimov, E. G.; Schmitt, F.-J.; Hätti, P.; Klementiev, K. E.; Paschenko, V. Z.; Renger, G.; Rubin, A. B.

    2013-05-01

    Using a single photon counting technique we have investigated fluorescence decay spectra of phycobiliproteins with picosecond time resolution. The studies were performed in a wide range of temperatures—from 4 to 300 K. Comparing the fluorescence decay kinetics of samples rapidly frozen in liquid nitrogen with samples that were frozen slowly revealed that the temperature-dependent changes of phycobiliproteins fluorescence lifetime reflect the presence of three different stages, with a phase transition between 273 and 263 K that strongly depends on the rate of freezing. When the temperature decreases from 300 to 273 K, the fluorescence lifetime increases from 1.6 to 1.8 ns. In the region from 273 to 263 K we observed a decrease of the fluorescence lifetime, which strongly depends on the freezing rate: a slight decrease at high freezing rate and a drop down to 200 ps lifetime at slow freezing rate. In the low-temperature regime from 263 to 4 K a linear increase in the fluorescence lifetime was observed for all samples. It was found that the strong temperature dependence of the phycobiliprotein fluorescence, especially in the range between 263 and 273 K, is due to the interaction of the solvent with the chromophore bound to the protein. This feature is explained by a photoisomerization of the phycobiliproteins into a quenching form which is naturally prevented by the protein environment. The formation of ice microcrystals at low freezing rate eliminates this ‘protective’ effect of the protein environment.

  5. Anomalous Temperature Dependence of Magnetic Moment in Monodisperse Antiferromagnetic Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillaspie, Dane; Gu, B.; Wang, W.; Shen, J.

    2005-03-01

    1 Condensed Matter Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory*, TN 37831 2 Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Tennessee, TN 37996 3 Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory*, TN 37831 Recent experiments [1] and theory [2] from AFM nanoparticles showed that they exhibit sizable net magnetization, which increases with increasing temperature. In order to further understand such peculiar temperature dependence, we have measured the magnetic properties of monodisperse hematite (α-Fe2O3) nanoparticles, grown using a microemulsion precipitation technique, which minimizes the impact of the particle moment distribution on the measured properties of the samples. Our measured results indicate that the net magnetization of these nanoparticles, when small, indeed increases linearly with increasing temperature. This is in sharp contrast to the bulk-like behavior of α-Fe2O3, which was observed in particles with size larger than 120 nm. [1] M. Seehra et al, Phys. Rev. B 61, 3513 (2000) [2] S. Mørup, C. Frandsen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 217201 (2004) *Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. Dept. of Energy under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725

  6. Origin of the anomalous temperature dependence of coercivity in soft ferromagnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the origin of the anomalous temperature dependence of coercivity observed in some soft ferromagnets by studying the magnetic and electronic properties of FeZr films doped using ion implantation by H, He, B, C, and N. The anomalous increase of the coercivity with temperature was observed only in the C- and B-doped samples. Using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, we show that the anomalous behavior of the coercivity coincides with the occurrence of an electron charge transfer for those implanted samples. The origin of the anomaly is discussed in terms of (i) magnetic softness, (ii) nature of the Fe-C and -B covalent bonds, and (iii) large charge transfer

  7. Anomalous temperature dependency of the Anderson-Grüneisen parameters in high ionic conductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Anderson-Grüneisen (AG) parameter carries information on the anharmonicity of the atomic vibrations of the materials. Therefore, its study is expected to provide useful insights to understand the ion transport properties in solids. However, few attentions on the AG parameter of ionic conductors have been paid till now. In the present paper, a comparative study on the temperature dependence of the AG parameter in superionic materials and other crystals is presented. It is shown that the AG parameter of superionic materials exhibit anomalously large temperature dependencies. The relations of this finding with the material properties of ionic conductors are briefly discussed.

  8. Anomalous temperature dependence in the Raman spectra of l-alanine: Evidence for dynamic localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Migliori, A.; Maxton, P.M.; Clogston, A.M.; Zirngiebl, E.; Lowe, M.

    1988-12-15

    We measured the temperature dependence of the intensity of the two lowest Raman modes in single crystals of l-alanine. The sum of the intensities obeys Maxwell-Boltzman statistics accurately from 20 to 340 K but the intensities of the individual lines are anomalous. This behavior is explained by assuming that both lines share the same degrees of freedom but that a mode instability is triggered abruptly at an occupation of seven quanta. This instability, which has an activation energy of 500 K, is observed at temperatures as low as 20 K, possibly indicating the existence of dynamic localization of vibrational energy.

  9. Anomalous temperature dependent magneto-conductance in organic light-emitting diodes with multiple emissive states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The temperature dependence of the magneto-conductance (MC) in organic electron donor-acceptor hybrid and layer heterojunction diodes was studied. The MC value increased with temperature in layer heterojunction and in 10 wt. % hybrid devices. An anomalous decrease of the MC with temperature was observed in 25 wt. %–50 wt. % hybrid devices. Further increasing donor concentration to 75 wt. %, the MC again increased with temperature. The endothermic exciplex-exciton energy transfer and the change in electroplex/exciton ratio caused by change in charge transport with temperature may account for these phenomena. Comparative studies of the temperature evolutions of the IV curves and the electroluminescence and photoluminescence spectra back our hypothesis

  10. The temperature dependent anomalous Hall effect in La-Ca-Mn-O films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The colossal magnetoresistance of La1-xCaxMnO3 has been reported in many experiments. The authors present their study of the anomalous Hall effect in epitaxial La0.67Ca0.33MnO3 thin films. They have measured the temperature dependence of resistivity, magnetization and AHE coefficients between 300K and 5K for the samples grown on different substrates. From these studies, the relation between the resistivity and AHE coefficient as well as the temperature dependence of AHE coefficient are explored. The results show that the direction of AHE is reversed below approximately 100K. This sign reversal is discussed in term of the change of band structure and the co-existence of hole-like and electron-like conduction

  11. CARBON DIFFUSION IN CARBON-SUPERSATURATED 9CR-1MO STEEL: ANOMALOUS TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF CARBON DIFFUSIVITY

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čermák, Jiří; Král, Lubomír

    Ostrava : Tanger Ltd, 2014. ISBN 978-80-87294-52-9. [Metal 2014. International Conference on Metallurgy and Materials /23./. Brno (CZ), 21.05.2014-23.05.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/0148; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0068 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Diffusion * Carbon * phase decomposition * Carbon-supersaturation * Cr-Mo steels Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics http://www.metal2014.com/cz/zobrazit-seznam-prispevku/2498-carbon-diffusion-in-carbon-supersaturated-9cr-1mo-steel-anomalous-temperature-dependence-of-carbon-diffusivity/

  12. Anomalous temperature dependence of the Casimir force for thin metal films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yampol'skii, V A; Savel'ev, Sergey; Mayselis, Z A; Apostolov, S S; Nori, Franco

    2008-08-29

    Within the framework of the Drude dispersive model, we predict an unusual nonmonotonic temperature dependence of the Casimir force for thin metal films. For certain conditions, this force decreases with temperature due to the decrease of the metallic conductivity, whereas the force increases at high temperatures due to the increase of the thermal radiation pressure. We consider the attraction of a film to: either (i) a bulk ideal metal with a planar boundary, or (ii) a bulk metal sphere (lens). The experimental observation of the predicted decreasing temperature dependence of the Casimir force can put an end to the long-standing discussion on the role of the electron relaxation in the Casimir effect. PMID:18851637

  13. Anomalous temperature dependence of PAL and 2D-ACAR in Ni-rich Ni-Ti alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni-rich NiTi alloys have been investigated by means of PAL spectroscopy, electrical resistivity measurement, 2D-ACAR and first principle calculation. An anomaly of positron lifetime has been observed for Ni52Ti48 alloy which does not exhibit the martensitic transformation: positron lifetime increases by about 25% with lowering temperature. Almost the same change in positron lifetime is observed on the subsequent heating run with little hysteresis. The 2D-ACAR for the same alloy also depends on temperature anomalously: the peak height of the 2D-ACAR increases by 20% and the anisotropy decreases by 60% with lowering temperature. Experimental results are discussed with the idea of Fermi surface nesting of B2-NiTi which has been evaluated from the 2D-ACAR spectra by LCW theory. (orig.)

  14. Anomalous temperature-dependent spin-valley polarization in monolayer WS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanbicki, A. T.; Kioseoglou, G.; Currie, M.; Hellberg, C. Stephen; McCreary, K. M.; Friedman, A. L.; Jonker, B. T.

    2016-01-01

    Single layers of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are direct gap semiconductors with nondegenerate valley indices. An intriguing possibility for these materials is the use of their valley index as an alternate state variable. Several limitations to such a utility include strong intervalley scattering, as well as multiparticle interactions leading to multiple emission channels. We prepare single-layer WS2 films such that the photoluminescence is from either the neutral or charged exciton (trion). After excitation with circularly polarized light, the neutral exciton emission has zero polarization. However, the trion emission has a large polarization (28%) at room temperature. The trion emission also has a unique, non-monotonic temperature dependence that is a consequence of the multiparticle nature of the trion. This temperature dependence enables us to determine that intervalley scattering, electron-hole radiative recombination, and Auger processes are the dominant mechanisms at work in this system. Because this dependence involves trion systems, one can use gate voltages to modulate the polarization (or intensity) emitted from TMD structures.

  15. Temperature-dependent reaction pathways for the anomalous hydrocracking of triglycerides in the presence of sulfided Co-Mo-catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Mohit; Sinha, Anil K

    2012-12-01

    Kinetic studies and product profiling was done to understand the anomalous cracking of jathropha oil triglycerides in the presence of sulfided Co-Mo/Al(2)O(3) catalyst. At temperatures between 320 and 340 °C, only deoxygenation and oligomerization reactions took place whereas at temperatures above 340 °C, internal conversions between the products and direct conversion to lighter and middle distillates were favored High pressures (80 bar) and H(2)/feed ratios (>1500) were necessary to minimize oligomerization of the products and to increase the lifespan of the catalyst. Lumped kinetic models were validated with experimental results. Activation energies for the formation of lighter (83 kJ/mol) and middle fractions (126 kJ/mol) were higher than those for the heavy (47 kJ/mol) and deoxygenated (47 kJ/mol) products. Jatropha oil triglycerides hydroconversion pathways were dependent on temperature and the triglycerides could be hydrocracked to lower range hydrocarbons (C5-C14) by increasing the reaction temperatures. PMID:23073102

  16. Communication: Anomalous temperature dependence of the intermediate range order in phosphonium ionic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a recent article by the Castner and Margulis groups [Faraday Discuss. 154, 133 (2012)], we described in detail the structure of the tetradecyltrihexylphosphonium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)-amide ionic liquid as a function of temperature using X-ray scattering, and theoretical partitions of the computationally derived structure function. Interestingly, and as opposed to the case in most other ionic-liquids, the first sharp diffraction peak or prepeak appears to increase in intensity as temperature is increased. This phenomenon is counter intuitive as one would expect that intermediate range order fades as temperature increases. This Communication shows that a loss of hydrophobic tail organization at higher temperatures is counterbalanced by better organization of polar components giving rise to the increase in intensity of the prepeak

  17. Strong localization induced anomalous temperature dependence exciton emission above 300 K from SnO{sub 2} quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, S. S., E-mail: sspan@issp.ac.cn, E-mail: ghli@issp.ac.cn; Li, F. D.; Liu, Q. W.; Xu, S. C.; Luo, Y. Y. [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Anhui Key Laboratory of Nanomaterials and Nanostructures, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Li, G. H., E-mail: sspan@issp.ac.cn, E-mail: ghli@issp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Anhui Key Laboratory of Nanomaterials and Nanostructures, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); School of Chemistry and Materials Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2015-05-07

    SnO{sub 2} quantum dots (QDs) are potential materials for deep ultraviolet (DUV) light emitting devices. In this study, we report the temperature and excitation power-dependent exciton luminescence from SnO{sub 2} QDs. The exciton emission exhibits anomalous blue shift, accompanied with band width reduction with increasing temperature and excitation power above 300 K. The anomalous temperature dependences of the peak energy and band width are well interpreted by the strongly localized carrier thermal hopping process and Gaussian shape of band tails states, respectively. The localized wells and band tails at conduction minimum are considered to be induced by the surface oxygen defects and local potential fluctuation in SnO{sub 2} QDs.

  18. Momentum and Energy Dependence of the Anomalous High-Energy Dispersion in the Electronic Structure of High Temperature Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inosov, D. S.; Fink, J.; Kordyuk, A. A.; Borisenko, S. V.; Zabolotnyy, V. B.; Schuster, R.; Knupfer, M.; Büchner, B.; Follath, R.; Dürr, H. A.; Eberhardt, W.; Hinkov, V.; Keimer, B.; Berger, H.

    2007-12-01

    Using high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy we have studied the momentum and photon energy dependence of the anomalous high-energy dispersion, termed waterfalls, between the Fermi level and 1 eV binding energy in several high-Tc superconductors. We observe strong changes of the dispersion between different Brillouin zones and a strong dependence on the photon energy around 75 eV, which we associate with the resonant photoemission at the Cu3p→3dx2-y2 edge. We conclude that the high-energy “waterfall” dispersion results from a strong suppression of the photoemission intensity at the center of the Brillouin zone due to matrix element effects and is, therefore, not an intrinsic feature of the spectral function. This indicates that the new high-energy scale in the electronic structure of cuprates derived from the waterfall-like dispersion may be incorrect.

  19. Temperature dependence of the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in Ta/Co2FeAl/MgO structures probed by Anomalous Hall Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabor, M. S.; Petrisor, T.; Pop, O.; Colis, S.; Tiusan, C.

    2015-10-01

    We report a detailed study of the temperature dependence of the magnetic anisotropy in Ta/Co2FeAl/MgO structures by means of Anomalous Hall Effect measurements. The volume magnetic anisotropy, although negligible at room temperature, shows a non-negligible value at low temperatures and favors an in-plane easy magnetization axis. The surface magnetic anisotropy, which promotes the perpendicular magnetic easy axis, shows an increase from 0.76 ± 0.05 erg /cm2 at 300 K, up to 1.08 ± 0.04 erg /cm2 at 5 K, attributed to the evolution of the Co2FeAl layer saturation magnetization with temperature.

  20. Small-polaron hopping via defect centres: anomalous temperature and voltage dependence of current through fatty-acid monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study electron hopping in thin metal-insulator-metal structures which involves two defect centres with a strong electron-phonon coupling. We calculate the dependences of the current, J, on voltage, V, and temperature, T, and show that they are consistent with those observed in molecular monolayers of fatty acids. We analyse in detail an unusual, near-exponential temperature dependence of the current: J(T) ∝ exp (T/T0) T ≥ 50 K in eicosanoic acid (C20) organic monolayers sandwiched between Pt electrodes, where the parameter T0 increases with the bias voltage. We show that at relatively high voltages the two-defect small-polaron hopping results in N-shape current-voltage characteristics which were observed in some organic molecular monolayers

  1. Structural Origin of the Anomalous Temperature Dependence of the Local Magnetic Moments in the CaFe2As2 Family of Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortenzi, L.; Gretarsson, H.; Kasahara, S.; Matsuda, Y.; Shibauchi, T.; Finkelstein, K. D.; Wu, W.; Julian, S. R.; Kim, Young-June; Mazin, I. I.; Boeri, L.

    2015-01-01

    We report a combination of Fe K β x-ray emission spectroscopy and density functional reduced Stoner theory calculations to investigate the correlation between structural and magnetic degrees of freedom in CaFe2(As1-xPx) 2 . The puzzling temperature behavior of the local moment found in rare earth-doped CaFe2As2 [H. Gretarsson et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 047003 (2013)] is also observed in CaFe2(As1-xPx) 2 . We explain this phenomenon based on first-principles calculations with scaled magnetic interaction. One scaling parameter is sufficient to describe quantitatively the magnetic moments in both CaFe2(As1-xPx) 2 (x =0.055 ) and Ca0.78La0.22Fe2As2 at all temperatures. The anomalous growth of the local moments with increasing temperature can be understood from the observed large thermal expansion of the c -axis lattice parameter combined with strong magnetoelastic coupling. These effects originate from the strong tendency to form As-As dimers across the Ca layer in the CaFe2As2 family of materials. Our results emphasize the dual local-itinerant character of magnetism in Fe pnictides.

  2. Study of anomalous temperature dependence of itinerant holes in under- and overdoped La sub 2 sub - sub x Sr sub x CuO sub 4 single crystals using polarised soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Singhal, R K; Dalela, S; Sekhar, B; Jain, D C; Garg, K B

    2003-01-01

    Some experiments have recently shown that in the YBCO detwinned system charge aggregation takes place in the Cu-O sub 2 plane along the b-axis at T>>T sub c followed by formation of Cooper pairs, again in the normal state. Polarised X-ray absorption measurements at the O K and Cu L sub 3 absorption edges in E parallel b orientation have been carried out on underdoped and overdoped single crystals of La sub 2 sub - sub x Sr sub x CuO sub 4 through a temperature range of 10-300 K to study the dependence of the itinerant hole density. Both the crystals do show an anomalous temperature dependence but there is a wide divergence in the earlier and our results. This paper discusses the results and possible causes for the difference.

  3. Anomalous scaling in an age-dependent branching model

    OpenAIRE

    Keller-Schmidt, Stephanie; Tugrul, Murat; Eguiluz, Victor M.; Hernandez-Garcia, Emilio; Klemm, Konstantin

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a one-parametric family of tree growth models, in which branching probabilities decrease with branch age $\\tau$ as $\\tau^{-\\alpha}$. Depending on the exponent $\\alpha$, the scaling of tree depth with tree size $n$ displays a transition between the logarithmic scaling of random trees and an algebraic growth. At the transition ($\\alpha=1$) tree depth grows as $(\\log n)^2$. This anomalous scaling is in good agreement with the trend observed in evolution of biological species, thus p...

  4. Anomalous scaling in an age-dependent branching model

    OpenAIRE

    Keller-Schmidt, Stephanie; Tugrul, Murat; Eguíluz, Víctor M.; Hernández-García, Emilio; Klemm, Konstantin

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a one-parametric family of tree growth models, in which branching probabilities decrease with branch age $\\tau$ as $\\tau^{-\\alpha}$. Depending on the exponent $\\alpha$, the scaling of tree depth with tree size $n$ displays a transition between the logarithmic scaling of random trees and an algebraic growth. At the transition ($\\alpha=1$) tree depth grows as $(\\log n)^2$. This anomalous scaling is in good agreement with the trend observed in evolution of biological species, thus p...

  5. Anomalous scaling in an age-dependent branching model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller-Schmidt, Stephanie; Tuğrul, Murat; Eguíluz, Víctor M; Hernández-García, Emilio; Klemm, Konstantin

    2015-02-01

    We introduce a one-parametric family of tree growth models, in which branching probabilities decrease with branch age τ as τ(-α). Depending on the exponent α, the scaling of tree depth with tree size n displays a transition between the logarithmic scaling of random trees and an algebraic growth. At the transition (α=1) tree depth grows as (logn)(2). This anomalous scaling is in good agreement with the trend observed in evolution of biological species, thus providing a theoretical support for age-dependent speciation and associating it to the occurrence of a critical point. PMID:25768548

  6. Anomalous scaling in an age-dependent branching model

    OpenAIRE

    Keller-Schmidt, Stephanie; Tugrul, Murat; Víctor M Eguíluz; Hernández-García, Emilio; Klemm, Konstantin

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 American Physical Society. We introduce a one-parametric family of tree growth models, in which branching probabilities decrease with branch age τ as τ-α. Depending on the exponent α, the scaling of tree depth with tree size n displays a transition between the logarithmic scaling of random trees and an algebraic growth. At the transition (α=1) tree depth grows as (logn)2. This anomalous scaling is in good agreement with the trend observed in evolution of biological species, thus provid...

  7. On the anomalous temperature behaviour of the permittivity of ? crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnoholovets, Volodymyr

    1996-05-01

    The proton bifurcation for T > 120 K in the 0953-8984/8/20/002/img2 crystal is considered as the origin of a phonon mixture. As a result, a supplementary term describing phonon fluctuations appears in the crystal Hamiltonian. This fluctuation correction forms the basis of a light absorption mechanism for mixed vibrational modes. An anomalous temperature behaviour of two modes that was previously found experimentally is explained in the framework of the present model.

  8. Anomalous magnetoresistance in nanocrystalline gadolinium at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, S. P.; Kaul, S. N.

    2015-02-01

    The results of a detailed investigation of electrical resistivity, ρ(T) and transverse magnetoresistance (MR) in nanocrystalline Gd samples with an average grain size d = 12 nm and 18 nm reveal the following. Besides a major contribution to the residual resistivity, ρr(0), arising from the scattering of conduction electrons from grain surfaces/interfaces/boundaries (which increases drastically as the average grain size decreases, as expected), coherent electron-magnon scattering makes a small contribution to ρr(0), which gets progressively suppressed as the applied magnetic field (H) increases in strength. At low temperatures (T ≲ 40 K) and fields (H = 0 and H = 5 kOe), ρH(T) varies as T3/2 with a change in slope at T+ ≃ 16.5 K. As the field increases beyond 5 kOe, the T3/2 variation of ρH(T) at low temperatures (T ≲ 40 K) changes over to the T2 variation and a slight change in the slope dρH/dT2 at T+(H) disappears at H ⩾ 20 kOe. The electron-electron scattering (Fermi liquid) contribution to the T2 term, if present, is completely swamped by the coherent electron-magnon scattering contribution. As a function of temperature, (negative) MR goes through a dip at a temperature Tmin ≃ T+, which increases with H as H2/3. MR at Tmin also increases in magnitude with H and attains a value as large as ˜15% (17%) for d = 12 nm (18 nm) at H = 90 kOe. This value is roughly five times greater than that reported earlier for crystalline Gd at Tmin ≃ 100 K. Unusually large MR results from an anomalous softening of magnon modes at T ≃ Tmin ≈ 20 K. In the light of our previous magnetization and specific heat results, we show that all the above observations, including the H2/3 dependence of Tmin (with Tmin(H) identified as the Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) transition temperature, TBEC(H)), are the manifestations of the BEC of magnons at temperatures T ⩽ TBEC. Contrasted with crystalline Gd, which behaves as a three-dimensional (3D) pure uniaxial dipolar

  9. Search for Anomalous Temperature Behavior of the Viscosity of Polyethylene Glycol Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóthová, Jana; Timko, Milan; Kopčanský, Peter; Lisý, Vladimír

    2014-11-01

    Viscometric studies of polyethylene glycol (PEG 35000) aqueous solutions are presented. The temperature and concentration dependences of the PEG solution viscosities were studied in the range from to and to , respectively. The intrinsic viscosity and the Huggins coefficient have been calculated from the data. The results exclude the recently reported anomalous behavior of these quantities. The measured viscosity is also used to estimate the hydrodynamic and gyration radii of the polymers.

  10. Effect of entropy on anomalous transport in electron-temperature-gradient-modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaqub Khan, M., E-mail: myaqubsultani@gmail.com [Department of Basic Sciences, Riphah International University, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); National Centre for Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Iqbal, J. [Department of Mathematics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Ul Haq, A. [Faculty of Engineering and Applied Physics, Riphah International University, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)

    2014-05-15

    Due to the interconnection of entropy with temperature and density of plasma, it would be interesting to investigate plasma related phenomena with respect to entropy. By employing Braginskii transport equations, it is proved that entropy is proportional to a function of potential and distribution function of entropy is re-defined, ∇S–drift in obtained. New dispersion relation is derived; it is found that the anomalous transport depends on the gradient of the entropy.

  11. Anomalous dephasing scattering time of Zr80Sn20-xFex alloys at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, R. N.; Sinha, S.; Meikap, A. K.

    2016-03-01

    We report the results of a comprehensive study of weak electron localization (WEL) and electron-electron interaction (EEI) effects in disordered Zr80Sn20-xFex alloys. The resistivity in absence of magnetic field shows a minimum at temperature T=Tm and follows ρo5/2T1/2 law within the temperature range 5 K≤T≤Tm, which suggests predominant EEI effect. Magnetoresistivity is positive due to strong spin-orbit interaction. The dephasing scattering time is dominated by the electron-phonon scattering. The electron-phonon scattering rate shows anomalous behavior and obeys the relation τe-ph-1 ∝ T2 le, where le is the electron elastic mean free path. The zero temperature scattering time (τ0) strongly depends on the disorder and its magnitude decreases with increasing disorder resistivity ρ0. Such anomalous behavior cannot be explained in terms of existing theories.

  12. Anomalous strain rate dependence of the flow stress in polycrystalline TiAl intermetallic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plastic deformation of TiAl and TiAl-V intermetallic compounds have been studied by compression experiment at various temperatures and strain rates. The results showed that plastic deformation was controlled primarily by Peierls Nabarro, cross slip and creep mechanisms of dislocations in distinct temperature ranges. In TiAl-V alloy deformed at range of 600-700K, anomalous strain rate dependence of flow stress was observed, i.e., the larger the plastic strain was, the more negative the dependence. A possible mechanism of the anomaly could be interpreted by thermal activation of dislocation cross slipping. The effects of temperature and strain rate on work-hardening exponent were also studied and discussed in the present paper

  13. Propagators and Time-Dependent Diffusion Coefficients for Anomalous Diffusion

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Jianrong; Berland, Keith M.

    2008-01-01

    Complex diffusive dynamics are often observed when one is investigating the mobility of macromolecules in living cells and other complex environments, yet the underlying physical or chemical causes of anomalous diffusion are often not fully understood and are thus a topic of ongoing research interest. Theoretical models capturing anomalous dynamics are widely used to analyze mobility data from fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and other experimental measurements, yet there is significant ...

  14. The temperature dependent amide I band of crystalline acetanilide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The temperature dependent anomalous peak in the amide I band of crystalline acetanilide is thought to be due to self-trapped states. On the contrary, according to the present model, the anomalous peak comes from the fraction of ACN molecules strongly hydrogen-bonded to a neighboring ACN molecule, and its intensity decreases because, on average, this fraction decreases as temperature increases. This model provides, for the first time, an integrated and theoretically consistent view of the temperature dependence of the full amide I band and a qualitative explanation of some of the features of nonlinear pump–probe experiments.

  15. Effect of microstructure on anomalous strain-rate-dependent behaviour of bacterial cellulose hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xing; Shi, Zhijun; Lau, Andrew; Liu, Changqin; Yang, Guang; Silberschmidt, Vadim V

    2016-05-01

    This study is focused on anomalous strain-rate-dependent behaviour of bacterial cellulose (BC) hydrogel that can be strain-rate insensitive, hardening, softening, or strain-rate insensitive in various ranges of strain rate. BC hydrogel consists of randomly distributed nanofibres and a large content of free water; thanks to its ideal biocompatibility, it is suitable for biomedical applications. Motivated by its potential applications in complex loading conditions of body environment, its time-dependent behaviour was studied by means of in-aqua uniaxial tension tests at constant temperature of 37 °C at various strain rates ranging from 0.000 1s(-1) to 0.3s(-1). Experimental results reflect anomalous strain-rate-dependent behaviour that was not documented before. Micro-morphological observations allowed identification of deformation mechanisms at low and high strain rates in relation to microstructural changes. Unlike strain-rate softening behaviours in other materials, reorientation of nanofibres and kinematics of free-water flow dominate the softening behaviour of BC hydrogel at high strain rates. PMID:26952406

  16. Temperature dependence of the magnetization of canted spin structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Henrik; Lefmann, Kim; Brok, Erik; Frandsen, Cathrine; Mørup, Steen

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies of the low-temperature saturation magnetization of ferrimagnetic nanoparticles and diamagnetically substituted ferrites have shown an anomalous temperature dependence. It has been suggested that this is related to freezing of canted magnetic structures. We present models for the...... temperature dependence of the magnetization of a simple canted spin structure in which relaxation can take place at finite temperatures between spin configurations with different canting angles. We show that the saturation magnetization may either decrease or increase with decreasing temperature, depending on...

  17. Thickness Dependence of the Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in Magnetic Topological Insulator Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiao; Feng, Yang; Wang, Jing; Ou, Yunbo; Hao, Zhenqi; Liu, Chang; Zhang, Zuocheng; Zhang, Liguo; Lin, Chaojing; Liao, Jian; Li, Yongqing; Wang, Li-Li; Ji, Shuai-Hua; Chen, Xi; Ma, Xucun; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; Wang, Yayu; He, Ke; Xue, Qi-Kun

    2016-08-01

    The evolution of the quantum anomalous Hall effect with the thickness of Cr-doped (Bi,Sb)2 Te3 magnetic topological insulator films is studied, revealing how the effect is caused by the interplay of the surface states, band-bending, and ferromagnetic exchange energy. Homogeneity in ferromagnetism is found to be the key to high-temperature quantum anomalous Hall material. PMID:27166762

  18. Dependence of (anomalous) fading of infra-red stimulated luminescence on trap occupancy in feldspars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morthekai, P.; Jain, Mayank; Gach, Grzegorz; Elema, Dennis Ringkjøbing; Prip, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    after 90Sr/90Y beta particle irradiation (3.5–15%/decade) for all the measured feldspar mineral specimens. Similarly, the fading rates after x-rays of 50 kV and 10 kV fall in between those of beta particle and proton irradiations. Our results suggest that rate of anomalous fading in feldspars depends on......Dose dependency of anomalous fading of infra-red stimulated luminescence (IRSL) from feldspars has been investigated using radiations of different ionisation qualities. The rate of fading of the IRSL signal after proton irradiation (9.4–30%/decade) is on an average almost twice compared to that...

  19. Unusual field and temperature dependence of Hall effect in graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Falkovsky, L. A.

    2006-01-01

    We calculate the classic Hall conductivity and mobility of the undoped and doped (or in the gate voltage) graphene as a function of temperature, magnetic field, and carrier concentration. Carrier collisions with defects and acoustic phonons are taken into account. The Hall resistivity varies almost linearly with temperature. The magnetic field dependence of resistivity and mobility is anomalous in weak magnetic fields. There is the square root contribution from the field in the resistivity. T...

  20. Anomalous behavior of fluorescence spectra of perylene in n-octane at variation of pressure and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transformation of the perylene molecules vibron spectra in the n-octane, which is expressed in the sharp change in the spectra multiplet structure by the pressure increase from the atmospheric one up to 10 kbar, is studied. The anomalous, close to the linear one temperature dependence of the lines width in the spectrum within the temperature range of 4.2-15 K is identified. Both the temperature and baric effects are explained within the frames of the single-well adiabatic potential model of the admixture center, leading to the emergence of low-frequency spallation in the areas of the basic and excited electron states

  1. Frequency dependence of anomalous transport in field theory and holography⋆,⋆⋆

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megías Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the frequency dependence of anomalous transport coefficients for a relativistic gas of free chiral fermions and for a strongly coupled conformal field theory with holographic dual. We perform the computation by using the Kubo formulae for- malism, and compare with a hydrodynamic calculation of two point functions. Some implications for heavy ion physics are discussed.

  2. Polarization dependent diffraction anomalous fine structure of rutile TiO2 001 and 111 reflections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy and polarization dependent Diffraction Anomalous Fine Structure (DAFS) also known as Anisotropic Anomalous Scattering (AAS) can be employed in addition to X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) to study electronic transitions from core states to unoccupied states. Here, we present results from resonant X-ray diffraction experiments on TiO2 rutile, space group (136) P42/mnm. For this model structure, site symmetry information was extracted from determination of the structure factor tensor by refining elements of Ti atomic scattering factor tensors. Influences of oxygen vacancies on the anomalous scattering contributions have been studied on a series of rutile wafers of different oxygen concentration. Samples investigated were 10 x 10 x 1 mm3 single crystal wafers and experiments were carried out at DESY/HASYLAB beamlines C and E2 using a Si(111) double crystal monochromator in the vicinity of the Ti-K absorption edge. Considered reflections include the 'forbidden' 001 and allowed 111 reflection.

  3. Room-temperature anomalous Hall effect and magnetroresistance in (Ga, Co)-codoped ZnO diluted magnetic semiconductor films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Xue-Chao; Chen Zhi-Zhan; Shi Er-Wei; Liao Da-Qian; Zhou Ke-Jin

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports that the (Ga, Co)-codoped ZnO thin films have been grown by inductively coupled plasma enhanced physical vapour deposition. Room-temperature ferromagnetism is observed for the as-grown thin films. The x-ray absorption fine structure characterization reveals that Co2+ and Ga3+ ions substitute for Zn2+ ions in the ZnO lattice and exclude the possibility of extrinsic ferromagnetism origin. The ferromagnetic (Ga, Co)-codoped ZnO thin films exhibit carrier concentration dependent anomalous Hall effect and positive magnetoresistance at room temperature. The mechanism of anomalous Hall effect and magneto-transport in ferromagnetic ZnO-based diluted magnetic semiconductors is discussed.

  4. Tokamak Plasmas : Measurement of temperature fluctuations and anomalous transport in the SINP tokamak

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Kumar; S K Saha

    2000-11-01

    Temperature fluctuations have been measured in the edge region of the SINP tokamak. We find that these fluctuations have a comparatively high level (30–40%) and a broad spectrum. The temperature fluctuations show a quite high coherence with density and potential fluctuations and contribute considerably to the anomalous particle flux.

  5. Large anomalous Hall effect in a non-collinear antiferromagnet at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsuji, Satoru; Kiyohara, Naoki; Higo, Tomoya

    2015-11-12

    In ferromagnetic conductors, an electric current may induce a transverse voltage drop in zero applied magnetic field: this anomalous Hall effect is observed to be proportional to magnetization, and thus is not usually seen in antiferromagnets in zero field. Recent developments in theory and experiment have provided a framework for understanding the anomalous Hall effect using Berry-phase concepts, and this perspective has led to predictions that, under certain conditions, a large anomalous Hall effect may appear in spin liquids and antiferromagnets without net spin magnetization. Although such a spontaneous Hall effect has now been observed in a spin liquid state, a zero-field anomalous Hall effect has hitherto not been reported for antiferromagnets. Here we report empirical evidence for a large anomalous Hall effect in an antiferromagnet that has vanishingly small magnetization. In particular, we find that Mn3Sn, an antiferromagnet that has a non-collinear 120-degree spin order, exhibits a large anomalous Hall conductivity of around 20 per ohm per centimetre at room temperature and more than 100 per ohm per centimetre at low temperatures, reaching the same order of magnitude as in ferromagnetic metals. Notably, the chiral antiferromagnetic state has a very weak and soft ferromagnetic moment of about 0.002 Bohr magnetons per Mn atom (refs 10, 12), allowing us to switch the sign of the Hall effect with a small magnetic field of around a few hundred oersted. This soft response of the large anomalous Hall effect could be useful for various applications including spintronics--for example, to develop a memory device that produces almost no perturbing stray fields. PMID:26524519

  6. Temperature correction to the Casimir force in cryogenic range and anomalous skin effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The temperature correction to the Casimir force is considered for real metals at low temperatures. With the temperature decrease, the mean free path for electrons becomes larger than the field penetration depth. In this condition, description of metals with the impedance of anomalous skin effect is shown to be more appropriate than with the permittivity. The effect is crucial for the temperature correction. It is demonstrated that in the zero-frequency limit, the reflection coefficients should coincide with those of ideal metal if we demand the entropy to be zero at T=0. All the other prescriptions discussed in the literature for the n=0 term in the Lifshitz formula give negative entropy. It is shown that the temperature correction in the region of anomalous skin effect is not suppressed as it happens in the plasma model. This correction will be important in the future cryogenic measurements of the Casimir force

  7. Dependence of (anomalous) fading of infra-red stimulated luminescence on trap occupancy in feldspars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dose dependency of anomalous fading of infra-red stimulated luminescence (IRSL) from feldspars has been investigated using radiations of different ionisation qualities. The rate of fading of the IRSL signal after proton irradiation (9.4–30%/decade) is on an average almost twice compared to that after 90Sr/90Y beta particle irradiation (3.5–15%/decade) for all the measured feldspar mineral specimens. Similarly, the fading rates after x-rays of 50 kV and 10 kV fall in between those of beta particle and proton irradiations. Our results suggest that rate of anomalous fading in feldspars depends on the number density of the trapped charge carriers. These results support the hypothesis that anomalous fading occurs across randomly distributed donor-acceptor distances as opposed to pairs with a fixed distance. -- Highlights: • Proton irradiated IRSL in feldspar fades twice as fast as that of beta particles. • Systematic increase of fading rates with beta particles, x-rays and proton. • Observation suggests the dose rate is dose dependent i.e., burial age. • Tunnelling model with randomly distributed sites is favoured by the results

  8. Analysis of printed organic MOSFET characteristics with a focus on the temperature dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenitani, Hiroshi; Maiti, Tapas Kumar; Hayashi, Takuro; Tanimoto, Yuta; Sato, Kenshiro; Chen, Lei; Kikuchihara, Hideyuki; Miura-Mattausch, Mitiko; Jürgen Mattausch, Hans

    2016-04-01

    An experimental and theoretical investigation of the device characteristics of printed organic MOSFETs with a focus on the temperature dependence is reported. In particular, an anomalous behavior of the temperature dependence of the I ds-V gs characteristic is observed, which is found to be increased at higher temperature in MOSFETs fabricated with the printing technology. Our analysis suggests that the temperature dependence of the trap density and the carrier transport mechanism are the causes for this anomalous increase at higher temperature. The results obtained with the compact model HiSIM-Organic, developed based on the physics of carrier dynamics in organic materials, confirm these conclusions. Improving stable characteristics in circuit applications are demonstrated to be achievable at higher temperatures, due to these anomalous properties of organic MOSFETs fabricated by applying the printing technology.

  9. Anomalous high-temperature coercivities in hard nanocomposite alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To elucidate the interphase interactions inherent to nanocomposite magnetic alloys, measurements of remanence Br, and coercivity Hci were made on a series of four meltspun, remanence-enhanced nanocomposite alloys consisting solely of various amounts of Nd2Fe14B and α-Fe. The phase constitution and microstructural scale of the alloys were characterized with synchrotron x-ray diffraction. Magnetic measurements were made using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry on evacuated and encapsulated samples in the temperature range of 300K≤T≤750K, in order to characterize the α-Fe component independently of the Nd2Fe14B component. The high-temperature coercivities of the samples increase with the amount of α-Fe present in the samples, ranging from an average value of approximately 75 Oe for the sample with 14 wt% excess Fe to over 400 Oe at 700 K for the sample with 27 wt% excess Fe. The relatively high coercivities of the samples found at elevated temperatures imply that a tabular morphology of the α-Fe grains is conferring anisotropy to the phase; this conclusion is supported by transmission electron microscopy. It is concluded that while the significant coercivity of the α-Fe phase likely reduces the room-temperature remanence enhancement of the alloy below its theoretical ideal, the favorable interphase interface orientation promotes exchange coupling. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  10. Temperature-induced anomalous structural changes of Al-12wt.%Sn-4wt.%Si melt and its influence on as-cast structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Zhiming

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The temperature dependence of the viscosity of liquid Al-12wt.%Sn-4wt.%Si was studied with a high-temperature viscosity apparatus. Anomalous changes of viscosity of the melt were found at 1,103 K and 968 K in the cooling process, which indicates anomalous structural changes of the melt. It is calculated that the anomalous structural change is associated with an abrupt decrease of atomic clusters’ size and activation energy in the melt. According to the temperature of the anomalous structural changes, melt heat treatment process (quenching from superheat to pouring temperature was performed on Al-12wt.%Sn-4wt.%Si melt prior to pouring, aimed to keep the small atomic clusters from higher temperature to lower pouring temperature. The results suggest that relatively small atomic clusters at the pouring temperature in the melt could generate a deep under-cooling of nucleation in the subsequent solidification process, and refine the as-cast structure. After being quenched from superheating to pouring temperature, the relatively small atomic clusters, especially the Si-Si clusters in the melt will grow to equilibrium state (relatively big atomic clusters with holding time, resulting in the prominent coarsening of the Si morphology in the as-cast structure.

  11. Relaxation and anomalous T- and H-dependence of the μ coefficient in (K,Ba)BiO3 superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ac shielding and classical DC relaxation experiments have been used to study the flux creep phenomena in the cubic (K,Ba)BiO3 superconductor (Tc ∝ 30 K). The relaxation rate is found to be constant (S ∝ 1.5%) at low temperature and magnetic field and increases sharply as the vortex-glass transition line is approached. This behavior can be attributed to an anomalous decrease of the μ exponent (U(J) = U0(J0/J)μ) close to Tg(H). In this regime, the temperature dependence of the apparent critical current J is then directly related to μ(T) as J(T) = J0/[kT/U0.ln(1/ωτ)] μ(T). A similar analysis can be made on the J(B) data recently published by Abulafia et al. (1996) on YBaCuO single crystals. (orig.)

  12. Anomalous law of cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapas, Luciano C., E-mail: luciano.lapas@unila.edu.br [Universidade Federal da Integração Latino-Americana, Caixa Postal 2067, 85867-970 Foz do Iguaçu, Paraná (Brazil); Ferreira, Rogelma M. S., E-mail: rogelma.maria@gmail.com [Centro de Ciências Exatas e Tecnológicas, Universidade Federal do Recôncavo da Bahia, 44380-000 Cruz das Almas, Bahia (Brazil); Rubí, J. Miguel, E-mail: mrubi@ub.edu [Departament de Física Fonamental, Facultat de Física, Universitat de Barcelona, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Oliveira, Fernando A., E-mail: fernando.oliveira@pq.cnpq.br [Instituto de Física and Centro Internacional de Física da Matéria Condensada, Universidade de Brasília, Caixa Postal 04513, 70919-970 Brasília, Distrito Federal (Brazil)

    2015-03-14

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton’s law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics.

  13. Anomalous law of cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton’s law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics

  14. Anomalous law of cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapas, Luciano C.; Ferreira, Rogelma M. S.; Rubí, J. Miguel; Oliveira, Fernando A.

    2015-03-01

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton's law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics.

  15. Excitation wavelength dependence of the anomalous circular photogalvanic effect in undoped InGaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The excitation wavelength dependence of the anomalous circular photogalvanic effect (ACPGE) current arising from the reciprocal spin Hall effect (RSHE) in undoped InGaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells is measured under normal incidence of circularly polarized light at room temperature. We found that the spot location with the maximum ACPGE current is wavelength independent. And the normalized ACPGE current decreases at smaller wavelengths, which can be attributed to the sharp decrease of the spin relaxation time (τs) and the hot electron relaxation time (τ1) at smaller wavelengths. The study of the excitation wavelength dependence of ACPGE current is a good supplement to the in-depth investigation of RSHE

  16. Anomalous Fano resonance of massive Dirac particle through a time-dependent barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cunxi; Liu, Jie; Fu, Libin

    2015-06-01

    As is well known Fano resonance arises from the interference between a localized state and a continuum state. Using the standard Floquet theory and the scattering matrix method, we study theoretically the massive Dirac particle transmission over a quantum barrier with an oscillating field. It is found that the massive relativistic particles can generate not only normal Fano resonance in the transmission due to the interference between a localized state (bound state) and the continuum state, but also anomalous Fano resonance due to the interference between a delocalized state (extended state) and the continuum state. The dependence of line shapes on driving parameters for these two kinds of Fano resonances is quite different. For normal Fano resonance the asymmetry parameter is approximately proportional to a power law of the amplitude of the oscillating field, while for the anomalous Fano resonance the asymmetry parameters change slightly with different oscillation amplitudes. In practice, the anomalous Fano resonance can be identified by observing asymmetry parameters in experiment.

  17. Anomalous temperature dependence of excitation transfer betweenquantum dots

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Král, Karel; Menšík, Miroslav

    Praha : Czechoslovak Association for Crystal Growth (CSACG), 2014 - (Kožíšek, Z.; Nitsch, K.). s. 25-25 ISBN 978-80-260-6599-9. [Joint Seminar Development of Materials Science in Research and Education /24./. 08.09.2014-12.09.2014, Lednice] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12186 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : quantum dots * nanoparticles * electron-phonon interaction * energy transfer Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  18. Temperature dependence of basalt weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gaojun; Hartmann, Jens; Derry, Louis A.; West, A. Joshua; You, Chen-Feng; Long, Xiaoyong; Zhan, Tao; Li, Laifeng; Li, Gen; Qiu, Wenhong; Li, Tao; Liu, Lianwen; Chen, Yang; Ji, Junfeng; Zhao, Liang; Chen, Jun

    2016-06-01

    The homeostatic balance of Earth's long-term carbon cycle and the equable state of Earth's climate are maintained by negative feedbacks between the levels of atmospheric CO2 and the chemical weathering rate of silicate rocks. Though clearly demonstrated by well-controlled laboratory dissolution experiments, the temperature dependence of silicate weathering rates, hypothesized to play a central role in these weathering feedbacks, has been difficult to quantify clearly in natural settings at landscape scale. By compiling data from basaltic catchments worldwide and considering only inactive volcanic fields (IVFs), here we show that the rate of CO2 consumption associated with the weathering of basaltic rocks is strongly correlated with mean annual temperature (MAT) as predicted by chemical kinetics. Relations between temperature and CO2 consumption rate for active volcanic fields (AVFs) are complicated by other factors such as eruption age, hydrothermal activity, and hydrological complexities. On the basis of this updated data compilation we are not able to distinguish whether or not there is a significant runoff control on basalt weathering rates. Nonetheless, the simple temperature control as observed in this global dataset implies that basalt weathering could be an effective mechanism for Earth to modulate long-term carbon cycle perturbations.

  19. Temperature dependence of interatomic separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Manoj [Department of Physics, G.B. Pant University of Agriculture and Technology, Pantnagar 263145, Uttarakhand (India); Kumar, M. [Department of Physics, G.B. Pant University of Agriculture and Technology, Pantnagar 263145, Uttarakhand (India)], E-mail: munish_dixit@yahoo.com

    2008-10-01

    A simple unification of various relations for the temperature dependence of interatomic separation is presented. It is found that the relations reported by the earlier workers as new are contained in a simple thermodynamic relation. Some other relations based on different physical origins are also included in the study and compared with the thermodynamic relation. The results are reported for ten crystals, viz. KF, KCl, KBr, KI, RbF, RbCl, RbBr, RbI, MgO and CaO. A good agreement between unified relation and experiment demonstrates the superiority of the simple theory based on the thermodynamic analysis.

  20. Proceedings of the workshop on 'anomalous electronic states and physical properties in high-temperature superconductors'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A workshop entitled 'Anomalous Electronic States and Physical Properties in High-Temperature Superconductors' was held on November 7-8, 2006 at Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University. In the workshop, leading scientists in the field of high-Tc superconductivity, both experimentalists and theorists, gathered in a hall to report the recent progress of the study, clarify the problems to be solved, and discuss the future prospects. The workshop was jointly organized by Specially Promoted Research of MEXT, Development of the 4D Spaces Access Neutron Spectrometer and Elucidation of the Mechanism of Oxide High-Tc Superconductivity' (repr. by M. Arai, JAEA) and by the Inter-university Cooperative Research Program of the Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 'Anomalous Electronic States and Physical Properties in High-Temperature Superconductors' (repr. by T. Tohyama, Kyoto Univ.). This report includes abstracts and materials of the presentations in the workshop. (author)

  1. Temperature Dependence of Lattice Vibration Frequencies of KNiF3 in Connection with Antiferromagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomono, Yuzo; Takaoka, Tosihide; Yajima, Masaaki; Tanokura, Yosiko; Jinda, Nan

    1990-02-01

    Temperature dependence of three infrared active modes of vibrations were measured for KNiF3 powdered specimen. A characteristic temperature dependence was observed for the highest mode, which is about 450 cm-1, at room temperature. This mode is due to a bending motion of F-Ni-F bond, which is expected to modulate superexchange interaction between nearest neighboring Ni ions. Therefore the anomalous increase of the highest mode frequency was interpreted by superexchange interaction, which increases at lower temperatures.

  2. On the Anomalous Flicker Noise Intensity in High-Temperature Superconductors

    OpenAIRE

    Kazakov, Kirill A.

    2009-01-01

    The problem of anomalously high levels of flicker noise observed in the normal state of the high-temperature superconductors is addressed. It is argued that the anomaly is the result of incorrect normalization of the power spectra according to the Hooge formula. A careful analysis of the available experimental data is given, which shows that the scaling of the spectral power with sample size is essentially different from the inverse proportionality. It is demonstrated that the measured spectr...

  3. Anomalous roughness of turbulent interfaces with system size dependent local roughness exponent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a system far from equilibrium the system size can play the role of control parameter that governs the spatiotemporal dynamics of the system. Accordingly, the kinetic roughness of interfaces in systems far from equilibrium may depend on the system size. To get an insight into this problem, we performed a detailed study of rough interfaces formed in paper combustion experiments. Using paper sheets of different width λ, we found that the turbulent flame fronts display anomalous multi-scaling characterized by non-universal global roughness exponent α and by the system size dependent spectrum of local roughness exponents, ζq(λ)=ζ1(1)q-ωλφq=0.93q-0.15. The structure factor of turbulent flame fronts also exhibits unconventional scaling dependence on λ. These results are expected to apply to a broad range of far from equilibrium systems when the kinetic energy fluctuations exceed a certain critical value.

  4. Anomalous transport in high-temperature plasmas with applications to solenoidal fusion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The linear, non-linear, and anomalous transport properties associated with various micro-instabilities driven by cross-field currents in high-temperature plasmas are reviewed. Particular emphasis is placed on instabilities pertinent to the implosion and post-implosion phases of theta-pinch plasmas, e.g. Buneman (electron-ion two-stream), ion acoustic, lower-hybrid-drift, electromagnetic ion cyclotron, and ion-ion cross-field instabilities. Analytic studies of the non-linear and quasi-linear evolution of these instabilities are presented, together with a detailed comparison with computer simulation experiments to test the validity of the various theoretical models and non-linear saturation mechanisms. A general theoretical formalism is presented which describes, in a self-consistent manner, the macroscopic transport produced by the (short-wave-length) turbulence associated with the microinstabilities enumerated above. The experimental evidence that such a self-consistent anomalous transport model is required for describing the implosion behaviour (characterized by diffuse current sheaths) in rapidly pulsed theta pinches is reviewed, together with the early attempts at modelling these implosions numerically with a one-fluid (MHD) model including artificial viscosity. It is shown that fluid-numerical simulations that include (at each space and time step) the effects of anomalous transport in a fully self-consistent manner, explain several features of the experimental observations. The relevance of reflected ions to sheath structure and implosion dynamics is also discussed, and state-of-the-art hybrid-numerical studies (Vlasov ions and fluid electrons) of pinch implosions are presented, which include reflected ion dynamics as well as the anomalous transport associated with cross-field instabilities. Finally, instability mechanisms for producing long-time interpenetration of plasma and magnetic field in post-implosion theta pinches are discussed, together with estimates

  5. Anomalous dependence of population growth on the birth rate in the plant-herbivore system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Xue M. [Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Yanbian University, Yanji (China); Han, Seung K.; Chung, Jean S. [Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    We performed a simulation of the two-species plant-herbivore system by using the agent-based NetLogo program and constructed a dynamic model of populations consistent with the simulation results. The dynamic model is a three-dimensional system including the mean energy of the herbivore in addition to two variables denoting the populations of plants and herbivores. A steady-state analysis of the dynamic model shows that the dependence of the herbivore population on the birth and the death rates observed from the agent model is consistent with the prediction of the dynamic model. Especially, the anomalous dependence of the herbivore population on the birth rate, where the population decreases with the birth rate for small death rate, is consistently explained by a phase plane analysis of the dynamic model.

  6. Chorioretinal burn: body temperature dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irradiance thresholds for chorioretinal damage in rhesus monkeys vary linearly with core temperatures between 34 and 390C. Damage results from the combined thermal effects of retinal irradiation and the body temperature. Visible damage is calculated to occur at a tissue temperature of 42.50C. Fever increases the retina's susceptibility to burns from the sun, lasers, and other radiant energy sources

  7. A Two-Temperature Supernova Fallback Disk Model for Anomalous X-ray Pulsars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    We present a case study of the relevance of the radially pulsational instability of a two-temperature accretion disk around a neutron star to anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs). Our estimates are based on the approximation that such a neutron star disk with mass in the range of 10-6 - 10-5 M⊙ is formed by supernova fallback. We derive several peculiar properties of the accretion disk instability: a narrow interval of X-ray pulse periods; lower X-ray luminosities; a period derivative and an evolution time scale. All these results are in good agreement with the observations of the AXPs.

  8. On the anomalous flicker noise intensity in high-temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of anomalously high levels of flicker noise observed in the normal state of the high-temperature superconductors is addressed. It is argued that the anomaly is the result of incorrect normalization of the power spectra according to the Hooge formula. A careful analysis of the available experimental data is given, which shows that the scaling of the spectral power with sample size is essentially different from the inverse proportionality. It is demonstrated that the measured spectra obey the law given by the recently proposed quantum theory of fundamental flicker noise.

  9. Linear temperature dependence of mobility in quantum wells and the effects of exchange and correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the temperature dependence of the mobility for elastic scattering in quantum wells. Due to anomalous screening in two-dimensional systems the mobility decreases linearly with temperature. The parameter for this linear temperature dependence is a function of well width and of carrier density. It is expressed in terms of the density dependence of the form factor for finite width effects and by the local-field correction for many-body effects (exchange and correlation). We argue that alloy-disorder scattering should lead to the linear temperature dependence of the mobility. (author)

  10. Anomalous magnetization dynamics close to the temperature of spin-reorientation transition in ε-In0.24Fe1.76O3 nanowire arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An anomalous direction of the shift of the temperature maximum of magnetic susceptibility with increasing magnetic field frequency was observed in ε-In0.24Fe1.76O3 nanowires arrays in spite of the prediction of the theory of thermoactivated processes. The unusual effect can be explained by the redistribution of the contributions from low- and high-temperature phases to the temperature dependence of magnetic susceptibility. The magnetic state of each of the phases is described by the model of cluster magnetic glass. Separated electron spin resonance responses of these phases were distinguished.

  11. Temperature Dependence of Elastic Properties for Amorphous SiO2 by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Bin; WANG Jing-Yang; ZHOU Yan-Chun; LI Fang-Zhi

    2008-01-01

    @@ Large-scale and long-time molecular-dynamics simulations are used to investigate the temperature dependences of elastic properties for amorphous SiO2. The elastic moduli increase in a temperature range up to 1600 K and decrease thereafter. The anomalous behaviour in elasticity is explained by analysing the changes of atomic-scale structure with respect to increment of temperature. The mechanism originates predominantly from distortion of the SiO4 tetrahedra network in low-temperature ranges. At an elevated temperature range, thermal-induced Si-O bond stretching dominates the process and leads to normal temperature dependence of elastic properties.

  12. Temperature dependence of electroluminescence from silicon p-i-n light-emitting diodes

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Cheng; Lai, Hongkai; Chen, Songyan; Suemasu, T.; Hasegawa, F

    2006-01-01

    The temperature dependence of electroluminescence from silicon p-i-n light-emitting diodes with a layer of beta-FeSi2 particles inserted in intrinsic silicon was investigated. Anomalous blueshift of the peak energy and enhanced electroluminescence intensity of the silicon band-edge emission were observed at temperatures from 50 to 200 K. The electroluminescence intensity was enhanced due to longer diffusion paths of the injected electrons at elevated temperature, as well as thermal escape ...

  13. The Temperature Dependence of Some Normal Modes in Strontium Titanate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The frequency/wave vector dispetsior curves have been measured for some of the normal modes in strontium titanate along [100]. The experiments were performed using the triple axis spectrometer at Chalk River, usually with the constant Q-bar technique. Of particular interest is the temperature dependence of the lowest transverse optical branch, which has been studied at two temperatures. The frequencies (units 1012 cycles/s) at q-bar = 0 are 1.27 ± 0.05 at 90oK and 2.73 ± 0.05 at 296oK. The dispersion curves have maximum frequencies (4.2 at 90oK, 4.4 at 296oK) near the middle of the zone; at the zone boundary the frequencies are about 3.5. The anomalous temperature dependence of the q-bar = 0 mode has been predicted by Cochran, and the magnitude of the change with temperature, which may be obtained from the temperature dependence of the dielectric constant, is in good agreement with the theory. The non-infrared active mode has been observed and has a frequency at q-bar = 0 of 7.95 ± 0.15. (author)

  14. Anomalous length dependence of the conductance of graphene nanoribbons with zigzag edges

    KAUST Repository

    Bilić, Ante

    2013-01-01

    Charge transport through two sets of symmetric graphene nanoribbons with zigzag shaped edges in a two-terminal device has been investigated, using density functional theory combined with the non-equilibrium Green\\'s function method. The conductance has been explored as a function of nanoribbon length, bias voltage, and the strength of terminal coupling. The set of narrower nanoribbons, in the form of thiolated linear acenes, shows an anomalous length dependence of the conductance, which at first exhibits a drop and a minimum, followed by an evident rise. The length trend is shown to arise because of a gradual transformation in the transport mechanism, which changes from being governed by a continuum of out-of-plane π type and in-plane state channels to being fully controlled by a single, increasingly more resonant, occupied π state channel. For the set of nanoribbons with a wider profile, a steady increase is observed across the whole length range, owing to the absence of the former transport mechanism. The predicted trends are confirmed by the inclusion of self-interaction correction in the calculations. For both sets of nanoribbons the replacement of the strongly coupling thiol groups by weakly bonding phenathroline has been found to cause a strong attenuation with the length and a generally low conductance. © 2013 American Institute of Physics.

  15. Stacking order dependence of inverse spin Hall effect and anomalous Hall effect in spin pumping experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang-Il; Seo, Min-Su; Park, Seung-Young, E-mail: parksy@kbsi.re.kr [Division of Materials Science, Korea Basic Science Institute, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong-Jun; Park, Byong-Guk [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-07

    The dependence of the measured DC voltage on the non-magnetic material (NM) in NM/CoFeB and CoFeB/NM bilayers is studied under ferromagnetic resonance conditions in a TE{sub 011} resonant cavity. The directional change of the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) voltage V{sub ISHE} for the stacking order of the bilayer can separate the pure V{sub ISHE} and the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) voltage V{sub AHE} utilizing the method of addition and subtraction. The Ta and Ti NMs show a broad deviation of the spin Hall angle θ{sub ISH}, which originates from the AHE in accordance with the high resistivity of NMs. However, the Pt and Pd NMs show that the kinds of NMs with low resistivity are consistent with the previously reported θ{sub ISH} values. Therefore, the characteristics that NM should simultaneously satisfy to obtain a reasonable V{sub ISHE} value in bilayer systems are large θ{sub ISH} and low resistivity.

  16. Layer-dependent quantum cooperation of electron and hole states in the anomalous semimetal WTe2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Pranab Kumar; di Sante, D.; Vobornik, I.; Fujii, J.; Okuda, T.; Bruyer, E.; Gyenis, A.; Feldman, B. E.; Tao, J.; Ciancio, R.; Rossi, G.; Ali, M. N.; Picozzi, S.; Yadzani, A.; Panaccione, G.; Cava, R. J.

    2016-02-01

    The behaviour of electrons and holes in a crystal lattice is a fundamental quantum phenomenon, accounting for a rich variety of material properties. Boosted by the remarkable electronic and physical properties of two-dimensional materials such as graphene and topological insulators, transition metal dichalcogenides have recently received renewed attention. In this context, the anomalous bulk properties of semimetallic WTe2 have attracted considerable interest. Here we report angle- and spin-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of WTe2 single crystals, through which we disentangle the role of W and Te atoms in the formation of the band structure and identify the interplay of charge, spin and orbital degrees of freedom. Supported by first-principles calculations and high-resolution surface topography, we reveal the existence of a layer-dependent behaviour. The balance of electron and hole states is found only when considering at least three Te-W-Te layers, showing that the behaviour of WTe2 is not strictly two dimensional.

  17. Layer-dependent quantum cooperation of electron and hole states in the anomalous semimetal WTe2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Pranab Kumar; Di Sante, D; Vobornik, I; Fujii, J; Okuda, T; Bruyer, E; Gyenis, A; Feldman, B E; Tao, J; Ciancio, R; Rossi, G; Ali, M N; Picozzi, S; Yadzani, A; Panaccione, G; Cava, R J

    2016-01-01

    The behaviour of electrons and holes in a crystal lattice is a fundamental quantum phenomenon, accounting for a rich variety of material properties. Boosted by the remarkable electronic and physical properties of two-dimensional materials such as graphene and topological insulators, transition metal dichalcogenides have recently received renewed attention. In this context, the anomalous bulk properties of semimetallic WTe2 have attracted considerable interest. Here we report angle- and spin-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of WTe2 single crystals, through which we disentangle the role of W and Te atoms in the formation of the band structure and identify the interplay of charge, spin and orbital degrees of freedom. Supported by first-principles calculations and high-resolution surface topography, we reveal the existence of a layer-dependent behaviour. The balance of electron and hole states is found only when considering at least three Te-W-Te layers, showing that the behaviour of WTe2 is not strictly two dimensional. PMID:26924386

  18. Anomalous capacitance in temperature and frequency characteristics of a TiW/p-InP Schottky barrier diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingsong; Chen, Jun; Tang, Hengjing; Li, Xue

    2016-06-01

    The capacitance-voltage (C–V) and conductance voltage (G/ω–V) characteristics of a TiW/p-InP Schottky barrier diode (SBD) are measured at 310 K in the frequency range from 10 kHz to 1 MHz and the temperature dependency of the diode from 310 K to 400 K at 1 MHz are also investigated. Anomalous peaks and negative capacitances caused by interface states (N ss ) and series resistance (R s) are discussed, which strongly influence the electrical characteristics of SBD. R s is calculated from the measured capacitance (C m ) and conductance (G m ) values, indicating that the effects of R s are apparent at low frequency. The corrected capacitance (C c) and corrected conductance (G c) are both obtained from the C m and G m values by taking into account R s. The experimental results clearly show that the capacitance (C) and conductance (G) values are strongly dependent on the temperature and frequency.

  19. Resistance and thermal expansion anomalous change in Cr-Re and Cr-Os alloys above Neel temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temperature dependences of electric resistance and thermal expansion of alloy series Cr-Re and Cr-Os in the range of ternary points concentration on phase diagrams of magnetic transformations are studied. It is shown, that with the increase in Re and Os concentration in chromium alloys to the concentration of ternary points during their heating above Tsub(N), an anomalous nonlinear to a certain temperature Tsub(l), and above Tsub(l) - a linear change in electric resistance and thermal expansion are observed. The highest anomalies of the properties and values of Tsub(l)-Tsub(N) temperature ranges are observed at the concentration of ternary points. With further increase in Re and Os concentration in the alloys both anomalies and Tsub(l)-Tsub(N) values decrease, but remain higher than those of pure chromium. Such anomalies are explained by the change in magnetic structure and first of all the values of domains, structure of domain boundaries of phase ao.reement with different magnetic order and with the possibility of ferromagnetism microregion formation

  20. Anomalous thermal behaviour in small electronic devices: non-uniformity and overshoot in dynamic temperature distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vermeersch, B; Mey, G de [Department of Electronics and Information Systems, Ghent University, Sint Pietersnieuwstraat 41, Gent 9000 (Belgium)

    2007-04-21

    This paper presents a theoretical investigation of the temperature distributions generated by a small heat source mounted on or embedded in semiconductor material. The dynamic thermal behaviour of the structures is studied in the frequency domain using phasor notation for the temperature and heat flux fields. Both classical and hyperbolic thermal conductions are considered. The latter accounts for the finite heat propagation speed, which is necessary for accurately describing very fast transitions. Although a uniform power density is applied, the temperature distribution inside the source is spatially non-uniform. As is already well known, this even holds for steady state conditions. For high frequencies, however, the maximum magnitude (i.e. largest oscillations) of the temperature occurs near the edges and corners of the heat source, rather than in the centre where it could intuitively be expected. This anomalous behaviour is observed for a wide variety of configurations, ranging from a simple 1D analytical slab model to numerical results for a 3D multi-layered electronic package. The classical theory clearly underestimates the edge effect, particularly for submicrometre structures. The substantial deviation from the distributions obtained by non-Fourier theory illustrates that special care should be taken when analysing fast heat transfer in small electronic devices.

  1. Magnetic modulation doping in topological insulators toward higher-temperature quantum anomalous Hall effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mogi, M., E-mail: mogi@cmr.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Yoshimi, R.; Yasuda, K.; Kozuka, Y. [Department of Applied Physics and Quantum Phase Electronics Center (QPEC), University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Tsukazaki, A. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Takahashi, K. S. [RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), Wako 351-0198 (Japan); Kawasaki, M.; Tokura, Y. [Department of Applied Physics and Quantum Phase Electronics Center (QPEC), University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), Wako 351-0198 (Japan)

    2015-11-02

    Quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE), which generates dissipation-less edge current without external magnetic field, is observed in magnetic-ion doped topological insulators (TIs) such as Cr- and V-doped (Bi,Sb){sub 2}Te{sub 3}. The QAHE emerges when the Fermi level is inside the magnetically induced gap around the original Dirac point of the TI surface state. Although the size of gap is reported to be about 50 meV, the observable temperature of QAHE has been limited below 300 mK. We attempt magnetic-Cr modulation doping into topological insulator (Bi,Sb){sub 2}Te{sub 3} films to increase the observable temperature of QAHE. By introducing the rich-Cr-doped thin (1 nm) layers at the vicinity of both the surfaces based on non-Cr-doped (Bi,Sb){sub 2}Te{sub 3} films, we have succeeded in observing the QAHE up to 2 K. The improvement in the observable temperature achieved by this modulation-doping appears to be originating from the suppression of the disorder in the surface state interacting with the rich magnetic moments. Such a superlattice designing of the stabilized QAHE may pave a way to dissipation-less electronics based on the higher-temperature and zero magnetic-field quantum conduction.

  2. Anomalous thermal behaviour in small electronic devices: non-uniformity and overshoot in dynamic temperature distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a theoretical investigation of the temperature distributions generated by a small heat source mounted on or embedded in semiconductor material. The dynamic thermal behaviour of the structures is studied in the frequency domain using phasor notation for the temperature and heat flux fields. Both classical and hyperbolic thermal conductions are considered. The latter accounts for the finite heat propagation speed, which is necessary for accurately describing very fast transitions. Although a uniform power density is applied, the temperature distribution inside the source is spatially non-uniform. As is already well known, this even holds for steady state conditions. For high frequencies, however, the maximum magnitude (i.e. largest oscillations) of the temperature occurs near the edges and corners of the heat source, rather than in the centre where it could intuitively be expected. This anomalous behaviour is observed for a wide variety of configurations, ranging from a simple 1D analytical slab model to numerical results for a 3D multi-layered electronic package. The classical theory clearly underestimates the edge effect, particularly for submicrometre structures. The substantial deviation from the distributions obtained by non-Fourier theory illustrates that special care should be taken when analysing fast heat transfer in small electronic devices

  3. Magnetic modulation doping in topological insulators toward higher-temperature quantum anomalous Hall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE), which generates dissipation-less edge current without external magnetic field, is observed in magnetic-ion doped topological insulators (TIs) such as Cr- and V-doped (Bi,Sb)2Te3. The QAHE emerges when the Fermi level is inside the magnetically induced gap around the original Dirac point of the TI surface state. Although the size of gap is reported to be about 50 meV, the observable temperature of QAHE has been limited below 300 mK. We attempt magnetic-Cr modulation doping into topological insulator (Bi,Sb)2Te3 films to increase the observable temperature of QAHE. By introducing the rich-Cr-doped thin (1 nm) layers at the vicinity of both the surfaces based on non-Cr-doped (Bi,Sb)2Te3 films, we have succeeded in observing the QAHE up to 2 K. The improvement in the observable temperature achieved by this modulation-doping appears to be originating from the suppression of the disorder in the surface state interacting with the rich magnetic moments. Such a superlattice designing of the stabilized QAHE may pave a way to dissipation-less electronics based on the higher-temperature and zero magnetic-field quantum conduction

  4. Self-propagating reactions in Al/Zr multilayers: Anomalous dependence of reaction velocity on bilayer thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High temperature, self-propagating reactions are observed in vapor-deposited Al/Zr multilayered foils of overall atomic ratios 3 Al:1 Zr and 2 Al:1 Zr and nanoscale layer thicknesses; however, the reaction velocities do not exhibit the inverse dependence on bilayer thickness that is expected based on changes in the average diffusion distance. Instead, for bilayer thicknesses of 20-30 nm, the velocity is essentially constant at ∼7.7 m/s. We explore several possible explanations for this anomalous behavior, including microstructural factors, changes in the phase evolution, and phase transformations in the reactant layers, but find no conclusive explanations. We determine that the phase evolution during self-propagating reactions in foils with a 3 Al:1 Zr stoichiometry is a rapid transformation from Al/Zr multilayers to the equilibrium intermetallic Al3Zr compound with no intermediate crystalline phases. This phase evolution is the same for foils of 90 nm bilayer thicknesses and foils of bilayer thicknesses in the range of 27 nm to 35 nm. Further, for foils with a bilayer thickness of 90 nm and a 3 Al:1 Zr overall chemistry, the propagation front is planar and steady, in contrast to unsteady reaction fronts in foils with 1 Al:1 Zr overall chemistry and similar bilayer thicknesses

  5. Water temperature dependence of single bubble sonoluminescence

    OpenAIRE

    Hilgenfeldt, Sascha; Lohse, Detlef; Moss, William C.

    1998-01-01

    The strong dependence of the intensity of single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) on water temperature observed in experiment can be accounted for by the temperature dependence of the material constants of water, most essentially of the viscosity, of the argon solubility in water, and of the vapor pressure. The strong increase of light emission at low water temperatures is due to the possibility of applying higher driving pressures, caused by increased bubble stability. The presented calculatio...

  6. Temperature Dependence of Light Absorption by Water

    OpenAIRE

    Cumming, J. B.

    2013-01-01

    A model is described that relates the temperature coefficient of the optical absorption spectrum of pure water to the frequency derivative of that spectrum and two parameters that quantify the dependence of a peak's amplitude and its position on temperature. When applied to experimental temperature coefficients, it provides a better understanding of the process than the analysis currently in use.

  7. Linear temperature dependence of the mobility in two-dimensional electron gases: many-body and spin-polarization effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present results for the temperature dependence of the mobility for elastic scattering in a two-dimensional electron gas at low temperatures. Due to anomalous screening in two-dimensional systems the mobility varies linearly with temperature. We discuss many-body effects and spin-polarization effects and compare with some recent experimental and theoretical results. We show that the sign of the temperature dependence may change in spin-polarized systems

  8. Temperature dependence of radiation chemistry of polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical reactions which occur during radiolysis of polymers usually show an increase in rate with increasing temperature that can be described by an Arrhenius relationship. The magnitude of the activation energy can vary widely and is affected by physical, as well as chemical, factors. Different reaction rates may be expected in crystalline and amorphous morphologies, and in glassy and rubbery regions. The temperature dependence of radiolysis reactions can be expected to show discontinuities at the glass and melting transitions, Tg and Tm. The ceiling temperature, Tc, for polymerization/depolymerization will also affect the rate of degradation, especially for depropagation to monomer. The temperature for this effect depends on the molecular structure of the polymer. The temperature dependence of free radical reactions can be studied by cryogenic trapping and ESR spectroscopy during thermal profiling. Increased degradation rates at high dose rates can be due to increased temperatures resulting from energy absorption

  9. Charge-dependent correlations from event-by-event anomalous hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Hirono, Yuji; Kharzeev, Dmitri E

    2016-01-01

    We report on our recent attempt of quantitative modeling of the Chiral Magnetic Effect (CME) in heavy-ion collisions. We perform 3+1 dimensional anomalous hydrodynamic simulations on an event-by-event basis, with constitutive equations that contain the anomaly-induced effects. We also develop a model of the initial condition for the axial charge density that captures the statistical nature of random chirality imbalances created by the color flux tubes. Basing on the event-by-event hydrodynamic simulations for hundreds of thousands of collisions, we calculate the correlation functions that are measured in experiments, and discuss how the anomalous transport affects these observables.

  10. Anomalous magnetic behavior of superconducting Tl2Ba2CaCu2O8 thin films in small magnetic fields close to the transition temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a specially designed SQUID magnetometer we measured the temperature dependence of the critical current density in a ring patterned Tl2Ba2CaCu2O8 thin film for magnetic fields 0.03Oe≤Hc is determined. The jc(T) data show a field-dependent anomalous kink close to Tc pointing to reduced dissipation with increasing temperature allowing to construct a corresponding H-T borderline. A similar behavior is observed for the normalized relaxation rate S(T) as extracted from the temporal behavior of the remanent state, which, at low temperatures, exhibits the expected increase for increasing T-values, while an anomalous decrease of S(T) is found for temperatures above 85 K. While the low-T regime is attributed to creep of 2D pinned single vortex lines, the high-T behavior is suggested to be dominated by collective motion with a more sluggish dynamics. This change in dynamics is also reflected by the activation barriers for flux creep U(j), which show a corresponding crossover in μ from 0.06 to 0.99. An additional scaling analysis of the E-j characteristics for T≥85 K according to vortex glass theory reveals quasi-2D collective creep behavior with Tg=96 K. (orig.)

  11. Temperature Dependent Neutron Scattering Sections for Polyethylene

    CERN Document Server

    Hill, R E; Hill, Roger E.

    2003-01-01

    This note presents neutron scattering cross sections for polyethylene at 296 K, 77 K and 4 K derived from a new scattering kernel for neutron scattering off of hydrogen in polyethylene. The kernel was developed in ENDF-6 format as a set of S(alpha,beta) tables using the LEAPR module of the NJOY94 code package. The polyethylene density of states (from 0 to sub eV) adopted to derive the new kernel is presented. We compare our calculated room temperature total scattering cross sections and double differential cross sections at 232 meV at various angles with the available experimental data (at room temperature), and then extrapolate the calculations to lower temperatures (77K and 4K). The new temperature dependent scattering kernel gives a good quantitative fit to the available room temperature data and has a temperature dependence that is qualitatively consistent with thermodynamics.

  12. Anomalous Molecular Weight Dependence of Chain Dynamics in Unentangled Polymer Blends with Strong Dynamic Asymmetry

    OpenAIRE

    Arrese-Igor, Silvia; Alegría, Ángel; Moreno Segurado, Ángel J.; Colmenero de León, Juan

    2011-01-01

    We address the general question of how the molecular weight dependence of chain dynamics in unentangled polymers is modified by blending. By dielectric spectroscopy we measure the normal mode relaxation of polyisoprene in blends with a slower component of poly(ter-butylstyrene). Unentangled polyisoprene in the blend exhibits strong deviations from Rouse scaling, approaching 'entangled-like' behavior at low temperatures in concomitance with the increase of the dynamic asymmetry in the blend. T...

  13. Layer-dependent quantum cooperation of electron and hole states in the anomalous semimetal WTe2

    OpenAIRE

    Das, P. K.; Di Sante, D.; Vobornik, I.; Fujii, J.; Okuda, T; Bruyer, E.; Gyenis, A.; Feldman, B; Tao, J.; Ciancio, R.; Rossi, G.; Ali, M.(National Centre for Particle Physics, Universiti Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia); Picozzi, S.; Yazdani, A.; G. Panaccione

    2016-01-01

    The behaviour of electrons and holes in a crystal lattice is a fundamental quantum phenomenon, accounting for a rich variety of material properties. Boosted by the remarkable electronic and physical properties of two-dimensional materials such as graphene and topological insulators, transition metal dichalcogenides have recently received renewed attention. In this context, the anomalous bulk properties of semimetallic WTe2 have attracted considerable interest. Here we report angle- and spin-r...

  14. Temperature dependent quasiparticle renormalization in nickel metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ovsyannikov, Ruslan; Sanchez-Barriga, Jaime; Fink, Joerg; Duerr, Hermann A. [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin (Germany). BESSY II

    2009-07-01

    One of the fundamental consequences of electron correlation effects is that the bare particles in solids become 'dressed', i.e. they acquire an increased effective mass and a lifetime. We studied the spin dependent quasiparticle band structure of Ni(111) with high resolution angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy. At low temperatures (50 K) a renormalization of quasiparticle energy and lifetime indicative of electron-phonon coupling is observed in agreement with literature. With increasing temperature we observe a decreasing quasiparticle lifetime at the Fermi level for all probed minority spin bands as expected from electron phonon coupling. Surprisingly the majority spin states behave differently. We actually observe a slightly increased lifetime at room temperature. The corresponding increase in Fermi velocity points to a temperature dependent reduction of the majority spin quasiparticle renormalization.

  15. Investigations of Low Temperature Time Dependent Cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Sluys, W A; Robitz, E S; Young, B A; Bloom, J

    2002-09-30

    The objective of this project was to investigate metallurgical and mechanical phenomena associated with time dependent cracking of cold bent carbon steel piping at temperatures between 327 C and 360 C. Boiler piping failures have demonstrated that understanding the fundamental metallurgical and mechanical parameters controlling these failures is insufficient to eliminate it from the field. The results of the project consisted of the development of a testing methodology to reproduce low temperature time dependent cracking in laboratory specimens. This methodology was used to evaluate the cracking resistance of candidate heats in order to identify the factors that enhance cracking sensitivity. The resultant data was integrated into current available life prediction tools.

  16. Simultaneous Measurement of Temperature Dependent Thermophysical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czél, Balázs; Gróf, Gyula; Kiss, László

    2011-11-01

    A new evaluation method for a transient measurement of thermophysical properties is presented in this paper. The aim of the research was to couple a new automatic evaluation procedure to the BICOND thermophysical property measurement method to enhance the simultaneous determination of the temperature dependent thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity. The thermophysical properties of two different polymers were measured and compared with the literature data and with the measurement results that were done by well-known, traditional methods. The BICOND method involves a step-down cooling, recording the temperature histories of the inner and the outer surfaces of a hollow cylindrical sample and the thermophysical properties are evaluated from the solution of the corresponding inverse heat conduction using a genetic algorithm-based method (BIGEN) developed by the authors. The BIGEN is able to find the material properties with any kind of temperature dependency, that is illustrated through the measurement results of poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) and polyamide (PA) samples.

  17. Temperature dependence of the Casimir effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The temperature dependence of the Casimir force between a real metallic plate and a metallic sphere is analyzed on the basis of optical data concerning the dispersion relation of metals such as gold and copper. Realistic permittivities imply, together with basic thermodynamic considerations, that the transverse electric zero mode does not contribute. This results in observable differences from the conventional prediction, which does not take this physical requirement into account. The results are shown to be consistent with the third law of thermodynamics, as well as being not inconsistent with current experiments. However, the predicted temperature dependence should be detectable in future experiments. The inadequacies of approaches based on ad hoc assumptions, such as the plasma dispersion relation and the use of surface impedance without transverse momentum dependence, are discussed

  18. Anomalous composition dependence of the band gap pressure coefficients in In-containing nitride semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorczyca, I.; Kamińska, A.; Staszczak, G.;

    2010-01-01

    The pressure-induced changes in the electronic band structures of In-containing nitride alloys, InxGa1-xN and InxAl1-xN are examined experimentally as well as by ab initio calculations. It is found that the band gap pressure coefficients, dEg/dp, exhibit very large bowing with x, and calculations...... with existing data for InxGa1-xN layers. We discuss possible explanations of the anomalously large magnitude of the dEg/dp bowing in these nitride alloys....

  19. Temperature dependent quasiparticle renormalization in nickel and iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ovsyannikov, Ruslan; Thirupathaiah, Setti; Sanchez-Barriga, Jaime; Fink, Joerg; Duerr, Hermann [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin, BESSY II, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 15, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    One of the fundamental consequences of electron correlation effects is that the bare particles in solids become 'dressed' with an excitation cloud resulting in quasiparticles. Such a quasiparticle will carry the same spin and charge as the original particle, but will have a renormalized mass and a finite lifetime. The properties of many-body interactions are described with a complex function called self energy which is directly accessible to modern high-resolution angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Ferromagnetic metals like nickel or iron offers the exciting possibility to study the spin dependence of quasiparticle coupling to bosonic modes. Utilizing the exchange split band structure as an intrinsic 'spin detector' it is possible to distinguish between electron-phonon and electron-magnon coupling phenomena. In this contribution we will report a systematic investigation of the k- and temperature dependence of the electron-boson coupling in nickel and iron metals as well as discuss origin of earlier observed anomalous lifetime broadening of majority spin states of nickel at Fermi level.

  20. Anomalous Hall effect in YIG$|$Pt bilayers

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, Sibylle; Schlitz, Richard; Geprägs, Stephan; Opel, Matthias; Huebl, Hans; Gross, Rudolf; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B.

    2015-01-01

    We measure the ordinary and the anomalous Hall effect in a set of yttrium iron garnet$|$platinum (YIG$|$Pt) bilayers via magnetization orientation dependent magnetoresistance experiments. Our data show that the presence of the ferrimagnetic insulator YIG leads to an anomalous Hall like signature in Pt, sensitive to both Pt thickness and temperature. Interpretation of the experimental findings in terms of the spin Hall anomalous Hall effect indicates that the imaginary part of the spin mixing ...

  1. Resonant cavity mode dependence of anomalous and inverse spin Hall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The direct current electric voltage induced by the Inverse Spin Hall Effect (ISHE) and Anomalous Hall Effect (AHE) was investigated in the TE011 and TE102 cavities. The ISHE and AHE components were distinguishable through the fitting of the voltage spectrum. The unwanted AHE was minimized by placing the DUT (Device Under Test) at the center of both the TE011 and TE102 cavities. The voltage of ISHE in the TE011 cavity was larger than that in the TE102 cavity due to the higher quality factor of the former. Despite optimized centering, AHE voltage from TE011 cavity was also higher. The reason was attributed to the E-field distribution inside the cavity. In the case of the TE011 cavity, the DUT was easily exposed to the E-field in all directions. Therefore, the parasitic AHE voltage in the TE102 cavity was less sensitive than that in the TE011 cavity to decentering problem

  2. Temperature dependence of radiochromic film dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three types of transparent radiochromic films, two forming a blue image and one a red image, are now widely used in high dose dosimetry. These are FWT-60-00, a free standing nylon base film (nominal absorbed dose range: 1-50 kGy) which is usually measured at 605 and 510 nm wavelengths, GafChromic dosimetry media, a coated polyester film (nominal dose range: 0.05-30 kGy), which is measured at a variety of visible wavelengths from 675 down to 400 nm, and Riso B3, a free standing polyvinylbutyral base film (nominal absorbed dose range 1-200 kGy) which is measured at a single wavelength, 554 nm. Each of these film types is also supplied in other forms for special applications and different useful dose ranges, so that the systems are now able to measure doses and make radiographic images (without development) over a wide dynamic range, namely 10 to 2 x 105 Gy, with reasonable precision, nominally ±3% at 95% confidence limits, without appreciable dose rate dependence. The high resolution radiographic images can be used for archival dose distribution records. One of the main sources of uncertainty in the use of these films at high doses and dose rates is the variation of response with irradiation temperature. A study has been made of the effect of temperature variations during irradiation of these film types over a temperature range of -78 to +80 deg. C. The results show that the shape of the temperature dependence function varies with the absorbed dose level, and, for some film types, with the batch of the dosimeter. Although correction factors for this effect may be applied to improve the accuracy of dose interpretations, it is best to calibrate the dosimeters as closely as possible to the mean temperature of application. None of the films should be used at temperatures greater than 60 deg. C, because of erratic response characteristics. (author). 14 refs, 10 figs

  3. Normal and anomalous stress relaxation in metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stress relaxation in certain metallic glasses at room temperature has been studied. Anomalous relaxation after off-loading of strained samples is detected. A dislocation model permitting to explain qualitatively the presence of anomalous relaxation is suggested. Activation volume of relaxation and its dependence on stress are calculated

  4. Temperature dependent light transmission in ferrofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brojabasi, Surajit; Mahendran, V.; Lahiri, B. B.; Philip, John

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the influence of temperature on the magnetic field induced light transmission in a kerosene based ferrofluid containing oleic acid coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles, where the direction of propagation of light is parallel to the direction of the external magnetic field. At a fixed temperature the transmitted light intensity is found to monotonically increase with incident wavelength due to reduced extinction efficiency at higher wavelength. The transmitted intensity decreases with external magnetic field due to enhanced scattering from the field induced linear chain like structures along the direction of the external magnetic field and due to the build-up of standing waves inside the scattering medium. The extinction of the field induced transmitted light intensity is found to occur at a lower external field as the sample temperature is lowered. The rate of extinction of normalized transmitted light intensity decreased linearly with increasing sample temperature due to slower field induced aggregation kinetics because of an increased Brownian motion of the suspended nanoparticles and a reduced coupling constant. The observed temperature dependent magneto-optical properties of magnetic nanofluids can be exploited for applications in optical devices.

  5. Radial deformation of single-walled carbon nanotubes on quartz substrates and the resultant anomalous diameter-dependent reaction selectivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan Yang; Yu Liu; Daqi Zhang; Xiao Wang; Ruoming Li; Yan Li

    2015-01-01

    Owing to the unique conjugated structure, the chemical-reaction selectivity of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) has attracted great attention. By utilizing the radial deformation of SWNTs caused by the strong interactions with the quartz lattice, we achieve an anomalous diameter-dependent reaction selectivity of quartz lattice-oriented SWNTs in treatment with iodine vapor; this is distinctly different from the widely reported and well accepted higher reaction activity in small-diameter tubes compared to large-diameter tubes. The radial deformation of SWNTs on quartz substrate is verified by detailed Raman spectroscopy and mappings in both G-band and radial breathing mode. Due to the strong interaction between SWNTs and the quartz lattice, large-diameter tubes present a larger degree of radial deformation and more delocalized partial electrons are distributed at certain sidewall sites with high local curvature. It is thus easier for the carbon--carbon bonds at these high-curvature sites on large-diameter tubes to break down during reaction. This anomalous reaction activity offers a novel approach for selective removal of small-band~aD large-diameter tubes.

  6. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence of polyazomethine films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report absorption and first reliable photoluminescence (PL) studies at various temperatures on relatively thick films of the basic polyazomethine — PPI, i.e., poly(1,4-phenylene-methylidynenitrilo-1,4-phenylenenitrilomethylidine), prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Both absorption and PL spectra exhibit the vibronic progression due to the C–C stretching mode, characteristic for conjugated polymers. The absorption spectra appear to be practically temperature independent, in contrast to PL spectra, the intensity of which strongly decreases with increasing temperature. The origin of generally weak photoluminescence of PPI is suggested to be the result of a non-radiative electronic state occupied by the lone electron pair on the nitrogen orbital. - Highlights: ► First reliable observation of photoluminescence (PL) in polyazomethine (PPI). ► PL spectrum of PPI appears to be strongly temperature-dependent. ► Weak PL of PPI is a result of non-radiative state occupied by lone electron pair.

  7. Anomalous temperature effect on the hydrogen bond strength and phase transition in 2,4,6-trimethylpyridinium pentachlorophenolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majerz, Irena; Jakubas, Ryszard

    2004-06-01

    The phase transition in 2,4,6-trimethylpyridinium pentachlorophenolate has been studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and dielectric method as well as theoretical calculations. The crystal undergoes a first order phase transition of order-disorder type at 376 K. The transition to the high temperature phase causes anomalous hydrogen-bond shortening. Experimental and theoretical results show that the change in the mutual orientation of the phenol and pyridine rings is connected with the change of the hydrogen bond. Such an effect, which appears in the present simple hydrogen-bond complex, may be common also for the other hydrogen-bond complexes.

  8. Linear mean free path and quadratic temperature dependence of electron-phonon scattering rate in V82Al18-xFex alloys at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have reported a comprehensive study on temperature and disorder dependence of inelastic electron dephasing scattering rate in disordered V82Al18-xFex alloys. The dephasing scattering time has been measured by analysis of low field magnetoresistance using the weak localization theory. In absence of magnetic field the variation of low temperature resistivity rise follows the relation Δρ(T)∝−ρ05/2√(T), which is well described by three-dimensional electron-electron interactions. The temperature-independent dephasing rate strongly depends on disorder and follows the relation τ0−1∝le, where le is the electron elastic mean free path. The inelastic electron-phonon scattering rate obeying the anomalous relation τe−ph−1∝T2le. This anomalous behavior of τe−ph−1 cannot be explained in terms of current theories for electron-phonon scattering in impure dirty conductors

  9. Temperature Dependent Kinetics DNA Charge Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlgamuth, Chris; McWilliams, Marc; Slinker, Jason

    2012-10-01

    Charge transport (CT) through DNA has been extensively studied, and yet the mechanism of this process is still not yet fully understood. Besides the benefits of understanding charge transport through this fundamental molecule, further understanding of this process will elucidate the biological implications of DNA CT and advance sensing technology. Therefore, we have investigated the temperature dependence of DNA CT by measuring the electrochemistry of DNA monolayers modified with a redox-active probe. By using multiplexed electrodes on silicon chips, we compare square wave voltammetry of distinct DNA sequences under identical experimental conditions. We vary the probe length within the well matched DNA duplex in order to investigate distance dependent kinetics. This length dependent study is a necessary step to understanding the dominant mechanism behind DNA CT. Using a model put forth by O'Dea and Osteryoung and applying a nonlinear least squares analysis we are able to determine the charge transfer rates (k), transfer coefficients (α), and the total surface concentration (&*circ;) of the DNA monolayer. Arrhenius like behavior is observed for the multiple probe locations, and the results are viewed in light of and compared to the prominent charge transport mechanisms.

  10. The origin of the anomalous thermal dependence of the band-gap in Black Phosphorus

    OpenAIRE

    Villegas, Cesar E. P.; Rocha, A. R.; Marini, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Black Phosphorus (BP) has gained renewed attention due to its singular anisotropic electronic and optical properties that might be exploited for a wide range of technological applications. In this respect, the thermal properties are particularly important both to predict its room temperature operation and to determine its thermoelectric potential. From this point of view, one of the most spectacular and poorly understood phenomena is, indeed, the BP temperature-induced band-gap opening: when ...

  11. Phase dependent impedance and temperature dependent response of microwave SQUID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report measurements of the microwave impedance of superconducting point contacts as a function of the quantum mechanical phase difference phi. They yield a conductance of the form G(phi) = G/sub o/(1+alpha cos phi) where alpha is a dimensionless parameter reflecting an interference between the Cooper pairs and the quasiparticles. Experimental results agree with a negative alpha approximately equal to -.5 which can be interpreted in terms of a phenomenological model that follows essentially the Time Dependent Landau Ginzburg theory (TDLG). In the second part we report measurements of the response of a microwave SQUID using a Ta point contact at various temperatures. They give a progression of operating conditions from the non-hysteretic to the hysteretic mode. The responses calculated by Soerensen and by Burhman and Jackel are in qualitative agreement with the measurements. We also present a theory based on a calculation of the reflection coefficient from the point contact. This theory reproduces the results of Bunhman and Jackel and Soerensen and is directly adaptable to our microwave geometry. In the last chapter we present a calculation that exhibits explicitly the dependence of the response on OMEGA = PHI/sub o/nu/I/sub X sub/R where nu is the microwave frequency, I/sub c/ and R the critical current and resistance of the junction and PHI/sub o/ fluxoid quantum, and that agrees with their data and their interpretation of it in terms of a limiting time tau for the supercurrent response with tau varies as DELTA(T)/sup -1/ where DELTA (T) is the BCS gap parameter

  12. Temperature-Dependent Photoluminescence of Graphene Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhav, S. T.; Rajoba, S. J.; Patil, S. A.; Han, S. H.; Jadhav, L. D.

    2016-01-01

    Graphene oxide thin films have been deposited by spray pyrolysis using graphene oxide powder prepared by modified Hummers method. These thin films were characterized by different physico-chemical techniques. The x-ray diffraction studies revealed the structural properties of GO (graphene oxide) while the Raman spectrum showed the presence of D and G and two-dimensional bands. The D/G intensity ratio for spray-deposited GO film is 1.10. The x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed 67% and 33% atomic percentages of carbon and oxygen, respectively. The ratio of O1s/C1s was found to be 0.49. The temperature-dependent photoluminescence of GO thin film and GO solution showed a blue emission.

  13. Anomalous equivalent potential temperature: an atmospheric feature predicting days with higher risk for fatal outcome in acute ischemic stroke-a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folyovich, András; Biczó, Dávid; Al-Muhanna, Nadim; Béres-Molnár, Anna K; Fejős, Ádám; Pintér, Ádám; Bereczki, Dániel; Fischer, Antal; Vadasdi, Károly; Pintér, Ferenc

    2015-09-01

    Acute stroke is a life-threatening condition. Fatal outcome is related to risk factors, some of these affected by climatic changes. Forecasting potentially harmful atmospheric processes may therefore be of practical importance in the acute care of stroke patients. We analyzed the history of all patients with acute ischemic stroke (N = 184) confirmed by neuroimaging including those who died (N = 35, 15 males) at our hospital department in the winter months of 2009. Patient data were anonymized, and the human meteorologists were only aware of patients' age, gender, and exact time of death. Of the meteorological parameters, equivalent potential temperature (EPT) has been chosen for analysis. EPT is generally used for forecasting thunderstorms, but in the case of synoptic scale airflow (10(6) m), it is suitable for characterizing the air mass inflowing from different regions. The behavior of measured EPT values was compared to the climatic (30 years) averages. We developed meteorological criteria for anomalous periods of EPT and tested if such periods are associated with higher rate of fatal outcome. The duration of anomalous and non-anomalous periods was nearly equal during the studied 3 months. Stroke onset distributed similarly between anomalous and non-anomalous days; however, of the 35 deaths, 27 occurred during anomalous periods: on average, 0.56 deaths occurred on anomalous days and 0.19 on non-anomalous days. Winter periods meeting the criteria of anomalous EPT may have a significant adverse human-meteorological impact on the outcome in acute ischemic stroke. PMID:26233665

  14. Raman scattering of rare earth sesquioxide Ho₂O₃: A pressure and temperature dependent study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, Sugandha Dogra; Samanta, K.; Singh, Jasveer; Sharma, Nita Dilawar; Bandyopadhyay, A. K. [Pressure and Vacuum Standards, National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India)

    2014-10-07

    Pressure and temperature dependent Raman scattering studies on Ho₂O₃ have been carried out to investigate the structural transition and the anharmonic behavior of the phonons. Ho₂O₃ undergoes a transition from cubic to monoclinic phase above 15.5 GPa, which is partially reversible on decompression. The anharmonic behavior of the phonon modes of Ho₂O₃ from 80 K to 440 K has been investigated. We find an anomalous line-width change with temperature. The mode Grüneisen parameter of bulk Ho₂O₃ was estimated from high pressure Raman investigation up to 29 GPa. Furthermore, the anharmonic components were calculated from the temperature dependent Raman scattering.

  15. Anomalous organic magnetoresistance from competing carrier-spin-dependent interactions with localized electronic and nuclear spins

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Y.; Harmon, N. J.; Sahin-Tiras, K.; Wohlgenannt, M.; Flatté, M. E.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a new regime for low-field magnetoresistance in organic semiconductors, in which the spin-relaxing effects of localized nuclear spins and electronic spins interfere. The regime is studied by the controlled addition of localized electronic spins to a material that exhibits substantial room-temperature magnetoresistance ($\\sim 20$\\%). Although initially the magnetoresistance is suppressed by the doping, at intermediate doping there is a regime where the magnetoresistance is insensit...

  16. Anomalous surface states modify the size-dependent mechanical properties and fracture of silica nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular dynamics simulations of amorphous silica nanowires under tension were analyzed for size and surface stress effects on mechanical properties and for structural modifications via bond angle distributions. Their fracture behavior was also investigated beyond the elastic limit. The Young’s moduli of silica nanowires were predicted to be about 75–100 GPa, depending on the nanowire size. The ultimate strength was calculated to be ∼10 GPa, depending on the diameter, which is in excellent agreement with the experiments. The dependence of the Young’s modulus on nanowire diameter is explained in terms of surface compressive stress effects. The fracture behavior of nanowires was also found to be influenced by surface compressive stresses. Bond angle distribution analysis of various nanowires reveals significant compressive surface states, as evidenced by the appearance of a secondary peak in the Si-O-Si bond angle distribution at ∼97°, which is absent in bulk silica. The strain rate was found to have a negligible effect on the Young’s modulus of the silica nanowires, but it has a critical role in determining their fracture mode. (paper)

  17. Anomalous magnetic reordering in magnetodielectric terbium iron garnet at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper deals with five topics: i) the single three-dimensional irreductible representation (Γ4g=T1g) of the paramagnetic space group Ia3¯d No. 230 is chosen according to the representation analysis of Bertaut for the interpretation of the neutron powder diffraction experiments performed on terbium iron garnet (Tb3Fe5O12); ii) the use of the method of the “symmetry lowering device” of Bertaut in order to select the appropriate rhombohedral subgroup of Ia3¯d which allows to deal with the case where the cubic description provides an incomplete answer to the changes observed below 160 K in the ferrimagnetic structure around the [1 1 1] axis from the Néel model toward the “double umbrella” observed at 13 K; iii) the magnetic modes belonging to the one-dimensional irreductible representation A2g of the highest rhombohedral subgroup R3¯c No. 167 are able to describe the occurrence of its anisotropic character which steeply increases below 160 K due to the concomitant anisotropic effects; iv) the broad anomaly observed near 54 K in the temperature dependences of the components of both sublattices of the Tb3+ ions in the Wyckoff positions (6e) and (6e′) is explained partially on the basis of the concept of Belov of the strong paraprocess which has been termed “exchange-enhanced paramagnetism” at the so-called “low-temperature point” (TB); v) the results are related to the magnetodielectric effect in low magnetic field and to the significant coupling between exchange magnons and ligand-field excitations reported recently in this compound. - Highlights: • We examine the changes of the “double umbrella” in TbIG using neutron diffraction. • Symmetry arguments of Bertaut clarify suitable rhombohedral space group at 13 K. • Its opening leads to an increasing of anisotropy of the Tb components below 160 K. • The “low-temperature point” of Belov explains partly its intricate behavior near 54 K. • A relationship with the magnetodielectric

  18. Anomalous dimensionality dependence of diffusion in a rugged energy landscape: How pathological is one dimension?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Kazuhiko; Bagchi, Kaushik; Bagchi, Biman

    2016-05-21

    Diffusion in one dimensional rugged energy landscape (REL) is predicted to be pathologically different (from any higher dimension) with a much larger chance of encountering broken ergodicity [D. L. Stein and C. M. Newman, AIP Conf. Proc. 1479, 620 (2012)]. However, no quantitative study of this difference has been reported, despite the prevalence of multidimensional physical models in the literature (like a high dimensional funnel guiding protein folding/unfolding). Paradoxically, some theoretical studies of these phenomena still employ a one dimensional diffusion description for analytical tractability. We explore the dimensionality dependent diffusion on REL by carrying out an effective medium approximation based analytical calculations and compare them with the available computer simulation results. We find that at an intermediate level of ruggedness (assumed to have a Gaussian distribution), where diffusion is well-defined, the value of the effective diffusion coefficient depends on dimensionality and changes (increases) by several factors (∼5-10) in going from 1d to 2d. In contrast, the changes in subsequent transitions (like 2d to 3d and 3d to 4d and so on) are far more modest, of the order of 10-20% only. When ruggedness is given by random traps with an exponential distribution of barrier heights, the mean square displacement (MSD) is sub-diffusive (a well-known result), but the growth of MSD is described by different exponents in one and higher dimensions. The reason for such strong ruggedness induced retardation in the case of one dimensional REL is discussed. We also discuss the special limiting case of infinite dimension (d = ∞) where the effective medium approximation becomes exact and where theoretical results become simple. We discuss, for the first time, the role of spatial correlation in the landscape on diffusion of a random walker. PMID:27208935

  19. The anomalous low temperature resistivity of thermally evaporated alpha-Mn thin film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ampong, F.K., E-mail: kampxx@yahoo.co [Department of Physics, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi (Ghana); Boakye, F.; Nkum, R.K. [Department of Physics, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi (Ghana)

    2010-08-15

    Electrical resistivity measurements have been carried out on thermally evaporated alpha-Mn thin film between 300 and 1.4 K using the van der Pauw four probe technique. The film was grown on a glass substrate held at a temperature of 373 K, in an ambient pressure of 5x10{sup -6} Torr. The results show a resistance minimum, a notable characteristic of alpha-Mn but at a (rather high) temperature of 194+-1 K. Below the resistivity maximum which corresponds to 70 K, the resistivity drops by only 0.02 muOMEGAm indicating a rather short range magnetic ordering. The low temperature results show a tendency towards saturation of the resistivity as the temperature approaches zero suggesting a Kondo scattering.

  20. On an anomalous kinetic in irradiated polymers around the glass transition temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipara, Mircea I.

    1997-08-01

    Anomalies occurring in irradiated polymers within the glass transition range, as reported by various authors are critically reviewed. A theoretical description for such processes, is developed within the free volume approximation. The discrepancies between the temperature at which such anomalies are noticed and the glass transition temperature have been ascribed to the fact that the volume of radiation-induced radicals is not equal with the segmental one. The agreement between experiment and theory is good.

  1. Temperature dependence of magnetoresistance in Co/ITO multilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The temperature dependence of resistance and giant magnetoresistance (GMR) has been investigated for Co/ITO multilayers in the temperature range of 15 and 300 K. The resistance of Co/ITO multilayers decreases with increasing temperature. The temperature dependence of resistance is found to obey Mott's 1/4 law below 60 K. The giant magnetoresistance and the net change of giant magnetoresistance of the samples decrease with increasing temperature. The temperature dependence of the net change of giant magnetoresistance can be fitted by a power law Tn with n equal 1. The electron-magnon scattering produces a destructive influence on the giant magnetoresistance effect.

  2. Temperature Dependent Molecular Dynamic Simulation of Friction

    CERN Document Server

    Dias, R A; Coura, P Z; Costa, B V

    2006-01-01

    In this work we present a molecular dynamics simulation of a FFM experiment. The tip-sample interaction is studied by varying the normal force in the tip and the temperature of the surface. The friction force, cA, at zero load and the friction coefficient, $\\mu$, were obtained. Our results strongly support the idea that the effective contact area, A, decreases with increasing temperature and the friction coefficient presents a clear signature of the premelting process of the surface.

  3. Anomalous thickness-dependent strain states and strain-tunable magnetization in Zn-doped ferrite epitaxial films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Y. J.; Bao, J.; Gao, C., E-mail: zlluo@ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: cgao@ustc.edu.cn [National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); CAS Key Laboratory of Materials for Energy Conversion, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Yang, M. M.; Luo, Z. L., E-mail: zlluo@ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: cgao@ustc.edu.cn; Hu, C. S.; Chen, X. C.; Pan, G. Q. [National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Huang, H. L. [CAS Key Laboratory of Materials for Energy Conversion, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Zhang, S.; Wang, J. W.; Li, P. S.; Liu, Y.; Zhao, Y. G. [Department of Physics and State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics, Fine Processing, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Jiang, T.; Liu, Y. K.; Li, X. G. [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale and Department of Physics, University of Science, Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2014-05-07

    A series of Zn{sub x}Fe{sub 3−x}O{sub 4} (ZFO, x = 0.4) thin films were epitaxially deposited on single-crystal (001)-SrTiO{sub 3} (STO) substrates by radio frequency magnetron sputtering. The anomalous thickness-dependent strain states of ZFO films were found, i.e., a tensile in-plane strain exists in the thinner ZFO film and which monotonously turns into compressive in the thicker films. Considering the lattice constant of bulk ZFO is bigger than that of STO, this strain state cannot be explained in the conventional framework of lattice-mismatch-induced strain in the hetero-epitaxial system. This unusual phenomenon is proposed to be closely related to the Volmer-Weber film growth mode in the thinner films and incorporation of the interstitial atoms into the island's boundaries during subsequent epitaxial growth of the thicker films. The ZFO/STO epitaxial film is found in the nature of magnetic semiconductor by transport measurements. The in-plane magnetization of the ZFO/STO films is found to increase as the in-plane compressive strain develops, which is further proved in the (001)-ZFO/PMN-PT film where the film strain state can be in situ controlled with applied electric field. This compressive-strain-enhanced magnetization can be attributed to the strain-mediated electric-field-induced in-plane magnetic anisotropy field enhancement. The above results indicate that strain engineering on magnetic oxide semiconductor ZFO films is promising for novel oxide-electronic devices.

  4. Anomalous thickness-dependent strain states and strain-tunable magnetization in Zn-doped ferrite epitaxial films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y. J.; Yang, M. M.; Luo, Z. L.; Hu, C. S.; Bao, J.; Huang, H. L.; Zhang, S.; Wang, J. W.; Li, P. S.; Liu, Y.; Zhao, Y. G.; Chen, X. C.; Pan, G. Q.; Jiang, T.; Liu, Y. K.; Li, X. G.; Gao, C.

    2014-05-01

    A series of ZnxFe3-xO4 (ZFO, x = 0.4) thin films were epitaxially deposited on single-crystal (001)-SrTiO3 (STO) substrates by radio frequency magnetron sputtering. The anomalous thickness-dependent strain states of ZFO films were found, i.e., a tensile in-plane strain exists in the thinner ZFO film and which monotonously turns into compressive in the thicker films. Considering the lattice constant of bulk ZFO is bigger than that of STO, this strain state cannot be explained in the conventional framework of lattice-mismatch-induced strain in the hetero-epitaxial system. This unusual phenomenon is proposed to be closely related to the Volmer-Weber film growth mode in the thinner films and incorporation of the interstitial atoms into the island's boundaries during subsequent epitaxial growth of the thicker films. The ZFO/STO epitaxial film is found in the nature of magnetic semiconductor by transport measurements. The in-plane magnetization of the ZFO/STO films is found to increase as the in-plane compressive strain develops, which is further proved in the (001)-ZFO/PMN-PT film where the film strain state can be in situ controlled with applied electric field. This compressive-strain-enhanced magnetization can be attributed to the strain-mediated electric-field-induced in-plane magnetic anisotropy field enhancement. The above results indicate that strain engineering on magnetic oxide semiconductor ZFO films is promising for novel oxide-electronic devices.

  5. Cation-dependent anomalous compression of gallosilicate zeolites with CGS topology: A high-pressure synchrotron powder diffraction study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high-pressure compression behaviour of 3 different cation forms of gallosilicate zeolite with CGS topology has been investigated using in situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction and a diamond-anvil cell technique. Under hydrostatic conditions mediated by a nominally penetrating pressure-transmitting medium, unit-cell lengths and volume compression is modulated by different degrees of pressure-induced hydration and accompanying channel distortion. In a Na-exchanged CGS (Na10Ga10Si22O64.16H2O), the unit-cell volume expands by ca. 0.6% upon applying hydrostatic pressure to 0.2 GPa, whereas, in an as-synthesized K-form (K10Ga10Si22O64.5H2O), this initial volume expansion is suppressed to ca. 0.1% at 0.16 GPa. In the early stage of hydrostatic compression below ∼1 GPa, relative decrease in the ellipticity of the non-planar 10-rings is observed, which is then reverted to a gradual increase in the ellipticity at higher pressures above ∼1 GPa, implying a change in the compression mechanism. In a Sr-exchanged sample (Sr5Ga10Si22O64.19H2O), on the other hand, no initial volume expansion is observed. Instead, a change in the slope of volume contraction is observed near 1.5 GPa, which leads to a 2-fold increase in the compressibility. This is interpreted as pressure-induced rearrangement of water molecules to facilitate further volume contraction at higher pressures. - Graphical abstract: Three different cation forms of gallosilicate CGS zeolites have been investigated using synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction and a diamond-anvil cell. Under hydrostatic conditions, unit-cell lengths and volume show anomalous compression behaviours depending on the non-framework cation type and initial hydration level, which implies different modes of pressure-induced hydration and channel distortion

  6. Anomalous fermion number non-conservation at high temperatures: Two dimensional example

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider γ5 version of Abelian Higgs model in 1+1 dimensions and find one loop expression for the rate of fermion number non-conservation at high temperatures. We discuss the construction of the noncontractible loop in the configuration space and an analog of the sphaleron solution in the theory. (orig.)

  7. Temperature dependence of electrical conductivity and lunar temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olhoeft, G. R.; Strangway, D. W.; Sharpe, H.; Frisillo, A. L.

    1974-01-01

    Metallic conduction mechanicsms are probably not important in lunar materials because of the small amounts of free metal and metallic oxides present. This is confirmed by the extremely low conductivities measured to date and the fact that the conductivity increases with temperature. The major conduction mechanicsm appears to be ionic. This conduction mechanism is very strongly controlled by temperature, by deviations from stoichiometry, by electric field strengths, and by oxygen fugacity.

  8. Temperature Dependent Electrical Properties of PZT Wafer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, T.; Sen, S.; Seal, A.; Sen, A.

    2016-04-01

    The electrical and electromechanical properties of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) wafers were investigated and compared with PZT bulk. PZT wafers were prepared by tape casting technique. The transition temperature of both the PZT forms remained the same. The transition from an asymmetric to a symmetric shape was observed for PZT wafers at higher temperature. The piezoelectric coefficient (d 33) values obtained were 560 pc/N and 234 pc/N, and the electromechanical coupling coefficient (k p) values were 0.68 and 0.49 for bulk and wafer, respectively. The reduction in polarization after fatigue was only ~3% in case of PZT bulk and ~7% for PZT wafer.

  9. Parametric dependencies of JET electron temperature profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schunke, B. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Imre, K.; Riedel, K. [New York Univ., NY (United States)

    1994-07-01

    The JET Ohmic, L-Mode and H-Mode electron temperature profiles obtained from the LIDAR Thomson Scattering Diagnostic are parameterized in terms of the normalized flux parameter and a set of the engineering parameters like plasma current, toroidal field, line averages electron density... It is shown that the electron temperature profiles fit a log-additive model well. It is intended to use the same model to predict the profile shape for D-T discharges in JET and in ITER. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Change of MMP dependent on temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudyk, Svetlana Nikolayevna; Søgaard, Erik Gydesen; Akwansa, Eugene

    2008-01-01

       The experiment was conducted with the purpose to investigate how Minimum Miscibility Pressure (MMP) changes at different temperatures. MMP was measured in a high pressure unit. An original oil saturated chalk core plug from the Danish oil field in North Sea was under investigation. The plug...

  11. Temperature dependence of gramicidin channel conductance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hyundeok; Beck, Thomas

    2010-03-01

    The gramicidin channel is the smallest known biological ion channel, and it exhibits cation selectivity. Recently, Dr. John Cuppoletti's group at the University of Cincinnati has shown that the gramicidin channel can function at high temperatures with significant currents. This finding may have implications for fuel cell technologies. In order to explore the effect of temperature on channel conductance, we examined the gramicidin system at 300K, 330K, and 360K by computer simulation. Two forms of gramicidin, the head-to-head helical dimer and the intertwined double helix, were examined. Both the decrease of the free energy barrier and the increase of the diffusion of potassium ions inside the gramicidin channel at high temperatures imply an increase of current. We found that higher temperatures also affect the lifetime of hydrogen bonds, the distribution of the bending angle, the distribution of the distance between dimers, and the size of the pore radius for the helical dimer structure. These finding may be related to the gating of the gramicidin channel.

  12. Anomalous phase behaviour of NH{sub 4}HSO{sub 4} below room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diosa, J.E.; Fernandez, M.E.; Vargas, R.A. [Dept. de Fisica, Univ. del Valle, Cali (Colombia)

    2001-10-01

    Impedance spectroscopy (IS) and modulated differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC) were used to study the phase behaviour of NH{sub 4}HSO{sub 4} (AHS) below room temperature. Phase transitions were clearly evidenced by dielectric measurements at about 270 and 154 K, but a large hysteresis of the low-temperature phase boundary was observed during thermal cycling of the samples. However, the thermal measurements at zero field (E = 0) only showed an endothermic peak at 154 K and thus appeared to be a first-order transition, but no thermal hysteresis was observed, which indicated a strong effect of the external field on the transition at this temperature. The phase transition at about 270 K, appeared to be a second-order one in which only dielectric measurements exhibited strong anomaly, but its intensity decreased remarkably on successive thermal cyclings of the sample. This behaviour is discussed in terms of disordering of the NH{sub 4}{sup +} orientations with thermal treatments of the sample that reduce the ferroelectric activity of the intermediate phase (154 K < T < 270 K) of AHS. (orig.)

  13. Strong temperature dependence of water reorientation in hydrophobic hydration shells

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, C; Tielrooij, K. J.; Bakker, H.J.

    2009-01-01

    We study the temperature dependence of the orientational mobility of water molecules solvating hydrophobic molecular groups with femtosecond midinfrared spectroscopy. We observe that these dynamics show a strong temperature dependence. At temperatures 10 ps, which is more than four times slower than in bulk water. With increasing temperature, the reorientation of the solvating molecules strongly accelerates and becomes much more equal to the reorientation rate of the molecules in the bulk liq...

  14. Testing dependence of anomalous Hall effect on resistivity in SrRuO3 by its increase with electron irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haham, N.; Konczykowski, M.; Kuiper, B.; Koster, G.; Klein, L.

    2013-01-01

    We measure the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) in several patterns of the itinerant ferromagnet SrRuO 3 before and after the patterns are irradiated with electrons. The irradiation increases the resistivity of the patterns due to the introduction of point defects and we find that the AHE coefficient R

  15. Temperature Dependent Neutron Scattering Sections for Polyethylene

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, Roger E.; Liu, C. -Y.

    2003-01-01

    This note presents neutron scattering cross sections for polyethylene at 296 K, 77 K and 4 K derived from a new scattering kernel for neutron scattering off of hydrogen in polyethylene. The kernel was developed in ENDF-6 format as a set of S(alpha,beta) tables using the LEAPR module of the NJOY94 code package. The polyethylene density of states (from 0 to sub eV) adopted to derive the new kernel is presented. We compare our calculated room temperature total scattering cross sections and doubl...

  16. Anomalous Flux-Flow Dynamics in Layered Type-II Superconductors at Low Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feigelman, M.; Skvortsov, M. [L.D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Moscow 117940 (Russia)

    1997-03-01

    Low-temperature dissipation due to vortex motion in strongly anisotropic type-II superconductors with a moderate disorder ({Delta}{sup 2}/E{sub F}{lt}{h_bar}/{tau} {lt}{Delta}) is shown to be determined by the Zener-type transitions between the localized electronic states in the vortex core. Statistics of these levels is described by the random matrix ensemble of class C defined recently by Atland and Zirnbauer, so the vortex motion leads naturally to a new example of a parametric statistics of energy levels. The flux-flow conductivity {sigma}{sub xx} is a bit lower than the quasiclassical one and {ital grows} slowly with the increase of the electric field. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  17. Thermal fission rates with temperature dependent fission barriers

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    \\item[Background] The fission processes of thermal excited nuclei are conventionally studied by statistical models which rely on inputs of phenomenological level densities and potential barriers. Therefore the microscopic descriptions of spontaneous fission and induced fission are very desirable for a unified understanding of various fission processes. \\item[Purpose] We propose to study the fission rates, at both low and high temperatures, with microscopically calculated temperature-dependent fission barriers and mass parameters. \\item[Methods] The fission barriers are calculated by the finite-temperature Skyrme-Hartree-Fock+BCS method. The mass parameters are calculated by the temperature-dependent cranking approximation. The thermal fission rates can be obtained by the imaginary free energy approach at all temperatures, in which fission barriers are naturally temperature dependent. The fission at low temperatures can be described mainly as a barrier-tunneling process. While the fission at high temperatures ...

  18. Observation of anomalous linear photogalvanic effect and its dependence on wavelength in undoped InGaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum well.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Laipan; Liu, Yu; Gao, Hansong; Qin, Xudong; Li, Yuan; Wu, Qing; Chen, Yonghai

    2014-01-01

    We observed an anomalous linear photogalvanic effect (ALPGE) in undoped InGaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum well and studied its wavelength dependence in details. This effect is believed to originate from the optical momentum alignment effect and the inhomogeneity of light intensity. We find that the spot location with the maximum ALPGE current is wavelength independent. And the normalized ALPGE current decreasing at smaller wavelengths is attributed to the sharp decrease of the momentum and energy relaxation time. The electrical measurement of the spectra dependence of ALPGE is highly sensitive proving to be an effective method for detecting the momentum anisotropy of photoinduced carriers and band coupling. PMID:25258612

  19. Anomalous ion thermal transport in hot ion plasmas by the ion temperature gradient mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.Y.; Horton, W. (Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Inst. for Fusion Studies); Coppi, B. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Research Lab. of Electronics)

    1992-01-01

    Experiments show that the observed radial profiles of the ion thermal conductivity {chi}{sub i} have the opposite shapes with those obtained from the ion temperature gradient mode ({eta}{sub i} mode) turbulence model by the traditional mixing length estimate. In this work, this radial profile problem is reconsidered with an electromagnetic study of the linear stability of the toroidal {eta}{sub i} mode and a new rule for choosing the mixing length. It is first shown that the electromagnetic effect gives a significant stabilizing effect on the toroidal {eta}{sub i} mode, and that the observed reduction of {chi}{sub i}(r) in the core region can be explained by this electromagnetic effect. Secondly, in view of earlier numerical simulations showing the transfer of fluctuation energy to larger scales that those for the fastest growth rate, as well as fluctuation measurements indicating longer radial correlation lengths, a new mixing length formula is proposed to explain the radial increase of the {chi}{sub i}. It is shown the new formula fits well the observed {chi}{sub i}(r) profiles in two TFTR supershot discharges and also gives the scaling law in the current and the magnetic field which agrees better with experiment than the conventional formula.

  20. Anomalous ion thermal transport in hot ion plasmas by the ion temperature gradient mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.Y.; Horton, W. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Inst. for Fusion Studies; Coppi, B. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Research Lab. of Electronics

    1992-08-01

    Experiments show that the observed radial profiles of the ion thermal conductivity {chi}{sub i} have the opposite shapes with those obtained from the ion temperature gradient mode ({eta}{sub i} mode) turbulence model by the traditional mixing length estimate. In this work, this radial profile problem is reconsidered with an electromagnetic study of the linear stability of the toroidal {eta}{sub i} mode and a new rule for choosing the mixing length. It is first shown that the electromagnetic effect gives a significant stabilizing effect on the toroidal {eta}{sub i} mode, and that the observed reduction of {chi}{sub i}(r) in the core region can be explained by this electromagnetic effect. Secondly, in view of earlier numerical simulations showing the transfer of fluctuation energy to larger scales that those for the fastest growth rate, as well as fluctuation measurements indicating longer radial correlation lengths, a new mixing length formula is proposed to explain the radial increase of the {chi}{sub i}. It is shown the new formula fits well the observed {chi}{sub i}(r) profiles in two TFTR supershot discharges and also gives the scaling law in the current and the magnetic field which agrees better with experiment than the conventional formula.

  1. Anomalous ion thermal transport in hot ion plasmas by the ion temperature gradient mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments show that the observed radial profiles of the ion thermal conductivity χi have the opposite shapes with those obtained from the ion temperature gradient mode (ηi mode) turbulence model by the traditional mixing length estimate. In this work, this radial profile problem is reconsidered with an electromagnetic study of the linear stability of the toroidal ηi mode and a new rule for choosing the mixing length. It is first shown that the electromagnetic effect gives a significant stabilizing effect on the toroidal ηi mode, and that the observed reduction of χi(r) in the core region can be explained by this electromagnetic effect. Secondly, in view of earlier numerical simulations showing the transfer of fluctuation energy to larger scales that those for the fastest growth rate, as well as fluctuation measurements indicating longer radial correlation lengths, a new mixing length formula is proposed to explain the radial increase of the χi. It is shown the new formula fits well the observed χi(r) profiles in two TFTR supershot discharges and also gives the scaling law in the current and the magnetic field which agrees better with experiment than the conventional formula

  2. Crossing regimes of temperature dependence in animal movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibert, Jean P; Chelini, Marie-Claire; Rosenthal, Malcolm F; DeLong, John P

    2016-05-01

    A pressing challenge in ecology is to understand the effects of changing global temperatures on food web structure and dynamics. The stability of these complex ecological networks largely depends on how predator-prey interactions may respond to temperature changes. Because predators and prey rely on their velocities to catch food or avoid being eaten, understanding how temperatures may affect animal movement is central to this quest. Despite our efforts, we still lack a mechanistic understanding of how the effect of temperature on metabolic processes scales up to animal movement and beyond. Here, we merge a biomechanical approach, the Metabolic Theory of Ecology and empirical data to show that animal movement displays multiple regimes of temperature dependence. We also show that crossing these regimes has important consequences for population dynamics and stability, which depend on the parameters controlling predator-prey interactions. We argue that this dependence upon interaction parameters may help explain why experimental work on the temperature dependence of interaction strengths has so far yielded conflicting results. More importantly, these changes in the temperature dependence of animal movement can have consequences that go well beyond ecological interactions and affect, for example, animal communication, mating, sensory detection, and any behavioral modality dependent on the movement of limbs. Finally, by not taking into account the changes in temperature dependence reported here we might not be able to properly forecast the impact of global warming on ecological processes and propose appropriate mitigation action when needed. PMID:26854767

  3. DNAzyme catalytic beacon sensors that resist temperature-dependent variations†

    OpenAIRE

    Nagraj, Nandini; Liu, Juewen; Sterling, Stephanie; Wu, Jenny; Lu, Yi

    2009-01-01

    The temperature-dependent variability of a Pb2+-specific 8-17E DNAzyme catalytic beacon sensor has been addressed through the introduction of mismatches in the DNAzyme, and the resulting sensors resist temperature-dependent variations from 4 to 30 °C.

  4. Temperature dependence of anuran distortion product otoacoustic emissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meenderink, Sebastlaan W. F.; Van Dijk, Pim

    2006-01-01

    To study the possible involvement of energy dependent mechanisms in the transduction of sound within the anuran ear, distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) were recorded in the northern leopard frog over a range of body temperatures. The effect of body temperature depended on the stimulus

  5. Temperature dependence of conductivity measurement for conducting polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Leandro; Duran, Jesus; Isah, Anne; Albers, Patrick; McDougall, Michael; Wang, Weining

    2014-03-01

    Conducting polymer-based solar cells are the newest generation solar cells. While research on this area has been progressing, the efficiency is still low because certain important parameters of the solar cell are still not well understood. It is of interest to study the temperature dependence of the solar cell parameters, such as conductivity of the polymer, open circuit voltage, and reverse saturation current to gain a better understanding on the solar cells. In this work, we report our temperature dependence of conductivity measurement using our in-house temperature-varying apparatus. In this project, we designed and built a temperature varying apparatus using a thermoelectric cooler module which gives enough temperature range as we need and costs much less than a cryostat. The set-up of the apparatus will be discussed. Temperature dependence of conductivity measurements for PEDOT:PSS films with different room-temperature conductivity will be compared and discussed. NJSGC-NASA Fellowship grant

  6. Temperature dependence of electronic heat capacity in Holstein model

    CERN Document Server

    Fialko, N S; Lakhno, V D

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of charge migration was modeled to calculate temperature dependencies of its thermodynamic equilibrium values such as energy and electronic heat capacity in homogeneous adenine fragments. The energy varies from nearly polaron one at T~0 to midpoint of the conductivity band at high temperatures. The peak on the graph of electronic heat capacity is observed at the polaron decay temperature.

  7. Temperature dependence of the quadrupole interaction of tin in cadmium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isomeric states in Sn isotopes offer the possibility to study the temperature dependence of the e.f.g. at a Sn impurity in Cd by DPAD methods. The isomeric states in 113Sn, 11/2-, tau=128 and 116Sn, 5-, tau=534 ns populated via the reactions Cd(α,n) and Cd(α,2n) on isotopically enriched polycrystalline targets were used. The temperature dependence behaviour can be well reproduced by the proposed Tsup(3/2) dependence and is the same for CdCd and SnCd. So far measured data indicate that for InCd the temperature dependence is also quite similar to that of CdCd, possibly somewhat steeper. One can conclude that the temperature dependence of the e.f.g. for these systems is determined by the host lattice alone, in contrast to the similar system GeZn relative to ZnZn. (Auth.)

  8. Climate change and temperature-dependent sex determination in reptiles.

    OpenAIRE

    Janzen, F J

    1994-01-01

    Despite increasing concern over the possible impact of global temperature change, there is little empirical evidence of direct temperature effects on biotic interactions in natural systems. Clear assessment of the ecological and evolutionary impact of changing climatic temperature requires a natural system in which populations exhibit a direct unambiguous fitness response to thermal fluctuation. I monitored nests of a population of painted turtles (Chrysemys picta) with temperature-dependent ...

  9. Temperature dependence of the emissivity of platinum in the IR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deemyad, Shanti; Silvera, Isaac F

    2008-08-01

    The accuracy of temperature determination by fitting the spectral irradiance to a Planck curve depends on knowledge of the emissivity at all temperatures and pressures of interest within a spectral region. Here, the emissivity of platinum is measured in the near infrared as a function of temperature. In the wavelength range of study and the temperature range of 650-1100 K, we find the emissivity to be independent of temperature to within experimental error. This result should lead to improved accuracy of temperature measurement by optical pyrometry where platinum is used as a thermal emitter. PMID:19044386

  10. Temperature and phase dependence of positron lifetimes in solid cyclohexane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard

    1985-01-01

    longer of these (≈ 2.5 ns), which is temperature dependent, is ascribed to ortho-Ps trapped at vacancies. The shorter lifetime (≈ 0.9 ns), shows little temperature dependence. In contrast to most other plastic crystals, no sigmoidal behaviour of the average ortho-Ps lifetime is observed. A possibility......The temperature dependence of position lifetimes in both the brittle and plastic phases of cyclohaxane has been examined. Long-lived components in both phases are associated with the formation of positronium (Ps). Two long lifetimes attributable to ortho-Ps are resolvable in the plastic phase. The...

  11. Anomalous Magnetohydrodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Anomalous symmetries induce currents which can be parallel rather than orthogonal to the hypermagnetic field. Building on the analogy with charged liquids at high magnetic Reynolds numbers, the persistence of anomalous currents is scrutinized for parametrically large conductivities when the plasma approximation is accurate. Different examples in globally neutral systems suggest that the magnetic configurations minimizing the energy density with the constraint that the helicity be conserved co...

  12. Anomalous magnetotransport of a surface electron layer above liquid helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The magnetoconductivity σxx of a surface electron layer above liquid helium has been measured at temperatures between 0.5-1.6 K, for concentrations up to about 4x108 cm-2, in magnetic fields up to 25 kOe. As was observed, σxx first decreases with lowering temperature, then has a minimum and at T xy, the earlier ascertained anomalous behaviour of the magnetoresistance ρxx taken into consideration. The calculated dependence of ρxx on T is in satisfactory agreement with the anomalous dependence ρxx(T) found earlier by experiment

  13. Anomalous transport of the cuprate strange metal from holography

    CERN Document Server

    Ge, Xian-Hui; Wu, Shang-Yu; Wu, Shao-Feng

    2016-01-01

    We study the anomalous transport of the cuprate strange metals by exploring a new black hole solution in AdS spacetime with a hyperscaling violating factor via the gauge/gravity duality. We show that both the linear T-dependence resistivity and the quadratic T-dependence inverse Hall angle can be naturally achieved. Other anomalous temperature scaling of transport quantities of cuprates, such as 1) the Hall Lorenz ratio, 2) the Nernst coefficient and 3) the magnetoresistance can also be reproduced. In the zero temperature limit, the Lorenz ratio obeys the Wiedemann-Franz law, suggestive of a Fermi-liquid ground state.

  14. Pipeline flow of heavy oil with temperature-dependent viscosity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maza Quinones, Danmer; Carvalho, Marcio da Silveira [Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), RJ (Brazil). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering], E-mail: msc@puc-rio.br

    2010-07-01

    The heavy oil produced offshore needs to be transported through pipelines between different facilities. The pipelines are usually laid down on the seabed and are submitted to low temperatures. Although heavy oils usually present Newtonian behavior, its viscosity is a strong function of temperature. Therefore, the prediction of pressure drops along the pipelines should include the solution of the energy equation and the dependence of viscosity to temperature. In this work, an asymptotic model is developed to study this problem. The flow is considered laminar and the viscosity varies exponentially with temperature. The model includes one-dimensional equations for the temperature and pressure distribution along the pipeline at a prescribed flow rate. The solution of the coupled differential equation is obtained by second-order finite difference. Results show a nonlinear behavior as a result of coupled interaction between the velocity, temperature, and temperature dependent material properties. (author)

  15. Temperature dependence of the HNO3 UV absorption cross sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkholder, James B.; Talukdar, Ranajit K.; Ravishankara, A. R.; Solomon, Susan

    1993-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the HNO3 absorption cross sections between 240 and 360 K over the wavelength range 195 to 350 nm has been measured using a diode array spectrometer. Absorption cross sections were determined using both (1) absolute pressure measurements at 298 K and (2) a dual absorption cell arrangement in which the absorption spectrum at various temperatures is measured relative to the room temperature absorption spectrum. The HNO3 absorption spectrum showed a temperature dependence which is weak at short wavelengths but stronger at longer wavelengths which are important for photolysis in the lower stratosphere. The 298 K absorption cross sections were found to be larger than the values currently recommended for atmospheric modeling (DeMore et al., 1992). Our absorption cross section data are critically compared with the previous measurements of both room temperature and temperature-dependent absorption cross sections. Temperature-dependent absorption cross sections of HNO3 are recommended for use in atmospheric modeling. These temperature dependent HNO3 absorption cross sections were used in a two-dimensional dynamical-photochemical model to demonstrate the effects of the revised absorption cross sections on loss rate of HNO3 and the abundance of NO2 in the stratosphere.

  16. Anomalous bootstrap current due to drift waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An anomalous parallel current driven by radial flux in tokamak is discussed. Drift waves, which cause an anomalous cross field diffusion, can generate a parallel current in a sheared magnetic field, if the fluctuation level has radial dependence. (author)

  17. Temperature dependence of postmortem MR quantification for soft tissue discrimination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate and correct the temperature dependence of postmortem MR quantification used for soft tissue characterization and differentiation in thoraco-abdominal organs. Thirty-five postmortem short axis cardiac 3-T MR examinations were quantified using a quantification sequence. Liver, spleen, left ventricular myocardium, pectoralis muscle and subcutaneous fat were analysed in cardiac short axis images to obtain mean T1, T2 and PD tissue values. The core body temperature was measured using a rectally inserted thermometer. The tissue-specific quantitative values were related to the body core temperature. Equations to correct for temperature differences were generated. In a 3D plot comprising the combined data of T1, T2 and PD, different organs/tissues could be well differentiated from each other. The quantitative values were influenced by the temperature. T1 in particular exhibited strong temperature dependence. The correction of quantitative values to a temperature of 37 C resulted in better tissue discrimination. Postmortem MR quantification is feasible for soft tissue discrimination and characterization of thoraco-abdominal organs. This provides a base for computer-aided diagnosis and detection of tissue lesions. The temperature dependence of the T1 values challenges postmortem MR quantification. Equations to correct for the temperature dependence are provided. (orig.)

  18. Temperature dependence of postmortem MR quantification for soft tissue discrimination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zech, Wolf-Dieter; Schwendener, Nicole; Jackowski, Christian [University of Bern, From the Institute of Forensic Medicine, Bern (Switzerland); Persson, Anders; Warntjes, Marcel J. [University of Linkoeping, The Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV), Linkoeping (Sweden)

    2015-08-15

    To investigate and correct the temperature dependence of postmortem MR quantification used for soft tissue characterization and differentiation in thoraco-abdominal organs. Thirty-five postmortem short axis cardiac 3-T MR examinations were quantified using a quantification sequence. Liver, spleen, left ventricular myocardium, pectoralis muscle and subcutaneous fat were analysed in cardiac short axis images to obtain mean T1, T2 and PD tissue values. The core body temperature was measured using a rectally inserted thermometer. The tissue-specific quantitative values were related to the body core temperature. Equations to correct for temperature differences were generated. In a 3D plot comprising the combined data of T1, T2 and PD, different organs/tissues could be well differentiated from each other. The quantitative values were influenced by the temperature. T1 in particular exhibited strong temperature dependence. The correction of quantitative values to a temperature of 37 C resulted in better tissue discrimination. Postmortem MR quantification is feasible for soft tissue discrimination and characterization of thoraco-abdominal organs. This provides a base for computer-aided diagnosis and detection of tissue lesions. The temperature dependence of the T1 values challenges postmortem MR quantification. Equations to correct for the temperature dependence are provided. (orig.)

  19. 40Ar/39Ar impact ages and time-temperature argon diffusion history of the Bunburra Rockhole anomalous basaltic achondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourdan, Fred; Benedix, Gretchen; Eroglu, Ela.; Bland, Phil. A.; Bouvier, Audrey.

    2014-09-01

    The Bunburra Rockhole meteorite is a brecciated anomalous basaltic achondrite containing coarse-, medium- and fine-grained lithologies. Petrographic observations constrain the limited shock pressure to between ca. 10 GPa and 20 GPa. In this study, we carried out nine 40Ar/39Ar step-heating experiments on distinct single-grain fragments extracted from the coarse and fine lithologies. We obtained six plateau ages and three mini-plateau ages. These ages fall into two internally concordant populations with mean ages of 3640 ± 21 Ma (n = 7; P = 0.53) and 3544 ± 26 Ma (n = 2; P = 0.54), respectively. Based on these results, additional 40Ar/39Ar data of fusion crust fragments, argon diffusion modelling, and petrographic observations, we conclude that the principal components of the Bunburra Rockhole basaltic achondrite are from a melt rock formed at ∼3.64 Ga by a medium to large impact event. The data imply that this impact generated high enough energy to completely melt the basaltic target rock and reset the Ar systematics, but only partially reset the Pb-Pb age. We also conclude that a complete 40Ar∗ resetting of pyroxene and plagioclase at this time could not have been achieved at solid-state conditions. Comparison with a terrestrial analog (Lonar crater) shows that the time-temperature conditions required to melt basaltic target rocks upon impact are relatively easy to achieve. Ar data also suggest that a second medium-size impact event occurred on a neighbouring part of the same target rock at ∼3.54 Ga. Concordant low-temperature step ages of the nine aliquots suggest that, at ∼3.42 Ga, a third smaller impact excavated parts of the ∼3.64 Ga and ∼3.54 Ga melt rocks and brought the fragments together. The lack of significant impact activity after 3.5 Ga, as recorded by the Bunburra Rockhole suggests that (1) either the meteorite was ejected in a small secondary parent body where it resided untouched by large impacts, or (2) it was covered by a porous heat

  20. Microscopic calculation of the temperature dependence of the effective interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effective interaction between two nucleons inside nuclear matter is calculated microscopically for several densities and several temperatures, assuming it is given by the Brueckner g-matrix, derived from the separable Graz version of the Paris potential. Particular attention is paid to the temperature dependence and to the way of putting the effective interaction into a Skyrme functional. It is found that the latter task can be achieved with a very good accuracy and that the Skyrme coefficients are weakly and quadratically temperature dependent. The g-matrix issued from the Paris potential turns out to be rather different from the standard Skyrme forces in singlet odd states. The charge dependence is investigated through the study of neutron matter. The connection with the temperature dependence of the surface energy is also discussed. (orig.)

  1. A percolation cluster model of the temperature dependent dielectric properties of hydrated proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suherman, Phe Man; Smith, Geoff [Faculty of Applied Sciences, De Montfort University, Leicester (United Kingdom)

    2003-02-21

    This study investigates the temperature dependence of the low frequency dielectric properties (0.1 Hz-1 MHz) of hydrated globular proteins (namely, ovalbumin, lysozyme and pepsin). The study aims to reveal the mechanisms of water-protein interaction from the dielectric response of these model proteins. Two principle dielectric responses were observed for each hydrated protein, namely, an anomalous low frequency dispersion and a dielectric loss peak at higher frequency (called the {epsilon}{sub 3} dispersion). The low frequency response conformed to a fractional power low of frequency, while the higher frequency response conformed to a Davidson-Cole model. The strength of both processes reached a maximum at a certain temperature within the experimental temperature range. This temperature is referred to as the percolation threshold (PT) and is thought to be associated with the percolation of protons between hydrogen-bonded water molecules. The relaxation times of the {epsilon}{sub 3} dispersion conformed to Arrhenius behaviour at temperatures below the PT, from which an activation energy ({delta}H) could be calculated. This activation energy is thought to be a measure of the concentration of available charged sites through which proton transport is facilitated. The structural fractal dimension in the hydrated protein system was also calculated, and enabled the approximation of the pathway for charge percolation in the protein matrix.

  2. A percolation cluster model of the temperature dependent dielectric properties of hydrated proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigates the temperature dependence of the low frequency dielectric properties (0.1 Hz-1 MHz) of hydrated globular proteins (namely, ovalbumin, lysozyme and pepsin). The study aims to reveal the mechanisms of water-protein interaction from the dielectric response of these model proteins. Two principle dielectric responses were observed for each hydrated protein, namely, an anomalous low frequency dispersion and a dielectric loss peak at higher frequency (called the ε3 dispersion). The low frequency response conformed to a fractional power low of frequency, while the higher frequency response conformed to a Davidson-Cole model. The strength of both processes reached a maximum at a certain temperature within the experimental temperature range. This temperature is referred to as the percolation threshold (PT) and is thought to be associated with the percolation of protons between hydrogen-bonded water molecules. The relaxation times of the ε3 dispersion conformed to Arrhenius behaviour at temperatures below the PT, from which an activation energy (ΔH) could be calculated. This activation energy is thought to be a measure of the concentration of available charged sites through which proton transport is facilitated. The structural fractal dimension in the hydrated protein system was also calculated, and enabled the approximation of the pathway for charge percolation in the protein matrix

  3. Temperature dependence of the Casimir force for bulk lossy media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss the limitations for the applicability of the Lifshitz theory to describe the temperature dependence of the Casimir force between bulk lossy metal slabs of finite sizes. We pay attention to the important fact that Lifshitz's theory is not applicable when the characteristic wavelength of the fluctuating field, responsible for the temperature-dependent terms in the Casimir force, are longer than the size of the sample. As a result, the widely discussed linearly decreasing temperature dependence of the Casimir force can be observed only for dirty and large metal samples at high enough temperatures. Moreover, for the correct description of the Casimir effect at low enough temperatures, a careful consideration of the concrete geometry of the interacting samples is essential.

  4. Identification of temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and experimental verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Weizhen; Yi, Fajun; Zhu, Yanwei; Meng, Songhe

    2016-07-01

    A modified Levenberg–Marquardt method (LMM) for the identification of temperature-dependent thermal conductivity is proposed; the experiment and structure of the specimen for identification are also designed. The temperature-dependent thermal conductivities of copper C10200 and brass C28000 are identified to verify the effectiveness of the proposed identification method. The comparison between identified results and the measured data of laser flash diffusivity apparatus indicates the fine consistency and potential usage of the proposed method.

  5. Temperature and size-dependent Hamaker constants for metal nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, K; Pinchuk, P

    2016-08-26

    Theoretical values of the Hamaker constant have been calculated for metal nanoparticles using Lifshitz theory. The theory describes the Hamaker constant in terms of the permittivity of the interacting bodies. Metal nanoparticles exhibit an internal size effect that alters the dielectric permittivity of the particle when its size falls below the mean free path of the conducting electrons. This size dependence of the permittivity leads to size-dependence of the Hamaker constant for metal nanoparticles. Additionally, the electron damping and the plasma frequency used to model the permittivity of the particle exhibit temperature-dependence, which lead to temperature dependence of the Hamaker constant. In this work, both the size and temperature dependence for gold, silver, copper, and aluminum nanoparticles is demonstrated. The results of this study might be of interest for studying the colloidal stability of nanoparticles in solution. PMID:27454147

  6. Temperature Dependence of Radiative and Nonradiative Rates from Time-Dependent Correlation Function Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Shiladitya; Baiardi, Alberto; Bloino, Julien; Barone, Vincenzo

    2016-02-01

    The temperature dependence of the rate constants in radiative and nonradiative decays from excited electronic states has been studied using a time-dependent correlation function approach in the framework of the adiabatic representation and the harmonic oscillator approximation. The present work analyzes the vibrational aspect of the processes, which gives rise to the temperature dependence, with the inclusion of mode-mixing, as well as of frequency change effects. The temperature dependence of the rate constants shows a contrasting nature, depending on whether the process has been addressed within the Franck-Condon approximation or beyond it. The calculation of the Duschinsky matrix and the shift vector between the normal modes of the two states can be done in Cartesian and/or internal coordinates, depending on the flexibility of the investigated molecule. A new computational code has been developed to calculate the rates of intersystem crossing, internal conversion, and fluorescence for selected molecules as functions of temperature. PMID:26683207

  7. The temperature dependence of electrical excitability in fish hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vornanen, Matti

    2016-07-01

    Environmental temperature has pervasive effects on the rate of life processes in ectothermic animals. Animal performance is affected by temperature, but there are finite thermal limits for vital body functions, including contraction of the heart. This Review discusses the electrical excitation that initiates and controls the rate and rhythm of fish cardiac contraction and is therefore a central factor in the temperature-dependent modulation of fish cardiac function. The control of cardiac electrical excitability should be sensitive enough to respond to temperature changes but simultaneously robust enough to protect against cardiac arrhythmia; therefore, the thermal resilience and plasticity of electrical excitation are physiological qualities that may affect the ability of fishes to adjust to climate change. Acute changes in temperature alter the frequency of the heartbeat and the duration of atrial and ventricular action potentials (APs). Prolonged exposure to new thermal conditions induces compensatory changes in ion channel expression and function, which usually partially alleviate the direct effects of temperature on cardiac APs and heart rate. The most heat-sensitive molecular components contributing to the electrical excitation of the fish heart seem to be Na(+) channels, which may set the upper thermal limit for the cardiac excitability by compromising the initiation of the cardiac AP at high temperatures. In cardiac and other excitable cells, the different temperature dependencies of the outward K(+) current and inward Na(+) current may compromise electrical excitability at temperature extremes, a hypothesis termed the temperature-dependent depression of electrical excitation. PMID:27385752

  8. Temperature dependence of photovoltaic cells, modules, and systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emery, K.; Burdick, J.; Caiyem, Y. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) cells and modules are often rated in terms of a set of standard reporting conditions defined by a temperature, spectral irradiance, and total irradiance. Because PV devices operates over a wide range of temperatures and irradiances, the temperature and irradiance related behavior must be known. This paper surveys the temperature dependence of crystalline and thin-film, state-of-the-art, research-size cells, modules, and systems measured by a variety of methods. The various error sources and measurement methods that contribute to cause differences in the temperature coefficient for a given cell or module measured with various methods are discussed.

  9. Temperature dependence of dose rate laser simulation adequacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2-D numerical modeling was carried out to analyze the temperature dependence of dose rate laser simulation adequacy in application to p-n junction ionising current. Experimental validation was performed using test structure in the temperature range of 0 to 100 deg.C. (authors)

  10. A new temperature-dependent equation of state of solids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kamal Kapoor; Anuj Kumar; Narsingh Dass

    2014-03-01

    In the present paper, a temperature-dependent equation of state (EOS) of solids is discussed which is found to be applicable in high-pressure and high-temperature range. Present equation of state has been applied in 18 solids. The calculated data are found in very good agreement with the data available from other sources.

  11. Temperature and field dependence of superconducting thermometer sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Empirical functions are presented which relate the sensitivity of thin film superconductive thermometers to variations in temperature and external magnetic field. A formula is given which, by relating the sensitivity to the temperature dependence of the critical field, can be used to simplify thermometer calibration. (author)

  12. Temperature Dependence of Viscosities of Common Carrier Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommers, Trent S.; Nahir, Tal M.

    2005-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental evidence for the dependence of viscosities of the real gases on temperature is described, suggesting that this dependence is greater than that predicted by the kinetic theory of gases. The experimental results were obtained using common modern instrumentation and could be reproduced by students in analytical or…

  13. Hysteresis and Temperature Dependency of Moisture Sorption – New Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rode, Carsten; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    measurements of hysteresis and temperature dependency of the moisture sorption characteristics of three different porous building materials: aerated concrete, cement paste and spruce. Scanning curves are measured for all three materials where periods with adsorption and desorption interrupt each other......It is well known that sorption characteristics of building materials exhibit hysteresis in the way the equilibrium curves develop between adsorption and desorption, and that the sorption curves are also somewhat temperature dependent. However, these two facts are most often neglected in models for...... intermittently. For one of the materials, aerated concrete, the sorption curves are determined at three different temperatures....

  14. Anomalous spreading of a density front from an infinite continuous source in a concentration-dependent lattice gas automaton diffusion model

    CERN Document Server

    Kuentz, M

    2003-01-01

    A two-dimensional lattice gas automaton (LGA) is used for simulating concentration-dependent diffusion in a microscopically random heterogeneous structure. The heterogeneous medium is initialized at a low density rho sub 0 and then submitted to a steep concentration gradient by continuous injection of particles at a concentration rho sub 1 >rho sub 0 from a one-dimensional source to model spreading of a density front. Whereas the nonlinear diffusion equation generally used to describe concentration-dependent diffusion processes predicts a scaling law of the type phi = xt sup - sup 1 sup / sup 2 in one dimension, the spreading process is shown to deviate from the expected t sup 1 sup / sup 2 scaling. The time exponent is found to be larger than 1/2, i.e. diffusion of the density front is enhanced with respect to standard Fickian diffusion. It is also established that the anomalous time exponent decreases as time elapses: anomalous spreading is thus not a timescaling process. We demonstrate that occurrence of a...

  15. Temperature dependence of surface enhanced Raman scattering on C70

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Ying; Zhang Zhenlong; DU Yinxiao; DONG Hua; MO Yujun

    2005-01-01

    The temperature dependence of surface enhanced Raman scattering of the C70 molecule is reported.The Raman scattering of C70 molecules adsorbed on the surface of a silver mirror was measured at different temperatures. The experimental results indicate that the relative intensities of the Raman features vary with the temperature of the sample. When the temperature decreases from room temperature to 0℃, the relative intensities of certain Raman bands decrease abruptly. If we take the strongest band 1565cm-1 as a standard value 100, the greatest decrease approaches to 43%. However, with the further decrease in the temperature these relative intensities increase and resume the value at room temperature. And such a temperature dependence is reversible. Our results show that the adsorption state of the C70 molecules on the silver surface around 0℃changes greatly with the temperature, resulting in a decrease in relative intensities for some main Raman features of C70molecule. When the temperature is lower than 0℃, the adsorption state changes continually and more slowly. Synchronously, eight new Raman featu res, which have not ever been reported in literature, are observed in our experiment and this enriches the basic information of the vibrational modes for C70 molecule.

  16. Temperature dependence of the MCXD at the Gd LIII edge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An energy dispersive spectrometer is used to measure the temperature dependence of the Magnetic Circular X-ray Dichroism (MCXD) effect at the gadolinium (Gd metal) LIII absorption edge from 94 K to 335 K. In ferromagnetic Gd, the MCXD spectrum consists of the main positive peak with pre- and post-edge features. Only the main positive peak exhibits a temperature dependence similar to that of Gd magnetization. All other features decrease as the temperature increases and vanish slightly above the transition temperature (293 K). Well above the ordering temperature (paramagnetic Gd), the MCXD consists only of the positive peak, with a post-edge background that slowly decays away from it over a range of 90 eV

  17. Temperature dependence of a large liquid scintillation detector efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of investigating the effect of temperature on the properties of a scintillation detector composed of 150-litre container filled with a white spirit liquid scintillator and a FEM-49 photomultiplier are presented. The investigation of the temperature variation effect on the FEM-49 photomultiplier show the amplification dependence on temperature to be about or less than 0.07% in the temperature range from 10 to 40 deg C. The temperature dependence of the detector efficiency has been measured by two independent methods: according to the anode current of the FEM-49 photomultiplier and the counting rate of cosmic M-mesons. The counting rate of one layer of the operating telescope with area of about 12.5 m2 has been assumed to be ''absolute'' value of muon intensity. The mean values of the efficiency temperature coefficient obtained as a result of measurements for three standard detectors are presented. From the obtained results one can draw the following conclusion: in facilities designed for measurements with a statistical accuracy of an order of the tenth part of percent, it is necessary to stabilize temperature (ΔT (<=) 1 deg C) or to introduce corrections accounting for the detector temperature dependence

  18. Substrate-dependent temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myachina, Olga; Blagodatskaya, Evgenia

    2015-04-01

    Activity of extracellular enzymes responsible for decomposition of organics is substrate dependent. Quantity of the substrate is the main limiting factor for enzymatic or microbial heterotrophic activity in soils. Different mechanisms of enzymes response to temperature suggested for low and high substrate availability were never proved for real soil conditions. We compared the temperature responses of enzymes-catalyzed reactions in soils. Basing on Michaelis-Menten kinetics we determined the enzymes affinity to substrate (Km) and mineralization potential of heterotrophic microorganisms (Vmax) 1) for three hydrolytic enzymes: β-1,4-glucosidase, N-acetyl- β -D-glucosaminidase and phosphatase by the application of fluorogenically labeled substrates and 2) for mineralization of 14C-labeled glucose by substrate-dependent respiratory response. Here we show that the amount of available substrate is responsible for temperature sensitivity of hydrolysis of polymers in soil, whereas monomers oxidation to CO2 does not depend on substrate amount and is mainly temperature governed. We also found that substrate affinity of enzymes (which is usually decreases with the temperature) differently responded to warming for the process of depolymerisation versus monomers oxidation. We suggest the mechanism to temperature acclimation based on different temperature sensitivity of enzymes kinetics for hydrolysis of polymers and for monomers oxidation.

  19. Anomalous low-temperature behavior in Th2Zn17-type U2CuxAl17-x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The specific heat (C) and AC magnetic susceptibility (χAC) of Th2Zn17-type U2CuxAl17-x (8 ≤ x ≤ 12) have been measured down to 0.1 K in magnetic fields up to 52 kOe. For all the samples studied, C/T increases with decreasing temperature through a kink at a characteristic temperature, T0, and attains a large value of about 1 J/K2 mol U. The AC susceptibility shows a cusp just at that temperature. As magnetic field increases, the kink in C/T and the cusp in χAC is suppressed, but C/T and χAC below 0.5 K remain unchanged. Furthermore, the temperature dependence of C/T tends to vary as - log T in magnetic fields. These facts indicate that non-Fermi-liquid behavior and a spin-glass ordering coexist at zero field, but an application of fields suppresses the former but not the latter. (orig.)

  20. Temperature Dependent Constitutive Modeling for Magnesium Alloy Sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnesium alloys have been increasingly used in automotive and electronic industries because of their excellent strength to weight ratio and EMI shielding properties. However, magnesium alloys have low formability at room temperature due to their unique mechanical behavior (twinning and untwining), prompting for forming at an elevated temperature. In this study, a temperature dependent constitutive model for magnesium alloy (AZ31B) sheet is developed. A hardening law based on non linear kinematic hardening model is used to consider Bauschinger effect properly. Material parameters are determined from a series of uni-axial cyclic experiments (T-C-T or C-T-C) with the temperature ranging 150-250 deg. C. The influence of temperature on the constitutive equation is introduced by the material parameters assumed to be functions of temperature. Fitting process of the assumed model to measured data is presented and the results are compared.

  1. Temperature dependence of photoluminescence of CdTe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temperature dependences of photoluminescence (PL) spectra of CdTe quantum dots (QDs) in a polymer matrix have been studied. The CdTe QDs in a polymer matrix were prepared by transferring them from an aqueous colloid solution. A long storage of specimens was found to result in a bimodal distribution of CdTe QDs by their size in the polymer matrix. The activation energies of the temperature quenching of photoluminescence bands of CdTe QDs in the polymer matrix that correspond to PL bands produced by QDs with different sizes have been determined. The photoluminescence of investigated specimens was found to have the exciton mechanism, which is confirmed by the temperature dependence of the PL peak position and the dependence of the integral PL intensity on the optical excitation intensity.

  2. On the detection of precipitation dependence on temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yu; Luo, Ming; Leung, Yee

    2016-05-01

    Employing their newly proposed interannual difference method (IADM), Liu et al. (2009) and Shiu et al. (2012) reported a shocking increase of around 100% K-1 in heavy precipitation with warming global temperature in 1979-2007. Such increase is alarming and prompts us to probe into the IADM. In this study, both analytical derivations and numerical analyses demonstrate that IADM provides no additional information to that of the conventional linear regression, and also, it may give a false indication of dependence. For clarity and simplicity, we therefore recommend linear regression analysis over the IADM for the detection of dependence. We also find that heavy precipitation decreased during the global warming hiatus, and the precipitation dependence on temperature drops by almost 50% when the study period is extended to 1979-2014 and it may keep dropping in the near future. The risk of having heavy precipitation under warming global temperature may have been overestimated.

  3. Temperature dependence of the Soret coefficient of ionic colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehnem, A. L.; Figueiredo Neto, A. M.; Aquino, R.; Campos, A. F. C.; Tourinho, F. A.; Depeyrot, J.

    2015-10-01

    The temperature dependence of the Soret coefficient ST(T ) in electrostatically charged magnetic colloids is investigated. Two different ferrofluids, with different particles' mean dimensions, are studied. In both cases we obtain a thermophilic behavior of the Soret effect. The temperature dependence of the Soret coefficient is described assuming that the nanoparticles migrate along the ionic thermoelectric field created by the thermal gradient. A model based on the contributions from the thermoelectrophoresis and variation of the double-layer energy, without fitting parameters, is used to describe the experimental results of the colloid with the bigger particles. To do so, independent measurements of the ζ potential, mass diffusion coefficient, and Seebeck coefficient are performed. The agreement of the theory and the experimental results is rather good. In the case of the ferrofluid with smaller particles, it is not possible to get experimentally reliable values of the ζ potential and the model described is used to evaluate this parameter and its temperature dependence.

  4. Temperature dependence of protein hydration hydrodynamics by molecular dynamics simulations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, E Y; Krishnan, V V

    2007-07-18

    The dynamics of water molecules near the protein surface are different from those of bulk water and influence the structure and dynamics of the protein itself. To elucidate the temperature dependence hydration dynamics of water molecules, we present results from the molecular dynamic simulation of the water molecules surrounding two proteins (Carboxypeptidase inhibitor and Ovomucoid) at seven different temperatures (T=273 to 303 K, in increments of 5 K). Translational diffusion coefficients of the surface water and bulk water molecules were estimated from 2 ns molecular dynamics simulation trajectories. Temperature dependence of the estimated bulk water diffusion closely reflects the experimental values, while hydration water diffusion is retarded significantly due to the protein. Protein surface induced scaling of translational dynamics of the hydration waters is uniform over the temperature range studied, suggesting the importance protein-water interactions.

  5. Temperature dependent elasticity and damping in dehydrated sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, T. W.; Struble, W.

    2013-12-01

    Work reported previously at this conference, outlining our observation of anomalously large elastic softening and damping in dehydrated Berea sandstone at elevated temperatures, has been analysed to study shear and compressional effects separately. Modeling of the sample using COMSOL software was necessary to identify modes, as the vibration spectrum of the sample is poorly approximated by a uniform isotropic solid. The first torsional mode of our evacuated, dry, core softens at nearly twice the rate of Young's modulus modes (bending and compressional) and is also damped nearly twice as strongly as temperature increases. We consider two possible models for explaining this behavior, based on the assumption that the mechanical properties of the sandstone are dominated by the framework of quartz grains and polycrystalline cementation, neglecting initially the effects of clay and feldspar inclusions. The 20cm x 2.54cm diameter core is dry such that the pressure of water vapor in the experiment chamber is below 1e-6 Torr at 70C, suggesting that surface water beyond a small number of monolayers is negligible. Our models consider (1) enhanced sliding of grain boundaries in the cementation at elevated temperature and reduced internal water content, and (2) strain microcracking of the cementatioin at low water content due to anisotropic expansion in the quartz grains. In model (1) interfaces parallel to polyhedral grain surfaces were placed in the cement bonds and assigned frictional properties. Model (2) has not yet been implemented. The overall elasticity of a 3-D several-grain model network was determined by modeling quasistatic loading and measuring displacements. Initial results with a small number of grains/bonds suggests that only the first model provides softening and damping for all the modes, however the details of the effects of defect motioin at individual interfaces as the source for the frictional properties is still being evaluated. Nonlinear effects are

  6. Temperature dependence of temporal resolution in an insect nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, A; Ronacher, B

    2002-05-01

    The vast majority of animals are poikilotherms, and thus face the problem that the temperature of their nervous systems rather smoothly follows the temperature changes imposed by their environment. Since basic properties of nerve cells, e.g., the time constants of ion channels, strongly depend on temperature, a temperature shift likely affects the processing of the temporal structure of sensory stimuli. This can be critical in acoustic communication systems in which time patterns of signals are decisive for recognition by the receiver. We investigated the temperature dependence of the responses of locust auditory receptors and interneurons by varying the temperature of the experimental animals during intracellular recordings. The resolution of fast amplitude modulations of acoustic signals was determined in a gap detection paradigm. In auditory receptors and local (second order) interneurons, temporal resolution was improved at higher temperatures. This gain could be attributed to a higher precision of spike timing. In a third-order neuron, a rise in temperature affected the interactions of inhibition and excitation in a complex manner, also resulting in a better resolution of gaps in the millisecond range. PMID:12012097

  7. Temperature dependence of plasmon resonances in spheroidal metal nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    N.I. Grigorchuk

    2013-01-01

    The effect of the electron temperature on both the light absorption and the scattering by metal nanoparticles (MNs) with excitation of the surface plasmon electron vibrations is studied in the framework of the kinetic theory. The formulae for electroconductivity and polarizability tensors are derived for finite temperatures of an electron gas. The electrical conductivity and the halfwidth of the surface plasmon resonance are studied in detail for a spherical MN. Depending on the size of MN, t...

  8. Thermal fission rates with temperature dependent fission barriers

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Yi; Pei, Junchen

    2016-01-01

    The fission processes of thermal excited nuclei are conventionally studied by statistical models which rely on inputs of phenomenological level densities and potential barriers. Therefore the microscopic descriptions of spontaneous fission and induced fission are very desirable for a unified understanding of various fission processes. We propose to study the fission rates, at both low and high temperatures, with microscopically calculated temperature-dependent fission barriers and collective ...

  9. Temperature Dependence of Spreading Width of Giant Dipole Resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Storozhenko, A N; Ventura, A; Blokhin, A I

    2002-01-01

    The Quasiparticle-Phonon Nuclear Model extended to finite temperature within the framework of Thermo Field Dynamics is applied to calculate a temperature dependence of the spreading width Gamma^{\\downarrow} of a giant dipole resonance. Numerical calculations are made for ^{120}Sn and ^{208}Pb nuclei. It is found that Gamma^{\\downarrow} increases with T. The reason of this effect is discussed as well as a relation of the present approach to other ones, existing in the literature.

  10. Temperature dependence of hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cell performances

    OpenAIRE

    Riesen, Y.; Stuckelberger, M.; Haug, F. -J.; Ballif, C.; N. Wyrsch

    2016-01-01

    Thin-film hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar (a-Si:H) cells are known to have better temperature coefficients than crystalline silicon cells. To investigate whether a-Si:H cells that are optimized for standard conditions (STC) also have the highest energy yield, we measured the temperature and irradiance dependence of the maximum power output (Pmpp), the fill factor (FF), the short-circuit current density (Jsc), and the open-circuit voltage (Voc) for four series of cells fabricated with dif...

  11. Pressure and temperature dependence of growth and morphology of Escherichia coli: Experiments and Stochastic Model

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Pradeep

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the growth of Escherichia coli E.coli, a mesophilic bacterium, as a function of pressure $P$ and temperature $T$. E.coli can grow and divide in a wide range of pressure (1-400atm) and temperature ($23-40^{\\circ}$C). For $T>30^{\\circ}$ C, the division time of E.coli increases exponentially with pressure and exhibit a departure from exponential behavior at pressures between 250-400 atm for all the temperatures studied in our experiments. For $T<30^{\\circ}$ C, the division time shows an anomalous dependence on pressure -- first decreases with increasing pressure and then increases upon further increase of pressure. The sharp change in division time is followed by a sharp change in phenotypic transition of E. Coli at high pressures where bacterial cells switch to an elongating cell type. We propose a model that this phenotypic changes in bacteria at high pressures is an irreversible stochastic process whereas the switching probability to elongating cell type increases with increasing press...

  12. On the temperature dependence of the chiral vortical effects

    CERN Document Server

    Kalaydzhyan, Tigran

    2014-01-01

    We discuss the origins of temperature dependence of the axial vortical effect (AVE), i.e. generation of an axial current in a rotating chiral medium along the rotation axis. We show that the corresponding transport coefficient depends on the number of light weakly interacting degrees of freedom, rather than on the gravitational anomaly. We also comment on the role of low-dimensional defects in the rotating medium, and appearance of the chiral vortical effect due to them.

  13. Temperature-dependent enthalpy of oxygenation in Antarctic fish hemoglobins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fago, A.; Wells, R.M.G.; Weber, Roy E.

    1997-01-01

    (logP(50) vs 1/T) of D. mawsoni hemoglobin indicates that the enthalpy of oxygenation (slope of the plot) is temperature dependent and that at high temperatures oxygen-binding becomes less exothermic. Nearly linear relationships were found in the hemoglobins of the other two species. The data were...... literature data for the enthalpy of oxygenation in Antarctic fish hemoglobins derives from the use of the nonintegrated (linearized) form of the van't Hoff equation over different temperature ranges. The general assumption that a low heat of oxygenation in hemoglobins from polar animals represents an...

  14. Thermal Aware Floorplanning Incorporating Temperature Dependent Wire Delay Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, AndreasThor; Liu, Wei; Nannarelli, Alberto;

    2015-01-01

    Temperature has a negative impact on metal resistance and thus wire delay. In state-of-the-art VLSI circuits, large thermal gradients usually exist due to the uneven distribution of heat sources. The difference in wire temperature can lead to performance mismatch because wires of the same length ...... metric in the evaluation of a floorplan. In addition, we consider other temperature dependent factors such as congestion and interconnect reliability. The experiment results show that a shorter delay can be achieved using the proposed method....

  15. Temperature Dependent Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements in a Phosphor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettles, Charles J.; Smith, R. Seth; Heath, Jonathan J.

    2012-03-01

    This poster will describe an undergraduate senior research project involving fluorescence lifetime measurements in a LaSO4:Eu phosphor compound. Specifically, this project seeks to determine the temperature dependence of the lifetime. The temperature of the phosphor will be varied using a heater block with temperature control. The phosphor will be excited with the 337 nm output of a Nitrogen Laser. An Oriel Monochromator will be used to disperse the fluorescence, and the lifetime for a particular wavelength will be determined from a photomultiplier tube signal. At the time of the presentation, this project will be nearing completion; and I will discuss my progress, successes, and challenges.

  16. Temperature dependent energy levels of methylammonium lead iodide perovskite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foley, Benjamin J.; Marlowe, Daniel L.; Choi, Joshua J., E-mail: jjc6z@virginia.edu, E-mail: mgupta@virginia.edu, E-mail: scudiero@wsu.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States); Sun, Keye; Gupta, Mool C., E-mail: jjc6z@virginia.edu, E-mail: mgupta@virginia.edu, E-mail: scudiero@wsu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States); Saidi, Wissam A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15261 (United States); Scudiero, Louis, E-mail: jjc6z@virginia.edu, E-mail: mgupta@virginia.edu, E-mail: scudiero@wsu.edu [Chemistry Department and Materials Science and Engineering Program, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Temperature dependent energy levels of methylammonium lead iodide are investigated using a combination of ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy and optical spectroscopy. Our results show that the valence band maximum and conduction band minimum shift down in energy by 110 meV and 77 meV as temperature increases from 28 °C to 85 °C. Density functional theory calculations using slab structures show that the decreased orbital splitting due to thermal expansion is a major contribution to the experimentally observed shift in energy levels. Our results have implications for solar cell performance under operating conditions with continued sunlight exposure and increased temperature.

  17. Temperature dependent energy levels of methylammonium lead iodide perovskite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temperature dependent energy levels of methylammonium lead iodide are investigated using a combination of ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy and optical spectroscopy. Our results show that the valence band maximum and conduction band minimum shift down in energy by 110 meV and 77 meV as temperature increases from 28 °C to 85 °C. Density functional theory calculations using slab structures show that the decreased orbital splitting due to thermal expansion is a major contribution to the experimentally observed shift in energy levels. Our results have implications for solar cell performance under operating conditions with continued sunlight exposure and increased temperature

  18. Trends in the temperature dependence of effective resonance integrals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The temperature dependence of the effective resonance integral for U238 in uranium metal and uranium oxide lumps is shown to arise from a balance of many conflicting factors, arising principally from differing temperature behaviour in resonances of different energy. If the effective resonance integral is expressed by a formula of the type I = ATm + B, then m increases as rod size decreases and with the addition of scattering material to the lump. In general m also increases with increasing temperature. For example, for small diameter uranium oxide rods, a higher value of m than that for larger uranium metal rods is to be expected. (author)

  19. Measurement of Temperature Dependent Apparent Specific Heat Capacity in Electrosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaki, Wafaa; Akyildiz, Ali; Borca Tasciuc, Diana-Andra; De, Suvranu

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on the measurement of temperature dependent apparent specific heat of ex-vivo porcine liver tissue during radiofrequency alternating current heating for a large temperature range. The difference between spatial and temporal evolution of experimental temperature, obtained during electrosurgical heating by infrared thermometry, and predictions based on finite element modeling was minimized to obtain the apparent specific heat. The model was based on transient heat transfer with internal heat generation considering heat storage along with conduction. Such measurements are important to develop computational models for real time simulation of electrosurgical procedures. PMID:27046573

  20. Temperature dependent energy levels of methylammonium lead iodide perovskite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Benjamin J.; Marlowe, Daniel L.; Sun, Keye; Saidi, Wissam A.; Scudiero, Louis; Gupta, Mool C.; Choi, Joshua J.

    2015-06-01

    Temperature dependent energy levels of methylammonium lead iodide are investigated using a combination of ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy and optical spectroscopy. Our results show that the valence band maximum and conduction band minimum shift down in energy by 110 meV and 77 meV as temperature increases from 28 °C to 85 °C. Density functional theory calculations using slab structures show that the decreased orbital splitting due to thermal expansion is a major contribution to the experimentally observed shift in energy levels. Our results have implications for solar cell performance under operating conditions with continued sunlight exposure and increased temperature.

  1. Electron temperature profile invariance on OH, L- and H-mode plasmas and consequences for the anomalous transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, G.

    1992-01-01

    The shapes of the electron temperature and electron density profiles in the OH, L- and H-mode confinement regimes of ASDEX are explored by statistical analysis. It is shown that the shape of Te(r) is conserved in the outer half of the plasma in these regimes and that it is invariant with respect to heating power, heating profile, density, density scale length, q value and ion mass. These results suggest that microturbulence constrains the shape of the temperature profile by adjusting the electron heat diffusivity χe(r). No such invariance is found for the temperature profile in the inner half of the plasma and for the density profile over the whole cross-section. Properties of the empirical electron heat diffusivity and the diffusion coefficient in different regimes can be described by Te profile invariance. The improved confinement with peaked density profiles, the reduction of χe in the bulk of H-mode plasmas and the power dependence of χe in the L-regime are discussed

  2. Turbulent thermal boundary layers with temperature-dependent viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Turbulent thermal boundary layers with temperature-dependent viscosity are simulated. • Effect of temperature-dependent viscosity on the statistics of the scalar field. • An identity for the Stanton number is derived and analyzed. • Effect of temperature-dependent viscosity on the statistics of scalar transfer rate. • Modification of turbulent flow field leads to an enhanced scalar transfer rate. - Abstract: Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent boundary layers (TBLs) over isothermally heated walls were performed, and the influence of the wall-heating on the thermal boundary layers was investigated. The DNS adopt an empirical relation for the temperature-dependent viscosity of water. The Prandtl number therefore changes with temperature, while the Péclet number is constant. Two wall temperatures (Tw = 70 °C and 99 °C) were considered relative to T∞ = 30 °C, and a reference simulation of TBL with constant viscosity was also performed for comparison. In the variable viscosity flow, the mean and variance of the scalar, when normalized by the friction temperature deficit, decrease relative to the constant viscosity flow. A relation for the mean scalar which takes into account the variable viscosity is proposed. Appropriate scalings for the scalar fluctuations and the scalar flux are also introduced, and are shown to be applicable for both variable and constant viscosity flows. Due to the modification of the near-wall turbulence, the Stanton number and the Reynolds analogy factor are augmented by 10% and 44%, respectively, in the variable viscosity flow. An identity for the Stanton number is derived and shows that the mean wall-normal velocity and wall-normal scalar flux cause the increase in the heat transfer coefficient. Finally, the augmented near-wall velocity fluctuations lead to an increase of the wall-normal scalar flux, which contributes favorably to the enhanced heat transfer at the wall

  3. Temperature dependence of electronic transport property in ferroelectric polymer films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The ferroelectric polymer was fabricated by Langmuir–Blodgett method. • The electrons as the dominant injected carrier were conformed in the ferroelectric polymer films. • The leakage current conduction mechanisms in ferroelectric polymer were investigated. - Abstract: The leakage current mechanism of ferroelectric copolymer of polyvinylidene fluoride with trifluoroethylene prepared by Langmuir–Blodgett was investigated in the temperature range from 100 K to 350 K. The electron as the dominant injected carrier was observed in the ferroelectric copolymer films. The transport mechanisms in copolymer strongly depend on the temperature and applied voltage. From 100 K to 200 K, Schottky emission dominates the conduction. With temperature increasing, the Frenkel–Poole emission instead of the Schottky emission to conduct the carrier transport. When the temperature gets to 260 K, the leakage current becomes independent of temperature, and the space charge limited current conduction was observed

  4. On the Anomalous Microwave Power Dependency of both Non-Resonant and Cu2+ Resonant Microwave Absorption in a YBa2Cu3O7-δ Type Superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velter-Stefanescu, M.; Duliu, O. G.

    2007-04-01

    A ceramic high temperature superconductor [HTS] of Y-Ba-Cu-O type has been investigated at 77 K by using a standard X-band Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) configuration. At very low microwave power (DPPH signal, pleading for an unambiguous absorption process, but it commutes to a typical superconductor signal (i.e. opposite to DPPH signal phase) with increasing the microwave power. At the same time, Cu2+ signal appreciably changes its shape with increasing microwave power. These anomalous behaviors could be in part explained by a conventional SQUID response at microwave frequency by taking into account that the sample itself could be described by a collection of both Josephson and proximity junctions.

  5. Temperature dependence of PMT cathode sensitivity and gain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An especially designed experimental apparatus was built for systematically testing the intrinsic stability in operation of photomultiplier tubes (PMT). Jointly with the counting rate change effects (up to 104 c.s-1, NaI(Tl)137Cs) the temperature dependence (temperature range from - 400C to 600C) of the PMT sensitivity was investigated upon over two hundred various tubes produced by four manufacturers. Because of their semiconductor compounds, the PMT anode sensitivity was found strongly depndent of the temperature, but moreover it should be noted that though the temperature produces the highest effect upon the photocathode sensitivity, its effect upon the dynodes gain is not generally negligible. The most stable semitransparent photocathodes (temperature coefficient 0C in the blue spectral region) are the bialcaline cathodes whatever the manufacturer may be; further, their monochromatic sensitivity hysteresis is always small (<2%) after a temperature run and temperature coefficients are quite constant in course of time. PMT gain stability appears connected with three technological parameters: the geometrical structure of dynodes, the secondary emitter nature and, probably, the photocathode associated with. In short, the best behavior (gain stability 1%) versus the temperature changes (and also versus counting rate changes) is typically given by bialcali, Cu-Be, venetian-blind PMT. For the measured EMI's PMT with Cs-Sb dynodes temperature gain stability is less good in the same operating conditions

  6. DETERMINATION OF TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION FOR ANNULAR FINS WITH TEMPERATURE DEPENDENT THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY BY HPM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davood Domairry Ganji

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, homotopy perturbation method has been used to evaluate the temperature distribution of annular fin with temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and to determine the temperature distribution within the fin. This method is useful and practical for solving the nonlinear heat transfer equation, which is associated with variable thermal conductivity condition. The homotopy perturbation method provides an approximate analytical solution in the form of an infinite power series. The annular fin heat transfer rate with temperature-dependent thermal conductivity has been obtained as a function of thermo-geometric fin parameter and the thermal conductivity parameter describing the variation of the thermal conductivity.

  7. Extraction of temperature dependent interfacial resistance of thermoelectric modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Min

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses an approach for extracting the temperature dependency of the electrical interfacial resistance associated with thermoelectric devices. The method combines a traditional module-level test rig and a nonlinear numerical model of thermoelectricity to minimize measurement errors...... on the interfacial resistance. The extracted results represent useful data to investigating the characteristics of thermoelectric module resistance and comparing performance of various modules....

  8. Efficiencies of thermodynamics when temperature-dependent energy levels exist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamano, Takuya

    2016-03-01

    Based on a generalized form of the second law of thermodynamics, in which the temperature-dependent energy levels of a system are appropriately included in entropy generation, we show that the effect reasonably appears in efficiencies of thermodynamic processes. PMID:26890276

  9. Temperature and phase dependence of positron lifetimes in solid cyclohexane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard

    1985-01-01

    The temperature dependence of position lifetimes in both the brittle and plastic phases of cyclohaxane has been examined. Long-lived components in both phases are associated with the formation of positronium (Ps). Two long lifetimes attributable to ortho-Ps are resolvable in the plastic phase. The...

  10. A Model of Temperature-Dependent Young's Modulus for Ultrahigh Temperature Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiguo Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the different sensitivities of material properties to temperature between ultrahigh temperature ceramics (UHTCs and traditional ceramics, the original empirical formula of temperature-dependent Young's modulus of ceramic materials is unable to describe the temperature dependence of Young's modulus of UHTCs which are used as thermal protection materials. In this paper, a characterization applied to Young's modulus of UHTC materials under high temperature which is revised from the original empirical formula is established. The applicable temperature range of the characterization extends to the higher temperature zone. This study will provide a basis for the characterization for strength and fracture toughness of UHTC materials and provide theoretical bases and technical reserves for the UHTC materials' design and application in the field of spacecraft.

  11. Temperature-dependent absorption cross-sections of perfluorotributylamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Paul J.; Cabaj, Alex; Conway, Stephanie; Hong, Angela C.; Le Bris, Karine; Mabury, Scott A.; Strong, Kimberly

    2016-05-01

    Cross-sections of perfluorotributylamine (PFTBA) were derived from Fourier transform spectroscopy at 570-3400 cm-1 with a resolution of 0.1 cm-1 over a temperature range of 298-344 K. These results were compared to theoretical density functional theory (DFT) calculations and to previous measurements of PFTBA made at room temperature. DFT calculations were performed using the B3LYP method and the 6-311G(d,p) basis set. We find good agreement between our experimentally derived results, DFT calculations, and previously published data. No significant temperature dependence in the PFTBA cross-sections was observed for the temperature range studied. We calculate an average integrated band strength of 7.81 × 10-16 cm/molecule for PFTBA over the spectral range studied. Radiative efficiencies (RE) and global warming potentials (GWP) for PFTBA were also derived. The calculated radiative efficiencies show no dependence on temperature and agree with prior publications. We find an average RE of 0.77 Wm-2 ppbv-1 and a range of GWP from 6874 to 7571 depending on the lifetime used. Our findings are consistent with previous studies and increase our confidence in the value of the GWP of PFTBA.

  12. Study of the PTW microLion chamber temperature dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of liquid ionization chambers in radiotherapy has grown during the past few years. While for air ionization chambers the kTP correction for air mass density due to pressure and temperature variations is well known, less work has been done on the case of liquid ionization chambers, where there is still the need to take into account the influence of temperature in the free ion yield. We have measured the PTW microLion isooctane-filled ionization chamber temperature dependence in a ∼ ±10 °C interval around the standard 20 °C room temperature for three operation voltages, including the manufacturer recommended voltage, and two beam qualities, 60Co and 50 kV x-rays. Within the measured temperature range, the microLion signal exhibits a positive linear dependence, which is around 0.24% K−1 at 800 V with 60Co irradiation. This effect is of the same order of magnitude as the T dependence found in air ionization chambers, but its nature is completely different and its sign opposite to that of an air chamber. Onsager theory has been used to model the results and is consistent with this linear behaviour. However, some inconsistencies in the modelling of the 50 kV x-ray results have been found that are attributed to the failure of Onsager's isolated pair assumption for such radiation quality. (paper)

  13. Temperature-dependent imaging of living cells by AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Characterization of lateral organization of plasma membranes is a prerequisite to the understanding of membrane structure-function relationships in living cells. Lipid-lipid and lipid-protein interactions are responsible for the existence of various membrane microdomains involved in cell signalization and in numerous pathologies. Developing approaches for characterizing microdomains associate identification tools like recognition imaging with high-resolution topographical imaging. Membrane properties are markedly dependent on temperature. However, mesoscopic scale topographical information of cell surface in a temperature range covering most of cell biology experimentation is still lacking. In this work we have examined the possibility of imaging the temperature-dependent behavior of eukaryotic cells by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Our results establish that the surface of living CV1 kidney cells can be imaged by AFM, between 5 and 37 deg. C, both in contact and tapping modes. These first temperature-dependent data show that large cell structures appeared essentially stable at a microscopic scale. On the other hand, as shown by contact mode AFM, the surface was highly dynamic at a mesoscopic scale, with marked changes in apparent topography, friction, and deflection signals. When keeping the scanning conditions constant, a progressive loss in the image contrast was however observed, using tapping mode, on decreasing the temperature

  14. The temperature dependence of positron annihilation in α-Hf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doppler-broadening of the positron annihilation photopeak has been measured for α-Hf (6.8 at% Zr) in the interval 298-1945 K. The data, in terms of peak (L) and wing (W) line-shape parameters, show three regions of behaviour. Region I, 298-750 K, shows a complex temperature response of W and S: it is associated with positron interactions with impurity-related defects. Region II, 750-1750 K, shows a linear temperature dependence of S and W, it is associated with thermal expansion effects. Region III, 1750-1945 K, shows an increasing temperature dependence indicative of positron-interactions with equilibrium vacancies. The vacancy formation energy deduced from the data is 2.5 eV. (orig.)

  15. Fission Dynamics: The Quest of a Temperature Dependent Nuclear Viscosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Vardaci

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a journey within some open questions about the current use of a temperature dependent nuclear viscosity in models of nuclear fission and proposes an alternative experimental approach by using systems of intermediate fissility. This study is particularly relevant because: i systems of intermediate fissility offer a suitable frame-work since the intervals between the compound nucleus and scission point temperatures with increasing excitation energy are much smaller than in the case of heavier systems, ii the dependence of viscosity on the temperature may change with the fissility of the composite system; iii the opportunity to measure also observables in the evaporation residues channel translates into a larger set of effective constraints for the models.

  16. Temperature dependence of penetration depth in thin film niobium

    Science.gov (United States)

    More, N.; Muhlfelder, B.; Lockhart, J.

    1989-01-01

    A novel technique is presented which should allow precise determination of the temperature dependence of the inductance, and hence of the penetration depth, of superconducting niobium thin-film structures. Four niobium thin-film stripline inductors are arranged in a bridge configuration, and inductance differences are measured using a potentiometric technique with a SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) as the null detector. Numerical simulations of the stripline inductances are presented which allow the performance of the measurement technique to be evaluated. The prediction of the two-fluid model for the penetration-depth temperature dependence is given for reduced temperatures of 0.3 to 0.9. The experimental apparatus and its resolution and accuracy are discussed.

  17. Stress versus temperature dependence of activation energies for creep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, A. D.; Raj, S. V.; Walker, K. P.

    1992-01-01

    The activation energy for creep at low stresses and elevated temperatures is associated with lattice diffusion, where the rate controlling mechanism for deformation is dislocation climb. At higher stresses and intermediate temperatures, the rate controlling mechanism changes from dislocation climb to obstacle-controlled dislocation glide. Along with this change in deformation mechanism occurs a change in the activation energy. When the rate controlling mechanism for deformation is obstacle-controlled dislocation glide, it is shown that a temperature-dependent Gibbs free energy does better than a stress-dependent Gibbs free energy in correlating steady-state creep data for both copper and LiF-22mol percent CaF2 hypereutectic salt.

  18. Stress versus temperature dependent activation energies in creep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, A. D.; Raj, S. V.; Walker, K. P.

    1990-01-01

    The activation energy for creep at low stresses and elevated temperatures is lattice diffusion, where the rate controlling mechanism for deformation is dislocation climb. At higher stresses and intermediate temperatures, the rate controlling mechanism changes from that of dislocation climb to one of obstacle-controlled dislocation glide. Along with this change, there occurs a change in the activation energy. It is shown that a temperature-dependent Gibbs free energy does a good job of correlating steady-state creep data, while a stress-dependent Gibbs free energy does a less desirable job of correlating the same data. Applications are made to copper and a LiF-22 mol. percent CaF2 hypereutectic salt.

  19. Temperature dependence of APD-based PET scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Solid state detectors such as avalanche photodiodes (APDs) are increasingly being used in PET detectors. One of the disadvantages of APDs is the strong decrease of their gain factor with increasing ambient temperature. The light yield of most scintillation crystals also decreases when ambient temperature is increased. Both effects lead to considerable temperature dependence of the performance of APD-based PET scanners. In this paper, the authors propose a model for this dependence and the performance of the LabPET8 APD-based small animal PET scanner is evaluated at different temperatures.Methods: The model proposes that the effect of increasing temperature on the energy histogram of an APD-based PET scanner is a compression of the histogram along the energy axis. The energy histogram of the LabPET system was acquired at 21 °C and 25 °C to verify the validity of this model. Using the proposed model, the effect of temperature on system sensitivity was simulated for different detector temperature coefficients and temperatures. Subsequently, the effect of short term and long term temperature changes on the peak sensitivity of the LabPET system was measured. The axial sensitivity profile was measured at 21 °C and 24 °C following the NEMA NU 4-2008 standard. System spatial resolution was also evaluated. Furthermore, scatter fraction, count losses and random coincidences were evaluated at different temperatures. Image quality was also investigated.Results: As predicted by the model, the photopeak energy at 25 °C is lower than at 21 °C with a shift of approximately 6% per °C. Simulations showed that this results in an approximately linear decrease of sensitivity when temperature is increased from 21 °C to 24 °C and energy thresholds are constant. Experimental evaluation of the peak sensitivity at different temperatures showed a strong linear correlation for short term (2.32 kcps/MBq/°C = 12%/°C, R = −0.95) and long term (1.92 kcps/MBq/°C = 10%/

  20. Finite element simulation of temperature dependent free surface flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelman, M. S.; Sani, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    The method of Engelman and Sani (1984) for a finite-element simulation of incompressible surface flows with a free and/or moving fluid interface, such as encountered in crystal growth and coating and polymer technology, is extended to temperature-dependent flows, including the effect of temperature-dependent surface tension. The basic algorithm of Saito and Scriven (1981) and Ruschak (1980) has been generalized and implemented in a robust and versatile finite-element code that can be employed with relative ease for the simulation of free-surface problems in complex geometries. As a result, the costly dependence on the Newton-Raphson algorithm has been eliminated by replacing it with a quasi-Newton iterative method, which nearly retains the superior convergence properties of the Newton-Raphson method.

  1. Temperature dependence of carbon isotope fractionation in CAM plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deleens, E.; Treichel, I.; O' Leary, M.H.

    1985-09-01

    The carbon isotope fractionation associated with nocturnal malic acid synthesis in Kalanchoe daigremontiana and Bryophyllum tubiflorum was calculated from the isotopic composition of carbon-4 of malic acid, after appropriate corrections. In the lowest temperature treatment (17/sup 0/C nights, 23/sup 0/C days), the isotope fractionation for both plants is -4% per thousand (that is, malate is enriched in /sup 13/C relative to the atmosphere). For K. daigremontiana, the isotope fractionation decreases with increasing temperature, becoming approximately 0% per thousand at 27/sup 0/C/33/sup 0/C. Detailed analysis of temperature effects on the isotope fractionation indicates that stomatal aperture decreases with increasing temperature and carboxylation capacity increases. For B. tubiflorum, the temperature dependence of the isotope fractionation is smaller and is principally attributed to the normal temperature dependences of the rates of diffusion and carboxylation steps. The small change in the isotopic composition of remaining malic acid in both species which is observed during deacidification indicates that malate release, rather than decarboxylation, is rate limiting in the deacidification process. 28 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  2. Temperature-Dependent Dielectric Properties of Al/Epoxy Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zijun; Zhou, Wenying; Sui, Xuezhen; Dong, Lina; Cai, Huiwu; Zuo, Jing; Chen, Qingguo

    2016-06-01

    Broadband dielectric spectroscopy was carried out to study the transition in electrical properties of Al/epoxy nanocomposites over the frequency range of 1-107 Hz and the temperature range of -20°C to 200°C. The dielectric permittivity, dissipation factor, and electrical conductivity of the nanocomposites increased with temperature and showed an abrupt increase around the glass transition temperature ( T g). The results clearly reveal an interesting transition of the electrical properties with increasing temperature: insulator below 70°C, conductor at about 70°C. The behavior of the transition in electrical properties of the nanocomposites was explored at different temperatures. The presence of relaxation peaks in the loss tangent and electric modulus spectra of the nanocomposites confirms that the chain segmental dynamics of the polymer is accompanied by the absorption of energy given to the system. It is suggested that the temperature-dependent transition of the electric properties in the nanocomposite is closely associated with the α-relaxation. The large increase in the dissipation factor and electric conductivity depends on the direct current conduction of thermally activated charge carriers resulting from the epoxy matrix above T g.

  3. New application of temperature-dependent modelling of high temperature superconductors: Quench propagation and pulse magnetization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Matsuda, Koichi; Coombs, T. A.

    2012-08-01

    We present temperature-dependent modeling of high-temperature superconductors (HTS) to understand HTS electromagnetic phenomena where temperature fluctuation plays a nontrivial role. Thermal physics is introduced into the well-developed H-formulation model, and the effect of temperature-dependent parameters is considered. Based on the model, we perform extensive studies on two important HTS applications: quench propagation and pulse magnetization. A micrometer-scale quench model of HTS coil is developed, which can be used to estimate minimum quench energy and normal zone propagation velocity inside the coil. In addition, we study the influence of inhomogeneity of HTS bulk during pulse magnetization. We demonstrate how the inhomogeneous distribution of critical current inside the bulk results in varying degrees of heat dissipation and uniformity of final trapped field. The temperature-dependent model is proven to be a powerful tool to study the thermally coupled electromagnetic phenomena of HTS.

  4. Temperature dependence of plasmon resonances in spheroidal metal nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.I. Grigorchuk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the electron temperature on both the light absorption and the scattering by metal nanoparticles (MNs with excitation of the surface plasmon electron vibrations is studied in the framework of the kinetic theory. The formulae for electroconductivity and polarizability tensors are derived for finite temperatures of an electron gas. The electrical conductivity and the halfwidth of the surface plasmon resonance are studied in detail for a spherical MN. Depending on the size of MN, the efficiencies of light absorption and scattering with the temperature change are investigated. It is found, in particular, that the absorption efficiency can both increase and decrease with a temperature drop. The derived formulas make it possible to analytically calculate various optical and transport phenomena for MNs of any spheroidal shape embedded in any dielectric media.

  5. Temperature dependence of contact resistance at metal/MWNT interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Eui; Moon, Kyoung-Seok; Sohn, Yoonchul

    2016-07-01

    Although contact resistance of carbon nanotube (CNT) is one of the most important factors for practical application of electronic devices, a study regarding temperature dependence on contact resistance of CNTs with metal electrodes has not been found. Here, we report an investigation of contact resistance at multiwalled nanotube (MWNT)/Ag interface as a function of temperature, using MWNT/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composite. Electrical resistance of MWNT/PDMS composite revealed negative temperature coefficient (NTC). Excluding the contact resistance with Ag electrode, the NTC effect became less pronounced, showing lower intrinsic resistivity with the activation energy of 0.019 eV. Activation energy of the contact resistance of MWNT/Ag interface was determined to be 0.04 eV, two times larger than that of MWNT-MWNT network. The increase in the thermal fluctuation assisted electron tunneling is attributed to conductivity enhancement at both MWNT/MWNT and MWNT/Ag interfaces with increasing temperature.

  6. A nanoscale temperature-dependent heterogeneous nucleation theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Y. Y. [Nanosurface Science and Engineering Research Institute, College of Mechatronics and Control Engineering, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, 518060 Guangdong (China); Yang, G. W., E-mail: stsygw@mail.sysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, Nanotechnology Research Center, School of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, 510275 Guangdong (China)

    2015-06-14

    Classical nucleation theory relies on the hypothetical equilibrium of the whole nucleation system, and neglects the thermal fluctuations of the surface; this is because the high entropic gains of the (thermodynamically extensive) surface would lead to multiple stable states. In fact, at the nanometer scale, the entropic gains of the surface are high enough to destroy the stability of the thermal equilibrium during nucleation, comparing with the whole system. We developed a temperature-dependent nucleation theory to elucidate the heterogeneous nucleation process, by considering the thermal fluctuations based on classical nucleation theory. It was found that the temperature not only affected the phase transformation, but also influenced the surface energy of the nuclei. With changes in the Gibbs free energy barrier, nucleation behaviors, such as the nucleation rate and the critical radius of the nuclei, showed temperature-dependent characteristics that were different from those predicted by classical nucleation theory. The temperature-dependent surface energy density of a nucleus was deduced based on our theoretical model. The agreement between the theoretical and experimental results suggested that the developed nucleation theory has the potential to contribute to the understanding and design of heterogeneous nucleation at the nanoscale.

  7. Temperature dependent local atomic displacements in ammonia intercalated iron selenide superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, E.; Simonelli, L.; Wakita, T.; Marini, C.; Lee, J.-H.; Olszewski, W.; Terashima, K.; Kakuto, T.; Nishimoto, N.; Kimura, T.; Kudo, K.; Kambe, T.; Nohara, M.; Yokoya, T.; Saini, N. L.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, ammonia-thermal reaction has been used for molecular intercalation in layered FeSe, resulting a new Lix(NH3)yFe2Se2 superconductor with Tc ~ 45 K. Here, we have used temperature dependent extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) to investigate local atomic displacements in single crystals of this new superconductor. Using polarized EXAFS at Fe K-edge we have obtained direct information on the local Fe-Se and Fe-Fe bondlengths and corresponding mean square relative displacements (MSRD). We find that the Se-height in the intercalated system is lower than the one in the binary FeSe, suggesting compressed FeSe4 tetrahedron in the title system. Incidentally, there is hardly any effect of the intercalation on the bondlengths characteristics, revealed by the Einstein temperatures, that are similar to those found in the binary FeSe. Therefore, the molecular intercalation induces an effective compression and decouples the FeSe slabs. Furthermore, the results reveal an anomalous change in the atomic correlations across Tc, appearing as a clear decrease in the MSRD, indicating hardening of the local lattice mode. Similar response of the local lattice has been found in other families of superconductors, e.g., A15-type and cuprates superconductors. This observation suggests that local atomic correlations should have some direct correlation with the superconductivity. PMID:27276997

  8. Temperature dependent stability model for graphene nanoribbon interconnects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanu, Waikhom Mona; Das, Debaprasad

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a temperature dependent equivalent circuit model for graphene nanoribbon (GNR) interconnects is proposed. The stability analysis of GNR interconnects is performed using this proposed model and its performance is compared with respect to that of the copper based interconnects. The analysis is performed for different interconnect systems for 16nm ITRS technology node. With increase in the length of interconnects, the relative stability increases. GNR interconnect shows less increase of resistance with the increase in temperature as compared to Cu interconnects.

  9. Temperature dependence of lattice parameters of langasite single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoefer, S.; Zastrau, U. [Institute of Optics and Quantumelectronics, Friedrich Schiller University of Jena (Germany); Jeutter, N.; Baehtz, C. [Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Dresden (Germany); Kraeusslich, J.

    2010-05-15

    To determine the coefficient of thermal expansion of trigonal langasite (La{sub 3}Ga{sub 5}SiO{sub 14}) the two independent lattice parameters a and c are measured over a temperature range of 800 C using X-ray diffraction on single crystal samples. From the given nonlinear temperature dependence the linear and quadratic thermal coefficients of expansion {alpha}{sub 11},{beta}{sub 11} and {alpha}{sub 33},{beta}{sub 33} for the two lattice parameters a and c could be deduced. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  10. Fission dynamics: The quest of a temperature dependent nuclear viscosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vardaci E.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This contribution presents a journey within the open questions about the current use of a temperature dependent nuclear viscosity in models of nuclear fission and proposes an alternative experimental approach by using systems of intermediate fissility. This study is particularly relevant because: i systems of intermediate fissility offer a suitable framework since the intervals between the compound nucleus and scission point temperatures with increasing excitation energy are much smaller than in the case of heavier systems, ii the measurement of observables in the ER channel translates into a larger set of effective constraints for the models.

  11. Anomalous Hall effect in YIG|Pt bilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We measure the ordinary and the anomalous Hall effect in a set of yttrium iron garnet|platinum (YIG|Pt) bilayers via magnetization orientation dependent magnetoresistance experiments. Our data show that the presence of the ferrimagnetic insulator YIG leads to an anomalous Hall effect like voltage in Pt, which is sensitive to both Pt thickness and temperature. Interpretation of the experimental findings in terms of the spin Hall anomalous Hall effect indicates that the imaginary part of the spin mixing conductance Gi plays a crucial role in YIG|Pt bilayers. In particular, our data suggest a sign change in Gi between 10 K and 300 K. Additionally, we report a higher order Hall effect contribution, which appears in thin Pt films on YIG at low temperatures

  12. Anomalous Hall effect in YIG|Pt bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Sibylle, E-mail: sibylle.meyer@wmi.badw.de; Schlitz, Richard [Walther-Meißner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, 85748 Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, Technische Universität München, 85748 Garching (Germany); Geprägs, Stephan; Opel, Matthias [Walther-Meißner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, 85748 Garching (Germany); Huebl, Hans; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B. [Walther-Meißner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, 85748 Garching (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich, 80799 München (Germany); Gross, Rudolf [Walther-Meißner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, 85748 Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, Technische Universität München, 85748 Garching (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich, 80799 München (Germany)

    2015-03-30

    We measure the ordinary and the anomalous Hall effect in a set of yttrium iron garnet|platinum (YIG|Pt) bilayers via magnetization orientation dependent magnetoresistance experiments. Our data show that the presence of the ferrimagnetic insulator YIG leads to an anomalous Hall effect like voltage in Pt, which is sensitive to both Pt thickness and temperature. Interpretation of the experimental findings in terms of the spin Hall anomalous Hall effect indicates that the imaginary part of the spin mixing conductance G{sub i} plays a crucial role in YIG|Pt bilayers. In particular, our data suggest a sign change in G{sub i} between 10 K and 300 K. Additionally, we report a higher order Hall effect contribution, which appears in thin Pt films on YIG at low temperatures.

  13. Temperature dependence of the beam-foil interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The beam energy dependence between 50 and 200 keV of the linear polarization fraction (M/I) of the 2s 1S--3p 1P, 5016 A transition in He I on temperature was measured. The thin carbon exciter foils were heated externally by nichrome resistance elements. The measurements of Hight et al. are duplicated; the energy and current dependences are the same for corresponding between beam heating and external heating. It was also observed that γ, the number of slow secondary electrons produced per incident ion, decreases with increasing foil temperature. These two effects, in conjunction, offer a plausible explanation for the variation of polarization with beam current density. 5 figures

  14. Temperature Dependence of Lattice Dynamics of Lithium 7

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beg, M. M.; Nielsen, Mourits

    1976-01-01

    parameter is found to be 3.490 ± 0.003 Å at 110 K and 3.537 ± 0.003 Å at 424 K. The elastic constants obtained at 293 K from the model parameters are (1011 dyn/cm2) C11=1.73±0.10, C12=1.31±0.20, and C44=0.84±0.060. The temperature dependence of elastic constants is also determined....... 10% smaller than those at 100 K. Temperature dependences of selected phonons have been studied from 110 K to near the melting point. The energy shifts and phonon linewidths have been evaluated at 293, 383, and 424 K by comparing the widths and energies to those measured at 110 K. The lattice...

  15. Temperature dependence of carrier capture by defects in gallium arsenide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wampler, William R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Modine, Normand A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-08-01

    This report examines the temperature dependence of the capture rate of carriers by defects in gallium arsenide and compares two previously published theoretical treatments of this based on multi phonon emission (MPE). The objective is to reduce uncertainty in atomistic simulations of gain degradation in III-V HBTs from neutron irradiation. A major source of uncertainty in those simulations is poor knowledge of carrier capture rates, whose values can differ by several orders of magnitude between various defect types. Most of this variation is due to different dependence on temperature, which is closely related to the relaxation of the defect structure that occurs as a result of the change in charge state of the defect. The uncertainty in capture rate can therefore be greatly reduced by better knowledge of the defect relaxation.

  16. Ab initio calculations of temperature dependent resistivity for transition metals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wagenknecht, D.; Turek, Ilja; Carva, K.

    Praha : Matfyzpress, 2015 - (Šafránková, J.; Pavlů, J.), s. 42-47 ISBN 978-80-7378-311-2. [Week of Doctoral Students 2015. Praha (CZ), 02.06.2015-04.06.2015] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-13436S Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : electrical resistivity * temperature dependence * transition metals Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  17. On the temperature dependence of photoconductivity of color centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method to calculate thermal activation energy ΔE from photoconductivity of colour centres taking into account its temperature dependence is suggested. Comparison of ΔE for ionic crystals (KCl, KBr, KI, RbCl), prepared by theoretical and experimental ways is made. It is shown, that the calculated values of ΔE are close to the experimental ones and can be used to calculate values, the experimental data for which are absent

  18. Spatial dependence of the finite-temperature meson correlation function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spatial dependence of the finite-temperature meson correlation functions is studied in detail. The calculations are based on the first order expression of the perturbative QCD. From the asymptotic behaviour of the correlation function we read off the values of the meson screening masses which are in agreement with the Eletskii and Ioffe limit: mscr = 2πT. The problems connected with the regularization of the diverging expressions are discussed thoroughly. (author). 9 refs, 3 figs

  19. Temperature dependence of heat sensitization and thermotolerance induction with ethanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cytoxicity of 1 M ethanol was strongly temperature dependent; survival curves between 340 and 390C were similar to heat survival curves between 40 and 450 without ethanol. Ethanol was non-toxic at 220; at 34.50 and 35.50 ethanol survival curves were biphasic. The major effect of 1 M ethanol was an effective temperature shift of 6.4 Celsius degrees, although temperatures between 340 and 360 caused additional sensitization reminiscent of the stepdown heating phenomenon. Induction of thermotolerance with equitoxic ethanol exposures at 35.50 and 370 or with heat alone (10 min, 450) resulted in tolerance development with similar kinetics; in contrast, ethanol exposures at 220 did not induce any tolerance development with similar kinetics; in contrast, ethanol exposures at 220 did not induce any tolerance to hyperthermia. These data provide a rationale for conflicting reports in the literature regarding thermotolerance induction by ethanol and suggest that ethanol causes ''heat'' stress at temperatures that are generally considered to be physiological. This interpretation predicts that the use of ethanol and other organic solvents in high concentrations will cause effects at 370 that normally occur only at hyperthermic temperatures, including membrane perturbations and HSP synthesis, and that ''physiological'' temperatures must be precisely controlled under those conditions

  20. Neutron flux shape dependent temperature distribution in a fuel pellet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuel centerline temperature is an important parameter in a fuel pin performance analysis. The quantitative measure of fuel centerline temperature depends on coolant temperature, thermal conductivity of the fuel and heat generation rate in the fuel pin. In general, fuel performance studies are carried out by assuming uniform volumetric heat generation across the fuel pin. However, fission rate is not uniform across the fuel pin. Due to self shielding effect, the thermal neutron flux shows a depression in the central region of the fuel pellet. Hence, more heat is generated in the peripheral region as compared to the central region. It is observed that in a thermal reactor, assumption of uniform heat generation across pellet gives a conservative value of fuel centerline temperature as compared to the centrally depressed heat generation for same linear heat rate. In this paper the variation of temperature distribution for various spatial shapes of the heat generation is brought out. The effect of enrichment on the heat generation profile and the difference between fuel centerline temperatures, with and without the assumption of uniform heat generation, has also been brought out. (author)

  1. Temperature Dependency of Water Vapor Permeability of Shape Memory Polyurethane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Yue-min; HU Jin-lian; YAN Hao-jing

    2002-01-01

    Solution-cast films of shape memory polyurethane have beea investigated. Differential scanning calorimetry,DMA, tensile test, water vapor permeability and the shape merry effect were carried out to characterize these polyurethane membranes. Samples cast at higher temperatures contained more hard segment in the crystalline state than a sample cast at lower temperature. The change in the water vapor permeability (WVP) of SMPU films with respect to the temperature follows an S- shaped curve, and increases abruptly at Tm of the soft segment for the fractional free volume (FFV, the ratio of free volume and specific volume in polymers) increased linearly with temperature. The water vapor permeability dependency of the temperature and humidity contribute to the result of the change of diffusion and solubility with the surrounding air condition. The diffusion coefficient (D)are the function of temperature and show good fit the Arrhenius form but show different parameter values when above and below Tg. The crystalline state hardsegment is necessary for the good shape memory effect.

  2. Temperature dependence of the Soret coefficient of ionic colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehnem, A L; Figueiredo Neto, A M; Aquino, R; Campos, A F C; Tourinho, F A; Depeyrot, J

    2015-10-01

    The temperature dependence of the Soret coefficient S(T)(T) in electrostatically charged magnetic colloids is investigated. Two different ferrofluids, with different particles' mean dimensions, are studied. In both cases we obtain a thermophilic behavior of the Soret effect. The temperature dependence of the Soret coefficient is described assuming that the nanoparticles migrate along the ionic thermoelectric field created by the thermal gradient. A model based on the contributions from the thermoelectrophoresis and variation of the double-layer energy, without fitting parameters, is used to describe the experimental results of the colloid with the bigger particles. To do so, independent measurements of the ζ potential, mass diffusion coefficient, and Seebeck coefficient are performed. The agreement of the theory and the experimental results is rather good. In the case of the ferrofluid with smaller particles, it is not possible to get experimentally reliable values of the ζ potential and the model described is used to evaluate this parameter and its temperature dependence. PMID:26565244

  3. Temperature dependence of hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cell performances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesen, Y.; Stuckelberger, M.; Haug, F.-J.; Ballif, C.; Wyrsch, N.

    2016-01-01

    Thin-film hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar (a-Si:H) cells are known to have better temperature coefficients than crystalline silicon cells. To investigate whether a-Si:H cells that are optimized for standard conditions (STC) also have the highest energy yield, we measured the temperature and irradiance dependence of the maximum power output (Pmpp), the fill factor (FF), the short-circuit current density (Jsc), and the open-circuit voltage (Voc) for four series of cells fabricated with different deposition conditions. The parameters varied during plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PE-CVD) were the power and frequency of the PE-CVD generator, the hydrogen-to-silane dilution during deposition of the intrinsic absorber layer (i-layer), and the thicknesses of the a-Si:H i-layer and p-type hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide layer. The results show that the temperature coefficient of the Voc generally varies linearly with the Voc value. The Jsc increases linearly with temperature mainly due to temperature-induced bandgap reduction and reduced recombination. The FF temperature dependence is not linear and reaches a maximum at temperatures between 15 °C and 80 °C. Numerical simulations show that this behavior is due to a more positive space-charge induced by the photogenerated holes in the p-layer and to a recombination decrease with temperature. Due to the FF(T) behavior, the Pmpp (T) curves also have a maximum, but at a lower temperature. Moreover, for most series, the cells with the highest power output at STC also have the best energy yield. However, the Pmpp (T) curves of two cells with different i-layer thicknesses cross each other in the operating cell temperature range, indicating that the cell with the highest power output could, for instance, have a lower energy yield than the other cell. A simple energy-yield simulation for the light-soaked and annealed states shows that for Neuchâtel (Switzerland) the best cell at STC also has the best energy

  4. Temperature-dependent particle-number projected moment of inertia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Expressions of the parallel and perpendicular temperature-dependent particle-number projected nuclear moment of inertia have been established by means of a discrete projection method. They generalize that of the FTBCS method and are well adapted to numerical computation. The effects of particle-number fluctuations have been numerically studied for some even-even actinide nuclei by using the single-particle energies and eigenstates of a deformed Woods-Saxon mean field. It has been shown that the parallel moment of inertia is practically not modified by the use of the projection method. In contrast, the discrepancy between the projected and FTBCS perpendicular moment of inertia values may reach 5%. Moreover, the particle-number fluctuation effects vary not only as a function of the temperature but also as a function of the deformation for a given temperature. This is not the case for the system energy

  5. Temperature dependence of densities of Sb and Bi melts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GENG HaoRan; SUN ChunJing; WANG Rui; QI XiaoGang; ZHANG Ning

    2007-01-01

    The densities of Sb and Bi melts were investigated by an improved Archimedean method. The results show that the density of the Sb melt decreases linearly with increasing temperature, but the density of the Bi melt firstly increases and then decreases as the temperature increases. There is a maximum density value of 10.002 g/cm3 at 310℃, about 39℃ above the melting point. The temperature dependence of the Sb melt is well fitted with the expression ρ= 6.8590-5.8105×10-4T, and that of the Bi melt is fitted with ρ=10.3312-1.18×10-3T. The results were discussed from a microstructure viewpoint.

  6. Temperature dependence of dielectric properties of poly pyrrole composite films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The composite polymer films of poly pyrrole-poly(vinyl alcohol)-iron chloride were prepared in the form of as-cast films. The dielectric properties of the samples were measured at the frequency range of 20 Hz to 1 MHz at different temperatures (300 K up to 353 K) by Inductance Capacitance Resistance (LCR) meter. The results show that the dielectric properties were strongly dependent on the variation of temperature applied. The composite polymer films exhibit the combination of intrinsic dielectric anisotropy, as a result of the competition of free charges, mainly between the polaron in poly pyrrole and the electronic polarisation that corresponded to PVA matrix. The main mechanism behind this finding can be explained by the dipole movement which highly activate at higher temperatures. In addition, high mobility of dipoles movement induced by thermal energy enables them to easily orient towards applied electric field. (author)

  7. Temperature dependence of charge transport in conjugated single molecule junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huisman, Eek; Kamenetska, Masha; Venkataraman, Latha

    2011-03-01

    Over the last decade, the break junction technique using a scanning tunneling microscope geometry has proven to be an important tool to understand electron transport through single molecule junctions. Here, we use this technique to probe transport through junctions at temperatures ranging from 5K to 300K. We study three amine-terminated (-NH2) conjugated molecules: a benzene, a biphenyl and a terphenyl derivative. We find that amine groups bind selectively to undercoordinate gold atoms gold all the way down to 5K, yielding single molecule junctions with well-defined conductances. Furthermore, we find that the conductance of a single molecule junction increases with temperature and we present a mechanism for this temperature dependent transport result. Funded by a Rubicon Grant from The Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO) and the NSEC program of NSF under grant # CHE-0641523.

  8. Configuration and temperature dependence of magnetic damping in spin valves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joyeux, X.; Devolder, T.; Kim, Joo-Von; Gomez de la Torre, Y.; Eimer, S.; Chappert, C. [Institut d' Electronique Fondamentale, University Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France); UMR8622, CNRS, University Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2011-09-15

    Using vector-analyzer ferromagnetic resonance, we have studied the microwave susceptibility of a Py/Co/Cu/Co/MnIr spin valve over a large temperature range (5-450 K) and as a function of the magnetic configuration. An effective magnetization and Gilbert damping constant of 1.1 T and 0.021, respectively, are found for the permalloy free layer, with no discernible variation in temperature observed for either quantities. In contrast, the pinned layer magnetization is reduced by heating, and the exchange bias collapses near a temperature of 450 K. The ferromagnetic resonance linewidth of the free layer increases by 500 MHz when the layer magnetizations are aligned in antiparallel, which is attributed to a configuration-dependent contribution to the damping from spin pumping effects.

  9. Heat experiment design to estimate temperature dependent thermal properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental conditions are studied to optimize transient experiments for estimating temperature dependent thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity. A mathematical model of a specimen is the one-dimensional heat equation with boundary conditions of the second kind. Thermal properties are assumed to vary nonlinearly with temperature. Experimental conditions refer to the thermal loading scheme, sampling times and sensor location. A numerical model of experimental configurations is studied to elicit the optimal conditions. The numerical solution of the design problem is formulated on a regularization scheme with a stabilizer minimization without a regularization parameter. An explicit design criterion is used to reveal the optimal sensor location, heating duration and flux magnitude. Results obtained indicate that even the strongly nonlinear experimental design problem admits the aggregation of its solution and has a strictly defined optimal measurement scheme. Additional region of temperature measurements with allowable identification error is revealed.

  10. Temperature dependence of exchange field in exchange-spring magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pr8Fe88B4 ribbons prepared by melt spinning have been investigated by x-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis, thermomagnetic analysis, atom force microscopy, and superconducting quantum interface device magnetometer. The results show that the annealed ribbons consist of the Pr2Fe14B and α-Fe phases. The magnetization of soft α-Fe phase remains parallel to the magnetization of the hard Pr2Fe14B phase for fields less than the exchange field (Hex). The exchange field in exchange-spring magnets, determined from the demagnetization curves measured at various temperatures, increases with decreasing grain size and measure temperature. The temperature dependence of exchange field was analyzed qualitatively by the expression Hex=(AK)1/2/(Mst). [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  11. Temperature-Dependent Fission Barriers of Superheavy Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Pei, J C; Sheikh-Javid, A; Kerman, A K

    2009-01-01

    The dependence of fission barriers on the excitation energy of the compound nucleus impacts the survival probability of superheavy nuclei synthesized in heavy-ion fusion reactions. We study the temperature-dependent fission barriers by means of the self-consistent nuclear density functional theory. The equivalence of isothermal and isentropic descriptions is demonstrated. The effect of the particle gas is found to be negligible in the range of temperatures studied. Calculations have been carried out for $^{264}$Fm, $^{272}$Ds, $^{278}$112, $^{292}$114, and $^{312}$124. For nuclei around $^{278}$112 produced in "cold fusion" reactions, we predict a more rapid decrease of fission barriers with temperature as compared to the nuclei around $^{292}$114 synthesized in "hot fusion" experiments. This is explained in terms of the difference between the ground-state and fission-barrier temperatures. Our calculations are consistent with the long survival probabilities of the superheavy elements produced in Dubna with th...

  12. Temperature dependent electroreflectance study of CdTe solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadmium telluride is a promising material for large scale photovoltaic applications. In this paper we study CdS/CdTe heterojunction solar cells with electroreflectance spectroscopy. Both CdS and CdTe layers in solar cells were grown sequentially without intermediate processing by the close-space sublimation method. Electroreflectance measurements were performed in the temperature range of T = 100–300 K. Two solar cells were investigated with conversion efficiencies of 4.1% and 9.6%. The main focus in this work was to study the temperature dependent behavior of the broadening parameter and the bandgap energy of CdTe thin film in solar cells. Room temperature bandgap values of CdTe were Eg = 1.499 eV and Eg = 1.481 eV for higher and lower efficiency solar cells, respectively. Measured bandgap energies are lower than for single crystal CdTe. The formation of CdTe1−xSx solid solution layer on the surface of CdTe is proposed as a possible cause of lower bandgap energies. - Highlights: ► Temperature dependent electroreflectance measurements of CdS/CdTe solar cells ► Investigation of junction properties between CdS and CdTe ► Formation of CdTe1− xSx solid solution layer in the junction area

  13. Speed of light with temperature dependence of the expanding universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: From an extended relativistic dynamics for a particle moving in a cosmic background field with temperature T, we aim to obtain the speed of light with an explicit dependence on the background temperature of the universe. Although finding the speed of light in the early universe much larger than its current value, our approach does not violate the postulate of Special Relativity (SR). Moreover, it is shown that the high value of the speed of light in the early universe was drastically decreased before the beginning of the inflationary period. So we are led to conclude that the theory of Varying Speed of Light (VSL) should be questioned as a possible solution of the horizon problem. It is curious to notice that the speed of light with temperature dependence emerges from Magueijo-Smolin DSR equation when we consider the background thermal energy instead of simply a relativistic energy E of a single particle in their equation. Our approach is within the context of Sciama, Shrodinger and Mach since we are considering the presence of the whole universe, which modifies the energy of the particle by means of a background field with temperature T. (author)

  14. Temperature-dependent mechanics in suspended graphene systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storch, Isaac Robert

    Graphene is an atomically thin material with unique electrical, optical, and mechanical properties. In this thesis, we explore some of the interesting temperature-dependent mechanics of graphene membranes. We start by presenting the typical mechanical theory used by experimentalists to model a suspended graphene membrane in the presence of an electrostatic force, and we expand it to account for various effects, such as slack, capacitive softening, and dynamic changes in tension. We also perform finite element analysis using COMSOL Multiphysics software and compare the results with the analytic solution. Then, we show how to use the transfer matrix technique to model graphene optically as an infinitesimal conducting boundary. We solve for the reflectance of a graphene sheet parallel to a perfect mirror, which is important for measurements using optical detection. Next, we summarize the first measurement of photothermal optomechanics in graphene resonators, demonstrate both self-oscillation and cooling, and develop a theory to predict the optomechanical spring constant induced by photothermal forces. Finally, we develop an optical technique for sensing the static deflection of a graphene membrane and use it to measure the temperature dependence of the Young's modulus of graphene for the first time. We find that the room temperature modulus is much softer than expected from thermal rippling theories, but it stiffens significantly at low temperature.

  15. Unconventional scaling of the anomalous Hall effect accompanying electron localization correction in the dirty regime

    KAUST Repository

    Lu, Y. M.

    2013-03-05

    Scaling of the anomalous Hall conductivity to longitudinal conductivity σAH∝σ2xx has been observed in the dirty regime of two-dimensional weak and strong localization regions in ultrathin, polycrystalline, chemically disordered, ferromagnetic FePt films. The relationship between electron transport and temperature reveals a quantitatively insignificant Coulomb interaction in these films, while the temperature dependent anomalous Hall conductivity experiences quantum correction from electron localization. At the onset of this correction, the low-temperature anomalous Hall resistivity begins to be saturated when the thickness of the FePt film is reduced, and the corresponding Hall conductivity scaling exponent becomes 2, which is above the recent unified theory of 1.6 (σAH∝σ1.6xx). Our results strongly suggest that the correction of the electron localization modulates the scaling exponent of the anomalous Hall effect.

  16. Temperature-dependent emergence of Osmia cornifrons (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae) adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Joseph; Son, Youngsoo; Park, Yong-Lak

    2009-12-01

    Japanese hornfaced bees Osmia cornifrons (Radoszkowski) (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae) are used for pollination of spring blooming fruit crops such as apple, pear, and blueberry. Because O. cornifrons has a short adult life span, synchronization of bee emergence with bloom is critical to maximize crop pollination. This study was conducted to determine lower temperature thresholds (LTDs), optimum temperatures, and required degree-day accumulation for emergence of O. cornifrons adults. Patterns of temperature-dependent emergence of O. cornifrons adults at seven temperatures (3.9, 12.0, 18.6, 26.6, 30.3, 35.6, and 42.5 degrees C) were modeled and simulated with linear and nonlinear regression analyses. Results of this study showed that required degree-days (DD) for emergence of male and female O. cornifrons adults were 125.2 DD, with LTD of 8.9 degrees C and 179.8 DD, with LTD of 8.6 degrees C, respectively. The optimum temperatures for emergence were 36.5, 30.2, and 35.7 degrees C for male, female, and both sexes combined, respectively. This study indicated that emergence of O. cornifrons adults could be manipulated to synchronize with pollination periods of target fruit crops. PMID:20069827

  17. Temperature Dependent Studies of Conformational Vibrational Modes of Biological Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markelz, A. G.; Pawar, A.

    2001-03-01

    Low frequency vibrational modes of proteins are correlated to conformation and conformational change critical to biochemical activity, however direct measurements of these modes has been impeded by limitations in spectroscopic techniques. We are presently exploring the use of the high sensitivity FIR spectroscopic technique of pulsed terahertz spectroscopy to measure these modes as a function of conformational state. Initial measurements have been preformed using bovine heart cytochrome c and the chromophore of photoactive yellow protein, p-coumaric acid (PCA). We have measured the temperature dependence (77 K - 300 K) of the far infrared absorption (2-100 cm-1) using both solid state and solution samples. Sample preparation techniques to eliminate etalon in the spectra will be discussed. For cytochrome c, a distinct absorption at 10 cm-1 is seen at room temperature that narrows and slightly red shifts as the temperature decreases. For PCA, the FIR absorption remains broad at lower temperatures, with an overall increase in FIR absorption at lower temperatures. We will discuss the implications of these measurements for future studies of conformational dynamics in these proteins.

  18. Theoretical description of anomalous properties of novel room temperature multiferroics Pb(Fe1/2Ta1/2)x(Zr0.53Ti0.47)1-xO3 and Pb(Fe1/2Nb1/2)x(Zr0.53Ti0.47)1-xO3

    OpenAIRE

    Glinchuk, Maya D.; Eliseev, Eugene A.; Morozovska, Anna N.

    2015-01-01

    The theoretical description of the anomalous ferroelectric, ferromagnetic and magnetoelectric properties of Pb(Fe1/2Ta1/2)x(Zr0.53Ti0.47)1-xO3 and Pb(Fe1/2Nb1/2)x(Zr0.53Ti0.47)1-xO3 micro-ceramics is given. We performed calculations of temperature, composition and external field dependence of ferroelectric, ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic phases transition temperatures, remanent polarization, magnetization, hysteresis loops, coercive fields, dielectric permittivity and magnetoelectric cou...

  19. Temperature Dependence of Radiation Induced Conductivity in Insulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study measures Radiation Induced Conductivity (RIC) of Low Density Polyethylene (LDPE) over temperatures ranging from ∼110 K to ∼350 K. RIC occurs when incident ionizing radiation deposits energy and excites electrons into the conduction band of insulators. Conductivity was measured when a voltage was applied across vacuum-baked, thin film LDPE polymer samples in a parallel plate geometry. RIC was calculated as the difference in sample conductivity under no incident radiation and under an incident ∼4 MeV electron beam at low incident fluxes of 10-4-10-1 Gr/sec. The steady-state RIC was found to agree well with the standard power law relation, σRIC = kRIC·D ring Δ between conductivity, σ and adsorbed dose rate, D ring . Both the proportionality constant, kRIC, and the power, δ, were found to be temperature dependant above ∼250 K, with behavior consistent with photoconductivity models developed for localized trap states in disordered semiconductors. Below ∼250 K, kRIC and Δ exhibited little change. The observed difference in temperature dependence might be related to a structural phase transition seen at Tβ∼256 K in prior studies of mechanical and thermodynamic properties of LDPE.

  20. Temperature dependence of the electrical properties of hydrogen titanate nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Diego C. B.; Brandão, Frederico D.; Krambrock, Klaus; Ferlauto, Andre S. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais 31270-901 (Brazil); Fonseca, Fabio C. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares, IPEN/CNEN-SP, 05508-000 São Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-11-14

    The temperature dependence of the electrical properties of hydrogen-rich titanate nanotubes (H-TNTs) in the 90–270 °C range was investigated by impedance spectroscopy. Three types of dominant conduction were found which depend on the previous thermal treatment of the samples. For untreated samples, at low temperatures (T < 100 °C), electrical conductivity is relatively high (>10{sup −4} S/cm at T ≈ 90 °C) and is dominated by protonic transport within structural water molecules. For thermal annealing in inert atmosphere up to 150 °C, water molecules are released from the nanotube structure resulting in a dehydrated H{sub 2}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 7} phase. Such phase has a low, thermally-dependent, electrical conductivity (10{sup −8} S/cm at T ≈ 90 °C) with activation energy of 0.68 eV. For samples annealed up to 260 °C, loss of OH groups, and consequent generation of oxygen vacancies, occurs that result in the non-stoichiometric H{sub 2(1−z)}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 7−z} phase. This phase has much higher conductivity (10{sup −5} S/cm at T ≈ 90 °C) and lower associated activation energy (0.40 eV). The generation of oxygen vacancies is confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance measurements at room temperature, which revealed the presence of single-electron-trapped oxygen vacancies. The activation energy value found is consistent with the thermal ionization energy of the oxygen vacancies. Such defect formation represents the initial stage of the phase transformation from titanate to TiO{sub 2} (B). X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy measurements also support such interpretation.

  1. Gas diffusion and temperature dependence of bubble nucleation during irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foreman, A. J. E.; Singh, Bachu Narain

    The continuous production of gases at relatively high rates under fusion irradiation conditions may enhance the nucleation of cavities. This can cause dimensional changes and could induce embrittlement arising from gas accumulation on grain boundaries. Computer calculations have been made of the...... diatomic nucleation of helium bubbles, assuming helium to diffuse substitutionally, with radiation-enhanced diffusion at lower temperatures. The calculated temperature dependence of the bubble density shows excellent agreement with that observed in 600 MeV proton irradiations, including a reduction in...... activation energy below Tm/2. The coalescence of diatomic nuclei due to Brownian motion markedly improves the agreement and also provides a well-defined terminal density. Bubble nucleation by this mechanism is sufficiently fast to inhibit any appreciable initial loss of gas to grain boundaries during the...

  2. Temperature Dependence of the Particle Diffusion Coefficient in Dust Grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechal, Radim; Richterova, Ivana; Pavlu, Jiri; Safrankova, Jana; Nemecek, Zdenek

    2014-05-01

    During the interaction of ions/neutrals with dust grains, some of the particles are implanted into the grain and, as a consequence, the density gradient induces their diffusion toward the grain surface. Their release can cause a transport of these particles over large distances in space. In our laboratory experiment, measurements of the diffusion coefficient of the particles implanted into the dust grain are carried out in an electrodynamic quadrupole trap. Although experimental setup does not allow an assessment of the dust grain temperature, it can be modified (e.g., by changing thermal radiation from the surrounding walls, laser irradiation, etc.). We present an upgraded laboratory set-up and the resulting temperature dependence of diffusion coefficient estimations and discuss implications for the space dust.

  3. A heat exchanger computational procedure for temperature-dependent fouling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiappetta, L. M.; Szetela, E. J.

    1981-01-01

    A novel heat exchanger computational procedure is described which provides a means of rapidly calculating the distributions of fluid and wall temperatures, deposit formation, and pressure loss at various points in a heat exchanger. The procedure is unique in that it is capable of treating wide variations in heat exchanger geometry without recourse to restrictive assumptions concerning heat exchanger type (e.g., co-flow, counterflow, cross flow devices, etc.). The analysis has been used extensively to predict the performance of cross-counterflow heat exchangers in which one fluid behaves as a perfect gas (e.g., air) while the other fluid is assumed to be a distillate fuel. The model has been extended to include the effects on heat exchanger performance of time varying inflow conditions. Heat exchanger performance degradation due to deposit formation with time can be simulated, making this procedure useful in predicting the effects of temperature-dependent fouling.

  4. Temperature dependence of the conductance in diluted magnetic semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect that the ferromagnetic order has on the electrical properties of the diluted magnetic semiconductors is investigated by analyzing the temperature dependence of the dielectric constant and the resistivity. We use a six band Kohn-Luttinger Hamiltonian, thermal fluctuations are treated in the mean-field approximation, carrier-carrier interaction in the random phase approximation, and transport properties using the relaxation time approximation. Resistivity changes near 20% when going from zero to Curie temperature are obtained in good agreement with experiment. We explain this change in the resistivity in terms of the variation of the Fermi surface and the transport scattering time when going from the ferromagnetic phase to the paramagnetic phase

  5. Temperature dependence of the dielectric constant of acrylic dielectric elastomer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, Junjie; Chen, Hualing; Li, Bo; Chang, Longfei [Xi' an Jiaotong University, State Key Laboratory for Strength and Vibration of Mechanical Structures, Xi' an (China); Xi' an Jiaotong University, School of Mechanical Engineering, Xi' an (China)

    2013-02-15

    The dielectric constant is an essential electrical parameter to the achievable voltage-induced deformation of the dielectric elastomer. This paper primarily focuses on the temperature dependence of the dielectric constant (within the range of 173 K to 373 K) for the most widely used acrylic dielectric elastomer (VHB 4910). First the dielectric constant was investigated experimentally with the broadband dielectric spectrometer (BDS). Results showed that the dielectric constant first increased with temperature up to a peak value and then dropped to a relative small value. Then by analyzing the fitted curves, the Cole-Cole dispersion equation was found better to characterize the rising process before the peak values than the Debye dispersion equation, while the decrease process afterward can be well described by the simple Debye model. Finally, a mathematical model of dielectric constant of VHB 4910 was obtained from the fitted results which can be used to further probe the electromechanical stability of the dielectric elastomers. (orig.)

  6. Temperature-dependent potential in cluster-decay process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharaei, R.; Zanganeh, V.

    2016-08-01

    Role of the thermal effects of the parent nucleus in the Coulomb barrier and the half-life of 28 cluster-decays is systematically analyzed within the framework of the proximity formalism, namely proximity potential 2010. The WKB approximation is used to determine the penetration probability of the emitted cluster. It is shown that the height and width of the Coulomb barrier in the temperature-dependent proximity potential are less than its temperature-independent version. Moreover, this investigation reveals that the calculated values of half-life for selected cluster-decays are in better agreement with the experimental data when the mentioned effects are imposed on the proximity approach. A discussion is also presented about the predictions of the present thermal approach for cluster-decay half-lives of the super-heavy-elements.

  7. The Dependence of Differential Rotation on Temperature and Rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, J R; Donati, J F; James, D J; Marsden, S C; Petit, P

    2004-01-01

    We use Doppler imaging techniques to determine the dependence of starspot rotation rates on latitude in an homogeneous sample of young, rapidly-rotating solar analogues. A solar-like differential rotation law is used, where the rotation depends on sin$^2$($\\theta$), where $\\theta$ is the stellar latitude. By including this term in the image reconstruction process, using starspots as tracers, we are able to determine the magnitude of the shear over more than one rotation cycle. We also consider results from matched filter starspot tracking techniques, where individual starspot rotation rates are determined. In addition we have re-analysed published results and present a new measurement for the K3 dwarf, Speedy Mic. A total of 10 stars of spectral type G2 - M2 are considered. We find a trend towards decreasing surface differential rotation with decreasing effective temperature. The implied approach to solid body rotation with increasing relative convection zone depth implies that the dynamo mechanism operating ...

  8. Investigating temperature degradation in THz quantum cascade lasers by examination of temperature dependence of output power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albo, Asaf, E-mail: asafalbo@gmail.com; Hu, Qing [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2015-03-30

    In this paper, we demonstrate a method to investigate the temperature degradation of THz quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) based on analyzing the dependence of lasing output power on temperature. The output power is suggested to decrease exponentially with some characteristic activation energy indicative of the degradation mechanism. As a proof of concept, Arrhenius plots of power versus temperature are used to extract the activation energy in vertical transition THz QCLs. The extracted energies are consistent with thermally activated longitudinal optical-phonon scattering being the dominant degradation mechanism, as is generally accepted. The extracted activation energy values are shown to be in good agreement with the values predicted from laser spectra.

  9. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence of surface-engineered silicon nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Somak; Švrček, Vladimir; Macias-Montero, Manual; Velusamy, Tamilselvan; Mariotti, Davide

    2016-06-01

    In this work we report on temperature-dependent photoluminescence measurements (15–300 K), which have allowed probing radiative transitions and understanding of the appearance of various transitions. We further demonstrate that transitions associated with oxide in SiNCs show characteristic vibronic peaks that vary with surface characteristics. In particular we study differences and similarities between silicon nanocrystals (SiNCs) derived from porous silicon and SiNCs that were surface-treated using a radio-frequency (RF) microplasma system.

  10. Temperature dependence of the receiver noise temperature and IF bandwidth of superconducting hot electron bolometer mixers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we study the temperature dependence of the receiver noise temperature and IF noise bandwidth of superconducting hot electron bolometer (HEB) mixers. Three superconducting NbN HEB devices of different transition temperatures (Tc) are measured at 0.85 THz and 1.4 THz at different bath temperatures (Tbath) between 4 K and 9 K. Measurement results demonstrate that the receiver noise temperature of superconducting NbN HEB devices is nearly constant for Tbath/Tc, less than 0.8, which is consistent with the simulation based on a distributed hot-spot model. In addition, the IF noise bandwidth appears independent of Tbath/Tc, indicating the dominance of phonon cooling in the investigated HEB devices. (paper)

  11. Temperature dependent transport characteristics of graphene/n-Si diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parui, S.; Ruiter, R.; Zomer, P. J.; Wojtaszek, M.; Wees, B. J. van; Banerjee, T., E-mail: T.Banerjee@rug.nl [Physics of Nanodevices, Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands)

    2014-12-28

    Realizing an optimal Schottky interface of graphene on Si is challenging, as the electrical transport strongly depends on the graphene quality and the fabrication processes. Such interfaces are of increasing research interest for integration in diverse electronic devices as they are thermally and chemically stable in all environments, unlike standard metal/semiconductor interfaces. We fabricate such interfaces with n-type Si at ambient conditions and find their electrical characteristics to be highly rectifying, with minimal reverse leakage current (<10{sup −10} A) and rectification of more than 10{sup 6}. We extract Schottky barrier height of 0.69 eV for the exfoliated graphene and 0.83 eV for the CVD graphene devices at room temperature. The temperature dependent electrical characteristics suggest the influence of inhomogeneities at the graphene/n-Si interface. A quantitative analysis of the inhomogeneity in Schottky barrier heights is presented using the potential fluctuation model proposed by Werner and Güttler.

  12. Temperature dependent transport characteristics of graphene/n-Si diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Realizing an optimal Schottky interface of graphene on Si is challenging, as the electrical transport strongly depends on the graphene quality and the fabrication processes. Such interfaces are of increasing research interest for integration in diverse electronic devices as they are thermally and chemically stable in all environments, unlike standard metal/semiconductor interfaces. We fabricate such interfaces with n-type Si at ambient conditions and find their electrical characteristics to be highly rectifying, with minimal reverse leakage current (<10−10 A) and rectification of more than 106. We extract Schottky barrier height of 0.69 eV for the exfoliated graphene and 0.83 eV for the CVD graphene devices at room temperature. The temperature dependent electrical characteristics suggest the influence of inhomogeneities at the graphene/n-Si interface. A quantitative analysis of the inhomogeneity in Schottky barrier heights is presented using the potential fluctuation model proposed by Werner and Güttler

  13. Interpretation of the temperature dependence of equilibrium and rate constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winzor, Donald J; Jackson, Craig M

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this review is to draw attention to potential pitfalls in attempts to glean mechanistic information from the magnitudes of standard enthalpies and entropies derived from the temperature dependence of equilibrium and rate constants for protein interactions. Problems arise because the minimalist model that suffices to describe the energy differences between initial and final states usually comprises a set of linked equilibria, each of which is characterized by its own energetics. For example, because the overall standard enthalpy is a composite of those individual values, a positive magnitude for DeltaH(o) can still arise despite all reactions within the subset being characterized by negative enthalpy changes: designation of the reaction as being entropy driven is thus equivocal. An experimenter must always bear in mind the fact that any mechanistic interpretation of the magnitudes of thermodynamic parameters refers to the reaction model rather than the experimental system. For the same reason there is little point in subjecting the temperature dependence of rate constants for protein interactions to transition-state analysis. If comparisons with reported values of standard enthalpy and entropy of activation are needed, they are readily calculated from the empirical Arrhenius parameters. PMID:16897812

  14. Magnetoresistance and Anomalous Hall Effect of InSb Doped with Mn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Kochura

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Transport properties of polycrystalline (In, MnSb samples are investigated. Behavior of the temperature and magnetic field dependencies of the resistivity, anomalous Hall coefficient and magnetoresistivity at low temperatures points out the influence of Mn complexes, Mn ions and nano- and microsizes MnSb precipitates on charge transport.

  15. Phenomenological Spin Transport Theory Driven by Anomalous Nernst Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Tomohiro

    2016-07-01

    Several experimental efforts such as material investigation and structure improvement have been made recently to find a large anomalous Nernst effect in ferromagnetic metals. Here, we develop a theory of spin transport driven by the anomalous Nernst effect in a diffusive ferromagnetic/nonmagnetic multilayer. Starting from a phenomenological formula of a spin-dependent electric current, the theoretical formulas of electric voltage and spin torque generated by the anomalous Nernst effect are derived. The magnitude of the electric voltage generated from the spin current via the inverse spin Hall effect is on the order of 0.1 µV for currently available experimental parameter values. The temperature gradient necessary to switch the magnetization is quite larger than the typical experimental value. The separation of the contributions of the Seebeck and transverse spin Seebeck effects is also discussed.

  16. Dependence of friction on roughness, velocity, and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Yi; Dubé, Martin; Grant, Martin

    2008-03-01

    We study the dependence of friction on surface roughness, sliding velocity, and temperature. Expanding on the classic treatment of Greenwood and Williamson, we show that the fractal nature of a surface has little influence on the real area of contact and the static friction coefficient. A simple scaling argument shows that the static friction exhibits a weak anomaly μ˜A0-χ/4 , where A0 is the apparent area and χ is the roughness exponent of the surface. We then develop a method to calculate atomic-scale friction between a microscopic asperity, such as the tip of a friction force microscope (FFM) and a solid substrate. This method, based on the thermal activation of the FFM tip, allows a quantitative extraction of all the relevant microscopic parameters and reveals a universal scaling behavior of atomic friction on velocity and temperature. This method is extended to include a soft atomic substrate in order to simulate FFM scans more realistically. The tip is connected with the support of the cantilever by an ideal spring and the substrate is simulated with a ball-spring model. The tip and substrate are coupled with repulsive potentials. Simulations are done at different temperatures and scanning velocities on substrates with different elastic moduli. Stick-slip motion of the tip is observed, and the numerical results of the friction force and distribution of force maxima match the theoretical framework.

  17. Anomalous Hall effect in Fe/Gd bilayers

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, W. J.

    2010-04-01

    Non-monotonic dependence of anomalous Hall resistivity on temperature and magnetization, including a sign change, was observed in Fe/Gd bilayers. To understand the intriguing observations, we fabricated the Fe/Gd bilayers and single layers of Fe and Gd simultaneously. The temperature and field dependences of longitudinal resistivity, Hall resistivity and magnetization in these films have also been carefully measured. The analysis of these data reveals that these intriguing features are due to the opposite signs of Hall resistivity/or spin polarization and different Curie temperatures of Fe and Gd single-layer films. Copyright (C) EPLA, 2010

  18. Variable Responses of Benthic Communities to Anomalously Warm Sea Temperatures on a High-Latitude Coral Reef

    OpenAIRE

    Bridge, Tom C.L.; Renata Ferrari; Mitch Bryson; Renae Hovey; Figueira, Will F.; Stefan B Williams; Oscar Pizarro; Harborne, Alastair R.; Maria Byrne

    2014-01-01

    High-latitude reefs support unique ecological communities occurring at the biogeographic boundaries between tropical and temperate marine ecosystems. Due to their lower ambient temperatures, they are regarded as potential refugia for tropical species shifting poleward due to rising sea temperatures. However, acute warming events can cause rapid shifts in the composition of high-latitude reef communities, including range contractions of temperate macroalgae and bleaching-induced mortality in c...

  19. Nonlocal Anomalous Hall Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Steven S.-L.; Vignale, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    The anomalous Hall (AH) effect is deemed to be a unique transport property of ferromagnetic metals, caused by the concerted action of spin polarization and spin-orbit coupling. Nevertheless, recent experiments have shown that the effect also occurs in a nonmagnetic metal (Pt) in contact with a magnetic insulator [yttrium iron garnet (YIG)], even when precautions are taken to ensure that there is no induced magnetization in the metal. We propose a theory of this effect based on the combined action of spin-dependent scattering from the magnetic interface and the spin-Hall effect in the bulk of the metal. At variance with previous theories, we predict the effect to be of first order in the spin-orbit coupling, just as the conventional anomalous Hall effect—the only difference being the spatial separation of the spin-orbit interaction and the magnetization. For this reason we name this effect the nonlocal anomalous Hall effect and predict that its sign will be determined by the sign of the spin-Hall angle in the metal. The AH conductivity that we calculate from our theory is in order of magnitude agreement with the measured values in Pt /YIG structures.

  20. Temperature dependence of the deformation behavior of type 316 stainless steel after low temperature neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A single heat of solution annealed 316 ss was irradiated to 7 and 18 dpa at 60, 200, 330, and 400 C. Tensile properties were studied vs dose and temperature. Large changes in yield strength, deformation mode, strain to necking (STN), and strain hardening capacity were seen. Magnitude of the changes are dependent on both irradiation temperature and neutron dose. Irradiation can more than triple the yield strength and decrease STN to <0.5% under certain conditions. A maximum increase in yield strength and a minimum in STN occur after irradiation at 330 C but failure mode remains ductile

  1. Time-dependent radiolytic yields at room temperature and temperature-dependent absorption spectra of the solvated electrons in polyols

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The molar extinction coefficients at the absorption maximum of the solvated electron spectrum have been evaluated to be 900, 970, and 1000 mol-1·m2 for 1,2-ethanediol (12ED), 1,2-propanediol (12PD), and 1,3-propanediol (13PD), respectively. These values are two-third or three-fourth of the value usually reported in the published report.Picosecond pulse radiolysis studies have aided in depicting the radiolytic yield of the solvated electron in these solvents as a function of time from picosecond to microsecond. The radiolytic yield in these viscous solvents is found to be strongly different from that of the water solution. The temperature dependent absorption spectra of the solvated electron in 12ED, 12PD, and 13PD have been also investigated. In all the three solvents, the optical spectra shift to the red with increasing temperature. While the shape of the spectra does not change in 13PD, a widening on the blue side of the absorption band is observed in 12ED and 12PD at elevated temperatures.

  2. Temperature dependence of the electronic structure of semiconductors and insulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poncé, S; Gillet, Y; Laflamme Janssen, J; Marini, A; Verstraete, M; Gonze, X

    2015-09-14

    The renormalization of electronic eigenenergies due to electron-phonon coupling (temperature dependence and zero-point motion effect) is sizable in many materials with light atoms. This effect, often neglected in ab initio calculations, can be computed using the perturbation-based Allen-Heine-Cardona theory in the adiabatic or non-adiabatic harmonic approximation. After a short description of the recent progresses in this field and a brief overview of the theory, we focus on the issue of phonon wavevector sampling convergence, until now poorly understood. Indeed, the renormalization is obtained numerically through a slowly converging q-point integration. For non-zero Born effective charges, we show that a divergence appears in the electron-phonon matrix elements at q → Γ, leading to a divergence of the adiabatic renormalization at band extrema. This problem is exacerbated by the slow convergence of Born effective charges with electronic wavevector sampling, which leaves residual Born effective charges in ab initio calculations on materials that are physically devoid of such charges. Here, we propose a solution that improves this convergence. However, for materials where Born effective charges are physically non-zero, the divergence of the renormalization indicates a breakdown of the adiabatic harmonic approximation, which we assess here by switching to the non-adiabatic harmonic approximation. Also, we study the convergence behavior of the renormalization and develop reliable extrapolation schemes to obtain the converged results. Finally, the adiabatic and non-adiabatic theories, with corrections for the slow Born effective charge convergence problem (and the associated divergence) are applied to the study of five semiconductors and insulators: α-AlN, β-AlN, BN, diamond, and silicon. For these five materials, we present the zero-point renormalization, temperature dependence, phonon-induced lifetime broadening, and the renormalized electronic band structure

  3. Temperature dependence of the electronic structure of semiconductors and insulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poncé, S., E-mail: samuel.pon@gmail.com; Gillet, Y.; Laflamme Janssen, J.; Gonze, X. [European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility and Institute of Condensed Matter and Nanosciences, Université catholique de Louvain, Chemin des étoiles 8, bte L07.03.01, B-1348 Louvain-la-neuve (Belgium); Marini, A. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Via Salaria Km 29.3, CP 10, 00016 Monterotondo Stazione (Italy); Verstraete, M. [European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility and Physique des matériaux et nanostructures, Université de Liège, Allée du 6 Août 17, B-4000 Liège (Belgium)

    2015-09-14

    The renormalization of electronic eigenenergies due to electron-phonon coupling (temperature dependence and zero-point motion effect) is sizable in many materials with light atoms. This effect, often neglected in ab initio calculations, can be computed using the perturbation-based Allen-Heine-Cardona theory in the adiabatic or non-adiabatic harmonic approximation. After a short description of the recent progresses in this field and a brief overview of the theory, we focus on the issue of phonon wavevector sampling convergence, until now poorly understood. Indeed, the renormalization is obtained numerically through a slowly converging q-point integration. For non-zero Born effective charges, we show that a divergence appears in the electron-phonon matrix elements at q → Γ, leading to a divergence of the adiabatic renormalization at band extrema. This problem is exacerbated by the slow convergence of Born effective charges with electronic wavevector sampling, which leaves residual Born effective charges in ab initio calculations on materials that are physically devoid of such charges. Here, we propose a solution that improves this convergence. However, for materials where Born effective charges are physically non-zero, the divergence of the renormalization indicates a breakdown of the adiabatic harmonic approximation, which we assess here by switching to the non-adiabatic harmonic approximation. Also, we study the convergence behavior of the renormalization and develop reliable extrapolation schemes to obtain the converged results. Finally, the adiabatic and non-adiabatic theories, with corrections for the slow Born effective charge convergence problem (and the associated divergence) are applied to the study of five semiconductors and insulators: α-AlN, β-AlN, BN, diamond, and silicon. For these five materials, we present the zero-point renormalization, temperature dependence, phonon-induced lifetime broadening, and the renormalized electronic band structure.

  4. Influenza virus transmission is dependent on relative humidity and temperature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anice C Lowen

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Using the guinea pig as a model host, we show that aerosol spread of influenza virus is dependent upon both ambient relative humidity and temperature. Twenty experiments performed at relative humidities from 20% to 80% and 5 degrees C, 20 degrees C, or 30 degrees C indicated that both cold and dry conditions favor transmission. The relationship between transmission via aerosols and relative humidity at 20 degrees C is similar to that previously reported for the stability of influenza viruses (except at high relative humidity, 80%, implying that the effects of humidity act largely at the level of the virus particle. For infected guinea pigs housed at 5 degrees C, the duration of peak shedding was approximately 40 h longer than that of animals housed at 20 degrees C; this increased shedding likely accounts for the enhanced transmission seen at 5 degrees C. To investigate the mechanism permitting prolonged viral growth, expression levels in the upper respiratory tract of several innate immune mediators were determined. Innate responses proved to be comparable between animals housed at 5 degrees C and 20 degrees C, suggesting that cold temperature (5 degrees C does not impair the innate immune response in this system. Although the seasonal epidemiology of influenza is well characterized, the underlying reasons for predominant wintertime spread are not clear. We provide direct, experimental evidence to support the role of weather conditions in the dynamics of influenza and thereby address a long-standing question fundamental to the understanding of influenza epidemiology and evolution.

  5. Temperature dependence of the deformation behavior of 316 stainless steel after low temperature neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawel-Robertson, J.E.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Grossbeck, M.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    The effects of low temperature neutron irradiation on the tensile behavior of 316 stainless steel have been investigated. A single heat of solution annealed 316 was irradiated to 7 and 18 dpa at 60, 200, 330, and 400{degrees}C. The tensile properties as a function of dose and as a function of temperature were examined. Large changes in yield strength, deformation mode, strain to necking, and strain hardening capacity were seen in this irradiation experiment. The magnitudes of the changes are dependent on both irradiation temperature and neutron dose. Irradiation can more than triple the yield strength over the unirradiated value and decrease the strain to necking (STN) to less than 0.5% under certain conditions. A maximum increase in yield strength and a minimum in the STN occur after irradiation at 330{degrees}C but the failure mode remains ductile.

  6. Inclusion of temperature dependent shell corrections in Landau theory for hot rotating nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G Shanmugam; P Arumugam

    2001-07-01

    Landau theory used for studying hot rotating nuclei usually uses zero temperature Strutinsky smoothed total energy for the temperature dependent shell corrections. This is replaced in this work by the temperature dependent Strutinsky smoothed free energy. Our results show that this replacement has only marginal effect for temperatures greater than 1 MeV but plays significant role at lower temperatures.

  7. Anomalous Freezing of Nano-Confined Water in Room-Temperature Ionic Liquid 1-Butyl-3-Methylimidazolium Nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Hiroshi; Takekiyo, Takahiro; Yoshimura, Yukihiro; Saihara, Koji; Shimizu, Akio

    2016-04-18

    Non-crystal formation of ice is investigated by simultaneous X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry measurements upon cooling to -100 °C. At room temperature, size-tunable water confinement (≈20 Å size) in a room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium nitrate, [C4 mim][NO3 ]) exists in a water-rich region (70-90 mol % D2 O). The confined water (water pocket) is characterized by almost monodispersive size distribution. In [C4 mim][NO3 ]-x mol % D2 O (70Bragg reflections and a distinct exothermal peak indicate that crystallization/cold crystallization both of [C4 mim][NO3 ] and D2 O is suppressed, even upon slow cooling and heating. PMID:26841088

  8. Temperature-Dependent Henry's Law Constants of Atmospheric Amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Chunbo; Kish, J Duncan; Roberts, Jason E; Dwebi, Iman; Chon, Nara; Liu, Yong

    2015-08-20

    There has been growing interest in understanding atmospheric amines in the gas phase and their mass transfer to the aqueous phase because of their potential roles in cloud chemistry, secondary organic aerosol formation, and the fate of atmospheric organics. Temperature-dependent Henry's law constants (KH) of atmospheric amines, a key parameter in atmospheric chemical transport models to account for mass transfer, are mostly unavailable. In this work, we investigated gas-liquid equilibria of five prevalent atmospheric amines, namely 1-propylamine, di-n-propylamine, trimethylamine, allylamine, and 4-methylmorpholine using bubble column technique. We reported effective KH, intrinsic KH, and gas phase diffusion coefficients of these species over a range of temperatures relevant to the lower atmosphere for the first time. The measured KH at 298 K and enthalpy of solution for 1-propylamine, di-n-propylamine, trimethylamine, allylamine, and 4-methylmorpholine are 61.4 ± 4.9 mol L(-1) atm(-1) and -49.0 ± 4.8 kJ mol(-1); 14.5 ± 1.2 mol L(-1) atm(-1) and -72.5 ± 6.8 kJ mol(-1); 8.9 ± 0.7 mol L(-1) atm(-1) and -49.6 ± 4.7 kJ mol(-1); 103.5 ± 10.4 mol L(-1) atm(-1) and -42.7 ± 4.3 kJ mol(-1); and 952.2 ± 114.3 mol L(-1) atm(-1) and -82.7 ± 9.7 kJ mol(-1), respectively. In addition, we evaluated amines' characteristic times to achieve gas-liquid equilibrium for partitioning between gas and aqueous phases. Results show gas-liquid equilibrium can be rapidly established at natural cloud droplets surface, but the characteristic times may be extended substantially at lower temperatures and pHs. Moreover, our findings imply that atmospheric amines are more likely to exist in cloud droplets, and ambient temperature, water content, and pH of aerosols play important roles in their partitioning. PMID:26200814

  9. Anomalous Hall effect in polycrystalline Ni films

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Zaibing

    2012-02-01

    We systematically studied the anomalous Hall effect in a series of polycrystalline Ni films with thickness ranging from 4 to 200 nm. It is found that both the longitudinal and anomalous Hall resistivity increased greatly as film thickness decreased. This enhancement should be related to the surface scattering. In the ultrathin films (46 nm thick), weak localization corrections to anomalous Hall conductivity were studied. The granular model, taking into account the dominated intergranular tunneling, has been employed to explain this phenomenon, which can explain the weak dependence of anomalous Hall resistivity on longitudinal resistivity as well. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Gain Flattening Filter Canceling Temperature Dependence of EDFA s gain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.; Ohmura; Y.; Ishizawa; H.; Nakaji; K.; Hashimoto; T.; Shibata; M.; Shigehara; A.; Inoue

    2003-01-01

    We have developed a gain flattening filter (GFF) for an erbium doped fiber (EDF) without temperature control systems. This GFF, which consists of temperature-sensitive long period gratings (LPGs) and a temperature compensated slanted fiber Bragg grating (SFBG), follows the gain shift of EDF with temperature. Gain variation of the EDFA less than 0.25dBp-p was achieved with the bandwidth of 37nm, and the temperature range 0-65℃ without any temperature control systems.

  11. Universal framework for temperature dependence prediction of the negative bias temperature instability based on microscope pictures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chenyue; Zhang, Lining; Lin, Xinnan; Chan, Mansun

    2016-04-01

    A universal framework for describing the temperature enhanced negative bias temperature instability (NBTI) is developed in this paper. Analytical time evolution models of the NBTI mechanisms, as Pb center generation and hole-transport in the oxygen vacancies, are proposed based on careful investigation of atom-level microscopic pictures. A logarithmic time function is derived to describe the interface state (Pb center) generation and recovery evolution by revealing a fact that the activation energy is significantly modified by the accumulation of generated defects. Corresponding coefficients, including the generation amplitudes and time constant, are identified depending on temperature linearly and exponentially. Moreover, the unrecoverable oxide hole-trapping is proposed resulted from the hole-transport among deep-level oxygen vacancies driven by electrical field within the gate oxide. A power-law time function is derived to describing this evolution, with time exponent linear to temperature. Parameters calculated by the proposed analytical models reveal good consistent with the parameters directly extracted from the measured data, indicating the validation and universality of the physical based framework in reproducing the parametric shift of the NBTI degradation under various temperature conditions and process technologies.

  12. Temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity in chiral carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mensah, N.G. [Department of Mathematics, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast (Ghana); Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy); Nkrumah, G. [Department of Physics, University of Ghana, Legon, Accra (Ghana) and Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy)]. E-mail: geon@ug.edu.gh; Mensah, S.Y. [Department of Physics, Laser and Fibre Optics Centre, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast (Ghana); Allotey, F.K.A. [Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Accra (Ghana)

    2004-08-30

    The thermal conductivity of a chiral carbon nanotube (CCNT) is calculated using a tractable analytical approach. This is based on solving the Boltzmann kinetic equation with energy dispersion relation obtained in the tight binding approximation. The results obtained are numerically analysed. Unusually high electron thermal conductivity {chi}{sub ez} is observed along the tubular axis. The dependence of {chi}{sub ez} against temperature T was plotted for varying {delta}{sub z} and a given {delta}{sub s} ({delta}{sub z} and {delta}{sub s} are the overlapping integrals (exchange energy) for the jumps along the tubular axis and the base helix, respectively). It is noted that {chi}{sub ez} shows a peaking behaviour before falling off at higher temperature. As {delta}{sub z} varies from 0.010 eV to 0.048 eV for a given {delta}{sub s}=0.0150 eV, the peak values of {chi}{sub ez} shift from 40000 W/m K at 100 K to 55000 W/m K at about 300 K. Interestingly our results at 104 K which is 41000 W/m K and occurred at {delta}{sub z}=0.023 eV compares very well with that reported for a 99.9% isotopically enriched {sup 12}C diamond crystal. Another interesting result obtained is the fact that the circumferential electron thermal conductivity {chi}{sub ec} appears to be very small. The ratio of {chi}{sub ez} to {chi}{sub ec} is of the order of 2.

  13. Observation of Anomalous Properties associated with the Low Temperature Structural Distortion in β-FeSe and Related Superconductorsa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu M. K.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of Superconductivity in the tetragonal phase FeSe provides a unique platform for the detailed investigation of the correlation between the physical properties and crystal structure to better understand the possible origin of superconductivity in the new iron-based superconductors. We have carried out a series of properties characterizations by measuring magnetic susceptibility, Raman, NMR and femtosecond spectroscopy on single crystals and epitaxial thin films of the FeSe and Te-doped Fe(SeTe samples. Our results show clearly the presence of anomalies in all the characterized properties at the temperature where a structural distortion from tetragonal to orthorhombic (or monoclinic appears for all superconducting samples, but not in the non-superconducting ones. This structural distortion was observed not accompanied by a magnetic ordering as commonly occurs in the parent compounds of FeAs-based superconductors. All the observations suggest that the low temperature structural distortion is essential for the occurrence of superconductivity in the FeSe and related compounds. Details of the experimental results will be presented and discussed.

  14. Temperature dependence of microwave oscillations in magnetic tunnel junctions with a perpendicularly magnetized free layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Peng; Feng, Jiafeng, E-mail: hxwei@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: jiafengfeng@iphy.ac.cn; Wei, Hongxiang, E-mail: hxwei@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: jiafengfeng@iphy.ac.cn; Han, Xiufeng [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Fang, Bin; Zhang, Baoshun; Zeng, Zhongming [Key Laboratory of Nanodevices and Applications, Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ruoshui Road 398, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2015-01-05

    We experimentally study the temperature dependence of the spin-transfer-torque-induced microwave oscillations in MgO-based magnetic tunnel junction nanopillars with a perpendicularly magnetized free layer. We demonstrate that the oscillation frequency increases rapidly with decreasing temperature, which is mainly ascribed to the temperature dependence of both the saturation magnetization and the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. We also find that a strong temperature dependence of the output power while a nonmonotonic temperature dependence of spectral linewidth are maintained for a constant dc bias in measured temperature range. Possible mechanisms leading to the different dependences of oscillation frequency, output power, and linewidth are discussed.

  15. Temperature dependence of penetration and coherence lengths in lead nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetization curves well below Tc of a lead nanowire array electrodeposited under pulsed voltage conditions are considered. Numerical simulations based on a two-dimensional resolution (2D model) of the Ginzburg-Landau (GL) equations for cylindrical configurations have also been developed. By freely adjusting the GL phenomenological lengths λ(T) and ξ(T), the experimental magnetization curves are reproduced to within a 10% error margin. The 2D model also allows us to check the cylindrical symmetry of the obtained configurations. Beyond the experimental-theoretical agreement, the question of whether the GL model remains valid far below Tc is also addressed. The temperature dependence of the adjusted characteristic lengths is compared with different theoretical and empirical laws. The most satisfactory agreement is achieved for the Gorter-Casimir two-fluid model. A comparison with a lead nanowire array electrodeposited under constant voltage conditions allows us to distinguish both samples in terms of their electronic mean free paths. The characterization of the latter quantities concurs perfectly with the experimental expectation given the different electrodeposition techniques

  16. Soft self-assembled nanoparticles with temperature-dependent properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovigatti, Lorenzo; Capone, Barbara; Likos, Christos N.

    2016-02-01

    The fabrication of versatile building blocks that reliably self-assemble into desired ordered and disordered phases is amongst the hottest topics in contemporary materials science. To this end, microscopic units of varying complexity, aimed at assembling the target phases, have been thought, designed, investigated and built. Such a path usually requires laborious fabrication techniques, especially when specific functionalisation of the building blocks is required. Telechelic star polymers, i.e., star polymers made of a number of f di-block copolymers consisting of solvophobic and solvophilic monomers grafted on a central anchoring point, spontaneously self-assemble into soft patchy particles featuring attractive spots (patches) on the surface. Here we show that the tunability of such a system can be widely extended by controlling the physical and chemical parameters of the solution. Indeed, under fixed external conditions the self-assembly behaviour depends only on the number of arms and on the ratio of solvophobic to solvophilic monomers. However, changes in temperature and/or solvent quality make it possible to reliably change the number and size of the attractive patches. This allows the steering of the mesoscopic self-assembly behaviour without modifying the microscopic constituents. Interestingly, we also demonstrate that diverse combinations of the parameters can generate stars with the same number of patches but different radial and angular stiffness. This mechanism could provide a neat way of further fine-tuning the elastic properties of the supramolecular network without changing its topology.

  17. Variable responses of benthic communities to anomalously warm sea temperatures on a high-latitude coral reef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridge, Tom C L; Ferrari, Renata; Bryson, Mitch; Hovey, Renae; Figueira, Will F; Williams, Stefan B; Pizarro, Oscar; Harborne, Alastair R; Byrne, Maria

    2014-01-01

    High-latitude reefs support unique ecological communities occurring at the biogeographic boundaries between tropical and temperate marine ecosystems. Due to their lower ambient temperatures, they are regarded as potential refugia for tropical species shifting poleward due to rising sea temperatures. However, acute warming events can cause rapid shifts in the composition of high-latitude reef communities, including range contractions of temperate macroalgae and bleaching-induced mortality in corals. While bleaching has been reported on numerous high-latitude reefs, post-bleaching trajectories of benthic communities are poorly described. Consequently, the longer-term effects of thermal anomalies on high-latitude reefs are difficult to predict. Here, we use an autonomous underwater vehicle to conduct repeated surveys of three 625 m(2) plots on a coral-dominated high-latitude reef in the Houtman Abrolhos Islands, Western Australia, over a four-year period spanning a large-magnitude thermal anomaly. Quantification of benthic communities revealed high coral cover (>70%, comprising three main morphospecies) prior to the bleaching event. Plating Montipora was most susceptible to bleaching, but in the plot where it was most abundant, coral cover did not change significantly because of post-bleaching increases in branching Acropora. In the other two plots, coral cover decreased while macroalgal cover increased markedly. Overall, coral cover declined from 73% to 59% over the course of the study, while macroalgal cover increased from 11% to 24%. The significant differences in impacts and post-bleaching trajectories among plots underline the importance of understanding the underlying causes of such variation to improve predictions of how climate change will affect reefs, especially at high-latitudes. PMID:25426718

  18. Variable responses of benthic communities to anomalously warm sea temperatures on a high-latitude coral reef.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom C L Bridge

    Full Text Available High-latitude reefs support unique ecological communities occurring at the biogeographic boundaries between tropical and temperate marine ecosystems. Due to their lower ambient temperatures, they are regarded as potential refugia for tropical species shifting poleward due to rising sea temperatures. However, acute warming events can cause rapid shifts in the composition of high-latitude reef communities, including range contractions of temperate macroalgae and bleaching-induced mortality in corals. While bleaching has been reported on numerous high-latitude reefs, post-bleaching trajectories of benthic communities are poorly described. Consequently, the longer-term effects of thermal anomalies on high-latitude reefs are difficult to predict. Here, we use an autonomous underwater vehicle to conduct repeated surveys of three 625 m(2 plots on a coral-dominated high-latitude reef in the Houtman Abrolhos Islands, Western Australia, over a four-year period spanning a large-magnitude thermal anomaly. Quantification of benthic communities revealed high coral cover (>70%, comprising three main morphospecies prior to the bleaching event. Plating Montipora was most susceptible to bleaching, but in the plot where it was most abundant, coral cover did not change significantly because of post-bleaching increases in branching Acropora. In the other two plots, coral cover decreased while macroalgal cover increased markedly. Overall, coral cover declined from 73% to 59% over the course of the study, while macroalgal cover increased from 11% to 24%. The significant differences in impacts and post-bleaching trajectories among plots underline the importance of understanding the underlying causes of such variation to improve predictions of how climate change will affect reefs, especially at high-latitudes.

  19. Anomalous Hall Effect in SnMnEuTe and SnMnErTe mixed crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Racka, K.; Kuryliszyn, I.; Arciszewska, M.; Dobrowolski, W.; Broto, J. -M.; Goiran, M.; Portugall, O.; Rakoto, H.; Raquet, B.; Dugaev, V.; Slynko, E. I.; Slynko, V. E.

    2002-01-01

    The Anomalous Hall Effect was investigated in IV-VI ferromagnetic semimagnetic semiconductors of Sn1-xMnxTe codoped with either Eu or Er. The analysis of experimental data: Hall resisitivity and magnetization showed that AHE coefficient RS depends on temperature, its value decreases with the temperature increase. We observe that above ferromagnet-paramagnet transition temperature RS changes sign. We discuss the possible physical mechanisms responsible for observed temperature dependence of RS...

  20. Effect of antiferromagnetic ordering on temperature dependent superconducting gap in ErNi2B2C: Laser-photoemission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have performed temperature (T)-dependent laser-photoemission spectroscopy of antiferromagnetic (AF) superconductor ErNi2B2C to study the electronic structure, especially the effect of AF ordering in T-dependent superconducting (SC) gap. To estimate the values of T-dependent SC gap, we fitted the experimental data by Dynes function having an anisotropic s-wave SC gap. From the fitting results, we find a sudden deviation from the BCS prediction just below TN. This observation can be well explained by the theoretical model, indicating that the origin of anomalous T-dependence is competition between rapid evolution of AF molecular field and SC condensation energy.

  1. Gain Flattening Filter Canceling Temperature Dependence of EDFA's gain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Ohmura; Y. Ishizawa; H. Nakaji; K. Hashimoto; T. Shibata; M. Shigehara; A. Inoue

    2003-01-01

    We have developed a gain flattening filter(GFF) for an erbium doped fiber (EDF) without temperature control systems. This GFF, which consists of temperature-sensitive long period gratings (LPGs)and a temperature compensated slanted fiber Bragg grating (SFBG), follows the gain shift of EDF with temperature. Gain variation of the EDFA less than 0.25dBp-p was achieved with the bandwidth of 37nm,and the temperature range 0-65℃ without and temperature control systems.

  2. Anomalous Micellization of Pluronic Block Copolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardi, Amanda; Ryu, Chang Y.

    2014-03-01

    Poly(ethylene oxide) - poly(propylene oxide) - poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO-PPO-PEO) block copolymers, commercially known as Pluronics, are a unique family of amphiphilic triblock polymers, which self-assemble into micelles in aqueous solution. These copolymers have shown promise in therapeutic, biomedical, cosmetic, and nanotech applications. As-received samples of Pluronics contain low molecular weight impurities (introduced during the manufacturing and processing), that are ignored in most applications. It has been observed, however, that in semi-dilute aqueous solutions, at concentrations above 1 wt%, the temperature dependent micellization behavior of the Pluronics is altered. Anomalous behavior includes a shift of the critical micellization temperature and formation of large aggregates at intermediate temperatures before stable sized micelles form. We attribute this behavior to the low molecular weight impurities that are inherent to the Pluronics which interfere with the micellization process. Through the use of Dynamic Light Scattering and HPLC, we compared the anomalous behavior of different Pluronics of different impurity levels to their purified counterparts.

  3. Anomalous hysteresis properties of iron films deposited on liquid surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Quan-Lin; Feng, Chun-Mu; Xu, Xiao-Jun; Jin, Jin-Sheng; Xia, A.-Gen; Ye, Gao-Xiang

    2005-07-01

    A nearly free sustained iron film system, deposited on silicone oil surfaces by vapor-phase deposition method, has been fabricated and its crystal structure as well as magnetic properties has been studied. Both the temperature-dependent coercivity Hc(T) and exchange anisotropy field HE(T) of the iron films possess a maximum peak around the critical temperature Tcrit=10-15 and 4K, respectively. Our experimental results show that the anomalous hysteresis properties mainly result from the oxide surfaces of the films with spin-glass-like phase below freezing temperature Tf=30-50K.

  4. Temperature dependence of the Cl atom reaction with deuterated methanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Frank; Portmann, Robert W; Ravishankara, A R; Burkholder, James B

    2015-05-14

    Kinetic isotope effect (KIE) and reaction rate coefficients, k1-k4, for the gas-phase reaction of Cl atoms with (12)CH3D (k1), (12)CH2D2 (k2), (12)CHD3 (k3), and (12)CD4 (k4) over the temperature range 223-343 K in 630 Torr of synthetic air are reported. Rate coefficients were measured using a relative rate technique with (12)CH4 as the primary reference compound. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to monitor the methane isotopologue loss. The obtained KIE values were (12)CH3D: KIE1(T) = (1.227 ± 0.004) exp((43 ± 5)/T); (12)CH2D2: KIE2(T) = (1.14 ± 0.20) exp((191 ± 60)/T); (12)CHD3: KIE3(T) = (1.73 ± 0.34) exp((229 ± 60)/T); and (12)CD4: KIE4(T) = (1.01 ± 0.3) exp((724 ± 19)/T), where KIEx(T) = kCl+(12)CH4(T)/kx(T). The quoted uncertainties are at the 2σ (95% confidence) level and represent the precision of our data. The following Arrhenius expressions and 295 K rate coefficient values (in units of cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)) were derived from the above KIE using a rate coefficient of 7.3 × 10(-12) exp(-1280/T) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) for the reaction of Cl with (12)CH4: k1(T) = (5.95 ± 0.70) × 10(-12) exp(-(1323 ± 50)/T), k1(295 K) = (6.7 ± 0.8) × 10(-14); k2(T) = (6.4 ± 1.3) × 10(-12) exp(-(1471 ± 60)/T), k2(295 K) = (4.4 ± 0.9) × 10(-14); k3(T) = (4.2 ± 1.0) × 10(-12) exp(-(1509 ± 60)/T), k3(295 K) = (2.53 ± 0.6) × 10(-14); and k4(T) = (7.13 ± 2.3) × 10(-12) exp(-(2000 ± 120)/T), k4(295 K) = (0.81 ± 0.26) × 10(-14). The reported uncertainties in the pre-exponential factors are 2σ and include estimated systematic errors in our measurements and the uncertainty in the reference reaction rate coefficient. The results from this study are compared with previously reported room-temperature rate coefficients for each of the deuterated methanes as well as the available temperature dependent data for the Cl atom reactions with CH3D and CD4. A two-dimensional atmospheric chemistry model was used to examine the implications of the

  5. Anomalous transport phenomena in px+i py superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Songci; Andreev, A. V.; Spivak, B. Z.

    2015-09-01

    Spontaneous breaking of time-reversal symmetry in superconductors with the px+i py symmetry of the order parameter allows for a class of effects which are analogous to the anomalous Hall effect in ferromagnets. These effects exist below the critical temperature, T anomalous Hall thermal conductivity, the polar Kerr effect, the anomalous Hall effect, and the anomalous photo- and acousto-galvanic effects.

  6. Temperature-dependent EXAFS study on oriented YBa2Cu3O7-δ superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The polarized Cu K-edge EXAFS measurements on oriented powder of YBa2Cu3O7-δ (Tc=93 K, 5 μm grain size) are made as a function of temperature from 20 to 300 K for the a-b plane and the c axis being parallel to the X-ray polarization vector arepsilon. Here, we focus on the local structure of Cu-O bonds in the a-b planes. It is found that the average Cu-O (equatorial) distance and cumulants in the CuO4 square plane show anomalous behaviors around Tc. ((orig.))

  7. Temperature and uniaxial stress dependence of the martensitic transformation temperature in Ni63Al37

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of the martensitic transformation in Ni63Al37 single crystals was made using optical, ultrasonic and atomic force microscope techniques. The transformation was studied as a function of temperature and uniaxial stress applied on (110) and (001) surfaces. Surface relief was observed optically several degrees above the bulk transformation determined ultrasonically. Atomic force measurements of the surface relief show clear evidence of the surface transformation at slightly higher temperatures, and the height of the thermally induced surface relief band increased from 20 nanometers to 3 microns when the band is fully developed. The stress induced bands are smaller and have different orientations. These measurements clearly show that the transformation emanates at the surface near regions of high local strain. Uniaxial stress applied along the [001] direction has a profound effect on the martensitic phase transformation temperature and the ultrasonic studies yield a value of dMs/dT = 0.4 K/MPa. These results will be compared with recent neutron diffraction of the uniaxial stress dependence of the phonon behavior in Ni62.5Al32.5 and thermal expansion studies. (orig.)

  8. Dependence of Arc Plasma Dispersion Capability on its Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yun-Yun; SONG Yang; HE An-Zhi; LI Zhen-Hua

    2008-01-01

    @@ The relationship between the dispersion capability and the temperature of argon arc plasma at Iatm is deduced in view of the plasma's refractive index equation.The results indicate that argon arc plasma has a normal dispersion and its dispersion capability is nonlinear to the plasma's temperature in a wide range of temperature and wavelength region.According to the results of numerical calculation, the preferred optical methods are believed to be suitable for the diagnosis of argon arc plasma in different temperature regions.

  9. Observation of an intermediate phase in tungsten doped Sb2Te phase change thin films by temperature dependent measurements of structural, optical, and electronic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, S.; Huang, T.; Xu, L. P.; Shi, K.; Zhang, J. Z.; Ji, X. L.; Hu, Z. G.; Wu, L. C.; Song, Z. T.; Chu, J. H.

    2016-07-01

    The optical properties, electronic structure, and microstructure of Sb2Te (ST) phase change films as functions of temperature and tungsten (W) concentration have been investigated by means of temperature dependent x-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman scattering, and spectroscopic ellipsometry. Based on the variations of the diffraction peaks, phonon modes, and dielectric functions during the temperature elevation process, the intermediate (INT) crystalline state of W doped Sb2Te (WST) films between amorphous (AM) and hexagonal (HEX) phases can be readily proposed, which is a mixture of crystalline Sb and Te. The anomalous behaviors of dielectric functions and partial spectral weight integral for crystalline films elucidate the existence of INT state. Furthermore, the good agreement between experimental and calculated dielectric functions reveals that the first-principles calculation method can be used to make qualitative analysis in the materials with similar multilayered structures.

  10. Temperature-dependent phenotypic variation of Campylobacter jejuni lipooligosaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moran Anthony P

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Campylobacter jejuni is a major bacterial cause of food-borne enteritis, and its lipooligosaccharide (LOS plays an initiating role in the development of the autoimmune neuropathy, Guillain-Barré syndrome, by induction of anti-neural cross-reactive antibodies through ganglioside molecular mimicry. Results Herein we describe the existence and heterogeneity of multiple LOS forms in C. jejuni strains of human and chicken origin grown at 37°C and 42°C, respectively, as determined on sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide electrophoresis gels with carbohydrate-specific silver staining and blotting with anti-ganglioside ligands, and confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy. The C. jejuni NCTC 11168 original isolate (11168-O was compared to its genome-sequenced variant (11168-GS, and both were found to have a lower-Mr LOS form, which was different in size and structure to the previously characterized higher-Mr form bearing GM1 mimicry. The lower-Mr form production was found to be dependent on the growth temperature as the production of this form increased from ~5%, observed at 37°C to ~35% at 42°C. The structure of the lower-Mr form contained a β-D-Gal-(1→3-β-D-GalNAc disaccharide moiety which is consistent with the termini of the GM1, asialo-GM1, GD1, GT1 and GQ1 gangliosides, however, it did not display GM1 mimicry as assessed in blotting studies but was shown in NMR to resemble asialo-GM1. The production of multiple LOS forms and lack of GM1 mimicry was not a result of phase variation in the genes tested of NCTC 11168 and was also observed in most of the human and chicken isolates of C. jejuni tested. Conclusion The presence of differing amounts of LOS forms at 37 and 42°C, and the variety of forms observed in different strains, indicate that LOS form variation may play a role in an adaptive mechanism or a stress response of the bacterium during the colonization of different hosts.

  11. Temperature-dependent phenotypic variation of Campylobacter jejuni lipooligosaccharides

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Semchenko, Evgeny A

    2010-11-30

    Abstract Background Campylobacter jejuni is a major bacterial cause of food-borne enteritis, and its lipooligosaccharide (LOS) plays an initiating role in the development of the autoimmune neuropathy, Guillain-Barré syndrome, by induction of anti-neural cross-reactive antibodies through ganglioside molecular mimicry. Results Herein we describe the existence and heterogeneity of multiple LOS forms in C. jejuni strains of human and chicken origin grown at 37°C and 42°C, respectively, as determined on sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide electrophoresis gels with carbohydrate-specific silver staining and blotting with anti-ganglioside ligands, and confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The C. jejuni NCTC 11168 original isolate (11168-O) was compared to its genome-sequenced variant (11168-GS), and both were found to have a lower-Mr LOS form, which was different in size and structure to the previously characterized higher-Mr form bearing GM1 mimicry. The lower-Mr form production was found to be dependent on the growth temperature as the production of this form increased from ~5%, observed at 37°C to ~35% at 42°C. The structure of the lower-Mr form contained a β-D-Gal-(1→3)-β-D-GalNAc disaccharide moiety which is consistent with the termini of the GM1, asialo-GM1, GD1, GT1 and GQ1 gangliosides, however, it did not display GM1 mimicry as assessed in blotting studies but was shown in NMR to resemble asialo-GM1. The production of multiple LOS forms and lack of GM1 mimicry was not a result of phase variation in the genes tested of NCTC 11168 and was also observed in most of the human and chicken isolates of C. jejuni tested. Conclusion The presence of differing amounts of LOS forms at 37 and 42°C, and the variety of forms observed in different strains, indicate that LOS form variation may play a role in an adaptive mechanism or a stress response of the bacterium during the colonization of different hosts.

  12. Anomalous coercivity enhancement with temperature and tunable exchange bias in Gd and Ti co-doped BiFeO3 multiferroics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmmad, Bashir; Islam, M. Z.; Billah, Areef; Basith, M. A.

    2016-03-01

    We have investigated the effects of temperature on the magnetic properties of the Bi0.9Gd0.1Fe1-x Ti x O3 (x  =  0.00-0.20) multiferroic system. Unexpectedly, the coercive fields (H c ) of this multiferroic system increased with increasing temperature. The coercive fields and remanent magnetization were higher over a wide range of temperatures in sample x  =  0.10, i.e. in a sample with a composition Bi0.9Gd0.1Fe0.9Ti0.1O3 than those of x  =  0.00 and 0.20 compositions. Therefore, we carried out temperature-dependent magnetization experiments extensively for sample x  =  0.10. The magnetic hysteresis loops at different temperatures exhibit an asymmetric shift towards the magnetic field axes, which indicates the presence of an exchange bias effect in this material system. The hysteresis loops were also carried out at temperatures of 150 K and 250 K by cooling down the sample from 300 K in various cooling magnetic fields ({{H}\\text{cool}} ). The exchange bias field ({{H}\\text{EB}} ) values increased with {{H}\\text{cool}} and decreased with temperature. The {{H}\\text{EB}} values were tunable by field cooling at temperatures of up to 250 K.

  13. Temperature-dependence of wetting properties of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Fatemeh; Gholamian Moghaddam, Melika

    2016-07-01

    We have carried out molecular dynamics simulations to study the spontaneous imbibition of water into a single-wall carbon nanotube (CNT) at various temperatures, ranging from 270 K to 370 K. The simulations indicate that by increasing the temperature, the rate of mass uptake improves as well. Considering the end-loss friction as the main source of energy dissipation and ignoring the inertial effect on the nano-scale transport, we derive a simple expression that relates the CNT's wettability to the fluid viscosity and the rate of imbibition over the temperature range that we study. Our results also indicate that the increase in the wettability of the CNT, and the reduction in the viscosity of water at higher temperatures cause enhancement of water uptake into the nanotube. They also enable us to estimate the wetting transition temperature for TIP3P model of water in the CNTs.

  14. Unparticles and anomalous dimensions in the cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karch, Andreas; Limtragool, Kridsanaphong; Phillips, Philip W.

    2016-03-01

    Motivated by the overwhelming evidence some type of quantum criticality underlies the power-law for the optical conductivity and T-linear resistivity in the cuprates, we demonstrate here how a scale-invariant or unparticle sector can lead to a unifying description of the observed scaling forms. We adopt the continuous mass formalism or multi band (flavor) formalism of the unparticle sector by letting various microscopic parameters be mass-dependent. In particular, we show that an effective mass that varies with the flavor index as well as a running band edge and lifetime capture the AC and DC transport phenomenology of the cuprates. A key consequence of the running mass is that the effective dynamical exponent can differ from the underlying bare critical exponent, thereby providing a mechanism for realizing the fractional values of the dynamical exponent required in a previous analysis [1]. We also predict that regardless of the bare dynamical exponent, z, a non-zero anomalous dimension for the current is required. Physically, the anomalous dimension arises because the charge depends on the flavor, mass or energy. The equivalent phenomenon in a d + 1 gravitational construction is the running of the charge along the radial direction. The nature of the superconducting instability in the presence of scale invariant stuff shows that the transition temperature is not necessarily a monotonic function of the pairing interaction.

  15. Temperature dependence of the energy dissipation in dynamic force microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Roll, Tino; Fendrich, Markus; Moeller, Rolf; Schleberger, Marika

    2008-01-01

    he dissipation of energy in dynamic force microscopy is usually described in terms of an adhesion hysteresis mechanism. This mechanism should become less efficient with increasing temperature. To verify this prediction we have measured topography and dissipation data with dynamic force microscopy in the temperature range from 100 K up to 300 K. We used 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic-dianhydride (PTCDA) grown on KBr(001), both materials exhibiting a strong dissipation signal at large frequency shifts. At room temperature, the energy dissipated into the sample (or tip) is 1.9 eV/cycle for PTCDA and 2.7 eV/cycle for KBr, respectively, and is in good agreement with an adhesion hysteresis mechanism. The energy dissipation over the PTCDA surface decreases with increasing temperature yielding a negative temperature coefficient. For the KBr substrate, we find the opposite behaviour: an increase of dissipated energy with increasing temperature. While the negative temperature coefficient in case of PTCDA agrees rathe...

  16. Anomalous Hall effects in pseudo-single-crystal γ'-Fe4N thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabara, Kazuki; Tsunoda, Masakiyo; Kokado, Satoshi

    2016-05-01

    The anomalous Hall effects (AHE) were investigated at various temperatures for the pseudo-single-crystal Fe4N films, deposited on MgO substrates with changing the degree of order (S) of the nitrogen site. Both the anomalous Hall resistivity and the longitudinal resistivity simply decrease with lowering temperature for all the specimens. The AHE of the Fe4N films is presumed to arise from an intrinsic mechanism because of the relationship between the anomalous Hall resistivity and longitudinal resistivity. The anomalous Hall conductivity, σAH, exhibits a specific behavior at low temperature. In the case of the film with S = 0.93, the σAH drastically drops below 50 K, while it simply increases with lowering temperature in the range of 50-300 K. This low-temperature anomaly decays with decreasing S of the film and nearly vanishes in the films with low S. The threshold temperature and the dependence on S of the low-temperature anomaly of the σAH well correspond to those of the anisotropic magnetoresistance effects in the Fe4N films, reported in the literatures. From these results, it is suggested that the low-temperature anomaly of the σAH originates from the crystal field effect which reflects the structural transformation from a cubic to a tetragonal symmetry below 50 K and provides a modulation of the orbital angular momentum of the 3d orbitals at the Fermi level.

  17. Temperature-dependent thermal inertia of homogeneous Martian regolith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piqueux, Sylvain; Christensen, Philip R.

    2011-07-01

    Past studies of the thermophysical properties of the Martian surface layer have assumed temperature-independent thermal inertia, which is a function of the material density, specific heat, and bulk conductivity. In this paper, we evaluate the temperature-driven variations of these quantities for particulated and cemented material under Martian conditions of atmospheric pressure and temperature. Temperature-driven density variations are negligible. The specific heat of a basaltic material is strongly influenced by the temperature (˜75% increase from 150 to 315 K), inducing significant variations of the thermal inertia. The thermal conductivity of uncemented Martian regolith is weakly controlled by the solid phase conductivity and strongly controlled by the gaseous phase conductivity. As a result, the conductivity of the solid phase (i.e., composition, temperature) is unimportant, whereas medium to large variations (30-50%) of the bulk conductivity are associated with temperature-induced fluctuations of the pore-filling gas conductivity. Overall, the thermal inertia of uncemented Martian soils is predicted to vary significantly (˜80%) throughout the range of the observed surface temperatures. In the case of cemented soils, the contribution of the gas conductivity is generally small, and the solid phase (i.e., grains and cement) conductivity (i.e., composition, temperature) becomes more important. Consequently, the magnitude of the thermal inertia change for cemented soils is variable, and smaller than that predicted for uncemented materials (10-50%). Large diurnal and seasonal temperature variations only occur within the top material, and most of the near-surface regolith does not experience large thermal inertia variations. The shapes of modeled diurnal temperature curves are not significantly modified (e.g., the 0200 LT (Martian local time) apparent thermal inertia of uncemented regolith is up to ˜15% lower than the average daily inertia of the top material

  18. Optical fiber temperature sensor based on wavelength-dependent detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhigang Li(李志刚); Zhenhui Du(杜振辉); Baoguang Wang(王宝光); Chengzhi Jiang(蒋诚志)

    2004-01-01

    Semiconductor fiber temperature sensors have been used widely in many fields, but most of them pick up temperature by measuring the optical intensity of certain fixed narrow-band in absorption spectrum.Furthermore, they are sensitive to the loss of optical intensity and the fluctuation of light source power.The novel temperature measurement system proposed in this paper is based on the semiconductor absorption theory and the spectral analysis of method. To measure temperature, the sensor model detects not the certain narrow-band spectrum but the most spectra of the optical absorption edge. Therefore the measurement accuracy and the stability can be improved greatly. Experimental results are in agreement with theoretical analysis results perfectly.

  19. Theoretical analysis for temperature dependence of laser- induced damage threshold of optical thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, K.; Motokoshi, S.; Somekawa, T.; Jitsuno, T.; Fujita, M.; Tanaka, KA; Azechi, H.

    2016-03-01

    The temperature dependence of the laser-induced damage threshold on optical coatings was studied in detail for laser pulses from 123 K to 473 K at different temperatures. The laser-induced damage threshold increased with decreasing temperatures when we tested long pulses (200 ps and 4 ns). The temperature dependence, however, was reversed for pulses shorter than a few picoseconds (100 fs testing). We propose a scaling model with a flowchart that includes three separate processes: free-electron generation, electron multiplication, and electron heating. Furthermore, we calculated the temperature dependence of laser-induced damage thresholds at different temperatures. Our calculation results agreed well with the experimental results.

  20. Temperature dependence of the energy dissipation in dynamic force microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Roll, Tino; Kunstmann, Tobias; Fendrich, Markus; Moeller, Rolf; Schleberger, Marika

    2008-01-01

    The dissipation of energy in dynamic force microscopy is usually described in terms of an adhesion hysteresis mechanism. This mechanism should become less efficient with increasing temperature. To verify this prediction we have measured topography and dissipation data with dynamic force microscopy in the temperature range from 100 K up to 300 K. We used 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic-dianhydride (PTCDA) grown on KBr(001), both materials exhibiting a strong dissipation signal at large freque...

  1. Temperature dependence of the optical absorption coefficient of microcrystalline silicon

    OpenAIRE

    Poruba, A.; Špringer, J.; Mullerova, L.; Beitlerova, A.; Vaněček, M.; Wyrsch, Nicolas; Shah, Arvind

    2008-01-01

    The optical absorption coefficient of amorphous and microcrystalline silicon was determined in a spectral range 400–3100 nm and a temperature range 77–350 K. Transmittance measurement and Fourier transform photocurrent spectroscopy were used. The measured data served as an input for our optical model of amorphous/microcrystalline tandem solar cell. Differences in the current generated in the amorphous and microcrystalline parts were computed, for an operating temperature between −20 °C and +8...

  2. The temperature dependence of FeRh's transport properties

    OpenAIRE

    Mankovsky, S.; Polesya, S.; Chadova, K.; Ebert, H.; Staunton, J. B.; Gruenbaum, T.; Schoen, M. A. W.; Back, C.H.; Chen, X. Z.; C. Song

    2016-01-01

    The finite-temperature transport properties of FeRh compounds are investigated by first-principles Density Functional Theory-based calculations. The focus is on the behavior of the longitudinal resistivity with rising temperature, which exhibits an abrupt decrease at the metamagnetic transition point, $T = T_m$ between ferro- and antiferromagnetic phases. A detailed electronic structure investigation for $T \\geq 0$ K explains this feature and demonstrates the important role of (i) the differe...

  3. Temperature-Dependent Nickel Release from Nickel-Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menne, T.; Solgaard, Per Bent

    1979-01-01

    Ni release from Danish 1 krone coins and metal buttons from jeans was measured at 20.degree. C in distilled water and at 35.degree. C in distilled water and synthetic sweat. The temperature elevation increased the Ni release from the coins and 2 of the 9 metal buttons investigated. The sensitivit...... to temperature elevation differs from 1 alloy to another. [These results were discussed in light of Ni induced contact sensitization...

  4. Temperature Dependence of Stark Broadening Dominated by Strong Collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of electron temperature in the broadening of spectral lines dominated by strong collisions has been studied. Computer simulation allows us to study the effects of strong and weak collisions separately. Results shown here are focused on some Sr+ and Ba+ resonance lines as examples of lines broadened dominantly by strong collisions. The exact numerical integration of the perturbation process due to the collision with a single particle permits the evaluation of Weisskopf radius. This parameter is usually defined as rw ∼ 1/v ∼ 1/√T, obtained from Bora approximation that is correct for high temperatures. However, at low temperatures the full integration of the collision process permits to test the relationship rw ∼ 1/T1/6. This calculation has allowed us to study the influence of temperature on the broadening of the lines dominated by strong collisions. This study has been done in two ways : through a plasma simulation and analyzing the calculated Weisskopf radius for an individual collision. The obtained results show that at low temperatures the width of the line increases for increasing temperature as a consequence of an increase of the number of collisions not compensated by the decrease of Weisskopf radius

  5. Depth-dependent temperature effects on thermoluminescence in multilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sangho S.; Armstrong, Philip R.; Mah, Merlin L.; Talghader, Joseph J.

    2013-08-01

    It is well known that thermal gradients penetrating deep into a material can preserve a memory of the temperature history of the surface. To date, this concept has been largely applied in the earth sciences, but there are many applications where a memory of rapid thermal events would be useful. For example, multiple layers of thermoluminescent films could serve as temperature sensors that indicate temperature versus depth in a microfabricated structure. As an advance toward this goal, this paper examines the effect of nonuniform temperature profiles on the thermoluminescence of heterogeneous multilayers. A Nd:YAG laser is used to create a known thermal event and apply pulses of heat energy of varying duration to a metalized thermoluminescent multilayer composed of LiF:Mg,Ti and CaF2:Dy. The thermoluminescence of the system is measured before and after the applied laser pulse. To model the process, a finite-difference time-domain method is used to calculate the dynamic heat transfer, and the temperature distribution is plugged into a first order kinetics model of the thermoluminescence of each film to get a final luminescent intensity. A thermal contact conductance between the critical layers is also introduced. Dynamic temperatures in durations of hundreds of milliseconds are resolved with the technique, and simulation curves match experimental measurements to within 6% at 250 ms.

  6. Dependence of Precipitation Extremes on Temperature over United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    H, V.; Singh, J.; Karmakar, S.; Ghosh, S.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrologic disturbances are commonly associated with the phenomenal occurrence of extreme events. The human kind has always been facing problem with hydrologic extremes in terms of deaths and economic loss. Hence, a complete analysis of observed extreme events will have a substantial role in planning, designing and management of the water resource systems. Over the United States, precipitation extremes, temperature and streamflow, have increased during the twentieth century and has been attributed to many natural and anthropogenic influences. The present study examines the association of precipitation extremes on temperature over US for the period of 1950-2000. The annual maxima (AM) precipitation has been extracted for hot and cold years. The spatial mean of surface temperature/ sea surface temperature from 1950 to 2000, so obtained is arranged in ascending order. The corresponding years, with lowest temperature of 25 years are defined as cold years and highest temperature of 25 years are defined as hot years respectively. The spatio-temporal variability of 50 year return level (RL) for the AM is determined considering generalized extreme value (GEV) and non-parametric kernel distributions. To identify the significant changes in the derived RL from cold to hot years, a bootstrap-based approach is implemented. The results exhibited no significant changes in the 50 year RL of AM precipitation between hot and cold years, with 70% of total grids showing no significant changes with respect to both land surface and sea surface temperature at 20% significance level. The scatter plot between the spatial mean of AM precipitation and both land surface and sea surface temperature over US showed no association. Further the comparison with the CMIP5 models revealed that the models are showed significant association between both land surface and sea surface temperature with the AM of precipitation. The major decision making and planning rely on the model predictions, which

  7. Mechanical behaviour of ferritic ODS steels - Temperature dependancy and anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, B.; Steckmeyer, A.; Rouffie, A.-L.; Malaplate, J.; Garnier, J.; Ratti, M.; Wident, P.; Ziolek, L.; Tournie, I.; Rabeau, V.; Gentzbittel, J. M.; Kruml, T.; Kubena, I.

    2012-11-01

    Ferritic 14%Cr and 18%Cr ODS steels produced at CEA in round bars or plates were tested mechanically. The present paper reports results obtained in tension, impact, fatigue, creep and toughness tests. These tests were carried out at various temperatures and in different directions. These materials show a pronounced anisotropy at all tested temperatures. No matter the loading, the transversal direction is always found to be far less resistant than the longitudinal one. This anisotropy is mainly observed in terms of damage mechanisms, with intergranular fracture preferentially occurring along the extrusion direction. This intergranular fracture mode leads to very low and anisotropic toughness values and to the absence of tertiairy creep stage, pointing out the unstable nature of fracture, even at high temperature. The unrealistically high values of the Norton exponent measured in creep suggests the existence of a threshold stress, which is consistent with the mainly kinematic nature of the stress as revealed by fatigue tests.

  8. Temperature-dependent permittivity of annealed and unannealed gold films

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Po-Ting; Lin, Cheng-Wei; Liu, Hsiang-Lin; Chang, Chih-Wei; Chu, Shi-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Due to local field enhancement and subwavelength confinements, nano-plasmonics provide numerous novel applications. Simultaneously, as an efficient nanoscale heat generator from inherent absorption, thermo-plasmonics is emerging as an important branch. However, although significant temperature increase is involved in applications, detailed characterization of metal permittivity at different temperatures is lacking. In this work, we extract the permittivity of gold film from 300K to the annealing temperature of 570K. By comparing annealed and unannealed films, more than one-order difference in thermo-derivative of permittivity is revealed, resulting in unexpectedly large variation of plasmonic properties. Our result is valuable not only for characterizing extensively used unannealed nanoparticles, but also for designing future thermo-nano-plasmonic systems.

  9. Soil Temperature Dependent Growth of Cotton Seedlings Before Emergence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Soil temperature is an important variable governing plant growth and development.Studies were conducted under laboratory conditions to determine the effect of soil temperature on root and shoot growth of cotton during emergence.Cotton seedlings were grown for 192 h at 20,32 and 38℃ in soil packed in 300 mm long and 50 mm diameter cylinders.The data indicated that the longest roots(173 ram)as well as shoots(152 mm)were recorded at 32 ℃ followed by 20 (130 mm root and 82 mm shoot)and 38℃(86 mm root and 50 mm shoot).Roots grown at 20 and 38 ℃ were 20% and 50% shorter,respectively,than those grown at 32℃ after 192 h.Roots and shoots exhibited the lowest length and dry biomass at 38℃.Shoot lengths grown at 20(74 ram)and 38℃(51 mm)were 44% and 61% shorter than those grown at 32℃(131 mm)after 180 h growth period,respectively.Growth at all three temperatures followed a similar pattern.Initially there was a linear growth phase followed by the reduction or cessation of growth.Time to cessation of growth varied with temperature and decreased faster at higher temperatures.Sowing of cotton should be accomlplished before seedbed reaches a soil temperature(≥38℃)detrimental for emergence.Further,the seedbeds should be capable of providing sufficient moisture and essential nutrients for emerging seedling before its seed reserves are exhausted to enhance seedling establishment in soil.

  10. TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF VISCOSITY OF Al-Si ALLOY MELTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.R. Geng; R. Wang; Z.X. Yang; J.H. Chen; C.J. Sun; Y. Wang

    2005-01-01

    The relationship between the viscosity and temperature of Al-Si alloy melts was investigated.The viscosity of three different types of Al-Si alloy melts was measured. It was showed that the relationship between the viscosity and temperature of hypoeutectic Al-5% Si and eutectic Al12.5%Si alloy melts is approximately exponential except for some special zones, but that of the hypereutectic melt is different. The paper discussed the correlation of the viscosity and atomic density, which is thought that the viscosity corresponds to the atomic density to some extent.

  11. Temperature and Bias Voltage Dependence of the MPPC Detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Dinu, N.; Bazin, C; Chaumat, C.; Cheikali, C.; Para, A.; Puill, V.; Sylvia, C.; Vagnucci, J.-F.

    2010-01-01

    This work reports on the characterization of the Multi-Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC) detectors as a function of the temperature and bias voltage. Devices of 1x1 mm2 and 3x3 mm2 total area and 50x50 µm2 µcell size produced by Hamamatsu Photonics have been studied. The temperature has been varied from -110°C to -50°C using a cryostat cooled by liquid nitrogen and from 0 to 38°C using a climatic chamber. Important electrical parameters of the MPPC detectors as gain, breakdown voltage, quenching re...

  12. On the frequency dependence of the high temperature background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high temperature background (HTB) damping in metals and alloys has been measured mostly as a function of temperature. These data were described by several empirical expressions proposed in the literature. In the present work, HTB in pure Mg and in two alloys (Zry-4 and Cu-5 at.%Au), measured with a torsion pendulum with variable moment of inertia, are analyzed on considering a new treatment of the data. This analysis provides an useful tool to determine whether a damping process is linear or not. (orig.)

  13. Temperature-Dependent Current-Voltage (I-V) and Capacitance-Voltage (C-V) Characteristics of Ni/Cu/n-InP Schottky Barrier Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munikrishana Reddy, Y.; Nagaraj, M. K.; Siva Pratap Reddy, M.; Lee, Jung-Hee; Rajagopal Reddy, V.

    2013-04-01

    The current-voltage (I-V) and capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics of Ni/Cu/n-InP Schottky barrier diodes are studied over a wide temperature range, from 210 K to 420 K. The I-V characteristics display anomalous thermal behavior. The apparent barrier height decays, and the ideality factor grows at low temperatures, and the series resistances resulting from Cheung's and Norde's procedures are markedly temperature dependent. The nonlinearity of the Richardson plot and the strong temperature dependence of the Schottky-barrier parameters indicate that the interface is spatially inhomogeneous. Plots of the zero-bias barrier height as a function of 1/(2kT) points to a Gaussian distribution of barrier heights with 0.90 eV mean height and 0.014 eV standard deviation. When this distribution is accounted for, a Richardson of 6.5 A/(cm K)2 results, relatively close to the 9.4/(cm K)2 predicted by theory. We conclude that, combined with a Gaussian distribution of barrier heights, the thermionic-emission mechanism explains the temperature-dependent I-V and C-V characteristics of the studied Schottky-barrier diodes.

  14. On the gauge dependence of vacuum transitions at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garny, Mathias [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Konstandin, Thomas [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland)

    2012-05-15

    In principle, observables as for example the sphaleron rate or the tunneling rate in a first-order phase transition are gauge-independent. However, in practice a gauge dependence is introduced in explicit perturbative calculations due to the breakdown of the gradient expansion of the effective action in the symmetric phase. We exemplify the situation using the effective potential of the Abelian Higgs model in the general renormalizable gauge. Still, we find that the quantitative dependence on the gauge choice is small for gauges that are consistent with the perturbative expansion.

  15. Radius dependence of the melting temperature of single-walled carbon nanotubes: molecular-dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated the radius dependence of the melting temperature of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by classical molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations using the environment-dependent interatomic potential (EDIP) proposed by Marks. Here we define the 'melting temperature' as a temperature at which there occurs a thermal instability of SWCNTs. We have carried out molecular-dynamics simulations at several temperatures for carbon nanotubes with various radii and estimated the 'melting temperature' based on the temperature dependence of the radial distribution functions, mean-square displacements and atomic configurations. It is shown that the 'melting temperature' of SWCNTs decreases with decreasing radius. The origin of this radius dependence of the melting temperature of SWCNTs is discussed in relation to the stability of SWCNTs energetically based on the strain energy of carbon nanotubes

  16. Temperature dependence of the coercive field of gas atomized Fe{sub 73.5}Si{sub 13.5}B{sub 9}Nb{sub 3}Cu{sub 1}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Escorial, A., E-mail: age@cenim.csic.es [CENIM-CSIC, Avda, Gregorio del Amo, 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Lieblich, M. [CENIM-CSIC, Avda, Gregorio del Amo, 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Hernando, A.; Aragon, A.; Marin, P. [Instituto de Magnetismo Aplicado, IMA, P.O. Box 155, 28230 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-09-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An anomalous thermal dependence of the coercive field of gas atomized Fe{sub 73.5}Si{sub 13.5}B{sub 9}Nb{sub 3}Cu{sub 1} powder particles under 25 {mu}m powder particle, increasing Hc as temperature increases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is proposed that Cu rich regions at inter-grain boundaries could act as exchange decoupling regions contributing to the thermal increase of coercivity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This anomalous thermal dependence points out that tailoring microstructure and size, by controlling the cooling rate of more adequate multiphase systems, could be a promising procedure to develop soft or hard magnets, avoiding Rare Earths metals that is nowadays an important target for the engineering of magnetic materials. - Abstract: In this work, the dependence of the coercive field of Fe{sub 73.5}Si{sub 13.5}B{sub 9}Nb{sub 3}Cu{sub 1} gas atomized powder with the temperature for different particle sizes has been studied, observing an anomalous behavior in the under 25 powder particle size fraction. This unusual behavior is related with the microstructure of the powder, and is attributed to the presence of a multiphase magnetic system, with non-magnetic regions decoupling the ferromagnetic domains.

  17. Anomalous scaling of the penetration depth in nodal superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Jian-Huang; Lawler, Michael J.; Kim, Eun-Ah

    2015-07-01

    Recent findings of anomalous superlinear scaling of low-temperature (T ) penetration depth (PD) in several nodal superconductors near putative quantum critical points suggest that the low-temperature PD can be a useful probe of quantum critical fluctuations in a superconductor. On the other hand, cuprates, which are poster child nodal superconductors, have not shown any such anomalous scaling of PD, despite growing evidence of quantum critical points (QCP). Then it is natural to ask when and how can quantum critical fluctuations cause anomalous scaling of PD? Carrying out the renormalization group calculation for the problem of two-dimensional superconductors with point nodes, we show that quantum critical fluctuations associated with a point group symmetry reduction result in nonuniversal logarithmic corrections to the T dependence of the PD. The resulting apparent power law depends on the bare velocity anisotropy ratio. We then compare our results to data sets from two distinct nodal superconductors: YBa2Cu3O6.95 and CeCoIn5. Considering all symmetry-lowering possibilities of the point group of interest, C4 v, we find our results to be remarkably consistent with YBa2Cu3O6.95 being near a vertical nematic QCP and CeCoIn5 being near a diagonal nematic QCP. Our results motivate a search for diagonal nematic fluctuations in CeCoIn5.

  18. Temperature-dependent reactions of phthalic acid on Ag(100)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Franke, M.; Marchini, M.; Zhang, L.; Tariq, Q.; Tsud, N.; Vorokhta, M.; Vondráček, Martin; Prince, K.; Röckert, M.; Williams, F.J.; Steinrück, H.-P.; Lytken, O.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 119, č. 41 (2015), 23580-23585. ISSN 1932-7447 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : phthalic acid * NEXAFS * photoemission spectroscopy * temperature-programmed desoprtion Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 4.772, year: 2014

  19. Temperature dependence of twinning activity in random textured cast magnesium

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čapek, J.; Farkas, G.; Pilch, Jan; Máthis, K.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 627, MAR (2015), s. 333-335. ISSN 0921-5093 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP204/12/1360; GA MŠk LM2011019 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : magnesium * acoustic emission * neutron diffraction * deformation twinning * high temperature Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.567, year: 2014

  20. Heat-Exchanger Computational Procedure For Temperature-Dependent Fouling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiappetta, L.; Szetela, E.

    1985-01-01

    Computer program predicts heat-exchanger performance under variety of conditions. Program provides rapid means of calculating distribution of fluid and wall temperatures, fuel deposit formation, and pressure losses at various locations in heat exchanger. Developed for use with heat exchanger that vaporizes fuel prior to fuel ignition; other applications possible.

  1. Temperature Dependences on Various Types of Photovoltaic (PV) Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audwinto, I. A.; Leong, C. S.; Sopian, K.; Zaidi, S. H.

    2015-09-01

    Temperature is one of the key roles in PV technology performance, since with the increases of temperature the open-circuit voltage will drop accordingly so do the electrical efficiency and power output generation. Different types of Photovoltaic (PV) panels- silicon solar panels and thin film solar panels; mono-crystalline, poly-crystalline, CIS, CIGS, CdTe, back-contact, and bi-facial solar panel under 40°C to 70°C approximately with 5°C interval have been comparatively analyzed their actual performances with uniformly distribution of light illumination from tungsten halogen light source, ±500W/m2. DC-Electronic Load and Data Logger devices with “Lab View” data program interface were used to collect all the necessary parameters in this study. Time needed to achieve a certain degree of temperature was recorded. Generally, each of the panels needed 15 minutes to 20 minutes to reach 70°C. Halogen based light source is not compatible in short wave-length in response to thin-film solar cell. Within this period of times, all the panels are facing a performance loss up to 15%. Other parameters; Pmax, Vmax, Imax, Voc, Isc, Rserries, Rshunt, Fillfactor were collected as study cases. Our study is important in determining Photovoltaic type selection and system design as for study or industrial needed under different temperature condition.

  2. The external field dependence of the BCS critical temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frank, Rupert L.; Hainzl, Christian; Seiringer, Robert;

    2016-01-01

    We consider the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer free energy functional for particles interacting via a two-body potential on a microscopic scale and in the presence of weak external fields varying on a macroscopic scale. We study the influence of the external fields on the critical temperature. We show...

  3. Temperature dependence of fluctuation time scales in spin glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kenning, Gregory G.; Bowen, J.; Sibani, Paolo;

    2010-01-01

    Using a series of fast cooling protocols we have probed aging effects in the spin glass state as a function of temperature. Analyzing the logarithmic decay found at very long time scales within a simple phenomenological barrier model, leads to the extraction of the fluctuation time scale of the s......-aging behavior in scaling aged TRM decay curves, as recently discussed theoretically~\\cite{Sibani09}.......Using a series of fast cooling protocols we have probed aging effects in the spin glass state as a function of temperature. Analyzing the logarithmic decay found at very long time scales within a simple phenomenological barrier model, leads to the extraction of the fluctuation time scale of the...... system at a particular temperature. This is the smallest dynamical time-scale, defining a lower-cut off in a hierarchical description of the dynamics.  We find that this fluctuation time scale, which is approximately equal to atomic spin fluctuation time scales near the transition temperature, follows a...

  4. Temperature dependence of damage in boron-implanted silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have performed a systematic investigation of boron implantation at 30 keV into n-type silicon in the 77-300 K temperature range and mostly at 9 x 1015 cm-2 fluence. The analyses have been performed with ion channeling and cross sectional transmission electron microscopy both in as-implanted samples and in samples annealed in vacuum furnace at 500 degree C and 850 degree C for 30 min. They confirm the impossibility of amorphization at room temperature and the presence of residual damage mainly located at the boron projected range. On the contrary, a continuous amorphous layer can be obtained for implants at 77 K and 193 K; the thickness of the implanted layer is increased by lowering the temperature, at the same time the amorphous-crystalline interface becomes sharper. Sheet resistance measurements performed after isochronal annealing shows an apparent reverse annealing of the dopant only in the sample implanted at 273 K. The striking differences between light and heavy ions observed at room temperature implantation disappears at 77 K and full recovery with no residual damage of the amorphous layer is observed. 10 refs., 5 figs

  5. Temperature dependence of electrical conductivity in granular metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A calculation is done to determine the range of temperature for hopping conduction (with a Log σ equivalent Tsup(-1/2) law) and the average metallic grain size in granular metals. It is shown that the correlation between the separation of nearest neighbour grains and their size seems rather improbable. (author)

  6. Finite range effective interactions and temperature dependence of nuclear symmetry energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The temperature dependence of nuclear symmetry energy has become a subject of current research interest because of its role in the studies of isoscaling analyses of Heavy Ion reactions and the formation mechanism of neutron stars particularly the properties of proto neutron stars (PNS). While the temperature dependence of the kinetic part of the nuclear symmetry energy is well understood, the temperature dependence of its interaction part is not yet known to a satisfactory extent. In the present work, we have investigated the temperature dependence of nuclear symmetry energy using some finite range effective interactions proposed in some earlier works

  7. Temperature dependence of excitonic transition in ZnSe/ZnCdSe quantum wells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Zi-zheng; LIANG Xi-xia; BAN Shi-liang

    2005-01-01

    A theoretical calculation for the temperature dependence of the excitonic transition in ZnSe/ZnCdSe quantum wells is performed. The exciton binding energy is calculated with a variational technique by considering the temperature-dependence parameters. Our results show that the exciton binding energy reduces linearly with temperature increasing. We find that the strain due to lattice mismatch and differential thermal expansion decreases with the temperature increasing.

  8. The unusual temperature dependence of the switching behavior in a ferroelectric single crystal with dislocations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The unusual temperature-induced switching behavior in a ferroelectric single crystal with dislocation arrays is investigated by using phase field simulations. The results show that the influence of temperature on the hysteresis loop of a ferroelectric is dependent on the dislocation arrays. In the presence of dislocation arrays, the dependence of the coercive field on the temperature is different from that of a dislocation-free ferroelectric. The coercive field increases when the temperature increases from room temperature to a critical temperature, which is attributed to the pinning of domains by the dislocation arrays. Above the critical temperature, both the coercive field and the remnant polarization decrease with temperature. It is found that double hysteresis loops can be induced by dislocation arrays when the temperature is higher than the Curie temperature. This work exhibits the complex role of temperature and dislocations in the polarization switching of ferroelectric single crystal. (paper)

  9. Temperature dependent dielectric and conductivity studies of polyvinyl alcohol-ZnO nanocomposite films by impedance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dielectric and conductivity behaviors of nano ZnO doped polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) composites for various concentrations of dopant were investigated using impedance spectroscopy for a wide range of temperatures (303 K–423 K) and frequencies (5 Hz–30 MHZ). The dielectric properties of host polymer matrix have been improved by the addition of nano ZnO and are found to be highly temperature dependent. Anomalous dielectric behavior was observed in the frequency range of 2.5 MHz–5 MHz. Increase in dielectric permittivity and dielectric loss was observed with respect to temperature. The Cole-Cole plot could be modeled by low resistance regions in a high resistance matrix and the lowest resistance was observed for the 10 mol. % films. The imaginary part of the electric modulus showed asymmetric peaks with the relaxation following Debye nature below and non-Debye nature above the peaks. The ac conductivity is found to obey Jonscher's power law, whereas the variation of dc conductivity with temperature was found to follow Arrhenius behavior. Two different activation energy values were obtained from Arrhenius plot indicating that two conduction mechanisms are involved in the composite films. Fitting the ac conductivity data to Jonscher's law indicates that large polaron assisted tunneling is the most likely conduction mechanism in the composites. Maximum conductivity is observed at 423 K for all the samples and it is optimum for 10 mol. % ZnO doped PVA composite film. Significant increase in dc and ac conductivities in these composite films makes them a potential candidate for application in electronic devices

  10. Temperature dependent dielectric and conductivity studies of polyvinyl alcohol-ZnO nanocomposite films by impedance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemalatha, K. S.; Damle, R.; Rukmani, K., E-mail: rukmani9909@yahoo.co.in [Department of Physics, Bangalore University, Bangalore 560056 (India); Sriprakash, G. [Department of Physics, Maharani' s Science College for Women, Bangalore 560001 (India); Ambika Prasad, M. V. N. [Department of Physics, Gulbarga University, Gulbarga 585106 (India)

    2015-10-21

    Dielectric and conductivity behaviors of nano ZnO doped polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) composites for various concentrations of dopant were investigated using impedance spectroscopy for a wide range of temperatures (303 K–423 K) and frequencies (5 Hz–30 MHZ). The dielectric properties of host polymer matrix have been improved by the addition of nano ZnO and are found to be highly temperature dependent. Anomalous dielectric behavior was observed in the frequency range of 2.5 MHz–5 MHz. Increase in dielectric permittivity and dielectric loss was observed with respect to temperature. The Cole-Cole plot could be modeled by low resistance regions in a high resistance matrix and the lowest resistance was observed for the 10 mol. % films. The imaginary part of the electric modulus showed asymmetric peaks with the relaxation following Debye nature below and non-Debye nature above the peaks. The ac conductivity is found to obey Jonscher's power law, whereas the variation of dc conductivity with temperature was found to follow Arrhenius behavior. Two different activation energy values were obtained from Arrhenius plot indicating that two conduction mechanisms are involved in the composite films. Fitting the ac conductivity data to Jonscher's law indicates that large polaron assisted tunneling is the most likely conduction mechanism in the composites. Maximum conductivity is observed at 423 K for all the samples and it is optimum for 10 mol. % ZnO doped PVA composite film. Significant increase in dc and ac conductivities in these composite films makes them a potential candidate for application in electronic devices.

  11. Diversity of electronic transitions and photoluminescence properties of p-type cuprous oxide films: A temperature-dependent spectral transmittance study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuprous oxide films have been deposited on quartz substrates by a sol-gel method under various annealing temperatures. The X-ray diffraction analysis and Raman scattering show that all the films are of pure Cu2O phase. From comparison of photoluminescence with 488 and 325 nm laser excitations, the electronic transition energies and intensities present the annealing-temperature dependent behavior. The electronic band structures of the Cu2O film annealed at 800 °C, especially for the contribution of exciton series and high energy transitions, have been investigated by temperature dependent transmittance. The extracted refraction index and the high frequency dielectric constant both abruptly decrease until the temperature rises up to 100 K. Six transitions can be clearly identified and the red shift trend of Eo3-Eo5 transition energies with increasing the temperature can be found. Moreover, the anomalous behavior takes place at about 200 K from the Eo6 transition. The singularities indicate that the change in the crystalline and electronic band structure occurs as the temperature near 100 K and 200 K for the film

  12. Rate dependent of strength in metallic glasses at different temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y. W.; Bian, X. L.; Wu, S. W.; Hussain, I.; Jia, Y. D.; Yi, J.; Wang, G.

    2016-06-01

    The correlation between the strength at the macroscale and the elastic deformation as well as shear cracking behavior at the microscale of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) is investigated. The temperatures of 298 K and 77 K as well as the strain rate ranging from 10‑6 s‑1 to 10‑2 s‑1 are applied to the BMGs, in which the mechanical responses of the BMGs are profiled through the compression tests. The yield strength is associated with the activation of the elementary deformation unit, which is insensitive to the strain rate. The maximum compressive strength is linked to the crack propagation during shear fracture process, which is influenced by the strain rate. The cryogenic temperature of 77 K significantly improves the yield strength and the maximum compressive strength of the BMGs.

  13. Effects of Temperature on Time Dependent Rheological Characteristics of Koumiss

    OpenAIRE

    Serdal Sabancı; Ömer Çokgezme; Derya Tezcan; Mutlu Cevik; Filiz İçier

    2016-01-01

    The rheological properties of koumiss were investigated at different temperatures (4, 10, and 20°C). Experimental shear stress–shear rate data were fitted to different rheological models. The consistency of koumiss was predicted by using the power-law model since it described the consistency of koumiss best with highest regression coefficient and lowest errors (root mean square error and chi-square). Koumiss exhibited shear thinning behavior (n

  14. The temperature dependence of the friction in the fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaji, Shuhei [Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Wako, Saitama (Japan)

    1996-03-01

    We study the slow collective motion at finite excitation on the basis of the linear response theory. The transport coefficients such as friction {gamma}, inertia M and local stiffness C formulated within a locally harmonic approximation are computed along the fission path of {sup 224}Th. It is found that the effective damping rate {eta} = {gamma}/=2{radical}(M|C|)= increases with the temperature T in accord with the fission experiment with the emission of {gamma}-rays. (author)

  15. Efficiency and temperature dependence of water removal by membrane dryers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leckrone, K. J.; Hayes, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    The vapor pressure of water in equilibrium with sorption sites within a Nafion membrane is given by log P(WN) = -3580/T + 10.01, where P(WN) is expressed in Torr and T is the membrane temperature, in kelvin. The efficiency of dryers based on selective permeation of water through Nafion can thus be enhanced by cooling the membrane. Residual water in effluents exceeds equilibrium levels if insufficient time is allowed for water to diffuse to the membrane surface as gas passes through the dryer. For tubular configurations, this limitation can be avoided if L > or = Fc(10(3.8)/120 pi D), where L is the length of the tubular membrane, in centimeters, Fc is the gas flow rate, in mL/ min, and D is the diffusion coefficient for water in the carrier gas at the operating temperature of the dryer, in cm2/s. An efficient dryer that at room temperature dries gas to a dew point of -61 degrees C is described; the same dryer maintained at 0 degrees C yields a dew point of -80 degrees C and removes water as effectively as Mg(ClO4)2 or a dry ice/acetone slush. The use of Nafion membranes to construct devices capable of delivering gas streams with low but precisely controlled humidities is discussed.

  16. Anomalous extracellular diffusion in rat cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Fanrong; Hrabe, Jan; Hrabetova, Sabina

    2015-05-01

    Extracellular space (ECS) is a major channel transporting biologically active molecules and drugs in the brain. Diffusion-mediated transport of these substances is hindered by the ECS structure but the microscopic basis of this hindrance is not fully understood. One hypothesis proposes that the hindrance originates in large part from the presence of dead-space (DS) microdomains that can transiently retain diffusing molecules. Because previous theoretical and modeling work reported an initial period of anomalous diffusion in similar environments, we expected that brain regions densely populated by DS microdomains would exhibit anomalous extracellular diffusion. Specifically, we targeted granular layers (GL) of rat and turtle cerebella that are populated with large and geometrically complex glomeruli. The integrative optical imaging (IOI) method was employed to evaluate diffusion of fluorophore-labeled dextran (MW 3000) in GL, and the IOI data analysis was adapted to quantify the anomalous diffusion exponent dw from the IOI records. Diffusion was significantly anomalous in rat GL, where dw reached 4.8. In the geometrically simpler turtle GL, dw was elevated but not robustly anomalous (dw = 2.6). The experimental work was complemented by numerical Monte Carlo simulations of anomalous ECS diffusion in several three-dimensional tissue models containing glomeruli-like structures. It demonstrated that both the duration of transiently anomalous diffusion and the anomalous exponent depend on the size of model glomeruli and the degree of their wrapping. In conclusion, we have found anomalous extracellular diffusion in the GL of rat cerebellum. This finding lends support to the DS microdomain hypothesis. Transiently anomalous diffusion also has a profound effect on the spatiotemporal distribution of molecules released into the ECS, especially at diffusion distances on the order of a few cell diameters, speeding up short-range diffusion-mediated signals in less permeable

  17. Exponential temperature dependence of the resistivity, thermopower, and susceptibility of Y9Co7: Evidence for local mode (abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkissian, B. V. B.

    1985-04-01

    The magnetic superconductor Y9Co7 is unique in that its magnetism coexists with superconductivity at a temperature (˜5.5 K) before it transforms into the superconducting state at a lower temperature (˜2.7 K) [B. V. B. Sarkissian, J. Appl. Phys. 53, 8070 (1982)]. There is now ample evidence that the compound has a puzzling array of magnetic properties. The magnetism is consistent with the lack of long-range order, and shows some evidence of dominant incipient ferromagnetic ordering. Apart from these striking effects this compound shows anomalous temperature dependence in a variety of physical properties at high temperatures, in particular, the ``saturation'' of the resistivity and thermopower with increasing temperature and marked departure of the susceptibility from the usual Curie-Weiss behavior. The conventional view of these effects is that the resistivity and the thermopower anomalies are a consequence of the s-d scattering mechanism [E. Gratz et al., J. Magn. Magn. Mater. 21, 191 (1980)], whereas the magnetic susceptibility is viewed as a composite of a Curie-Weiss and a temperature independent part [A. Kolodziejczyk and J. Spalek, J. Phys. F 14, 1277 (1984)]. We have carried out measurements of the variation in resistivity, thermopower, and susceptibility with temperature in Y9Co7. All the results show a temperature dependence dominated by an exponential-type behavior with a well-defined characteristic temperature. The latter defines the crossover from the region dominated by strong T dependence to that dominated by weak T dependence. The presence of similar unusual high T properties in many intermetallic compounds—particularly the A15 compounds—has been evident for many years. Many of them show one or more of the properties of the Y9Co7; however, at lower temperatures their behavior differs considerably from that of Y9Co7. In interpreting the anomalous exponential behavior shown by Y9Co7 a mechanism, closely related to localized phonon mode formation

  18. Temperature dependence of charge carrier generation in organic photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Feng; Tress, Wolfgang; Wang, Jianpu; Inganäs, Olle

    2015-03-27

    The charge generation mechanism in organic photovoltaics is a fundamental yet heavily debated issue. All the generated charges recombine at the open-circuit voltage (V_{OC}), so that investigation of recombined charges at V_{OC} provides a unique approach to understanding charge generation. At low temperatures, we observe a decrease of V_{OC}, which is attributed to reduced charge separation. Comparison between benchmark polymer:fullerene and polymer:polymer blends highlights the critical role of charge delocalization in charge separation and emphasizes the importance of entropy in charge generation. PMID:25860774

  19. Universal size/shape-dependent law for characteristic temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The description of different effects observed in nature by only one general equation is the 'Holy Grail' for all physicists. This goal has been achieved for characteristic temperatures through a top-down approach and is presented here. The general equation is based only on the surface area to volume ratio of nanostructures and statistics (Fermi-Dirac or Bose-Einstein) followed by the particles involved in the considered phenomena (melting, ferromagnetism, vibration and superconduction). From the distinction between fermions and bosons, this equation indicates the universal behaviour of size and shape effects. Theoretical predictions show satisfactory agreement with experimental data taken from literature.

  20. Temperature dependence on the synthesis of Jatropha bio lubricant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Jatropha oil has good potential as the renewable energy as well as lubricant feedstock. The synthesis of jatropha bio lubricant was performed by transesterification of jatropha methyl ester (JME) with trimethyl-ol-propane (TMP) with sodium methoxide (NaOCH3) catalyst. The effects of temperature on the synthesis were studied at a range between 120 degree Celsius and 200 degree Celsius with pressure kept at 10 mbar. The conversion of JME to jatropha bio lubricant was found to be the highest (47 %) at 200 degree Celsius. However, it was suggested that the optimum temperature of the reaction is at 150 degree Celsius due to insignificant improvement in bio lubricant production. To maintain forward reaction, the excess amount of JME was maintained at 3.9:1 ratios to TMP. Kinetic study was done and compared. The synthesis was found to follow a second order reaction with overall rate constant of 1.49 x 10-1 (% wt/ wt.min.degree Celsius)-1. The estimated activation energy was 3.94 kJ/mol. Pour point for jatropha bio lubricant was at -3 degree Celsius and Viscosity Index (VI) ranged from 178 to 183. The basic properties of jatropha bio lubricant, pour point and viscosities are found comparable to other plant based bio lubricant, namely palm oil and soybean based bio lubricant. (author)

  1. Temperature Dependence on The Synthesis of Jatropha Biolubricant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resul, Muhammad Faiz M Gunam; Ghazi, Tinia Idaty Mohd; Idris, Azni, E-mail: tinia@eng.upm.edu.my [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2011-02-15

    Jatropha oil has good potential as the renewable energy as well as lubricant feedstock. The synthesis of jatropha biolubricant was performed by transesterification of jatropha methyl ester (JME) with trimethyl-ol-propane (TMP) with sodium methoxide (NaOCH3) catalyst. The effects of temperature on the synthesis were studied at a range between 120 deg. C and 200 deg. C with pressure kept at 10mbar. The conversion of JME to jatropha biolubricant was found to be the highest (47%) at 200 deg. C. However, it was suggested that the optimum temperature of the reaction is at 150 deg. C due to insignificant improvement in biolubricant production. To maintain forward reaction, the excess amount of JME was maintained at 3.9:1 ratios to TMP. Kinetic study was done and compared. The synthesis was found to follow a second order reaction with overall rate constant of 1.49 x 10-1 (%wt/wt.min.deg. C)-1. The estimated activation energy was 3.94 kJ/mol. Pour point for jatropha biolubricant was at -3 deg. C and Viscosity Index (VI) ranged from 178 to 183. The basic properties of jatropha biolubricant, pour point and viscosities are found comparable to other plant based biolubricant, namely palm oil and soybean based biolubricant.

  2. Temperature Dependence on The Synthesis of Jatropha Biolubricant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunam Resul, Muhammad Faiz M.; Idaty Mohd Ghazi, Tinia; Idris, Azni

    2011-02-01

    Jatropha oil has good potential as the renewable energy as well as lubricant feedstock. The synthesis of jatropha biolubricant was performed by transesterification of jatropha methyl ester (JME) with trimethyl-ol-propane (TMP) with sodium methoxide (NaOCH3) catalyst. The effects of temperature on the synthesis were studied at a range between 120°C and 200°C with pressure kept at 10mbar. The conversion of JME to jatropha biolubricant was found to be the highest (47%) at 200°C. However, it was suggested that the optimum temperature of the reaction is at 150°C due to insignificant improvement in biolubricant production. To maintain forward reaction, the excess amount of JME was maintained at 3.9:1 ratios to TMP. Kinetic study was done and compared. The synthesis was found to follow a second order reaction with overall rate constant of 1.49 × 10-1 (%wt/wt.min.°C)-1. The estimated activation energy was 3.94 kJ/mol. Pour point for jatropha biolubricant was at -3°C and Viscosity Index (VI) ranged from 178 to 183. The basic properties of jatropha biolubricant, pour point and viscosities are found comparable to other plant based biolubricant, namely palm oil and soybean based biolubricant.

  3. Seafloor Weathering Dependence on Temperature and Dissolved Inorganic Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbot, D. S.; Farahat, N. X.; Archer, D. E.

    2015-12-01

    Most thinking on Earth's carbon cycle implicates silicate weathering as the dominant control of atmospheric CO2 concentration over long timescales. Recent analyses of alteration of basalt at the seafloor, however, suggest that seafloor weathering (low-temperature (type of weathering available on an exoplanet entirely covered by water, so understanding how it might work is essential for understanding the habitable zones of such waterworlds. We have built a 2D numerical model of the flow of seawater through porous basalt coupled to chemical alteration reactions that can calculate alkalinity fluxes and carbonate deposition (seafloor weathering). I will present simulations in which we vary the seawater temperature and dissolved inorganic carbon concentration, which are boundary conditions to our model, over large ranges. These results will provide a constraint on the ability of seafloor weathering to act as an effective climate buffer on Earth and other planets. I can't give you a preview of the results yet because at the time of writing this abstract we haven't completed the simulations!

  4. Electrical conduction in polycrystalline CVD diamond: Temperature dependent impedance measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, H.; Williams, O.A.; Jackman, R.B. [Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University College London, Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom); Rudkin, R.; Atkinson, A. [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2002-10-16

    In this paper, we report the first measurement of impedance on freestanding diamond films from 0.1 Hz to 10 MHz up to 300 C. A wide range of CVD materials have been investigated, but here we concentrate on 'black' diamond grown by MWPECVD. The Cole-Cole (Z' via Z{sup ''}) plots are well fitted to a RC parallel circuit model and the equivalent resistance and capacitance for the diamond films have been estimated using the Zview curve fitting. The results show only one single semicircle response at each temperature measured. It was found that the resistance decreases from 62 M{omega} at room temperature to 4 k{omega} at 300 C, with an activation energy around 0.51 eV. The equivalent capacitance is maintained at the level of 10{sup 2} pF up to 300 C, suggesting that the diamond grain boundaries are dominating the conduction. At 400 C, the impedance at low frequencies shows a linear tail, which can be explained that the ac polarization of diamond/Au interface occurs. (Abstract Copyright [2002], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  5. Binary accretion rates: dependence on temperature and mass-ratio

    CERN Document Server

    Young, Matthew D

    2015-01-01

    We perform a series of 2D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of gas accretion onto binaries via a circumbinary disc, for a range of gas temperatures and binary mass ratios ($q$). We show that increasing the gas temperature increases the accretion rate onto the primary for all values of the binary mass ratio: for example, for $q=0.1$ and a fixed binary separation, an increase of normalised sound speed by a factor of $5$ (from our "cold" to "hot" simulations) changes the fraction of the accreted gas that flows on to the primary from $ 10\\%$ to $\\sim40\\%$. We present a simple parametrisation for the average accretion rate of each binary component accurate to within a few percent and argue that this parametrisation (rather than those in the literature based on warmer simulations) is relevant to supermassive black hole accretion and all but the widest stellar binaries. We present trajectories for the growth of $q$ during circumbinary disc accretion and argue that the period distribution of stellar "...

  6. Temperature dependence of blistering and deuterium retention in tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tungsten has been selected as the plasma facing material (PFM) at the divertor baffles and dome in the ITER design, because tungsten has a very high threshold energy for sputtering, a high melting point and a very low tritium inventory. However, blistering can occur at tungsten surface, even if the ion energy is too low to create displacement damage such as vacancies. Tungsten blistering could lead to instability of the plasma due to high-Z impurity release into the core plasma and sudden gas recycling. In addition, an increasing tritium inventory in the near surface region of PFCs could become a significant safety issue during the exchange process of the PFCs. Therefore, blistering and deuterium retention in tungsten exposed to high fluences (up to 1E27 D/m2) of high flux (1E22 D+/m2/s) and low energy (38 eV) deuterium plasma were examined in the temperature range of 315 K to 1000 K with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), focused ion beam (FIB) and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). At 315 K, only sparse low-dome blisters with a chord of a few microns or less appeared even the fluence was increased to 1E27 D/m2. At around 400 K, the blisters became much denser and the dome of blisters became a little higher. Peculiar change occurred around 500 K, where two kinds of blisters appeared. One is the large blisters with sizes of a few tens of microns and varying ratios of height against chord (up to 0.6), and the other is the small blisters with chords of less than a few microns and large ratio of height against chord (about 0.7). In high temperature region (higher than 600 K), the blisters became much sparser with the increasing temperature and disappeared at 1000 K. In addition, the phenomenon of blister bursting with a tail, or partially-opened or fully-opened lid was found on some grains after plasma exposure or TDS experiments. During TDS experiments, bursting release with sadden peaks was observed, suggesting the bursts of blisters. Deuterium retention showed

  7. Temperature Dependence of PMD of the Optical Cables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, S.J. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    2000-03-01

    This report is relevant to the project {sup K}EPCO All-Optical Network Project{sup w}hich is being carried out by Computer and Communication Group in Power System Laboratory. This report is planned to be used as a reference guide for the PMD strategy of the KEPCO optical networks. The PMD of the optical cable installed in the air as OPGW is greatly affected by the environmental temperature change, unlike that of the optical cable installed underground. The variance was turned out to be 70% larger compared with that of underground optical cable and the time scale of the PMD was less than 5 min, in the worst case. Hence, the compensation technology should be chosen taking into account the properties of the aerial optical cables. (author). 6 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Dependence of electric strength on the ambient temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Čaja, Alexander, E-mail: alexander.caja@fstroj.uniza.sk, E-mail: patrik.nemec@fstroj.uniza.sk, E-mail: milan.malcho@fstroj.uniza.sk; Nemec, Patrik, E-mail: alexander.caja@fstroj.uniza.sk, E-mail: patrik.nemec@fstroj.uniza.sk, E-mail: milan.malcho@fstroj.uniza.sk; Malcho, Milan, E-mail: alexander.caja@fstroj.uniza.sk, E-mail: patrik.nemec@fstroj.uniza.sk, E-mail: milan.malcho@fstroj.uniza.sk [University of Žilina, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Department of Power Engeneering, Univerzitná 1, 010 26 Žilina (Slovakia)

    2014-08-06

    At present, the volume concentration of electronic components in their miniaturization to different types of microchips and increasing their performance raises the problem of cooling such elements due to the increasing density of heat flow of heat loss. Compliance with safe operating temperature of active semiconductor element is very closely related to the reliability and durability not only components, but also the entire device. Often it is also necessary to electrically isolate the unit from the side of the cooler air. Cooling demand by natural convection is typical for applications with high operating reliability. To the reliability of the system for removing heat loss increased, it is necessary to minimize need to use the mechanically or electrically powered elements, such as circulation pumps or fans. Experience to date with applications of heat pipe in specific systems appears to be the most appropriate method of cooling.

  9. Dependence of electric strength on the ambient temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present, the volume concentration of electronic components in their miniaturization to different types of microchips and increasing their performance raises the problem of cooling such elements due to the increasing density of heat flow of heat loss. Compliance with safe operating temperature of active semiconductor element is very closely related to the reliability and durability not only components, but also the entire device. Often it is also necessary to electrically isolate the unit from the side of the cooler air. Cooling demand by natural convection is typical for applications with high operating reliability. To the reliability of the system for removing heat loss increased, it is necessary to minimize need to use the mechanically or electrically powered elements, such as circulation pumps or fans. Experience to date with applications of heat pipe in specific systems appears to be the most appropriate method of cooling

  10. Temperature-dependent THz vibrational spectra of clenbuterol hydrochloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, YuPing; Lei, XiangYun; Yue, Ai; Zhang, Zhenwei

    2013-04-01

    Using the high-resolution Terahertz Time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) and the standard sample pellet technique, the far-infrared vibrational spectra of clenbuterol hydrochloride (CH), a β 2-adrenergic agonist for decreasing fat deposition and enhancing protein accretion, were measured in temperature range of 77-295 K. Between 0.2 and 3.6 THz (6.6-120.0 cm-1), seven highly resolved spectral features, strong line-narrowing and a frequency blue-shift were observed with cooling. However, ractopamine hydrochloride, with some structural and pharmacological similarities to clenbuterol hydrochloride, showed no spectral features, indicating high sensitivity and strong specificity of THz-TDS. These results could be used for the rapid and nondestructive CH residual detection in food safety control.

  11. Dynamic temperature dependence patterns in future energy demand models in the context of climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hekkenberg, M.; Moll, H.C.; Schoot Uiterkamp, A.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Energy demand depends on outdoor temperature in a 'u' shaped fashion. Various studies have used this temperature dependence to investigate the effects of climate change on energy demand. Such studies contain implicit or explicit assumptions to describe expected socio-economic changes that may affect

  12. Anomalous near-field heat transfer between a cylinder and a perforated surface

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; Reid, M. T. Homer; Varela, Jaime; Joannopoulos, John D.; Capasso, Federico; Johnson, Steven G.

    2012-01-01

    We predict that the radiative heat-transfer rate between a cylinder and a perforated surface depends non-monotonically on their separation. This anomalous behavior, which arises due to near-field effects, is explained using a heuristic model based on the interaction of a dipole with a plate. We show that nonmonotonicity depends not only on geometry and temperature but also on material dispersion - for micron and submicron objects, nonmonotonicity is present in polar dielectrics but absent in ...

  13. Temperature-dependence of detection efficiency in NbN and TaN SNSPD

    OpenAIRE

    Engel, Andreas; Inderbitzin, Kevin; Schilling, Andreas; Lusche, Robert; Semenov, Alexei; Hübers, Heinz-Wilhelm; Henrich, Dagmar; Hofherr, Matthias; Il'in, Konstantin; Siegel, Michael

    2012-01-01

    We present systematic measurements of the temperature-dependence of detection efficiencies in TaN and NbN superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors. We have observed a clear increase of the cut-off wavelength with decreasing temperature that we can qualitatively describe with a temperature-dependent diffusion coefficient of the quasi-particles created after photon absorption. Furthermore, the detection efficiency at wavelengths shorter than the cut-off wavelength as well as at longer w...

  14. Temperature and Electric Field Dependence of Conduction in Low-Density Polyethylene

    OpenAIRE

    Dennison, JR; Brunson, Jerilyn

    2008-01-01

    A traditional constant voltage conductivity test method was used to measure how the conductivity of highly insulating low-density polyethylene (LDPE) polymer films depends on applied electric field, repeated and prolonged electric field exposure, and sample temperature. The strength of the applied voltage was varied to determine the electric field dependence. At low electric field, the resistivity was measured from cryogenic temperatures to well above the glass transition temperature. Compari...

  15. Measurement of the temperature dependence of pulse lengths in an -type germanium detector

    OpenAIRE

    Abt, I; CALDWELL A.; J. Liu; Majorovits, B.; Volynets, O.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The temperature dependence of the pulse length was measured for an 18-fold segmented n-type germanium detector in the temperature range of 77?120 K. The interactions of 122 keV photons originating from a 152Eu source were selected and pulses as observed on the core and segment electrodes were studied. In both cases, the temperature dependence can be well described by a Boltzmann-like ansatz.

  16. Temperature dependent spin transport properties of Platinum inferred from spin Hall magnetoresistance measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, Sibylle; Althammer, Matthias; Geprägs, Stephan; Opel, Matthias; Gross, Rudolf; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B.

    2014-01-01

    We study the temperature dependence of the spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) in yttrium iron garnet/platinum hybrid structures via magnetization orientation dependent magnetoresistance measurements. Our experiments show a decrease of the SMR magnitude with decreasing temperature. Using the sensitivity of the SMR to the spin transport properties of the normal metal, we interpret our data in terms of a decrease of the spin Hall angle in platinum from 0.11 at room temperature to 0.075 at 10K, wh...

  17. A Temperature-Dependent Thermal Model of IGBT Modules Suitable for Circuit-Level Simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Rui; Wang, Huai; Ma, Ke; Ghimire, Pramod; Iannuzzo, Francesco; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2014-01-01

    Thermal impedance of IGBT modules may vary with operating conditions due to that the thermal conductivity and heat capacity of materials are temperature dependent. This paper proposes a Cauer thermal model for a 1700 V/1000 A IGBT module with temperature-dependent thermal resistances and thermal capacitances. The temperature effect is investigated by Finite Element Method (FEM) simulation based on the geometry and material information of the IGBT module. The developed model is ready for circu...

  18. Temperature dependence of InAs/GaAs quantum dots solar photovoltaic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the temperature dependence measurements characterisation of several InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) solar cell devices. The devices with cylindrical geometry were fabricated and characterised on-wafer under 20 suns in a temperature range from 300°K to 430°K. The temperature dependence parameters such as open circuit voltage, short circuit density current, fill factor and efficiency are studied in detail. The increase of temperature produces an enhancement of the short circuit current. However, the open circuit voltage is degraded because the temperature increases the recombination phenomena involved, as well as reducing the effective band gap of the semiconductor. (semiconductor devices)

  19. Temperature dependent electron Lande g-factor and interband matrix element in GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huebner, Jens; Doehrmann, Stefanie; Haegele, Daniel; Oestreich, Michael [Institute for Solid State Physics, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz University Hannover (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    High precision measurements of the electron Lande g-factor in GaAs are presented using spin quantum beat spectroscopy at low excitation densities and temperatures ranging from 2.6 to 300 K. Influences of nuclear spin polarization at low temperatures have been fully compensated. Comparing these measurements with available data for the temperature dependent effective mass reveals an unexpected strong temperature dependence of the interband matrix element and resolves a long lasting discrepancy between experiment and kp - theory. The strong decrease of the interband matrix element with increasing temperature is explained by phonon induced fluctuations of the interatomic spacing and adiabatic following of the electrons.

  20. Temperature dependency of tensile properties of GFRP composite for wind turbine blades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the temperature dependency of the tensile properties of a glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) used in wind turbine blades was examined. The tensile strength, elastic modulus, and Poisson's ratio of the tensile specimen manufactured from uniaxial (0 .deg.) and triaxial (0/±45.deg) laminate composite plates were measured at four different testing temperatures-room temperature, -30 .deg. C, -50 .deg. C, and 60 .deg. C. It was found that the tensile strengths and elastic moduli of the uniaxial laminates were greater than those of the triaxial laminates over the testing temperature range. The tensile strength of the two laminates was significantly dependent on the testing temperature, while the dependency of the elastic modulus on the temperature was insignificant. Furthermore, it could be considered that the Poisson's ratio changed slightly with a change in the testing temperature

  1. Temperature dependency of tensile properties of GFRP composite for wind turbine blades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huh, Yong Hak; Kim, Jong Il; Kim, Dong Jin; Lee, Gun Chang [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    In this study, the temperature dependency of the tensile properties of a glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) used in wind turbine blades was examined. The tensile strength, elastic modulus, and Poisson's ratio of the tensile specimen manufactured from uniaxial (0 .deg.) and triaxial (0/{+-}45.deg) laminate composite plates were measured at four different testing temperatures-room temperature, -30 .deg. C, -50 .deg. C, and 60 .deg. C. It was found that the tensile strengths and elastic moduli of the uniaxial laminates were greater than those of the triaxial laminates over the testing temperature range. The tensile strength of the two laminates was significantly dependent on the testing temperature, while the dependency of the elastic modulus on the temperature was insignificant. Furthermore, it could be considered that the Poisson's ratio changed slightly with a change in the testing temperature.

  2. Temperature and time-dependence of the elastic moduli of Pu and Pu-Ga alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Migliori, Albert [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mihut, I. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)], E-mail: izabela@lanl.gov; Betts, J.B.; Ramos, M.; Mielke, C.; Pantea, C.; Miller, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2007-10-11

    In previous work, on cooling from 300 K to 10 K the elastic moduli for both {alpha}- and {delta}-Pu dropped 30%. This large change may reflect effects of 5f-electron localization. In this work, the elastic moduli at ambient temperature of several Pu-Ga alloys were measured using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS). The strong temperature dependence of the bulk and shear modulus and the temperature independence of Poisson's ratio was confirmed and the upper temperature limit for {alpha}-Pu was extended to 360 K. Measurements of the time dependence of the shear moduli of Pu and Pu-2.36 at.% Ga were determined with high precision as a function of time and temperature. Using a model for time dependence of point defects, we determined the exponential time constant at ambient temperature for such variations. The low temperature results are consistent with Fluss.

  3. Temperature and time-dependence of the elastic moduli of Pu and Pu-Ga alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In previous work, on cooling from 300 K to 10 K the elastic moduli for both α- and δ-Pu dropped 30%. This large change may reflect effects of 5f-electron localization. In this work, the elastic moduli at ambient temperature of several Pu-Ga alloys were measured using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS). The strong temperature dependence of the bulk and shear modulus and the temperature independence of Poisson's ratio was confirmed and the upper temperature limit for α-Pu was extended to 360 K. Measurements of the time dependence of the shear moduli of Pu and Pu-2.36 at.% Ga were determined with high precision as a function of time and temperature. Using a model for time dependence of point defects, we determined the exponential time constant at ambient temperature for such variations. The low temperature results are consistent with Fluss

  4. Size-dependent hysteresis and phase formation kinetics during temperature cycling of metal nanopowders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a description of the evolution of a polymorphically transforming metal nanoparticle ensemble subjected to a temperature cycling with constant rates of temperature change. The calculations of the time dependence of the volume fraction of the new phase show the existence of size-dependent hysteresis and its main features. The statistical analysis makes it possible to introduce and determine the size-dependent superheating limit and supercooling limit.

  5. Temperature dependence of electronic heat capacity in Holstein model of DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fialko, N.; Sobolev, E.; Lakhno, V.

    2016-04-01

    The dynamics of charge migration was modeled to calculate temperature dependencies of its thermodynamic equilibrium values such as energy and electronic heat capacity in homogeneous adenine fragments. The energy varies from nearly polaron one at T ∼ 0 to midpoint of the conductivity band at high temperatures. The peak on the graph of electronic heat capacity is observed at the polaron decay temperature.

  6. A simple equation for describing the temperature dependent growth of free-floating macrophytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heide, van Tj.; Roijackers, R.M.M.; Nes, van E.H.; Peeters, E.T.H.M.

    2006-01-01

    Temperature is one of the most important factors determining growth rates of free-floating macrophytes in the field. To analyse and predict temperature dependent growth rates of these pleustophytes, modelling may play an important role. Several equations have been published for describing temperatur

  7. Temperature Dependence Calibration and Correction of the DAMPE BGO Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Yifeng; Zhang, Yunlong; Wen, Sicheng; Wang, Chi; Li, Zhiying; Feng, Changqing; Wang, Xiaolian; Xu, Zizong; Huang, Guangshun; Liu, Shubin

    2016-01-01

    A BGO electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) is built for the DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) mission. The effect of temperature on the BGO ECAL was investigated with a thermal vacuum experiment. The light output of a BGO crystal depends on temperature significantly. The temperature coefficient of each BGO crystal bar has been calibrated, and a correction method is also presented in this paper.

  8. Fiber-optic temperature sensor based on interaction of temperature-dependent refractive index and absorption of germanium film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Li, Yulin

    2011-01-10

    The interaction of a large temperature-dependent refractive index and a temperature-dependent absorption of semiconductor materials at 1550 nm can be used to build a very sensitive, film coated fiber-optic temperature probe. We developed a sensor model for the optical fiber-germanium film sensor. A temperature sensitivity of reflectivity change of 0.0012/°C, corresponding to 0.1°C considering a moderate signal processing system, over 100°C within the temperature regime of -20°C to 120°C, has been demonstrated by experimental tests of the novel sensor. The potential sensitivity and further applications of the sensor are discussed. PMID:21221150

  9. Wall temperature measurements using a thermal imaging camera with temperature-dependent emissivity corrections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A methodology is presented whereby the relationship between temperature and emissivity for fused quartz has been used to correct the temperature values of a quartz impingement plate detected by an SC3000 thermal imaging camera. The methodology uses an iterative method using the initial temperature (obtained by assuming a constant emissivity) to find the emissivity values which are then put into the thermal imaging software and used to find the subsequent temperatures, which are used to find the emissivities, and so on until converged. This method is used for a quartz impingement plate that has been heated under various flame conditions, and the results are compared. Radiation losses from the plate are also calculated, and it is shown that even a slight change in temperature greatly affects the radiation loss. It is a general methodology that can be used for any wall material whose emissivity is a function of temperature

  10. Temperature dependence of DNA condensation at high ionic concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Wei; Gao, Qingqing; Liu, Yanhui; Fan, Yangtao; Hu, Lin; Xu, Houqiang

    2016-08-01

    A series of experiments pointed out that compact states of DNA condensed by multivalent cation prefer higher temperature. The condensed DNA takes elongated coil or compact globule states and the population of the compact globule states increases with an increase in temperature. At the same time, a recent experimental work carried out in buffer solution without multivalent cation points out that DNA persistence length strongly depends on the temperature. DNA persistence length is a key parameter for quantitative interpretation of the conformational properties of DNA and related to the bending rigidity of DNA. It is necessary to revolve the effects of temperature dependence of persistence length on DNA condensation, and a model including the temperature dependence of persistence length and strong correlation of multivalent cation on DNA is provided. The autocorrelation function of the tangent vectors is found as an effective way to detect the temperature dependence of toroid conformations. With an increase in temperature, the first periodic oscillation in the autocorrelation function shifts left and the number of segments containing the first periodic oscillation decreases gradually. According to the experiments mentioned above, the long-axis length is defined to estimate the temperature dependence of condensation process further. At the temperatures defined in experiments mentioned above, the relation between long-axis length and temperature matches the experimental results.

  11. Silicon carbide powders: Temperature-dependent dielectric properties and enhanced microwave absorption at gigahertz range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui-Jing; Yuan, Jie; Li, Yong; Hou, Zhi-Ling; Jin, Hai-Bo; Fang, Xiao-Yong; Cao, Mao-Sheng

    2013-06-01

    The dielectric properties of SiC powders are investigated in the temperature range of 373-773 K at gigahertz range (8.2-12.4 GHz). The complex permittivity ɛ and the loss tgδ exhibit frequency-dependent characteristics with the frequency, and they also show temperature-dependent characteristic with the temperature. From the Cole-Cole plots, the relaxation and electrical conductance both affect the dielectric properties at high temperature. First principle calculations are employed to analyze the electronic structure of SiC, which infer the influence of relaxation and conductance on dielectric behaviors. The reflection loss RL peak is below -10 dB in temperatures of 373-773 K with the sample in thickness 2.1 mm. More importantly, the microwave absorption coupled with widening effective absorption bandwidth demonstrates positive temperature effects on the absorption with the increasing temperature, indicating promising potential applications in high-temperature microwave absorption fields.

  12. Study of temperature dependent local structure by polarized Cu K-edge EXAFS measurements on La sub 2 sub - sub x Sr sub x CuO sub 4 (x=0.105, 0.13, 0.20)

    CERN Document Server

    Saini, N L; Bianconi, A; Oyanagi, H; Ito, T; Oka, K

    2003-01-01

    We have studied temperature dependent local structure of superconducting La sub 2 sub - sub x Sr sub x CuO sub 4 (0.105, 0.13, 0.20) single crystals by Cu K-edge extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements with polarization parallel to the in-plane Cu-O bonds. We find that, while underdoped crystals (x=0.105, 0.13) show anomalous temperature dependence, similar to the case of optimally doped system (x=0.15), overdoped crystal (x=0.20) does not reveal such anomaly. Correlated Debye-Waller factor (DWF) of the Cu-O bonds (distance broadening) has been used as an order parameter to determine characteristic local displacements in the CuO sub 2 plane. The amplitude of temperature dependent step-like increase in the DWF at low temperature decreases with increasing doping. It has been discussed that decreasing electron-lattice interaction with increasing doping, shown by angle resolved photoemission measurements, is closely related to the evolving anomalous local CuO sub 2 distortion and charge inho...

  13. Simultaneous retrieval of temperature-dependent absorption coefficient and conductivity of participating media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yatao; Qi, Hong; Zhao, Fangzhou; Ruan, Liming; Tan, Heping

    2016-02-01

    A secondary optimization technique was proposed to estimate the temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and absorption coefficient. In the proposed method, the stochastic particle swarm optimization was applied to solve the inverse problem. The coupled radiation and conduction problem was solved in a 1D absorbing, emitting, but non-scattering slab exposed to a pulse laser. It is found that in the coupled radiation and conduction problem, the temperature response is highly sensitive to conductivity but slightly sensitive to the optical properties. On the contrary, the radiative intensity is highly sensitive to optical properties but slightly sensitive to thermal conductivity. Therefore, the optical and thermal signals should both be considered in the inverse problem to estimate the temperature-dependent properties of the transparent media. On this basis, the temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and absorption coefficient were both estimated accurately by measuring the time-dependent temperature, and radiative response at the boundary of the slab.

  14. The charmonium dissociation in an "anomalous wind"

    CERN Document Server

    Sadofyev, Andrey V

    2016-01-01

    We study the charmonium dissociation in a strongly coupled chiral plasma in the presence of magnetic field and axial charge imbalance. This type of plasma carries ``anomalous flow" induced by the chiral anomaly and exhibits novel transport phenomena such as chiral magnetic effect. We found that the ``anomalous flow" would modify the charmonium color screening length by using the gauge/gravity correspondence. We derive an analytical expression quantifying the ``anomalous flow" experienced by a charmonium for a large class of chiral plasma with a gravity dual. We elaborate on the similarity and {\\it qualitative} difference between anomalous effects on the charmonium color screening length which are {\\it model-dependent} and those on the heavy quark drag force which are fixed by the second law of thermodynamics. We speculate on the possible charmonium dissociation induced by chiral anomaly in heavy ion collisions.

  15. The charmonium dissociation in an "anomalous wind"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadofyev, Andrey V.; Yin, Yi

    2016-01-01

    We study the charmonium dissociation in a strongly coupled chiral plasma in the presence of magnetic field and axial charge imbalance. This type of plasma carries "anomalous flow" induced by the chiral anomaly and exhibits novel transport phenomena such as chiral magnetic effect. We found that the "anomalous flow" would modify the charmonium color screening length by using the gauge/gravity correspondence. We derive an analytical expression quantifying the "anomalous flow" experienced by a charmonium for a large class of chiral plasma with a gravity dual. We elaborate on the similarity and qualitative difference between anomalous effects on the charmonium color screening length which are model-dependent and those on the heavy quark drag force which are fixed by the second law of thermodynamics. We speculate on the possible charmonium dissociation induced by the chiral anomaly in heavy ion collisions.

  16. Temperature and pressure dependent osmotic pressure in liquid sodium-cesium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evaluation of the osmotic pressure in terms of the concentration fluctuations of mixtures and the equations of state of the pure liquids is considered. The temperature and pressure dependent experimentally measured concentration-concentration correlations in the long wavelength limit of liquid sodium-cesium alloys are used to demonstrate the appreciable dependence of the temperature and pressure on the osmotic pressure as a function of concentration. Introducing interchange energies as functions of temperature and pressure, our analysis is consistent with the Flory model. Thus, a formalism for evaluating the state dependent osmotic pressure is developed and our numerical work is considered to be an extension of the calculations of Rashid and March in the sense that a temperature and pressure dependent interchange energy parameter that more closely parameterizes the state dependent concentration fluctuations in the liquid alloys, is used. (author)

  17. Temperature-dependent photocarrier recombination dynamics in Cu[2]ZnSnS[4] single crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Phuong, Le Quang; Okano, Makoto; Yamada, Yasuhiro; Nagaoka, Akira; Yoshino, Kenji; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko

    2014-01-01

    Time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) measurements have been used to study the temperature-dependent photocarrier recombination dynamics in Cu[2]ZnSnS[4] (CZTS) single crystals. We found a significant change of nearly four orders of magnitude of the PL decay time, from microseconds at low temperatures to subnanoseconds at room temperature. The slow PL decay at low temperatures indicates localization of the photocarriers at the band tails. Due to the large band tail states, the PL decay time de...

  18. Temperature dependence calibration and correction of the DAMPE BGO electromagnetic calorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Y. F.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhang, Y. L.; Wen, S. C.; Wang, C.; Li, Z. Y.; Feng, C. Q.; Wang, X. L.; Xu, Z. Z.; Huang, G. S.; Liu, S. B.

    2016-07-01

    A BGO electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) is built for the DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) mission. The temperature effect on the BGO ECAL was investigated with a thermal vacuum experiment. The light output of a BGO crystal depends on temperature significantly, and the readout system is also affected by temperature. The temperature coefficient of each BGO detection unit has been calibrated, and a correction method is also presented in this paper.

  19. A unified model for temperature dependent electrical conduction in polymer electrolytes

    OpenAIRE

    Mikrajuddin; Lenggoro, I. Wuled; Okuyama, Kikuo

    2001-01-01

    The observed temperature dependence of electrical conduction in polymer electrolytes is usually fitted with two separated equations: an Arrhenius equation at low temperatures and Vogel-Tamman-Fulcher (VTF) at high temperatures. We report here a derivation of a single equation to explain the variation of electrical conduction in polymer electrolytes at all temperature ranges. Our single equation is in agreement with the experimental data

  20. Electrostatic control over temperature-dependent tunnelling across a single-molecule junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrigues, Alvar R.; Wang, Lejia; Del Barco, Enrique; Nijhuis, Christian A.

    2016-05-01

    Understanding how the mechanism of charge transport through molecular tunnel junctions depends on temperature is crucial to control electronic function in molecular electronic devices. With just a few systems investigated as a function of bias and temperature so far, thermal effects in molecular tunnel junctions remain poorly understood. Here we report a detailed charge transport study of an individual redox-active ferrocene-based molecule over a wide range of temperatures and applied potentials. The results show the temperature dependence of the current to vary strongly as a function of the gate voltage. Specifically, the current across the molecule exponentially increases in the Coulomb blockade regime and decreases at the charge degeneracy points, while remaining temperature-independent at resonance. Our observations can be well accounted for by a formal single-level tunnelling model where the temperature dependence relies on the thermal broadening of the Fermi distributions of the electrons in the leads.

  1. Determination of the temperature dependence of the up- down-quark mass in QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Dominguez, C A

    2016-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the sum of the QCD up- and down-quark masses, $(m_u + m_d)$ and the pion decay constant, $f_\\pi$, are determined from two thermal finite energy QCD sum rules for the pseudoscalar-current correlator. This quark-mass remains mostly constant for temperatures well below the critical temperature for deconfinement/chiral-symmetry restoration. As this critical temperature is approached, the quark-mass increases sharply with increasing temperature. This increase is far more pronounced if the temperature dependence of the pion mass (determined independently from other methods) is taken into account. The behavior of $f_\\pi(T)$ is consistent with the expectation from chiral symmetry, i.e. that it should follow the thermal dependence of the quark condensate, independently of the quark mass.

  2. Study of the Energy Dependence of the Anomalous Mean Free Path Effect by Means of High-energy ($\\geq$12 GeV/nucleon) Helium Nuclei

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The proposal concerns an extension to higher energies of previous experiments which have provided evidence for anomalously short reaction mean free paths among projectile fragments from heavy ion interactions.\\\\ \\\\ It is intended to provide information on the interaction properties of projectile fragments, mainly 3He, P, D, T as well as of scattered 4He nuclei in passive detectors exposed to beams of energies exceeding those available in previous experim factor of about 7. \\\\ \\\\ Interaction mean free paths and event topologies will be measured in a nuclear emulsion stack (LBL) of 7.5~cm~x~5~cm~x~25~cm dimensions. Decay effects will be recorded by comparing the activity of spallation residues in dense and diluted copper target assemblies (Marburg). Target fragmentation will be studied in a stack of silverchloride crystal foils (Frankfurt) of about 7~cm~x~6~cm~x~1~cm dimensions. The \\alpha beam ejected at EJ~62 will be used to provide both exposures at high intensity of 10|1|2 alphas on th and at low intensity ...

  3. Temperature Dependence of the Raman Spectra and Phase Transition of Zirconia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尤静林; 蒋国昌; 杨松华; 马金昌; 徐匡迪

    2001-01-01

    A newly constructed high-temperature Raman spectrometer was used to study the temperature-dependence Raman spectra (up to 2023 K) and transformation of zirconia crystal. High-temperature Raman scattering is a useful tool in characterizing the different structures of zirconia and offers the possibility of identifying the phase transformation. It shows that monoclinic zirconia transforms to tetragonal phase at about 1440 K during the process of increasing temperature, but shows a lower transformation temperature from tetragonal to monoclinic phase at about 1323 K while the temperature decreases.

  4. Large anomalous Hall effect driven by a nonvanishing Berry curvature in the noncolinear antiferromagnet Mn3Ge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Ajaya K; Fischer, Julia Erika; Sun, Yan; Yan, Binghai; Karel, Julie; Komarek, Alexander C; Shekhar, Chandra; Kumar, Nitesh; Schnelle, Walter; Kübler, Jürgen; Felser, Claudia; Parkin, Stuart S P

    2016-04-01

    It is well established that the anomalous Hall effect displayed by a ferromagnet scales with its magnetization. Therefore, an antiferromagnet that has no net magnetization should exhibit no anomalous Hall effect. We show that the noncolinear triangular antiferromagnet Mn3Ge exhibits a large anomalous Hall effect comparable to that of ferromagnetic metals; the magnitude of the anomalous conductivity is ~500 (ohm·cm)(-1) at 2 K and ~50 (ohm·cm)(-1) at room temperature. The angular dependence of the anomalous Hall effect measurements confirms that the small residual in-plane magnetic moment has no role in the observed effect except to control the chirality of the spin triangular structure. Our theoretical calculations demonstrate that the large anomalous Hall effect in Mn3Ge originates from a nonvanishing Berry curvature that arises from the chiral spin structure, and that also results in a large spin Hall effect of 1100 (ħ/e) (ohm·cm)(-1), comparable to that of platinum. The present results pave the way toward the realization of room temperature antiferromagnetic spintronics and spin Hall effect-based data storage devices. PMID:27152355

  5. The dependence of surface temperature on IGBTs load and ambient temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Čaja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, older power electronics and electrotechnics are improvement and at the same time developing new and more efficient devices. These devices produce in their activities a significant part of the heat which, if not effectively drained, causing damage to these elements. In this case, it is important to develop new and more efficient cooling system. The most widespread of modern methods of cooling is the cooling by heat pipe. This contribution is aimed at cooling the insulated-gate bipolar transistor (IGBT elements by loop heat pipe (LHP. IGBTs are very prone to damage due to high temperatures, and therefore is the important that the surface temperature was below 100°C. It was therefore created a model that examined what impact of surface temperature on the IGBT element and heat removal at different load and constant ambient temperature.

  6. The dependence of surface temperature on IGBTs load and ambient temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Čaja; Marek, Patsch

    2015-05-01

    Currently, older power electronics and electrotechnics are improvement and at the same time developing new and more efficient devices. These devices produce in their activities a significant part of the heat which, if not effectively drained, causing damage to these elements. In this case, it is important to develop new and more efficient cooling system. The most widespread of modern methods of cooling is the cooling by heat pipe. This contribution is aimed at cooling the insulated-gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) elements by loop heat pipe (LHP). IGBTs are very prone to damage due to high temperatures, and therefore is the important that the surface temperature was below 100°C. It was therefore created a model that examined what impact of surface temperature on the IGBT element and heat removal at different load and constant ambient temperature.

  7. Anomalous ionic conductivity of Sc sub 2 (WO sub 4) sub 3 mediated by structural changes at high pressures and temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Secco, R A; Imanaka, N; Adachi, G

    2002-01-01

    The ionic conductivity of Sc sub 2 (WO sub 4) sub 3 at 400 deg. C shows a normal decrease with increase in pressure up to 2.9 GPa but then increases anomalously at pressures up to 4.3 GPa. Synchrotron in situ x-ray diffraction results show that Sc sub 2 (WO sub 4) sub 3 undergoes pressure-induced amorphization at pressures coincident with the reversal in conductivity behaviour. The loss of crystal structure at high pressure may be associated with the property of negative thermal expansion in Sc sub 2 (WO sub 4) sub 3.

  8. Temperature dependence of the magnetization of disc shaped NiO nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Stine Nyborg; Lindgard, P.A.; Lefmann, Kim;

    2002-01-01

    We present neutron diffraction data of NiO nanoparticles measuring the total magnetization and the sublattice magnetization at various temperatures. Electron microscopy shows that the particles are disc shaped with average diameter of about 12 nm and a thickness of about 2 nm. The Neel temperature...... temperature dependent contribution of a structural peak in contrast to bulk NiO. The two magnetic signals vanish at the same temperature. The data are interpreted on the basis of an extended mean field model on disc shaped NiO particles. This model includes the finite size dependence of the effective field...

  9. Temperature-dependent structural behavior of self-avoiding walks on Sierpinski carpets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsche, Miriam; Roman, H Eduardo; Porto, Markus

    2007-12-01

    We study the temperature-dependent structural behavior of self-avoiding walks (SAWs) on two-dimensional Sierpinski carpets as a simple model of polymers adsorbed on a disordered surface. Thereby, the Sierpinski carpet defines two types of sites with energy 0 and >0 , respectively, yielding a deterministic fractal energy landscape. In the limiting cases of temperature T-->0 and T-->infinity , the known behaviors of SAWs on Sierpinski carpets and on regular square lattices, respectively, are recovered. For finite temperatures, the structural behavior is found to be intermediate between the two limiting cases; the characteristic exponents, however, display a nontrivial dependence on temperature. PMID:18233808

  10. Tunneling magnetoresistance dependence on the temperature in a ferromagnetic Zener diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comesana, E; Aldegunde, M; GarcIa-Loureiro, A, E-mail: enrique.comesana@usc.e [Departamento de Electronica e Computacion, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2009-11-15

    In the present work we focus on the study of the temperature dependence of the tunnelling current in a ferromagnetic Zener diode. We predict the tunneling magnetoresistance dependence on the temperature. Large doping concentrations lead to magnetic semiconductors with Curie temperature T{sub C} near or over room temperature and this will facilitate the introduction of new devices that make use of the ferromagnetism effects. According to our calculations the tunneling magnetoresistance has the form TMR {proportional_to} (T{sup n}{sub C}-T{sup n}).

  11. Temperature dependence of spin Hall magnetoresistance in W/CoFeB bilayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuno, Takaya; Taniguchi, Takuya; Kim, Sanghoon; Baek, Seung-heon Chris; Park, Byong-Guk; Moriyama, Takahiro; Kim, Kab-Jin; Ono, Teruo

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the temperature dependence of the spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) in a W/CoFeB bilayer. The SMR is found to increase with decreasing temperature. An analysis based on the SMR theory suggests that the spin Hall angle of W and/or the spin polarization of CoFeB can be the origin of the temperature dependence of the SMR. We also find that the spin diffusion length and the resistivity of W do not significantly vary with temperature, which indicates the necessity of further study on the electron transport mechanism in W films to reveal the origin of the spin Hall effect in W.

  12. The Temperature Dependence of the Debye-Waller Factor of Magnesium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sledziewska-Blocka, D.; Lebech, Bente

    1976-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the average Debye-Waller factor for magnesium was measured by means of neutron diffraction spectrometry. The experimental results obtained in the temperature range from 5 to 256 K are compared with theoretical calculations, using the harmonic and quasi-harmonic appro......The temperature dependence of the average Debye-Waller factor for magnesium was measured by means of neutron diffraction spectrometry. The experimental results obtained in the temperature range from 5 to 256 K are compared with theoretical calculations, using the harmonic and quasi...

  13. A Temperature-Dependent Thermal Model of IGBT Modules Suitable for Circuit-Level Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Rui; Wang, Huai; Ma, Ke;

    2014-01-01

    Thermal impedance of IGBT modules may vary with operating conditions due to that the thermal conductivity and heat capacity of materials are temperature dependent. This paper proposes a Cauer thermal model for a 1700 V/1000 A IGBT module with temperature-dependent thermal resistances and thermal...... capacitances. The temperature effect is investigated by Finite Element Method (FEM) simulation based on the geometry and material information of the IGBT module. The developed model is ready for circuit-level simulation to achieve an improved accuracy of the estimation on IGBT junction temperature and its...

  14. On the Limitations of the Anomalous Microwave Emission Emissivity

    OpenAIRE

    Roberta Paladini; Tibbs, Christopher T.; Clive Dickinson

    2012-01-01

    Many studies of anomalous microwave emission (AME) have computed an AME emissivity to compare the strength of the AME detected in different regions. Such a value is usually defined as the ratio between the intensity of the AME at 1 cm and the thermal dust emission at 100 \\mu m. However, as studies of Galactic dust emission have shown, the intensity of the thermal dust emission at 100 \\mu m is strongly dependent on the dust temperature, which has severe implications for the AME emissivity defi...

  15. Analysis of Anomalously Low Surface Air Temperature in the Northern Hemisphere during 2009/2010 Winter%2009/2010年北半球冬季异常低温分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙诚; 李建平

    2012-01-01

    The anomalously low Surface Air Temperature (SAT) and the corresponding atmospheric circulation anomalies in the Northern Hemisphere during the winter (DJF) of 2009/2010 are investigated. Surface Air Temperature Anomalies (SATA) were zonally distributed with a "positive-negative-positive" pattern from tropical to polar region which was characterized by positive SATA in low latitudes, negative SATA in middle latitudes, and positive SAT A in high latitudes. The coldest SATA were located in Eurasia and eastern USA, and in some parts SATA exceeded -4 ℃. SAT in middle latitudes decreased by nearly 1 °C compared to the average of the last 15 years, and in Eurasia SAT even decreased by -8 ℃ The anomalous feathers of horizontal circulation was that, both sea level pressure and geopotential height fields exhibited positive anomalies in high latitudes and negative anomalies in low latitudes, associated with anticyelonic circulation anomalies in high latitudes and cyclonic circulation anomalies in middle latitude, and both high levels and low levels exhibited this feather. The anomalous feathers of zonally mean meridional circulation indicated that, Ferrel cell was weakened, with anomalous ascending motion in middle latitudes and anomalous descending motion in high latitudes, at the same time, atmosphere temperature of troposphere in middle latitudes was anomalously low and that in high latitudes was warmer, with a stronger jet in subtropics and a weaker jet in the polar region. Composite and correlation analysis of the Northern Hemisphere Annular Mode (NAM) and SATA shows that, during positive (negative) phase of NAM, there was a positive (negative) band in middle latitudes, and it was most significant in Eurasia and eastern USA, with nearly 2 °C warming (cooling) in some regions. Analysis of air temperature equation shows that meridional temperature advection anomalies associated with anomalous meridional wind play a very important role in the variability of local

  16. Deformation microstructure and positive temperature dependence of flow stress in Ni3Ge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single crystalline specimens of Ni3Ge were compressed along [0 0 1] at different temperatures. Temperature dependence of the critical resolved shear stress (τ0(T)) has been obtained. Detailed measurements at cryogen temperatures (4.2-77 K temperature interval) showed that the increase of the yield stress with temperature starts at liquid helium temperature. The values of the apparent activation volume (V*) have been obtained as a result of stress relaxation tests repeated along the stress-strain curve at different stress levels at seven temperatures (77, 293, 373, 473, 573, 673, 773 K). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) methods were used to analyze the evolution of dislocation structure with temperature and strain. The measurements of the straight dislocations fraction determined as δ = ρsd / ρ, (ρsd is the straight dislocation density, ρ is a total dislocation density) have been performed. The experimental data obtained in different tests in Ni3Ge confirm two-stage nature of the positive temperature dependence of the flow stress of alloys with the L12 structure. The model of thermal strengthening considering two different types of mechanisms, first acting at low temperatures and second at high has been proposed. Using this model the temperature dependence of the critical resolved shear stress has been approximated and the activation parameters of thermal strengthening of Ni3Ge have been obtained

  17. Deformation microstructure and positive temperature dependence of flow stress in Ni{sub 3}Ge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solov’eva, Yulia, E-mail: j-sol@yandex.ru; Starenchenko, Vladimir, E-mail: star@tsuab.ru; Starenchenko, Svetlana, E-mail: sve-starenchenko@yandex.ru; Solov’ev, Artem, E-mail: tsk-san@mail.ru [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building 2, Solyanaya Sq., Tomsk, 634003 (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    Single crystalline specimens of Ni{sub 3}Ge were compressed along [0 0 1] at different temperatures. Temperature dependence of the critical resolved shear stress (τ{sub 0}(T)) has been obtained. Detailed measurements at cryogen temperatures (4.2-77 K temperature interval) showed that the increase of the yield stress with temperature starts at liquid helium temperature. The values of the apparent activation volume (V*) have been obtained as a result of stress relaxation tests repeated along the stress-strain curve at different stress levels at seven temperatures (77, 293, 373, 473, 573, 673, 773 K). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) methods were used to analyze the evolution of dislocation structure with temperature and strain. The measurements of the straight dislocations fraction determined as δ = ρ{sub sd} / ρ, (ρ{sub sd} is the straight dislocation density, ρ is a total dislocation density) have been performed. The experimental data obtained in different tests in Ni{sub 3}Ge confirm two-stage nature of the positive temperature dependence of the flow stress of alloys with the L1{sub 2} structure. The model of thermal strengthening considering two different types of mechanisms, first acting at low temperatures and second at high has been proposed. Using this model the temperature dependence of the critical resolved shear stress has been approximated and the activation parameters of thermal strengthening of Ni{sub 3}Ge have been obtained.

  18. Quantitative Analysis of Temperature Dependence of Raman shift of monolayer WS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaoting; Gao, Yang; Yang, Tianqi; Ren, Wencai; Cheng, Hui-Ming; Lai, Tianshu

    2016-01-01

    We report the temperature-dependent evolution of Raman spectra of monolayer WS2 directly CVD-grown on a gold foil and then transferred onto quartz substrates over a wide temperature range from 84 to 543 K. The nonlinear temperature dependence of Raman shifts for both and A1g modes has been observed. The first-order temperature coefficients of Raman shifts are obtained to be -0.0093 (cm(-1)/K) and -0.0122 (cm(-1)/K) for and A1g peaks, respectively. A physical model, including thermal expansion and three- and four-phonon anharmonic effects, is used quantitatively to analyze the observed nonlinear temperature dependence. Thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) of monolayer WS2 is extracted from the experimental data for the first time. It is found that thermal expansion coefficient of out-plane mode is larger than one of in-plane mode, and TECs of and A1g modes are temperature-dependent weakly and strongly, respectively. It is also found that the nonlinear temperature dependence of Raman shift of mode mainly originates from the anharmonic effect of three-phonon process, whereas one of A1g mode is mainly contributed by thermal expansion effect in high temperature region, revealing that thermal expansion effect cannot be ignored. PMID:27576751

  19. Power-law temperature dependence of collision broadening and shift of atomic and molecular rovibronic lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The classical phase-shift theory of spectral line shapes is used to examine various aspects of the applicability of the power-law relations to the description of temperature variations of pressure broadening and shifting coefficients of the isolated atomic and rovibronic molecular lines in a wide temperature range. Model calculations performed for potentials of the Lennard-Jones type indicate that the temperature dependence exponents of the broadening and shifting can be related to the details of the intermolecular interactions. It is shown that they are sensitive to the range of temperatures assumed in the fit and therefore extreme care must be taken when the power-law temperature dependence is used as a scaling law. The problems of the failure of the power-law and of variations in the sign of pressure shift coefficients with increasing temperature are discussed. Very good fits of Frost's empirical formula for temperature dependence of pressure shift to the theoretical ones are obtained. -- Highlights: ► Classical theory of line shapes is used to examine the power-law relations. ► The broadening and shifting exponents depend on the range of temperatures in the fit. ► Extreme care must be taken when using the power-law dependence as a scaling law

  20. Sex reversal triggers the rapid transition from genetic to temperature-dependent sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holleley, Clare E; O'Meally, Denis; Sarre, Stephen D; Marshall Graves, Jennifer A; Ezaz, Tariq; Matsubara, Kazumi; Azad, Bhumika; Zhang, Xiuwen; Georges, Arthur

    2015-07-01

    Sex determination in animals is amazingly plastic. Vertebrates display contrasting strategies ranging from complete genetic control of sex (genotypic sex determination) to environmentally determined sex (for example, temperature-dependent sex determination). Phylogenetic analyses suggest frequent evolutionary transitions between genotypic and temperature-dependent sex determination in environmentally sensitive lineages, including reptiles. These transitions are thought to involve a genotypic system becoming sensitive to temperature, with sex determined by gene-environment interactions. Most mechanistic models of transitions invoke a role for sex reversal. Sex reversal has not yet been demonstrated in nature for any amniote, although it occurs in fish and rarely in amphibians. Here we make the first report of reptile sex reversal in the wild, in the Australian bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps), and use sex-reversed animals to experimentally induce a rapid transition from genotypic to temperature-dependent sex determination. Controlled mating of normal males to sex-reversed females produces viable and fertile offspring whose phenotypic sex is determined solely by temperature (temperature-dependent sex determination). The W sex chromosome is eliminated from this lineage in the first generation. The instantaneous creation of a lineage of ZZ temperature-sensitive animals reveals a novel, climate-induced pathway for the rapid transition between genetic and temperature-dependent sex determination, and adds to concern about adaptation to rapid global climate change. PMID:26135451

  1. In-situ high temperature irradiation setup for temperature dependent structural studies of materials under swift heavy ion irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulriya, P. K.; Kumari, Renu; Kumar, Rajesh; Grover, V.; Shukla, R.; Tyagi, A. K.; Avasthi, D. K.

    2015-01-01

    An in-situ high temperature (1000 K) setup is designed and installed in the materials science beam line of superconducting linear accelerator at the Inter-University Accelerator Centre (IUAC) for temperature dependent ion irradiation studies on the materials exposed with swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation. The Gd2Ti2O7 pyrochlore is irradiated using 120 MeV Au ion at 1000 K using the high temperature irradiation facility and characterized by ex-situ X-ray diffraction (XRD). Another set of Gd2Ti2O7 samples are irradiated with the same ion beam parameter at 300 K and simultaneously characterized using in-situ XRD available in same beam line. The XRD studies along with the Raman spectroscopic investigations reveal that the structural modification induced by the ion irradiation is strongly dependent on the temperature of the sample. The Gd2Ti2O7 is readily amorphized at an ion fluence 6 × 1012 ions/cm2 on irradiation at 300 K, whereas it is transformed to a radiation-resistant anion-deficient fluorite structure on high temperature irradiation, that amorphized at ion fluence higher than 1 × 1013 ions/cm2. The temperature dependent ion irradiation studies showed that the ion fluence required to cause amorphization at 1000 K irradiation is significantly higher than that required at room temperature irradiation. In addition to testing the efficiency of the in-situ high temperature irradiation facility, the present study establishes that the radiation stability of the pyrochlore is enhanced at higher temperatures.

  2. Temperature dependence of spectral induced polarization data: experimental results and membrane polarization theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bairlein, Katharina; Bücker, Matthias; Hördt, Andreas; Hinze, Björn

    2016-04-01

    Spectral induced polarization measurements are affected by temperature variations due to a variety of temperature-dependent parameters that control the complex electrical conductivity. Most important is the influence of the ion mobility, which increases with increasing temperature. It is responsible for the increase of the conductivity of the fluid in the pores with temperature and influences the electrical double layer on the mineral surface. This work is based on laboratory measurements of 13 sandstone samples from different sources with different geological and petrophysical characteristics. We measured the complex impedance in a frequency range from 0.01 to 100 Hz and a temperature range from 0 to 40 °C. The main observation is a decrease of the characteristic time (defined by the inverse of the frequency, at which the phase shift is maximum) with increasing temperature. The strength of this decrease differs from one sample to another. The temperature dependence of the phase shift magnitude cannot easily be generalized, as it depends on the particular sample. The experimental findings suggest that neglecting the influence of temperature on complex conductivity may lead to significant errors when estimating hydraulic conductivity from relaxation time. We also simulate the temperature dependence with a theoretical model of membrane polarization and review some of the model properties, with an emphasis on the temperature dependence of the parameters. The model reproduces several features characterizing the measured data, including the temperature dependence of the characteristic times. Computed tomography and microscope images of the pore structure of three samples also allow us to associate differences in the geometrical parameters used in the modelling with pore scale parameters of the actual samples.

  3. Temperature dependence of pulse-induced mechanoluminescence excitation in coloured alkali halide crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Namita Rajput; S Tiwari; B P Chandra

    2004-12-01

    In practice, the relative efficiencies of different crystals are often determined under identical conditions of temperature and excitation. If the temperature of a crystal is increased or decreased with respect to room temperature, luminescence efficiency may get increased or decreased according to the composition of the crystal. When coloured crystals of NaCl, NaBr, KCl and KBr are excited by pulse-induced excitation at different temperatures, the mechanoluminescence (ML) intensity increases with temperature. The ML intensity of first peak, ml, second peak, _m2 and the total ML intensity, T, initially increase with temperature and then tend to attain an optimum value for a particular temperature of crystals. The ratio, m2/ml, is found to increase with increasing temperature of the crystals. The expression derived on the basis of rate equations, are able to explain the temperature dependence of ML intensity on several parameters.

  4. Temperature-dependent dynamic mechanical properties of magnetorheological elastomers under magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, Benxiang, E-mail: jubenxiang@qq.com [National Instrument Functional Materials Engineering Technology Research Center, Chongqing 400707 (China); Tang, Rui; Zhang, Dengyou; Yang, Bailian [National Instrument Functional Materials Engineering Technology Research Center, Chongqing 400707 (China); Yu, Miao; Liao, Changrong [College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2015-01-15

    Both anisotropic and isotropic magnetorheological elastomer (MRE) samples were fabricated by using as-prepared polyurethane (PU) matrix and carbonyl iron particles. Temperature-dependent dynamic mechanical properties of MRE were investigated and analyzed. Due to the unique structural features of as-prepared matrix, temperature has a greater impact on the properties of as-prepared MRE, especially isotropic MRE. With increasing of temperature and magnetic field, MR effect of isotropic MRE can reach up to as high as 4176.5% at temperature of 80 °C, and the mechanism of the temperature-dependent in presence of magnetic field was discussed. These results indicated that MRE is a kind of temperature-dependent material, and can be cycled between MRE and MR plastomer (MRP) by varying temperature. - Highlights: • Both anisotropic and isotropic MRE were fabricated by using as-prepared matrix. • Temperature-dependent properties of MRE under magnetic field were investigated. • As-prepared MRE can transform MRE to MRP by adjusting temperature.

  5. Heavy-ion Collisions: Direct and indirect probes of the density and temperature dependence of Esym

    CERN Document Server

    Kohley, Z

    2014-01-01

    Heavy-ion collisions provide a versatile terrestrial probe of the nuclear equation of state through the formation of nuclear matter at a wide variety of temperatures, densities, and pressures. Direct and indirect approaches for constraining the density dependence of the symmetry energy using heavy-ion collisions have been developed. The direct approach relies on scaling methods which attempt to connect isotopic fragment distributions to the symmetry energy. Using the indirect approach constraints on the equation of state are extracted from comparison of experimental results and theoretical transport calculations which utilize effective nucleon-nucleon interactions. Besides exploring the density dependence of the equation of state, heavy-ion collisions are simultaneously probing different temperature gradients of nuclear matter allowing for the temperature dependence of the symmetry energy to be examined. The current progress and open questions related to constraining the density and temperature dependence of ...

  6. Semi-Empirical formula for describing the temperature dependence of the bulk modulus

    CERN Document Server

    Garai, J

    2006-01-01

    The product of the bulk modulus and the molar volume is constant for materials with the same crystal structure. Using this correlation a semi-empirical formula is suggested for describing the temperature dependence of the bulk modulus.

  7. Temperature dependences of Raman scattering in different types of GaN epilayers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue Xiao-Yong; Xu Sheng-Rui; Zhang Jin-Cheng; Lin Zhi-Yu; Ma Jun-Cai; Liu Zi-Yang; Xue Jun-Shuai; Hao Yue

    2012-01-01

    First-order Raman scatterings of hexagonal GaN layers deposited by the hydride vapour phase epitaxy and by metal-organic chemical vapour deposition on SiC and sapphire substrates are studied in a temperature range between 303 K and 503 K.The temperature dependences of two GaN Raman modes (A1 (LO) and E2 (high)) are obtained.We focus our attention on the temperature dependence of E2 (high) mode and find that for different types of GaN epilayers their temperature dependences are somewhat different.We compare their differences and give them an explanation.The simplified formulas we obtained are in good accordance with experiment data.The results can be used to determine the temperature of a GaN sample.

  8. Temperature dependence of the spin relaxation in highly degenerate ZnO thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prestgard, M. C.; Siegel, G.; Tiwari, A., E-mail: tiwari@eng.utah.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States); Materials Research Science and Engineering Center, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States); Roundy, R.; Raikh, M. [Materials Research Science and Engineering Center, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States)

    2015-02-28

    Zinc oxide is considered a potential candidate for fabricating next-generation transparent spintronic devices. However, before this can be achieved, a thorough scientific understanding of the various spin transport and relaxation processes undergone in this material is essential. In the present paper, we are reporting our investigations into these processes via temperature dependent Hanle experiments. ZnO thin films were deposited on c-axis sapphire substrates using a pulsed laser deposition technique. Careful structural, optical, and electrical characterizations of the films were performed. Temperature dependent non-local Hanle measurements were carried out using an all-electrical scheme for spin injection and detection over the temperature range of 20–300 K. From the Hanle data, spin relaxation time in the films was determined at different temperatures. A detailed analysis of the data showed that the temperature dependence of spin relaxation time follows the linear-in-momentum Dyakonov-Perel mechanism.

  9. Anomalous Chiral Superfluidity

    OpenAIRE

    Lublinsky, Michael(Physics Department, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva 84105, Israel); Zahed, Ismail

    2009-01-01

    We discuss both the anomalous Cartan currents and the energy-momentum tensor in a left chiral theory with flavour anomalies as an effective theory for flavored chiral phonons in a chiral superfluid with the gauged Wess-Zumino-Witten term. In the mean-field (leading tadpole) approximation the anomalous Cartan currents and the energy momentum tensor take the form of constitutive currents in the chiral superfluid state. The pertinence of higher order corrections and the Adler-Bardeen theorem is ...

  10. Anomalous Hall effect in the Co-based Heusler compounds Co2FeSi and Co2FeAI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imort, I.-M.; Thomas, P.; Reiss, G.; Thomas, A.

    2012-04-01

    The anomalous Hall effect (AHE) in the Heusler compounds Co2FeSi and Co2FeAl is studied in dependence of the annealing temperature to achieve a general comprehension of its origin. We have demonstrated that the crystal quality affected by annealing processes is a significant control parameter to tune the electrical resistivity ρxx as well as the anomalous Hall resistivity ρahe. Analyzing the scaling behavior of ρahe in terms of ρxx points to a temperature-dependent skew scattering as the dominant mechanism in both Heusler compounds.

  11. Temperature dependence of the bandgap width in FeIn2Se4 single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have used the Bridgman method to grow single crystals of the ternary compound FeIn2Se4 and we have determined their composition and structure. We measured the transmission spectra in the intrinsic absorption edge region in the temperature range 20-300 K. From the transmission spectra, we determined the bandgap width and plotted its temperature dependence. We show that the Eg(T) dependence has a shape typical for semiconductor compounds. (authors)

  12. Temperature-dependent transformation thermotics: From switchable thermal cloaks to macroscopic thermal diodes

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Ying; Shen, Xiangying; Wu, Zuhui; Huang, Junying; Chen, Yixuan; Ni, Yushan; Huang, Jiping

    2015-01-01

    The macroscopic control of ubiquitous heat flow remains poorly explored due to the lack of a fundamental theoretical method. Here, by establishing temperature-dependent transformation thermotics for treating materials whose conductivity depends on temperature, we show analytical and simulation evidence for switchable thermal cloaking and a macroscopic thermal diode based on the cloaking. The latter allows heat flow in one direction but prohibits the flow in the opposite direction, which is al...

  13. Temperature dependence and mechanism of the reaction between O(3P) and chlorine dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colussi, A. J.; Sander, S. P.; Fiedl, R. R.

    1992-01-01

    Second-order rate constants for the decay of O(3P) in excess chlorine dioxide, k(II), were measured as a function of total pressure (20-600 Torr argon) and temperature (248-312 K), using flash photolysis-atomic resonance fluorescence. Results indicate that k(II) is pressure dependent with a value, K(b), that is nonzero at zero pressure, and both the third-order rate constant and k(b) have negative temperature dependences.

  14. Temperature dependence of 1H NMR relaxation time, T2, for intact and neoplastic plant tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewa, Czesław J.; Lewa, Maria

    Temperature dependences of the spin-spin proton relaxation time, T2, have been shown for normal and tumorous tissues collected from kalus culture Nicotiana tabacum and from the plant Kalanchoe daigremontiana. For neoplastic plant tissues, time T2 was increased compared to that for intact plants, a finding similar to that for animal and human tissues. The temperature dependences obtained were compared to analogous relations observed with animal tissues.

  15. Quark mass density- and temperature- dependent model for bulk strange quark matter

    OpenAIRE

    al, Yun Zhang et.

    2002-01-01

    It is shown that the quark mass density-dependent model can not be used to explain the process of the quark deconfinement phase transition because the quark confinement is permanent in this model. A quark mass density- and temperature-dependent model in which the quark confinement is impermanent has been suggested. We argue that the vacuum energy density B is a function of temperature. The dynamical and thermodynamical properties of bulk strange quark matter for quark mass density- and temper...

  16. TEMPERATURE-DEPENDENT MODEL OF ION-ALLOYED RESISTORS OF SUB-MICRON BIPOLAR AIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Belous

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Results of the investigation on main characteristics library of various integral resistors (IR  within the following temperature and current ranges, respectively (–70–(+150 °С and 10–6–10–2 А  are presented in the paper. The paper contains a temperature-dependent IR-model. Its analysis permits to explain experimental dependences and develop concrete recommendations on IR calculation and application in IS. 

  17. Effects of a temperature dependent viscosity on thermal convection in binary mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Hilt, Markus; Glässl, Martin; Zimmermann, Walter

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the effect of a temperature dependent viscosity on the onset of thermal convection in a horizontal layer of a binary fluid mixture that is heated from below. For an exponential temperature dependence of the viscosity, we find in binary mixtures as a function of a positive separation ratio and beyond a certain viscosity contrast a discontinuous transition between two stationary convection modes having a different wavelength. In the range of negative values of the separation rati...

  18. The irradiance and temperature dependent mathematical model for estimation of photovoltaic panel performances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The temperature and irradiance dependent model for the I–V curve estimation is presented. • The purely mathematical model based on the analysis of the I–V curve shape is presented. • The model includes the Gompertz function with temperature and irradiance dependent parameters. • The input data are extracted from the data sheet I–V curves. - Abstract: The temperature and irradiance dependent mathematical model for photovoltaic panel performances estimation is proposed in the paper. The base of the model is the mathematical function of the photovoltaic panel current–voltage curve. The model of the current–voltage curve is based on the sigmoid function with temperature and irradiance dependent parameters. The temperature and irradiance dependencies of the parameters are proposed in the form of analytic functions. The constant parameters are involved in the analytical functions. The constant parameters need to be estimated to get the temperature and irradiance dependent current–voltage curve. The mathematical model contains 12 constant parameters and they are estimated by using the evolutionary algorithm. The optimization problem is defined for this purpose. The optimization problem objective function is based on estimated and extracted (measured) current and voltage values. The current and voltage values are extracted from current–voltage curves given in datasheet of the photovoltaic panels. The new procedure for estimation of open circuit voltage value at any temperature and irradiance is proposed in the model. The performance of the proposed mathematical model is presented for three different photovoltaic panel technologies. The simulation results indicate that the proposed mathematical model is acceptable for estimation of temperature and irradiance dependent current–voltage curve and photovoltaic panel performances within temperature and irradiance ranges

  19. Temperature-dependent isovector pairing gap equations using a path integral approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temperature-dependent isovector neutron-proton (np) pairing gap equations have been established by means of the path integral approach. These equations generalize the BCS ones for the pairing between like particles at finite temperature. The method has been numerically tested using the one-level model. It has been shown that the gap parameter Δnp has a behavior analogous to that of Δnn and Δpp as a function of the temperature: one notes the presence of a critical temperature. Moreover, it has been shown that the isovector pairing effects remain beyond the critical temperature that corresponds to the pairing between like particles

  20. Glass transition temperature of a cationic polymethacrylate dependent on the plasticizer content - Simulation vs. experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Karl G.; Maus, Martin; Kornherr, Andreas; Zifferer, Gerhard

    2005-04-01

    Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations ( NPT ensemble) are performed to compute the specific volume as a function of temperature of cationic polymethacrylate (Eudragit ® RS) with varying plasticizer (triethylcitrate) content ranging from pure polymer to a plasticizer weight proportion of 7.70%. The simulated glass transition temperature of these polymer-plasticizer blends is determined as the temperature marking the kink in the slope of specific volume vs. temperature plots. A linear dependence of the glass transition temperature on the plasticizer content is found. The computational findings are supported by differential scanning calorimetry experiments showing the same trend thus validating the applied computational method.

  1. Temperature Dependence of Brillouin Light Scattering Spectra of Acoustic Phonons in Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somerville, Kevin; Klimovich, Nikita; An, Kyongmo; Sullivan, Sean; Weathers, Annie; Shi, Li; Li, Xiaoqin

    2015-03-01

    Thermal management represents an outstanding challenge in many areas of technology. Electrons, optical phonons, and acoustic phonons are often driven out of local equilibrium in electronic devices or during laser-material interaction processes. Interest in non-equilibrium transport processes has motivated the development of Raman spectroscopy as a local temperature sensor of optical phonons and intermediate frequency acoustic phonons, whereas Brillouin light scattering (BLS) has recently been explored as a temperature sensor of low-frequency acoustic phonons. Here, we report temperature dependent BLS spectra of silicon, with Raman spectra taken simultaneously for comparison. The origins of the observed temperature dependence of the BLS peak position, linewidth, and intensity are examined in order to evaluate their potential use as temperature sensors for acoustic phonons. We determine that the integrated BLS intensity can be used measure the temperature of specific acoustic phonon modes. This work is supported by National Science Foundation (NSF) Thermal Transport Processes Program under Grant CBET-1336968.

  2. High spectral resolution ozone absorption cross-sections – Part 2: Temperature dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Serdyuchenko

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We report on the temperature dependence of ozone absorption cross-sections measured in our laboratory in the spectral range 213–1100 nm with a spectral resolution of 0.02–0.24 nm (Full Width Half Maximum, FWHM in the atmospherically relevant temperature range from 193 to 293 K. The temperature dependence of ozone absorption cross-sections was established using measurements at eleven temperatures. The methodology of the absolute broadband measurements, experimental procedures and spectra processing were described in our companion paper together with the associated error budget. In this paper, we report in detail on our data below room temperature and compare them with literature data using direct comparisons as well as the standard approach using a quadratic polynomial in temperature fitted to the cross-section data.

  3. Diameter and Temperature Dependence of Thermal Conductivity of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Rui-Qin

    2011-01-01

    Temperature and diameter dependence of the thermal conductivity of several armchair single-walled carbon nan-otubes (SWNTs) are studied by nonequilibrium molecular dynamics method with Brenner II potential. The thermal conductivities are calculated at temperatures from WOK to 600K. It is found that the thermal conductivity decreases as the temperature increases and increases as the diameter of SWNT increases. The results demonstrate that these two phenomena are due to the onset of the Umklapp process.%@@ Temperature and diameter dependence of the thermal conductivity of several armchair single-walled carbon nan- otubes (SWNTs) are studied by nonequilibrium molecular dynamics method with Brenner Ⅱ potential.The thermal conductivities are calculated at temperatures from 100K to 600K.It is found that the thermal con- ductivity decreases as the temperature increases and increases as the diameter of SWNT increases.The results demonstrate that these two phenomena are due to the onset of the Umklapp process.

  4. Anomalous Growth of Aging Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebenkov, Denis S.

    2016-04-01

    We consider a discrete-time population dynamics with age-dependent structure. At every time step, one of the alive individuals from the population is chosen randomly and removed with probability q_k depending on its age, whereas a new individual of age 1 is born with probability r. The model can also describe a single queue in which the service order is random while the service efficiency depends on a customer's "age" in the queue. We propose a mean field approximation to investigate the long-time asymptotic behavior of the mean population size. The age dependence is shown to lead to anomalous power-law growth of the population at the critical regime. The scaling exponent is determined by the asymptotic behavior of the probabilities q_k at large k. The mean field approximation is validated by Monte Carlo simulations.

  5. Electron spin resonance in neutron-irradiated graphite. Dependence on temperature and effect of annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The temperature dependence of the electron spin resonance signal from neutron irradiated graphite has been studied. The results lead to an interpretation of the nature of the paramagnetic centers created by irradiation. In annealing experiments on graphite samples, which had been irradiated at low temperature, two annealing peaks and one anti-annealing peak were found. Interpretations are proposed for these peaks. (author)

  6. Temperature dependence of acoustic harmonics generated by nonlinear ultrasound wave propagation in water at various frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maraghechi, Borna; Hasani, Mojtaba H; Kolios, Michael C; Tavakkoli, Jahan

    2016-05-01

    Ultrasound-based thermometry requires a temperature-sensitive acoustic parameter that can be used to estimate the temperature by tracking changes in that parameter during heating. The objective of this study is to investigate the temperature dependence of acoustic harmonics generated by nonlinear ultrasound wave propagation in water at various pulse transmit frequencies from 1 to 20 MHz. Simulations were conducted using an expanded form of the Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov nonlinear acoustic wave propagation model in which temperature dependence of the medium parameters was included. Measurements were performed using single-element transducers at two different transmit frequencies of 3.3 and 13 MHz which are within the range of frequencies simulated. The acoustic pressure signals were measured by a calibrated needle hydrophone along the axes of the transducers. The water temperature was uniformly increased from 26 °C to 46 °C in increments of 5 °C. The results show that the temperature dependence of the harmonic generation is different at various frequencies which is due to the interplay between the mechanisms of absorption, nonlinearity, and focusing gain. At the transmit frequencies of 1 and 3.3 MHz, the harmonic amplitudes decrease with increasing the temperature, while the opposite temperature dependence is observed at 13 and 20 MHz. PMID:27250143

  7. Temperature dependence of photoluminescence from submonolayer deposited InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Zhangcheng; Leosson, K.; Birkedal, Dan; Sadowski, J.; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    2002-01-01

    The temperature dependence of photoluminescence (PL) from self-assembled InGaAs quantum dots (QD's) grown by submonolayer deposition mode (non-SK mode), is investigated. It is found that the PL spectra are dominated by the ground-state transitions at low temperatures, but increasingly by the exci...

  8. Universality of temperature-dependent effects in finite many-fermion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The temperature dependence of the specific heat for a finite system of fermions is investigated for some simple models. It is found that finite-size effects produce a maximum in the specific heat at a temperature Tc that has a universal value when scaled by the appropriate characteristic energy

  9. (abstract) Ulysses Solar Wind Ion Temperatures: Radial, Latitudinal, and Dynamical Dependencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, B. E.; Smith, E. J.; Gosling, J. T.; McComas, D. J.; Balogh, A.

    1996-01-01

    Observations of the Ulysses SWOOPS plasma experiment are used to determine the dependencies of solar wind ion temperatures upon radial distance, speed, and other parameters, and to estimate solar wind heating. Comparisons with three dimensional temperature estimates determined from the ion spectra by a least squares fitting program will be provided (only small samples of data have been reduced with this program).

  10. Dependence of negative muon depolarization on molecular weight and temperature in organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An atomic capture of negative muons in the aliphatic spirit series, the dependence of muon rest polarization on the molecular weight of spirit have been studied. The temperature dependence of depolarization in benzole and styrene has been obtained. The results on depolarization are being interpreted basing on notions about chemical interactions of mesic atoms in organic compounds. (author)

  11. Shape Dependence of Low-Temperature Magnetic Relaxation of Mn12Ac

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hai-Qing; SU Shao-Kui; JING Xiu-nian; LIU Ying; LI Yan-rong; HE Lun-Hua; GE Pei-Wen; YAN Qi-Wei; WANG Yun-Ping

    2008-01-01

    We report the discovery that the low-temperature magnetic relaxation in Mn,12 Ac single crystals strongly depends on the shape of the samples. The relaxation time exhibits a minimum at the phase transition point between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic phases. The shape dependence is attributed to the dipolar interaction between molecular magnets.

  12. Temperature dependence of crystals conductivity both potassium sulfates and ammonium sulfates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the work the results of temperature dependence of conductivity of crystals both potassium sulfate and ammonium sulfate are given. The superficial specific conductivity and its dependence on width of a backlash between the central and ring electrodes are determined. (author)

  13. Temperature and humidity dependence of secondary organic aerosol yield from the ozonolysis of β-pinene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. J. Nielsen

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The temperature dependence of secondary organic aerosol (SOA formation from ozonolysis of β-pinene was studied in a flow reactor at 263 K–303 K and 1007 hPa under dry and humid conditions (0% and 26%–68% relative humidity, respectively. The observed SOA yields were of similar magnitude as predicted by a two-product model based on detailed gas phase chemistry (Jenkin, 2004, reaching maximum values of 0.18–0.39 at high particle mass concentrations (Mo. Under dry conditions, however, the measurement data exhibited significant oscillatory deviations from the predicted linear increase with inverse temperature (up to 50% at high Mo. Under humid conditions the SOA yield exhibited a linear decrease with inverse temperature, which is opposite to modelled temperature dependence and implies that the model substantially overestimates the yield at low temperatures and underestimates it at high temperatures (deviations up to 80% at high Mo. For the atmospherically relevant concentration level of Mo=10 μg m−3 and temperature range 263 K–293 K, the results from humid experiments in this study indicate that the SOA yield of β-pinene ozonolysis may be well represented by an average value of 0.15 with an uncertainty estimate of ±0.05. When fitting the measurement data with a two-product model, both the partitioning coefficients (Kom,i and the stoichiometric yields (αi of the low-volatile and semi-volatile model species were found to vary with temperature. The results indicate that not only the reaction product vapour pressures but also the relative contributions of different gas-phase or multiphase reaction channels are strongly dependent on temperature and the presence of water vapour. In fact, the oscillatory positive temperature dependence observed under dry conditions and the negative temperature dependence observed under humid conditions indicate that the SOA yield is governed much more by the temperature and humidity dependence of the involved

  14. Electrostatic Control over Temperature-Dependent Tunneling across a Single Molecule Junction

    OpenAIRE

    Alvar R. Garrigues; Wang, Lejia; del Barco, Enrique; Nijhuis, Christian A.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how the mechanism of charge transport through molecular tunnel junctions depends on temperature is crucial to control electronic function in molecular electronic devices. With just a few systems investigated as a function of bias and temperature so far, thermal effects in molecular tunnel junctions remain poorly understood. Here we report a detailed charge transport study of an individual redox-active ferrocene-based molecule over a wide range of temperatures and applied potenti...

  15. The temperature dependence of the isothermal bulk modulus at 1 bar pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Garai, J.; Laugier, A

    2006-01-01

    It is well established that the product of the volume coefficient of thermal expansion and the bulk modulus is nearly constant at temperatures higher than the Debye temperature. Using this approximation allows predicting the values of the bulk modulus. The derived analytical solution for the temperature dependence of the isothermal bulk modulus has been applied to ten substances. The good correlations to the experiments indicate that the expression may be useful for substances for which bulk ...

  16. Investigation of light intensity and temperature dependency of solar cells electric parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Tobnaghi, Davoud Mostafa; Madatov, Rahim; Farhadi, Payam

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the performance and overview use of solar cells is expressed. The role of temperature, sunlight intensity on the solar cells electric parameters has been studied. Experimental results the amount of solar cell output parameters variations such as maximum output power, open circuit voltage, short circuit current, and fill factor in terms of temperature and light intensity shows. the most significant is the temperature dependence of the voltage which decreases with increasing t...

  17. Sensitively Temperature-Dependent Spin Orbit Coupling in SrIrO3 Thin Films

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Lunyong; Chen, Y. B.; Zhou, Jian; Zhang, Shan-Tao; Gu, Zheng-Bin; Yao, Shu-Hua; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2013-01-01

    Spin orbit coupling plays a non-perturbation effect in many recently developed novel fields including topological insulators and spin-orbit assistant Mott insulators. In this paper, strongly temperature-dependent spin orbit coupling, revealed by weak anti-localization, is observed at low temperature in 5d strongly correlated compound, SrIrO3. As the temperature rising, increase rate of Rashba coefficient is nearly 30%-45%/K. The increase is nearly 100 times over that observed in semiconductor...

  18. Efficiency and optimisation of fin with temperature-dependent thermal conductivity: a simplified solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouaziz, M.N.; Hanini, S.

    2007-11-15

    An analytical simplified solution is proposed for temperature distribution and fin efficiency, when thermal conductivity is temperature dependent. An optimal linearization technique is used to solve the nonlinear equation. Based on classical solution, some accurate results are obtained and presented with thermal conductivity parameter and fin parameter. Arithmetic mean temperature is less precise than an equivalent thermal conductivity. Optimal thickness for rectangular fin is derived. (orig.)

  19. Time-dependent temperature field under conditions of filtration of gas-liquid mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One solved the problem of temperature fields at filtration of gas containing liquid with regard to phase transitions and imperfection of a gas phase. One determined regularities of formation of time-dependent temperature fields at filtration of those mixtures. At rather long times and at not very high values of coefficient of gas solubility the temperature effect of filtrating liquid with dissolved gas changes the sign

  20. Temperature-dependent infrared reflectivity studies of multiferroic TbMnO3: Evidence for spin-phonon coupling

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pradeep Kumar; Surajit Saha; C R Serrao; A K Sood; C N R Rao

    2010-02-01

    We have measured near normal incidence far-infrared (FIR) reflectivity spectra of a single crystal of TbMnO3 from 10 K to 300 K in the spectral range of 50 cm-1 –700 cm-1. Fifteen transverse optic (TO) and longitudinal optic (LO) modes are identified in the imaginary part of the dielectric function 2 ()$ and energy loss function Im(−1/()), respectively. Some of the observed phonon modes show anomalous softening below the magnetic transition temperature N (∼ 46 K). We attribute this anomalous softening to the spin-phonon coupling caused by phonon modulation of the superexchange integral between the Mn3+ spins. The effective charge of oxygen (O) calculated using the measured LO–TO splitting increases below N.

  1. New precise determination of the high temperature unusual temperature dependent thermopower of liquid divalent cadmium and zinc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We do not know any precise measurement of the absolute thermopower (ATP) of liquid cadmium and zinc at high temperatures. For liquid cadmium, there are, in the literature, apparent contradictory results. Bath and Kliem and North and Wagner observed that the ATP increases with temperature between 350 deg. C and 650 deg. C, but Bradley observed the opposite behaviour between 600 deg. C and 750 deg. C. In this work we measured accurately the absolute thermopower of liquid cadmium from the melting point up to 900 deg. C. We find a maximum around 520 deg. C, and then the thermopower decreases down to a surprising negative value. To our knowledge, it is the first time that such an unusual behaviour is reported. Nevertheless, it is qualitatively consistent with all the authors mentioned and the apparent contradictory results should only be due to the different temperature ranges of measurements. Using the ATP expression from the Faber-Ziman formalism, we can fit very well the experimental absolute thermopower versus temperature curve with only one adjustable parameter. For this, we have considered that the temperature dependence of the ATP is dominated by the resistivity, and we have introduced the experimental resistivity temperature dependence in the ATP expression. The very good fitting quality demonstrates that our hypothesis is consistent. In contrast, the liquid zinc ATP only increases with temperature. Nevertheless, near 1100 deg. C, the highest temperature achieved, it shows saturation that may be an indication of a decrease at higher temperature. The same type of fitting gives also quite good results. (author)

  2. Pressure and temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility intermediate valence Ce and Yb compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The magnetic susceptibility of 13 intermediate valence Ce and Yb compounds was studied at room temperature as a function of pressure. Low temperature measurements showed a pressure induced shift of the susceptibility maximum for YbInAu2 and Ce(Rhsub(0.7) Ptsub(0.3))2. A general relationship between the pressure dependent activation energy and the fluctuation temperature is supposed for Yb compounds. The relative pressure dependence of the susceptibility has a maximum at the intermediate valence 2.5 and is decreasing toward integer valences. (TW)

  3. Temperature dependence of residual electrical resistivity of Cu-Au in pseudopotential approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of temperature dependence of residual electrical resistivity of Cu-Au system is re-examined in the light of static distortion and thermal vibration of the lattice along with the short-range-order of atoms above critical temperature. The extended version of Ziman's formula for resistivity obtained yields a unified version for the calculation of resistivity in pseudopotential approximation. The temperature dependence of the quantity Δρ/ρ in this framework for Cu-Au system is found to be in better agreement with the experimental data as compared to previous calculation. (author)

  4. Temperature dependent optical properties of stacked InGaAs/GaAs quantum rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we describe the results of temperature dependent photoluminescence intensity and decay time measurements of In(Ga)As/GaAs quantum rings where the depth of barrier is varied from sample to sample. The activation energy found for the reduction of the exciton decay time as a function of the temperature is approximately half the value of the thermionic escape energy of excitons. The temperature dependant behaviour is ascribed to the carriers lost via the excited state to the WL. The time resolved PL study indicates that thermal escape mechanisms is not so affected by reducing the spacer thickness, but it's influenced essentially by the excited state recombination

  5. Temperature-dependent efficiency droop of blue InGaN micro-light emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temperature-dependent trends in radiative and Auger recombination coefficients have been determined at different injection carrier concentrations using InGaN micro-light emitting diodes 40 μm in diameter. The differential lifetime was obtained first from the measured modulation bandwidth and was then employed to calculate the carrier concentration in the quantum well active region. When the temperature increases, the carrier concentration increases, but both the radiative and Auger recombination coefficients decrease. In addition, the temperature dependence of radiative and Auger recombination coefficients is weaker at a higher injection carrier concentration, which is strongly related to phase space filling.

  6. Temperature-dependent hyperfine interactions at 111Cd-C complex in germanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The temperature dependent nuclear hyperfine interaction of 111Cd-carbon complex in germanium has been studied using the perturbed γ-γ angular correlation (PAC) method. The parameters of the hyperfine interaction representing substitutional carbon-cadmium complex in germanium (ν Q1=207(1) MHz (η=0.16)) shows dependence on temperature. The formation and thermal stability of the complex has been reported by the same author earlier. It was found in this study that the quadrupole coupling constant of the interaction increases at sample temperature below 293 K. The results are encouraging toward better understanding of the complex in the host matrix. (orig.)

  7. Temperature dependent spin transport properties of platinum inferred from spin Hall magnetoresistance measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the temperature dependence of the spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) in yttrium iron garnet/platinum hybrid structures via magnetization orientation dependent magnetoresistance measurements. Our experiments show a decrease of the SMR magnitude with decreasing temperature. Using the sensitivity of the SMR to the spin transport properties of the normal metal, we interpret our data in terms of a decrease of the spin Hall angle in platinum from 0.11 at room temperature to 0.075 at 10 K, while the spin diffusion length and the spin mixing conductance of the ferrimagnetic insulator/normal metal interface remain almost constant.

  8. Temperature dependent spin transport properties of platinum inferred from spin Hall magnetoresistance measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Sibylle, E-mail: sibylle.meyer@wmi.badw-muenchen.de; Althammer, Matthias; Geprägs, Stephan; Opel, Matthias; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B. [Walther-Meißner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, 85748 Garching (Germany); Gross, Rudolf [Walther-Meißner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, 85748 Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, Technische Universität München, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2014-06-16

    We study the temperature dependence of the spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) in yttrium iron garnet/platinum hybrid structures via magnetization orientation dependent magnetoresistance measurements. Our experiments show a decrease of the SMR magnitude with decreasing temperature. Using the sensitivity of the SMR to the spin transport properties of the normal metal, we interpret our data in terms of a decrease of the spin Hall angle in platinum from 0.11 at room temperature to 0.075 at 10 K, while the spin diffusion length and the spin mixing conductance of the ferrimagnetic insulator/normal metal interface remain almost constant.

  9. Temperature-dependent hyperfine interactions at {sup 111}Cd-C complex in germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mola, Genene Tessema [University of Kwazulu-Natal, School Chemistry and Physics, Pietermaritzburg Campus, Private Bag X01, Scottsville (South Africa)

    2013-09-15

    The temperature dependent nuclear hyperfine interaction of {sup 111}Cd-carbon complex in germanium has been studied using the perturbed {gamma}-{gamma} angular correlation (PAC) method. The parameters of the hyperfine interaction representing substitutional carbon-cadmium complex in germanium ({nu} {sub Q1}=207(1) MHz ({eta}=0.16)) shows dependence on temperature. The formation and thermal stability of the complex has been reported by the same author earlier. It was found in this study that the quadrupole coupling constant of the interaction increases at sample temperature below 293 K. The results are encouraging toward better understanding of the complex in the host matrix. (orig.)

  10. Interferometric signatures of the temperature dependence of the specific shear viscosity in heavy-ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Plumberg, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Recent work has shown that a temperature dependence of the shear viscosity to entropy ratio, $\\eta/s$, influences the collective flow pattern in heavy-ion collisions in characteristic ways that can be measured by studying hadron transverse momentum spectra and their anisotropies. Here we point out that it also affects the pair momentum dependence of the Hanbury-Brown$-$Twiss (HBT) radii (the source size parameters extracted from two-particle intensity interferometry) and the variance of their event-by-event fluctuations. This observation establishes interferometric signatures as useful observables to complement the constraining power of single-particle spectra on the temperature dependence of $\\eta/s$.

  11. Temperature dependence of fracture toughness in HT9 steel neutron-irradiated up to 145 dpa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Jong-Hyuk [KAERI; Byun, Thak Sang [ORNL; Maloy, S [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Toloczko, M [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

    2014-01-01

    The temperature dependence of fracture toughness in HT9 steel irradiated to high doses was investigated using miniature three-point bend (TPB) fracture specimens. These specimens were from the ACO-3 fuel duct wall of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), in which irradiation doses were in the range of 3.2 144.8 dpa and irradiation temperatures in the range of 380.4 502.6 oC. A miniature specimen reuse technique has been established for this investigation: the specimens used were the tested halves of miniature Charpy impact specimens (~13 3 4 mm) with diamond-saw cut in the middle. The fatigue precracking for specimens and fracture resistance (J-R) tests were carried out in a MTS servo-hydraulic testing machine with a vacuum furnace following the standard procedure described in the ASTM Standard E 1820-09. For each of five irradiated and one archive conditions, 7 to 9 J-R tests were performed at selected temperatures ranging from 22 C to 600 C. The fracture toughness of the irradiated HT9 steel was strongly dependent on irradiation temperatures rather than irradiation dose. When the irradiation temperature was below about 430 C, the fracture toughness of irradiated HT9 increased with test temperature, reached an upper shelf of 180 200 MPa m at 350 450 C and then decreased with test temperature. When the irradiation temperature 430 C, the fracture toughness was nearly unchanged until about 450 C and decreased with test temperature in higher temperature range. Similar test temperature dependence was observed for the archive material although the highest toughness values are lower after irradiation. Ductile stable crack growth occurred except for a few cases where both the irradiation temperature and test temperature are relatively low.

  12. Temperature dependent competition between different recombination channels in organic heterojunction solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A modification of the Shockley–Queisser theory for organic heterojunctions is presented with a special focus on constellations, where a linear extrapolation of the temperature dependence of the open circuit voltage results in the optical gap of the absorber rather than in the intermolecular charge transfer (CT) gap. We demonstrate that, depending on the electronic coupling strength between donor and acceptor molecules, either singlet or CT recombination is dominant in different temperature regimes. The different regimes are separated by a transition temperature that is usually well above room temperature (RT). However, in the case of small energy level offset and weak electronic coupling, it can be around 300 K or even below. We point out that a linear extrapolation of the open circuit voltage V oc towards 0 K for measured temperatures larger than the transition temperature results in a photovoltaic gap that is close to the optical gap, whereas for values below the transition temperature the CT gap will be extracted. We show that for α-sexithiophene (6T)/diindenoperylene (DIP) solar cells heating the substrate during 6T deposition leads to a molecular configuration at the interface where the coupling between donor and acceptor molecules is strongly reduced. This leads to a transition temperature well below RT which is confirmed by temperature dependent electroluminescence measurements. By comparing the temperature dependent spectra of high temperature and RT grown 6T/DIP solar cells to the spectra of the individual materials, the different contributions from the CT gap and the optical gap are separated. (paper)

  13. Angular dependence of coercivity with temperature in Co-based nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bran, C., E-mail: cristina.bran@icmm.csic.es [Institute of Materials Science of Madrid, CSIC, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Espejo, A.P. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (USACH) and Center for the Development of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (CEDENNA), Avenida Ecuador 3493, 9170124 Santiago (Chile); Palmero, E.M. [Institute of Materials Science of Madrid, CSIC, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Escrig, J. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (USACH) and Center for the Development of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (CEDENNA), Avenida Ecuador 3493, 9170124 Santiago (Chile); Vázquez, M. [Institute of Materials Science of Madrid, CSIC, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-12-15

    The magnetic behavior of arrays of Co and CoFe nanowire arrays has been measured in the temperature range between 100 and 300 K. We have paid particular attention to the angular dependence of magnetic properties on the applied magnetic field orientation. The experimental angular dependence of coercivity has been modeled according to micromagnetic analytical calculations, and we found that the propagation of a transversal domain wall mode gives the best fitting with experimental observations. That reversal mode holds in the whole measuring temperature range, for nanowires with different diameters and crystalline structure. Moreover, the quantitative strength of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy and its magnetization easy axis are determined to depend on the crystalline structure and nanowires diameter. The evolution of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy with temperature for nanowires with different composition gives rise to an opposite evolution of coercivity with increasing temperature: it decreases for CoFe while it increases for Co nanowire arrays.

  14. Scaling Laws for Convection with Temperature-dependent Viscosity and Grain-damage

    CERN Document Server

    Foley, Bradford J

    2014-01-01

    Numerical experiments of convection with grain-damage are used to develop scaling laws for convective heat flow, mantle velocity, and plate velocity across the stagnant lid and plate-tectonic regimes. Three main cases are presented in order of increasing complexity: a simple case wherein viscosity is only dependent on grainsize, a case where viscosity depends on temperature and grainsize, and finally a case where viscosity is temperature and grainsize sensitive, and the grain-growth (or healing) is also temperature sensitive. In all cases, convection with grain-damage scales differently than Newtonian convection due to the effects of grain-damage. For the fully realistic case, numerical results show stagnant lid convection, fully mobilized convection that resembles the temperature-independent viscosity case, and partially mobile or transitional convection, depending on damage to healing ratio, Rayleigh number, and the activation energies for viscosity and healing. Applying our scaling laws for the fully reali...

  15. Angular dependence of coercivity with temperature in Co-based nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The magnetic behavior of arrays of Co and CoFe nanowire arrays has been measured in the temperature range between 100 and 300 K. We have paid particular attention to the angular dependence of magnetic properties on the applied magnetic field orientation. The experimental angular dependence of coercivity has been modeled according to micromagnetic analytical calculations, and we found that the propagation of a transversal domain wall mode gives the best fitting with experimental observations. That reversal mode holds in the whole measuring temperature range, for nanowires with different diameters and crystalline structure. Moreover, the quantitative strength of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy and its magnetization easy axis are determined to depend on the crystalline structure and nanowires diameter. The evolution of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy with temperature for nanowires with different composition gives rise to an opposite evolution of coercivity with increasing temperature: it decreases for CoFe while it increases for Co nanowire arrays

  16. Measurement of the temperature dependence of pulse lengths in an n-type germanium detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Germanium detectors are operated at liquid nitrogen temperatures to reduce the number of electrons in the conduction band. The mobility of the charge carriers is temperature dependent and thus also the rise time of the pulses induced by the drifting charge carriers. The temperature, T, dependence of the pulse lengths for an 18-fold segmented n-type germanium detector was measured in the temperature range of 77-120 K. The interactions of 122 keV photons originating from 152Eu were selected and pulses as observed on the core and segment electrodes were studied. In both cases, the T dependence can be well described by an eκ/T ansatz, where κ is a fit parameter.

  17. Temperature dependences of the contact resistivity in ohmic contacts to n{sup +}-InN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachenko, A. V.; Belyaev, A. E. [National Academy of Sciences, Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics (Ukraine); Boltovets, N. S. [“Orion” Research Institute (Ukraine); Brunkov, P. N.; Jmerik, V. N.; Ivanov, S. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Kapitanchuk, L. M. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Paton Electric Welding Institute (Ukraine); Konakova, R. V., E-mail: konakova@isp.kiev.ua; Klad’ko, V. P.; Romanets, P. N.; Saja, P. O.; Safryuk, N. V.; Sheremet, V. N. [National Academy of Sciences, Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics (Ukraine)

    2015-04-15

    The temperature dependences of the contact resistivity (ρ{sub c}) of ohmic contacts based on the Au-Ti-Pd-InN system are measured at an InN doping level of 2 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup −3} in the temperature range of 4.2–300 K. At temperatures T > 150 K, linearly increasing dependences ρ{sub c}(T) are obtained. The dependences are explained within the mechanism of thermionic current flow through metal shunts associated with dislocations. Good agreement between theoretical and experimental dependences is achieved assuming that the flowing current is limited by the total resistance of the metal shunts, and the density of conductive dislocations is ∼5 × 10{sup 9} cm{sup −2}. Using the X-ray diffraction method, the density of screw and edge dislocations in the structure under study is measured: their total density exceeds 10{sup 10} cm{sup −2}.

  18. Anomalous transport effects in magnetically-confined plasma columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolution of density structure in a magnetized plasma column is analyzed accounting for anomalous diffusion due to the lower hybrid drift instability. The plasma column is found to be divided into regions of classical, anomalous, and intermediate diffusivity. The bulk behavior, described in terms of radial confinement time, depends most sensitively upon the particle line density (ion/cm). For broad plasmas (large line density), the transport is characteristic of classical diffusion, and for slender plasmas (small line density) the transport is characteristic of anomalous diffusion. For intermediate line densities, the transport undertakes a rapid transition from classical to anomalous. Correlations between the theoretical results and past experiments are described

  19. Temperature dependence of electric quadrupole interaction in high Tc superconductor Bi1.7Pb0.3Sr2CaCu2O8+δ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The temperature dependence of the electric quadrupole interaction in high Tc superconductor Bi1.7Pb0.3Sr2CaCu2O8+δ has been measured by means of the differential perturbed angular correlation (DPAC) from 77 K to 300 K. Two static, non-axially symmetric electric field gradients, which assigned to Bi1 and Bi2 sites in the Bi-O planes and the incommensurate modulation sites respectively have been derived from the fitting of DPAC spectra. Anomalous changes of the EFGs and their non-axially symmetric parameters of both the Bi sites were observed at 120 K and 170 K. It may indicate that a phase-like transition caused by the lattice displacing happens. The stronger nuclear relaxation phenomenon of B11 sites in the Bi-O planes can be found from the changes of relaxation constants measured with temperature. It shows that there is a fluctuation field in action. The behavior of the relaxation constants with temperature is different from the regularity of the low temperature superconductor expected by the BCS theory

  20. Petrology of Anomalous Eucrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Peng, Z. X.; Ross, D. K.

    2015-01-01

    Most mafic achondrites can be broadly categorized as being "eucritic", that is, they are composed of a ferroan low-Ca clinopyroxene, high-Ca plagioclase and a silica phase. They are petrologically distinct from angritic basalts, which are composed of high-Ca, Al-Ti-rich clinopyroxene, Carich olivine, nearly pure anorthite and kirschsteinite, or from what might be called brachinitic basalts, which are composed of ferroan orthopyroxene and high-Ca clinopyroxene, intermediate-Ca plagioclase and ferroan olivine. Because of their similar mineralogy and composition, eucrite-like mafic achondrites formed on compositionally similar asteroids under similar conditions of temperature, pressure and oxygen fugacity. Some of them have distinctive isotopic compositions and petrologic characteristics that demonstrate formation on asteroids different from the parent of the HED clan (e.g., Ibitira, Northwest Africa (NWA) 011). Others show smaller oxygen isotopic distinctions but are otherwise petrologically and compositionally indistinguishable from basaltic eucrites (e.g., Pasamonte, Pecora Escarpment (PCA) 91007). The degree of uniformity in delta O-17 of eucrites and diogenites is one piece of evidence considered to favor of a magma-ocean scenario for their petrogenesis. Given that the O isotopic differences separating Pasamonte and PCA 91007 from other eucrites are small, and that there is an absence of other distinguishing characteristics, a legitimate question is: Did the HED parent asteroid fail to homogenize via a magma-ocean stage, thus explaining outliers like Pasamonte? We are initiating a program of study of anomalous eucrite-like achondrites as one part of our effort to seek a resolution of this issue. Here we present preliminary petrologic information on Asuka (A-) 881394, Elephant Moraine (EET) 87520 and EET 87542. We will have studied several more by conference time.

  1. Improved Regression Analysis of Temperature-Dependent Strain-Gage Balance Calibration Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbrich, N.

    2015-01-01

    An improved approach is discussed that may be used to directly include first and second order temperature effects in the load prediction algorithm of a wind tunnel strain-gage balance. The improved approach was designed for the Iterative Method that fits strain-gage outputs as a function of calibration loads and uses a load iteration scheme during the wind tunnel test to predict loads from measured gage outputs. The improved approach assumes that the strain-gage balance is at a constant uniform temperature when it is calibrated and used. First, the method introduces a new independent variable for the regression analysis of the balance calibration data. The new variable is designed as the difference between the uniform temperature of the balance and a global reference temperature. This reference temperature should be the primary calibration temperature of the balance so that, if needed, a tare load iteration can be performed. Then, two temperature{dependent terms are included in the regression models of the gage outputs. They are the temperature difference itself and the square of the temperature difference. Simulated temperature{dependent data obtained from Triumph Aerospace's 2013 calibration of NASA's ARC-30K five component semi{span balance is used to illustrate the application of the improved approach.

  2. Calculation of temperature distribution in adiabatic shear band based on gradient-dependent plasticity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王学滨

    2004-01-01

    A method for calculation of temperature distribution in adiabatic shear band is proposed in terms of gradient-dependent plasticity where the characteristic length describes the interactions and interplaying among microstructures. First, the increment of the plastic shear strain distribution in adiabatic shear band is obtained based on gradient-dependent plasticity. Then, the plastic work distribution is derived according to the current flow shear stress and the obtained increment of plastic shear strain distribution. In the light of the well-known assumption that 90% of plastic work is converted into the heat resulting in increase in temperature in adiabatic shear band, the increment of the temperature distribution is presented. Next, the average temperature increment in the shear band is calculated to compute the change in flow shear stress due to the thermal softening effect. After the actual flow shear stress considering the thermal softening effect is obtained according to the Johnson-Cook constitutive relation, the increment of the plastic shear strain distribution, the plastic work and the temperature in the next time step are recalculated until the total time is consumed. Summing the temperature distribution leads to rise in the total temperature distribution. The present calculated maximum temperature in adiabatic shear band in titanium agrees with the experimental observations. Moreover, the temperature profiles for different flow shear stresses are qualitatively consistent with experimental and numerical results. Effects of some related parameters on the temperature distribution are also predicted.

  3. Temperature dependence of electromechanical properties of PLZT /57/43 ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Shukla; V K Agrawal; I M L Das; Janardan Singh; S L Srivastava

    2010-08-01

    The compositions of lead lanthanum zirconate titanate PLZT [Pb(Zr0.57Ti0.43)O3 + at% of La, where = 3, 5, 6, 10 and 12] have been synthesized using mixed oxide route. The temperature dependent electromechanical parameters have been determined using vector impedance spectroscopy (VIS). The charge constant 31 and elastic compliance $s^{E}_{11}$ show a peak in all the samples at a temperature mt much below the ferroelectric – paraelectric transition temperature, whereas the series resonance frequency s shows a dip at these temperatures. The Poisson’s ratio increases with temperature showing a broad peak at a temperature higher than mt. The voltage constant 31 decreases and the planar coupling coefficient p remains constant up to half of the mt and then falls sharply with . Half of the mt can, therefore, be used for specifying the working temperature limit of the piezoceramics for the device applications.

  4. Temperature-dependent structural relaxation in As40Se60 glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The origin of structural relaxation in As40Se60 glass at different annealing temperatures is studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and in situ extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) methods. Strong physical aging effect, expressed through the increase of endothermic peak area in the vicinity of Tg, is recorded by DSC technique at the annealing temperatures Ta>90oC. EXAFS data show that the observed structural relaxation is not associated with significant changes in the short-range order of this glass. An explanation is proposed for this relaxation behavior assuming temperature-dependent constraints. -- Highlights: → In this study we report experimental evidence for temperature-dependent constraints theory. → Structural relaxation of As2Se3 glass at higher annealing temperatures is studied by DSC technique. → Accompanied changes in the structure are monitored by in situ EXAFS measurements.

  5. Temperature-dependent structural relaxation in As{sub 40}Se{sub 60} glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golovchak, R., E-mail: roman_ya@yahoo.com [Lviv Sci. and Res. Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' , 202 Stryjska str., 79031 Lviv (Ukraine); Kozdras, A. [Opole University of Technology, 75, Ozimska str., Opole, PL-45370 (Poland); Academy of Management and Administration, 18 Niedzialkowski str., Opole, PL-45085 (Poland); Shpotyuk, O. [Jan Dlugosz University, 13/15, al. Armii Krajowej, 42201, Czestochowa (Poland); Gorecki, Cz. [Opole University of Technology, 75, Ozimska str., Opole, PL-45370 (Poland); Kovalskiy, A.; Jain, H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Lehigh University, 5 East Packer Avenue, Bethlehem, PA 18015-3195 (United States)

    2011-08-01

    The origin of structural relaxation in As{sub 40}Se{sub 60} glass at different annealing temperatures is studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and in situ extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) methods. Strong physical aging effect, expressed through the increase of endothermic peak area in the vicinity of T{sub g}, is recorded by DSC technique at the annealing temperatures T{sub a}>90{sup o}C. EXAFS data show that the observed structural relaxation is not associated with significant changes in the short-range order of this glass. An explanation is proposed for this relaxation behavior assuming temperature-dependent constraints. -- Highlights: → In this study we report experimental evidence for temperature-dependent constraints theory. → Structural relaxation of As{sub 2}Se{sub 3} glass at higher annealing temperatures is studied by DSC technique. → Accompanied changes in the structure are monitored by in situ EXAFS measurements.

  6. Temperature dependence of rate constants of the reactions Br(Br*)+IBr → Br2+I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rate constant and their temperature dependence in the range from -25 to +50 deg C for reactions Br(2P3/2)+IBr → Br2+I(2P2/3) and Br*(2P1/2)+IBr → Br2+I(2P3/2) have been measured by the method of laser atomic-resonance spectroscopy using radiation of iodine and bromine lasers. It has been detected that at 300 K the values of k1 and k2 agree with the known ones, meanwhile with the temperature growth both constants increase, moreover, for k2 the temperature dependence is much stronger. It is shown that the value of deceleration of the rate of reaction between Br atom and IBr in case of its spin-orbital excitation is the function of the temperature, decreasing with the temperature increase. 14 refs.; 3 figs.; 2 tabs

  7. Temperature Dependence of Sound Velocity in High-Strength Fiber-Reinforced Plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Ryuji; Yoneyama, Keiichi; Ogasawara, Futoshi; Ueno, Masashi; Okuda, Yuichi; Yamanaka, Atsuhiko

    2003-08-01

    Longitudinal sound velocity in unidirectional hybrid composites or high-strength fiber-reinforced plastics (FRPs) was measured along the fiber axis over a wide temperature range (from 77 K to 420 K). We investigated two kinds of high-strength crystalline polymer fibers, polyethylene (Dyneema) and polybenzobisoxazole (Zylon), which are known to have negative thermal expansion coefficients and high thermal conductivities along the fiber axis. Both FRPs had very high sound velocities of about 9000 m/s at low temperatures and their temperature dependences were very strong. Sound velocity monotonically decreased with increasing temperature. The temperature dependence of sound velocity was much stronger in Dyneema-FRP than in Zylon-FRP.

  8. Temperature dependence of the velocity of longitudinal ultrasonic wave propagation in steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of measurement of the velocity of longitudinal ultrasonic wave propagation in low-alloy steels as well as in armco-iron and in invar alloy at 700-1000 deg C are given. Temperature dependences are shown to be nonlinear, the largest drop of the curve takes place in the region of the Curie temperature. Decrease of the velocity of longitudinal ultrasonic waves reaches 8% within the temperature range of investigation. Effect of the magnetic phase transition on the temperature dependence of the velocity of ultrasound propagation (drop of the curve is maximum in the Curie point region) is also established. Investigation results are used to correct data on ultrasonic contactless control of wall thickness of hot-rolled tubes at high temperatures

  9. Temperature dependent two-phase behaviour of magnetisation and spin polarisation in NiPt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefers, Markus; Thomas, Andy; Reiss, Guenter [Bielefeld University, Universitaetsstrasse 25, D-33615 Bielefeld (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    We investigated the temperature dependent behaviour of magnetisation and spin polarisation in NiCu and NiPt alloys. The advantage of these alloys is the reduced Curie temperature compared with pure Nickel. The whole range of magnetisation is accessible in experiment for these alloys. Magnetic tunnel junctions with these alloys as free electrode were prepared by dc-magnetron sputtering in an UHV system with a base pressure of 1 . 10{sup -7} mbar and argon ion beam etching. TMR ratio was measured temperature dependent with a dc 2-point method. Spin polarisation was calculated by Julliere's formula. Magnetisation was measured with a SQUID for different temperatures. The NiPt alloy showed a maximum for in-plane magnetisation and spin polarisation at about 190 K. There are indications for a perpendicular magnetic anisotropy at low temperatures in the NiPt alloy.

  10. Surface Temperature Dependence of Hydrogen Ortho-Para Conversion on Amorphous Solid Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueta, Hirokazu; Watanabe, Naoki; Hama, Tetsuya; Kouchi, Akira

    2016-06-01

    The surface temperature dependence of the ortho-to-para conversion of H2 on amorphous solid water is first reported. A combination of photostimulated desorption and resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization techniques allowed us to sensitively probe the conversion on the surface of amorphous solid water at temperatures of 9.2-16 K. Within a narrow temperature window of 8 K, the conversion time steeply varied from ˜4.1 ×103 to ˜6.4 ×102 s . The observed temperature dependence is discussed in the context of previously suggested models and the energy dissipation process. The two-phonon process most likely dominates the conversion rate at low temperatures.

  11. Temperature dependence of the photoluminescence of MnS/ZnS core—shell quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Dai-Feng; Ding, Xing; Dai, Ru-Cheng; Zhao, Zhi; Wang, Zhong-Ping; Zhang, Zeng-Ming

    2014-12-01

    The temperature dependence of the photoluminescence (PL) from MnS/ZnS core—shell quantum dots is investigated in a temperature range of 8 K-300 K. The orange emission from the 4T1 → 6A1 transition of Mn2+ ions and the blue emission related to the trapped surface state are observed in the MnS/ZnS core—shell quantum dots. As the temperature increases, the orange emission is shifted toward a shorter wavelength while the blue emission is shifted towards the longer wavelength. Both the orange and blue emissions reduce their intensities with the increase of temperature but the blue emission is quenched faster. The temperature-dependent luminescence intensities of the two emissions are well explained by the thermal quenching theory.

  12. Temperature dependence of light power propagation in bending plastic optical fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Ning; Teng, Chuanxin; Zheng, Jie; Wang, Guanjun; Zhang, Minjuan; Wang, Zhibin

    2016-09-01

    This study investigates the effect of temperature variation on the light power propagation in bending plastic optical fiber (POF). The transmittance of bending POFs with curvature radius of 2-30 mm and turns of 1/4, 1/2, 1, and 2 are measured over temperature of 20-70 °C. The temperature dependent loss of the bending POF is obtained. It is found that the temperature dependent loss of the bending POF changes with curvature radius and turns. The temperature effect reaches the highest value of 0.011 dB/°C with 2 turns, and is less than 0.002 dB/°C with curvature radius greater than 25 mm.

  13. High temperature and wavelength dependence of avalanche gain of AlAsSb avalanche photodiodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandall, Ian C; Xie, Shiyu; Xie, Jingjing; Tan, Chee Hing

    2011-11-01

    The evolution of the dark currents and breakdown at elevated temperatures of up to 450  K are studied using thin AlAsSb avalanche regions. While the dark currents increase rapidly as the temperature is increased, the avalanche gain is shown to only have a weak temperature dependence. Temperature coefficients of breakdown voltage of 0.93 and 1.93  mV/K were obtained from the diodes of 80 and 230  nm avalanche regions (i-regions), respectively. These values are significantly lower than for other available avalanche materials at these temperatures. The wavelength dependence of multiplication characteristics of AlAsSb p-i-n diodes has also been investigated, and it was found that the ionization coefficients for electrons and holes are comparable within the electric field and wavelength ranges measured. PMID:22048393

  14. Temperature dependence of the pulse properties and the leakage current of germanium detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldwell, Allen; Lenz, Daniel; Liu, Jing; Liu, Xiang; Majorovitz, Bela; Volynets, Oleksandr [Max-Planck-Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    High-purity germanium detectors are used in neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments like Gerda as they have very good resolution and act as the detector and the source simultaneously. Germanium detectors are operated at liquid nitrogen temperatures to reduce the number of electrons in the conduction band. The mobility of the charge carriers is temperature dependent and thus also the rise time of the pulses induced by the drifting charge carriers. Therefore pulse shapes analysis has to take into account possible temperature variations. Measurements of the temperature dependence of the pulses were made using a high-purity n-type segmented germanium detector. The detector was installed in a vacuum cryostat and cooled through a copper cooling finger submerged in liquid nitrogen. A collimated {sup 152}Eu source located at two different positions along the crystal axes 100 and 110 was used. The temperature was monitored using a PT100 resistor installed at the closest possible point to the detector. The pulse properties in the temperature range from 93 to 99 K and the temperature dependence of the leakage current in the temperature range from 85 to 112 K are discussed.

  15. Temperature dependent current transport properties in Cu2ZnSnS4 solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quaternary semiconductor compound Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) is a promising non-toxic absorber material for solar cells made from earth abundant elements. In this study temperature dependencies (T = 10-300 K) of current-voltage (J-V) characteristics and external quantum efficiency (EQE) spectra of CZTS monograin layer solar cells were measured in order to clarify current transport in CZTS that is still not fully understood. Three different temperature ranges can be distinguished from the temperature dependence of the series resistance (Rs) obtained from J-V measurements and the effective bandgap energy (Eg⁎) determined from the EQE spectra. Thermally activated conductivity, Mott's variable-range hopping conductivity, and very low temperature (< 40 K) blocking of the interface recombination were observed. - Highlights: • Cu2ZnSnS4 monograin layer solar cell temperature dependent parameters were studied. • Thermally activated conductivity at temperatures T > 90 K • Mott's variable-range hopping conductivity at temperatures T = 90-40 K • Very low temperature (< 40 K) blocking of interface recombination was observed

  16. The effect of interfacial intermixing on magnetization and anomalous Hall effect in Co/Pd multilayers

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Zaibing

    2015-05-01

    The effect of interfacial intermixing on magnetization and anomalous Hall effect (AHE) in Co/Pd multilayers is studied by using rapid thermal annealing to enhance the interfacial diffusion. The dependence of saturation magnetization and coercivity on the temperature of rapid thermal annealing at 5 K is discussed. It is found that AHE is closely related to the relative thickness of the Co and Pd layers. Localized paramagnetism has been observed which destroys AHE, while AHE can be enhanced by annealing.

  17. Temperature dependence of magnetopolarons in a parabolic quantum dot in arbitrary magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The temperature and the size dependence of a magnetopolaron in a harmonic quantum dot with an external magnetic field normal to the plane of the quantum dot are investigated theoretically. For a weak magnetic field (ωc LO), both the cyclotron mass m*c+ and the cyclotron mass m*c- are the increasing functions of temperature, whereas for strong magnetic fields (ωc > ωLO), the cyclotron mass m*c+ is the decreasing function of temperature, while the cyclotron mass m*c- is the increasing function of temperature. (author). 27 refs, 2 figs

  18. Temperature-Dependent Raman Spectra and Microstructure of Barium Metaborate Crystals and Its Melts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尤静林; 蒋国昌; 侯怀宇; 吴永全; 陈辉; 徐匡迪

    2002-01-01

    We have measured the Raman spectra of β- and α-barium metaborate in crystal and liquid states from room temperature to 1873K, with a semiconductor laser as the laser source, coupled with a time-resolved detection system to eliminate the dense thermal emission background when temperature was considerably high.Temperature-dependent Raman spectra can clearly indicate that the phase transformation from β- to α-barium metaborate has been completed during 1273 - 1300 K. Variations of different kinds of microstructure units with temperature are identified and discussed.

  19. Spatial organization and time dependence of Jupiter's tropospheric temperatures, 1980-1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orton, Glenn S.; Friedson, A. James; Yanamandra-Fisher, Padmavati A.; Caldwell, John; Hammel, Heidi B.; Baines, Kevin H.; Bergstralh, Jay T.; Martin, Terry Z.; West, Robert A.; Veeder, Glenn J., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The spatial organization and time dependence of Jupiter's temperature near 250-millibar pressure were measured through a jovian year by imaging thermal emission at 18 micrometers. The temperature field is influenced by seasonal radiative forcing, and its banded organization is closely correlated with the visible cloud field. Evidence was found for a quasi-periodic oscillation of temperatures in the Equatorial Zone, a correlation between tropospheric and stratospheric waves in the North Equatorial Belt, and slowly moving thermal features in the North and South Equatorial Belts. There appears to be no common relation between temporal changes of temperature and changes in the visual albedo of the various axisymmetric bands.

  20. Temperature-dependent characteristics of 4H—SiC junction barrier Schottky diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feng-Ping; Zhang, Yu-Ming; Zhang, Yi-Men; Tang, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Yue-Hu; Chen, Wen-Hao

    2012-03-01

    The current—voltage characteristics of 4H—SiC junction barrier Schottky (JBS) diodes terminated by an offset field plate have been measured in the temperature range of 25-300 °C. An experimental barrier height value of about 0.5 eV is obtained for the Ti/4H—SiC JBS diodes at room temperature. A decrease in the experimental barrier height and an increase in the ideality factor with decreasing temperature are shown. Reverse recovery testing also shows the temperature dependence of the peak recovery current density and the reverse recovery time. Finally, a discussion of reducing the reverse recovery time is presented.