WorldWideScience

Sample records for anomalous dispersion effect

  1. Fickian dispersion is anomalous

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushman, John H.; O'Malley, Dan

    2015-12-01

    The thesis put forward here is that the occurrence of Fickian dispersion in geophysical settings is a rare event and consequently should be labeled as anomalous. What people classically call anomalous is really the norm. In a Lagrangian setting, a process with mean square displacement which is proportional to time is generally labeled as Fickian dispersion. With a number of counter examples we show why this definition is fraught with difficulty. In a related discussion, we show an infinite second moment does not necessarily imply the process is super dispersive. By employing a rigorous mathematical definition of Fickian dispersion we illustrate why it is so hard to find a Fickian process. We go on to employ a number of renormalization group approaches to classify non-Fickian dispersive behavior. Scaling laws for the probability density function for a dispersive process, the distribution for the first passage times, the mean first passage time, and the finite-size Lyapunov exponent are presented for fixed points of both deterministic and stochastic renormalization group operators. The fixed points of the renormalization group operators are p-self-similar processes. A generalized renormalization group operator is introduced whose fixed points form a set of generalized self-similar processes. Power-law clocks are introduced to examine multi-scaling behavior. Several examples of these ideas are presented and discussed.

  2. Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shay, T. M.; Yin, B.; Alvarez, L. S.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filters on infrared and blue transitions of some alkali atoms is calculated. A composite system is designed to further increase the background noise rejection. The measured results of the solar background rejection and image quality through the filter are presented. The results show that the filter may provide high transmission and high background noise rejection with excellent image quality.

  3. Faraday anomalous dispersion optical tuners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanninger, P.; Valdez, E. C.; Shay, T. M.

    1992-01-01

    Common methods for frequency stabilizing diode lasers systems employ gratings, etalons, optical electric double feedback, atomic resonance, and a Faraday cell with low magnetic field. Our method, the Faraday Anomalous Dispersion Optical Transmitter (FADOT) laser locking, is much simpler than other schemes. The FADOT uses commercial laser diodes with no antireflection coatings, an atomic Faraday cell with a single polarizer, and an output coupler to form a compound cavity. This method is vibration insensitive, thermal expansion effects are minimal, and the system has a frequency pull in range of 443.2 GHz (9A). Our technique is based on the Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter. This method has potential applications in optical communication, remote sensing, and pumping laser excited optical filters. We present the first theoretical model for the FADOT and compare the calculations to our experimental results.

  4. Structure investigation of metal ions clustering in dehydrated gel using x-ray anomalous dispersion effect

    CERN Document Server

    Soejima, Y; Sugiyama, M; Annaka, M; Nakamura, A; Hiramatsu, N; Hara, K

    2003-01-01

    The structure of copper ion clusters in dehydrated N-isopropylacrylamide/sodium acrylate (NIPA/SA) gel has been studied by means of small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) method. In order to distinguish the intensity scattered by Cu ions, the X-ray anomalous dispersion effect around the Cu K absorption edge has been coupled with SAXS. It is found that the dispersion effect dependent on the incident X-ray energy is remarkable only at the momentum transfer q = 0.031 A sup - sup 1 , where a SAXS peak is observed. The results indicate that copper ions form clusters in the dehydrated gel, and that the mean size of clusters is the same as that of SA clusters produced by microphase separation. It is therefore naturally presumed that copper ions are adsorbed into the SA molecules. On the basis of the presumption, a mechanism is proposed for microphase-separation and clustering of Cu ions.

  5. Relation between the structure and catalytic activity for automotive emissions. Use of x-ray anomalous dispersion effect

    CERN Document Server

    Mizuki, J; Tanaka, H

    2003-01-01

    The employment of the X-ray anomalous dispersion effect allows us to detect the change in structure of catalytic converters with the environment exposed. Here we show that palladium atoms in a perovskite crystal move into and out of the crystal by anomalous X-ray diffraction and absorption techniques. This movement of the precious metal plays an important role to keep the catalytic activity long-lived. (author)

  6. Design of photonic crystal fibers with anomalous dispersion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHI Hao; ZHANG Xian-min; SHEN Lin-fang

    2006-01-01

    Photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) with anomalous dispersion in short wavelength region are significant for some applications, such as short wavelength soliton propagation, super continuum generation and short pulse fiber lasing.In this paper,a systematic method for designing PCFs with required anomalous dispersion region is proposed by using a finite difference solver and the scaling transformation of the waveguide dispersion of PCFs.Designed PCF can be anomalously dispersive in the region less than 1.3 μm,which is very difficult to realize in the traditional standard single-mode fibers.The effectiveness of the proposed method is approved by numerical results.

  7. Signal velocity for anomalous dispersive waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mainardi, F. (Bologna Univ. (Italy))

    1983-03-11

    The concept of signal velocity for dispersive waves is usually identified with that of group velocity. When the dispersion is anomalous, this interpretation is not correct since the group velocity can assume nonphysical values. In this note, by using the steepest descent method first introduced by Brillouin, the phase velocity is shown to be the signal velocity when the dispersion is anomalous in the full range of frequencies.

  8. Anomalous dispersions of `hedgehog' particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahng, Joong Hwan; Yeom, Bongjun; Wang, Yichun; Tung, Siu On; Hoff, J. Damon; Kotov, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Hydrophobic particles in water and hydrophilic particles in oil aggregate, but can form colloidal dispersions if their surfaces are chemically camouflaged with surfactants, organic tethers, adsorbed polymers or other particles that impart affinity for the solvent and increase interparticle repulsion. A different strategy for modulating the interaction between a solid and a liquid uses surface corrugation, which gives rise to unique wetting behaviour. Here we show that this topographical effect can also be used to disperse particles in a wide range of solvents without recourse to chemicals to camouflage the particles' surfaces: we produce micrometre-sized particles that are coated with stiff, nanoscale spikes and exhibit long-term colloidal stability in both hydrophilic and hydrophobic media. We find that these `hedgehog' particles do not interpenetrate each other with their spikes, which markedly decreases the contact area between the particles and, therefore, the attractive forces between them. The trapping of air in aqueous dispersions, solvent autoionization at highly developed interfaces, and long-range electrostatic repulsion in organic media also contribute to the colloidal stability of our particles. The unusual dispersion behaviour of our hedgehog particles, overturning the notion that like dissolves like, might help to mitigate adverse environmental effects of the use of surfactants and volatile organic solvents, and deepens our understanding of interparticle interactions and nanoscale colloidal chemistry.

  9. A potassium Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, B.; Shay, T. M.

    1992-01-01

    The characteristics of a potassium Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter operating on the blue and near infrared transitions are calculated. The results show that the filter can be designed to provide high transmission, very narrow pass bandwidth, and low equivalent noise bandwidth. The Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter (FADOF) provides a narrow pass bandwidth (about GHz) optical filter for laser communications, remote sensing, and lidar. The general theoretical model for the FADOF has been established in our previous paper. In this paper, we have identified the optimum operational conditions for a potassium FADOF operating on the blue and infrared transitions. The signal transmission, bandwidth, and equivalent noise bandwidth (ENBW) are also calculated.

  10. Powder diffraction studies using anomalous dispersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, D.E. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Wilkinson, A.P. [California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials

    1993-05-01

    With the increasing availability and accessibility of high resolution powder diffractometers at many synchrotron radiation sources throughout the world, there is rapidly-growing interest in the exploitation of anomalous dispersion techniques for structural studies of polycrystalline materials. In conjunction with the Rietveld profile method for structure refinement, such studies are especially useful for the determination of the site distributions of two or more atoms which are near neighbors in the periodic table, or atoms which are distributed among partially occupied sites. Additionally, it is possible to (1) determine the mean-square displacements associated with different kinds of atoms distributed over a single set of sites, (2) distinguish between different oxidation states and coordination geometries of a particular atom in a compound and (3) to determine f` for a wide range of atomic species as a function of energy in the vicinity of an absorption edge. Experimental methods for making anomalous dispersion measurements are described in some detail, including data collection strategies, data analysis and correlation problems, possible systematic errors, and the accuracy of the results. Recent work in the field is reviewed, including cation site-distribution studies (e.g. doped high {Tc} superconductors, ternary alloys, FeCo{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}, FeNi{sub 2}BO{sub 5}), oxidation-state contrast (e.g. YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x}, Eu{sub 3}O{sub 4}, GaCl{sub 2}, Fe{sub 2}PO{sub 5}), and the effect of coordination geometry (e.g. Y{sub 3}Ga{sub 5}O{sub l2}).

  11. Powder diffraction studies using anomalous dispersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, D.E. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Wilkinson, A.P. (California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials)

    1993-01-01

    With the increasing availability and accessibility of high resolution powder diffractometers at many synchrotron radiation sources throughout the world, there is rapidly-growing interest in the exploitation of anomalous dispersion techniques for structural studies of polycrystalline materials. In conjunction with the Rietveld profile method for structure refinement, such studies are especially useful for the determination of the site distributions of two or more atoms which are near neighbors in the periodic table, or atoms which are distributed among partially occupied sites. Additionally, it is possible to (1) determine the mean-square displacements associated with different kinds of atoms distributed over a single set of sites, (2) distinguish between different oxidation states and coordination geometries of a particular atom in a compound and (3) to determine f' for a wide range of atomic species as a function of energy in the vicinity of an absorption edge. Experimental methods for making anomalous dispersion measurements are described in some detail, including data collection strategies, data analysis and correlation problems, possible systematic errors, and the accuracy of the results. Recent work in the field is reviewed, including cation site-distribution studies (e.g. doped high [Tc] superconductors, ternary alloys, FeCo[sub 2](PO[sub 4])[sub 3], FeNi[sub 2]BO[sub 5]), oxidation-state contrast (e.g. YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 6+x], Eu[sub 3]O[sub 4], GaCl[sub 2], Fe[sub 2]PO[sub 5]), and the effect of coordination geometry (e.g. Y[sub 3]Ga[sub 5]O[sub l2]).

  12. Theoretical model for a Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, B.; Shay, T. M.

    1991-01-01

    A model for the Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter is presented. The model predicts a bandwidth of 0.6 GHz and a transmission peak of 0.98 for a filter operating on the Cs (D2) line. The model includes hyperfine effects and is valid for arbitrary magnetic fields.

  13. Theoretical model for a Stark anomalous dispersion optical filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, B.; Shay, T. M.

    1993-01-01

    A theoretical model for the first atomic Stark anomalous dispersion optical filter is reported. The results show the filter may serve as a widely tunable narrow bandwidth and high throughput optical filter for freespace laser communications and remote sensing.

  14. Nonlocal Anomalous Hall Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Steven S-L; Vignale, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    The anomalous Hall (AH) effect is deemed to be a unique transport property of ferromagnetic metals, caused by the concerted action of spin polarization and spin-orbit coupling. Nevertheless, recent experiments have shown that the effect also occurs in a nonmagnetic metal (Pt) in contact with a magnetic insulator [yttrium iron garnet (YIG)], even when precautions are taken to ensure that there is no induced magnetization in the metal. We propose a theory of this effect based on the combined action of spin-dependent scattering from the magnetic interface and the spin-Hall effect in the bulk of the metal. At variance with previous theories, we predict the effect to be of first order in the spin-orbit coupling, just as the conventional anomalous Hall effect-the only difference being the spatial separation of the spin-orbit interaction and the magnetization. For this reason we name this effect the nonlocal anomalous Hall effect and predict that its sign will be determined by the sign of the spin-Hall angle in the metal. The AH conductivity that we calculate from our theory is in order of magnitude agreement with the measured values in Pt/YIG structures.

  15. Nonlocal Anomalous Hall Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Steven S.-L.; Vignale, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    The anomalous Hall (AH) effect is deemed to be a unique transport property of ferromagnetic metals, caused by the concerted action of spin polarization and spin-orbit coupling. Nevertheless, recent experiments have shown that the effect also occurs in a nonmagnetic metal (Pt) in contact with a magnetic insulator [yttrium iron garnet (YIG)], even when precautions are taken to ensure that there is no induced magnetization in the metal. We propose a theory of this effect based on the combined action of spin-dependent scattering from the magnetic interface and the spin-Hall effect in the bulk of the metal. At variance with previous theories, we predict the effect to be of first order in the spin-orbit coupling, just as the conventional anomalous Hall effect—the only difference being the spatial separation of the spin-orbit interaction and the magnetization. For this reason we name this effect the nonlocal anomalous Hall effect and predict that its sign will be determined by the sign of the spin-Hall angle in the metal. The AH conductivity that we calculate from our theory is in order of magnitude agreement with the measured values in Pt /YIG structures.

  16. Anomalous dispersion of sea ice in the Fram Strait region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielski, A.; Badin, G.; Kaleschke, L.

    2015-03-01

    The single-particle dispersion of sea ice in the Fram Strait region is investigated using ice drift buoys deployed from 2002 to 2009 within the Fram Strait Cyclones and the Arctic Climate System Study campaigns. A new method to estimate the direction of the mean flow, based on a satellite drift product, is introduced. As a result, the bias in the dispersion introduced by the mean flow is eliminated considering only the displacements of the buoys in the cross-stream direction. Results show an absolute dispersion growing quadratically in time for the first 3 days and an anomalous dispersion regime exhibiting a strongly self-similar scaling following a 5/4 power law for time scales larger than 6 days persisting over the whole time series of length 32 days. The non-Gaussian distribution of the velocity fluctuations with a skewness of -0.15 and a kurtosis of 7.33 as well as the slope of the Lagrangian frequency spectrum between -2 and -1 are in agreement with the anomalous diffusion regime. Comparison with data from the International Arctic Buoy Program yields similar results with an anomalous dispersion starting after 10 days and persisting over the whole time series of length 50 days. The results suggest the presence of deformation and shear acting on the sea ice dispersion. The high correlation between the cross-stream displacements and the cross-stream wind velocities shows the important role of the wind as a source for the anomalous dispersion.

  17. Design of apochromatic telescope without anomalous dispersion glasses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qinghua Yang; Baochang Zhao; Renkui Zhou

    2008-01-01

    A novel lens 8vstem with correction of secondary spectrum without using anomalous glasses is presented.The lens system comprises four separated lens components,with three of them being subapertures.Two examples of apochromatic telescope are presented,both with the use of typical normal glasses,namely crown K9 and flint F5 glasses,and low-cost slightly anomalous dispersion glasses.Secondary spectrum and other chromatic aberrations of the two design examples are corrected.

  18. A fractional calculus model of anomalous dispersion of acoustic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wharmby, Andrew W

    2016-09-01

    An empirical formula based on viscoelastic analysis techniques that employs concepts from the fractional calculus that was used to model the dielectric behavior of materials exposed to oscillating electromagnetic fields in the radiofrequency, terahertz, and infrared bands. This work adapts and applies the formula to model viscoelastic behavior of materials that show an apparent increase of phase velocity of vibration with an increase in frequency, otherwise known as anomalous dispersion. A fractional order wave equation is derived through the application of the classic elastic-viscoelastic correspondence principle whose analytical solution is used to describe absorption and dispersion of acoustic waves in the viscoelastic material displaying anomalous dispersion in a specific frequency range. A brief discussion and comparison of an alternative fractional order wave equation recently formulated is also included.

  19. Transfer of information in an anomalous dispersion medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄超光; 张元仲

    2003-01-01

    The transfer of information and signal velocity in an anomalous dispersion medium are studied. We propose that the discontinuous points in the envelop and its derivatives of any order are the information carried by a pulse different from others. The signal velocity will not exceed the speed of the shift of these discontinuous points. We study the propagation of pulses with a triangle envelop and with the envelop made up by three pieces of quadratic curve in dilute, anomalous dispersion gas with double gain lines. The discontinuous points of the envelop, its first derivative, and its second derivative are shown to propagate with vacuum speed of light c in the medium. A criterion has been suggested to determine theoretically whether the distortion of a pulse can be ignored.

  20. Theoretical analyses of resonant frequency shift in anomalous dispersion enhanced resonant optical gyroscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jian; Liu, Jiaming; Zhang, Hao; Li, Wenxiu; Zhao, Lu; Jin, Junjie; Huang, Anping; Zhang, Xiaofu; Xiao, Zhisong

    2016-12-01

    Rigorous expressions of resonant frequency shift (RFS) in anomalous dispersion enhanced resonant optical gyroscopes (ADEROGs) are deduced without making approximation, which provides a precise theoretical guidance to achieve ultra-sensitive ADEROGs. A refractive index related modification factor is introduced when considering special theory of relativity (STR). We demonstrate that the RFS will not be ”infinitely large” by using critical anomalous dispersion (CAD) and negative modification does not exist, which make the mechanism of anomalous dispersion enhancement clear and coherent. Although step change of RFS will happen when the anomalous dispersion condition varies, the amplification of RFS is limited by attainable variation of refractive index in practice. Moreover, it is shown that the properties of anomalous dispersion will influence not only the amplification of RFS, but also the detection range of ADEROGs.

  1. Hollow cathode lamp based Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Duo; Xue, Xiaobo; Shang, Haosen; Luo, Bin; Chen, Jingbiao; Guo, Hong

    2016-07-15

    The Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter (FADOF), which has acquired wide applications, is mainly limited to some gaseous elements and low melting-point metals before, for the restriction of the attainable atomic density. In conventional FADOF systems a high atomic density is usually achieved by thermal equilibrium at the saturated vapor pressure, hence for elements with high melting-points a high temperature is required. To avoid this restriction, we propose a scheme of FADOF based on the hollow cathode lamp (HCL), instead of atomic vapor cells. Experimental results in strontium atoms verified this scheme, where a transmission peak corresponding to the (88)Sr (5s(2))(1)S0 - (5s5p)(1)P1 transition (461 nm) is obtained, with a maximum transmittance of 62.5% and a bandwith of 1.19 GHz. The dependence of transmission on magnetic field and HCL discharge current is also studied. Since the state-of-art commercial HCLs cover about 70 elements, this scheme can greatly expand the applications of FADOFs, and the abundant atomic transitions they provide bring the HCL based FADOFs potential applications for frequency stabilization.

  2. Impact of anomalous dispersion on the interferometer measurements of plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsen, J; Johnson, W R; Iglesias, C A; Scofield, J H

    2004-12-16

    For many decades optical interferometers have been used to measure the electron density of plasmas. During the last ten years X-ray lasers in the wavelength range 14 to 47 nm have enabled researchers to use interferometers to probe even higher density plasmas. The data analysis assumes that the index of refraction is due only to the free electrons, which makes the index of refraction less than one and the electron density proportional to the number of fringe shifts. Recent experiments in Al plasmas observed plasmas with an index of refraction greater than one and made us question the validity of the usual formula for calculating the index of refraction. Recent calculations showed how the anomalous dispersion from the bound electrons can dominate the index of refraction in many types of plasma and make the index greater than one or enhance the index such that one would greatly overestimate the electron density of the plasma using interferometers. In this work we calculate the index of refraction of C, Al, Ti, and Pd plasmas for photon energies from 0 to 100 eV (12.4 nm) using a new average-atom code. The results show large variations from the free electron approximation under many different plasma conditions. We validate the average-atom code against the more detailed OPAL code for carbon and aluminum plasmas. During the next decade X-ray free electron lasers and other sources will be available to probe a wider variety of plasmas at higher densities and shorter wavelengths so understanding the index of refraction in plasmas will be even more essential.

  3. Anomalous Hall effect in polycrystalline Ni films

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Zaibing

    2012-02-01

    We systematically studied the anomalous Hall effect in a series of polycrystalline Ni films with thickness ranging from 4 to 200 nm. It is found that both the longitudinal and anomalous Hall resistivity increased greatly as film thickness decreased. This enhancement should be related to the surface scattering. In the ultrathin films (46 nm thick), weak localization corrections to anomalous Hall conductivity were studied. The granular model, taking into account the dominated intergranular tunneling, has been employed to explain this phenomenon, which can explain the weak dependence of anomalous Hall resistivity on longitudinal resistivity as well. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Demonstration of a Tunable-Bandwidth White Light Interferometer using Anomalous Dispersion in Atomic Vapor

    CERN Document Server

    Pati, G S; Salit, M; Shahriar, M S

    2006-01-01

    The concept of the 'white-light cavity' has recently generated considerable research interest in the context of gravitational wave detection. Cavity designs are proposed using negative (or anomalous) dispersion in an intracavity medium to make the cavity resonate over a large range of frequencies and still maintain a high cavity build-up. This paper presents the first experimental attempt and demonstration of white-light effect in a meter long ring cavity using an intracavity atomic medium. The medium's negative dispersion is caused by bi-frequency Raman gain in an atomic vapor cell. Although the white light condition was not perfectly achieved and improvements in experimental control are still desirable, significantly broad cavity response over bandwidth greater than 20 MHz has been observed. These devices will have potential applications in new generation laser interferometer gravitational wave detectors.

  5. High-energy pulse compressor using self-defocusing spectral broadening in anomalously dispersive media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Morten; Zhou, Binbin

    2014-01-01

    A new high-energy pulse compressor uses self-defocusing spectral broadening in anomalously dispersive quadratic nonlinear crystals, followed by positive group-delay-dispersion compensation. Compression to sub-50 fs is possible from Joule-class 1.03 µm femtosecond amplifiers in large-aperture KDP....

  6. Anomalous, extreme weather disrupts obligate seed dispersal mutualism: snow in a subtropical forest ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Youbing; Newman, Chris; Chen, Jin; Xie, Zongqiang; Macdonald, David W

    2013-09-01

    Ongoing global climate change is predicted to increase the frequency and magnitude of extreme weather events, impacting population dynamics and community structure. There is, however, a critical lack of case studies considering how climatic perturbations affect biotic interactions. Here, we document how an obligate seed dispersal mutualism was disrupted by a temporally anomalous and meteorologically extreme interlude of unseasonably frigid weather, with accompanying snowstorms, in subtropical China, during January-February 2008. Based on the analysis of 5892 fecal samples (representing six mammalian seed dispersers), this event caused a substantial disruption to the relative seed dispersal function for the raisin tree Hovenia dulcis from prestorm 6.29 (2006) and 11.47 (2007), down to 0.35 during the storm (2008). Crucially, this was due to impacts on mammalian seed dispersers and not due to a paucity of fruit, where 4.63 fruit per branch were available in January 2008, vs. 3.73 in 2006 and 3.58 in 2007. An induced dietary shift occurred among omnivorous carnivores during this event, from the consumption fruit to small mammals and birds, reducing their role in seed dispersal substantially. Induced range shift extinguished the functionality of herbivorous mammals completely, however, seed dispersal function was compensated in part by three omnivorous carnivores during poststorm years, and thus while the mutualism remained intact it was enacted by a narrower assemblage of species, rendering the system more vulnerable to extrinsic perturbations. The storm's extended effects also had anthropogenic corollaries - migrating ungulates becoming exposed to heightened levels of illegal hunting - causing long-term modification to the seed dispersal community and mutualism dynamics. Furthermore, degraded forests proved especially vulnerable to the storm's effects. Considering increasing climate variability and anthropogenic disturbance, the impacts of such massive, aberrant

  7. Anomalous Dispersion of the S1 Lamb Mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faiz Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The S1 mode of the Lamb spectrum of an isotropic plate exhibits negative group velocity in a narrow frequency domain. This anomalous behavior is explained analytically by examining the slope of each mode first in its initial state and then near its turning points.

  8. Advances in understanding the anomalous dispersion of plasmas in the X-ray regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsen, J; Cheng, K T; Johnson, W R

    2008-09-24

    Over the last several years we have predicted and observed plasmas with an index of refraction greater than one in the soft X-ray regime. These plasmas are usually a few times ionized and have ranged from low-Z carbon plasmas to mid-Z tin plasmas. Our main computational tool has been the average atom code AVATOMKG that enables us to calculate the index of refraction for any plasma at any wavelength. In the last year we have improved this code to take into account many-atomic collisions. This allows the code to converge better at low frequencies. In this paper we present our search for plasmas with strong anomalous dispersion that could be used in X-ray laser interferometer experiments to help understand this phenomena. We discuss the calculations of anomalous dispersion in Na vapor and Ne plasmas near 47 nm where we predict large effects. We also discuss higher Z plasmas such as Ce and Yb plasmas that look very interesting near 47 nm. With the advent of the FLASH X-ray free electron laser in Germany and the LCLS X-FEL coming online at Stanford in another year we use the average atom code to explore plasmas at higher X-ray energy to identify potential experiments for the future. In particular we look near the K shell lines of near solid carbon plasmas and predict strong effects. During the next decade X-ray free electron lasers and other X-ray sources will be available to probe a wider variety of plasmas at higher densities and shorter wavelengths so understanding the index of refraction in plasmas will be even more essential.

  9. Anomalous dissolution behaviour of tablets prepared from sugar glass-based solid dispersions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Drooge, D.J.; Hinrichs, W.L.J.; Frijlink, H.W.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, anomalous dissolution behaviour of tablets consisting of sugar glass dispersions was investigated. The poorly aqueous soluble diazepam was used as a lipophilic model drug. The release of diazepam and sugar carrier was determined to study the mechanisms governing dissolution behaviour.

  10. Anomalous Hall Effect for chiral fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, P -M

    2014-01-01

    Semiclassical chiral fermions manifest the anomalous spin-Hall effect: when put into a pure electric field, they suffer a side jump, analogous to what happens to their massive counterparts in non-commutative mechanics. The transverse shift is consistent with the conservation of the angular momentum. In a pure magnetic field a cork-screw-like, spiraling motion is found.

  11. Crystal structure of thermostable catechol 2,3-dioxygenase determined by multiwavelength anomalous dispersion method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The selenomethionyl derivative of the thermostable catechol 2,3-dioxygenase (SeMet-TC23O) is expressed,purified and crystallized. By using multiwave length anomalous dispersion (MAD) phasing techniques, the crystal structure of TC23O at 0.3 nm resolutions is determined.TC23O is a homotetramer. Each monomer is composed of N-terminal and C-terminal domains (residues 1~153 and 153~319, respectively). The two domains are proximately symmetric by a non-crystallographic axis. Each domain contains two characteristic motifs which are found in almost all of extradial dioxygenases.Kevwords: multiwavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD), X-ray diffraction, thermostable catechol 2,3-dioxygenase, crystal structure,synchrotron light source.

  12. Targets, ripples and spirals in a precipitation system with anomalous dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayass, Mahmoud M; Lagzi, Istvan; Al-Ghoul, Mazen

    2015-08-14

    We present a novel reaction-diffusion system that exhibits three-dimensional superdiffusive traveling waves without utilizing any external forces. These waves include single circular targets, spirals, and ripples as well as phase-like waves. The system is based on the interplay of the precipitation reaction of mercuric iodide in a gel medium, its polymorphic transformation to a different crystalline form, and its redissolution in excess iodide. A phase diagram is constructed as a function of the initial concentrations of the reagents. The spatiotemporal evolution of these waves is thoroughly analyzed and seems to be a consequence of an anomalous dispersion relationship. Pattern selection and wavelengths of propagating waves are found to depend on initial concentrations of the reactants. The breakup of the waves is also investigated. While the breakdown of ripples and spirals is shown to be a consequence of a Doppler-like instability in conjunction with anomalous dispersion, the targets undergo a boundary defect-mediated breakup.

  13. Towards a Better Understanding of the Anomalous Hall Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Di; Jin, Xiaofeng

    2017-01-01

    Recent experimental efforts to identify the intrinsic and extrinsic contributions in the anomalous Hall effect are reviewed. Benefited from the experimental control of artificial impurity density in single crystalline magnetic thin films, a comprehensive physical picture of the anomalous Hall effect involving multiple competing scattering processes has been established. Some new insights into the microscopic mechanisms of the anomalous Hall effect are discussed.

  14. Anomalous dispersion of Lagrangian particles in local regions of turbulent flows revealed by convex hull analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Pratt, J; Mueller, W -C; Chapman, S C; Watkins, N W

    2014-01-01

    Local regions of anomalous particle dispersion, and intermittent events that occur in turbulent flows can greatly influence the global statistical description of the flow. These local behaviors can be identified and analyzed by comparing the growth of neighboring convex hulls of Lagrangian tracer particles. Although in our simulations of homogeneous turbulence the convex hulls generally grow in size, after the Lagrangian particles that define the convex hulls begin to disperse, our analysis reveals short periods when the convex hulls of the Lagrangian particles shrink, evidence that particles are not dispersing simply. Shrinkage can be associated with anisotropic flows, since it occurs most frequently in the presence of a mean magnetic field or thermal convection. We compare dispersion between a wide range of statistically homogeneous and stationary turbulent flows ranging from homogeneous isotropic Navier-Stokes turbulence over different configurations of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence and Boussinesq convect...

  15. Super Continuum Generation at 1310nm in a Highly Nonlinear Photonic Crystal Fiber with a Minimum Anomalous Group Velocity Dispersion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashkan Ghanbari

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we investigate the evolution of the super continuum generation (SCG through the triangular photonic crystal fiber (PCF at 1310nm by using both full-vector multi pole method (M.P.M and novel concrete algorithms: Symmetric Split-step Fourier (SSF and fourth order Runge Kutta(RK4 which is an accurate method to solve the general nonlinear Schrodinger equation (GNLSE. We propose an ideal solid-core PCF structure featuring a minimum anomalous group velocity dispersion (GVD, small higher order dispersions (HODs and enhanced nonlinearity for appropriate super continuum generation with low input pulse energies over discrete distances of the PCF. We also investigate the impact of the linear and nonlinear effects on the super continuum spectra in detail and compare the results with different status.

  16. Anomalous Hall Effect in a Kagome Ferromagnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Linda; Wicker, Christina; Suzuki, Takehito; Checkelsky, Joseph; Joseph Checkelsky Team

    The ferromagnetic kagome lattice is theoretically known to possess topological band structures. We have synthesized large single crystals of a kagome ferromagnet Fe3Sn2 which orders ferromagnetically well above room temperature. We have studied the electrical and magnetic properties of these crystals over a broad temperature and magnetic field range. Both the scaling relation of anomalous Hall effect and anisotropic magnetic susceptibility show that the ferromagnetism of Fe3Sn2 is unconventional. We discuss these results in the context of magnetism in kagome systems and relevance to the predicted topological properties in this class of compounds. This research is supported by DMR-1231319.

  17. Theoretical analysis of the electromagnetic field inside an anomalous-dispersion microresonator under synthetical pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Xu; Xiaohong, Hu; Ye, Feng; Yuanshan, Liu; Wei, Zhang; Zhi, Yang; Wei, Zhao; Yishan, Wang

    2016-03-01

    We study the spatiotemporal evolution of the electromagnetic field inside a microresonator showing an anomalous dispersion at the pump wavelength by using the normalized Lugiato-Lefever equation. Unlike the traditional single continuous wave (CW) pumping, an additional pump source consisting of periodical pulse train with variable repetition rate is adopted. The influences of the microresonator properties and the pump parameters on the field evolution and the electromagnetic field profile are analyzed. The simulation results indicate that, in the anomalous dispersion regime, both increases of the input pulse amplitude and the repetition frequency can result in the field profiles consisting of multiple peaks. A series of equidistant pulses can also be obtained by increasing the CW pump power. In addition, we find that a large physical detuning between the pump laser carrier and the cavity resonance frequency also causes the splitting of the inside field. Project supported by the National Major Scientific Instrumentation Development Program of China (Grant No. 2011YQ120022), CAS/SAFEA International Partnership Program for Creative Research Teams, China, and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61275164).

  18. Dynamic polarization of the LiH molecule in strong light field in anomalous-dispersion domain

    CERN Document Server

    Shtoff, A V; Gusarov, S I; Dmitriev, Yu

    1995-01-01

    A new method is proposed to calculate the polarization vector of a molecule in a monochromatic external field in the anomalous-despersion domain. The method takes into account the instantaneous switching of the field. A simple modification of the method allows one to consider a more general switching procedure. As an illustration of the method Fourier components of the polarization vector of the LiH molecule in the anomalous -dispersion domain is calculated.

  19. Anomalous anisotropic magnetoresistance effects in graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiwei Liu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the effect of external stimulus (temperature, magnetic field, and gases adsorptions on anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR in multilayer graphene. The graphene sample shows superlinear magnetoresistance when magnetic field is perpendicular to the plane of graphene. A non-saturated AMR with a value of −33% is found at 10 K under a magnetic field of 7 T. It is surprisingly to observe that a two-fold symmetric AMR at high temperature is changed into a one-fold one at low temperature for a sample with an irregular shape. The anomalous AMR behaviors may be understood by considering the anisotropic scattering of carriers from two asymmetric edges and the boundaries of V+(V- electrodes which serve as active adsorption sites for gas molecules at low temperature. Our results indicate that AMR in graphene can be optimized by tuning the adsorptions, sample shape and electrode distribution in the future application.

  20. Anomalous Power Law Dispersions in ac Conductivity and Permittivity Shown to be Characteristics of Microstructural Electrical Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almond, D. P.; Bowen, C. R.

    2004-04-01

    The frequency dependent ac conductivity and permittivity of porous lead zirconate titanate ceramic with the pore volume filled with water are shown to match the simulated electrical response of a large network of randomly positioned resistors and capacitors. Anomalous power law dispersions in conductivity and permittivity are shown to be an electrical response characteristic of the microstructural network formed by the porous lead zirconate titanate pore structure. The anomalous power law dispersions of a wide range of materials are also suggested to be microstructural network characteristics.

  1. High-energy femtosecond Yb-doped fiber laser operating in the anomalous dispersion regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortaç, Bülend; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2007-08-01

    We report on high-energy ultrashort pulse generation from a passively mode-locked ytterbium-doped large-mode-area photonic crystal fiber oscillator operating in the anomalous dispersion regime. In the single-pulse regime, the laser directly generates 880 mW of average power of sub-500 fs pulses at a repetition rate of 53.33 MHz, corresponding to a pulse energy of 16.5 nJ. Stable and self-starting operation is obtained by adapting the spot size at the saturable absorber mirror to the pulse evolution in the low-nonlinearity fiber. The approach presented demonstrates the scaling potential of fiber based short pulse oscillators towards the microJ-level.

  2. Analysis of excited-state Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter at 1529 nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Junyu; Yin, Longfei; Luo, Bin; Guo, Hong

    2016-06-27

    In this work, a detailed theoretical analysis of 1529 nm ES-FADOF (excited state Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter) based on rubidium atoms pumped by 780 nm laser is introduced, where Zeeman splitting, Doppler broadening, and relaxation processes are considered. Experimental results are carefully compared with the derivation. The results prove that the optimal pumping frequency is affected by the working magnetic field. The population distribution among all hyperfine Zeeman sublevels under the optimal pumping frequency has also been obtained, which shows that 85Rb atoms are the main contribution to the population. The peak transmittance above 90% is obtained, which is in accordance with the experiment. The calculation also shows that the asymmetric spectra observed in the experiment are caused by the unbalanced population distribution among Zeeman sublevels. This theoretical model can be used for all kinds of calculations for FADOF.

  3. Searching for plasmas with anomalous dispersion in the soft X-ray regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsen, J; Johnson, W R; Cheng, K T

    2007-08-24

    Over the last decade the electron density of plasmas has been measured using X-ray laser interferometers in the 14 to 47 nm wavelength regime. With the same formula used in decades of experiments with optical interferometers, the data analysis assumes the index of refraction is due only to the free electrons, which makes the index less than one. Over the last several years, interferometer experiments in C, Al, Ag, and Sn plasmas have observed plasmas with index of refraction greater than one at 14 or 47 nm and demonstrated unequivocally that the usual formula for calculating the index of refraction is not always valid as the contribution from bound electrons can dominate the free electrons in certain cases. In this paper we search for other materials with strong anomalous dispersion that could be used in X-ray laser interferometer experiments to help understand this phenomena. An average atom code is used to calculate the plasma properties. This paper discusses the calculations of anomalous dispersion in Ne and Na plasmas near 47 nm and Xe plasmas near 14 nm. With the advent of the FLASH X-ray free electron laser in Germany and the LCLS X-FEL coming online at Stanford in 2 years the average atom code will be an invaluable tool to explore plasmas at higher X-ray energy to identify potential experiments for the future. During the next decade X-ray free electron lasers and other X-ray sources will be used to probe a wider variety of plasmas at higher densities and shorter wavelengths so understanding the index of refraction in plasmas will be even more essential.

  4. Anomalous dispersion in Lithium Niobate one-dimensional waveguide array in the near-infrared wavelength range

    CERN Document Server

    Apetrei, Alin Marian; Minot, Christophe; Moison, Jean-Marie; Belabas, Nadia; Tascu, Sorin

    2016-01-01

    Knowing the dispersion regime (normal vs anomalous) is important for both an isolated waveguide and a waveguide array. We investigate by the Finite Element Method the dispersion properties of a LiNbO3 waveguides array using two techniques. The first one assumes the Coupled Mode Theory in a 2-waveguide system. The other one uses the actual diffraction curve determined in a 7-waveguide system. In both approaches we find that by decreasing the array period, one passes from normal dispersion by achromatic point to anomalous array dispersion. We then illustrate the wavelength separation by doing Runge-Kutta light propagation simulations in waveguide array. As all the parameters values are technologically feasible, this opens new possibilities for optical data processing.

  5. Antipodean white sharks on a Mediterranean walkabout? Historical dispersal leads to genetic discontinuity and an endangered anomalous population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubili, Chrysoula; Bilgin, Rasit; Kalkan, Evrim; Karhan, S Ünsal; Jones, Catherine S; Sims, David W; Kabasakal, Hakan; Martin, Andrew P; Noble, Leslie R

    2011-06-07

    The provenance of white sharks (Carcharodon carcharias) in the Mediterranean is both a conundrum and an important conservation issue. Considering this species's propensity for natal philopatry, any evidence that the Mediterranean stock has little or no contemporary immigration from the Atlantic would suggest that it is extraordinarily vulnerable. To address this issue we sequenced the mitochondrial control region of four rare Mediterranean white sharks. Unexpectedly, the juvenile sequences were identical although collected at different locations and times, showing little genetic differentiation from Indo-Pacific lineages, but strong separation from geographically closer Atlantic/western Indian Ocean haplotypes. Historical long-distance dispersal (probably a consequence of navigational error during past climatic oscillations) and potential founder effects are invoked to explain the anomalous relationships of this isolated 'sink' population, highlighting the present vulnerability of its nursery grounds.

  6. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in real materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiayong; Zhao, Bao; Zhou, Tong; Yang, Zhongqin

    2016-11-01

    Under a strong magnetic field, the quantum Hall (QH) effect can be observed in two-dimensional electronic gas systems. If the quantized Hall conductivity is acquired in a system without the need of an external magnetic field, then it will give rise to a new quantum state, the quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) state. The QAH state is a novel quantum state that is insulating in the bulk but exhibits unique conducting edge states topologically protected from backscattering and holds great potential for applications in low-power-consumption electronics. The realization of the QAH effect in real materials is of great significance. In this paper, we systematically review the theoretical proposals that have been brought forward to realize the QAH effect in various real material systems or structures, including magnetically doped topological insulators, graphene-based systems, silicene-based systems, two-dimensional organometallic frameworks, quantum wells, and functionalized Sb(111) monolayers, etc. Our paper can help our readers to quickly grasp the recent developments in this field. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB921803), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11574051), the Natural Science Foundation of Shanghai, China (Grant No. 14ZR1403400), and Fudan High-end Computing Center, China.

  7. In-plane magnetization-induced quantum anomalous Hall effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Hsu, Hsiu-Chuan; Liu, Chao-Xing

    2013-08-23

    The quantum Hall effect can only be induced by an out-of-plane magnetic field for two-dimensional electron gases, and similarly, the quantum anomalous Hall effect has also usually been considered for systems with only out-of-plane magnetization. In the present work, we predict that the quantum anomalous Hall effect can be induced by in-plane magnetization that is not accompanied by any out-of-plane magnetic field. Two realistic two-dimensional systems, Bi2Te3 thin film with magnetic doping and HgMnTe quantum wells with shear strains, are presented and the general condition for the in-plane magnetization-induced quantum anomalous Hall effect is discussed based on the symmetry analysis. Nonetheless, an experimental setup is proposed to confirm this effect, the observation of which will pave the way to search for the quantum anomalous Hall effect in a wider range of materials.

  8. Polarization-maintaining higher-order mode fiber module with anomalous dispersion at 1 μm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Stine Højer Møller; Pedersen, Martin Erland Vestergaard; Grüner-Nielsen, L.

    2012-01-01

    This Letter demonstrates a polarization-maintaining higher-order mode fiber module that has anomalous dispersion at 1 μm. The group velocity dispersion of the module is measured, showing a split of the two polarization axes. The excellent polarization-maintaining properties of the relevant fiber...... modes for the higher-order mode fiber are likewise demonstrated employing a new simple method for the measurement of the beat length of higher-order modes at a single wavelength. The higher-order fiber module is intended for group velocity dispersion compensation....

  9. Polarization-maintaining higher-order mode fiber module with anomalous dispersion at 1 μm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, S H M; Pedersen, M E V; Grüner-Nielsen, L; Yan, M F; Monberg, E M; Wisk, P W; Rottwitt, K

    2012-10-15

    This Letter demonstrates a polarization-maintaining higher-order mode fiber module that has anomalous dispersion at 1 μm. The group velocity dispersion of the module is measured, showing a split of the two polarization axes. The excellent polarization-maintaining properties of the relevant fiber modes for the higher-order mode fiber are likewise demonstrated employing a new simple method for the measurement of the beat length of higher-order modes at a single wavelength. The higher-order fiber module is intended for group velocity dispersion compensation.

  10. Understanding the anomalous dispersion of doubly-ionized carbon plasmas near 47 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsen, J; Castor, J I; Iglesias, C A; Cheng, K T; Dunn, J; Johnson, W R; Filevich, J; Purvis, M A; Grava, J; Rocca, J J

    2008-04-15

    Over the last several years we have predicted and observed plasmas with an index of refraction greater than one in the soft X-ray regime. These plasmas are usually a few times ionized and have ranged from low-Z carbon plasmas to mid-Z tin plasmas. Our main calculational tool has been the average atom code. We have recently observed C{sup 2+} plasmas with an index of refraction greater than one at a wavelength of 46.9 nm (26.44 eV). In this paper we compare the average atom method, AVATOMKG, against two more detailed methods, OPAL and CAK, for calculating the index of refraction for the carbon plasmas and discuss the different approximations used. We present experimental measurements of carbon plasmas that display this anomalous dispersion phenomenon. It is shown that the average atom calculation is a good approximation when the strongest lines dominate the dispersion. However, when weaker lines make a significant contribution, the more detailed calculations such as OPAL and CAK are essential. During the next decade X-ray free electron lasers and other X-ray sources will be available to probe a wider variety of plasmas at higher densities and shorter wavelengths so understanding the index of refraction in plasmas will be even more essential. With the advent of tunable X-ray lasers the frequency dependent interferometer measurements of the index of refraction may enable us to determine the absorption coefficients and line-shapes and make detailed comparisons against our atomic physics codes.

  11. Spurious dispersion effects at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prat, Eduard

    2009-07-15

    The performance of the Free-Electron Laser (FEL) process imposes stringent demands on the transverse trajectory and size of the electron beam. Since transverse dispersion changes off-energy particle trajectories and increases the effective beam size, dispersion must be controlled. This thesis treats the concept of dispersion in linacs, and analyses the impact of dispersion on the electron beam and on the FEL process. It presents generation mechanisms for spurious dispersion, quantifying its importance for FLASH (Free-electron Laser in Hamburg) and the XFEL (European X-ray Free-Electron Laser). A method for measuring and correcting dispersion and its implementation in FLASH is described. Experiments of dispersion e ects on the transverse beam quality and on the FEL performance are presented. (orig.)

  12. Ultra-narrow bandwidth optical filters consisting of one-dimensional photonic crystals with anomalous dispersion materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Jiang-Tao; Zhou Yun-Song; Wang Fu-He; Gu Ben-Yuan

    2005-01-01

    We present a new type of optical filter with an ultra-narrow bandwidth and a wide field-of-view (FOV). This kind of optical filter consists of one-dimensional photonic crystal (PC) incorporating an anomalous-dispersion-material (ADM) with, for instance, an anomalous dispersion of 6P3/2 ← 6S1/2 hyperfine structure transition of a caesium atom.The transmission spectra of optical filters are calculated by using the transfer-matrix method. The simulation results show that the designed optical filter has a bandwidth narrower than 0.33GHz and a wide FOV of ±30° as well. The response of transmission spectrum to an external magnetic field is also investigated.

  13. Anomalous Effects from Dipole-Environment Quantum Entanglement

    CERN Document Server

    Porcelli, Elio B

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we analyze anomalous effects observed in the operation of two different technological devices: a magnetic core and a parallel plate (symmetrical or asymmetrical) capacitor. From experimental measurements on both devices, we detected small raised anomalous forces that cannot be explained by known interactions in the traditional theories. As the variations of device inertia have not been completely understood by means of current theories, we here propose a theoretical framework in which the anomalous effects can consistently be explained by a preexisting state of quantum entanglement between the external environment and either magnetic dipoles of magnetic cores or electric dipoles of capacitors, so that the effects would be manifested by the application of a strong magnetic field on the former or an intense electric field on the latter. The values of the macroscopic observables calculated in such a theoretical framework revealed good agreement with the experimental measurements performed in both c...

  14. Anomalous dispersion and band gap reduction in UO2+x and its possible coupling to the coherent polaronic quantum state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conradson, Steven D.; Andersson, David A.; Bagus, Paul S.; Boland, Kevin S.; Bradley, Joseph A.; Byler, Darrin D.; Clark, David L.; Conradson, Dylan R.; Espinosa-Faller, Francisco J.; Lezama Pacheco, Juan S.; Martucci, Mary B.; Nordlund, Dennis; Seidler, Gerald T.; Valdez, James A.

    2016-05-01

    Hypervalent UO2, UO2(+x) formed by both addition of excess O and photoexcitation, exhibits a number of unusual or often unique properties that point to it hosting a polaronic Bose-Einstein(-Mott) condensate. A more thorough analysis of the O X-ray absorption spectra of UO2, U4O9, and U3O7 shows that the anomalous increase in the width of the spectral features assigned to predominantly U 5f and 6d final states that points to increased dispersion of these bands occurs on the low energy side corresponding to the upper edge of the gap bordered by the conduction or upper Hubbard band. The closing of the gap by 1.5 eV is more than twice as much as predicted by calculations, consistent with the dynamical polaron found by structural measurements. In addition to fostering the excitation that is the proposed mechanism for the coherence, the likely mirroring of this effect on the occupied, valence side of the gap below the Fermi level points to increased complexity of the electronic structure that could be associated with the Fermi topology of BEC-BCS crossover and two band superconductivity.

  15. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in magnetic insulator heterostructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gang; Wang, Jing; Felser, Claudia; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Zhang, Shou-Cheng

    2015-03-11

    On the basis of ab initio calculations, we predict that a monolayer of Cr-doped (Bi,Sb)2Te3 and GdI2 heterostructure is a quantum anomalous Hall insulator with a nontrivial band gap up to 38 meV. The principle behind our prediction is that the band inversion between two topologically trivial ferromagnetic insulators can result in a nonzero Chern number, which offers a better way to realize the quantum anomalous Hall state without random magnetic doping. In addition, a simple effective model is presented to describe the basic mechanism of spin polarized band inversion in this system. Moreover, we predict that 3D quantum anomalous Hall insulator could be realized in (Bi2/3Cr1/3)2Te3 /GdI2 superlattice.

  16. Anomalous Hall Effect in a 2D Rashba Ferromagnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ado, I A; Dmitriev, I A; Ostrovsky, P M; Titov, M

    2016-07-22

    Skew scattering on rare impurity configurations is shown to dominate the anomalous Hall effect in a 2D Rashba ferromagnet. The mechanism originates in scattering on rare impurity pairs separated by distances of the order of the Fermi wavelength. The corresponding theoretical description goes beyond the conventional noncrossing approximation. The mechanism provides the only contribution to the anomalous Hall conductivity in the most relevant metallic regime and strongly modifies previously obtained results for lower energies in the leading order with respect to impurity strength.

  17. Generation of dual-wavelength square pulse in a figure-eight erbium-doped fiber laser with ultra-large net-anomalous dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Zhihua; Qiao, Xueguang; Rong, Qiangzhou; Su, Dan

    2015-08-01

    A type of wave-breaking-free mode-locked dual-wavelength square pulse was experimentally observed in a figure-eight erbium-doped fiber laser with ultra-large net-anomalous dispersion. A 2.7 km long single-mode fiber (SMF) was incorporated as a nonlinear optical loop mirror (NOLM) and provided largely nonlinear phase accumulation and anomalous dispersion, which enhanced the four-wave-mixing effect to improve the stability of the dual-wavelength operation. In the NOLM, the long SMF with small birefringence supported the Sagnac interference as a filter to manage the dual-wavelength lasing. The dual-wavelength operation was made switchable by adjusting the intra-cavity polarization loss and phase delay corresponding to two square pulses. When the pump power was increased, the duration of the square pulse increased continuously while the peak pulse power gradually decreased. This square-type pulse can potentially be utilized for signal transmission and sensing.

  18. High-energy pulse compressor using self-defocusing spectral broadening in anomalously dispersive media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    A method and a pulse compressor (1) for compressing an optical pulse, wherein the pulse compressor comprising a bulk quadratic nonlinear medium (2) adapted for generating a negative nonlinear phase variation on the optical pulse and having a negative group-velocity dispersion, and a dispersive un...... subsequently be compressed by providing normal dispersion. As KDP crystals can be glued together, large apertures of the pulse compressor are possible making this method suitable for pulse compression in Joule-class lasers....

  19. Z' effects and anomalous gauge couplings at LC with polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Pankov, A A; Verzegnassi, Claudio

    1998-01-01

    We show that the availability of longitudinally polarized electron beams at a $500 GeV$ Linear Collider would allow, from an analysis of the reaction $e^+e^-\\to W^+W^-$, to set stringent bounds on the couplings of a Z' of the most general type. In addition, to some extent it would be possible to disentangle observable effects of the Z' from analogous ones due to competitor models with anomalous trilinear gauge couplings.

  20. Anomalous effective lagrangians and vector resonance models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pallante, E.; Petronzio, R.

    1993-01-01

    Chiral lagrangians including vector resonances have been shown to saturate the finite part of some of the counterterms needed to regularize ordinary one-loop effective lagrangians of pseudoscalar interactions with external currents. The equivalence between different models has been discussed in the

  1. Quantifying Chiral Magnetic Effect from Anomalous-Viscous Fluid Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Yin; Yin, Yi; Liao, Jinfeng

    2016-01-01

    Chiral Magnetic Effect (CME) is the macroscopic manifestation of the fundamental chiral anomaly in a many-body system of chiral fermions, and emerges as anomalous transport current in the fluid dynamics framework. Experimental observation of CME is of great interest and has been reported in Dirac and Weyl semimetals. Significant efforts have also been made to search for CME in heavy ion collisions. Encouraging evidence of CME-induced charge separation in those collisions has been reported, albeit with ambiguity due to background contamination. Crucial for addressing such issue, is the need of quantitative predictions for CME signal with sophisticated modelings. In this paper we develop such a tool, the Anomalous Viscous Fluid Dynamics (AVFD) framework, which simulates the evolution of fermion currents in QGP on top of the data-validated VISHNU bulk hydrodynamic flow. With realistic initial conditions and magnetic field lifetime, the AVFD-predicted CME signal could be quantitatively consistent with measured ch...

  2. Anomalous Hall Effect in Geometrically Frustrated Magnets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Boldrin

    2012-01-01

    space mechanism based on spin chirality that was originally applied to the pyrochlore Nd2Mo2O7 appears unsatisfactory. Recently, an orbital description based on the Aharonov-Bohm effect has been proposed and applied to both the ferromagnetic pyrochlores Nd2Mo2O7 and Pr2Ir2O7; the first of which features long-ranged magnetic order while the latter is a chiral spin liquid. Two further examples of geometrically frustrated conducting magnets are presented in this paper—the kagome-like Fe3Sn2 and the triangular PdCrO2. These possess very different electronic structures to the 3-dimensional heavy-metal pyrochlores and provide new opportunities to explore the different origins of the AHE. This paper summarises the experimental findings in these materials in an attempt to unite the conflicting theoretical arguments.

  3. Anomalous screening in two-dimensional materials with an extremum ring in the dispersion law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolomeisky, Eugene B.; Straley, Joseph P.

    2016-12-01

    A variety of two-dimensional materials possess a band structure with an energy extremal ridge along a ring in momentum space. Examples are biased bilayer graphene and surfaces and interfaces with a Rashba spin-orbit interaction where at low doping the carriers fill an annulus. This topological feature causes an anomalous screening behavior, which we study using the Thomas-Fermi theory. Specifically, reducing the doping is predicted to enhance the linear screening response, whereas at zero doping the size of the screening cloud surrounding a Coulomb impurity is found to increase as the cube root of the impurity charge.

  4. Effects of surface and interface scattering on anomalous Hall effect in Co/Pd multilayers

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Z. B.

    2012-09-27

    In this paper, we report the results of surface and interface scattering on anomalous Hall effect in Co/Pd multilayers with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. The surface scattering effect has been extracted from the total anomalous Hall effect. By scaling surface scattering contribution with ρAHs∼ργss, the exponent γ has been found to decrease with the increase of surface scattering resistivity, which could account for the thickness-dependent anomalous Hall effect. Interface diffusion induced by rapid thermal annealing modifies not only the magnetization and longitudinal resistivity but also the anomalous Hall effect; a large exponent γ ∼ 5.7 has been attributed to interface scattering-dominated anomalous Hall effect.

  5. Quantized Anomalous Hall Effect in Magnetic Topological Insulators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Rui

    2011-01-01

    The Hall effect, the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) and the spin Hall effect are thndamental transport processes in solids arising from the Lorentz force and the spin-orbit coupling respectively. The AHE, in which a voltage transverse to the electric current appears even in the absence of an external magnetic field, was first detected in ferromagnetic (FM) metals in 1881 and later found to arise from the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) between the current and magnetic moments.

  6. Anomalous Propagation of Electromagnetic Waves in Anisotropic Media with a Unique Dispersion Relation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHU Wei-Xing; LUO Hai-Lu; LI Fei; REN Zhong-Zhou

    2006-01-01

    @@ We investigate the propagation of electromagnetic waves at the interface between an isotropic material and the anisotropic medium with a unique dispersion relation. We show that the refraction behaviour of E-polarized waves is opposite to that of H-polarized waves, though the dispersion relations for E- and H-polarized waves are the same. It is found that waves exhibit different propagation properties in anisotropic media with different sign combinations of the permittivity and permeability tensors. Some interesting properties of propagation are also found in the special anisotropic media, leading to potential applications.

  7. Muon anomalous magnetic moment due to the brane stretching effect

    CERN Document Server

    Sawa, K

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the contribution of extra dimensions to muon anomalous magnetic moment using a 6-dimensional model. The approach analyzes the extent to which small brane fluctuations influence the magnetic moment. In particular, we assume that the fluctuations are static in time, which add the new potential terms to the schr{\\"o}dinger equation through the induced vierbein. This paper shows that the fluctuations result in the brane stretching effect due to the negative tension. The effect would be a capable of reproducing the appropriate order for the recent BNL measurements of the muon (g-2) deviation.

  8. Quantized Anomalous Hall Effect in Magnetic Topological Insulators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Rui

    2011-01-01

    @@ The Hall effect, the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) and the spin Hall effect are fundamental transport processes in solids arising from the Lorentz force and the spin-orbit coupling respectively.The AHE, in which a voltage transverse to the electric current appears even in the absence of an external magnetic field, was first detected in ferromagnetic (FM) metals in 1881 and later found to arise from the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) between the current and magnetic moments.Recent progress on the mechanism of AHE has established a link between the AHE and the topological nature of the Hall current by adopting the Berry-phase concepts in close analogy to the intrinsic spin Hall effect.Given the experimental discovery of the quantum Hall and the quantum spin Hall effects, it is natural to ask whether the AHE can also be quantized.In a quantized anomalous Hall (QAH) insulator, spontaneous magnetic moments and spin-orbit coupling combine to give rise to a topologically non-trivial electronic structure, leading to the quantized Hall effect without any external magnetic field.

  9. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in topological insulator memory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalil, Mansoor B. A., E-mail: elembaj@nus.edu.sg [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, 4 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Data Storage Institute, Agency for Science, Technology and Research A*STAR, DSI Building, 5 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore, Singapore 117608 (Singapore); Tan, S. G. [Data Storage Institute, Agency for Science, Technology and Research A*STAR, DSI Building, 5 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore, Singapore 117608 (Singapore); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, 4 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Siu, Z. B. [Data Storage Institute, Agency for Science, Technology and Research A*STAR, DSI Building, 5 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore, Singapore 117608 (Singapore); NUS Graduate School for Integrative Sciences and Engineering, National University of Singapore (Singapore)

    2015-05-07

    We theoretically investigate the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) in a magnetically coupled three-dimensional-topological insulator (3D-TI) system. We apply the generalized spin-orbit coupling Hamiltonian to obtain the Hall conductivity σ{sup xy} of the system. The underlying topology of the QAHE phenomenon is then analyzed to show the quantization of σ{sup xy} and its relation to the Berry phase of the system. Finally, we analyze the feasibility of utilizing σ{sup xy} as a memory read-out in a 3D-TI based memory at finite temperatures, with comparison to known magnetically doped 3D-TIs.

  10. Large anomalous Hall effect in a half-Heusler antiferromagnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, T.; Chisnell, R.; Devarakonda, A.; Liu, Y.-T.; Feng, W.; Xiao, D.; Lynn, J. W.; Checkelsky, J. G.

    2016-12-01

    The quantum mechanical (Berry) phase of the electronic wavefunction plays a critical role in the anomalous and spin Hall effects, including their quantized limits. While progress has been made in understanding these effects in ferromagnets, less is known in antiferromagnetic systems. Here we present a study of antiferromagnet GdPtBi, whose electronic structure is similar to that of the topologically non-trivial HgTe (refs ,,), and where the Gd ions offer the possibility to tune the Berry phase via control of the spin texture. We show that this system supports an anomalous Hall angle ΘAH > 0.1, comparable to the largest observed in bulk ferromagnets and significantly larger than in other antiferromagnets. Neutron scattering measurements and electronic structure calculations suggest that this effect originates from avoided crossing or Weyl points that develop near the Fermi level due to a breaking of combined time-reversal and lattice symmetries. Berry phase effects associated with such symmetry breaking have recently been explored in kagome networks; our results extend this to half-Heusler systems with non-trivial band topology. The magnetic textures indicated here may also provide pathways towards realizing the topological insulating and semimetallic states predicted in this material class.

  11. A Classical Theory of the Anomalous Zeeman Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, James; Woodyard, James

    2010-10-01

    Over a hundred years ago, it was discovered that spectral lines were shifted by magnetic fields. Lorentz was able to explain a small set of phenomena that was ironically called the normal Zeeman effect. It took more than twenty years for Lande to arrive at a vector model of the atom to explain the majority of shiftings called the anomalous Zeeman effect. Within a couple of years, Uhlenbeck and Goudsmit introduced the idea of a spinning electron that would give an underlying explanation of the vector model rules. It is generally taught that without the concept of spin there can be no explanation of all the spectral splittings caused by a magnetic field. We will present a purely classical model developed by Woldemar Voigt to describe the most famous anomalous splitting, the sodium D line. In addition, his theory correctly describes the transition from the weak field state to the strong one, called the Paschen-Back effect. We will show how his theory matches well with our classical picture of the atom.

  12. Anomalous Hall effect in Fe/Au multilayers

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Q.

    2016-07-22

    To understand the interfacial scattering effect on the anomalous Hall effect (AHE), we prepared multilayers of (Fe(36/n)nm/Au(12/n)nm)n using an e-beam evaporator. This structure design allowed us to investigate the effect of interfacial scattering on the AHE, while keeping the samples\\' thickness and composition unchanged. We measured the (magneto)transport properties of the samples in a wide temperature range (10–310 K) with magnetic fields up to 50 kOe. We found that the scaling between the anomalous Hall resistivity (ρAHE) and longitudinal resistivity (ρxx) can be roughly described by ρAHE∼ργxx with γ=2.65±0.10 and 1.90 ± 0.04 for samples from n=1 to n=4 and samples from n=4 to n=12, respectively. Our quantitative analysis results showed that the interfacial scattering suppresses the contribution of the intrinsic mechanism and gives rise to a side-jump contribution.

  13. Non-collinear antiferromagnets and the anomalous Hall effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kübler, J.; Felser, C.

    2014-12-01

    The anomalous Hall effect is investigated theoretically by employing density functional calculations for the non-collinear antiferromagnetic order of the hexagonal compounds Mn3Ge and Mn3Sn using various planar triangular magnetic configurations as well as unexpected non-planar configurations. The former give rise to anomalous Hall conductivities (AHC) that are found to be extremely anisotropic. For the planar cases the AHC is connected with Weyl points in the energy-band structure. If this case were observable in Mn3Ge, a large AHC of about σzx≈ 900 (Ω \\text{cm})-1 should be expected. However, in Mn3Ge it is the non-planar configuration that is energetically favored, in which case it gives rise to an AHC of σxy≈ 100 (Ω \\text{cm})-1 . The non-planar configuration allows a quantitative evaluation of the topological Hall effect that is seen to determine this value of σxy to a large extent. For Mn3Sn it is the planar configurations that are predicted to be observable. In this case the AHC can be as large as σyz≈250 (Ω \\text{cm})-1 .

  14. Anomalous photoelectric effect of a polycrystalline topological insulator film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongbin; Yao, Jiandong; Shao, Jianmei; Li, Hai; Li, Shuwei; Bao, Dinghua; Wang, Chengxin; Yang, Guowei

    2014-07-29

    A topological insulator represents a new state of quantum matter that possesses an insulating bulk band gap as well as a spin-momentum-locked Dirac cone on the surface that is protected by time-reversal symmetry. Photon-dressed surface states and light-induced surface photocurrents have been observed in topological insulators. Here, we report experimental observations of an anomalous photoelectric effect in thin films of Bi2Te3, a polycrystalline topological insulator. Under illumination with non-polarised light, transport measurements reveal that the resistance of the topological surface states suddenly increases when the polycrystalline film is illuminated. The resistance variation is positively dependent on the light intensity but has no relation to the applied electric field; this finding can be attributed to the gap opening of the surface Dirac cone. This observation of an anomalous photoelectric effect in polycrystalline topological insulators offers exciting opportunities for the creation of photodetectors with an unusually broad spectral range. Moreover, polycrystalline topological insulator films provide an attractive material platform for exploring the nature and practical application of topological insulators.

  15. Anomalous photovoltaic effect in organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yongbo; Li, Tao; Wang, Qi; Xing, Jie; Gruverman, Alexei; Huang, Jinsong

    2017-01-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites (OIHPs) have been demonstrated to be highly successful photovoltaic materials yielding very-high-efficiency solar cells. We report the room temperature observation of an anomalous photovoltaic (APV) effect in lateral structure OIHP devices manifested by the device’s open-circuit voltage (VOC) that is much larger than the bandgap of OIHPs. The persistent VOC is proportional to the electrode spacing, resembling that of ferroelectric photovoltaic devices. However, the APV effect in OIHP devices is not caused by ferroelectricity. The APV effect can be explained by the formation of tunneling junctions randomly dispersed in the polycrystalline films, which allows the accumulation of photovoltage at a macroscopic level. The formation of internal tunneling junctions as a result of ion migration is visualized with Kelvin probe force microscopy scanning. This observation points out a new avenue for the formation of large and continuously tunable VOC without being limited by the materials’ bandgap. PMID:28345043

  16. Precise quantization of anomalous Hall effect near zero magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bestwick, A. J. [Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Fox, E. J. [Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Kou, Xufeng [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Pan, Lei [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Wang, Kang L. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Goldhaber-Gordon, D. [Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-05-04

    In this study, we report a nearly ideal quantum anomalous Hall effect in a three-dimensional topological insulator thin film with ferromagnetic doping. Near zero applied magnetic field we measure exact quantization in the Hall resistance to within a part per 10,000 and a longitudinal resistivity under 1 Ω per square, with chiral edge transport explicitly confirmed by nonlocal measurements. Deviations from this behavior are found to be caused by thermally activated carriers, as indicated by an Arrhenius law temperature dependence. Using the deviations as a thermometer, we demonstrate an unexpected magnetocaloric effect and use it to reach near-perfect quantization by cooling the sample below the dilution refrigerator base temperature in a process approximating adiabatic demagnetization refrigeration.

  17. Influence of disorder on anomalous Hall effect for Heusler compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilanova Vidal, E.; Schneider, H.; Jakob, G.

    2011-05-01

    The anomalous Hall effect (AHE) is a long known but still not fully understood transport effect. Most theory papers focus on the influence of one particular contribution to the AHE. Actual measured experimental data, however, often are not in accord with idealized assumptions. In this work we discuss the data analysis for materials with low residual resistivity ratios. As prototypical materials we study half metallic Heusler compounds. Here the influence of defects and disorder is apparent in a material with a complex topology of the Fermi surface. Using films of different degree of disorder, we show how different scattering mechanisms can be separated. For Co2FeSi0.6Al0.4 and Co2FeGa0.5Ge0.5 the AHE induced by B2-type disorder and temperature-dependent scattering is positive, while DO3-type disorder and possible intrinsic contributions possess a negative sign.

  18. The quantum anomalous Hall effect in kagome lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Zhiyong, E-mail: zyzhang@nju.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2011-09-14

    The quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect in kagome lattices is investigated in the presence of both Rashba spin-orbit coupling and an exchange field. In addition to the gap at the Dirac points as found in graphene, a new topological energy gap is opened at the {Gamma} point. With the Fermi energy lying in the first gap, the Chern number c = 2 as in graphene, whereas with it lying in the second one, c = 1. The distribution of Berry curvature is obtained to reveal the nontrivial topological properties in momentum space. For stripes with 'armchair' and 'zigzag' edges, the topological characteristics of gapless edge states on the genus g = 2 Riemann surface are studied. The obtained nonzero winding numbers also demonstrate the QAH effect. (paper)

  19. Precise quantization of anomalous Hall effect near zero magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bestwick, Andrew; Fox, Eli; Kou, Xufeng; Pan, Lei; Wang, Kang; Goldhaber-Gordon, David

    2015-03-01

    The quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) has recently been of great interest due to its recent experimental realization in thin films of Cr-doped (Bi, Sb)2Te3, a ferromagnetic 3D topological insulator. The presence of ferromagnetic exchange breaks time-reversal symmetry, opening a gap in the surface states, but gives rise to dissipationless chiral conduction at the edge of a magnetized film. Ideally, this leads to vanishing longitudinal resistance and Hall resistance quantized to h /e2 , where h is Planck's constant and e is the electron charge, but perfect quantization has so far proved elusive. Here, we study the QAHE in the limit of zero applied magnetic field, and measure Hall resistance quantized to within one part per 10,000. Deviation from quantization is due primarily to thermally activated carriers, which can be nearly eliminated through adiabatic demagnetization cooling. This result demonstrates an important step toward dissipationless electron transport in technologically relevant conditions.

  20. Detecting topological phases in silicene by anomalous Nernst effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yafang; Zhou, Xingfei; Jin, Guojun

    2016-05-01

    Silicene undergoes various topological phases under the interplay of intrinsic spin-orbit coupling, perpendicular electric field, and off-resonant light. We propose that the abundant topological phases can be distinguished by measuring the Nernst conductivity even at room temperature, and their phase boundaries can be determined by differentiating the charge and spin Nernst conductivities. By modulating the electric and light fields, pure spin polarized, valley polarized, and even spin-valley polarized Nernst currents can be generated. As Nernst conductivity is zero for linear polarized light, silicene can act as an optically controlled spin and valley field-effect transistor. Similar investigations can be extended from silicene to germanene and stanene, and a comparison is made for the anomalous thermomagnetic figure of merits between them. These results will facilitate potential applications in spin and valley caloritronics.

  1. Thickness Dependence of the Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in Magnetic Topological Insulator Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiao; Feng, Yang; Wang, Jing; Ou, Yunbo; Hao, Zhenqi; Liu, Chang; Zhang, Zuocheng; Zhang, Liguo; Lin, Chaojing; Liao, Jian; Li, Yongqing; Wang, Li-Li; Ji, Shuai-Hua; Chen, Xi; Ma, Xucun; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; Wang, Yayu; He, Ke; Xue, Qi-Kun

    2016-08-01

    The evolution of the quantum anomalous Hall effect with the thickness of Cr-doped (Bi,Sb)2 Te3 magnetic topological insulator films is studied, revealing how the effect is caused by the interplay of the surface states, band-bending, and ferromagnetic exchange energy. Homogeneity in ferromagnetism is found to be the key to high-temperature quantum anomalous Hall material.

  2. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in stanene on a nonmagnetic substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huisheng; Zhou, Tong; Zhang, Jiayong; Zhao, Bao; Yao, Yugui; Yang, Zhongqin

    2016-12-01

    Since the quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect was realized in magnetic topological insulators, research on the effect has become a hot topic. The very harsh realizing requirements of the effect in experiments, however, hinder its practical applications. Based on ab initio methods, we find that nonmagnetic Pb I2 films are ideal substrates for the two-dimensional honeycomb stanene. The QAH effect with a pretty large band gap (up to 90 meV) can be achieved in the functionalized stanene /Pb I2 heterostructure. Despite van der Waals interactions in the heterostructure, band inversions are found to be happening between Sn (s and px ,y ) and Pb (px ,y) orbitals, playing a key role in determining the nontrivial topology and the large band gap of the system. Having no magnetic atoms is imperative to triggering the QAH effect. A very stable rudimentary device having QAH effects is proposed based on the Sn /Pb I2 heterostructure. Our results demonstrate that QAH effects can be easily realized in the Sn /Pb I2 heterostructures in experiments.

  3. Nonlinear Dispersion Effect on Wave Transformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ruijie; Dong-Young LEE

    2000-01-01

    A new nonlinear dispersion relation is given in this paper, which can overcome the limitation of the intermediate minimum value in the dispersion relation proposed by Kirby and Dalrymple (1986), and which has a better approximation to Hedges' empirical relation than the modilied relations by Hedges (1987). Kirby and Dahymple (1987) for shallow waters. The new dispersion relation is simple in form. thus it can be used easily in practice. Meanwhile. a general explicil approximalion to the new dispersion rela tion and olher nonlinear dispersion relations is given. By use of the explicit approximation to the new dispersion relation along with the mild slope equation taking inlo account weakly nonlinear effect, a mathematical model is obtained, and it is applied to laboratory data. The results show that the model developed vith the new dispersion relation predicts wave translornation over complicated topography quite well.

  4. Understanding the dramatic role of anomalous dispersion on the measurement of electron densities in plasmas using interferometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsen, J; Johnson, W R; Iglesias, C A; Scofield, J H

    2005-07-20

    For decades the electron density of plasmas has been measured using optical interferometers. With the availability of good X-ray laser sources in the last decade interferometers have been extended into the wavelength range 14-47 nm, which has enabled researchers to probe even higher density plasmas. The data analysis assumes the index of refraction is due only to the free electrons, which makes the index less than one. Recent interferometer experiments in Al plasmas observed plasmas with index of refraction greater than one at 14 nm and brought into question the validity of the usual formula for calculating the index. In this paper we show how the anomalous dispersion from bound electrons can dominate the free electron contribution to the index of refraction in many plasmas and make the index greater than one or enhance the contribution to the index such that one would greatly overestimate the density of the plasma using interferometers. Using a new average-atom code we calculate the index of refraction in many plasmas at different temperatures for photon energies from 0 to 100 eV and compare against calculations done with OPAL. We also present examples of other plasmas that may have index of refraction greater than one at X-ray laser energies. During the next decade X-ray free electron lasers and other X-ray sources will be available to probe a wider variety of plasmas at higher densities and shorter wavelengths so understanding the index of refraction in plasmas will be even more essential.

  5. Fe I oscillator strengths determined from anomalous dispersion of shock-heated gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, M. C. E.; Parkinson, W. H.

    1972-01-01

    Determination of Fe I oscillator strengths by the hook method on shock-heated gases. Within the given errors these values agree with oscillator strengths obtained by other methods, including wall-stabilized arc and shock-tube emission, the beam-foil technique, and delayed-coincidence measurements, except that the data reported in the present article tend to be somewhat higher. If it is assumed that no change occurs in atmospheric models, the authors' f-value scale would suggest a solar abundance at the lower limit of the recently published values - namely, log (A sub Fe/A sub H) + 12 = 7.4. This study demonstrates the effectiveness of the hook method for quantitative spectroscopy on shock-heated gases and points up its usefulness for gas diagnostics on optically thick lines.

  6. Robust quantum anomalous Hall effect in ferromagnetic transition metal halides

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Chengxi; Wu, Haiping; Deng, Kaiming; Jena, Puru; Kan, Erjun

    2016-01-01

    The quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect is a novel topological spintronic phenomenon arising from inherent magnetization and spin-orbit coupling. Various theoretical and experimental efforts have been devoted in search of robust intrinsic QAH insulators. However, up to now, it has only been observed in Cr or V doped (Bi,Sb)2Te3 film in experiments with very low working temperature. Based on the successful synthesis of transition metal halides, we use first-principles calculations to predict that RuI3 monolayer is an intrinsic ferromagnetic QAH insulator with a topologically nontrivial global band gap of 11 meV. This topologically nontrivial band gap at the Fermi level is due to its crystal symmetry, thus the QAH effect is robust. Its Curie temperature, estimated to be ~360 K using Monte-Carlo simulation, is above room temperature and higher than most of two-dimensional ferromagnetic thin films. We also discuss the manipulation of its exchange energy and nontrivial band gap by applying in-plane strain. Our wor...

  7. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in ferromagnetic transition metal halides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chengxi; Zhou, Jian; Wu, Haiping; Deng, Kaiming; Jena, Puru; Kan, Erjun

    2017-01-01

    The quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect is a novel topological spintronic phenomenon arising from inherent magnetization and spin-orbit coupling. Various theoretical and experimental efforts have been devoted in search of intrinsic QAH insulators. However, up to now, it has only been observed in Cr or V doped (Bi,Sb ) 2T e3 film in experiments with very low working temperature. Based on the successful synthesis of transition metal halides, we use first-principles calculations to predict that the Ru I3 monolayer is an intrinsic ferromagnetic QAH insulator with a topologically nontrivial global band gap of 11 meV. This topologically nontrivial band gap at the Fermi level is due to its crystal symmetry, thus the QAH effect is robust. Its Curie temperature, estimated to be ˜360 K using Monte Carlo simulation, is above room temperature and higher than most two-dimensional ferromagnetic thin films. The inclusion of Hubbard U in the Ru-d electrons does not affect this result. We also discuss the manipulation of its exchange energy and nontrivial band gap by applying in-plane strain. Our work adds an experimentally feasible member to the QAH insulator family, which is expected to have broad applications in nanoelectronics and spintronics.

  8. Concepts of ferrovalley material and anomalous valley Hall effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Wen-Yi; Gong, Shi-Jing; Wan, Xiangang; Duan, Chun-Gang

    2016-12-16

    Valleytronics rooted in the valley degree of freedom is of both theoretical and technological importance as it offers additional opportunities for information storage, as well as electronic, magnetic and optical switches. In analogy to ferroelectric materials with spontaneous charge polarization, or ferromagnetic materials with spontaneous spin polarization, here we introduce a new member of ferroic family, that is, a ferrovalley material with spontaneous valley polarization. Combining a two-band k·p model with first-principles calculations, we show that 2H-VSe2 monolayer, where the spin-orbit coupling coexists with the intrinsic exchange interaction of transition-metal d electrons, is such a room-temperature ferrovalley material. We further predict that such system could demonstrate many distinctive properties, for example, chirality-dependent optical band gap and, more interestingly, anomalous valley Hall effect. On account of the latter, functional devices based on ferrovalley materials, such as valley-based nonvolatile random access memory and valley filter, are contemplated for valleytronic applications.

  9. Concepts of ferrovalley material and anomalous valley Hall effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Wen-Yi; Gong, Shi-Jing; Wan, Xiangang; Duan, Chun-Gang

    2016-12-01

    Valleytronics rooted in the valley degree of freedom is of both theoretical and technological importance as it offers additional opportunities for information storage, as well as electronic, magnetic and optical switches. In analogy to ferroelectric materials with spontaneous charge polarization, or ferromagnetic materials with spontaneous spin polarization, here we introduce a new member of ferroic family, that is, a ferrovalley material with spontaneous valley polarization. Combining a two-band k.p model with first-principles calculations, we show that 2H-VSe2 monolayer, where the spin-orbit coupling coexists with the intrinsic exchange interaction of transition-metal d electrons, is such a room-temperature ferrovalley material. We further predict that such system could demonstrate many distinctive properties, for example, chirality-dependent optical band gap and, more interestingly, anomalous valley Hall effect. On account of the latter, functional devices based on ferrovalley materials, such as valley-based nonvolatile random access memory and valley filter, are contemplated for valleytronic applications.

  10. Employment Effects of Spatial Dispersal of Refugees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, Anna Piil; Rosholm, Michael

    We argue that spatial dispersal influences labour market assimilation of refugees through two mechanisms: first, the local job offer arrival rate and, second, place utility. Our partial search model with simultaneous job and residential location search predicts that the reservation wage for local...... by evaluating the employment effects of the Danish spatial dispersal policy carried out 1986-1998....

  11. Generation of high energy square-wave pulses in all anomalous dispersion Er:Yb passive mode locked fiber ring laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semaan, Georges; Ben Braham, Fatma; Salhi, Mohamed; Meng, Yichang; Bahloul, Faouzi; Sanchez, François

    2016-04-18

    We have experimentally demonstrated square pulses emission from a co-doped Er:Yb double-clad fiber laser operating in anomalous dispersion DSR regime using the nonlinear polarization evolution technique. Stable mode-locked pulses have a repetition rate of 373 kHz with 2.27 µJ energy per pulse under a pumping power of 30 W in cavity. With the increase of pump power, both the duration and the energy of the output square pulses broaden. The experimental results demonstrate that the passively mode-locked fiber laser operating in the anomalous regime can also realize a high-energy pulse, which is different from the conventional low-energy soliton pulse.

  12. Spatiotemporal instability in nonlinear dispersive media in the presence of space-time focusing effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    文双春; 范滇元

    2002-01-01

    Spatiotemporal instability in nonlinear dispersive media is investigated on the basis of the nonlinear envelope equation. A general expression for instability gain which includes the effects of space-time focusing, arbitrarily higher-order dispersions and self-steepening is obtained. It is found that, for both normal and anomalous group-velocity dispersions, space-time focusing may lead to the appearance of new instability regions and influence the original instability gain spectra mainly by shrinking their regions. The region of the original instability gain spectrum shrinks much more in normal dispersion case than in anomalous one. In the former case, space-time focusing completely suppresses the growing of higher frequency components. In addition, we find that all the oddth-order dispersions contribute none to instability, while all the eventh-order dispersions influence instability region and do not influence the maximum instability gain, therein the fourth-order dispersion plays the same role as space-time focusing in spatiotemporal instability. The main role played by self-steepening in spatiotemporal instability is that it reduces the instability gain and exerts much more significant influence on the new instability regions resulting from space-time focusing.

  13. Localization correction to the anomalous Hall effect in amorphous CoFeB thin films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁进军; 吴少兵; 杨晓非; 朱涛

    2015-01-01

    An obvious weak localization correction to anomalous Hall conductance (AHC) in very thin CoFeB film is reported. We find that both the weak localization to AHC and the mechanism of anomalous Hall effect are related to the CoFeB thickness. When the film is thicker than 3 nm, the side jump mechanism dominates and the weak localization to AHC vanishes. For very thin CoFeB films, both the side jump and skew scattering mechanisms contribute to the anomalous Hall effect, and the weak localization correction to AHC is observed.

  14. Seed dispersal effectiveness revisited: a conceptual review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schupp, Eugene W; Jordano, Pedro; Gómez, José María

    2010-10-01

    Growth in seed dispersal studies has been fast-paced since the seed disperser effectiveness (SDE) framework was developed 17 yr ago. Thus, the time is ripe to revisit the framework in light of accumulated new insight. Here, we first present an overview of the framework, how it has been applied, and what we know and do not know. We then introduce the SDE landscape as the two-dimensional representation of the possible combinations of the quantity and the quality of dispersal and with elevational contours representing isoclines of SDE. We discuss the structure of disperser assemblages on such landscapes. Following this we discuss recent advances and ideas in seed dispersal in the context of their impacts on SDE. Finally, we highlight a number of emerging issues that provide insight into SDE. Overall, the SDE framework successfully captures the complexities of seed dispersal. We advocate an expanded use of the term dispersal encompassing the multiple recruitment stages from fruit to adult. While this entails difficulties in estimating SDE, it is a necessary expansion if we are to understand the central relevance of seed dispersal in plant ecology and evolution.

  15. Magnetic Topological Insulators and Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Xufeng

    The engineering of topological surface states is a key to realize applicable devices based on topological insulators (TIs). Among various proposals, introducing magnetic impurities into TIs has been proven to be an effective way to open a surface gap and integrate additional ferromagnetism with the original topological order. In this Dissertation, we study both the intrinsic electrical and magnetic properties of the magnetic TI thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy. By doping transition element Cr into the host tetradymite-type V-VI semiconductors, we achieve robust ferromagnetic order with a strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. With additional top-gating capability, we realize the electric-field-controlled ferromagnetism in the magnetic TI systems, and demonstrate such magneto-electric effects can be effectively manipulated, depending on the interplays between the band topology, magnetic exchange coupling, and structural engineering. Most significantly, we report the observation of quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) in the Cr-doped (BiSb)2Te3 samples where dissipationless chiral edge conduction is realized in the macroscopic millimeter-size devices without the presence of any external magnetic field, and the stability of the quantized Hall conductance of e2/h is well-maintained as the film thickness varies across the 2D hybridization limit. With additional quantum confinement, we discover the metal-to-insulator switching between two opposite QAHE states, and reveal the universal QAHE phase diagram in the thin magnetic TI samples. In addition to the uniform magnetic TIs, we further investigate the TI/Cr-doped TI bilayer structures prepared by the modulation-doped growth method. By controlling the magnetic interaction profile, we observe the Dirac hole-mediated ferromagnetism and develop an effective way to manipulate its strength. Besides, the giant spin-orbit torque in such magnetic TI-based heterostructures enables us to demonstrate the current

  16. Influence of External Magnetic Field on Anomalous Skin Effects in Inductively Coupled Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAO Ming; WANG You-Nian

    2004-01-01

    @@ Using a one-dimensional slab model, we study the influence of the external static magnetic field on the anomalous skin effects in the inductively coupled plasma. The rf electromagnetic field in the plasma is determined by solving the linearized Boltzmann equation incorporating with the Maxwell equations. The numerical results show that,due to the existence of the external magnetic field, the anomalous skin effects are greatly enhanced and the number of regions with negative absorption is decreased.

  17. High-Multipolar Effects on Dispersive Forces

    CERN Document Server

    Noguez, C; Esquivel-Sirvent, R; Villarreal, C; Noguez, Cecilia; Roman-Velazquez, Carlos E.

    2003-01-01

    We show that the dispersive force between a spherical nanoparticle (with a radius $\\le$ 100 nm) and a substrate is enhanced by several orders of magnitude when the sphere is near to the substrate. We calculate exactly the dispersive force in the non-retarded limit by incorporating the contributions to the interaction from of all the multipolar electromagnetic modes. We show that as the sphere approaches the substrate, the fluctuations of the electromagnetic field, induced by the vacuum and the presence of the substrate, the dispersive force is enhanced by orders of magnitude. We discuss this effect as a function of the size of the sphere.

  18. Anomalous $tqZ$ coupling effects in rare B- and K-meson decays

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Xin-Qiang; Yuan, Xing-Bo

    2011-01-01

    As a top-factory, the LHC is performing a direct study of top-quark anomalous FCNC couplings, which are, however, correlated closely with the rare B- and K-meson decays. In this paper, we study the effects of anomalous $tqZ$ (with $q=u,c$) couplings in the rare decays $B_{s,d}\\to \\mu^+\\mu^-$, $B\\to X_s \

  19. Unconventional scaling of the anomalous Hall effect accompanying electron localization correction in the dirty regime

    KAUST Repository

    Lu, Y. M.

    2013-03-05

    Scaling of the anomalous Hall conductivity to longitudinal conductivity σAH∝σ2xx has been observed in the dirty regime of two-dimensional weak and strong localization regions in ultrathin, polycrystalline, chemically disordered, ferromagnetic FePt films. The relationship between electron transport and temperature reveals a quantitatively insignificant Coulomb interaction in these films, while the temperature dependent anomalous Hall conductivity experiences quantum correction from electron localization. At the onset of this correction, the low-temperature anomalous Hall resistivity begins to be saturated when the thickness of the FePt film is reduced, and the corresponding Hall conductivity scaling exponent becomes 2, which is above the recent unified theory of 1.6 (σAH∝σ1.6xx). Our results strongly suggest that the correction of the electron localization modulates the scaling exponent of the anomalous Hall effect.

  20. Narrow Bandwidth Faraday Anomalous Dispersion Optical Filter%窄带 Faraday 反常色散光学滤波器

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘阳; 王健; 王海华; 康智慧; 王磊; 罗梦希; 闫西章; 王潇潇; 高锦岳

    2014-01-01

    研究 Faraday 反常色散光学滤波器,给出其理论计算过程和模拟结果。结果表明, Faraday反常色散光学滤波器有线翼和线芯透过两种工作方式,其中线翼透过单峰谱线线宽约为600 MHz,透过率约为25%,线芯透过谱线线宽约为700 MHz,透过率约为100%。实验结果与理论结果相符。%To obtain the weak signal light from the high background light,a narrow bandwidth Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter (FADOF)was studied.The theoretical model for the filter was reported.The Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filters have two working modes:two side peak transmission and center peak transmission.The former work mode can get single peak transmission of 25% with a bandwidth of about 600 MHz.The other work mode can get a spectra with a transmission rate of almost 100% and a bandwith of about 700 MHz.The experimental measurements are consistent with theoretical results.

  1. Large anomalous Hall effect in a non-collinear antiferromagnet at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsuji, Satoru; Kiyohara, Naoki; Higo, Tomoya

    2015-11-12

    In ferromagnetic conductors, an electric current may induce a transverse voltage drop in zero applied magnetic field: this anomalous Hall effect is observed to be proportional to magnetization, and thus is not usually seen in antiferromagnets in zero field. Recent developments in theory and experiment have provided a framework for understanding the anomalous Hall effect using Berry-phase concepts, and this perspective has led to predictions that, under certain conditions, a large anomalous Hall effect may appear in spin liquids and antiferromagnets without net spin magnetization. Although such a spontaneous Hall effect has now been observed in a spin liquid state, a zero-field anomalous Hall effect has hitherto not been reported for antiferromagnets. Here we report empirical evidence for a large anomalous Hall effect in an antiferromagnet that has vanishingly small magnetization. In particular, we find that Mn3Sn, an antiferromagnet that has a non-collinear 120-degree spin order, exhibits a large anomalous Hall conductivity of around 20 per ohm per centimetre at room temperature and more than 100 per ohm per centimetre at low temperatures, reaching the same order of magnitude as in ferromagnetic metals. Notably, the chiral antiferromagnetic state has a very weak and soft ferromagnetic moment of about 0.002 Bohr magnetons per Mn atom (refs 10, 12), allowing us to switch the sign of the Hall effect with a small magnetic field of around a few hundred oersted. This soft response of the large anomalous Hall effect could be useful for various applications including spintronics--for example, to develop a memory device that produces almost no perturbing stray fields.

  2. Chiral Magnetic Effect and Anomalous Hall Effect in Antiferromagnetic Insulators with Spin-Orbit Coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, Akihiko; Nomura, Kentaro

    2016-03-04

    We search for dynamical magnetoelectric phenomena in three-dimensional correlated systems with spin-orbit coupling. We focus on the antiferromagnetic insulator phases where the dynamical axion field is realized by the fluctuation of the antiferromagnetic order parameter. It is shown that the dynamical chiral magnetic effect, an alternating current generation by magnetic fields, emerges due to such time dependences of the order parameter as antiferromagnetic resonance. It is also shown that the anomalous Hall effect arises due to such spatial variations of the order parameter as antiferromagnetic domain walls. Our study indicates that spin excitations in antiferromagnetic insulators with spin-orbit coupling can result in nontrivial charge responses. Moreover, observing the chiral magnetic effect and anomalous Hall effect in our system is equivalent to detecting the dynamical axion field in condensed matter.

  3. Separation of spin Seebeck effect and anomalous Nernst effect in Co/Cu/YIG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Dai [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); State Key Laboratory of Surface Physics and Department of Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Li, Yufan; Qu, D.; Chien, C. L., E-mail: clchien@jhu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Jin, Xiaofeng [State Key Laboratory of Surface Physics and Department of Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2015-05-25

    The spin Seebeck effect (SSE) and Anomalous Nernst effect (ANE) have been observed in Co/Cu/YIG (yttrium iron garnet) multi-layer structure, where the ferromagnetic insulator YIG acts as the pure spin injector and the ferromagnetic metal Co layer acts as the spin current detector. With the insertion of 5 nm Cu layer, the two ferromagnetic layers are decoupled, thus allowing unambiguous separation of the SSE and ANE contributions under the same experimental conditions in the same sample.

  4. Separation of spin Seebeck effect and anomalous Nernst effect in Co/Cu/YIG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Dai; Li, Yufan; Qu, D.; Jin, Xiaofeng; Chien, C. L.

    2015-05-01

    The spin Seebeck effect (SSE) and Anomalous Nernst effect (ANE) have been observed in Co/Cu/YIG (yttrium iron garnet) multi-layer structure, where the ferromagnetic insulator YIG acts as the pure spin injector and the ferromagnetic metal Co layer acts as the spin current detector. With the insertion of 5 nm Cu layer, the two ferromagnetic layers are decoupled, thus allowing unambiguous separation of the SSE and ANE contributions under the same experimental conditions in the same sample.

  5. The effect of interfacial intermixing on magnetization and anomalous Hall effect in Co/Pd multilayers

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Zaibing

    2015-05-01

    The effect of interfacial intermixing on magnetization and anomalous Hall effect (AHE) in Co/Pd multilayers is studied by using rapid thermal annealing to enhance the interfacial diffusion. The dependence of saturation magnetization and coercivity on the temperature of rapid thermal annealing at 5 K is discussed. It is found that AHE is closely related to the relative thickness of the Co and Pd layers. Localized paramagnetism has been observed which destroys AHE, while AHE can be enhanced by annealing.

  6. Anomalous Hall effect in Fe/Gd bilayers

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, W. J.

    2010-04-01

    Non-monotonic dependence of anomalous Hall resistivity on temperature and magnetization, including a sign change, was observed in Fe/Gd bilayers. To understand the intriguing observations, we fabricated the Fe/Gd bilayers and single layers of Fe and Gd simultaneously. The temperature and field dependences of longitudinal resistivity, Hall resistivity and magnetization in these films have also been carefully measured. The analysis of these data reveals that these intriguing features are due to the opposite signs of Hall resistivity/or spin polarization and different Curie temperatures of Fe and Gd single-layer films. Copyright (C) EPLA, 2010

  7. Anomalous and planar Righi-Leduc effects in Ni80Fe20 ferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madon, B.; Pham, Do Ch.; Wegrowe, J.-E.; Lacour, D.; Hehn, M.; Polewczyk, V.; Anane, A.; Cros, V.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we report experimental evidence of anomalous and planar Righi-Leduc effects on NiFe . The Righi-Leduc effect is the thermal analog of the Hall effect, in which the electric current is replaced by the heat current and the electric field by the temperature gradient. When the material is ferromagnetic, it is well known that there are two other contributions to the Hall voltage which depend on the orientation of the magnetization. These two extra contributions are called the anomalous Hall effect when the magnetization is out of the plane of the sample and the planar Hall effect when the magnetization is in the plane of the sample. In the same way, an anomalous and a planar Righi-Leduc effects are shown to appear when a transverse temperature gradient is generated by a heat current.

  8. Effective spectral dispersion of refractive index modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojtíšek, Petr; Květoň, Milan; Richter, Ivan

    2017-04-01

    For diffraction effects inside photopolymer materials, which act as volume diffraction systems (e.g. gratings), refractive index modulation is one of the key parameters. Due to its importance it is necessary to study this parameter from many perspectives, one of which is its value for different spectral components, i.e. its spectral dispersion. In this paper, we discuss this property and present an approach to experimental and numerical extraction and analysis (via rigorous coupled wave analysis and Cauchy’s empirical relation) of the effective dispersion of refractive index modulation based on an analysis of transmittance maps measured in an angular-spectral plane. It is indicated that the inclusion of dispersion leads to a significantly better description of the real grating behavior (which is often necessary in various design implementations of diffraction gratings) and that this estimation can be carried out for all the diffraction orders present.

  9. Anomalous transport effects and possible environmental symmetry 'violation' in heavy-ion collisions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jinfeng Liao

    2015-05-01

    The heavy-ion collision provides a unique many-body environment where local domains of strongly interacting chiral medium may occur and in a sense allow environmental symmetry 'violation' phenomena. For example, certain anomalous transport processes, forbidden in usual medium, become possible in such domains. We briefly review recent progress in both the theoretical understanding and experimental search of various anomalous transport effects (such as the chiral magnetic effect, chiral separation effect, chiral electric separation effect, chiral electric/magnetic waves, etc.) in the hot QCD fluid formed by such collisions.

  10. Sub 100-ps dynamics of the anomalous Hall effect at THz frequencies

    CERN Document Server

    Huisman, T J; Tsukamoto, A; Ma, L; Fan, W J; Zhou, S M; Rasing, Th; Kimel, A V

    2016-01-01

    We report about the anomalous Hall effect in 4f 3d metallic alloys measured using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. The strength of the observed terahertz spin-dependent transport phenomenon is in good agreement with expectations based on electronic transport measurements. Employing this effect, we succeeded to reveal ultrafast dynamics of the anomalous Hall effect which accompanies the sub-100 picosecond optically induced magnetization reversal in a GdFeCo alloy. The experiments demonstrate the ability to control currents at terahertz frequencies in spintronic devices magnetically and ultrafast.

  11. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in magnetically doped InAs/GaSb quantum wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing-Ze; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Hai-Jun; Samarth, Nitin; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; Liu, Chao-Xing

    2014-10-03

    The quantum anomalous Hall effect has recently been observed experimentally in thin films of Cr-doped (Bi,Sb)(2)Te(3) at a low temperature (∼ 30 mK). In this work, we propose realizing the quantum anomalous Hall effect in more conventional diluted magnetic semiconductors with magnetically doped InAs/GaSb type-II quantum wells. Based on a four-band model, we find an enhancement of the Curie temperature of ferromagnetism due to band edge singularities in the inverted regime of InAs/GaSb quantum wells. Below the Curie temperature, the quantum anomalous Hall effect is confirmed by the direct calculation of Hall conductance. The parameter regime for the quantum anomalous Hall phase is identified based on the eight-band Kane model. The high sample quality and strong exchange coupling make magnetically doped InAs/GaSb quantum wells good candidates for realizing the quantum anomalous Hall insulator at a high temperature.

  12. Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in Co2MnGa and its anomalous Hall effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludbrook, B. M.; Ruck, B. J.; Granville, S.

    2017-02-01

    We report perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in the ferromagnetic Heusler alloy Co2MnGa in a MgO/Co2MnGa/Pd trilayer stack for Co2MnGa thicknesses up to 3.5 nm. There is a thickness- and temperature-dependent spin reorientation transition from perpendicular to in-plane magnetic anisotropy, which we study through the anomalous Hall effect. From the temperature dependence of the anomalous Hall effect, we observe the expected scaling of ρx y A H E with ρxx, suggesting that the intrinsic and side-jump mechanisms are largely responsible for the anomalous Hall effect in this material.

  13. Absence of anomalous Nernst effect in spin Seebeck effect of Pt/YIG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, B. F.; Huang, S. Y.; Qu, D.; Chien, C. L.

    2016-01-01

    The Pt/YIG structure has been widely used to study spin Seebeck effect (SSE), inverse spin Hall effect, and other pure spin current phenomena. However, the magnetic proximity effect in Pt when in contact with YIG, and the potential anomalous Nernst effect (ANE) may compromise the spin current phenomena in Pt/YIG. By inserting a Cu layer of various thicknesses between Pt and YIG, we have separated the signals from the SSE and that of the ANE. It is demonstrated that the thermal voltage in Pt/YIG mainly comes from spin current due to the longitudinal SSE with negligible contribution from the ANE.

  14. Absence of anomalous Nernst effect in spin Seebeck effect of Pt/YIG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, B. F., E-mail: bfmiao@nju.edu.cn [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Huang, S. Y. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Qu, D.; Chien, C. L., E-mail: clchien@jhu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    The Pt/YIG structure has been widely used to study spin Seebeck effect (SSE), inverse spin Hall effect, and other pure spin current phenomena. However, the magnetic proximity effect in Pt when in contact with YIG, and the potential anomalous Nernst effect (ANE) may compromise the spin current phenomena in Pt/YIG. By inserting a Cu layer of various thicknesses between Pt and YIG, we have separated the signals from the SSE and that of the ANE. It is demonstrated that the thermal voltage in Pt/YIG mainly comes from spin current due to the longitudinal SSE with negligible contribution from the ANE.

  15. Absence of anomalous Nernst effect in spin Seebeck effect of Pt/YIG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. F. Miao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Pt/YIG structure has been widely used to study spin Seebeck effect (SSE, inverse spin Hall effect, and other pure spin current phenomena. However, the magnetic proximity effect in Pt when in contact with YIG, and the potential anomalous Nernst effect (ANE may compromise the spin current phenomena in Pt/YIG. By inserting a Cu layer of various thicknesses between Pt and YIG, we have separated the signals from the SSE and that of the ANE. It is demonstrated that the thermal voltage in Pt/YIG mainly comes from spin current due to the longitudinal SSE with negligible contribution from the ANE.

  16. Transverse spin Seebeck effect versus anomalous and planar Nernst effects in Permalloy thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, M; Srichandan, S; Meier, D; Kuschel, T; Schmalhorst, J-M; Vogel, M; Reiss, G; Strunk, C; Back, C H

    2013-11-01

    Transverse magnetothermoelectric effects are studied in Permalloy thin films grown on MgO and GaAs substrates and compared to those grown on suspended SiN(x) membranes. The transverse voltage along platinum strips patterned on top of the Permalloy films is measured versus the external magnetic field as a function of the angle and temperature gradients. After the identification of the contribution of the planar and anomalous Nernst effects, we find an upper limit for the transverse spin Seebeck effect, which is several orders of magnitude smaller than previously reported.

  17. Tunnelling anomalous and planar Hall effects (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos-Abiague, Alex; Scharf, Benedikt; Han, Jong E.; Hankiewicz, Ewelina M.; Zutic, Igor

    2016-10-01

    We theoretically show how the interplay between spin-orbit coupling (SOC) and magnetism can result in a finite tunneling Hall conductance, transverse to the applied bias. For two-dimensional tunnel junctions with a ferromagnetic lead and magnetization perpendicular to the current flow, the detected anomalous Hall voltage can be used to extract information not only about the spin polarization but also about the strength of the interfacial SOC. In contrast, a tunneling current across a ferromagnetic barrier on the surface of a three-dimensional topological insulator (TI) can induce a planar Hall response even when the magnetization is oriented along the current flow[1]. The tunneling nature of the states contributing to the planar Hall conductance can be switched from the ordinary to the Klein regimes by the electrostatic control of the barrier strength. This allows for an enhancement of the transverse response and a giant Hall angle, with the tunneling planar Hall conductance exceeding the longitudinal component. Despite the simplicity of a single ferromagnetic region, the TI/ferromagnet system exhibits a variety of functionalities. In addition to a spin-valve operation for magnetic sensing and storing information, positive, negative, and negative differential conductances can be tuned by properly adjusting the barrier potential and/or varying the magnetization direction. Such different resistive behaviors in the same system are attractive for potential applications in reconfigurable spintronic devices. [1] B. Scharf, A. Matos-Abiague, J. E. Han, E. M. Hankiewicz, and I. Zutic, arXiv:1601.01009 (2016).

  18. Scaling of anomalous hall effect in amorphous CoFeB Films with accompanying quantum correction

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yan

    2015-05-08

    Scaling of anomalous Hall effect in amorphous CoFeB films with thickness ranging from 2 to 160 nm have been investigated. We have found that the scaling relationship between longitudinal (ρxx) and anomalous Hall (ρAH) resistivity is distinctly different in the Bloch and localization regions. For ultrathin CoFeB films, the sheet resistance (Rxx) and anomalous Hall conductance (GAH) received quantum correction from electron localization showing two different scaling relationships at different temperature regions. In contrast, the thicker films show a metallic conductance, which have only one scaling relationship in the entire temperature range. Furthermore, in the dirty regime of localization regions, an unconventional scaling relationship View the MathML sourceσAH∝σxxα with α=1.99 is found, rather than α=1.60 predicted by the unified theory.

  19. Exploration of Anomalous Gravity Effects by rf-Pumped Magnetized High-T(c) Superconducting Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Tony; Litchford, Ron; Peters, Randall; Thompson, Byran; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A number of anomalous gravitational effects have been reported in the scientific literature during recent years, but there has been no independent confirmation with regard to any of these claims. Therefore, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, in response to the propulsion challenges specified by NASA's Breakthrough Propulsion Physics (BPP) program, proposed to explore the possibility of observing anomalous gravitation behavior through the manipulation of Josephson junction effects in magnetized high-Tc superconducting oxides. The technical goal was to critically test this revolutionary physical claim and provide a rigorous, independent, empirical confirmation (or refutation) of anomalous effects related to the manipulation of gravity by radio frequency (rf)-pumped magnetized type-2 superconductors. Because the current empirical evidence for gravity modification is anecdotal, our objective was to design, construct, and meticulously implement a discriminating experiment, which would put these observations on a more firm footing within the scientific community. Our approach is unique in that we advocate the construction of an extremely sensitive torsion balance with which to measure gravity modification effects by rf-pumped type-2 superconductor test masses. This paper reviews the anecdotal evidence for anomalous gravity effects, describes the design and development of a simplified torsion balance experiment for empirically investigating these claims, and presents the results of preliminary experiments.

  20. Effective anomalous Hall coefficient in an ultrathin Co layer sandwiched by Pt layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Peng; Wu, Di; Jiang, Zhengsheng; Sang, Hai, E-mail: weiwei.lin@u-psud.fr, E-mail: haisang@nju.edu.cn [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Lin, Weiwei, E-mail: weiwei.lin@u-psud.fr, E-mail: haisang@nju.edu.cn [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Institut d' Electronique Fondamentale, Université Paris-Sud, Orsay 91405 (France)

    2014-02-14

    Anomalous Hall effect in Co/Pt multilayer is important to study the effect of interface with strong spin-orbit coupling. However, the shunting effect of the layers in such system and the circuit in the plane perpendicular to the injected current were overlooked in most works and thus, anomalous Hall coefficient in Co/Pt multilayer has not been determined accurately. Considering the shunting effect and the equivalent circuit, we show that the effective anomalous Hall coefficient of a 0.5 nm thick Co layer sandwiched by Pt layers R{sub S} is 0.29 ± 0.01 μΩ cm/T at the zero temperature limit and increases to about 0.73 μΩ cm/T at the temperature of 300 K. R{sub S} is one order larger than that in bulk Co film, indicating the large contribution of the Co/Pt interface. R{sub S} increases with the resistivity of Co as well as a resistivity independent contribution of −0.23 ± 0.01 μΩ cm/T. The equivalent anomalous Hall current in the Co layer has a maximum of 1.1% of the injected transverse current in the Co layer around the temperature of 80 K.

  1. Anomalous Triple Gauge Couplings in the Effective Field Theory Approach at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Falkowski, Adam; Greljo, Admir; Marzocca, David; Son, Minho

    2016-01-01

    We discuss how to perform consistent extractions of anomalous triple gauge couplings (aTGC) from electroweak boson pair production at the LHC in the Standard Model Effective Field Theory (SMEFT). After recasting recent ATLAS and CMS searches in $pp\\to WZ (WW) \\to \\ell' \

  2. Anomalous Hall effects in pseudo-single-crystal γ'-Fe4N thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabara, Kazuki; Tsunoda, Masakiyo; Kokado, Satoshi

    2016-05-01

    The anomalous Hall effects (AHE) were investigated at various temperatures for the pseudo-single-crystal Fe4N films, deposited on MgO substrates with changing the degree of order (S) of the nitrogen site. Both the anomalous Hall resistivity and the longitudinal resistivity simply decrease with lowering temperature for all the specimens. The AHE of the Fe4N films is presumed to arise from an intrinsic mechanism because of the relationship between the anomalous Hall resistivity and longitudinal resistivity. The anomalous Hall conductivity, σAH, exhibits a specific behavior at low temperature. In the case of the film with S = 0.93, the σAH drastically drops below 50 K, while it simply increases with lowering temperature in the range of 50-300 K. This low-temperature anomaly decays with decreasing S of the film and nearly vanishes in the films with low S. The threshold temperature and the dependence on S of the low-temperature anomaly of the σAH well correspond to those of the anisotropic magnetoresistance effects in the Fe4N films, reported in the literatures. From these results, it is suggested that the low-temperature anomaly of the σAH originates from the crystal field effect which reflects the structural transformation from a cubic to a tetragonal symmetry below 50 K and provides a modulation of the orbital angular momentum of the 3d orbitals at the Fermi level.

  3. Temperature, pressure, and compositional effects on anomalous or "self" preservation of gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, L.A.; Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.

    2003-01-01

    We previously reported on a thermal regime where pure, polycrystalline methane hydrate is preserved metastably in bulk at up to 75 K above its nominal temperature stability limit of 193 K at 0.1 MPa, following rapid release of the sample pore pressure. Large fractions (>50 vol.%) of methane hydrate can be preserved for 2-3 weeks by this method, reflecting the greatly suppressed rates of dissociation that characterize this "anomalous preservation" regime. This behavior contrasts that exhibited by methane hydrate at both colder (193-240 K) and warmer (272-290 K) isothermal test conditions, where dissociation rates increase monotonically with increasing temperature. Here, we report on recent experiments that further investigate the effects of temperature, pressure, and composition on anomalous preservation behavior. All tests conducted on sI methane hydrate yielded self-consistent results that confirm the highly temperature-sensitive but reproducible nature of anomalous preservation behavior. Temperature-stepping experiments conducted between 250 and 268 K corroborate the relative rates measured previously in isothermal preservation tests, and elevated pore-pressure tests showed that, as expected, dissociation rates are further reduced with increasing pressure. Surprisingly, sII methane-ethane hydrate was found to exhibit no comparable preservation effect when rapidly depressurized at 268 K, even though it is thermodynamically stable at higher temperatures and lower pressures than sI methane hydrate. These results, coupled with SEM imaging of quenched sample material from a variety of dissociation tests, strongly support our earlier arguments that ice-"shielding" effects provided by partial dissociation along hydrate grain surfaces do not serve as the primary mechanism for anomalous preservation. The underlying physical-chemistry mechanism(s) of anomalous preservation remains elusive, but appears to be based more on textural or morphological changes within the hydrate

  4. Higgs mechanism in three-dimensional topological superconductors and anomalous Hall effect in zero magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogueira, Flavio; Eremin, Ilya [Theoretische Physik III, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    We discuss the peculiar nature of Higgs mechanism in an effective field theory for three-dimensional topological superconductors. The effective theory features two order parameters associated to the two chiral fermion species in the system. The resulting electrodynamics of such a topological superconductor exhibits a topological magnetoelectric effect with an axion field given by the phase difference of the order parameters. As consequence, the London regime is highly non-linear and anomalous Hall effect in the absence of an external magnetic field occurs. In this anomalous Hall effect the generated current transverse to an applied electric field changes sign with the temperature. We also discuss the scaling behavior of the penetration depth near the transition temperature, which is also shown to exhibit a scaling exponent that is crucially influenced by the axion term, varying continuously as function of the average phase difference.

  5. An anomalous extinction law in the Cep OB3b young cluster: Evidence for dust processing during gas dispersal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Thomas S.; Prchlik, Jakub J.; Megeath, S. Thomas [University of Toledo, Ritter Astrophysical Observatory, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Gutermuth, Robert A. [Five College Astronomy Department, Smith College, Northampton, MA 01063 (United States); Pipher, Judith L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States); Naylor, Tim [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Exeter, UK EX4 4QL (United Kingdom); Jeffries, R. D. [Astrophysics Group, School of Physical and Geographical Sciences, Keele University, Keele, Staffordshire, UK ST5 5BG (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-10

    We determine the extinction law through Cep OB3b, a young cluster of 3000 stars undergoing gas dispersal. The extinction is measured toward 76 background K giants identified with MMT/Hectospec spectra. Color excess ratios were determined toward each of the giants using V and R photometry from the literature, g, r, i, and z photometry from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and J, H, and K{sub s} photometry from the Two Micron All Sky Survey. These color excess ratios were then used to construct the extinction law through the dusty material associated with Cep OB3b. The extinction law through Cep OB3b is intermediate between the R{sub V} = 3.1 and R{sub V} = 5 laws commonly used for the diffuse atomic interstellar medium and dense molecular clouds, respectively. The dependence of the extinction law on line-of-sight A{sub V} is investigated and we find the extinction law becomes shallower for regions with A{sub V} > 2.5 mag. We speculate that the intermediate dust law results from dust processing during the dispersal of the molecular cloud by the cluster.

  6. Quantum anomalous Hall effect and tunable topological states in 3d transition metals doped silicene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Long; Liu, Lan-Feng; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2013-10-09

    Silicene is an intriguing 2D topological material which is closely analogous to graphene but with stronger spin orbit coupling effect and natural compatibility with current silicon-based electronics industry. Here we demonstrate that silicene decorated with certain 3d transition metals (Vanadium) can sustain a stable quantum anomalous Hall effect using both analytical model and first-principles Wannier interpolation. We also predict the quantum valley Hall effect and electrically tunable topological states could be realized in certain transition metal doped silicene where the energy band inversion occurs. Our findings provide new scheme for the realization of quantum anomalous Hall effect and platform for electrically controllable topological states which are highly desirable for future nanoelectronics and spintronics application.

  7. Prospect of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall effect in doped kagome lattice Mott insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guterding, Daniel; Jeschke, Harald O.; Valentí, Roser

    2016-05-01

    Electronic states with non-trivial topology host a number of novel phenomena with potential for revolutionizing information technology. The quantum anomalous Hall effect provides spin-polarized dissipation-free transport of electrons, while the quantum spin Hall effect in combination with superconductivity has been proposed as the basis for realizing decoherence-free quantum computing. We introduce a new strategy for realizing these effects, namely by hole and electron doping kagome lattice Mott insulators through, for instance, chemical substitution. As an example, we apply this new approach to the natural mineral herbertsmithite. We prove the feasibility of the proposed modifications by performing ab-initio density functional theory calculations and demonstrate the occurrence of the predicted effects using realistic models. Our results herald a new family of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall insulators at affordable energy/temperature scales based on kagome lattices of transition metal ions.

  8. Prospect of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall effect in doped kagome lattice Mott insulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guterding, Daniel; Jeschke, Harald O; Valentí, Roser

    2016-05-17

    Electronic states with non-trivial topology host a number of novel phenomena with potential for revolutionizing information technology. The quantum anomalous Hall effect provides spin-polarized dissipation-free transport of electrons, while the quantum spin Hall effect in combination with superconductivity has been proposed as the basis for realizing decoherence-free quantum computing. We introduce a new strategy for realizing these effects, namely by hole and electron doping kagome lattice Mott insulators through, for instance, chemical substitution. As an example, we apply this new approach to the natural mineral herbertsmithite. We prove the feasibility of the proposed modifications by performing ab-initio density functional theory calculations and demonstrate the occurrence of the predicted effects using realistic models. Our results herald a new family of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall insulators at affordable energy/temperature scales based on kagome lattices of transition metal ions.

  9. Prospect of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall effect in doped kagome lattice Mott insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guterding, Daniel; Jeschke, Harald O.; Valentí, Roser

    2016-01-01

    Electronic states with non-trivial topology host a number of novel phenomena with potential for revolutionizing information technology. The quantum anomalous Hall effect provides spin-polarized dissipation-free transport of electrons, while the quantum spin Hall effect in combination with superconductivity has been proposed as the basis for realizing decoherence-free quantum computing. We introduce a new strategy for realizing these effects, namely by hole and electron doping kagome lattice Mott insulators through, for instance, chemical substitution. As an example, we apply this new approach to the natural mineral herbertsmithite. We prove the feasibility of the proposed modifications by performing ab-initio density functional theory calculations and demonstrate the occurrence of the predicted effects using realistic models. Our results herald a new family of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall insulators at affordable energy/temperature scales based on kagome lattices of transition metal ions. PMID:27185665

  10. Some anomalous effects of sodium ions on the electrophoretic mobility and heteroaggregation of microgel particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routh, Alexander F; Vincent, Brian

    2004-05-15

    Experiments on the kinetics of heteroaggregation between oppositely charged particles, using both dynamic light scattering and turbidity methods, are reported. The negatively charged particles were cross-linked poly( [Formula: see text] -isopropylacrylamide) [PNIPAM] microgel particles, prepared using a carboxylic-acid-based initiator; these particles are swollen at room temperature. The positive particles were poly(4-vinylpyridine) [P4VP] particles, prepared using an amidinium-based initiator; such particles do not respond to temperature changes but do swell below pH approximately 4, where the pyridine moieties become protonated. As expected, the rate of heteroaggregation was shown to be largely independent of added salt concentration (up to approximately 20 mM), for a variety of alkali metal chlorides (MCl, where M = Li, Na, K, or Rb). However, an unexpected, significant decrease in the aggregation rate was observed at certain specific sodium chloride concentrations (typically at approximately 1 and also approximately 4 mM). Similar effects were not seen with the other alkali metal chloride salts. This strange effect was eventually attributed to the fact that the net charge on the positively charged P4VP particles had been reduced by the adsorption of (anionic) silicate species leached from the glassware container. Sodium silicates are known to be significantly more soluble than those of the other alkali metal ions, particularly at high pH. Moreover, P4VP particles dispersed in water, ostensibly at neutral pH, do buffer the aqueous medium to pH values around 9 or higher. This mechanism was confirmed by determining the electrophoretic mobility of the P4VP particles as a function of pH in the presence of the various alkali metal chloride salts. The mobility remained positive in 1 mM salt solutions over the pH range 3 to 11 for all the salts, except for sodium chloride; in that case the mobility reversed sign at alkaline pH values. A similar effect was observed for

  11. Anomalous Effects of Driving Field Linewidth on a One-Atom Dressed-State Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jin-Jin; Hu Xiang-Ming

    2007-01-01

    We examine the effects of driving Geld linewidth on a one-atom dressed state laser. Unexpectedly, the linewidth leads to anomalous effects on the cavity Geld. The mean photon number of the cavity Geld is raised or the normalized variance is reduced to a certain degree as the linewidth increases for an appropriate range of parameters. The responsible mechanism is attributed to the fluctuation-induced modification of the electromagnetic reservoir where the atom stays.

  12. Dispersal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clobert, J.; Danchin, E.; Dhondt, A.A.; Nichols, J.D.

    2001-01-01

    The ability of species to migrate and disperse is a trait that has interested ecologists for many years. Now that so many species and ecosystems face major environmental threats from habitat fragmentation and global climate change, the ability of species to adapt to these changes by dispersing, migrating, or moving between patches of habitat can be crucial to ensuring their survival. This book provides a timely and wide-ranging overview of the study of dispersal and incorporates much of the latest research. The causes, mechanisms, and consequences of dispersal at the individual, population, species and community levels are considered. The potential of new techniques and models for studying dispersal, drawn from molecular biology and demography, is also explored. Perspectives and insights are offered from the fields of evolution, conservation biology and genetics. Throughout the book, theoretical approaches are combined with empirical data, and care has been taken to include examples from as wide a range of species as possible.

  13. The NET effect of dispersants - a critical review of testing and modelling of surface oil dispersion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeinstra-Helfrich, Marieke; Koops, Wierd; Murk, A.J.

    2015-01-01

    Application of chemical dispersants or mechanical dispersion on surface oil is a trade-off between surface effects (impact of floating oil) and sub-surface effects (impact of suspended oil). Making an informed decision regarding such response, requires insight in the induced change in fate and tr

  14. Temperature correction to the Casimir force in cryogenic range and anomalous skin effect

    CERN Document Server

    Svetovoy, V B

    2003-01-01

    Temperature correction to the Casimir force is considered for real metals at low temperatures. With the temperature decrease the mean free path for electrons becomes larger than the field penetration depth. In this condition description of metals with the impedance of anomalous skin effect is shown to be more appropriate than with the permittivity. The effect is crucial for the temperature correction. It is demonstrated that in the zero frequency limit the reflection coefficients should coincide with those of ideal metal if we demand the entropy to be zero at T=0. All the other prescriptions discussed in the literature for the $n=0$ term in the Lifshitz formula give negative entropy. It is shown that the temperature correction in the region of anomalous skin effect is not suppressed as it happens in the plasma model. This correction will be important in the future cryogenic measurements of the Casimir force.

  15. Anomalous Quantum Hall Effect of 4D Graphene in Background Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Drissi, L B; Saidi, E H

    2011-01-01

    Bori\\c{c}i-Creutz (BC) model describing the dynamics of light quarks in lattice QCD has been shown to be intimately linked to the four dimensional extension of 2D graphene refereed below to as four dimensional graphene (4D- graphene). Borrowing ideas from the field theory description of the usual 2D graphene, we study in this paper the anomalous quantum Hall effect (AQHE) of the BC fermions in presence of a constant background electromagnetic field strength F_{{\\mu}{\

  16. Semiclassical origin of anomalous shell effect for tetrahedral deformation in radial power-law potential model

    CERN Document Server

    Arita, Ken-ichiro

    2014-01-01

    Shell structures in single-particle energy spectra are investigated against regular tetrahedral type deformation using radial power-law potential model. Employing a natural way of shape parametrization which interpolate sphere and regular tetrahedron, we find prominent shell effects at rather large tetrahedral deformations, which bring about shell energies much larger than the cases of spherical and quadrupole type shapes. We discuss the semiclassical origin of these anomalous shell structures using periodic orbit theory.

  17. Anomalous diffraction in hyperbolic materials

    CERN Document Server

    Alberucci, Alessandro; Boardman, Allan D; Assanto, Gaetano

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that light is subject to anomalous (i.e., negative) diffraction when propagating in the presence of hyperbolic dispersion. We show that light propagation in hyperbolic media resembles the dynamics of a quantum particle of negative mass moving in a two-dimensional potential. The negative effective mass implies time reversal if the medium is homogeneous. Such property paves the way to diffraction compensation, spatial analogue of dispersion compensating fibers in the temporal domain. At variance with materials exhibiting standard elliptic dispersion, in inhomogeneous hyperbolic materials light waves are pulled towards regions with a lower refractive index. In the presence of a Kerr-like optical response, bright (dark) solitons are supported by a negative (positive) nonlinearity.

  18. Anomalous diffraction in hyperbolic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberucci, Alessandro; Jisha, Chandroth P.; Boardman, Allan D.; Assanto, Gaetano

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate that light is subject to anomalous (i.e., negative) diffraction when propagating in the presence of hyperbolic dispersion. We show that light propagation in hyperbolic media resembles the dynamics of a quantum particle of negative mass moving in a two-dimensional potential. The negative effective mass implies time reversal if the medium is homogeneous. Such property paves the way to diffraction compensation, i.e., spatial analog of dispersion compensating fibers in the temporal domain. At variance with materials exhibiting standard elliptic dispersion, in inhomogeneous hyperbolic materials light waves are pulled towards regions with a lower refractive index. In the presence of a Kerr-like optical response, bright (dark) solitons are supported by a negative (positive) nonlinearity.

  19. Effect of entropy on anomalous transport in ITG-modes of magneto-plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaqub Khan, M.; Qaiser Manzoor, M.; Haq, A. ul; Iqbal, J.

    2017-04-01

    The ideal gas equation and S={{c}v}log ≤ft(P/ρ \\right) (where S is entropy, P is pressure and ρ is the mass density) define the interconnection of entropy with the temperature and density of plasma. Therefore, different phenomena relating to plasma and entropy need to be investigated. By employing the Braginskii transport equations for a nonuniform electron–ion magnetoplasma, two new parameters—the entropy distribution function and the entropy gradient drift—are defined, a new dispersion relation is obtained, and the dependence of anomalous transport on entropy is also proved. Some results, like monotonicity, the entropy principle and the second law of thermodynamics, are proved with a new definition of entropy. This work will open new horizons in fusion processes, not only by controlling entropy in tokamak plasmas—particularly in the pedestal regions of the H-mode and space plasmas—but also in engineering sciences.

  20. When Chiral Photons Meet Chiral Fermions: Photoinduced Anomalous Hall Effects in Weyl Semimetals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ching-Kit; Lee, Patrick A.; Burch, Kenneth S.; Han, Jung Hoon; Ran, Ying

    2016-01-01

    The Weyl semimetal is characterized by three-dimensional linear band touching points called Weyl nodes. These nodes come in pairs with opposite chiralities. We show that the coupling of circularly polarized photons with these chiral electrons generates a Hall conductivity without any applied magnetic field in the plane orthogonal to the light propagation. This phenomenon comes about because with all three Pauli matrices exhausted to form the three-dimensional linear dispersion, the Weyl nodes cannot be gapped. Rather, the net influence of chiral photons is to shift the positions of the Weyl nodes. Interestingly, the momentum shift is tightly correlated with the chirality of the node to produce a net anomalous Hall signal. Application of our proposal to the recently discovered TaAs family of Weyl semimetals leads to an order-of-magnitude estimate of the photoinduced Hall conductivity which is within the experimentally accessible range.

  1. Giant Anomalous Hall Effect in the Chiral Antiferromagnet Mn3Ge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyohara, Naoki; Tomita, Takahiro; Nakatsuji, Satoru

    2016-06-01

    The external field control of antiferromagnetism is a significant subject both for basic science and technological applications. As a useful macroscopic response to detect magnetic states, the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) is known for ferromagnets, but it has never been observed in antiferromagnets until the recent discovery in Mn3Sn . Here we report another example of the AHE in a related antiferromagnet, namely, in the hexagonal chiral antiferromagnet Mn3Ge . Our single-crystal study reveals that Mn3Ge exhibits a giant anomalous Hall conductivity |σx z|˜60 Ω-1 cm-1 at room temperature and approximately 380 Ω-1 cm-1 at 5 K in zero field, reaching nearly half of the value expected for the quantum Hall effect per atomic layer with Chern number of unity. Our detailed analyses on the anisotropic Hall conductivity indicate that in comparison with the in-plane-field components |σx z| and |σz y|, which are very large and nearly comparable in size, we find |σy x| obtained in the field along the c axis to be much smaller. The anomalous Hall effect shows a sign reversal with the rotation of a small magnetic field less than 0.1 T. The soft response of the AHE to magnetic field should be useful for applications, for example, to develop switching and memory devices based on antiferromagnets.

  2. Anomalous effective action, Noether current, Virasoro algebra and Horizon entropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majhi, Bibhas Ranjan [IUCAA, Ganeshkhind, Pune University Campus, Post Bag 4, Pune (India); Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Racah Institute of Physics, Jerusalem (Israel); Chakraborty, Sumanta [IUCAA, Ganeshkhind, Pune University Campus, Post Bag 4, Pune (India)

    2014-05-15

    Several investigations show that in a very small length scale there exist corrections to the entropy of black hole horizon. Due to fluctuations of the background metric and the external fields the action incorporates corrections. In the low energy regime, the one-loop effective action in four dimensions leads to trace anomaly. We start from the Noether current corresponding to the Einstein-Hilbert plus the one-loop effective action to calculate the charge for the diffeomorphisms which preserve the Killing horizon structure. Then a bracket for the charges is calculated. We show that the Fourier modes of the bracket are exactly similar to the Virasoro algebra. Then using the Cardy formula the entropy is evaluated. Finally, the explicit terms of the entropy expression is calculated for a classical background. It turns out that the usual expression for the entropy; i.e. the Bekenstein-Hawking form, is not modified. (orig.)

  3. Anomalous piezoelectric effects, found in the laboratory and reconstructed by numerical simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. P. Teisseyre

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Various rocks and minerals, which are not piezoelectric in the common sense, exhibit transient electric polarization in response to sudden changes in stress load. This anomalous piezoelectric effect differs from the regular, static piezoelectric response, in which electric charges appear as a result of crystal lattice deformation. The anomalous piezoelectricity is dynamic decaying in a few seconds or a few tens of seconds. However, in some materials different polarization properties are discovered. To explain certain aspects of the polarization signal increase and decay, some complicated mechanisms of electric charge generation and relaxation need to be assumed in their number ? concurrence of two or three relaxation processes. The hypothetical mechanisms are only mentioned, as the purpose of this work is to construct numerical models, behaving like the rocks investigated. Examples of experimental plots are shown together with the results of the numerical simulation of these experiments.

  4. [Effect of an anomalous broadening of the synchronization band after electric stimulation of heart tissues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurov, M E

    1987-01-01

    Synchronization effects of the second order induced by a change of the action potential (AP) shape in relation to the frequency of periodic stimulation were studied. Mechanism of anomalous increase of the synchronization band at periodic stimulation of the heart fibers was explained. By means of a modified method of synchronization diagrams the synchronization bands were calculated for possible stimulation regimes taking into account a change in RP shape and dynamic threshold (DT) depending on the frequency of the initiated regimes. Regions of stimulating signals parameters (multiplicity regions or prolonging regions) were discovered, within the range of which the same stimulating signal may induce different synchronization regimes. Physiological meaning of the existence of anomalous synchronization regimes which significantly broaden the adaptation possibilities of the heart is discussed.

  5. Predicting molecular scale skin-effect in electrochemical impedance due to anomalous subdiffusion mediated adsorption phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushagra, Arindam

    2016-02-01

    Anomalous subdiffusion governs the processes which are not energetically driven, on a molecular scale. This paper proposes a model to predict the response of electrochemical impedance due to such diffusion process. Previous works considered the use of fractional calculus to predict the impedance behaviour in response to the anomalous diffusion. Here, we have developed an expression which predicts the skin-effect, marked by an increase in the impedance with increasing frequency, in this regime. Negative inductances have also been predicted as a consequence of the inertial response of adsorbed species upon application of frequency-mediated perturbations. It might help the researchers in the fields of impedimetric sensors to choose the working frequency and those working in the field of batteries to choose the parameters, likewise. This work would shed some light into the molecular mechanisms governing the impedance when exposed to frequency-based perturbations like electromagnetic waves (microwaves to ionizing radiations) and in charge storage devices like batteries etc.

  6. Enhancement of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and anomalous hall effect in Co/Ni multilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yiwei; Zhang, Jingyan; Jiang, Shaolong; Liu, Qianqian; Li, Xujing; Yu, Guanghua

    2016-12-01

    The perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) and the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) in Co/Ni multilayer were optimized by manipulating its interface structure (inducing HfO2 capping layer and Pt insertion) and post-annealing treatment. A strong PMA can be obtained in Co/Ni multilayers with HfO2 capping layer even after annealing at 400 °C. The heavy metal Hf may improve the interfacial spin-orbit coupling, which responsible for the enhanced PMA and high annealing stability. Moreover, the multilayer containing HfO2 capping layer also exhibited high saturation anomalous Hall resistivity through post-annealing, which is 0.85 μΩ cm after annealing at 375 °C, 211% larger than in the sample at deposited state which is only 0.27 μΩ cm. The enhancement of AHE is mainly attributed to the interface scattering through post-annealing treatment.

  7. Prediction of near-room-temperature quantum anomalous Hall effect on honeycomb materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shu-Chun; Shan, Guangcun; Yan, Binghai

    2014-12-19

    Recently, the long-sough quantum anomalous Hall effect was realized in a magnetic topological insulator. However, the requirement of an extremely low temperature (approximately 30 mK) hinders realistic applications. Based on ab initio band structure calculations, we propose a quantum anomalous Hall platform with a large energy gap of 0.34 and 0.06 eV on honeycomb lattices comprised of Sn and Ge, respectively. The ferromagnetic (FM) order forms in one sublattice of the honeycomb structure by controlling the surface functionalization rather than dilute magnetic doping, which is expected to be visualized by spin polarized STM in experiment. Strong coupling between the inherent quantum spin Hall state and ferromagnetism results in considerable exchange splitting and, consequently, an FM insulator with a large energy gap. The estimated mean-field Curie temperature is 243 and 509 K for Sn and Ge lattices, respectively. The large energy gap and high Curie temperature indicate the feasibility of the quantum anomalous Hall effect in the near-room-temperature and even room-temperature regions.

  8. Large anomalous Hall effect driven by a nonvanishing Berry curvature in the noncolinear antiferromagnet Mn3Ge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Ajaya K; Fischer, Julia Erika; Sun, Yan; Yan, Binghai; Karel, Julie; Komarek, Alexander C; Shekhar, Chandra; Kumar, Nitesh; Schnelle, Walter; Kübler, Jürgen; Felser, Claudia; Parkin, Stuart S P

    2016-04-01

    It is well established that the anomalous Hall effect displayed by a ferromagnet scales with its magnetization. Therefore, an antiferromagnet that has no net magnetization should exhibit no anomalous Hall effect. We show that the noncolinear triangular antiferromagnet Mn3Ge exhibits a large anomalous Hall effect comparable to that of ferromagnetic metals; the magnitude of the anomalous conductivity is ~500 (ohm·cm)(-1) at 2 K and ~50 (ohm·cm)(-1) at room temperature. The angular dependence of the anomalous Hall effect measurements confirms that the small residual in-plane magnetic moment has no role in the observed effect except to control the chirality of the spin triangular structure. Our theoretical calculations demonstrate that the large anomalous Hall effect in Mn3Ge originates from a nonvanishing Berry curvature that arises from the chiral spin structure, and that also results in a large spin Hall effect of 1100 (ħ/e) (ohm·cm)(-1), comparable to that of platinum. The present results pave the way toward the realization of room temperature antiferromagnetic spintronics and spin Hall effect-based data storage devices.

  9. Origin of enhanced anomalous Hall effect in ultrathin Pt/permalloy bilayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Q. Zhang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available There are two mechanisms which could enhance spin-dependent scattering in a low dimensional Pt/Ferromagnetic metal structure. One is magnetic proximity effect. The other is spin orbit coupling proximity effect which was suggested recently. This work demonstrates that, through a series of experiments on anomalous Hall effect, the spin orbit coupling proximity effect dominates the enhancement in very thin Pt/Permalloy bilayers. It may help to find a way to optimize magnetic transport property of spintronics devices in which the spin orbit coupling is deeply involved.

  10. Anomalous Response in Heteroacene-Based Organic Field Effect Transistors under High Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken-ichi Sakai

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Carrier transport properties of organic field effect transistors in dinaphtho[2,3-b:2',3'-f]thieno[3,2-b]thiophene single crystals have been investigated under high pressure. In contrast to the typical pressure effect of monotonic increase in charge transfer rates according to the application of external hydrostatic pressure, it is clarified that the present organic semiconductor devices exhibit nonmonotonic pressure response, such as negative pressure effect. X-ray diffraction analysis under high pressure reveals that on-site molecular orientation and displacement in the heteroacene molecule is assumed to be the origin for the anomalous pressure effects.

  11. Anomalous coupling, top-mass and parton-shower effects in W + W - production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellm, J.; Gieseke, S.; Greiner, N.; Heinrich, G.; Plätzer, S.; Reuschle, C.; von Soden-Fraunhofen, J. F.

    2016-05-01

    We calculate the process ppto {W}+{W}-to {e}+{ν}_e{μ}-{overline{ν}}_{μ } at NLO QCD, including also effective field theory (EFT) operators mediating the ggW + W - interaction, which first occur at dimension eight. We further combine the NLO and EFT matrix elements produced by G oS am with the H erwig7/M atchbox framework, which offers the possibility to study the impact of a parton shower. We assess the effects of the anomalous couplings by comparing them to top-mass effects as well as uncertainties related to variations of the renormalisation, factorisation and hard shower scales.

  12. When effective theories predict: the inevitability of Mercury's anomalous perihelion precession

    CERN Document Server

    Wells, James D

    2012-01-01

    If the concepts underlying Effective Theory were appreciated from the earliest days of Newtonian gravity, Le Verrier's announcement in 1845 of the anomalous perihelion precession of Mercury would have been no surprise. Furthermore, the size of the effect could have been anticipated through "naturalness" arguments well before the definitive computation in General Relativity. Thus, we have an illustration of how Effective Theory concepts can guide us in extending our knowledge to "new physics", and not just in how to reduce larger theories to restricted (e.g., lower energy) domains.

  13. Dispersion engineering for integrated nanophotonics

    CERN Document Server

    Vanbésien, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    This book shows how dispersion engineering in two dimensional dielectric photonic crystals can provide new effects for the precise control of light propagation for integrated nanophotonics.Dispersion engineering in regular and graded photonic crystals to promote anomalous refraction effects is studied from the concepts to experimental demonstration via nanofabrication considerations. Self collimation, ultra and negative refraction, second harmonic generation, mirage and invisibility effects which lead to an unprecedented control of light propagation at the (sub-)wavelength scale for the

  14. Absence of the Thermal Hall Effect in Anomalous Nernst and Spin Seebeck Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Jia; Huang, Ssu-Yen

    2016-12-01

    The anomalous Nernst effect (ANE) and the spin Seebeck effect (SSE) in spin caloritronics are two of the most important mechanisms to manipulate the spin-polarized current and pure spin current by thermal excitation. While the ANE in ferromagnetic metals and the SSE in magnetic insulators have been extensively studied, a recent theoretical work suggests that the signals from the thermal Hall effect (THE) have field dependences indistinguishable from, and may even overwhelm, those of the ANE and SSE. Therefore, it is vital to investigate the contribution of the THE in the ANE and SSE. In this work, we systematically study the THE in a ferromagnetic metal, Permalloy (Py), and magnetic insulator, an yttrium iron garnet (YIG), by using different Seebeck coefficients between electrodes and contact wires. Our results demonstrate that the contribution of the THE by the thermal couple effect in the Py and YIG is negligibly small if one includes the thickness dependence of the Seebeck coefficient. Thus, the spin-polarized current in the ANE and the pure spin current in the SSE remain indispensable for exploring spin caloritronics phenomena.

  15. Effect of extended confinement on the structure of edge channels in the quantum anomalous Hall effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Z.; Raikh, M. E.

    2016-09-01

    The Quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect in the films with nontrivial band structure accompanies the ferromagnetic transition in the system of magnetic dopants. Experimentally, the QAH transition manifests itself as a jump in the dependence of longitudinal resistivity on a weak external magnetic field. Microscopically, this jump originates from the emergence of a chiral edge mode on one side of the ferromagnetic transition. We study analytically the effect of an extended confinement on the structure of the edge modes. We employ the simplest model of the extended confinement in the form of a potential step next to the hard wall. It is shown that, unlike the conventional quantum Hall effect, where all edge channels are chiral, in the QAH effect, a complex structure of the boundary leads to nonchiral edge modes which are present on both sides of the ferromagnetic transition. Wave functions of nonchiral modes are different above and below the transition: on the "topological" side, where the chiral edge mode is supported, nonchiral modes are "repelled" from the boundary; i.e., they are much less localized than on the "trivial" side. Thus, the disorder-induced scattering into these modes will boost the extension of the chiral edge mode. The prime experimental manifestation of nonchiral modes is that, by contributing to longitudinal resistance, they smear the QAH transition.

  16. Direct phase selection of initial phases from single-wavelength anomalous dispersion (SAD) for the improvement of electron density and ab initio structure determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chung-De [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, 101 Hsin-Ann Road, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China); National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Huang, Yen-Chieh [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, 101 Hsin-Ann Road, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China); Chiang, Hsin-Lin [National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Hsieh, Yin-Cheng; Guan, Hong-Hsiang; Chuankhayan, Phimonphan [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, 101 Hsin-Ann Road, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chun-Jung, E-mail: cjchen@nsrrc.org.tw [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, 101 Hsin-Ann Road, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China); National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); National Cheng Kung University, Tainan City 701, Taiwan (China); National Cheng Kung University, Tainan City 701, Taiwan (China)

    2014-09-01

    A novel direct phase-selection method to select optimized phases from the ambiguous phases of a subset of reflections to replace the corresponding initial SAD phases has been developed. With the improved phases, the completeness of built residues of protein molecules is enhanced for efficient structure determination. Optimization of the initial phasing has been a decisive factor in the success of the subsequent electron-density modification, model building and structure determination of biological macromolecules using the single-wavelength anomalous dispersion (SAD) method. Two possible phase solutions (ϕ{sub 1} and ϕ{sub 2}) generated from two symmetric phase triangles in the Harker construction for the SAD method cause the well known phase ambiguity. A novel direct phase-selection method utilizing the θ{sub DS} list as a criterion to select optimized phases ϕ{sub am} from ϕ{sub 1} or ϕ{sub 2} of a subset of reflections with a high percentage of correct phases to replace the corresponding initial SAD phases ϕ{sub SAD} has been developed. Based on this work, reflections with an angle θ{sub DS} in the range 35–145° are selected for an optimized improvement, where θ{sub DS} is the angle between the initial phase ϕ{sub SAD} and a preliminary density-modification (DM) phase ϕ{sub DM}{sup NHL}. The results show that utilizing the additional direct phase-selection step prior to simple solvent flattening without phase combination using existing DM programs, such as RESOLVE or DM from CCP4, significantly improves the final phases in terms of increased correlation coefficients of electron-density maps and diminished mean phase errors. With the improved phases and density maps from the direct phase-selection method, the completeness of residues of protein molecules built with main chains and side chains is enhanced for efficient structure determination.

  17. Seed dispersal effectiveness revisited: a conceptual review

    OpenAIRE

    Schupp, Eugene W.; JORDANO, Pedro; Gómez Reyes, José M.

    2010-01-01

    Growth in seed dispersal studies has been fast-paced since the seed disperser effec- tiveness (SDE) framework was developed 17 yr ago. Thus, the time is ripe to revisit the framework in light of accumulated new insight. Here, we first present an over- view of the framework, how it has been applied, and what we know and do not know. We then introduce the SDE landscape as the two-dimensional representa- tion of the possible combinations of the quantity and the quality of dispersal and with ele...

  18. Dispersion flattened single mode optical fiber with large effective area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babita, Rastogi, Vipul

    2013-06-01

    In this paper we present design of a fiber having ultra-flattened dispersion with large effective area over a wide range of wavelengths. The maximum value of the dispersion and dispersion slope within the spectral range 1450-1600 nm are 1.0 ps/km/nm and 0.05 ps/km/nm2 respectively. Effective mode area within the aforementioned wavelength range varies from 100-295 μm2.

  19. Effect of anomalous vertex on decay-lepton distributions in + -→ t\\overline{t}$ and CP-violating asymmetries

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Saurabh D Rindani

    2000-06-01

    We obtain analytic expressions for the energy and polar-angle double differential distributions of a secondary lepton +(-) arising from the decay of ($\\overline{t}$) in + - → $t\\overline{t}$ with an anomalous decay vertex. We also obtain analytic expressions for the various differential cross-sections with the lepton energy integrat ed over. In this case, we find that the angular distributions of the secondary lepton do not depend on the anomalous coupling in the decay, regardless of possible anomalous couplings occurring in the production amplitude for + - → $t\\overline{t}$. Our study includes the effect of longitudinal - and + beam polarization. We also study the lepton energy and beam polarization dependence of certain CP-violating lepton angular asymmetries arising from an anomalous decay vertex and compare them with the asymmetries arising due to CP-violation in the production process due to the top electric or weak dipole moment.

  20. Stacking order dependence of inverse spin Hall effect and anomalous Hall effect in spin pumping experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang-Il; Seo, Min-Su; Park, Seung-Young, E-mail: parksy@kbsi.re.kr [Division of Materials Science, Korea Basic Science Institute, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong-Jun; Park, Byong-Guk [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-07

    The dependence of the measured DC voltage on the non-magnetic material (NM) in NM/CoFeB and CoFeB/NM bilayers is studied under ferromagnetic resonance conditions in a TE{sub 011} resonant cavity. The directional change of the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) voltage V{sub ISHE} for the stacking order of the bilayer can separate the pure V{sub ISHE} and the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) voltage V{sub AHE} utilizing the method of addition and subtraction. The Ta and Ti NMs show a broad deviation of the spin Hall angle θ{sub ISH}, which originates from the AHE in accordance with the high resistivity of NMs. However, the Pt and Pd NMs show that the kinds of NMs with low resistivity are consistent with the previously reported θ{sub ISH} values. Therefore, the characteristics that NM should simultaneously satisfy to obtain a reasonable V{sub ISHE} value in bilayer systems are large θ{sub ISH} and low resistivity.

  1. From magnetically doped topological insulator to the quantum anomalous Hall effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Ke; Ma Xu-Cun; Chen Xi; Lü Li; Wang Ya-Yu; Xue Qi-Kun

    2013-01-01

    Quantum Hall effect (QHE),as a class of quantum phenomena that occur in macroscopic scale,is one of the most important topics in condensed matter physics.It has long been expected that QHE may occur without Landau levels so that neither extemal magnetic field nor high sample mobility is required for its study and application.Such a QHE free of Landau levels,can appear in topological insulators (TIs) with ferromagnetism as the quantized version of the anomalous Hall effect,i.e.,quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect.Here we review our recent work on experimental realization of the QAH effect in magnetically doped TIs.With molecular beam epitaxy,we prepare thin films of Cr-doped (Bi,Sb)2Te3 TIs with wellcontrolled chemical potential and long-range ferromagnetic order that can survive the insulating phase.In such thin films,we eventually observed the quantization of the Hall resistance at h/e2 at zero field,accompanied by a considerable drop in the longitudinal resistance.Under a strong magnetic field,the longitudinal resistance vanishes,whereas the Hall resistance remains at the quantized value.The realization of the QAH effect provides a foundation for many other novel quantum phenomena predicted in TIs,and opens a route to practical applications of quantum Hall physics in low-power-consumption electronics.

  2. Comparison of anomalous Doppler resonance effects with molybdenum and graphite limiters on HT-7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y M; Gao, X; Ling, B L; Liu, Y; Zhang, S B; Han, X; Ti, A; Li, E Z

    2012-03-01

    The material of limiter in HT-7 tokamak was changed from graphite to molybdenum in the last experimental campaign. The pitch angle scattering of runaway electrons due to anomalous Doppler resonance effects was observed. The experimental results agree very well with the stable boundary condition expected from the linear resistive theory but only agree with that from the nonlinear evolutionary of runaway-electron distribution theory in low electric field region. The current carried by runaway electrons is the same under different limiter conditions.

  3. Anomalous Hall effect of heavy holes in Ⅲ-Ⅴ semiconductor quantum wells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Zhi-Gang; Zhang Ping

    2007-01-01

    The anomalous Hall effect of heavy holes in semiconductor quantum wells is studied in the intrinsic transport regime, where the Berry curvature governs the Hall current properties. Based on the first-order perturbation of wave function the expression of the Hall conductivity the same as that from the semiclassical equation of motion of the Bloch particles is derived. The dependence of Hall conductivity on the system parameters is shown. The amplitude of Hall conductivity is found to be balanced by a competition between the Zeeman splitting and the spin-orbit splitting.

  4. Measurement of Nonadiabatic Effects in Ultracold Molecules via Anomalous Linear and Quadratic Zeeman Shifts

    CERN Document Server

    McGuyer, B H; McDonald, M; Reinaudi, G; Skomorowski, W; Moszynski, R; Zelevinsky, T

    2013-01-01

    Anomalously large linear and quadratic Zeeman shifts are measured for weakly bound ultracold $^{88}$Sr$_2$ molecules near the intercombination line asymptote. Nonadiabatic Coriolis coupling and the nature of long-range molecular potentials explain how this effect arises and scales roughly cubically with the size of the molecule. The linear shifts yield nonadiabatic mixing angles of the molecular states. The quadratic shifts are sensitive to fourth-order contributions and to nearby opposite $f$-parity states, and provide a stringent test of a state-of-the-art ab initio model.

  5. Anomalous transport model study of chiral magnetic effects in heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Yifeng; Li, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Using an anomalous transport model for massless quarks, we study the effect of magnetic field on the elliptic flows of quarks and antiquarks in relativistic heavy ion collisions. With initial conditions from a blast wave model and assuming that the strong magnetic field produced in non-central heavy ion collisions can last for a sufficiently long time, we obtain an appreciable electric quadrupole moment in the transverse plane of a heavy ion collision, which subsequently leads to a splitting between the elliptic flows of quarks and antiquarks as expected from the chiral magnetic wave formed in the produced QGP and observed in experiments at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC).

  6. The giant anomalous Hall effect in the ferromagnet Fe3Sn2--a frustrated kagome metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kida, T; Fenner, L A; Dee, A A; Terasaki, I; Hagiwara, M; Wills, A S

    2011-03-23

    The kagome-bilayer material Fe(3)Sn(2) has recently been shown to be an example of a rare class of magnet-a frustrated ferromagnetic metal. While the magnetism of Fe(3)Sn(2) appears to be relatively simple at high temperature, with localized moments parallel to the c-axis (T(C) = 640 K), upon cooling the competing exchange interactions and spin frustration become apparent as they cause the moments to become non-collinear and to rotate towards the kagome plane, forming firstly a canted ferromagnetic structure and then a re-entrant spin glass (T(f) approximately equal 80 K). In this work we show that Fe(3)Sn(2) possesses an unusual anomalous Hall effect. The saturated Hall resistivity of Fe(3)Sn(2) is 3.2 µΩ cm at 300 K, almost 20 times higher than that of typical itinerant ferromagnets such as Fe and Ni. The anomalous Hall coefficient R(s) is 6.7 × 10(-9) Ω cm G(-1) at 300 K, which is three orders of magnitude larger than that of pure Fe, and obeys an unconventional scaling with the longitudinal resistivity, ρ(xx), of R(s) is proportional to ρ(xx)(3.15). Such a relationship cannot be explained by either the conventional skew or side-jump mechanisms, indicating that the anomalous Hall effect in Fe(3)Sn(2) has an extraordinary origin that is presumed to be related to the underlying frustration of the magnetism. These findings demonstrate that frustrated ferromagnets, whether based on bulk materials or on artificial nanoscale structures, can provide new routes to room temperature spin-dependent electron transport properties suited to application in spintronics.

  7. Comparing seed dispersal effectiveness by frugivores at the community level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Castro, Aarón; Calviño-Cancela, Marĺa; Nogales, Manuel

    2015-03-01

    Seed dispersal effectiveness (SDE) is the contribution of dispersers to plant recruitment and is estimated as the product of the number of seeds dispersed (quantity) and the probability of recruitment of each dispersed seed (quality). Although SDE is a key concept in seed dispersal ecology, few studies estimate SDE and none has a community approach. Oceanic islands, with simple communities, are ideal for this purpose. In this study, we compared the SDE of the main types of dispersers (lizards and passerine birds) at the community level in a given habitat. We estimated SDE using a stochastic simulation model parameterized with empirical data on quantity and quality components measured throughout the recruitment process. Although lizards are highly frugivorous and their density was approximately 20 times higher than that of birds, lizards and birds dispersed a similar quantity of seeds. This may be due to lower intake of seeds by lizards due to their slower metabolism (approximately 20 times lower than birds). This low metabolic rate limits the importance of lizards as seed dispersers, but it is compensated by extraordinarily high lizard densities in the study area (approximately 9600 individuals/km2). High densities of lizards are typical of islands, and this helps to explain why dispersal by lizards seems mainly an island phenomenon. Birds and lizards showed functional complementarity, especially regarding seed dispersal distribution patterns. In fact, lizards dispersed more seeds in shrublands and open sites, and birds in woodlands and beneath canopies, with their joint contribution helping to maximize recruitment. Lizards provided higher SDE than birds for 7 out of 11 plant species. The disperser with a higher quantity for a given plant generally had the higher quality, and plants could be classified as bird- or lizard-dependent for dispersal. This dependence increased when considering SDE instead of dispersal quantity only. Moreover, quality was a better

  8. Employment Effects of Spatial Dispersal of Refugees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, Anna Piil; Rosholm, Michael

    Spatial dispersal policies may influence labour market integration of refugees through two mechanisms. First, it may affect the local job offer arrival rate, and second, it may affect place utility. We investigate the second mechanism theoretically by formulating a partial search model in which...... an individual searches simultaneously for a job and for a new residential location. The model predicts that the reservation wage for local jobs is decreasing in place utility. We argue that spatial dispersal policies decrease average place utility of refugees which decrease the transition rate into first job...

  9. Chemically manipulated anomalous Hall effect and perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in Co/Pt multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Shao-Long; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Jing-Yan; Yang, Guang; Teng, Jiao; Li, Xu-Jing; Cao, Yi; Zhao, Zhi-Duo; Yang, Kang; Liu, Yang; Yu, Guang-Hua, E-mail: ghyu@mater.ustb.edu.cn

    2014-11-30

    Highlights: • We studied magnetic and electric transport properties of MgO/[Co/Pt]{sub 3}/Mg/MgO films • The chemical states at Co/MgO and Co/Mg interfaces were investigated by XPS. • Interface chemical states have strong influence on AHE and PMA in Co/Pt multilayers. - Abstract: Chemically manipulated anomalous Hall effect (AHE) and perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) have been studied in MgO/[Co/Pt]{sub 3}/MgO multilayers by introducing a Mg metal layer between the Co layer and the top MgO layer. It is shown that the saturation anomalous Hall resistivity (ρ{sub AH}) and effective magnetic anisotropy (K{sub eff}) are 125% and 26% larger than those in the multilayers without Mg insertion, respectively. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis shows that the enhancement of AHE and PMA is primarily ascribed to effective control of chemical states at the Co/MgO interface.

  10. Employment effects of spatial dispersal of refugees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, Anna Piil; Rosholm, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Refugees subjected to a spatial dispersal tend to be assigned to a location outside the immigrant-dense cities. We argue that such locations are associated with low place utility. Our partial equilibrium search model with simultaneous job and residential location search predicts that the reservat...

  11. Semiclassical wave packet study of anomalous isotope effect in ozone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetoshkin, Evgeny; Babikov, Dmitri

    2007-10-21

    We applied the semiclassical initial value representation method to calculate energies, lifetimes, and wave functions of scattering resonances in a two-dimensional potential for O+O2 collision. Such scattering states represent the metastable O3* species and play a central role in the process of ozone formation. Autocorrelation functions for scattering states were computed and then analyzed using the Prony method, which permits one to extract accurate energies and widths of the resonances. We found that the results of the semiclassical wave packet propagation agree well with fully quantum results. The focus was on the 16O16O18O isotopomer and the anomalous isotope effect associated with formation of this molecule, either through the 16O16O+18O or the 16O+16O18O channels. An interesting correlation between the local vibration mode character of the metastable states and their lifetimes was observed and explained. New insight is obtained into the mechanism by which the long-lived resonances in the delta zero-point energy part of spectrum produce the anomalously large isotope effect.

  12. The anomalous exchange bias effect in core-shell Co/CoO nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feygenson, Mikhail; Yuen, Yiu; Kim, Kisub; Aronson, Meigan

    2008-03-01

    We study the anomalous exchange bias effect in Co/CoO nanoparticles by means of neutron and x-ray scattering and magnetic experiments. The Co nanoparticles were prepared in oleic acid by thermal decomposition of Co2(CO)8 and were subsequently oxidized. Co core- CoO shell nanoparticles with differing core and shell dimensions were obtained. The magnetic measurements indicated that there is an optimal ratio of the core and shell dimensions which maximizes the exchange bias field. Anomalous small angle x-ray scattering experiments using core-shell contrast and energy analysis provide high accuracy measurements of the core and shell, and their respective size distributions. Neutron diffraction measurements find that oxidation introduces a new modulation wave vector for the magnetization, leading to the increasing magnetic decompensation of the core-shell interface. It is our proposal that this interface moment enhances the exchange coupling of the core and shell, and leads to the extraordinarily large exchange bias effect.

  13. Effect of Center High Explosive in Dispersion of Fuel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张奇; 林大超; 白春华; 郭彦懿

    2004-01-01

    The dispersion of the fuel due to the center high explosive, including several different physical stages, is analyzed by means of experimental results observed with a high speed motion analysis system, and the effect of center high explosive charge is suggested. The process of the fuel dispersion process can be divided into three main stages, acceleration, deceleration and turbulence. Within a certain scope, the radius of the final fuel cloud dispersed is independent of the center explosive charge mass in an FAE (fuel air explosive) device, while only dependent both on the duration of acceleration stage and on that of the deceleration. In these two stages, the dispersion of the fuel dust mainly occurs along the radial direction. There is a close relation between the fuel dispersion process and the center explosive charge mass. To describe the motion of fuel for different stages of dispersion, different mechanical models should be applied.

  14. Anomalous Hall effect in the prospective spintronic material Eu1-x Gd x O integrated with Si.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parfenov, Oleg E; Averyanov, Dmitry V; Tokmachev, Andrey M; Taldenkov, Alexander N; Storchak, Vyacheslav G

    2016-06-08

    Remarkable properties of EuO make it a versatile spintronic material. Despite numerous experimental and theoretical studies of EuO, little is known about the anomalous Hall effect in this ferromagnet. So far, the effect has not been observed in bulk EuO, though has been detected in EuO films with uncontrolled distribution of defects. In the present work doping is taken under control: epitaxial films of Gd-doped EuO are synthesized integrated with Si using molecular beam epitaxy and characterized with x-ray diffraction and magnetization measurements. Nanoscale transport studies reveal the anomalous Hall effect in the ferromagnetic region for samples with different Gd concentration. The saturated anomalous Hall effect conductivity value of 5.0 S·cm(-1) in Gd-doped EuO is more than an order of magnitude larger than those reported so far for Eu chalcogenides doped with anion vacancies.

  15. Magnetoresistance generated from charge-spin conversion by anomalous Hall effect in metallic ferromagnetic/nonmagnetic bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Tomohiro

    2016-11-01

    A theoretical formulation of magnetoresistance effect in a metallic ferromagnetic/nonmagnetic bilayer originated from the charge-spin conversion by the anomalous Hall effect is presented. Analytical expressions of the longitudinal and transverse resistivities in both nonmagnet and ferromagnet are obtained by solving the spin diffusion equation. The magnetoresistance generated from charge-spin conversion purely caused by the anomalous Hall effect in the ferromagnet is found to be proportional to the square of the spin polarizations in the ferromagnet and has fixed sign. We also find additional magnetoresistances in both nonmagnet and ferromagnet arising from the mixing of the spin Hall and anomalous Hall effects. The sign of this mixing resistance depends on those of the spin Hall angle in the nonmagnet and the spin polarizations of the ferromagnet.

  16. Factors Affecting Training Effectiveness in Synchronous, Dispersed Virtual Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    report will consider both pedagogies but will be constrained to dispersed applications with synchronous modes of interaction (Figure 3). Where relatable ...NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA MBA PROFESSIONAL REPORT FACTORS AFFECTING TRAINING EFFECTIVENESS IN SYNCHRONOUS, DISPERSED...VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENTS By: William Spears June 2014 Advisors: Kathryn Aten, Marco DiRenzo Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited

  17. Anomalous effective medium approximation breakdown in deeply subwavelength all-dielectric photonic multilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andryieuski, Andrei; Lavrinenko, Andrei; Zhukovsky, Sergei

    2015-01-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of the applicability of the effective medium approximation to deeply subwavelength (period ≤λ/50) all-dielectric multilayer structures. We demonstrate that even though the dispersion relations for such multilayers differ from the effective medium prediction onl...

  18. Dispersed phase effects on boundary layer turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, David; Helgans, Brian

    2016-11-01

    In natural and environmental settings, turbulence is often seeded with some sort of dispersed phase: dust, rain, snow, sediment, etc. Depending on the circumstances, elements of the dispersed phase can participate in both dynamic and thermodynamic coupling, thereby altering the turbulent transfer of heat, moisture, and momentum through several complex avenues. In this study, evaporating droplets are two-way coupled to turbulent wall-bounded flow via direct numerical simulation (DNS) and Lagrangian point particle tracking, and we are specifically interested in the wall-normal transport of momentum, heat, and moisture. Our studies show that particles can carry significant portions of all three, and that this is a strong function of the particle Stokes number. These findings are interpreted in the context of environmental flows and the practical implications will be discussed. The authors acknowledge the National Science Foundation for funding under Grant #AGS-1429921.

  19. Anomalous scaling in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence: Effects of anisotropy and compressibility in the kinematic approximation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonov, N V; Kostenko, M M

    2015-11-01

    The field-theoretic renormalization group and the operator product expansion are applied to the model of passive vector (magnetic) field advected by a random turbulent velocity field. The latter is governed by the Navier-Stokes equation for compressible fluid, subject to external random force with the covariance ∝ δ(t-t')k(4-d-y), where d is the dimension of space and y is an arbitrary exponent. From physics viewpoints, the model describes magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the so-called kinematic approximation, where the effects of the magnetic field on the dynamics of the fluid are neglected. The original stochastic problem is reformulated as a multiplicatively renormalizable field-theoretic model; the corresponding renormalization group equations possess an infrared attractive fixed point. It is shown that various correlation functions of the magnetic field and its powers demonstrate anomalous scaling behavior in the inertial-convective range already for small values of y. The corresponding anomalous exponents, identified with scaling (critical) dimensions of certain composite fields ("operators" in the quantum-field terminology), can be systematically calculated as series in y. The practical calculation is performed in the leading one-loop approximation, including exponents in anisotropic contributions. It should be emphasized that, in contrast to Gaussian ensembles with finite correlation time, the model and the perturbation theory presented here are manifestly Galilean covariant.

  20. Assessing the effects of timing irregularities on radio pulsars anomalous braking indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukwude, A. E.; Chidi Odo, Finbarr

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the statistical effects of non-discrete timing irregularities on observed radio pulsar braking indices using correlations between the second derivative of the measured anomalous frequency (̈νobs) and some parameters that have been widely used to quantify pulsar timing fluctuations (the timing activity parameter (A), the amount of timing fluctuations absorbed by the cubic term (σR23) and a measure of pulsar rotational stability (σz)) in a large sample of 366 Jodrell Bank Observatory radio pulsars. The result demonstrates that anomalous braking indices are largely artifacts produced by aggregations of fluctuations that occur within or outside the pulsar system. For a subsample of 223 normal radio pulsars whose observed timing activity appeared consistent with instabilities in rotation of the underlying neutron stars (or timing noise) over timescales of ˜ 10 - 40 yr, |̈νobs| strongly correlates (with correlation coefficient |r| ˜ 0.80 - 0.90) with the pulsar timing activity parameters and spin-down properties. On the other hand, no meaningful correlations (r < 0.3) were found between ̈νobs and the timing activity diagnostics and spin-down parameters in the remaining 143 objects, whose timing activity appears significantly dominated by white noise fluctuations. The current result can be better understood if the timing noise in isolated pulsars originates from intrinsic spin-down processes of the underlying neutron stars, but white noise fluctuations largely arise from processes external to the pulsar system.

  1. Effects of Anomalous Tensor Couplings in BOs -(B-)Os Mixing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG Qin; HAN Lin; YANG Ya-Dong

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by the recently observed anomalous large dimuon charge asymmetry in neutral B decays,we study the effects of the anomalous tensor couplings to pursue a possible solution.With the constraints from the observables φJ/(φ)(φ,f0)s,aSsl and ΔMs,the new physics parameter spaces are severely restricted.We find that the contributions induced by the color-singlet or the color-octet tensor operators are helpful to moderate the anomaly in BOs - (B-)Osmixing.Numerically,the observable aSsl could be enhanced by about two orders of magnitude by the contributionsof color-singlet or color-octet tensor operators with their respective nontrivial new weak phase φT1 =41° ± 35° orφs =-47° ± 33° and relevant strength parameters |gT1| =(2.89 ± 1.40) × 10-2 or |gT8| =(0.79 ± 0.34) × 10-2.However,due to the fact that the NP contributions are severely suppressed by the recent LHCb measurement for φJ/φ(φ,f0)s,our theoretical result of aSsl is still much smaller than the central value of the experimental data.

  2. Predicting molecular scale skin-effect in electrochemical impedance due to anomalous subdiffusion mediated adsorption phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arindam Kushagra

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Anomalous subdiffusion governs the processes which are not energetically driven, on a molecular scale. This paper proposes a model to predict the response of electrochemical impedance due to such diffusion process. Previous works considered the use of fractional calculus to predict the impedance behaviour in response to the anomalous diffusion. Here, we have developed an expression which predicts the skin-effect, marked by an increase in the impedance with increasing frequency, in this regime. Negative inductances have also been predicted as a consequence of the inertial response of adsorbed species upon application of frequency-mediated perturbations. It might help the researchers in the fields of impedimetric sensors to choose the working frequency and those working in the field of batteries to choose the parameters, likewise. This work would shed some light into the molecular mechanisms governing the impedance when exposed to frequency-based perturbations like electromagnetic waves (microwaves to ionizing radiations and in charge storage devices like batteries etc.

  3. QCD Dirac Spectrum at Finite Chemical Potential: Anomalous Effective Action, Berry Phase and Composite Fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yizhuang

    2015-01-01

    We show that the QCD Dirac spectrum at finite chemical potential using a 2-matrix model in the spontaneously broken phase, is amenable to a generic 2-dimensional effective action on a curved eigenvalue manifold. The eigenvalues form a droplet with strong screening and non-linear plasmons. The droplet is threaded by a magnetic vortex which is at the origin of a Berry phase. The adiabatic transport in the droplet maps onto the one in the fractional quantum Hall effect, suggesting that composite fermions at half filling are Dirac particles. We use this observation to argue for two novel anomalous effects in the edge transport of composite fermions, and conversely on a novel contribution to the QCD quark condensate in a rotating frame.

  4. Anomalous DIBL Effect in Fully Depleted SOI MOSFETs Using Nanoscale Gate-Recessed Channel Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avi Karsenty

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoscale Gate-Recessed Channel (GRC Fully Depleted- (FD- SOI MOSFET device with a silicon channel thickness (tSi as low as 2.2 nm was first tested at room temperature for functionality check and then tested at low temperature (77 K for I-V characterizations. In spite of its FD-SOI nanoscale thickness and long channel feature, the device has surprisingly exhibited a Drain-Induced Barrier Lowering (DIBL effect at RT. However, this effect was suppressed at 77 K. If the apparition of such anomalous effect can be explained by a parasitic short channel transistor located at the edges of the channel, its suppression is explained by the decrease of the potential barrier between the drain and the channel when lowering the temperature.

  5. Evaluating Chemical Dispersant Efficacy In An Experimental Wave Tank: 1, Dispersant Effectiveness As A Function Of Energy Dissipation Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numerous laboratory test systems have been developed for the comparison of efficacy between various chemical oil dispersant formulations. However, for the assessment of chemical dispersant effectiveness under realistic sea state, test protocols are required to produce hydrodynam...

  6. Anomalous memory effect in the breakdown of low-pressure argon in a long discharge tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meshchanov, A. V.; Korshunov, A. N.; Ionikh, Yu. Z., E-mail: y.ionikh@spbu.ru [St. Petersburg State University (Russian Federation); Dyatko, N. A. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation)

    2015-08-15

    The characteristics of breakdown of argon in a long tube (with a gap length of 75 cm and diameter of 2.8 cm) at pressures of 1 and 5 Torr and stationary discharge currents of 5–40 mA were studied experimentally. The breakdown was initiated by paired positive voltage pulses with a rise rate of ∼10{sup 8}–10{sup 9} V/s and duration of ∼1–10 ms. The time interval between pairs was varied in the range of Τ ∼ 0.1–1 s, and that between pulses in a pair was varied from τ = 0.4 ms to ≈Τ/2. The aim of this work was to detect and study the so-called “anomalous memory effect” earlier observed in breakdown in nitrogen. The effect consists in the dynamic breakdown voltage in the second pulse in a pair being higher than in the first pulse (in contrast to the “normal” memory effect, in which the relation between the breakdown voltages is opposite). It is found that this effect is observed when the time interval between pairs of pulses is such that the first pulse in a pair is in the range of the normal memory effect of the preceding pair (under the given conditions, Τ ≈ 0.1–0.4 s). In this case, at τ ∼ 10 ms, the breakdown voltage of the second pulse is higher than the reduced breakdown voltage of the first pulse. Optical observations of the ionization wave preceding breakdown in a long tube show that, in the range of the anomalous memory effect and at smaller values of τ, no ionization wave is detected before breakdown in the second pulse. A qualitative interpretation of the experimental results is given.

  7. The formation of anomalous Hall effect depending on W atoms in ZnO thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Can, Musa Mutlu, E-mail: musamutlucan@gmail.com [Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Nanotechnology Research and Application Center, Sabancı University, Tuzla, 34956 İstanbul (Turkey); CNR-SPIN, Universitá di Napoli “Federico II”, Compl. Univ. di Monte S. Angelo, Via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Shah, S. Ismat [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Department of Material Science and Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Fırat, Tezer [Department of Physics Engineering, Hacettepe University, Beytepe 06800 Ankara (Turkey)

    2014-06-01

    This article investigates the effects of intrinsic point defects and extrinsic W atoms on magneto electrical properties in the ZnO lattice. The analyses were accomplished for ∼0.5% W including ZnO thin films, grown using a radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering system. The polarized spin current dependent magnetic formation was investigated by longitudinal and transverse magneto electrical measurements in a temperature range of 5 K to 300 K. The positive magneto resistivity (PMR) ratios reached 28.8%, 12.7%, and 17.6% at 5 K for thin films, having different post-deposition annealing conditions as a consequence of ionic W dependent defects in the lattice. Furthermore, an anomalous Hall effect, originating from polarized spin currents, was understood from the split in Hall resistance versus magnetic field (R{sub xy}(H)) curves for the thin film with high amount of Zn{sup 2+} and W{sup 6+} ionic defects.

  8. Anomalous isotopic effect on electron-directed reactivity by a 3-{\\mu}m midinfrared pulse

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Kunlong; Lan, Pengfei; Lu, Peixiang

    2012-01-01

    We have theoretically studied the effect of nuclear mass on electron localization in dissociating H_2^+ and its isotopes subjected to a few-cycle 3-{\\mu}m laser pulse. Compared to the isotopic trend in the near-infrared regime, our results reveal an inverse isotopic effect in which the degree of electron-directed reactivity is even higher for heavier isotopes. With the semi-classical analysis, we find, for the first time, the pronounced electron localization is established by the interferences through different channels of one- and, more importantly, higher-order photon coupling. Interestingly, due to the enhanced high-order above-threshold dissociation of heavier isotopes, the interference maxima gradually become in phase with growing mass and ultimately lead to the anomalous isotopic behavior of the electron localization. This indicates that the multi-photon coupling channels will play an important role in controlling the dissociation of larger molecules with midinfrared pulses.

  9. Precise Quantization of the Anomalous Hall Effect near Zero Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bestwick, A. J.; Fox, E. J.; Kou, Xufeng; Pan, Lei; Wang, Kang L.; Goldhaber-Gordon, D.

    2015-05-01

    We report a nearly ideal quantum anomalous Hall effect in a three-dimensional topological insulator thin film with ferromagnetic doping. Near zero applied magnetic field we measure exact quantization in the Hall resistance to within a part per 10 000 and a longitudinal resistivity under 1 Ω per square, with chiral edge transport explicitly confirmed by nonlocal measurements. Deviations from this behavior are found to be caused by thermally activated carriers, as indicated by an Arrhenius law temperature dependence. Using the deviations as a thermometer, we demonstrate an unexpected magnetocaloric effect and use it to reach near-perfect quantization by cooling the sample below the dilution refrigerator base temperature in a process approximating adiabatic demagnetization refrigeration.

  10. Scaling of Anomalous Hall Effects in Facing-Target Reactively Sputtered Fe4N Films

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yan

    2015-05-13

    Anomalous Hall effect (AHE) in the reactively sputtered epitaxial and polycrystalline γ′-Fe4N films is investigated systematically. The Hall resistivity is positive in the entire temperature range. The magnetization, carrier density and grain boundaries scattering have a major impact on the AHE scaling law. The scaling exponent γ in the conventional scaling of is larger than 2 in both the epitaxial and polycrystalline γ′-Fe4N films. Although γ>2 has been found in heterogeneous systems due to the effects of the surface and interface scattering on AHE, γ>2 is not expected in homogenous epitaxial systems. We demonstrated that γ>2 results from residual resistivity (ρxx0) in γ′-Fe4N films. Furthermore, the side-jump and intrinsic mechanisms are dominant in both epitaxial and polycrystalline samples according to the proper scaling relation.

  11. Thermally Driven Pure Spin and Valley Currents via the Anomalous Nernst Effect in Monolayer Group-VI Dichalcogenides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Xiao-Qin; Zhu, Zhen-Gang; Su, Gang;

    2015-01-01

    The spin and valley-dependent anomalous Nernst effects are analyzed for monolayer MoS2 and other group-VI dichalcogenides. We find that pure spin and valley currents can be generated perpendicular to the applied thermal gradient in the plane of these two-dimensional materials. This effect provide...

  12. Effective Long-Distance Pollen Dispersal in Centaurea jacea

    OpenAIRE

    Albrecht, M; Duelli, P; M. K. Obrist; Müller, C.; Kleijn, D.; Schmid, B.

    2009-01-01

    Background Agri-environment schemes play an increasingly important role for the conservation of rare plants in intensively managed agricultural landscapes. However, little is known about their effects on gene flow via pollen dispersal between populations of these species. Methodology/Principal Findings In a 2-year experiment, we observed effective pollen dispersal from source populations of Centaurea jacea in restored meadows, the most widespread Swiss agri-environment scheme, to potted plant...

  13. Effective Long-Distance Pollen Dispersal in Centaurea jacea

    OpenAIRE

    Matthias Albrecht; Peter Duelli; Obrist, Martin K.; David Kleijn; Bernhard Schmid

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Agri-environment schemes play an increasingly important role for the conservation of rare plants in intensively managed agricultural landscapes. However, little is known about their effects on gene flow via pollen dispersal between populations of these species. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a 2-year experiment, we observed effective pollen dispersal from source populations of Centaurea jacea in restored meadows, the most widespread Swiss agri-environment scheme, to potted pla...

  14. Shade Effects on the Dispersal of Airborne Hemileia vastatrix Uredospores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudrot, Audrey; Pico, Jimmy; Merle, Isabelle; Granados, Eduardo; Vílchez, Sergio; Tixier, Philippe; Filho, Elías de Melo Virginio; Casanoves, Fernando; Tapia, Ana; Allinne, Clémentine; Rice, Robert A; Avelino, Jacques

    2016-06-01

    Hemileia vastatrix caused a severe epidemic in Central America in 2012-13. The gradual development of that epidemic on nearly a continental scale suggests that dispersal at different scales played a significant role. Shade has been proposed as a way of reducing uredospore dispersal. The effect of shade (two strata: Erythrina poeppigiana below and Chloroleucon eurycyclum above) and full sun on H. vastatrix dispersal was studied with Burkard traps in relation to meteorological records. Annual and daily patterns of dispersal were observed, with peaks of uredospore capture obtained during wet seasons and in the early afternoon. A maximum of 464 uredospores in 1 day (in 14.4 m(3) of air) was recorded in October 2014. Interactions between shade/full sun and meteorological conditions were found. Rainfall, possibly intercepted by tree cover and redistributed by raindrops of higher kinetic energy, was the main driver of uredospore dispersal under shade. Wind gusts reversed this effect, probably by inhibiting water accumulation on leaves. Wind gusts also promoted dispersal under dry conditions in full sun, whereas they had no effect under shaded conditions, probably because the canopy blocked the wind. Our results indicate the importance of managing shade cover differentially in rainy versus dry periods to control the dispersal of airborne H. vastatrix uredospores.

  15. Anomalous Hall effect and magnetoresistance behavior in Co/Pd1−xAgx multilayers

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Z. B.

    2013-02-13

    In this paper, we report anomalous Hall effect (AHE) correlated with the magnetoresistance behavior in [Co/Pd1-xAg x]n multilayers. For the multilayers with n = 6, the increase in Ag content from x = 0 to 0.52 induces the change in AHE sign from negative surface scattering-dominated AHE to positive interface scattering-dominated AHE, which is accompanied with the transition from anisotropy magnetoresistance (AMR) dominated transport to giant magnetoresistance (GMR) dominated transport. For n = 80, scaling analysis with Rs ∝ρ xx γ yields γ ∼ 3.44 for x = 0.52 which presents GMR-type transport, in contrast to γ ∼ 5.7 for x = 0 which presents AMR-type transport. © 2013 American Institute of Physics.

  16. Tuning anomalous Hall effect in perpendicular multilayers with different oxygen environment by interfacial ionic migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J. Y.; Sun, Q. Y.; Liu, Y. W.; Peng, W. L.; Wang, F. M.; Pan, Y. D.; Ding, L.; Yu, G. H.

    2017-02-01

    Interfacial oxygen migration and its induced anomalous Hall effect are reported in perpendicular multilayers with different interfacial oxygen-coordinated. Saturation Hall resistance RAH for Pt/Co/MgO/Pt and Pt/Co/Al2O3/Pt multilayers is 3.66 Ω and 4.34 Ω in as-deposited state, respectively. After annealing at 400 °C, RAH value reaches 4.82 Ω and 6.67 Ω, which is 32% and 54% larger than that in as-deposited samples, respectively. Especially, the increment value ΔRAH in Pt/Co/Al2O3/Pt multilayers is 101% larger than that in Pt/Co/MgO/Pt film. Interfacial structural analysis shows such differentΔRAH in two samples originates from distinct oxygen migration behavior induced different interfacial oxygen-coordinated.

  17. Chern half metals: a new class of topological materials to realize the quantum anomalous Hall effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jun; Zhu, Zhenyue; Wu, Ruqian

    2015-03-11

    New topological insulators that demonstrate the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) are a cutting-edge research topic in condensed matter physics and materials science. So far, the QAHE has been observed only in Cr-doped (Bi,Sb)2Te3 at extremely low temperature. Therefore, it is important to find new materials with large topological band gap and high thermal stability for the realization of the QAHE. On the basis of first-principles and tight-binding model calculations, we discovered a new class of topological phase, Chern half metal, which manifests the QAHE in one spin channel while is metallic in the other spin channel, in Co or Rh deposited graphene. The QAHE is robust in these sytems for the adatom coverage ranging from 2% to 6%. Meanwhile, these systems have large perpendicular magnetic anisotropy energies of 5.3 and 11.5 meV, necessary for the observation of the QAHE at reasonably high temperature.

  18. Theory of Multifarious Quantum Phases and Large Anomalous Hall Effect in Pyrochlore Iridate Thin Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kyusung; Kim, Yong Baek

    2016-07-15

    We theoretically investigate emergent quantum phases in the thin film geometries of the pyrochore iridates, where a number of exotic quantum ground states are proposed to occur in bulk materials as a result of the interplay between electron correlation and strong spin-orbit coupling. The fate of these bulk phases as well as novel quantum states that may arise only in the thin film platforms, are studied via a theoretical model that allows layer-dependent magnetic structures. It is found that the magnetic order develop in inhomogeneous fashions in the thin film geometries. This leads to a variety of magnetic metal phases with modulated magnetic ordering patterns across different layers. Both the bulk and boundary electronic states in these phases conspire to promote unusual electronic properties. In particular, such phases are akin to the Weyl semimetal phase in the bulk system and they would exhibit an unusually large anomalous Hall effect.

  19. Anomalous finite-size effects in the Battle of the Sexes

    CERN Document Server

    Cremer, Jonas; Frey, Erwin

    2007-01-01

    The Battle of the Sexes describes asymmetric conflicts in mating behavior of males and females. Males can be philanderer or faithful, while females are either fast or coy, leading to a cyclic dynamics. The adjusted replicator equation predicts stable coexistence of all four strategies. In this situation, we consider the effects of fluctuations stemming from a finite population size. We show that they unavoidably lead to extinction of two strategies in the population. However, the typical time until extinction occurs strongly prolongs with increasing system size. In the meantime, a quasi-stationary probability distribution forms that is anomalously flat in the vicinity of the coexistence state. This behavior originates in a vanishing linear deterministic drift near the fixed point. We provide numerical data as well as an analytical approach to the mean extinction time and the quasi-stationary probability distribution.

  20. Theory for the anomalous electron transport in Hall effect thrusters. II. Kinetic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafleur, T.; Baalrud, S. D.; Chabert, P.

    2016-05-01

    In Paper I [T. Lafleur et al., Phys. Plasmas 23, 053502 (2016)], we demonstrated (using particle-in-cell simulations) the definite correlation between an anomalously high cross-field electron transport in Hall effect thrusters (HETs), and the presence of azimuthal electrostatic instabilities leading to enhanced electron scattering. Here, we present a kinetic theory that predicts the enhanced scattering rate and provides an electron cross-field mobility that is in good agreement with experiment. The large azimuthal electron drift velocity in HETs drives a strong instability that quickly saturates due to a combination of ion-wave trapping and wave-convection, leading to an enhanced mobility many orders of magnitude larger than that expected from classical diffusion theory. In addition to the magnetic field strength, B0, this enhanced mobility is a strong function of the plasma properties (such as the plasma density) and therefore does not, in general, follow simple 1 /B02 or 1 /B0 scaling laws.

  1. Anomalous Hall effect in a ferromagnetic Fe3Sn2 single crystal with a geometrically frustrated Fe bilayer kagome lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Sun, Shanshan; Zhang, Xiao; Pang, Fei; Lei, Hechang

    2016-08-01

    The anomalous Hall effect (AHE) is investigated for a ferromagnetic Fe3Sn2 single crystal with a geometrically frustrated kagome bilayer of Fe. The scaling behavior between anomalous Hall resistivity ρxy A and longitudinal resistivity ρx x is quadratic and further analysis implies that the AHE in the Fe3Sn2 single crystal should be dominated by the intrinsic Karplus-Luttinger mechanism rather than extrinsic skew-scattering or side-jump mechanisms. Moreover, there is a sudden jump of anomalous Hall conductivity σxy A appearing at about 100 K where the spin-reorientation transition from the c axis to the a b plane is completed. This change of σxy A might be related to the evolution of the Fermi surface induced by the spin-reorientation transition.

  2. EFFECTS OF CHEMICAL DISPERSANTS AND MINERAL FINES ON CRUDE OIL DISPERSION IN A WAVE TANK UNDER BREAKING WAVES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The interaction of chemical dispersants and suspended sediments with crude oil influences the fate and transport of oil spills in coastal waters. A wave tank study was conducted to investigate the effects of chemical dispersants and mineral fines on the dispersion of oil and the ...

  3. Atmospheric dispersion effects in weak lensing measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Plazas, Andrés A

    2012-01-01

    The wavelength dependence of atmospheric refraction causes elongation of finite-bandwidth images along the elevation vector, which produces spurious signals in weak gravitational lensing shear measurements unless this atmospheric dispersion is calibrated and removed to high precision. Because astrometric solutions and point spread function (PSF) characteristics are typically calibrated from stellar images, differences between the reference stars' spectra and the galaxies' spectra will leave residual errors in both the astrometric positions ($\\Delta{\\bar{R}}$) and in the second moment (width) of the wavelength-averaged PSF ($\\Delta{v}$) for galaxies. We estimate the level of $\\Delta{V}$ that will induce spurious weak lensing signals in PSF-corrected galaxy shapes that exceed the statistical errors of the {\\em Dark Energy Survey (DES)} and the {\\em Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST)} cosmic-shear experiments. We also estimate the $\\Delta{\\bar{R}}$ signals that will produce unacceptable spurious distortions ...

  4. Effect of Solvation Film on the Viscosity of Colloidal Dispersions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Chang-Sheng; GU Qing-Bao; SONG Shao-Xian

    2005-01-01

    Viscosity is one of the most important properties of colloids in mixing, transportation, stabilization, energy consumption, and so on. According to Einstein's viscosity equation, the viscosity of a colloidal dispersion increases with the increase of particle concentration. And the equation can be applicable to all micro-particle dispersions, because the effect of solvation films coated on particles can be neglectable in that case. But with the decrease of particle size to nano-scale, the formation of solvation films on nano-particles can greatly affect the viscosity of a dispersion, and Einstein's equation may not be applicable to this case. In this work, one kind of micro-size silica particle and two kinds of nano-size silica particles were used to investigate the effect of solvation films on dispersion viscosity, dispersed in water and ethyl alcohol solvents, respectively. The results of theoretical calculation and experimental investigation show that the increase of viscosity is contributed from solvation films by more than 95 percent for nano-particle dispersions, while less than 10 percent for micro-particle dispersions.

  5. Measurement of the nucleation and propagation field in a single Co/Pt multilayer dot by anomalous Hall effect.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de J.; Delalande, M.Y.; Abelmann, L.; Lodder, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    It has been suggested that the reversal mechanism in highly exchange coupled systems, like Co/Pt multilayers, takes place by nucleation of a reversed domain, followed by domain wall movement. Based on magnetic force microscopy (MFM) and anomalous Hall effect (AHE) measurements, we show that this mod

  6. Measurement of the nucleation and domain depinning field in a single Co/Pt multilayer dot by anomalous Hall effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delalande, M.; Vries, de J.; Abelmann, L.; Lodder, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    Co/Pt multilayer dots with perpendicular anisotropy and with diameters of 250 and 350 nm were fabricated on top of a Hall cross configuration. The angular dependence of the magnetic reversal of the individual dot was investigated by Anomalous Hall effect measurements. At near in-plane angles (85° wi

  7. Vacuum effects in magnetic field with with account for fermion anomalous magnetic moment and axial-vector interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubnov, Andrey; Gubina, Nadezda; Zhukovsky, Vladimir

    2016-05-01

    We study vacuum polarization effects in the model of Dirac fermions with additional interaction of an anomalous magnetic moment with an external magnetic field and fermion interaction with an axial-vector condensate. The proper time method is used to calculate the one-loop vacuum corrections with consideration for different configurations of the characteristic parameters of these interactions.

  8. Effects of landscape corridors on seed dispersal by birds.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levey, Douglas, J.; Bolker, Benjamin M.; Tewksbury, Joshua J.; Sargent, Sarah; Haddad, Nick M.

    2005-07-01

    Levey, Douglas, J., Benjamin M. Bolker, Joshua J. Tewksbury, Sarah Sargent, and Nick M. Haddad. 2005. Effects of landscape corridors on seed dispersal by birds. Science 309:146-148. Abstract: Habitat fragmentation threatens biodiversity by disrupting dispersal. The mechanisms and consequences of this disruption are controversial, primarily because most organisms are difficult to track. We examined the effect of habitat corridors on long-distance dispersal of seeds by birds, and tested whether small-scale (G20 meters) movements of birds could be scaled up to predict dispersal of seeds across hundreds of meters in eight experimentally fragmented landscapes. A simulation model accurately predicted the observed pattern of seed rain and revealed that corridors functioned through edge following behavior of birds. Our study shows how models based on easily observed behaviors can be scaled up to predict landscape-level processes.

  9. Statistical characteristics and effects of polarization mode dispersion in dispersion managed soliton systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Ming; JI Jian-hua

    2006-01-01

    Firstly,the JME(Jones matrix eigen) method is used to simulate the statistical characteristics of first- and second-order PMD in dispersion management system.Then,with help of the CNLSE (coupled nonlinear Schrdinger equations),the effects of PMD on DMS (dispersion managed soliton) transmission is studied with a variational method.The simplified relationships of the statistical parameters of second-order and first-order of PMD in dispersion management system have been gotten,from which the detailed information of second-order can be obtained,if the condition of DGD is given.The results have shown that the first and second-order PMD (polarization mode dispersion) vectors influence the evolution of energy and Mean square of time displacement of DMS in high-speed bit rates systems.When D1 stPMD>0.3 ps/km1/2,we must consider some means of control(for example the filter) to restrain the PMD.

  10. Two-loop anomalous dimensions of heavy baryon currents in heavy quark effective theory

    CERN Document Server

    Groote, S; Yakovlev, O I

    1996-01-01

    We present results on the two-loop anomalous dimensions of the heavy baryon HQET currents J=(q^TC\\Gamma\\tau q)\\Gamma'Q with arbitrary Dirac matrices \\Gamma and \\Gamma'. From our general result we obtain the two-loop anomalous dimensions for currents with quantum numbers of the ground state heavy baryons \\Lambda_Q, \\Sigma_Q and \\Sigma_Q^*. As a by-product of our calculation and as an additional check we rederive the known two-loop anomalous dimensions of mesonic scalar, pseudoscalar, vector, axial vector and tensor currents (J=\\bar q\\Gamma q) in massless QCD as well as in HQET.

  11. Effect of Initial Frequency Chirp on Supercontinuum Generation in Dispersion-flattened Fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yong-zhu; LI Yong-yao; YU Zhi-qiang Yu; FENG Ming-neng

    2009-01-01

    . Supercontinuum generation in dispersion-flattened fibers is studied theoretically. It is found that the flat spectral width of the supercontinuum generation in normal dispersion-flattened fiber can be increased from 66 nm to over 100 nm when the absolute value of the initial frequency chirps is increased from zero to 10. It is further found that initial frequency chirps are adverse to flat and wideband supercontinuum generation in anomalous dispersion-flattened fiber, and when the absolute value of the frequency chirps is increased to a certain degree, supercontinuum spectrum even can not be achieved.

  12. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in time-reversal-symmetry breaking topological insulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Cui-Zu; Li, Mingda

    2016-03-31

    The quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE), the last member of Hall family, was predicted to exhibit quantized Hall conductivity σ(yx) = e2/h without any external magnetic field. The QAHE shares a similar physical phenomenon with the integer quantum Hall effect (QHE), whereas its physical origin relies on the intrinsic topological inverted band structure and ferromagnetism. Since the QAHE does not require external energy input in the form of magnetic field, it is believed that this effect has unique potential for applications in future electronic devices with low-power consumption. More recently, the QAHE has been experimentally observed in thin films of the time-reversal symmetry breaking ferromagnetic (FM) topological insulators (TI), Cr- and V- doped (Bi,Sb)2Te3. In this topical review, we review the history of TI based QAHE, the route to the experimental observation of the QAHE in the above two systems, the current status of the research of the QAHE, and finally the prospects for future studies.

  13. Anomalous effect of ion velocity on track formation in GeS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szenes, G.; Pécz, B.

    2016-12-01

    Systematic experiments were performed for studying the effect of the projectile velocity (velocity effect, VE) in GeS which has a highly anisotropic conductivity. The prethinned specimens were irradiated by Bi, Au, W, Xe, Ag, Kr, Ni and Fe ions of about E ≈ 1 MeV/nucleon energy. Track radii were measured by transmission electron microscopy. Compared to previous experiments performed with high velocity projectile, there is a marked VE for Se > 20 keV/nm (Se - electronic stopping power). However, the VE is gradually reduced and finally disappears as Se decreases. This effect is described for the first time. The predictions according to the Analytical Thermal Spike Model are in excellent quantitative agreement with the experiments in the range Se > 20 keV/nm. The anomalous behavior of track evolution at lower values of Se is attributed to the combination of semiconducting and insulating properties. An explanation of the VE is given based on the Coulomb explosion model.

  14. Anomalous Hall effect sensors based on magnetic element doped topological insulator thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Yan; Zhang, Zhen; Nlebedim, Ikenna; Jiles, David

    Anomalous Hall effect (AHE) is recently discovered in magnetic element doped topological insulators (TIs), which promises low power consumption highly efficient spintronics and electronics. This discovery broaden the family of Hall effect (HE) sensors. In this work, both HE and AHE sensor based on Mn and Cr doped Bi2Te3 TI thin films will be systematically studied. The influence of Mn concentration on sensitivity of MnxBi2-xTe3 HE sensors will be discussed. The Hall sensitivity increase 8 times caused by quantum AHE will be reported. AHE senor based on Cr-doped Bi2Te3 TI thin films will also be studied and compared with Mn doped Bi2Te3 AHE sensor. The influence of thickness on sensitivity of CrxBi2-xTe3 AHE sensors will be discussed. Ultrahigh Hall sensitivity is obtained in Cr doped Bi2Te3. The largest Hall sensitivity can reach 2620 Ω/T in sensor which is almost twice higher than that of the normal semiconductor HE sensor. Our work indicates that magnetic element doped topological insulator with AHE are good candidates for ultra-sensitive Hall effect sensors.

  15. Reducing losses and dispersion effects in multilayer metamaterial tunnelling devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baena, Juan D [Department of Electronics and Electromagnetism, Faculty of Physics, University of Seville, Avenida Reina Mercedes, 41012 Seville (Spain); Jelinek, Lukas [Department of Electromagnetic Field, Czech Technical University, Technicka 2, 16627-Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Marques, Ricardo [Department of Electronics and Electromagnetism, Faculty of Physics, University of Seville, Avenida Reina Mercedes, 41012 Seville (Spain)

    2005-01-01

    This paper focuses on reduction of losses and dispersion effects on tunnelling through waveguides filled with metamaterial. It will be shown that these unwanted effects could be reduced by dividing the metamaterial into several regions separated by air slabs. In the first part, these effects will be studied for isotropic left-handed media (LHM). Later this will be substituted by an anisotropic magnetic medium which will lead to a practical realization with broadside coupled split ring resonators (BC-SRRs). Finally, it is shown that quasi-perfect tunnelling is possible, even in the presence of unavoidable losses and dispersion in the metamaterial.

  16. Sub-100 fs pulses from an all-polarization maintaining Yb-fiber oscillator with an anomalous dispersion higher-order-mode fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verhoef, A. J.; Zhu, L.; Israelsen, Stine Møller;

    2015-01-01

    We present an Yb-fiber oscillator with an all-polarizationmaintaining cavity with a higher-order-mode fiber for dispersion compensation. The polarization maintaining higher order mode fiber introduces not only negative second order dispersion but also negative third order dispersion in the cavity......, in contrast to dispersion compensation schemes used in previous demonstrations of all-polarization maintaining Yb-fiber oscillators. The performance of the saturable absorber mirror modelocked oscillator, that employs a free space scheme for coupling onto the saturable absorber mirror and output coupling......-fiber oscillator. The spectral phase of the output pulses is well behaved and can be compensated such that wing-free Fourier transform limited pulses can be obtained. Further reduction of the net intracavity third order dispersion will allow generating broader output spectra and consequently shorter pulses...

  17. Sub-100 fs pulses from an all-polarization maintaining Yb-fiber oscillator with an anomalous dispersion higher-order-mode fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verhoef, A.J.; Zhu, L.; Israelsen, Stine Møller;

    2015-01-01

    We present an Yb-fiber oscillator with an all-polarization-maintaining cavity with a higher-order-mode fiber for dispersion compensation. The polarization maintaining higher order mode fiber introduces not only negative second order dispersion but also negative third order dispersion in the cavity......, in contrast to dispersion compensation schemes used in previous demonstrations of all-polarization maintaining Yb-fiber oscillators. The performance of the saturable absorber mirror modelocked oscillator, that employs a free space scheme for coupling onto the saturable absorber mirror and output coupling......-fiber oscillator. The spectral phase of the output pulses is well behaved and can be compensated such that wing-free Fourier transform limited pulses can be obtained. Further reduction of the net intracavity third order dispersion will allow generating broader output spectra and consequently shorter pulses...

  18. The foreign exchange market: return distributions, multifractality, anomalous multifractality and the Epps effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drożdż, Stanisław; Kwapień, Jarosław; Oświȩcimka, Paweł; Rak, Rafał

    2010-10-01

    We present a systematic study of various statistical characteristics of high-frequency returns from the foreign exchange market. This study is based on six exchange rates forming two triangles: EUR-GBP-USD and GBP-CHF-JPY. It is shown that the exchange rate return fluctuations for all of the pairs considered are well described by the non-extensive statistics in terms of q-Gaussians. There exist some small quantitative variations in the non-extensivity q-parameter values for different exchange rates (which depend also on the time scales studied), and this can be related to the importance of a given exchange rate in the world's currency trade. Temporal correlations organize the series of returns such that they develop the multifractal characteristics for all of the exchange rates, with a varying degree of symmetry of the singularity spectrum f(α), however. The most symmetric spectrum is identified for the GBP/USD. We also form time series of triangular residual returns and find that the distributions of their fluctuations develop disproportionately heavier tails as compared to small fluctuations, which excludes description in terms of q-Gaussians. The multifractal characteristics of these residual returns reveal such anomalous properties as negative singularity exponents and even negative singularity spectra. Such anomalous multifractal measures have so far been considered in the literature in connection with diffusion-limited aggregation and with turbulence. Studying the cross-correlations among different exchange rates, we found that market inefficiency on short time scales leads to the occurrence of the Epps effect on much longer time scales, but comparable to the ones for the stock market. Although the currency market is much more liquid than the stock markets and has a much greater transaction frequency, the building up of correlations takes up to several hours—a duration that does not differ much from what is observed in the stock markets. This may suggest

  19. Correction to the Casimir force due to the anomalous skin effect

    CERN Document Server

    Esquivel, R

    2004-01-01

    The surface impedance approach is discussed in connection with the precise calculation of the Casimir force between metallic plates. It allows to take into account the nonlocal connection between the current density and electric field inside of metals. In general, a material has to be described by two impedances $Z_{s}(\\omega,q)$ and $Z_{p}(\\omega,q)$ corresponding to two different polarization states. In contrast with the approximate Leontovich impedance they depend not only on frequency $\\omega$ but also on the wave vector along the plate $q$. In this paper only the nonlocal effects happening at frequencies $\\omega<\\omega_{p}$ (plasma frequency) are analyzed. We refer to all of them as the anomalous skin effect. The impedances are calculated for the propagating and evanescent fields in the Boltzmann approximation. It is found that $Z_p$ significantly deviates from the local impedance as a result of the Thomas-Fermi screening. The nonlocal correction to the Casimir force is calculated at zero temperature....

  20. Switching of a large anomalous Hall effect between metamagnetic phases of a non-collinear antiferromagnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sürgers, Christoph; Wolf, Thomas; Adelmann, Peter; Kittler, Wolfram; Fischer, Gerda; Löhneysen, Hilbert v.

    2017-01-01

    The anomalous Hall effect (AHE), which in long-range ordered ferromagnets appears as a voltage transverse to the current and usually is proportional to the magnetization, often is believed to be of negligible size in antiferromagnets due to their low uniform magnetization. However, recent experiments and theory have demonstrated that certain antiferromagnets with a non-collinear arrangement of magnetic moments exhibit a sizeable spontaneous AHE at zero field due to a non-vanishing Berry curvature arising from the quantum mechanical phase of the electron’s wave functions. Here we show that antiferromagnetic Mn5Si3 single crystals exibit a large AHE which is strongly anisotropic and shows multiple transitions with sign changes at different magnetic fields due to field-induced rearrangements of the magnetic structure despite only tiny variations of the total magnetization. The presence of multiple non-collinear magnetic phases offers the unique possiblity to explore the details of the AHE and the sensitivity of the Hall effect on the details of the magnetic texture. PMID:28218287

  1. Switching of a large anomalous Hall effect between metamagnetic phases of a non-collinear antiferromagnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sürgers, Christoph; Wolf, Thomas; Adelmann, Peter; Kittler, Wolfram; Fischer, Gerda; Löhneysen, Hilbert V

    2017-02-20

    The anomalous Hall effect (AHE), which in long-range ordered ferromagnets appears as a voltage transverse to the current and usually is proportional to the magnetization, often is believed to be of negligible size in antiferromagnets due to their low uniform magnetization. However, recent experiments and theory have demonstrated that certain antiferromagnets with a non-collinear arrangement of magnetic moments exhibit a sizeable spontaneous AHE at zero field due to a non-vanishing Berry curvature arising from the quantum mechanical phase of the electron's wave functions. Here we show that antiferromagnetic Mn5Si3 single crystals exibit a large AHE which is strongly anisotropic and shows multiple transitions with sign changes at different magnetic fields due to field-induced rearrangements of the magnetic structure despite only tiny variations of the total magnetization. The presence of multiple non-collinear magnetic phases offers the unique possiblity to explore the details of the AHE and the sensitivity of the Hall effect on the details of the magnetic texture.

  2. Strong and Anomalous Thermal Expansion Precedes the Thermosalient Effect in Dynamic Molecular Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Manas K; Centore, Roberto; Causà, Mauro; Tuzi, Angela; Borbone, Fabio; Naumov, Panče

    2016-07-12

    The ability of thermosalient solids, organic analogues of inorganic martensites, to move by rapid mechanical reconfiguration or ballistic event remains visually appealing and potentially useful, yet mechanistically elusive phenomenon. Here, with a material that undergoes both thermosalient and non-thermosalient phase transitions, we demonstrate that the thermosalient effect is preceded by anomalous thermal expansion of the unit cell. The crystal explosion occurs as sudden release of the latent strain accumulated during the anisotropic, exceedingly strong expansion of the unit cell with αa = 225.9 × 10(-6) K(-1), αb = 238.8 × 10(-6) K(-1) and αc = -290.0 × 10(-6) K(-1), the latter being the largest negative thermal expansivity observed for an organic compound thus far. The results point out to the occurence of the thermosalient effect in phase transitions as means to identify new molecular materials with strong positive and/or negative thermal expansion which prior to this work could only be discovered serendipitously.

  3. Magnetoresistance and anomalous Hall effect of reactive sputtered polycrystalline Ti1 - XCrxN films

    KAUST Repository

    Duan, Xiaofei

    2013-09-01

    The reactive-sputtered polycrystalline Ti1 - xCrxN films with 0.17 ≤ x ≤ 0.51 are ferromagnetic and at x = 0.47 the Curie temperature TC shows a maximum of ~ 120 K. The films are metallic at 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.47, while the films with x = 0.51 and 0.78 are semiconducting-like. The upturn of resistivity below 70 K observed in the films with 0.10 ≤ x ≤ 0.47 is from the effects of the electron-electron interaction and weak localization. The negative magnetoresistance (MR) of the films with 0.10 ≤ x ≤ 0.51 is dominated by the double-exchange interaction, while at x = 0.78, MR is related to the localized magnetic moment scattering at the grain boundaries. The scaling ρxyA/n ∝ ρxx2.19 suggests that the anomalous Hall effect in the polycrystalline Ti1 - xCrxN films is scattering-independent. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Sub-100 fs pulses from an all-polarization maintaining Yb-fiber oscillator with an anomalous dispersion higher-order-mode fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verhoef, A. J.; Zhu, L.; Israelsen, Stine Møller;

    2015-01-01

    , was investigated for different settings of the intracavity dispersion. When the cavity is operated with close to zero net dispersion, highly stable 0.5-nJ pulses externally compressed to sub-100-fs are generated. These are to our knowledge the shortest pulses generated from an all-polarization-maintaining Yb......-fiber oscillator. The spectral phase of the output pulses is well behaved and can be compensated such that wing-free Fourier transform limited pulses can be obtained. Further reduction of the net intracavity third order dispersion will allow generating broader output spectra and consequently shorter pulses......, without sacrificing pulse fidelity....

  5. High-order dispersion effects in two-photon interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzotta, Zeudi; Cialdi, Simone; Cipriani, Daniele; Olivares, Stefano; Paris, Matteo G. A.

    2016-12-01

    Two-photon interference and Hong-Ou-Mandel (HOM) effect are relevant tools for quantum metrology and quantum information processing. In optical coherence tomography, the HOM effect is exploited to achieve high-resolution measurements with the width of the HOM dip being the main parameter. On the other hand, applications like dense coding require high-visibility performance. Here we address high-order dispersion effects in two-photon interference and study, theoretically and experimentally, the dependence of the visibility and the width of the HOM dip on both the pump spectrum and the downconverted photon spectrum. In particular, a spatial light modulator is exploited to experimentally introduce and manipulate a custom phase function to simulate the high-order dispersion effects. Overall, we show that it is possible to effectively introduce high-order dispersion effects on the propagation of photons and also to compensate for such effect. Our results clarify the role of the different dispersion phenomena and pave the way for optimization procedures in quantum technological applications involving PDC photons and optical fibers.

  6. Geometric doppler effect: spin-split dispersion of thermal radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahan, Nir; Gorodetski, Yuri; Frischwasser, Kobi; Kleiner, Vladimir; Hasman, Erez

    2010-09-24

    A geometric Doppler effect manifested by a spin-split dispersion relation of thermal radiation is observed. A spin-dependent dispersion splitting was obtained in a structure consisting of a coupled thermal antenna array. The effect is due to a spin-orbit interaction resulting from the dynamics of the surface waves propagating along the structure whose local anisotropy axis is rotated in space. The observation of the spin-symmetry breaking in thermal radiation may be utilized for manipulation of spontaneous or stimulated emission.

  7. Surface roughness effects with solid lubricants dispersed in mineral oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusano, C.; Goglia, P. R.; Sliney, H. E.

    1983-01-01

    The lubricating effectiveness of solid-lubricant dispersions are investigated in both point and line contacts using surfaces with both random and directional roughness characteristics. Friction and wear data obtained at relatively low speeds and at room temperature, indicate that the existence of solid lubricants such as graphite, MoS2, and PTFE in a plain mineral oil generally will not improve the effectiveness of the oil as a lubricant for such surfaces. Under boundary lubrication conditions, the friction force, as a function of time, initially depends upon the directional roughness properties of the contacting surfaces irrespective of whether the base oil or dispersions are used as lubricants.

  8. Coherent quantum effects through dispersive bosonic media

    CERN Document Server

    Ye, Sai-Yun; Zheng, Shi-Biao; Serafini, Alessio

    2010-01-01

    The coherent evolution of two atomic qubits mediated by a set of bosonic field modes is investigated. By assuming a specific encoding of the quantum states in the internal levels of the two atoms we show that entangling quantum gates can be realised, with high fidelity, even when a large number of mediating modes is involved. The effect of losses and imperfections on the gates' operation is also considered in detail.

  9. Anomalous peak-effect in type-II superconductors: A competition between bulk pinning and a surface barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maksimov, I.L. [Department of Theoretical Physics, Nizhny Novgorod University, Gagarin Avenue 23, Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation); Ainbinder, R.M. [Department of Theoretical Physics, Nizhny Novgorod University, Gagarin Avenue 23, Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: romain@inbox.ru; Vodolazov, D.Yu. [Institute for Physics of Microstructures, GSP-105, Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation)

    2007-01-15

    In this work, the joint influence of the surface barrier and bulk pinning on the magnetic-field dependence of the critical current I {sub c} for bulk type-II superconductors is investigated. It is shown that in the weak magnetic field H {sub 0}, there is a section in the dependence I {sub c}(H {sub 0}) in which I {sub c} increases with the growth of H {sub 0}; this increase results in a pronounced peak in the dependence I {sub c}(H {sub 0}) - the anomalous peak-effect. This effect is explained by the combined influence of the surface barrier and bulk pinning. Two well-known models - the Bean model and the Kim-Anderson model - of the critical state were analysed in order to describe the anomalous peak-effect quantitatively.

  10. Anomalous Hall effect in L 10-MnAl films with controllable orbital two-channel Kondo effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, L. J.; Nie, S. H.; Zhao, J. H.

    2016-05-01

    The anomalous Hall effect (AHE) in strongly disordered magnetic systems has been buried in persistent confusion despite its long history. We report the AHE in perpendicularly magnetized L 10-MnAl epitaxial films with a variable orbital two-channel Kondo (2CK) effect arising from the strong coupling of conduction electrons and the structural disorders of two-level systems. The AHE is observed to excellently scale with ρAH/f =a0ρx x 0+b ρxx 2 at high temperatures where phonon scattering prevails. In contrast, significant deviation occurs at low temperatures where the orbital 2CK effect becomes important, suggesting a negative AHE contribution. The deviation of the scaling agrees with the orbital 2CK effect in the breakdown temperatures and deviation magnitudes.

  11. High-Temperature Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in n-p Codoped Topological Insulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Shifei; Qiao, Zhenhua; Deng, Xinzhou; Cubuk, Ekin D; Chen, Hua; Zhu, Wenguang; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Zhang, S B; Xu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2016-07-29

    The quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) is a fundamental quantum transport phenomenon that manifests as a quantized transverse conductance in response to a longitudinally applied electric field in the absence of an external magnetic field, and it promises to have immense application potential in future dissipationless quantum electronics. Here, we present a novel kinetic pathway to realize the QAHE at high temperatures by n-p codoping of three-dimensional topological insulators. We provide a proof-of-principle numerical demonstration of this approach using vanadium-iodine (V-I) codoped Sb_{2}Te_{3} and demonstrate that, strikingly, even at low concentrations of ∼2%  V and ∼1% I, the system exhibits a quantized Hall conductance, the telltale hallmark of QAHE, at temperatures of at least ∼50  K, which is 3 orders of magnitude higher than the typical temperatures at which it has been realized to date. The underlying physical factor enabling this dramatic improvement is tied to the largely preserved intrinsic band gap of the host system upon compensated n-p codoping. The proposed approach is conceptually general and may shed new light in experimental realization of high-temperature QAHE.

  12. Anomalous transport model study of chiral magnetic effects in heavy ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yifeng; Ko, Che Ming; Li, Feng

    2016-10-01

    Using an anomalous transport model for massless quarks and antiquarks, we study the effect of a magnetic field on the elliptic flows of quarks and antiquarks in relativistic heavy ion collisions. With initial conditions from a blast wave model and assuming that the strong magnetic field produced in noncentral heavy ion collisions can last for a sufficiently long time, we obtain an appreciable electric quadrupole moment in the transverse plane of a heavy ion collision. The electric quadrupole moment subsequently leads to a splitting between the elliptic flows of quarks and antiquarks. The slope of the charge asymmetry dependence of the elliptic flow difference between positively and negatively charged particles is positive, which is expected from the chiral magnetic wave formed in the produced QGP and observed in experiments at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, only if the Lorentz force acting on the charged particles is neglected and the quark-antiquark scattering is assumed to be dominated by the chirality changing channel.

  13. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in magnetically modulated topological insulator/normal insulator heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Men'shov, V. N.; Tugushev, V. V.; Chulkov, E. V.

    2016-10-01

    We theoretically study how magnetic modulation can be used to manipulate the transport properties of heterostructures formed by a thin film of a three-dimensional topological insulator sandwiched between slabs of a normal insulator. Employing the k • p scheme, in the framework of a continual approach, we argue that electron states of the system are spin-polarized when ultrathin magnetic insertions are incorporated into the film. We demonstrate that (i) the spin-polarization magnitude depends strongly on the magnetic insertion position in the film and (ii) there is the optimal insertion position to realize quantum anomalous Hall effect, which is a function of the material parameters, the film thickness and the topological insulator/normal insulator interface potential. For the heterostructure with a pair of symmetrically placed magnetic insertions, we calculate a phase diagram that shows a series of transitions between distinct quantum regimes of transverse conductivity. We provide consistent interpretation of recent experimental findings in the context of our results.

  14. Optical properties of metals: Infrared emissivity in the anomalous skin effect spectral region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Echániz, T. [Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnología, UPV/EHU, Sarriena s/n, Leioa 48940 (Spain); Pérez-Sáez, R. B., E-mail: raul.perez@ehu.es; Tello, M. J. [Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnología, UPV/EHU, Sarriena s/n, Leioa 48940 (Spain); Instituto de Síntesis y Estudio de Materiales, Universidad del País Vasco, Apdo. 644, Bilbao 48080 (Spain)

    2014-09-07

    When the penetration depth of an electromagnetic wave in a metal is similar to the mean free path of the conduction electrons, the Drude classical theory is no longer satisfied and the skin effect becomes anomalous. Physical parameters of this theory for twelve metals were calculated and analyzed. The theory predicts an emissivity peak ε{sub peak} at room temperature in the mid-infrared for smooth surface metals that moves towards larger wavelengths as temperature decreases. Furthermore, the theory states that ε{sub peak} increases with the emission angle but its position, λ{sub peak}, is constant. Copper directional emissivity measurements as well as emissivity obtained using optical constants data confirm the predictions of the theory. Considering the relationship between the specularity parameter p and the sample roughness, it is concluded that p is not the simple parameter it is usually assumed to be. Quantitative comparison between experimental data and theoretical predictions shows that the specularity parameter can be equal to one for roughness values larger than those predicted. An exhaustive analysis of the experimental optical parameters shows signs of a reflectance broad peak in Cu, Al, Au, and Mo around the wavelength predicted by the theory for p = 1.

  15. Anomalous triple gauge couplings in the effective field theory approach at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkowski, Adam; González-Alonso, Martín; Greljo, Admir; Marzocca, David; Son, Minho

    2017-02-01

    We discuss how to perform consistent extractions of anomalous triple gauge couplings (aTGC) from electroweak boson pair production at the LHC in the Standard Model Effective Field Theory (SMEFT). After recasting recent ATLAS and CMS searches in pp → W Z( W W ) → ℓ'νℓ+ℓ-(νℓ) channels, we find that: (a) working consistently at order Λ-2 in the SMEFT expansion the existing aTGC bounds from Higgs and LEP-2 data are not improved, (b) the strong limits quoted by the experimental collaborations are due to the partial Λ-4 corrections (dimension-6 squared contributions). Using helicity selection rule arguments we are able to explain the suppression in some of the interference terms, and discuss conditions on New Physics (NP) models that can benefit from such LHC analyses. Furthermore, standard analyses assume implicitly a quite large NP scale, an assumption that can be relaxed by imposing cuts on the underlying scale of the process ( √{widehat{s}} ). In practice, we find almost no correlation between √{widehat{s}} and the experimentally accessible quantities, which complicates the SMEFT interpretation. Nevertheless, we provide a method to set (conservative) aTGC bounds in this situation, and recast the present searches accordingly. Finally, we introduce a simple NP model for aTGC to compare the bounds obtained directly in the model with those from the SMEFT analysis.

  16. Magnetic modulation doping in topological insulators toward higher-temperature quantum anomalous Hall effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mogi, M., E-mail: mogi@cmr.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Yoshimi, R.; Yasuda, K.; Kozuka, Y. [Department of Applied Physics and Quantum Phase Electronics Center (QPEC), University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Tsukazaki, A. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Takahashi, K. S. [RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), Wako 351-0198 (Japan); Kawasaki, M.; Tokura, Y. [Department of Applied Physics and Quantum Phase Electronics Center (QPEC), University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), Wako 351-0198 (Japan)

    2015-11-02

    Quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE), which generates dissipation-less edge current without external magnetic field, is observed in magnetic-ion doped topological insulators (TIs) such as Cr- and V-doped (Bi,Sb){sub 2}Te{sub 3}. The QAHE emerges when the Fermi level is inside the magnetically induced gap around the original Dirac point of the TI surface state. Although the size of gap is reported to be about 50 meV, the observable temperature of QAHE has been limited below 300 mK. We attempt magnetic-Cr modulation doping into topological insulator (Bi,Sb){sub 2}Te{sub 3} films to increase the observable temperature of QAHE. By introducing the rich-Cr-doped thin (1 nm) layers at the vicinity of both the surfaces based on non-Cr-doped (Bi,Sb){sub 2}Te{sub 3} films, we have succeeded in observing the QAHE up to 2 K. The improvement in the observable temperature achieved by this modulation-doping appears to be originating from the suppression of the disorder in the surface state interacting with the rich magnetic moments. Such a superlattice designing of the stabilized QAHE may pave a way to dissipation-less electronics based on the higher-temperature and zero magnetic-field quantum conduction.

  17. Smearing of the quantum anomalous Hall effect due to statistical fluctuations of magnetic dopants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Z.; Raikh, M. E.

    2016-10-01

    The quantum anomalous Hall effect is induced by substitution of a certain portion x of Bi atoms in a BiTe-based insulating parent compound by magnetic ions (Cr or V). We find the density of in-gap states N (E ) emerging as a result of statistical fluctuations of the composition x in the vicinity of the transition point where the average gap E¯g passes through zero. A local gap follows the fluctuations of x . Using the instanton approach, we show that, near the gap edges, the tails are exponential lnN (E ) ∝-(E¯g-|E |) and the tail states are due to small local gap reduction. Our main finding is that, even when the smearing magnitude exceeds the gap width, there exists a semihard gap around zero energy, where lnN (E ) ∝-E/¯g|E | ln(E/¯g|E | ) . The states responsible for N (E ) originate from local gap reversals within narrow rings. The consequence of the semihard gap is the Arrhenius, rather than variable-range hopping, temperature dependence of the diagonal conductivity at low temperatures.

  18. Theory for the anomalous electron transport in Hall-effect thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafleur, Trevor; Baalrud, Scott; Chabert, Pascal

    2016-09-01

    Using insights from particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, we develop a kinetic theory to explain the anomalous cross-field electron transport in Hall-effect thrusters (HETs). The large axial electric field in the acceleration region of HETs, together with the radially applied magnetic field, causes electrons to drift in the azimuthal direction with a very high velocity. This drives an electron cyclotron instability that produces large amplitude oscillations in the plasma density and azimuthal electric field, and which is convected downstream due to the large axial ion drift velocity. The frequency and wavelength of the instability are of the order of 5 MHz and 1 mm respectively, while the electric field amplitude can be of a similar magnitude to axial electric field itself. The instability leads to enhanced electron scattering many orders of magnitude higher than that from standard electron-neutral or electron-ion Coulomb collisions, and gives electron mobilities in good agreement with experiment. Since the instability is a strong function of almost all plasma properties, the mobility cannot in general be fitted with simple 1/B or 1/B2 scaling laws, and changes to the secondary electron emission coefficient of the HET channel walls are expected to play a role in the evolution of the instability. This work received financial support from a CNES postdoctoral research award.

  19. Ultrasensitive Anomalous Hall Effect in Ta/CoFe/Oxide/Ta Multilayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrahigh anomalous Hall sensitivity has been demonstrated in Ta/CoFe/Oxide/Ta multilayers. By changing oxides (MgO and HfO2 and annealing temperature, different annealing dependence of sensitivity was found in MgO-sample and HfO2-sample. For the MgO-sample, the anomalous Hall sensitivity reaches 18792 Ω/T in the as-deposited state and significantly reduces as annealing temperature increases. On the contrary, the sensitivity of the as-deposited HfO2-sample is only 765 Ω/T, while it remarkably increases with annealing temperature increasing, finally reaching 14741 Ω/T at 240°C. The opposite variation of anomalous sensitivity in two samples originates from the different change of magnetic anisotropy and anomalous Hall resistance during the annealing process. Our study provides a new perspective that both the choice of oxide material and the optimization of annealing treatment are important to the anomalous Hall sensitivity.

  20. Effective long-distance pollen dispersal in Centaurea jacea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Albrecht

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Agri-environment schemes play an increasingly important role for the conservation of rare plants in intensively managed agricultural landscapes. However, little is known about their effects on gene flow via pollen dispersal between populations of these species. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a 2-year experiment, we observed effective pollen dispersal from source populations of Centaurea jacea in restored meadows, the most widespread Swiss agri-environment scheme, to potted plants in adjacent intensively managed meadows without other individuals of this species. Potted plants were put in replicated source populations at 25, 50, 100 m and where possible 200 m distance from these source populations. Pollen transfer among isolated plants was prevented by temporary bagging, such that only one isolated plant was accessible for flower visitors at any one time. Because C. jacea is self-incompatible, seed set in single-plant isolates indicated insect mediated effective pollen dispersal from the source population. Seed set was higher in source populations (35.7+/-4.4 than in isolates (4.8+/-1.0. Seed set declined from 18.9% of that in source populations at a distance of 25 m to 7.4% at 200 m. At a distance of 200 m seed set was still significantly higher in selfed plants, indicating long-distance effective pollen dispersal up to 200 m. Analyses of covariance suggested that bees contributed more than flies to this long-distance pollen dispersal. We found evidence that pollen dispersal to single-plant isolates was positively affected by the diversity and flower abundance of neighboring plant species in the intensively managed meadow. Furthermore, the decline of the dispersal was less steep when the source population of C. jacea was large. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that insect pollinators can effectively transfer pollen from source populations of C. jacea over at least 200 m, even when "recipient populations" consisted of single-plant isolates

  1. Expanded potential of seleno-carbohydrates as a molecular tool for X-ray structural determination of a carbohydrate-protein complex with single/multi-wavelength anomalous dispersion phasing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Tatsuya; Makyio, Hisayoshi; Ando, Hiromune; Komura, Naoko; Menjo, Masanori; Yamada, Yusuke; Imamura, Akihiro; Ishida, Hideharu; Wakatsuki, Soichi; Kato, Ryuichi; Kiso, Makoto

    2014-04-01

    Seleno-lactoses have been successfully synthesized as candidates for mimicking carbohydrate ligands for human galectin-9 N-terminal carbohydrate recognition domain (NCRD). Selenium was introduced into the mono- or di-saccharides using p-methylselenobenzoic anhydride (Tol2Se) as a novel selenating reagent. The TolSe-substituted monosaccharides were converted into selenoglycosyl donors or acceptors, which were reacted with coupling partners to afford seleno-lactoses. The seleno-lactoses were converted to the target compounds. The structure of human galectin-9 NCRD co-crystallized with 6-MeSe-lactose was determined with single/multi-wavelength anomalous dispersion (SAD/MAD) phasing and was similar to that of the co-crystal with natural lactose.

  2. Room-temperature anomalous Hall effect and magnetroresistance in (Ga, Co)-codoped ZnO diluted magnetic semiconductor films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Xue-Chao; Chen Zhi-Zhan; Shi Er-Wei; Liao Da-Qian; Zhou Ke-Jin

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports that the (Ga, Co)-codoped ZnO thin films have been grown by inductively coupled plasma enhanced physical vapour deposition. Room-temperature ferromagnetism is observed for the as-grown thin films. The x-ray absorption fine structure characterization reveals that Co2+ and Ga3+ ions substitute for Zn2+ ions in the ZnO lattice and exclude the possibility of extrinsic ferromagnetism origin. The ferromagnetic (Ga, Co)-codoped ZnO thin films exhibit carrier concentration dependent anomalous Hall effect and positive magnetoresistance at room temperature. The mechanism of anomalous Hall effect and magneto-transport in ferromagnetic ZnO-based diluted magnetic semiconductors is discussed.

  3. Effect of band filling on anomalous Hall conductivity and magneto-crystalline anisotropy in NiFe epitaxial thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Zhong; Jiang, Hang-Yu; Zhou, Shi-Ming, E-mail: shiming@tongji.edu.cn [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Special Artificial Microstructure Materials and Technology & Pohl Institute of Solid State Physics, School of Physics Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Hou, Yan-Liang; Ye, Quan-Lin [Department of Physics, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou 310036 (China); Su Si, Ming [Key Laboratory for Magnetism and Magnetic Materials of the Ministry of Education, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2016-01-15

    The anomalous Hall effect (AHE) and magneto-crystalline anisotropy (MCA) are investigated in epitaxial Ni{sub x}Fe{sub 1−x} thin films grown on MgO (001) substrates. The scattering independent term b of anomalous Hall conductivity shows obvious correlation with cubic magneto-crystalline anisotropy K{sub 1}. When nickel content x decreasing, both b and K{sub 1} vary continuously from negative to positive, changing sign at about x = 0.85. Ab initio calculations indicate Ni{sub x}Fe{sub 1−x} has more abundant band structures than pure Ni due to the tuning of valence electrons (band fillings), resulting in the increased b and K{sub 1}. This remarkable correlation between b and K{sub 1} can be attributed to the effect of band filling near the Fermi surface.

  4. Intrinsic Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in the Kagome Lattice Cs2 LiMn3 F12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gang; Lian, Biao; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; Zhang's Group Team

    In a kagome lattice, the time reversal symmetry can be broken by a staggered magnetic flux emerging from the ferromagnetic ordering and intrinsic spin-orbit coupling, leading to several well-separated nontrivial Chern bands and intrinsic quantum anomalous Hall effect. Based on this idea and ab initio calculations, we propose the realization of the intrinsic quantum anomalous Hall effect in the single layer Cs2Mn3F12 kagome lattice and on the (001) surface of a Cs2LiMn3F12 single crystal by modifying the carrier coverage on it, where the band gap is around 20 meV. Moreover, a simplified tight binding model based on the inplane dd σ antibonding states is constructed to understand the topological band structures of the system.

  5. Effect of band filling on anomalous Hall conductivity and magneto-crystalline anisotropy in NiFe epitaxial thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Shi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The anomalous Hall effect (AHE and magneto-crystalline anisotropy (MCA are investigated in epitaxial NixFe1−x thin films grown on MgO (001 substrates. The scattering independent term b of anomalous Hall conductivity shows obvious correlation with cubic magneto-crystalline anisotropy K1. When nickel content x decreasing, both b and K1 vary continuously from negative to positive, changing sign at about x = 0.85. Ab initio calculations indicate NixFe1−x has more abundant band structures than pure Ni due to the tuning of valence electrons (band fillings, resulting in the increased b and K1. This remarkable correlation between b and K1 can be attributed to the effect of band filling near the Fermi surface.

  6. Intrinsic Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in the Kagome Lattice Cs_{2}LiMn_{3}F_{12}.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gang; Lian, Biao; Zhang, Shou-Cheng

    2015-10-30

    In a kagome lattice, the time reversal symmetry can be broken by a staggered magnetic flux emerging from ferromagnetic ordering and intrinsic spin-orbit coupling, leading to several well-separated nontrivial Chern bands and intrinsic quantum anomalous Hall effect. Based on this idea and ab initio calculations, we propose the realization of the intrinsic quantum anomalous Hall effect in the single layer Cs_{2}Mn_{3}F_{12} kagome lattice and on the (001) surface of a Cs_{2}LiMn_{3}F_{12} single crystal by modifying the carrier coverage on it, where the band gap is around 20 meV. Moreover, a simplified tight binding model based on the in-plane ddσ antibonding states is constructed to understand the topological band structures of the system.

  7. Stability and anomalous compressibility of Bose gases near resonance: The scale-dependent interactions and thermal effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shao-Jian; Zhou, Fei

    2015-07-01

    The stability of Bose gases near resonance has been a puzzling problem in recent years. In this article, we demonstrate that in addition to generating thermal pressure, thermal atoms enhance the repulsiveness of the scale-dependent interactions between condensed atoms due to a renormalization effect and further stabilize the Bose gases. Consequently, we find that, as a precursor of instability, the compressibility develops an anomalous structure as a function of scattering length and is drastically reduced compared with the mean-field value. Furthermore, the density profile of a Bose gas in a harmonic trap is found to develop a flat top near the center. This is due to the anomalous behavior of compressibility and can be a potential smoking gun for probing such an effect.

  8. Effective Long-Distance Pollen Dispersal in Centaurea jacea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albrecht, M.; Duelli, P.; Obrist, M.K.; Müller, C.; Kleijn, D.; Schmid, B.

    2009-01-01

    Background Agri-environment schemes play an increasingly important role for the conservation of rare plants in intensively managed agricultural landscapes. However, little is known about their effects on gene flow via pollen dispersal between populations of these species. Methodology/Principal Findi

  9. OIL SPILL DISPERSANT EFFECTIVENESS PROTOCOL. I: IMPACT OF OPERATIONAL VARIABLES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The current U.S. Environmental Protection Agency protocol for testing the effectiveness of dispersants, the swirling flask test, has been found to give widely varying results in the hands of different testing laboratories. The sources of the ambiguities in the test were determin...

  10. Employment Effects of Dispersal Policies. Part I: Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, Anna Piil; Rosholm, Michael

    2003-01-01

    and the transition rate into employment outside the local labour market, but decreases the transition rate into local employment. Thus, a decrease in current place utility decreases the overall job-finding rate if the local reservation wage effect dominates. We argue that dispersal policies on refugee immigrants...

  11. Effects of Anomalous Electron Cross-Field Transport in a Low Temperature Magnetized Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raitses, Yevgeny

    2014-10-01

    The application of the magnetic field in a low pressure plasma can cause a spatial separation of low and high energy electrons. This so-called magnetic filter effect is used for many plasma applications, including ion and neutral beam sources, plasma processing of semiconductors and nanomaterials, and plasma thrusters. In spite of successful practical applications, the magnetic filter effect is not well understood. In this work, we explore this effect by characterizing the electron and ion energy distribution functions in a plasma column with crossed electric and magnetic fields. Experimental results revealed a strong dependence of spatial variations of plasma properties on the gas pressure. For xenon and argon gases, below ~ 1 mtorr, the increase of the magnetic field leads to a more uniform profile of the electron temperature. This surprising result is due to anomalously high electron cross-field transport that causes mixing of hot and cold electrons. High-speed imaging and probe measurements revealed a coherent structure rotating in E cross B direction with frequency of a few kHz. Theory and simulations describing this rotating structure has been developed and points to ionization and electrostatic instabilities as their possible cause. Similar to spoke oscillations reported for Hall thrusters, this rotating structure conducts the large fraction of the cross-field current. The use of segmented electrodes with an electrical feedback control is shown to mitigate these oscillations. Finally, a new feature of the spoke phenomenon that has been discovered, namely a sensitive dependence of the rotating oscillations on the gas pressure, can be important for many applications. This work was supported by DOE Contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  12. Effects of dispersive wave modes on charged particles transport

    CERN Document Server

    Schreiner, Cedric

    2015-01-01

    The transport of charged particles in the heliosphere and the interstellar medium is governed by the interaction of particles and magnetic irregularities. For the transport of protons a rather simple model using a linear Alfv\\'en wave spectrum which follows the Kolmogorov distribution usually yields good results. Even magnetostatic spectra may be used. For the case of electron transport, particles will resonate with the high-k end of the spectrum. Here the magnetic fluctuations do not follow the linear dispersion relation, but the kinetic regime kicks in. We will discuss the interaction of fluctuations of dispersive waves in the kinetic regime using a particle-in-cell code. Especially the scattering of particles following the idea of Lange et al. (2013) and its application to PiC codes will be discussed. The effect of the dispersive regime on the electron transport will be discussed in detail.

  13. Local orbitals approach to the anomalous Hall and Nernst effects in itinerant ferromagnets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Středa Pavel

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Linear response of the orbital momentum to the gradient of the chemical potential is used to obtain anomalous Hall conductivity. Transition from the ideal Bloch system for which the conductivity is determined by the Berry phase curvatures to the case of strong disorder for which the conductivity becomes dependent on the relaxation time is analysed. Presented tight-binding model reproduces experimentally observed qualitative features of the anomalous Hall conductivity and the transverse Peltier coefficient in the so called bad-metal and scattering-independent regimes.

  14. Anomalous role change of tertiary amino and ester groups as hydrogen acceptors in eudragit E based solid dispersion depending on the concentration of naproxen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Hiroshi; Wakabayashi, Shinobu; Kikuchi, Junko; Ida, Yasuo; Kadota, Kazunori; Tozuka, Yuichi

    2015-04-01

    Eudragit E (EGE) is a basic polymer incorporating tertiary amino and ester groups. The role of the functional groups of EGE in the formation of solid dispersion (SD) with Naproxen (NAP) was investigated. The glass transition temperature (Tg) of EGE decreased with the plasticizing effect of NAP up to 20% weight ratio. Addition of NAP at over 30% induced a rise in Tg, with the maximum value being reached at 60% NAP. Further addition of NAP led to a rapid drop of the Tg. A dramatic difference of physical stability between the SDs including 60 and 70% NAP was confirmed. The SD including 70% NAP rapidly crystallized at 40 °C with 75% relative humidity, while the amorphous state could be maintained over 6 months in the SD with 60% NAP. The infrared and (13)C solid state-NMR spectra of the SDs suggested a formation of ionic interaction between the carboxylic acid of NAP and the amino group of EGE. The SD with 20% NAP raised the (13)C spin-lattice relaxation (T1) of the amino group, but it decreased with over 30% NAP. The change in the (13)C-T1 disappeared with 70% NAP. The (13)C-T1 of the ester group rose depending on the amount of NAP. From these findings, we concluded that the role as hydrogen acceptor shifted from the amine to the ester group with an increase in amount of NAP. Furthermore, the amino group of EGE did not contribute to the interaction at over 70% NAP. These phenomena could be strongly correlated with Tg and stability.

  15. Anomalous chiral superfluidity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lublinsky, Michael, E-mail: lublinsky@phys.uconn.ed [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Physics Department, Ben-Gurion University, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel); Zahed, Ismail [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States)

    2010-02-08

    We discuss both the anomalous Cartan currents and the energy-momentum tensor in a left chiral theory with flavor anomalies as an effective theory for flavored chiral phonons in a chiral superfluid with the gauged Wess-Zumino-Witten term. In the mean-field (leading tadpole) approximation the anomalous Cartan currents and the energy-momentum tensor take the form of constitutive currents in the chiral superfluid state. The pertinence of higher order corrections and the Adler-Bardeen theorem is briefly noted.

  16. Anomalous H/D isotope effect on {sup 35}Cl NQR frequencies in piperidinium p-chlorobenzoate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, Ryo; Honda, Hisashi, E-mail: hhonda@yokohama-cu.ac.jp [Yokohama City University, Graduate School of Integrated Science (Japan); Kimura, Taiki [Yokohama City University, Faculty of Science (Japan); Nakata, Eiichi; Takamizawa, Satoshi; Noro, Sumiko [Yokohama City University, Graduate School of Integrated Science (Japan); Ishimaru, Shin' ichi [Tokyo Denki University, Department of Green and Sustainable Chemistry (Japan)

    2008-01-15

    Anomalous isotope effects were detected in the {sup 35}Cl nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) frequency of piperidinium p-chlrobenzoate (C{sub 5}H{sub 10}NH. ClC{sub 6}H{sub 4}COOH) by deuteration of hydrogen atoms. The atoms were determined to form two kinds of N-H...O type H-bonds in the crystal structure. Large frequency shifts of the {sup 35}Cl resonance lines reaching 288 kHz at 77 K and 278 kHz at room temperature were caused upon deuteration, in spite of the fact that the Cl atoms in the molecule do not form hydrogen bonds in the crystal. Results of single crystal X-ray diffraction measurements and density-functional-theorem calculations suggest that a dihedral-angle change of 1.8{sup o} between benzene and the piperidine ring contributes to {sup 35}Cl NQR anomalous frequency shifts.

  17. High-order dispersion effects in two-photon interference

    CERN Document Server

    Mazzotta, Z; Cipriani, D; Olivares, S; Paris, M G A

    2016-01-01

    Two-photon interference and Hong-Ou-Mandel (HOM) effect are relevant tools for quantum metrology and quantum information processing. In optical coherence tomography, HOM effect is exploited to achieve high-resolution measurements with the width of the HOM dip being the main parameter. On the other hand, applications like dense coding require high-visibility performances. Here we address high-order dispersion effects in two-photon interference and study, theoretically and experimentally, the dependence of the visibility and the width of the HOM dip on both the pump spectrum and the downconverted photon spectrum. In particular, a spatial light modulator is exploited to experimentally introduce and manipulate a custom phase function to simulate the high-order dispersion effects.

  18. Effects of vertical shear in modelling horizontal oceanic dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanotte, A. S.; Corrado, R.; Palatella, L.; Pizzigalli, C.; Schipa, I.; Santoleri, R.

    2016-02-01

    The effect of vertical shear on the horizontal dispersion properties of passive tracer particles on the continental shelf of the South Mediterranean is investigated by means of observation and model data. In situ current measurements reveal that vertical gradients of horizontal velocities in the upper mixing layer decorrelate quite fast ( ˜ 1 day), whereas an eddy-permitting ocean model, such as the Mediterranean Forecasting System, tends to overestimate such decorrelation time because of finite resolution effects. Horizontal dispersion, simulated by the Mediterranean sea Forecasting System, is mostly affected by: (1) unresolved scale motions, and mesoscale motions that are largely smoothed out at scales close to the grid spacing; (2) poorly resolved time variability in the profiles of the horizontal velocities in the upper layer. For the case study we have analysed, we show that a suitable use of deterministic kinematic parametrizations is helpful to implement realistic statistical features of tracer dispersion in two and three dimensions. The approach here suggested provides a functional tool to control the horizontal spreading of small organisms or substance concentrations, and is thus relevant for marine biology, pollutant dispersion as well as oil spill applications.

  19. Anomalous polymer dynamics is non-Markovian: memory effects and the generalized Langevin equation formulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Panja, D.

    2010-01-01

    Any first course on polymer physics teaches that the dynamics of a tagged monomer of a polymer is anomalously subdiffusive, i.e., the mean-square displacement of a tagged monomer increases as tα for some α < 1 until the terminal relaxation time τ of the polymer. Beyond time τ the motion of the tagge

  20. Competing effects of magnetic impurities in the anomalous Hall effect on the surface of a topological insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Ming-Xun; Luo, Wei; Deng, W. Y.; Chen, M. N.; Sheng, L.; Xing, D. Y.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) on the surface of a topological insulator induced by a finite concentration of magnetic impurities, and find topologically nontrivial and trivial mechanisms simultaneously contributing to the Hall conductivity. In the topologically nontrivial mechanism, the impurities gap the surface spectrum and result in a half-integer quantized intrinsic Hall conductivity in units e2/h , while in the topologically trivial mechanism, the half-integer quantized plateau is modified by impurity-induced localized states via a gap-filling process. The nonmagnetic charge potential itself, though participating in the gap-filling process, cannot induce the AHE. In the presence of a finite magnetic potential, the charge potential would destroy the symmetric distribution of the Hall conductivity by redistributing the localized levels. More interestingly, the sign of the Hall conductivity is tunable by changing the strength of the charge potential.

  1. Effects of Surface Modification on the Dispersion Property of VGCF

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Yaqin; HAN Chunshao; NI Qingqing

    2009-01-01

    In view of the easy agglomeration issue of vapor grown carbon fiber (VGCF) and the poor interfacial adhesion between VGCF and matrix resin, two-step surface modification with hydrogen peroxide and concentrated nitric acid was performed on VGCF. The surface structure and dispersion of VGCF before and after modification were tested and analyzed by XRD, TGA, FTIR, UV-visible spectrum and SEM. Moreover, VGCF/SMPU composites were prepared via a solution mixing method taking shape memory polyurethane (SMPU) as matrix, and the mechanical properties of the composites were also tested. The graphite crystal structure of VGCF showed very little change af-ter modification, the concentration of oxygen-containing functional groups on the surface of VGCF was visibly in-creased, and the dispersion and dispersion stability of VGCF in organic solvent were also clearly improved. In the cross section of the VGCF/SMPU composites, the dispersion of VGCF in matrix and the VGCF-matrix interfacial adhesion observed through SEM were both enhanced to a certain extent after surface modification. The two-step surface modified VGCF had more obvious mechanical reinforcement effects on the composites than that of the pris-tine VGCF.

  2. Site Specific X-ray Anomalous Dispersion of the Geometrically Frustrated Kagome´ Magnet Herbertsmithite ZnCu3(OH)6Cl2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A Freedman; T Han; A Prodi; P Muller; Q Huang; Y Chen; S Webb; Y Lee; T McQueen; D Nocera

    2011-12-31

    Structural characterization, exploiting X-ray scattering differences at elemental absorption edges, is developed to quantitatively determine crystallographic site-specific metal disorder. We apply this technique to the problem of Zn-Cu chemical disorder in ZnCu{sub 3}(OH){sub 6}Cl{sub 2}. This geometrically frustrated kagome antiferromagnet is one of the best candidates for a spin-liquid ground state, but chemical disorder has been suggested as a mundane explanation for its magnetic properties. Using anomalous scattering at the Zn and Cu edges, we determine that there is no Zn occupation of the intralayer Cu sites within the kagome layer; however there is Cu present on the Zn intersite, leading to a structural formula of (Zn{sub 0.85}Cu{sub 0.15})Cu{sub 3}(OH){sub 6}Cl{sub 2}. The lack of Zn mixing onto the kagome lattice sites lends support to the idea that the electronic ground state in ZnCu{sub 3}(OH){sub 6}Cl{sub 2} and its relatives is nontrivial.

  3. Site specific X-ray anomalous dispersion of the geometrically frustrated kagomé magnet, herbertsmithite, ZnCu(3)(OH)(6)Cl(2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Danna E; Han, Tianheng H; Prodi, Andrea; Müller, Peter; Huang, Qing-Zhen; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Webb, Samuel M; Lee, Young S; McQueen, Tyrel M; Nocera, Daniel G

    2010-11-17

    Structural characterization, exploiting X-ray scattering differences at elemental absorption edges, is developed to quantitatively determine crystallographic site-specific metal disorder. We apply this technique to the problem of Zn-Cu chemical disorder in ZnCu(3)(OH)(6)Cl(2). This geometrically frustrated kagomé antiferromagnet is one of the best candidates for a spin-liquid ground state, but chemical disorder has been suggested as a mundane explanation for its magnetic properties. Using anomalous scattering at the Zn and Cu edges, we determine that there is no Zn occupation of the intralayer Cu sites within the kagomé layer; however there is Cu present on the Zn intersite, leading to a structural formula of (Zn(0.85)Cu(0.15))Cu(3)(OH)(6)Cl(2). The lack of Zn mixing onto the kagomé lattice sites lends support to the idea that the electronic ground state in ZnCu(3)(OH)(6)Cl(2) and its relatives is nontrivial.

  4. Influence of defects and disorder on anomalous Hall effect and spin Seebeck effect on permalloy and Heusler compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilanova Vidal, Enrique

    2012-09-19

    In this work Heusler thin films have been prepared and their transport properties have been studied. Of particularly interest is the anomalous Hall effect (AHE). The effect is a long known but still not fully understood transport effect. Most theory papers focus on the influence of one particular contribution to the AHE. Actual measured experimental data, however, often are not in accordance with idealized assumptions. This thesis discusses the data analysis for materials with low residual resistivity ratios. As prototypical materials, half metallic Heusler compounds are studied. Here, the influence of defects and disorder is apparent in a material with a complex topology of the Fermi surface. Using films with different degrees of disorder, the different scattering mechanisms can be separated. For Co{sub 2}FeSi{sub 0.6}Al{sub 0.4} and Co{sub 2}FeGa{sub 0.5}Ge{sub 0.5}, the AHE induced by B2-type disorder and temperature-dependent scattering is positive, while DO{sub 3}-type disorder and possible intrinsic contributions possess a negative sign. For these compounds, magneto-optical Kerr effects (MOKE) are investigated. First order contributions as a function of intrinsic and extrinsic parameters are qualitatively analyzed. The relation between the crystalline ordering and the second order contributions to the MOKE signal is studied. In addition, sets of the Heusler compound Co{sub 2}MnAl thin films were grown on MgO(100) and Si(100) substrates by radio frequency magnetron sputtering. Composition, magnetic and transport properties were studied systematically for samples deposited at different conditions. In particular, the anomalous Hall effect resistivity presents an extraordinarily temperature independent behavior in a moderate magnetic field range from 0 to 0.6 T. The off-diagonal transport at temperatures up to 300 C was analyzed. The data show the suitability of the material for Hall sensors working well above room temperature. Recently, the spin Seebeck effect

  5. Strong anisotropic anomalous Hall effect and spin Hall effect in the chiral antiferromagnetic compounds Mn3X (X =Ge , Sn, Ga, Ir, Rh, and Pt)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Sun, Yan; Yang, Hao; Železný, Jakub; Parkin, Stuart P. P.; Felser, Claudia; Yan, Binghai

    2017-02-01

    We have carried out a comprehensive study of the intrinsic anomalous Hall effect and spin Hall effect of several chiral antiferromagnetic compounds Mn3X (X = Ge, Sn, Ga, Ir, Rh and Pt) by ab initio band structure and Berry phase calculations. These studies reveal large and anisotropic values of both the intrinsic anomalous Hall effect and spin Hall effect. The Mn3X materials exhibit a noncollinear antiferromagnetic order which, to avoid geometrical frustration, forms planes of Mn moments that are arranged in a Kagome-type lattice. With respect to these Kagome planes, we find that both the anomalous Hall conductivity (AHC) and the spin Hall conductivity (SHC) are quite anisotropic for any of these materials. Based on our calculations, we propose how to maximize AHC and SHC for different materials. The band structures and corresponding electron filling, that we show are essential to determine the AHC and SHC, are compared for these different compounds. We point out that Mn3Ga shows a large SHC of about 600 (ℏ /e ) (Ωcm) -1 . Our work provides insights into the realization of strong anomalous Hall effects and spin Hall effects in chiral antiferromagnetic materials.

  6. Partial Wave Analysis of Scattering with Nonlocal Aharonov-Bohm Effect and Anomalous Cross Section induced by Quantum Interference

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, D H

    2003-01-01

    Partial wave theory of a three dmensional scattering problem for an arbitray short range potential and a nonlocal Aharonov-Bohm magnetic flux is established. The scattering process of a ``hard shere'' like potential and the magnetic flux is examined. An anomalous total cross section is revealed at the specific quantized magnetic flux at low energy which helps explain the composite fermion and boson model in the fractional quantum Hall effect. Since the nonlocal quantum interference of magnetic flux on the charged particles is universal, the nonlocal effect is expected to appear in quite general potential system and will be useful in understanding some other phenomena in mesoscopic phyiscs.

  7. Anomalous Doppler effect at interaction of electromagnetic waves with electron beams experimental researches and opportunities for application

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanov, B I

    2002-01-01

    The anomalous Doppler effect (ADE) in systems consisting of an electron beam and slow wave structure in longitudinal magnetic field is considered. Resonance condition for amplifiers and generators based on ADE enables resonance maintaining in case of wave phase velocity or beam velocity changing (acceleration of ions at ADE, reception of high efficiency at microwave generation). Essential advantages can be reached at combination of ADE and normal Doppler effect. The review of experimental studies of ADE is presented: amplification and generation of microwaves, energetic relations, excitation of accelerating IH-structures, development of ion acceleration.

  8. Effect of Third-order Dispersion of Birefringent Fiber on Pulse Transmission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The effect of thirdorder dispersion on pulse transmission is discussed. The coupled nonlinear Schrdinger equations characterizing the birefringent singlemode fibers is solved numerically with combined consideration on chromatic dispersion, including second and thirdorder dispersions, polarization mode dispersion (PMD) and nonlinearity. Various simulation results are presented.

  9. Unambiguous separation of the inverse spin Hall and anomalous Nernst effects within a ferromagnetic metal using the spin Seebeck effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Stephen M., E-mail: swu@anl.gov; Hoffman, Jason; Pearson, John E.; Bhattacharya, Anand [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The longitudinal spin Seebeck effect is measured on the ferromagnetic insulator Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} with the ferromagnetic metal Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.6}B{sub 0.2} (CoFeB) as the spin detector. By using a non-magnetic spacer material between the two materials (Ti), it is possible to decouple the two ferromagnetic materials and directly observe pure spin flow from Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} into CoFeB. It is shown that in a single ferromagnetic metal, the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) and anomalous Nernst effect (ANE) can occur simultaneously with opposite polarity. Using this and the large difference in the coercive fields between the two magnets, it is possible to unambiguously separate the contributions of the spin Seebeck effect from the ANE and observe the degree to which each effect contributes to the total response. These experiments show conclusively that the ISHE and ANE in CoFeB are separate phenomena with different origins and can coexist in the same material with opposite response to a thermal gradient.

  10. Counterintuitive dispersion effect near surface plasmon resonances in Otto structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Wang, Li-Gang; Ye, Lin-Hua; Al-Amri, M.; Zhu, Shi-Yao; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we investigate the counterintuitive dispersion effect associated with the poles and zeros of reflection and transmission functions in an Otto configuration when a surface plasmon resonance is excited. We show that the zeros and/or poles in the reflection and transmission functions may move into the upper-half complex-frequency plane (CFP), and these locations of the zeros and poles determine the dispersion properties of the whole structures (i.e., the frequency-dependent change of both reflected and transmitted phases). Meanwhile, we demonstrate various dispersion effects (both normal and abnormal) related to the changes of the poles and zeros in both reflection and transmission functions when considering the properties of metal substrates. For a realistic metal substrate in an Otto structure, there are the optimal thickness and incident angle, which correspond to the transitions of the zeros in the reflection function from the upper-half to lower-half CFP. These properties may be helpful to manipulate light propagation in optical devices.

  11. First Numerical Simulations of Anomalous Hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Hongo, Masaru; Hirano, Tetsufumi

    2013-01-01

    Anomalous hydrodynamics is a low-energy effective theory that captures effects of quantum anomalies. We develop a numerical code of anomalous hydrodynamics and apply it to dynamics of heavy-ion collisions, where anomalous transports are expected to occur. This is the first attempt to perform fully non-linear numerical simulations of anomalous hydrodynamics. We discuss implications of the simulations for possible experimental observations of anomalous transport effects. From analyses of the charge-dependent elliptic flow parameters ($v_2^\\pm$) as a function of the net charge asymmetry $A_\\pm$, we quantitatively verify that the linear dependence of $\\Delta v_2 \\equiv v_2^- - v_2^+$ on the net charge asymmetry $A_\\pm$ cannot be regarded as a sensitive signal of anomalous transports, contrary to previous studies. We, however, find that the intercept $\\Delta v_2(A_\\pm=0)$ is sensitive to anomalous transport effects.

  12. CFD Modeling of LNG Spill: Humidity Effect on Vapor Dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannissi, S. G.; Venetsanos, A. G.; Markatos, N.

    2015-09-01

    The risks entailed by an accidental spill of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) should be indentified and evaluated, in order to design measures for prevention and mitigation in LNG terminals. For this purpose, simulations are considered a useful tool to study LNG spills and to understand the mechanisms that influence the vapor dispersion. In the present study, the ADREA-HF CFD code is employed to simulate the TEEX1 experiment. The experiment was carried out at the Brayton Fire Training Field, which is affiliated with the Texas A&M University system and involves LNG release and dispersion over water surface in open- obstructed environment. In the simulation the source was modeled as a two-phase jet enabling the prediction of both the vapor dispersion and the liquid pool spreading. The conservation equations for the mixture are solved along with the mass fraction for natural gas. Due to the low prevailing temperatures during the spill ambient humidity condenses and this might affect the vapor dispersion. This effect was examined in this work by solving an additional conservation equation for the water mass fraction. Two different models were tested: the hydrodynamic equilibrium model which assumes kinetic equilibrium between the phases and the non hydrodynamic equilibrium model, in order to assess the effect of slip velocity on the prediction. The slip velocity is defined as the difference between the liquid phase and the vapor phase and is calculated using the algebraic slip model. Constant droplet diameter of three different sizes and a lognormal distribution of the droplet diameter were applied and the results are discussed and compared with the measurements.

  13. Motional dispersions and ratchet effect in inertial systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    W L Reenbohn; S Saikia; R Roy; Mangal C Mahato

    2008-08-01

    We obtain ratchet effect in inertial structureless systems in symmetric periodic potentials where the asymmetry comes from the non-uniform friction offered by the medium and driven by symmetric periodic forces. In the adiabatic limit the calculations are done by extending the matrix continued fraction method and also by numerically solving the appropriate Langevin equation. For finite frequency field drive the ratchet effect is obtained only numerically. In the transient time scales the system shows dispersionless behaviour as reported earlier when a constant force is applied. In the periodic drive case the dispersion behaviour is more complex. In this brief communication we report some of the results of our work.

  14. Co-occurrence of Superparamagnetism and Anomalous Hall Effect in Highly Reduced Cobalt Doped Rutile TiO2 Films

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    We report a detailed magnetic and structural analysis of highly reduced Co doped rutile TiO2 films displaying an anomalous Hall effect (AHE). The temperature and field dependence of magnetization, and transmission electron microscopy clearly establish the presence of nano-sized superparamagnetic cobalt clusters of 8-10 nm size in the films at the interface. The co-occurrence of superparamagnetism and AHE raises questions regarding the use of the AHE as a test of the intrinsic nature of ferrom...

  15. Generalized dispersive wave emission in nonlinear fiber optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, K E; Xu, Y Q; Erkintalo, M; Murdoch, S G

    2013-01-15

    We show that the emission of dispersive waves in nonlinear fiber optics is not limited to soliton-like pulses propagating in the anomalous dispersion regime. We demonstrate, both numerically and experimentally, that pulses propagating in the normal dispersion regime can excite resonant dispersive radiation across the zero-dispersion wavelength into the anomalous regime.

  16. The giant anomalous Hall effect in the ferromagnet Fe{sub 3}Sn{sub 2}-a frustrated kagome metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kida, T; Hagiwara, M [KYOKUGEN, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Fenner, L A; Dee, A A; Wills, A S [Department of Chemistry, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom); Terasaki, I, E-mail: a.s.wills@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Applied Physics, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2011-03-23

    The kagome-bilayer material Fe{sub 3}Sn{sub 2} has recently been shown to be an example of a rare class of magnet-a frustrated ferromagnetic metal. While the magnetism of Fe{sub 3}Sn{sub 2} appears to be relatively simple at high temperature, with localized moments parallel to the c-axis (T{sub C} = 640 K), upon cooling the competing exchange interactions and spin frustration become apparent as they cause the moments to become non-collinear and to rotate towards the kagome plane, forming firstly a canted ferromagnetic structure and then a re-entrant spin glass (T{sub f{approx_equal}}80 K). In this work we show that Fe{sub 3}Sn{sub 2} possesses an unusual anomalous Hall effect. The saturated Hall resistivity of Fe{sub 3}Sn{sub 2} is 3.2 {mu}{Omega} cm at 300 K, almost 20 times higher than that of typical itinerant ferromagnets such as Fe and Ni. The anomalous Hall coefficient R{sub s} is 6.7 x 10{sup -9} {Omega} cm G{sup -1} at 300 K, which is three orders of magnitude larger than that of pure Fe, and obeys an unconventional scaling with the longitudinal resistivity, {rho}{sub xx}, of R{sub s{proportional_to}{rho}xx}{sup 3.15}. Such a relationship cannot be explained by either the conventional skew or side-jump mechanisms, indicating that the anomalous Hall effect in Fe{sub 3}Sn{sub 2} has an extraordinary origin that is presumed to be related to the underlying frustration of the magnetism. These findings demonstrate that frustrated ferromagnets, whether based on bulk materials or on artificial nanoscale structures, can provide new routes to room temperature spin-dependent electron transport properties suited to application in spintronics. (fast track communication)

  17. Effects of Three Types of Oil Dispersants on Biodegradation of Dispersed Crude Oil in Water Surrounding Two Persian Gulf Provinces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azadeh Zolfaghari-Baghbaderani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine the most effective and biodegradable dispersant of spilled oil in water surrounding two Persian Gulf provinces. Methods. This study compared the effects of three dispersants, Pars 1, Pars 2, and Gamlen OD4000 on removal of oil in two Persian Gulf provinces' water. Overall, 16 stations were selected. Using the Well method, the growth rate of isolated bacteria and fungi was identified. To specify the growth rate of microorganisms and their usage of oil in the presence of the above-mentioned dispersants, as exclusive sources of carbon, the bacteria were grown in culture medium for 28 days at 120 rpm, 30∘C, and their optical density was measured by spectrophotometry. Then, we tested biological oxygen demand (BOD and chemical oxygen demand (COD in microorganisms. Results. The highest growth rate was documented for the growth of microorganisms on either Pars 1 or Pars 2 dispersants or their mixtures with oil. However, the culture having microorganisms grown on Pars 1 had higher BOD and COD than the other two dispersants (9200 and 16800 versus 500 and 960, P<0.05. Mixture of oil and Pars 2 as well as oil and Pars 1 dispersants showed the highest BODs and CODs, respectively. In the Bahregan province, microorganisms grown on Pars 2 had maximum amount of BOD and COD in comparison with Pars 1 and Gamlen dispersants (7100 and 15200 versus 6000 and 10560, P<0.05. Conclusion. Pars 1 and Pars 2 were the most effective dispersants with highest degradability comparing Gamlen. In each region, the most suitable compound for removing oil spill from offshores with least secondary contamination should be investigated.

  18. Employment Effects of Dispersal Policies. Part II: Empirical evidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, Anna Piil; Rosholm, Michael

    2003-01-01

    to the Danish Dispersal Policy 1986-1998. We correct for selection into relocation to another municipality by joint estimation of the duration of the first non-employment spell and time until relocation. The main estimation results are as follows: First, the hazard rate into first job is increasing...... of refugees of the same ethnic origin across regions with low unemployment. Second, on average, geographical mobility had large, positive effects on the job finding rate, suggesting that either relocations were carried out to improve employment prospects, or they were carried out to improve place utility...

  19. Effects of dispersion forces in the instability of polymer films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao He-Ping; Ophelia K.C.Tsui; Liu Zheng-You

    2006-01-01

    Spontaneous rupture of some polymer films upon heating is commonplace. The very criterion for this instability is the system free energy possessing a negative curvature. Within the framework of full frequency-dependent theory of dispersion forces, we have derived the excess free energy of a typical system-polystyrene film deposited on the silicon substrate. The excess free energy, wavelengths and growth rates are calculate and a comparison is made between the accurate results and the approximate results. It is found that the stability of the film can be tuned by the variation of the thickness of the coating and the retardation effects can be significant sometimes.

  20. Magnetoviscous effect in ferrofluids with different dispersion media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borin, D. Yu; Korolev, V. V.; Ramazanova, A. G.; Odenbach, S.; Balmasova, O. V.; Yashkova, V. I.; Korolev, D. V.

    2016-10-01

    Ferrofluids based on magnetite nanoparticles dispersed in different carrier media (dialkyldiphenyl and polyethylsiloxane) have been synthesized using mixed surfactants (oleic acid, stearic acid and alkenyl succinic anhydride). Magnetic properties of the samples and a change of their shear viscosities in an applied magnetic field have been studied in order to evaluate an influence of the carrier medium on a magnetoviscous effect. A significance of the interaction of the carrier medium and surfactant with a consideration of the magnetic and rheological behavior of ferrofluids was demonstrated.

  1. Effect of microstructure on anomalous strain-rate-dependent behaviour of bacterial cellulose hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xing; Shi, Zhijun; Lau, Andrew; Liu, Changqin; Yang, Guang; Silberschmidt, Vadim V

    2016-05-01

    This study is focused on anomalous strain-rate-dependent behaviour of bacterial cellulose (BC) hydrogel that can be strain-rate insensitive, hardening, softening, or strain-rate insensitive in various ranges of strain rate. BC hydrogel consists of randomly distributed nanofibres and a large content of free water; thanks to its ideal biocompatibility, it is suitable for biomedical applications. Motivated by its potential applications in complex loading conditions of body environment, its time-dependent behaviour was studied by means of in-aqua uniaxial tension tests at constant temperature of 37 °C at various strain rates ranging from 0.000 1s(-1) to 0.3s(-1). Experimental results reflect anomalous strain-rate-dependent behaviour that was not documented before. Micro-morphological observations allowed identification of deformation mechanisms at low and high strain rates in relation to microstructural changes. Unlike strain-rate softening behaviours in other materials, reorientation of nanofibres and kinematics of free-water flow dominate the softening behaviour of BC hydrogel at high strain rates.

  2. Anomalous compressibility effects and superconductivity of EuFe2As2 under high pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhoya, Walter [University of Alabama, Birmingham; Tsoi, Georgiy [University of Alabama, Birmingham; Vohra, Y. K. [University of Alabama, Birmingham; McGuire, Michael A [ORNL; Sefat, A. S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Sales, Brian C [ORNL; Mandrus, David [ORNL; Weir, S. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

    2010-01-01

    The crystal structure and electrical resistance of structurally layered EuFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} have been studied up to 70 GPa and down to a temperature of 10 K, using a synchrotron x-ray source and designer diamond anvils. The room temperature compression of the tetragonal phase of EuFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} (I4/mmm) results in an increase in the a-axis length and a rapid decrease in the c-axis length with increasing pressure. This anomalous compression reaches a maximum at 8 GPa and the tetragonal lattice behaves normally above 10 GPa, with a nearly constant c/a axial ratio. The rapid rise in the superconducting transition temperature (T{sub c}) to 41 K with increasing pressure is correlated with this anomalous compression, and a decrease in T{sub c} is observed above 10 GPa. We present P-V data or the equation of state for EuFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} both in the ambient tetragonal phase and in the high pressure collapsed tetragonal phase up to 70 GPa.

  3. Polarization modulational instability in a birefringent optical fiber with fourth order dispersion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Ganapathy; V C Kuriakose

    2001-10-01

    We obtain conditions for the occurrence of polarization modulational instability in the anomalous and normal dispersion regimes for the coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equation modelling fourth order dispersion effects when the linearly polarized pump is oriented at arbitrary angles with respect to the slow and fast axes of the birefringent fiber.

  4. Effects of Reynolds Number on Mixing and Dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockman, H. W.

    2001-12-01

    The lattice Boltzmann (LB) method was used to estimate the effects of Reynolds number (Re), and sidewall boundaries, on dispersion of gases in fractured and porous media. The systems studied ranged from idealized channels with parallel grooves and honeycomb structures, to casts of natural fractures and aggregates of sedimented, quasi-spherical particles. For specific configurations of rough, intersecting fractures, Re variation from 0 to 100 causes only a factor ~2 variation in the mixing ratio C2/(C1+C2), where C1 and C2 are the concentrations of solute in the outlet legs of the fracture intersection. However, slight changes in the intersection alignment yield up to factor 5 range in the mixing ratio, for the geometries studied. For both individual fractures and fracture intersections, sidewall boundary effects tend to be overwhelmed by velocity variations within the fracture planes. LB simulations for porous aggregates give good agreement with experimental studies. However, in random aggregates at high Re, it becomes impractical to obtain dispersion coefficients by LB and the method of moments. Alternative LB methods are discussed.

  5. Effects of high-order dispersions on dark-bright vector soliton propagation and interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Li; Dongning Wang

    2011-01-01

    The dynamics of dark-bright vector solitons is investigated in a birefringent fiber with the high-order dispersions, and their effects on vector soliton propagation and interaction are analyzed using the numerical method. The combined role of the high-order dispersions, such as the third-order dispersion (TOD) and the fourth-order dispersion (FOD), may cause various deformation of the vector soliton and enhance interaction. These effects depend strictly on the sign of the high-order dispersions. Results indicate that the disadvantageous effects can be reduced effectively via proper mapping of the high-order dispersions.%@@ The dynamics of dark-bright vector solitons is investigated in a birefringent fiber with the high-order dispersions, and their effects on vector soliton propagation and interaction are analyzed using the numerical method.The combined role of the high-order dispersions, such as the third-order dispersion (TOD) and the fourth-order dispersion (FOD), may cause various deformation of the vector soliton and enhance interaction.These effects depend strictly on the sign of the high-order dispersions.Results indicate that the disadvantageous effects can be reduced effectively via proper mapping of the high-order dispersions.

  6. Study on Dispersion Properties of Photonic Crystal Fiber by Effective-Index Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The group-velocity-dispersion properties of photonic crystal fiber (PCF) were investigated by effective-index model. The relationship between waveguide dispersion and structure parameters: the pitch A and the relative hole size/was studied.

  7. Study on Dispersion Properties of Photonic Crystal Fiber by Effective-Index Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ren Guobin; Wang Zhi; Lou Shuqin; Jian Shuisheng

    2003-01-01

    The group-velocity-dispersion properties of photonic crystal fiber (PCF) were investigated by effective-index model. The relationship between waveguide dispersion and structure parameters: the pitch and the relative hole size f was studied.

  8. Effects of Intraseasonal Oscillation on the Anomalous East Asian Summer Monsoon During 1999

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Ying; DING Yihui

    2008-01-01

    The 1999 East Asian summer monsoon was very unusual for its weak northward advance and remarkably anomalous climate conditions.The monsoonal southwesterly airflow and related rain belt in East Asia were blocked south of the Yangtze River Valley.The monsoonal airflow and major moisture transport conduct shifted eastward and turned northward to Japan from the tropical western Pacific rather than to East China from the South China Sea(SCS)as in normal years.Severe and prolonged drought occurred over extensive areas of North China and heavy precipitation in South China and Japan.The investigation on the possible intrinsic mechanisms related to such an anomalous monsoon year has shown that the unique behavior of intraseasonal oscillation may play an essential role during this process.During this year,the northward propagation of 30-60-day anomalous low-level cyclone/anticyclone collapsed in the region around 20℃N and did not extend beyond the latitudes of the Yangtze River basin due to the barrier of strong cold air intrusion from the mid-latitudes.The southwesterly moisture flux on the northwestern flank of the anticyclonic moisture transport system in the western North Pacific,which was regulated by the northward shift of 30-60-day cyclonic/anticyclonic moisture transport.also did not reach the region north of 30℃N as well.Under this circumstance,the weak northward advance of the monsoon westerlies and associated northward moisture transport could not arrive in North China and led to the severe droughts there in 1999.The SCS and South China were mostly affected by the alrflow in the southern and northern flanks of the same 30-60-day cyclones or anticyclones.respectively,and thus controlled by the nearly reverse zonal wind and moisture convergent/divergent conditions.The rainfall in the SCS and South China showed out-of-phase oscillation through the transient local Hadley circulation.with the rainfall maximum occurring in the SCS (South China)when the 30-60-day

  9. Emerging magnetism and anomalous Hall effect in iridate-manganite heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, John; Gao, Xiang; Lee, Shinbuhm; Meyer, Tricia L.; Freeland, John W.; Lauter, Valeria; Yi, Di; Liu, Jian; Haskel, Daniel; Petrie, Jonathan R.; Guo, Er-Jia; Herklotz, Andreas; Lee, Dongkyu; Ward, Thomas Z.; Eres, Gyula; Fitzsimmons, Michael R.; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2016-09-01

    Strong Coulomb repulsion and spin-orbit coupling are known to give rise to exotic physical phenomena in transition metal oxides. Initial attempts to investigate systems, where both of these fundamental interactions are comparably strong, such as 3d and 5d complex oxide superlattices, have revealed properties that only slightly differ from the bulk ones of the constituent materials. Here we observe that the interfacial coupling between the 3d antiferromagnetic insulator SrMnO3 and the 5d paramagnetic metal SrIrO3 is enormously strong, yielding an anomalous Hall response as the result of charge transfer driven interfacial ferromagnetism. These findings show that low dimensional spin-orbit entangled 3d-5d interfaces provide an avenue to uncover technologically relevant physical phenomena unattainable in bulk materials.

  10. Effect of combined treatments on viscosity of whey dispersions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camillo, A.; Sabato, S.F. E-mail: sfsabato@ipen.br

    2004-10-01

    Whey proteins, enriched protein fractions from milk, are of great interest as ingredients due to nutritional value associated with its functional properties. These proteins could have their structural properties improved when some treatments are applied, such as thermal and gamma irradiation or when some compounds are added. The current work aimed to study the viscometer behavior of whey dispersions submitted to two different combined treatments: (1) thermal plus irradiation and (2) thermal plus vacuum and N{sub 2} plus irradiation. Dispersions of whey protein in water (5% and 8% protein (w/v) base) and containing proteins and glycerol at ratios 1:1 and 2:1 (protein:glycerol) were submitted to both combined treatments. The irradiation doses were 0, 5, 15 and 25 kGy. The viscosity of the two combined treatments and for four levels of absorbed doses is presented and the combined effects are discussed. The thermal treatment combined with gamma irradiation contributed to increase the viscosity as irradiation doses increases for both (5% and 8%) concentrations of proteins (p<0.05). For protein and glycerol solutions, the irradiation dose seemed to result in a slightly increase. The vacuum applied before the irradiation showed a small contribution.

  11. Effect of combined treatments on viscosity of whey dispersions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camillo, A.; Sabato, S. F.

    2004-09-01

    Whey proteins, enriched protein fractions from milk, are of great interest as ingredients due to nutritional value associated with its functional properties. These proteins could have their structural properties improved when some treatments are applied, such as thermal and gamma irradiation or when some compounds are added. The current work aimed to study the viscometer behavior of whey dispersions submitted to two different combined treatments: (1) thermal plus irradiation and (2) thermal plus vacuum and N 2 plus irradiation. Dispersions of whey protein in water (5% and 8% protein (w/v) base) and containing proteins and glycerol at ratios 1:1 and 2:1 (protein:glycerol) were submitted to both combined treatments. The irradiation doses were 0, 5, 15 and 25 kGy. The viscosity of the two combined treatments and for four levels of absorbed doses is presented and the combined effects are discussed. The thermal treatment combined with gamma irradiation contributed to increase the viscosity as irradiation doses increases for both (5% and 8%) concentrations of proteins ( p<0.05). For protein and glycerol solutions, the irradiation dose seemed to result in a slightly increase. The vacuum applied before the irradiation showed a small contribution.

  12. The Gibbs-Thomson effect and intergranular melting in ice emulsions: Interpreting the anomalous heat capacity and volume of supercooled water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johari, G. P.

    1997-12-01

    Calculations for the Gibbs-Thomson effect and the intergranular melting of the ice droplets in (water) emulsions at temperatures below 273.16 K show that water and ice coexist at thermodynamic equilibrium in an apparently frozen emulsion. The fraction of water at this equilibrium increases on heating, which alters further the thermodynamic properties of the emulsion. As some of the ice in the emulsion has already melted, the increase in the enthalpy, H, and heat capacity, Cp, and the decrease in the volume measured on the normal melting at 273.16 K, are less than the values anticipated. The ratio of this increase in H, or Cp, on melting of the emulsion to the corresponding value for pure ice, underestimates the emulsion's water content which, when used for scaling the difference between the Cp of the unfrozen and frozen emulsion at lower temperatures, as in earlier studies, leads to a larger Cp of supercooled water than the actual value. Similar scaling of the corresponding difference between the volume leads to higher volume, or lower density, than the actual value. A formalism for this premelting effect is given for both the adiabatic and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and its magnitude is calculated. New experiments show that the rise in the DSC signal, or equivalently in the apparent Cp observed on heating the frozen emulsion, occurs over a temperature range much wider than the Gibbs-Thomson effect and intergranular melting predict, for which reasons are given. It is shown that Cp of the dispersant phase is also affected by the melting of ice droplets. There are four consequences of the premelting effects for all finely dispersed materials, for frozen water emulsions below 273.16 K: (i) water and ice coexist in the emulsion, (ii) its apparent Cp will increase with increase in the heat input used to measure it, (iii) the apparent Cp will increase with decrease in the average size of the droplets, and (iv) the apparent Cp will decrease on annealing the

  13. Effectiveness of primate seed dispersers for an "oversized" fruit, Garcinia benthamii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConkey, Kim R; Brockelman, Warren Y; Saralamba, Chanpen; Nathalang, Anuttara

    2015-10-01

    The largest fruits found in tropical forests may depend on complementary seed dispersal strategies. These fruits are dispersed most effectively by megafauna, but populations can persist where megafauna are absent or erratic visitors. Smaller animals often consume these large fruits, but their capacity to disperse these seeds effectively has rarely been assessed. We evaluated the contributions of gibbons (Hylobates lar) and other frugivores in the seed dispersal of the megafaunal fruit Garcinia benthamii, using the SDE (seed dispersal effectiveness) landscape. Gibbons preferentially consumed G. benthamii fruits and were the main seed disperser that we observed. However, gibbons became satiated when availability was high, with 57% of fruits falling to the ground unhandled. Recruitment of seedlings from gibbon-dispersed seeds was also very low. Elephants consumed G. benthamii fruit, but occurred at low density and were rare visitors to the trees. We suggest that gibbons might complement the seed dispersal role of elephants for G. benthamii, allowing limited recruitment in areas (such as the study site) where elephants occur at low density. Fruit availability varied between years; when availability was low, gibbons reliably consumed most of the crop and dispersed some seeds that established seedlings, albeit at low numbers (2.5 seedlings per crop). When fruit availability was high, the fruit supply overwhelmed the gibbons and other arboreal frugivores, ensuring a large abundance of fruit available to terrestrial seed dispersers. Although gibbons effectively dispersed more seeds at these times (20.7 seedlings per crop), there was the potential for elephants to move many more seeds. Complementary seed dispersal strategies may be important for megafaunal fruit, because they ensure that very large fruits are able to benefit from megafaunal dispersal but also persist where this dispersal becomes erratic. However, our data suggest that smaller seed dispersers might not be

  14. In-resonator variation of waveguide cross-sections for dispersion control of aluminum nitride micro-rings

    CERN Document Server

    Jung, Hojoong; Tang, Hong X

    2015-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate a dispersion control technique by combination of different waveguide cross sections in an aluminum nitride micro-ring resonator. Narrow and wide waveguides with normal and anomalous dispersion, respectively, are linked with tapering waveguides and enclosed in a ring resonator to produce a total dispersion near zero. The mode-coupling in multimoded waveguides is also effectively suppressed. This technique provides new degrees of freedom and enhanced flexibility in engineering the dispersion of microcomb resonators.

  15. Discriminating between Z'-boson effects and effects of anomalous gauge couplings in the double production of W ± bosons at a linear collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreev, Vasili V.; Pankov, A. A.

    2013-06-01

    The potential of the International Linear electron-positron Collider (ILC) for seeking, in the annihilation production of W ±-boson pairs, signals induced by new neutral gauge bosons predicted by models belonging to various classes and featuring an extended gauge sector is studied. Limits that will be obtained at ILC for the parameters and masses of Z' bosons are compared with present-day and future data from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The possibility of discriminating between the effects of Z-Z' mixing and signals induced by anomalous gauge couplings (AGC) is demonstrated within theoretically motivated trilinear gauge models involving several free anomalous parameters. It is found that the sensitivity of ILC to the effects of Z-Z' mixing in the process e + e - → W + W - and its ability to discriminate between these two new-physics scenarios, Z' and AGC, become substantially higher upon employing polarized initial ( e + e -) and final ( W ±) states.

  16. Metallic transport and large anomalous Hall effect at room temperature in ferrimagnetic Mn{sub 4}N epitaxial thin film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Xi; Shigematsu, Kei [Department of Chemistry, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Chikamatsu, Akira, E-mail: chikamatsu@chem.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Fukumura, Tomoteru [Department of Chemistry, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Hirose, Yasushi; Hasegawa, Tetsuya [Department of Chemistry, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Kanagawa Academy of Science and Technology (KAST), Kawasaki 213-0012 (Japan)

    2014-08-18

    We report the electrical transport properties of ferrimagnetic Mn{sub 4}N (001) epitaxial thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition on MgO (001) substrates. The Mn{sub 4}N thin films were tetragonally distorted with a ratio of out-of-plane to in-plane lattice constants of 0.987 and showed perpendicular magnetic anisotropy with an effective magnetic anisotropy constant of 0.16 MJ/m{sup 3}, which is comparable with that of a recently reported molecular-beam-epitaxy-grown film. The thin films exhibited metallic transport with a room temperature resistivity of 125 μΩ cm in addition to a large anomalous Hall effect with a Hall angle tangent of 0.023.

  17. Anomalous Hall effect in ZnxFe3-xO4: Universal scaling law and electron localization below the Verwey transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Jedrecy

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We show that the well-established universal scaling σxyAHE ∼ σxx1.6 between anomalous Hall and longitudinal conductivities in the low conductivity regime (σxx < 104 Ω−1 cm−1 transforms into the scaling σxyAHE ∼ σxx2 at the onset of strong electron localization. The crossover between the two relations is observed in magnetite-derived ZnxFe3-xO4 thin films where an insulating/hopping regime follows a bad metal/hopping regime below the Verwey transition temperature Tv. Our results demonstrate that electron localization effects come into play in the anomalous Hall effect (AHE modifying significantly the scaling exponent. In addition, the thermal evolution of the anomalous Hall resistivity suggests the existence of spin polarons whose size would decrease below Tv.

  18. The effect of plasma shear flow on drift Alfven instabilities of a finite beta plasma and on anomalous heating of ions by ion cyclotron turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Young Hyun; Lee, Hae June; Mikhailenko, Vladimir V.; Mikhailenko, Vladimir S.

    2016-01-01

    It was derived that the drift-Alfven instabilities with the shear flow parallel to the magnetic field have significant difference from the drift-Alfven instabilities of a shearless plasma when the ion temperature is comparable with electron temperature for a finite plasma beta. The velocity shear not only modifies the frequency and the growth rate of the known drift-Alfven instability, which develops due to the inverse electron Landau damping, but also triggers a combined effect of the velocity shear and the inverse ion Landau damping, which manifests the development of the ion kinetic shear-flow-driven drift-Alfven instability. The excited unstable waves have the phase velocities along the magnetic field comparable with the ion thermal velocity, and the growth rate is comparable with the frequency. The development of this instability may be the efficient mechanism of the ion energization in shear flows. The levels of the drift--Alfven turbulence, resulted from the development of both instabilities, are determined from the renormalized nonlinear dispersion equation, which accounts for the nonlinear effect of the scattering of ions by the electromagnetic turbulence. The renormalized quasilinear equation for the ion distribution function, which accounts for the same effect of the scattering of ions by electromagnetic turbulence, is derived and employed for the analysis of the ion viscosity and ions heating, resulted from the interactions of ions with drift-Alfven turbulence. In the same way, the phenomena of the ion cyclotron turbulence and anomalous anisotropic heating of ions by ion cyclotron plasma turbulence has numerous practical applications in physics of the near-Earth space plasmas. Using the methodology of the shearing modes, the kinetic theory of the ion cyclotron turbulence of the plasma with transverse current with strong velocity shear has been developed.

  19. Anomalous decay and scattering processes of the eta meson

    CERN Document Server

    Kubis, Bastian

    2015-01-01

    We amend a recent dispersive analysis of the anomalous $\\eta$ decay process $\\eta\\to\\pi^+\\pi^-\\gamma$ by the effects of the $a_2$ tensor meson, the lowest-lying resonance that can contribute in the $\\pi\\eta$ system. While the net effects on the measured decay spectrum are small, they may be more pronounced for the analogous $\\eta'$ decay. There are nonnegligible consequences for the $\\eta$ transition form factor, which is an important quantity for the hadronic light-by-light scattering contribution to the muon's anomalous magnetic moment. We predict total and differential cross sections, as well as a marked forward-backward asymmetry, for the crossed process $\\gamma\\pi^-\\to\\pi^-\\eta$ that could be measured in Primakoff reactions in the future.

  20. Experimental Demonstration of Electromagnetic Induced Transparency and Dispersion Effects in Cs Atom Vapour

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张俊香; 董瑞芳; 常宏; 谢常德; 彭忻墀; 肖敏

    2001-01-01

    The effects of the electromagnetically induced transparency and dispersion of a A-type three-level atomic system are experimentally measured with a vapour cell of Cs atoms. The steep dispersion at low absorption is observed. Thus a small group velocity for the probe beam is inferred from the measured dispersion curve.

  1. Effects of experimental snowmelt and rain on dispersal of six plant species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarneel, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Water flows affect dispersal of propagules of many plant species, and rivers and streams are therefore very important dispersal vectors. However, small water flows such as trough rain and snowmelt are much more common, but their effects on dispersal are barely studied. The importance of this form of

  2. Casimir effect for two lossy dispersive dielectric slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matloob, R.; Keshavarz, A.; Sedighi, D.

    1999-11-01

    The electromagnetic field is quantized using the Green's-function method for the geometry of a Fabry-Perot cavity, made up of two identical lossy dispersive slabs of finite thickness. The dielectric functions of the slabs are assumed to be an arbitrary complex function of frequency obeying causality requirements. The attractive Casimir force between the two slabs is calculated by the help of the latter field operators, via evaluating the difference between the vacuum pressures on both sides of each slab. Special attention is paid to the limiting case of the Casimir effect for two conducting plates. The Lorentz model of the dielectric function is used to demonstrate the variation of the force in terms of plasma frequency. The Casimir force expression is also related to the imaginary part of the response function. The latter expression is used to introduce the repulsive Casimir force between two conducting plates located inside a Fabry-Perot cavity.

  3. Carbamate and Organophosphorus Nematicides: Acetylcholinesterase inhibition and Effects on Dispersal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pree, D J; Townshend, J L; Archibald, D E

    1989-10-01

    The sensitivities of acetylcholinesterases (ACHE) from the fungus-feeder Aphelenchus avenae and the plant-parasitic species Helicotylenchus dihystera and Pratylenchus penetrans and the housefly, Musca domestica, were compared using a radiometric assay which utilized H(3) acetylcholine as a substrate. Nematode ACHE were generally less sensitive to inhibition by organophosphorns and carbamate pesticides than were ACHE from the housefly. ACHE from the plant-parasitic species and A. avenae were generally similar in sensitivity. In soil, carbamates were more toxic than the organophosphorus pesticides to A. avenae. All pesticides tested affected nematode movement, but fenamiphos was more inhibitory than others. The effects on dispersal of nematodes may be an important mechanism in control by some nematicides.

  4. Dispersion and nonlinear effects in OFDM-RoF system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhasson, Bader H.; Bloul, Albe M.; Matin, M.

    2010-08-01

    The radio-over-fiber (RoF) network has been a proven technology to be the best candidate for the wireless-access technology, and the orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) technique has been established as the core technology in the physical layer of next generation wireless communication system, as a result OFDM-RoF has drawn attentions worldwide and raised many new research topics recently. At the present time, the trend of information industry is towards mobile, wireless, digital and broadband. The next generation network (NGN) has motivated researchers to study higher-speed wider-band multimedia communication to transmit (voice, data, and all sorts of media such as video) at a higher speed. The NGN would offer services that would necessitate broadband networks with bandwidth higher than 2Mbit/s per radio channel. Many new services emerged, such as Internet Protocol TV (IPTV), High Definition TV (HDTV), mobile multimedia and video stream media. Both speed and capacity have been the key objectives in transmission. In the meantime, the demand for transmission bandwidth increased at a very quick pace. The coming of 4G and 5G era will provide faster data transmission and higher bit rate and bandwidth. Taking advantages of both optical communication and wireless communication, OFDM Radio over Fiber (OFDM-RoF) system is characterized by its high speed, large capacity and high spectral efficiency. However, up to the present there are some problems to be solved, such as dispersion and nonlinearity effects. In this paper we will study the dispersion and nonlinearity effects and their elimination in OFDM-radio-over-fiber system.

  5. Rapid effects of marine reserves via larval dispersal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Cudney-Bueno

    Full Text Available Marine reserves have been advocated worldwide as conservation and fishery management tools. It is argued that they can protect ecosystems and also benefit fisheries via density-dependent spillover of adults and enhanced larval dispersal into fishing areas. However, while evidence has shown that marine reserves can meet conservation targets, their effects on fisheries are less understood. In particular, the basic question of if and over what temporal and spatial scales reserves can benefit fished populations via larval dispersal remains unanswered. We tested predictions of a larval transport model for a marine reserve network in the Gulf of California, Mexico, via field oceanography and repeated density counts of recently settled juvenile commercial mollusks before and after reserve establishment. We show that local retention of larvae within a reserve network can take place with enhanced, but spatially-explicit, recruitment to local fisheries. Enhancement occurred rapidly (2 yrs, with up to a three-fold increase in density of juveniles found in fished areas at the downstream edge of the reserve network, but other fishing areas within the network were unaffected. These findings were consistent with our model predictions. Our findings underscore the potential benefits of protecting larval sources and show that enhancement in recruitment can be manifested rapidly. However, benefits can be markedly variable within a local seascape. Hence, effects of marine reserve networks, positive or negative, may be overlooked when only focusing on overall responses and not considering finer spatially-explicit responses within a reserve network and its adjacent fishing grounds. Our results therefore call for future research on marine reserves that addresses this variability in order to help frame appropriate scenarios for the spatial management scales of interest.

  6. Rapid effects of marine reserves via larval dispersal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cudney-Bueno, Richard; Lavín, Miguel F; Marinone, Silvio G; Raimondi, Peter T; Shaw, William W

    2009-01-01

    Marine reserves have been advocated worldwide as conservation and fishery management tools. It is argued that they can protect ecosystems and also benefit fisheries via density-dependent spillover of adults and enhanced larval dispersal into fishing areas. However, while evidence has shown that marine reserves can meet conservation targets, their effects on fisheries are less understood. In particular, the basic question of if and over what temporal and spatial scales reserves can benefit fished populations via larval dispersal remains unanswered. We tested predictions of a larval transport model for a marine reserve network in the Gulf of California, Mexico, via field oceanography and repeated density counts of recently settled juvenile commercial mollusks before and after reserve establishment. We show that local retention of larvae within a reserve network can take place with enhanced, but spatially-explicit, recruitment to local fisheries. Enhancement occurred rapidly (2 yrs), with up to a three-fold increase in density of juveniles found in fished areas at the downstream edge of the reserve network, but other fishing areas within the network were unaffected. These findings were consistent with our model predictions. Our findings underscore the potential benefits of protecting larval sources and show that enhancement in recruitment can be manifested rapidly. However, benefits can be markedly variable within a local seascape. Hence, effects of marine reserve networks, positive or negative, may be overlooked when only focusing on overall responses and not considering finer spatially-explicit responses within a reserve network and its adjacent fishing grounds. Our results therefore call for future research on marine reserves that addresses this variability in order to help frame appropriate scenarios for the spatial management scales of interest.

  7. Anomalous effect in Schumann resonance phenomena observed in Japan, possibly associated with the Chi-chi earthquake in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hayakawa

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The Schumann resonance phenomenon has been monitored at Nakatsugawa (near Nagoya in Japan since the beginning of 1999, and due to the occurance of a severe earthquake (so-called Chi-chi earthquake on 21 September 1999 in Taiwan we have examined our Schumann resonance data at Nakatsugawa during the entire year of 1999. We have found a very anomalous effect in the Schumann resonance, possibly associated with two large land earthquakes (one is the Chi-chi earthquake and another one on 2 November 1999 (Chia-yi earthquake with a magnitude again greater than 6.0. Conspicuous effects are observed for the larger Chi-chi earthquake, so that we summarize the characteristics for this event. The anomaly is characterized mainly by the unusual increase in amplitude of the fourth Schumann resonance mode and a significant frequency shift of its peak frequency (~1.0Hz from the conventional value on the By magnetic field component which is sensitive to the waves propagating in the NS meridian plane. Anomalous Schumann resonance signals appeared from about one week to a few days before the main shock. Secondly, the goniometric estimation of the arrival angle of the anomalous signal is found to coincide with the Taiwan azimuth (the unresolved dual direction indicates toward South America. Also, the pulsed signals, such as the Q-bursts, were simultaneously observed with the "carrier" frequency around the peak frequency of the fourth Schumann resonance mode. The anomaly for the second event for the Chia-yi earthquake on 2 November had much in common. But, most likely due to a small magnitude, the anomaly appears one day before and lasts until one day after the main shock, with the enhancement at the fourth Schumann resonance mode being smaller in amplitude than the case of the Chi-chi earthquake. Yet, the other characteristics, including the goniometric direction finding result, frequency shift, etc., are nearly the same. Although the emphasis of

  8. An exact solution for the Hawking effect in a dispersive fluid

    CERN Document Server

    Philbin, T G

    2016-01-01

    We consider the wave equation for sound in a moving fluid with a fourth-order anomalous dispersion relation. The velocity of the fluid is a linear function of position, giving two points in the flow where the fluid velocity matches the group velocity of low-frequency waves. We find the exact scattering coefficients for wave propagation in the flow. The scattering shows amplification of classical waves, leading to spontaneous emission when the waves are quantized. In the dispersionless limit the system corresponds to a 1+1-dimensional black-hole or white-hole binary and there is a thermal spectrum of Hawking radiation from each horizon. Dispersion changes the scattering coefficients so that the quantum emission is no longer thermal.

  9. Ferromagnetism, variable range hopping, and the anomalous Hall effect in epitaxial Co:ZnO thin film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bai Hong-Liang; Chen Yan-Xue; Mei Liang-Mo; He Shu-Min; Xu Tong-Shuai; Liu Guo-Lei; Yan Shi-Shen; Zhu Da-Peng; Dai Zheng-Kun; Yang Feng-Fan; Dai You-Yong

    2012-01-01

    A series of high quality single crystalline epitaxial Zn0.95Co0.05O thin films is prepared by molecular beam epitaxy.Superparamagnetism and ferromagnetism are observed when the donor density is manipulated in a range of 1018 cm-3- 1020 cm-3 by changing the oxygen partial pressure during film growth.The conduction shows variable range hopping at low temperature and thermal activation conduction at high temperature.The ferromagnetism can be maintained up to room temperature.However,the anomalous Hall effect is observed only at low temperature and disappears above 160 K.This phenomenon can be attributed to the local ferromagnetism and the decreased optimal hopping distance at high temperatures.

  10. Elution time changes due to anomalous DEP effects in microchannels under uniform and non-uniform electric fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonino Magliano

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Conventional dielectrophoresis (DEP force on cell and particle is altered in the proximity of the electrodes due to the failure of the dipole approximation. In these conditions an anomalous DEP (aDEP force rules the particle manipulation. Anyhow, the role of the aDEP is barely considered in the design of DEP devices. Here we analyze, using a multiscale simulation approach, the aDEP effects in micro-fluidic device coupled with interdigitated channel commonly used in continuous mode field flow fractionation dielectrophoretic (FFF-DEP devices for the separation of circulating tumor cells (MDA and Lymphocytes (LYM. We study the propagation of an injected density of MDA and LYM respectively and evaluate how the aDEP changes the migrations of the cells.

  11. Electron's anomalous magnetic moment effects on electron-hydrogen elastic collisions in the presence of a circularly polarized laser field

    CERN Document Server

    Elhandi, S; attaourti, Y; Manaut, B; Oufni, L

    2010-01-01

    The effect of the electron's anomalous magnetic moment on the relativistic electronic dressing for the process of electron-hydrogen atom elastic collisions is investigated. We consider a laser field with circular polarization and various electric field strengths. The Dirac-Volkov states taking into account this anomaly are used to describe the process in the first order of perturbation theory. The correlation between the terms coming from this anomaly and the electric field strength gives rise to new results, namely the strong dependence of the spinor part of the differential cross section (DCS) with respect to these terms. A detailed study has been devoted to the non relativistic regime as well as the moderate relativistic regime. Some aspects of this dependence as well as the dynamical behavior of the DCS in the relativistic regime have been addressed.

  12. Step-wise switching of anomalous Hall effect in a topological insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lukas; Chen, Zhiyi; Korzhovska, Inna; Zhao, Shihua; Krusin-Elbaum, Lia; Konczykowski, Marcin

    Surfaces of three-dimensional (3D) topological insulators (TIs) have emerged as one of the most remarkable states of condensed quantum matter where exotic charge and spin phases of Dirac particles could arise. The main challenge to finding these phases comes from a non-vanishing conductivity of the bulk. Recently we have demonstrated that we can access 2D surface transport and reach the charge neutrality point (CNP) by compensating intrinsically p-type TIs using high energy electron beams, and increase bulk resistivity by orders of magnitude. Here we report a discovery of anomalous Hall signal (AHE) at the CNP in Bi2Te3 of unprecedented appearance; it shows regions of plateaus on sweeping the temperature, where Hall resistivity is flat in temperature, and has sharp (nearly discontinuous) `steps' in-between the plateaus. The height of the steps increases on cooling, consistently following the ratio of 1:3 with each step. We will show by electrostatically tuning gated structures how this macroscopic switching of spins evolves in the vicinity of CNP and discuss the phenomenon of step-wise AHE in the context of charge inhomogeneities (puddles) and correlations between the localized bulk spins and Dirac spins. Supported by NSF-DMR-1420634, NSF-DMR-1312483-MWN, and DOD-W911NF-13-1-0159.

  13. Study Pulse Parameters versus Cavity Length for Both Dispersion Regimes in FM Mode Locked

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bushra Razooky Mhdi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available To demonstrate the effect of changing cavity length for  FM mode locked on pulse parameters and make comparison for both dispersion regime , a plot for each pulse parameter as Lr function are presented for normal and anomalous dispersion regimes. The analysis is based on the theoretical study and the results of numerical simulation using MATLAB. The effect of both normal and anomalous dispersion regimes on output pulses is investigate Fiber length effects on pulse parameters are investigated by driving the modulator into different values. A numerical solution for model equations using fourth-fifth order, Runge-Kutta method is performed through MATLAB 7.0 program. Fiber length effect on pulse parameters is investigated by driving the modulator into different values of lengths. Result shows that, the output pulse width from the FM mode locked equals to τ= 501ns anomalous regime and τ=518ns in normal regime.

  14. Effective grid-dependent dispersion coefficient for conservative and reactive transport simulations in heterogeneous porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortinez, J. M.; Valocchi, A. J.; Herrera, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    Because of the finite size of numerical grids, it is very difficult to correctly account for processes that occur at different spatial scales to accurately simulate the migration of conservative and reactive compounds dissolved in groundwater. In one hand, transport processes in heterogeneous porous media are controlled by local-scale dispersion associated to transport processes at the pore-scale. On the other hand, variations of velocity at the continuum- or Darcy-scale produce spreading of the contaminant plume, which is referred to as macro-dispersion. Furthermore, under some conditions both effects interact, so that spreading may enhance the action of local-scale dispersion resulting in higher mixing, dilution and reaction rates. Traditionally, transport processes at different spatial scales have been included in numerical simulations by using a single dispersion coefficient. This approach implicitly assumes that the separate effects of local-dispersion and macro-dispersion can be added and represented by a unique effective dispersion coefficient. Moreover, the selection of the effective dispersion coefficient for numerical simulations usually do not consider the filtering effect of the grid size over the small-scale flow features. We have developed a multi-scale Lagragian numerical method that allows using two different dispersion coefficients to represent local- and macro-scale dispersion. This technique considers fluid particles that carry solute mass and whose locations evolve according to a deterministic component given by the grid-scale velocity and a stochastic component that corresponds to a block-effective macro-dispersion coefficient. Mass transfer between particles due to local-scale dispersion is approximated by a meshless method. We use our model to test under which transport conditions the combined effect of local- and macro-dispersion are additive and can be represented by a single effective dispersion coefficient. We also demonstrate that for

  15. Anomalous effects on radiation detectors and capacitance measurements inside a modified Faraday cage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milián-Sánchez, V.; Mocholí-Salcedo, A.; Milián, C.; Kolombet, V. A.; Verdú, G.

    2016-08-01

    We present experimental results showing certain anomalies in the measurements performed inside a modified Faraday cage of decay rates of Ra-226, Tl-204 and Sr-90/I-90, of the gamma spectrum of a Cs-137 preparation, and of the capacitance of both a class-I multilayer ceramic capacitor and of the interconnection cable between the radiation detector and the scaler. Decay rates fluctuate significantly up to 5% around the initial value and differently depending on the type of nuclide, and the spectrum photopeak increases in 4.4%. In the case of the capacitor, direct capacitance measurements at 100 Hz, 10 kHz and 100 kHz show variations up to 0.7%, the most significant taking place at 100 Hz. In the case of the interconnection cable, the capacitance varies up to 1%. Dispersion also tends to increase inside the enclosure. However, the measured capacitance variations do not explain the variations observed in decay rates.

  16. Influence of an anomalous dimension effect on thermal instability in amorphous-InGaZnO thin-film transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Kuan-Hsien; Chou, Wu-Ching, E-mail: tcchang3708@gmail.com, E-mail: wuchingchou@mail.nctu.edu.tw [Department of Electrophysics, National Chiao Tung University, Hsin-chu 300, Taiwan (China); Chang, Ting-Chang, E-mail: tcchang3708@gmail.com, E-mail: wuchingchou@mail.nctu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan (China); Advanced Optoelectronics Technology Center, National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan (China); Chen, Hua-Mao; Tai, Ya-Hsiang [Department of Photonics and Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsin-chu 300, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Ming-Yen; Hung, Pei-Hua; Chu, Ann-Kuo [Department of Photonics, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan (China); Wu, Ming-Siou; Hung, Yi-Syuan [Department of Electronics Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsin-Chu 300, Taiwan (China); Hsieh, Tien-Yu [Department of Physics, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan (China); Yeh, Bo-Liang [Advanced Display Technology Research Center, AU Optronics, No.1, Li-Hsin Rd. 2, Hsinchu Science Park, Hsin-Chu 30078, Taiwan (China)

    2014-10-21

    This paper investigates abnormal dimension-dependent thermal instability in amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors. Device dimension should theoretically have no effects on threshold voltage, except for in short channel devices. Unlike short channel drain-induced source barrier lowering effect, threshold voltage increases with increasing drain voltage. Furthermore, for devices with either a relatively large channel width or a short channel length, the output drain current decreases instead of saturating with an increase in drain voltage. Moreover, the wider the channel and the shorter the channel length, the larger the threshold voltage and output on-state current degradation that is observed. Because of the surrounding oxide and other thermal insulating material and the low thermal conductivity of the IGZO layer, the self-heating effect will be pronounced in wider/shorter channel length devices and those with a larger operating drain bias. To further clarify the physical mechanism, fast I{sub D}-V{sub G} and modulated peak/base pulse time I{sub D}-V{sub D} measurements are utilized to demonstrate the self-heating induced anomalous dimension-dependent threshold voltage variation and on-state current degradation.

  17. Demonstration and Verification of a Broad Spectrum Anomalous Dispersion Effects Tool for Index of Refraction and Optical Turbulence Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    exchange function for heat diffusion , and ε is the energy dissipation rate. Similarity theory (Rachele et al., 1995) can be used to determine surface...frozen purified water (water that had been through a reverse osmosis process) and ensuring they read 0°C. Figure 32 is created using Type K, while

  18. Anomalous effects on radiation detectors and capacitance measurements inside a modified Faraday cage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milián-Sánchez, V., E-mail: vicmisan@iqn.upv.es [Institute for Industrial, Radiophysical and Environmental Safety, Universitat Politècnica de València, Camino de Vera, s/n, Valencia (Spain); Mocholí-Salcedo, A., E-mail: amocholi@eln.upv.es [Traffic Control Systems Group, ITACA Institute, Universitat Politécnica de, Camino de Vera, s/n, Valencia (Spain); Milián, C., E-mail: carles.milian@cpht.polytechnique.fr [Centre de Physique Théorique, CNRS, École Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Kolombet, V.A., E-mail: kolombet@iteb.ru [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Biophysics, Russian Academy of Science, Moscow Region, Pushchino 142290 (Russian Federation); Verdú, G., E-mail: gverdu@iqn.upv.es [Institute for Industrial, Radiophysical and Environmental Safety, Universitat Politècnica de València, Camino de Vera, s/n, Valencia (Spain); Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Department, Universitat Politécnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera, s/n, Valencia (Spain)

    2016-08-21

    We present experimental results showing certain anomalies in the measurements performed inside a modified Faraday cage of decay rates of Ra-226, Tl-204 and Sr-90/I-90, of the gamma spectrum of a Cs-137 preparation, and of the capacitance of both a class-I multilayer ceramic capacitor and of the interconnection cable between the radiation detector and the scaler. Decay rates fluctuate significantly up to 5% around the initial value and differently depending on the type of nuclide, and the spectrum photopeak increases in 4.4%. In the case of the capacitor, direct capacitance measurements at 100 Hz, 10 kHz and 100 kHz show variations up to 0.7%, the most significant taking place at 100 Hz. In the case of the interconnection cable, the capacitance varies up to 1%. Dispersion also tends to increase inside the enclosure. However, the measured capacitance variations do not explain the variations observed in decay rates. - Highlights: • Background counts and decay rates changes of different nuclides are described. • Those changes are observed inside a multilayer modified Faraday cage. • Noise in a multichannel analyzer increases inside the multilayer enclosure. • Capacitance of a class-I multilayer ceramic capacitor varies inside the enclosure. • Capacitance changes depend on the used frequency.

  19. The Effect of Height, Wing Length, and Wing Symmetry on Tabebuia rosea Seed Dispersal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmeen Moussa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between the vertical drop height and the horizontal distance traveled (dispersal ratio was investigated for a sample of fifty Tabebuia rosea seeds by dropping the seeds from five heights ranging from 1.00 to 2.00 meters. The dispersal ratio was found to be a constant 0.16 m/m for these heights. The effects of total seed length and asymmetry of seed wings on dispersal ratio were also measured using separate samples of fifty Tabebuia rosea seeds. It was found that neither seed length nor asymmetry had a significant effect on the dispersal ratio.

  20. Engineering chromatic dispersion and effective nonlinearity in a dual-slot waveguide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Yan, Jing; Han, Genquan

    2014-09-20

    In this paper, we propose a new dual slot based on rib-like structure, which exhibits a flat and near-zero dispersion over a 198 nm wide wavelength range. Chromatic dispersion of dual-slot silicon (Si) waveguide is mainly determined by waveguide dispersion due to the manipulating mode effective area rather than by the material dispersion. Moreover, the nonlinear coefficient and effective mode area of the waveguide are also explored in detail. A nonlinear coefficient of 1460/m/W at 1550 nm is achieved, which is 10 times larger than that of the Si rib waveguide. By changing different waveguide variables, both the dispersion and nonlinear coefficient can be tailored, thus enabling the potential for a highly nonlinear waveguide with uniform dispersion over a wide wavelength range, which could benefit the performance of broadband optical signal systems.

  1. Pictures of Blockscale Transport: Effective versus Ensemble Dispersion and Its Uncertainty

    CERN Document Server

    de Barros, Felipe P J

    2016-01-01

    Using a Lagrangian framework, we discuss different conceptualizations of the blockscale dispersion tensor. We distinguish effective and ensemble blockscale dispersion, which measure the impact of subscale velocity fluctuations on solute dispersion. Ensemble dispersion quantifies subscale velocity fluctuations between realizations, which overestimates the actual velocity variability. Effective dispersion on the other hand quantifies the actual blockscale velocity variability and thus reflects the impact of subscale velocity fluctuations on mixing and spreading. Based on these concepts, we quantify the impact of subscale velocity fluctuations on solute particle spreading and determine the governing equations for the coarse-grained concentration distributions. We develop analytical and semi-analytical expressions for the average and variance of the blockscale dispersion tensor in 3D flow fields as a function of the structural parameters characterizing the subsurface. Our results illustrate the relevance of the b...

  2. Observation and Modeling of Anomalous CN Polarization Profiles Produced by the Molecular Paschen-Back Effect in Sunspots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asensio Ramos, A.; Trujillo Bueno, J.; Collados, M.

    2005-04-01

    We report novel spectropolarimetric observations of sunspots carried out with the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter in a near-IR spectral region around 15410 Å, which is known to contain two groups of prominent OH lines that show circular polarization signals of opposite polarity. Surrounding these well-known OH lines, we have discovered the presence of CN lines of the Δv=1 band that show anomalous polarization profiles. Although the Stokes V signals of the OH lines are antisymmetric and of a sizable amplitude, the CN lines show almost negligible circular polarization. On the contrary, the linear polarization signals turn out to be much stronger in the CN lines than in the OH lines. Interestingly, these CN lines present striking antisymmetric linear polarization profiles, which we are able to explain and model via the Paschen-Back effect theory for diatomic molecules. The presence of such peculiar CN lines in the same spectral region of the OH lines may be useful to improve our empirical knowledge of solar magnetic fields via the simultaneous observation and modeling of the transverse and longitudinal Zeeman effects in two different molecular species.

  3. Quantum spin-quantum anomalous Hall effect with tunable edge states in Sb monolayer-based heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tong; Zhang, Jiayong; Xue, Yang; Zhao, Bao; Zhang, Huisheng; Jiang, Hua; Yang, Zhongqin

    2016-12-01

    A novel topological insulator with tunable edge states, called a quantum spin-quantum anomalous Hall (QSQAH) insulator, is predicted in a heterostructure of a hydrogenated Sb (S b2H ) monolayer on a LaFe O3 substrate by using ab initio methods. The substrate induces a drastic staggered exchange field in the S b2H film, which plays an important role to generate the QSQAH effect. A topologically nontrivial band gap (up to 35 meV) is opened by Rashba spin-orbit coupling, which can be enlarged by strain and an electric field. To understand the underlying physical mechanism of the QSQAH effect, a tight-binding model based on px and py orbitals is constructed. With the model, the exotic behaviors of the edge states in the heterostructure are investigated. Dissipationless chiral charge edge states related to one valley are found to emerge along both sides of the sample, whereas low-dissipation spin edge states related to the other valley flow only along one side of the sample. These edge states can be tuned flexibly by polarization-sensitive photoluminescence controls and/or chemical edge modifications. Such flexible manipulations of the charge, spin, and valley degrees of freedom provide a promising route towards applications in electronics, spintronics, and valleytronics.

  4. An exact solution for the Hawking effect in a dispersive fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philbin, T. G.

    2016-09-01

    We consider the wave equation for sound in a moving fluid with a fourth-order anomalous dispersion relation. The velocity of the fluid is a linear function of position, giving two points in the flow where the fluid velocity matches the group velocity of low-frequency waves. We find the exact solution for wave propagation in the flow. The scattering shows amplification of classical waves, leading to spontaneous emission when the waves are quantized. In the dispersionless limit the system corresponds to a 1 +1 -dimensional black-hole or white-hole binary and there is a thermal spectrum of Hawking radiation from each horizon. Dispersion changes the scattering coefficients so that the quantum emission is no longer thermal. The scattering coefficients were previously obtained by Busch and Parentani in a study of dispersive fields in de Sitter space [Phys. Rev. D 86, 104033 (2012)]. Our results give further details of the wave propagation in this exactly solvable case, where our focus is on laboratory systems.

  5. Anomalous Hall effect suppression in anatase Co:TiO2 by the insertion of an interfacial TiO2 buffer layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Y.J.; Jong, de M.P.; Wiel, van der W.G.; Kim, Y.; Brock, J.D.

    2010-01-01

    We present the effect of introducing a TiO2 buffer layer at the SrTiO3/Co:TiO2 interface on the magnetic and structural properties of anatase Co:TiO2 (1.4 at. % Co). Inserting the buffer layer leads to suppression of the room-temperature anomalous Hall effect, accompanied by a reduced density of Co

  6. Effect of nonlocal dispersion on self-interacting excitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peter Leth; Rasmussen, Kim; Gaididei, Yu.B.

    1996-01-01

    The dynamics of self-interacting quasiparticles in 1Dsystems with long-range dispersive interactions isexpressed in terms of a nonlocal nonlinear Schrödingerequation. Two branches of stationary solutions are found.The new branch which contains a cusp soliton is shown to beunstable and blowup...

  7. Effects of nonlocal dispersive interactions on self-trapping excitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaididei, Yu.B.; Mingaleev, S.F.; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    1997-01-01

    A one-dimensional discrete nonlinear Schrodinger (NLS) model with the power dependence r(-s) on the distance r of the dispersive interactions is proposed. The stationary states psi(n) of the system are studied both analytically and numerically. Two types of stationary states are investigated: on...

  8. Nonequilibrium effects in fixed-bed interstitial fluid dispersion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kronberg, A.E.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1999-01-01

    Continuum models for the role of the interstitial fluid with respect to mass and heat dispersion in a fixed bed are discussed. It is argued that the departures from local equilibrium and not the concentration and temperature gradients as such should be considered as the driving forces for mass and h

  9. Conetronics in 2D metal-organic frameworks: double/half Dirac cones and quantum anomalous Hall effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Menghao; Wang, Zhijun; Liu, Junwei; Li, Wenbin; Fu, Huahua; Sun, Lei; Liu, Xin; Pan, Minghu; Weng, Hongming; Dincă, Mircea; Fu, Liang; Li, Ju

    2017-03-01

    Bandstructure with Dirac cones gives rise to massless Dirac fermions with rich physics, and here we predict rich cone properties in M 3C12S12 and M 3C12O12, where M = Zn, Cd, Hg, Be, or Mg based on recently synthesized Ni3C12S12—class 2D metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). For M 3C12S12, their band structures exhibit double Dirac cones with different Fermi velocities that are n (electron) and p (hole) type, respectively, which are switchable by few-percent strain. The crossing of two cones are symmetry-protected to be non-hybridizing, leading to two independent channels at the same k-point akin to spin-channels in spintronics, rendering ‘conetronics’ device possible. For M 3C12O12, together with conjugated metal-tricatecholate polymers M 3(HHTP)2, the spin-polarized slow Dirac cone center is pinned precisely at the Fermi level, making the systems conducting in only one spin/cone channel. Quantum anomalous Hall effect can arise in MOFs with non-negligible spin-orbit coupling like Cu3C12O12. Compounds of M 3C12S12 and M 3C12O12 with different M, can be used to build spin/cone-selecting heterostructure devices tunable by strain or electrostatic gating, suggesting their potential applications in spintroincs/conetronics.

  10. Anomalous magnetostrictive effects in (La1-xTbx)2/3Sr1/3MnO3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴坚; 张世远

    2003-01-01

    A series of (La1-xTbx)2/aSr1/3MnOa polycrystalline samples has been studied by means of x-ray diffraction,magnetostriction, and thermal expansion measurements. It has been found that this series undergoes a phase transitionfrom a rhombohedral to an orthorhombic form at the doping level x≈0.20 at room temperature accompanied by ananisotropic magnetostriction up to -50×10-6 under a magnetic field of iT. The linear and volume magnetostrictionsvary with chemical composition, even change sign. At T=80K, the magnetostrictions for the samples of x=0.20 and0.40 exhibit different behaviours. The sample of x=0.20 has positive volume and linear magnetostrictions and a neg-ative anisotropic magnetostriction, while the sample of x=0.40 has an opposite behaviour. The magnitude of volumemagnetostriction for both the samples is essential (~ 10-4) at T=80K under a magnetic field of 4T. We conclude thatthese anomalous effects are due to the charge delocalization and the structural phase transition between orthorhombicand rhombohedral forms induced by the applied magnetic field.

  11. Anomalous magnetostrictive effects in (Lal-xTbx)2/3Sr1/3MnO3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴坚; 张世远

    2003-01-01

    A series of (La1-xTbx)2/3Srl/3MnO3 polycrystalline samples has been studied by means of x-ray diffraction,magnetostriction, and thermal expansion measurements. It has been found that this series undergoes a phase transition from a rhombohedral to an orthorhombic form at the doping level x≈0.20 at room temperature accompanied by an anisotropic magnetostriction up to -50×10-6 under a magnetic field of 1T. The linear and volume magnetostrictions vary with chemical composition, even change sign. At T=80K, the magnetostrictions for the samples of x=0.20 and 0.40 exhibit different behaviours. The sample of x=0.20 has positive volume and linear magnetostrictions and a negative anisotropic magnetostriction, while the sample of x=0.40 has an opposite behaviour. The magnitude of volume magnetostriction for both the samples is essential (-10-4) at T=80K under a magnetic field of 4T. We conclude that these anomalous effects are due to the charge delocalization and the structural phase transition between orthorhombic and rhombohedral forms induced by the applied magnetic field.

  12. Observation and modeling of anomalous CN polarization profiles produced by the molecular Paschen-Back effect in sunspots

    CERN Document Server

    Ramos, A A; Collados, M

    2005-01-01

    We report novel spectropolarimetric observations of sunspots carried out with the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter (TIP) in a near-IR spectral region around 15410 A, which is known to contain two groups of prominent OH lines that show circular polarization signals of opposite polarity. Surrounding these well-known OH lines, we have discovered the presence of CN lines of the $\\Delta v=1$ band which show anomalous polarization profiles. Although the Stokes V signals of the OH lines are antisymmetric and with a sizable amplitude, the CN lines show almost negligible circular polarization. On the contrary, the linear polarization signals turn out to be much stronger in the CN lines than in the OH lines. Interestingly, these CN lines present striking antisymmetric linear polarization profiles, which we are able to explain and model via the Paschen-Back effect theory for diatomic molecules. The presence of such peculiar CN lines in the same spectral region of the OH lines may be useful to improve our empirical knowledg...

  13. Anomalous enhancement and suppression of ionization induced by an effective few-cycle pulse in the frequency domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foote, David; Lin, Yingda; Hill, Wendell T., III

    2015-05-01

    In a recent set of coherent control experiments, an anomalous sinusoidal variation of the ionization yield was observed in Xe when ionized by a pairs of phase-locked, many-cycle 800 nm pulses. Compared with the signal of a single transform limited pulse, both enhancement and suppression was possible, which depended on the temporal separation and relative phase of the pulses. In the time domain, the control can be viewed as a temporal Young's double slit experiment - two coherent electron wavepackets interfering. In the frequency domain, the photoelectron spectrum is given by the modulus squared of the Fourier transform of the field, which is a few-cycle squared sinusodial function. In analogy to a few-cycle pulse where the carrier phase dictates the ejection direction of rescattered electrons, enhancement (suppression) occurs when the effective carrier waveform is cos[w-w0]2 (sin[w-w0]2). The contrast decreased with increasing pulse separation and decreasing multiphoton order. Detailed results and a model simulation will be presented.

  14. A dispersive approach to Sudakov resummation

    CERN Document Server

    Gardi, Einan

    2007-01-01

    We present a general all-order formulation of Sudakov resummation in QCD in terms of dispersion integrals. We show that the Sudakov exponent can be written as a dispersion integral over spectral density functions, weighted by characteristic functions that encode information on power corrections. The characteristic functions are defined and computed analytically in the large-beta_0 limit. The spectral density functions encapsulate the non-Abelian nature of the interaction. They are defined by the time-like discontinuity of specific effective charges (couplings) that are directly related to the familiar Sudakov anomalous dimensions and can be computed order-by-order in perturbation theory. The dispersive approach provides a realization of Dressed Gluon Exponentiation, where Sudakov resummation is enhanced by an internal resummation of running-coupling corrections. We establish all-order relations between the scheme-invariant Borel formulation and the dispersive one, and address the difference in the treatment o...

  15. Heritability and artificial selection on ambulatory dispersal distance in Tetranychus urticae: effects of density and maternal effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellyn Valery Bitume

    Full Text Available Dispersal distance is understudied although the evolution of dispersal distance affects the distribution of genetic diversity through space. Using the two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae, we tested the conditions under which dispersal distance could evolve. To this aim, we performed artificial selection based on dispersal distance by choosing 40 individuals (out of 150 that settled furthest from the home patch (high dispersal, HDIS and 40 individuals that remained close to the home patch (low dispersal, LDIS with three replicates per treatment. We did not observe a response to selection nor a difference between treatments in life-history traits (fecundity, survival, longevity, and sex-ratio after ten generations of selection. However, we show that heritability for dispersal distance depends on density. Heritability for dispersal distance was low and non-significant when using the same density as the artificial selection experiments while heritability becomes significant at a lower density. Furthermore, we show that maternal effects may have influenced the dispersal behaviour of the mites. Our results suggest primarily that selection did not work because high density and maternal effects induced phenotypic plasticity for dispersal distance. Density and maternal effects may affect the evolution of dispersal distance and should be incorporated into future theoretical and empirical studies.

  16. Effect of activation volume on the pressure-induced anomalous resistances in EuFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwang-Hua, Chu W., E-mail: xajialj@gmail.com [School of Mechanical Engineering, Qinghai University, Xining 810016 (China); Transfer Centre, 3/F, No. 24, Lane 260, Section 1, Mucha Road, Taipei 116, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► Use quantum chemistry to capture the anomalous transition of EuFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}. ► Activation energy and volume are crucial to the critical temperature. ► Pressure effect of EuFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}-resistances can be captured via our approach. - Abstract: We illustrate the effect of activation volume on the pressure-induced anomalous transitional resistances in EuFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} as well as the frictionless transport of many condensed electrons in FeAs based materials by using the verified transition-state approach which is borrowed from the quantum chemistry. Our results suggest that tuning of activation volume could enhance the onset temperature of critical transitional states.

  17. The Effect of Dispersal on Population Growth with Stage-structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-guang Yu; Suo-chun Zhang; Zai-zhong Yang

    2003-01-01

    The effect of dispersal on the permanence of population in a polluted patch is studied in thispaper. The authors constructed a single-species dispersal model with stage-structure in two patches. Theanalysis focuses on the case that the toxicant input in the polluted patch has a limit value. The authors derivedthe conditions under which the population will be either permanent, or extinct.

  18. A Modeling Study of the Effects of Anomalous Snow Cover over the Tibetan Plateau upon the South Asian Summer Monsoon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘华强; 孙照渤; 王举; 闵锦忠

    2004-01-01

    The effect of anomalous snow cover over the Tibetan Plateau upon the South Asian summer monsoon is investigated by numerical simulations using the NCAR regional climate model (RegCM2) into which gravity wave drag has been introduced. The simulations adopt relatively realistic snow mass forcings based on Scanning Multi-channel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) pentad snow depth data. The physical mechanism and spatial structure of the sensitivity of the South Asian early summer monsoon to snow cover anomaly over the Tibetan Plateau are revealed. The main results are summarized as follows. The heavier than normal snow cover over the Plateau can obviously reduce the shortwave radiation absorbed by surface through the albedo effect, which is compensated by weaker upward sensible heat flux associated with colder surface temperature, whereas the effects of snow melting and evaporation are relatively smaller.The anomalies of surface heat fluxes can last until June and become unobvions in July. The decrease of the Plateau surface temperature caused by heavier snow cover reaches its maximum value from late April to early May. The atmospheric cooling in the mid-upper troposphere over the Plateau and its surrounding areas is most obvious in May and can keep a fairly strong intensity in June. In contrast, there is warming to the south of the Plateau in the mid-lower troposphere from April to June with a maximum value in May.The heavier snow cover over the Plateau can reduce the intensity of the South Asian summer monsoon and rainfall to some extent, but this influence is only obvious in early summer and almost disappears in later stages.

  19. Anomalous Hall effect and spin-orbit torques in MnGa/IrMn films: Modification from strong spin Hall effect of the antiferromagnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, K. K.; Miao, J.; Xu, X. G.; Wu, Y.; Zhao, X. P.; Zhao, J. H.; Jiang, Y.

    2016-12-01

    We report systematic measurements of anomalous Hall effect (AHE) and spin-orbit torques (SOTs) in MnGa/IrMn films, in which a single L 10-MnGa epitaxial layer reveals obvious orbital two-channel Kondo (2CK) effect. As increasing the thickness of the antiferromagnet IrMn, the strong spin Hall effect (SHE) has gradually suppressed the orbital 2CK effect and modified the AHE of MnGa. A scaling involving multiple competing scattering mechanisms has been used to distinguish different contributions to the modified AHE. Finally, the sizeable SOT in the MnGa/IrMn films induced by the strong SHE of IrMn have been investigated. The IrMn layer also supplies an in-plane exchange bias field and enables nearly field-free magnetization reversal.

  20. Simulation of position sensitivity of the anomalous Hall effect on a single magnetic dot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de Jeroen; Delalande, Michael; Abelmann, Leon; Alexandrou, Marios; Schedin, Fred; Nutter, Paul; Hill, Ernie; Thomson, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    To overcome the superparamagnetic effect caused by scaling bit and grain sizes in magnetic storage media different approaches are investigated. One alternative is bit patterned magnetic media (BPM) where each bit is represented by a single domain magnetic dot. A key problem with BPM is the large dif

  1. Anomalous dimensions of gauge-invariant amplitudes in massless effective gauge theories of strongly correlated systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gusynin, VP; Khveshchenko, DV; Reenders, M

    2003-01-01

    We use the radial gauge to calculate the recently proposed ansatz for the physical electron propagator in such effective models of strongly correlated electron systems as the QED(3) theory of the pseudogap phase of the cuprates. The results of our analysis help to settle the recent dispute about the

  2. Potential lethal and non-lethal effects of predators on dispersal of spider mites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuki, Hatsune; Yano, Shuichi

    2014-11-01

    Predators can affect prey dispersal lethally by direct consumption or non-lethally by making prey hesitate to disperse. These lethal and non-lethal effects are detectable only in systems where prey can disperse between multiple patches. However, most studies have drawn their conclusions concerning the ability of predatory mites to suppress spider mites based on observations of their interactions on a single patch or on heavily infested host plants where spider mites could hardly disperse toward intact patches. In these systems, specialist predatory mites that penetrate protective webs produced by spider mites quickly suppress the spider mites, whereas generalist predators that cannot penetrate the webs were ineffective. By using a connected patch system, we revealed that a generalist ant, Pristomyrmex punctatus Mayr (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), effectively prevented dispersal of spider mites, Tetranychus kanzawai Kishida (Acari: Tetranychidae), by directly consuming dispersing individuals. We also revealed that a generalist predatory mite, Euseius sojaensis Ehara (Acari: Phytoseiidae), prevented between-patch dispersal of T. kanzawai by making them hesitate to disperse. In contrast, a specialist phytoseiid predatory mite, Neoseiulus womersleyi Schicha, allowed spider mites to escape an initial patch, increasing the number of colonized patches within the system. Our results suggest that ants and generalist predatory mites can effectively suppress Tetranychus species under some conditions, and should receive more attention as agents for conservation biological control in agroecosystems.

  3. THE EFFECT OF CLAY DISPERSION ON THE CRYSTALLIZATION AND MORPHOLOGY OF POLYPROPYLENE/CLAY COMPOSITES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin Zhang; Xiao-lin Gao; Ke Wang; Qiang Fu

    2004-01-01

    PP/clay composites with different dispersions, namely, exfoliated dispersion, intercalated dispersion and agglomerates and panicle-like dispersion, were prepared by direct melt intercalation or compounding. The effect of clay dispersion on the crystallization and morphology of PP was investigated via PLM, SAXS and DSC. Experimental results show that exfoliated clay layers are much more efficient than intercalated clay and agglomerates of clay in serving as nucleation agent due to the nano-scale dispersion of clay, resulting in a dramatic decrease in crystal size (lamellar thickness and spherulites) and an increase of crystallization temperature and crystallization rate. On the other hand, a decrease of melting temperature and crystallinity was also observed in PP/clay composites with exfoliated dispersion, due to the strong interaction between PP and clay. Compared with exfoliated clay layers, the intercalated clay layers have a less important effect on the crystallization and crystal morphology. No effect is seen for samples with agglomerates and panicle-like dispersion, in regard to melting temperature, crystallization temperature, crystal thickness and crystallinity.

  4. Optically Anomalous Crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Shtukenberg, Alexander; Kahr, Bart

    2007-01-01

    Optical anomalies in crystals are puzzles that collectively constituted the greatest unsolved problems in crystallography in the 19th Century. The most common anomaly is a discrepancy between a crystal’s symmetry as determined by its shape or by X-ray analysis, and that determined by monitoring the polarization state of traversing light. These discrepancies were perceived as a great impediment to the development of the sciences of crystals on the basis of Curie’s Symmetry Principle, the grand organizing idea in the physical sciences to emerge in the latter half of the 19th Century. Optically Anomalous Crystals begins with an historical introduction covering the contributions of Brewster, Biot, Mallard, Brauns, Tamman, and many other distinguished crystallographers. From this follows a tutorial in crystal optics. Further chapters discuss the two main mechanisms of optical dissymmetry: 1. the piezo-optic effect, and 2. the kinetic ordering of atoms. The text then tackles complex, inhomogeneous crystals, and...

  5. Effects of the anomalous Higgs couplings on the Higgs boson production at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Kanemura, Shinya

    2008-01-01

    We study the impact of dimension-six operators on single- and double-Higgs production via gluon fusion at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). If the top-Yukawa coupling is modified by some new physics whose scale is of the TeV scale, its effect changes the cross sections of single-Higgs production $gg\\to H$ and double-Higgs production $gg\\to HH$ through the top-loop diagram. In particular, double-Higgs production can receive significant enhancement from the effective top-Yukawa coupling and the new dimension-five coupling $t{\\bar t}HH$ which are induced by the dimension-six operator. Comparing these results to the forthcoming data at the LHC, one can extract information of the dimension-six operators relevant to the top quark and the Higgs boson.

  6. Pictures of blockscale transport: Effective versus ensemble dispersion and its uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barros, Felipe P. J.; Dentz, Marco

    2016-05-01

    Solute transport models tend to use coarse numerical grid blocks to alleviate computational costs. Aside from computational issues, the subsurface environment is usually characterized over a coarse measurement network where only large scale fluctuations of the flow field are captured. Neglecting the subscale velocity fluctuations in transport simulators can lead to erroneous predictions with consequences in risk analysis and remediation. For such reasons, upscaled dispersion coefficients in spatially heterogeneous flow fields must (1) account for the subscale variability that is filtered out by homogenization and (2) be modeled as a random function to incorporate the uncertainty associated with non-ergodic solute bodies. In this work, we examine the low order statistical properties of the blockscale dispersion tensor. The blockscale is defined as the scale upon which the spatially variable flow field is homogenized (e.g. the numerical grid block). Using a Lagrangian framework, we discuss different conceptualizations of the blockscale dispersion tensor. We distinguish effective and ensemble blockscale dispersion, which measure the impact of subscale velocity fluctuations on solute dispersion. Ensemble dispersion quantifies subscale velocity fluctuations between realizations, which overestimates the actual velocity variability. Effective dispersion on the other hand quantifies the actual blockscale velocity variability and thus reflects the impact of subscale velocity fluctuations on mixing and spreading. Based on these concepts, we quantify the impact of subscale velocity fluctuations on solute particle spreading and determine the governing equations for the coarse-grained concentration distributions. We develop analytical and semi-analytical expressions for the average and variance of the blockscale dispersion tensor in 3D flow fields as a function of the structural parameters characterizing the subsurface. Our results illustrate the relevance of the blockscale

  7. Chiral magnetic effect and anomalous transport from real-time lattice simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Mueller, Niklas; Sharma, Sayantan

    2016-01-01

    We present a first-principle study of anomaly induced transport phenomena by performing real-time lattice simulations with dynamical fermions coupled simultaneously to non-Abelian $SU(N_c)$ and Abelian $U(1)$ gauge fields. Investigating the behavior of vector and axial currents during a sphaleron transition in the presence of an external magnetic field, we demonstrate how the interplay of the Chiral magnetic (CME) and Chiral separation effect (CSE) lead to the formation of a propagating wave. We further analyze the dependence of the magnitude of the induced vector current and the propagation of the wave on the amount of explicit chiral symmetry breaking due to finite quark mass.

  8. Anomalous Hall effect in epitaxial ferrimagnetic anti-perovskite Mn{sub 4−x}Dy{sub x}N films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, M.; Wu, S. X., E-mail: wushx3@mail.sysu.edu.cn; Zhou, W. Q.; Ren, L. Z.; Wang, Y. J.; Wang, G. L.; Li, S. W., E-mail: stslsw@mail.sysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)

    2015-08-07

    Anomalous Hall effect (AHE) has been studied for ferrimagnetic antiperovskite Mn{sub 4−x}Dy{sub x}N films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. The introduction of Dy changes the AHE dramatically, even changes its sign, while the variations in magnetization are negligible. Two sign reversals of the AHE (negative-positive-negative) are ascribed to the variation of charge carriers as a result of Fermi surface reconstruction. We further demonstrate that the AHE current J{sub AH} is dissipationless (independent of the scattering rate), by confirming that anomalous Hall conductivity, σ{sub AH}, is proportional to the carrier density n at 5 K. Our study may provide a route to further utilize antiperovskite manganese nitrides in spintronics.

  9. High electron mobility, quantum Hall effect and anomalous optical response in atomically thin InSe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandurin, Denis A.; Tyurnina, Anastasia V.; Yu, Geliang L.; Mishchenko, Artem; Zólyomi, Viktor; Morozov, Sergey V.; Kumar, Roshan Krishna; Gorbachev, Roman V.; Kudrynskyi, Zakhar R.; Pezzini, Sergio; Kovalyuk, Zakhar D.; Zeitler, Uli; Novoselov, Konstantin S.; Patanè, Amalia; Eaves, Laurence; Grigorieva, Irina V.; Fal'Ko, Vladimir I.; Geim, Andre K.; Cao, Yang

    2016-11-01

    A decade of intense research on two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystals has revealed that their properties can differ greatly from those of the parent compound. These differences are governed by changes in the band structure due to quantum confinement and are most profound if the underlying lattice symmetry changes. Here we report a high-quality 2D electron gas in few-layer InSe encapsulated in hexagonal boron nitride under an inert atmosphere. Carrier mobilities are found to exceed 103 cm2 V‑1 s‑1 and 104 cm2 V‑1 s‑1 at room and liquid-helium temperatures, respectively, allowing the observation of the fully developed quantum Hall effect. The conduction electrons occupy a single 2D subband and have a small effective mass. Photoluminescence spectroscopy reveals that the bandgap increases by more than 0.5 eV with decreasing the thickness from bulk to bilayer InSe. The band-edge optical response vanishes in monolayer InSe, which is attributed to the monolayer's mirror-plane symmetry. Encapsulated 2D InSe expands the family of graphene-like semiconductors and, in terms of quality, is competitive with atomically thin dichalcogenides and black phosphorus.

  10. Anomalous quantum and isotope effects in water clusters: Physical phenomenon, model artifact, or bad approximation?

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Sandra E

    2014-01-01

    Free energy differences $\\Delta F:=F-F_{\\text{prism}}$ are computed for several isomers of water hexamer relative to the "prism" isomer using the self-consistent phonons method. %$\\Delta F:=F-F({prism})$ We consider the isotope effect defined by the quantity $\\delta F_{D_2O}:=\\Delta F_{\\rm D_2O}-\\Delta F_{\\rm H_2O}$, and the quantum effect, $\\delta F_{\\hbar=0}:=\\Delta F_{\\hbar=0}-\\Delta F_{\\rm H_2O}$, and evaluate them using different flexible water models. While both $\\delta F_{D_2O}$ and $\\delta F_{\\hbar=0}$ are found to be rather small for all of the potentials, they are especially small for two of the empirical models, q-TIP4P/F and TTM3-F, compared to q-SPC/Fw and the two {\\it abinitio}-based models, WHBB and HBB2-pol. This qualitative difference in the properties of different water models cannot be explained by one being "more accurate" than the other. We speculate as to whether the observed anomalies are caused by the special properties of water systems, or are an artifact of either the potential energ...

  11. High electron mobility, quantum Hall effect and anomalous optical response in atomically thin InSe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandurin, Denis A; Tyurnina, Anastasia V; Yu, Geliang L; Mishchenko, Artem; Zólyomi, Viktor; Morozov, Sergey V; Kumar, Roshan Krishna; Gorbachev, Roman V; Kudrynskyi, Zakhar R; Pezzini, Sergio; Kovalyuk, Zakhar D; Zeitler, Uli; Novoselov, Konstantin S; Patanè, Amalia; Eaves, Laurence; Grigorieva, Irina V; Fal'ko, Vladimir I; Geim, Andre K; Cao, Yang

    2016-11-21

    A decade of intense research on two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystals has revealed that their properties can differ greatly from those of the parent compound. These differences are governed by changes in the band structure due to quantum confinement and are most profound if the underlying lattice symmetry changes. Here we report a high-quality 2D electron gas in few-layer InSe encapsulated in hexagonal boron nitride under an inert atmosphere. Carrier mobilities are found to exceed 10(3) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and 10(4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) at room and liquid-helium temperatures, respectively, allowing the observation of the fully developed quantum Hall effect. The conduction electrons occupy a single 2D subband and have a small effective mass. Photoluminescence spectroscopy reveals that the bandgap increases by more than 0.5 eV with decreasing the thickness from bulk to bilayer InSe. The band-edge optical response vanishes in monolayer InSe, which is attributed to the monolayer's mirror-plane symmetry. Encapsulated 2D InSe expands the family of graphene-like semiconductors and, in terms of quality, is competitive with atomically thin dichalcogenides and black phosphorus.

  12. On the anomalous Stark effect in a thin disc-shaped quantum dot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oukerroum, A [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere Condensee, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, BP 140, Bd Yassima, 28820 Mohammedia (Morocco); Feddi, E [LaMIPI, ENSET de Rabat, Universite Mohamed V Souissi, BP 6207, Rabat-Institut, 10100 Rabat (Morocco); Bailach, J Bosch; MartInez-Pastor, J [Instituto de Ciencia de los Materiales, Universidad de Valencia, PO Box 2085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Dujardin, F [Laboratoire de Physique des Milieux Denses, Universite Paul Verlaine, 1 Bd Arago, F-57078 Metz (France); Assaid, E, E-mail: feddi@univ-metz.f [Laboratoire d' Electronique et Optique des Nanostructures de Semiconducteurs, Faculte des Sciences, BP 20, 24000 El Jadida (Morocco)

    2010-09-22

    The effect of a lateral external electric field F on an exciton ground state in an InAs disc-shaped quantum dot has been studied using a variational method within the effective mass approximation. We consider that the radial dimension of the disc is very large compared to its height. This situation leads to separating the excitonic Hamiltonian into two independent parts: the lateral confinement which corresponds to a two-dimensional harmonic oscillator and an infinite square well in the growth direction. Our calculations show that the complete description of the lateral Stark shift requires both the linear and quadratic terms in F which explains that the exciton possess nonzero lateral dipolar moment and polarizability. The fit of the calculated Stark shift permits us to estimate the lateral permanent dipole moment and the polarizability according to the disc size. Our results are compared to those existing in the literature. In addition the behavior of the optical integral shows that the exciton lifetime is greater than that under zero field which is due to the field-induced polarization.

  13. Demographic stochasticity reduces the synchronizing effect of dispersal in predator-prey metapopulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonis, Joseph L

    2012-07-01

    Dispersal may affect predator-prey metapopulations by rescuing local sink populations from extinction or by synchronizing population dynamics across the metapopulation, increasing the risk of regional extinction. Dispersal is likely influenced by demographic stochasticity, however, particularly because dispersal rates are often very low in metapopulations. Yet the effects of demographic stochasticity on predator-prey metapopulations are not well known. To that end, I constructed three models of a two-patch predator-prey system. The models constitute a hierarchy of complexity, allowing direct comparisons. Two models included demographic stochasticity (pure jump process [PJP] and stochastic differential equations [SDE]), and the third was deterministic (ordinary differential equations [ODE]). One stochastic model (PJP) treated population sizes as discrete, while the other (SDE) allowed population sizes to change continuously. Both stochastic models only produced synchronized predator-prey dynamics when dispersal was high for both trophic levels. Frequent dispersal by only predators or prey in the PJP and SDE spatially decoupled the trophic interaction, reducing synchrony of the non-dispersive species. Conversely, the ODE generated synchronized predator-prey dynamics across all dispersal rates, except when initial conditions produced anti-phase transients. These results indicate that demographic stochasticity strongly reduces the synchronizing effect of dispersal, which is ironic because demographic stochasticity is often invoked post hoc as a driver of extinctions in synchronized metapopulations.

  14. Intrinsic quantum spin Hall and anomalous Hall effects in h-Sb/Bi epitaxial growth on a ferromagnetic MnO2 thin film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jian; Sun, Qiang; Wang, Qian; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki; Jena, Puru

    2016-06-07

    Exploring a two-dimensional intrinsic quantum spin Hall state with a large band gap as well as an anomalous Hall state in realizable materials is one of the most fundamental and important goals for future applications in spintronics, valleytronics, and quantum computing. Here, by combining first-principles calculations with a tight-binding model, we predict that Sb or Bi can epitaxially grow on a stable and ferromagnetic MnO2 thin film substrate, forming a flat honeycomb sheet. The flatness of Sb or Bi provides an opportunity for the existence of Dirac points in the Brillouin zone, with its position effectively tuned by surface hydrogenation. The Dirac points in spin up and spin down channels split due to the proximity effects induced by MnO2. In the presence of both intrinsic and Rashba spin-orbit coupling, we find two band gaps exhibiting a large band gap quantum spin Hall state and a nearly quantized anomalous Hall state which can be tuned by adjusting the Fermi level. Our findings provide an efficient way to realize both quantized intrinsic spin Hall conductivity and anomalous Hall conductivity in a single material.

  15. Strong Quantum Size Effects in Pb(111) Thin Films Mediated by Anomalous Friedel Oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yu; Wu, Biao; Li, Chong; Einstein, T. L.; Weitering, H. H.; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2010-08-01

    Using first-principles calculations within density functional theory, we study Friedel oscillations (FOs) in the electron density at different metal surfaces and their influence on the lattice relaxation and stability of ultrathin metal films. We show that the FOs at the Pb(111) surface decay as 1/x with the distance x from the surface, different from the conventional 1/x2 power law at other metal surfaces. The underlying physical reason for this striking difference is tied to the strong nesting of the two different Fermi sheets along the Pb(111) direction. The interference of the strong FOs emanating from the two surfaces of a Pb(111) film, in turn, not only results in superoscillatory interlayer relaxations around the center of the film, but also determines its stability in the quantum regime. As a simple and generic picture, the present findings also explain why quantum size effects are exceptionally robust in Pb(111) films.

  16. Effect of pore blockage on adsorption isotherms and dynamics: Anomalous adsorption of iodine on activated carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatia, S.K.; Liu, F.; Arvind, G.

    2000-04-18

    Isotherm hysteresis and pore-clocking effects of trapped molecules on adsorption dynamics is studied here, using the iodine-carbon system in the 300--343 K temperature range. It is found that a portion of the iodine is strongly adsorbed, and does not desorb, even over very long time scales, while the remainder adsorbs reversibly as a homogeneous monolayer with a Langmuirian isotherm in mesopores. The strongly adsorbed iodine appears to adsorb in micropores and at the mesopore mouths, hindering uptake of the reversible iodine. The uptake data for the adsorption and desorption dynamics of the reversible part is found to be best explained by means of a pore mouth resistance control mechanism. it is concluded that the dynamics of the adsorption and desorption at the pore mouth is important at early stages of the process.

  17. Possible anomalous doppler shift effect in superconductor Sr sub 2 RuO sub 4

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, Y; Tanuma, Y; Kashiwaya, S

    2003-01-01

    The effect of Doppler shift is studied in a model for the alpha-beta bands of Sr sub 2 RuO sub 4 consisting of two hybridized one-dimensional (1D) bands. Assuming a superconducting gap with nodes in a diagonal direction, we examine the oscillation of surface density of states and thermal conductivity under a rotating magnetic field. Upon varying the strength of hybridization, the oscillation of these quantities is found to exhibit 2D to 1D crossover. In the crossover regime, which corresponds to the actual Sr sub 2 RuO sub 4 , the thermal conductivity exhibits a two-fold-symmetry oscillation, while a four-fold-symmetry component in the oscillation is barely detectable.

  18. Effects of Schwarzschild Geometry on Isothermal Plasma Wave Dispersion

    CERN Document Server

    Sharif, M

    2007-01-01

    The behavior of isothermal plasma waves has been analyzed near the Schwarzschild horizon. We consider a non-rotating background with non-magnetized and magnetized plasmas. The general relativistic magnetohydrodynamical equations for the Schwarzschild planar analogue spacetime with an isothermal state of the plasma are formulated. The perturbed form of these equations is linearized and Fourier analyzed by introducing simple harmonic waves. The determinant of these equations in each case leads to a complex dispersion relation, which gives complex values of the wave number. This has been used to discuss the nature of the waves and their characteristics near the horizon.

  19. Acoustoelectric effect in graphene with degenerate energy dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dompreh, K. A.; Mensah, N. G.; Mensah, S. Y.

    2017-01-01

    Acoustoelectric current (jac) in Free-Standing Graphene (FSG) having degenerate energy dispersion at low temperatures T ≪TBG (TBG is the Block-Gruneisen temperature) was studied theoretically. We considered electron interaction with in-plain acoustic phonons in the hypersound regime (sound vibration in the range 109 -1012 Hz). The obtained expression for jac was numerically analyzed for various temperatures (T) and frequencies (ωq) and graphically presented. The non-linear dependence of jac on ωq varied with temperature. This qualitatively agreed with an experimentally obtained result which deals with temperature dependent acoustoelectric current in graphene [21].

  20. Environmental effects of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill: focus on effects on fish and effects of dispersants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trannum, H.; Bakke, T.

    2012-07-01

    NIVA has conducted a literature study on environmental effects of the Deepwater Horizon accident for the Norwegian Oil Industry Association, and the present report summarizes this work with particular focus on fish and dispersants. The report also briefly discusses relevance for Norwegian waters. In the literature, negative effects on the population level of fish have not been reported, although there is evidence of effects on the cellular level of fish. Several exploited species were even characterized by notably higher catch rates during 2010. Despite this, the economic losses for the fishing industry were huge due to an extensive closure of fisheries and effects in the marked. Following the oil spill, large amounts of dispersants were used, mainly Corexit, and for the first time, the dispersants were added under the sea surface. It is not clear whether the dispersants were successful in reducing the overall impacts of the oil. Furthermore, there are indications that the dispersants had the potential to inhibit the natural degradation of oil. Although the use of Corexit was criticized, laboratory studies have shown that Corexit generally tends to be less toxic than several other dispersants. (Author)

  1. Effects of Salinity on Oil Spill Dispersant Toxicity in Estuarine Organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckmann, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    Chemical dispersants can be a useful tool to mitigate oil spills, but the potential risks to sensitive estuarine species should be carefully considered. To improve the decision making process, more information is needed regarding the effects of oil spill dispersants on the health of coastal ecosystems under variable environmental conditions such as salinity. The two oil dispersants used in this study were Corexit ® 9500 and Finasol ® OSR 52. Corexit ® 9500 was the primary dispersant used during the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill event, while Finasol® OSR 52 is another dispersant approved for oil spill response in the U.S., yet considerably less is known regarding its toxicity to estuarine species. The grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio, was used as a model estuarine species. It is a euryhaline species that tolerates salinities from brackish to full strength seawater. Adult and larval life stages were tested with each dispersant at three salinities, 5ppt, 20ppt, and 30ppt. Median acute lethal toxicity thresholds were calculated. Lipid peroxidation assays were conducted on surviving shrimp to investigate sublethal effects. The toxicity of both dispersants was significantly influenced by salinity, with greatest toxicity observed at the lowest salinity tested. Larval shrimp were significantly more sensitive than adult shrimp to both dispersants, and both life stages were significantly more sensitive to Finasol than to Corexit. Furthermore, significant sublethal effects were seen at higher concentrations of both dispersants compared to the control. These data will enable environmental managers to make informed decisions regarding dispersant use in future oil spills.

  2. Variable effects of dispersal on productivity of bacterial communities due to changes in functional trait composition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ina Severin

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown variable relationships between dispersal rate and ecosystem functioning, but the reasons for and mechanisms behind variable dispersal rate-functioning patterns are currently unknown. In this study we used six bacterial lake water communities in a laboratory experiment in order to investigate how dispersal among communities influences community productivity by evaluating three different mechanisms: 1 changes in taxonomic diversity, 2 changes in phylogenetic diversity or 3 changes in the composition of functional traits. The experiment was conducted in two phases; (A a dialysis bag experiment where the dispersal rate among six communities was manipulated and the subsequent change in bacterial diversity and growth rate was recorded, and (B a regrowth experiment where we manipulated available resources to study how well a taxon grows on certain organic carbon resources, i.e. their functional traits. From experiment (B we could thus estimate changes in functional traits in communities in experiment (A. Bacterial production was affected by dispersal, but not consistently among lakes. Neither change in taxonomic or phylogenetic diversity with dispersal could explain the observed dispersal-productivity relationships. Instead, changes in trait composition with dispersal, especially the communities' ability to use p-coumaric acid, an aromatic compound, could explain the observed dispersal-productivity relationships. Changes in this trait caused by dispersal seemed especially important for bacterial productivity in waters with a high aromaticity of the organic matter pool. We conclude that the effect of dispersal on bacterial communities can affect ecosystem functioning in different ways, through changes in functional key-traits which are important for the local environment.

  3. A correction technique for the dispersive effects of mass lumping for transport problems

    KAUST Repository

    Guermond, Jean-Luc

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses the well-known dispersion effect that mass lumping induces when solving transport-like equations. A simple anti-dispersion technique based on the lumped mass matrix is proposed. The method does not require any non-trivial matrix inversion and has the same anti-dispersive effects as the consistent mass matrix. A novel quasi-lumping technique for P2 finite elements is introduced. Higher-order extensions of the method are also discussed. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  4. Hyperbolic Mild Slope Equations with Inclusion of Amplitude Dispersion Effect: Regular Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Hong; ZOU Zhi-li

    2008-01-01

    A new form of hyperbolic mild slope equations is derived with the inclusion of the amplitude dispersion of nonlinear waves. The effects of including the amplitude dispersion effect on the wave propagation are discussed. Wave breaking mechanism is incorporated into the present model to apply the new equations to surf zone. The equations are solved numerically for regular wave propagation over a shoal and in surf zone, and a comparison is made against measurements. It is found that the inclusion of the amplitude dispersion can also improve model's performance on prediction of wave heights around breaking point for the wave motions in surf zone.

  5. Effect of thermal dispersion on free convection in a fluid saturated porous medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbas, Ibrahim A. [Mathematics Department, Faculty of Science, Sohag University, Sohag 82524 (Egypt)], E-mail: ibrabbas7@yahoo.com; El-Amin, M.F. [Mathematics Department, Aswan Faculty of Science, South Valley University, Aswan 81258 (Egypt)], E-mail: mfam2000@yahoo.com; Salama, Amgad [Environmental Engineering Department, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: asalama@konkuk.ac.kr

    2009-04-15

    The present article considers a numerical study of thermal dispersion effect on the non-Darcy natural convection over a vertical flat plate in a fluid saturated porous medium. Forchheimer extension is considered in the flow equations. The coefficient of thermal diffusivity has been assumed to be the sum of molecular diffusivity and the dispersion thermal diffusivity due to mechanical dispersion. The non-dimensional governing equations are solved by the finite element method (FEM) with a Newton-Raphson solver. Numerical results for the details of the stream function, velocity and temperature contours and profiles as well as heat transfer rates in terms of Nusselt number are obtained. The study shows that the increase in thermal dispersion coefficient of the porous medium results in more heat energy to disperse away in the normal direction to the wall. This induces more fluid to flow along the wall, enhancing the heat transfer coefficient particularly near the wall.

  6. Equality versus differentiation: the effects of power dispersion on group interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Lindred L; van Kleef, Gerben A

    2010-11-01

    Power is an inherent characteristic of social interaction, yet research has yet to fully explain what power and power dispersion may mean for conflict resolution in work groups. We found in a field study of 42 organizational work groups and a laboratory study of 40 negotiating dyads that the effects of power dispersion on conflict resolution are contingent on the level of interactants' power, thereby explaining contradictory theory and findings on power dispersion. We found that when members have low power, power dispersion is positively related to conflict resolution, but when members have high power, power dispersion is negatively related to conflict resolution (i.e., power equality is better). These findings can be explained by the mediating role of intragroup power struggles. Together, these findings suggest that power hierarchies function as a heuristic solution for conflict and contribute to adaptive social dynamics in groups with low, but not high, levels of power.

  7. Ultrasound emulsification: effect of ultrasonic and physicochemical properties on dispersed phase volume and droplet size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaikwad, Shashank G; Pandit, Aniruddha B

    2008-04-01

    Ultrasonic emulsification of oil and water was carried out and the effect of irradiation time, irradiation power and physicochemical properties of oil on the dispersed phase volume and dispersed phase droplet size has been studied. The increase in the irradiation time increases the dispersed phase volume while decreases the dispersed phase droplets size. With an increase in the ultrasonic irradiation power, there is an increase in the fraction of volume of the dispersed phase while the droplet size of the dispersed phase decreases. The fractional volume of the dispersed phase increases for the case of groundnut oil-water system while it is low for paraffin (heavy) oil-water system. The droplet size of soyabean oil dispersed in water is found to be small while that of paraffin (heavy) oil is found to be large. These variations could be explained on the basis of varying physicochemical properties of the system, i.e., viscosity of oil and the interfacial tension. During the ultrasonic emulsification, coalescence phenomenon which is only marginal, has been observed, which can be attributed to the collision of small droplets when the droplet concentration increases beyond a certain number and the acoustic streaming strength increases.

  8. Effects of oil dispersants on photodegradation of pyrene in marine water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Yanyan [Environmental Engineering Program, Department of Civil Engineering, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States); College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Fu, Jie [Environmental Engineering Program, Department of Civil Engineering, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States); O’Reilly, S.E. [U.S. Department of the Interior, Gulf of Mexico OCS, Office of Environment, New Orleans, LA 70123 (United States); Zhao, Dongye, E-mail: zhaodon@auburn.edu [Environmental Engineering Program, Department of Civil Engineering, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States)

    2015-04-28

    Highlights: • Oil dispersant enhances pyrene photodegradation in seawater. • Oil dispersant increases formation of superoxide radicals. • Pyrene photodegradation shows a two-stage kinetics and follows first-order rate law. • Pyrene is degraded mainly through electron transfer from excited pyrene to oxygen. • Higher ionic strength and temperature and lower HA favor pyrene photodegradation. - Abstract: This work investigated effects of a popular oil dispersant (Corexit EC9500A) on UV- or sunlight-mediated photodegradation of pyrene (a model polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon) in seawater. The presence of 18 and 180 mg/L of the dispersant increased the first-order photodegradation rate by 5.5% and 16.7%, respectively, and reduced or ceased pyrene volatilization. By combining individual first-order rate laws for volatilization and photodegradation, we proposed an integrated kinetic model that can adequately predict the overall dissipation of pyrene from seawater. Mechanistic studies indicated that superoxide radicals played a predominant role in pyrene photodegradation, and the dispersant enhanced formation of superoxide radicals. 1-Hydroxypyrene was the main intermediate regardless of the dispersant, suggesting that electrons were transferred from excited pyrene to oxygen. In the presence of 18 mg/L of the dispersant, the photodegradation rate increased with increasing ionic strength and temperature, but decreased with increasing HA concentration, and remained independent of solution pH. The results are important in understanding roles of oil dispersants on environmental fate of persistent oil components in natural and engineered systems.

  9. Dispersion-Enhanced Laser Gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David D.; Chang, Hongrok; Arissian, L.; Diels, J. C.

    2008-01-01

    We analyze the effect of a highly dispersive element placed inside a modulated optical cavity on the frequency and amplitude of the output modulation to determine the conditions for enhanced gyroscopic sensitivities. The element is treated as both a phase and amplitude filter, and the time-dependence of the cavity field is considered. Both atomic gases (two-level and multi-level) and optical resonators (single and coupled) are considered and compared as dispersive elements. We find that it is possible to simultaneously enhance the gyro scale factor sensitivity and suppress the dead band by using an element with anomalous dispersion that has greater loss at the carrier frequency than at the side-band frequencies, i.e., an element that simultaneously pushes and intensifies the perturbed cavity modes, e.g. a two-level absorber or an under-coupled optical resonator. The sensitivity enhancement is inversely proportional to the effective group index, becoming infinite at a group index of zero. However, the number of round trips required to reach a steady-state also becomes infinite when the group index is zero (or two). For even larger dispersions a steady-state cannot be achieved, and nonlinear dynamic effects such as bistability and periodic oscillations are predicted in the gyro response.

  10. Dispersion-enhanced laser gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David D.; Chang, Hongrok; Arissian, L.; Diels, J. C.

    2008-11-01

    We analyze the effect of a highly dispersive element placed inside a modulated optical cavity on the frequency and amplitude of the output modulation to determine the conditions for enhanced gyroscopic sensitivities. The element is treated as both a phase and amplitude filter, and the time dependence of the cavity field is considered. Both atomic gases (two level and multilevel) and optical resonators (single and coupled) are considered and compared as dispersive elements. We find that it is possible to simultaneously enhance the gyro scale factor sensitivity and suppress the dead band by using an element with anomalous dispersion that has greater loss at the carrier frequency than at the sideband frequencies, i.e., an element that simultaneously pushes and intensifies the perturbed cavity modes, e.g. a two-level absorber or an undercoupled optical resonator. The sensitivity enhancement is inversely proportional to the effective group index, becoming infinite at a group index of zero. However, the number of round trips required to reach a steady state also becomes infinite when the group index is zero (or two). For even larger dispersions a steady state cannot be achieved, and nonlinear dynamic effects such as bistability and periodic oscillations are predicted in the gyro response.

  11. Uncoupling the effects of seed predation and seed dispersal by granivorous ants on plant population dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Arnan

    Full Text Available Secondary seed dispersal is an important plant-animal interaction, which is central to understanding plant population and community dynamics. Very little information is still available on the effects of dispersal on plant demography and, particularly, for ant-seed dispersal interactions. As many other interactions, seed dispersal by animals involves costs (seed predation and benefits (seed dispersal, the balance of which determines the outcome of the interaction. Separate quantification of each of them is essential in order to understand the effects of this interaction. To address this issue, we have successfully separated and analyzed the costs and benefits of seed dispersal by seed-harvesting ants on the plant population dynamics of three shrub species with different traits. To that aim a stochastic, spatially-explicit individually-based simulation model has been implemented based on actual data sets. The results from our simulation model agree with theoretical models of plant response dependent on seed dispersal, for one plant species, and ant-mediated seed predation, for another one. In these cases, model predictions were close to the observed values at field. Nonetheless, these ecological processes did not affect in anyway a third species, for which the model predictions were far from the observed values. This indicates that the balance between costs and benefits associated to secondary seed dispersal is clearly related to specific traits. This study is one of the first works that analyze tradeoffs of secondary seed dispersal on plant population dynamics, by disentangling the effects of related costs and benefits. We suggest analyzing the effects of interactions on population dynamics as opposed to merely analyzing the partners and their interaction strength.

  12. Chromatic and Dispersive Effects in Nonlinear Integrable Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Webb, Stephen D; Valishev, Alexander; Nagaitsev, Sergei N; Danilov, Viatcheslav V

    2015-01-01

    Proton accumulator rings and other circular hadron accelerators are susceptible to intensity-driven parametric instabilities because the zero-current charged particle dynamics are characterized by a single tune. Landau damping can suppress these instabilities, which requires energy spread in the beam or introducing nonlinear magnets such as octupoles. However, this approach reduces dynamic aperture. Nonlinear integrable optics can suppress parametric instabilities independent of energy spread in the distribution, while preserving the dynamic aperture. This novel approach promises to reduce particle losses and enable order-of-magnitude increases in beam intensity. In this paper we present results, obtained using the Lie operator formalism, on how chromaticity and dispersion affect particle orbits in integrable optics. We conclude that chromaticity in general breaks the integrability, unless the vertical and horizontal chromaticities are equal. Because of this, the chromaticity correcting magnets can be weaker ...

  13. Species coexistence in a lattice-structured habitat: effects of species dispersal and interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Zhixia; Liao, Jinbao; Wang, Shichang; Lu, Hui; Liu, Yongjie; Ma, Liang; Li, Zhenqing

    2014-10-21

    Opinions differ on how the spatial distribution of species over space affects species coexistence. Here, we constructed both mean-field and pair approximation (PA) models to explore the effects of interspecific and intraspecific interactions and dispersal modes on species coexistence. We found that spatial structure resulting from species dispersal traits and neighboring interactions in PA model did not promote coexistence if two species had the same traits, though it might intensify the contact frequency of intraspecific competition. If two species adopt different dispersal modes, the spatial structure in PA would make the coexistence or founder control less likely since it alters the species effective birth rate. This suggests that the spatial distribution caused by neighboring interactions and local dispersal does not affect species coexistence unless it adequately alters the effective birth rate for two species. Besides, we modeled how the initial densities and patterns affected population dynamics and revealed how the final spatial pattern was generated.

  14. The comparative effectiveness of rodents and dung beetles as local seed dispersers in Mediterranean oak forests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio M Pérez-Ramos

    Full Text Available The process of seed dispersal of many animal-dispersed plants is frequently mediated by a small set of biotic agents. However, the contribution that each of these dispersers makes to the overall recruitment may differ largely, with important ecological and management implications for the population viability and dynamics of the species implied in these interactions. In this paper, we compared the relative contribution of two local guilds of scatter-hoarding animals with contrasting metabolic requirements and foraging behaviours (rodents and dung beetles to the overall recruitment of two Quercus species co-occurring in the forests of southern Spain. For this purpose, we considered not only the quantity of dispersed seeds but also the quality of the seed dispersal process. The suitability for recruitment of the microhabitats where the seeds were deposited was evaluated in a multi-stage demographic approach. The highest rates of seed handling and predation occurred in those microhabitats located under shrubs, mostly due to the foraging activity of rodents. However, the probability of a seed being successfully cached was higher in microhabitats located beneath a tree canopy as a result of the feeding behaviour of beetles. Rodents and beetles showed remarkable differences in their effectiveness as local acorn dispersers. Quantitatively, rodents were much more important than beetles because they dispersed the vast majority of acorns. However, they were qualitatively less effective because they consumed a high proportion of them (over 95%, and seeds were mostly dispersed under shrubs, a less suitable microhabitat for short-term recruitment of the two oak species. Our findings demonstrate that certain species of dung beetles (such as Thorectes lusitanicus, despite being quantitatively less important than rodents, can act as effective local seed dispersers of Mediterranean oak species. Changes in the abundance of beetle populations could thus have

  15. The comparative effectiveness of rodents and dung beetles as local seed dispersers in Mediterranean oak forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Ramos, Ignacio M; Verdú, José R; Numa, Catherine; Marañón, Teodoro; Lobo, Jorge M

    2013-01-01

    The process of seed dispersal of many animal-dispersed plants is frequently mediated by a small set of biotic agents. However, the contribution that each of these dispersers makes to the overall recruitment may differ largely, with important ecological and management implications for the population viability and dynamics of the species implied in these interactions. In this paper, we compared the relative contribution of two local guilds of scatter-hoarding animals with contrasting metabolic requirements and foraging behaviours (rodents and dung beetles) to the overall recruitment of two Quercus species co-occurring in the forests of southern Spain. For this purpose, we considered not only the quantity of dispersed seeds but also the quality of the seed dispersal process. The suitability for recruitment of the microhabitats where the seeds were deposited was evaluated in a multi-stage demographic approach. The highest rates of seed handling and predation occurred in those microhabitats located under shrubs, mostly due to the foraging activity of rodents. However, the probability of a seed being successfully cached was higher in microhabitats located beneath a tree canopy as a result of the feeding behaviour of beetles. Rodents and beetles showed remarkable differences in their effectiveness as local acorn dispersers. Quantitatively, rodents were much more important than beetles because they dispersed the vast majority of acorns. However, they were qualitatively less effective because they consumed a high proportion of them (over 95%), and seeds were mostly dispersed under shrubs, a less suitable microhabitat for short-term recruitment of the two oak species. Our findings demonstrate that certain species of dung beetles (such as Thorectes lusitanicus), despite being quantitatively less important than rodents, can act as effective local seed dispersers of Mediterranean oak species. Changes in the abundance of beetle populations could thus have profound implications

  16. Bird and ant synergy increases the seed dispersal effectiveness of an ornithochoric shrub.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Paulo H S A; Martins, Milene M; Feitosa, Rodrigo M; Christianini, Alexander V

    2016-06-01

    Seed dispersal may involve different vectors of dispersal in two or more sequential phases (i.e., diplochory). However, contributions of each phase to the overall seed dispersal effectiveness (SDE) are poorly understood and hard to evaluate due to post-dispersal processes that affect seed and seedling survival. We investigated the simultaneous bird (phase 1, in plant canopy) and ant (phase 2, on the floor) contributions to SDE with the ornithochoric shrub Erythroxylum ambiguum in a Brazilian Atlantic forest. Twelve species of birds fed on fruit and dispersed approximately 26 % of the seed crop. The remaining seed crop, 90 % of which contained viable seeds, fell to the ground beneath the parental plant. Ants either cleaned seeds in fruits or carried fallen fruit and seeds from bird feces to their nests. Although E. ambiguum has no adaptation for ant dispersal, ants were as quantitatively important as birds. Birds and ants equally increased germination rates compared to controls. However, birds deposited seeds farther from the parent, where seedling survival was higher (78 %) than it was beneath the parent (44 %), whereas ants carried seeds to their nests, where seedling survival was higher (83 %) than in controls away from their nests (63 %). Diplochory allowed a 42 % increase in SDE compared to dispersal in phase 1 alone. High lipid content in the fruit pulp of E. ambiguum may facilitate the inclusion of ants in a second step of dispersal after diaspores reach the floor. Ants can also buffer the dispersal of diplochorous plants against decreases in phase 1 dispersers.

  17. Combined effect of magnetic field and thermal dispersion on a non-darcy mixed convection

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2011-05-21

    This paper is devoted to investigate the influences of thermal dispersion and magnetic field on a hot semi-infinite vertical porous plate embedded in a saturated Darcy-Forchheimer-Brinkman porous medium. The coefficient of thermal diffusivity has been assumed to be the sum of the molecular diffusivity and the dynamic diffusivity due to mechanical dispersion. The effects of transverse magnetic field parameter (Hartmann number Ha), Reynolds number Re (different velocities), Prandtl number Pr (different types of fluids) and dispersion parameter on the wall shear stress and the heat transfer rate are discussed. © 2011 Science Press, Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, CAS and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  18. ANOMALOUS MAGNETIC FILMS,

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three types of anomalous nickel-iron magnetic films characterized by hysteresigraph and torque-magnetometer measurements; bitter-pattern observations; reprint from ’ Journal of Applied Physics .’

  19. Effects of Spatial Dispersion on Reflection from Mushroom-type Artificial Impedance Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Luukkonen, Olli; Yakovlev, Alexander B; Simovski, Constantin R; Nefedov, Igor S; Tretyakov, Sergei A

    2008-01-01

    Several recent works have emphasized the role of spatial dispersion in wire media, and demonstrated that arrays of parallel metallic wires may behave very differently from a uniaxial local material with negative permittivity. Here, we investigate using local and non-local homogenization methods the effect of spatial dispersion on reflection from the mushroom structure introduced by Sievenpiper. The objective of the paper is to clarify the role of spatial dispersion in the mushroom structure and demonstrate that under some conditions it is suppressed. The metamaterial substrate, or metasurface, is modeled as a wire medium covered with an impedance surface. Surprisingly, it is found that in such configuration the effects of spatial dispersion may be nearly suppressed when the slab is electrically thin, and that the wire medium can be modeled very accurately using a local model. This result paves the way for the design of artificial surfaces that exploit the plasmonic-type response of the wire medium slab.

  20. The charmonium dissociation in an "anomalous wind"

    CERN Document Server

    Sadofyev, Andrey V

    2016-01-01

    We study the charmonium dissociation in a strongly coupled chiral plasma in the presence of magnetic field and axial charge imbalance. This type of plasma carries ``anomalous flow" induced by the chiral anomaly and exhibits novel transport phenomena such as chiral magnetic effect. We found that the ``anomalous flow" would modify the charmonium color screening length by using the gauge/gravity correspondence. We derive an analytical expression quantifying the ``anomalous flow" experienced by a charmonium for a large class of chiral plasma with a gravity dual. We elaborate on the similarity and {\\it qualitative} difference between anomalous effects on the charmonium color screening length which are {\\it model-dependent} and those on the heavy quark drag force which are fixed by the second law of thermodynamics. We speculate on the possible charmonium dissociation induced by chiral anomaly in heavy ion collisions.

  1. Effect of lime concentration on gelatinized maize starch dispersions properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobato-Calleros, C; Hernandez-Jaimes, C; Chavez-Esquivel, G; Meraz, M; Sosa, E; Lara, V H; Alvarez-Ramirez, J; Vernon-Carter, E J

    2015-04-01

    Maize starch was lime-cooked at 92 °C with 0.0-0.40% w/w Ca(OH)2. Optical micrographs showed that lime disrupted the integrity of insoluble remnants (ghosts) and increased the degree of syneresis of the gelatinized starch dispersions (GSD). The particle size distribution was monomodal, shifting to smaller sizes and narrower distributions with increasing lime concentration. X-ray patterns and FTIR spectra showed that crystallinity decreased to a minimum at lime concentration of 0.20% w/w. Lime-treated GSD exhibited thixotropic and viscoelastic behaviour. In the linear viscoelastic region the storage modulus was higher than the loss modulus, but a crossover between these moduli occurred in the non-linear viscoelastic region. The viscoelastic properties decreased with increased lime concentration. The electrochemical properties suggested that the amylopectin-rich remnants and the released amylose contained in the continuous matrix was firstly attacked by calcium ions at low lime levels (<0.20% w/w), disrupting the starch gel microstructure.

  2. Effects of Carbon Nanotube Environmental Dispersion on an Aquatic Invertebrate, Hirudo medicinalis

    OpenAIRE

    Rossana Girardello; Stefano Tasselli; Nicolò Baranzini; Roberto Valvassori; Magda de Eguileor; Annalisa Grimaldi

    2015-01-01

    The recent widespread applications of nanomaterials, because of their properties, opens new scenarios that affect their dispersal in the environment. In particular multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), despite their qualities, seem to be harmful for animals and humans. To evaluate possible toxic effects caused by carbon nanotube environmental dispersion, with regard to aquatic compartment, we proposed as experimental model a freshwater invertebrate: Hirudo medicinalis. In the present study we ...

  3. Effect of the size distribution of nanoscale dispersed particles on the Zener drag pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Eivani, A.R.; Valipour, S.; Ahmed, H.; Zhou, J; Duszczyk, J.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, a new relationship for the calculation of the Zener drag pressure is described in which the effect of the size distribution of nanoscale dispersed particles is taken into account, in addition to particle radius and volume fraction, which have been incorporated in the existing relationships. Microstructural observations indicated a clear correlation between the size distribution of dispersed particles and recrystallized grain sizes in the AA7020 aluminum alloy. However, the ex...

  4. Axial Dispersion in Segmented Gas-Liquid Flow: Effects of the Channel Curvature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muradoglu, Metin

    2009-11-01

    The effects of channel curvature on the axial dispersion in segmented gas-liquid flows have been studied computationally in a two-dimensional setting using a front-tracking/finite-volume method. Passive tracer particles are used to visualize and quantify the axial dispersion. The molecular diffusion is modeled by random walk of tracer particles. It is found that there is significant axial dispersion in serpentine channels even in the absence of molecular diffusion and dispersion increases with channel curvature. It is known that there is no dispersion in straight channels since a lubricating thin liquid layer persists on the wall. However this lubricating liquid layer is periodically broken in the curved channel case leading to enhanced axial dispersion. It is found that the dispersion increases as the Peclet number (Pe) decreases both in straight and curved channels. Difference between the straight and curved channel decreases continuously as the Peclet number decreases and virtually disappears at low Peclet numbers, i.e., Pestudy. A model is proposed based on the difference between the liquid film thicknesses on the inner and outer side of the bend in the limit as Pe->∞. Good agreement is found between the computational results and the model when the liquid slug is well mixed by the chaotic advection.

  5. Fermi surface versus Fermi sea contributions to intrinsic anomalous and spin Hall effects of multiorbital metals in the presence of Coulomb interaction and spin-Coulomb drag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, Naoya

    2016-06-01

    Anomalous Hall effect (AHE) and spin Hall effect (SHE) are fundamental phenomena, and their potential for application is great. However, we understand the interaction effects unsatisfactorily, and should have clarified issues about the roles of the Fermi sea term and Fermi surface term of the conductivity of the intrinsic AHE or SHE of an interacting multiorbital metal and about the effects of spin-Coulomb drag on the intrinsic SHE. Here, we resolve the first issue and provide the first step about the second issue by developing a general formalism in the linear response theory with appropriate approximations and using analytic arguments. The most striking result is that even without impurities, the Fermi surface term, a non-Berry-curvature term, plays dominant roles at high or slightly low temperatures. In particular, this Fermi surface term causes the temperature dependence of the dc anomalous Hall or spin Hall conductivity due to the interaction-induced quasiparticle damping and the correction of the dc spin Hall conductivity due to the spin-Coulomb drag. Those results revise our understanding of the intrinsic AHE and SHE. We also find that the differences between the dc anomalous Hall and longitudinal conductivities arise from the difference in the dominant multiband excitations. This not only explains why the Fermi sea term such as the Berry-curvature term becomes important in clean and low-temperature case only for interband transports, but also provides the useful principles on treating the electron-electron interaction in an interacting multiorbital metal for general formalism of transport coefficients. Several correspondences between our results and experiments are finally discussed.

  6. The effect of processing on the surface physical stability of amorphous solid dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ziyi; Nollenberger, Kathrin; Albers, Jessica; Moffat, Jonathan; Craig, Duncan; Qi, Sheng

    2014-11-01

    The focus of this study was to investigate the effect of processing on the surface crystallization of amorphous molecular dispersions and gain insight into the mechanisms underpinning this effect. The model systems, amorphous molecular dispersions of felodipine-EUDRAGIT® E PO, were processed both using spin coating (an ultra-fast solvent evaporation based method) and hot melt extrusion (HME) (a melting based method). Amorphous solid dispersions with drug loadings of 10-90% (w/w) were obtained by both processing methods. Samples were stored under 75% RH/room temperatures for up to 10months. Surface crystallization was observed shortly after preparation for the HME samples with high drug loadings (50-90%). Surface crystallization was characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and imaging techniques (SEM, AFM and localized thermal analysis). Spin coated molecular dispersions showed significantly higher surface physical stability than hot melt extruded samples. For both systems, the progress of the surface crystal growth followed zero order kinetics on aging. Drug enrichment at the surfaces of HME samples on aging was observed, which may contribute to surface crystallization of amorphous molecular dispersions. In conclusion it was found the amorphous molecular dispersions prepared by spin coating had a significantly higher surface physical stability than the corresponding HME samples, which may be attributed to the increased process-related apparent drug-polymer solubility and reduced molecular mobility due to the quenching effect caused by the rapid solvent evaporation in spin coating.

  7. Effect of Two Oil Dispersants on Larval Grass Shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio) Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancourt, P.; Key, P. B.; Chung, K. W.; DeLorenzo, M. E.

    2015-12-01

    The study focused on the effects that two oil dispersants, Corexit® EC9500A and Finasol® OSR52, have on the development of larval grass shrimp, (Palaemonetes pugio). The hypothesis was that Finasol would have a greater effect on larval grass shrimp development than Corexit. The experiment was conducted using 300 grass shrimp larvae that were 24 hours old. Each larva was exposed individually. In total, five sub-lethal concentrations were tested for each dispersant (control, 1.25, 2.50, 5.0,10.0 mg/L). The larvae were exposed for five days then transferred to clean seawater until metamorphosis into the juvenile stage. Key data measurements recorded included number of days to become juveniles, number of instars, length, dry weight, and mortality. Data from exposed shrimp was compared to the results of the control for each dispersant concentration. Corexit and Finasol exposure treatments of 5 mg/L and 10 mg/L showed significantly higher values for number of days and number of instars to reach juvenile status than values obtained from unexposed, control shrimp. Overall, mortality was higher in the Finasol treatments but the two dispersants did not respond significantly different from one another. Future studies are needed to determine the long term effects of dispersant exposure on all grass shrimp life stages and how any dispersant exposure impacts grass shrimp populations. Grass shrimp serve as excellent toxicity indicators of estuaries, and further studies will help to develop better oil spill mitigation techniques.

  8. Anomalous transport due to scale anomaly

    CERN Document Server

    Chernodub, M N

    2016-01-01

    We show that the scale anomaly in field theories leads to new anomalous transport effects that emerge in external electromagnetic field in inhomogeneous gravitational background. In inflating geometry the QED scale anomaly generates electric current which flows in opposite direction with respect to background electric field. In static spatially inhomogeneous gravitational background the dissipationless electric current flows transversely both to the magnetic field axis and to the gradient of the inhomogeneity. The anomalous currents are proportional to the beta function of the theory.

  9. Disentangling the effects of habitat suitability, dispersal, and fragmentation on the distribution of river fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radinger, Johannes; Wolter, Christian

    2015-06-01

    Habitat suitability, dispersal potential, and fragmentation influence the distribution of stream fishes; however, their relative influence and interacting effects on species distributions are poorly understood, which may result in uncertain outcomes of river rehabilitation and conservation. Using empirical data describing 17 relatively common stream fishes, we combine (1) species habitat suitability models (MaxEnt) with a (2) species dispersal model (FIDIMO) and a (3) worst-case scenario of the influence of river fragmentation on dispersal. Using generalized linear mixed models, we aimed to uncover the role of these factors in explaining the probability of presence. Simulations over nine years allowed for assessing the relative importance of dispersal over time for structuring species occurrences vs. the importance of habitat suitability. Models combining all three structuring factors performed consistently better in predicting the spatial occurrence patterns than models including only single factors. Our results confirmed that distribution patterns of stream fishes are jointly controlled by species dispersal and habitat suitability. An increase of 0.1 habitat suitability probability more than doubled the odds of species occurrence; an increase of 0.1 dispersal probability yielded a 14-fold increase of the odds of species occurrence. Temporal simulations revealed that over short time frames (1-2 years) dispersal from nearby source populations is four times more important than habitat suitability for species presence. However, over longer time periods, the importance of habitat suitability increases relative to the importance of dispersal. Surprisingly, fragmentation by migration barriers did not appear as a significant driver of occurrence patterns. Concluding, these findings demonstrate the importance of the spatial arrangement of suitable habitats and potential source populations, as well as their relative position in relation to barriers. We emphasize

  10. Biological effects of mechanically and chemically dispersed oil on the Icelandic scallop (Chlamys islandica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frantzen, Marianne; Regoli, Francesco; Ambrose, William G; Nahrgang, Jasmine; Geraudie, Perrine; Benedetti, Maura; Locke, William L; Camus, Lionel

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to simulate conditions in which dispersant (Dasic NS) might be used to combat an oil spill in coastal sub-Arctic water of limited depth and water exchange in order to produce input data for Net Environmental Benefit Analysis (NEBA) of Arctic and sub-Arctic coastal areas. Concentration dependent differences in acute responses and long-term effects of a 48h acute exposure to dispersed oil, with and without the application of a chemical dispersant, were assessed on the Arctic filter feeding bivalve Chlamys islandica. Icelandic scallops were exposed for 48h to a range of spiked concentrations of mechanically and chemically dispersed oil. Short-term effects were assessed in terms of lysosomal membrane stability, superoxide dismutase, catalase, gluthatione S-transferases, glutathione peroxidases, glutathione reductase, glutathione, total oxyradical scavenging capacity, lipid peroxidation and peroxisomal proliferation. Post-exposure survival, growth and reproductive investment were followed for 2 months to evaluate any long-term consequence. Generally, similar effects were observed in scallops exposed to mechanically and chemically dispersed oil. Limited short-term effects were observed after 48h, suggesting that a different timing would be required for measuring the possible onset of such effects. There was a concentration dependent increase in cumulative post-exposure mortality, but long-term effects on gonadosomatic index, somatic growth/condition factor did not differ among treatments.

  11. The effect of unresolved binaries on globular cluster proper-motion dispersion profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Bianchini, P; van de Ven, G; Schinnerer, E; Bellini, A; van der Marel, R P; Watkins, L L; Anderson, J

    2016-01-01

    High-precision kinematic studies of globular clusters require an accurate knowledge of all possible sources of contamination. Amongst other sources, binary stars can introduce systematic biases in the kinematics. Using a set of Monte Carlo cluster simulations with different concentrations and binary fractions, we investigate the effect of unresolved binaries on proper-motion dispersion profiles, treating the simulations like HST proper-motion samples. Since globular clusters evolve towards a state of partial energy equipartition, more massive stars lose energy and decrease their velocity dispersion. As a consequence, on average, binaries have a lower velocity dispersion, since they are more massive kinematic tracers. We show that, in the case of clusters with high binary fraction (initial binary fraction of 50%) and high concentration (i.e., closer to energy equipartition), unresolved binaries introduce a color-dependent bias in the velocity dispersion of main-sequence stars of the order of 0.1-0.3 km s$^{-1}...

  12. Effect of solvent composition on dispersing ability of reaction sialon suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xin; Oliveira, Marta; Ferreira, José M F

    2003-03-15

    This work focuses on the optimization of the rheological behavior of suspensions considering different solvent compositions. The effects of methyl ethyl ketone (MEK)/ethanol (E) solvent mixtures on reaction sialon suspensions were investigated by measuring sedimentation behavior, adsorption of dispersant, and flow behavior. It was shown that both the flow behavior and the sedimentation behavior strongly depended on selection of solvent composition. Using 3 wt% KD1 as dispersant, well-dispersed colloidal suspensions could be obtained in MEK-rich solvents. The suspensions with 60 vol% MEK/40 vol% E as solvent could be fitted to the Bingham model with very low yield stress, while suspensions with pure MEK or ethanol-rich mixtures as solvent showed pseudo plastic behavior with relatively high yield stress values. A model was proposed to explain the different flow behaviors of suspensions considering the different configurations of dispersant at particles' surfaces.

  13. Stellar Velocity Dispersion in Mergers: The Effects of Dust and Star Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Stickley, Nathaniel R

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the effects of stellar evolution and dust on measurements of stellar velocity dispersion in mergers of disk galaxies. $N$-body simulations and radiative transfer analysis software are used to obtain mass-weighted and flux-weighted measurements of stellar velocity dispersion. We find that the distribution of dust with respect to the distribution of young stars in such systems is more important than the total degree of attenuation. The presence of dust typically causes flux-weighted measurements of stellar velocity dispersion to be elevated with respect to mass-weighted measurements because dust preferentially obscures young stars, which tend to be dynamically cooler than older stellar populations in such systems. In exceptional situations, in which young stars are not preferentially obscured by dust, flux-weighted velocity dispersion measurements tend to be negatively offset with respect to mass-weighted measurements because the dynamically cool young stellar populations are more luminous, per u...

  14. Effects of dispersion particle agents on the hardening of V–4Cr–4Ti alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, P.F., E-mail: zhengpf@swip.ac.cn [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu, Sichuan (China); Chen, J.M., E-mail: chenjm@swip.ac.cn [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu, Sichuan (China); Nagasaka, T., E-mail: nagasaka@nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Muroga, T., E-mail: muroga@nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Zhao, J.J., E-mail: zhaojj@dlut.edu.cn [Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, Liaoning (China); Xu, Z.Y., E-mail: zyxu@swip.ac.cn [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu, Sichuan (China); Li, C.H., E-mail: li_chenhui68@163.com [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei (China); Fu, H.Y., E-mail: fu_haiying@ms.nifs.ac.jp [The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Chen, H., E-mail: chenh@swip.ac.cn [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu, Sichuan (China); Duan, X.R., E-mail: duanxr@swip.ac.cn [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu, Sichuan (China)

    2014-12-15

    In the mechanical alloying (MA) of vanadium alloys, various particles can have a combined dispersion-strengthening effect. The nature, especially the thermal stability, of the dispersion particle agents can play an important role for the strengthening at elevated temperatures. In order to optimize the particle species in dispersion strengthened vanadium alloys for high temperature application, this study focuses on the hardening of V–4Cr–4Ti alloy by different dispersion particle agents such as yttrium compounds and carbides. Alloying degrees, grain sizes, densifications and solid solution of interstitial impurities are compared for better understanding the hardening due to nano-particles. Though the dissolution of carbides may be poor, it has been found that the hardening due to Ti{sub 3}SiC{sub 2} addition is efficient and most stable after annealing at high temperature up to 1723 K.

  15. Fabrication and local laser heating of freestanding Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} bridges with Pt contacts displaying anisotropic magnetoresistance and anomalous Nernst effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandl, F.; Grundler, D., E-mail: grundler@ph.tum.de [Lehrstuhl für Physik funktionaler Schichtsysteme, Physik-Department E10, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching b. München (Germany)

    2014-04-28

    In spin caloritronics, ferromagnetic samples subject to relatively large in-plane temperature gradients ∇T have turned out to be extremely interesting. We report on a preparation technique that allows us to create freely suspended permalloy/Pt hybrid structures where a scanning laser induces ∇T on the order of a few K/μm. We observe both the anisotropic magnetoresistance at room temperature and the magnetic field dependent anomalous Nernst effect under laser heating. The technique is promising for the realization of device concepts considered in spin caloritronics based on suspended ferromagnetic nanostructures with electrical contacts.

  16. Effect of non-random dispersal strategies on spatial coexistence mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarasekare, Priyanga

    2010-01-01

    1. Random dispersal leads to spatial coexistence via two mechanisms (emigration-mediated and source-sink), both of which involve the movement of organisms from areas of higher to lower fitness. What is not known is whether such coexistence would occur if organisms dispersed non-randomly, using cues such as density and habitat quality to gauge fitness differences between habitats. Here, I conduct a comparative analysis of random and non-random dispersal strategies in a foodweb with a basal resource, top predator, and two intermediate consumers that exhibit a trade-off between competitive ability and predator susceptibility. 2. I find a striking contrast between density- and habitat-dependent dispersal in their effects on spatial coexistence. Dispersal in response to competitor and predator density facilitates coexistence while dispersal in response to habitat quality (resource productivity and predator pressure) inhibits it. Moreover, density-dependent dispersal changes species' distribution patterns from interspecific segregation to interspecific aggregation, while habitat-dependent dispersal preserves the interspecific segregation observed in the absence of dispersal. Under density-dependent dispersal, widespread spatial coexistence results in an overall decline in the abundance of the inferior competitor that is less susceptible to predation and an overall increase in the abundance of the superior competitor that is more susceptible to predation. Under habitat-dependent dispersal, restricted spatial coexistence results in species' abundances being essentially unchanged from those observed in the absence of dispersal. 3. A key outcome is that when the superior competitor moves in the direction of increasing fitness but the inferior competitor does not, spatial coexistence is possible in both resource-poor and resource-rich habitats. However, when the inferior competitor moves in the direction of increasing fitness but the superior competitor does not, spatial

  17. Dispersion of conservative properties for SGD effects by numerical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, G.; Marino-Tapia, I.; Enriquez, C.

    2013-05-01

    The submarine groundwater discharges around de coasts of theYucatán Peninsula are very common because of its karstic nature. These discharges of fresh water into the sea can change the thermohaline conditions of the region. There are several studies that demonstrate that point submarine groundwater discharges can change the superficial temperature and haline conditions near the point-SGD. Furthermore, there is evidence that considerable concentrations of nutrients are transported to the sea via SGDs. In order to quantify the area of influence of a point-SGD and the ability of the coastal system to dissipate the ground water, this study presents a numerical simulation of a point-SGD on the north coast of Yucatán, Dzilam Bravo. Teh flow recorded for this SGD is ~1m^3/s and it is located 200m offshore in waters of less than 2m detph.. The numerical simulation was carried out in the model DELFT-3D which has been calibrated with water level and hydrodynamics data for the region with a grid of 486 x 243 nodes that cover an area of 6 km alongshore by 2 km crosshore with a resolution of 14 m. Three ideal numerical scenarios were simulated: only wind forcing, only tidal forcing and wind-tide forcing. The real cases are for two different wind conditions, the first is a southeast wind, and the second is a breeze with an easterly component; the dominant winds in the region are easterly. Seasonal variation was also simulated; the two conditions that exist in the region are the rainy and dry seasons. The extreme events of ENSO and northerly storms locally known as "nortes" were also simulated. The results of the ideal set of scenarios shows wind as the principal forcing for dispersion and it governs the direction of the salinity gradient. The seasonal variations show that the area of influence in terms of salinity is also a function of the contrast between fresh and sea water, and finally the set of extreme condition simulations shows, in case of the northerly storms, that the

  18. TESTING FOR VARYING DISPERSION OF LONGITUDINAL BINOMIAL DATA IN NONLINEAR LOGISTIC MODELS WITH RANDOM EFFECTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林金官; 韦博成

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, it is discussed that two tests for varying dispersion of binomial data in the framework of nonlinear logistic models with random effects, which are widely used in analyzing longitudinal binomial data. One is the individual test and power calculation for varying dispersion through testing the randomness of cluster effects, which is extensions of Dean(1992) and Commenges et al (1994). The second test is the composite test for varying dispersion through simultaneously testing the randomness of cluster effects and the equality of random-effect means. The score test statistics are constructed and expressed in simple, easy to use, matrix formulas. The authors illustrate their test methods using the insecticide data (Giltinan, Capizzi & Malani (1988)).

  19. Large power factor and anomalous Hall effect and their correlation with observed linear magneto resistance in Co-doped Bi2Se3 3D topological insulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rahul; Shukla, K K; Kumar, A; Okram, G S; Singh, D; Ganeshan, V; Lakhani, Archana; Ghosh, A K; Chatterjee, Sandip

    2016-09-21

    Magnetoresistance (MR), thermo power, magnetization and Hall effect measurements have been performed on Co-doped Bi2Se3 topological insulators. The undoped sample shows that the maximum MR as a destructive interference due to a π-Berry phase leads to a decrease of MR. As the Co is doped, the linearity in MR is increased. The observed MR of Bi2Se3 can be explained with the classical model. The low temperature MR behavior of Co doped samples cannot be explained with the same model, but can be explained with the quantum linear MR model. Magnetization behavior indicates the establishment of ferromagnetic ordering with Co doping. Hall effect data also supports the establishment of ferromagnetic ordering in Co-doped Bi2Se3 samples by showing the anomalous Hall effect. Furthermore, when spectral weight suppression is insignificant, Bi2Se3 behaves as a dilute magnetic semiconductor. Moreover, the maximum power factor is observed when time reversal symmetry (TRS) is maintained. As the TRS is broken the power factor value is decreased, which indicates that with the rise of Dirac cone above the Fermi level the anomalous Hall effect and linearity in MR increase and the power factor decreases.

  20. Large power factor and anomalous Hall effect and their correlation with observed linear magneto resistance in Co-doped Bi2Se3 3D topological insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rahul; Shukla, K. K.; Kumar, A.; Okram, G. S.; Singh, D.; Ganeshan, V.; Lakhani, Archana; Ghosh, A. K.; Chatterjee, Sandip

    2016-09-01

    Magnetoresistance (MR), thermo power, magnetization and Hall effect measurements have been performed on Co-doped Bi2Se3 topological insulators. The undoped sample shows that the maximum MR as a destructive interference due to a π-Berry phase leads to a decrease of MR. As the Co is doped, the linearity in MR is increased. The observed MR of Bi2Se3 can be explained with the classical model. The low temperature MR behavior of Co doped samples cannot be explained with the same model, but can be explained with the quantum linear MR model. Magnetization behavior indicates the establishment of ferromagnetic ordering with Co doping. Hall effect data also supports the establishment of ferromagnetic ordering in Co-doped Bi2Se3 samples by showing the anomalous Hall effect. Furthermore, when spectral weight suppression is insignificant, Bi2Se3 behaves as a dilute magnetic semiconductor. Moreover, the maximum power factor is observed when time reversal symmetry (TRS) is maintained. As the TRS is broken the power factor value is decreased, which indicates that with the rise of Dirac cone above the Fermi level the anomalous Hall effect and linearity in MR increase and the power factor decreases.

  1. Single-walled carbon nanotubes dispersed in aqueous media via non-covalent functionalization: effect of dispersant on the stability, cytotoxicity, and epigenetic toxicity of nanotube suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpatova, Alla L; Shan, Wenqian; Babica, Pavel; Upham, Brad L; Rogensues, Adam R; Masten, Susan J; Drown, Edward; Mohanty, Amar K; Alocilja, Evangelyn C; Tarabara, Volodymyr V

    2010-01-01

    As the range of applications for carbon nanotubes (CNTs) rapidly expands, understanding the effect of CNTs on prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell systems has become an important research priority, especially in light of recent reports of the facile dispersion of CNTs in a variety of aqueous systems including natural water. In this study, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were dispersed in water using a range of natural (gum arabic, amylose, Suwannee River natural organic matter) and synthetic (polyvinyl pyrrolidone, Triton X-100) dispersing agents (dispersants) that attach to the CNT surface non-covalently via different physiosorption mechanisms. The charge and the average effective hydrodynamic diameter of suspended SWCNTs as well as the concentration of exfoliated SWCNTs in the dispersion were found to remain relatively stable over a period of 4 weeks. The cytotoxicity of suspended SWCNTs was assessed as a function of dispersant type and exposure time (up to 48 h) using general viability bioassay with Escherichia coli and using neutral red dye uptake (NDU) bioassay with WB-F344 rat liver epithelia cells. In the E. coli viability bioassays, three types of growth media with different organic loadings and salt contents were evaluated. When the dispersant itself was non-toxic, no losses of E. coli and WB-F344 viability were observed. The cell viability was affected only by SWCNTs dispersed using Triton X-100, which was cytotoxic in SWCNT-free (control) solution. The epigenetic toxicity of dispersed CNTs was evaluated using gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) bioassay applied to WB-F344 rat liver epithelial cells. With all SWCNT suspensions except those where SWCNTs were dispersed using Triton X-100 (wherein GJIC could not be measured because the sample was cytotoxic), no inhibition of GJIC in the presence of SWCNTs was observed. These results suggest a strong dependence of the toxicity of SWCNT suspensions on the toxicity of the dispersant and point to

  2. Boundary effects and gapped dispersion in rotating fermionic matter

    CERN Document Server

    Ebihara, Shu; Mameda, Kazuya

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the importance of boundary effects on fermionic matter in a rotating frame. By explicit calculations at zero temperature we show that the scalar condensate of fermion and anti-fermion cannot be modified by the rotation once the boundary condition is properly implemented. The situation is qualitatively changed at finite temperature and/or in the presence of a sufficiently strong magnetic field that supersedes the boundary effects. Therefore, to establish an interpretation of the rotation as an effective chemical potential, it is crucial to consider further environmental effects such as the finite temperature and magnetic field.

  3. Boundary effects and gapped dispersion in rotating fermionic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebihara, Shu; Fukushima, Kenji; Mameda, Kazuya

    2017-01-01

    We discuss the importance of boundary effects on fermionic matter in a rotating frame. By explicit calculations at zero temperature we show that the scalar condensate of fermion and anti-fermion cannot be modified by the rotation once the boundary condition is properly implemented. The situation is qualitatively changed at finite temperature and/or in the presence of a sufficiently strong magnetic field that supersedes the boundary effects. Therefore, to establish an interpretation of the rotation as an effective chemical potential, it is crucial to consider further environmental effects such as the finite temperature and magnetic field.

  4. Boundary effects and gapped dispersion in rotating fermionic matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Ebihara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the importance of boundary effects on fermionic matter in a rotating frame. By explicit calculations at zero temperature we show that the scalar condensate of fermion and anti-fermion cannot be modified by the rotation once the boundary condition is properly implemented. The situation is qualitatively changed at finite temperature and/or in the presence of a sufficiently strong magnetic field that supersedes the boundary effects. Therefore, to establish an interpretation of the rotation as an effective chemical potential, it is crucial to consider further environmental effects such as the finite temperature and magnetic field.

  5. Effect of third-order dispersion on breathing localized solutions in the quintic complex Ginzburg-Landau equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lijun Song; Lu Li; Guosheng Zhou

    2005-01-01

    The effect of third-order dispersion on breathing localized solutions in the quintic complex GinzburgLandau (CGL) equation is investigated. It is found that even small third-order dispersion can cause dramatic changes in the behavior of the solutions, such as breathing solution asymmetrically and travelling slowly towards the right for the positive third-order dispersion.

  6. Flux Pinning Effects of Y2O3 Nanoparticulate Dispersions in Multilayered YBCO Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    AFRL-RZ-WP-TP-2012-0090 FLUX PINNING EFFECTS OF Y2O3 NANOPARTICULATE DISPERSIONS IN MULTILAYERED YBCO THIN FILMS (POSTPRINT) T.A...January 2005 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE FLUX PINNING EFFECTS OF Y2O3 NANOPARTICULATE DISPERSIONS IN MULTILAYERED YBCO THIN FILMS (POSTPRINT) 5a...Clearance Date: 06 Dec 2005. 14. ABSTRACT The flux pinning effects of Y2O3 nanoparticulate inclusions in YBa2Cu3O7-δ (Y123 or YBCO ) thin films

  7. Chemical conversion of aircraft emissions in the dispersing plume: Calculation of effective emission indices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petry, H. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere; Hendricks, J. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere; Moellhoff, M. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere; Lippert, E. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere; Meier, A. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere; Ebel, A. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Geophysik und Meteorologie; Sausen, R. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere

    1997-06-01

    A box model representative for a mesoscale volume and three different plume models are used to estimate the chemical conversion of exhaust species of a subsonic aircraft at cruise altitude. Clearly deviating results have been obtained for instantaneous mixing of the exhaust in a box and gradual dispersion of a plume. The effect of varying daytime of release as well as the impact of changing dispersion time is studied with emphasis on the aircraft induced O{sub 3} production. Effective emission indices are calculated which enable a correction for expanding plume effects in global or mesoscale models. (orig.)

  8. An effective dispersant for oil spills based on food-grade amphiphiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athas, Jasmin C; Jun, Kelly; McCafferty, Caitlyn; Owoseni, Olasehinde; John, Vijay T; Raghavan, Srinivasa R

    2014-08-12

    Synthetic dispersants such as Corexit 9500A were used in large quantities (∼2 million gallons) to disperse the oil spilled in the ocean during the recent Deepwater Horizon event. These dispersant formulations contain a blend of surfactants in a base of organic solvent. Some concerns have been raised regarding the aquatic toxicity and environmental impact of these formulations. In an effort to create a safer dispersant, we have examined the ability of food-grade amphiphiles to disperse (emulsify) crude oil in seawater. Our studies show that an effective emulsifier is obtained by combining two such amphiphiles: lecithin (L), a phospholipid extracted from soybeans, and Tween 80 (T), a surfactant used in many food products including ice cream. Interestingly, we find that L/T blends show a synergistic effect, i.e., their combination is an effective emulsifier, but neither L or T is effective on its own. This synergy is maximized at a 60/40 weight ratio of L/T and is attributed to the following reasons: (i) L and T pack closely at the oil-water interface; (ii) L has a low tendency to desorb, which fortifies the interfacial film; and (iii) the large headgroup of T provides steric repulsions between the oil droplets and prevents their coalescence. A comparison of L/T with Corexit 9500A shows that the former leads to smaller oil droplets that remain stable to coalescence for a much longer time. The smaller size and stability of crude oil droplets are believed to be important to their dispersion and eventual microbial degradation in the ocean. Our findings suggest that L/T blends could potentially be a viable alternative for the dispersion of oil spills.

  9. Disentangling the physical contributions to the anomalous Hall effect and domain wall resistance in isoelectronic L10-FePd and L10-FePt alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seemann, Klaus; Garcia-Sanchez, Felipe; Kakay, Attila; Schneider, Claus; Freimuth, Frank; Mokrousov, Yuriy; Bluegel, Stefan; Hertel, Riccardo

    2012-02-01

    We analyze the origin of the electrical resistance arising in domain walls of perpendicularly magnetized materials by considering a superposition of anisotropic magnetoresistance and the resistance implied by the magnetization chirality. The domain wall profiles of L10-FePd and L10-FePt are determined by micromagnetic simulations based on which we perform first principles calculations to quantify electron transport through the core and closure region of the walls. The wall resistance, being twice as high in L10-FePd than in L10-FePt, is found to be clearly dominated in both cases by a high gradient of magnetization rotation, and not by the spin-orbit interaction driven anisotropic magnetoresistance effect. Concerning the anomalous Hall effect on the other hand, we show that difference in spin-orbit interaction strength of Pt and Pd atoms leads to a pronounced cross-over from an extrinsic side jump mechanism in L10-FePd to an intrinsic Berry-phase anomalous Hall effect in L10-FePt.

  10. Functional behavior of the anomalous magnetic relaxation observed in melt-textured YBa2Cu3O7-δ samples showing the paramagnetic Meissner effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, F. T.; Vieira, V. N.; Garcia, E. L.; Wolff-Fabris, F.; Kampert, E.; Gouvêa, C. P.; Schaf, J.; Obradors, X.; Puig, T.; Roa, J. J.

    2016-10-01

    We have studied the functional behavior of the field-cooled (FC) magnetic relaxation observed in melt-textured YBa2Cu3O7-δ (Y123) samples with 30 wt% of Y2Ba1Cu1O5 (Y211) phase, in order to investigate anomalous paramagnetic moments observed during the experiments. FC magnetic relaxation experiments were performed under controlled conditions, such as cooling rate and temperature. Magnetic fields up to 5T were applied parallel to the ab plane and along the c-axis. Our results are associated with the paramagnetic Meissner effect (PME), characterized by positive moments during FC experiments, and related to the magnetic flux compression into the samples. After different attempts our experimental data could be adequately fitted by an exponential decay function with different relaxation times. We discuss our results suggesting the existence of different and preferential flux dynamics governing the anomalous FC paramagnetic relaxation in different time intervals. This work is one of the first attempts to interpret this controversial effect in a simple analysis of the pinning mechanisms and flux dynamics acting during the time evolution of the magnetic moment. However, the results may be useful to develop models to explain this interesting and still misunderstood feature of the paramagnetic Meissner effect.

  11. Relative impacts of adult movement, larval dispersal and harvester movement on the effectiveness of reserve networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Grüss

    Full Text Available Movement of individuals is a critical factor determining the effectiveness of reserve networks. Marine reserves have historically been used for the management of species that are sedentary as adults, and, therefore, larval dispersal has been a major focus of marine-reserve research. The push to use marine reserves for managing pelagic and demersal species poses significant questions regarding their utility for highly-mobile species. Here, a simple conceptual metapopulation model is developed to provide a rigorous comparison of the functioning of reserve networks for populations with different admixtures of larval dispersal and adult movement in a home range. We find that adult movement produces significantly lower persistence than larval dispersal, all other factors being equal. Furthermore, redistribution of harvest effort previously in reserves to remaining fished areas ('fishery squeeze' and fishing along reserve borders ('fishing-the-line' considerably reduce persistence and harvests for populations mobile as adults, while they only marginally changes results for populations with dispersing larvae. Our results also indicate that adult home-range movement and larval dispersal are not simply additive processes, but rather that populations possessing both modes of movement have lower persistence than equivalent populations having the same amount of 'total movement' (sum of larval and adult movement spatial scales in either larval dispersal or adult movement alone.

  12. Relative impacts of adult movement, larval dispersal and harvester movement on the effectiveness of reserve networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grüss, Arnaud; Kaplan, David M; Hart, Deborah R

    2011-01-01

    Movement of individuals is a critical factor determining the effectiveness of reserve networks. Marine reserves have historically been used for the management of species that are sedentary as adults, and, therefore, larval dispersal has been a major focus of marine-reserve research. The push to use marine reserves for managing pelagic and demersal species poses significant questions regarding their utility for highly-mobile species. Here, a simple conceptual metapopulation model is developed to provide a rigorous comparison of the functioning of reserve networks for populations with different admixtures of larval dispersal and adult movement in a home range. We find that adult movement produces significantly lower persistence than larval dispersal, all other factors being equal. Furthermore, redistribution of harvest effort previously in reserves to remaining fished areas ('fishery squeeze') and fishing along reserve borders ('fishing-the-line') considerably reduce persistence and harvests for populations mobile as adults, while they only marginally changes results for populations with dispersing larvae. Our results also indicate that adult home-range movement and larval dispersal are not simply additive processes, but rather that populations possessing both modes of movement have lower persistence than equivalent populations having the same amount of 'total movement' (sum of larval and adult movement spatial scales) in either larval dispersal or adult movement alone.

  13. Effects of Acclimation on Poststocking Dispersal and Physiological Condition of Age-1 Pallid Sturgeon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldenburg, Eric W.; Guy, Christopher S.; Cureton, Eli S.; Webb, Molly H.; Gardner, William M.

    2011-03-28

    A propagation program for pallid sturgeon Scaphirhynchus albus in the upper Missouri River was implemented by the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service in 1997. Preliminary research indicated that many hatchery-reared pallid sturgeon were experiencing significant downstream poststocking dispersal, negatively affecting their recruitment. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of acclimation to flow and site-specific physicochemical water conditions on poststocking dispersal and physiological condition of age-1 pallid sturgeon. Fish from three acclimation treatments were radio-tagged, released at two locations (Missouri River and Marias River), and monitored using passive telemetry stations. Marias treatment was acclimated to flow and site-specific physicochemical conditions, Bozeman treatment was acclimated to flow only, and traditional treatment had no acclimation (reared under traditional protocol). During both years fish released in the Missouri River dispersed less than fish released in the Marias River. In 2005, Marias treatment dispersed less and nearly twice as many fish remained in the Missouri River reach than traditional treatment. In 2006, pallid sturgeon dispersed similarly among treatments and fish remaining in the Missouri River reach were similar among all treatments. Differences in poststocking dispersal between years may be related to fin curl. Fin curl was present in all fish in 2005 and 27% of the fish in 2006. Pallid sturgeon from all treatments in both years had a greater affinity for the lower reaches of the Missouri River than the upper reaches. Thus, habitat at release site influenced poststocking dispersal more than acclimation treatment. No difference was observed in relative growth rate among treatments in 2006. However, acclimation to flow (i.e., exercise conditioning) may reduce liver fat content. Acclimation conditions used in this study may not benefit pallid sturgeon unless physiological maladies are present

  14. THE BAFFLED FLASK TEST FOR DISPERSANT EFFECTIVENESS: A ROUND ROBIN EVALUATION OF REPRODUCIBILITY AND REPEATABILITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    After two previous investigations demonstrated that the Baffled Flask Test (BFT) was an effective and reproducible method for screening the effectiveness of dispersant products in the laboratory, the USEPA decided that before the new protocol cold be considered for replacement of...

  15. Anomalous response of supported few-layer hexagonal boron nitride to DC electric fields: a confined water effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Camilla; Matos, Matheus; Mazzoni, Mário; Chacham, Hélio; Neves, Bernardo

    2013-03-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is a two-dimensional compound from III-V family, with the atoms of boron and nitrogen arranged in a honeycomb lattice, similar to graphene. Unlike graphene though, h-BN is an insulator material, with a gap larger than 5 eV. Here, we use Electric Force Microscopy (EFM) to study the electrical response of mono and few-layers of h-BN to an electric field applied by the EFM tip. Our results show an anomalous behavior in the dielectric response for h-BN for different bias orientation: for a positive bias applied to the tip, h-BN layers respond with a larger dielectric constant than the dielectric constant of the silicon dioxide substrate; while for a negative bias, the h-BN dielectric constant is smaller than the dielectric constant of the substrate. Based on first-principles calculations, we showed that this anomalous response may be interpreted as a macroscopic consequence of confinement of a thin water layer between h-BN and substrate. These results were confirmed by sample annealing and also also by a comparative analysis with h-BN on a non-polar substrate. All the authors acknowledge financial support from CNPq, Fapemig, Rede Nacional de Pesquisa em Nanotubos de Carbono and INCT-Nano-Carbono.

  16. Development of dispersed-type sonophotocatalytic process using piezoelectric effect caused by ultrasonic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Naohito; Yasutomi, Ryosuke; Kasai, Eiki

    2010-06-01

    Recently, degradation of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) with low biodegradability in the environment and in industrial and municipal wastewaters has gained importance. In this study, a dispersed-type sonophotocatalysis (SP) process, which is a combination of sonolysis and photocatalysis with dispersed light sources, has been proposed for the effective and energy-efficient degradation of POPs. In this method, the piezoelectric effect caused by ultrasonic resonance in a piezoelectric element is used for producing luminescence in a LED. A luminescent device composed of eight UV-LEDs and a piezoelectric element was designed for dispersion of UV light in water; this device was confirmed to show luminescence under ultrasonic irradiation. Sonophotocatalytic degradation experiments were carried out using several such devices, and the results were compared with those obtained in sonolysis, photocatalysis, and fixed-type SP. The comparison showed that the degradation rate constants in fixed-type and dispersed-type SP were larger than the sum of the rate constants obtained for sonolysis and photocatalysis; further, the synergetic effect caused by the combination of sonolysis and photocatalysis was 7.5% and 18% in fixed-type and dispersed-type SP, respectively.

  17. Effective Block-Scale Dispersion and Its Self-Averaging Behavior in Heterogeneous Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barros, Felipe; Dentz, Marco

    2015-04-01

    Upscaled (effective) dispersion coefficients in spatially heterogeneous flow fields must (1) account for the sub-scale variability that is filtered out by homogenization and (2) be modeled as a random function to incorporate the uncertainty associated with non-ergodic solute bodies. In this study, we use the framework developed in de Barros and Rubin (2011) [de Barros F.P.J. and Rubin Y., Modelling of block-scale macrodispersion as a random function. Journal of Fluid Mechanics 676 (2011): 514-545] to develop novel semi-analytical expressions for the first two statistical moments of the block-effective dispersion coefficients in three-dimensional spatially random flow fields as a function of the key characteristic length scales defining the transport problem. The derived expressions are based on perturbation theory and limited to weak-to-mild heterogeneity and uniform-in-the-mean steady state flow fields. The semi-analytical solutions provide physical insights of the main controlling factors influencing the temporal scaling of the dispersion coefficient of the solute body and its self-averaging dispersion behavior. Our results illustrate the relevance of the joint influence of the block-scale and local-scale dispersion in diminishing the macrodispersion variance under non-ergodic conditions. The impact of the statistical anisotropy ratio in the block-effective macrodispersion self-averaging behavior is also investigated. The analysis performed in this work has implications in numerical modeling and grid design.

  18. Hydrodynamic waves in an anomalous charged fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Navid; Davody, Ali; Hejazi, Kasra; Rezaei, Zahra

    2016-11-01

    We study the collective excitations in a relativistic fluid with an anomalous U (1) current. In 3 + 1 dimensions at zero chemical potential, in addition to ordinary sound modes we find two propagating modes in presence of an external magnetic field. The first one which is a transverse degenerate mode, propagates with a velocity proportional to the coefficient of gravitational anomaly; this is in fact the Chiral Alfvén wave recently found in [1]. Another one is a wave of density perturbation, namely a chiral magnetic wave (CMW). The velocity dependence of CMW on the chiral anomaly coefficient is well known. We compute the dependence of CMW's velocity on the coefficient of gravitational anomaly as well. We also show that the dissipation splits the degeneracy of CAW. At finite chiral charge density we show that in general there may exist five chiral hydrodynamic waves. Of these five waves, one is the CMW while the other four are mixed Modified Sound-Alfvén waves. It turns out that in propagation transverse to the magnetic field no anomaly effect appears while in parallel to the magnetic field we find sound waves become dispersive due to anomaly.

  19. Dispersion effect in optical microscopy systems with a supersphere solid immersion lens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Yao-Ju; Zhuang You-Yi

    2009-01-01

    This paper studies the dispersion effect of the supersphere solid immersion lens (SIL) on a near field optical microscopy system by using the vector diffraction theory. Results show that when a real non-monochromatic beam illuminates a supersphere SIL microscopy, the dispersion effect of the SIL has an important influence on the image quality. As the wavelength bandwidth of the non-monochromatic beam increases, the size of the focused spot increases and its intensity decreases in near-field microscopy systems with a supersphere SIL.

  20. Memory effect of polymer dispersed liquid crystal by hybridization with nanoclay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The electro-optical performances of polymer dispersed liquid crystal (PDLC were investigated in the presence of organically modified clays. With the addition and increasing amount of modified clay, driving voltage and memory effect, viz. transparent state of the film after the electricity is off simultaneously increased due most likely to the increased viscosity. Among the two types of modifier, 4-(4-aminophenyl benzonitrile having greater chemical affinity with LC than hexylamine, gave finer dispersion of clay in liquid crystal, greater viscosity, larger driving voltage and response time, and greater memory effect.

  1. Mathematical analysis of a quorum sensing induced biofilm dispersal model and numerical simulation of hollowing effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerenini, Blessing O; Sonner, Stefanie; Eberl, Hermann J

    2017-06-01

    We analyze a mathematical model of quorum sensing induced biofilm dispersal. It is formulated as a system of non-linear, density-dependent, diffusion-reaction equations. The governing equation for the sessile biomass comprises two non-linear diffusion effects, a degeneracy as in the porous medium equation and fast diffusion. This equation is coupled with three semi-linear diffusion-reaction equations for the concentrations of growth limiting nutrients, autoinducers, and dispersed cells. We prove the existence and uniqueness of bounded non-negative solutions of this system and study the behavior of the model in numerical simulations, where we focus on hollowing effects in established biofilms.

  2. Anomalous law of cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapas, Luciano C.; Ferreira, Rogelma M. S.; Rubí, J. Miguel; Oliveira, Fernando A.

    2015-03-01

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton's law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics.

  3. Anomalous law of cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapas, Luciano C; Ferreira, Rogelma M S; Rubí, J Miguel; Oliveira, Fernando A

    2015-03-14

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton's law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics.

  4. THE EFFECT OF UNRESOLVED BINARIES ON GLOBULAR CLUSTER PROPER-MOTION DISPERSION PROFILES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bianchini, P.; Norris, M. A.; Ven, G. van de; Schinnerer, E. [Max-Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Bellini, A.; Marel, R. P. van der; Watkins, L. L.; Anderson, J., E-mail: bianchini@mpia.de [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2016-03-20

    High-precision kinematic studies of globular clusters (GCs) require an accurate knowledge of all possible sources of contamination. Among other sources, binary stars can introduce systematic biases in the kinematics. Using a set of Monte Carlo cluster simulations with different concentrations and binary fractions, we investigate the effect of unresolved binaries on proper-motion dispersion profiles, treating the simulations like Hubble Space Telescope proper-motion samples. Since GCs evolve toward a state of partial energy equipartition, more-massive stars lose energy and decrease their velocity dispersion. As a consequence, on average, binaries have a lower velocity dispersion, since they are more-massive kinematic tracers. We show that, in the case of clusters with high binary fractions (initial binary fractions of 50%) and high concentrations (i.e., closer to energy equipartition), unresolved binaries introduce a color-dependent bias in the velocity dispersion of main-sequence stars of the order of 0.1–0.3 km s{sup −1} (corresponding to 1%−6% of the velocity dispersion), with the reddest stars having a lower velocity dispersion, due to the higher fraction of contaminating binaries. This bias depends on the ability to distinguish binaries from single stars, on the details of the color–magnitude diagram and the photometric errors. We apply our analysis to the HSTPROMO data set of NGC 7078 (M15) and show that no effect ascribable to binaries is observed, consistent with the low binary fraction of the cluster. Our work indicates that binaries do not significantly bias proper-motion velocity-dispersion profiles, but should be taken into account in the error budget of kinematic analyses.

  5. Silica nanoparticles and biological dispersants: genotoxic effects on A549 lung epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, David M., E-mail: d.brown@hw.ac.uk [Heriot-Watt University, Nanosafety Research Group, School of Life Sciences (United Kingdom); Varet, Julia, E-mail: julia.varet@IOM-world.org [Institute of Occupational Medicine (United Kingdom); Johnston, Helinor, E-mail: h.johnston@hw.ac.uk; Chrystie, Alison; Stone, Vicki, E-mail: v.stone@hw.ac.uk [Heriot-Watt University, Nanosafety Research Group, School of Life Sciences (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    Silica nanoparticle exposure could be intentional (e.g. medical application or food) or accidental (e.g. occupational inhalation). On entering the body, particles become coated with specific proteins depending on the route of entry. The ability of silica particles of different size and charge (non-functionalized 50 and 200 nm and aminated 50 and 200 nm) to cause genotoxic effects in A549 lung epithelial cells was investigated. Using the modified comet assay and the micronucleus assay, we examined the effect of suspending the particles in different dispersion media [RPMI or Hanks’ balanced salt solution (HBSS), supplemented with bovine serum albumin (BSA), lung lining fluid (LLF) or serum] to determine if this influenced the particle’s activity. Particle characterisation suggested that the particles were reasonably well dispersed in the different media, with the exception of aminated 50 nm particles which showed evidence of agglomeration. Plain 50, 200 nm and aminated 50 nm particles caused significant genotoxic effects in the presence of formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase when dispersed in HBSS or LLF. These effects were reduced when the particles were dispersed in BSA and serum. There was no significant micronucleus formation produced by any of the particles when suspended in any of the dispersants. The data suggest that silica particles can produce a significant genotoxic effect according to the comet assay in A549 cells, possibly driven by an oxidative stress-dependent mechanism which may be modified depending on the choice of dispersant employed.

  6. Interface energy effect on the dispersion relation of nano-sized cylindrical piezoelectric/piezomagnetic composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xue-Qian; Liu, Yue; Liu, Xiang-Lin; Liu, Jin-Xi

    2015-02-01

    Interface between the constituents plays an important role in the non-destructive detection of smart piezoelectric/piezomagnetic devices. The propagation of SH waves in nano-sized cylindrically multiferroic composites consisting of a piezoelectric layer and a piezomagnetic central cylinder is investigated, and the size-dependent dispersion relation with interface effect is derived. The general solutions of decoupled governing equation in different regions are expressed by using Bessel functions, and the unknown coefficients are determined by satisfying the boundary conditions at the inner interface with negligible thickness and the outer surface of the structure. Through the numerical examples of dispersion relation, it is found that the interface around the nano-cylinder may remarkably reduce the phase velocity, depending on the combination of the value of thickness ratio and the surface condition. The interface shows different effect on the first and second modes of dispersion relation.

  7. Effect of sodium dodecyl sulfate on flow and electrokinetic properties of Na-activated bentonite dispersions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E Günıster; S İşçı; A Alemdar; N Güngör

    2004-06-01

    The present study reports the effect of anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS, C12H25 OSO3Na) upon the electrokinetic (electrophoretic mobility, zeta potential) and rheological (viscosity, yield value) properties of the Ca-bentonitic clay found in Turkey and its Na-activated form. The SDS dispersant was added in different concentrations in the range of 1 × 10-5-5 × 10-2 mol/l. The results show that the viscosity and zeta potential values of bentonite dispersion are affected by the addition of anionic surfactant. The obtained data are analysed by considering the kind of exchangeable cations. Thixotropic property effect was observed in bentonite dispersions.

  8. Effect of tidal fluctuations on transient dispersion of simulated contaminant concentrations in coastal aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Licata, Ivana; Langevin, Christian D.; Dausman, Alyssa M.; Alberti, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Variable-density groundwater models require extensive computational resources, particularly for simulations representing short-term hydrologic variability such as tidal fluctuations. Saltwater-intrusion models usually neglect tidal fluctuations and this may introduce errors in simulated concentrations. The effects of tides on simulated concentrations in a coastal aquifer were assessed. Three analyses are reported: in the first, simulations with and without tides were compared for three different dispersivity values. Tides do not significantly affect the transfer of a hypothetical contaminant into the ocean; however, the concentration difference between tidal and non-tidal simulations could be as much as 15%. In the second analysis, the dispersivity value for the model without tides was increased in a zone near the ocean boundary. By slightly increasing dispersivity in this zone, the maximum concentration difference between the simulations with and without tides was reduced to as low as 7%. In the last analysis, an apparent dispersivity value was calculated for each model cell using the simulated velocity variations from the model with tides. Use of apparent dispersivity values in models with a constant ocean boundary seems to provide a reasonable approach for approximating tidal effects in simulations where explicit representation of tidal fluctuations is not feasible.

  9. Axial dispersion in segmented gas-liquid flow: Effects of alternating channel curvature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muradoglu, Metin

    2010-12-01

    The effects of channel curvature on the axial dispersion in segmented gas-liquid flows are studied computationally in a two-dimensional setting using a finite-volume/front-tracking method. Passive tracer particles are used to visualize and quantify the axial dispersion. The molecular diffusion is modeled by random walk of tracer particles. It is found that there is significant axial dispersion in serpentine channels even in the absence of molecular diffusion. The lubricating thin liquid layer that persists on the wall of a straight channel is periodically broken in the serpentine channel leading to enhanced axial dispersion. It is also found that the axial dispersion is always larger in the serpentine channel than that in the straight channel but the effects of channel curvature are more pronounced at high Peclet numbers, i.e., Pe>104. A model is proposed based on the difference between the liquid film thicknesses on the inner and outer side of the bend in the limit as Pe→∞. Good agreement is found between the computational results and the model when the liquid slug is well mixed by the chaotic advection.

  10. Effects of dispersion and absorption in resonant Bragg diffraction of x-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovesey, S W; Scagnoli, V; Dobrynin, A N; Joly, Y; Collins, S P

    2014-03-26

    Resonant diffraction of x-rays by crystals with anisotropic optical properties is investigated theoretically, to assess how the intensity of a Bragg spot is influenced by effects related to dispersion (birefringence) and absorption (dichroism). Starting from an exact but opaque expression, simple analytic results are found to expose how intensity depends on dispersion and absorption in the primary and secondary beams and, also, the azimuthal angle (rotation of the crystal about the Bragg wavevector). If not the full story for a given application, our results are more than adequate to explore consequences of dispersion and absorption in the intensity of a Bragg spot. Results are evaluated for antiferromagnetic copper oxide, and low quartz. For CuO, one of our results reproduces all salient features of a previously published simulation of the azimuthal-angle dependence of a magnetic Bragg peak. It is transparent in our analytic result that dispersion and absorption effects alone cannot reproduce published experimental data. Available data for the azimuthal-angle dependence of space-group forbidden reflections (0,0, l), with l ≠ 3n, of low quartz depart from symmetry imposed by the triad axis of rotation symmetry. The observed asymmetry can be induced by dispersion and absorption even though absorption coefficients are constant, independent of the azimuthal angle, in this class of reflections.

  11. Effect of gelatin on the water dispersion and centrifugal purification of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanium Maria, Kazi; Mieno, Tetsu

    2016-01-01

    We report a convenient and effective procedure for the water dispersion and purification of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The purification procedure involves a combination of dispersion and centrifugation, in which gelatin; an environmentally friendly material is used as a dispersing agent. It has been found that an aqueous solution of gelatin effectively disperses SWNTs for more than a month. Another advantage of using gelatin as a dispersing agent is that it can be easily removed by washing with water and filtration. The centrifugation procedure employs a centrifugal force of about 2500 times the gravitational force to separate the particles. Although carbonaceous and metallic impurities usually have higher density than SWNTs in arc-produced carbon soot, the centrifugation can easily remove impurities leaving undamaged SWNTs in solution when appropriate centrifugal force and a centrifugation time are used. Centrifugation is carried out for three times to sufficiently remove impurities. Finally, the SWNTs are separated from the gelatin by heating in water and filtering.

  12. Effect of the magnon dispersion on the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect in yttrium iron garnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hyungyu; Boona, Stephen R.; Yang, Zihao; Myers, Roberto C.; Heremans, Joseph P.

    2015-08-01

    We study the temperature dependence of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect (LSSE) in an yttrium iron garnet Y3F e5O12 (YIG)/Pt system for samples of different thicknesses. In this system, the thermal spin torque is magnon driven. The LSSE signal peaks at a specific temperature that depends on the YIG sample thickness. We also observe freeze-out of the LSSE signal at high magnetic fields, which we attribute to the opening of an energy gap in the magnon dispersion. We observe partial freeze-out of the LSSE signal even at room temperature, where kBT is much larger than the gap. This suggests that a subset of the magnon population with an energy below kBTC (TC˜40 K ) contributes disproportionately to the LSSE; at temperatures above TC, we label these magnons subthermal magnons. The T dependence of the LSSE at temperatures below the maximum is interpreted in terms of an empirical model that ascribes most of the temperature dependence to that of the thermally driven magnon flux, which is related to the details of the magnon dispersion.

  13. Effects of disease, dispersal, and area on bighorn sheep restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, J.E.; Singer, F.J.; Moses, M.E.

    2000-01-01

    Golden Bear Oil or GB-1111 is a petroleum distillate that is used throughout the United States as a larvicide for mosquito pupae. The oil forms a barrier at the air-water interface, which suffocates air-breathing insects. There are few published studies on non-target effects of GB-1111 but the product label warns that ?GB-1111 is toxic to fish and other aquatic organisms.? Fertile eggs of mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) and bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) were incubated in the laboratory, and treated on days 4 or 11 of incubation with external applications equivalent to either 0, 1/3, 1, 3, or 10 times the maximum rate (5 gal/A) of field application of GB-1111. Hatching success was significantly reduced in mallards treated on day 4 or day 11 at 3 and 10 times the maximum field application, with a calculated approximate LD50 of 1.9 times the maximum field application. Most mortality occurred within a week of treatment. Hatching success of bobwhite was only reduced at the highest level of treatment. Other effects at this level in bobwhite included a significant increase in incidence of abnormal embryos/ hatchlings, lower body and liver weights of hatchlings and a two-fold increase in hepatic microsomal P450-associated monooxygenase activity (EROD) in hatchlings. Recommended rates of field application of GB-1111 are potentially toxic to mallard embryos, especially under conditions of larvicide drift or spray overlap, but unlikely to impair the survival or development of bobwhite embryos.

  14. Effect of Additional Structure on Effective Stack Height of Gas Dispersion in Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takenobu Michioka

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Wind-tunnel experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of additional structure (building, sea wall and banking on the effective stack height, which is usually used in safety analyses of nuclear power facilities in Japan. The effective stack heights were estimated with and without the additional structure in addition to the reactor building while varying several conditions such as the source height, the height of additional structure and the distance between the source position and the additional structure. When the source height is equivalent to the reactor building height, the additional structure enhances both the vertical and horizontal gas dispersion widths and decreases the ground gas concentration, and it means that the additional structure does not decrease the effective stack height. When the source height is larger than the reactor height, the additional structures might affect the effective stack height. As the distance between the source and the additional structure decreases, or as the height of the additional structure increases, the structure has a larger effect on the effective stack height.

  15. Three octave spanning supercontinuum by red-shifted dispersive wave in photonic crystal fibers

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, Mohit

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a three layer index guided lead silicate (SF57) photonic crystal fiber which simultaneously promises to yield large effective optical nonlinear coefficient and low anomalous dispersion that makes it suitable for supercontinuum generation. At an operating wavelength 1550 nm, the typical optimized value of anomalous dispersion and effective nonlinear coefficient turns out to be ~4 ps/km/nm and ~1078 W^(-1) km^(-1), respectively. Through numerical simulation it is realized that the designed fiber promises to exhibit three octave spanning supercontinuum from 900 to 7200 nm by using 50 fs sech optical pulses of 5 kW peak power. Due to the cross-phase modulation and four-wave mixing processes, a long range of red-shifted dispersive wave generated, which assist to achieve such large broadening. In addition, we have investigated the compatibility of supercontinuum generation with input pulse peak power increment and briefly discussed the impact of nonlinear processes on supercontinuum generation.

  16. Three octave spanning supercontinuum by red-shifted dispersive wave in photonic crystal fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mohit; Konar, S.

    2016-03-01

    This article presents a three-layer index guided lead silicate (SF57) photonic crystal fiber which simultaneously promises to yield large effective optical nonlinear coefficient and low anomalous dispersion that makes it suitable for supercontinuum (SC) generation. At an operating wavelength 1550 nm, the typical optimized value of anomalous dispersion and effective nonlinear coefficient turns out to be ~4 ps/km/nm and ~1078 W-1km-1, respectively. Through numerical simulation, it is realized that the designed fiber promises to exhibit three octave spanning SC from 900 to 7200 nm using 50 fs 'sech' optical pulses of 5 kW peak power. Due to the cross-phase modulation and four-wave mixing processes, a long range of red-shifted dispersive wave generated, which assists to achieve such large broadening. In addition, we have investigated the compatibility of SC generation with input pulse peak power increment and briefly discussed the impact of nonlinear processes on SC generation.

  17. Anomalous pion decay revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Battistel, O A; Nemes, M C; Hiller, B

    1999-01-01

    An implicit four dimensional regularization is applied to calculate the axial-vector-vector anomalous amplitude. The present technique always complies with results of Dimensional Regularization and can be easily applied to processes involving odd numbers of $\\gamma_5$ matrices. This is illustrated explicitely in the example of this letter.

  18. Partial oxidation of Step-Bound Water Leads to Anomalous pH Effects on Metal Electrode Step-Edges

    CERN Document Server

    Schwarz, Kathleen; Yan, Yushan; Sundararaman, Ravishankar

    2016-01-01

    The design of better heterogeneous catalysts for applications such as fuel cells and electrolyzers requires a mechanistic understanding of electrocatalytic reactions and the dependence of their activity on operating conditions such as pH. A satisfactory explanation for the unexpected pH dependence of electrochemical properties of platinum surfaces has so far remained elusive, with previous explanations resorting to complex co-adsorption of multiple species and resulting in limited predictive power. This knowledge gap suggests that the fundamental properties of these catalysts are not yet understood, limiting systematic improvement. Here, we analyze the change in charge and free energies upon adsorption using density-functional theory (DFT) to establish that water adsorbs on platinum step edges across a wide voltage range, including the double-layer region, with a loss of approximately 0.2 electrons upon adsorption. We show how the change in net surface charge due to this water explains the anomalous pH variat...

  19. Effect of nanoparticle dispersion on mechanical behavior of polymer matrix and their fiber reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Mohammed Farid

    Fiber reinforced composites are widely used to achieve weight savings in different construction. However, their used are restricted as their matrix-dominant properties are much weaker than their fiber-dominated properties. The recent advent of nanoparticles has attracted much attention in improving the matrix properties by using various nanoparticles as reinforcements. Due to the lack of well-developed and consistent processing method, experimental results on nanocomposites show a broad spectrum of anomalies in their properties. Dispersion of nanoparticles in the polymeric precursor is often blamed for these inconsistencies in their properties which becomes even worse with high particle loading. In this research, a processing technique has been developed to fabricate very well-dispersed nanocomposite even with high particle loading in order to fully utilize the advantages of nanoparticle reinforcement. An attempt has also been made to modify the conventional sonication method to improve the dispersion by combining the sol-gel and sonication methods to fabricate hybrid nanocomposites. Transmission electronic microscopy has been employed to investigate dispersion quality of nanoparticles. Finally, mechanical characterization has been performed to evaluate the effect of different state of particle dispersion. Once the effect of dispersion is identified, a micromechanical model has been proposed to estimate the strength of particle reinforced composites based on particle/matrix interfacial crack growth. Finite element analyses were performed to validate the experimental results for microparticle reinforced composites. Using the model, effect of particle size has also been validated with experimental results. The model is then further extended to reveal the failure modes in nanocomposite with the support of some experimental evidences. Finally, an effort has been made to evaluate the potential application of the nanoparticle modified resin by fabricating unidirectional

  20. Effect of source location on particle dispersion in displacement ventilation rooms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke Zhong; Yanming Kang; Youjun Wang

    2008-01-01

    A proposed computer model for predicting aerosol particle dispersion in indoor spaces was validated with experimental data found in the literature,and is then used to study the effect of the area and point source locations on particle dispersion in displacement ventilation (DV) rooms.The results show that aerosol source location has a strong impact on the spatial distribution and removal rate of indoor particles.Particle removal performance depends strongly on ventilation efficiency and particle deposition rate on indoor surfaces.Important consideration for both relative ventilation efficiency and deposition rate consists of the position of the aerosol source relative to the main airflow pattern and the occupied zone.

  1. Dispersion of Co/CNTs via strong electrostatic adsorption method: Thermal treatment effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbarzadeh, Omid; Zabidi, Noor Asmawati Mohd; Abdullah, Bawadi; Subbarao, Duvvuri

    2015-07-01

    The effect of different thermal treatment temperature on the structure of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and Co particle dispersion on CNTs support is studied using Strong electrostatic adsorption (SEA) method. The samples tested by N2-adsorption, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). N2-adsorption results showed BET surface area increased using thermal treatment and TEM images showed that increasing the thermal treatment temperature lead to flaky CNTs and defects introduced on the outer surface and Co particle dispersion increased.

  2. Dispersion of Co/CNTs via strong electrostatic adsorption method: Thermal treatment effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbarzadeh, Omid, E-mail: omid.akbarzadeh63@gmail.com; Abdullah, Bawadi, E-mail: bawadi-abdullah@petronas.com.my; Subbarao, Duvvuri, E-mail: duvvuri-subbarao@petronas.com.my [Department of Chemical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia); Zabidi, Noor Asmawati Mohd, E-mail: noorasmawati-mzabidi@petronas.com.my [Department of Fundamental and Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia)

    2015-07-22

    The effect of different thermal treatment temperature on the structure of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and Co particle dispersion on CNTs support is studied using Strong electrostatic adsorption (SEA) method. The samples tested by N{sub 2}-adsorption, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). N{sub 2}-adsorption results showed BET surface area increased using thermal treatment and TEM images showed that increasing the thermal treatment temperature lead to flaky CNTs and defects introduced on the outer surface and Co particle dispersion increased.

  3. Fibre Optical Parametric Amplification in Defect Bragg Fibres with Zero Dispersion Slow Light Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Li; ZHANG Wei; HUANG Yi-Dong; PENG Jiang-De; ZHAO Hong; YANG Ke-Wu

    2008-01-01

    Nonfinearity enhancement by slow light effect and strong light confinement in defect Bragg fibres is demonstrated and analysed in applications of fibre optical parametric amplifiers. Broadband low group velocity and zero dispersion as well as the strong light confinement by band gap enhances the nonlinear coefficient up to more than one order than the conventional high nonlinear fibres.Moreover,the zero dispersion wavelength of coupled core mode can be designed arbitrarily,under which the phase-matching bandwidth of the nonlinear process can be extended.

  4. Investigation of magnon dispersion relations and neutron scattering cross sections with special attention to anisotropy effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgård, Per-Anker; Kowalska, A.; Laut, Peter

    1967-01-01

    A general bilinear two-Bose Hamiltonian is diagonalized and the result used in a discussion of non-imteracting spin waves in a two-sub-lattice ferromagnet having not negligible anisotropy in the spin interaction. Model-independent functions suitable for the analysis of experimental dispersion...... for the exchange interaction seem to be necessary for agreement with experimental dispersion curves be obtained. The effect of the anisotropy in the cross section is estimated and shown to be important for small magnon energies....

  5. Dispersive and nonlinear effects in high-speed reconfigurable WDM optical fiber communication systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Changyuan

    Chromatic dispersion, polarization mode dispersion (PMD) and nonlinear effects are important issues on the physical layer of high-speed reconfigurable WDM optical fiber communication systems. For beyond 10 Gbit/s optical fiber transmission system, it is essential that chromatic dispersion and PMD be well managed by dispersion monitoring and compensation. One the other hand, dispersive and nonlinear effects in optical fiber systems can also be beneficial and has applications on pulse management, all-optical signal processing and network function, which will be essential for high bite-rate optical networks and replacing the expensive optical-electrical-optical (O/E/O) conversion. In this Ph.D. dissertation, we present a detailed research on dispersive and nonlinear effects in high-speed optical communication systems. We have demonstrated: (i) A novel technique for optically compensating the PMD-induced RF power fading that occurs in single-sideband (SSB) subcarrier-multiplexed systems. By aligning the polarization states of the optical carrier and the SSB, RF power fading due to all orders of PMD can be completely compensated. (ii) Chromatic-dispersion-insensitive PMD monitoring by using a narrowband FBG notch filter to recover the RF clock power for 10Gb/s NRZ data, and apply it as a control signal for PMD compensation. (iii) Chirp-free high-speed optical pulse generation with a repetition rate of 160 GHz (which is four times of the frequency of the electrical clock) using a phase modulator and polarization maintaining (PM) fiber. (iv) Polarization-insensitive all-optical wavelength conversion based on four-wave mixing in dispersion-shifted fiber (DSF) with a fiber Bragg grating and a Faraday rotator mirror. (v) Width-tunable optical RZ pulse train generation based on four-wave mixing in highly-nonlinear fiber. By electrically tuning the delay between two pump pulse trains, the pulse-width of a generated pulse train is continuously tuned. (vi) A high-speed all

  6. The effect of dispersed Petrobaltic oil droplet size on photosynthetically active radiation in marine environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haule, Kamila; Freda, Włodzimierz

    2016-04-01

    Oil pollution in seawater, primarily visible on sea surface, becomes dispersed as an effect of wave mixing as well as chemical dispersant treatment, and forms spherical oil droplets. In this study, we examined the influence of oil droplet size of highly dispersed Petrobaltic crude on the underwater visible light flux and the inherent optical properties (IOPs) of seawater, including absorption, scattering, backscattering and attenuation coefficients. On the basis of measured data and Mie theory, we calculated the IOPs of dispersed Petrobaltic crude oil in constant concentration, but different log-normal size distributions. We also performed a radiative transfer analysis, in order to evaluate the influence on the downwelling irradiance Ed, remote sensing reflectance Rrs and diffuse reflectance R, using in situ data from the Baltic Sea. We found that during dispersion, there occurs a boundary size distribution characterized by a peak diameter d0  = 0.3 μm causing a maximum E d increase of 40% within 0.5-m depth, and the maximum Ed decrease of 100% at depths below 5 m. Moreover, we showed that the impact of size distribution on the "blue to green" ratios of Rrs and R varies from 24% increase to 27% decrease at the same crude oil concentration.

  7. Effect of the Size Distribution of Nanoscale Dispersed Particles on the Zener Drag Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eivani, A. R.; Valipour, S.; Ahmed, H.; Zhou, J.; Duszczyk, J.

    2011-04-01

    In this article, a new relationship for the calculation of the Zener drag pressure is described in which the effect of the size distribution of nanoscale dispersed particles is taken into account, in addition to particle radius and volume fraction, which have been incorporated in the existing relationships. Microstructural observations indicated a clear correlation between the size distribution of dispersed particles and recrystallized grain sizes in the AA7020 aluminum alloy. However, the existing relationship to calculate the Zener drag pressure yielded a negligible difference of 0.016 pct between the two structures homogenized at different conditions resulting in totally different size distributions of nanoscale dispersed particles and, consequently, recrystallized grain sizes. The difference in the Zener drag pressure calculated by the application of the new relationship was 5.1 pct, being in line with the experimental observations of the recrystallized grain sizes. Mathematical investigations showed that the ratio of the Zener drag pressure from the new equation to that from the existing equation is maximized when the number densities of all the particles with different sizes are equal. This finding indicates that in the two structures with identical parameters except the size distribution of nanoscale dispersed particles, the one that possesses a broader size distribution of particles, i.e., the number densities of particles with different sizes being equal, gives rise to a larger Zener drag pressure than that having a narrow size distribution of nanoscale dispersed particles, i.e., most of the particles being in the same size range.

  8. OIL SPILL DISPERSANT EFFECTIVENESS PROTOCOL. II: PERFORMANCE OF THE REVISED PROTOCOL

    Science.gov (United States)

    The current U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) protocol for testing the effectiveness of dispersants for use in treating oil spills on the open water, the swirling flask test (SFT), has been found to give widely varying results in the hands of different testing laborator...

  9. Strengthened currents override the effect of warming on lobster larval dispersal and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetina-Heredia, Paulina; Roughan, Moninya; van Sebille, Erik; Feng, Ming; Coleman, Melinda A

    2015-12-01

    Human-induced climate change is projected to increase ocean temperature and modify circulation patterns, with potential widespread implications for the transport and survival of planktonic larvae of marine organisms. Circulation affects the dispersal of larvae, whereas temperature impacts larval development and survival. However, the combined effect of changes in circulation and temperature on larval dispersal and survival has rarely been studied in a future climate scenario. Such understanding is crucial to predict future species distributions, anticipate ecosystem shifts and design effective management strategies. We simulate contemporary (1990s) and future (2060s) dispersal of lobster larvae using an eddy-resolving ocean model in south-eastern Australia, a region of rapid ocean warming. Here we show that the effects of changes in circulation and temperature can counter each other: ocean warming favours the survival of lobster larvae, whereas a strengthened western boundary current diminishes the supply of larvae to the coast by restricting cross-current larval dispersal. Furthermore, we find that changes in circulation have a stronger effect on connectivity patterns of lobster larvae along south-eastern Australia than ocean warming in the future climate so that the supply of larvae to the coast reduces by ~4% and the settlement peak shifts poleward by ~270 km in the model simulation. Thus, ocean circulation may be one of the dominant factors contributing to climate-induced changes of species ranges.

  10. Equality versus differentiation: the effects of power dispersion on group interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greer, L.L.; van Kleef, G.A.

    2010-01-01

    Power is an inherent characteristic of social interaction, yet research has yet to fully explain what power and power dispersion may mean for conflict resolution in work groups. We found in a field study of 42 organizational work groups and a laboratory study of 40 negotiating dyads that the effects

  11. Effect of the size distribution of nanoscale dispersed particles on the Zener drag pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eivani, A.R.; Valipour, S.; Ahmed, H.; Zhou, J.; Duszczyk, J.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, a new relationship for the calculation of the Zener drag pressure is described in which the effect of the size distribution of nanoscale dispersed particles is taken into account, in addition to particle radius and volume fraction, which have been incorporated in the existing relati

  12. Dispersion effects in SiO2 polymorphs: An ab initio study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Henri; Ferlat, Guillaume; Casula, Michele; Seitsonen, Ari Paavo; Mauri, Francesco

    2015-10-01

    The effect of electronic dispersion over a wide variety of SiO2 polymorphs (faujasite, ferrierite, α -cristobalite, α -quartz, coesite, and stishovite) is investigated using state-of-the-art density functional theory. Different functionals and dispersion correction schemes are compared, ranging from the local density approximation to fully nonlocal exchange-correlation functionals. It is shown that both empirical dispersion corrections and fully nonlocal functionals improve the energetics and give correct volumetric data. However, the correct volume results come from error cancellation between an overestimation of the Si-O distance and an underestimation of the Si-O-Si angle. Quantum Monte Carlo is used to compute the quartz-cristobalite energy difference within an accuracy of 0.2 kCal/mol per SiO2 unit. This demonstrates the feasability of achieving subchemical accuracy on extended systems, and confirms the validity of the Slater-Jastrow ansatz for describing SiO2 polymorphs.

  13. Effect of Nanoparticle Dispersion on Polymer Matrix and their Fiber Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Mohammed F.; Sun, Chin-Teh

    Dispersion of nanoparticles and its effect on mechanical properties were investigated by fabricating nanocomposites via conventional sonication, sol-gel, and modified sonication method. Silica nanoparticles dispersed in epoxy and MEK produced via sol-gel method were procured as Nanopox F 400 and MEK-ST-MS, respectively, to produce silica/epoxy nanocomposite whereas the conventional son-ication method was followed to produce alumina/epoxy and carbon nanofibers (CNF)/epoxy nanocomposites. The conventional sonication method was modified by combining it with sol-gel method to improve the dispersion quality as well as to increase the particle loading. The as-prepared nanocomposites were morphologically and mechanically characterized to investigate the effect of dispersion of nanoparticles on polymer matrix nanocomposites. The nanocomposites fabricated via sol-gel method revealed the most improved and consistent properties among all nanocomposites which showed almost proportional properties improvement with particle loading in contrast to conventional nanocomposites. Subsequently, the modified matrix (silica/epoxy) was used to make fiber reinforced nanocomposites via the VARTM process. The effect of improved matrix properties was reflected in the properties of fiber composites which showed significant improvements in compressive strength, tensile strength and modulus, fracture toughness and impact resistance.

  14. Dispersion effect and auto-reconditioning performance of nanometer WS2 particles in green lubricant

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shi Chen; Mao Daheng; Zhou Ming

    2010-10-01

    This paper reported on dispersion effect and dispersing techniques of nanometer WS2 particles in the green lubricant concocted by us. And it also researched on auto-reconditioning performance of nanometer WS2 particles to the abrasive surfaces of steel ball from four-ball tribology test and piston ring from engine lubrication test. The treated and untreated nanometer WS2 particles were analysed by infrared spectrum. And the elementary component and interior elementary distribution of abrasive surface repaired by nanometer WS2 particles were analysed by multifunction electron spectrometer. The results showed that the combinative method of ultrasonic dispersion, mechanical agitation and surface modification could improve the dispersion uniformity and stability of nanometer WS2 particles in the green lubricant effectively. And the optimal ratio of the mass between surface modifier and nanometer WS2 particles was 1 : 2.5, the optimal treating time was 5 h. And IR analysis indicated that surface modifier could react with hydroxide radicals on surfaces of WS2 particles and modify the surfaces, and the long lipophilic groups on surfaces of nanometer WS2 particles could stretch in oil adequately and form steric hindrance layers between particles which prevented particles from conglomerating and depositing. In addition, tribological tests and surface analysis indicated that there were WS2 adsorption film and reaction film on abrasive surfaces during the tribological tests, which could fill and level up the furrows on abrasive surfaces. As a result, the abrasive surfaces were repaired effectively by nanometer WS2 particles.

  15. Effects of Single Dose Energy Drink on QT and P-Wave Dispersion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huseyin Arinc

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Aim of this study is to evaluate the cardiac electrophysiological effects of energy drink (Red Bull on QT and P duration and dispersion on surface electrocardiogram. METHODS: Twenty healthy volunteers older than 17 years of age were included the study. Subjects with a cardiac rhythm except sinus rhythm, history of atrial or ventricular arrhythmia, family history of premature sudden cardiac death, palpitations, T-wave abnormalities, QTc interval greater than 440 milliseconds, or those P-waves and QT intervals unavailable in at least eight ECG leads were excluded. Subjects having insomnia, lactose intolerance, caffeine allergy, recurrent headaches, depression, any psychiatric condition, and history of alcohol or drug abuse, pregnant or lactating women were also excluded from participation. 12 lead ECG was obtained before and after consumption of 250 cc enegry drink. QT and P-wave dispersion was calculated. RESULTS: No significant difference have occurred in heart rate (79 ± 14 vs.81 ±13, p=0.68, systolic pressure (114 ± 14 vs.118 ± 16,p=0.38, diastolic blood pressure (74 ± 12 vs.76 ± 14, p=0.64, QT dispersion (58 ± 12 vs. 57 ± 22, p= 0.785 and P-wave dispersion (37 ± 7 vs. 36 ± 13, p= 0.755 between before and 2 hours after consumption of energy drink. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: Consumption of single dose energy drink doesn't affect QT dispersion and P-wave dispersion, heart rate and blood pressure in healthy adults.

  16. Effect of Autonomic Nervous System on the Transmurai Dispersion of Ventricular Repolarization in Intact Canine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张存泰; 徐大文; 李泱; 刘念; 王琳; 陆再英

    2004-01-01

    Summary: The effect of the autonomic nerves on the transmural dispersion of ventricular repolarization in intact canine was investigated. By using the monophasic action potential (MAP) recording technique, monophasic action potentials (MAPs) of the epicardium (Epi), midmyocardium (Mid)and endocardium (Endo) were recorded simultaneously by specially designed plunge-needle electrodes at the left ventricular free wall in 12 open-chest dogs. MAPD90 and transmural dispersion of repolarization among three myocardial layers as well as the incidence of the EAD before autonomic nervous stimulation and during autonomic nervous stimulation were compared. The results showed that the MAPD90 of Epi, Mid and Endo before autonomic nervous stimulation were 278±11 ms,316± 16 ms and 270± 12 ms respectively, the MAPD90of Mid was significantly longer than that of Epi or Endo (P<0.01). MAPD90 of Epi, Mid and Endo were shortened by 19±4 ms, 45±6 ms,18± 3 ms respectively during sympathetic stimulation. Compared with that of the control, the transmural dispersion of repolarization during sympathetic stimulation was shortened from 44 ± 4 ms to 15±3 ms (P<0. 01), but early afterdepolarizations were elicited in the Mid of 5 dogs (41 0%)during sympathetic stimulation. Parasympathetic stimulation did not significantly affect the MAPD90 in the three layers. It is concluded that there is the transmural dispersion of ventricular repolarization in intact canine. Sympathetic stimulation can reduce transmural dispersion of repolarization, but it can produce early afterdepolarizations in the Mid. Parasympathetic stimulation does not significantly affect the transmural dispersion of ventricular repolarization.

  17. Moment method, Higher order dispersion map and other effects in optical pulse propagation

    OpenAIRE

    Mondal, Basanti; Chowdhury, A. Roy.

    2005-01-01

    Analytical and numerical procedures are applied to show that both third and second order dispersion maps can be explicitly constructed and their mutual effects on the optical pulse propagation are analysed. In these connection it is also shown how the other important features such as amplification, intra-channel Raman Scattering(IRS), fibre loss, centre frequency of the pulse spectrum effect the propagation of pulse. Due to the presence of IRS, moment method is adopted which is easily reduced...

  18. Organic farming effects on clay dispersion in carbon-exhausted soils

    OpenAIRE

    Schjønning, Per; de Jonge, Lis Wollesen; Olesen, Jørgen E.; Greve, Mogens Humlekrog

    2009-01-01

    Many Danish soils are depleted in organic matter (OM) after decades of intensive cereal cultivation (Schjønning et al., 2009). In this paper we show that clay particles (colloids) in soils that are low in OM content are easily dispersed in the soil water, which in turn has important effects on soil ecosystem functions and services. Organic farming systems generally tend to increase soil OM contents and may thus mitigate the negative effects.

  19. Anomalous transports in a time-delayed system subjected to anomalous diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ru-Yin; Tong, Lu-Mei; Nie, Lin-Ru; Wang, Chaojie; Pan, Wanli

    2017-02-01

    We investigate anomalous transports of an inertial Brownian particle in a time-delayed periodic potential subjected to an external time-periodic force, a constant bias force, and the Lévy noise. By means of numerical calculations, effect of the time delay and the Lévy noise on its mean velocity are discussed. The results indicate that: (i) The time delay can induce both multiple current reversals (CRs) and absolute negative mobility (ANM) phenomena in the system; (ii) The CRs and ANM phenomena only take place in the region of superdiffusion, while disappear in the regions of normal diffusion; (iii) The time delay can cause state transition of the system from anomalous →normal →anomalous →normal →anomalous →normal transport in the case of superdiffusion.

  20. Pre-dispersal predation effect on seed packaging strategies and seed viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSoto, Lucía; Tutor, David; Torices, Rubén; Rodríguez-Echeverría, Susana; Nabais, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    An increased understanding of intraspecific seed packaging (i.e. seed size/number strategy) variation across different environments may improve current knowledge of the ecological forces that drive seed evolution in plants. In particular, pre-dispersal seed predation may influence seed packaging strategies, triggering a reduction of the resources allocated to undamaged seeds within the preyed fruits. Assessing plant reactions to pre-dispersal seed predation is crucial to a better understanding of predation effects, but the response of plants to arthropod attacks remains unexplored. We have assessed the effect of cone predation on the size and viability of undamaged seeds in populations of Juniperus thurifera with contrasting seed packaging strategies, namely, North African populations with single-large-seeded cones and South European populations with multi-small-seeded cones. Our results show that the incidence of predation was lower on the single-large-seeded African cones than on the multi-small-seeded European ones. Seeds from non-preyed cones were also larger and had a higher germination success than uneaten seeds from preyed cones, but only in populations with multi-seeded cones and in cones attacked by Trisetacus sp., suggesting a differential plastic response to predation. It is possible that pre-dispersal seed predation has been a strong selective pressure in European populations with high cone predation rates, being a process which maintains multi-small-seeded cones and empty seeds as a strategy to save some seeds from predation. Conversely, pre-dispersal predation might not have a strong effect in the African populations with single-large-seeded cones characterized by seed germination and filling rates higher than those in the European populations. Our results indicate that differences in pre-dispersal seed predators and predation levels may affect both selection on and intraspecific variation in seed packaging.

  1. Ferromagnetism in reactive sputtered Cu0.96Fe 0.04O1-δ nanocrystalline films evidenced by anomalous Hall effect

    KAUST Repository

    Mi, Wenbo

    2011-03-14

    Cu0.96Fe0.04O1-δ nanocrystalline films were fabricated using reactive sputtering at different oxygen partial pressures (PO2). The electrical transport properties of the films were measured in a broad temperature range (10-300 K) under magnetic fields of up to 5T. Anomalous Hall effect (AHE) of up to 0.4μΩ cm was observed at 10 K and decreased to 0.2μΩ cm at 300 K. The characteristic AHE clearly indicated the existence of ferromagnetism in these materials. The AHE weakened as PO2 increased because the increasing PO2 reduced the fraction of Fe2+ ions, and consequently weakened the double exchange coupling between Fe2+-O2--Cu2+ in the materials. © 2011 The Japan Society of Applied Physics.

  2. Anomalous law of cooling

    OpenAIRE

    Lapas, Luciano C.; Ferreira, Rogelma M. S.; Oliveira, Fernando A.; Rubí, J. Miguel

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergo a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton's law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature ma...

  3. Anomalous diffusion of epicentres

    CERN Document Server

    Sotolongo-Costa, Oscar; Posadas, A; Luzon, F

    2007-01-01

    The classification of earthquakes in main shocks and aftershocks by a method recently proposed by M. Baiesi and M. Paczuski allows to the generation of a complex network composed of clusters that group the most correlated events. The spatial distribution of epicentres inside these structures corresponding to the catalogue of earthquakes in the eastern region of Cuba shows anomalous anti-diffusive behaviour evidencing the attractive nature of the main shock and the possible description in terms of fractional kinetics.

  4. Chemical dispersants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahsepar, Shokouhalsadat; Smit, Martijn P.J.; Murk, Albertinka J.; Rijnaarts, Huub H.M.; Langenhoff, Alette A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Chemical dispersants were used in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, both at the sea surface and the wellhead. Their effect on oil biodegradation is unclear, as studies showed both inhibition and enhancement. This study addresses the effect of Corexit on oil biodeg

  5. Partial oxidation of step-bound water leads to anomalous pH effects on metal electrode step-edges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Kathleen; Xu, Bingjun; Yan, Yushan; Sundararaman, Ravishankar

    2016-06-28

    The design of better heterogeneous catalysts for applications such as fuel cells and electrolyzers requires a mechanistic understanding of electrocatalytic reactions and the dependence of their activity on operating conditions such as pH. A satisfactory explanation for the unexpected pH dependence of electrochemical properties of platinum surfaces has so far remained elusive, with previous explanations resorting to complex co-adsorption of multiple species and resulting in limited predictive power. This knowledge gap suggests that the fundamental properties of these catalysts are not yet understood, limiting systematic improvement. Here, we analyze the change in charge and free energies upon adsorption using density-functional theory (DFT) to establish that water adsorbs on platinum step edges across a wide voltage range, including the double-layer region, with a loss of approximately 0.2 electrons upon adsorption. We show how this as-yet unreported change in net surface charge due to this water explains the anomalous pH variations of the hydrogen underpotential deposition (Hupd) and the potentials of zero total charge (PZTC) observed in published experimental data. This partial oxidation of water is not limited to platinum metal step edges, and we report the charge of the water on metal step edges of commonly used catalytic metals, including copper, silver, iridium, and palladium, illustrating that this partial oxidation of water broadly influences the reactivity of metal electrodes.

  6. Measurements of Finite Dust Temperature Effects in the Dispersion Relation of the Dust Acoustic Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snipes, Erica; Williams, Jeremiah

    2009-04-01

    A dusty plasma is a four-component system composed of ions, electrons, neutral particles and charged microparticles. The presence of these charged microparticles gives rise to new plasma wave modes, including the dust acoustic wave. Recent measurements [1, 2] of the dispersion relationship for the dust acoustic wave in a glow discharge have shown that finite temperature effects are observed at higher values of neutral pressure. Other work [3] has shown that these effects are not observed at lower values of neutral pressure. We present the results of ongoing work examining finite temperature effects in the dispersion relation as a function of neutral pressure. [4pt] [1] E. Thomas, Jr., R. Fisher, and R. L. Merlino, Phys. Plasmas 14, 123701 (2007). [0pt] [2] J. D. Williams, E. Thomas Jr., and L. Marcus, Phys. Plasmas 15, 043704 (2008). [0pt] [3] T. Trottenberg, D. Block, and A. Piel, Phys. Plasmas 13, 042105 (2006).

  7. ON THE SOURCE OF ASTROMETRIC ANOMALOUS REFRACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, M. Suzanne [Department of Natural and Environmental Sciences, Western State Colorado University, 128 Hurst Hall, Gunnison, CO 81230 (United States); McGraw, John T.; Zimmer, Peter C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, MSC07 4220, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Pier, Jeffrey R., E-mail: mstaylor@western.edu [Division of Astronomical Sciences, NSF 4201 Wilson Blvd, Arlington, VA 22230 (United States)

    2013-03-15

    More than a century ago, astronomers using transit telescopes to determine precise stellar positions were hampered by an unexplained periodic shifting of the stars they were observing. With the advent of CCD transit telescopes in the past three decades, this unexplained motion, termed 'anomalous refraction' by these early astronomers, is again being observed. Anomalous refraction is described as a low-frequency, large angular scale ({approx}2 Degree-Sign ) motion of the entire image plane with respect to the celestial coordinate system as observed and defined by astrometric catalogs. These motions, of typically several tenths of an arcsecond amplitude with timescales on the order of 10 minutes, are ubiquitous to ground-based drift-scan astrometric measurements regardless of location or telescopes used and have been attributed to the effect of tilting of equal-density layers of the atmosphere. The cause of this tilting has often been attributed to atmospheric gravity waves, but this cause has never been confirmed. Although theoretical models of atmospheric refraction show that atmospheric gravity waves are a plausible cause of anomalous refraction, an observational campaign specifically directed at defining this relationship provides clear evidence that anomalous refraction is not consistent with the passage of atmospheric gravity waves. The source of anomalous refraction is found to be meter-scale, slowly evolving quasi-coherent dynamical structures in the boundary layer below 60 m above ground level.

  8. On the Source of Astrometric Anomalous Refraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, M. Suzanne; McGraw, John T.; Zimmer, Peter C.; Pier, Jeffrey R.

    2013-03-01

    More than a century ago, astronomers using transit telescopes to determine precise stellar positions were hampered by an unexplained periodic shifting of the stars they were observing. With the advent of CCD transit telescopes in the past three decades, this unexplained motion, termed "anomalous refraction" by these early astronomers, is again being observed. Anomalous refraction is described as a low-frequency, large angular scale (~2°) motion of the entire image plane with respect to the celestial coordinate system as observed and defined by astrometric catalogs. These motions, of typically several tenths of an arcsecond amplitude with timescales on the order of 10 minutes, are ubiquitous to ground-based drift-scan astrometric measurements regardless of location or telescopes used and have been attributed to the effect of tilting of equal-density layers of the atmosphere. The cause of this tilting has often been attributed to atmospheric gravity waves, but this cause has never been confirmed. Although theoretical models of atmospheric refraction show that atmospheric gravity waves are a plausible cause of anomalous refraction, an observational campaign specifically directed at defining this relationship provides clear evidence that anomalous refraction is not consistent with the passage of atmospheric gravity waves. The source of anomalous refraction is found to be meter-scale, slowly evolving quasi-coherent dynamical structures in the boundary layer below 60 m above ground level.

  9. Methods for estimating cleaning effectiveness, dispersion, and toxicity of shoreline cleaning agents at oil spills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stransky, B.C.; Clayton, J.R. Jr.; Schwartz, M.J.; Snyder, B.J.; Lees, D.C.; Adkins, A.C.; Reilly, T.J. [Ogden Environmental, San Diego, CA (United States); Michel, J. [Research Planning, Inc., Columbia, SC (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Chemical shoreline cleaning agents (SCAs) are designed to enhance removal of stranded oil from shoreline surfaces. However, difficulties associated with estimating cleaning effectiveness and toxicity of SCAs for site-specific conditions make it desirable to perform measurements in the field with onsite oil, substrates, and resident or otherwise appropriate test organisms. Information for onsite testing should address the following questions: (1) does use of an SCA promote removal of oil from substate surfaces; (2) does use of an SCA increase the amount of dispersed oil in the water column; (3) does toxicity for resident organisms indicate a likelihood for adverse effects; (4) does toxicity with a portable test organism indicate a likelihood for adverse effects? Methodologies are described for use in a portable kit to estimate quantitative and qualitative information for cleaning effectiveness, dispersion of oil, and toxicity of SCAs in the field. Toxicity methodologies for resident organisms include echinoderm fertilization, byssal thread attachment for mussels, and righting/water-escaping ability for periwinkle snails. Microtox{trademark} is used for toxicity measurements as a portable test organism/assay. Use of portable methodologies for assessing cleaning effectiveness, dispersion of oil, and toxicity of SCAs in the field can assist onsite evaluations for cleaning performance and relative risk to biological resources, which are important for supporting use-no use decisions for SCAs.

  10. Comparison of the effects of different protocols on the particle size distribution of TiO2 dispersions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tantra, Ratna; Sikora, Aneta; Hartmann, Nanna Isabella Bloch

    2015-01-01

    studies, the degree of variability in TiO2 nanomaterial dispersions was assessed by differential centrifugal sedimentation (DCS) methods. Case study 1 addresses the variability that arises from variations within one protocol, investigating the effects of dispersion aging, sonication exposure time....... The implication of this study is clear: for the purpose of data comparability, there is a need to provide the exact details of all steps involved in a dispersion protocol....

  11. The effect of the dispersal kernel on isolation-by-distance in a continuous population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara N. Furstenau

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Under models of isolation-by-distance, population structure is determined by the probability of identity-by-descent between pairs of genes according to the geographic distance between them. Well established analytical results indicate that the relationship between geographical and genetic distance depends mostly on the neighborhood size of the population which represents a standardized measure of gene flow. To test this prediction, we model local dispersal of haploid individuals on a two-dimensional landscape using seven dispersal kernels: Rayleigh, exponential, half-normal, triangular, gamma, Lomax and Pareto. When neighborhood size is held constant, the distributions produce similar patterns of isolation-by-distance, confirming predictions. Considering this, we propose that the triangular distribution is the appropriate null distribution for isolation-by-distance studies. Under the triangular distribution, dispersal is uniform over the neighborhood area which suggests that the common description of neighborhood size as a measure of an effective, local panmictic population is valid for popular families of dispersal distributions. We further show how to draw random variables from the triangular distribution efficiently and argue that it should be utilized in other studies in which computational efficiency is important.

  12. Dual effects of a dispersant and nutrient supplementation on weathered Endicott oil biodegradation in seawater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves R. Personna

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory-scale experiments were conducted to evaluate the biodegradation of physically (WAF and chemically dispersed (CEWAF Endicott oil in seawater (salinity: 29.1‰ from Prince William Sound, Alaska, under low nutrient (LN (background seawater and high nutrient (HN (addition of 100 mg NO3-N/L and 10 mg PO4-P/L to background seawater at 15 ± 0.5 °C for 42 days. The dispersant was Corexit 9500. The dispersed oil concentration of the WAF (0.019 g/L ± 0.002 was an order of magnitude lower than that in the CEWAF (0.363 g/L ± 0.038. While remaining negligible in the WAF, the total oil removal in the CEWAF was 26% and 44% in LN and HN treatments, respectively. Nutrient supplementation significantly accelerated the rate of oil biodegradation as confirmed by ANOVA coupled with Tukey’s test at 95% confidence intervals (α = 0.05. GC/MS analyses revealed that biodegradation affected mainly alkane compounds. In the CEWAF, O2 consumption, CO2 production and biomass were much larger in HN than in LN treatments, which suggests that chemical dispersion of oil coupled with high nutrient concentration could be very useful in terms of remediation strategies and effective responses to oil spill at sea.

  13. Dispersibility and emulsion-stabilizing effect of cellulose nanowhiskers esterified by vinyl acetate and vinyl cinnamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sèbe, Gilles; Ham-Pichavant, Frédérique; Pecastaings, Gilles

    2013-08-12

    The surface of cotton cellulose nanowhiskers (CNW's) was esterified by vinyl acetate (VAc) and vinyl cinnamate (VCin), in the presence of potassium carbonate as catalyst. Reactions were performed under microwave activation and monitored by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The supramolecular structure of CNW's before and after modification was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Distinctively from the acetylation treatment, an increase in particles dimensions was noted after esterification with VCin, which was assigned to π-π stacking interactions that may exist between cinnamoyl moieties. The dispersibility and emulsion stabilizing effect of acylated CNW's was examined in ethyl acetate, toluene, and cyclohexane, three organic solvents of medium to low polarity. The acylated nanoparticles could never be dispersed in toluene nor cyclohexane, but they formed stable dispersions in ethyl acetate while remaining dispersible in water. Stable ethyl acetate-in-water, toluene-in-water, and cyclohexane-in-water emulsions were successfully prepared with CNW's grafted with acetyl moieties, whereas the VCin-treated particles could stabilize only the cyclohexane-in-water emulsions. The impact of esterification treatment on emulsion stability and droplets size was particularly discussed.

  14. Post-release dispersal in animal translocations: social attraction and the "vacuum effect".

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Baptiste Mihoub

    Full Text Available Animal translocations are human-induced colonizations that can represent opportunities to contribute to the knowledge on the behavioral and demographic processes involved in the establishment of animal populations. Habitat selection behaviors, such as social cueing, have strong implications on dispersal and affect the establishment success of translocations. Using modeling simulations with a two-population network model (a translocated population and a remnant population, we investigated the consequences of four habitat selection strategies on post-translocation establishment probabilities in short- and long-lived species. Two dispersal strategies using social cues (conspecific attraction and habitat copying were compared to random and quality-based strategies. We measured the sensitivity of local extinctions to dispersal strategies, life cycles, release frequencies, remnant population and release group sizes, the proportion of breeders and the connectivity between populations. Our results indicate that social behaviors can compromise establishment as a result of post-release dispersal, particularly in long-lived species. This behavioral mechanism, the "vacuum effect", arises from increased emigration in populations that are small relative to neighboring populations, reducing their rate of population growth. The vacuum effect can drive small remnant populations to extinction when a translocated group is large. In addition, the magnitude of the vacuum effect varies non-linearly with connectivity. The vacuum effect represents a novel form of the behaviorally mediated Allee effect that can cause unexpected establishment failures or population extinctions in response to social cueing. Accounting for establishment probabilities as a conditional step to the persistence of populations would improve the accuracy of predicting the fates of translocated or natural (metapopulations.

  15. Post-release dispersal in animal translocations: social attraction and the "vacuum effect".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihoub, Jean-Baptiste; Robert, Alexandre; Le Gouar, Pascaline; Sarrazin, François

    2011-01-01

    Animal translocations are human-induced colonizations that can represent opportunities to contribute to the knowledge on the behavioral and demographic processes involved in the establishment of animal populations. Habitat selection behaviors, such as social cueing, have strong implications on dispersal and affect the establishment success of translocations. Using modeling simulations with a two-population network model (a translocated population and a remnant population), we investigated the consequences of four habitat selection strategies on post-translocation establishment probabilities in short- and long-lived species. Two dispersal strategies using social cues (conspecific attraction and habitat copying) were compared to random and quality-based strategies. We measured the sensitivity of local extinctions to dispersal strategies, life cycles, release frequencies, remnant population and release group sizes, the proportion of breeders and the connectivity between populations. Our results indicate that social behaviors can compromise establishment as a result of post-release dispersal, particularly in long-lived species. This behavioral mechanism, the "vacuum effect", arises from increased emigration in populations that are small relative to neighboring populations, reducing their rate of population growth. The vacuum effect can drive small remnant populations to extinction when a translocated group is large. In addition, the magnitude of the vacuum effect varies non-linearly with connectivity. The vacuum effect represents a novel form of the behaviorally mediated Allee effect that can cause unexpected establishment failures or population extinctions in response to social cueing. Accounting for establishment probabilities as a conditional step to the persistence of populations would improve the accuracy of predicting the fates of translocated or natural (meta)populations.

  16. Light-induced nonlinear effects on dispersion relation of ultracold Bose gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡正峰; 杜春光; 李师群

    2003-01-01

    We have investigated the optical properties of A-configuration ultracold dense Bose gas interacting with two laser pulses, which usually result in electromagnetically induced transparency. With the nonrelativistic quantum electrodynamics and taking into account the atomic dipole-dipole interaction and local field effect, we have derived the Maxwell-Bloch equations of the system. The dispersion relation of an ultracold Bose gas has been obtained and the light-induced nonlinear effects have been analysed. The light-induced nonlinear effects are different from the effects induced by two-body collision of Bose-Einstein condensation atoms which have a frequency shift of transparent window.

  17. Light—induced nonlinear effects of dispersion relation of ultracold Bose gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HuZheng-Feng; DuChunGuang; LiShi-Qun

    2003-01-01

    We have investigated the optical properties of A-configuration ultracold dense Bose gas interacting with two laser pulses, which usually result in electromagnetically induced transparency. With the nonrelativistic quantum electrodynamics and taking into account the atomic dipole-dipole interaction and local field effect, we have derived the Maxwell-Bloch equations of the system. The dispersion relation of an ultracold Bose gas has been obtained and the light-induced nonlinear effects have been analysed. The light-induced nonlinear effects are different from the effects induced by two-body collision of Bose-Einstein condensation atoms which have a frequency shift of transparent window.

  18. Minimal flavour violation and anomalous top decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faller, Sven; Mannel, Thomas [Theoretische Physik 1, Department Physik, Universitaet Siegen, D-57068 Siegen (Germany); Gadatsch, Stefan [Nikhef, National Institute for Subatomatic Physics, P.O. Box 41882, 1009 Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-07-01

    Any experimental evidence of anomalous top-quark couplings will open a window to study physics beyond the standard model (SM). However, all current flavour data indicate that nature is close to ''minimal flavour violation'', i.e. the pattern of flavour violation is given by the CKM matrix, including the hierarchy of parameters. In this talk we present results of the conceptual test of minimal flavour violation for the anomalous charged as well as flavour changing top-quark couplings. Our analysis is embedded in two-Higgs doublet model of type II (2HDM-II). Including renormalization effects, we calculate the top decay rates taking into account anomalous couplings constrained by minimal flavour violation.

  19. Theory of the Muon Anomalous Magnetic Moment

    CERN Document Server

    Melnikov, Kirill

    2006-01-01

    The theory of the muon anomalous magnetic moment is "particle physics in a nutshell" and as such is interesting, exciting and difficult. The current precision of the experimental value for this quantity, improved significantly in the past several years due to experiment E821 at Brookhaven National Laboratory, is so high that a large number of subtle effects not relevant previously, become important for the interpretation of the experimental result. The theory of the muon anomalous magnetic moment is at the cutting edge of current research in particle physics and includes multiloop calculations in both QED and electroweak theory, precision low-energy hadron physics, isospin violations and scattering of light by light. Any deviation between the theoretical prediction and the experimental value might be interpreted as a signal of an as-yet-unknown new physics. This book provides a comprehensive review of the theory of the muon anomalous magnetic moment.

  20. Anomalous magnetohydrodynamics in the extreme relativistic domain

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    The evolution equations of anomalous magnetohydrodynamics are derived in the extreme relativistic regime and contrasted with the treatment of hydromagnetic nonlinearities pioneered by Lichnerowicz in the absence of anomalous currents. In particular we explore the situation where the conventional vector currents are complemented by the axial-vector currents arising either from the pseudo Nambu-Goldstone bosons of a spontaneously broken symmetry or because of finite fermionic density effects. After expanding the generally covariant equations in inverse powers of the conductivity, the relativistic analog of the magnetic diffusivity equation is derived in the presence of vortical and magnetic currents. While the anomalous contributions are generally suppressed by the diffusivity, they are shown to disappear in the perfectly conducting limit. When the flow is irrotational, boost-invariant and with vanishing four-acceleration the corresponding evolution equations are explicitly integrated so that the various physic...

  1. Electroweak Baryogenesis with Anomalous Higgs Couplings

    CERN Document Server

    Kobakhidze, Archil; Yue, Jason

    2015-01-01

    We investigate feasibility of efficient baryogenesis at the electroweak scale within the effective field theory framework based on a non-linear realisation of the electroweak gauge symmetry. In this framework the LHC Higgs boson is described by a singlet scalar field, which, therefore, admits new interactions. Assuming that Higgs couplings with the eletroweak gauge bosons are as in the Standard Model, we demonstrate that the Higgs cubic coupling and the CP-violating Higgs-top quark anomalous couplings alone may drive the a strongly first-order phase transition. The distinguished feature of this transition is that the anomalous Higgs vacuum expectation value is generally non-zero in both phases. We identify a range of anomalous couplings, consistent with current experimental data, where sphaleron rates are sufficiently fast in the 'symmetric' phase and are suppressed in the 'broken' phase and demonstrate that the desired baryon asymmetry can indeed be generated in this framework. This range of the Higgs anomal...

  2. Hyperbolic Mild Slope Equations with Inclusion of Amplitude Dispersion Effect: Random Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    New hyperbolic mild slope equations for random waves are developed with the inclusion of amplitude dispersion. The frequency perturbation around the peak frequency of random waves is adopted to extend the equations for regular waves to random waves. The nonlinear effect of amplitude dispersion is incorporated approximately into the model by only considering the nonlinear effect on the carrier waves of random waves, which is done by introducing a representative wave amplitude for the carrier waves. The computation time is greatly saved by the introduction of the representative wave amplitude. The extension of the present model to breaking waves is also considered in order to apply the new equations to surf zone. The model is validated for random waves propagate over a shoal and in surf zone against measurements.

  3. Cavity-mediated entanglement between distant atoms: Effect of spatial dispersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brouard, S., E-mail: sbrouard@ull.e [Departamento de Fisica Fundamental II, Universidad de La Laguna, La Laguna E38204, Tenerife (Spain); Instituto Universitario de Estudios Avanzados (IUdEA) en Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Fotonica, Universidad de La Laguna, La Laguna E38204, Tenerife (Spain); Martinez, R. [Departamento de Fisica Fundamental II, Universidad de La Laguna, La Laguna E38204, Tenerife (Spain)

    2011-04-11

    The decoherence effect of spatial atomic dispersion on entangled states prepared between two non-interacting atoms that pass through a resonant electromagnetic cavity is studied in detail. Entanglement is shown to oscillate with the atom-field interaction time with an amplitude that decays due to inhomogeneous coupling strength. An upper bound for the entanglement that can be obtained using this procedure is introduced and evaluated numerically for different sets of system parameters. This magnitude depends solely on the overlap between atomic wavefunctions evolved according to two different atom-field interactions. Analytical expressions for the associated decay rate are obtained under different approximations. - Highlights: Preparation of entangled atomic states mediated by a resonant electromagnetic cavity. Decoherent effect of spatial atomic dispersion is studied. Entanglement is evaluated for different sets of system parameters. An upper bound for the entanglement achievable is introduced and discussed. Different analytical approximations for the decay rate are presented.

  4. Scattering of dislocated wavefronts by vertical vorticity and the Aharonov-Bohm effect; 2, Dispersive waves

    CERN Document Server

    Coste, C; Coste, Christophe; Lund, Fernando

    1999-01-01

    Previous results on the scattering of surface waves by vertical vorticity on shallow water are generalized to the case of dispersive water waves. Dispersion effects are treated perturbatively around the shallow water limit, to first order in the ratio of depth to wavelength. The dislocation of the incident wavefront, analogous to the Aharonov-Bohm effect, is still observed. At short wavelengths the scattering is qualitatively similar to the nondispersive case. At moderate wavelengths, however, there are two markedly different scattering regimes according to wether the capillary length is smaller or larger than depends both on phase and group velocity. The validity range of the calculation is the same as in the shallow water case: wavelengths small compared to vortex radius, and low Mach number. The implications of these limitations are carefully considered.

  5. Effects of UV-blocking films on the dispersal behavior of Encarsia formosa (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doukas, Dimitrios; Payne, Christopher C

    2007-02-01

    The parasitoid Encarsia formosa Gahan (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae) has been used successfully for the control of Trialeurodes vaporariorum (Westwood) (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae). The development of UV-blocking plastic films has added a new component to future integrated pest management systems by disrupting insect pest infestation when UV light is excluded. Because both T. vaporariorum and E. formosa are reported to have similar spectral efficiency, there was a need to identify the impact of UV-blocking films on the dispersal behavior of both the pest and the natural enemy. In field studies, using choice-chamber experiments, E. formosa showed some preference to disperse into compartments where less UV light was blocked. However, further studies indicated that the effect was primarily attributable to the different light diffusion properties of the films tested. Thus, unlike its whitefly host, when the UV-absorbing properties of the films were similar, but the light diffusion properties differed, E. formosa adults preferred to disperse into compartments clad with films that had high light diffusion properties. When the plastic films differed most in their UV-absorbing capacity and had no light-diffusion capability, the initial dispersal of E. formosa between treatments was similar, although a small preference toward the environment with UV light was observed over time. When parasitoid dispersal was measured 3 h after release, more parasitoids were found on plants, suggesting that the parasitoids would search plants for whitefly hosts, even in a UV-blocked light environment. The potential for the integration of UV-blocking films with E. formosa in an advanced whitefly management system is discussed.

  6. The permeability of poly-disperse porous media and effective particle size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markicevic, B. I.; Preston, C.; Osterroth, S.; Iliev, O.; Hurwitz, M.

    2015-11-01

    The interactions between the fluid and solid phases in porous media account for the openness and length of the flow path that the fluid needs to travel within. The same reasoning applies for both mono- and poly-disperse media, and is reflected in the adoption of the same permeability models. The only difference is that an effective particle size diameter has to be used for the poly-disperse samples. A filtration experiment is used to form a particle layer, filter cake, consisting of particles of different sizes. Both inflow and outflow particle size distribution are measured by particle counting method, and from their difference, the particle size distribution in the cake is determined. In a set of experiments, the filtration history is altered by changing (i) filtration medium; (ii) suspension flow rate; and (iii) particle concentration, where in all cases investigated the cake permeability remains constant. In order to predict the permeability of poly-disperse cake from the analytical models, the particle size distribution moments are calculated, and the permeability is found for each moment. Comparing the experimental to the analytical permeability values the effective particle size is found, where the permeability calculated by using the harmonic mean of the particle size distribution reproduces the permeability experimental value best. Finally, in the parametric study, reducing the cake porosity and/or lowering the particle retention shifts effective particle size used in the permeability model toward higher moments of the particle size distribution function.

  7. Correlation of Effective Dispersive and Polar Surface Energies in Heterogeneous Self-Assembled Monolayer Coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhuang, Yanxin; Hansen, Ole

    2009-01-01

    We show, theoretically, that the measured effective dispersive and polar surface energies of a heterogeneous Surface are correlated; the correlation, however, differs whether a Cassic or an Israelachvili and Gee model is assumed. Fluorocarbon self-assembled monolayers with varying coverage were...... grown oil oxidized (100) silicon Surfaces in a vapor phase process using five different precursors. Experimentally, effective surface energy components of the fluorocarbon self-assembled monolayers were determined from measured contact angles using the Owens-Wendt-Rabel-Kaelble method. We show...... that the correlation between the effective surface energy components of the heterogeneous Surfaces coated with fluorocarbon self-assembled monolayers is in agreement with the Cassie model....

  8. Effects of tree architecture on pollen dispersal and mating patterns in Abies pinsapo Boiss. (Pinaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Robles, Jose M; García-Castaño, Juan L; Balao, Francisco; Terrab, Anass; Navarro-Sampedro, Laura; Tremetsberger, Karin; Talavera, Salvador

    2014-12-01

    Plant architecture is crucial to pollination and mating in wind-pollinated species. We investigated the effect of crown architecture on pollen dispersal, mating system and offspring quality, combining phenotypic and genotypic analyses in a low-density population of the endangered species Abies pinsapo. A total of 598 embryos from three relative crown height levels (bottom, middle and top) in five mother plants were genotyped using eleven nuclear microsatellite markers (nSSRs). Paternity analysis and mating system models were used to infer mating and pollen dispersal parameters. In addition, seeds were weighed (N = 16 110) and germinated (N = 736), and seedling vigour was measured to assess inbreeding depression. Overall, A. pinsapo shows a fat-tailed dispersal kernel, with an average pollen dispersal distance of 113-227 m, an immigration rate of 0.84-26.92%, and a number of effective pollen donors (Nep ) ranging between 3.5 and 11.9. We found an effect of tree height and relative crown height levels on mating parameters. A higher proportion of seeds with embryo (about 50%) and a higher rate of self-fertilization (about 60%) were found at the bottom level in comparison with the top level. Seed weight and seedling vigour are positively related. Nevertheless, no differences were found in seed weight or in seedling-related variables such as weight and length of aerial and subterranean parts among the different relative crown height levels, suggesting that seeds from the more strongly inbred bottom level are not affected by inbreeding depression. Our results point to vertical isotropy for outcross-pollen and they suggest that self-pollen may ensure fertilization when outcross-pollen is not available in low-density population.

  9. Anomalous atomic volume of alpha-Pu

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kollar, J.; Vitos, Levente; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1997-01-01

    .3%. The comparison between the LDA and GGA results show that the anomalously large atomic volume of alpha-Pu relative to alpha-Np can be ascribed to exchange-correlation effects connected with the presence of low coordinated sites in the structure where the f electrons are close to the onset of localization...

  10. Beta Function and Anomalous Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Pica, Claudio

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate that it is possible to determine the coefficients of an all-order beta function linear in the anomalous dimensions using as data the two-loop coefficients together with the first one of the anomalous dimensions which are universal. The beta function allows to determine the anomalous dimension of the fermion masses at the infrared fixed point, and the resulting values compare well with the lattice determinations.

  11. Anomalous Dimensions of Conformal Baryons

    CERN Document Server

    Pica, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    We determine the anomalous dimensions of baryon operators for the three color theory as function of the number of massless flavours within the conformal window to the maximum known order in perturbation theory. We show that the anomalous dimension of the baryon is controllably small for a wide range of number of flavours. We also find that this is always smaller than the anomalous dimension of the fermion mass operator. These findings challenge the partial compositeness paradigm.

  12. Dispersion effect on the current voltage characteristic of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pu Yan; Pang Lei; Chen Xiao-Juan; Yuan Ting-Ting; Luo Wei-Jun; Liu Xin-Yu

    2011-01-01

    The current voltage (IV) characteristics are greatly influenced by the dispersion effects in AlGaN/GaN highelectron mobility transistors. The direct current (DC) IV and pulsed IV measurements are performed to give a deep investigation into the dispersion effects,which are mainly related to the trap and self-heating mechanisms. The results show that traps play an important role in the kink effects,and high stress can introduce more traps and defects in the device. With the help of the pulsed IV measurements,the trapping effects and self-heating effects can be separated.The impact of time constants on the dispersion effects is also discussed. In order to achieve an accurate static DC IV measurement,the steady state of the bias points must be considered carefully to avoid the dispersion effects.

  13. Anomalous radiative transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Ishikawa, Kenzo; Tobita, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Anomalous transitions involving photons derived by many-body interaction of the form, $\\partial_{\\mu} G^{\\mu}$, in the standard model are studied. This does not affect the equation of motion in the bulk, but makes wave functions modified, and causes the unusual transition characterized by the time-independent probability. In the transition probability at a time-interval T expressed generally in the form $P=T \\Gamma_0 +P^{(d)}$, now with $\\Gamma_0=0, P^{(d)} \

  14. Diffusion related isotopic fractionation effects with one-dimensional advective–dispersive transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Bruce S. [Civil Engineering Department, University of Toronto, 35 St George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 1A4 (Canada); Lollar, Barbara Sherwood [Earth Sciences Department, University of Toronto, 22 Russell Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3B1 (Canada); Passeport, Elodie [Civil Engineering Department, University of Toronto, 35 St George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 1A4 (Canada); Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry Department, University of Toronto, 200 College Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3E5 (Canada); Sleep, Brent E., E-mail: sleep@ecf.utoronto.ca [Civil Engineering Department, University of Toronto, 35 St George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 1A4 (Canada)

    2016-04-15

    Aqueous phase diffusion-related isotope fractionation (DRIF) for carbon isotopes was investigated for common groundwater contaminants in systems in which transport could be considered to be one-dimensional. This paper focuses not only on theoretically observable DRIF effects in these systems but introduces the important concept of constraining “observable” DRIF based on constraints imposed by the scale of measurements in the field, and on standard limits of detection and analytical uncertainty. Specifically, constraints for the detection of DRIF were determined in terms of the diffusive fractionation factor, the initial concentration of contaminants (C{sub 0}), the method detection limit (MDL) for isotopic analysis, the transport time, and the ratio of the longitudinal mechanical dispersion coefficient to effective molecular diffusion coefficient (D{sub mech}/D{sub eff}). The results allow a determination of field conditions under which DRIF may be an important factor in the use of stable carbon isotope measurements for evaluation of contaminant transport and transformation for one-dimensional advective–dispersive transport. This study demonstrates that for diffusion-dominated transport of BTEX, MTBE, and chlorinated ethenes, DRIF effects are only detectable for the smaller molar mass compounds such as vinyl chloride for C{sub 0}/MDL ratios of 50 or higher. Much larger C{sub 0}/MDL ratios, corresponding to higher source concentrations or lower detection limits, are necessary for DRIF to be detectable for the higher molar mass compounds. The distance over which DRIF is observable for VC is small (less than 1 m) for a relatively young diffusive plume (< 100 years), and DRIF will not easily be detected by using the conventional sampling approach with “typical” well spacing (at least several meters). With contaminant transport by advection, mechanical dispersion, and molecular diffusion this study suggests that in field sites where D{sub mech}/D{sub eff} is

  15. Effective supercontinuum generation by using highly nonlinear dispersion-shifted fiber incorporated with Si nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Seongmook; Ju, Seongmin; Kim, Youngwoong; Watekar, Pramod R; Jeong, Hyejeong; Lee, Ho-Jae; Boo, Seongjae; Kim, Dug Young; Han, Won-Taek

    2012-01-01

    The dispersion-shifted fiber (DSF) incorporated with Si nanocrystals (Si-NCs) having highly nonlinear optical property was fabricated to investigate the effective supercontinuum generation characteristics by using the MCVD process and the drawing process. Optical nonlinearity was enhanced by incorporating Si nanocrystals in the core of the fiber and the refractive index profile of a dispersion-shifted fiber was employed to match its zero-dispersion wavelength to that of the commercially available pumping source for generating effective supercontinuum. The non-resonant nonlinear refractive index, n2, of the Si-NCs doped DSF measured by the cw-SPM method was measured to be 7.03 x 10(-20) [m2/W] and the coefficient of non-resonant nonlinearity, gamma, was 7.14 [W(-1) km(-1)]. To examine supercontinuum generation of the Si-NCs doped DSF, the femtosecond fiber laser with the pulse width of 150 fs (at 1560 nm) was launched into the fiber core. The output spectrum of the Si-NCs doped DSF was found to broaden from 1300 nm to wavelength well beyond 1700 nm, which can be attributed to the enhanced optical nonlinearity by Si-NCs embedded in the fiber core. The short wavelength of the supercontinuum spectrum in the Si-NCs doped DSF showed shift from 1352 nm to 1220 nm for the fiber length of 2.5 m and 200 m, respectively.

  16. Role of Joule heating in dispersive mixing effects in electrophoretic cells: convective-diffusive transport aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosse, M A; Arce, P

    2000-03-01

    This contribution addresses the problem of solute dispersion in a free convection electrophoretic cell for the batch mode of operation, caused by the Joule heating generation. The problem is analyzed by using the two-problem approach originally proposed by Bosse and Arce (Electrophoresis 2000, 21, 1018-1025). The approach identifies the carrier fluid problem and the solute problem. This contribution is focused on the latter. The strategy uses a sequential coupling between the energy, momentum and mass conservation equations and, based on geometrical and physical assumptions for the system, leads to the derivation of analytical temperature and velocity profiles inside the cell. These results are subsequently used in the derivation of the effective dispersion coefficient for the cell by using the method of area averaging. The result shows the first design equation that relates the Joule heating effect directly to the solute dispersion in the cell. Some illustrative results are presented and discussed and their implication to the operation and design of the device is addressed. Due to the assumptions made, the equation may be viewed as an upper boundary for applications such as free flow electrophoresis.

  17. Effect of mechanical and chemical clay removals by hydrocyclone and dispersants on coal flotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oats, W.J.; Ozdemir, O.; Nguyen, A.V. [University of Queensland, Brisbane, Qld. (Australia). School of Chemical Engineering

    2010-04-15

    Fine minerals, mostly clays, are known to have a detrimental effect on coal flotation. This paper focuses on the effect of mechanical and chemical removals of fine minerals by hydrocyclone and dispersants on coal flotation. The experimental results showed that the flotation recovery slightly increased from medium acidic to medium alkaline ranges. The flotation experiments carried out with dispersants at different dosages showed that the dispersants did not enhance the flotation recovery significantly. However, the removal of the fine fraction from the feed using a hydrocyclone significantly increased the flotation recovery. The bubble-particle attachment tests also indicated that the attachment time between an air bubble and the coal particles increased in the presence of clay particles. These attachment time results clearly showed that the clay particles adversely affected the flotation of coal particles by covering the coal surfaces which reduced the efficiency of bubble-coal attachment. An analysis based on the colloid stability theory showed that the clay coating was governed by the van der Waals attraction and that the double-layer interaction played a secondary role. It was also concluded that the best way to increase the flotation recovery in the presence of clays was to remove these fine minerals by mechanical means such as hydrocylones.

  18. Cross-linkage effect of cellulose/laponite hybrids in aqueous dispersions and solid films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zaiwu; Fan, Qingrui; Dai, Xiaonan; Zhao, Chao; Lv, Aijie; Zhang, Jingjing; Xu, Guiying; Qin, Menghua

    2014-02-15

    Homogenous cellulose/laponite aqueous dispersions and composite films were respectively prepared from the pre-cooling NaOH/urea aqueous systems. Rheological measurements of aqueous dispersions demonstrated a sol-to-gel transition triggered by loading of laponite, reflecting a cross-linkage effect of cellulose/laponite hybrids. Similarly, based on scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) characterizations, as well as mechanical and thermal measurements, the cross-linkage effect of cellulose/laponite hybrids was also found in solid films, which played an important role in improving the tensile strength (σb) of composite films. For instance, the σb exhibited a largest enhancement up to 75.7% at a critical laponite content of 0.100 wt%, indicating that the property of composite film was closely related with the dispersion and interaction state of laponite, i.e. its content in cellulose matrix. These results were expected to provide significant information for fabrication and utility of cellulose-based materials.

  19. Effect of Spatial Dispersion on Evolutionary Stability: A Two-Phenotype and Two-Patch Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Zhang, Jiahua; Zhang, Boyu; Cressman, Ross; Tao, Yi

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate a simple two-phenotype and two-patch model that incorporates both spatial dispersion and density effects in the evolutionary game dynamics. The migration rates from one patch to another are considered to be patch-dependent but independent of individual's phenotype. Our main goal is to reveal the dynamical properties of the evolutionary game in a heterogeneous patchy environment. By analyzing the equilibria and their stabilities, we find that the dynamical behavior of the evolutionary game dynamics could be very complicated. Numerical analysis shows that the simple model can have twelve equilibria where four of them are stable. This implies that spatial dispersion can significantly complicate the evolutionary game, and the evolutionary outcome in a patchy environment should depend sensitively on the initial state of the patches.

  20. Effects of dispersion solvent on the formation of silicon nanoparticles synthesized via microemulsion route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liong, W. L.; Sreekantan, S.; Hutagalung, S. D.

    2010-05-01

    Silicon nanoparticles are synthesized by microemulsion route. Silicon tetrachloride (SiCl4) is used as a silicon source. Meanwhile, hydrazine (N2H5OH), sodium hydroxide (NaOH), and polyethylene glycol (PEG) are used as reduction agent, stabilizer, and capping agent, respectively. In this study, the effects of different solvents (methanol, 1-butanol, 2-propanol, ethanol, acetone, and toluene) on the dispersion and the stabilization of silicon nanoparticles are studied intensively. The results in this study show that ethanol solvent has given smaller particle size, better size distribution, stable suspension and well dispersion of silicon nanoparticles. The diameter of synthesized silicon nanoparticles is in the range of 30-100 nm. Moreover, the absorption edge of silicon nanoparticles in ethanol is observed at a shorter wavelength compared to the others solvent.