WorldWideScience

Sample records for anomalous quantum interference

  1. Partial Wave Analysis of Scattering with Nonlocal Aharonov-Bohm Effect and Anomalous Cross Section induced by Quantum Interference

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, D H

    2003-01-01

    Partial wave theory of a three dmensional scattering problem for an arbitray short range potential and a nonlocal Aharonov-Bohm magnetic flux is established. The scattering process of a ``hard shere'' like potential and the magnetic flux is examined. An anomalous total cross section is revealed at the specific quantized magnetic flux at low energy which helps explain the composite fermion and boson model in the fractional quantum Hall effect. Since the nonlocal quantum interference of magnetic flux on the charged particles is universal, the nonlocal effect is expected to appear in quite general potential system and will be useful in understanding some other phenomena in mesoscopic phyiscs.

  2. IETS and quantum interference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jacob Lykkebo; Gagliardi, Alessio; Pecchia, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Destructive quantum interference in single molecule electronics is an intriguing phenomenon; however, distinguishing quantum interference effects from generically low transmission is not trivial. In this paper, we discuss how quantum interference effects in the transmission lead to either low...... suppressed when quantum interference effects dominate. That is, we expand the understanding of propensity rules in inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy to molecules with destructive quantum interference....

  3. Interference of Quantum Market Strategies

    CERN Document Server

    Piotrowski, E W; Syska, J

    2003-01-01

    Recent development in quantum computation and quantum information theory allows to extend the scope of game theory for the quantum world. The paper is devoted to the analysis of interference of quantum strategies in quantum market games.

  4. Quantum interference in graphene with quantum anomalous hall effect system%石墨烯量子反常霍尔效应体系中的量子干涉效应

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐娟; 吴泽文; 王雪娇; 邢燕霞

    2016-01-01

    To study characteristics of quantum interference in graphene possessed quantum anomalous Hall effect,graphene has been made into specific structure.With the aid of the tight-binding model and none-equilibrium Green’s function,the interfer-ences between the quantum anomalous Hall edge states in a graphene based quantum scattering cavity are investigated in the pres-ence of weak magnetic field.The interference period is inversely proportional with flux penetrating the scattering cavity.Further-more,the interfering effects are sensitive to the disorder scattering and the bulk states.Finally,researches show that quantum interference can be used to measure the edge states in graphene.%为了研究量子边缘态间的干涉效应,以锯齿型石墨烯纳米带为基础,通过引入外部自旋轨道耦合及磁交换场,在石墨烯纳米带中实现量子反常霍尔效应。在此基础上,构造弱耦合量子散射腔,并采用紧束缚近似下的哈密顿模型和非平衡格林函数方法,研究经由2个耦合边界反射的量子边缘态间的量子干涉效应。结果表明:弱磁场下,2个理想的反射边缘态间产生 A-B 干涉效应,随着磁场的变化,透射系数发生周期性的相长或相消干涉,干涉周期和穿过散射腔的磁通成反比。此外,干涉效应对杂质散射和体态非常敏感。因此,通过观测量子干涉效应可以定性地判断体系是否存在真正的边缘态。

  5. Quantum interference in polyenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Yuta; Hoffmann, Roald; Movassagh, Ramis; Datta, Supriyo

    2014-12-01

    The explicit form of the zeroth Green's function in the Hückel model, approximated by the negative of the inverse of the Hückel matrix, has direct quantum interference consequences for molecular conductance. We derive a set of rules for transmission between two electrodes attached to a polyene, when the molecule is extended by an even number of carbons at either end (transmission unchanged) or by an odd number of carbons at both ends (transmission turned on or annihilated). These prescriptions for the occurrence of quantum interference lead to an unexpected consequence for switches which realize such extension through electrocyclic reactions: for some specific attachment modes the chemically closed ring will be the ON position of the switch. Normally the signs of the entries of the Green's function matrix are assumed to have no physical significance; however, we show that the signs may have observable consequences. In particular, in the case of multiple probe attachments - if coherence in probe connections can be arranged - in some cases new destructive interference results, while in others one may have constructive interference. One such case may already exist in the literature.

  6. Quantum interference in polyenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuji, Yuta; Hoffmann, Roald, E-mail: rh34@cornell.edu [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cornell University, Baker Laboratory, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Movassagh, Ramis [Department of Mathematics, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA and Department of Mathematics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Building E18, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139-4307 (United States); Datta, Supriyo [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, Electrical Engineering Building, 465 Northwestern Ave., West Lafayette, Indiana 47907-2035 (United States)

    2014-12-14

    The explicit form of the zeroth Green's function in the Hückel model, approximated by the negative of the inverse of the Hückel matrix, has direct quantum interference consequences for molecular conductance. We derive a set of rules for transmission between two electrodes attached to a polyene, when the molecule is extended by an even number of carbons at either end (transmission unchanged) or by an odd number of carbons at both ends (transmission turned on or annihilated). These prescriptions for the occurrence of quantum interference lead to an unexpected consequence for switches which realize such extension through electrocyclic reactions: for some specific attachment modes the chemically closed ring will be the ON position of the switch. Normally the signs of the entries of the Green's function matrix are assumed to have no physical significance; however, we show that the signs may have observable consequences. In particular, in the case of multiple probe attachments – if coherence in probe connections can be arranged – in some cases new destructive interference results, while in others one may have constructive interference. One such case may already exist in the literature.

  7. Graphene quantum interference photodetector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahbub Alam

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a graphene quantum interference (QI photodetector was simulated in two regimes of operation. The structure consists of a graphene nanoribbon, Mach–Zehnder interferometer (MZI, which exhibits a strongly resonant transmission of electrons of specific energies. In the first regime of operation (that of a linear photodetector, low intensity light couples two resonant energy levels, resulting in scattering and differential transmission of current with an external quantum efficiency of up to 5.2%. In the second regime of operation, full current switching is caused by the phase decoherence of the current due to a strong photon flux in one or both of the interferometer arms in the same MZI structure. Graphene QI photodetectors have several distinct advantages: they are of very small size, they do not require p- and n-doped regions, and they exhibit a high external quantum efficiency.

  8. Graphene quantum interference photodetector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Mahbub; Voss, Paul L

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a graphene quantum interference (QI) photodetector was simulated in two regimes of operation. The structure consists of a graphene nanoribbon, Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI), which exhibits a strongly resonant transmission of electrons of specific energies. In the first regime of operation (that of a linear photodetector), low intensity light couples two resonant energy levels, resulting in scattering and differential transmission of current with an external quantum efficiency of up to 5.2%. In the second regime of operation, full current switching is caused by the phase decoherence of the current due to a strong photon flux in one or both of the interferometer arms in the same MZI structure. Graphene QI photodetectors have several distinct advantages: they are of very small size, they do not require p- and n-doped regions, and they exhibit a high external quantum efficiency.

  9. Interference Phenomena in Quantum Information

    CERN Document Server

    Stefanak, Martin

    2010-01-01

    One of the key features of quantum mechanics is the interference of probability amplitudes. The reason for the appearance of interference is mathematically very simple. It is the linear structure of the Hilbert space which is used for the description of quantum systems. In terms of physics we usually talk about the superposition principle valid for individual and composed quantum objects. So, while the source of interference is understandable it leads in fact to many counter-intuitive physical phenomena which puzzle physicists for almost hundred years. The present thesis studies interference in two seemingly disjoint fields of physics. However, both have strong links to quantum information processing and hence are related. In the first part we study the intriguing properties of quantum walks. In the second part we analyze a sophisticated application of wave packet dynamics in atoms and molecules for factorization of integers. The main body of the thesis is based on the original contributions listed separately...

  10. Quantum Interference in Graphene Nanoconstrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehring, Pascal; Sadeghi, Hatef; Sangtarash, Sara; Lau, Chit Siong; Liu, Junjie; Ardavan, Arzhang; Warner, Jamie H; Lambert, Colin J; Briggs, G Andrew D; Mol, Jan A

    2016-07-13

    We report quantum interference effects in the electrical conductance of chemical vapor deposited graphene nanoconstrictions fabricated using feedback controlled electroburning. The observed multimode Fabry-Pérot interferences can be attributed to reflections at potential steps inside the channel. Sharp antiresonance features with a Fano line shape are observed. Theoretical modeling reveals that these Fano resonances are due to localized states inside the constriction, which couple to the delocalized states that also give rise to the Fabry-Pérot interference patterns. This study provides new insight into the interplay between two fundamental forms of quantum interference in graphene nanoconstrictions.

  11. "Quantum Interference with Slits" Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Rothman, Tony

    2010-01-01

    Marcella [arXiv:quant-ph/0703126] has presented a straightforward technique employing the Dirac formalism to calculate single- and double-slit interference patterns. He claims that no reference is made to classical optics or scattering theory and that his method therefore provides a purely quantum mechanical description of these experiments. He also presents his calculation as if no approximations are employed. We show that he implicitly makes the same approximations found in classical treatments of interference and that no new physics has been introduced. At the same time, some of the quantum mechanical arguments Marcella gives are, at best, misleading.

  12. Superluminal light propagation via quantum interference in decay channels

    OpenAIRE

    Arun, R.

    2016-01-01

    We examine the propagation of a weak probe light through a coherently driven $Y$-type system. Under the condition that the excited atomic levels decay via same vacuum modes, the effects of quantum interference in decay channels are considered. It is found that the interference in decay channels results in a lossless anomalous dispersion between two gain peaks. We demonstrate that the probe pulse propagation can in principle be switched from subluminal to superluminal due to the decay-induced ...

  13. "Quantum Interference with Slits" Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Tony; Boughn, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Marcella has presented a straightforward technique employing the Dirac formalism to calculate single- and double-slit interference patterns. He claims that no reference is made to classical optics or scattering theory and that his method therefore provides a purely quantum mechanical description of these experiments. He also presents his…

  14. Silicon superconducting quantum interference device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duvauchelle, J. E.; Francheteau, A.; Marcenat, C.; Lefloch, F., E-mail: francois.lefloch@cea.fr [Université Grenoble Alpes, CEA - INAC - SPSMS, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Chiodi, F.; Débarre, D. [Université Paris-sud, CNRS - IEF, F-91405 Orsay - France (France); Hasselbach, K. [Université Grenoble Alpes, CNRS - Inst. Néel, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Kirtley, J. R. [Center for probing at nanoscale, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California 94305-4045 (United States)

    2015-08-17

    We have studied a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) made from a single layer thin film of superconducting silicon. The superconducting layer is obtained by heavily doping a silicon wafer with boron atoms using the gas immersion laser doping technique. The SQUID is composed of two nano-bridges (Dayem bridges) in a loop and shows magnetic flux modulation at low temperature and low magnetic field. The overall behavior shows very good agreement with numerical simulations based on the Ginzburg-Landau equations.

  15. ``Quantum'' interference with bouncing drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohr, Tomas; Andersen, Anders; Madsen, Jacob; Reichelt, Christian; Lautrup, Benny; Ellegaard, Clive; Levinsen, Mogens

    2013-11-01

    In a series of recent papers (most recently) Yves Couder and collaborators have explored the dynamics of walking drops on the surface of a vibrated bath of silicon oil and have demonstrated a close analogy to quantum phenomena. The bouncing drop together with the surface wave that it excites seems to be very similar to the pilot wave envisaged by de Broglie for quantum particles. In particular, have studied a double slit experiment with walking drops, where an interference pattern identical to the quantum version is found even though it is possible to follow the orbits of the drops and unambigously determine which slit it goes through, something which in quantum mechanics would be ruled out by the Heisenberg uncertainly relations. We have repeated the experiment and present a somewhat more complicated picture. Theoretically, we study a Schrödinger equation with a source term originating from a localised ``particle'' being simultaneously guided by the wave. We present simple solutions to such a field theory and discuss the fundamental difficulties met by such a theory in order to comply with quantum mechanics.

  16. General Quantum Interference Principle and Duality Computer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LONG Gui-Lu

    2006-01-01

    In this article, we propose a general principle of quantum interference for quantum system, and based on this we propose a new type of computing machine, the duality computer, that may outperform in principle both classical computer and the quantum computer. According to the general principle of quantum interference, the very essence of quantum interference is the interference of thesub-waves of the quantum system itself. A quantum system considered here can be any quantum system: a single microscopic particle, a composite quantum system such as an atom or a molecule, or a loose collection of a few quantum objects such as two independent photons. In the duality computer,the wave of the duality computer is split into several sub-waves and they pass through different routes, where different computing gate operations are performed. These sub-waves are then re-combined to interfere to give the computational results. The quantum computer, however, has only used the particle nature of quantum object. In a duality computer,it may be possible to find a marked item from an unsorted database using only a single query, and all NP-complete problems may have polynomial algorithms. Two proof-of-the-principle designs of the duality computer are presented:the giant molecule scheme and the nonlinear quantum optics scheme. We also propose thought experiment to check the related fundamental issues, the measurement efficiency of a partial wave function.

  17. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in real materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiayong; Zhao, Bao; Zhou, Tong; Yang, Zhongqin

    2016-11-01

    Under a strong magnetic field, the quantum Hall (QH) effect can be observed in two-dimensional electronic gas systems. If the quantized Hall conductivity is acquired in a system without the need of an external magnetic field, then it will give rise to a new quantum state, the quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) state. The QAH state is a novel quantum state that is insulating in the bulk but exhibits unique conducting edge states topologically protected from backscattering and holds great potential for applications in low-power-consumption electronics. The realization of the QAH effect in real materials is of great significance. In this paper, we systematically review the theoretical proposals that have been brought forward to realize the QAH effect in various real material systems or structures, including magnetically doped topological insulators, graphene-based systems, silicene-based systems, two-dimensional organometallic frameworks, quantum wells, and functionalized Sb(111) monolayers, etc. Our paper can help our readers to quickly grasp the recent developments in this field. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB921803), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11574051), the Natural Science Foundation of Shanghai, China (Grant No. 14ZR1403400), and Fudan High-end Computing Center, China.

  18. In-plane magnetization-induced quantum anomalous Hall effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Hsu, Hsiu-Chuan; Liu, Chao-Xing

    2013-08-23

    The quantum Hall effect can only be induced by an out-of-plane magnetic field for two-dimensional electron gases, and similarly, the quantum anomalous Hall effect has also usually been considered for systems with only out-of-plane magnetization. In the present work, we predict that the quantum anomalous Hall effect can be induced by in-plane magnetization that is not accompanied by any out-of-plane magnetic field. Two realistic two-dimensional systems, Bi2Te3 thin film with magnetic doping and HgMnTe quantum wells with shear strains, are presented and the general condition for the in-plane magnetization-induced quantum anomalous Hall effect is discussed based on the symmetry analysis. Nonetheless, an experimental setup is proposed to confirm this effect, the observation of which will pave the way to search for the quantum anomalous Hall effect in a wider range of materials.

  19. Gravitational and rotational effects in quantum interference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anandan, J.

    1977-03-15

    The phase shift due to gravitation and rotation in the quantum interference of two coherent beams is obtained relativistically and compared with the recent experiment of Colella, Overhauser, and Werner. A general expression relating the quantum phase shift to the transverse acceleration of a classical particle in the plane of interference for an arbitrary interaction with any external field is given. This can serve as a correspondence principle between quantum physics and classical physics. The phase shift due to the coupling of spin to curvature of space-time is deduced and written explicitly for the special case of a Schwarzschild field. The last result implies that a massless spinning particle can have at most two helicity states and its world line in a gravitational field is a null geodesic. Finally, new experiments are proposed to test the effect of rotation on quantum interference and to obtain direct evidence of the equivalence principle in quantum mechanics.

  20. Quantum interference from remotely trapped ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, S; Rotter, D; Hennrich, M; Blatt, R [Institute for Experimental Physics, University of Innsbruck, Technikerstr. 25, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Rohde, F; Schuck, C; Almendros, M; Gehr, R; Dubin, F; Eschner, J [ICFO-Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques, Mediterranean Technology Park, Av del Canal OlImpic, E-08860 Castelldefels (Spain)], E-mail: francois.dubin@icfo.es

    2009-01-15

    We observe quantum interference of photons emitted by two continuously laser-excited single ions, independently trapped in distinct vacuum vessels. High contrast two-photon interference is observed in two experiments with different ion species, Ca{sup +} and Ba{sup +}. Our experimental findings are quantitatively reproduced by Bloch equation calculations. In particular, we show that the coherence of the individual resonance fluorescence light field is determined from the observed interference.

  1. Scattering Induced Quantum Interference of Multiple Quantum Optical States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ott, Johan Raunkjær; Wubs, Martijn; Mortensen, N. Asger;

    2011-01-01

    Using a discrete mode theory for propagation of quantum optical states, we investigate the consequences of multiple scattering on the degree of quadrature entanglement and quantum interference. We report that entangled states can be created by multiple-scattering. We furthermore show that quantum...... interference induced by the transmission of quantized light through a multiple-scattering medium will persist even after averaging over an ensemble of scattering samples....

  2. Quantum Radiation Reaction: From Interference to Incoherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinu, Victor; Harvey, Chris; Ilderton, Anton; Marklund, Mattias; Torgrimsson, Greger

    2016-01-29

    We investigate quantum radiation reaction in laser-electron interactions across different energy and intensity regimes. Using a fully quantum approach which also accounts exactly for the effect of the strong laser pulse on the electron motion, we identify in particular a regime in which radiation reaction is dominated by quantum interference. We find signatures of quantum radiation reaction in the electron spectra which have no classical analogue and which cannot be captured by the incoherent approximations typically used in the high-intensity regime. These signatures are measurable with presently available laser and accelerator technology.

  3. Quantum radiation reaction: from interference to incoherence

    CERN Document Server

    Dinu, Victor; Ilderton, Anton; Marklund, Mattias; Torgrimsson, Greger

    2015-01-01

    We investigate quantum radiation reaction in laser-electron interactions across different energy and intensity regimes. Using a fully quantum approach which also accounts exactly for the effect of the strong laser pulse on the electron motion, we identify in particular a regime in which radiation reaction is dominated by quantum interference. We find signatures of quantum radiation reaction in the electron spectra which have no classical analogue and which cannot be captured by the incoherent approximations typically used in the high-intensity regime. These signatures are measurable with presently available laser and accelerator technology.

  4. Quantum interference between transverse spatial waveguide modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Aseema; Zhang, Mian; Dutt, Avik; Ramelow, Sven; Nussenzveig, Paulo; Lipson, Michal

    2017-01-01

    Integrated quantum optics has the potential to markedly reduce the footprint and resource requirements of quantum information processing systems, but its practical implementation demands broader utilization of the available degrees of freedom within the optical field. To date, integrated photonic quantum systems have primarily relied on path encoding. However, in the classical regime, the transverse spatial modes of a multi-mode waveguide have been easily manipulated using the waveguide geometry to densely encode information. Here, we demonstrate quantum interference between the transverse spatial modes within a single multi-mode waveguide using quantum circuit-building blocks. This work shows that spatial modes can be controlled to an unprecedented level and have the potential to enable practical and robust quantum information processing. PMID:28106036

  5. Quantum interference between transverse spatial waveguide modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Aseema; Zhang, Mian; Dutt, Avik; Ramelow, Sven; Nussenzveig, Paulo; Lipson, Michal

    2017-01-01

    Integrated quantum optics has the potential to markedly reduce the footprint and resource requirements of quantum information processing systems, but its practical implementation demands broader utilization of the available degrees of freedom within the optical field. To date, integrated photonic quantum systems have primarily relied on path encoding. However, in the classical regime, the transverse spatial modes of a multi-mode waveguide have been easily manipulated using the waveguide geometry to densely encode information. Here, we demonstrate quantum interference between the transverse spatial modes within a single multi-mode waveguide using quantum circuit-building blocks. This work shows that spatial modes can be controlled to an unprecedented level and have the potential to enable practical and robust quantum information processing.

  6. Understanding quantum interference in General Nonlocality

    CERN Document Server

    Wanng, Hai-Jhun

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we attempt to give an understanding of quantum double-slit interference of fermions in the framework of General Nonlocality (GN) [J. Math. Phys. 49, 033513 (2008)] by studying the self-interaction of matter wave. From the metric of the GN, we derive a special formalism to interpret the interference contrast when the self-interaction is perturbative. According to the formalism, the characteristic of interference pattern is in agreement with experiment qualitatively. As examples, we apply the formalism to the cases governed by Schr\\"odinger current and Dirac current respectively, both of which are relevant to topology. The gap between these two cases corresponds to a spin-current effect, which is possible to test in the near future. In addition, a general interference formalism for both perturbative and non-perturbative self-interactions is presented. By analyzing the general formalism we predict that in the nonperturbative limit there is no interference at all.

  7. Nonclassical Paths in Quantum Interference Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, Rahul; Samuel, Joseph; Sinha, Aninda; Sinha, Supurna; Sinha, Urbasi

    2014-09-01

    In a double slit interference experiment, the wave function at the screen with both slits open is not exactly equal to the sum of the wave functions with the slits individually open one at a time. The three scenarios represent three different boundary conditions and as such, the superposition principle should not be applicable. However, most well-known text books in quantum mechanics implicitly and/or explicitly use this assumption that is only approximately true. In our present study, we have used the Feynman path integral formalism to quantify contributions from nonclassical paths in quantum interference experiments that provide a measurable deviation from a naive application of the superposition principle. A direct experimental demonstration for the existence of these nonclassical paths is difficult to present. We find that contributions from such paths can be significant and we propose simple three-slit interference experiments to directly confirm their existence.

  8. Many-body quantum interference on hypercubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittel, Christoph; Keil, Robert; Weihs, Gregor

    2017-03-01

    Beyond the regime of distinguishable particles, many-body quantum interferences influence quantum transport in an intricate manner. However, symmetries of the single-particle transformation matrix alleviate this complexity and even allow the analytic formulation of suppression laws, which predict final states to occur with a vanishing probability due to total destructive interference. Here we investigate the symmetries of hypercube graphs and their generalisations with arbitrary identical subgraphs on all vertices. We find that initial many-particle states, which are invariant under self-inverse symmetries of the hypercube, lead to a large number of suppressed final states. The condition for suppression is determined solely by the initial symmetry, while the fraction of suppressed states is given by the number of independent symmetries of the initial state. Our findings reveal new insights into particle statistics for ensembles of indistinguishable bosons and fermions and may represent a first step towards many-particle quantum protocols in higher-dimensional structures.

  9. Heuristic explanation of quantum interference experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Guowen, W

    2005-01-01

    A particle is described as a non-spreading wave packet satisfying a linear equation within the framework of special relativity. Young's and other interference experiments are explained with a hypothesis that there is a coupling interaction between the peaked and non-peaked pieces of the wave packet. This explanation of the interference experiments provides a realistic interpretation of quantum mechanics. The interpretation implies that there is physical reality of particles and no wave function collapse. It also implies that neither classical mechanics nor current quantum mechanics is a complete theory for describing physical reality and the Bell inequalities are not the proper touchstones for reality and locality. The problems of the boundary between the macro-world and micro-world and the de-coherence in the transition region (meso-world) between the two are discussed. The present interpretation of quantum mechanics is consistent with the physical aspects of the Copenhagen interpretation, such as, the super...

  10. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in magnetic insulator heterostructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gang; Wang, Jing; Felser, Claudia; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Zhang, Shou-Cheng

    2015-03-11

    On the basis of ab initio calculations, we predict that a monolayer of Cr-doped (Bi,Sb)2Te3 and GdI2 heterostructure is a quantum anomalous Hall insulator with a nontrivial band gap up to 38 meV. The principle behind our prediction is that the band inversion between two topologically trivial ferromagnetic insulators can result in a nonzero Chern number, which offers a better way to realize the quantum anomalous Hall state without random magnetic doping. In addition, a simple effective model is presented to describe the basic mechanism of spin polarized band inversion in this system. Moreover, we predict that 3D quantum anomalous Hall insulator could be realized in (Bi2/3Cr1/3)2Te3 /GdI2 superlattice.

  11. Radio VLBI and the quantum interference paradox

    CERN Document Server

    Singal, Ashok K

    2016-01-01

    We address here the question of interference of radio signals from astronomical sources like distant quasars, in a very long baseline interferometer (VLBI), where two (or more) distantly located radio telescopes (apertures), receive simultaneous signal from the sky. In an equivalent optical two-slit experiment, it is generally argued that for the photons involved in the interference pattern on the screen, it is not possible, even in principle, to ascertain which of the two slits a particular photon went through. It is argued that any procedure to ascertain this destroys the interference pattern. But in the case of the modern radio VLBI, it is a routine matter to record the phase and amplitude of the voltage outputs from the two radio antennas on a recording media separately and then do the correlation between the two recorded signals later in an offline manner. Does this not violate the quantum interference principle? We provide a resolution of this problem here.

  12. Quantum Interference of Multiple Beams Induced by Multiple Scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ott, Johan Raunkjær; Mortensen, N. Asger; Lodahl, Peter

    2011-01-01

    We report on quantum interference induced by the transmission of quantized light through a multiple-scattering medium. We show that entangled states can be created by multiple-scattering and that quantum interference survives disorder averaging.......We report on quantum interference induced by the transmission of quantized light through a multiple-scattering medium. We show that entangled states can be created by multiple-scattering and that quantum interference survives disorder averaging....

  13. rf superconducting quantum interference device metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarides, N.; Tsironis, G. P.

    2007-04-01

    A rf superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) array in an alternating magnetic field is investigated with respect to its effective magnetic permeability, within the effective medium approximation. This system acts as an inherently nonlinear magnetic metamaterial, leading to negative magnetic response, and thus negative permeability above the resonance frequency of the individual SQUIDs. Moreover, the permeability exhibits oscillatory behavior at low field intensities, allowing its tuning by a slight change of the intensity of the applied field.

  14. Strong Correlation of Fluorescence Photons without Quantum Interference

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Xiang-Ming; WANG Fei

    2007-01-01

    It has been predicted that a driven three-level V atom can emit strongly correlated fluorescence photons in the presence of quantum interference. Here we examine the effects of quantum interference on the intensity correlation of fluorescence photons emitted from a driven three-level A atom. Unexpectedly, strong correlation occurs without quantum interference. The quantum interference tends to reduce the correlation function to a normal level. The essential difference between these two cases is traced to the different effects of quantum interference on coherent population trapping (CPT). For the V atom, quantum interference and coherent excitation combine to lead to CPT. For the A atom, however, the quantum interference tends to spoil CPT while the coherent excitation induces the effect.

  15. Quantum search via superconducting quantum interference devices in a cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Yan; Dong Ping; Xue Zheng-Yuan; Cao Zhuo-Liang

    2007-01-01

    We propose a scheme for implementing the Grover search algorithm with two superconducing quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) in a cavity. Our scheme only requires single resonant interaction of the SQUID-cavity system and the required interaction time is very short. The simplicity of the process and the reduction of the interaction time are important for restraining decoherence.

  16. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in magnetically doped InAs/GaSb quantum wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing-Ze; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Hai-Jun; Samarth, Nitin; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; Liu, Chao-Xing

    2014-10-03

    The quantum anomalous Hall effect has recently been observed experimentally in thin films of Cr-doped (Bi,Sb)(2)Te(3) at a low temperature (∼ 30 mK). In this work, we propose realizing the quantum anomalous Hall effect in more conventional diluted magnetic semiconductors with magnetically doped InAs/GaSb type-II quantum wells. Based on a four-band model, we find an enhancement of the Curie temperature of ferromagnetism due to band edge singularities in the inverted regime of InAs/GaSb quantum wells. Below the Curie temperature, the quantum anomalous Hall effect is confirmed by the direct calculation of Hall conductance. The parameter regime for the quantum anomalous Hall phase is identified based on the eight-band Kane model. The high sample quality and strong exchange coupling make magnetically doped InAs/GaSb quantum wells good candidates for realizing the quantum anomalous Hall insulator at a high temperature.

  17. Anomalous conductances in an ultracold quantum wire

    CERN Document Server

    Kanász-Nagy, Márton; Esslinger, Tilman; Demler, Eugene A

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the recently measured anomalous transport properties of an ultracold gas through a ballistic constriction [S. Krinner et al., PNAS 201601812 (2016)]. The quantized conductance observed at weak interactions increases several-fold as the gas is made strongly interacting, which cannot be explained by the Landauer theory of single-channel transport. We show that this phenomenon is due to the multichannel Andreev reflections at the edges of the constriction, where the interaction and confinement result in a superconducting state. Andreev processes convert atoms of otherwise reflecting channels into the condensate propagating through the constriction, leading to a significant excess conductance. Furthermore, we find the spin conductance being suppressed by superconductivity; the agreement with experiment provides an additional support for our model.

  18. Quantum Interference and Entanglement Induced by Multiple Scattering of Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ott, Johan Raunkjær; Mortensen, Asger; Lodahl, Peter

    2010-01-01

    We report on the effects of quantum interference induced by the transmission of an arbitrary number of optical quantum states through a multiple-scattering medium. We identify the role of quantum interference on the photon correlations and the degree of continuous variable entanglement between tw...

  19. Anomalous Effects from Dipole-Environment Quantum Entanglement

    CERN Document Server

    Porcelli, Elio B

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we analyze anomalous effects observed in the operation of two different technological devices: a magnetic core and a parallel plate (symmetrical or asymmetrical) capacitor. From experimental measurements on both devices, we detected small raised anomalous forces that cannot be explained by known interactions in the traditional theories. As the variations of device inertia have not been completely understood by means of current theories, we here propose a theoretical framework in which the anomalous effects can consistently be explained by a preexisting state of quantum entanglement between the external environment and either magnetic dipoles of magnetic cores or electric dipoles of capacitors, so that the effects would be manifested by the application of a strong magnetic field on the former or an intense electric field on the latter. The values of the macroscopic observables calculated in such a theoretical framework revealed good agreement with the experimental measurements performed in both c...

  20. Microstrip Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices for Quantum Information Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Feo, Michael P.

    Quantum-limited amplification in the microwave frequency range is of both practical and fundamental importance. The weak signals corresponding to single microwave photons require substantial amplification to resolve. When probing quantum excitations of the electromagnetic field, the substantial noise produced by standard amplifiers dominates the signal, therefore, several averages must be accumulated to achieve even a modest signal-to-noise ratio. Even worse, the back-action on the system due to amplifier noise can hasten the decay of the quantum state. In recent years, low-noise microwave-frequency amplification has been advancing rapidly and one field that would benefit greatly from this is circuit quantum electrodynamics (cQED). The development of circuit quantum electrodynamics—which implements techniques of quantum optics at microwave frequencies—has led to revolutionary progress in the field of quantum information science. cQED employs quantum bits (qubits) and superconducting microwave resonators in place of the atoms and cavities used in quantum optics permitting preparation and control of low energy photon states in macroscopic superconducting circuits at millikelvin temperatures. We have developed a microstrip superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) amplifier (MSA) to provide the first stage of amplification for these systems. Employing sub-micron Josephson tunnel junctions for enhanced gain, these MSAs operate at microwave frequencies and are optimized to perform with near quantum-limited noise characteristics. Our MSA is utilized as the first stage of amplification to probe the dynamics of a SQUID oscillator. The SQUID oscillator is a flux-tunable microwave resonator formed by a capacitively shunted dc SQUID. Josephson plasma oscillations are induced by pulsed microwave excitations at the resonant frequency of the oscillator. Once pulsed, decaying plasma oscillations are observed in the time domain. By measuring with pulse amplitudes

  1. Anomalous Fraunhofer interference in epitaxial superconductor-semiconductor Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suominen, H. J.; Danon, J.; Kjaergaard, M.; Flensberg, K.; Shabani, J.; Palmstrøm, C. J.; Nichele, F.; Marcus, C. M.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate patterns of critical current as a function of perpendicular and in-plane magnetic fields in superconductor-semiconductor-superconductor (SNS) junctions based on InAs/InGaAs heterostructures with an epitaxial Al layer. This material system is of interest due to its exceptionally good superconductor-semiconductor coupling, as well as large spin-orbit interaction and g factor in the semiconductor. Thin epitaxial Al allows the application of large in-plane field without destroying superconductivity. For fields perpendicular to the junction, flux focusing results in aperiodic node spacings in the pattern of critical currents known as Fraunhofer patterns by analogy to the related interference effect in optics. Adding an in-plane field yields two further anomalies in the pattern. First, higher-order nodes are systematically strengthened, indicating current flow along the edges of the device, as a result of confinement of Andreev states driven by an induced flux dipole; second, asymmetries in the interference appear that depend on the field direction and magnitude. A model is presented, showing good agreement with experiment, elucidating the roles of flux focusing, Zeeman and spin-orbit coupling, and disorder in producing these effects.

  2. Quantum interference by localized scattering waves of gapless helical modes in narrow strips of topological insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagaki, Y.

    2016-09-01

    Quantum interference in scattering from a potential offset is investigated in narrow strips of two-dimensional systems described by the Bernevig-Hughes-Zhang Hamiltonian. Attention is focused on the situations where the transmission in the scattering region takes place around the Dirac point of topological insulators when the hybridization energy gap is eliminated by utilizing transverse interference. Apart from conventional periodic transmission modulation that takes place when the length of the potential offset region is varied, resonant disappearances of reflection occur for short potential offsets. The anomalous resonance appears not only for the four-band Hamiltonian but also for the two-band Hamiltonian, manifesting the generality of the phenomenon. Evanescent-like waves excited around the potential steps are indicated to be responsible for the anomalous behavior. The interference states can couple with each other and generic reduction in the amplitude of transmission modulation occurs upon coupling with the periodic modulation.

  3. Anomalous screening of quantum impurities by a neutral environment

    OpenAIRE

    Yakaboylu, Enderalp; Lemeshko, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    It is a common knowledge that an effective interaction of a quantum impurity with an electromagnetic field can be screened by surrounding charge carriers, whether mobile or static. Here we demonstrate that very strong, `anomalous' screening can take place in the presence of a neutral, weakly-polarizable environment, due to an exchange of orbital angular momentum between the impurity and the bath. Furthermore, we show that it is possible to generalize all phenomena related to isolated impuriti...

  4. Quantum interference in an interfacial superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Srijit; Mulazimoglu, Emre; Monteiro, Ana M. R. V. L.; Wölbing, Roman; Koelle, Dieter; Kleiner, Reinhold; Blanter, Ya. M.; Vandersypen, Lieven M. K.; Caviglia, Andrea D.

    2016-10-01

    The two-dimensional superconductor that forms at the interface between the complex oxides lanthanum aluminate (LAO) and strontium titanate (STO) has several intriguing properties that set it apart from conventional superconductors. Most notably, an electric field can be used to tune its critical temperature (Tc; ref. 7), revealing a dome-shaped phase diagram reminiscent of high-Tc superconductors. So far, experiments with oxide interfaces have measured quantities that probe only the magnitude of the superconducting order parameter and are not sensitive to its phase. Here, we perform phase-sensitive measurements by realizing the first superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) at the LAO/STO interface. Furthermore, we develop a new paradigm for the creation of superconducting circuit elements, where local gates enable the in situ creation and control of Josephson junctions. These gate-defined SQUIDs are unique in that the entire device is made from a single superconductor with purely electrostatic interfaces between the superconducting reservoir and the weak link. We complement our experiments with numerical simulations and show that the low superfluid density of this interfacial superconductor results in a large, gate-controllable kinetic inductance of the SQUID. Our observation of robust quantum interference opens up a new pathway to understanding the nature of superconductivity at oxide interfaces.

  5. Anomalous spectral lines and relic quantum nonequilibrium

    CERN Document Server

    Underwood, Nicolas G

    2016-01-01

    We describe general features that might be observed in the line spectra of relic cosmological particles should quantum nonequilibrium be preserved in their statistics. According to our arguments, these features would represent a significant departure from those of a conventional origin. Among other features, we find a possible spectral broadening (for incident photons) that is proportional to the energy resolution of the recording telescope (and so could be orders of magnitude larger than any intrinsic broadening). Notably, for a range of possible initial conditions we find the possibility of spectral line `narrowing' whereby a telescope could observe a spectral line which is narrower than it should conventionally be able to resolve. We briefly discuss implications for the indirect search for dark matter.

  6. Time-domain quantum interference in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillion-Gourdeau, François; Gagnon, Denis; Lefebvre, Catherine; MacLean, Steve

    2016-09-01

    The electron momentum density obtained from the Schwinger-like mechanism is evaluated for a graphene sample immersed in a homogeneous time-dependent electric field. Based on the analogy between graphene low-energy electrons and quantum electrodynamics (QED), numerical techniques borrowed from strong field QED are employed and compared to approximate analytical approaches. It is demonstrated that for some range of experimentally accessible parameters, the pair production proceeds by sequences of adiabatic evolutions followed by nonadiabatic Landau-Zener transitions, reminiscent of the Kibble-Zurek mechanism describing topological defect density in second order phase transitions. For some field configurations, this yields interference patterns in momentum space which are explained in terms of the adiabatic-impulse model and the Landau-Zener-Stückelberg interferometry.

  7. Metal-to-insulator switching in quantum anomalous Hall states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Lei; Kou, Xufeng; Wang, Jing; Fan, Yabin; Choi, Eun Sang; Shao, Qiming; Zhang, Shou Cheng; Wang, Kang Lung

    Quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) was recently achieved in magnetic topological insulator films as a form of dissipationless transport without external magnetic field. However, the universal phase diagram of QAHE and its relation with quantum Hall effect (QHE) remain to be investigated. Here, we report the experimental observation of the giant longitudinal resistance peak and zero Hall conductance plateau at the coercive field in the six quintuple-layer (Cr0.12Bi0.26Sb0.62)2 Te3 film, and demonstrate the metal-to-insulator switching between two opposite QAHE plateau states up to 0.3 K. The universal QAHE phase diagram is further confirmed through the angle-dependent measurements. Our results address that the quantum phase transitions in both QAHE and QHE regimes are in the same universality class, yet the microscopic details are different.

  8. Fraunhofer regime of operation for superconducting quantum interference filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shadrin, A.V.; Constantinian, K.Y.; Ovsyannikov, G.A.;

    2008-01-01

    Series arrays of superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) with incommensurate loop areas, so-called superconducting quantum interference filters (SQIFs), are investigated in the kilohertz and the gigahertz frequency range. In SQIFs made of high-T-c bicrystal junctions the flux-to-vol...

  9. Ruling Out Multi-Order Interference in Quantum Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Sinha, Urbasi; Jennewein, Thomas; Laflamme, Raymond; Weihs, Gregor

    2010-01-01

    Quantum mechanics and gravitation are two pillars of modern physics. Despite their success in describing the physical world around us, they seem to be incompatible theories. There are suggestions that one of these theories must be generalized to achieve unification. For example, Born's rule, one of the axioms of quantum mechanics could be violated. Born's rule predicts that quantum interference, as shown by a double slit diffraction experiment, occurs from pairs of paths. A generalized version of quantum mechanics might allow multi-path, i.e. higher order interferences thus leading to a deviation from the theory. We performed a three slit experiment with photons and bounded the magnitude of three path interference to less than 10-2 of the expected two-path interference, thus ruling out third and higher order interference and providing a bound on the accuracy of Born's rule. Our experiment is consistent with the postulate both in semi-classical and quantum regimes.

  10. Ruling out multi-order interference in quantum mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Urbasi; Couteau, Christophe; Jennewein, Thomas; Laflamme, Raymond; Weihs, Gregor

    2010-07-23

    Quantum mechanics and gravitation are two pillars of modern physics. Despite their success in describing the physical world around us, they seem to be incompatible theories. There are suggestions that one of these theories must be generalized to achieve unification. For example, Born's rule--one of the axioms of quantum mechanics--could be violated. Born's rule predicts that quantum interference, as shown by a double-slit diffraction experiment, occurs from pairs of paths. A generalized version of quantum mechanics might allow multipath (i.e., higher-order) interference, thus leading to a deviation from the theory. We performed a three-slit experiment with photons and bounded the magnitude of three-path interference to less than 10(-2) of the expected two-path interference, thus ruling out third- and higher-order interference and providing a bound on the accuracy of Born's rule. Our experiment is consistent with the postulate both in semiclassical and quantum regimes.

  11. Prospect of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall effect in doped kagome lattice Mott insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guterding, Daniel; Jeschke, Harald O.; Valentí, Roser

    2016-05-01

    Electronic states with non-trivial topology host a number of novel phenomena with potential for revolutionizing information technology. The quantum anomalous Hall effect provides spin-polarized dissipation-free transport of electrons, while the quantum spin Hall effect in combination with superconductivity has been proposed as the basis for realizing decoherence-free quantum computing. We introduce a new strategy for realizing these effects, namely by hole and electron doping kagome lattice Mott insulators through, for instance, chemical substitution. As an example, we apply this new approach to the natural mineral herbertsmithite. We prove the feasibility of the proposed modifications by performing ab-initio density functional theory calculations and demonstrate the occurrence of the predicted effects using realistic models. Our results herald a new family of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall insulators at affordable energy/temperature scales based on kagome lattices of transition metal ions.

  12. Prospect of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall effect in doped kagome lattice Mott insulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guterding, Daniel; Jeschke, Harald O; Valentí, Roser

    2016-05-17

    Electronic states with non-trivial topology host a number of novel phenomena with potential for revolutionizing information technology. The quantum anomalous Hall effect provides spin-polarized dissipation-free transport of electrons, while the quantum spin Hall effect in combination with superconductivity has been proposed as the basis for realizing decoherence-free quantum computing. We introduce a new strategy for realizing these effects, namely by hole and electron doping kagome lattice Mott insulators through, for instance, chemical substitution. As an example, we apply this new approach to the natural mineral herbertsmithite. We prove the feasibility of the proposed modifications by performing ab-initio density functional theory calculations and demonstrate the occurrence of the predicted effects using realistic models. Our results herald a new family of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall insulators at affordable energy/temperature scales based on kagome lattices of transition metal ions.

  13. Prospect of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall effect in doped kagome lattice Mott insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guterding, Daniel; Jeschke, Harald O.; Valentí, Roser

    2016-01-01

    Electronic states with non-trivial topology host a number of novel phenomena with potential for revolutionizing information technology. The quantum anomalous Hall effect provides spin-polarized dissipation-free transport of electrons, while the quantum spin Hall effect in combination with superconductivity has been proposed as the basis for realizing decoherence-free quantum computing. We introduce a new strategy for realizing these effects, namely by hole and electron doping kagome lattice Mott insulators through, for instance, chemical substitution. As an example, we apply this new approach to the natural mineral herbertsmithite. We prove the feasibility of the proposed modifications by performing ab-initio density functional theory calculations and demonstrate the occurrence of the predicted effects using realistic models. Our results herald a new family of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall insulators at affordable energy/temperature scales based on kagome lattices of transition metal ions. PMID:27185665

  14. General relativistic effects in quantum interference of "clocks"

    CERN Document Server

    Zych, Magdalena; Costa, Fabio; Brukner, Časlav

    2016-01-01

    Quantum mechanics and general relativity have been each successfully tested in numerous experiments. However, the regime where both theories are jointly required to explain physical phenomena remains untested by laboratory experiments, and is also not fully understood by theory. This contribution reviews recent ideas for a new type of experiments: quantum interference of "clocks", which aim to test novel quantum effects that arise from time dilation. "Clock" interference experiments could be realised with atoms or photons in near future laboratory experiments.

  15. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in topological insulator memory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalil, Mansoor B. A., E-mail: elembaj@nus.edu.sg [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, 4 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Data Storage Institute, Agency for Science, Technology and Research A*STAR, DSI Building, 5 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore, Singapore 117608 (Singapore); Tan, S. G. [Data Storage Institute, Agency for Science, Technology and Research A*STAR, DSI Building, 5 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore, Singapore 117608 (Singapore); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, 4 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Siu, Z. B. [Data Storage Institute, Agency for Science, Technology and Research A*STAR, DSI Building, 5 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore, Singapore 117608 (Singapore); NUS Graduate School for Integrative Sciences and Engineering, National University of Singapore (Singapore)

    2015-05-07

    We theoretically investigate the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) in a magnetically coupled three-dimensional-topological insulator (3D-TI) system. We apply the generalized spin-orbit coupling Hamiltonian to obtain the Hall conductivity σ{sup xy} of the system. The underlying topology of the QAHE phenomenon is then analyzed to show the quantization of σ{sup xy} and its relation to the Berry phase of the system. Finally, we analyze the feasibility of utilizing σ{sup xy} as a memory read-out in a 3D-TI based memory at finite temperatures, with comparison to known magnetically doped 3D-TIs.

  16. Interference and interactions in open quantum dots

    CERN Document Server

    Bird, J P; Ferry, D K; Moura, A P S; Lai, Y C; Indlekofer, K M

    2003-01-01

    In this report, we review the results of our joint experimental and theoretical studies of electron-interference, and interaction, phenomena in open electron cavities known as quantum dots. The transport through these structures is shown to be heavily influenced by the remnants of their discrete density of states, elements of which remain resolved in spite of the strong coupling that exists between the cavity and its reservoirs. The experimental signatures of this density of states are discussed at length in this report, and are shown to be related to characteristic wavefunction scarring, involving a small number of classical orbits. A semiclassical analysis of this behaviour shows it to be related to the effect of dynamical tunnelling, in which electrons are injected into the dot tunnel through classically forbidden regions of phase space, to access isolated regular orbits. The dynamical tunnelling gives rise to the formation of long-lived quasi-bound states in the open dots, and the many-body implications a...

  17. Enhanced Kerr nonlinearity via quantum interference from spontaneous emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asadpour, S.H., E-mail: S.Hosein.Asadpour@gmail.com [Young Researchers Club, Bandar Anzali Branch, Islamic Azad University, Bandar Anzali (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sahrai, M. [Research Institute for Applied Physics and Astronomy, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Soltani, A. [School of Engineering and Emerging Technologies, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hamedi, H.R. [Research Institute for Applied Physics and Astronomy, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-01-02

    A novel atom configuration is proposed for a giant Kerr nonlinearity in zero linear and nonlinear probe absorption. It is shown that without coherent control field and just by quantum interference of spontaneous emission, a giant Kerr nonlinearity can be obtained. -- Highlights: ► The quantum interference from spontaneous emission is considered in a four-level medium. ► The giant Kerr nonlinearity in the zero linear and nonlinear absorption is obtained. ► The quantum interference effect on group velocity is then investigated.

  18. Thickness Dependence of the Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in Magnetic Topological Insulator Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiao; Feng, Yang; Wang, Jing; Ou, Yunbo; Hao, Zhenqi; Liu, Chang; Zhang, Zuocheng; Zhang, Liguo; Lin, Chaojing; Liao, Jian; Li, Yongqing; Wang, Li-Li; Ji, Shuai-Hua; Chen, Xi; Ma, Xucun; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; Wang, Yayu; He, Ke; Xue, Qi-Kun

    2016-08-01

    The evolution of the quantum anomalous Hall effect with the thickness of Cr-doped (Bi,Sb)2 Te3 magnetic topological insulator films is studied, revealing how the effect is caused by the interplay of the surface states, band-bending, and ferromagnetic exchange energy. Homogeneity in ferromagnetism is found to be the key to high-temperature quantum anomalous Hall material.

  19. Interference and inequality in quantum decision theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheon, Taksu, E-mail: taksu.cheon@kochi-tech.ac.j [Laboratory of Physics, Kochi University of Technology, Tosa Yamada, Kochi 782-8502 (Japan); Takahashi, Taiki, E-mail: ttakahashi@lynx.let.hokudai.ac.j [Laboratory of Social Psychology, Department of Behavioral Science, Faculty of Letters, Hokkaido University, N.10, W.7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan)

    2010-12-01

    The quantum decision theory is examined in its simplest form of two-condition two-choice setting. A set of inequalities to be satisfied by any quantum conditional probability describing the decision process is derived. Experimental data indicating the breakdown of classical explanations are critically examined with quantum theory using the full set of quantum phases.

  20. Quantum Interference between Transverse Spatial Waveguide Modes

    CERN Document Server

    Mohanty, Aseema; Dutt, Avik; Ramelow, Sven; Nussenzveig, Paulo; Lipson, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Integrated quantum optics has drastically reduced the size of table-top optical experiments to the chip-scale, allowing for demonstrations of large-scale quantum information processing and quantum simulation. However, despite these advances, practical implementations of quantum photonic circuits remain limited because they consist of large networks of waveguide interferometers that path encode information which do not easily scale. Increasing the dimensionality of current quantum systems using higher degrees of freedom such as transverse spatial field distribution, polarization, time, and frequency to encode more information per carrier will enable scalability by simplifying quantum computational architectures, increasing security and noise tolerance in quantum communication channels, and simulating richer quantum phenomena. Here we demonstrate a scalable platform for photonic quantum information processing using waveguide quantum circuit building blocks based on the transverse spatial mode degree of freedom:...

  1. Quantum Interference and Selectivity through Biological Ion Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salari, Vahid; Naeij, Hamidreza; Shafiee, Afshin

    2017-01-01

    The mechanism of selectivity in ion channels is still an open question in biology for more than half a century. Here, we suggest that quantum interference can be a solution to explain the selectivity mechanism in ion channels since interference happens between similar ions through the same size of ion channels. In this paper, we simulate two neighboring ion channels on a cell membrane with the famous double-slit experiment in physics to investigate whether there is any possibility of matter-wave interference of ions via movement through ion channels. Our obtained decoherence timescales indicate that the quantum states of ions can only survive for short times, i.e. ≈100 picoseconds in each channel and ≈17–53 picoseconds outside the channels, giving the result that the quantum interference of ions seems unlikely due to environmental decoherence. However, we discuss our results and raise few points, which increase the possibility of interference. PMID:28134331

  2. Holographic duality between (2 +1 ) -dimensional quantum anomalous Hall state and (3 +1 ) -dimensional topological insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yingfei; Lee, Ching Hua; Wen, Xueda; Cho, Gil Young; Ryu, Shinsei; Qi, Xiao-Liang

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we study (2 +1 ) -dimensional quantum anomalous Hall states, i.e., band insulators with quantized Hall conductance, using exact holographic mapping. Exact holographic mapping is an approach to holographic duality which maps the quantum anomalous Hall state to a different state living in (3 +1 ) -dimensional hyperbolic space. By studying topological response properties and the entanglement spectrum, we demonstrate that the holographic dual theory of a quantum anomalous Hall state is a (3 +1 ) -dimensional topological insulator. The dual description enables a characterization of topological properties of a system by the quantum entanglement between degrees of freedom at different length scales.

  3. Quantum mechanics in fractional and other anomalous spacetimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calcagni, Gianluca [Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics (Albert Einstein Institute), Am Muehlenberg 1, D-14476 Golm (Germany); Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Nardelli, Giuseppe [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Universita Cattolica, via Musei 41, 25121 Brescia (Italy); INFN Gruppo Collegato di Trento, Universita di Trento, 38100 Povo (Trento) (Italy); Scalisi, Marco [Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics (Albert Einstein Institute), Am Muehlenberg 1, D-14476 Golm (Germany); Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands)

    2012-10-15

    We formulate quantum mechanics in spacetimes with real-order fractional geometry and more general factorizable measures. In spacetimes where coordinates and momenta span the whole real line, Heisenberg's principle is proven and the wave-functions minimizing the uncertainty are found. In spite of the fact that ordinary time and spatial translations are broken and the dynamics is not unitary, the theory is in one-to-one correspondence with a unitary one, thus allowing us to employ standard tools of analysis. These features are illustrated in the examples of the free particle and the harmonic oscillator. While fractional (and the more general anomalous-spacetime) free models are formally indistinguishable from ordinary ones at the classical level, at the quantum level they differ both in the Hilbert space and for a topological term fixing the classical action in the path integral formulation. Thus, all non-unitarity in fractional quantum dynamics is encoded in a contribution depending only on the initial and final states.

  4. The quantum anomalous Hall effect in kagome lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Zhiyong, E-mail: zyzhang@nju.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2011-09-14

    The quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect in kagome lattices is investigated in the presence of both Rashba spin-orbit coupling and an exchange field. In addition to the gap at the Dirac points as found in graphene, a new topological energy gap is opened at the {Gamma} point. With the Fermi energy lying in the first gap, the Chern number c = 2 as in graphene, whereas with it lying in the second one, c = 1. The distribution of Berry curvature is obtained to reveal the nontrivial topological properties in momentum space. For stripes with 'armchair' and 'zigzag' edges, the topological characteristics of gapless edge states on the genus g = 2 Riemann surface are studied. The obtained nonzero winding numbers also demonstrate the QAH effect. (paper)

  5. Anomalous vacuum energy and stability of a quantum liquid

    CERN Document Server

    Trachenko, K

    2016-01-01

    We show that the vacuum (zero-point) energy of a low-temperature quantum liquid is a variable property which changes with the state of the system, in notable contrast to the static vacuum energy in solids commonly considered. We further show that this energy is inherently anomalous: it decreases with temperature and gives negative contribution to system's heat capacity. This effect operates in an equilibrium and macroscopic system, in marked contrast to small or out-of-equilibrium configurations discussed previously. We find that the negative contribution is over-compensated by the positive term from the excitation of longitudinal fluctuations and demonstrate how the overall positive heat capacity is related to the stability of a condensed phase at the microscopic level.

  6. Quantum interference of independently generated telecom-band single photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Monika [Center for Photonic Communication and Computing, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208-3112 (United States); Altepeter, Joseph B.; Huang, Yu-Ping; Oza, Neal N. [Center for Photonic Communication and Computing, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208-3118 (United States); Kumar, Prem [Center for Photonic Communication and Computing, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208-3112, USA and Center for Photonic Communication and Computing, Department of Electrical Engineering (United States)

    2014-12-04

    We report on high-visibility quantum interference of independently generated telecom O-band (1310 nm) single photons using standard single-mode fibers. The experimental data are shown to agree well with the results of simulations using a comprehensive quantum multimode theory without the need for any fitting parameter.

  7. An exact factorization perspective on quantum interferences in nonadiabatic dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curchod, Basile F. E.; Agostini, Federica; Gross, E. K. U.

    2016-07-01

    Nonadiabatic quantum interferences emerge whenever nuclear wavefunctions in different electronic states meet and interact in a nonadiabatic region. In this work, we analyze how nonadiabatic quantum interferences translate in the context of the exact factorization of the molecular wavefunction. In particular, we focus our attention on the shape of the time-dependent potential energy surface—the exact surface on which the nuclear dynamics takes place. We use a one-dimensional exactly solvable model to reproduce different conditions for quantum interferences, whose characteristic features already appear in one-dimension. The time-dependent potential energy surface develops complex features when strong interferences are present, in clear contrast to the observed behavior in simple nonadiabatic crossing cases. Nevertheless, independent classical trajectories propagated on the exact time-dependent potential energy surface reasonably conserve a distribution in configuration space that mimics one of the exact nuclear probability densities.

  8. An Exact Factorization Perspective on Quantum Interferences in Nonadiabatic Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Curchod, Basile F E; Gross, E K U

    2016-01-01

    Nonadiabatic quantum interferences emerge whenever nuclear wavefunctions in different electronic states meet and interact in a nonadiabatic region. In this work, we analyze how nonadiabatic quantum interferences translate in the context of the exact factorization of the molecular wavefunction. In particular, we focus our attention on the shape of the time-dependent potential energy surface - the exact surface on which the nuclear dynamics takes place - using an exactly-solvable model to reproduce different conditions for quantum interferences. The time-dependent potential energy surface develops complex features when strong interferences are present, in clear contrast to the observed behavior in simple nonadiabatic crossing cases. Nevertheless, independent classical trajectories propagated on the exact time-dependent potential energy surface reasonably conserve a distribution in configuration space that mimics the one of the exact nuclear probability density.

  9. General relativistic effects in quantum interference of “clocks”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zych, M.; Pikovski, I.; Costa, F.; Brukner, Č.

    2016-06-01

    Quantum mechanics and general relativity have been each successfully tested in numerous experiments. However, the regime where both theories are jointly required to explain physical phenomena remains untested by laboratory experiments, and is also not fully understood by theory. This contribution reviews recent ideas for a new type of experiments: quantum interference of “clocks”, which aim to test novel quantum effects that arise from time dilation. “Clock” interference experiments could be realised with atoms or photons in near future laboratory experiments.

  10. Complementarity in temporal ghost interference and temporal quantum eraser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kiyoung; Noh, Jaewoo

    2015-06-01

    We present a theory for the complementarity in temporal interference and quantum erasure. We consider the case of entangled biphoton where we can get the information of single photon's arrival time without making a disturbing measurement. We find a mathematical equation for the complementary relation for a temporal double slit experiment. We also propose a quantum eraser scheme that will elucidate that the complementarity is originated from the quantum entanglement.

  11. Giant anisotropic magnetoresistance in a quantum anomalous Hall insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandala, Abhinav; Richardella, Anthony; Kempinger, Susan; Liu, Chao-Xing; Samarth, Nitin

    2015-07-01

    When a three-dimensional ferromagnetic topological insulator thin film is magnetized out-of-plane, conduction ideally occurs through dissipationless, one-dimensional (1D) chiral states that are characterized by a quantized, zero-field Hall conductance. The recent realization of this phenomenon, the quantum anomalous Hall effect, provides a conceptually new platform for studies of 1D transport, distinct from the traditionally studied quantum Hall effects that arise from Landau level formation. An important question arises in this context: how do these 1D edge states evolve as the magnetization is changed from out-of-plane to in-plane? We examine this question by studying the field-tilt-driven crossover from predominantly edge-state transport to diffusive transport in Crx(Bi,Sb)2-xTe3 thin films. This crossover manifests itself in a giant, electrically tunable anisotropic magnetoresistance that we explain by employing a Landauer-Büttiker formalism. Our methodology provides a powerful means of quantifying dissipative effects in temperature and chemical potential regimes far from perfect quantization.

  12. Anomalous time delays and quantum weak measurements in optical micro-resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, M.; Bliokh, K. Y.; Bliokh, Y. P.; Kofman, A. G.; Ikuta, R.; Yamamoto, T.; Kivshar, Y. S.; Yang, L.; Imoto, N.; Özdemir, Ş. K.; Nori, F.

    2016-11-01

    Quantum weak measurements, wavepacket shifts and optical vortices are universal wave phenomena, which originate from fine interference of multiple plane waves. These effects have attracted considerable attention in both classical and quantum wave systems. Here we report on a phenomenon that brings together all the above topics in a simple one-dimensional scalar wave system. We consider inelastic scattering of Gaussian wave packets with parameters close to a zero of the complex scattering coefficient. We demonstrate that the scattered wave packets experience anomalously large time and frequency shifts in such near-zero scattering. These shifts reveal close analogies with the Goos-Hänchen beam shifts and quantum weak measurements of the momentum in a vortex wavefunction. We verify our general theory by an optical experiment using the near-zero transmission (near-critical coupling) of Gaussian pulses propagating through a nano-fibre with a side-coupled toroidal micro-resonator. Measurements demonstrate the amplification of the time delays from the typical inverse-resonator-linewidth scale to the pulse-duration scale.

  13. Quantum Interference in Time-Delayed Nonsequential Double Ionization

    CERN Document Server

    Maxwell, A S

    2015-01-01

    We perform a systematic analysis of quantum interference in nonsequential double ionization focusing on the recollision-excitation with subsequent ionization (RESI) mechanism, employing the strong-field approximation (SFA). We find that interference has a major influence on the shape, localization and symmetry of the correlated electron momentum distributions. In particular, the fourfold symmetry with regard to the parallel momentum components observed in previous SFA studies is broken. Two types of interference are observed and thoroughly analyzed, namely that caused by electron indistinguishability and intra-cycle events, and that stemming from different excitation channels. We find that interference is most prominent around the diagonal and anti-diagonal in the parallel-momentum plane and provide fully analytical expressions for most interference patterns encountered. We also show that this interference can be controlled by an appropriate choice of phase and excited-state geometry. This leads a to myriad o...

  14. Spying on photons with photons: quantum interference and information

    CERN Document Server

    Ataman, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The quest to have both which-path knowledge and interference fringes in a double-slit experiment dates back to the inception of quantum mechanics (QM) and to the famous Einstein-Bohr debates. In this paper we propose and discuss an experiment able to spy on one photon's path with another photon. We modify the quantum state inside the interferometer as opposed to the traditional physical modification of the "wave-like" or "particle-like" experimental setup. We are able to show that it is the ability to harvest or not which-path information that finally limits the visibility of the interference pattern and not the "wave-like" or "particle-like" experimental setups. Remarkably, a full "particle-like" experimental setup is able to show interference fringes with 100 % visibility if the quantum state is carefully engineered.

  15. Spying on photons with photons: quantum interference and information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataman, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    The quest to have both which-path knowledge and interference fringes in a double-slit experiment dates back to the inception of quantum mechanics (QM) and to the famous Einstein-Bohr debates. In this paper we propose and discuss an experiment able to spy on one photon's path with another photon. We modify the quantum state inside the interferometer as opposed to the traditional physical modification of the "wave-like" or "particle-like" experimental setup. We are able to show that it is the ability to harvest or not which-path information that finally limits the visibility of the interference pattern and not the "wave-like" or "particle-like" experimental setups. Remarkably, a full "particle-like" experimental setup is able to show interference fringes with 100% visibility if the quantum state is carefully engineered.

  16. Quantum interference of molecules -- probing the wave nature of matter

    CERN Document Server

    Venugopalan, Anu

    2012-01-01

    The double slit interference experiment has been famously described by Richard Feynman as containing the "only mystery of quantum mechanics". The history of quantum mechanics is intimately linked with the discovery of the dual nature of matter and radiation. While the double slit experiment for light is easily undertsood in terms of its wave nature, the very same experiment for particles like the electron is somewhat more difficult to comprehend. By the 1920s it was firmly established that electrons have a wave nature. However, for a very long time, most discussions pertaining to interference experiments for particles were merely gedanken experiments. It took almost six decades after the establishment of its wave nature to carry out a 'double slit interference' experiment for electrons. This set the stage for interference experiments with larger particles. In the last decade there has been spectacular progress in matter-wave interefernce experiments. Today, molecules with over a hundred atoms can be made to i...

  17. Prediction of a quantum anomalous Hall state in Co-decorated silicene

    KAUST Repository

    Kaloni, Thaneshwor P.

    2014-01-09

    Based on first-principles calculations, we demonstrate that Co-decorated silicene can host a quantum anomalous Hall state. The exchange field induced by the Co atoms combined with the strong spin-orbit coupling of the silicene opens a nontrivial band gap at the K point. As compared to other transition metals, Co-decorated silicene is unique in this respect, since usually hybridization and spin-polarization induced in the silicene suppress a quantum anomalous Hall state.

  18. Nonmonotonic quantum-to-classical transition in multiparticle interference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ra, Young-Sik; Tichy, Malte; Lim, Hyang-Tag

    2013-01-01

    Quantum-mechanical wave–particle duality implies that probability distributions for granular detection events exhibit wave-like interference. On the single-particle level, this leads to self-interference—e.g., on transit across a double slit—for photons as well as for large, massive particles...... that interference fades away monotonically with increasing distinguishability—in accord with available experimental evidence on the single- and on the many-particle level. Here, we demonstrate experimentally and theoretically that such monotonicity of the quantum-to-classical transition is the exception rather than...

  19. Oscillatory quantum interference effects in narrow-gap semiconductor heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillianfeld, R. B.; Kallaher, R. L.; Heremans, J. J.; Chen, Hong; Goel, N.; Chung, S. J.; Santos, M. B.; Van Roy, W.; Borghs, G.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate quantum interference phenomena in narrow bandgap semiconductors under strong spin-orbit interaction, by measuring the magnetoresistance across mesoscopic closed-path structures fabricated in two-dimensional electron systems. We discuss our results in terms of four quantum interference effects brought about by geometric phases acquired by the electron wave functions: the Aharonov-Bohm phase, the Altshuler-Aronov-Spivak effect, the Berry's phase due to the evolution of the spin degree of freedom, and the Aharonov-Casher phase.

  20. Robust quantum anomalous Hall effect in ferromagnetic transition metal halides

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Chengxi; Wu, Haiping; Deng, Kaiming; Jena, Puru; Kan, Erjun

    2016-01-01

    The quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect is a novel topological spintronic phenomenon arising from inherent magnetization and spin-orbit coupling. Various theoretical and experimental efforts have been devoted in search of robust intrinsic QAH insulators. However, up to now, it has only been observed in Cr or V doped (Bi,Sb)2Te3 film in experiments with very low working temperature. Based on the successful synthesis of transition metal halides, we use first-principles calculations to predict that RuI3 monolayer is an intrinsic ferromagnetic QAH insulator with a topologically nontrivial global band gap of 11 meV. This topologically nontrivial band gap at the Fermi level is due to its crystal symmetry, thus the QAH effect is robust. Its Curie temperature, estimated to be ~360 K using Monte-Carlo simulation, is above room temperature and higher than most of two-dimensional ferromagnetic thin films. We also discuss the manipulation of its exchange energy and nontrivial band gap by applying in-plane strain. Our wor...

  1. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in stanene on a nonmagnetic substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huisheng; Zhou, Tong; Zhang, Jiayong; Zhao, Bao; Yao, Yugui; Yang, Zhongqin

    2016-12-01

    Since the quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect was realized in magnetic topological insulators, research on the effect has become a hot topic. The very harsh realizing requirements of the effect in experiments, however, hinder its practical applications. Based on ab initio methods, we find that nonmagnetic Pb I2 films are ideal substrates for the two-dimensional honeycomb stanene. The QAH effect with a pretty large band gap (up to 90 meV) can be achieved in the functionalized stanene /Pb I2 heterostructure. Despite van der Waals interactions in the heterostructure, band inversions are found to be happening between Sn (s and px ,y ) and Pb (px ,y) orbitals, playing a key role in determining the nontrivial topology and the large band gap of the system. Having no magnetic atoms is imperative to triggering the QAH effect. A very stable rudimentary device having QAH effects is proposed based on the Sn /Pb I2 heterostructure. Our results demonstrate that QAH effects can be easily realized in the Sn /Pb I2 heterostructures in experiments.

  2. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in ferromagnetic transition metal halides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chengxi; Zhou, Jian; Wu, Haiping; Deng, Kaiming; Jena, Puru; Kan, Erjun

    2017-01-01

    The quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect is a novel topological spintronic phenomenon arising from inherent magnetization and spin-orbit coupling. Various theoretical and experimental efforts have been devoted in search of intrinsic QAH insulators. However, up to now, it has only been observed in Cr or V doped (Bi,Sb ) 2T e3 film in experiments with very low working temperature. Based on the successful synthesis of transition metal halides, we use first-principles calculations to predict that the Ru I3 monolayer is an intrinsic ferromagnetic QAH insulator with a topologically nontrivial global band gap of 11 meV. This topologically nontrivial band gap at the Fermi level is due to its crystal symmetry, thus the QAH effect is robust. Its Curie temperature, estimated to be ˜360 K using Monte Carlo simulation, is above room temperature and higher than most two-dimensional ferromagnetic thin films. The inclusion of Hubbard U in the Ru-d electrons does not affect this result. We also discuss the manipulation of its exchange energy and nontrivial band gap by applying in-plane strain. Our work adds an experimentally feasible member to the QAH insulator family, which is expected to have broad applications in nanoelectronics and spintronics.

  3. Collisional quantum interference on rotational energy transfer: physical interpretation of the differential interference angle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yong-Qing; Li Jian; Ma Feng-Cai

    2006-01-01

    Collisional quantum interference (CQI) on the intramolecular rotational energy transfer is observed in an experiment with a static cell, and the integral interference angles are measured. To obtain more accurate information, an experiment with a molecular beam is carried out, and thereby the relationship between the differential interference angle and the scattering angle is obtained. Based on the first-Born approximation of time-dependent perturbation theory,the theoretical model of CQI is developed in an atom-diatom system in the condition of the molecular beam, with the long-range interaction potential taken into account. The method of measuring correctly the differential interference angle is presented. The tendencies of the differential interference angle changing with the impact parameter and relative velocity are discussed. The theoretical model presented here is important for understanding or performing the experiment in the molecular beam.

  4. Quantum Physics A First Encounter Interference, Entanglement, and Reality

    CERN Document Server

    Scarani, Valerio

    2006-01-01

    The essential features of quantum physics, largely debated since its discovery, are presented in this book, through the description (without mathematics) of recent experiments. Putting the accent on physical phenomena, this book clarifies the historical issues (delocalisation, interferences) and reaches out to modern topics (quantum cryptography, non-locality and teleportation); the debate on interpretations is serenely reviewed. - ;Quantum physics is often perceived as a weird and abstract theory, which physicists must use in order to make correct predictions. But many recent experiments have shown that the weirdness of the theory simply mirrors the weirdness of phenomena: it is Nature itself, and not only our description of it, that behaves in an astonishing way. This book selects those, among these typical quantum phenomena, whose rigorous description requires neither the formalism, nor an important. background in physics. The first part of the book deals with the phenomenon of single-particle interference...

  5. Observation of quantum interference between separated mechanical oscillator wavepackets

    CERN Document Server

    Kienzler, D; Negnevitsky, V; Lo, H -Y; Marinelli, M; Nadlinger, D; Home, J P

    2015-01-01

    The ability of matter to be superposed at two different locations while being intrinsically connected by a quantum phase is among the most counterintuitive predictions of quantum physics. While such superpositions have been created for a variety of systems, the in-situ observation of the phase coherence has remained out of reach. Using a heralding measurement on a spin-oscillator entangled state, we project a mechanical trapped-ion oscillator into a superposition of two spatially separated states, a situation analogous to Schr\\"odinger's cat. Quantum interference is clearly observed by extracting the occupations of the energy levels. For larger states, we encounter problems in measuring the energy distribution, which we overcome by performing the analogous measurement in a squeezed Fock basis with each basis element stretched along the separation axis. Using 8 dB of squeezing we observe quantum interference for cat states with phase space separations of $\\Delta \\alpha = 15.6$, corresponding to wavepackets wit...

  6. Quantum Interference in Cognition: Structural Aspects of the Brain

    CERN Document Server

    Aerts, Diederik

    2012-01-01

    We identify the presence of typically quantum effects, namely 'superposition' and 'interference', in what happens when human concepts are combined, and provide a quantum model in complex Hilbert space that represents faithfully experimental data measuring the situation of combining concepts. Our model shows how 'interference of concepts' explains the effects of underextension and overextension when two concepts combine to the disjunction of these two concepts. This result supports our earlier hypothesis that human thought has a superposed two-layered structure, one layer consisting of 'classical logical thought' and a superposed layer consisting of 'quantum conceptual thought'. Possible connections with recent findings of a 'grid-structure' for the brain are analyzed, and influences on the mind/brain relation, and consequences on applied disciplines, such as artificial intelligence and quantum computation, are considered.

  7. Quantum superposition counterintuitive consequences of coherence, entanglement, and interference

    CERN Document Server

    Silverman, M P

    2007-01-01

    Coherence, entanglement, and interference arise from quantum superposition, the most distinctive and puzzling feature of quantum physics. Silverman, whose extensive experimental and theoretical work has helped elucidate these processes, presents a clear and engaging discussion of the role of quantum superposition in diverse quantum phenomena such as the wavelike nature of particle propagation, indistinguishability of identical particles, nonlocal interactions of correlated particles, topological effects of magnetic fields, and chiral asymmetry in nature. He also examines how macroscopic quantum coherence may be able to extricate physics from its most challenging quandary, the collapse of a massive degenerate star to a singularity in space in which the laws of physics break down. Explained by a physicist with a concern for clarity and experimental achievability, the extraordinary nature of quantum superposition will fascinate the reader not only for its apparent strangeness, but also for its comprehensibility.

  8. Unruh effect and macroscopic quantum interference

    CERN Document Server

    Steane, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the influence of Unruh radiation on matter-wave interferometry experiments using neutral objects modeled as dielectric spheres. The Unruh effect leads to a loss of coherence through momentum diffusion. This is a fundamental source of decoherence that affects all objects having electromagnetic interactions. However, the effect is not large enough to prevent the observation of interference for objects of any size, even when the path separation is larger than the size of the object. When the acceleration in the interferometer arms is large, inertial tidal forces will disrupt the material integrity of the interfering objects before the Unruh decoherence of the centre of mass motion is sufficient to prevent observable interference.

  9. Quantum interferences reconstruction with low homodyne detection efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esposito, Martina; Randi, Francesco [Universita degli studi di Trieste, Dipartimento di Fisica, Trieste (Italy); Titimbo, Kelvin; Zimmermann, Klaus; Benatti, Fabio [Universita degli studi di Trieste, Dipartimento di Fisica, Trieste (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Kourousias, Georgios; Curri, Alessio [Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Trieste (Italy); Floreanini, Roberto [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Parmigiani, Fulvio [Universita degli studi di Trieste, Dipartimento di Fisica, Trieste (Italy); Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Trieste (Italy); University of Cologne, Institute of Physics II, Cologne (Germany); Fausti, Daniele [Universita degli studi di Trieste, Dipartimento di Fisica, Trieste (Italy); Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Trieste (Italy)

    2016-12-15

    Optical homodyne tomography consists in reconstructing the quantum state of an optical field from repeated measurements of its amplitude at different field phases (homodyne data). The experimental noise, which unavoidably affects the homodyne data, leads to a detection efficiency η<1. The problem of reconstructing quantum states from noisy homodyne data sets prompted an intense scientific debate about the presence or absence of a lower homodyne efficiency bound (η>0.5) below which quantum features, like quantum interferences, cannot be retrieved. Here, by numerical experiments, we demonstrate that quantum interferences can be effectively reconstructed also for low homodyne detection efficiency. In particular, we address the challenging case of a Schroedinger cat state and test the minimax and adaptive Wigner function reconstruction technique by processing homodyne data distributed according to the chosen state but with an efficiency η>0.5. By numerically reproducing the Schroedinger's cat interference pattern, we give evidence that quantum state reconstruction is actually possible in these conditions, and provide a guideline for handling optical tomography based on homodyne data collected by low efficiency detectors. (orig.)

  10. Observation of the Zero Hall Plateau in a Quantum Anomalous Hall Insulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Yang; Feng, Xiao; Ou, Yunbo; Wang, Jing; Liu, Chang; Zhang, Liguo; Zhao, Dongyang; Jiang, Gaoyuan; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; He, Ke; Ma, Xucun; Xue, Qi-Kun; Wang, Yayu

    2015-09-16

    We report experimental investigations on the quantum phase transition between the two opposite Hall plateaus of a quantum anomalous Hall insulator. We observe a well-defined plateau with zero Hall conductivity over a range of magnetic field around coercivity when the magnetization reverses. The features of the zero Hall plateau are shown to be closely related to that of the quantum anomalous Hall effect, but its temperature evolution exhibits a significant difference from the network model for a conventional quantum Hall plateau transition. We propose that the chiral edge states residing at the magnetic domain boundaries, which are unique to a quantum anomalous Hall insulator, are responsible for the novel features of the zero Hall plateau.

  11. Observation of quantum interference in molecular charge transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guedon, Constant M.; Valkenier, Hennie; Markussen, Troels

    2012-01-01

    , phenomena such as giant magnetoresistance(5), Kondo effects(6) and conductance switching(7-11) have been observed in single molecules, and theorists have predicted that it should also be possible to observe quantum interference in molecular conductors(12-18), but until now all the evidence...

  12. Dimerous Electron and Quantum Interference beyond the Probability Amplitude Paradigm

    CERN Document Server

    Kassandrov, Vladimir V

    2011-01-01

    We generalize the formerly proposed relationship between a special complex geometry (originating from the structure of biquaternion algebra) and induced real geometry of (extended) space-time. The primordial dynamics in complex space allows for a new realization of the "one electron Universe" of Wheeler-Feynman (the so called "ensemble of duplicons") and leads to a radical concept of "dimerous" (consisting of two identical matter pre-elements, "duplicons") electron. Using this concept, together with an additional phase-like invariant (arising from the complex pre-geometry), we manage to give a visual classical explanation for quantum interference phenomena and, in particular, for the canonical two-slit experiment. Fundamental relativistic condition of quantum interference generalizing the de Broglie relationship is obtained, and an experimentally verifiable distinction in predictions of quantum theory and presented algebrodynamical scheme is established.

  13. The differential interference angle in collisional quantum interference on rotational energy transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Wei-Li; Miao Gang; Chen Yue-Hui; Tang Dan; Ma Feng-Cai

    2008-01-01

    Collisional quantum interference (CQI) in the intramolecular rotational energy transfer was observed in experiment by Sha and co-workers.[1] The interference angle, which measuring the degree of the coherence, were measured in the experiment of the static cell. Based on the first Born approximation of time dependent perturbation theory, taking into accounts the anisotropic Lennard-Jones interaction potentials, this paper describes the theoretical model of CQI in intramolecular rotational energy transfer in an atom-diatom collision system. In the model, the differential interference angle for the experiment of the molecular beam is calculated, the changing tendencies of the differential interference angle with the impact parameter and collision partners are obtained. This theoretical model is important for understanding or performing this kind of experiments.

  14. Magnetic Topological Insulators and Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Xufeng

    The engineering of topological surface states is a key to realize applicable devices based on topological insulators (TIs). Among various proposals, introducing magnetic impurities into TIs has been proven to be an effective way to open a surface gap and integrate additional ferromagnetism with the original topological order. In this Dissertation, we study both the intrinsic electrical and magnetic properties of the magnetic TI thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy. By doping transition element Cr into the host tetradymite-type V-VI semiconductors, we achieve robust ferromagnetic order with a strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. With additional top-gating capability, we realize the electric-field-controlled ferromagnetism in the magnetic TI systems, and demonstrate such magneto-electric effects can be effectively manipulated, depending on the interplays between the band topology, magnetic exchange coupling, and structural engineering. Most significantly, we report the observation of quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) in the Cr-doped (BiSb)2Te3 samples where dissipationless chiral edge conduction is realized in the macroscopic millimeter-size devices without the presence of any external magnetic field, and the stability of the quantized Hall conductance of e2/h is well-maintained as the film thickness varies across the 2D hybridization limit. With additional quantum confinement, we discover the metal-to-insulator switching between two opposite QAHE states, and reveal the universal QAHE phase diagram in the thin magnetic TI samples. In addition to the uniform magnetic TIs, we further investigate the TI/Cr-doped TI bilayer structures prepared by the modulation-doped growth method. By controlling the magnetic interaction profile, we observe the Dirac hole-mediated ferromagnetism and develop an effective way to manipulate its strength. Besides, the giant spin-orbit torque in such magnetic TI-based heterostructures enables us to demonstrate the current

  15. Quantum interference in a thermal bath

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anisimov, Alexey [Bielefeld Univ. (Germany). Fakultaet fuer Physik; Buchmueller, Wilfried; Mendizabal, Sebastian [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Drewes, Marco [Inst. de Theorie des Phenomenes Physiques EPFL, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2010-01-15

    Thermal leptogenesis explains the observed matter-antimatter asymmetry of the universe in terms of neutrino masses, consistent with neutrino oscillation experiments. We present a full quantum mechanical calculation of the generated lepton asymmetry based on Kadanoff-Baym equations. Origin of the asymmetry is the departure of the statistical propagator of the heavy Majorana neutrino from the equilibrium propagator, together with CP violating couplings. The lepton asymmetry is calculated directly in terms of Green's functions without referring to 'number densities'. A detailed comparison with Boltzmann equations shows that conventional leptogenesis calculations have an uncertainty of at least one order of magnitude. (orig.)

  16. Dissipative time-dependent quantum transport theory: Quantum interference and phonon induced decoherence dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Yam, ChiYung; Chen, GuanHua

    2015-04-28

    A time-dependent inelastic electron transport theory for strong electron-phonon interaction is established via the equations of motion method combined with the small polaron transformation. In this work, the dissipation via electron-phonon coupling is taken into account in the strong coupling regime, which validates the small polaron transformation. The corresponding equations of motion are developed, which are used to study the quantum interference effect and phonon-induced decoherence dynamics in molecular junctions. Numerical studies show clearly quantum interference effect of the transport electrons through two quasi-degenerate states with different couplings to the leads. We also found that the quantum interference can be suppressed by the electron-phonon interaction where the phase coherence is destroyed by phonon scattering. This indicates the importance of electron-phonon interaction in systems with prominent quantum interference effect.

  17. Dissipative time-dependent quantum transport theory: Quantum interference and phonon induced decoherence dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yu, E-mail: zhy@yangtze.hku.hk; Chen, GuanHua, E-mail: ghc@everest.hku.hk [Department of Chemistry, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong (China); Yam, ChiYung [Department of Chemistry, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong (China); Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2015-04-28

    A time-dependent inelastic electron transport theory for strong electron-phonon interaction is established via the equations of motion method combined with the small polaron transformation. In this work, the dissipation via electron-phonon coupling is taken into account in the strong coupling regime, which validates the small polaron transformation. The corresponding equations of motion are developed, which are used to study the quantum interference effect and phonon-induced decoherence dynamics in molecular junctions. Numerical studies show clearly quantum interference effect of the transport electrons through two quasi-degenerate states with different couplings to the leads. We also found that the quantum interference can be suppressed by the electron-phonon interaction where the phase coherence is destroyed by phonon scattering. This indicates the importance of electron-phonon interaction in systems with prominent quantum interference effect.

  18. Two-photon quantum interference in plasmonics: theory and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S Dutta; Agarwal, G S

    2014-01-15

    We report perfect two-photon quantum interference with near-unity visibility in a resonant tunneling plasmonic structure in folded Kretschmann geometry. This is despite absorption-induced loss of unitarity in plasmonic systems. The effect is traced to perfect destructive interference between the squares of amplitude reflection and transmission coefficients. We further highlight yet another remarkable potential of coincidence measurements as a probe with better resolution as compared to standard spectroscopic techniques. The finer features show up in both angle resolved and frequency resolved studies.

  19. Cooling atomic motion with quantum interference

    CERN Document Server

    Morigi, G

    2002-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the quantum dynamics of the center of mass of trapped atoms, whose internal degrees of freedom are driven in a $\\Lambda$-shaped configuration with the lasers tuned at two-photon resonance. In the Lamb-Dicke regime, when the motional wave packet is well localized over the laser wavelenght, transient coherent population trapping occurs, cancelling transitions at the laser frequency. In this limit the motion can be efficiently cooled to the ground state of the trapping potential. We derive an equation for the center-of-mass motion by adiabatically eliminating the internal degrees of freedom. This treatment provides the theoretical background of the scheme presented in [G. Morigi {\\it et al}, Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 85}, 4458 (2000)] and implemented in [C.F. Roos {\\it et al}, Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 85}, 5547 (2000)]. We discuss the physical mechanisms determining the dynamics and identify new parameters regimes, where cooling is efficient. We discuss implementations of the scheme to case...

  20. Directly Measuring the Degree of Quantum Coherence using Interference Fringes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Tao; Tang, Jian-Shun; Wei, Zhi-Yuan; Yu, Shang; Ke, Zhi-Jin; Xu, Xiao-Ye; Li, Chuan-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can

    2017-01-01

    Quantum coherence is the most distinguished feature of quantum mechanics. It lies at the heart of the quantum-information technologies as the fundamental resource and is also related to other quantum resources, including entanglement. It plays a critical role in various fields, even in biology. Nevertheless, the rigorous and systematic resource-theoretic framework of coherence has just been developed recently, and several coherence measures are proposed. Experimentally, the usual method to measure coherence is to perform state tomography and use mathematical expressions. Here, we alternatively develop a method to measure coherence directly using its most essential behavior—the interference fringes. The ancilla states are mixed into the target state with various ratios, and the minimal ratio that makes the interference fringes of the "mixed state" vanish is taken as the quantity of coherence. We also use the witness observable to witness coherence, and the optimal witness constitutes another direct method to measure coherence. For comparison, we perform tomography and calculate l1 norm of coherence, which coincides with the results of the other two methods in our situation. Our methods are explicit and robust, providing a nice alternative to the tomographic technique.

  1. Spatially resolving valley quantum interference of a donor in silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salfi, J; Mol, J A; Rahman, R; Klimeck, G; Simmons, M Y; Hollenberg, L C L; Rogge, S

    2014-06-01

    Electron and nuclear spins of donor ensembles in isotopically pure silicon experience a vacuum-like environment, giving them extraordinary coherence. However, in contrast to a real vacuum, electrons in silicon occupy quantum superpositions of valleys in momentum space. Addressable single-qubit and two-qubit operations in silicon require that qubits are placed near interfaces, modifying the valley degrees of freedom associated with these quantum superpositions and strongly influencing qubit relaxation and exchange processes. Yet to date, spectroscopic measurements have only probed wavefunctions indirectly, preventing direct experimental access to valley population, donor position and environment. Here we directly probe the probability density of single quantum states of individual subsurface donors, in real space and reciprocal space, using scanning tunnelling spectroscopy. We directly observe quantum mechanical valley interference patterns associated with linear superpositions of valleys in the donor ground state. The valley population is found to be within 5% of a bulk donor when 2.85 ± 0.45 nm from the interface, indicating that valley-perturbation-induced enhancement of spin relaxation will be negligible for depths greater than 3 nm. The observed valley interference will render two-qubit exchange gates sensitive to atomic-scale variations in positions of subsurface donors. Moreover, these results will also be of interest for emerging schemes proposing to encode information directly in valley polarization.

  2. Tunable quantum interference in a 3D integrated circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaboyer, Zachary; Meany, Thomas; Helt, L G; Withford, Michael J; Steel, M J

    2015-04-27

    Integrated photonics promises solutions to questions of stability, complexity, and size in quantum optics. Advances in tunable and non-planar integrated platforms, such as laser-inscribed photonics, continue to bring the realisation of quantum advantages in computation and metrology ever closer, perhaps most easily seen in multi-path interferometry. Here we demonstrate control of two-photon interference in a chip-scale 3D multi-path interferometer, showing a reduced periodicity and enhanced visibility compared to single photon measurements. Observed non-classical visibilities are widely tunable, and explained well by theoretical predictions based on classical measurements. With these predictions we extract Fisher information approaching a theoretical maximum. Our results open a path to quantum enhanced phase measurements.

  3. Holographic duality between $(2+1)$-d quantum anomalous Hall state and $(3+1)$-d topological insulators

    CERN Document Server

    Gu, Yingfei; Wen, Xueda; Cho, Gil Young; Ryu, Shinsei; Qi, Xiao-Liang

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we study $(2+1)$-dimensional quantum anomalous Hall states, i.e. band insulators with quantized Hall conductance, using the exact holographic mapping. The exact holographic mapping is an approach to holographic duality which maps the quantum anomalous Hall state to a different state living in $(3+1)$-dimensional hyperbolic space. By studying topological response properties and the entanglement spectrum, we demonstrate that the holographic dual theory of a quantum anomalous Hall state is a $(3+1)$-dimensional topological insulator. The dual description enables a new characterization of topological properties of a system by the quantum entanglement between degrees of freedom at different length scales.

  4. Quantum interference in an asymmetric Mach-Zehnder interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenti, A.; Borghi, M.; Mancinelli, M.; Price, H. M.; Fontana, G.; Pavesi, L.

    2016-08-01

    A re-visitation of the well known free space Mach-Zehnder interferometer is reported here. The coexistence between one-photon and two-photons interference from collinear color entangled photon pairs is investigated. Thisarises from an arbitrarily small unbalance in the arm transmittance. The tuning of such asymmetry is reflected in dramatic changes in the coincidence detection, revealing beatings between one particle and two particle interference patterns. In particular, the role of the losses and of the intrinsic phase imperfectness of the lossy beamsplitter are explored in a single-port excited Mach-Zehnder interferometer. This configuration is especially useful for quantum optics on a chip, where the guiding geometry forces photons to travel in the same spatial mode.

  5. Improved superconducting quantum interference devices by resistance asymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, G.; Pagano, S.; Sarnelli, E.; Calidonna, C. R.; Furnari, M. Mango

    2001-10-01

    Direct current superconducting quantum interference devices made by Josephson junctions with asymmetric shunt resistances have been numerically investigated in the low temperature regime. When combined with a damping resistance, the asymmetry leads to a flux to voltage transfer coefficient several times larger than the one typical of symmetric devices, together with a lower magnetic flux noise. These results show that this type of asymmetric device may replace the standard ones in a large number of magnetometric applications, improving the sensitivity performance. The large transfer coefficient may also simplify the readout electronics allowing a direct coupling of asymmetric devices to an external preamplifier, without the need of an impedance matching flux transformer.

  6. Observation of the Quantum Anomalous Hall Insulator to Anderson Insulator Quantum Phase Transition and its Scaling Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Cui-Zu; Zhao, Weiwei; Li, Jian; Jain, J. K.; Liu, Chaoxing; Moodera, Jagadeesh S.; Chan, Moses H. W.

    2016-09-01

    Fundamental insight into the nature of the quantum phase transition from a superconductor to an insulator in two dimensions, or from one plateau to the next or to an insulator in the quantum Hall effect, has been revealed through the study of its scaling behavior. Here, we report on the experimental observation of a quantum phase transition from a quantum-anomalous-Hall insulator to an Anderson insulator in a magnetic topological insulator by tuning the chemical potential. Our experiment demonstrates the existence of scaling behavior from which we extract the critical exponent for this quantum phase transition. We expect that our work will motivate much further investigation of many properties of quantum phase transition in this new context.

  7. Quantum anomalous Hall effect and tunable topological states in 3d transition metals doped silicene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Long; Liu, Lan-Feng; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2013-10-09

    Silicene is an intriguing 2D topological material which is closely analogous to graphene but with stronger spin orbit coupling effect and natural compatibility with current silicon-based electronics industry. Here we demonstrate that silicene decorated with certain 3d transition metals (Vanadium) can sustain a stable quantum anomalous Hall effect using both analytical model and first-principles Wannier interpolation. We also predict the quantum valley Hall effect and electrically tunable topological states could be realized in certain transition metal doped silicene where the energy band inversion occurs. Our findings provide new scheme for the realization of quantum anomalous Hall effect and platform for electrically controllable topological states which are highly desirable for future nanoelectronics and spintronics application.

  8. On the quantum mechanics of consciousness, with application to anomalous phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, Robert G.; Dunne, Brenda J.

    1986-08-01

    Theoretical explication of a growing body of empirical data on consciousness-related anomalous phenomena is unlikely to be achieved in terms of known physical processes. Rather, it will first be necessary to formulate the basic role of consciousness in the definition of reality before such anomalous experience can adequately be represented. This paper takes the position that reality is constituted only in the interaction of consciousness with its environment, and therefore that any scheme of conceptual organization developed to represent that reality must reflect the processes of consciousness as well as those of its environment. In this spirit, the concepts and formalisms of elementary quantum mechanics, as originally proposed to explain anomalous atomic-scale physical phenomena, are appropriated via metaphor to represent the general characteristics of consciousness interacting with any environment. More specifically, if consciousness is represented by a quantum mechanical wave function, and its environment by an appropriate potential profile, Schrödinger wave mechanics defines eigenfunctions and eigenvalues that can be associated with the cognitive and emotional experiences of that consciousness in that environment. To articulate this metaphor it is necessary to associate certain aspects of the formalism, such as the coordinate system, the quantum numbers, and even the metric itself, with various impressionistic descriptors of consciousness, such as its intensity, perspective, approach/avoidance attitude, balance between cognitive and emotional activity, and receptive/assertive disposition. With these established, a number of the generic features of quantum mechanics, such as the wave/particle duality, and the uncertainty, indistinguishability, and exclusion principles, display metaphoric relevance to familiar individual and collective experiences. Similarly, such traditional quantum theoretic exercises as the central force field and atomic structure, covalent

  9. Multilayer MgB2 superconducting quantum interference filter magnetometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galan, Elias; Melbourne, Thomas; Davidson, Bruce A.; Xi, X. X.; Chen, Ke

    2016-04-01

    We report two types of all-MgB2 superconductive quantum interference filter (SQIF) magnetometers that can measure absolute magnetic fields with high sensitivity. In one configuration, the SQIFs were made of 20 multilayer nonplanar all-MgB2 superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) connected in parallel with loop areas ranging in size from 0.4 to 3.6 μm2. These devices are sensitive to magnetic fields parallel to the substrate and show a single antipeak from 3 to 16 K with a maximum transfer function of ˜16 V/T at 3 K and a field noise of ˜110 pT/Hz1/2 above 100 Hz at 10 K. In a second configuration, the SQIFs were made with 16 planar SQUIDs connected in parallel with loop areas ranging in size from 4 μm2 to 25 μm2 and are sensitive to the magnetic fields perpendicular to the substrate. The planar SQIF shows a single antipeak from 10 to 22 K with a maximum transfer function of 7800 V/T at 10 K and a field noise of ˜70 pT/Hz1/2 above 100 Hz at 20 K.

  10. Real-time single-molecule imaging of quantum interference

    CERN Document Server

    Juffmann, Thomas; Müllneritsch, Michael; Asenbaum, Peter; Tsukernik, Alexander; Tüxen, Jens; Mayor, Marcel; Cheshnovsky, Ori; Arndt, Markus

    2014-01-01

    The observation of interference patterns in double-slit experiments with massive particles is generally regarded as the ultimate demonstration of the quantum nature of these objects. Such matter-wave interference has been observed for electrons, neutrons, atoms and molecules and it differs from classical wave-physics in that it can even be observed when single particles arrive at the detector one by one. The build-up of such patterns in experiments with electrons has been described as the "most beautiful experiment in physics". Here we show how a combination of nanofabrication and nanoimaging methods allows us to record the full two-dimensional build-up of quantum diffraction patterns in real-time for phthalocyanine molecules PcH2 and their tailored derivatives F24PcH2 with a mass of 1298 amu. A laser-controlled micro-evaporation source was used to produce a beam of molecules with the required intensity and coherence and the gratings were machined in 10 nm thick silicon nitride membranes to reduce the effect ...

  11. Photocurrent Control in a Magnetic Field through Quantum Interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Kiran Murti

    Quantum-mechanical interference between excitation pathways can be used to inject photocurrents optically in semiconductors, the properties of which can be coherently controlled through the phases and polarizations of the optical pulses. In this thesis, coherent photocurrent control is investigated theoretically for two-dimensional semiconductor systems in a perpendicular magnetic field. The semiconductor systems are subjected to optical pulses with centre frequencies o 0 and 2o0, which excite interband transitions through one- and two-photon processes, selection rules for which are determined from envelope wave functions. It is shown using time-dependent perturbation theory that the interference between one- and two-photon pathways connecting a particular valence Landau level to two different but adjacent conduction Landau levels manifests itself as electron currents that rotate counterclockwise, while interference between pathways connecting two adjacent valence Landau levels to a particular conduction Landau level manifests itself as hole currents that rotate clockwise. The initial directions of the currents can be controlled by adjusting the polarizations and a relative phase parameter of the pulses. The analysis is performed for a GaAs quantum well, monolayer graphene and bilayer graphene. For GaAs, the equally spaced Landau levels in each band lead to electron currents rotating at a single frequency and hole currents rotating at a different frequency. Monolayer and bilayer graphene allow currents with multiple frequency components as well as other peculiarities resulting from additional interference processes not present for GaAs. The photocurrents in all of these systems radiate in the terahertz regime. This radiation is calculated for realistic experimental conditions, with scattering and relaxation processes accounted for phenomenologically. Finally, the effect of Coulomb interactions on the coherent control process is considered for an undoped Ga

  12. Anomalous phase shift in a twisted quantum loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taira, Hisao [Division of Applied Physics, Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan); Shima, Hiroyuki, E-mail: taira@eng.hokudai.ac.j [Department of Applied Mathematics 3, LaCaN, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya (UPC), Barcelona 08034 (Spain)

    2010-09-03

    The coherent motion of electrons in a twisted quantum ring is considered to explore the effect of torsion inherent to the ring. Internal torsion of the ring composed of helical atomic configuration yields a non-trivial quantum phase shift in the electrons' eigenstates. This torsion-induced phase shift causes novel kinds of persistent current flow and an Aharonov-Bohm-like conductance oscillation. The two phenomena can occur even when no magnetic flux penetrates inside the twisted ring, thus being in complete contrast with the counterparts observed in untwisted rings.

  13. Prediction of near-room-temperature quantum anomalous Hall effect on honeycomb materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shu-Chun; Shan, Guangcun; Yan, Binghai

    2014-12-19

    Recently, the long-sough quantum anomalous Hall effect was realized in a magnetic topological insulator. However, the requirement of an extremely low temperature (approximately 30 mK) hinders realistic applications. Based on ab initio band structure calculations, we propose a quantum anomalous Hall platform with a large energy gap of 0.34 and 0.06 eV on honeycomb lattices comprised of Sn and Ge, respectively. The ferromagnetic (FM) order forms in one sublattice of the honeycomb structure by controlling the surface functionalization rather than dilute magnetic doping, which is expected to be visualized by spin polarized STM in experiment. Strong coupling between the inherent quantum spin Hall state and ferromagnetism results in considerable exchange splitting and, consequently, an FM insulator with a large energy gap. The estimated mean-field Curie temperature is 243 and 509 K for Sn and Ge lattices, respectively. The large energy gap and high Curie temperature indicate the feasibility of the quantum anomalous Hall effect in the near-room-temperature and even room-temperature regions.

  14. Scaling of anomalous hall effect in amorphous CoFeB Films with accompanying quantum correction

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yan

    2015-05-08

    Scaling of anomalous Hall effect in amorphous CoFeB films with thickness ranging from 2 to 160 nm have been investigated. We have found that the scaling relationship between longitudinal (ρxx) and anomalous Hall (ρAH) resistivity is distinctly different in the Bloch and localization regions. For ultrathin CoFeB films, the sheet resistance (Rxx) and anomalous Hall conductance (GAH) received quantum correction from electron localization showing two different scaling relationships at different temperature regions. In contrast, the thicker films show a metallic conductance, which have only one scaling relationship in the entire temperature range. Furthermore, in the dirty regime of localization regions, an unconventional scaling relationship View the MathML sourceσAH∝σxxα with α=1.99 is found, rather than α=1.60 predicted by the unified theory.

  15. Anomalous Behaviour of the Spectra in Young's Double-Slit Interference Experiments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PU Ji-Xiong; CAI Chao

    2004-01-01

    It is shown that an anomaly of the spectrum takes place in the interference field when Young's double-slit interference experiment is illuminated by spatially coherent polychromatic light. Specifically, drastic spectral changes (i.e. the spectral shifts exhibit a rapid transition) occur in the vicinity of the dark fringes. The potential applications of this spectral anomaly are also considered.

  16. Anomalous Quantum Hall Effect of 4D Graphene in Background Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Drissi, L B; Saidi, E H

    2011-01-01

    Bori\\c{c}i-Creutz (BC) model describing the dynamics of light quarks in lattice QCD has been shown to be intimately linked to the four dimensional extension of 2D graphene refereed below to as four dimensional graphene (4D- graphene). Borrowing ideas from the field theory description of the usual 2D graphene, we study in this paper the anomalous quantum Hall effect (AQHE) of the BC fermions in presence of a constant background electromagnetic field strength F_{{\\mu}{\

  17. Phase sensitive quantum interference on forbidden transition in ladder scheme

    CERN Document Server

    Koganov, Gennady A

    2014-01-01

    A three level ladder system is analyzed and the coherence of initially electric-dipole forbidden transition is calculated. Due to the presence of two laser fields the initially dipole forbidden transition becomes dynamically permitted due to ac Stark effect. It is shown that such transitions exhibit quantum-interference-related phenomena, such as electromagnetically induced transparency, gain without inversion and enhanced refractive index. Gain and dispersion characteristics of such transitions strongly depend upon the relative phase between the driving and the probe fields. Unlike allowed transitions, gain/absorption behavior of ac-Stark allowed transitions exhibit antisymmetric feature on the Rabi sidebands. It is found that absorption/gain spectra possess extremely narrow sub-natural resonances on these ac Stark allowed forbidden transitions. An interesting finding is simultaneous existence of gain and negative dispersion at Autler-Townes transition which may lead to both reduction of the group velocity a...

  18. Micron size superconducting quantum interference devices of lead (Pb)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Sagar; Biswas, Sourav; Gupta, Anjan K.

    2017-02-01

    Micron size superconducting quantum interference devices (μ-SQUID) of lead (Pb), for probing nano-magnetism, were fabricated and characterized. In order to get continuous Pb films with small grain size, Pb was thermally evaporated on a liquid nitrogen cooled Si substrate. Pb was sandwiched between two thin Cr layers for improved adhesion and protection. The SQUID pattern was made by e-beam lithography with Pb lift-off after deposition. The current-voltage characteristics of these devices show a critical current, which exhibits the expected SQUID oscillations with magnetic field, and two re-trapping currents. As a result these devices have hysteresis at low temperatures, which disappears just below the critical temperature.

  19. 1D Josephson quantum interference grids: diffraction patterns and dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucci, M.; Badoni, D.; Corato, V.; Merlo, V.; Ottaviani, I.; Salina, G.; Cirillo, M.; Ustinov, A. V.; Winkler, D.

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the magnetic response of transmission lines with embedded Josephson junctions and thus generating a 1D underdamped array. The measured multi-junction interference patterns are compared with the theoretical predictions for Josephson supercurrent modulations when an external magnetic field couples both to the inter-junction loops and to the junctions themselves. The results provide a striking example of the analogy between Josephson phase modulation and 1D optical diffraction grid. The Fiske resonances in the current-voltage characteristics with voltage spacing {Φ0}≤ft(\\frac{{\\bar{c}}}{2L}\\right) , where L is the total physical length of the array, {Φ0} the magnetic flux quantum and \\bar{c} the speed of light in the transmission line, demonstrate that the discrete line supports stable dynamic patterns generated by the ac Josephson effect interacting with the cavity modes of the line.

  20. An electro-optic waveform interconnect based on quantum interference

    CERN Document Server

    Qin, Li-Guo; Gong, Shang-Qing

    2016-01-01

    The ability to modulate an optical field via an electric field is regarded as a key function of electro-optic interconnects, which are used in optical communications and information processing systems. One of the main required devices for such interconnects is the electro-optic modulator (EOM). Current EOM based on the electro-optic effect and the electro-absorption effect often is bulky and power inefficient due to the weak electro-optic properties of its constituent materials. Here we propose a new mechanism to produce an arbitrary-waveform EOM based on the quantum interference, in which both the real and imaginary parts of the susceptibility are engineered coherently with the superhigh efficiency. Based on this EOM, a waveform interconnect from the voltage to the modulated optical absorption is realised. We expect that such a new type of electro-optic interconnect will have a broad range of applications including the optical communications and network.

  1. Anomalously Slow Cross Symmetry Phase Relaxation, Thermalized Non-Equilibrated Matter and Quantum Computing Beyond the Quantum Chaos Border

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.H. Seligman

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Thermalization in highly excited quantum many-body system does not necessarily mean a complete memory loss of the way the system was formed. This effect may pave a way for a quantum computing, with a large number of qubits $nsimeq 100-1000$, far beyond the quantum chaos border. One of the manifestations of such a thermalized non-equilibrated matter is revealed by a strongasymmetry around 90$^circ $ c.m. of evaporating proton yield in the Bi($gamma$,p photonuclear reaction. The effect is described in terms of anomalously slow cross symmetry phase relaxation in highly excited quantum many-body systems withexponentially large Hilbert space dimensions. In the above reaction this phase relaxation is about eight orders of magnitude slower than energy relaxation (thermalization.

  2. Anomalously Slow Cross Symmetry Phase Relaxation, Thermalized Non-Equilibrated Matter and Quantum Computing Beyond the Quantum Chaos Border

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienert, M.; Flores, J.; Kun, S. Yu.; Seligman, T. H.

    2006-02-01

    Thermalization in highly excited quantum many-body system does not necessarily mean a complete memory loss of the way the system was formed. This effect may pave a way for a quantum computing, with a large number of qubits n ≈ 100-1000, far beyond the quantum chaos border. One of the manifestations of such a thermalized non-equilibrated matter is revealed by a strong asymmetry around 90° c.m. of evaporating proton yield in the Bi(γ,p) photonuclear reaction. The effect is described in terms of anomalously slow cross symmetry phase relaxation in highly excited quantum many-body systems with exponentially large Hilbert space dimensions. In the above reaction this phase relaxation is about eight orders of magnitude slower than energy relaxation (thermalization).

  3. Anomalously Slow Cross Symmetry Phase Relaxation, Thermalized Non-Equilibrated Matter and Quantum Computing Beyond the Quantum Chaos Border

    CERN Document Server

    Bienert, M; Kun, S Yu; Seligman, T H

    2006-01-01

    Thermalization in highly excited quantum many-body system does not necessarily mean a complete memory loss of the way the system was formed. This effect may pave a way for a quantum computing, with a large number of qubits $n\\simeq 100$--1000, far beyond the quantum chaos border. One of the manifestations of such a thermalized non-equilibrated matter is revealed by a strong asymmetry around 90$^\\circ $ c.m. of evaporating proton yield in the Bi($\\gamma$,p) photonuclear reaction. The effect is described in terms of anomalously slow cross symmetry phase relaxation in highly excited quantum many-body systems with exponentially large Hilbert space dimensions. In the above reaction this phase relaxation is about eight orders of magnitude slower than energy relaxation (thermalization).

  4. Molecular spintronics: destructive quantum interference controlled by a gate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraiva-Souza, Aldilene; Smeu, Manuel; Zhang, Lei; Souza Filho, Antonio Gomes; Guo, Hong; Ratner, Mark A

    2014-10-22

    The ability to control the spin-transport properties of a molecule bridging conducting electrodes is of paramount importance to molecular spintronics. Quantum interference can play an important role in allowing or forbidding electrons from passing through a system. In this work, the spin-transport properties of a polyacetylene chain bridging zigzag graphene nanoribbons (ZGNRs) are studied with nonequilibrium Green's function calculations performed within the density functional theory framework (NEGF-DFT). ZGNR electrodes have inherent spin polarization along their edges, which causes a splitting between the properties of spin-up and spin-down electrons in these systems. Upon adding an imidazole donor group and a pyridine acceptor group to the polyacetylene chain, this causes destructive interference features in the electron transmission spectrum. Particularly, the donor group causes a large antiresonance dip in transmission at the Fermi energy EF of the electrodes. The application of a gate is investigated and found to provide control over the energy position of this feature making it possible to turn this phenomenon on and off. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of this system are also calculated, showing near ohmic scaling for spin-up but negative differential resistance (NDR) for spin-down.

  5. From magnetically doped topological insulator to the quantum anomalous Hall effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Ke; Ma Xu-Cun; Chen Xi; Lü Li; Wang Ya-Yu; Xue Qi-Kun

    2013-01-01

    Quantum Hall effect (QHE),as a class of quantum phenomena that occur in macroscopic scale,is one of the most important topics in condensed matter physics.It has long been expected that QHE may occur without Landau levels so that neither extemal magnetic field nor high sample mobility is required for its study and application.Such a QHE free of Landau levels,can appear in topological insulators (TIs) with ferromagnetism as the quantized version of the anomalous Hall effect,i.e.,quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect.Here we review our recent work on experimental realization of the QAH effect in magnetically doped TIs.With molecular beam epitaxy,we prepare thin films of Cr-doped (Bi,Sb)2Te3 TIs with wellcontrolled chemical potential and long-range ferromagnetic order that can survive the insulating phase.In such thin films,we eventually observed the quantization of the Hall resistance at h/e2 at zero field,accompanied by a considerable drop in the longitudinal resistance.Under a strong magnetic field,the longitudinal resistance vanishes,whereas the Hall resistance remains at the quantized value.The realization of the QAH effect provides a foundation for many other novel quantum phenomena predicted in TIs,and opens a route to practical applications of quantum Hall physics in low-power-consumption electronics.

  6. Anomalous paths in quantum mechanical path-integrals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimsmo, Arne L., E-mail: arne.grimsmo@ntnu.no [Department of Physics, The Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491 Trondheim (Norway); Department of Physics, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Klauder, John R., E-mail: klauder@phys.ufl.edu [Departments of Physics and Mathematics, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Skagerstam, Bo-Sture K., E-mail: bo-sture.skagerstam@ntnu.no [Department of Physics, The Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491 Trondheim (Norway); Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kohn Hall, University of California at Santa Barbara, CA 93106-4030 (United States); CREOL, The College of Optics and Photonics at the University of Central Florida, 4000 Central Florida Boulevard, Orlando, FL 32816 (United States)

    2013-11-25

    We investigate modifications of the discrete-time lattice action, for a quantum mechanical particle in one spatial dimension, that vanish in the naïve continuum limit but which, nevertheless, induce non-trivial effects due to quantum fluctuations. These effects are seen to modify the geometry of the paths contributing to the path-integral describing the time evolution of the particle, which we investigate through numerical simulations. In particular, we demonstrate the existence of a modified lattice action resulting in paths with any fractal dimension, d{sub f}, between one and two. We argue that d{sub f}=2 is a critical value, and we exhibit a type of lattice modification where the fluctuations in the position of the particle becomes independent of the time step, in which case the paths are interpreted as superdiffusive Lévy flights. We also consider the jaggedness of the paths, and show that this gives an independent classification of lattice theories.

  7. Phase Interference in a Multi-level Quantum-Dot System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xu-Ming; CHEN Xiao-Shuang; LU Wei

    2009-01-01

    @@ Considering phase interference, we investigate coherent transport in a quantum dot by using a thermopower. In the single process of the electronic transport through the quantum dot, it is shown that the phase interference between the levels of a quantum dot is like the Aharonov-Bohm effect. The result indicates that the thermopower is very sensitive to phase interference. It is also found that the phase-difference change of the different levels of the quantum dot can determine the shape of the thermopower.

  8. The Study of Quantum Interference in Metallic Photonic Crystals Doped with Four-Level Quantum Dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatef Ali

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this work, the absorption coefficient of a metallic photonic crystal doped with nanoparticles has been obtained using numerical simulation techniques. The effects of quantum interference and the concentration of doped particles on the absorption coefficient of the system have been investigated. The nanoparticles have been considered as semiconductor quantum dots which behave as a four-level quantum system and are driven by a single coherent laser field. The results show that changing the position of the photonic band gap about the resonant energy of the two lower levels directly affects the decay rate, and the system can be switched between transparent and opaque states if the probe laser field is tuned to the resonance frequency. These results provide an application for metallic nanostructures in the fabrication of new optical switches and photonic devices.

  9. Quantum Interference Induced Photon Blockade in a Coupled Single Quantum Dot-Cavity System

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Jing; Xu, Xiulai

    2015-01-01

    We propose an experimental scheme to implement a strong photon blockade with a single quantum dot coupled to a nanocavity. The photon blockade effect can be tremendously enhanced by driving the cavity and the quantum dot simultaneously with two classical laser fields. This enhancement of photon blockade is ascribed to the quantum interference effect to avoid two-photon excitation of the cavity field. Comparing with Jaynes-Cummings model, the second-order correlation function at zero time delay $g^{(2)}(0)$ in our scheme can be reduced by two orders of magnitude and the system sustains a large intracavity photon number. A red (blue) cavity-light detuning asymmetry for photon quantum statistics with bunching or antibunching characteristics is also observed. The photon blockade effect has a controllable flexibility by tuning the relative phase between the two pumping laser fields and the Rabi coupling strength between the quantum dot and the pumping field. Moreover, the photon blockade scheme based on quantum in...

  10. Theory of Multifarious Quantum Phases and Large Anomalous Hall Effect in Pyrochlore Iridate Thin Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kyusung; Kim, Yong Baek

    2016-07-15

    We theoretically investigate emergent quantum phases in the thin film geometries of the pyrochore iridates, where a number of exotic quantum ground states are proposed to occur in bulk materials as a result of the interplay between electron correlation and strong spin-orbit coupling. The fate of these bulk phases as well as novel quantum states that may arise only in the thin film platforms, are studied via a theoretical model that allows layer-dependent magnetic structures. It is found that the magnetic order develop in inhomogeneous fashions in the thin film geometries. This leads to a variety of magnetic metal phases with modulated magnetic ordering patterns across different layers. Both the bulk and boundary electronic states in these phases conspire to promote unusual electronic properties. In particular, such phases are akin to the Weyl semimetal phase in the bulk system and they would exhibit an unusually large anomalous Hall effect.

  11. Real-time approach to tunnelling in open quantum systems: decoherence and anomalous diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calzetta, Esteban [Departmento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellon I, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Verdaguer, Enric [Departament de Fisica Fonamental and CER en AstrofIsica, Fisica de PartIcules i Cosmologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2006-07-28

    Macroscopic quantum tunnelling is described using the master equation for the reduced Wigner function of an open quantum system at zero temperature. Our model consists of a particle trapped in a cubic potential interacting with an environment characterized by dissipative and normal and anomalous diffusion coefficients. A representation based on the energy eigenfunctions of the isolated system, i.e. the system uncoupled to the environment, is used to write the reduced Wigner function, and the master equation becomes simpler in that representation. The energy eigenfunctions computed in a WKB approximation incorporate the tunnelling effect of the isolated system and the effect of the environment is described by an equation that is in many ways similar to a Fokker-Planck equation. Decoherence is easily identified from the master equation and we find that when the decoherence time is much shorter than the tunnelling time the master equation can be approximated by a Kramers-like equation describing thermal activation due to the zero point fluctuations of the quantum environment. The effect of anomalous diffusion can be dealt with perturbatively and its overall effect is to inhibit tunnelling.

  12. Anomalous Hall effect of heavy holes in Ⅲ-Ⅴ semiconductor quantum wells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Zhi-Gang; Zhang Ping

    2007-01-01

    The anomalous Hall effect of heavy holes in semiconductor quantum wells is studied in the intrinsic transport regime, where the Berry curvature governs the Hall current properties. Based on the first-order perturbation of wave function the expression of the Hall conductivity the same as that from the semiclassical equation of motion of the Bloch particles is derived. The dependence of Hall conductivity on the system parameters is shown. The amplitude of Hall conductivity is found to be balanced by a competition between the Zeeman splitting and the spin-orbit splitting.

  13. Quantum-ring spin interference device tuned by quantum point contacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diago-Cisneros, Leo [Facultad de Física, Universidad de La Habana, C.P.10400, La Habana (Cuba); Mireles, Francisco [Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, C.P. 22800 Ensenada, Baja California, México (Mexico)

    2013-11-21

    We introduce a spin-interference device that comprises a quantum ring (QR) with three embedded quantum point contacts (QPCs) and study theoretically its spin transport properties in the presence of Rashba spin-orbit interaction. Two of the QPCs conform the lead-to-ring junctions while a third one is placed symmetrically in the upper arm of the QR. Using an appropriate scattering model for the QPCs and the S-matrix scattering approach, we analyze the role of the QPCs on the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) and Aharonov-Casher (AC) conductance oscillations of the QR-device. Exact formulas are obtained for the spin-resolved conductances of the QR-device as a function of the confinement of the QPCs and the AB/AC phases. Conditions for the appearance of resonances and anti-resonances in the spin-conductance are derived and discussed. We predict very distinctive variations of the QR-conductance oscillations not seen in previous QR proposals. In particular, we find that the interference pattern in the QR can be manipulated to a large extend by varying electrically the lead-to-ring topological parameters. The latter can be used to modulate the AB and AC phases by applying gate voltage only. We have shown also that the conductance oscillations exhibits a crossover to well-defined resonances as the lateral QPC confinement strength is increased, mapping the eigenenergies of the QR. In addition, unique features of the conductance arise by varying the aperture of the upper-arm QPC and the Rashba spin-orbit coupling. Our results may be of relevance for promising spin-orbitronics devices based on quantum interference mechanisms.

  14. Interference with a quantum dot single-photon source and a laser at telecom wavelength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felle, M. [Toshiba Research Europe Limited, Cambridge Research Laboratory, 208 Cambridge Science Park, Milton Road, Cambridge CB4 0GZ (United Kingdom); Centre for Advanced Photonics and Electronics, University of Cambridge, J.J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom); Huwer, J., E-mail: jan.huwer@crl.toshiba.co.uk; Stevenson, R. M.; Skiba-Szymanska, J.; Ward, M. B.; Shields, A. J. [Toshiba Research Europe Limited, Cambridge Research Laboratory, 208 Cambridge Science Park, Milton Road, Cambridge CB4 0GZ (United Kingdom); Farrer, I.; Ritchie, D. A. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, J.J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Penty, R. V. [Centre for Advanced Photonics and Electronics, University of Cambridge, J.J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-28

    The interference of photons emitted by dissimilar sources is an essential requirement for a wide range of photonic quantum information applications. Many of these applications are in quantum communications and need to operate at standard telecommunication wavelengths to minimize the impact of photon losses and be compatible with existing infrastructure. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the quantum interference of telecom-wavelength photons from an InAs/GaAs quantum dot single-photon source and a laser; an important step towards such applications. The results are in good agreement with a theoretical model, indicating a high degree of indistinguishability for the interfering photons.

  15. Programmable two-photon quantum interference in $10^3$ channels in opaque scattering media

    CERN Document Server

    Wolterink, Tom A W; Ctistis, Georgios; Vos, Willem L; Boller, Klaus -J; Pinkse, Pepijn W H

    2015-01-01

    We investigate two-photon quantum interference in an opaque scattering medium that intrinsically supports $10^6$ transmission channels. By adaptive spatial phase-modulation of the incident wavefronts, the photons are directed at targeted speckle spots or output channels. From $10^3$ experimentally available coupled channels, we select two channels and enhance their transmission, to realize the equivalent of a fully programmable $2\\times2$ beam splitter. By sending pairs of single photons from a parametric down-conversion source through the opaque scattering medium, we observe two-photon quantum interference. The programmed beam splitter need not fulfill energy conservation over the two selected output channels and hence could be non-unitary. Consequently, we have the freedom to tune the quantum interference from bunching (Hong-Ou-Mandel-like) to antibunching. Our results establish opaque scattering media as a platform for high-dimensional quantum interference that is notably relevant for boson sampling and ph...

  16. Programmable two-photon quantum interference in 103 channels in opaque scattering media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolterink, Tom A. W.; Uppu, Ravitej; Ctistis, Georgios; Vos, Willem L.; Boller, Klaus-J.; Pinkse, Pepijn W. H.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate two-photon quantum interference in an opaque scattering medium that intrinsically supports a large number of transmission channels. By adaptive spatial phase modulation of the incident wave fronts, the photons are directed at targeted speckle spots or output channels. From 103 experimentally available coupled channels, we select two channels and enhance their transmission to realize the equivalent of a fully programmable 2 ×2 beam splitter. By sending pairs of single photons from a parametric down-conversion source through the opaque scattering medium, we observe two-photon quantum interference. The programed beam splitter need not fulfill energy conservation over the two selected output channels and hence could be nonunitary. Consequently, we have the freedom to tune the quantum interference from bunching (Hong-Ou-Mandel-like) to antibunching. Our results establish opaque scattering media as a platform for high-dimensional quantum interference that is notably relevant for boson sampling and physical-key-based authentication.

  17. Bosonic Operator Realization of Hamiltonian for a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Hong-Yi

    2004-01-01

    Based on the appropriate bosonic phase operator diagonalized in the entangled state representation we construct the Hamiltonian operator model for a superconducting quantum interference device. The current operator and voltage operator equations are derived.

  18. SQUID detected NMR and NQR. Superconducting Quantum Interference Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustine, M P; TonThat, D M; Clarke, J

    1998-03-01

    The dc Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) is a sensitive detector of magnetic flux, with a typical flux noise of the order 1 muphi0 Hz(-1/2) at liquid helium temperatures. Here phi0 = h/2e is the flux quantum. In our NMR or NQR spectrometer, a niobium wire coil wrapped around the sample is coupled to a thin film superconducting coil deposited on the SQUID to form a flux transformer. With this untuned input circuit the SQUID measures the flux, rather than the rate of change of flux, and thus retains its high sensitivity down to arbitrarily low frequencies. This feature is exploited in a cw spectrometer that monitors the change in the static magnetization of a sample induced by radio frequency irradiation. Examples of this technique are the detection of NQR in 27Al in sapphire and 11B in boron nitride, and a level crossing technique to enhance the signal of 14N in peptides. Research is now focused on a SQUID-based spectrometer for pulsed NQR and NMR, which has a bandwidth of 0-5 MHz. This spectrometer is used with spin-echo techniques to measure the NQR longitudinal and transverse relaxation times of 14N in NH4ClO4, 63+/-6 ms and 22+/-2 ms, respectively. With the aid of two-frequency pulses to excite the 359 kHz and 714 kHz resonances in ruby simultaneously, it is possible to obtain a two-dimensional NQR spectrum. As a third example, the pulsed spectrometer is used to study NMR spectrum of 129Xe after polariza-tion with optically pumped Rb. The NMR line can be detected at frequencies as low as 200 Hz. At fields below about 2 mT the longitudinal relaxation time saturates at about 2000 s. Two recent experiments in other laboratories have extended these pulsed NMR techniques to higher temperatures and smaller samples. In the first, images were obtained of mineral oil floating on water at room temperature. In the second, a SQUID configured as a thin film gradiometer was used to detect NMR in a 50 microm particle of 195Pt at 6 mT and 4.2 K.

  19. A quantum dynamic belief model to explain the interference effects of categorization on decision making

    OpenAIRE

    He, Zichang; Jiang, Wen

    2017-01-01

    Categorization is necessary for many decision making tasks. However, the categorization process may interfere the decision making result and the law of total probability can be violated in some situations. To predict the interference effect of categorization, some model based on quantum probability has been proposed. In this paper, a new quantum dynamic belief (QDB) model is proposed. Considering the precise decision may not be made during the process, the concept of uncertainty is introduced...

  20. Quantum random walks with multiphoton interference and high order correlation functions

    CERN Document Server

    Gard, Bryan T; Anisimov, Petr M; Lee, Hwang; Dowling, Jonathan P

    2011-01-01

    We show a simulation of quantum random walks with multiple photons using a staggered array of 50/50 beam splitters with a bank of detectors at any desired level. We discuss the multiphoton interference effects that are inherent to this setup, and introduce one, two, and threefold coincidence detection schemes. The use of Feynman diagrams are used to intuitively explain the unique multiphoton interference effects of these quantum random walks.

  1. Quantum interference effects at room temperature in OPV-based single-molecule junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arroyo, Carlos R.; Frisenda, Riccardo; Moth-Poulsen, Kasper;

    2013-01-01

    Interference effects on charge transport through an individual molecule can lead to a notable modulation and suppression on its conductance. In this letter, we report the observation of quantum interference effects occurring at room temperature in single-molecule junctions based on oligo(3...

  2. Interaction-induced quantum anomalous Hall phase in bilayers of 3d transition-metal oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yilin; Fang, Zhong; Dai, Xi

    2014-03-01

    In the present paper, we have studied the electronic structure of 3d transition-metal oxide LaCoO3 thin film grown on the [111] surface of SrTiO3. By using first-principles calculation under local density approximation implemented with Gutzwiller variational method (LDA+G), we have studied the bilayer systems of LaCoO3 thin films grown along the [111] direction on SrTiO3. The LDA results show that two nearly flat bands locate at the top and bottom of eg bands of Co atoms, and the Fermi level crosses the lower one, which is almost half-filled. After including both the spin-orbit coupling and the rotational invariant Coulomb interaction in the LDA+G method, we found that the Coulomb interaction will enhance the effective spin-orbit coupling, and a ferromagnetic insulator phase with a gap as large as 0.15 eV will be stabilized. Further calculations indicate that such a ferromagnetic insulator phase will have non zero Chern number one leading to quantum anomalous Hall effect. Increasing Hund's rule coupling in this system will generate a low spin to high spin transition and destroy the quantum anomalous Hall phase.

  3. Molecular internal dynamics studied by quantum path interferences in high order harmonic generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaïr, Amelle, E-mail: azair@imperial.ac.uk [Imperial College London, Department of Physics, Blackett Laboratory Laser Consortium, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Siegel, Thomas; Sukiasyan, Suren; Risoud, Francois; Brugnera, Leonardo; Hutchison, Christopher [Imperial College London, Department of Physics, Blackett Laboratory Laser Consortium, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Diveki, Zsolt; Auguste, Thierry [Service des Photons, Atomes et Molécules, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Tisch, John W.G. [Imperial College London, Department of Physics, Blackett Laboratory Laser Consortium, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Salières, Pascal [Service des Photons, Atomes et Molécules, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Ivanov, Misha Y.; Marangos, Jonathan P. [Imperial College London, Department of Physics, Blackett Laboratory Laser Consortium, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2013-03-12

    Highlights: ► Electronic trajectories in high order harmonic generation encodes attosecond and femtosecond molecular dynamical information. ► The observation of these quantum paths allows us to follow nuclear motion after ionization. ► Quantum paths interference encodes a signature of superposition of ionization channels. ► Quantum paths interference encodes a signature of transfer of population between channels due to laser coupling. ► Quantum paths interference is a promising technique to resolve ultra-fast dynamical processes after ionization. - Abstract: We investigate how short and long electron trajectory contributions to high harmonic emission and their interferences give access to information about intra-molecular dynamics. In the case of unaligned molecules, we show experimental evidence that the long trajectory contribution is more dependent upon the molecular species than the short one, providing a high sensitivity to cation nuclear dynamics from 100’s of as to a few fs after ionisation. Using theoretical approaches based on the strong field approximation and numerical integration of the time dependent Schrödinger equation, we examine how quantum path interferences encode electronic motion when the molecules are aligned. We show that the interferences are dependent upon which ionisation channels are involved and any superposition between them. In particular, quantum path interferences can encode signatures of electron dynamics if the laser field drives a coupling between the channels. Hence, molecular quantum path interferences are a promising method for attosecond spectroscopy, allowing the resolution of ultra-fast charge migration in molecules after ionisation in a self-referenced manner.

  4. Quantum interference and diffraction of parametric down-converted biphotons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ryosuke Shimizu; Keiichi Edamatsu; Tadashi Itoh

    2002-08-01

    We present two-photon diffraction and interference experiments utilizing parametric down-converted photon pairs (biphotons) and a transmission grating. The biphoton exhibits a diffraction-interference pattern equivalent to an effective single particle with half wavelength of the constituent photons.

  5. Computational design of donor-bridge-acceptor systems exhibiting pronounced quantum interference effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorczak, Natalie; Renaud, Nicolas; Galan, Elena; Eelkema, Rienk; Siebbeles, Laurens D A; Grozema, Ferdinand C

    2016-03-01

    Quantum interference is a well-known phenomenon that dictates charge transport properties of single molecule junctions. However, reports on quantum interference in donor-bridge-acceptor molecules are scarce. This might be due to the difficulties in meeting the conditions for the presence of quantum interference in a donor-bridge-acceptor system. The electronic coupling between the donor, bridge, and acceptor moieties must be weak in order to ensure localised initial and final states for charge transfer. Yet, it must be strong enough to allow all bridge orbitals to mediate charge transfer. We present the computational route to the design of a donor-bridge-acceptor molecule that features the right balance between these contradicting requirements and exhibits pronounced interference effects.

  6. High-Efficiency Cooper-Pair Splitter in Quantum Anomalous Hall Insulator Proximity-Coupled with Superconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying-Tao; Deng, Xinzhou; Sun, Qing-Feng; Qiao, Zhenhua

    2015-01-01

    The quantum entanglement between two qubits is crucial for applications in the quantum communication. After the entanglement of photons was experimentally realized, much effort has been taken to exploit the entangled electrons in solid-state systems. Here, we propose a Cooper-pair splitter, which can generate spatially-separated but entangled electrons, in a quantum anomalous Hall insulator proximity-coupled with a superconductor. After coupling with a superconductor, the chiral edge states of the quantum anomalous Hall insulator can still survive, making the backscattering impossible. Thus, the local Andreev reflection becomes vanishing, while the crossed Andreev reflection becomes dominant in the scattering process. This indicates that our device can serve as an extremely high-efficiency Cooper-pair splitter. Furthermore, because of the chiral characteristic, our Cooper-pair splitter is robust against disorders and can work in a wide range of system parameters. Particularly, it can still function even if the system length exceeds the superconducting coherence length.

  7. Play building blocks on population distribution of multilevel superconducting flux qubit with quantum interference

    CERN Document Server

    Wen, Xueda; Yu, Yang

    2009-01-01

    Recent experiments on Landau-Zener interference in multilevel superconducting flux qubits revealed various interesting characteristics, which have been studied theoretically in our recent work by simply using rate equation method [PRB 79, 094529, (2009)]. In this note we extend this method to the same system but with larger driving amplitude and higher driving frequency. The results show various anomalous characteristics, some of which have been observed in a recent work.

  8. Anomalous temperature dependent photoluminescence properties of CdSxSe1-x quantum dots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    CdSxSe1-x quantum dots were fabricated by a simple spin-coating heat volatilization method on InP wafer.Temperature dependent photoluminescence of CdSxSe1-x quantum dots was carried out in a range of 10-300 K.The integrated photoluminescence intensity revealed an anomalous behavior with increasing temperature in the range of 180-200 K.The band gap energy showed a redshift of 61.34 meV when the temperature increased from 10 to 300 K.The component ratio of S to Se in the CdSxSe1-x quantum dots was valued by both the X-ray diffraction data and photoluminescence peak energy at room temperature according to Vegard Law.Moreover,the parameters of the Varshni relation for CdS0.9Se0.1 materials were also obtained using photoluminescence peak energy as a function of temperature and the best-fit curve:α=(3.5 ± 0.1)10-4 eV/K,and β=210 ± 10 K (close to the Debye temperature θD of the material).

  9. High-Temperature Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in n-p Codoped Topological Insulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Shifei; Qiao, Zhenhua; Deng, Xinzhou; Cubuk, Ekin D; Chen, Hua; Zhu, Wenguang; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Zhang, S B; Xu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2016-07-29

    The quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) is a fundamental quantum transport phenomenon that manifests as a quantized transverse conductance in response to a longitudinally applied electric field in the absence of an external magnetic field, and it promises to have immense application potential in future dissipationless quantum electronics. Here, we present a novel kinetic pathway to realize the QAHE at high temperatures by n-p codoping of three-dimensional topological insulators. We provide a proof-of-principle numerical demonstration of this approach using vanadium-iodine (V-I) codoped Sb_{2}Te_{3} and demonstrate that, strikingly, even at low concentrations of ∼2%  V and ∼1% I, the system exhibits a quantized Hall conductance, the telltale hallmark of QAHE, at temperatures of at least ∼50  K, which is 3 orders of magnitude higher than the typical temperatures at which it has been realized to date. The underlying physical factor enabling this dramatic improvement is tied to the largely preserved intrinsic band gap of the host system upon compensated n-p codoping. The proposed approach is conceptually general and may shed new light in experimental realization of high-temperature QAHE.

  10. Anomalous electronic transport features in a lateral quantum dot array sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Wei; Dunn, R. G.; Reno, J. L.; Simmons, J. A.; Li, D.; Brueck, S. R. J.

    2006-03-01

    We will present in this talk experimental results obtained in a lateral quantum dot array sample, with a pitch size of ˜ 350 nm and a designed dot size of ˜ 150nm. The starting material is a high quality quantum well with the two-dimensional electron gas buried 200 nm below the surface. The quantum dot array is defined by a Ti/Au metal grid, which was fabricated using the interferometric lithograph and lift-off techniques. Around zero magnetic field, a pronounced positive magnetoresistance is observed, which can be explained by the semi-classical model of magnetic breakdown. The so-called commensurability oscillations together with the usual Shubnikov- de Hass oscillations are also observed. Surprisingly, in a pure DC measurement of longitudinal resistance, an anomalous resistance spike is clearly seen. The magnetic field position of this resistance spike depends on the amplitude of applied DC bias (Vds) between source and drain, and shows roughly a 1/Vds dependence.Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  11. Quantum interferences and their classical limit in laser driven coherent control scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco, Ignacio, E-mail: ifranco@chem.northwestern.edu [Chemical Physics Theory Group, Department of Chemistry, Center for Quantum Information and Quantum Control, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 3H6 (Canada); Spanner, Michael; Brumer, Paul [Chemical Physics Theory Group, Department of Chemistry, Center for Quantum Information and Quantum Control, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 3H6 (Canada)

    2010-05-12

    Graphical abstract: The analogy between Young's double-slit experiment with matter and laser driven coherent control schemes is investigated, and shown to be limited. To do so, a general decomposition of observables in the Heisenberg picture into direct terms and interference contributions is introduced, and formal quantum-classical correspondence arguments in the Heisenberg picture are employed to define classical analogs of quantum interference terms. While the classical interference contributions in the double-slit experiment are shown to be zero, they can be nonzero in laser driven coherent control schemes and lead to laser control in the classical limit. This classical limit is interpreted in terms of nonlinear response theory arguments. - Abstract: The analogy between Young's double-slit experiment with matter and laser driven coherent control schemes is investigated, and shown to be limited. To do so, a general decomposition of observables in the Heisenberg picture into direct terms and interference contributions is introduced, and formal quantum-classical correspondence arguments in the Heisenberg picture are employed to define classical analogs of quantum interference terms. While the classical interference contributions in the double-slit experiment are shown to be zero, they can be nonzero in laser driven coherent control schemes and lead to laser control in the classical limit. This classical limit is interpreted in terms of nonlinear response theory arguments.

  12. Quantum interference in heterogeneous superconducting-photonic circuits on a silicon chip

    CERN Document Server

    Schuck, Carsten; Fan, Linran; Ma, Xiao-Song; Poot, Menno; Tang, Hong X

    2015-01-01

    Quantum information processing holds great promise for communicating and computing data efficiently. However, scaling current photonic implementation approaches to larger system size remains an outstanding challenge for realizing disruptive quantum technology. Two main ingredients of quantum information processors are quantum interference and single-photon detectors. Here we develop a hybrid superconducting-photonic circuit system to show how these elements can be combined in a scalable fashion on a silicon chip. We demonstrate the suitability of this approach for integrated quantum optics by interfering and detecting photon pairs directly on the chip with waveguide-coupled single-photon detectors. Using a directional coupler implemented with silicon nitride nanophotonic waveguides, we observe 97% interference visibility when measuring photon statistics with two monolithically integrated superconducting single photon detectors. The photonic circuit and detector fabrication processes are compatible with standa...

  13. Prediction of Quantum Anomalous Hall Insulator in Functionalized GaBi Honeycomb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisostomo, Christian; Chen, Sung-Ping; Huang, Zhi-Quan; Hsu, Chia-Hsiu; Chuang, Feng-Chuan; Lin, Hsin; Bansil, Arun

    Using first-principles electronic calculations, we predict functionalized GaBi honeycomb under tensile strain to harbor quantum anomalous hall (QAH) insulating phase. A single band inversion at Γ point was found in spin-polarized band structure of half-fluorinated planar strained GaBi. In order to confirm the topological properties, we evaluated the Chern number (C) and found that C = 1, indicating the presence of QAH phase. Additionally, the same value was also obtained by using hydrogen atoms, instead of fluorine atoms, as the adsorbate in both planar and buckled GaBi. Moreover, the electronic spectrum of a half-fluorinated GaBi nanoribbon with armchair or zigzag edges possess only one edge band crossing the Fermi level within the band gap. Finally, a suitable substrate which could induce the similar effect of half-hydrogenation or half-fluorination on the GaBi honeycomb could be used for spintronic devices.

  14. Anderson Localization from the Berry-Curvature Interchange in Quantum Anomalous Hall Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Zhenhua; Han, Yulei; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Ke; Deng, Xinzhou; Jiang, Hua; Yang, Shengyuan A.; Wang, Jian; Niu, Qian

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically investigate the localization mechanism of the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) in the presence of spin-flip disorders. We show that the QAHE stays quantized at weak disorders, then enters a Berry-curvature mediated metallic phase at moderate disorders, and finally goes into the Anderson insulating phase at strong disorders. From the phase diagram, we find that at the charge neutrality point although the QAHE is most robust against disorders, the corresponding metallic phase is much easier to be localized into the Anderson insulating phase due to the interchange of Berry curvatures carried, respectively, by the conduction and valence bands. In the end, we provide a phenomenological picture related to the topological charges to better understand the underlying physical origin of the QAHE Anderson localization.

  15. Chern half metals: a new class of topological materials to realize the quantum anomalous Hall effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jun; Zhu, Zhenyue; Wu, Ruqian

    2015-03-11

    New topological insulators that demonstrate the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) are a cutting-edge research topic in condensed matter physics and materials science. So far, the QAHE has been observed only in Cr-doped (Bi,Sb)2Te3 at extremely low temperature. Therefore, it is important to find new materials with large topological band gap and high thermal stability for the realization of the QAHE. On the basis of first-principles and tight-binding model calculations, we discovered a new class of topological phase, Chern half metal, which manifests the QAHE in one spin channel while is metallic in the other spin channel, in Co or Rh deposited graphene. The QAHE is robust in these sytems for the adatom coverage ranging from 2% to 6%. Meanwhile, these systems have large perpendicular magnetic anisotropy energies of 5.3 and 11.5 meV, necessary for the observation of the QAHE at reasonably high temperature.

  16. Interaction-induced quantum anomalous Hall phase in (111) bilayer of LaCoO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yilin; Wang, Zhijun; Fang, Zhong; Dai, Xi

    2015-03-01

    In the present paper, the Gutzwiller density functional theory (LDA+G) has been applied to study the bilayer system of LaCoO3 grown along the (111 ) direction on SrTiO3. The LDA calculations show that there are two nearly flat bands located at the top and bottom of eg bands of Co atoms with the Fermi level crossing the lower one. After including both the spin-orbit coupling and the Coulomb interaction in the LDA+G method, we find that the interplay between spin-orbit coupling and Coulomb interaction stabilizes a very robust ferromagnetic insulator phase with the nonzero Chern number indicating the possibility of realizing the quantum anomalous Hall effect in this system.

  17. Anomalous curie response of impurities in quantum-critical spin-1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höglund, Kaj H; Sandvik, Anders W

    2007-07-13

    We consider a magnetic impurity in two different S=1/2 Heisenberg bilayer antiferromagnets at their respective critical interlayer couplings separating Néel and disordered ground states. We calculate the impurity susceptibility using a quantum Monte Carlo method. With intralayer couplings in only one of the layers (Kondo lattice), we observe an anomalous Curie constant C*, as predicted on the basis of field-theoretical work [S. Sachdev, Science 286, 2479 (1999)10.1126/science.286.5449.2479]. The value C* = 0.262 +/- 0.002 is larger than the normal Curie constant C=S(S+1)/3. Our low-temperature results for a symmetric bilayer are consistent with a universal C*.

  18. A new method to calculate Berry phase in one-dimensional quantum anomalous Hall insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yi

    2016-08-01

    Based on the residue theorem and degenerate perturbation theory, we derive a new, simple and general formula for Berry phase calculation in a two-level system for which the Hamiltonian is a real symmetric matrix. The special torus topology possessed by the first Brillouin zone (1 BZ) of this kind of systems ensures the existence of a nonzero Berry phase. We verify the correctness of our formula on the Su-Schrieffer-Heeger (SSH) model. Then the Berry phase of one-dimensional quantum anomalous Hall insulator (1DQAHI) is calculated analytically by applying our method, the result being -π/2 -π/4 sgn (B) [ sgn (Δ - 4 B) + sgn (Δ) ]. Finally, illuminated by this idea, we investigate the Chern number in the two-dimensional case, and find a very simple way to determine the parameter range of the non-trivial Chern number in the phase diagram.

  19. Terahertz spectroscopy on Faraday and Kerr rotations in a quantum anomalous Hall state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Ken N; Takahashi, Youtarou; Mogi, Masataka; Yoshimi, Ryutaro; Tsukazaki, Atsushi; Takahashi, Kei S; Ogawa, Naoki; Kawasaki, Masashi; Tokura, Yoshinori

    2016-07-20

    Electrodynamic responses from three-dimensional topological insulators are characterized by the universal magnetoelectric term constituent of the Lagrangian formalism. The quantized magnetoelectric coupling, which is generally referred to as topological magnetoelectric effect, has been predicted to induce exotic phenomena including the universal low-energy magneto-optical effects. Here we report the experimental indication of the topological magnetoelectric effect, which is exemplified by magneto-optical Faraday and Kerr rotations in the quantum anomalous Hall states of magnetic topological insulator surfaces by terahertz magneto-optics. The universal relation composed of the observed Faraday and Kerr rotation angles but not of any material parameters (for example, dielectric constant and magnetic susceptibility) well exhibits the trajectory towards the fine structure constant in the quantized limit.

  20. ∧-related Quantum Interference of 2Π [Case(a)] Diatom on Rotational Energy Transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Li; Yan-qing Ni; Yong-qing Li; Wei-li Wang; Feng-cai Ma

    2009-01-01

    To study theoretically the relationship between the integral interference angle and the scat-tering angle in collisional quantum interference, the integral interference angle of atom-2Π[case(a)] diatomic molecules system is described. To simulate the experiment theoret-ically, the theoretical model on collision-induced rotational energy transfer in an atom-2Π[case(a)]diatom system is presented based on .the first order Born approximation tak-ing into account of the long-range interaction potential. For the 2Π electronic state in the Hund's case(a) diatom, the degree of the interference is discussed. The interference angles of collision-induced rotational energy transfer of CN(A2Π) in Hund's case(a) with He, Ne, and Ar are calculated quantitatively. The key parameters in the determination of integral interference angles are obtained.

  1. Using charged defects in BN to create rewritable graphene quantum dots and visualize quantum interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, Jairo, Jr.

    Heterostructures of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (BN) are highly tunable platforms that enable the study of novel physical phenomena and technologically promising nanoelectronic devices. Common control schemes employed in these studies are electrostatic gating and chemical doping. However, these methods have significant drawbacks, such as complicated fabrication processes that introduce contamination and irreversible changes to material properties, as well as a lack of flexible control. To address these problems we have developed a new method that employs light and/or electric field excitation to control defect charge (from the single impurity level to ensembles) in the underlying BN. We have used optoelectronic and scanning tunneling spectroscopy measurements to characterize these BN defects. We find that by manipulating defect charge in BN it is possible to create rewritable tip-induced doping patterns such as gate-tunable graphene pn junctions and quantum dots. This creates new opportunities for mapping the electronic states of confined electrons in graphene and to visualize their quantum interference behavior.

  2. Strong Quantum Size Effects in Pb(111) Thin Films Mediated by Anomalous Friedel Oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yu; Wu, Biao; Li, Chong; Einstein, T. L.; Weitering, H. H.; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2010-08-01

    Using first-principles calculations within density functional theory, we study Friedel oscillations (FOs) in the electron density at different metal surfaces and their influence on the lattice relaxation and stability of ultrathin metal films. We show that the FOs at the Pb(111) surface decay as 1/x with the distance x from the surface, different from the conventional 1/x2 power law at other metal surfaces. The underlying physical reason for this striking difference is tied to the strong nesting of the two different Fermi sheets along the Pb(111) direction. The interference of the strong FOs emanating from the two surfaces of a Pb(111) film, in turn, not only results in superoscillatory interlayer relaxations around the center of the film, but also determines its stability in the quantum regime. As a simple and generic picture, the present findings also explain why quantum size effects are exceptionally robust in Pb(111) films.

  3. Direct observation of large quantum interference effect in anthraquinone solid-state junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabache, Vincent; Chaste, Julien; Petit, Philippe; Della Rocca, Maria Luisa; Martin, Pascal; Lacroix, Jean-Christophe; McCreery, Richard L; Lafarge, Philippe

    2013-07-17

    Quantum interference in cross-conjugated molecules embedded in solid-state devices was investigated by direct current-voltage and differential conductance transport measurements of anthraquinone (AQ)-based large area planar junctions. A thin film of AQ was grafted covalently on the junction base electrode by diazonium electroreduction, while the counter electrode was directly evaporated on top of the molecular layer. Our technique provides direct evidence of a large quantum interference effect in multiple CMOS compatible planar junctions. The quantum interference is manifested by a pronounced dip in the differential conductance close to zero voltage bias. The experimental signature is well developed at low temperature (4 K), showing a large amplitude dip with a minimum >2 orders of magnitude lower than the conductance at higher bias and is still clearly evident at room temperature. A temperature analysis of the conductance curves revealed that electron-phonon coupling is the principal decoherence mechanism causing large conductance oscillations at low temperature.

  4. Radio-Frequency Field-Induced Quantum Interference Effects in Cold Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龙全; 周蜀渝; 周善钰; 王育竹

    2001-01-01

    We propose constructing a quantum interference configuration for cold atoms in a magneto-optical trap by applying a radio frequency field, which coherently couples adjacent Zeeman sublevels, in combination with a repumping laser field. One effect of this interference is that a dip exists in the absorption of the repumping light when the radio frequency is scanned. Our prediction has been indirectly detected through the fluorescence of cold atoms in a preliminary experiment.

  5. Quantum spin-quantum anomalous Hall effect with tunable edge states in Sb monolayer-based heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tong; Zhang, Jiayong; Xue, Yang; Zhao, Bao; Zhang, Huisheng; Jiang, Hua; Yang, Zhongqin

    2016-12-01

    A novel topological insulator with tunable edge states, called a quantum spin-quantum anomalous Hall (QSQAH) insulator, is predicted in a heterostructure of a hydrogenated Sb (S b2H ) monolayer on a LaFe O3 substrate by using ab initio methods. The substrate induces a drastic staggered exchange field in the S b2H film, which plays an important role to generate the QSQAH effect. A topologically nontrivial band gap (up to 35 meV) is opened by Rashba spin-orbit coupling, which can be enlarged by strain and an electric field. To understand the underlying physical mechanism of the QSQAH effect, a tight-binding model based on px and py orbitals is constructed. With the model, the exotic behaviors of the edge states in the heterostructure are investigated. Dissipationless chiral charge edge states related to one valley are found to emerge along both sides of the sample, whereas low-dissipation spin edge states related to the other valley flow only along one side of the sample. These edge states can be tuned flexibly by polarization-sensitive photoluminescence controls and/or chemical edge modifications. Such flexible manipulations of the charge, spin, and valley degrees of freedom provide a promising route towards applications in electronics, spintronics, and valleytronics.

  6. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in time-reversal-symmetry breaking topological insulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Cui-Zu; Li, Mingda

    2016-03-31

    The quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE), the last member of Hall family, was predicted to exhibit quantized Hall conductivity σ(yx) = e2/h without any external magnetic field. The QAHE shares a similar physical phenomenon with the integer quantum Hall effect (QHE), whereas its physical origin relies on the intrinsic topological inverted band structure and ferromagnetism. Since the QAHE does not require external energy input in the form of magnetic field, it is believed that this effect has unique potential for applications in future electronic devices with low-power consumption. More recently, the QAHE has been experimentally observed in thin films of the time-reversal symmetry breaking ferromagnetic (FM) topological insulators (TI), Cr- and V- doped (Bi,Sb)2Te3. In this topical review, we review the history of TI based QAHE, the route to the experimental observation of the QAHE in the above two systems, the current status of the research of the QAHE, and finally the prospects for future studies.

  7. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in magnetically modulated topological insulator/normal insulator heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Men'shov, V. N.; Tugushev, V. V.; Chulkov, E. V.

    2016-10-01

    We theoretically study how magnetic modulation can be used to manipulate the transport properties of heterostructures formed by a thin film of a three-dimensional topological insulator sandwiched between slabs of a normal insulator. Employing the k • p scheme, in the framework of a continual approach, we argue that electron states of the system are spin-polarized when ultrathin magnetic insertions are incorporated into the film. We demonstrate that (i) the spin-polarization magnitude depends strongly on the magnetic insertion position in the film and (ii) there is the optimal insertion position to realize quantum anomalous Hall effect, which is a function of the material parameters, the film thickness and the topological insulator/normal insulator interface potential. For the heterostructure with a pair of symmetrically placed magnetic insertions, we calculate a phase diagram that shows a series of transitions between distinct quantum regimes of transverse conductivity. We provide consistent interpretation of recent experimental findings in the context of our results.

  8. Magnetic modulation doping in topological insulators toward higher-temperature quantum anomalous Hall effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mogi, M., E-mail: mogi@cmr.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Yoshimi, R.; Yasuda, K.; Kozuka, Y. [Department of Applied Physics and Quantum Phase Electronics Center (QPEC), University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Tsukazaki, A. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Takahashi, K. S. [RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), Wako 351-0198 (Japan); Kawasaki, M.; Tokura, Y. [Department of Applied Physics and Quantum Phase Electronics Center (QPEC), University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), Wako 351-0198 (Japan)

    2015-11-02

    Quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE), which generates dissipation-less edge current without external magnetic field, is observed in magnetic-ion doped topological insulators (TIs) such as Cr- and V-doped (Bi,Sb){sub 2}Te{sub 3}. The QAHE emerges when the Fermi level is inside the magnetically induced gap around the original Dirac point of the TI surface state. Although the size of gap is reported to be about 50 meV, the observable temperature of QAHE has been limited below 300 mK. We attempt magnetic-Cr modulation doping into topological insulator (Bi,Sb){sub 2}Te{sub 3} films to increase the observable temperature of QAHE. By introducing the rich-Cr-doped thin (1 nm) layers at the vicinity of both the surfaces based on non-Cr-doped (Bi,Sb){sub 2}Te{sub 3} films, we have succeeded in observing the QAHE up to 2 K. The improvement in the observable temperature achieved by this modulation-doping appears to be originating from the suppression of the disorder in the surface state interacting with the rich magnetic moments. Such a superlattice designing of the stabilized QAHE may pave a way to dissipation-less electronics based on the higher-temperature and zero magnetic-field quantum conduction.

  9. Effect of extended confinement on the structure of edge channels in the quantum anomalous Hall effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Z.; Raikh, M. E.

    2016-09-01

    The Quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect in the films with nontrivial band structure accompanies the ferromagnetic transition in the system of magnetic dopants. Experimentally, the QAH transition manifests itself as a jump in the dependence of longitudinal resistivity on a weak external magnetic field. Microscopically, this jump originates from the emergence of a chiral edge mode on one side of the ferromagnetic transition. We study analytically the effect of an extended confinement on the structure of the edge modes. We employ the simplest model of the extended confinement in the form of a potential step next to the hard wall. It is shown that, unlike the conventional quantum Hall effect, where all edge channels are chiral, in the QAH effect, a complex structure of the boundary leads to nonchiral edge modes which are present on both sides of the ferromagnetic transition. Wave functions of nonchiral modes are different above and below the transition: on the "topological" side, where the chiral edge mode is supported, nonchiral modes are "repelled" from the boundary; i.e., they are much less localized than on the "trivial" side. Thus, the disorder-induced scattering into these modes will boost the extension of the chiral edge mode. The prime experimental manifestation of nonchiral modes is that, by contributing to longitudinal resistance, they smear the QAH transition.

  10. Interference control of nonlinear excitation in a multi-atom cavity quantum electrodynamics system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guoqing; Tan, Zheng; Zou, Bichen; Zhu, Yifu

    2014-12-01

    We show that by manipulating quantum interference in a multi-atom cavity quantum electrodynamics (CQED) system, the nonlinear excitation of the cavity-atom polariton can be resonantly enhanced while the linear excitation is suppressed. Under the appropriate conditions, it is possible to selectively enhance or suppress the polariton excitation with two free-pace laser fields. We report on an experiment with cold Rb atoms in an optical cavity and present experimental results that demonstrate such interference control of the CQED excitation and its direct application to studies of all-optical switching and cross-phase modulation of the cavity-transmitted light.

  11. Molecular Beam Epitaxial Growth of Heterostructures to Study Quantum Interference Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    MBE growth and regrowth of heterostructures for quantum interference transistors and a detailed study of the physical mechanisms and the limitations imposed by them in such devices. We have investigated in detail the suitability of the MBE regrowth process for such applications. Very encouraging progress has been made. The performance characteristics of dual-channel quantum interference devices grown in our laboratory and defined by e-beam lithography have been measured and reported. From this work it is clear that to achieve enhanced performance and to demonstrate a large

  12. A parabolic model to control quantum interference in T-shaped molecular junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Daijiro; Sevinçli, Hâldun; Avdoshenko, Stanislav M; Gutierrez, Rafael; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2013-09-01

    Quantum interference (QI) effects in molecular devices have drawn increasing attention over the past years due to their unique features observed in the conductance spectrum. For the further development of single molecular devices exploiting QI effects, it is of great theoretical and practical interest to develop simple methods controlling the emergence and the positions of QI effects like anti-resonances or Fano line shapes in conductance spectra. In this work, starting from a well-known generic molecular junction with a side group (T-shaped molecule), we propose a simple graphical method to visualize the conditions for the appearance of quantum interference, Fano resonances or anti-resonances, in the conductance spectrum. By introducing a simple graphical representation (parabolic diagram), we can easily visualize the relation between the electronic parameters and the positions of normal resonant peaks and anti-resonant peaks induced by quantum interference in the conductance spectrum. This parabolic model not only can predict the emergence and energetic position of quantum interference from a few electronic parameters but also can enable one to know the coupling between the side group and the main conduction channel from measurements in the case of orthogonal basis. The results obtained within the parabolic model are validated using density-functional based quantum transport calculations in realistic T-shaped molecular junctions.

  13. Implementation of Deutsch-Jozsa Algorithm with Superconducting Quantum-Interference Devices via Raman Transition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAN Zhi-Ming

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a theoretical scheme is proposed to implement the Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm with SQUIDs (superconducting quantum-interference devices) in cavity via Raman transition. The scheme only requires a quantized cavity field and classical microwave pulses. In this scheme, no transfer of quantum information between the SQUIDs and the cavity is required, the cavity field is only virtually excited and thus the cavity decay is suppressed.

  14. A parabolic model to control quantum interference in T-shaped molecular junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nozaki, Daijiro; Sevincli, Haldun; Avdoshenko, Stanislav M.;

    2013-01-01

    Quantum interference (QI) effects in molecular devices have drawn increasing attention over the past years due to their unique features observed in the conductance spectrum. For the further development of single molecular devices exploiting QI effects, it is of great theoretical and practical int...... and the main conduction channel from measurements in the case of orthogonal basis. The results obtained within the parabolic model are validated using density-functional based quantum transport calculations in realistic T-shaped molecular junctions....

  15. Generation of an Entangled State of Two Three-Level Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices in Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    We propose a scheme for generating a maximally entangled state of two three-level superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) by using a quantized cavity field and classical microwave pluses in cavity. In this scheme, no quantum information will be transferred from the SQUIDs to the cavity since the cavity field is only virtually excited. Thus, the cavity decay is suppressed during the entanglement generation.

  16. Normal and Anomalous Diffusion: An Analytical Study Based on Quantum Collision Dynamics and Boltzmann Transport Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahakrishnan, Sathiya; Chakraborty, Subrata; Vijay, Amrendra

    2016-09-15

    Diffusion, an emergent nonequilibrium transport phenomenon, is a nontrivial manifestation of the correlation between the microscopic dynamics of individual molecules and their statistical behavior observed in experiments. We present a thorough investigation of this viewpoint using the mathematical tools of quantum scattering, within the framework of Boltzmann transport theory. In particular, we ask: (a) How and when does a normal diffusive transport become anomalous? (b) What physical attribute of the system is conceptually useful to faithfully rationalize large variations in the coefficient of normal diffusion, observed particularly within the dynamical environment of biological cells? To characterize the diffusive transport, we introduce, analogous to continuous phase transitions, the curvature of the mean square displacement as an order parameter and use the notion of quantum scattering length, which measures the effective interactions between the diffusing molecules and the surrounding, to define a tuning variable, η. We show that the curvature signature conveniently differentiates the normal diffusion regime from the superdiffusion and subdiffusion regimes and the critical point, η = ηc, unambiguously determines the coefficient of normal diffusion. To solve the Boltzmann equation analytically, we use a quantum mechanical expression for the scattering amplitude in the Boltzmann collision term and obtain a general expression for the effective linear collision operator, useful for a variety of transport studies. We also demonstrate that the scattering length is a useful dynamical characteristic to rationalize experimental observations on diffusive transport in complex systems. We assess the numerical accuracy of the present work with representative experimental results on diffusion processes in biological systems. Furthermore, we advance the idea of temperature-dependent effective voltage (of the order of 1 μV or less in a biological environment, for example

  17. Genuine quantum interference in interacting bosonic fields: The semiclassical propagator in Fock space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbina, Juan Diego; Engl, Thomas; Richter, Klaus [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Regensburg (Germany); Arguelles, Arturo [Department of Physics, University of Liege (Belgium); Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Regensburg (Germany); Dujardin, Julien; Schlagheck, Peter [Department of Physics, University of Liege (Belgium)

    2013-07-01

    We present a semiclassical theory of quantum interference effects in interacting bosonic fields. We make special emphasis on the difference between genuine quantum interference (due to the superposition principle in the many-body Hilbert space), and classical interference effects due to the wave character of the classical limit. First, we discuss how the usual approaches to this problem are unable to provide the characteristic sum of oscillatory terms, each asociated with a solution of the classical equations of motion, required to semiclassically address interference effects. We show then how to solve this problems by a formal construction of the van Vleck-Gutzwiller propagator for bosonic fields as a sum over paths in the associated Fock space and we identify the classical limit as a Gross-Pitaevskii equation with boundary conditions and multiple solutions. The theory predicts effects akin to weak localization to take place in Fock space, and in particular the enhancement of quantum probability of return due to interference between time-reversed paths there. We support our claims with extensive numerical calculations for a discrete version of an interacting bosonic field.

  18. Generation of Entangled States of Multiple Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices in Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    We propose a scheme for generating the maximally entangled states of many superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) by using a quantized cavity field and classicalmicrowave pulses in cavity. In the scheme,the maximally entangled states can be generated without requiring the measurement and individual addressing of the SQUIDs.

  19. Electrochemical control of quantum interference in anthraquinone-based molecular switches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Troels; Schiøtz, Jakob; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2010-01-01

    Using first-principles calculations we analyze the electronic transport properties of a recently proposed anthraquinone-based electrochemical switch. Robust conductance on/off ratios of several orders of magnitude are observed due to destructive quantum interference present in the anthraquinone...

  20. Nonlinear optical effects and Hong-Ou-Mandel interference in cavity quantum electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Imran M.; van Enk, Steven J.

    Pure quantum interference among single photons is one of the key ingredients to perform linear optics quantum computation (LOQC). The Hong-Ou-Mandel interference (HOMI) [C. K. Hong, Z. Y. Ou and L. Mandel, Phys. Rev. Lett. 59, (18), 2044-2046 (1987)] i.e. complete destructive interference between two identical and indistinguishable photons simultaneously entering input ports of a 50/50 beam splitter, is a well-known example in this context. In this talk, I'll present our theoretical study of HOMI in a coupled Jaynes-Cummings array. In particular and by applying quantum jump/trajectory formalism, I'll focus on how partial quantum interference between two photons survive both non-linearities produced by two-level emitter and spectral filtering due to optical cavities in our coupled cavity array setup [Imran M. Mirza and Steven J. van Enk, Opt. Comm. 343, 172-177 (2015)]. Along with LOQC, this work is crucial from the perspective of exploiting coupled cavity arrays to store single photons reliably (without altering their temporal and spectral traits) [Imran M. Mirza, Steven J. van Enk and Jeff Kimble, JOSA B, 10, 2640-2649, (2013)].

  1. Intrinsic Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in the Kagome Lattice Cs2 LiMn3 F12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gang; Lian, Biao; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; Zhang's Group Team

    In a kagome lattice, the time reversal symmetry can be broken by a staggered magnetic flux emerging from the ferromagnetic ordering and intrinsic spin-orbit coupling, leading to several well-separated nontrivial Chern bands and intrinsic quantum anomalous Hall effect. Based on this idea and ab initio calculations, we propose the realization of the intrinsic quantum anomalous Hall effect in the single layer Cs2Mn3F12 kagome lattice and on the (001) surface of a Cs2LiMn3F12 single crystal by modifying the carrier coverage on it, where the band gap is around 20 meV. Moreover, a simplified tight binding model based on the inplane dd σ antibonding states is constructed to understand the topological band structures of the system.

  2. Intrinsic Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in the Kagome Lattice Cs_{2}LiMn_{3}F_{12}.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gang; Lian, Biao; Zhang, Shou-Cheng

    2015-10-30

    In a kagome lattice, the time reversal symmetry can be broken by a staggered magnetic flux emerging from ferromagnetic ordering and intrinsic spin-orbit coupling, leading to several well-separated nontrivial Chern bands and intrinsic quantum anomalous Hall effect. Based on this idea and ab initio calculations, we propose the realization of the intrinsic quantum anomalous Hall effect in the single layer Cs_{2}Mn_{3}F_{12} kagome lattice and on the (001) surface of a Cs_{2}LiMn_{3}F_{12} single crystal by modifying the carrier coverage on it, where the band gap is around 20 meV. Moreover, a simplified tight binding model based on the in-plane ddσ antibonding states is constructed to understand the topological band structures of the system.

  3. Multiple-path Quantum Interference Effects in a Double-Aharonov-Bohm Interferometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang XF

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We investigate quantum interference effects in a double-Aharonov-Bohm (AB interferometer consisting of five quantum dots sandwiched between two metallic electrodes in the case of symmetric dot-electrode couplings by the use of the Green’s function equation of motion method. The analytical expression for the linear conductance at zero temperature is derived to interpret numerical results. A three-peak structure in the linear conductance spectrum may evolve into a double-peak structure, and two Fano dips (zero conductance points may appear in the quantum system when the energy levels of quantum dots in arms are not aligned with one another. The AB oscillation for the magnetic flux threading the double-AB interferometer is also investigated in this paper. Our results show the period of AB oscillation can be converted from 2π to π by controlling the difference of the magnetic fluxes threading the two quantum rings.

  4. Quantum Interference and Superposition in Cognition: Development of a Theory for the Disjunction of Concepts

    CERN Document Server

    Aerts, Diederik

    2007-01-01

    We elaborate a theory for the modeling of concepts using the mathematical structure of quantum mechanics. Items and concepts are represented by vectors in the complex Hilbert space of quantum mechanics and membership weights of items are modeled by quantum weights calculated following the quantum rules. We apply this theory to model the disjunction of concepts and show that the predictions of our theory for the membership weights of items with respect to the disjunction of concepts match with great accuracy the results of an experiment conducted by Hampton (1988b). It is the quantum effects of interference and superposition that are at the origin of the effects of overextension and underextension observed by Hampton as deviations from a classical use of the disjunction. We show that the complex numbers of the Hilbert space are essential to obtaining the experimental predictions, i.e. vector space models over real numbers do not provide predictions matching the experimental data. We put forward an explanation ...

  5. Quantum interference between H + D2 quasiclassical reaction mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jambrina, Pablo G; Herráez-Aguilar, Diego; Aoiz, F Javier; Sneha, Mahima; Jankunas, Justinas; Zare, Richard N

    2015-08-01

    Interferences are genuine quantum phenomena that appear whenever two seemingly distinct classical trajectories lead to the same outcome. They are common in elastic scattering but are seldom observable in chemical reactions. Here we report experimental measurements of the state-to-state angular distribution for the H + D2 reaction using the 'photoloc' technique. For products in low rotational and vibrational states, a characteristic oscillation pattern governs backward scattering. The comparison between the experiments, rigorous quantum calculations and classical trajectories on an accurate potential energy surface allows us to trace the origin of that structure to the quantum interference between different quasiclassical mechanisms, a phenomenon analogous to that observed in the double-slit experiment.

  6. Exploiting quantum interference in dye sensitized solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maggio, Emanuele; Solomon, Gemma C.; Troisi, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    A strategy to hinder the charge recombination process in dye sensitized solar cells is developed in analogy with similar approaches to modulate charge transport across nanostructures. The system studied is a TiO2 (anatase)-chromophore interface, with an unsaturated carbon bridge connecting the two...... subunits. A theory for nonadiabatic electron transfer is employed in order to take explicitly into account the contribution from the bridge states mediating the process. If a cross-conjugated fragment is present in the bridge, it is possible to suppress the charge recombination by negative interference...... of the possible tunnelling path. Calculations carried out on realistic molecules at the DFT level of theory show how the recombination lifetime can be modulated by changes in the electron-withdrawing (donating) character of the groups connected to the cross-conjugated bridge. Tight binding calculations...

  7. High-temperature large-gap quantum anomalous Hall insulating state in ultrathin double perovskite films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baidya, Santu; Waghmare, Umesh V.; Paramekanti, Arun; Saha-Dasgupta, Tanusri

    2016-10-01

    Towards the goal of realizing topological phases in thin films of correlated oxide and heterostructures, we propose here a quantum anomalous Hall insulator (QAHI) in ultrathin films of double perovskites based on mixed 3 d -5 d or 3 d -4 d transition-metal ions, grown along the [111] direction. Considering the specific case of ultrathin Ba2FeReO6 , we present a theoretical analysis of an effective Hamiltonian derived from first principles. We establish that a strong spin-orbit coupling at the Re site, t2 g symmetry of the low-energy d bands, polarity of its [111] orientation of perovskite structure, and mixed 3 d -5 d chemistry results in room temperature magnetism with a robust QAHI state of Chern number C =1 and a large band gap. We uncover and highlight a nonrelativistic orbital Rashba-type effect in addition to the spin-orbit coupling, that governs this QAHI state. With a band gap of ˜100 meV in electronic structure and magnetic transition temperature Tc˜300 K estimated by Monte Carlo simulations, our finding of the QAHI state in ultrathin Ba2FeReO6 is expected to stimulate experimental verification along with possible practical applications of its dissipationless edge currents.

  8. Smearing of the quantum anomalous Hall effect due to statistical fluctuations of magnetic dopants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Z.; Raikh, M. E.

    2016-10-01

    The quantum anomalous Hall effect is induced by substitution of a certain portion x of Bi atoms in a BiTe-based insulating parent compound by magnetic ions (Cr or V). We find the density of in-gap states N (E ) emerging as a result of statistical fluctuations of the composition x in the vicinity of the transition point where the average gap E¯g passes through zero. A local gap follows the fluctuations of x . Using the instanton approach, we show that, near the gap edges, the tails are exponential lnN (E ) ∝-(E¯g-|E |) and the tail states are due to small local gap reduction. Our main finding is that, even when the smearing magnitude exceeds the gap width, there exists a semihard gap around zero energy, where lnN (E ) ∝-E/¯g|E | ln(E/¯g|E | ) . The states responsible for N (E ) originate from local gap reversals within narrow rings. The consequence of the semihard gap is the Arrhenius, rather than variable-range hopping, temperature dependence of the diagonal conductivity at low temperatures.

  9. Interference of Light in Michelson-Morley Interferometer: A Quantum Optical Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Langangen, O; Vaskinn, A

    2011-01-01

    We investigate how the temporal coherence interference properties of light in a Michelson-Morley interferometer (MMI), using only a single-photon detector, can be understood in a quantum-optics framework in a straightforward and pedagogical manner. For this purpose we make use of elementary quantum field theory and Glaubers theory for photon detection in order to calculate the expected interference pattern in the MMI. If a thermal reference source is used in the MMI local oscillator port in combination with a thermal source in the signal port, the interference pattern revealed by such an intensity measurement shows a distinctive dependence on the differences in the temperature of the two sources. The MMI can therefore be used in order to perform temperature measurements. A related method was actually used to carry out high precision measurements of the cosmic micro-wave background radiation on board of the COBE satellite. The theoretical framework allows us to consider any initial quantum state. The interfere...

  10. Interference of Light in a Michelson-Morley Interferometer: A Quantum Optical Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ø. Langangen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The temporal coherence interference properties of light as revealed by single detector intensity measurements in a Michelson-Morley interferometer (MMI is often described in terms of classical optics. We show, in a pedagogical manner, how such features of light also can be understood in terms of a more general quantum-optics framework. If a thermal reference source is used in the MMI local oscillator port in combination with a thermal source in the signal port, the interference pattern revealed by single detector intensity measurements shows a distinctive dependence on the differences in the temperature of the two sources. A related method has actually been used to perform high-precision measurements of the cosmic microwave background radiation. The general quantum-optics framework allows us to consider any initial quantum state. As an example, we consider the interference of single photons as a tool to determine the peak angular-frequency of a single-photon pulse interfering with a single-photon reference pulse. A similar consideration for laser pulses, in terms of coherent states, leads to a different response in the detector. The MMI experimental setup is therefore an example of an optical device where one, in terms of intensity measurements, can exhibit the difference between classical and quantum-mechanical light.

  11. Control of quantum interference of an excitonic wave in a chlorophyll chain with a chlorophyll ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Suc-Kyoung; Nam, Seog-Woo [Korea University, Jochiwon, Chungnam (Korea, Republic of); Yeon, Kyu-Hwang [Chungbuk National University, Cheonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    The quantum interference of an excitonic wave and its coherent control in a nanochain with a nanoring are studied. The nanochain is comprised of six chlorophylls, where four chlorophylls compose the nanoring and two chlorophylls are attached at two opposite sites on the nanoring. The exciton dynamics and the correlation of the excitation between chlorophylls are analyzed for a given configurational arrangement and dipolar orientation of the chlorophylls. The results of this study show that the excitation at specified chlorophylls is suppressed or enhanced by destructive or constructive interference of the excitonic wave in the chlorophyll nanochain.

  12. Interference control of perfect photon absorption in cavity quantum electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Liyong; Zhu, Yifu; Agarwal, G S

    2016-01-01

    We propose and analyze a scheme for controlling coherent photon transmission and reflection in a cavity-quantum-electrodynamics (CQED) system consisting of an optical resonator coupled with three-level atoms coherently prepared by a control laser from free space. When the control laser is off and the cavity is excited by two identical light fields from two ends of the cavity, the two input light fields can be completely absorbed by the CQED system and the light energy is converted into the excitation of the polariton states, but no light can escape from the cavity. Two distinct cases of controlling the perfect photon absorption are analyzed: (a) when the control laser is tuned to the atomic resonance and creates electromagnetically induced transparency, the prefect photon absorption is suppressed and the input light fields are nearly completely transmitted through the cavity; (b) when the control laser is tuned to the polariton state resonance and inhibits the polariton state excitation, the perfect photon ab...

  13. Quantum interference of highly-dispersive surface plasmons (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokpanov, Yury S.; Fakonas, James S.; Atwater, Harry A.

    2016-09-01

    Previous experiments have shown that surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) preserve their entangled state and do not cause measurable decoherence. However, essentially all of them were done using SPPs whose dispersion was in the linear "photon-like" regime. We report in this presentation on experiments showing how transition to "true-plasmon" non-linear dispersion regime, which occurs near SPP resonance frequency, will affect quantum coherent properties of light. To generate a polarization-entangled state we utilize type-I parametric down-conversion, occurring in a pair of non-linear crystals (BiBO), glued together and rotated by 90 degrees with respect to each other. For state projection measurements, we use a pair of polarizers and single-photon avalanche diode coincidence count detectors. We interpose a plasmonic hole array in the path of down-converted light before the polarizer. Without the hole array, we measure visibility V=99-100% and Bell's number S=2.81±0.03. To study geometrical effects we fabricated plasmonic hole arrays (gold on optically polished glass) with elliptical holes (axes are 190nm and 240nm) using focused ion beam. When we put this sample in our system we measured the reduction of visibility V=86±5% using entangled light. However, measurement using classical light gave exactly the same visibility; hence, this reduction is caused only by the difference in transmission coefficients of different polarizations. As samples with non-linear dispersion we fabricated two-layer (a-Si - Au) and three-layer (a-Si - Au - a-Si) structures on optically polished glass with different pitches and circular holes. The results of measurements with these samples will be discussed along with the theoretical investigations.

  14. Quantization and anomalous structures in the conductance of Si/SiGe quantum point contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Pock, J. F.; Salloch, D.; Qiao, G.; Wieser, U.; Hackbarth, T.; Kunze, U.

    2016-04-01

    Quantum point contacts (QPCs) are fabricated on modulation-doped Si/SiGe heterostructures and ballistic transport is studied at low temperatures. We observe quantized conductance with subband separations up to 4 meV and anomalies in the first conductance plateau at 4e2/h. At a temperature of T = 22 mK in the linear transport regime, a weak anomalous kink structure arises close to 0.5(4e2/h), which develops into a distinct plateau-like structure as temperature is raised up to T = 4 K. Under magnetic field parallel to the wire up to B = 14 T, the anomaly evolves into the Zeeman spin-split level at 0.5(4e2/h), resembling the "0.7 anomaly" in GaAs/AlGaAs QPCs. Additionally, a zero-bias anomaly (ZBA) is observed in nonlinear transport spectroscopy. At T = 22 mK, a parallel magnetic field splits the ZBA peak up into two peaks. At B = 0, elevated temperatures lead to similar splitting, which differs from the behavior of ZBAs in GaAs/AlGaAs QPCs. Under finite dc bias, the differential resistance exhibits additional plateaus approximately at 0.8(4e2/h) and 0.2(4e2/h) known as "0.85 anomaly" and "0.25 anomaly" in GaAs/AlGaAs QPCs. Unlike the first regular plateau at 4e2/h, the 0.2(4e2/h) plateau is insensitive to dc bias voltage up to at least VDS = 80 mV, in-plane magnetic fields up to B = 15 T, and to elevated temperatures up to T = 25 K. We interpret this effect as due to pinching off one of the reservoirs close to the QPC. We do not see any indication of lifting of the valley degeneracy in our samples.

  15. Constructive quantum interference in a bis-copper six-porphyrin nanoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richert, Sabine; Cremers, Jonathan; Kuprov, Ilya; Peeks, Martin D.; Anderson, Harry L.; Timmel, Christiane R.

    2017-03-01

    The exchange interaction, J, between two spin centres is a convenient measure of through bond electronic communication. Here, we investigate quantum interference phenomena in a bis-copper six-porphyrin nanoring by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy via measurement of the exchange coupling between the copper centres. Using an analytical expression accounting for both dipolar and exchange coupling to simulate the time traces obtained in a double electron electron resonance experiment, we demonstrate that J can be quantified to high precision even in the presence of significant through-space coupling. We show that the exchange coupling between two spin centres is increased by a factor of 4.5 in the ring structure with two parallel coupling paths as compared to an otherwise identical system with just one coupling path, which is a clear signature of constructive quantum interference.

  16. Probing electron-phonon excitations in molecular junctions by quantum interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessis, C; Della Rocca, M L; Barraud, C; Martin, P; Lacroix, J C; Markussen, T; Lafarge, P

    2016-02-11

    Electron-phonon coupling is a fundamental inelastic interaction in condensed matter and in molecules. Here we probe phonon excitations using quantum interference in electron transport occurring in short chains of anthraquinone based molecular junctions. By studying the dependence of molecular junction's conductance as a function of bias voltage and temperature, we show that inelastic scattering of electrons by phonons can be detected as features in conductance resulting from quenching of quantum interference. Our results are in agreement with density functional theory calculations and are well described by a generic two-site model in the framework of non-equilibrium Green's functions formalism. The importance of the observed inelastic contribution to the current opens up new ways for exploring coherent electron transport through molecular devices.

  17. Vacuum-Induced Quantum Interference in a Trapped ∧-Configuration Three-Level System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zheng-Ling; YIN Jian-Ping

    2005-01-01

    @@ In consideration of quantization of centre-of-mass motion, we derive the second-order solution of the dynamic equation of a ∧-configuration three-level atom confined in an approximately harmonic trap by using the timedependent perturbation theory. It is found that there are a series of dark lines in the second-order probability spectrum with multi-peak structures, which is the result of the quantum interference from the same vacuum mode in the spontaneous decay process of the trapped atom from the upper level to the two nearby lower levels. Our study shows that the second-order spectrum may be modified by the oscillation frequency Ω of the trap and the frequency difference △ between two lower levels of the three-level atom, and the depth of the dark lines from the vacuum-induced quantum interference effect is strongly dependent on the above two parameters (Ω and △).

  18. Beyond Quantum interference and Optical pumping: invoking a Closed-loop phase

    CERN Document Server

    Kani, A

    2016-01-01

    Atomic coherence effects arising from coherent light-atom interaction are conventionally known to be governed by quantum interference and optical pumping mechanisms. However, anisotropic nonlinear response driven by optical field involves another fundamental effect arising from closed-loop multiphoton transitions. This closed-loop phase dictates the tensorial structure of the nonlinear susceptibility as it governs the principal coordinate system in determining, whether the light field will either compete or cooperate with the external magnetic field stimulus. Such a treatment provides deeper understanding of all magneto-optical anisotropic response. The magneto-optical response in all atomic systems is classified using closed-loop phase. The role of quantum interference in obtaining electromagnetically induced transparency or electromagnetically induced absorption in multi-level systems is identified.

  19. Effects of Quantum Interference on the Profile of Excitation Spectra in the Atomic Sodium D1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yongfang; ZHANG Xiangyang; SUN Jianfeng; ZHAO Yongmei; WANG Yongchang; ZHANG Yanliang; DING Liang’en; WANG Zugeng

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, an experiment in a sodium vapor cell with cw laser pumping is reported. Two dips in the excitation spectrum profile of the sodium \\$D1\\$ line are observed. Theoretically excitation spectra in the three-level system are calculated in detail and results are identical with experiments. It is demonstrated that the appearance of the two dips in the excitation spectrum is close connected with quantum interference effect.

  20. Fast scheme for generating quantum-interference states and G HZ state of N trapped ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Xiao-Juan; Fang Mao-Fa; Liao Xiang-Ping; Cai Jian-Wu; Cao Shuai

    2007-01-01

    We propose a fast scheme to generate the quantum-interference states of N trapped ions. In the scheme the ions are driven by a standing-wave laser beam whose carrier frequency is tuned such that the ion transition can take place.We also propose a simple and fast scheme to produce the GHZ state of N hot trapped ions and this scheme is insensitive to the heating of vibrational motion, which is important from the viewpoint of decoherence.

  1. Effects of quantum interference in spectra of cascade spontaneous emission from multilevel systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, A. A.; Yudson, V. I.

    2016-12-01

    A general expression for the spectrum of cascade spontaneous emission from an arbitrary multilevel system is presented. Effects of the quantum interference of photons emitted in different transitions are analyzed. These effects are especially essential when the transition frequencies are close. Several examples are considered: (i) Three-level system; (ii) Harmonic oscillator; (iii) System with equidistant levels and equal rates of the spontaneous decay for all the transitions; (iv) Dicke superradiance model.

  2. Retrieval of original signals for superconducting quantum interference device operating in flux locked mode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘当婷; 田野; 赵士平; 任育峰; 陈赓华

    2015-01-01

    We discuss a simple relation between the input and output signals of a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer operating in flux locked mode in a cosine curve approximation. According to this relation, an original fast input signal can be easily retrieved from its distorted output response. This technique can be used in some areas such as sensitive and fast detection of magnetic or metallic grains in medicine and food security checking.

  3. Note: Increasing dynamic range of digital-to-analog converter using a superconducting quantum interference device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakanishi, Masakazu, E-mail: m.nakanishi@aist.go.jp [Metrology Institute of Japan, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, AIST Central-3, 1-1, Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8563 (Japan)

    2014-10-15

    Responses of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) are periodically dependent on magnetic flux coupling to its superconducting ring and the period is a flux quantum (Φ{sub o} = h/2e, where h and e, respectively, express Planck's constant and elementary charge). Using this periodicity, we had proposed a digital to analog converter using a SQUID (SQUID DAC) of first generation with linear current output, interval of which corresponded to Φ{sub o}. Modification for increasing dynamic range by interpolating within each interval is reported. Linearity of the interpolation was also based on the quantum periodicity. A SQUID DAC with dynamic range of about 1.4 × 10{sup 7} was created as a demonstration.

  4. The Two-Dimensional MnO2/Graphene Interface: Half-metallicity and Quantum Anomalous Hall State

    KAUST Repository

    Gan, Liyong

    2015-10-07

    We explore the electronic properties of the MnO2/graphene interface by first-principles calculations, showing that MnO2 becomes half-metallic. MnO2 in the MnO2/graphene/MnO2 system provides time-reversal and inversion symmetry breaking. Spin splitting by proximity occurs at the Dirac points and a topologically nontrivial band gap is opened, enabling a quantum anomalous Hall state. The half-metallicity, spin splitting, and size of the band gap depend on the interfacial interaction, which can be tuned by strain engineering.

  5. Quantum interference and control of the optical response in quantum dot molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, H. S.; Sanz, L.; Villas-Boas, J. M.; Alcalde, A. M. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, 38400-902 Uberlândia-MG (Brazil)

    2013-11-25

    We discuss the optical response of a quantum molecule under the action of two lasers fields. Using a realistic model and parameters, we map the physical conditions to find three different phenomena reported in the literature: the tunneling induced transparency, the formation of Autler-Townes doublets, and the creation of a Mollow-like triplet. We found that the electron tunneling between quantum dots is responsible for the different optical regime. Our results not only explain the experimental results in the literature but also give insights for future experiments and applications in optics using quantum dots molecules.

  6. Quantum Interference Phenomena and Novel Switching in Split Gate High Electron Mobility Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jong-Ching

    Nanometer scales electronic channels with and without a discontinuity were made in modulation-doped AlGaAs/GaAs heterojunctions using a split-gate technique. Quantum interference phenomena in an electron cavity, and fast switching behavior due to hot electron effects in a lateral double potential barrier structure were explored. First, one-dimensional channels with a double bend discontinuity were examined in the mK temperature range. Low-field ac-conductance measurements have evidenced quantum wave guide effects: resonant features were observed in the one-dimensional conductance plateaus in which the number of peaks was directly related to the geometry of the double bend. Temperature and magnetic field studies, along with a standing wave model have provided a better understanding of quantum interference phenomena in electron wave guide and cavity structures. Secondly, a structure containing two cascaded double bend discontinuities was studied. The structure behaves as a constricted cavity coupling two point-contacts, in which the depletion by the split gate was used to form and control the lateral double potential barriers. The low temperature source-drain characteristics exhibited a pronounced S-shaped negative differential conductance that can be attributed to a nonlinear electron temperature effect along the conducting path. The data presented show two types of conducting state: electron tunneling in the off state and hot electron conduction (thermionic emission) in the on state. The estimated switching speed of the device could be as fast as 5 ps due to short transit time.

  7. Dissecting contact mechanics from quantum interference in single-molecule junctions of stilbene derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aradhya, Sriharsha V; Meisner, Jeffrey S; Krikorian, Markrete; Ahn, Seokhoon; Parameswaran, Radha; Steigerwald, Michael L; Nuckolls, Colin; Venkataraman, Latha

    2012-03-14

    Electronic factors in molecules such as quantum interference and cross-conjugation can lead to dramatic modulation and suppression of conductance in single-molecule junctions. Probing such effects at the single-molecule level requires simultaneous measurements of independent junction properties, as conductance alone cannot provide conclusive evidence of junction formation for molecules with low conductivity. Here, we compare the mechanics of the conducting para-terminated 4,4'-di(methylthio)stilbene and moderately conducting 1,2-bis(4-(methylthio)phenyl)ethane to that of insulating meta-terminated 3,3'-di(methylthio)stilbene single-molecule junctions. We simultaneously measure force and conductance across single-molecule junctions and use force signatures to obtain independent evidence of junction formation and rupture in the meta-linked cross-conjugated molecule even when no clear low-bias conductance is measured. By separately quantifying conductance and mechanics, we identify the formation of atypical 3,3'-di(methylthio)stilbene molecular junctions that are mechanically stable but electronically decoupled. While theoretical studies have envisaged many plausible systems where quantum interference might be observed, our experiments provide the first direct quantitative study of the interplay between contact mechanics and the distinctively quantum mechanical nature of electronic transport in single-molecule junctions.

  8. Diode laser using narrow bandwidth interference filter at 852 nm and its application in Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhaojie; Zhou, Qi; Tao, Zhiming; Zhang, Xiaogang; Zhang, Shengnan; Zhu, Chuanwen; Lin, Pingwei; Chen, Jingbiao

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate an 852-nm external cavity diode laser (ECDL) system whose wavelength is mainly determined by an interference filter instead of other wavelength selective elements. The Lorentzian linewidth measured by the heterodyne beating between two identical lasers is 28.3 kHz. Moreover, we test the application of the ECDL in the Faraday atomic filter. Besides saturated absorption spectrum, the transmission spectrum of the Faraday atomic filter at 852 nm is measured by using the ECDL. This interference filter ECDL method can also be extended to other wavelengths and widen the application range of diode laser. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 91436210) and the International Science and Technology Cooperation Program of China (Grant No. 2010DFR10900).

  9. Anomalous Rashba spin-orbit interaction in electrically controlled topological insulator based on InN/GaN quantum wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepkowski, S P; Bardyszewski, Witold

    2017-03-22

    We study theoretically the topological phase transition and the Rashba spin-orbit interaction in electrically biased InN/GaN quantum wells. We show that that for properly chosen widths of quantum wells and barriers, one can effectively tune the system through the topological phase transition applying an external electric field perpendicular to the QW plane. We find that in InN/GaN quantum wells with the inverted band structure, when the conduction band s-type level is below the heavy hole and light hole p-type levels, the spin splitting of the subbands decreases with increasing the amplitude of the electric field in the quantum wells, which reveals the anomalous Rashba effect. Derived effective Rashba Hamiltonians can describe the subband spin splitting only for very small wave vectors due to strong coupling between the subbands. Furthermore, we demonstrate that for InN/GaN quantum wells in a Hall bar geometry, the critical voltage for the topological phase transition depends distinctly on the width of the structure and a significant spin splitting of the edge states lying in the two-dimensional band gap can be almost switched off by increasing the electric field in quantum wells only by a few percent. We show that the dependence of the spin splitting of the upper branch of the edge state dispersion curve on the wave vector has a threshold-like behavior with the on/off spin splitting ratio reaching two orders of magnitude for narrow Hall bars. The threshold wave vector depends weakly on the Hall bar width, whereas it increases significantly with the bias voltage due to an increase of the energetic distance between the s-type and p-type quantum well energy levels and a reduction of the coupling between the subbands.

  10. Anomalous time delays of an optical pulse interacting with a micro-resonator: a quantum weak-measurement approach

    CERN Document Server

    Asano, M; Bliokh, Y P; Kofman, A G; Zhao, G; Ikuta, R; Yamamoto, T; Kivshar, Y S; Yang, L; Imoto, N; Ozdemir, S K; Nori, F

    2016-01-01

    We study inelastic resonant scattering of a Gaussian pulse with the parameters close to a zero of the complex scattering coefficient. We demonstrate, both theoretically and experimentally, that such near-zero scattering can result in anomalously-large time delays and frequency shifts of the scattered pulse. Furthermore, we reveal a close analogy of these anomalous shifts with the spatial and angular Goos-Hanchen optical beam shifts, which are amplified via quantum weak measurements. However, in contrast to other beam-shift and weak-measurement systems, we deal with a one-dimensional scalar wave without any intrinsic degrees of freedom. It is the non-Hermitian nature of the system that produces its rich and non-trivial behaviour. Our results are generic for any scattering problem, either quantum or classical. As an example, we consider the transmission of an optical pulse through a nano-fiber with a side-coupled toroidal micro-resonator. The zero of the transmission coefficient corresponds to the critical coup...

  11. 0.54 {\\mu}m resolution two-photon interference with dispersion cancellation for quantum optical coherence tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Okano, Masayuki; Okamoto, Ryo; Nishizawa, Norihiko; Kurimura, Sunao; Takeuchi, Shigeki

    2016-01-01

    Quantum information technologies harness the intrinsic nature of quantum theory to beat the limitations of the classical methods for information processing and communication. Recently, the application of quantum features to metrology has attracted much attention. Quantum optical coherence tomography (QOCT), which utilizes two-photon interference between entangled photon pairs, is a promising approach to overcome the problem with optical coherence tomography (OCT): As the resolution of OCT becomes higher, degradation of the resolution due to dispersion within the medium becomes more critical. Here we report on the realization of 0.54 $\\mu$m resolution two-photon interference, which surpasses the current record resolution 0.75 $\\mu$m of low-coherence interference for OCT. In addition, the resolution for QOCT showed almost no change against the dispersion of a 1 mm thickness of water inserted in the optical path, whereas the resolution for OCT dramatically degrades. For this experiment, a highly-efficient chirpe...

  12. Modulation Voltage of High T c DC Superconducting Quantum Interference Device with Damping Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enpuku, Keiji; Doi, Hideki; Tokita, Go; Maruo, Taku

    1994-05-01

    The effect of damping resistance on the voltage versus flux (V -Φ) relation of the high T c dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) is studied experimentally. Dc SQUID using YBaCuO step-edge junction and damping resistance in parallel with SQUID inductance is fabricated. Measured values of modulation voltage in the V -Φ relation are compared with those of the conventional SQUID without damping resistance. It is shown that modulation voltage is much improved by using damping resistance. The obtained experimental results agree reasonably with theoretical predictions reported previously.

  13. Quantum interference of virtual and real amplitudes in a semiconductor exciton system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Y H; Choe, S B; Woo, J C; Kim, D S; Cundiff, S T; Shacklette, J M; Lim, Y S

    2002-12-02

    By two-color pulse shaping, we simultaneously create virtual and real amplitudes for excitons in GaAs quantum wells, and monitor population and amplitude by pump-probe and four-wave mixing spectroscopies. Excited-state probability amplitude can be induced by the off-resonant, virtual excitations as well as by the resonant, real excitations. Population modulation in time-domain results from the interference between the virtual and real amplitudes, and the modulation depth reveals the relative contributions of these two amplitudes. The fact that virtual and real amplitudes have a phase difference of 90 degrees is demonstrated directly in time-domain.

  14. Broadband calibrated scattering parameters characterization of a superconducting quantum interference device amplifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranzani, Leonardo [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States); University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Spietz, Lafe; Aumentado, Jose [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States)

    2013-07-08

    In this work, we characterize the 2-port scattering parameters of a superconducting quantum interference device amplifier at {approx}20 mK over several gigahertz of bandwidth. The measurement reference plane is positioned on a 6.25 {Omega} microstrip line situated directly at the input and output of the device by means of a thru-reflect-line cryogenic calibration procedure. From the scattering parameters, we derive the device available power gain, isolation, and input impedance over the 2-8 GHz range. This measurement methodology provides a path towards designing wide-band matching circuits for low impedance superconducting amplifiers operating at dilution refrigerator temperatures.

  15. Superconducting multiturn flux transformers for radio frequency superconducting quantum interference devices

    OpenAIRE

    Yi, H. R.; Zhang, Y; Schubert, J.; Zander, W.; Zeng, X. H.; Klein, N

    2000-01-01

    This article describes three planar layouts of superconducting multiturn flux transformers integrated with a coplanar resonator for radio frequency (rf) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers. The best magnetic field noise values of 22 and 11.5 fT/Hz(1/2) in the white noise regime were obtained for the layout with two input coils and the layout with the labyrinth resonator, respectively. Excess low-frequency noise (about 200 fT/Hz(1/2) at 10 Hz) was present. Compute...

  16. The impact of quantum interferences between different J-levels on scattering polarization in spectral lines

    CERN Document Server

    Belluzzi, Luca

    2011-01-01

    The spectral line polarization produced by optically pumped atoms contains a wealth of information on the thermal and magnetic structure of a variety of astrophysical plasmas, including that of the solar atmosphere. A correct decoding of such information from the observed Stokes profiles requires a clear understanding of the effects that radiatively induced quantum interferences (or coherences) between pairs of magnetic sublevels produce on these observables, in the absence and in the presence of magnetic fields of arbitrary strength. Here we present a detailed theoretical investigation on the role of coherences between pairs of sublevels pertaining to different fine-structure J-levels, clarifying when they can be neglected for facilitating the modeling of the linear polarization produced by scattering processes in spectral lines. To this end, we apply the quantum theory of spectral line polarization and calculate the linear polarization patterns of the radiation scattered at 90 degrees by a slab of stellar a...

  17. Fast preparation of W states with superconducting quantum interference devices by using dressed states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yi-Hao; Chen, Ye-Hong; Shi, Zhi-Cheng; Song, Jie; Xia, Yan

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a protocol to prepare W states with superconducting quantum interference devices by using dressed states. Through choosing a set of dressed states suitably, the protocol can be used to accelerate the adiabatic passages while additional couplings are unnecessary. Moreover, we can optimize the evolution of the system with the restraint to the populations of the intermediate states by choosing suitable control parameters. Numerical simulations show that the protocol is robust against the parameter variations and decoherence mechanisms. Furthermore, the protocol is faster and more robust against the dephasing compared with that by the adiabatic passages. As for the Rabi frequencies of pulses designed by the method, they can be expressed by the linear superpositions of Gaussian functions, which does not increase difficulty in the experiments. In addition, the protocol could be controlled and manipulated easily in experiments with a circuit quantum electrodynamics system.

  18. Anomalous breaking of anisotropic scaling symmetry in the quantum lifshitz model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baggio, M.; de Boer, J.; Holsheimer, K.

    2012-01-01

    In this note we investigate the anomalous breaking of anisotropic scaling symmetry (t, x) → (λ z t, λ x) in a non-relativistic field theory with dynamical exponent z = 2. On general grounds, one can show that there exist two possible "central charges" which characterize the breaking of scale invaria

  19. The Anomalous Nambu-Goldstone Theorem in Relativistic/Nonrelativistic Quantum Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Ohsaku, Tadafumi

    2013-01-01

    The anomalous Nambu-Goldstone (NG) theorem which is found as a violation of counting law of the number of NG bosons of the normal NG theorem in nonrelativistic and Lorentz-symmetry-violated relativistic theories is studied in detail, with emphasis on its mathematical aspect from Lie algebras, geometry to number theory. The basis of counting law of NG bosons in the anomalous NG theorem is examined by Lie algebras (local) and Lie groups (global). A quasi-Heisenberg algebra is found generically in various symmetry breaking schema of the anomalous NG theorem, and it indicates that it causes a violation/modification of the Heisenberg uncertainty relation in an NG sector which can be experimentally confirmed. The formalism of effective potential is presented for understanding the mechanism of anomalous NG theorem with the aid of our result of Lie algebras. After an investigation on a bosonic kaon condensation model with a finite chemical potential as an explicit Lorentz-symmetry-breaking parameter, a model Lagrangi...

  20. Role of inter-tube coupling and quantum interference on electrical transport in carbon nanotube junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, Srijeet; Bhattacharyya, Tarun Kanti

    2016-09-01

    Due to excellent transport properties, Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) show a lot of promise in sensor and interconnect technology. However, recent studies indicate that the conductance in CNT/CNT junctions are strongly affected by the morphology and orientation between the tubes. For proper utilization of such junctions in the development of CNT based technology, it is essential to study the electronic properties of such junctions. This work presents a theoretical study of the electrical transport properties of metallic Carbon nanotube homo-junctions. The study focuses on discerning the role of inter-tube interactions, quantum interference and scattering on the transport properties on junctions between identical tubes. The electronic structure and transport calculations are conducted with an Extended Hückel Theory-Non Equilibrium Green's Function based model. The calculations indicate conductance to be varying with a changing crossing angle, with maximum conductance corresponding to lattice registry, i.e. parallel configuration between the two tubes. Further calculations for such parallel configurations indicate onset of short and long range oscillations in conductance with respect to changing overlap length. These oscillations are attributed to inter-tube coupling effects owing to changing π orbital overlap, carrier scattering and quantum interference of the incident, transmitted and reflected waves at the inter-tube junction.

  1. Interference features in scanning gate conductance maps of quantum point contacts with disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolasiński, K.; Szafran, B.; Brun, B.; Sellier, H.

    2016-08-01

    We consider quantum point contact (QPC) defined within a disordered two-dimensional electron gas as studied by scanning gate microscopy. We evaluate the conductance maps in the Landauer approach with a wave-function picture of electron transport for samples with both low and high electron mobility at finite temperatures. We discuss the spatial distribution of the impurities in the context of the branched electron flow. We reproduce the surprising temperature stability of the experimental interference fringes far from the QPC. Next, we discuss funnel-shaped features that accompany splitting of the branches visible in previous experiments. Finally, we study elliptical interference fringes formed by an interplay of scattering by the pointlike impurities and by the scanning probe. We discuss the details of the elliptical features as functions of the tip voltage and the temperature, showing that the first interference fringe is very robust against the thermal widening of the Fermi level. We present a simple analytical model that allows for extraction of the impurity positions and the electron-gas depletion radius induced by the negatively charged tip of the atomic force microscope, and apply this model on experimental scanning gate images showing such elliptical fringes.

  2. Macroscopic Quantum Phenomena and Topological Phase Interference Effects in Single-Domain Magnets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) Rong; ZHU Jialin

    2001-01-01

    The tunneling of macroscopic object is one of the most fascinating phenomena in condensed matter physics.During the last decade,the problem of quantum tunneling of magnetization in nanometer-scale magnets has attracted a great deal of theoretical and experimental interest.A review of recent theoretical research of the macroscopic quantum phenomena in nanometer-scale single-domain magnets is presented in this paper.It includes macroscopic quantum tunneling (MQT) and coherence (MQC) in single-domain magnetic particles,the topological phase interference or spin-parity effects,and tunneling of magnetization in an arbitrarily directed magnetic field.The general formulas are shown to evaluate the tunneling rate and the tunneling level splitting for single-domain AFM particles.A nontrivial generalization of Kramers degeneracy for double-well system is provided to coherently spin tunneling for spin systems with m-fold rotational symmetry.The effects induced by the external magnetic field have been studied,where the field is along the easy,medium,hard axis,or arbitrary direction.

  3. Temporal Purity and Quantum Interference of Single Photons from Two Independent Cold Atomic Ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Peng; Gu, Zhenjie; Cao, Rong; Wen, Rong; Ou, Z. Y.; Chen, J. F.; Zhang, Weiping

    2016-07-01

    The temporal purity of single photons is crucial to the indistinguishability of independent photon sources for the fundamental study of the quantum nature of light and the development of photonic technologies. Currently, the technique for single photons heralded from time-frequency entangled biphotons created in nonlinear crystals does not guarantee the temporal-quantum purity, except using spectral filtering. Nevertheless, an entirely different situation is anticipated for narrow-band biphotons with a coherence time far longer than the time resolution of a single-photon detector. Here we demonstrate temporally pure single photons with a coherence time of 100 ns, directly heralded from the time-frequency entangled biphotons generated by spontaneous four-wave mixing in cold atomic ensembles, without any supplemented filters or cavities. A near-perfect purity and indistinguishability are both verified through Hong-Ou-Mandel quantum interference using single photons from two independent cold atomic ensembles. The time-frequency entanglement provides a route to manipulate the pure temporal state of the single-photon source.

  4. Effect of Quantum Interference from Incoherent Pumping Field and Spontaneous Emission on Controlling the Optical Bistability and Multi-Stability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.R.Hamedi; Ali Sari; M.Sahrai; S.H.Asadpour

    2013-01-01

    Optical bistability (OB) and optical multi-stability (OM) of a four-level A-type atomic system with two fold lower levels inside a unidirectional ring cavity is investigated.The effect of quantum interference arising from spontaneous emission and incoherent pumping on OB and OM is discussed.It is found that the threshold of OB and OM can be controlled by quantum interference mechanisms.In addition intensity of coupling field and the rate of an incoherent pumping field on behavior of OB and OM are then discussed.

  5. Prediction of quantum interference in molecular junctions using a parabolic diagram: Understanding the origin of Fano and anti-resonances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nozaki, Daijiro; Avdoshenko, Stanislav M.; Sevincli, Haldun;

    2013-01-01

    to predict the appearance of quantum interference, Fano resonances or anti- resonances, and its position in the conductance spectrum by introducing a simple graphical representation (parabolic model). Using it we can easily visualize the relation between the key electronic parameters and the positions...... of normal resonant peaks and anti-resonant peaks induced by quantum interference in the conductance spectrum. We also demonstrate Fano and anti-resonance in T-shaped molecular junctions using a simple tight-binding model. This parabolic model enables one to infer on-site energies of T-shaped molecules...

  6. Nuclear wave packet quantum interference in the intense laser dissociation of the $\\mathrm{D}_{2}^{+}$ molecule

    CERN Document Server

    Halász, Gábor J; Moiseyev, Nimrod; Cederbaum, Lorenz S

    2013-01-01

    Recently it has been recognized that electronic conical intersections in molecular systems can be induced by laser light even in diatomics. As is known a direct consequence of these accidental degeneracies is the appearence of nonadiabatic effects which has a strong impact on the nuclear quantum dynamics. Studying the photodissociation process of the $\\mathrm{D}_{2}^{+}$ molecule, we report here some novel and observable quantum interference phenomena that arise from the topological singularity induced by a strong laser field.

  7. Polarization-Dependent Interference of Coherent Scattering from Orthogonal Dipole Moments of a Resonantly Excited Quantum Dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Disheng; Lander, Gary R.; Solomon, Glenn S.; Flagg, Edward B.

    2017-01-01

    Resonant photoluminescence excitation (RPLE) spectra of a neutral InGaAs quantum dot show unconventional line shapes that depend on the detection polarization. We characterize this phenomenon by performing polarization-dependent RPLE measurements and simulating the measured spectra with a three-level quantum model. The spectra are explained by interference between fields coherently scattered from the two fine structure split exciton states, and the measurements enable extraction of the steady-state coherence between the two exciton states.

  8. Manipulation of Spontaneous Emission via Quantum Interference in an Elliptically Polarized Laser Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Chun-Ling; LI Jia-Hua; YU Rong; ZHANG Duo; YANG Xiao-Xue

    2013-01-01

    Manipulation of spontaneous emission from an atom confined in three kinds of modified reservoirs has been investigated by means of an elliptically polarized laser field.Some interesting phenomena such as the multi-peak structure,extreme spectral narrowing,and cancellation of spontaneous emission can be observed by adjusting controllable system parameters.Moreover,these phenomena depend on the constructive or destructive quantum interference between multiple decay channels and which can be changed appreciably by varying the phase difference between the two circularly polarized components of the probe field.These results demonstrate the importance of an elliptically polarized laser field in controlling the spontaneous emission and its potential applications in high-precision spectroscopy.

  9. A cryogen-free ultralow-field superconducting quantum interference device magnetic resonance imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob, E-mail: ihahn@caltech.edu [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at microtesla fields using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detection has previously been demonstrated, and advantages have been noted. Although the ultralow-field SQUID MRI technique would not need the heavy superconducting magnet of conventional MRI systems, liquid helium required to cool the low-temperature detector still places a significant burden on its operation. We have built a prototype cryocooler-based SQUID MRI system that does not require a cryogen. The SQUID detector and the superconducting gradiometer were cooled down to 3.7 K and 4.3 K, respectively. We describe the prototype design, characterization, a phantom image, and areas of further improvements needed to bring the imaging performance to parity with conventional MRI systems.

  10. A cryogen-free ultralow-field superconducting quantum interference device magnetic resonance imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2014-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at microtesla fields using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detection has previously been demonstrated, and advantages have been noted. Although the ultralow-field SQUID MRI technique would not need the heavy superconducting magnet of conventional MRI systems, liquid helium required to cool the low-temperature detector still places a significant burden on its operation. We have built a prototype cryocooler-based SQUID MRI system that does not require a cryogen. The SQUID detector and the superconducting gradiometer were cooled down to 3.7 K and 4.3 K, respectively. We describe the prototype design, characterization, a phantom image, and areas of further improvements needed to bring the imaging performance to parity with conventional MRI systems.

  11. Phase-dependent quantum interference between different pathways in bichromatic harmonic generation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cai Jun; Wang Li-Ming; Qiao Hao-Xue

    2009-01-01

    This paper studies the harmonic generation of the hydrogen atom subjected to a collinear bichromatic laser field by numerically solving the time-dependent Schr(o)dinger equation using the split-operator pseudo-spectral method.By adding a frequency variation to the additional field,the contributions of different pathways to particular order harmonic generation can be isolated.The quantum interference pattern between harmonic pathways,which influences the harmonic intensity,is found to be either constructive or destructive with respect to different relative phase of the two field components.Detailed description of up to the 35th-order harmonics and the harmonic pathways for a wide range of field parameters is presented.

  12. Generation of continuous-wave THz radiation by use of quantum interference

    CERN Document Server

    Korsunsky, E A

    1999-01-01

    We propose a scheme for generation of continuous-wave THz radiation. The scheme requires a medium where three discrete states in a $\\Lambda $ configuration can be selected, with the THz-frequency transition between the two lower metastable states. We consider the propagation of three-frequency continuous-wave electromagnetic (e.m.) radiation through a $\\Lambda $ medium. Under resonant excitation, the medium absorption can be strongly reduced due to quantum interference of transitions, while the nonlinear susceptibility is enhanced. This leads to very efficient energy transfer between the e.m. waves providing a possibility for THz generation. We demonstrate that the photon conversion efficiency is approaching unity in this technique.

  13. Constructive interference between disordered couplings enhances multiparty entanglement in quantum Heisenberg spin glass models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Utkarsh; Rakshit, Debraj; Prabhu, R.; Sen(De, Aditi; Sen, Ujjwal

    2016-08-01

    Disordered systems form one of the centrestages of research in many body sciences and lead to a plethora of interesting phenomena and applications. A paradigmatic disordered system consists of a one-dimensional array of quantum spin-1/2 particles, governed by the Heisenberg spin glass Hamiltonian with natural or engineered quenched disordered couplings in an external magnetic field. These systems allow disorder-induced enhancement for bipartite and multipartite observables. Here we show that simultaneous application of independent quenched disorders results in disorder-induced enhancement, while the same is absent with individual application of the same disorders. We term the phenomenon as constructive interference and the corresponding parameter stretches as the Venus regions. Interestingly, it has only been observed for multiparty entanglement and is absent for the single- and two-party physical quantities.

  14. Optical transmission modules for multi-channel superconducting quantum interference device readouts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Mok; Kwon, Hyukchan; Yu, Kwon-kyu; Lee, Yong-Ho; Kim, Kiwoong

    2013-12-01

    We developed an optical transmission module consisting of 16-channel analog-to-digital converter (ADC), digital-noise filter, and one-line serial transmitter, which transferred Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) readout data to a computer by a single optical cable. A 16-channel ADC sent out SQUID readouts data with 32-bit serial data of 8-bit channel and 24-bit voltage data at a sample rate of 1.5 kSample/s. A digital-noise filter suppressed digital noises generated by digital clocks to obtain SQUID modulation as large as possible. One-line serial transmitter reformed 32-bit serial data to the modulated data that contained data and clock, and sent them through a single optical cable. When the optical transmission modules were applied to 152-channel SQUID magnetoencephalography system, this system maintained a field noise level of 3 fT/√Hz @ 100 Hz.

  15. Single-Molecule Electronics with Cross- Conjugated Molecules: Quantum Interference, IETS and Non-Equilibrium "Temperatures"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jacob Lykkebo

    , which is characterised by destructive quantum interference. The molecules are cross-conjugated, which means that the two parts of the molecules are conjugated to a third part, but not to each other. This gives rise to an anti-resonance in the trans- mission. In the low bias and low temperature regime......, the electrons can tunnel in- elastically from the left to the right electrode. This is the process behind inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy (IETS), which is a single-molecule spectroscopic method, where the vibrational ngerprint of a molecule is di- rectly observed by the tunnelling current......-conjugated molecules. We nd that the vibrational modes that would be expected to dominate, following the propensity, rules are very weak. Instead, other modes are found to be the dominant ones. We study this phenomenon for a number of cross-conjugated molecules, and link these ndings to the anti...

  16. Principle and experimental investigation of current-driven negative-inductance superconducting quantum interference device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Liu, Jianshe; Zhang, Yingshan; Cai, Han; Li, Gang; Liu, Qichun; Han, Siyuan; Chen, Wei

    2017-03-01

    A negative-inductance superconducting quantum interference device (nSQUID) is an adiabatic superconducting logic device with high energy efficiency, and therefore a promising building block for large-scale low-power superconducting computing. However, the principle of the nSQUID is not that straightforward and an nSQUID driven by voltage is vulnerable to common mode noise. We investigate a single nSQUID driven by current instead of voltage, and clarify the principle of the adiabatic transition of the current-driven nSQUID between different states. The basic logic operations of the current-driven nSQUID with proper parameters are simulated by WRspice. The corresponding circuit is fabricated with a 100 A cm‑2 Nb-based lift-off process, and the experimental results at low temperature confirm the basic logic operations as a gated buffer.

  17. Superconducting quantum interference device microsusceptometer balanced over a wide bandwidth for nuclear magnetic resonance applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinante, A., E-mail: anvinante@fbk.eu; Falferi, P. [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, CNR - Fondazione Bruno Kessler, I-38123 Povo, Trento (Italy); Mezzena, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Trento, I-38123 Povo, Trento (Italy)

    2014-10-15

    Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) microsusceptometers have been widely used to study magnetic properties of materials at microscale. As intrinsically balanced devices, they could also be exploited for direct SQUID-detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) from micron sized samples, or for SQUID readout of mechanically detected NMR from submicron sized samples. Here, we demonstrate a double balancing technique that enables achievement of very low residual imbalance of a SQUID microsusceptometer over a wide bandwidth. In particular, we can generate ac magnetic fields within the SQUID loop as large as 1 mT, for frequencies ranging from dc up to a few MHz. As an application, we demonstrate direct detection of NMR from {sup 1}H spins in a glycerol droplet placed directly on top of the 20 μm SQUID loops.

  18. Superconductive quantum interference magnetometer with high sensitivity achieved by an induced resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vettoliere, A; Granata, C

    2014-08-01

    A fully integrated low noise superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) in a magnetometer configuration is presented. An intrinsic high voltage responsivity as high as 500 μV/Φ0 has been obtained by introducing a resonance in the voltage - magnetic flux characteristic. This resonance is induced by an integrated superconducting coil surrounding the pick-up coil and connected to one end of the SQUID output. The SQUID magnetometer exhibits a spectral density of magnetic field noise as low as 3 fT/Hz(1/2). In order to verify the suitability of the magnetometer, measurements of bandwidth and slew rate have been performed and compared with those of the same device without the resonance and with additional positive feedback. Due to their good characteristics such devices can be employed in a large number of applications including biomagnetism.

  19. Optical transmission modules for multi-channel superconducting quantum interference device readouts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin-Mok, E-mail: jmkim@kriss.re.kr; Kwon, Hyukchan; Yu, Kwon-kyu; Lee, Yong-Ho; Kim, Kiwoong [Brain Cognition Measurement Center, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    We developed an optical transmission module consisting of 16-channel analog-to-digital converter (ADC), digital-noise filter, and one-line serial transmitter, which transferred Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) readout data to a computer by a single optical cable. A 16-channel ADC sent out SQUID readouts data with 32-bit serial data of 8-bit channel and 24-bit voltage data at a sample rate of 1.5 kSample/s. A digital-noise filter suppressed digital noises generated by digital clocks to obtain SQUID modulation as large as possible. One-line serial transmitter reformed 32-bit serial data to the modulated data that contained data and clock, and sent them through a single optical cable. When the optical transmission modules were applied to 152-channel SQUID magnetoencephalography system, this system maintained a field noise level of 3 fT/√Hz @ 100 Hz.

  20. Non-linear behaviour of a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device coupled to a radio frequency oscillator

    CERN Document Server

    Murrell, J K J

    2001-01-01

    previously unexplored regions of parameter space. We show that these calculations predict a range of previously unreported dynamical I-V characterises for SQUID rings in the strongly hysteretic regime. Finally, we present the successful realisation of a novel experimental technique that permits the weak link of a SQUID to be probed independently of the associated ring structure by mechanically opening and closing the ring. We demonstrate that this process can be completed during the same experimental run without the need for warming and re-cooling of the sample. This thesis is concerned with the investigation of the non-linear behaviour of a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) coupled to a RF tank circuit. We consider two regimes, one where the underlying SQUID behaviour is non-hysteretic with respect to an externally applied magnetic flux, and the other where hysteretic (dissipative) behaviour is observed. We show that, by following non-linearities induced in the tank circuit response, the un...

  1. Experimental validation of superconducting quantum interference device sensors for electromagnetic scattering in geologic structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, R.H. Jr.; Flynn, E.; Ruminer, P. [and others

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project has supported the collaborative development with Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the University of New Mexico (UNM) of two critical components for a hand-held low-field magnetic sensor based on superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) sensor technology. The two components are a digital signal processing (DSP) algorithm for background noise rejection and a small hand-held dewar cooled by a cryocooler. A hand-held sensor has been designed and fabricated for detection of extremely weak magnetic fields in unshielded environments. The sensor is capable of measuring weak magnetic fields in unshielded environments and has multiple applications. We have chosen to pursue battlefield medicine as the highest probability near-term application because of stated needs of several agencies.

  2. Exploring quantum interference in heteroatom-substituted graphene-like molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangtarash, Sara; Sadeghi, Hatef; Lambert, Colin J.

    2016-07-01

    If design principles for controlling quantum interference in single molecules could be elucidated and verified, then this will lay the foundations for exploiting such effects in nanoscale devices and thin-film materials. When the core of a graphene-like polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) is weakly coupled to external electrodes by atoms i and j, the single-molecule electrical conductance σij depends on the choice of connecting atoms i,j. Furthermore, provided the Fermi energy is located between the HOMO and LUMO, conductance ratios σij/σlm corresponding to different connectivities i,j and l,m are determined by quantum interference within the PAH core. In this paper, we examine how such conductance ratios change when one of the carbon atoms within the `parent' PAH core is replaced by a heteroatom to yield a `daughter' molecule. For bipartite parental cores, in which odd-numbered sites are connected to even-numbered sites only, the effect of heteroatom substitution onto an odd-numbered site is summarized by the following qualitative rules: (a) when i and j are odd, both parent and daughter have low conductances, (b) when i is odd and j is even, or vice versa both parent and daughter have high conductances and (c) when i,j are both even, the parent has a low conductance and the daughter a high conductance. These rules are verified by comparison with density-functional calculations on naphthalene, anthracene, pyrene and anthanthrene cores connected via two different anchor groups to gold electrodes.If design principles for controlling quantum interference in single molecules could be elucidated and verified, then this will lay the foundations for exploiting such effects in nanoscale devices and thin-film materials. When the core of a graphene-like polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) is weakly coupled to external electrodes by atoms i and j, the single-molecule electrical conductance σij depends on the choice of connecting atoms i,j. Furthermore, provided the Fermi energy is

  3. Cosmic Structure as the Quantum Interference of a Coherent Dark Wave

    CERN Document Server

    Schive, Hsi-Yu; Broadhurst, Tom

    2014-01-01

    The conventional cold, particle interpretation of dark matter (CDM) still lacks laboratory support and struggles with the basic properties of common dwarf galaxies, which have surprisingly uniform central masses and shallow density profiles. In contrast, galaxies predicted by CDM extend to much lower masses, with steeper, singular profiles. This tension motivates cold, wavelike dark matter ($\\psi$DM) composed of a non-relativistic Bose-Einstein condensate, so the uncertainty principle counters gravity below a Jeans scale. Here we achieve the first cosmological simulations of this quantum state at unprecedentedly high resolution capable of resolving dwarf galaxies, with only one free parameter, $\\bf{m_B}$, the boson mass. We demonstrate the large scale structure of this $\\psi$DM simulation is indistinguishable from CDM, as desired, but differs radically inside galaxies. Connected filaments and collapsed haloes form a large interference network, with gravitationally self-bound solitonic cores inside every galax...

  4. Anomalous excitation-power-dependent photoluminescence of InGaAsN/GaAs T-shaped quantum wire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klangtakai, Pawinee; Pimanpang, Samuk [Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Khon Kaen University, 123 Mittraphap Rd., Muang, Khon Kaen, 40002 (Thailand); Nanotec-KKU Center of Excellence on Advanced Nanomaterials for Energy Production and Storage, Khon Kaen, 40002 (Thailand); Integrated Nanotechnology Research Center, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, 40002 (Thailand); Sanorpim, Sakuntam [Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Chulalongkorn University, Phayathai Rd., Patumwan, Bangkok, 10330 (Thailand); Karlsson, Fredrik; Holtz, Per Olof [Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Biology (IFM), Linkoeping University, 58183, Linkoeping (Sweden); Onabe, Kentaro [Department of Advanced Materials Science, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba, 277-8561 (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    The selected InGaAsN/GaAs T-shaped quantum wire (T-QWR) fabricated by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy has been investigated by microphotoluminescence (μ-PL) and excitation-power-dependent μ-PL. The optical characteristics of one-dimensional structure were taken at low-temperature (4 K) and room temperature (RT) to clarify the intersection of two familiar quantum wells (QWs) in the [001] and [110] directions, named QW1 and QW2, respectively. For the excitation-power-dependent measurement, the intensity of the excitation source was used in the range of 0.001I{sub 0} to I{sub 0}. The result shows that all of emissions related to QW1 and QWR peaks have a nonsymmetric line shape as evidenced by the tailing on the lower-energy side. All peaks shift to higher-energy side (blueshift) with the increase of the excitation power intensity. The blueshift and the low-energy tailing of PL peaks are attributed to the alloying effect. However, the emission peak related to QWR region shows a larger blueshift rate than that of QW1 on increasing of the excitation power intensity. This is an anomalous characteristic for the low-dimensional structure, affected by the large fluctuation state in the QWR region. This fluctuation state is combined of both edges of QWs (QW1 and QW2). (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Color-tuned and transparent colloidal quantum dot solar cells via optimized multilayer interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arinze, Ebuka S; Qiu, Botong; Palmquist, Nathan; Cheng, Yan; Lin, Yida; Nyirjesy, Gabrielle; Qian, Gary; Thon, Susanna M

    2017-02-20

    Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs), are a promising candidate material for realizing colored and semitransparent solar cells, due to their band gap tunability, near infrared responsivity and solution-based processing flexibility. CQD solar cells are typically comprised of several optically thin active and electrode layers that are optimized for their electrical properties; however, their spectral tunability beyond the absorption onset of the CQD layer itself has been relatively unexplored. In this study, we design, optimize and fabricate multicolored and transparent CQD devices by means of thin film interference engineering. We develop an optimization algorithm to produce devices with controlled color characteristics. We quantify the tradeoffs between attainable color or transparency and available photocurrent, calculate the effects of non-ideal interference patterns on apparent device color, and apply our optimization method to tandem solar cell design. Experimentally, we fabricate blue, green, yellow, red and semitransparent devices and achieve photocurrents ranging from 10 to 15.2 mA/cm2 for the colored devices. We demonstrate semitransparent devices with average visible transparencies ranging from 27% to 32%, which match our design simulation results. We discuss how our optimization method provides a general platform for custom-design of optoelectronic devices with arbitrary spectral profiles.

  6. The quantum interference effects in the Sc II 4247 $\\AA$ line of the Second Solar Spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Smitha, H N; Stenflo, J O; Bianda, M; Ramelli, R

    2014-01-01

    The Sc II 4247 $\\AA$ line formed in the chromosphere is one of the lines well known, like the Na I D$_2$ and Ba II D$_2$, for its prominent triple peak structure in $Q/I$ and the underlying quantum interference effects governing it. In this paper, we try to study the nature of this triple peak structure using the theory of $F$-state interference including the effects of partial frequency redistribution (PRD) and radiative transfer (RT). We compare our results with the observations taken in a quiet region near the solar limb. In spite of accounting for PRD and RT effects it has not been possible to reproduce the observed triple peak structure in $Q/I$. While the two wing PRD peaks (on either side of central peak) and the near wing continuum can be reproduced, the central peak is completely suppressed by the enhanced depolarization resulting from the hyperfine structure splitting. This suppression remains for all the tested widely different 1D model atmospheres or for any multi-component combinations of them. W...

  7. Self-heterodyne detection of the in situ phase of an atomic superconducting quantum interference device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, R.; Kumar, A.; Eckel, S.; Jendrzejewski, F.; Campbell, G. K.; Edwards, Mark; Tiesinga, E.

    2015-09-01

    We present theoretical and experimental analysis of an interferometric measurement of the in situ phase drop across and current flow through a rotating barrier in a toroidal Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). This experiment is the atomic analog of the rf-superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). The phase drop is extracted from a spiral-shaped density profile created by the spatial interference of the expanding toroidal BEC and a reference BEC after release from all trapping potentials. We characterize the interferometer when it contains a single particle, which is initially in a coherent superposition of a torus and reference state, as well as when it contains a many-body state in the mean-field approximation. The single-particle picture is sufficient to explain the origin of the spirals, to relate the phase-drop across the barrier to the geometry of a spiral, and to bound the expansion times for which the in situ phase can be accurately determined. Mean-field estimates and numerical simulations show that the interatomic interactions shorten the expansion time scales compared to the single-particle case. Finally, we compare the mean-field simulations with our experimental data and confirm that the interferometer indeed accurately measures the in situ phase drop.

  8. Aharonov-Bohm-type quantum interference effects in narrow gap semiconductor heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillianfeld, R. B.; Kallaher, R. L.; Heremans, J. J.; Chen, Hong; Goel, N.; Chung, S. J.; Santos, M. B.; van Roy, W.; Borghs, G.

    2009-03-01

    We present experiments on quantum interference phenomena in semiconductors with strong spin-orbit interaction, using mesoscopic parallel ring arrays fabricated on InSb/InAlSb and InAs/AlGaSb heterostructures. Both external electric field effects and temperature dependence of the ring magnetoresistance are examined. Top-gate voltage-dependent oscillations in ring resistance in the absence of an external magnetic field are suggestive of Aharonov-Casher interference. At low magnetic fields the ring magnetoresistance is dominated by oscillations with h/2e periodicity characteristic of Altshuler-Aronov-Spivak (AAS) oscillations, whereas the h/e periodicity characteristic of Aharonov-Bohm (AB) oscillations persists to high magnetic fields. Fourier spectra (FS) reveal AB amplitudes on the same order as AAS amplitudes at low fields, and in some samples reveal a splitting of the AB peaks, which has been interpreted as a signature of Berry's phase. The FS are also used to quantify the temperature dependence of the oscillation amplitudes (NSF DMR-0618235, DOE DE-FG02-08ER46532, NSF DMR-0520550).

  9. An Efficient Scheme for Implementing an N-Qubit Toffoli Gate with Superconducting Quantum-Interference Devices in Cavity QED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG An-Shou; LIU Ji-Bing; XIANG Dong; LIU Cui-Lan; YUAN Hong

    2007-01-01

    An alternative approach is proposed to realize an n-qubit Toffoli gate with superconducting quantum-interference devices (SQUIDs) in cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED). In the proposal, we represent two logical gates of a qubit with the two lowest levels of a SQUID while a higher-energy intermediate level of each SQUID is utilized for the gate manipulation. During the operating process, because the cavity field is always in vacuum state, the requirement on the cavity is greatly loosened and there is no transfer of quantum information between the cavity and SQUIDs.

  10. Unravelling the role of quantum interference in the weak-field laser phase modulation control of photofragment distributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    García-Vela, Alberto; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    2016-01-01

    The role played by quantum interference in the laser phase modulation coherent control of photofragment distributions in the weak-field regime is investigated in detail in this work. The specific application involves realistic wave packet calculations of the transient vibrational populations of t...

  11. Classical and quantum mechanics on information spaces with applications to cognitive, psychological, social and anomalous phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Khrennikov, A Yu

    1999-01-01

    We use the system of p-adic numbers for the description of informationprocesses. Basic objects of our models are so called transformers ofinformation, basic processes are information processes, the statistics areinformation statistics (thus we present a model of information reality). Theclassical and quantum mechanical formalisms on information p-adic spaces aredeveloped. It seems that classical and quantum mechanical models on p-adicinformation spaces can be applied for the investigation of flows of informationin cognitive and social systems, since a p-adic metric gives quite naturaldescription of the ability to form associations.

  12. Tiny adiabatic-demagnetization refrigerator for a commercial superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Taku J; Okuyama, Daisuke; Kimura, Hideo

    2016-12-01

    A tiny adiabatic-demagnetization refrigerator (T-ADR) has been developed for a commercial superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer [Magnetic Property Measurement System (MPMS) from Quantum Design]. The whole T-ADR system is fit in a cylindrical space of diameter 8.5 mm and length 250 mm, and can be inserted into the narrow sample tube of MPMS. A sorption pump is self-contained in T-ADR, and hence no complex gas handling system is necessary. With the single crystalline Gd3Ga5O12 garnet (∼2 g) used as a magnetic refrigerant, the routinely achievable lowest temperature is ∼0.56 K. The lower detection limit for a magnetization anomaly is ∼1 × 10(-7) emu, estimated from fluctuation of the measured magnetization. The background level is ∼5 × 10(-5) emu below 2 K at H = 100 Oe, which is largely attributable to a contaminating paramagnetic signal from the magnetic refrigerant.

  13. Tiny adiabatic-demagnetization refrigerator for a commercial superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Taku J.; Okuyama, Daisuke; Kimura, Hideo

    2016-12-01

    A tiny adiabatic-demagnetization refrigerator (T-ADR) has been developed for a commercial superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer [Magnetic Property Measurement System (MPMS) from Quantum Design]. The whole T-ADR system is fit in a cylindrical space of diameter 8.5 mm and length 250 mm, and can be inserted into the narrow sample tube of MPMS. A sorption pump is self-contained in T-ADR, and hence no complex gas handling system is necessary. With the single crystalline Gd3Ga5O12 garnet (˜2 g) used as a magnetic refrigerant, the routinely achievable lowest temperature is ˜0.56 K. The lower detection limit for a magnetization anomaly is ˜1 × 10-7 emu, estimated from fluctuation of the measured magnetization. The background level is ˜5 × 10-5 emu below 2 K at H = 100 Oe, which is largely attributable to a contaminating paramagnetic signal from the magnetic refrigerant.

  14. Rigorous quantum field theory functional integrals over the p-adics I: anomalous dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Abdesselam, Abdelmalek; Guadagni, Gianluca

    2013-01-01

    In this article we provide the complete proof of the result announced in arXiv:1210.7717 about the construction of scale invariant non-Gaussian generalized stochastic processes over three dimensional p-adic space. The construction includes that of the associated squared field and our result shows this squared field has a dynamically generated anomalous dimension which rigorously confirms a prediction made more than forty years ago, in an essentially identical situation, by K. G. Wilson. We also prove a mild form of universality for the model under consideration. Our main innovation is that our rigourous renormalization group formalism allows for space dependent couplings. We derive the relationship between mixed correlations and the dynamical systems features of our extended renormalization group transformation at a nontrivial fixed point. The key to our control of the composite field is a partial linearization theorem which is an infinite-dimensional version of the Koenigs Theorem in holomorphic dynamics. Th...

  15. The Third Law of Quantum Thermodynamics in the Presence of Anomalous Couplings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Chun-Yang; BAO Jing-Dong

    2008-01-01

    The quantum thermodynamic functions of a hormonic oscillator coupled to a heat bath through velocity dependent coupling are obtained analytically.It is shown that both the free energy and the entropy decay fast with the temperature in relation to that of the usual coupling from.This implies that the veloeity-dependent coupling helps to ensure the third law of thermodynamics.

  16. Modeling the quantum interference signatures of the Ba II D2 4554 A line in the second solar spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Smitha, H N; Stenflo, J O; Sampoorna, M

    2013-01-01

    Quantum interference effects play a vital role in shaping the linear polarization profiles of solar spectral lines. The Ba II D2 line at 4554 A is a prominent example, where the F-state interference effects due to the odd isotopes produce polarization profiles, which are very different from those of the even isotopes that have no F-state interference. It is therefore necessary to account for the contributions from the different isotopes to understand the observed linear polarization profiles of this line. Here we do radiative transfer modeling with partial frequency redistribution (PRD) of such observations while accounting for the interference effects and isotope composition. The Ba II D2 polarization profile is found to be strongly governed by the PRD mechanism. We show how a full PRD treatment succeeds in reproducing the observations, while complete frequency redistribution (CRD) alone fails to produce polarization profiles that have any resemblance with the observed ones. However, we also find that the li...

  17. Anomalous conductance of a strongly interacting Fermi gas through a quantum point contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Boyang; Zhai, Hui; Zhang, Shizhong

    2017-01-01

    In this work we study the particle conductance of a strongly interacting Fermi gas through a quantum point contact. With an atom-molecule two-channel model, we compute the contribution to particle conductance by both the fermionic atoms and the bosonic molecules using the Keldysh formalism. Focusing on the regime above the Fermi superfluid transition temperature, we find that the fermionic contribution to the conductance is reduced by interaction compared with the quantized value for the noninteracting case; while the bosonic contribution to the conductance exhibits a plateau with nonuniversal values that is larger than the quantized conductance. This feature is particularly profound at temperature close to the superfluid transition. We emphasize that the enhanced conductance arises because of the bosonic nature of closed channel molecules and the low dimensionality of the quantum point contact.

  18. Anomalous Temperature Dependence of Photoluminescence in InAs/InAlGaAs/InP Quantum Wire and Dot Hybrid Nanostructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xin-Rong; XU Bo; WANG Hai-Fei; ZHAO Guo-Qing; SHI Shu-Hui; SHEN Xiao-Zhi; LI Jun-Feng; WANG Zhan-Guo

    2011-01-01

    Self-assembled InAs quantum wires (QWRs) are fabricated on an InP substrate by solid-source molecular beam epitaxy (SSMBE). Photoluminescence (PL) spectra are investigated in these nanostructures as a function of temperature. An anomalous enhancement of PL intensity and a temperature insensitive PL emission are observed from lnAs nanostructures grown on InP substrates using lnAIGaAs as the matrix layer and the origin of this phenomenon is discussed. We attribute the anomalous temperature dependence of photoluminescence to the formation of Al-rich and In-rich region in the InAlGaAs buffer layer and the cap layer.%@@ Self-assembled InAs quantum wires (QWRs) are fabricated on an InP substrate by solid-source molecular beam epitaxy (SSMBE).Photoluminescence (PL) spectra are investigated in these nanostructures as a function of temperature.An anomalous enhancement of PL intensity and a temperature insensitive PL emission are observed from InAs nanostructures grown on InP substrates using InAlGaAs as the matrix layer and the origin of this phenomenon is discussed.We attribute the anomalous temperature dependence of photoluminescence to the formation of Al-rich and In-rich region in the InAlGaAs buffer layer and the cap layer.

  19. Anomalous enhanced emission from PbS quantum dots on a photonic-crystal microcavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luk, Ting Shan; Xiong, Shisheng; Chow, Weng W.; Miao, Xiaoyu; Subramania, Ganesh; Resnick, Paul J.; Fischer, Arthur J.; Brinker, Jeffrey C.

    2011-05-09

    We report up to 75 times enhancement in emission from lithographically produced photonic crystals with postprocessing close-packed colloidal quantum-dot incorporation. In our analysis, we use the emission from a close-packed free-standing film as a reference. After discounting the angular redistribution effect, our analysis shows that the observed enhancement is larger than the combined effects of Purcell enhancement and dielectric enhancement with the microscopic local field. The additional enhancement mechanisms, which are consistent with all our observations, are thought to be spectral diffusion mediated by phonons and local polarization fluctuations that allow off-resonant excitons to emit at the cavity wavelengths.

  20. Intrinsic quantum spin Hall and anomalous Hall effects in h-Sb/Bi epitaxial growth on a ferromagnetic MnO2 thin film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jian; Sun, Qiang; Wang, Qian; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki; Jena, Puru

    2016-06-07

    Exploring a two-dimensional intrinsic quantum spin Hall state with a large band gap as well as an anomalous Hall state in realizable materials is one of the most fundamental and important goals for future applications in spintronics, valleytronics, and quantum computing. Here, by combining first-principles calculations with a tight-binding model, we predict that Sb or Bi can epitaxially grow on a stable and ferromagnetic MnO2 thin film substrate, forming a flat honeycomb sheet. The flatness of Sb or Bi provides an opportunity for the existence of Dirac points in the Brillouin zone, with its position effectively tuned by surface hydrogenation. The Dirac points in spin up and spin down channels split due to the proximity effects induced by MnO2. In the presence of both intrinsic and Rashba spin-orbit coupling, we find two band gaps exhibiting a large band gap quantum spin Hall state and a nearly quantized anomalous Hall state which can be tuned by adjusting the Fermi level. Our findings provide an efficient way to realize both quantized intrinsic spin Hall conductivity and anomalous Hall conductivity in a single material.

  1. Conetronics in 2D metal-organic frameworks: double/half Dirac cones and quantum anomalous Hall effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Menghao; Wang, Zhijun; Liu, Junwei; Li, Wenbin; Fu, Huahua; Sun, Lei; Liu, Xin; Pan, Minghu; Weng, Hongming; Dincă, Mircea; Fu, Liang; Li, Ju

    2017-03-01

    Bandstructure with Dirac cones gives rise to massless Dirac fermions with rich physics, and here we predict rich cone properties in M 3C12S12 and M 3C12O12, where M = Zn, Cd, Hg, Be, or Mg based on recently synthesized Ni3C12S12—class 2D metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). For M 3C12S12, their band structures exhibit double Dirac cones with different Fermi velocities that are n (electron) and p (hole) type, respectively, which are switchable by few-percent strain. The crossing of two cones are symmetry-protected to be non-hybridizing, leading to two independent channels at the same k-point akin to spin-channels in spintronics, rendering ‘conetronics’ device possible. For M 3C12O12, together with conjugated metal-tricatecholate polymers M 3(HHTP)2, the spin-polarized slow Dirac cone center is pinned precisely at the Fermi level, making the systems conducting in only one spin/cone channel. Quantum anomalous Hall effect can arise in MOFs with non-negligible spin-orbit coupling like Cu3C12O12. Compounds of M 3C12S12 and M 3C12O12 with different M, can be used to build spin/cone-selecting heterostructure devices tunable by strain or electrostatic gating, suggesting their potential applications in spintroincs/conetronics.

  2. High electron mobility, quantum Hall effect and anomalous optical response in atomically thin InSe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandurin, Denis A.; Tyurnina, Anastasia V.; Yu, Geliang L.; Mishchenko, Artem; Zólyomi, Viktor; Morozov, Sergey V.; Kumar, Roshan Krishna; Gorbachev, Roman V.; Kudrynskyi, Zakhar R.; Pezzini, Sergio; Kovalyuk, Zakhar D.; Zeitler, Uli; Novoselov, Konstantin S.; Patanè, Amalia; Eaves, Laurence; Grigorieva, Irina V.; Fal'Ko, Vladimir I.; Geim, Andre K.; Cao, Yang

    2016-11-01

    A decade of intense research on two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystals has revealed that their properties can differ greatly from those of the parent compound. These differences are governed by changes in the band structure due to quantum confinement and are most profound if the underlying lattice symmetry changes. Here we report a high-quality 2D electron gas in few-layer InSe encapsulated in hexagonal boron nitride under an inert atmosphere. Carrier mobilities are found to exceed 103 cm2 V‑1 s‑1 and 104 cm2 V‑1 s‑1 at room and liquid-helium temperatures, respectively, allowing the observation of the fully developed quantum Hall effect. The conduction electrons occupy a single 2D subband and have a small effective mass. Photoluminescence spectroscopy reveals that the bandgap increases by more than 0.5 eV with decreasing the thickness from bulk to bilayer InSe. The band-edge optical response vanishes in monolayer InSe, which is attributed to the monolayer's mirror-plane symmetry. Encapsulated 2D InSe expands the family of graphene-like semiconductors and, in terms of quality, is competitive with atomically thin dichalcogenides and black phosphorus.

  3. High electron mobility, quantum Hall effect and anomalous optical response in atomically thin InSe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandurin, Denis A; Tyurnina, Anastasia V; Yu, Geliang L; Mishchenko, Artem; Zólyomi, Viktor; Morozov, Sergey V; Kumar, Roshan Krishna; Gorbachev, Roman V; Kudrynskyi, Zakhar R; Pezzini, Sergio; Kovalyuk, Zakhar D; Zeitler, Uli; Novoselov, Konstantin S; Patanè, Amalia; Eaves, Laurence; Grigorieva, Irina V; Fal'ko, Vladimir I; Geim, Andre K; Cao, Yang

    2016-11-21

    A decade of intense research on two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystals has revealed that their properties can differ greatly from those of the parent compound. These differences are governed by changes in the band structure due to quantum confinement and are most profound if the underlying lattice symmetry changes. Here we report a high-quality 2D electron gas in few-layer InSe encapsulated in hexagonal boron nitride under an inert atmosphere. Carrier mobilities are found to exceed 10(3) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and 10(4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) at room and liquid-helium temperatures, respectively, allowing the observation of the fully developed quantum Hall effect. The conduction electrons occupy a single 2D subband and have a small effective mass. Photoluminescence spectroscopy reveals that the bandgap increases by more than 0.5 eV with decreasing the thickness from bulk to bilayer InSe. The band-edge optical response vanishes in monolayer InSe, which is attributed to the monolayer's mirror-plane symmetry. Encapsulated 2D InSe expands the family of graphene-like semiconductors and, in terms of quality, is competitive with atomically thin dichalcogenides and black phosphorus.

  4. Spin-dependent quantum interference in photoemission process from spin-orbit coupled states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaji, Koichiro; Kuroda, Kenta; Toyohisa, Sogen; Harasawa, Ayumi; Ishida, Yukiaki; Watanabe, Shuntaro; Chen, Chuangtian; Kobayashi, Katsuyoshi; Komori, Fumio; Shin, Shik

    2017-01-01

    Spin–orbit interaction entangles the orbitals with the different spins. The spin–orbital-entangled states were discovered in surface states of topological insulators. However, the spin–orbital-entanglement is not specialized in the topological surface states. Here, we show the spin–orbital texture in a surface state of Bi(111) by laser-based spin- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (laser-SARPES) and describe three-dimensional spin-rotation effect in photoemission resulting from spin-dependent quantum interference. Our model reveals that, in the spin–orbit-coupled systems, the spins pointing to the mutually opposite directions are independently locked to the orbital symmetries. Furthermore, direct detection of coherent spin phenomena by laser-SARPES enables us to clarify the phase of the dipole transition matrix element responsible for the spin direction in photoexcited states. These results permit the tuning of the spin polarization of optically excited electrons in solids with strong spin–orbit interaction. PMID:28232721

  5. Three-dimensional dynamic photonic crystal creation by four laser beams interference in colloidal quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, A. M.; Mantsevich, V. N.; Ezhova, K. V.; Tikhonov, I. V.; Dneprovskii, V. S.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate a simple way to create dynamic photonic crystals with different lattice symmetry by interference of four non-coplanar laser beams in colloidal solution of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs). The formation of dynamic photonic crystal was confirmed by the observed diffraction of the beams that have excited photonic crystal at the angles equal to that calculated for the corresponding three-dimensional lattice (self-diffraction regime). Self-diffraction from an induced 3D transient photonic crystal has been discovered in the case of resonant excitation of the excitons (electron - hole transitions) in CdSe/ZnS QDs (highly absorbing colloidal solution) by powerful beams of mode-locked laser with picosecond pulse duration. Self-diffraction arises for four laser beams intersecting in the cell with colloidal CdSe/ZnS QDs due to the induced 3D dynamic photonic crystal. The physical processes that arise in CdSe/ZnS QDs and are responsible for the observed self-action effects are discussed.

  6. Step edge Josephson junctions and high temperature superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) gradiometers

    CERN Document Server

    Millar, A J

    2002-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the development of Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) gradiometers based on the high temperature superconductor YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7 sub - subdelta (YBCO). A step-edge Josephson junction fabrication process was developed to produce sufficiently steep (>60 deg) step-edges such that junctions exhibited RSJ-like current-voltage characteristics. The mean I sub C R sub N product of a sample of twenty step-edge junctions was 130 mu V. Step-edge dc SQUIDs with inductances between 67pH and 114pH were fabricated. Generally the SQUIDs had an intrinsic white flux noise in the 10-30 mu PHI sub 0 /sq root Hz range, with the best device, a 70pH SQUID, exhibiting a white flux noise of 5 mu PHI sub 0 /sq root Hz. Different first-order SQUID gradiometer designs were fabricated from single layers of YBCO. Two single-layer gradiometer (SLG) designs were fabricated on 10x10mm sup 2 substrates. The best balance and lowest gradient sensitivity measured for these devices were 1/3...

  7. High temperature superconducting thin films and quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) for gradiometers

    CERN Document Server

    Graf zu Eulenburg, A

    1999-01-01

    the best balance and gradient sensitivity at 1kHz were 3x10 sup - sup 3 and 222fT/(cm sq root Hz))) respectively. The measured spatial response to a current carrying wire was in good agreement with a theoretical model. A significant performance improvement was obtained with the development of a single layer gradiometer with 13mm baseline, fabricated on 30x10mm sup 2 bicrystals. For such a device, the gradient sensitivity at 1kHz was 50fT/(cm sq root Hz)) and the gradiometer was used successfully for unshielded magnetocardiography. A parasitic effective area compensation scheme was employed with two neighbouring SQUIDs coupled in an opposite sense to the same gradiometer loop. This improved the balance from the intrinsic value of 10 sup - sup 3 to 3x10 sup - sup 5. This thesis describes several aspects of the development of gradiometers using high temperature Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUID). The pulsed laser deposition of thin films of YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7 sub - subdelta (YBCO) on Sr...

  8. Parasitic effects in superconducting quantum interference device-based radiation comb generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosisio, R., E-mail: riccardo.bosisio@nano.cnr.it [SPIN-CNR, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); NEST, Instituto Nanoscienze-CNR and Scuola Normale Superiore, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Giazotto, F., E-mail: giazotto@sns.it [NEST, Instituto Nanoscienze-CNR and Scuola Normale Superiore, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Solinas, P., E-mail: paolo.solinas@spin.cnr.it [SPIN-CNR, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy)

    2015-12-07

    We study several parasitic effects on the implementation of a Josephson radiation comb generator based on a dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) driven by an external magnetic field. This system can be used as a radiation generator similarly to what is done in optics and metrology, and allows one to generate up to several hundreds of harmonics of the driving frequency. First we take into account how the assumption of a finite loop geometrical inductance and junction capacitance in each SQUID may alter the operation of the devices. Then, we estimate the effect of imperfections in the fabrication of an array of SQUIDs, which is an unavoidable source of errors in practical situations. We show that the role of the junction capacitance is, in general, negligible, whereas the geometrical inductance has a beneficial effect on the performance of the device. The errors on the areas and junction resistance asymmetries may deteriorate the performance, but their effect can be limited to a large extent by a suitable choice of fabrication parameters.

  9. Development of a Cryostat to Characterize Nano-scale Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Mathew; Matheny, Matthew; Knudsen, Jasmine

    2016-03-01

    We have designed and constructed a low-noise vacuum cryostat to be used for the characterization of nano-scale superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). Such devices are very sensitive to magnetic fields and can measure changes in flux on the order of a single electron magnetic moment. As a part of the design process, we calculated the separation required between the cryogenic preamplifier and superconducting magnet, including a high-permeability magnetic shield, using a finite-element model of the apparatus. The cryostat comprises a vacuum cross at room temperature for filtered DC and shielded RF electrical connections, a thin-wall stainless steel support tube, a taper-sealed cryogenic vacuum can, and internal mechanical support and wiring for the nanoSQUID. The Dewar is modified with a room-temperature flange with a sliding seal for the cryostat. The flange supports the superconducting 3 Tesla magnet and thermometry wiring. Upon completion of the cryostat fabrication and Dewar modifications, operation of the nanoSQUIDs as transported from our collaborator's laboratory in Israel will be confirmed, as the lead forming the SQUID is sensitive to oxidation and the SQUIDs must be shipped in a vacuum container. After operation of the nanoSQUIDs is confirmed, the primary work of characterizing their high-speed properties will begin. This will include looking at the measurement of relaxation oscillations at high bandwidth in comparison to the theoretical predictions of the current model.

  10. An ultra-sensitive and wideband magnetometer based on a superconducting quantum interference device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, Jan-Hendrik; Hömmen, Peter; Drung, Dietmar; Körber, Rainer

    2017-02-01

    The magnetic field noise in superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) used for biomagnetic research such as magnetoencephalography or ultra-low-field nuclear magnetic resonance is usually limited by instrumental dewar noise. We constructed a wideband, ultra-low noise system with a 45 mm diameter superconducting pick-up coil inductively coupled to a current sensor SQUID. Thermal noise in the liquid helium dewar is minimized by using aluminized polyester fabric as superinsulation and aluminum oxide strips as heat shields. With a magnetometer pick-up coil in the center of the Berlin magnetically shielded room 2 (BMSR2), a noise level of around 150 aT Hz-1/2 is achieved in the white noise regime between about 20 kHz and the system bandwidth of about 2.5 MHz. At lower frequencies, the resolution is limited by magnetic field noise arising from the walls of the shielded room. Modeling the BMSR2 as a closed cube with continuous μ-metal walls, we can quantitatively reproduce its measured field noise.

  11. Detection of bacteria in suspension using a superconducting Quantum interference device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossman, H.L.; Myers, W.R.; Vreeland, V.J.; Alper, J.D.; Bertozzi, C.R.; Clarke, J.

    2003-06-09

    We demonstrate a technique for detecting magnetically-labeled Listeria monocytogenes and for measuring the binding rate between antibody-linked magnetic particles and bacteria. This assay, which is both sensitive and straightforward to perform, can quantify specific bacteria in a sample without the need to immobilize the bacteria or wash away unbound magnetic particles. In the measurement, we add 50 nm diameter superparamagnetic particles, coated with antibodies, to a liquid sample containing L. monocytogenes. We apply a pulsed magnetic field to align the magnetic dipole moments and use a high transition temperature Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID), an extremely sensitive detector of magnetic flux, to measure the magnetic relaxation signal when the field is turned off. Unbound particles randomize direction by Brownian rotation too quickly to be detected. In contrast, particles bound to L. monocytogenes are effectively immobilized and relax in about 1 s by rotation of the internal dipole moment. This Neel relaxation process is detected by the SQUID. The measurements indicate a detection limit of (5.6 {+-} 1.1) x 10{sup 6} L. monocytogenes for a 20 {micro}L sample volume. If the sample volume were reduced to 1 nL, we estimate that the detection limit could be improved to 230 {+-} 40 L. monocytogenes cells. Time-resolved measurements yield the binding rate between the particles and bacteria.

  12. High temperature radio-frequency superconducting quantum interference device system for detection of magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pretzell, Alf

    2012-07-01

    This doctoral thesis was aimed at establishing a set-up with high-temperature superconductor (HTS) radio-frequency (rf) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) technology for the detection of magnetic nanoparticles and in particular for testing applications of magnetic nanoparticle immunoassays. It was part of the EU-project ''Biodiagnostics'' running from 2005 to 2008. The method of magnetic binding assays was developed as an alternative to other methods of concentration determination like enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), or fluorescent immunoassay. The ELISA has sensitivities down to analyte-concentrations of pg/ml. Multiple incubation and washing steps have to be performed for these techniques, the analyte has to diffuse to the site of binding. The magnetic assay uses magnetic nanoparticles as markers for the substance to be detected. It is being explored by current research and shows similar sensitivity compared to ELISA but in contrast - does not need any washing and can be read out directly after binding - can be applied in solution with opaque media, e.g. blood or muddy water - additionally allows magnetic separation or concentration - in combination with small magnetoresistive or Hall sensors, allows detection of only a few particles or even single beads. For medical or environmental samples, maybe opaque and containing a multitude of substances, it would be advantageous to devise an instrument, which allows to be read out quickly and with high sensitivity. Due to the mentioned items the magnetic assay might be a possibility here.

  13. Close relation between quantum interference in molecular conductance and diradical existence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Yuta; Hoffmann, Roald; Strange, Mikkel; Solomon, Gemma C

    2016-01-26

    An empirical observation of a relationship between a striking feature of electronic transmission through a π-system, destructive quantum interference (QI), on one hand, and the stability of diradicals on the other, leads to the proof of a general theorem that relates the two. Subject to a number of simplifying assumptions, in a π-electron system, QI occurs when electrodes are attached to those positions of an N-carbon atom N-electron closed-shell hydrocarbon where the matrix elements of the Green's function vanish. These zeros come in two types, which are called easy and hard. Suppose an N+2 atom, N+2 electron hydrocarbon is formed by substituting 2 CH2 groups at two atoms, where the electrodes were. Then, if a QI feature is associated with electrode attachment to the two atoms of the original N atom system, the resulting augmented N+2 molecule will be a diradical. If there is no QI feature, i.e., transmission of current is normal if electrodes are attached to the two atoms, the resulting hydrocarbon will not be a diradical but will have a classical closed-shell electronic structure. Moreover, where a diradical exists, the easy zero is associated with a nondisjoint diradical, and the hard zero is associated with a disjoint one. A related theorem is proven for deletion of two sites from a hydrocarbon.

  14. Aluminum and boron nuclear quadrupole resonance with a direct current superconducting quantum interference device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, C.; Chang, J.; Pines, A.

    1990-12-01

    We report the application of our dc SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) spectrometer [C. Connor, J. Chang, and A. Pines, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 61, 1059(1990)] to nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) studies of aluminum-27, and boron-11 in crystalline and glassy solids. Our results give e2qQ/h=2.38 MHz and η=0.0 for α-Al2O3 at 4.2 K. For the natural mineral petalite (LiAlSi4O10), we obtain e2qQ/h=4.56 MHz and η=0.47. The quadrupole resonance frequency is 1467 kHz in boron nitride, and in the vicinity of 1300 kHz for various borates in the B2O3ṡxH2O system. The distribution of boron environments in a B2O3 glass gives rise to a linewidth of about 80 kHz in the SQUID detected resonance.

  15. Superconducting multiturn flux transformers for radio frequency superconducting quantum interference devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, H. R.; Zhang, Y.; Schubert, J.; Zander, W.; Zeng, X. H.; Klein, N.

    2000-11-01

    This article describes three planar layouts of superconducting multiturn flux transformers integrated with a coplanar resonator for radio frequency (rf) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers. The best magnetic field noise values of 22 and 11.5 fT/Hz1/2 in the white noise regime were obtained for the layout with two input coils and the layout with the labyrinth resonator, respectively. Excess low-frequency noise (about 200 fT/Hz1/2 at 10 Hz) was present. Computer simulation showed that the loss in this trilayer system was dominated by the high loss tangent of the dielectric film used for the separation of the upper and lower superconducting films. The rf coupling coefficient krf between the resonator and the flip-chip-coupled SQUID was also estimated. The values krf2≈14×10-3 obtained for the layout with two input coils, and krf2≈45×10-3 for the layout with the labyrinth resonator were considerably higher than the typical value of krf2≈7×10-3 for the single-layer coplanar resonator. These high coupling coefficients have compensated the somewhat degraded unloaded quality factor of the resonator, thus securing the optimum operation of the rf SQUID.

  16. Anomalous thermal decoherence in a quantum magnet measured with neutron spin echo spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groitl, F.; Keller, T.; Rolfs, K.; Tennant, D. A.; Habicht, K.

    2016-04-01

    The effect of temperature dependent asymmetric line broadening is investigated in Cu (NO3)2.2.5 D2O , a model material for a one-dimensional bond alternating Heisenberg chain, using the high resolution neutron-resonance spin echo (NRSE) technique. Inelastic neutron scattering experiments on dispersive excitations including phase sensitive measurements demonstrate the potential of NRSE to resolve line shapes, which are non-Lorentzian, opening up a new and hitherto unexplored class of experiments for the NRSE method beyond standard linewidth measurements. The particular advantage of NRSE is its direct access to the correlations in the time domain without convolution with the resolution function of the background spectrometer. This application of NRSE is very promising and establishes a basis for further experiments on different systems, since the results for Cu(NO3)2. 2.5 D2O are applicable to a broad range of quantum systems.

  17. Anomalous birefringence in andradite-grossular solid solutions: a quantum-mechanical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacivita, Valentina; D'Arco, Philippe; Orlando, Roberto; Dovesi, Roberto; Meyer, Alessio

    2013-11-01

    The static linear optical properties (refractive indices, birefringence and axial angle) of andradite-grossular (Ca3Fe2Si3O12-Ca3Al2Si3O12) solid solutions have been computed at the ab initio quantum-mechanical level through the Coupled Perturbed Kohn-Sham scheme, using an all-electron Gaussian-type basis set. Geometry relaxation after substitution of 1-8 Al for Fe atoms in the primitive cell of andradite yields 23 non-equivalent configurations ranging from cubic to triclinic symmetry. Refractive indices vary quite regularly between the andradite (1.860) and grossular (1.671) end-members; the birefringence δ and the axial angle 2 V at intermediate compositions can be as large as 0.02° and 89°, respectively. Comparison with experiments suffers from inhomogeneities and impurities of natural samples; however, semi-quantitative agreement is observed.

  18. Quantum Interference of Dual-Channel Excited Magnons in Spin-1 Bose—Einstein Condensates Atomic Chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xu; Zhao, Xing-Dong; Zhou, Lu; Jing, Hui; Zhang, Wei-Ping

    2013-07-01

    We investigate the quantum interference of spin wave excitations of a spin-1 atomic Bose condensate confined in an optical lattice. Single-channel and dual-channel interactions are employed in our system, and their induced excitations are compared. Also we consider the interplay of magneto-optical excitations, which leads to a constructive or destructive effect for the creation of magnons based on background excitations. The population distributions of excited magnons can be well controlled by steering the long-range dipole-dipole interactions. Such a scheme can be used to demonstrate conventional quantum-optical phenomena like dynamical Casimir effect at finite temperatures.

  19. Quantum Interference of Dual-Channel Excited Magnons in Spin-1 Bose-Einstein Condensates Atomic Chain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Xu; ZHAO Xing-Dong; ZHOU Lu; JING Hui; ZHANG Wei-Ping

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the quantum interference of spin wave excitations of a spin-1 atomic Bose condensate confined in an optical lattice.Single-channel and dual-channel interactions are employed in our system,and their induced excitations are compared.Also we consider the interplay of magneto-optical excitations,which leads to a constructive or destructive effect for the creation of magnons based on background excitations.The population distributions of excited magnons can be well controlled by steering the long-range dipole-dipole interactions.Such a scheme can be used to demonstrate conventional quantum-optical phenomena like dynamical Casimir effect at finite temperatures.

  20. Note: simultaneous measurements of magnetization and electrical transport signal by a reconstructed superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H L; Yu, X Z; Wang, S L; Chen, L; Zhao, J H

    2013-08-01

    We have developed a sample rod which makes the conventional superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer capable of performing magnetization and electrical transport measurements simultaneously. The sample holder attached to the end of a 140 cm long sample rod is a nonmagnetic drinking straw or a 1.5 mm wide silicon strip with small magnetic background signal. Ferromagnetic semiconductor (Ga,Mn)As films are used to test the new sample rod, and the results are in good agreement with previous report.

  1. Suppression and Enhancement in Parametric Two-Photon Resonant Nondegenerate Four-Wave Mixing via Quantum Interference

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Jiang; MI Xin; YU Zu-He; JIANG Qian; ZUO Zhan-Chun; WANG Yan-Bang; WU Ling-An; FU Pan-Ming

    2004-01-01

    @@ Quantum interference may lead to suppression and enhancement of the two-photon resonant nondegenerate fourwave mixing signal in a cascade four-level system. Such phenomena are demonstrated in Ba through inducing atomic coherence between the ground state 6s2 and the doubly excited autoionizing Rydberg state 6pnd. This method can be used as a new spectroscopic tool for measuring the transition dipole moment between two highly excited atomic states.

  2. Anomalous quantum and isotope effects in water clusters: Physical phenomenon, model artifact, or bad approximation?

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Sandra E

    2014-01-01

    Free energy differences $\\Delta F:=F-F_{\\text{prism}}$ are computed for several isomers of water hexamer relative to the "prism" isomer using the self-consistent phonons method. %$\\Delta F:=F-F({prism})$ We consider the isotope effect defined by the quantity $\\delta F_{D_2O}:=\\Delta F_{\\rm D_2O}-\\Delta F_{\\rm H_2O}$, and the quantum effect, $\\delta F_{\\hbar=0}:=\\Delta F_{\\hbar=0}-\\Delta F_{\\rm H_2O}$, and evaluate them using different flexible water models. While both $\\delta F_{D_2O}$ and $\\delta F_{\\hbar=0}$ are found to be rather small for all of the potentials, they are especially small for two of the empirical models, q-TIP4P/F and TTM3-F, compared to q-SPC/Fw and the two {\\it abinitio}-based models, WHBB and HBB2-pol. This qualitative difference in the properties of different water models cannot be explained by one being "more accurate" than the other. We speculate as to whether the observed anomalies are caused by the special properties of water systems, or are an artifact of either the potential energ...

  3. On the anomalous Stark effect in a thin disc-shaped quantum dot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oukerroum, A [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere Condensee, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, BP 140, Bd Yassima, 28820 Mohammedia (Morocco); Feddi, E [LaMIPI, ENSET de Rabat, Universite Mohamed V Souissi, BP 6207, Rabat-Institut, 10100 Rabat (Morocco); Bailach, J Bosch; MartInez-Pastor, J [Instituto de Ciencia de los Materiales, Universidad de Valencia, PO Box 2085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Dujardin, F [Laboratoire de Physique des Milieux Denses, Universite Paul Verlaine, 1 Bd Arago, F-57078 Metz (France); Assaid, E, E-mail: feddi@univ-metz.f [Laboratoire d' Electronique et Optique des Nanostructures de Semiconducteurs, Faculte des Sciences, BP 20, 24000 El Jadida (Morocco)

    2010-09-22

    The effect of a lateral external electric field F on an exciton ground state in an InAs disc-shaped quantum dot has been studied using a variational method within the effective mass approximation. We consider that the radial dimension of the disc is very large compared to its height. This situation leads to separating the excitonic Hamiltonian into two independent parts: the lateral confinement which corresponds to a two-dimensional harmonic oscillator and an infinite square well in the growth direction. Our calculations show that the complete description of the lateral Stark shift requires both the linear and quadratic terms in F which explains that the exciton possess nonzero lateral dipolar moment and polarizability. The fit of the calculated Stark shift permits us to estimate the lateral permanent dipole moment and the polarizability according to the disc size. Our results are compared to those existing in the literature. In addition the behavior of the optical integral shows that the exciton lifetime is greater than that under zero field which is due to the field-induced polarization.

  4. Low-noise nano superconducting quantum interference device operating in Tesla magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Tobias; Nagel, Joachim; Wölbing, Roman; Kemmler, Matthias; Kleiner, Reinhold; Koelle, Dieter

    2013-01-22

    Superconductivity in the cuprate YBa(2)Cu(3)O(7) (YBCO) persists up to huge magnetic fields (B) up to several tens of Teslas, and sensitive direct current (dc) superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) can be realized in epitaxially grown YBCO films by using grain boundary Josephson junctions (GBJs). Here we present the realization of high-quality YBCO nanoSQUIDs, patterned by focused ion beam milling. We demonstrate low-noise performance of such a SQUID up to B = 1 T applied parallel to the plane of the SQUID loop at the temperature T = 4.2 K. The GBJs are shunted by a thin Au layer to provide nonhysteretic current voltage characteristics, and the SQUID incorporates a 90 nm wide constriction which is used for on-chip modulation of the magnetic flux through the SQUID loop. The white flux noise of the device increases only slightly from 1.3 μΦ(0)/(Hz)(1/2) at B = 0 to 2.3 μΦ(0)/(Hz))(1/2) at 1 T. Assuming that a point-like magnetic particle with magnetization in the plane of the SQUID loop is placed directly on top of the constriction and taking into account the geometry of the SQUID, we calculate a spin sensitivity S(μ)(1/2) = 62 μ(B)/(Hz))(1/2) at B = 0 and 110 μ(B)/(Hz))(1/2) at 1 T. The demonstration of low noise of such a SQUID in Tesla fields is a decisive step toward utilizing the full potential of ultrasensitive nanoSQUIDs for direct measurements of magnetic hysteresis curves of magnetic nanoparticles and molecular magnets.

  5. Low-noise dc superconducting quantum interference devices for gravity wave detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Insik

    I have designed, built and tested a low noise dc Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) system which is intended primarily for use in a 50 mK omnidirectional gravity wave antenna. The SQUID system has three SQUIDs on a single chip: one SQUID is the sensor, another SQUID is the main readout, and the last is a spare readout. For good impedance matching between the sensor SQUID and the input circuit, I use a thin-film transformer. This thin-film transformer gives an input inductance of about 1 muH, which is good for many applications. A SQUID system in a gravity wave antenna must operate continuously for at least 6 months with high reliability. To meet these requirements, I fabricated dc SQUID chips from Nb-Al/AlOsbx-Nb trilayers. I tested the SQUID chips in a liquid helium bath and a dilution refrigerator in the temperature range of 4.2 K to 90 mK. I have designed and tested an eddy-current damping filter as a distributed microwave filter to damp out microwave resonances in strip-line input coils coupled to SQUIDs. The filter chip consists of a Au/Cu-dot array. The filter chip was coupled to the SQUID using a flip-chip arrangement on the SQUID chip. I found that the filter reduced noise bumps and removed distortion from the current-voltage curves. To flux-lock the SQUID system, I developed 2-stage SQUID feedback loops. I investigated two cascade SQUID systems in which I feed the feedback signal into the sensor SQUID and couple the ac modulation signal to the readout SQUID. I found that the noise spectrum with 2-SQUID feedback operation recovers the noise spectrum of the sensor SQUID with about 9% higher noise.

  6. Nano Superconducting Quantum Interference device: A powerful tool for nanoscale investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granata, Carmine, E-mail: carmine.granata@cnr.it; Vettoliere, Antonio

    2016-02-19

    The magnetic sensing at nanoscale level is a promising and interesting research topic of nanoscience. Indeed, magnetic imaging is a powerful tool for probing biological, chemical and physical systems. The study of small spin cluster, like magnetic molecules and nanoparticles, single electron, cold atom clouds, is one of the most stimulating challenges of applied and basic research of the next years. In particular, the magnetic nanoparticle investigation plays a fundamental role for the modern material science and its relative technological applications like ferrofluids, magnetic refrigeration and biomedical applications, including drug delivery, hyper-thermia cancer treatment and magnetic resonance imaging contrast-agent. Actually, one of the most ambitious goals of the high sensitivity magnetometry is the detection of elementary magnetic moment or spin. In this framework, several efforts have been devoted to the development of a high sensitivity magnetic nanosensor pushing sensing capability to the individual spin level. Among the different magnetic sensors, Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) exhibit an ultra high sensitivity and are widely employed in numerous applications. Basically, a SQUID consists of a superconducting ring (sensitive area) interrupted by two Josephson junctions. In the recent years, it has been proved that the magnetic response of nano-objects can be effectively measured by using a SQUID with a very small sensitive area (nanoSQUID). In fact, the sensor noise, expressed in terms of the elementary magnetic moment (spin or Bohr magneton), is linearly dependent on the SQUID loop side length. For this reason, SQUIDs have been progressively miniaturized in order to improve the sensitivity up to few spin per unit of bandwidth. With respect to other techniques, nanoSQUIDs offer the advantage of direct measurement of magnetization changes in small spin systems. In this review, we focus on nanoSQUIDs and its applications. In

  7. Operation of a superconducting nanowire quantum interference device with mesoscopic leads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekker, David; Bezryadin, Alexey; Hopkins, David S.; Goldbart, Paul M.

    2005-09-01

    A theory describing the operation of a superconducting nanowire quantum interference device (NQUID) is presented. The device consists of a pair of thin-film superconducting leads connected by a pair of topologically parallel ultranarrow superconducting wires. It exhibits intrinsic electrical resistance, due to thermally activated dissipative fluctuations of the superconducting order parameter. Attention is given to the dependence of this resistance on the strength of an externally applied magnetic field aligned perpendicular to the leads, for lead dimensions such that there is essentially complete and uniform penetration of the leads by the magnetic field. This regime, in which at least one of the lead dimensions—length or width—lies between the superconducting coherence and penetration lengths, is referred to as the mesoscopic regime. The magnetic field causes a pronounced oscillation of the device resistance, with a period not dominated by the Aharonov-Bohm effect through the area enclosed by the wires and the film edges but, rather, in terms of the geometry of the leads, in contrast to the well-known Little-Parks resistance of thin-walled superconducting cylinders. A detailed theory, encompassing this phenomenology quantitatively, is developed through extensions, to the setting of parallel superconducting wires, of the Ivanchenko-Zil’berman-Ambegaokar-Halperin theory of intrinsic resistive fluctuations in a current-biased Josephson junction and the Langer-Ambegaokar-McCumber-Halperin theory of intrinsic resistive fluctuations in a superconducting wire. In particular, it is demonstrated that via the resistance of the NQUID, the wires act as a probe of spatial variations in the superconducting order parameter along the perimeter of each lead: in essence, a superconducting phase gradiometer.

  8. Nano Superconducting Quantum Interference device: A powerful tool for nanoscale investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granata, Carmine; Vettoliere, Antonio

    2016-02-01

    The magnetic sensing at nanoscale level is a promising and interesting research topic of nanoscience. Indeed, magnetic imaging is a powerful tool for probing biological, chemical and physical systems. The study of small spin cluster, like magnetic molecules and nanoparticles, single electron, cold atom clouds, is one of the most stimulating challenges of applied and basic research of the next years. In particular, the magnetic nanoparticle investigation plays a fundamental role for the modern material science and its relative technological applications like ferrofluids, magnetic refrigeration and biomedical applications, including drug delivery, hyper-thermia cancer treatment and magnetic resonance imaging contrast-agent. Actually, one of the most ambitious goals of the high sensitivity magnetometry is the detection of elementary magnetic moment or spin. In this framework, several efforts have been devoted to the development of a high sensitivity magnetic nanosensor pushing sensing capability to the individual spin level. Among the different magnetic sensors, Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) exhibit an ultra high sensitivity and are widely employed in numerous applications. Basically, a SQUID consists of a superconducting ring (sensitive area) interrupted by two Josephson junctions. In the recent years, it has been proved that the magnetic response of nano-objects can be effectively measured by using a SQUID with a very small sensitive area (nanoSQUID). In fact, the sensor noise, expressed in terms of the elementary magnetic moment (spin or Bohr magneton), is linearly dependent on the SQUID loop side length. For this reason, SQUIDs have been progressively miniaturized in order to improve the sensitivity up to few spin per unit of bandwidth. With respect to other techniques, nanoSQUIDs offer the advantage of direct measurement of magnetization changes in small spin systems. In this review, we focus on nanoSQUIDs and its applications. In

  9. Inductance mode characteristics of a ceramic YBa2Cu3O7-x radio-frequency superconducting quantum interference device at 77 K

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Il'ichev, E. V.; Andreev, A. V.; Jacobsen, Claus Schelde

    1993-01-01

    Experimental results on some radio-frequency superconducting quantum interference device (rf-SQUID) signal properties are presented. The quantum interferometer was made of ceramic YBa2Cu3O7−x and was due to a low critical current operated in the inductance or nonhysteretic mode. With bias current...

  10. Potential Applications of Microtesla Magnetic Resonance ImagingDetected Using a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, Whittier Ryan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation describes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of protons performed in a precession field of 132 μT. In order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), a pulsed 40-300 mT magnetic field prepolarizes the sample spins and an untuned second-order superconducting gradiometer coupled to a low transition temperature superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detects the subsequent 5.6-kHz spin precession. Imaging sequences including multiple echoes and partial Fourier reconstruction are developed. Calculating the SNR of prepolarized SQUID-detected MRI shows that three-dimensional Fourier imaging yields higher SNR than slice-selection imaging. An experimentally demonstrated field-cycling pulse sequence and post-processing algorithm mitigate image artifacts caused by concomitant gradients in low-field MRI. The magnetic field noise of SQUID untuned detection is compared to the noise of SQUID tuned detection, conventional Faraday detection, and the Nyquist noise generated by conducting biological samples. A second-generation microtesla MRI system employing a low-noise SQUID is constructed to increase SNR. A 2.4-m cubic, eddy-current shield with 6-mm thick aluminum walls encloses the experiment to attenuate external noise. The measured noise is 0.75 fT Hz-1/2 referred to the bottom gradiometer loop. Solenoids wound from 30-strand braided wire to decrease Nyquist noise and cooled by either liquid nitrogen or water polarize the spins. Copper wire coils wound on wooden supports produce the imaging magnetic fields and field gradients. Water phantom images with 0.8 x 0.8 x 10 mm3 resolution have a SNR of 6. Three-dimensional 1.6 x 1.9 x 14 mm3 images of bell peppers and 3 x 3 x 26 mm3 in vivo images of the human arm are presented. Since contrast based on the transverse spin relaxation rate (T1) is enhanced at low magnetic fields, microtesla MRI could potentially be used for tumor imaging. The

  11. Theory of quantum frequency translation of light in optical fiber: application to interference of two photons of different color

    CERN Document Server

    McGuinness, H J; McKinstrie, C J

    2011-01-01

    We study quantum frequency translation and two-color photon interference enabled by the Bragg scattering four-wave mixing process in optical fiber. Using realistic model parameters, we computationally and analytically determine the Green function and Schmidt modes for cases with various pump-pulse lengths. These cases can be categorized as either "non-discriminatory" or "discriminatory" in regards to their propensity to exhibit high-efficiency translation or high-visibility two-photon interference for many different shapes of input wave packets or for only a few input wave packets, respectively. Also, for a particular case, the Schmidt mode set was found to be nearly equal to a Hermite-Gaussian function set. The methods and results also apply with little modification to frequency conversion by sum-frequency conversion in optical crystals.

  12. Quantum interference in laser-assisted photo-ionization excited by a femtosecond x-ray pulse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ge Yu-Cheng

    2008-01-01

    The photoelectron energy spectra (PESs) excited by monochromatic femtosecond x-ray pulses in the presence of a femtosecond laser are investigated. APES is composed of a set of separate peaks, showing interesting comb-like structures. These structures result from the quantum interferences between photoelectron wave packets generated at different times. The width and the localization of each peak as well as the number of peaks are determined by all the laser and x-ray parameters. Most of peak heights of the PES are higher than the classical predictions.

  13. One-Step Realization of SWAP Gate with Superconducting Quantum-Interference Devices and Atoms in Cavity QED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAN Zhi-Ming

    2008-01-01

    We put forward a simple scheme for one-step realization of a two-qubit SWAP gate with SQUIDs (super-conducting quantum-interference devices) in cavity QED via Raman transition. In this scheme, the cavity field is only virtually excited and thus the cavity decay is suppressed. The SWAP gate is realized by using only two lower flux states of the SQUID system and the excited state would not be excited. Therefore, the effect of decoherence caused from the levels of the SQUID system is possibly minimized. The scheme can also be used to implement the SWAP gate with atoms.

  14. A new type of HTc superconducting film comb-shape resonator for radio frequency superconducting quantum interference devices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAO Hai-yan; WANG Fu-ren; MENG Shu-chao; MAO Bo; LI Zhuang-zhi; NIE Rui-juan; LIU Xin-yuan; DAI Yuan-dong

    2006-01-01

    A new type of HTc superconducting film combshape resonator for radio frequency superconducting quantum interference devices (RF SQUID) has been designed.This new type of superconducting film comb-shape resonator is formed by a foursquare microstrip line without a flux concentrator.The range of the center frequency of this type of resonator varies from 800 MHz to 1300 MHz by changing the length of the teeth.In this paper,we report on simulating the relationship of the value of the center frequency and the length of the teeth,and testing the noise of HTc RF SQUID coupling this comb-shape resonator.

  15. Unshielded use of thin-film Nb dc superconducting quantum interference devices and integrated asymmetric gradiometers for nondestructive evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, M.E.; Nakane, H.; Cochran, A.; Weston, R.G.; Klein, U.; Pegrum, C.M.; Donaldson, G.B. [Department of Physics and Applied Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom)

    1997-07-01

    Novel nondestructive evaluation measurements made using niobium dc superconducting quantum interference devices with integrated asymmetric first-order gradiometers are described. Comparative theoretical and experimental studies of their spatial response have been described, and it is shown that the gradiometric response makes operation possible in an unshielded and electromagnetically noisy environment. As a demonstration of their capabilities, subsurface defects in a multilayer aluminum structure have been located and mapped using induced eddy currents at 70 Hz, with no magnetic shielding around the specimen or cryostat. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. High-Tc superconducting quantum interference device recordings of spontaneous brain activity: Towards high-Tc magnetoencephalography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öisjöen, F.; Schneiderman, J. F.; Figueras, G. A.; Chukharkin, M. L.; Kalabukhov, A.; Hedström, A.; Elam, M.; Winkler, D.

    2012-03-01

    We have performed single- and two-channel high transition temperature (high-Tc) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetoencephalography (MEG) recordings of spontaneous brain activity in two healthy human subjects. We demonstrate modulation of two well-known brain rhythms: the occipital alpha rhythm and the mu rhythm found in the motor cortex. We further show that despite higher noise-levels compared to their low-Tc counterparts, high-Tc SQUIDs can be used to detect and record physiologically relevant brain rhythms with comparable signal-to-noise ratios. These results indicate the utility of high-Tc technology in MEG recordings of a broader range of brain activity.

  17. Low-frequency nuclear magnetic resonance and nuclear quadrupole resonance spectrometer based on a dc superconducting quantum interference device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, N. Q.; Clarke, John

    1991-06-01

    A sensitive spectrometer, based on a dc superconducting quantum interference device, for the direct detection of low-frequency pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR), is described. The frequency response extends from about 10 to 200 kHz, and the recovery time after the magnetic pulse is removed is typically 50 μs. As examples, NMR spectra are shown from Pt and Cu metal powders in a magnetic field of 6 mT, and NQR spectra are shown from 2D in a tunneling methyl group and 14N in NH4ClO4.

  18. Unconventional Geometric Phase-Shift Gates Based on Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices Coupled to a Single-Mode Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Ke-Hui; ZHOU Zheng-Wei; GUO Guang-Can

    2006-01-01

    We present a scheme to realize geometric phase-shift gate for two superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) qubits coupled to a single-mode microwave field. The geometric phase-shift gate operation is performed transitions during the gate operation. Thus, the docoherence due to energy spontaneous emission based on the levels of SQUIDs are suppressed. The gate is insensitive to the cavity decay throughout the operation since the cavity mode is displaced along a circle in the phase space, acquiring a phase conditional upon the two lower flux states of the SQUID qubits, and the cavity mode is still in the original vacuum state. Based on the SQUID qubits interacting with the cavity mode, our proposed approach may open promising prospects for quantum logic in SQUID-system.

  19. Spatially and spectrally resolved quantum path interference with chirped driving pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Preclíková, Jana; Lorek, Eleonora; Larsen, Esben Witting; Heyl, Christoph M; Paleček, David; Zigmantas, Donatas; Schafer, Kenneth J; Gaarde, Mette B; Mauritsson, Johan

    2016-01-01

    We measure spectrally and spatially resolved high-order harmonics generated in argon using chirped multi-cycle laser pulses. Using a very stable, high-repetition rate laser we are able to clearly observe the interference between light emitted from the two shortest trajectories and study this interference structure systematically. The interference structure is clearly observed over a large range of harmonic orders, ranging from harmonic 11, which is below the ionization threshold of argon, to harmonic 25. The interference pattern contains more information than just the relative phase of the light from the two trajectories, since it is both spatially and spectrally resolved. We can access this additional information by changing the chirp of the driving laser pulses which affects both the spatial and the spectral phases of the two trajectories differently, allowing us to reconstruct the dipole phase parameters for the short ($\\alpha_s$) and long ($\\alpha_l$) trajectories from the data. The reconstruction is done...

  20. Radiation-damage-free quantum crystallography and resolution-enhanced x-ray imaging techniques using quantum multipath interference of thermal light

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Zheng; Medvedev, Nikita; Wang, Fenglin; Chapman, Henry N; Shih, Yanhua

    2016-01-01

    Using higher order coherence of thermal light sources, we can achieve enhancement of resolution of standard x-ray imaging techniques, such as x-ray diffraction and phase contrast imaging. The cost of implementing such schemes is minimal comparing to the schemes using entangled two-photon pairs. The proposed diffractive quan- tum crystallography using multipath interference of thermal light can be eventually free of radiation damage, because the diffraction pattern could be formed by using low energy photons of optical wavelength. Thus it is promising to apply the proposed quantum crystallography scheme to nanocrystalline or non-crystalline samples that are too difficult to be crystallized.

  1. Cooperative biexciton generation and destructive interference in coupled quantum dots using adiabatic rapid passage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renaud, N.; Grozema, F.C.

    2014-01-01

    We report numerical simulations of biexciton generation in coupled quantum dots (CQDs) placed in a static electric field and excited by a chirped laser pulse. Our simulations explicitly account for exciton-phonon interactions at finite temperature using a non-Markovian quantum jump approach to solve

  2. Conformation-driven quantum interference effects mediated by through-space conjugation in self-assembled monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlotti, Marco; Kovalchuk, Andrii; Wächter, Tobias; Qiu, Xinkai; Zharnikov, Michael; Chiechi, Ryan C.

    2016-12-01

    Tunnelling currents through tunnelling junctions comprising molecules with cross-conjugation are markedly lower than for their linearly conjugated analogues. This effect has been shown experimentally and theoretically to arise from destructive quantum interference, which is understood to be an intrinsic, electronic property of molecules. Here we show experimental evidence of conformation-driven interference effects by examining through-space conjugation in which π-conjugated fragments are arranged face-on or edge-on in sufficiently close proximity to interact through space. Observing these effects in the latter requires trapping molecules in a non-equilibrium conformation closely resembling the X-ray crystal structure, which we accomplish using self-assembled monolayers to construct bottom-up, large-area tunnelling junctions. In contrast, interference effects are completely absent in zero-bias simulations on the equilibrium, gas-phase conformation, establishing through-space conjugation as both of fundamental interest and as a potential tool for tuning tunnelling charge-transport in large-area, solid-state molecular-electronic devices.

  3. Kondo Resonance versus Fano Interference in Double Quantum Dots Coupled to a Two-Lead One-Ring System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xiong-Wen; SHI Zhen-Gang; CHEN Bao-Ju; SONG Ke-Hui

    2007-01-01

    We analyse the transport properties of a coupled double quantum dot (DQD) device with one of the dots (QD1) coupled to metallic leads and the other (QD2) embedded in an Aharonov-Bhom (A-B) ring by means of the slave-boson mean-Geld theory. It is found that in this system, the Kondo resonance and the Fano interference exist simultaneously, the enhancing Kondo effect and the increasing hopping of the QD2-Ring destroy the localized electron state in the QD2 for the QD1-leads, and accordingly, the Fano interference between the DQD-leads and the QD1-leads are suppressed. Under some conditions, the Fano interference can be quenched fully and the single Kondo resonance of the QD1-leads comes into being. Moreover, when the magnetic flux of the A-B ring is zero, the influence of the parity of the A-B ring on the transport properties is very weak, but this inSuence becomes more obvious with non-zero magnetic flux. Thus this model may be a candidate for future device applications.

  4. Quantum interference and Kondo effects in an Aharonov-Bohm-Casher interferometer containing a laterally coupled double quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, T.; Tokura, Y.; Tarucha, S.

    2010-01-01

    We theoretically investigate spin-dependent electron transport through an Aharonov-Bohm-Casher interferometer containing a laterally coupled double quantum dot. In particular, we numerically calculate the Aharonov-Bohm and Aharonov-Casher oscillations of the linear conductance in the Kondo regime. We show that the AC oscillation in the Kondo regime deviates from the sinusoidal form.

  5. New method to simulate quantum interference using deterministic processes and application to event-based simulation of quantum computation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Raedt, H.; De Raedt, K.; Michielsen, K.

    2005-01-01

    We demonstrate that networks of locally connected processing units with a primitive learning capability exhibit behavior that is usually only attributed to quantum systems. We describe networks that simulate single-photon beam-splitter and Mach-Zehnder interferometer experiments on a causal, event-b

  6. Novel interference effects and a new quantum phase in mesoscopic systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Singha Deo; A M Jayannavar

    2001-02-01

    Mesoscopic systems have provided an opportunity to study quantum effects beyond the atomic realm. In these systems quantum coherence prevails over the entire sample. We discuss several novel effects related to persistent currents in open systems which do not have analogues in closed systems. Some phenomena arising simultaneously due to two non-classical effects namely, Aharonov–Bohm effect and quantum tunneling are presented. Simple analysis of sharp phase jumps observed in double-slit Aharonov–Bohm experiments is given. Some consequences of parity violation are elaborated. Finally, we briefly describe the dephasing of Aharonov–Bohm oscillations in Aharonov–Bohm ring geometry due to spin-flip scattering in one of the arms. Several experimental manifestations of these phenomena and their applications are given.

  7. Experimental Study of Electronic Quantum Interference, Photonic Crystal Cavity, Photonic Band Edge Effects for Optical Amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-26

    performed. 2.0 INTRODUCTION Three dimensional (3D) photonic crystals and their optical properties have attracted a lot of attention in the past decade... physical phenomena. The band gap frequency of this system can be varied to tailor to the electronic transition levels of a gain medium such as InAs...quantum dot or an InGaAs quantum well. The band gap can be varied in addition to include either one or two electronic levels of a multi-level system

  8. Quantum measurements are physical processes. Comment on "Consciousness and the double-slit interference pattern: Six experiments," By Dean Radin et al. [Physics Essays 25, 2 (2012)

    CERN Document Server

    de Bianchi, Massimiliano Sassoli

    2013-01-01

    The validity of the assertion that some recent double-slit interference experiments, conducted by Radin et al., would have tested the possible role of the experimenter's mind in the collapse of the quantum wave function, is questioned. It is emphasized that quantum mechanics doesn't need any psychophysical ingredient to explain the measurement processes, and therefore parapsychologists shouldn't resort to the latter to support the possibility of psychokinesis, but search for more convincing explanations.

  9. An integrated quantum photonic sensor based on Hong-Ou-Mandel interference

    CERN Document Server

    Basiri-Esfahani, Sahar; Armin, Ardalan; Combes, Joshua; Milburn, Gerard J

    2015-01-01

    Photonic-crystal-based integrated optical systems have been used for a broad range of sensing applications with great success. This has been motivated by several advantages such as high sensitivity, miniaturization, remote sensing, selectivity and stability. Many photonic crystal sensors have been proposed with various fabrication designs that result in improved optical properties. Here we propose a novel multi-purpose sensor architecture that can be used for force, refractive index and possibly local temperature detection. In this scheme, two coupled cavities behave as an "effective beam splitter". The sensor works based on fourth order interference (the Hong-Ou-Mandel effect) and requires a sequence of single photon pulses and consequently has low pulse power. Changes in the parameter to be measured induce variations in the effective beam splitter reflectivity and result in changes to the visibility of interference. We demonstrate this generic scheme in coupled L3 photonic crystal cavities as an example and...

  10. Quantum transport in bilayer graphene. Fabry-Perot interferences and proximity-induced superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Renjun

    2015-10-30

    Bilayer graphene (BLG) p-n junctions made of hBN-BLG-hBN (hexagonal boron nitride) heterostructures enable ballistic transport over long distances. We investigate Fabry-Perot interferences, and detect that the bilayer-like anti-Klein tunneling transits into single-layer-like Klein tunneling when tuning the Fermi level towards the band edges. Furthermore, the proximity-induced superconductivity has been studied in these devices with Al leads.

  11. Quantum interferences in swift highly-charged dressed-ion-atom collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monti, J M; Rivarola, R D [Instituto de Fisica Rosario (CONICET-UNR) and Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Ingenieria y Agrimensura, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Avenida Pellegrini 250, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Fainstein, P D [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Centro Atomico Bariloche, 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche (RN) (Argentina)], E-mail: jmonti@ifir.edu.ar

    2008-10-28

    Ionization of He targets by impact of partially stripped nuclei is investigated. A unified theoretical model, based on the continuum distorted wave-eikonal initial state approximation, is employed to describe the appearance of structures in the experimental doubly differential spectra. These structures are interpreted in terms of coherent interference of short- and long-range contributions of the perturbative projectile potential. (fast track communication)

  12. Anomalous spectral dependence of optical polarization and its impact on spin detection in InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puttisong, Y.; Huang, Y. Q.; Buyanova, I. A.; Chen, W. M. [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, S-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Yang, X. J.; Subagyo, A.; Sueoka, K.; Murayama, A. [Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, Hokkaido University, Kita 14, Nishi 9, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0814 (Japan)

    2014-09-29

    We show that circularly polarized emission light from InGaAs/GaAs quantum dot (QD) ensembles under optical spin injection from an adjacent GaAs layer can switch its helicity depending on emission wavelengths and optical excitation density. We attribute this anomalous behavior to simultaneous contributions from both positive and negative trions and a lower number of photo-excited holes than electrons being injected into the QDs due to trapping of holes at ionized acceptors and a lower hole mobility. Our results call for caution in reading out electron spin polarization by optical polarization of the QD ensembles and also provide a guideline in improving efficiency of spin light emitting devices that utilize QDs.

  13. High critical temperature superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer with feedforward active noise control system for magnetocardiographic measurement in unshielded circumstances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizukami, A.; Nishiura, H.; Sakuta, K.; Kobayashi, T

    2003-10-15

    Magnetocardiographic (MCG) measurement in unshielded environment for practical use requires to suppress the environmental magnetic noise. We have designed the high critical temperature superconducting quantum interference device (High-T{sub c} SQUID) magnetometer with feedforward active noise control (ANC) system to suppress the environmental magnetic noise. The compensatory system consisted of two SQUID magnetometers, a digital signal processor (DSP) and the coil wound around the input magnetometer. The DSP calculated the output data to minimize the environmental noise from the input and reference date and then the coil generated the magnetic field to cancel the environmental noise. This method achieved the effective noise attenuation below 100 Hz about 40 dB. MCG measurement in unshielded environment was also performed.

  14. Quantum interference effects on the probe amplification without and with inversion in a four-level system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Bing; Xu Wei-Hua; Zhang Hui-Fang; Gao Jin-Yue

    2004-01-01

    A four-level system driven by two coherent fields is considered. It is shown that in the presence of an incoherent pump, the probe gain at a short wavelength can be achieved due to the quantum interference. Our density matrix calculation provides the conditions for probe amplification from different origins, including gain without population inversion on any state basis, gain with population inversion on the dressed-state basis, and gain with population inversion on the bare-state basis. Also, by controlling the Rabi frequency of the coupling field a total change from non-inversion to inversion can be achieved which does not depend on the intensity of the incoherent pump.

  15. Single-molecule phenyl-acetylene-macrocycle-based optoelectronic switch functioning as a quantum-interference-effect transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Liang-Yan; Rabitz, Herschel

    2012-11-02

    This work proposes a new type of optoelectronic switch, the phenyl-acetylene-macrocycle-based single-molecule transistor, which utilizes photon-assisted tunneling and destructive quantum interference. The analysis uses single-particle Green's functions along with Floquet theory. Without the optical field, phenyl-acetylene-macrocycle exhibits a wide range of strong antiresonance between its frontier orbitals. The simulations show large on-off ratios (over 10(4)) and measurable currents (~10(-11) A) enabled by photon-assisted tunneling in a weak optical field (~2 × 10(5) V/cm) and at a small source-drain voltage (~0.05 V). Field amplitude power scaling laws and a range of field intensities are given for operating one- and two-photon assisted tunneling in phenyl-acetylene-macrocycle-based single-molecule transistors. This development opens up a new direction for creating molecular switches.

  16. Magnetic gradiometer based on a high-transition temperaturesuperconducting quantum interference device for improved sensitivity of abiosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, SeungKyun; Myers, W.R.; Grossman, H.L.; Cho, H-M.; Chemla,Y.R.; Clarke, John

    2002-07-08

    We describe a gradiometer based on a high-transition temperature Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) for improving the sensitivity of a SQUID-based biosensor. The first-derivative gradiometer, fabricated from a single layer of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x}, has a baseline of 480 {micro}m and a balance against uniform fields of 1 part in 150. Used in our SQUID ''microscope,'' it reduces parasitic magnetic fields generated by the measurement process to the level of the SQUID noise. The gradiometer-based microscope is two orders of magnitude more sensitive to super paramagnetic nanoparticles bound to biological targets than our earlier magnetometer-based microscope.

  17. Properties of ground state and anomalous quantum fluctuations in one-dimensional polaron-soliton ystems——the effects of electron-two-phonon interaction and non-adiabatic quantum correlations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luo Zhi-Hua; Cao Xi-Jin; Yu Chao-Fan

    2011-01-01

    Based on the Holstein model Hamiltonian of one-dimensional molecular crystals, by making use of the expansion approach of the correlated squeezed-coherent states of phonon instead of the two-phonon coherent state expansion scheme, the properties of the ground state and the anomalous quantum fluctuations are investigated in a strongly coupled electron-phonon system with special consideration of the electron-two-phonon interaction. The effective renormalization ((~α)i) of the displacement of the squeezed phonons with the effect of the squeezed-coherent states of phonon and both the electron-displaced phonon and the polaron-squeezed phonon correlations have been combined to obtain the anomalous quantum fluctuations for the corrections of the coherent state. Due to these non-adiabatic correlations, the effective displacement parameter (~α)i is larger than the ordinary parameter αi(0). In comparison with the electron-one-phonon interaction (g) corrected as (~α)ig, we have found the electron-two-phonon interaction (g1) corrected as (~α)2ig1 is enhanced significantly. For this reason, the ground state energy (EO(2)) contributed by the electron-two-phonon interaction is more negative than the single-phonon case (EO(1)) and the soliton solution is more stable. At the same time, the effects of the electron-two-phonon interaction greatly increase the polaron energy and the quantum fluctuations. Furthermore,in a deeper level, we have considered the effect of the polaron-squeezed phonon correlation (f-correlation). Since this correlation parameter f > 1, this effect will strengthen the electron-one and two-phonon interactions by f(~α)ig and f2( ~α)2i1, respectively. The final results show that the ground state energy and the polaron energy will appear more negative further and the quantum fluctuations will gain further improvement.

  18. Y1Ba2Cu3O(7-delta) thin film dc SQUIDs (superconducting quantum interference device)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racah, Daniel

    1991-03-01

    Direct current superconducting quantum interferometers (SQUIDs) based on HTSC thin films have been measured and characterized. The thin films used were of different quality: (1) Granular films on Sapphire substrates, prepared either by e-gun evaporation, by laser ablation or by MOCVD (metal oxide chemical vapor deposition), (2) Epitaxial films on MgO substrates. Modulations of the voltage on the SQUIDs as a function of the applied flux have been observed in a wide range of temperatures. The nature of the modulation was found to be strongly dependent on the morphology of the film and on its critical current. The SQUIDs based on granular films were relatively noisy, hysteretic and with a complicated V-phi shape. Those devices based on low quality (lowIc) granular films could be measured only at low temperatures (much lower than 77 K). While those of higher quality (granular films with high Ic) could be measured near to the superconductive transition. The SQUID based on high quality epitaxial film was measured near Tc and showed an anomalous, time dependent behavior.

  19. Anomalous effect of phonon wind on lateral migration of excitons in ultrathin quantum CdTe/ZnTe well

    CERN Document Server

    Onishchenko, E E; Zajtsev, V V

    2001-01-01

    The effect of the acoustic phonons nonequilibrium flux on the photoluminescence of the CdTe/ZnTe thin quantum well, excited quasi-resonantly by the He-Ne-laser is studied. It is established that the phonon flux leads to the change in the form of the quantum well luminescence band even by low generation capacities. It is assumed that the nonequilibrium phonons flux stimulates the excitons migration in the quantum well plane, conditioned by the tunnel transitions between the potential local minima, which are accompanied by the phonons induced emission

  20. Quantum Interference between a Single-Photon Fock State and a Coherent State

    CERN Document Server

    Windhager, Armin; Pacher, Christoph; Peev, Momtchil; Poppe, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    We derive analytical expressions for the single mode quantum field state at the individual output ports of a beam splitter when a single-photon Fock state and a coherent state are incident on the input ports. The output states turn out to be a statistical mixture between a displaced Fock state and a coherent state. Consequently we are able to find an analytical expression for the corresponding Wigner function. Because of the generality of our calculations the obtained results are valid for all passive and lossless optical four port devices. We show further how the results can be adapted to the case of the Mach-Zehnder interferometer. In addition we consider the case for which the single-photon Fock state is replaced with a general input state: a coherent input state displaces each general quantum state at the output port of a beam splitter with the displacement parameter being the amplitude of the coherent state.

  1. Quantum interference between a single-photon Fock state and a coherent state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windhager, A.; Suda, M.; Pacher, C.; Peev, M.; Poppe, A.

    2011-04-01

    We derive analytical expressions for the single mode quantum field state at the individual output ports of a beam splitter when a single-photon Fock state and a coherent state are incident on the input ports. The output states turn out to be a statistical mixture between a displaced Fock state and a coherent state. Consequently we are able to find an analytical expression for the corresponding Wigner function. Because of the generality of our calculations the obtained results are valid for all passive and lossless optical four port devices. We show further how the results can be adapted to the case of the Mach-Zehnder interferometer. In addition we consider the case for which the single-photon Fock state is replaced with a general input state: a coherent input state displaces each general quantum state at the output port of a beam splitter with the displacement parameter being the amplitude of the coherent state.

  2. Quantum interferences in single ionization of He by highly charged dressed-ions impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monti, J M; Rivarola, R D [Instituto de Fisica Rosario (CONICET-UNR) and Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, IngenierIa y Agrimensura, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Pellegrini 250, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Fainstein, P D, E-mail: rivarola@fceia.unr.edu.ar [Comision Nacional de EnergIa Atomica, Centro Atomico Bariloche, Av. Bustillo 9500, 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina)

    2011-06-15

    Ionization of He targets by impact of partially stripped ions is investigated by means of an extension to the continuum distorted wave-eikonal initial state model with a particular representation of the projectile potential. Structures appearing superimposed on the binary encounter peak are interpreted in terms of coherent interference of short- and long-range contributions of the perturbative projectile potential. The case of 600 keV u{sup -1}Au{sup 11+} ions impinging on He is presented and discussed.

  3. Quantum Interference of Surface States in Bismuth Nanowires in Transverse Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopko, L. A.; Huber, T. E.; Nikolaeva, A. A.; Burceacov, L. A.

    2013-06-01

    We report the results of studies of the magnetoresistance (MR) and electric field effect (EFE) of single-crystal Bi nanowires with diameter dMurakami, bismuth bilayers can exhibit the quantum spin Hall effect. A Bi crystal can be viewed as a stacking of bilayers with a honeycomblike lattice structure along the [111] direction. An interpretation of transverse MR oscillations with using this theory is presented.

  4. Quantum Interference in Spontaneous Emission from a V-Type Three-Level Atom in a Two-Band Photonic Crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Ya-Ping; Chen Hong; ZHU Shi-Yao

    2000-01-01

    The spontaneous emission from a V-type three-level atom embedded in a two-band photonic crystal is studied.Due to the quantum interference between the two transitions and existence of two bands, the populations in the upper levels display some novel behavior: anti-trapping, population oscillation, and population inversion.

  5. Nonlinear optical spectra having characteristics of Fano interferences in coherently coupled lowest exciton biexciton states in semiconductor quantum dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Gotoh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Optical nonlinear effects are examined using a two-color micro-photoluminescence (micro-PL method in a coherently coupled exciton-biexciton system in a single quantum dot (QD. PL and photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy (PLE are employed to measure the absorption spectra of the exciton and biexciton states. PLE for Stokes and anti-Stokes PL enables us to clarify the nonlinear optical absorption properties in the lowest exciton and biexciton states. The nonlinear absorption spectra for excitons exhibit asymmetric shapes with peak and dip structures, and provide a distinct contrast to the symmetric dip structures of conventional nonlinear spectra. Theoretical analyses with a density matrix method indicate that the nonlinear spectra are caused not by a simple coherent interaction between the exciton and biexciton states but by coupling effects among exciton, biexciton and continuum states. These results indicate that Fano quantum interference effects appear in exciton-biexciton systems at QDs and offer important insights into their physics.

  6. Destructive quantum interference in electron transport: A reconciliation of the molecular orbital and the atomic orbital perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin; Geskin, Victor; Stadler, Robert

    2017-03-01

    Destructive quantum interference (DQI) in single molecule electronics is a purely quantum mechanical effect and is entirely defined by the inherent properties of the molecule in the junction such as its structure and symmetry. This definition of DQI by molecular properties alone suggests its relation to other more general concepts in chemistry as well as the possibility of deriving simple models for its understanding and molecular device design. Recently, two such models have gained a wide spread attention, where one was a graphical scheme based on visually inspecting the connectivity of the carbon sites in conjugated π systems in an atomic orbital (AO) basis and the other one puts the emphasis on the amplitudes and signs of the frontier molecular orbitals (MOs). There have been discussions on the range of applicability for these schemes, but ultimately conclusions from topological molecular Hamiltonians should not depend on whether they are drawn from an AO or a MO representation, as long as all the orbitals are taken into account. In this article, we clarify the relation between both models in terms of the zeroth order Green's function and compare their predictions for a variety of systems. From this comparison, we conclude that for a correct description of DQI from a MO perspective, it is necessary to include the contributions from all MOs rather than just those from the frontier orbitals. The cases where DQI effects can be successfully predicted within a frontier orbital approximation we show them to be limited to alternant even-membered hydrocarbons, as a direct consequence of the Coulson-Rushbrooke pairing theorem in quantum chemistry.

  7. Quantum Interference between a Single-Photon Fock State and a Coherent State

    OpenAIRE

    Windhager, Armin; Suda, Martin; Pacher, Christoph; Peev, Momtchil; Poppe, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    We derive analytical expressions for the single mode quantum field state at the individual output ports of a beam splitter when a single-photon Fock state and a coherent state are incident on the input ports. The output states turn out to be a statistical mixture between a displaced Fock state and a coherent state. Consequently we are able to find an analytical expression for the corresponding Wigner function. Because of the generality of our calculations the obtained results are valid for al...

  8. Magnetic topological insulator and quantum anomalous Hall effect%磁性拓扑绝缘体与量子反常霍尔效应

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翁红明; 戴希; 方忠

    2014-01-01

    量子反常霍尔绝缘体,有时也被称为陈数绝缘体,是不同于普通绝缘体和拓扑绝缘体的一类新的二维绝缘体,该体系具有可被实验观测的特殊物理性质-量子反常霍尔效应。该体系的物态不能用朗道对称性破缺理论来描写,而要用到拓扑物态的概念。它的发现也经历了从反常霍尔效应的内秉物性阐释,到量子自旋霍尔效应与拓扑绝缘体的发现,再到磁性拓扑绝缘体的理论预测与实现,并最终成功实验观测的漫长过程。由于量子反常霍尔效应的实现不需要外加磁场,而此时样品的边缘态可以被看成一根无能耗的理想导线,因此人们对于其将来可能的应用充满了期待。本文将从理论的角度简单综述该领域的发展历程、基本概念、以及相关的材料系统。%Quantum anomalous Hall insulator, also called as Chern insulator, is a new two-dimensional insulator distinguished from normal insulator and topological insulator by possess-ing a special and experimentally observable physical property-quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE). This is a novel quantum state can not be described by the Landau symmetry breaking theory but by the concept of topology of band structure. Its discovery experienced a long his-tory: from the explanation of intrinsic contribution to anomalous Hall effect, to the discovery of quantum spin Hall effect and topological insulator, to the prediction and realization of magnetic topological insulator, and finally to the experimental observation of it. Since QAHE does not require external magnetic field and has dissipationless (without lost of kinetic energy that being transferred to thermal energy) conducting edge states which can be used as an ideal conducting wire, it is expected to have various potential applications in future. This paper gives a review of this field on its history, basic concepts and related materials from the theoretical point of view.

  9. Anomalous electromagnetic coupling via entanglement at the nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slepyan, Gregory; Boag, Amir; Mordachev, Vladimir; Sinkevich, Eugene; Maksimenko, Sergey; Kuzhir, Polina; Miano, Giovanni; Portnoi, Mikhail E.; Maffucci, Antonio

    2017-02-01

    Understanding unwanted mutual interactions between devices at the nanoscale is crucial for the study of the electromagnetic compatibility in nanoelectronic and nanophotonic systems. Anomalous electromagnetic coupling (crosstalk) between nanodevices may arise from the combination of electromagnetic interaction and quantum entanglement. In this paper we study in detail the crosstalk between two identical nanodevices, each consisting of a quantum emitter (atom, quantum dot, etc), capacitively coupled to a pair of nanoelectrodes. Using the generalized susceptibility concept, the overall system is modeled as a two-port within the framework of the electrical circuit theory and it is characterized by the admittance matrix. We show that the entanglement changes dramatically the physical picture of the electromagnetic crosstalk. In particular, the excitation produced in one of the ports may be redistributed in equal parts between both the ports, in spite of the rather small electromagnetic interactions. Such an anomalous crosstalk is expected to appear at optical frequencies in lateral GaAs double quantum dots. A possible experimental set up is also discussed. The classical concepts of interference in the operation of electronic devices, which have been known since the early days of radio-communications and are associated with electromagnetic compatibility, should then be reconsidered at the nanoscale.

  10. Quantum interference effects in a multidriven transition Fg = 3 (←→) Fe= 2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Ya-Bin; Zhang Jun-Xiang; Wang Hai-Hong; Gao Jiang-Rui

    2006-01-01

    We have theoretically and experimentally studied the quantum coherence effects of a degenerate transition Fg =3 (←→)Fe = 2 system interacting with a weak linearly polarized (with σ± components) probe light and a strong linearly polarized (with σ± components) coupling field. Due to the competition between the drive Rabi frequency and the Zeeman splitting, electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) and electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA)are present at the different values of applied magnetic field in the case where the Zeeman splitting of excited state △e is larger than the Zeeman splitting of ground state △g (i.e. △e >△g).

  11. Achieving the Han-Kobayashi inner bound for the quantum interference channel by sequential decoding

    CERN Document Server

    Sen, Pranab

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we study the power of sequential decoding strategies for several channels with classical input and quantum output. In our sequential decoding strategies, the receiver loops through all candidate messages trying to project the received state onto a `typical' subspace for the candidate message under consideration, stopping if the projection succeeds for a message, which is then declared as the guess of the receiver for the sent message. We show that even such a conceptually simple strategy can be used to achieve rates up to the mutual information for a single sender single receiver channel called cq-channel henceforth, as well as the standard inner bound for a two sender single receiver multiple access channel, called ccq-MAC in this paper. Our decoding scheme for the ccq-MAC uses a new kind of conditionally typical projector which is constructed using a geometric result about how two subspaces interact structurally. As the main application of our methods, we construct an encoding and decoding sc...

  12. Quantum interference effects in topological nanowires in a longitudinal magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacksteder, Vincent E.; Wu, Quansheng

    2016-11-01

    We study the magnetoconductance of topological insulator nanowires in a longitudinal magnetic field, including Aharonov-Bohm, Altshuler-Aronov-Spivak, perfectly conducting channel, and universal conductance fluctuation effects. Our focus is on predicting experimental behavior in single wires in the quantum limit where temperature is reduced to zero. We show that changing the Fermi energy EF can tune a wire from from ballistic to diffusive conduction and to localization. In both ballistic and diffusive single wires we find both Aharonov-Bohm and Altshuler-Aronov-Spivak oscillations with similar strengths, accompanied by quite strong universal conductance fluctuations, all with amplitudes between 0.3 G0 and 1 G0 . This contrasts strongly with the average behavior of many wires, which shows Aharonov-Bohm oscillations in the ballistic regime and Altshuler-Aronov-Spivak oscillations in the diffusive regime, with both oscillations substantially larger than the conductance fluctuations. In single wires the ballistic and diffusive regimes can be distinguished by varying EF and studying the sign of the Aharonov-Bohm signal, which depends periodically on EF in ballistic wires and randomly on EF in diffusive wires. We also show that in long wires the perfectly conducting channel is visible at a wide range of energies within the bulk gap. We present typical conductance profiles at several wire lengths, showing that conductance fluctuations can dominate the average signal. Similar behavior will be found in carbon nanotubes.

  13. Anomalous dispersion and band gap reduction in UO2+x and its possible coupling to the coherent polaronic quantum state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conradson, Steven D.; Andersson, David A.; Bagus, Paul S.; Boland, Kevin S.; Bradley, Joseph A.; Byler, Darrin D.; Clark, David L.; Conradson, Dylan R.; Espinosa-Faller, Francisco J.; Lezama Pacheco, Juan S.; Martucci, Mary B.; Nordlund, Dennis; Seidler, Gerald T.; Valdez, James A.

    2016-05-01

    Hypervalent UO2, UO2(+x) formed by both addition of excess O and photoexcitation, exhibits a number of unusual or often unique properties that point to it hosting a polaronic Bose-Einstein(-Mott) condensate. A more thorough analysis of the O X-ray absorption spectra of UO2, U4O9, and U3O7 shows that the anomalous increase in the width of the spectral features assigned to predominantly U 5f and 6d final states that points to increased dispersion of these bands occurs on the low energy side corresponding to the upper edge of the gap bordered by the conduction or upper Hubbard band. The closing of the gap by 1.5 eV is more than twice as much as predicted by calculations, consistent with the dynamical polaron found by structural measurements. In addition to fostering the excitation that is the proposed mechanism for the coherence, the likely mirroring of this effect on the occupied, valence side of the gap below the Fermi level points to increased complexity of the electronic structure that could be associated with the Fermi topology of BEC-BCS crossover and two band superconductivity.

  14. A High-Performance Nb Nano-Superconducting Quantum Interference Device with a Three-Dimensional Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Wang, Hao; Liu, Xiaoyu; Wu, Long; Wang, Zhen

    2016-12-14

    A superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) miniaturized into the nanoscale is promising in the inductive detection of a single electron spin. A nano-SQUID with a strong spin coupling coefficient, a low flux noise, and a wide working magnetic field range is highly desired in a single spin resonance measurement. Nano-SQUIDs with Dayem bridge junctions excel in a high working field range and in the direct coupling from spins to the bridge. However, the common planar structure of nano-SQUIDs is known for problems such as a shallow flux modulation depth and a troublesome hysteresis in current-voltage curves. Here, we developed a fabrication process for creating three-dimensional (3-D) niobium (Nb) nano-SQUIDs with nanobridge junctions that can be tuned independently. Characterization of the device shows up to 45.9% modulation depth with a reversible current-voltage curve. Owning to the large modulation depth, the measured flux noise is as low as 0.34 μΦ0/Hz(1/2). The working field range of the SQUID is greater than 0.5 T parallel to the SQUID plane. We believe that 3-D Nb nano-SQUIDs provide a promising step toward effective single-spin inductive detection.

  15. Magnetic measurements at pressures above 10 GPa in a miniature ceramic anvil cell for a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateiwa, Naoyuki; Haga, Yoshinori; Matsuda, Tatsuma D; Fisk, Zachary

    2012-05-01

    A miniature ceramic anvil high pressure cell (mCAC) was earlier designed by us for magnetic measurements at pressures up to 7.6 GPa in a commercial superconducting quantum interference magnetometer [N. Tateiwa et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 82, 053906 (2011)]. Here, we describe methods to generate pressures above 10 GPa in the mCAC. The efficiency of the pressure generation is sharply improved when the Cu-Be gasket is sufficiently preindented. The maximum pressure for the 0.6 mm culet anvils is 12.6 GPa when the Cu-Be gasket is preindented from the initial thickness of 300-60 μm. The 0.5 mm culet anvils were also tested with a rhenium gasket. The maximum pressure attainable in the mCAC is about 13 GPa. The present cell was used to study YbCu(2)Si(2) which shows a pressure induced transition from the non-magnetic to magnetic phases at 8 GPa. We confirm a ferromagnetic transition from the dc magnetization measurement at high pressure. The mCAC can detect the ferromagnetic ordered state whose spontaneous magnetic moment is smaller than 1 μ(B) per unit cell. The high sensitivity for magnetic measurements in the mCAC may result from the simplicity of cell structure. The present study shows the availability of the mCAC for precise magnetic measurements at pressures above 10 GPa.

  16. Fermi energy dependence of first- and second-order Raman spectra in graphene: Kohn anomaly and quantum interference effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasdeo, Eddwi H.; Nugraha, Ahmad R. T.; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.; Saito, Riichiro

    2016-08-01

    Intensities of the first- and the second-order Raman spectra are calculated as a function of the Fermi energy. We show that the Kohn anomaly effect, i.e., phonon frequency renormalization, in the first-order Raman spectra originates from the phonon renormalization by the interband electron-hole excitation, whereas in the second-order Raman spectra, a competition between the interband and intraband electron-hole excitations takes place. By this calculation, we confirm the presence of different dispersive behaviors of the Raman peak frequency as a function of the Fermi energy for the first- and the second-order Raman spectra, as observed in some previous experiments. Moreover, the calculated results of the Raman intensity sensitively depend on the Fermi energy for both the first- and the second-order Raman spectra, indicating the presence of the quantum interference effect. The electron-phonon matrix element plays an important role in the intensity increase (decrease) of the combination (overtone) phonon modes as a function of the Fermi energy.

  17. First Numerical Simulations of Anomalous Hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Hongo, Masaru; Hirano, Tetsufumi

    2013-01-01

    Anomalous hydrodynamics is a low-energy effective theory that captures effects of quantum anomalies. We develop a numerical code of anomalous hydrodynamics and apply it to dynamics of heavy-ion collisions, where anomalous transports are expected to occur. This is the first attempt to perform fully non-linear numerical simulations of anomalous hydrodynamics. We discuss implications of the simulations for possible experimental observations of anomalous transport effects. From analyses of the charge-dependent elliptic flow parameters ($v_2^\\pm$) as a function of the net charge asymmetry $A_\\pm$, we quantitatively verify that the linear dependence of $\\Delta v_2 \\equiv v_2^- - v_2^+$ on the net charge asymmetry $A_\\pm$ cannot be regarded as a sensitive signal of anomalous transports, contrary to previous studies. We, however, find that the intercept $\\Delta v_2(A_\\pm=0)$ is sensitive to anomalous transport effects.

  18. Quantum interferences revealed by neutron diffraction accord with a macroscopic-scale quantum-theory of ferroelectrics KH2(1- ρ)D2 ρ PO4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillaux, François; Cousson, Alain

    2016-03-01

    Neutron diffraction by single-crystals KH2(1- ρ)D2 ρ PO4 at 293 K reveal quantum interferences consistent with a static lattice of entangled proton-deuteron scatterers. These crystals are represented by a macroscopic-scale condensate of phonons with continuous space-time-translation symmetry and zero-entropy. This state is energetically favored and decoherence-free over a wide temperature-range. Projection of the crystal state onto a basis of four electrically- and isotopically-distinct state-vectors accounts for isotope and pressure effects on the temperature of the ferroelectric-dielectric transition, as well as for the latent heat. At the microscopic level, an incoming wave realizes a transitory state either in the space of static positional parameters (elastic scattering) or in that of the symmetry species (energy transfer). Neutron diffraction, vibrational spectroscopy, relaxometry and neutron Compton scattering support the conclusion that proton and deuteron scatterers are separable exclusively through resonant energy-transfer.

  19. Non-Markovian spin-resolved counting statistics and an anomalous relation between autocorrelations and cross correlations in a three-terminal quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, JunYan; Yan, Yiying; Huang, Yixiao; Yu, Li; He, Xiao-Ling; Jiao, HuJun

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the noise correlations of spin and charge currents through an electron spin resonance (ESR)-pumped quantum dot, which is tunnel coupled to three electrodes maintained at an equivalent chemical potential. A recursive scheme is employed with inclusion of the spin degrees of freedom to account for the spin-resolved counting statistics in the presence of non-Markovian effects due to coupling with a dissipative heat bath. For symmetric spin-up and spin-down tunneling rates, an ESR-induced spin flip mechanism generates a pure spin current without an accompanying net charge current. The stochastic tunneling of spin carriers, however, produces universal shot noises of both charge and spin currents, revealing the effective charge and spin units of quasiparticles in transport. In the case of very asymmetric tunneling rates for opposite spins, an anomalous relationship between noise autocorrelations and cross correlations is revealed, where super-Poissonian autocorrelation is observed in spite of a negative cross correlation. Remarkably, with strong dissipation strength, non-Markovian memory effects give rise to a positive cross correlation of the charge current in the absence of a super-Poissonian autocorrelation. These unique noise features may offer essential methods for exploiting internal spin dynamics and various quasiparticle tunneling processes in mesoscopic transport.

  20. Transport and quantum interference in ferromagnetic (Ga,Mn)As nanostructures; Transportuntersuchungen von Quanteninterferenzeffekten in ferromagnetischen (Ga,Mn)As Nanostrukturen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Konrad

    2007-09-15

    In the framework of the thesis presented here for the first time quantum interference effects in ferromagnetic semiconductors could be uniquely detected. For this wire and ring structures with line widths of few nanometers were fabricated and universal conductivity fluctuations and Aharonov-Bohm oscillations at very low temperatures (<20 mK) were studied. From the analysis of the temperature and length dependence of the fluctuations knowledge about the coherence length and the scattering processes connected with this could be obtained.

  1. Miniature ceramic-anvil high-pressure cell for magnetic measurements in a commercial superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateiwa, Naoyuki; Haga, Yoshinori; Fisk, Zachary; Ōnuki, Yoshichika

    2011-05-01

    A miniature opposed-anvil high-pressure cell has been developed for magnetic measurement in a commercial superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer. Non-magnetic anvils made of composite ceramic material were used to generate high-pressure with a Cu-Be gasket. We have examined anvils with different culet sizes (1.8, 1.6, 1.4, 1.2, 1.0, 0.8, and 0.6 mm). The pressure generated at low temperature was determined by the pressure dependence of the superconducting transition of lead (Pb). The maximum pressure P(max) depends on the culet size of the anvil: the values of P(max) are 2.4 and 7.6 GPa for 1.8 and 0.6 mm culet anvils, respectively. We revealed that the composite ceramic anvil has potential to generate high-pressure above 5 GPa. The background magnetization of the Cu-Be gasket is generally two orders of magnitude smaller than the Ni-Cr-Al gasket for the indenter cell. The present cell can be used not only with ferromagnetic and superconducting materials with large magnetization but also with antiferromagnetic compounds with smaller magnetization. The production cost of the present pressure cell is about one tenth of that of a diamond anvil cell. The anvil alignment mechanism is not necessary in the present pressure cell because of the strong fracture toughness (6.5 MPa m(1∕2)) of the composite ceramic anvil. The simplified pressure cell is easy-to-use for researchers who are not familiar with high-pressure technology. Representative results on the magnetization of superconducting MgB(2) and antiferromagnet CePd(5)Al(2) are reported.

  2. Two-photon interference from a quantum dot-microcavity: Persistent pure-dephasing and suppression of time-jitter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Unsleber, S.; McCutcheon, Dara; Dambach, M.;

    We demonstrate the emission of highly indistinguishable photons from a quasiresonantly pumped coupled quantum dot–microcavity system operating in the regime of cavity quantum electrodynamics. Changing the sample temperature allows us to vary the quantum dot–cavity detuning, and on spectral...

  3. Preparation of Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger entangled states with multiple superconducting quantum-interference device qubits or atoms in cavity QED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chui-Ping; Han, Siyuan

    2004-12-01

    A scheme is proposed for generating Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) entangled states of multiple superconducting quantum-interference device (SQUID) qubits by the use of a microwave cavity. The scheme operates essentially by creating a single photon through an auxiliary SQUID built in the cavity and performing a joint multiqubit phase shift with assistance of the cavity photon. It is shown that entanglement can be generated using this method, deterministic and independent of the number of SQUID qubits. In addition, we show that the present method can be applied to preparing many atoms in a GHZ entangled state, with tolerance to energy relaxation during the operation.

  4. Generation of entangled state using superconducting quantum interference devices%利用超导量子相干装置制备纠缠态的方案

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马驰; 叶柳; 王戴木

    2007-01-01

    本文提出用两个超导量子相干装置在一个单模大失谐腔中制备一个最大纠缠态的新方案,在这个方案里,腔场态处于虚激发,在超导量子相干装置和腔场之间没有信息传递,因此对腔的品质要求大大减低.%We propose a new scheme to generate a maximally entangled state of twosuperconducting quantum interference devices with a nonresonant cavity. In this scheme, the cavity field is virtually excited, no quantum-information transfer exists between the SQUIDs system and the cavity field, thus the requirement on the quality factor of the cavity is greatly relaxed.

  5. RNA Interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NIGMS Home > Science Education > RNA Interference Fact Sheet RNA Interference Fact Sheet Tagline (Optional) Middle/Main Content Area What is RNA interference? RNA interference (RNAi) is a natural process ...

  6. How does interference fall?

    CERN Document Server

    Orlando, Patrick J; Modi, Kavan

    2016-01-01

    We study how single- and double-slit interference patterns fall in the presence of gravity. First, we demonstrate that universality of free fall still holds in this case, i.e., interference patterns fall just like classical objects. Next, we explore lowest order relativistic effects in the Newtonian regime by employing a recent quantum formalism which treats mass as an operator. This leads to interactions between non-degenerate internal degrees of freedom (like spin in an external magnetic field) and external degrees of freedom (like position). Based on these effects, we present an unusual phenomenon, in which a falling double slit interference pattern periodically decoheres and recoheres. The oscillations in the visibility of this interference occur due to correlations built up between spin and position. Finally, we connect the interference visibility revivals with non-Markovian quantum dynamics.

  7. Anomalous Dissipative Quantum Harmonic Oscillator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Dian-Yong; BAI Zhan-Wu; DONG Yu-Bing

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the low-temperature statistical properties of a harmonic oscillator coupled to a heat bath, where the low-frequency spectrum vanishes. We obtain the exact result of the zero point energy. Due to the low frequency shortage of environmental oscillators' spectral density, the coordinate and momentum correlation functions decay as r-4and r-6 respectively at zero temperature, where T is the correlation time. The low-temperature behavior of the mean energy does not violate the third law of thermodynamics, but differs largely from the Ohmic spectrum case.

  8. 基于SQUIDs和腔场相互作用传送量子信息的方案%Quantum information transfer with superconducting quantum interference device qubits in cavity QED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴韬; 何娟; 倪致祥

    2009-01-01

    本文提出了一个基于SQUIDs和腔场的大失谐相互作用传送量子信息的方案,此方案可以直接地、百分之百地实现量子信息的传送.该方案中腔场和SQUIDs系统之间没有量子信息的传递,腔场只是虚激发,这样对腔的品质因子的要求大大的降低了.同时也可以在SQUIDs之间建立传送量子信息的量子网络.%We propose a scheme for transferring Quantum information via superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) qubits and cavity field interaction with a large detuning.In the scheme,no quantum information is transferred between the SQUIDs and the cavities,the cavity-fields are only virtually excited,thus the requirement on the quality factor of the cavities is greatly relaxed.In addition,in the scheme the quantum information can be directly transferred with a successful probability of 100% in a simple manner.And meanwhile we can establish a network for transferring quantum information between SQUID qubits.

  9. Two-photon interference from a quantum dot-microcavity: Persistent pure-dephasing and suppression of time-jitter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Unsleber, Sebastian; McCutcheon, Dara; Dambach, Michael;

    2015-01-01

    , we observea threefold improvement in the Hong-Ou-Mandel interference visibility, reaching values in excess of 80%. Ourmeasurements off-resonance allow us to investigate varying Purcell enhancements, and to probe the dephasingenvironment at different temperatures and energy scales. By comparison...

  10. Aharanov-Bohm quantum interference in LaAlO3/SrTiO3 Hall bar structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvin, Patrick; Lu, Shicheng; Annadi, Anil; Cheng, Guanglei; Tomczyk, Michelle; Huang, Mengchen; Levy, Jeremy; Lee, Hyungwoo; Eom, Chang-Beom

    Aharanov-Bohm (AB) interference can arise in transport experiments when magnetic flux threads through two or more transport channels. The existence of this behavior requires long-range ballistic transport and is typically observed only in exceptionally clean materials. We observe AB interference in wide (w ~ 100 nm) channels created at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface using conductive AFM lithography. Interference occurs above a critical field B ~ 4 T and increases in magnitude with increasing magnetic field. The period of oscillation implies a ballistic length that greatly exceeds the micron-scale length of the channel, consistent with Fabry-Perot interference in 1D channels. The conditions under which AB oscillations are observed will be discussed in the context of the electron pairing mechanism in LaAlO3/SrTiO3. We gratefully acknowledge financial support from AFOSR (FA9550-10-1-0524 (JL), FA9550-12-1-0268 (JL), and FA9550-12-1-0342 (CBE)) and NSF (DMR-1124131 (JL), DMR-1104191 (JL), and DMR-1234096 (CBE)).

  11. The role of quantum interference and partial redistribution in the solar Ba II D2 4554 A line

    CERN Document Server

    Smitha, H N; Stenflo, J O; Sampoorna, M

    2014-01-01

    The Ba II D2 line at 4554 A is a good example, where the F-state interference effects due to the odd isotopes produce polarization profiles, which are very different from those of the even isotopes that do not exhibit F-state interference. It is therefore necessary to account for the contributions from the different isotopes to understand the observed linear polarization profiles of this line. In this paper we present radiative transfer modeling with partial frequency redistribution (PRD), which is shown to be essential to model this line. This is because complete frequency redistribution (CRD) cannot reproduce the observed wing polarization. We present the observed and computed Q/I profiles at different limb distances. The theoretical profiles strongly depend on limb distance (\\mu) and the model atmosphere which fits the limb observations fails at other \\mu\\ positions.

  12. Spin-glass and variable range hopping quantum interference magnetoresistance in FeSr2Y1.3Ce0.7Cu2O10-x

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambale, S.; Williams, G. V. M.; Stephen, J.; Chong, S. V.

    2014-12-01

    Electronic transport and magnetic measurements have been made on FeSr2Y1.3Ce0.7Cu2O10-x. We observe a spin-glass at ˜23 K and a magnetoresistance that reaches -22% at 8 T. The magnetoresistance is due to variable range hopping quantum interference where at low temperatures each hop is over a large number of scatterers. This magnetoresistance is negative at and above 5 K and can be described by the Nguen, Spivak, and Shklovskii (NSS) model. However, there is an increasingly positive contribution to the magnetoresistance for temperatures below 5 K that may be due to scattering from localized free spins during each hop that is not accounted for in the NSS model.

  13. Direct current superconducting quantum interference device spectrometer for pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance and nuclear quadrupole resonance at frequencies up to 5 MHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    TonThat, Dinh M.; Clarke, John

    1996-08-01

    A spectrometer based on a dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) has been developed for the direct detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) or nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) at frequencies up to 5 MHz. The sample is coupled to the input coil of the niobium-based SQUID via a nonresonant superconducting circuit. The flux locked loop involves the direct offset integration technique with additional positive feedback in which the output of the SQUID is coupled directly to a low-noise preamplifier. Precession of the nuclear quadrupole spins is induced by a magnetic field pulse with the feedback circuit disabled; subsequently, flux locked operation is restored and the SQUID amplifies the signal produced by the nuclear free induction signal. The spectrometer has been used to detect 27Al NQR signals in ruby (Al2O3[Cr3+]) at 359 and 714 kHz.

  14. Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices for the Detection of Magnetic Flux and Application to Airborne High Frequency Direction Finding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-26

    Faculty Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Graduate School of Engineering and Management Air Force Institute of Technology Air...Clair Corbin [18]. Captain Corbin evaluated alternative direction of arrival (DOA) estimation techniques to improve azimuthal resolution and found...starts with finding the wave function of an elementary particle Ψ(x, t). The wave function describes a quantum object for all future time, given suitable

  15. Anomalous Thermalization in Ergodic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luitz, David J.; Bar Lev, Yevgeny

    2016-10-01

    It is commonly believed that quantum isolated systems satisfying the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis (ETH) are diffusive. We show that this assumption is too restrictive since there are systems that are asymptotically in a thermal state yet exhibit anomalous, subdiffusive thermalization. We show that such systems satisfy a modified version of the ETH ansatz and derive a general connection between the scaling of the variance of the off-diagonal matrix elements of local operators, written in the eigenbasis of the Hamiltonian, and the dynamical exponent. We find that for subdiffusively thermalizing systems the variance scales more slowly with system size than expected for diffusive systems. We corroborate our findings by numerically studying the distribution of the coefficients of the eigenfunctions and the off-diagonal matrix elements of local operators of the random field Heisenberg chain, which has anomalous transport in its thermal phase. Surprisingly, this system also has non-Gaussian distributions of the eigenfunctions, thus, directly violating Berry's conjecture.

  16. Fiber-Optic Sources of Quantum Entanglement

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, P; Fiorentino, M; Voss, P L; Sharping, J E; Barbosa, G A

    2002-01-01

    We present a fiber-based source of polarization-entangled photon pairs that is well suited for quantum communication applications in the 1.5$\\mu$m band of standard telecommunication fiber. Quantum-correlated signal and idler photon pairs are produced when a nonlinear-fiber Sagnac interferometer is pumped in the anomalous-dispersion region of the fiber. Recently, we have demonstrated nonclassical properties of such photon pairs by using Geiger-mode InGaAs/InP avalanche photodiodes. Polarization entanglement in the photon pairs can be created by pumping the Sagnac interferometer with two orthogonally polarized pulses. In this case the parametrically scattered signal-idler photons yield biphoton interference with $>$90% visibility in coincidence detection, while no interference is observed in direct detection of either the signal or the idler photons.

  17. Destructive Interference of Dualities

    CERN Document Server

    Wotzasek, C

    1998-01-01

    We show that the fusion of two (diffeomorphism) invariant self-dual scalars described by right and left chiral-WZW actions, produces a Hull non-mover field. After fusion, right and left moving modes disappear from the spectrum, displaying in this way the phenomenon of (destructive) quantum interference of dualities.

  18. On Quantum Algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Cleve, R; Henderson, L; Macchiavello, C; Mosca, M

    1998-01-01

    Quantum computers use the quantum interference of different computational paths to enhance correct outcomes and suppress erroneous outcomes of computations. In effect, they follow the same logical paradigm as (multi-particle) interferometers. We show how most known quantum algorithms, including quantum algorithms for factorising and counting, may be cast in this manner. Quantum searching is described as inducing a desired relative phase between two eigenvectors to yield constructive interference on the sought elements and destructive interference on the remaining terms.

  19. Phonon-Mediated Nonclassical Interference in Diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, Duncan G.; Fisher, Kent A. G.; MacLean, Jean-Philippe W.; Bustard, Philip J.; Heshami, Khabat; Resch, Kevin J.; Sussman, Benjamin J.

    2016-08-01

    Quantum interference of single photons is a fundamental aspect of many photonic quantum processing and communication protocols. Interference requires that the multiple pathways through an interferometer be temporally indistinguishable to within the coherence time of the photon. In this Letter, we use a diamond quantum memory to demonstrate interference between quantum pathways, initially temporally separated by many multiples of the optical coherence time. The quantum memory can be viewed as a light-matter beam splitter, mapping a THz-bandwidth single photon to a variable superposition of the output optical mode and stored phononic mode. Because the memory acts both as a beam splitter and as a buffer, the relevant coherence time for interference is not that of the photon, but rather that of the memory. We use this mechanism to demonstrate nonclassical single-photon and two-photon interference between quantum pathways initially separated by several picoseconds, even though the duration of the photons themselves is just ˜250 fs .

  20. Effects of nanoscale quantum dots in male Chinese loaches (Misgurnus anguillicaudatus):Estrogenic interference action,toxicokinetics and oxidative stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) have received more and more attention as a novel example of nanocrystals due to their unique fluorescent characteristics. Recently, the toxicity and the potential environmental effects of QDs have become a research hotspot. In this work, in vivo endocrine disrupting effect, toxicokinetics and oxidative stress of QDs were characterized following the intraperitoneal dosing in Chinese loaches. Vitellogenin (Vtg) levels induced by E2 decreased significantly when administrated with the mixture of QDs and E2, which was consistent with the observations of histopathology in testes. The release of free Cd2+ from QDs and the non-specific adsorption of E2 by QDs might be the joint factors contributing to the inhibition of Vtg expression induced by E2 in the male Chinese loaches. In the muscle, bone, intestines, blood and testis, CdSe QDs reached the maximal concentration (Cmax) in approximately 1-h postinjection and subsequently presented downtrend with the prolonged time. Whereas, there were even increasing tendencies of CdSe QDs’ concentrations in the liver and kidney. It is educible that CdSe QDs can be persistent at least for 7 days, indicating the overall half-life of CdSe QDs in the fish body is very long. The measurement of hepatic superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and reduced glutathione (GSH) content indicate that QDs have smaller effects on the antioxidative system of the organisms compared with free Cd2+ due to the effective prevention of the release of Cd by PEG coating of QDs. The comprehensive evaluation of QDs’ toxicity in the present study provides an essential and general framework towards more focused research on the elucidation of the biological effects of QDs in vivo.

  1. Effects of nanoscale quantum dots in male Chinese Ioaches (Misgurnus anguillicaudatus): Estrogenic interference action, toxicokinetics and oxidative stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI HongCheng; LUO WenRu; TAO Yong; WU Yuan; LV XueFei; ZHOU QunFang; JIANG GuiBin

    2009-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) have received more and more attention as a novel example of nanocrystals due to their unique fluorescent characteristics. Recently, the toxicity and the potential environmental effects of QDs have become a research hotspot. In this work, in vivo endocrine disrupting effect, toxicokinetics and oxidative stress of QDs were characterized following the intraperitoneal dosing in Chinese Ioaches. Vitellogenin (Vtg) levels induced by E2 decreased significantly when administrated with the mixture of QDs and E2, which was consistent with the observations of histopathology in testes. The release of free Cd~(2+) from QDs and the non-specific adsorption of E2 by QDs might be the joint factors contributing to the inhibition of Vtg expression induced by E2 in the male Chinese Ioaches. In the muscle, bone, intestines, blood and testis, CdSe QDs reached the maximal concentration (Cmax) in approximately 1-h postinjection and subsequently presented downtrend with the prolonged time. Whereas, there were even increasing tendencies of CdSe ODs' concentrations in the liver and kidney. It is educible that CdSe QDs can be persistent at least for 7 days, indicating the overall half-life of CdSe QDs in the fish body is very long. The measurement of hepatic superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and reduced glutathione (GSH) content indicate that QDs have smaller effects on the antioxidative system of the organisms compared with free Cd~(2+) due to the effective prevention of the release of Cd by PEG coating of QDs. The comprehensive evaluation of QDs' toxicity in the present study provides an essential and general framework towards more focused research on the elucidation of the biological effects of QDs in vivo.

  2. Molecular Orbital Rule for Quantum Interference in Weakly Coupled Dimers: Low-Energy Giant Conductivity Switching Induced by Orbital Level Crossing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Daijiro; Lücke, Andreas; Schmidt, Wolf Gero

    2017-02-16

    Destructive quantum interference (QI) in molecular junctions has attracted much attention in recent years. It can tune the conductance of molecular devices dramatically, which implies numerous potential applications in thermoelectric and switching applications. There are several schemes that address and rationalize QI in single molecular devices. Dimers play a particular role in this respect because the QI signal may disappear, depending on the dislocation of monomers. We derive a simple rule that governs the occurrence of QI in weakly coupled dimer stacks of both alternant and nonalternant polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and extends the Tada-Yoshizawa scheme. Starting from the Green's function formalism combined with the molecular orbital expansion approach, it is shown that QI-induced antiresonances and their energies can be predicted from the amplitudes of the respective monomer terminal molecular orbitals. The condition is illustrated for a toy model consisting of two hydrogen molecules and applied within density functional calculations to alternant dimers of oligo(phenylene-ethynylene) and nonalternant PAHs. Minimal dimer structure modifications that require only a few millielectronvolts and lead to an energy crossing of the essentially preserved monomer orbitals are shown to result in giant conductance switching ratios.

  3. Understanding ghost interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Tabish; Chingangbam, Pravabati; Shafaq, Sheeba

    2016-08-01

    The ghost interference observed for entangled photons is theoretically analyzed using wave-packet dynamics. It is shown that ghost interference is a combined effect of virtual double-slit creation due to entanglement, and quantum erasure of which-path information for the interfering photon. For the case where the two photons are of different color, it is shown that fringe width of the interfering photon depends not only on its own wavelength, but also on the wavelength of the other photon which it is entangled with.

  4. Wave and Particle in Molecular Interference Lithography

    CERN Document Server

    Juffmann, Thomas; Geyer, Philipp; Major, Andras G; Deachapunya, Sarayut; Ulbricht, Hendrik; Arndt, Markus; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.103.263601

    2010-01-01

    The wave-particle duality of massive objects is a cornerstone of quantum physics and a key property of many modern tools such as electron microscopy, neutron diffraction or atom interferometry. Here we report on the first experimental demonstration of quantum interference lithography with complex molecules. Molecular matter-wave interference patterns are deposited onto a reconstructed Si(111) 7x7 surface and imaged using scanning tunneling microscopy. Thereby both the particle and the quantum wave character of the molecules can be visualized in one and the same image. This new approach to nanolithography therefore also represents a sensitive new detection scheme for quantum interference experiments.

  5. Wave and particle in molecular interference lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juffmann, Thomas; Truppe, Stefan; Geyer, Philipp; Major, András G; Deachapunya, Sarayut; Ulbricht, Hendrik; Arndt, Markus

    2009-12-31

    The wave-particle duality of massive objects is a cornerstone of quantum physics and a key property of many modern tools such as electron microscopy, neutron diffraction or atom interferometry. Here we report on the first experimental demonstration of quantum interference lithography with complex molecules. Molecular matter-wave interference patterns are deposited onto a reconstructed Si(111) 7x7 surface and imaged using scanning tunneling microscopy. Thereby both the particle and the quantum wave character of the molecules can be visualized in one and the same image. This new approach to nanolithography therefore also represents a sensitive new detection scheme for quantum interference experiments.

  6. Quantum diagrammatic theory of the extrinsic spin Hall effect in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milletarı, Mirco; Ferreira, Aires

    2016-10-01

    We present a rigorous microscopic theory of the extrinsic spin Hall effect in disordered graphene based on a nonperturbative quantum diagrammatic treatment incorporating skew scattering and anomalous (impurity-concentration-independent) quantum corrections on equal footing. The leading skew-scattering contribution to the spin Hall conductivity is shown to quantitatively agree with Boltzmann transport theory over a wide range of parameters. Our self-consistent approach, where all topologically equivalent noncrossing diagrams are resummed, unveils that the skewness generated by spin-orbit-active impurities deeply influences the anomalous component of the spin Hall conductivity, even in the weak-scattering regime. This seemingly counterintuitive result is explained by the rich sublattice structure of scattering potentials in graphene, for which traditional Gaussian disorder approximations fail to capture the intricate correlations between skew scattering and side jumps generated through diffusion. Finally, we assess the role of quantum interference corrections by evaluating an important subclass of crossing diagrams recently considered in the context of the anomalous Hall effect, the X and Ψ diagrams [A. Ado et al., Europhys. Lett. 111, 37004 (2015), 10.1209/0295-5075/111/37004]. We show that Ψ diagrams, encoding quantum coherent skew scattering, display a strong Fermi energy dependence, dominating the anomalous spin Hall component away from the Dirac point. Our findings have direct implications for nonlocal transport experiments in spin-orbit-coupled graphene systems.

  7. Gain Measurement and Anomalous Decrease of Peak Gain at Long Wavelength for InAs/GaAs Quantum-Dot Lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Jin-Long; HUANG Yong-Zhen; DU Yun; ZHAO Huan; NI Hai-Qiao; NIU Zhi-Chuan

    2007-01-01

    Mode gain spectrum is measured by the Fourier series expansion method for InAs/GaAs quantum-dot (QD) lasers with seven stacks of QDs at different injection currents. Gain spectra with distinctive peaks are observed at the short and long wavelengths of about 1210nm and 1300nm. For a QD laser with the cavity length of 1060 μm, the peak gain of the long wavelength first increases slowly or even decreases with the injection current as the peak gain of the short wavelength increases quickly, and finally increases quickly before approaching the saturated values as the injection current further increases.

  8. On the magnetization relaxation of ring-shaped Tl 2Ba 2CaCu 2O 8 thin films as determined by superconducting quantum interference device measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Hai-hu; Ziemann, Paul; Radovan, Henri A.; Herzog, Thomas

    1998-09-01

    By using a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID), the temporal relaxation of the magnetization was determined for ring-shaped Tl 2Ba 2CaCu 2O 8 thin films at various temperatures between 10 K and 80 K in magnetic fields ranging from 2 mT to 0.3 T. Based on these data, a detailed analysis has been performed related to the following methods or models: (1) Fitting the data to the thermally activated flux motion and collective pinning model; (2) Applying the Generalized Inversion Scheme to extract the temperature dependence of the unrelaxed critical current density jc( T) and pinning potential Uc( T); (3) Testing a modified Maley's method to obtain the current dependent activation energy for flux motion; (4) 2D vortex glass scaling. It is found that, for low fields (2 mT, 10 mT, 40 mT) the experimental data can be described by an elastic flux motion, most probably due to 3D single vortex creep. At higher fields (0.1 T, 0.2 T, 0.3 T), the observed behavior can be interpreted in terms of plastic flux motion which is probably governed by dislocation mediated flux creep. These high field data can also be consistently described by the 2D vortex glass scaling with scaling parameters ν2D, T0 and p being consistent with those derived from corresponding transport measurement. Also, results are presented demonstrating the importance of optimizing the scan length of the sample in a moving sample SQUID magnetometer to avoid artifacts.

  9. Synthesis and characterization of YBa2Cu3O7(Y123) via sol-gel method for development of superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahya, Noorhana; Zakariah, Muhammad Hanis

    2012-10-01

    Electromagnetic (EM) waves transmitted by Horizontal Electric Dipole (HED) source to detect contrasts in subsurface resistivity termed Seabed Logging (SBL) is now an established method for hydrocarbon exploration. However, currently used EM wave detectors for SBL have several challenges including the sensitivity and its bulk size. This work exploits the benefit of superconductor technology in developing a magnetometer termed Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) which can potentially be used for SBL. A SQUID magnetometer was fabricated using hexagon shape-niobium wire with YBa2Cu37O, (YBCO) as a barrier. The YBa2Cu37O, samples were synthesized by sol-gel method and were sintered using a furnace and conventional microwave oven. The YBCO gel was dried at 120 degrees C in air for 72 hours. It was then ground and divided into 12 parts. Four samples were sintered at 750 degrees C, 850 degrees C, 900 degrees C, and 950 degrees C for 12 hours in a furnace to find the optimum temperature. The other eight samples were sintered in a microwave with 1100 Watt (W) with a different sintering time, 5, 15, 45 minutes, 1 hour, 1 hour 15 minutes, 1 hour 30 minutes, 1 hour 45 minutes and 2 hours. A DEWAR container was designed and fabricated using fiberglass material. It was filled with liquid nitrogen (LN2) to ensure the superconducting state of the magnetometer. XRD results showed that the optimum sintering temperature for the formation of orthorhombic Y-123 phase was at 950 degrees C with the crystallite size of 67 nm. The morphology results from Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) showed that the grains had formed a rod shape with an average diameter of 60 nm. The fabricated SQUID magnetometer was able to show an increment of approximately 249% in the intensity of the EM waves when the source receiver offset was one meter apart.

  10. Quantum

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Khalili, Jim

    2003-01-01

    In this lively look at quantum science, a physicist takes you on an entertaining and enlightening journey through the basics of subatomic physics. Along the way, he examines the paradox of quantum mechanics--beautifully mathematical in theory but confoundingly unpredictable in the real world. Marvel at the Dual Slit experiment as a tiny atom passes through two separate openings at the same time. Ponder the peculiar communication of quantum particles, which can remain in touch no matter how far apart. Join the genius jewel thief as he carries out a quantum measurement on a diamond without ever touching the object in question. Baffle yourself with the bizzareness of quantum tunneling, the equivalent of traveling partway up a hill, only to disappear then reappear traveling down the opposite side. With its clean, colorful layout and conversational tone, this text will hook you into the conundrum that is quantum mechanics.

  11. Topics in Perturbative Quantum Field Theory: Eighth Order QED Contribution to the Anomalous Magnetic Moment of the Muon and Next to Leading Order QCD Correction to Photon Photon ---> Positive M, Negative M

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizic, Bene

    1985-12-01

    This thesis consists of two unrelated topics in perturbative quantum field theory: eighth order QED contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon and next to leading order perturbative QCD correction to (gamma)(gamma) ( --->) M('+)M('-)(M = (pi),K). In Part I we present the evaluation of the complete eighth order QED contribution to the difference of the anomalous magnetic moments of the muon and the electron, (a(,(mu)) - a(,e))('(8)), arising from 469 Feynman diagrams. Our result is 140.7(4.5)((alpha)/(pi))('4). The theoretical error represents the estimated accuracy of the required numerical integration. We have also improved the light -by-light QED contribution to (a(,(mu)) - a(,e))('(6)). With these results the difference a(,(mu)) - a(,e) through eighth order in QED is (a(,(mu)) - a(,e))('QED) = 619 551(21) x 10('-11). Adding to the present theoretical value of the electron anomaly a(,e)('QED) = 115 965 246(5) x 10(' -11), we find that the pure QED contribution to the muon anomaly is given by a(,(mu))('QED) = 116 584 797(22) x 10('-11). In Part II we present the results of our calculation of the next to leading order perturbative QCD correction to the two-photon exclusive channels (gamma)(gamma)(-- ->)M('+)M('-)(M = (pi),K) at large momentum transfer. Calculation is performed in the Feynman gauge. Dimensional regularization is used to treat both UV and (//R) divergences. The meson distribution amplitude is taken to be (PHI)(,M)(PROPORTIONAL)('(delta))(x - 1/2). In order to reduce the dependence on the particular choice of (PHI)(,M), similarity of (gamma)(gamma)(--->)M('+)M(' -) and meson electromagnetic form-factor is employed. One loop correction to the (gamma)(gamma)(--->)M('+)M('-) cross section is obtained. In the MS renormalization scheme this correction is found not to be large.

  12. ANOMALOUS MAGNETIC FILMS,

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three types of anomalous nickel-iron magnetic films characterized by hysteresigraph and torque-magnetometer measurements; bitter-pattern observations; reprint from ’ Journal of Applied Physics .’

  13. Anomalous diffraction in hyperbolic materials

    CERN Document Server

    Alberucci, Alessandro; Boardman, Allan D; Assanto, Gaetano

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that light is subject to anomalous (i.e., negative) diffraction when propagating in the presence of hyperbolic dispersion. We show that light propagation in hyperbolic media resembles the dynamics of a quantum particle of negative mass moving in a two-dimensional potential. The negative effective mass implies time reversal if the medium is homogeneous. Such property paves the way to diffraction compensation, spatial analogue of dispersion compensating fibers in the temporal domain. At variance with materials exhibiting standard elliptic dispersion, in inhomogeneous hyperbolic materials light waves are pulled towards regions with a lower refractive index. In the presence of a Kerr-like optical response, bright (dark) solitons are supported by a negative (positive) nonlinearity.

  14. Anomalous diffraction in hyperbolic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberucci, Alessandro; Jisha, Chandroth P.; Boardman, Allan D.; Assanto, Gaetano

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate that light is subject to anomalous (i.e., negative) diffraction when propagating in the presence of hyperbolic dispersion. We show that light propagation in hyperbolic media resembles the dynamics of a quantum particle of negative mass moving in a two-dimensional potential. The negative effective mass implies time reversal if the medium is homogeneous. Such property paves the way to diffraction compensation, i.e., spatial analog of dispersion compensating fibers in the temporal domain. At variance with materials exhibiting standard elliptic dispersion, in inhomogeneous hyperbolic materials light waves are pulled towards regions with a lower refractive index. In the presence of a Kerr-like optical response, bright (dark) solitons are supported by a negative (positive) nonlinearity.

  15. Interference, Reduced Action, and Trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, Edward R.

    2007-09-01

    Instead of investigating the interference between two stationary, rectilinear wave functions in a trajectory representation by examining the trajectories of the two rectilinear wave functions individually, we examine a dichromatic wave function that is synthesized from the two interfering wave functions. The physics of interference is contained in the reduced action for the dichromatic wave function. As this reduced action is a generator of the motion for the dichromatic wave function, it determines the dichromatic wave function’s trajectory. The quantum effective mass renders insight into the behavior of the trajectory. The trajectory in turn renders insight into quantum nonlocality.

  16. Interference, reduced action, and trajectories

    CERN Document Server

    Floyd, E R

    2006-01-01

    Instead of investigating the interference between two stationary, rectilinear wave functions in a trajectory representation by examining the two rectilinear wave functions individually, we examine a dichromatic wave function that is synthesized from the two interfering wave functions. The physics of interference is contained in the reduced action for the dichromatic wave function. As this reduced action is a generator of the motion for the dichromatic wave function, it determines the dichromatic wave function's trajectory. The quantum effective mass renders insight into the behavior of the trajectory. The trajectory in turn renders insight into quantum nonlocality.

  17. Photon trajectories, anomalous velocities, and weak measurements: A classical interpretation

    CERN Document Server

    Bliokh, Konstantin Y; Nori, Franco

    2013-01-01

    Recently, Kocsis et al. reported the observation of "average trajectories of single photons" in a two-slit interference experiment [Science 332, 1170 (2011)]. This was possible by using the quantum weak-measurements method, which implies averaging over many events, i.e., in fact, a multi-photon limit of classical optics. We give a classical-optics interpretation to this experiment and other related problems. It appears that weak measurements of the local momentum of photons made by Kocsis et al. represent measurements of the Poynting vector in an optical field. We consider both the real and imaginary parts of the local momentum, and show that their measurements have been realized in classical optics using small probe particles. We also examine the appearance of "anomalous" values of the local momentum: either negative (backflow) or exceeding the wavenumber (superluminal propagation). These features appear to be closely related to vortices and evanescent waves. Finally, we revisit a number of older works and f...

  18. Multimode Hong-Ou-Mandel interference

    CERN Document Server

    Walborn, S P; Pádua, S; Monken, C H

    2003-01-01

    We consider multimode two-photon interference at a beam splitter by photons created by spontaneous parametric down-conversion. The resulting interference pattern is shown to depend upon the transverse spatial symmetry of the pump beam. In an experiment, we employ the first-order Hermite-Gaussian modes in order to show that, by manipulating the pump beam, one can control the resulting two-photon interference behavior. We expect these results to play an important role in the engineering of quantum states of light for use in quantum information processing and quantum imaging.

  19. Anomalously Strong Scattering of Spontaneously Produced Laser Radiation in the First Free-Electron Laser and Study of Free-Electron Two-Quantum Stark Lasing in an Electric Wiggler with Quantum-Wiggler Electrodynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. H. Kim

    2006-01-01

    We calculate the scattering cross section of an electron with respect to the spontaneously produced laser radiation in the first free-electron laser (FEL) with quantum-wiggler electrodynamics (QWD). The cross section is 1016 times the Thomson cross section, confirming the result obtained by a previous analysis of the experimental data. A QWD calculation show that spontaneous emission in an FEL using only an electric wiggler can be very strong while amplification through net stimulated emission is practically negligible.

  20. The Anomalous Magnetic Moment of the Muon

    CERN Document Server

    Jegerlehner, Friedrich

    2008-01-01

    This book reviews the present state of knowledge of the anomalous magnetic moment a=(g-2)/2 of the muon. The muon anomalous magnetic moment amy is one of the most precisely measured quantities in elementary particle physics and provides one of the most stringent tests of relativistic quantum field theory as a fundamental theoretical framework. It allows for an extremely precise check of the standard model of elementary particles and of its limitations. Recent experiments at the Brookhaven National Laboratory now reach the unbelievable precision of 0.5 parts per million, improving the accuracy of previous g-2 experiments at CERN by a factor of 14. A major part of the book is devoted to the theory of the anomalous magnetic moment and to estimates of the theoretical uncertainties. Quantum electrodynamics and electroweak and hadronic effects are reviewed. Since non-perturbative hadronic effects play a key role for the precision test, their evaluation is described in detail. After the overview of theory, the exper...

  1. Anomalous law of cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapas, Luciano C.; Ferreira, Rogelma M. S.; Rubí, J. Miguel; Oliveira, Fernando A.

    2015-03-01

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton's law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics.

  2. Anomalous chiral superfluidity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lublinsky, Michael, E-mail: lublinsky@phys.uconn.ed [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Physics Department, Ben-Gurion University, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel); Zahed, Ismail [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States)

    2010-02-08

    We discuss both the anomalous Cartan currents and the energy-momentum tensor in a left chiral theory with flavor anomalies as an effective theory for flavored chiral phonons in a chiral superfluid with the gauged Wess-Zumino-Witten term. In the mean-field (leading tadpole) approximation the anomalous Cartan currents and the energy-momentum tensor take the form of constitutive currents in the chiral superfluid state. The pertinence of higher order corrections and the Adler-Bardeen theorem is briefly noted.

  3. Anomalous law of cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapas, Luciano C; Ferreira, Rogelma M S; Rubí, J Miguel; Oliveira, Fernando A

    2015-03-14

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton's law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics.

  4. Quantum cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Hughes, R J; Dyer, P L; Luther, G G; Morgan, G L; Schauer, M M; Hughes, Richard J; Dyer, P; Luther, G G; Morgan, G L; Schauer, M

    1995-01-01

    Quantum cryptography is a new method for secret communications offering the ultimate security assurance of the inviolability of a Law of Nature. In this paper we shall describe the theory of quantum cryptography, its potential relevance and the development of a prototype system at Los Alamos, which utilises the phenomenon of single-photon interference to perform quantum cryptography over an optical fiber communications link.

  5. Anomalous electromagnetism of pions and magnons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiese, U.-J. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Bern University Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland)

    2005-04-15

    Pions and magnons - the Goldstone bosons of the strong interactions and of magnetism - share a number of common features. Pion and magnon fields couple anomalously to electromagnetism through the conserved Goldstone-Wilczek current of their topological Skyrmion excitations. In the pion case, this coupling gives rise to the decay of the neutral pion into two photons. In the magnon case, the anomalous coupling leads to photonmagnon conversion in an external magnetic field. A measurement of the conversion rate in quantum Hall ferromagnets determines the anyon statistics angle of baby-Skyrmions. If photon-magnon conversion also occurs in antiferromagnets, baby-Skyrmions carry electric charge and may represent the Cooper-pairs of high-temperature superconductors.

  6. Conditions for stimulated emission in anomalous gravity-superconductors interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Modanese, G

    2009-01-01

    Several authors have studied the generation of gravitational fields by condensed-matter systems in non-extreme density conditions. General Relativity and lowest-order perturbative Quantum Gravity predict in this case an extremely small emission rate, so these phenomena can become relevant only if some strong quantum effect occurs. Quantum aspects of gravity are still poorly understood. It is believed that they could play a role in systems which exhibit macroscopic quantum coherence, like superconductors and superfluids, leading to an "anomalous" coupling between matter and field. We mention here recent work in this field by Woods, Chiao, Becker, Agop et al., Ummarino, Kiefer and Weber. New results are presented concerning anomalous stimulated gravitational emission in a layered superconductor like YBCO. We model the superconductor as an array of intrinsic Josephson junctions. The superconducting parameters are defined by our preliminary measurements with melt-textured samples. We write explicitly and solve nu...

  7. Anomalous pion decay revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Battistel, O A; Nemes, M C; Hiller, B

    1999-01-01

    An implicit four dimensional regularization is applied to calculate the axial-vector-vector anomalous amplitude. The present technique always complies with results of Dimensional Regularization and can be easily applied to processes involving odd numbers of $\\gamma_5$ matrices. This is illustrated explicitely in the example of this letter.

  8. Ramsey Interference with Single Photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemmen, Stéphane; Farsi, Alessandro; Ramelow, Sven; Gaeta, Alexander L.

    2016-11-01

    Interferometry using discrete energy levels of nuclear, atomic, or molecular systems is the foundation for a wide range of physical phenomena and enables powerful techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance, electron spin resonance, Ramsey-based spectroscopy, and laser or maser technology. It also plays a unique role in quantum information processing as qubits may be implemented as energy superposition states of simple quantum systems. Here, we demonstrate quantum interference involving energy states of single quanta of light. In full analogy to the energy levels of atoms or nuclear spins, we implement a Ramsey interferometer with single photons. We experimentally generate energy superposition states of a single photon and manipulate them with unitary transformations to realize arbitrary projective measurements. Our approach opens the path for frequency-encoded photonic qubits in quantum information processing and quantum communication.

  9. Ramsey interference with single photons

    CERN Document Server

    Clemmen, Stéphane; Ramelow, Sven; Gaeta, Alexander L

    2016-01-01

    Interferometry using discrete energy levels in nuclear, atomic or molecular systems is the foundation for a wide range of physical phenomena and enables powerful techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance, electron spin resonance, Ramsey-based spectroscopy and laser/maser technology. It also plays a unique role in quantum information processing as qubits are realized as energy superposition states of single quantum systems. Here, we demonstrate quantum interference of different energy states of single quanta of light in full analogy to energy levels of atoms or nuclear spins and implement a Ramsey interferometer with single photons. We experimentally generate energy superposition states of a single photon and manipulate them with unitary transformations to realize arbitrary projective measurements, which allows for the realization a high-visibility single-photon Ramsey interferometer. Our approach opens the path for frequency-encoded photonic qubits in quantum information processing and quantum communicati...

  10. Toponymic interferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Ilie Oros

    1985-12-01

    Full Text Available The study of linguistic interferences has been greatly extended lately. It comprises all language sections. In onomastics great attention was paid to to the study of macrotoponyms of foreign origin. I would like to mention in this respect the research concerning the toponyms of Slavic origin in Romania and Greece, the toponyms of Romance origin in Yugoslavia etc. The studies referring to the interferences in microtoponymy are more rare. These call for the collecting of all microtoponyms through inquiries made in plaees inhabited by mixed populetion from the ethnic point of view. The microtoponymy of these places off ers a very interesting material as far as the interactiong the reciprocal in.fluences of two or more toponymic systems is concerned.

  11. Investigando a aprendizagem de professores de física acerca do fenômeno da interferência quântica Investigating Physics teachers' learning on the quantum interference phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Ostermann

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Analisa-se a evolução conceitual de 14 professores de Ensino Médio que foram estudantes, no 2º semestre de 2005, de uma disciplina sobre Física Quântica (FQ no Mestrado Profissional em Ensino de Física da UFRGS. Foi realizada uma análise de suas respostas acerca da interferência quântica em questionários especialmente desenvolvidos. Este estudo insere-se no âmbito de um projeto sobre Tópicos de Física Moderna e Contemporânea na formação de professores e já tem, como resultados a elaboração de um questionário sobre conceitos de FQ, construção e avaliação de uma unidade didática baseada em experimentos virtuais e o desenvolvimento de um software livre, do tipo "bancada virtual", que simula o fenômeno da interferência quântica em um aparato denominado Interferômetro de Mach Zehnder. A partir das sínteses das questões e da análise das respostas dos alunos, os resultados aqui relatados evidenciam aspectos de uma evolução conceitual em tópicos introdutórios de FQ.An analysis of the conceptual evolution of 14 Physics Teachers attending a 4 credit discipline "Introductory Quantum Physics" from August to December 2005 is presented in this work. They were all regular students in the Professional Masters Degree Program in Instituto de Física (UFRGS. Our analysis focuses on answers to learning questionnaires on the particular phenomenon of quantum interference. This study is part of a current project concerned with the preparation of Physics Teachers in Topics of Modern and Contemporary Physics. The project has so far resulted in the elaboration of learning questionnaires on Quantum Physics, the elaboration and evaluation of a teaching unit based on virtual experiments and the elaboration of a freeware interactive software that simulates the quantum interference in the Mach-Zehnder Interferometer. From questions synthesis and student´s answers, outcomes here related show aspects of a conceptual evolution in Quantum

  12. Analysis of Noise and Interference to Single Photon Satellite Quantum Communication%单光子卫星量子通信噪声和干扰分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李铁飞; 杨峰; 李伟; 崔树民

    2015-01-01

    Satellite quantum communication is one of the best choices for building a global quantum net-work. In view of the polarization maintaining problem in satellite quantum communication which uses po-larization encoding, the impact of atmospheric scattering and relative movement between satellite and ground station on the photon polarization states’ phase and alignment and the influence of alignment error and phase delay on quantum bit error rate of the system is researched. The influence of background noise and hardware on the quantum communication and the photon-number-splitting attacks to the single photon in quantum communication are analyzed. Research in this paper has important significance to quantum sig-nal’ s cognitive design.%卫星量子通信是建立全球量子通信网络的最佳选择之一。针对采用偏振编码的卫星量子通信中的偏振保持问题,研究了大气散射和卫星与地面站间相对运动等因素对量子偏振态相位和对准的影响以及相位延迟和对准误差对系统量子误码率的影响,分析了背景噪声和系统硬件噪声对通信产生的影响以及单光子通信过程中可能受到的光子分离攻击干扰,为量子信号认知设计提供借鉴意义。

  13. Anomalous law of cooling

    OpenAIRE

    Lapas, Luciano C.; Ferreira, Rogelma M. S.; Oliveira, Fernando A.; Rubí, J. Miguel

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergo a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton's law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature ma...

  14. Anomalous diffusion of epicentres

    CERN Document Server

    Sotolongo-Costa, Oscar; Posadas, A; Luzon, F

    2007-01-01

    The classification of earthquakes in main shocks and aftershocks by a method recently proposed by M. Baiesi and M. Paczuski allows to the generation of a complex network composed of clusters that group the most correlated events. The spatial distribution of epicentres inside these structures corresponding to the catalogue of earthquakes in the eastern region of Cuba shows anomalous anti-diffusive behaviour evidencing the attractive nature of the main shock and the possible description in terms of fractional kinetics.

  15. Nonlocal Anomalous Hall Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Steven S-L; Vignale, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    The anomalous Hall (AH) effect is deemed to be a unique transport property of ferromagnetic metals, caused by the concerted action of spin polarization and spin-orbit coupling. Nevertheless, recent experiments have shown that the effect also occurs in a nonmagnetic metal (Pt) in contact with a magnetic insulator [yttrium iron garnet (YIG)], even when precautions are taken to ensure that there is no induced magnetization in the metal. We propose a theory of this effect based on the combined action of spin-dependent scattering from the magnetic interface and the spin-Hall effect in the bulk of the metal. At variance with previous theories, we predict the effect to be of first order in the spin-orbit coupling, just as the conventional anomalous Hall effect-the only difference being the spatial separation of the spin-orbit interaction and the magnetization. For this reason we name this effect the nonlocal anomalous Hall effect and predict that its sign will be determined by the sign of the spin-Hall angle in the metal. The AH conductivity that we calculate from our theory is in order of magnitude agreement with the measured values in Pt/YIG structures.

  16. Nonlocal Anomalous Hall Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Steven S.-L.; Vignale, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    The anomalous Hall (AH) effect is deemed to be a unique transport property of ferromagnetic metals, caused by the concerted action of spin polarization and spin-orbit coupling. Nevertheless, recent experiments have shown that the effect also occurs in a nonmagnetic metal (Pt) in contact with a magnetic insulator [yttrium iron garnet (YIG)], even when precautions are taken to ensure that there is no induced magnetization in the metal. We propose a theory of this effect based on the combined action of spin-dependent scattering from the magnetic interface and the spin-Hall effect in the bulk of the metal. At variance with previous theories, we predict the effect to be of first order in the spin-orbit coupling, just as the conventional anomalous Hall effect—the only difference being the spatial separation of the spin-orbit interaction and the magnetization. For this reason we name this effect the nonlocal anomalous Hall effect and predict that its sign will be determined by the sign of the spin-Hall angle in the metal. The AH conductivity that we calculate from our theory is in order of magnitude agreement with the measured values in Pt /YIG structures.

  17. Quantum Physics Without Quantum Philosophy

    CERN Document Server

    Dürr, Detlef; Zanghì, Nino

    2013-01-01

    It has often been claimed that without drastic conceptual innovations a genuine explanation of quantum interference effects and quantum randomness is impossible. This book concerns Bohmian mechanics, a simple particle theory that is a counterexample to such claims. The gentle introduction and other contributions collected here show how the phenomena of non-relativistic quantum mechanics, from Heisenberg's uncertainty principle to non-commuting observables, emerge from the Bohmian motion of particles, the natural particle motion associated with Schrödinger's equation. This book will be of value to all students and researchers in physics with an interest in the meaning of quantum theory as well as to philosophers of science.

  18. Beta Function and Anomalous Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Pica, Claudio

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate that it is possible to determine the coefficients of an all-order beta function linear in the anomalous dimensions using as data the two-loop coefficients together with the first one of the anomalous dimensions which are universal. The beta function allows to determine the anomalous dimension of the fermion masses at the infrared fixed point, and the resulting values compare well with the lattice determinations.

  19. Anomalous Dimensions of Conformal Baryons

    CERN Document Server

    Pica, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    We determine the anomalous dimensions of baryon operators for the three color theory as function of the number of massless flavours within the conformal window to the maximum known order in perturbation theory. We show that the anomalous dimension of the baryon is controllably small for a wide range of number of flavours. We also find that this is always smaller than the anomalous dimension of the fermion mass operator. These findings challenge the partial compositeness paradigm.

  20. Anomalous radiative transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Ishikawa, Kenzo; Tobita, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Anomalous transitions involving photons derived by many-body interaction of the form, $\\partial_{\\mu} G^{\\mu}$, in the standard model are studied. This does not affect the equation of motion in the bulk, but makes wave functions modified, and causes the unusual transition characterized by the time-independent probability. In the transition probability at a time-interval T expressed generally in the form $P=T \\Gamma_0 +P^{(d)}$, now with $\\Gamma_0=0, P^{(d)} \

  1. Accounting for Interference, Scattering, and Electrode Absorption to Make Accurate Internal Quantum Efficiency Measurements in Organic and Other Thin Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Burkhard, George F.

    2010-05-31

    Accurately measuring internal quantum efficiency requires knowledge of absorption in the active layer of a solar cell. The experimentally accessible total absorption includes significant contributions from the electrodes and other nonactive layers. We suggest a straightforward method for calculating the active layer contribution that minimizes error by subtracting optically-modeled electrode absorption from experimentally measured total absorption. (Figure Presented) © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Whirling waves in Interference experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Urbasi; Sawant, Rahul; Samuel, Joseph; Sinha, Aninda; Sinha, Supurna

    2014-03-01

    In a double slit interference experiment, the wave function at the screen with both slits open is not exactly the sum of the wave functions with the slits individually open one at a time. The three scenarios represent three different boundary conditions and as such, the superposition principle should not be applicable. However, most well- known text books in quantum mechanics implicitly and/or explicitly use this assumption, the wave function hypothesis, which is only approximately true. In our present study, we have used the Feynman path integral formalism to quantify contributions from non-classical paths in interference experiments which provide a measurable deviation from the wave function hypothesis. A direct experimental demonstration for the existence of these non-classical paths is hard. We find that contributions from such paths can be significant and we propose simple three-slit interference experiments to directly confirm their existence. I will also describe some ongoing experimental efforts towards testing our theoretical findings.

  3. Anomalous Microwave Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Kogut, A J

    1999-01-01

    Improved knowledge of diffuse Galactic emission is important to maximize the scientific return from scheduled CMB anisotropy missions. Cross-correlation of microwave maps with maps of the far-IR dust continuum show a ubiquitous microwave emission component whose spatial distribution is traced by far-IR dust emission. The spectral index of this emission, beta_{radio} = -2.2 (+0.5 -0.7) is suggestive of free-free emission but does not preclude other candidates. Comparison of H-alpha and microwave results show that both data sets have positive correlations with the far-IR dust emission. Microwave data, however, are consistently brighter than can be explained solely from free-free emission traced by H-alpha. This ``anomalous'' microwave emission can be explained as electric dipole radiation from small spinning dust grains. The anomalous component at 53 GHz is 2.5 times as bright as the free-free emission traced by H-alpha, providing an approximate normalization for models with significant spinning dust emission.

  4. Fickian dispersion is anomalous

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushman, John H.; O'Malley, Dan

    2015-12-01

    The thesis put forward here is that the occurrence of Fickian dispersion in geophysical settings is a rare event and consequently should be labeled as anomalous. What people classically call anomalous is really the norm. In a Lagrangian setting, a process with mean square displacement which is proportional to time is generally labeled as Fickian dispersion. With a number of counter examples we show why this definition is fraught with difficulty. In a related discussion, we show an infinite second moment does not necessarily imply the process is super dispersive. By employing a rigorous mathematical definition of Fickian dispersion we illustrate why it is so hard to find a Fickian process. We go on to employ a number of renormalization group approaches to classify non-Fickian dispersive behavior. Scaling laws for the probability density function for a dispersive process, the distribution for the first passage times, the mean first passage time, and the finite-size Lyapunov exponent are presented for fixed points of both deterministic and stochastic renormalization group operators. The fixed points of the renormalization group operators are p-self-similar processes. A generalized renormalization group operator is introduced whose fixed points form a set of generalized self-similar processes. Power-law clocks are introduced to examine multi-scaling behavior. Several examples of these ideas are presented and discussed.

  5. Quantum physics without quantum philosophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duerr, Detlef [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Mathematisches Inst.; Goldstein, Sheldon [Rutgers State Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States). Dept. of Mathematics; Zanghi, Nino [Genova Univ. (Italy); Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare, Genova (Italy)

    2013-02-01

    Integrates and comments on the authors' seminal papers in the field. Emphasizes the natural way in which quantum phenomena emerge from the Bohmian picture. Helps to answer many of the objections raised to Bohmian quantum mechanics. Useful overview and summary for newcomers and students. It has often been claimed that without drastic conceptual innovations a genuine explanation of quantum interference effects and quantum randomness is impossible. This book concerns Bohmian mechanics, a simple particle theory that is a counterexample to such claims. The gentle introduction and other contributions collected here show how the phenomena of non-relativistic quantum mechanics, from Heisenberg's uncertainty principle to non-commuting observables, emerge from the Bohmian motion of particles, the natural particle motion associated with Schroedinger's equation. This book will be of value to all students and researchers in physics with an interest in the meaning of quantum theory as well as to philosophers of science.

  6. Anomalous Dimensions of Conformal Baryons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pica, Claudio; Sannino, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    We determine the anomalous dimensions of baryon operators for the three color theory as function of the number of massless flavours within the conformal window to the maximum known order in perturbation theory. We show that the anomalous dimension of the baryon is controllably small, within...

  7. Anomalous Dimensions of Conformal Baryons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pica, Claudio; Sannino, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    We determine the anomalous dimensions of baryon operators for the three color theory as function of the number of massless flavours within the conformal window to the maximum known order in perturbation theory. We show that the anomalous dimension of the baryon is controllably small, within the $...

  8. Beta Function and Anomalous Dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pica, Claudio; Sannino, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate that it is possible to determine the coefficients of an all-order beta function linear in the anomalous dimensions using as data the two-loop coefficients together with the first one of the anomalous dimensions which are universal. The beta function allows to determine the anomalou...

  9. Fractal model of anomalous diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gmachowski, Lech

    2015-12-01

    An equation of motion is derived from fractal analysis of the Brownian particle trajectory in which the asymptotic fractal dimension of the trajectory has a required value. The formula makes it possible to calculate the time dependence of the mean square displacement for both short and long periods when the molecule diffuses anomalously. The anomalous diffusion which occurs after long periods is characterized by two variables, the transport coefficient and the anomalous diffusion exponent. An explicit formula is derived for the transport coefficient, which is related to the diffusion constant, as dependent on the Brownian step time, and the anomalous diffusion exponent. The model makes it possible to deduce anomalous diffusion properties from experimental data obtained even for short time periods and to estimate the transport coefficient in systems for which the diffusion behavior has been investigated. The results were confirmed for both sub and super-diffusion.

  10. Detection of anomalous events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferragut, Erik M.; Laska, Jason A.; Bridges, Robert A.

    2016-06-07

    A system is described for receiving a stream of events and scoring the events based on anomalousness and maliciousness (or other classification). The system can include a plurality of anomaly detectors that together implement an algorithm to identify low-probability events and detect atypical traffic patterns. The anomaly detector provides for comparability of disparate sources of data (e.g., network flow data and firewall logs.) Additionally, the anomaly detector allows for regulatability, meaning that the algorithm can be user configurable to adjust a number of false alerts. The anomaly detector can be used for a variety of probability density functions, including normal Gaussian distributions, irregular distributions, as well as functions associated with continuous or discrete variables.

  11. Optically Anomalous Crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Shtukenberg, Alexander; Kahr, Bart

    2007-01-01

    Optical anomalies in crystals are puzzles that collectively constituted the greatest unsolved problems in crystallography in the 19th Century. The most common anomaly is a discrepancy between a crystal’s symmetry as determined by its shape or by X-ray analysis, and that determined by monitoring the polarization state of traversing light. These discrepancies were perceived as a great impediment to the development of the sciences of crystals on the basis of Curie’s Symmetry Principle, the grand organizing idea in the physical sciences to emerge in the latter half of the 19th Century. Optically Anomalous Crystals begins with an historical introduction covering the contributions of Brewster, Biot, Mallard, Brauns, Tamman, and many other distinguished crystallographers. From this follows a tutorial in crystal optics. Further chapters discuss the two main mechanisms of optical dissymmetry: 1. the piezo-optic effect, and 2. the kinetic ordering of atoms. The text then tackles complex, inhomogeneous crystals, and...

  12. Introduction to Quantum Computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekert, A.

    A computation is a physical process. It may be performed by a piece of electronics or on an abacus, or in your brain, but it is a process that takes place in nature and as such it is subject to the laws of physics. Quantum computers are machines that rely on characteristically quantum phenomena, such as quantum interference and quantum entanglement in order to perform computation. In this series of lectures I want to elaborate on the computational power of such machines.

  13. Fano interference in two-photon transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shanshan; Fan, Shanhui

    2016-10-01

    We present a general input-output formalism for the few-photon transport in multiple waveguide channels coupled to a local cavity. Using this formalism, we study the effect of Fano interference in two-photon quantum transport. We show that the physics of Fano interference can manifest as an asymmetric spectral line shape in the frequency dependence of the two-photon correlation function. The two-photon fluorescence spectrum, on the other hand, does not exhibit the physics of Fano interference.

  14. Universality of anomalous conductivities in theories with higher-derivative holographic duals

    CERN Document Server

    Grozdanov, Sašo

    2016-01-01

    Anomalous chiral conductivities in theories with global anomalies are independent of whether they are computed in a weakly coupled quantum (or thermal) field theory, hydrodynamics, or at infinite coupling from holography. While the presence of dynamical gauge fields and mixed, gauge-global anomalies can destroy this universality, in their absence, the non-renormalisation of anomalous Ward identities is expected to be obeyed at all intermediate coupling strengths. In holography, bulk theories with higher-derivative corrections incorporate coupling constant corrections to the boundary theory observables in an expansion around infinite coupling. In this work, we investigate the coupling constant dependence and universality of anomalous conductivities (and thus of the anomalous Ward identities) in general, four-dimensional systems that possess asymptotically anti-de Sitter holographic duals with a non-extremal black brane in five dimensions, and anomalous transport introduced into the boundary theory via the bulk...

  15. Optimization of the detection coil of high-Tc superconducting quantum interference device-based nuclear magnetic resonance for discriminating a minimum amount of liver tumor of rats in microtesla fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-Hsien; Huang, Kai-Wen; Yang, Hong-Chang; Horng, Herng-Er; Liao, Shu-Hsien

    2013-08-01

    This study presents an optimization of the detection coil of high-Tc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID)-based nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in microtesla fields for discriminating a minimum amount of liver tumor in rats by characterizing the longitudinal relaxation rate, T1-1, of tested samples. The detection coil, which was coupled to the SQUID through a flux transformer, was optimized by varying the copper wires' winding turns and diameters. When comparing the measured NMR signals, we found that the simulated NMR signal agrees with simulated signals. When discriminating liver tumors in rats, the averaged longitudinal relaxation rate was observed to be T1-1 = 3.3 s-1 for cancerous liver tissue and T1-1 = 6.6 s-1 for normal liver tissue. The results suggest that it can be used to successfully discriminate cancerous liver tissue from normal liver tissues in rats. The minimum amount of samples that can be detected is 0.2 g for liver tumor and 0.4 g for normal liver tissue in 100 μT fields. The specimen was not damaged; it can be used for other pathological analyses. The proposed method provides more possibilities for examining undersized specimens.

  16. Realization of Multi-qubit GHZ States in Superconducting Quantum-interference Devices via Double Raman Transition%通过双Raman作用在超导量子干涉器件中实现多比特GHZ态

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    詹志明; 刘晓东; 张立辉; 石文星; 李星

    2011-01-01

    Propose a scheme to realize multi-qubit GHZ states in superconducting quantum-interference devices(SQUIDs) via double Raman transition.In this scheme,the cavity field is only virtually excited and thus the cavity decay can be ignored.The GHZ states are realized by using only two basic states of the SQUID system and the relaxation of excited state of the system are avoided.Base on the points mentioned above,the scheme should be easily realized on experiment.%在腔中通过双Raman作用,在超导量子干涉器件中实现多比特GHZ(Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger)态的制备.在制备过程中,由于腔场只是被虚激发的,所以腔模的衰减可以忽略.GHZ态的实现只用到了超导系统的两个基态,有效地避免了超导系统激发态的弛豫.

  17. Observation of quantum interference effects and SQUID operation in a bulk sample of YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub y/ at 77 and 4. 2 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pegrum, C.M.; Donaldson, G.B.; Carr, A.H.; Hendry, A.

    1987-10-26

    We have studied the response of a bulk sample of YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub y/ to an applied static magnetic field B and a 20-MHz rf field. At both 77 and 4.2 K we found clear evidence of behavior within the sample that was characteristic of a superconducting quantum interference device. At 77 K, the absorption of rf power was a periodic function of B, characterized by several superposed periods in the range 8 x 10/sup -8/ to 9 x 10/sup -6/ T. At 4.2 K only one period, of 4.8 x 10/sup -7/ T, was evident. By applying flux feedback we could lock to minima in the response, and in this mode of operation as a magnetometer the field spectral density S/sup 1/2//sub B/ was 1.5 x 10/sup -10/ T Hz/sup -1//sup ///sup 2/ at 77 K and 5.8 x 10/sup -10/ T Hz/sup -1//sup ///sup 2/ at 4.2 K.

  18. 基于量子双缝干涉实验的神经网络模型%RESEARCH ON THE NEURAL NETWORK MODEL BASED ON QUANTUM DOUBLE-SLIT INTERFERENCE EXPERIMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    解光军; 杨俊安; 庄镇泉

    2003-01-01

    本文利用量子理论中的双缝干涉实验(Double-slit Interference Experiment)构造了一种全新的量子神经网络(Quantum Neural Network,QNN)模型.通过理论分析,推导出该模型的动力学表达式,并给出相应的训练算法.仿真实验表明,该模型具有学习布尔逻辑函数的功能,特别是两层网络结构能够实现类似异或(XOR)逻辑的学习,体现出了量子计算对传统神经网络的优越性.本文的研究为探索神经网络与量子计算的结合提供了一个新的途径.

  19. Two-loop anomalous dimensions of heavy baryon currents in heavy quark effective theory

    CERN Document Server

    Groote, S; Yakovlev, O I

    1996-01-01

    We present results on the two-loop anomalous dimensions of the heavy baryon HQET currents J=(q^TC\\Gamma\\tau q)\\Gamma'Q with arbitrary Dirac matrices \\Gamma and \\Gamma'. From our general result we obtain the two-loop anomalous dimensions for currents with quantum numbers of the ground state heavy baryons \\Lambda_Q, \\Sigma_Q and \\Sigma_Q^*. As a by-product of our calculation and as an additional check we rederive the known two-loop anomalous dimensions of mesonic scalar, pseudoscalar, vector, axial vector and tensor currents (J=\\bar q\\Gamma q) in massless QCD as well as in HQET.

  20. Vergleich unterschiedlicher Parametrisierungen anomaler Vier-Eichboson-Kopplungen in der Streuung zweier Eichbosonen WZ → WZ und gleich geladener WW → WW am Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Melzer, Alexander; Stoeckinger, Dominik

    In this bachelor thesis was an analysis with RIVET on truth level with and without unitarization performed to study compliance or disparity in kinematic distributions, interference terms and pure anomalous coupling terms of the total cross sections which result from the conversion of dierent parametrizations of anomalous couplings, used by the simulation programs WHIZARD and VBFNLO.

  1. Multiple scattering mechanisms causing interference effects in the differential cross sections of H + D2 → HD(v' = 4, j') + D at 3.26 eV collision energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneha, Mahima; Gao, Hong; Zare, Richard N.; Jambrina, P. G.; Menéndez, M.; Aoiz, F. J.

    2016-07-01

    Differential cross sections (DCSs) for the H + D2 → HD(v' = 4, j') + D reaction at 3.26 eV collision energy have been measured using the photoloc technique, and the results have been compared with those from quantum and quasiclassical scattering calculations. The quantum mechanical DCSs are in good overall agreement with the experimental measurements. In common with previous results at 1.97 eV, clear interference patterns which appear as fingerlike structures have been found at 3.26 eV but in this case for vibrational states as high as v' = 4. The oscillatory structure is prominent for low rotational states and progressively disappears as j' increases. A detailed analysis, similar to that carried out at 1.97 eV, shows that the origin of these structures could be traced to interferences between well defined classical mechanisms. In addition, at this energy, we do not observe the anomalous positive j'-θ trend found for the v' = 4 manifold at lower collision energies, thus reinforcing our explanation that the anomalous distribution for HD(v' = 4, j') at 1.97 eV only takes place for those states associated with low product recoil energies.

  2. Petrology of Anomalous Eucrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Peng, Z. X.; Ross, D. K.

    2015-01-01

    Most mafic achondrites can be broadly categorized as being "eucritic", that is, they are composed of a ferroan low-Ca clinopyroxene, high-Ca plagioclase and a silica phase. They are petrologically distinct from angritic basalts, which are composed of high-Ca, Al-Ti-rich clinopyroxene, Carich olivine, nearly pure anorthite and kirschsteinite, or from what might be called brachinitic basalts, which are composed of ferroan orthopyroxene and high-Ca clinopyroxene, intermediate-Ca plagioclase and ferroan olivine. Because of their similar mineralogy and composition, eucrite-like mafic achondrites formed on compositionally similar asteroids under similar conditions of temperature, pressure and oxygen fugacity. Some of them have distinctive isotopic compositions and petrologic characteristics that demonstrate formation on asteroids different from the parent of the HED clan (e.g., Ibitira, Northwest Africa (NWA) 011). Others show smaller oxygen isotopic distinctions but are otherwise petrologically and compositionally indistinguishable from basaltic eucrites (e.g., Pasamonte, Pecora Escarpment (PCA) 91007). The degree of uniformity in delta O-17 of eucrites and diogenites is one piece of evidence considered to favor of a magma-ocean scenario for their petrogenesis. Given that the O isotopic differences separating Pasamonte and PCA 91007 from other eucrites are small, and that there is an absence of other distinguishing characteristics, a legitimate question is: Did the HED parent asteroid fail to homogenize via a magma-ocean stage, thus explaining outliers like Pasamonte? We are initiating a program of study of anomalous eucrite-like achondrites as one part of our effort to seek a resolution of this issue. Here we present preliminary petrologic information on Asuka (A-) 881394, Elephant Moraine (EET) 87520 and EET 87542. We will have studied several more by conference time.

  3. Electron Interference in Ballistic Graphene Nanoconstrictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baringhaus, Jens; Settnes, Mikkel; Aprojanz, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    We realize nanometer size constrictions in ballistic graphene nanoribbons grown on sidewalls of SiC mesa structures. The high quality of our devices allows the observation of a number of electronic quantum interference phenomena. The transmissions of Fabry-Perot-like resonances are probed...

  4. Information flow due to controlled interference in entangled systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Srikanth

    2002-08-01

    We point out that controlled quantum interference corresponds to measurement in an incomplete basis and implies a nonlocal transfer of classical information. A test of whether such a generalized measurement is permissible in quantum theory is presented.

  5. Non-classical paths in interference experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Sawant, Rahul; Sinha, Aninda; Sinha, Supurna; Sinha, Urbasi

    2014-01-01

    In a double slit interference experiment, the wave function at the screen with both slits open is not exactly equal to the sum of the wave functions with the slits individually open one at a time. The three scenarios represent three different boundary conditions and as such, the superposition principle should not be applicable. However, most well known text books in quantum mechanics implicitly and/or explicitly use this assumption which is only approximately true. In our present study, we have used the Feynman path integral formalism to quantify contributions from non-classical paths in quantum interference experiments which provide a measurable deviation from a naive application of the superposition principle. A direct experimental demonstration for the existence of these non-classical paths is hard. We find that contributions from such paths can be significant and we propose simple three-slit interference experiments to directly confirm their existence.

  6. Opportunistic Interference Alignment in MIMO Interference Channels

    CERN Document Server

    Perlaza, Samir Medina; Lasaulce, Samson; Chaufray, Jean Marie

    2008-01-01

    We present two interference alignment techniques such that an opportunistic point-to-point multiple input multiple output (MIMO) link can reuse, without generating any additional interference, the same frequency band of a similar pre-existing primary link. In this scenario, we exploit the fact that under power constraints, although each radio maximizes independently its rate by water-filling on their channel transfer matrix singular values, frequently, not all of them are used. Therefore, by aligning the interference of the opportunistic radio it is possible to transmit at a significant rate while insuring zero-interference on the pre-existing link. We propose a linear pre-coder for a perfect interference alignment and a power allocation scheme which maximizes the individual data rate of the secondary link. Our numerical results show that significant data rates are achieved even for a reduced number of antennas.

  7. Quantum interference and spin-orbit effects in the heterostructure with the 2D hole gas in the Si sub 0 sub . sub 2 Ge sub 0 sub . 8 quantum well

    CERN Document Server

    Andrievskij, V V; Komnik, Y F; Mironov, M; Mironov, O A; Whall, T E

    2003-01-01

    The magnetic field (approx 110 kOe)dependences of resistance of the Si sub 0 sub . sub 7 Ge sub 0 sub . sub 3 /Si sub 0 sub . sub 2 Ge sub 0 sub . sub 8 /Si sub 0 sub . sub 7 Ge sub 0 sub . sub 3 heterostructure with a 2D hole gas in the Si sub 0 sub . sub 2 Ge sub 0 sub . sub 8 quantum well were measured at T = 0.335-10 K with varying current between 100 nA and 50 mA. It was found that in high magnetic fields there occurred Shubnikov-de-Haas oscillations, while in weak fields (H<= kOe) a positive magnetoresistance transforming than in a negative one was observed. This peculiarity is due to the effects of weak localization of 2D charge carriers with very close spin-orbit and inelastic scattering time,tau sub s sub o and tau subphi, respectively. This suggests that the spin states are splitted in response to the perturbing potential associated with the generation of a two-dimensional potential well (Rashba mechanism). The analysis of the effects of weak localization yields the characteristic relaxation time...

  8. Large power factor and anomalous Hall effect and their correlation with observed linear magneto resistance in Co-doped Bi2Se3 3D topological insulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rahul; Shukla, K K; Kumar, A; Okram, G S; Singh, D; Ganeshan, V; Lakhani, Archana; Ghosh, A K; Chatterjee, Sandip

    2016-09-21

    Magnetoresistance (MR), thermo power, magnetization and Hall effect measurements have been performed on Co-doped Bi2Se3 topological insulators. The undoped sample shows that the maximum MR as a destructive interference due to a π-Berry phase leads to a decrease of MR. As the Co is doped, the linearity in MR is increased. The observed MR of Bi2Se3 can be explained with the classical model. The low temperature MR behavior of Co doped samples cannot be explained with the same model, but can be explained with the quantum linear MR model. Magnetization behavior indicates the establishment of ferromagnetic ordering with Co doping. Hall effect data also supports the establishment of ferromagnetic ordering in Co-doped Bi2Se3 samples by showing the anomalous Hall effect. Furthermore, when spectral weight suppression is insignificant, Bi2Se3 behaves as a dilute magnetic semiconductor. Moreover, the maximum power factor is observed when time reversal symmetry (TRS) is maintained. As the TRS is broken the power factor value is decreased, which indicates that with the rise of Dirac cone above the Fermi level the anomalous Hall effect and linearity in MR increase and the power factor decreases.

  9. Large power factor and anomalous Hall effect and their correlation with observed linear magneto resistance in Co-doped Bi2Se3 3D topological insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rahul; Shukla, K. K.; Kumar, A.; Okram, G. S.; Singh, D.; Ganeshan, V.; Lakhani, Archana; Ghosh, A. K.; Chatterjee, Sandip

    2016-09-01

    Magnetoresistance (MR), thermo power, magnetization and Hall effect measurements have been performed on Co-doped Bi2Se3 topological insulators. The undoped sample shows that the maximum MR as a destructive interference due to a π-Berry phase leads to a decrease of MR. As the Co is doped, the linearity in MR is increased. The observed MR of Bi2Se3 can be explained with the classical model. The low temperature MR behavior of Co doped samples cannot be explained with the same model, but can be explained with the quantum linear MR model. Magnetization behavior indicates the establishment of ferromagnetic ordering with Co doping. Hall effect data also supports the establishment of ferromagnetic ordering in Co-doped Bi2Se3 samples by showing the anomalous Hall effect. Furthermore, when spectral weight suppression is insignificant, Bi2Se3 behaves as a dilute magnetic semiconductor. Moreover, the maximum power factor is observed when time reversal symmetry (TRS) is maintained. As the TRS is broken the power factor value is decreased, which indicates that with the rise of Dirac cone above the Fermi level the anomalous Hall effect and linearity in MR increase and the power factor decreases.

  10. Quantum coherent oscillations in the early universe

    CERN Document Server

    Pikovski, Igor

    2015-01-01

    Cosmic inflation is commonly assumed to be driven by quantum fields. Quantum mechanics predicts phenomena such as quantum fluctuations and tunneling of the field. Here we show an example of a quantum interference effect which goes beyond the semi-classical treatment and which may be of relevance in the early universe. We study the quantum coherent dynamics for a tilted, periodic potential, which results in genuine quantum oscillations of the inflaton field, analogous to Bloch oscillations in condensed matter and atomic systems. Our results show that quantum interference phenomena may be of relevance in cosmology.

  11. Measuring quantumness via anticommutators

    CERN Document Server

    Fazio, Rosario; Pascazio, Saverio; Vedral, Vlatko; Yuasa, Kazuya

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a method to witness the quantumness of a system. The method relies on the fact that the anticommutator of two classical states is always positive. We show that there is always a nonpositive anticommutator due to any two quantum states. We notice that interference depends on the trace of the anticommutator of two states and it is therefore more natural to detect quantumness by looking at anticommutators of states rather than their commutators.

  12. Probability distributions of continuous measurement results for conditioned quantum evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franquet, A.; Nazarov, Yuli V.

    2017-02-01

    We address the statistics of continuous weak linear measurement on a few-state quantum system that is subject to a conditioned quantum evolution. For a conditioned evolution, both the initial and final states of the system are fixed: the latter is achieved by the postselection in the end of the evolution. The statistics may drastically differ from the nonconditioned case, and the interference between initial and final states can be observed in the probability distributions of measurement outcomes as well as in the average values exceeding the conventional range of nonconditioned averages. We develop a proper formalism to compute the distributions of measurement outcomes, and evaluate and discuss the distributions in experimentally relevant setups. We demonstrate the manifestations of the interference between initial and final states in various regimes. We consider analytically simple examples of nontrivial probability distributions. We reveal peaks (or dips) at half-quantized values of the measurement outputs. We discuss in detail the case of zero overlap between initial and final states demonstrating anomalously big average outputs and sudden jump in time-integrated output. We present and discuss the numerical evaluation of the probability distribution aiming at extending the analytical results and describing a realistic experimental situation of a qubit in the regime of resonant fluorescence.

  13. Anomalous magnetic moment of anyons

    CERN Document Server

    Gat, G; Gat, Gil; Ray, Rashmi

    1994-01-01

    The anomalous magnetic moment of anyons is calculated to leading order in a 1/N expansion. It is shown that the gyromagnetic ratio g remains 2 to the leading order in 1/N. This result strongly supports that obtained in \\cite{poly}, namely that g=2 is in fact exact.

  14. Unconventional scaling of the anomalous Hall effect accompanying electron localization correction in the dirty regime

    KAUST Repository

    Lu, Y. M.

    2013-03-05

    Scaling of the anomalous Hall conductivity to longitudinal conductivity σAH∝σ2xx has been observed in the dirty regime of two-dimensional weak and strong localization regions in ultrathin, polycrystalline, chemically disordered, ferromagnetic FePt films. The relationship between electron transport and temperature reveals a quantitatively insignificant Coulomb interaction in these films, while the temperature dependent anomalous Hall conductivity experiences quantum correction from electron localization. At the onset of this correction, the low-temperature anomalous Hall resistivity begins to be saturated when the thickness of the FePt film is reduced, and the corresponding Hall conductivity scaling exponent becomes 2, which is above the recent unified theory of 1.6 (σAH∝σ1.6xx). Our results strongly suggest that the correction of the electron localization modulates the scaling exponent of the anomalous Hall effect.

  15. Superconducting Quantum Interference based Electromechanical Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Etaki, S.

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical sensors are essential tools for the detection of small forces. This thesis presents the dc SQUID as a detector for the displacement of embedded micromechanical resonators. The device geometry and basic operating principle are described. The SQUID displacement detector reaches an excellent

  16. Quantum dice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sassoli de Bianchi, Massimiliano, E-mail: autoricerca@gmail.com

    2013-09-15

    In a letter to Born, Einstein wrote [42]: “Quantum mechanics is certainly imposing. But an inner voice tells me that it is not yet the real thing. The theory says a lot, but does not really bring us any closer to the secret of the ‘old one.’ I, at any rate, am convinced that He does not throw dice.” In this paper we take seriously Einstein’s famous metaphor, and show that we can gain considerable insight into quantum mechanics by doing something as simple as rolling dice. More precisely, we show how to perform measurements on a single die, to create typical quantum interference effects, and how to connect (entangle) two identical dice, to maximally violate Bell’s inequality. -- Highlights: •Rolling a die is a quantum process admitting a Hilbert space representation. •Rolling experiments with a single die can produce interference effects. •Two connected dice can violate Bell’s inequality. •Correlations need to be created by the measurement, to violate Bell’s inequality.

  17. Topics in perturbative quantum field theory: eighth order QED contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon and next to leading order QCD correction to. gamma gamma -->. M/sup +/M/sup -/(M =. pi. , K)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nizic, B.

    1985-01-01

    In Part I the evaluation of the complete eighth order QED contribution to the difference of the anomalous magnetic moments of the muon and the electron, (a/sub ..mu../ - a/sub e/, arising from 469 Feynman diagrams is presented. The result is 140.7(4.5)(..cap alpha../..pi..). The theoretical error represents the estimated accuracy of the required numerical integration. The light-by-light QED contribution to (a/sub ..mu../ - a/sub e/) has also been improved. With these results the difference a/sub ..mu../ - a/sub e/ through eighth order in QED is (a/sub ..mu../ - a/sub e/)/sup QED/ = 619,551(21) x 10/sup -11/. Adding to the present theoretical value of the electron anomaly a/sub e//sup QED/ = 115,965,246(5) x 10/sup -11/, it was found that the pure QED contribution to the muon anomaly is given by a/sub ..mu..//sup QED/ = 116,584,797(22) x 10/sup -11/. In Part II the results of the calculation of the next to leading order perturbative QCD correction to the two-photon exclusive channels ..gamma gamma -->..M/sup +/M/sup -/(M = ..pi..,K) at large momentum transfer is presented. Calculation is performed in the Feynman gauge. Dimensional regularization is used to treat both UV and the set of reals divergences. One loop correction to the ..gamma gamma -->..M/sup +/M/sup -/ cross section is obtained. In the mean MS renormalization scheme this correction is found not to be large.

  18. Two-photon Interference with Non-identical Photons

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jianbin; Zheng, Huaibin; Chen, Hui; Li, Fu-Li; Xu, Zhuo

    2014-01-01

    The indistinguishability of non-identical photons is dependent on detection system in quantum physics. If two photons with different wavelengths are indistinguishable for a detection system, there can be two-photon interference when these two photons are incident to two input ports of a Hong-Ou-Mandel interferometer, respectively. The reason why two-photon interference phenomena are different for classical and nonclassical light is not due to interference, but due to the properties of light and detection system. These conclusions are helpful to understand the physics and applications of two-photon interference.

  19. 超导量子干涉仪及其在低场核磁共振及成像中的应用%Superconducting Quantum Interference Device and Its Application in Low-Field Nuclear M agnetic Resonance & Imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宁; 蒋凤英; 金贻荣; 李绍; 邓辉; 田野; 任育峰; 郑东宁

    2013-01-01

    Superconducting Quantum Interference Device ( SQUID) is a kind of ultra-sensitive flux detector based on macroscopic quantum interferencephenomenon of Josephson junctions .The principle of SQUID and advantages of its appli-cation in low-field nuclear magnetic resonance ( NMR) &imaging ( MRI) technologies are introduced, and some important experimental results are reported here .We built a low-field NMR&MRI system and obtained highly improved 1 H proton FID&Spin echo spectra.Pure J-coupling spectrum of 2, 2, 2-Trifluoroethyl was also measured and agreed well with high-field NMR results.In addition, we tried and successfully obtained 1D and 2D MRI images of water phantoms and bio-sam-ples.The influence of 8nm Fe3 O4 magnetic nanoparticles on longitudinal relaxation time of water was studied.Based on this property, we illustrated T1-contrast enhanced 2D imaging of water phantoms by using magnetic nanoparticles, which show evident contrast variation under different pre-polarization times.%超导量子干涉仪利用约瑟夫森结宏观量子干涉效应,是一种具有超高灵敏度的磁通探测器件。对超导量子干涉仪的基本原理及其在低场核磁共振/成像技术中的应用进行了简要介绍,并报道了在这方面的主要研究成果。搭建了一套低场核磁共振及成像系统并获得具有较高信噪比的水样品1 H质子NMR谱及三氟乙醇的纯J-耦合谱,同时还测到了清晰的自旋回波信号。在此基础上,采用直接背投影重建方法,尝试并成功获得了水样品和生物样品的一维及二维核磁共振像。采用8 nm粒径的超顺磁Fe3 O4磁性纳米粒子作为对比增强剂,研究了磁性纳米粒子对1 H核自旋纵向弛豫时间 T1的影响,据此演示了磁性纳米粒子T1加权对比度增强成像实验,所得二维核磁共振像随极化时间的不同显示出显著的对比度变化。

  20. The Pioneer's Anomalous Doppler Drift as a Berry Phase

    CERN Document Server

    Rosales, J L

    2004-01-01

    The detected anomalous frequency drift acceleration in Pioneer's radar data finds its explanation in a Berry phase that obtains the quantum state of a photon that propagates within an expanding space-time. The clock acceleration is just the adiabatic expansion rate and an analogy between the effect and Foucault's experiment is fully suggested. In this sense, light rays play a similar role in the expanding space than Foucault's Pendulum does while determining Earth's rotation. On the other hand, one could speculate about a suitable future experiment at "laboratory" scales able to measure the local cosmological expansion rate using the procedure of outlined in this paper.

  1. Faraday anomalous dispersion optical tuners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanninger, P.; Valdez, E. C.; Shay, T. M.

    1992-01-01

    Common methods for frequency stabilizing diode lasers systems employ gratings, etalons, optical electric double feedback, atomic resonance, and a Faraday cell with low magnetic field. Our method, the Faraday Anomalous Dispersion Optical Transmitter (FADOT) laser locking, is much simpler than other schemes. The FADOT uses commercial laser diodes with no antireflection coatings, an atomic Faraday cell with a single polarizer, and an output coupler to form a compound cavity. This method is vibration insensitive, thermal expansion effects are minimal, and the system has a frequency pull in range of 443.2 GHz (9A). Our technique is based on the Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter. This method has potential applications in optical communication, remote sensing, and pumping laser excited optical filters. We present the first theoretical model for the FADOT and compare the calculations to our experimental results.

  2. Exciton interference revealed by energy dependent exciton transfer rate for ring-structured molecular systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Yun-An, E-mail: yunan@gznc.edu.cn [Guizhou Provincial Key Laboratory of Computational Nanomaterial Science, Guizhou Education University, Guiyang, Guizhou 550018 (China)

    2016-01-14

    The quantum interference is an intrinsic phenomenon in quantum physics for photon and massive quantum particles. In principle, the quantum interference may also occur with quasi-particles, such as the exciton. In this study, we show how the exciton quantum interference can be significant in aggregates through theoretical simulations with hierarchical equations of motion. The systems under investigation are generalized donor-bridge-acceptor model aggregates with the donor consisting of six homogeneous sites assuming the nearest neighbor coupling. For the models with single-path bridge, the exciton transfer time only shows a weak excitation energy dependence. But models with double-path bridge have a new short transfer time scale and the excitation energy dependence of the exciton transfer time assumes clear peak structure which is detectable with today’s nonlinear spectroscopy. This abnormality is attributed to the exciton quantum interference and the condition for a clear observation in experiment is also explored.

  3. Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shay, T. M.; Yin, B.; Alvarez, L. S.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filters on infrared and blue transitions of some alkali atoms is calculated. A composite system is designed to further increase the background noise rejection. The measured results of the solar background rejection and image quality through the filter are presented. The results show that the filter may provide high transmission and high background noise rejection with excellent image quality.

  4. Interference Phenomenon for Different Chiral Bosonization Schemes

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, Everton M C; Abreu, Everton M C; Wotzasek, Clovis

    1998-01-01

    We study the relationship between different chiral bosonization schemes (CBS) in the context of the soldering formalism\\cite{MS}, that considers the phenomenon of interference in the quantum field theory\\cite{ABW}. This analysis is done in the framework put forward by Siegel\\cite{WS} and by Floreanini and Jackiw\\cite{FJ} (FJ). We propose a field redefinition that discloses the presence of a noton, a non dynamical field, in Siegel's formulation for chiral bosons. The presence of a noton in the Siegel CBS is a new and surprising result, that separates dynamics from symmetry by diagonalising the Siegel action into the FJ and the noton action. While the first describes the chiral dynamics, the noton carries the symmetry contents, acquiring dynamics upon quantization and is fully responsible for the Siegel anomaly. The diagonal representation proposed here is used to study the effect of quantum interference between gauged rightons and leftons.

  5. Dark Matter Interference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Del Nobile, Eugenio; Kouvaris, Christoforos; Sannino, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    We study different patterns of interference in WIMP-nuclei elastic scattering that can accommodate the DAMA and CoGeNT experiments via an isospin violating ratio $f_n/f_p=-0.71$. We study interference between the following pairs of mediators: Z and Z', Z' and Higgs, and two Higgs fields. We show...

  6. Quantum Social Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haven, Emmanuel; Khrennikov, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    Preface; Part I. Physics Concepts in Social Science? A Discussion: 1. Classical, statistical and quantum mechanics: all in one; 2. Econophysics: statistical physics and social science; 3. Quantum social science: a non-mathematical motivation; Part II. Mathematics and Physics Preliminaries: 4. Vector calculus and other mathematical preliminaries; 5. Basic elements of quantum mechanics; 6. Basic elements of Bohmian mechanics; Part III. Quantum Probabilistic Effects in Psychology: Basic Questions and Answers: 7. A brief overview; 8. Interference effects in psychology - an introduction; 9. A quantum-like model of decision making; Part IV. Other Quantum Probabilistic Effects in Economics, Finance and Brain Sciences: 10. Financial/economic theory in crisis; 11. Bohmian mechanics in finance and economics; 12. The Bohm-Vigier Model and path simulation; 13. Other applications to economic/financial theory; 14. The neurophysiological sources of quantum-like processing in the brain; Conclusion; Glossary; Index.

  7. Entanglement, which-way measurements, and a quantum erasure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Christian; Braunecker, Bernd

    2010-08-01

    We present a didactical approach to the which-way experiment and the counterintuitive effect of the quantum erasure for one-particle quantum interferences. The fundamental concept of entanglement plays a central role and highlights the complementarity between quantum interference and knowledge of which path is followed by the particle.

  8. The Stueckelberg wave equation and the anomalous magnetic moment of the electron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, A. F.

    2012-07-01

    The parametrized relativistic quantum mechanics of Stueckelberg (1942 Helv. Phys. Acta 15 23) represents time as an operator, and has been shown elsewhere to yield the recently observed phenomena of quantum interference in time, quantum diffraction in time and quantum entanglement in time. The Stueckelberg wave equation as extended to a spin-1/2 particle by Horwitz and Arshansky (1982 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 15 L659) is shown here to yield the electron g-factor g = 2 (1 + α/2π), to leading order in the renormalized fine structure constant α, in agreement with the quantum electrodynamics of Schwinger (1948 Phys. Rev. 73 416).

  9. The bright and dark photon number states in Young's interference experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weihan Tan(谭维翰); Qizhi Guo(郭奇志)

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we derive the bright and dark photon number states for spatial interference of two or morelight beams and succeed in the explanation of Young's interference experiment, and also achieve a bettercomprehension of the well known comment of Dirac "each photon only interferences with itself". Fromthe fully quantum point of view, the origin of the interference fringes consists in the mode transformationand the detection of double-slit states.

  10. Electromagnetic fields and anomalous transports in heavy-ion collisions-a pedagogical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xu-Guang

    2016-07-01

    The hot and dense matter generated in heavy-ion collisions may contain domains which are not invariant under P and CP transformations. Moreover, heavy-ion collisions can generate extremely strong magnetic fields as well as electric fields. The interplay between the electromagnetic field and triangle anomaly leads to a number of macroscopic quantum phenomena in these P- and CP-odd domains known as anomalous transports. The purpose of this article is to give a pedagogical review of various properties of the electromagnetic fields, the anomalous transport phenomena, and their experimental signatures in heavy-ion collisions.

  11. Large anomalous magnetic moment in three-dimensional Dirac and Weyl semimetals

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wurff, E. C. I.; Stoof, H. T. C.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the effect of Coulomb interactions on the electromagnetic response of three-dimensional Dirac and Weyl semimetals. In a calculation reminiscent of Schwinger's seminal work on quantum electrodynamics, we find three physically distinct effects for the anomalous magnetic moment of the relativisticlike quasiparticles in the semimetal. In the case of nonzero doping, the anomalous magnetic moment is finite at long wavelengths and typically orders of magnitude larger than Schwinger's result. We also find interesting effects of one of the three new Hamiltonian terms on the topological surface states at the interface between vacuum and a Weyl semimetal. We conclude that observation of these effects should be within experimental reach.

  12. Quantized Anomalous Hall Effect in Magnetic Topological Insulators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Rui

    2011-01-01

    @@ The Hall effect, the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) and the spin Hall effect are fundamental transport processes in solids arising from the Lorentz force and the spin-orbit coupling respectively.The AHE, in which a voltage transverse to the electric current appears even in the absence of an external magnetic field, was first detected in ferromagnetic (FM) metals in 1881 and later found to arise from the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) between the current and magnetic moments.Recent progress on the mechanism of AHE has established a link between the AHE and the topological nature of the Hall current by adopting the Berry-phase concepts in close analogy to the intrinsic spin Hall effect.Given the experimental discovery of the quantum Hall and the quantum spin Hall effects, it is natural to ask whether the AHE can also be quantized.In a quantized anomalous Hall (QAH) insulator, spontaneous magnetic moments and spin-orbit coupling combine to give rise to a topologically non-trivial electronic structure, leading to the quantized Hall effect without any external magnetic field.

  13. Anomalous Transport Foundations and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Klages, Rainer; Sokolov, Igor M

    2008-01-01

    This multi-author reference work provides a unique introduction to the currently emerging, highly interdisciplinary field of those transport processes that cannot be described by using standard methods of statistical mechanics. It comprehensively summarizes topics ranging from mathematical foundations of anomalous dynamics to the most recent experiments in this field. In so doing, this monograph extracts and emphasizes common principles and methods from many different disciplines while providing up-to-date coverage of this new field of research, considering such diverse applications as plasma

  14. Recovery of dynamic interference

    CERN Document Server

    Baghery, Mehrdad; Rost, Jan M

    2016-01-01

    We develop general quantitative criteria for dynamic interference, a manifestation of double-slit interference in time which should be realizable with brilliant state-of-the-art high-frequency laser sources. Our analysis reveals that the observation of dynamic interference hinges upon maximizing the difference between the dynamic polarization of the initial bound and the final continuum state of the electron during the light pulse, while keeping depletion of the initial state small. Confirmed by numerical results, we predict that this is impossible for the hydrogen ground-state but feasible with excited states explicitly exemplified with the hydrogen 2p-state.

  15. Group Based Interference Alignment

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Yanjun; Chen, Rui; Yao, Junliang

    2010-01-01

    in $K$-user single-input single-output (SISO) frequency selective fading interference channels, it is shown that the achievable multiplexing gain is almost surely $K/2$ by using interference alignment (IA). However when the signaling dimensions is limited, allocating all the resource to all the users simultaneously is not optimal. According to this problem, a group based interference alignment (GIA) scheme is proposed and a search algorithm is designed to get the group patterns and the resource allocation among them. Analysis results show that our proposed scheme achieves a higher multiplexing gain when the resource is limited.

  16. Anomalous Hall effect in polycrystalline Ni films

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Zaibing

    2012-02-01

    We systematically studied the anomalous Hall effect in a series of polycrystalline Ni films with thickness ranging from 4 to 200 nm. It is found that both the longitudinal and anomalous Hall resistivity increased greatly as film thickness decreased. This enhancement should be related to the surface scattering. In the ultrathin films (46 nm thick), weak localization corrections to anomalous Hall conductivity were studied. The granular model, taking into account the dominated intergranular tunneling, has been employed to explain this phenomenon, which can explain the weak dependence of anomalous Hall resistivity on longitudinal resistivity as well. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Super-resolving multi-photon interferences with independent light sources

    CERN Document Server

    Oppel, Steffen; Kok, Pieter; von Zanthier, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    Multi-photon interferences with indistinguishable photons from independent light sources are at the focus of current research owing to their potential in optical quantum computing, creating remote entanglement for quantum computation and communication, and quantum metrology. The paradigmatic states for multi-photon interference are the highly entangled NOON states, which can be used to achieve increased resolution in spectroscopy, interferometry, lithography, and microscopy. Multi-photon interferences from independent, uncorrelated emitters can also lead to enhanced resolution in metrology and imaging. So far, such interferences have been observed with maximally two independent emitters. Here, we report multi-photon interferences with up to five independent emitters, displaying interference patterns equivalent to those of NOON states. Experimental results with independent thermal light sources confirm this NOON-like modulation. The experiment is an extension of the landmark measurement by Hanbury Brown and Tw...

  18. Quantum adiabatic machine learning

    CERN Document Server

    Pudenz, Kristen L

    2011-01-01

    We develop an approach to machine learning and anomaly detection via quantum adiabatic evolution. In the training phase we identify an optimal set of weak classifiers, to form a single strong classifier. In the testing phase we adiabatically evolve one or more strong classifiers on a superposition of inputs in order to find certain anomalous elements in the classification space. Both the training and testing phases are executed via quantum adiabatic evolution. We apply and illustrate this approach in detail to the problem of software verification and validation.

  19. Weak interference in the high-signal regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Juan P; Puentes, Graciana; Hermosa, Nathaniel; Salazar-Serrano, Luis Jose

    2012-08-13

    Weak amplification is a signal enhancement technique which is used to measure tiny changes that otherwise cannot be determined because of technical limitations. It is based on: a) the existence of a weak interaction which couples a property of a system (the system) with a separate degree of freedom (the pointer), and b) the measurement of an anomalously large mean value of the pointer state (weak mean value), after appropriate pre-and post-selection of the state of the system. Unfortunately, the weak amplification process is generally accompanied by severe losses of the detected signal, which limits its applicability. However, we will show here that since weak amplification is essentially the result of an interference phenomena, it should be possible to use the degree of interference (weak interference) to get relevant information about the physical system under study in a more general scenario, where the signal is not severely depleted (high-signal regime).

  20. Interference effects of categorization on decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng; Busemeyer, Jerome R

    2016-05-01

    Many decision making tasks in life involve a categorization process, but the effects of categorization on subsequent decision making has rarely been studied. This issue was explored in three experiments (N=721), in which participants were shown a face stimulus on each trial and performed variations of categorization-decision tasks. On C-D trials, they categorized the stimulus and then made an action decision; on X-D trials, they were told the category and then made an action decision; on D-alone trials, they only made an action decision. An interference effect emerged in some of the conditions, such that the probability of an action on the D-alone trials (i.e., when there was no explicit categorization before the decision) differed from the total probability of the same action on the C-D or X-D trials (i.e., when there was explicit categorization before the decision). Interference effects are important because they indicate a violation of the classical law of total probability, which is assumed by many cognitive models. Across all three experiments, a complex pattern of interference effects systematically occurred for different types of stimuli and for different types of categorization-decision tasks. These interference effects present a challenge for traditional cognitive models, such as Markov and signal detection models, but a quantum cognition model, called the belief-action entanglement (BAE) model, predicted that these results could occur. The BAE model employs the quantum principles of superposition and entanglement to explain the psychological mechanisms underlying the puzzling interference effects. The model can be applied to many important and practical categorization-decision situations in life.

  1. Quantum wave packet revivals

    CERN Document Server

    Robinett, R W

    2004-01-01

    The numerical prediction, theoretical analysis, and experimental verification of the phenomenon of wave packet revivals in quantum systems has flourished over the last decade and a half. Quantum revivals are characterized by initially localized quantum states which have a short-term, quasi-classical time evolution, which then can spread significantly over several orbits, only to reform later in the form of a quantum revival in which the spreading reverses itself, the wave packet relocalizes, and the semi-classical periodicity is once again evident. Relocalization of the initial wave packet into a number of smaller copies of the initial packet (`minipackets' or `clones') is also possible, giving rise to fractional revivals. Systems exhibiting such behavior are a fundamental realization of time-dependent interference phenomena for bound states with quantized energies in quantum mechanics and are therefore of wide interest in the physics and chemistry communities. We review the theoretical machinery of quantum w...

  2. Anomalous osmosis resulting from preferential absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staverman, A.J.; Kruissink, C.A.; Pals, D.T.F.

    1965-01-01

    An explanation of the anomalous osmosis described in the preceding paper is given in terms of friction coefficients in the glass membrane. It is shown that anomalous osmosis may be expected when the friction coefficients are constant and positive provided that the membrane absorbs solute strongly an

  3. Quantum structure and human thought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aerts, Diederik; Broekaert, Jan; Gabora, Liane; Sozzo, Sandro

    2013-06-01

    We support the authors' claims, except that we point out that also quantum structure different from quantum probability abundantly plays a role in human cognition. We put forward several elements to illustrate our point, mentioning entanglement, contextuality, interference, and emergence as effects, and states, observables, complex numbers, and Fock space as specific mathematical structures.

  4. Quantum reality theory and philosophy

    CERN Document Server

    Allday, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    PrefaceIntroductionAuthorPart I Our First Quantum Object: Light Some Opening Thoughts A Little Light Reading Lasers and Video Cameras Photons An Interference Experiment with Photons Interference as a Wave Effect Mach-Zehnder with Photons Delayed Choice Summary Endnotes Interlude 1: Another Interference Experiment Particles Electrons The Electron Gun The Stern-Gerlach Experiment Turning Things Round Things Get More Puzzling So, Where Did It Go? What Does It All Mean? Some Indications with Other Particles The Long and the Short of It Summary Endnotes Quantum States Where Are We Now? Describing C

  5. Non-classical interference in integrated 3D multiports

    CERN Document Server

    Meany, Thomas; Gross, Simon; Marshall, Graham D; Steel, M J; Withford, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate three and four input multiports in a three dimensional glass platform, fabricated using the femtosecond laser direct-write technique. Hong-Ou-Mandel (HOM) interference is observed and a full quantum characterisation is performed, obtaining two photon correlation matrices for all combinations of input and output ports. For the three-port case, the quantum visibilities are accurately predicted solely from measurement of the classical coupling ratios.

  6. Quantum Computer Games: Schrodinger Cat and Hounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Michal; Gordon, Goren

    2012-01-01

    The quantum computer game "Schrodinger cat and hounds" is the quantum extension of the well-known classical game fox and hounds. Its main objective is to teach the unique concepts of quantum mechanics in a fun way. "Schrodinger cat and hounds" demonstrates the effects of superposition, destructive and constructive interference, measurements and…

  7. Anomalous inverse bremsstrahlung heating of laser-driven plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Mrityunjay

    2016-05-01

    Absorption of laser light in plasma via electron-ion collision (inverse bremsstrahlung) is known to decrease with the laser intensity as I 0 -3/2 or with the electron temperature as T e -3/2 where Coulomb logarithm ln Λ = 0.5ln(1 + k 2 min/k 2 max) in the expression of electron-ion collision frequency v ei is assumed to be independent of ponderomotive velocity v 0 = E0/ω which is unjustified. Here k -1 min = v th/max(ω, ω p), and k -1 max = Z/v 2 th are maximum and minimum cut-off distances of the colliding electron from the ion, v th = √T e is its thermal velocity, ω, ω p are laser and plasma frequency. Earlier with a total velocity v = (v 2 0 + v 2 th)1/2 dependent ln Λ(v) it was reported that v ei and corresponding fractional laser absorption (α) initially increases with increasing intensity, reaches a maximum value, and then fall according to the conventional I 0 -3/2 scaling. This anomalous increase in v ei and α may be objected due to an artifact introduced in ln Λ(v) through k-1 min ∝ v. Here we show similar anomalous increase of v ei and α versus I 0 (in the low temperature and under-dense density regime) with quantum and classical kinetic models of v ei without using ln Λ, but a proper choice of the total velocity dependent inverse cut-off length kmax -1 ∝ v 2 (in classical case) or kmax ∝ v (in quantum case). For a given I 0 15 eV, anomalous growth of vei and a disappear. The total velocity dependent k max in kinetic models, as proposed here, may explain anomalous increase of a with I 0 measured in some earlier laser-plasma experiments. This work may be important to understand collisional absorption in the under-dense pre-plasma region due to low intensity pre-pulses and amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) pedestal in the context of laser induced inertial confinement fusion.

  8. New schemes for manipulating quantum states using a Kerr cell

    CERN Document Server

    Genovèse, M

    2000-01-01

    In this proceeding we describe various proposals of application of an high coefficient Kerr cell to quantum states manipulation, ranging from fast modulation of quantum interference, GHZ states generation, Schroedinger cats creation, translucent eavesdropping, etc.

  9. Anomalous propagation of Omega VLF waves near the geomagnetic equator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtani, A.; Kikuchi, T.; Nozaki, K.; Kurihara, N.; Kuratani, Y.; Ohse, M.

    1983-09-01

    Omega HAIKU, REUNION, and LIBERIA signals were received and anomalous propagation characteristics were obtained near the geomagnetic equator. Short-period fluctuations were found in the phase of the HAIKU 10.2 kHz signal in November 1979 and in the phase and amplitude of the HAIKU 13.6 kHz signal in November 1981. These cyclic fluctuations are in close correlation with the phase cycle slippings, which occur most frequently when the receiver is located at 6 S geomagnetic latitude. On the basis of anisotropic waveguide mode theory indicating much less attenuation in WE propagation than in EW propagation at the geomagnetic equator, it is concluded that the short-period fluctuations in the phase and amplitude are due to interference between the short-path and the long-path signals.

  10. Trajectory description of the quantum–classical transition for wave packet interference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Chia-Chun, E-mail: ccchou@mx.nthu.edu.tw

    2016-08-15

    The quantum–classical transition for wave packet interference is investigated using a hydrodynamic description. A nonlinear quantum–classical transition equation is obtained by introducing a degree of quantumness ranging from zero to one into the classical time-dependent Schrödinger equation. This equation provides a continuous description for the transition process of physical systems from purely quantum to purely classical regimes. In this study, the transition trajectory formalism is developed to provide a hydrodynamic description for the quantum–classical transition. The flow momentum of transition trajectories is defined by the gradient of the action function in the transition wave function and these trajectories follow the main features of the evolving probability density. Then, the transition trajectory formalism is employed to analyze the quantum–classical transition of wave packet interference. For the collision-like wave packet interference where the propagation velocity is faster than the spreading speed of the wave packet, the interference process remains collision-like for all the degree of quantumness. However, the interference features demonstrated by transition trajectories gradually disappear when the degree of quantumness approaches zero. For the diffraction-like wave packet interference, the interference process changes continuously from a diffraction-like to collision-like case when the degree of quantumness gradually decreases. This study provides an insightful trajectory interpretation for the quantum–classical transition of wave packet interference.

  11. Classical codes for quantum broadcast channels

    CERN Document Server

    Savov, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    We discuss two techniques for transmitting classical information over quantum broadcast channels. The first technique is a quantum generalization of the superposition coding scheme for the classical broadcast channel. We use a quantum simultaneous nonunique decoder and obtain a simpler proof of the rate region recently published by Yard et al. in independent work. Our second result is a quantum Marton coding scheme, which gives the best known achievable rate region for quantum broadcast channels. Both results exploit recent advances in quantum simultaneous decoding developed in the context of quantum interference channels.

  12. Temperature Insensitivity of Optical Properties of InAs/GaAs Quantum Dots due to a Pregrown InGaAs Quantum Well

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Zhi-Mei; JIN Can; JIN Peng; WU Ju; WANG Zhan-Guo

    2009-01-01

    Both the peak position and linewidth in the photoluminescence spectrum of the InAs/GaAs quantum dots usually vary in an anomalous way with increasing temperature. Such anomalous optical behaviour is eliminated by inserting an In0.2Ga0.8As quantum well below the quantum dot layer in molecular beam epitaxy. The insensitivity of the photoluminescence spectra to temperature is explained in terms of the effective carrier redistribution between quantum dots through the ln0.2Ga0.8As quantum well.

  13. Teaching Quantum Uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobson, Art

    2011-01-01

    An earlier paper introduces quantum physics by means of four experiments: Youngs double-slit interference experiment using (1) a light beam, (2) a low-intensity light beam with time-lapse photography, (3) an electron beam, and (4) a low-intensity electron beam with time-lapse photography. It's ironic that, although these experiments demonstrate…

  14. Quantum Computing over Finite Fields

    CERN Document Server

    James, Roshan P; Sabry, Amr

    2011-01-01

    In recent work, Benjamin Schumacher and Michael~D. Westmoreland investigate a version of quantum mechanics which they call "modal quantum theory" but which we prefer to call "discrete quantum theory". This theory is obtained by instantiating the mathematical framework of Hilbert spaces with a finite field instead of the field of complex numbers. This instantiation collapses much the structure of actual quantum mechanics but retains several of its distinguishing characteristics including the notions of superposition, interference, and entanglement. Furthermore, discrete quantum theory excludes local hidden variable models, has a no-cloning theorem, and can express natural counterparts of quantum information protocols such as superdense coding and teleportation. Our first result is to distill a model of discrete quantum computing from this quantum theory. The model is expressed using a monadic metalanguage built on top of a universal reversible language for finite computations, and hence is directly implementab...

  15. Quantum mechanics theory and experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, Mark

    2012-01-01

    This textbook presents quantum mechanics at the junior/senior undergraduate level. It is unique in that it describes not only quantum theory, but also presents five laboratories that explore truly modern aspects of quantum mechanics. These laboratories include "proving" that light contains photons, single-photon interference, and tests of local realism. The text begins by presenting the classical theory of polarization, moving on to describe the quantum theory of polarization. Analogies between the two theories minimize conceptual difficulties that students typically have when first presented with quantum mechanics. Furthermore, because the laboratories involve studying photons, using photon polarization as a prototypical quantum system allows the laboratory work to be closely integrated with the coursework. Polarization represents a two-dimensional quantum system, so the introduction to quantum mechanics uses two-dimensional state vectors and operators. This allows students to become comfortable with the mat...

  16. Measurement-induced decoherence and information in double-slit interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kincaid, Joshua; McLelland, Kyle; Zwolak, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The double slit experiment provides a classic example of both interference and the effect of observation in quantum physics. When particles are sent individually through a pair of slits, a wave-like interference pattern develops, but no such interference is found when one observes which “path” the particles take. We present a model of interference, dephasing, and measurement-induced decoherence in a one-dimensional version of the double-slit experiment. Using this model, we demonstrate how the loss of interference in the system is correlated with the information gain by the measuring apparatus/observer. In doing so, we give a modern account of measurement in this paradigmatic example of quantum physics that is accessible to students taking quantum mechanics at the graduate or senior undergraduate levels. PMID:27807373

  17. Measurement-induced decoherence and information in double-slit interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kincaid, Joshua; McLelland, Kyle; Zwolak, Michael

    2016-07-01

    The double slit experiment provides a classic example of both interference and the effect of observation in quantum physics. When particles are sent individually through a pair of slits, a wave-like interference pattern develops, but no such interference is found when one observes which "path" the particles take. We present a model of interference, dephasing, and measurement-induced decoherence in a one-dimensional version of the double-slit experiment. Using this model, we demonstrate how the loss of interference in the system is correlated with the information gain by the measuring apparatus/observer. In doing so, we give a modern account of measurement in this paradigmatic example of quantum physics that is accessible to students taking quantum mechanics at the graduate or senior undergraduate levels.

  18. Measurement-induced decoherence and information in double-slit interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kincaid, Joshua; McLelland, Kyle; Zwolak, Michael

    2016-07-01

    The double slit experiment provides a classic example of both interference and the effect of observation in quantum physics. When particles are sent individually through a pair of slits, a wave-like interference pattern develops, but no such interference is found when one observes which "path" the particles take. We present a model of interference, dephasing, and measurement-induced decoherence in a one-dimensional version of the double-slit experiment. Using this model, we demonstrate how the loss of interference in the system is correlated with the information gain by the measuring apparatus/observer. In doing so, we give a modern account of measurement in this paradigmatic example of quantum physics that is accessible to students taking quantum mechanics at the graduate or senior undergraduate levels.

  19. Downlink Interference Alignment

    CERN Document Server

    Suh, Changho; Tse, David

    2010-01-01

    We develop an interference alignment (IA) technique for a downlink cellular system. In the uplink, IA schemes need channel-state-information exchange across base-stations of different cells, but our downlink IA technique requires feedback only within a cell. As a result, the proposed scheme can be implemented with a few changes to an existing cellular system where the feedback mechanism (within a cell) is already being considered for supporting multi-user MIMO. Not only is our proposed scheme implementable with little effort, it can in fact provide substantial gain especially when interference from a dominant interferer (base-station) is significantly stronger than the remaining interference: it is shown that in the two-isolated cell layout, our scheme provides four-fold gain in throughput performance over a standard multi-user MIMO technique. We show through simulations that our technique provides respectable gain under more realistic scenarios: it gives approximately 55% and 20% gain for a linear cell layou...

  20. Interference Alignment for Secrecy

    CERN Document Server

    Koyluoglu, Onur Ozan; Lai, Lifeng; Poor, H Vincent

    2008-01-01

    This paper studies the frequency/time selective $K$-user Gaussian interference channel with secrecy constraints. Two distinct models, namely the interference channel with confidential messages and the one with an external eavesdropper, are analyzed. The key difference between the two models is the lack of channel state information (CSI) about the external eavesdropper. Using interference alignment along with secrecy pre-coding, it is shown that each user can achieve non-zero secure Degrees of Freedom (DoF) for both cases. More precisely, the proposed coding scheme achieves $\\frac{K-2}{2K-2}$ secure DoF {\\em with probability one} per user in the confidential messages model. For the external eavesdropper scenario, on the other hand, it is shown that each user can achieve $\\frac{K-2}{2K}$ secure DoF {\\em in the ergodic setting}. Remarkably, these results establish the {\\em positive impact} of interference on the secrecy capacity region of wireless networks.

  1. Interference and radioastronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, A. R.; Vanden Bout, Paul A.; Gergely, Tomas E.

    1991-11-01

    The vulnerabilty of radio astronomy to the growing flood of interfering sources ranging from garage door openers to digital audio broadcast satellites is reviewed. Technical solutions to these problems are briefly examined, and work that needs to be done in the international regulatory system to ameliorate the interference is addressed. An overview is given of existing regulations.

  2. Quantum optics of lossy asymmetric beam splitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppu, Ravitej; Wolterink, Tom A. W.; Tentrup, Tristan B. H.; Pinkse, Pepijn W. H.

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically investigate quantum interference of two single photons at a lossy asymmetric beam splitter, the most general passive 2$\\times$2 optical circuit. The losses in the circuit result in a non-unitary scattering matrix with a non-trivial set of constraints on the elements of the scattering matrix. Our analysis using the noise operator formalism shows that the loss allows tunability of quantum interference to an extent not possible with a lossless beam splitter. Our theoretical studies support the experimental demonstrations of programmable quantum interference in highly multimodal systems such as opaque scattering media and multimode fibers.

  3. Quantum optics of lossy asymmetric beam splitters

    CERN Document Server

    Uppu, Ravitej; Tentrup, Tristan B H; Pinkse, Pepijn W H

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically investigate quantum interference of two single photons at a lossy asymmetric beam splitter, the most general passive 2$\\times$2 optical circuit. The losses in the circuit result in a non-unitary scattering matrix with a non-trivial set of constraints on the elements of the scattering matrix. Our analysis using the noise operator formalism shows that the loss allows tunability of quantum interference to an extent not possible with a lossless beam splitter. Our theoretical studies support the experimental demonstrations of programmable quantum interference in highly multimodal systems such as opaque scattering media and multimode fibers.

  4. Canonical quantization of a two-dimensional model with anomalous breaking of gauge invariance

    OpenAIRE

    Girotti, Horacio Oscar; Rothe, Heinz J.; Rothe, Klaus D.

    1986-01-01

    We investigate in detail the operator quantum dynamics of a two-dimensional model exhibiting anomalous breaking of gauge invariance. The equal-time algebra is systematically obtained by using the Dirac-bracket formalism for constrained systems. For certain values of the regularization parameter the system is shown to undergo drastic changes. For the value of the parameter corresponding to the chiral Schwinger model no operator solutions are found to exist.

  5. Breakdown of interference rules in azulene, a nonalternant hydrocarbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xia, Jianlong; Capozzi, Brian; Wei, Sujun;

    2014-01-01

    We have designed and synthesized five azulene derivatives containing gold-binding groups at different points of connectivity within the azulene core to probe the effects of quantum interference through single-molecule conductance measurements. We compare conducting paths through the 5-membered ri...

  6. Anomalous doublets of states in a PT symmetric quantum model

    CERN Document Server

    Znojil, M; Roy, P; Roychoudhury, R; Znojil, Miloslav; Levai, Geza; Roy, Pinaki; Roychoudhury, Rajkumar

    2001-01-01

    A PT symmetric complexification of a conditionally exactly solvable potential in one dimension leads to a paradox. The set of its normalizable solutions proves larger than one would expect on the basis of its point canonical transformation analysis.

  7. Transient interference of transmission and incidence

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez-Prieto, A L; Muga, J G

    2000-01-01

    Due to a transient quantum interference during a wavepacket collision with a potential barrier, a particular momentum, that depends on the potential parameters but is close to the initial average momentum, becomes suppressed. The hole left pushes the momentum distribution outwards leading to a significant constructive enhancement of lower and higher momenta. This is explained in the momentum complex-plane language in terms of a saddle point and two contiguous ``structural'' poles, which are not associated with resonances but with incident and transmitted components of the wavefunction.

  8. Angular momentum sensitive two-center interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilchen, M; Glaser, L; Scholz, F; Walter, P; Deinert, S; Rothkirch, A; Seltmann, J; Viefhaus, J; Decleva, P; Langer, B; Knie, A; Ehresmann, A; Al-Dossary, O M; Braune, M; Hartmann, G; Meissner, A; Tribedi, L C; AlKhaldi, M; Becker, U

    2014-01-17

    In quantum mechanics the Young-type double-slit experiment can be performed with electrons either traveling through a double slit or being coherently emitted from two inversion symmetric molecular sites. In the latter one the valence photoionization cross sections of homonuclear diatomic molecules were predicted to oscillate over kinetic energy almost 50 years ago. Beyond the direct proof of the oscillatory behavior of these photoionization cross sections σ, we show that the angular distribution of the emitted electrons reveals hitherto unexplored information on the relative phase shift between the corresponding partial waves through two-center interference patterns.

  9. Angular Momentum Sensitive Two-Center Interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilchen, M.; Glaser, L.; Scholz, F.; Walter, P.; Deinert, S.; Rothkirch, A.; Seltmann, J.; Viefhaus, J.; Decleva, P.; Langer, B.; Knie, A.; Ehresmann, A.; Al-Dossary, O. M.; Braune, M.; Hartmann, G.; Meissner, A.; Tribedi, L. C.; AlKhaldi, M.; Becker, U.

    2014-01-01

    In quantum mechanics the Young-type double-slit experiment can be performed with electrons either traveling through a double slit or being coherently emitted from two inversion symmetric molecular sites. In the latter one the valence photoionization cross sections of homonuclear diatomic molecules were predicted to oscillate over kinetic energy almost 50 years ago. Beyond the direct proof of the oscillatory behavior of these photoionization cross sections σ, we show that the angular distribution of the emitted electrons reveals hitherto unexplored information on the relative phase shift between the corresponding partial waves through two-center interference patterns.

  10. On the Physical Origin of the Anomalous Magnetic Moment of Electron

    CERN Document Server

    Mandache, N B

    2013-01-01

    A simple physical insight into the origin of the magnetic moment anomaly of electron is presented. This approach is based on the assumption that the electromagnetic mass of the electron due to the electric field generated by electron charge in the exterior of the sphere of radius half of the Compton wavelength of the electron, does not contribute to the magnetic moment of the electron. This explanation is compatible with the well-known quantum electrodynamics approach. A formula is derived, which is similar to that obtained by quantum electrodynamics calculus of one loop contribution to anomalous part of the magnetic moment.

  11. The importance of probability interference in social science: rationale and experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Khrennikov, Andrei

    2007-01-01

    Probability interference is a fundamental characteristic of quantum mechanics. In this paper we attempt to show with the help of some examples, where this fundamental trait of quantum physics can be found back in a social science environment. In order to support our thesis that interference can possibly be found back in many other macro-scopic areas, we proceed in setting up an experimental test.

  12. Large anomalous Hall effect in a half-Heusler antiferromagnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, T.; Chisnell, R.; Devarakonda, A.; Liu, Y.-T.; Feng, W.; Xiao, D.; Lynn, J. W.; Checkelsky, J. G.

    2016-12-01

    The quantum mechanical (Berry) phase of the electronic wavefunction plays a critical role in the anomalous and spin Hall effects, including their quantized limits. While progress has been made in understanding these effects in ferromagnets, less is known in antiferromagnetic systems. Here we present a study of antiferromagnet GdPtBi, whose electronic structure is similar to that of the topologically non-trivial HgTe (refs ,,), and where the Gd ions offer the possibility to tune the Berry phase via control of the spin texture. We show that this system supports an anomalous Hall angle ΘAH > 0.1, comparable to the largest observed in bulk ferromagnets and significantly larger than in other antiferromagnets. Neutron scattering measurements and electronic structure calculations suggest that this effect originates from avoided crossing or Weyl points that develop near the Fermi level due to a breaking of combined time-reversal and lattice symmetries. Berry phase effects associated with such symmetry breaking have recently been explored in kagome networks; our results extend this to half-Heusler systems with non-trivial band topology. The magnetic textures indicated here may also provide pathways towards realizing the topological insulating and semimetallic states predicted in this material class.

  13. Anomalous photoelectric effect of a polycrystalline topological insulator film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongbin; Yao, Jiandong; Shao, Jianmei; Li, Hai; Li, Shuwei; Bao, Dinghua; Wang, Chengxin; Yang, Guowei

    2014-07-29

    A topological insulator represents a new state of quantum matter that possesses an insulating bulk band gap as well as a spin-momentum-locked Dirac cone on the surface that is protected by time-reversal symmetry. Photon-dressed surface states and light-induced surface photocurrents have been observed in topological insulators. Here, we report experimental observations of an anomalous photoelectric effect in thin films of Bi2Te3, a polycrystalline topological insulator. Under illumination with non-polarised light, transport measurements reveal that the resistance of the topological surface states suddenly increases when the polycrystalline film is illuminated. The resistance variation is positively dependent on the light intensity but has no relation to the applied electric field; this finding can be attributed to the gap opening of the surface Dirac cone. This observation of an anomalous photoelectric effect in polycrystalline topological insulators offers exciting opportunities for the creation of photodetectors with an unusually broad spectral range. Moreover, polycrystalline topological insulator films provide an attractive material platform for exploring the nature and practical application of topological insulators.

  14. Locality of quantum entanglement

    CERN Document Server

    Guowen, W

    2005-01-01

    This article presents a local realistic interpretation of quantum entanglement. The entanglement is explained as innate interference between the non-empty state associated with the peaked piece of one particle and the empty states associated with the non-peaked pieces of the others of entangled particles, which inseparably join together. The correlation of the results of measurements on the ensemble of composite entangled systems is related to this kind of interference. Consequently, there is no nonlocal influence between entangled particles in measurements. Particularly, this explanation thus rules out the possibility of quantum teleportation which is nowadays considered as one of cornerstones of quantum information processing. Besides, likewise, communication and computation schemes based on alleged spooky action at a distance are unlikely to be promising.

  15. The charmonium dissociation in an "anomalous wind"

    CERN Document Server

    Sadofyev, Andrey V

    2016-01-01

    We study the charmonium dissociation in a strongly coupled chiral plasma in the presence of magnetic field and axial charge imbalance. This type of plasma carries ``anomalous flow" induced by the chiral anomaly and exhibits novel transport phenomena such as chiral magnetic effect. We found that the ``anomalous flow" would modify the charmonium color screening length by using the gauge/gravity correspondence. We derive an analytical expression quantifying the ``anomalous flow" experienced by a charmonium for a large class of chiral plasma with a gravity dual. We elaborate on the similarity and {\\it qualitative} difference between anomalous effects on the charmonium color screening length which are {\\it model-dependent} and those on the heavy quark drag force which are fixed by the second law of thermodynamics. We speculate on the possible charmonium dissociation induced by chiral anomaly in heavy ion collisions.

  16. Anomalous magnetic moment with heavy virtual leptons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurz, Alexander [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Teilchenphysik; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Liu, Tao; Steinhauser, Matthias [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Teilchenphysik; Marquard, Peter [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2013-11-15

    We compute the contributions to the electron and muon anomalous magnetic moment induced by heavy leptons up to four-loop order. Asymptotic expansion is applied to obtain three analytic expansion terms which show rapid convergence.

  17. Anomalous Fractional Diffusion Equation for Transport Phenomena

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QiuhuaZENG; HouqiangLI; 等

    1999-01-01

    We derive the standard diffusion equation from the continuity equation and by discussing the defectiveness of earlier proposed equations,we get the generalized fractional diffusion equation for anomalous diffusion.

  18. Anomalous magnetic moment with heavy virtual leptons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurz, Alexander [Institut für Theoretische Teilchenphysik, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY), 15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Liu, Tao [Institut für Theoretische Teilchenphysik, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Marquard, Peter [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY), 15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Steinhauser, Matthias [Institut für Theoretische Teilchenphysik, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    We compute the contributions to the electron and muon anomalous magnetic moment induced by heavy leptons up to four-loop order. Asymptotic expansion is applied to obtain three analytic expansion terms which show rapid convergence.

  19. Anomalous magnetic moment with heavy virtual leptons

    CERN Document Server

    Kurz, Alexander; Marquard, Peter; Steinhauser, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    We compute the contributions to the electron and muon anomalous magnetic moment induced by heavy leptons up to four-loop order. Asymptotic expansion is applied to obtain three analytic expansion terms which show rapid convergence.

  20. Precise quantization of anomalous Hall effect near zero magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bestwick, A. J. [Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Fox, E. J. [Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Kou, Xufeng [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Pan, Lei [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Wang, Kang L. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Goldhaber-Gordon, D. [Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-05-04

    In this study, we report a nearly ideal quantum anomalous Hall effect in a three-dimensional topological insulator thin film with ferromagnetic doping. Near zero applied magnetic field we measure exact quantization in the Hall resistance to within a part per 10,000 and a longitudinal resistivity under 1 Ω per square, with chiral edge transport explicitly confirmed by nonlocal measurements. Deviations from this behavior are found to be caused by thermally activated carriers, as indicated by an Arrhenius law temperature dependence. Using the deviations as a thermometer, we demonstrate an unexpected magnetocaloric effect and use it to reach near-perfect quantization by cooling the sample below the dilution refrigerator base temperature in a process approximating adiabatic demagnetization refrigeration.